Sample records for 241-er-311 catch tank

  1. Sampling and Analysis Plan for Catch Tank 241ER311 Vapor

    SciTech Connect

    NGUYEN, D.M.

    1999-11-15

    This tank sampling and analysis plan (TSAF') identifies the sample collection, laboratory analysis, quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) objectives for the characterization of catch tank 241-ER-311 vapor space. Data to be collected under this revision (Revision 2) of the TSAP will be used to evaluate the effectiveness of the portable exhauster recently installed for the tank. Vapor samples taken previous to the issuance of this revision shall be analyzed in accordance with Revision 1.

  2. Radioactive air emissions notice of construction 241-ER-311 catch tank

    SciTech Connect

    HILL, J.S.

    1999-11-01

    The following description, attachments and references are provided to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH), Division of Radiation Protection, Air Emissions & Defense Waste Section as a notice of construction (NOC) in accordance with the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247, Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. The WAC 246-247-060, ''Applications, registration and licensing,'' states ''This section describes the information requirements for approval to construct, modify, and operate an emission unit. Any NOC requires the submittal of the information listed in Appendix A,'' Appendix A (WAC 246-247-110) lists the requirements that must be addressed. Additionally, the following description, attachments and references are provided to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as an NOC, in accordance with Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 6 1, ''National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants.'' The information required for submittal to the EPA is specified in 40 CFR 61.07. The potential emissions from this activity are estimated to provide less than 0.1 millirem/year total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) to the hypothetical offsite maximally exposed individual (MEI), and commencement is needed within a short time frame. Therefore, this application is also intended to provide notification of the anticipated date of initial startup in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(l), and it is requested that approval of this application will also constitute EPA acceptance of this 40 CFR 61.09(a)(l) notification. Written notification of the actual date of initial startup, in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(2) will be provided later.

  3. Catch tank inhibitor addition 200-East and 200-West Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Palit, A.N.

    1996-06-21

    Reported is the study of 11 catch tanks in the 200-East Area and the 7 catch tanks in the 200-West Area listed as active. The location, capacity, material of construction, annual total accumulation, annual rain intrusion, waste transfer rate, and access for chemical injection in these tanks are documented. The present and future utilization and isolation plans for the catch tanks are established.

  4. Engineering Task Plan for the Integrity Assessment Examination of Double Contained Receiver Tanks (DCRT) Catch Tanks and Ancillary facilities

    SciTech Connect

    BECKER, D.L.

    2000-05-23

    This Engineering Task Plan (ETP) presents the integrity assessment examination of three DCRTs, seven catch tanks, and two ancillary facilities located in the 200 East and West Areas of the Hanford Site. The integrity assessment examinations, as described in this ETP, will provide the necessary information to enable the independently qualified registered professional engineer (IQRPE) to assess the condition and integrity of these facilities. The plan is consistent with the Double-Shell Tank Waste Transfer Facilities Integrity Assessment Plan.

  5. Functional Analysis for Double Shell Tank (DST) Subsystems

    SciTech Connect

    SMITH, D.F.

    2000-08-22

    This functional analysis identifies the hierarchy and describes the subsystem functions that support the Double-Shell Tank (DST) System described in HNF-SD-WM-TRD-007, System Specification for the Double-Shell Tank System. Because of the uncertainty associated with the need for upgrades of the existing catch tanks supporting the Waste Feed Delivery (WFD) mission, catch tank functions are not addressed in this document. The functions identified herein are applicable to the Phase 1 WFD mission only.

  6. Catch a Star!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-11-01

    ESO and the European Association for Astronomy Education are launching today the 2007 edition of 'Catch a Star!', their international astronomy competition for school students. Now in its fifth year, the competition offers students the chance to win a once-in-a-lifetime trip to ESO's flagship observatory in Chile, as well as many other prizes. Students are invited to 'become astronomers' and embark on a journey to explore the Universe. ESO PR Photo 42/06 The competition includes separate categories - 'Catch a Star Researchers' and 'Catch a Star Adventurers' - to ensure that every student, whatever their level, has the chance to enter and win exciting prizes. For the artistically minded, 'Catch a Star!' also includes an artwork competition, 'Catch a Star Artists'. "'Catch a Star!' offers a unique opportunity for students to learn more about astronomy and about the methods scientists use to discover new things about the Universe", said Douglas Pierce-Price, Education Officer at ESO. In teams, students choose an astronomical topic to study and produce an in-depth report. An important part of the project for 'Catch a Star Researchers' is to think about how ESO's telescopes or a telescope of the future can contribute to their investigations of the subject. As well as the top prize - a trip to one of ESO's observatory sites in Chile - visits to observatories in Germany, Austria and Spain, and many other prizes are also available to be won. 'Catch a Star Researchers' winners will be chosen by an international jury, and 'Catch a Star Adventurers' will be awarded further prizes by lottery. Entries for 'Catch a Star Artists' will be displayed on the web and winners chosen with the help of a public online vote. The first editions of 'Catch a Star!' have attracted several hundred entries from more than 25 countries worldwide. Previous winning entries have included "Star clusters and the structure of the Milky Way" (Budapest, Hungary), "Vega" (Acqui Terme, Italy) and "Venus transit" (Lleida, Spain). Some previous winning entries are visible on the Catch a Star! Web site. Detailed entry information can be found on ESO's website, at http://www.eso.org/catchastar/ The deadline for submitting an entry for the 2007 competition is Friday 2 March 2007, 17:00 Central European Time.

  7. Technical bases for leak detection surveillance of waste storage tanks. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.G.; Badden, J.J.

    1995-02-13

    This document provides the technical bases for specification limits, monitoring frequencies and baselines used for leak detection and intrusion (for single shell tanks only) in all single and double shell radioactive waste storage tanks, waste transfer lines, and most catch tanks and receiver tanks in the waste tank farms and associated areas at Hanford.

  8. 50 CFR 648.53 - Acceptable biological catch (ABC), annual catch limits (ACL), annual catch targets (ACT), DAS...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... false Acceptable biological catch (ABC), annual catch limits (ACL), annual...648.53 Acceptable biological catch (ABC), annual catch limits (ACL), annual...quotas (IFQ). (a) Scallop fishery ABC. The ABC for the scallop fishery...

  9. Tank Farm surveillance and waste status summary report for April 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hanlon, B.M.

    1993-07-01

    This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations.

  10. Tank farm surveillance and waste status summary report for May 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hanlon, B.M.

    1993-08-01

    This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations.

  11. "Catch a Star !"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-05-01

    ESO and EAAE Launch Web-based Educational Programme for Europe's Schools Catch a star!... and discover all its secrets! This is the full title of an innovative educational project, launched today by the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and the European Association for Astronomy Education (EAAE). It welcomes all students in Europe's schools to an exciting web-based programme with a competition. It takes place within the context of the EC-sponsored European Week of Science and Technology (EWST) - 2002 . This unique project revolves around a web-based competition and is centred on astronomy. It is specifically conceived to stimulate the interest of young people in various aspects of this well-known field of science, but will also be of interest to the broad public. What is "Catch a Star!" about? [Go to Catch a Star Website] The programme features useful components from the world of research, but it is specifically tailored to (high-)school students. Younger participants are also welcome. Groups of up to four persons (e.g., three students and one teacher) have to select an astronomical object - a bright star, a distant galaxy, a beautiful comet, a planet or a moon in the solar system, or some other celestial body. Like detectives, they must then endeavour to find as much information as possible about "their" object. This information may be about the position and visibility in the sky, the physical and chemical characteristics, particular historical aspects, related mythology and sky lore, etc. They can use any source available, the web, books, newspaper and magazine articles, CDs etc. for this work. The group members must prepare a (short) summarising report about this investigation and "their" object, with their own ideas and conclusions, and send it to ESO (email address: eduinfo@eso.org). A jury, consisting of specialists from ESO and the EAAE, will carefully evaluate these reports. All projects that are found to fulfill the stipulated requirements, including a reasonable degree of scientific correctness, are entered as "registered projects" and will receive a lottery number. The first 1000 participants from the corresponding groups will also get a "Catch a star" T-Shirt by mail. All accepted entries will be listed at the corresponding website and all accepted reports will be displayed soon after the expiry of the deadline for submission on November 1st, 2002 . Winners to be Announced on November 8, 2002 On November 8th, 2002, at the end of the European Week of Science and Technology, the winners will be found by drawing numbers in a lottery. This event will take place at the ESO Headquarters in Garching (Germany) and will be webcast. The First Prize is a free trip for the members of the group to the ESO Paranal Observatory in Chile , the site of the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) . The Paranal trip will be realised in any case, but because of age restrictions, it can only be offered to a group in which all participants are 15 years of age or older at the time of the drawing. Younger participants may win an interesting trip within Europe. There will also be other prizes, to be announced later. Starting now The programme starts now and is open for groups of up to three students and one teacher, who must all belong to a school in Europe on November 1, 2002 . This means that only students who did not yet terminate their school studies on this date can participate. No student may participate in more than one group. The programme is administered by the ESO Educational Office , in close collaboration with members of the EAAE, mostly physics teachers. Details about how to register and how to prepare the report about "your" object are available on the web at: http://www.eso.org/public/outreach/eduoff/cas/ About the ESO Educational Office The ESO Educational Office was established in July 2001. It is part of the EPR Department at ESO Headquarters in Garching near Munich. The aim is to provide support of astronomy and astrophysics education, especially at the high-schoo

  12. Tarasoff's catch-22.

    PubMed

    Huey, Stephen R

    2015-04-01

    Comments on the article by D. N. Bersoff (see record 2014-28692-002). Bersoff poses a much-needed challenge to the rationale of laws based on Tarasoff v. Regents of the University of California (1976), which exist in most states and require therapists to warn the intended victim, police, and/or others when a patient voices serious threats of violence. If Tarasoff-related laws were ever to be modified, research support would be required. To begin with, what is the experience of other countries that happen to address this issue differently and of the seven states that, according to Bersoff, have not adopted Tarasoff-related requirements? Another question is whether patients who are unwilling to invite the consequences of therapist disclosure ever reveal reportable intentions to their therapists anyway-say, by mistake or impulse-thus making current law marginally useful? Rules that undercut sacrosanct confidentiality create a catch-22 in which the indisputable ethical necessity of informed consent has an unintended consequence- namely, therapy is preceded by informed consent but precluded by it. PMID:25844657

  13. Tank farm surveillance and waste status report for July 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Hanlon, B.M.

    1991-09-01

    This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. The intent of the report is to provide data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and to provide supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. 1 fig., 8 tabs.

  14. Flammable gas/slurry growth unreviewed safety question:justification for continued operation for the tank farms at the Hanford site

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, C.E., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-31

    This Justification for Continued Operation (JCO) provides a basis for continued operation in 176 high level waste tanks, double contained receiver tanks (DCRTs), catch tanks, 244-AR Vault, 242-S and 242-T Evaporators and inactive miscellaneous underground storage tanks (IMUSTs) relative to flammable gas hazards. Required controls are specified.

  15. 50 CFR 648.71 - Catch quotas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...recruitment. (iv) Projected effort and corresponding catches. (v) Geographical distribution of the catch relative to the geographical distribution of the resource. (vi) Status of areas previously closed to surfclam fishing that are to...

  16. Catch Curves and Mortality Rates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. S. Robson; D. G. Chapman

    1961-01-01

    The assumptions necessary to obtain a valid estimate of survival rate from a single catch curve are discussed. An example of the best estimate of survival rate and its variance is worked out for the case that age is known exactly for the entire sample. A test for validity of the model is illustrated. Methods of estimating the survival rate

  17. Passing and Catching in Rugby.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Namudu, Mike M.

    This booklet contains the fundamentals for rugby at the primary school level. It deals primarily with passing and catching the ball. It contains instructions on (1) holding the ball for passing, (2) passing the ball to the left--standing, (3) passing the ball to the left--running, (4) making a switch pass, (5) the scrum half's normal pass, (6) the…

  18. Theoretical Aspects of the Biological Catch Bond

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oleg V. Prezhdo; Yuriy V. Pereverzev

    2009-01-01

    he biological catch bond is fascinating and counterintuitive. When an external force is applied to a catch bond, either in vivo or in vitro, the bond resists breaking and becomes stronger instead. In contrast, ordinary slip bonds, which represent the vast majority of biological and chemical bonds, dissociate faster when subjected to a force. Catch-bond behavior was first predicted theoretically

  19. TECHNICAL BASIS FOR VENTILATION REQUIREMENTS IN TANK FARMS OPERATING SPECIFICATIONS DOCUMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    BERGLIN, E J

    2003-06-23

    This report provides the technical basis for high efficiency particulate air filter (HEPA) for Hanford tank farm ventilation systems (sometimes known as heating, ventilation and air conditioning [HVAC]) to support limits defined in Process Engineering Operating Specification Documents (OSDs). This technical basis included a review of older technical basis and provides clarifications, as necessary, to technical basis limit revisions or justification. This document provides an updated technical basis for tank farm ventilation systems related to Operation Specification Documents (OSDs) for double-shell tanks (DSTs), single-shell tanks (SSTs), double-contained receiver tanks (DCRTs), catch tanks, and various other miscellaneous facilities.

  20. Effect of catch-and-release angling on growth and survival of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pope, K.L.; Wilde, G.R.; Knabe, D.W.

    2007-01-01

    Catch-and-release angling is popular in many parts of the world and plays an increasingly important role in fish conservation efforts. Although survival rates associated with catch-and-release angling are well documented for many species, sublethal effects have been less studied. An experiment was conducted to directly assess the effects of catch-and-release angling on growth and survival of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum). Catch-and-release events were simulated in laboratory tanks maintained at 15-16 ??C with hooks manually placed in pre-designated locations in the mouths of the fish. There were no differences in standard length (P = 0.59) or wet weight (P = 0.81) gained between caught and uncaught fish over a 1-month angling and recovery period. Survival was 96.99 ?? 0.06% for rainbow trout caught and released, and did not vary with number (one, two or four) of captures. Thus, catch-and-release angling appears to have little effect on growth and mortality of rainbow trout hooked in the mouth. ?? 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Improving Fishery Catch Statistics for Lake Victoria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. G. Cowx; M. van der Knaap; L. I. Muhoozi; A. Othina

    2003-01-01

    The fisheries of Lake Victoria are highly dispersed and catch statistical information is insufficient for supporting management. Catch assessment surveys for the three riparian countries were found to be weak or inadequate and a strategy for improving this source of information is proposed. Considerable illegal fishing, using banned gears and small-meshed nets was prevalent and considered to be detrimental to

  2. 5 CFR 1600.23 - Catch-up contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Catch-up contributions. 1600.23 Section 1600...of Contributions § 1600.23 Catch-up contributions. (a) A participant may make traditional catch-up contributions or Roth catch-up...

  3. (Seoul National University) Schumpeterian analysis of economic catch-up

    E-print Network

    Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

    Keun Lee (Seoul National University) Schumpeterian analysis of economic catch-up: knowledge, path explores the reasons why examples of successful catching-up are limited and in particular, why the Asian Question: Sustaining the Catch-up 1.2. The Middle-income Country Trap and Sustaining the Catch-up 1

  4. 5 CFR 1600.23 - Catch-up contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Catch-up contributions. 1600.23 Section 1600...of Contributions § 1600.23 Catch-up contributions. (a) A participant may make traditional catch-up contributions or Roth catch-up...

  5. 30 CFR 57.19132 - Safety catches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety catches. 57.19132 Section 57.19132 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH...

  6. 30 CFR 56.19132 - Safety catches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety catches. 56.19132 Section 56.19132 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH...

  7. 30 CFR 56.19132 - Safety catches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety catches. 56.19132 Section 56.19132 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH...

  8. 30 CFR 57.19132 - Safety catches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety catches. 57.19132 Section 57.19132 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH...

  9. REGULATORY AMENDMENT TO REVISE CATCH REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

    E-print Network

    REGULATORY AMENDMENT TO REVISE CATCH REPORTING REQUIREMENTS IN THE ATLANTIC HERRING FISHERY.......................................................................................................13 3.1.3.2 ATLANTIC HERRING ESSENTIAL FISH HABITAT ...............................................................................................................22 3.1.5.1 ATLANTIC HERRING VESSELS AND PERMIT CATEGORIES

  10. Dual Tank Fuel System

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Richard William (Albion, NY); Burkhard, James Frank (Churchville, NY); Dauer, Kenneth John (Avon, NY)

    1999-11-16

    A dual tank fuel system has primary and secondary fuel tanks, with the primary tank including a filler pipe to receive fuel and a discharge line to deliver fuel to an engine, and with a balance pipe interconnecting the primary tank and the secondary tank. The balance pipe opens close to the bottom of each tank to direct fuel from the primary tank to the secondary tank as the primary tank is filled, and to direct fuel from the secondary tank to the primary tank as fuel is discharged from the primary tank through the discharge line. A vent line has branches connected to each tank to direct fuel vapor from the tanks as the tanks are filled, and to admit air to the tanks as fuel is delivered to the engine.

  11. Theoretical aspects of the biological catch bond.

    PubMed

    Prezhdo, Oleg V; Pereverzev, Yuriy V

    2009-06-16

    The biological catch bond is fascinating and counterintuitive. When an external force is applied to a catch bond, either in vivo or in vitro, the bond resists breaking and becomes stronger instead. In contrast, ordinary slip bonds, which represent the vast majority of biological and chemical bonds, dissociate faster when subjected to a force. Catch-bond behavior was first predicted theoretically 20 years ago and has recently been experimentally observed in a number of protein receptor-ligand complexes. In this Account, we review the simplest physical-chemical models that lead to analytic expressions for bond lifetime, the concise universal representations of experimental data, and the explicit requirements for catch binding. The phenomenon has many manifestations: increased lifetime with growing constant force is its defining characteristic. If force increases with time, as in jump-ramp experiments, catch binding creates an additional maximum in the probability density of bond rupture force. The new maximum occurs at smaller forces than the slip-binding maximum, merging with the latter at a certain ramp rate in a process resembling a phase transition. If force is applied periodically, as in blood flows, catch-bond properties strongly depend on force frequency. Catch binding results from a complex landscape of receptor-ligand interactions. Bond lifetime can increase if force (i) prevents dissociation through the native pathway and drives the system over a higher energy barrier or (ii) alters protein conformations in a way that strengthens receptor-ligand binding. The bond deformations can be associated with allostery; force-induced conformational changes at one end of the protein propagate to the binding site at the other end. Surrounding water creates further exciting effects. Protein-water tension provides an additional barrier that can be responsible for significant drops in bond lifetimes observed at low forces relative to zero force. This strong dependence of bond properties on weak protein-water interactions may provide universal activation mechanisms in many biological systems and create new types of catch binding. Molecular dynamics simulations provide atomistic insights: the molecular view of bond dissociation gives a foundation for theoretical models and differentiates between alternative interpretations of experimental data. The number of known catch bonds is growing; analogs are found in enzyme catalysis, peptide translocation through nanopores, DNA unwinding, photoinduced dissociation of chemical bonds, and negative thermal expansion of bulk materials, for example. Finer force resolution will likely provide many more. Understanding the properties of catch bonds offers insight into the behavior of biological systems subjected to external perturbations in general. PMID:19331389

  12. Calico Tanks

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A view of the Calico Tanks, a sandstone formation in Red Rock Canyon. Red Rock Canyon is a National Conservation Area managed by the Bureau of Land Management, located just outside of Las Vegas, Nevada. It is part of the Mojave Desert....

  13. Petroleum Tank

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Petroleum first saw widespread use in the transporation industry as a lubricant. It was refined into various products depending on which part of the engine they were meant to lubricate. Once transported by tanker car, it was stored in large tanks such as this one....

  14. Tank farm surveillance and waste status summary report for December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hanlon, B.M.

    1993-02-01

    This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Order 5820.2A, Chapter I, Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, US Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

  15. Tank farm surveillance and waste status summary report for October 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hanlon, B.M.

    1993-01-01

    This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Order 5820.2A, Chapter 1, Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, US Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

  16. Tank farm surveillance and waste status summary report for May 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hanlon, B.M.

    1994-08-01

    This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Order 5820.2A, Chapter 1, Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, US Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

  17. Tank farm surveillance and waste status summary report for November 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hanlon, B.M.

    1993-02-01

    This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Order 5820.2A, Chapter 1, Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, US Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

  18. Tank Farm surveillance and waste status summary report for September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hanlon, B.M.

    1994-01-01

    This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Order 5820.2A, Chapter 1, Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, US Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

  19. Tank Farm surveillance and waste status summary report for February 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hanlon, B.M.

    1994-07-01

    This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is Intended to meet the requirement of US Department of Energy Richland Operations Office Order 5820.2A, Chapter 1, Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, US Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

  20. Tank farm surveillance and waste status summary report for November 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hanlon, B.M.

    1994-02-01

    This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Order 5820.2A, Chapter I. Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, US Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

  1. Tank farm surveillance and waste status summary report for June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hanlon, B.M.

    1993-10-01

    This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Order 5820.2A, Chapter I, Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, US Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

  2. Tank farm surveillance and waste status summary report for December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hanlon, B.M.

    1994-05-01

    This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special 9 surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of U.S. Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Order 5820.2A, Chapter I, Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, U.S. Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

  3. Tank Farm surveillance and waste status summary report for July 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hanlon, B.M.

    1993-11-01

    This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vesseL integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 Large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Order 5820.2A, Chapter I, Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, US Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

  4. Tank farm surveillance and waste status summary report for January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hanlon, B.M.

    1993-03-01

    This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Order 5820.2A, Chapter I, Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, US Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

  5. Tank Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    For NASA's Apollo program, McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company, Huntington Beach, California, developed and built the S-IVB, uppermost stage of the three-stage Saturn V moonbooster. An important part of the development task was fabrication of a tank to contain liquid hydrogen fuel for the stage's rocket engine. The liquid hydrogen had to be contained at the supercold temperature of 423 degrees below zero Fahrenheit. The tank had to be perfectly insulated to keep engine or solar heat from reaching the fuel; if the hydrogen were permitted to warm up, it would have boiled off, or converted to gaseous form, reducing the amount of fuel available to the engine. McDonnell Douglas' answer was a supereffective insulation called 3D, which consisted of a one-inch thickness of polyurethane foam reinforced in three dimensions with fiberglass threads. Over a 13-year development and construction period, the company built 30 tanks and never experienced a failure. Now, after years of additional development, an advanced version of 3D is finding application as part of a containment system for transporting Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) by ship.

  6. Measuring angler attitudes toward the catch-related aspects of recreational fishing

    E-print Network

    Anderson, David K.

    2005-11-01

    the scale. Consumptive orientation was defined as the attitude anglers hold towards catching fish, including catching something, retaining fish (as opposed to releasing), catching large fish (size), and catching large amounts of fish (numbers). In order...

  7. 49 CFR 172.331 - Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. 172.331 Section 172.331 Transportation...packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a)...

  8. Catching oriented objects Frouke Hermens *, Stan Gielen

    E-print Network

    Gielen, C.C.A.M.

    Catching oriented objects Frouke Hermens *, Stan Gielen Department of Biophysics, Facultiet der We have investigated how participants match the orientation of a line, which moves on a vertical touched the screen with the same orientation as the moving line at the very moment when the line passed

  9. A Catching Trap for All Antiproton Seasons

    E-print Network

    Michael Martin Nieto; Michael H. Holzscheiter

    1994-11-10

    We describe the origin, development, and status of the Los Alamos antiproton catching trap. Originally designed for the antiproton gravity experiment, it now is clear that this device can be a source of low-energy antiprotons for a wide range of physics, both on site, at CERN, and also off site.

  10. NOAA Technical Report NMFS 31 Shark Catches

    E-print Network

    31 NOAA Technical Report NMFS 31 Shark Catches From Selected Fisheries Off the U.S. East Coast July Fisheries Service #12;NOAA TECHNICAL REPORTS NMFS The major responsibilities of the National Marine. It collects, analyzes, and publishes statistics on various phases of the industry. The NOAA Technical Report

  11. Eight Ways to Catch an Insect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Alice

    1977-01-01

    The webs of eight North American spiders are illustrated and discussed. Using these webs, the spiders are able to catch insects for their meals. Each of the webs are unique and require a different approach to the problem of food getting. (MA)

  12. Catching the Dream Annual Report, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavers, Dean, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    In 2002, Catching the Dream (CTD) provided college scholarships to 208 American Indian students as well as grants to improve education in schools that serve Native students. This annual report describes CTD's programs and activities in 2002. Contents include short descriptions of CTD's scholarship, fellowship, and internship programs; describe…

  13. Book review: Methods for catching beetles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beetles are the most speciose animal group and found in virtually all habitats on Earth. Methods for Catching Beetles is a comprehensive general sourcebook about where and how to collect members of this diverse group. The book makes a compelling case in its Introduction about the value of scientif...

  14. Catch to Bycatch Ratios: Comparing Hawaii's Longline

    E-print Network

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Catch to Bycatch Ratios: Comparing Hawaii's Longline Fisheries with Others Paul K. Bartram and J. John Kaneko PacMar, Inc. 3615 Harding Avenue, Suite 409 Honolulu, Hawaii SOEST 04-05 JIMAR Contribution finfish bycatch per unit effort estimates (BPUE) for Hawaii pelagic longline fisheries without assistance

  15. Pitch-catch only ultrasonic fluid densitometer

    DOEpatents

    Greenwood, Margaret S. (Richland, WA); Harris, Robert V. (Pasco, WA)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is an ultrasonic fluid densitometer that uses a material wedge and pitch-catch only ultrasonic transducers for transmitting and receiving ultrasonic signals internally reflected within the material wedge. Density of a fluid is determined by immersing the wedge into the fluid and measuring reflection of ultrasound at the wedge-fluid interface.

  16. Polymer-Based Catch-Bonds

    E-print Network

    Chen, Hsieh

    Catch-bonds refer to the counterintuitive notion that the average lifetime of a bond has a maximum at a nonzero applied force. They have been found in several ligand-receptor pairs and their origin is still a topic of ...

  17. Catch statistics in the bloodworm fishery in Maine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eben Sypitkowski; William G. Ambrose Jr.; Curtis Bohlen; Joseph Warren

    2009-01-01

    Though they are of critical importance as tools for fisheries managers, catch statistics of small-scale artisanal fisheries are rare. The bloodworm (Glycera dibranchiata) fishery in Maine has lacked catch data since the 1970s, and the extent of the disturbance to the mudflats from which they are dug has never been examined. We tested the hypothesis that worm catch rates have

  18. 50 CFR 622.457 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Spiny Lobster Fishery of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands § 622.457 Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets...

  19. 50 CFR 622.457 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Spiny Lobster Fishery of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands § 622.457 Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets...

  20. 50 CFR 622.439 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Reef Fish Fishery of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands § 622.439 Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets...

  1. 50 CFR 622.439 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Reef Fish Fishery of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands § 622.439 Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets...

  2. 50 CFR 622.496 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Queen Conch Resources of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands § 622.496 Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets...

  3. 50 CFR 622.496 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Queen Conch Resources of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands § 622.496 Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets...

  4. AX Tank Farm tank removal study

    SciTech Connect

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1999-02-24

    This report examines the feasibility of remediating ancillary equipment associated with the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. Ancillary equipment includes surface structures and equipment, process waste piping, ventilation components, wells, and pits, boxes, sumps, and tanks used to make waste transfers to/from the AX tanks and adjoining tank farms. Two remedial alternatives are considered: (1) excavation and removal of all ancillary equipment items, and (2) in-situ stabilization by grout filling, the 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a strawman in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tanks. This is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

  5. Tank Farm surveillance and waste status summary report for March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hanlon, B.M.

    1993-05-01

    This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are Contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding flank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office order 5820.2A, Chapter I, Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, US Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

  6. Vision Algorithms Catch Defects in Screen Displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    Andrew Watson, a senior scientist at Ames Research Center, developed a tool called the Spatial Standard Observer (SSO), which models human vision for use in robotic applications. Redmond, Washington-based Radiant Zemax LLC licensed the technology from NASA and combined it with its imaging colorimeter system, creating a powerful tool that high-volume manufacturers of flat-panel displays use to catch defects in screens.

  7. AX Tank Farm tank removal study

    SciTech Connect

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1998-10-14

    This report considers the feasibility of exposing, demolishing, and removing underground storage tanks from the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. For the study, it was assumed that the tanks would each contain 360 ft{sup 3} of residual waste (corresponding to the one percent residual Inventory target cited in the Tri-Party Agreement) at the time of demolition. The 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a ''strawman'' in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tank farms. The report is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

  8. Tank 241-BY-111 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Homi, C.S.

    1994-11-03

    The sampling and analytical needs associated with the 51 Hanford Site underground storage tanks classified on one or more of the four Watch Lists (ferrocyanide, organic, flammable gas, and high heat), and the safety screening of all 177 tanks have been identified through the Data Quality Objective (DQO) process. DQO`s identify information needed by a program group in the Tank Waste Remediation System concerned with safety issues, regulatory requirements, or the transporting and processing of tank waste. This Tank Characterization Plan will identify characterization objectives for Tank BY-111 pertaining to sample collection, sample preparation and analysis, and laboratory analytical evaluation and reporting requirements. In addition, an estimate of the current contents and status of the tank is given.

  9. 49 CFR 179.401 - Individual specification requirements applicable to inner tanks for cryogenic liquid tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...applicable to inner tanks for cryogenic liquid tank car tanks. 179.401 Section 179.401 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

  10. 49 CFR 179.401 - Individual specification requirements applicable to inner tanks for cryogenic liquid tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...applicable to inner tanks for cryogenic liquid tank car tanks. 179.401 Section 179.401 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

  11. 49 CFR 179.401 - Individual specification requirements applicable to inner tanks for cryogenic liquid tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...applicable to inner tanks for cryogenic liquid tank car tanks. 179.401 Section 179.401 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

  12. 49 CFR 179.401 - Individual specification requirements applicable to inner tanks for cryogenic liquid tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...applicable to inner tanks for cryogenic liquid tank car tanks. 179.401 Section 179.401 Transportation...MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

  13. 49 CFR 179.401 - Individual specification requirements applicable to inner tanks for cryogenic liquid tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...applicable to inner tanks for cryogenic liquid tank car tanks. 179.401 Section 179.401 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

  14. African-American and Anglo Anglers' Attitudes toward the Catch-Related Aspects of Fishing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin M. Hunt; Myron F. Floyd; Robert B. Ditton

    2007-01-01

    Race and ethnic differences with respect to catch and harvest related attitudes are poorly known. Based on previous research, African Americans and Anglos were expected to differ with respect to importance attached to four constructs related to the catch-related aspects of recreational fishing: catching something, catching a lot of fish, catching large fish, and retaining fish. Four Texas statewide angler

  15. Catch and Release of Microwave Photon States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yi; Chen, Yu; Sank, Daniel; O'Malley, P. J. J.; White, T. C.; Barends, R.; Kelly, J.; Lucero, Erik; Mariantoni, Matteo; Megrant, A.; Neill, C.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; Korotkov, Alexander N.; Cleland, A. N.; Martinis, John M.

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate a superconducting resonator with variable coupling to a measurement transmission line. The resonator coupling can be adjusted through zero to a photon emission rate 1000 times the intrinsic resonator decay rate. We demonstrate the catch and release of photons in the resonator, as well as control of nonclassical Fock states. We also demonstrate the dynamical control of the release waveform of photons from the resonator, a key functionality that will enable high-fidelity quantum state transfer between distant resonators or qubits.

  16. Tank evaluation system shielded annular tank application

    SciTech Connect

    Freier, D.A.

    1988-10-04

    TEST (Tank Evaluation SysTem) is a research project utilizing neutron interrogation techniques to analyze the content of nuclear poisons and moderators in tank shielding. TEST experiments were performed on an experimental SAT (Shielded Annular Tank) at the Rocky Flats Plant. The purpose of these experiments was threefold: (1) to assess TEST application to SATs, (2) to determine if Nuclear Safety inspection criteria could be met, and (3) to perform a preliminary calibration of TEST for SATs. Several experiments were performed, including measurements of 11 tank shielding configurations, source-simulated holdup experiments, analysis of three detector modes, resolution studies, and TEST scanner geometry experiments. 1 ref., 21 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Assemblies of Conformal Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Assemblies of tanks having shapes that conform to each other and/or conform to other proximate objects have been investigated for use in storing fuels and oxidizers in small available spaces in upper stages of spacecraft. Such assemblies might also prove useful in aircraft, automobiles, boats, and other terrestrial vehicles in which space available for tanks is limited. The basic concept of using conformal tanks to maximize the utilization of limited space is not new in itself: for example, conformal tanks are used in some automobiles to store windshield -washer liquid and coolant that overflows from radiators. The novelty of the present development lies in the concept of an assembly of smaller conformal tanks, as distinguished from a single larger conformal tank. In an assembly of smaller tanks, it would be possible to store different liquids in different tanks. Even if the same liquid were stored in all the tanks, the assembly would offer an advantage by reducing the mechanical disturbance caused by sloshing of fuel in a single larger tank: indeed, the requirement to reduce sloshing is critical in some applications. The figure shows a prototype assembly of conformal tanks. Each tank was fabricated by (1) copper plating a wax tank mandrel to form a liner and (2) wrapping and curing layers of graphite/epoxy composite to form a shell supporting the liner. In this case, the conformal tank surfaces are flat ones where they come in contact with the adjacent tanks. A band of fibers around the outside binds the tanks together tightly in the assembly, which has a quasi-toroidal shape. For proper functioning, it would be necessary to maintain equal pressure in all the tanks.

  18. Engineering study of 50 miscellaneous inactive underground radioactive waste tanks located at the Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1994-03-02

    This engineering study addresses 50 inactive underground radioactive waste tanks. The tanks were formerly used for the following functions associated with plutonium and uranium separations and waste management activities in the 200 East and 200 West Areas of the Hanford Site: settling solids prior to disposal of supernatant in cribs and a reverse well; neutralizing acidic process wastes prior to crib disposal; receipt and processing of single-shell tank (SST) waste for uranium recovery operations; catch tanks to collect water that intruded into diversion boxes and transfer pipeline encasements and any leakage that occurred during waste transfer operations; and waste handling and process experimentation. Most of these tanks have not been in use for many years. Several projects have, been planned and implemented since the 1970`s and through 1985 to remove waste and interim isolate or interim stabilize many of the tanks. Some tanks have been filled with grout within the past several years. Responsibility for final closure and/or remediation of these tanks is currently assigned to several programs including Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS), Environmental Restoration and Remedial Action (ERRA), and Decommissioning and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure (D&RCP). Some are under facility landlord responsibility for maintenance and surveillance (i.e. Plutonium Uranium Extraction [PUREX]). However, most of the tanks are not currently included in any active monitoring or surveillance program.

  19. 50 CFR 679.84 - Rockfish Program recordkeeping, permits, monitoring, and catch accounting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...section are met. (e) Catch monitoring requirements for catcher vessels...this section. (f) Catch monitoring requirements for shoreside and...floating processors —(1) Catch monitoring and control plan (CMCP). The...

  20. Liquid rocket metal tanks and tank components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, W. A.; Keller, R. B. (editor)

    1974-01-01

    Significant guidelines are presented for the successful design of aerospace tanks and tank components, such as expulsion devices, standpipes, and baffles. The state of the art is reviewed, and the design criteria are presented along with recommended practices. Design monographs are listed.

  1. Tank 241-BX-104 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1994-12-14

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-BX-104.

  2. XRDS Spring 2011 Vol .17 no.316 Catching Bad

    E-print Network

    Murphy, Robert F.

    XRDS · Spring 2011 · Vol .17 · no.316 Catching Bad Guys with Graph Mining Perhaps these questions successfully applied to many domains. Here we look at how it works in e-commerce to help catch the bad guys' trustworthiness. One type of fraud scheme works as follows. The bad guy first creates multiple identities t he

  3. Six Years of Catch Statistics on Yellowstone Lake

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oliver B. Cope

    1957-01-01

    The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service collected catch statistics on Yellowstone Lake and adjacent waters from 1950 to 1955 as part of an investigation on the status of the cutthroat trout fishery and the fish populations. Methods for estimating numbers of fishermen, hours of effort, and catch, were developed for each unit of the fishery and were used to

  4. Wasted fishery resources: discarded by-catch in the USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennie M Harrington; Ransom A Myers; Andrew A Rosenberg

    2005-01-01

    Fishery by-catch, especially discarded by-catch, is a serious problem in the world's oceans. Not only are the stocks of discarded species affected, but entire trophic webs and habitats may be disrupted at the ecosystem level. This paper reviews discarding in the marine fisheries of the USA; however, the type, diversity and regulatory mechanisms of the fisheries are similar to developed

  5. Evaluation of Video Technology for Monitoring of Multispecies Longline Catches

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert T. Ames; Bruce M. Leaman; Kelly L. Ames

    2007-01-01

    At-sea catch monitoring of the Alaskan longline fishery for Pacific halibut Hippoglossus stenolepis is insufficient. The International Pacific Halibut Commission (IPHC) conducted studies in 2002 and 2004 comparing catch composition data from electronic monitoring (EM) systems to those of at-sea observers. The EM systems use automated data loggers linked to digital video cameras, a transducer on shipboard hydraulic systems, and

  6. Catch forecasting and relationship between water temperature and catch fluctuations in snow crab Chionoecetes opilio in the western Sea of Japan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daisuke Yamanaka; Kazumi Sakuramoto; Naoki Suzuki; Tohru Nagasawa

    2007-01-01

    Catch forecasting and the relationship between water temperature and catch in the snow crab Chionoecetes opilio in the western Sea of Japan were investigated. Catch was used as an index of abundance on the basis of high correlations\\u000a between catch per unit effort for the period when the latter data were available. The pattern of fluctuations, in catches\\u000a and index

  7. Shark Catches by the HawaiiShark Catches by the Hawaii--basedbased LonglineLongline FisheryFishery

    E-print Network

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Shark Catches by the HawaiiShark Catches by the Hawaii--basedbased LonglineLongline Fishery Title:Project Title: Investigation of SharkInvestigation of Shark BycatchBycatch in thein the Hawai this fishery negatively biased for sharkslogbook data from this fishery negatively biased for sharks (Blue

  8. Nutritionally-Induced Catch-Up Growth

    PubMed Central

    Gat-Yablonski, Galia; Phillip, Moshe

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition is considered a leading cause of growth attenuation in children. When food is replenished, spontaneous catch-up (CU) growth usually occurs, bringing the child back to its original growth trajectory. However, in some cases, the CU growth is not complete, leading to a permanent growth deficit. This review summarizes our current knowledge regarding the mechanism regulating nutrition and growth, including systemic factors, such as insulin, growth hormone, insulin- like growth factor-1, vitamin D, fibroblast growth factor-21, etc., and local mechanisms, including autophagy, as well as regulators of transcription, protein synthesis, miRNAs and epigenetics. Studying the molecular mechanisms regulating CU growth may lead to the establishment of better nutritional and therapeutic regimens for more effective CU growth in children with malnutrition and growth abnormalities. It will be fascinating to follow this research in the coming years and to translate the knowledge gained to clinical benefit. PMID:25594438

  9. 49 CFR 174.63 - Portable tanks, IM portable tanks, IBCs, Large Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car tanks. 174.63 Section 174.63 ...Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) A carrier may not transport...Packaging, cargo tank, or multi-unit tank car tank) containing a hazardous...

  10. 49 CFR 174.63 - Portable tanks, IM portable tanks, IBCs, Large Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car tanks. 174.63 Section 174.63 ...Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) A carrier may not transport...Packaging, cargo tank, or multi-unit tank car tank) containing a hazardous...

  11. 49 CFR 174.63 - Portable tanks, IM portable tanks, IBCs, Large Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car tanks. 174.63 Section 174.63 ...Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) A carrier may not transport...Packaging, cargo tank, or multi-unit tank car tank) containing a hazardous...

  12. 49 CFR 174.63 - Portable tanks, IM portable tanks, IBCs, Large Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car tanks. 174.63 Section 174.63 ...Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) A carrier may not transport...Packaging, cargo tank, or multi-unit tank car tank) containing a hazardous...

  13. 49 CFR 174.63 - Portable tanks, IM portable tanks, IBCs, Large Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car tanks. 174.63 Section 174.63 ...Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) A carrier may not transport...Packaging, cargo tank, or multi-unit tank car tank) containing a hazardous...

  14. Tank 241-BX-110 tank characterization report

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, R.D., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-22

    This document summarizes the information on the historical uses, present status and the sampling and analysis results of waste stored in Tank 241-BX-110. This reports supports the requirements of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-44-09.

  15. 1. VIEW EAST, COMPONENTS TEST LABORATORY SHOWING CATCH BASINS, TURBINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW EAST, COMPONENTS TEST LABORATORY SHOWING CATCH BASINS, TURBINE TESTING AREA, AND PUMP TESTING TOWER. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Components Test Laboratory, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  16. THE 1978 SPRING RECREATIONAL CATCH OF ATLANTIC MACKEREL, SCOMBER SCOMBRUS,

    E-print Network

    THE 1978 SPRING RECREATIONAL CATCH OF ATLANTIC MACKEREL, SCOMBER SCOMBRUS, OFF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC REGION Atlantic mackerel, Scomber scombrus, season- ally migrate through the Middle Atlantic region of Atlantic mackerel in New Jersey in 1975 was

  17. 33 CFR 157.15 - Slop tanks in tank vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...have at least one slop tank. (2) A new vessel...more must have at least two slop tanks. (b) Capacity. ...oil carrying capacity. Two percent capacity is allowed...1) Segregated ballast tanks that meet the...

  18. 33 CFR 157.15 - Slop tanks in tank vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...have at least one slop tank. (2) A new vessel...more must have at least two slop tanks. (b) Capacity. ...oil carrying capacity. Two percent capacity is allowed...1) Segregated ballast tanks that meet the...

  19. 33 CFR 157.15 - Slop tanks in tank vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...have at least one slop tank. (2) A new vessel...more must have at least two slop tanks. (b) Capacity. ...oil carrying capacity. Two percent capacity is allowed...1) Segregated ballast tanks that meet the...

  20. 50 CFR 622.251 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Golden Crab Fishery of the South Atlantic Region § 622.251 Annual catch...

  1. Ferrocyanide tank waste stability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1993-01-01

    Ferrocyanide wastes were generated at the Hanford Site during the mid to late 1950s as a result of efforts to create more tank space for the storage of high-level nuclear waste. The ferrocyanide process was developed to remove [sup 137]CS from existing waste and newly generated waste that resulted from the recovery of valuable uranium in Hanford Site waste tanks.

  2. 49 CFR 179.500 - Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks. 179.500 Section 179.500 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

  3. 49 CFR 179.500 - Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks. 179.500 Section 179.500 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

  4. 49 CFR 179.400 - General specification applicable to cryogenic liquid tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...specification applicable to cryogenic liquid tank car tanks. 179.400 Section 179.400 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

  5. 49 CFR 179.400 - General specification applicable to cryogenic liquid tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...specification applicable to cryogenic liquid tank car tanks. 179.400 Section 179.400 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

  6. 49 CFR 179.500 - Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks. 179.500 Section 179.500 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

  7. 49 CFR 179.400 - General specification applicable to cryogenic liquid tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...specification applicable to cryogenic liquid tank car tanks. 179.400 Section 179.400 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

  8. 49 CFR 179.500 - Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks. 179.500 Section 179.500 Transportation...MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

  9. 49 CFR 179.400 - General specification applicable to cryogenic liquid tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...specification applicable to cryogenic liquid tank car tanks. 179.400 Section 179.400 Transportation...MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

  10. 49 CFR 179.500 - Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks. 179.500 Section 179.500 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

  11. 49 CFR 179.400 - General specification applicable to cryogenic liquid tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...specification applicable to cryogenic liquid tank car tanks. 179.400 Section 179.400 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

  12. Tank characterization reference guide

    SciTech Connect

    De Lorenzo, D.S.; DiCenso, A.T.; Hiller, D.B.; Johnson, K.W.; Rutherford, J.H.; Smith, D.J. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Kennewick, WA (United States); Simpson, B.C. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Characterization of the Hanford Site high-level waste storage tanks supports safety issue resolution; operations and maintenance requirements; and retrieval, pretreatment, vitrification, and disposal technology development. Technical, historical, and programmatic information about the waste tanks is often scattered among many sources, if it is documented at all. This Tank Characterization Reference Guide, therefore, serves as a common location for much of the generic tank information that is otherwise contained in many documents. The report is intended to be an introduction to the issues and history surrounding the generation, storage, and management of the liquid process wastes, and a presentation of the sampling, analysis, and modeling activities that support the current waste characterization. This report should provide a basis upon which those unfamiliar with the Hanford Site tank farms can start their research.

  13. ADM. Tanks: from left to right: fuel oil tank, fuel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ADM. Tanks: from left to right: fuel oil tank, fuel pump house (TAN-611), engine fuel tank, water pump house, water storage tank. Camera facing northwest. Not edge of shielding berm at left of view. Date: November 25, 1953. INEEL negative no. 9217 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. Tank 241-U-202 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1995-02-21

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, and WHC 222-S Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples for tank 241-U-202.

  15. Tank 241-U-201 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1995-02-21

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, and WHC 22-S Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples for tank 241-U-201.

  16. Tank 241-AP-107 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1994-12-06

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, WHC 222-S Laboratory, and PNL 325 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples from tank 241-AP-107.

  17. Tank 241-BY-105 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1995-02-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, PNL 325 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, and WHC 222-S Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples for tank 241-BY-105.

  18. Signature of ocean warming in global fisheries catch.

    PubMed

    Cheung, William W L; Watson, Reg; Pauly, Daniel

    2013-05-16

    Marine fishes and invertebrates respond to ocean warming through distribution shifts, generally to higher latitudes and deeper waters. Consequently, fisheries should be affected by 'tropicalization' of catch (increasing dominance of warm-water species). However, a signature of such climate-change effects on global fisheries catch has so far not been detected. Here we report such an index, the mean temperature of the catch (MTC), that is calculated from the average inferred temperature preference of exploited species weighted by their annual catch. Our results show that, after accounting for the effects of fishing and large-scale oceanographic variability, global MTC increased at a rate of 0.19 degrees Celsius per decade between 1970 and 2006, and non-tropical MTC increased at a rate of 0.23 degrees Celsius per decade. In tropical areas, MTC increased initially because of the reduction in the proportion of subtropical species catches, but subsequently stabilized as scope for further tropicalization of communities became limited. Changes in MTC in 52 large marine ecosystems, covering the majority of the world's coastal and shelf areas, are significantly and positively related to regional changes in sea surface temperature. This study shows that ocean warming has already affected global fisheries in the past four decades, highlighting the immediate need to develop adaptation plans to minimize the effect of such warming on the economy and food security of coastal communities, particularly in tropical regions. PMID:23676754

  19. Pressurizer tank upper support

    DOEpatents

    Baker, T.H.; Ott, H.L.

    1994-01-11

    A pressurizer tank in a pressurized water nuclear reactor is mounted between structural walls of the reactor on a substructure of the reactor, the tank extending upwardly from the substructure. For bearing lateral loads such as seismic shocks, a girder substantially encircles the pressurizer tank at a space above the substructure and is coupled to the structural walls via opposed sway struts. Each sway strut is attached at one end to the girder and at an opposite end to one of the structural walls, and the sway struts are oriented substantially horizontally in pairs aligned substantially along tangents to the wall of the circular tank. Preferably, eight sway struts attach to the girder at 90[degree] intervals. A compartment encloses the pressurizer tank and forms the structural wall. The sway struts attach to corners of the compartment for maximum stiffness and load bearing capacity. A valve support frame carrying the relief/discharge piping and valves of an automatic depressurization arrangement is fixed to the girder, whereby lateral loads on the relief/discharge piping are coupled directly to the compartment rather than through any portion of the pressurizer tank. Thermal insulation for the valve support frame prevents thermal loading of the piping and valves. The girder is shimmed to define a gap for reducing thermal transfer, and the girder is free to move vertically relative to the compartment walls, for accommodating dimensional variation of the pressurizer tank with changes in temperature and pressure. 10 figures.

  20. Pressurizer tank upper support

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Tod H. (O'Hara Township, Allegheny County, PA); Ott, Howard L. (Kiski Township, Armstrong County, PA)

    1994-01-01

    A pressurizer tank in a pressurized water nuclear reactor is mounted between structural walls of the reactor on a substructure of the reactor, the tank extending upwardly from the substructure. For bearing lateral loads such as seismic shocks, a girder substantially encircles the pressurizer tank at a space above the substructure and is coupled to the structural walls via opposed sway struts. Each sway strut is attached at one end to the girder and at an opposite end to one of the structural walls, and the sway struts are oriented substantially horizontally in pairs aligned substantially along tangents to the wall of the circular tank. Preferably, eight sway struts attach to the girder at 90.degree. intervals. A compartment encloses the pressurizer tank and forms the structural wall. The sway struts attach to corners of the compartment for maximum stiffness and load bearing capacity. A valve support frame carrying the relief/discharge piping and valves of an automatic depressurization arrangement is fixed to the girder, whereby lateral loads on the relief/discharge piping are coupled directly to the compartment rather than through any portion of the pressurizer tank. Thermal insulation for the valve support frame prevents thermal loading of the piping and valves. The girder is shimmed to define a gap for reducing thermal transfer, and the girder is free to move vertically relative to the compartment walls, for accommodating dimensional variation of the pressurizer tank with changes in temperature and pressure.

  1. Tank farm potential ignition sources

    SciTech Connect

    Scaief, C.C. III

    1996-01-01

    This document identifies equipment, instrumentation, and sensors that are located in-tank as well as ex-tank in areas that may have communication paths with the tank vapor space. For each item, and attempt is made to identify the potential for ignition of flammable vapors using a graded approach. The scope includes all 177 underground storage tanks.

  2. SPRING_TANK

    EPA Science Inventory

    This point coverage shows springs and water tanks on Salt River Indian Reservation in Arizona. This coverage was digitized off of USGS 7.5 minute quad maps by the Phoenix office of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. ...

  3. Evolving Robocode Tank Fighters

    E-print Network

    Eisenstein, Jacob

    2003-10-28

    In this paper, I describe the application of genetic programming to evolve a controller for a robotic tank in a simulated environment. The purpose is to explore how genetic techniques can best be applied to produce ...

  4. Tank 48 - Chemical Destruction

    SciTech Connect

    Simner, Steven P.; Aponte, Celia I.; Brass, Earl A.

    2013-01-09

    Small tank copper-catalyzed peroxide oxidation (CCPO) is a potentially viable technology to facilitate the destruction of tetraphenylborate (TPB) organic solids contained within the Tank 48H waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS). A maturation strategy was created that identified a number of near-term development activities required to determine the viability of the CCPO process, and subsequent disposition of the CCPO effluent. Critical activities included laboratory-scale validation of the process and identification of forward transfer paths for the CCPO effluent. The technical documentation and the successful application of the CCPO process on simulated Tank 48 waste confirm that the CCPO process is a viable process for the disposition of the Tank 48 contents.

  5. 50 CFR 648.70 - Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Limit (ACL).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Limit (ACL). 648...Management Measures for the Atlantic Surf Clam and Ocean Quahog Fisheries § 648.70 Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Limit (ACL)....

  6. 50 CFR 648.71 - Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Targets (ACT).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Targets (ACT). 648...Management Measures for the Atlantic Surf Clam and Ocean Quahog Fisheries § 648.71 Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Targets (ACT)....

  7. 50 CFR 648.70 - Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Limit (ACL).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Limit (ACL). 648...Management Measures for the Atlantic Surf Clam and Ocean Quahog Fisheries § 648.70 Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Limit (ACL)....

  8. 50 CFR 648.71 - Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Targets (ACT).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Targets (ACT). 648...Management Measures for the Atlantic Surf Clam and Ocean Quahog Fisheries § 648.71 Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Targets (ACT)....

  9. 50 CFR 648.71 - Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Targets (ACT).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Targets (ACT). 648...Management Measures for the Atlantic Surf Clam and Ocean Quahog Fisheries § 648.71 Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Targets (ACT)....

  10. 50 CFR 648.70 - Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Limit (ACL).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Limit (ACL). 648...Management Measures for the Atlantic Surf Clam and Ocean Quahog Fisheries § 648.70 Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Limit (ACL)....

  11. Comparing catch orientation among Minnesota walleye, northern pike, and bass anglers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroeder, Susan A.; Fulton, David C.

    2013-01-01

    We compared the catch orientations of Minnesota walleye (Sander vitreus), northern pike (Esox lucius), largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), and smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) anglers. Results were derived from 2009, 2010, and 2012 surveys of anglers targeting these different species. Consistent with previous research, we identified four dimensions of anglers’ catch orientation: (a) catching something, (b) catching big fish, (c) catching many fish, and (d) keeping fish. Walleye anglers were the most motivated to keep fish, while northern pike anglers were more oriented toward catching big fish. Largemouth bass anglers, and to a lesser extent smallmouth bass anglers, were also oriented toward catching big fish. Bass anglers reported the lowest interest in keeping fish. An orientation to keep fish was negatively related to more restrictive management actions, regardless of species. A stronger orientation to catch big fish was associated with support for increased harvest restrictions only for northern pike and smallmouth bass.

  12. Catch and release: how do kinetochores hook the right

    E-print Network

    Asbury, Chip

    Catch and release: how do kinetochores hook the right microtubules during mitosis? Krishna K version of this angler's trick, operating at kinetochores, ensures accu- racy during mitosis: the mitotic toward emerging models for other force- activated systems. Although attention in the mitosis field has

  13. ABC Allowable Biological Catch AFSC Alaska Fisheries Science Center

    E-print Network

    ­ Sustainable Fisheries Act (1996) SPC ­ Secretariat of the Pacific Community SQAP ­ Science Quality Assurance69 Acronyms ABC ­ Allowable Biological Catch AFSC ­ Alaska Fisheries Science Center AI ­ Aleutian Significant Units FFA ­ South Pacific Forum Fisheries Agency FIS ­ Fisheries Information System FMC ­ Fishery

  14. MAKE YOUR CATCH COUNT! www.countmyfish.noaa.gov

    E-print Network

    . MAKE YOUR CATCH COUNT! www.countmyfish.noaa.gov You can register and fish TODAY at: www the program. You MUST register if you: Fish in federal waters, and Do not meet any of the exemptions under,partyor guide boats, or Hold a Highly Migratory Species Angling permit

  15. Scholarships and School Improvement: Annual Report of Catching the Dream.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavers, Dean, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This issue of "The Native Scholar" is comprised entirely of the annual report of Catching the Dream (CTD), an organization that awards scholarships to Native American students and grants for improving Native American schools. CTD scholarship programs are described, as are scholarships in general and how to find them. Fourteen scholarship websites…

  16. Optical Trajectories and the Informational Basis of Fly Ball Catching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marken, Richard S.

    2005-01-01

    D. M. Shaffer and M. K. McBeath (see record 2002-02027-006) plotted the optical trajectories of uncatchable fly balls and concluded that linear optical trajectory is the informational basis of the actions taken to catch these balls. P. McLeod, N. Reed, and Z. Dienes (see record 2002-11140-016) replotted these trajectories in terms of changes in…

  17. Catch Me, If You Can: Evading Network Signatures

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    . The results of our experiments show that a PHP-based poly- morphic worm would be able to successfully evade ex types of worms. Therefore, we developed a PHP-based worm that ex- ploits a web-based vulnerability. Web-basedCatch Me, If You Can: Evading Network Signatures with Web-based Polymorphic Worms Matthew Van Gundy

  18. Global marine primary production constrains fisheries catches Emmanuel Chassot1*

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Global marine primary production constrains fisheries catches Emmanuel Chassot1* , Sylvain and Sustainability, I- 21027 Ispra (VA), Italy. frederic.melin@jrc.ec.europa.eu 5 Sea Around Us project, Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, 2202 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada. r.watson@fisheries

  19. 50 CFR 648.100 - Catch quotas and other restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...50-percent probability of success, a fishing mortality rate (F) that produces the maximum...catch data; current estimates of fishing mortality; stock status; recent estimates...of gear other than otter trawls on the mortality of summer flounder; and any other...

  20. 50 CFR 648.160 - Catch quotas and other restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...necessary to achieve the target fishing mortality rate (F) specified in the Fishery...catch data; current estimates of fishing mortality; stock status; recent estimates of...than otter trawls and gill nets on the mortality of bluefish; and any other...

  1. Biomedical companies catch and bleed horseshoe crabs for the pro-

    E-print Network

    293 Biomedical companies catch and bleed horseshoe crabs for the pro- duction of Limulus amebocyte is a clotting agent, derived solely from horseshoe crab blood cells, which is used to detect the presence product. The biomedical industry harvest- ed approximately 260,000 horseshoe crabs in 1997 (HCTC1

  2. Cod catches onboard Swedish tour boats in the Sound during 2011

    E-print Network

    Cod catches onboard Swedish tour boats in the Sound during 2011 Vidar Øresland Aqua reports 2012:2 #12;Cod catches onboard Swedish tour boats in the Sound during 2011 By Vidar Øresland February 2012) This report may be cited as: Øresland, V. (2012). Cod catches onboard Swedish tour boats in the Sound during

  3. Rapid shifts in catch composition in the artisanal Red Sea reef fisheries of Eritrea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Iyob Tsehaye; Marcel A. M. Machiels; Leopold A. J. Nagelkerke

    2007-01-01

    Shifts in catch composition were registered in the Eritrean artisanal fisheries, which were launched into a renewed development after the end of the independence war in 1991. Our analysis of catch and effort data showed that total fishing effort as well as total annual catch increased more than two-fold from 1996 to 2002. Yet, overall CPUE remained unchanged upon the

  4. Different Strategies for Using Motion-in-Depth Information in Catching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Rob; Sieffert, Randy

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies on ball catching have had the limitation that the catcher was restricted to lateral hand movements. The authors investigated catching behavior in the more natural situation in which hand movements were unconstrained. Movements of the hand were tracked as participants tried to "catch" an approaching ball simulated with changing…

  5. 26 CFR 1.402(g)-2 - Increased limit for catch-up contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Increased limit for catch-up contributions. 1.402(g)-2 Section...g)-2 Increased limit for catch-up contributions. (a) General rule...income under section 402(g) for a catch-up eligible participant (within the...

  6. 26 CFR 1.402(g)-2 - Increased limit for catch-up contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Increased limit for catch-up contributions. 1.402(g)-2 Section...g)-2 Increased limit for catch-up contributions. (a) General rule...income under section 402(g) for a catch-up eligible participant (within the...

  7. 26 CFR 1.402(g)-2 - Increased limit for catch-up contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Increased limit for catch-up contributions. 1.402(g)-2 Section...g)-2 Increased limit for catch-up contributions. (a) General rule...income under section 402(g) for a catch-up eligible participant (within the...

  8. 26 CFR 1.402(g)-2 - Increased limit for catch-up contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Increased limit for catch-up contributions. 1.402(g)-2 Section...g)-2 Increased limit for catch-up contributions. (a) General rule...income under section 402(g) for a catch-up eligible participant (within the...

  9. 26 CFR 1.402(g)-2 - Increased limit for catch-up contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 true Increased limit for catch-up contributions. 1.402(g)-2 Section...g)-2 Increased limit for catch-up contributions. (a) General rule...income under section 402(g) for a catch-up eligible participant (within the...

  10. Efficacy of a Light Attractant for Increasing Trap Net Catches of White Crappies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Greg R. Binion; Daniel J. Daugherty; J. Warren Schlechte; Richard A. Ott Jr; Timothy J. Bister

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of trap nets fitted with a battery-operated, submersible light in the net mouth in increasing the catch rates of white crappies Pomoxis annularis by comparing the catch rate and size structure of white crappies collected by these nets with those of fish collected by standard (i.e., unlighted) trap nets in six Texas reservoirs. The catch rates

  11. 49 CFR 179.102 - Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks. 179.102 Section 179.102 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

  12. 49 CFR 179.201 - Individual specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks. 179.201 Section 179.201 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

  13. 49 CFR 179.102 - Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks. 179.102 Section 179.102 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

  14. 49 CFR 179.100 - General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks. 179.100 Section 179.100 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

  15. 49 CFR 179.100 - General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks. 179.100 Section 179.100 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

  16. 49 CFR 179.301 - Individual specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks. 179.301 Section 179.301 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) §...

  17. 49 CFR 179.301 - Individual specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks. 179.301 Section 179.301 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) §...

  18. 49 CFR 179.101 - Individual specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks. 179.101 Section 179.101 Transportation...MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

  19. 49 CFR 179.102 - Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks. 179.102 Section 179.102 Transportation...MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

  20. 49 CFR 179.102 - Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks. 179.102 Section 179.102 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

  1. 49 CFR 179.100 - General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks. 179.100 Section 179.100 Transportation...MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

  2. 49 CFR 179.201 - Individual specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks. 179.201 Section 179.201 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

  3. 49 CFR 179.102 - Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks. 179.102 Section 179.102 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

  4. 49 CFR 179.301 - Individual specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks. 179.301 Section 179.301 Transportation...MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) §...

  5. 49 CFR 179.201 - Individual specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks. 179.201 Section 179.201 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

  6. 49 CFR 179.101 - Individual specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks. 179.101 Section 179.101 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

  7. 49 CFR 179.103 - Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks. 179.103 Section 179.103 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

  8. 49 CFR 179.301 - Individual specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks. 179.301 Section 179.301 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) §...

  9. 49 CFR 179.101 - Individual specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks. 179.101 Section 179.101 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

  10. 49 CFR 179.103 - Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks. 179.103 Section 179.103 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

  11. 49 CFR 179.301 - Individual specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks. 179.301 Section 179.301 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) §...

  12. 49 CFR 179.103 - Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks. 179.103 Section 179.103 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

  13. 49 CFR 179.103 - Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks. 179.103 Section 179.103 Transportation...MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

  14. 49 CFR 179.103 - Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks. 179.103 Section 179.103 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

  15. 49 CFR 179.201 - Individual specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks. 179.201 Section 179.201 Transportation...MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

  16. 49 CFR 179.101 - Individual specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks. 179.101 Section 179.101 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

  17. 49 CFR 179.101 - Individual specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks. 179.101 Section 179.101 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

  18. 49 CFR 179.100 - General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks. 179.100 Section 179.100 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

  19. 49 CFR 179.201 - Individual specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks. 179.201 Section 179.201 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

  20. 49 CFR 179.100 - General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks. 179.100 Section 179.100 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

  1. 46 CFR 32.60-30 - Tank vessels with independent tanks-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tank vessels with independent tanks-TB/ALL. 32.60-30 ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT... Tank vessels with independent tanks—TB/ALL. (a)...

  2. 46 CFR 32.65-30 - Tank vessels with independent tanks-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tank vessels with independent tanks-TB/ALL. 32.65-30 ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT... Tank vessels with independent tanks—TB/ALL. Independent...

  3. Optical Cryogenic Tank Level Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffell, Amanda

    2005-01-01

    Cryogenic fluids play an important role in space transportation. Liquid oxygen and hydrogen are vital fuel components for liquid rocket engines. It is also difficult to accurately measure the liquid level in the cryogenic tanks containing the liquids. The current methods use thermocouple rakes, floats, or sonic meters to measure tank level. Thermocouples have problems examining the boundary between the boiling liquid and the gas inside the tanks. They are also slow to respond to temperature changes. Sonic meters need to be mounted inside the tank, but still above the liquid level. This causes problems for full tanks, or tanks that are being rotated to lie on their side.

  4. Ferrocyanide tank waste stability

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, K.D.

    1993-01-01

    Ferrocyanide wastes were generated at the Hanford Site during the mid to late 1950s as a result of efforts to create more tank space for the storage of high-level nuclear waste. The ferrocyanide process was developed to remove [sup 137]CS from existing waste and newly generated waste that resulted from the recovery of valuable uranium in Hanford Site waste tanks. During the course of research associated with the ferrocyanide process, it was recognized that ferrocyanide materials, when mixed with sodium nitrate and/or sodium nitrite, were capable of violent exothermic reaction. This chemical reactivity became an issue in the 1980s, when safety issues associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes in Hanford Site tanks became prominent. These safety issues heightened in the late 1980s and led to the current scrutiny of the safety issues associated with these wastes, as well as current research and waste management programs. Testing to provide information on the nature of possible tank reactions is ongoing. This document supplements the information presented in Summary of Single-Shell Tank Waste Stability, WHC-EP-0347, March 1991 (Borsheim and Kirch 1991), which evaluated several issues. This supplement only considers information particular to ferrocyanide wastes.

  5. Material selection for Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Larrick, A.P.; Blackburn, L.D.; Brehm, W.F.; Carlos, W.C.; Hauptmann, J.P. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Danielson, M.J.; Westerman, R.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Divine, J.R. [ChemMet Ltd., West Richland, WA (United States); Foster, G.M. [ICF Kaiser Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    This paper briefly summarizes the history of the materials selection for the US Department of Energy`s high-level waste carbon steel storage tanks. It also provides an evaluation of the materials for the construction of new tanks at the evaluation of the materials for the construction of new tanks at the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. The evaluation included a materials matrix that summarized the critical design, fabrication, construction, and corrosion resistance requirements: assessed. each requirement: and cataloged the advantages and disadvantages of each material. This evaluation is based on the mission of the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. On the basis of the compositions of the wastes stored in Hanford waste tanks, it is recommended that tanks for the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility be constructed of ASME SA 515, Grade 70, carbon steel.

  6. 131. NORTH PLANT TANK CHEMICAL STORAGE TANKS FROM GB MANUFACTURING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    131. NORTH PLANT TANK CHEMICAL STORAGE TANKS FROM GB MANUFACTURING PLANT. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Bounded by Ninety-sixth Avenue & Fifty-sixth Avenue, Buckley Road, Quebec Street & Colorado Highway 2, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  7. VIEW OF PDP TANK TOP, LEVEL 0?, WITH LTR TANK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PDP TANK TOP, LEVEL 0?, WITH LTR TANK TOP ON LEFT, LOOKING NORTHEAST. CRANE AND VERTICAL HOISTING ELEMENTS AT TOP - Physics Assembly Laboratory, Area A/M, Savannah River Site, Aiken, Aiken County, SC

  8. Tank characterization data report: Tank 241-C-112

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. C. Simpson; G. L. Borsheim; L. Jensen

    1993-01-01

    Tank 241-C-112 is a Hanford Site Ferrocyanide Watch List tank that was most recently sampled in March 1992. Analyses of materials obtained from tank 241-C-112 were conducted to support the resolution of the Ferrocyanide Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) and to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-10-00. Analysis of core samples obtained from tank 241-C-112

  9. Composite overwrapped metallic tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caudill, C. L.; Kirlin, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Work is reported for fabricating and testing the fiberglass overwrapped titanium pressure vessel for cryogenic service. Difficulties encountered in the tank liner fabrication phase involved explosive forming, vacuum annealing, chemical milling and electron beam welding. While each of these processes and the nondestructive test methods employed are normally considered to be individually reliable, the combination of poor material together with fabrication and development reversals prevented the full achievement of the desired end results. Eight tanks plus a prototype and tool proofing article were produced. Six of the vessels failed during the hydrostatic sizing operation. One of the remaining tanks was hydrostatically pressurized to burst and the other was pressurized repeatedly at 75 F from 100 psi to the operating pressure until failure occurred. As a result, it is not possible to draw firm conclusions as to the true value of the design concept due to the problems encountered in the program.

  10. Fireman's Air Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Together with NASA's Johnson Space Center, A-T-O Inc.'s Scott Aviation has developed light-weight firefighter's air tanks. New backpack system weighs only 20 pounds for 30 minute air supply, 13 pounds less than conventional firefighting tanks. They are pressurized at 4,500 psi, (twice current tanks). Made of aluminum liner wrapped by resin-impregnated glass fibers, eliminating corrosion as well as lightening the load. Redesigned face mask permits better vision. Warning device to tell fireman he is running out of air is personalized so it can't be heard by others reducing confusion in an already hectic environment. Structural Composites Inc., The Boeing Co., and Martin- Marietta Corp. have developed uses for this technology.

  11. How Tank Bromeliads Respond to Changing Tank Conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rebecca Tribelhorn

    2010-01-01

    Bromeliads, particularly those with a water-holding tank formed by leaves, act as amplifiers of biodiversity in their tropical forest ecosystem. The tanks play host to a wide diversity of life forms, and provide the bromeliad with almost all of its water and mineral nutrients. Bacteria, insects, amphibians, and other plants thrive in the conditions created by the tank. To investigate

  12. Hanford Tank Waste Information Enclosure 1 Hanford Tank Waste Information

    E-print Network

    Hanford Tank Waste Information Enclosure 1 1 Hanford Tank Waste Information 1.0 Summary This information demonstrates the wastes in the twelve Hanford Site tanks meet the definition of transuranic (TRU) waste as set forth in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Land Withdrawal Act of 1996, as amended

  13. Waste tank structural evaluation program. Waste Tank Safety Programs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. DeFigh-Price; I. E. Reep

    1991-01-01

    This program is part of the overall Waste Tank Safety Programs for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. It is managed by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) for the Tank Farm Project Office (TFPO) of the US Department of Energy Field Office, Richland (RL). Waste Tank Safety Programs (Gasper 1991) is responsible for identifying, addressing, and closing all major safety issues

  14. 33 CFR 157.15 - Slop tanks in tank vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...must have at least two slop tanks. (b) Capacity. Slop tanks must have the total capacity to retain oily mixtures from cargo tank...mixture of 3 percent or more of the oil carrying capacity. Two percent capacity is allowed if...

  15. Enhanced Waste Tank Level Model

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M.R.

    1999-06-24

    'With the increased sensitivity of waste-level measurements in the H-Area Tanks and with periods of isolation, when no mass transfer occurred for certain tanks, waste-level changes have been recorded with are unexplained.'

  16. Tank waste isotope contributions

    SciTech Connect

    VANKEUREN, J.C.

    1999-08-26

    This document presents the results of a calculation to determine the relative contribution of selected isotopes to the inhalation and ingestion doses for a postulated release of Hanford tank waste. The fraction of the dose due to {sup 90}Sr, {sup 90}Y, {sup 137}Cs and the alpha emitters for single shell solids and liquids, double shell solids and liquids, aging waste solids and liquids and all solids and liquids. An effective dose conversion factor was also calculated for the alpha emitters for each composite of the tank waste.

  17. TANK 4 CHARACTERIZATION, SETTLING, AND WASHING STUDIES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Bannochie; J. Pareizs; D. Click; J. Zamecnik

    2009-01-01

    A sample of PUREX sludge from Tank 4 was characterized, and subsequently combined with a Tank 51 sample (Tank 51-E1) received following Al dissolution, but prior to a supernate decant by the Tank Farm, to perform a settling and washing study to support Sludge Batch 6 preparation. The sludge source for the majority of the Tank 51-E1 sample is Tank

  18. Fuel Gage for Sloshing Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, H. D.; Howell, W. E.

    1986-01-01

    New gage accurately measures fuel remaining in moving, or sloshing, tank. Measures tank air (or other gas) pressure and time required for pressure to change from one preselected level to another. Time measurement directly proportional to volume of air. Data processor computes relative volumes of air and fuel in tank.

  19. Waste tank structural evaluation program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. DeFigh-Price; I. E. Reep

    1991-01-01

    This program is part of the overall Waste Tank Safety Programs for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. It is managed by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) for the Tank Farm Project Office (TFPO) of the US Department of Energy Field Office, Richland (RL). Waste Tank Safety Programs (Gasper 1991) is responsible for identifying, addressing, and closing all major safety issues

  20. Tank bump consequence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Board, B.D.

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to derive radiological and toxicological consequences for a tank bump event based on analysis performed using the GOTH computer model, to estimate the mitigative effect of pump and sluice pit cover blocks, and to discuss preventative measures.

  1. Hybrid Tank Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Researchers have accomplished great advances in pressure vessel technology by applying high-performance composite materials as an over-wrap to metal-lined pressure vessels. These composite over-wrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) are used in many areas, from air tanks for firefighters and compressed natural gas tanks for automobiles, to pressurant tanks for aerospace launch vehicles and propellant tanks for satellites and deep-space exploration vehicles. NASA and commercial industry are continually striving to find new ways to make high-performance pressure vessels safer and more reliable. While COPVs are much lighter than all-metal pressure vessels, the composite material, typically graphite fibers with an epoxy matrix resin, is vulnerable to impact damage. Carbon fiber is most frequently used for the high-performance COPV applications because of its high strength-to-weight characteristics. Other fibers have been used, but with limitations. For example, fiberglass is inexpensive but much heavier than carbon. Aramid fibers are impact resistant but have less strength than carbon and their performance tends to deteriorate.

  2. Sharing of Tank Information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamminga, Joshua D.

    2011-01-01

    Test Rationale -- Attempt to Address 10% vs. 25+% effects of crater penetration on full scale titanium alloy tanks and comparison to plate tests Utilize Baseline Burst Pressure versus HVI impacted vessels as gauge of effects Examine craters (post test) to determine penetration characteristics on a fluid filled vessel versus plate tests. Examine crater effects leading to vessel failure (if any).

  3. Peacekeeper tank slosh model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Sidney H.

    1987-09-01

    Information on a tank slosh model for Peacekeeper missiles is given in viewgraph form. Allowable vehicle errors for nose cone ejection clearance, vehicle maneuver sloshing problems, slosh/moment prediction, slosh surface specification, code validation, experimental model-computational model comparison and the propellant storage assembly are covered.

  4. Peacekeeper tank slosh model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Sidney H.

    1987-01-01

    Information on a tank slosh model for Peacekeeper missiles is given in viewgraph form. Allowable vehicle errors for nose cone ejection clearance, vehicle maneuver sloshing problems, slosh/moment prediction, slosh surface specification, code validation, experimental model-computational model comparison and the propellant storage assembly are covered.

  5. Tank characterization report for Single-Shell Tank T-102

    SciTech Connect

    Remund, K.M.; Hartley, S.A.; Toth, J.J.; Tingey, J.M.; Heasler, P.G.; Ryan, F.M.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-09-01

    Tank 241-T-102 (hereafter referred to as T-102) is a 530,000 gallon single-shell waste tank located in the 200 West T Tank farm at the Hanford Site. In 1993, two cores were taken from this tank and analysis of the cores was conducted by Battelle`s 325-A Laboratory. Characterization of the waste in this tank was conducted to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-44-05. Tank T-102 was constructed in 1943 and put into service in 1945; it is the second tank in a cascade system with Tanks T-101 and T-103. During its process history, Tank T-102 received mostly Metal Waste (MW) from the Bismuth Phosphate Process and Coating Waste (CW) from the REDOX Process via the cascade from Tank T-101 and in transfers from Tank C-102. In 1956, the MW was removed from T-102 by pumping and sluicing`. This tank was declared inactive and retired from service in 1976. In 1981, intrusion prevention and stabilization measures were taken to isolate the waste in T-102. The tank presently contains approximately 121,100 liters (32,000 gallons) of liquid and sludge-like waste. Historically, there are no unreviewed safety issues associated with this tank and none were revealed after reviewing the data from the latest core sampling event in 1993. An extensive set of analytical measurements was performed on the core composites. The major constituents (>0.5 wt%) of the waste are water, aluminum, sodium, iron, and nitrate, ordered from the largest concentration to the smallest. The concentrations and inventories of these and other constituents are given. The results of the chemical analyses have been compared to the dangerous waste codes in the Washington Dangerous Waste Regulations (WAC 173-303).

  6. Long-term implementation of the CATCH physical education program.

    PubMed

    Kelder, Steven H; Mitchell, Paul D; McKenzie, Thomas L; Derby, Carol; Strikmiller, Patricia K; Luepker, Russell V; Stone, Elaine J

    2003-08-01

    To test the effectiveness of the Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health (CATCH) program, a randomized trial was conducted in 96 elementary schools in four regions of the United States. Results from the original trial indicated a significant positive effect on the delivery of physical education (PE). All 56 former intervention schools (FI), 20 randomly selected former control schools (FC), and 12 newly selected unexposed control schools (UC) were assessed 5 years postintervention. Results indicate a strong secular trend of increasing moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in PE classes among both FC and UC schools. The FI schools surpassed the Healthy People 2010 goal for MVPA during PE lesson time (i.e., 50%), whereas the FC and UC schools came close to it. Barriers to implementing CATCH PE included insufficient training and lower importance of PE compared to other academic areas and indicate the need for in-service training. PMID:12929897

  7. Hanford Waste Tank Grouping Study

    SciTech Connect

    Remund, K.M.; Simpson, B.C.

    1996-09-30

    This letter report discusses the progress and accomplishments of the Tank Grouping Study in FY96. Forty-one single-shell tanks (SSTs) were included in the FY95. In FY96, technical enhancements were also made to data transformations and tank grouping methods. The first focus of the FY96 effort was a general tank grouping study in which the 41 SSTs were grouped into classes with similar waste properties. The second FY96 focus was a demonstration of how multivariate statistical methods can be used to help resolve tank safety issues.

  8. Egocentric and allocentric reference frames for catching a falling object

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne Brec’hed Le Séac’h; Patrice Senot; Joseph McIntyre

    2010-01-01

    When programming movement, one must account for gravitational acceleration. This is particularly important when catching a\\u000a falling object because the task requires a precise estimate of time-to-contact. Knowledge of gravity’s effects is intimately\\u000a linked to our definition of ‘up’ and ‘down’. Both directions can be described in an allocentric reference frame, based on\\u000a visual and\\/or gravitational cues, or in an

  9. A quick-catch corral trap for wintering canvasbacks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haramis, G.M.; Derleth, E.L.; McAuley, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    We designed a bait trap for wintering Canvasbacks (Aythya valisineria) that has proven more effective than conventional funnel or slot entrance traps for diving ducks. The unique feature of this trap is the corral entrance that presents unimpaired access to the bait and thus ease of entrance to the trap. Catches of 50-75 ducks have been made in a matter of minutes at prebaited sites.

  10. Storage tanks under earthquake loading

    SciTech Connect

    Rammerstorfer, F.G.; Scharf, K. (Technical Univ. of Vienna (Austria)); Fisher, F.D. (Univ. for Mining and Metallurgy, Leoben (Austria))

    1990-11-01

    This is a state-of-the-art review of various treatments of earthquake loaded liquid filled shells by the methods of earthquake engineering, fluid dynamics, structural and soil dynamics, as well as the theory of stability and computational mechanics. Different types of tanks and different possibilities of tank failure will be discussed. The authors will emphasize cylindrical above-ground liquid storage tanks with vertical axis. But many of the treatments are also valid for other tank configurations. For the calculation of the dynamically activated pressure due to an earthquake a fluid-structure-soil interaction problem must be solved. The review will describe the methods, proposed by different authors, to solve this interaction problem. To study the dynamic behavior of liquid storage tanks, one must distinguish between anchored and unanchored tanks. In the case of an anchored tank, the tank bottom edge is fixed to the foundation. If the tank is unanchored, partial lifting of the tank's bottom may occur, and a strongly nonlinear problem has to be solved. They will compare the various analytical and numerical models applicable to this problem, in combination with experimental data. An essential aim of this review is to give a summary of methods applicable as tools for an earthquake resistant design, which can be used by an engineer engaged in the construction of liquid storage tanks.

  11. Tank characterization technical sampling basis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, T.M.

    1998-04-28

    Tank Characterization Technical Sampling Basis (this document) is the first step of an in place working process to plan characterization activities in an optimal manner. This document will be used to develop the revision of the Waste Information Requirements Document (WIRD) (Winkelman et al. 1997) and ultimately, to create sampling schedules. The revised WIRD will define all Characterization Project activities over the course of subsequent fiscal years 1999 through 2002. This document establishes priorities for sampling and characterization activities conducted under the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Tank Waste Characterization Project. The Tank Waste Characterization Project is designed to provide all TWRS programs with information describing the physical, chemical, and radiological properties of the contents of waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site. These tanks contain radioactive waste generated from the production of nuclear weapons materials at the Hanford Site. The waste composition varies from tank to tank because of the large number of chemical processes that were used when producing nuclear weapons materials over the years and because the wastes were mixed during efforts to better use tank storage space. The Tank Waste Characterization Project mission is to provide information and waste sample material necessary for TWRS to define and maintain safe interim storage and to process waste fractions into stable forms for ultimate disposal. This document integrates the information needed to address safety issues, regulatory requirements, and retrieval, treatment, and immobilization requirements. Characterization sampling to support tank farm operational needs is also discussed.

  12. A person catching fish or shellfish with no intent to sell, including people releasing the catch. Also known as a recreational fisherman.

    E-print Network

    #12;Glossary Angler1 A person catching fish or shellfish with no intent to sell, including people reasons. Catch1 1. To undertake any activity that results in taking fish out of its environment dead or alive, or to bring fish on board a vessel dead or alive; 2. The total number (or weight) of fish caught

  13. Strategy for catch crop development II. Screening of species undersown in spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) with respect to catch crop growth and grain yield

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Rydberg; H. C. Becker; M. Umaerus

    1998-01-01

    Catch crops are recommended in Sweden as a way of decreasing nitrogen leaching from arable land. In six field trials a total of 118 accessions from 39 species of Poaceae, Fabaceae and “other”; families was tested as potential undersown catch crops. Barley yield was used as an indicator of competition. Establishment, height and green?matter production, after harvest of the main

  14. Estimating historical eastern North Pacific blue whale catches using spatial calling patterns.

    PubMed

    Monnahan, Cole C; Branch, Trevor A; Stafford, Kathleen M; Ivashchenko, Yulia V; Oleson, Erin M

    2014-01-01

    Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) were exploited extensively around the world and remain endangered. In the North Pacific their population structure is unclear and current status unknown, with the exception of a well-studied eastern North Pacific (ENP) population. Despite existing abundance estimates for the ENP population, it is difficult to estimate pre-exploitation abundance levels and gauge their recovery because historical catches of the ENP population are difficult to separate from catches of other populations in the North Pacific. We collated previously unreported Soviet catches and combined these with known catches to form the most current estimates of North Pacific blue whale catches. We split these conflated catches using recorded acoustic calls from throughout the North Pacific, the knowledge that the ENP population produces a different call than blue whales in the western North Pacific (WNP). The catches were split by estimating spatiotemporal occurrence of blue whales with generalized additive models fitted to acoustic call patterns, which predict the probability a catch belonged to the ENP population based on the proportion of calls of each population recorded by latitude, longitude, and month. When applied to the conflated historical catches, which totaled 9,773, we estimate that ENP blue whale catches totaled 3,411 (95% range 2,593 to 4,114) from 1905-1971, and amounted to 35% (95% range 27% to 42%) of all catches in the North Pacific. Thus most catches in the North Pacific were for WNP blue whales, totaling 6,362 (95% range 5,659 to 7,180). The uncertainty in the acoustic data influence the results substantially more than uncertainty in catch locations and dates, but the results are fairly insensitive to the ecological assumptions made in the analysis. The results of this study provide information for future studies investigating the recovery of these populations and the impact of continuing and future sources of anthropogenic mortality. PMID:24892427

  15. 9 CFR 316.14 - Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation of edible products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 2013-01-01 false Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation...CONTAINERS § 316.14 Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation of edible products. Each tank car and each tank truck carrying...

  16. 9 CFR 316.14 - Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation of edible products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 2012-01-01 false Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation...CONTAINERS § 316.14 Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation of edible products. Each tank car and each tank truck carrying...

  17. The effects of cattle on shoreline vegetation of ponds and tanks in south Texas 

    E-print Network

    Whyte, Richard John

    1978-01-01

    of longtom and common Bermudagrass in the Longtom Zone of Mesquite Tank in relation to season and grazing (UG~nrcazed; G=grazed), June 1977- Nay 1978 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 31 16 Biomass of invertebrates (g/trap h) collected. on Rincon and Paloma... h for i h. The invertebrates trapped were removed from the collection buckets and weighed. using a Nettler analytical balance (Nodel H10w). The most abundant Orders in each catch were identified. Analysis of variance was used to test the effects...

  18. Interactions between finfish aquaculture and lobster catches in a sheltered bay.

    PubMed

    Loucks, Ronald H; Smith, Ruth E; Fisher, E Brian

    2014-11-15

    Interactions between open-net pen finfish aquaculture and lobster catches in a sheltered bay in Nova Scotia, Canada, were investigated using fishermen's participatory research in annual lobster trap surveys over seven years. Fishermen recorded lobster catches during the last two weeks of May from 2007 to 2013. Catches for each trap haul were recorded separately for ovigerous and market-sized lobsters. Catch trends within the bay were compared to regional trends. Results of correlation analyses indicated that ovigerous catch trends were strongly affected by the fish farm's feeding/fallow periods. There was no significant correlation between trends for bay and LFA lobster landings. Patterns of lobster catch per unit effort extending over considerable distance in Port Mouton Bay appear to be influenced by proximity to the fish farm regardless of year-to-year variation in water temperatures and weather conditions. Odours and habitat changes surrounding open-net pen finfish operations are potential factors affecting lobster displacement. PMID:25242235

  19. Tank characterization data report: Tank 241-C-112

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, B.C.; Borsheim, G.L.; Jensen, L.

    1993-09-01

    Tank 241-C-112 is a Hanford Site Ferrocyanide Watch List tank that was most recently sampled in March 1992. Analyses of materials obtained from tank 241-C-112 were conducted to support the resolution of the Ferrocyanide Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) and to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-10-00. Analysis of core samples obtained from tank 241-C-112 strongly indicates that the fuel concentration in the tank waste will not support a propagating exothermic reaction. Analysis of the process history of the tank as well as studies of simulants provided valuable information about the physical and chemical condition of the waste. This information, in combination with the analysis of the tank waste, sup ports the conclusion that an exothermic reaction in tank 241-C-112 is not plausible. Therefore, the contents of tank 241-C-112 present no imminent threat to the workers at the Hanford Site, the public, or the environment from its forrocyanide inventory. Because an exothermic reaction is not credible, the consequences of this accident scenario, as promulgated by the General Accounting Office, are not applicable.

  20. Tank characterization report for Single-Shell Tank B-111

    SciTech Connect

    Remund, K.M.; Tingey, J.M.; Heasler, P.G.; Toth, J.J.; Ryan, F.M.; Hartley, S.A.; Simpson, D.B.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-09-01

    Tank 241-B-111 (hereafter referred to as B-111) is a 2,006,300 liter (530,000 gallon) single-shell waste tank located in the 200 East B tank farm at Hanford. Two cores were taken from this tank in 1991 and analysis of the cores was conducted by Battelle`s 325-A Laboratory in 1993. Characterization of the waste in this tank is being done to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-44-05. Tank B-111 was constructed in 1943 and put into service in 1945; it is the second tank in a cascade system with Tanks B-110 and B-112. During its process history, B-111 received mostly second-decontamination-cycle waste and fission products waste via the cascade from Tank B-110. This tank was retired from service in 1976, and in 1978 the tank was assumed to have leaked 30,300 liters (8,000 gallons). The tank was interim stabilized and interim isolated in 1985. The tank presently contains approximately 893,400 liters (236,000 gallons) of sludge-like waste and approximately 3,800 liters (1,000 gallons) of supernate. Historically, there are no unreviewed safety issues associated with this tank and none were revealed after reviewing the data from the latest core sampling event in 1991. An extensive set of analytical measurements was performed on the core composites. The major constituents (> 0.5 wt%) measured in the waste are water, sodium, nitrate, phosphate, nitrite, bismuth, iron, sulfate and silicon, ordered from largest concentration to the smallest. The concentrations and inventories of these and other constituents are given. Since Tanks B-110 and B-111 have similar process histories, their sampling results were compared. The results of the chemical analyses have been compared to the dangerous waste codes in the Washington Dangerous Waste Regulations (WAC 173-303). This assessment was conducted by comparing tank analyses against dangerous waste characteristics `D` waste codes; and against state waste codes.

  1. Occurrence of Macroalgae in the By-catch of Beach Seine Fisheries at Sakumono, Ghana

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. K. E. Nunoo; G. K. Ameka

    Dense growths of macro-algae contribute to primary productivity in nearshore marine environments and their abundance has been correlated with fish catch. Though the two resources are captured together in beach seine nets, macro-algae are usually regarded as a nuisance by fishermen and discarded (as by-catch). The species composition, abundance and seasonality of macro-algal species in fisheries by-catch of beach seine

  2. Improved method for determining tank heel volumes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. H. Holt; R. R. Livingston; S. E. Nave

    1994-01-01

    As part of the tank calibration process, the instrument heel is that part of the tank that cannot be measured by the liquid level instrumentation. if the tank being calibrated is not a bottom drain tank, some volume of fluid will be present in the bottom of the tank after draining as much as possible. The amount of fluid remaining

  3. 49 CFR 238.423 - Fuel tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Equipment § 238.423 Fuel tanks. (a) External fuel tanks. Each type of external fuel tank must be approved by FRA's Associate Administrator...equivalent to a fuel tank that complies with the external fuel tank requirements in § 238.223(a)....

  4. 49 CFR 238.423 - Fuel tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Equipment § 238.423 Fuel tanks. (a) External fuel tanks. Each type of external fuel tank must be approved by FRA's Associate Administrator...equivalent to a fuel tank that complies with the external fuel tank requirements in § 238.223(a)....

  5. 49 CFR 238.423 - Fuel tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Equipment § 238.423 Fuel tanks. (a) External fuel tanks. Each type of external fuel tank must be approved by FRA's Associate Administrator...equivalent to a fuel tank that complies with the external fuel tank requirements in § 238.223(a)....

  6. 49 CFR 238.423 - Fuel tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Equipment § 238.423 Fuel tanks. (a) External fuel tanks. Each type of external fuel tank must be approved by FRA's Associate Administrator...equivalent to a fuel tank that complies with the external fuel tank requirements in § 238.223(a)....

  7. 49 CFR 238.423 - Fuel tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Equipment § 238.423 Fuel tanks. (a) External fuel tanks. Each type of external fuel tank must be approved by FRA's Associate Administrator...equivalent to a fuel tank that complies with the external fuel tank requirements in § 238.223(a)....

  8. 27 CFR 24.230 - Examination of tank car or tank truck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 false Examination of tank car or tank truck. 24.230 Section 24.230...WINE Spirits § 24.230 Examination of tank car or tank truck. Upon arrival of a tank car or tank truck at the bonded wine premises,...

  9. 27 CFR 24.230 - Examination of tank car or tank truck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 false Examination of tank car or tank truck. 24.230 Section 24.230...WINE Spirits § 24.230 Examination of tank car or tank truck. Upon arrival of a tank car or tank truck at the bonded wine premises,...

  10. 27 CFR 24.230 - Examination of tank car or tank truck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 false Examination of tank car or tank truck. 24.230 Section 24.230...WINE Spirits § 24.230 Examination of tank car or tank truck. Upon arrival of a tank car or tank truck at the bonded wine premises,...

  11. 27 CFR 24.230 - Examination of tank car or tank truck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2014-04-01 false Examination of tank car or tank truck. 24.230 Section 24.230...WINE Spirits § 24.230 Examination of tank car or tank truck. Upon arrival of a tank car or tank truck at the bonded wine premises,...

  12. 27 CFR 24.230 - Examination of tank car or tank truck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 false Examination of tank car or tank truck. 24.230 Section 24.230...WINE Spirits § 24.230 Examination of tank car or tank truck. Upon arrival of a tank car or tank truck at the bonded wine premises,...

  13. Catch-disperse-release readout for superconducting qubits.

    PubMed

    Sete, Eyob A; Galiautdinov, Andrei; Mlinar, Eric; Martinis, John M; Korotkov, Alexander N

    2013-05-24

    We analyze a single-shot readout for superconducting qubits via the controlled catch, dispersion, and release of a microwave field. A tunable coupler is used to decouple the microwave resonator from the transmission line during the dispersive qubit-resonator interaction, thus circumventing damping from the Purcell effect. We show that, if the qubit frequency tuning is sufficiently adiabatic, a fast high-fidelity qubit readout is possible, even in the strongly nonlinear dispersive regime. Interestingly, the Jaynes-Cummings nonlinearity leads to the quadrature squeezing of the resonator field below the standard quantum limit, resulting in a significant decrease of the measurement error. PMID:23745846

  14. Teleoperation for a ball-catching task with significant dynamics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christian Smith; Mattias Bratt; Henrik I. Christensen

    2008-01-01

    Abstract—In this paper,we,present,ongoing,work,on,how to incorporate,human,motion,models,into the,design,of a high performance,teleoperation,platform. A short description of human,motion,models,used for ballcatching is followed by a more detailed study of a teleoperation,platform,on which,to conduct experiments. Also, a pilot study using minimum jerk theory to explain user input behavior,in teleoperated catching is presented. Index Terms—Teleoperation, control, high performance ma-

  15. Tank Waste Remediation System Tank Waste Analysis Plan. FY 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, C.S.; Dove, T.H.

    1994-11-01

    This documents lays the groundwork for preparing the implementing the TWRS tank waste analysis planning and reporting for Fiscal Year 1995. This Tank Waste Characterization Plan meets the requirements specified in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, better known as the Tri-Party Agreement.

  16. 39. DIABLO POWERHOUSE: GRAVITY LUBRICATING OIL TANKS. THESE TANKS ARE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. DIABLO POWERHOUSE: GRAVITY LUBRICATING OIL TANKS. THESE TANKS ARE LOCATED AT ROOF LEVEL AT THE NORTHEAST REAR CORNER OF DIABLO POWERHOUSE, 1989. - Skagit Power Development, Diablo Powerhouse, On Skagit River, 6.1 miles upstream from Newhalem, Newhalem, Whatcom County, WA

  17. 46 CFR 64.29 - Tank saddles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.29 Tank saddles. If a tank is not completely supported...must be supported by two or more external saddles, each of which...

  18. 49 CFR 229.217 - Fuel tank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...STANDARDS Locomotive Crashworthiness Design Requirements § 229.217 Fuel tank. (a) External fuel tanks. Locomotives equipped with external fuel tanks shall, at a minimum, comply with the requirements of AAR S-5506,...

  19. 49 CFR 229.217 - Fuel tank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...STANDARDS Locomotive Crashworthiness Design Requirements § 229.217 Fuel tank. (a) External fuel tanks. Locomotives equipped with external fuel tanks shall, at a minimum, comply with the requirements of AAR S-5506,...

  20. 46 CFR 64.29 - Tank saddles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.29 Tank saddles. If a tank is not completely supported...must be supported by two or more external saddles, each of which...

  1. 46 CFR 64.29 - Tank saddles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.29 Tank saddles. If a tank is not completely supported...must be supported by two or more external saddles, each of which...

  2. 49 CFR 229.217 - Fuel tank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...STANDARDS Locomotive Crashworthiness Design Requirements § 229.217 Fuel tank. (a) External fuel tanks. Locomotives equipped with external fuel tanks shall, at a minimum, comply with the requirements of AAR S-5506,...

  3. 46 CFR 64.29 - Tank saddles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.29 Tank saddles. If a tank is not completely supported...must be supported by two or more external saddles, each of which...

  4. 46 CFR 64.29 - Tank saddles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.29 Tank saddles. If a tank is not completely supported...must be supported by two or more external saddles, each of which...

  5. 49 CFR 229.217 - Fuel tank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...STANDARDS Locomotive Crashworthiness Design Requirements § 229.217 Fuel tank. (a) External fuel tanks. Locomotives equipped with external fuel tanks shall, at a minimum, comply with the requirements of AAR S-5506,...

  6. 49 CFR 229.217 - Fuel tank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...STANDARDS Locomotive Crashworthiness Design Requirements § 229.217 Fuel tank. (a) External fuel tanks. Locomotives equipped with external fuel tanks shall, at a minimum, comply with the requirements of AAR S-5506,...

  7. 49 CFR 230.116 - Oil tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Steam Locomotive Tanks § 230.116 Oil tanks. The oil tanks on oil...

  8. Tank closure reducing grout

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, T.B.

    1997-04-18

    A reducing grout has been developed for closing high level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. The grout has a low redox potential, which minimizes the mobility of Sr{sup 90}, the radionuclide with the highest dose potential after closure. The grout also has a high pH which reduces the solubility of the plutonium isotopes. The grout has a high compressive strength and low permeability, which enhances its ability to limit the migration of contaminants after closure. The grout was designed and tested by Construction Technology Laboratories, Inc. Placement methods were developed by the Savannah River Site personnel.

  9. Evaporation loss from storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Wagoner, R.B. [Matrix Service, Inc., Tulsa, OK (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The loss of stored hydrocarbons has been a concern since the early days of the petroleum industry. Initially hydrocarbon liquids were stored in open tanks or in tanks with only fixed roof covers. The theory of storage tanks with floating roof was born in 1880. The initial concept was patented by William Birge of Franklin, Pennsylvania. Birge revealed his idea after the U.S.A. Petroleum industry suffered its first major industrial disaster. A tank with stored hydrocarbon liquid was struck directly by lightening. The results were catastrophic. After this incident a concept was revealed to the United States Patent office. The concept was noted as follows: {open_quotes}It is often the case that oil tanks are struck by lightning and when lightning stored beneath the roof is instantly ignited and explodes, the explosion either throwing the roof off from the tank or slivering it into pieces, thus exposing the oil and setting it afire. The result of such an accident is the loss of the tank itself which alone involves the loss of several thousand dollars. The object of my invention is to provide an oil tank such that the surface of oil in the tank will always be covered and protected regardless of the quantity of oil in the tank and no space be provided between the oil and cover for the accumulation of the escaping gases, and with these ends in view, my invention consists essentially, an oil tank with a floating cover{close_quotes}. Various concepts of floating roofs and seals have been presented over the last 100 years. Safety and conservation are still a primary concern for storage of hydrocarbon liquids. Environmental pollution from hydrocarbon emissions has become a major concern for the storage industry. This paper is an attempt to describe these devices and how to quantify the evaporation losses from stationary sources. The stationary losses from external floating roofs will primarily be addressed in this paper.

  10. SINDA/FLUINT Stratified Tank Modeling for Cryrogenic Propellant Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakowski, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    A general purpose SINDA/FLUINT (S/F) stratified tank model was created to simulate self-pressurization and axial jet TVS; Stratified layers in the vapor and liquid are modeled using S/F lumps.; The stratified tank model was constructed to permit incorporating the following additional features:, Multiple or singular lumps in the liquid and vapor regions of the tank, Real gases (also mixtures) and compressible liquids, Venting, pressurizing, and draining, Condensation and evaporation/boiling, Wall heat transfer, Elliptical, cylindrical, and spherical tank geometries; Extensive user logic is used to allow detailed tailoring - Don't have to rebuilt everything from scratch!!; Most code input for a specific case is done through the Registers Data Block:, Lump volumes are determined through user input:; Geometric tank dimensions (height, width, etc); Liquid level could be input as either a volume percentage of fill level or actual liquid level height

  11. Cardiac alterations induced by a fish-catching diving competition.

    PubMed

    Gargne, O; Joulia, F; Golé, Y; Coulange, M; Bessereau, J; Fontanari, P; Desruelle, A-V; Gavarry, O; Boussuges, A

    2012-06-01

    Cardiac changes induced by repeated breath-hold diving were investigated after a fish-catching diving competition. Eleven healthy subjects carried out repeated breath-hold dives at a mean maximal depth of 20 ± 2.7 msw (66 ± 9 fsw) during 5 h. One hour after the competition, the body mass loss was -1.7 ± 0.5 kg. Most of the breath-hold divers suffered from cold and although the core temperature remained normal, a decrease in cutaneous temperature was recorded in the extremities. Systolic blood pressure was reduced in both upper and lower limbs. Heart rate was unchanged, but left ventricular (LV) stroke volume was reduced leading to a decrease in cardiac output (-20%). Left atrial and LV diameters were significantly decreased. LV filling was assessed on a trans-mitral profile. An increase in the contribution of the atrial contraction to LV filling was observed. Right cavity diameters were increased. The cardiac autonomic alterations were in favor of sympathetic hyperactivity. After a fish-catching diving competition in cold water, alterations suggesting dehydration, contraction in plasma volume and sympathetic hyperactivity were observed. Furthermore, enlargements of right cavities were in favor of right ventricular strains. Repeated apnea and swimming in cold water may account for these alterations. PMID:20738824

  12. Tunnel catch from potential wells and energy detection

    E-print Network

    M. V. Karasev; E. V. Vybornyi

    2014-11-17

    We consider the one-dimensional Schr\\"{o}dinger operator in the semiclassical regime assuming that its double-well potential is the sum of a finite "physically given" well and a square shape probing well whose width or depth can be varied (tuned). We study the dynamics of initial state localized in the physical well. It is shown that if the probing well is not too close to the physical one and if its parameters are specially tuned, then the {\\it tunnel catch effect} appears, i.e. the initial state starts tunneling oscillations between the physical and probing wells. The asymptotic formula for the probability of finding the state in the probing well is obtained. We show that the observation of the tunnel catch effect can be used to determine the energy level of the initial state, and we obtain the corresponding asymptotic formula for the initial state energy. We also calculate the leading term of the tunneling splitting of energy levels in this double well potential.

  13. Catch-Bond Behavior of Bacteria Binding by Slip Bonds

    PubMed Central

    Björnham, Oscar; Axner, Ove

    2010-01-01

    It is shown that multipili-adhering bacteria expressing helix-like pili binding by slip bonds can show catch-bond behavior. When exposed to an external force, such bacteria can mediate adhesion to their hosts by either of two limiting means: sequential or simultaneous pili force exposure (referring to when the pili mediate force in a sequential or simultaneous manner, respectively). As the force is increased, the pili can transition from sequential to simultaneous pili force exposure. Since the latter mode of adhesion gives rise to a significantly longer bacterial adhesion lifetime than the former, this results in a prolongation of the lifetime, which shows up as a catch-bond behavior. The properties and conditions of this effect were theoretically investigated and assessed in some detail for dual-pili-adhering bacteria, by both analytical means and simulations. The results indicate that the adhesion lifetime of such bacteria can be prolonged by more than an order of magnitude. This implies that the adhesion properties of multibinding systems cannot be directly conveyed to the individual adhesion-receptor bonds. PMID:20816044

  14. PyCatch: catchment modelling in the PCRaster framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karssenberg, Derek; Lana-Renault, Noemí; Schmitz, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    PCRaster is an open source software framework for the construction and execution of stochastic, spatio-temporal, forward, models. It provides a large number of spatial operations on raster maps, with an emphasis on operations that are capable of transporting material (water, sediment) over a drainage network. These operations have been written in C++ and are provided to the model builder as Python functions. Models are constructed by combining these functions in a Python script. To ease implementation of models that use time steps and Monte Carlo iterations, the software comes with a Python framework providing control flow for temporal modelling and Monte Carlo simulation, including options for Bayesian data assimilation (Ensemble Kalman Filter, Particle Filter). A sophisticated visualization tool is provided capable of visualizing, animating, and exploring stochastic, spatio-temporal input or model output data. PCRaster is used for construction of for instance hydrological models (hillslope to global scale), land use change models, and geomorphological models. It is still being improved upon, for instance by adding under the hood functionality for executing models on multiple CPU cores, and by adding components for agent-based and network simulation. The software runs in MS Windows and Linux and is available at http://www.pcraster.eu. We provide an extensive set of online course materials (partly available free of charge). Using the PCRaster software framework, we recently developed the PyCatch model components for hydrological modelling and land degradation modelling at catchment scale. The PyCatch components run at time steps of seconds to weeks, and grid cell sizes of approximately 1-100 m, which can be selected depending on the case study for which PyCatch is used. Hydrological components currently implemented include classes for simulation of incoming solar radiation, evapotranspiration (Penman-Monteith), surface storage, infiltration (Green and Ampt), subsurface flow and surface water flow (kinematic wave). A number of components for modelling of water erosion have been implemented, providing capability to model water erosion largely following Modified Morgan-Morgan-Finney model equations (Morgan and Duzant 2008), soil creep, and bedrock weathering. PyCatch is built in a modular way, which makes it relatively easy to swap model components, for instance to compare different process representations, or to add new model components, for instance for modelling pollution transport or vegetation growth. By combining hydrological and land degradation components it can be used for landscape evolution modelling at geological time scales. It comes with all functionality offered by PCRaster and thus is capable of Monte Carlo simulation to calculate error propagation in models and Bayesian data assimilation. We would like to invite the modelling community to contribute to further development of PCRaster and PyCatch. References Morgan, R. P. C., and J. H. Duzant. 2008. Modified MMF (Morgan-Morgan-Finney) model for evaluating effects of crops and vegetation cover on soil erosion. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms 33:90-106.

  15. 1990 waste tank inspection program

    SciTech Connect

    McNatt, F.G.

    1990-01-01

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site separations processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Tank conditions are evaluated by inspection using periscopes, still photography, and video systems for visual imagery. Inspections made in 1990 are the subject of this report.

  16. 1990 waste tank inspection program

    SciTech Connect

    McNatt, F.G.

    1990-12-31

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site separations processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Tank conditions are evaluated by inspection using periscopes, still photography, and video systems for visual imagery. Inspections made in 1990 are the subject of this report.

  17. A person catching fish or shellfish with no intent to sell, including people releasing the catch. Also known as a recreational Annual Payroll2

    E-print Network

    #12;Glossary Angler1 A person catching fish or shellfish with no intent to sell, including people environment dead or alive, or to bring fish on board a vessel dead or alive; 2. The total number (or weight

  18. A person catching fish or shellfish with no intent to sell, including people releasing the catch. Also known as a recreational fisherman.

    E-print Network

    people releasing the catch. Also known as a recreational fisherman. Annual Payroll2 Total payroll environment dead or alive, or to bring fish on board a vessel dead or alive; 2. The total number (or weight

  19. Interpreting catch per unit effort data to assess the status of individual stocks and communities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark N. Maunder; John R. Sibert; Alain Fonteneau; John Hampton; Pierre Kleiber; Shelton J. Harley

    2006-01-01

    Despite being one of the most common pieces of information used in assessing the status of fish stocks, relative abundance indices based on catch per unit effort (cpue) data are noto- riously problematic. Raw cpue is seldom proportional to abundance over a whole exploita- tion history and an entire geographic range, because numerous factors affect catch rates. One of the

  20. Effect of Baiting on Hoop Net Catch Rates of Endangered Humpback Chub

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dennis M. Stone

    2005-01-01

    The effects of unbaited, scented (odor emitted by inaccessible hatchery feed), and baited (accessible feed) single-throated hoop nets on the catch rates of the federally endangered humpback chub Gila cypha (?100 mm total length) were assessed in the Little Colorado River, Arizona, to determine how baiting affected the catch of these fish. Of a total of 1,297 unique humpback chub

  1. Retained and discarded catches from commercial beach-seining in Botany Bay, Australia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. A Gray; S. J Kennelly; K. E Hodgson; C. J. T Ashby; M. L Beatson

    2001-01-01

    Observer-based estimates of the quantities and size compositions of discarded and retained catches from the commercial beach-seine fishery in Botany Bay, NSW, Australia are presented. A total of 71 finfish and 10 invertebrate taxa were identified in catches sampled between February 1998 and February 1999, with 39 taxa being retained by fishers and 77 taxa discarded. Gerres subfasciatus, Pseudocaranx dentex,

  2. Composition of Catches Made by Anglers Fishing for Summer Flounder, Paralichthys dentatus,

    E-print Network

    Composition of Catches Made by Anglers Fishing for Summer Flounder, Paralichthys dentatus, From New Jersey Party Boats in 1978 DARRYL J. CHRISTENSEN and WALTER J. CLIFFORD Introduction The summer flounder (McHugh, 1977). This survey was conducted to document the current catch rates made aboard party boats

  3. Factorial Validity of the Chedoke-McMaster Attitudes towards Children with Handicaps Scale (CATCH)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bossaert, Goele; Petry, Katja

    2013-01-01

    The Chedoke-McMaster Attitudes towards Children with Handicaps Scale (CATCH) has been developed to measure the attitudes of children toward peers with disabilities. The present study aims to evaluate the factorial validity of the CATCH in a sample of 2396 students in 7th grade, including 179 students with disabilities and 2217 typically developing…

  4. Table 1.-Somali fish catch, 1971-80. Foreign Fishery Developments

    E-print Network

    Table 1.-Somali fish catch, 1971-80. Foreign Fishery Developments Year Calch (x 1,000 I) Year Catch (x 1,000 t) 'FAO estimate. Source: FAD "Yearbook of Fishery Slatistics," 1980. Somali Fishing suffered from food shonages caused by a severe drought during the early 1970's. The Somali Ministry

  5. RAPID COMMUNICATION \\/ COMMUNICATION RAPIDE Folly and fantasy in the analysis of spatial catch rate data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carl Walters

    Spatial catch per effort data can provide useful indices of population trends provided that they are averaged so as to correct for effects of changes in the distribution of fishing activity. Simple, nonspatial ratio estimates should not be used in such analyses. The averaging for any time period must necessarily make some assumptions about what catch rates would have been

  6. Catching up with Harvard: Results from Regression Analysis of World Universities League Tables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Mei; Shankar, Sriram; Tang, Kam Ki

    2011-01-01

    This paper uses regression analysis to test if the universities performing less well according to Shanghai Jiao Tong University's world universities league tables are able to catch up with the top performers, and to identify national and institutional factors that could affect this catching up process. We have constructed a dataset of 461…

  7. ORIGINAL PAPER Arctic fisheries catches in Russia, USA, and Canada: baselines

    E-print Network

    Pauly, Daniel

    ORIGINAL PAPER Arctic fisheries catches in Russia, USA, and Canada: baselines for neglected northern Siberia (Russia), Arctic Alaska (USA), and the Canadian Arctic, extends over seven coastal Large-scale operations conducted mainly in estuaries and river deltas. Most of the catches have traditionally not been

  8. 50 CFR 300.63 - Catch sharing plan and domestic management measures in Area 2A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...is allocated as incidental catch in the salmon troll fishery in Area 2A. Each year...Federal Register along with the annual salmon management measures. (3) A portion...The incidental catch fishery during the salmon troll fishery as authorized in...

  9. 50 CFR 300.63 - Catch sharing plan and domestic management measures in Area 2A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...is allocated as incidental catch in the salmon troll fishery in Area 2A. Each year...Federal Register along with the annual salmon management measures. (3) A portion...The incidental catch fishery during the salmon troll fishery as authorized in...

  10. 50 CFR 300.63 - Catch sharing plan and domestic management measures in Area 2A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...is allocated as incidental catch in the salmon troll fishery in Area 2A. Each year...Federal Register along with the annual salmon management measures. (3) A portion...The incidental catch fishery during the salmon troll fishery as authorized in...

  11. 50 CFR 300.63 - Catch sharing plan and domestic management measures in Area 2A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...is allocated as incidental catch in the salmon troll fishery in Area 2A. Each year...Federal Register along with the annual salmon management measures. (3) A portion...The incidental catch fishery during the salmon troll fishery as authorized in...

  12. Control of mosquitoes in catch basins in Connecticut with Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis, Bacillus sphearicus, and Spinosad

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Catch basins are a major source of Culex pipiens pipiens, Cx. restuans, and Aedes japonicus in northeastern U.S. VectoBac CG®, VectoLex CG®, and VectoBac 12AS® applied at maximum label rates to catch basins in Stratford, CT on June 30 and July 28, 2008 significantly reduced numbers of larvae for on...

  13. Estimating insect flight densities from attractive trap catches and flight height distributions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insect species often exhibit a specific mean flight height and vertical flight distribution that approximates a normal distribution with a characteristic standard deviation (SD). Many studies in the literature report catches on passive (non-attractive) traps at several heights. These catches were us...

  14. Catch Efficiencies of Purse and Beach Seines in Ivory Coast Lagoons

    E-print Network

    Catch Efficiencies of Purse and Beach Seines in Ivory Coast Lagoons Emmanuel Charles-Dominique ABSTRACT: Catch efficiencies of two commonly used fishing gears. in Ivory Coast lagoons, purse seine fisheries are well developed in Ivory Coast lagoons, yielding from 10,000 to 20,000 tons of commercially

  15. Reductions in Child Obesity Among Disadvantaged School Children With Community Involvement: The Travis County CATCH Trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Deanna M. Hoelscher; Andrew E. Springer; Nalini Ranjit; Cheryl L. Perry; Alexandra E. Evans; Melissa Stigler; Steven H. Kelder

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the impact of two intervention approaches on the prevalence of child overweight and obesity: (i) Coordinated Approach To Child Health BasicPlus (CATCH BP), in which schools were provided evidence-based coordinated school health program training, materials, and facilitator support visits, and (ii) CATCH BP and Community (BPC), in which BP schools received additional

  16. Species-specific Analyses of Shark Catch Data from the Hawaii-based

    E-print Network

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Species-specific Analyses of Shark Catch Data from the Hawaii-based Longline Fishery, 1995 2006 soliciting sharks research in this fishery · Project requiring species-specific analyses of sharks period (1995 ­ 2006) affected magnitude, composition, and disposition of sharks catch #12;Background (2

  17. Standardization of catch and effort data in a spatially-structured shark fishery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    André E. Punt; Terence I. Walker; Bruce L. Taylor; Fred Pribac

    2000-01-01

    The methods used to develop catch rate based indices of relative abundance for the school shark Galeorhinus galeus resource off southern Australia are outlined. These methods are based on fitting generalized linear models to catch and effort data for several regions in this fishery. This is to take account of the multi-gear nature of the fishery and the spatial structure

  18. Squid Catches Resulting From Trawl Surveys off the Southeastern United States

    E-print Network

    Squid Catches Resulting From Trawl Surveys off the Southeastern United States J. DAVID WHITAKER Introduction The importance of the squid fishery off the northeastern United States has grown considerably since 1964 with re- cent squid catches by foreign fleets av- eraging 50,000 t (110,231 ,000 pounds

  19. Relationship of Sea Surface Temperature Isotherm Patterns off Northwestern Mexico to the Catch of Striped Marlin,

    E-print Network

    Relationship of Sea Surface Temperature Isotherm Patterns off Northwestern Mexico to the Catch the distribution of striped marlin and sea surface temperature. Many researchers have reviewed the migration. SST Climatology vs. Striped Marlin Catch Uda (1957) provided a range of sea surface temperatures

  20. Catches of Humpback Whales in the Southern Ocean, 1947-1973

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Phil Clapham; Yuri Mikhalev; Wally Franklin; David Paton; Scott Baker; Brownell Jr. Robert L

    2005-01-01

    We review catches of humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) in the Southern Ocean during the period following World War II, with an emphasis on Areas IV, V and VI (the principal regions of illegal Soviet whaling on this species). Where possible, we summarize legal and illegal Soviet catches by year, Area and factory fleet, and also include information on takes by

  1. 14 CFR 121.1113 - Fuel tank system maintenance program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...fuel tank system Instructions...auxiliary fuel tanks, if...returning an aircraft to service...for which fuel tank ICA...fuel tank system based on those...any later fuel tank system revisions...Bristol Aircraft...

  2. Cornell University's Online Aboveground Petroleum Tank Inspection Program

    E-print Network

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Cornell University's Online Aboveground Petroleum Tank Inspection Program How To's What is Cornell University's Online Aboveground Petroleum Tank Inspection Program? Cornell University's Online Aboveground Petroleum Tank Inspection Program enables assigned tank inspectors to record their monthly aboveground tank

  3. 49 CFR 179.400-16 - Access to inner tank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 2010-10-01 false Access to inner tank. 179.400-16 Section 179.400-16...MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

  4. 49 CFR 179.400-17 - Inner tank piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inner tank piping. 179.400-17 Section 179...MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

  5. 49 CFR 179.500-14 - Test of tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Test of tanks. 179.500-14 Section 179.500-14...MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

  6. 49 CFR 179.400-18 - Test of inner tank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Test of inner tank. 179.400-18 Section 179.400-18...MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

  7. Suspending Zeolite Particles In Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.R.

    1999-01-19

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is in the process of removing waste (sludge and salt cake) from million gallon waste tanks. The current practice for removing waste from the tanks is adding water, agitating the tanks with long shaft vertical centrifugal pumps, and pumping the sludge/salt solution from the tank to downstream treatment processes. This practice has left sludge heels ({tilde} 30,000 gallons) in the bottom of the tanks. SRS is evaluating shrouded axial impeller mixers for removing the sludge heels in the waste tanks. The authors conducted a test program to determine mixer requirements for suspending sludge heels using the shrouded axial impeller mixers. The tests were performed with zeolite in scaled tanks which have diameters of 1.5, 6.0, and 18.75 feet. The mixer speeds required to suspend zeolite particles were measured at each scale. The data were analyzed with various scaling methods to compare their ability to describe the suspension of insoluble solids with the mixers and to apply the data to a full-scale waste tank. The impact of changes in particle properties and operating parameters was also evaluated. The conclusions of the work are: Scaling of the suspension of fast settling zeolite particles was best described by the constant power per unit volume method. Increasing the zeolite particle concentration increased the required mixer power needed to suspend the particles. Decreasing the zeolite particle size from 0.7 mm ? 0.3 mm decreased the required mixer power needed to suspend the particles. Increasing the number of mixers in the tank decreased the required mixer power needed to suspend the particles. A velocity of 1.6 ft/sec two inches above the tank bottom is needed to suspend zeolite particles.

  8. 76 FR 65153 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Comprehensive Annual Catch Limit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-20

    ...annual catch limits (ACLs), allowable biological catch (ABC), ABC control rules, and accountability measures (AMs) for...Sargassum. The Comprehensive ACL Amendment proposes to specify ABC, and describe the current terminology and measures...

  9. 49 CFR 179.221 - Individual specification requirements applicable to tank car tanks consisting of an inner...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Individual specification requirements applicable to tank car tanks consisting of an inner container supported...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

  10. 49 CFR 179.200 - General specifications applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks (Class DOT-111).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...specifications applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks (Class DOT-111). 179.200 Section...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

  11. 49 CFR 179.200 - General specifications applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks (Class DOT-111).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...specifications applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks (Class DOT-111). 179.200 Section...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

  12. 49 CFR 179.221 - Individual specification requirements applicable to tank car tanks consisting of an inner...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Individual specification requirements applicable to tank car tanks consisting of an inner container supported...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

  13. 49 CFR 179.220 - General specifications applicable to nonpressure tank car tanks consisting of an inner container...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...General specifications applicable to nonpressure tank car tanks consisting of an inner container supported...MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

  14. 49 CFR 179.221 - Individual specification requirements applicable to tank car tanks consisting of an inner...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Individual specification requirements applicable to tank car tanks consisting of an inner container supported...MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

  15. 49 CFR 179.200 - General specifications applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks (Class DOT-111).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...specifications applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks (Class DOT-111). 179.200 Section...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

  16. 49 CFR 179.220 - General specifications applicable to nonpressure tank car tanks consisting of an inner container...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...General specifications applicable to nonpressure tank car tanks consisting of an inner container supported...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

  17. 49 CFR 179.221 - Individual specification requirements applicable to tank car tanks consisting of an inner...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Individual specification requirements applicable to tank car tanks consisting of an inner container supported...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

  18. 49 CFR 179.220 - General specifications applicable to nonpressure tank car tanks consisting of an inner container...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...General specifications applicable to nonpressure tank car tanks consisting of an inner container supported...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

  19. 49 CFR 179.220 - General specifications applicable to nonpressure tank car tanks consisting of an inner container...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...General specifications applicable to nonpressure tank car tanks consisting of an inner container supported...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

  20. 49 CFR 179.200 - General specifications applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks (Class DOT-111).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...specifications applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks (Class DOT-111). 179.200 Section...MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

  1. 49 CFR 179.200 - General specifications applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks (Class DOT-111).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...specifications applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks (Class DOT-111). 179.200 Section...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

  2. 49 CFR 179.220 - General specifications applicable to nonpressure tank car tanks consisting of an inner container...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...General specifications applicable to nonpressure tank car tanks consisting of an inner container supported...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

  3. 49 CFR 179.221 - Individual specification requirements applicable to tank car tanks consisting of an inner...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Individual specification requirements applicable to tank car tanks consisting of an inner container supported...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

  4. 40 CFR 280.220 - Ownership of an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system or facility or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Ownership of an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system or facility or property on which an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system...OPERATORS OF UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS (UST) Lender Liability...

  5. Catch trials in force field learning influence adaptation and consolidation of human motor memory

    PubMed Central

    Stockinger, Christian; Focke, Anne; Stein, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Force field studies are a common tool to investigate motor adaptation and consolidation. Thereby, subjects usually adapt their reaching movements to force field perturbations induced by a robotic device. In this context, so-called catch trials, in which the disturbing forces are randomly turned off, are commonly used to detect after-effects of motor adaptation. However, catch trials also produce sudden large motor errors that might influence the motor adaptation and the consolidation process. Yet, the detailed influence of catch trials is far from clear. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the influence of catch trials on motor adaptation and consolidation in force field experiments. Therefore, 105 subjects adapted their reaching movements to robot-generated force fields. The test groups adapted their reaching movements to a force field A followed by learning a second interfering force field B before retest of A (ABA). The control groups were not exposed to force field B (AA). To examine the influence of diverse catch trial ratios, subjects received catch trials during force field adaptation with a probability of either 0, 10, 20, 30, or 40%, depending on the group. First, the results on motor adaptation revealed significant differences between the diverse catch trial ratio groups. With increasing amount of catch trials, the subjects' motor performance decreased and subjects' ability to accurately predict the force field—and therefore internal model formation—was impaired. Second, our results revealed that adapting with catch trials can influence the following consolidation process as indicated by a partial reduction to interference. Here, the optimal catch trial ratio was 30%. However, detection of consolidation seems to be biased by the applied measure of performance. PMID:24795598

  6. Catch trials in force field learning influence adaptation and consolidation of human motor memory.

    PubMed

    Stockinger, Christian; Focke, Anne; Stein, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Force field studies are a common tool to investigate motor adaptation and consolidation. Thereby, subjects usually adapt their reaching movements to force field perturbations induced by a robotic device. In this context, so-called catch trials, in which the disturbing forces are randomly turned off, are commonly used to detect after-effects of motor adaptation. However, catch trials also produce sudden large motor errors that might influence the motor adaptation and the consolidation process. Yet, the detailed influence of catch trials is far from clear. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the influence of catch trials on motor adaptation and consolidation in force field experiments. Therefore, 105 subjects adapted their reaching movements to robot-generated force fields. The test groups adapted their reaching movements to a force field A followed by learning a second interfering force field B before retest of A (ABA). The control groups were not exposed to force field B (AA). To examine the influence of diverse catch trial ratios, subjects received catch trials during force field adaptation with a probability of either 0, 10, 20, 30, or 40%, depending on the group. First, the results on motor adaptation revealed significant differences between the diverse catch trial ratio groups. With increasing amount of catch trials, the subjects' motor performance decreased and subjects' ability to accurately predict the force field-and therefore internal model formation-was impaired. Second, our results revealed that adapting with catch trials can influence the following consolidation process as indicated by a partial reduction to interference. Here, the optimal catch trial ratio was 30%. However, detection of consolidation seems to be biased by the applied measure of performance. PMID:24795598

  7. Sloshing impact in roofed tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Uras, R.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Reactor Engineering Div.

    1995-12-31

    A large number of high-level waste (HLW) storage tanks exists in various tank farms. Seismic activities at those locations may cause significant sloshing in HLW tanks. These tanks are covered to avoid any spilling during large amplitude earthquakes. However, large amplitude sloshing may result in impact on the cover or the roof of the tank. Hence, a better understanding of the impact phenomenon is necessary to assess the safety of the tanks currently in existence, and to establish design guidelines for future designs. A pressure based formulation is derived to model sloshing impact in roofed tanks. It is incorporated into Argonne`s in-house finite element code FLUSTR-ANL. A numerical test case with a harmonic input excitation is studied. The simulation results indicate that linear behavior is preserved beyond the first impact, and some mesh distortion is observed following a stronger second impact. During the impact, the displacement of the contacting surface nodes remains constant, and the velocities are reduced to zero. An identification of impacting nodes is possible from the dynamic pressures induced in surface elements.

  8. Sloshing impact in roofed tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Uras, R.A.

    1995-07-01

    A large number of high-level waste (HLW) storage tanks exists in various tank farms. Seismic activities at those locations may cause significant sloshing in HLW tanks. These tanks are covered to avoid any spilling during large amplitude earthquakes. However, large amplitude sloshing may result in impact on the cover or the roof of the tank. Hence, a better understanding of the impact phenomenon is necessary to assess the safety of the tanks currently in existence, and to establish design guidelines for future designs. A pressure based formulation is derived to model sloshing impact in roared tanks. It is incorporated into Argonne`s in-house finite element code FLUSTR-ANL. A numerical test case with a harmonic input excitation is studied. The simulation results indicate that linear behavior is preserved beyond the first impact, and some mesh distortion is observed following a stronger second impact. During the impact, the displacement of the contacting surface nodes remains constant, and the velocities are reduced to zero. An identification of impacting nodes is possible from the dynamic pressures induced in surface elements.

  9. 76 FR 80266 - Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod for Processing by the Inshore Component of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-23

    ...vessels catching Pacific cod for processing by the inshore component in...vessels catching Pacific cod for processing by the inshore component in...will be accepted in Microsoft Word or Excel, WordPerfect, or...vessels catching Pacific cod for processing by the inshore component...

  10. International Snow Science Workshop Grenoble -Chamonix Mont-Blanc -2013 Influence of upstream catching dam slope on powder avalanche

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    catching dam slope on powder avalanche Caccamo P. , Naaim-Bouvet F. and Faug T. ABSTRACT: The influence was studied. Both of the obstacles represent a catching dam, one with a vertical uphill face (OBS1 of protection effectiveness, laboratory tests showed that a catching dam with the upstream face vertical

  11. Biomass and energy production of catch crops in areas with deficiency of precipitation during summer period in central Bohemia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. Brant; J. Pivec; P. Fuksa; K. Necká?; D. Kocourková; V. Venclová

    2011-01-01

    The biomass production dynamics of catch crops, volunteers and weeds in dependence on precipitation and air temperature, was studied in central Bohemia from 2004 to 2006. The cover of individual components of the growth was monitored during the same period. Also measured were energy and efficiency of utilization of global radiation by catch crops and volunteers. The catch crops included

  12. 76 FR 55343 - Pacific Halibut Fisheries; Extension of Public Comment Period on Proposed Rule for a Catch...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ...on Proposed Rule for a Catch Sharing Plan for Guided Sport and Commercial...regulations to implement a catch sharing plan for the guided sport and...or Adobe portable document file (pdf) formats only. Written...that would implement a catch sharing plan for the guided sport...

  13. 78 FR 44920 - Pacific Halibut Fisheries; Catch Sharing Plan for Guided Sport and Commercial Fisheries in Alaska...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-25

    ...Pacific Halibut Fisheries; Catch Sharing Plan for Guided Sport and Commercial...regulations to implement a catch sharing plan for the guided sport and...Word, Excel, or Adobe PDF file formats only. Electronic copies...that would implement a catch sharing plan for the guided sport...

  14. 50 CFR 300.209 - Alternative procedures for nations identified as having vessels engaged in shark catch that are...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...identified as having vessels engaged in shark catch that are not certified in this subpart...identified as having vessels engaged in shark catch that are not certified in this subpart...that do not target or incidentally catch sharks, or were harvested by practices...

  15. 50 CFR 300.209 - Alternative procedures for nations identified as having vessels engaged in shark catch that are...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...identified as having vessels engaged in shark catch that are not certified in this subpart...identified as having vessels engaged in shark catch that are not certified in this subpart...that do not target or incidentally catch sharks, or were harvested by practices...

  16. Stabilization of in-tank residual wastes and external-tank soil contamination for the tank focus area, Hanford tank initiative: Applications to the AX Tank Farm

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. D. Balsley; J. L. Krumhansl; D. J. Borns; R. G. McKeen

    1998-01-01

    A combined engineering and geochemistry approach is recommended for the stabilization of waste in decommissioned tanks and contaminated soils at the AX Tank Farm, Hanford, WA. A two-part strategy of desiccation and gettering is proposed for treatment of the in-tank residual wastes. Dry portland cement and\\/or fly ash are suggested as an effective and low-cost desiccant for wicking excess moisture

  17. Noncovalent catch and release of carboxylates in water.

    PubMed

    Beck, Christie L; Winter, Arthur H

    2014-04-01

    Association constants of a bis-(acetylguanidinium)ferrocene dication to various (di)carboxylates were determined through UV-vis titrations. Association constant values greater than 10(4) M(-1) were determined for both phthalate and maleate carboxylates to the bis-(acetylguanidinium)ferrocene salt in pure water. Density functional theory computations of the binding enthalpy of the rigid carboxylates for these complexes agree well with the experimentally determined association constants. Catch and release competitive binding experiments were done by NMR for the cation-carboxylate ion-pair complexes with cucurbit[7]uril, and they show dissociation of the ion-pair complex upon addition of cucurbit[7]uril and release of the free (di)carboxylate. PMID:24605882

  18. Tank 241-AP-107 tank characterization plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, R.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-01-20

    Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has directed the DOE to concentrate ear-term sampling and analysis activities on identification and resolution of issues (Conway 1993). The Data Quality Objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used in the resolution of safety issues. As a result, a revision in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestone M-44-00 has been made, which states that ``A Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) will be developed for each double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process; Development of TCPs by the DQO process is intended to allow users (e.g., Hanford Facility user groups, regulators) to ensure their needs will be met and that resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information.`` This document satisfies that requirement for the tank 241-AP-107 (AP-107).

  19. Tank vapor mitigation requirements for Hanford Tank Farms

    SciTech Connect

    Rakestraw, L.D.

    1994-11-15

    Westinghouse Hanford Company has contracted Los Alamos Technical Associates to listing of vapors and aerosols that are or may be emitted from the High Level Waste (HLW) tanks at Hanford. Mitigation requirements under Federal and State law, as well as DOE Orders, are included in the listing. The lists will be used to support permitting activities relative to tank farm ventilation system up-grades. This task is designated Task 108 under MJB-SWV-312057 and is an extension of efforts begun under Task 53 of Purchase Order MPB-SVV-03291 5 for Mechanical Engineering Support. The results of that task, which covered only thirty-nine tanks, are repeated here to provide a single source document for vapor mitigation requirements for all 177 HLW tanks.

  20. Tank characterization report for single-shell Tank B-201

    SciTech Connect

    Heasler, P.G.; Remund, K.M.; Tingey, J.M.; Baird, D.B.; Ryan, F.M.

    1994-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to characterize the waste in single shell Tank B-201. Characterization includes the determination of the physical, chemical (e.g., concentrations of elements and organic species), and radiological properties of the waste. These determinations are made using analytical results from B-201 core samples as well as historical information about the tank. The main objective is to determine average waste properties: but in some cases, concentrations of analytes as a function of depth were also determined. This report also consolidates the available historical information regarding Tank B-201, arranges the analytical information from the recent core sampling in a useful format, and provides an interpretation of the data within the context of what is known about the tank.

  1. Tank characterization report for single shell tank 241-SX-108

    SciTech Connect

    Eggers, R.F., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-11

    This document summarizes the information on the historical uses, present status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste stored in tank 241-SX-108. This report supports the requirements of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-44-09.

  2. Thermal Protection Standards for Railroad Tank Cars

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carlos J. Hilado; Diana P. Brauer

    1978-01-01

    As a result of a series of serious railroad accidents involv ing certain uninsulated pressure tank cars transporting hazardous materials, the specifications for railroad tank cars were amended in the interest of safety. Specification 112 and 114 tank cars used to transport flammable gases such as propane, butane, and vinyl chloride are required to have both thermal and tank head

  3. 7 CFR 58.218 - Surge tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...218 Surge tanks. If surge tanks are used for hot milk, and temperatures...including foam being held in the surge tank during processing, is not maintained at a minimum of 150 °F, then two or more surge tanks shall be installed with cross...

  4. 7 CFR 58.218 - Surge tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...218 Surge tanks. If surge tanks are used for hot milk, and temperatures...including foam being held in the surge tank during processing, is not maintained at a minimum of 150 °F, then two or more surge tanks shall be installed with cross...

  5. 7 CFR 58.218 - Surge tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...218 Surge tanks. If surge tanks are used for hot milk, and temperatures...including foam being held in the surge tank during processing, is not maintained at a minimum of 150 °F, then two or more surge tanks shall be installed with cross...

  6. 7 CFR 58.218 - Surge tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...218 Surge tanks. If surge tanks are used for hot milk, and temperatures...including foam being held in the surge tank during processing, is not maintained at a minimum of 150 °F, then two or more surge tanks shall be installed with cross...

  7. 7 CFR 58.218 - Surge tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...218 Surge tanks. If surge tanks are used for hot milk, and temperatures...including foam being held in the surge tank during processing, is not maintained at a minimum of 150 °F, then two or more surge tanks shall be installed with cross...

  8. Space Shuttle external tank rocket engine addition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Hetzel

    1983-01-01

    An addition to the external tank of the Space Transportation System which will put the now nonrecoverable tank into orbit for eventual reuse is described. The addition will house a rocket engine and all of its support equipment in an aluminum tank attached to the bottom of the external tank. The engine will not be active during the liftoff phase,

  9. CHARACTERIZATION OF TANK 17 RESIDUAL WASTE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P DEntremont; T Thomas Caldwell

    1997-01-01

    Plans are to close Tank 17, a type IV waste tank in the F-area Tank Farm, by filling it with pumpable backfills. Most of the waste was removed from the tank in the late 1980s, and the remainder of the waste was removed in a short spray washing campaign that began on 11 April 1997. More details on the planned

  10. Stabilization of in-tank residual wastes and external-tank soil contamination for the tank focus area, Hanford tank initiative: Applications to the AX Tank Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Balsley, S.D.; Krumhansl, J.L.; Borns, D.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); McKeen, R.G. [Alliance for Transportation Research, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-07-01

    A combined engineering and geochemistry approach is recommended for the stabilization of waste in decommissioned tanks and contaminated soils at the AX Tank Farm, Hanford, WA. A two-part strategy of desiccation and gettering is proposed for treatment of the in-tank residual wastes. Dry portland cement and/or fly ash are suggested as an effective and low-cost desiccant for wicking excess moisture from the upper waste layer. Getters work by either ion exchange or phase precipitation to reduce radionuclide concentrations in solution. The authors recommend the use of specific natural and man-made compounds, appropriately proportioned to the unique inventory of each tank. A filler design consisting of multilayered cementitous grout with interlayered sealant horizons should serve to maintain tank integrity and minimize fluid transport to the residual waste form. External tank soil contamination is best mitigated by placement of grouted skirts under and around each tank, together with installation of a cone-shaped permeable reactive barrier beneath the entire tank farm. Actinide release rates are calculated from four tank closure scenarios ranging from no action to a comprehensive stabilization treatment plan (desiccant/getters/grouting/RCRA cap). Although preliminary, these calculations indicate significant reductions in the potential for actinide transport as compared to the no-treatment option.

  11. Children's one-hand catching as a function of age, gender, and ball location.

    PubMed

    Fischman, M G; Moore, J B; Steele, K H

    1992-12-01

    A sizable body of literature exists on the product characteristics and developmental sequence for two-hand catching, but to date there is no description of the developmental characteristics of simple one-hand catching in young children. This study investigated the influence of age, gender, and ball location on children's one-hand catching. Boys and girls (N = 240) ranging in age from 5 to 12 years attempted to catch a total of 24 tennis balls, tossed from a 9-ft distance. Tosses were directed to four locations: (a) Waist, (b) Shoulder, (c) Above-the-Head, and (d) Out-to-the-Side. Descriptive data consisted of the percentage of successful catches at each ball location, and the hand-arm orientation selected by the child as a function of ball location. Results revealed that catching performance improved with age, boys caught more balls than girls, ball location influenced catching success, and, in general, the location of the toss constrained the child's selection of an appropriate hand-arm orientation. With the possible exception of the Shoulder location for girls, even very young children are sensitive to the perceptual aspects of the toss and respond with an appropriate orientation. PMID:1439158

  12. Evaluation of nontarget effects of methoprene applied to catch basins for mosquito control

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butler, M.; Ginsberg, H.S.; LeBrun, R.A.; Gettman, A.

    2010-01-01

    The mosquito larvicide methoprene is a juvenile growth hormone mimic that is widely used to control mosquito larvae in stormwater catch basins. This study addresses two concerns pertaining to methoprene's use for mosquito control. First, measurements of methoprene concentrations were made from water in catch basins that had been treated with methoprene and from an adjoining salt pond near where the treated catch basins emptied. The concentrations of methoprene in catch basins and at drainage outlets after application at the rates currently used for mosquito control in southern Rhode Island were 0.5 ppb and lower, orders of magnitude below what has been determined as detrimental to organisms other than mosquitoes. Second, the effects of methoprene on the communities that live in catch basins were evaluated both in simulated catch basins in the laboratory and in actual catch basins in the field. We found no evidence of declines in abundances of any taxa attributable to the application. Furthermore, we found no consistent changes in community-level parameters (e.g., taxonomic richness, and dominance-diversity relationships) related to methoprene application in either field or laboratory trials. ?? 2010 The Society for Vector Ecology.

  13. Evaluation of nontarget effects of methoprene applied to catch basins for mosquito control

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butler, Mari; Ginsberg, Howard S.; LeBrun, Roger A.; Gettman, Alan

    2010-01-01

    The mosquito larvicide methoprene is a juvenile growth hormone mimic that is widely used to control mosquito larvae in stormwater catch basins. This study addresses two concerns pertaining to methoprene's use for mosquito control. First, measurements of methoprene concentrations were made from water in catch basins that had been treated with methoprene and from an adjoining salt pond near where the treated catch basins emptied. The concentrations of methoprene in catch basins and at drainage outlets after application at the rates currently used for mosquito control in southern Rhode Island were 0.5 ppb and lower, orders of magnitude below what has been determined as detrimental to organisms other than mosquitoes. Second, the effects of methoprene on the communities that live in catch basins were evaluated both in simulated catch basins in the laboratory and in actual catch basins in the field. We found no evidence of declines in abundances of any taxa attributable to the application. Furthermore, we found no consistent changes in community-level parameters (e.g., taxonomic richness, and dominance-diversity relationships) related to methoprene application in either field or laboratory trials.

  14. Tank 48 Chemical Destruction - 13237

    SciTech Connect

    Simner, Steven P.; Aponte, Celia I.; Brass, Earl A. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC, Savannah River Remediation, Savannah River Site, Building 766-H, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation, LLC, Savannah River Remediation, Savannah River Site, Building 766-H, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Small tank copper-catalyzed peroxide oxidation (CCPO) is a potentially viable technology to facilitate the destruction of tetraphenylborate (TPB) organic solids contained within the Tank 48H waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS). A maturation strategy was created that identified a number of near-term development activities required to determine the viability of the CCPO process, and subsequent disposition of the CCPO effluent. Critical activities included laboratory scale validation of the process and identification of forward transfer paths for the CCPO effluent. The technical documentation and the successful application of the CCPO process on simulated Tank 48 waste confirm that the CCPO process is a viable process for the disposition of the Tank 48 contents. (authors)

  15. Tight-budget tank inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.A.

    1997-04-01

    To assure reliability of above ground storage tanks (ASTs), the American Petroleum Institute (API) established API Standard 653. Adherence to this provides both environmental protection and stored product protection. Implementing every aspect of API 653 at a particular storage tank isn`t easy. Periodically carrying out all three types of required inspections can be expensive. Many tank storage facilities comply by turning the inspection job over to contractors. A contractor`s rigorous adherence to what is perceived necessary to meet the standard`s requirements can be costly and time consuming. Conversely, response to API 653`s formal external inspection (FEI) requirement by briefly walking around a tank taking minor notes clearly violates the purpose of this safety standard. An easy, quick and cost-effective approach between these extremes, the expedited external inspection (EEI), has been developed. The approach is discussed.

  16. A sampling device for the fauna of storm water catch basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butler, M.; Casagrande, R.; LeBrun, R.; Ginsberg, H.; Gettman, A.

    2007-01-01

    Storm water drainage catch basins provide habitat to a variety of different aquatic organisms including arthropods, molluscs and annelid worms. Arthropods such as mosquitoes are known to use these environments as larval habitat. Because of health concerns, catch basins are often targeted for mosquito control exposing all inhabitants to pesticides such as methoprene or BTI. In this paper we describe a sampler that we used to evaluate catch basin communities in southern Rhode Island over a six month period. We also examine its efficacy and consistency. We found that the sampler effectively estimated organism abundances.

  17. 33 CFR 157.208 - Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks Operations Manual for foreign tank vessels: Submission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks Operations Manual...208 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT...CARRYING OIL IN BULK Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks on Tank...

  18. 33 CFR 157.208 - Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks Operations Manual for foreign tank vessels: Submission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks Operations Manual...208 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT...CARRYING OIL IN BULK Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks on Tank...

  19. 33 CFR 157.208 - Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks Operations Manual for foreign tank vessels: Submission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks Operations Manual...208 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT...CARRYING OIL IN BULK Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks on Tank...

  20. Stabilization of in-tank residual wastes and external-tank soil contamination for the tank focus area, Hanford Tank Initiative: Applications to the AX tank farm

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1997-01-01

    This report investigates five technical areas for stabilization of decommissioned waste tanks and contaminated soils at the Hanford Site AX Farm. The investigations are part of a preliminary evacuation of end-state options for closure of the AX Tanks. The five technical areas investigated are: (1) emplacement of cementations grouts and\\/or other materials; (2) injection of chemicals into contaminated soils surrounding

  1. Modeling the impact of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine serotype catch-up program using United States claims data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Analysis of US claims data from April 2010 to June 2011 estimated that 39% of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) catch-up eligible cohort would ever receive the catch-up vaccination; a previous analysis assumed 87%. Methods This updated figure was applied to a previously published 10-year Markov model while holding all other inputs constant. Results Our model estimated that the catch-up program as currently implemented is estimated to prevent an additional 1.7 million cases of disease in children aged ?59?months over a 10-year period, compared with routine PCV13 vaccination with no catch-up program. Conclusions Because 39% catch-up uptake is less than the level of completion of the 4-dose primary PCV13 series, vaccine-preventable cases of pneumococcal disease and related deaths could be decreased further with additional uptake of catch-up vaccination in the catch-up eligible cohort. PMID:22863074

  2. Stabilization of in-tank residual wastes and external-tank soil contamination for the tank focus area, Hanford Tank Initiative: Applications to the AX tank farm

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, D.L.

    1997-11-03

    This report investigates five technical areas for stabilization of decommissioned waste tanks and contaminated soils at the Hanford Site AX Farm. The investigations are part of a preliminary evacuation of end-state options for closure of the AX Tanks. The five technical areas investigated are: (1) emplacement of cementations grouts and/or other materials; (2) injection of chemicals into contaminated soils surrounding tanks (soil mixing); (3) emplacement of grout barriers under and around the tanks; (4) the explicit recognition that natural attenuation processes do occur; and (5) combined geochemical and hydrological modeling. Research topics are identified in support of key areas of technical uncertainty, in each of the five areas. Detailed cost-benefit analyses of the technologies are not provided. This investigation was conducted by Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, during FY 1997 by tank Focus Area (EM-50) funding.

  3. ROBOTIC TANK INSPECTION END EFFECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Rachel Landry

    1999-10-01

    The objective of this contract between Oceaneering Space Systems (OSS) and the Department of Energy (DOE) was to provide a tool for the DOE to inspect the inside tank walls of underground radioactive waste storage tanks in their tank farms. Some of these tanks are suspected to have leaks, but the harsh nature of the environment within the tanks precludes human inspection of tank walls. As a result of these conditions only a few inspection methods can fulfill this task. Of the methods available, OSS chose to pursue Alternating Current Field Measurement (ACFM), because it does not require clean surfaces for inspection, nor any contact with the Surface being inspected, and introduces no extra by-products in the inspection process (no coupling fluids or residues are left behind). The tool produced by OSS is the Robotic Tank Inspection End Effector (RTIEE), which is initially deployed on the tip of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA). The RTEE combines ACFM with a color video camera for both electromagnetic and visual inspection The complete package consists of an end effector, its corresponding electronics and software, and a user's manual to guide the operator through an inspection. The system has both coarse and fine inspection modes and allows the user to catalog defects and suspected areas of leakage in a database for further examination, which may lead to emptying the tank for repair, decommissioning, etc.. The following is an updated report to OSS document OSS-21100-7002, which was submitted in 1995. During the course of the contract, two related subtasks arose, the Wall and Coating Thickness Sensor and the Vacuum Scarifying and Sampling Tool Assembly. The first of these subtasks was intended to evaluate the corrosion and wall thinning of 55-gallon steel drums. The second was retrieved and characterized the waste material trapped inside the annulus region of the underground tanks on the DOE's tank farms. While these subtasks were derived from the original intent of the contract, the focus remains on the RTIEE.

  4. 241-AY-101 Tank Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Travis J.; Gunter, Jason R.

    2013-08-26

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for tank 241-AY-101. The construction history of tank 241-AY-101 has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In tank 241-AY-101, the second double-shell tank constructed, similar issues as those with tank 241-AY-102 construction reoccurred. The overall extent of similary and affect on tank 241-AY-101 integrity is described herein.

  5. 241-AP Tank Farm Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Travis J.; Gunter, Jason R.; Reeploeg, Gretchen E.

    2014-04-04

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for the 241-AP tank farm. The construction history of the 241-AP tank farm has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In the 241-AP tank farm, the sixth double-shell tank farm constructed, tank bottom flatness, refractory material quality, post-weld stress relieving, and primary tank bottom weld rejection were improved.

  6. Auxiliary resonant DC tank converter

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Fang Z. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01

    An auxiliary resonant dc tank (ARDCT) converter is provided for achieving soft-switching in a power converter. An ARDCT circuit is coupled directly across a dc bus to the inverter to generate a resonant dc bus voltage, including upper and lower resonant capacitors connected in series as a resonant leg, first and second dc tank capacitors connected in series as a tank leg, and an auxiliary resonant circuit comprising a series combination of a resonant inductor and a pair of auxiliary switching devices. The ARDCT circuit further includes first clamping means for holding the resonant dc bus voltage to the dc tank voltage of the tank leg, and second clamping means for clamping the resonant dc bus voltage to zero during a resonant period. The ARDCT circuit resonantly brings the dc bus voltage to zero in order to provide a zero-voltage switching opportunity for the inverter, then quickly rebounds the dc bus voltage back to the dc tank voltage after the inverter changes state. The auxiliary switching devices are turned on and off under zero-current conditions. The ARDCT circuit only absorbs ripples of the inverter dc bus current, thus having less current stress. In addition, since the ARDCT circuit is coupled in parallel with the dc power supply and the inverter for merely assisting soft-switching of the inverter without participating in real dc power transmission and power conversion, malfunction and failure of the tank circuit will not affect the functional operation of the inverter; thus a highly reliable converter system is expected.

  7. 76 FR 37285 - Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Mechanism for Specifying Annual Catch Limits and Accountability...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-27

    ...rule establishes the procedures and timing for specifying annual catch limits...participates, or for species with life cycles of approximately one year. ACLs and...this section. (e) Procedures and timing. (1) No later than 60 days...

  8. 30 CFR 75.1400-2 - Hoists; tests of safety catches; records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Hoists; tests of safety catches; records. 75.1400-2 ...1400-2 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY...

  9. 30 CFR 75.1400-2 - Hoists; tests of safety catches; records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Hoists; tests of safety catches; records. 75.1400-2 ...1400-2 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY...

  10. 36 CFR 13.908 - Fishing limit of catch and in possession.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park and Preserve General Provisions § 13.908 Fishing limit of catch and in possession. The limit of...

  11. 36 CFR 13.908 - Fishing limit of catch and in possession.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park and Preserve General Provisions § 13.908 Fishing limit of catch and in possession. The limit of...

  12. 36 CFR 13.908 - Fishing limit of catch and in possession.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park and Preserve General Provisions § 13.908 Fishing limit of catch and in possession. The limit of...

  13. 36 CFR 13.908 - Fishing limit of catch and in possession.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park and Preserve General Provisions § 13.908 Fishing limit of catch and in possession. The limit of...

  14. 36 CFR 13.908 - Fishing limit of catch and in possession.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park and Preserve General Provisions § 13.908 Fishing limit of catch and in possession. The limit of...

  15. 75 FR 69014 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Total Allowable Catch...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    ...Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Total Allowable Catch Harvested...limit reduction in Area 1A of the Atlantic Herring Fishery...2,000 lb (907.2 kg) of Atlantic herring (herring), per trip or calendar...

  16. Researchers develop new search tool to help fight child porn, catch cyber

    E-print Network

    Fung, Benjamin C. M.

    Researchers develop new search tool to help fight child porn, catch cyber thieves Canada Standard a comment... Post to Facebook 0 0 New #12;Researchers develop new search tool to help fight child porn

  17. Tank 241-TX-302C grab samples 302C-TX-97-1A through 302C-TX-97-3B analytical results for the final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Esch

    1998-01-01

    This document is the final report for tank 241-TX-302C grab samples. Six grabs samples (302C-TX-97-1A, 302C-TX-97-1B, 302C-TX-97-2A, 302C-TX-97-2B, 302C-TX-97-3A, and 302C-TX-97-3B) were collected from the catch tank level gauge riser on December 19, 1997. The ``A`` and ``B`` portions from each sample location were composited and analyses were performed on the composites in accordance with the Compatibility Grab Sampling and

  18. Effects of Catch-and-Release Angling on Salmonids at Elevated Water Temperatures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James W. Boyd; Christopher S. Guy; Travis B. Horton; Stephen A. Leathe

    2010-01-01

    Few studies have assessed catch-and-release mortality of salmonids at water temperatures of 23°C or above, despite predictions of warming stream temperatures due to climate change. The primary objective of this study was to measure the catch-and-release mortality of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, brown trout Salmo trutta, and mountain whitefish Prosopium williamsoni in three water temperature treatments, namely, when daily maximum

  19. Combining Telephone Surveys and Fishing Catches Self-Report: The French Sea Bass Recreational Fishery Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Rocklin, Delphine; Levrel, Harold; Drogou, Mickaël; Herfaut, Johanna; Veron, Gérard

    2014-01-01

    Fisheries statistics are known to be underestimated, since they are mainly based on information about commercial fisheries. However, various types of fishing activities exist and evaluating them is necessary for implementing effective management plans. This paper assesses the characteristics and catches of the French European sea bass recreational fishery along the Atlantic coasts, through the combination of large-scale telephone surveys and fishing diaries study. Our results demonstrated that half of the total catches (mainly small fish) were released at sea and that the mean length of a kept sea bass was 46.6 cm. We highlighted different patterns of fishing methods and type of gear used. Catches from boats were greater than from the shore, both in abundance and biomass, considering mean values per fishing trip as well as CPUE. Spearfishers caught the highest biomass of sea bass per fishing trip, but the fishing rod with lure was the most effective type of gear in terms of CPUE. Longlines had the highest CPUE value in abundance but not in biomass: they caught numerous but small sea bass. Handlines were less effective, catching few sea bass in both abundance and biomass. We estimated that the annual total recreational sea bass catches was 3,173 tonnes of which 2,345 tonnes were kept. Since the annual commercial catches landings were evaluated at 5,160 tonnes, recreational landings represent 30% of the total fishing catches on the Atlantic coasts of France. Using fishers' self-reports was a valuable way to obtain new information on data-poor fisheries. Our results underline the importance of evaluating recreational fishing as a part of the total amount of fisheries catches. More studies are critically needed to assess overall fish resources caught in order to develop effective fishery management tools. PMID:24489885

  20. Is catch-and-release recreational angling compatible with no-take marine protected areas?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven J. Cooke; Andy J. Danylchuk; Sascha E. Danylchuk; Cory D. Suski; Tony L. Goldberg

    2006-01-01

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) have become a common conservation and management tool for reducing exploitation from the commercial and recreational fisheries sectors. However, the recreational fisheries sector has the potential to be compatible with no-take MPAs when catch-and-release angling is practiced because, in theory, no fish are actually harvested. This presumes that the effects of catch-and-release angling and related activities

  1. N-catch crops affect soil profile nitrate-N accumulation during vegetable cultivation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yanzhi Ji; Xiaotang Ju; Wanzhong Feng; Lijuan Zhang; Shuqing Liu

    2011-01-01

    To reduce nitrate leaching, the effects of three N-catch crops of sweet corn (Zea mays L.), amaranth (Amaranthus spp.), and sweet sorghum (Sorghum Linn.) on nitrate-N accumulation in the soil profile were examined using an incubation experiment. Results showed that the\\u000a biomass and N absorbed by sweet corn were the largest compared with the other two N-catch crop treatments. Root

  2. Incidence of Sport Fishes in the Commercial Fish Catch from Kentucky Lake, Kentucky and Tennessee

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tom J. Timmons; Tim Hoffnagle; R. Scott Hale; John B. Soldo

    1989-01-01

    On-board observers accompanied commercial fishermen on Kentucky Lake and recorded the occurrences of sport fishes in gill-net, bait-line, and hoop-net catches. Sport fishes constituted 0.5% of the total catch on bait lines, 0.1% in hoop nets, and 3.9% in gill nets. The most common incidental sport species caught were freshwater drum Aplodinotus grunniens and small yellow bass Morone mississippiensis on

  3. High Level Waste Tank Gamma Profiling paper

    SciTech Connect

    FRANK, MOORE

    2005-01-24

    Cleanup at the Savannah River Site brings with it the need to clean out and close down the radioactive waste tanks constructed in support of the fuel rod dissolution process. An innovative technique for assaying waste tanks has been developed at the Savannah River Site. The technique uses a gamma detector in the annular space between the inner and outer tank walls of double walled tanks. Unique shielding, counting electronics, and deployment techniques were developed. The system provides information to facilitate mapping interstitial liquid levels, sludge layers and other structures in the waste tank located near the tank walls. The techniques used, results, and lessons learned will be discussed.

  4. Lightweight Tanks for Storing Liquefied Natural Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Single-walled, jacketed aluminum tanks have been conceived for storing liquefied natural gas (LNG) in LNG-fueled motor vehicles. Heretofore, doublewall steel tanks with vacuum between the inner and outer walls have been used for storing LNG. In comparison with the vacuum- insulated steel tanks, the jacketed aluminum tanks weigh less and can be manufactured at lower cost. Costs of using the jacketed aluminum tanks are further reduced in that there is no need for the vacuum pumps heretofore needed to maintain vacuum in the vacuum-insulated tanks.

  5. [Preparation of a spread from shrimp by-catch fish].

    PubMed

    Sena, C; Bello, R A

    1988-12-01

    The composition of shrimp by-catch fish from the Central-Western region of Venezuela at different periods of the year was studied, as well as mean size and weight of same, and the yields obtained during processing, until the edible portion (pulp) was reached. The pulp was also analyzed from the physical, chemical and microbiological (pH, basic volatile N, trimethylamine, thiobarbituric acid test, moisture, fat, protein, ashes content and mesophyll and psychrophilic counts) points of view. The purpose of these studies was to determine its quality and freshness, since said pulp was utilized for the preparation of a canned and sterilized bread spread. Results obtained indicated the pulp to have an acceptable freshness, a fact which reflected in a final product with adequate characteristics. The bread spread was also analyzed from the physical, chemical, microbiological and sensory viewpoints (objective analyses of color and texture, pH, rancidity and sterility tests, moisture, fat protein, ashes, carbohydrates, sodium chloride contents, and sensory evaluation). In addition, these analyses were repeated monthly during the three-month storage period at two temperatures. On the basis of the above-mentioned findings, it was possible to determine that the bread spread had adequate acceptability and stability during storage. Furthermore, raw material variations did not affect the final product characteristics, which resulted in a product with commercial potential. PMID:3154297

  6. Catching the therapeutic window of opportunity in early Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Danese, Silvio; Fiorino, Gionata; Fernandes, Carlos; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laureal

    2014-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic, disabling, progressive and destructive disease. The general goal of conventional step-up strategy in CD treatment is to treat and control symptoms. This strategy did not change the disease course and is now being replaced with a treat-to-target approach. Achieving deep remission (clinical remission and absence of mucosal ulcerations) is the target in CD in 2014. Inducing and maintaining deep remission is needed to prevent long-term outcomes such as bowel damage and disability in CD. Diagnostic delay is a common issue in CD and is associated with an increased risk of bowel damage over time. Identification of poor prognostic factors, risk stratification together with the development of "red flags" may result in early intervention with disease-modifying agents such as anti-TNF agents with the final aim of preventing overtreatment and avoiding undertreatment. Similar to rheumatoid arthritis, by catching the therapeutic window of opportunity in early CD and achieving deep remission, this could be the best way to change disease course (hospitalizations, surgeries, bowel damage, and disability) and patients' life. PMID:25198784

  7. Tank Waste Disposal Program redefinition

    SciTech Connect

    Grygiel, M.L.; Augustine, C.A.; Cahill, M.A.; Garfield, J.S.; Johnson, M.E.; Kupfer, M.J.; Meyer, G.A.; Roecker, J.H. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Holton, L.K.; Hunter, V.L.; Triplett, M.B. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1991-10-01

    The record of decision (ROD) (DOE 1988) on the Final Environmental Impact Statement, Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic and Tank Wastes, Hanford Site, Richland Washington identifies the method for disposal of double-shell tank waste and cesium and strontium capsules at the Hanford Site. The ROD also identifies the need for additional evaluations before a final decision is made on the disposal of single-shell tank waste. This document presents the results of systematic evaluation of the present technical circumstances, alternatives, and regulatory requirements in light of the values of the leaders and constitutents of the program. It recommends a three-phased approach for disposing of tank wastes. This approach allows mature technologies to be applied to the treatment of well-understood waste forms in the near term, while providing time for the development and deployment of successively more advanced pretreatment technologies. The advanced technologies will accelerate disposal by reducing the volume of waste to be vitrified. This document also recommends integration of the double-and single-shell tank waste disposal programs, provides a target schedule for implementation of the selected approach, and describes the essential elements of a program to be baselined in 1992.

  8. Commercial catch rates of the clam Spisula solida reflect local environmental coastal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, V.; Leitão, F.

    2014-02-01

    The effect of environmental variables and fishing pressure (explanatory variables were lagged 1 year) on commercial catch rates of the clam Spisula solida was studied on an annual basis over a 21 year period in three areas off the Portuguese coast (the Northwest, the Southwest and the South) between 1989 and 2009. Each area showed distinct environmental (oceanographic and hydrological) characteristics. Different sensitivities of S. solida fishing grounds to environmental variables were found among the study areas. On the Northwest coast, the combined effect of NAO indices and sea surface temperature had a positive effect on S. solida fisheries, particularly during the spawning season. On the Southwest coast, the variation of S. solida catches was negatively associated with wind magnitude and positively related with South-Southeast winds. Winter river discharges and summer sea surface temperature negatively affected S. solida catches on the South coast. Fishing effort also affected S. solida catch rates in the South. However, “extreme” changes in environmental conditions were the main drivers of short-term variations in catch rates. These results indicate that variations of S. solida catches strongly reflect a regional signature of local climatic features off the coast. Information on local environmental conditions should therefore be used for the purpose of identifying management actions to ensure long-term sustainability of S. solida fisheries.

  9. 49 CFR 180.507 - Qualification of tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Qualification of tank cars. 180.507 Section 180.507 Transportation...PACKAGINGS Qualification and Maintenance of Tank Cars § 180.507 Qualification of tank cars. (a) Each tank car marked as meeting...

  10. 49 CFR 180.507 - Qualification of tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Qualification of tank cars. 180.507 Section 180.507 Transportation...PACKAGINGS Qualification and Maintenance of Tank Cars § 180.507 Qualification of tank cars. (a) Each tank car marked as meeting...

  11. 49 CFR 180.507 - Qualification of tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Qualification of tank cars. 180.507 Section 180.507 Transportation...PACKAGINGS Qualification and Maintenance of Tank Cars § 180.507 Qualification of tank cars. (a) Each tank car marked as meeting...

  12. 49 CFR 180.507 - Qualification of tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Qualification of tank cars. 180.507 Section 180.507 Transportation...PACKAGINGS Qualification and Maintenance of Tank Cars § 180.507 Qualification of tank cars. (a) Each tank car marked as meeting...

  13. 49 CFR 180.507 - Qualification of tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Qualification of tank cars. 180.507 Section 180.507 Transportation...PACKAGINGS Qualification and Maintenance of Tank Cars § 180.507 Qualification of tank cars. (a) Each tank car marked as meeting...

  14. 14 CFR 125.507 - Fuel tank system inspection program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Continued...125.507 Fuel tank system inspection...returning an aircraft to service...for which fuel tank ICA...fuel tank system based on...any later fuel tank system revisions...Bristol Aircraft...

  15. 14 CFR 23.969 - Fuel tank expansion space.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 23.969 Fuel tank expansion space. Each fuel tank must have an expansion space of not less than two percent of the tank capacity, unless the tank vent discharges clear of the airplane...

  16. 14 CFR 23.969 - Fuel tank expansion space.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 23.969 Fuel tank expansion space. Each fuel tank must have an expansion space of not less than two percent of the tank capacity, unless the tank vent discharges clear of the airplane...

  17. 14 CFR 23.969 - Fuel tank expansion space.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 23.969 Fuel tank expansion space. Each fuel tank must have an expansion space of not less than two percent of the tank capacity, unless the tank vent discharges clear of the airplane...

  18. 49 CFR 178.255-11 - Tank mountings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tank mountings. 178.255-11 Section 178...FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Portable Tanks § 178.255-11 Tank mountings. (a) Tanks shall be designed and fabricated with...

  19. 49 CFR 179.100-18 - Tests of tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tests of tanks. 179.100-18 Section 179.100-18...MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and...

  20. ICPP Tank Farm systems analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, W.B.; Beer, M.J.; Cukars, M.; Law, J.P.; Millet, C.B.; Murphy, J.A.; Nenni, J.A.; Park, C.V.; Pruitt, J.I.; Thiel, E.C.; Ward, F.S.; Woodard, J.

    1994-01-01

    During the early years (1950--1965) of Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) operations, eleven, 300,000-gallon waste storage tanks were constructed. A project was in progress to replace these aging tanks; however, since fuel reprocessing has been curtailed at ICPP, it is not clear that the new tanks are required. The Department of Energy (DOE) requested a systems engineering evaluation to determine the need for the new tanks. Over 100 alternatives were identified during a facilitated team meeting using Value Engineering techniques. After eliminating any ideas which clearly could not meet the requirements, the remaining ideas were combined into nine basic cases with five sub cases. These fourteen cases were then carefully defined using two methods. First, each case was drawn graphically to show waste processing equipment interfaces and time constraints where they existed or were imposed. Second, each case was analyzed using a time-dependent computer simulation of ICPP waste management activities to determine schedule interactions, liquid storage requirements, and solid waste quantities. Based on the evaluation data, the team developed the following recommendations: Install and operate the high-level liquid waste evaporator; minimize liquid waste generation as much as possible within the constraints of required ICPP operational, safety, and environmental commitments; bring a Waste Immobilization Facility on line by 2008 or earlier; operate NWCF as required to alleviate the need for new tank farm capacity; maximize the concentration of Na and K in the calcine to minimize the final amount of waste requiring immobilization; avoid using Bin Set 7 for calcine storage, if possible, to reduce future calcine retrieval and D&D costs; and use WM-190 for liquid waste storage and one of the pillar and panel vaulted tanks as the spare.

  1. 78 FR 71633 - Tank Vessel Oil Transfers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-29

    ...Coast Guard [Docket No. USCG-2013-0522] Tank Vessel Oil Transfers AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice...2013, concerning new measures to reduce the risks of oil spills in oil transfer operations from or to a tank vessel. In...

  2. 49 CFR 172.328 - Cargo tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...closure. (e) NON-ODORIZED marking on cargo tanks containing LPG. After September 30, 2006, no person may offer for transportation...or transport a cargo tank containing liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) that is unodorized as authorized in §...

  3. 49 CFR 172.326 - Portable tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (d) NON-ODORIZED marking on portable tanks containing LPG. After September 30, 2006, no person may offer for transportation...transport a portable tank containing liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) that is unodorized as authorized in §...

  4. Comparative safety analysis of LNG storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Fecht, B.A.; Gates, T.E.; Nelson, K.O.; Marr, G.D.

    1982-07-01

    LNG storage tank design and response to selected release scenarios were reviewed. The selection of the scenarios was based on an investigation of potential hazards as cited in the literature. A review of the structure of specific LNG storage facilities is given. Scenarios initially addressed included those that most likely emerge from the tank facility itself: conditions of overfill and overflow as related to liquid LNG content levels; over/underpressurization at respective tank vapor pressure boundaries; subsidence of bearing soil below tank foundations; and crack propagation in tank walls due to possible exposure of structural material to cryogenic temperatures. Additional scenarios addressed include those that result from external events: tornado induced winds and pressure drops; exterior tank missile impact with tornado winds and rotating machinery being the investigated mode of generation; thermal response due to adjacent fire conditions; and tank response due to intense seismic activity. Applicability of each scenario depended heavily on the specific tank configurations and material types selected. (PSB)

  5. 14 CFR 27.1013 - Oil tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Oil System § 27.1013 Oil tanks. Each oil tank must be designed and installed so that...Reserved] (c) Where used with a reciprocating engine, it has an expansion space of not less...

  6. 14 CFR 27.1013 - Oil tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Oil System § 27.1013 Oil tanks. Each oil tank must be designed and installed so that...Reserved] (c) Where used with a reciprocating engine, it has an expansion space of not less...

  7. 14 CFR 27.1013 - Oil tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Oil System § 27.1013 Oil tanks. Each oil tank must be designed and installed so that...Reserved] (c) Where used with a reciprocating engine, it has an expansion space of not less...

  8. UNIT OPERATION Separator, 3 phase separator, tank.

    E-print Network

    Hong, Deog Ki

    , , , input . hold-up . heat input out put . multi feed liquid volumeUNIT OPERATION 1. TANK Separator, 3 phase separator, tank. inlet outlet connection define gas volume . . valve, control system . column, reactor . 2. ROATING

  9. Tank waste concentration mechanism study

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, L.C.; Johnson, L.J.

    1994-09-01

    This study determines whether the existing 242-A Evaporator should continue to be used to concentrate the Hanford Site radioactive liquid tank wastes or be replaced by an alternative waste concentration process. Using the same philosophy, the study also determines what the waste concentration mechanism should be for the future TWRS program. Excess water from liquid DST waste should be removed to reduce the volume of waste feed for pretreatment, immobilization, and to free up storage capacity in existing tanks to support interim stabilization of SSTS, terminal cleanout of excess facilities, and other site remediation activities.

  10. 40 CFR 280.220 - Ownership of an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system or facility or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ownership of an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system or facility or property on which an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system is located. 280.220...

  11. 40 CFR 280.220 - Ownership of an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system or facility or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ownership of an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system or facility or property on which an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system is located. 280.220...

  12. 40 CFR 280.220 - Ownership of an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system or facility or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ownership of an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system or facility or property on which an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system is located. 280.220...

  13. 40 CFR 280.220 - Ownership of an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system or facility or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ownership of an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system or facility or property on which an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system is located. 280.220...

  14. Thermal hydraulic evaluation of consolidating tank C-106 waste into tank AY102

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sathyanarayana

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the thermal hydraulic analysis performed to provide a technical basis in support of consolidation of tank C-106 waste into tank AY-102. Several parametric calculations were performed using the HUB and GOTH computer codes. First, the current heat load of tank AY-102 was determined. Potential quantities of waste transfer from tank C-106 were established to maintain the peak

  15. 46 CFR 153.219 - Access to double bottom tanks serving as dedicated ballast tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...tanks serving as dedicated ballast tanks must not be located within a cargo...access opening to a double bottom tank that is a dedicated ballast tank and that is located within a cargo...the cargo containment system by two manhole coverings; or...

  16. 46 CFR 153.219 - Access to double bottom tanks serving as dedicated ballast tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...tanks serving as dedicated ballast tanks must not be located within a cargo...access opening to a double bottom tank that is a dedicated ballast tank and that is located within a cargo...the cargo containment system by two manhole coverings; or...

  17. 46 CFR 153.219 - Access to double bottom tanks serving as dedicated ballast tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...tanks serving as dedicated ballast tanks must not be located within a cargo...access opening to a double bottom tank that is a dedicated ballast tank and that is located within a cargo...the cargo containment system by two manhole coverings; or...

  18. 46 CFR 153.219 - Access to double bottom tanks serving as dedicated ballast tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...tanks serving as dedicated ballast tanks must not be located within a cargo...access opening to a double bottom tank that is a dedicated ballast tank and that is located within a cargo...the cargo containment system by two manhole coverings; or...

  19. 46 CFR 153.219 - Access to double bottom tanks serving as dedicated ballast tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...tanks serving as dedicated ballast tanks must not be located within a cargo...access opening to a double bottom tank that is a dedicated ballast tank and that is located within a cargo...the cargo containment system by two manhole coverings; or...

  20. 45Fuel Level in a Spherical Tank Spherical tanks are found in many

    E-print Network

    full the tank is by measuring h and relating it to the remaining volume of the liquid. A sensor can the storage of cryogenic liquids, to fuel tanks. Under the influence of gravity, or acceleration, the liquid45Fuel Level in a Spherical Tank Spherical tanks are found in many different situations, from

  1. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR SAMPLING OF TANK 19 IN F TANK FARM

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, S.; Shine, G.

    2009-12-14

    Representative sampling is required for characterization of the residual material in Tank 19 prior to operational closure. Tank 19 is a Type IV underground waste storage tank located in the F-Tank Farm. It is a cylindrical-shaped, carbon steel tank with a diameter of 85 feet, a height of 34.25 feet, and a working capacity of 1.3 million gallons. Tank 19 was placed in service in 1961 and initially received a small amount of low heat waste from Tank 17. It then served as an evaporator concentrate (saltcake) receiver from February 1962 to September 1976. Tank 19 also received the spent zeolite ion exchange media from a cesium removal column that once operated in the Northeast riser of the tank to remove cesium from the evaporator overheads. Recent mechanical cleaning of the tank removed all mounds of material. Anticipating a low level of solids in the residual waste, Huff and Thaxton [2009] developed a plan to sample the waste during the final clean-up process while it would still be resident in sufficient quantities to support analytical determinations in four quadrants of the tank. Execution of the plan produced fewer solids than expected to support analytical determinations in all four quadrants. Huff and Thaxton [2009] then restructured the plan to characterize the residual separately in the North and the South regions: two 'hemispheres.' This document provides sampling recommendations to complete the characterization of the residual material on the tank bottom following the guidance in Huff and Thaxton [2009] to split the tank floor into a North and a South hemisphere. The number of samples is determined from a modification of the formula previously published in Edwards [2001] and the sample characterization data for previous sampling of Tank 19 described by Oji [2009]. The uncertainty is quantified by an upper 95% confidence limit (UCL95%) on each analyte's mean concentration in Tank 19. The procedure computes the uncertainty in analyte concentration as a function of the number of samples, and the final number of samples is determined when the reduction in the uncertainty from an additional sample no longer has a practical impact on results. The characterization of the full suite of analytes in the North and South hemispheres is currently supported by a single Mantis rover sample in each hemisphere. A floor scrape sample was obtained from a compact region near the center riser slightly in the South hemisphere and has been analyzed for a shortened list of key analytes. There is not enough additional material from the floor scrape sample material for completing the full suite of constituents. No floor scrape samples have been previously taken from the North hemisphere. The criterion to determine the number of additional samples was based on the practical reduction in the uncertainty when a new sample is added. This was achieved when five additional samples are obtained. In addition, two archived samples will be used if a contingency such as failing to demonstrate the comparability of the Mantis samples to the floor scrape samples occurs. To complete sampling of the Tank 19 residual floor material, four additional samples should be taken from the North hemisphere and four additional samples should be taken from the South hemisphere. One of the samples from each hemisphere will be archived in case of need. Three of the four additional samples from each hemisphere will be analyzed. Once the results are available, differences between the Mantis and three floor scrape sample results will be evaluated. If there are no statistically significant analyte concentration differences between the Mantis and floor scrape samples, those results will be combined and then UCL95%s will be calculated. If the analyte concentration differences between the Mantis and floor scrape samples are statistically significant, the UCL95%s will be calculated without the Mantis sample results. If further reduction in the upper confidence limits is needed and can be achieved by the addition of the archived samples, they will be analyzed and included in t

  2. Tank 241-BY-103 Tank Characterization Plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1995-02-27

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations and WHC 222-S Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples for tank 241-BY-103.

  3. Evaluation of tank waste transfers at 241AW tank farm

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1998-01-01

    A number of waste transfers are needed to process and feed waste to the private contractors in support of Phase 1 Privatization. Other waste transfers are needed to support the 242-A Evaporator, saltwell pumping, and other ongoing Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) operations. The purpose of this evaluation is to determine if existing or planned equipment and systems are capable

  4. Filament-wound, fiberglass cryogenic tank supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, J. S.; Timberlake, T. E.

    1971-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of filament-wound, fiberglass cryogenic tank supports for a LH2 tank, a LF2/FLOX tank and a CH4 tank. These supports consist of filament-wound fiberglass tubes with titanium end fittings. These units were satisfactorily tested at cryogenic temperatures, thereby offering a design that can be reliably and economically produced in large or small quantities. The basic design concept is applicable to any situation where strong, lightweight axial load members are desired.

  5. 10/16/12 10:53 AMNew Test Could Catch Autism Earlier Than Ever | The Stir Page 1 of 5http://thestir.cafemom.com/baby/143625/new_test_could_catch_autism

    E-print Network

    Itti, Laurent

    10/16/12 10:53 AMNew Test Could Catch Autism Earlier Than Ever | The Stir Page 1 of 5http://thestir.cafemom.com/baby/143625/new_test_could_catch_autism Comments (6) | I Like ThisTweetTweet 6 New Test Could Catch Autism obsessed with milestones? A new test for autism that could diagnose kids on the spectrum as young as 6

  6. Single-shell tank interim stabilization project plan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1998-01-01

    Solid and liquid radioactive waste continues to be stored in 149 single-shell tanks at the Hanford Site. To date, 119 tanks have had most of the pumpable liquid removed by interim stabilization. Thirty tanks remain to be stabilized. One of these tanks (C-106) will be stabilized by retrieval of the tank contents. The remaining 29 tanks will be interim stabilized

  7. Tank 241-U-111 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-05-31

    Tank 241-U-111 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in {open_quotes}Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.{close_quotes} Tank 241-U-111 was vapor sampled in accordance with {open_quotes}Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.{close_quotes}

  8. Tank 241-C-108 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-05-31

    Tank 241-C-108 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in {open_quotes}Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.{close_quotes} Tank 241-C-108 was vapor sampled in accordance with {open_quotes}Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.{close_quotes}

  9. SRS tank closure. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-08-01

    High-level waste (HLW) tank closure technology is designed to stabilize any remaining radionuclides and hazardous constituents left in a tank after bulk waste removal. Two Savannah River Site (SRS) HLW tanks were closed after cleansing and then filling each tank with three layers of grout. The first layer consists of a chemically reducing grout. The fill material has chemical properties that retard the movement of some radionuclides and chemical constituents. A layer of controlled low-strength material (CLSM), a self-leveling fill material, is placed on top of the reducing grout. CLSM provides sufficient strength to support the overbearing weight. The final layer is a free-flowing, strong grout similar to normal concrete. After the main tank cavity is filled, risers are filled with grout, and all waste transfer piping connected to the tank is isolated. The tank ventilation system is dismantled, and the remaining systems are isolated. Equipment that remains with the tank is filled with grout. The tank and ancillary systems are left in a state requiring only limited surveillance. Administrative procedures are in place to control land use and access. DOE eventually plans to remove all of its HLW storage tanks from service. These tanks are located at SRS, Hanford, and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Low-activity waste storage tanks at Oak Ridge Reservation are also scheduled for closure.

  10. Thermal stratification in liquid storage tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, D. L.; Han, S. M.

    1980-01-01

    Comprehensive literature survey indicates thermal stratification in solarenergy/liquid-storage tank improves system performance by as much as 15 percent. Collector efficiency increases when collector inlet fluid is drawn from bottom of storage tank, where fluid is coolest; warmest liquid drawn top of tank to satisfy thermal load.

  11. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Pump Tank 

    E-print Network

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23

    Pump tanks are concrete, fiberglass or polyethylene containers that collect wastewater to be dosed into the soil at intervals. This publication explains the design and maintenance of pump tanks, and it offers advice on what to do if a pump tank...

  12. Screening the Hanford tanks for trapped gas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1995-01-01

    The Hanford Site is home to 177 large, underground nuclear waste storage tanks. Hydrogen gas is generated within the waste in these tanks. This document presents the results of a screening of Hanford`s nuclear waste storage tanks for the presence of gas trapped in the waste. The method used for the screening is to look for an inverse correlation between

  13. 49 CFR 172.326 - Portable tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...172.326 Portable tanks. (a) Shipping name...or transport a portable tank containing a hazardous...it is legibly marked on two opposing sides with...or transport a portable tank containing liquefied petroleum...NON-ODORIZED or NOT ODORIZED on two opposing sides near...

  14. 49 CFR 172.328 - Cargo tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (2) “NQT”, if the cargo tank is constructed of other than...NON-ODORIZED marking on cargo tanks containing LPG. After September...transportation or transport a cargo tank containing liquefied petroleum...NON-ODORIZED or NOT ODORIZED on two opposing sides near the...

  15. 49 CFR 172.328 - Cargo tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (2) “NQT”, if the cargo tank is constructed of other than...NON-ODORIZED marking on cargo tanks containing LPG. After September...transportation or transport a cargo tank containing liquefied petroleum...NON-ODORIZED or NOT ODORIZED on two opposing sides near the...

  16. 49 CFR 172.326 - Portable tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...172.326 Portable tanks. (a) Shipping name...or transport a portable tank containing a hazardous...it is legibly marked on two opposing sides with...or transport a portable tank containing liquefied petroleum...NON-ODORIZED or NOT ODORIZED on two opposing sides near...

  17. 49 CFR 172.328 - Cargo tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (2) “NQT”, if the cargo tank is constructed of other than...NON-ODORIZED marking on cargo tanks containing LPG. After September...transportation or transport a cargo tank containing liquefied petroleum...NON-ODORIZED or NOT ODORIZED on two opposing sides near the...

  18. 49 CFR 172.328 - Cargo tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (2) “NQT”, if the cargo tank is constructed of other than...NON-ODORIZED marking on cargo tanks containing LPG. After September...transportation or transport a cargo tank containing liquefied petroleum...NON-ODORIZED or NOT ODORIZED on two opposing sides near the...

  19. 49 CFR 172.326 - Portable tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...172.326 Portable tanks. (a) Shipping name...or transport a portable tank containing a hazardous...it is legibly marked on two opposing sides with...or transport a portable tank containing liquefied petroleum...NON-ODORIZED or NOT ODORIZED on two opposing sides near...

  20. 49 CFR 172.326 - Portable tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...172.326 Portable tanks. (a) Shipping name...or transport a portable tank containing a hazardous...it is legibly marked on two opposing sides with...or transport a portable tank containing liquefied petroleum...NON-ODORIZED or NOT ODORIZED on two opposing sides near...

  1. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Pump Tank

    E-print Network

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23

    Pump tanks are concrete, fiberglass or polyethylene containers that collect wastewater to be dosed into the soil at intervals. This publication explains the design and maintenance of pump tanks, and it offers advice on what to do if a pump tank...

  2. DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) EMERGENCY PUMPING GUIDE

    SciTech Connect

    REBERGER, D.W.

    2006-03-17

    This document provides preplanning necessary to expeditiously remove any waste that may leak from the primary tank to the secondary tank for Hanford's 28 DSTs. The strategy is described, applicable emergency procedures are referenced, and transfer routes and pumping equipment for each tank are identified.

  3. Stabilization of In-Tank Residual Wastes and External-Tank Soil Contamination for the Hanford Tank Closure Program: Applications to the AX Tank Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, H.L.; Dwyer, B.P.; Ho, C.; Krumhansl, J.L.; McKeen, G.; Molecke, M.A.; Westrich, H.R.; Zhang, P.

    1998-11-01

    Technical support for the Hanford Tank Closure Program focused on evaluation of concepts for immobilization of residual contaminants in the Hanford AX tanks and underlying soils, and identification of cost-effective approaches to improve long-term performance of AX tank farm cIosure systems. Project objectives are to develop materials or engineered systems that would significantly reduce the radionuclide transport to the groundwater from AX tanks containing residual waste. We pursued several studies that, if implemented, would help achieve these goals. They include: (1) tank fill design to reduce water inilltration and potential interaction with residual waste; (2) development of in-tank getter materials that would specifically sorb or sequester radionuclides; (3) evaluation of grout emplacement under and around the tanks to prevent waste leakage during waste retrieval or to minimize water infiltration beneath the tanks; (4) development of getters that will chemically fix specific radionuclides in soils under tanks; and (5) geochemical and hydrologic modeling of waste-water-soil-grout interactions. These studies differ in scope from the reducing grout tank fill employed at the Savannah River Site in that our strategy improves upon tank fill design by providing redundancy in the barriers to radionuclide migration and by modification the hydrogeochemistry external to the tanks.

  4. Tank Farms Restoration and Upgrades Program Plan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. D. Bigbee; G. D. Bouchey

    1993-01-01

    The Tank Farm Restoration and Upgrades Program Plan provides a summary description of action plans to renovate various Tank Farm management control programs, equipment, systems, and facilities. The Tank Farm upgrades identified in this plan are required (1) to ensure safe, environmentally compliant, and efficient operation of the facilities or (2) to support the waste cleanup mission at the Hanford

  5. Buffer Tank Design for Acceptable Control Performance

    E-print Network

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    ), and neutralization vessels. We start with a definition: A buffer tank is a unit where the holdup (volume) is exploited to provide smoother operation. We here focus on buffer tanks for liquids, although most, accumulators, or inventories. 2 #12;In both cases the tank volume is exploited, and a larger volume gives

  6. Tank 41H bounding uranium enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    Cavin, W.S.

    1994-07-12

    The intent of this document is to combine data from salt samples and historical process information to bound the uranium (U-235) enrichment which could be expected in the upper portion of the salt in Tank 41H. This bounding enrichment will be used in another document to establish a nuclear safety basis for initial salt removal operations. During the processing period of interest (4/82-4/87), waste was fed to the 2H Evaporator from Tank 43H, and the evaporator bottoms were sent to Tank 41H where the bottoms were allowed to cool (resulting in the formation of salt deposits in the tank). As Tank 41H was filled with concentrate, the supernate left after salt formation was recycled back to Tank 43H and reprocessed through the evaporator along with any additional waste which had been added to Tank 43H. As Tank 41 H filled with salt, this recycle took place with increasing frequency because it took less time to fill the decreased volume with evaporator concentrate. By determining which of the sampled waste tanks were receiving fresh waste from the canyons at the time the tanks were sampled (from published transfer records), it was possible to deduce which samples were likely representative of fresh canyon waste. The processing that was being carried out in the Separation canyons when these tanks were sampled, should be comparable to the processing while Tank 41H was being filled.

  7. Adipose Tissue Plasticity During Catch-Up Fat Driven by Thrifty Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Summermatter, Serge; Marcelino, Helena; Arsenijevic, Denis; Buchala, Antony; Aprikian, Olivier; Assimacopoulos-Jeannet, Françoise; Seydoux, Josiane; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Solinas, Giovanni; Dulloo, Abdul G.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Catch-up growth, a risk factor for later type 2 diabetes, is characterized by hyperinsulinemia, accelerated body-fat recovery (catch-up fat), and enhanced glucose utilization in adipose tissue. Our objective was to characterize the determinants of enhanced glucose utilization in adipose tissue during catch-up fat. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS White adipose tissue morphometry, lipogenic capacity, fatty acid composition, insulin signaling, in vivo glucose homeostasis, and insulinemic response to glucose were assessed in a rat model of semistarvation-refeeding. This model is characterized by glucose redistribution from skeletal muscle to adipose tissue during catch-up fat that results solely from suppressed thermogenesis (i.e., without hyperphagia). RESULTS Adipose tissue recovery during the dynamic phase of catch-up fat is accompanied by increased adipocyte number with smaller diameter, increased expression of genes for adipogenesis and de novo lipogenesis, increased fatty acid synthase activity, increased proportion of saturated fatty acids in triglyceride (storage) fraction but not in phospholipid (membrane) fraction, and no impairment in insulin signaling. Furthermore, it is shown that hyperinsulinemia and enhanced adipose tissue de novo lipogenesis occur concomitantly and are very early events in catch-up fat. CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest that increased adipose tissue insulin stimulation and consequential increase in intracellular glucose flux play an important role in initiating catch-up fat. Once activated, the machinery for lipogenesis and adipogenesis contribute to sustain an increased insulin-stimulated glucose flux toward fat storage. Such adipose tissue plasticity could play an active role in the thrifty metabolism that underlies glucose redistribution from skeletal muscle to adipose tissue. PMID:19602538

  8. Spatial-temporal dynamics of stable fly (Diptera: Muscidae) trap catches in Eastern Nebraska.

    PubMed

    Taylor, David B; Friesen, Kristina; Zhu, Junwei Jerry

    2013-06-01

    Spatial and temporal relationships among catches of adult stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.), on sticky traps in eastern Nebraska were evaluated. Twenty-five alsynite sticky traps were placed in a 5 by 5 grid with ?1.6-km intervals in a mixed agricultural environment from 2003 to 2011. Denser grids of 45-90 traps were implemented for varying lengths of time during the course of the study. More than two million stable flies were collected over 9 yr. Seasonal abundances based upon total collections from the primary grid of 25 traps were bimodal most years with population peaks in June and September or October. Individual trap catches varied greatly, both spatially and temporally. Trap catches were spatially aggregated with autocorrelation extending to ?2 km. Synchrony among trap catches declined linearly with respect to distance between traps and differences in seasonal distribution increased asymptotically relative to distance between traps. Proximity to confined livestock facilities increased catch and proportion of catch collected later in the season. Fifteen to 20 traps were adequate for estimating stable fly populations with the standard error of the mean equal to 30% of the mean for most of the stable fly season. Early and late in the season, when mean trap catches were low, between 100 and 135 traps would be needed to maintain that level of confidence. Seasonal collection distributions from permutations of subsets of the data with fewer than 24 traps differed significantly from those of the complete grid of 25 traps, indicating that 20 or more traps may be needed to evaluate the seasonal dynamics of a stable fly population. PMID:23726061

  9. water tank 9/13/2007 1 4.1 Water tank

    E-print Network

    Taylor, Peter

    water tank 9/13/2007 1 4.1 Water tank (a) A cylindrical tank contains 800 ml of water. At t=0 (min- utes) a hole is punched in the bottom, and water begins to flow out. It takes exactly 100 seconds for the tank to empty. Draw the graph of the amount z of water in the tank against time t. Explain the shape

  10. Tank characterization report for double-shell tank 241-AP-102

    SciTech Connect

    LAMBERT, S.L.

    1999-02-23

    In April 1993, Double-Shell Tank 241-AP-102 was sampled to determine waste feed characteristics for the Hanford Grout Disposal Program. This Tank Characterization Report presents an overview of that tank sampling and analysis effort, and contains observations regarding waste characteristics, expected bulk inventory, and concentration data for the waste contents based on this latest sampling data and information on the history of the tank. Finally, this report makes recommendations and conclusions regarding tank operational safety issues.

  11. 9 CFR 316.14 - Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation of edible products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation of edible...Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation of edible... Each tank car and each tank truck carrying inspected and...

  12. A Comparison of Immersive HMD, Fish Tank VR and Fish Tank with Haptics Displays for Volume Visualization

    E-print Network

    Healey, Christopher G.

    A Comparison of Immersive HMD, Fish Tank VR and Fish Tank with Haptics Displays for Volume: (1) head-mounted display (HMD); (2) fish tank VR (fish tank); and (3) fish tank VR augmented its structure. Fish tank and haptic participants saw the entire volume on-screen and rotated

  13. Moonrise over the Calico Tanks

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The Moon rises over the Calico Tanks, a sandstone formation within Red Rock Canyon. Red Rock Canyon is a National Conservation Area managed by the Bureau of Land Management, located just outside of Las Vegas, Nevada. It is part of the Mojave Desert....

  14. Pallid Sturgeon in Holding Tank

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Nine-year-old pallid sturgeon wait in holding tanks for their turn to be evaluated by biologists at CERC.  More than 100 pallid sturgeon made the trip from Gavins Point National Fish Hatchery to Columbia on a snowy December day....

  15. Foreign Language "Think Tank" Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Kathleen H.

    At the Foreign Language"Think Tank" Symposium of April 1975, the following major problems of community college foreign language teachers were identified: (1) low enrollment; (2) attrition; (3) low achievers; (4) articulation with universities; and (5) lack of interest. Suggested solutions included: (Problem 1) advertisement, a foreign language…

  16. In Defense of External Tanks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chris Y. Taylor

    2006-01-01

    External tanks can reduce the specific cost of reusable, partially reusable, and even certain types of fully expendable launch vehicles. Adding external tan ks to a single -stage -to - orbit launch vehicle reduces development cost by easing the difficulty of an otherwise very challenging design problem. At flight rates that will b e likely in the near future, this

  17. Tank Pressure Control Experiment (TPCE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bentz, Mike

    1992-01-01

    The Tank Pressure Control Experiment (TPCE) is a small self-contained STS payload designed to test a jet mixer for cryogenic fluid pressure control. Viewgraphs are presented that describe project organization, experiment objectives and approach, risk management, payload concept and mission plan, and initial test data.

  18. Do we still need tanks?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A C I Gadsby ADC

    1997-01-01

    For over 80 years the tank has held sway over the battlefield. But the end of the Cold War sees to have called into question not only the doctrine but even the trappings of the old confrontation. The current Strategic Defence Review will only be the most official platform for the question posed in the title to this article— should

  19. External Tank - The Structure Backbone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welzyn, Kenneth; Pilet, Jeffrey C.; Diecidue-Conners, Dawn; Worden, Michelle; Guillot, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    The External Tank forms the structural backbone of the Space Shuttle in the launch configuration. Because the tank flies to orbital velocity with the Space Shuttle Orbiter, minimization of weight is mandatory, to maximize payload performance. Choice of lightweight materials both for structure and thermal conditioning was necessary. The tank is large, and unique manufacturing facilities, tooling, handling, and transportation operations were required. Weld processes and tooling evolved with the design as it matured through several block changes, to reduce weight. Non Destructive Evaluation methods were used to assure integrity of welds and thermal protection system materials. The aluminum-lithium alloy was used near the end of the program and weld processes and weld repair techniques had to be refined. Development and implementation of friction stir welding was a substantial technology development incorporated during the Program. Automated thermal protection system application processes were developed for the majority of the tank surface. Material obsolescence was an issue throughout the 40 year program. The final configuration and tank weight enabled international space station assembly in a high inclination orbit allowing international cooperation with the Russian Federal Space Agency. Numerous process controls were implemented to assure product quality, and innovative proof testing was accomplished prior to delivery. Process controls were implemented to assure cleanliness in the production environment, to control contaminants, and to preclude corrosion. Each tank was accepted via rigorous inspections, including non-destructive evaluation techniques, proof testing, and all systems testing. In the post STS-107 era, the project focused on ascent debris risk reduction. This was accomplished via stringent process controls, post flight assessment using substantially improved imagery, and selective redesigns. These efforts were supported with a number of test programs to simulate combined environments. Processing improvements included development and use of low spray guns for foam application, additional human factors considerations for production, use of high fidelity mockups during hardware processing with video review, improved tank access, extensive use of non destructive evaluation, and producibility enhancements. Design improvements included redesigned bipod fittings, a bellows heater, a feedline camera active during ascent flight, removal of the protuberance airload ramps, redesigned ice frost ramps, and titanium brackets replaced aluminum brackets on the liquid oxygen feedline. Post flight assessment improved due to significant addition of imagery assets, greatly improving situational awareness. The debris risk was reduced by two orders of magnitude. During this time a major natural disaster was overcome when Katrina damaged the manufacturing facility. Numerous lessons from these efforts are documented within the paper.

  20. Inexpensive site-assembled thermal storage tank

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    An inexpensive ($0.20 per gallon) thermal storage tank was constructed using polystyrene foam, welded steel (hog) wire, and polyethylene film. The tank was formed as a right circular cylinder using the welded wire as a hoop. Polystyrene foam was cut to shape using a hot wire and used to line the wire hoop. Polyethylene film was placed in the interior of the tank to complete a leakproof liquid thermal storage tank. The design incorporates features making the tank both inexpensive and relatively easy to construct in a confined space. Thermal performance can be adjusted by choosing thickness of the polystrene foam as it is cut.

  1. Tank 241-C-103 headspace flammability

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Information regarding flammable vapors, gases, and aerosols is presented for the purpose of resolving the tank 241-C-103 headspace flammability issue. Analyses of recent vapor and liquid samples, as well as visual inspections of the tank headspace, are discussed in the context of tank dynamics. This document is restricted to issues regarding the flammability of gases, vapors, and an aerosol that may exist in the headspace of tank 241-C-103. While discussing certain information about the organic liquid present in tank 241-C-103, this document addresses neither the potential for, nor consequences of, a pool fire involving this organic liquid; they will be discussed in a separate report.

  2. Sampling plan to support HLW tank 16

    SciTech Connect

    Rodwell, P.O.; Martin, B.

    1997-10-30

    Plans are to remove the residual waste from the annulus of High-Level Waste Tank 16, located in the H-Area Tank Farm, in 1998. The interior of the tank is virtually clean. In the late 1970`s, the waste was removed from the interior of the tank by several campaigns of waste removal with slurry pumps, spray washing, and oxalic acid cleaning. The annulus of the tank at one time had several thousand gallons of waste salt, which had leaked from the tank interior. Some of this salt was removed by adding water to the annulus and circulating, but much of the salt remains in the annulus. In order to confirm the source term used for fate and transport modeling, samples of the tank interior and annulus will be obtained and analyzed. If the results of the analyses indicate that the data used for the initial modeling is bounding then no changes will be made to the model. However, if the results indicate that the source term is higher than that assumed in the initial modeling, thus not bounding, additional modeling will be performed. The purpose of this Plan is to outline the approach to sampling the annulus and interior of Tank 16 as a prerequisite to salt removal in the annulus and closure of the entire tank system. The sampling and analysis of this tank system must be robust to reasonably ensure the actual tank residual is within the bounds of analysis error.

  3. Pad B Liquid Hydrogen Storage Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Felicia

    2007-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center is home to two liquid hydrogen storage tanks, one at each launch pad of Launch Complex 39. The liquid hydrogen storage tank at Launch Pad B has a significantly higher boil off rate that the liquid hydrogen storage tank at Launch Pad A. This research looks at various calculations concerning the at Launch Pad B in an attempt to develop a solution to the excess boil off rate. We will look at Perlite levels inside the tank, Boil off rates, conductive heat transfer, and radiant heat transfer through the tank. As a conclusion to the research, we will model the effects of placing an external insulation to the tank in order to reduce the boil off rate and increase the economic efficiency of the liquid hydrogen storage tanks.

  4. Ferrocyanide tank safety program: Cesium uptake capacity of simulated ferrocyanide tank waste. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Burgeson, I.E.; Bryan, S.A.

    1995-07-01

    The objective of this project is to determine the capacity for {sup 137}Cs uptake by mixed metal ferrocyanides present in Hanford Site waste tanks, and to assess the potential for aggregation of these {sup 137}Cs-exchanged materials to form ``hot-spots`` in the tanks. This research, performed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for Westinghouse Hanford Company, stems from concerns regarding possible localized radiolytic heating within the tanks. After ferrocyanide was added to 18 high-level waste tanks in the 1950s, some of the ferrocyanide tanks received considerable quantities of saltcake waste that was rich in {sup 137}Cs. If radioactive cesium was exchanged and concentrated by the nickel ferrocyanide present in the tanks, the associated heating could cause tank temperatures to rise above the safety limits specified for the ferrocyanide-containing tanks, especially if the supernate in the tanks is pumped out and the waste becomes drier.

  5. CRITICAL ASSUMPTIONS IN THE F-TANK FARM CLOSURE OPERATIONAL DOCUMENTATION REGARDING WASTE TANK INTERNAL CONFIGURATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hommel, S.; Fountain, D.

    2012-03-28

    The intent of this document is to provide clarification of critical assumptions regarding the internal configurations of liquid waste tanks at operational closure, with respect to F-Tank Farm (FTF) closure documentation. For the purposes of this document, FTF closure documentation includes: (1) Performance Assessment for the F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (hereafter referred to as the FTF PA) (SRS-REG-2007-00002), (2) Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Closure of F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (DOE/SRS-WD-2012-001), (3) Tier 1 Closure Plan for the F-Area Waste Tank Systems at the Savannah River Site (SRR-CWDA-2010-00147), (4) F-Tank Farm Tanks 18 and 19 DOE Manual 435.1-1 Tier 2 Closure Plan Savannah River Site (SRR-CWDA-2011-00015), (5) Industrial Wastewater Closure Module for the Liquid Waste Tanks 18 and 19 (SRRCWDA-2010-00003), and (6) Tank 18/Tank 19 Special Analysis for the Performance Assessment for the F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (hereafter referred to as the Tank 18/Tank 19 Special Analysis) (SRR-CWDA-2010-00124). Note that the first three FTF closure documents listed apply to the entire FTF, whereas the last three FTF closure documents listed are specific to Tanks 18 and 19. These two waste tanks are expected to be the first two tanks to be grouted and operationally closed under the current suite of FTF closure documents and many of the assumptions and approaches that apply to these two tanks are also applicable to the other FTF waste tanks and operational closure processes.

  6. Effects of variable recruitment on catch-curve analysis for crappie populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, M.S.

    1997-01-01

    Catch-curve analysis is frequently used to estimate total annual mortality (A) of exploited fishes, but the method assumes constant recruitment. Because populations of crappie Pomoxis spp. have exhibited large fluctuations in recruitment, I conducted simulations to assess the amount of variability in recruitment that precludes the use of a catch curve and compared results to recruitment dynamics in six crappie populations. Coefficients of variation (CV = 100 ?? SD/mean) in recruitment to age 1 ranged from 55% to 84% among the six crappie populations. Simulations suggested that recruitment variability in these ranges would likely allow estimation of A within ?? 10%, but the probability of obtaining estimates of A that were ??5% or more of the true A would exceed 0.15. I suggest that catch curves may be used to approximate A in crappie populations but that managers should consider the effects on management recommendations if A were ??10% of the estimated A.

  7. The influence of catch trials on the consolidation of motor memory in force field adaptation tasks.

    PubMed

    Focke, Anne; Stockinger, Christian; Diepold, Christina; Taubert, Marco; Stein, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    In computational neuroscience it is generally accepted that human motor memory contains neural representations of the physics of the musculoskeletal system and the objects in the environment. These representations are called "internal models". Force field studies, in which subjects have to adapt to dynamic perturbations induced by a robotic manipulandum, are an established tool to analyze the characteristics of such internal models. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether catch trials during force field learning could influence the consolidation of motor memory in more complex tasks. Thereby, the force field was more than double the force field of previous studies (35 N·s/m). Moreover, the arm of the subjects was not supported. A total of 46 subjects participated in this study and performed center-out movements at a robotic manipulandum in two different force fields. Two control groups learned force field A on day 1 and were retested in the same force field on day 3 (AA). Two test groups additionally learned an interfering force field B (= -A) on day 2 (ABA). The difference between the two test and control groups, respectively, was the absence (0%) or presence (19%) of catch trials, in which the force field was turned-off suddenly. The results showed consolidation of force field A on day 3 for both control groups. Test groups showed no consolidation of force field A (19% catch trials) and even poorer performance on day 3 (0% catch trials). In conclusion, it can be stated that catch trials seem to have a positive effect on the performance on day 3 but do not trigger a consolidation process as shown in previous studies that used a lower force field viscosity with supported arm. These findings indicate that the results of previous studies in which less complex tasks were analyzed, cannot be fully transferred to more complex tasks. Moreover, the effects of catch trials in these situations are insufficiently understood and further research is needed. PMID:23898319

  8. Effects of Catch-and-Release Angling on Salmonids at Elevated Water Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, James W.; Guy, Christopher S.; Horton, Travis; Leathe, Steven A.

    2010-08-01

    Few studies have assessed catch and release mortality of salmonids at water temperatures ?23°C, despite predictions of warming stream temperatures due to climate change. In addition, the effects of diel temperature fluctuations on salmonid mortality have largely been ignored in catch and release angling studies. The primary objective of this study was to measure catch and release mortality of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, brown trout Salmo trutta, and mountain whitefish Prosopium williamsoni in three water temperature treatments; when daily maximum water temperatures were cool (<20°C), warm (20 to 22.9°C), and hot ( 23°C). A secondary objective was to assess catch and release mortality of salmonids angled in morning and evening within water-temperature treatments. These objectives were related to Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks’ Drought Fishing Closure Policy (DFCP). Angling (fly-fishing only) occurred in the Gallatin and Smith rivers. All angled fish were confined to in-stream holding cages and monitored for mortality for 72 h. Mortality of rainbow trout peaked at 16% in the Gallatin River and 9% in the Smith River during the hot treatment. Mortality of brown trout was less than 5% in all water-temperature treatments in both rivers. Mountain whitefish mortality peaked at 28% in the hot treatment in the Smith River. No mortality for any species occurred in either river when daily maximum water temperatures were <20°C. Mortality of rainbow trout peaked at 16% in the evening hot treatment in the Smith River. Mortality of brown trout and mountain whitefish was not related to time of day. The catch and release mortality values presented here likely represent fishing mortality given that most anglers in southwest Montana practice catch and release angling. The mortality values we observed were lower than predicted (< 30%), given reports in the literature. The difference is likely related to the in situ nature of the study and periods of cooler water temperatures between peaks facilitating recovery from thermal stress.

  9. The influence of catch trials on the consolidation of motor memory in force field adaptation tasks

    PubMed Central

    Focke, Anne; Stockinger, Christian; Diepold, Christina; Taubert, Marco; Stein, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    In computational neuroscience it is generally accepted that human motor memory contains neural representations of the physics of the musculoskeletal system and the objects in the environment. These representations are called “internal models”. Force field studies, in which subjects have to adapt to dynamic perturbations induced by a robotic manipulandum, are an established tool to analyze the characteristics of such internal models. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether catch trials during force field learning could influence the consolidation of motor memory in more complex tasks. Thereby, the force field was more than double the force field of previous studies (35 N·s/m). Moreover, the arm of the subjects was not supported. A total of 46 subjects participated in this study and performed center-out movements at a robotic manipulandum in two different force fields. Two control groups learned force field A on day 1 and were retested in the same force field on day 3 (AA). Two test groups additionally learned an interfering force field B (= ?A) on day 2 (ABA). The difference between the two test and control groups, respectively, was the absence (0%) or presence (19%) of catch trials, in which the force field was turned-off suddenly. The results showed consolidation of force field A on day 3 for both control groups. Test groups showed no consolidation of force field A (19% catch trials) and even poorer performance on day 3 (0% catch trials). In conclusion, it can be stated that catch trials seem to have a positive effect on the performance on day 3 but do not trigger a consolidation process as shown in previous studies that used a lower force field viscosity with supported arm. These findings indicate that the results of previous studies in which less complex tasks were analyzed, cannot be fully transferred to more complex tasks. Moreover, the effects of catch trials in these situations are insufficiently understood and further research is needed. PMID:23898319

  10. The myosin cross-bridge cycle and its control by twitchin phosphorylation in catch muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Butler, T M; Narayan, S R; Mooers, S U; Hartshorne, D J; Siegman, M J

    2001-01-01

    The anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis was used to characterize the myosin cross-bridge during catch, a state of tonic force maintenance with a very low rate of energy utilization. Addition of MgATP to permeabilized muscles in high force rigor at pCa > 8 results in a rapid loss of some force followed by a very slow rate of relaxation that is characteristic of catch. The fast component is slowed 3-4-fold in the presence of 1 mM MgADP, but the distribution between the fast and slow (catch) components is not dependent on [MgADP]. Phosphorylation of twitchin results in loss of the catch component. Fewer than 4% of the myosin heads have ADP bound in rigor, and the time course (0.2-10 s) of ADP formation following release of ATP from caged ATP is similar whether or not twitchin is phosphorylated. This suggests that MgATP binding to the cross-bridge and subsequent splitting are independent of twitchin phosphorylation, but detachment occurs only if twitchin is phosphorylated. A similar dependence of detachment on twitchin phosphorylation is seen with AMP-PNP and ATPgammaS. Single turnover experiments on bound ADP suggest an increase in the rate of release of ADP from the cross-bridge when catch is released by phosphorylation of twitchin. Low [Ca(2+)] and unphosphorylated twitchin appear to cause catch by 1) markedly slowing ADP release from attached cross-bridges and 2) preventing detachment following ATP binding to the rigor cross-bridge. PMID:11159412

  11. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT BUCKLING EVALUATION METHODS & RESULTS FOR THE PRIMARY TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    MACKEY, T.C.

    2006-03-17

    This report documents a detailed buckling evaluation of the primary tanks in the Hanford double shell waste tanks. The analysis is part of a comprehensive structural review for the Double-Shell Tank Integrity Project. This work also provides information on tank integrity that specifically responds to concerns raise by the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Oversight (EH-22) during a review (in April and May 2001) of work being performed on the double-shell tank farms, and the operation of the aging waste facility (AWF) primary tank ventilation system.

  12. 241-AZ Tank Farm Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Travis J.; Boomer, Kayle D.; Gunter, Jason R.; Venetz, Theodore J.

    2013-07-30

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102. The construction history of the 241-AZ tank farm has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In the 241-AZ tank farm, the second DST farm constructed, both refractory quality and tank and liner fabrication were improved.

  13. 241-SY Tank Farm Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Travis J.; Boomer, Kayle D.; Gunter, Jason R.; Venetz, Theodore J.

    2013-07-25

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for tanks 241-SY-101, 241-SY-102, and 241-SY-103. The construction history of the 241-SY tank farm has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank 241-AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank 241-AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In the 241-SY tank farm, the third DST farm constructed, refractory quality and stress relief were improved, while similar tank and liner fabrication issues remained.

  14. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR SAMPLING OF TANK 18 IN F TANK FARM

    SciTech Connect

    Shine, G.

    2009-12-14

    Representative sampling is required for characterization of the residual floor material in Tank 18 prior to operational closure. Tank 18 is an 85-foot diameter, 34-foot high carbon steel tank with nominal operating volume of 1,300,000 gallons. It is a Type IV tank, and has been in service storing radioactive materials since 1959. Recent mechanical cleaning of the tank removed all mounds of material. Anticipating a low level of solids in the residual material, Huff and Thaxton [2009] developed a plan to sample the material during the final clean-up process while it would still be resident in sufficient quantities to support analytical determinations in four quadrants of the tank. Execution of the plan produced fewer solids than expected to support analytical determinations in all four quadrants. Huff and Thaxton [2009] then restructured the plan to characterize the residual floor material separately in the North and the South regions: two 'hemispheres.' This document provides sampling recommendations to complete the characterization of the residual material on the tank bottom following the guidance in Huff and Thaxton [2009] to split the tank floor into a North and a South hemisphere. The number of samples is determined from a modification of the formula previously published in Edwards [2001] and the sample characterization data for previous sampling of Tank 18 described by Oji [2009]. The uncertainty is quantified by an upper 95% confidence limit (UCL95%) on each analyte's mean concentration in Tank 18. The procedure computes the uncertainty in analyte concentration as a function of the number of samples, and the final number of samples is determined when the reduction in the uncertainty from an additional sample no longer has a practical impact on results. The characterization of the full suite of analytes in the North hemisphere is currently supported by a single Mantis rover sample obtained from a compact region near the center riser. A floor scrape sample was obtained from a compact region near the northeast riser and has been analyzed for a shortened list of key analytes. Since the unused portion of the floor scrape sample material is archived and available in sufficient quantity, additional analyses need to be performed to complete results for the full suite of constituents. The characterization of the full suite of analytes in the South hemisphere is currently supported by a single Mantis rover sample; there have been no floor scrape samples previously taken from the South hemisphere. The criterion to determine the number of additional samples was based on the practical reduction in the uncertainty when a new sample is added. This was achieved when five additional samples are obtained. In addition, two archived samples will be used if a contingency such as failing to demonstrate the comparability of the Mantis samples to the floor scrape samples occurs. To complete sampling of the Tank 18 residual floor material, three additional samples should be taken from the North hemisphere and four additional samples should be taken from the South hemisphere. One of the samples from each hemisphere will be archived in case of need. Two of the three additional samples from the North hemisphere and three of the four additional samples from the South hemisphere will be analyzed. Once the results are available, differences between the Mantis and three floor scrape samples (the sample previously obtained near NE riser plus the two additional samples that will be analyzed) results will be evaluated. If there are no statistically significant analyte concentration differences between the Mantis and floor scrape samples, those results will be combined and then UCL95%s will be calculated. If the analyte concentration differences between the Mantis and floor scrape samples are statistically significant, the UCL95%s will be calculated without the Mantis sample results. If further reduction in the upper confidence limits is needed and can be achieved by the addition of the archived samples, they will be analyzed and included in the stati

  15. Do caesarean section rates 'catch-up'? Evidence from 14 European countries.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Yi

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated the catch up effect of Caesarean Section (CS) birth rates across 14 European countries during 1980-2009 for the first time. The panel stationary test incorporating multiple structural breaks and cross-sectional dependence was used to provide reliable evidence for the existence of the catch up effect of CS birth rates. Our results suggested that the CS birth rates in 14 European countries have mostly exhibited signs of convergence through a steady upward trend from 1980 to 2009. Policymakers in low CS birth rate countries should be cautioned concerning the negative impact of the increase of CS births. PMID:23519946

  16. Rocking response of tanks containing two liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yu; Chang, Y.W.

    1993-06-01

    Liquid storage tanks are important components of industrial facilities and, when located in earthquake prone regions, should be designed to withstand the earthquakes to which they may be subjected. There are cases in which the density of the tank content is not uniform. For such cases, the dynamic responses of tanks containing liquids with different densities must be studied. A study on the dynamic response of upright circular cylindrical liquid-storage tanks containing two different liquids under a rock base motion with an arbitrary temporal variation is presented. Only rigid tanks were studied. The response quantities examined include the hydrodynamic pressure, sloshing wave height and the associated frequencies, base shear and moments. Each of these response quantities is expressed as the sum of the so-called impulsive component and convective component. Unlike the case of tanks containing one liquid, in which the response is controlled by one parameter, height-to-radius ratio, the response of tanks containing two different liquids are controlled by three parameters: height-to-radius ratio, and mass density ratio and height ratio of the two liquids. The interrelationship of the responses of the tank-liquid system to rocking and lateral base excitations is established by examining numerical results extensively. It is found that some of the response quantities for a tank-liquid system under a rocking base motion can be determined from the corresponding response quantities for an identical tank under a horizontal base motion.

  17. Chemical composition of Hanford Tank SY-102

    SciTech Connect

    Birnbaum, E.; Agnew, S.; Jarvinen, G.; Yarbro, S.

    1993-12-01

    The US Department of Energy established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) to safely manage and dispose of the radioactive waste, both current and future, stored in double-shell and single-shell tanks at the Hanford sites. One major program element in TWRS is pretreatment which was established to process the waste prior to disposal using the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant. In support of this program, Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a conceptual process flow sheet which will remediate the entire contents of a selected double-shelled underground waste tank, including supernatant and sludge, into forms that allow storage and final disposal in a safe, cost-effective and environmentally sound manner. The specific tank selected for remediation is 241-SY-102 located in the 200 West Area. As part of the flow sheet development effort, the composition of the tank was defined and documented. This database was built by examining the history of liquid waste transfers to the tank and by performing careful analysis of all of the analytical data that have been gathered during the tank`s lifetime. In order to more completely understand the variances in analytical results, material and charge balances were done to help define the chemistry of the various components in the tank. This methodology of defining the tank composition and the final results are documented in this report.

  18. Discovery External Tank Connection Check

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Vehicle Assembly Building, Ken Strite, NASA Quality Control, inspects the connection between Space Shuttle Discovery and the external tank that will be used to launch mission STS-103 in early December. This 10 day mission is designed to replace aging parts on the nine year old Hubble Space Telescope and to upgrade some of its functioning systems. During the flight, the astronaut crew will replace all six of the observatory's gyroscopes, a fine guidance sensor, its main computer, and other equipment.

  19. Sloshing motions in excited tanks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jannette B. Frandsen

    2004-01-01

    A fully non-linear finite difference model has been developed based on inviscid flow equations. Numerical experiments of sloshing wave motion are undertaken in a 2-D tank which is moved both horizontally and vertically. Results of liquid sloshing induced by harmonic base excitations are presented for small to steep non-breaking waves. The simulations are limited to a single water depth above

  20. RETRIEVAL & TREATMENT OF HANFORD TANK WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    EACKER, J.A.; SPEARS, J.A.; STURGES, M.H.; MAUSS, B.M.

    2006-01-20

    The Hanford Tank Farms contain 53 million gal of radioactive waste accumulated during over 50 years of operations. The waste is stored in 177 single-shell and double-shell tanks in the Hanford 200 Areas. The single-shell tanks were put into operation from the early 1940s through the 1960s with wastes received from several generations of processing facilities for the recovery of plutonium and uranium, and from laboratories and other ancillary facilities. The overall hanford Tank Farm system represents one of the largest nuclear legacies in the world driving towards completion of retrieval and treatment in 2028 and the associated closure activity completion by 2035. Remote operations, significant radiation/contamination levels, limited access, and old facilities are just some of the challenges faced by retrieval and treatment systems. These systems also need to be able to successfully remove 99% or more of the waste, and support waste treatment, and tank closure. The Tank Farm retrieval program has ramped up dramatically in the past three years with design, fabrication, installation, testing, and operations ongoing on over 20 of the 149 single-shell tanks. A variety of technologies are currently being pursued to retrieve different waste types, applications, and to help establish a baseline for recovery/operational efficiencies. The paper/presentation describes the current status of retrieval system design, fabrication, installation, testing, readiness, and operations, including: (1) Saltcake removal progress in Tanks S-102, S-109, and S-112 using saltcake dissolution, modified sluicing, and high pressure water lancing techniques; (2) Sludge vacuum retrieval experience from Tanks C-201, C-202, C-203, and C-204; (3) Modified sluicing experience in Tank C-103; (4) Progress on design and installation of the mobile retrieval system for sludge in potentially leaking single-shell tanks, particularly Tank C-101; and (5) Ongoing installation of various systems in the next generation of tanks to be retrieved.

  1. Decline in angler use despite increased catch rates: Anglers’ response to the implementation of a total catch-and-release regulation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fiona D. Johnston; Robert Arlinghaus; Jim Stelfox; John R. Post

    2011-01-01

    A mandatory total catch-and-release regulation and a bait ban were implemented on Lower Kananaskis Lake, Canada, due to the drastic decline of the native bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) population. In the decade following harvest-regulation changes, the adult bull trout population experienced a 28-fold increase in abundance. Two roving creel surveys of winter ice-anglers, the first conducted just prior to the

  2. Reactor tank UT acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W.L.

    1990-01-30

    The SRS reactor tanks are constructed of type 304 stainless steel, with 0.5 inch thick walls. An ultrasonic (UT) in-service inspection program has been developed for examination of these tanks, in accordance with the ISI Plan for the Savannah River Production Reactors Process Water System (DPSTM-88-100-1). Prior to initiation of these inspections, criteria for the disposition of any indications that might be found are required. A working group has been formed to review available information on the SRS reactor tanks and develop acceptance criteria. This working group includes nationally recognized experts in the nuclear industry. The working group has met three times and produced three documents describing the proposed acceptance criteria, the technical basis for the criteria and a proposed initial sampling plan. This report transmits these three documents, which were prepared in accordance with the technical task plan and quality assurance plan for this task, task 88-001-A- 1. In addition, this report summarizes the acceptance criteria and proposed sampling plan, and provides further interpretation of the intent of these three documents where necessary.

  3. Model selection and multimodel inference for standardizing catch rates of bycatch species: a case study of oceanic whitetip

    E-print Network

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    ARTICLE Model selection and multimodel inference for standardizing catch rates of bycatch species-fitting zero-inflated negative binomial model showed that standardized CPUE of oceanic whitetip sharks. Walsh Abstract: One key issue for standardizing catch per unit effort (CPUE) of bycatch species is how

  4. Optimal estimation of catch by the continuous underway fish egg sampler based on a model of the vertical distribution

    E-print Network

    deYoung, Brad

    Optimal estimation of catch by the continuous underway fish egg sampler based on a model of the vertical distribution of American plaice (Hippoglossoides platessoides) eggs P. Pepin, K. A. Curtis, P. V., and Helbig, J.A. 2007. Optimal estimation of catch by the continous underway fish egg sampler based

  5. Maintenance of Effects of the Eat Smart School Food Service Program: Results from the Catch-on Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stavroula K. Osganian; Deanna M. Hoelscher; Michelle Zive; Paul D. Mitchell; Patricia Snyder; Larry S. Webber

    2003-01-01

    The Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health (CATCH) Eat Smart Program targeted the food service of the 56 CATCH intervention elementary schools to effect positive changes in the total fat and saturated fat content of school lunch. Maintenance of the food service intervention in former intervention (n = 56) and control (n = 20) schools was evaluated 5 years

  6. Productivity Change in U.S. Catch Share Fisheries John Walden, Juan Agar, Ron Felthoven, Abigail Harley, Stephen Kasperski,

    E-print Network

    Productivity Change in U.S. Catch Share Fisheries John Walden, Juan Agar, Ron Felthoven, Abigail.S. Catch Share Fisheries John Walden, Juan Agar, Ron Felthoven, Abigail Harley, Stephen Kasperski, Jean Lee, Assistant Administrator for Fisheries #12;ii Recommended citation: Walden, J., J. Agar, R. Felthoven, A

  7. 46 CFR 32.55-30 - Venting of cargo tanks of tank vessels constructed between November 10, 1936, and July 1, 1951-TB...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Venting of cargo tanks of tank vessels constructed between November...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY...32.55-30 Venting of cargo tanks of tank vessels constructed...

  8. Motor vehicle fuel tank with unitary fuel reservoir

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bailey

    1987-01-01

    A method of forming a motor vehicle fuel tank i\\/d having a unitary tank wall comprising a bottom wall and opposed side walls extending upwardly from the bottom wall. The fuel tank comprises a fuel reservoir unitary with the tank wall and two opposed substantially C-shaped ridges extending upwardly into the tank from the plane of the bottom wall. Each

  9. CLOSURE OF HLW TANKS FORMULATION FOR A COOLING COIL GROUT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. R. Harbour; V Vickie Williams; E Erich Hansen

    2008-01-01

    The Tank Closure and Technology Development Groups are developing a strategy for closing the High Level Waste (HLW) tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Two Type IV tanks, 17 and 20 in the F-Area Tank Farm, have been successfully filled with grout. Type IV tanks at SRS do not contain cooling coils; on the other hand, the majority of

  10. LH2 fuel tank design for SSTO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Geoff

    1994-01-01

    This report will discuss the design of a liquid hydrogen fuel tank constructed from composite materials. The focus of this report is to recommend a design for a fuel tank which will be able to withstand all static and dynamic forces during manned flight. Areas of study for the design include material selection, material structural analysis, heat transfer, thermal expansion, and liquid hydrogen diffusion. A structural analysis FORTRAN program was developed for analyzing the buckling and yield characteristics of the tank. A thermal analysis Excel spreadsheet was created to determine a specific material thickness which will minimize heat transfer through the wall of the tank. The total mass of the tank was determined by the combination of both structural and thermal analyses. The report concludes with the recommendation of a layered material tank construction. The designed system will include exterior insulation, combination of metal and organize composite matrices and honeycomb.

  11. Single Shell Tank (SST) Retrieval Sequence & Double Shell Tank (DST) Space Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    HOHL, T.M.

    2001-09-20

    This document describes the baseline single-shell tank (SST) waste retrieval sequence for the River Protection Project updated for Fiscal Year 2002. The double-shell tank (DST) space evaluation presents projected DST needs for Hanford for additional DSTs.

  12. Single Shell Tank (SST) Retrieval Sequence & Double Shell Tank (DST) Space Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    STRODE, J.N.

    2002-09-23

    This document describes the baseline single-shell tank (SST) waste retrieval sequence for the River Protection Project updated for Fiscal Year 2002. The double-shell tank (DST) space evaluation presents projected DST needs for Hanford for additional DSTs.

  13. Single Shell Tank (SST) Retrieval Sequence and Double Shell Tank (DST) Space Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    KIRCH, N.W.

    2003-09-23

    This document describes the baseline single-shell tank (SST) waste retrieval sequence for the River Protection Project updated for Fiscal Year 2002. The double-shell tank (DST) space evaluation presents projected DST needs for Hanford for additional DSTs.

  14. Project Catch: A space based solution to combat illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing. Part I: Vessel monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detsis, Emmanouil; Brodsky, Yuval; Knudtson, Peter; Cuba, Manuel; Fuqua, Heidi; Szalai, Bianca

    2012-11-01

    Space assets have a unique opportunity to play a more active role in global resource management. There is a clear need to develop resource management tools in a global framework. Illegal, Unregulated and Unreported (IUU) fishing is placing pressure on the health and size of fishing stocks around the world. Earth observation systems can provide fishery management organizations with cost effective monitoring of large swaths of ocean. Project Catch is a fisheries management project based upon the complimentary, but independent Catch-VMS and Catch-GIS systems. Catch-VMS is a Vessel Monitoring System with increased fidelity over existing offerings. Catch-GIS is a Geographical Information System that combines VMS information with existing Earth Observation data and other data sources to identify Illegal, Unregulated and Unreported (IUU) fishing. Project Catch was undertaken by 19 Masters students from the 2010 class of the International Space University. In this paper, the space-based system architecture of Project Catch is presented and analyzed. The rationale for the creation of the system, as well as the engineering trade-off studies in its creation, are discussed. The Catch-VMS proposal was envisaged in order to address two specific problems: (1) the expansion of illegal fishing to high-latitude regions where existing satellite systems coverage is an issue and (2) the lack of coverage in remote oceanic regions due to reliance on coastal-based monitoring. Catch-VMS utilizes ship-borne transponders and hosted-payload receivers on a Global Navigation Satellite System in order to monitor the position and activity of compliant fishing vessels. Coverage is global and continuous with multiple satellites in view providing positional verification through multilateration techniques. The second part of the paper briefly describes the Catch-GIS system and investigates its cost of implementation.

  15. TANK 50 BATCH 0 SALTSTONE FORMULATION CONFIRMATION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Langton

    2006-01-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel were requested to confirm the Tank 50 Batch 0 grout formulation per Technical Task Request, SSF-TTR-2006-0001 (task 1 of 2) [1]. Earlier Batch 0 formulation testing used a Tank 50 sample collected in September 2005 and is described elsewhere [2]. The current testing was performed using a sample of Tank 50 waste collected in

  16. FY 1996 Tank waste analysis plan

    SciTech Connect

    Homi, C.S.

    1996-09-18

    This Tank Waste Analysis Plan (TWAP) describes the activities of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Characterization Project to plan, schedule, obtain, and document characterization information on Hanford waste tanks. This information is required to meet several commitments of Programmatic End-Users and the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement. This TWAP applies to the activities scheduled to be completed in fiscal year 1996.

  17. PCB Analysis Plan for Tank Archive Samples

    SciTech Connect

    NGUYEN, D.M.

    2001-03-22

    This analysis plan specifies laboratory analysis, quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC), and data reporting requirements for analyzing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) concentrations in archive samples. Tank waste archive samples that are planned for PCB analysis are identified in Nguyen 2001. The tanks and samples are summarized in Table 1-1. The analytical data will be used to establish a PCB baseline inventory in Hanford tanks.

  18. Stabilization of In-Tank Residual Wastes and External-Tank Soil Contamination for the Hanford Tank Closure Program: Applications to the AX Tank Farm

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. L. Anderson; B. P. Dwyer; C. Ho; J. L. Krumhansl; G. McKeen; M. A. Molecke; H. R. Westrich; P. Zhang

    1998-01-01

    Technical support for the Hanford Tank Closure Program focused on evaluation of concepts for immobilization of residual contaminants in the Hanford AX tanks and underlying soils, and identification of cost-effective approaches to improve long-term performance of AX tank farm cIosure systems. Project objectives are to develop materials or engineered systems that would significantly reduce the radionuclide transport to the groundwater

  19. Liquid sloshing in a tilted cylindrical tank.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodge, F. T.; Garza, L. R.

    1972-01-01

    Two distinct fundamental modes are shown to exist for liquid sloshing in a tilted cylindrical tank. The 'long' mode is excited by tank motions parallel to the long axis of the elliptical free surface, the 'short' mode by tank motions perpendicular to it. Experiments show that the natural frequencies of both modes decrease as the tilt increases, and the slosh damping decreases markedly with increased tilt for the long mode.

  20. Reinforcing Liner For Composite Cryogenic Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgeson, John E.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed fiber-reinforced liner for graphite/epoxy fuel tank prevents metal-foil leakage barrier from detaching at low temperatures. Consists of epoxy containing fibers of Spectra 1000. Tank holds inner layers of foil, adhesive, and proposed liner. Liner much thinner than shell, adds little weight, and subtracts little volume. Lined composite tank used to hold liquids from room temperature to cryogenic temperatures. Not suitable for oxygen, because organic materials in liner oxidized quickly.

  1. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-U-110

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, T.M.; Jensen, L.

    1993-04-01

    This report investigates the nature of the waste in tank U-110 using historical and current information. When characterizing tank waste, several important properties are considered. First, the physical characteristics of the waste are presented, including waste appearance, density, and size of waste particles. The existence of any exotherms in the tank that may present a safety concern is investigated. Finally, the radiological and chemical composition of the tank are presented.

  2. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-U-110. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, T.M.; Jensen, L.

    1993-09-01

    Tank 241-U-110 (U-110) is a Hanford Site waste tank that was ;most recently sampled in November and December 1989. Analysis of the samples obtained from tank U-110 was conducted to support the characterization of the contents of this tank and to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-10-00 (Ecology, et al. 1992). Because of incomplete recovery of the waste during sampling, there may be bias in the results of this characterization report.

  3. Stabilization of in-tank residuals and external-tank soil contamination: FY 1997 interim report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1997-01-01

    This interim report evaluates various ways to stabilize decommissioned waste tanks and contaminated soils at the AX Tank Farm as part of a preliminary evaluation of end-state options for the Hanford tanks. Five technical areas were considered: (1) emplacement of smart grouts and\\/or other materials, (2) injection of chemical-getters into contaminated soils surrounding tanks (soil mixing), (3) emplacement of grout

  4. Tank characterization report for double-shell tank 241-AN-102

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-29

    This characterization report summarizes the available information on the historical uses, current status, and sampling and analysis results of waste stored in double-shell underground storage tank 241- AN-102. This report supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, Milestone M-44-09 (Ecology et al. 1996). Tank 241-AN-102 is one of seven double-shell tanks located in the AN Tank Farm in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. The tank was hydrotested in 1981, and when the water was removed, a 6-inch heel was left. Tank 241-AN-102 began receiving waste from tank 241-SY-102 beginning in 1982. The tank was nearly emptied in the third quarter of 1983, leaving only 125 kL (33 kgal) of waste. Between the fourth quarter of 1983 and the first quarter of 1984, tank 241-AN-102 received waste from tanks 241-AY-102, 241-SY-102, 241-AW-105, and 241- AN-101. The tank was nearly emptied in the second quarter of 1984, leaving a heel of 129 kL (34 kgal). During the second and third quarters of 1984, the tank was filled with concentrated complexant waste from tank 241-AW-101. Since that time, only minor amounts of Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant miscellaneous waste and water have been received; there have been no waste transfer to or from the tank since 1992. Therefore, the waste currently in the tank is considered to be concentrated complexant waste. Tank 241-AN-102 is sound and is not included on any of the Watch Lists.

  5. Tank waste remediation system (TWRS) mission analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rieck, R.H.

    1996-10-03

    The Tank Waste Remediation System Mission Analysis provides program level requirements and identifies system boundaries and interfaces. Measures of success appropriate to program level accomplishments are also identified.

  6. Developing NDE Techniques for Large Cryogenic Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Don; Starr, Stan; Arens, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    The Shuttle Program requires very large cryogenic ground storage tanks in which to store liquid oxygen and hydrogen. The existing Pads A and B Launch Complex-39 tanks, which will be passed onto future launch programs, are 45 years old and have received minimal refurbishment and only external inspections over the years. The majority of the structure is inaccessible without a full system drain of cryogenic liquid and granular insulation in the annular region. It was previously thought that there was a limit to the number of temperature cycles that the tanks could handle due to possible insulation compaction before undergoing a costly and time consuming complete overhaul; therefore the tanks were not drained and performance issues with these tanks, specifically the Pad B liquid hydrogen tank, were accepted. There is a needind an opportunity, as the Shuttle program ends and work to upgrade the launch pads progresses, to develop innovative non-destructive evaluation (NDE) techniques to analyze the current tanks. Techniques are desired that can aid in determining the extent of refurbishment required to keep the tanks in service for another 20+ years. A nondestructive technique would also be a significant aid in acceptance testing of new and refurbished tanks, saving significant time and money, if corrective actions can be taken before cryogen is introduced to the systems.

  7. 46 CFR 153.266 - Tank linings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED...the tank as recommended by the lining manufacturer. Piping Systems and Cargo Handling...

  8. 46 CFR 153.266 - Tank linings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED...the tank as recommended by the lining manufacturer. Piping Systems and Cargo Handling...

  9. 46 CFR 153.266 - Tank linings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED...the tank as recommended by the lining manufacturer. Piping Systems and Cargo Handling...

  10. 46 CFR 153.266 - Tank linings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED...the tank as recommended by the lining manufacturer. Piping Systems and Cargo Handling...

  11. 46 CFR 153.266 - Tank linings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED...the tank as recommended by the lining manufacturer. Piping Systems and Cargo Handling...

  12. Rocking response of tanks containing two liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Reactor Engineering Div.

    1995-01-01

    A study on the dynamic response of upright circular cylindrical liquid-storage tanks containing two different liquids under a rocking base motion with an arbitrary temporal variation is presented. Only rigid tanks were studied. The response quantities examined include the hydrodynamic pressure, sloshing wave height and the associated frequencies, base shear and moments. Each of these response quantities is expressed as the sum of the so-called impulsive component and convective component. Unlike the case of tanks containing one liquid, in which the response is controlled by one parameter, height-to-radius ratio, the response of tanks containing two different liquids are controlled by three parameters: height-to-radius ratio, and mass density ratio and height ratio of the two liquids. The interrelationship of the responses of the tank-liquid system to rocking and lateral base excitations is established by examining numerical results extensively. The study shows that some of the response quantities for tank-liquid system under a rocking base motion can be determined from the available data for the response of an identical tank under a horizontal base motion. Base rocking motion can occur in a ground-supported tank or in an elevated tank under earthquake motions.

  13. Seismic response of large suspended tanks. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, D.C.; Gvildys, J.; Chang, Y.W.

    1983-01-01

    The response of the large-diametered liquid-filled tank under seismic disturbances is studied in this paper with the emphasis on the effects of the bottom-plate vibration on fluid dynamic pressure and free-surface sloshing. The fluid in the tank is treated as a continuum medium, which is quite different from the conventional method that treats the fluid as an added mass attached on the tank wall. As a result, important effects such as free-surface sloshing, fluid-structure interaction, flexibility of tank are included in the analysis.

  14. Seismic response of large suspended tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, D.C.; Chang, Y.W.; Gvildys, J.

    1983-01-01

    The response of a large-diameter liquid-filled tank to seismic disturbances is studied in this paper with the emphasis on the effects of the bottom plate vibration on fluid dynamic pressure and free-surface sloshing. The fluid in the tank is treated as a continuum medium, which is quite different from the conventional method that treats the fluid as an added mass attached on the tank wall. As a result, important effects such as free-surface sloshing, fluid-structure interaction, and flexibility of the tank are included in the analysis.

  15. Characterization of Hanford tank wastes containing ferrocyanides

    SciTech Connect

    Tingey, J.M.; Matheson, J.D.; McKinley, S.G.; Jones, T.E.; Pool, K.H.

    1993-02-01

    Currently, 17 storage tanks on the Hanford site that are believed to contain > 1,000 gram moles (465 lbs) of ferrocyanide compounds have been identified. Seven other tanks are classified as ferrocyanide containing waste tanks, but contain less than 1,000 gram moles of ferrocyanide compounds. These seven tanks are still included as Hanford Watch List Tanks. These tanks have been declared an unreviewed safety question (USQ) because of potential thermal reactivity hazards associated with the ferrocyanide compounds and nitrate and nitrite. Hanford tanks with waste containing > 1,000 gram moles of ferrocyanide have been sampled. Extensive chemical, radiothermical, and physical characterization have been performed on these waste samples. The reactivity of these wastes were also studied using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetric analysis. Actual tank waste samples were retrieved from tank 241-C-112 using a specially designed and equipped core-sampling truck. Only a small portion of the data obtained from this characterization effort will be reported in this paper. This report will deal primarily with the cyanide and carbon analyses, thermal analyses, and limited physical property measurements.

  16. Hanford Technology Development (Tank Farms) - 12509

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, Thomas; Charboneau, Stacy; Olds, Erik [US DOE (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The mission of the Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is to safely retrieve and treat the 56 million gallons of Hanford's tank waste and close the Tank Farms to protect the Columbia River. The millions of gallons of tank waste are a byproduct of decades of plutonium production. After irradiated fuel rods were taken from the nuclear reactors to the processing facilities at Hanford they were exposed to a series of chemicals designed to dissolve away the rod, which enabled workers to retrieve the plutonium. Once those chemicals were exposed to the fuel rods they became radioactive and extremely hot. They also couldn't be used in this process more than once. Because the chemicals are caustic and extremely hazardous to humans and the environment, underground storage tanks were built to hold these chemicals until a more permanent solution could be found. One key part of the ongoing work at Hanford is retrieving waste from the single-shell tanks, some of which have leaked in the past, and transferring that waste to the double-shell tanks - none of which have ever leaked. The 56 million gallons of radioactive tank waste is stored in 177 underground tanks, 149 of which are single-shell tanks built between 1943 and 1964. The tanks sit approximately 250 feet above the water table. Hanford's single-shell tanks are decades past their 20-year design life. In the past, up to 67 of the single-shell tanks are known or suspected to have leaked as much as one million gallons of waste to the surrounding soil. Starting in the late 1950's, waste leaks from dozens of the single-shell tanks were detected or suspected. Most of the waste is in the soil around the tanks, but some of this waste is thought to have reached groundwater. The Vadose Zone Project was established to understand the radioactive and chemical contamination in the soil beneath the tanks as the result of leaks and discharges from past plutonium-production operations. The vadose zone is the area of soil between the ground surface and the water table 200-to-300 feet below. The project tracks and monitors contamination in the soil. Technologies are being developed and deployed to detect and monitor contaminants. Interim surface barriers, which are barriers put over the single-shell tanks, prevent rain and snow from soaking into the ground and spreading contamination. The impermeable barrier placed over T Farm, which was the site of the largest tank waste leak in Hanford's history, is 60,000 square feet and sloped to drain moisture outside the tank farm. The barrier over TY Farm is constructed of asphalt and drains moisture to a nearby evaporation basin. Our discussion of technology will address the incredible challenge of removing waste from Hanford's single-shell tanks. Under the terms of the Tri-Party Agreement, ORP is required to remove 99 percent of the tank waste, or until the limits of technology have been reached. All pumpable liquids have been removed from the single-shell tanks, and work now focuses on removing the non-pumpable liquids. Waste retrieval was completed from the first single-shell tank in late 2003. Since then, another six single-shell tanks have been retrieved to regulatory standards. (authors)

  17. Math 315 Exam #3 Solutions in Brief 1. (20 points) Two tanks contain 10 liters of water each. Initially tank

    E-print Network

    Math 315 Exam #3 Solutions in Brief 1. (20 points) Two tanks contain 10 liters of water each. Initially tank 1 contains no salt and tank 2 contains 246 grams of salt. Water con- taining 50 grams of salt per liter is added to tank 1 at the rate 2 liters/minute. Water containing no salt is added to tank 2

  18. Trawl catches for many fish species exhibit diel patterns (Casey and Myers,

    E-print Network

    145 Trawl catches for many fish species exhibit diel patterns (Casey and Myers, 1998. Many gadids exhibit diel changes in availability associated with vertical migration (Beamish, 1965: a comparison of diel responses to conventional sweeps and elevated sweeps Clifford H. Ryer1 (contact author

  19. Mortality of Largemouth Bass during Catch-and-Release Tournaments in a Puerto Rico Reservoir

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Wesley Neal; Darien Lopez-Clayton

    2001-01-01

    In Puerto Rico, unique protocols are used during fishing tournaments for largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides. Live wells are not required, and many anglers retain their catch on metal stringers. During day tournaments, fish are collected and weighed by a roving weigh-in boat; night tournaments use a central weigh-in station. We monitored 15 fishing tournaments over 1 year in Lucchetti Reservoir,

  20. Catching Old Influenza Virus with A New Markov Model HamChing Lam

    E-print Network

    Boley, Daniel

    Catching Old Influenza Virus with A New Markov Model HamChing Lam Dept. of Computer Science on the Hemag- glutinin (HA) gene, a major surface antigen of the avian influenza virus. Using this model we Influenza virus, Poisson process, Markov Model 1. INTRODUCTION For the past century researchers have been