Note: This page contains sample records for the topic 241-er-311 catch tank from Science.gov.
While these samples are representative of the content of Science.gov,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of Science.gov
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.
Last update: August 15, 2014.
1

Sampling and Analysis Plan for Catch Tank 241ER311 Vapor  

Microsoft Academic Search

This tank sampling and analysis plan (TSAP) identifies the sample collection, laboratory analysis, quality assurance\\/quality control (QA\\/QC) objectives for the characterization of catch tank 241-ER-311 vapor space.

1999-01-01

2

Sampling and Analysis Plan for Catch Tank 241ER311 Vapor  

Microsoft Academic Search

This tank sampling and analysis plan (TSAF') identifies the sample collection, laboratory analysis, quality assurance\\/quality control (QA\\/QC) objectives for the characterization of catch tank 241-ER-311 vapor space. Data to be collected under this revision (Revision 2) of the TSAP will be used to evaluate the effectiveness of the portable exhauster recently installed for the tank. Vapor samples taken previous to

1999-01-01

3

Tank 241ER311 Interconnected Piping and Equipment Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan  

Microsoft Academic Search

This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for vapor samples obtained from piping, equipment, or facilities connected to tank 241-ER-311. The purpose of this sampling event is to obtain information about the effects of the argon purge gas added to tank 241-ER-311. Vapor samples will be taken in

1999-01-01

4

Tank 241-ER-311, grab samples, ER311-98-1, ER311-98-2, ER311-98-3 analytical results for the final report  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final report for catch tank 241-ER-311 grab samples. Three grab samples ER311-98-1, ER311-98-2 and ER311-98-3 were taken from East riser of tank 241-ER-311 on August 4, 1998 and received by the 222-S Laboratory on August 4, 1998. Analyses were performed in accordance with the Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Sasaki, 1998)and the Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) (Mulkey and Miller, 1997). The analytical results are presented in the data summary report (Table 1). No notification limits were exceeded.

FULLER, R.K.

1999-02-24

5

Radioactive air emissions notice of construction 241-ER-311 catch tank  

SciTech Connect

The following description, attachments and references are provided to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH), Division of Radiation Protection, Air Emissions & Defense Waste Section as a notice of construction (NOC) in accordance with the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247, Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. The WAC 246-247-060, ''Applications, registration and licensing,'' states ''This section describes the information requirements for approval to construct, modify, and operate an emission unit. Any NOC requires the submittal of the information listed in Appendix A,'' Appendix A (WAC 246-247-110) lists the requirements that must be addressed. Additionally, the following description, attachments and references are provided to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as an NOC, in accordance with Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 6 1, ''National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants.'' The information required for submittal to the EPA is specified in 40 CFR 61.07. The potential emissions from this activity are estimated to provide less than 0.1 millirem/year total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) to the hypothetical offsite maximally exposed individual (MEI), and commencement is needed within a short time frame. Therefore, this application is also intended to provide notification of the anticipated date of initial startup in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(l), and it is requested that approval of this application will also constitute EPA acceptance of this 40 CFR 61.09(a)(l) notification. Written notification of the actual date of initial startup, in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(2) will be provided later.

HILL, J.S.

1999-11-01

6

Data Report for Catch Tank Vapor Sampling  

SciTech Connect

CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) is responsible for developing and maintaining the authorization basis for River Protection Project (RPP) facilities and operations. This responsibility includes closure of the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) for waste tank ancillary equipment such as catch tanks, double-contained receiver tanks, 244-AR and 244-CR vaults, 242-S and 242-T Evaporators, and inactive miscellaneous underground storage tanks. To support closure of the Flammable Gas USQ for catch tanks, an analysis of the flammable gas hazard was performed. This document provides a summary of flammable gas data obtained from RPP active catch tanks in FY 2000. Flammable gas level measurements for each catch tank (other than 241-AX-152) are discussed on a tank-by-tank basis in Section 3.0. Conclusions based on the data are provided in Section 4.0. This section also includes recommendations that would be useful when conducting vapor sampling for other miscellaneous tanks (e.g., inactive miscellaneous underground storage tanks).

NGUYEN, D.M.

2000-09-28

7

Catching Sunlight  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Everyone knows that astronomy is done in the dark. Astronomers are creatures of the night, like vampires, sleeping during the day and working all night long to catch the faint light of their elusive prey.

Friedman, Alan

8

Clean catch urine sample  

MedlinePLUS

Urine culture - clean catch; Urinalysis - clean catch; Clean catch urine specimen; Urine collection - clean catch ... If possible, collect the sample when urine has been in your bladder for 2 to 3 hours. You will use a special kit to collect the urine. It will ...

9

Functional Analysis for Double Shell Tank (DST) Subsystems  

SciTech Connect

This functional analysis identifies the hierarchy and describes the subsystem functions that support the Double-Shell Tank (DST) System described in HNF-SD-WM-TRD-007, System Specification for the Double-Shell Tank System. Because of the uncertainty associated with the need for upgrades of the existing catch tanks supporting the Waste Feed Delivery (WFD) mission, catch tank functions are not addressed in this document. The functions identified herein are applicable to the Phase 1 WFD mission only.

SMITH, D.F.

2000-08-22

10

Catch a Wave  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Catch A Wave is an educational project for students, grades 6 - 12, that uses online real time data to guide student discovery of the causes and effects of ocean waves and tides. By the end of the project, students will be able to distinguish the difference between semi-diurnal, diurnal and mixed tides, determine the effect of weather on wave highest, determine the effects of tides and biological organisms, and determine how much energy is in a wave. There is a teachers guide, many student activities, a student gallery, reference material, and project information.

2006-01-01

11

Technical bases for leak detection surveillance of waste storage tanks. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the technical bases for specification limits, monitoring frequencies and baselines used for leak detection and intrusion (for single shell tanks only) in all single and double shell radioactive waste storage tanks, waste transfer lines, and most catch tanks and receiver tanks in the waste tank farms and associated areas at Hanford.

Johnson, M.G.; Badden, J.J.

1995-02-13

12

50 CFR 660.511 - Catch restrictions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Catch restrictions. 660.511 Section 660.511 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION...OFF WEST COAST STATES Coastal Pelagics Fisheries § 660.511 Catch restrictions. (a) All CPS...

2013-10-01

13

Passing and Catching in Rugby.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet contains the fundamentals for rugby at the primary school level. It deals primarily with passing and catching the ball. It contains instructions on (1) holding the ball for passing, (2) passing the ball to the left--standing, (3) passing the ball to the left--running, (4) making a switch pass, (5) the scrum half's normal pass, (6) the…

Namudu, Mike M.

14

Linking Total Catch Quotas and Allocation Schemes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fishery managers are faced with many options when setting the total catch quota for a fishery and allocating the catch among user groups. In many fisheries, these management issues are approached independently, and allocations are assigned after the total catch quota has been determined. Because allocations determine not just the yields to the different user groups but also characteristics of

Christopher M. Legault

1998-01-01

15

Tank farm surveillance and waste status summary report for May 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations.

Hanlon, B.M.

1993-08-01

16

Tank farm surveillance and waste status report for June 1991  

SciTech Connect

This report is Westinghouse Hanford Company's official inventory for radioactive stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. The intent of the report is to provide data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and to provide supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. 2 figs., 8 tabs.

Hanlon, B.M.

1991-09-01

17

Flammable gas/slurry growth unreviewed safety question:justification for continued operation for the tank farms at the Hanford site  

SciTech Connect

This Justification for Continued Operation (JCO) provides a basis for continued operation in 176 high level waste tanks, double contained receiver tanks (DCRTs), catch tanks, 244-AR Vault, 242-S and 242-T Evaporators and inactive miscellaneous underground storage tanks (IMUSTs) relative to flammable gas hazards. Required controls are specified.

Leach, C.E., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-31

18

Improving Fishery Catch Statistics for Lake Victoria  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fisheries of Lake Victoria are highly dispersed and catch statistical information is insufficient for supporting management. Catch assessment surveys for the three riparian countries were found to be weak or inadequate and a strategy for improving this source of information is proposed. Considerable illegal fishing, using banned gears and small-meshed nets was prevalent and considered to be detrimental to

I. G. Cowx; M. van der Knaap; L. I. Muhoozi; A. Othina

2003-01-01

19

Small Waste Tank Sampling and Retrieval System  

SciTech Connect

At the Test Reactor Area of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), four 1500-gal catch tanks were found to contain RCRAhazardous waste. A system was needed to obtain a representative sample of the liquid, as well as the hardpacked heels, and to ultimately homogenize and remove the tank contents for disposal. After surveying the available technologies, the AEA Fluidic Pulse Mixing and Retrieval System was chosen for a technology demonstration. A demonstration, conducted with nonhazardous surrogate material, proved that the system was capable of loosening the hard-packed heel, homogenizing the entire tank contents, and collecting a representative sample. Based on the success of the demonstration, a detailed evaluation was done to determine the applicability of the system to other tanks. The evaluation included the sorting of data on more than 700 tanks to select candidates for further deployment of the system. A detailed study was also done to determine if the purchase of a second system would be cost effective. The results of the evaluation indicated that a total of thirteen tanks at the INEEL are amenable to sampling and/or remediation using the AEA Fluidic Pulse Mixing and Retrieval System. Although the currently-owned system appears sufficient for the needs of one INEEL program, it is insufficient to meet the combined needs at the INEEL. The INEEL will commence operation of the system on the TRA-730 Catch Tank System in June 2002.

Magleby, Mary Theresa

2002-08-01

20

School students "Catch a Star"!  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

School students from across Europe and beyond have won prizes in an astronomy competition, including the trip of a lifetime to one of the world's most powerful astronomical observatories, on a mountaintop in Chile. ESO, the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, together with the European Association for Astronomy Education (EAAE), has just announced the winners of the 2007 "Catch a Star!" competition. ESO PR Photo 21/07 "Catch a Star!" is an international astronomy competition for school students, in which students are invited to 'become astronomers' and explore the Universe. The competition includes two categories for written projects on astronomical themes, to ensure that every student, whatever their level, has the chance to enter and win exciting prizes. For the artistically minded, "Catch a Star!" also includes an astronomy-themed artwork competition. Students from 22 countries submitted hundreds of written projects and pieces of artwork. "The standard of entries was most impressive, and made the jury's task of choosing winners both enjoyable and difficult! We hope that everyone, whether or not they won a prize, had fun taking part, and learnt some exciting things about our Universe", said Douglas Pierce-Price, Education Officer at ESO. The top prize, of a week-long trip to Chile to visit the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) on Paranal, was won by students Jan Mestan and Jan Kotek from Gymnazium Pisek in the Czech Republic, together with their teacher Marek Tyle. Their report on "Research and Observation of the Solar Eclipse" told how they had studied solar eclipses, and involved their fellow students in observations of an eclipse from their school in 2006. The team will travel to Chile and visit the ESO VLT - one of the world's most powerful optical/infrared telescopes - where they will meet astronomers and be present during a night of observations on the 2600m high Paranal mountaintop. "It's fantastic that we will see the VLT in action. I'm also looking forward to my first view of the southern sky!" said Jan Mestan. His fellow student is also excited about the trip. "I am very happy that we'll visit the Paranal observatory, because this is one of the best astronomical observatories in the world, in the amazing scenery of the Atacama Desert", said Jan Kotek. "This was a very well written project, and we particularly liked the way in which the students involved the rest of their school.", said Douglas Pierce-Price. The team's hard work was also helped by some good fortune, as it seemed at first that bad weather might block their view of the eclipse. "It was cloudy, overcast, and a strong west wind was blowing in Pisek. The meteorological situation was nearly hopeless, and we thought we might have to cancel the observation. But later, the sky luckily cleared up and we could see the eclipse!", said the students. "I am very glad that my students' work won the top prize in this great competition. I believe that the visit to the VLT will be an important experience in their education." said teacher Marek Tyle. Other "Catch a Star" participants have won exciting trips to observatories across Europe. Emilio Rojas, Angel Sanchez, Javier Ortiz and their teacher Roberto Palmer from Spain have won a trip to Koenigsleiten Observatory in Austria for their project "Jupiter on the radio". Bogumil Giertler, Ammar Ahmed, and their teacher Richard Burt from Italy have won a trip to Wendelstein Observatory in Germany for their project "Determining the relative radiant of the Geminid meteor shower". Victor Raimbault, Remi Takase, Thomas Salez and their teacher Michel Faye from France have won a trip to Calar Alto Observatory in Spain, a prize kindly donated by the Spanish Council for Scientific Research, for their project "Light on Dark Matter". Forty other teams won prizes, which included astronomy software and sets of posters showcasing stunning astronomical ima

2007-04-01

21

30 CFR 57.19132 - Safety catches.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety catches. 57.19132 Section 57.19132 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH...

2013-07-01

22

TECHNICAL BASIS FOR VENTILATION REQUIREMENTS IN TANK FARMS OPERATING SPECIFICATIONS DOCUMENTS  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the technical basis for high efficiency particulate air filter (HEPA) for Hanford tank farm ventilation systems (sometimes known as heating, ventilation and air conditioning [HVAC]) to support limits defined in Process Engineering Operating Specification Documents (OSDs). This technical basis included a review of older technical basis and provides clarifications, as necessary, to technical basis limit revisions or justification. This document provides an updated technical basis for tank farm ventilation systems related to Operation Specification Documents (OSDs) for double-shell tanks (DSTs), single-shell tanks (SSTs), double-contained receiver tanks (DCRTs), catch tanks, and various other miscellaneous facilities.

BERGLIN, E J

2003-06-23

23

Effect of survey design and catch rate estimation on total catch estimates in Chinook salmon fisheries  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Roving–roving and roving–access creel surveys are the primary techniques used to obtain information on harvest of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in Idaho sport fisheries. Once interviews are conducted using roving–roving or roving–access survey designs, mean catch rate can be estimated with the ratio-of-means (ROM) estimator, the mean-of-ratios (MOR) estimator, or the MOR estimator with exclusion of short-duration (?0.5 h) trips. Our objective was to examine the relative bias and precision of total catch estimates obtained from use of the two survey designs and three catch rate estimators for Idaho Chinook salmon fisheries. Information on angling populations was obtained by direct visual observation of portions of Chinook salmon fisheries in three Idaho river systems over an 18-d period. Based on data from the angling populations, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to evaluate the properties of the catch rate estimators and survey designs. Among the three estimators, the ROM estimator provided the most accurate and precise estimates of mean catch rate and total catch for both roving–roving and roving–access surveys. On average, the root mean square error of simulated total catch estimates was 1.42 times greater and relative bias was 160.13 times greater for roving–roving surveys than for roving–access surveys. Length-of-stay bias and nonstationary catch rates in roving–roving surveys both appeared to affect catch rate and total catch estimates. Our results suggest that use of the ROM estimator in combination with an estimate of angler effort provided the least biased and most precise estimates of total catch for both survey designs. However, roving–access surveys were more accurate than roving–roving surveys for Chinook salmon fisheries in Idaho.

McCormick, Joshua L.; Quist, Michael C.; Schill, Daniel J.

2012-01-01

24

Nutritional catch-up growth.  

PubMed

Malnutrition, marked by variant nutrient deficiencies, is considered a leading cause of stunted growth worldwide. In developing countries, malnutrition is caused mainly by food shortage and infectious diseases. Malnutrition may also be found in the developed world, where it is due mostly to prematurity, chronic diseases, and anorexia nervosa. In most cases, when food consumption is corrected, spontaneous catch-up (CU) growth occurs. However, CU growth is not always complete, leading to growth deficits. Therefore, it is important to understand the mechanisms that govern this process. Using a rat model of food restriction followed by refeeding, we established a nutrition-induced CU growth model. Levels of leptin and insulin-like growth factor-1 were found to significantly decrease when food was restricted and to increase already 1 day after refeeding. Gene expression analysis of the growth plate revealed that food restriction specifically affects transcription factors such as the hypoxia inducible factor-1 and its downstream targets on the one hand, and global gene expression, indicating epigenetic regulation, on the other. Food restriction also reduced the level of several microRNAs, including the chondrocyte-specific miR-140, which led to an increase in its target, SIRT1, a class III histone deacetylase. These findings may explain the global changes in gene expression observed under nutritional manipulation. We suggest that multiple levels of regulation, including transcription factors, epigenetic mechanisms, and microRNAs respond to nutritional cues and offer a possible explanation for some of the effects of food restriction on epiphyseal growth plate growth. The means whereby these components sense changes in nutritional status are still unknown. Deciphering the role of epigenetic regulation in growth may pave the way for the development of new treatments for children with growth disorders. PMID:23428685

Gat-Yablonski, Galia; Pando, Rakefet; Phillip, Moshe

2013-01-01

25

Trammel net catch species composition, catch rates and métiers in southern European waters: A multivariate approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

We identified and quantified the effect of season, depth, and inner and outer panel mesh size on the trammel net catch species composition and catch rates in four southern European areas (Northeast Atlantic: Basque Country, Spain; Algarve, Portugal; Gulf of Cádiz, Spain; Mediterranean: Cyclades, Greece), all of which are characterised by important trammel net fisheries. In each area, we conducted,

Konstantinos I. Stergiou; Dimitrios K. Moutopoulos; Milagrosa C. Soriguer; Esteban Puente; Pedro G. Lino; Cristina Zabala; Pedro Monteiro; Luis A Errazkin; Karim Erzini

2006-01-01

26

Visuomotor transformation for interception: catching while fixating.  

PubMed

Catching a ball involves a dynamic transformation of visual information about ball motion into motor commands for moving the hand to the right place at the right time. We previously formulated a neural model for this transformation to account for the consistent leftward movement biases observed in our catching experiments. According to the model, these biases arise within the representation of target motion as well as within the transformation from a gaze-centered to a body-centered movement command. Here, we examine the validity of the latter aspect of our model in a catching task involving gaze fixation. Gaze fixation should systematically influence biases in catching movements, because in the model movement commands are only generated in the direction perpendicular to the gaze direction. Twelve participants caught balls while gazing at a fixation point positioned either straight ahead or 14 degrees to the right. Four participants were excluded because they could not adequately maintain fixation. We again observed a consistent leftward movement bias, but the catching movements were unaffected by fixation direction. This result refutes our proposal that the leftward bias partly arises within the visuomotor transformation, and suggests instead that the bias predominantly arises within the early representation of target motion, specifically through an imbalance in the represented radial and azimuthal target motion. PMID:19543722

Dessing, Joost C; Oostwoud Wijdenes, Leonie; Peper, C E; Beek, Peter J

2009-07-01

27

METHODS FOR ESTIMATING FISH CATCH SIZES  

EPA Science Inventory

This report reviews and evaluates methods for estimating fish catch size of major edible species in free-flowing rivers and nearshore marine areas. Based on this effort, a detailed work plan is presented for developing a stepwise regression analysis approach for estimating fish c...

28

Pitch-catch only ultrasonic fluid densitometer  

DOEpatents

The present invention is an ultrasonic fluid densitometer that uses a material wedge and pitch-catch only ultrasonic transducers for transmitting and receiving ultrasonic signals internally reflected within the material wedge. Density of a fluid is determined by immersing the wedge into the fluid and measuring reflection of ultrasound at the wedge-fluid interface.

Greenwood, Margaret S. (Richland, WA); Harris, Robert V. (Pasco, WA)

1999-01-01

29

Decline of fish catch in Switzerland  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   Fish catch, especially of brown trout, has decreased by about 50% over the last 15 years in many Swiss rivers and streams.\\u000a In addition, the health status of brown trout has been reported to be impaired in many streams. In order to evaluate the causes\\u000a of these phenomena, the project \\

Patricia Burkhardt-Holm; Armin Peter; Helmut Segner

2002-01-01

30

Catching the Dream Annual Report, 2002.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2002, Catching the Dream (CTD) provided college scholarships to 208 American Indian students as well as grants to improve education in schools that serve Native students. This annual report describes CTD's programs and activities in 2002. Contents include short descriptions of CTD's scholarship, fellowship, and internship programs; describe…

Chavers, Dean, Ed.

2002-01-01

31

Illinois PER Interactive Examples: Catch the Ball  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive homework problem requires the student to determine the velocity necessary for a person to catch a ball thrown up in the air a given distance away. The problem is accompanied by a sequence of questions designed to encourage critical thinking and conceptual analysis. It is part of a larger collection of interactive problems developed by the Illinois Physics Education Research Group.

Gladding, Gary

2008-02-09

32

Pitch-catch only ultrasonic fluid densitometer  

DOEpatents

The present invention is an ultrasonic fluid densitometer that uses a material wedge and pitch-catch only ultrasonic transducers for transmitting and receiving ultrasonic signals internally reflected within the material wedge. Density of a fluid is determined by immersing the wedge into the fluid and measuring reflection of ultrasound at the wedge-fluid interface. 6 figs.

Greenwood, M.S.; Harris, R.V.

1999-03-23

33

Does habitat or depth influence catch rates of pelagic species?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The efficiency of a pelagic longline fishing operation and the species composition of the resulting catch is influenced primarily by the relationship between the distribution of hooks and species vulnerability, with vulnerability described by either depth or some suite of environmental variables. We therefore fitted longline catch rate models to determine whether catch is estimated better by vertically distributing a

Keith A. Bigelow; Mark N. Maunder

2007-01-01

34

50 CFR 622.457 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Spiny Lobster Fishery of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands § 622.457 Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures...

2013-10-01

35

50 CFR 622.58 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Shrimp Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico § 622.58 Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and...

2013-10-01

36

Dual Tank Fuel System  

DOEpatents

A dual tank fuel system has primary and secondary fuel tanks, with the primary tank including a filler pipe to receive fuel and a discharge line to deliver fuel to an engine, and with a balance pipe interconnecting the primary tank and the secondary tank. The balance pipe opens close to the bottom of each tank to direct fuel from the primary tank to the secondary tank as the primary tank is filled, and to direct fuel from the secondary tank to the primary tank as fuel is discharged from the primary tank through the discharge line. A vent line has branches connected to each tank to direct fuel vapor from the tanks as the tanks are filled, and to admit air to the tanks as fuel is delivered to the engine.

Wagner, Richard William (Albion, NY); Burkhard, James Frank (Churchville, NY); Dauer, Kenneth John (Avon, NY)

1999-11-16

37

Catch and release of microwave photon states.  

PubMed

We demonstrate a superconducting resonator with variable coupling to a measurement transmission line. The resonator coupling can be adjusted through zero to a photon emission rate 1000 times the intrinsic resonator decay rate. We demonstrate the catch and release of photons in the resonator, as well as control of nonclassical Fock states. We also demonstrate the dynamical control of the release waveform of photons from the resonator, a key functionality that will enable high-fidelity quantum state transfer between distant resonators or qubits. PMID:23521281

Yin, Yi; Chen, Yu; Sank, Daniel; O'Malley, P J J; White, T C; Barends, R; Kelly, J; Lucero, Erik; Mariantoni, Matteo; Megrant, A; Neill, C; Vainsencher, A; Wenner, J; Korotkov, Alexander N; Cleland, A N; Martinis, John M

2013-03-01

38

Illinois PER Interactive Examples: Catch the Ball  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is an interactive homework problem for introductory physics students relating to velocity and acceleration. A ball is thrown straight upward and a person 70m away runs to catch it before it hits the ground. Given initial speed of the thrown ball, students are required to determine how fast the runner must go. This problem is accompanied by a Socratic-dialog "help" sequence designed to encourage critical thinking as users do a guided conceptual analysis before attempting the mathematics. It is part of a larger collection of interactive physics problems.

Gladding, Gary

2008-09-10

39

Catch and Release of Microwave Photon States  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We demonstrate a superconducting resonator with variable coupling to a measurement transmission line. The resonator coupling can be adjusted through zero to a photon emission rate 1000 times the intrinsic resonator decay rate. We demonstrate the catch and release of photons in the resonator, as well as control of nonclassical Fock states. We also demonstrate the dynamical control of the release waveform of photons from the resonator, a key functionality that will enable high-fidelity quantum state transfer between distant resonators or qubits.

Yin, Yi; Chen, Yu; Sank, Daniel; O'Malley, P. J. J.; White, T. C.; Barends, R.; Kelly, J.; Lucero, Erik; Mariantoni, Matteo; Megrant, A.; Neill, C.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; Korotkov, Alexander N.; Cleland, A. N.; Martinis, John M.

2013-03-01

40

Tank farm surveillance and waste status summary report for December 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special 9 surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of U.S. Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Order 5820.2A, Chapter I, Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, U.S. Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

Hanlon, B.M.

1994-05-01

41

Tank 241-U-204 tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is the tank characterization plan for Tank 241-U-204 located in the 200 Area Tank Farm on the Hanford Reservation in Richland, Washington. This plan describes Data Quality Objectives (DQO) and presents historical information and scheduled sampling events for tank 241-U-204.

Bell, K.E.

1995-03-23

42

Tank 241-S-111: Tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, ORNL, and PNL tank vapor program. Scope of this plan is to provide guidance for sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-S-111 (this tank is on the organic and flammable gas watch list). This tank received Redox plant waste, among other wastes.

Homi, C.S.

1995-03-07

43

Catching the wave at its crest.  

PubMed

Leland Kaiser, PhD, a long-time member of the ACPE faculty, describes opportunities in terms of surfers. Many smaller and insignificant waves will appear before the surfer senses "the big one." The knowledgeable and skilled surfer will distinguish these small waves (mere fads in management terms) from the real one (a significant trend for the medical manager). If the surfer catches the big wave before its crest, there is a formidable danger of being too far in front and being crushed by it. If the surfer misjudges the wave and starts behind the crest, the wave will leave the surfer behind. It is only by catching the wave at or near its crest that the surfer has a chance for a long and exciting ride. And, of course, even having judged the wave perfectly, there is no guarantee of success. The surfer must still use his or her skills with daring and precision if the ride is to end in the calmer waters of the shore and not in the toss and tumble of a spill. PMID:10161232

Schenke, R

1995-09-01

44

Wasted fishery resources: discarded by-catch in the USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fishery by-catch, especially discarded by-catch, is a serious problem in the world's oceans. Not only are the stocks of discarded species affected, but entire trophic webs and habitats may be disrupted at the ecosystem level. This paper reviews discarding in the marine fisheries of the USA; however, the type, diversity and regulatory mechanisms of the fisheries are similar to developed

Jennie M Harrington; Ransom A Myers; Andrew A Rosenberg

2005-01-01

45

50 CFR 665.72 - Total Allowable Catch (TAC) limit.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-10-01 2009-10-01 false Total Allowable Catch (TAC) limit. 665.72 Section 665.72 Wildlife and...Groundfish Fisheries § 665.72 Total Allowable Catch (TAC) limit. (a) TAC limits will be set annually for the fishing...

2009-10-01

46

50 CFR 665.211 - Total Allowable Catch (TAC) limit.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Total Allowable Catch (TAC) limit. 665.211 Section 665.211 Wildlife...Hawaii Fisheries § 665.211 Total Allowable Catch (TAC) limit. (a) TAC limits will be set annually for the fishing...

2010-10-01

47

Six Years of Catch Statistics on Yellowstone Lake  

Microsoft Academic Search

The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service collected catch statistics on Yellowstone Lake and adjacent waters from 1950 to 1955 as part of an investigation on the status of the cutthroat trout fishery and the fish populations. Methods for estimating numbers of fishermen, hours of effort, and catch, were developed for each unit of the fishery and were used to

Oliver B. Cope

1957-01-01

48

49 CFR 172.331 - Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. 172.331 Section 172.331 Transportation...packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a)...

2013-10-01

49

Composite Tank Technologies Development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The need for cryogenic fuel tanks continues to expand, and research at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is addressing these needs. This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of composite tank development, including tank testing, cryogenic materials research, tank liners, and dual-walled tanks, at MSFC.

DeLay, Tom

2005-01-01

50

Underground storage tank management  

SciTech Connect

In this third edition, sixteen new and revised chapters provide tank owners and operators with guidance in making engineering and management decisions: Regulatory Highlights, Inventory Control, Leak Prediction Through Inventory Analysis, Underground Tank Testing, Tank Design, Secondary Containment, Monitoring and Leak Protection, Overfill and Transfer Protection, Maintenance and Retrofit, Tank Removal, Remedial Action, Tank Installation, Tank Management Plan, Storing Hazardous Substances, Minimizing Your Liabilities, and Financial Responsibility.

Not Available

1988-01-01

51

Tank 241-U-203: Tank Characterization Plan  

SciTech Connect

The revised Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order states that a tank characterization plan will be developed for each double-shell tank and single-shell tank using the data quality objective process. The plans are intended to allow users and regulators to ensure their needs will be met and resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information. This document satisfies that requirement for Tank 241-U-203 sampling activities.

Sathyanarayana, P. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-03-27

52

Tank 241-BX-106: Tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, and WHC 222-S Laboratory. Scope of this plan is to provide guidance for sampling and analysis of samples for tank 241-BX-106. (Waste from this tank shall be transferred to a double-shell tank.)

Schreiber, R.D.

1995-03-06

53

Tank 241-T-110 tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

This Tank Characterization Plan (ICP) identifies the information needed to address issues related to short-term and long-term safe storage and long-term management of single shell tank 241-T-1,10 (T- 110). It should be understood that needs and issues surrounding tank T-110 are evolving as new information becomes available. As a result, this TCP addresses only issues that have been identified to date. It is expected that changes may be necessary as additional issues or needs arise which impact the management of tank T-110. As necessary, this TCP will be revised to reflect changes. This plan reflects the best information available as of August 1996. Tank T-110 entered into service in the first quarter of 1945. The tank began receiving second- cycle decontamination waste in the first quarter of 1945 (Agnew et al. 1995). The tank began to cascade overflow to Tank 241-T-111 in October 1945. In the second quarter of 1952, the tank began receiving 224 waste in addition to the second-cycle waste. The tank contained second-cycle and 224 waste until the first quarter of 1976. During the third quarter of 1974, the tank received waste water. The tank was removed from service in 1976. A level adjustment was made in April of 1982. The tank was primarily stabilized in 1978 and partially isolated in December 1982. The tank is classified as a sound, non-stabilized tank (Brevick et al. 1995). Tank T-110 currently contains a total volume of 14351789 kL. (379 kgal ) of waste, which is equivalent to 338.5 cm (133 in) of waste as measured from the baseline of the tank (Hanlon 1996). Tank T-110 is on the Flammable Gas Watch List. Near-term sampling and analysis activities are focused on verifying or changing the Watch List tank status, and identifying any new safety issues. If new safety issues are identified, analysis activities consistent with the identified issue will be performed. In addition to resolving safety issues, it is intended that all tank waste will be subject to pretreatment and retrieval to prepare it for final storage or disposal. Presently, these long-range plans are not yet fully identified and, therefore, are not included in this document.

Mccain, D.J.

1996-09-19

54

50 CFR 648.140 - Catch quotas and other restrictions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...STATES Management Measures for the Black Sea Bass Fishery § 648.140 Catch...restrictions. (a) Review . The Black Sea Bass Monitoring Committee...pots and traps on the mortality of black sea bass; and any other relevant...

2010-10-01

55

50 CFR 648.140 - Catch quotas and other restrictions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...STATES Management Measures for the Black Sea Bass Fishery § 648.140 Catch...restrictions. (a) Review . The Black Sea Bass Monitoring Committee...pots and traps on the mortality of black sea bass; and any other relevant...

2009-10-01

56

Catch-Disperse-Release Readout for Superconducting Qubits.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

We analyze single-shot readout for superconducting qubits via controlled catch, dispersion, and release of a microwave field. A tunable coupler is used to decouple the microwave resonator from the transmission line during the dispersive qubit-resonator in...

A. Galiautdinov A. N. Korokov E. Mlinar E. A. Sete J. M. Martinis

2013-01-01

57

1. VIEW EAST, COMPONENTS TEST LABORATORY SHOWING CATCH BASINS, TURBINE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. VIEW EAST, COMPONENTS TEST LABORATORY SHOWING CATCH BASINS, TURBINE TESTING AREA, AND PUMP TESTING TOWER. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Components Test Laboratory, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

58

A Case of CATCH22 Syndrome Diagnosed in Postmenopausal Woman  

PubMed Central

CATCH 22 Syndrome is caused by chromosome 22q11.2 microdeletion, characterized by developmental abnormalities of the third and fourth pharyngeal pouches. It has a prevalence estimated at 1:3,000-1:9,000. Most deletions occurs sporadic, but autosomal dominant inheritance observed in 6-10% of cases. CATCH22 often diagnosed due to hypocalcemia during neonatal period or decreased immunity or facial defect, so it is very rare being diagnosed CATCH22 in adulthood. We report a 57 year old female who referred to mental change due to hypocalcemia and is diagnosed CATCH22. She was presented with hypoparathyroidism, single kidney due to renal agenesis, and mild facial defect. Our patient responded well to calcium and vitamin D treatment and she is on follow-up in outpatient clinic.

Lee, Seung Kyung; Lee, Min Jeong; Lee, Hyo Jin; Kim, Bu Kyung; Sohn, Young Bae

2013-01-01

59

Regulatory issues associated with closure of the Hanford AX Tank Farm ancillary equipment  

SciTech Connect

Liquid mixed, high-level radioactive waste has been stored in underground single-shell tanks at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Hanford Site. After retrieval of the waste from the single-shell tanks, the DOE will proceed with closure of the tank farm. The 241-AX Tank Farm includes four one-million gallon single-shell tanks in addition to sluice lines, transfer lines, ventilation headers, risers, pits, cribs, catch tanks, buildings, well and associated buried piping. This equipment is classified as ancillary equipment. This document addresses the requirements for regulatory close of the ancillary equipment in the Hanford Site 241-AX Tank Farm. The options identified for physical closure of the ancillary equipment include disposal in place, disposal in place after treatment, excavation and disposal on site in an empty single-shell tank, and excavation and disposal outside the AX Tank Farm. The document addresses the background of the Hanford Site and ancillary equipment in the AX Tank Farm, regulations for decontamination and decommissioning of radioactively contaminated equipment, requirements for the cleanup and disposal of radioactive wastes, cleanup and disposal requirements governing hazardous and mixed waste, and regulatory requirements and issues associated with each of the four physical closure options. This investigation was conducted by the Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, during Fiscal Year 1998 for the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project.

Becker, D.L.

1998-09-02

60

Operational Design and Quality Control in the CATCH Multicenter Trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background.The Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health (CATCH) was the first multicenter school-based research study to employ the fundamentals of clinical trials including the standardized protocol and Manuals of Operation, a steering committee for study governance, a distributed data system, an extensive quality control system, and a Data and Safety Monitoring Board.Method.CATCH tested the effectiveness of changes in school

Elaine J. Stone; Stavroula K. Osganian; Sonja M. McKinlay; Margaret C. Wu; Larry S. Webber; Russell V. Luepker; Cheryl L. Perry; Guy S. Parcel; John P. Elder

1996-01-01

61

Tank 241-BY-111 tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

The sampling and analytical needs associated with the 51 Hanford Site underground storage tanks classified on one or more of the four Watch Lists (ferrocyanide, organic, flammable gas, and high heat), and the safety screening of all 177 tanks have been identified through the Data Quality Objective (DQO) process. DQO`s identify information needed by a program group in the Tank Waste Remediation System concerned with safety issues, regulatory requirements, or the transporting and processing of tank waste. This Tank Characterization Plan will identify characterization objectives for Tank BY-111 pertaining to sample collection, sample preparation and analysis, and laboratory analytical evaluation and reporting requirements. In addition, an estimate of the current contents and status of the tank is given.

Homi, C.S.

1994-11-03

62

50 CFR 622.41 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Reef Fish Resources of the Gulf of Mexico § 622.41 Annual catch...groupers and tilefishes in the Gulf of Mexico serves as the accountability...

2013-10-01

63

HANFORD TANK CLEANUP UPDATE  

SciTech Connect

Access to Hanford's single-shell radioactive waste storage tank C-107 was significantly improved when workers completed the cut of a 55-inch diameter hole in the top of the tank. The core and its associated cutting equipment were removed from the tank and encased in a plastic sleeve to prevent any potential spread of contamination. The larger tank opening allows use of a new more efficient robotic arm to complete tank retrieval.

BERRIOCHOA MV

2011-04-07

64

Comparison of Access and Roving Catch Rate Estimates Under Varying Within-Trip Catch-Rates and Different Roving Minimum Trip Lengths.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Reliable roving interview catch rates require relative consistency of catch rate throughout individual angler trips and appropriate minimum fishing time prior to interview. Onehalf hour fishing time prior to interview has been the accepted minimum. Roving...

R. N. Lockwood

2004-01-01

65

49 CFR 179.401 - Individual specification requirements applicable to inner tanks for cryogenic liquid tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...applicable to inner tanks for cryogenic liquid tank car tanks. 179.401 Section 179.401 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

2013-10-01

66

Mitigating by-catch of diamondback terrapins in crab pots  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Chronic by-catch of diamondback terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin) in blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) pots is a concern for terrapin conservation along the United States Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts. Despite the availability of by-catch reduction devices (BRDs) for crab pots, adoption of BRDs has not been mandated and by-catch of terrapins continues. We conducted experimental fishing studies in North Carolina's year-round blue crab fishery from 2000 to 2004 to evaluate the ability of various BRDs to reduce terrapin by-catch without a concomitant reduction in the catch of blue crabs. In 4,822 crab pot days fished, we recorded only 21 terrapin captures. Estimated capture rates were 0.003 terrapins/pot per day in hard crab experimental fishing and 0.008 terrapins/pot per day in peeler experimental fishing. All terrapin captures occurred from April to mid-May within 321.4 m of the shoreline. Longer soak times produced more dead terrapins, with 4 live and 4 dead during hard crab experimental fishing and 11 live and 2 dead during peeler experimental fishing. The 4.0-cm BRDs in fall and 4.5-cm and 5.0-cm BRDs in spring reduced the catch of legal-sized male hard crabs by 26.6%, 21.2%, and 5.7%, respectively. Only the 5.0-cm BRDs did not significantly affect the catch of legal-sized hard male crabs. However, BRDs had no measurable effect on catch of target crabs in the peeler crab fishery. Our results identify 3 complementary and economically feasible tools for blue crab fishery managers to exclude terrapins from commercially fished crab pots in North Carolina: 1) gear modifications (e.g., BRDs); 2) distance-to-shore restrictions; and 3) time-of-year regulations. These measures combined could provide a reduction in terrapin by-catch of up to 95% without a significant reduction in target crab catch.

Hart, Kristen M.; Crowder, Larry B.

2011-01-01

67

49 CFR 174.63 - Portable tanks, IM portable tanks, IBCs, Large Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...IM portable tanks, IBCs, Large Packagings, cargo tanks...IM portable tanks, IBCs, Large Packagings, cargo tanks, and...tank, IM portable tank, IBC, Large Packaging, cargo tank...approved for transportation by the Associate Administrator for Safety,...

2010-10-01

68

Engineering study of 50 miscellaneous inactive underground radioactive waste tanks located at the Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This engineering study addresses 50 inactive underground radioactive waste tanks. The tanks were formerly used for the following functions associated with plutonium and uranium separations and waste management activities in the 200 East and 200 West Areas of the Hanford Site: settling solids prior to disposal of supernatant in cribs and a reverse well; neutralizing acidic process wastes prior to crib disposal; receipt and processing of single-shell tank (SST) waste for uranium recovery operations; catch tanks to collect water that intruded into diversion boxes and transfer pipeline encasements and any leakage that occurred during waste transfer operations; and waste handling and process experimentation. Most of these tanks have not been in use for many years. Several projects have, been planned and implemented since the 1970`s and through 1985 to remove waste and interim isolate or interim stabilize many of the tanks. Some tanks have been filled with grout within the past several years. Responsibility for final closure and/or remediation of these tanks is currently assigned to several programs including Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS), Environmental Restoration and Remedial Action (ERRA), and Decommissioning and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure (D&RCP). Some are under facility landlord responsibility for maintenance and surveillance (i.e. Plutonium Uranium Extraction [PUREX]). However, most of the tanks are not currently included in any active monitoring or surveillance program.

Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

1994-03-02

69

Tank 241-B-101 tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) has advised the US Department of Energy (DOE) to concentrate the near-term sampling and analysis activities on identification and resolution of safety issues (Conway 1993). The data quality objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used to identify the sampling and analytical needs for the resolution of safety issues. As a result, a revision in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement or TPA) milestone M-44 has been made, which states that ``A Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) will be developed for each double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process``. This document satisfies that requirement for tank 241-B-101 (B-101) sampling activities. Tank B-101 is identified as a low-heat load non-Watch List tank, and is classified as an assumed leaker. The tank is passively ventilated, interim stabilized, and intrusion prevention measures have been completed. As of January 31, 1995, approximately 428,000 liters of non-complexed waste was contained in the tank. Tank B-101 is expected to have two primary layers. A layer of saltcake waste generated from the 242-B evaporator, followed by a top layer of sludge composed of B-Plant high-level, B-Plant low-level, and unknown waste.

Schreiber, R.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-04-28

70

Tank Characterization Report for Single Shell Tank 241-C-104  

SciTech Connect

Interprets information about the tank answering a series of six questions covering areas such as information drivers, tank history, tank comparisons, disposal implications, data quality and quantity, and unique aspects of the tank.

ADAMS, M.R.

2000-04-06

71

Signature of ocean warming in global fisheries catch.  

PubMed

Marine fishes and invertebrates respond to ocean warming through distribution shifts, generally to higher latitudes and deeper waters. Consequently, fisheries should be affected by 'tropicalization' of catch (increasing dominance of warm-water species). However, a signature of such climate-change effects on global fisheries catch has so far not been detected. Here we report such an index, the mean temperature of the catch (MTC), that is calculated from the average inferred temperature preference of exploited species weighted by their annual catch. Our results show that, after accounting for the effects of fishing and large-scale oceanographic variability, global MTC increased at a rate of 0.19 degrees Celsius per decade between 1970 and 2006, and non-tropical MTC increased at a rate of 0.23 degrees Celsius per decade. In tropical areas, MTC increased initially because of the reduction in the proportion of subtropical species catches, but subsequently stabilized as scope for further tropicalization of communities became limited. Changes in MTC in 52 large marine ecosystems, covering the majority of the world's coastal and shelf areas, are significantly and positively related to regional changes in sea surface temperature. This study shows that ocean warming has already affected global fisheries in the past four decades, highlighting the immediate need to develop adaptation plans to minimize the effect of such warming on the economy and food security of coastal communities, particularly in tropical regions. PMID:23676754

Cheung, William W L; Watson, Reg; Pauly, Daniel

2013-05-16

72

Assemblies of Conformal Tanks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Assemblies of tanks having shapes that conform to each other and/or conform to other proximate objects have been investigated for use in storing fuels and oxidizers in small available spaces in upper stages of spacecraft. Such assemblies might also prove useful in aircraft, automobiles, boats, and other terrestrial vehicles in which space available for tanks is limited. The basic concept of using conformal tanks to maximize the utilization of limited space is not new in itself: for example, conformal tanks are used in some automobiles to store windshield -washer liquid and coolant that overflows from radiators. The novelty of the present development lies in the concept of an assembly of smaller conformal tanks, as distinguished from a single larger conformal tank. In an assembly of smaller tanks, it would be possible to store different liquids in different tanks. Even if the same liquid were stored in all the tanks, the assembly would offer an advantage by reducing the mechanical disturbance caused by sloshing of fuel in a single larger tank: indeed, the requirement to reduce sloshing is critical in some applications. The figure shows a prototype assembly of conformal tanks. Each tank was fabricated by (1) copper plating a wax tank mandrel to form a liner and (2) wrapping and curing layers of graphite/epoxy composite to form a shell supporting the liner. In this case, the conformal tank surfaces are flat ones where they come in contact with the adjacent tanks. A band of fibers around the outside binds the tanks together tightly in the assembly, which has a quasi-toroidal shape. For proper functioning, it would be necessary to maintain equal pressure in all the tanks.

DeLay, Tom

2009-01-01

73

Test plan for measuring ventilation rates and combustible gas levels in RPP active catch tanks  

SciTech Connect

T Plant is the primary decontamination facility for the Hanford Site, and also performs waste handling, verification, and repackaging. This Interim Operational Safety Requirement (IOSR) document provides required limits, programs, and administrative controls at the T Plant Complex. It is to be used in conjunction with HNF-SD-WM-ISB-006, Interim Safety Basis (ISB) for Solid Waste Facilities (T Plant), and HNF-2896, Safety Assessment for Project W-259, which is an addendum to the ISB.

NGUYEN, D.M.

1999-06-03

74

Test plan for measuring ventilation rates and combustible gas levels in RPP active catch tanks  

Microsoft Academic Search

T Plant is the primary decontamination facility for the Hanford Site, and also performs waste handling, verification, and repackaging. This Interim Operational Safety Requirement (IOSR) document provides required limits, programs, and administrative controls at the T Plant Complex. It is to be used in conjunction with HNF-SD-WM-ISB-006, Interim Safety Basis (ISB) for Solid Waste Facilities (T Plant), and HNF-2896, Safety

1999-01-01

75

Status report for inactive miscellaneous underground storage tanks at Hanford Site 200 Areas  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this status report is to summarize updated data and information from the FY 1994 strategy plan that is associated with inactive miscellaneous underground storage tanks (IMUSTs). Assumptions and processes to assess potential risks and operational concerns are documented in this report. Safety issue priorities are ranked based on a number of considerations. Sixty-three IMUSTs have been Identified and placed on the official IMUST list. All the tanks are associated with past Hanford Site operations. Of the 63 tanks., 19 are catch tanks, 20 are vault tanks, 3 are neutralization tanks, 8 are settling tanks, 2 are solvent makeup tanks used to store hexone, 2 are flush tanks, 3 are decontamination tanks, 1 is a diverter station, 1 is a receiver tank, 1 is an experimental tank, and 3 are waste handling tanks. It is important to proactively deal with the risks Imposed by these 63 tanks, and at the same time not jeopardize the existing commitments and schedules for mitigating and resolving identified safety issues related to the 177 SSTs and DSTS. Access controls and signs have been placed on all but the three official IMUSTs added most recently. An accelerated effort to identify authorization documents and perform unreviewed safety question (USQ) screening has been completed. According to a set of criteria consistent with the safety screening data quality objective (DQO) process, 6 IMUSTs are ranked high related to the hydrogen generation potential safety Issue, 1 is ranked high related to the ferrocyanide potential safety issue, 6 are ranked high related to the flammability potential safety issue, and 25 are ranked high related to the vapor emissions potential safety issue.

Powers, T.B.

1995-10-01

76

Feed tank transfer requirements.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document presents a definition of tank turnover; DOE responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements; records an...

J. R. Freeman-Pollard

1998-01-01

77

Resolving the molecular mechanism of cadherin catch bond formation.  

PubMed

Classical cadherin Ca(2+)-dependent cell-cell adhesion proteins play key roles in embryogenesis and in maintaining tissue integrity. Cadherins mediate robust adhesion by binding in multiple conformations. One of these adhesive states, called an X-dimer, forms catch bonds that strengthen and become longer lived in the presence of mechanical force. Here we use single-molecule force-clamp spectroscopy with an atomic force microscope along with molecular dynamics and steered molecular dynamics simulations to resolve the molecular mechanisms underlying catch bond formation and the role of Ca(2+) ions in this process. Our data suggest that tensile force bends the cadherin extracellular region such that they form long-lived, force-induced hydrogen bonds that lock X-dimers into tighter contact. When Ca(2+) concentration is decreased, fewer de novo hydrogen bonds are formed and catch bond formation is eliminated. PMID:24887573

Manibog, Kristine; Li, Hui; Rakshit, Sabyasachi; Sivasankar, Sanjeevi

2014-01-01

78

Retractable tool bit having latch type catch mechanism  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A retractable tool bit assembly for a tool such as an allen key is presented. The assembly includes one or more spring loaded nestable or telescoping tubular sections together with a catch mechanism for capturing and holding the tool in its retracted position. The catch mechanism consists of a latch mechanism located in a base section and which engages a conically shaped tool head located at the inner end of the tool. The tool head adjoins an eccentric oval type neck portion which extends to a rear lip of the tool head. The latch mechanism releases when the ovular neck portion rotates about the catch members upon actuation of a rotary tool drive motor. When released, all the telescoping sections and the tool extends fully outward to a use position.

Voellmer, George (inventor)

1993-01-01

79

Tank 241-B-112 tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) has advised the US Department of Energy (DOE) to concentrate the near-term sampling and analysis activities on identification and resolution of safety issues. The data quality objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used to identify sampling and analytical needs for the resolution of safety issues. As a result, a revision in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement or TPA) milestone M-44-00 has been made, which states that ``A Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) will also be developed for each double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process... Development of TCPs by the DQO process is intended to allow users (e.g., Hanford Facility user groups, regulators) to ensure their needs will be met and that resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information.`` This document satisfies that requirement for tank 241-B-112 (B-112). Tank B-112 is currently a non-Watch List tank; therefore, the only applicable DQO as of January 1995 is the Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objective, which is described below. Tank B-112 is expected to have three primary layers. A bottom layer of sludge consisting of second-cycle waste, followed by a layer of BY saltcake and a top layer of supernate.

Schreiber, R.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-02-06

80

Tank 241-U-105 tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-U-105.

Homi, C.S.

1995-02-03

81

Liquid rocket metal tanks and tank components  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Significant guidelines are presented for the successful design of aerospace tanks and tank components, such as expulsion devices, standpipes, and baffles. The state of the art is reviewed, and the design criteria are presented along with recommended practices. Design monographs are listed.

Wagner, W. A.; Keller, R. B. (editor)

1974-01-01

82

Tank 241-TY-101 Tank Characterization Plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-TY-101.

Homi, C.S.

1995-03-20

83

Tank Battalion Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Tank Battalion Study is an analytical evaluation using the Close Combat Tactical Trainer (CCTT) at Ft Knox Ky. The tested alternative structures are the 4 company, 3 platoon, 3 tank per platoon and the 3 company, 3 platoon, 4 tank per platoon battalio...

D. Lindow T. Russell L. Vowels

2001-01-01

84

Fosas Septicas (Septic Tanks).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Manual of Septic Tanks is an in depth account of septic tank installation. Design rules, diagrams, and an extensive bibliography included. Septic Tank Systems for Low-Cost Homes is a guide for septic systems that comply with the minimum real estate st...

1969-01-01

85

Tank 241-AZ-102 tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has advised the DOE to concentrate the near-term sampling and analysis activities on identification and resolution of safety issues. The Data Quality Objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used in the resolution of safety issues. As a result, a revision in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestone M-44 has been made, which states that ``A Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) will also be developed for each double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process ... Development of TCPs by the DQO process is intended to allow users to ensure their needs will be met and that resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information``. This document satisfies that requirement for tank 241-AZ-102 (AZ-102) sampling activities. Tank AZ-102 is currently a non-Watch List tank, so the only DQOs applicable to this tank are the safety screening DQO and the compatibility DQO, as described below. The current contents of Tank AZ-102, as of October 31, 1994, consisted of 3,600 kL (950 kgal) of dilute non-complexed waste and aging waste from PUREX (NCAW, neutralized current acid waste). Tank AZ-102 is expected to have two primary layers. The bottom layer is composed of 360 kL of sludge, and the top layer is composed of 3,240 kL of supernatant, with a total tank waste depth of approximately 8.9 meters.

Schreiber, R.D.

1995-02-06

86

Tank 241-AZ-101 tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has advised the DOE to concentrate the near-term sampling and analysis activities on identification and resolution of safety issues. The Data Quality Objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used in the resolution of safety issues. As a result, A revision in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestone M-44 has been made, which states that ``A Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) will also be developed for each double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process. Development of TCPs by the DQO process is intended to allow users to ensure their needs will be met and that resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information``. This document satisfies that requirement for Tank 241-AZ-101 (AZ-101) sampling activities. Tank AZ-101 is currently a non-Watch List tank, so the only DQOs applicable to this tank are the safety screening DQO and the compatibility DQO, as described below. The contents of Tank AZ-101, as of October 31, 1994, consisted of 3,630 kL (960 kgal) of dilute non-complexed waste and aging waste from PUREX (NCAW, neutralized current acid waste). Tank AZ-101 is expected to have two primary layers. The bottom layer is composed of 132 kL of sludge, and the top layer is composed of 3,500 kL of supernatant, with a total tank waste depth of approximately 8.87 meters.

Schreiber, R.D.

1995-02-06

87

Powder avalanche and catching dam interaction : influence of upstream dam slope ?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The influence of an obstacle on the dynamics of a finite-volume density current modelling a powder-snow avalanche was investigated. A constant volume of a dyed salt solution reproduced the small-scale aerosol flowing down an inclined channel immersed in a water tank. Reference tests in the absence of the obstacle characterized the dynamics parameters of the flow and then the influence of two different types of obstacles on these parameters was studied. Both of the obstacles represent a catching dam one with a vertical uphill face (OBS1) and the second one with an inclined uphill face 32° (OBS2). A high resolution acoustic velocimeter allows measurements on the 3D Flow velocity. For the reference avalanche, it was shown that the maximum velocity norm can be up to 18% greater than the maximum horizontal contribution (parallel to the slope) and that the ratio maximum velocity norm over front velocity varies between 1.75 and 2.2. THis ratio varies between 1.7 and 2.8 for the obstacles situation. In terms of protection effectiveness, laboratory tests showed that a catching dam with the upstream vertical to the slope is more efficient than a dam with an inclined upstream face. In presence of OBS2 the flow does not hit the obstacle but it rather passes smoothly over it, without any visible detachment from the surface. The ramp effect is remarkable and the avalanche reaches faster (in terms of time) a given point downstream from the obstacle. On the contrary, in the OBS1 configuration, the incoming flow hits the vertical wall and bursts. The flow is subjected to a strong deflection with the formation of a vertical jet.

Caccamo, Paolo; Naaim-Bouvet, Florence; Faug, Thierry

2013-04-01

88

77 FR 66746 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch Limit) Harvested for Management...biological catch, annual catch limit (ACL), optimum yield, domestic harvest and...processing, border transfer, and the sub-ACL for each management area. The 2012...

2012-11-07

89

50 CFR 679.84 - Rockfish Program recordkeeping, permits, monitoring, and catch accounting.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...are weighed on a NMFS-approved scale in compliance with the scale requirements at § 679.28...movement of catch between the scale used to weigh total catch and...composition samples. (5) Fish on deck. No fish are...

2010-10-01

90

50 CFR 648.101 - Summer flounder Annual Catch Target (ACT).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Summer flounder Annual Catch Target (ACT). 648...UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Summer Flounder Fisheries § 648.101 Summer flounder Annual Catch Target (ACT)....

2013-10-01

91

50 CFR 648.53 - Target total allowable catch, DAS allocations, and individual fishing quotas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Scallop incidental catch target TAC. The 2010 incidental catch target TAC for vessels with incidental...in § 648.55, using the target TAC for open areas specified...12,920. (2) Prior to setting the DAS allocations...

2010-10-01

92

Comparing catch orientation among Minnesota walleye, northern pike, and bass anglers  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We compared the catch orientations of Minnesota walleye (Sander vitreus), northern pike (Esox lucius), largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), and smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) anglers. Results were derived from 2009, 2010, and 2012 surveys of anglers targeting these different species. Consistent with previous research, we identified four dimensions of anglers’ catch orientation: (a) catching something, (b) catching big fish, (c) catching many fish, and (d) keeping fish. Walleye anglers were the most motivated to keep fish, while northern pike anglers were more oriented toward catching big fish. Largemouth bass anglers, and to a lesser extent smallmouth bass anglers, were also oriented toward catching big fish. Bass anglers reported the lowest interest in keeping fish. An orientation to keep fish was negatively related to more restrictive management actions, regardless of species. A stronger orientation to catch big fish was associated with support for increased harvest restrictions only for northern pike and smallmouth bass.

Schroeder, Susan A,; Fulton, David C.

2013-01-01

93

Allocation of Statewide-Reported MRFSS Catch and Landings Statistics between Areas: Application to Winter Flounder.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A method is described for allocating statewide-reported catch and landings statistics (coming from the Marine Recreational Fisheries Statistics Survey (MRFSS)) between two groups when both contribute to the state's catches and landings. The method, based ...

F. P. Almeida

1989-01-01

94

Storage tank corrosion  

SciTech Connect

Knocking out corrosion in crude oil storage tanks has made a winner of Joe Lewis, a corrosion technician for Shell Pipeline Co. at Midland, Texas. ''I've been battling rust and decay for 21 years and I've never lost a fight yet,'' he explains. Lewis was recently matched against two heavyweight opponents - two crude oil storage tanks, one with a capacity of 122,000 bbl, the other with a capacity of 82,000 bbl. The tanks are located at the McCamey Tank Farm in West Texas. Again, Lewis was the winner. ''One tank was leaking, so we repaired it and replaced the bottom coating on the inside of the tank,'' he said. ''Fixing the other tank required replacing the bottom coating with a new one.'' Shell Pipelines's McCamey Tank Farm has been operating since 1928, growing over the years to include 32 storage tanks ranging in size from small to giant. Most of the tanks were erected in the 1930s and 1940s and have been storing oil since that time. Occasionally, water will seep in through cracks in a tank's bottom coating and eat away at the steel; small holes develop and these must be repaired to prevent oil from leaking into the ground below.

Not Available

1986-03-01

95

Tank 241-A-104 tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, WHC 222-S Laboratory, and PNL 325 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of auger samples from tank 241-A-104. This Tank Characterization Plan will identify characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, hot cell sample isolation, and laboratory analytical evaluation and reporting requirements in addition to reporting the current contents and status of the tank as projected from historical information.

Schreiber, R.D.

1994-10-01

96

Catch up growth and pancreatic function in growth retarded neonates.  

PubMed Central

To test the hypothesis that relative pancreatic dysfunction is a determinant of catch up growth in small for gestational age (SGA) babies, 47 such babies (median gestation 38 weeks; range 27-41) and 41 appropriate for gestational age (AGA) babies matched for sex, race, and gestational age were recruited. Anthropometry was performed within 48 hours of birth and at 6 months. Faecal chymotrypsin activities were measured at 0-2 days, 14 days, 6 weeks and 6 months. At 6 months 30 SGA infants and 25 AGA infants were remeasured. In each group, median stool chymotrypsin activities doubled between 0-2 days and 6 months (9.0-25.5 IU/g SGA group; 11.6-25.3 IU/g AGA group). SGA babies had significantly lower chymotrypsin activities at 14 days (10.9 U/g) than AGA babies (15.5 U/g). In the SGA group faecal chymotrypsin activities at 0-2 days were strongly correlated with both catch up weight and with catch up length when corrected for the effects of birthweight. These data show that impaired pancreatic exocrine function at birth is associated with severe intrauterine malnutrition and with impaired catch up growth during the first 6 months of life.

Williams, S. P.; Durbin, G. M.; Morgan, M. E.; Booth, I. W.

1995-01-01

97

Catch Assessment Survey on the Niger River in Niger.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Information on the number of fishermen, the fish catch, and the fish harvest per unit of fishing effort are needed to develop fishing regulations and management strategies and to make long-term predictions of maximum expected yields, species stocking, and...

S. P. Malvestuto

1982-01-01

98

Content Analysis Schedule for Bilingual Education Programs: Catch-Up.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This content analysis schedule for Project Catch-Up in Zapata, Texas, presents information on the history, funding, and scope of the project. Included are sociolinguistic process variables such as the native and dominant languages of students and their interaction. Information is provided on staff selection and the linguistic background of project…

Ehrlich, Roselin S.; Shore, Marietta Saravia

99

Estimating illegal and unreported catches from marine ecosystems: a basis for change  

Microsoft Academic Search

To evaluate the impacts of ¢shing on marine ecosystems, the total extraction of ¢sh must be known. Putting a ¢gure on total extraction entails the di?cult task of estimat- ing, in addition to reported landings, discards, illegal and unmandated catches. Unre- ported catches cast various types of shadow, which may be tracked and estimated quantitatively. Some shadows of unreported catches

Tony J Pitcher; Robyn Forrest; Hreikar ÞorV altysson; Sylvie Guenette

100

Reconstruction of coral reef fisheries catches in American Samoa, 1950–2002  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fisheries catches from Pacific Island coral reefs are rarely recorded in official statistics. Reconstruction of catch estimates with limited hard data requires interpolation and assumptions, justifiable only by the unsatisfactory alternative of continued substitution of zero catches, a common policy interpretation for ‘no data’. Uncertainties associated with reconstructions are high, requiring conservative estimation. American Samoan domestic fisheries consist of an

Dirk Zeller; Shawn Booth; Peter Craig; Daniel Pauly

2006-01-01

101

Catch rates relative to angler party size with implications for monitoring angler success  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Angler catch rates often are used to monitor angler success, assess the need for additional management actions, and evaluate the effectiveness of management practices. Potential linkages between catch rate and angler party size were examined to assess how party size might affect the use of catch rate as an index of angler success in recreational fisheries. Data representing 22,355 completed interviews conducted at access points in lakes and reservoirs throughout Mississippi during 1987-2003 were analyzed. Total party catch was not proportional to total party effort; thus, catch rate decreased as party size increased. Depending on the taxa targeted, the average catch rate per angler decreased 40-50% between parties of one and parties of two, although subsequent decreases were less substantial. Because party size accounted for a considerable portion of the variability in catch rate over time and space, failure to remove this variability weakens the manager's ability to detect differences or changes in catch rates. Therefore, the use of catch rates to monitor fisheries may be inappropriate unless party size is taken into account. Party size may influence the angler's ability to catch fish through a variety of processes, including partitioning a limited number of catchable fish among members of a party and party composition. When catch rates are used to estimate total catch rather than to index angler success, party size is not a concern.

Miranda, L. E.

2005-01-01

102

Estimation of a Catch Level Which Stabilizes the Parental Biomass of an Exploited Fish Stock.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The objective of this paper is to demonstrate how a level of yearly catch that will stabilize the parental biomass of a population at its present level can be determined. This catch is hereafter referred to as the stabilizing catch. Initially, two methods...

J. Majkowski J. Hampton

1983-01-01

103

50 CFR 300.63 - Catch sharing plan and domestic management measures in Area 2A.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...allocated as incidental catch in the salmon troll fishery in Area 2A. Each year the landing...incidental catch fishery during the salmon troll fishery as authorized in section 8 of the...incidental catch fishery during the salmon troll fishery as authorized in Section 8 of...

2009-10-01

104

Tank 241-BX-110 tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the information on the historical uses, present status and the sampling and analysis results of waste stored in Tank 241-BX-110. This reports supports the requirements of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-44-09.

Schreiber, R.D., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-05-22

105

Multifunctional Tanks for Spacecraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A document discusses multifunctional tanks as means to integrate additional structural and functional efficiencies into designs of spacecraft. Whereas spacecraft tanks are traditionally designed primarily to store fluids and only secondarily to provide other benefits, multifunctional tanks are designed to simultaneously provide multiple primary benefits. In addition to one or more chamber(s) for storage of fluids, a multifunctional tank could provide any or all of the following: a) Passageways for transferring the fluids; b) Part or all of the primary structure of a spacecraft; c) All or part of an enclosure; d) Mechanical interfaces to components, subsystems, and/or systems; e) Paths and surfaces for transferring heat; f)Shielding against space radiation; j) Shielding against electromagnetic interference; h) Electrically conductive paths and surfaces; and i) Shades and baffles to protect against sunlight and/or other undesired light. Many different multifunctional-tank designs are conceivable. The design of a particular tank can be tailored to the requirements for the spacecraft in which the tank is to be installed. For example, the walls of the tank can be flat or curved or have more complicated shapes, and the tank can include an internal structure for strengthening the tank and/or other uses.

Collins, David H.; Lewis, Joseph C.; MacNeal, Paul D.

2006-01-01

106

49 CFR 174.63 - Portable tanks, IM portable tanks, IBCs, Large Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car tanks. 174.63 Section 174.63 ...Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) A carrier may not transport...Packaging, cargo tank, or multi-unit tank car tank) containing a hazardous...

2013-10-01

107

Catch-up growth occurs after diarrhea in early childhood.  

PubMed

Diarrhea and linear growth faltering continue to burden low-income countries and are among the most important contributors to poor health during early childhood. Diarrhea is thought to adversely affect linear growth, but catch-up growth can occur if no additional insults are experienced. We sought to characterize catch-up growth in relation to diarrhea burden in a multisite dataset of 1007 children. Using longitudinal anthropometry and diarrheal surveillance data from 7 cohort studies in 4 countries, we examined the relation between diarrhea prevalence and growth in 3- to 6-mo periods using linear mixed-effect models. Growth during each period was calculated as a function of age using linear splines. We incorporated the longitudinal prevalence of diarrhea in both current and previous periods into the model. Diarrhea during the current period was associated with slower linear and ponderal growth. Faster (catch-up) growth in length was observed in children with no diarrhea in age groups immediately after an age group in which diarrhea was experienced [age group >6-12 mo: 0.03 mm/mo for each percentage diarrhea prevalence in the previous period (95% CI: 0.007, 0.06) relative to 11.3 mm/mo mean growth rate; age group >12-18 mo: 0.04 mm/mo (95% CI: 0.02, 0.06) relative to 8.9 mm/mo mean growth rate; age group >18-24 mo: 0.04 mm/mo (95% CI: 0.003, 0.09) relative to 7.9 mm/mo mean growth rate]. The associations were stronger in boys than in girls when separate models were run. Similar results were observed when weight was the outcome variable. When diarrheal episodes are followed by diarrhea-free periods in the first 2 y of life, catch-up growth is observed that may allow children to regain their original trajectories. The finding of a greater effect of diarrhea on linear growth in boys than in girls was unexpected and requires additional study. Diarrhea burdens are high throughout the first 2 y of life in these study sites, therefore reducing the likelihood of catch-up growth. Extending diarrhea-free periods may increase the likelihood of catch-up growth and decrease the prevalence of stunting. PMID:24699805

Richard, Stephanie A; Black, Robert E; Gilman, Robert H; Guerrant, Richard L; Kang, Gagandeep; Lanata, Claudio F; Mølbak, Kåre; Rasmussen, Zeba A; Sack, R Bradley; Valentiner-Branth, Palle; Checkley, William

2014-06-01

108

Long-term implementation of the CATCH physical education program.  

PubMed

To test the effectiveness of the Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health (CATCH) program, a randomized trial was conducted in 96 elementary schools in four regions of the United States. Results from the original trial indicated a significant positive effect on the delivery of physical education (PE). All 56 former intervention schools (FI), 20 randomly selected former control schools (FC), and 12 newly selected unexposed control schools (UC) were assessed 5 years postintervention. Results indicate a strong secular trend of increasing moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in PE classes among both FC and UC schools. The FI schools surpassed the Healthy People 2010 goal for MVPA during PE lesson time (i.e., 50%), whereas the FC and UC schools came close to it. Barriers to implementing CATCH PE included insufficient training and lower importance of PE compared to other academic areas and indicate the need for in-service training. PMID:12929897

Kelder, Steven H; Mitchell, Paul D; McKenzie, Thomas L; Derby, Carol; Strikmiller, Patricia K; Luepker, Russell V; Stone, Elaine J

2003-08-01

109

Septic Tanks and the Environment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report reviews and evaluates the available literature on septic tanks, and influence of septic tanks on public health and environmental quality. The consistently poor performance of septic tanks indicates that other waste disposal methods are necessar...

J. W. Patterson R. A. Minear T. K. Nedved

1971-01-01

110

Heated Aluminum Tanks Resist Corrosion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Simple expedient of heating foam-insulated aluminum alloy tanks prevents corrosion by salt-laden moisture. Relatively-small temperature difference between such tank and surrounding air will ensure life of tank is extended by many years.

Johnson, L. E.

1983-01-01

111

People favour imperfect catching by assuming a stable world.  

PubMed

The visual angle that is projected by an object (e.g. a ball) on the retina depends on the object's size and distance. Without further information, however, the visual angle is ambiguous with respect to size and distance, because equal visual angles can be obtained from a big ball at a longer distance and a smaller one at a correspondingly shorter distance. Failure to recover the true 3D structure of the object (e.g. a ball's physical size) causing the ambiguous retinal image can lead to a timing error when catching the ball. Two opposing views are currently prevailing on how people resolve this ambiguity when estimating time to contact. One explanation challenges any inference about what causes the retinal image (i.e. the necessity to recover this 3D structure), and instead favors a direct analysis of optic flow. In contrast, the second view suggests that action timing could be rather based on obtaining an estimate of the 3D structure of the scene. With the latter, systematic errors will be predicted if our inference of the 3D structure fails to reveal the underlying cause of the retinal image. Here we show that hand closure in catching virtual balls is triggered by visual angle, using an assumption of a constant ball size. As a consequence of this assumption, hand closure starts when the ball is at similar distance across trials. From that distance on, the remaining arrival time, therefore, depends on ball's speed. In order to time the catch successfully, closing time was coupled with ball's speed during the motor phase. This strategy led to an increased precision in catching but at the cost of committing systematic errors. PMID:22558205

López-Moliner, Joan; Keil, Matthias S

2012-01-01

112

75 FR 56016 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the 2010 Pacific total allowable catch (TAC) apportioned to vessels catching Pacific...of 50 CFR part 680. The 2010 Pacific cod TAC apportioned to vessels catching Pacific...has determined that the 2010 Pacific cod TAC apportioned to vessels catching...

2010-09-15

113

75 FR 63402 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the 2010 Pacific total allowable catch (TAC) apportioned to vessels catching Pacific...of 50 CFR part 680. The 2010 Pacific cod TAC apportioned to vessels catching Pacific...has determined that the 2010 Pacific cod TAC apportioned to vessels catching...

2010-10-15

114

Ideal, catch, and slip bonds in cadherin adhesion  

PubMed Central

Classical cadherin cell-cell adhesion proteins play key morphogenetic roles during development and are essential for maintaining tissue integrity in multicellular organisms. Classical cadherins bind in two distinct conformations, X-dimer and strand-swap dimer; during cellular rearrangements, these adhesive states are exposed to mechanical stress. However, the molecular mechanisms by which cadherins resist tensile force and the pathway by which they convert between different conformations are unclear. Here, we use single molecule force measurements with an atomic force microscope (AFM) to show that E-cadherin, a prototypical classical cadherin, forms three types of adhesive bonds: catch bonds, which become longer lived in the presence of tensile force; slip bonds, which become shorter lived when pulled; and ideal bonds that are insensitive to mechanical stress. We show that X-dimers form catch bonds, whereas strand-swap dimers form slip bonds. Our data suggests that ideal bonds are formed as X-dimers convert to strand-swap binding. Catch, slip, and ideal bonds allow cadherins to withstand tensile force and tune the mechanical properties of adhesive junctions.

Rakshit, Sabyasachi; Zhang, Yunxiang; Manibog, Kristine; Shafraz, Omer; Sivasankar, Sanjeevi

2012-01-01

115

Aspects of smooth muscle function in molluscan catch muscle.  

PubMed

1) Catch in Mytilus ABRM may be a specialization of a mechanism common to all muscles that gives rise to stretch resistance in the resting state. Catch appears to be due to actin myosin interaction. Since this interaction is regulated by nerves, it provides a convenient model for studying resting stretch resistance. 2) Studies of the structure of Mytilus ABRM revela two types of intercellular connections: a) direct connections between muscle fibers [these nexal (gap) junctions interconnect the muscle cells electrically]; b) muscle fiber-collagen-muscle fiber connections [these provide mechanical connections between muscle cells via collagen fibers]. The structure of Mytilus ABRM supports speculation that smooth muscle filaments are organized into contractile units. 3) A rise in cAMP levels occurs in response to the relaxing transmitter, serotonin. It is not certain whether the cAMP system directly controls the ability of the contractile proteins to interact or whether it regulates intracellular levels of Ca2+. 4) Calcium ions in activation are derived from two sources: an internal source, probably the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and an external source, across the muscle membrane. 5) The nature of catch remains in question, although most evidence favors the linkage hypothesis. PMID:185635

Twarog, B M

1976-10-01

116

Environmental effects on recreational squid jigging fishery catches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Experimental fishing sessions simulating the operating procedures of the recreational fishery for the European squid that operates at inshore Palma Bay (Balearic Islands, Spain) were conducted to investigate the effects of environmental variables on squid catches. The catch per unit of effort (cpue) of recreational-like jigging sessions showed a seasonal pattern (higher cpue during colder months). Two alternative hypotheses can explain such a pattern. First, squid could migrate inshore during colder months to seek spatio-temporal windows within which the sea temperature maximize spawning success. Second, the timing of the seasonal reproductive peak and the growth rate of any given cohort would result in a higher percentage of squid whose body size is greater than the gear-specific vulnerability threshold during the colder months. The combination of environmental variables that maximized cpue was a low sea surface temperature, a low windspeed, low atmospheric pressure, and days close to the new moon. A specific period of the day, narrowly around sunset, favoured the catches. Within this narrow period, the sunlight is still sufficient to allow the recreational fishing lures to be effective, and the squid have already shifted to a more active pattern of movement characteristic of the night-time period.

Cabanellas-Reboredo, Miguel; Alós, Josep; Palmer, Miquel; Morales-Nin, Beatriz

2012-08-01

117

Insulated tank jacketing system  

Microsoft Academic Search

An improved jacketing system for storage tank structures is disclosed wherein insulated panels are attached to modular tracks mounted in horizontal courses on the outside walls of the tanks. The individual tracks are made up of modular segments secured together both by splice plates and take-up devices in an improved pretensioned fashion to provide for an efficient mounting of the

Schroter

1977-01-01

118

Underground Tank Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The harm to human health and our environment caused by leaking underground storage tanks can be devastating. Schools can meet new federal waste management standards by instituting daily inventory monitoring, selecting a reliable volumetric testing company, locating and repairing leaks promptly, and removing and installing tanks appropriately. (MLH)

Bednar, Barbara A.

1990-01-01

119

Tank gauging advances  

SciTech Connect

Substantial improvements in magnetostrictive liquid level sensors have recently been achieved, making them more attractive for use in automatic tank gauging (ATG) systems. The improvements include flexible probes that are much easier to install and bottom-referenced probes which allow for more accurate readings for a storage tank. Such liquid level sensors are the key element in magnetostrictive tank gauges, which offer certain advantages over other types of automatic tank gauges. Common types of ATGs include radar, magnetostrictive, hydrostatic, servo, float and tape. Radar gauges are popular for their accuracy. They are particularly useful in gauging tars and other products not suitable for contact-type sensors. On the other hand, for liquids that can accommodate a float, a bottom-references magnetostrictive tank gauge (MTG) can provide superior accuracy. It is not affected by motion of the tank top. In addition, it can incorporate averaging temperature measurement into its liquid level probe. Hydrostatic tank gauges provide direct reading of mass but are less accurate for level. Servo-powered gauges can provide good accuracy but have a higher installed cost. Float operated tank gauges widely used in the past are losing popularity due to maintenance demands.

Nyce, D. [MTS Systems Corp., Cary, NC (United States)

1997-01-01

120

The Virtual Fish Tank  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a simulated fish tank that requires Shockwave. You need to register to log in. Once you log in, you can create up to four unique fish. Then you can launch your fish into a Personal Tank on your own computer and see how they behave.

Science NetLinks (Nearlife, Inc.;)

2008-04-29

121

CATCH, FISHING EFFORT AND CATCH PER UNIT EFFORT OF TAIWANESE LONGLINE FISHERY FOR BLUE MARLIN AND WHITE MARLIN IN THE ATLANTIC  

Microsoft Academic Search

Catch, fishing effort and catch per unit effort of white marlin (Tetrapturus albidus) and blue mar- lin (Makaira nigricans) are verified and updated to 1998 for Taiwanese longline fishery. The nominal CPUE of white marlin and blue marlin were standardized by general linear model with Year, Quarter and Area factors, and with Quarter:Area interactions for two time periods (1968-1980 and

Chien-Chung Hsu

122

49 CFR 179.400 - General specification applicable to cryogenic liquid tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...specification applicable to cryogenic liquid tank car tanks. 179.400 Section 179.400 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

2013-10-01

123

49 CFR 179.500 - Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks. 179.500 Section 179.500 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

2013-10-01

124

Quantifying catch-and-release: the extensor tendon force needed to overcome the catching flexors in trigger fingers.  

PubMed

The extensor tendon forces required to overcome the catching flexors in trigger fingers are unknown. A biomechanical model with moment equilibrium equations and method of least squares was developed for estimating the tendon force at triggering in trigger fingers. Trigger fingers that exhibited significant catching and sudden release during finger extension were tested. A customized "pulling tester" was used to pull the finger from flexion to extension and provide synchronic measurement of the pulling force. The displacement of the tested finger was measured by a motion capture system. This preliminary study presents kinematic and kinetic data at triggering of 10 trigger fingers. The distal and proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints presented sudden release while the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint started extension in the early phase of finger extension. The tendon tension of flexor digitorum profundus was greater than that of flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) in six fingers, and less than that of FDS in three fingers. The tension of two flexor tendons was almost equal in one finger. At the PIP and MCP joints, 1.54 times the force of flexors was needed for the extensors to overcome the catching flexors in trigger fingers. This biomechanical model provides clinicians with a clearer idea of the tendon force at triggering. The quantitative results may help in the understanding of movement characteristics of trigger fingers. These findings are useful to better understand the etiology and nature of trigger finger development, and thus aid in further development of better assessments and treatments related to this. PMID:23553720

Lu, Szu-Ching; Kuo, Li-Chieh; Jou, I-Ming; Wu, Chih-Chung; Tung, Wen-Lin; Sun, Yung-Nien; Su, Fong-Chin

2013-07-01

125

Estimating Historical Eastern North Pacific Blue Whale Catches Using Spatial Calling Patterns  

PubMed Central

Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) were exploited extensively around the world and remain endangered. In the North Pacific their population structure is unclear and current status unknown, with the exception of a well-studied eastern North Pacific (ENP) population. Despite existing abundance estimates for the ENP population, it is difficult to estimate pre-exploitation abundance levels and gauge their recovery because historical catches of the ENP population are difficult to separate from catches of other populations in the North Pacific. We collated previously unreported Soviet catches and combined these with known catches to form the most current estimates of North Pacific blue whale catches. We split these conflated catches using recorded acoustic calls from throughout the North Pacific, the knowledge that the ENP population produces a different call than blue whales in the western North Pacific (WNP). The catches were split by estimating spatiotemporal occurrence of blue whales with generalized additive models fitted to acoustic call patterns, which predict the probability a catch belonged to the ENP population based on the proportion of calls of each population recorded by latitude, longitude, and month. When applied to the conflated historical catches, which totaled 9,773, we estimate that ENP blue whale catches totaled 3,411 (95% range 2,593 to 4,114) from 1905–1971, and amounted to 35% (95% range 27% to 42%) of all catches in the North Pacific. Thus most catches in the North Pacific were for WNP blue whales, totaling 6,362 (95% range 5,659 to 7,180). The uncertainty in the acoustic data influence the results substantially more than uncertainty in catch locations and dates, but the results are fairly insensitive to the ecological assumptions made in the analysis. The results of this study provide information for future studies investigating the recovery of these populations and the impact of continuing and future sources of anthropogenic mortality.

Monnahan, Cole C.; Branch, Trevor A.; Stafford, Kathleen M.; Ivashchenko, Yulia V.; Oleson, Erin M.

2014-01-01

126

Tank-farm construction. Part 2. Tank-soil interaction in tank-farm construction  

SciTech Connect

Part 1 of this series described new approaches to tank-farm construction utilizing the concepts of preloading, hydroloading, artificial drains, and counterbalancing berms. This study illustrates examples of tank-soil interaction as a result of utilization of these concepts. The need to address tank-soil interaction arises due to concern for 2 phenomena, namely, stability and settlement. If adequate soil bearing is not available, soil will move out from under the tank causing the tank to fail. Settlement of soil can create stresses leading to rupture of tank bottom, shell buckling, or ovality of tank which can inhibit the movement of the roof in floating-roof tanks.

Ahmed, S.

1984-01-30

127

Tank 241-U-201 tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, and WHC 22-S Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples for tank 241-U-201.

Schreiber, R.D.

1995-02-21

128

Tank 241-BY-105 tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, PNL 325 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, and WHC 222-S Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples for tank 241-BY-105.

Schreiber, R.D.

1995-02-01

129

Tank 241-C-202: Tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, and WHC 222-S Laboratory. Scope of this plan is to provide guidance for sampling and analysis of samples for tank 241-C-202.

Schreiber, R.D.

1995-03-06

130

Tank 241-BY-106 tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, PNL 325 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, and WHC 222-S Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples for tank 241-BY-106.

Schreiber, R.D.

1995-01-24

131

Tank 241-C-201: Tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, and WHC 222-S Laboratory. Scope of this plan is to provide guidance for sampling and analysis of samples for tank 241-C-201.

Schreiber, R.D.

1995-03-06

132

Tank 241-AX-102 tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, WHC 222-S Laboratory, and PNL 325 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples from tank 241-AX-102.

Schreiber, R.D.

1995-01-24

133

Tank 241-TY-104 Tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, and WHC 222-C Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples for tank 241-TY-104.

Schreiber, R.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-02-15

134

Tank 241-C-204 Tank Characterization Plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, and WHC 222-S Laboratory. Scope of this plan is to provide guidance for sampling and analysis of samples for tank 241-C-204.

Schreiber, R.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-03-06

135

Tank 241-TY-106 Tank Characterization Plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, and WHC 222-S Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples for tank 241-TY-106.

Schreiber, R.D.

1995-02-22

136

Tank 241-U-202 tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, and WHC 222-S Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples for tank 241-U-202.

Schreiber, R.D.

1995-02-21

137

Tank 241-SX-115 tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Project, Sampling Operations, and WHC 222-S Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples for tank 241-SX-115.

Sasaki, L.M.

1995-04-24

138

Tank 241-C-203: Tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, and WHC 222-S Laboratory. Scope of this plan is to provide guidance for sampling and analysis of samples for tank 241-C-203.

Schreiber, R.D.

1995-03-06

139

Tank 241-AP-107 tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, WHC 222-S Laboratory, and PNL 325 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples from tank 241-AP-107.

Schreiber, R.D.

1994-12-06

140

Tank 241-BX-103 tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, and WHC 222-S Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples for tank 241-BX-103.

Bell, K.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-04-21

141

Interference Model: Ripple Tank  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Interference Model: Ripple Tank investigates constructive and destructive interference between two point sources. The user can change the point source frequency, location and separation and phase difference between the point sources. The model also shows the difference in distance from the point sources to a movable observation point. The Interference Model: Ripple Tank was created using the Easy Java Simulations (EJS) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the ejs_bu_Ripple_Tank_Interference.jar file will run the program if Java is installed.

Duffy, Andrew

2010-04-25

142

Picking a storage tank system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Across the country, aboveground storage tanks (ASTs) are replacing underground storage tanks (USTs) at many facilities. A significant percentage of managers of onsite fueling operations are opting to replace existing USTs with new aboveground storage tanks. But there are a number of major issues to consider when choosing either petroleum storage tank option, such as costs, regulations and liability. Budgetary

Deaver

1994-01-01

143

Estimating environmental preferences of South African pelagic fish species using catch size- and remote sensing data  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have studied the relationship between the variations in density of South African anchovy (Engraulisicapensis), sardine (Sardinopssagax) and round herring (Etrumeuswhiteheadi) from commercial catch records (1987–1997) and a suite of variables describing the environment. The indicator of density (local fish abundance) used was Catch-per-set, obtained from the more than 130?000 catches made during the 11-year study period. The set of

J. J. Agenbag; A. J. Richardson; H. Demarcq; P. Freon; F. A. Shillington

2003-01-01

144

Teleoperation for a ball-catching task with significant dynamics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract—In this paper,we,present,ongoing,work,on,how to incorporate,human,motion,models,into the,design,of a high performance,teleoperation,platform. A short description of human,motion,models,used for ballcatching is followed by a more detailed study of a teleoperation,platform,on which,to conduct experiments. Also, a pilot study using minimum jerk theory to explain user input behavior,in teleoperated catching is presented. Index Terms—Teleoperation, control, high performance ma-

Christian Smith; Mattias Bratt; Henrik I. Christensen

2008-01-01

145

Catch-disperse-release readout for superconducting qubits.  

PubMed

We analyze a single-shot readout for superconducting qubits via the controlled catch, dispersion, and release of a microwave field. A tunable coupler is used to decouple the microwave resonator from the transmission line during the dispersive qubit-resonator interaction, thus circumventing damping from the Purcell effect. We show that, if the qubit frequency tuning is sufficiently adiabatic, a fast high-fidelity qubit readout is possible, even in the strongly nonlinear dispersive regime. Interestingly, the Jaynes-Cummings nonlinearity leads to the quadrature squeezing of the resonator field below the standard quantum limit, resulting in a significant decrease of the measurement error. PMID:23745846

Sete, Eyob A; Galiautdinov, Andrei; Mlinar, Eric; Martinis, John M; Korotkov, Alexander N

2013-05-24

146

SPRING_TANK  

EPA Science Inventory

This point coverage shows springs and water tanks on Salt River Indian Reservation in Arizona. This coverage was digitized off of USGS 7.5 minute quad maps by the Phoenix office of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. ...

147

Tank waste characterization basis  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the issues requiring characterization information, the process of determining high priority tanks to obtain information, and the outcome of the prioritization process. In addition, this document provides the reasoning for establishing and revising priorities and plans.

Brown, T.M.

1996-08-09

148

External tanks touted  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Renovation of the space shuttle's external tanks (ETs) for civilian space stations can and should begin by 1990, according to a consensus of scientists and administrators. Their views were presented August 3-4, 1987, in Boulder, Colo., at the Workshop on the Scientific Use of Orbiting Shuttle External Tanks, sponsored by the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR).Initial efforts should make use of 6000 ft3 (˜170 m3) of unpressurized volume inside the ET, according to the scientists. The tank is larger than the body of a Boeing 747 aircraft and contains the liquid oxygen and hydrogen fuel that puts the shuttle in orbit. A Memorandum of Understanding signed August 3 by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and UCAR opens the way for exploration of the many uses proposed for the tanks. UCAR is the principal partner in the ET program, which is called Space Phoenix.

149

Efficacy of methoprene for mosquito control in storm water catch basins  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This study evaluated the efficacy of methoprene, a widely used juvenile hormone mimic, formulated as 30-day slow release Altosid? pellets, at controlling mosquitoes in underground storm water drainage catch basins. Data from applications to ?-sized cement catch basins in the laboratory, field observations from treated and untreated basins, and an experiment that confined mosquito larvae in floating emergence jars in catch basins showed that methoprene effectively controlled mosquitoes for a month under field conditions and substantially longer under laboratory conditions when applied at a dose of 3.5 g pellets per average-sized catch basin.

Butler, M.; LeBrun, R.A.; Ginsberg, H.S.; Gettman, A.D.

2006-01-01

150

Catch Force Links and the Low to High Force Transition of Myosin  

PubMed Central

Catch is characterized by maintenance of force with very low energy utilization in some invertebrate muscles. Catch is regulated by phosphorylation of the mini-titin, twitchin, and a catch component of force exists at all [Ca2+] except those resulting in maximum force. The mechanism responsible for catch force was characterized by determining how the effects of agents that inhibit the low to high force transition of the myosin cross-bridge (inorganic phosphate, butanedione monoxime, trifluoperazine, and blebbistatin) are modified by twitchin phosphorylation and [Ca2+]. In permeabilized anterior byssus retractor muscles from Mytilus edulis, catch force was identified as being sensitive to twitchin phosphorylation, whereas noncatch force was insensitive. In all cases, inhibition of the low to high force transition caused an increase in catch force. The same relationship exists between catch force and noncatch force whether force is varied by changes in [Ca2+] and/or agents that inhibit cross-bridge force production. This suggests that myosin in the high force state detaches catch force maintaining structures, whereas myosin in the low force state promotes their formation. It is unlikely that the catch structure is the myosin cross-bridge; rather, it appears that myosin interacts with the structure, most likely twitchin, and regulates its attachment and detachment.

Butler, Thomas M.; Mooers, Susan U.; Siegman, Marion J.

2006-01-01

151

Mechanism of Catch Force: Tethering of Thick and Thin Filaments by Twitchin  

PubMed Central

Catch is a mechanical state occurring in some invertebrate smooth muscles characterized by high force maintenance and resistance to stretch during extremely slow relaxation. During catch, intracellular calcium is near basal concentration and myosin crossbridge cyctng rate is extremely slow. Catch force is relaxed by a protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation of sites near the N- and C- temini of the minititin twitchin (~526?kDa). Some catch force maintenance car also occur together with cycling myosin crossbridges at submaximal calcium concentrations, but not when the muscle is maximally activated. Additionally, the link responsible for catch can adjust during shortening of submaximally activated muscles and maintain catch force at the new shorter length. Twitchin binds to both thick and thin filaments, and the thin filament binding shown by both the N- and Cterminal portions of twitchin is decreased by phosphorylation of the sites that regulate catch. The data suggest that the twitchin molecule itself is the catch force beanng tether between thick and thin filaments. We present a model for the regulation of catch in which the twitchin tether can be displaced from thin filaments by both (a) the phosphorylation of twitchin and (b) the attachment of high force myosin crossbridges.

Butler, Thomas M.; Siegman, Marion J.

2010-01-01

152

TANK 5 SAMPLING  

SciTech Connect

Tank 5 at the Savannah River Site has been used to store high level waste and is currently undergoing waste removal processes in preparation for tank closure. Samples were taken from two locations to determine the contents in support of Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) development for chemical cleaning. These samples were obtained through the use of the Drop Core Sampler and the Snowbank Sampler developed by the Engineered Equipment & Systems (EES) group of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL).

Vrettos, N; William Cheng, W; Thomas Nance, T

2007-11-26

153

Aboveground storage tank regulations  

SciTech Connect

There are critical differences between the potential for environmental impact of aboveground and underground oil storage. For example, while leaks from underground storage tanks (USTs) seep into soil or aquifers, the concern with aboveground storage tanks (ASTs) is that an overfill or tank rupture can cause product to escape into a navigable stream and immediately create an oil spill pollution incident. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has very distinct programs outlining regulation parameters for each type of storage, including source of authority, regulatory cutoffs and exclusions, definitions, prevention and response requirements, and penalties, etc. Engineers considering changes or recommending a change in type of storage, particularly from a UST to an AST, need to be aware of existing federal regulations. Since the federal UST program began, remediation costs have skyrocketed as a result of the need to clean up leaking tank and piping sites, backfill and surrounding soil or groundwater. Compliance with federal and state UST regulations has not been cheap, and is expected to top $23 billion, according to some estimates. Partly as a result, market demand has shifted toward use of aboveground storage tanks, a trend that is expected to continue. Industry figures show a 100% increase in factory fabricated aboveground tank activity during the last four years.

Geyer, W. (Steel Tank Inst., Lake Zurich, IL (United States))

1993-01-01

154

Spatiotemporal characteristics of muscle patterns for ball catching  

PubMed Central

What sources of information and what control strategies the central nervous system (CNS) uses to perform movements that require accurate sensorimotor coordination, such as catching a flying ball, is still debated. Here we analyzed the EMG waveforms recorded from 16 shoulder and elbow muscles in six subjects during catching of balls projected frontally from a distance of 6 m and arriving at two different heights and with three different flight times (550, 650, 750 ms). We found that a large fraction of the variation in the muscle patterns was captured by two time-varying muscle synergies, coordinated recruitment of groups of muscles with specific activation waveforms, modulated in amplitude and shifted in time according to the ball's arrival height and flight duration. One synergy was recruited with a short and fixed delay from launch time. Remarkably, a second synergy was recruited at a fixed time before impact, suggesting that it is timed according to an accurate time-to-contact estimation. These results suggest that the control of interceptive movements relies on a combination of reactive and predictive processes through the intermittent recruitment of time-varying muscle synergies. Knowledge of the dynamic effect of gravity and drag on the ball may be then implicitly incorporated in a direct mapping of visual information into a small number of synergy recruitment parameters.

D'Andola, M.; Cesqui, B.; Portone, A.; Fernandez, L.; Lacquaniti, F.; d'Avella, A.

2013-01-01

155

49 CFR 179.100 - General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks. 179.100 Section 179.100 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

2013-10-01

156

49 CFR 179.301 - Individual specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks. 179.301 Section 179.301 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) §...

2013-10-01

157

49 CFR 179.101 - Individual specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks. 179.101 Section 179.101 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

2013-10-01

158

49 CFR 179.103 - Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks. 179.103 Section 179.103 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

2013-10-01

159

49 CFR 179.102 - Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks. 179.102 Section 179.102 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

2013-10-01

160

Optical Cryogenic Tank Level Sensor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Cryogenic fluids play an important role in space transportation. Liquid oxygen and hydrogen are vital fuel components for liquid rocket engines. It is also difficult to accurately measure the liquid level in the cryogenic tanks containing the liquids. The current methods use thermocouple rakes, floats, or sonic meters to measure tank level. Thermocouples have problems examining the boundary between the boiling liquid and the gas inside the tanks. They are also slow to respond to temperature changes. Sonic meters need to be mounted inside the tank, but still above the liquid level. This causes problems for full tanks, or tanks that are being rotated to lie on their side.

Duffell, Amanda

2005-01-01

161

Key factors influencing the potential of catch crops for methane production.  

PubMed

Catch crops are grown in crop rotation primarily for soil stabilization. The excess biomass of catch crops was investigated for its potential as feedstock for biogas production. Ten variables affecting catch crop growth and methane potential were evaluated. Field trials and methane potential were studied for 14 different catch crops species, with 19 samples harvested in 2010 and 36 harvested in 2011. Principal component analysis was applied to the data to identify the variables characterizing the potential for the different catch crops species for methane production. Two principal components explained up to 84.6% and 71.6% of the total variation for 2010 and 2011 samples, respectively. Specific methane yield, climate conditions (rainfall and temperature) and total nitrogen in the biomass were the variables classifying the different catch crops. Catch crops in the Brassicaceae and Graminaceae botanical families showed the highest methane yield. This study demonstrates the importance of the crop species when choosing a suitable catch crop for biogas production. PMID:24956759

Molinuevo-Salces, Beatriz; Fernández-Varela, Raquel; Uellendahl, Hinrich

2014-08-01

162

Catch Rates and Size Structure of Two Ictalurids Sampled with Different Sizes of Hoop Nets  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hoop nets with initial openings of 0.6 m and 0.8 m were set in a Missouri River tributary stream to determine if catch per unit effort (CPUE) and size structure [length (mm)] of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus and flathead catfish Pylodictus olivaris differed between the two sizes of nets, set baited or unbaited. Catch per unit effort for channel catfish

Jeff S. Tillma; Jim Milligan; Christopher S. Guy

1997-01-01

163

50 CFR 300.63 - Catch sharing plan and domestic management measures in Area 2A.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...is allocated as incidental catch in the salmon troll fishery in Area 2A. Each year...Federal Register along with the annual salmon management measures. (3) A portion...The incidental catch fishery during the salmon troll fishery as authorized in...

2013-10-01

164

Wisconsin's 1997 Open Water Sportfishing Effort and Catch from Lake Michigan and Green Bay.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper documents the sport fishery in Wisconsin waters of Lake Michigan and Green Bay from March 1, 1997 through December 31, 1997. Fishing effort, catch and catch rates were determined from (1) a stratified random creel survey for launched-boat, pier...

B. T. Eggold

1997-01-01

165

Reductions in Child Obesity Among Disadvantaged School Children With Community Involvement: The Travis County CATCH Trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to compare the impact of two intervention approaches on the prevalence of child overweight and obesity: (i) Coordinated Approach To Child Health BasicPlus (CATCH BP), in which schools were provided evidence-based coordinated school health program training, materials, and facilitator support visits, and (ii) CATCH BP and Community (BPC), in which BP schools received additional

Deanna M. Hoelscher; Andrew E. Springer; Nalini Ranjit; Cheryl L. Perry; Alexandra E. Evans; Melissa Stigler; Steven H. Kelder

2010-01-01

166

50 CFR 648.70 - Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Limit (ACL).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Limit (ACL). 648...Management Measures for the Atlantic Surf Clam and Ocean Quahog Fisheries § 648.70 Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Limit (ACL)....

2013-10-01

167

50 CFR 648.71 - Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Targets (ACT).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Targets (ACT). 648...Management Measures for the Atlantic Surf Clam and Ocean Quahog Fisheries § 648.71 Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Targets (ACT)....

2013-10-01

168

Standardization of catch and effort data in a spatially-structured shark fishery  

Microsoft Academic Search

The methods used to develop catch rate based indices of relative abundance for the school shark Galeorhinus galeus resource off southern Australia are outlined. These methods are based on fitting generalized linear models to catch and effort data for several regions in this fishery. This is to take account of the multi-gear nature of the fishery and the spatial structure

André E. Punt; Terence I. Walker; Bruce L. Taylor; Fred Pribac

2000-01-01

169

Acylsulfonamide safety-catch linker: promise and limitations for solid-phase oligosaccharide synthesis  

PubMed Central

Summary Safety-catch linkers are useful for solid-phase oligosaccharide synthesis as they are orthogonal to many common protective groups. A new acylsulfonamide safety-catch linker was designed, synthesized and employed during glycosylations using an automated carbohydrate synthesizer. The analysis of the cleavage products revealed shortcomings for oligosaccharide synthesis.

Yin, Jian; Eller, Steffen; Collot, Mayeul

2012-01-01

170

50 CFR 648.141 - Black sea bass Annual Catch Target (ACT).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Black sea bass Annual Catch Target (ACT). 648.141...NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Black Sea Bass Fishery § 648.141 Black sea bass Annual Catch Target (ACT). (a)...

2013-10-01

171

50 CFR 648.140 - Black sea bass Annual Catch Limit (ACL).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Black sea bass Annual Catch Limit (ACL). 648.140...NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Black Sea Bass Fishery § 648.140 Black sea bass Annual Catch Limit (ACL). (a)...

2013-10-01

172

Comprehensive Quantification of the Spastic Catch in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In clinical settings, the spastic catch is judged subjectively. This study assessed the psychometric properties of objective parameters that define and quantify the severity of the spastic catch in children with cerebral palsy (CP). A convenience sample of children with spastic CP (N = 46; age range: 4-16 years) underwent objective spasticity…

Lynn, Bar-On; Erwin, Aertbelien; Guy, Molenaers; Herman, Bruyninckx; Davide, Monari; Ellen, Jaspers; Anne, Cazaerck; Kaat, Desloovere

2013-01-01

173

Interpreting catch per unit effort data to assess the status of individual stocks and communities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite being one of the most common pieces of information used in assessing the status of fish stocks, relative abundance indices based on catch per unit effort (cpue) data are noto- riously problematic. Raw cpue is seldom proportional to abundance over a whole exploita- tion history and an entire geographic range, because numerous factors affect catch rates. One of the

Mark N. Maunder; John R. Sibert; Alain Fonteneau; John Hampton; Pierre Kleiber; Shelton J. Harley

2006-01-01

174

Modelling International Economic Integration: Patterns of Catching-up, Foreign Direct Investment and Migration Flows  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper develops a Schumpeterian model of international specialization and catching-up. In a previous version of the model we looked at the impact on international trade specialization when different patterns of technological catching-up are followed. One of these is a Gerschenkron pattern at the industrial level, where the largest initial gaps in productivity give rise to the fastest relative productivity

Michael Landesmann; Robert Stehrer

2004-01-01

175

Field observations on nitrogen catch crops. III. Transfer of nitrogen to the succeeding main crop  

Microsoft Academic Search

In temperate climates with a precipitation surplus during autumn and winter, nitrogen (N) catch crops can help to reduce nitrogen losses from cropping systems by absorbing nitrogen from the soil and transfer it to a following main crop. In two field experiments the catch crop species winter rye (Secale cereale) and forage rape (Brassica napus ssp. oleifera (Metzg.) Sinsk) or

J. C. Vos

2001-01-01

176

Catch-and-release science and its application to conservation and management of recreational fisheries  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Catch-and-release angling is a well-established practice in recreational angler behaviour and fisheries management. Accompanying this is a growing body of catch-and-release research that can be applied to reduce injury, mortality and sublethal alterations in behaviour and physiology. Here, the status of catch-and-release research from a symposium on the topic is summarised. Several general themes emerged including the need to: (1) better connect sublethal assessments to population-level processes; (2) enhance understanding of the variation in fish, fishing practices and gear and their role in catch and release; (3) better understand animal welfare issues related to catch and release; (4) increase the exchange of information on fishing-induced stress, injury and mortality between the recreational and commercial fishing sectors; and (5) improve procedures for measuring and understanding the effect of catch-and-release angling. Through design of better catch-and-release studies, strategies could be developed to further minimise stress, injury and mortality arising from catch-and-release angling. These strategies, when integrated with other fish population and fishery characteristics, can be used by anglers and managers to sustain or enhance recreational fishing resources. ?? 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Cooke, S. J.; Schramm, H. L.

2007-01-01

177

Total Commercial Catch 1982, Production of Processed Fishery Products 1982, and Fishing Consumption 1982 -- South Africa.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

1982 is known as a year of great problems for the fishing industry in South Africa. Pelagic fishery depended almost entirely on one species (anchovy, with 81 percent of the total pelagic catch) and registered a decline in pilchard and horse mackerel catch...

1983-01-01

178

Trip Limits, Catch, and Effort in the British Columbia Rockfish Trawl Fishery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Trip limits (catch ceilings on individual fishing trips) have been used extensively in the management of groundfish trawl fisheries on the west coast of North America. Here, I describe some consequences of this management approach on the fishery for Pacific ocean perch Sebastes alutus off British Columbia. Before the implementation of trip limits, vessels regularly landed catches of over 50

Laura J. Richards

1994-01-01

179

50 CFR 300.63 - Catch sharing plan and domestic management measures in Area 2A.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...is allocated as incidental catch in the salmon troll fishery in Area 2A. Each year...Federal Register along with the annual salmon management measures. (3) A portion...The incidental catch fishery during the salmon troll fishery as authorized in...

2011-10-01

180

50 CFR 300.63 - Catch sharing plan and domestic management measures in Area 2A.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...is allocated as incidental catch in the salmon troll fishery in Area 2A. Each year...Federal Register along with the annual salmon management measures. (3) A portion...The incidental catch fishery during the salmon troll fishery as authorized in...

2012-10-01

181

Incidental catch of the loggerhead turtle Caretta caretta off the Balearic Islands (western Mediterranean)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey, which included questionnaires for fishermen and the placement of observers onboard fishing vessels, was conducted to assess turtle catch off the Balearic Islands. The survey focused on those fishing vessels whose base port was in the archipelago and, hence, the catch of South-eastern Spain longliners moving in summer to the archipelago was not considered. The fishermen's perception was

Carlos Carreras; Luis Cardona; Alex Aguilar

2004-01-01

182

Estimating illegal and unreported catches from marine ecosystems: a basis for change  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract To evaluate the impacts of ¢shing on marine ecosystems, the total extraction of ¢sh must be known. Putting a ¢gure on total extraction entails the di?cult task of estimat- ing, in addition to reported landings, discards, illegal and unmandated catches. Unre- ported catches cast various types of shadow, which may be tracked and estimated quantitatively. Some shadows of unreported

Tony J Pitcher; Reg Watson; Robyn Forrest; Hreidar Por Valtysson; Sylvie Guenette

2002-01-01

183

Deriving Acceptable Biological Catch from the Overfishing Limit: Implications for Assessment Models  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recently revised Magnuson–Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act requires that U.S. fishery management councils avoid overfishing by setting annual catch limits (ACLs) not exceeding recommendations of the councils' scientific advisers. To meet that requirement, the scientific advisers will need to know the overfishing limit (OFL) estimated in each stock assessment, with OFL being the catch available from applying the

Michael H. Prager; Kyle W. Shertzer

2010-01-01

184

Catch characteristics of the commercial beach-seine fisheries in two Australian barrier estuaries  

Microsoft Academic Search

A scientific observer programme was used to estimate the retained and discarded catches taken in two of the largest commercial beach-seine fisheries (Lake Macquarie and St. Georges Basin) in New South Wales, Australia. Catches were sampled in each estuary in each of four seasons throughout 1998\\/1999 and the data were used to estimate the quantities and length compositions of species

Charles A. Gray; Steven J. Kennelly

2003-01-01

185

Material selection for Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility tanks  

SciTech Connect

This paper briefly summarizes the history of the materials selection for the US Department of Energy`s high-level waste carbon steel storage tanks. It also provides an evaluation of the materials for the construction of new tanks at the evaluation of the materials for the construction of new tanks at the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. The evaluation included a materials matrix that summarized the critical design, fabrication, construction, and corrosion resistance requirements: assessed. each requirement: and cataloged the advantages and disadvantages of each material. This evaluation is based on the mission of the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. On the basis of the compositions of the wastes stored in Hanford waste tanks, it is recommended that tanks for the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility be constructed of ASME SA 515, Grade 70, carbon steel.

Larrick, A.P.; Blackburn, L.D.; Brehm, W.F.; Carlos, W.C.; Hauptmann, J.P. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Danielson, M.J.; Westerman, R.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Divine, J.R. [ChemMet Ltd., West Richland, WA (United States); Foster, G.M. [ICF Kaiser Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-03-01

186

131. NORTH PLANT TANK CHEMICAL STORAGE TANKS FROM GB MANUFACTURING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

131. NORTH PLANT TANK CHEMICAL STORAGE TANKS FROM GB MANUFACTURING PLANT. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Bounded by Ninety-sixth Avenue & Fifty-sixth Avenue, Buckley Road, Quebec Street & Colorado Highway 2, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

187

Catching up: The rise of the Chinese wind turbine industry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This thesis argues that Chinese firms can catch up with the technological frontier in the scope of new climate friendly energy technologies and provides a detailed study of the case of wind power. Chapter 2 assesses the nature and extent of wind turbine technology catch-up. Firstly, it uses various wind turbine technology indicators to detail the convergence of trends of leading Chinese firms with firms at the technological frontier. Secondly, the chapter assesses the evolution of technological capabilities among leading Chinese turbine manufacturers. It shows that Chinese firms were progressively introducing turbine technologies similar to those produced by frontier firms and had rapidly improved their capabilities, allowing them to increasingly rely on independent technology development efforts. Chapter 3 describes how the Chinese wind power technology development system, characterized by the presence of a powerful and proactive government, provided the necessary conditions for Chinese wind turbine manufacturers to make rapid technological progress. In particular, it highlights the policies introduced by the government to create a large and rapidly growing wind power market in China and the steps taken by the government to ensure that Chinese firms entered and progressively dominated the domestic turbine manufacturing market. The competition which ensued among domestic turbine manufacturers was arguably the main driver of technology development efforts. The most significant challenge to the continued progress of the industry was whether the Chinese system could transition from a model of technology development based on technology transfer to one based on its own innovation efforts. Chapter 4 shows that due to limited government support over the years in both Europe and the United States, the wind power technology frontier has evolved relatively slowly, making it easier for Chinese firms to catch up. Firstly, using patenting rates as indicators of knowledge development, the chapter shows a strong correlation between changes in government wind power support policies and patenting activity. Secondly, using both technology penetration rates and patenting trends, the chapter shows that the evolution of the wind power frontier was slow compared to most other technology sectors globally.

Lefevre-Marton, Nicolas

188

Above- and underground storage tanks  

SciTech Connect

Storage tanks are the primary means of storing liquid, fluid and gas products. Federal and state environmental regulations, as well as local building and fire codes, take into account leaks and spills, tank emissions, underground tank seepage and safety issues, and they define standards for tank manufacturers and owners. For specific regulatory information pertaining to your application, contact the local authorities having jurisdiction. Storage tanks listed within this product guide have been classified as underground or aboveground, with subcategories including modular, process and temporary tanks. Tank construction materials include aluminum, carbon steel, concrete, fiberglass-reinforced plastic (FRP) and stainless steel. A variety of accessories, including automatic tank gauging systems, level monitors, leak detectors, overfill protection and tank inspection systems, also are listed. Aboveground storage tanks (ASTs) have less than 10 percent of their tank volume and piping below ground. Available in both vertical and horizontal configurations, they can be either erected in the field or fabricated in a factory. Underground storage tanks (USTs) are primarily used to contain regulated substances; USTs have at least 10% of their tank volume and piping buried belowground. Common UST construction materials include carbon steel, coated steel, cathodically protected steel and FRP. USTs are required to have corrosion protection, spill and overfill prevention and control and release detection in place by December 1998.

Canning, K.; Kilbourne, A.

1997-09-01

189

How the CATCH eat smart program helps implement the USDA regulations in school cafeterias.  

PubMed

This article describes the implementation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National School Lunch Program (NSLP) standards in school lunch menus in 56 intervention and 20 control schools from the Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health (CATCH) 5 years after the main trial, compared with 12 schools previously unexposed to CATCH. School food service personnel completed questionnaires to assess CATCH guideline implementation, demographic data, behavioral constructs, training, program material use, and participation in competing programs. Five days of menus and recipes were collected from school cafeteria staff, averaged, and compared to USDA School Meal Initiative (SMI) standards. Significant differences between intervention and unexposed schools were found for training and knowledge of CATCH and in mean percentage energy from fat and carbohydrates. Intervention schools most closely met USDA SMI recommendations for fat. Thus, the CATCH Eat Smart Program assisted school cafeterias in meeting USDA guidelines 5 years postimplementation. PMID:12929895

Hoelscher, Deanna M; Mitchell, Paul; Dwyer, Johanna; Elder, John; Clesi, Ann; Snyder, Patricia

2003-08-01

190

Composite overwrapped metallic tanks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Work is reported for fabricating and testing the fiberglass overwrapped titanium pressure vessel for cryogenic service. Difficulties encountered in the tank liner fabrication phase involved explosive forming, vacuum annealing, chemical milling and electron beam welding. While each of these processes and the nondestructive test methods employed are normally considered to be individually reliable, the combination of poor material together with fabrication and development reversals prevented the full achievement of the desired end results. Eight tanks plus a prototype and tool proofing article were produced. Six of the vessels failed during the hydrostatic sizing operation. One of the remaining tanks was hydrostatically pressurized to burst and the other was pressurized repeatedly at 75 F from 100 psi to the operating pressure until failure occurred. As a result, it is not possible to draw firm conclusions as to the true value of the design concept due to the problems encountered in the program.

Caudill, C. L.; Kirlin, R. L.

1972-01-01

191

Fireman's Air Tanks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Together with NASA's Johnson Space Center, A-T-O Inc.'s Scott Aviation has developed light-weight firefighter's air tanks. New backpack system weighs only 20 pounds for 30 minute air supply, 13 pounds less than conventional firefighting tanks. They are pressurized at 4,500 psi, (twice current tanks). Made of aluminum liner wrapped by resin-impregnated glass fibers, eliminating corrosion as well as lightening the load. Redesigned face mask permits better vision. Warning device to tell fireman he is running out of air is personalized so it can't be heard by others reducing confusion in an already hectic environment. Structural Composites Inc., The Boeing Co., and Martin- Marietta Corp. have developed uses for this technology.

1976-01-01

192

77 FR 23652 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Comprehensive Annual Catch Limit...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Annual Catch Limit Amendment (Comprehensive ACL Amendment) for the Fishery Management Plan...Council (Council). The Comprehensive ACL Amendment specified, in part, annual catch...final rule implementing the Comprehensive ACL Amendment was published in the Federal...

2012-04-20

193

77 FR 42192 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Comprehensive Annual Catch Limit...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Annual Catch Limit Amendment (Comprehensive ACL Amendment) for the Fishery Management Plan...Council (Council). The Comprehensive ACL Amendment specified, in part, annual catch...final rule implementing the Comprehensive ACL Amendment published on March 16,...

2012-07-18

194

How Tank Bromeliads Respond to Changing Tank Conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bromeliads, particularly those with a water-holding tank formed by leaves, act as amplifiers of biodiversity in their tropical forest ecosystem. The tanks play host to a wide diversity of life forms, and provide the bromeliad with almost all of its water and mineral nutrients. Bacteria, insects, amphibians, and other plants thrive in the conditions created by the tank. To investigate

Rebecca Tribelhorn

2010-01-01

195

Tank plan for tank 241-C-104 retrieval testing  

SciTech Connect

Tank 241-C-104 has been identified as one of the first tanks to be retrieved for high-level waste pretreatment and immobilization. Retrieval of the tank waste will require dilution. Laboratory tests are needed to determine the amount of dilution required for safe retrieval and transfer of feed. The proposed laboratory tests are described in this document.

HERTING, D.L.

1999-05-21

196

Catch trials in force field learning influence adaptation and consolidation of human motor memory  

PubMed Central

Force field studies are a common tool to investigate motor adaptation and consolidation. Thereby, subjects usually adapt their reaching movements to force field perturbations induced by a robotic device. In this context, so-called catch trials, in which the disturbing forces are randomly turned off, are commonly used to detect after-effects of motor adaptation. However, catch trials also produce sudden large motor errors that might influence the motor adaptation and the consolidation process. Yet, the detailed influence of catch trials is far from clear. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the influence of catch trials on motor adaptation and consolidation in force field experiments. Therefore, 105 subjects adapted their reaching movements to robot-generated force fields. The test groups adapted their reaching movements to a force field A followed by learning a second interfering force field B before retest of A (ABA). The control groups were not exposed to force field B (AA). To examine the influence of diverse catch trial ratios, subjects received catch trials during force field adaptation with a probability of either 0, 10, 20, 30, or 40%, depending on the group. First, the results on motor adaptation revealed significant differences between the diverse catch trial ratio groups. With increasing amount of catch trials, the subjects' motor performance decreased and subjects' ability to accurately predict the force field—and therefore internal model formation—was impaired. Second, our results revealed that adapting with catch trials can influence the following consolidation process as indicated by a partial reduction to interference. Here, the optimal catch trial ratio was 30%. However, detection of consolidation seems to be biased by the applied measure of performance.

Stockinger, Christian; Focke, Anne; Stein, Thorsten

2014-01-01

197

Catch trials in force field learning influence adaptation and consolidation of human motor memory.  

PubMed

Force field studies are a common tool to investigate motor adaptation and consolidation. Thereby, subjects usually adapt their reaching movements to force field perturbations induced by a robotic device. In this context, so-called catch trials, in which the disturbing forces are randomly turned off, are commonly used to detect after-effects of motor adaptation. However, catch trials also produce sudden large motor errors that might influence the motor adaptation and the consolidation process. Yet, the detailed influence of catch trials is far from clear. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the influence of catch trials on motor adaptation and consolidation in force field experiments. Therefore, 105 subjects adapted their reaching movements to robot-generated force fields. The test groups adapted their reaching movements to a force field A followed by learning a second interfering force field B before retest of A (ABA). The control groups were not exposed to force field B (AA). To examine the influence of diverse catch trial ratios, subjects received catch trials during force field adaptation with a probability of either 0, 10, 20, 30, or 40%, depending on the group. First, the results on motor adaptation revealed significant differences between the diverse catch trial ratio groups. With increasing amount of catch trials, the subjects' motor performance decreased and subjects' ability to accurately predict the force field-and therefore internal model formation-was impaired. Second, our results revealed that adapting with catch trials can influence the following consolidation process as indicated by a partial reduction to interference. Here, the optimal catch trial ratio was 30%. However, detection of consolidation seems to be biased by the applied measure of performance. PMID:24795598

Stockinger, Christian; Focke, Anne; Stein, Thorsten

2014-01-01

198

TANK SPACE OPTIONS REPORT  

SciTech Connect

Since this report was originally issued in 2001, several options proposed for increasing double-shell tank (DST) storage space were implemented or are in the process of implementation. Changes to the single-shell tank (SST) waste retrieval schedule, completion of DST space saving options, and the DST space saving options in progress have delayed the projected shortfall of DST storage space from the 2007-2011 to the 2018-2025 timeframe (ORP-11242, River Protection Project System Plan). This report reevaluates options from Rev. 0 and includes evaluations of new options for alleviating projected restrictions on SST waste retrieval beginning in 2018 because of the lack of DST storage space.

WILLIS WL; AHRENDT MR

2009-08-11

199

Calculate tank losses easier  

SciTech Connect

Attempts to eliminate potential for error, save time and enable computer calculation of tankage vapor losses by converting the US EPA's AP-42 nomograms, graphs and tabulated data into analytical equations using linear regression curve-fitting techniques. Points out that since tankage emission inventories in a 75,000 to 150,000 B/D petroleum refinery may involve as many as 100 tanks or more, there is a significant potential for error inherent in the calculation methodology found in AP-42. Presents a typical printout from a program (written in BASIC for a Hewlett-Packard 87 personal desktop computer) for calculating vapor losses from some fixed-roof tanks.

Beychok, M.R.

1983-03-01

200

3.OA Fish Tanks  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a task from the Illustrative Mathematics website that is one part of a complete illustration of the standard to which it is aligned. Each task has at least one solution and some commentary that addresses important asects of the task and its potential use. Here are the first few lines of the commentary for this task: Suppose there are 4 tanks and 3 fish in each tank. The total number of fish in this situation can be expressed as $4 \\times 3 = 12$. Describe what is m...

201

ThinkTank  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource is a free tool to help students develop and narrow research questions for project-based learning. ThinkTank allows students to create an outline of topics and subtopics, narrow their choices, and export topics to NoteStar, a related cost-free tool. ThinkTank is part of the collection of online tools available through 4Teachers.org, founded to support integration of technology in the K-12 classroom. ***PLEASE NOTE: Some of the pages within this resource are sponsored by commercial vendors.

2009-11-19

202

Hazardous Waste Tanks Risk Analysis.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this analysis was to assess the human health risks associated with: (1) the population of hazardous waste tanks under the current regulatory approach; and (2) the population of hazardous waste tanks under the various regulatory strategies c...

1986-01-01

203

Hazardous Waste Tanks Risk Analysis.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of the analysis was to assess the human health risks associated with: (1) the population of hazardous waste tanks under the current regulatory approach; and (2) the population of hazardous waste tanks under the various regulatory strategies co...

1986-01-01

204

Regulation of Catch Bonds by Rate of Force Application*  

PubMed Central

The current paradigm for receptor-ligand dissociation kinetics assumes off-rates as functions of instantaneous force without impact from its prior history. This a priori assumption is the foundation for predicting dissociation from a given initial state using kinetic equations. Here we have invalidated this assumption by demonstrating the impact of force history with single-bond kinetic experiments involving selectins and their ligands that mediate leukocyte tethering and rolling on vascular surfaces during inflammation. Dissociation of bonds between L-selectin and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) loaded at a constant ramp rate to a constant hold force behaved as catch-slip bonds at low ramp rates that transformed to slip-only bonds at high ramp rates. Strikingly, bonds between L-selectin and 6-sulfo-sialyl Lewis X were impervious to ramp rate changes. This ligand-specific force history effect resembled the effect of a point mutation at the L-selectin surface (L-selectinA108H) predicted to contact the former but not the latter ligand, suggesting that the high ramp rate induced similar structural changes as the mutation. Although the A108H substitution in L-selectin eliminated the ramp rate responsiveness of its dissociation from PSGL-1, the inverse mutation H108A in P-selectin acquired the ramp rate responsiveness. Our data are well explained by the sliding-rebinding model for catch-slip bonds extended to incorporate the additional force history dependence, with Ala-108 playing a pivotal role in this structural mechanism. These results call for a paradigm shift in modeling the mechanical regulation of receptor-ligand bond dissociation, which includes conformational coupling between binding pocket and remote regions of the interacting molecules.

Sarangapani, Krishna K.; Qian, Jin; Chen, Wei; Zarnitsyna, Veronika I.; Mehta, Padmaja; Yago, Tadayuki; McEver, Rodger P.; Zhu, Cheng

2011-01-01

205

Regulation of catch bonds by rate of force application.  

PubMed

The current paradigm for receptor-ligand dissociation kinetics assumes off-rates as functions of instantaneous force without impact from its prior history. This a priori assumption is the foundation for predicting dissociation from a given initial state using kinetic equations. Here we have invalidated this assumption by demonstrating the impact of force history with single-bond kinetic experiments involving selectins and their ligands that mediate leukocyte tethering and rolling on vascular surfaces during inflammation. Dissociation of bonds between L-selectin and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) loaded at a constant ramp rate to a constant hold force behaved as catch-slip bonds at low ramp rates that transformed to slip-only bonds at high ramp rates. Strikingly, bonds between L-selectin and 6-sulfo-sialyl Lewis X were impervious to ramp rate changes. This ligand-specific force history effect resembled the effect of a point mutation at the L-selectin surface (L-selectinA108H) predicted to contact the former but not the latter ligand, suggesting that the high ramp rate induced similar structural changes as the mutation. Although the A108H substitution in L-selectin eliminated the ramp rate responsiveness of its dissociation from PSGL-1, the inverse mutation H108A in P-selectin acquired the ramp rate responsiveness. Our data are well explained by the sliding-rebinding model for catch-slip bonds extended to incorporate the additional force history dependence, with Ala-108 playing a pivotal role in this structural mechanism. These results call for a paradigm shift in modeling the mechanical regulation of receptor-ligand bond dissociation, which includes conformational coupling between binding pocket and remote regions of the interacting molecules. PMID:21775439

Sarangapani, Krishna K; Qian, Jin; Chen, Wei; Zarnitsyna, Veronika I; Mehta, Padmaja; Yago, Tadayuki; McEver, Rodger P; Zhu, Cheng

2011-09-16

206

Storage Tanks-Marble Point  

NSF Publications Database

Background An Environmental Action Memorandum (EAM) for Placement of Steel Fuel Storage Tanks at Marble Point, Antarctica, was originally issued on January 28, 1991 by the Environmental Officer, NSF. Sidney Draggan Attachments 10 Percent Basis of Design Site Map Attachment 1 Marble Point Fuel Tank Design Marble Point, Antarctica 10% BASIS OF DESIGN I. Project Description and General Goals: Four, double-wall 25,000-gallon fuel tanks and three, single-wall 15,000-gallon tanks are to be ...

207

Hanford Waste Tank Grouping Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This letter report discusses the progress and accomplishments of the Tank Grouping Study in FY96. Forty-one single-shell tanks (SSTs) were included in the FY95. In FY96, technical enhancements were also made to data transformations and tank grouping methods. The first focus of the FY96 effort was a general tank grouping study in which the 41 SSTs were grouped into classes

K. M. Remund; B. C. Simpson

1996-01-01

208

50 CFR 300.209 - Alternative procedures for nations identified as having vessels engaged in shark catch that are...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...identified as having vessels engaged in shark catch that are not certified in this subpart...identified as having vessels engaged in shark catch that are not certified in this subpart...that do not target or incidentally catch sharks, or were harvested by practices...

2013-10-01

209

76 FR 55343 - Pacific Halibut Fisheries; Extension of Public Comment Period on Proposed Rule for a Catch...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Rule for a Catch Sharing Plan for Guided Sport and Commercial Fisheries in Alaska AGENCY...implement a catch sharing plan for the guided sport and commercial fisheries for Pacific halibut...implement a catch sharing plan for the guided sport and commercial fisheries for Pacific...

2011-09-07

210

78 FR 44920 - Pacific Halibut Fisheries; Catch Sharing Plan for Guided Sport and Commercial Fisheries in Alaska...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Fisheries; Catch Sharing Plan for Guided Sport and Commercial Fisheries in Alaska; Extension...implement a catch sharing plan for the guided sport and commercial fisheries for Pacific halibut...implement a catch sharing plan for the guided sport and commercial fisheries for Pacific...

2013-07-25

211

78 FR 62331 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-Annual Catch Limit...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Herring Fishery; Sub-Annual Catch Limit (ACL) Harvested for Management Area 1A AGENCY...biological catch, annual catch limit (ACL), optimum yield, domestic harvest and...800 metric tons (mt); the 2013 sub-ACL allocated to Area 1A is 29,775 mt,...

2013-10-17

212

77 FR 10668 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch Limit) Harvested for Management...biological catch, annual catch limit (ACL), optimum yield, domestic harvest and...200 metric tons (mt); the 2012 sub-ACL allocated to Area 2 is 22,146 mt,...

2012-02-23

213

76 FR 66654 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch Limit) Harvested for Management...biological catch, annual catch limit (ACL), optimum yield, domestic harvest and...200 metric tons (mt); the 2011 sub-ACL allocated to Area 1A is 26,546 mt,...

2011-10-27

214

78 FR 21071 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch Limit) Harvested for Management...biological catch, annual catch limit (ACL), optimum yield, domestic harvest and...200 metric tons (mt); the 2013 sub-ACL allocated to Area 2 is 22,146 mt,...

2013-04-09

215

26 CFR 31.3121(b)(20)-1 - Service performed on a boat engaged in catching fish.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Service performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. 31.3121(b)(20)-1 Section...performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. (a) In general. (1) Service...individual on a boat engaged in catching fish or other forms of aquatic animal life...

2013-04-01

216

26 CFR 31.3401(a)(17)-1 - Remuneration for services performed on a boat engaged in catching fish.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. 31.3401(a)(17)-1 Section...performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. (a) Remuneration for services performed...individual on a boat engaged in catching fish or other forms of aquatic animal life...

2013-04-01

217

TANK 4 CHARACTERIZATION, SETTLING, AND WASHING STUDIES  

Microsoft Academic Search

A sample of PUREX sludge from Tank 4 was characterized, and subsequently combined with a Tank 51 sample (Tank 51-E1) received following Al dissolution, but prior to a supernate decant by the Tank Farm, to perform a settling and washing study to support Sludge Batch 6 preparation. The sludge source for the majority of the Tank 51-E1 sample is Tank

C. Bannochie; J. Pareizs; D. Click; J. Zamecnik

2009-01-01

218

Accelerated Tank Closure Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

Among the highest priorities for action under the ''Hanford Federal Facility and Agreement and Consent Order'', hereafter referred to as the Tri-Party Agreement, is the retrieval, treatment and disposal of Hanford Site tank waste. Tank waste is recognized as one of the primary threats to the Columbia River and one of the most complex technical challenges. Progress has been made in resolving safety issues, characterizing tank waste and past tank leaks, enhancing double-shell tank waste transfer and operations systems, retrieving single-shell tank waste, deploying waste treatment facilities, and planning for the disposal of immobilized waste product. However, limited progress has been made in developing technologies and providing a sound technical basis for tank system closure. To address this limitation the Accelerated Tank Closure Demonstration Project was created to develop information through technology demonstrations in support of waste retrieval and closure decisions. To complete its mission the Accelerated Tank Closure Demonstration Project has adopted performance objectives that include: protecting human health and the environment; minimizing/eliminating potential waste releases to the soil and groundwater; preventing water infiltration into the tank; maintaining accessibility of surrounding tanks for future closure; maintaining tank structural integrity; complying with applicable waste retrieval, disposal, and closure regulations; and maintaining flexibility for final closure options in the future.

SAMS, T.L.

2003-02-01

219

Floating roof storage tank boilover  

Microsoft Academic Search

Storage tanks are important facilities for the major hazard installations (MHIs) to store large quantity of crude oil. There is several fire types can occur with large diameter open top floating roof storage tanks. Boilover is considered one of the most dangerous fires in large-scale oil tank. The world has witnessed many incidents due to boilover in floating roof storage

Ibrahim M. Shaluf; Salim A. Abdullah

2011-01-01

220

CALIFORNIA LEAKING UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS  

EPA Science Inventory

Points represent Leaking Underground Storage Tanks (LUST) for the State of California. This database was developed and is maintained by the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). Point locations represent tanks where leak events have occurred. Tank latitude-long...

221

Sharing of Tank Information  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Test Rationale -- Attempt to Address 10% vs. 25+% effects of crater penetration on full scale titanium alloy tanks and comparison to plate tests Utilize Baseline Burst Pressure versus HVI impacted vessels as gauge of effects Examine craters (post test) to determine penetration characteristics on a fluid filled vessel versus plate tests. Examine crater effects leading to vessel failure (if any).

Tamminga, Joshua D.

2011-01-01

222

Tank bump consequence analysis  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to derive radiological and toxicological consequences for a tank bump event based on analysis performed using the GOTH computer model, to estimate the mitigative effect of pump and sluice pit cover blocks, and to discuss preventative measures.

Board, B.D.

1996-08-07

223

Hybrid Tank Technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Researchers have accomplished great advances in pressure vessel technology by applying high-performance composite materials as an over-wrap to metal-lined pressure vessels. These composite over-wrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) are used in many areas, from air tanks for firefighters and compressed natural gas tanks for automobiles, to pressurant tanks for aerospace launch vehicles and propellant tanks for satellites and deep-space exploration vehicles. NASA and commercial industry are continually striving to find new ways to make high-performance pressure vessels safer and more reliable. While COPVs are much lighter than all-metal pressure vessels, the composite material, typically graphite fibers with an epoxy matrix resin, is vulnerable to impact damage. Carbon fiber is most frequently used for the high-performance COPV applications because of its high strength-to-weight characteristics. Other fibers have been used, but with limitations. For example, fiberglass is inexpensive but much heavier than carbon. Aramid fibers are impact resistant but have less strength than carbon and their performance tends to deteriorate.

2004-01-01

224

Aboveground storage tank regulations  

SciTech Connect

There are critical differences between the potential for environmental impact of aboveground and underground oil storage. For example, while leaks from underground storage tanks (USTs) seep into soil or aquifers, the concern with aboveground storage tanks (ASTs) is that an overfill or tank rupture can cause product to escape into a navigable stream and immediately create an oil spill pollution incident. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has very distinct programs outlining regulation parameters for each type of storage, including source of authority, regulatory cutoffs and exclusions, definitions, prevention and response requirements, and penalties, etc. Engineers considering changing or recommending a change in type of storage, particularly from a UST to an AST, need to be aware of existing federal regulations. UST regulation, administered primarily by the states, falls under EPA Regulation 40 CFR 280. EPA's underground storage tank program, which began in 1988, and the individual state programs that have evolved since then, provide generally accepted benchmarks for safe, reliable underground storage of petroleum and hazardous liquid products.

Geyer, W. (Steel Tank Inst., Lake Zurich, IL (United States))

1993-09-01

225

Tank characterization report for Single-Shell Tank T-102  

SciTech Connect

Tank 241-T-102 (hereafter referred to as T-102) is a 530,000 gallon single-shell waste tank located in the 200 West T Tank farm at the Hanford Site. In 1993, two cores were taken from this tank and analysis of the cores was conducted by Battelle`s 325-A Laboratory. Characterization of the waste in this tank was conducted to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-44-05. Tank T-102 was constructed in 1943 and put into service in 1945; it is the second tank in a cascade system with Tanks T-101 and T-103. During its process history, Tank T-102 received mostly Metal Waste (MW) from the Bismuth Phosphate Process and Coating Waste (CW) from the REDOX Process via the cascade from Tank T-101 and in transfers from Tank C-102. In 1956, the MW was removed from T-102 by pumping and sluicing`. This tank was declared inactive and retired from service in 1976. In 1981, intrusion prevention and stabilization measures were taken to isolate the waste in T-102. The tank presently contains approximately 121,100 liters (32,000 gallons) of liquid and sludge-like waste. Historically, there are no unreviewed safety issues associated with this tank and none were revealed after reviewing the data from the latest core sampling event in 1993. An extensive set of analytical measurements was performed on the core composites. The major constituents (>0.5 wt%) of the waste are water, aluminum, sodium, iron, and nitrate, ordered from the largest concentration to the smallest. The concentrations and inventories of these and other constituents are given. The results of the chemical analyses have been compared to the dangerous waste codes in the Washington Dangerous Waste Regulations (WAC 173-303).

Remund, K.M.; Hartley, S.A.; Toth, J.J.; Tingey, J.M.; Heasler, P.G.; Ryan, F.M.; Simpson, B.C.

1994-09-01

226

Evaluation of nontarget effects of methoprene applied to catch basins for mosquito control  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The mosquito larvicide methoprene is a juvenile growth hormone mimic that is widely used to control mosquito larvae in stormwater catch basins. This study addresses two concerns pertaining to methoprene's use for mosquito control. First, measurements of methoprene concentrations were made from water in catch basins that had been treated with methoprene and from an adjoining salt pond near where the treated catch basins emptied. The concentrations of methoprene in catch basins and at drainage outlets after application at the rates currently used for mosquito control in southern Rhode Island were 0.5 ppb and lower, orders of magnitude below what has been determined as detrimental to organisms other than mosquitoes. Second, the effects of methoprene on the communities that live in catch basins were evaluated both in simulated catch basins in the laboratory and in actual catch basins in the field. We found no evidence of declines in abundances of any taxa attributable to the application. Furthermore, we found no consistent changes in community-level parameters (e.g., taxonomic richness, and dominance-diversity relationships) related to methoprene application in either field or laboratory trials.

Butler, Mari; Ginsberg, Howard S.; LeBrun, Roger A.; Gettman, Alan

2010-01-01

227

FY2003 Visual examination of In Tank and Tank annuli at 241-SY tank farm  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the completion of the FY 2003 in-tank and annulus video inspections for the 241-SY tank farms. Representative photos of observed anomalies, water-streaks, corrosion deposits, pitting, and in-tank strains on the 241-SY-101, 102 & 103

AFTANAS, B.L.

2003-07-08

228

X-33 Liquid Hydrogen Tanks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The liquid hydrogen tank is a multi-lobe graphite/epoxy tank with integrally bonded, woven composite joints. The tanks are broken down into three major subgroups: aft dome/bulkhead, mid barrel section, and the forward dome/bulkhead. The vehicle uses two tanks (a left and right hand tank) as the "aft fuselage" of the vehicle, to react all body bending loads, landing gear loads, canted and vertical fin loads and air loads, as well as being used as the cryogenic fuel cells.

Adams, Andrew J.; Buck, P.; Franklin, W.; Yu, T.

1999-01-01

229

Comparison of catch and lake trout bycatch in commercial trap nets and gill nets targeting lake whitefish in northern Lake Huron  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We compared seasonal lake whitefish catch rates, lake trout bycatch, and gearinduced lake trout mortality between commercial trap nets and gill nets in north-central Lake Huron. Onboard monitors recorded catches from 260 gill net and 96 trap net lifts from October 1998 through December 1999. Catch rates for lake whitefish were highest in fall for both gear types, reflecting proximity of spawning sites to the study area. Lake whitefish catch rates were also relatively high in spring but low in both gear types in summer. Lake trout were the principal bycatch species in both gears. The lake trout bycatch was lowest in both gear types in fall, highest in gill nets in spring, and highest in trap nets in summer. The ratio of lake trout to legal whitefish (the target species) was highest in summer and lowest in fall in both gear types. The high lake trout ratio in summer was due principally to low catch rates of lake whitefish. All but 3 of 186 live lake trout removed from trap net pots survived for at least two days of observation in laboratory tanks. Therefore, we estimated that post-release survival of trap netted lake trout that had not been entangled in the mesh was 98.4%. In addition, we accounted for stress-induced mortality for lake trout that were live at capture but entangled in the mesh of either gear type. Resulting estimates of lake trout survival were higher in trap nets (87.8%) than in gill nets (39.6%). The number of lake trout killed per lift was highest during summer in trap nets and during spring in gill nets. In trap nets, 85% of dead lake trout were observed to be entangled in the mesh of the pot or tunnels. Survival rates of lake trout in gill nets were higher in our study than reported by others, probably because our nets were hand lifted in a small boat. Our trap net-induced mortality estimates on lake trout were higher than those reported by others because we adjusted our estimates to account for post-release mortality caused by handling and injury. Studies such as ours should prove useful to managers developing harvest allocation options that are consistent with the need to protect nontarget populations. For example, applying our seasonal lake trout-whitefish catch ratios to a hypothetical small-boat gill net fishery, the lake trout bycatch from harvest of 100,000 kg of whitefish would equal the estimated lake trout production available for harvest in the study area for year 2002. The two trap net fisheries may have incidentally killed half this number of lake trout annually from 1995-99. Bycatch estimates are also important inputs to catch-at-age decision models used in developing rehabilitation and harvest strategies for target and bycatch species.

Johnson, James E.; Ebener, Mark P.; Gebhardt, Kenneth; Bergstedt, Roger

2004-01-01

230

Lining avoids tank bottom replacement  

SciTech Connect

Steel petroleum storage tanks are susceptible to corrosion. The average corrosion rate of a carbon steel storage tank in crude oil service (at ambient temperatures) is more than 1 mil per year. Corrosion rates can accelerate quickly when a layer of water containing corrosive compounds, such as salt and sediment, settle to the bottom of a crude oil tank. Chlorides and other soluble salts in the water also generate a strong electrolyte that can further speed corrosion. External corrosion is another problem. For example, the bottom plates of an above-ground storage tank are vulnerable, especially if the tank is located close to the ocean or exposed to stray electrical currents in the soil. Some tanks have developed leaks in as little as five years. Faced with a quickly corroding tank bottom, tank maintenance engineers have two choices: replace it or reline it. Replacing a tank bottom can be a costly and time-consuming process. Relining the tank with a fiberglass-reinforced plastic (FRP) coating system is the least-cost alternative. A properly applied FRP lining is likely to prevent tank bottom corrosion for up to 20 years. This article describes how thick-film linings (ranging from 60 to 65 mils thick) can control internal corrosion and leaks. Such linings have sufficient strength to bridge over small perforations and are not sensitive to internal pits and other surface irregularities.

LeBleu, J.B.; Hummel, B.

1993-11-01

231

49 CFR 179.500-14 - Test of tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes... § 179.500-14 Test of tanks. (a) After heat-treatment, tanks shall be subjected to...

2010-10-01

232

49 CFR 179.500-14 - Test of tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes... § 179.500-14 Test of tanks. (a) After heat-treatment, tanks shall be subjected to hydrostatic...

2013-10-01

233

49 CFR 179.500-14 - Test of tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes... § 179.500-14 Test of tanks. (a) After heat-treatment, tanks shall be subjected to...

2009-10-01

234

Tank 241-AP-106 tank characterization plan: Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Tank 241-AP-106 (AP-106) is a candidate feed tank which is expected to be processed at the 242-A Evaporator. Three issues related to the overall concern of the evaporator must be evaluated: compatibility of the candidate waste with respect to feed tank, slurry tank, and evaporator requirements; safety parameters of the candidate waste tank to avoid a facility condition which is outside the safety boundaries; and compliance of the waste as dictated by regulations from various government and environmental agencies. The characterization efforts of this Tank Characterization Plan are focused on the resolution of the issues above. To evaluate the potential for waste incompatibility with the feed tank, slurry tank, and evaporator, as well as relevant safety issues, analyses will be performed on the grab samples obtained from tank AP-106. These analyses are discussed in Section 4.0. Once the characterization of tank AP-106 has been performed, the waste compatibility and safety assessment shall be conducted. This effort is discussed elsewhere.

Valenzuela, B.D.

1994-11-17

235

Tank characterization data report: Tank 241-C-112  

SciTech Connect

Tank 241-C-112 is a Hanford Site Ferrocyanide Watch List tank that was most recently sampled in March 1992. Analyses of materials obtained from tank 241-C-112 were conducted to support the resolution of the Ferrocyanide Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) and to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-10-00. Analysis of core samples obtained from tank 241-C-112 strongly indicates that the fuel concentration in the tank waste will not support a propagating exothermic reaction. It is probable that tank 241-C-112 exceeds the 1,000 g-mol inventory criteria established for the Ferrocyanide USQ; however, extensive energetic analysis of the waste has determined a maximum exothermic value of -9 cal/g dry waste. This value is substantially below any levels of concern (-75 cal/g). In addition, an investigation of potential mechanisms to generate concentration levels of radionuclides high enough to be of concern was performed. No credible mechanism was postulated that could initiate the formation of such concentration levels in the tank. Tank 241-C-112 waste is a complex material made up primarily of water and inert salts. The insoluble solids are a mixture of phosphates, sulfates, and hydroxides in combination with aluminum, calcium, iron, nickel, and uranium. Disodium nickel ferrocyanide and sodium cesium nickel ferrocyanide probably exist in the tank; however, there appears to have been significant degradation of this material since the waste was initially settled in the tank.

Simpson, B.C.; Borsheim, G.L.; Jensen, L.

1993-04-01

236

Tank-farm construction: Tank-soil interaction in tank-farm construction  

SciTech Connect

This article illustrates examples of tank-soil interaction as a result of utilization of the above concepts. The need to address tank-soil interaction arises due to concern for two phenomena, namely, stability and settlement. If adequate soil bearing is not available, soil will move out from under the tank causing the tank to fail. Settlement of soil can create stresses leading to rupture of tank bottom, shell buckling, or ovality of tank which can inhibit the movement of the roof in floating-roof tanks. This article surveyed the interaction of tank and soil as the result of soil-improvement approaches. The soil improvement is time dependent. Tank-soil interaction should be monitored by using geotechnical instrumentation and evaluation methods to fulfill two underlying objectives. One, the bearing capacity of soil at any time during the soil improvement program should be higher than applied load. Two, the magnitude and the rate of soil settlement should be such that it does not detrimentally affect the structural integrity of the tank. The soil behavior should be monitored with respect to pore water pressure, vertical settlement, and lateral movement. The tank behavior should be monitored with respect to bottom rupture, shell buckling, ovality, roof binding, and failure of ringwall foundation.

Ahmed, S.

1984-01-30

237

DEVELOPMENT OF ANSYS FINITE ELEMENT MODELS FOR SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) & DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) TANKS  

SciTech Connect

Summary report of ANSYS finite element models developed for dome load analysis of Hanford 100-series single-shell tanks and double-shell tanks. Document provides user interface for selecting proper tank model and changing of analysis parameters for tank specific analysis. Current dome load restrictions for the Hanford Site underground waste storage tanks are based on existing analyses of record (AOR) that evaluated the tanks for a specific set of design load conditions. However, greater flexibility is required in controlling dome loadings applied to the tanks due to day-to-day operations and waste retrieval activities. This requires the development of an analytical model with sufficient detail to evaluate various dome loading conditions not specifically addressed in the AOR.

JULYK, L.J.; MACKEY, T.C.

2003-06-19

238

40 CFR 280.220 - Ownership of an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system or facility or...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...storage tank or underground storage tank system or facility or property on...storage tank or underground storage tank system is located. 280.220 ...storage tank or underground storage tank system or facility or property...

2009-07-01

239

40 CFR 280.220 - Ownership of an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system or facility or...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...storage tank or underground storage tank system or facility or property on...storage tank or underground storage tank system is located. 280.220 ...storage tank or underground storage tank system or facility or property...

2010-07-01

240

Calculate tank losses easier  

Microsoft Academic Search

Attempts to eliminate potential for error, save time and enable computer calculation of tankage vapor losses by converting the US EPA's AP-42 nomograms, graphs and tabulated data into analytical equations using linear regression curve-fitting techniques. Points out that since tankage emission inventories in a 75,000 to 150,000 B\\/D petroleum refinery may involve as many as 100 tanks or more, there

Beychok

1983-01-01

241

Will a catch share for whales improve social welfare?  

PubMed

We critique a proposal to use catch shares to manage transboundary wildlife resources with potentially high non-extractive values, and we focus on the case of whales. Because whales are impure public goods, a policy that fails to capture all nonmarket benefits (due to free riding) could lead to a suboptimal outcome. Even if free riding were overcome, whale shares would face four implementation challenges. First, a whale share could legitimize the international trade in whale meat and expand the whale meat market. Second, a legal whale trade creates monitoring and enforcement challenges similar to those of organizations that manage highly migratory species such as tuna. Third, a whale share could create a new political economy of management that changes incentives and increases costs for nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) to achieve the current level of conservation. Fourth, a whale share program creates new logistical challenges for quota definition and allocation regardless of whether the market for whale products expands or contracts. Each of these issues, if left unaddressed, could result in lower overall welfare for society than under the status quo. PMID:24640530

Smith, Martin D; Asche, Frank; Bennear, Lori S; Havice, Elizabeth; Read, Andrew J; Squires, Dale

2014-01-01

242

Estimating the number of species with CatchAll.  

PubMed

In many situations we are faced with the need to estimate the number of classes in a population from observed count data: this arises not only in biology, where we are interested in the number of taxa such as species, but also in many other fields such as public health, criminal justice, software engineering, etc. This problem has a rich history in theoretical statistics, dating back at least to 1943, and many approaches have been proposed and studied. However, to date only one approach has been implemented in readily available software, namely a relatively simple nonparametric method which, while straightforward to program, is not flexible and can be prone to information loss. Here we present CatchAll, a new, platform-independent, user-friendly, computationally optimized software package which calculates a powerful and flexible suite of parametric models (based on current statistical research) in addition to all existing nonparametric procedures. We briefly describe the software and its mathematical underpinnings (which are treated in depth elsewhere), and we work through an applied example from microbial ecology in detail. PMID:21121040

Bunge, John

2011-01-01

243

[Preparation of a spread from shrimp by-catch fish].  

PubMed

The composition of shrimp by-catch fish from the Central-Western region of Venezuela at different periods of the year was studied, as well as mean size and weight of same, and the yields obtained during processing, until the edible portion (pulp) was reached. The pulp was also analyzed from the physical, chemical and microbiological (pH, basic volatile N, trimethylamine, thiobarbituric acid test, moisture, fat, protein, ashes content and mesophyll and psychrophilic counts) points of view. The purpose of these studies was to determine its quality and freshness, since said pulp was utilized for the preparation of a canned and sterilized bread spread. Results obtained indicated the pulp to have an acceptable freshness, a fact which reflected in a final product with adequate characteristics. The bread spread was also analyzed from the physical, chemical, microbiological and sensory viewpoints (objective analyses of color and texture, pH, rancidity and sterility tests, moisture, fat protein, ashes, carbohydrates, sodium chloride contents, and sensory evaluation). In addition, these analyses were repeated monthly during the three-month storage period at two temperatures. On the basis of the above-mentioned findings, it was possible to determine that the bread spread had adequate acceptability and stability during storage. Furthermore, raw material variations did not affect the final product characteristics, which resulted in a product with commercial potential. PMID:3154297

Sena, C; Bello, R A

1988-12-01

244

Albacore Tuna Catches in the Northeast Pacific During Summer 1969 as Related to Selected Ocean Conditions.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Oregon's commercial fishery for albacore tune (Thunnus alalunga) is large, valuable, and variable. Primarily using logbook data contributed by fishermen, this study compares albacore catches with selected ocean conditions. The study is limited to troll-ca...

D. A. Panshin

1971-01-01

245

50 CFR 679.93 - Amendment 80 Program recordkeeping, permits, monitoring, and catch accounting.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...fishing or receiving fish in the BSAI and...on a NMFS-approved scale in compliance with the scale requirements at § 679...of catch between the scale used to weigh total...composition samples. (5) Fish on deck. No...

2010-10-01

246

Timely Healthcare Checkup Catches Melanoma Early | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine  

MedlinePLUS

... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Skin Cancer Timely Healthcare Checkup Catches Melanoma Early Past Issues / ... and research. How did you discover you had skin cancer? It was 1996, I had just left the ...

247

50 CFR 679.63 - Catch weighing requirements for vessels and processors.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA American Fisheries Act and Aleutian Island Directed Pollock Fishery Management Measures § 679.63 Catch weighing requirements for vessels and...

2013-10-01

248

Incidental catches of marine-mammals in pelagic trawl fisheries of the northeast Atlantic  

Microsoft Academic Search

Marine mammal by-catch in 11 pelagic trawl fisheries operated by four different countries in the northeast Atlantic was studied. Observers accompanied commercial fishing vessels and monitored 374 tows totalling 1771h of towing during 377 days fishing. Three species of marine mammal were identified in by-catches (white-sided dolphin, Lagenorhynchus acutus, common dolphin, Delphinus delphis and grey seal Halichoerus grypus) and a

Y. Morizur; S. D. Berrow; N. J. C. Tregenza; A. S. Couperus; S. Pouvreau

1999-01-01

249

Combining telephone surveys and fishing catches self-report: the French sea bass recreational fishery assessment.  

PubMed

Fisheries statistics are known to be underestimated, since they are mainly based on information about commercial fisheries. However, various types of fishing activities exist and evaluating them is necessary for implementing effective management plans. This paper assesses the characteristics and catches of the French European sea bass recreational fishery along the Atlantic coasts, through the combination of large-scale telephone surveys and fishing diaries study. Our results demonstrated that half of the total catches (mainly small fish) were released at sea and that the mean length of a kept sea bass was 46.6 cm. We highlighted different patterns of fishing methods and type of gear used. Catches from boats were greater than from the shore, both in abundance and biomass, considering mean values per fishing trip as well as CPUE. Spearfishers caught the highest biomass of sea bass per fishing trip, but the fishing rod with lure was the most effective type of gear in terms of CPUE. Longlines had the highest CPUE value in abundance but not in biomass: they caught numerous but small sea bass. Handlines were less effective, catching few sea bass in both abundance and biomass. We estimated that the annual total recreational sea bass catches was 3,173 tonnes of which 2,345 tonnes were kept. Since the annual commercial catches landings were evaluated at 5,160 tonnes, recreational landings represent 30% of the total fishing catches on the Atlantic coasts of France. Using fishers' self-reports was a valuable way to obtain new information on data-poor fisheries. Our results underline the importance of evaluating recreational fishing as a part of the total amount of fisheries catches. More studies are critically needed to assess overall fish resources caught in order to develop effective fishery management tools. PMID:24489885

Rocklin, Delphine; Levrel, Harold; Drogou, Mickaël; Herfaut, Johanna; Veron, Gérard

2014-01-01

250

Combining Telephone Surveys and Fishing Catches Self-Report: The French Sea Bass Recreational Fishery Assessment  

PubMed Central

Fisheries statistics are known to be underestimated, since they are mainly based on information about commercial fisheries. However, various types of fishing activities exist and evaluating them is necessary for implementing effective management plans. This paper assesses the characteristics and catches of the French European sea bass recreational fishery along the Atlantic coasts, through the combination of large-scale telephone surveys and fishing diaries study. Our results demonstrated that half of the total catches (mainly small fish) were released at sea and that the mean length of a kept sea bass was 46.6 cm. We highlighted different patterns of fishing methods and type of gear used. Catches from boats were greater than from the shore, both in abundance and biomass, considering mean values per fishing trip as well as CPUE. Spearfishers caught the highest biomass of sea bass per fishing trip, but the fishing rod with lure was the most effective type of gear in terms of CPUE. Longlines had the highest CPUE value in abundance but not in biomass: they caught numerous but small sea bass. Handlines were less effective, catching few sea bass in both abundance and biomass. We estimated that the annual total recreational sea bass catches was 3,173 tonnes of which 2,345 tonnes were kept. Since the annual commercial catches landings were evaluated at 5,160 tonnes, recreational landings represent 30% of the total fishing catches on the Atlantic coasts of France. Using fishers' self-reports was a valuable way to obtain new information on data-poor fisheries. Our results underline the importance of evaluating recreational fishing as a part of the total amount of fisheries catches. More studies are critically needed to assess overall fish resources caught in order to develop effective fishery management tools.

Rocklin, Delphine; Levrel, Harold; Drogou, Mickael; Herfaut, Johanna; Veron, Gerard

2014-01-01

251

Food security implications of global marine catch losses due to overfishing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Excess fishing capacity and the growth in global demand for fishery products have made overfishing ubiquitous in the world’s\\u000a oceans. Here we describe the potential catch losses due to unsustainable fishing in all countries’ exclusive economic zones\\u000a (EEZs) and on the high seas over 1950–2004. To do so, we relied upon catch and price statistics from the Sea Around Us

U. Thara Srinivasan; William W. L. Cheung; Reg Watson; U. Rashid Sumaila

2010-01-01

252

Is catch-and-release recreational angling compatible with no-take marine protected areas?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Marine protected areas (MPAs) have become a common conservation and management tool for reducing exploitation from the commercial and recreational fisheries sectors. However, the recreational fisheries sector has the potential to be compatible with no-take MPAs when catch-and-release angling is practiced because, in theory, no fish are actually harvested. This presumes that the effects of catch-and-release angling and related activities

Steven J. Cooke; Andy J. Danylchuk; Sascha E. Danylchuk; Cory D. Suski; Tony L. Goldberg

2006-01-01

253

Tank characterization data report: Tank 241-C-112  

SciTech Connect

Tank 241-C-112 is a Hanford Site Ferrocyanide Watch List tank that was most recently sampled in March 1992. Analyses of materials obtained from tank 241-C-112 were conducted to support the resolution of the Ferrocyanide Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) and to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-10-00. Analysis of core samples obtained from tank 241-C-112 strongly indicates that the fuel concentration in the tank waste will not support a propagating exothermic reaction. Analysis of the process history of the tank as well as studies of simulants provided valuable information about the physical and chemical condition of the waste. This information, in combination with the analysis of the tank waste, sup ports the conclusion that an exothermic reaction in tank 241-C-112 is not plausible. Therefore, the contents of tank 241-C-112 present no imminent threat to the workers at the Hanford Site, the public, or the environment from its forrocyanide inventory. Because an exothermic reaction is not credible, the consequences of this accident scenario, as promulgated by the General Accounting Office, are not applicable.

Simpson, B.C.; Borsheim, G.L.; Jensen, L.

1993-09-01

254

Tank characterization report for Single-Shell Tank B-111  

SciTech Connect

Tank 241-B-111 (hereafter referred to as B-111) is a 2,006,300 liter (530,000 gallon) single-shell waste tank located in the 200 East B tank farm at Hanford. Two cores were taken from this tank in 1991 and analysis of the cores was conducted by Battelle`s 325-A Laboratory in 1993. Characterization of the waste in this tank is being done to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-44-05. Tank B-111 was constructed in 1943 and put into service in 1945; it is the second tank in a cascade system with Tanks B-110 and B-112. During its process history, B-111 received mostly second-decontamination-cycle waste and fission products waste via the cascade from Tank B-110. This tank was retired from service in 1976, and in 1978 the tank was assumed to have leaked 30,300 liters (8,000 gallons). The tank was interim stabilized and interim isolated in 1985. The tank presently contains approximately 893,400 liters (236,000 gallons) of sludge-like waste and approximately 3,800 liters (1,000 gallons) of supernate. Historically, there are no unreviewed safety issues associated with this tank and none were revealed after reviewing the data from the latest core sampling event in 1991. An extensive set of analytical measurements was performed on the core composites. The major constituents (> 0.5 wt%) measured in the waste are water, sodium, nitrate, phosphate, nitrite, bismuth, iron, sulfate and silicon, ordered from largest concentration to the smallest. The concentrations and inventories of these and other constituents are given. Since Tanks B-110 and B-111 have similar process histories, their sampling results were compared. The results of the chemical analyses have been compared to the dangerous waste codes in the Washington Dangerous Waste Regulations (WAC 173-303). This assessment was conducted by comparing tank analyses against dangerous waste characteristics `D` waste codes; and against state waste codes.

Remund, K.M.; Tingey, J.M.; Heasler, P.G.; Toth, J.J.; Ryan, F.M.; Hartley, S.A.; Simpson, D.B.; Simpson, B.C.

1994-09-01

255

Tank Characterization Report for Double Shell Tank (DST) 241-AN-107  

SciTech Connect

This report interprets information about the tank answering a series of six questions covering areas such as information drivers, tank history, tank comparisons, disposal implications, data quality and quantity, and unique aspects of the tank.

ADAMS, M.R.

2000-03-23

256

40 CFR 280.230 - Operating an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Operating an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system. 280.230 Section 280.230 Protection...an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system. (a) Operating an UST or UST system...

2010-07-01

257

40 CFR 280.230 - Operating an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-07-01 false Operating an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system. 280.230 Section 280.230 Protection...an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system. (a) Operating an UST or UST system...

2009-07-01

258

FOR REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE CRYOGENIC PROPELLANT TANKS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analytical and experimental studies conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center for investigating integrated cryogenic propellant tank systems for a Reusable Launch Vehicle are described. The cryogenic tanks are investigated as an integrated tank system. An integrated tank system includes the tank wall, cryogenic insulation, Thermal Protection System (TPS) attachment sub-structure, and TPS. Analysis codes are used to size the

Theodore F. Johnson; Roderick Natividad; H. Kevin Rivers; Russell Smith

259

27 CFR 24.230 - Examination of tank car or tank truck.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-04-01 false Examination of tank car or tank truck. 24.230 Section 24.230...WINE Spirits § 24.230 Examination of tank car or tank truck. Upon arrival of a tank car or tank truck at the bonded wine premises,...

2013-04-01

260

Fog collection and deposition modelling - EcoCatch Lunz  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The area of Lunz am See (N 047.855°, E 015.068°, 650 m a.s.l.) in Lower Austria has been subject to long term monitoring of meteorological parameters as well as wet deposition. Even though Lunz is known for its good air quality, with about 200 days of precipitation per year reaching an annual average of 1500 mm deposition, immission fluxes reach levels of critical loads. For instance, nitrogen input from wet deposition of nitrate and ammonium is > 14 kg ha-1 a-1, and sulphur input from sulphate is 5 kg ha-1 a-1. In the framework of the EcoCatch project1) wet, dry and occult deposition have been investigated in detail in an alluvial forest near the Biological Station (Lunz/See) since September 2008. The overall contribution of dry and occult deposition was expected to be comparably low and only of importance in times of decreased wet deposition. Collection of fog samples was performed with an active fog sampler, regulated by a Vaisala PWD-12 sensor monitoring visibility. Temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction were logged by a HOBO weather station. Filter stacks were used for sampling of aerosol particles and gaseous components and a Wet And Dry Only Sampler (WADOS) was used to sample precipitation. Solute analysis was carried out via ion chromatography. Alkali and earth alkali metals, chloride as well as ammonium, sulphate and nitrate were quantified in rain, aerosol and fog samples on an event basis. In addition dry deposition included nitrogen oxide and dioxide, sulphur dioxide and ammonia measurements. A site specific relation of liquid water content (LWC) to visibility was established using the collection rate and the known collection efficiency of the fog sampler. A modified version of the fog deposition resistance model devised by G.M. Lovett was used to quantify occult deposition onto the alluvial forest. The surface area index of local vegetation was measured with a SunScan System and tree height was determined using a Vertex IV/GS. Between September 2008 and October 2009 roughly 560 hours of fog were observed and about 380 hours thereof were sampled. Duration, frequency as well as density of fog events showed strong seasonal variations. As expected, spring and autumn seasons exhibited the highest frequencies and durations of fog events. Concentrations of nitrate in fog samples during the cold season (Nov-Mar) were 10-fold higher than in rain, reaching monthly averages of 50 mg L-1 in January and February. With 15-25 mg L-1, sulphate was 11-fold higher in fog compared to rain. Ammonium reached on average 14 mg L-1 in fog samples and was thus 15-fold higher than in rain. 1)EcoCatch - Understanding the effects of global change on ecosystem processes and services at catchment scale (funded by Amt der Niederösterreichischen Landesregierung, and Clean Air Commission, Austrian Academy of Sciences).

Koller, M. W.; Ramírez-Santa Cruz, C.; Leder, K.; Bauer, H.; Dorninger, M.; Hofhansl, F.; Wanek, W.; Kasper-Giebl, A.

2010-07-01

261

Catching the Light - The Entwined History of Light and Mind  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In 1910, the surgeons Moreau and LePrince wrote about their successful operation on an eight-year-old boy who had been blind since birth because of cataracts. When the boy's eyes were healed they removed the bandages and, waving a hand in front of the child's physically perfect eyes, asked him what he saw. "I don't know," was his only reply. What he saw was only a varying brightness in front of him. However, when allowed to touch the hand as it began to move, he cried out in a voice of triumph, "It's moving!" He could feel it move, but he still needed laboriously to learn to see it move. Light and eyes were not enough to grant him sight. How, then, do we see? What's the difference between seeing and perception? What is light? From ancient times to the present, from philosophers to quantum physicists, nothing has so perplexed, so fascinated, so captivated the mind as the elusive definition of light. In Catching the Light , Arthur Zajonc takes us on an epic journey into history, tracing how humans have endeavored to understand the phenomenon of light. Blending mythology, religion, science, literature, and painting, Zajonc reveals in poetic detail the human struggle to identify the vital connection between the outer light of nature and the inner light of the human spirit. He explains the curiousness of the Greeks' blue and green "color blindness": Odysseus gazing longingly at the "wine-dark sea"; the use of chloros (green) as the color of honey in Homer's Odessey ; and Euripides' use of the color green to describe the hue of tears and blood. He demonstrates the complexity of perception through the work of Paul Cézanne--the artist standing on the bank of a river, painting the same scene over and over again, the motifs multiplying before his eyes. And Zajonc goes on to show how our quest for an understanding of light, as well as the conclusions we draw, reveals as much about the nature of our own psyche as it does about the nature of light itself. For the ancient Egyptians the nature of light was clear--it simply was the gaze of God. In the hands of the ancient Greeks, light had become the luminous inner fire whose ethereal effluence brought sight. In our contemporary world of modern quantum physics, science plays the greatest part in our theories of light's origin--from scientific perspectives such as Sir Isaac Newton's "corpuscular theory of light" and Michael Faraday's "lines of force" to such revolutionary ideas as Max Planck's "discrete motion of a pendulum" (the basis of quantum mechanics), Albert Einstein's "particles of light" and "theory of relativity," and Niels Bohr's "quantum jumps." Yet the metaphysical aspects of the scientific search, Zajonc shows, still loom large. For the physicist Richard Feynman, a quantum particle travels all paths, eventually distilling to one path whose action is least--the most beautiful path of all. Whatever light is, here is where we will find it. With rare clarity and unmatched lyricism, Zajonc illuminates the profound implications of the relationships between the multifaceted strands of human experience and scientific endeavor. A fascinating search into our deepest scientific mystery, Catching the Light is a brilliant synthesis that will both entertain and inform.

Zajonc, Arthur

1995-04-01

262

39. DIABLO POWERHOUSE: GRAVITY LUBRICATING OIL TANKS. THESE TANKS ARE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

39. DIABLO POWERHOUSE: GRAVITY LUBRICATING OIL TANKS. THESE TANKS ARE LOCATED AT ROOF LEVEL AT THE NORTHEAST REAR CORNER OF DIABLO POWERHOUSE, 1989. - Skagit Power Development, Diablo Powerhouse, On Skagit River, 6.1 miles upstream from Newhalem, Newhalem, Whatcom County, WA

263

11. Station Accumulator Tanks, view to the northeast. The tanks ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

11. Station Accumulator Tanks, view to the northeast. The tanks are visible along the right side of photograph, opposite a wall of the Unit 1 turbine pit. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Cabinet Gorge Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, North Bank of Clark Fork River at Cabinet Gorge, Cabinet, Bonner County, ID

264

Tank-farm construction. Part 2. Tank-soil interaction in tank-farm construction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Part 1 of this series described new approaches to tank-farm construction utilizing the concepts of preloading, hydroloading, artificial drains, and counterbalancing berms. This study illustrates examples of tank-soil interaction as a result of utilization of these concepts. The need to address tank-soil interaction arises due to concern for 2 phenomena, namely, stability and settlement. If adequate soil bearing is not

Ahmed

1984-01-01

265

[High Pressure Gas Tanks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Four high-pressure gas tanks, the basis of this study, were especially made by a private contractor and tested before being delivered to NASA Kennedy Space Center. In order to insure 100% reliability of each individual tank the staff at KSC decided to again submit the four tanks under more rigorous tests. These tests were conducted during a period from April 10 through May 8 at KSC. This application further validates the predictive safety model for accident prevention and system failure in the testing of four high-pressure gas tanks at Kennedy Space Center, called Continuous Hazard Tracking and Failure Prediction Methodology (CHTFPM). It is apparent from the variety of barriers available for a hazard control that some barriers will be more successful than others in providing protection. In order to complete the Barrier Analysis of the system, a Task Analysis and a Biomechanical Study were performed to establish the relationship between the degree of biomechanical non-conformities and the anomalies found within the system on particular joints of the body. This relationship was possible to obtain by conducting a Regression Analysis to the previously generated data. From the information derived the body segment with the lowest percentage of non-conformities was the neck flexion with 46.7%. Intense analysis of the system was conducted including Preliminary Hazard Analysis (PHA), Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA), and Barrier Analysis. These analyses resulted in the identification of occurrences of conditions, which may be becoming hazardous in the given system. These conditions, known as dendritics, may become hazards and could result in an accident, system malfunction, or unacceptable risk conditions. A total of 56 possible dendritics were identified. Work sampling was performed to observe the occurrence each dendritic. The out of control points generated from a Weighted c control chart along with a Pareto analysis indicate that the dendritics "Personnel not Wearing Proper Protective and Hose/tubing located in high-traffic area" which account for 59.18% of total dendritic frequency need to be addressed to reduce the chance of a hazard from occurring. However, the occurrences of some dendritics are more important than others. As a result immediate, from a Weighted c perspective, corrective action should be taken to ameliorate the cause of the Class A dendritic "Personnel located under suspended or moving loads" rather than just the most commonly occurring dendritics. In any case the vast majority of data obtained indicates that testing operations possess a relatively high degree of safety.

Quintana, Rolando

2002-01-01

266

Tank closure reducing grout  

SciTech Connect

A reducing grout has been developed for closing high level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. The grout has a low redox potential, which minimizes the mobility of Sr{sup 90}, the radionuclide with the highest dose potential after closure. The grout also has a high pH which reduces the solubility of the plutonium isotopes. The grout has a high compressive strength and low permeability, which enhances its ability to limit the migration of contaminants after closure. The grout was designed and tested by Construction Technology Laboratories, Inc. Placement methods were developed by the Savannah River Site personnel.

Caldwell, T.B.

1997-04-18

267

FY 1996 Tank waste analysis plan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Tank Waste Analysis Plan (TWAP) describes the activities of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Characterization Project to plan, schedule, obtain, and document characterization information on Hanford waste tanks. This information is required to...

C. S. Homi

1996-01-01

268

Space Shuttle with Improved External Propellant Tank.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The configuration and relationship of the external propellant tank and solid rocket boosters of space transportation systems such as the space shuttle are described. The space shuttle system with the improved propellant tank is shown. The external tank ha...

G. L. Vonpragenau

1982-01-01

269

A role for pancreatic beta-cell secretory hyperresponsiveness in catch-up growth hyperinsulinemia: Relevance to thrifty catch-up fat phenotype and risks for type 2 diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current notions about mechanisms by which catch-up growth predisposes to later type 2 diabetes center upon those that link hyperinsulinemia with an accelerated rate of fat deposition (catch-up fat). Using a rat model of semistarvation-refeeding in which catch-up fat is driven solely by elevated metabolic efficiency associated with hyperinsulinemia, we previously reported that insulin-stimulated glucose utilization is diminished in skeletal

Marina Casimir; Paula B de Andrade; Asllan Gjinovci; Jean-Pierre Montani; Pierre Maechler; Abdul G Dulloo

2011-01-01

270

Code check floating tank roofs  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports that both API 650 and BS 2654 contain criteria for design of single deck pontoon-type tank floating roofs. The codes states that the floating roof shall have sufficient buoyancy to remain afloat under the following conditions: tank content specific gravity is 0.7; the roof center deck is punctured; any two adjacent pontoon compartments are punctured; no water

Hassan

1992-01-01

271

Hanford waste tank cone penetrometer  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new tool is being developed to characterize tank waste at the Hanford Reservation. This tool, known as the cone penetrometer, is capable of obtaining chemical and physical properties in situ. For the past 50 years, this tool has been used extensively in soil applications and now has been modified for usage in Hanford Underground Storage tanks. These modifications include

Seda

1995-01-01

272

1990 waste tank inspection program  

SciTech Connect

Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site separations processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Tank conditions are evaluated by inspection using periscopes, still photography, and video systems for visual imagery. Inspections made in 1990 are the subject of this report.

McNatt, F.G.

1990-01-01

273

LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY COMPREHENSIVE TANK SURVEY.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Comprehensive Tank Survey process, identifies and prioritizes the potential vulnerabilities posed by tanks and pressure vessels surveyed, and provides recommendations for action plans.

Reynolds, Robin P.; Bourque, Dr. Robert F.; Lemke, Terrill; Bollschweiler, Allen; Barnes, Janina; Foote, Jennifer; Muir, Renee; Winsemius, Shellie; Tardella, Daniel

2003-07-17

274

Changes in Nutrient Intakes of Elementary School Children Following a School-Based Intervention: Results from the CATCH Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background.Twenty-four-hour recalls were used to assess the change in nutrient intake among elementary-age school children exposed to the Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health (CATCH). The purpose of this paper is to compare changes in nutrient intakes between treatment groups, sexes, ethnic groups, and the four CATCH sites.Methods.Twenty-four-hour recalls were administered to a subsample of the CATCH cohort at

Leslie A. Lytle; Elaine J. Stone; Milton Z. Nichaman; Cheryl L. Perry; Deanna H. Montgomery; Theresa A. Nicklas; Michelle M. Zive; Paul Mitchell; Johanna T. Dwyer; Mary Kay Ebzery; Marguerite A. Evans; Todd P. Galati

1996-01-01

275

SLUDGE BATCH 7 PREPARATION TANK 4 AND 12 CHARACTERIZATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

Samples of PUREX sludge from Tank 4 and HM sludge from Tank 12 were characterized in preparation for Sludge Batch 7 (SB7) formulation in Tank 51. SRNL analyses on Tank 4 and Tank 12 were requested in separate Technical Assistance Requests (TAR). The Tank 4 samples were pulled on January 19, 2010 following slurry operations by F-Tank Farm. The Tank

C. Bannochie; D. Click; J. Pareizs

2010-01-01

276

Supporting document for the Southeast Quadrant historical tank content estimate report for SY-tank farm  

SciTech Connect

Historical Tank Content Estimate of the Southeast Quadrant provides historical evaluations on a tank by tank basis of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the underground double-shell tanks of the Hanford 200 East and West Areas. This report summarizes historical information such as waste history, temperature profiles, psychrometric data, tank integrity, inventory estimates and tank level history on a tank by tank basis. Tank Farm aerial photos and in-tank photos of each tank are provided. A brief description of instrumentation methods used for waste tank surveillance are included. Components of the data management effort, such as Waste Status and Transaction Record Summary, Tank Layer Model, Supernatant Mixing Model, Defined Waste Types, and Inventory Estimates which generate these tank content estimates, are also given in this report.

Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Consort, S.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-12-31

277

Too much of a good thing? When to stop catch-up vaccination.  

PubMed

During the 20th century, deaths from a range of serious infectious diseases decreased dramatically due to the development of safe and effective vaccines. However, infant immunization coverage has increased only marginally since the 1960s, and many people remain susceptible to vaccine-preventable diseases. "Catch-up vaccination" for age groups beyond infancy can be an attractive and effective means of immunizing people who were missed earlier. However, as newborn vaccination rates increase, catch-up vaccination becomes less attractive: the number of susceptible people decreases, so the cost to find and vaccinate each unvaccinated person may increase; in addition, the number of infected individuals decreases, so each unvaccinated person faces a lower risk of infection. This article presents a general framework for determining the optimal time to discontinue a catch-up vaccination program. We use a cost-effectiveness framework: we consider the cost per quality-adjusted life year gained of catch-up vaccination efforts as a function of newborn immunization rates over time and consequent disease prevalence and incidence. We illustrate our results with the example of hepatitis B catch-up vaccination in China. We contrast results from a dynamic modeling approach with an approach that ignores the impact of vaccination on future disease incidence. The latter approach is likely to be simpler for decision makers to understand and implement because of lower data requirements. PMID:23858015

Hutton, David W; Brandeau, Margaret L

2013-10-01

278

From tanks to tumors.  

PubMed

"Tanks to Tumors" succeeded in bringing several different communities together--medical, military, academic, industrial, and engineering. They worked together in panels to determine how the United States might adopt thermal imaging diagnostic technology in an orderly and demonstrable way for the early detection of breast cancer and other conditions. The panel recommendations will serve to guide the transition of military technology developments in ATR, the VDL, and IR sensors to the civilian medical community. The result will be a new tool in the war against breast cancer--a major benefit to the military and civilian population. A CD of the workshop proceedings is available at no cost through Advanced Concepts Analysis, Falls Church, Virginia; +1 703 914 9237; e-mail: diakides@erols.com. PMID:12613208

Paul, Jeffrey L; Lupo, Jasper C

2002-01-01

279

49 CFR 179.221 - Individual specification requirements applicable to tank car tanks consisting of an inner...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Individual specification requirements applicable to tank car tanks consisting of an inner container supported...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

2013-10-01

280

49 CFR 179.200 - General specifications applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks (Class DOT-111).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...specifications applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks (Class DOT-111). 179.200 Section...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

2013-10-01

281

49 CFR 179.220 - General specifications applicable to nonpressure tank car tanks consisting of an inner container...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...General specifications applicable to nonpressure tank car tanks consisting of an inner container supported...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

2013-10-01

282

Tank farms hazards assessment  

SciTech Connect

Hanford contractors are writing new facility specific emergency procedures in response to new and revised US Department of Energy (DOE) Orders on emergency preparedness. Emergency procedures are required for each Hanford facility that has the potential to exceed the criteria for the lowest level emergency, an Alert. The set includes: (1) a facility specific procedure on Recognition and Classification of Emergencies, (2) area procedures on Initial Emergency Response and, (3) an area procedure on Protective Action Guidance. The first steps in developing these procedures are to identify the hazards at each facility, identify the conditions that could release the hazardous material, and calculate the consequences of the releases. These steps are called a Hazards Assessment. The final product is a document that is similar in some respects to a Safety Analysis Report (SAR). The document could br produced in a month for a simple facility but could take much longer for a complex facility. Hanford has both types of facilities. A strategy has been adopted to permit completion of the first version of the new emergency procedures before all the facility hazards Assessments are complete. The procedures will initially be based on input from a task group for each facility. This strategy will but improved emergency procedures in place sooner and therefore enhance Hanford emergency preparedness. The purpose of this document is to summarize the applicable information contained within the Waste Tank Facility ``Interim Safety Basis Document, WHC-SD-WM-ISB-001`` as a resource, since the SARs covering Waste Tank Operations are not current in all cases. This hazards assessment serves to collect, organize, document and present the information utilized during the determination process.

Broz, R.E.

1994-09-30

283

Synthesis of Seafood Catch, Distribution, and Consumption Patterns in the Gulf of Mexico Region  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this task was to gather and assemble information that will provide a synthesis of seafood catch, distribution and consumption patterns for the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) region. This task was part of a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored project entitled ''Environmental and Economic Assessment of Discharges from Gulf of Mexico Region Oil and Gas Operations.'' Personal interviews were conducted with a total of 905 recreational fishermen and 218 commercial fishermen (inclusive of shrimpers, crabbers, oystermen and finfishermen) in Louisiana and Texas using survey questionnaires developed for the study. Results of these interviews detail the species and quantities caught, location of catch, mode of fishing, distribution of catch, family consumption patterns and demographics of the fishermen.

Steimle and Associates, Inc.

1999-08-16

284

Catch bond mechanism of force-enhanced adhesion: counter-intuitive, elusive but ... widespread?  

PubMed Central

Summary Catch bonds are biological interactions that are enhanced by mechanical force pulling a ligand-receptor complex apart. So far, the existence of catch bond-forming cellular adhesins has been ascertained for the most common Escherichia coli adhesin, FimH, and P-/L-selectins universally expressed by leukocytes and blood vessel walls. One compelling model for these force-enhanced interactions proposes that conformation of the ligand-binding pocket in the receptor protein is allosterically linked to the quaternary configuration of the receptor domains. The catch bond properties are likely widespread among adhesive proteins, calling for a detailed understanding of the underpinning mechanisms and physiological significance of this elusive phenomenon.

Sokurenko, Evgeni V.; Vogel, Viola; Thomas, Wendy E.

2008-01-01

285

Cyclic Stretch Induces Cell Reorientation on Substrates by Destabilizing Catch Bonds in Focal Adhesions  

PubMed Central

A minimal model of cellular mechanosensing system that consists of a single stress fiber adhering on a substrate via two focal adhesions made of catch bonds is adopted to investigate the phenomena of cell reorientation on substrates induced by an applied uniaxial cyclic stretch. The model indicates that the catch bonds in the focal adhesions experience a periodically oscillating internal force with amplitude and frequency controlled by two intrinsic clocks of the stress fiber, one associated with localized activation and the other with homogeneous activation of sarcomere units along the stress fiber. It is shown that this oscillating force due to cyclic stretch tends to destabilize focal adhesions by reducing the lifetime of catch bonds. The resulting slide or relocation of focal adhesions then causes the associated stress fiber to shorten and rotate to configurations nearly perpendicular to the stretching direction. These predicted behaviors from our model are consistent with a wide range of experimental observations.

Chen, Bin; Kemkemer, Ralf; Deibler, Martin; Spatz, Joachim; Gao, Huajian

2012-01-01

286

Downstream Impacts of Tank 48H In-tank and Out-of-tank Processing Alternatives  

SciTech Connect

This document discusses a number of possible impacts that an in-tank or out-of-tank process may have on downstream processing facilities. The analysis is part of a task to develop processes to destroy tetraphenylborate using Fenton Chemistry (metal catalyst plus hydrogen peroxide). Two processes being evaluated are funded by a grant from DOE's National Energy Technology Center. The first is an in-tank process, where the tetraphenylborate is destroyed by decreasing the pH, increasing the temperature and adding a catalyst and hydrogen peroxide as required. After the TPB is destroyed, sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrite are added to the tank to return the tank to conditions that minimize corrosion. The resulting slurry is stored in a HLW tank, likely concentrated in the HLW evaporators, and later will be fed to the Salt Waste Processing Facility. The second process is an out-of-tank Fenton process. This process produces two streams, a high cesium stream that feeds to DWPF and a low cesium feed that returns to a HLW tank with the DWPF recycle. The recycle stream may be evaporated in the HLW evaporators, and will later be fed to the Saltstone Facility or the Actinide Removal Process. An additional two processes being evaluated are in-tank processes. In the first, thermal hydrolysis, the TPB is destroyed by decreasing the pH and increasing the temperature. In the second process, thermal hydrolysis, the TPB is destroyed in by decreasing the pH, adding a catalyst, and increasing the temperature. After the TPB is destroyed, sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrite are added to the tank to return the tank to conditions that minimize corrosion. The resulting slurry is stored in a HLW tank, will likely be concentrated in the HLW evaporators and later will be fed to the Salt Waste Processing Facility. This evaluation is designed to identify possible downstream impacts that may limit the productivity or quality of existing and proposed processing facilities, including the Salt Waste Processing Facility, Defense Waste Processing Facility, Actinide Removal Process, Tank Farms, Saltstone Facility, or the HLW evaporators. This list was compiled so that researchers and modelers could target their future work to determine whether these postulated interactions will truly impact the downstream facilities. summarizes the possible downstream impacts noted in this document, and attempts to compare the processing alternatives.

Lambert, D.P.

2003-12-22

287

Tank characterization report for single shell tank 241-A-102  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the information on the historical uses, present status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste stored in Tank 241-A-102. This report supports the requirements of Tri-party Agreement Milestone M-44-09.

Jo, J., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-29

288

Tank 241-AP-107 tank characterization plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has directed the DOE to concentrate ear-term sampling and analysis activities on identification and resolution of issues (Conway 1993). The Data Quality Objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used in the resolution of safety issues. As a result, a revision in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestone M-44-00 has been made, which states that ``A Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) will be developed for each double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process; Development of TCPs by the DQO process is intended to allow users (e.g., Hanford Facility user groups, regulators) to ensure their needs will be met and that resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information.`` This document satisfies that requirement for the tank 241-AP-107 (AP-107).

Schreiber, R.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-01-20

289

Tank characterization report for single-shell Tank B-201  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to characterize the waste in single shell Tank B-201. Characterization includes the determination of the physical, chemical (e.g., concentrations of elements and organic species), and radiological properties of the waste. These determinations are made using analytical results from B-201 core samples as well as historical information about the tank. The main objective is to determine average waste properties: but in some cases, concentrations of analytes as a function of depth were also determined. This report also consolidates the available historical information regarding Tank B-201, arranges the analytical information from the recent core sampling in a useful format, and provides an interpretation of the data within the context of what is known about the tank.

Heasler, P.G.; Remund, K.M.; Tingey, J.M.; Baird, D.B.; Ryan, F.M.

1994-09-01

290

Tank vapor mitigation requirements for Hanford Tank Farms  

SciTech Connect

Westinghouse Hanford Company has contracted Los Alamos Technical Associates to listing of vapors and aerosols that are or may be emitted from the High Level Waste (HLW) tanks at Hanford. Mitigation requirements under Federal and State law, as well as DOE Orders, are included in the listing. The lists will be used to support permitting activities relative to tank farm ventilation system up-grades. This task is designated Task 108 under MJB-SWV-312057 and is an extension of efforts begun under Task 53 of Purchase Order MPB-SVV-03291 5 for Mechanical Engineering Support. The results of that task, which covered only thirty-nine tanks, are repeated here to provide a single source document for vapor mitigation requirements for all 177 HLW tanks.

Rakestraw, L.D.

1994-11-15

291

Tank 241-U-111 tank characterization plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan that identifies the information needed to address relevant issues concerning short-term and long-term safe storage and long-term management of Single-Shell Tank (SST) 241-U-111.

Homi, C.S.

1995-10-25

292

The myosin cross-bridge cycle and its control by twitchin phosphorylation in catch muscle.  

PubMed Central

The anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis was used to characterize the myosin cross-bridge during catch, a state of tonic force maintenance with a very low rate of energy utilization. Addition of MgATP to permeabilized muscles in high force rigor at pCa > 8 results in a rapid loss of some force followed by a very slow rate of relaxation that is characteristic of catch. The fast component is slowed 3-4-fold in the presence of 1 mM MgADP, but the distribution between the fast and slow (catch) components is not dependent on [MgADP]. Phosphorylation of twitchin results in loss of the catch component. Fewer than 4% of the myosin heads have ADP bound in rigor, and the time course (0.2-10 s) of ADP formation following release of ATP from caged ATP is similar whether or not twitchin is phosphorylated. This suggests that MgATP binding to the cross-bridge and subsequent splitting are independent of twitchin phosphorylation, but detachment occurs only if twitchin is phosphorylated. A similar dependence of detachment on twitchin phosphorylation is seen with AMP-PNP and ATPgammaS. Single turnover experiments on bound ADP suggest an increase in the rate of release of ADP from the cross-bridge when catch is released by phosphorylation of twitchin. Low [Ca(2+)] and unphosphorylated twitchin appear to cause catch by 1) markedly slowing ADP release from attached cross-bridges and 2) preventing detachment following ATP binding to the rigor cross-bridge.

Butler, T M; Narayan, S R; Mooers, S U; Hartshorne, D J; Siegman, M J

2001-01-01

293

Effects of Catch-and-Release Angling on Salmonids at Elevated Water Temperatures  

SciTech Connect

Few studies have assessed catch and release mortality of salmonids at water temperatures ?23°C, despite predictions of warming stream temperatures due to climate change. In addition, the effects of diel temperature fluctuations on salmonid mortality have largely been ignored in catch and release angling studies. The primary objective of this study was to measure catch and release mortality of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, brown trout Salmo trutta, and mountain whitefish Prosopium williamsoni in three water temperature treatments; when daily maximum water temperatures were cool (<20°C), warm (20 to 22.9°C), and hot ( 23°C). A secondary objective was to assess catch and release mortality of salmonids angled in morning and evening within water-temperature treatments. These objectives were related to Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks’ Drought Fishing Closure Policy (DFCP). Angling (fly-fishing only) occurred in the Gallatin and Smith rivers. All angled fish were confined to in-stream holding cages and monitored for mortality for 72 h. Mortality of rainbow trout peaked at 16% in the Gallatin River and 9% in the Smith River during the hot treatment. Mortality of brown trout was less than 5% in all water-temperature treatments in both rivers. Mountain whitefish mortality peaked at 28% in the hot treatment in the Smith River. No mortality for any species occurred in either river when daily maximum water temperatures were <20°C. Mortality of rainbow trout peaked at 16% in the evening hot treatment in the Smith River. Mortality of brown trout and mountain whitefish was not related to time of day. The catch and release mortality values presented here likely represent fishing mortality given that most anglers in southwest Montana practice catch and release angling. The mortality values we observed were lower than predicted (< 30%), given reports in the literature. The difference is likely related to the in situ nature of the study and periods of cooler water temperatures between peaks facilitating recovery from thermal stress.

Boyd, James W.; Guy, Christopher S.; Horton, Travis; Leathe, Steven A.

2010-08-01

294

The influence of catch trials on the consolidation of motor memory in force field adaptation tasks.  

PubMed

In computational neuroscience it is generally accepted that human motor memory contains neural representations of the physics of the musculoskeletal system and the objects in the environment. These representations are called "internal models". Force field studies, in which subjects have to adapt to dynamic perturbations induced by a robotic manipulandum, are an established tool to analyze the characteristics of such internal models. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether catch trials during force field learning could influence the consolidation of motor memory in more complex tasks. Thereby, the force field was more than double the force field of previous studies (35 N·s/m). Moreover, the arm of the subjects was not supported. A total of 46 subjects participated in this study and performed center-out movements at a robotic manipulandum in two different force fields. Two control groups learned force field A on day 1 and were retested in the same force field on day 3 (AA). Two test groups additionally learned an interfering force field B (= -A) on day 2 (ABA). The difference between the two test and control groups, respectively, was the absence (0%) or presence (19%) of catch trials, in which the force field was turned-off suddenly. The results showed consolidation of force field A on day 3 for both control groups. Test groups showed no consolidation of force field A (19% catch trials) and even poorer performance on day 3 (0% catch trials). In conclusion, it can be stated that catch trials seem to have a positive effect on the performance on day 3 but do not trigger a consolidation process as shown in previous studies that used a lower force field viscosity with supported arm. These findings indicate that the results of previous studies in which less complex tasks were analyzed, cannot be fully transferred to more complex tasks. Moreover, the effects of catch trials in these situations are insufficiently understood and further research is needed. PMID:23898319

Focke, Anne; Stockinger, Christian; Diepold, Christina; Taubert, Marco; Stein, Thorsten

2013-01-01

295

Stabilization of in-tank residual wastes and external-tank soil contamination for the tank focus area, Hanford tank initiative: Applications to the AX Tank Farm  

SciTech Connect

A combined engineering and geochemistry approach is recommended for the stabilization of waste in decommissioned tanks and contaminated soils at the AX Tank Farm, Hanford, WA. A two-part strategy of desiccation and gettering is proposed for treatment of the in-tank residual wastes. Dry portland cement and/or fly ash are suggested as an effective and low-cost desiccant for wicking excess moisture from the upper waste layer. Getters work by either ion exchange or phase precipitation to reduce radionuclide concentrations in solution. The authors recommend the use of specific natural and man-made compounds, appropriately proportioned to the unique inventory of each tank. A filler design consisting of multilayered cementitous grout with interlayered sealant horizons should serve to maintain tank integrity and minimize fluid transport to the residual waste form. External tank soil contamination is best mitigated by placement of grouted skirts under and around each tank, together with installation of a cone-shaped permeable reactive barrier beneath the entire tank farm. Actinide release rates are calculated from four tank closure scenarios ranging from no action to a comprehensive stabilization treatment plan (desiccant/getters/grouting/RCRA cap). Although preliminary, these calculations indicate significant reductions in the potential for actinide transport as compared to the no-treatment option.

Balsley, S.D.; Krumhansl, J.L.; Borns, D.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); McKeen, R.G. [Alliance for Transportation Research, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-07-01

296

Double Shell Tank (DST) Emergency Pumping Guide  

SciTech Connect

This document provides preplanning necessary to expeditiously remove any waste that may leak from the primary tank to the secondary tank for Hanford's 28 Double Shell Tanks (DSTs). The strategy is described, applicable emergency procedures are referenced, and transfer routes and pumping equipment for each tank are identified.

DOMNOSKI-RAUCH, L.A.

2001-01-10

297

CHARACTERIZATION OF TANK 19F SAMPLES  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked by Liquid Waste Operations to characterize Tank 19F closure samples. Tank 19F slurry samples analyzed included the liquid and solid fractions derived from the slurry materials along with the floor scrape bottom Tank 19F wet solids. These samples were taken from Tank 19F in April 2009 and made available to SRNL in

L. Oji; D. Diprete; D. Click

2009-01-01

298

Floating roof tank with rim space seal  

Microsoft Academic Search

This patent describes a vertical cylindrical liquid storage tank having a circular floating roof of smaller diameter than the tank thereby defining a clearance space between the roof edge and the tank wall; a seal joined to the roof and extending upwardly therefrom into slidable contact with the tank wall; the seal completely covering the clearance space; the seal comprising

R. B. Grove; S. W. Peters; M. L. Tellalian

1986-01-01

299

46 CFR 154.446 - Tank design.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Tank design. 154.446 Section 154.446...VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Independent Tank Type B § 154.446 Tank design. An independent tank type B...

2013-10-01

300

Catch-All Virtual Organizations - Solution for Heterogeneous and Disperse Grid Users Communities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The virtual organizations form a key concept for seamless utilization of all advanced features of available worldwide grid environments, the EGEE Grid in particular. However, apart from large, well organized user communities there is a substantial, non-trivial activation barrier in adopting grid concept and creating a new VO for small research groups. To minimize this barrier, a so-called "catch-all" virtual organization approach has been implemented. Here we present two successful use cases of catch-all virtual organizations (Virtual Organization for Central Europe and for EUAsia), demonstrating the strengths of this approach, discussing their setups, encountered challenges and suggesting corresponding solutions.

Kmuní?ek, Jan; Kou?il, Daniel; Yen, Eric; Matyska, Lud?k; St?elcová, Zora; Kulhánek, Petr; Ko?a, Jaroslav

301

Do caesarean section rates 'catch-up'? Evidence from 14 European countries.  

PubMed

This study investigated the catch up effect of Caesarean Section (CS) birth rates across 14 European countries during 1980-2009 for the first time. The panel stationary test incorporating multiple structural breaks and cross-sectional dependence was used to provide reliable evidence for the existence of the catch up effect of CS birth rates. Our results suggested that the CS birth rates in 14 European countries have mostly exhibited signs of convergence through a steady upward trend from 1980 to 2009. Policymakers in low CS birth rate countries should be cautioned concerning the negative impact of the increase of CS births. PMID:23519946

Chen, Wen-Yi

2013-12-01

302

49 CFR 179.201 - Individual specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks. 179.201 Section 179.201 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

2013-10-01

303

RCS Propellant Tank Thermostat Test.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The propellant and oxidizer tanks of the Gemini B Reentry Control System incorporate thermostatically controlled heaters to maintain their temperature within prescribed limits. Tests were performed to develop a method to verify operation of the thermostat...

1968-01-01

304

Weather in a Tank (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

';Weather in a Tank' is an approach to teaching atmospheres, oceans and climate which uses rotating laboratory demonstrations and associated curriculum materials. Originating at MIT, the approach has been further developed and expanded through collaborations with many Professors in universities across the country and around the world. The aim of the project is to offer instructors a repertoire of rotating tank experiments and a curriculum in fluid dynamics to better assist students in making connections between phenomena in the real world and basic principles of rotating fluid dynamics. The approach also provides a context for interactive experiments in which data is collected in real-time and then analyzed. In this presentation we will illustrate the ideas behind ';Weather in a Tank' by performing (if possible) some live laboratory experiments using rotating tanks of water, dyes and ice buckets, emphasizing the kind of quantitative approach we use in our teaching.

Illari, L.

2013-12-01

305

Hydrocarbon tank leak detection system  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a leak detection system for detecting leaks of a liquid hydrocarbon from an underground tank, comprising in combination: at least one riser pipe extending from a point adjacent the bottom of the tank to the surface; communication means for communicating hydrocarbon leaked from the tank to the interior of the riser pipe; a dye which is soluble in hydrocarbon and insoluble in water; a permeable container containing a quantity of the dye; means for lowering the container to the bottom of the riser pipe and retrieving the container to the top of the riser pipe, the dye within the container being exposed to the interior of the pipe for contacting any liquid contained in the pipe, enabling an inspector to periodically pull the container to the surface to determine if any of the dye has dissolved and thus changed the color of the container, indicating leakage of hydrocarbon from the tank.

Flippo, W.J.B. Jr.

1988-09-13

306

Tank 48 Chemical Destruction - 13237  

SciTech Connect

Small tank copper-catalyzed peroxide oxidation (CCPO) is a potentially viable technology to facilitate the destruction of tetraphenylborate (TPB) organic solids contained within the Tank 48H waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS). A maturation strategy was created that identified a number of near-term development activities required to determine the viability of the CCPO process, and subsequent disposition of the CCPO effluent. Critical activities included laboratory scale validation of the process and identification of forward transfer paths for the CCPO effluent. The technical documentation and the successful application of the CCPO process on simulated Tank 48 waste confirm that the CCPO process is a viable process for the disposition of the Tank 48 contents. (authors)

Simner, Steven P.; Aponte, Celia I.; Brass, Earl A. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC, Savannah River Remediation, Savannah River Site, Building 766-H, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation, LLC, Savannah River Remediation, Savannah River Site, Building 766-H, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01

307

Tank Farms Technical Safety Requirements  

SciTech Connect

The TSRs define the acceptable conditions, safe boundaries, bases thereof, and controls to ensure safe operation during authorized activities, for facilities within the scope of the Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis (DSA), in parallel with the DSA.

DANNA, M.A.

2003-10-24

308

Tank Farms Technical Safety Requirements.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The technical safety requirements (TSRs) define the acceptable conditions, safe boundaries, bases thereof, and controls to ensure safe operation during authorized activities, for facilities within the scope of the Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis.

M. A. Danna

2003-01-01

309

Controlled Tank Car Impact Tests.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A series of controlled tank car impact tests were performed by the Association of American Railroads as part of a Federal Railroad Administration Task Order entitled Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Research Test Program. The objective of these t...

R. K. Larson B. R. Rajkumar

1992-01-01

310

Catches of Greenland halibut ( Reinhardtius hippoglossoides) in deepwater ghost-fishing gillnets on the Norwegian continental slope  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fishing gear may continue to fish after it has been lost. Large catches have been observed during cruises to retrieve lost gillnets in Norwegian waters, especially in the fishery for Greenland halibut (Reinhardtius hippoglossoides). The Norwegian Greenland halibut is overexploited, and there is serious concern about the effect of lost nets on this stock. Catches in deliberately lost gillnets were

Odd-Børre Humborstad; Svein Løkkeborg; Nils-Roar Hareide; Dag Magne Furevik

2003-01-01

311

FITTING SURPLUS-PRODUCTION MODELS WITH MISSING CATCH DATA USING ASPIC: EVALUATION WITH SIMULATED DATA ON ATLANTIC BLUE MARLIN  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY Assessments of sailfish and marlins usually rely on application of surplus-production models, because size and age composition of catches are not known. However, even annual catches of these species are unreported in some Atlantic fisheries where they are taken primarily as bycatch. Past ICCAT billfish assessments have omitted the missing data, an ad hoc approach that reduces credibility of

C. Phillip Goodyear; Michael H. Prager

312

Total Catch of a Red-Listed Marine Species Is an Order of Magnitude Higher than Official Data  

PubMed Central

Accurate information on total catch and effort is essential for successful fisheries management. Officially reported landings, however, may be underestimates of total catch in many fisheries. We investigated the fishery for the nationally red-listed European lobster (Homarus gammarus) in south-eastern Norway. Probability-based strip transect surveys were used to count buoys in the study area in combination with catch per unit effort data obtained independently from volunteer catch diaries, phone interviews, and questionnaires. We estimate that recreational catch accounts for 65% of total catch in the study area. Moreover, our results indicate that only a small proportion (24%) of lobsters landed commercially were sold through the legal market and documented. Total estimated lobster catch was nearly 14 times higher than reported officially. Our study highlights the need for adequate catch monitoring and data collection efforts in coastal areas, presents a clear warning to resource managers that illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fisheries in coastal areas should not be ignored, and shows the potential impact of recreational fisheries.

Kleiven, Alf Ring; Olsen, Esben Moland; V?lstad, Jon Helge

2012-01-01

313

Sensitivity of predicted cohort size and catches to errors in estimates of fishing mortality in the terminal year  

Microsoft Academic Search

Horbowy, J. 2008. Sensitivity of predicted cohort size and catches to errors in estimates of fishing mortality in the terminal year. - ICES Journal of Marine Science, 65: 1227 - 1234. Formulae for the sensitivity of projected cohort size and catches to errors (bias) in estimates of fishing mortality in the terminal year were developed. Assessment models allowing for random

Jan Horbowy

2008-01-01

314

Long-term impact of incidental catches by tuna longlines: the black escolar ( Lepidocybium flavobrunneum) of the southwestern Atlantic Ocean  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analyze intra and inter-annual harvesting patterns of the black escolar Lepidocybium flavobrunneum (Gempylidae), an important component of the incidental catch of the Uruguayan tuna fleet (UTF) at the southwestern Atlantic Ocean (SAO), based on daily information of catch, fishing effort and individual weight of all the specimens caught during 16 years (1981–1996). The analysis also compares the activities of

Andrés C. Milessi; Omar Defeo

2002-01-01

315

Catch-tentacles in sea anemones: occurrence in Haliplanella luciae (Verrill) and a review of current knowledge  

Microsoft Academic Search

The occurrence of catch-tentacles or Fangtentakeln in the sea anemone Haliplanella luciae is reported for the first time, and some aspects of their anatomy and behaviour are noted. Provision is made for this discovery in the diagnoses of the family Haliplanellidae and the genus Haliplanella. The species of acontiarian anemones at present known to possess catch-tentacles are listed. The cnidom

R. B. Williams

1975-01-01

316

77 FR 61299 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Catch Limit) Harvested for Management Area 3 AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service...directed herring fishery in Management Area 3, because 95 percent of the catch limit for...calendar day of Atlantic herring in or from Area 3 until January 1, 2013, when the 2013...

2012-10-09

317

The illegal and unregulated fishery for toothfish in the Southern Ocean, and the CCAMLR catch documentation scheme  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fishing for toothfish in Antarctic waters started in the 1980s. Large amounts of illegal and unregulated fishing were observed in the mid-1990s, reaching 4 times the regulated catch in 1997. The Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources has adopted a number of Conservation Measures to control this illegal fishing. The Catch Document Scheme, adopted in 1999, which

D. J. Agnew

2000-01-01

318

Integral Radiator and Storage Tank  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A simplified, lightweight system for dissipating heat of a regenerative fuel- cell system would include a heat pipe with its evaporator end placed at the heat source and its condenser end integrated into the wall of the regenerative fuel cell system gas-storage tanks. The tank walls act as heat-radiating surfaces for cooling the regenerative fuel cell system. The system was conceived for use in outer space, where radiation is the only physical mechanism available for transferring heat to the environment. The system could also be adapted for use on propellant tanks or other large-surface-area structures to convert them to space heat-radiating structures. Typically for a regenerative fuel cell system, the radiator is separate from the gas-storage tanks. By using each tank s surface as a heat-radiating surface, the need for a separate, potentially massive radiator structure is eliminated. In addition to the mass savings, overall volume is reduced because a more compact packaging scheme is possible. The underlying tank wall structure provides ample support for heat pipes that help to distribute the heat over the entire tank surface. The heat pipes are attached to the outer surface of each gas-storage tank by use of a high-thermal conductance, carbon-fiber composite-material wrap. Through proper choice of the composite layup, it is possible to exploit the high longitudinal conductivity of the carbon fibers (greater than the thermal conductivity of copper) to minimize the unevenness of the temperature distribution over the tank surface, thereby helping to maximize the overall heat-transfer efficiency. In a prototype of the system, the heat pipe and the composite wrap contribute an average mass of 340 g/sq m of radiator area. Lightweight space radiator panels have a mass of about 3,000 g/sq m of radiator area, so this technique saves almost 90 percent of the mass of separate radiator panels. In tests, the modified surface of the tank was found to have an emissivity of 0.85. The composite wrap remained tightly bound to the surface of the tank throughout the testing in thermal vacuum conditions.

Burke, Kenneth A.; Miller, John R.; Jakupca, Ian; Sargi,Scott

2007-01-01

319

Code check floating tank roofs  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that both API 650 and BS 2654 contain criteria for design of single deck pontoon-type tank floating roofs. The codes states that the floating roof shall have sufficient buoyancy to remain afloat under the following conditions: tank content specific gravity is 0.7; the roof center deck is punctured; any two adjacent pontoon compartments are punctured; no water or live loads are present; and the roof primary drain is inoperative.

Hassan, H.M.K. (Abu Dhabi Marine Operating Co. (United Arab Emirates))

1992-10-01

320

Tank 241-C-109 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank C-109. The drivers and objectives of the waste tank headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedures that were presented in other reports.

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31

321

Stabilization of in-tank residual wastes and external-tank soil contamination for the tank focus area, Hanford Tank Initiative: Applications to the AX tank farm  

SciTech Connect

This report investigates five technical areas for stabilization of decommissioned waste tanks and contaminated soils at the Hanford Site AX Farm. The investigations are part of a preliminary evacuation of end-state options for closure of the AX Tanks. The five technical areas investigated are: (1) emplacement of cementations grouts and/or other materials; (2) injection of chemicals into contaminated soils surrounding tanks (soil mixing); (3) emplacement of grout barriers under and around the tanks; (4) the explicit recognition that natural attenuation processes do occur; and (5) combined geochemical and hydrological modeling. Research topics are identified in support of key areas of technical uncertainty, in each of the five areas. Detailed cost-benefit analyses of the technologies are not provided. This investigation was conducted by Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, during FY 1997 by tank Focus Area (EM-50) funding.

Becker, D.L.

1997-11-03

322

Kinesthetic Ability as Related to a Ball Catching Task with Dominant and Non-Dominant Hands.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was designed to investigate a specific skill pattern as it relates to kinesthetics and hand dominance. The specific skill pattern investigated was the ability of subjects, using either their dominant or nondominant hand, to catch a ball when they were unable to see their arm or hand. An "L" shaped curtain containing a hole for the ball…

Watz, Karyl A.; Eskridge, Veronica L.

323

Australian Children Catch the Bug: Motivating Young Children to Engage in Reading  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Concerned by a report that a number of seven-year-olds in their school were at risk for literacy difficulties, a team of teachers devised a low-budget program to promote reading at school and at home. After researching reading motivation, two of the authors conceived a catch phrase, a mascot, and gimmicks, including all-school activities, to…

Exley, Beryl

2007-01-01

324

How Position, Velocity, and Temporal Information Combine in the Prospective Control of Catching: Data and Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

The cerebral cortex contains circuitry for continuously computing properties of the environment and one's body, as well as relations among those properties. The success of complex perceptuomotor performances requires integrated, simultaneous use of such relational information. Ball catching is a good example as it involves reaching and grasping of visually pursued objects that move relative to the catcher. Although integrated

Joost C. Dessing; Daniel Bullock; Peter J. Beek

2005-01-01

325

Walking is more like catching than tapping: gait in the elderly as a complex cognitive task  

Microsoft Academic Search

Walking is generally viewed as an automated, over-learned, rhythmic motor task and may even be considered the lower-limb analog of rhythmic finger tapping, another automated motor task. Thus, one might hypothesize that walking would be associated with a simple rhythmic task like tapping rather than with a complex motor task like catching. Surprisingly, however, we find that among older adults,

Jeffrey M Hausdorff; Galit Yogev; Shmuel Springer; Ely S. Simon; Nir Giladi

2005-01-01

326

On Catching Humpback Salmon Oncorhynchus gorbuscha and Chum Salmon Oncorhynchus keta of Rare Age  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data on catching humpback salmon Oncorhynchus gorbuscha at the age of 0?+ and chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta at the age of 1+ in the Ilyushina River (Kunashir Island) in the period of spawning migration are given. The sex of fish, the body length, the stage of gonad maturity, and the number and width of sclerites on scales are indicated.

A. M. Kaev

2002-01-01

327

Nitrate leaching from ploughed pasture and the effectiveness of winter catch crops in reducing leaching losses  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of five catch crops (ryecorn, ryegrass, mustard, lupin, bean) on nitrogen (N) leaching following the autumn ploughing of a grass ley was compared with N leaching from bare fallow soil. The concentrations of nitrate N and ammonium N in the drainage water and the quantities of drainage water from the various treatments were measured over a winter period

R. D. McLenaghen; K. C. Cameron; N. H. Lampkin; M. L. Daly; B. Deo

1996-01-01

328

50 CFR 679.32 - Groundfish and halibut CDQ catch monitoring.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...required once a CDQ group has reached its salmon PSQ or crab PSQ are listed in § 679.7(d)(5). The catch of salmon or crab by vessels using other than... (2 ) Retain all CDQ species and salmon PSQ until they are delivered to...

2013-10-01

329

Disentangling the effects of capture efficiency and population abundance on catch data using random effects models  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose a random effects model for disentangling population abundance and capture efficiency effects on bottom-trawl catches. The spatial distribution of individual fish is assumed random leading to a Poisson distribution for the number of individuals in the trawl path (no schooling). Capture efficiency, i.e. the proportion of individuals in the trawl path being retained by the gear, is modelled

Verena M. Trenkel; Hans J. Skaug

2005-01-01

330

Police Posing as Juveniles Online to Catch Sex Offenders: Is It Working?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores the extent and effectiveness of proactive investigations in which investigators pose as minors on the Internet to catch potential sex offenders. It utilizes a subsample of cases from the National Juvenile Online Victimization Survey, which concerned persons arrested for Internet sex crimes against minors in the year beginning July 1, 2000. Results suggest proactive investigations represented a

Kimberly J. Mitchell; Janis Wolak; David Finkelhor

2005-01-01

331

On-line robot trajectory planning for catching a moving object  

Microsoft Academic Search

The problem of using a manipulator to catch a moving object without any advanced knowledge of its trajectory is discussed, and a heuristic procedure is proposed. The method is divided into two parts: a coarse tuning algorithm first drives the end effector into the neighborhood of the object in near-minimum time; a finite tuning algorithm then provides precise matching of

Z. Lin; V. Zeman; R. V. Patel

1989-01-01

332

Methods for Motion Generation and Interaction with a Humanoid Robot: Case Studies of Dancing and Catching  

Microsoft Academic Search

We focus on creating realistic, adaptable movement for hu- manoid robots and virtual characters. Here we present mo- tion synthesis of dance movements for a humanoid robot, and interactive behavior for catching. Our approach to mo- tion generation includes collection of example human move- ments, handling of marker occlusion, extraction of motion parameters, and trajectory generation, all of which must

Marcia Riley; Christopher G. Atkeson

2000-01-01

333

Confidence Limits Associated with Means and Medians of Series of Net Catches  

Microsoft Academic Search

Statistical methods for determining errors associated with means and medians of series of catches in stationary nets are discussed and two suggested methods presented: a parametric method based on the negative binomial distribution and a non-parametric method using sequential ranking of values around the median. It is concluded that the former is most useful from the viewpoint of mathematical description,

John B. Moyle; Richard Lound

1960-01-01

334

Composting of Food Waste and Waste Paper with Top soils for Nitrogen Catching  

Microsoft Academic Search

Food waste, waste paper and different topsoils were composted in different experiments. The composts were characterised by high contents of N, P, S, Na and K in the food waste, of Mg in the soil, and of Ca in paper and soils. The nitrogen catching was between 50 and 70% of the input. The lowest amounts were caught in the

Nils Brink

1993-01-01

335

Basic research and catch-up in China's high-speed rail industry  

Microsoft Academic Search

The existing literature has not studied the role of basic research in industrial catch-up in developing countries in any depth. This article takes high-speed rail as a case study in order to show how basic research has helped the industry to master imported technology and produce secondary innovations. The role of government is important in terms of coordinating the process

Xielin Liu; Peng Cheng; Ao Chen

2011-01-01

336

Catch Trends and Fish Utilization in Virginia's Offshore Recreational Pelagic Fishery, 1987-1988.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The objective of the second year of the two-year study was to expand the catch and effort data base for Virginia's recreational fishery for tuna and marlin while concluding the study of tuna handling practices in the fishery. The results of the study will...

J. A. Lucy N. J. Chartier W. D. Dupaul

1989-01-01

337

50 CFR 679.32 - Groundfish and halibut CDQ catch monitoring.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...required once a CDQ group has reached its salmon PSQ or crab PSQ are listed in § 679.7(d)(8). The catch of salmon or crab by vessels using other than...groundfish CDQ species, halibut CDQ, and salmon PSQ until they are delivered to a...

2011-10-01

338

50 CFR 679.32 - CDQ fisheries monitoring and catch accounting.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...required once a CDQ group has reached its salmon PSQ or crab PSQ are listed in § 679.7(d)(5). The catch of salmon or crab by vessels using other than...groundfish CDQ species, halibut CDQ, and salmon PSQ until they are delivered to...

2012-10-01

339

ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: STORMWATER SOURCE AREA TREATMENT DEVICE - STORMWATER MANAGEMENT INC., CATCH BASIN STORMFILTER®  

EPA Science Inventory

Verification testing of the Stormwater Management CatchBasin StormFilter® (CBSF) was conducted on a 0.16 acre drainage basin at the City of St. Clair Shores, Michigan Department of Public Works facility. The four-cartridge CBSF consists of a storm grate and filter chamber inlet b...

340

Catching up in new energy vehicle industry: Review of its development and policies in China  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to reduce the emission of automobile exhaust and overcome energy crisis, like other countries, China has launched incentive policies to develop new energy vehicles including electric vehicles since 2001. Additionally, as one of priorities in the Chinese national 5-year plans, it is a strategy to catch up in auto industries. This paper reviews the latest policy issued in

Hongtao Chen; Jun Jin; Jin Chen

2008-01-01

341

Multi-Level Management and Literacy: Issues Arising from the Catch Up Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explores whether primary schoolchildren's success in reading and writing depends on managing of literacy teaching at different levels, not simply the underlying pedagogic principles. Communication breakdowns in England's Catch Up Project illustrate how increasingly complex variables become in a top-down approach. (Contains 38 references.) (MLH)

Clipson-Boyles, Suzi; Blandford, Sonia

2001-01-01

342

Fishing Effort and Catch Composition of Urban Market and Rural Villages in Brazilian Amazon  

Microsoft Academic Search

The management of small-scale freshwater fisheries in Amazon has been based usually on surveys of urban markets, while fisheries of rural villages have gone unnoticed. We compared the fishing characteristics (catch, effort and selectivity) between an urban market and five small villages in the Lower Tocantins River (Brazilian Amazon), downstream from a large reservoir. We recorded 86 and 601 fish

Gustavo Hallwass; Priscila Fabiana Lopes; Anastacio Afonso Juras; Renato Azevedo Matias Silvano

2011-01-01

343

Factors affecting catches of the crab Scylla serrata (Forskål) (Decapoda: Portunidae) in baited traps: Soak time, time of day and accessibility of the bait  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effect of soak time, time of day and accessibility of the bait on catches of Scylla serrata in baited box traps was investigated. Catches over 24 h were compared on nine occasions at two different sites in traps that were cleared of their catch every 2 h and in traps that were not cleared. Mean catches differed between sites by factors of 4·5 in cleared traps and 2·2 in uncleared traps, indicating different crab densities. Catch did not increase linearly with soak time but tended towards an asymptote. Curves were fitted using the equation Ct = Cx (1- e- ?t), where Ct is catch at time t, C? is the asymptotic catch and ? is a constant. Catches after 24 h were 1·3 to 4·3 times higher in cleared traps than in uncleared traps. This was attributed to saturation of the uncleared traps. Estimated saturation levels varied between 0·8 and 6·1 crabs per trap, indicating that this parameter is not a constant for a particular design of trap. As catch was asymptotic, catch per unit effort (CPUE) expressed as catch per trap hour decreased with soak time. CPUE is, therefore, considered to be a poor index of abundance. The possibility of using either the asymptotic catch of regularly cleared traps or the rate at which this asymptotic catch is approached, as an index of abundance, is recommended for further research. Night catches were not significantly higher than day catches. There was no significant improvement in catch if trapped crabs were prevented from eating the bait.

Robertson, W. D.

1989-08-01

344

ROBOTIC TANK INSPECTION END EFFECTOR  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this contract between Oceaneering Space Systems (OSS) and the Department of Energy (DOE) was to provide a tool for the DOE to inspect the inside tank walls of underground radioactive waste storage tanks in their tank farms. Some of these tanks are suspected to have leaks, but the harsh nature of the environment within the tanks precludes human inspection of tank walls. As a result of these conditions only a few inspection methods can fulfill this task. Of the methods available, OSS chose to pursue Alternating Current Field Measurement (ACFM), because it does not require clean surfaces for inspection, nor any contact with the Surface being inspected, and introduces no extra by-products in the inspection process (no coupling fluids or residues are left behind). The tool produced by OSS is the Robotic Tank Inspection End Effector (RTIEE), which is initially deployed on the tip of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA). The RTEE combines ACFM with a color video camera for both electromagnetic and visual inspection The complete package consists of an end effector, its corresponding electronics and software, and a user's manual to guide the operator through an inspection. The system has both coarse and fine inspection modes and allows the user to catalog defects and suspected areas of leakage in a database for further examination, which may lead to emptying the tank for repair, decommissioning, etc.. The following is an updated report to OSS document OSS-21100-7002, which was submitted in 1995. During the course of the contract, two related subtasks arose, the Wall and Coating Thickness Sensor and the Vacuum Scarifying and Sampling Tool Assembly. The first of these subtasks was intended to evaluate the corrosion and wall thinning of 55-gallon steel drums. The second was retrieved and characterized the waste material trapped inside the annulus region of the underground tanks on the DOE's tank farms. While these subtasks were derived from the original intent of the contract, the focus remains on the RTIEE.

Rachel Landry

1999-10-01

345

Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-C-109  

Microsoft Academic Search

This document provides the characterization information and interprets the data for Single-Shell Tank 241-C-109. Single-Shell Tank 241-C-109 is an underground storage tank containing high-level radioactive waste. It is located in the C Tank Farm in the Hanford Site`s 200 East Area. The tank was sampled in September of 1992 to address the Ferrocyanide Unreviewed Safety Question. Analyses of tank waste

A. T. DiCenso; L. C. Amato; R. W. Lambie; J. D. Franklin; B. J. Seymour; K. W. Johnson; R. H. Stevens; K. M. Remund; L. M. Sasaki; B. C. Simpson

1995-01-01

346

Identification of single-shell tank in-tank hardware obstructions to retrieval at Hanford Site Tank Farms  

SciTech Connect

Two retrieval technologies, one of which uses robot-deployed end effectors, will be demonstrated on the first single-shell tank (SST) waste to be retrieved at the Hanford Site. A significant impediment to the success of this technology in completing the Hanford retrieval mission is the presence of unique tank contents called in-tank hardware (ITH). In-tank hardware includes installed and discarded equipment and various other materials introduced into the tank. This paper identifies those items of ITH that will most influence retrieval operations in the arm-based demonstration project and in follow-on tank operations within the SST farms.

Ballou, R.A.

1994-10-01

347

241-AY-101 Tank Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for tank 241-AY-101. The construction history of tank 241-AY-101 has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In tank 241-AY-101, the second double-shell tank constructed, similar issues as those with tank 241-AY-102 construction reoccurred. The overall extent of similary and affect on tank 241-AY-101 integrity is described herein.

Barnes, Travis J.; Gunter, Jason R.

2013-08-26

348

CHARACTERIZATION OF TANK 17 RESIDUAL WASTE  

SciTech Connect

Plans are to close Tank 17, a type IV waste tank in the F-area Tank Farm, by filling it with pumpable backfills. Most of the waste was removed from the tank in the late 1980s, and the remainder of the waste was removed in a short spray washing campaign that began on 11 April 1997. More details on the planned closure can be found in the Closure Plan for the High-Level Waste (HLW) Tanks and the specific closure module for Tank 17. To show that closure of the tank is environmentally sound, a performance evaluation has been performed for Tank 17. The performance evaluation projected the concentration of contaminants at various locations and times after closure. This report documents the basis for the inventories of contaminants that were used in the Tank 17 performance evaluation.

D'Entremont, P; Thomas Caldwell, T

1997-09-22

349

The Effect of Nitrogen Catch Crops on the Nitrogen Nutrition of a Succeeding Crop: I. Effects through Mineralization and Pre-emptive Competition  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of catch crops on the nitrogen nutrition of a succeeding carrot crop were investigated. An attempt was made to distinguish the effects of growth and nitrogen uptake by the catch crop from the effect of mineralization of its residues. It was found that growth and nitrogen uptake by catch crops could reduce the nitrogen supply to the succeeding

Kristian Thorup-Kristensen

1993-01-01

350

Can fishermen allocate their fishing effort in space and time on the basis of their catch rates? An example from Spermonde Archipelago, SW Sulawesi, Indonesia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Spatial and temporal patterns in catch rates and in allocation of fishing effort were analysed for the coastal fishery in Spermonde Archipelago, Indonesia, to assess whether fishermen can optimise their strategy from catch information, or whether they fish under great uncertainty and merely minimise risks. On average 517 fishing units operated in the 2800 km2 area, catching 21 t fish

C. P ET-SOEDE; W. L. T. V AN D ENSEN; S. K UYL; M. A. M. M ACHIELS

351

Muskie Lunacy: Does the Lunar Cycle Influence Angler Catch of Muskellunge (Esox masquinongy)?  

PubMed Central

We analyzed angling catch records for 341,959 muskellunge (Esox masquinongy) from North America to test for a cyclic lunar influence on the catch. Using periodic regression, we showed that the number caught was strongly related to the 29-day lunar cycle, and the effect was consistent across most fisheries. More muskellunge were caught around the full and new moon than at other times. At night, more muskellunge were caught around the full moon than the new moon. The predicted maximum relative effect was ?5% overall. Anglers fishing exclusively on the peak lunar day would, on average, catch 5% more muskellunge than anglers fishing on random days. On some lakes and at night, the maximum relative effect was higher. We obtained angler effort data for Wisconsin, Mille Lacs (MN), and Lake Vermilion (MN). For Lake Vermilion there was a significant effect of the lunar cycle on angler effort. We could therefore not conclude that the lunar effect on catch was due to an effect on fish behavior alone. Several factors affected the amount of variation explained by the lunar cycle. The lunar effect was stronger for larger muskellunge (>102 cm) than for smaller fish, stronger in midsummer than in June or October, and stronger for fish caught at high latitudes (>48°N) than for fish caught further south. There was no difference in the lunar effect between expert and novice muskellunge anglers. We argue that this variation is evidence that the effect of the lunar cycle on catch is mediated by biological factors and is not due solely to angler effort and reflects lunar synchronization in feeding. This effect has been attributed to variation among moon phases in lunar illumination, but our results do not support that hypothesis for angler-caught muskellunge.

Vinson, Mark R.; Angradi, Ted R.

2014-01-01

352

Muskie Lunacy: Does the Lunar Cycle Influence Angler Catch of Muskellunge (Esox masquinongy)?  

PubMed

We analyzed angling catch records for 341,959 muskellunge (Esox masquinongy) from North America to test for a cyclic lunar influence on the catch. Using periodic regression, we showed that the number caught was strongly related to the 29-day lunar cycle, and the effect was consistent across most fisheries. More muskellunge were caught around the full and new moon than at other times. At night, more muskellunge were caught around the full moon than the new moon. The predicted maximum relative effect was ?5% overall. Anglers fishing exclusively on the peak lunar day would, on average, catch 5% more muskellunge than anglers fishing on random days. On some lakes and at night, the maximum relative effect was higher. We obtained angler effort data for Wisconsin, Mille Lacs (MN), and Lake Vermilion (MN). For Lake Vermilion there was a significant effect of the lunar cycle on angler effort. We could therefore not conclude that the lunar effect on catch was due to an effect on fish behavior alone. Several factors affected the amount of variation explained by the lunar cycle. The lunar effect was stronger for larger muskellunge (>102 cm) than for smaller fish, stronger in midsummer than in June or October, and stronger for fish caught at high latitudes (>48°N) than for fish caught further south. There was no difference in the lunar effect between expert and novice muskellunge anglers. We argue that this variation is evidence that the effect of the lunar cycle on catch is mediated by biological factors and is not due solely to angler effort and reflects lunar synchronization in feeding. This effect has been attributed to variation among moon phases in lunar illumination, but our results do not support that hypothesis for angler-caught muskellunge. PMID:24871329

Vinson, Mark R; Angradi, Ted R

2014-01-01

353

Muskie lunacy: does the lunar cycle influence angler catch of muskellunge (Esox masquinongy)?  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We analyzed angling catch records for 341,959 muskellunge (Esox masquinongy) from North America to test for a cyclic lunar influence on the catch. Using periodic regression, we showed that the number caught was strongly related to the 29-day lunar cycle, and the effect was consistent across most fisheries. More muskellunge were caught around the full and new moon than at other times. At night, more muskellunge were caught around the full moon than the new moon. The predicted maximum relative effect was ?5% overall. Anglers fishing exclusively on the peak lunar day would, on average, catch 5% more muskellunge than anglers fishing on random days. On some lakes and at night, the maximum relative effect was higher. We obtained angler effort data for Wisconsin, Mille Lacs (MN), and Lake Vermilion (MN). For Lake Vermilion there was a significant effect of the lunar cycle on angler effort. We could therefore not conclude that the lunar effect on catch was due to an effect on fish behavior alone. Several factors affected the amount of variation explained by the lunar cycle. The lunar effect was stronger for larger muskellunge (>102 cm) than for smaller fish, stronger in midsummer than in June or October, and stronger for fish caught at high latitudes (>48°N) than for fish caught further south. There was no difference in the lunar effect between expert and novice muskellunge anglers. We argue that this variation is evidence that the effect of the lunar cycle on catch is mediated by biological factors and is not due solely to angler effort and reflects lunar synchronization in feeding. This effect has been attributed to variation among moon phases in lunar illumination, but our results do not support that hypothesis for angler-caught muskellunge.

Vinson, Mark R.; Angradi, Ted R.

2014-01-01

354

Comprehensive quantification of the spastic catch in children with cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

In clinical settings, the spastic catch is judged subjectively. This study assessed the psychometric properties of objective parameters that define and quantify the severity of the spastic catch in children with cerebral palsy (CP). A convenience sample of children with spastic CP (N=46; age range: 4-16 years) underwent objective spasticity assessments. High velocity, passive stretches were applied to the gastrocnemius (GAS) and medial hamstrings (MEH). Muscle activity was measured with surface electromyography (sEMG), joint angle characteristics using inertial sensors and reactive torque using a force sensor. To test reliability, a group of 12 children were retested after an average of 13 ± 9 days. The angle of spastic catch (AOC) was estimated by three biomechanical definitions: joint angle at (1) maximum angular deceleration; (2) maximum change in torque; and (3) minimum power. Each definition was checked for reliability and validity. Construct and clinical validity were evaluated by correlating each AOC definition to the averaged root mean square envelope of EMG (RMS-EMG) and the Modified Tardieu Scale (MTS). Severity categories were created based on selected parameters to establish face validity. All definitions showed moderate to high reliability. Significant correlations were found between AOC3 and the MTS of both muscles and the RMS-EMG of the MEH, though coefficients were only weak. AOC3 further distinguished between mild, moderate and severe catches. Objective parameters can define and quantify the severity of the spastic catch in children with CP. However, a comprehensive understanding requires the integration of both biomechanical and RMS-EMG data. PMID:23000637

Lynn, Bar-On; Erwin, Aertbeliën; Guy, Molenaers; Herman, Bruyninckx; Davide, Monari; Ellen, Jaspers; Anne, Cazaerck; Kaat, Desloovere

2013-01-01

355

Selectin catch-slip kinetics encode shear threshold adhesive behavior of rolling leukocytes  

PubMed Central

The selectin family of leukocyte adhesion receptors is principally recognized for mediating transient rolling interactions during the inflammatory response. Recent studies using ultrasensitive force probes to characterize the force–lifetime relationship between P- and L-selectin and their endogenous ligands have underscored the ability of increasing levels of force to initially extend the lifetime of these complexes before disrupting bond integrity. This so-called “catch–slip” transition has provided an appealing explanation for shear threshold phenomena in which increasing levels of shear stress stabilize leukocyte rolling under flow. We recently incorporated catch–slip kinetics into a mechanical model for cell adhesion and corroborated this hypothesis for neutrophils adhering via L-selectin. Here, using adhesive dynamics simulations, we demonstrate that biomembrane force probe measurements of various P- and L-selectin catch bonds faithfully predict differences in cell adhesion patterns that have been described extensively in vitro. Using phenomenological parameters to characterize the dominant features of molecular force spectra, we construct a generalized phase map that reveals that robust shear-threshold behavior is possible only when an applied force very efficiently stabilizes the bound receptor complex. This criteria explains why only a subset of selectin catch bonds exhibit a shear threshold and leads to a quantitative relationship that may be used to predict the magnitude of the shear threshold for families of catch–slip bonds directly from their force spectra. Collectively, our results extend the conceptual framework of adhesive dynamics as a means to translate complex single-molecule biophysics to macroscopic cell behavior.

Beste, Michael T.; Hammer, Daniel A.

2008-01-01

356

TANK48 CFD MODELING ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank to ensure uniformity of the discharge stream. Mixing is accomplished with one to four dual-nozzle slurry pumps located within the tank liquid. For the work, a Tank 48 simulation model with a maximum of four slurry pumps in operation has been developed to estimate flow patterns for efficient solid mixing. The modeling calculations were performed by using two modeling approaches. One approach is a single-phase Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model to evaluate the flow patterns and qualitative mixing behaviors for a range of different modeling conditions since the model was previously benchmarked against the test results. The other is a two-phase CFD model to estimate solid concentrations in a quantitative way by solving the Eulerian governing equations for the continuous fluid and discrete solid phases over the entire fluid domain of Tank 48. The two-phase results should be considered as the preliminary scoping calculations since the model was not validated against the test results yet. A series of sensitivity calculations for different numbers of pumps and operating conditions has been performed to provide operational guidance for solids suspension and mixing in the tank. In the analysis, the pump was assumed to be stationary. Major solid obstructions including the pump housing, the pump columns, and the 82 inch central support column were included. The steady state and three-dimensional analyses with a two-equation turbulence model were performed with FLUENT{trademark} for the single-phase approach and CFX for the two-phase approach. Recommended operational guidance was developed assuming that local fluid velocity can be used as a measure of sludge suspension and spatial mixing under single-phase tank model. For quantitative analysis, a two-phase fluid-solid model was developed for the same modeling conditions as the single-phase model. The modeling results show that the flow patterns driven by four pump operation satisfy the solid suspension requirement, and the average solid concentration at the plane of the transfer pump inlet is about 12% higher than the tank average concentrations for the 70 inch tank level and about the same as the tank average value for the 29 inch liquid level. When one of the four pumps is not operated, the flow patterns are satisfied with the minimum suspension velocity criterion. However, the solid concentration near the tank bottom is increased by about 30%, although the average solid concentrations near the transfer pump inlet have about the same value as the four-pump baseline results. The flow pattern results show that although the two-pump case satisfies the minimum velocity requirement to suspend the sludge particles, it provides the marginal mixing results for the heavier or larger insoluble materials such as MST and KTPB particles. The results demonstrated that when more than one jet are aiming at the same position of the mixing tank domain, inefficient flow patterns are provided due to the highly localized momentum dissipation, resulting in inactive suspension zone. Thus, after completion of the indexed solids suspension, pump rotations are recommended to avoid producing the nonuniform flow patterns. It is noted that when tank liquid level is reduced from the highest level of 70 inches to the minimum level of 29 inches for a given number of operating pumps, the solid mixing efficiency becomes better since the ratio of the pump power to the mixing volume becomes larger. These results are consistent with the literature results.

Lee, S.

2011-05-17

357

Lightweight Tanks for Storing Liquefied Natural Gas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Single-walled, jacketed aluminum tanks have been conceived for storing liquefied natural gas (LNG) in LNG-fueled motor vehicles. Heretofore, doublewall steel tanks with vacuum between the inner and outer walls have been used for storing LNG. In comparison with the vacuum- insulated steel tanks, the jacketed aluminum tanks weigh less and can be manufactured at lower cost. Costs of using the jacketed aluminum tanks are further reduced in that there is no need for the vacuum pumps heretofore needed to maintain vacuum in the vacuum-insulated tanks.

DeLay, Tom

2008-01-01

358

In-tank recirculating arsenic treatment system  

DOEpatents

A low-cost, water treatment system and method for reducing arsenic contamination in small community water storage tanks. Arsenic is removed by using a submersible pump, sitting at the bottom of the tank, which continuously recirculates (at a low flow rate) arsenic-contaminated water through an attached and enclosed filter bed containing arsenic-sorbing media. The pump and treatment column can be either placed inside the tank (In-Tank) by manually-lowering through an access hole, or attached to the outside of the tank (Out-of-Tank), for easy replacement of the sorption media.

Brady, Patrick V. (Albuquerque, NM); Dwyer, Brian P. (Albuquerque, NM); Krumhansl, James L. (Albuquerque, NM); Chwirka, Joseph D. (Tijeras, NM)

2009-04-07

359

Tank Waste Disposal Program redefinition  

SciTech Connect

The record of decision (ROD) (DOE 1988) on the Final Environmental Impact Statement, Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic and Tank Wastes, Hanford Site, Richland Washington identifies the method for disposal of double-shell tank waste and cesium and strontium capsules at the Hanford Site. The ROD also identifies the need for additional evaluations before a final decision is made on the disposal of single-shell tank waste. This document presents the results of systematic evaluation of the present technical circumstances, alternatives, and regulatory requirements in light of the values of the leaders and constitutents of the program. It recommends a three-phased approach for disposing of tank wastes. This approach allows mature technologies to be applied to the treatment of well-understood waste forms in the near term, while providing time for the development and deployment of successively more advanced pretreatment technologies. The advanced technologies will accelerate disposal by reducing the volume of waste to be vitrified. This document also recommends integration of the double-and single-shell tank waste disposal programs, provides a target schedule for implementation of the selected approach, and describes the essential elements of a program to be baselined in 1992.

Grygiel, M.L.; Augustine, C.A.; Cahill, M.A.; Garfield, J.S.; Johnson, M.E.; Kupfer, M.J.; Meyer, G.A.; Roecker, J.H. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Holton, L.K.; Hunter, V.L.; Triplett, M.B. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1991-10-01

360

46 CFR 154.412 - Cargo tank corrosion allowance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-10-01 false Cargo tank corrosion allowance. 154.412 Section 154...Containment Systems § 154.412 Cargo tank corrosion allowance. A cargo tank must be designed with a corrosion allowance if the cargo tank:...

2013-10-01

361

46 CFR 153.281 - Piping to independent tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...281 Piping to independent tanks. Piping for an independent cargo tank must penetrate the tank only through that part of the tank or dome extending above the weatherdeck. [CGD 78-128, 47 FR 21208, May 17,...

2013-10-01

362

33 CFR 157.216 - Required documents: Foreign tank vessels.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Required documents: Foreign tank vessels. 157.216 Section 157.216 ...THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks on Tank Vessels General § 157.216 Required...

2013-07-01

363

49 CFR 180.507 - Qualification of tank cars.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Qualification of tank cars. 180.507 Section 180.507 Transportation...PACKAGINGS Qualification and Maintenance of Tank Cars § 180.507 Qualification of tank cars. (a) Each tank car marked as meeting...

2013-10-01

364

46 CFR 154.412 - Cargo tank corrosion allowance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-10-01 false Cargo tank corrosion allowance. 154.412 Section 154...Containment Systems § 154.412 Cargo tank corrosion allowance. A cargo tank must be designed with a corrosion allowance if the cargo tank:...

2010-10-01

365

Tank waste concentration mechanism study  

SciTech Connect

This study determines whether the existing 242-A Evaporator should continue to be used to concentrate the Hanford Site radioactive liquid tank wastes or be replaced by an alternative waste concentration process. Using the same philosophy, the study also determines what the waste concentration mechanism should be for the future TWRS program. Excess water from liquid DST waste should be removed to reduce the volume of waste feed for pretreatment, immobilization, and to free up storage capacity in existing tanks to support interim stabilization of SSTS, terminal cleanout of excess facilities, and other site remediation activities.

Pan, L.C.; Johnson, L.J.

1994-09-01

366

Catching a Galactic Football: Chandra Examines Cygnus A  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, astronomers have found a giant football-shaped cavity within X-ray emitting hot gas surrounding the galaxy Cygnus A. The cavity in the hot gas has been created by two powerful jets emitted from the central black hole region in the nucleus of Cygnus A. Hot gas is steadily being piled up around the cavity as it continuously expands, creating a bright rim of X-ray emission. The jets themselves terminate in radio and X-ray emitting "hot spots" some 300,000 light years from the center of the galaxy. These results are being presented to the High Energy Astrophysics Division of the American Astronomical Society meeting in Honolulu, HI, by Andrew S. Wilson, Andrew J. Young (University of Maryland) and Patrick L. Shopbell (California Institute of Technology). "This is a spectacular cavity, which is inflated by jets and completely surrounds the Cygnus A galaxy," said Dr. Wilson, who is Professor of Astronomy at the University of Maryland, College Park. "We are witnessing a battle between the gravity of the Cygnus A galaxy, which is trying to pull the hot gas inwards, and the pressure of material created by the jets, which is trying to push the hot gas outwards." Cygnus A has long been famous as the brightest radio source in the sky. It is the nearest powerful radio galaxy. The Chandra X-ray image, which was taken with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), shows the cavity surrounded by a vast sea of extremely hot gas. The elongated oval shape comes from the force of the outwardly moving jets as they push through the hot gas. Bright bands around the "equator of the football" are also visible, and this may be evidence of material swirling toward the central black hole. Cygnus A Illustration Illustration of Cygnus A Credit: CXC Without the jets, an X-ray image of Cygnus A, which is about 700 million light years from Earth, would appear as a more or less spherical region (about 2 million light years across) of hot gas slowly falling into the Cygnus A galaxy. However, the two jets powered by the nuclear black hole in this galaxy push this gas outward, like a balloon being inflated by a tank of gas. Cygnus A is not alone in its galactic neighborhood, but is a member of a large cluster containing many galaxies. Extremely hot (tens of millions of degrees Celsius) gas is spread between the galaxies. Although it has a very low density, this gas provides enough resistance to slow down the outward advancement of the particle jets from Cygnus A. At the ends of the jets, astronomers find bright areas of radio and X-ray emission known as "hot spots." Scientists believe that fast atomic particles and magnetic fields from the jets spill out into the region, providing pressure that continuously inflates the cavity. In a paper accepted by the Astrophysical Journal Letters, Wilson, Young and Shopbell discuss how the Chandra observations resolve a long-standing puzzle about the hot spots at the ends of the jets. By analyzing the X-ray emission of the hot spots, the astronomers have measured the strength of the magnetic field associated with them. "The radio data themselves cannot determine the strength of the magnetic field, a limitation that has inhibited progress in our understanding of cosmic radio sources for 50 years," said Wilson. "Combination of the Chandra X-ray and the radio data allows a quite precise measurement of the field strength." The Chandra observation of Cygnus A was made with the ACIS on May 21, 2000, for over nine hours. The ACIS X-ray camera was developed for NASA by Pennsylvania State University and MIT. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL, manages the Chandra program. TRW, Inc., Redondo Beach, California, is the prime contractor for the spacecraft. The Smithsonian's Chandra X-ray Center controls science and flight operations from Cambridge, MA. This research was supported by the Chandra project at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Images associated with this release are available on the Wo

2000-11-01

367

STS-114: Discovery Tanking Operations for Launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Jessica Rye from NASA Public Affairs is the narrator for the tanking operations for the launch of the Space Shuttle Discovery. She presents a video of the arrival and processing of the new external tank at the Kennedy Space Center. The external tank is also shown entering the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The external tank underwent new processing resulting from its redesign including inspection of the bipod heater and the external separation camera. The changes to the external tank include: 1) Electric heaters to protect from icing; and 2) Liquid Oxygen feed line bellows to carry fuel from the external tank to the Orbiter. Footage of the external tank processing facility at NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, La. prior to its arrival at Kennedy Space Center is shown and a video of the three key modifications to the external tank including the bipod, flange and bellows are shown.

2005-01-01

368

Steel fuel tanks-Marble Point  

NSF Publications Database

Title : Steel fuel tanks-Marble Point Type : Antarctic EAM NSF Org: OD / OPP Date : January 28, 1991 ... Environmental Action Memorandum (Placement of Steel Fuel Storage Tanks at Marble Point, Antarctica ...

369

Comparative safety analysis of LNG storage tanks  

SciTech Connect

LNG storage tank design and response to selected release scenarios were reviewed. The selection of the scenarios was based on an investigation of potential hazards as cited in the literature. A review of the structure of specific LNG storage facilities is given. Scenarios initially addressed included those that most likely emerge from the tank facility itself: conditions of overfill and overflow as related to liquid LNG content levels; over/underpressurization at respective tank vapor pressure boundaries; subsidence of bearing soil below tank foundations; and crack propagation in tank walls due to possible exposure of structural material to cryogenic temperatures. Additional scenarios addressed include those that result from external events: tornado induced winds and pressure drops; exterior tank missile impact with tornado winds and rotating machinery being the investigated mode of generation; thermal response due to adjacent fire conditions; and tank response due to intense seismic activity. Applicability of each scenario depended heavily on the specific tank configurations and material types selected. (PSB)

Fecht, B.A.; Gates, T.E.; Nelson, K.O.; Marr, G.D.

1982-07-01

370

Technical requirements specification for tank waste retrieval  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the technical requirements specification for the retrieval of waste from the underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site. All activities covered by this scope are conducted in support of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) mission.

Lamberd, D.L.

1996-09-26

371

Waste conditioning for tank heel transfer.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report summarizes the research carried out at Florida International University's Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (FIU-HCET) for the fiscal year 1998 (FY98) under the Tank Focus Area (TFA) project 'Waste Conditioning for Tank Slurry Tr...

M. A. Ebadian

1999-01-01

372

Out-of-tank evaporator demonstration: Tanks focus area  

SciTech Connect

Approximately 100 million gal of liquid waste is stored in underground storage tanks (UST)s at the Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Savannah River Site (SRS), and Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). This waste is radioactive with a high salt content. The US Department of Energy (DOE) wants to minimize the volume of radioactive liquid waste in USTs by removing the excess water. This procedure conserves tank space; lowers the cost of storage; and reduces the volume of wastes subsequently requiring separation, immobilization, and disposal. The Out-of-Tank Evaporator Demonstration (OTED) was initiated to test a modular, skid-mounted evaporator. A mobile evaporator system manufactured by Delta Thermal Inc. was selected. The evaporator design was routinely used in commercial applications such as concentrating metal-plating wastes for recycle and concentrating ethylene glycol solutions. In FY 1995, the skid-mounted evaporator system was procured and installed in an existing ORNL facility (Building 7877) with temporary shielding and remote controls. The evaporator system was operational in January 1996. The system operated 24 h/day and processed 22,000 gal of Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) supernatant. The distillate contained essentially no salts or radionuclides. Upon completion of the demonstration, the evaporator underwent decontamination testing to illustrate the feasibility of hands-on maintenance and potential transport to another DOE facility. This report describes the process and the evaporator, its performance at ORNL, future plans, applications of this technology, cost estimates, regulatory and policy considerations, and lessons learned.

NONE

1998-11-01

373

Tank 241-C-101: Tank characterization plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the characterization program, sampling operations, and WHC 222-S Laboratory. Scope of this plan is to provide guidance for sampling and analysis of samples for tank 241-C-101. The sampling type has been changed from push mode core sampling to auger sampling.

Schreiber, R.D.

1995-03-08

374

Tank Characterization Report for Single Shell Tank 241-U-103  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the information on the historical uses, present status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste stored in Tank 241-U-103. This report supports the requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-44-15B.

ADAMS, M.R.

2000-02-01

375

Source Assessment: Rail Tank Car, Tank Truck, and Drum Cleaning, State-of-the-Art.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document reviews the state of the art of air emissions and water pollutants from cleaning rail tank cars, tank trucks, and drums. Composition, quantity, and rate of emissions and pollutants are described. Rail tank cars, tank trucks, and drums are us...

D. E. Earley K. M. Tackett T. R. Blackwood

1978-01-01

376

Tanks: Storage tank emission estimation software, version 3.0 (for microcomputers). Model-Simulation  

SciTech Connect

TANKS is a user-friendly computer software program developed for use in estimating volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from both fixed and floating roof storage tanks. TANKS is based on the emission estimation procedures presented in Chapter 7 of the Compilation of Air Pollutant Emission Factors, AP-42. The emission estimation procedures used as the basis of the TANKS program include the recent updates to the equations from the American Petroleum Institute (API) Bulletins, for which EPA has been granted noncommercial use. An electronic copy of the user`s manual is included with the program to aid users in mastering the program`s many features and options. TANKS can generate emissions for vertical and horizontal fixed roof tanks, internal and external floating roof tanks, and domed external floating roof tanks. TANKS can also estimate emissions from underground storage tanks. After the user provides specific information concerning storage tank construction and the stored liquid, the program produces a report estimating total VOC emissions. TANKS includes four internal databases which contain chemical, meterological, roof fitting, and rim seal data, which greatly enhance the usefulness of the program. TANKS also contains three alternative speciation options that allow the user to estimate individual component emissions of stored liquid mixtures. To accommodate facilities with large numbers of tanks, the program can generate either a single report for an individual tank or a batch report for a series of tanks.

NONE

1996-03-01

377

Thermal hydraulic evaluation of consolidating tank C-106 waste into tank AY102  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report describes the thermal hydraulic analysis performed to provide a technical basis in support of consolidation of tank C-106 waste into tank AY-102. Several parametric calculations were performed using the HUB and GOTH computer codes. First, the current heat load of tank AY-102 was determined. Potential quantities of waste transfer from tank C-106 were established to maintain the peak

Sathyanarayana

1996-01-01

378

SOURCE ASSESSMENT: RAIL TANK CAR, TANK TRUCK, AND DRUM CLEANING, STATE-OF-THE-ART  

EPA Science Inventory

This document reviews the state of the art of air emissions and water pollutants from cleaning rail tank cars, tank trucks, and drums. Composition, quantity, and rate of emissions and pollutants are described. Rail tank cars, tank trucks, and drums are used to transport chemical ...

379

40 CFR 280.220 - Ownership of an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system or facility or...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ownership of an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system or facility or property on which an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system is located. 280.220...

2013-07-01

380

Effectiveness of catch basins equipped with hoods in retaining gross solids and hydrocarbons in highway runoff, Southeast Expressway, Boston, Massachusetts, 2008-09  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Stormwater mobilizes litter and other debris along the roadway where it is transported to the highway drainage systems. Initial treatment for stormwater runoff typically is provided by catch basins in highway settings. Modification of catch basins to include hoods that cover the catch-basin outlet is intended to enhance catch-basin performance by retaining floatable debris and various hydrophobic organic compounds that tend to float on the water surface within the sump of the catch basin. The effectiveness of six deep-sump off-line catch basins equipped with hoods in reducing the mass of gross solids greater than 0.25 inches in diameter and concentrations of oil and grease (OG) and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) was examined along the Southeast Expressway, in Boston, Massachusetts. Two deep-sump catch basins were equipped with cast-iron hoods. Three were equipped with molded plastic hoods, known as an Eliminator, and a single catch basin was equipped with a fiberglass anti-siphoning hood, known as a Snout. Samples of gross solids greater than 0.25 inches in diameter, excluding gravel and metallic materials, were routinely collected for a 6-month period from a collection structure mounted at the end of each catch-basin outlet pipe. After about 6 months, all floatable, saturated low-density and high-density solids were removed from each catch basin. In addition to the collection of samples of gross solids, samples of sump water from five catch basins and flow-weighted composite samples of stormwater from the outlet of one catch basin were collected and analyzed for concentrations of OG and TPH. A mass balance approach was used to assess the effectiveness of each catch basin equipped with a hood in retaining gross solids. The effectiveness of the deep-sump catch basins fitted with one of three types of hoods in retaining gross solids ranged from 27 to 52 percent. From 45 to 90 percent of the gross solids collected from the catch-basin sumps were composed of materials made of high-density plastics that did not float in water, and as a result, the effect that the catch-basin hoods had on these materials likely was marginal. The effectiveness for the deep-sump hooded catch basins, excluding the mass of high-density materials identified in the solids collected from the outlet pipe and the sump of the catch basins, ranged from 13 to 38 percent. The effectiveness for each catch basin, based solely on the material that remained floating at the end of the monitoring period, was less than 11 percent; however, these values likely underestimate the effectiveness of the hooded catch basins because much of the low-density material collected from the sumps may have been retained as floatable material before it was saturated and settled during non-storm conditions. The effectiveness of the catch basins equipped with hoods in reducing gross solids was not greatly different among the three types of hoods tested in this study. Concentrations of OG and TPH collected from the water surface of the catch-basins varied from catch basin to catch basin and were similar to concentrations of flow-weighted composite samples collected during storms. Comparisons indicate concentrations of OG and TPH in flow-weighted composite samples collected at the outlet of a catch basin equipped with an Eliminator hood were not substantially different from concentrations of the respective constituents in flow-weighted composite samples collected during a previous study from catch basins containing cast-iron hoods in the same study area. The similarity between these flow-weighted concentrations and the concentrations of the respective constituents in a vertical profile sample collected from the catch-basin sump indicates that OG and TPH are emulsified in the sump of each catch basin during storms and circumvent the hoods.

Smith, Kirk P.

2011-01-01

381

CHARACTERIZATION OF THE TANK 18F SAMPLES  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked by Liquid Waste Operations to characterize Tank 18F closure samples. Tank 18F slurry samples analyzed included the liquid and solid fractions derived from the 'as-received' slurry materials along with the floor scrape bottom Tank 18F wet solids. These samples were taken from Tank 18F in March 2009 and made available to SRNL

L. Oji; D. Click; D. Diprete

2009-01-01

382

Filament-wound, fiberglass cryogenic tank supports  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The design, fabrication, and testing of filament-wound, fiberglass cryogenic tank supports for a LH2 tank, a LF2/FLOX tank and a CH4 tank. These supports consist of filament-wound fiberglass tubes with titanium end fittings. These units were satisfactorily tested at cryogenic temperatures, thereby offering a design that can be reliably and economically produced in large or small quantities. The basic design concept is applicable to any situation where strong, lightweight axial load members are desired.

Carter, J. S.; Timberlake, T. E.

1971-01-01

383

Tank 241-TX-105 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect

Tank 241-TX-105 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in {open_quotes}Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.{close_quotes} Tank 241-TX-105 was vapor sampled in accordance with {open_quotes}Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.{close_quotes}

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31

384

Tank 241-BY-105 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Tank 241-BY-105 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in {open_quotes}Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.{close_quotes} Tank 241-BY-105 was vapor sampled in accordance with {open_quotes}Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.{close_quotes}

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31

385

Tank 241-S-102 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect

Tank 241-S-102 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in {open_quotes}Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.{close_quotes} Tank 241-S-102 was vapor sampled in accordance with {open_quotes}Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution. {close_quotes}

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31

386

Tank 241-C-112 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Tank 241-C-112 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in {open_quotes}Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.{close_quotes} Tank 241-C-112 was vapor sampled in accordance with {open_quotes}Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.{close_quotes}

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31

387

Tank 241-U-111 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect

Tank 241-U-111 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in {open_quotes}Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.{close_quotes} Tank 241-U-111 was vapor sampled in accordance with {open_quotes}Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.{close_quotes}

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31

388

Tank 241-BY-103 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect

Tank 241-BY-103 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in {open_quotes}Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.{close_quotes} Tank 241-BY-103 was vapor sampled in accordance with {open_quotes}Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.{close_quotes}

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-05

389

Tank 241-BY-111 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect

Tank 241-BY-111 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in {open_quotes}Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.{close_quotes} Tank 241-BY-111 was vapor sampled in accordance with {open_quotes}Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.{close_quotes}

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31

390

Tank 241-C-108 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Tank 241-C-108 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in {open_quotes}Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.{close_quotes} Tank 241-C-108 was vapor sampled in accordance with {open_quotes}Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.{close_quotes}

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31

391

Tank 241-BY-104 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Tank 241-BY-104 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in {open_quotes}Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.{close_quotes} Tank 241-BY-104 was vapor sampled in accordance with {open_quotes}Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.{close_quotes}

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31

392

Tank 241-TX-118 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect

Tank 241-TX-118 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in {open_quotes}Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.{close_quotes} Tank 241-TX-118 was vapor sampled in accordance with {open_quotes}Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.{close_quotes}

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31

393

Tank 241-C-108 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect

Tank 241-C-108 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues (Osborne and Huckaby 1994). Tank 241-C-108 was vapor sampled in accordance with Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution (Osborne et al., 1994).

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-05

394

Tank 241-C-104 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect

Tank 241-C-104 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in {open_quotes}Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.{close_quotes} Tank 241-C-104 was vapor sampled in accordance with {open_quotes}Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.{close_quotes}

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31

395

Opposed Bellows Would Expel Contents Of Tank  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Proposed storage tank contains two pairs of opposed bellows used to expel its contents. Storage and expulsion volumes of tank same as those of older version of tank equipped with single bellows. Four bellows offer greater stability. Applications include automobile cooling systems and gasoline-powered tools like chain saws and leaf blowers.

Whitaker, Willie

1994-01-01

396

DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) EMERGENCY PUMPING GUIDE  

SciTech Connect

This document provides preplanning necessary to expeditiously remove any waste that may leak from the primary tank to the secondary tank for Hanford's 28 DSTs. The strategy is described, applicable emergency procedures are referenced, and transfer routes and pumping equipment for each tank are identified.

REBERGER, D.W.

2006-03-17

397

Double Shell Tank (DST) Emergency Pumping Guide  

SciTech Connect

This document provides preplanning necessary to expeditiously remove any waste that may leak from the primary tank to the secondary tank for Hanford's 28 DSTs. The strategy is described, applicable emergency procedures are referenced, and transfer routes and pumping equipment for each tank are identified.

DOMNOSKE-RAUCH, L.A.

2000-05-17

398

Wax scraper for floating roof tanks  

Microsoft Academic Search

A wax scraper is described for removing waxy deposits from the inside surface of floating roof storage tanks during the operation of such tanks, without requiring the removal of all obstructions from the inside surface of the tanks. The floating roof structure has affixed to it a number of support means. Each support means carries a scraper blade having scraper

H. A. Maeder; A. H. Nelson; F. R. Neely

1971-01-01

399

Liquid storage tank with floating roof structure  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a cylindrical wall storage tank for containing a liquid, said tank is described having a floor, a floatable roof supportable by said contained liquid, said roof including a peripheral seal for engaging the cylindrical wall to maintain a fluid-tight sliding seal therewith, and support means associated with said roof including, the improvement in said tank of, at least one

1993-01-01

400

Evaporation loss measurement from storage tanks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evaporation loss measurement from storage tanks is explored here. The paper concentrates only on external and internal floating-roof tanks. Specifically, it covers: parameters affecting tank losses, loss estimation methods, and several sample problems for assuring proper utilization of these methods. The main goal is to understand the application of the loss estimation methods using specific examples.

1984-01-01

401

Evaporation loss measurement from storage tanks  

SciTech Connect

Evaporation loss measurement from storage tanks is explored here. The paper concentrates only on external and internal floating-roof tanks. Specifically, it covers: parameters affecting tank losses, loss estimation methods, and several sample problems for assuring proper utilization of these methods. The main goal is to understand the application of the loss estimation methods using specific examples.

Connors, K.A.

1984-04-01

402

Guidelines help select storage tank calibration method  

Microsoft Academic Search

Guidelines have been developed to help owners and operators of vertical, cylindrical storage tanks determine the bet technology to calibrate their specific tanks, and the circumstances under which they are used. For more than half a century, vertical, cylindrical storage tanks have been calibrated by the manual strapping method. In that method, calibrated measuring tapes are used to measure the

Sivaraman

1990-01-01

403

Breaking the Mold: Tanks in the Cities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Few lessons are as prevalent in military history as is the adage that tanks don't perform well in cities. The notion of deliberately committing tanks to urban combat is anathema to most. In 'Breaking the Mold: Tanks in the Cities,' Ken Gott disproves that...

K. D. Gott

2006-01-01

404

Tank 241AY102 Data Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This data report discusses the methods and philosophy used to characterize two samples of sludge and one sample of drainable liquid from tank 241-AY-102 at the Hanford Site. Archived samples of sludge and drainable liquid from tank 241-AY-102 were characterized in the laboratory in order to evaluate analytical methods for testing tank waste and determine the composition and leaching characteristics

Michael J. Lindberg; William J. Deutsch

2003-01-01

405

40 CFR 265.1085 - Standards: Tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...section. (i) The hazardous waste in the tank has a maximum organic vapor...kPa. (ii) The hazardous waste in the tank is not heated by the owner or...section. (iii) The hazardous waste in the tank is not treated by the owner...

2009-07-01

406

40 CFR 265.1085 - Standards: Tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...section. (i) The hazardous waste in the tank has a maximum organic vapor...kPa. (ii) The hazardous waste in the tank is not heated by the owner or...section. (iii) The hazardous waste in the tank is not treated by the owner...

2010-07-01

407

Predominant radoinuclides in Hanford site waste tanks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Predominant radionuclides in Hanford Site waste tanks are determined. Predominant radionuclides are defined as those radionuclides presenting over 99 percent of the long-term or short-term risk to workers or members of the public. Predominant radionuclides are those for which best estimates of inventory are needed on a tank-by-tank basis.

Boothe

1996-01-01

408

CHARACTERIZATION OF TANK 16H ANNULUS SAMPLES  

Microsoft Academic Search

The closure of Tank 16H will require removal of material from the annulus of the tank. Samples from Tank 16H annulus were characterized and tested to provide information to evaluate various alternatives for removing the annulus waste. The analysis found all four annulus samples to be composed mainly of Si, Na, and Al and lesser amounts of other elements. The

M. Hay; S. Reboul

2012-01-01

409

46 CFR 154.439 - Tank design.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Tank design. 154.439 Section 154...CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment...Type A § 154.439 Tank design. An independent tank type...Shipping published in âRules for Building and Classing Steel...

2013-10-01

410

46 CFR 154.420 - Tank design.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Tank design. 154.420 Section 154...CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment...Tanks § 154.420 Tank design. (a) The structure of...Shipping published in âRules for Building and Classing Steel...

2013-10-01

411

Catch-bond behaviour facilitates membrane tubulation by non-processive myosin 1b  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Myosin 1b is a single-headed membrane-associated motor that binds to actin filaments with a catch-bond behaviour in response to load. In vivo, myosin 1b is required to form membrane tubules at both endosomes and the trans-Golgi network. To establish the link between these two fundamental properties, here we investigate the capacity of myosin 1b to extract membrane tubes along bundled actin filaments in a minimal reconstituted system. We show that single-headed non-processive myosin 1b can extract membrane tubes at a biologically relevant low density. In contrast to kinesins we do not observe motor accumulation at the tip, suggesting that the underlying mechanism for tube formation is different. In our theoretical model, myosin 1b catch-bond properties facilitate tube extraction under conditions of increasing membrane tension by reducing the density of myo1b required to pull tubes.

Yamada, Ayako; Mamane, Alexandre; Lee-Tin-Wah, Jonathan; di Cicco, Aurélie; Prévost, Coline; Lévy, Daniel; Joanny, Jean-François; Coudrier, Evelyne; Bassereau, Patricia

2014-04-01

412

Visually guided catching and tracking skills in pigeons: A preliminary analysis  

PubMed Central

Research on reaching, tracking, and catching in the pigeon has been hampered by limitations of technology. A new system was developed in which the target was a small rectangle presented on a video display terminal and the pecking response was detected with touch technology. The target moved up and down vertically with sinusoidal velocity. A coincidence between the location of the pigeon's beak and the cursor produced reinforcement. The pigeon pecked ahead and behind the target, but most pecks occurred behind the target so the dominant tracking strategy was lagging. The pigeon was adept at “catching” the target at many locations throughout the trajectory. Transfer of motor learning was tested on probe trials during which the trajectory changed from vertical to horizontal. On transfer trials the pigeons' dominant pattern of pecking immediately shifted from vertical to horizontal. The motor skill displayed by the pigeons was flexible and adaptive, suggesting that the pigeons had learned to track the cursor.

Rilling, Mark E.; LaClaire, Thomas L.

1989-01-01

413

Visually guided catching and tracking skills in pigeons: A preliminary analysis.  

PubMed

Research on reaching, tracking, and catching in the pigeon has been hampered by limitations of technology. A new system was developed in which the target was a small rectangle presented on a video display terminal and the pecking response was detected with touch technology. The target moved up and down vertically with sinusoidal velocity. A coincidence between the location of the pigeon's beak and the cursor produced reinforcement. The pigeon pecked ahead and behind the target, but most pecks occurred behind the target so the dominant tracking strategy was lagging. The pigeon was adept at "catching" the target at many locations throughout the trajectory. Transfer of motor learning was tested on probe trials during which the trajectory changed from vertical to horizontal. On transfer trials the pigeons' dominant pattern of pecking immediately shifted from vertical to horizontal. The motor skill displayed by the pigeons was flexible and adaptive, suggesting that the pigeons had learned to track the cursor. PMID:16812602

Rilling, M E; Laclaire, T L

1989-11-01

414

Comparison of fish catches with buoyant pop nets and seines in vegetated and nonvegetated habitats  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Two models of pop nets were developed to sample fish in shallow riverine waters, one for use in vegetated areas and the other for nonvegetated areas. Both nets have a mechanical release mechanism that can be tripped from the water surface. Replicated field tests were conducted to compare pop-net catches with bag-seine collections every 2 weeks from May through mid-October. Overall, total catch per effort did not vary significantly (P 2) was smaller than the area swept by the average seine haul (70-140 m2). The pop net effectively sampled fish in shallow nonvegetated habitats and was useful in heavily vegetated areas where seining or electroshocking was difficult.

Dewey, M. R.; Holland-Bartels, L. E.; Zigler, S. J.

1989-01-01

415

Floating-roof tank evaporation  

SciTech Connect

The book describes an improved method for estimating the total evaporative losses of the equivalent atmospheric hydrocarbon emissions from external floating-roof tanks that contain multicomponent hydrocarbon mixtures (such as gasolines and crude oils) or single-component stocks (such as petro-chemicals).

Not Available

1989-01-01

416

37-Inch Cryogenic Demonstration Tank.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper presents the design, analysis, fabrication, and testing of a 940 mm (37-inch) diameter by 1,118 mm (44-inch) long cryogenic demonstration tank that was developed and manufactured under a contract for SRS Technologies of Huntsville, Alabama. The...

M. J. Warner D. J. Son D. M. Lester

2000-01-01

417

Tank characterization report for double-shell tank 241-AP-102  

SciTech Connect

In April 1993, Double-Shell Tank 241-AP-102 was sampled to determine waste feed characteristics for the Hanford Grout Disposal Program. This Tank Characterization Report presents an overview of that tank sampling and analysis effort, and contains observations regarding waste characteristics, expected bulk inventory, and concentration data for the waste contents based on this latest sampling data and information on the history of the tank. Finally, this report makes recommendations and conclusions regarding tank operational safety issues.

LAMBERT, S.L.

1999-02-23

418

Tyrosine requirement during the rapid catch-up growth phase of recovery from severe childhood undernutrition.  

PubMed

The requirement for aromatic amino acids during the rapid catch-up in weight phase of recovery from severe childhood undernutrition (SCU) is not clearly established. As a first step, the present study aimed to estimate the tyrosine requirement of children with SCU during the catch-up growth phase of nutritional rehabilitation using a diet enriched in energy and proteins. Tyrosine requirement was calculated from the rate of excretion of ¹³CO2 (F ¹³CO2) during [¹³C]phenylalanine infusion in thirteen children with SCU, five females and eight males, at about 19 d after admission when the subjects were considered to have entered their rapid catch-up growth phase and were consuming 627.3 kJ and about 3.5 g protein/kg per d. Measurements of F ¹³CO2 during [¹³C]phenylalanine infusion were made on two separate days with a 1 d interval. Three measurements at tyrosine intakes of 48, 71 and 95 mg/kg per d were performed on experimental day 1 and measurements at tyrosine intakes of 148, 195 and 241 mg/kg per d were performed on experimental day 2. An estimate of the mean requirement was derived by breakpoint analysis with a two-phase linear regression cross-over model. The breakpoint, which represents an estimate of the mean tyrosine requirement, is a value of 99 mg/kg per d when the children were growing at about 15 g/kg per d. The result indicates that the mean requirement for tyrosine during the catch-up growth phase of SCU is about 99 mg/kg per d under similar conditions to the present study. PMID:20550742

Badaloo, Asha; Hsu, Jean W-C; Taylor-Bryan, Carolyn; Reid, Marvin; Forrester, Terrence; Jahoor, Farook

2010-10-01

419

Filipino children exhibit catch-up growth from age 2 to 12 years  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT Potential for catch-up growth among stunted children is thought to be limited after age 2 y, particularly when,they remain,in poor environments.,We explored,the extent to which,there were,improvements,in height status from age 2 to 12 y in a cohort of .2,000 children from the Cebu (The Philippines) Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Survey. At age 2 y, about 63% of sample children

L. Adair

1999-01-01

420

Catch Up and Keep Up: Relative Deprivation and Conspicuous Consumption in an Emerging Market  

Microsoft Academic Search

Exploratory research investigated whether the conspicuous consumption of affluent black South Africans is associated with prior experiences of relative deprivation. In-depth face-to-face interviews revealed that egoistic relative deprivation played a role initially in “catch up” consumption to the more privileged (white) consumers to whom black South Africans had been exposed during childhood to early adulthood. This resulted in a spike

Kerry Chipp; Nicola Kleyn; Thando Manzi

2011-01-01

421

Catches of lost fish traps (ghost fishing) from fishing grounds near Muscat, Sultanate of Oman  

Microsoft Academic Search

A field study was undertaken to quantify the catch rate of simulated lost fish traps at five traditional fishing grounds near Muscat and Mutrah, Sultanate of Oman. Twenty-five traps were set at depths between 16 and 36m during the period late November 2000 to mid-July 2001. Ghost fishing mortality was estimated at 1.34kg\\/trap per day, decreasing over time. An exponential

H. Al-Masroori; H. Al-Oufi; J. L. McIlwain; E. McLean

2004-01-01

422

Assessment of fish health status in four Swiss rivers showing a decline of brown trout catches  

Microsoft Academic Search

.  A pronounced decline in catch of brown trout (Salmo trutta L.) over the last 10–20 years has been reported for many rivers in Switzerland. Impaired health status of the fishes has\\u000a been suggested as one possible cause of the decline. The present study investigated the health status of juvenile brown trout\\u000a from four Swiss rivers which experienced reductions of brown

Simone Zimmerli; Daniel Bernet; Patricia Burkhardt-Holm; Heike Schmidt-Posthaus; Pascal Vonlanthen; Thomas Wahli; Helmut Segner

2007-01-01

423

Midwater trawl catches of adolescent and adult anguilliform fishes during the Sargasso Sea Eel Expedition 1979  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the research program on the biology and migration of Anguilla spp. carried out with F.R.V. “Anton Dohrn” in 1979, approximately 1300 adolescent and adult anguilliform individuals were caught covering 8 families, 10 genera and 12 species. Observations on each of these species, including horizontal and vertical distributional patterns, are dealt with herein. The appearance of various species in hauls and the absence of adult Anguilla spp. in the catches obtained are discussed.

Post, A.; Tesch, F.-W.

1982-09-01

424

Comparison of arboreal beetle catches in wet and dry collection cups with Lindgren multiple funnel traps.  

PubMed

We compared the effectiveness of a dry collection cup (with an insecticide killing strip) to a wet collection cup (containing antifreeze) for use with Lindgren multiple-funnel traps in catching several common species of bark and wood-boring beetles, and their associates in southern pine forests. All traps were baited with either the binary combination of ethanol and (-)-alpha-pinene or the quaternary combination of (+/-)-ipsenol, (+/-)-ipsdienol, ethanol, and (-)-alpha-pinene. We found that cup treatment had little, if any, effect on catches of Ips avulsus (Eichhoff) and I. grandicollis (Eichhoff) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), Alaus myops (F.) (Elateridae), Chalcophora Solier species (Buprestidae), Temnochila virescens (F.) (Trogositidae), and Lasconotus Erichson species (Colydiidae). In contrast, catches of the following species were significantly less (by 40-97%) in traps with dry cups than in traps with wet cups: Hylobius pales Herbst and Pachylobius picivorus LeConte (Curculionidae); Buprestis lineata F. (Buprestidae); Acanthocinus obsoletus (Olivier), Arhopalus rusticus nubilus (LeConte), Monochamus titillator (F.) and Xylotrechus sagittatus sagittatus (Cerambycidae); Hylastes porculus Erichson and Xyleborinus saxeseni (Ratzeburg) (Scolytidae); and Thanasimus dubius (F.) (Cleridae). The same was true in at least one experiment for the following species: Dendroctonus terebrans (Olivier), Hylastes salebrosus Eichhoff, Hylastes tenuis Eichhoff, and Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Motschulsky) (Scolytidae). We conclude that cup treatment can have a significant impact on catches of some arboreal beetles in baited multiple-funnel traps. Anyone using multiple-funnel traps to capture arboreal beetles should evaluate the potential impacts arising from their choice of collection cup treatment to their trapping objectives and expectations. The issue of cup treatment may be particular important at low population levels when maximum trap efficiency is required such as in the detection of exotic insects at ports-of-entry and within quarantine and containment zones. PMID:18330123

Miller, Daniel R; Duerr, Donald A

2008-02-01

425

Effects of increased mesh size on catch and fishing power of coral reef fish traps  

Microsoft Academic Search

Effects of increased mesh size on catch and fishing power of coral reef fish traps (Antillean design) were investigated in the Barbados west coast trap fishery by experimental fishing with commercial traps (maximum aperture 4.1cm) and large mesh traps (maximum aperture 5.5cm). Large mesh traps caught 53–63% less fish by number and 51% less by weight than the commercial traps.

David Robichaud; Wayne Hunte; Hazel A Oxenford

1999-01-01

426

Catching bubbles: targeting ultrasound microbubbles using bioorthogonal inverse-electron-demand diels-alder reactions.  

PubMed

Catching bubbles: Tetrazine-functionalized microbubbles were prepared for use as ultrasound contrast agents, and shown to selectively localize on cells labeled with a TCO-derivatized antibody against VEGFR2. This capture approach based on labeling and bioorthogonal chemistry was validated in a flow-chamber assay and in?vivo through ultrasound imaging of VEGFR2-positive and VEGFR2-negative murine tumor models. TCO=trans-cyclooctene. PMID:24829138

Zlitni, Aimen; Janzen, Nancy; Foster, F Stuart; Valliant, John F

2014-06-16

427

Short but catching up: statural growth among native Amazonian Bolivian children.  

PubMed

The ubiquity and consequences of childhood growth stunting (<-2 SD in height-for-age Z score, HAZ) in rural areas of low-income nations has galvanized research into the reversibility of stunting, but the shortage of panel data has hindered progress. Using panel data from a native Amazonian society of foragers-farmers in Bolivia (Tsimane'), we estimate rates of catch-up growth for stunted children. One hundred forty-six girls and 158 boys 2 < or = age < or = 7 were measured annually during 2002-2006. Annual Delta height in cm and in HAZ were regressed separately against baseline stunting and control variables related to attributes of the child, mother, household, and village. Children stunted at baseline had catch-up growth rates 0.11 SD/year higher than their nonstunted age and sex peers, with a higher rate among children farther from towns. The rate of catch up did not differ by the child's sex. A 10% rise in household income and an additional younger sibling lowered by 0.16 SD/year and 0.53 SD/year the rate of growth. Results were weaker when measuring Delta height in cm rather than in HAZ. Possible reasons for catch-up growth include (a) omitted variable bias, (b) parental reallocation of resources to redress growth faltering, particularly if parents perceive the benefits of redressing growth faltering for child school achievement, and (c) developmental plasticity during this period when growth rates are most rapid and linear growth trajectories have not yet canalized. PMID:19844899

Godoy, Ricardo; Nyberg, Colleen; Eisenberg, Dan T A; Magvanjav, Oyunbileg; Shinnar, Eliezer; Leonard, William R; Gravlee, Clarence; Reyes-García, Victoria; McDade, Thomas W; Huanca, Tomás; Tanner, Susan

2010-01-01

428

Catch vs count: Effects of gill-netting on reef fish populations in southern New Zealand  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the relationships between visual counts of fishes and the catch from gill-nets on rocky reefs in southern New Zealand. Visual censuses were done and then gill-nets of three mesh sizes (2.5?, 3.5? and 4.5?) were set in the surveyed areas. There were significant differences among habitats in the assemblages of reef fishes. The number and species of

Michael J. H. Hickford; David R. Schiel

1995-01-01

429

Catch-and-Release Fishing: A Comparison of Intended and Actual Behavior of Marine Anglers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research on catch-and-release fishing has typically relied on stated or observed preferences, with few applications that incorporate both data types. Further, most models ignore the effects of species on the release decision. We present a discrete-choice model estimated from stated preference data in which conservation release is a function of the species caught and angler characteristics that include fishing avidity,

Kristy Wallmo; Brad Gentner

2008-01-01

430

Fishing Effort and Catch Composition of Urban Market and Rural Villages in Brazilian Amazon  

Microsoft Academic Search

The management of small-scale freshwater fisheries in Amazon has been based usually on surveys of urban markets, while fisheries\\u000a of rural villages have gone unnoticed. We compared the fishing characteristics (catch, effort and selectivity) between an\\u000a urban market and five small villages in the Lower Tocantins River (Brazilian Amazon), downstream from a large reservoir. We\\u000a recorded 86 and 601 fish

Gustavo Hallwass; Priscila Fabiana Lopes; Anastacio Afonso Juras; Renato Azevedo Matias Silvano

2011-01-01

431

A Comparison of the Hoop-Net Catches in Several Fish Habitats of Wheeler Reservoir  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hoop nets were fished in all four major habitats in Wheeler Reservoir, a T.V.A. main-stream impoundment, during a six-months' period in 1941. Long-nose gar, mooneye, skipjack, mud catfish, black bullhead, white bass, sauger, and crappie were best represented in the catch from the fast tailwater; drum were taken in greatest numbers in the upper “third,” which had retained many of

Lawrence F. Miller

1945-01-01

432

Association between postnatal catch-up growth and obesity in childhood: prospective cohort study  

Microsoft Academic Search

AbstractObjective: To identify predictors of postnatal catch-up growth from birth to two years and its relation to size and obesity at five years.Design: Regional prospective cohort study.Setting: Avon longitudinal study of pregnancy and childhood, United Kingdom.Subjects: 848 full term singletons from a 10% random sample of the Avon longitudinal study of pregnancy and childhood.Main outcome measures: Maternal birth weight, prepregnancy

Ken K L Ong; Marion L Ahmed; Pauline M Emmett; Michael A Preece; David B Dunger

2000-01-01

433

Comparison of Statistical Methods to Standardize Catch-Per-Unit-Effort of the Alaska Longline Sablefish Fishery.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Improving existing catch per unit effort (CPUE) models for construction of a fishery abundance index is important to the Alaska sablefish (Anoplopoma fimbria) stock assessment. Performance of statistical methods including Generalized Linear Models (GLM), ...

D. H. Hanselman I. Mateo

2014-01-01

434

78 FR 79388 - Western Pacific Pelagic Fisheries; Catch and Effort Limits for the U.S. Participating Territories  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Administration 50 CFR Part 665 RIN 0648-BD46 Western Pacific Pelagic Fisheries; Catch and...SUMMARY: NMFS announces that the Western Pacific Fishery Management Council proposes...Ecosystem Plan for Pelagic Fisheries of the Western Pacific Region. If approved,...

2013-12-30

435

76 FR 61061 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Volume 76, Number 191 (Monday, October 3, 2011)] [Rules and Regulations] [Page...Catch Limit) Harvested for Management Area 3 AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service...announces that, effective 0001 hr, October 3, 2011, federally permitted vessels...

2011-10-03

436

External Tank - The Structure Backbone  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The External Tank forms the structural backbone of the Space Shuttle in the launch configuration. Because the tank flies to orbital velocity with the Space Shuttle Orbiter, minimization of weight is mandatory, to maximize payload performance. Choice of lightweight materials both for structure and thermal conditioning was necessary. The tank is large, and unique manufacturing facilities, tooling, handling, and transportation operations were required. Weld processes and tooling evolved with the design as it matured through several block changes, to reduce weight. Non Destructive Evaluation methods were used to assure integrity of welds and thermal protection system materials. The aluminum-lithium alloy was used near the end of the program and weld processes and weld repair techniques had to be refined. Development and implementation of friction stir welding was a substantial technology development incorporated during the Program. Automated thermal protection system application processes were developed for the majority of the tank surface. Material obsolescence was an issue throughout the 40 year program. The final configuration and tank weight enabled international space station assembly in a high inclination orbit allowing international cooperation with the Russian Federal Space Agency. Numerous process controls were implemented to assure product quality, and innovative proof testing was accomplished prior to delivery. Process controls were implemented to assure cleanliness in the production environment, to control contaminants, and to preclude corrosion. Each tank was accepted via rigorous inspections, including non-destructive evaluation techniques, proof testing, and all systems testing. In the post STS-107 era, the project focused on ascent debris risk reduction. This was accomplished via stringent process controls, post flight assessment using substantially improved imagery, and selective redesigns. These efforts were supported with a number of test programs to simulate combined environments. Processing improvements included development and use of low spray guns for foam application, additional human factors considerations for production, use of high fidelity mockups during hardware processing with video review, improved tank access, extensive use of non destructive evaluation, and producibility enhancements. Design improvements included redesigned bipod fittings, a bellows heater, a feedline camera active during ascent flight, removal of the protuberance airload ramps, redesigned ice frost ramps, and titanium brackets replaced aluminum brackets on the liquid oxygen feedline. Post flight assessment improved due to significant addition of imagery assets, greatly improving situational awareness. The debris risk was reduced by two orders of magnitude. During this time a major natural disaster was overcome when Katrina damaged the manufacturing facility. Numerous lessons from these efforts are documented within the paper.

Welzyn, Kenneth; Pilet, Jeffrey C.; Diecidue-Conners, Dawn; Worden, Michelle; Guillot, Michelle

2011-01-01

437

Comparison of Elasmobranch Catches of Trawl Surveys and Commercial Landings of the Port of Viareggio (North Tyrrhenian-South Ligurian Sea-Italy) in the Last Decade (Elasmobranch Fisheries - Poster)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A catch assessment survey to monitor the landed elasmobranchs was enforced at the Viareggio harbour, the more important fishing port of the Tyrrhenian and Ligurian seas. Monthly data of catches by species and gear, size structure of the catches and spatial information on fishing effort distribution were collected over the period 1990- 2001. Data on catch rates and geographical distribution

A. J. Abell; F. Serena

438

Characteristics of 5-year-olds who catch-up with MMR: findings from the UK Millennium Cohort Study  

PubMed Central

Objectives To examine predictors of partial and full measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccination catch-up between 3 and 5?years. Design Secondary data analysis of the nationally representative Millennium Cohort Study (MCS). Setting Children born in the UK, 2000–2002. Participants 751 MCS children who were unimmunised against MMR at age 3, with immunisation information at age 5. Main outcome measures Catch-up status: unimmunised (received no MMR), partial catch-up (received one MMR) or full catch-up (received two MMRs). Results At age 5, 60.3% (n=440) children remained unvaccinated, 16.1% (n=127) had partially and 23.6% (n=184) had fully caught-up. Children from families who did not speak English at home were five times as likely to partially catch-up than children living in homes where only English was spoken (risk ratio 4.68 (95% CI 3.63 to 6.03)). Full catch-up was also significantly more likely in those did not speak English at home (adjusted risk ratio 1.90 (1.08 to 3.32)). In addition, those from Pakistan/Bangladesh (2.40 (1.38 to 4.18)) or ‘other’ ethnicities (such as Chinese) (1.88 (1.08 to 3.29)) were more likely to fully catch-up than White British. Those living in socially rented (1.86 (1.34 to 2.56)) or ‘Other’ (2.52 (1.23 to 5.18)) accommodations were more likely to fully catch-up than home owners, and families were more likely to catch-up if they lived outside London (1.95 (1.32 to 2.89)). Full catch-up was less likely if parents reported medical reasons (0.43 (0.25 to 0.74)), a conscious decision (0.33 (0.23 to 0.48)), or ‘other’ reasons (0.46 (0.29 to 0.73)) for not immunising at age 3 (compared with ‘practical’ reasons). Conclusions Parents who partially or fully catch-up with MMR experience practical barriers and tend to come from disadvantaged or ethnic minority groups. Families who continue to reject MMR tend to have more advantaged backgrounds and make a conscious decision to not immunise early on. Health professionals should consider these findings in light of the characteristics of their local populations.

Pearce, Anna; Mindlin, Miranda; Cortina-Borja, Mario; Bedford, Helen

2013-01-01

439

Accumulation of Dynamic Catch Bonds between TCR and Agonist Peptide-MHC Triggers T Cell Signaling.  

PubMed

TCR-pMHC interactions initiate adaptive immune responses, but the mechanism of how such interactions under force induce T cell signaling is unclear. We show that force prolongs lifetimes of single TCR-pMHC bonds for agonists (catch bonds) but shortens those for antagonists (slip bonds). Both magnitude and duration of force are important, as the highest Ca(2+) responses were induced by 10 pN via both pMHC catch bonds whose lifetime peaks at this force and anti-TCR slip bonds whose maximum lifetime occurs at 0 pN. High Ca(2+) levels require early and rapid accumulation of bond lifetimes, whereas short-lived bonds that slow early accumulation of lifetimes correspond to low Ca(2+) responses. Our data support a model in which force on the TCR induces signaling events depending on its magnitude, duration, frequency, and timing, such that agonists form catch bonds that trigger the T cell digitally, whereas antagonists form slip bonds that fail to activate. PMID:24725404

Liu, Baoyu; Chen, Wei; Evavold, Brian D; Zhu, Cheng

2014-04-10

440

Fishing effort and catch composition of urban market and rural villages in Brazilian Amazon.  

PubMed

The management of small-scale freshwater fisheries in Amazon has been based usually on surveys of urban markets, while fisheries of rural villages have gone unnoticed. We compared the fishing characteristics (catch, effort and selectivity) between an urban market and five small villages in the Lower Tocantins River (Brazilian Amazon), downstream from a large reservoir. We recorded 86 and 601 fish landings in the urban market and villages, respectively, using the same methodology. The urban fishers showed higher catch per unit of effort, higher amount of ice (related to a higher fishing effort, as ice is used to store fish catches) and larger crew size per fishing trip, but village fishers had a higher estimated annual fish production. Conversely, urban and village fishers used similar fishing gear (gillnets) and the main fish species caught were the same. However, village fishers showed more diverse strategies regarding gear, habitats and fish caught. Therefore, although it underestimated the total amount of fish caught in the Lower Tocantins River region, the data from the urban market could be a reliable indicator of main fish species exploited and fishing gear used by village fishers. Monitoring and management should consider the differences and similarities between urban and rural fisheries, in Amazon and in other tropical regions. PMID:21153639

Hallwass, Gustavo; Lopes, Priscila Fabiana; Juras, Anastacio Afonso; Silvano, Renato Azevedo Matias

2011-02-01

441

A Hexylchloride-Based Catch-and-Release System for Chemical Proteomic Applications  

PubMed Central

Bioorthogonal ligation methods that allow the selective conjugation of fluorophores or biotin to proteins and small molecule probes that contain inert chemical handles are an important component of many chemical proteomic strategies. Here, we present a new catch-and-release enrichment strategy that utilizes a hexylchloride group as a bioorthogonal chemical handle. Proteins and small molecules that contain a hexylchloride tag can be efficiently captured by an immobilized version of the self-labeling protein HaloTag. Furthermore, by using a HaloTag fusion protein that contains a protease cleavage site, captured proteins can be selectively eluted under mild conditions. We demonstrate the utility of the hexylchloride-based catch-and-release strategy by enriching protein kinases that are covalently and non-covalently bound to ATP-binding site-directed probes from mammalian cell lysates. Our catch-and-release system creates new possibilities for profiling enzyme families and for the identification of the cellular targets of bioactive small molecules.

Brigham, Jennifer L.; Perera, B. Gayani K.; Maly, Dustin J.

2013-01-01

442

A hexylchloride-based catch-and-release system for chemical proteomic applications.  

PubMed

Bioorthogonal ligation methods that allow the selective conjugation of fluorophores or biotin to proteins and small molecule probes that contain inert chemical handles are an important component of many chemical proteomic strategies. Here, we present a new catch-and-release enrichment strategy that utilizes a hexylchloride group as a bioorthogonal chemical handle. Proteins and small molecules that contain a hexylchloride tag can be efficiently captured by an immobilized version of the self-labeling protein HaloTag. Furthermore, by using a HaloTag fusion protein that contains a protease cleavage site, captured proteins can be selectively eluted under mild conditions. We demonstrate the utility of the hexylchloride-based catch-and-release strategy by enriching protein kinases that are covalently and noncovalently bound to ATP-binding site-directed probes from mammalian cell lysates. Our catch-and-release system creates new possibilities for profiling enzyme families and for the identification of the cellular targets of bioactive small molecules. PMID:23305300

Brigham, Jennifer L; Perera, B Gayani K; Maly, Dustin J

2013-04-19

443

Improving School Breakfasts: Effects of the CATCH Eat Smart Program on the Nutrient Content of School Breakfasts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background.This paper describes the impact of the Eat Smart School Nutrition Program, the food service component of the Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health (CATCH), on the percentage of calories from total fat and saturated fat and the sodium content of school breakfasts.Methods.Fifty-nine of the 96 CATCH schools offered breakfast. We collected 5 consecutive days of school breakfast menu,

Johanna T. Dwyer; Lynn V. Hewes; Paul D. Mitchell; Theresa A. Nicklas; Deanna H. Montgomery; Leslie A. Lytle; M. Patricia Snyder; Michelle M. Zive; Kathryn J. Bachman; Rochelle Rice; Guy S. Parcel

1996-01-01

444

RE-ESTIMATION OF SHORTFIN MAKO SHARK CATCHES BY JAPANESE TUNA LONGLINE VESSELS IN THE ATLANTIC OCEAN  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY Shortfin mako shark catches by the Japanese longline fishery in the Atlantic Ocean were re-estimated using the logbook data from 1971 to 2004 filtered using a 70% reporting rate. Yearly catches of shortfin mako shark in number were estimated to be 900-17,600 in the North and 200-31,700 in the South. They became 50-890 tons and 10-1,620 tons, respectively, after

Hiroaki Matsunaga; Yukio Takeuchi

445

Is juvenile salmon abundance related to subsequent and preceding catches? Perspectives from a long-term monitoring programme  

Microsoft Academic Search

The abundance of wild Atlantic salmon in the River Teno system has been monitored since the 1970s by estimating salmon catches and juvenile salmon densities at permanent electrofishing sites. Analysis of the time-series has shown significant relationships between juvenile densities (0C and 1C) and subsequent 1SW and 2SW catches. Corresponding significant relationships have been detected between 1SW and 2SW female

E. Niemela; J. Erkinaro; M. Julkunen; E. Hassinen

2005-01-01

446

Menarcheal age and growth pattern of Indian girls adopted in Sweden. II. Catch-up growth and final height  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adopted girls (n=107) previously studied regarding menarcheal age in relation to age at arrival, were analysed as to growth\\u000a pattern and final height related to nutritional status at arrival and menarcheal age. It was found that most girls had catch-up\\u000a growth regarding height and half of them regarding weight. Faster catch-up and later arrival age in Sweden were associated\\u000a with

L. A. Proos; Y. Hofvander; T. Tuvemo

1991-01-01

447

Changes in the Nutrient Content of School Lunches: Results from the CATCH Eat Smart Food Service Intervention  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background.The Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health (CATCH) tested the effectiveness of a multilevel intervention aimed at promoting a healthful school environment and positive eating and physical activity behaviors in children. The CATCH Eat Smart Program targeted the school food service staff and aimed to lower the total fat, saturated fat, and sodium content of school meals.Methods.The Eat Smart

Stavroula K. Osganian; Mary Kay Ebzery; Deanna H. Montgomery; Theresa A. Nicklas; Marguerite A. Evans; Paul D. Mitchell; Leslie A. Lytle; M. Patricia Snyder; Elaine J. Stone; Michelle M. Zive; Kathryn J. Bachman; Rochelle Rice; Guy S. Parcel

1996-01-01

448

Phosphorylation of a twitchin-related protein controls catch and calcium sensitivity of force production in invertebrate smooth muscle  

PubMed Central

Catch” is a condition of prolonged, high-force maintenance at resting intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]) and very low energy usage, occurring in invertebrate smooth muscles, including the anterior byssus retractor muscle (ABRM) of Mytilus edulis. Relaxation from catch is rapid on serotonergic nerve stimulation in intact muscles and application of cAMP in permeabilized muscles. This release of catch occurs by protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation of a high (?600 kDa) molecular mass protein, the regulator of catch. Here, we identify the catch-regulating protein as a homologue of the mini-titin, twitchin, based on (i) a partial cDNA of the purified isolated protein showing 77% amino acid sequence identity to the kinase domain of Aplysia californica twitchin; (ii) a polyclonal antibody to a synthetic peptide in this sequence reacting with the phosphorylated catch-regulating protein band from permeabilized ABRM; and (iii) the similarity of the amino acid composition and molecular weight of the protein to twitchin. In permeabilized ABRM, at all but maximum [Ca2+], phosphorylation of twitchin results in a decreased calcium sensitivity of force production (half-maximum at 2.5 vs. 1.3 ?M calcium). At a given submaximal force, with equal numbers of force generators, twitchin phosphorylation increased unloaded shortening velocity ?2-fold. These data suggest that aspects of the catch state exist not only at resting [Ca2+], but also at higher submaximal [Ca2+]. The mechanism that gives rise to force maintenance in catch probably operates together, to some extent, with that of cycling myosin crossbridges.

Siegman, Marion J.; Funabara, Daisuke; Kinoshita, Shigeharu; Watabe, Shugo; Hartshorne, David J.; Butler, Thomas M.

1998-01-01

449

Comparison of Elasmobranch Catches from Research Trawl Surveys and Commercial Landings at Port of Viareggio, Italy, in the Last Decade  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract A program to monitor commercial elasmobranchs was put into effect at Viareggio, the most important fishing port of the Tyrrhenian and Ligurian seas. Size structure of the catches and spatial information on fishing effort distribution were collected monthly,by species and gear over the period 1990–2001. Data on catch,rates and geographical distribution were also obtained from annual research trawl surveys

A J Abella; F. serena

2005-01-01

450

Recent developments Is catch-and-release recreational angling compatible with no-take marine protected areas?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Marine protected areas (MPAs) have become a common conservation and management tool for reducing exploitation from the commercial and recreational fisheries sectors. However, the recreational fisheries sector has the potential to be compatible with no-take MPAs when catch- and-release angling is practiced because, in theory, no fish are actually harvested. This presumes that the effects of catch-and-release angling and related

Steven J. Cooke; Andy J. Danylchuk; Sascha E. Danylchuk; Cory D. Suski; Tony L. Goldberg

2006-01-01

451

Evaluation of two methods for indexing fish year-class strength: Catch-curve residuals and cohort method  

Microsoft Academic Search

Assessment of fish year-class strength is often a key objective of fish monitoring programs. We used a simulation model to assess the performance of two methods for indexing fish year-class strength from catch-at-age data on adult fish populations: catch-curve residuals and tracking cohorts through time. For this comparison we used three performance metrics: correlation with true recruitment values, ability to

Jakob C. Tetzlaff; Matthew J. Catalano; Micheal S. Allen; William E. Pine

2011-01-01

452

Recent developments Is catch-and-release recreational angling compatible with no-take marine protected areas?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Marine protected areas (MPAs) have become a common conservation and management tool for reducing exploitation from the commercial and recreational fisheries sectors. However, the recreational fisheries sector has the potential to be compatible with no-take MPAs when catch- and-release angling is practiced because, in theory, no fish are actually harvested. This presumes that the effects of catch-and-release angling and related

Steven J. Cooke; Andy J. Danylchuk; Sascha E. Danylchuk; Cory D. Suskie; Tony L. Goldberg

453

Inexpensive site-assembled thermal storage tank  

SciTech Connect

An inexpensive ($0.20 per gallon) thermal storage tank was constructed using polystyrene foam, welded steel (hog) wire, and polyethylene film. The tank was formed as a right circular cylinder using the welded wire as a hoop. Polystyrene foam was cut to shape using a hot wire and used to line the wire hoop. Polyethylene film was placed in the interior of the tank to complete a leakproof liquid thermal storage tank. The design incorporates features making the tank both inexpensive and relatively easy to construct in a confined space. Thermal performance can be adjusted by choosing thickness of the polystrene foam as it is cut.

Forbes, R.E.

1981-01-01

454

ICPP Tank Farm planning through 2012  

SciTech Connect

Historically, liquid high-level waste (HLW) generated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant has been stored in the Tank Farm after which it is calcined with the calcine being stored in stainless steel bins. Following the curtailment of spent nuclear fuel reprocessing in 1992, the HLW treatment methods were re-evaluated to establish a path forward for producing a final waste form from the liquid sodium bearing wastes (SBW) and the HLW calcine. Projections for significant improvements in waste generation, waste blending and evaporation, and calcination were incorporated into the Tank Farm modeling. This optimized modeling shows that all of the SBW can be calcined by the end of 2012 as required by the Idaho Settlement Agreement. This Tank Farm plan discusses the use of each of the eleven HLW tanks and shows that two tanks can be emptied, allowing them to be Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closed by 2006. In addition, it describes the construction of each tank and vault, gives the chemical concentrations of the contents of each tank, based on historical input and some sampling, and discusses the regulatory drivers important to Tank Farm operation. It also discusses new waste generation, the computer model used for the Tank Farm planning, the operating schedule for each tank, and the schedule for when each tank will be empty and closed.

Palmer, W.B.; Millet, C.B.; Staiger, M.D.; Ward, F.S.

1998-04-01

455

Control emissions from aboveground storage tanks  

SciTech Connect

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are emitted as vapors escape from aboveground organic liquid storage tanks. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that in the petroleum industry along, in the absence of additional regulation, storage tank VOC emissions would reach 231,000 t/yr from the gasoline distribution industry and 122,000 t/yr from the petroleum refining industry by 1998. Proposed storage tank emission controls for the refining industry are estimated to reduce VOC emissions by 23,000 t/yr, with a cost-effectiveness of $309 per ton of VOC eliminated. This article discusses VOC emission estimates and storage tank design and retrofit techniques for controlling emissions from fixed-roof tanks (FRTs), external-floating-roof tanks (EFRTs), and internal-floating-roof tanks (IFRTs). It does not address VOC control systems for treating collected vapors, which were covered in a previous article.

Brown, C.; Dixon, P.

1996-05-01

456

Hanford Site Waste Storage Tank Information Notebook  

SciTech Connect

This report provides summary data on the radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 East and West Areas at the Hanford Site. The summary data covers each of the existing 161 Series 100 underground waste storage tanks (500,000 gallons and larger). It also contains information on the design and construction of these tanks. The information in this report is derived from existing reports that document the status of the tanks and their materials. This report also contains interior, surface photographs of each of the 54 Watch List tanks, which are those tanks identified as Priority I Hanford Site Tank Farm Safety Issues in accordance with Public Law 101-510, Section 3137*.

Husa, E.I.; Raymond, R.E.; Welty, R.K.; Griffith, S.M.; Hanlon, B.M.; Rios, R.R.; Vermeulen, N.J.

1993-07-01

457

Adolescent varicocelectomy: does artery sparing influence recurrence rate and/or catch-up growth?  

PubMed

The prevalence of varicocoeles is 15% in the general adolescent and adult male population and in 35-40% of men evaluated for infertility. While varicocelectomy can be performed using various methods and techniques, the laparoscopic approach allows for clear visualization of the testicular artery and lymphatics. Amongst urologists, particularly paediatric urologists, and andrologists there is much debate regarding the significance of testicular artery sparing when performing a varicocelectomy, with some believing that ligating the testicular artery impairs catch-up growth and future fertility. On the other hand, several studies have reported higher failure rates with artery preservation. To help resolve the debate regarding the significance of artery sparing, we sought to compare varicocoele recurrence rate and catch-up growth in patients who underwent artery sparing laparoscopic varicocelectomy compared with those who had the artery sacrificed. We identified 524 laparoscopic varicocelectomies in 425 patients from our adolescent varicocoele database. Only patients who had ultrasound determined testicular volume measurements pre-operatively and at least 6 months post-operatively were included. Post-operative persistence/recurrence of varicocoele, testicular atrophy and repeat varicocelectomy were noted. Catch-up growth was compared between procedures in those with significant pre-operative asymmetry. Four hundred and forty primary laparoscopic varicocelectomies were performed in 355 patients (mean age: 15.5 years, range 9.3-20.6; mean follow-up: 32.9 months, range 6.0-128.9) who had both pre- and post-varicocelectomy scrotal Duplex Doppler ultrasound performed. The testicular artery was preserved in 54 varicocoeles (41 patients) and ligated in 384 varicocoeles (312 patients). We observed an increased rate of persistent/recurrent varicocoele in the artery-sparing vs. artery ligating patients (12.2% vs. 5.4%, p = 0.09). In addition, there was no difference in catch-up growth and no instance of testicular atrophy. As artery sparing varicocelectomy offered no advantage in regards to catch-up growth and was associated with a higher incidence of recurrent varicocoele, preservation of the artery does not appear to be routinely necessary in adolescent varicocelectomy. PMID:24339439

Fast, A M; Deibert, C M; Van Batavia, J P; Nees, S N; Glassberg, K I

2014-03-01

458

Jet mixing long horizontal storage tanks  

SciTech Connect

Large storage tanks may require mixing to achieve homogeneity of contents for several reasons: prior to sampling for mass balance purposes, for blending in reagents, for suspending settled solids for removal, or for use as a feed tank to a process. At ORNL, mixed waste evaporator concentrates are stored in 50,000-gal tanks, about 12 ft in diameter and 60 ft long. This tank configuration has the advantage of permitting transport by truck and therefore fabrication in the shop rather than in the field. Jet mixing experiments were carried out on two model tanks: a 230-gal (1/6-linear-scale) Plexiglas tank and a 25,000-gal tank (about 2/3 linear scale). Mixing times were measured using sodium chloride tracer and several conductivity probes distributed through the tanks. Several jet sizes and configurations were tested. One-directional and two-directional jets were tested in both tanks. Mixing times for each tank were correlated with the jet Reynolds number. Mixing times were correlated for the two tank sizes using the recirculation time for the developed jet. When the recirculation times were calculated using the distance from the nozzle to the end of the tank as the length of the developed jet, the correlation was only marginally successful. Data for the two tank sizes were correlated empirically using a modified effective jet length expressed as a function of the Reynolds number raised to the 1/3 power. Mixing experiments were simulated using the TEMTEST computer program. The simulations predicted trends correctly and were within the scatter of the experimental data with the lower jet Reynolds numbers. Agreement was not as good at high Reynolds numbers except for single nozzles in the 25,000-gal tank, where agreement was excellent over the entire range.

Perona, J.J.; Hylton, T.D.; Youngblood, E.L.; Cummins, R.L.

1994-12-01

459

Ferrocyanide tank safety program: Cesium uptake capacity of simulated ferrocyanide tank waste. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to determine the capacity for {sup 137}Cs uptake by mixed metal ferrocyanides present in Hanford Site waste tanks, and to assess the potential for aggregation of these {sup 137}Cs-exchanged materials to form ``hot-spots`` in the tanks. This research, performed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for Westinghouse Hanford Company, stems from concerns regarding possible localized radiolytic heating within the tanks. After ferrocyanide was added to 18 high-level waste tanks in the 1950s, some of the ferrocyanide tanks received considerable quantities of saltcake waste that was rich in {sup 137}Cs. If radioactive cesium was exchanged and concentrated by the nickel ferrocyanide present in the tanks, the associated heating could cause tank temperatures to rise above the safety limits specified for the ferrocyanide-containing tanks, especially if the supernate in the tanks is pumped out and the waste becomes drier.

Burgeson, I.E.; Bryan, S.A.

1995-07-01

460

CRITICAL ASSUMPTIONS IN THE F-TANK FARM CLOSURE OPERATIONAL DOCUMENTATION REGARDING WASTE TANK INTERNAL CONFIGURATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The intent of this document is to provide clarification of critical assumptions regarding the internal configurations of liquid waste tanks at operational closure, with respect to F-Tank Farm (FTF) closure documentation. For the purposes of this document, FTF closure documentation includes: (1) Performance Assessment for the F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (hereafter referred to as the FTF PA) (SRS-REG-2007-00002), (2) Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Closure of F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (DOE/SRS-WD-2012-001), (3) Tier 1 Closure Plan for the F-Area Waste Tank Systems at the Savannah River Site (SRR-CWDA-2010-00147), (4) F-Tank Farm Tanks 18 and 19 DOE Manual 435.1-1 Tier 2 Closure Plan Savannah River Site (SRR-CWDA-2011-00015), (5) Industrial Wastewater Closure Module for the Liquid Waste Tanks 18 and 19 (SRRCWDA-2010-00003), and (6) Tank 18/Tank 19 Special Analysis for the Performance Assessment for the F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (hereafter referred to as the Tank 18/Tank 19 Special Analysis) (SRR-CWDA-2010-00124). Note that the first three FTF closure documents listed apply to the entire FTF, whereas the last three FTF closure documents listed are specific to Tanks 18 and 19. These two waste tanks are expected to be the first two tanks to be grouted and operationally closed under the current suite of FTF closure documents and many of the assumptions and approaches that apply to these two tanks are also applicable to the other FTF waste tanks and operational closure processes.

Hommel, S.; Fountain, D.

2012-03-28

461

Tank of a low temperature liquefied gas tanker ship  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bridgestone Liquefied Gas Co., Ltd.'s new LNG cargo-tank design offers increased cargo-tank capacity and improved ship stability by relatively small free surface of the liquefied gas. The tank consists of a lower-membrane-tank portion with compression-resistant heat insulation and a rigid upper-tank portion with a fluid-tight connection to the lower-tank portion. The upper central section of the upper-tank portion extends upward

1974-01-01

462

Tank Focus Area pretreatment activities  

SciTech Connect

Plans call for the high-level wastes to be retrieved from the tanks and immobilized in a stable waste form suitable for long-term isolation. Chemistry and chemical engineering operations are required to retrieve the wastes, to condition the wastes for subsequent steps, and to reduce the costs of the waste management enterprise. Pretreatment includes those processes between retrieval and immobilization, and includes preparation of suitable feed material for immobilization and separations to partition the waste into streams that yield lower life-cycle costs. Some of the technologies being developed by the Tank Focus Area (TFA) to process these wastes are described. These technologies fall roughly into three areas: (1) solid/liquid separation (SLS), (2) sludge pretreatment, and (3) supernate pretreatment.

McGinnis, C.P.; Welch, T.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Manke, K.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1997-03-01

463

HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT BUCKLING EVALUATION METHODS & RESULTS FOR THE PRIMARY TANKS  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a detailed buckling evaluation of the primary tanks in the Hanford double shell waste tanks. The analysis is part of a comprehensive structural review for the Double-Shell Tank Integrity Project. This work also provides information on tank integrity that specifically responds to concerns raise by the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Oversight (EH-22) during a review (in April and May 2001) of work being performed on the double-shell tank farms, and the operation of the aging waste facility (AWF) primary tank ventilation system.

MACKEY, T.C.

2006-03-17

464

Energy storage-boiler tank  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Activities performed in an effort to demonstrate heat of fusion energy storage in containerized salts are reported. The properties and cycle life characteristics of a eutectic salt having a boiling point of about 385 C (NaCl, KCl, Mg Cl2) were determined. M-terphenyl was chosen as the heat transfer fluid. Compatibility studies were conducted and mild steel containers were selected. The design and fabrication of a 2MWh storage boiler tank are discussed.

Chubb, T. A.; Nemecek, J. J.; Simmons, D. E.

1980-03-01

465

ANNUAL RADIOACTIVE WASTE TANK INSPECTION PROGRAM - 2011  

SciTech Connect

Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations and vitrification processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 2011 to evaluate these vessels and other waste handling facilities along with evaluations based on data from previous inspections are the subject of this report. The 2011 inspection program revealed that the structural integrity and waste confinement capability of the Savannah River Site waste tanks were maintained. All inspections scheduled per SRR-LWE-2011-00026, HLW Tank Farm Inspection Plan for 2011, were completed. Ultrasonic measurements (UT) performed in 2011 met the requirements of C-ESR-G-00006, In-Service Inspection Program for High Level Waste Tanks, Rev. 3, and WSRC-TR-2002-00061, Rev.6. UT inspections were performed on Tanks 25, 26 and 34 and the findings are documented in SRNL-STI-2011-00495, Tank Inspection NDE Results for Fiscal Year 2011, Waste Tanks 25, 26, 34 and 41. A total of 5813 photographs were made and 835 visual and video inspections were performed during 2011. A potential leaksite was discovered at Tank 4 during routine annual inspections performed in 2011. The new crack, which is above the allowable fill level, resulted in no release to the environment or tank annulus. The location of the crack is documented in C-ESR-G-00003, SRS High Level Waste Tank Leaksite Information, Rev.6.

West, B.; Waltz, R.

2012-06-21

466

Chemical composition of Hanford Tank SY-102  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) to safely manage and dispose of the radioactive waste, both current and future, stored in double-shell and single-shell tanks at the Hanford sites. One major program element in TWRS is pretreatment which was established to process the waste prior to disposal using the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant. In support of this program, Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a conceptual process flow sheet which will remediate the entire contents of a selected double-shelled underground waste tank, including supernatant and sludge, into forms that allow storage and final disposal in a safe, cost-effective and environmentally sound manner. The specific tank selected for remediation is 241-SY-102 located in the 200 West Area. As part of the flow sheet development effort, the composition of the tank was defined and documented. This database was built by examining the history of liquid waste transfers to the tank and by performing careful analysis of all of the analytical data that have been gathered during the tank`s lifetime. In order to more completely understand the variances in analytical results, material and charge balances were done to help define the chemistry of the various components in the tank. This methodology of defining the tank composition and the final results are documented in this report.

Birnbaum, E.; Agnew, S.; Jarvinen, G.; Yarbro, S.

1993-12-01

467

In situ vitrification of radioactive underground tanks  

SciTech Connect

In situ vitrification (ISV) is a treatment process with great potential for remediating underground tanks previously used for storing radioactive and hazardous chemical wastes at US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Tests at several scales have demonstrated the utility of ISV for these tanks. An engineering-scale test vitrified a 30-cm-diameter buried steel and concrete tank that contained simulated tank sludge. Hazardous components of the tank sludge were immobilized, or removed and captured in the off-gas treatment system, and the tank walls were melted or incorporated into the ISV block. A pilot-scale ISV test vitrified a 1-m simulated underground tank than contained a simulated refractory sludge. The ISV process completely vitrified the tank, its contents, and the soil below the tank to a depth of 2.4 m, producing a uniform glass and crystalline monolith with an estimated mass of 30 tons. A large-scale underground tank test is scheduled for early 1991. 5 refs., 4 figs.

Koegler, S.S.; Gibby, R.D.; Thompson, L.E.

1991-10-01

468

Tank C6A solids  

SciTech Connect

The Separations Technology Laboratory was requested to characterize solids, removed as a slurry, from cleanout of Tank C6A last month. For some time, solids had been appearing in samples taken from this tank. The analytical evidence from this study shows the solids, although principally plutonium and aluminum, to be a complex mixture, stoichiometrically. The solids have likely been forming over the past few years due to conditions leading to insolubility, primarily of aluminum nitrate, in Tank C6A. This mode of formation is probably responsible for the larger particles. Since aluminum nitrate crystals can be highly hydrated, small quantities of plutonium could have been carried along from the 150--200 g Pu/L mother liquor. The smaller particles could have formed in the same manner, but since they contain more plutonium than the larger ones, they could have originated in upstream processing from C6A and have been fine enough to either bypass filtration or be passed along during line breaks to change filters or for other maintenance. Routinely scheduled inspection and/or cleanout is recommended to prevent further buildup of solids in such process vessels.

Holcomb, H.P.

1988-03-09

469

Reactor tank UT acceptance criteria  

SciTech Connect

The SRS reactor tanks are constructed of type 304 stainless steel, with 0.5 inch thick walls. An ultrasonic (UT) in-service inspection program has been developed for examination of these tanks, in accordance with the ISI Plan for the Savannah River Production Reactors Process Water System (DPSTM-88-100-1). Prior to initiation of these inspections, criteria for the disposition of any indications that might be found are required. A working group has been formed to review available information on the SRS reactor tanks and develop acceptance criteria. This working group includes nationally recognized experts in the nuclear industry. The working group has met three times and produced three documents describing the proposed acceptance criteria, the technical basis for the criteria and a proposed initial sampling plan. This report transmits these three documents, which were prepared in accordance with the technical task plan and quality assurance plan for this task, task 88-001-A- 1. In addition, this report summarizes the acceptance criteria and proposed sampling plan, and provides further interpretation of the intent of these three documents where necessary.

Daugherty, W.L.

1990-01-30

470

High-heat tank safety issues evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Subsection (b) of Public Law 101-510, Section 3137, {open_quotes}Safety Measures for Waste Tanks at Hanford Nuclear Reservation{close_quotes} (PL 101-510), requires the Secretary of Energy to {open_quotes}identify those tanks that may have a serious potential for release of high-level waste due to uncontrolled increase in temperature or pressure{close_quotes}. One of the tanks that has been identified to meet this criteria is single-shell tank (SST) 241-C-106 (Wilson and Reep 1991). This report presents the results of an evaluation of the safety issue associated with tank 241-C-106: the continued cooling required for high heat generation in tank 241-C-106. If tank 241-C-106 should start leaking, continued addition of water for cooling could possibly increase the amount of leakage to the soil column. In turn, if the current methods of cooling tank 241-C-106 are stopped, the sludge temperatures may exceed established temperature limits, the long term structural integrity of the tank liner and concrete would be jeopardized, leading to an unacceptable release to the environment. Among other conclusions, this evaluation has determined that tank 241-C-106 contains enough heat generating wastes to justify retaining this tank on the list {open_quotes}Single-Shell Tanks With High Heat Loads (>40,000 Btu/H){close_quotes} and that to confirm the structural integrity needed for the retrieval of the contents of tank 241-C-106, an updated structural analysis and thermal analysis need to be conducted. Other findings of this evaluation are also reported.

Conner, J.C.

1993-05-10

471

RETRIEVAL & TREATMENT OF HANFORD TANK WASTE  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Tank Farms contain 53 million gal of radioactive waste accumulated during over 50 years of operations. The waste is stored in 177 single-shell and double-shell tanks in the Hanford 200 Areas. The single-shell tanks were put into operation from the early 1940s through the 1960s with wastes received from several generations of processing facilities for the recovery of plutonium and uranium, and from laboratories and other ancillary facilities. The overall hanford Tank Farm system represents one of the largest nuclear legacies in the world driving towards completion of retrieval and treatment in 2028 and the associated closure activity completion by 2035. Remote operations, significant radiation/contamination levels, limited access, and old facilities are just some of the challenges faced by retrieval and treatment systems. These systems also need to be able to successfully remove 99% or more of the waste, and support waste treatment, and tank closure. The Tank Farm retrieval program has ramped up dramatically in the past three years with design, fabrication, installation, testing, and operations ongoing on over 20 of the 149 single-shell tanks. A variety of technologies are currently being pursued to retrieve different waste types, applications, and to help establish a baseline for recovery/operational efficiencies. The paper/presentation describes the current status of retrieval system design, fabrication, installation, testing, readiness, and operations, including: (1) Saltcake removal progress in Tanks S-102, S-109, and S-112 using saltcake dissolution, modified sluicing, and high pressure water lancing techniques; (2) Sludge vacuum retrieval experience from Tanks C-201, C-202, C-203, and C-204; (3) Modified sluicing experience in Tank C-103; (4) Progress on design and installation of the mobile retrieval system for sludge in potentially leaking single-shell tanks, particularly Tank C-101; and (5) Ongoing installation of various systems in the next generation of tanks to be retrieved.

EACKER, J.A.; SPEARS, J.A.; STURGES, M.H.; MAUSS, B.M.

2006-01-20

472

Artisanal Green Turtle, Chelonia mydas, Fishery of Caribbean Nicaragua: I. Catch Rates and Trends, 1991-2011  

PubMed Central

This is the first assessment of catch rates for the legal, artisanal green turtle, Chelonia mydas, fishery in Caribbean Nicaragua. Data were collected by community members, monitoring up to 14 landing sites from 1991 to 2011. We examined take levels, and temporal and spatial variability in catch rates for the overall fishery, by region, and community using General Additive Mixed Models (GAMMs). More than 171,556 green turtles were killed during the period, with a mean estimated minimum 8,169±2,182 annually. There was a statistically significant decline in catch rates overall. Catch rates peaked in 1997 and 2002, followed by a downward trend, particularly from mid-2008 to the end of the study period. Similar downward trends were evident in both study regions. Community specific catch rate trends also indicated declines with decreases ranging from 21% to 90%. Decrease in catch rates in Nicaragua is cause for concern even though the principal source rookery at Tortuguero, Costa Rica, shows an increase in nesting activity. Explanations for the apparent discrepancy between the increasing trend at Tortuguero and decreasing catch rate trends in Nicaragua include: i) an increase in reproductive output, ii) insufficient time has passed to observe the impact of the fishery on the rookery due to a time lag, iii) changes in other segments of the population have not been detected since only nesting activity is monitored, iv) the expansive northern Nicaragua foraging ground may provide a refuge for a sufficient portion of the Tortuguero rookery, and/or v) a larger than expected contribution of non-Tortuguero rookeries occurring in Nicaragua turtle fishing areas. Our results highlight the need for close monitoring of rookeries and in-water aggregations in the Caribbean. Where consumptive use still occurs, nations sharing this resource should implement scientifically based limits on exploitation to ensure sustainability and mitigate impacts to regional population diversity.

Lagueux, Cynthia J.; Campbell, Cathi L.; Strindberg, Samantha

2014-01-01

473

Artisanal Green Turtle, Chelonia mydas, Fishery of Caribbean Nicaragua: I. Catch Rates and Trends, 1991-2011.  

PubMed

This is the first assessment of catch rates for the legal, artisanal green turtle, Chelonia mydas, fishery in Caribbean Nicaragua. Data were collected by community members, monitoring up to 14 landing sites from 1991 to 2011. We examined take levels, and temporal and spatial variability in catch rates for the overall fishery, by region, and community using General Additive Mixed Models (GAMMs). More than 171,556 green turtles were killed during the period, with a mean estimated minimum 8,169±2,182 annually. There was a statistically significant decline in catch rates overall. Catch rates peaked in 1997 and 2002, followed by a downward trend, particularly from mid-2008 to the end of the study period. Similar downward trends were evident in both study regions. Community specific catch rate trends also indicated declines with decreases ranging from 21% to 90%. Decrease in catch rates in Nicaragua is cause for concern even though the principal source rookery at Tortuguero, Costa Rica, shows an increase in nesting activity. Explanations for the apparent discrepancy between the increasing trend at Tortuguero and decreasing catch rate trends in Nicaragua include: i) an increase in reproductive output, ii) insufficient time has passed to observe the impact of the fishery on the rookery due to a time lag, iii) changes in other segments of the population have not been detected since only nesting activity is monitored, iv) the expansive northern Nicaragua foraging ground may provide a refuge for a sufficient portion of the Tortuguero rookery, and/or v) a larger than expected contribution of non-Tortuguero rookeries occurring in Nicaragua turtle fishing areas. Our results highlight the need for close monitoring of rookeries and in-water aggregations in the Caribbean. Where consumptive use still occurs, nations sharing this resource should implement scientifically based limits on exploitation to ensure sustainability and mitigate impacts to regional population diversity. PMID:24740258

Lagueux, Cynthia J; Campbell, Cathi L; Strindberg, Samantha

2014-01-01

474

LH2 fuel tank design for SSTO  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This report will discuss the design of a liquid hydrogen fuel tank constructed from composite materials. The focus of this report is to recommend a design for a fuel tank which will be able to withstand all static and dynamic forces during manned flight. Areas of study for the design include material selection, material structural analysis, heat transfer, thermal expansion, and liquid hydrogen diffusion. A structural analysis FORTRAN program was developed for analyzing the buckling and yield characteristics of the tank. A thermal analysis Excel spreadsheet was created to determine a specific material thickness which will minimize heat transfer through the wall of the tank. The total mass of the tank was determined by the combination of both structural and thermal analyses. The report concludes with the recommendation of a layered material tank construction. The designed system will include exterior insulation, combination of metal and organize composite matrices and honeycomb.

Wright, Geoff

475

Guidelines help select storage tank calibration method  

SciTech Connect

Guidelines have been developed to help owners and operators of vertical, cylindrical storage tanks determine the bet technology to calibrate their specific tanks, and the circumstances under which they are used. For more than half a century, vertical, cylindrical storage tanks have been calibrated by the manual strapping method. In that method, calibrated measuring tapes are used to measure the circumference of the tank at several elevations. But during the past decade, new technologies for tank calibration have emerged, and many of these methods are in the final stages of standardization by national and international standards organizations. These new technologies offer advantages toward improved safety, accuracy, and efficiency in the overall spectrum of tank calibration. Guidelines are presented in this article for fixed-roof designs and for both internal and external floating-roof designs. The guidelines also take specific construction details into account.

Sivaraman, S. (Exxon Research and Engineering Co., Florham Park, NJ (USA))

1990-02-01

476

Composite Tanks and Pressure Vessel Development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Pressure vessels and tanks are vital to NASA missions. Tanks need to be lightweight and perform under the operational environments. Design and material limitations make it difficult to contain the fuels and oxidizers. Recent interest in 90% Hydrogen Peroxide adds to the challenge of containment. The majority of current tank technologies are not easily adaptable to conformal shapes. The cost of tooling-up for large tanks are magnified by sudden design changes. New launch vehicle concepts may require tanks and pressure vessels of a non-standard configuration. Scaled versions of new tanks have been fabricated and testing has begun. Second and third generation launch vehicles decisions will effect the path of research and development.

DeLay, Thomas K.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

477

Liquid storage tanks under vertical excitation  

SciTech Connect

Until recently, the hydrodynamic effects on liquid storage tanks induced by an earthquake excitation were basically treated for the horizontal component of the earthquake. Recent studies, however, showed that the hydrodynamic effects due to the vertical component of an earthquake may be significant. In these studies the tank is assumed to be fixed at the bottom. This paper is concerned with the hydrodynamic behavior of liquid storage tanks induced by vertical earthquake input excitation. First, the fluid-tank system is treated as a fixed-base system and a simple formula is obtained for the coupled fluid-structure natural frequency. Second, additional interaction effects due to the foundation flexibility on the fluid-tank system are investigated. It is concluded that the foundation flexibility may have a significant effect on the hydrodynamic behavior of the liquid storage tanks under a vertical ground shaking.

Philippacopoulos, A.J.

1985-01-01

478

LH2 fuel tank design for SSTO  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report will discuss the design of a liquid hydrogen fuel tank constructed from composite materials. The focus of this report is to recommend a design for a fuel tank which will be able to withstand all static and dynamic forces during manned flight. Areas of study for the design include material selection, material structural analysis, heat transfer, thermal expansion, and liquid hydrogen diffusion. A structural analysis FORTRAN program was developed for analyzing the buckling and yield characteristics of the tank. A thermal analysis Excel spreadsheet was created to determine a specific material thickness which will minimize heat transfer through the wall of the tank. The total mass of the tank was determined by the combination of both structural and thermal analyses. The report concludes with the recommendation of a layered material tank construction. The designed system will include exterior insulation, combination of metal and organize composite matrices and honeycomb.

Wright, Geoff

1994-01-01

479

An integrated catch-and-hold mechanism activates nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.  

PubMed

In neuromuscular acetylcholine (ACh) receptor channels (AChRs), agonist molecules bind with a low affinity (LA) to two sites that can switch to high affinity (HA) and increase the probability of channel opening. We measured (by using single-channel kinetic analysis) the rate and equilibrium constants for LA binding and channel gating for several different agonists of adult-type mouse AChRs. Almost all of the variation in the equilibrium constants for LA binding was from differences in the association rate constants. These were consistently below the limit set by diffusion and were substantially different even though the agonists had similar sizes and the same charge. This suggests that binding to resting receptors is not by diffusion alone and, hence, that each binding site can undergo two conformational changes ("catch" and "hold") that connect three different structures (apo-, LA-bound, and HA-bound). Analyses of ACh-binding protein structures suggest that this binding site, too, may adopt three discrete structures having different degrees of loop C displacement ("capping"). For the agonists we tested, the logarithms of the equilibrium constants for LA binding and LA?HA gating were correlated. Although agonist binding and channel gating have long been considered to be separate processes in the activation of ligand-gated ion channels, this correlation implies that the catch-and-hold conformational changes are energetically linked and together comprise an integrated process having a common structural basis. We propose that loop C capping mainly reflects agonist binding, with its two stages corresponding to the formation of the LA and HA complexes. The catch-and-hold reaction coordinate is discussed in terms of preopening states and thermodynamic cycles of activation. PMID:22732309

Jadey, Snehal; Auerbach, Anthony

2012-07-01

480

An integrated catch-and-hold mechanism activates nicotinic acetylcholine receptors  

PubMed Central

In neuromuscular acetylcholine (ACh) receptor channels (AChRs), agonist molecules bind with a low affinity (LA) to two sites that can switch to high affinity (HA) and increase the probability of channel opening. We measured (by using single-channel kinetic analysis) the rate and equilibrium constants for LA binding and channel gating for several different agonists of adult-type mouse AChRs. Almost all of the variation in the equilibrium constants for LA binding was from differences in the association rate constants. These were consistently below the limit set by diffusion and were substantially different even though the agonists had similar sizes and the same charge. This suggests that binding to resting receptors is not by diffusion alone and, hence, that each binding site can undergo two conformational changes (“catch” and “hold”) that connect three different structures (apo-, LA-bound, and HA-bound). Analyses of ACh-binding protein structures suggest that this binding site, too, may adopt three discrete structures having different degrees of loop C displacement (“capping”). For the agonists we tested, the logarithms of the equilibrium constants for LA binding and LA?HA gating were correlated. Although agonist binding and channel gating have long been considered to be separate processes in the activation of ligand-gated ion channels, this correlation implies that the catch-and-hold conformational changes are energetically linked and together comprise an integrated process having a common structural basis. We propose that loop C capping mainly reflects agonist binding, with its two stages corresponding to the formation of the LA and HA complexes. The catch-and-hold reaction coordinate is discussed in terms of preopening states and thermodynamic cycles of activation.

Jadey, Snehal

2012-01-01

481

Reductions in child obesity among disadvantaged school children with community involvement: the Travis County CATCH Trial.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to compare the impact of two intervention approaches on the prevalence of child overweight and obesity: (i) Coordinated Approach To Child Health BasicPlus (CATCH BP), in which schools were provided evidence-based coordinated school health program training, materials, and facilitator support visits, and (ii) CATCH BP and Community (BPC), in which BP schools received additional promotion of community partnerships with the aim of integrating community members and organizations into schools, local decision making and action, and best practices workshops. Schools (n = 97) in four central Texas districts were recruited to participate in the 4-year project. Of the low-income schools (n = 58), 15 schools were selected to receive the BPC intervention and matched with 15 schools in the BP condition. A serial cross-sectional design was used, in which 4th grade student BMI, physical activity, and diet were assessed in the 30 schools in spring 2007 and 2008. Measurements in spring 2007 included 1,107 students, with 53% female; 61% Hispanic, and 14% African American; and mean age of 9.9 years. Adjusted prevalence of overweight/obesity (>or=85th percentile) was 42.0 and 47.4% in spring 2007 for the BP and BPC students, respectively. From spring 2007 to spring 20