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1

Vandals: Think Tank Says Catch Them But Don't Punish Them Too Harshly.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A report of the British government's Central Policy Review Staff finds no reliable evidence that harsh punishment deters the vandal. It recommends that local authorities make buildings more vandal-proof and adults be encouraged to help deter and catch young offenders. (Author/SJL)

Haydon, Carolyn

1978-01-01

2

Catching Sunlight  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Everyone knows that astronomy is done in the dark. Astronomers are creatures of the night, like vampires, sleeping during the day and working all night long to catch the faint light of their elusive prey.

Friedman, Alan

3

Catch a Star!  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

ESO and the European Association for Astronomy Education are launching today the 2007 edition of 'Catch a Star!', their international astronomy competition for school students. Now in its fifth year, the competition offers students the chance to win a once-in-a-lifetime trip to ESO's flagship observatory in Chile, as well as many other prizes. Students are invited to 'become astronomers' and embark on a journey to explore the Universe. ESO PR Photo 42/06 The competition includes separate categories - 'Catch a Star Researchers' and 'Catch a Star Adventurers' - to ensure that every student, whatever their level, has the chance to enter and win exciting prizes. For the artistically minded, 'Catch a Star!' also includes an artwork competition, 'Catch a Star Artists'. "'Catch a Star!' offers a unique opportunity for students to learn more about astronomy and about the methods scientists use to discover new things about the Universe", said Douglas Pierce-Price, Education Officer at ESO. In teams, students choose an astronomical topic to study and produce an in-depth report. An important part of the project for 'Catch a Star Researchers' is to think about how ESO's telescopes or a telescope of the future can contribute to their investigations of the subject. As well as the top prize - a trip to one of ESO's observatory sites in Chile - visits to observatories in Germany, Austria and Spain, and many other prizes are also available to be won. 'Catch a Star Researchers' winners will be chosen by an international jury, and 'Catch a Star Adventurers' will be awarded further prizes by lottery. Entries for 'Catch a Star Artists' will be displayed on the web and winners chosen with the help of a public online vote. The first editions of 'Catch a Star!' have attracted several hundred entries from more than 25 countries worldwide. Previous winning entries have included "Star clusters and the structure of the Milky Way" (Budapest, Hungary), "Vega" (Acqui Terme, Italy) and "Venus transit" (Lleida, Spain). Some previous winning entries are visible on the Catch a Star! Web site. Detailed entry information can be found on ESO's website, at http://www.eso.org/catchastar/ The deadline for submitting an entry for the 2007 competition is Friday 2 March 2007, 17:00 Central European Time.

2006-11-01

4

Catch a Star 2008!  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

ESO and the European Association for Astronomy Education have just launched the 2008 edition of 'Catch a Star', their international astronomy competition for school students. Now in its sixth year, the competition offers students the chance to win a once-in-a-lifetime trip to ESO's flagship observatory in Chile, as well as many other prizes. CAS logo The competition includes separate categories - 'Catch a Star Researchers' and 'Catch a Star Adventurers' - to ensure that every student, whatever their level, has the chance to enter and win exciting prizes. In teams, students investigate an astronomical topic of their choice and write a report about it. An important part of the project for 'Catch a Star Researchers' is to think about how ESO's telescopes such as the Very Large Telescope (VLT) or future telescopes such as the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) could contribute to investigations of the topic. Students may also include practical activities such as observations or experiments. For the artistically minded, 'Catch a Star' also offers an artwork competition, 'Catch a Star Artists'. Last year, hundreds of students from across Europe and beyond took part in 'Catch a Star', submitting astronomical projects and artwork. "'Catch a Star' gets students thinking about the wonders of the Universe and the science of astronomy, with a chance of winning great prizes. It's easy to take part, whether by writing about astronomy or creating astronomically inspired artwork," said Douglas Pierce-Price, Education Officer at ESO. As well as the top prize - a trip to ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile - visits to observatories in Austria and Spain, and many other prizes, can also be won. 'Catch a Star Researchers' winners will be chosen by an international jury, and 'Catch a Star Adventurers' will be awarded further prizes by lottery. Entries for 'Catch a Star Artists' will be displayed on the web and winners chosen with the help of a public online vote. Detailed entry information and rules can be found at http://www.eso.org/catchastar/cas2008/. The deadline for submitting an entry for the 2008 competition is Friday 29 February 2008, 17:00 Central European Time.

2007-10-01

5

How flowers catch raindrops  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several species of plants have raindrop-sized flowers that catch raindrops opportunistically in order to spread their 0.3-mm seeds distances of over 1 m. In the following fluid dynamics video, we show examples of these plants and some of the high speed videography used to visualize the splash dynamics responsible for raindrop-driven seed dispersal. Experiments were conducted on shape mimics of

Guillermo Amador; Yasukuni Yamada; David Hu

2011-01-01

6

CatchBob!  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our stance with the CatchBob! project was that recent technologies (such as pervasive computing and location-based applications) provide game designers\\u000a with the means to revisit the concepts formulated by the Situationists, an international group of avant-garde artists and\\u000a thinkers formed in 1957. The Situationists developed their own theory of space, which considered the city as a playground\\u000a in which to

Nicolas Nova; Fabien Girardin

7

Catch a Wave  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Catch A Wave is an educational project for students, grades 6 - 12, that uses online real time data to guide student discovery of the causes and effects of ocean waves and tides. By the end of the project, students will be able to distinguish the difference between semi-diurnal, diurnal and mixed tides, determine the effect of weather on wave highest, determine the effects of tides and biological organisms, and determine how much energy is in a wave. There is a teachers guide, many student activities, a student gallery, reference material, and project information.

2006-01-01

8

Constant catch or constant harvest rate?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Overfishing is a major problem in the world fisheries. Constant harvest rate strategies, with catches proportional to the abundance of the target species, stimulates investments when stock sizes are large, often resulting in an overcapacity when the stocks decrease. These investment incentives are weaker under a constant catch strategy, since there are less reasons to have a catching and fish

Olle Hjerne; Sture Hansson

2001-01-01

9

Catching?up and post catching?up strategies of latecomer firms: Evidence from samsung semiconductor  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study analyzes the difference between the post catching?up innovation of latecomer countries versus the catching?up of latecomer countries and the innovation by advanced countries through the adaptation of post catching?up innovation. To review the overall technology?innovation strategy of leading companies in latecomer countries during their catching?up and post catching?up periods, the case of the semiconductor business of Samsung Electronics

Wangdong Kim; Jieun Seong

2010-01-01

10

Tank farm surveillance and waste status summary report for May 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations.

Hanlon, B.M.

1993-08-01

11

Tank farm surveillance and waste status report for July 1991  

SciTech Connect

This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. The intent of the report is to provide data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and to provide supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. 1 fig., 8 tabs.

Hanlon, B.M.

1991-09-01

12

Tank farm surveillance and waste status report for June 1991  

SciTech Connect

This report is Westinghouse Hanford Company's official inventory for radioactive stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. The intent of the report is to provide data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and to provide supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. 2 figs., 8 tabs.

Hanlon, B.M.

1991-09-01

13

Catching Performance: Implications for the Practitioner.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Influential factors on the elementary students' proficiency in the fundamental skill of catching include: ball size, ball and background color, ball velocity, adjustive movements, and trajectory angle. (CJ)

Isaacs, Larry D.

1980-01-01

14

Small Waste Tank Sampling and Retrieval System  

SciTech Connect

At the Test Reactor Area of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), four 1500-gal catch tanks were found to contain RCRAhazardous waste. A system was needed to obtain a representative sample of the liquid, as well as the hardpacked heels, and to ultimately homogenize and remove the tank contents for disposal. After surveying the available technologies, the AEA Fluidic Pulse Mixing and Retrieval System was chosen for a technology demonstration. A demonstration, conducted with nonhazardous surrogate material, proved that the system was capable of loosening the hard-packed heel, homogenizing the entire tank contents, and collecting a representative sample. Based on the success of the demonstration, a detailed evaluation was done to determine the applicability of the system to other tanks. The evaluation included the sorting of data on more than 700 tanks to select candidates for further deployment of the system. A detailed study was also done to determine if the purchase of a second system would be cost effective. The results of the evaluation indicated that a total of thirteen tanks at the INEEL are amenable to sampling and/or remediation using the AEA Fluidic Pulse Mixing and Retrieval System. Although the currently-owned system appears sufficient for the needs of one INEEL program, it is insufficient to meet the combined needs at the INEEL. The INEEL will commence operation of the system on the TRA-730 Catch Tank System in June 2002.

Magleby, Mary Theresa

2002-08-01

15

Improving Fishery Catch Statistics for Lake Victoria  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fisheries of Lake Victoria are highly dispersed and catch statistical information is insufficient for supporting management. Catch assessment surveys for the three riparian countries were found to be weak or inadequate and a strategy for improving this source of information is proposed. Considerable illegal fishing, using banned gears and small-meshed nets was prevalent and considered to be detrimental to

I. G. Cowx; M. van der Knaap; L. I. Muhoozi; A. Othina

2003-01-01

16

Effect of catch-and-release angling on growth and survival of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Catch-and-release angling is popular in many parts of the world and plays an increasingly important role in fish conservation efforts. Although survival rates associated with catch-and-release angling are well documented for many species, sublethal effects have been less studied. An experiment was conducted to directly assess the effects of catch-and-release angling on growth and survival of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum). Catch-and-release events were simulated in laboratory tanks maintained at 15-16 ??C with hooks manually placed in pre-designated locations in the mouths of the fish. There were no differences in standard length (P = 0.59) or wet weight (P = 0.81) gained between caught and uncaught fish over a 1-month angling and recovery period. Survival was 96.99 ?? 0.06% for rainbow trout caught and released, and did not vary with number (one, two or four) of captures. Thus, catch-and-release angling appears to have little effect on growth and mortality of rainbow trout hooked in the mouth. ?? 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Pope, K.L.; Wilde, G.R.; Knabe, D.W.

2007-01-01

17

TECHNICAL BASIS FOR VENTILATION REQUIREMENTS IN TANK FARMS OPERATING SPECIFICATIONS DOCUMENTS  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the technical basis for high efficiency particulate air filter (HEPA) for Hanford tank farm ventilation systems (sometimes known as heating, ventilation and air conditioning [HVAC]) to support limits defined in Process Engineering Operating Specification Documents (OSDs). This technical basis included a review of older technical basis and provides clarifications, as necessary, to technical basis limit revisions or justification. This document provides an updated technical basis for tank farm ventilation systems related to Operation Specification Documents (OSDs) for double-shell tanks (DSTs), single-shell tanks (SSTs), double-contained receiver tanks (DCRTs), catch tanks, and various other miscellaneous facilities.

BERGLIN, E J

2003-06-23

18

5 CFR 1600.23 - Catch-up contributions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...contributions. (a) A participant may make traditional catch-up contributions or Roth catch-up...amounts. (c) A participant may make traditional catch-up contributions and Roth...catch-up contributions to his or her traditional balance from pay which is exempt...

2013-01-01

19

5 CFR 1600.23 - Catch-up contributions.  

...contributions. (a) A participant may make traditional catch-up contributions or Roth catch-up...amounts. (c) A participant may make traditional catch-up contributions and Roth...catch-up contributions to his or her traditional balance from pay which is exempt...

2014-01-01

20

Shark Catches by the HawaiiShark Catches by the Hawaii--basedbased LonglineLongline FisheryFishery  

E-print Network

and inferential species-- specific catch statistics, pooled and by fishery sectors.specific catch statisticsShark Catches by the HawaiiShark Catches by the Hawaii--basedbased LonglineLongline FisheryFishery William A. WalshWilliam A. Walsh Pelagic Fisheries Research ProgramPelagic Fisheries Research Program NOAA

Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

21

Effect of survey design and catch rate estimation on total catch estimates in Chinook salmon fisheries  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Roving–roving and roving–access creel surveys are the primary techniques used to obtain information on harvest of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in Idaho sport fisheries. Once interviews are conducted using roving–roving or roving–access survey designs, mean catch rate can be estimated with the ratio-of-means (ROM) estimator, the mean-of-ratios (MOR) estimator, or the MOR estimator with exclusion of short-duration (?0.5 h) trips. Our objective was to examine the relative bias and precision of total catch estimates obtained from use of the two survey designs and three catch rate estimators for Idaho Chinook salmon fisheries. Information on angling populations was obtained by direct visual observation of portions of Chinook salmon fisheries in three Idaho river systems over an 18-d period. Based on data from the angling populations, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to evaluate the properties of the catch rate estimators and survey designs. Among the three estimators, the ROM estimator provided the most accurate and precise estimates of mean catch rate and total catch for both roving–roving and roving–access surveys. On average, the root mean square error of simulated total catch estimates was 1.42 times greater and relative bias was 160.13 times greater for roving–roving surveys than for roving–access surveys. Length-of-stay bias and nonstationary catch rates in roving–roving surveys both appeared to affect catch rate and total catch estimates. Our results suggest that use of the ROM estimator in combination with an estimate of angler effort provided the least biased and most precise estimates of total catch for both survey designs. However, roving–access surveys were more accurate than roving–roving surveys for Chinook salmon fisheries in Idaho.

McCormick, Joshua L.; Quist, Michael C.; Schill, Daniel J.

2012-01-01

22

2. CATCH BASIN, INFLOW PIPES AT CENTER, COLD FLOW LABORATORY ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. CATCH BASIN, INFLOW PIPES AT CENTER, COLD FLOW LABORATORY AT LEFT, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Catch Basin, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

23

ESTIMATING DISCARDS FROM CATCH SPECIES COMPOSITIONS  

Microsoft Academic Search

This contribution presents a procedure for estimating discards based on the log-normal abundance model using observed catch data. The method is programmed as a Dynamic Link Library (DLL) in Borland Delphi (a version of Pascal). The DLL procedures can be accessed from a variety of programs. Accessing the DLL from VBA in MS Excel is only dealt with here. The

Paul Medley

24

Catch Your Breath: Asthma's on the Rise!  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Asthma will be a significant public health problem until economic and social progress catches up with medical progress. The article explains asthma and discusses how to handle childhood asthma. Parents, politicians, and health care professionals must unite to assure adequate medical care and healthful living conditions for all children. (SM)

Lurye, Donald R.

1993-01-01

25

Student Program Catch the BC Spirit  

E-print Network

find Orientation 2014 useful and engaging. Catch the BC spirit! Sincerely, rev. joseph p. marchese to every BC student and to answer any questions you might have about computing, telephone, or television enrolling in the Honors Program in the College of Arts and Sciences and the Lynch School of Education meet

Huang, Jianyu

26

Parent Program Catch the BC Spirit  

E-print Network

ourselves as a learning community. We are all involved in the great enterprise of educating young men hope you find Orientation 2014 useful and engaging. Catch the BC spirit! Sincerely, rev. joseph p to every BC student and to answer any questions you might have about computing, telephone, or television

Huang, Jianyu

27

Liberal Arts Catch-Up Revisited  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper replicates the work of Giles and Drewes from the 1990s. They showed a catch-up effect whereby graduates of liberal arts undergraduate programs, although at an early-career disadvantage compared with graduates of applied programs, had higher incomes by mid-career. Working with the Panel 5 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (2005-2010),…

Goyder, John

2014-01-01

28

A Catching Trap for All Antiproton Seasons  

E-print Network

We describe the origin, development, and status of the Los Alamos antiproton catching trap. Originally designed for the antiproton gravity experiment, it now is clear that this device can be a source of low-energy antiprotons for a wide range of physics, both on site, at CERN, and also off site.

Michael Martin Nieto; Michael H. Holzscheiter

1994-11-10

29

Emergence of robotic intelligence by chaos for catching fish  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we tackle a fish-catching task under a visual feedback hand-eye robotic system with a catching net. Taken into consideration of emotional aspect, the fish can suddenly change its escaping trajectory or speed up when being threatened as the net attached at hand approaches to it. As the time of tracking and catching process flows, the fish can

Jun Hirao; Mamoru Minami; Yasushi Mae; Gao Jingyu

2007-01-01

30

Dual Tank Fuel System  

DOEpatents

A dual tank fuel system has primary and secondary fuel tanks, with the primary tank including a filler pipe to receive fuel and a discharge line to deliver fuel to an engine, and with a balance pipe interconnecting the primary tank and the secondary tank. The balance pipe opens close to the bottom of each tank to direct fuel from the primary tank to the secondary tank as the primary tank is filled, and to direct fuel from the secondary tank to the primary tank as fuel is discharged from the primary tank through the discharge line. A vent line has branches connected to each tank to direct fuel vapor from the tanks as the tanks are filled, and to admit air to the tanks as fuel is delivered to the engine.

Wagner, Richard William (Albion, NY); Burkhard, James Frank (Churchville, NY); Dauer, Kenneth John (Avon, NY)

1999-11-16

31

Think Tank.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the options for upgrading, replacing, and removal or closure of underground storage tanks (UST). Reveals the diverse regulatory control involving USTs, the Environmental Protection Agency's interest in pursuing violators, and stresses the need for administrators to be knowledgeable about state and local agency definitions of regulated…

Governick, Heather; Wellington, Thom

1998-01-01

32

Tank farm surveillance and waste status summary report for October 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Order 5820.2A, Chapter 1, Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, US Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

Hanlon, B.M.

1993-01-01

33

Tank farm surveillance and waste status summary report for December 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special 9 surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of U.S. Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Order 5820.2A, Chapter I, Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, U.S. Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

Hanlon, B.M.

1994-05-01

34

Tank farm surveillance and waste status summary report for November 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Order 5820.2A, Chapter I. Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, US Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

Hanlon, B.M.

1994-02-01

35

Tank farm surveillance and waste status summary report for November 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Order 5820.2A, Chapter 1, Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, US Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

Hanlon, B.M.

1993-02-01

36

Tank farm surveillance and waste status summary report for January 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Order 5820.2A, Chapter I, Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, US Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

Hanlon, B.M.

1993-03-01

37

Tank farm surveillance and waste status summary report for December 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Order 5820.2A, Chapter I, Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, US Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

Hanlon, B.M.

1993-02-01

38

Tank Farm surveillance and waste status summary report for February 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is Intended to meet the requirement of US Department of Energy Richland Operations Office Order 5820.2A, Chapter 1, Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, US Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

Hanlon, B.M.

1994-07-01

39

Tank Farm surveillance and waste status summary report for September 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Order 5820.2A, Chapter 1, Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, US Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

Hanlon, B.M.

1994-01-01

40

Feed tank transfer requirements  

SciTech Connect

This document presents a definition of tank turnover. Also, DOE and PC responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements are presented for two cases (i.e., tank modifications occurring before tank turnover and tank modification occurring after tank turnover). Finally, records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor are presented.

Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

1998-09-16

41

Illinois PER Interactive Examples: Catch the Ball  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is an interactive homework problem for introductory physics students relating to velocity and acceleration. A ball is thrown straight upward and a person 70m away runs to catch it before it hits the ground. Given initial speed of the thrown ball, students are required to determine how fast the runner must go. This problem is accompanied by a Socratic-dialog "help" sequence designed to encourage critical thinking as users do a guided conceptual analysis before attempting the mathematics. It is part of a larger collection of interactive physics problems.

Gladding, Gary

2008-09-10

42

49 CFR 172.331 - Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks.  

...packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. 172.331 Section 172.331 Transportation...packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a)...

2014-10-01

43

49 CFR 172.331 - Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. 172.331 Section 172.331 Transportation...packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a)...

2010-10-01

44

Underground storage tank management  

SciTech Connect

In this third edition, sixteen new and revised chapters provide tank owners and operators with guidance in making engineering and management decisions: Regulatory Highlights, Inventory Control, Leak Prediction Through Inventory Analysis, Underground Tank Testing, Tank Design, Secondary Containment, Monitoring and Leak Protection, Overfill and Transfer Protection, Maintenance and Retrofit, Tank Removal, Remedial Action, Tank Installation, Tank Management Plan, Storing Hazardous Substances, Minimizing Your Liabilities, and Financial Responsibility.

Not Available

1988-01-01

45

distribution of minke whale catch off west Greenland  

Microsoft Academic Search

Here we present an analysis of the past twenty years (1987 - 2006) of minke whale catch 21 reports for spatial and temporal distribution of the catches, size, sex ratio and measurements 22 of the caught animals and the foetuses. The minke whales were caught in the area between 23 Nanortalik and Uummannaq, with most whales caught in the central

MALENE SIMON; MICHAEL KINGSLEY; LARS WITTING

46

Angler Catch Rates of Billfishes in the Pacific Ocean  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1%9, 1970, and 1971 marine game fish anglers participating in the Pacific phase of the National Marine Fisheries Service cooperative marine game fish tagging program were asked to complete a postcard form which requested information of the number of days of hillfwhing the angler engaged in and the catches made. From the 17,876 angler days reported, the catch consisted

JAMES L. SQUIRE

47

Generalized additive model and regression tree analyses of blue shark (Prionace glauca) catch rates by the  

E-print Network

Generalized additive model and regression tree analyses of blue shark (Prionace glauca) catch rates) and regression tree analyses were conducted with blue shark, Prionace glauca, catch rates (catch per set

Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

48

Tank Farm surveillance and waste status summary report for March 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are Contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding flank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office order 5820.2A, Chapter I, Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, US Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

Hanlon, B.M.

1993-05-01

49

Tank 241-T-110 tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

This Tank Characterization Plan (ICP) identifies the information needed to address issues related to short-term and long-term safe storage and long-term management of single shell tank 241-T-1,10 (T- 110). It should be understood that needs and issues surrounding tank T-110 are evolving as new information becomes available. As a result, this TCP addresses only issues that have been identified to date. It is expected that changes may be necessary as additional issues or needs arise which impact the management of tank T-110. As necessary, this TCP will be revised to reflect changes. This plan reflects the best information available as of August 1996. Tank T-110 entered into service in the first quarter of 1945. The tank began receiving second- cycle decontamination waste in the first quarter of 1945 (Agnew et al. 1995). The tank began to cascade overflow to Tank 241-T-111 in October 1945. In the second quarter of 1952, the tank began receiving 224 waste in addition to the second-cycle waste. The tank contained second-cycle and 224 waste until the first quarter of 1976. During the third quarter of 1974, the tank received waste water. The tank was removed from service in 1976. A level adjustment was made in April of 1982. The tank was primarily stabilized in 1978 and partially isolated in December 1982. The tank is classified as a sound, non-stabilized tank (Brevick et al. 1995). Tank T-110 currently contains a total volume of 14351789 kL. (379 kgal ) of waste, which is equivalent to 338.5 cm (133 in) of waste as measured from the baseline of the tank (Hanlon 1996). Tank T-110 is on the Flammable Gas Watch List. Near-term sampling and analysis activities are focused on verifying or changing the Watch List tank status, and identifying any new safety issues. If new safety issues are identified, analysis activities consistent with the identified issue will be performed. In addition to resolving safety issues, it is intended that all tank waste will be subject to pretreatment and retrieval to prepare it for final storage or disposal. Presently, these long-range plans are not yet fully identified and, therefore, are not included in this document.

Mccain, D.J.

1996-09-19

50

AX Tank Farm tank removal study  

SciTech Connect

This report considers the feasibility of exposing, demolishing, and removing underground storage tanks from the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. For the study, it was assumed that the tanks would each contain 360 ft{sup 3} of residual waste (corresponding to the one percent residual Inventory target cited in the Tri-Party Agreement) at the time of demolition. The 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a ''strawman'' in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tank farms. The report is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

SKELLY, W.A.

1998-10-14

51

Tank 241-BY-111 tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

The sampling and analytical needs associated with the 51 Hanford Site underground storage tanks classified on one or more of the four Watch Lists (ferrocyanide, organic, flammable gas, and high heat), and the safety screening of all 177 tanks have been identified through the Data Quality Objective (DQO) process. DQO`s identify information needed by a program group in the Tank Waste Remediation System concerned with safety issues, regulatory requirements, or the transporting and processing of tank waste. This Tank Characterization Plan will identify characterization objectives for Tank BY-111 pertaining to sample collection, sample preparation and analysis, and laboratory analytical evaluation and reporting requirements. In addition, an estimate of the current contents and status of the tank is given.

Homi, C.S.

1994-11-03

52

49 CFR 179.401 - Individual specification requirements applicable to inner tanks for cryogenic liquid tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...applicable to inner tanks for cryogenic liquid tank car tanks. 179.401 Section 179.401 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

2013-10-01

53

49 CFR 179.401 - Individual specification requirements applicable to inner tanks for cryogenic liquid tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...applicable to inner tanks for cryogenic liquid tank car tanks. 179.401 Section 179.401 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

2011-10-01

54

49 CFR 179.401 - Individual specification requirements applicable to inner tanks for cryogenic liquid tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...applicable to inner tanks for cryogenic liquid tank car tanks. 179.401 Section 179.401 Transportation...MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

2010-10-01

55

49 CFR 179.401 - Individual specification requirements applicable to inner tanks for cryogenic liquid tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...applicable to inner tanks for cryogenic liquid tank car tanks. 179.401 Section 179.401 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

2012-10-01

56

50 CFR 648.140 - Catch quotas and other restrictions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...STATES Management Measures for the Black Sea Bass Fishery § 648.140 Catch...restrictions. (a) Review . The Black Sea Bass Monitoring Committee...pots and traps on the mortality of black sea bass; and any other relevant...

2010-10-01

57

50 CFR 648.140 - Catch quotas and other restrictions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...STATES Management Measures for the Black Sea Bass Fishery § 648.140 Catch...2011. (a) Review . The Black Sea Bass Monitoring Committee...pots and traps on the mortality of black sea bass; and any other relevant...

2011-10-01

58

Tank characterization report: Tank 241-C-109  

SciTech Connect

Single-shell tank 241-C-109 is a Hanford Site Ferrocyanide Watch List tank that was most recently sampled in September 1992. Analyses of materials obtained from tank 241-C-109 were conducted to support the resolution of the ferrocyanide unreviewed safety question (USQ) and to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and consent Order (Tri- Party Agreement) Milestone M-10-00. This report describes this analysis.

Simpson, B.C.; Borshiem, G.L.; Jensen, L.

1993-09-01

59

Operational Design and Quality Control in the CATCH Multicenter Trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background.The Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health (CATCH) was the first multicenter school-based research study to employ the fundamentals of clinical trials including the standardized protocol and Manuals of Operation, a steering committee for study governance, a distributed data system, an extensive quality control system, and a Data and Safety Monitoring Board.Method.CATCH tested the effectiveness of changes in school

Elaine J. Stone; Stavroula K. Osganian; Sonja M. McKinlay; Margaret C. Wu; Larry S. Webber; Russell V. Luepker; Cheryl L. Perry; Guy S. Parcel; John P. Elder

1996-01-01

60

Assemblies of Conformal Tanks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Assemblies of tanks having shapes that conform to each other and/or conform to other proximate objects have been investigated for use in storing fuels and oxidizers in small available spaces in upper stages of spacecraft. Such assemblies might also prove useful in aircraft, automobiles, boats, and other terrestrial vehicles in which space available for tanks is limited. The basic concept of using conformal tanks to maximize the utilization of limited space is not new in itself: for example, conformal tanks are used in some automobiles to store windshield -washer liquid and coolant that overflows from radiators. The novelty of the present development lies in the concept of an assembly of smaller conformal tanks, as distinguished from a single larger conformal tank. In an assembly of smaller tanks, it would be possible to store different liquids in different tanks. Even if the same liquid were stored in all the tanks, the assembly would offer an advantage by reducing the mechanical disturbance caused by sloshing of fuel in a single larger tank: indeed, the requirement to reduce sloshing is critical in some applications. The figure shows a prototype assembly of conformal tanks. Each tank was fabricated by (1) copper plating a wax tank mandrel to form a liner and (2) wrapping and curing layers of graphite/epoxy composite to form a shell supporting the liner. In this case, the conformal tank surfaces are flat ones where they come in contact with the adjacent tanks. A band of fibers around the outside binds the tanks together tightly in the assembly, which has a quasi-toroidal shape. For proper functioning, it would be necessary to maintain equal pressure in all the tanks.

DeLay, Tom

2009-01-01

61

Engineering study of 50 miscellaneous inactive underground radioactive waste tanks located at the Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This engineering study addresses 50 inactive underground radioactive waste tanks. The tanks were formerly used for the following functions associated with plutonium and uranium separations and waste management activities in the 200 East and 200 West Areas of the Hanford Site: settling solids prior to disposal of supernatant in cribs and a reverse well; neutralizing acidic process wastes prior to crib disposal; receipt and processing of single-shell tank (SST) waste for uranium recovery operations; catch tanks to collect water that intruded into diversion boxes and transfer pipeline encasements and any leakage that occurred during waste transfer operations; and waste handling and process experimentation. Most of these tanks have not been in use for many years. Several projects have, been planned and implemented since the 1970`s and through 1985 to remove waste and interim isolate or interim stabilize many of the tanks. Some tanks have been filled with grout within the past several years. Responsibility for final closure and/or remediation of these tanks is currently assigned to several programs including Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS), Environmental Restoration and Remedial Action (ERRA), and Decommissioning and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure (D&RCP). Some are under facility landlord responsibility for maintenance and surveillance (i.e. Plutonium Uranium Extraction [PUREX]). However, most of the tanks are not currently included in any active monitoring or surveillance program.

Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

1994-03-02

62

Mitigating by-catch of diamondback terrapins in crab pots  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Chronic by-catch of diamondback terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin) in blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) pots is a concern for terrapin conservation along the United States Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts. Despite the availability of by-catch reduction devices (BRDs) for crab pots, adoption of BRDs has not been mandated and by-catch of terrapins continues. We conducted experimental fishing studies in North Carolina's year-round blue crab fishery from 2000 to 2004 to evaluate the ability of various BRDs to reduce terrapin by-catch without a concomitant reduction in the catch of blue crabs. In 4,822 crab pot days fished, we recorded only 21 terrapin captures. Estimated capture rates were 0.003 terrapins/pot per day in hard crab experimental fishing and 0.008 terrapins/pot per day in peeler experimental fishing. All terrapin captures occurred from April to mid-May within 321.4 m of the shoreline. Longer soak times produced more dead terrapins, with 4 live and 4 dead during hard crab experimental fishing and 11 live and 2 dead during peeler experimental fishing. The 4.0-cm BRDs in fall and 4.5-cm and 5.0-cm BRDs in spring reduced the catch of legal-sized male hard crabs by 26.6%, 21.2%, and 5.7%, respectively. Only the 5.0-cm BRDs did not significantly affect the catch of legal-sized hard male crabs. However, BRDs had no measurable effect on catch of target crabs in the peeler crab fishery. Our results identify 3 complementary and economically feasible tools for blue crab fishery managers to exclude terrapins from commercially fished crab pots in North Carolina: 1) gear modifications (e.g., BRDs); 2) distance-to-shore restrictions; and 3) time-of-year regulations. These measures combined could provide a reduction in terrapin by-catch of up to 95% without a significant reduction in target crab catch.

Hart, Kristen M.; Crowder, Larry B.

2011-01-01

63

Ecological indicators display reduced variation in North American catch share fisheries  

PubMed Central

A growing push to implement catch share fishery programs is based partly on the recognition that they may provide stronger incentives for ecological stewardship than conventional fisheries management. Using data on population status, quota compliance, discard rates, use of habitat-damaging gear, and landings for 15 catch share programs in North America, I tested the hypothesis that catch share systems lead to improved ecological stewardship and status of exploited populations. Impacts of catch share programs were measured through comparisons of fisheries with catch shares to fisheries without catch shares or by comparing fisheries before and after catch shares were implemented. The average levels of most indicators were unaffected by catch share implementation: only discard rate, which declined significantly in catch share fisheries, showed a significant response. However, catch share fisheries were distinguished by markedly reduced interannual variability in all indicators, being statistically significant for exploitation rate, landings, discard rate, and the ratio of catch to catch quotas. These impacts of catch shares were common between nations and ocean basins and were independent of the number of years that catch share programs had been in place. These findings suggest that for the indicators examined, the primary effect of catch shares was greater consistency over time. This enhanced consistency could be beneficial to fishery systems and might also be an indication of more effective management. PMID:20080747

Essington, Timothy E.

2009-01-01

64

Tank 241-B-112 tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) has advised the US Department of Energy (DOE) to concentrate the near-term sampling and analysis activities on identification and resolution of safety issues. The data quality objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used to identify sampling and analytical needs for the resolution of safety issues. As a result, a revision in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement or TPA) milestone M-44-00 has been made, which states that ``A Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) will also be developed for each double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process... Development of TCPs by the DQO process is intended to allow users (e.g., Hanford Facility user groups, regulators) to ensure their needs will be met and that resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information.`` This document satisfies that requirement for tank 241-B-112 (B-112). Tank B-112 is currently a non-Watch List tank; therefore, the only applicable DQO as of January 1995 is the Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objective, which is described below. Tank B-112 is expected to have three primary layers. A bottom layer of sludge consisting of second-cycle waste, followed by a layer of BY saltcake and a top layer of supernate.

Schreiber, R.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-02-06

65

Liquid rocket metal tanks and tank components  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Significant guidelines are presented for the successful design of aerospace tanks and tank components, such as expulsion devices, standpipes, and baffles. The state of the art is reviewed, and the design criteria are presented along with recommended practices. Design monographs are listed.

Wagner, W. A.; Keller, R. B. (editor)

1974-01-01

66

Feed tank transfer requirements  

SciTech Connect

This document presents a definition of tank turnover; DOE responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements; records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor for use during Phase 1B.

Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

1998-09-16

67

Leaking underground storage tanks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The problems associated with leaking underground storage tanks are discussed. An estimated 10-30% of the 3.5 million or more underground tanks now used to store petroleum products and other liquids may be leaking their contents to the surrounding environment. The EPA is initiating a national field survey of tanks used for the storing of engine fuels. The first phase of

Richard Dowd

1984-01-01

68

Signature of ocean warming in global fisheries catch.  

PubMed

Marine fishes and invertebrates respond to ocean warming through distribution shifts, generally to higher latitudes and deeper waters. Consequently, fisheries should be affected by 'tropicalization' of catch (increasing dominance of warm-water species). However, a signature of such climate-change effects on global fisheries catch has so far not been detected. Here we report such an index, the mean temperature of the catch (MTC), that is calculated from the average inferred temperature preference of exploited species weighted by their annual catch. Our results show that, after accounting for the effects of fishing and large-scale oceanographic variability, global MTC increased at a rate of 0.19 degrees Celsius per decade between 1970 and 2006, and non-tropical MTC increased at a rate of 0.23 degrees Celsius per decade. In tropical areas, MTC increased initially because of the reduction in the proportion of subtropical species catches, but subsequently stabilized as scope for further tropicalization of communities became limited. Changes in MTC in 52 large marine ecosystems, covering the majority of the world's coastal and shelf areas, are significantly and positively related to regional changes in sea surface temperature. This study shows that ocean warming has already affected global fisheries in the past four decades, highlighting the immediate need to develop adaptation plans to minimize the effect of such warming on the economy and food security of coastal communities, particularly in tropical regions. PMID:23676754

Cheung, William W L; Watson, Reg; Pauly, Daniel

2013-05-16

69

Tank 241-B-103 tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) has advised the US Department of Energy (DOE) to concentrate the near-term sampling and analysis activities on identification and resolution of safety issues. The data quality objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used to identify sampling and analytical needs for the resolution of safety issues. As a result, a revision in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement or TPA) milestone M-44-00 has been made, which states that ``A Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) will also be developed for each double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process... Development of TCPs by the DQO process is intended to allow users (e.g., Hanford Facility user groups, regulators) to ensure their needs will be met and that resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information.`` This document satisfies that requirement for Tank 241-B-103 (B-103) sampling activities. Tank B-103 was placed on the Organic Watch List in January 1991 due to review of TRAC data that predicts a TOC content of 3.3 dry weight percent. The tank was classified as an assumed leaker of approximately 30,280 liters (8,000 gallons) in 1978 and declared inactive. Tank B-103 is passively ventilated with interim stabilization and intrusion prevention measures completed in 1985.

Carpenter, B.C. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-01-23

70

Revise storage tank inspections  

SciTech Connect

To avoid catastrophic failures and other product-loss incidents, operators must periodically inspect atmospheric storage tanks. Realizing the serious impact of these evaluations, API published an inspection document, API-653, to help operators fully scrutinize a storage tank`s current condition and future service life. Especially for older tanks, problems can occur when vital design information, particularly weld-joint efficiency data is missing. The case history shows how to inspect and evaluate an older storage tank when corrosion is found on the lower shell concourse and critical design information is lost. This example is a step-by-step evaluation of the corrosion`s impact and extent. More important, the example identifies some pitfalls when using default assumptions for corrosion. Because storage capacity is critical, operating facilities must use all resources to their full capabilities. Operating tanks with compromised fill heights can incur losses. Use these guidelines to confirm that the tank-shell thickness satisfies API-653 requirements.

Carucci, V.A. [Carmagen Engineering, Inc., Madison, NJ (United States); Ay, R.L. [COADE, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-10-01

71

Rupture of multiple catch-slip bonds: Two-state two-pathway catch-slip bonds.  

PubMed

We performed Monte Carlo simulation of the detachment of a polymorphonuclear (PMN) leukocyte immersed in a Newtonian fluid and adhered to a substrate by multiple catch-slip bonds. We found that at certain loading rates the interplay of multiple catch-slip bonds leads to a bimodal distribution of the bond rupture force. We also found that the low force peak in these bond rupture force distributions switches to a high force peak with a gradual increase in the loading rate. These trends in the bond rupture force distributions are characteristics of two-state systems. Consequently, though individual catch-slip bonds follow one-state two-pathway energy landscape, their interplay mimics a two-state two-pathway energy landscape. PMID:24272665

Gupta, V K

2013-11-01

72

49 CFR 174.63 - Portable tanks, IM portable tanks, IBCs, Large Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car...  

...Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car tanks. 174.63 Section 174.63 ...Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) A carrier may not transport...Packaging, cargo tank, or multi-unit tank car tank) containing a hazardous...

2014-10-01

73

49 CFR 174.63 - Portable tanks, IM portable tanks, IBCs, Large Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car tanks. 174.63 Section 174.63 ...Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) A carrier may not transport...Packaging, cargo tank, or multi-unit tank car tank) containing a hazardous...

2010-10-01

74

49 CFR 174.63 - Portable tanks, IM portable tanks, IBCs, Large Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car tanks. 174.63 Section 174.63 ...Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) A carrier may not transport...Packaging, cargo tank, or multi-unit tank car tank) containing a hazardous...

2012-10-01

75

49 CFR 174.63 - Portable tanks, IM portable tanks, IBCs, Large Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car tanks. 174.63 Section 174.63 ...Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) A carrier may not transport...Packaging, cargo tank, or multi-unit tank car tank) containing a hazardous...

2011-10-01

76

49 CFR 174.63 - Portable tanks, IM portable tanks, IBCs, Large Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car tanks. 174.63 Section 174.63 ...Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) A carrier may not transport...Packaging, cargo tank, or multi-unit tank car tank) containing a hazardous...

2013-10-01

77

Comparison of logbook reports of incidental blue shark catch rates by Hawaii-based longline vessels to shery observer data  

E-print Network

) of blue shark, Prionace glauca, catch rates (catch per set) was ®tted to data gathered by National Marine #12;rates (catch per longline set) for blue shark, Prionace glauca, in the Hawaii-based longline

Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

78

WETLANDS AND FISH: CATCH THE LINK For additional copies of this document, contact  

E-print Network

#12;WETLANDS AND FISH: CATCH THE LINK For additional copies of this document, contact: National Cover Page: Photographs: Kathryn Conant Striped bass graphic: Duane Raver I #12;WETLANDS AND FISH: CATCH THE LINK Table of Contents Fish Need Wetlands

79

Comparing catch orientation among Minnesota walleye, northern pike, and bass anglers  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We compared the catch orientations of Minnesota walleye (Sander vitreus), northern pike (Esox lucius), largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), and smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) anglers. Results were derived from 2009, 2010, and 2012 surveys of anglers targeting these different species. Consistent with previous research, we identified four dimensions of anglers’ catch orientation: (a) catching something, (b) catching big fish, (c) catching many fish, and (d) keeping fish. Walleye anglers were the most motivated to keep fish, while northern pike anglers were more oriented toward catching big fish. Largemouth bass anglers, and to a lesser extent smallmouth bass anglers, were also oriented toward catching big fish. Bass anglers reported the lowest interest in keeping fish. An orientation to keep fish was negatively related to more restrictive management actions, regardless of species. A stronger orientation to catch big fish was associated with support for increased harvest restrictions only for northern pike and smallmouth bass.

Schroeder, Susan A.; Fulton, David C.

2013-01-01

80

50 CFR 648.71 - Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Targets (ACT).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Targets (ACT...STATES Management Measures for the Atlantic Surf Clam and Ocean Quahog Fisheries § 648.71 Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Targets...

2013-10-01

81

50 CFR 648.71 - Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Targets (ACT).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Targets (ACT...STATES Management Measures for the Atlantic Surf Clam and Ocean Quahog Fisheries § 648.71 Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Targets...

2012-10-01

82

Moth Sounds and the Insect-Catching Behavior of Bats  

Microsoft Academic Search

Captive bats trained to catch mealworms tossed in midair turned away from most of these targets when simultaneously confronted with a recorded train of the ultrasonic pulses generated by an Arctiid moth. When similarly exposed to the recorded echolocation pulses of another bat, presented at the same intensity as the \\

Dorothy C. Dunning; Kenneth D. Roeder

1965-01-01

83

Peripheral vision and simple catching: The screen paradigm revisted  

Microsoft Academic Search

The importance of effector visual feedback has previously been indicated using an opaque screen to prevent sight of the catching hand for the final 150–200 ms of a flight path of 850 ms in total. Attention was drawn to the finding that the ability to position the arm correctly in the line of flight of the ball deteriorated as a

Keith Davids; Rolf Stratford

1989-01-01

84

CATCH: Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health. [Multimedia.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health has launched an initiative called the Cardiovascular Health Promotion Project to teach heart-healthy habits to children. One of the programs developed by this initiative, CATCH, the Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health, is the largest…

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD.

85

Catch and release: how do kinetochores hook the right  

E-print Network

Catch and release: how do kinetochores hook the right microtubules during mitosis? Krishna K version of this angler's trick, operating at kinetochores, ensures accu- racy during mitosis: the mitotic toward emerging models for other force- activated systems. Although attention in the mitosis field has

Asbury, Chip

86

13. CANVAS NET USED TO CATCH TOOLS OR SUPPORT PERSONNEL ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

13. CANVAS NET USED TO CATCH TOOLS OR SUPPORT PERSONNEL FALLING FROM UPPER LEVELS OF MOBILE SERVICE STRUCTURE. BELOW NET IS A NINETY FOOT DROP TO THE PAVEMENT; VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Cape Canaveral Air Station, Launch Complex 17, Facility 28416, East end of Lighthouse Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

87

Are catch-up reefs an artefact of coring?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Drill cores through modern coral reefs commonly show a time lag in reef initiation followed by a phase of rapid accretion to sea level from submerged foundations - the so-called 'catch-up response'. But because of the difficulty of drilling in these environments, core distribution is usually restricted to accessible areas that may not fully represent reef history, especially if the

PAUL B LANCHON; DAVID B LAKEWAY

2003-01-01

88

Scholarships and School Improvement: Annual Report of Catching the Dream.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This issue of "The Native Scholar" is comprised entirely of the annual report of Catching the Dream (CTD), an organization that awards scholarships to Native American students and grants for improving Native American schools. CTD scholarship programs are described, as are scholarships in general and how to find them. Fourteen scholarship websites…

Chavers, Dean, Ed.

2001-01-01

89

Maximizing the Utilization of Fish Catch for Human Consumption  

Microsoft Academic Search

Small-scale fish trawlers operating in the Southeast Asian region normally catch substantial amounts of fishes that are sorted onboard the vessels into high economic-value species and other species. The latter comprise a significant portion of small demersal fishes also known as \\

Goh Kian Heng; Tan-Low Lai Kim

90

Optical Trajectories and the Informational Basis of Fly Ball Catching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

D. M. Shaffer and M. K. McBeath (see record 2002-02027-006) plotted the optical trajectories of uncatchable fly balls and concluded that linear optical trajectory is the informational basis of the actions taken to catch these balls. P. McLeod, N. Reed, and Z. Dienes (see record 2002-11140-016) replotted these trajectories in terms of changes in…

Marken, Richard S.

2005-01-01

91

ABC Allowable Biological Catch AFSC Alaska Fisheries Science Center  

E-print Network

Protected Area MRFSS ­ Marine Recreational Fisheries Statistics Survey MSFCMA ­ Magnuson-Stevens Fishery69 Acronyms ABC ­ Allowable Biological Catch AFSC ­ Alaska Fisheries Science Center AI ­ Aleutian Islands ASMFC ­ Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission BSAI ­ Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands CIE

92

Is complete catch-up possible for stunted malnourished children?  

PubMed

Although malnourished children are stunted, their bone maturity is usually retarded to a comparable degree. This is seen in impoverished societies as well as in diseases such as coeliac disease, inflammatory bowel disease and hormonal deficiency. When these children are followed to adulthood they normally have some degree of spontaneous catch-up. With a change in environment, through adoption, emigration or with treatment of the disease there is usually definite catch-up growth, although it is often not to the NCHS standards. If puberty is delayed and/or growth continues into the early or mid twenties, then an acceptable final adult height is achieved. However, there may be a limitation imposed on an individual's maximum height by genetic imprinting in very early development. This may be the case where full catch-up appears to have taken place but is followed by an advanced puberty and early cessation of growth (Proos, Hofvander & Tuvemo, 1991a). The data from US slaves and cases of hormonal replacement, where treatment was initiated after age 18, each show that, if the circumstances of children in the Third World change, almost complete reversal of stunting is possible. The children can reach their own height potentials. Total reversal to affluent societal norms would probably require cross-generational catch-up. The most obvious reason why catch-up is not seen regularly is that an appropriate diet is not available over a sufficient period of time. We do not know the optimum ingredients for such a diet. Sulphur has been neglected as an essential nutrient; its economy should be examined in relation to skeletal growth in stunted populations. PMID:8005092

Golden, M H

1994-02-01

93

Different Strategies for Using Motion-in-Depth Information in Catching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Previous studies on ball catching have had the limitation that the catcher was restricted to lateral hand movements. The authors investigated catching behavior in the more natural situation in which hand movements were unconstrained. Movements of the hand were tracked as participants tried to "catch" an approaching ball simulated with changing…

Gray, Rob; Sieffert, Randy

2005-01-01

94

Efficacy of a Light Attractant for Increasing Trap Net Catches of White Crappies  

Microsoft Academic Search

We evaluated the efficacy of trap nets fitted with a battery-operated, submersible light in the net mouth in increasing the catch rates of white crappies Pomoxis annularis by comparing the catch rate and size structure of white crappies collected by these nets with those of fish collected by standard (i.e., unlighted) trap nets in six Texas reservoirs. The catch rates

Greg R. Binion; Daniel J. Daugherty; J. Warren Schlechte; Richard A. Ott Jr; Timothy J. Bister

2011-01-01

95

Reconstruction of coral reef fisheries catches in American Samoa, 1950–2002  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fisheries catches from Pacific Island coral reefs are rarely recorded in official statistics. Reconstruction of catch estimates with limited hard data requires interpolation and assumptions, justifiable only by the unsatisfactory alternative of continued substitution of zero catches, a common policy interpretation for ‘no data’. Uncertainties associated with reconstructions are high, requiring conservative estimation. American Samoan domestic fisheries consist of an

Dirk Zeller; Shawn Booth; Peter Craig; Daniel Pauly

2006-01-01

96

Heated Aluminum Tanks Resist Corrosion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Simple expedient of heating foam-insulated aluminum alloy tanks prevents corrosion by salt-laden moisture. Relatively-small temperature difference between such tank and surrounding air will ensure life of tank is extended by many years.

Johnson, L. E.

1983-01-01

97

Oxygen tank assemblies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Structural design considerations for O2 tank shells and suspension systems of ground based storage and mobile tank systems are outlined. Safety factors, chemical compatibility, liquid slosh strength, and cryogenic temperature properties are summarized. Finally, costs, quality control measures, and long life characteristics are examined.

1975-01-01

98

The Virtual Fish Tank  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a simulated fish tank that requires Shockwave. You need to register to log in. Once you log in, you can create up to four unique fish. Then you can launch your fish into a Personal Tank on your own computer and see how they behave.

Science NetLinks (Nearlife, Inc.;)

2008-04-29

99

Underground Tank Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The harm to human health and our environment caused by leaking underground storage tanks can be devastating. Schools can meet new federal waste management standards by instituting daily inventory monitoring, selecting a reliable volumetric testing company, locating and repairing leaks promptly, and removing and installing tanks appropriately. (MLH)

Bednar, Barbara A.

1990-01-01

100

Leaking underground storage tanks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Remedial options for leaking underground storage tanks were investigated in a joint project of the Electric Power Research Institute and the Underground Storage Tank Committee of the Utility Solid Waste Activities Group. Both existing and emerging technologies were examined. Thirteen remedial techniques were identified and initially characterized as in situ or non-in situ. In situ methods include volatilization, biodegradation, leaching

M. E. McLearn; M. J. Miller; P. T. Kostecki; E. J. Calabrese; L. M. Presio; W. Suyama; W. A. Kucharski

1988-01-01

101

Catching Comet's Particles in the Earth's Atmosphere by Using Balloons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The project is intended to catch cometary particles in the atmosphere by using balloons. The investigation is based upon knowledge that the Earth crosses the comet’s tails during the year. One can catch these particles at different altitudes in the atmosphere. So, we will be able to gradually advance in the ability to launch balloons from low to high altitudes and try to catch particles from different comet tails. The maximum altitude that we have to reach is 40 km. Both methods - distance observation and cometary samples from mission Stardust testify to the presence of organic components in comet’s particles. It would be useful to know more details about this organic matter for astrobiology; besides, the factor poses danger to the Earth. Moreover, it is important to prove that it is possible to get fundamental scientific results at low cost. In the last 5 years launching balloons has become popular and this movement looks like hackers’ one - as most of them occur without launch permission to airspace. The popularity of ballooning is connected with low cost of balloon, GPS unit, video recording unit. If you use iPhone, you have a light solution with GPS, video, picture and control function in one unit. The price of balloon itself begins from $50; it depends on maximum altitude, payload weight and material. Many university teams realized balloon launching and reached even stratosphere at an altitude of 33 km. But most of them take only video and picture. Meanwhile, it is possible to carry out scientific experiments by ballooning, for example to collect comet particles. There is rich experience at the moment of the use of mineral, chemical and isotopic analysis techniques and data of the comet’s dust after successful landing of StarDust capsule with samples in 2006. Besides, we may use absolutely perfect material to catch particles in the atmosphere, which was used by cosmic missions such as Stardust and Japanese Hayabusa. As to balloon launches, we could use Indian Space Research Organization experience that launched a balloon to stratosphere in 2009 and successfully caught particles with organics at an altitude of 42 km. The main aim of the project is to catch cometary particles by using balloons and to make this method steady and reliable. Why are the comet particles interesting? The nature of a comet is full of puzzles; many researchers think that comets may give keys to the origin of the Solar System and origin of life on the Earth. 2014 and 2015 are special years for comet science: mission Rozetta will reach the vicinity of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko - 10 years after leaving the Earth. Using astronomic data, one may choose date for ballooning, specify the altitude of comet particles by photometry and laser measurement of particle outburst. After height measurement one may launch a balloon. For example, for Draconids particles (Parent comet: 21PGiacobini-Zinner) the expected time of outburst maximum - hence that for catching is 22:42 UT, October 6, 2014. The best conditions for catching will be in Greenland and extreme north-eastern part of North America. Draconids are very convenient for the initial stage of the project - the altitude of observed Draconids outburst is 10 km. One may catch them above 10 km, e.g. 10500 m. We consider ballooning is quite a good method to get experimental data as an additional technique in comparison with big space missions. Moreover, it might be a part of cosmic mission to other planets such as Mars and Venus. The approach of the project is to make targeting catch of comet particles. The method consists of choosing the right place and time for ballooning.

Potashko, Oleksandr; Viso, Michel

102

49 CFR 179.500 - Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks. 179.500 Section 179.500 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

2011-10-01

103

49 CFR 179.500 - Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks. 179.500 Section 179.500 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

2012-10-01

104

49 CFR 179.400 - General specification applicable to cryogenic liquid tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...specification applicable to cryogenic liquid tank car tanks. 179.400 Section 179.400 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

2013-10-01

105

49 CFR 179.500 - Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks. 179.500 Section 179.500 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

2013-10-01

106

49 CFR 179.400 - General specification applicable to cryogenic liquid tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...specification applicable to cryogenic liquid tank car tanks. 179.400 Section 179.400 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

2011-10-01

107

27 CFR 24.229 - Tank car and tank truck requirements.  

...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tank car and tank truck requirements. 24.229 Section... ALCOHOL WINE Spirits § 24.229 Tank car and tank truck requirements. Railroad tank cars and tank trucks used to transport...

2014-04-01

108

49 CFR 179.400 - General specification applicable to cryogenic liquid tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...specification applicable to cryogenic liquid tank car tanks. 179.400 Section 179.400 Transportation...MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

2010-10-01

109

49 CFR 179.400 - General specification applicable to cryogenic liquid tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...specification applicable to cryogenic liquid tank car tanks. 179.400 Section 179.400 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

2012-10-01

110

49 CFR 179.500 - Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks. 179.500 Section 179.500 Transportation...MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

2010-10-01

111

Catch-up growth occurs after diarrhea in early childhood.  

PubMed

Diarrhea and linear growth faltering continue to burden low-income countries and are among the most important contributors to poor health during early childhood. Diarrhea is thought to adversely affect linear growth, but catch-up growth can occur if no additional insults are experienced. We sought to characterize catch-up growth in relation to diarrhea burden in a multisite dataset of 1007 children. Using longitudinal anthropometry and diarrheal surveillance data from 7 cohort studies in 4 countries, we examined the relation between diarrhea prevalence and growth in 3- to 6-mo periods using linear mixed-effect models. Growth during each period was calculated as a function of age using linear splines. We incorporated the longitudinal prevalence of diarrhea in both current and previous periods into the model. Diarrhea during the current period was associated with slower linear and ponderal growth. Faster (catch-up) growth in length was observed in children with no diarrhea in age groups immediately after an age group in which diarrhea was experienced [age group >6-12 mo: 0.03 mm/mo for each percentage diarrhea prevalence in the previous period (95% CI: 0.007, 0.06) relative to 11.3 mm/mo mean growth rate; age group >12-18 mo: 0.04 mm/mo (95% CI: 0.02, 0.06) relative to 8.9 mm/mo mean growth rate; age group >18-24 mo: 0.04 mm/mo (95% CI: 0.003, 0.09) relative to 7.9 mm/mo mean growth rate]. The associations were stronger in boys than in girls when separate models were run. Similar results were observed when weight was the outcome variable. When diarrheal episodes are followed by diarrhea-free periods in the first 2 y of life, catch-up growth is observed that may allow children to regain their original trajectories. The finding of a greater effect of diarrhea on linear growth in boys than in girls was unexpected and requires additional study. Diarrhea burdens are high throughout the first 2 y of life in these study sites, therefore reducing the likelihood of catch-up growth. Extending diarrhea-free periods may increase the likelihood of catch-up growth and decrease the prevalence of stunting. PMID:24699805

Richard, Stephanie A; Black, Robert E; Gilman, Robert H; Guerrant, Richard L; Kang, Gagandeep; Lanata, Claudio F; Mølbak, Kåre; Rasmussen, Zeba A; Sack, R Bradley; Valentiner-Branth, Palle; Checkley, William

2014-06-01

112

Tank 241-AP-107 tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, WHC 222-S Laboratory, and PNL 325 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples from tank 241-AP-107.

Schreiber, R.D.

1994-12-06

113

Tank 241-TY-106 Tank Characterization Plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, and WHC 222-S Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples for tank 241-TY-106.

Schreiber, R.D.

1995-02-22

114

ADM. Tanks: from left to right: fuel oil tank, fuel ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

ADM. Tanks: from left to right: fuel oil tank, fuel pump house (TAN-611), engine fuel tank, water pump house, water storage tank. Camera facing northwest. Not edge of shielding berm at left of view. Date: November 25, 1953. INEEL negative no. 9217 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

115

Pressurizer tank upper support  

DOEpatents

A pressurizer tank in a pressurized water nuclear reactor is mounted between structural walls of the reactor on a substructure of the reactor, the tank extending upwardly from the substructure. For bearing lateral loads such as seismic shocks, a girder substantially encircles the pressurizer tank at a space above the substructure and is coupled to the structural walls via opposed sway struts. Each sway strut is attached at one end to the girder and at an opposite end to one of the structural walls, and the sway struts are oriented substantially horizontally in pairs aligned substantially along tangents to the wall of the circular tank. Preferably, eight sway struts attach to the girder at 90[degree] intervals. A compartment encloses the pressurizer tank and forms the structural wall. The sway struts attach to corners of the compartment for maximum stiffness and load bearing capacity. A valve support frame carrying the relief/discharge piping and valves of an automatic depressurization arrangement is fixed to the girder, whereby lateral loads on the relief/discharge piping are coupled directly to the compartment rather than through any portion of the pressurizer tank. Thermal insulation for the valve support frame prevents thermal loading of the piping and valves. The girder is shimmed to define a gap for reducing thermal transfer, and the girder is free to move vertically relative to the compartment walls, for accommodating dimensional variation of the pressurizer tank with changes in temperature and pressure. 10 figures.

Baker, T.H.; Ott, H.L.

1994-01-11

116

People Favour Imperfect Catching by Assuming a Stable World  

PubMed Central

The visual angle that is projected by an object (e.g. a ball) on the retina depends on the object's size and distance. Without further information, however, the visual angle is ambiguous with respect to size and distance, because equal visual angles can be obtained from a big ball at a longer distance and a smaller one at a correspondingly shorter distance. Failure to recover the true 3D structure of the object (e.g. a ball's physical size) causing the ambiguous retinal image can lead to a timing error when catching the ball. Two opposing views are currently prevailing on how people resolve this ambiguity when estimating time to contact. One explanation challenges any inference about what causes the retinal image (i.e. the necessity to recover this 3D structure), and instead favors a direct analysis of optic flow. In contrast, the second view suggests that action timing could be rather based on obtaining an estimate of the 3D structure of the scene. With the latter, systematic errors will be predicted if our inference of the 3D structure fails to reveal the underlying cause of the retinal image. Here we show that hand closure in catching virtual balls is triggered by visual angle, using an assumption of a constant ball size. As a consequence of this assumption, hand closure starts when the ball is at similar distance across trials. From that distance on, the remaining arrival time, therefore, depends on ball's speed. In order to time the catch successfully, closing time was coupled with ball's speed during the motor phase. This strategy led to an increased precision in catching but at the cost of committing systematic errors. PMID:22558205

Lopez-Moliner, Joan; Keil, Matthias S.

2012-01-01

117

A quick-catch corral trap for wintering canvasbacks  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We designed a bait trap for wintering Canvasbacks (Aythya valisineria) that has proven more effective than conventional funnel or slot entrance traps for diving ducks. The unique feature of this trap is the corral entrance that presents unimpaired access to the bait and thus ease of entrance to the trap. Catches of 50-75 ducks have been made in a matter of minutes at prebaited sites.

Haramis, G.M.; Derleth, E.L.; McAuley, D.G.

1987-01-01

118

The Conservation Catch22: Indigenous Peoples and Cultural Change  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a \\u000a Catch-22, the title of Joseph Heller’s 1961 novel, has come to signify a paradoxical situation from which any apparent means of resolution\\u000a leads inevitably back to the starting point - a “no win” situation. Often people concerned with biodiversity conservation\\u000a ascribe conservationist ethics to societies with limited technology, subsistence levels of production, and low population\\u000a densities relative to resources. Conversely,

Flora Lu

119

Interference Model: Ripple Tank  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Interference Model: Ripple Tank investigates constructive and destructive interference between two point sources. The user can change the point source frequency, location and separation and phase difference between the point sources. The model also shows the difference in distance from the point sources to a movable observation point. The Interference Model: Ripple Tank was created using the Easy Java Simulations (EJS) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the ejs_bu_Ripple_Tank_Interference.jar file will run the program if Java is installed.

Duffy, Andrew

2010-04-25

120

Environmental effects on recreational squid jigging fishery catches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Experimental fishing sessions simulating the operating procedures of the recreational fishery for the European squid that operates at inshore Palma Bay (Balearic Islands, Spain) were conducted to investigate the effects of environmental variables on squid catches. The catch per unit of effort (cpue) of recreational-like jigging sessions showed a seasonal pattern (higher cpue during colder months). Two alternative hypotheses can explain such a pattern. First, squid could migrate inshore during colder months to seek spatio-temporal windows within which the sea temperature maximize spawning success. Second, the timing of the seasonal reproductive peak and the growth rate of any given cohort would result in a higher percentage of squid whose body size is greater than the gear-specific vulnerability threshold during the colder months. The combination of environmental variables that maximized cpue was a low sea surface temperature, a low windspeed, low atmospheric pressure, and days close to the new moon. A specific period of the day, narrowly around sunset, favoured the catches. Within this narrow period, the sunlight is still sufficient to allow the recreational fishing lures to be effective, and the squid have already shifted to a more active pattern of movement characteristic of the night-time period.

Cabanellas-Reboredo, Miguel; Alós, Josep; Palmer, Miquel; Morales-Nin, Beatriz

2012-08-01

121

Targeted Sequencing of Large Genomic Regions with CATCH-Seq  

PubMed Central

Current target enrichment systems for large-scale next-generation sequencing typically require synthetic oligonucleotides used as capture reagents to isolate sequences of interest. The majority of target enrichment reagents are focused on gene coding regions or promoters en masse. Here we introduce development of a customizable targeted capture system using biotinylated RNA probe baits transcribed from sheared bacterial artificial chromosome clone templates that enables capture of large, contiguous blocks of the genome for sequencing applications. This clone adapted template capture hybridization sequencing (CATCH-Seq) procedure can be used to capture both coding and non-coding regions of a gene, and resolve the boundaries of copy number variations within a genomic target site. Furthermore, libraries constructed with methylated adapters prior to solution hybridization also enable targeted bisulfite sequencing. We applied CATCH-Seq to diverse targets ranging in size from 125 kb to 3.5 Mb. Our approach provides a simple and cost effective alternative to other capture platforms because of template-based, enzymatic probe synthesis and the lack of oligonucleotide design costs. Given its similarity in procedure, CATCH-Seq can also be performed in parallel with commercial systems. PMID:25357200

Day, Kenneth; Song, Jun; Absher, Devin

2014-01-01

122

Efficient sex pheromone trapping: catching the sweetpotato weevil, Cylas formicarius.  

PubMed

The sweetpotato weevil, Cylas formicarius (Fabricius) (Coleoptera: Brentidae), is the most serious pest of sweetpotato around the world, damaging sweetpotatoes in the field and in storage, as well as being a quarantine pest. Because the larval period is spent within vines or tubers, and the adults are nocturnal, chemical control frequently is not effective. In addition, there are few natural enemies, and pheromone-based trapping does not appear to reduce the damage level. In the present study, we evaluated a number of parameters that affect pheromone-based trap catch, including trap design, trap size, trap color, and height at which the traps are placed. Pherocon unitraps caught higher numbers than ground, funnel water, or delta traps. Medium-sized traps (13?×?17.5 cm) were more effective than larger or smaller traps. In a color-choice test, C. formicarius preferred red over gray, brown, blue, white, yellow, black, or red traps; light red was more attractive than other shades of red. Maximum catches were obtained when the traps were set 50 cm above the crop canopy. Light-red unitraps with pheromone lures caught more adults than identical traps without lures, suggesting that C. formicarius is influenced by both visual and olfactory cues. Pheromone-baited light-red unitraps, 13?×?17.5 cm, installed 50 cm above the crop canopy, were the most effective at catching C. formicarius adults, and they appear to have the greatest potential for use in trap-and-kill strategies and eradication programs. PMID:22782300

Reddy, G V P; Gadi, Nirupa; Taianao, Anthony J

2012-07-01

123

75 FR 63402 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the 2010 Pacific total allowable catch (TAC) apportioned to vessels catching Pacific...of 50 CFR part 680. The 2010 Pacific cod TAC apportioned to vessels catching Pacific...has determined that the 2010 Pacific cod TAC apportioned to vessels catching...

2010-10-15

124

Above and underground storage tanks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Storage tanks are the primary means of storing liquid, fluid and gas products. Federal and state environmental regulations, as well as local building and fire codes, take into account leaks and spills, tank emissions, underground tank seepage and safety issues, and they define standards for tank manufacturers and owners. For specific regulatory information pertaining to your application, contact the local

K. Canning; A. Kilbourne

1997-01-01

125

Goldfish in a tank  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Goldfish need places to hide from predators and when they feel scared. People that own them as pets can decorate their tanks with live or plastic plants, wood logs, and other plastic structures that they can hide in.

N/A N/A (None;)

2008-02-27

126

Tank 48 - Chemical Destruction  

SciTech Connect

Small tank copper-catalyzed peroxide oxidation (CCPO) is a potentially viable technology to facilitate the destruction of tetraphenylborate (TPB) organic solids contained within the Tank 48H waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS). A maturation strategy was created that identified a number of near-term development activities required to determine the viability of the CCPO process, and subsequent disposition of the CCPO effluent. Critical activities included laboratory-scale validation of the process and identification of forward transfer paths for the CCPO effluent. The technical documentation and the successful application of the CCPO process on simulated Tank 48 waste confirm that the CCPO process is a viable process for the disposition of the Tank 48 contents.

Simner, Steven P.; Aponte, Celia I.; Brass, Earl A.

2013-01-09

127

Estimating historical eastern North Pacific blue whale catches using spatial calling patterns.  

PubMed

Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) were exploited extensively around the world and remain endangered. In the North Pacific their population structure is unclear and current status unknown, with the exception of a well-studied eastern North Pacific (ENP) population. Despite existing abundance estimates for the ENP population, it is difficult to estimate pre-exploitation abundance levels and gauge their recovery because historical catches of the ENP population are difficult to separate from catches of other populations in the North Pacific. We collated previously unreported Soviet catches and combined these with known catches to form the most current estimates of North Pacific blue whale catches. We split these conflated catches using recorded acoustic calls from throughout the North Pacific, the knowledge that the ENP population produces a different call than blue whales in the western North Pacific (WNP). The catches were split by estimating spatiotemporal occurrence of blue whales with generalized additive models fitted to acoustic call patterns, which predict the probability a catch belonged to the ENP population based on the proportion of calls of each population recorded by latitude, longitude, and month. When applied to the conflated historical catches, which totaled 9,773, we estimate that ENP blue whale catches totaled 3,411 (95% range 2,593 to 4,114) from 1905-1971, and amounted to 35% (95% range 27% to 42%) of all catches in the North Pacific. Thus most catches in the North Pacific were for WNP blue whales, totaling 6,362 (95% range 5,659 to 7,180). The uncertainty in the acoustic data influence the results substantially more than uncertainty in catch locations and dates, but the results are fairly insensitive to the ecological assumptions made in the analysis. The results of this study provide information for future studies investigating the recovery of these populations and the impact of continuing and future sources of anthropogenic mortality. PMID:24892427

Monnahan, Cole C; Branch, Trevor A; Stafford, Kathleen M; Ivashchenko, Yulia V; Oleson, Erin M

2014-01-01

128

What a Country Must Do to Catch Up to the Industrial Leaders  

Microsoft Academic Search

What, if anything, can a country today do to catch-up with the industrial leaders? This paper reviews a theory of the evoluti on of international income levels and examines its predictions for catch-up. The main pol icy implication of this theory is that a country will catch-up to the industrial leaders if it eliminates policies that constrain the choice of

Stephen L. Parente; Edward C. Prescott

2004-01-01

129

Optical Cryogenic Tank Level Sensor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Cryogenic fluids play an important role in space transportation. Liquid oxygen and hydrogen are vital fuel components for liquid rocket engines. It is also difficult to accurately measure the liquid level in the cryogenic tanks containing the liquids. The current methods use thermocouple rakes, floats, or sonic meters to measure tank level. Thermocouples have problems examining the boundary between the boiling liquid and the gas inside the tanks. They are also slow to respond to temperature changes. Sonic meters need to be mounted inside the tank, but still above the liquid level. This causes problems for full tanks, or tanks that are being rotated to lie on their side.

Duffell, Amanda

2005-01-01

130

49 CFR 179.100 - General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks. 179.100 Section 179.100 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

2013-10-01

131

49 CFR 179.103 - Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks. 179.103 Section 179.103 Transportation...MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

2010-10-01

132

49 CFR 179.103 - Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks. 179.103 Section 179.103 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

2012-10-01

133

49 CFR 179.301 - Individual specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks. 179.301 Section 179.301 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) §...

2012-10-01

134

49 CFR 179.102 - Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks. 179.102 Section 179.102 Transportation...MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

2010-10-01

135

49 CFR 179.101 - Individual specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks. 179.101 Section 179.101 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

2011-10-01

136

49 CFR 179.201 - Individual specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks. 179.201 Section 179.201 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

2013-10-01

137

49 CFR 179.101 - Individual specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks. 179.101 Section 179.101 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

2013-10-01

138

49 CFR 179.102 - Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks. 179.102 Section 179.102 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

2013-10-01

139

49 CFR 179.102 - Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks. 179.102 Section 179.102 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

2012-10-01

140

49 CFR 179.301 - Individual specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks. 179.301 Section 179.301 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) §...

2013-10-01

141

49 CFR 179.102 - Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks. 179.102 Section 179.102 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

2011-10-01

142

49 CFR 179.100 - General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks. 179.100 Section 179.100 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

2011-10-01

143

49 CFR 179.103 - Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks. 179.103 Section 179.103 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

2011-10-01

144

49 CFR 179.201 - Individual specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks. 179.201 Section 179.201 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

2011-10-01

145

49 CFR 179.201 - Individual specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks. 179.201 Section 179.201 Transportation...MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

2010-10-01

146

49 CFR 179.201 - Individual specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks. 179.201 Section 179.201 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

2012-10-01

147

49 CFR 179.100 - General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks. 179.100 Section 179.100 Transportation...MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

2010-10-01

148

49 CFR 179.100 - General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks. 179.100 Section 179.100 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

2012-10-01

149

49 CFR 179.101 - Individual specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks. 179.101 Section 179.101 Transportation...MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

2010-10-01

150

49 CFR 179.103 - Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks. 179.103 Section 179.103 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

2013-10-01

151

49 CFR 179.101 - Individual specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks. 179.101 Section 179.101 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

2012-10-01

152

49 CFR 179.301 - Individual specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks. 179.301 Section 179.301 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) §...

2011-10-01

153

49 CFR 179.301 - Individual specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks. 179.301 Section 179.301 Transportation...MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) §...

2010-10-01

154

49 CFR 180.519 - Periodic retest and inspection of tank cars other than single-unit tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Periodic retest and inspection of tank cars other than single-unit tank car tanks. 180.519 Section 180.519 Transportation...PACKAGINGS Qualification and Maintenance of Tank Cars § 180.519 Periodic retest and inspection...

2011-10-01

155

49 CFR 180.519 - Periodic retest and inspection of tank cars other than single-unit tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Periodic retest and inspection of tank cars other than single-unit tank car tanks. 180.519 Section 180.519 Transportation...PACKAGINGS Qualification and Maintenance of Tank Cars § 180.519 Periodic retest and inspection...

2013-10-01

156

49 CFR 180.519 - Periodic retest and inspection of tank cars other than single-unit tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... false Periodic retest and inspection of tank cars other than single-unit tank car tanks. 180.519 Section 180.519 Transportation...PACKAGINGS Qualification and Maintenance of Tank Cars § 180.519 Periodic retest and inspection...

2012-10-01

157

49 CFR 180.519 - Periodic retest and inspection of tank cars other than single-unit tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Periodic retest and inspection of tank cars other than single-unit tank car tanks. 180.519 Section 180.519 Transportation...PACKAGINGS Qualification and Maintenance of Tank Cars § 180.519 Periodic retest and inspection...

2010-10-01

158

Efficacy of methoprene for mosquito control in storm water catch basins  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This study evaluated the efficacy of methoprene, a widely used juvenile hormone mimic, formulated as 30-day slow release Altosid? pellets, at controlling mosquitoes in underground storm water drainage catch basins. Data from applications to ?-sized cement catch basins in the laboratory, field observations from treated and untreated basins, and an experiment that confined mosquito larvae in floating emergence jars in catch basins showed that methoprene effectively controlled mosquitoes for a month under field conditions and substantially longer under laboratory conditions when applied at a dose of 3.5 g pellets per average-sized catch basin.

Butler, M.; LeBrun, R.A.; Ginsberg, H.S.; Gettman, A.D.

2006-01-01

159

Protein phosphatase 2B dephosphorylates twitchin, initiating the catch state of invertebrate smooth muscle.  

PubMed

"Catch" is the state where some invertebrate muscles sustain high tension for long periods at low ATP hydrolysis rates. Physiological studies using muscle fibers have not yet fully provided the details of the initiation process of the catch state. The process was extensively studied by using an in vitro reconstitution assay with several phosphatase inhibitors. Actin filaments bound to thick filaments pretreated with the soluble protein fraction of muscle homogenate and Ca2+ (catch treatment) in the presence of MgATP at a low free Ca2+ concentration (the catch state). Catch treatment with > 50 microm okadaic acid, > 1 microm microcystin LR, 1 microm cyclosporin A, 1 microm FK506, or 0.2 mm calcineurin autoinhibitory peptide fragment produced almost no binding of the actin filaments, indicating protein phosphatase 2B (PP2B) was involved. Use of bovine calcineurin (PP2B) and its activator calmodulin instead of the soluble protein fraction initiated the catch state, indicating that only PP2B and calmodulin in the soluble protein fraction are essential for the initiation process. The initiation was reproduced with purified actin, myosin, twitchin, PP2B, and calmodulin. 32P autoradiography showed that only twitchin was dephosphorylated during the catch treatment with either the soluble protein fraction or bovine calcineurin and calmodulin. These results indicate that PP2B directly dephosphorylates twitchin and initiates the catch state and that no other component is required for the initiation process of the catch state. PMID:15272026

Yamada, Akira; Yoshio, Maki; Nakamura, Akio; Kohama, Kazuhiro; Oiwa, Kazuhiro

2004-09-24

160

131. NORTH PLANT TANK CHEMICAL STORAGE TANKS FROM GB MANUFACTURING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

131. NORTH PLANT TANK CHEMICAL STORAGE TANKS FROM GB MANUFACTURING PLANT. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Bounded by Ninety-sixth Avenue & Fifty-sixth Avenue, Buckley Road, Quebec Street & Colorado Highway 2, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

161

VIEW OF PDP TANK TOP, LEVEL 0?, WITH LTR TANK ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

VIEW OF PDP TANK TOP, LEVEL 0?, WITH LTR TANK TOP ON LEFT, LOOKING NORTHEAST. CRANE AND VERTICAL HOISTING ELEMENTS AT TOP - Physics Assembly Laboratory, Area A/M, Savannah River Site, Aiken, Aiken County, SC

162

Fireman's Air Tanks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Together with NASA's Johnson Space Center, A-T-O Inc.'s Scott Aviation has developed light-weight firefighter's air tanks. New backpack system weighs only 20 pounds for 30 minute air supply, 13 pounds less than conventional firefighting tanks. They are pressurized at 4,500 psi, (twice current tanks). Made of aluminum liner wrapped by resin-impregnated glass fibers, eliminating corrosion as well as lightening the load. Redesigned face mask permits better vision. Warning device to tell fireman he is running out of air is personalized so it can't be heard by others reducing confusion in an already hectic environment. Structural Composites Inc., The Boeing Co., and Martin- Marietta Corp. have developed uses for this technology.

1976-01-01

163

Automatic tank gauging systems for monitoring underground storage tanks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Federal, state, and local officials have developed an increased awareness of and sensitivity to problems associated with underground storage tank systems (UST). Before 1980, these tanks were generally out of sight - out of mind. Beginning about 1980, public concern about leaking tanks began to increase dramatically as a number of major gasoline releases received national attention. On 8 November

Scheinfeld

1987-01-01

164

Hanford Tank Waste Information Enclosure 1 Hanford Tank Waste Information  

E-print Network

Hanford Tank Waste Information Enclosure 1 1 Hanford Tank Waste Information 1.0 Summary This information demonstrates the wastes in the twelve Hanford Site tanks meet the definition of transuranic (TRU conducted at the Hanford Site to demonstrate how these wastes were generated and segregated and why

165

3.OA Fish Tanks  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a task from the Illustrative Mathematics website that is one part of a complete illustration of the standard to which it is aligned. Each task has at least one solution and some commentary that addresses important asects of the task and its potential use. Here are the first few lines of the commentary for this task: Suppose there are 4 tanks and 3 fish in each tank. The total number of fish in this situation can be expressed as $4 \\times 3 = 12$. Describe what is m...

166

TANK SPACE OPTIONS REPORT  

SciTech Connect

Since this report was originally issued in 2001, several options proposed for increasing double-shell tank (DST) storage space were implemented or are in the process of implementation. Changes to the single-shell tank (SST) waste retrieval schedule, completion of DST space saving options, and the DST space saving options in progress have delayed the projected shortfall of DST storage space from the 2007-2011 to the 2018-2025 timeframe (ORP-11242, River Protection Project System Plan). This report reevaluates options from Rev. 0 and includes evaluations of new options for alleviating projected restrictions on SST waste retrieval beginning in 2018 because of the lack of DST storage space.

WILLIS WL; AHRENDT MR

2009-08-11

167

ThinkTank  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource is a free tool to help students develop and narrow research questions for project-based learning. ThinkTank allows students to create an outline of topics and subtopics, narrow their choices, and export topics to NoteStar, a related cost-free tool. ThinkTank is part of the collection of online tools available through 4Teachers.org, founded to support integration of technology in the K-12 classroom. ***PLEASE NOTE: Some of the pages within this resource are sponsored by commercial vendors.

2009-11-19

168

Enhanced Waste Tank Level Model  

SciTech Connect

'With the increased sensitivity of waste-level measurements in the H-Area Tanks and with periods of isolation, when no mass transfer occurred for certain tanks, waste-level changes have been recorded with are unexplained.'

Duignan, M.R.

1999-06-24

169

SRS Tank Structural Integrity Program  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Structural Integrity Program is to ensure continued safe management and operation of the waste tanks for whatever period of time these tanks are required. Matthew Maryak provides an overview of the Structural Integrity Program to open Session 5 (Waste Storage and Tank Inspection) of the 2010 EM Waste Processing Technical Exchange.

Maryak, Matthew

2010-11-01

170

CALIFORNIA LEAKING UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS  

EPA Science Inventory

Points represent Leaking Underground Storage Tanks (LUST) for the State of California. This database was developed and is maintained by the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). Point locations represent tanks where leak events have occurred. Tank latitude-long...

171

Shift scheduling for tank trucks  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we deal with shift scheduling of tank trucks for a small oil company. Given are a set of tank trucks with different characteristics and a set of drivers with different skills. The objective is to assign a feasible driver to every shift of the tank trucks such that legal and safety restrictions are satisfied, the total working

Sigrid Knust; Elisabeth Schumacher

2011-01-01

172

TSUAHXETSUAHXE UndergroUnd tank  

E-print Network

EXHAUST EXHAUST TSUAHXETSUAHXE EXHAUST EXHAUST EXHAUST UndergroUnd tank air handlerair handler hot water Storage tank temperedventillationair hotairSUpply warmairexhaUSt indUction diffUSer indUction diff rainwater storage Roof inverterS hot water Storage tank 1 2 3 Join us for the first tours of this new state

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

173

Sharing of Tank Information  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Test Rationale -- Attempt to Address 10% vs. 25+% effects of crater penetration on full scale titanium alloy tanks and comparison to plate tests Utilize Baseline Burst Pressure versus HVI impacted vessels as gauge of effects Examine craters (post test) to determine penetration characteristics on a fluid filled vessel versus plate tests. Examine crater effects leading to vessel failure (if any).

Tamminga, Joshua D.

2011-01-01

174

Managing underground storage tanks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Owners and\\/or operators of underground petroleum storage systems have faced many changes in the last 10 years. Regulations regarding all aspects of petroleum storage, including regulations pertaining to the assessment and remediation following petroleum releases, have been established to protect human health and environmental resources. The primary focal points in the evolution of underground storage tank (UST) management are: upgrades

T. M. Gurr; R. L. Homann

1996-01-01

175

Fish tank virtual reality  

Microsoft Academic Search

The defining characteristics of what we call “Fish Tank Virtual Reality” are a stereo image of a three dimensional (3D) scene viewed on a monitor using a perspective projection coupled to the head position of the observer. We discuss some of the relative merits of this mode of viewing as compared to head mounted stereo displays. In addition, we report

Colin Ware; Kevin Arthur; Kellogg S. Booth

1993-01-01

176

Improvement of Soil Phosphorus Availability by Green Fertilization with Catch Crops  

Microsoft Academic Search

The efficient use of phosphorus (P) is a main task in sustainable agriculture. In pot and field experiments, the effects of green fertilization with catch crops and P supply with organic and inorganic fertilizers on plant and soil parameters were investigated on a P?poor loamy sand. For the field experiment, the catch crops were sown in September and remained on

Renata Gaj; Ewald Schnug

2009-01-01

177

Non-uniformity of sarcomere lengths can explain the 'catch-like' effect of arthropod muscle.  

PubMed

The 'catch-like' effect, a hysteresis phenomenon in arthropod skeletal muscle contraction thought to be related to the catch of molluscan smooth muscle, was investigated in the closer muscle of the crab Eriphia spinifrons. Several parameters were varied to determine their influence on the catch-like effect. These parameters were (1) the frequency of repetitive stimulation of the slow excitatory neuron, (2) additional stimulation of the inhibitory neuron, (3) the amount of stretch applied to the muscle and (4) the stiffness of the mechano-electrical transducer. The results show that the catch-like effect is not related to the catch of molluscan smooth muscle but rather to the 'residual force enhancement' or 'creep' phenomenon described for vertebrate muscle. A hypothesis for residual force enhancement implies that the increase in force is caused by non-uniformity of sarcomere lengths along the muscle fibre. Based on this hypothesis and the actual force-length relationship of the crab muscle studied, calculations were carried out to determine, if the observed catch-like effect can be explained by such a model. The calculations corroborate the experimental evidence. The catch-like effect of arthropod muscles can thus be explained by the same mechanism responsible for residual force enhancement and creep in vertebrate muscle. A physiological relevance of the catch-like effect in arthropod muscle is inferred. PMID:7860701

Günzel, D; Rathmayer, W

1994-10-01

178

Application of the Leslie Model to Commercial Catch and Effort of the Slipper Lobster,  

E-print Network

Application of the Leslie Model to Commercial Catch and Effort of the Slipper Lobster to the Leslie model to estimate preexploitationabundance andthe catchabil ity coefficient ofslipper lobsterCPUE on cumula tive catch (Leslie and Davis, 1939) or LOG (CPUE) on LOG cumulativeeffort (Delury, 1947

179

50 CFR 648.140 - Black sea bass Annual Catch Limit (ACL).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Black sea bass Annual Catch Limit (ACL). 648.140...NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Black Sea Bass Fishery § 648.140 Black sea bass Annual Catch Limit (ACL). (a)...

2012-10-01

180

50 CFR 648.141 - Black sea bass Annual Catch Target (ACT).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Black sea bass Annual Catch Target (ACT). 648.141...NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Black Sea Bass Fishery § 648.141 Black sea bass Annual Catch Target (ACT). (a)...

2013-10-01

181

50 CFR 648.140 - Black sea bass Annual Catch Limit (ACL).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Black sea bass Annual Catch Limit (ACL). 648.140...NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Black Sea Bass Fishery § 648.140 Black sea bass Annual Catch Limit (ACL). (a)...

2013-10-01

182

50 CFR 648.141 - Black sea bass Annual Catch Target (ACT).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Black sea bass Annual Catch Target (ACT). 648.141...NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Black Sea Bass Fishery § 648.141 Black sea bass Annual Catch Target (ACT). (a)...

2012-10-01

183

Standardization of catch and effort data in a spatially-structured shark fishery  

Microsoft Academic Search

The methods used to develop catch rate based indices of relative abundance for the school shark Galeorhinus galeus resource off southern Australia are outlined. These methods are based on fitting generalized linear models to catch and effort data for several regions in this fishery. This is to take account of the multi-gear nature of the fishery and the spatial structure

André E. Punt; Terence I. Walker; Bruce L. Taylor; Fred Pribac

2000-01-01

184

Species-specific Analyses of Shark Catch Data from the Hawaii-based  

E-print Network

Species-specific Analyses of Shark Catch Data from the Hawaii-based Longline Fishery, 1995 2006 soliciting sharks research in this fishery · Project requiring species-specific analyses of sharks period (1995 ­ 2006) affected magnitude, composition, and disposition of sharks catch #12;Background (2

Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

185

Effect of Baiting on Hoop Net Catch Rates of Endangered Humpback Chub  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of unbaited, scented (odor emitted by inaccessible hatchery feed), and baited (accessible feed) single-throated hoop nets on the catch rates of the federally endangered humpback chub Gila cypha (?100 mm total length) were assessed in the Little Colorado River, Arizona, to determine how baiting affected the catch of these fish. Of a total of 1,297 unique humpback chub

Dennis M. Stone

2005-01-01

186

78 FR 6798 - Western Pacific Fisheries; 2013 Annual Catch Limits and Accountability Measures  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...fisheries where the proposed catch limits are slightly higher compared...action. Proposed Annual Catch Limit Specifications Table 1...specific areas, changes to bag limits, or restrictions in effort...take action to correct the operational issue that caused the ACL...

2013-01-31

187

Catching up with Harvard: Results from Regression Analysis of World Universities League Tables  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper uses regression analysis to test if the universities performing less well according to Shanghai Jiao Tong University's world universities league tables are able to catch up with the top performers, and to identify national and institutional factors that could affect this catching up process. We have constructed a dataset of 461…

Li, Mei; Shankar, Sriram; Tang, Kam Ki

2011-01-01

188

ORIGINAL PAPER Arctic fisheries catches in Russia, USA, and Canada: baselines  

E-print Network

ORIGINAL PAPER Arctic fisheries catches in Russia, USA, and Canada: baselines for neglected northern Siberia (Russia), Arctic Alaska (USA), and the Canadian Arctic, extends over seven coastal Large-scale operations conducted mainly in estuaries and river deltas. Most of the catches have traditionally not been

Pauly, Daniel

189

Relationship of Sea Surface Temperature Isotherm Patterns off Northwestern Mexico to the Catch of Striped Marlin,  

E-print Network

Relationship of Sea Surface Temperature Isotherm Patterns off Northwestern Mexico to the Catch the distribution of striped marlin and sea surface temperature. Many researchers have reviewed the migration. SST Climatology vs. Striped Marlin Catch Uda (1957) provided a range of sea surface temperatures

190

Estimating Catch Weight of Reef Fish Species Using Estimation and Intercept Data from the  

E-print Network

; Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center Administrative Report H-13-04 Estimating Catch Weight of Reef Estimating Catch Weight of Reef Fish Species Using Estimation and Intercept Data Administrative Report H-13-04 #12; About this report Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center Administrative

191

Estimating time to contact and impact velocity when catching an accelerating object with the hand  

Microsoft Academic Search

To catch a moving object with the hand requires precise coordination between visual information about the target's motion and the muscle activity necessary to prepare for the impact. A key question remains open as to if and how a human observer uses velocity and acceleration information when controlling muscles in anticipation of impact. Participants were asked to catch the moving

Patrice Senot; Pascal Prevost; Joseph McIntyre

2003-01-01

192

Squid Catches Resulting From Trawl Surveys off the Southeastern United States  

E-print Network

Squid Catches Resulting From Trawl Surveys off the Southeastern United States J. DAVID WHITAKER Introduction The importance of the squid fishery off the northeastern United States has grown considerably since 1964 with re- cent squid catches by foreign fleets av- eraging 50,000 t (110,231 ,000 pounds

193

SCIENTIFIC ADVICE ON CATCH LEVELS J. A. GULLAND AND L. K. BOEREMA1  

E-print Network

SCIENTIFIC ADVICE ON CATCH LEVELS J. A. GULLAND AND L. K. BOEREMA1 ABSTRACT The sustainable yield, or maximum sustainable yield, has been used to provide, on an objective scientific basis, target figures for the catches to be taken from a heavily exploited stock that is under regulation. The simple concept

194

Retained and discarded catches from commercial beach-seining in Botany Bay, Australia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Observer-based estimates of the quantities and size compositions of discarded and retained catches from the commercial beach-seine fishery in Botany Bay, NSW, Australia are presented. A total of 71 finfish and 10 invertebrate taxa were identified in catches sampled between February 1998 and February 1999, with 39 taxa being retained by fishers and 77 taxa discarded. Gerres subfasciatus, Pseudocaranx dentex,

C. A Gray; S. J Kennelly; K. E Hodgson; C. J. T Ashby; M. L Beatson

2001-01-01

195

Few data but many fish: marine small-scale fisheries catches for Mozambique and Tanzania  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fisheries data supplied to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) by national agencies have served as the primary tool for many global and regional studies. However, it is recognised that these data are incomplete and often underestimate actual catches, particularly for small-scale fisheries. This study reconstructed total marine fisheries catches from 1950 to 2005 for

J Jacquet; H Fox; H Motta; A Ngusaru; D Zeller

2010-01-01

196

Effect of catch-and-release angling on growth of largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides  

E-print Network

Effect of catch-and-release angling on growth of largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides K . L . P O bass, Micropterus salmoides Lace´ pe` de. Angling mortality was 0.00 ± 0.092% for largemouth bass species. K E Y W O R D S : angling effects, growth, Micropterus salmoides, weight. Introduction Catch

Wilde, Gene

197

Catch-and-release science and its application to conservation and management of recreational fisheries  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Catch-and-release angling is a well-established practice in recreational angler behaviour and fisheries management. Accompanying this is a growing body of catch-and-release research that can be applied to reduce injury, mortality and sublethal alterations in behaviour and physiology. Here, the status of catch-and-release research from a symposium on the topic is summarised. Several general themes emerged including the need to: (1) better connect sublethal assessments to population-level processes; (2) enhance understanding of the variation in fish, fishing practices and gear and their role in catch and release; (3) better understand animal welfare issues related to catch and release; (4) increase the exchange of information on fishing-induced stress, injury and mortality between the recreational and commercial fishing sectors; and (5) improve procedures for measuring and understanding the effect of catch-and-release angling. Through design of better catch-and-release studies, strategies could be developed to further minimise stress, injury and mortality arising from catch-and-release angling. These strategies, when integrated with other fish population and fishery characteristics, can be used by anglers and managers to sustain or enhance recreational fishing resources. ?? 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Cooke, S. J.; Schramm, H. L.

2007-01-01

198

78 FR 39121 - Pacific Halibut Fisheries; Catch Sharing Plan for Guided Sport and Commercial Fisheries in Alaska  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Catch Sharing Plan for Guided Sport and Commercial Fisheries in Alaska; Proposed Rule...Catch Sharing Plan for Guided Sport and Commercial Fisheries in Alaska AGENCY: National...for the guided sport (charter) and commercial fisheries for Pacific halibut in...

2013-06-28

199

Using demographic data to better interpret pitfall trap catches  

PubMed Central

Abstract The results of pitfall trapping are often interpreted as abundance in a particular habitat. At the same time, there are numerous cases of almost unrealistically high catches of ground beetles in seemingly unsuitable sites. The correlation of catches by pitfall trapping with the true distribution and abundance of Carabidae needs corroboration. During a full year survey in 2006/07 in the Lake Elton region (Volgograd Area, Russia), 175 species of ground beetles were trapped. Considering the differences in demographic structure of the local populations, and not their abundances, three groups of species were recognized: residents, migrants and sporadic. In residents, the demographic structure of local populations is complete, and their habitats can be considered “residential”. In migrants and sporadic species, the demographic structure of the local populations is incomplete, and their habitats can be considered “transit”. Residents interact both with their prey and with each other in a particular habitat. Sporadic species are hardly important to a carabid community because of their low abundances. The contribution of migrants to the structure of carabid communities is not apparent and requires additional research. Migrants and sporadic species represent a “labile” component in ground beetles communities, as opposed to a “stable” component, represented by residents. The variability of the labile component substantially limits our interpretation of species diversity in carabid communities. Thus, the criteria for determining the most abundant, or dominant species inevitably vary because the abundance of migrants in some cases can be one order of magnitude higher than that of residents. The results of pitfall trapping adequately reflect the state of carabid communities only in zonal habitats, while azonal and disturbed habitats are merely transit ones for many species of ground beetles. A study of the demographic structure of local populations and assessment of the migratory/residential status of particular carabid species are potential ways of increasing the reliability of pitfall trap information. PMID:21738415

Matalin, Andrey V.; Makarov, Kirill V.

2011-01-01

200

Catch Distribution and Related Sea Surface Temperature For Striped Marlin (Tetrapturus audax) Caught off San Diego, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Records for 4,535 marlin landed at San Diego, California, and related sea surface temperature data were examined for the period 1963 through 1970 to determine time-space distribution and the relationship of catch and sea surface temperatures. For the period 1963 through 1970 the catch of 4,535 marlin was compared to sea surface temperature conditions relative to increased catches. Catch distribution

JAMES L. SQUIRE

201

49 CFR 179.500-14 - Test of tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113... § 179.500-14 Test of tanks. (a) After heat-treatment, tanks shall be subjected to hydrostatic tests...

2013-10-01

202

49 CFR 179.500-14 - Test of tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113... § 179.500-14 Test of tanks. (a) After heat-treatment, tanks shall be subjected to hydrostatic tests...

2012-10-01

203

49 CFR 179.500-14 - Test of tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113... § 179.500-14 Test of tanks. (a) After heat-treatment, tanks shall be subjected to hydrostatic tests...

2011-10-01

204

49 CFR 179.500-14 - Test of tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113... § 179.500-14 Test of tanks. (a) After heat-treatment, tanks shall be subjected to hydrostatic tests...

2010-10-01

205

26 CFR 31.3121(b)(20)-1 - Service performed on a boat engaged in catching fish.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Service performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. 31.3121(b)(20)-1 Section...performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. (a) In general. (1) Service...individual on a boat engaged in catching fish or other forms of aquatic animal life...

2010-04-01

206

26 CFR 31.3401(a)(17)-1 - Remuneration for services performed on a boat engaged in catching fish.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. 31.3401(a)(17)-1 Section...performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. (a) Remuneration for services performed...individual on a boat engaged in catching fish or other forms of aquatic animal life...

2011-04-01

207

26 CFR 31.3401(a)(17)-1 - Remuneration for services performed on a boat engaged in catching fish.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. 31.3401(a)(17)-1 Section...performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. (a) Remuneration for services performed...individual on a boat engaged in catching fish or other forms of aquatic animal life...

2010-04-01

208

26 CFR 31.3401(a)(17)-1 - Remuneration for services performed on a boat engaged in catching fish.  

...performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. 31.3401(a)(17)-1 Section...performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. (a) Remuneration for services performed...individual on a boat engaged in catching fish or other forms of aquatic animal life...

2014-04-01

209

26 CFR 31.3401(a)(17)-1 - Remuneration for services performed on a boat engaged in catching fish.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. 31.3401(a)(17)-1 Section...performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. (a) Remuneration for services performed...individual on a boat engaged in catching fish or other forms of aquatic animal life...

2013-04-01

210

26 CFR 31.3121(b)(20)-1 - Service performed on a boat engaged in catching fish.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Service performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. 31.3121(b)(20)-1 Section...performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. (a) In general. (1) Service...individual on a boat engaged in catching fish or other forms of aquatic animal life...

2013-04-01

211

26 CFR 31.3401(a)(17)-1 - Remuneration for services performed on a boat engaged in catching fish.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. 31.3401(a)(17)-1 Section...performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. (a) Remuneration for services performed...individual on a boat engaged in catching fish or other forms of aquatic animal life...

2012-04-01

212

26 CFR 31.3121(b)(20)-1 - Service performed on a boat engaged in catching fish.  

...Service performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. 31.3121(b)(20)-1 Section...performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. (a) In general. (1) Service...individual on a boat engaged in catching fish or other forms of aquatic animal life...

2014-04-01

213

26 CFR 31.3121(b)(20)-1 - Service performed on a boat engaged in catching fish.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Service performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. 31.3121(b)(20)-1 Section...performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. (a) In general. (1) Service...individual on a boat engaged in catching fish or other forms of aquatic animal life...

2011-04-01

214

26 CFR 31.3121(b)(20)-1 - Service performed on a boat engaged in catching fish.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Service performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. 31.3121(b)(20)-1 Section...performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. (a) In general. (1) Service...individual on a boat engaged in catching fish or other forms of aquatic animal life...

2012-04-01

215

HISTORICAL CATCH RATES OF BLUE SHARK (PRIONACE GLAUCA) IN THE SOUTHWESTERN EQUATORIAL ATLANTIC OCEAN BETWEEN 1958 AND 1962  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY The increasing catches of blue shark (Prionace glauca) in the past years, both as by-catch and as a target species, have enhanced the need of more accurate data in order to assure an adequate assessment of the exploited stocks, which, in turn, constitutes the very basis for a sound management of the fishery. Historical catch rates from the early

Felipe Carvalho; Fábio H. V. Hazin; Humberto G. Hazin; Paulo Travassos

216

Day Versus Night Electrofishing Catches from NearShore Waters of the Ohio and Muskingum Rivers1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Day and night electrofishing catches were compared for sampling effectiveness and diel movements offish to and from near-shore waters of the Ohio and Muskingum rivers. Standardized methods were used to collect same-day paired samples by sampling during the day, displacing the catch, and resampling after twilight. Night catches contained significantly higher numbers of species, individuals (excluding Dorosoma cepedianum), weight, and

RANDALL E. SANDERS

1992-01-01

217

77 FR 56791 - Main Hawaiian Islands Deep 7 Bottomfish Annual Catch Limits and Accountability Measures for 2012-13  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Bottomfish Annual Catch Limits and Accountability Measures for 2012-13 AGENCY: National...catch limit, annual catch target and accountability measure will help prevent overfishing...areas were and continue to be, the responsibility of the State, and any change to...

2012-09-14

218

9 CFR 316.14 - Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation of edible products.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-01-01 false Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation...CONTAINERS § 316.14 Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation of edible products. Each tank car and each tank truck carrying...

2011-01-01

219

9 CFR 316.14 - Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation of edible products.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-01-01 false Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation...CONTAINERS § 316.14 Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation of edible products. Each tank car and each tank truck carrying...

2013-01-01

220

9 CFR 316.14 - Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation of edible products.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-01-01 false Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation...CONTAINERS § 316.14 Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation of edible products. Each tank car and each tank truck carrying...

2012-01-01

221

9 CFR 316.14 - Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation of edible products.  

... 2014-01-01 false Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation...CONTAINERS § 316.14 Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation of edible products. Each tank car and each tank truck carrying...

2014-01-01

222

9 CFR 316.14 - Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation of edible products.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-01-01 false Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation...CONTAINERS § 316.14 Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation of edible products. Each tank car and each tank truck carrying...

2010-01-01

223

Evaluation of nontarget effects of methoprene applied to catch basins for mosquito control  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The mosquito larvicide methoprene is a juvenile growth hormone mimic that is widely used to control mosquito larvae in stormwater catch basins. This study addresses two concerns pertaining to methoprene's use for mosquito control. First, measurements of methoprene concentrations were made from water in catch basins that had been treated with methoprene and from an adjoining salt pond near where the treated catch basins emptied. The concentrations of methoprene in catch basins and at drainage outlets after application at the rates currently used for mosquito control in southern Rhode Island were 0.5 ppb and lower, orders of magnitude below what has been determined as detrimental to organisms other than mosquitoes. Second, the effects of methoprene on the communities that live in catch basins were evaluated both in simulated catch basins in the laboratory and in actual catch basins in the field. We found no evidence of declines in abundances of any taxa attributable to the application. Furthermore, we found no consistent changes in community-level parameters (e.g., taxonomic richness, and dominance-diversity relationships) related to methoprene application in either field or laboratory trials.

Butler, Mari; Ginsberg, Howard S.; LeBrun, Roger A.; Gettman, Alan

2010-01-01

224

Evaluation of nontarget effects of methoprene applied to catch basins for mosquito control  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The mosquito larvicide methoprene is a juvenile growth hormone mimic that is widely used to control mosquito larvae in stormwater catch basins. This study addresses two concerns pertaining to methoprene's use for mosquito control. First, measurements of methoprene concentrations were made from water in catch basins that had been treated with methoprene and from an adjoining salt pond near where the treated catch basins emptied. The concentrations of methoprene in catch basins and at drainage outlets after application at the rates currently used for mosquito control in southern Rhode Island were 0.5 ppb and lower, orders of magnitude below what has been determined as detrimental to organisms other than mosquitoes. Second, the effects of methoprene on the communities that live in catch basins were evaluated both in simulated catch basins in the laboratory and in actual catch basins in the field. We found no evidence of declines in abundances of any taxa attributable to the application. Furthermore, we found no consistent changes in community-level parameters (e.g., taxonomic richness, and dominance-diversity relationships) related to methoprene application in either field or laboratory trials. ?? 2010 The Society for Vector Ecology.

Butler, M.; Ginsberg, H.S.; LeBrun, R.A.; Gettman, A.

2010-01-01

225

Comparison of catch and lake trout bycatch in commercial trap nets and gill nets targeting lake whitefish in northern Lake Huron  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We compared seasonal lake whitefish catch rates, lake trout bycatch, and gearinduced lake trout mortality between commercial trap nets and gill nets in north-central Lake Huron. Onboard monitors recorded catches from 260 gill net and 96 trap net lifts from October 1998 through December 1999. Catch rates for lake whitefish were highest in fall for both gear types, reflecting proximity of spawning sites to the study area. Lake whitefish catch rates were also relatively high in spring but low in both gear types in summer. Lake trout were the principal bycatch species in both gears. The lake trout bycatch was lowest in both gear types in fall, highest in gill nets in spring, and highest in trap nets in summer. The ratio of lake trout to legal whitefish (the target species) was highest in summer and lowest in fall in both gear types. The high lake trout ratio in summer was due principally to low catch rates of lake whitefish. All but 3 of 186 live lake trout removed from trap net pots survived for at least two days of observation in laboratory tanks. Therefore, we estimated that post-release survival of trap netted lake trout that had not been entangled in the mesh was 98.4%. In addition, we accounted for stress-induced mortality for lake trout that were live at capture but entangled in the mesh of either gear type. Resulting estimates of lake trout survival were higher in trap nets (87.8%) than in gill nets (39.6%). The number of lake trout killed per lift was highest during summer in trap nets and during spring in gill nets. In trap nets, 85% of dead lake trout were observed to be entangled in the mesh of the pot or tunnels. Survival rates of lake trout in gill nets were higher in our study than reported by others, probably because our nets were hand lifted in a small boat. Our trap net-induced mortality estimates on lake trout were higher than those reported by others because we adjusted our estimates to account for post-release mortality caused by handling and injury. Studies such as ours should prove useful to managers developing harvest allocation options that are consistent with the need to protect nontarget populations. For example, applying our seasonal lake trout-whitefish catch ratios to a hypothetical small-boat gill net fishery, the lake trout bycatch from harvest of 100,000 kg of whitefish would equal the estimated lake trout production available for harvest in the study area for year 2002. The two trap net fisheries may have incidentally killed half this number of lake trout annually from 1995-99. Bycatch estimates are also important inputs to catch-at-age decision models used in developing rehabilitation and harvest strategies for target and bycatch species.

Johnson, James E.; Ebener, Mark P.; Gebhardt, Kenneth; Bergstedt, Roger

2004-01-01

226

A sampling device for the fauna of storm water catch basins  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Storm water drainage catch basins provide habitat to a variety of different aquatic organisms including arthropods, molluscs and annelid worms. Arthropods such as mosquitoes are known to use these environments as larval habitat. Because of health concerns, catch basins are often targeted for mosquito control exposing all inhabitants to pesticides such as methoprene or BTI. In this paper we describe a sampler that we used to evaluate catch basin communities in southern Rhode Island over a six month period. We also examine its efficacy and consistency. We found that the sampler effectively estimated organism abundances.

Butler, M.; Casagrande, R.; LeBrun, R.; Ginsberg, H.; Gettman, A.

2007-01-01

227

27 CFR 24.230 - Examination of tank car or tank truck.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-04-01 false Examination of tank car or tank truck. 24.230 Section 24.230...WINE Spirits § 24.230 Examination of tank car or tank truck. Upon arrival of a tank car or tank truck at the bonded wine premises,...

2012-04-01

228

27 CFR 27.174 - Tank cars and tank trucks to be sealed.  

...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tank cars and tank trucks to be sealed. 27.174...Distilled Spirits Plant § 27.174 Tank cars and tank trucks to be sealed. Where...distilled spirits plant is made in a tank car or tank truck, all openings...

2014-04-01

229

27 CFR 24.230 - Examination of tank car or tank truck.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-04-01 false Examination of tank car or tank truck. 24.230 Section 24.230...WINE Spirits § 24.230 Examination of tank car or tank truck. Upon arrival of a tank car or tank truck at the bonded wine premises,...

2013-04-01

230

27 CFR 24.230 - Examination of tank car or tank truck.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-04-01 false Examination of tank car or tank truck. 24.230 Section 24.230...WINE Spirits § 24.230 Examination of tank car or tank truck. Upon arrival of a tank car or tank truck at the bonded wine premises,...

2011-04-01

231

27 CFR 24.230 - Examination of tank car or tank truck.  

... 2014-04-01 false Examination of tank car or tank truck. 24.230 Section 24.230...WINE Spirits § 24.230 Examination of tank car or tank truck. Upon arrival of a tank car or tank truck at the bonded wine premises,...

2014-04-01

232

27 CFR 24.230 - Examination of tank car or tank truck.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-04-01 false Examination of tank car or tank truck. 24.230 Section 24.230...WINE Spirits § 24.230 Examination of tank car or tank truck. Upon arrival of a tank car or tank truck at the bonded wine premises,...

2010-04-01

233

Tank closure reducing grout  

SciTech Connect

A reducing grout has been developed for closing high level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. The grout has a low redox potential, which minimizes the mobility of Sr{sup 90}, the radionuclide with the highest dose potential after closure. The grout also has a high pH which reduces the solubility of the plutonium isotopes. The grout has a high compressive strength and low permeability, which enhances its ability to limit the migration of contaminants after closure. The grout was designed and tested by Construction Technology Laboratories, Inc. Placement methods were developed by the Savannah River Site personnel.

Caldwell, T.B.

1997-04-18

234

Tank Waste Remediation System Tank Waste Analysis Plan. FY 1995  

SciTech Connect

This documents lays the groundwork for preparing the implementing the TWRS tank waste analysis planning and reporting for Fiscal Year 1995. This Tank Waste Characterization Plan meets the requirements specified in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, better known as the Tri-Party Agreement.

Haller, C.S.; Dove, T.H.

1994-11-01

235

Molluscan smooth catch muscle contains calponin but not caldesmon.  

PubMed

We isolated Ca(2+)-regulated thin filaments from the smooth muscle of the mussel Crenomytilus grayanus and studied the protein composition of different preparations from this muscle: whole muscle, heat-stable extract, fractions from heat-stable extract, thin filaments and intermediate stages of thin filaments purification. Among the protein components of the above-listed preparations, we did not find caldesmon (CaD), although two isoforms of a calponin-like (CaP-like) protein, which along with CaD is characteristic of vertebrate smooth muscle, were present in thin filaments. Thus, CaD is not Ca(2+)-regulator of thin filaments of this muscle. On the other hand, the mussel CaP-like protein is also not such Ca(2+)-regulator since we have shown that this protein can be selectively removed from isolated mussel thin filaments without loss of their Ca(2+)-sensitivity. We suggest that thin filaments in the smooth catch muscle possess other type of Ca(2+)-regulation, different from that in vertebrate smooth muscles. PMID:23081709

Dobrzhanskaya, Anna V; Vyatchin, Ilya G; Lazarev, Stanislav S; Matusovsky, Oleg S; Shelud'ko, Nikolay S

2013-02-01

236

Will a catch share for whales improve social welfare?  

PubMed

We critique a proposal to use catch shares to manage transboundary wildlife resources with potentially high non-extractive values, and we focus on the case of whales. Because whales are impure public goods, a policy that fails to capture all nonmarket benefits (due to free riding) could lead to a suboptimal outcome. Even if free riding were overcome, whale shares would face four implementation challenges. First, a whale share could legitimize the international trade in whale meat and expand the whale meat market. Second, a legal whale trade creates monitoring and enforcement challenges similar to those of organizations that manage highly migratory species such as tuna. Third, a whale share could create a new political economy of management that changes incentives and increases costs for nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) to achieve the current level of conservation. Fourth, a whale share program creates new logistical challenges for quota definition and allocation regardless of whether the market for whale products expands or contracts. Each of these issues, if left unaddressed, could result in lower overall welfare for society than under the status quo. PMID:24640530

Smith, Martin D; Asche, Frank; Bennear, Lori S; Havice, Elizabeth; Read, Andrew J; Squires, Dale

2014-01-01

237

Evaporation loss from storage tanks  

SciTech Connect

The loss of stored hydrocarbons has been a concern since the early days of the petroleum industry. Initially hydrocarbon liquids were stored in open tanks or in tanks with only fixed roof covers. The theory of storage tanks with floating roof was born in 1880. The initial concept was patented by William Birge of Franklin, Pennsylvania. Birge revealed his idea after the U.S.A. Petroleum industry suffered its first major industrial disaster. A tank with stored hydrocarbon liquid was struck directly by lightening. The results were catastrophic. After this incident a concept was revealed to the United States Patent office. The concept was noted as follows: {open_quotes}It is often the case that oil tanks are struck by lightning and when lightning stored beneath the roof is instantly ignited and explodes, the explosion either throwing the roof off from the tank or slivering it into pieces, thus exposing the oil and setting it afire. The result of such an accident is the loss of the tank itself which alone involves the loss of several thousand dollars. The object of my invention is to provide an oil tank such that the surface of oil in the tank will always be covered and protected regardless of the quantity of oil in the tank and no space be provided between the oil and cover for the accumulation of the escaping gases, and with these ends in view, my invention consists essentially, an oil tank with a floating cover{close_quotes}. Various concepts of floating roofs and seals have been presented over the last 100 years. Safety and conservation are still a primary concern for storage of hydrocarbon liquids. Environmental pollution from hydrocarbon emissions has become a major concern for the storage industry. This paper is an attempt to describe these devices and how to quantify the evaporation losses from stationary sources. The stationary losses from external floating roofs will primarily be addressed in this paper.

Wagoner, R.B. [Matrix Service, Inc., Tulsa, OK (United States)

1995-12-01

238

14 CFR 29.1013 - Oil tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Oil tanks. 29.1013 Section 29.1013 Aeronautics...STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Oil System § 29.1013 Oil tanks. (a) Installation. Each oil tank...

2013-01-01

239

14 CFR 25.1013 - Oil tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Oil tanks. 25.1013 Section 25.1013 Aeronautics...STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Oil System § 25.1013 Oil tanks. (a) Installation. Each oil tank...

2013-01-01

240

New Storage Tanks-McMurdo  

NSF Publications Database

... actions to install two bulk fuel storage tanks (Bulk Fuel Tanks "J-6" and "J-7" with secondary ... in the potential for fuel spills and leaks due to the addition of fuel storage tanks and associated ...

241

vent a serious depletion of the resource. Scientists accurately predicted catch  

E-print Network

vent a serious depletion of the resource. Scientists accurately predicted catch declines of which Polish, Yugoslavian, Russian, German, and Italian Fishery Translations Are Available A limited number of the following Polish, Russian and Yugoslav publi- cations translated and printed

242

Maintenance of the classroom health education curricula: results from the CATCH-ON study.  

PubMed

Maintenance of the interactive Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health (CATCH) third- to fifth-grade curricula was studied in the 56 original intervention schools and 20 of the original control schools 5 years postintervention in four regions of the United States. Target grade teachers completed a self-administered survey that included questions regarding use of the CATCH materials, training in CATCH or other health education, barriers and perceived support for health education, and amount of health education currently taught. Percentage of teachers who continued to teach CATCH in the classroom was low; however, percentages were significantly higher in former intervention compared with control schools, even though control schools received training and materials following the main field trial. The results of this study can provide useful information for future development of classroom health promotion materials with a higher level of sustainability. PMID:12929898

Johnson, Carolyn C; Li, Donglin; Galati, Todd; Pedersen, Sheryl; Smyth, Mary; Parcel, Guy S

2003-08-01

243

77 FR 66 - Western Pacific Fisheries; 2012 Annual Catch Limits and Accountability Measures  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Proposed Annual Catch Limit Specifications Table 1...specific areas, changes to bag limits, or restrictions in effort...take action to correct the operational issue that caused the ACL...cannot, however, speculate on operational measures or the...

2012-01-03

244

78 FR 77089 - Pacific Island Fisheries; 2014 Annual Catch Limits and Accountability Measures  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...ACL requirements. Proposed Annual Catch Limit Specifications Table 1--American...closing specific areas, changing to bag limits, or restricting effort. However, local...NMFS would take action to correct the operational issue that caused the ACL overage....

2013-12-20

245

Maintenance of caspase-3 proenzyme dormancy by an intrinsic "safety catch" regulatory tripeptide  

PubMed Central

Caspase-3 is synthesized as a dormant proenzyme and is maintained in an inactive conformation by an Asp-Asp-Asp “safety-catch” regulatory tripeptide contained within a flexible loop near the large-subunit/small-subunit junction. Removal of this “safety catch” results in substantially enhanced autocatalytic maturation as well as increased vulnerability to proteolytic activation by upstream proteases in the apoptotic pathway such as caspase-9 and granzyme B. The safety catch functions through multiple ionic interactions that are disrupted by acidification, which occurs in the cytosol of cells during the early stages of apoptosis. We propose that the caspase-3 safety catch is a key regulatory checkpoint in the apoptotic cascade that regulates terminal events in the caspase cascade by modulating the triggering of caspase-3 activation. PMID:11353841

Roy, Sophie; Bayly, Christopher I.; Gareau, Yves; Houtzager, Vicky M.; Kargman, Stacia; Keen, Sabina L. C.; Rowland, Kathleen; Seiden, Isolde M.; Thornberry, Nancy A.; Nicholson, Donald W.

2001-01-01

246

Maintenance of caspase-3 proenzyme dormancy by an intrinsic "safety catch" regulatory tripeptide.  

PubMed

Caspase-3 is synthesized as a dormant proenzyme and is maintained in an inactive conformation by an Asp-Asp-Asp "safety-catch" regulatory tripeptide contained within a flexible loop near the large-subunit/small-subunit junction. Removal of this "safety catch" results in substantially enhanced autocatalytic maturation as well as increased vulnerability to proteolytic activation by upstream proteases in the apoptotic pathway such as caspase-9 and granzyme B. The safety catch functions through multiple ionic interactions that are disrupted by acidification, which occurs in the cytosol of cells during the early stages of apoptosis. We propose that the caspase-3 safety catch is a key regulatory checkpoint in the apoptotic cascade that regulates terminal events in the caspase cascade by modulating the triggering of caspase-3 activation. PMID:11353841

Roy, S; Bayly, C I; Gareau, Y; Houtzager, V M; Kargman, S; Keen, S L; Rowland, K; Seiden, I M; Thornberry, N A; Nicholson, D W

2001-05-22

247

Researchers develop new search tool to help fight child porn, catch cyber  

E-print Network

Researchers develop new search tool to help fight child porn, catch cyber thieves Canada Standard a comment... Post to Facebook 0 0 New #12;Researchers develop new search tool to help fight child porn

Fung, Benjamin C. M.

248

Effects of Catch-and-Release Angling on Salmonids at Elevated Water Temperatures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Few studies have assessed catch-and-release mortality of salmonids at water temperatures of 23°C or above, despite predictions of warming stream temperatures due to climate change. The primary objective of this study was to measure the catch-and-release mortality of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, brown trout Salmo trutta, and mountain whitefish Prosopium williamsoni in three water temperature treatments, namely, when daily maximum

James W. Boyd; Christopher S. Guy; Travis B. Horton; Stephen A. Leathe

2010-01-01

249

Perfecting the Catching-up: The Case of Taiwan's Motorcycle Industry  

Microsoft Academic Search

The final stage of the catching-up process has formidable hurdles. This paper examines the case of Taiwan’s motorcycle industry and shows how latecomers overcame the hurdles. In the early 1990s, the two largest motorcycle makers in Taiwan, Sanyang and Kwang Yang, had completed the catching-up process and became independent from Honda, on which they had technologically depended since the early

Yukihito Sato

2009-01-01

250

Incidence of Sport Fishes in the Commercial Fish Catch from Kentucky Lake, Kentucky and Tennessee  

Microsoft Academic Search

On-board observers accompanied commercial fishermen on Kentucky Lake and recorded the occurrences of sport fishes in gill-net, bait-line, and hoop-net catches. Sport fishes constituted 0.5% of the total catch on bait lines, 0.1% in hoop nets, and 3.9% in gill nets. The most common incidental sport species caught were freshwater drum Aplodinotus grunniens and small yellow bass Morone mississippiensis on

Tom J. Timmons; Tim Hoffnagle; R. Scott Hale; John B. Soldo

1989-01-01

251

Combining telephone surveys and fishing catches self-report: the French sea bass recreational fishery assessment.  

PubMed

Fisheries statistics are known to be underestimated, since they are mainly based on information about commercial fisheries. However, various types of fishing activities exist and evaluating them is necessary for implementing effective management plans. This paper assesses the characteristics and catches of the French European sea bass recreational fishery along the Atlantic coasts, through the combination of large-scale telephone surveys and fishing diaries study. Our results demonstrated that half of the total catches (mainly small fish) were released at sea and that the mean length of a kept sea bass was 46.6 cm. We highlighted different patterns of fishing methods and type of gear used. Catches from boats were greater than from the shore, both in abundance and biomass, considering mean values per fishing trip as well as CPUE. Spearfishers caught the highest biomass of sea bass per fishing trip, but the fishing rod with lure was the most effective type of gear in terms of CPUE. Longlines had the highest CPUE value in abundance but not in biomass: they caught numerous but small sea bass. Handlines were less effective, catching few sea bass in both abundance and biomass. We estimated that the annual total recreational sea bass catches was 3,173 tonnes of which 2,345 tonnes were kept. Since the annual commercial catches landings were evaluated at 5,160 tonnes, recreational landings represent 30% of the total fishing catches on the Atlantic coasts of France. Using fishers' self-reports was a valuable way to obtain new information on data-poor fisheries. Our results underline the importance of evaluating recreational fishing as a part of the total amount of fisheries catches. More studies are critically needed to assess overall fish resources caught in order to develop effective fishery management tools. PMID:24489885

Rocklin, Delphine; Levrel, Harold; Drogou, Mickaël; Herfaut, Johanna; Veron, Gérard

2014-01-01

252

Main tank injection pressurization program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Computer program predicts performance of fluorine-hydrogen main tank injection pressurization system for full range of liquid-hydrogen-fueled space vehicles. Analytical model includes provisions for heat transfer, injectant jet penetration, and ullage gas mixing. Analysis predicts GF2 usage, ullage gas and tank wall temperatures, and LH2 evaporation.

Cady, E. C.; Kendle, D. W.

1972-01-01

253

1990 waste tank inspection program  

SciTech Connect

Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site separations processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Tank conditions are evaluated by inspection using periscopes, still photography, and video systems for visual imagery. Inspections made in 1990 are the subject of this report.

McNatt, F.G.

1990-01-01

254

1990 waste tank inspection program  

SciTech Connect

Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site separations processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Tank conditions are evaluated by inspection using periscopes, still photography, and video systems for visual imagery. Inspections made in 1990 are the subject of this report.

McNatt, F.G.

1990-12-31

255

Thermal stratification in storage tanks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The future of solar energy as a commerical source of energy critically depends on cost reduction and\\/or improvement in the performance of solar systems. Use of a properly designed thermocline storage tank is one factor in reducing overall solar system costs. Thermal stratification of a fluid in storage tank is a natural process that takes place due to the decreased

M. A. Abdoly

1981-01-01

256

Catch Rates, Composition and Fish Size from Reefs Managed with Periodically-Harvested Closures  

PubMed Central

Periodically-harvested closures are commonly employed within co-management frameworks to help manage small-scale, multi-species fisheries in the Indo-Pacific. Despite their widespread use, the benefits of periodic harvesting strategies for multi-species fisheries have, to date, been largely untested. We examine catch and effort data from four periodically-harvested reef areas and 55 continuously-fished reefs in Solomon Islands. We test the hypothesis that fishing in periodically-harvested closures would yield: (a) higher catch rates, (b) proportionally more short lived, fast growing, sedentary taxa, and (c) larger finfish and invertebrates, compared to catches from reefs continuously open to fishing. Our study showed that catch rates were significantly higher from periodically-harvested closures for gleaning of invertebrates, but not for line and spear fishing. The family level composition of catches did not vary significantly between open reefs and periodically-harvested closures. Fish captured from periodically-harvested closures were slightly larger, but Trochus niloticus were significantly smaller than those from continuously open reefs. In one case of intense and prolonged harvesting, gleaning catch rates significantly declined, suggesting invertebrate stocks were substantially depleted in the early stages of the open period. Our study suggests periodically-harvested closures can have some short term benefits via increasing harvesting efficiency. However, we did not find evidence that the strategy had substantially benefited multi-species fin-fisheries. PMID:24066044

Cohen, Philippa Jane; Alexander, Timothy J.

2013-01-01

257

In-tank photo analysis  

SciTech Connect

This report documents an analysis performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) of photographs showing the interior of a single shell tank (SST) at the Hanford site. This report shows that in-tank photos can be used to create a plan-view map of the waste surface inside a tank, and that measuring the elevation of the waste surface from the photos is possible, but not accurate enough to be useful at this time. In-tank photos were acquired for Tanks BX111 and T111. The BX111 photos were used to create the waste surface map and to measure the waste surface elevation. T111 photos were used to measure the waste surface elevation. Uncertainty analyses of the mapping and surface elevation are included to show the accuracy of the calculations for both methods.

Vorvick, C.A.; Baird, D.B.; Heasler, P.G. [and others

1995-09-01

258

Supporting document for the Southeast Quadrant historical tank content estimate report for SY-tank farm  

SciTech Connect

Historical Tank Content Estimate of the Southeast Quadrant provides historical evaluations on a tank by tank basis of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the underground double-shell tanks of the Hanford 200 East and West Areas. This report summarizes historical information such as waste history, temperature profiles, psychrometric data, tank integrity, inventory estimates and tank level history on a tank by tank basis. Tank Farm aerial photos and in-tank photos of each tank are provided. A brief description of instrumentation methods used for waste tank surveillance are included. Components of the data management effort, such as Waste Status and Transaction Record Summary, Tank Layer Model, Supernatant Mixing Model, Defined Waste Types, and Inventory Estimates which generate these tank content estimates, are also given in this report.

Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Consort, S.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-12-31

259

Catching the Light - The Entwined History of Light and Mind  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In 1910, the surgeons Moreau and LePrince wrote about their successful operation on an eight-year-old boy who had been blind since birth because of cataracts. When the boy's eyes were healed they removed the bandages and, waving a hand in front of the child's physically perfect eyes, asked him what he saw. "I don't know," was his only reply. What he saw was only a varying brightness in front of him. However, when allowed to touch the hand as it began to move, he cried out in a voice of triumph, "It's moving!" He could feel it move, but he still needed laboriously to learn to see it move. Light and eyes were not enough to grant him sight. How, then, do we see? What's the difference between seeing and perception? What is light? From ancient times to the present, from philosophers to quantum physicists, nothing has so perplexed, so fascinated, so captivated the mind as the elusive definition of light. In Catching the Light , Arthur Zajonc takes us on an epic journey into history, tracing how humans have endeavored to understand the phenomenon of light. Blending mythology, religion, science, literature, and painting, Zajonc reveals in poetic detail the human struggle to identify the vital connection between the outer light of nature and the inner light of the human spirit. He explains the curiousness of the Greeks' blue and green "color blindness": Odysseus gazing longingly at the "wine-dark sea"; the use of chloros (green) as the color of honey in Homer's Odessey ; and Euripides' use of the color green to describe the hue of tears and blood. He demonstrates the complexity of perception through the work of Paul Cézanne--the artist standing on the bank of a river, painting the same scene over and over again, the motifs multiplying before his eyes. And Zajonc goes on to show how our quest for an understanding of light, as well as the conclusions we draw, reveals as much about the nature of our own psyche as it does about the nature of light itself. For the ancient Egyptians the nature of light was clear--it simply was the gaze of God. In the hands of the ancient Greeks, light had become the luminous inner fire whose ethereal effluence brought sight. In our contemporary world of modern quantum physics, science plays the greatest part in our theories of light's origin--from scientific perspectives such as Sir Isaac Newton's "corpuscular theory of light" and Michael Faraday's "lines of force" to such revolutionary ideas as Max Planck's "discrete motion of a pendulum" (the basis of quantum mechanics), Albert Einstein's "particles of light" and "theory of relativity," and Niels Bohr's "quantum jumps." Yet the metaphysical aspects of the scientific search, Zajonc shows, still loom large. For the physicist Richard Feynman, a quantum particle travels all paths, eventually distilling to one path whose action is least--the most beautiful path of all. Whatever light is, here is where we will find it. With rare clarity and unmatched lyricism, Zajonc illuminates the profound implications of the relationships between the multifaceted strands of human experience and scientific endeavor. A fascinating search into our deepest scientific mystery, Catching the Light is a brilliant synthesis that will both entertain and inform.

Zajonc, Arthur

1995-04-01

260

10/6/13 To catch a cyber-thief www.ecnmag.com/news/2013/06/catch-cyber-thief 1/8  

E-print Network

IN REGISTERFIND MY COMPANY News ADVERTISEMENT To catch a cyber-thief Wed, 06/05/2013 - 11:20am by Concordia Montreal, June 5, 2013 ­ When local police came calling with child porn allegations last January, former common medium used by scammers, identity thieves and child exploitation criminals. But this type of data

Fung, Benjamin C. M.

261

Comparison of the Species Composition, Catch Rate, and Length Distribution of the Catch from Trap Nets with Three Different Mesh and Throat Size Combinations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Trap nets of varying design are commonly used to assess fish populations, but the effect of the design on gear selectivity is not well known. In particular, it may be advantageous to use multiple net designs with different mesh and throat sizes to maximize the catch of specific length-classes and to minimize the risk of predation on small fish by

Daniel E. Shoup; Robert E. Carlson; Robert T. Heath; Mark W. Kershner

2003-01-01

262

Insulated solar storage tanks  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the theoretical and experimental investigation of an insulated parallelepiped, outdoor solar, water-filled storage tank of size 1 m {times} 0.5 m {times} 0.3 m, that is made from galvanized iron. The absorption coefficient of the insulating material has been determined. The effects of plastic covers and insulation thickness on the water temperature and the energy gained or lost by water are investigated. Moreover, the effects of insulation thickness on the temperature profiles of the insulating material are discussed. The results show that the absorption coefficient decreases as the insulation thickness increases. Also, it is found that the glass wool insulation of 2.5 cm thickness has the best results compared with the other thicknesses (5 cm, 7.5 cm, and 10 cm) as far as the water temperature and the energy gained by water are concerned.

Eldighidy, S.M. (Sultan Qaboos Univ., Muscat (Oman))

1991-01-01

263

Ripple Tank Model for Teachers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Ripple Tank Model for Teachers allows instructors to simulate 2D wave interference. A ripple tank is a shallow glass tank of water used to demonstrate the basic properties of waves. The tank is usually illuminated from above, so that the light shines through the water. The ripples on the water show up as shadows on the screen underneath the tank. In the default visualization the wave crests and troughs are shown as red and blue. Users can change the number of sources, their amplitude and phase, and other parameters. Selecting student mode repackages the modified simulation into a stand-alone jar file with fewer options for classroom use. The Ripple Tank Model for Teachers was created using the Easy Java Simulations (EJS) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the ejs_waves_teacher_RippleTank.jar file will run the program if Java is installed.

Christian, Wolfgang

2012-06-09

264

49 CFR 179.220 - General specifications applicable to nonpressure tank car tanks consisting of an inner container...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...General specifications applicable to nonpressure tank car tanks consisting of an inner container supported...MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

2010-10-01

265

49 CFR 179.221 - Individual specification requirements applicable to tank car tanks consisting of an inner...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Individual specification requirements applicable to tank car tanks consisting of an inner container supported...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

2011-10-01

266

49 CFR 179.200 - General specifications applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks (Class DOT-111).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...specifications applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks (Class DOT-111). 179.200 Section...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

2011-10-01

267

49 CFR 179.200 - General specifications applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks (Class DOT-111).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...specifications applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks (Class DOT-111). 179.200 Section...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

2012-10-01

268

49 CFR 179.200 - General specifications applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks (Class DOT-111).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...specifications applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks (Class DOT-111). 179.200 Section...MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

2010-10-01

269

49 CFR 179.221 - Individual specification requirements applicable to tank car tanks consisting of an inner...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Individual specification requirements applicable to tank car tanks consisting of an inner container supported...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

2013-10-01

270

49 CFR 179.220 - General specifications applicable to nonpressure tank car tanks consisting of an inner container...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...General specifications applicable to nonpressure tank car tanks consisting of an inner container supported...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

2011-10-01

271

49 CFR 179.200 - General specifications applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks (Class DOT-111).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...specifications applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks (Class DOT-111). 179.200 Section...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

2013-10-01

272

49 CFR 179.220 - General specifications applicable to nonpressure tank car tanks consisting of an inner container...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...General specifications applicable to nonpressure tank car tanks consisting of an inner container supported...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

2012-10-01

273

49 CFR 179.220 - General specifications applicable to nonpressure tank car tanks consisting of an inner container...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...General specifications applicable to nonpressure tank car tanks consisting of an inner container supported...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

2013-10-01

274

49 CFR 179.221 - Individual specification requirements applicable to tank car tanks consisting of an inner...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Individual specification requirements applicable to tank car tanks consisting of an inner container supported...MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

2010-10-01

275

49 CFR 179.221 - Individual specification requirements applicable to tank car tanks consisting of an inner...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Individual specification requirements applicable to tank car tanks consisting of an inner container supported...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

2012-10-01

276

10/16/12 10:53 AMNew Test Could Catch Autism Earlier Than Ever | The Stir Page 1 of 5http://thestir.cafemom.com/baby/143625/new_test_could_catch_autism  

E-print Network

10/16/12 10:53 AMNew Test Could Catch Autism Earlier Than Ever | The Stir Page 1 of 5http://thestir.cafemom.com/baby/143625/new_test_could_catch_autism Comments (6) | I Like ThisTweetTweet 6 New Test Could Catch Autism obsessed with milestones? A new test for autism that could diagnose kids on the spectrum as young as 6

Itti, Laurent

277

LeukoCatch, a quick and efficient tool for the preparation of leukocyte extracts from blood  

PubMed Central

Background Whole-protein extracts from peripheral blood leukocytes are ideal for basic and clinical research. However, lack of a simple preparation technique has limited the use of such extracts. The aim of this study is to develop a simple and easy system that can selectively obtain leukocyte extracts without hemoglobin. Methods A filter that captures the leukocytes but not RBCs was set at the bottom of a 10-mL medical syringe by sandwiching it between plastic stoppers. The capturing efficiency of leukocytes with this tool, called LeukoCatch, was examined using human macrophage cells (MONO-MAC-6). The abilities of LeukoCatch system to capture the leukocyte proteins and to remove the hemoglobin from RBCs were tested by western blot analysis using human blood samples. Results This study presents the development of LeukoCatch, a novel tool that allows the preparation of leukocyte extracts from blood samples within 3 min without centrifugation. Tissue-cultured human macrophage cells were tested to determine the optimal filter numbers and pass-through frequencies of LeukoCatch, which was then applied to 2-mL blood samples. Samples were passed 2~5 times through a LeukoCatch equipped with 5 filters, washed twice with phosphate-buffered saline for red cell removal, and leukocyte proteins were extracted with 0.5 mL of elution buffer. Western blot analysis of the purified extract indicated that more than 90% of hemoglobin was removed by the LeukoCatch and that the protein recovery rate of leukocytes was at least 4 times better than that of the conventional centrifugation method. Conclusion We conclude that LeukoCatch is useful not only for diagnosis at the bedside but also for basic research using blood samples or tissue culture cells. PMID:21849019

2011-01-01

278

Spatial-temporal dynamics of stable fly (Diptera: Muscidae) trap catches in Eastern Nebraska.  

PubMed

Spatial and temporal relationships among catches of adult stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.), on sticky traps in eastern Nebraska were evaluated. Twenty-five alsynite sticky traps were placed in a 5 by 5 grid with ?1.6-km intervals in a mixed agricultural environment from 2003 to 2011. Denser grids of 45-90 traps were implemented for varying lengths of time during the course of the study. More than two million stable flies were collected over 9 yr. Seasonal abundances based upon total collections from the primary grid of 25 traps were bimodal most years with population peaks in June and September or October. Individual trap catches varied greatly, both spatially and temporally. Trap catches were spatially aggregated with autocorrelation extending to ?2 km. Synchrony among trap catches declined linearly with respect to distance between traps and differences in seasonal distribution increased asymptotically relative to distance between traps. Proximity to confined livestock facilities increased catch and proportion of catch collected later in the season. Fifteen to 20 traps were adequate for estimating stable fly populations with the standard error of the mean equal to 30% of the mean for most of the stable fly season. Early and late in the season, when mean trap catches were low, between 100 and 135 traps would be needed to maintain that level of confidence. Seasonal collection distributions from permutations of subsets of the data with fewer than 24 traps differed significantly from those of the complete grid of 25 traps, indicating that 20 or more traps may be needed to evaluate the seasonal dynamics of a stable fly population. PMID:23726061

Taylor, David B; Friesen, Kristina; Zhu, Junwei Jerry

2013-06-01

279

Tank characterization report for single shell tank 241-A-102  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the information on the historical uses, present status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste stored in Tank 241-A-102. This report supports the requirements of Tri-party Agreement Milestone M-44-09.

Jo, J., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-29

280

Tank 241-AP-107 tank characterization plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has directed the DOE to concentrate ear-term sampling and analysis activities on identification and resolution of issues (Conway 1993). The Data Quality Objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used in the resolution of safety issues. As a result, a revision in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestone M-44-00 has been made, which states that ``A Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) will be developed for each double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process; Development of TCPs by the DQO process is intended to allow users (e.g., Hanford Facility user groups, regulators) to ensure their needs will be met and that resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information.`` This document satisfies that requirement for the tank 241-AP-107 (AP-107).

Schreiber, R.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-01-20

281

Tank 241-BX-103 tank characterization plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan that identifies the information needed to address relevant issues concerning short-term and long-term safe storage and long-term management of Single-Shell Tank (SST) 241-BX-103.

Homi, C.S.

1995-10-04

282

Tank 241-C-103 tank characterization plan. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan that identifies the information needed to address relevant issues concerning short-term and long-term safe storage and long-term management of Single-Shell Tank (SST) 241-C-103.

Homi, C.S.

1995-10-04

283

Tank vapor mitigation requirements for Hanford Tank Farms  

SciTech Connect

Westinghouse Hanford Company has contracted Los Alamos Technical Associates to listing of vapors and aerosols that are or may be emitted from the High Level Waste (HLW) tanks at Hanford. Mitigation requirements under Federal and State law, as well as DOE Orders, are included in the listing. The lists will be used to support permitting activities relative to tank farm ventilation system up-grades. This task is designated Task 108 under MJB-SWV-312057 and is an extension of efforts begun under Task 53 of Purchase Order MPB-SVV-03291 5 for Mechanical Engineering Support. The results of that task, which covered only thirty-nine tanks, are repeated here to provide a single source document for vapor mitigation requirements for all 177 HLW tanks.

Rakestraw, L.D.

1994-11-15

284

Tank characterization report for double shell tank 241-AP-104  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the information on the historical uses, present status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste stored in Tank 241-AP-104. This report supports the requirements of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-44-09.

Winkelman, W.D., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-08-07

285

Buffer Tank Design for Acceptable Control Performance  

E-print Network

Buffer Tank Design for Acceptable Control Performance Audun Faanes and Sigurd Skogestad for the design of buffer tanks. We consider mainly the case where the objective of the buffer tank is to dampen-mail: skoge@chemeng.ntnu.no, Tel.: +47 73 59 41 54, Fax.: +47 73 59 40 80 1 #12;1 Introduction Buffer tanks

Skogestad, Sigurd

286

COMMERCIAL BY-CATCH RATES OF BLUE SHARK (PRIONACE GLAUCA) FROM LONGLINE FISHERIES IN THE CANADIAN ATLANTIC  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY There is no directed fishery for blue sharks (Prionace glauca) in Canadian waters, and virtually all blue sharks caught as by-catch in pelagic longline fisheries are discarded at sea. Based on an extensive series of observer measurements, total by-catch by both observed and unobserved vessels was estimated since 1986. Total blue shark by-catch has averaged over 2000 t annually

G. M. Fowler; S. E. Campana

2009-01-01

287

Changes in Nutrient Intakes of Elementary School Children Following a School-Based Intervention: Results from the CATCH Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background.Twenty-four-hour recalls were used to assess the change in nutrient intake among elementary-age school children exposed to the Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health (CATCH). The purpose of this paper is to compare changes in nutrient intakes between treatment groups, sexes, ethnic groups, and the four CATCH sites.Methods.Twenty-four-hour recalls were administered to a subsample of the CATCH cohort at

Leslie A. Lytle; Elaine J. Stone; Milton Z. Nichaman; Cheryl L. Perry; Deanna H. Montgomery; Theresa A. Nicklas; Michelle M. Zive; Paul Mitchell; Johanna T. Dwyer; Mary Kay Ebzery; Marguerite A. Evans; Todd P. Galati

1996-01-01

288

Cross-country Catch-up in the Manufacturing Sector: Impacts of Heterogeneity on Convergence and Technology Adoption  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract We analyze how technology transfer from a leading economy,affects followers’ productivity growth in manufacturingsectors and Gross Domestic Product. Allowing for heterogeneous technology levels we explore how this impacts rates of catch-up in labor productivity across manufacturing,sectors and GDP for 16 OECD nations. Our results indicate that aggregate studies bias downward the estimated rates of catch-up. These rates of catch-up,

Patrik T. Hultberg; M. Ishaq Nadiri; Robin C. Sickles

2003-01-01

289

Tank 48 Chemical Destruction - 13237  

SciTech Connect

Small tank copper-catalyzed peroxide oxidation (CCPO) is a potentially viable technology to facilitate the destruction of tetraphenylborate (TPB) organic solids contained within the Tank 48H waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS). A maturation strategy was created that identified a number of near-term development activities required to determine the viability of the CCPO process, and subsequent disposition of the CCPO effluent. Critical activities included laboratory scale validation of the process and identification of forward transfer paths for the CCPO effluent. The technical documentation and the successful application of the CCPO process on simulated Tank 48 waste confirm that the CCPO process is a viable process for the disposition of the Tank 48 contents. (authors)

Simner, Steven P.; Aponte, Celia I.; Brass, Earl A. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC, Savannah River Remediation, Savannah River Site, Building 766-H, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation, LLC, Savannah River Remediation, Savannah River Site, Building 766-H, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01

290

Weather in a Tank (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

';Weather in a Tank' is an approach to teaching atmospheres, oceans and climate which uses rotating laboratory demonstrations and associated curriculum materials. Originating at MIT, the approach has been further developed and expanded through collaborations with many Professors in universities across the country and around the world. The aim of the project is to offer instructors a repertoire of rotating tank experiments and a curriculum in fluid dynamics to better assist students in making connections between phenomena in the real world and basic principles of rotating fluid dynamics. The approach also provides a context for interactive experiments in which data is collected in real-time and then analyzed. In this presentation we will illustrate the ideas behind ';Weather in a Tank' by performing (if possible) some live laboratory experiments using rotating tanks of water, dyes and ice buckets, emphasizing the kind of quantitative approach we use in our teaching.

Illari, L.

2013-12-01

291

Too much of a good thing? When to stop catch-up vaccination.  

PubMed

During the 20th century, deaths from a range of serious infectious diseases decreased dramatically due to the development of safe and effective vaccines. However, infant immunization coverage has increased only marginally since the 1960s, and many people remain susceptible to vaccine-preventable diseases. "Catch-up vaccination" for age groups beyond infancy can be an attractive and effective means of immunizing people who were missed earlier. However, as newborn vaccination rates increase, catch-up vaccination becomes less attractive: the number of susceptible people decreases, so the cost to find and vaccinate each unvaccinated person may increase; in addition, the number of infected individuals decreases, so each unvaccinated person faces a lower risk of infection. This article presents a general framework for determining the optimal time to discontinue a catch-up vaccination program. We use a cost-effectiveness framework: we consider the cost per quality-adjusted life year gained of catch-up vaccination efforts as a function of newborn immunization rates over time and consequent disease prevalence and incidence. We illustrate our results with the example of hepatitis B catch-up vaccination in China. We contrast results from a dynamic modeling approach with an approach that ignores the impact of vaccination on future disease incidence. The latter approach is likely to be simpler for decision makers to understand and implement because of lower data requirements. PMID:23858015

Hutton, David W; Brandeau, Margaret L

2013-10-01

292

Too Much of a Good Thing? When to Stop Catch-Up Vaccination  

PubMed Central

During the 20th century, deaths from a range of serious infectious diseases decreased dramatically due to the development of safe and effective vaccines. However, infant immunization coverage has increased only marginally since the 1960s, and many people remain susceptible to vaccine-preventable diseases. “Catch-up vaccination” for age groups beyond infancy can be an attractive and effective means of immunizing people who were missed earlier. However, as newborn vaccination rates increase, catch-up vaccination becomes less attractive: the number of susceptible people decreases, so the cost to find and vaccinate each unvaccinated person may increase; additionally, the number of infected individuals decreases, so each unvaccinated person faces a lower risk of infection. This paper presents a general framework for determining the optimal time to discontinue a catch-up vaccination program. We use a cost-effectiveness framework: we consider the cost per quality-adjusted life year gained of catch-up vaccination efforts, as a function of newborn immunization rates over time and consequent disease prevalence and incidence. We illustrate our results with the example of hepatitis B catch-up vaccination in China. We contrast results from a dynamic modeling approach with an approach that ignores the impact of vaccination on future disease incidence. The latter approach is likely to be simpler for decision makers to understand and implement because of lower data requirements. PMID:23858015

Hutton, David W.; Brandeau, Margaret L.

2014-01-01

293

A Role for Adipose Tissue De Novo Lipogenesis in Glucose Homeostasis During Catch-up Growth  

PubMed Central

Catch-up growth, a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, is characterized by hyperinsulinemia and accelerated body fat recovery. Using a rat model of semistarvation-refeeding that exhibits catch-up fat, we previously reported that during refeeding on a low-fat diet, glucose tolerance is normal but insulin-dependent glucose utilization is decreased in skeletal muscle and increased in adipose tissue, where de novo lipogenic capacity is concomitantly enhanced. Here we report that isocaloric refeeding on a high-fat (HF) diet blunts the enhanced in vivo insulin-dependent glucose utilization for de novo lipogenesis (DNL) in adipose tissue. These are shown to be early events of catch-up growth that are independent of hyperphagia and precede the development of overt adipocyte hypertrophy, adipose tissue inflammation, or defective insulin signaling. These results suggest a role for enhanced DNL as a glucose sink in regulating glycemia during catch-up growth, which is blunted by exposure to an HF diet, thereby contributing, together with skeletal muscle insulin resistance, to the development of glucose intolerance. Our findings are presented as an extension of the Randle cycle hypothesis, whereby the suppression of DNL constitutes a mechanism by which dietary lipids antagonize glucose utilization for storage as triglycerides in adipose tissue, thereby impairing glucose homeostasis during catch-up growth. PMID:22961086

Marcelino, Helena; Veyrat-Durebex, Christelle; Summermatter, Serge; Sarafian, Delphine; Miles-Chan, Jennifer; Arsenijevic, Denis; Zani, Fabio; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Seydoux, Josiane; Solinas, Giovanni; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, Francoise; Dulloo, Abdul G.

2013-01-01

294

Method for underground storage tank abandoment  

SciTech Connect

A method of abandoning an empty used underground storage tank and rendering the underground tank unusable for the storage of any liquid material is described. The method consists of introducing polyurethane foam material into the underground tank and allowing the polyurethane foam material to become rigid. The polyurethane foam material substantially completely and tightly fills the underground tank and any of its connecting lines. The method is performed without creating or requiring a large hole in the underground tank.

Dugger, M.D.

1987-09-15

295

Corrosion testing in flash tanks  

SciTech Connect

As kraft pulp mills adopt modified cooking processes, an increasing amount of corrosion of carbon steel digester systems is being encountered. Many mills have had severe corrosion in the flash tanks, in particular, the first ({number{underscore}sign}1) flash tank. The work described in this report was aimed at characterizing the corrosion. Coupons of carbon steel, several stainless steels and titanium were exposed at two mills. At mill A, identical sets of coupons were exposed in the {number{underscore}sign}1 and {number{underscore}sign}2 flash tank. At mill B, three identical sets of coupons were placed in flash tank {number{underscore}sign}1. The results of the exposures showed that both carbon steel and titanium suffered high rates of general corrosion, while the stainless steels suffered varying degrees of localized attack. The ranking of the resistance of corrosion in the flash tank was the same ranking as would be expected in a reducing acid environment. In the light of the coupon results, organic acids is concluded to be the most likely cause of corrosion of the flash tanks.

Clarke, S.J.; Stead, N.J.

1999-07-01

296

40 CFR 280.230 - Operating an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-07-01 false Operating an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system. 280.230 Section 280.230...REQUIREMENTS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS (UST) Lender Liability §...

2012-07-01

297

40 CFR 280.230 - Operating an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-07-01 false Operating an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system. 280.230 Section 280.230...REQUIREMENTS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS (UST) Lender Liability §...

2013-07-01

298

40 CFR 280.230 - Operating an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-07-01 false Operating an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system. 280.230 Section 280.230...REQUIREMENTS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS (UST) Lender Liability §...

2011-07-01

299

33 CFR 157.208 - Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks Operations Manual for foreign tank vessels: Submission.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks Operations Manual...208 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT...CARRYING OIL IN BULK Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks on Tank...

2010-07-01

300

ROBOTIC TANK INSPECTION END EFFECTOR  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this contract between Oceaneering Space Systems (OSS) and the Department of Energy (DOE) was to provide a tool for the DOE to inspect the inside tank walls of underground radioactive waste storage tanks in their tank farms. Some of these tanks are suspected to have leaks, but the harsh nature of the environment within the tanks precludes human inspection of tank walls. As a result of these conditions only a few inspection methods can fulfill this task. Of the methods available, OSS chose to pursue Alternating Current Field Measurement (ACFM), because it does not require clean surfaces for inspection, nor any contact with the Surface being inspected, and introduces no extra by-products in the inspection process (no coupling fluids or residues are left behind). The tool produced by OSS is the Robotic Tank Inspection End Effector (RTIEE), which is initially deployed on the tip of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA). The RTEE combines ACFM with a color video camera for both electromagnetic and visual inspection The complete package consists of an end effector, its corresponding electronics and software, and a user's manual to guide the operator through an inspection. The system has both coarse and fine inspection modes and allows the user to catalog defects and suspected areas of leakage in a database for further examination, which may lead to emptying the tank for repair, decommissioning, etc.. The following is an updated report to OSS document OSS-21100-7002, which was submitted in 1995. During the course of the contract, two related subtasks arose, the Wall and Coating Thickness Sensor and the Vacuum Scarifying and Sampling Tool Assembly. The first of these subtasks was intended to evaluate the corrosion and wall thinning of 55-gallon steel drums. The second was retrieved and characterized the waste material trapped inside the annulus region of the underground tanks on the DOE's tank farms. While these subtasks were derived from the original intent of the contract, the focus remains on the RTIEE.

Rachel Landry

1999-10-01

301

Tank characterization report for single-shell Tank 241B110  

Microsoft Academic Search

Single-shell Tank 241-B-110 is an underground storage tank containing radioactive waste. The tank was sampled at various times between August and November of 1989 and later in April of 1990. The analytical data gathered from these sampling efforts were used to generate this Tank Characterization Report. Tank 241-B-110, located in the 200 East Area B Tank Farm, was constructed in

L. C. Amato; D. S. De Lorenzo; A. T. DiCenso; J. H. Rutherford; R. H. Stephens; P. G. Heasler; T. M. Brown; B. C. Simpson

1994-01-01

302

Effects of Catch-and-Release Angling on Salmonids at Elevated Water Temperatures  

SciTech Connect

Few studies have assessed catch and release mortality of salmonids at water temperatures ?23°C, despite predictions of warming stream temperatures due to climate change. In addition, the effects of diel temperature fluctuations on salmonid mortality have largely been ignored in catch and release angling studies. The primary objective of this study was to measure catch and release mortality of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, brown trout Salmo trutta, and mountain whitefish Prosopium williamsoni in three water temperature treatments; when daily maximum water temperatures were cool (<20°C), warm (20 to 22.9°C), and hot ( 23°C). A secondary objective was to assess catch and release mortality of salmonids angled in morning and evening within water-temperature treatments. These objectives were related to Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks’ Drought Fishing Closure Policy (DFCP). Angling (fly-fishing only) occurred in the Gallatin and Smith rivers. All angled fish were confined to in-stream holding cages and monitored for mortality for 72 h. Mortality of rainbow trout peaked at 16% in the Gallatin River and 9% in the Smith River during the hot treatment. Mortality of brown trout was less than 5% in all water-temperature treatments in both rivers. Mountain whitefish mortality peaked at 28% in the hot treatment in the Smith River. No mortality for any species occurred in either river when daily maximum water temperatures were <20°C. Mortality of rainbow trout peaked at 16% in the evening hot treatment in the Smith River. Mortality of brown trout and mountain whitefish was not related to time of day. The catch and release mortality values presented here likely represent fishing mortality given that most anglers in southwest Montana practice catch and release angling. The mortality values we observed were lower than predicted (< 30%), given reports in the literature. The difference is likely related to the in situ nature of the study and periods of cooler water temperatures between peaks facilitating recovery from thermal stress.

Boyd, James W.; Guy, Christopher S.; Horton, Travis; Leathe, Steven A.

2010-08-01

303

The influence of Community Access to Child Health (CATCH) program on community pediatrics.  

PubMed

The CATCH (Community Access to Child Health) Program, which supports pediatricians who engage with the community to improve child health, increase access to health care, and promote advocacy through small seed grants, was last evaluated in 1998. The objective was to describe the characteristics of CATCH grant recipients and projects and assess the community impact of funded projects. Prospective data was collected from CATCH applications (grantee characteristics, topic area and target population for projects funded from 2006-2012) and post-project 2-year follow-up survey (project outcomes, sustainability, and impact for projects funded from 2008 through 2010). From 2006 through 2012, the CATCH Program awarded 401 projects to grantees working mostly in general pediatrics. Eighty-five percent of projects targeted children covered by Medicaid, 33% targeted uninsured children, and 75% involved a Latino population. Main topic areas addressed were nutrition, access to health care, and medical home. Sixty-nine percent of grantees from 2008 to 2010 responded to the follow-up survey. Ninety percent reported completing their projects, and 86% of those projects continued to exist in some form. Grantees reported the development of community partnerships (77%) and enhanced recognition of child health issues in the community (73%) as the most frequent changes due to the projects. The CATCH Program funds community-based projects led by pediatricians that address the medical home and access to care. A majority of these projects and community partnerships are sustained beyond their original CATCH funding and, in many cases, are leveraged into additional financial or other community support. PMID:24323996

Soares, Neelkamal S; Hobson, Wendy L; Ruch-Ross, Holly; Finneran, Maureen; Varrasso, Denia A; Keller, David

2014-01-01

304

Evaluation of tank waste transfers at 241-AW tank farm  

SciTech Connect

A number of waste transfers are needed to process and feed waste to the private contractors in support of Phase 1 Privatization. Other waste transfers are needed to support the 242-A Evaporator, saltwell pumping, and other ongoing Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) operations. The purpose of this evaluation is to determine if existing or planned equipment and systems are capable of supporting the Privatization Mission of the Tank Farms and continuing operations through the end of Phase 1B Privatization Mission. Projects W-211 and W-314 have been established and will support the privatization effort. Equipment and system upgrades provided by these projects (W-211 and W-314) will also support other ongoing operations in the tank farms. It is recognized that these projects do not support the entire transfer schedule represented in the Tank Waste Remediation system Operation and Utilization Plan. Additionally, transfers surrounding the 241-AW farm must be considered. This evaluation is provided as information, which will help to define transfer paths required to complete the Waste Feed Delivery (WFD) mission. This document is not focused on changing a particular project, but it is realized that new project work in the 241-AW Tank Farm is required.

Willis, W.L.

1998-05-27

305

Auxiliary resonant DC tank converter  

DOEpatents

An auxiliary resonant dc tank (ARDCT) converter is provided for achieving soft-switching in a power converter. An ARDCT circuit is coupled directly across a dc bus to the inverter to generate a resonant dc bus voltage, including upper and lower resonant capacitors connected in series as a resonant leg, first and second dc tank capacitors connected in series as a tank leg, and an auxiliary resonant circuit comprising a series combination of a resonant inductor and a pair of auxiliary switching devices. The ARDCT circuit further includes first clamping means for holding the resonant dc bus voltage to the dc tank voltage of the tank leg, and second clamping means for clamping the resonant dc bus voltage to zero during a resonant period. The ARDCT circuit resonantly brings the dc bus voltage to zero in order to provide a zero-voltage switching opportunity for the inverter, then quickly rebounds the dc bus voltage back to the dc tank voltage after the inverter changes state. The auxiliary switching devices are turned on and off under zero-current conditions. The ARDCT circuit only absorbs ripples of the inverter dc bus current, thus having less current stress. In addition, since the ARDCT circuit is coupled in parallel with the dc power supply and the inverter for merely assisting soft-switching of the inverter without participating in real dc power transmission and power conversion, malfunction and failure of the tank circuit will not affect the functional operation of the inverter; thus a highly reliable converter system is expected.

Peng, Fang Z. (Knoxville, TN)

2000-01-01

306

CHARACTERIZATION OF TANK 17 RESIDUAL WASTE  

SciTech Connect

Plans are to close Tank 17, a type IV waste tank in the F-area Tank Farm, by filling it with pumpable backfills. Most of the waste was removed from the tank in the late 1980s, and the remainder of the waste was removed in a short spray washing campaign that began on 11 April 1997. More details on the planned closure can be found in the Closure Plan for the High-Level Waste (HLW) Tanks and the specific closure module for Tank 17. To show that closure of the tank is environmentally sound, a performance evaluation has been performed for Tank 17. The performance evaluation projected the concentration of contaminants at various locations and times after closure. This report documents the basis for the inventories of contaminants that were used in the Tank 17 performance evaluation.

D'Entremont, P; Thomas Caldwell, T

1997-09-22

307

241-AY-101 Tank Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for tank 241-AY-101. The construction history of tank 241-AY-101 has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In tank 241-AY-101, the second double-shell tank constructed, similar issues as those with tank 241-AY-102 construction reoccurred. The overall extent of similary and affect on tank 241-AY-101 integrity is described herein.

Barnes, Travis J.; Gunter, Jason R.

2013-08-26

308

241-AW Tank Farm Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for the 241-AW tank farm. The construction history of the 241-AW tank farm has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In the 241-AW tank farm, the fourth double-shell tank farm constructed, similar issues as those with tank 241-AY-102 construction occured. The overall extent of similary and affect on 241-AW tank farm integrity is described herein.

Barnes, Travis J.; Gunter, Jason R.; Reeploeg, Gretchen E.

2013-11-19

309

TANK48 CFD MODELING ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank to ensure uniformity of the discharge stream. Mixing is accomplished with one to four dual-nozzle slurry pumps located within the tank liquid. For the work, a Tank 48 simulation model with a maximum of four slurry pumps in operation has been developed to estimate flow patterns for efficient solid mixing. The modeling calculations were performed by using two modeling approaches. One approach is a single-phase Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model to evaluate the flow patterns and qualitative mixing behaviors for a range of different modeling conditions since the model was previously benchmarked against the test results. The other is a two-phase CFD model to estimate solid concentrations in a quantitative way by solving the Eulerian governing equations for the continuous fluid and discrete solid phases over the entire fluid domain of Tank 48. The two-phase results should be considered as the preliminary scoping calculations since the model was not validated against the test results yet. A series of sensitivity calculations for different numbers of pumps and operating conditions has been performed to provide operational guidance for solids suspension and mixing in the tank. In the analysis, the pump was assumed to be stationary. Major solid obstructions including the pump housing, the pump columns, and the 82 inch central support column were included. The steady state and three-dimensional analyses with a two-equation turbulence model were performed with FLUENT{trademark} for the single-phase approach and CFX for the two-phase approach. Recommended operational guidance was developed assuming that local fluid velocity can be used as a measure of sludge suspension and spatial mixing under single-phase tank model. For quantitative analysis, a two-phase fluid-solid model was developed for the same modeling conditions as the single-phase model. The modeling results show that the flow patterns driven by four pump operation satisfy the solid suspension requirement, and the average solid concentration at the plane of the transfer pump inlet is about 12% higher than the tank average concentrations for the 70 inch tank level and about the same as the tank average value for the 29 inch liquid level. When one of the four pumps is not operated, the flow patterns are satisfied with the minimum suspension velocity criterion. However, the solid concentration near the tank bottom is increased by about 30%, although the average solid concentrations near the transfer pump inlet have about the same value as the four-pump baseline results. The flow pattern results show that although the two-pump case satisfies the minimum velocity requirement to suspend the sludge particles, it provides the marginal mixing results for the heavier or larger insoluble materials such as MST and KTPB particles. The results demonstrated that when more than one jet are aiming at the same position of the mixing tank domain, inefficient flow patterns are provided due to the highly localized momentum dissipation, resulting in inactive suspension zone. Thus, after completion of the indexed solids suspension, pump rotations are recommended to avoid producing the nonuniform flow patterns. It is noted that when tank liquid level is reduced from the highest level of 70 inches to the minimum level of 29 inches for a given number of operating pumps, the solid mixing efficiency becomes better since the ratio of the pump power to the mixing volume becomes larger. These results are consistent with the literature results.

Lee, S.

2011-05-17

310

Catch-tentacles in sea anemones: occurrence in Haliplanella luciae (Verrill) and a review of current knowledge  

Microsoft Academic Search

The occurrence of catch-tentacles or Fangtentakeln in the sea anemone Haliplanella luciae is reported for the first time, and some aspects of their anatomy and behaviour are noted. Provision is made for this discovery in the diagnoses of the family Haliplanellidae and the genus Haliplanella. The species of acontiarian anemones at present known to possess catch-tentacles are listed. The cnidom

R. B. Williams

1975-01-01

311

Seasonal Variation in Catch Rate and Body Condition for Four Fish Species in a South Dakota Natural Lake  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seasonal variation in catch rate (catch per unit effort, CPUE) and body condition (relative weight, Wr) for northern pike Esox lucius, black crappie Pomoxis nigromaculatus, yellow perch Perca flavescens, and walleye Stizostedion vitreum sampled with trap (modified fyke) nets was evaluated in Lake Madison, a natural lake in eastern South Dakota, from March through October, 1990. Seasonal variation in CPUE

Christopher S. Guy; David W. Willis

1991-01-01

312

Releasing recreationally caught fish to fight another day helps ensure there will be fish to catch today,  

E-print Network

Releasing recreationally caught fish to fight another day helps ensure there will be fish to catch today, tomorrow, and for anglers in the future. Catch and release fishing done correctly helps preserve your sport. What Do I Need To Know? Releasing a fish in a way which improves its probability

313

78 FR 75843 - Pacific Halibut Fisheries; Catch Sharing Plan for Guided Sport and Commercial Fisheries in Alaska  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Catch Sharing Plan for Guided Sport and Commercial Fisheries in Alaska; Final Rule Federal...Catch Sharing Plan for Guided Sport and Commercial Fisheries in Alaska AGENCY: National...for the guided sport (charter) and commercial fisheries for Pacific halibut in...

2013-12-12

314

76 FR 44155 - Pacific Halibut Fisheries; Catch Sharing Plan for Guided Sport and Commercial Fisheries in Alaska  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Catch Sharing Plan for Guided Sport and Commercial Fisheries in Alaska; Proposed Rule...Catch Sharing Plan for Guided Sport and Commercial Fisheries in Alaska AGENCY: National...sharing plan for the guided sport and commercial fisheries for Pacific halibut in...

2011-07-22

315

78 FR 44920 - Pacific Halibut Fisheries; Catch Sharing Plan for Guided Sport and Commercial Fisheries in Alaska...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...a catch sharing plan for the guided sport and commercial fisheries for Pacific...by any of the following methods: Electronic Submission: Submit all electronic...remain anonymous). Attachments to electronic comments will be accepted in Microsoft...or Adobe PDF file formats only. Electronic copies of the Environmental Assessment...a catch sharing plan for the......

2013-07-25

316

76 FR 55343 - Pacific Halibut Fisheries; Extension of Public Comment Period on Proposed Rule for a Catch...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...a catch sharing plan for the guided sport and commercial fisheries for Pacific...any one of the following methods: Electronic submissions: Submit all electronic...remain anonymous). Attachments to electronic comments will be accepted in Microsoft...gov or fax to 202-395-7285. Electronic copies of the proposed rule and the...a catch sharing plan for the guided......

2011-09-07

317

Cross-country catch-up in the manufacturing sector: Impacts of heterogeneity on convergence and technology adoption  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analyze how technology transfer from a leading economy affects followers’ productivity growth in manufacturing sectors and Gross Domestic Product. Allowing for heterogeneous technology levels we explore how this impacts rates of catch-up in labor productivity across manufacturing sectors and GDP for 16 OECD nations. Our results indicate that aggregate studies bias downward the estimated rates of catch-up. These rates

Patrik T. Hultberg; M. Ishaq Nadiri; Robin C. Sickles

2004-01-01

318

To Catch an Entrapper: The Inadequacy of the Entrapment Defense Globally and the Need to Reevaluate Our Current Legal Rubric  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is fair to say that a majority of us have either seen or been exposed to the hit television show To Catch a Predator on NBC. To Catch a Predator is a series of hidden investigations by the television newsmagazine Dateline NBC devoted to the subject of identifying and detaining potential child sexual abusers who contact children over the

Paul W. Valentine

2009-01-01

319

In-tank recirculating arsenic treatment system  

DOEpatents

A low-cost, water treatment system and method for reducing arsenic contamination in small community water storage tanks. Arsenic is removed by using a submersible pump, sitting at the bottom of the tank, which continuously recirculates (at a low flow rate) arsenic-contaminated water through an attached and enclosed filter bed containing arsenic-sorbing media. The pump and treatment column can be either placed inside the tank (In-Tank) by manually-lowering through an access hole, or attached to the outside of the tank (Out-of-Tank), for easy replacement of the sorption media.

Brady, Patrick V. (Albuquerque, NM); Dwyer, Brian P. (Albuquerque, NM); Krumhansl, James L. (Albuquerque, NM); Chwirka, Joseph D. (Tijeras, NM)

2009-04-07

320

Tank Waste Disposal Program redefinition  

SciTech Connect

The record of decision (ROD) (DOE 1988) on the Final Environmental Impact Statement, Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic and Tank Wastes, Hanford Site, Richland Washington identifies the method for disposal of double-shell tank waste and cesium and strontium capsules at the Hanford Site. The ROD also identifies the need for additional evaluations before a final decision is made on the disposal of single-shell tank waste. This document presents the results of systematic evaluation of the present technical circumstances, alternatives, and regulatory requirements in light of the values of the leaders and constitutents of the program. It recommends a three-phased approach for disposing of tank wastes. This approach allows mature technologies to be applied to the treatment of well-understood waste forms in the near term, while providing time for the development and deployment of successively more advanced pretreatment technologies. The advanced technologies will accelerate disposal by reducing the volume of waste to be vitrified. This document also recommends integration of the double-and single-shell tank waste disposal programs, provides a target schedule for implementation of the selected approach, and describes the essential elements of a program to be baselined in 1992.

Grygiel, M.L.; Augustine, C.A.; Cahill, M.A.; Garfield, J.S.; Johnson, M.E.; Kupfer, M.J.; Meyer, G.A.; Roecker, J.H. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Holton, L.K.; Hunter, V.L.; Triplett, M.B. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1991-10-01

321

Designing I*CATch: A Multipurpose, Education-Friendly Construction Kit for Physical and Wearable Computing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents the design and development of i*CATch, a construction kit for physical and wearable computing that was designed to be scalable, plug-and-play, and to provide support for iterative and exploratory learning. It consists of a standardized construction interface that can be adapted for a wide range of soft textiles or electronic…

Ngai, Grace; Chan, Stephen C. F.; Leong, Hong Va; Ng, Vincent T. Y.

2013-01-01

322

Sustainable Seafood Purchasing at the University of British Columbia What's the catch?  

E-print Network

Sustainable Seafood Purchasing at the University of British Columbia ­ What's the catch? An evaluation of the sustainability of current seafood purchasing practices at UBC Anna Magera SEEDS Directed THE SUSTAINABLE SEAFOOD MOVEMENT ­ A BRIEF HISTORY 3 Sustainable Seafood ­ What is it? 3 Main Concerns

323

FISHERIES SCIENCE PARTNERSHIP Catches of Monk, Hake and other species in western  

E-print Network

Billy Rowney, FV Twilight III, and by RV Corystes, autumn 2003 Fisheries Management Group CEFAS. The project used two commercial beam trawlers fishing chain mat gear with an 80 mm mesh codend. FV Twilight, for the two commercial vessels; #12;3 · Species compositions of the commercial catches. Methods FV Twilight

324

Kinesthetic Ability as Related to a Ball Catching Task with Dominant and Non-Dominant Hands.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was designed to investigate a specific skill pattern as it relates to kinesthetics and hand dominance. The specific skill pattern investigated was the ability of subjects, using either their dominant or nondominant hand, to catch a ball when they were unable to see their arm or hand. An "L" shaped curtain containing a hole for the ball…

Watz, Karyl A.; Eskridge, Veronica L.

325

Catching Old Influenza Virus with A New Markov Model HamChing Lam  

E-print Network

Catching Old Influenza Virus with A New Markov Model HamChing Lam Dept. of Computer Science on the Hemag- glutinin (HA) gene, a major surface antigen of the avian influenza virus. Using this model we Influenza virus, Poisson process, Markov Model 1. INTRODUCTION For the past century researchers have been

Boley, Daniel

326

Temporal and Spatial Distribution of Catches of Tiger Sharks, Galeocerdo cuvier, in the Pelagic Longline  

E-print Network

Temporal and Spatial Distribution of Catches of Tiger Sharks, Galeocerdo cuvier, in the Pelagic The tiger shark, Galeocerdo cuvier, has a circumglobal distribution in tropi cal and temperate oceans (Randall, 1992). While considered a nearshore shark, returns of tagged tiger sharks from the east coast

327

Yong Zhao: Catching up or leading the way: American education in the age of globalization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Written by a Chinese academic who is familiar with the American and Chinese educational systems, Zhao’s (2009) Catching Up or Leading the Way provides a refreshing look at American education and offers a new approach for education reform in which he calls for a paradigm shift in thinking about the purposes of education. In a nutshell, Zhao’s thesis is that

Wei Ling Karen Lam; Karen Lam

2011-01-01

328

Table 1.-Somali fish catch, 1971-80. Foreign Fishery Developments  

E-print Network

8.3 14.8 8.4 11.0 '11.0 Somalia is one of the least developed countries in Africa. It has also of the country's catch, almost all of which is marine since Somalia lacks freshwater lakes and rivers. Somalia

329

Global catches, exploitation rates, and rebuilding options for sharks Boris Worm a,n  

E-print Network

Global catches, exploitation rates, and rebuilding options for sharks Boris Worm a,n , Brendal in revised form 20 December 2012 Accepted 21 December 2012 Keywords: Sharks Fishing mortality Conservation Ecosystem management Shark finning a b s t r a c t Adequate conservation and management of shark populations

Myers, Ransom A.

330

Comparison of Catch per Effort and Removal Procedures for Sampling Stream Fish Assemblages  

Microsoft Academic Search

Methods used to estimate fish abundance in streams should be chosen based on the precision required by the study, the available time, and the number and kinds of species targeted. When entire assemblages of predominantly small, nongame fishes are to be sampled, most existing procedures have limitations. We compared estimates of species richness, abundance, and assemblage structure based on catch

Timothy D. Simonson; John Lyons

1995-01-01

331

A Fluorous-Tagged "Safety Catch" Linker for Preparing Heterocycles by Ring-Closing Metathesis  

PubMed Central

A fluorous-tagged “safety catch” linker is described for the synthesis of heterocycles with use of ring-closing metathesis. The linker facilitiates the purification of metathesis substrates, the removal of the catalyst, the functionalization of the products, and the release of only metathesis products. The synthesis of a range of heterocycles is described. PMID:19173645

2009-01-01

332

Australian Children Catch the Bug: Motivating Young Children to Engage in Reading  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Concerned by a report that a number of seven-year-olds in their school were at risk for literacy difficulties, a team of teachers devised a low-budget program to promote reading at school and at home. After researching reading motivation, two of the authors conceived a catch phrase, a mascot, and gimmicks, including all-school activities, to…

Exley, Beryl

2007-01-01

333

Catch›up growth in childhood and death from coronary heart disease: longitudinal study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To examine whether catch›up growth during childhood modifies the increased risk of death from coronary heart disease that is associated with reduced intrauterine growth. Design Follow up study of men whose body size at birth was recorded and who had an average of 10 measurements taken of their height and weight through childhood. Setting Helsinki, Finland. Subjects 3641 men

J G Eriksson; J Tuomilehto; P D Winter; C Osmond; D J P Barker

1999-01-01

334

Fish Catches in Baited and Unbaited Hoop Nets in the Upper Mississippi River  

Microsoft Academic Search

Catch rates for all species combined were higher in hoop nets baited with soybean cake than in unbaited hoop nets. However, baited and unbaited nets differed in the fish species for which they were most selective. Significantly more common carp (Cyprinus carpio), channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), smallmouth buffaloes (Ictiobus bubalus), and bluegills (Lepomis macrochirus) were caught in hoop nets baited

Rodney B. Pierce; Daniel W. Coble; Scott Corley

1981-01-01

335

Dynamics of unbinding of cell adhesion molecules: Transition from catch to slip bonds  

E-print Network

Dynamics of unbinding of cell adhesion molecules: Transition from catch to slip bonds V. Barsegov by the hydrodynamic flow field. Because of the requirement of adhesive interaction and the breakage of such bonds could also prolong bond lifetimes by deforming the adhesion complexes into an alternative locked

Barsegov, Valeri

336

AbstractAnalysis of 32 years of stan dardized survey catches (196798) indi  

E-print Network

of juve niles in shallow waters off southern New England during autumn resulted from inshore spawning-mail address (for E. M. C. Hatfield): e.hatfield@marlab.ac.uk The longfin inshore squid, Loligo pea- mers, 1967 of Analyses of survey catches indicate commercial exploitation (from southern that depth, time of day

337

Comparison of Catches in Mono and Multifilament Gill Nets in Lake Erie  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to compare the number, age, sex, and size offish caught in mono- and multifilament gill nets used to assess populations in Lake Erie, The results of this study could be used to adjust estimates of catch per unit of effort if there were a change from multifilament to monofilament gill nets. More yellow perch

Bryan A. Henderson; Stephen J. Nepszy

1992-01-01

338

Influence of River Stage on Shoreline Electrofishing Catches in the Upper Mississippi River  

Microsoft Academic Search

The numbers of fish and fish species caught per unit of electrofishing effort along main-channel shorelines in pool 13 of the upper Mississippi River were inversely related to water level. Four species contributed predominantly to the relation between catch rate and water level: Bluegill Lepomis macrochirus; freshwater drum Aplodinotus grunniens; white bass Morone chrysops; and sauger Stizostedion canadense. There was

Rodney B. Pierce; Daniel W. Coble; Scott D. Corley

1985-01-01

339

DISTRIBUTION AND CATCH COMPOSITION OF JONAH CRAB, CANCER BOREALIS, AND ROCK CRAB, CANCER IRRORATUS,  

E-print Network

DISTRIBUTION AND CATCH COMPOSITION OF JONAH CRAB, CANCER BOREALIS, AND ROCK CRAB, CANCER IRRORATUS ofJonah crab, Cancer borealis, and rock crab, C. irroratus, collected near Boothbay Harbor, Maine, revealed dissimilarities in the distribution of the two species. Jonah crabs were more numerous

340

Try/CATCH 2013Computing and Technology Conference for HER Sponsorship Opportunities  

E-print Network

, and the advantages of working in the technology field will be highlighted through discussion with women mentors. Try/CATCH will provide snacks, lunch, live music and a reception for the students volunteers. The Women in Computing Science (WICS) at Simon Fraser University sponsor

Hell, Pavol

341

ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: STORMWATER SOURCE AREA TREATMENT DEVICE - STORMWATER MANAGEMENT INC., CATCH BASIN STORMFILTER®  

EPA Science Inventory

Verification testing of the Stormwater Management CatchBasin StormFilter® (CBSF) was conducted on a 0.16 acre drainage basin at the City of St. Clair Shores, Michigan Department of Public Works facility. The four-cartridge CBSF consists of a storm grate and filter chamber inlet b...

342

EFFECTIVENESS OF ESCAPE VENT SHAPE IN TRAPS FOR CATCHING LEGAL-SIZED LOBSTER, HOMARUS AMERICANUS,  

E-print Network

EFFECTIVENESS OF ESCAPE VENT SHAPE IN TRAPS FOR CATCHING LEGAL-SIZED LOBSTER, HOMARUS AMERICANUS was conducted to find an escape vent that would select similar sized lobsters as the rectangular vent, yet of marketable-sized crabs exiting through an opening 58 mm in diameter. Escapement studies for lobsters confirm

343

Influence of environmental and fishery parameters on loggerhead sea turtle by-catch  

E-print Network

(Caretta caretta (Linnaeus, 1758)) and 50,000 leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea (Vandelli, 1761Influence of environmental and fishery parameters on loggerhead sea turtle by-catch in the longline of the Azores, 9901-862 Horta, Azores, Portugal, 3 Archie Carr Center for Sea Turtle Research and Department

Florida, University of

344

The Very Handy Manual: How to Catch and Identify Bees and Manage a Collection  

E-print Network

The Very Handy Manual: How to Catch and Identify Bees and Manage a Collection A Collective and Ongoing Effort by Those Who Love to Study Bees in North America Last Revised: May, 2012 This manual and others not. We thank all of you. The bulk of the text was compiled by Sam Droege at the USGS Native Bee

Torgersen, Christian

345

Catch Me if You Can: A Projection of Southeast Alaskan Coho Salmon Populations  

E-print Network

Catch Me if You Can: A Projection of Southeast Alaskan Coho Salmon Populations Control Team 51 February 7, 2005 Abstract We model the future of the Coho salmon stock for five rivers in South- east to mimic the Coho life cycle. Our model estimates salmon stocks based on the parameters of initial stock

Morrow, James A.

346

Methods for Motion Generation and Interaction with a Humanoid Robot: Case Studies of Dancing and Catching  

Microsoft Academic Search

We focus on creating realistic, adaptable movement for hu- manoid robots and virtual characters. Here we present mo- tion synthesis of dance movements for a humanoid robot, and interactive behavior for catching. Our approach to mo- tion generation includes collection of example human move- ments, handling of marker occlusion, extraction of motion parameters, and trajectory generation, all of which must

Marcia Riley; Christopher G. Atkeson

2000-01-01

347

Presented at AERA 2008 1 How to `Catch' a Virus: Representational Affordances in a  

E-print Network

Presented at AERA 2008 1 How to `Catch' a Virus: Representational Affordances in a Middle of single-strand DNA to detect viruses. This topic appears well- suited for the purpose, since middle-school students are familiar with viruses and understand the need to detect them. The design approach was chosen

Moher, Tom

348

Innovation Dynamics in Catch?Up Firms: Process, Product and Proprietary Capabilities for Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper analyses how firms organize for industrial innovation where they are significantly below being globally competitive. It investigates the dynamics by which catch?up firms in developing countries (DCs) go beyond the boundaries assigned to them by their national environments and by the world's leading technology?driven firms. The paper analyses cases of how a range of successful firms managed to

Naushad Forbes; David Wield

2008-01-01

349

Offensive odorants released from stormwater catch basins (SCB) in an urban area  

Microsoft Academic Search

The potent role of stormwater catch basins (SCB) as a source of malodor in urban areas has been recognized because of its active involvement in the production and release of diverse odorants. Here, the status of odor pollution was investigated from two types of SCBs (i.e., wet and dry systems) by measuring a list of offensive odorants (i.e., reduced sulfur

Ehsanul Kabir; Ki-Hyun Kim; Ji-Won Ahn; Y.-S. Chang

2010-01-01

350

SOUTHEAST MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERY STATISTICAL SURVEY: DISTANCE AND CATCH BASED CHOICE SETS  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we estimate the economic value associated with marine recreational fishing in the southeast United States using the random utility model. The data used is the Southeast (North Carolina to Louisiana) Marine Recreational Fishery Statistics Survey (SE MRFSS). The geographic extent of the market and potential catch are used to determine the effect of choice set definition on

John C. Whitehead; Timothy C. Haab

1999-01-01

351

Factors Affecting Catch-and-Release Mortality of Bluefish MARY C. FABRIZIO*  

E-print Network

Fisheries Service, Fisheries Statistics Division, unpublished data). This pattern of increasing recreationalFactors Affecting Catch-and-Release Mortality of Bluefish MARY C. FABRIZIO* Department of Fisheries and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries, Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Woods Hole Laboratory, 166 Water

Scharf, Fred

352

Social Networks and Fisheries: The Relationship between a Charter Fishing Network, Social Capital, and Catch Dynamics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interactions among fishery stakeholders can play an important role in mediating against the negative social and ecological consequences of fishery resource use. A number of studies have suggested that individual fishers draw on social relationships to access resources (e.g., fishing-related information) embedded in social systems. Investment in social relationships can enable fishers to better locate and catch their target species,

Katrina B. Mueller; William W. Taylor; Kenneth A. Frank; John M. Robertson; Dennis L. Grinold

2008-01-01

353

50 CFR 300.63 - Catch sharing plan and domestic management measures in Area 2A.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...action will not result in exceeding the catch limit for the area. (iii) If any of the sport fishery subareas north of Cape Falcon, Oregon are not projected to utilize their respective quotas by September 30, NMFS may take inseason action to transfer...

2010-10-01

354

LETTER doi:10.1038/nature12156 Signature of ocean warming in global fisheries catch  

E-print Network

LETTER doi:10.1038/nature12156 Signature of ocean warming in global fisheries catch William W. L changes in sea surface temperature5 . This study shows that ocean warming has already affected global. Cheung1 , Reg Watson2 & Daniel Pauly3 Marine fishes and invertebrates respond to ocean warming through

Pauly, Daniel

355

Strategy for Catch Crop Development: I. Hypothetical Ideotype and Screening of Species  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hypothetical criteria were defined for a catch crop insown in spring cereals with the main purpose of reducing leaching of nitrogen. The criteria were applied in the screening of a large variable plant material from three groups: Poaceae, Fabaceae and species from other families. Variation in the characters of interest between and within species was recorded in spaced field plantings.Perennial

E.-M. Karlsson-Strese; M. Umaerus; I. Rydberg

1996-01-01

356

Relationship Between Marketing Category (Count) Composition and Ex-Vessel Value of Reported Annual Catches of  

E-print Network

into three major statistical regions (Fig. I): Pensacola to Mississippi River (statistical areas 10- pass that part of the Louisiana coast east of the Mississippi River, the coasts of Mississippi catches in the Pensacola to Mississippi River region (Fig. 2). The Apalachicola region appears

357

FLUCTUATION IN TRAP-NET CATCHES IN THE UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER  

E-print Network

FLUCTUATION IN TRAP-NET CATCHES IN THE UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER if; Marine Biological Labofdiury and Wildlife Service, meeting in December, I9I1.3, formed the Upper Mississippi River Conservation Committee MISSISSIPPI RIVER By D. W. Kelley, Aquatic Biologist Fisheries Research Unit, Minnesota Department

358

46 CFR 154.412 - Cargo tank corrosion allowance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-10-01 false Cargo tank corrosion allowance. 154.412 Section 154...Containment Systems § 154.412 Cargo tank corrosion allowance. A cargo tank must be designed with a corrosion allowance if the cargo tank:...

2011-10-01

359

46 CFR 154.412 - Cargo tank corrosion allowance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-10-01 false Cargo tank corrosion allowance. 154.412 Section 154...Containment Systems § 154.412 Cargo tank corrosion allowance. A cargo tank must be designed with a corrosion allowance if the cargo tank:...

2010-10-01

360

46 CFR 154.412 - Cargo tank corrosion allowance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-10-01 false Cargo tank corrosion allowance. 154.412 Section 154...Containment Systems § 154.412 Cargo tank corrosion allowance. A cargo tank must be designed with a corrosion allowance if the cargo tank:...

2012-10-01

361

46 CFR 154.412 - Cargo tank corrosion allowance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-10-01 false Cargo tank corrosion allowance. 154.412 Section 154...Containment Systems § 154.412 Cargo tank corrosion allowance. A cargo tank must be designed with a corrosion allowance if the cargo tank:...

2013-10-01

362

14 CFR 25.981 - Fuel tank ignition prevention.  

...Wing Tank is an integral tank in an unheated semi-monocoque aluminum wing of a subsonic airplane that is equivalent in aerodynamic performance, structural capability, fuel tank capacity and tank configuration to the designed wing. (ii) Fleet...

2014-01-01

363

49 CFR 193.2623 - Inspecting LNG storage tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2623 Inspecting LNG storage tanks. Each LNG storage tank must be inspected or tested to verify that...structural integrity or safety of the tank: (a) Foundation and tank movement during normal operation...

2010-10-01

364

33 CFR 157.134 - Cargo tank drainage.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Cargo tank drainage. 157.134 Section 157.134...Installation § 157.134 Cargo tank drainage. Each cargo tank must be designed for longitudinal and transverse drainage of crude oil to allow the tank...

2013-07-01

365

33 CFR 157.134 - Cargo tank drainage.  

...2014-07-01 false Cargo tank drainage. 157.134 Section 157.134...Installation § 157.134 Cargo tank drainage. Each cargo tank must be designed for longitudinal and transverse drainage of crude oil to allow the tank...

2014-07-01

366

49 CFR 180.507 - Qualification of tank cars.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Qualification of tank cars. 180.507 Section 180.507 Transportation...PACKAGINGS Qualification and Maintenance of Tank Cars § 180.507 Qualification of tank cars. (a) Each tank car marked as meeting...

2012-10-01

367

49 CFR 180.507 - Qualification of tank cars.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Qualification of tank cars. 180.507 Section 180.507 Transportation...PACKAGINGS Qualification and Maintenance of Tank Cars § 180.507 Qualification of tank cars. (a) Each tank car marked as meeting...

2011-10-01

368

49 CFR 180.507 - Qualification of tank cars.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Qualification of tank cars. 180.507 Section 180.507 Transportation...PACKAGINGS Qualification and Maintenance of Tank Cars § 180.507 Qualification of tank cars. (a) Each tank car marked as meeting...

2010-10-01

369

49 CFR 180.507 - Qualification of tank cars.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Qualification of tank cars. 180.507 Section 180.507 Transportation...PACKAGINGS Qualification and Maintenance of Tank Cars § 180.507 Qualification of tank cars. (a) Each tank car marked as meeting...

2013-10-01

370

Tank waste concentration mechanism study  

SciTech Connect

This study determines whether the existing 242-A Evaporator should continue to be used to concentrate the Hanford Site radioactive liquid tank wastes or be replaced by an alternative waste concentration process. Using the same philosophy, the study also determines what the waste concentration mechanism should be for the future TWRS program. Excess water from liquid DST waste should be removed to reduce the volume of waste feed for pretreatment, immobilization, and to free up storage capacity in existing tanks to support interim stabilization of SSTS, terminal cleanout of excess facilities, and other site remediation activities.

Pan, L.C.; Johnson, L.J.

1994-09-01

371

TANK SPACE ALTERNATIVES ANALYSIS REPORT  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the projected shortfall of double-shell tank (DST) space starting in 2018. Using a multi-variant methodology, a total of eight new-term options and 17 long-term options for recovering DST space were evaluated. These include 11 options that were previously evaluated in RPP-7702, Tank Space Options Report (Rev. 1). Based on the results of this evaluation, two near-term and three long-term options have been identified as being sufficient to overcome the shortfall of DST space projected to occur between 2018 and 2025.

TURNER DA; KIRCH NW; WASHENFELDER DJ; SCHAUS PS; WODRICH DD; WIEGMAN SA

2010-04-27

372

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR SAMPLING OF TANK 19 IN F TANK FARM  

SciTech Connect

Representative sampling is required for characterization of the residual material in Tank 19 prior to operational closure. Tank 19 is a Type IV underground waste storage tank located in the F-Tank Farm. It is a cylindrical-shaped, carbon steel tank with a diameter of 85 feet, a height of 34.25 feet, and a working capacity of 1.3 million gallons. Tank 19 was placed in service in 1961 and initially received a small amount of low heat waste from Tank 17. It then served as an evaporator concentrate (saltcake) receiver from February 1962 to September 1976. Tank 19 also received the spent zeolite ion exchange media from a cesium removal column that once operated in the Northeast riser of the tank to remove cesium from the evaporator overheads. Recent mechanical cleaning of the tank removed all mounds of material. Anticipating a low level of solids in the residual waste, Huff and Thaxton [2009] developed a plan to sample the waste during the final clean-up process while it would still be resident in sufficient quantities to support analytical determinations in four quadrants of the tank. Execution of the plan produced fewer solids than expected to support analytical determinations in all four quadrants. Huff and Thaxton [2009] then restructured the plan to characterize the residual separately in the North and the South regions: two 'hemispheres.' This document provides sampling recommendations to complete the characterization of the residual material on the tank bottom following the guidance in Huff and Thaxton [2009] to split the tank floor into a North and a South hemisphere. The number of samples is determined from a modification of the formula previously published in Edwards [2001] and the sample characterization data for previous sampling of Tank 19 described by Oji [2009]. The uncertainty is quantified by an upper 95% confidence limit (UCL95%) on each analyte's mean concentration in Tank 19. The procedure computes the uncertainty in analyte concentration as a function of the number of samples, and the final number of samples is determined when the reduction in the uncertainty from an additional sample no longer has a practical impact on results. The characterization of the full suite of analytes in the North and South hemispheres is currently supported by a single Mantis rover sample in each hemisphere. A floor scrape sample was obtained from a compact region near the center riser slightly in the South hemisphere and has been analyzed for a shortened list of key analytes. There is not enough additional material from the floor scrape sample material for completing the full suite of constituents. No floor scrape samples have been previously taken from the North hemisphere. The criterion to determine the number of additional samples was based on the practical reduction in the uncertainty when a new sample is added. This was achieved when five additional samples are obtained. In addition, two archived samples will be used if a contingency such as failing to demonstrate the comparability of the Mantis samples to the floor scrape samples occurs. To complete sampling of the Tank 19 residual floor material, four additional samples should be taken from the North hemisphere and four additional samples should be taken from the South hemisphere. One of the samples from each hemisphere will be archived in case of need. Three of the four additional samples from each hemisphere will be analyzed. Once the results are available, differences between the Mantis and three floor scrape sample results will be evaluated. If there are no statistically significant analyte concentration differences between the Mantis and floor scrape samples, those results will be combined and then UCL95%s will be calculated. If the analyte concentration differences between the Mantis and floor scrape samples are statistically significant, the UCL95%s will be calculated without the Mantis sample results. If further reduction in the upper confidence limits is needed and can be achieved by the addition of the archived samples, they will be analyzed and included in t

Harris, S.; Shine, G.

2009-12-14

373

78 FR 71633 - Tank Vessel Oil Transfers  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Coast Guard [Docket No. USCG-2013-0522] Tank Vessel Oil Transfers AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice...2013, concerning new measures to reduce the risks of oil spills in oil transfer operations from or to a tank vessel. In...

2013-11-29

374

Annual Radioactive Waste Tank Inspection Program 2001  

SciTech Connect

The waste tank in-service inspection program is an ongoing program. This report gives results of the 2001 inspections and summarizes significant findings of previous in-service inspections for each waste tank.

Waltz, R.S.

2002-06-25

375

STS-114: Discovery Tanking Operations for Launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Jessica Rye from NASA Public Affairs is the narrator for the tanking operations for the launch of the Space Shuttle Discovery. She presents a video of the arrival and processing of the new external tank at the Kennedy Space Center. The external tank is also shown entering the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The external tank underwent new processing resulting from its redesign including inspection of the bipod heater and the external separation camera. The changes to the external tank include: 1) Electric heaters to protect from icing; and 2) Liquid Oxygen feed line bellows to carry fuel from the external tank to the Orbiter. Footage of the external tank processing facility at NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, La. prior to its arrival at Kennedy Space Center is shown and a video of the three key modifications to the external tank including the bipod, flange and bellows are shown.

2005-01-01

376

Comparative safety analysis of LNG storage tanks  

SciTech Connect

LNG storage tank design and response to selected release scenarios were reviewed. The selection of the scenarios was based on an investigation of potential hazards as cited in the literature. A review of the structure of specific LNG storage facilities is given. Scenarios initially addressed included those that most likely emerge from the tank facility itself: conditions of overfill and overflow as related to liquid LNG content levels; over/underpressurization at respective tank vapor pressure boundaries; subsidence of bearing soil below tank foundations; and crack propagation in tank walls due to possible exposure of structural material to cryogenic temperatures. Additional scenarios addressed include those that result from external events: tornado induced winds and pressure drops; exterior tank missile impact with tornado winds and rotating machinery being the investigated mode of generation; thermal response due to adjacent fire conditions; and tank response due to intense seismic activity. Applicability of each scenario depended heavily on the specific tank configurations and material types selected. (PSB)

Fecht, B.A.; Gates, T.E.; Nelson, K.O.; Marr, G.D.

1982-07-01

377

Muskie lunacy: does the lunar cycle influence angler catch of muskellunge (Esox masquinongy)?  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We analyzed angling catch records for 341,959 muskellunge (Esox masquinongy) from North America to test for a cyclic lunar influence on the catch. Using periodic regression, we showed that the number caught was strongly related to the 29-day lunar cycle, and the effect was consistent across most fisheries. More muskellunge were caught around the full and new moon than at other times. At night, more muskellunge were caught around the full moon than the new moon. The predicted maximum relative effect was ?5% overall. Anglers fishing exclusively on the peak lunar day would, on average, catch 5% more muskellunge than anglers fishing on random days. On some lakes and at night, the maximum relative effect was higher. We obtained angler effort data for Wisconsin, Mille Lacs (MN), and Lake Vermilion (MN). For Lake Vermilion there was a significant effect of the lunar cycle on angler effort. We could therefore not conclude that the lunar effect on catch was due to an effect on fish behavior alone. Several factors affected the amount of variation explained by the lunar cycle. The lunar effect was stronger for larger muskellunge (>102 cm) than for smaller fish, stronger in midsummer than in June or October, and stronger for fish caught at high latitudes (>48°N) than for fish caught further south. There was no difference in the lunar effect between expert and novice muskellunge anglers. We argue that this variation is evidence that the effect of the lunar cycle on catch is mediated by biological factors and is not due solely to angler effort and reflects lunar synchronization in feeding. This effect has been attributed to variation among moon phases in lunar illumination, but our results do not support that hypothesis for angler-caught muskellunge.

Vinson, Mark R.; Angradi, Ted R.

2014-01-01

378

The impact of escaped farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) on catch statistics in Scotland.  

PubMed

In Scotland and elsewhere, there are concerns that escaped farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) may impact on wild salmon stocks. Potential detrimental effects could arise through disease spread, competition, or inter-breeding. We investigated whether there is evidence of a direct effect of recorded salmon escape events on wild stocks in Scotland using anglers' counts of caught salmon (classified as wild or farmed) and sea trout (Salmo trutta L.). This tests specifically whether documented escape events can be associated with reduced or elevated escapes detected in the catch over a five-year time window, after accounting for overall variation between areas and years. Alternate model frameworks were somewhat inconsistent, however no robust association was found between documented escape events and higher proportion of farm-origin salmon in anglers' catch, nor with overall catch size. A weak positive correlation was found between local escapes and subsequent sea trout catch. This is in the opposite direction to what would be expected if salmon escapes negatively affected wild fish numbers. Our approach specifically investigated documented escape events, contrasting with earlier studies examining potentially wider effects of salmon farming on wild catch size. This approach is more conservative, but alleviates some potential sources of confounding, which are always of concern in observational studies. Successful analysis of anglers' reports of escaped farmed salmon requires high data quality, particularly since reports of farmed salmon are a relatively rare event in the Scottish data. Therefore, as part of our analysis, we reviewed studies of potential sensitivity and specificity of determination of farmed origin. Specificity estimates are generally high in the literature, making an analysis of the form we have performed feasible. PMID:22970132

Green, Darren M; Penman, David J; Migaud, Herve; Bron, James E; Taggart, John B; McAndrew, Brendan J

2012-01-01

379

Tanks: Storage tank emission estimation software, version 3.0 (for microcomputers). Model-Simulation  

SciTech Connect

TANKS is a user-friendly computer software program developed for use in estimating volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from both fixed and floating roof storage tanks. TANKS is based on the emission estimation procedures presented in Chapter 7 of the Compilation of Air Pollutant Emission Factors, AP-42. The emission estimation procedures used as the basis of the TANKS program include the recent updates to the equations from the American Petroleum Institute (API) Bulletins, for which EPA has been granted noncommercial use. An electronic copy of the user`s manual is included with the program to aid users in mastering the program`s many features and options. TANKS can generate emissions for vertical and horizontal fixed roof tanks, internal and external floating roof tanks, and domed external floating roof tanks. TANKS can also estimate emissions from underground storage tanks. After the user provides specific information concerning storage tank construction and the stored liquid, the program produces a report estimating total VOC emissions. TANKS includes four internal databases which contain chemical, meterological, roof fitting, and rim seal data, which greatly enhance the usefulness of the program. TANKS also contains three alternative speciation options that allow the user to estimate individual component emissions of stored liquid mixtures. To accommodate facilities with large numbers of tanks, the program can generate either a single report for an individual tank or a batch report for a series of tanks.

NONE

1996-03-01

380

HOTS; Underground heating oil tanks hold as many liabilities as other underground storage tanks  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on the liabilities associated with underground storage tanks (USTs) that are a growing concern. Tank owners worry that they will have or worse, will inherit financial or legal burdens resulting from leaking tanks. Indeed, it appropriate precautions are not taken, the consequences can be devastating. In 1984, after too many tank-related horror stories surfaced, Congress began to

Hayman

1989-01-01

381

Tank 241-U-106 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-U-106. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedures that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank.

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31

382

SOURCE ASSESSMENT: RAIL TANK CAR, TANK TRUCK, AND DRUM CLEANING, STATE-OF-THE-ART  

EPA Science Inventory

This document reviews the state of the art of air emissions and water pollutants from cleaning rail tank cars, tank trucks, and drums. Composition, quantity, and rate of emissions and pollutants are described. Rail tank cars, tank trucks, and drums are used to transport chemical ...

383

Generalized additive model and regression tree analyses of blue shark ( Prionace glauca) catch rates by the Hawaii-based commercial longline fishery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Generalized additive model (GAM) and regression tree analyses were conducted with blue shark, Prionace glauca, catch rates (catch per set) as reported by National Marine Fisheries Service observers serving aboard Hawaii-based commercial longline vessels from March 1994 through December 1997 (N=2010 longline sets). The objective was to use GAM and regression tree methodology to relate catch rates to a tractable

William A. Walsh; Pierre Kleiber

2001-01-01

384

40 CFR 280.220 - Ownership of an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system or facility or...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ownership of an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system or facility or property on which an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system is located. 280.220...

2010-07-01

385

Tank 241-BY-107 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect

Tank 241-BY-107 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in {open_quotes}Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues{close_quotes}. Tank 241-BY-107 was vapor sampled in accordance with {open_quotes}Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution{close_quotes}.

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-05

386

Tank 241-U-107 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect

Tank 241-U-107 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in {open_quotes}Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.{close_quotes} Tank 241-U-107 was vapor sampled in accordance with {open_quotes}Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.{close_quotes}

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31

387

Tank 241-U-111 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect

Tank 241-U-111 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in {open_quotes}Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.{close_quotes} Tank 241-U-111 was vapor sampled in accordance with {open_quotes}Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.{close_quotes}

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31

388

Tank 241-S-102 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect

Tank 241-S-102 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in {open_quotes}Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.{close_quotes} Tank 241-S-102 was vapor sampled in accordance with {open_quotes}Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution. {close_quotes}

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31

389

DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) EMERGENCY PUMPING GUIDE  

SciTech Connect

This document provides preplanning necessary to expeditiously remove any waste that may leak from the primary tank to the secondary tank for Hanford's 28 DSTs. The strategy is described, applicable emergency procedures are referenced, and transfer routes and pumping equipment for each tank are identified.

REBERGER, D.W.

2006-03-17

390

Viewing Systems for Large Underground Storage Tanks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Specialized remote video systems have been successfully developed and deployed in a number of large radiological Underground Storage Tanks (USTs)that tolerate the hostile tank interior, while providing high resolution video to a remotely located operator. The deployment is through 100 mm (4 in) tank openings, while incorporating full video functions of the camera, lights, and zoom lens. The usage of

Heckendorn

1996-01-01

391

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Pump Tank  

E-print Network

Pump tanks are concrete, fiberglass or polyethylene containers that collect wastewater to be dosed into the soil at intervals. This publication explains the design and maintenance of pump tanks, and it offers advice on what to do if a pump tank...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-23

392

Natural Sloshing Frequencies in Truncated Conical Tanks  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY Conical-shaped or conical-bottom reservoirs are widely used as water containment for elevated tanks. After earthquakes water tanks play an important role, by making the water available needed for extinguishing fires which arise with such catastrophic events frequently. Therefore special care must be practiced with the construction of the tanks in order to assure their safety and functionality during a

I. Gavrilyuk; M. Hermann; I. Lukovsky; O. Solodun; A. Timokha

393

Stabilization of In-Tank Residual Wastes and External-Tank Soil Contamination for the Hanford Tank Closure Program: Applications to the AX Tank Farm  

SciTech Connect

Technical support for the Hanford Tank Closure Program focused on evaluation of concepts for immobilization of residual contaminants in the Hanford AX tanks and underlying soils, and identification of cost-effective approaches to improve long-term performance of AX tank farm cIosure systems. Project objectives are to develop materials or engineered systems that would significantly reduce the radionuclide transport to the groundwater from AX tanks containing residual waste. We pursued several studies that, if implemented, would help achieve these goals. They include: (1) tank fill design to reduce water inilltration and potential interaction with residual waste; (2) development of in-tank getter materials that would specifically sorb or sequester radionuclides; (3) evaluation of grout emplacement under and around the tanks to prevent waste leakage during waste retrieval or to minimize water infiltration beneath the tanks; (4) development of getters that will chemically fix specific radionuclides in soils under tanks; and (5) geochemical and hydrologic modeling of waste-water-soil-grout interactions. These studies differ in scope from the reducing grout tank fill employed at the Savannah River Site in that our strategy improves upon tank fill design by providing redundancy in the barriers to radionuclide migration and by modification the hydrogeochemistry external to the tanks.

Anderson, H.L.; Dwyer, B.P.; Ho, C.; Krumhansl, J.L.; McKeen, G.; Molecke, M.A.; Westrich, H.R.; Zhang, P.

1998-11-01

394

14 CFR 23.1013 - Oil tanks.  

...Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Oil tanks. 23.1013 Section 23.1013 Aeronautics...ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Oil System § 23.1013 Oil tanks. (a) Installation. Each oil tank must...

2014-01-01

395

14 CFR 23.1013 - Oil tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Oil tanks. 23.1013 Section 23.1013 Aeronautics...ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Oil System § 23.1013 Oil tanks. (a) Installation. Each oil tank must...

2011-01-01

396

14 CFR 23.1013 - Oil tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Oil tanks. 23.1013 Section 23.1013 Aeronautics...ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Oil System § 23.1013 Oil tanks. (a) Installation. Each oil tank must...

2013-01-01

397

14 CFR 23.1013 - Oil tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Oil tanks. 23.1013 Section 23.1013 Aeronautics...ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Oil System § 23.1013 Oil tanks. (a) Installation. Each oil tank must...

2010-01-01

398

14 CFR 23.1013 - Oil tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Oil tanks. 23.1013 Section 23.1013 Aeronautics...ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Oil System § 23.1013 Oil tanks. (a) Installation. Each oil tank must...

2012-01-01

399

14 CFR 27.1013 - Oil tanks.  

...Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Oil tanks. 27.1013 Section 27.1013 Aeronautics...STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Oil System § 27.1013 Oil tanks. Each oil tank must be designed and...

2014-01-01

400

SRS tank closure. Innovative technology summary report  

SciTech Connect

High-level waste (HLW) tank closure technology is designed to stabilize any remaining radionuclides and hazardous constituents left in a tank after bulk waste removal. Two Savannah River Site (SRS) HLW tanks were closed after cleansing and then filling each tank with three layers of grout. The first layer consists of a chemically reducing grout. The fill material has chemical properties that retard the movement of some radionuclides and chemical constituents. A layer of controlled low-strength material (CLSM), a self-leveling fill material, is placed on top of the reducing grout. CLSM provides sufficient strength to support the overbearing weight. The final layer is a free-flowing, strong grout similar to normal concrete. After the main tank cavity is filled, risers are filled with grout, and all waste transfer piping connected to the tank is isolated. The tank ventilation system is dismantled, and the remaining systems are isolated. Equipment that remains with the tank is filled with grout. The tank and ancillary systems are left in a state requiring only limited surveillance. Administrative procedures are in place to control land use and access. DOE eventually plans to remove all of its HLW storage tanks from service. These tanks are located at SRS, Hanford, and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Low-activity waste storage tanks at Oak Ridge Reservation are also scheduled for closure.

Not Available

1999-08-01

401

Tank Pressure Control Experiment (TPCE)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Tank Pressure Control Experiment (TPCE) is a small self-contained STS payload designed to test a jet mixer for cryogenic fluid pressure control. Viewgraphs are presented that describe project organization, experiment objectives and approach, risk management, payload concept and mission plan, and initial test data.

Bentz, Mike

1992-01-01

402

Double wall underground storage tank  

Microsoft Academic Search

A double wall underground storage tank is described comprising: (a) a cylindrical inner wall, (b) a cylindrical outer wall comprising plastic resin and reinforcement fibers, and (c) a layer of spacer filaments wound around the inner wall, the spacer filaments separating the inner and outer walls, and the spacer filaments being at least partially surrounded by voids to enable liquids

E. B. Jr. Canaan; J. R. Wiegand; D. H. Bartlow

1993-01-01

403

Farming in a fish tank.  

PubMed

Water, fish, and vegetables are all things that most developing countries do not have enough of. There is a method of food production called aquaculture that integrates fish and vegetable growing and conserves and purifies water at the same time. A working system that grows vegetables and fish for regional supermarkets in Massachusetts is a gravity fed system. At the top of the system is a 3,000 gallon fish rearing tank that measures 12 feet in diameter. Water trickles out of the tank and fish wastes are captured which can be composted and used in farm fields. The water goes into a bio filter that contains bacteria which convert harmful ammonia generated from fish waste into beneficial nitrate. Then the water flows into 100 foot long hydroponic tanks where lettuce grows. A 1/6 horsepower pump return the purified water to the fish tank and completes the cycle. The key to success is maintaining a balance between the fish nutrients and waste and the plants nutrients and waste. The system is estimated to produce 35,000 heads of lettuce and 2 tons of fish annually which translates into $23,500. The system could be adapted to developing countries with several modifications to reduce the start up cost. PMID:12317429

Youth, H

1992-01-01

404

Liquid tank leakage detection system  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a system for use in detecting leakage within a liquid tank having a filler pipe. It comprises: a standpipe; coupling means; a float; a sensing beam; a beam support means; temperature means; strain measuring means; and float coupling means.

Harrison, J.M.; Marshburn, H.L.

1991-01-22

405

Liquid tank leakage detection system  

Microsoft Academic Search

This patent describes a system for use in detecting leakage within a liquid tank having a filler pipe. It comprises: a standpipe; coupling means; a float; a sensing beam; a beam support means; temperature means; strain measuring means; and float coupling means.

J. M. Harrison; H. L. Marshburn

1991-01-01

406

External Tank - The Structure Backbone  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The External Tank forms the structural backbone of the Space Shuttle in the launch configuration. Because the tank flies to orbital velocity with the Space Shuttle Orbiter, minimization of weight is mandatory, to maximize payload performance. Choice of lightweight materials both for structure and thermal conditioning was necessary. The tank is large, and unique manufacturing facilities, tooling, handling, and transportation operations were required. Weld processes and tooling evolved with the design as it matured through several block changes, to reduce weight. Non Destructive Evaluation methods were used to assure integrity of welds and thermal protection system materials. The aluminum-lithium alloy was used near the end of the program and weld processes and weld repair techniques had to be refined. Development and implementation of friction stir welding was a substantial technology development incorporated during the Program. Automated thermal protection system application processes were developed for the majority of the tank surface. Material obsolescence was an issue throughout the 40 year program. The final configuration and tank weight enabled international space station assembly in a high inclination orbit allowing international cooperation with the Russian Federal Space Agency. Numerous process controls were implemented to assure product quality, and innovative proof testing was accomplished prior to delivery. Process controls were implemented to assure cleanliness in the production environment, to control contaminants, and to preclude corrosion. Each tank was accepted via rigorous inspections, including non-destructive evaluation techniques, proof testing, and all systems testing. In the post STS-107 era, the project focused on ascent debris risk reduction. This was accomplished via stringent process controls, post flight assessment using substantially improved imagery, and selective redesigns. These efforts were supported with a number of test programs to simulate combined environments. Processing improvements included development and use of low spray guns for foam application, additional human factors considerations for production, use of high fidelity mockups during hardware processing with video review, improved tank access, extensive use of non destructive evaluation, and producibility enhancements. Design improvements included redesigned bipod fittings, a bellows heater, a feedline camera active during ascent flight, removal of the protuberance airload ramps, redesigned ice frost ramps, and titanium brackets replaced aluminum brackets on the liquid oxygen feedline. Post flight assessment improved due to significant addition of imagery assets, greatly improving situational awareness. The debris risk was reduced by two orders of magnitude. During this time a major natural disaster was overcome when Katrina damaged the manufacturing facility. Numerous lessons from these efforts are documented within the paper.

Welzyn, Kenneth; Pilet, Jeffrey C.; Diecidue-Conners, Dawn; Worden, Michelle; Guillot, Michelle

2011-01-01

407

water tank 9/13/2007 1 4.1 Water tank  

E-print Network

water tank 9/13/2007 1 4.1 Water tank (a) A cylindrical tank contains 800 ml of water. At t=0 (min- utes) a hole is punched in the bottom, and water begins to flow out. It takes exactly 100 seconds for the tank to empty. Draw the graph of the amount z of water in the tank against time t. Explain the shape

Taylor, Peter

408

Tank characterization report for double-shell tank 241-AP-102  

SciTech Connect

In April 1993, Double-Shell Tank 241-AP-102 was sampled to determine waste feed characteristics for the Hanford Grout Disposal Program. This Tank Characterization Report presents an overview of that tank sampling and analysis effort, and contains observations regarding waste characteristics, expected bulk inventory, and concentration data for the waste contents based on this latest sampling data and information on the history of the tank. Finally, this report makes recommendations and conclusions regarding tank operational safety issues.

LAMBERT, S.L.

1999-02-23

409

Tank 241-C-103 headspace flammability  

SciTech Connect

Information regarding flammable vapors, gases, and aerosols is presented for the purpose of resolving the tank 241-C-103 headspace flammability issue. Analyses of recent vapor and liquid samples, as well as visual inspections of the tank headspace, are discussed in the context of tank dynamics. This document is restricted to issues regarding the flammability of gases, vapors, and an aerosol that may exist in the headspace of tank 241-C-103. While discussing certain information about the organic liquid present in tank 241-C-103, this document addresses neither the potential for, nor consequences of, a pool fire involving this organic liquid; they will be discussed in a separate report.

Huckaby, J.L.

1994-01-01

410

Catching a Galactic Football: Chandra Examines Cygnus A  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, astronomers have found a giant football-shaped cavity within X-ray emitting hot gas surrounding the galaxy Cygnus A. The cavity in the hot gas has been created by two powerful jets emitted from the central black hole region in the nucleus of Cygnus A. Hot gas is steadily being piled up around the cavity as it continuously expands, creating a bright rim of X-ray emission. The jets themselves terminate in radio and X-ray emitting "hot spots" some 300,000 light years from the center of the galaxy. These results are being presented to the High Energy Astrophysics Division of the American Astronomical Society meeting in Honolulu, HI, by Andrew S. Wilson, Andrew J. Young (University of Maryland) and Patrick L. Shopbell (California Institute of Technology). "This is a spectacular cavity, which is inflated by jets and completely surrounds the Cygnus A galaxy," said Dr. Wilson, who is Professor of Astronomy at the University of Maryland, College Park. "We are witnessing a battle between the gravity of the Cygnus A galaxy, which is trying to pull the hot gas inwards, and the pressure of material created by the jets, which is trying to push the hot gas outwards." Cygnus A has long been famous as the brightest radio source in the sky. It is the nearest powerful radio galaxy. The Chandra X-ray image, which was taken with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), shows the cavity surrounded by a vast sea of extremely hot gas. The elongated oval shape comes from the force of the outwardly moving jets as they push through the hot gas. Bright bands around the "equator of the football" are also visible, and this may be evidence of material swirling toward the central black hole. Cygnus A Illustration Illustration of Cygnus A Credit: CXC Without the jets, an X-ray image of Cygnus A, which is about 700 million light years from Earth, would appear as a more or less spherical region (about 2 million light years across) of hot gas slowly falling into the Cygnus A galaxy. However, the two jets powered by the nuclear black hole in this galaxy push this gas outward, like a balloon being inflated by a tank of gas. Cygnus A is not alone in its galactic neighborhood, but is a member of a large cluster containing many galaxies. Extremely hot (tens of millions of degrees Celsius) gas is spread between the galaxies. Although it has a very low density, this gas provides enough resistance to slow down the outward advancement of the particle jets from Cygnus A. At the ends of the jets, astronomers find bright areas of radio and X-ray emission known as "hot spots." Scientists believe that fast atomic particles and magnetic fields from the jets spill out into the region, providing pressure that continuously inflates the cavity. In a paper accepted by the Astrophysical Journal Letters, Wilson, Young and Shopbell discuss how the Chandra observations resolve a long-standing puzzle about the hot spots at the ends of the jets. By analyzing the X-ray emission of the hot spots, the astronomers have measured the strength of the magnetic field associated with them. "The radio data themselves cannot determine the strength of the magnetic field, a limitation that has inhibited progress in our understanding of cosmic radio sources for 50 years," said Wilson. "Combination of the Chandra X-ray and the radio data allows a quite precise measurement of the field strength." The Chandra observation of Cygnus A was made with the ACIS on May 21, 2000, for over nine hours. The ACIS X-ray camera was developed for NASA by Pennsylvania State University and MIT. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL, manages the Chandra program. TRW, Inc., Redondo Beach, California, is the prime contractor for the spacecraft. The Smithsonian's Chandra X-ray Center controls science and flight operations from Cambridge, MA. This research was supported by the Chandra project at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Images associated with this release are available on the Wo

2000-11-01

411

ICPP Tank Farm planning through 2012  

SciTech Connect

Historically, liquid high-level waste (HLW) generated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant has been stored in the Tank Farm after which it is calcined with the calcine being stored in stainless steel bins. Following the curtailment of spent nuclear fuel reprocessing in 1992, the HLW treatment methods were re-evaluated to establish a path forward for producing a final waste form from the liquid sodium bearing wastes (SBW) and the HLW calcine. Projections for significant improvements in waste generation, waste blending and evaporation, and calcination were incorporated into the Tank Farm modeling. This optimized modeling shows that all of the SBW can be calcined by the end of 2012 as required by the Idaho Settlement Agreement. This Tank Farm plan discusses the use of each of the eleven HLW tanks and shows that two tanks can be emptied, allowing them to be Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closed by 2006. In addition, it describes the construction of each tank and vault, gives the chemical concentrations of the contents of each tank, based on historical input and some sampling, and discusses the regulatory drivers important to Tank Farm operation. It also discusses new waste generation, the computer model used for the Tank Farm planning, the operating schedule for each tank, and the schedule for when each tank will be empty and closed.

Palmer, W.B.; Millet, C.B.; Staiger, M.D.; Ward, F.S.

1998-04-01

412

Pad B Liquid Hydrogen Storage Tank  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Kennedy Space Center is home to two liquid hydrogen storage tanks, one at each launch pad of Launch Complex 39. The liquid hydrogen storage tank at Launch Pad B has a significantly higher boil off rate that the liquid hydrogen storage tank at Launch Pad A. This research looks at various calculations concerning the at Launch Pad B in an attempt to develop a solution to the excess boil off rate. We will look at Perlite levels inside the tank, Boil off rates, conductive heat transfer, and radiant heat transfer through the tank. As a conclusion to the research, we will model the effects of placing an external insulation to the tank in order to reduce the boil off rate and increase the economic efficiency of the liquid hydrogen storage tanks.

Hall, Felicia

2007-01-01

413

Single shell tank waste characterization for Tank 241BX108  

Microsoft Academic Search

The BX-108 sample from riser 6 was removed from the tank on 7\\/14\\/94 at 1130 hours. The dose rate through the drill was string 30 mR\\/hr. Shipment to the 222-S Laboratories took place on 7\\/15\\/94 at 1220 hours. The auger was loaded into the Hot Cell on 7\\/26\\/94 and extruded. The sample contained no drainable liquid or liner liquid and

Kocher

1994-01-01

414

Ferrocyanide tank safety program: Cesium uptake capacity of simulated ferrocyanide tank waste. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to determine the capacity for {sup 137}Cs uptake by mixed metal ferrocyanides present in Hanford Site waste tanks, and to assess the potential for aggregation of these {sup 137}Cs-exchanged materials to form ``hot-spots`` in the tanks. This research, performed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for Westinghouse Hanford Company, stems from concerns regarding possible localized radiolytic heating within the tanks. After ferrocyanide was added to 18 high-level waste tanks in the 1950s, some of the ferrocyanide tanks received considerable quantities of saltcake waste that was rich in {sup 137}Cs. If radioactive cesium was exchanged and concentrated by the nickel ferrocyanide present in the tanks, the associated heating could cause tank temperatures to rise above the safety limits specified for the ferrocyanide-containing tanks, especially if the supernate in the tanks is pumped out and the waste becomes drier.

Burgeson, I.E.; Bryan, S.A.

1995-07-01

415

Effectiveness of catch basins equipped with hoods in retaining gross solids and hydrocarbons in highway runoff, Southeast Expressway, Boston, Massachusetts, 2008-09  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Stormwater mobilizes litter and other debris along the roadway where it is transported to the highway drainage systems. Initial treatment for stormwater runoff typically is provided by catch basins in highway settings. Modification of catch basins to include hoods that cover the catch-basin outlet is intended to enhance catch-basin performance by retaining floatable debris and various hydrophobic organic compounds that tend to float on the water surface within the sump of the catch basin. The effectiveness of six deep-sump off-line catch basins equipped with hoods in reducing the mass of gross solids greater than 0.25 inches in diameter and concentrations of oil and grease (OG) and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) was examined along the Southeast Expressway, in Boston, Massachusetts. Two deep-sump catch basins were equipped with cast-iron hoods. Three were equipped with molded plastic hoods, known as an Eliminator, and a single catch basin was equipped with a fiberglass anti-siphoning hood, known as a Snout. Samples of gross solids greater than 0.25 inches in diameter, excluding gravel and metallic materials, were routinely collected for a 6-month period from a collection structure mounted at the end of each catch-basin outlet pipe. After about 6 months, all floatable, saturated low-density and high-density solids were removed from each catch basin. In addition to the collection of samples of gross solids, samples of sump water from five catch basins and flow-weighted composite samples of stormwater from the outlet of one catch basin were collected and analyzed for concentrations of OG and TPH. A mass balance approach was used to assess the effectiveness of each catch basin equipped with a hood in retaining gross solids. The effectiveness of the deep-sump catch basins fitted with one of three types of hoods in retaining gross solids ranged from 27 to 52 percent. From 45 to 90 percent of the gross solids collected from the catch-basin sumps were composed of materials made of high-density plastics that did not float in water, and as a result, the effect that the catch-basin hoods had on these materials likely was marginal. The effectiveness for the deep-sump hooded catch basins, excluding the mass of high-density materials identified in the solids collected from the outlet pipe and the sump of the catch basins, ranged from 13 to 38 percent. The effectiveness for each catch basin, based solely on the material that remained floating at the end of the monitoring period, was less than 11 percent; however, these values likely underestimate the effectiveness of the hooded catch basins because much of the low-density material collected from the sumps may have been retained as floatable material before it was saturated and settled during non-storm conditions. The effectiveness of the catch basins equipped with hoods in reducing gross solids was not greatly different among the three types of hoods tested in this study. Concentrations of OG and TPH collected from the water surface of the catch-basins varied from catch basin to catch basin and were similar to concentrations of flow-weighted composite samples collected during storms. Comparisons indicate concentrations of OG and TPH in flow-weighted composite samples collected at the outlet of a catch basin equipped with an Eliminator hood were not substantially different from concentrations of the respective constituents in flow-weighted composite samples collected during a previous study from catch basins containing cast-iron hoods in the same study area. The similarity between these flow-weighted concentrations and the concentrations of the respective constituents in a vertical profile sample collected from the catch-basin sump indicates that OG and TPH are emulsified in the sump of each catch basin during storms and circumvent the hoods.

Smith, Kirk P.

2011-01-01

416

Catch-bond behaviour facilitates membrane tubulation by non-processive myosin 1b  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Myosin 1b is a single-headed membrane-associated motor that binds to actin filaments with a catch-bond behaviour in response to load. In vivo, myosin 1b is required to form membrane tubules at both endosomes and the trans-Golgi network. To establish the link between these two fundamental properties, here we investigate the capacity of myosin 1b to extract membrane tubes along bundled actin filaments in a minimal reconstituted system. We show that single-headed non-processive myosin 1b can extract membrane tubes at a biologically relevant low density. In contrast to kinesins we do not observe motor accumulation at the tip, suggesting that the underlying mechanism for tube formation is different. In our theoretical model, myosin 1b catch-bond properties facilitate tube extraction under conditions of increasing membrane tension by reducing the density of myo1b required to pull tubes.

Yamada, Ayako; Mamane, Alexandre; Lee-Tin-Wah, Jonathan; di Cicco, Aurélie; Prévost, Coline; Lévy, Daniel; Joanny, Jean-François; Coudrier, Evelyne; Bassereau, Patricia

2014-04-01

417

A modern approach to catch-age analysis for Hecate Strait rock sole ( Pleuronectes bilineatus)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We analyse catch-age data for Hecate Strait rock sole ( Pleuronectes bilineatus) over the 1945-1995 period. We employ a stochastic state-space model to assess uncertainty in stock abundance and recruitment trends. Rock sole biomass appears to have increased substantially since 1945. However, the apparent increase in biomass may be an artifact of inconsistencies in the age proportion data. Broad confidence intervals for model estimates of spawning stock biomass and corresponding age-4 recruits illustrate the uncertainty in the stock-recruitment relationship. This uncertainty must be acknowledged when results from catch-age analysis are translated into fishery yields. Thus, the tools we demonstrate here provide one step in implementing the precautionary approach to fish stock assessment.

Fargo, Jeff; Richards, Laura J.

1998-03-01

418

Catching fly balls in virtual reality: a critical test of the outfielder problem.  

PubMed

How does a baseball outfielder know where to run to catch a fly ball? The "outfielder problem" remains unresolved, and its solution would provide a window into the visual control of action. It may seem obvious that human action is based on an internal model of the physical world, such that the fielder predicts the landing point based on a mental model of the ball's trajectory (TP). However, two alternative theories, Optical Acceleration Cancellation (OAC) and Linear Optical Trajectory (LOT), propose that fielders are led to the right place at the right time by coupling their movements to visual information in a continuous "online" manner. All three theories predict successful catches and similar running paths. We provide a critical test by using virtual reality to perturb the vertical motion of the ball in mid-flight. The results confirm the predictions of OAC but are at odds with LOT and TP. PMID:20055547

Fink, Philip W; Foo, Patrick S; Warren, William H

2009-01-01

419

Catching fly balls in virtual reality: a critical test of the outfielder problem  

PubMed Central

How does a baseball outfielder know where to run to catch a fly ball? The “outfielder problem” remains unresolved, and its solution would provide a window into the visual control of action. It may seem obvious that human action is based on an internal model of the physical world, such that the fielder predicts the landing point based on a mental model of the ball’s trajectory (TP). But two alternative theories, Optical Acceleration Cancellation (OAC) and Linear Optical Trajectory (LOT), propose that fielders are led to the right place at the right time by coupling their movements to visual information in a continuous “online” manner. All three theories predict successful catches and similar running paths. We provide a critical test by using virtual reality to perturb the vertical motion of the ball in mid-flight. The results confirm the predictions of OAC, but are at odds with LOT and TP. PMID:20055547

Fink, Philip W.; Foo, Patrick S.; Warren, William H.

2013-01-01

420

CRITICAL ASSUMPTIONS IN THE F-TANK FARM CLOSURE OPERATIONAL DOCUMENTATION REGARDING WASTE TANK INTERNAL CONFIGURATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The intent of this document is to provide clarification of critical assumptions regarding the internal configurations of liquid waste tanks at operational closure, with respect to F-Tank Farm (FTF) closure documentation. For the purposes of this document, FTF closure documentation includes: (1) Performance Assessment for the F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (hereafter referred to as the FTF PA) (SRS-REG-2007-00002), (2) Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Closure of F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (DOE/SRS-WD-2012-001), (3) Tier 1 Closure Plan for the F-Area Waste Tank Systems at the Savannah River Site (SRR-CWDA-2010-00147), (4) F-Tank Farm Tanks 18 and 19 DOE Manual 435.1-1 Tier 2 Closure Plan Savannah River Site (SRR-CWDA-2011-00015), (5) Industrial Wastewater Closure Module for the Liquid Waste Tanks 18 and 19 (SRRCWDA-2010-00003), and (6) Tank 18/Tank 19 Special Analysis for the Performance Assessment for the F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (hereafter referred to as the Tank 18/Tank 19 Special Analysis) (SRR-CWDA-2010-00124). Note that the first three FTF closure documents listed apply to the entire FTF, whereas the last three FTF closure documents listed are specific to Tanks 18 and 19. These two waste tanks are expected to be the first two tanks to be grouted and operationally closed under the current suite of FTF closure documents and many of the assumptions and approaches that apply to these two tanks are also applicable to the other FTF waste tanks and operational closure processes.

Hommel, S.; Fountain, D.

2012-03-28

421

Tank Focus Area pretreatment activities  

SciTech Connect

Plans call for the high-level wastes to be retrieved from the tanks and immobilized in a stable waste form suitable for long-term isolation. Chemistry and chemical engineering operations are required to retrieve the wastes, to condition the wastes for subsequent steps, and to reduce the costs of the waste management enterprise. Pretreatment includes those processes between retrieval and immobilization, and includes preparation of suitable feed material for immobilization and separations to partition the waste into streams that yield lower life-cycle costs. Some of the technologies being developed by the Tank Focus Area (TFA) to process these wastes are described. These technologies fall roughly into three areas: (1) solid/liquid separation (SLS), (2) sludge pretreatment, and (3) supernate pretreatment.

McGinnis, C.P.; Welch, T.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Manke, K.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1997-03-01

422

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR SAMPLING OF TANK 18 IN F TANK FARM  

SciTech Connect

Representative sampling is required for characterization of the residual floor material in Tank 18 prior to operational closure. Tank 18 is an 85-foot diameter, 34-foot high carbon steel tank with nominal operating volume of 1,300,000 gallons. It is a Type IV tank, and has been in service storing radioactive materials since 1959. Recent mechanical cleaning of the tank removed all mounds of material. Anticipating a low level of solids in the residual material, Huff and Thaxton [2009] developed a plan to sample the material during the final clean-up process while it would still be resident in sufficient quantities to support analytical determinations in four quadrants of the tank. Execution of the plan produced fewer solids than expected to support analytical determinations in all four quadrants. Huff and Thaxton [2009] then restructured the plan to characterize the residual floor material separately in the North and the South regions: two 'hemispheres.' This document provides sampling recommendations to complete the characterization of the residual material on the tank bottom following the guidance in Huff and Thaxton [2009] to split the tank floor into a North and a South hemisphere. The number of samples is determined from a modification of the formula previously published in Edwards [2001] and the sample characterization data for previous sampling of Tank 18 described by Oji [2009]. The uncertainty is quantified by an upper 95% confidence limit (UCL95%) on each analyte's mean concentration in Tank 18. The procedure computes the uncertainty in analyte concentration as a function of the number of samples, and the final number of samples is determined when the reduction in the uncertainty from an additional sample no longer has a practical impact on results. The characterization of the full suite of analytes in the North hemisphere is currently supported by a single Mantis rover sample obtained from a compact region near the center riser. A floor scrape sample was obtained from a compact region near the northeast riser and has been analyzed for a shortened list of key analytes. Since the unused portion of the floor scrape sample material is archived and available in sufficient quantity, additional analyses need to be performed to complete results for the full suite of constituents. The characterization of the full suite of analytes in the South hemisphere is currently supported by a single Mantis rover sample; there have been no floor scrape samples previously taken from the South hemisphere. The criterion to determine the number of additional samples was based on the practical reduction in the uncertainty when a new sample is added. This was achieved when five additional samples are obtained. In addition, two archived samples will be used if a contingency such as failing to demonstrate the comparability of the Mantis samples to the floor scrape samples occurs. To complete sampling of the Tank 18 residual floor material, three additional samples should be taken from the North hemisphere and four additional samples should be taken from the South hemisphere. One of the samples from each hemisphere will be archived in case of need. Two of the three additional samples from the North hemisphere and three of the four additional samples from the South hemisphere will be analyzed. Once the results are available, differences between the Mantis and three floor scrape samples (the sample previously obtained near NE riser plus the two additional samples that will be analyzed) results will be evaluated. If there are no statistically significant analyte concentration differences between the Mantis and floor scrape samples, those results will be combined and then UCL95%s will be calculated. If the analyte concentration differences between the Mantis and floor scrape samples are statistically significant, the UCL95%s will be calculated without the Mantis sample results. If further reduction in the upper confidence limits is needed and can be achieved by the addition of the archived samples, they will be analyzed and included in the stati

Shine, G.

2009-12-14

423

Patient Safety Reporting Systems: Sustained Quality Improvement Using a Multidisciplinary Team and "Good Catch" Awards  

PubMed Central

Background Since 1999, hospitals have made substantial commitments to healthcare quality and patient safety through individual initiatives of executive leadership involvement in quality, investments in safety culture, education and training for medical students and residents in quality and safety, the creation of patient safety committees, and implementation of patient safety reporting systems. Cohesive quality and safety approaches have become comprehensive programs to identify and mitigate hazards that could harm patients. This article moves to the next level with an intense refocusing of attention on one of the individual components of a comprehensive program--the patient safety reporting system—with a goal of maximized usefulness of the reports and long-term sustainability of quality improvements arising from them. Methods A six-phase framework was developed to deal with patient safety hazards: identify, report, analyze, mitigate, reward, and follow up. Unique features of this process included a multidisciplinary team to review reports, mitigate hazards, educate and empower providers, recognize the identifying/reporting individuals or groups with “Good Catch” awards, and follow up to determine if quality improvements were sustained over time. Results To date, 29 patient safety hazards have gone through this process with “Good Catch” awards being granted at our institution. These awards were presented at various times over the past 4 years since the process began in 2008. Follow-up revealed that 86% of the associated quality improvements have been sustained over time since the awards were given. We present the details of two of these “Good Catch” awards: vials of heparin with an unusually high concentration of the drug that posed a potential overdose hazard and a rapid infusion device that resisted practitioner control. Conclusion A multidisciplinary team's analysis and mitigation of hazards identified in a patient safety reporting system, positive recognition with a “Good Catch” award, education of practitioners, and long-term follow-up resulted in an outcome of sustained quality improvement initiatives. PMID:22946251

Herzer, Kurt R.; Mirrer, Meredith; Xie, Yanjun; Steppan, Jochen; Li, Matthew; Jung, Clinton; Cover, Renee; Doyle, Peter A.; Mark, Lynette J.

2014-01-01

424

Association between postnatal catch-up growth and obesity in childhood: prospective cohort study  

Microsoft Academic Search

AbstractObjective: To identify predictors of postnatal catch-up growth from birth to two years and its relation to size and obesity at five years.Design: Regional prospective cohort study.Setting: Avon longitudinal study of pregnancy and childhood, United Kingdom.Subjects: 848 full term singletons from a 10% random sample of the Avon longitudinal study of pregnancy and childhood.Main outcome measures: Maternal birth weight, prepregnancy

Ken K L Ong; Marion L Ahmed; Pauline M Emmett; Michael A Preece; David B Dunger

2000-01-01

425

Movement as a specific stimulus for prey catching behaviour in rhinolophid and hipposiderid bats  

Microsoft Academic Search

1.The echolocating ‘long CF\\/FM-bat’Rhinolophus rouxi and the ‘short CF\\/FM-bats’Hipposideros bicolor andHipposideros speoris were tested for catching responses to moving and non-moving targets.2.Under our experimental conditions (freshly caught caged bats in a natural environment)Rhinolophus rouxi andHipposideros speoris only responded to insects of any sort that were beating their wings. The bats showed no reactions whatsoever to nonmoving insects or those walking

A. Link; G. Marimuthu; G. Neuweiler

1986-01-01

426

Angler Catch Rates and Catchability of Walleyes in Oneida Lake, New York  

Microsoft Academic Search

Understanding the relationship between anglers and fish is important to the management of angling fisheries. We compared angler catch rates estimated from creel surveys with (1) population density estimates of age-3 and older walleyes Sander vitreus based on mark–recapture and (2) mean growth of walleyes aged 4–6 in Oneida Lake during 1957–1959, 1997, and 2002– 2003. We also compared walleye

Anthony J. VanDeValk; John L. Forney; James R. Jackson; Lars G. Rudstam; Thomas E. Brooking; Scott D. Krueger

2005-01-01

427

Spatial-temporal dynamics of stable fly (Diptera: Muscidae) trap catches in eastern Nebraska  

Microsoft Academic Search

Spatial and temporal relationships among catches of adult stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.), on sticky traps in eastern Nebraska were evaluated. Twenty-five alsynite sticky traps were placed in a 5 by 5 grid with ?1.6-km intervals in a mixed agricultural environment from 2003 to 2011. Denser grids of 45-90 traps were implemented for varying lengths of time during the course

D.B. Taylor; K. Friesen; J. J. Zhu

2013-01-01

428

Relationship between Electrofishing Catch Rate and Adult Trout Abundance in Wisconsin Streams  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relative quickness and cost effectiveness of single-pass electrofishing samples (catch per effort [CPE]) argues for their use over multiple-pass estimates for enumerating stream fish populations. However, CPE can be an imprecise index of fish abundance and therefore may be less useful than more-precise indices of abundance, such as those obtained from mark–recapture or depletion methods, for assessing trout populations.

Paul S. Bergman; Michael J. Hansen; Nancy A. Nate

2011-01-01

429

Comparison of arboreal beetle catches in wet and dry collection cups with Lindgren multiple funnel traps.  

PubMed

We compared the effectiveness of a dry collection cup (with an insecticide killing strip) to a wet collection cup (containing antifreeze) for use with Lindgren multiple-funnel traps in catching several common species of bark and wood-boring beetles, and their associates in southern pine forests. All traps were baited with either the binary combination of ethanol and (-)-alpha-pinene or the quaternary combination of (+/-)-ipsenol, (+/-)-ipsdienol, ethanol, and (-)-alpha-pinene. We found that cup treatment had little, if any, effect on catches of Ips avulsus (Eichhoff) and I. grandicollis (Eichhoff) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), Alaus myops (F.) (Elateridae), Chalcophora Solier species (Buprestidae), Temnochila virescens (F.) (Trogositidae), and Lasconotus Erichson species (Colydiidae). In contrast, catches of the following species were significantly less (by 40-97%) in traps with dry cups than in traps with wet cups: Hylobius pales Herbst and Pachylobius picivorus LeConte (Curculionidae); Buprestis lineata F. (Buprestidae); Acanthocinus obsoletus (Olivier), Arhopalus rusticus nubilus (LeConte), Monochamus titillator (F.) and Xylotrechus sagittatus sagittatus (Cerambycidae); Hylastes porculus Erichson and Xyleborinus saxeseni (Ratzeburg) (Scolytidae); and Thanasimus dubius (F.) (Cleridae). The same was true in at least one experiment for the following species: Dendroctonus terebrans (Olivier), Hylastes salebrosus Eichhoff, Hylastes tenuis Eichhoff, and Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Motschulsky) (Scolytidae). We conclude that cup treatment can have a significant impact on catches of some arboreal beetles in baited multiple-funnel traps. Anyone using multiple-funnel traps to capture arboreal beetles should evaluate the potential impacts arising from their choice of collection cup treatment to their trapping objectives and expectations. The issue of cup treatment may be particular important at low population levels when maximum trap efficiency is required such as in the detection of exotic insects at ports-of-entry and within quarantine and containment zones. PMID:18330123

Miller, Daniel R; Duerr, Donald A

2008-02-01

430

Physiological Response of Some Economically Important Freshwater Salmonids to Catch-and-Release Fishing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Catch-and-release fishing regulations are widely used by fishery resource managers to maintain both the quantity and quality of sport fish populations. We evaluated blood chemistry disturbances in wild brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis, brown trout Salmo trutta, cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii, and Arctic grayling Thymallus arcticus that had been hooked and played for 1–5 min in waters of the intermountain western

Gary A. Wedemeyer; Richard S. Wydoski

2008-01-01

431

How to assign a catch value to fishing grounds when fisheries statistics are not spatially explicit  

Microsoft Academic Search

SuMMarY: Fishery statistics do not usually include small-scale spatial references to assess the effects of natural or human disturbances. We present a methodology which assigns a geographical origin to the catches and assesses the total revenue of the fishing grounds. Market statistics are combined with the results of an ethnographic survey to provide a spatial allocation of the fishing effort.

Pablo Pita; Juan Freire

2008-01-01

432

A Review of Catch-and-Release Angling Mortality with Implications for No-take Reserves  

Microsoft Academic Search

Management agencies have increasingly relied on size limits, daily bag or trip limits, quotas, and seasonal closures to manage\\u000a fishing in recreational and commercial fisheries. Another trend is to establish aquatic protected areas, including no-take\\u000a reserves (NTRs), to promote sustainable fisheries and protect aquatic ecosystems. Some anglers, assuming that no serious harm\\u000a befalls the fish, advocate allowing catch-and-release (C&R) angling

Aaron Bartholomew; James A. Bohnsack

2005-01-01

433

Factors Influencing By-catch and Discard Rates: Analyses from Multispecies\\/Multifishery Sea Sampling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Factors influencing the species composition and magnitude of landings and discards were evaluated based on data from at-sea observations of 4 533 otter trawl tows. Data were collected from the USA mixed species otter trawl fisheries of the Georges Bank-Southern New England region, sampled during 1989-92. General linear models for main effects have related discard rates, total catch, and indices

S. A. Murawski

1996-01-01

434

Prey catching with and without echolocation in the Indian false vampire ( Megaderma lyra )  

Microsoft Academic Search

1.Under laboratory conditions echolocation sounds were recorded from four Megaderma lyra catching a mouse in complete darkness from an experimental table. Flight paths and sequences of sound emission were synchronously recorded by stroboscopic photography and high-speed tape-recording (Figs. 1 and 2).2.During approach toward a live mouse in 54% of 35 completely recorded flights, the bat emitted ultrasounds, but only up

Joachim Fiedler; Fachbereich Biologie

1979-01-01

435

Double wall underground storage tank  

SciTech Connect

A double wall underground storage tank is described comprising: (a) a cylindrical inner wall, (b) a cylindrical outer wall comprising plastic resin and reinforcement fibers, and (c) a layer of spacer filaments wound around the inner wall, the spacer filaments separating the inner and outer walls, and the spacer filaments being at least partially surrounded by voids to enable liquids to flow along the filaments.

Canaan, E.B. Jr.; Wiegand, J.R.; Bartlow, D.H.

1993-07-06

436

241-AZ Tank Farm Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102. The construction history of the 241-AZ tank farm has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In the 241-AZ tank farm, the second DST farm constructed, both refractory quality and tank and liner fabrication were improved.

Barnes, Travis J.; Boomer, Kayle D.; Gunter, Jason R.; Venetz, Theodore J.

2013-07-30

437

241-SY Tank Farm Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for tanks 241-SY-101, 241-SY-102, and 241-SY-103. The construction history of the 241-SY tank farm has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank 241-AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank 241-AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In the 241-SY tank farm, the third DST farm constructed, refractory quality and stress relief were improved, while similar tank and liner fabrication issues remained.

Barnes, Travis J.; Boomer, Kayle D.; Gunter, Jason R.; Venetz, Theodore J.

2013-07-25

438

Genetic Evidence Highlights Potential Impacts of By-Catch to Cetaceans  

PubMed Central

Incidental entanglement in fishing gear is arguably the most serious threat to many populations of small cetaceans, judging by the alarming number of captured animals. However, other aspects of this threat, such as the potential capture of mother-offspring pairs or reproductive pairs, could be equally or even more significant but have rarely been evaluated. Using a combination of demographic and genetic data we provide evidence that i) Franciscana dolphin pairs that are potentially reproductive and mother-offspring pairs form temporal bonds, and ii) are entangled simultaneously. Our results highlight potential demographic and genetic impacts of by-catch to cetacean populations: the joint entanglement of mother-offspring or reproductive pairs, compared to random individuals, might exacerbate the demographic consequences of by-catch, and the loss of groups of relatives means that significant components of genetic diversity could be lost together. Given the social nature of many odontocetes (toothed cetaceans), we suggest that these potential impacts could be rather general to the group and therefore by-catch could be more detrimental than previously considered. PMID:21179542

Mendez, Martin; Rosenbaum, Howard C.; Wells, Randall S.; Stamper, Andrew; Bordino, Pablo

2010-01-01

439

Applying a reservoir functional-zone paradigm to littoral bluegills: differences in length and catch frequency?  

PubMed Central

Reservoirs exhibit gradients in conditions and resources along the transition from lotic to lentic habitat that may be important to bluegill ecology. The lotic–lentic gradient can be partitioned into three functional zones: the riverine, transitional, and lacustrine zones. We measured catch frequency and length of bluegills (Lepomis macrochirus) captured along the periphery of these areas (i.e., in the littoral zone of each functional zone) for four small reservoirs in Southeastern Ohio during the summer months of three years. Catch frequency differed between zones for two reservoirs, but these differences were not observed in other years. There was no relationship between reservoir zone and either standard length or catch frequency when the data for all reservoirs were pooled, but we did observe a bimodal length distribution in all reservoirs. A combination of ecological factors including inter and intraspecific competition, predation intensity, management practices, limnology, and assemblage complexity may be mitigating bluegill distribution and abundance in reservoirs. Therefore, a functional zone (categorical) approach to understanding bluegill ecology in reservoirs may not be appropriate.

DeAngelis, Holly; Crosby, Abigale M.; Roosenburg, Willem M.

2014-01-01

440

Fishing Effort and Catch Composition of Urban Market and Rural Villages in Brazilian Amazon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The management of small-scale freshwater fisheries in Amazon has been based usually on surveys of urban markets, while fisheries of rural villages have gone unnoticed. We compared the fishing characteristics (catch, effort and selectivity) between an urban market and five small villages in the Lower Tocantins River (Brazilian Amazon), downstream from a large reservoir. We recorded 86 and 601 fish landings in the urban market and villages, respectively, using the same methodology. The urban fishers showed higher catch per unit of effort, higher amount of ice (related to a higher fishing effort, as ice is used to store fish catches) and larger crew size per fishing trip, but village fishers had a higher estimated annual fish production. Conversely, urban and village fishers used similar fishing gear (gillnets) and the main fish species caught were the same. However, village fishers showed more diverse strategies regarding gear, habitats and fish caught. Therefore, although it underestimated the total amount of fish caught in the Lower Tocantins River region, the data from the urban market could be a reliable indicator of main fish species exploited and fishing gear used by village fishers. Monitoring and management should consider the differences and similarities between urban and rural fisheries, in Amazon and in other tropical regions.

Hallwass, Gustavo; Lopes, Priscila Fabiana; Juras, Anastacio Afonso; Silvano, Renato Azevedo Matias

2011-02-01

441

A Hexylchloride-Based Catch-and-Release System for Chemical Proteomic Applications  

PubMed Central

Bioorthogonal ligation methods that allow the selective conjugation of fluorophores or biotin to proteins and small molecule probes that contain inert chemical handles are an important component of many chemical proteomic strategies. Here, we present a new catch-and-release enrichment strategy that utilizes a hexylchloride group as a bioorthogonal chemical handle. Proteins and small molecules that contain a hexylchloride tag can be efficiently captured by an immobilized version of the self-labeling protein HaloTag. Furthermore, by using a HaloTag fusion protein that contains a protease cleavage site, captured proteins can be selectively eluted under mild conditions. We demonstrate the utility of the hexylchloride-based catch-and-release strategy by enriching protein kinases that are covalently and non-covalently bound to ATP-binding site-directed probes from mammalian cell lysates. Our catch-and-release system creates new possibilities for profiling enzyme families and for the identification of the cellular targets of bioactive small molecules. PMID:23305300

Brigham, Jennifer L.; Perera, B. Gayani K.; Maly, Dustin J.

2013-01-01

442

Chemical composition of Hanford Tank SY-102  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) to safely manage and dispose of the radioactive waste, both current and future, stored in double-shell and single-shell tanks at the Hanford sites. One major program element in TWRS is pretreatment which was established to process the waste prior to disposal using the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant. In support of this program, Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a conceptual process flow sheet which will remediate the entire contents of a selected double-shelled underground waste tank, including supernatant and sludge, into forms that allow storage and final disposal in a safe, cost-effective and environmentally sound manner. The specific tank selected for remediation is 241-SY-102 located in the 200 West Area. As part of the flow sheet development effort, the composition of the tank was defined and documented. This database was built by examining the history of liquid waste transfers to the tank and by performing careful analysis of all of the analytical data that have been gathered during the tank`s lifetime. In order to more completely understand the variances in analytical results, material and charge balances were done to help define the chemistry of the various components in the tank. This methodology of defining the tank composition and the final results are documented in this report.

Birnbaum, E.; Agnew, S.; Jarvinen, G.; Yarbro, S.

1993-12-01

443

Rocking response of tanks containing two liquids  

SciTech Connect

Liquid storage tanks are important components of industrial facilities and, when located in earthquake prone regions, should be designed to withstand the earthquakes to which they may be subjected. There are cases in which the density of the tank content is not uniform. For such cases, the dynamic responses of tanks containing liquids with different densities must be studied. A study on the dynamic response of upright circular cylindrical liquid-storage tanks containing two different liquids under a rock base motion with an arbitrary temporal variation is presented. Only rigid tanks were studied. The response quantities examined include the hydrodynamic pressure, sloshing wave height and the associated frequencies, base shear and moments. Each of these response quantities is expressed as the sum of the so-called impulsive component and convective component. Unlike the case of tanks containing one liquid, in which the response is controlled by one parameter, height-to-radius ratio, the response of tanks containing two different liquids are controlled by three parameters: height-to-radius ratio, and mass density ratio and height ratio of the two liquids. The interrelationship of the responses of the tank-liquid system to rocking and lateral base excitations is established by examining numerical results extensively. It is found that some of the response quantities for a tank-liquid system under a rocking base motion can be determined from the corresponding response quantities for an identical tank under a horizontal base motion.

Tang, Yu; Chang, Y.W.

1993-06-01

444

High-heat tank safety issues evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Subsection (b) of Public Law 101-510, Section 3137, {open_quotes}Safety Measures for Waste Tanks at Hanford Nuclear Reservation{close_quotes} (PL 101-510), requires the Secretary of Energy to {open_quotes}identify those tanks that may have a serious potential for release of high-level waste due to uncontrolled increase in temperature or pressure{close_quotes}. One of the tanks that has been identified to meet this criteria is single-shell tank (SST) 241-C-106 (Wilson and Reep 1991). This report presents the results of an evaluation of the safety issue associated with tank 241-C-106: the continued cooling required for high heat generation in tank 241-C-106. If tank 241-C-106 should start leaking, continued addition of water for cooling could possibly increase the amount of leakage to the soil column. In turn, if the current methods of cooling tank 241-C-106 are stopped, the sludge temperatures may exceed established temperature limits, the long term structural integrity of the tank liner and concrete would be jeopardized, leading to an unacceptable release to the environment. Among other conclusions, this evaluation has determined that tank 241-C-106 contains enough heat generating wastes to justify retaining this tank on the list {open_quotes}Single-Shell Tanks With High Heat Loads (>40,000 Btu/H){close_quotes} and that to confirm the structural integrity needed for the retrieval of the contents of tank 241-C-106, an updated structural analysis and thermal analysis need to be conducted. Other findings of this evaluation are also reported.

Conner, J.C.

1993-05-10

445

RETRIEVAL & TREATMENT OF HANFORD TANK WASTE  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Tank Farms contain 53 million gal of radioactive waste accumulated during over 50 years of operations. The waste is stored in 177 single-shell and double-shell tanks in the Hanford 200 Areas. The single-shell tanks were put into operation from the early 1940s through the 1960s with wastes received from several generations of processing facilities for the recovery of plutonium and uranium, and from laboratories and other ancillary facilities. The overall hanford Tank Farm system represents one of the largest nuclear legacies in the world driving towards completion of retrieval and treatment in 2028 and the associated closure activity completion by 2035. Remote operations, significant radiation/contamination levels, limited access, and old facilities are just some of the challenges faced by retrieval and treatment systems. These systems also need to be able to successfully remove 99% or more of the waste, and support waste treatment, and tank closure. The Tank Farm retrieval program has ramped up dramatically in the past three years with design, fabrication, installation, testing, and operations ongoing on over 20 of the 149 single-shell tanks. A variety of technologies are currently being pursued to retrieve different waste types, applications, and to help establish a baseline for recovery/operational efficiencies. The paper/presentation describes the current status of retrieval system design, fabrication, installation, testing, readiness, and operations, including: (1) Saltcake removal progress in Tanks S-102, S-109, and S-112 using saltcake dissolution, modified sluicing, and high pressure water lancing techniques; (2) Sludge vacuum retrieval experience from Tanks C-201, C-202, C-203, and C-204; (3) Modified sluicing experience in Tank C-103; (4) Progress on design and installation of the mobile retrieval system for sludge in potentially leaking single-shell tanks, particularly Tank C-101; and (5) Ongoing installation of various systems in the next generation of tanks to be retrieved.

EACKER, J.A.; SPEARS, J.A.; STURGES, M.H.; MAUSS, B.M.

2006-01-20

446

Diurnal Variation in Invertebrate Catch Rates by Sticky Traps: Potential for Biased Indices of Piping Plover Forage  

Microsoft Academic Search

Measuring abundance of invertebrate forage for piping plovers (Charadrius melodus; hereafter plovers), a federally listed species in the USA, is an important component of research and monitoring targeted\\u000a toward species recovery. Sticky traps are commonly used to passively sample invertebrates, but catch rates may vary diurnally\\u000a or in response to weather. We examined diurnal variation in catch rates of invertebrates

Michael J. Anteau; Mark H. Sherfy

2010-01-01

447

Phosphorylation of a high molecular weight (?600 kDa) protein regulates catch in invertebrate smooth muscle  

Microsoft Academic Search

A unique property of smooth muscle is its ability to maintain force with a very low expenditure of energy. This characteristic\\u000a is highly expressed in molluscan smooth muscles, such as the anterior byssus retractor muscle (ABRM) of Mytilus edulis, during\\u000a a contractile state called ‘catch’. Catch occurs following the initial activation of the muscle, and is characterized by prolonged\\u000a force

Marion J. Siegman; Susan U. Mooers; Chenqing Li; Srinivasa Narayan; Laura Trinkle-Mulcahy; Shugo Watabe; David J. Hartshorne; Thomas M. Butler

1997-01-01

448

78 FR 63406 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-Annual Catch Limit...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

Effective 1200 hr, October 24, 2013, federally permitted vessels may not fish for, catch, possess, transfer, or land more than 2,000 lb (907.2 kg) of Atlantic herring (herring) per trip or calendar day in or from Management Area 3 until January 1, 2014, when the 2014 allocation for Area 3 becomes available. This action is required because NMFS projects that 92 percent of the catch limit for that......

2013-10-24

449

Changes in the Nutrient Content of School Lunches: Results from the CATCH Eat Smart Food Service Intervention  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background.The Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health (CATCH) tested the effectiveness of a multilevel intervention aimed at promoting a healthful school environment and positive eating and physical activity behaviors in children. The CATCH Eat Smart Program targeted the school food service staff and aimed to lower the total fat, saturated fat, and sodium content of school meals.Methods.The Eat Smart

Stavroula K. Osganian; Mary Kay Ebzery; Deanna H. Montgomery; Theresa A. Nicklas; Marguerite A. Evans; Paul D. Mitchell; Leslie A. Lytle; M. Patricia Snyder; Elaine J. Stone; Michelle M. Zive; Kathryn J. Bachman; Rochelle Rice; Guy S. Parcel

1996-01-01

450

Diurnal variation in invertebrate catch rates by sticky traps: Potential for biased indices of piping plover forage  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Measuring abundance of invertebrate forage for piping plovers (Charadrius melodus; hereafter plovers), a federally listed species in the USA, is an important component of research and monitoring targeted toward species recovery. Sticky traps are commonly used to passively sample invertebrates, but catch rates may vary diurnally or in response to weather. We examined diurnal variation in catch rates of invertebrates using an experiment on reservoir shoreline and riverine sandbar habitats of the Upper Missouri River in 2006 and 2008. Highest catch rates of large invertebrates (>3 mm) on dry sand habitats occurred during 08:00-11:00 Central Daylight Time (CDT) on the reservoir and 08:00-14:00 CDT on the river. On wet sand habitats, catch rates were lowest during 17:00-20:00 on both the reservoir and the river. Catch rates decreased 24% for every 10 kph increase in wind. Sticky traps deployed continuously for 12 h or more had lower catch rates than four consecutive-composited 3-hour deployments, suggesting that trap effectiveness declined for >3-hour deployments. Thus, if sticky traps are used to index plover forage abundance without controlling for time of day and wind speed, data may be highly variable or estimates could be biased. ?? 2010 Society of Wetland Scientists.

Anteau, M. J.; Sherfy, M. H.

2010-01-01

451

LH2 fuel tank design for SSTO  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This report will discuss the design of a liquid hydrogen fuel tank constructed from composite materials. The focus of this report is to recommend a design for a fuel tank which will be able to withstand all static and dynamic forces during manned flight. Areas of study for the design include material selection, material structural analysis, heat transfer, thermal expansion, and liquid hydrogen diffusion. A structural analysis FORTRAN program was developed for analyzing the buckling and yield characteristics of the tank. A thermal analysis Excel spreadsheet was created to determine a specific material thickness which will minimize heat transfer through the wall of the tank. The total mass of the tank was determined by the combination of both structural and thermal analyses. The report concludes with the recommendation of a layered material tank construction. The designed system will include exterior insulation, combination of metal and organize composite matrices and honeycomb.

Wright, Geoff

452

Method of Making a Composite Tank  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A composite tank for containing liquid oxygen and the method of making the same wherein a water-soluble mandrel having the desired tank configuration and a cylindrical A method of making a composite tank for containing liquid oxygen configuration of the mandrel and an outer boss conforming to the configuration of the inner boss, the bosses each having a tubular portion for receiving the protuberance on the mandrel and a spherical portion. The mandrel and the bosses are first coated with a nickel coating. The mandrel is then wrapped with graphite fibers wetted with an epoxy resin and this resin is cured. A layer of insulating foam is then applied to the tank and cured. The insulating foam is machined to a desired configuration and a layer of aramid fibers wetted with a second epoxy resin is wrapped around the tank. The second resin is cured and the water soluble mandrel is washed from inside the tank.

DeLay, Thomas K. (Inventor)

2001-01-01

453

Liquid storage tanks under vertical excitation  

SciTech Connect

Until recently, the hydrodynamic effects on liquid storage tanks induced by an earthquake excitation were basically treated for the horizontal component of the earthquake. Recent studies, however, showed that the hydrodynamic effects due to the vertical component of an earthquake may be significant. In these studies the tank is assumed to be fixed at the bottom. This paper is concerned with the hydrodynamic behavior of liquid storage tanks induced by vertical earthquake input excitation. First, the fluid-tank system is treated as a fixed-base system and a simple formula is obtained for the coupled fluid-structure natural frequency. Second, additional interaction effects due to the foundation flexibility on the fluid-tank system are investigated. It is concluded that the foundation flexibility may have a significant effect on the hydrodynamic behavior of the liquid storage tanks under a vertical ground shaking.

Philippacopoulos, A.J.

1985-01-01

454

Stabilization of Underground Solvent Storage Tanks  

SciTech Connect

The Old Solvent Tanks (OST), located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) are comprised of 22 underground storage tanks that were used to store spent radioactive solvent and aqueous wastes generated from the plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) process. The OSTs were installed at various dates between 1955 and 1968 and used to store the spent solvents until 1974. The spent solvents stored in the OSTs were transferred out from 1976 through 1981 leaving only residual liquids and sludges that could not be pumped out.Final remediation goals include an overlying infiltration control system. If the tanks were to structurally fail, they would collapse causing potential for onsite worker exposure and release of tank contents to the environment. Therefore, as an interim action, methods for stabilizing the tanks were evaluated. This paper will discuss the systems designed to perform and monitor the grouting operation, the grouting process, and the radiological controls and wastes associated with grouting the Old Solvent Tanks.

Smail, T.R.

2003-08-15

455

Waste Tank Vapor Project: Tank vapor database development  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Tank Vapor Database (TVD) Development task in FY 1994 was to create a database to store, retrieve, and analyze data collected from the vapor phase of Hanford waste tanks. The data needed to be accessible over the Hanford Local Area Network to users at both Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The data were restricted to results published in cleared reports from the laboratories analyzing vapor samples. Emphasis was placed on ease of access and flexibility of data formatting and reporting mechanisms. Because of time and budget constraints, a Rapid Application Development strategy was adopted by the database development team. An extensive data modeling exercise was conducted to determine the scope of information contained in the database. a A SUN Sparcstation 1000 was procured as the database file server. A multi-user relational database management system, Sybase{reg_sign}, was chosen to provide the basic data storage and retrieval capabilities. Two packages were chosen for the user interface to the database: DataPrism{reg_sign} and Business Objects{trademark}. A prototype database was constructed to provide the Waste Tank Vapor Project`s Toxicology task with summarized and detailed information presented at Vapor Conference 4 by WHC, PNL, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Oregon Graduate Institute. The prototype was used to develop a list of reported compounds, and the range of values for compounds reported by the analytical laboratories using different sample containers and analysis methodologies. The prototype allowed a panel of toxicology experts to identify carcinogens and compounds whose concentrations were within the reach of regulatory limits. The database and user documentation was made available for general access in September 1994.

Seesing, P.R.; Birn, M.B.; Manke, K.L.

1994-09-01

456

49 CFR 173.315 - Compressed gases in cargo tanks and portable tanks.  

...MC-330, MC-331 100. Carbon dioxide, refrigerated liquid See par...and portable tank containers for carbon dioxide, refrigerated liquid...to: (1) A tank containing carbon dioxide, refrigerated liquid or...

2014-10-01

457

45Fuel Level in a Spherical Tank Spherical tanks are found in many  

E-print Network

the storage of cryogenic liquids, to fuel tanks. Under the influence of gravity, or acceleration, the liquid full the tank is by measuring h and relating it to the remaining volume of the liquid. A sensor can

458

92. VIEW OF PRECIPITATION AREA FROM SOUTHWEST. VACUUM CLARIFIER TANK ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

92. VIEW OF PRECIPITATION AREA FROM SOUTHWEST. VACUUM CLARIFIER TANK No. 1 AT LOWER LEFT, UNDER LAUNDER FEED TO GOLD TANK No. 2, AND VACUUM CLARIFIER TANK No. 2, AT MIDRIGHT. VACUUM RECEIVER TANK ON UPPER LEFT. PIPE TO TOP CENTER OF TANK TAKES OUTFLOW FROM CLARIFIER LEAVES. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

459

CLOSURE OF HLW TANKS FORMULATION FOR A COOLING COIL GROUT  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Tank Closure and Technology Development Groups are developing a strategy for closing the High Level Waste (HLW) tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Two Type IV tanks, 17 and 20 in the F-Area Tank Farm, have been successfully filled with grout. Type IV tanks at SRS do not contain cooling coils; on the other hand, the majority of

J. R. Harbour; V Vickie Williams; E Erich Hansen

2008-01-01

460

Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-U-110  

SciTech Connect

This report investigates the nature of the waste in tank U-110 using historical and current information. When characterizing tank waste, several important properties are considered. First, the physical characteristics of the waste are presented, including waste appearance, density, and size of waste particles. The existence of any exotherms in the tank that may present a safety concern is investigated. Finally, the radiological and chemical composition of the tank are presented.

Brown, T.M.; Jensen, L.

1993-04-01

461

Tank Closure Progress at the Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Tank Farm Facility  

SciTech Connect

Significant progress has been made at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to empty, clean and close radioactive liquid waste storage tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Tank Farm Facility (TFF). The TFF includes eleven 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) underground stainless steel storage tanks and four smaller, 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) stainless steel tanks, along with tank vaults, interconnecting piping, and ancillary equipment. The TFF tanks have historically been used to store a variety of radioactive liquid waste, including wastes associated with past spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. Although four of the large storage tanks remain in use for waste storage, the other seven 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) tanks and the four 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) tanks have been emptied of waste, cleaned and filled with grout. A water spray cleaning system was developed and deployed to clean internal tank surfaces and remove remaining tank wastes. The cleaning system was effective in removing all but a very small volume of solid residual waste particles. Recent issuance of an Amended Record of Decision (ROD) in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act, and a Waste Determination complying with Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2005, has allowed commencement of grouting activities on the cleaned tanks. The first three 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) tanks were grouted in the Fall of 2006 and the fourth tank and the seven 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) tanks were filled with grout in 2007 to provide long-term stability. It is currently planned that associated tank valve boxes and interconnecting piping, will be stabilized with grout as early as 2008. (authors)

Quigley, K.D. [CH2M..WG Idaho, LLC, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Butterworth, St.W. [CH2M..WG Idaho, LLC, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lockie, K.A. [U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

2008-07-01

462

Tank 241-TY-101 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-TY-101. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedure that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank.

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31

463

Tank 241-SX-106 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-SX-106. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedure that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank.

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31

464

Tank 241-TY-103 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-TY-103. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedure that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank.

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31

465

Tank 241-TY-104 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-TY-104. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedures that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank.

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31

466

Protocol for disposition of tank farm equipment lists and tank farm drawings for year 2000 compliance  

SciTech Connect

A program has been initiated to assess, renovate, document and certify tank farm field equipment for year 2000 compliance. The program is necessary to assure no adverse effects occur in tank farm operations as a result of equipment malfunction due to what is widely known as the ''millennium bug''. This document elaborates the protocols for reviewing field equipment lists and tank farm drawings for the purpose of identifying and resolving year 2000 compliance problems in tank farm equipment.

ADAMS, M.R.

1999-02-23

467

Radiotracer investigation in gold leaching tanks.  

PubMed

Measurement and analysis of residence time distribution (RTD) is a classical method to investigate performance of chemical reactors. In the present investigation, the radioactive tracer technique was used to measure the RTD of aqueous phase in a series of gold leaching tanks at the Damang gold processing plant in Ghana. The objective of the investigation was to measure the effective volume of each tank and validate the design data after recent process intensification or revamping of the plant. I-131 was used as a radioactive tracer and was instantaneously injected into the feed stream of the first tank and monitored at the outlet of different tanks. Both sampling and online measurement methods were used to monitor the tracer concentration. The results of measurements indicated that both the methods provided identical RTD curves. The mean residence time (MRT) and effective volume of each tank was estimated. The tanks-in-series model with exchange between active and stagnant volume was used and found suitable to describe the flow structure of aqueous phase in the tanks. The estimated effective volume of the tanks and high degree of mixing in tanks could validate the design data and confirmed the expectation of the plant engineer after intensification of the process. PMID:22004896

Dagadu, C P K; Akaho, E H K; Danso, K A; Stegowski, Z; Furman, L

2012-01-01

468

Method for abandoning an underground storage tank  

SciTech Connect

A method is described of abandoning an underground storage tank in which hydrocarbon substances have been stored comprising the steps of: (a) removing residual substances, if any, from said tank; (b) washing said tank with a detergent solution; (c) removing said detergent solution; and (d) completely filling said tank with a mixture which includes water, sand, a binding agent and a material for enhancing the flowability of said mixture wherein said mixture forms a solid composition with a structural strength similar to that of the surrounding soil.

Hannay, R.C.

1993-08-24

469

Underground storage tank: Removal vs. abandonment  

SciTech Connect

What can you do with an underground storage tank (UST) when its service life is concluding Two options: remove it or abandon it. Environmental managers must weigh the pros and cons of each disposal method when handling individual USTs. Summarized here are the required steps and common problems attendant to each UST closure method. Some operations, such as tank cleaning, must be performed regardless of whether the tank is abandoned or removed. Other steps, such as filling an abandoned tank or discarding a removed one, require decisions about particular materials or technologies that must be made or agreed to by the tank owner prior to contracting the tank disposal. The variety of different procedures has its own relevancy to the final liability and cost remaining to the tank owner. Good documentation, especially of waste and tank disposal locations and the results of the site assessment, are critical when proving to regulators or future site owners that the tank was indeed closed properly and no longer presents an environmental threat. Because of the high cost of environmental investigations, close attention to this once-routine task will ensure that USTs are one potential problem that truly will go away.

Robinson, J.E. (Woodard and Curran Environmental Services, Inc., Portland, ME (United States))

1993-08-01

470

DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) EMERGENCY PUMPING GUIDE  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this plan is to provide as much preplanning as practical for pumping waste out of the annulus or secondary containment of Double-Shell Tanks (DST). If the primary tank leaks, waste would accumulate in the secondary tank. For the purposes of this report, the terms ''secondary tank'' and ''annulus'' are used interchangeably. The preplanning will expedite emergency pumping and provide the basis for demonstrating that the leaked waste will be ''removed from the secondary containment system within 24 hours, or in as timely a manner as is possible'' as required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-640 (4) (iv) ''Tank Systems''. There are 177 underground waste storage tanks in the Hanford Site 200 East and 200 West Areas. There are 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs), and 28 DSTs. The scope of this plan includes all 28 of the Hanford Site DSTs in AN, AP, AW, AY, AZ and SY Tank Farms. The scope also includes the transfer lines, pump pits, valve pits, jumpers, transfer pumps, sump pumps, and procedures necessary to accomplish the emergency pumping. Revision 5 of the Emergency Pumping Guide updates transfer routes and equipment in the Double Shell Tank Farm to be consistent with the transition to a RCRA compliant operating system as of July 1, 2005.

REBERGER, D.W.

2005-08-10

471

Rocking response of tanks containing two liquids  

SciTech Connect

A study on the dynamic response of upright circular cylindrical liquid-storage tanks containing two different liquids under a rocking base motion with an arbitrary temporal variation is presented. Only rigid tanks were studied. The response quantities examined include the hydrodynamic pressure, sloshing wave height and the associated frequencies, base shear and moments. Each of these response quantities is expressed as the sum of the so-called impulsive component and convective component. Unlike the case of tanks containing one liquid, in which the response is controlled by one parameter, height-to-radius ratio, the response of tanks containing two different liquids are controlled by three parameters: height-to-radius ratio, and mass density ratio and height ratio of the two liquids. The interrelationship of the responses of the tank-liquid system to rocking and lateral base excitations is established by examining numerical results extensively. The study shows that some of the response quantities for tank-liquid system under a rocking base motion can be determined from the available data for the response of an identical tank under a horizontal base motion. Base rocking motion can occur in a ground-supported tank or in an elevated tank under earthquake motions.

Tang, Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Reactor Engineering Div.

1995-01-01

472

Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for BY Tank Farm  

SciTech Connect

This document provides historical evaluations of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the Hanford Site 200-East Area underground single-shell tanks (SSTs). A Historical Tank Content Estimate has been developed by reviewing the process histories, waste transfer data, and available physical and chemical characterization data from various Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Defense (DOD) contractors. The historical data will supplement information gathered from in-tank core sampling activities that are currently underway. A tank history review that is accompanied by current characterization data creates a complete and reliable inventory estimate. Additionally, historical review of the tanks may reveal anomalies or unusual contents that are critical to characterization and post characterization activities. Complete and accurate tank waste characterizations are critical first steps for DOE and Westinghouse Hanford Company safety programs, waste pretreatment, and waste retrieval activities. The scope of this document is limited to the SSTs in the BY Tank Farm of the northeast quadrant of the 200 East Area. Nine appendices contain data on: tank level histories; temperature graphs; surface level graphs; drywell graphs; riser configuration and tank cross section; sampling data; tank photographs; unknown tank transfers; and tank layering comparison. 113 refs.

Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Walsh, A.C.

1994-06-01

473

Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for C-tank farm  

SciTech Connect

This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on C-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information,temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the northeast quadrant of the Hanford 200 East Area.

Brevick, C.H.

1996-06-28

474

Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for AX-tank farm  

SciTech Connect

This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on AX-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information,temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the northeast quadrant of the Hanford 200 East Area.

Brevick, C.H., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-06-28

475

Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for AY-tank farm  

SciTech Connect

This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on AY-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the Southeast Quadrant of the Hanford 200 Areas.

Brevick, C.H.; Stroup, J.L.; Funk, J.W., Fluor Daniel Hanford, Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-03-12

476

Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for B-Tank farm  

SciTech Connect

This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on B-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information,temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the northeast quadrant of the Hanford 200 East Area.

Brevick, C.H.

1996-06-28

477

Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for AW-tank farm  

SciTech Connect

This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on AW-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the Southeast Quadrant of the Hanford 200 Areas.

Brevick, C.H., Stroup, J.L.; Funk, J.W., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-03-06

478

Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for BY-Tank farm  

SciTech Connect

This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on BY-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information,temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the northeast quadrant of the Hanford 200 East Area.

Brevick, C.H.

1996-06-28

479

Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for the SX-tank farm  

SciTech Connect

This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on SX-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the Southwest Quadrant of the Hanford 200 West Area.

Brevick, C.H., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-25

480

Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for A-Tank farm  

SciTech Connect

This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on A-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information,temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the northeast quadrant of the Hanford 200 East Area.

Brevick, C.H.

1996-06-28

481

Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for BX-tank farm  

SciTech Connect

This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on BX-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information,temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the northeast quadrant of the Hanford 200 East Area.

Brevick, C.H.

1996-06-28

482

Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for B Tank Farm  

SciTech Connect

This document provides historical evaluations of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the Hanford Site 200-East Area underground single-shell tanks (SSTs). A Historical Tank Content Estimate has been developed by reviewing the process histories, waste transfer data, and available physical and chemical characterization data from various Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Defense (DOD) contractors. The historical data will supplement information gathered from in-tank core sampling activities that are currently underway. A tank history review that is accompanied by current characterization data creates a complete and reliable inventory estimate. Additionally, historical review of the tanks may reveal anomalies or unusual contents that are critical to characterization and post characterization activities. Complete and accurate tank waste characterizations are critical first steps for DOE and Westinghouse Hanford Company safety programs, waste pretreatment, and waste retrieval activities. The scope of this document is limited to the SSTs in the B Tank Farm of the northeast quadrant of the 200 East Area. Nine appendices compile data on: tank level histories; temperature graphs; surface level graphs; drywell graphs; riser configuration and tank cross section; sampling data; tank photographs; unknown tank transfers; and tank layering comparison. 113 refs.

Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Johnson, E.D.

1994-06-01

483

Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for S tank farm  

SciTech Connect

This document provides historical evaluations of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the Hanford Site 200 West Area underground single-shell tanks (SSTs). A Historical Tank Content Estimate has been developed by reviewing the process histories, waste transfer data, and available physical and chemical characterization data from various Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Defense (DOD) contractors. The historical data will supplement information gathered from in-tank core sampling activities that are currently underway. A tank history review that is accompanied by current characterization data creates a complete and reliable inventory estimate. Additionally, historical review of the tanks may reveal anomalies or unusual contents that are critical to characterization and post characterization activities. Complete and accurate tank waste characterizations are critical first steps for DOE and Westinghouse Hanford Company safety programs, waste pretreatment, and waste retrieval activities. The scope of this document is limited to all the SSTs in the S Tank Farm of the southwest quadrant of the 200 West Area. Nine appendices compile data on: tank level histories; temperature graphs; surface level graphs; drywell graphs; riser configuration and tank cross section; sampling data; tank photographs; unknown tank transfers; and tank layering comparison. 113 refs.

Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Walsh, A.C.

1994-06-01

484

View of tanks T18 and T19 with redwood tanks to ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of tanks T18 and T19 with redwood tanks to right. Old rain shed (Building No. 43) can be seen behind the tanks. Ground catchment can be seen at left in background. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

485

Supporting document for the SW Quadrant Historical Tank Content Estimate for U-Tank Farm  

SciTech Connect

This Supporting Document provides historical characterization information gathered on U-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature data, sampling data, and drywell and liquid observation well data for Historical Tank Content Estimate of the SW Quadrant at the Hanford 200 West Area.

Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Johnson, E.D.

1994-06-01

486

Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for A Tank Farm  

SciTech Connect

This document provides historical evaluations of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the Hanford Site 200-East Area underground single-shell tanks (SSTs). A Historical Tank Content Estimate has been developed by reviewing the process histories, waste transfer data, and available physical and chemical characterization data from various Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Defense (DOD) contractors. The historical data will supplement information gathered from in-tank core sampling activities that are currently underway. A tank history review that is accompanied by current characterization data creates a complete and reliable inventory estimate. Additionally, historical review of the tanks may reveal anomalies or unusual contents that are critical to characterization and post characterization activities. Complete and accurate tank waste characterizations are critical first steps for DOE and Westinghouse Hanford Company safety programs, waste pretreatment, and waste retrieval activities. The scope of this document is limited to the SSTs in the A Tank Farm of the northeast quadrant of the 200 East Area. Nine appendices compile data on: tank level histories; temperature graphs; surface level graphs; drywell graphs; riser configuration and tank cross section; sampling data; tank photographs; unknown tank transfers; and tank layering comparison. 113 refs.

Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Walsh, A.C.

1994-06-01

487

Inspecting petroleum tank bottom linings  

SciTech Connect

When steel floors have been severely pitted on the inside, it is common practice to either weld the pits or fill them with a thixotropic putty. The coating specification usually will stipulate the depth beyond which a pit must be welded or filled. The difficult part comes when it is time to get down on hands and knees to examine the floor with a pit gauge to determine which pits will be treated and which ones won't. The inspection of petroleum tank bottom linings is a specialized discipline requiring unique skills and experience. Coating inspectors must be prepared to perform arduous work that requires painstaking attention to detail.

Ward, J. (B and D Inspection, Cleveland, OH (United States))

1994-03-01

488

Tank Waste Remediation System Guide  

SciTech Connect

The scope, number and complexity of Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) decisions require an integrated, consistent, and logical approach to decision making. TWRS has adopted a seven-step decision process applicable to all decisions. Not all decisions, however, require the same degree of rigor/detail. The decision impact will dictate the appropriate required detail. In the entire process, values, both from the public as well as from the decision makers, play a key role. This document concludes with a general discussion of the implementation process that includes the roles of concerned parties.

Robershotte, M.A.; Dirks, L.L.; Seaver, D.A.; Bothers, A.J.; Madden, M.S.

1995-06-01

489

Artisanal Green Turtle, Chelonia mydas, Fishery of Caribbean Nicaragua: I. Catch Rates and Trends, 1991-2011  

PubMed Central

This is the first assessment of catch rates for the legal, artisanal green turtle, Chelonia mydas, fishery in Caribbean Nicaragua. Data were collected by community members, monitoring up to 14 landing sites from 1991 to 2011. We examined take levels, and temporal and spatial variability in catch rates for the overall fishery, by region, and community using General Additive Mixed Models (GAMMs). More than 171,556 green turtles were killed during the period, with a mean estimated minimum 8,169±2,182 annually. There was a statistically significant decline in catch rates overall. Catch rates peaked in 1997 and 2002, followed by a downward trend, particularly from mid-2008 to the end of the study period. Similar downward trends were evident in both study regions. Community specific catch rate trends also indicated declines with decreases ranging from 21% to 90%. Decrease in catch rates in Nicaragua is cause for concern even though the principal source rookery at Tortuguero, Costa Rica, shows an increase in nesting activity. Explanations for the apparent discrepancy between the increasing trend at Tortuguero and decreasing catch rate trends in Nicaragua include: i) an increase in reproductive output, ii) insufficient time has passed to observe the impact of the fishery on the rookery due to a time lag, iii) changes in other segments of the population have not been detected since only nesting activity is monitored, iv) the expansive northern Nicaragua foraging ground may provide a refuge for a sufficient portion of the Tortuguero rookery, and/or v) a larger than expected contribution of non-Tortuguero rookeries occurring in Nicaragua turtle fishing areas. Our results highlight the need for close monitoring of rookeries and in-water aggregations in the Caribbean. Where consumptive use still occurs, nations sharing this resource should implement scientifically based limits on exploitation to ensure sustainability and mitigate impacts to regional population diversity. PMID:24740258

Lagueux, Cynthia J.; Campbell, Cathi L.; Strindberg, Samantha

2014-01-01

490

Artisanal Green Turtle, Chelonia mydas, fishery of Caribbean Nicaragua: I. Catch rates and trends, 1991-2011.  

PubMed

This is the first assessment of catch rates for the legal, artisanal green turtle, Chelonia mydas, fishery in Caribbean Nicaragua. Data were collected by community members, monitoring up to 14 landing sites from 1991 to 2011. We examined take levels, and temporal and spatial variability in catch rates for the overall fishery, by region, and community using General Additive Mixed Models (GAMMs). More than 171,556 green turtles were killed during the period, with a mean estimated minimum 8,169±2,182 annually. There was a statistically significant decline in catch rates overall. Catch rates peaked in 1997 and 2002, followed by a downward trend, particularly from mid-2008 to the end of the study period. Similar downward trends were evident in both study regions. Community specific catch rate trends also indicated declines with decreases ranging from 21% to 90%. Decrease in catch rates in Nicaragua is cause for concern even though the principal source rookery at Tortuguero, Costa Rica, shows an increase in nesting activity. Explanations for the apparent discrepancy between the increasing trend at Tortuguero and decreasing catch rate trends in Nicaragua include: i) an increase in reproductive output, ii) insufficient time has passed to observe the impact of the fishery on the rookery due to a time lag, iii) changes in other segments of the population have not been detected since only nesting activity is monitored, iv) the expansive northern Nicaragua foraging ground may provide a refuge for a sufficient portion of the Tortuguero rookery, and/or v) a larger than expected contribution of non-Tortuguero rookeries occurring in Nicaragua turtle fishing areas. Our results highlight the need for close monitoring of rookeries and in-water aggregations in the Caribbean. Where consumptive use still occurs, nations sharing this resource should implement scientifically based limits on exploitation to ensure sustainability and mitigate impacts to regional population diversity. PMID:24740258

Lagueux, Cynthia J; Campbell, Cathi L; Strindberg, Samantha

2014-01-01

491

14 CFR 23.963 - Fuel tanks: General.  

... § 23.963 Fuel tanks: General. (a) Each fuel tank must be able to withstand, without failure, the vibration, inertia, fluid, and structural loads that it may be subjected to in operation. (b) Each flexible fuel tank liner must be...

2014-01-01

492

14 CFR 23.963 - Fuel tanks: General.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... § 23.963 Fuel tanks: General. (a) Each fuel tank must be able to withstand, without failure, the vibration, inertia, fluid, and structural loads that it may be subjected to in operation. (b) Each flexible fuel tank liner must be...

2011-01-01

493

46 CFR 105.20-3 - Cargo tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 5 And other alloys acceptable to the Commandant. (2) All tank joints, connections, and fittings shall be welded or brazed. Tanks with flanged-up top edges will not be acceptable. (3) All tanks exceeding 30 inches in any...

2010-10-01

494

4. Bulk fuel tanks and pump station. Detail of a ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. Bulk fuel tanks and pump station. Detail of a vertical tank. View to southeast. - Conrad Refining Company Oil Refinery, Bulk Tanks & Pump Station, 90 feet northeast of Office & Warehouse Building, Conrad, Pondera County, MT

495

3. Bulk fuel tanks and pump station. West side of ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. Bulk fuel tanks and pump station. West side of tanks. View to southeast. - Conrad Refining Company Oil Refinery, Bulk Tanks & Pump Station, 90 feet northeast of Office & Warehouse Building, Conrad, Pondera County, MT

496

2. Bulk fuel tanks and pump station. North side of ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. Bulk fuel tanks and pump station. North side of tanks. View to southwest. - Conrad Refining Company Oil Refinery, Bulk Tanks & Pump Station, 90 feet northeast of Office & Warehouse Building, Conrad, Pondera County, MT

497

1. Bulk fuel tanks and pump station. East side of ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. Bulk fuel tanks and pump station. East side of tanks. View to northwest. - Conrad Refining Company Oil Refinery, Bulk Tanks & Pump Station, 90 feet northeast of Office & Warehouse Building, Conrad, Pondera County, MT

498

46 CFR 154.195 - Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. 154.195...Equipment Hull Structure § 154.195 Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. (a) An aluminum cargo tank and its dome must be...

2012-10-01

499

Heat removal characteristics of waste storage tanks. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

A topical report that examines the relationship between tank heat load and maximum waste temperatures. The passive cooling response of the tanks is examined, and loss of active cooling in ventilated tanks is investigated.

Kummerer, M.

1995-10-01

500

46 CFR 64.13 - Allowable stress; tank.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable stress; tank. 64.13 Section 64.13 Shipping... Standards for an MPT § 64.13 Allowable stress; tank. (a) The calculated stress in the tank under design conditions,...

2011-10-01