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1

Sampling and Analysis Plan for Catch Tank 241ER311 Vapor  

SciTech Connect

This tank sampling and analysis plan (TSAP) identifies the sample collection, laboratory analysis, quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) objectives for the characterization of catch tank 241-ER-311 vapor space.

NGUYEN, D.M.

1999-11-05

2

Sampling and Analysis Plan for Catch Tank 241ER311 Vapor  

SciTech Connect

This tank sampling and analysis plan (TSAP) identifies the sample collection, laboratory analysis, quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) objectives for the characterization of catch tank 241-ER-311 vapor space.

NGUYEN, D.M.

1999-11-09

3

Tank 241ER311 Interconnected Piping and Equipment Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan  

Microsoft Academic Search

This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for vapor samples obtained from piping, equipment, or facilities connected to tank 241-ER-311. The purpose of this sampling event is to obtain information about the effects of the argon purge gas added to tank 241-ER-311. Vapor samples will be taken in

1999-01-01

4

Data Report for Catch Tank Vapor Sampling  

SciTech Connect

CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) is responsible for developing and maintaining the authorization basis for River Protection Project (RPP) facilities and operations. This responsibility includes closure of the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) for waste tank ancillary equipment such as catch tanks, double-contained receiver tanks, 244-AR and 244-CR vaults, 242-S and 242-T Evaporators, and inactive miscellaneous underground storage tanks. To support closure of the Flammable Gas USQ for catch tanks, an analysis of the flammable gas hazard was performed. This document provides a summary of flammable gas data obtained from RPP active catch tanks in FY 2000. Flammable gas level measurements for each catch tank (other than 241-AX-152) are discussed on a tank-by-tank basis in Section 3.0. Conclusions based on the data are provided in Section 4.0. This section also includes recommendations that would be useful when conducting vapor sampling for other miscellaneous tanks (e.g., inactive miscellaneous underground storage tanks).

NGUYEN, D.M.

2000-09-28

5

Test plan for measuring ventilation rates and combustible gas levels in TWRS active catch tanks  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this test is to provide an initial screening of combustible gas concentrations in catch tanks that currently are operated by Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS). The data will be used to determine whether or not additional data will be needed for closure of the flammable gas unreviewed safety question for these facilities. This test will involve field measurements of ammonia, organic vapor, and total combustible gas levels in the headspace of the catch tanks. If combustible gas level in a tank exceeds an established threshold, gas samples will be collected in SUMMA canisters for more extensive laboratory analysis. In addition, ventilation rates of some catch tanks will be measured to evaluate removal of flammable gas by air flow through the tanks.

NGUYEN, D.M.

1999-05-20

6

Test plan for measuring ventilation rates and combustible gas levels in RPP active catch tanks  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this test is to provide an initial screening of combustible gas concentrations in catch tanks that currently are operated by River Protection Project (RPP). The data will be used to determine whether or not additional data will be needed for closure of the flammable gas unreviewed safety question for these facilities. This test will involve field measurements of ammonia, organic vapor, and total combustible gas levels in the headspace of the catch tanks. If combustible gas level in a tank exceeds an established threshold, gas samples will be collected in SUMMA canisters for more extensive laboratory analysis. In addition, ventilation rates of some catch tanks will be measured to evaluate removal of flammable gas by air flow through the tanks.

NGUYEN, D.M.

1999-06-03

7

Engineering Task Plan for the Integrity Assessment Examination of Double Contained Receiver Tanks (DCRT) Catch Tanks and Ancillary facilities  

SciTech Connect

This Engineering Task Plan (ETP) presents the integrity assessment examination of three DCRTs, seven catch tanks, and two ancillary facilities located in the 200 East and West Areas of the Hanford Site. The integrity assessment examinations, as described in this ETP, will provide the necessary information to enable the independently qualified registered professional engineer (IQRPE) to assess the condition and integrity of these facilities. The plan is consistent with the Double-Shell Tank Waste Transfer Facilities Integrity Assessment Plan.

BECKER, D.L.

2000-05-23

8

Test Plan for Measuring Ventilation Rates and Combustible Gas Levels in TWRS Active Catch Tanks  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this sampling activity is to obtain data to support an initial evaluation of potential hazards due to the presence of combustible gas in catch tanks that are currently operated by the River Protection Project (RPP). Results of the hazard analysis will be used to support closure of the flammable gas unreviewed safety question for these facilities. The data collection will be conducted in accordance with the Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (Dukelow et al. 1995). Combustible gas, ammonia, and organic vapor levels in the headspace of the catch tanks will be field-measured using hand-held instruments. If a combustible gas level measurement in a tank exceeds an established threshold, gas samples will he collected in SUMMA' canisters for more extensive laboratory analysis. In addition, ventilation rates of some catch tanks will be measured to evaluate removal of flammable gas by air flowing through the tanks. This test plan identifies the sample collection, laboratory analysis, quality assurance, and reporting objectives for this data collection effort. The plan also provides the procedures for field measurement of combustible gas concentrations and ventilation rates.

NGUYEN, D.M.

1999-10-25

9

Test Plan for Measuring Ventilation Rates and Combustible Gas Levels in TWRS Active Catch Tanks  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this data collection activity is to obtain data for a screening of combustible gases in catch tanks that are currently operated by the River Protection Project (RPP). The results will be used to support closure of the flammable gas unreviewed safety question for these facilities. The data collection will be conducted in accordance with the ''Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objective'' (Dukelow et al. 1995). Combustible gas, ammonia, and organic vapor levels in the headspace of the catch tanks will be field-measured using hand-held instruments. If a combustible gas level measurement in a tank exceeds an established threshold, vapor grab samples (i.e., Hoke and SUMMA) will be collected for laboratory analysis. In addition, ventilation rates of some catch tanks will be determine using the tracer gas injection method to evaluate removal of flammable gas by air flowing through the tanks. This test plan identifies the field tests, sample collection, laboratory analysis, quality assurance, and reporting objectives for this data collection effort. The plan also provides step-by-step direction for field measurement of combustible gas concentrations and determination of ventilation rates.

NGUYEN, D.M.

2000-03-01

10

Nitrogen catch crops  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

High costs of nitrogen (N) fertilizer and the potential for N losses to ground and surface water have resulted in increased interest in using catch crops to recover this N. Research on potatoes has shown that the amount of N lost to leaching can be as much as the amount of N removed from the field ...

11

Catch-22. [Lesson Plan].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on Joseph Heller's novel "Catch-22," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that active readers evaluate the actions and statements of characters in a novel; and active readers apply the ideas of a novel to contexts outside the novel. The main activity of the lesson involves students writing a paper on a…

Ramstad, Rita

12

Applying Mathematics.... ... to catch criminals  

E-print Network

Applying Mathematics.... ... to catch criminals Mike O'Leary Department of Mathematics Towson to catch criminals September 10, 2008 1 / 42 #12;Acknowledgements Towson University Applied Mathematics Department Mike O'Leary (Towson University) Applying mathematics to catch criminals September 10, 2008 2 / 42

O'Leary, Michael

13

Hatch to Catch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Learn about ocean circulation, early lobster life stages, and benthic environments, playing "Hatch to Catch." This web resource challenges users to guide 1,000 lobster larvae through the Gulf of Maine with a goal of ensuring that at least 25 grow to harvest size. Users identify and select favorable environmental conditions for lobster larvae dispersion and settling. All outcome scenarios are based on research data from the Gulf of Maine.

Decharon, Annette

2000-08-25

14

"Catch a Star !"  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

ESO and EAAE Launch Web-based Educational Programme for Europe's Schools Catch a star!... and discover all its secrets! This is the full title of an innovative educational project, launched today by the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and the European Association for Astronomy Education (EAAE). It welcomes all students in Europe's schools to an exciting web-based programme with a competition. It takes place within the context of the EC-sponsored European Week of Science and Technology (EWST) - 2002 . This unique project revolves around a web-based competition and is centred on astronomy. It is specifically conceived to stimulate the interest of young people in various aspects of this well-known field of science, but will also be of interest to the broad public. What is "Catch a Star!" about? [Go to Catch a Star Website] The programme features useful components from the world of research, but it is specifically tailored to (high-)school students. Younger participants are also welcome. Groups of up to four persons (e.g., three students and one teacher) have to select an astronomical object - a bright star, a distant galaxy, a beautiful comet, a planet or a moon in the solar system, or some other celestial body. Like detectives, they must then endeavour to find as much information as possible about "their" object. This information may be about the position and visibility in the sky, the physical and chemical characteristics, particular historical aspects, related mythology and sky lore, etc. They can use any source available, the web, books, newspaper and magazine articles, CDs etc. for this work. The group members must prepare a (short) summarising report about this investigation and "their" object, with their own ideas and conclusions, and send it to ESO (email address: eduinfo@eso.org). A jury, consisting of specialists from ESO and the EAAE, will carefully evaluate these reports. All projects that are found to fulfill the stipulated requirements, including a reasonable degree of scientific correctness, are entered as "registered projects" and will receive a lottery number. The first 1000 participants from the corresponding groups will also get a "Catch a star" T-Shirt by mail. All accepted entries will be listed at the corresponding website and all accepted reports will be displayed soon after the expiry of the deadline for submission on November 1st, 2002 . Winners to be Announced on November 8, 2002 On November 8th, 2002, at the end of the European Week of Science and Technology, the winners will be found by drawing numbers in a lottery. This event will take place at the ESO Headquarters in Garching (Germany) and will be webcast. The First Prize is a free trip for the members of the group to the ESO Paranal Observatory in Chile , the site of the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) . The Paranal trip will be realised in any case, but because of age restrictions, it can only be offered to a group in which all participants are 15 years of age or older at the time of the drawing. Younger participants may win an interesting trip within Europe. There will also be other prizes, to be announced later. Starting now The programme starts now and is open for groups of up to three students and one teacher, who must all belong to a school in Europe on November 1, 2002 . This means that only students who did not yet terminate their school studies on this date can participate. No student may participate in more than one group. The programme is administered by the ESO Educational Office , in close collaboration with members of the EAAE, mostly physics teachers. Details about how to register and how to prepare the report about "your" object are available on the web at: http://www.eso.org/public/outreach/eduoff/cas/ About the ESO Educational Office The ESO Educational Office was established in July 2001. It is part of the EPR Department at ESO Headquarters in Garching near Munich. The aim is to provide support of astronomy and astrophysics education, especially at the high-schoo

2002-05-01

15

Tank farm surveillance and waste status summary report for May 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations.

Hanlon, B.M.

1993-08-01

16

Using Charterboat Catch Records for Fisheries Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

48 managing our fisheries but are not produced such that catch quotas or levels can be monitored in a timely manner. Fisheries with large recreational components pose special problems for managers, because real-time estimates of either total catch or total effort and catch per unit of effort (CPUE) must be made to determine closure points. Although many efforts have been

HAROLD A. BRUSHER; MARK L. WILLIAMS; LEE TRENT; BARBARA J. PALKO

17

50 CFR 622.251 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures...the South Atlantic Region § 622.251 Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability...

2013-10-01

18

50 CFR 622.58 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures...Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico § 622.58 Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability...

2013-10-01

19

50 CFR 622.388 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures...Mexico and South Atlantic) § 622.388 Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability...

2013-10-01

20

Centrifugal filter for catching dust  

Microsoft Academic Search

Possibilities are considered of using a test centrifugal filter for catching dust within which there is normally separation\\u000a of heterogeneous gas stream phases. The capture efficiency and hydraulic resistance of the test centrifugal filter are determined\\u000a by means of computer simulation. Results are provided for comparative industrial tests of a two-level centrifugal filter and\\u000a cyclone. An industrial example is demonstrated

D. A. Serebryanskii

2009-01-01

21

Effect of catch-and-release angling on growth and survival of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Catch-and-release angling is popular in many parts of the world and plays an increasingly important role in fish conservation efforts. Although survival rates associated with catch-and-release angling are well documented for many species, sublethal effects have been less studied. An experiment was conducted to directly assess the effects of catch-and-release angling on growth and survival of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum). Catch-and-release events were simulated in laboratory tanks maintained at 15-16 ??C with hooks manually placed in pre-designated locations in the mouths of the fish. There were no differences in standard length (P = 0.59) or wet weight (P = 0.81) gained between caught and uncaught fish over a 1-month angling and recovery period. Survival was 96.99 ?? 0.06% for rainbow trout caught and released, and did not vary with number (one, two or four) of captures. Thus, catch-and-release angling appears to have little effect on growth and mortality of rainbow trout hooked in the mouth. ?? 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Pope, K.L.; Wilde, G.R.; Knabe, D.W.

2007-01-01

22

Improving Fishery Catch Statistics for Lake Victoria  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fisheries of Lake Victoria are highly dispersed and catch statistical information is insufficient for supporting management. Catch assessment surveys for the three riparian countries were found to be weak or inadequate and a strategy for improving this source of information is proposed. Considerable illegal fishing, using banned gears and small-meshed nets was prevalent and considered to be detrimental to

I. G. Cowx; M. van der Knaap; L. I. Muhoozi; A. Othina

2003-01-01

23

50 CFR 648.71 - Catch quotas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...paper to the MAFMC based on the latest available stock assessment report prepared by NMFS, data reported by harvesters and processors, and other...quotas, the MAFMC shall consider the current stock assessments, catch reports, and other...

2010-10-01

24

50 CFR 648.71 - Catch quotas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...paper to the MAFMC based on the latest available stock assessment report prepared by NMFS, data reported by harvesters and processors, and other...quotas, the MAFMC shall consider the current stock assessments, catch reports, and other...

2011-10-01

25

Effect of survey design and catch rate estimation on total catch estimates in Chinook salmon fisheries  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Roving–roving and roving–access creel surveys are the primary techniques used to obtain information on harvest of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in Idaho sport fisheries. Once interviews are conducted using roving–roving or roving–access survey designs, mean catch rate can be estimated with the ratio-of-means (ROM) estimator, the mean-of-ratios (MOR) estimator, or the MOR estimator with exclusion of short-duration (?0.5 h) trips. Our objective was to examine the relative bias and precision of total catch estimates obtained from use of the two survey designs and three catch rate estimators for Idaho Chinook salmon fisheries. Information on angling populations was obtained by direct visual observation of portions of Chinook salmon fisheries in three Idaho river systems over an 18-d period. Based on data from the angling populations, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to evaluate the properties of the catch rate estimators and survey designs. Among the three estimators, the ROM estimator provided the most accurate and precise estimates of mean catch rate and total catch for both roving–roving and roving–access surveys. On average, the root mean square error of simulated total catch estimates was 1.42 times greater and relative bias was 160.13 times greater for roving–roving surveys than for roving–access surveys. Length-of-stay bias and nonstationary catch rates in roving–roving surveys both appeared to affect catch rate and total catch estimates. Our results suggest that use of the ROM estimator in combination with an estimate of angler effort provided the least biased and most precise estimates of total catch for both survey designs. However, roving–access surveys were more accurate than roving–roving surveys for Chinook salmon fisheries in Idaho.

McCormick, Joshua L.; Quist, Michael C.; Schill, Daniel J.

2012-01-01

26

Calico Tanks  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

A view of the Calico Tanks, a sandstone formation in Red Rock Canyon. Red Rock Canyon is a National Conservation Area managed by the Bureau of Land Management, located just outside of Las Vegas, Nevada. It is part of the Mojave Desert....

27

Petroleum Tank  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Petroleum first saw widespread use in the transporation industry as a lubricant. It was refined into various products depending on which part of the engine they were meant to lubricate. Once transported by tanker car, it was stored in large tanks such as this one....

28

Tank Insulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

For NASA's Apollo program, McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company, Huntington Beach, California, developed and built the S-IVB, uppermost stage of the three-stage Saturn V moonbooster. An important part of the development task was fabrication of a tank to contain liquid hydrogen fuel for the stage's rocket engine. The liquid hydrogen had to be contained at the supercold temperature of 423 degrees below zero Fahrenheit. The tank had to be perfectly insulated to keep engine or solar heat from reaching the fuel; if the hydrogen were permitted to warm up, it would have boiled off, or converted to gaseous form, reducing the amount of fuel available to the engine. McDonnell Douglas' answer was a supereffective insulation called 3D, which consisted of a one-inch thickness of polyurethane foam reinforced in three dimensions with fiberglass threads. Over a 13-year development and construction period, the company built 30 tanks and never experienced a failure. Now, after years of additional development, an advanced version of 3D is finding application as part of a containment system for transporting Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) by ship.

1979-01-01

29

Tank farm surveillance and waste status summary report for October 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Order 5820.2A, Chapter 1, Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, US Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

Hanlon, B.M.

1993-01-01

30

Tank farm surveillance and waste status summary report for June 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Order 5820.2A, Chapter I, Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, US Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

Hanlon, B.M.

1993-10-01

31

Tank farm surveillance and waste status summary report for January 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Order 5820.2A, Chapter I, Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, US Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

Hanlon, B.M.

1993-03-01

32

Tank farm surveillance and waste status summary report for November 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Order 5820.2A, Chapter 1, Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, US Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

Hanlon, B.M.

1993-02-01

33

Tank Farm surveillance and waste status summary report for September 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Order 5820.2A, Chapter 1, Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, US Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

Hanlon, B.M.

1994-01-01

34

Tank farm surveillance and waste status summary report for December 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special 9 surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of U.S. Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Order 5820.2A, Chapter I, Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, U.S. Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

Hanlon, B.M.

1994-05-01

35

Tank farm surveillance and waste status summary report for November 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Order 5820.2A, Chapter I. Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, US Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

Hanlon, B.M.

1994-02-01

36

Tank Farm surveillance and waste status summary report for February 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is Intended to meet the requirement of US Department of Energy Richland Operations Office Order 5820.2A, Chapter 1, Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, US Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

Hanlon, B.M.

1994-07-01

37

Tank farm surveillance and waste status summary report for December 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Order 5820.2A, Chapter I, Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, US Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

Hanlon, B.M.

1993-02-01

38

Liberal Arts Catch-Up Revisited  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper replicates the work of Giles and Drewes from the 1990s. They showed a catch-up effect whereby graduates of liberal arts undergraduate programs, although at an early-career disadvantage compared with graduates of applied programs, had higher incomes by mid-career. Working with the Panel 5 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (2005-2010),…

Goyder, John

2014-01-01

39

Ionic catch and release oligosaccharide synthesis (ICROS).  

PubMed

A general and efficient chromatography-free ionic-liquid-supported "catch-and-release" strategy for oligosaccharide synthesis (ICROS) is reported. The methodology is compatible with current glycosylation strategies and amenable to protecting group manipulations. A series of ?-(1?6) and ?-(1?2)-linked glycan structures have been prepared to showcase the versatility of the strategy. PMID:21390376

Tran, Anh-Tuan; Burden, Richard; Racys, Daugirdas T; Galan, M Carmen

2011-04-21

40

Illinois PER Interactive Examples: Catch the Ball  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive homework problem requires the student to determine the velocity necessary for a person to catch a ball thrown up in the air a given distance away. The problem is accompanied by a sequence of questions designed to encourage critical thinking and conceptual analysis. It is part of a larger collection of interactive problems developed by the Illinois Physics Education Research Group.

Gladding, Gary

2008-02-09

41

Polymer-Based Catch-Bonds  

E-print Network

Catch-bonds refer to the counterintuitive notion that the average lifetime of a bond has a maximum at a nonzero applied force. They have been found in several ligand-receptor pairs and their origin is still a topic of ...

Chen, Hsieh

42

49 CFR 172.331 - Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. 172.331 Section 172.331 Transportation...packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a)...

2010-10-01

43

A catch-length analysis for crab populations*  

E-print Network

growth and sepa- rates recruitment into year and length components. However, most catch-length analysesA catch-length analysis for crab populations* Jie Zheng Margaret C. Murphy Gordon H. Kruse Alaska. Alaska 99802-5526 576 Abstract.-A catch-length model was constructed to estimate abundance of crab

44

50 CFR 622.496 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Queen Conch Resources of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands § 622.496 Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch...

2013-10-01

45

50 CFR 622.457 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Spiny Lobster Fishery of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands § 622.457 Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch...

2013-10-01

46

Underground storage tank management  

SciTech Connect

In this third edition, sixteen new and revised chapters provide tank owners and operators with guidance in making engineering and management decisions: Regulatory Highlights, Inventory Control, Leak Prediction Through Inventory Analysis, Underground Tank Testing, Tank Design, Secondary Containment, Monitoring and Leak Protection, Overfill and Transfer Protection, Maintenance and Retrofit, Tank Removal, Remedial Action, Tank Installation, Tank Management Plan, Storing Hazardous Substances, Minimizing Your Liabilities, and Financial Responsibility.

Not Available

1988-01-01

47

AX Tank Farm tank removal study  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the feasibility of remediating ancillary equipment associated with the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. Ancillary equipment includes surface structures and equipment, process waste piping, ventilation components, wells, and pits, boxes, sumps, and tanks used to make waste transfers to/from the AX tanks and adjoining tank farms. Two remedial alternatives are considered: (1) excavation and removal of all ancillary equipment items, and (2) in-situ stabilization by grout filling, the 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a strawman in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tanks. This is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

SKELLY, W.A.

1999-02-24

48

Vision Algorithms Catch Defects in Screen Displays  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Andrew Watson, a senior scientist at Ames Research Center, developed a tool called the Spatial Standard Observer (SSO), which models human vision for use in robotic applications. Redmond, Washington-based Radiant Zemax LLC licensed the technology from NASA and combined it with its imaging colorimeter system, creating a powerful tool that high-volume manufacturers of flat-panel displays use to catch defects in screens.

2014-01-01

49

Tank Farm surveillance and waste status summary report for March 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are Contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding flank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office order 5820.2A, Chapter I, Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, US Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

Hanlon, B.M.

1993-05-01

50

AX Tank Farm tank removal study  

SciTech Connect

This report considers the feasibility of exposing, demolishing, and removing underground storage tanks from the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. For the study, it was assumed that the tanks would each contain 360 ft{sup 3} of residual waste (corresponding to the one percent residual Inventory target cited in the Tri-Party Agreement) at the time of demolition. The 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a ''strawman'' in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tank farms. The report is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

SKELLY, W.A.

1998-10-14

51

HANFORD TANK CLEANUP UPDATE  

SciTech Connect

Access to Hanford's single-shell radioactive waste storage tank C-107 was significantly improved when workers completed the cut of a 55-inch diameter hole in the top of the tank. The core and its associated cutting equipment were removed from the tank and encased in a plastic sleeve to prevent any potential spread of contamination. The larger tank opening allows use of a new more efficient robotic arm to complete tank retrieval.

BERRIOCHOA MV

2011-04-07

52

49 CFR 172.331 - Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. 172.331...tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) Each...offers a hazardous material to a motor carrier for transportation in a bulk packaging shall provide the motor carrier with the...

2013-10-01

53

49 CFR 172.331 - Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. 172.331...tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) Each...offers a hazardous material to a motor carrier for transportation in a bulk packaging shall provide the motor carrier with the...

2011-10-01

54

49 CFR 172.331 - Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. 172.331...tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) Each...offers a hazardous material to a motor carrier for transportation in a bulk packaging shall provide the motor carrier with the...

2012-10-01

55

Illinois PER Interactive Examples: Catch the Ball  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is an interactive homework problem for introductory physics students relating to velocity and acceleration. A ball is thrown straight upward and a person 70m away runs to catch it before it hits the ground. Given initial speed of the thrown ball, students are required to determine how fast the runner must go. This problem is accompanied by a Socratic-dialog "help" sequence designed to encourage critical thinking as users do a guided conceptual analysis before attempting the mathematics. It is part of a larger collection of interactive physics problems.

Gladding, Gary

2008-09-10

56

How Dogs Navigate to Catch Frisbees  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT—Using micro-video cameras,attached,to the heads of 2 dogs, we examined their optical behavior while catching Frisbees. Our findings reveal,that dogs,use the same,viewer- based,navigational,heuristics previously,found,with,baseball players (i.e., maintaining the target along a linear optical tra- jectory, LOT, with optical speed constancy). On trials in which the Frisbee dramatically changed direction, the dog maintained an LOTwith speed constancy,until it apparently,could no longer

Dennis M. Shaffer; Scott M. Krauchunas; Marianna Eddy; Michael K. McBeath

2004-01-01

57

Tank characterization report: Tank 241-C-109  

SciTech Connect

Single-shell tank 241-C-109 is a Hanford Site Ferrocyanide Watch List tank that was most recently sampled in September 1992. Analyses of materials obtained from tank 241-C-109 were conducted to support the resolution of the ferrocyanide unreviewed safety question (USQ) and to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and consent Order (Tri- Party Agreement) Milestone M-10-00. This report describes this analysis.

Simpson, B.C.; Borshiem, G.L.; Jensen, L.

1993-09-01

58

Assemblies of Conformal Tanks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Assemblies of tanks having shapes that conform to each other and/or conform to other proximate objects have been investigated for use in storing fuels and oxidizers in small available spaces in upper stages of spacecraft. Such assemblies might also prove useful in aircraft, automobiles, boats, and other terrestrial vehicles in which space available for tanks is limited. The basic concept of using conformal tanks to maximize the utilization of limited space is not new in itself: for example, conformal tanks are used in some automobiles to store windshield -washer liquid and coolant that overflows from radiators. The novelty of the present development lies in the concept of an assembly of smaller conformal tanks, as distinguished from a single larger conformal tank. In an assembly of smaller tanks, it would be possible to store different liquids in different tanks. Even if the same liquid were stored in all the tanks, the assembly would offer an advantage by reducing the mechanical disturbance caused by sloshing of fuel in a single larger tank: indeed, the requirement to reduce sloshing is critical in some applications. The figure shows a prototype assembly of conformal tanks. Each tank was fabricated by (1) copper plating a wax tank mandrel to form a liner and (2) wrapping and curing layers of graphite/epoxy composite to form a shell supporting the liner. In this case, the conformal tank surfaces are flat ones where they come in contact with the adjacent tanks. A band of fibers around the outside binds the tanks together tightly in the assembly, which has a quasi-toroidal shape. For proper functioning, it would be necessary to maintain equal pressure in all the tanks.

DeLay, Tom

2009-01-01

59

Tank 241-BX-104 tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-BX-104.

Carpenter, B.C.

1994-12-14

60

Tank 241-U-105 tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-U-105.

Homi, C.S.

1995-02-03

61

Tank 241-T-107 tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-T-107.

Homi, C.S.

1995-01-05

62

Tank 241-T-111 tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-T-111.

Homi, C.S.

1995-01-10

63

Tank 241-TX-105 tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, WHC 222-S Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-TX-105.

Carpenter, B.C.

1995-01-01

64

Tank 241-TY-101 Tank Characterization Plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-TY-101.

Homi, C.S.

1995-03-20

65

Tank 241-T-111 tank characterization plan  

Microsoft Academic Search

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-T-111.

Homi

1995-01-01

66

Liquid rocket metal tanks and tank components  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Significant guidelines are presented for the successful design of aerospace tanks and tank components, such as expulsion devices, standpipes, and baffles. The state of the art is reviewed, and the design criteria are presented along with recommended practices. Design monographs are listed.

Wagner, W. A.; Keller, R. B. (editor)

1974-01-01

67

50 CFR 665.4 - Annual catch limits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...annual catch limit in a fishing year, the Council will take action in accordance with 50 CFR 600.310(g), which...catch limit for the subsequent year by the amount of the overage...the requirement pursuant to 50 CFR...

2011-10-01

68

50 CFR 665.4 - Annual catch limits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...annual catch limit in a fishing year, the Council will take action in accordance with 50 CFR 600.310(g), which...catch limit for the subsequent year by the amount of the overage...the requirement pursuant to 50 CFR...

2012-10-01

69

Project Catch-Up. Analysis and Selection Kit.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Project Catch-Up is an ESEA Title I reading and math laboratory project for kindergarten through sixth-grade students, operating in Southern California's Newport-Mesa Unified School District. Its philosophy is that students having difficulty in reading and math can catch up with other students. Teachers take responsibility for the achievement…

Newport-Mesa Unified School District, Newport Beach, CA.

70

HAND VS. MECHANICAL CATCHING AND LOADING OF BROILERS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Mechanical catching was originally designed to address labor supply problems. As a result of early studies on damage at the processing plant, mechanical catching was quickly designated as a more humane method of handling. Assessment at the plant contains confounding variables that occur after catc...

71

Catching Fireflies: a persuasive augmented reality game for Android phones  

Microsoft Academic Search

This poster explains the development of the unique game Catching Fireflies and how it is an example of persuasive technology used to draw people outdoors. Catching Fireflies is a game for Android operating systems which uses multiple aspects of the phone including the camera, GPS, accelerometers, orientation and proximity sensors, vibration, and camera LEDs, among others.

Amy Eubanks

2011-01-01

72

Counting fish: a typology for fisheries catch data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Good decisions ideally require good data. Here, we present a straightforward typology for the broad classification of fisheries catch data. At each stage in the reporting chain, from fisher to national\\/international agencies, fisheries catches can be: known and reported; known and underreported; unknown and overreported; or unknown and underreported. Here, we consider largely the data reporting at the national\\/international level.

Jennifer Jacquet; Dirk Zeller; Daniel Pauly

2010-01-01

73

Feed tank transfer requirements  

SciTech Connect

This document presents a definition of tank turnover; DOE responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements; records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor for use during Phase 1B.

Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

1998-09-16

74

Leaking underground storage tanks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The problems associated with leaking underground storage tanks are discussed. An estimated 10-30% of the 3.5 million or more underground tanks now used to store petroleum products and other liquids may be leaking their contents to the surrounding environment. The EPA is initiating a national field survey of tanks used for the storing of engine fuels. The first phase of

Richard Dowd

1984-01-01

75

Nutritionally-Induced Catch-Up Growth  

PubMed Central

Malnutrition is considered a leading cause of growth attenuation in children. When food is replenished, spontaneous catch-up (CU) growth usually occurs, bringing the child back to its original growth trajectory. However, in some cases, the CU growth is not complete, leading to a permanent growth deficit. This review summarizes our current knowledge regarding the mechanism regulating nutrition and growth, including systemic factors, such as insulin, growth hormone, insulin- like growth factor-1, vitamin D, fibroblast growth factor-21, etc., and local mechanisms, including autophagy, as well as regulators of transcription, protein synthesis, miRNAs and epigenetics. Studying the molecular mechanisms regulating CU growth may lead to the establishment of better nutritional and therapeutic regimens for more effective CU growth in children with malnutrition and growth abnormalities. It will be fascinating to follow this research in the coming years and to translate the knowledge gained to clinical benefit. PMID:25594438

Gat-Yablonski, Galia; Phillip, Moshe

2015-01-01

76

NC CATCH: Advancing Public Health Analytics  

PubMed Central

The North Carolina Comprehensive Assessment for Tracking Community Health (NC CATCH) is a Web-based analytical system deployed to local public health units and their community partners. The system has the following characteristics: flexible, powerful online analytic processing (OLAP) interface; multiple sources of multidimensional, event-level data fully conformed to common definitions in a data warehouse structure; enabled utilization of available decision support software tools; analytic capabilities distributed and optimized locally with centralized technical infrastructure; two levels of access differentiated by the user (anonymous versus registered) and by the analytical flexibility (Community Profile versus Design Phase); and, an emphasis on user training and feedback. The ability of local public health units to engage in outcomes-based performance measurement will be influenced by continuing access to event-level data, developments in evidence-based practice for improving population health, and the application of information technology-based analytic tools and methods. PMID:23569592

Studnicki, James; Fisher, John W.; Eichelberger, Christopher; Bridger, Colleen; Angelon-Gaetz, Kim; Nelson, Debi

2010-01-01

77

49 CFR 179.102 - Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks. 179.102 Section...SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105... Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks. (a) In...

2012-10-01

78

49 CFR 179.102 - Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks. 179.102 Section...SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105... Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks. (a) In...

2010-10-01

79

49 CFR 179.101 - Individual specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks. 179.101 Section...SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105...specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks. Editorial...

2011-10-01

80

49 CFR 179.101 - Individual specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks. 179.101 Section...SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105...specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks. Editorial...

2010-10-01

81

49 CFR 179.101 - Individual specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks. 179.101 Section...SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105...specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks. Editorial...

2012-10-01

82

49 CFR 179.101 - Individual specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks. 179.101 Section...SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105...specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks. Editorial...

2013-10-01

83

49 CFR 179.102 - Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks. 179.102 Section...SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105... Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks. (a) In...

2013-10-01

84

49 CFR 179.102 - Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks. 179.102 Section...SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105... Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks. (a) In...

2011-10-01

85

Catch-per-unit-effort: which estimator is best?  

PubMed

In this paper we examine the accuracy and precision of three indices of catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE). We carried out simulations, generating catch data according to six probability distributions (normal, Poisson, lognormal, gamma, delta and negative binomial), three variance structures (constant, proportional to effort and proportional to the squared effort) and their magnitudes (tail weight). The Jackknife approach of the index is recommended, whenever catch is proportional to effort or even under small deviations from proportionality assumption, when a ratio estimator is to be applied and little is known about the underlying behaviour of variables, as is the case for most fishery studies. PMID:20737116

Petrere Jr, M; Giacomini, H C; De Marco Jr, P

2010-08-01

86

49 CFR 174.63 - Portable tanks, IM portable tanks, IBCs, Large Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car tanks. 174.63 Section 174.63 ...Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) A carrier may not transport...Packaging, cargo tank, or multi-unit tank car tank) containing a hazardous...

2013-10-01

87

49 CFR 174.63 - Portable tanks, IM portable tanks, IBCs, Large Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car tanks. 174.63 Section 174.63 ...Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) A carrier may not transport...Packaging, cargo tank, or multi-unit tank car tank) containing a hazardous...

2012-10-01

88

49 CFR 174.63 - Portable tanks, IM portable tanks, IBCs, Large Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car tanks. 174.63 Section 174.63 ...Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) A carrier may not transport...Packaging, cargo tank, or multi-unit tank car tank) containing a hazardous...

2011-10-01

89

49 CFR 174.63 - Portable tanks, IM portable tanks, IBCs, Large Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car tanks. 174.63 Section 174.63 ...Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) A carrier may not transport...Packaging, cargo tank, or multi-unit tank car tank) containing a hazardous...

2010-10-01

90

49 CFR 174.63 - Portable tanks, IM portable tanks, IBCs, Large Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car...  

...tanks, IM portable tanks, IBCs, Large Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank...tanks, IM portable tanks, IBCs, Large Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank...A carrier may not transport a bulk packaging (e.g., portable tank, IM...

2014-10-01

91

Alaska's 1975 Salmon Catch Best in 3 Years Canadians' gear while conducting their  

E-print Network

Rock Lobster Fishery Commercial catch statistics and catch samplings in 1972 showed that an- nual catches of rock lobster. particu- larly in Tasmanian waters, had reached a stage where they were almost was partially responsible for the decrease in Western Australian rock lobster catches within the past two years

92

77 FR 5473 - Pacific Halibut Fisheries; Catch Sharing Plan  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...120106033-2031-01] RIN 0648-BB68 Pacific Halibut Fisheries; Catch Sharing Plan AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and...IPHC. These measures include the sport fishery allocations and management measures...

2012-02-03

93

75 FR 5745 - Pacific Halibut Fisheries; Catch Sharing Plan  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...100119028-0029-01] RIN 0648-AY31 Pacific Halibut Fisheries; Catch Sharing Plan AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and...includes tribal regulations and the sport fishery allocations and management measures...

2010-02-04

94

50 CFR 648.121 - Scup Annual Catch Target (ACT).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...process. (1) Sectors. Commercial and recreational specific ACTs shall be less than or equal to the sector-specific ACLs. The Scup Monitoring Committee shall recommend any reduction in catch necessary to address sector-specific management...

2012-10-01

95

50 CFR 648.121 - Scup Annual Catch Target (ACT).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...process. (1) Sectors. Commercial and recreational specific ACTs shall be less than or equal to the sector-specific ACLs. The Scup Monitoring Committee shall recommend any reduction in catch necessary to address sector-specific management...

2013-10-01

96

Test plan for measuring ventilation rates and combustible gas levels in RPP active catch tanks  

SciTech Connect

T Plant is the primary decontamination facility for the Hanford Site, and also performs waste handling, verification, and repackaging. This Interim Operational Safety Requirement (IOSR) document provides required limits, programs, and administrative controls at the T Plant Complex. It is to be used in conjunction with HNF-SD-WM-ISB-006, Interim Safety Basis (ISB) for Solid Waste Facilities (T Plant), and HNF-2896, Safety Assessment for Project W-259, which is an addendum to the ISB.

NGUYEN, D.M.

1999-06-03

97

Ecological indicators display reduced variation in North American catch share fisheries  

PubMed Central

A growing push to implement catch share fishery programs is based partly on the recognition that they may provide stronger incentives for ecological stewardship than conventional fisheries management. Using data on population status, quota compliance, discard rates, use of habitat-damaging gear, and landings for 15 catch share programs in North America, I tested the hypothesis that catch share systems lead to improved ecological stewardship and status of exploited populations. Impacts of catch share programs were measured through comparisons of fisheries with catch shares to fisheries without catch shares or by comparing fisheries before and after catch shares were implemented. The average levels of most indicators were unaffected by catch share implementation: only discard rate, which declined significantly in catch share fisheries, showed a significant response. However, catch share fisheries were distinguished by markedly reduced interannual variability in all indicators, being statistically significant for exploitation rate, landings, discard rate, and the ratio of catch to catch quotas. These impacts of catch shares were common between nations and ocean basins and were independent of the number of years that catch share programs had been in place. These findings suggest that for the indicators examined, the primary effect of catch shares was greater consistency over time. This enhanced consistency could be beneficial to fishery systems and might also be an indication of more effective management. PMID:20080747

Essington, Timothy E.

2009-01-01

98

Mitigating by-catch of diamondback terrapins in crab pots  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Chronic by-catch of diamondback terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin) in blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) pots is a concern for terrapin conservation along the United States Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts. Despite the availability of by-catch reduction devices (BRDs) for crab pots, adoption of BRDs has not been mandated and by-catch of terrapins continues. We conducted experimental fishing studies in North Carolina's year-round blue crab fishery from 2000 to 2004 to evaluate the ability of various BRDs to reduce terrapin by-catch without a concomitant reduction in the catch of blue crabs. In 4,822 crab pot days fished, we recorded only 21 terrapin captures. Estimated capture rates were 0.003 terrapins/pot per day in hard crab experimental fishing and 0.008 terrapins/pot per day in peeler experimental fishing. All terrapin captures occurred from April to mid-May within 321.4 m of the shoreline. Longer soak times produced more dead terrapins, with 4 live and 4 dead during hard crab experimental fishing and 11 live and 2 dead during peeler experimental fishing. The 4.0-cm BRDs in fall and 4.5-cm and 5.0-cm BRDs in spring reduced the catch of legal-sized male hard crabs by 26.6%, 21.2%, and 5.7%, respectively. Only the 5.0-cm BRDs did not significantly affect the catch of legal-sized hard male crabs. However, BRDs had no measurable effect on catch of target crabs in the peeler crab fishery. Our results identify 3 complementary and economically feasible tools for blue crab fishery managers to exclude terrapins from commercially fished crab pots in North Carolina: 1) gear modifications (e.g., BRDs); 2) distance-to-shore restrictions; and 3) time-of-year regulations. These measures combined could provide a reduction in terrapin by-catch of up to 95% without a significant reduction in target crab catch.

Hart, Kristen M.; Crowder, Larry B.

2011-01-01

99

Filling Tanks with Hydrazine  

Microsoft Academic Search

At the Hydrazine workshop in 2002 in Noordwijk several presentations dealt with the filling of satellite tanks. I was a bit surprised about the amount of manpower that is needed for this work. But I saw the same during the filling of the SCA system tanks some years ago in Trauen\\/Germany. I want to present the work flow of filling

K. Krueger

2004-01-01

100

Tank characterization reference guide  

SciTech Connect

Characterization of the Hanford Site high-level waste storage tanks supports safety issue resolution; operations and maintenance requirements; and retrieval, pretreatment, vitrification, and disposal technology development. Technical, historical, and programmatic information about the waste tanks is often scattered among many sources, if it is documented at all. This Tank Characterization Reference Guide, therefore, serves as a common location for much of the generic tank information that is otherwise contained in many documents. The report is intended to be an introduction to the issues and history surrounding the generation, storage, and management of the liquid process wastes, and a presentation of the sampling, analysis, and modeling activities that support the current waste characterization. This report should provide a basis upon which those unfamiliar with the Hanford Site tank farms can start their research.

De Lorenzo, D.S.; DiCenso, A.T.; Hiller, D.B.; Johnson, K.W.; Rutherford, J.H.; Smith, D.J. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Kennewick, WA (United States); Simpson, B.C. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-09-01

101

27 CFR 24.229 - Tank car and tank truck requirements.  

...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tank car and tank truck requirements. 24.229 Section... ALCOHOL WINE Spirits § 24.229 Tank car and tank truck requirements. Railroad tank cars and tank trucks used to transport...

2014-04-01

102

49 CFR 179.500 - Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks. 179.500 Section 179.500 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

2013-10-01

103

49 CFR 179.500 - Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks. 179.500 Section 179.500 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

2012-10-01

104

49 CFR 179.500 - Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks. 179.500 Section 179.500 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

2011-10-01

105

49 CFR 179.500 - Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks. 179.500 Section 179.500 Transportation...MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes...

2010-10-01

106

49 CFR 179.100 - General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks. 179.100 Section...SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105... General specifications applicable to pressure tank car...

2010-10-01

107

49 CFR 179.201 - Individual specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks. 179.201 Section...TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW...specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car...

2012-10-01

108

49 CFR 179.201 - Individual specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks. 179.201 Section...TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW...specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car...

2013-10-01

109

49 CFR 179.100 - General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks. 179.100 Section...SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105... General specifications applicable to pressure tank car...

2011-10-01

110

49 CFR 179.201 - Individual specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks. 179.201 Section...TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW...specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car...

2011-10-01

111

49 CFR 179.100 - General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks. 179.100 Section...SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105... General specifications applicable to pressure tank car...

2012-10-01

112

49 CFR 179.100 - General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks. 179.100 Section...SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105... General specifications applicable to pressure tank car...

2013-10-01

113

49 CFR 179.201 - Individual specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks. 179.201 Section...TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW...specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car...

2010-10-01

114

Tank 241-TY-104 Tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, and WHC 222-C Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples for tank 241-TY-104.

Schreiber, R.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-02-15

115

Tank 241-AN-102 tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, PNL 325 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, and WHC 222-S Laboratory. The scope of this plane is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples for tank 241-AN-102.

Schreiber, R.D.

1995-02-03

116

Tank 241-BY-106 tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, PNL 325 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, and WHC 222-S Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples for tank 241-BY-106.

Schreiber, R.D.

1995-01-24

117

Tank 241-BY-105 tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, PNL 325 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, and WHC 222-S Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples for tank 241-BY-105.

Schreiber, R.D.

1995-02-01

118

Tank 241-BY-103 tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, WHC 222-S Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL 329 Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-BY-103.

Carpenter, B.C.

1994-10-21

119

Tank 241-U-201 tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, and WHC 22-S Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples for tank 241-U-201.

Schreiber, R.D.

1995-02-21

120

Tank 241-U-202 tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, and WHC 222-S Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples for tank 241-U-202.

Schreiber, R.D.

1995-02-21

121

Tank 241-AX-102 tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, WHC 222-S Laboratory, and PNL 325 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of auger samples from tank 241-AX-102.

Carpenter, B.C.

1994-08-26

122

Bayesian Catch Curve Analysis Institute of Statistics Mimeo Series # 2615  

E-print Network

Catch curves have been used to estimate survival and instantaneous mortality for fish and wildlife populations for many years. In order to better analyze catch curve data from the Apostle Islands population lake trout Salvelinus namaycush in Lake Superior, we develop a Bayesian approach to catch curve analysis. First, the proposed Bayesian approach is illustrated for a single catch curve and then extended to multiple years of data. We also relax the model assumption of a stable age distribution to allow random effects across years. The proposed models are compared with the traditional methods using the focused DIC. There are many potential advantages to the Bayesian approach over the traditional methods such as least squares and maximum likelihood, based on large sample theory. Bayesian estimates are valid for finite samples, and efficient numerical methods can be used to obtain estimates of instantaneous mortality. We conclude that many benefits can be obtained from the Bayesian approach to a single catch curve and to multiple years of data, such as closed-form variance estimates and the ability to both model and estimate the process variation of survival rates.

Emily H. Griffith; Sujit K. Ghosh; Kenneth H. Pollock; Michael J

123

Pressurizer tank upper support  

DOEpatents

A pressurizer tank in a pressurized water nuclear reactor is mounted between structural walls of the reactor on a substructure of the reactor, the tank extending upwardly from the substructure. For bearing lateral loads such as seismic shocks, a girder substantially encircles the pressurizer tank at a space above the substructure and is coupled to the structural walls via opposed sway struts. Each sway strut is attached at one end to the girder and at an opposite end to one of the structural walls, and the sway struts are oriented substantially horizontally in pairs aligned substantially along tangents to the wall of the circular tank. Preferably, eight sway struts attach to the girder at 90[degree] intervals. A compartment encloses the pressurizer tank and forms the structural wall. The sway struts attach to corners of the compartment for maximum stiffness and load bearing capacity. A valve support frame carrying the relief/discharge piping and valves of an automatic depressurization arrangement is fixed to the girder, whereby lateral loads on the relief/discharge piping are coupled directly to the compartment rather than through any portion of the pressurizer tank. Thermal insulation for the valve support frame prevents thermal loading of the piping and valves. The girder is shimmed to define a gap for reducing thermal transfer, and the girder is free to move vertically relative to the compartment walls, for accommodating dimensional variation of the pressurizer tank with changes in temperature and pressure. 10 figures.

Baker, T.H.; Ott, H.L.

1994-01-11

124

Pressurizer tank upper support  

DOEpatents

A pressurizer tank in a pressurized water nuclear reactor is mounted between structural walls of the reactor on a substructure of the reactor, the tank extending upwardly from the substructure. For bearing lateral loads such as seismic shocks, a girder substantially encircles the pressurizer tank at a space above the substructure and is coupled to the structural walls via opposed sway struts. Each sway strut is attached at one end to the girder and at an opposite end to one of the structural walls, and the sway struts are oriented substantially horizontally in pairs aligned substantially along tangents to the wall of the circular tank. Preferably, eight sway struts attach to the girder at 90.degree. intervals. A compartment encloses the pressurizer tank and forms the structural wall. The sway struts attach to corners of the compartment for maximum stiffness and load bearing capacity. A valve support frame carrying the relief/discharge piping and valves of an automatic depressurization arrangement is fixed to the girder, whereby lateral loads on the relief/discharge piping are coupled directly to the compartment rather than through any portion of the pressurizer tank. Thermal insulation for the valve support frame prevents thermal loading of the piping and valves. The girder is shimmed to define a gap for reducing thermal transfer, and the girder is free to move vertically relative to the compartment walls, for accommodating dimensional variation of the pressurizer tank with changes in temperature and pressure.

Baker, Tod H. (O'Hara Township, Allegheny County, PA); Ott, Howard L. (Kiski Township, Armstrong County, PA)

1994-01-01

125

Tow Tank #1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Digging the channel for the Tow Tank. In the late 1920s, the NACA decided to investigate the aero/hydro dynamics of floats for seaplanes. A Hydrodynamics Branch was established in 1929 and special towing basin was authorized in March of that same year. Starr Truscott (the first head of the new division) described the tank in NACA TR 470: 'The N.A.C.A. tank is of the Froude type; that is, the model which is being tested is towed through still water at successive constant speeds from a carriage spanning the tank. At each constant speed the towing pull is measured, the trim and the rise, or change of draft, are recorded and, if the model is being towed at a fixed trim, the moment required to hold it there is measured and recorded.' 'The reinforced concrete basin containing the water has the following dimensions: (1) Length on water, extreme, 2,020 feet; (2) Normal width of water surface, 24 feet; (3) Normal depth of water, 12 feet; (4) Length of 12 foot depth, 1,980 feet.' The tank was dedicated on May 27, 1931. In 1936 the tank was extended to a total length of 2,960 feet. In 1959 the facility was turned over to the U.S. Navy.Published in NACA TR No. 470, 'The N.A.C.A. Tank: A High-Speed Towing Basin for Testing Models of Seaplane Floats,' by Starr Truscott, 1933.

1930-01-01

126

NACA Tow Tank  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

L4695 shows the interior view of construction of the Tow Tank. In the late 1920s, the NACA decided to investigate the aero/hydro dynamics of floats for seaplanes. A Hydrodynamics Branch was established in 1929 and special towing basin was authorized in March of that same year. Starr Truscott (the first head of the new division) described the tank in NACA TR 470: 'The N.A.C.A. tank is of the Froude type; that is, the model which is being tested is towed through still water at successive constant speeds from a carriage spanning the tank. At each constant speed the towing pull is measured, the trim and the rise, or change of draft, are recorded and, if the model is being towed at a fixed trim, the moment required to hold it there is measured and recorded.' 'The reinforced concrete basin containing the water has the following dimensions: (1) Length on water, extreme, 2,020 feet; (2) Normal width of water surface, 24 feet; (3) Normal depth of water, 12 feet; (4) Length of 12 foot depth, 1,980 feet.' This picture shows the tank before the coving was added. This brought the rails for the carriage closer together and helped suppress waves produced by the models. The finished tank would be filled with approximately 4 million gallons of salt water pumped in from the Back River. The tank was covered by a shelter which protected the water surface. The tank was dedicated on May 27, 1931. In 1936 the tank was extended to a total length of 2,960 feet. In 1959 the facility was turned over to the U.S. Navy.

1930-01-01

127

Interference Model: Ripple Tank  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Interference Model: Ripple Tank investigates constructive and destructive interference between two point sources. The user can change the point source frequency, location and separation and phase difference between the point sources. The model also shows the difference in distance from the point sources to a movable observation point. The Interference Model: Ripple Tank was created using the Easy Java Simulations (EJS) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the ejs_bu_Ripple_Tank_Interference.jar file will run the program if Java is installed.

Duffy, Andrew

2010-04-25

128

Retractable tool bit having latch type catch mechanism  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A retractable tool bit assembly for a tool such as an allen key is presented. The assembly includes one or more spring loaded nestable or telescoping tubular sections together with a catch mechanism for capturing and holding the tool in its retracted position. The catch mechanism consists of a latch mechanism located in a base section and which engages a conically shaped tool head located at the inner end of the tool. The tool head adjoins an eccentric oval type neck portion which extends to a rear lip of the tool head. The latch mechanism releases when the ovular neck portion rotates about the catch members upon actuation of a rotary tool drive motor. When released, all the telescoping sections and the tool extends fully outward to a use position.

Voellmer, George (inventor)

1993-01-01

129

Evolving Robocode Tank Fighters  

E-print Network

In this paper, I describe the application of genetic programming to evolve a controller for a robotic tank in a simulated environment. The purpose is to explore how genetic techniques can best be applied to produce ...

Eisenstein, Jacob

2003-10-28

130

Waste tank sample transport  

SciTech Connect

Since 1943, radioactive liquid waste has been stored in underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The waste was the result of chemical separation processes for the production of fissile defense materials. Associated with the current environmental cleanup mission, waste characterization and processing programs are requiring the extraction of samples from the tanks. Approved onsite packaging are in place and in use for transfers of samples from the tanks to onsite laboratories. Initiatives are under way to develop and procure packaging for sample shipments to offsite laboratories. This paper will provide a current status of the tank sample packaging used at the Hanford Site, as well as the project status for new packaging to be used for offsite shipments.

Field, J.G.; Mercado, M.S.; Smith, R.J.; Thornton, J.W.

1994-08-01

131

TANK 5 SAMPLING  

SciTech Connect

Tank 5 at the Savannah River Site has been used to store high level waste and is currently undergoing waste removal processes in preparation for tank closure. Samples were taken from two locations to determine the contents in support of Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) development for chemical cleaning. These samples were obtained through the use of the Drop Core Sampler and the Snowbank Sampler developed by the Engineered Equipment & Systems (EES) group of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL).

Vrettos, N; William Cheng, W; Thomas Nance, T

2007-11-26

132

Tow Tank #1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Digging the channel for the Tow Tank. In the late 1920s, the NACA decided to investigate the aero/hydro dynamics of floats for seaplanes. A Hydrodynamics Branch was established in 1929 and special towing basin was authorized in March of that same year. Starr Truscott (the first head of the new division) described the tank in NACA TR 470: 'The N.A.C.A. tank is of the Froude type; that is, the model which is being tested is towed through still water at successive constant speeds from a carriage spanning the tank. At each constant speed the towing pull is measured, the trim and the rise, or change of draft, are recorded and, if the model is being towed at a fixed trim, the moment required to hold it there is measured and recorded.' 'The reinforced concrete basin containing the water has the following dimensions: (1) Length on water, extreme, 2,020 feet; (2) Normal width of water surface, 24 feet; (3) Normal depth of water, 12 feet; (4) Length of 12 foot depth, 1,980 feet.' The tank was dedicated on May 27, 1931. In 1936 the tank was extended to a total length of 2,960 feet. In 1959 the facility was turned over to the U.S. Navy.

1930-01-01

133

Comparing catch orientation among Minnesota walleye, northern pike, and bass anglers  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We compared the catch orientations of Minnesota walleye (Sander vitreus), northern pike (Esox lucius), largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), and smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) anglers. Results were derived from 2009, 2010, and 2012 surveys of anglers targeting these different species. Consistent with previous research, we identified four dimensions of anglers’ catch orientation: (a) catching something, (b) catching big fish, (c) catching many fish, and (d) keeping fish. Walleye anglers were the most motivated to keep fish, while northern pike anglers were more oriented toward catching big fish. Largemouth bass anglers, and to a lesser extent smallmouth bass anglers, were also oriented toward catching big fish. Bass anglers reported the lowest interest in keeping fish. An orientation to keep fish was negatively related to more restrictive management actions, regardless of species. A stronger orientation to catch big fish was associated with support for increased harvest restrictions only for northern pike and smallmouth bass.

Schroeder, Susan A.; Fulton, David C.

2013-01-01

134

50 CFR 648.230 - Spiny dogfish Annual Catch Limits (ACLs).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Spiny dogfish Annual Catch Limits (ACLs). 648.230 Section 648.230 ...230 Spiny dogfish Annual Catch Limits (ACLs). (a) The Spiny Dogfish Monitoring...changes in measures intended to ensure ACLs are not exceeded as frequently....

2012-10-01

135

50 CFR 648.230 - Spiny dogfish Annual Catch Limits (ACLs).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Spiny dogfish Annual Catch Limits (ACLs). 648.230 Section 648.230 ...230 Spiny dogfish Annual Catch Limits (ACLs). (a) The Spiny Dogfish Monitoring...changes in measures intended to ensure ACLs are not exceeded as frequently....

2013-10-01

136

50 CFR 648.71 - Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Targets (ACT).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Targets (ACT). 648...Management Measures for the Atlantic Surf Clam and Ocean Quahog Fisheries § 648.71 Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Targets (ACT)....

2013-10-01

137

50 CFR 648.71 - Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Targets (ACT).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Targets (ACT). 648...Management Measures for the Atlantic Surf Clam and Ocean Quahog Fisheries § 648.71 Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Targets (ACT)....

2012-10-01

138

50 CFR 648.70 - Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Limit (ACL).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Limit (ACL). 648...Management Measures for the Atlantic Surf Clam and Ocean Quahog Fisheries § 648.70 Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Limit (ACL)....

2012-10-01

139

50 CFR 648.70 - Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Limit (ACL).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Limit (ACL). 648...Management Measures for the Atlantic Surf Clam and Ocean Quahog Fisheries § 648.70 Surfclam and ocean quahog Annual Catch Limit (ACL)....

2013-10-01

140

WETLANDS AND FISH: CATCH THE LINK For additional copies of this document, contact  

E-print Network

#12;WETLANDS AND FISH: CATCH THE LINK For additional copies of this document, contact: National Cover Page: Photographs: Kathryn Conant Striped bass graphic: Duane Raver I #12;WETLANDS AND FISH: CATCH THE LINK Table of Contents Fish Need Wetlands

141

"Catching the second wave" of the Plug in Electric Vehicle  

E-print Network

"Catching the second wave" of the Plug in Electric Vehicle Market PEV market update from ITS PHEV on gasoline, diesel, natural gas, biofuels and other liquid or gaseous fuels. · HEV = Hybrid electric vehicles Vehicles are like HEVs, but have bigger batteries, and can store electricity from plugging into the grid

California at Davis, University of

142

Keep Your Kidneys Healthy: Catch Kidney Disease Early  

MedlinePLUS

... please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Keep Your Kidneys Healthy Catch Kidney Disease Early Your kidneys aren’t very big—each is about the ... other substances inside your body. Unfortunately, if your kidneys start to malfunction, you might not realize it ...

143

13. CANVAS NET USED TO CATCH TOOLS OR SUPPORT PERSONNEL ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

13. CANVAS NET USED TO CATCH TOOLS OR SUPPORT PERSONNEL FALLING FROM UPPER LEVELS OF MOBILE SERVICE STRUCTURE. BELOW NET IS A NINETY FOOT DROP TO THE PAVEMENT; VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Cape Canaveral Air Station, Launch Complex 17, Facility 28416, East end of Lighthouse Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

144

Fishery Notes Great Lakes Fishery Catch, Value Listed  

E-print Network

commercial catch from 1974 to 1975 was primarily due to declines in the Lake Erie production of yellow perch Arbor, Mich. A major factor in the 1975 U.S. produc- tion decrease is attributable to the Lake Michigan of pounds): Illinois, 240; In- diana, 199; Michigan, 12,009; :vtinnesota, 1,213; New York, 600; Ohio, 7

145

Fishery Notes Great Lakes 1976 Commercial Fish Catch  

E-print Network

production come from Lake Michigan. Other important high-value species are the yellow perch and chub. Landing from the several lake basins. In terms of fish production , Lake Michigan ' 48.4 million pounds tands in all of the lakes except Superior, the commercial catch is es- sentially all from Lake Michigan. The 39

146

YELWWFIN TUNA, THUNNUS ALBACARES, CATCH RATES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC  

E-print Network

YELWWFIN TUNA, THUNNUS ALBACARES, CATCH RATES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC TOM POLACHECKl ABSTRACf The surface fishery for yellowfin tuna, ThtwnU8 albac(~res, in the western Pacific has increased drama and time period indicated no relation between them and suggests that the yellowfin tuna stocks

147

Foreign Fishery Developments ROK Expands Catch of Large Whales  

E-print Network

Foreign Fishery Developments ROK Expands Catch of Large Whales (about two-thirds of the Danish Industry Significant quantities of cod landed early this year by Danish fishermen in Danish ports did such fish would be processed into fresh fillets or frozen fillets and blocks. A major share of Danish

148

VOLUME & VALUE OF CATCH BY REGIONS 1970 Million Pounds  

E-print Network

IV VOLUME & VALUE OF CATCH BY REGIONS 1970 G 0) 8 8 G 8 Hawaii Oll o 4.0 Million Pounds o Million.7 million. Record im- ports exceeded $1 billion. THE 1970 STORY The industry picture at year end was this. But many parts of the industry competed well with foreign fleets and were functioning at r e cord volume

149

Comparison of Catch Efficiencies between Black and Galvanized Minnow Traps  

Microsoft Academic Search

Minnow traps are widely used in aquatic ecology for the quantitative sampling of small-bodied fish. We used paired sampling stations to compare the catch efficiency of minnow traps constructed of galvanized steel with that of traps constructed of steel mesh covered with a black vinyl coating in field and laboratory conditions. Except for northern redbelly dace Phoxinus eos in field

Yves Paradis; Angélique Dupuch; Pierre Magnan

2012-01-01

150

September 23, 2009 Engineer: Aggie Irrigation Catch Can best in the world  

E-print Network

September 23, 2009 Engineer: Aggie Irrigation Catch Can best in the world Un-calibrated irrigation systems can waste half their water By: Robert Burns, 903-834-6191 Contact(s): Dr. Guy Fipps, 979 engineers claim they have the best- designed irrigation catch can in the world: The Aggie Catch Can. "This

151

Cod catches onboard Swedish tour boats in the Sound during 2011  

E-print Network

Cod catches onboard Swedish tour boats in the Sound during 2011 Vidar Ã?resland Aqua reports 2012:2 #12;Cod catches onboard Swedish tour boats in the Sound during 2011 By Vidar Ã?resland February 2012) This report may be cited as: Ã?resland, V. (2012). Cod catches onboard Swedish tour boats in the Sound during

152

Optical Cryogenic Tank Level Sensor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Cryogenic fluids play an important role in space transportation. Liquid oxygen and hydrogen are vital fuel components for liquid rocket engines. It is also difficult to accurately measure the liquid level in the cryogenic tanks containing the liquids. The current methods use thermocouple rakes, floats, or sonic meters to measure tank level. Thermocouples have problems examining the boundary between the boiling liquid and the gas inside the tanks. They are also slow to respond to temperature changes. Sonic meters need to be mounted inside the tank, but still above the liquid level. This causes problems for full tanks, or tanks that are being rotated to lie on their side.

Duffell, Amanda

2005-01-01

153

49 CFR 179.200 - General specifications applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks (Class DOT-111).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...General specifications applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks (Class DOT-111...TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW...General specifications applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks (Class...

2012-10-01

154

49 CFR 179.200 - General specifications applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks (Class DOT-111).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...General specifications applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks (Class DOT-111...TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW...General specifications applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks (Class...

2011-10-01

155

49 CFR 179.200 - General specifications applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks (Class DOT-111).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...General specifications applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks (Class DOT-111...TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW...General specifications applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks (Class...

2013-10-01

156

49 CFR 179.200 - General specifications applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks (Class DOT-111).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...General specifications applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks (Class DOT-111...TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW...General specifications applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks (Class...

2010-10-01

157

49 CFR 179.103 - Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks. 179.103 Section 179.103 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

2013-10-01

158

49 CFR 179.301 - Individual specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks. 179.301 Section 179.301 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) §...

2012-10-01

159

49 CFR 179.103 - Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks. 179.103 Section 179.103 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

2012-10-01

160

49 CFR 179.301 - Individual specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks. 179.301 Section 179.301 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) §...

2013-10-01

161

49 CFR 179.301 - Individual specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks. 179.301 Section 179.301 Transportation...MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) §...

2010-10-01

162

49 CFR 179.103 - Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks. 179.103 Section 179.103 Transportation...MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

2010-10-01

163

49 CFR 179.103 - Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks. 179.103 Section 179.103 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114...

2011-10-01

164

49 CFR 179.301 - Individual specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks. 179.301 Section 179.301 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) §...

2011-10-01

165

VIEW OF PDP TANK TOP, LEVEL 0?, WITH LTR TANK ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

VIEW OF PDP TANK TOP, LEVEL 0?, WITH LTR TANK TOP ON LEFT, LOOKING NORTHEAST. CRANE AND VERTICAL HOISTING ELEMENTS AT TOP - Physics Assembly Laboratory, Area A/M, Savannah River Site, Aiken, Aiken County, SC

166

131. NORTH PLANT TANK CHEMICAL STORAGE TANKS FROM GB MANUFACTURING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

131. NORTH PLANT TANK CHEMICAL STORAGE TANKS FROM GB MANUFACTURING PLANT. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Bounded by Ninety-sixth Avenue & Fifty-sixth Avenue, Buckley Road, Quebec Street & Colorado Highway 2, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

167

Shark Catches by the HawaiiShark Catches by the Hawaii--basedbased LonglineLongline FisheryFishery  

E-print Network

Hawai``ii--basedbased LonglineLongline Fishery, and an Extension of Analyses of Catch Data fromFishery, and an Extension with fishery observer data because:Analyses conducted with fishery observer data because: -- logbook data from this fishery negatively biased for sharkslogbook data from this fishery negatively biased for sharks (Blue

Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

168

Sloshing in conical tanks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tanks of rockets, spacecraft, and satellites have often the form of a cone or part of a cone. Oscillations of a liquid occurring in connection with the presence of a free liquid surface can become a danger for structural integrity and stability in the case of many rockets, aircraft, satellites, tank trucks, and even stationary tanks containing liquids. An evaluation of the hazards of such oscillations must be based on information regarding the natural frequencies of the involved systems. The present investigation is concerned with suitable mathematical approaches for obtaining the required information. Mathematical relations desdribing conditions in the case of conical container forms are presented. Attention is also given to an approach taking into account harmonic translational excitation. Methods of numerical evaluation are considered along with a correction for the characteristic frequencies, and experimental results.

Bauer, H. F.

169

49 CFR 172.331 - Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks.  

...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks...PLANS Marking § 172.331 Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks...carrier for transportation in a bulk packaging shall provide the motor carrier...

2014-10-01

170

Hanford Tank Waste Information Enclosure 1 Hanford Tank Waste Information  

E-print Network

Hanford Tank Waste Information Enclosure 1 1 Hanford Tank Waste Information 1.0 Summary This information demonstrates the wastes in the twelve Hanford Site tanks meet the definition of transuranic (TRU conducted at the Hanford Site to demonstrate how these wastes were generated and segregated and why

171

33 CFR 157.15 - Slop tanks in tank vessels.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...must have at least two slop tanks. (b) Capacity. Slop tanks must have the total capacity to retain oily mixtures from cargo tank...mixture of 3 percent or more of the oil carrying capacity. Two percent capacity is allowed if...

2012-07-01

172

33 CFR 157.15 - Slop tanks in tank vessels.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...must have at least two slop tanks. (b) Capacity. Slop tanks must have the total capacity to retain oily mixtures from cargo tank...mixture of 3 percent or more of the oil carrying capacity. Two percent capacity is allowed if...

2013-07-01

173

33 CFR 157.15 - Slop tanks in tank vessels.  

...must have at least two slop tanks. (b) Capacity. Slop tanks must have the total capacity to retain oily mixtures from cargo tank...mixture of 3 percent or more of the oil carrying capacity. Two percent capacity is allowed if...

2014-07-01

174

33 CFR 157.15 - Slop tanks in tank vessels.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...must have at least two slop tanks. (b) Capacity. Slop tanks must have the total capacity to retain oily mixtures from cargo tank...mixture of 3 percent or more of the oil carrying capacity. Two percent capacity is allowed if...

2011-07-01

175

46 CFR 154.420 - Tank design.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Construction and Equipment Integral Tanks § 154.420 Tank...a) The structure of an integral tank must meet the deep...b) The structure of an integral tank must be designed and shown by calculation to withstand the...

2010-10-01

176

Calculate tank losses easier  

SciTech Connect

Attempts to eliminate potential for error, save time and enable computer calculation of tankage vapor losses by converting the US EPA's AP-42 nomograms, graphs and tabulated data into analytical equations using linear regression curve-fitting techniques. Points out that since tankage emission inventories in a 75,000 to 150,000 B/D petroleum refinery may involve as many as 100 tanks or more, there is a significant potential for error inherent in the calculation methodology found in AP-42. Presents a typical printout from a program (written in BASIC for a Hewlett-Packard 87 personal desktop computer) for calculating vapor losses from some fixed-roof tanks.

Beychok, M.R.

1983-03-01

177

TANK SPACE OPTIONS REPORT  

SciTech Connect

Since this report was originally issued in 2001, several options proposed for increasing double-shell tank (DST) storage space were implemented or are in the process of implementation. Changes to the single-shell tank (SST) waste retrieval schedule, completion of DST space saving options, and the DST space saving options in progress have delayed the projected shortfall of DST storage space from the 2007-2011 to the 2018-2025 timeframe (ORP-11242, River Protection Project System Plan). This report reevaluates options from Rev. 0 and includes evaluations of new options for alleviating projected restrictions on SST waste retrieval beginning in 2018 because of the lack of DST storage space.

WILLIS WL; AHRENDT MR

2009-08-11

178

Enhanced Waste Tank Level Model  

SciTech Connect

'With the increased sensitivity of waste-level measurements in the H-Area Tanks and with periods of isolation, when no mass transfer occurred for certain tanks, waste-level changes have been recorded with are unexplained.'

Duignan, M.R.

1999-06-24

179

Effect of loading conditions on the dissociation behaviour of catch bond clusters  

PubMed Central

Under increasing tensile load, the lifetime of a single catch bond counterintuitively increases up to a maximum and then decreases exponentially like a slip bond. So far, the characteristics of single catch bond dissociation have been extensively studied. However, it remains unclear how a cluster of catch bonds behaves under tensile load. We perform computational analysis on the following models to examine the characteristics of clustered catch bonds: (i) clusters of catch bonds with equal load sharing, (ii) clusters of catch bonds with linear load sharing, and (iii) clusters of catch bonds in micropipette-manipulated cell detachment. We focus on the differences between the slip and catch bond clusters, identifying the critical factors for exhibiting the characteristics of catch bond mechanism for the multiple-bond system. Our computation reveals that for a multiple-bond cluster, the catch bond behaviour could only manifest itself under relatively uniform loading conditions and at certain stages of decohesion, explaining the difficulties in observing the catch bond mechanism under real biological conditions. PMID:21937488

Sun, L.; Cheng, Q. H.; Gao, H. J.; Zhang, Y. W.

2012-01-01

180

Probing time-dependent mechanical behaviors of catch bonds based on two-state models  

PubMed Central

With lifetime counter-intuitively being prolonged under forces, catch bonds can play critical roles in various sub-cellular processes. By adopting different “catching” strategies within the framework of two-state models, we construct two types of catch bonds that have a similar force-lifetime profile upon a constant force-clamp load. However, when a single catch bond of either type is subjected to varied forces, we find that they can behave very differently in both force history dependence and bond strength. We further find that a cluster of catch bonds of either type generally becomes unstable when subjected to a periodically oscillating force, which is consistent with experimental results. These results provide important insights into versatile time-dependent mechanical behaviors of catch bonds. We suggest that it is necessary to further differentiate those bonds that are all phenomenologically referred to as “Catch bonds”. PMID:25598078

Chen, Xiaofeng; Mao, Zhixiu; Chen, Bin

2015-01-01

181

SRS Tank Structural Integrity Program  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Structural Integrity Program is to ensure continued safe management and operation of the waste tanks for whatever period of time these tanks are required. Matthew Maryak provides an overview of the Structural Integrity Program to open Session 5 (Waste Storage and Tank Inspection) of the 2010 EM Waste Processing Technical Exchange.

Maryak, Matthew

2010-11-01

182

CALIFORNIA LEAKING UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS  

EPA Science Inventory

Points represent Leaking Underground Storage Tanks (LUST) for the State of California. This database was developed and is maintained by the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). Point locations represent tanks where leak events have occurred. Tank latitude-long...

183

Salmon-Filled Tanks  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Specialized tanks at the USGS Tunison Lab hold young Atlantic salmon until they are released in Lake Ontario tributaries. A new, sophisticated fish rearing facility in Cortland, N.Y. will help restore Atlantic salmon, bloater, and lake herring to Lake Ontario, strengthening the local ecosystem and ...

184

Sharing of Tank Information  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Test Rationale -- Attempt to Address 10% vs. 25+% effects of crater penetration on full scale titanium alloy tanks and comparison to plate tests Utilize Baseline Burst Pressure versus HVI impacted vessels as gauge of effects Examine craters (post test) to determine penetration characteristics on a fluid filled vessel versus plate tests. Examine crater effects leading to vessel failure (if any).

Tamminga, Joshua D.

2011-01-01

185

Hybrid Tank Technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Researchers have accomplished great advances in pressure vessel technology by applying high-performance composite materials as an over-wrap to metal-lined pressure vessels. These composite over-wrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) are used in many areas, from air tanks for firefighters and compressed natural gas tanks for automobiles, to pressurant tanks for aerospace launch vehicles and propellant tanks for satellites and deep-space exploration vehicles. NASA and commercial industry are continually striving to find new ways to make high-performance pressure vessels safer and more reliable. While COPVs are much lighter than all-metal pressure vessels, the composite material, typically graphite fibers with an epoxy matrix resin, is vulnerable to impact damage. Carbon fiber is most frequently used for the high-performance COPV applications because of its high strength-to-weight characteristics. Other fibers have been used, but with limitations. For example, fiberglass is inexpensive but much heavier than carbon. Aramid fibers are impact resistant but have less strength than carbon and their performance tends to deteriorate.

2004-01-01

186

Fish tank virtual reality  

Microsoft Academic Search

The defining characteristics of what we call “Fish Tank Virtual Reality” are a stereo image of a three dimensional (3D) scene viewed on a monitor using a perspective projection coupled to the head position of the observer. We discuss some of the relative merits of this mode of viewing as compared to head mounted stereo displays. In addition, we report

Colin Ware; Kevin Arthur; Kellogg S. Booth

1993-01-01

187

Tank characterization report for Single-Shell Tank T-102  

SciTech Connect

Tank 241-T-102 (hereafter referred to as T-102) is a 530,000 gallon single-shell waste tank located in the 200 West T Tank farm at the Hanford Site. In 1993, two cores were taken from this tank and analysis of the cores was conducted by Battelle`s 325-A Laboratory. Characterization of the waste in this tank was conducted to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-44-05. Tank T-102 was constructed in 1943 and put into service in 1945; it is the second tank in a cascade system with Tanks T-101 and T-103. During its process history, Tank T-102 received mostly Metal Waste (MW) from the Bismuth Phosphate Process and Coating Waste (CW) from the REDOX Process via the cascade from Tank T-101 and in transfers from Tank C-102. In 1956, the MW was removed from T-102 by pumping and sluicing`. This tank was declared inactive and retired from service in 1976. In 1981, intrusion prevention and stabilization measures were taken to isolate the waste in T-102. The tank presently contains approximately 121,100 liters (32,000 gallons) of liquid and sludge-like waste. Historically, there are no unreviewed safety issues associated with this tank and none were revealed after reviewing the data from the latest core sampling event in 1993. An extensive set of analytical measurements was performed on the core composites. The major constituents (>0.5 wt%) of the waste are water, aluminum, sodium, iron, and nitrate, ordered from the largest concentration to the smallest. The concentrations and inventories of these and other constituents are given. The results of the chemical analyses have been compared to the dangerous waste codes in the Washington Dangerous Waste Regulations (WAC 173-303).

Remund, K.M.; Hartley, S.A.; Toth, J.J.; Tingey, J.M.; Heasler, P.G.; Ryan, F.M.; Simpson, B.C.

1994-09-01

188

Estimating historical eastern North Pacific blue whale catches using spatial calling patterns.  

PubMed

Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) were exploited extensively around the world and remain endangered. In the North Pacific their population structure is unclear and current status unknown, with the exception of a well-studied eastern North Pacific (ENP) population. Despite existing abundance estimates for the ENP population, it is difficult to estimate pre-exploitation abundance levels and gauge their recovery because historical catches of the ENP population are difficult to separate from catches of other populations in the North Pacific. We collated previously unreported Soviet catches and combined these with known catches to form the most current estimates of North Pacific blue whale catches. We split these conflated catches using recorded acoustic calls from throughout the North Pacific, the knowledge that the ENP population produces a different call than blue whales in the western North Pacific (WNP). The catches were split by estimating spatiotemporal occurrence of blue whales with generalized additive models fitted to acoustic call patterns, which predict the probability a catch belonged to the ENP population based on the proportion of calls of each population recorded by latitude, longitude, and month. When applied to the conflated historical catches, which totaled 9,773, we estimate that ENP blue whale catches totaled 3,411 (95% range 2,593 to 4,114) from 1905-1971, and amounted to 35% (95% range 27% to 42%) of all catches in the North Pacific. Thus most catches in the North Pacific were for WNP blue whales, totaling 6,362 (95% range 5,659 to 7,180). The uncertainty in the acoustic data influence the results substantially more than uncertainty in catch locations and dates, but the results are fairly insensitive to the ecological assumptions made in the analysis. The results of this study provide information for future studies investigating the recovery of these populations and the impact of continuing and future sources of anthropogenic mortality. PMID:24892427

Monnahan, Cole C; Branch, Trevor A; Stafford, Kathleen M; Ivashchenko, Yulia V; Oleson, Erin M

2014-01-01

189

Estimating Historical Eastern North Pacific Blue Whale Catches Using Spatial Calling Patterns  

PubMed Central

Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) were exploited extensively around the world and remain endangered. In the North Pacific their population structure is unclear and current status unknown, with the exception of a well-studied eastern North Pacific (ENP) population. Despite existing abundance estimates for the ENP population, it is difficult to estimate pre-exploitation abundance levels and gauge their recovery because historical catches of the ENP population are difficult to separate from catches of other populations in the North Pacific. We collated previously unreported Soviet catches and combined these with known catches to form the most current estimates of North Pacific blue whale catches. We split these conflated catches using recorded acoustic calls from throughout the North Pacific, the knowledge that the ENP population produces a different call than blue whales in the western North Pacific (WNP). The catches were split by estimating spatiotemporal occurrence of blue whales with generalized additive models fitted to acoustic call patterns, which predict the probability a catch belonged to the ENP population based on the proportion of calls of each population recorded by latitude, longitude, and month. When applied to the conflated historical catches, which totaled 9,773, we estimate that ENP blue whale catches totaled 3,411 (95% range 2,593 to 4,114) from 1905–1971, and amounted to 35% (95% range 27% to 42%) of all catches in the North Pacific. Thus most catches in the North Pacific were for WNP blue whales, totaling 6,362 (95% range 5,659 to 7,180). The uncertainty in the acoustic data influence the results substantially more than uncertainty in catch locations and dates, but the results are fairly insensitive to the ecological assumptions made in the analysis. The results of this study provide information for future studies investigating the recovery of these populations and the impact of continuing and future sources of anthropogenic mortality. PMID:24892427

Monnahan, Cole C.; Branch, Trevor A.; Stafford, Kathleen M.; Ivashchenko, Yulia V.; Oleson, Erin M.

2014-01-01

190

Calculate tank losses easier  

Microsoft Academic Search

Attempts to eliminate potential for error, save time and enable computer calculation of tankage vapor losses by converting the US EPA's AP-42 nomograms, graphs and tabulated data into analytical equations using linear regression curve-fitting techniques. Points out that since tankage emission inventories in a 75,000 to 150,000 B\\/D petroleum refinery may involve as many as 100 tanks or more, there

Beychok

1983-01-01

191

9 CFR 316.14 - Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation of edible products.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-01-01 false Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation...CONTAINERS § 316.14 Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation of edible products. Each tank car and each tank truck carrying...

2012-01-01

192

9 CFR 316.14 - Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation of edible products.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-01-01 false Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation...CONTAINERS § 316.14 Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation of edible products. Each tank car and each tank truck carrying...

2013-01-01

193

9 CFR 316.14 - Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation of edible products.  

... 2014-01-01 false Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation...CONTAINERS § 316.14 Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation of edible products. Each tank car and each tank truck carrying...

2014-01-01

194

9 CFR 316.14 - Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation of edible products.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-01-01 false Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation...CONTAINERS § 316.14 Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation of edible products. Each tank car and each tank truck carrying...

2010-01-01

195

9 CFR 316.14 - Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation of edible products.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-01-01 false Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation...CONTAINERS § 316.14 Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation of edible products. Each tank car and each tank truck carrying...

2011-01-01

196

Flammability potential in in-tank precipitation tanks  

SciTech Connect

The frequency of deflagration in in-tank precipitation tanks due to ventilation failures was determined. The in-tank precipitation is an addition to the tank farm operations. This facility will prepare waste tank supernate and salt for treatment by the vitrification facility and saltstone facility. As the neutralized high-level waste ages, gravity causes it to settle into a salt solution (supernate) over a layer of containing solids (sludge). In some waste tanks, some of the salt has crystallized from the solution. Salt crystallization, and thus volume reduction, is enhanced by concentrating the supernate in the waste evaporators. The salt Solution is decontaminated by in-tank precipitation using a batch process in existing waste tanks in the tank farm, which are specifically designated for that purpose. The low-activity (decontaminated) salt solution is prepared front the supernate in dedicated waste tanks by a combination of precipitation, adsorption, and filtration. The most abundant radio- isotope in the supernate, {sup 137}Cs, is precipitated with sodium tetraphenylborate (STPB). In the same step, {sup 90}Sr, uranium, and plutonium are adsorbed on monosodium titanate particles. The solution (slurry) is filtered into two separate streams: filtrate and precipitate. The filtrate from this process is treated in order to remove volatile organics and is stored for later processing in the saltstone facility. The precipitate from this process is one of two concentrate slurries fed to the vitrification facility. The precipitation and adsorption processes by which radioactive constituents are removed from the salt supernate produce flammable vapors, predominately benzene, not previously present in the tank farm. The high vapor pressure of benzene allows evaporation at the temperatures in the waste tanks and can result in flammable vapor concentrations.

Gupta, M.K.; Britt, T.E.; Cramer, D.S. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Olsen, L.M. [Mason & Hanger, Amarillo, TX (United States)

1995-12-31

197

Interactions between finfish aquaculture and lobster catches in a sheltered bay.  

PubMed

Interactions between open-net pen finfish aquaculture and lobster catches in a sheltered bay in Nova Scotia, Canada, were investigated using fishermen's participatory research in annual lobster trap surveys over seven years. Fishermen recorded lobster catches during the last two weeks of May from 2007 to 2013. Catches for each trap haul were recorded separately for ovigerous and market-sized lobsters. Catch trends within the bay were compared to regional trends. Results of correlation analyses indicated that ovigerous catch trends were strongly affected by the fish farm's feeding/fallow periods. There was no significant correlation between trends for bay and LFA lobster landings. Patterns of lobster catch per unit effort extending over considerable distance in Port Mouton Bay appear to be influenced by proximity to the fish farm regardless of year-to-year variation in water temperatures and weather conditions. Odours and habitat changes surrounding open-net pen finfish operations are potential factors affecting lobster displacement. PMID:25242235

Loucks, Ronald H; Smith, Ruth E; Fisher, E Brian

2014-11-15

198

Tank characterization data report: Tank 241-C-112  

SciTech Connect

Tank 241-C-112 is a Hanford Site Ferrocyanide Watch List tank that was most recently sampled in March 1992. Analyses of materials obtained from tank 241-C-112 were conducted to support the resolution of the Ferrocyanide Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) and to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-10-00. Analysis of core samples obtained from tank 241-C-112 strongly indicates that the fuel concentration in the tank waste will not support a propagating exothermic reaction. Analysis of the process history of the tank as well as studies of simulants provided valuable information about the physical and chemical condition of the waste. This information, in combination with the analysis of the tank waste, sup ports the conclusion that an exothermic reaction in tank 241-C-112 is not plausible. Therefore, the contents of tank 241-C-112 present no imminent threat to the workers at the Hanford Site, the public, or the environment from its forrocyanide inventory. Because an exothermic reaction is not credible, the consequences of this accident scenario, as promulgated by the General Accounting Office, are not applicable.

Simpson, B.C.; Borsheim, G.L.; Jensen, L.

1993-09-01

199

Catch-and-release science and its application to conservation and management of recreational fisheries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Catch-and-release angling is a well-established practice in recreational angler behaviour and fisheries management. Accompanying this is a growing body of catch-and-release research that can be applied to reduce injury, mortality and sublethal alterations in behaviour and physiology. Here, the status of catch-and-release research from a symposium on the topic is summarised. Several general themes emerged including the need to: (1)

S. J. C OOKE

2007-01-01

200

46 CFR 153.219 - Access to double bottom tanks serving as dedicated ballast tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01...bottom tanks serving as dedicated ballast tanks. 153.219 Section 153.219 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT...bottom tanks serving as dedicated ballast tanks. (a) Except...

2010-10-01

201

46 CFR 153.219 - Access to double bottom tanks serving as dedicated ballast tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01...bottom tanks serving as dedicated ballast tanks. 153.219 Section 153.219 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT...bottom tanks serving as dedicated ballast tanks. (a) Except...

2012-10-01

202

46 CFR 153.219 - Access to double bottom tanks serving as dedicated ballast tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01...bottom tanks serving as dedicated ballast tanks. 153.219 Section 153.219 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT...bottom tanks serving as dedicated ballast tanks. (a) Except...

2013-10-01

203

46 CFR 153.219 - Access to double bottom tanks serving as dedicated ballast tanks.  

46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01...bottom tanks serving as dedicated ballast tanks. 153.219 Section 153.219 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT...bottom tanks serving as dedicated ballast tanks. (a) Except...

2014-10-01

204

46 CFR 153.219 - Access to double bottom tanks serving as dedicated ballast tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01...bottom tanks serving as dedicated ballast tanks. 153.219 Section 153.219 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT...bottom tanks serving as dedicated ballast tanks. (a) Except...

2011-10-01

205

27 CFR 24.229 - Tank car and tank truck requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... WINE Spirits § 24.229 Tank car and tank truck requirements. Railroad tank cars and tank trucks used to transport spirits for use in wine production will be constructed, marked, filled, labeled, and inspected in the manner...

2011-04-01

206

27 CFR 24.229 - Tank car and tank truck requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... WINE Spirits § 24.229 Tank car and tank truck requirements. Railroad tank cars and tank trucks used to transport spirits for use in wine production will be constructed, marked, filled, labeled, and inspected in the manner...

2010-04-01

207

27 CFR 24.229 - Tank car and tank truck requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... WINE Spirits § 24.229 Tank car and tank truck requirements. Railroad tank cars and tank trucks used to transport spirits for use in wine production will be constructed, marked, filled, labeled, and inspected in the manner...

2012-04-01

208

27 CFR 24.229 - Tank car and tank truck requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... WINE Spirits § 24.229 Tank car and tank truck requirements. Railroad tank cars and tank trucks used to transport spirits for use in wine production will be constructed, marked, filled, labeled, and inspected in the manner...

2013-04-01

209

Tank Characterization Report for Double Shell Tank (DST) 241-AN-107  

SciTech Connect

This report interprets information about the tank answering a series of six questions covering areas such as information drivers, tank history, tank comparisons, disposal implications, data quality and quantity, and unique aspects of the tank.

ADAMS, M.R.

2000-03-23

210

Redistribution of glucose from skeletal muscle to adipose tissue during catch-up fat: a link between catch-up growth and later metabolic syndrome.  

PubMed

Catch-up growth, a risk factor for later obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases, is characterized by hyperinsulinemia and an accelerated rate for recovering fat mass, i.e., catch-up fat. To identify potential mechanisms in the link between hyperinsulinemia and catch-up fat during catch-up growth, we studied the in vivo action of insulin on glucose utilization in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue in a previously described rat model of weight recovery exhibiting catch-up fat caused by suppressed thermogenesis per se. To do this, we used euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamps associated with the labeled 2-deoxy-glucose technique. After 1 week of isocaloric refeeding, when body fat, circulating free fatty acids, or intramyocellular lipids in refed animals had not yet exceeded those of controls, insulin-stimulated glucose utilization in refed animals was lower in skeletal muscles (by 20-43%) but higher in white adipose tissues (by two- to threefold). Furthermore, fatty acid synthase activity was higher in adipose tissues from refed animals than from fed controls. These results suggest that suppressed thermogenesis for the purpose of sparing glucose for catch-up fat, via the coordinated induction of skeletal muscle insulin resistance and adipose tissue insulin hyperresponsiveness, might be a central event in the link between catch-up growth, hyperinsulinemia and risks for later metabolic syndrome. PMID:15734852

Cettour-Rose, Philippe; Samec, Sonia; Russell, Aaron P; Summermatter, Serge; Mainieri, Davide; Carrillo-Theander, Claudia; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Seydoux, Josiane; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, Françoise; Dulloo, Abdul G

2005-03-01

211

Efficacy of methoprene for mosquito control in storm water catch basins  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This study evaluated the efficacy of methoprene, a widely used juvenile hormone mimic, formulated as 30-day slow release Altosid? pellets, at controlling mosquitoes in underground storm water drainage catch basins. Data from applications to ?-sized cement catch basins in the laboratory, field observations from treated and untreated basins, and an experiment that confined mosquito larvae in floating emergence jars in catch basins showed that methoprene effectively controlled mosquitoes for a month under field conditions and substantially longer under laboratory conditions when applied at a dose of 3.5 g pellets per average-sized catch basin.

Butler, M.; LeBrun, R.A.; Ginsberg, H.S.; Gettman, A.D.

2006-01-01

212

27 CFR 24.230 - Examination of tank car or tank truck.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-04-01 false Examination of tank car or tank truck. 24.230 Section 24.230...WINE Spirits § 24.230 Examination of tank car or tank truck. Upon arrival of a tank car or tank truck at the bonded wine premises,...

2013-04-01

213

27 CFR 27.174 - Tank cars and tank trucks to be sealed.  

...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tank cars and tank trucks to be sealed. 27.174...Distilled Spirits Plant § 27.174 Tank cars and tank trucks to be sealed. Where...distilled spirits plant is made in a tank car or tank truck, all openings...

2014-04-01

214

27 CFR 24.230 - Examination of tank car or tank truck.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-04-01 false Examination of tank car or tank truck. 24.230 Section 24.230...WINE Spirits § 24.230 Examination of tank car or tank truck. Upon arrival of a tank car or tank truck at the bonded wine premises,...

2012-04-01

215

27 CFR 24.230 - Examination of tank car or tank truck.  

... 2014-04-01 false Examination of tank car or tank truck. 24.230 Section 24.230...WINE Spirits § 24.230 Examination of tank car or tank truck. Upon arrival of a tank car or tank truck at the bonded wine premises,...

2014-04-01

216

27 CFR 24.230 - Examination of tank car or tank truck.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-04-01 false Examination of tank car or tank truck. 24.230 Section 24.230...WINE Spirits § 24.230 Examination of tank car or tank truck. Upon arrival of a tank car or tank truck at the bonded wine premises,...

2010-04-01

217

27 CFR 24.230 - Examination of tank car or tank truck.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-04-01 false Examination of tank car or tank truck. 24.230 Section 24.230...WINE Spirits § 24.230 Examination of tank car or tank truck. Upon arrival of a tank car or tank truck at the bonded wine premises,...

2011-04-01

218

Tank closure reducing grout  

SciTech Connect

A reducing grout has been developed for closing high level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. The grout has a low redox potential, which minimizes the mobility of Sr{sup 90}, the radionuclide with the highest dose potential after closure. The grout also has a high pH which reduces the solubility of the plutonium isotopes. The grout has a high compressive strength and low permeability, which enhances its ability to limit the migration of contaminants after closure. The grout was designed and tested by Construction Technology Laboratories, Inc. Placement methods were developed by the Savannah River Site personnel.

Caldwell, T.B.

1997-04-18

219

[High Pressure Gas Tanks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Four high-pressure gas tanks, the basis of this study, were especially made by a private contractor and tested before being delivered to NASA Kennedy Space Center. In order to insure 100% reliability of each individual tank the staff at KSC decided to again submit the four tanks under more rigorous tests. These tests were conducted during a period from April 10 through May 8 at KSC. This application further validates the predictive safety model for accident prevention and system failure in the testing of four high-pressure gas tanks at Kennedy Space Center, called Continuous Hazard Tracking and Failure Prediction Methodology (CHTFPM). It is apparent from the variety of barriers available for a hazard control that some barriers will be more successful than others in providing protection. In order to complete the Barrier Analysis of the system, a Task Analysis and a Biomechanical Study were performed to establish the relationship between the degree of biomechanical non-conformities and the anomalies found within the system on particular joints of the body. This relationship was possible to obtain by conducting a Regression Analysis to the previously generated data. From the information derived the body segment with the lowest percentage of non-conformities was the neck flexion with 46.7%. Intense analysis of the system was conducted including Preliminary Hazard Analysis (PHA), Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA), and Barrier Analysis. These analyses resulted in the identification of occurrences of conditions, which may be becoming hazardous in the given system. These conditions, known as dendritics, may become hazards and could result in an accident, system malfunction, or unacceptable risk conditions. A total of 56 possible dendritics were identified. Work sampling was performed to observe the occurrence each dendritic. The out of control points generated from a Weighted c control chart along with a Pareto analysis indicate that the dendritics "Personnel not Wearing Proper Protective and Hose/tubing located in high-traffic area" which account for 59.18% of total dendritic frequency need to be addressed to reduce the chance of a hazard from occurring. However, the occurrences of some dendritics are more important than others. As a result immediate, from a Weighted c perspective, corrective action should be taken to ameliorate the cause of the Class A dendritic "Personnel located under suspended or moving loads" rather than just the most commonly occurring dendritics. In any case the vast majority of data obtained indicates that testing operations possess a relatively high degree of safety.

Quintana, Rolando

2002-01-01

220

33 CFR 157.15 - Slop tanks in tank vessels.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...requirements of this section: (1) A new vessel of less than 70,000 tons DWT and an existing vessel must have at least one slop tank. (2) A new vessel of 70,000 tons DWT or more must have at least two slop tanks. (b) Capacity....

2010-07-01

221

49 CFR 179.10 - Tank mounting.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS General Design Requirements § 179.10 Tank mounting. (a) The manner in which tanks are attached to the car structure shall be approved. The use of rivets...

2012-10-01

222

49 CFR 179.10 - Tank mounting.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS General Design Requirements § 179.10 Tank mounting. (a) The manner in which tanks are attached to the car structure shall be approved. The use of rivets...

2010-10-01

223

49 CFR 179.10 - Tank mounting.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS General Design Requirements § 179.10 Tank mounting. (a) The manner in which tanks are attached to the car structure shall be approved. The use of rivets...

2013-10-01

224

49 CFR 179.10 - Tank mounting.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS General Design Requirements § 179.10 Tank mounting. (a) The manner in which tanks are attached to the car structure shall be approved. The use of rivets...

2011-10-01

225

14 CFR 29.1013 - Oil tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Oil tanks. 29.1013 Section 29.1013 Aeronautics...STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Oil System § 29.1013 Oil tanks. (a) Installation. Each oil tank...

2012-01-01

226

14 CFR 29.1013 - Oil tanks.  

...Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Oil tanks. 29.1013 Section 29.1013 Aeronautics...STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Oil System § 29.1013 Oil tanks. (a) Installation. Each oil tank...

2014-01-01

227

14 CFR 25.1013 - Oil tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Oil tanks. 25.1013 Section 25.1013 Aeronautics...STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Oil System § 25.1013 Oil tanks. (a) Installation. Each oil tank...

2011-01-01

228

14 CFR 29.1013 - Oil tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Oil tanks. 29.1013 Section 29.1013 Aeronautics...STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Oil System § 29.1013 Oil tanks. (a) Installation. Each oil tank...

2013-01-01

229

14 CFR 25.1013 - Oil tanks.  

...Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Oil tanks. 25.1013 Section 25.1013 Aeronautics...STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Oil System § 25.1013 Oil tanks. (a) Installation. Each oil tank...

2014-01-01

230

14 CFR 25.1013 - Oil tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Oil tanks. 25.1013 Section 25.1013 Aeronautics...STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Oil System § 25.1013 Oil tanks. (a) Installation. Each oil tank...

2012-01-01

231

14 CFR 25.1013 - Oil tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Oil tanks. 25.1013 Section 25.1013 Aeronautics...STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Oil System § 25.1013 Oil tanks. (a) Installation. Each oil tank...

2013-01-01

232

14 CFR 29.1013 - Oil tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Oil tanks. 29.1013 Section 29.1013 Aeronautics...STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Oil System § 29.1013 Oil tanks. (a) Installation. Each oil tank...

2011-01-01

233

14 CFR 29.1013 - Oil tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Oil tanks. 29.1013 Section 29.1013 Aeronautics...STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Oil System § 29.1013 Oil tanks. (a) Installation. Each oil tank...

2010-01-01

234

14 CFR 25.1013 - Oil tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Oil tanks. 25.1013 Section 25.1013 Aeronautics...STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Oil System § 25.1013 Oil tanks. (a) Installation. Each oil tank...

2010-01-01

235

Tunnel catch from potential wells and energy detection  

E-print Network

We consider the one-dimensional Schr\\"{o}dinger operator in the semiclassical regime assuming that its double-well potential is the sum of a finite "physically given" well and a square shape probing well whose width or depth can be varied (tuned). We study the dynamics of initial state localized in the physical well. It is shown that if the probing well is not too close to the physical one and if its parameters are specially tuned, then the {\\it tunnel catch effect} appears, i.e. the initial state starts tunneling oscillations between the physical and probing wells. The asymptotic formula for the probability of finding the state in the probing well is obtained. We show that the observation of the tunnel catch effect can be used to determine the energy level of the initial state, and we obtain the corresponding asymptotic formula for the initial state energy. We also calculate the leading term of the tunneling splitting of energy levels in this double well potential.

M. V. Karasev; E. V. Vybornyi

2014-11-17

236

Cardiac alterations induced by a fish-catching diving competition.  

PubMed

Cardiac changes induced by repeated breath-hold diving were investigated after a fish-catching diving competition. Eleven healthy subjects carried out repeated breath-hold dives at a mean maximal depth of 20 ± 2.7 msw (66 ± 9 fsw) during 5 h. One hour after the competition, the body mass loss was -1.7 ± 0.5 kg. Most of the breath-hold divers suffered from cold and although the core temperature remained normal, a decrease in cutaneous temperature was recorded in the extremities. Systolic blood pressure was reduced in both upper and lower limbs. Heart rate was unchanged, but left ventricular (LV) stroke volume was reduced leading to a decrease in cardiac output (-20%). Left atrial and LV diameters were significantly decreased. LV filling was assessed on a trans-mitral profile. An increase in the contribution of the atrial contraction to LV filling was observed. Right cavity diameters were increased. The cardiac autonomic alterations were in favor of sympathetic hyperactivity. After a fish-catching diving competition in cold water, alterations suggesting dehydration, contraction in plasma volume and sympathetic hyperactivity were observed. Furthermore, enlargements of right cavities were in favor of right ventricular strains. Repeated apnea and swimming in cold water may account for these alterations. PMID:20738824

Gargne, O; Joulia, F; Golé, Y; Coulange, M; Bessereau, J; Fontanari, P; Desruelle, A-V; Gavarry, O; Boussuges, A

2012-06-01

237

Filling an Unvented Cryogenic Tank  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Slow-cooling technique enables tank lacking top vent to be filled with cryogenic liquid. New technique: pressure buildup prevented through condensation of accumulating gas resulting in condensate being added to bulk liquid. Filling method developed for vibration test on vacuum-insulated spherical tank containing liquid hydrogen.

Beck, Phillip; Willen, Gary S.

1987-01-01

238

Control of mosquitoes in catch basins in Connecticut with Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis, Bacillus sphearicus, and Spinosad  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Catch basins are a major source of Culex pipiens pipiens, Cx. restuans, and Aedes japonicus in northeastern U.S. VectoBac CG®, VectoLex CG®, and VectoBac 12AS® applied at maximum label rates to catch basins in Stratford, CT on June 30 and July 28, 2008 significantly reduced numbers of larvae for on...

239

Catching up with Harvard: Results from Regression Analysis of World Universities League Tables  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper uses regression analysis to test if the universities performing less well according to Shanghai Jiao Tong University's world universities league tables are able to catch up with the top performers, and to identify national and institutional factors that could affect this catching up process. We have constructed a dataset of 461…

Li, Mei; Shankar, Sriram; Tang, Kam Ki

2011-01-01

240

Key factors influencing the potential of catch crops for methane production.  

PubMed

Catch crops are grown in crop rotation primarily for soil stabilization. The excess biomass of catch crops was investigated for its potential as feedstock for biogas production. Ten variables affecting catch crop growth and methane potential were evaluated. Field trials and methane potential were studied for 14 different catch crops species, with 19 samples harvested in 2010 and 36 harvested in 2011. Principal component analysis was applied to the data to identify the variables characterizing the potential for the different catch crops species for methane production. Two principal components explained up to 84.6% and 71.6% of the total variation for 2010 and 2011 samples, respectively. Specific methane yield, climate conditions (rainfall and temperature) and total nitrogen in the biomass were the variables classifying the different catch crops. Catch crops in the Brassicaceae and Graminaceae botanical families showed the highest methane yield. This study demonstrates the importance of the crop species when choosing a suitable catch crop for biogas production. PMID:24956759

Molinuevo-Salces, Beatriz; Fernández-Varela, Raquel; Uellendahl, Hinrich

2014-08-01

241

Effect of Baiting on Hoop Net Catch Rates of Endangered Humpback Chub  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of unbaited, scented (odor emitted by inaccessible hatchery feed), and baited (accessible feed) single-throated hoop nets on the catch rates of the federally endangered humpback chub Gila cypha (?100 mm total length) were assessed in the Little Colorado River, Arizona, to determine how baiting affected the catch of these fish. Of a total of 1,297 unique humpback chub

Dennis M. Stone

2005-01-01

242

INCIDENCE OF CULL LOBSTERS, HOMARUS AMERICANUS, IN COMMERCIAL AND RESEARCH CATCHES OFF THE MAINE COASTI  

E-print Network

INCIDENCE OF CULL LOBSTERS, HOMARUS AMERICANUS, IN COMMERCIAL AND RESEARCH CATCHES OFF THE MAINE COASTI JAY S. KROUSE2 ABSTRACf Data obtained by port sampling the Maine commercial lobster catch (1968.74) and the natural lobster population near Boothbay Harbor, Maine, with research gear (1969-74) indicate that 6

243

76 FR 14367 - Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Mechanism for Specifying Annual Catch Limits and Accountability...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...0648-AY93 Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Mechanism for Specifying Annual Catch Limits and...ecosystem plans (FEPs) to establish a mechanism for specifying annual catch limits...fishery management plan must include a mechanism for specifying ACLs so that...

2011-03-16

244

Catch Efficiencies of Purse and Beach Seines in Ivory Coast Lagoons  

E-print Network

Catch Efficiencies of Purse and Beach Seines in Ivory Coast Lagoons Emmanuel Charles-Dominique ABSTRACT: Catch efficiencies of two commonly used fishing gears. in Ivory Coast lagoons, purse seine fisheries are well developed in Ivory Coast lagoons, yielding from 10,000 to 20,000 tons of commercially

245

36 CFR 13.908 - Fishing limit of catch and in possession.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...pounds and one fish, except that the limit of catch of lake trout (mackinaw) per person per day shall be two fish including those hooked and released. Possession of more than one day's limit of catch by one person at any one time is...

2010-07-01

246

36 CFR 13.908 - Fishing limit of catch and in possession.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...pounds and one fish, except that the limit of catch of lake trout (mackinaw) per person per day shall be two fish including those hooked and released. Possession of more than one day's limit of catch by one person at any one time is...

2012-07-01

247

36 CFR 13.908 - Fishing limit of catch and in possession.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...pounds and one fish, except that the limit of catch of lake trout (mackinaw) per person per day shall be two fish including those hooked and released. Possession of more than one day's limit of catch by one person at any one time is...

2013-07-01

248

36 CFR 13.908 - Fishing limit of catch and in possession.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...pounds and one fish, except that the limit of catch of lake trout (mackinaw) per person per day shall be two fish including those hooked and released. Possession of more than one day's limit of catch by one person at any one time is...

2011-07-01

249

Effect of catch-and-release angling on growth of largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides  

E-print Network

Effect of catch-and-release angling on growth of largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides K . L . P O bass, Micropterus salmoides Lace´ pe` de. Angling mortality was 0.00 ± 0.092% for largemouth bass species. K E Y W O R D S : angling effects, growth, Micropterus salmoides, weight. Introduction Catch

Wilde, Gene

250

Catches of Humpback Whales, Megaptera novaeangliae, by the Soviet Union and Other Nations  

E-print Network

71(1) 39 Catches of Humpback Whales, Megaptera novaeangliae, by the Soviet Union and Other Nations of illegal whaling worldwide. We review Soviet catches of humpback whales, Meg- aptera novaeangliae assignable to area. In all, at least 72,542 humpback whales were killed by all operations (Soviet plus other

251

Catch crops and green manures as biological tools in nitrogen management in temperate zones  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the last decades a lot of research have been made on the use of cover crops. Cover crops are grown for many purposes, but most of the resent interest have focused on their effects on nitrogen. Studies have been made on catch crops grown to catch N from the soil and prevent leaching losses to the environment and on

Kristian Thorup-Kristensen; Jacob Magid; Lars Stoumann Jensen

2003-01-01

252

Effect of catch-and-release angling on growth and survival of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss  

E-print Network

Effect of catch-and-release angling on growth and survival of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss K on growth and survival of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum). Catch-and-release events were trout hooked in the mouth. K E Y W O R D S : angling effects, growth, Oncorhynchus mykiss, weight

Wilde, Gene

253

Dietary supplementation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylbutyrate improves catch-up growth in underfed lambs  

E-print Network

Dietary supplementation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylbutyrate improves catch-up growth in underfed lambs P of this study was to assess the effect of dietary supplementation of HMB on catch-up growth in underfed lambs) and a hay. Affer 1.5 week adjustment period, half of the animals recei- ved a dietary supplement of Ca

Boyer, Edmond

254

A NOVEL BAYESIAN METHOD FOR MAKING THE MOST OF SPATIAL FISHERY CATCH AND EFFORT  

E-print Network

A NOVEL BAYESIAN METHOD FOR MAKING THE MOST OF SPATIAL FISHERY CATCH AND EFFORT DATA by Aaron Project: A Novel Bayesian Method for Making the Most of Spatial Fishery Catch and Effort Data Report 1 Spatial hierarchical Bayesian models for analyzing fishery data 1 1.1 Introduction

255

76 FR 7155 - Atlantic Highly Migratory Species; Announcement of Billfish and Swordfish Catch Card Pilot...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...documenting their landing. If the pilot catch card program is successful, NMFS may consider long-term implementation in place of...assist in this effort. If the pilot catch card program is successful, NMFS may consider long-term implementation in place...

2011-02-09

256

Squid Catches Resulting From Trawl Surveys off the Southeastern United States  

E-print Network

Squid Catches Resulting From Trawl Surveys off the Southeastern United States J. DAVID WHITAKER Introduction The importance of the squid fishery off the northeastern United States has grown considerably since 1964 with re- cent squid catches by foreign fleets av- eraging 50,000 t (110,231 ,000 pounds

257

Improvement of Soil Phosphorus Availability by Green Fertilization with Catch Crops  

Microsoft Academic Search

The efficient use of phosphorus (P) is a main task in sustainable agriculture. In pot and field experiments, the effects of green fertilization with catch crops and P supply with organic and inorganic fertilizers on plant and soil parameters were investigated on a P?poor loamy sand. For the field experiment, the catch crops were sown in September and remained on

Renata Gaj; Ewald Schnug

2009-01-01

258

Catching up: The rise of the Chinese wind turbine industry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This thesis argues that Chinese firms can catch up with the technological frontier in the scope of new climate friendly energy technologies and provides a detailed study of the case of wind power. Chapter 2 assesses the nature and extent of wind turbine technology catch-up. Firstly, it uses various wind turbine technology indicators to detail the convergence of trends of leading Chinese firms with firms at the technological frontier. Secondly, the chapter assesses the evolution of technological capabilities among leading Chinese turbine manufacturers. It shows that Chinese firms were progressively introducing turbine technologies similar to those produced by frontier firms and had rapidly improved their capabilities, allowing them to increasingly rely on independent technology development efforts. Chapter 3 describes how the Chinese wind power technology development system, characterized by the presence of a powerful and proactive government, provided the necessary conditions for Chinese wind turbine manufacturers to make rapid technological progress. In particular, it highlights the policies introduced by the government to create a large and rapidly growing wind power market in China and the steps taken by the government to ensure that Chinese firms entered and progressively dominated the domestic turbine manufacturing market. The competition which ensued among domestic turbine manufacturers was arguably the main driver of technology development efforts. The most significant challenge to the continued progress of the industry was whether the Chinese system could transition from a model of technology development based on technology transfer to one based on its own innovation efforts. Chapter 4 shows that due to limited government support over the years in both Europe and the United States, the wind power technology frontier has evolved relatively slowly, making it easier for Chinese firms to catch up. Firstly, using patenting rates as indicators of knowledge development, the chapter shows a strong correlation between changes in government wind power support policies and patenting activity. Secondly, using both technology penetration rates and patenting trends, the chapter shows that the evolution of the wind power frontier was slow compared to most other technology sectors globally.

Lefevre-Marton, Nicolas

259

Catch trials in force field learning influence adaptation and consolidation of human motor memory  

PubMed Central

Force field studies are a common tool to investigate motor adaptation and consolidation. Thereby, subjects usually adapt their reaching movements to force field perturbations induced by a robotic device. In this context, so-called catch trials, in which the disturbing forces are randomly turned off, are commonly used to detect after-effects of motor adaptation. However, catch trials also produce sudden large motor errors that might influence the motor adaptation and the consolidation process. Yet, the detailed influence of catch trials is far from clear. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the influence of catch trials on motor adaptation and consolidation in force field experiments. Therefore, 105 subjects adapted their reaching movements to robot-generated force fields. The test groups adapted their reaching movements to a force field A followed by learning a second interfering force field B before retest of A (ABA). The control groups were not exposed to force field B (AA). To examine the influence of diverse catch trial ratios, subjects received catch trials during force field adaptation with a probability of either 0, 10, 20, 30, or 40%, depending on the group. First, the results on motor adaptation revealed significant differences between the diverse catch trial ratio groups. With increasing amount of catch trials, the subjects' motor performance decreased and subjects' ability to accurately predict the force field—and therefore internal model formation—was impaired. Second, our results revealed that adapting with catch trials can influence the following consolidation process as indicated by a partial reduction to interference. Here, the optimal catch trial ratio was 30%. However, detection of consolidation seems to be biased by the applied measure of performance. PMID:24795598

Stockinger, Christian; Focke, Anne; Stein, Thorsten

2014-01-01

260

Tank fragmentation test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A photographic study of a simulated tank fragmentation test was made. Sixteen disks and four spheres were ejected from a test article mounted in a vertical orientation 110 ft above a target installed on the test chamber floor. The test was performed at a chamber pressure of 25 microns. Velocities at impingement on the target ranged from 88 to 120 ft/sec; corresponding ejection velocities at the exit plane of the ejector assembly ranged from 29 to 87 ft/sec. Tumble axes of the disks were expected to be all in the north-south direction; the majority of those measured were, while some were skewed from this direction, the maximum observed being 90 deg. A typical measured tumble rate was 2.4 turns/sec. The dispersion pattern measured on the target was reasonably regular, and measured approximately 16 ft east-to-west by 11 ft north-to-south.

Daye, C. J.; Cooksey, D.; Walters, R. J.; Auble, A. E.

1973-01-01

261

Tank farms hazards assessment  

SciTech Connect

Hanford contractors are writing new facility specific emergency procedures in response to new and revised US Department of Energy (DOE) Orders on emergency preparedness. Emergency procedures are required for each Hanford facility that has the potential to exceed the criteria for the lowest level emergency, an Alert. The set includes: (1) a facility specific procedure on Recognition and Classification of Emergencies, (2) area procedures on Initial Emergency Response and, (3) an area procedure on Protective Action Guidance. The first steps in developing these procedures are to identify the hazards at each facility, identify the conditions that could release the hazardous material, and calculate the consequences of the releases. These steps are called a Hazards Assessment. The final product is a document that is similar in some respects to a Safety Analysis Report (SAR). The document could br produced in a month for a simple facility but could take much longer for a complex facility. Hanford has both types of facilities. A strategy has been adopted to permit completion of the first version of the new emergency procedures before all the facility hazards Assessments are complete. The procedures will initially be based on input from a task group for each facility. This strategy will but improved emergency procedures in place sooner and therefore enhance Hanford emergency preparedness. The purpose of this document is to summarize the applicable information contained within the Waste Tank Facility ``Interim Safety Basis Document, WHC-SD-WM-ISB-001`` as a resource, since the SARs covering Waste Tank Operations are not current in all cases. This hazards assessment serves to collect, organize, document and present the information utilized during the determination process.

Broz, R.E.

1994-09-30

262

49 CFR 179.220 - General specifications applicable to nonpressure tank car tanks consisting of an inner container...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...General specifications applicable to nonpressure tank car tanks consisting of an inner container supported...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

2012-10-01

263

49 CFR 179.220 - General specifications applicable to nonpressure tank car tanks consisting of an inner container...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...General specifications applicable to nonpressure tank car tanks consisting of an inner container supported...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

2013-10-01

264

49 CFR 179.221 - Individual specification requirements applicable to tank car tanks consisting of an inner...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Individual specification requirements applicable to tank car tanks consisting of an inner container supported...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

2013-10-01

265

49 CFR 179.221 - Individual specification requirements applicable to tank car tanks consisting of an inner...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Individual specification requirements applicable to tank car tanks consisting of an inner container supported...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

2012-10-01

266

49 CFR 179.221 - Individual specification requirements applicable to tank car tanks consisting of an inner...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Individual specification requirements applicable to tank car tanks consisting of an inner container supported...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

2011-10-01

267

49 CFR 179.220 - General specifications applicable to nonpressure tank car tanks consisting of an inner container...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...General specifications applicable to nonpressure tank car tanks consisting of an inner container supported...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) §...

2011-10-01

268

Ripple Tank Model for Teachers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Ripple Tank Model for Teachers allows instructors to simulate 2D wave interference. A ripple tank is a shallow glass tank of water used to demonstrate the basic properties of waves. The tank is usually illuminated from above, so that the light shines through the water. The ripples on the water show up as shadows on the screen underneath the tank. In the default visualization the wave crests and troughs are shown as red and blue. Users can change the number of sources, their amplitude and phase, and other parameters. Selecting student mode repackages the modified simulation into a stand-alone jar file with fewer options for classroom use. The Ripple Tank Model for Teachers was created using the Easy Java Simulations (EJS) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the ejs_waves_teacher_RippleTank.jar file will run the program if Java is installed.

Christian, Wolfgang

2012-06-09

269

Platelet adhesion: a game of catch and release  

PubMed Central

The interaction of circulating platelets with the vessel wall involves a process of cell catch and release, regulating cell rolling, skipping, or firm adhesion and leading to thrombus formation in flowing blood. In this regard, the interaction of platelet glycoprotein Ib? (GPIb?) with its adhesive ligand, vWF, is activated by shear force and critical for platelet adhesion to the vessel wall. In this issue of the JCI, Yago and colleagues show how gain-of-function mutations in the GPIb?-binding vWF A1 domain disrupt intramolecular interactions within WT vWF A1 that regulate binding to GPIb? and flow-enhanced platelet rolling and adhesion (see the related article beginning on page 3195). Together, these studies reveal molecular mechanisms regulating GPIb?-vWF bond formation and platelet adhesion under shear stress. PMID:18725992

Andrews, Robert K.; Berndt, Michael C.

2008-01-01

270

Day Versus Night Electrofishing Catches from NearShore Waters of the Ohio and Muskingum Rivers1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Day and night electrofishing catches were compared for sampling effectiveness and diel movements offish to and from near-shore waters of the Ohio and Muskingum rivers. Standardized methods were used to collect same-day paired samples by sampling during the day, displacing the catch, and resampling after twilight. Night catches contained significantly higher numbers of species, individuals (excluding Dorosoma cepedianum), weight, and

RANDALL E. SANDERS

1992-01-01

271

26 CFR 31.3121(b)(20)-1 - Service performed on a boat engaged in catching fish.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Service performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. 31.3121(b)(20)-1 Section...performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. (a) In general. (1) Service...individual on a boat engaged in catching fish or other forms of aquatic animal life...

2011-04-01

272

26 CFR 31.3401(a)(17)-1 - Remuneration for services performed on a boat engaged in catching fish.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. 31.3401(a)(17)-1 Section...performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. (a) Remuneration for services performed...individual on a boat engaged in catching fish or other forms of aquatic animal life...

2010-04-01

273

26 CFR 31.3401(a)(17)-1 - Remuneration for services performed on a boat engaged in catching fish.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. 31.3401(a)(17)-1 Section...performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. (a) Remuneration for services performed...individual on a boat engaged in catching fish or other forms of aquatic animal life...

2013-04-01

274

26 CFR 31.3121(b)(20)-1 - Service performed on a boat engaged in catching fish.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Service performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. 31.3121(b)(20)-1 Section...performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. (a) In general. (1) Service...individual on a boat engaged in catching fish or other forms of aquatic animal life...

2013-04-01

275

26 CFR 31.3401(a)(17)-1 - Remuneration for services performed on a boat engaged in catching fish.  

...performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. 31.3401(a)(17)-1 Section...performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. (a) Remuneration for services performed...individual on a boat engaged in catching fish or other forms of aquatic animal life...

2014-04-01

276

26 CFR 31.3401(a)(17)-1 - Remuneration for services performed on a boat engaged in catching fish.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. 31.3401(a)(17)-1 Section...performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. (a) Remuneration for services performed...individual on a boat engaged in catching fish or other forms of aquatic animal life...

2012-04-01

277

26 CFR 31.3401(a)(17)-1 - Remuneration for services performed on a boat engaged in catching fish.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. 31.3401(a)(17)-1 Section...performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. (a) Remuneration for services performed...individual on a boat engaged in catching fish or other forms of aquatic animal life...

2011-04-01

278

26 CFR 31.3121(b)(20)-1 - Service performed on a boat engaged in catching fish.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Service performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. 31.3121(b)(20)-1 Section...performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. (a) In general. (1) Service...individual on a boat engaged in catching fish or other forms of aquatic animal life...

2010-04-01

279

26 CFR 31.3121(b)(20)-1 - Service performed on a boat engaged in catching fish.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Service performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. 31.3121(b)(20)-1 Section...performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. (a) In general. (1) Service...individual on a boat engaged in catching fish or other forms of aquatic animal life...

2012-04-01

280

26 CFR 31.3121(b)(20)-1 - Service performed on a boat engaged in catching fish.  

...Service performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. 31.3121(b)(20)-1 Section...performed on a boat engaged in catching fish. (a) In general. (1) Service...individual on a boat engaged in catching fish or other forms of aquatic animal life...

2014-04-01

281

International Snow Science Workshop Grenoble -Chamonix Mont-Blanc -2013 Influence of upstream catching dam slope on powder avalanche  

E-print Network

catching dam slope on powder avalanche Caccamo P. , Naaim-Bouvet F. and Faug T. ABSTRACT: The influence was studied. Both of the obstacles represent a catching dam, one with a vertical uphill face (OBS1 of protection effectiveness, laboratory tests showed that a catching dam with the upstream face vertical

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

282

Regulation of Catch Bonds by Rate of Force Application*  

PubMed Central

The current paradigm for receptor-ligand dissociation kinetics assumes off-rates as functions of instantaneous force without impact from its prior history. This a priori assumption is the foundation for predicting dissociation from a given initial state using kinetic equations. Here we have invalidated this assumption by demonstrating the impact of force history with single-bond kinetic experiments involving selectins and their ligands that mediate leukocyte tethering and rolling on vascular surfaces during inflammation. Dissociation of bonds between L-selectin and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) loaded at a constant ramp rate to a constant hold force behaved as catch-slip bonds at low ramp rates that transformed to slip-only bonds at high ramp rates. Strikingly, bonds between L-selectin and 6-sulfo-sialyl Lewis X were impervious to ramp rate changes. This ligand-specific force history effect resembled the effect of a point mutation at the L-selectin surface (L-selectinA108H) predicted to contact the former but not the latter ligand, suggesting that the high ramp rate induced similar structural changes as the mutation. Although the A108H substitution in L-selectin eliminated the ramp rate responsiveness of its dissociation from PSGL-1, the inverse mutation H108A in P-selectin acquired the ramp rate responsiveness. Our data are well explained by the sliding-rebinding model for catch-slip bonds extended to incorporate the additional force history dependence, with Ala-108 playing a pivotal role in this structural mechanism. These results call for a paradigm shift in modeling the mechanical regulation of receptor-ligand bond dissociation, which includes conformational coupling between binding pocket and remote regions of the interacting molecules. PMID:21775439

Sarangapani, Krishna K.; Qian, Jin; Chen, Wei; Zarnitsyna, Veronika I.; Mehta, Padmaja; Yago, Tadayuki; McEver, Rodger P.; Zhu, Cheng

2011-01-01

283

Stabilization of in-tank residual wastes and external-tank soil contamination for the tank focus area, Hanford tank initiative: Applications to the AX Tank Farm  

Microsoft Academic Search

A combined engineering and geochemistry approach is recommended for the stabilization of waste in decommissioned tanks and contaminated soils at the AX Tank Farm, Hanford, WA. A two-part strategy of desiccation and gettering is proposed for treatment of the in-tank residual wastes. Dry portland cement and\\/or fly ash are suggested as an effective and low-cost desiccant for wicking excess moisture

S. D. Balsley; J. L. Krumhansl; D. J. Borns; R. G. McKeen

1998-01-01

284

Tank characterization report for single-shell Tank B-201  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to characterize the waste in single shell Tank B-201. Characterization includes the determination of the physical, chemical (e.g., concentrations of elements and organic species), and radiological properties of the waste. These determinations are made using analytical results from B-201 core samples as well as historical information about the tank. The main objective is to determine average waste properties: but in some cases, concentrations of analytes as a function of depth were also determined. This report also consolidates the available historical information regarding Tank B-201, arranges the analytical information from the recent core sampling in a useful format, and provides an interpretation of the data within the context of what is known about the tank.

Heasler, P.G.; Remund, K.M.; Tingey, J.M.; Baird, D.B.; Ryan, F.M.

1994-09-01

285

Ecodesign of Liquid Fuel Tanks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The subject of the study is a 10 litre liquid fuel tank made of metal and used for fuel storage and transportation. The study dealt with separate life cycle stages of this product, compared environmental impacts of similar fuel tanks made of metal and plastic, as well as analysed the product's end-of-life cycle stage, studying the waste treatment and disposal scenarios. The aim of this study was to find opportunities for improvement and to develop proposals for the ecodesign of 10 litre liquid fuel tank.

Gicevska, Jana; Bazbauers, Gatis; Repele, Mara

2011-01-01

286

[Death in a relaxation tank].  

PubMed

Complete relaxation can be achieved by floating in a darkened, sound-proof relaxation tank filled with salinated water kept at body temperature. Under these conditions, meditation exercises up to self-hypnosis may lead to deep relaxation with physical and mental revitalization. A user manipulated his tank, presumably to completely cut off all optical and acoustic stimuli and accidentally also covered the ventilation hole. The man was found dead in his relaxation tank. The findings suggested lack of oxygen as the cause of death. PMID:20069775

Rupp, Wolf; Simon, Karl-Heinz; Bohnert, Michael

2009-01-01

287

Comparison of catch and lake trout bycatch in commercial trap nets and gill nets targeting lake whitefish in northern Lake Huron  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We compared seasonal lake whitefish catch rates, lake trout bycatch, and gearinduced lake trout mortality between commercial trap nets and gill nets in north-central Lake Huron. Onboard monitors recorded catches from 260 gill net and 96 trap net lifts from October 1998 through December 1999. Catch rates for lake whitefish were highest in fall for both gear types, reflecting proximity of spawning sites to the study area. Lake whitefish catch rates were also relatively high in spring but low in both gear types in summer. Lake trout were the principal bycatch species in both gears. The lake trout bycatch was lowest in both gear types in fall, highest in gill nets in spring, and highest in trap nets in summer. The ratio of lake trout to legal whitefish (the target species) was highest in summer and lowest in fall in both gear types. The high lake trout ratio in summer was due principally to low catch rates of lake whitefish. All but 3 of 186 live lake trout removed from trap net pots survived for at least two days of observation in laboratory tanks. Therefore, we estimated that post-release survival of trap netted lake trout that had not been entangled in the mesh was 98.4%. In addition, we accounted for stress-induced mortality for lake trout that were live at capture but entangled in the mesh of either gear type. Resulting estimates of lake trout survival were higher in trap nets (87.8%) than in gill nets (39.6%). The number of lake trout killed per lift was highest during summer in trap nets and during spring in gill nets. In trap nets, 85% of dead lake trout were observed to be entangled in the mesh of the pot or tunnels. Survival rates of lake trout in gill nets were higher in our study than reported by others, probably because our nets were hand lifted in a small boat. Our trap net-induced mortality estimates on lake trout were higher than those reported by others because we adjusted our estimates to account for post-release mortality caused by handling and injury. Studies such as ours should prove useful to managers developing harvest allocation options that are consistent with the need to protect nontarget populations. For example, applying our seasonal lake trout-whitefish catch ratios to a hypothetical small-boat gill net fishery, the lake trout bycatch from harvest of 100,000 kg of whitefish would equal the estimated lake trout production available for harvest in the study area for year 2002. The two trap net fisheries may have incidentally killed half this number of lake trout annually from 1995-99. Bycatch estimates are also important inputs to catch-at-age decision models used in developing rehabilitation and harvest strategies for target and bycatch species.

Johnson, James E.; Ebener, Mark P.; Gebhardt, Kenneth; Bergstedt, Roger

2004-01-01

288

Is Early Puberty Triggered by Catch-Up Growth Following Undernutrition?  

PubMed Central

Undernutrition during fetal and postnatal life is still a major problem in many low- and middle-income countries. Even in high-income countries malnutrition may exist in cases of intrauterine growth retardation, as well as in chronic conditions such as anorexia nervosa and inflammatory bowel disease. Children adopted from developing countries are often chronically malnourished. Nutritional rehabilitation, resulting in catch-up growth, is often complicated by influences originating in fetal life as well as during postnatal growth. This may result in hormonal and metabolic changes as well as alterations in pubertal development. The present review focuses on fetal, postnatal and fetal-postnatal undernutrition and subsequent catch-up growth as well as catch-up growth in relation to pubertal development. Catch-up growth in children can be associated with early puberty following fetal or combined fetal-postnatal undernutrition. However, early puberty does not seem to occur following catch-up growth after isolated postnatal undernutrition. Gonadotropins have been reported to be elevated in prepubertal adopted girls as well as during catch-up growth in animals. Even if other factors may contribute, linear catch-up growth seems to be associated with the timing of pubertal development. The mechanisms behind this are still unknown. Future research may elucidate how to carry out nutritional rehabilitation without risk for early pubertal development. PMID:22754473

Proos, Lemm; Gustafsson, Jan

2012-01-01

289

Toroidal Tank Development for Upper-stages  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The advantages, development, and fabrication of toroidal propellant tanks are profiled in this viewgraph presentation. Several images are included of independent research and development (IR&D) of toroidal propellant tanks at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Other images in the presentation give a brief overview of Thiokol conformal tank technology development. The presentation describes Thiokol's approach to continuous composite toroidal tank fabrication in detail. Images are shown of continuous and segmented toroidal tanks fabricated by Thiokol.

DeLay, Tom; Roberts, Keith

2003-01-01

290

Corrosion testing in flash tanks  

SciTech Connect

As kraft pulp mills adopt modified cooking processes, an increasing amount of corrosion of carbon steel digester systems is being encountered. Many mills have had severe corrosion in the flash tanks, in particular, the first ({number{underscore}sign}1) flash tank. The work described in this report was aimed at characterizing the corrosion. Coupons of carbon steel, several stainless steels and titanium were exposed at two mills. At mill A, identical sets of coupons were exposed in the {number{underscore}sign}1 and {number{underscore}sign}2 flash tank. At mill B, three identical sets of coupons were placed in flash tank {number{underscore}sign}1. The results of the exposures showed that both carbon steel and titanium suffered high rates of general corrosion, while the stainless steels suffered varying degrees of localized attack. The ranking of the resistance of corrosion in the flash tank was the same ranking as would be expected in a reducing acid environment. In the light of the coupon results, organic acids is concluded to be the most likely cause of corrosion of the flash tanks.

Clarke, S.J.; Stead, N.J.

1999-07-01

291

A sampling device for the fauna of storm water catch basins  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Storm water drainage catch basins provide habitat to a variety of different aquatic organisms including arthropods, molluscs and annelid worms. Arthropods such as mosquitoes are known to use these environments as larval habitat. Because of health concerns, catch basins are often targeted for mosquito control exposing all inhabitants to pesticides such as methoprene or BTI. In this paper we describe a sampler that we used to evaluate catch basin communities in southern Rhode Island over a six month period. We also examine its efficacy and consistency. We found that the sampler effectively estimated organism abundances.

Butler, M.; Casagrande, R.; LeBrun, R.; Ginsberg, H.; Gettman, A.

2007-01-01

292

Tank 241-C-109 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank C-109. The drivers and objectives of the waste tank headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedures that were presented in other reports.

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31

293

ANNUAL RADIOACTIVE WASTE TANK INSPECTION PROGRAM 2009  

SciTech Connect

Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations and vitrification processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 2009 to evaluate these vessels and other waste handling facilities along with evaluations based on data from previous inspections are the subject of this report. The 2009 inspection program revealed that the structural integrity and waste confinement capability of the Savannah River Site waste tanks were maintained. All inspections scheduled per LWO-LWE-2008-00423, HLW Tank Farm Inspection Plan for 2009, were completed. All Ultrasonic measurements (UT) performed in 2009 met the requirements of C-ESG-00006, In-Service Inspection Program for High Level Waste Tanks, Rev. 1, and WSRC-TR-2002-00061, Rev.4. UT inspections were performed on Tank 29 and the findings are documented in SRNL-STI-2009-00559, Tank Inspection NDE Results for Fiscal Year 2009, Waste Tank 29. Post chemical cleaning UT measurements were made in Tank 6 and the results are documented in SRNL-STI-2009-00560, Tank Inspection NDE Results Tank 6, Including Summary of Waste Removal Support Activities in Tanks 5 and 6. A total of 6669 photographs were made and 1276 visual and video inspections were performed during 2009. Twenty-Two new leaksites were identified in 2009. The locations of these leaksites are documented in C-ESR-G-00003, SRS High Level Waste Tank Leaksite Information, Rev.4. Fifteen leaksites at Tank 5 were documented during tank wall/annulus cleaning activities. Five leaksites at Tank 6 were documented during tank wall/annulus cleaning activities. Two new leaksites were identified at Tank 19 during waste removal activities. Previously documented leaksites were reactivated at Tanks 5 and 12 during waste removal activities. Also, a very small amount of additional leakage from a previously identified leaksite at Tank 14 was observed.

West, B.; Waltz, R.

2010-06-21

294

ROBOTIC TANK INSPECTION END EFFECTOR  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this contract between Oceaneering Space Systems (OSS) and the Department of Energy (DOE) was to provide a tool for the DOE to inspect the inside tank walls of underground radioactive waste storage tanks in their tank farms. Some of these tanks are suspected to have leaks, but the harsh nature of the environment within the tanks precludes human inspection of tank walls. As a result of these conditions only a few inspection methods can fulfill this task. Of the methods available, OSS chose to pursue Alternating Current Field Measurement (ACFM), because it does not require clean surfaces for inspection, nor any contact with the Surface being inspected, and introduces no extra by-products in the inspection process (no coupling fluids or residues are left behind). The tool produced by OSS is the Robotic Tank Inspection End Effector (RTIEE), which is initially deployed on the tip of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA). The RTEE combines ACFM with a color video camera for both electromagnetic and visual inspection The complete package consists of an end effector, its corresponding electronics and software, and a user's manual to guide the operator through an inspection. The system has both coarse and fine inspection modes and allows the user to catalog defects and suspected areas of leakage in a database for further examination, which may lead to emptying the tank for repair, decommissioning, etc.. The following is an updated report to OSS document OSS-21100-7002, which was submitted in 1995. During the course of the contract, two related subtasks arose, the Wall and Coating Thickness Sensor and the Vacuum Scarifying and Sampling Tool Assembly. The first of these subtasks was intended to evaluate the corrosion and wall thinning of 55-gallon steel drums. The second was retrieved and characterized the waste material trapped inside the annulus region of the underground tanks on the DOE's tank farms. While these subtasks were derived from the original intent of the contract, the focus remains on the RTIEE.

Rachel Landry

1999-10-01

295

241-AW Tank Farm Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for the 241-AW tank farm. The construction history of the 241-AW tank farm has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In the 241-AW tank farm, the fourth double-shell tank farm constructed, similar issues as those with tank 241-AY-102 construction occured. The overall extent of similary and affect on 241-AW tank farm integrity is described herein.

Barnes, Travis J.; Gunter, Jason R.; Reeploeg, Gretchen E.

2013-11-19

296

241-AP Tank Farm Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for the 241-AP tank farm. The construction history of the 241-AP tank farm has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In the 241-AP tank farm, the sixth double-shell tank farm constructed, tank bottom flatness, refractory material quality, post-weld stress relieving, and primary tank bottom weld rejection were improved.

Barnes, Travis J.; Gunter, Jason R.; Reeploeg, Gretchen E.

2014-04-04

297

CHARACTERIZATION OF TANK 17 RESIDUAL WASTE  

SciTech Connect

Plans are to close Tank 17, a type IV waste tank in the F-area Tank Farm, by filling it with pumpable backfills. Most of the waste was removed from the tank in the late 1980s, and the remainder of the waste was removed in a short spray washing campaign that began on 11 April 1997. More details on the planned closure can be found in the Closure Plan for the High-Level Waste (HLW) Tanks and the specific closure module for Tank 17. To show that closure of the tank is environmentally sound, a performance evaluation has been performed for Tank 17. The performance evaluation projected the concentration of contaminants at various locations and times after closure. This report documents the basis for the inventories of contaminants that were used in the Tank 17 performance evaluation.

D'Entremont, P; Thomas Caldwell, T

1997-09-22

298

Three-Tank Level Control Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Three Tank Level Control Model simulates the use of a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller to to achieve a smooth control of the water level in tanks 1 and 2 of the coupled three-tank system. The three coupled tanks system consist in a series of three tanks which are connected in their base by valves. Tanks 1 and 2 are placed in the extremes and receive the water flow which can be controlled either manually or with the PID while tank 3 is placed in the middle and couples the two previous tanks. This EJS simulation is based on a real system running at the Spanish Open University for Distance Education (UNED).  The real three coupled tanks system is used as a remote laboratory for learning purposes and a different application created with EJS (visually identical to this simulation) serves as graphical user interface to operate the remote laboratory.

De La Torre, Luis; Oyarzun, Hector V.

2014-03-18

299

Auxiliary resonant DC tank converter  

DOEpatents

An auxiliary resonant dc tank (ARDCT) converter is provided for achieving soft-switching in a power converter. An ARDCT circuit is coupled directly across a dc bus to the inverter to generate a resonant dc bus voltage, including upper and lower resonant capacitors connected in series as a resonant leg, first and second dc tank capacitors connected in series as a tank leg, and an auxiliary resonant circuit comprising a series combination of a resonant inductor and a pair of auxiliary switching devices. The ARDCT circuit further includes first clamping means for holding the resonant dc bus voltage to the dc tank voltage of the tank leg, and second clamping means for clamping the resonant dc bus voltage to zero during a resonant period. The ARDCT circuit resonantly brings the dc bus voltage to zero in order to provide a zero-voltage switching opportunity for the inverter, then quickly rebounds the dc bus voltage back to the dc tank voltage after the inverter changes state. The auxiliary switching devices are turned on and off under zero-current conditions. The ARDCT circuit only absorbs ripples of the inverter dc bus current, thus having less current stress. In addition, since the ARDCT circuit is coupled in parallel with the dc power supply and the inverter for merely assisting soft-switching of the inverter without participating in real dc power transmission and power conversion, malfunction and failure of the tank circuit will not affect the functional operation of the inverter; thus a highly reliable converter system is expected.

Peng, Fang Z. (Knoxville, TN)

2000-01-01

300

Counting fish: a typology for fisheries catch data Jennifer Jacquet*, Dirk Zeller and Daniel Pauly  

E-print Network

Counting fish: a typology for fisheries catch data Jennifer Jacquet*, Dirk Zeller and Daniel Pauly, and agriculture (Ward 2004). The FAO *Corresponding author. Email: j.jacquet@fisheries.ubc.ca Journal

Pauly, Daniel

301

Emerging Technologies Look Deeper into the Eyes to Catch Signs of Disease  

MedlinePLUS

... at NEI Education Programs Training and Jobs Emerging technologies look deeper into the eyes to catch signs ... to eye gazing Adaptive optics (AO) is one technology helping to overcome this problem. It deals with ...

302

Researchers develop new search tool to help fight child porn, catch cyber  

E-print Network

Researchers develop new search tool to help fight child porn, catch cyber thieves Canada Standard a comment... Post to Facebook 0 0 New #12;Researchers develop new search tool to help fight child porn

Fung, Benjamin C. M.

303

50 CFR 648.141 - Black sea bass Annual Catch Target (ACT).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...process. (1) Sectors. Commercial and recreational specific ACTs shall be less than or equal to the sector-specific ACLs. The Black Sea Bass Monitoring Committee shall recommend any reduction in catch necessary to address sector-specific...

2013-10-01

304

50 CFR 648.101 - Summer flounder Annual Catch Target (ACT).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...process. (1) Sectors. Commercial and recreational specific ACTs shall be less than or equal to the sector-specific ACLs. The Summer Flounder Monitoring Committee shall recommend any reduction in catch necessary to address sector-specific...

2013-10-01

305

50 CFR 648.141 - Black sea bass Annual Catch Target (ACT).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...process. (1) Sectors. Commercial and recreational specific ACTs shall be less than or equal to the sector-specific ACLs. The Black Sea Bass Monitoring Committee shall recommend any reduction in catch necessary to address sector-specific...

2012-10-01

306

50 CFR 648.101 - Summer flounder Annual Catch Target (ACT).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...process. (1) Sectors. Commercial and recreational specific ACTs shall be less than or equal to the sector-specific ACLs. The Summer Flounder Monitoring Committee shall recommend any reduction in catch necessary to address sector-specific...

2012-10-01

307

Early Birds May Catch the Worm, but Night Owls May Snatch the Win  

MedlinePLUS

... features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Early Birds May Catch the Worm, but Night Owls May ... quarter of the study participants were naturally early birds, getting to bed by 11 p.m. and ...

308

Effects of Catch-and-Release Angling on Salmonids at Elevated Water Temperatures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Few studies have assessed catch-and-release mortality of salmonids at water temperatures of 23°C or above, despite predictions of warming stream temperatures due to climate change. The primary objective of this study was to measure the catch-and-release mortality of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, brown trout Salmo trutta, and mountain whitefish Prosopium williamsoni in three water temperature treatments, namely, when daily maximum

James W. Boyd; Christopher S. Guy; Travis B. Horton; Stephen A. Leathe

2010-01-01

309

Combining Telephone Surveys and Fishing Catches Self-Report: The French Sea Bass Recreational Fishery Assessment  

PubMed Central

Fisheries statistics are known to be underestimated, since they are mainly based on information about commercial fisheries. However, various types of fishing activities exist and evaluating them is necessary for implementing effective management plans. This paper assesses the characteristics and catches of the French European sea bass recreational fishery along the Atlantic coasts, through the combination of large-scale telephone surveys and fishing diaries study. Our results demonstrated that half of the total catches (mainly small fish) were released at sea and that the mean length of a kept sea bass was 46.6 cm. We highlighted different patterns of fishing methods and type of gear used. Catches from boats were greater than from the shore, both in abundance and biomass, considering mean values per fishing trip as well as CPUE. Spearfishers caught the highest biomass of sea bass per fishing trip, but the fishing rod with lure was the most effective type of gear in terms of CPUE. Longlines had the highest CPUE value in abundance but not in biomass: they caught numerous but small sea bass. Handlines were less effective, catching few sea bass in both abundance and biomass. We estimated that the annual total recreational sea bass catches was 3,173 tonnes of which 2,345 tonnes were kept. Since the annual commercial catches landings were evaluated at 5,160 tonnes, recreational landings represent 30% of the total fishing catches on the Atlantic coasts of France. Using fishers' self-reports was a valuable way to obtain new information on data-poor fisheries. Our results underline the importance of evaluating recreational fishing as a part of the total amount of fisheries catches. More studies are critically needed to assess overall fish resources caught in order to develop effective fishery management tools. PMID:24489885

Rocklin, Delphine; Levrel, Harold; Drogou, Mickaël; Herfaut, Johanna; Veron, Gérard

2014-01-01

310

TANK48 CFD MODELING ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank to ensure uniformity of the discharge stream. Mixing is accomplished with one to four dual-nozzle slurry pumps located within the tank liquid. For the work, a Tank 48 simulation model with a maximum of four slurry pumps in operation has been developed to estimate flow patterns for efficient solid mixing. The modeling calculations were performed by using two modeling approaches. One approach is a single-phase Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model to evaluate the flow patterns and qualitative mixing behaviors for a range of different modeling conditions since the model was previously benchmarked against the test results. The other is a two-phase CFD model to estimate solid concentrations in a quantitative way by solving the Eulerian governing equations for the continuous fluid and discrete solid phases over the entire fluid domain of Tank 48. The two-phase results should be considered as the preliminary scoping calculations since the model was not validated against the test results yet. A series of sensitivity calculations for different numbers of pumps and operating conditions has been performed to provide operational guidance for solids suspension and mixing in the tank. In the analysis, the pump was assumed to be stationary. Major solid obstructions including the pump housing, the pump columns, and the 82 inch central support column were included. The steady state and three-dimensional analyses with a two-equation turbulence model were performed with FLUENT{trademark} for the single-phase approach and CFX for the two-phase approach. Recommended operational guidance was developed assuming that local fluid velocity can be used as a measure of sludge suspension and spatial mixing under single-phase tank model. For quantitative analysis, a two-phase fluid-solid model was developed for the same modeling conditions as the single-phase model. The modeling results show that the flow patterns driven by four pump operation satisfy the solid suspension requirement, and the average solid concentration at the plane of the transfer pump inlet is about 12% higher than the tank average concentrations for the 70 inch tank level and about the same as the tank average value for the 29 inch liquid level. When one of the four pumps is not operated, the flow patterns are satisfied with the minimum suspension velocity criterion. However, the solid concentration near the tank bottom is increased by about 30%, although the average solid concentrations near the transfer pump inlet have about the same value as the four-pump baseline results. The flow pattern results show that although the two-pump case satisfies the minimum velocity requirement to suspend the sludge particles, it provides the marginal mixing results for the heavier or larger insoluble materials such as MST and KTPB particles. The results demonstrated that when more than one jet are aiming at the same position of the mixing tank domain, inefficient flow patterns are provided due to the highly localized momentum dissipation, resulting in inactive suspension zone. Thus, after completion of the indexed solids suspension, pump rotations are recommended to avoid producing the nonuniform flow patterns. It is noted that when tank liquid level is reduced from the highest level of 70 inches to the minimum level of 29 inches for a given number of operating pumps, the solid mixing efficiency becomes better since the ratio of the pump power to the mixing volume becomes larger. These results are consistent with the literature results.

Lee, S.

2011-05-17

311

In-tank recirculating arsenic treatment system  

DOEpatents

A low-cost, water treatment system and method for reducing arsenic contamination in small community water storage tanks. Arsenic is removed by using a submersible pump, sitting at the bottom of the tank, which continuously recirculates (at a low flow rate) arsenic-contaminated water through an attached and enclosed filter bed containing arsenic-sorbing media. The pump and treatment column can be either placed inside the tank (In-Tank) by manually-lowering through an access hole, or attached to the outside of the tank (Out-of-Tank), for easy replacement of the sorption media.

Brady, Patrick V. (Albuquerque, NM); Dwyer, Brian P. (Albuquerque, NM); Krumhansl, James L. (Albuquerque, NM); Chwirka, Joseph D. (Tijeras, NM)

2009-04-07

312

Tank Waste Disposal Program redefinition  

SciTech Connect

The record of decision (ROD) (DOE 1988) on the Final Environmental Impact Statement, Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic and Tank Wastes, Hanford Site, Richland Washington identifies the method for disposal of double-shell tank waste and cesium and strontium capsules at the Hanford Site. The ROD also identifies the need for additional evaluations before a final decision is made on the disposal of single-shell tank waste. This document presents the results of systematic evaluation of the present technical circumstances, alternatives, and regulatory requirements in light of the values of the leaders and constitutents of the program. It recommends a three-phased approach for disposing of tank wastes. This approach allows mature technologies to be applied to the treatment of well-understood waste forms in the near term, while providing time for the development and deployment of successively more advanced pretreatment technologies. The advanced technologies will accelerate disposal by reducing the volume of waste to be vitrified. This document also recommends integration of the double-and single-shell tank waste disposal programs, provides a target schedule for implementation of the selected approach, and describes the essential elements of a program to be baselined in 1992.

Grygiel, M.L.; Augustine, C.A.; Cahill, M.A.; Garfield, J.S.; Johnson, M.E.; Kupfer, M.J.; Meyer, G.A.; Roecker, J.H. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Holton, L.K.; Hunter, V.L.; Triplett, M.B. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1991-10-01

313

Catch Rates, Composition and Fish Size from Reefs Managed with Periodically-Harvested Closures  

PubMed Central

Periodically-harvested closures are commonly employed within co-management frameworks to help manage small-scale, multi-species fisheries in the Indo-Pacific. Despite their widespread use, the benefits of periodic harvesting strategies for multi-species fisheries have, to date, been largely untested. We examine catch and effort data from four periodically-harvested reef areas and 55 continuously-fished reefs in Solomon Islands. We test the hypothesis that fishing in periodically-harvested closures would yield: (a) higher catch rates, (b) proportionally more short lived, fast growing, sedentary taxa, and (c) larger finfish and invertebrates, compared to catches from reefs continuously open to fishing. Our study showed that catch rates were significantly higher from periodically-harvested closures for gleaning of invertebrates, but not for line and spear fishing. The family level composition of catches did not vary significantly between open reefs and periodically-harvested closures. Fish captured from periodically-harvested closures were slightly larger, but Trochus niloticus were significantly smaller than those from continuously open reefs. In one case of intense and prolonged harvesting, gleaning catch rates significantly declined, suggesting invertebrate stocks were substantially depleted in the early stages of the open period. Our study suggests periodically-harvested closures can have some short term benefits via increasing harvesting efficiency. However, we did not find evidence that the strategy had substantially benefited multi-species fin-fisheries. PMID:24066044

Cohen, Philippa Jane; Alexander, Timothy J.

2013-01-01

314

Commercial catch rates of the clam Spisula solida reflect local environmental coastal conditions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effect of environmental variables and fishing pressure (explanatory variables were lagged 1 year) on commercial catch rates of the clam Spisula solida was studied on an annual basis over a 21 year period in three areas off the Portuguese coast (the Northwest, the Southwest and the South) between 1989 and 2009. Each area showed distinct environmental (oceanographic and hydrological) characteristics. Different sensitivities of S. solida fishing grounds to environmental variables were found among the study areas. On the Northwest coast, the combined effect of NAO indices and sea surface temperature had a positive effect on S. solida fisheries, particularly during the spawning season. On the Southwest coast, the variation of S. solida catches was negatively associated with wind magnitude and positively related with South-Southeast winds. Winter river discharges and summer sea surface temperature negatively affected S. solida catches on the South coast. Fishing effort also affected S. solida catch rates in the South. However, “extreme” changes in environmental conditions were the main drivers of short-term variations in catch rates. These results indicate that variations of S. solida catches strongly reflect a regional signature of local climatic features off the coast. Information on local environmental conditions should therefore be used for the purpose of identifying management actions to ensure long-term sustainability of S. solida fisheries.

Baptista, V.; Leitão, F.

2014-02-01

315

ICPP Tank Farm systems analysis  

SciTech Connect

During the early years (1950--1965) of Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) operations, eleven, 300,000-gallon waste storage tanks were constructed. A project was in progress to replace these aging tanks; however, since fuel reprocessing has been curtailed at ICPP, it is not clear that the new tanks are required. The Department of Energy (DOE) requested a systems engineering evaluation to determine the need for the new tanks. Over 100 alternatives were identified during a facilitated team meeting using Value Engineering techniques. After eliminating any ideas which clearly could not meet the requirements, the remaining ideas were combined into nine basic cases with five sub cases. These fourteen cases were then carefully defined using two methods. First, each case was drawn graphically to show waste processing equipment interfaces and time constraints where they existed or were imposed. Second, each case was analyzed using a time-dependent computer simulation of ICPP waste management activities to determine schedule interactions, liquid storage requirements, and solid waste quantities. Based on the evaluation data, the team developed the following recommendations: Install and operate the high-level liquid waste evaporator; minimize liquid waste generation as much as possible within the constraints of required ICPP operational, safety, and environmental commitments; bring a Waste Immobilization Facility on line by 2008 or earlier; operate NWCF as required to alleviate the need for new tank farm capacity; maximize the concentration of Na and K in the calcine to minimize the final amount of waste requiring immobilization; avoid using Bin Set 7 for calcine storage, if possible, to reduce future calcine retrieval and D&D costs; and use WM-190 for liquid waste storage and one of the pillar and panel vaulted tanks as the spare.

Palmer, W.B.; Beer, M.J.; Cukars, M.; Law, J.P.; Millet, C.B.; Murphy, J.A.; Nenni, J.A.; Park, C.V.; Pruitt, J.I.; Thiel, E.C.; Ward, F.S.; Woodard, J.

1994-01-01

316

49 CFR 179.400-16 - Access to inner tank.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113...access closure must be of an approved material and design. (b) If a welded closure is used,...

2013-10-01

317

49 CFR 179.400-16 - Access to inner tank.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113...access closure must be of an approved material and design. (b) If a welded closure is used,...

2010-10-01

318

49 CFR 179.400-16 - Access to inner tank.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113...access closure must be of an approved material and design. (b) If a welded closure is used,...

2011-10-01

319

49 CFR 179.400-16 - Access to inner tank.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113...access closure must be of an approved material and design. (b) If a welded closure is used,...

2012-10-01

320

46 CFR 151.15-1 - Tank types.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...An independent tank is not essential...c) Gravity. Tanks having a design pressure (as...geometry where stress analysis is neither readily...determinate. (Integral tanks are of the gravity...Independent tanks whose design pressure...

2010-10-01

321

49 CFR 180.507 - Qualification of tank cars.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Qualification of tank cars. 180.507 Section 180.507 Transportation...PACKAGINGS Qualification and Maintenance of Tank Cars § 180.507 Qualification of tank cars. (a) Each tank car marked as meeting...

2012-10-01

322

49 CFR 180.507 - Qualification of tank cars.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Qualification of tank cars. 180.507 Section 180.507 Transportation...PACKAGINGS Qualification and Maintenance of Tank Cars § 180.507 Qualification of tank cars. (a) Each tank car marked as meeting...

2013-10-01

323

46 CFR 154.412 - Cargo tank corrosion allowance.  

... 2014-10-01 false Cargo tank corrosion allowance. 154.412 Section 154...Containment Systems § 154.412 Cargo tank corrosion allowance. A cargo tank must be designed with a corrosion allowance if the cargo tank:...

2014-10-01

324

46 CFR 154.412 - Cargo tank corrosion allowance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-10-01 false Cargo tank corrosion allowance. 154.412 Section 154...Containment Systems § 154.412 Cargo tank corrosion allowance. A cargo tank must be designed with a corrosion allowance if the cargo tank:...

2011-10-01

325

46 CFR 154.412 - Cargo tank corrosion allowance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-10-01 false Cargo tank corrosion allowance. 154.412 Section 154...Containment Systems § 154.412 Cargo tank corrosion allowance. A cargo tank must be designed with a corrosion allowance if the cargo tank:...

2012-10-01

326

46 CFR 154.412 - Cargo tank corrosion allowance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-10-01 false Cargo tank corrosion allowance. 154.412 Section 154...Containment Systems § 154.412 Cargo tank corrosion allowance. A cargo tank must be designed with a corrosion allowance if the cargo tank:...

2013-10-01

327

46 CFR 154.412 - Cargo tank corrosion allowance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-10-01 false Cargo tank corrosion allowance. 154.412 Section 154...Containment Systems § 154.412 Cargo tank corrosion allowance. A cargo tank must be designed with a corrosion allowance if the cargo tank:...

2010-10-01

328

46 CFR 119.435 - Integral fuel tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...fuel tanks. (a) Diesel fuel tanks may not be built integral with...certification of a vessel, integral fuel tanks must withstand a hydrostatic...feet) in height attached to the tank may be filled with water to accomplish the...

2012-10-01

329

46 CFR 119.435 - Integral fuel tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...fuel tanks. (a) Diesel fuel tanks may not be built integral with...certification of a vessel, integral fuel tanks must withstand a hydrostatic...feet) in height attached to the tank may be filled with water to accomplish the...

2011-10-01

330

46 CFR 119.435 - Integral fuel tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...fuel tanks. (a) Diesel fuel tanks may not be built integral with...certification of a vessel, integral fuel tanks must withstand a hydrostatic...feet) in height attached to the tank may be filled with water to accomplish the...

2010-10-01

331

46 CFR 154.427 - Membrane tank system design.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Membrane tank system design. A membrane tank system must be designed for: (a) Any...interbarrier space; (2) Vacuum in the cargo tank; (3) Sloshing in a partially filled cargo tank; and (4) Hull vibrations; and...

2012-10-01

332

46 CFR 154.427 - Membrane tank system design.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Membrane tank system design. A membrane tank system must be designed for: (a) Any...interbarrier space; (2) Vacuum in the cargo tank; (3) Sloshing in a partially filled cargo tank; and (4) Hull vibrations; and...

2013-10-01

333

46 CFR 119.435 - Integral fuel tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...fuel tanks. (a) Diesel fuel tanks may not be built integral with...certification of a vessel, integral fuel tanks must withstand a hydrostatic...feet) in height attached to the tank may be filled with water to accomplish the...

2013-10-01

334

46 CFR 154.427 - Membrane tank system design.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Membrane tank system design. A membrane tank system must be designed for: (a) Any...interbarrier space; (2) Vacuum in the cargo tank; (3) Sloshing in a partially filled cargo tank; and (4) Hull vibrations; and...

2011-10-01

335

46 CFR 154.427 - Membrane tank system design.  

... Membrane tank system design. A membrane tank system must be designed for: (a) Any...interbarrier space; (2) Vacuum in the cargo tank; (3) Sloshing in a partially filled cargo tank; and (4) Hull vibrations; and...

2014-10-01

336

49 CFR 180.507 - Qualification of tank cars.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Qualification of tank cars. 180.507 Section 180.507 Transportation...PACKAGINGS Qualification and Maintenance of Tank Cars § 180.507 Qualification of tank cars. (a) Each tank car marked as meeting...

2011-10-01

337

49 CFR 180.507 - Qualification of tank cars.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Qualification of tank cars. 180.507 Section 180.507 Transportation...PACKAGINGS Qualification and Maintenance of Tank Cars § 180.507 Qualification of tank cars. (a) Each tank car marked as meeting...

2010-10-01

338

Tank waste concentration mechanism study  

SciTech Connect

This study determines whether the existing 242-A Evaporator should continue to be used to concentrate the Hanford Site radioactive liquid tank wastes or be replaced by an alternative waste concentration process. Using the same philosophy, the study also determines what the waste concentration mechanism should be for the future TWRS program. Excess water from liquid DST waste should be removed to reduce the volume of waste feed for pretreatment, immobilization, and to free up storage capacity in existing tanks to support interim stabilization of SSTS, terminal cleanout of excess facilities, and other site remediation activities.

Pan, L.C.; Johnson, L.J.

1994-09-01

339

Catching the Light - The Entwined History of Light and Mind  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In 1910, the surgeons Moreau and LePrince wrote about their successful operation on an eight-year-old boy who had been blind since birth because of cataracts. When the boy's eyes were healed they removed the bandages and, waving a hand in front of the child's physically perfect eyes, asked him what he saw. "I don't know," was his only reply. What he saw was only a varying brightness in front of him. However, when allowed to touch the hand as it began to move, he cried out in a voice of triumph, "It's moving!" He could feel it move, but he still needed laboriously to learn to see it move. Light and eyes were not enough to grant him sight. How, then, do we see? What's the difference between seeing and perception? What is light? From ancient times to the present, from philosophers to quantum physicists, nothing has so perplexed, so fascinated, so captivated the mind as the elusive definition of light. In Catching the Light , Arthur Zajonc takes us on an epic journey into history, tracing how humans have endeavored to understand the phenomenon of light. Blending mythology, religion, science, literature, and painting, Zajonc reveals in poetic detail the human struggle to identify the vital connection between the outer light of nature and the inner light of the human spirit. He explains the curiousness of the Greeks' blue and green "color blindness": Odysseus gazing longingly at the "wine-dark sea"; the use of chloros (green) as the color of honey in Homer's Odessey ; and Euripides' use of the color green to describe the hue of tears and blood. He demonstrates the complexity of perception through the work of Paul Cézanne--the artist standing on the bank of a river, painting the same scene over and over again, the motifs multiplying before his eyes. And Zajonc goes on to show how our quest for an understanding of light, as well as the conclusions we draw, reveals as much about the nature of our own psyche as it does about the nature of light itself. For the ancient Egyptians the nature of light was clear--it simply was the gaze of God. In the hands of the ancient Greeks, light had become the luminous inner fire whose ethereal effluence brought sight. In our contemporary world of modern quantum physics, science plays the greatest part in our theories of light's origin--from scientific perspectives such as Sir Isaac Newton's "corpuscular theory of light" and Michael Faraday's "lines of force" to such revolutionary ideas as Max Planck's "discrete motion of a pendulum" (the basis of quantum mechanics), Albert Einstein's "particles of light" and "theory of relativity," and Niels Bohr's "quantum jumps." Yet the metaphysical aspects of the scientific search, Zajonc shows, still loom large. For the physicist Richard Feynman, a quantum particle travels all paths, eventually distilling to one path whose action is least--the most beautiful path of all. Whatever light is, here is where we will find it. With rare clarity and unmatched lyricism, Zajonc illuminates the profound implications of the relationships between the multifaceted strands of human experience and scientific endeavor. A fascinating search into our deepest scientific mystery, Catching the Light is a brilliant synthesis that will both entertain and inform.

Zajonc, Arthur

1995-04-01

340

Fog collection and deposition modelling - EcoCatch Lunz  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The area of Lunz am See (N 047.855°, E 015.068°, 650 m a.s.l.) in Lower Austria has been subject to long term monitoring of meteorological parameters as well as wet deposition. Even though Lunz is known for its good air quality, with about 200 days of precipitation per year reaching an annual average of 1500 mm deposition, immission fluxes reach levels of critical loads. For instance, nitrogen input from wet deposition of nitrate and ammonium is > 14 kg ha-1 a-1, and sulphur input from sulphate is 5 kg ha-1 a-1. In the framework of the EcoCatch project1) wet, dry and occult deposition have been investigated in detail in an alluvial forest near the Biological Station (Lunz/See) since September 2008. The overall contribution of dry and occult deposition was expected to be comparably low and only of importance in times of decreased wet deposition. Collection of fog samples was performed with an active fog sampler, regulated by a Vaisala PWD-12 sensor monitoring visibility. Temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction were logged by a HOBO weather station. Filter stacks were used for sampling of aerosol particles and gaseous components and a Wet And Dry Only Sampler (WADOS) was used to sample precipitation. Solute analysis was carried out via ion chromatography. Alkali and earth alkali metals, chloride as well as ammonium, sulphate and nitrate were quantified in rain, aerosol and fog samples on an event basis. In addition dry deposition included nitrogen oxide and dioxide, sulphur dioxide and ammonia measurements. A site specific relation of liquid water content (LWC) to visibility was established using the collection rate and the known collection efficiency of the fog sampler. A modified version of the fog deposition resistance model devised by G.M. Lovett was used to quantify occult deposition onto the alluvial forest. The surface area index of local vegetation was measured with a SunScan System and tree height was determined using a Vertex IV/GS. Between September 2008 and October 2009 roughly 560 hours of fog were observed and about 380 hours thereof were sampled. Duration, frequency as well as density of fog events showed strong seasonal variations. As expected, spring and autumn seasons exhibited the highest frequencies and durations of fog events. Concentrations of nitrate in fog samples during the cold season (Nov-Mar) were 10-fold higher than in rain, reaching monthly averages of 50 mg L-1 in January and February. With 15-25 mg L-1, sulphate was 11-fold higher in fog compared to rain. Ammonium reached on average 14 mg L-1 in fog samples and was thus 15-fold higher than in rain. 1)EcoCatch - Understanding the effects of global change on ecosystem processes and services at catchment scale (funded by Amt der Niederösterreichischen Landesregierung, and Clean Air Commission, Austrian Academy of Sciences).

Koller, M. W.; Ramírez-Santa Cruz, C.; Leder, K.; Bauer, H.; Dorninger, M.; Hofhansl, F.; Wanek, W.; Kasper-Giebl, A.

2010-07-01

341

Tank 241-BY-103 Tank Characterization Plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations and WHC 222-S Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples for tank 241-BY-103.

Schreiber, R.D.

1995-02-27

342

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR SAMPLING OF TANK 19 IN F TANK FARM  

SciTech Connect

Representative sampling is required for characterization of the residual material in Tank 19 prior to operational closure. Tank 19 is a Type IV underground waste storage tank located in the F-Tank Farm. It is a cylindrical-shaped, carbon steel tank with a diameter of 85 feet, a height of 34.25 feet, and a working capacity of 1.3 million gallons. Tank 19 was placed in service in 1961 and initially received a small amount of low heat waste from Tank 17. It then served as an evaporator concentrate (saltcake) receiver from February 1962 to September 1976. Tank 19 also received the spent zeolite ion exchange media from a cesium removal column that once operated in the Northeast riser of the tank to remove cesium from the evaporator overheads. Recent mechanical cleaning of the tank removed all mounds of material. Anticipating a low level of solids in the residual waste, Huff and Thaxton [2009] developed a plan to sample the waste during the final clean-up process while it would still be resident in sufficient quantities to support analytical determinations in four quadrants of the tank. Execution of the plan produced fewer solids than expected to support analytical determinations in all four quadrants. Huff and Thaxton [2009] then restructured the plan to characterize the residual separately in the North and the South regions: two 'hemispheres.' This document provides sampling recommendations to complete the characterization of the residual material on the tank bottom following the guidance in Huff and Thaxton [2009] to split the tank floor into a North and a South hemisphere. The number of samples is determined from a modification of the formula previously published in Edwards [2001] and the sample characterization data for previous sampling of Tank 19 described by Oji [2009]. The uncertainty is quantified by an upper 95% confidence limit (UCL95%) on each analyte's mean concentration in Tank 19. The procedure computes the uncertainty in analyte concentration as a function of the number of samples, and the final number of samples is determined when the reduction in the uncertainty from an additional sample no longer has a practical impact on results. The characterization of the full suite of analytes in the North and South hemispheres is currently supported by a single Mantis rover sample in each hemisphere. A floor scrape sample was obtained from a compact region near the center riser slightly in the South hemisphere and has been analyzed for a shortened list of key analytes. There is not enough additional material from the floor scrape sample material for completing the full suite of constituents. No floor scrape samples have been previously taken from the North hemisphere. The criterion to determine the number of additional samples was based on the practical reduction in the uncertainty when a new sample is added. This was achieved when five additional samples are obtained. In addition, two archived samples will be used if a contingency such as failing to demonstrate the comparability of the Mantis samples to the floor scrape samples occurs. To complete sampling of the Tank 19 residual floor material, four additional samples should be taken from the North hemisphere and four additional samples should be taken from the South hemisphere. One of the samples from each hemisphere will be archived in case of need. Three of the four additional samples from each hemisphere will be analyzed. Once the results are available, differences between the Mantis and three floor scrape sample results will be evaluated. If there are no statistically significant analyte concentration differences between the Mantis and floor scrape samples, those results will be combined and then UCL95%s will be calculated. If the analyte concentration differences between the Mantis and floor scrape samples are statistically significant, the UCL95%s will be calculated without the Mantis sample results. If further reduction in the upper confidence limits is needed and can be achieved by the addition of the archived samples, they will be analyzed and included in t

Harris, S.; Shine, G.

2009-12-14

343

Comparative safety analysis of LNG storage tanks  

SciTech Connect

LNG storage tank design and response to selected release scenarios were reviewed. The selection of the scenarios was based on an investigation of potential hazards as cited in the literature. A review of the structure of specific LNG storage facilities is given. Scenarios initially addressed included those that most likely emerge from the tank facility itself: conditions of overfill and overflow as related to liquid LNG content levels; over/underpressurization at respective tank vapor pressure boundaries; subsidence of bearing soil below tank foundations; and crack propagation in tank walls due to possible exposure of structural material to cryogenic temperatures. Additional scenarios addressed include those that result from external events: tornado induced winds and pressure drops; exterior tank missile impact with tornado winds and rotating machinery being the investigated mode of generation; thermal response due to adjacent fire conditions; and tank response due to intense seismic activity. Applicability of each scenario depended heavily on the specific tank configurations and material types selected. (PSB)

Fecht, B.A.; Gates, T.E.; Nelson, K.O.; Marr, G.D.

1982-07-01

344

STS-114: Discovery Tanking Operations for Launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Jessica Rye from NASA Public Affairs is the narrator for the tanking operations for the launch of the Space Shuttle Discovery. She presents a video of the arrival and processing of the new external tank at the Kennedy Space Center. The external tank is also shown entering the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The external tank underwent new processing resulting from its redesign including inspection of the bipod heater and the external separation camera. The changes to the external tank include: 1) Electric heaters to protect from icing; and 2) Liquid Oxygen feed line bellows to carry fuel from the external tank to the Orbiter. Footage of the external tank processing facility at NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, La. prior to its arrival at Kennedy Space Center is shown and a video of the three key modifications to the external tank including the bipod, flange and bellows are shown.

2005-01-01

345

78 FR 71633 - Tank Vessel Oil Transfers  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Coast Guard [Docket No. USCG-2013-0522] Tank Vessel Oil Transfers AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice...2013, concerning new measures to reduce the risks of oil spills in oil transfer operations from or to a tank vessel. In...

2013-11-29

346

7 CFR 58.427 - Paraffin tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... § 58.427 Paraffin tanks. The metal tank should be adequate in size, have wood rather than metal racks to support the cheese, have heat controls and an indicating thermometer. The cheese wax shall be kept...

2011-01-01

347

Tank Riser Suspension System Conceptual Design  

SciTech Connect

A team of engineers from High Level Waste (HLW), the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), and Project Engineering and Construction Division (PE and CD) explored ways of more effectively utilizing the HLW tank's risers during waste removal and closure activities. Currently, some of the risers are being used to store failed and contaminated equipment. To make those risers available for tank operation, failed equipment must be moved out of the tank and relocated or disposed of appropriately. Disposing of contaminated equipment is a time consuming and expensive process. This report describes the Tank Riser Suspension System (TRSS). It will allow failed equipment to be stored inside of the tank while making riser space available for other tank process equipment. In addition, the TRSS will permit disposing of failed equipment in the tank as part of tank closure activities.

Fogle, R.

2002-10-29

348

SOURCE ASSESSMENT: RAIL TANK CAR, TANK TRUCK, AND DRUM CLEANING, STATE-OF-THE-ART  

EPA Science Inventory

This document reviews the state of the art of air emissions and water pollutants from cleaning rail tank cars, tank trucks, and drums. Composition, quantity, and rate of emissions and pollutants are described. Rail tank cars, tank trucks, and drums are used to transport chemical ...

349

Filament-wound, fiberglass cryogenic tank supports  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The design, fabrication, and testing of filament-wound, fiberglass cryogenic tank supports for a LH2 tank, a LF2/FLOX tank and a CH4 tank. These supports consist of filament-wound fiberglass tubes with titanium end fittings. These units were satisfactorily tested at cryogenic temperatures, thereby offering a design that can be reliably and economically produced in large or small quantities. The basic design concept is applicable to any situation where strong, lightweight axial load members are desired.

Carter, J. S.; Timberlake, T. E.

1971-01-01

350

Tank 241-BY-107 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Tank 241-BY-107 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in {open_quotes}Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.{close_quotes} Tank 241-BY-107 was vapor sampled in accordance with {open_quotes}Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.{close_quotes}

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31

351

Tank 241-C-108 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Tank 241-C-108 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in {open_quotes}Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.{close_quotes} Tank 241-C-108 was vapor sampled in accordance with {open_quotes}Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.{close_quotes}

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31

352

Tank 241-BY-106 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Tank 241-BY-106 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in {open_quotes}Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.{close_quotes} Tank 241-BY-106 was vapor sampled in accordance with {open_quotes}Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.{close_quotes}

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31

353

Tank 241-BY-105 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Tank 241-BY-105 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in {open_quotes}Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.{close_quotes} Tank 241-BY-105 was vapor sampled in accordance with {open_quotes}Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.{close_quotes}

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31

354

Tank 241-C-112 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Tank 241-C-112 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in {open_quotes}Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.{close_quotes} Tank 241-C-112 was vapor sampled in accordance with {open_quotes}Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.{close_quotes}

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31

355

Tank 241-C-108 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect

Tank 241-C-108 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues (Osborne and Huckaby 1994). Tank 241-C-108 was vapor sampled in accordance with Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution (Osborne et al., 1994).

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-05

356

7 CFR 58.320 - Brine tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brine tanks. 58.320 Section 58...Equipment and Utensils § 58.320 Brine tanks. Brine tanks used for the treating of...safe means of heating the salt solution for the treatment of the...

2010-01-01

357

SRS tank closure. Innovative technology summary report  

SciTech Connect

High-level waste (HLW) tank closure technology is designed to stabilize any remaining radionuclides and hazardous constituents left in a tank after bulk waste removal. Two Savannah River Site (SRS) HLW tanks were closed after cleansing and then filling each tank with three layers of grout. The first layer consists of a chemically reducing grout. The fill material has chemical properties that retard the movement of some radionuclides and chemical constituents. A layer of controlled low-strength material (CLSM), a self-leveling fill material, is placed on top of the reducing grout. CLSM provides sufficient strength to support the overbearing weight. The final layer is a free-flowing, strong grout similar to normal concrete. After the main tank cavity is filled, risers are filled with grout, and all waste transfer piping connected to the tank is isolated. The tank ventilation system is dismantled, and the remaining systems are isolated. Equipment that remains with the tank is filled with grout. The tank and ancillary systems are left in a state requiring only limited surveillance. Administrative procedures are in place to control land use and access. DOE eventually plans to remove all of its HLW storage tanks from service. These tanks are located at SRS, Hanford, and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Low-activity waste storage tanks at Oak Ridge Reservation are also scheduled for closure.

Not Available

1999-08-01

358

Turbulent characteristics in a baffled contact tank  

Microsoft Academic Search

Turbulence measurements were undertaken using a two-component laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) in a serpentine contact tank (CT) commonly used for water chlorination. A detailed examination of turbulent parameters was carried out and showed the significant effects of the baffle lee and the inlet and outlet of the tank on the CT's hydraulic efficiency. Turbulence levels were quantified along the tank

K. Shiono; E. C. Teixeira

2000-01-01

359

7 CFR 58.427 - Paraffin tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Paraffin tanks. 58.427 Section 58.427... Equipment and Utensils § 58.427 Paraffin tanks. The metal tank should be adequate...an indicating thermometer. The cheese wax shall be kept...

2010-01-01

360

14 CFR 23.1013 - Oil tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Oil tanks. 23.1013 Section 23.1013 Aeronautics...ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Oil System § 23.1013 Oil tanks. (a) Installation. Each oil tank must...

2012-01-01

361

14 CFR 23.1013 - Oil tanks.  

...Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Oil tanks. 23.1013 Section 23.1013 Aeronautics...ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Oil System § 23.1013 Oil tanks. (a) Installation. Each oil tank must...

2014-01-01

362

14 CFR 23.1013 - Oil tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Oil tanks. 23.1013 Section 23.1013 Aeronautics...ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Oil System § 23.1013 Oil tanks. (a) Installation. Each oil tank must...

2013-01-01

363

14 CFR 23.1013 - Oil tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Oil tanks. 23.1013 Section 23.1013 Aeronautics...ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Oil System § 23.1013 Oil tanks. (a) Installation. Each oil tank must...

2011-01-01

364

Apparatus for filling tanks with liquefied gas  

Microsoft Academic Search

This patent describes an apparatus for filling tanks with a liquid gas which consists of in combination, a carrier for receiving tanks for holding a liquid gas, a drive connected to the carrier for moving the carrier to transfer the tanks from one station to another in the apparatus, a filling station filler at the filling station for delivering liquid

Nalbach

1986-01-01

365

Dynamic behavior of fluid-tank systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hydrodynamic forces were induced in fluid-filled storage tanks subjected to earthquake excitation and of the free vibration of the coupled fluid-tank systems. Throughout this study, the fluid is assumed to be incompressible and inviscid. The first part deals with the hydrodynamic forces induced in a rigid tank subjected to a lateral earthquake excitation. In the second part, an approximate analysis

J. Y. Yang

1976-01-01

366

Summary report of waste tank improvement studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conceptual studies to improve the safety of storing high-level defense waste in the single-shell tanks were directed toward methods that would not prevent retrieval of the waste. Two concepts could be beneficial: (1) provide an impervious barrier between the storage tanks and the biosphere, and (2) strengthen the tank structure. Cement grout, chemical additives, subsurface slurry walls, and steel sheet

Mercier

1980-01-01

367

14 CFR 23.1013 - Oil tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Oil tanks. 23.1013 Section 23.1013 Aeronautics...ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Oil System § 23.1013 Oil tanks. (a) Installation. Each oil tank must...

2010-01-01

368

Opposed Bellows Would Expel Contents Of Tank  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Proposed storage tank contains two pairs of opposed bellows used to expel its contents. Storage and expulsion volumes of tank same as those of older version of tank equipped with single bellows. Four bellows offer greater stability. Applications include automobile cooling systems and gasoline-powered tools like chain saws and leaf blowers.

Whitaker, Willie

1994-01-01

369

Stabilization of In-Tank Residual Wastes and External-Tank Soil Contamination for the Hanford Tank Closure Program: Applications to the AX Tank Farm  

SciTech Connect

Technical support for the Hanford Tank Closure Program focused on evaluation of concepts for immobilization of residual contaminants in the Hanford AX tanks and underlying soils, and identification of cost-effective approaches to improve long-term performance of AX tank farm cIosure systems. Project objectives are to develop materials or engineered systems that would significantly reduce the radionuclide transport to the groundwater from AX tanks containing residual waste. We pursued several studies that, if implemented, would help achieve these goals. They include: (1) tank fill design to reduce water inilltration and potential interaction with residual waste; (2) development of in-tank getter materials that would specifically sorb or sequester radionuclides; (3) evaluation of grout emplacement under and around the tanks to prevent waste leakage during waste retrieval or to minimize water infiltration beneath the tanks; (4) development of getters that will chemically fix specific radionuclides in soils under tanks; and (5) geochemical and hydrologic modeling of waste-water-soil-grout interactions. These studies differ in scope from the reducing grout tank fill employed at the Savannah River Site in that our strategy improves upon tank fill design by providing redundancy in the barriers to radionuclide migration and by modification the hydrogeochemistry external to the tanks.

Anderson, H.L.; Dwyer, B.P.; Ho, C.; Krumhansl, J.L.; McKeen, G.; Molecke, M.A.; Westrich, H.R.; Zhang, P.

1998-11-01

370

Moonrise over the Calico Tanks  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

The Moon rises over the Calico Tanks, a sandstone formation within Red Rock Canyon. Red Rock Canyon is a National Conservation Area managed by the Bureau of Land Management, located just outside of Las Vegas, Nevada. It is part of the Mojave Desert....

371

Farming in a fish tank.  

PubMed

Water, fish, and vegetables are all things that most developing countries do not have enough of. There is a method of food production called aquaculture that integrates fish and vegetable growing and conserves and purifies water at the same time. A working system that grows vegetables and fish for regional supermarkets in Massachusetts is a gravity fed system. At the top of the system is a 3,000 gallon fish rearing tank that measures 12 feet in diameter. Water trickles out of the tank and fish wastes are captured which can be composted and used in farm fields. The water goes into a bio filter that contains bacteria which convert harmful ammonia generated from fish waste into beneficial nitrate. Then the water flows into 100 foot long hydroponic tanks where lettuce grows. A 1/6 horsepower pump return the purified water to the fish tank and completes the cycle. The key to success is maintaining a balance between the fish nutrients and waste and the plants nutrients and waste. The system is estimated to produce 35,000 heads of lettuce and 2 tons of fish annually which translates into $23,500. The system could be adapted to developing countries with several modifications to reduce the start up cost. PMID:12317429

Youth, H

1992-01-01

372

Tank Farms and Waste Feed Delivery - 12507  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is to safely retrieve and treat the 56 million gallons of Hanford's tank waste and close the Tank Farms to protect the Columbia River. Our discussion of the Tank Farms and Waste Feed Delivery will cover progress made to date with Base and Recovery Act funding in reducing the risk posed by tank waste and in preparing for the initiation of waste treatment at Hanford. The millions of gallons of waste are a by-product of decades of plutonium production. After irradiated fuel rods were taken from the nuclear reactors to the processing facilities at Hanford they were exposed to a series of chemicals designed to dissolve away the rod, which enabled workers to retrieve the plutonium. Once those chemicals were exposed to the fuel rods they became radioactive and extremely hot. They also couldn't be used in this process more than once. Because the chemicals are caustic and extremely hazardous to humans and the environment, underground storage tanks were built to hold these chemicals until a more permanent solution could be found. The underground storage tanks range in capacity from 55,000 gallons to more than 1 million gallons. The tanks were constructed with carbon steel and reinforced concrete. There are eighteen groups of tanks, called 'tank farms', some having as few as two tanks and others up to sixteen tanks. Between 1943 and 1964, 149 single-shell tanks were built at Hanford in the 200 West and East Areas. Heat generated by the waste and the composition of the waste caused an estimated 67 of these single-shell tanks to leak into the ground. Washington River Protection Solutions is the prime contractor responsible for the safe management of this waste. WRPS' mission is to reduce the risk to the environment that is posed by the waste. All of the pumpable liquids have been removed from the single-shell tanks and transferred to the double-shell tanks. What remains in the single-shell tanks are solid and semi-solid wastes. Known as salt-cakes, they have the consistency of wet beach sand. Some of the waste resembles small broken ice, or whitish crystals. Because the original pumps inside the tanks were designed to remove only liquid waste, other methods have been developed to reach the remaining waste. Access to the tank waste is through long, typically skinny pipes, called risers, extending out of the tanks. It is through these pipes that crews are forced to send machines and devices into the tanks that are used to break up the waste or push it toward a pump. These pipes range in size from just a few inches to just over a foot in diameter because they were never intended to be used in this manner. As part of the agreement regulating Hanford cleanup, crews must remove at least 99% of the material in every tank on the site, or at least as much waste that can be removed based on available technology. To date, seven single-shell tanks have been emptied, and work is underway in another 10 tanks in preparation for additional retrieval activities. Two barriers have been installed over single-shell tanks to prevent the intrusion of surface water down to the tanks, with additional barriers planned for the future. Single and double-shell tank integrity analyses are ongoing. Because the volume of the waste generated through plutonium production exceeded the capacity of the single-shell tanks, between 1968 and 1986 Hanford engineers built 28 double-shell tanks. These tanks were studied and made with a second shell to surround the carbon steel and reinforced concrete. The double-shell tanks have not leaked any of their waste. (authors)

Fletcher, Thomas; Charboneau, Stacy; Olds, Erik [US DOE (United States)

2012-07-01

373

water tank 9/13/2007 1 4.1 Water tank  

E-print Network

water tank 9/13/2007 1 4.1 Water tank (a) A cylindrical tank contains 800 ml of water. At t=0 (min- utes) a hole is punched in the bottom, and water begins to flow out. It takes exactly 100 seconds for the tank to empty. Draw the graph of the amount z of water in the tank against time t. Explain the shape

Taylor, Peter

374

Tank 241-C-103 headspace flammability  

SciTech Connect

Information regarding flammable vapors, gases, and aerosols is presented for the purpose of resolving the tank 241-C-103 headspace flammability issue. Analyses of recent vapor and liquid samples, as well as visual inspections of the tank headspace, are discussed in the context of tank dynamics. This document is restricted to issues regarding the flammability of gases, vapors, and an aerosol that may exist in the headspace of tank 241-C-103. While discussing certain information about the organic liquid present in tank 241-C-103, this document addresses neither the potential for, nor consequences of, a pool fire involving this organic liquid; they will be discussed in a separate report.

Huckaby, J.L.

1994-01-01

375

A Role for Adipose Tissue De Novo Lipogenesis in Glucose Homeostasis During Catch-up Growth  

PubMed Central

Catch-up growth, a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, is characterized by hyperinsulinemia and accelerated body fat recovery. Using a rat model of semistarvation-refeeding that exhibits catch-up fat, we previously reported that during refeeding on a low-fat diet, glucose tolerance is normal but insulin-dependent glucose utilization is decreased in skeletal muscle and increased in adipose tissue, where de novo lipogenic capacity is concomitantly enhanced. Here we report that isocaloric refeeding on a high-fat (HF) diet blunts the enhanced in vivo insulin-dependent glucose utilization for de novo lipogenesis (DNL) in adipose tissue. These are shown to be early events of catch-up growth that are independent of hyperphagia and precede the development of overt adipocyte hypertrophy, adipose tissue inflammation, or defective insulin signaling. These results suggest a role for enhanced DNL as a glucose sink in regulating glycemia during catch-up growth, which is blunted by exposure to an HF diet, thereby contributing, together with skeletal muscle insulin resistance, to the development of glucose intolerance. Our findings are presented as an extension of the Randle cycle hypothesis, whereby the suppression of DNL constitutes a mechanism by which dietary lipids antagonize glucose utilization for storage as triglycerides in adipose tissue, thereby impairing glucose homeostasis during catch-up growth. PMID:22961086

Marcelino, Helena; Veyrat-Durebex, Christelle; Summermatter, Serge; Sarafian, Delphine; Miles-Chan, Jennifer; Arsenijevic, Denis; Zani, Fabio; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Seydoux, Josiane; Solinas, Giovanni; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, Françoise; Dulloo, Abdul G.

2013-01-01

376

Catch-Bond Model Derived from Allostery Explains Force-Activated Bacterial Adhesion  

PubMed Central

High shear enhances the adhesion of Escherichia coli bacteria binding to mannose coated surfaces via the adhesin FimH, raising the question as to whether FimH forms catch bonds that are stronger under tensile mechanical force. Here, we study the length of time that E. coli pause on mannosylated surfaces and report a double exponential decay in the duration of the pauses. This double exponential decay is unlike previous single molecule or whole cell data for other catch bonds, and indicates the existence of two distinct conformational states. We present a mathematical model, derived from the common notion of chemical allostery, which describes the lifetime of a catch bond in which mechanical force regulates the transitions between two conformational states that have different unbinding rates. The model explains these characteristics of the data: a double exponential decay, an increase in both the likelihood and lifetime of the high-binding state with shear stress, and a biphasic effect of force on detachment rates. The model parameters estimated from the data are consistent with the force-induced structural changes shown earlier in FimH. This strongly suggests that FimH forms allosteric catch bonds. The model advances our understanding of both catch bonds and the role of allostery in regulating protein activity. PMID:16272438

Thomas, Wendy; Forero, Manu; Yakovenko, Olga; Nilsson, Lina; Vicini, Paolo; Sokurenko, Evgeni; Vogel, Viola

2006-01-01

377

ICPP Tank Farm planning through 2012  

SciTech Connect

Historically, liquid high-level waste (HLW) generated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant has been stored in the Tank Farm after which it is calcined with the calcine being stored in stainless steel bins. Following the curtailment of spent nuclear fuel reprocessing in 1992, the HLW treatment methods were re-evaluated to establish a path forward for producing a final waste form from the liquid sodium bearing wastes (SBW) and the HLW calcine. Projections for significant improvements in waste generation, waste blending and evaporation, and calcination were incorporated into the Tank Farm modeling. This optimized modeling shows that all of the SBW can be calcined by the end of 2012 as required by the Idaho Settlement Agreement. This Tank Farm plan discusses the use of each of the eleven HLW tanks and shows that two tanks can be emptied, allowing them to be Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closed by 2006. In addition, it describes the construction of each tank and vault, gives the chemical concentrations of the contents of each tank, based on historical input and some sampling, and discusses the regulatory drivers important to Tank Farm operation. It also discusses new waste generation, the computer model used for the Tank Farm planning, the operating schedule for each tank, and the schedule for when each tank will be empty and closed.

Palmer, W.B.; Millet, C.B.; Staiger, M.D.; Ward, F.S.

1998-04-01

378

Hanford Site Waste Storage Tank Information Notebook  

SciTech Connect

This report provides summary data on the radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 East and West Areas at the Hanford Site. The summary data covers each of the existing 161 Series 100 underground waste storage tanks (500,000 gallons and larger). It also contains information on the design and construction of these tanks. The information in this report is derived from existing reports that document the status of the tanks and their materials. This report also contains interior, surface photographs of each of the 54 Watch List tanks, which are those tanks identified as Priority I Hanford Site Tank Farm Safety Issues in accordance with Public Law 101-510, Section 3137*.

Husa, E.I.; Raymond, R.E.; Welty, R.K.; Griffith, S.M.; Hanlon, B.M.; Rios, R.R.; Vermeulen, N.J.

1993-07-01

379

Pad B Liquid Hydrogen Storage Tank  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Kennedy Space Center is home to two liquid hydrogen storage tanks, one at each launch pad of Launch Complex 39. The liquid hydrogen storage tank at Launch Pad B has a significantly higher boil off rate that the liquid hydrogen storage tank at Launch Pad A. This research looks at various calculations concerning the at Launch Pad B in an attempt to develop a solution to the excess boil off rate. We will look at Perlite levels inside the tank, Boil off rates, conductive heat transfer, and radiant heat transfer through the tank. As a conclusion to the research, we will model the effects of placing an external insulation to the tank in order to reduce the boil off rate and increase the economic efficiency of the liquid hydrogen storage tanks.

Hall, Felicia

2007-01-01

380

Decision document for transuranic tank waste disposal  

SciTech Connect

During the Tank Waste Remediation System systems requirements review, an issue was raised regarding the disposal of potentially transuranic tank waste. This report documents the decision analysis process to resolve this issue. A decision was made to blend the Hanford Site transuranic tank waste with high-level waste for disposal in an offsite repository. In the interim, the transuranic tank waste will remain stored consistent with the existing safety authorization basis and waste compatibility requirements. The transuranic tank waste will not be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for disposal. The decision is justified based on several decision criteria including cost,volume of waste produced, operability, safety, and technical maturity. There is no cost incentive to segregate transuranic tank waste for disposal at Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The additional operating and capital costs required to immobilize segregated transuranic tank waste outweigh the savings gained in disposal cost.

Crawford, T.W.; McConville, C.M., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-24

381

Tank characterization report for double-shell Tank 241-AW-102  

SciTech Connect

This Tank Characterization Report presents an overview of the waste transfer history of Tank 241-AW-102 and contains observations regarding waste characteristics which resulted from the 242-A Evaporator Campaign 94-1. The purpose of this report is to describe and characterize the waste in Tank 241-AW-102 based on information obtained from various sources. Specific objectives for the sampling and characterization of the waste in Tank 241-AW-102 are to: Contribute toward the fulfillment of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) concerning the characterization of Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks and provide tank waste characterization to the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program Elements in accordance with the TWRS Tank Waste Analysis Plan. This report deviates from the standard format for Tank Characterization Reports because of the special nature of the tank. (Tank 241-AW-102 is the designated feed tank for the 242-A Evaporator; consequently, its level and waste composition are constantly changing.) Instead, a broad description of the tank and its historical background are presented. An estimation of the contents of Tank 241-AW-102 based on data presented in O`Rourke (1994) is also presented in this document. Finally, specific safety issues and program element needs are discussed.

DiCenso, A.T.; Amato, L.C.; Franklin, J.D.; Nuttall, G.L.; Tran, T.T. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Kennewick, WA (United States); Simpson, B.C. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-09-28

382

Life Extension of Aging High-Level Waste Tanks  

SciTech Connect

The Double Shell Tanks (DSTs) play a critical role in the Hanford High-Level Waste Treatment Complex, and therefore activities are underway to protect and better understand these tanks. The DST Life Extension Program is focused on both tank life extension and on evaluation of tank integrity. Tank life extension activities focus on understanding tank failure modes and have produced key chemistry and operations controls to minimize tank corrosion and extend useful tank life. Tank integrity program activities have developed and applied key technologies to evaluate the condition of the tank structure and predict useful tank life. Program results to date indicate that DST useful life can be extended well beyond the original design life and allow the existing tanks to fill a critical function within the Hanford High-Level Waste Treatment Complex. In addition the tank life may now be more reliably predicted, facilitating improved planning for the use and possible future replacement of these tanks.

Bryson, D.; Callahan, V.; Ostrom, M.; Bryan, W.; Berman, H.

2002-02-26

383

Synthesis of Seafood Catch, Distribution, and Consumption Patterns in the Gulf of Mexico Region  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this task was to gather and assemble information that will provide a synthesis of seafood catch, distribution and consumption patterns for the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) region. This task was part of a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored project entitled ''Environmental and Economic Assessment of Discharges from Gulf of Mexico Region Oil and Gas Operations.'' Personal interviews were conducted with a total of 905 recreational fishermen and 218 commercial fishermen (inclusive of shrimpers, crabbers, oystermen and finfishermen) in Louisiana and Texas using survey questionnaires developed for the study. Results of these interviews detail the species and quantities caught, location of catch, mode of fishing, distribution of catch, family consumption patterns and demographics of the fishermen.

Steimle and Associates, Inc.

1999-08-16

384

Catch bond mechanism of force-enhanced adhesion: counter-intuitive, elusive but … widespread?  

PubMed Central

Summary Catch bonds are biological interactions that are enhanced by mechanical force pulling a ligand-receptor complex apart. So far, the existence of catch bond-forming cellular adhesins has been ascertained for the most common Escherichia coli adhesin, FimH, and P-/L-selectins universally expressed by leukocytes and blood vessel walls. One compelling model for these force-enhanced interactions proposes that conformation of the ligand-binding pocket in the receptor protein is allosterically linked to the quaternary configuration of the receptor domains. The catch bond properties are likely widespread among adhesive proteins, calling for a detailed understanding of the underpinning mechanisms and physiological significance of this elusive phenomenon. PMID:18854236

Sokurenko, Evgeni V.; Vogel, Viola; Thomas, Wendy E.

2008-01-01

385

Cyclic Stretch Induces Cell Reorientation on Substrates by Destabilizing Catch Bonds in Focal Adhesions  

PubMed Central

A minimal model of cellular mechanosensing system that consists of a single stress fiber adhering on a substrate via two focal adhesions made of catch bonds is adopted to investigate the phenomena of cell reorientation on substrates induced by an applied uniaxial cyclic stretch. The model indicates that the catch bonds in the focal adhesions experience a periodically oscillating internal force with amplitude and frequency controlled by two intrinsic clocks of the stress fiber, one associated with localized activation and the other with homogeneous activation of sarcomere units along the stress fiber. It is shown that this oscillating force due to cyclic stretch tends to destabilize focal adhesions by reducing the lifetime of catch bonds. The resulting slide or relocation of focal adhesions then causes the associated stress fiber to shorten and rotate to configurations nearly perpendicular to the stretching direction. These predicted behaviors from our model are consistent with a wide range of experimental observations. PMID:23152769

Chen, Bin; Kemkemer, Ralf; Deibler, Martin; Spatz, Joachim; Gao, Huajian

2012-01-01

386

By-Catch of Grey Seals (Halichoerus grypus) in Baltic Fisheries—A Bayesian Analysis of Interview Survey  

PubMed Central

Baltic seals are recovering after a population decline. The increasing seal stocks cause notable damage to fisheries in the Baltic Sea, with an unknown number of seals drowning in fishing gear every year. Thus, sustainable seal management requires updated knowledge of the by-catch of seals—the number of specimens that die in fishing gear. We analyse the by-catch of grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) in Finland, Sweden, and Estonia in 2012. We collect data with interviews (35 in Finland, 54 in Sweden, and 72 in Estonia) and analyse them with a hierarchical Bayesian model. The model accounts for variability in seal abundance, seal mortality and fishing effort in different sub-areas of the Baltic Sea and allows us to predict the by-catch in areas where interview data was not available. We provide a detailed description of the survey design and interview methods, and discuss different factors affecting fishermen's motivation to report by-catch and how this may affect the results. Our analysis shows that the total yearly by-catch by trap and gill nets in Finland, Sweden and Estonia is, with 90% probability, more than 1240 but less than 2860; and the posterior median and mean of the total by-catch are 1550 and 1880 seals, respectively. Trap nets make about 88% of the total by-catch. However, results also indicate that in one of the sub-areas of this study, fishermen may have underreported their by-catch. Taking the possible underreporting into account the posterior mean of the total by-catch is between 2180 and 2380. The by-catch in our study area is likely to represent at least 90% of the total yearly grey seal by-catch in the Baltic Sea. PMID:25423168

Vanhatalo, Jarno; Vetemaa, Markus; Herrero, Annika; Aho, Teija; Tiilikainen, Raisa

2014-01-01

387

By-Catch of Grey Seals (Halichoerus grypus) in Baltic Fisheries-A Bayesian Analysis of Interview Survey.  

PubMed

Baltic seals are recovering after a population decline. The increasing seal stocks cause notable damage to fisheries in the Baltic Sea, with an unknown number of seals drowning in fishing gear every year. Thus, sustainable seal management requires updated knowledge of the by-catch of seals-the number of specimens that die in fishing gear. We analyse the by-catch of grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) in Finland, Sweden, and Estonia in 2012. We collect data with interviews (35 in Finland, 54 in Sweden, and 72 in Estonia) and analyse them with a hierarchical Bayesian model. The model accounts for variability in seal abundance, seal mortality and fishing effort in different sub-areas of the Baltic Sea and allows us to predict the by-catch in areas where interview data was not available. We provide a detailed description of the survey design and interview methods, and discuss different factors affecting fishermen's motivation to report by-catch and how this may affect the results. Our analysis shows that the total yearly by-catch by trap and gill nets in Finland, Sweden and Estonia is, with 90% probability, more than 1240 but less than 2860; and the posterior median and mean of the total by-catch are 1550 and 1880 seals, respectively. Trap nets make about 88% of the total by-catch. However, results also indicate that in one of the sub-areas of this study, fishermen may have underreported their by-catch. Taking the possible underreporting into account the posterior mean of the total by-catch is between 2180 and 2380. The by-catch in our study area is likely to represent at least 90% of the total yearly grey seal by-catch in the Baltic Sea. PMID:25423168

Vanhatalo, Jarno; Vetemaa, Markus; Herrero, Annika; Aho, Teija; Tiilikainen, Raisa

2014-01-01

388

Modeling the potential benefits of catch-crop introduction in fodder crop rotations in a Western Europe landscape.  

PubMed

Among possible mitigation options to reduce agricultural-borne nitrate fluxes to water bodies, introduction of catch crop before spring crops is acknowledged as a cost-efficient solution at the plot scale, but it was rarely assessed at the catchment level. This study aims to evaluate a set of catch crop implantation scenarios and their consequences in a coastal catchment prone to eutrophication. The objectives are (i) to discuss the potential benefits of catch crop introduction taking into account the limitations due to the physiographic and agricultural context of the area (ii) to propose a multicriteria classification of these scenarios as a basis for discussion with stakeholders. We used the distributed agro-hydrological model TNT2 to simulate 25 scenarios of catch crop management, differing in length of catch crop growing period, place in the crop rotation and residue management. The scenarios were classified considering the variations in main crop yields and either nitrogen fluxes in stream or the global nitrogen mass balance at the catchment level. The simulations showed that in the catchment studied, little improvement can be expected from increasing the catch crop surface. Catch crop cultivation was always beneficial to reduce nitrogen losses, but led to adverse effects on main crop yields in some cases. Among the scenarios involving additional catch crop surface, introducing catch crop between two winter cereals appeared as the most promising. The classification of scenarios depended on the chosen criteria: when considering only the reduction of nitrogen fluxes in streams, exporting catch crop residues was the most efficient while when considering the global nitrogen mass balance, soil incorporation of catch crop residues was the most beneficial. This work highlights the interest, while using integrated models, of assessing simulated scenarios with multicriteria approach to provide stakeholder with a picture as complete as possible of the consequences of prospective policies. PMID:22944220

Moreau, P; Ruiz, L; Raimbault, T; Vertès, F; Cordier, M O; Gascuel-Odoux, C; Masson, V; Salmon-Monviola, J; Durand, P

2012-10-15

389

CRITICAL ASSUMPTIONS IN THE F-TANK FARM CLOSURE OPERATIONAL DOCUMENTATION REGARDING WASTE TANK INTERNAL CONFIGURATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The intent of this document is to provide clarification of critical assumptions regarding the internal configurations of liquid waste tanks at operational closure, with respect to F-Tank Farm (FTF) closure documentation. For the purposes of this document, FTF closure documentation includes: (1) Performance Assessment for the F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (hereafter referred to as the FTF PA) (SRS-REG-2007-00002), (2) Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Closure of F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (DOE/SRS-WD-2012-001), (3) Tier 1 Closure Plan for the F-Area Waste Tank Systems at the Savannah River Site (SRR-CWDA-2010-00147), (4) F-Tank Farm Tanks 18 and 19 DOE Manual 435.1-1 Tier 2 Closure Plan Savannah River Site (SRR-CWDA-2011-00015), (5) Industrial Wastewater Closure Module for the Liquid Waste Tanks 18 and 19 (SRRCWDA-2010-00003), and (6) Tank 18/Tank 19 Special Analysis for the Performance Assessment for the F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (hereafter referred to as the Tank 18/Tank 19 Special Analysis) (SRR-CWDA-2010-00124). Note that the first three FTF closure documents listed apply to the entire FTF, whereas the last three FTF closure documents listed are specific to Tanks 18 and 19. These two waste tanks are expected to be the first two tanks to be grouted and operationally closed under the current suite of FTF closure documents and many of the assumptions and approaches that apply to these two tanks are also applicable to the other FTF waste tanks and operational closure processes.

Hommel, S.; Fountain, D.

2012-03-28

390

The influence of catch trials on the consolidation of motor memory in force field adaptation tasks  

PubMed Central

In computational neuroscience it is generally accepted that human motor memory contains neural representations of the physics of the musculoskeletal system and the objects in the environment. These representations are called “internal models”. Force field studies, in which subjects have to adapt to dynamic perturbations induced by a robotic manipulandum, are an established tool to analyze the characteristics of such internal models. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether catch trials during force field learning could influence the consolidation of motor memory in more complex tasks. Thereby, the force field was more than double the force field of previous studies (35 N·s/m). Moreover, the arm of the subjects was not supported. A total of 46 subjects participated in this study and performed center-out movements at a robotic manipulandum in two different force fields. Two control groups learned force field A on day 1 and were retested in the same force field on day 3 (AA). Two test groups additionally learned an interfering force field B (= ?A) on day 2 (ABA). The difference between the two test and control groups, respectively, was the absence (0%) or presence (19%) of catch trials, in which the force field was turned-off suddenly. The results showed consolidation of force field A on day 3 for both control groups. Test groups showed no consolidation of force field A (19% catch trials) and even poorer performance on day 3 (0% catch trials). In conclusion, it can be stated that catch trials seem to have a positive effect on the performance on day 3 but do not trigger a consolidation process as shown in previous studies that used a lower force field viscosity with supported arm. These findings indicate that the results of previous studies in which less complex tasks were analyzed, cannot be fully transferred to more complex tasks. Moreover, the effects of catch trials in these situations are insufficiently understood and further research is needed. PMID:23898319

Focke, Anne; Stockinger, Christian; Diepold, Christina; Taubert, Marco; Stein, Thorsten

2013-01-01

391

Effects of Catch-and-Release Angling on Salmonids at Elevated Water Temperatures  

SciTech Connect

Few studies have assessed catch and release mortality of salmonids at water temperatures ?23°C, despite predictions of warming stream temperatures due to climate change. In addition, the effects of diel temperature fluctuations on salmonid mortality have largely been ignored in catch and release angling studies. The primary objective of this study was to measure catch and release mortality of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, brown trout Salmo trutta, and mountain whitefish Prosopium williamsoni in three water temperature treatments; when daily maximum water temperatures were cool (<20°C), warm (20 to 22.9°C), and hot ( 23°C). A secondary objective was to assess catch and release mortality of salmonids angled in morning and evening within water-temperature treatments. These objectives were related to Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks’ Drought Fishing Closure Policy (DFCP). Angling (fly-fishing only) occurred in the Gallatin and Smith rivers. All angled fish were confined to in-stream holding cages and monitored for mortality for 72 h. Mortality of rainbow trout peaked at 16% in the Gallatin River and 9% in the Smith River during the hot treatment. Mortality of brown trout was less than 5% in all water-temperature treatments in both rivers. Mountain whitefish mortality peaked at 28% in the hot treatment in the Smith River. No mortality for any species occurred in either river when daily maximum water temperatures were <20°C. Mortality of rainbow trout peaked at 16% in the evening hot treatment in the Smith River. Mortality of brown trout and mountain whitefish was not related to time of day. The catch and release mortality values presented here likely represent fishing mortality given that most anglers in southwest Montana practice catch and release angling. The mortality values we observed were lower than predicted (< 30%), given reports in the literature. The difference is likely related to the in situ nature of the study and periods of cooler water temperatures between peaks facilitating recovery from thermal stress.

Boyd, James W.; Guy, Christopher S.; Horton, Travis; Leathe, Steven A.

2010-08-01

392

The influence of Community Access to Child Health (CATCH) program on community pediatrics.  

PubMed

The CATCH (Community Access to Child Health) Program, which supports pediatricians who engage with the community to improve child health, increase access to health care, and promote advocacy through small seed grants, was last evaluated in 1998. The objective was to describe the characteristics of CATCH grant recipients and projects and assess the community impact of funded projects. Prospective data was collected from CATCH applications (grantee characteristics, topic area and target population for projects funded from 2006-2012) and post-project 2-year follow-up survey (project outcomes, sustainability, and impact for projects funded from 2008 through 2010). From 2006 through 2012, the CATCH Program awarded 401 projects to grantees working mostly in general pediatrics. Eighty-five percent of projects targeted children covered by Medicaid, 33% targeted uninsured children, and 75% involved a Latino population. Main topic areas addressed were nutrition, access to health care, and medical home. Sixty-nine percent of grantees from 2008 to 2010 responded to the follow-up survey. Ninety percent reported completing their projects, and 86% of those projects continued to exist in some form. Grantees reported the development of community partnerships (77%) and enhanced recognition of child health issues in the community (73%) as the most frequent changes due to the projects. The CATCH Program funds community-based projects led by pediatricians that address the medical home and access to care. A majority of these projects and community partnerships are sustained beyond their original CATCH funding and, in many cases, are leveraged into additional financial or other community support. PMID:24323996

Soares, Neelkamal S; Hobson, Wendy L; Ruch-Ross, Holly; Finneran, Maureen; Varrasso, Denia A; Keller, David

2014-01-01

393

Submerged tank aids platform stability  

SciTech Connect

A new floating platform concept, proposed for the installation of a new lighthouse, 64 km off Ouessant Island, northwest France, in water 130 meters deep, is described. A series of model tests carried out in test tanks in 1983 demonstrated that this new concept is viable in the offshore business as an alternative for deep and rough seas. The key to the success of this design is primarily the location and shape of a large, submerged buoyancy tank - a floater sandwiched between a conventional rig topside and a rigid, vertically suspended counter-weight. The floater balanced by a counter-weight acts as a damper and minimizes the effect of most wave action. This configuration permits a considerable gain in structure weight, improves stability and allows the structure to support a very high deck load with or without storage facilities when used as a production platform.

Compagnon, J.P.

1985-05-01

394

Investigating leaking underground storage tanks  

E-print Network

an analysis of pertinent data, modified. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I thank those who assisted me during the field investigation portion of this research project: Tim Dale, Janice Smith-Bagheri, and Dave White (driller). Without their assistance and suggestions... LEAKING UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK CASE STUDY Previous Work . Drilling, Sampling, and Well Construction Drilling Method and Equipment . Sampling Considerations . Sampling Methods Sampling Procedure Well Design and Construction Analysis of Data...

Upton, David Thompson

1989-01-01

395

241-SY Tank Farm Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for tanks 241-SY-101, 241-SY-102, and 241-SY-103. The construction history of the 241-SY tank farm has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank 241-AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank 241-AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In the 241-SY tank farm, the third DST farm constructed, refractory quality and stress relief were improved, while similar tank and liner fabrication issues remained.

Barnes, Travis J.; Boomer, Kayle D.; Gunter, Jason R.; Venetz, Theodore J.

2013-07-25

396

241-AZ Tank Farm Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102. The construction history of the 241-AZ tank farm has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In the 241-AZ tank farm, the second DST farm constructed, both refractory quality and tank and liner fabrication were improved.

Barnes, Travis J.; Boomer, Kayle D.; Gunter, Jason R.; Venetz, Theodore J.

2013-07-30

397

Chemical composition of Hanford Tank SY-102  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) to safely manage and dispose of the radioactive waste, both current and future, stored in double-shell and single-shell tanks at the Hanford sites. One major program element in TWRS is pretreatment which was established to process the waste prior to disposal using the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant. In support of this program, Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a conceptual process flow sheet which will remediate the entire contents of a selected double-shelled underground waste tank, including supernatant and sludge, into forms that allow storage and final disposal in a safe, cost-effective and environmentally sound manner. The specific tank selected for remediation is 241-SY-102 located in the 200 West Area. As part of the flow sheet development effort, the composition of the tank was defined and documented. This database was built by examining the history of liquid waste transfers to the tank and by performing careful analysis of all of the analytical data that have been gathered during the tank`s lifetime. In order to more completely understand the variances in analytical results, material and charge balances were done to help define the chemistry of the various components in the tank. This methodology of defining the tank composition and the final results are documented in this report.

Birnbaum, E.; Agnew, S.; Jarvinen, G.; Yarbro, S.

1993-12-01

398

Hanford waste tank bump accident analysis  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a new evaluation of the Hanford tank bump accident analysis (HNF-SD-Wh4-SAR-067 2001). The purpose of the new evaluation is to consider new information and to support new recommendations for final safety controls. This evaluation considers historical data, industrial failure modes, plausible accident scenarios, and system responses. A tank bump is a postulated event in which gases, consisting mostly of water vapor, are suddenly emitted from the waste and cause tank headspace pressurization. A tank bump is distinguished from a gas release event in two respects: First, the physical mechanism for release involves vaporization of locally superheated liquid, and second, gases emitted to the head space are not flammable. For this reason, a tank bump is often called a steam bump. In this report, even though non-condensible gases may be considered in bump models, flammability and combustion of emitted gases are not. The analysis scope is safe storage of waste in its current configuration in single-shell tanks (SSTs) and double-shell tanks (DSTs). The analysis considers physical mechanisms for tank bump to formulate criteria for bump potential, application of the criteria to the tanks, and accident analysis of bump scenarios. The result of consequence analysis is the mass of waste released from tanks for specific scenarios where bumps are credible; conversion to health consequences is performed elsewhere using standard Hanford methods (Cowley et al. 2000). The analysis forms a baseline for future extension to consider waste retrieval.

MALINOVIC, B.

2003-03-21

399

Seasonal Variation in Catch Rate and Body Condition for Four Fish Species in a South Dakota Natural Lake  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seasonal variation in catch rate (catch per unit effort, CPUE) and body condition (relative weight, Wr) for northern pike Esox lucius, black crappie Pomoxis nigromaculatus, yellow perch Perca flavescens, and walleye Stizostedion vitreum sampled with trap (modified fyke) nets was evaluated in Lake Madison, a natural lake in eastern South Dakota, from March through October, 1990. Seasonal variation in CPUE

Christopher S. Guy; David W. Willis

1991-01-01

400

77 FR 61299 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Catch Limit) Harvested for Management Area 3 AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service...directed herring fishery in Management Area 3, because 95 percent of the catch limit for...calendar day of Atlantic herring in or from Area 3 until January 1, 2013, when the 2013...

2012-10-09

401

Foreign Fishery Developments Fleet Table 1.-The Ivory Coast catch of tuna and tunalike species, 1971-78'.  

E-print Network

Foreign Fishery Developments Fleet Catch (t) Table 1.-The Ivory Coast catch of tuna and tuna,83 7,420 10,026 10,138 The Ivory Coast tuna fleet, while small, is the most modem of any African. It is the sixth tuna vessel ordered by the Ivory Coast- French joint venture SIPAR (Societe Ivoirienne de Peche et

402

Phosphorylation of a high molecular weight (,600 kDa) protein regulates catch in invertebrate smooth muscle  

E-print Network

muscle, the degree of phosphorylation of the protein increases signi®cantly when catch is released with serotonin. In muscles pre-treated with serotonin, a net dephosphorylation of the protein occurs when the muscle is subsequently put into catch. We conclude that the phosphorylation state of the ,600 kDa protein

Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura

403

Spatially explicit estimates of stocks sizes, structure and biomass of herring and blue whiting, and catch data of bluefin tuna  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The north Atlantic is a productive marine region which has supported important commercial fisheries for centuries. Many of these fisheries have exploited the pelagic species, including herring, blue whiting and tuna. Here we present data on the distribution of herring and blue whiting based on surveys in the Norwegian Sea, the Bay of Biscay and Celtic Sea. We also present catch data on bluefin tuna, which has been depleted for decades, but historically used to be a key predator on the other pelagic stocks during summer. The results show that there have been substantial changes in the herring and blue whiting distribution during the 1990s and early 2000s. The earliest bluefin tuna catches noted were in 1907. The catches in the Norwegian Sea area peaked in the 1950s and there have been very small catches since the 1980s. The catches in the Mediterranean on the other hand peaked in the late 1990, and had subsequently a strong reduction.

Huse, G.; MacKenzie, B. R.; Trenkel, V.; Doray, M.; Nøttestad, L.; Oskarsson, G.

2014-07-01

404

LH2 fuel tank design for SSTO  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This report will discuss the design of a liquid hydrogen fuel tank constructed from composite materials. The focus of this report is to recommend a design for a fuel tank which will be able to withstand all static and dynamic forces during manned flight. Areas of study for the design include material selection, material structural analysis, heat transfer, thermal expansion, and liquid hydrogen diffusion. A structural analysis FORTRAN program was developed for analyzing the buckling and yield characteristics of the tank. A thermal analysis Excel spreadsheet was created to determine a specific material thickness which will minimize heat transfer through the wall of the tank. The total mass of the tank was determined by the combination of both structural and thermal analyses. The report concludes with the recommendation of a layered material tank construction. The designed system will include exterior insulation, combination of metal and organize composite matrices and honeycomb.

Wright, Geoff

405

LH2 fuel tank design for SSTO  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report will discuss the design of a liquid hydrogen fuel tank constructed from composite materials. The focus of this report is to recommend a design for a fuel tank which will be able to withstand all static and dynamic forces during manned flight. Areas of study for the design include material selection, material structural analysis, heat transfer, thermal expansion, and liquid hydrogen diffusion. A structural analysis FORTRAN program was developed for analyzing the buckling and yield characteristics of the tank. A thermal analysis Excel spreadsheet was created to determine a specific material thickness which will minimize heat transfer through the wall of the tank. The total mass of the tank was determined by the combination of both structural and thermal analyses. The report concludes with the recommendation of a layered material tank construction. The designed system will include exterior insulation, combination of metal and organize composite matrices and honeycomb.

Wright, Geoff

1994-01-01

406

49 CFR 173.315 - Compressed gases in cargo tanks and portable tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Additional gauging devices may be installed but may not be used as primary controls for filling...or portable tank. Primary gauging devices used on cargo...tank. (2) If the primary gauging device is...

2012-10-01

407

49 CFR 173.315 - Compressed gases in cargo tanks and portable tanks.  

...Additional gauging devices may be installed but may not be used as primary controls for filling...or portable tank. Primary gauging devices used on cargo...tank. (2) If the primary gauging device is...

2014-10-01

408

49 CFR 173.315 - Compressed gases in cargo tanks and portable tanks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Additional gauging devices may be installed but may not be used as primary controls for filling...or portable tank. Primary gauging devices used on cargo...tank. (2) If the primary gauging device is...

2013-10-01

409

Load Distribution of Railway Tank Car in Fluid Sloshing  

Microsoft Academic Search

In most structural analysis and fatigue calculations of tank car, researchers would directly input the horizontal inertial force of the fluid on the end wall of the tank as the pressure of the tank wall. In fact, the fluid will influences the distribution of pressure on the tank end wall. Especially when the viscosity of the liquid inside tank is

Jimin Zhang; Yongqiang Wang; Jun Liu

2009-01-01

410

Waste Acceptance for Vitrified Sludge from Oak Ridge Tank Farms  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Tanks Focus Area of the DOE`s Office of Science and Technology (EM-50) has funded the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) to develop formulations which can incorporate sludges from Oak Ridge Tank Farms into immobilized glass waste forms. The four tank farms included in this study are: Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST), Bethel Valley Evaporation Service Tanks (BVEST), Gunite and

J. R. Harbour; M. K. Andrews

1998-01-01

411

92. VIEW OF PRECIPITATION AREA FROM SOUTHWEST. VACUUM CLARIFIER TANK ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

92. VIEW OF PRECIPITATION AREA FROM SOUTHWEST. VACUUM CLARIFIER TANK No. 1 AT LOWER LEFT, UNDER LAUNDER FEED TO GOLD TANK No. 2, AND VACUUM CLARIFIER TANK No. 2, AT MIDRIGHT. VACUUM RECEIVER TANK ON UPPER LEFT. PIPE TO TOP CENTER OF TANK TAKES OUTFLOW FROM CLARIFIER LEAVES. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

412

Project Catch: A space based solution to combat illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing. Part I: Vessel monitoring system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Space assets have a unique opportunity to play a more active role in global resource management. There is a clear need to develop resource management tools in a global framework. Illegal, Unregulated and Unreported (IUU) fishing is placing pressure on the health and size of fishing stocks around the world. Earth observation systems can provide fishery management organizations with cost effective monitoring of large swaths of ocean. Project Catch is a fisheries management project based upon the complimentary, but independent Catch-VMS and Catch-GIS systems. Catch-VMS is a Vessel Monitoring System with increased fidelity over existing offerings. Catch-GIS is a Geographical Information System that combines VMS information with existing Earth Observation data and other data sources to identify Illegal, Unregulated and Unreported (IUU) fishing. Project Catch was undertaken by 19 Masters students from the 2010 class of the International Space University. In this paper, the space-based system architecture of Project Catch is presented and analyzed. The rationale for the creation of the system, as well as the engineering trade-off studies in its creation, are discussed. The Catch-VMS proposal was envisaged in order to address two specific problems: (1) the expansion of illegal fishing to high-latitude regions where existing satellite systems coverage is an issue and (2) the lack of coverage in remote oceanic regions due to reliance on coastal-based monitoring. Catch-VMS utilizes ship-borne transponders and hosted-payload receivers on a Global Navigation Satellite System in order to monitor the position and activity of compliant fishing vessels. Coverage is global and continuous with multiple satellites in view providing positional verification through multilateration techniques. The second part of the paper briefly describes the Catch-GIS system and investigates its cost of implementation.

Detsis, Emmanouil; Brodsky, Yuval; Knudtson, Peter; Cuba, Manuel; Fuqua, Heidi; Szalai, Bianca

2012-11-01

413

Nonvented Filling Of A Cryogenic Tank  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Chilling before filling reduces ullage. Report describes experiments on nonvented filling of tank designed to store cryogenic liquids. Experiments showed if tank first chilled and evacuated, it can then be filled to more than 90 percent of its capacity without venting, provided conditions of chilling, initial tank pressure, and filling chosen properly. Developed for space applications, also useful in ground-based operations where venting impractical or hazardous.

Chato, David J.; Moran, Matthew E.; Nyland, Ted W.; Nakanishi, Shigeo

1992-01-01

414

Stabilization of In-Tank Residual Wastes and External-Tank Soil Contamination for the Hanford Tank Closure Program: Applications to the AX Tank Farm  

Microsoft Academic Search

Technical support for the Hanford Tank Closure Program focused on evaluation of concepts for immobilization of residual contaminants in the Hanford AX tanks and underlying soils, and identification of cost-effective approaches to improve long-term performance of AX tank farm cIosure systems. Project objectives are to develop materials or engineered systems that would significantly reduce the radionuclide transport to the groundwater

H. L. Anderson; B. P. Dwyer; C. Ho; J. L. Krumhansl; G. McKeen; M. A. Molecke; H. R. Westrich; P. Zhang

1998-01-01

415

ICPP tank farm closure study. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The disposition of INEEL radioactive wastes is now under a Settlement Agreement between the DOE and the State of Idaho. The Settlement Agreement requires that existing liquid sodium bearing waste (SBW), and other liquid waste inventories be treated by December 31, 2012. This agreement also requires that all HLW, including calcined waste, be disposed or made road ready to ship from the INEEL by 2035. Sodium bearing waste (SBW) is produced from decontamination operations and HLW from reprocessing of SNF. SBW and HLW are radioactive and hazardous mixed waste; the radioactive constituents are regulated by DOE and the hazardous constituents are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Calcined waste, a dry granular material, is produced in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF). Two primary waste tank storage locations exist at the ICPP: Tank Farm Facility (TFF) and the Calcined Solids Storage Facility (CSSF). The TFF has the following underground storage tanks: four 18,400-gallon tanks (WM 100-102, WL 101); four 30,000-gallon tanks (WM 103-106); and eleven 300,000+ gallon tanks. This includes nine 300,000-gallon tanks (WM 182-190) and two 318,000 gallon tanks (WM 180-181). This study analyzes the closure and subsequent use of the eleven 300,000+ gallon tanks. The 18,400 and 30,000-gallon tanks were not included in the work scope and will be closed as a separate activity. This study was conducted to support the HLW Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) waste separations options and addresses closure of the 300,000-gallon liquid waste storage tanks and subsequent tank void uses. A figure provides a diagram estimating how the TFF could be used as part of the separations options. Other possible TFF uses are also discussed in this study.

Spaulding, B.C.; Gavalya, R.A.; Dahlmeir, M.M. [and others

1998-02-01

416

ANNUAL RADIOACTIVE WASTE TANK INSPECTION PROGRAM 2010  

SciTech Connect

Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations and vitrification processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 2010 to evaluate these vessels and other waste handling facilities along with evaluations based on data from previous inspections are the subject of this report. The 2010 inspection program revealed that the structural integrity and waste confinement capability of the Savannah River Site waste tanks were maintained. All inspections scheduled per SRR-LWE-2009-00138, HLW Tank Farm Inspection Plan for 2010, were completed. Ultrasonic measurements (UT) performed in 2010 met the requirements of C-ESG-00006, In-Service Inspection Program for High Level Waste Tanks, Rev. 3, and WSRC-TR-2002-00061, Rev.6. UT inspections were performed on Tanks 30, 31 and 32 and the findings are documented in SRNL-STI-2010-00533, Tank Inspection NDE Results for Fiscal Year 2010, Waste Tanks 30, 31 and 32. A total of 5824 photographs were made and 1087 visual and video inspections were performed during 2010. Ten new leaksites at Tank 5 were identified in 2010. The locations of these leaksites are documented in C-ESR-G-00003, SRS High Level Waste Tank Leaksite Information, Rev.5. Ten leaksites at Tank 5 were documented during tank wall/annulus cleaning activities. None of these new leaksites resulted in a release to the environment. The leaksites were documented during wall cleaning activities and the waste nodules associated with the leaksites were washed away. Previously documented leaksites were reactivated at Tank 12 during waste removal activities.

West, B.; Waltz, R.

2011-06-23

417

Tank characterization report for double-shell tank 241-AN-102  

SciTech Connect

This characterization report summarizes the available information on the historical uses, current status, and sampling and analysis results of waste stored in double-shell underground storage tank 241- AN-102. This report supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, Milestone M-44-09 (Ecology et al. 1996). Tank 241-AN-102 is one of seven double-shell tanks located in the AN Tank Farm in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. The tank was hydrotested in 1981, and when the water was removed, a 6-inch heel was left. Tank 241-AN-102 began receiving waste from tank 241-SY-102 beginning in 1982. The tank was nearly emptied in the third quarter of 1983, leaving only 125 kL (33 kgal) of waste. Between the fourth quarter of 1983 and the first quarter of 1984, tank 241-AN-102 received waste from tanks 241-AY-102, 241-SY-102, 241-AW-105, and 241- AN-101. The tank was nearly emptied in the second quarter of 1984, leaving a heel of 129 kL (34 kgal). During the second and third quarters of 1984, the tank was filled with concentrated complexant waste from tank 241-AW-101. Since that time, only minor amounts of Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant miscellaneous waste and water have been received; there have been no waste transfer to or from the tank since 1992. Therefore, the waste currently in the tank is considered to be concentrated complexant waste. Tank 241-AN-102 is sound and is not included on any of the Watch Lists.

Jo, J., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-08-29

418

Tank Closure Progress at the Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Tank Farm Facility  

SciTech Connect

Significant progress has been made at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to empty, clean and close radioactive liquid waste storage tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Tank Farm Facility (TFF). The TFF includes eleven 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) underground stainless steel storage tanks and four smaller, 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) stainless steel tanks, along with tank vaults, interconnecting piping, and ancillary equipment. The TFF tanks have historically been used to store a variety of radioactive liquid waste, including wastes associated with past spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. Although four of the large storage tanks remain in use for waste storage, the other seven 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) tanks and the four 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) tanks have been emptied of waste, cleaned and filled with grout. A water spray cleaning system was developed and deployed to clean internal tank surfaces and remove remaining tank wastes. The cleaning system was effective in removing all but a very small volume of solid residual waste particles. Recent issuance of an Amended Record of Decision (ROD) in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act, and a Waste Determination complying with Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2005, has allowed commencement of grouting activities on the cleaned tanks. The first three 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) tanks were grouted in the Fall of 2006 and the fourth tank and the seven 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) tanks were filled with grout in 2007 to provide long-term stability. It is currently planned that associated tank valve boxes and interconnecting piping, will be stabilized with grout as early as 2008. (authors)

Quigley, K.D. [CH2M..WG Idaho, LLC, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Butterworth, St.W. [CH2M..WG Idaho, LLC, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lockie, K.A. [U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

2008-07-01

419

Tank 241-C-111 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-C-111. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedures that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank.

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31

420

Tank 241-C-109 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-C-109. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedures that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank.

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-10

421

Tank 241-C-105 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-C-105. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedures that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank.

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31

422

Tank 241-C-107 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-C-107. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedures that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank.

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31

423

Tank 241-C-110 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-C-110. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedure that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank.

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31

424

Tank 241-T-107 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-T-107. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedure that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank.

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31

425

Catch Me if You Can: A Projection of Southeast Alaskan Coho Salmon Populations  

E-print Network

to mimic the Coho life cycle. Our model estimates salmon stocks based on the parameters of initial stock and the Southeast . . . . . 7 4.2 The Life Cycle of Coho Salmon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 4.3 CohoCatch Me if You Can: A Projection of Southeast Alaskan Coho Salmon Populations Control Team 51

Morrow, James A.

426

Kinesthetic Ability as Related to a Ball Catching Task with Dominant and Non-Dominant Hands.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was designed to investigate a specific skill pattern as it relates to kinesthetics and hand dominance. The specific skill pattern investigated was the ability of subjects, using either their dominant or nondominant hand, to catch a ball when they were unable to see their arm or hand. An "L" shaped curtain containing a hole for the ball…

Watz, Karyl A.; Eskridge, Veronica L.

427

Temporal and Spatial Distribution of Catches of Tiger Sharks, Galeocerdo cuvier, in the Pelagic Longline  

E-print Network

Temporal and Spatial Distribution of Catches of Tiger Sharks, Galeocerdo cuvier, in the Pelagic The tiger shark, Galeocerdo cuvier, has a circumglobal distribution in tropi cal and temperate oceans (Randall, 1992). While considered a nearshore shark, returns of tagged tiger sharks from the east coast

428

Strategy of recreational anglers and estimated eel (Anguilla anguilla) catches in a large European catchment  

E-print Network

Strategy of recreational anglers and estimated eel (Anguilla anguilla) catches in a large European (18 September 2007) for the recovery of eel stocks required European states to report on eel stocks% in the departments with the most eels, and between 0.1 and 0.2% in the departments located further upstream

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

429

LETTER doi:10.1038/nature12156 Signature of ocean warming in global fisheries catch  

E-print Network

LETTER doi:10.1038/nature12156 Signature of ocean warming in global fisheries catch William W. L changes in sea surface temperature5 . This study shows that ocean warming has already affected global. Cheung1 , Reg Watson2 & Daniel Pauly3 Marine fishes and invertebrates respond to ocean warming through

Pauly, Daniel

430

Project Catch-Up (Newport-Mesa Unified School District, California): Analysis and Selection Kit.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Project Catch-Up is a reading and math laboratory project for kindergarten through sixth-grade students. It features highly qualified teachers and aides who teach in the morning only, in an attractive, well-equipped laboratory, using an eclectic approach. Staff members are free to use whatever techniques they choose and to purchase instructional…

RMC Research Corp., Mountain View, CA.

431

EFFECTIVENESS OF ESCAPE VENT SHAPE IN TRAPS FOR CATCHING LEGAL-SIZED LOBSTER, HOMARUS AMERICANUS,  

E-print Network

EFFECTIVENESS OF ESCAPE VENT SHAPE IN TRAPS FOR CATCHING LEGAL-SIZED LOBSTER, HOMARUS AMERICANUS was conducted to find an escape vent that would select similar sized lobsters as the rectangular vent, yet.4 mm) vents release shorts and retain legal lobsters (;;;'81 mm carapace length) equally well

432

DreamThrower: Creating, Throwing and Catching Dreams for Collaborative Dream Sharing  

E-print Network

on preliminary results, the sound and light stimuli were found to have little influence on their dreams. OurDreamThrower: Creating, Throwing and Catching Dreams for Collaborative Dream Sharing Noreen Kamal 1.2 tsoul@ece.ubc.ca, 1 alhajria@interchange.ubc.ca, 1.3 ssfels@ece.ubc.ca Abstract. The Dream

Boyer, Edmond

433

For the pain in fish(eries) Consequenses of pain perception in fish for catch  

E-print Network

For the pain in fish(eries) Consequenses of pain perception in fish for catch and release fishing 2 DO FISH FEEL PAIN? VIEWS FROM A SCIENTIFIC PERSPECTIVE 4 Sensing pain 4 Experiencing pain 5 Pain could not sense pain (Rowan 1984). Also subsequent philosophers, such as Augustin (354-430) and Aquinas

Bech, Claus

434

76 FR 17808 - Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Mechanism for Specifying Annual Catch Limits and Accountability...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...0648-AY93 Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Mechanism for Specifying Annual Catch Limits and...amendments establish a procedural framework (mechanism) that the Council would use to set ACLs...fishery management plans that include a mechanism for specifying ACLs at a level such...

2011-03-31

435

76 FR 37285 - Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Mechanism for Specifying Annual Catch Limits and Accountability...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...0648-AY93 Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Mechanism for Specifying Annual Catch Limits and...that fishery management plans include a mechanism for specifying ACLs at a level such that...use. This final rule implements the mechanism that NMFS will use to specify...

2011-06-27

436

Laterality differences in elite ice hockey: an investigation of shooting and catching orientations.  

PubMed

Little is known about the implications of motor asymmetries for skilled performers in dynamic, time-constrained, team-based activities such as ice hockey. Three studies were conducted to examine laterality differences in ice hockey. Study 1 investigated laterality distributions across three leagues of increasing calibre. Among skating players, skill level was related to changes in laterality patterns based on position, while a significant increase in the proportion of left-catching goaltenders was found across the levels of competition. Study 2 examined laterality differences through a 90-year retrospective analysis of player performance measures within an evolving system. Regression analysis indicated right shot preferences were associated with scoring more goals, while left shot preferences were related to assisting more goals. Among goaltenders, right-catching preferences were associated with an increased save percentage compared with left-catching goaltenders. In Study 3, player-goaltender shootout interactions revealed left shooters to be less successful against right-catching goaltenders. Results suggest ice hockey supports models of skilled perception, and provide new information in the area of laterality and strategic frequency-dependent effects in ice hockey. PMID:21058167

Puterman, Jared; Schorer, Jörg; Baker, Joseph

2010-12-01

437

The By-catch From the Artisanal Shrimp Trawl Fishery, Gulf of Paria, Trinidad  

E-print Network

The By-catch From the Artisanal Shrimp Trawl Fishery, Gulf of Paria, Trinidad VISHWANIE MAHARAJ in the GulfofParia, Trinidad. From August 1986 to May 1987, 34 late evening-early morning trawl trips were made, Animal and Veterinary Science, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02881. In Trinidad, the artisanal

438

Try/CATCH 2013Computing and Technology Conference for HER Sponsorship Opportunities  

E-print Network

mentors. Try/CATCH will provide snacks, lunch, live music and a reception for the students sponsorship coordinator, Marjan Rouhipour at: mrouhipo@sfu.ca. Benefits · Inspire high school their secondary education · Encourage the girls to explore the different computing science

Hell, Pavol

439

Incidental Catch of Marine Mammals by Foreign Fishing Vessels, 1978-81  

E-print Network

Incidental Catch of Marine Mammals by Foreign Fishing Vessels, 1978-81 THOMAS R. LOUGHLIN, LEWIS CONSIGLIERI, ROBERT L. DELONG, and ANN T ACTOR Introduction Passage of the Marine Mammal Pro- tection Act (MMPA) of 1972 established a moratorium on the taking of marine mammals. Exceptions to the moratorium

440

Police Posing as Juveniles Online to Catch Sex Offenders: Is It Working?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores the extent and effectiveness of proactive investigations in which investigators pose as minors on the Internet to catch potential sex offenders. It utilizes a subsample of cases from the National Juvenile Online Victimization Survey, which concerned persons arrested for Internet sex crimes against minors in the year beginning July 1, 2000. Results suggest proactive investigations represented a

Kimberly J. Mitchell; Janis Wolak; David Finkelhor

2005-01-01

441

How France is going to catch up on marine renewable technologies?  

E-print Network

3 10 30? MRE in France >20% of electric mix (without OTEC) #12;A Public-Private PartnershipHow France is going to catch up on marine renewable technologies? Marc BOEUF, R&D Manager 2013 Martinique project Surface water pump Deep water pipes Mooring lines #12;Air-conditioning & heat pump

Canet, Léonie

442

Dynamics of unbinding of cell adhesion molecules: Transition from catch to slip bonds  

E-print Network

Dynamics of unbinding of cell adhesion molecules: Transition from catch to slip bonds V. Barsegov by the hydrodynamic flow field. Because of the requirement of adhesive interaction and the breakage of such bonds could also prolong bond lifetimes by deforming the adhesion complexes into an alternative locked

Barsegov, Valeri

443

The California Red Sea Urchin, Strongylocentrotus franc;scanus, Fishery: Catch, Effort, and Management Trends  

E-print Network

The California Red Sea Urchin, Strongylocentrotus franc;scanus, Fishery: Catch, Effort are found in the nearshore coastal waters of California, the red sea urchin, Strongy locentrotus franciscanus, and purple sea urchin, S. purpuratus. While both are fished commercially for their highly val ued

444

Telemetry reveals how catch and release affects prespawning migration in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)  

E-print Network

and the daily probability that a fish would cross a fish ladder, while water discharge influenced daily distance: With the decline of many exploited fish populations, catch and release has become an increasingly used management practice to allow sport fishing while reducing its impact on wild populations. However, survival

Bernatchez, Louis

445

Designing I*CATch: A Multipurpose, Education-Friendly Construction Kit for Physical and Wearable Computing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents the design and development of i*CATch, a construction kit for physical and wearable computing that was designed to be scalable, plug-and-play, and to provide support for iterative and exploratory learning. It consists of a standardized construction interface that can be adapted for a wide range of soft textiles or electronic…

Ngai, Grace; Chan, Stephen C. F.; Leong, Hong Va; Ng, Vincent T. Y.

2013-01-01

446

A Method for Correcting Catches of Fish Larvae For the Size Selection of Plankton Nets  

E-print Network

A Method for Correcting Catches of Fish Larvae For the Size Selection of Plankton Nets David A (Pc) varies with larval length. Pecan be considered as the probability of capturing a larva, and this): (1) (3) (2) N=~, PePr where Pe is equal to 1 minus the probability of a larva avoiding the net and P

447

b i o s p h e re First, catch a worm  

E-print Network

b i o s p h e re First, catch a worm New microfluidic devices sort and screen small animals. High Institute of Technology (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2007, 104, 13,891­13,895). "Shuffling worms around practical high-throughput worm handler." "It is one of those works that helps bring the long-promised change

Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

448

Comparison of Catches in Mono and Multifilament Gill Nets in Lake Erie  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to compare the number, age, sex, and size offish caught in mono- and multifilament gill nets used to assess populations in Lake Erie, The results of this study could be used to adjust estimates of catch per unit of effort if there were a change from multifilament to monofilament gill nets. More yellow perch

Bryan A. Henderson; Stephen J. Nepszy

1992-01-01

449

Composting of Food Waste with Straw and other Carbon Sources for Nitrogen Catching  

Microsoft Academic Search

Food waste, straw, paper and topsoil were composted in different combinations. The catching of nitrogen was more than 90% when using different amounts of straw and of a small amount of paper. It was above 50% in paper composts at high maximum temperature and below 46% at low temperatures. A cultivation test with tomato, cucumber and white cabbage in one

Nils Brink

1995-01-01

450

FISHERIES SCIENCE PARTNERSHIP Catches of Cod and other species along the  

E-print Network

1 FISHERIES SCIENCE PARTNERSHIP Catches of Cod and other species along the English NE coast by FV The Yorkshire coast project This report presents the initial results of a project carried out on the cod September and 24 October. The work plan involved fishing with an 80 mm mesh codend on known cod grounds

451

FISHERIES SCIENCE PARTNERSHIP Report on catches of cod and other species in the  

E-print Network

FISHERIES SCIENCE PARTNERSHIP Report on catches of cod and other species in the Eastern Celtic Sea Federation of Fishermen's Orgnaisations The Eastern Celtic Sea and Bristol Channel cod project This report presents the initial results of an FSP project carried out on the trawl fishery for cod in the eastern

452

FISHERIES SCIENCE PARTNERSHIP Report on catches of cod and haddock in the western  

E-print Network

1 FISHERIES SCIENCE PARTNERSHIP Report on catches of cod and haddock in the western Irish Sea by FV and Aquaculture Science 3. National Federation of Fishermen's Orgnaisations The western Irish Sea cod project for cod on the Irish side of the Irish Sea in spring 2004. The project used a commercial trawler, the FV

453

CPUE AND CATCH TRENDS OF SHARK SPECIES CAUGHT BY BRAZILIAN LONGLINERS IN THE SOUTHWESTERN ATLANTIC OCEAN  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY Although pelagic sharks are caught in a variety of fishing gears in the Atlantic Ocean, pelagic longline fisheries targeting tunas and swordfish account for the majority of their catch. With the widest geographic range among all large sharks, Prionace glauca is the most abundant elasmobranch caught by longline in oceanic areas. It is a common species throughout the Brazilian

Fábio H. V. Hazin; Humberto G. Hazin; Paulo Travassos

2007-01-01

454

50 CFR 679.32 - CDQ fisheries monitoring and catch accounting.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...required once a CDQ group has reached its salmon PSQ or crab PSQ are listed in § 679.7(d)(5). The catch of salmon or crab by vessels using other than...groundfish CDQ species, halibut CDQ, and salmon PSQ until they are delivered to...

2012-10-01

455

50 CFR 679.32 - Groundfish and halibut CDQ catch monitoring.  

...required once a CDQ group has reached its salmon PSQ or crab PSQ are listed in § 679.7(d)(5). The catch of salmon or crab by vessels using other than... (2 ) Retain all CDQ species and salmon PSQ until they are delivered to...

2014-10-01

456

50 CFR 679.32 - Groundfish and halibut CDQ catch monitoring.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...required once a CDQ group has reached its salmon PSQ or crab PSQ are listed in § 679.7(d)(8). The catch of salmon or crab by vessels using other than...groundfish CDQ species, halibut CDQ, and salmon PSQ until they are delivered to a...

2010-10-01

457

50 CFR 679.32 - Groundfish and halibut CDQ catch monitoring.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...required once a CDQ group has reached its salmon PSQ or crab PSQ are listed in § 679.7(d)(8). The catch of salmon or crab by vessels using other than...groundfish CDQ species, halibut CDQ, and salmon PSQ until they are delivered to a...

2011-10-01

458

Historical Catches of Humpback Whales, Megaptera novaeangliae, in the North Atlantic Ocean  

E-print Network

72(3) 1 Historical Catches of Humpback Whales, Megaptera novaeangliae, in the North Atlantic OceanHistory@gmail.com). ABSTRACT--Whaling for humpback whales, Megaptera novaeangliae, in the North At- lantic Ocean has occurred- ent. Several previous attempts to estimate the total numbers of humpback whales removed were

459

The Two-Pathway Model for the Catch-Slip Transition in Biological Adhesion  

E-print Network

The Two-Pathway Model for the Catch-Slip Transition in Biological Adhesion Yuriy V. Pereverzev. (1) in a mathematical description of membrane-to- surface adhesion and detachment. In this work adhesion protein FimH was shown to undergo a force-induced conformational change that led to stronger

460

Walking is more like catching than tapping: gait in the elderly as a complex cognitive task  

Microsoft Academic Search

Walking is generally viewed as an automated, over-learned, rhythmic motor task and may even be considered the lower-limb analog of rhythmic finger tapping, another automated motor task. Thus, one might hypothesize that walking would be associated with a simple rhythmic task like tapping rather than with a complex motor task like catching. Surprisingly, however, we find that among older adults,

Jeffrey M Hausdorff; Galit Yogev; Shmuel Springer; Ely S. Simon; Nir Giladi

2005-01-01

461

DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT For Proposed Amendment 38 (Annual Catch Limits) and Amendment 39 (Snow crab  

E-print Network

catch limits (ACLs) and accountability measures (AMs). ACLs and AMs are required by the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (Magnuson-Stevens Act). ACLs would be established based upon Fisheries Service 709 West 9th St. Juneau, Alaska 99801 (907)586-7228 #12;#12;Executive Summary Crab ACLs

462

Size composition of Jack mackerel catches from the west coast of New Zealand  

Microsoft Academic Search

Catches of iack mackerel Trachurus declivis taken everv 2 months from the west coast of New Zealand show that this species attains lengths of approximately 11 cm and 24 cm at the completion of the first and second years of life respectively. Above these lengths, year classes overlap considerably. Juveniles were found from Westland to North Cape and were most

G. D. James

1975-01-01

463

Catches in pitfall traps in relation to mean densities of carabid beetles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on continuous pitfall catches summed over the whole activity period for the carabid beetles Pterostichus versicolor Sturm and Calathus melanocephalus L., a satisfactorily linear relationship is presented between the mean densities in several habitats and in different years and the numbers of beetles trapped. This means that with the help of continuous pitfall sampling a reliable relative measure of

M. A. Baars

1979-01-01

464

Who Is Peeping at Your Passwords at Starbucks? To Catch an Evil Twin Access Point  

E-print Network

Who Is Peeping at Your Passwords at Starbucks? ­ To Catch an Evil Twin Access Point Yimin Song twin is essentially a phishing (rogue) Wi-Fi access point (AP) that looks like a legitimate one (with and the wide deployment of Wi-Fi equipment. Users can easily access the Internet wirelessly when

Gu, Guofei

465

Catching Old Influenza Virus with A New Markov Model HamChing Lam  

E-print Network

Catching Old Influenza Virus with A New Markov Model HamChing Lam Dept. of Computer Science on the Hemag- glutinin (HA) gene, a major surface antigen of the avian influenza virus. Using this model we Influenza virus, Poisson process, Markov Model 1. INTRODUCTION For the past century researchers have been

Boley, Daniel

466

Pilot-Testing CATCH Early Childhood: A Preschool-Based Healthy Nutrition and Physical Activity Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: The literature on theoretically-based programs targeting healthy nutrition and physical activity in preschools is scarce. Purpose: To pilot test CATCH Early Childhood (CEC), a preschool-based nutrition and physical activity program among children ages three to five in Head Start. Methods: The study was conducted in two Head Start…

Sharma, Shreela; Chuang, Ru-Jye; Hedberg, Ann Marie

2011-01-01

467

Catching-up Crisis and Industrial Upgrading: Evolutionary Aspects of Technological Learning in Korea's Electronics Industry  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper address a puzzle: How is it possible that a country that has established a broad, export-oriented industrial base at record speed, remain vulnerable to the vicissitudes of international finance and currency markets? We argue that the Korean model that was tremendously successful for catching-up has now reached its limits. The focus is on the role of technological learning

Dieter Ernst

1998-01-01

468

FLUCTUATION IN TRAP-NET CATCHES IN THE UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER  

E-print Network

FLUCTUATION IN TRAP-NET CATCHES IN THE UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER if; Marine Biological Labofdiury and Wildlife Service, meeting in December, I9I1.3, formed the Upper Mississippi River Conservation Committee for the purpose of carrying on scientific investigations of the fishery and wildlife resources of the Mississippi

469

The Very Handy Manual: How to Catch and Identify Bees and Manage a Collection  

E-print Network

The Very Handy Manual: How to Catch and Identify Bees and Manage a Collection A Collective and Ongoing Effort by Those Who Love to Study Bees in North America Last Revised: May, 2012 This manual and others not. We thank all of you. The bulk of the text was compiled by Sam Droege at the USGS Native Bee

Torgersen, Christian

470

Radiotracer investigation in gold leaching tanks.  

PubMed

Measurement and analysis of residence time distribution (RTD) is a classical method to investigate performance of chemical reactors. In the present investigation, the radioactive tracer technique was used to measure the RTD of aqueous phase in a series of gold leaching tanks at the Damang gold processing plant in Ghana. The objective of the investigation was to measure the effective volume of each tank and validate the design data after recent process intensification or revamping of the plant. I-131 was used as a radioactive tracer and was instantaneously injected into the feed stream of the first tank and monitored at the outlet of different tanks. Both sampling and online measurement methods were used to monitor the tracer concentration. The results of measurements indicated that both the methods provided identical RTD curves. The mean residence time (MRT) and effective volume of each tank was estimated. The tanks-in-series model with exchange between active and stagnant volume was used and found suitable to describe the flow structure of aqueous phase in the tanks. The estimated effective volume of the tanks and high degree of mixing in tanks could validate the design data and confirmed the expectation of the plant engineer after intensification of the process. PMID:22004896

Dagadu, C P K; Akaho, E H K; Danso, K A; Stegowski, Z; Furman, L

2012-01-01

471

Practical Physics: Basic Experiments with Ripple Tanks  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource contains a set of eight introductory experiments on wave reflections, appropriate for use in high school and middle school. Use of the ripple tank can be a powerful tool to help students visualize wave behavior in general. In these basic experiments, students are introduced to ripple tanks and gain confidence in using them by doing some simple experiments with pulses. SEE RELATED ITEMS for a Teachers' Guide on using ripple tanks, and for ripple tank experiments for the more advanced classroom. This item is part of a much larger collection of physics/astronomy experiments, sponsored by the UK's Institute of Physics and funded by the Nuffield Curriculum Centre.

Centre, Nuffield C.

472

The NDT perspective on aboveground storage tanks  

SciTech Connect

This article is an overview of above-ground storage tank (AST) in the US. Tank numbers, size, construction, location, and material stored will be discussed. The present environment for nondestructive testing (NDT) technologies will also be explored. The present aging storage tank population presents an opportunity for the NDT community to provide the necessary technologies to verify storage tank reliability in a cost beneficial manner. The paper first explains terminology, definitions, and standards, then discusses estimates of the AST population, causes of petroleum spillage, and how the industry tests for leaks.

Rusing, J.E. (J. Rusing and Associates NDT Marketing Consultants, Wilton, CT (United States))

1994-07-01

473

Tank waste remediation system (TWRS) mission analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Tank Waste Remediation System Mission Analysis provides program level requirements and identifies system boundaries and interfaces. Measures of success appropriate to program level accomplishments are also identified.

Rieck, R.H.

1996-10-03

474

Characterization of Hanford tank wastes containing ferrocyanides  

SciTech Connect

Currently, 17 storage tanks on the Hanford site that are believed to contain > 1,000 gram moles (465 lbs) of ferrocyanide compounds have been identified. Seven other tanks are classified as ferrocyanide containing waste tanks, but contain less than 1,000 gram moles of ferrocyanide compounds. These seven tanks are still included as Hanford Watch List Tanks. These tanks have been declared an unreviewed safety question (USQ) because of potential thermal reactivity hazards associated with the ferrocyanide compounds and nitrate and nitrite. Hanford tanks with waste containing > 1,000 gram moles of ferrocyanide have been sampled. Extensive chemical, radiothermical, and physical characterization have been performed on these waste samples. The reactivity of these wastes were also studied using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetric analysis. Actual tank waste samples were retrieved from tank 241-C-112 using a specially designed and equipped core-sampling truck. Only a small portion of the data obtained from this characterization effort will be reported in this paper. This report will deal primarily with the cyanide and carbon analyses, thermal analyses, and limited physical property measurements.

Tingey, J.M.; Matheson, J.D.; McKinley, S.G.; Jones, T.E.; Pool, K.H.

1993-02-01

475

Cleaning large tanks and gas bottles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Distillation technique using vapor solvent trichloromonofluoromethane is economical, effective, and eliminates need to enter tank, thus reducing risk of further contamination. Solvent can be purified for reuse.

Smith, I. D.

1977-01-01

476

Hanford Technology Development (Tank Farms) - 12509  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is to safely retrieve and treat the 56 million gallons of Hanford's tank waste and close the Tank Farms to protect the Columbia River. The millions of gallons of tank waste are a byproduct of decades of plutonium production. After irradiated fuel rods were taken from the nuclear reactors to the processing facilities at Hanford they were exposed to a series of chemicals designed to dissolve away the rod, which enabled workers to retrieve the plutonium. Once those chemicals were exposed to the fuel rods they became radioactive and extremely hot. They also couldn't be used in this process more than once. Because the chemicals are caustic and extremely hazardous to humans and the environment, underground storage tanks were built to hold these chemicals until a more permanent solution could be found. One key part of the ongoing work at Hanford is retrieving waste from the single-shell tanks, some of which have leaked in the past, and transferring that waste to the double-shell tanks - none of which have ever leaked. The 56 million gallons of radioactive tank waste is stored in 177 underground tanks, 149 of which are single-shell tanks built between 1943 and 1964. The tanks sit approximately 250 feet above the water table. Hanford's single-shell tanks are decades past their 20-year design life. In the past, up to 67 of the single-shell tanks are known or suspected to have leaked as much as one million gallons of waste to the surrounding soil. Starting in the late 1950's, waste leaks from dozens of the single-shell tanks were detected or suspected. Most of the waste is in the soil around the tanks, but some of this waste is thought to have reached groundwater. The Vadose Zone Project was established to understand the radioactive and chemical contamination in the soil beneath the tanks as the result of leaks and discharges from past plutonium-production operations. The vadose zone is the area of soil between the ground surface and the water table 200-to-300 feet below. The project tracks and monitors contamination in the soil. Technologies are being developed and deployed to detect and monitor contaminants. Interim surface barriers, which are barriers put over the single-shell tanks, prevent rain and snow from soaking into the ground and spreading contamination. The impermeable barrier placed over T Farm, which was the site of the largest tank waste leak in Hanford's history, is 60,000 square feet and sloped to drain moisture outside the tank farm. The barrier over TY Farm is constructed of asphalt and drains moisture to a nearby evaporation basin. Our discussion of technology will address the incredible challenge of removing waste from Hanford's single-shell tanks. Under the terms of the Tri-Party Agreement, ORP is required to remove 99 percent of the tank waste, or until the limits of technology have been reached. All pumpable liquids have been removed from the single-shell tanks, and work now focuses on removing the non-pumpable liquids. Waste retrieval was completed from the first single-shell tank in late 2003. Since then, another six single-shell tanks have been retrieved to regulatory standards. (authors)

Fletcher, Thomas; Charboneau, Stacy; Olds, Erik [US DOE (United States)

2012-07-01

477

Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-BY-112  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the information on the historical uses, present status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste stored in Tank 241-BY-112. This report supports the requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-44-10. (This tank has been designated a Ferrocyanide Watch List tank.)

Baldwin, J.H.

1997-08-22

478

Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for A Tank Farm  

SciTech Connect

This document provides historical evaluations of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the Hanford Site 200-East Area underground single-shell tanks (SSTs). A Historical Tank Content Estimate has been developed by reviewing the process histories, waste transfer data, and available physical and chemical characterization data from various Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Defense (DOD) contractors. The historical data will supplement information gathered from in-tank core sampling activities that are currently underway. A tank history review that is accompanied by current characterization data creates a complete and reliable inventory estimate. Additionally, historical review of the tanks may reveal anomalies or unusual contents that are critical to characterization and post characterization activities. Complete and accurate tank waste characterizations are critical first steps for DOE and Westinghouse Hanford Company safety programs, waste pretreatment, and waste retrieval activities. The scope of this document is limited to the SSTs in the A Tank Farm of the northeast quadrant of the 200 East Area. Nine appendices compile data on: tank level histories; temperature graphs; surface level graphs; drywell graphs; riser configuration and tank cross section; sampling data; tank photographs; unknown tank transfers; and tank layering comparison. 113 refs.

Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Walsh, A.C.

1994-06-01

479

Tank Waste Remediation System Resolution of Potentially Hazardous Tank Vapor Issues  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the resolution of industrial health and safety issues regarding potentially hazardous tank vapors in the Hanford 200 Area Tank Farms. It also summarizes the tasks and controls which have been implemented and demonstrates that with the present work controls in place, an unacceptable inhalation risk to workers from tank farm vapors does not exist.

Hewitt, E.R., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-10

480

ATR/OTR-SY Tank Camera Purge System and in Tank Color Video Imaging System  

SciTech Connect

This procedure will document the satisfactory operation of the 101-SY tank Camera Purge System (CPS) and 101-SY in tank Color Camera Video Imaging System (CCVIS). Included in the CPRS is the nitrogen purging system safety interlock which shuts down all the color video imaging system electronics within the 101-SY tank vapor space during loss of nitrogen purge pressure.

Werry, S.M.

1995-06-06

481

Tank characterization report for double-shell tank 241-AN-103  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the information on the historical uses, present status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste stored in Tank 241-AN-103. This report supports the requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-44-10. (This tank has been designated an Hydrogen Watch List tank.)

Wilkins, N.E.

1997-08-22

482

Tank 241-C-101 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect

Tank C-101 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks of fugitive emissions to tank farm workers. Gas and vapor samples from the Tank C-101 headspace were collected on July 7, 1994 using the in situ sampling (ISS) method, and again on September 1, 1994 using the more robust vapor sampling system (VSS). Gas and vapor concentrations in Tank C-101 are influenced by its connections to other tanks and its ventilation pathways. At issue is whether the organic vapors in Tank C-101 are from the waste in that tank, or from Tanks C-102 or C-103. Tank C-103 is on the Organic Watch List; the other two are not. Air from the Tank C-101 headspace was withdrawn via a 7.9-m long heated sampling probe mounted in riser 8, and transferred via heated tubing to the VSS sampling manifold. The tank headspace temperature was determined to be 34.0 C, and all heated zones of the VSS were maintained at approximately 50 C. Sampling media were prepared and analyzed by WHC, Oak Ridge National Laboratories, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, and Oregon Graduate Institute of Science and Technology through a contract with Sandia National Laboratories. The 39 tank air samples and 2 ambient air control samples collected are listed in Table X-1 by analytical laboratory. Table X-1 also lists the 14 trip blanks and 2 field blanks provided by the laboratories.

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31

483

View of tanks T18 and T19 with redwood tanks to ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of tanks T18 and T19 with redwood tanks to right. Old rain shed (Building No. 43) can be seen behind the tanks. Ground catchment can be seen at left in background. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

484

Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for B-Tank farm  

SciTech Connect

This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on B-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information,temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the northeast quadrant of the Hanford 200 East Area.

Brevick, C.H.

1996-06-28

485

Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for AX-tank farm  

SciTech Connect

This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on AX-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information,temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the northeast quadrant of the Hanford 200 East Area.

Brevick, C.H., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-06-28

486

Selectin catch–slip kinetics encode shear threshold adhesive behavior of rolling leukocytes  

PubMed Central

The selectin family of leukocyte adhesion receptors is principally recognized for mediating transient rolling interactions during the inflammatory response. Recent studies using ultrasensitive force probes to characterize the force–lifetime relationship between P- and L-selectin and their endogenous ligands have underscored the ability of increasing levels of force to initially extend the lifetime of these complexes before disrupting bond integrity. This so-called “catch–slip” transition has provided an appealing explanation for shear threshold phenomena in which increasing levels of shear stress stabilize leukocyte rolling under flow. We recently incorporated catch–slip kinetics into a mechanical model for cell adhesion and corroborated this hypothesis for neutrophils adhering via L-selectin. Here, using adhesive dynamics simulations, we demonstrate that biomembrane force probe measurements of various P- and L-selectin catch bonds faithfully predict differences in cell adhesion patterns that have been described extensively in vitro. Using phenomenological parameters to characterize the dominant features of molecular force spectra, we construct a generalized phase map that reveals that robust shear-threshold behavior is possible only when an applied force very efficiently stabilizes the bound receptor complex. This criteria explains why only a subset of selectin catch bonds exhibit a shear threshold and leads to a quantitative relationship that may be used to predict the magnitude of the shear threshold for families of catch–slip bonds directly from their force spectra. Collectively, our results extend the conceptual framework of adhesive dynamics as a means to translate complex single-molecule biophysics to macroscopic cell behavior. PMID:19095798

Beste, Michael T.; Hammer, Daniel A.

2008-01-01

487

Muskie Lunacy: Does the Lunar Cycle Influence Angler Catch of Muskellunge (Esox masquinongy)?  

PubMed Central

We analyzed angling catch records for 341,959 muskellunge (Esox masquinongy) from North America to test for a cyclic lunar influence on the catch. Using periodic regression, we showed that the number caught was strongly related to the 29-day lunar cycle, and the effect was consistent across most fisheries. More muskellunge were caught around the full and new moon than at other times. At night, more muskellunge were caught around the full moon than the new moon. The predicted maximum relative effect was ?5% overall. Anglers fishing exclusively on the peak lunar day would, on average, catch 5% more muskellunge than anglers fishing on random days. On some lakes and at night, the maximum relative effect was higher. We obtained angler effort data for Wisconsin, Mille Lacs (MN), and Lake Vermilion (MN). For Lake Vermilion there was a significant effect of the lunar cycle on angler effort. We could therefore not conclude that the lunar effect on catch was due to an effect on fish behavior alone. Several factors affected the amount of variation explained by the lunar cycle. The lunar effect was stronger for larger muskellunge (>102 cm) than for smaller fish, stronger in midsummer than in June or October, and stronger for fish caught at high latitudes (>48°N) than for fish caught further south. There was no difference in the lunar effect between expert and novice muskellunge anglers. We argue that this variation is evidence that the effect of the lunar cycle on catch is mediated by biological factors and is not due solely to angler effort and reflects lunar synchronization in feeding. This effect has been attributed to variation among moon phases in lunar illumination, but our results do not support that hypothesis for angler-caught muskellunge. PMID:24871329

Vinson, Mark R.; Angradi, Ted R.

2014-01-01

488

The effect of load uncertainty on anticipatory muscle activity in catching.  

PubMed

To investigate how the CNS copes with load uncertainty in catching, anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) in one-handed catching of balls of known and unknown weights were compared. Twenty-nine (n = 29) men (mean age = 21.1 years) participated, all of whom had engaged in a sport activity requiring hand-eye coordination. Participants' muscle activity in the biceps brachii, triceps brachii, wrist flexor group, and bilateral erector spinae at L4-5 was recorded using electromyography (EMG) while they caught visually identical balls of four different weights (0.5, 1.33, 2.17, and 3.0 kg). EMG integrals were computed for the 1 s prior to ball drop (pre-drop period), and the interval between ball drop and catch (drop period). Uncertainty about ball weight had no effect on APA activity during the pre-drop period. During the drop period, however, load uncertainty did influence APA activity in the biceps brachii, triceps brachii, and the wrist flexor muscles (i.e., the effect of ball weight on APA magnitude depended on the presence or absence of load knowledge). In the known ball weight condition, participants exhibit greater APA magnitude with increases in ball weight. In contrast, under the unknown ball weight condition, APA magnitude was relatively consistent across ball weights and at a level similar to the APA magnitude for an intermediate weight (i.e., the second heaviest ball of four) in the known weight condition. In catching balls of unknown weights, the CNS appears to scale APA magnitude to afford the greatest chance of catching the ball, regardless of the weight. PMID:22729455

Eckerle, Jason J; Berg, William P; Ward, Rose Marie

2012-08-01

489

The Impact of Escaped Farmed Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar L.) on Catch Statistics in Scotland  

PubMed Central

In Scotland and elsewhere, there are concerns that escaped farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) may impact on wild salmon stocks. Potential detrimental effects could arise through disease spread, competition, or inter-breeding. We investigated whether there is evidence of a direct effect of recorded salmon escape events on wild stocks in Scotland using anglers' counts of caught salmon (classified as wild or farmed) and sea trout (Salmo trutta L.). This tests specifically whether documented escape events can be associated with reduced or elevated escapes detected in the catch over a five-year time window, after accounting for overall variation between areas and years. Alternate model frameworks were somewhat inconsistent, however no robust association was found between documented escape events and higher proportion of farm-origin salmon in anglers' catch, nor with overall catch size. A weak positive correlation was found between local escapes and subsequent sea trout catch. This is in the opposite direction to what would be expected if salmon escapes negatively affected wild fish numbers. Our approach specifically investigated documented escape events, contrasting with earlier studies examining potentially wider effects of salmon farming on wild catch size. This approach is more conservative, but alleviates some potential sources of confounding, which are always of concern in observational studies. Successful analysis of anglers' reports of escaped farmed salmon requires high data quality, particularly since reports of farmed salmon are a relatively rare event in the Scottish data. Therefore, as part of our analysis, we reviewed studies of potential sensitivity and specificity of determination of farmed origin. Specificity estimates are generally high in the literature, making an analysis of the form we have performed feasible. PMID:22970132

Green, Darren M.; Penman, David J.; Migaud, Herve; Bron, James E.; Taggart, John B.; McAndrew, Brendan J.

2012-01-01

490

Tank farms essential drawing plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to define criteria for selecting Essential Drawings, Support Drawings, and Controlled Print File (CPF) drawings and documents for facilities that are part of East and West Tank Farms. Also, the drawings and documents that meet the criteria are compiled separate listings. The Essential Drawing list and the Support Drawing list establish a priority for updating technical baseline drawings. The CPF drawings, denoted by an asterisk (*), defined the drawings and documents that Operations is required to maintain per the TWRS Administration Manual. The Routing Boards in Buildings 272-WA and 272-AW are not part of the CPF.

Domnoske-Rauch, L.A.

1998-08-04

491

External tank aft cargo carrier  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The External Tank (ET) Aft Cargo Carrier (ACC) is a low cost, low risk augmentation of the Space Transportation System (STS). It almost doubles the cargo volume of the STS while minimally impacting other STS elements (orbiter, ET and solid rocket boosters SRBs, launch facilities and STS operations. In addition to increasing the potential volume of cargo carried on a Shuttle launch, the ACC provides the following additional benefits: (1) Increased STS competitiveness for payloads; (2) Increased cargo manifest flexibility; (3) Increased spacecraft design options; (4) Alternate manifesting for special payloads; and (5) Future space platform/station design options.

Mobley, T. B.

1984-01-01

492

Hybrid Composite Cryogenic Tank Structure  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A hybrid lightweight composite tank has been created using specially designed materials and manufacturing processes. The tank is produced by using a hybrid structure consisting of at least two reinforced composite material systems. The inner composite layer comprises a distinct fiber and resin matrix suitable for cryogenic use that is a braided-sleeve (and/or a filamentwound layer) aramid fiber preform that is placed on a removable mandrel (outfitted with metallic end fittings) and is infused (vacuum-assisted resin transfer molded) with a polyurethane resin matrix with a high ductility at low temperatures. This inner layer is allowed to cure and is encapsulated with a filamentwound outer composite layer of a distinct fiber resin system. Both inner and outer layer are in intimate contact, and can also be cured at the same time. The outer layer is a material that performs well for low temperature pressure vessels, and it can rely on the inner layer to act as a liner to contain the fluids. The outer layer can be a variety of materials, but the best embodiment may be the use of a continuous tow of carbon fiber (T-1000 carbon, or others), or other high-strength fibers combined with a high ductility epoxy resin matrix, or a polyurethane matrix, which performs well at low temperatures. After curing, the mandrel can be removed from the outer layer. While the hybrid structure is not limited to two particular materials, a preferred version of the tank has been demonstrated on an actual test tank article cycled at high pressures with liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen, and the best version is an inner layer of PBO (poly-pphenylenebenzobisoxazole) fibers with a polyurethane matrix and an outer layer of T-1000 carbon with a high elongation epoxy matrix suitable for cryogenic temperatures. A polyurethane matrix has also been used for the outer layer. The construction method is ideal because the fiber and resin of the inner layer has a high strain to failure at cryogenic temperatures, and will not crack or produce leaks. The outer layer serves as more of a high-performance structural unit for the inner layer, and can handle external environments.

DeLay, Thomas

2011-01-01

493

46 CFR 154.195 - Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. 154.195...Equipment Hull Structure § 154.195 Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. (a) An aluminum cargo tank and its dome must be...

2013-10-01

494

46 CFR 154.195 - Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. 154.195...Equipment Hull Structure § 154.195 Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. (a) An aluminum cargo tank and its dome must be...

2012-10-01

495

46 CFR 154.195 - Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. 154.195...Equipment Hull Structure § 154.195 Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. (a) An aluminum cargo tank and its dome must be...

2011-10-01

496

46 CFR 154.195 - Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure.  

...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. 154.195...Equipment Hull Structure § 154.195 Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. (a) An aluminum cargo tank and its dome must be...

2014-10-01

497

46 CFR 154.195 - Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. 154.195...Equipment Hull Structure § 154.195 Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. (a) An aluminum cargo tank and its dome must be...

2010-10-01

498

46 CFR 154.410 - Cargo tank sloshing loads.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Cargo tank sloshing loads. 154...BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment... § 154.410 Cargo tank sloshing loads. ...loads affect the cargo tank scantlings, an analysis of the effects of...

2010-10-01

499

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Septic Tank/Soil Absorption Field  

E-print Network

Gravel Geotextile fabric Bruce Lesikar Professor and Extension Agricultural Engineer The Texas A&M System A watertight septic tank prevents rainwater from entering the tank and flooding the soil absorption field All tanks must be watertight...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-23

500

40 CFR 52.1931 - Petroleum storage tank controls.  

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Petroleum storage tank controls. 52.1931...CONTINUED) Oklahoma § 52.1931 Petroleum storage tank controls. (a) Notwithstanding...the Oklahoma implementation plan, the petroleum storage tanks listed in...

2014-07-01