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Sample records for 241-sy-101 surface level

  1. Process control plan for tank 241-SY-101 surface level rise remediation

    SciTech Connect

    ESTEY, S.D.

    1999-06-29

    The tank 241-SY-101 transfer system was conceived and designed to address the immediate needs presented by rapidly changing waste conditions in tank 241-SY-101. Within the past year or so, the waste in this tank has exhibited unexpected behavior in the form of rapidly increasing crust growth. The Process Control Plan (PCP), HNF-4264, was written to translate high-level guidance and regulatory criteria and express it in terms of operating instructions for the waste transfer system. These controls include: (1) Tank Farm Operations Administrative Controls developed in response to DOE-ORP direction reg,arding supplemental controls placed upon tank 241-SY-101 surface level rise remediation activities specifically involving waste transfer activities. (2) Authorization Basis controls (Basis for Interim Operation (BIO)/Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs)) and supplemental DOE direction. (3) Environmental, Industrial Hygiene and Safety controls. (4) Operating Specification Document (OSD) controls. (5) Good operating practices. Included in the document are descriptions of tank conditions, waste conditions, major equipment, and a high-level overview of the system and the line-ups in which it operates. Primarily, the PCP addresses how the waste transfer will be managed, defining the monitoring and control methods including material balances to determine the progress and to define completion criteria for the transfer. The actual plant modifications and waste transfer will be authorized and controlled by plant procedures.

  2. Process Control Plan for Tank 241-SY-101 Surface Level Rise Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    ESTEY, S.D.

    1999-09-28

    The tank 241-SY-101 transfer system was conceived and designed to address the immediate needs presented by rapidly changing waste conditions in tank 241-SY-101. Within the last year or so, the waste in this tank has exhibited unexpected behavior (Rassat et al. 1999) in the form of rapidly increasing crust growth. This growth has been brought about by a rapidly increasing rate of gas entrapment within the crust. It has been conceived that the lack of crust agitation beginning upon the advent of mixer pump operations may have set-up a more consolidated, gas impermeable barrier when compared to a crust regularly broken up by the prior buoyant displacement events within the tank. As a result, a series of level-growth remediation activities have been developed for tank 241-SY-101. The initial activities are also known as near-term crust mitigation. The first activity of near-term mitigation is to perform the small transfer of convective waste from tank 241-SY-101 into tank 241-SY-102. A 100 kgal transfer represents about a 10% volume reduction allowing a 10% water in-tank dilution. Current thinking holds that this should be enough to dissolve nitrite solids in the crust and perhaps largely eliminate gas retention problem in the crust (Raymond 1999).

  3. Process Control Plan for Tank 241-SY-101 Surface Level Rise Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    ESTEY, S.D.

    1999-11-01

    The tank 241-SY-101 transfer system was conceived and designed to address the immediate needs presented by rapidly changing waste conditions in tank 241-SY-101. Within approximately the last year, the waste in this tank has exhibited unexpected behavior (Rassat et al. 1999) in the form of rapidly increasing crust growth. This growth has been brought about by a rapidly increasing rate of gas entrapment within the crust. It has been conceived that the lack of crust agitation beginning upon the advent of mixer pump operations may have set-up a more consolidated, gas impermeable barrier when compared to a crust regularly broken up by the prior buoyant displacement events within the tank. The interim goals of the project are to: (1) protect the mixer pump operability (2) begin releasing gas from the crust, and (3) begin dissolving the crust and solids in the slurry layer. The final goals of the project (Final State) are to solve both the level growth and BD-GRE safety issues in this tank by achieving a condition of the waste such that no active measures are required to safely store the waste, i.e., crust and non convective layer are mostly dissolved, and therefore the mixer pump will no longer be needed to prevent BD-GREs in excess of 100% LFL. Transfers (which are designed to create space in the tank) and dilution (which will dissolve the solids) will accomplish this. Dissolution of solids will result in a release of gas retained by those solids and remove that volume of solids as a future retention site.

  4. Historical trends in tank 241-SY-101 waste temperatures and levels

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniak, Z.I.

    1993-09-01

    The gas release and fluctuating level of the waste in tank 241-SY-101 have prompted more detailed interest in its historical behavior, in hopes of achieving a better understanding of its current status. To examine the historical behavior, essentially all of the tank waste temperature and level data record has been retrieved, examined, and plotted in various ways. To aid in interpreting the data, the depth of the non-convective waste layer was estimated by using a least-squares Chebyshev approximation to the temperatures. This report documents the retrieval critical examination, and graphic presentation of 241-SY-101 temperature and waste level histories. The graphic presentations clearly indicate a tank cooling trend that has become precipitous since late 1991. The plots also clearly show the decreasing frequency of waste gas release events, increasing height of the non-convective layer, and larger level drops per event.

  5. Level sensor replacement/sampling of Tank 241-SY-101 at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for management and storage of waste accumulated from the processing of defense reactor irradiated fuels for plutonium recovery at the Hanford Site. DOE is proposing to remove three level detectors from Tank 241-SY-101 and analyze the waste that is presently encrusted on the detectors. The proposed sampling is less intrusive than core sampling and will provide data regarding characterization of the crust to support future core sampling. The purpose of this environmental assessment (EA) is to provide information about the proposed action such that a decision can be made on whether a Finding of No Significant Impact should be issued or an environmental impact statement should be prepared. Therefore, this EA evaluates the proposed action and the no action alternative, in keeping with requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and regulations of the Council on Environmental Quality, Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, parts 1500--1508. 6 refs.

  6. Probabilistic safety assessment for Hanford high-level waste tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    MacFarlane, D.R.; Bott, T.F.; Brown, L.F.; Stack, D.W.; Kindinger, J.; Deremer, R.K.; Medhekar, S.R.; Mikschl, T.J.

    1994-05-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) is performing a comprehensive probabilistic safety assessment (PSA), which will include consideration of external events for the 18 tank farms at the Hanford Site. This effort is sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE/EM, EM-36). Even though the methodology described herein will be applied to the entire tank farm, this report focuses only on the risk from the weapons-production wastes stored in tank number 241-SY-101, commonly known as Tank 101-SY, as configured in December 1992. This tank, which periodically releases ({open_quotes}burps{close_quotes}) a gaseous mixture of hydrogen, nitrous oxide, ammonia, and nitrogen, was analyzed first because of public safety concerns associated with the potential for release of radioactive tank contents should this gas mixture be ignited during one of the burps. In an effort to mitigate the burping phenomenon, an experiment is being conducted in which a large pump has been inserted into the tank to determine if pump-induced circulation of the tank contents will promote a slow, controlled release of the gases. At the Hanford Site there are 177 underground tanks in 18 separate tank farms containing accumulated liquid/sludge/salt cake radioactive wastes from 50 yr of weapons materials production activities. The total waste volume is about 60 million gal., which contains approximately 120 million Ci of radioactivity.

  7. Engineering task plan for determining the interstitial liquid level in tank 241-SY-101 utilizing a neutron probe in the multifunction instrument tree

    SciTech Connect

    CANNON, N.S.

    1999-02-23

    This plan outlines the steps to be taken to modify existing neutron/gamma probe designs to allow insertion of these probes into the multifunction instrument trees (MITs) at tank 241-SY-101. The objective is to locate and track this tank's Interstitial Liquid Level (ILL). This plan provides scope, schedule, and cost estimates to achieve this objective, and assigns individual organizational responsibilities to carry out this task.

  8. Status of tank 241-SY-101 data analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Anantatmula, R.P.

    1992-09-01

    The Waste Tank Flammable Gas Stabilization Program was established in 1990 to provide for resolution of a major safety issue identified for 23 of the high-level waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The safety issue involves the production, accumulation, and periodic release from these tanks of flammable gases in concentrations exceeding the lower flammability limits. This document deals primarily with tank 241-SY-101 from the SY Tank Farm. The flammable gas condition has existed for this tank since the tank was first filled in the time period from 1977 to 1980. During a general review of waste tank chemical stability in 1988--1989, this situation was re-examined and, in March 1990, the condition was declared to be an unreviewed safety question. Tank 241-SY-101 was placed under special operating restrictions, and a program of investigation was begun to evaluate the condition and determine appropriate courses of action. This report summarizes the data that have become available on tank 241-SY-101 since it was declared as an unreviewed safety question and updates the information reported in an earlier document (WHC-EP-0517). The report provides a technical basis for use in the evaluation of safety risks of the tank and subsequent resolution of the unreviewed safety question.

  9. Jet mixer pump testing in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, C.W.

    1994-11-01

    A mixer pump was found effective in controlling and possibly eliminating large episodic flammable gas releases from Hanford Tank 241-SY-101. A gas release event (GRE) is initiated when the gas-bearing sludge layer accumulates sufficient gas to become buoyant. The buoyant sludge pulls free from the surrounding material and rises through the surface crust releasing the trapped gas to the dome space. Mixer pump operation is intended to keep enough of the gas-generating material in suspension so that it releases gas continuously instead of periodically in large, potentially dangerous GREs. A mixer pump was installed in the tank on July 3, 1993, seven days after a typical GRE that met the safety criteria for pump installation. Because nozzle plugging did occur, bump speed and duration were increased, eventually arriving at the accepted five-minute period at 1000 rpm on July 26. There has been no nozzle plugging since. Bumping was initially performed twice daily through mid-August and once daily until the start of Phase B testing. By the end of Phase B, thrice-weekly bumping during non-testing periods became the rule. The jets were aimed into previously undisturbed material and gas release induced by the pump increased immediately. In November, the pump was indexed progressively around the entire tank in 30{degrees} steps. This steadily released a large quantity of retained gas at each position and reduced the waste level to 400 inches, the minimum level in many years. By December, the jets had apparently excavated most of the gas-bearing sludge within reach, because only modest gas releases and essentially no level change occurred after pump operation. For the rest of Phase B testing, there were no large gas releases that would suggest a large volume of unmixed waste. The two thermocouple trees showed a uniform vertical temperature profile. In the month following Phase B, minimal pump operation apparently maintained most of the mixing achieved during testing.

  10. Jet mixer pump testing in Hanford tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, C.W.

    1994-12-31

    A mixer pump was found effective in controlling and possibly eliminating large flammable gas releases from Hanford Tank 241-SY-101. A gas release event (GRE) is initiated when gas-bearing sludge accumulates sufficient gas to become buoyant. The buoyant sludge pulls free from the surrounding material and rises to the surface releasing the trapped gas. Mixer pump operation is intended to keep gas-generating material in suspension so that it releases gas continuously instead of periodically in large, potentially dangerous GREs. A mixer pump was installed July 3, 1993, 7 days after a typical GRE. The initial pump operation in phase-A testing was extremely gentle, beginning with a series of daily pump {open_quotes}bumps{close_quotes} intended to keep the pump nozzles clear. Because nozzle plugging did occur, bump speed and duration were increased, eventually arriving at the accepted 5-min period at 1000 rpm on July 26. There has been no nozzle plugging since. Bumping was initially performed twice daily through mid-August and once daily until the start of phase-B testing. By the end of phase B, thrice-weekly bumping became the rule.

  11. Hazard evaluation for transfer of waste from tank 241-SY-101 to tank 241-SY-102

    SciTech Connect

    SHULTZ, M.V.

    1999-04-05

    Tank 241-SY-101 waste level growth is an emergent, high priority issue. The purpose of this document is to record the hazards evaluation process and document potential hazardous conditions that could lead to the release of radiological and toxicological material from the proposed transfer of a limited quantity (approximately 100,000 gallons) of waste from Tank 241-SY-101 to Tank 241-SY-102. The results of the hazards evaluation were compared to the current Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Basis for Interim Operation (HNF-SD-WM-BIO-001, 1998, Revision 1) to identify any hazardous conditions where Authorization Basis (AB) controls may not be sufficient or may not exist. Comparison to LA-UR-92-3196, A Safety Assessment for Proposed Pump Mixing Operations to Mitigate Episodic Gas Releases in Tank 241-SY-101, was also made in the case of transfer pump removal activities. Revision 1 of this document deletes hazardous conditions no longer applicable to the current waste transfer design and incorporates hazardous conditions related to the use of an above ground pump pit and overground transfer line. This document is not part of the AB and is not a vehicle for requesting authorization of the activity; it is only intended to provide information about the hazardous conditions associated with this activity. The AB Control Decision process will be used to determine the adequacy of controls and whether the proposed activity is within the AB. This hazard evaluation does not constitute an accident analysis.

  12. Operability test procedure [Tank] 241-SY-101 equipment removal system

    SciTech Connect

    Mast, J.C.

    1994-12-08

    The 241-SY-101 equipment removal system (ERS) consists of components, equipment, instrumentation and procedures that will provide the means to disconnect, retrieve, contain, load and transport the Mitigation Pump Assembly (MPA) from waste Tank 241-SY-101 to the Central Waste Complex (CWC). The Operability Test Procedure (OTP) will test the interfaces between ERS components and will rehearse the procedure for MPA removal and transportation to the extent they can be mocked-up at the CTF (Cold Test Facility). At the conclusion of the OTP, the ERS components and equipment will be removed from the CTF, entered into the Component Based Recall System (CBRS), and stored until needed for actual MPA removal and transportation.

  13. Quarterly review of 241-SY-101 mixer pump data: October - December, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    CONNER, J.M.

    1999-05-11

    This report presents data obtained on 241-SY-101 pump performance. The period covered is October 1 through December 31, 1998. During the quarter: (1) There was an indication of a 7.0-inch increase in the waste level at riser lA, and an average growth rate of 0.076 inches per day. (2) There was an indication of a 2.3-inch increase in the waste level at riser 1C. This riser was flushed with water several times, which would lower the level of the crust at this location. (3) Gases continued to be released at less than the pre-pump installation baseline rate, indicating a decrease in the gas generation rate, or an increase in gas retention, or both. The release rate was about 60 percent of the rate in the previous few quarters, and only 44 percent of the pre-pump release rate. (4) There was no change in the parameters that monitor pump performance. Key controls exist for waste temperature, gas concentration, pump parameters, and long-term waste behavior associated with the safe operation of the mixer pump that mitigates the buoyant displacement gas release event behavior of 241-SY-101. Table 1-1 compares the key controls and the current state of the waste as of December 31, 1998.

  14. Neutron and Gamma Probe Application to Hanford Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    CANNON, N.S.

    2000-02-01

    A neutron (moisture-sensitive) and gamma (in-situ radiation) probe technique has been utilized at a number of Hanford radioactive waste tanks for many years. This technology has been adapted for use in tank 241-SY-101's two Multifunction Instrument Trees (MITs) which have a hollow dry-well center opening two inches (51 cm) in diameter. These probes provide scans starting within a few inches of the tank bottom and traversing up through the top of the tank revealing a variety of waste features as a function of tank elevation. These features have been correlated with void fraction data obtained independently from two other devices, the Retained Gas Sampler (RGS) and the Void Fraction Instrument (VFI). The MIT probes offer the advantage of nearly continuous count-rate versus elevation scans and they can be operated significantly more often and at lower cost than temperature probes or the RGS or VFI devices while providing better depth resolution. The waste level in tank 241-SY-101 had been rising at higher rates than expected during 1998 and early 1999 indicating an increasing amount of trapped gas in the waste. The use of the MIT probes has assisted in evaluating changes in crust thickness and level and also in estimating relative changes in gas stored in the crust. This information is important in assuring that the tank remains in a safe configuration and will support safe waste transfer when those operations take place.

  15. Hazard evaluation for transfer of waste from tank 241-SY-101 to tank 241-SY-102

    SciTech Connect

    SHULTZ, M.V.

    1999-02-12

    Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) waste level growth is an emergent, high priority issue. The purpose of this document is to record the hazards evaluation process and document potential hazardous conditions that could lead to the release of radiological and toxicological material from the proposed transfer of a limited quantity (approximately 100,000 gallons) of waste from SY-101 to 241-SY-102 (SY-102). The results of the hazards evaluation will be compared to the current Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Basis for Interim Operation (HNF-SD-WM-BIO-001, 1998, Revision 1) to identify any hazardous conditions where Authorization Basis (AB) controls may not be sufficient or may not exist. Comparison to LA-UR-92-3196, A Safety Assessment for Proposed Pump Mixing Operations to Mitigate Episodic Gas Releases in Tank 241-SY-101, was also made in the case of transfer pump removal activities. This document is not intended to authorize the activity or determine the adequacy of controls; it is only intended to provide information about the hazardous conditions associated with this activity. The Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) process will be used to determine the adequacy of controls and whether the proposed activity is within the AB. This hazard evaluation does not constitute an accident analysis.

  16. Structural analysis and evaluation of the 241SY101 tank annulus heat-up

    SciTech Connect

    Ziada, H.H.

    1994-10-19

    This document provides the structural analysis (static and thermal loads) of the 241SY101 tank to determine the maximum allowable temperature and rate of heating that could be applied to tank 241SY101 through annulus air heating without detrimental effects to the structural integrity of the concrete and steel liner of the tank.

  17. 241-SY-101 data acquisition and control system (DACS) remote operator interface operational test report

    SciTech Connect

    ERMI, A.M.

    1999-06-24

    The readiness of the upgraded 241-SY-101 Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) to provide proper control and monitoring of the mixer pump and instrumentation in tank 241-SY-101 was evaluated by the performance of OTP-440-001. Results of the OTP are reported here.

  18. 241-SY-101 DACS High hydrogen abort limit reduction (SCR 473) acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    ERMI, A.M.

    1999-09-09

    The capability of the 241-SY-101 Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) computer system to provide proper control and monitoring of the 241-SY-101 underground storage tank hydrogen monitoring system utilizing the reduced hydrogen abort limit of 0.69% was systematically evaluated by the performance of ATP HNF-4927. This document reports the results of the ATP.

  19. 241-SY-101 data acquisition and control system (DACS) operator interface upgrade operational test report

    SciTech Connect

    ERMI, A.M.

    1999-05-11

    This procedure provides instructions for readiness of the first portion of the upgraded 241-SY-101 Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) computer system to provide proper control and monitoring of the mitigation mixer pump and instrumentation installed in the 241-SY-101 underground storage tank will be systematically evaluated by the performance of this procedure.

  20. 241-SY-101 DACS instrument problem screen (SCR 448) acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect

    ERMI, A.M.

    1999-06-28

    The operability of the 241-SY-101 Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) to provide proper control and monitoring of the mitigation mixer pump and instrumentation installed in the 241-SY-101 underground storage tank utilizing the [INSTPROB] screen will be systematically evaluated by the performance of this procedure.

  1. Solubilities of gases in simulated Tank 241-SY-101 wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, J.D.; Pederson, L.R.

    1995-09-01

    Oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, methane, and nitrous oxide solubilities were evaluated as a function of temperature in SYl-SIM-93B, a homogeneous simulated waste mixture containing sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate, sodium aluminate, and sodium carbonate, the principal inorganic constituents of the wastes in Tank 241-SY-101. Ammonia solubility data for this simulated waste was obtained as a function of temperature in an earlier study. The choice of a homogeneous waste mixture in this study has the advantage of eliminating complications associated with a changing electrolyte concentration as a function of temperature that would be encountered with a slurry simulant. Dissolution is one of the means by which gases may be retained in Hanford Site wastes. While models are available to estimate gas solubilities in electrolyte solutions, few data are in existence that pertain to highly concentrated, multicomponent electrolytes such as those stored in Hanford Site waste tanks.

  2. Tank 241-SY-101 push mode core sampling and analysis plan

    SciTech Connect

    CONNER, J.M.

    1998-10-09

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for push mode core samples from tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101). It is written in accordance with Data Quality Objective to Support Resolution of the Flammable Gas Safety Issue (Bauer 1998), Low Activity Waste Feed Data Quality Objectives (Wiemers and Miller 1997 and DOE 1998), Data Quality Objectives for TWRS Privatization Phase I: Confirm Tank T is an Appropriate Feed Source for Low-Activity Waste Feed Batch X (Certa 1998), and the Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (Dukelow et al. 1995). The Tank Characterization Technical Sampling Basis document (Brown et al. 1998) indicates that these issues apply to tank SY-101 for this sampling event. Brown et al. also identifies high-level waste, regulatory, pretreatment and disposal issues as applicable issues for this tank. However, these issues will not be addressed via this sampling event.

  3. In situ determination of rheological properties and void fraction in Hanford Waste Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, C.W.; Shepard, C.L.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Stokes, T.I.; Terrones, G.

    1995-08-01

    This report presents the results of the operation of the void fraction instrument (VFI) and ball rheometer in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101, which contains approximately one million gallons of radioactive waste. These instruments provided the first direct assay of the waste condition in the tank after more than a year of mixer pump operation. The two instruments were deployed in the tank in late 1994 and early 1995 to gather much-needed data on the effect prolonged mixer pump operation has on gas retention in the waste. The information supplied by these instruments has filled a great gap in the quantitative knowledge of the waste condition. The results show that the solids are well-mixed by the current mixer pump to within less than a meter of the tank bottom. Undisturbed sludge remains only on the lowest 10--30 cm and contains 10--12% void. The mixed slurry above contains less than 1% void and has no measurable yield strength and a shear-thinning viscosity of approximately 6 Poise at 1 sec{sup {minus}1}. Estimating the gas volumes in each of the four layers based on VFI data yields a total of 221 {+-} 57 m{sup 3} (7,800 {+-} 2,000 SCF) of gas at 1 atmosphere. Given the current waste level of 10.2 m (400 inches), the degassed waste level would be 9.8 m (386 inches). These results confirm that the mixer pump in Tank 241-SY-101 has performed the job it was installed to do--thoroughly mix the waste to release stored gas and prevent gas accumulation.

  4. Closed out Tank 241-SY-101 DACS system change request {number_sign}1--100

    SciTech Connect

    Gauck, G.J.

    1995-03-07

    This report is a compilation of system change requests processed during the development of the Data Acquisition and Control System for the Tank 241-SY-101 hydrogen mitigation project. Tank 241-SY-101 is on the Hydrogen Watch List. The disposition of the request, date the change was installed, date verified, and whether an Acceptance Test Procedure was required and completed are described for each request change.

  5. Miscellaneous component design for Tank 241SY101 pump removal

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, F.H.

    1995-03-02

    A mixer pump has been used to mitigate the hydrogen build-up in tank 241SY101 (SY101), located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. New equipment is being prepared for the removal, transport, storage, and disposal of the test pump. The disposal equipment for the test pump now in tank SY101 includes a shipping container, a strong back, a lifting beam, a test weight, container support stands, a modified mock-up pump, a flexible receiver blast shield, a lifting yoke, and a yoke brace. The structural evaluations of container and strong back are detailed in another supporting document (WHC 1994a), the engineering analyses of flexible receiver blast shield/lifting yoke and yoke brace are given in other supporting documents (WHC 1994b, WHC 1994c), respectively. Engineering tasks that were contracted to Advanced Engineering Consultants (AEC) include the design and analysis of the following. Two spreader-beam lifting devices. a Container test weight. Container support saddles. Mock-up pump modification. This report documents the work description, design basis, assumptions, and design calculations provided by AEC for the above components. All AEC documents appear in Appendix A. Additional work conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) on the modified container test weight, modification to the mock-up pump, the removable support for the transport assembly, and saddle modification for air pallets also are included in this document.

  6. 241-SY-101 mixer pump lifetime expectancy. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, C.P.

    1995-12-08

    The purpose of WHC-SD-WM-TI-726, Rev. 0 241-SY-101 Mixer Pump Lifetime Expectancy is to determine a best estimate of the mean lifetime of non-repairable (located in the waste) essential features of the hydrogen mitigation mixer pump presently installed in 101-SY. The estimated mean lifetime is 9.1 years. This report does not demonstrate operation of the entire pump assembly within the Tank Farm ``safety envelope``. It was recognized by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) this test pump was not specifically designed for long term service in tank 101-SY. In June 95 the DNFSB visited Hanford and ask the question, ``how long will this test pump last and how will the essential features fail?`` During the 2 day meeting with the DNFSB it was discussed and defined within the meeting just exactly what essential features of the pump must operate. These essential features would allow the pump to operate for the purpose of extending the window for replacement. Operating with only essential features would definitely be outside the operating safety envelope and would require a waiver. There are three essential features: 1. The pump itself (i.e. the impeller and motor) must operate 2. Nozzles and discharges leg must remain unplugged 3. The pump can be re-aimed, new waste targeted, even if manually.

  7. Dynamics of Crust Dissolution and Gas Release in Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    SD Rassat; CW Stewart; BE Wells; WL Kuhn; ZI Antoniak; JM Cuta; KP Recknagle; G Terrones; VV Viswanathan; JH Sukamto; DP Mendoza

    2000-01-26

    Due primarily to an increase in floating crust layer thickness, the waste level in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) has grown appreciably, and the flammable gas volume stored in the crust has become a potential hazard. To remediate gas retention in the crust and the potential for buoyant displacement gas releases from the nonconnective layer at the bottom of the tank, SY-101 will be diluted to dissolve a large fraction of the solids that allow the waste to retain gas. In this work we develop understanding of the state of the tank waste and some of its physical properties, investigate how added water will be distributed in the tank and affect the waste, and use the information to evaluate mechanisms and rates of waste solids dissolution and gas release. This work was completed to address these questions and in support of planning and development of controls for the SY-101 Surface Level Rise Remediation Project. Particular emphasis is given to dissolution of and gas release from the crust, although the effects of back-dilution on all waste layers are addressed. The magnitude and rates of plausible gas release scenarios are investigated, and it is demonstrated that none of the identified mechanisms of continuous (dissolution-driven) or sudden gas release, even with conservative assumptions, lead to domespace hydrogen concentrations exceeding the lower flammability limit. This report documents the results of studies performed in 1999 to address the issues of the dynamics, of crust dissolution and gas release in SY-101. It contains a brief introduction to the issues at hand; a summary of our knowledge of the SY-101 crust and other waste properties, including gas fractions, strength and volubility; a description of the buoyancy and dissolution models that are applied to predict the crust response to waste transfers and back dilution; and a discussion of the effectiveness of mixing for water added below the crust and the limited potential for significant stratification

  8. Assessment of gas accumulation and retention -- Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Alleman, R.T.; Burke, T.M.; Reynolds, D.A.; Simpson, D.E.

    1993-03-01

    An approximate analysis has been carried out to assess and estimate the maximum quantity of gas that is likely to be accumulated within waste tank 241-SY-101, and the maximum quantity which is likely to be retained after gas release events (GRE). According to the phenomenological models used for this assessment, based on interpretation of current and recent operational data, the estimated gas generation rate in the tank is approximately 4 m{sup 3}/day (147 ft{sup 3}/day). About half of this gas is released as it is generated, which is (essentially) continuously. The remainder is accumulated within the slurry layer of settled solids at the bottom of the tank, and released episodically in GREs, known as ``burps,`` that are induced by unstable buoyant conditions which develop when sufficient gas accumulates in the slurry. Calculations based on gas volumes to cause neutral buoyancy in the slurry predict the following: the maximum gas accumulation (at 1 atm pressure) that can occur without triggering a GRE is in the range of 606 to 1,039 m{sup 3} (21,400 to 36,700 ft{sup 3}); and the maximum gas retention immediately after a GRE is equal to the maximum accumulation minus the gas released in the GRE. GREs do not necessarily involve all of the slurry. In the largest GREs, which are assumed to involve all of the slurry, the minimum gas release (at 1 atm pressure) is calculated to be in the range of 193 to 328 m{sup 3} (6,800 to 11,600 ft{sup 3}). The corresponding maximum gas retention would be 413 to 711 m{sup 3} (14,600 to 25,100 ft{sup 3}).

  9. Quarterly review of 241-SY-101 mixer pump data: January - March 1999

    SciTech Connect

    CONNER, J.M.

    1999-07-22

    This report presents data obtained on 241-SY-101 pump performance. The period covered is January 1 through March 31, 1999. During the quarter: There were changes in pumping parameters. Both the pump volute pressure and amperage decreased during the quarter. It is not clear whether this was due to changes in waste properties (due to less solids or more entrained gas) or due to degradation of the pump. There was an indication of a 7.5-inch increase in the waste level at riser 1 A, and an average growth rate of 0.082 inches per day. There was an indication of a 5.7-inch increase in the waste level at riser 1C. This riser was flushed with water several times, which would lower the level of the crust at this location. Gases continued to be released at less than the pre-pump installation baseline rate, indicating a decrease in the gas generation rate, or an increase in gas retention, or both. The release rate was about 78 percent of the rate in the previous few quarters, and only 34 percent of the generation rate calculated prior to mixer pump installation in 1993. Key controls exist for waste temperature, gas concentration, pump parameters, and long-term waste behavior associated with the safe operation of the mixer pump that mitigates the buoyant displacement gas release event behavior of 241-SY-101. Table 1-1 compares the key controls and the current state of the waste as of March 3 1. 1999. The pump was run 28 times between January 1 and March 31, 1999. All of the pump runs were intended to be normal 25-minute, 1000-rpm excavation runs performed to mix the waste and release gas. Because of the pump oil often reached the high temperature alarm setpoint of 190 F, many of the runs were shortened (by as many as 8 minutes). This phenomenon was identified in November 1998, but got progressively worse over the quarter. The pump schedule was nominally three runs per week. However, core sampling activities interrupted the usual pump schedule several times during the quarter

  10. Quarterly Review of 241SY101 Mixer Pump Data 10/1998 Thru 12/1998

    SciTech Connect

    CONNER, J.M.

    1999-05-11

    This report presents data obtained on 241-SY-101 pump performance. The period covered is October 1 through December 31, 1998. During the quarter: (1) There was an indication of a 7.0-inch increase in the waste level at riser 1A, and an average growth rate of 0.076 inches per day; (2) There was an indication of a 2.3-inch increase in the waste level at riser 1C; (3) This riser was flushed with water several times, which would lower the level of the crust at this location; (4) Gases continued to be released at less than the pre-pump installation baseline rate, indicating a decrease in the gas generation rate, or an increase in gas retention, or both. The release rate was about 60 percent of the rate in the previous few quarters, and only 44 percent of the pre-pump release rate; and (5) There was no change in the parameters that monitor pump performance.

  11. Mitigation of tank 241-SY-101 by pump mixing: Results of full-scale testing

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, C.W.; Hudson, J.D.; Friley, J.R.; Panisko, F.E.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Irwin, J.J.; Fadeff, J.G.; Efferding, L.F.; Michener, T.E.; Kirch, N.W.

    1994-06-01

    The Full-Scale Mixer Pump Test Program was performed in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 from February 4 to April 13, 1994, to confirm the long-term operational strategy for flammable gas mitigation and to demonstrate that mixing can control the gas release and waste level. Since its installation on July 3, 1993, the current pump, operating only a few hours per week, has proved capable of mixing the waste sufficiently to release gas continuously instead of in large episodic events. The results of Full-Scale Testing demonstrated that the pump can control gas release and waste level for long-term mitigation, and the four test sequences formed the basis for the long-term operating schedule. The last test sequence, jet penetration tests, showed that the current pump jet creates flow near the tank wall and that it can excavate portions of the bottom sludge layer if run at maximum power. Pump mixing has altered the {open_quote}normal{close_quote} configuration of the waste; most of the original nonconvective sludge has been mixed with the supernatant liquid into a mobile convective slurry that has since been maintained by gentle pump operation and does not readily return to sludge.

  12. 1/12-scale physical modeling experiments in support of tank 241-SY- 101 hydrogen mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Fort, J.A.; Bamberger, J.A.; Bates, J.M.; Enderlin, C.W.; Elmore, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    Hanford tank 241-SY-101 is a 75-ft-dia double-shell tank that contains approximately 1.1 M gal of radioactive fuel reprocessing waste. Core samples have shown that the tank contents are separated into two main layers, a article laden supernatant liquid at the top of the tank and a more dense slurry on the bottom. Two additional layers may be present, one being a potentially thick sludge lying beneath the slurry at the bottom of the tank and the other being the crust that has formed on the surface of the supernatant liquid. The supernatant is more commonly referred to as the convective layer and the slurry as the non-convective layer. Accumulation of gas (partly hydrogen) in the non-convective layer is suspected to be the key mechanism behind the gas burp phenomena, and several mitigation schemes are being developed to encourage a more uniform gas release rate (Benegas 1992). To support the full-scale hydraulic mitigation test, scaled experiments were performed to satisfy two objectives: 1. provide an experimental database for numerical- model validation; 2. establish operating parameter values required to mobilize the settled solids and maintain the solids in suspension.

  13. Dynamics of Crust Dissolution and Gas Release in Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Rassat, Scot D.; Stewart, Charles W.; Wells, Beric E.; Kuhn, William L.; Antoniak, Zenen I.; Cuta, Judith M.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Terrones, Guillermo; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Sukamto, Johanes H.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.

    2000-01-24

    Due primarily to an increase in floating crust thickness, the waste level in Tank 241-SY-101 has grown appreciably and the flammable gas volume stored in the crust has become a potential hazard. To remediate gas retention in the crust and the potential for buoyant displacement gas releases from the nonconvective layer at the bottom of the tank, SY-101 will be diluted to dissolve a large fraction of the solids that allow the waste to retain gas. The plan is to transfer some waste out and back-dilute with water in several steps. In this work, mechanisms and rates of waste solids dissolution and gas releases are evaluated theoretically and experimentally. Particular emphasis is given to crust dissolution processes and associated gas releases, although dissolution and gas release from the mixed-slurry and nonconvective layers are also considered. The release of hydrogen gas to the tank domespace is modeled for a number of scenarios. Under the tank conditions expected at the time of back-dilution, no plausible continuous or sudden gas release scenarios resulting in flammable hydrogen concentrations were identified.

  14. Evaluation of the generation and release of flammable gases in tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Babad, H.; Johnson, G.D.; Lechelt, J.A.; Reynolds, D.A. ); Pederson, L.R.; Strachan, D.M. ); Meisel, D.; Jonah, C. ); Ashby, E.C. )

    1991-11-01

    Tank 241-SY-101 is a double shell, high-level waste tank located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. This tank contains about 1 million gallons of waste that was concentrated at the 242-S Evaporator. Shortly after the waste was put in the tank, the waste began to expand because the generation of gases. In 1990 this tank was declared to have an unreviewed safety question because of the periodic release of hydrogen and nitrous oxide. A safety program was established to conduct a characterization of the waste and vented gases and to determine an effective means to prevent the accumulation of flammable gases in the tank dome space and ventilation system. Results of the expanded characterization conducted in fiscal year 1991 are presented. The use of gas chromatographs, mass spectrometers, and hydrogen-specific monitors provided a greater understanding of the vented gases. Additional instrumentation placed in the tank also helped to provide more detailed information on tank temperatures, gas pressure, and gas flow rates. An extensive laboratory study involving the Westinghouse Hanford Company, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and the Georgia Institute of Technology was initiated for the purpose of determining the mechanisms responsible for the generation of various gases. These studies evaluate both radiolytic and thermochemical processes. Results of the first series of experiments are described.

  15. Thermal analysis of tank 241-SY-101 to support structural assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Beaver, T.R.

    1994-10-14

    This report documents a thermal model of tank 241-SY-101 and the surrounding soil column that was used to predict tank temperatures resulting from heating of the annulus ventilation air. Transient results from the model were input to a structural model of the tank for evaluation of the annulus heat-up event.

  16. Mixer pump long term operations plan for Tank 241-SY-101 mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, J.J.

    1994-09-07

    This document provides the general Operations Plan for performance of the mixer pump long term operations for Tank 241-SY-101 mitigation of gas retention and periodic release in Tank 101-SY. This operations plan will utilize a 112 kW (150 hp) mixing pump to agitate/suspend the particulates in the tank.

  17. An assessment of the dilution required to mitigate Hanford tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, J.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Felmy, A.R.; Stewart, C.W.; Tingey, J.M.; Trent, D.S.; Barney, G.S.; Herting, D.L.; Larrick, A.P.; Reynolds, D.A.

    1995-02-01

    A group of experts from PNL and WHC convened November 2 and 3, 1994, to screen the current state of knowledge about dilution and reach a consensus on the minimum dilution ratio that will achieve passive mitigation of Tank 241-SY-101 wastes and the dilution ratio that would satisfy the given cross-site transfer criteria with reasonable assurance. The panel evaluated the effects of dilution on the parameters important in gas generation, retention, and release and reached the following conclusions, which are deduced from the existing body of data, experience, and analyses: (1) Dissolution of solids is the single most important aspect of mitigation by dilution. We are confident that diluting until nitrates, nitrites, and aluminum salts are dissolved will mitigate Hanford flammable gas tanks; (2) Sufficient solids dissolution can be achieved in Tank 241-SY-101 at a dilution ratio of 1:1, which will result in a average specific gravity of approximately 1.35. It is likely that a 0.5:1 dilution will also mitigate 241-SY-101, but the current uncertainty is too high to recommend this dilution ratio; (3) The recommended dilution requires a diluent with at least 2 molar free hydroxide, because aluminum probably precipitates at lower hydroxide concentrations. The transfer criteria for Tank 241-SY-101 waste were also evaluated. These criteria have been specified as solids content {<=}30% (volume), viscosity {<=}30% cP and density <1.5 g/mL. (1) Solids content is the limiting criterion if it is defined as volume fraction of settled solids. A 1:1 dilution will satisfy this criterion at nominal premixing conditions in Tank 241-SY-101; however, analysis of Window E core samples suggests that up to 1.5:1 might be required. If the solids content is interpreted simply as solids volume fraction no further dilution is necessary, because Tank 241-SY-101 waste (excluding the crust) is already below 30%; (2) Bulk density is the next limiting criterion and is met at 0.4:1 dilution.

  18. Results of Waste Transfer and Back-Dilution in Tanks 241-SY-101 and 241-SY-102

    SciTech Connect

    LA Mahoney; ZI Antoniak; WB Barton; JM Conner; NW Kirch; CW Stewart; BE Wells

    2000-07-26

    This report chronicles the process of remediation of the flammable gas hazard in Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) by waste transfer and back-dilution from December 18, 1999 through April 2, 2000. A brief history is given of the development of the flammable gas retention and release hazard in this tank, and the transfer and dilution systems are outlined. A detailed narrative of each of the three transfer and dilution campaigns is given to provide structure for the balance of the report. Details of the behavior of specific data are then described, including the effect of transfer and dilution on the waste levels in Tanks SY-101 and SY-102, data from strain gauges on equipment suspended from the tank dome, changes in waste configuration as inferred from neutron and gamma logs, headspace gas concentrations, waste temperatures, and the mixerpump operating performance. Operating data and performance of the transfer pump in SY-101 are also discussed.

  19. Acceptance test procedure, 241-SY-101/241-C-106 shot loading system

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrom, M.J.

    1994-11-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure is for the 241-SY-101/241-C-106 Shot Loading System. The procedure will test the components of the Shot Loading System and its capability of adequately loading shot into the annular space of the Container. The loaded shot will provide shielding as required for transporting and storage of a contaminated pump after removal from the tank. This test serves as verification that the SLS is acceptable for use in the pump removal operations for Tanks 241-SY-101, 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102. The pump removal operation for these three tanks will be performed by two different organizations with different equipment, but the Shot Loading System will be compatible between the two operations.

  20. Thermocouple module halt failure acceptance test procedure for Tank 241-SY-101 DACS-1

    SciTech Connect

    Ermi, A.M.

    1997-12-09

    The readiness of the Tank 241-SY-101 Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS-1) to provide monitoring and alarms for a halt failure of any thermocouple module will be tested during the performance of this procedure. Updated DACS-1 ``1/0 MODULE HEALTH STATUS``, ``MININ1``, and ``MININ2`` screens, which now provide indication of thermocouple module failure, will also be tested as part of this procedure.

  1. Acceptance and operational test procedure for neutron and gamma probe application to tank 241-SY-101 MITs

    SciTech Connect

    CANNON, N.S.

    1999-06-02

    This ATP/OTP provides procedures for testing to be performed to verify that newly procured neutron and gamma probes (reduced diameter design modifications) for operation in the Tank 241-SY-101 MlTs are compatible with existing LOW van instrumentation and hardware. A set of moisture data versus elevation will be obtained from the Tank 241-SY-101 MITs, and (optionally) from the Tank 241-AX-I01 LOW as part of this testing program.

  2. Acceptance and Operational Test Report for Neutron and Gamma Probe Application to Tank 241-SY-101 MITs

    SciTech Connect

    CANNON, N.S.

    1999-08-12

    This Operational Test Report (OTR) presents the results of the ATP/OTP testing performed to verify that newly procured neutron and gamma probes (reduced diameter design modifications) for operation in the Tank 241-SY-101 MITs are compatible with existing LOW van instrumentation and hardware. This verification was accomplished and a set of moisture data versus elevation were obtained from the Tank 241-SY-101 MITs as part of this testing program.

  3. The Potential for Buoyant Displacement Gas Release Events in Tank 241-SY-102 after Waste Transfer from Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Beric E.; Meyer, Perry A.; Chen, Guang

    2000-04-10

    Tank 241-SY-101 is a double-shell radioactive waste storage tank containing waste that, before recent transfer and water back-dilution operations, was capable of retaining gas and producing flammable buoyant displacement gas release events (BD GREs). A BD GRE occurs when a portion of the nonconvective layer waste retains enough gas to become buoyant, rises to the waste surface, breaks up, and releases some of the stored gas. Installing the mixer pump in 1993 successfully mitigated gas retention in the settled solids layer in SY-101 and has prevented BD GREs. Gas retention in the floating drust layer and the corresponding accelerated waste level growth made it necessary to begin waste removal and back-dilution with water in December 1999. During these operations, some of the SY-101 mixed slurry layer is removed and transferred into Tank 241-SY-102. There was some concern that adding the SY-101 waste into SY-102 could create a waste configuration in SY-102 capable of BD GREs. This report updates and extends earlier assessments of the potential for BD GRE conditions in SY-102 after waste is transferred from SY-101. We determined that, under the given assumptions, no possibility of BD GREs exists in SY-102 from the SY-101 waste being added during from December 1999 through March 2000.

  4. Buoyant Response of the Tank 241-SY-101 Crust to Transfer and Back-Dilution

    SciTech Connect

    CW Stewart

    1999-11-08

    The mixer pump installed in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) in July 1993 has prevented the large buoyant displacement gas release events (BD GRE) it has historically exhibited. But the absence of periodic disruption from GREs and the action of mixing have allowed the crust to grow. The accelerated gas retention has resulted in over 30 inches of waste level growth and the flammable gas volume stored in the crust has become a hazard. To remediate gas retention in the crust and the potential for buoyant displacement gas releases from below the crust, SY-101 will be diluted in the fall of 1999 to dissolve a large fraction of the solids in the tank. The plan is to transfer waste out and back-dilute with water in several steps of about 100,000 gallons each. Back-dilution water may be added at the transfer pump inlet, the base of the mixer pump, and on top of the crust. The mixer pump will continue to be required to prevent formation of a deep nonconnective layer and resumption of BD GREs. Therefore, it is vital to ensure that the transfer and back-dilution processes do not significantly degrade the pump's effectiveness. Part of the strategy to avoid mixer pump degradation is to keep the base of the crust layer well above the pump inlet, which is 236 inches above the tank bottom. The maximum transfer for which an equal back-dilution is possible without sinking the crust is 90 kgal if water is injected at the 96-inch transfer pump inlet and 120 kgal for injection at the 9-inch mixer pump burrowing ring. To keep the crust base above the lowest observed elevation of 295 inches, transfer and back-dilution must be limited to 143 kgal and 80 kgal, respectively, for the 96-inch back-dilution and 175 kgal with a 112 kgal back-dilution using the 9-inch back-dilution elevation. These limits can be avoided by adding water to the top of the crust to dissolve the negatively buoyant layers. If 20 kgal of water is placed on top of the crust and the rest of the back-dilution is placed

  5. The behavior, quantity, and location of undissolved gas in Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Brewster, M.E.; Gallagher, N.B.; Hudson, J.D.; Stewart, C.W.

    1995-10-01

    Mitigation of episodic flammable gas releases from Hanford Waste Tank 241-SY-101 was accomplished in July 1993 with the installation of a mixer pump that prevents gas retention. But is has not been possible until recently to measure the effects of mixing on the waste or how much gas remains and where it is located. Direct measurements of the void fraction and rheology of the mixed waste by the void fraction instrument (VFI) and ball rheometer along with previous data provide estimates of the location, quantity, and behavior of undissolved gas in the tank. This report documents the compilation and integration of the information that enables this understanding.

  6. Engineering test plan for Tank 241-SY-101 in situ viscometer

    SciTech Connect

    Sobocinski, R.G.; Stokes, T.I.; Pearce, K.L.

    1994-11-01

    To obtain in situ measurements of the rheological properties within tank 241-SY-101, this document will implement the test strategy defined in PNLMIT-041994, acquisition and Reduction of Data Obtained in Tank SY-101 with the Ball Rheometer. Instructions for all sequences are defined within the procedure. All safety requirements as defined in LA-UR-92-3196, A Safety Assessment for Proposed Mixing Operations to Mitigate Episodic Gas Releases in Tank 241-101-SY have been implemented into this procedure.

  7. Ultrasonic Examination of Double-Shell Tank 241-SY-101. Examination Completed March 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Pardini, Allan F.; Posakony, Gerald J.

    2004-07-22

    COGEMA Engineering Corporation (COGEMA), under a contract from CH2M Hill Hanford Group (CH2M Hill), has performed an ultrasonic nondestructive examination of selected portions of Double-Shell Tank 241-SY-101. The purpose of this examination was to provide information that could be used to evaluate the integrity of the wall of the primary tank. The requirements for the ultrasonic examination of Tank 241-SY-101 were to detect, characterize (identify, size, and locate), and record measurements made of any wall thinning, pitting, or cracks that might be present in the wall of the primary tank. Any measurements that exceed the requirements set forth in the Engineering Task Plan (ETP), RPP-17750 (Jensen 2003) and summarized on page 1 of this document, are reported to CH2M Hill and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for further evaluation. Under the contract with CH2M Hill, all data is to be recorded on disk and paper copies of all measurements are provided to PNNL for third-party evaluation. PNNL is responsible for preparing a report that describes the results of the COGEMA ultrasonic examinations.

  8. Ultrasonic Examination of Double-Shell Tank 241-SY-101. Examination Completed March 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Pardini, Allan F.; Posakony, Gerald J.

    2004-05-25

    COGEMA Engineering Corporation (COGEMA), under a contract from CH2M Hill Hanford Group (CH2M Hill), has performed an ultrasonic nondestructive examination of selected portions of Double-Shell Tank 241-SY-101. The purpose of this examination was to provide information that could be used to evaluate the integrity of the wall of the primary tank. The requirements for the ultrasonic examination of Tank 241-SY-101 were to detect, characterize (identify, size, and locate), and record measurements made of any wall thinning, pitting, or cracks that might be present in the wall of the primary tank. Any measurements that exceed the requirements set forth in the Engineering Task Plan (ETP), RPP-17750 (Jensen 2003) and summarized on page 1 of this document, are reported to CH2M Hill and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for further evaluation. Under the contract with CH2M Hill, all data is to be recorded on disk and paper copies of all measurements are provided to PNNL for third-party evaluation. PNNL is responsible for preparing a report that describes the results of the COGEMA ultrasonic examinations.

  9. Numerical simulation of jet mixing concepts in Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, D.S.; Michener, T.E.

    1993-03-01

    The episodic gas release events (GRES) that have characterized the behavior of Tank 241-SY-101 for the past several years are thought to result from gases generated by the waste material in it that become trapped in the layer of settled solids at the bottom of the tank. Several concepts for mitigating the GREs have been proposed. One concept involves mobilizing the solid particles with mixing jets. The rationale behind this idea is to prevent formation of a consolidated layer of settled solids at the bottom of the tank, thus inhibiting the accumulation of gas bubbles in this layer. Numerical simulations were conducted using the TEMPEST computer code to assess the viability and effectiveness of the proposed jet discharge concepts and operating parameters. Before these parametric studies were commenced, a series of turbulent jet studies were conducted that established the adequacy of the TEMPEST code for this application. Configurations studied for Tank 241-SY-101 include centrally located downward discharging jets, draft tubes, and horizontal jets that are either stationary or rotating. Parameter studies included varying the jet discharge velocity, jet diameter, discharge elevation, and material properties. A total of 18 simulations were conducted and are reported in this document. The effect of gas bubbles on the mixing dynamics was not included within the scope of this study.

  10. 1/12-scale physical modeling experiments in support of tank 241-SY- 101 hydrogen mitigation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fort, J.A.; Bamberger, J.A.; Bates, J.M.; Enderlin, C.W.; Elmore, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    Hanford tank 241-SY-101 is a 75-ft-dia double-shell tank that contains approximately 1.1 M gal of radioactive fuel reprocessing waste. Core samples have shown that the tank contents are separated into two main layers, a article laden supernatant liquid at the top of the tank and a more dense slurry on the bottom. Two additional layers may be present, one being a potentially thick sludge lying beneath the slurry at the bottom of the tank and the other being the crust that has formed on the surface of the supernatant liquid. The supernatant is more commonly referred to as the convective layer and the slurry as the non-convective layer. Accumulation of gas (partly hydrogen) in the non-convective layer is suspected to be the key mechanism behind the gas burp phenomena, and several mitigation schemes are being developed to encourage a more uniform gas release rate (Benegas 1992). To support the full-scale hydraulic mitigation test, scaled experiments were performed to satisfy two objectives: 1. provide an experimental database for numerical- model validation; 2. establish operating parameter values required to mobilize the settled solids and maintain the solids in suspension.

  11. Waste tank 241-SY-101 dome airspace and ventilation system response to a flammable gas plume burn

    SciTech Connect

    Heard, F.J.

    1995-11-01

    A series of flammable gas plume burn and transient pressure analyses have been completed for a nuclear waste tank (241-SY-101) and associated tank farm ventilation system at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford facility. The subject analyses were performed to address issues concerning the effects of transient pressures resulting from igniting a small volume of concentrated flammable gas just released from the surface of the waste as a plume and before the flammable gas concentration could be reduced by mixing with the dome airspace by local convection and turbulent diffusion. Such a condition may exist as part of an in progress episode gas release (EGR) or gas plume event. The analysis goal was to determine the volume of flammable gas that if burned within the dome airspace would result in a differential pressure, after propagating through the ventilation system, greater than the current High Efficiency Particulate Filter (HEPA) limit of 2.49 KPa (10 inches of water or 0. 36 psi). Such a pressure wave could rupture the tank ventilation system inlet and outlet HEPA filters leading to a potential release of contaminants to the environment

  12. Buoyancy and Dissolution of the Floating Crust Layer in Tank 241-SY-101 During Transfer and Back-Dilution

    SciTech Connect

    CW Stewart; JH Sukamto; JM Cuta; SD Rassat

    1999-11-22

    To remediate gas retention in the floating crust layer and the potential for buoyant displacement gas releases from below the crust, waste will be transferred out of Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) in the fall of 1999 and back-diluted with water in several steps of about 100,000 gallons each. To evaluate the effects of back-dilution on the crust a static buoyancy model is derived that predicts crust and liquid surface elevations as a function of mixing efficiency and volume of water added during transfer and back-dilution. Experimental results are presented that demonstrate the basic physics involved and verify the operation of the models. A dissolution model is also developed to evaluate the effects of dissolution of solids on crust flotation. The model includes dissolution of solids suspended in the slurry as well as in the crust layers. The inventory and location of insoluble solids after dissolution of the soluble fraction are also tracked. The buoyancy model is applied to predict the crust behavior for the first back-dilution step in SY-101. Specific concerns addressed include conditions that could cause the crust to sink and back-dilution requirements that keep the base of the crust well above the mixer pump inlet.

  13. In Situ Void Fraction and Gas Volume in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 as Measured with the Void Fraction Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    CW Stewart; G Chen; JM Alzheimer; PA Meyer

    1998-11-10

    The void fraction instrument (WI) was deployed in Tank 241-SY-101 three times in 1998 to confm and locate the retained gas (void) postulated to be causing the accelerating waste level rise observed since 1995. The design, operation, and data reduction model of the WI are described along with validation testing and potential sources of uncertainty. The test plans, field observations and void measurements are described in detail, including the total gas volume calculations and the gas volume model. Based on 1998 data, the void fraction averaged 0.013 i 0.001 in the mixed slurry and 0.30 ~ 0.04 in the crust. This gives gas volumes (at standard pressure and temperature) of 87 t 9 scm in the slurry and 138 ~ 22 scm in the crust for a total retained gas volume of221 *25 scm. This represents an increase of about 74 scm in the crust and a decrease of about 34 scm in the slurry from 1994/95 results. The overall conclusion is that the gas retention is occurring mainly in the crust layer and there is very little gas in the mixed slurry and loosely settled layers below. New insights on crust behavior are also revealed.

  14. The potential for buoyant displacement gas release events in Tank 241-SY-102 after waste transfer from Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    BE Wells; PE Meyer; G Chen

    2000-05-10

    Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) is a double-shell, radioactive waste storage tank with waste that, before the recent transfer and water back-dilution operations, was capable of retaining gas and producing buoyant displacement (BD) gas release events (GREs). Some BD GREs caused gas concentrations in the tank headspace to exceed the lower flammability limit (LFL). A BD GRE occurs when a portion of the nonconvective layer retains enough gas to become buoyant, rises to the waste surface, breaks up, and releases some of its stored gas. The installation of a mixer pump in 1993 successfully mitigated gas retention in the settled solids layer in SY-101 and has since prevented BD GREs. However, operation of the mixer pump over the years caused gas retention in the floating crust layer and a corresponding accelerated waste level growth. The accelerating crust growth trend observed in 1997--98 led to initiation of sequences of waste removal and water back-dilutions in December 1999. Waste is removed from the mixed slurry layer in Tank SY-101 and transferred into Tank 241-Sy-102 (SY-102). Water is then added back to dissolve soluble solids that retain gas. The initial transfer of 89,500 gallons of SY-101 waste, diluted in-line at 0.94:1 by volume with water, to SY-102 was conducted in December 1999. The second transfer of 230,000 gallons of original SY-101 waste, diluted approximately 0.9:1, was completed in January 2000, and the third transfer of 205,500 gallons of original SY-101 waste diluted at 0.9:1 was completed in March 2000.

  15. Type B Investigation Report for 241-SY-101 Pump Start and 241-C-106 Pit Cleanout

    SciTech Connect

    Ewalt, J.R.

    1993-09-01

    In accordance with the direction of the Department of Energy (DOE) Manager, Richland Operations Office, a Type ``B`` investigation in accordance with the DOE Order 5484.1, Environmental Protection, Safety and Health Protection Information Reporting Requirements, has been conducted. The scope of the investigation included two events: The ``Inadvertent Mixer Pump Operation at 241-SY-101`` (RL-WHC-TANK FARM-1993-069); ``Inadequate Work Control Results in Personnel Skin Contamination at 241-C-106, Pit B`` (RL-WHC-TANK FARM-1993-071) events. Additionally, at the request of the President of the WHC, a broader investigation into Waste Tank Farm ``safety practices`` and ``Conduct of Operations`` was also conducted. The review was focused on (1) WHC organizations performing operations, maintenance, and radiological safety tasks; and (2) KEH organizations performing major maintenance tasks.

  16. Simulation and rheological analysis of Hanford Tank 241-SY-101. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sams, E.C.; Tennant, R.A.; Piccola, J.P. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    Rheological characterization and small scale simulation of Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 has been initiated to aid in the remediation efforts for the Department of Energy Hanford Site. The study has been initiated in response to growing concerns about the potential flammability hazard pertaining to the periodic release of up to 10,000 cubic feet of hydrogen, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, and ammonia gases. Various stimulants emulating the radioactive waste stored in this tank have been used to ascertain the rheological parameters of the waste, simulate the ongoing processes of gas generation and release phenomenon inside the tank, and determine the feasibility of jet mixing to achieve a controlled release of the gas mixture.

  17. A survey of available information on gas generation in tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, D.M. ); Reynolds, D.A. ); Siemer, D.D. ); Wallace, R.W. )

    1991-03-01

    As a result of a concerted effort to determine the chemical and physical mechanisms underlying the generation and episodic release of gases from tank 241-SY-101, more commonly known as tank 101-SY, the Tank Waste Science Panel has been established at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Four of the members of this panel met to screen the available information on tank 101-SY and provide to the remaining members a shortened list of references that could be used to assess the mechanisms underlying the generation and episodic release of gases from tank 101-SY. This document is the result of this preliminary screening of information for the Tank Waste Science Panel and was provided to the Panel members at their first meeting. 14 refs., 3 tabs.

  18. 241-SY-101 strain concentration factor development via nonlinear analysis. Volume 1 of 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The 241-SY-101 waste storage tank at the Hanford-Site has been known to accumulate and release significant quantities of hydrogen gas. An analysis was performed to assess the tank`s structural integrity when subjected to postulated hydrogen deflagration loads. The analysis addressed many nonlinearities and appealed to a strain-based failure criteria. The model used to predict the global response of the tank was not refined enough to confidently predict local peak strains. Strain concentration factors were applied at structural discontinuities that were based on steel-lined reinforced-concrete containment studies. The discontinuities included large penetrations, small penetrations, springline geometries, stud/liner connections, and the {1/2} inch to 3/8 inch liner thickness transition. The only tank specific strain concentration factor applied in the evaluation was for the {1/2} inch to 3/8 inch liner thickness change in the dome. Review of the tank drawings reveals the possibility that a 4 inches Sch. 40 pipe penetrates the dome thickness transition region. It is not obvious how to combine the strain concentration factors for a small penetration with that of a thickness transition to arrive at a composite strain concentration factor. It is the goal of this effort to make an approximate determination of the relative significance of the 4 inch penetration and the {1/2} inch to 3/8 inch thickness transition in the 241-SY-101 dome geometry. This is accomplished by performing a parametric study with three general finite-element models. The first represents the thickness transition only, the second represents a 4 inch penetration only, and the third combines the thickness transition with a penetration model.

  19. Structural analysis of multiport riser 5A installation on tank 241SY101

    SciTech Connect

    Strehlow, J.P.

    1994-09-16

    The Tank 101-SY multiport riser assembly in the 241-SY-101 waste tank will replace the existing 42 inch riser with four smaller ports. Each smaller port can be used independently to access the tank interior with equipment and instruments needed to mitigate the concentration of hydrogen in the tank. This document provides a design report on the structural evaluation of the multiport riser assembly as well as its anchorage. The multiport riser assembly is a steel structure installed directly above the 42-inch riser and sealed at the existing riser flange. The assembly is structurally supported by the concrete pad placed around the 42 inch riser. The multiport riser assembly will provide two 8-inch penetrations, one 12-inch penetration and one 24-inch penetration. Each penetration will have a shielding plate. These penetrations will be used to insert equipment such as a sonic probe into the tank. In addition to normal loads, non-reactor Safety Class 1 structures, systems and components are to withstand the effects of extreme environmental loads including Design Basis Earthquake (DBE), Design Basis Wind (DBW), Design Basis Flood, Volcanic Eruptions and other abnormal loads considered on a case by case basis. Non-reactor Safety Class 2, 3 and 4 structures, systems and components are those that are not Safety Class 1 and are respectively specified as onsite safety related, occupational safety related and non-safety related items. The 241-SY-101 tank is considered as a non-reactor Safety Class 1 structure. The multiport riser assembly is considered as a non-reactor Safety Class 2 structure since it serves to contain the radioactive and toxic materials under normal operating conditions. However, the pressure relief doors provided on the assembly are considered as Safety Class 1 structures.

  20. Laboratory testing of ozone oxidation of Hanford Site waste from Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, C.H.; Stubbs, A.M.; Bolling, S.D.

    1993-12-14

    Ozone was investigated as a reagent to oxidize and destroy organic species present in simulated and genuine waste from Hanford Site Tank 241-SY-101 (Tank 101-SY). Two high-shear mixing apparatus were tested to perform the gas-to-solution mass transfer necessary to achieve efficient use of the ozone reagent. Oxidations of nitrite (to form nitrate) and organic species were observed. The organics oxidized to form carbonate and oxalate as well as nitrate and nitrogen gas from nitrogen associated with the organic. oxidations of metal species also were observed directly or inferred by solubilities. The chemical reaction stoichiometries were consistent with reduction of one oxygen atom per ozone molecule. Acetate, oxalate, and formate were found to comprise about 40% of the genuine waste`s total organic carbon (TOC) concentration. Ozonation was found to be chemically feasible for destroying organic species (except oxalate) present in the wastes in Tank 101-SY. The simulated waste formulation used in these studies credibly modelled the ozonation behavior of the genuine waste.

  1. Assessment of Tank 241-S-112 Liquid Waste Mixing in Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Yasuo; Trent, Donald S.; Wells, Beric E.; Mahoney, Lenna A.

    2003-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate mixing of liquid waste from Tank 241-S-112 with waste in Tank 241-SY-101 and to determine the properties of the resulting waste for the cross-site transfer to avoid potential double-shell tank corrosion and pipeline plugging. We applied the time-varying, three-dimensional computer code TEMPEST to Tank SY-101 as it received the S-112 liquid waste. The model predicts that temperature variations in Tank SY-101 generate a natural convection flow that is very slow, varying from about 7 x 10{sup -5} to 1 x 10{sup -3} ft/sec (0.3 to about 4 ft/hr) in most areas. Thus, natural convection would eventually mix the liquid waste in SY-101 but would be very slow to achieve nearly complete mixing. These simulations indicate that the mixing of S-112 and SY-101 wastes in Tank SY-101 is a very slow process, and the density difference between the two wastes would further limit mixing. It is expected to take days or weeks to achieve relatively complete mixing in Tank SY-101.

  2. Chemical and physical processes in Tank 241-SY-101: A preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-01

    Since 1942, chemical and radioactive waste have been stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site. In March 1981 one of the double shell tanks, 241-SY-101 (called 101-SY), began venting large quantities of gas, primarily hydrogen and nitrous oxide. Because of the potential for explosion Westinghouse Hanford Company and the US Department of Energy realized the need for knowledge about the processes occurring in this tank that lead to generation of the gases. In June 1990, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory began assembling a Tank Waste Science Panel to develop a better understanding of the processes occurring the Tank 101-SY. This knowledge is necessary to provide a technically defensible basis for the safety analyses, which will allow the tank contents to be sampled, as well as for the future remediation of the tank and its contents. The Panel concluded that the data available on Tank 101-SY are insufficient to allow the critical chemical and physical processes giving rise to gas formation and release to be unambiguously identified. To provide the needed information the Panel recommends that Tank 101-SY by physically and chemically characterized as fully as possible and as expeditiously as safety considerations allow, and laboratory studies and modeling efforts be undertaken the chemical and physical processes involved in gas generation and release. Finally, the Panel recommends that no remediation steps be taken until there is a better understanding of the chemical and physical phenomena occurring in Tank 101-SY. Premature remediation steps may only serve to compound the problem. Furthermore, such steps may change the chemical and physical characteristics of the tank and prevent a true understanding of the phenomena involved. As a consequence, similar problems in other tanks on the site may not be adequately addressed. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Numerical simulation of Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 jet initiated fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, D.S.; Michener, T.E.

    1994-12-31

    The episodic Gas Release Events (GREs) that have characterized the behavior of Hanford tank 241-SY-101 for the past several years are thought to result from the entrapment of gases generated in the settled solids, i.e., sludge, layer of the tank. Gases consisting of about 36% hydrogen by volume, which are generated by complicated and poorly understood radiological and chemical processes, are apparently trapped in the settled solids layer until their accumulation initiates a buoyant upset of this layer, abruptly releasing large quantities of gas. Once concept for preventing the gas accumulation is to mobilize the settled materials with jet mixing. It is suggested that continual agitation of the settled solids using a mixer pump would free the gas bubbles so that they could continually escape, thus mitigating the potential for accumulation of flammable concentrations of hydrogen in the tank dome space following a GRE. A pump test is planned to evaluate the effectiveness of the jet mixing mitigation concept. The pump will circulate liquid from the upper layer of the tank, discharging it through two horizontal jets located approximately 2{1/2} ft above the tank floor. To prepare for start-up of this pump test, technical, operation, and safety questions concerning an anticipated gas release were addressed by numerical simulation using the TEMPEST computer code. Simulations of the pump initiated gas release revealed that the amount of gas that could potentially be released to the tank dome space is very sensitive to the initial conditions assumed for the amount and distribution of gas in the sludge layer. Calculations revealed that within the assumptions regarding gas distribution and content, the pump might initiate a rollover--followed by a significant gas release--if the sludge layer contains more than about 13 to 14% gas distributed with constant volume fraction.

  4. Effects of oxygen cover gas and NaOH dilution on gas generation in tank 241-SY-101 waste

    SciTech Connect

    Person, J.C.

    1996-05-30

    Laboratory studies are reported of gas generation in heated waste from tank 241-SY-101. The rates of gas generation and the compositions of product gas were measured. Three types of tests are compared. The tests use: undiluted waste, waste diluted by a 54% addition of 2.5 M NaOH, and undiluted waste with a reactive cover gas of 30% Oxygen in He. The gas generation rate is reduced by dilution, increased by higher temperatures (which determines activation energies), and increased by reactions of Oxygen (these primarily produce H{sub 2}). Gases are generated as reduction products oxidation of organic carbon species by nitrite and oxygen.

  5. Potential for Waste Stratification from Back-Dilution in Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniak, Z.I.; Meyer, P.A.

    1999-10-20

    Since late 1997, the floating crust layer in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) has grown about two meters by gas accumulation. To reverse crust growth and reduce its retained gas volume, the waste in SY-101 will be diluted by transferring at least 300,000 gal of waste out of the tank and replacing it with water. In the fall of 1999, approximately 100,000 gal of this waste will be transferred into Tank SY-102; within a few days of that initial transfer, approximately 100,000 gal of water will be added to SY-101. This initial back-dilution is being planned to ensure that the base of the floating crust layer will be lifted away from the mixer pump inlet with minimal effect on the crust itself. The concern is that the added water will pool under the crust, so the resulting fluid mixture will be too light to lift the crust away from the mixer pump and dissolution at the crust base could cause unwanted gas release. To ensure sufficient mixing to prevent such stratification, water will be added near the tank bottom either through an existing sparge ring on the base of the mixer pump or through the dilution line at the inlet of the transfer pump. A number of simulations using the TEMPEST code showed that the mixing of the water and waste by this method is rapid, and the water does not pool under the crust. Although a density gradient is present, its magnitude is small compared with the difference between the slurry and water density. The result is essentially the same whether water is introduced at the base of the mixer pump or at the transfer pump. There is little effect of water flowrate up to the 500 gpm studied. In all cases, the minimum density remained above that required to float the crust and well above the density of saturated liquid. This indicates that the base of the crust will rise during back-dilution and there will be little or no dissolution of the crust base because the water will be close to saturation from the dissolution of solids in the mixed slurry.

  6. Effects of Crust Ingestion on Mixer Pump Performance in Tank 241-SY-101: Workshop Results

    SciTech Connect

    Brennen, C.E.; Stewart, C.W.; Meyer, P.A.

    1999-10-20

    In August 1999, a workshop was held at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to discuss the effects of crust ingestion on mixer pump performance in Hanford Waste Tank 241-SY-101. The main purpose of the workshop was to evaluate the potential for crust ingestion to degrade mixing and/or damage the mixer pump. The need for a previously determined 12-inch separation between the top of the mixer pump inlet and the crust base was evaluated. Participants included a representative from the pump manufacturer, an internationally known expert in centrifugal pump theory, Hanford scientists and engineers, and operational specialists representing relevant fields of expertise. The workshop focused on developing an understanding of the pump design, addressing the physics of entrainment of solids and gases into the pump, and assessing the effects of solids and gases on pump performance. The major conclusions are summarized as follows: (1) Entrainment of a moderate amount of solids or gas from the crust should not damage the pump or reduce its lifetime, though mixing effectiveness will be somewhat reduced. (2) Air binding should not damage the pump. Vibrations due to ingestion of gas, solids, and objects potentially could cause radial loads that might reduce the lifetime of bearings and seals. However, significant damage would require extreme conditions not associated with the small bubbles, fine solids, and chunks of relatively weak material typical of the crust. (3) The inlet duct extension opening, 235 inches from the tank bottom, should be considered the pump inlet, not the small gap at 262 inches. (4) A suction vortex exists at the inlet of all pumps. The characteristics of the inlet suction vortex in the mixer pump are very hard to predict, but its effects likely extend upward several feet. Because of this, the current 12-inch limit should be replaced with criteria based on actual monitored pump performance. The most obvious criterion (in addition to current operational

  7. Transport of Tank 241-SY-101 Waste Slurry: Effects of Dilution and Temperature on Critical Pipeline Velocity

    SciTech Connect

    KP Recknagle; Y Onishi

    1999-06-15

    This report presents the methods and results of calculations performed to predict the critical velocity and pressure drop required for the two-inch pipeline transfer of solid/liquid waste slurry from underground waste storage Tank 241-SY-101 to Tank 241-SY- 102 at the Hanford Site. The effects of temperature and dilution on the critical velocity were included in the analysis. These analyses show that Tank 241-SY-101 slurry should be diluted with water prior to delivery to Tank 241-SY-102. A dilution ratio of 1:1 is desirable and would allow the waste to be delivered at a critical velocity of 1.5 ft/sec. The system will be operated at a flow velocity of 6 ft/sec or greater therefore, this velocity will be sufficient to maintain a stable slurry delivery through the pipeline. The effect of temperature on the critical velocity is not a limiting factor when the slurry is diluted 1:1 with water. Pressure drop at the critical velocity would be approximately two feet for a 125-ft pipeline (or 250-ft equivalent straight pipeline). At 6 ft/sec, the pressure drop would be 20 feet over a 250-ft equivalent straight pipeline.

  8. Analysis of several hazardous conditions for large transfer and back-dilution sequences in Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    CW Stewart; LA Mahoney; WB Barton

    2000-01-28

    The first transfer of 89 kgal of waste and back-dilution of 61 kgal of water in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 was accomplished December 18--20, 1999. Limits were placed on the transfer and back-dilution volumes because of concerns about potential gas release, crust sinking, and degradation of mixer pump performance. Additional transfers and back-dilutions are being planned that will bring the total to 500 kgal, which should dissolve a large fraction of the solids in the tank and dilute it well beyond the point where significant gas retention can occur. This report provides the technical bases for removing the limits on transfer and back-dilution volume by evaluating the potential consequences of several postulated hazardous conditions in view of the results of the first campaign and results of additional analyses of waste behavior.

  9. Ion exchange removal of cesium from simulated and actual supernate from Hanford tanks 241-SY-101 and 241-SY-103

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.N.; Bontha, J.R.; Carlson, C.D.

    1995-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), in conjunction with the Process Chemistry and Statistics Section of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), conducted this study as part of the Supernatant Treatment Development Task for the Initial Pretreatment Module (IPM) Applied Engineering Project. The study assesses the performance of the CS-100 ion exchange material for removing cesium from simulated and actual alkaline supernate from Hanford tanks 241-SY-101 and 241-SY-103. The objective of these experiments is to compare the cesium ion exchange loading and elution profiles of actual and simulated wastes. Specific experimental objectives include (1) demonstration of decontamination factors (DF) for cesium removal, 92) verification of simulant performance, (3) investigation of waste/exchanger chemistry, and (4) determination of the radionuclide content of the regenerated CS-100 resin prior to disposal.

  10. A safety assessment for proposed pump mixing operations to mitigate episodic gas releases in tank 241-SY-101: Hanford Site,Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Lentsch, J.W.

    1996-07-01

    This safety assessment addresses each of the elements required for the proposed action to remove a slurry distributor and to install, operate, and remove a mixing pump in Tank 241-SY-101,which is located within the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington.The proposed action is required as part of an ongoing evaluation of various mitigation concepts developed to eliminate episodic gas releases that result in hydrogen concentrations in the tank dome space that exceed the lower flammability limit.

  11. Human-machine interface (HMI) report for 241-SY-101 data acquisition [and control] system (DACS) upgrade study

    SciTech Connect

    Truitt, R.W.

    1997-10-22

    This report provides an independent evaluation of information for a Windows based Human Machine Interface (HMI) to replace the existing DOS based Iconics HMI currently used in the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) used at Tank 241-SY-101. A fundamental reason for this evaluation is because of the difficulty of maintaining the system with obsolete, unsupported software. The DACS uses a software operator interface (Genesis for DOS HMI) that is no longer supported by its manufacturer, Iconics. In addition to its obsolescence, it is complex and difficult to train additional personnel on. The FY 1997 budget allocated $40K for phase 1 of a software/hardware upgrade that would have allowed the old DOS based system to be replaced by a current Windows based system. Unfortunately, budget constraints during FY 1997 has prompted deferral of the upgrade. The upgrade needs to be performed at the earliest possible time, before other failures render the system useless. Once completed, the upgrade could alleviate other concerns: spare pump software may be able to be incorporated into the same software as the existing pump, thereby eliminating the parallel path dilemma; and the newer, less complex software should expedite training of future personnel, and in the process, require that less technical time be required to maintain the system.

  12. Similarity analysis applied to the design of scaled tests of hydraulic mitigation methods for Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Liljegren, L.M.

    1993-02-01

    The episodic gas releases from Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) pose a potential safety hazard. It is thought that gas releases occur because gases are generated and trapped in layers of settled solids located at the bottom of the tank. This document focuses on issues associated with testing of hydraulic mitigation technologies proposed for SY-101. The basic assumption underlying the concept of hydraulic mitigation is that mobilization or maintained suspension of the solids settled in the bottom of the tank wig prevent gas accumulation. Engineering of hydraulic technologies will require testing to determine the operating parameters required to mobilize the solids and to maintain these solids in suspension. Because full scale testing is extremely expensive (even when possible), scaled tests are needed to assess the merit of the proposed technologies and to provide data for numerical or analytical modeling. This research is conducted to support testing and evaluation of proposed hydraulic mitigation concepts only. The work here is oriented towards determining the jet velocities, nozzle sizes, and other operating parameters required to mobilize the settled solids in SY- 101 and maintain them in suspension.

  13. Thermal and combined thermal and radiolytic reactions involving nitrous oxide, hydrogen, nitrogen, and ammonia in contact with tank 241-SY-101 simulated waste

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.

    1996-02-01

    Work described in this report was conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Flammable Gas Safety Project, the purpose of which is to develop information needed to support Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) in their efforts to ensure the safe interim storage of wastes at the Hanford Site. Described in this report are the results of tests to evaluate the rates of thermal and combined thermal and radiolytic reactions involving flammable gases in the presence of Tank 241-SY-101 simulated waste. Flammable gases generated by the radiolysis of water and by the thermal and radiolytic decomposition of organic waste constituents may themselves participate in further reactions. Examples include the decomposition of nitrous oxide to yield nitrogen and oxygen, the reaction of nitrous oxide and hydrogen to produce nitrogen and water, and the reaction of nitrogen and hydrogen to produce ammonia. The composition of the gases trapped in bubbles in the wastes might therefore change continuously as a function of the time that the gas bubbles are retained.

  14. Maximum First Transfer and Dilution Volumes for 241SY101

    SciTech Connect

    BARTON, W.B.

    1999-10-28

    This report discusses the solution to the following problem: what is the maximum waste transfer and dilution quantities and locations which can be allowed in the first transfer of waste from SY-101 given the following constraints? (1) The crust must float on the submerged waste (waste becomes less dense when diluted, eventually allowing crust to sink); (2) No credit is taken for the top dilution; (3) Addition of water to the bulk slurry through the transfer pump must be able to refloat the crust base to above 295 inches; (4) The margin between refloating to 295 inches and crust sinking must be at least 10,000 gallons; (5) The crust can't be thinned to less than 60 inches thick.

  15. Chemical mechanisms for gas generation in Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, D.M.; Pederson, L.R.; Bryan, S.A.; Ashby, E.C.; Liotta, C.; Barefield, E.K.; Meisel, D.; Jonah, C.D.; Sauer, M.C. Jr.

    1993-08-01

    The mixing of wastes at Hanford over the years has led to several safety concerns. These safety concerns fall into six categories: wastes that generate flammable gasses or gas mixtures; wastes that contain high concentrations of ferrocyanides or tanks suspected of containing large amounts of ferrocyanides; wastes that contain greater than 3 wt % total organic carbon; wastes from which toxic or noxious vapors are suspected of emanating; wastes that contain high radiolytic heat; and wastes that may contain sufficient fissile material to pose a criticality concern. This report addresses the chemistry associated with the generation of flammable gases.

  16. Pipeline Cross-Site Transfer Assessment for Tank 241-SY-101 Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Yasuo; Wells, Beric E.; Hartley, Stacey A.; Cooley, Scott K.

    2002-02-20

    This study evaluated the feasibility of transferring waste now stored in Tank SY-101 in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site to a storage tank in 200 East Area through a 6.2-mile-long, 3-inch-diameter stainless steel pipeline. Using the Wasp slurry transport model, the critical velocity and expected pressure drop were calculated to determine 1) whether current SY-101 waste can be transferred through the existing cross-site transfer pipeline without additional dilution and, if it is not possible, how much dilution is needed.

  17. Analysis of the flexible receiver lifting yoke and blast shield assembly. Tank 241SY101

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, F.H.

    1995-03-02

    The analysis of the lifting yoke and blast shield assembly considers the bending stress, weld strength, and resistance of the lug hole to tear out. The bending stress of the lifting lugs is evaluated to ensure that they meet the requirements of the American Institute for Steel Construction (AISC 1989). Also considered in the calculations is the capability of the thick lugs to withstand the weight of the pump together with that of the container and strongback during rotation to the horizontal position.

  18. Safety equipment list for the 241-SY-101 RAPID mitigation project

    SciTech Connect

    MORRIS, K.L.

    1999-06-29

    This document provides the safety classification for the safety (safety class and safety RAPID Mitigation Project. This document is being issued as the project SEL until the supporting authorization basis documentation, this document will be superseded by the TWRS SEL (LMHC 1999), documentation istlralized. Upon implementation of the authorization basis significant) structures, systems, and components (SSCS) associated with the 241-SY-1O1 which will be updated to include the information contained herein.

  19. Radioactive air emissions notice of construction 241-SY-101 crust growth near term mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    HOMAN, N.A.

    1999-04-12

    The following description and any attachments and references are provided to the Washington State Department of Health, Division of Radiation Protection, Air Emissions & Defense Waste Section as a notice of construction (NOC) in accordance with the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247, Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. The WAC 246-247-060, ''Applications, registration and licensing'', states ''This section describes the information requirements for approval to construct, modify, and operate an emission unit. Any NOC requires the submittal of the information listed in Appendix A.'' Appendix A (WAC 246-247-110), lists the requirements that must be addressed. Additionally, the following description, attachments and references are provided to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as an NOC, in accordance with Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, ''National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants.'' The information required for submittal to the EPA is specified in 40 CFR 61.07. The potential emissions from this activity are estimated to provide less than 0.1 mrem/year total effective dose equivalent to the hypothetical offsite maximally exposed individual, and commencement is needed within a short time frame. Therefore, this application is also intended to provide notification of the anticipated date of initial startup in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(1), and it is requested that approval of this application will also constitute EPA acceptance of this 40 CFR 61.09(a)(1) notification. Written notification of the actual date of initial startup, in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(2), will be provided at a later date.

  20. Structural analysis of the equipment removal system for tank 241SY101

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, T.C.

    1995-03-02

    The calculations documented in this report show that the ERS major components are structurally qualified to complete the objective, i.e., to install the removed equipment into a shipping container and transport and store the container at the Central Waste Complex (CWC). The analysis for the structural members of the ERS components considers live load with an impact factor of 125 % added to dead load. An allowable stress of one-third yield is used for all structural components carrying the load based on DOE-RL-92-36. Adherence to DOE-RL-92-36 is not a code requirement. However, the loads considered make this factor of safety appropriate. The calculations meet the strength requirements of the American Institute for Steel Construction (ASIC 1989) for all non-critical structural elements.

  1. Thermocouple module halt acceptance test report for tank 241-SY-101 DACS-1

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, D.C.

    1998-03-10

    Testing was started on February 24, 1998 and completed on February 25, 1998. The completed procedure consists of 4 acceptance test sections, 6.1 through 6.4. Three test exceptions were identified during the procedure. The first test exception was determined to be unrelated to the ATP and unfortunate that the instrument failed during the ATP. The next two test exceptions were disposition as acceptable because the alarming functions worked correctly in identifying a problem when software communications were interrupted. The test was completed satisfactorily over 2 days. The remainder of the acceptance test report is the completed test procedure.

  2. Evaluation of 241 AN tank farm flammable gas behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    The 241 AN Tank Farm tanks 241-AN-103, -104, and 105 are Flammable Gas Watch List tanks. Characteristics exhibited by these tanks (i.e., surface level drops, pressure increases, and temperature profiles) are similar to those exhibited by tank 241-SY-101, which is also a Watch List tank. Although the characteristics exhibited by tank 241-SY-101 are also present in tanks 241-AN-103, -104, and 105, they are exhibited to a lesser degree in the AN Tank Farm tanks. The 241 AN Tank Farm tanks have only small surface level drops, and the pressure changes that occur are not sufficient to release an amount of gas that would cause the dome space to exceed the lower flammability limit (LFL) for hydrogen. Therefore, additional restrictions are probably unnecessary for working within the 241 AN Tank Farm, either within the dome space of the tanks or in the waste.

  3. 1/12-Scale mixing interface visualization and buoyant particle release tests in support of Tank 241-SY-101 hydrogen mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Eschbach, E.J.; Enderlin, C.W.

    1993-10-01

    In support of tank waste safety programs, visualization tests were performed in the 1/12-scale tank facility, using a low-viscosity simulant. The primary objective of the tests was to obtain video records of the transient jet-sludge interaction. The intent is that these videos will provide useful qualitative data for comparison with model predictions. Two tests were initially planned: mixing interface visualization (MIV) and buoyant particle release (BPR). Completion of the buoyant particle release test was set aside in order to complete additional MIV tests. Rheological measurements were made on simulant samples before testing, and the simulant was found to exhibit thixotropic behavior. Shear vane measurements were also made on an in-situ analog of the 1/12-scale tank simulant. Simulant shear strength has been observed to be time dependent. The primary objective of obtaining video records of jet-sludge interaction was satisfied, and the records yielded jet location information which may be of use in completing model comparisons. The modeling effort is not part of this task, but this report also discusses test specific instrumentation, visualization techniques, and shear vane instrumentation which would enable improved characterization of jet-sludge interaction and simulant characteristics.

  4. Final report of the TWRS Plant Implementation Team to review potential reactive component in tank 241-T-111 and methane in tank 241-SY-101 gas release event

    SciTech Connect

    Engelman, D.B.

    1994-02-01

    This is the final report of the results of a Tank Waste Remediation Systems Plant Implementation Team chartered by TWRS Operations, in response to a potential Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) due to the discovery of a reactive component in waste tank 241-T-111 (T-111). Tank T-111, a non-Watch List single-shell tank, has no historical evidence of any potential safety problems. Core samples from tank T-111 were taken in 1991 and analyzed in 1992. The presence of uncharacterized exotherms was identified in the first three segments of two cores and reported to tank farm management in November 1993.

  5. Evaluation of high-level nuclear waste tanks having a potential flammable gas hazard

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.D.; Barton, W.B.; Hill, R.C.; et al, Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-14

    In 1990 the U.S. Department of Energy declared an unreviewed safety question as a result of the behavior of tank 241-SY-101. This tank exhibited episodic releases of flammable gases that on a couple of occasions exceeded the lower flammability limit of hydrogen in air. Over the past six years a considerable amount of knowledge has been gained about the chemical and physical processes that govern the behavior of tank 241-SY-101 and the other tanks associated with a potential flammable gas hazard. This paper presents an overview of the current understanding of gas generation, retention, and release and covers the results of direct sampling of the tanks to determine the gas composition and the amount of stored gas.

  6. Thermal and combined thermal and radiolytic reactions involving nitrous oxide, hydrogen, and nitrogen in the gas phase; comparison of gas generation rates in supernate and solid fractions of Tank 241-SY-101 simulated waste

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.

    1995-03-01

    This report summarizes progress made in evaluating me by which flammable gases are generated in Hanford double-shell tank wastes, based on the results of laboratory tests using simulated waste mixtures. Work described in this report. was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the Flammable Gas Safety Project, the purpose of which is to develop information needed to support Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) in their efforts to ensure the safe interim storage of wastes at the Hanford Site. This work is related to gas generation studies being performed at Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), under subcontract to PNL, using simulated wastes, and to studies being performed at VMC using actual wastes.

  7. Level maintenance for Tank 101-SY mitigation-by-mixing test

    SciTech Connect

    Sobocinski, R.G.

    1994-11-16

    This document provides the procedure to be followed to implement the requirements of the Mixer Pump Long-Term Operations Plan for Tank 241-SY-101 Mitigation, WHC-SD-WM-PLN-081. The test is divided into 2 distinct sequences, named Single Position Pump Run and Tank Sweep. Instructions for all sequences are defined within the procedure. All safety requirements as defined in LA-UR-92-3196, A Safety Assessment for Proposed Mixing Operations to Mitigate Episodic Gas Releases in Tank 241-101-SY have been implemented into this procedure.

  8. The effect of dilution on the gas retention behavior of Tank 241-SY- 103 waste

    SciTech Connect

    Bredt, P.R.; Tingey, S.M.

    1996-01-01

    Twenty-five of the 177 underground waste storage tanks on the Hanford Site have been placed on the Flammable Gas watch list. These 25 tanks, containing high-level waste generated during plutonium and uranium processing, have been identified as potentially capable of accumulating flammable gases above the lower flammability limit (Babad et al. 1991). In the case of Tanks 241-SY-101 and 241-SY-103, it has been proposed that diluting the tank waste may mitigate this hazard (Hudson et al. 1995; Stewart et al. 1994). The effect of dilution on the ability of waste from Tank 241-SY-103 to accumulate gas was studied at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. A similar study has been completed for waste from Tank 241-SY-101 (Bredt et al. 1995). Because of the additional waste-storage volume available in Tank 241-SY-103 and because the waste is assumed to be similar to that currently in Tank 241-SY-101, Tank 241-SY-103 became the target for a demonstration of passive mitigation through in-tank dilution. In 1994, plans for the in-tank dilution demonstration were deferred pending a decision on whether to pursue dilution as a mitigation strategy. However, because Tank 241-SY-103 is an early retrieval target, determination of how waste properties vary with dilution will still be required.

  9. Hybridization of ionic levels at metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürpick, P.; Thumm, U.

    1998-09-01

    We investigated the hybridization of He+, Li2+, and Be3+ ionic levels and the creation of surface resonances for nuclear charges Z=2, 3, and 4 near an Al surface. Starting from a two-center basis set expansion with hydrogenic wave functions on the ion site and jellium wave functions in the metal half space, we calculate the self-energy for ion-surface system in the fixed-ion approximation. We obtain convergence by using a rather small set of bound ionic states. This ideally suits this method for the generation of adiabatic basis states that can be used in time-dependent close-coupling calculations for slow ion-surface collisions. We compare our resonance energies and widths with other theoretical approaches, discuss electronic density profiles, and analyze resonances in terms of Stark states.

  10. Chemically Induced Surface Evolutions with Level Sets

    SciTech Connect

    2006-11-17

    ChISELS is used for the theoretical modeling of detailed surface chemistry and consomitant surface evolutions occurring during microsystem fabrication processes conducted at low pressures. Examples include physical vapor deposition (PVD), low pressure chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), and plasma etching. Evolving interfaces are represented using the level-set method and the evolution equations time integrated using a Semi-Lagrangian approach. A Ballistic transport model is employed to solve for the fluxes incident on each of the surface elements. Surface chemistry leading to etching or deposition is computed by either coupling to Surface Chemkin (a commercially available code) or by providing user defined subroutines. The computational meshes used are quad-trees (2-D) and oct-trees (3-D), constructed such that grid refinement is localized to regions near the surface interfaces. As the interface evolves, the mesh is dynamically reconstructed as needed for the grid to remain fine only around the interface. For parallel computation, a domain decomposition scheme with dynamic load balancing is used to distribute the computational work across processors.

  11. Chemically Induced Surface Evolutions with Level Sets

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-11-17

    ChISELS is used for the theoretical modeling of detailed surface chemistry and consomitant surface evolutions occurring during microsystem fabrication processes conducted at low pressures. Examples include physical vapor deposition (PVD), low pressure chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), and plasma etching. Evolving interfaces are represented using the level-set method and the evolution equations time integrated using a Semi-Lagrangian approach. A Ballistic transport model is employed to solve for the fluxes incident on each of the surface elements.more » Surface chemistry leading to etching or deposition is computed by either coupling to Surface Chemkin (a commercially available code) or by providing user defined subroutines. The computational meshes used are quad-trees (2-D) and oct-trees (3-D), constructed such that grid refinement is localized to regions near the surface interfaces. As the interface evolves, the mesh is dynamically reconstructed as needed for the grid to remain fine only around the interface. For parallel computation, a domain decomposition scheme with dynamic load balancing is used to distribute the computational work across processors.« less

  12. The world's highest levels of surface UV.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Raul R; Seckmeyer, Gunther; Damiani, Alessandro; Riechelmann, Stefan; Rayas, Juan; Labbe, Fernando; Laroze, David

    2014-01-01

    Chile's northern Atacama Desert has been pointed out as one of the places on earth where the world's highest surface ultraviolet (UV) may occur. This area is characterized by its high altitude, prevalent cloudless conditions and relatively low total ozone column. Aimed at detecting those peak UV levels, we carried out in January 2013 ground-based spectral measurements on the Chajnantor Plateau (5100 m altitude, 23°00'S, 67°45'W) and at the Paranal Observatory (2635 m altitude, 24°37'S, 70°24'W). The UV index computed from our spectral measurements peaked at 20 on the Chajnantor Plateau (under broken cloud conditions) and at 16 at the Paranal Observatory (under cloudless conditions). Spectral measurements carried out in June 2005 at the Izaña Observatory (2367 m altitude, 28°18'N, 16°30'W) were used for further comparisons. Due to the differences in sun-earth separation, total ozone column, altitude, albedo, aerosols and clouds, peak UV levels are expected to be significantly higher at southern hemisphere sites than at their northern hemisphere counterparts. PMID:24202188

  13. Challenges and methodology for safety analysis of a high-level waste tank with large periodic releases of flammable gas

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J.N.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.O.; White, J.R.; Stewart, C.W.

    1994-07-01

    Tank 241-SY-101, located at the Department of Energy Hanford Site, has periodically released up to 10,000 ft{sup 3} of flammable gas. This release has been one of the highest-priority DOE operational safety problems. The gases include hydrogen and ammonia (fuels) and nitrous oxide (oxidizer). There have been many opinions regarding the controlling mechanisms for these releases, but demonstrating an adequate understanding of the problem, selecting a mitigation methodology, and preparing the safety analysis have presented numerous new challenges. The mitigation method selected for the tank was to install a pump that would mix the tank contents and eliminate the sludge layer believed to be responsible for the gas retention and periodic releases. This report will describe the principal analysis methodologies used to prepare the safety assessment for the installation and operation of the pump, and because this activity has been completed, it will describe the results of pump operation.

  14. An alternative to reduction of surface pressure to sea level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deardorff, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    The pitfalls of the present method of reducing surface pressure to sea level are reviewed, and an alternative, adjusted pressure, P, is proposed. P is obtained from solution of a Poisson equation over a continental region, using the simplest boundary condition along the perimeter or coastline where P equals the sea level pressure. The use of P would avoid the empiricisms and disadvantages of pressure reduction to sea level, and would produce surface pressure charts which depict the true geostrophic wind at the surface.

  15. Beryllium surface levels in a military ammunition plant.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Wayne T; Leonard, Stephanie; Ott, Darrin; Fuortes, Laurence; Field, William

    2008-07-01

    This study evaluated the presence of beryllium surface contamination in a U.S. conventional munitions plant as an indicator of possible past beryllium airborne and skin exposure and used these measurements to classify job categories by potential level of exposure. Surface samples were collected from production and nonproduction areas of the plant and at regional industrial reference sites with no known history of beryllium use. Surface samples of premoistened wiping material were analyzed for beryllium mass content using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and results expressed as micrograms of beryllium per 100 square centimeters (micro g/100 cm(2)). Beryllium was detected in 87% of samples collected at the munitions plant and in 72% of the samples collected at regional reference sites. Two munitions plant samples from areas near sanders and grinders were above 3.0 micro g/100 cm(2) (U.S. Department of Energy surface contamination limit). The highest surface level found at the reference sites was 0.44 micro g/100 cm(2). Workers in areas where beryllium-containing alloy tools were sanded or ground, but not other work areas, may have been exposed to airborne beryllium concentrations above levels encountered in other industries where metal work is conducted. Surface sampling provided information useful for categorizing munitions plant jobs by level of past beryllium airborne and skin exposure and, subsequently, for identifying employees within exposure strata to be screened for beryllium sensitization. PMID:18569510

  16. Performance evaluation of the Enraf-Nonius Model 872 radar gage

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.J.; Park, W.R.

    1992-12-01

    There are indications that the Enraf-Nonius Radar Gage installed in Tank 241-SY-101 may not be providing an accurate reading of the true surface level in the waste tank. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) performed an initial study to determine the effect of the following items on the distance read by the gage: Tank riser; Material permittivity and conductivity Foam; Proportion of supernatant to solid material in the field of view of the instrument; Physical geometry of the supernatant and solid material changing in the field of view with respect to time; and Varying water content in the solid material. The results of the tests indicate that distance measured by the radar gage is affected by the permittivity, conductivity, and angle of the target surface. These parameters affect the complex input impedance of the signal received by the radar gage to measure the distance to the target. In Tank 101-SY, the radar gage is placed on top of a 12 in. diameter riser. The riser affects the field of view of the instrument, and a much smaller target surface is detected when the radar beam propagates through a riser. In addition, the riser acts as a waveguide, and standing waves are enhanced between the target surface and the radar gage. The result is a change in the level measured by the radar gage due to changing properties of the target surface even when the distance to the target does not change. The test results indicate that the radar will not detect dry crust or foam. However, if the crust or foam is stirred so that it becomes wet, then the crust or foam became detectable. The level read using the radar gage decreased as the moisture in the crust or foam evaporated.

  17. Doping level influence on chemical surface of diamond electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, A. F.; Baldan, M. R.; Ferreira, N. G.

    2013-04-01

    The modification of surface bond termination promoted by the doping level on diamond electrodes is analyzed. The films were prepared by hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique using the standard mixture of H2/CH4 with an extra H2 flux passing through a bubbler containing different concentrations of B2O3 dissolved in methanol. Diamond morphology and quality were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and Raman scattering spectroscopy techniques while the changes in film surfaces were analyzed by contact angle, cyclic voltammetry and synchrotron X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The boron-doped diamond (BDD) films hydrophobicity, reversibility, and work potential window characteristics were related to their physical properties and chemical surface, as a function of the doping level. From the Mott-Schottky plots (MSP) and XPS analyzes, for the lightly (1018 cm-3) and highly (1020 cm-3) BDD films, the relationship between the BDD electrochemical responses and their surface bond terminations is discussed.

  18. Fabrication and characterization of multi-level hierarchical surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Bharat; Lee, Hyungoo

    2012-01-01

    A nanostructured surface may exhibit low adhesion or high adhesion depending upon fibrillar density, and it presents the possibility of realizing eco-friendly surface structures with desirable adhesion by mimicking the mechanics of fibrillar adhesive surfaces of biological systems. The current research uses a patterning technique to fabricate smart adhesion surfaces: one-, two- and three-level hierarchical synthetic adhesive structure surfaces with various fibrillar densities and diameters. The contact angles and contact angle hysteresis were measured to characterize the wettability. A conventional and a glass ball attached to an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip were used to obtain the adhesive forces via force-distance curves and to study the buckling behavior of a single fiber on the hierarchical structures. PMID:23285631

  19. A siphon gage for monitoring surface-water levels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCobb, T.D.; LeBlanc, D.R.; Socolow, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    A device that uses a siphon tube to establish a hydraulic connection between the bottom of an onshore standpipe and a point at the bottom of a water body was designed and tested for monitoring surface-water levels. Water is added to the standpipe to a level sufficient to drive a complete slug of water through the siphoning tube and to flush all air out of the system. The water levels in the standpipe and the water body equilibrate and provide a measurable static water surface in the standpipe. The siphon gage was designed to allow quick and accurate year-round measurements with minimal maintenance. Currently available devices for monitoring surface-water levels commonly involve time-consuming and costly installation and surveying, and the movement of reference points and the presence of ice cover in cold regions cause discontinuity and inaccuracy in the data collected. Installation and field testing of a siphon gage using 0.75-in-diameter polyethylene tubing at Ashumet Pond in Falmouth, Massachusetts, demonstrated that the siphon gage can provide long-term data with a field effort and accuracy equivalent to measurement of ground-water levels at an observation well.A device that uses a siphon tube to establish a hydraulic connection between the bottom of an onshore standpipe and a point at the bottom of a water body was designed and tested for monitoring surface-water levels. Water is added to the standpipe to a level sufficient to drive a complete slug of water through the siphoning tube and to flush all air out of the system. The water levels in the standpipe and the water body equilibrate and provide a measurable static water surface in the standpipe. The siphon gage was designed to allow quick and accurate year-round measurements with minimal maintenance. Currently available devices for monitoring surface-water levels commonly involve time-consuming and costly installation and surveying, and the movement of reference points and the presence of ice cover in cold

  20. Probabilistic surface reconstruction of relative sea-level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choblet, Gael; Husson, Laurent; Bodin, Thomas; Capdeville, Yann

    2013-04-01

    Relative sea level is shaped by multiple processes (mantle dynamic topography, plate tectonics, glacio-isostatic adjustment, present day melting of continental ice, anthropogenic causes…), most of which induce spatial gradients in relative sea level fluctuations. The evaluation of the global mean sea level rise is a also a key variable to decipher sea level evolution. Tide gauges represent the only mean to monitor sea-level rise on the scale of the 20th century, while the high quality satellite altimetry era is too short to be immune from short-term fluctuations. Tide gauge data compiled by the Permanent Service for the Mean Sea Level (PSMSL) converts into local estimates of sea level rise. Classically, these in situ observations are averaged spatially in order to infer the global mean sea level trend. However, the strongly heterogeneous distribution of tide gauges (e.g. very sparse in the Southern hemisphere) makes this approach relatively prone to uncertainties, given that sea level rise strongly varies geographically. Last, the societal consequences for coastal communities raise the prominent need for local (rather than global) sea level estimates. An alternative is therefore to provide a global surface reconstruction of relative sea level leading to both local variations and a better constrained global average. Here, we propose such a model from tide gauge records using a probabilistic scheme based on the reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm (as described by Bodin et al., JGR, 2012 for the example of the Australian Moho). This method allows to infer both model and parameter space so that not only the functions within the model but also the number of functions itself are free to vary. This is particulalry relevant to the case of tide gauges that are unevenly distributed on the surface of the Earth and whose record lengths are strongly variable. In addition, Bayesian statistics leads to a probabilistic representation (rather than a best fitting

  1. Efficient molecular surface generation using level-set methods.

    PubMed

    Can, Tolga; Chen, Chao-I; Wang, Yuan-Fang

    2006-12-01

    Molecules interact through their surface residues. Calculation of the molecular surface of a protein structure is thus an important step for a detailed functional analysis. One of the main considerations in comparing existing methods for molecular surface computations is their speed. Most of the methods that produce satisfying results for small molecules fail to do so for large complexes. In this article, we present a level-set-based approach to compute and visualize a molecular surface at a desired resolution. The emerging level-set methods have been used for computing evolving boundaries in several application areas from fluid mechanics to computer vision. Our method provides a uniform framework for computing solvent-accessible, solvent-excluded surfaces and interior cavities. The computation is carried out very efficiently even for very large molecular complexes with tens of thousands of atoms. We compared our method to some of the most widely used molecular visualization tools (Swiss-PDBViewer, PyMol, and Chimera) and our results show that we can calculate and display a molecular surface 1.5-3.14 times faster on average than all three of the compared programs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our method is able to detect all of the interior inaccessible cavities that can accommodate one or more water molecules. PMID:16621636

  2. Physics of the Be(0001) surface core-level spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Feibelman, P.J.; Stumpf, R. )

    1994-12-15

    First-principles calculations for slabs as many as 13 layers thick show that the three surface core-level features observed on Be(0001) correspond to core-electron ionizations in its three outermost atomic layers. The calculations also imply that the experimental peak identified with core ionization in the bulk is a composite; theoretical core-ionization potentials for the fourth and deeper layers differ by as much as 90 meV. The sign and surprisingly large magnitudes of the Be(0001) surface core-level shifts (SCLS's) are attributed to unusually large surface-state contributions to the three outer layers' local densities of states. Both initial- and final-state effects are substantial in the SCLS's, and their contributions are additive.

  3. Automatic Measurement of Low Level Contamination on Concrete Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tachibana, M.; Itoh, H.; Shimada, T.; Yanagihara, S.

    2002-02-28

    Automatic measurement of radioactivity is necessary for considering cost effectiveness in final radiological survey of building structures in decommissioning nuclear facilities. The RAPID (radiation measuring pilot device for surface contamination) was developed to be applied to automatic measurement of low level contamination on concrete surfaces. The RAPID has a capability to measure contamination with detection limit of 0.14 Bq/cm2 for 60Co in 30 seconds of measurement time and its efficiency is evaluated to be 5 m2/h in a normal measurement option. It was confirmed that low level contamination on concrete surfaces could be surveyed by the RAPID efficiently compared with direct measurement by workers through its actual application.

  4. Sea level: measuring the bounding surfaces of the ocean

    PubMed Central

    Tamisiea, Mark E.; Hughes, Chris W.; Williams, Simon D. P.; Bingley, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    The practical need to understand sea level along the coasts, such as for safe navigation given the spatially variable tides, has resulted in tide gauge observations having the distinction of being some of the longest instrumental ocean records. Archives of these records, along with geological constraints, have allowed us to identify the century-scale rise in global sea level. Additional data sources, particularly satellite altimetry missions, have helped us to better identify the rates and causes of sea-level rise and the mechanisms leading to spatial variability in the observed rates. Analysis of all of the data reveals the need for long-term and stable observation systems to assess accurately the regional changes as well as to improve our ability to estimate future changes in sea level. While information from many scientific disciplines is needed to understand sea-level change, this review focuses on contributions from geodesy and the role of the ocean's bounding surfaces: the sea surface and the Earth's crust. PMID:25157196

  5. Sea level: measuring the bounding surfaces of the ocean.

    PubMed

    Tamisiea, Mark E; Hughes, Chris W; Williams, Simon D P; Bingley, Richard M

    2014-09-28

    The practical need to understand sea level along the coasts, such as for safe navigation given the spatially variable tides, has resulted in tide gauge observations having the distinction of being some of the longest instrumental ocean records. Archives of these records, along with geological constraints, have allowed us to identify the century-scale rise in global sea level. Additional data sources, particularly satellite altimetry missions, have helped us to better identify the rates and causes of sea-level rise and the mechanisms leading to spatial variability in the observed rates. Analysis of all of the data reveals the need for long-term and stable observation systems to assess accurately the regional changes as well as to improve our ability to estimate future changes in sea level. While information from many scientific disciplines is needed to understand sea-level change, this review focuses on contributions from geodesy and the role of the ocean's bounding surfaces: the sea surface and the Earth's crust. PMID:25157196

  6. The effect of polarity and surface states on the Fermi level at III-nitride surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, P; Bryan, I; Bryan, Z; Guo, W; Hussey, L; Collazo, R; Sitar, Z

    2014-09-28

    Surface states and their influence on the Fermi level at the surface of GaN and AlN are studied using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The effect of polarity on surface electronic properties was studied. Accurate modeling of the valence band edge and comparison with XPS data revealed the presence of donor surface states at 1.4 eV and acceptor states at energies > 2.7 eV from the valence band in GaN. Al polar AlN showed acceptor states at energies > 3.3 eV. Density of acceptor surface states was estimated to be between 10(13) and 10(14) eV(-1) cm(-2) in both GaN and AlN. The shift in charge neutrality levels and barrier heights due to polarity and the density of surface states on AlN and GaN were estimated from XPS measurements. Theoretical modeling and comparison with XPS data implied full compensation of spontaneous polarization charge by charged surface states. Barrier height measurements also reveal a dependence on polarity with phi(metal-polar)>phi(non-polar)>phi(nitrogen-polar) suggesting that the N-polar surface is the most suitable for Ohmic contacts. (C) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  7. Design review report for the SY-101 RAPID mitigation system

    SciTech Connect

    SCHLOSSER, R.L.

    1999-05-24

    This report documents design reviews conducted of the SY-101 Respond And Pump In Days (RAPID) Mitigation System. As part of the SY-101 Surface-Level-Rise Remediation Project, the SY-101 WID Mitigation System will reduce the potential unacceptable consequences of crust growth in Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101). Projections of the crust growth rate indicate that the waste level in the tank may reach the juncture of the primary and secondary confinement structures of the tank late in 1999. Because of this time constraint, many design activities are being conducted in parallel and design reviews were conducted for system adequacy as well as design implementation throughout the process. Design implementation, as used in this design review report, is the final component selection (e.g., which circuit breaker, valve, or thermocouple) that meets the approved design requirements, system design, and design and procurement specifications. Design implementation includes the necessary analysis, testing, verification, and qualification to demonstrate compliance with the system design and design requirements. Design implementation is outside the scope of this design review. The design activities performed prior to detailed design implementation (i.e., system mission requirements, functional design requirements, technical criteria, system conceptual design, and where design and build contracts were placed, the procurement specification) have been reviewed and are within the scope of this design review report. Detailed design implementation will be controlled, reviewed, and where appropriate, approved in accordance with Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) engineering procedures. Review of detailed design implementation will continue until all components necessary to perform the transfer function are installed and tested.

  8. The half-filled Landau level and topological insulator surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthil, T.

    The metallic state of the half-filled Landau level - described originally in pioneering work by Halperin , Lee, and Read as a liquid of composite fermions - was proposed recently by Son to be described by a particle-hole symmetric effective field theory distinct from that in the prior literature. This talk will develop a simple picture of the particle-hole symmetric composite fermion through a modification of older pictures as electrically neutral ``dipolar'' particles. This picture, and the proposed particle-hole symmetric theory, will be further substantiated through a recently developed deep connection between the half-filled Landau level and correlated surface states of certain three dimensional topological insulators. The phenomenology of composite fermi liquids (with or without particle-hole symmetry) will be revisited. It will be shown that their heat/electrical transport dramatically violates the conventional Wiedemann-Franz law but satisfies a modified one. References: 1. Chong Wang and T. Senthil, ``Half-filled Landau Level, Topological Insulator Surfaces, and Three Dimensional Quantum Spin Liquids,'' cond-mat arXiv:1507.08290 (2015).

  9. Surface core-level shifts and atomic coordination at a stepped W(110) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Riffe, D.M.; Kim, B.; Erskine, J.L. ); Shinn, N.D. )

    1994-11-15

    Core-level 4[ital f][sub 7/2] photoemission spectra have been measured from a single, bifacial W crystal, which has both a flat W(110) and a vicinal, stepped W(110) [W(320)] surface. This procedure reduces uncertainties in the quantitative description of peaks in the spectra from W(320). Various analyses, including nonlinear least-squares curve fitting, show that the average surface core-level shift (SCS) for W(320) is only [similar to][minus]140 meV, compared to [minus]310 meV for W(110) and that, at a maximum, only two of five terrace rows are isoelectronic to W(110) surface atoms. The absence of a large SCS for the step-edge atoms contradicts earlier interpretations of W(320) core-level spectra and departs significantly from expectations based on atomic-coordination models or tight-binding calculations of a bulk truncated surface. We suggest that systematic errors are responsible for the differences in reported core-level shifts for W(320). Implications of possible step-edge-driven atomic rearrangements are discussed.

  10. Molecular-level assemblies on metal oxide surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Schoonover, J.R.; Bignozzi, C.; Meyer, T.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to explore molecular-level assemblies based on polypyridyl transition metal complexes attached to metal oxide surfaces to provide the basis for applications such as energy conversion and electricity generation, photoremediation of hazardous waste, chemical sensors, and optical storage and photorefractive devices for communications and optical computing. We have elucidated the fundamental factors that determine the photochemistry and photophysics of a series of these photoactive inorganic complexes in solution and on metal oxide substrates by exploiting our unique transient laser capabilities. This data is being utilized to design and fabricate molecular-level photonic devices. The rich chemistry of transition metal polypyridyl complexes can be utilized to prepare molecular assemblies having well-defined redox or excited-state properties that can be finely tuned to produce desired materials properties. We plan to explore other novel applications such as photorefractive switches and optical sensors using this molecular engineering approach.

  11. Contact Potentials, Fermi Level Equilibration, and Surface Charging.

    PubMed

    Peljo, Pekka; Manzanares, José A; Girault, Hubert H

    2016-06-14

    This article focuses on contact electrification from thermodynamic equilibration of the electrochemical potential of the electrons of two conductors upon contact. The contact potential difference generated in bimetallic macro- and nanosystems, the Fermi level after the contact, and the amount and location of the charge transferred from one metal to the other are discussed. The three geometries considered are spheres in contact, Janus particles, and core-shell particles. In addition, the force between the two spheres in contact with each other is calculated and is found to be attractive. A simple electrostatic model for calculating charge distribution and potential profiles in both vacuum and an aqueous electrolyte solution is described. Immersion of these bimetallic systems into an electrolyte solution leads to the formation of an electric double layer at the metal-electrolyte interface. This Fermi level equilibration and the associated charge transfer can at least partly explain experimentally observed different electrocatalytic, catalytic, and optical properties of multimetallic nanosystems in comparison to systems composed of pure metals. For example, the shifts in the surface plasmon resonance peaks in bimetallic core-shell particles seem to result at least partly from contact charging. PMID:27176729

  12. Process for levelling film surfaces and products thereof

    DOEpatents

    Birkmire, Robert W.; McCandless, Brian E.

    1990-03-20

    Semiconductor films and photovoltaic devices prepared therefrom are provided wherein the semiconductor films have a specular surface with a texture less than about 0.25 micron greater than the average planar film surface and wherein the semiconductor films are surface modified by exposing the surface to an aqueous solution of bromine containing an acid or salt and continuing such exposure for a time sufficient to etch the surface.

  13. Process for leveling film surfaces and products thereof

    DOEpatents

    Birkmire, R.W.; McCandless, B.E.

    1990-03-20

    Semiconductor films and photovoltaic devices prepared therefrom are provided wherein the semiconductor films have a specular surface with a texture less than about 0.25 micron greater than the average planar film surface and wherein the semiconductor films are surface modified by exposing the surface to an aqueous solution of bromine containing an acid or salt and continuing such exposure for a time sufficient to etch the surface. 8 figs.

  14. Airborne Interferometry using GNSS Reflections for Surface Level Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semmling, Maximilian; Beyerle, Georg; Schön, Steffen; Stosius, Ralf; Gerber, Thomas; Beckheinrich, Jamila; Markgraf, Markus; Ge, Maorong; Wickert, Jens

    2013-04-01

    The interferometric use of GNSS reflections for ocean altimetry can fill the gap in coverage of ocean observations. Today radar altimeters are used for large scale ocean observations to monitor e.g. global sea level change or circulation processes like El Niño. Spacial and temporal resolution of a single radar altimeter, however, is insufficient to observe mesoscale ocean phenomena like large oceanic eddies that are important indicators of climate change. The high coverage expected for a spaceborne altimeter based on GNSS reflections stimulated investigations on according interferometric methods. Several airborne experiments have been conducted using code observations. Carrier observations have a better precision but are severely affected by noise and have mostly been used in ground-based experiments. A new interferometric approach is presented using carrier observations for airborne application. Implementing a spectral retrieval noise reduction is achieved. A flight experiment was conducted with a Zeppelin airship on 2010/10/12 over Lake Constance at the border between Austria, Germany and Switzerland. The lake surface with an area of 536km2 is suitable for altimetric study as its decimeter range Geoid undulations are well-known. Three GNSS receiver were installed on the airship. A Javad Delta receiver recording direct signals for navigation. The DLR G-REX receiver recording reflected signals for scatterometry and the GORS (GNSS Occultation Reflectometry Scatterometry) receiver recording direct and reflected signals for interferometry. The airship's trajectory is determined from navigation data with a precision better than 10cm using regional augmentation. This presentation focuses on the interferometric analysis of GORS observations. Ray tracing calculations are used to model the difference of direct and reflected signals' path. Spectral retrieval is applied to determine Doppler residuals of modelled path difference and interferometric observations. Lake level

  15. Maximum surface level and temperature histories for Hanford waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, B.D.; Ha, N.D.; Huisingh, J.S.

    1994-09-02

    Radioactive defense waste resulting from the chemical processing of spent nuclear fuel has been accumulating at the Hanford Site since 1944. This waste is stored in underground waste-storage tanks. The Hanford Site Tank Farm Facilities Interim Safety Basis (ISB) provides a ready reference to the safety envelope for applicable tank farm facilities and installations. During preparation of the ISB, tank structural integrity concerns were identified as a key element in defining the safety envelope. These concerns, along with several deficiencies in the technical bases associated with the structural integrity issues and the corresponding operational limits/controls specified for conduct of normal tank farm operations are documented in the ISB. Consequently, a plan was initiated to upgrade the safety envelope technical bases by conducting Accelerated Safety Analyses-Phase 1 (ASA-Phase 1) sensitivity studies and additional structural evaluations. The purpose of this report is to facilitate the ASA-Phase 1 studies and future analyses of the single-shell tanks (SSTs) and double-shell tanks (DSTs) by compiling a quantitative summary of some of the past operating conditions the tanks have experienced during their existence. This report documents the available summaries of recorded maximum surface levels and maximum waste temperatures and references other sources for more specific data.

  16. PSA results for Hanford high level waste Tank 101-SY

    SciTech Connect

    MacFarlane, D.R.; Bott, T.F.; Brown, L.F.; Stack, D.W.; Kindinger, J.; Deremer, R.K.; Medhekar, S.R.; Mikschl, T.J.

    1993-10-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has performed a comprehensive probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) that includes consideration of external events for the weapons-production wastes stored in tank number 241-SY-101, commonly known as Tank 101-SY, as configured in December 1992. This tank, which periodically releases (``burps``) a gaseous mixture of hydrogen, nitrous oxide, ammonia, and nitrogen, was analyzed because of public safety concerns associated with the potential for release of radioactive tank contents should this gas mixture be ignited during one of the burps. In an effort to mitigate the burping phenomenon, an experiment is underway in which a large pump has been inserted into the tank to determine if pump-induced circulation of the tank contents will promote a slow, controlled release of the gases. This PSA for Tank 101-SY, which did not consider the pump experiment or future tank-remediation activities, involved three distinct tasks. First, the accident sequence analysis identified and quantified those potential accidents whose consequences result in tank material release. Second, characteristics and release paths for the airborne and liquid radioactive source terms were determined. Finally, the consequences, primarily onsite and offsite potential health effects resulting from radionuclide release, were estimated, and overall risk curves were constructed. An overview of each of these tasks and a summary of the overall results of the analysis are presented in the following sections.

  17. Test report for run-in acceptance testing of hydrogen mitigation retrieval Pump-3

    SciTech Connect

    Berglin, B.G.

    1997-08-15

    This report will provide the findings of the demonstration test conducted on the Double-Shell Tank (DST) 241-SY-101 HMR Pump-3 in accordance with WHC-SDWM-TP-434 ``Test plan for run-in acceptance testing of hydrogen mitigation/retrieval pump-3`` at the 400 Area Maintenance and Storage Facility (MASF) building from 7 June 1996 through 30 July 1996 per work package 4A-96-92/W. The DST 241-SY-101 hydrogen mitigation retrieval Pump-3 is a 200-HP submersible electric driven pump that has been modified for use in the DST 241-SY-101 containing mixed waste located in the 200W area. The pump has a motor driven rotation mechanism that allows the pump column to rotate through 355{degree}. Prior to operation, pre-operational checks were performed which included loop calibration grooming and alignment of instruments, learning how plumb HMR-3 assembly hung in a vertical position and bump test of the motor to determine rotation direction. The pump was tested in the MASF Large Diameter Cleaning Vessel (LDCV) with process water at controlled temperatures and levels. In addition, the water temperature of the cooling water to the motor oil heat exchanger was recorded during testing. A 480-volt source powered a Variable Frequency Drive (VFD). The VFD powered the pump at various frequencies and voltages to control speed and power output of the pump. A second VFD powered the oil cooling pump. A third VFD was not available to operate the rotational drive motor during the 72 hour test, so it was demonstrated as operational before and after the test. A Mini Acquisition and Control System (Mini-DACS) controls pump functions and monitoring of the pump parameters. The Mini-DACS consists of three computers, software and some Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC). Startup and shutdown of either the pump motor or the oil cooling pump can be accomplished by the Mini-DACS. When the pump was in operation, the Mini-DACS monitors automatically collects data electronically. However, some required data

  18. Measurement of local high-level, transient surface heat flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.

    1988-01-01

    This study is part of a continuing investigation to develop methods for measuring local transient surface heat flux. A method is presented for simultaneous measurements of dual heat fluxes at a surface location by considering the heat flux as a separate function of heat stored and heat conducted within a heat flux gage. Surface heat flux information is obtained from transient temperature measurements taken at points within the gage. Heat flux was determined over a range of 4 to 22 MW/sq m. It was concluded that the method is feasible. Possible applications are for heat flux measurements on the turbine blade surfaces of space shuttle main engine turbopumps and on the component surfaces of rocket and advanced gas turbine engines and for testing sensors in heat flux gage calibrators.

  19. Distributions of surface-layer buoyance versus lifting condensation level over a heterogeneous land surface

    SciTech Connect

    Schrieber, K.; Zhang, Qing; Stull, R.

    1996-04-15

    Onset and coverage of small cumulus clouds depend on the relative abundance of surface-layer air parcels possessing favorable buoyancy and moisture - two variables that are coupled through the surface energy budget. This abundance is described using a joint frequency distribution (JFD) as a function of virtual potential temperature {theta}{sub v} and height of the lifting condensation level z{sub LCL}. It is shown analytically that the shape and spread of this JFD depends on the ranges of Bowen ratios and solar forcings (albedoes, cloud shading, etc.) that exist within a domain of heterogeneous land use. To sample the character of such JFDs in the real atmosphere, a case study is presented using turbulence data gathered by aircraft flying in the surface layer of southwest France. This case study includes 4 days of clear skies during the Hydrologic Atmospheric Pilot Experiment (HAPEX) of 1986. The full flight track during HAPEX overflew a wide range of land use including evergreen forest, corn, vineyards, pastures, and irrigated fields over varied topography. The JFDs from these full tracks are found to be quite complex, being frequently multimodal with a convoluted perimeter. However, when a full track is broken into segments, each over a subdomain of quasi-homogeneous land use, the resulting segment JFDs are mono-modal with simpler topology. Such a characterization of JFDs provides guidance toward eventual subgrid cumulus parameterization in large-scale forecast models, with associated impacts in aviation forecasting, pollutant venting and chemical reactions, verticle dispersion and turbulence modulation, and radiation balance in climate-change models. 48 refs., 17 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. A Molecular-Level Account of the Antigenic Hantaviral Surface.

    PubMed

    Li, Sai; Rissanen, Ilona; Zeltina, Antra; Hepojoki, Jussi; Raghwani, Jayna; Harlos, Karl; Pybus, Oliver G; Huiskonen, Juha T; Bowden, Thomas A

    2016-05-01

    Hantaviruses, a geographically diverse group of zoonotic pathogens, initiate cell infection through the concerted action of Gn and Gc viral surface glycoproteins. Here, we describe the high-resolution crystal structure of the antigenic ectodomain of Gn from Puumala hantavirus (PUUV), a causative agent of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. Fitting of PUUV Gn into an electron cryomicroscopy reconstruction of intact Gn-Gc spike complexes from the closely related but non-pathogenic Tula hantavirus localized Gn tetramers to the membrane-distal surface of the virion. The accuracy of the fitting was corroborated by epitope mapping and genetic analysis of available PUUV sequences. Interestingly, Gn exhibits greater non-synonymous sequence diversity than the less accessible Gc, supporting a role of the host humoral immune response in exerting selective pressure on the virus surface. The fold of PUUV Gn is likely to be widely conserved across hantaviruses. PMID:27117403

  1. A Molecular-Level Account of the Antigenic Hantaviral Surface

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sai; Rissanen, Ilona; Zeltina, Antra; Hepojoki, Jussi; Raghwani, Jayna; Harlos, Karl; Pybus, Oliver G.; Huiskonen, Juha T.; Bowden, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Hantaviruses, a geographically diverse group of zoonotic pathogens, initiate cell infection through the concerted action of Gn and Gc viral surface glycoproteins. Here, we describe the high-resolution crystal structure of the antigenic ectodomain of Gn from Puumala hantavirus (PUUV), a causative agent of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. Fitting of PUUV Gn into an electron cryomicroscopy reconstruction of intact Gn-Gc spike complexes from the closely related but non-pathogenic Tula hantavirus localized Gn tetramers to the membrane-distal surface of the virion. The accuracy of the fitting was corroborated by epitope mapping and genetic analysis of available PUUV sequences. Interestingly, Gn exhibits greater non-synonymous sequence diversity than the less accessible Gc, supporting a role of the host humoral immune response in exerting selective pressure on the virus surface. The fold of PUUV Gn is likely to be widely conserved across hantaviruses. PMID:27117403

  2. The perception of surface layout during low level flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrone, John A.

    1991-01-01

    Although it is fairly well established that information about surface layout can be gained from motion cues, it is not so clear as to what information humans can use and what specific information they should be provided. Theoretical analyses tell us that the information is in the stimulus. It will take more experiments to verify that this information can be used by humans to extract surface layout from the 2D velocity flow field. The visual motion factors that can affect the pilot's ability to control an aircraft and to infer the layout of the terrain ahead are discussed.

  3. Atomic-level imaging, processing and characterization of semiconductor surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Kazmerski, L.L.

    1995-08-22

    A method for selecting and removing single specific atoms from a solid material surface uses photon biasing to break down bonds that hold the selected atom in the lattice and to reduce barrier effects that hold the atom from transferring to a probe. The photon bias is preferably light or other electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength and frequency that approximately matches the wave function of the target atom species to be removed to induce high energy, selective thermionic-like vibration. An electric field potential is then applied between the probe and the surface of the solid material to pull the atom out of the lattice and to transfer the atom to the probe. Different extrinsic atoms can be installed in the lattice sites that are vacated by the removed atoms by using a photon bias that resonates the extrinsic atom species, reversing polarity of the electric field, and blowing gas comprising the extrinsic atoms through a hollow catheter probe. 8 figs.

  4. Atomic-level imaging, processing and characterization of semiconductor surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Kazmerski, Lawrence L.

    1995-01-01

    A method for selecting and removing single specific atoms from a solid material surface uses photon biasing to break down bonds that hold the selected atom in the lattice and to reduce barrier effects that hold the atom from transferring to a probe. The photon bias is preferably light or other electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength and frequency that approximately matches the wave function of the target atom species to be removed to induce high energy, selective thermionic-like vibration. An electric field potential is then applied between the probe and the surface of the solid material to pull the atom out of the lattice and to transfer the atom to the probe. Different extrinsic atoms can be installed in the lattice sites that are vacated by the removed atoms by using a photon bias that resonates the extrinsic atom species, reversing polarity of the electric field, and blowing gas comprising the extrinsic atoms through a hollow catheter probe.

  5. Assessment of alternative mitigation concepts for Hanford flammable gas tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, C.W.; Schienbein, L.A.; Hudson, J.D.; Eschbach, E.J.; Lessor, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    This report provides a review and assessment of four selected mitigation concepts: pump jet mixing, sonic vibration, dilution, and heating. Though the relative levels of development of these concepts are quite different, some definite conclusions are made on their comparative feasibility. Key findings of this report are as follows. A mixer pump has proven to be a safe and effective active mitigation method in Tank 241-SY-101, and the authors are confident that mixer pumps will effectively mitigate other tanks with comparable waste configurations and properties. Low-frequency sonic vibration is also predicted to be effective for mitigation. Existing data cannot prove that dilution can mitigate gas release event (GRE) behavior. However, dilution is the only concept of the four that potentially offers passive mitigation. Like dilution, heating the waste cannot be proven with available information to mitigate GRE behavior. The designs, analyses, and data from which these conclusions are derived are presented along with recommendations.

  6. Slurry growth, gas retention, and flammable gas generation by Hanford radioactive waste tanks: Synthetic waste studies, FY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.; Ryan, J.L.; Scheele, R.D.; Tingey, J.M.

    1992-08-01

    Of 177 high-level waste storage tanks on the Hanford Site, 23 have been placed on a safety watch list because they are suspected of producing flammable gases in flammable or explosive concentrate. One tankin particular, Tank 241-SY-101 (Tank 101-SY), has exhibited slow increases in waste volume followed by a rapid decrease accompanied by venting of large quantities of gases. The purpose of this study is to help determine the processes by which flammable gases are produced, retained, and eventually released from Tank 101-SY. Waste composition data for single- and double-shell waste tanks on the flammable gas watch listare critically reviewed. The results of laboratory studies using synthetic double-shell wastes are summarized, including physical and chemical properties of crusts that are formed, the stoichiometry and rate ofgas generation, and mechanisms responsible for formation of a floating crust.

  7. New Performance Levels for TPV Front Surface Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmlow, Thomas D.; Lazo-Wasem, Jeanne E.; Gratrix, Edward J.; Fourspring, Patrick M.; DePoy, David M.

    2004-11-01

    Front surface spectral control filters significantly improve the efficiency of thermophotovoltaic (TPV) converters. Tandem filter designs for 0.52 and 0.60 eV cells were fabricated. Energy and angle weighted spectral efficiencies of ˜83% for the 0.52 eV application and ˜76% for the 0.60 eV applications were achieved with ˜78% angle weighted above bandgap transmission. Manufacturing demonstrations of both designs were completed with good yield. Design improvements were made using angle weighted spectral utilization and above bandgap transmission as refinement goals. Current development work addresses elimination of the plasma filter and alternate substrates.

  8. Probing the Doping level in Graphene Using Surface Plasmon Resonance.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Kamrul; Li, Yang; Bao, Jiming

    2015-03-01

    The present work describes an investigation of the electrochemically doped large area CVD grown graphene by using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). As graphene was doped electrochemically its conductance changes based on electron and hole concentration, that have an effect on its permittivity which has influence on the refractive index. We have used SPR angle interrogation scheme, generally known as Kretschmann configuration, to detect this change in refractive index of graphene as a shift in the angle of the SPR curve. To verify our results we have use Raman spectroscopy of the graphene-Au hybrid sample that was used for SPR measurement. Shift in the G peak signifies that graphene is doped electrochemically which is also in agreement with the shift in the angle of the SPR curve.

  9. Model Study of Ozone Levels Over Snow-Covered Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval, A. E.; Jacobson, M. Z.

    2001-12-01

    A column gas-aerosol-radiative model is used to simulate chemistry and radiation in and above snowpack at mid-latitudes and over the Arctic. Fifty vertical layers are modeled, the lowest of which represent the upper 15 cm of the snowpack. Snow layers are treated as dense aerosol layers with the physical and optical properties of snow. Aqueous phase and heterogeneous reactions thought to occur in the snowpack are represented as reactions on the aerosol surface. Model simulations include analysis of (1) the spectral UV radiation extinction in the snowpack, (2) chemistry over the snowpack, including snowpack release of NOx and H2O2 and ozone reduction and its susceptibility to the presence of aldehydes and bromine, (3) and the effect of soot in snow on chemistry, UV extinction, and local energy balance. Model predictions are compared to measurements of UV fluxes and ozone over snow.

  10. Contingency plan for deployment of the void fraction instrument in Tank 241-AY-102

    SciTech Connect

    CONNER, J.M.

    1999-02-24

    High-heat producing sludge from tank 241-C-106 will be sluiced and transferred to tank 241-AY-102 beginning in October 1998. Safety analyses have postulated that after retrieval, the waste in 241-AY-102 may generate and retain unsafe levels of flammable gases (Noorani 1998, Pasamebmetoglu etal. 1997). Unsafe levels of retained gas are not expected, but cannot be ruled out because of the large uncertainty in the gas generation and retention rates. The Tank Waste Remediation System Basis for Interim Operation (Noorani 1998) identifies the need for a contingency plan to add void fraction monitoring to tank 241-AY-102 within 2 weeks of the identification of flammable gas buildup that would warrant monitoring. The Tank 241-C-106 Waste Retrieval Sluicing System Process Control Plan (Carothers et al. 1998) committed to providing a contingency plan for deployment of the void fraction instrument (VFI) in tank 241-AY-102. The VFI determines the local void fraction of the waste by compressing a waste sample captured in a gas-tight test chamber. The sample chamber is mounted on the end of a 76-cm (2.5-ft) arm that can be rotated from vertical to horizontal when the instrument is deployed. Once in the waste, the arm can be positioned horizontally and rotated to sample in different areas below the riser. The VFI is deployed using a crane. The VFI has been deployed previously in 241-AW, 241-AN, and 241-SY tank farms, most recently in tank 241-SY-101 in June and July 1998. An additional test in tank 241-SY-101 is planned in September 1998. Operating instructions for the VFI are included in the Void Fraction Instrument Operation and Maintenance Manual (Pearce 1994).

  11. System Design Description for the SY-101 Hydrogen Mitigation Test Project Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS-1)

    SciTech Connect

    ERMI, A.M.

    2000-01-24

    This document describes the hardware and software of the computer subsystems for the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) used in mitigation tests conducted on waste tank 241-SY-101 at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation.

  12. Computer system design description for the spare pump mini-dacs data acquisition and control system

    SciTech Connect

    Vargo, G.F. Jr.

    1994-09-29

    The attached document outlines the computer software design for the mini data acquisition and control system (DACS), that supports the testing of the spare pump for Tank 241-SY-101, at the maintenance and storage facility (MASF).

  13. Ammonia in simulated Hanford double-shell tank wastes: Solubility and effects on surface tension

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, J.D.; Pederson, L.R.

    1994-09-01

    Radioactive and wastes left from defense materials production activities are temporarily stored in large underground tanks at the Hanford Site in south central Washington State (Tank Waste Science Panel 1991). Some of these wastes are in the form of a thick slurry (``double-shell slurry``) containing sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, sodium aluminate, sodium hydroxide, sodium carbonate, organic complexants and buffering agents, complexant fragments and other minor components (Herting et al. 1992a; Herting et al. 1992b; Campbell et al. 1994). As a result of thermal and radiolytic processes, a number of gases are known to be produced by some of these stored wastes, including ammonia, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, hydrogen, and methane (Babad et al. 1991; Ashby et al. 1992; Meisel et al. 1993; Ashby et al. 1993; Ashby et al. 1994; Bryan et al. 1993; US Department of Energy 1994). Before the emplacement of a mixer pump, these gases were retained in and periodically released from Tank 241-SY-101, a double-shell tank at the Hanford Site (Babad et al. 1992; US Department of Energy 1994). Gases are believed to be retained primarily in the form of bubbles attached to solid particles (Bryan, Pederson, and Scheele 1992), with very little actually dissolved in the liquid. Ammonia is an exception. The relation between the concentration of aqueous ammonia in such concentrated, caustic mixtures and the ammonia partial pressure is not well known, however.

  14. Sea level and turbidity controls on mangrove soil surface elevation change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovelock, Catherine E.; Adame, Maria Fernanda; Bennion, Vicki; Hayes, Matthew; Reef, Ruth; Santini, Nadia; Cahoon, Donald R.

    2015-02-01

    Increases in sea level are a threat to seaward fringing mangrove forests if levels of inundation exceed the physiological tolerance of the trees; however, tidal wetlands can keep pace with sea level rise if soil surface elevations can increase at the same pace as sea level rise. Sediment accretion on the soil surface and belowground production of roots are proposed to increase with increasing sea level, enabling intertidal habitats to maintain their position relative to mean sea level, but there are few tests of these predictions in mangrove forests. Here we used variation in sea level and the availability of sediments caused by seasonal and inter-annual variation in the intensity of La Nina-El Nino to assess the effects of increasing sea level on surface elevation gains and contributing processes (accretion on the surface, subsidence and root growth) in mangrove forests. We found that soil surface elevation increased with mean sea level (which varied over 250 mm during the study) and with turbidity at sites where fine sediment in the water column is abundant. In contrast, where sediments were sandy, rates of surface elevation gain were high, but not significantly related to variation in turbidity, and were likely to be influenced by other factors that deliver sand to the mangrove forest. Root growth was not linked to soil surface elevation gains, although it was associated with reduced shallow subsidence, and therefore may contribute to the capacity of mangroves to keep pace with sea level rise. Our results indicate both surface (sedimentation) and subsurface (root growth) processes can influence mangrove capacity to keep pace with sea level rise within the same geographic location, and that current models of tidal marsh responses to sea level rise capture the major feature of the response of mangroves where fine, but not coarse, sediments are abundant.

  15. Surface Landau levels and spin states in bismuth (111) ultrathin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Hongjian; Sun, Xia; Liu, Xiaogang; Wu, Xiaojun; Wang, Jufeng; Tian, Mingyang; Zhao, Aidi; Luo, Yi; Yang, Jinlong; Wang, Bing; Hou, J. G.

    2016-03-01

    The development of next-generation electronics is much dependent on the discovery of materials with exceptional surface-state spin and valley properties. Because of that, bismuth has attracted a renewed interest in recent years. However, despite extensive studies, the intrinsic electronic transport properties of Bi surfaces are largely undetermined due to the strong interference from the bulk. Here we report the unambiguous determination of the surface-state Landau levels in Bi (111) ultrathin films using scanning tunnelling microscopy under magnetic fields perpendicular to the surface. The Landau levels of the electron-like and the hole-like carriers are accurately characterized and well described by the band structure of the Bi (111) surface from density functional theory calculations. Some specific surface spin states with a large g-factor are identified. Our findings shed light on the exploiting surface-state properties of Bi for their applications in spintronics and valleytronics.

  16. Surface Landau levels and spin states in bismuth (111) ultrathin films

    PubMed Central

    Du, Hongjian; Sun, Xia; Liu, Xiaogang; Wu, Xiaojun; Wang, Jufeng; Tian, Mingyang; Zhao, Aidi; Luo, Yi; Yang, Jinlong; Wang, Bing; Hou, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    The development of next-generation electronics is much dependent on the discovery of materials with exceptional surface-state spin and valley properties. Because of that, bismuth has attracted a renewed interest in recent years. However, despite extensive studies, the intrinsic electronic transport properties of Bi surfaces are largely undetermined due to the strong interference from the bulk. Here we report the unambiguous determination of the surface-state Landau levels in Bi (111) ultrathin films using scanning tunnelling microscopy under magnetic fields perpendicular to the surface. The Landau levels of the electron-like and the hole-like carriers are accurately characterized and well described by the band structure of the Bi (111) surface from density functional theory calculations. Some specific surface spin states with a large g-factor are identified. Our findings shed light on the exploiting surface-state properties of Bi for their applications in spintronics and valleytronics. PMID:26964494

  17. Tomographic investigation of fermi level pinning at focused ion beam milled semiconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, D.; Lubk, A.; Lenk, A.; Sturm, S.; Lichte, H.

    2013-12-01

    Electron holography in the transmission electron microscope (TEM) offers the spatial and signal resolution for studying effects like Fermi level pinning or dopant concentration variations important for the design of modern electronic devices. To overcome the loss of information along the projection direction, surface effects, and surface damage due to TEM specimen preparation, we apply electron holographic tomography to analyze the 3D potential distribution of semiconductor samples prepared by focused-ion-beam. We observe mid-band gap pinning of the Fermi level at Si surfaces but valence band pinning at Ge surfaces. The pinning extends over tens of nanometers into the bulk.

  18. Effects of the atomic level shift in the Auger neutralization rates of noble metal surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Monreal, R.C.; Goebl, D.; Primetzhofer, D.; Bauer, P.

    2013-01-01

    In this work we compare characteristics of Auger neutralization of He+ ions at noble metal and free-electron metal surfaces. For noble metals, we find that the position of the energy level of He with respect to the Fermi level has a non-negligible influence on the values of the calculated Auger rates through the evaluation of the surface dielectric susceptibility. We conclude that even though our calculated rates are accurate, further theoretical effort is needed to obtain realistic values of the energy level of He in front of these surfaces. PMID:25843996

  19. Surface solar ultraviolet radiation for paleoatmospheric levels of oxygen and ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Many investigators have concluded that the level of solar ultraviolet radiation (200-300 nm) reaching the surface was a key parameter in the origin and evolution of life on earth. The level of solar ultraviolet radiation between 200 and 300 nm is controlled primarily by molecular absorption by ozone, whose presence is strongly coupled to the level of molecular oxygen. In this paper, a series of calculations is presented of the solar ultraviolet radiation reaching the surface for oxygen levels ranging from 0.0001 the present atmospheric level to the present level. The solar spectrum between 200 and 300 nm has been divided into 34 spectral intervals. For each spectral interval, the solar ultraviolet radiation reaching the earth's surface has been calculated by considering the attenuation of the incoming beam due to ozone and oxygen absorption. A one-dimensional photochemical model of the atmosphere was used for these calculations.

  20. Neuromuscular strategies for the transitions between level and hill surfaces during walking

    PubMed Central

    Gottschall, Jinger S.; Nichols, T. Richard

    2011-01-01

    Despite continual fluctuations in walking surface properties, humans and animals smoothly transition between terrains in their natural surroundings. Walking transitions have the potential to influence dynamic balance in both the anterior–posterior and medial–lateral directions, thereby increasing fall risk and decreasing mobility. The goal of the current manuscript is to provide a review of the literature that pertains to the topic of surface slope transitions between level and hill surfaces, as well as report the recent findings of two experiments that focus on the neuromuscular strategies of surface slope transitions. Our results indicate that in anticipation of a change in surface slope, neuromuscular patterns during level walking prior to a hill are significantly different from the patterns during level walking without the future change in surface. Typically, the changes in muscle activity were due to co-contraction of opposing muscle groups and these changes correspond to modifications in head pitch. In addition, further experiments revealed that the neck proprioceptors may be an initial source of feedback for upcoming surface slope transitions. Together, these results illustrate that in order to safely traverse varying surfaces, transitions strides are functionally distinct from either level walking or hill walking independently. PMID:21502127

  1. Full-Dimensional Potential Energy Surface and Ro-vibrational Levels of Dioxirane.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Guo, Hua

    2016-05-19

    A full-dimensional potential energy surface is developed for dioxirane based on a high-fidelity fit of ∼46,000 ab initio points at the CCSD(T)-F12a/AVTZ level. The ro-vibrational levels of dioxirane were computed using the MULTIMODE method on this potential energy surface, and the agreement with the available experimental microwave spectrum is quite satisfactory. In addition, dipole moment surfaces have been constructed from ab initio data, and they allow the prediction of the infrared (IR) spectrum. PMID:26422048

  2. A Discussion of SY-101 Crust Gas Retention and Release Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    SD Rassat; PA Gauglitz; SM Caley; LA Mahoney; DP Mendoza

    1999-02-23

    The flammable gas hazard in Hanford waste tanks was made an issue by the behavior of double-shell Tank (DST) 241-SY-101 (SY-101). Shortly after SY-101 was filled in 1980, the waste level began rising periodically, due to the generation and retention of gases within the slurry, and then suddenly dropping as the gases were released. An intensive study of the tank's behavior revealed that these episodic releases posed a safety hazard because the released gas was flammable, and, in some cases, the volume of gas released was sufficient to exceed the lower flammability limit (LFL) in the tank headspace (Allemann et al. 1993). A mixer pump was installed in SY-101 in late 1993 to prevent gases from building up in the settled solids layer, and the large episodic gas releases have since ceased (Allemann et al. 1994; Stewart et al. 1994; Brewster et al. 1995). However, the surface level of SY-101 has been increasing since at least 1995, and in recent months the level growth has shown significant and unexpected acceleration. Based on a number of observations and measurements, including data from the void fraction instrument (VFI), we have concluded that the level growth is caused largely by increased gas retention in the floating crust. In September 1998, the crust contained between about 21 and 43% void based on VFI measurements (Stewart et al. 1998). Accordingly, it is important to understand the dominant mechanisms of gas retention, why the gas retention is increasing, and whether the accelerating level increase will continue, diminish or even reverse. It is expected that the retained gas in the crust is flammable, with hydrogen as a major constituent. This gas inventory would pose a flammable gas hazard if it were to release suddenly. In May 1997, the mechanisms of bubble retention and release from crust material were the subject of a workshop. The evaluation of the crust and potential hazards assumed a more typical void of roughly 15% gas. It could be similar to percolati

  3. Analysis of sea level and sea surface temperature changes in the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betul Avsar, Nevin; Jin, Shuanggen; Kutoglu, Hakan; Erol, Bihter

    2016-07-01

    The Black Sea is a nearly closed sea with limited interaction with the Mediterranean Sea through the Turkish Straits. Measurement of sea level change will provide constraints on the water mass balance and thermal expansion of seawaters in response to climate change. In this paper, sea level changes in the Black Sea are investigated between January 1993 and December 2014 using multi-mission satellite altimetry data and sea surface temperature (SST) data. Here, the daily Maps of Sea Level Anomaly (MSLA) gridded with a 1/8°x1/8° spatial resolution from AVISO and the NOAA 1/4° daily Optimum Interpolation Sea Surface Temperature (OISST) Anomaly data set are used. The annual cycles of sea level and sea surface temperature changes reach the maximum values in November and January, respectively. The trend is 3.16±0.77 mm/yr for sea level change and -0.06±0.01°C/yr for sea surface temperature during the same 22-year period. The observed sea level rise is highly correlated with sea surface warming for the same time periods. In addition, the geographical distribution of the rates of the Black Sea level and SST changes between January 1993 and December 2014 are further analyzed, showing a good agreement in the eastern Black Sea. The rates of sea level rise and sea surface warming are larger in the eastern part than in the western part except in the northwestern Black Sea. Finally, the temporal correlation between sea level and SST time series are presented based on the Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis.

  4. Origin of Fermi-level pinning at GaAs surfaces and interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colleoni, Davide; Miceli, Giacomo; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2014-12-01

    Through first-principles simulation methods, we assign the origin of Fermi-level pinning at GaAs surfaces and interfaces to the bistability between the As-As dimer and two As dangling bonds, which transform into each other upon charge trapping. This defect is shown to be naturally formed both at GaAs surfaces upon oxygen deposition and in the near-interface substoichiometric oxide. Using electron-counting arguments, we infer that the identified defect occurs in opposite charge states. The Fermi-level pinning then results from the amphoteric nature of this defect which drives the Fermi level to its defect level. These results account for the experimental characterization at both GaAs surfaces and interfaces within a unified picture, wherein the role of As antisites is elucidated.

  5. Origin of Fermi-level pinning at GaAs surfaces and interfaces.

    PubMed

    Colleoni, Davide; Miceli, Giacomo; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2014-12-10

    Through first-principles simulation methods, we assign the origin of Fermi-level pinning at GaAs surfaces and interfaces to the bistability between the As-As dimer and two As dangling bonds, which transform into each other upon charge trapping. This defect is shown to be naturally formed both at GaAs surfaces upon oxygen deposition and in the near-interface substoichiometric oxide. Using electron-counting arguments, we infer that the identified defect occurs in opposite charge states. The Fermi-level pinning then results from the amphoteric nature of this defect which drives the Fermi level to its defect level. These results account for the experimental characterization at both GaAs surfaces and interfaces within a unified picture, wherein the role of As antisites is elucidated. PMID:25372411

  6. Surface core-level binding energy shifts for MgO(100).

    PubMed

    Nelin, Connie J; Uhl, Felix; Staemmler, Volker; Bagus, Paul S; Fujimori, Yuichi; Sterrer, Martin; Kuhlenbeck, Helmut; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2014-10-28

    Theoretical and experimental results for the surface core-level binding energy, BE, shifts, SCLS, for MgO(100) are presented and the anomalous O(1s) SCLS is interpreted in terms of the surface electronic structure. While the Mg(2p) surface BE shifts to a higher value than bulk by ≈1 eV as expected from the different surface and bulk Madelung potentials, the O(1s) SCLS is almost 0 rather than ≈-1 eV, expected from the Madelung potentials. The distortion of the surface atoms from the spherical symmetry of the bulk Mg and O atoms is examined by a novel theoretical procedure. The anomalous O SCLS is shown to arise from the increase of the effective size of surface O anions. PMID:25212984

  7. Multi-level polysilicon surface-micromachining technology: Applications and issues

    SciTech Connect

    Sniegowski, J.J.

    1996-08-01

    Polysilicon surface micromachining is a technology for manufacturing Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) which has, as its basis, the manufacturing methods and tool sets used to manufacture the integrated electronic circuit. This paper describes a three-level mechanical-polysilicon surface-micromachining technology and includes a discussion of the advantages of this level of process complexity along with issues which affect device fabrication and performance. Historically, the primary obstacles to multi-level polysilicon fabrication were related to the severe wafer topography generated by the repetition of film depositions and etching. The introduction of Chemical Mechanical Polishing (CMP) to surface micromachining has largely removed these issues and opened significant avenues for device complexity. Several examples of three-level devices with the benefits of CMP are presented. Of primary hindrance to the widespread use of polysilicon surface micromachining, and in particular microactuation mechanisms, are issues related to the device surfaces. The closing discussion examines the potential of several latter and post-fabrication processes to circumvent or to directly alleviate the surface problems.

  8. Manufacturing microsystems-on-a-chip with 5-level surface micromachining technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sniegowski, J.; Rodgers, M.S.

    1998-05-01

    An agile microsystem manufacturing technology has been developed that provides unprecedented 5 levels of independent polysilicon surface-micromachine films for the designer. Typical surface-micromachining processes offer a maximum of 3 levels, making this the most complex surface-micromachining process technology developed to date. Leveraged from the extensive infrastructure present in the microelectronics industry, the manufacturing method of polysilicon surface-micromachining offers similar advantages of high-volume, high-reliability, and batch-fabrication to microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) as has been accomplished with integrated circuits (ICs). These systems, comprised of microscopic-sized mechanical elements, are laying the foundation for a rapidly expanding, multi-billion dollar industry 2 which impacts the automotive, consumer product, and medical industries to name only a few.

  9. Synergistic prevention of biofouling in seawater desalination by zwitterionic surfaces and low-level chlorination.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rong; Jang, Hongchul; Stocker, Roman; Gleason, Karen K

    2014-03-19

    Smooth, durable, ultrathin antifouling layers are deposited onto commercial reverse osmosis membranes without damaging them and they exhibit a fouling reduction. A new synergistic approach to antifouling, by coupling surface modification and drinking-water-level chlorination is enabled by the films' unique resistance against chlorine degradation. This approach substantially enhances longer-term fouling resistance compared with surface modification or chlorination alone, and can reduce freshwater production cost and its collateral toxicity to marine biota. PMID:24375685

  10. 5-level polysilicon surface micromachine technology: Application to complex mechanical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, M.S.; Sniegowski, J.J.

    1998-06-01

    The authors recently reported on the development of a 5-level poly-ilicon surface micromachine fabrication process consisting of four levels of mechanical poly plus an electrical interconnect layer. They are now reporting on the first components designed for and fabricated in this process. These are demonstration systems, which definitively show that five levels of polysilicon provide greater performance, reliability, and significantly increased functionality. This new technology makes it possible to realize levels of system complexity that have so far only existed on paper, while simultaneously adding to the robustness of many of the individual subassemblies.

  11. Local-field corrections to surface and interface core-level shifts in insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Rotenberg, E. ); Olmstead, M.A. )

    1992-11-15

    We present a model for the extra-atomic contributions to core-level shifts in insulating thin films on polarizable substrates. The final-state shift is calculated from the screening-dependent local fields at a photoemitting atom and shown to be comparable to the initial-state Madelung potential shift in polar crystals. For Xe(111) films, our model completely accounts for experimental results. For NaCl(100) and CaF{sub 2}(111) surfaces, we present predictions of surface core-level shifts for simple bulk terminations. We discuss corrections which can be incorporated into our model.

  12. Hanford Tank Safety Project: Minutes of the Tank Waste Science Panel meeting, February 7--8, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, D.M.

    1991-06-01

    The Tank Waste Science Panel met February 7--8, 1991, to review the latest data from the analyses of the October 24, 1990, gas release from Tank 241-SY-101 (101-SY) at Hanford; discuss the results of work being performed in support of the Hanford Tank Safety Project; and be briefed on the ferrocyanide issues included in the expanded scope of the Science Panel. The shapes of the gas release curves from the past three events are similar and correlate well with changes in waste level, but the correlation between the released volume of gas and the waste height is not as good. An analysis of the kinetics of gas generation from waste height measurements in Tank 101-SY suggests that the reaction giving rise to the gases in the tank is independent of the gas pressure and independent of the physical processes that give rise to the episodic release of the gases. Tank waste height data were also used to suggest that a floating crust formed early in the history of the tank and that the current crust is being made thicker in the eastern sector of the tank by repeated upheaval of waste slurry onto the surface. The correlation between the N{sub 2}O and N{sub 2} generated in the October release appears to be 1:1, suggesting a single mechanistic pathway. Analysis of other gas generation ratios, however, suggests that H{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O are evolved together, whereas N{sub 2} is from the air. If similar ratios are observed in planned radiolysis experiments are Argonne National Laboratory, radiolysis would appear to be generating most of the gases in Tank 101-SY. Data from analysis of synthetic waste crust using a dynamic x-ray diffractometer suggest that, in air, organics are being oxidized and liberating CO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Experiments at Savannah River Laboratory indicate that irradiation of solutions containing NO{sub 3} and organics can produce N{sub 2}O.

  13. Development, Characterization, and Optimization of Protein Level in Date Bars Using Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Nadeem, Muhammad; Salim-ur-Rehman; Muhammad Anjum, Faqir; Murtaza, Mian Anjum; Mueen-ud-Din, Ghulam

    2012-01-01

    This project was designed to produce a nourishing date bar with commercial value especially for school going children to meet their body development requirements. Protein level of date bars was optimized using response surface methodology (RSM). Economical and underutilized sources, that is, whey protein concentrate and vetch protein isolates, were explored for protein supplementation. Fourteen date bar treatments were produced using a central composite design (CCD) with 2 variables and 3 levels for each variable. Date bars were then analyzed for nutritional profile. Proximate composition revealed that addition of whey protein concentrate and vetch protein isolates improved the nutritional profile of date bars. Protein level, texture, and taste were considerably improved by incorporating 6.05% whey protein concentrate and 4.35% vetch protein isolates in date bar without affecting any sensory characteristics during storage. Response surface methodology was observed as an economical and effective tool to optimize the ingredient level and to discriminate the interactive effects of independent variables. PMID:22792044

  14. Development, characterization, and optimization of protein level in date bars using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Nadeem, Muhammad; Salim-ur-Rehman; Muhammad Anjum, Faqir; Murtaza, Mian Anjum; Mueen-ud-Din, Ghulam

    2012-01-01

    This project was designed to produce a nourishing date bar with commercial value especially for school going children to meet their body development requirements. Protein level of date bars was optimized using response surface methodology (RSM). Economical and underutilized sources, that is, whey protein concentrate and vetch protein isolates, were explored for protein supplementation. Fourteen date bar treatments were produced using a central composite design (CCD) with 2 variables and 3 levels for each variable. Date bars were then analyzed for nutritional profile. Proximate composition revealed that addition of whey protein concentrate and vetch protein isolates improved the nutritional profile of date bars. Protein level, texture, and taste were considerably improved by incorporating 6.05% whey protein concentrate and 4.35% vetch protein isolates in date bar without affecting any sensory characteristics during storage. Response surface methodology was observed as an economical and effective tool to optimize the ingredient level and to discriminate the interactive effects of independent variables. PMID:22792044

  15. Fusion of multi-sensory NDT data for reliable detection of surface cracks: Signal-level vs. decision-level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heideklang, René; Shokouhi, Parisa

    2016-02-01

    We present and compare two different approaches for NDT multi-sensor data fusion at signal (low) and decision (high) levels. Signal-level fusion is achieved by applying simple algebraic rules to strategically post-processed images. This is done in the original domain or in the domain of a suitable signal transform. The importance of signal normalization for low-level fusion applications is emphasized in regard to heterogeneous NDT data sets. For fusion at decision level, we develop a procedure based on assembling joint kernel density estimation (KDE). The procedure involves calculating KDEs for individual sensor detections and aggregating them by applying certain combination rules. The underlying idea is that if the detections from more than one sensor fall spatially close to one another, they are likely to result from the presence of a defect. On the other hand, single-senor detections are more likely to be structural noise or false alarm indications. To this end, we design the KDE combination rules such that it prevents single-sensor domination and allows data-driven scaling to account for the influence of individual sensors. We apply both fusion rules to a three-sensor dataset consisting in ET, MFL/GMR and TT data collected on a specimen with built-in surface discontinuities. The performance of the fusion rules in defect detection is quantitatively evaluated and compared against those of the individual sensors. Both classes of data fusion rules result in a fused image of fewer false alarms and thus improved defect detection. Finally, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of low-level and high-level NDT data fusion with reference to our experimental results.

  16. Visually assessing the level of development and soil surface stability of cyanobacterially dominated biological soil crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, J.; Phillips, S.L.; Witwicki, D.L.; Miller, M.E.

    2008-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are an integral part of dryland ecosystems and often included in long-term ecological monitoring programs. Estimating moss and lichen cover is fairly easy and non-destructive, but documenting cyanobacterial level of development (LOD) is more difficult. It requires sample collection for laboratory analysis, which causes soil surface disturbance. Assessing soil surface stability also requires surface disturbance. Here we present a visual technique to assess cyanobacterial LOD and soil surface stability. We define six development levels of cyanobacterially dominated soils based on soil surface darkness. We sampled chlorophyll a concentrations (the most common way of assessing cyanobacterial biomass), exopolysaccharide concentrations, and soil surface aggregate stability from representative areas of each LOD class. We found that, in the laboratory and field, LOD classes were effective at predicting chlorophyll a soil concentrations (R2=68-81%), exopolysaccharide concentrations (R2=71%), and soil aggregate stability (R2=77%). We took representative photos of these classes to construct a field guide. We then tested the ability of field crews to distinguish these classes and found this technique was highly repeatable among observers. We also discuss how to adjust this index for the different types of BSCs found in various dryland regions.

  17. Cholesterol level affects surface charge of lipid membranes in saline solution

    PubMed Central

    Magarkar, Aniket; Dhawan, Vivek; Kallinteri, Paraskevi; Viitala, Tapani; Elmowafy, Mohammed; Róg, Tomasz; Bunker, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol is an important component of all biological membranes as well as drug delivery liposomes. We show here that increasing the level of cholesterol in a phospholipid membrane decreases surface charge in the physiological environment. Through molecular dynamics simulation we have shown that increasing the level of cholesterol decreases Na+ ion binding. Complementary experimental ζ – potential measurements have shown a decreased ζ – potential with increasing cholesterol content, indicative of reduced surface charge. Both experiments and simulations have been carried out on both saturated 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) and monounsaturated 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) membranes. This result is particularly important because membrane surface charge plays an important role in the interactions of biomembranes with peripheral membrane proteins and drug delivery liposomes with the immune system. PMID:24845659

  18. Spatially-varying surface roughness and ground-level air quality in an operational dispersion model.

    PubMed

    Barnes, M J; Brade, T K; MacKenzie, A R; Whyatt, J D; Carruthers, D J; Stocker, J; Cai, X; Hewitt, C N

    2014-02-01

    Urban form controls the overall aerodynamic roughness of a city, and hence plays a significant role in how air flow interacts with the urban landscape. This paper reports improved model performance resulting from the introduction of variable surface roughness in the operational air-quality model ADMS-Urban (v3.1). We then assess to what extent pollutant concentrations can be reduced solely through local reductions in roughness. The model results suggest that reducing surface roughness in a city centre can increase ground-level pollutant concentrations, both locally in the area of reduced roughness and downwind of that area. The unexpected simulation of increased ground-level pollutant concentrations implies that this type of modelling should be used with caution for urban planning and design studies looking at ventilation of pollution. We expect the results from this study to be relevant for all atmospheric dispersion models with urban-surface parameterisations based on roughness. PMID:24212233

  19. Non-Contact, No Wafer Preparation Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy Based on Surface Photovoltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagowski, Jacek; Morawski, Andrzej; Edelman, Piotr

    1992-08-01

    We discuss a novel approach to Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) in which the emission of trapped minority carriers is analyzed employing the surface photovoltage (SPV) transient as measured in a non-contact manner on the native depletion barrier on semiconductor surfaces. Optical excitation is used as the trap-filling pulse. Experiments done on n-type GaAs demonstrate that the SPV-DLTS is suitable for wafer-scale, non-contact determination of deep level defects on semiconductor surfaces. The SPV approach can monitor emission rates up to 106 s-1 which is 102 to 103 above the limit of standard capacitance DLTS. The sensitivity of the method is comparable to that of the oplical capacitance DLTS.

  20. Assessment of heavy metal levels in surface sediments of estuaries and adjacent coastal areas in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianbin; Li, Deliang; Song, Guisheng

    2016-05-01

    This article investigates the variations of contamination levels of heavy metals such as copper, lead, chromium, cadmium, zinc, arsenic, and mercury over time in surface sediments of the Changjiang River Estuary (CRE), Yellow River Estuary (YRE), Pearl River Estuary (PRE), and their adjacent coastal areas in China. The contamination factor (CF), pollution load index (PLI), and geoaccumulation index (I geo) are used to evaluate the quality of the surface sediments in the study areas. The results showed that the CRE, YRE, and their adjacent coastal areas were at a low risk of contamination in terms of heavy metals, while the PRE and its adjacent coastal area were at a moderate level. By comparison, the concentrations of heavy metals in the surface sediments of the YRE and its adjacent coastal area were relatively lower than those in the CRE, PRE, and their adjacent coastal areas.

  1. Alkyl-terminated Si(111) surfaces: A high-resolution, core level photoelectron spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, J.; Linford, M.R.; Wigren, C.; Cao, R.; Pianetta, P.; Chidsey, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    The bonding of alkyl monolayers to Si(111) surfaces has been studied with high-resolution core level photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). Two very different wet-chemical methods have been used to prepare the alkyl monolayers: (i) Olefin insertion into the H{endash}Si bond of the H{endash}Si(111) surface, and (ii) replacement of Cl on the Cl{endash}Si(111) surface by an alkyl group from an alkyllithium reagent. In both cases, PES has revealed a C 1s component shifted to lower binding energy and a Si 2p component shifted to higher binding energy. Both components are attributed to the presence of a C{endash}Si bond at the interface. Along with photoelectron diffraction data [Appl. Phys. Lett. {bold 71}, 1056, (1997)], these data are used to show that these two synthetic methods can be used to functionalize the Si(111) surface. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Observational evidence of temperature trends at two levels in the surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, X.; Pielke, R. A., Sr.; Mahmood, R.; Fiebrich, C. A.; Aiken, R.

    2015-09-01

    Long-term surface air temperatures at 1.5 m screen level over land are used in calculating a global average surface temperature trend. This global trend is used by the IPCC and others to monitor, assess, and describe global warming or warming hiatus. Current knowledge of near-surface temperature trends with respect to height, however, is limited and inadequately understood because surface temperature observations at different heights in the surface layer in the world are rare especially from a high-quality and long-term climate monitoring network. Here we use high-quality two-height Oklahoma Mesonet observations, synchronized in time, fixed in height, and situated in relatively flat terrain, to assess temperature trends and differentiating temperature trends with respect to heights (i.e., near-surface lapse rate trend) over the period 1997 to 2013. We show that the near-surface lapse rate has significantly decreased with a trend of -0.18 ± 0.03 °C (10 m)-1 decade-1 indicating that the 9 m height temperatures increased faster than temperatures at the 1.5 m screen level and conditions at the 1.5 m height cooled faster than at the 9 m height. However, neither of the two individual height temperature trends by themselves were statistically significant. The magnitude of lapse rate trend is greatest under lighter winds at night. Nighttime lapse rate trends were significantly more negative than daytime lapse rate trends and the average lapse rate trend was three times more negative under calm conditions than under windy conditions. Our results provide the first observational evidence of near-surface temperature changes with respect to height that could enhance the assessment of climate model predictions.

  3. The effect of the sea breeze circulation on surface ozone levels at Wallops Island, Virginia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, C. L.; Williams, M. E.

    1979-01-01

    Surface measurements of windspeed, direction, and ozone concentration collected at Wallops Island, Virginia, during the summers of 1977 and 1978 are analyzed to study the effects of the dominant mesoscale sea breeze circulation on the local photochemical oxidant levels. A bimodality in the atmospheric dynamics is linked to systematic variations in ozone concentration. It is concluded that during certain phases of the two circulation modes, increased wind speed reduces the resistance of the earth's surface to the deposition of ozone, and decreased ozone concentration levels result. For other phases, light winds occur, signifying high resistance to deposition and high ozone levels. This modulation by the local dynamics is a major impediment for pollutant studies in coastal environments, especially those centering on transport, because it tends to mask other processes that may be occurring.

  4. Magnetic breakdown and Landau level spectra of a tunable double-quantum-well Fermi surface

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, J.A.; Harff, N.E.; Lyo, S.K.; Klem, J.F.; Boebinger, G.S.; Pfeiffer, L.N.; West, K.W.

    1997-12-31

    By measuring longitudinal resistance, the authors map the Landau level spectra of double quantum wells as a function of both parallel (B{sub {parallel}}) and perpendicular (B{sub {perpendicular}}) magnetic fields. In this continuously tunable highly non-parabolic system, the cyclotron masses of the two Fermi surface orbits change in opposite directions with B{sub {parallel}}. This causes the two corresponding ladders of Landau levels formed at finite B{sub {perpendicular}} to exhibit multiple crossings. They also observe a third set of landau levels, independent of B{sub {parallel}}, which arise from magnetic breakdown of the Fermi surface. Both semiclassical and full quantum mechanical calculations show good agreement with the data.

  5. The effect of leveling coatings on the atomic oxygen durability of solar concentrator surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degroh, Kim K.; Dever, Therese M.; Quinn, William F.

    1990-01-01

    Space power systems for Space Station Freedom will be exposed to the harsh environment of low earth orbit (LEO). Neutral atomic oxygen is the major constituent in LEO and has the potential of severely reducing the efficiency of solar dynamic power systems through degradation of the concentrator surfaces. Several transparent dielectric thin films have been found to provide atomic oxygen protection, but atomic oxygen undercutting at inherent defect sites is still a threat to solar dynamic power system survivability. Leveling coatings smooth microscopically rough surfaces, thus eliminating potential defect sites prone to oxidation attack on concentrator surfaces. The ability of leveling coatings to improve the atomic oxygen durability of concentrator surfaces was investigated. The application of a EPO-TEK 377 epoxy leveling coating on a graphite epoxy substrate resulted in an increase in solar specular reflectance, a decrease in the atomic oxygen defect density by an order of magnitude and a corresponding order of magnitude decrease in the percent loss of specular reflectance during atomic oxygen plasma ashing.

  6. Aerosols attenuating the solar radiation collected by solar tower plants: The horizontal pathway at surface level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Thierry; Ramon, Didier; Dubus, Laurent; Bourdil, Charles; Cuevas-Agulló, Emilio; Zaidouni, Taoufik; Formenti, Paola

    2016-05-01

    Aerosols attenuate the solar radiation collected by solar tower plants (STP), along two pathways: 1) the atmospheric column pathway, between the top of the atmosphere and the heliostats, resulting in Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) changes; 2) the grazing pathway close to surface level, between the heliostats and the optical receiver. The attenuation along the surface-level grazing pathway has been less studied than the aerosol impact on changes of DNI, while it becomes significant in STP of 100 MW or more. Indeed aerosols mostly lay within the surface atmospheric layer, called the boundary layer, and the attenuation increases with the distance covered by the solar radiation in the boundary layer. In STP of 100 MW or more, the distance between the heliostats and the optical receiver becomes large enough to produce a significant attenuation by aerosols. We used measured aerosol optical thickness and computed boundary layer height to estimate the attenuation of the solar radiation at surface level at Ouarzazate (Morocco). High variabilities in aerosol amount and in vertical layering generated a significant magnitude in the annual cycle and significant inter-annual changes. Indeed the annual mean of the attenuation caused by aerosols over a 1-km heliostat-receiver distance was 3.7% in 2013, and 5.4% in 2014 because of a longest desert dust season. The monthly minimum attenuation of less than 3% was observed in winter and the maximum of more than 7% was observed in summer.

  7. Processing of Surface-NMR Data From Sites With High Noise Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behroozmand, A. A.; Larsen, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    The applicability of surface NMR in investigations of groundwater is often limited by high noise levels in many areas of interest. In this paper we present measurements from a high noise level area in Ristrup, Denmark. Standard multichannel filtering techniques for noise reduction are inadequate for several data sets acquired in this area and surface-NMR signals cannot be resolved from the acquired data. With a careful assessment of the frequency content of the data, we show how a model-based approach can be used to subtract two harmonic noise components from the data and reliable surface-NMR data can be extracted from the noise-reduced data. Moreover, we show the impact of the proposed processing approaches on the inversion results and also present an example where the proposed methodology allows us to reveal and avoid an otherwise overlooked contamination of the reference coil signals with surface-NMR signal. The results of this study show that a careful processing of the data makes it possible to extract surface-NMR data in more places of interest.

  8. Surface damage correction, and atomic level smoothing of optics by Accelerated Neutral Atom Beam (ANAB) Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, M.; Chau, K.; Kirkpatrick, S.; Svrluga, R.

    2014-10-01

    Surface damage and surface contamination of optics has long been a source of problems for laser, lithography and other industries. Nano-sized surface defects may present significant performance issues in optical materials for deep UV and EUV applications. The effects of nanometer sized surface damage (scratches, pits, and organics) on the surface of optics made of traditional materials and new more exotic materials is a limiting factor to high end performance. Angstrom level smoothing of materials such as calcium fluoride, spinel, zinc sulfide, BK7 and others presents a unique set of challenges. Exogenesis Corporation, using its proprietary Accelerated Neutral Atom Beam (ANAB) technology, is able to remove nano-scale surface damage and contamination and leaves many material surfaces with roughness typically around one angstrom. This process technology has been demonstrated on nonlinear crystals, and various other high-end optical materials. This paper describes the ANAB technology and summarizes smoothing results for various materials that have been processed with ANAB. All surface measurement data for the paper was produced via AFM analysis. Exogenesis Corporation's ANAB processing technology is a new and unique surface modification technique that has demonstrated to be highly effective at correcting nano-scale surface defects. ANAB is a non-contact vacuum process comprised of an intense beam of accelerated, electrically neutral gas atoms with average energies of a few tens of electron volts. The ANAB process does not apply normal forces associated with traditional polishing techniques. ANAB efficiently removes surface contaminants, nano-scale scratches, bumps and other asperities under low energy physical sputtering conditions as the removal action proceeds. ANAB may be used to remove a precisely controlled, uniform thickness of material without any increase of surface roughness, regardless of the total amount of material removed. The ANAB process does not

  9. Differential internalin A levels in biofilms of Listeria monocytogenes grown on different surfaces and nutrient conditions.

    PubMed

    Gilmartin, Niamh; Gião, Maria S; Keevil, Charles W; O'Kennedy, Richard

    2016-02-16

    Listeria monoctyogenes is a foodborne pathogen containing the surface protein, internalin A (InlA). The expression of this protein permits the invasion of L. monocytogenes into intestinal epithelial cells expressing the receptor E-cadherin, thus crossing the intestinal barrier and resulting in listerosis. The main aim of this work was to investigate InlA levels in different L. monocytogenes strains in both planktonic and sessile states using an anti-InlA antibody. Biofilms were grown in high and low nutrient environments on glass, stainless steel and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). This study demonstrated that InlA levels varied greatly between strains and serotypes of L. monocytogenes. However, the serotypes 1/2a, 1/2b and 4b, associated with the largest number of outbreaks of listerosis consistently showed the highest InlA levels, regardless of nutrient content or planktonic or sessile state. Differences in InlA levels were also observed in biofilms grown on different surfaces such as glass, stainless steel and PTFE, with a significant reduction in InlA levels observed in biofilms on PTFE. Interestingly, although a large number of the total cells observed in biofilms formed in tap-water were non-cultivable, the virulence factor, InlA, was expressed at levels between 78 and 85%, thus indicating that these cells may still be virulent. A greater understanding of the factors that affect the levels of InlA on the surface of L. monocytogenes, is essential in the appreciation of the role of InlA in the persistence of biofilms containing L. monocytogenes and their potential to cause food borne disease. PMID:26724402

  10. Generation of topographic terrain models utilizing synthetic aperture radar and surface level data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imhoff, Marc L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Topographical terrain models are generated by digitally delineating the boundary of the region under investigation from the data obtained from an airborne synthetic aperture radar image and surface elevation data concurrently acquired either from an airborne instrument or at ground level. A set of coregistered boundary maps thus generated are then digitally combined in three dimensional space with the acquired surface elevation data by means of image processing software stored in a digital computer. The method is particularly applicable for generating terrain models of flooded regions covered entirely or in part by foliage.

  11. Topology-optimized multiple-disk resonators obtained using level set expression incorporating surface effects.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Garuda; Ueta, Tsuyoshi; Mizuno, Mamoru; Nakamura, Masayuki

    2015-05-01

    Topology-optimized designs of multiple-disk resonators are presented using level-set expression that incorporates surface effects. Effects from total internal reflection at the surfaces of the dielectric disks are precisely simulated by modeling clearly defined dielectric boundaries during topology optimization. The electric field intensity in optimal resonators increases to more than four and a half times the initial intensity in a resonant state, whereas in some cases the Q factor increases by three and a half times that for the initial state. Wavelength-scale link structures between neighboring disks improve the performance of the multiple-disk resonators. PMID:25969226

  12. A numerical approach to sound levels in near-surface refractive shadows.

    PubMed

    Cheinet, Sylvain

    2012-03-01

    The present study formulates a consistent method to simulate the outdoor, near-surface sound propagation through realistic refractive conditions. The correlated atmospheric stratification and turbulence properties are derived from standard meteorological quantities through flux-profile similarity relationships. The propagation of a monochromatic sound field is simulated in presence of the turbulence and stratification effects and an impedance ground. The propagation model uses a numerical solution of a second-order moment parabolic equation, which is introduced and evaluated. The so-formed coupled atmospheric-acoustic model is used to systematically investigate the sound levels in near-surface refractive shadows. In an illustrative propagation scenario, the shadow zone sound levels are predicted to show significant variations with the meteorological conditions. Specifically, the sound levels decrease with the adverse wind, as a consequence of enhanced mean upward refraction. Conversely, they increase with the absolute value of the surface heat flux, as a consequence of enhanced turbulence scattering. Implications for the assessment of the sound levels in shadow zones are discussed. PMID:22423692

  13. Application of the two-surface method for determining the sound power level of equipment in a power plant environment

    SciTech Connect

    Nuspl, S.P.

    1982-01-01

    The physical size and power requirements of some power plant equipment precludes any type of laboratory test for sound output, yet this information is often desired. Sound data usually is required on a free-field basis at some specified distance, or in terms of sound power level. As its name implies, the two-surface method of determining sound power level requires two enclosing measurement surfaces which are parallel to each other and are at some distance from the equipment under test. Average sound levels are determined from a series of grid measurements on each surface. These levels are derived using energy-averaging techniques and may represent overall, octave, or third-octave measurements. By calculating the difference in sound pressure levels and the area ratio of inner to outer surface, and by using information on hand (namely the inner surface area and average sound level on the inner surface), the sound power level can be calculated.

  14. Mapping Hydrophobicity on the Protein Molecular Surface at Atom-Level Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Nicolau Jr., Dan V.; Paszek, Ewa; Fulga, Florin; Nicolau, Dan V.

    2014-01-01

    A precise representation of the spatial distribution of hydrophobicity, hydrophilicity and charges on the molecular surface of proteins is critical for the understanding of the interaction with small molecules and larger systems. The representation of hydrophobicity is rarely done at atom-level, as this property is generally assigned to residues. A new methodology for the derivation of atomic hydrophobicity from any amino acid-based hydrophobicity scale was used to derive 8 sets of atomic hydrophobicities, one of which was used to generate the molecular surfaces for 35 proteins with convex structures, 5 of which, i.e., lysozyme, ribonuclease, hemoglobin, albumin and IgG, have been analyzed in more detail. Sets of the molecular surfaces of the model proteins have been constructed using spherical probes with increasingly large radii, from 1.4 to 20 Å, followed by the quantification of (i) the surface hydrophobicity; (ii) their respective molecular surface areas, i.e., total, hydrophilic and hydrophobic area; and (iii) their relative densities, i.e., divided by the total molecular area; or specific densities, i.e., divided by property-specific area. Compared with the amino acid-based formalism, the atom-level description reveals molecular surfaces which (i) present an approximately two times more hydrophilic areas; with (ii) less extended, but between 2 to 5 times more intense hydrophilic patches; and (iii) 3 to 20 times more extended hydrophobic areas. The hydrophobic areas are also approximately 2 times more hydrophobicity-intense. This, more pronounced “leopard skin”-like, design of the protein molecular surface has been confirmed by comparing the results for a restricted set of homologous proteins, i.e., hemoglobins diverging by only one residue (Trp37). These results suggest that the representation of hydrophobicity on the protein molecular surfaces at atom-level resolution, coupled with the probing of the molecular surface at different geometric resolutions

  15. Level repulsion of GHz phononic surface waves in quartz substrate with finite-depth holes.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Sih-Ling; Lin, Yu-Ching; Tsai, Yao-Chuan; Ono, Takahito; Wu, Tsung-Tsong

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents numerical and experimental results on the level repulsion of gigahertz surface acoustic waves in an air/ST-cut quartz phononic structure with finite-depth holes. The colorful dispersion with the parameter of the in-plane (sagittal plane) ratio of polarization was adopted to determine the Rayleigh wave bandgap induced by the level repulsion. The results of numerical analyses showed that the frequency and width of the bandgap induced by the level repulsion strongly depend on the geometry of the air holes in the phononic structure. In the experiment, a pair of slanted interdigital transducers with frequency in the gigahertz range was designed and fabricated to generate and receive broadband Rayleigh waves, whereas the reactive ion etching process with electron-beam lithography was used to fabricate submicrometer phononic structures. The measured results of the bandgap induced by the level repulsion agreed favorably with the numerical prediction. PMID:27300272

  16. A kinematic and dynamic comparison of surface and underwater displacement in high level monofin swimming.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Guillaume; Bideau, Benoit

    2009-08-01

    Fin swimming performance can be divided into underwater and surface water races. World records are about 10% faster for underwater swimming vs. surface swimming, but little is known about the advantage of underwater swimming for monofin swimming. Some authors reported that the air-water interface influences the kinematics and leads to a narrow vertical amplitude of the fin. On the one hand, surface swimming is expected to affect drag parameters (cross-sectional area (S) and active drag (AD)) when compared to underwater swimming. On the other hand, the surface swimming technique may also affect efficiency (eta(F)). The aim of this study is therefore to evaluate and compare drag parameters and efficiency during underwater and surface swimming. To this end, 12 international level monofin swimmers were measured during both underwater and surface swimming. Kinematic parameters (both dimensional and non-dimensional), eta(F) (calculated according to the Elongated-Body Theory), and AD (computed with Velocity Perturbation Method) were calculated for an underwater and a surface fin swimming trial, performed at maximal speed. As expected, results showed significantly lower velocities during surface swimming vs. underwater V(1,under) =2.5ms(-1) vs. V(1,surf) =2.36ms(-1), p<.01). Velocities during underwater and surface swimming were strongly correlated (r=.97, p<.01). Underwater swimming was also associated with higher vertical amplitudes of the fin compared to surface swimming (V(under) =0.55mvs. V(surf) )=0.46m, p<.01). Length-specific amplitudes (A(under)/L(b)) were in the order of 20% during underwater swimming as for undulating fish, and significantly higher than during surface swimming (A(surf)/L(b)=17%, p<.01). Efficiency for surface swimming was about 6% lower than for underwater swimming (eta(F,under) =0.79 vs. eta(F,surf) =0.74, p<.01). This decrease could be associated with an increase in swimming frequency for surface swimming (f (surf)=2.15Hz vs. f (under)=2.08Hz

  17. Exploring the core level shift origin of sulfur and thiolates on Pd(111) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Salvarezza, Roberto Carlos; Carro, Pilar

    2015-10-01

    Thiol molecules on planar metal surfaces are widely used for building sensing and electronic devices and also as capping agents to protect and to control the size and shape of nanoparticles. In the case of Pd the thiol molecules exhibit a complex behavior because C-S bond scission is possible, resulting in a significant amount of co-adsorbed S. Therefore identification of these species on Pd is a key point for many applications, a task that is usually achieved by XPS. Here we show, from DFT calculations, that the core level shift (CLS) of the S 2p binding energy (BE) of thiol and sulfur on different thiol-Pd(111) surface models strongly depends on the adsorbed or subsurface state of sulfur atoms. Our results reflect the complexity of S 2p BE behavior and contribute to understanding and reanalyzing the experimental data of thiolated Pd surfaces. PMID:26325179

  18. Spectral properties of thermal fluctuations on simple liquid surfaces below shot-noise levels.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Kenichiro; Mitsui, Takahisa

    2012-07-01

    We study the spectral properties of thermal fluctuations on simple liquid surfaces, sometimes called ripplons. Analytical properties of the spectral function are investigated and are shown to be composed of regions with simple analytic behavior with respect to the frequency or the wave number. The derived expressions are compared to spectral measurements performed orders of magnitude below shot-noise levels, which is achieved using a novel noise reduction method. The agreement between the theory of thermal surface fluctuations and the experiment is found to be excellent, elucidating the spectral properties of the surface fluctuations. The measurement method requires relatively only a small sample both spatially (few μm) and temporally (~20 s). The method also requires relatively weak light power (~0.5 mW) so that it has a broad range of applicability, including local measurements, investigations of time-dependent phenomena, and noninvasive measurements. PMID:23005425

  19. Direct Measurement of Surface Defect Level Distribution Associated with GaAs Antiphase Boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Q.; Hsu, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    Using an electrostatic force microscope, we measure surface contact potential (SCP) variations across antiphase boundaries (APBs) on GaAs films grown on Ge substrates. The SCP at the APBs is consistently and reproducibly measured to be 30 mV higher than that at GaAs domains. This is due to Fermi levels being pinned at different surface states. The identical electrical behavior observed for all APBs indicates that they are the lowest energy {l_brace}110{r_brace} orientation. The sign of observed Fermi level shift is consistent with a prevalence of Ga-Ga bonds at real {l_brace}110{r_brace} APBs. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Reduction of the sonic boom level in supersonic aircraft flight by the method of surface cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, V. M.; Chirkashenko, V. F.; Volkov, V. F.; Kharitonov, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Based on the analysis of various aspects of creating a supersonic transport aircraft of the second generation, the necessity of developing unconventional active methods of sonic boom level reduction is demonstrated. Surface cooling is shown to exert a significant effect on formation of the disturbed flow structure up to large distances from the body by an example of a supersonic flow around a body of revolution. A method of reducing the intensity of the intermediate shock wave and excess pressure momentum near the body is proposed. This method allows the length of the reduced (by 50%) sonic boom level to be increased and the bow shock wave intensity in the far zone to be reduced by 12%. A possibility of controlling the process of formation of wave structures, such as hanging pressure shocks arising near the aircraft surface, is demonstrated. The action of the cryogenic mechanism is explained.

  1. Reduction of the sonic boom level in supersonic aircraft flight by the method of surface cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, V. M.; Chirkashenko, V. F.; Volkov, V. F.; Kharitonov, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Based on the analysis of various aspects of creating a supersonic transport aircraft of the second generation, the necessity of developing unconventional active methods of sonic boom level reduction is demonstrated. Surface cooling is shown to exert a significant effect on formation of the disturbed flow structure up to large distances from the body by an example of a supersonic flow around a body of revolution. A method of reducing the intensity of the intermediate shock wave and excess pressure momentum near the body is proposed. This method allows the length of the reduced (by 50%) sonic boom level to be increased and the bow shock wave intensity in the far zone to be reduced by 12%. A possibility of controlling the process of formation of wave structures, such as hanging pressure shocks arising near the aircraft surface, is demonstrated. The action of the cryogenic mechanism is explained.

  2. Definition and Development of Habitation Readiness Levels (HRLs) for Planetary Surface Habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Janis H.; Toups, Larry

    2007-01-01

    One could argue that NASA has never developed a true habitat for a planetary surface, with only the Lunar Module from the 1960's-era Apollo Program providing for a sparse 2 person, 3 day capability. An integral part of NASA's current National Vision for Space Exploration is missions back to the moon and eventually to Mars. One of the largest leaps i11 lunar surface exploration beyond the Apollo lunar missions will be the conduct of these extended duration human missions. These missions could range from 30 to 90 days in length initially and may eventually range up to 500 days in length. To enable these extended duration human missions, probably the single-most important lunar surface element is the Surface Habitat. The requirements that must be met by the Surface Habitat will go far beyond the safety, performance and operational requirements of the Lunar Module, and NASA needs to develop a basis for making intelligent, technically correct habitat design decisions. This paper will discuss the possibilities of the definition and development of a Habitation Readiness Level (HRL) scale that might be mapped to current Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) for technology development. HRLs could help measure how well a particular technology thrust is advanced by a proposed planetary habitat concept. The readiness level would have to be measured differently than TRLs, and may include such milestones as habitat design performance under simulated mission operations and constraints (including relevant field testing), functional allocation demonstrations, crew interface evaluation and post-occupancy evaluation. With many concepts for planetary habitats proposed over the past 20 years, there are many strategic technical challenges facing designers of planetary habitats that will support NASA's exploration of the moon and Mars. The systematic assessment of a variety of planetary habitat options will be an important approach and will influence the associated requirements for human

  3. Comparison of TOPEX sea surface heights and tide gauge sea levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchum, Gary T.

    1994-01-01

    TOPEX sea surface height data from the first 300 days of the mission are compared to sea level data from 71 tide gauges. The initial comparison uses sea surface height data processed according to standard procedures as defined in the users handbook. It is found that the median correlations for island and for coastal tide gauges are 0.53 and 0.42, respectively. The analogous root mean square (RMS) differences between the two data sets are 7.9 and 10.4 cm. The comparisons improve significantly when a 60-day harmonic is fit to the differences and removed. This period captures aliased M(sub 2) and S(sub 2) tidal energy that is not removed by the tide model. Making this correction and smoothing the sea surface height data over 25-km along-track segments results in median correlations of 0.58 and 0.46 for the islands and coastal stations, and median RMS differences of 5.8 and 7.7 cm, respectively. Removing once per revolution signals from the sea surface heights results in degraded comparisons with the sea levels. It is also found that a number of stations have poor comparisons due to propagating signals that introduce temporal lags between the altimeter and tide gauge time series. A final comparison is made by eliminating stations where this propagation effect is large, discarding two stations that are suspected to have problems with the sea level data, smoothing over 10-day intervals, and restricting attention to islands gauges. This results in a set of 552 data pairs that have a correlation of 0.66 and a RMS difference of 4.3 cm. The conclusion is that on timescales longer than about 10 days the RMS sea surface height errors are less than or of the order of several centimeters.

  4. Potassium-induced charge redistribution on Si(111) surfaces studied by core-level photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Y. ); Chen, C.T.; Meigs, G.; Sette, F. ); Illing, G. ); Shigakawa, H. )

    1992-03-15

    High-resolution core-level photoemission spectra of the K/Si(111)(7{times}7) surface system are presented. The Si 2{ital p} results show that potassium adsorption induces a Si 2{ital p} core level to shift to o/Ihighero/P binding energy, i.e., to the opposite direction than that expected from the Si-K electronegativity differences. This result is compared with that of the K/Si(111)({radical}3 {times} {radical}3 ){ital R}30{degree}-B system and is interpreted in terms of the K-induced charge redistribution between the Si-adatom--rest-atom pair.

  5. Iterative algorithm for reconstructing rotationally asymmetric surface deviation with pixel-level spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Haiyang; Wu, Fan; Hou, Xi

    2015-10-01

    New method for reconstructing rotationally asymmetric surface deviation with pixel-level spatial resolution is proposed. It is based on basic iterative scheme and accelerates the Gauss-Seidel method by introducing an acceleration parameter. This modified Successive Over-relaxation (SOR) is effective for solving the rotationally asymmetric components with pixel-level spatial resolution, without the usage of a fitting procedure. Compared to the Jacobi and Gauss-Seidel method, the modified SOR method with an optimal relaxation factor converges much faster and saves more computational costs and memory space without reducing accuracy. It has been proved by real experimental results.

  6. Statistical relation between monthly mean precipitable water and surface-level humidity over global oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. T.

    1986-01-01

    Monthly summaries of atmospheric soundings taken over 17 years from 49 midocean stations at small islands and weather ships distributed over major oceans are examined. Over tropical oceans, precipitable water is found to be a better predictor of surface-level humidity than surface-level air temperature. A statistical relation in the form of a polynomial is derived; from this relation, the monthly-mean, surface-level mixing ratio can be computed from monthly-mean precipitable water. The root-mean-square differences between the measured and derived values were found to be less than 8 x 10 to the -4th over most ocean areas. Such a relation is useful in deriving large-scale evaporation and latent heat flux data from the ocean, using spaceborne observations. The temporal and spatial variabilities of data deviations from this relation are examined. This relation is found to be applicable to all major ocean basins and can be used to monitor interannual variability. Boundary-layer thermodynamics of different air masses are suggested as an explanation of some characteristics of this relation.

  7. Surface tension prediction for hydrocarbons and its application to level swell modelling.

    PubMed

    Cumber, Peter

    2002-01-28

    In this article, methods for estimating surface tension are considered where the specific gravity and normal boiling point are known such as when the composition is expressed using petroleum fractions. This is of interest as surface tension is an important parameter in the calculation of outflow conditions from a two-phase vessel undergoing level swell. A new improved correlation for the parachor is presented and the improved accuracy of the surface tension and bubble rise velocity compared to when the original parachor correlation is used is assessed. Finally the sensitivity of outflow predictions to changes in the surface tension is presented for a depressurising vessel containing pentane. For the vessel depressurisation simulation where the original parachor correlation is used, two-phase venting is maintained for two-three times as long compared to when the actual parachor or improved parachor correlation is used to estimate the surface tension. This has an impact on the error in predicting the mass flow rate as a source condition for other consequence models and also in vent sizing calculations. PMID:11744200

  8. Exceptionally crystalline and conducting acid doped polyaniline films by level surface assisted solution casting approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthirath, Anand B.; Methattel Raman, Shijeesh; Varma, Sreekanth J.; Jayalekshmi, S.

    2016-04-01

    Emeraldine salt form of polyaniline (PANI) was synthesized by chemical oxidative polymerisation method using ammonium persulfate as oxidant. Resultant emeraldine salt form of PANI was dedoped using ammonia solution and then re-doped with camphor sulphonic acid (CSA), naphthaline sulphonic acid (NSA), hydrochloric acid (HCl), and m-cresol. Thin films of these doped PANI samples were deposited on glass substrates using solution casting method with m-cresol as solvent. A level surface was employed to get homogeneous thin films of uniform thickness. Detailed X-ray diffraction studies have shown that the films are exceptionally crystalline. The crystalline peaks observed in the XRD spectra can be indexed to simple monoclinic structure. FTIR and Raman spectroscopy studies provide convincing explanation for the exceptional crystallinity observed in these polymer films. FESEM and AFM images give better details of surface morphology of doped PANI films. The DC electrical conductivity of the samples was measured using four point probe technique. It is seen that the samples also exhibit quite high DC electrical conductivity, about 287 S/cm for CSA doped PANI, 67 S/cm for NSA doped PANI 65 S/cm for HCl doped PANI, and just below 1 S/cm for m-cresol doped PANI. Effect of using the level surface for solution casting is studied and correlated with the observed crystallinity.

  9. Comparison of surface vacuum ultraviolet emissions with resonance level number densities. I. Argon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Boffard, John B. Lin, Chun C.; Culver, Cody; Wang, Shicong; Wendt, Amy E.; Radovanov, Svetlana; Persing, Harold

    2014-03-15

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons emitted from excited atomic states are ubiquitous in material processing plasmas. The highly energetic photons can induce surface damage by driving surface reactions, disordering surface regions, and affecting bonds in the bulk material. In argon plasmas, the VUV emissions are due to the decay of the 1s{sub 4} and 1s{sub 2} principal resonance levels with emission wavelengths of 104.8 and 106.7 nm, respectively. The authors have measured the number densities of atoms in the two resonance levels using both white light optical absorption spectroscopy and radiation-trapping induced changes in the 3p{sup 5}4p→3p{sup 5}4s branching fractions measured via visible/near-infrared optical emission spectroscopy in an argon inductively coupled plasma as a function of both pressure and power. An emission model that takes into account radiation trapping was used to calculate the VUV emission rate. The model results were compared to experimental measurements made with a National Institute of Standards and Technology-calibrated VUV photodiode. The photodiode and model results are in generally good accord and reveal a strong dependence on the neutral gas temperature.

  10. Influence of reconstruction water-bearing levels on surface displacement of post-mining areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milczarek, Wojciech; Blachowski, Jan; Grzempowski, Piotr

    2014-05-01

    The phenomenon of secondary deformation characteristic of the post-mining areas is not sufficiently recognized. For ground surfaces phenomenon may be continuous or discontinuous. There is no sufficient information that describes behavior of the rock mass in the long term after end of exploitation. It is considered that this phenomenon is gradually disappears with end of exploitation. Reliable quantitative data comes only from the analysis of direct measurements in selected areas: geodetic and satellites measurements. Analyzing current situation of operating mines can be said that in the near years, more centers will limit the mining of coal mining. This will contribute to separation further of post-mining areas, in which will be required to maintaining a permanent monitoring and making predictions on the impact of ended exploitation of the rock mass surface. This will be particularly important for highly urbanized areas. This study used finite element method (FEM) to describe phenomenon of reconstruction water-bearing levels and its impact on displacement on the ground surface. It was assumed that significant factors that influence the occurrence and size of secondary deformations are: reconstruction of water-bearing levels in the prior drainer rock mass, size of past exploitation, spatial distribution of coal seams and geological and tectonic structure has been assumed. The transversally isotropic model of six elastic constants: E1 = E2, E3, ν = ν12, ν13, G12, G13 has been assumed to describe of rock mass in the numerical calculations. Geometrical models used in the numerical calculations have been developed using GIS tools. For the study two-dimensional and three-dimensional models characterized by different geological conditions and different configuration of mining data have been developed. The results obtained displacements of the ground surface for the period of mining activity has been verified with the results based on the Knothe theory. The results of

  11. Reduction of Fermi level pinning and recombination at polycrystalline CdTe surfaces by laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Simonds, Brian J.; Kheraj, Vipul; Palekis, Vasilios; Ferekides, Christos; Scarpulla, Michael A.

    2015-06-14

    Laser processing of polycrystalline CdTe is a promising approach that could potentially increase module manufacturing throughput while reducing capital expenditure costs. For these benefits to be realized, the basic effects of laser irradiation on CdTe must be ascertained. In this study, we utilize surface photovoltage spectroscopy (SPS) to investigate the changes to the electronic properties of the surface of polycrystalline CdTe solar cell stacks induced by continuous-wave laser annealing. The experimental data explained within a model consisting of two space charge regions, one at the CdTe/air interface and one at the CdTe/CdS junction, are used to interpret our SPS results. The frequency dependence and phase spectra of the SPS signal are also discussed. To support the SPS findings, low-temperature spectrally-resolved photoluminescence and time-resolved photoluminescence were also measured. The data show that a modest laser treatment of 250 W/cm{sup 2} with a dwell time of 20 s is sufficient to reduce the effects of Fermi level pinning at the surface due to surface defects.

  12. Roles of low-level thermodynamics on surface-convection interactions over West-Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guichard, F.; Couvreux, F.; Gounou, A.; Nuret, M.

    2009-09-01

    This study aims to characterize the thermodynamics of the atmospheric low levels across West Africa (WA), on the basis of observations provided by the AMMA project. A dataset made of several thousands of high-resolution soundings is used for this purpose. Moist-convection related indexes, boundary layer (BL) parameters, and a combination of two indexes proposed by Findell and Eltahir (2003) (FE03) are compted for each sounding. These latter indexes are well suited for distinguishing between aspects of surface-atmosphere interactions involving atmospheric vertical structures. The variability of the low levels is found to be stronger in the Sahelian zone than in the Soudanian zone, from daily scale up to the monsoon season (JJAS). FE03 indexes suggest that surface-atmosphere feedbacks are actually significantly operating over West-Africa, but that the feedback loops change sign with latitude and season. Thus, thermodynamic environment at low level is broadly consistent with the idea of daytime convection being either suppressed or favoured over wet surface versus dry ones, depending on latitude and seasonal variations. This finding is consistent with observations that daytime convection is not always favoured over wet land surfaces. It remains to assess the scale down to which the local thermodynamic environment is actually playing a role, and how it combines with other factors, such as turbulence, clouds and mesoscale circulations, to explain observations. Variations of the lifting condensation level (LCL) and level of free convection (LFC) are further consistent with the previous analysis. For instance, in Niamey (Sahelian), a strong diurnal cycle of LCL is found, especially early in the season, while the LFC does not fluctuates much with the hour in the day, but shifts downwards from June to August. The LCL is however not such a good indicator of BL height when the low levels are the driest. This is particularly true in June in the Sahel, on days when none of the

  13. Potential relation between equatorial sea surface temperatures and historic water level variability for Lake Turkana, Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloszies, Chris; Forman, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Water level in Lake Turkana, Kenya in the past ca. 150 years is controlled primarily from the biannual passage of the East and West African Monsoon, with rainfall volume related partially to sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the Western Indian and East Atlantic oceans. Empirical orthogonal function analyses show significant correlation between Eastern Atlantic or Western Indian SSTs and lake level anomalies, with the first mode accounting for 66% and 55% of the variability. The primary geographic loadings are consistent with a Gulf of Guinea moisture source and positive Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) state. The second mode explains 10% of variability, and reflects the westward extension of an Indian Ocean cool pool, potentially indicative of a normal to a negative IOD state. There is significant spatial correlation between basin rainfall anomalies associated with Eastern Atlantic SSTs and a low in the continental divide between the Kenyan and the Ethiopian Highlands, which is a passage for moisture from the Congo Basin. Linear regression analysis with Bootstrap sampling and Monte Carlo simulations define numeric relations between Western Indian and Eastern Atlantic SSTs and lake level change for AD 1992-2013. The monthly and yearly lake level reconstructions based on this numeric analysis capture the decadal-scale variability and the 15 m drop in water level in the early 20th century. Meter-scale variability in lake level since ca. AD 1930 is associated with precipitation sourced from the Western Indian Ocean with IOD variability, whereas the 15 m drop in water level in the early 20th century may reflect a profound decrease in moisture from Atlantic/Congo Basin source. These numerical solutions are poised to reconstruct water level variations in the past ca. 300 years for Lake Turkana with new proxy records of SSTs from the Western Indian Ocean and the Gulf of Guinea.

  14. Modelling the impact of global changes on European summer surface ozone levels at the 2050 horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clain, Gaelle; Szopa, Sophie; Vautard, Robert; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Colette, Augustin

    2013-04-01

    As pointed by the IPCC, climate change and evolution of green house gases emissions in the coming decades are likely to affect regional pollution levels as well as the background ozone levels (Jacob et al., 1999): first, the evolution of climate due to the increase of green house gas emissions is liable to induce modifications of the meteorological parameters of crucial interest for air quality. Secondly, the emissions of air pollutants will be affected by changes in population and energy demands as well as policy aiming to reduce global warming or pollution impacts. In order to assess the relative impact of climate change and change in green house gas emissions, a set of regional simulations is conducted using CHIMERE model (Bessagnet et al., 2009). These simulations account for change in anthropogenic emissions of precursors from future scenarii, global background pollutant levels through appropriate boundary conditions from LMDz-INCA model, and future meteorological conditions reflecting AR5 scenario. For consistency, all these forcings are built on the same scenario: the RCP 8.5 (Representative Concentration Pathways, Riahi et al., 2007) developed in IPCC-AR5 framework for climate projections. The RCP8.5 scenario used in this study is defined by a rising radiative forcing pathway leading to 8.5 W.m-2 in 2100. Long term simulations of summer periods (July 1st to August 31st ) with CHIMERE model are conducted, reproducing present (1995-2005), future (2045-2055) conditions in emissions, climate, and boundary conditions. Mean summer surface ozone levels from each simulated case are compared in order to discriminate the impact of climate and the impact of RCP8.5 scenario emission progression alone on surface ozone levels.

  15. Observation of Landau levels on nitrogen-doped flat graphite surfaces without external magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Takahiro; Guo, Donghui; Shikano, Taishi; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Sakurai, Masataka; Okada, Susumu; Nakamura, Junji

    2015-11-01

    Under perpendicular external magnetic fields, two-dimensional carriers exhibit Landau levels (LLs). However, it has recently been reported that LLs have been observed on graphene and graphite surfaces without external magnetic fields being applied. These anomalous LLs have been ascribed primarily to a strain of graphene sheets, leading to in-plane hopping modulation of electrons. Here, we report the observation of the LLs of massive Dirac fermions on atomically flat areas of a nitrogen-doped graphite surface in the absence of external magnetic fields. The corresponding magnetic fields were estimated to be as much as approximately 100 T. The generation of the LLs at the area with negligible strain can be explained by inequivalent hopping of π electrons that takes place at the perimeter of high-potential domains surrounded by positively charged substituted graphitic-nitrogen atoms.

  16. Interaction between low-level jet and sea surface temperature gradient in the Carolina Capes

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, L.; Pietrafesa, L.J.; Raman, S.

    1994-12-31

    The continental shelf off the Carolina coast is a preferred region of formation of low-level jet, coastal fronts and cyclones. During winter, the sharp contrast between the warm and moist air over the coastal waters and the cold and dry air over the continent forms an intense baroclinic zone along the coast. This baroclinic zone is often enhanced by a cold-air damming to the east of the Appalachian mountains. On the other hand, coastal waters, particularly the inner- and mid-shelf waters in the Carolina Capes are strongly affected by winds and surface cooling. According to these studies, the most energetic subtidal variance of midshelf circulation occurs between 2 and 10 days which coincide with the energy peaks of local surface winds. A fundamental question is whether or not mesoscale atmospheric systems are effectively coupled to the ocean circulation and frontal features over the shelf. This question will be the focus of this study.

  17. Physics of the Be(10{bar 1} 0) Surface Core Level Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Lizzit, S.; Pohl, K. |; Baraldi, A.; Comelli, G.; Fritzsche, V.; Plummer, E.W. |; Stumpf, R.; Hofmann, P. ||

    1998-10-01

    Photoelectron diffraction has been utilized to confirm the theoretical prediction that the surface core level shifts observed for Be(10{bar 1}0) have been improperly assigned. The original assignment based upon the relative intensity of the shifted components was intuitively obvious: the peak with the largest shift of {minus}0.7 eV with respect to the bulk was associated with the surface plane, the next peak shifted by {minus}0.5 eV stems from the second layer, and the third peak at {minus}0.22 eV from the third and fourth layers. First-principles theory and our experimental data show that the largest shift is associated with the second plane, not the first plane. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society }

  18. Observation of Landau levels on nitrogen-doped flat graphite surfaces without external magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Takahiro; Guo, Donghui; Shikano, Taishi; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Sakurai, Masataka; Okada, Susumu; Nakamura, Junji

    2015-01-01

    Under perpendicular external magnetic fields, two-dimensional carriers exhibit Landau levels (LLs). However, it has recently been reported that LLs have been observed on graphene and graphite surfaces without external magnetic fields being applied. These anomalous LLs have been ascribed primarily to a strain of graphene sheets, leading to in-plane hopping modulation of electrons. Here, we report the observation of the LLs of massive Dirac fermions on atomically flat areas of a nitrogen-doped graphite surface in the absence of external magnetic fields. The corresponding magnetic fields were estimated to be as much as approximately 100 T. The generation of the LLs at the area with negligible strain can be explained by inequivalent hopping of π electrons that takes place at the perimeter of high-potential domains surrounded by positively charged substituted graphitic-nitrogen atoms. PMID:26549618

  19. Surface hole accumulation and Fermi level stabilization energy in SnTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishitani, Junichi; Detert, Douglas; Beeman, Jeffrey; Yu, Kin Man; Walukiewicz, Wladek

    2014-09-01

    SnTe films were deposited by RF magnetron sputtering. The thickness dependence of the sheet hole concentration indicated the presence of a high hole density surface accumulation layer. Irradiation of SnTe by Ne+ ions led to the saturation of the hole concentration corresponding to a Fermi energy that is 0.5 eV below the valence band edge. The stabilized Fermi energy on the surface and in the heavily damaged bulk is in agreement with the amphoteric native defect model. These results show that SnTe is a unique semiconductor with an extremely high valence band edge located at 4.4 eV below the vacuum level.

  20. Automatic leveling procedure by use of the spring method in measurement of three-dimensional surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurokawa, Syuhei; Ariura, Yasutsune; Yamamoto, Tatsuyuki

    2008-12-01

    Leveling of specimen surfaces is very important in measurement of surface roughness. If the surface is not leveled, the measured roughness has large distortion and less vertical measurement range. It is convenient to utilize some automatic leveling procedures instead of manual leveling which needs longer adjustment time. In automatic leveling, a new algorithm is proposed, which is named the spring method superior to the least square method. The spring method has an advantage that a part of tentative data points is used to calculate the surface inclination, so the obtained results are less influenced by local pits for example. As examples, the spring method was applied to actual engineered surfaces, which were milled, shot-peened, and ground surfaces, and also an artificial ditched surface. The results went well for the calculation of the surface inclinations and consequently the specimen surfaces were leveled with less distortion and large vertical measurement range can be achieved. It is also found the least square method is a special case of the spring method with using all sampling data points. That means the spring method is a comprehensive procedure including the least square method. This must become a very strong and robust method in automatic leveling algorithm

  1. Preferences of lame cows for type of surface and level of social contact in hospital pens.

    PubMed

    Jensen, M B; Herskin, M S; Thomsen, P T; Forkman, B; Houe, H

    2015-07-01

    To investigate preferences of lame cows for flooring and level of social contact, 37 lame, lactating dairy cows (diagnosed with sole ulcer or white line disease) were housed individually for 6 d in experimental hospital pens, where they could choose between 2 equally sized areas (6m × 4.5m) with either deep-bedded sand or a rubber surface. On both surfaces, cows could choose between 2 equally sized areas either near or away from heifers in a neighboring group pen. Cows spent more time lying on the deep-bedded sand than on the rubber surface (870 vs. 71min/d), whereas they spent less time upright (standing or walking) on the sand than on the rubber surface (180 vs. 319min/d). In addition, cows spent less time self-grooming on the sand than on the rubber surface (2.2 vs. 4.7% of time spent upright). With regard to level of social contact, cows spent more time near the neighboring heifers than away from them; this was true both while lying (565 vs. 374min/d) and upright (276 vs. 223min/d). Self-grooming was seen significantly more near neighboring heifers than away from them (4.8 vs. 3.3% of time spent upright). When lying, cows more often positioned themselves in areas of the pen where they could maintain visual contact with neighboring heifers. Lame cows with sole ulcers or white line disease preferred deep-bedded sand for lying, and preferred to perform self-grooming while on the rubber surface. Similarly, they preferred to lie and to perform self-grooming while positioned near animals in a neighboring pen. These results suggest that provision of a deep-bedded lying area in hospital pens is important to the welfare of lame cows. We found no evidence of isolation-seeking behavior in animals with these diagnoses (and no systemic symptoms) while they were kept in individual hospital pens. PMID:25935249

  2. Levels of hydrocarbons in mussels, Mytilus edulis, and surface sediments from Danish coastal areas

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, K.

    1981-02-01

    Until recently, most effort in oil pollution research has been spent on investigating the effects of oil spills and use of detergents. The effects of long-term low level input to the marine environment are much less elucidated. This study represents the first step in a project concerning chronic oil pollution undertaken by the Marine Pollution Laboratory, Denmark. Results from previous studies on this subject in the area concerned, which have not been internationally published, are also included. In a series of Danish coastal localities, samples of surface sediments (top cm) were taken and samples of blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, were collected by SCUBA diving.

  3. Paper-based surfaced enhanced Raman spectroscopy for drug level testing with tear fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Kenji; Yokoyama, Moe; Jeong, Hieyong; Kido, Michiko; Ohno, Yuko

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to show the effectiveness of therapeutic drug level testing by Paper-based Surfaced Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (PSERS) for artificial lacrimal fluid. We have been used substrates which consist of a common filter paper and gold nano-rods. The targets were Phenobarbital (PB) which dissolved in artificial lacrimal fluid. We measured them using PSERS which the wavelength was 785nm, the power was 30mW. It was found that there were the strong peaks of PB at 997cm-1 and 1026cm-1 which corresponded with solid PB spectral peak for 1mM artificial lacrimal fluid. The results demonstrated the usefulness of this method. It is concluded that our method for therapeutic drug level testing is very efficient.

  4. Active Monte Carlo Localization in Outdoor Terrains Using Multi-level Surface Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kümmerle, Rainer; Pfaff, Patrick; Triebel, Rudolph; Burgard, Wolfram

    In this paper we consider the problem of active mobile robot localization with range sensors in outdoor environments. In contrast to passive approaches our approach actively selects the orientation of the laser range finder to improve the localization results. It applies a particle filter to estimate the full sixdimensional state of the robot. To represent the environment we utilize multi-level surface maps which allow the robot to represent vertical structures and multiple levels. To efficiently calculate the optimal orientation for the range scanner, we apply a clustering operation on the particles and only evaluate potential orientations based on these clusters. Experimental results obtained with a mobile robot in an outdoor environment indicate that the active control of the range sensor leads to more efficient localization results.

  5. Experimental observation of surface states and Landau levels bending in bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Long-Jing; Zhang, Yu; Qiao, Jia-Bin; Li, Si-Yu; He, Lin

    2016-03-01

    We report on microscopic measurements of the low-energy electronic structures both at the zigzag and armchair edges of bilayer graphene using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM and STS). We have found that, both in the absence and in the presence of a magnetic field, an almost zero-energy peak in the density of states was localized at the zigzag edges, as expected for the surface states at the zigzag edges of bilayer graphene. In the quantum Hall regime, we have clearly observed Landau levels bending away from the charge neutrality point near both the zigzag and armchair edges. Such a result is direct evidence for the evolution of Landau levels into quantum Hall edge states in graphene bilayers. Our experiment indicates that it is possible to explore rich quantum Hall physics in graphene systems using STM and STS.

  6. Surface ozone levels in the forest and vegetation areas of the Biga Peninsula, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sari, Deniz; İncecik, Selahattin; Ozkurt, Nesimi

    2016-11-15

    Spatial and temporal variability of surface ozone in the rural, mountainous and suburban sites of Biga Peninsula, at the northwest of Turkey which is about 300km southwest of Istanbul was investigated using passive samplers and continuous analyzers. A total 10 passive samplers and two continuous analyzers were used between 1.1.2013 and 31.12.2014. OX levels in the study region were examined to understand NOx dependent or independent contribution to ozone. The influences of the meteorological parameters on ozone levels were also examined by wind speed and ambient temperature. The results clearly show that mountainous areas have higher cumulative exposure to ozone than suburban locations. In order to understand the long range transport sources contributing to the high ozone levels in the region backward trajectories were computed using HYSPLIT model and then clustering of trajectories are performed. The results clearly show the characteristics of pollutant transport from north to Biga Peninsula. Additionally, AOT40 (Accumulated hourly O3 concentrations Over a Threshold of 40ppb) cumulative index was calculated using daytime hourly measurements. The results indicate that the ozone values in the study area are much higher than the critical levels for forest and vegetation based on EU Directive 2008/50/EC. PMID:27474990

  7. Measurements of Location-Dependent Nitric Oxide Levels on Skin Surface in relation to Acupuncture Point

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Yejin; Kim, Misun; Nah, Jiseon; Suh, Minah; Lee, Youngmi

    2012-01-01

    Location-dependent skin surface's partial nitric oxide pressure (pNO) is studied using highly sensitive amperometric NO microsensor with a small sensing area (diameter  = 76 μm). The pNO level of LI4 (Hegu) acupuncture point is measured and compared with the pNO level of nonacupuncture point. In addition, the mapping of pNO is carried out over the left wrist skin area one- as well as two-dimensionally. Statistically higher pNO levels near the position of acupuncture points than non-acupuncture points are observed consistently, implying tight relationship between the level of NO release of skin and acupuncture points. The amperometric planar NO microsensor successfully monitors the heterogeneity of skin pNO distribution in high spatial resolution due to its advantageous features such as high sensitivity and small sensing dimension. The current study suggests the direct connection between NO and acupuncture points and possibly provides beneficial information to understand physiological roles and basis of the acupuncture points. PMID:23049611

  8. High-Level Clouds and Relation to Sea Surface Temperature as Inferred from Japan's GMS Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Lindzen, Richard S.; Lee, Kyu-Tae; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    High-level clouds have a significant impact on the radiation energy budgets and, hence, the climate of the Earth. Convective cloud systems, which are controlled by large-scale thermal and dynamical conditions, propagate rapidly within days. At this time scale, changes of sea surface temperature (SST) are small. Radiances measured by Japan's Geostationary Meteorological Satellite (GMS) are used to study the relation between high-level clouds and SST in the tropical western and central Pacific (30 S-30 N; 130 E-170 W), where the ocean is warm and deep convection is intensive. Twenty months (January 1998 - August, 1999) of GMS data are used, which cover the second half of the strong 1997-1998 El Nino. Brightness temperature at the 11-micron channel is used to identify high-level clouds. The core of convection is identified based on the difference in the brightness temperatures of the 11- and 12-micron channels. Because of the rapid movement of clouds, there is little correlation between clouds six hours apart. When most of deep convection moves to regions of high SST, the domain averaged high-level cloud amount decreases. A +2C change of SST in cloudy regions results in a relative change of -30% in high-level cloud amount. This large change in cloud amount is due to clouds moving from cool regions to warm regions but not the change in SST itself. A reduction in high-level cloud amount in the equatorial region implies an expanded dry upper troposphere in the off-equatorial region, and the greenhouse warming of high clouds and water vapor is reduced through enhanced longwave cooling to space. The results are important for understanding the physical processes relating SST, convection, and water vapor in the tropics. They are also important for validating climate simulations using global general circulation models.

  9. Comparison pesticide residue levels in the surface of Bertam River in Cameron Highlands, Pahang

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haron, S. H.; Ismail B., S.

    2015-09-01

    The presence of pesticide residues in the surface water of Bertam River in the agricultural areas of Cameron Highlands in Pahang, Malaysia was monitored from May to October 2014. The sampling sites were located at 10 sampling points along the Bertam River in the vegetable planting areas. The extraction method of the pesticide (organophosphate/pyrethroid) from the river samples used solid phase extraction followed by gas chromatography (with electron capture detector, ECD). Insecticides, cypermethrin and chlorpyrifos were found in the surface water of Bertam River. High level concentrations of those insecticides in the river were observed during the period from May to October 2014, a period which included both seasons (wet and dry seasons). The highest concentration of 2.66 µg/mL and 1.23 µg/mL of cypermethrin was observed during the wet and dry seasons respectively. This could be due to the frequent usage of the above-mentioned insecticides coupled with contamination that could have originated from the application sites. Meanwhile, the lowest concentration detected in the surface water was chlorpyrifos (0.11 µg/mL and 0.17 µg/mL) during the dry and wet seasons, respectively.

  10. Half-filled Landau level, topological insulator surfaces, and three-dimensional quantum spin liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chong; Senthil, T.

    2016-02-01

    We synthesize and partly review recent developments relating the physics of the half-filled Landau level in two dimensions to correlated surface states of topological insulators in three dimensions. The latter are in turn related to the physics of certain three-dimensional quantum spin liquid states. The resulting insights provide an interesting answer to the old question of how particle-hole symmetry is realized in composite fermion liquids. Specifically the metallic state at filling ν =1/2 —described originally in pioneering work by Halperin, Lee, and Read as a liquid of composite fermions—was proposed recently by Son to be described by a particle-hole symmetric effective field theory distinct from that in the prior literature. We show how the relation to topological insulator surface states leads to a physical understanding of the correctness of this proposal. We develop a simple picture of the particle-hole symmetric composite fermion through a modification of older pictures as electrically neutral "dipolar" particles. We revisit the phenomenology of composite fermi liquids (with or without particle-hole symmetry), and show that their heat/electrical transport dramatically violates the conventional Wiedemann-Franz law but satisfies a modified one. We also discuss the implications of these insights for finding physical realizations of correlated topological insulator surfaces.

  11. Interplay between Self-Assembled Structures and Energy Level Alignment of Benzenediamine on Au(111) Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guo; Neaton, Jeffrey

    2015-03-01

    Using van der Waals-corrected density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we study the adsorption of benzene-diamine (BDA) molecules on Au(111) surfaces. We find that at low surface coverage, the adsorbed molecules prefer to stay isolated from each other in a monomer phase, due to the inter-molecular dipole-dipole repulsions. However, when the coverage rises above a critical value of 0.9nm-2, the adsorbed molecules aggregate into linear structures via hydrogen bonding between amine groups, consistent with recent experiments [Haxton, Zhou, Tamblyn, et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 265701 (2013)]. Moreover, we find that these linear structures at high density considerably reduces the Au work function (relative to a monomer phase). Due to reduced surface polarization effects, we estimate that the resonance energy of the highest occupied molecular orbital of the adsorbed BDA molecule relative to the Au Fermi level is significantly lower than the monomer phase by more than 0.5 eV, consistent with the experimental measurements [DellAngela, Kladnik, and Cossaro, et al., Nano Lett. 10, 2470 (2010)]. This work supported by DOE (the JCAP under Award Number DE-SC000499 and the Molecular Foundry of LBNL), and computational resources provided by NERSC.

  12. Comparison pesticide residue levels in the surface of Bertam River in Cameron Highlands, Pahang

    SciTech Connect

    Haron, S. H. Ismail, B. S.

    2015-09-25

    The presence of pesticide residues in the surface water of Bertam River in the agricultural areas of Cameron Highlands in Pahang, Malaysia was monitored from May to October 2014. The sampling sites were located at 10 sampling points along the Bertam River in the vegetable planting areas. The extraction method of the pesticide (organophosphate/pyrethroid) from the river samples used solid phase extraction followed by gas chromatography (with electron capture detector, ECD). Insecticides, cypermethrin and chlorpyrifos were found in the surface water of Bertam River. High level concentrations of those insecticides in the river were observed during the period from May to October 2014, a period which included both seasons (wet and dry seasons). The highest concentration of 2.66 µg/mL and 1.23 µg/mL of cypermethrin was observed during the wet and dry seasons respectively. This could be due to the frequent usage of the above-mentioned insecticides coupled with contamination that could have originated from the application sites. Meanwhile, the lowest concentration detected in the surface water was chlorpyrifos (0.11 µg/mL and 0.17 µg/mL) during the dry and wet seasons, respectively.

  13. MARCH1 regulates insulin sensitivity by controlling cell surface insulin receptor levels.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Arvindhan; Petersen, Max C; Nasiri, Ali R; Butrico, Gina; Fung, Annie; Ruan, Hai-Bin; Kursawe, Romy; Caprio, Sonia; Thibodeau, Jacques; Bourgeois-Daigneault, Marie-Claude; Sun, Lisha; Gao, Guangping; Bhanot, Sanjay; Jurczak, Michael J; Green, Michael R; Shulman, Gerald I; Wajapeyee, Narendra

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a key driver of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and is characterized by defective insulin receptor (INSR) signalling. Although surface INSR downregulation is a well-established contributor to insulin resistance, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain obscure. Here we show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase MARCH1 impairs cellular insulin action by degrading cell surface INSR. Using a large-scale RNA interference screen, we identify MARCH1 as a negative regulator of INSR signalling. March1 loss-of-function enhances, and March1 overexpression impairs, hepatic insulin sensitivity in mice. MARCH1 ubiquitinates INSR to decrease cell surface INSR levels, but unlike other INSR ubiquitin ligases, MARCH1 acts in the basal state rather than after insulin stimulation. Thus, MARCH1 may help set the basal gain of insulin signalling. MARCH1 expression is increased in white adipose tissue of obese humans, suggesting that MARCH1 contributes to the pathophysiology of T2D and could be a new therapeutic target. PMID:27577745

  14. Origin of Fermi-level pinning and its control on the n -type Ge(100) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, Mikhail; Laukkanen, Pekka; Mäkelä, Jaakko; Tuominen, Marjukka; Yasir, Muhammad; Dahl, Johnny; Punkkinen, Marko P. J.; Kokko, Kalevi

    2016-07-01

    Strong Fermi-level pinning (FLP) near the valence-band maximum on n -type Ge surfaces has been a long-standing challenge in semiconductor physics, and the nature of this phenomenon has been heavily debated for years. Here, we report a systematic synchrotron-based photoemission study of atomically well-defined Ge(100) surfaces and interfaces to elucidate the origin of FLP in such systems. It is experimentally shown that the FLP on n -Ge is not due to the dangling-bond, back-bond, and defect states, but is strongly contributed by the evanescent state of the Ge bulk. The conditions required for alleviating the FLP and even the implementation of a flatband structure on Ge(100) are formulated. Such a structure is realized in the BaO/Ge(100) system where one can obtain control over the Fermi-level position in the Ge gap. These findings are not only important from a fundamental viewpoint, but also open a route to producing Ohmic metal-insulator-semiconductor contacts for n -type Ge-based technology.

  15. The SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root-zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, Rolf; Crow, Wade; Koster, Randal; Kimball, John

    2010-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) mission is being developed by NASA for launch in 2013 as one of four first-tier missions recommended by the U.S. National Research Council Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space in 2007. The primary science objectives of SMAP are to enhance understanding of land surface controls on the water, energy and carbon cycles, and to determine their linkages. Moreover, the high resolution soil moisture mapping provided by SMAP has practical applications in weather and seasonal climate prediction, agriculture, human health, drought and flood decision support. In this paper we describe the assimilation of SMAP observations for the generation of the planned SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root-zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) product. The SMAP mission makes simultaneous active (radar) and passive (radiometer) measurements in the 1.26-1.43 GHz range (L-band) from a sun-synchronous low-earth orbit. Measurements will be obtained across a 1000 km wide swath using conical scanning at a constant incidence angle (40 deg). The radar resolution varies from 1-3 km over the outer 70% of the swath to about 30 km near the center of the swath. The radiometer resolution is 40 km across the entire swath. The radiometer measurements will allow high-accuracy but coarse resolution (40 km) measurements. The radar measurements will add significantly higher resolution information. The radar is however very sensitive to surface roughness and vegetation structure. The combination of the two measurements allows optimal blending of the advantages of each instrument. SMAP directly observes only surface soil moisture (in the top 5 cm of the soil column). Several of the key applications targeted by SMAP, however, require knowledge of root zone soil moisture (approximately top 1 m of the soil column), which is not directly measured by SMAP. The foremost objective of the SMAP L4_SM product is to fill this gap and provide estimates of root zone soil moisture

  16. Surface capping and size-dependent toxicity of gold nanoparticles on different trophic levels.

    PubMed

    Iswarya, V; Manivannan, J; De, Arpita; Paul, Subhabrata; Roy, Rajdeep; Johnson, J B; Kundu, Rita; Chandrasekaran, N; Mukherjee, Anita; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, the toxicity of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) was evaluated on various trophic organisms. Bacteria, algae, cell line, and mice were used as models representing different trophic levels. Two different sizes (CIT30 and CIT40) and surface-capped (CIT30-polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP)-capped) Au NPs were selected. CIT30 Au NP aggregated more rapidly than CIT40 Au NP, while an additional capping of PVP (CIT30-PVP capped Au NP) was found to enhance its stability in sterile lake water medium. Interestingly, all the forms of NPs evaluated were stable in the cell culture medium during the exposure period. Size- and dose-dependent cytotoxicities were observed in both bacteria and algae, with a strong dependence on reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. CIT30-PVP capped Au NP showed a significant decrease in toxicity compared to CIT30 Au NP in bacteria and algae. In the SiHa cell line, dose- and exposure-dependent decline in cell viability were noted for all three types of Au NPs. In mice, the induction of DNA damage was size and dose dependent, and surface functionalization with PVP reduced the toxic effects of CIT30 Au NP. The exposure to CIT30, CIT40, and CIT30-PVP capped Au NPs caused an alteration of the oxidative stress-related endpoints in mice hepatocytes. The toxic effects of the gold nanoparticles were found to vary in diverse test systems, accentuating the importance of size and surface functionalization at different trophic levels. PMID:26545887

  17. Space-based detection of wetlands' surface water level changes from L-band SAR interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wdowinski, S.; Kim, S.-W.; Amelung, F.; Dixon, T.H.; Miralles-Wilhelm, F.; Sonenshein, R.

    2008-01-01

    Interferometric processing of JERS-1 L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data acquired over south Florida during 1993-1996 reveals detectable surface changes in the Everglades wetlands. Although our study is limited to south Florida it has implication for other large-scale wetlands, because south Florida wetlands have diverse vegetation types and both managed and natural flow environments. Our analysis reveals that interferometric coherence level is sensitive to wetland vegetation type and to the interferogram time span. Interferograms with time spans less than six months maintain phase observations for all wetland types, allowing characterization of water level changes in different wetland environments. The most noticeable changes occur between the managed and the natural flow wetlands. In the managed wetlands, fringes are organized, follow patterns related to some of the managed water control structures and have high fringe-rate. In the natural flow areas, fringes are irregular and have a low fringe-rate. The high fringe rate in managed areas reflects dynamic water topography caused by high flow rate due to gate operation. Although this organized fringe pattern is not characteristic of most large-scale wetlands, the high level of water level change enables accurate estimation of the wetland InSAR technique, which lies in the range of 5-10??cm. The irregular and low rate fringe pattern in the natural flow area reflects uninterrupted flow that diffuses water efficiently and evenly. Most of the interferograms in the natural flow area show an elongated fringe located along the transitional zone between salt- and fresh-water wetlands, reflecting water level changes due to ocean tides. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Surface dental enamel lead levels and antisocial behavior in Brazilian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Olympio, Kelly P K; Oliveira, Pedro V; Naozuka, Juliana; Cardoso, Maria R A; Marques, Antonio F; Günther, Wanda M R; Bechara, Etelvino J H

    2010-01-01

    Lead poisoning has been reportedly linked to a high risk of learning disabilities, aggression and criminal offenses. To study the association between lead exposure and antisocial/delinquent behavior, a cross-sectional study was conducted with 173 Brazilian youths aged 14-18 and their parents (n=93), living in impoverished neighborhoods of Bauru-SP, with high criminality indices. Self-Reported Delinquency (SRD) and Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) questionnaires were used to evaluate delinquent/antisocial behavior. Body lead burdens were evaluated in surface dental enamel acid microbiopsies. The dental enamel lead levels (DELL) were quantified by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) and phosphorus content was measured using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Logistic regression was used to identify associations between DELL and each scale defined by CBCL and SRD scores. Odd ratios adjusted for familial and social covariates, considering a group of youths exposed to high lead levels (>or=75 percentile), indicated that high DELL is associated with increased risk of exceeding the clinical score for somatic complaints, social problems, rule-breaking behavior and externalizing problems (CI 95%). High DELL was not found to be associated with elevated SRD scores. In conclusion, our data support the hypothesis that high-level lead exposure can trigger antisocial behavior, which calls for public policies to prevent lead poisoning. PMID:20005947

  19. Using continuous surface water level and temperature data to characterize hydrological connectivity in riparian wetlands.

    PubMed

    Cabezas, Alvaro; Gonzalez-Sanchís, Maria; Gallardo, Belinda; Comín, Francisco A

    2011-12-01

    Methods to characterize hydrological connectivity at riparian wetlands are necessary for ecosystem management given its importance over ecosystem structure and functioning. In this paper, we aimed to describe hydrological connectivity at one Ebro River reach (NE Spain) and test a method to perform such characterization. Continuous surface water level and temperature data were recorded at five riparian wetlands during the period October 2006-June 2007. Combining water level and temperature, we classified the examined wetlands in three groups, which mainly differed in the dominant water source during different flood stages. Firstly, a comparison of water level fluctuations in riparian wetlands with those in the river channel during events with different characteristics was used to describe hydrological connectivity. Such comparison was also used to extract quantitative hydrological connectivity descriptors as the wetland response initiation time. Secondly, water temperature series were divided in phases with different average, range and daily oscillation, and these parameters were interpreted for each phase to identify dominant flowpaths. By doing so, a more complete description of hydrological connectivity was achieved. Our method provided useful insights to describe hydrological connectivity using a qualitative approach that can be expanded if required to include quantitative parameters for studies of biotic assemblages or ecosystem processes. PMID:21400244

  20. A Response Surface Methodology for Bi-Level Integrated System Synthesis (BLISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altus, Troy David; Sobieski, Jaroslaw (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The report describes a new method for optimization of engineering systems such as aerospace vehicles whose design must harmonize a number of subsystems and various physical phenomena, each represented by a separate computer code, e.g., aerodynamics, structures, propulsion, performance, etc. To represent the system internal couplings, the codes receive output from other codes as part of their inputs. The system analysis and optimization task is decomposed into subtasks that can be executed concurrently, each subtask conducted using local state and design variables and holding constant a set of the system-level design variables. The subtasks results are stored in form of the Response Surfaces (RS) fitted in the space of the system-level variables to be used as the subtask surrogates in a system-level optimization whose purpose is to optimize the system objective(s) and to reconcile the system internal couplings. By virtue of decomposition and execution concurrency, the method enables a broad workfront in organization of an engineering project involving a number of specialty groups that might be geographically dispersed, and it exploits the contemporary computing technology of massively concurrent and distributed processing. The report includes a demonstration test case of supersonic business jet design.

  1. Improving Limit Surface Search Algorithms in RAVEN Using Acceleration Schemes: Level II Milestone

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Mandelli, Diego; Cogliati, Joshua Joseph; Sen, Ramazan Sonat; Smith, Curtis Lee

    2015-07-01

    , subject of the analysis. These methodologies are named, in the RAVEN environment, adaptive sampling strategies. These methodologies infer system responses from surrogate models constructed from already existing samples (produced using high fidelity simulations) and suggest the most relevant location (coordinate in the input space) of the next sampling point to be explored in the uncertain/parametric domain. When using those methodologies, it is possible to understand features of the system response with a small number of carefully selected samples. This report focuses on the development and improvement of the limit surface search. The limit surface is an important concept in system reliability analysis. Without going into the details, which will be covered later in the report, the limit surface could be briefly described as an hyper-surface in the system uncertainty/parametric space separating the regions leading to a prescribed system outcome. For example, if the uncertainty/parametric space is the one generated by the reactor power level and the duration of the batteries, the system is a nuclear power plant and the system outcome discriminating variable is the clad failure in a station blackout scenario, then the limit surface separates the combinations of reactor power level and battery duration that lead to clad failure from the ones that do not.

  2. Reactive ion etching-assisted surface-enhanced Raman scattering measurements on the single nanoparticle level

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Si-Yi; Jiang, Xiang-Xu; Wei, Xin-Pan; Lee, Shuit-Tong E-mail: yaohe@suda.edu.cn; He, Yao E-mail: yaohe@suda.edu.cn; Xu, Ting-Ting

    2014-06-16

    Single-nanoparticle surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) measurement is of essential importance for both fundamental research and practical applications. In this work, we develop a class of single-particle SERS approaches, i.e., reactive ion etching (RIE)-assisted SERS measurements correlated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) strategy (RIE/SERS/SEM), enabling precise and high-resolution identification of single gold nanoparticle (AuNP) in facile and reliable manners. By using AuNP-coated silicon wafer and quartz glass slide as models, we further employ the developed RIE/SERS/SEM method for interrogating the relationship between SERS substrates and enhancement factor (EF) on the single particle level. Together with theoretical calculation using an established finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) method, we demonstrate silicon wafer as superior SERS substrates, facilitating improvement of EF values.

  3. Facet personality and surface-level diversity as team mental model antecedents: implications for implicit coordination.

    PubMed

    Fisher, David M; Bell, Suzanne T; Dierdorff, Erich C; Belohlav, James A

    2012-07-01

    Team mental models (TMMs) have received much attention as important drivers of effective team processes and performance. Less is known about the factors that give rise to these shared cognitive structures. We examined potential antecedents of TMMs, with a specific focus on team composition variables, including various facets of personality and surface-level diversity. Further, we examined implicit coordination as an important outcome of TMMs. Results suggest that team composition in terms of the cooperation facet of agreeableness and racial diversity were significantly related to team-focused TMM similarity. TMM similarity was also positively predictive of implicit coordination, which mediated the relationship between TMM similarity and team performance. Post hoc analyses revealed a significant interaction between the trust facet of agreeableness and racial diversity in predicting TMM similarity. Results are discussed in terms of facilitating the emergence of TMMs and corresponding implications for team-related human resource practices. PMID:22468847

  4. Energy pumping analysis of skating motion in a half pipe and on a level surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Z. C.; Xin, Ming

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an energy pumping mechanism for locomotion is analysed. The pumping is accomplished by exerting forces perpendicular to the direction of motion. The paper attempts to demonstrate an interesting application of the classical mechanics to two sporting events: a person skating in a half pipe and a person travelling on a level surface on a skateboard. The equations of motion based on simplified mechanical models are derived using the Lagrange mechanics. The energy-pumping phenomenon is revealed through numerical simulations with simple pumping actions. The result presented in this paper can be used as an interesting class project in undergraduate mechanics or physics courses. It also motivates potential new applications of energy pumping in many engineering fields.

  5. A Low-Voltage Rotary Actuator Fabricated Using a Five-Level Polysilicon Surface Micromachining Technology

    SciTech Connect

    JAKUBCZAK II,JEROME F.; KRYGOWSKI,THOMAS W.; MILLER,SAMUEL L.; RODGERS,M. STEVEN; SNIEGOWSKI,JEFFRY J.

    1999-09-22

    The design, fabrication and characterization of a low-voltage rotary stepper motor are presented in this work. Using a five-level polysilicon MEMS technology, steps were taken to increase the capacitance over previous stepper motor designs to generate high torque at low voltages. A low-friction hub was developed to minimize frictional loads due to rubbing surfaces, producing an estimated resistive torque of about 6 pN-m. This design also allowed investigations into the potential benefit of using hard materials such as silicon nitride for lining of both the stationary and rotating hub components. The result is an electrostatic stepper motor capable of operation at less than six volts.

  6. BOREAS Level-2 MAS Surface Reflectance and Temperature Images in BSQ Format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey (Editor); Lobitz, Brad; Spanner, Michael; Strub, Richard; Lobitz, Brad

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Staff Science Aircraft Data Acquisition Program focused on providing the research teams with the remotely sensed aircraft data products they needed to compare and spatially extend point results. The MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) images, along with other remotely sensed data, were collected to provide spatially extensive information over the primary study areas. This information includes biophysical parameter maps such as surface reflectance and temperature. Collection of the MAS images occurred over the study areas during the 1994 field campaigns. The level-2 MAS data cover the dates of 21-Jul-1994, 24-Jul-1994, 04-Aug-1994, and 08-Aug-1994. The data are not geographically/geometrically corrected; however, files of relative X and Y coordinates for each image pixel were derived by using the C130 navigation data in a MAS scan model. The data are provided in binary image format files.

  7. BOREAS Level-4c AVHRR-LAC Ten-Day Composite Images: Surface Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cihlar, Josef; Chen, Jing; Huang, Fengting; Nickeson, Jaime; Newcomer, Jeffrey A.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Staff Science Satellite Data Acquisition Program focused on providing the research teams with the remotely sensed satellite data products they needed to compare and spatially extend point results. Manitoba Remote Sensing Center (MRSC) and BOREAS Information System (BORIS) personnel acquired, processed, and archived data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instruments on the NOAA-11 and -14 satellites. The AVHRR data were acquired by CCRS and were provided to BORIS for use by BOREAS researchers. These AVHRR level-4c data are gridded, 10-day composites of surface parameters produced from sets of single-day images. Temporally, the 10-day compositing periods begin 11-Apr-1994 and end 10-Sep-1994. Spatially, the data cover the entire BOREAS region. The data are stored in binary image format files. Note: Some of the data files on the BOREAS CD-ROMs have been compressed using the Gzip program.

  8. Impact of Nocturnal Low-Level Jets on Near-Surface Turbulence Kinetic Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Henrique F.; Leclerc, Monique Y.; Zhang, Gengsheng; Durden, David; Kurzeja, Robert; Parker, Matthew; Werth, David

    2015-09-01

    We report on the role of low-level jets (LLJs) on the modulation of near-surface turbulence in the stable boundary layer, focusing on the behaviour of the transport terms of the turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) budget. We also examine the applicability of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) in light of these terms. Using coincident near-surface turbulence and LLJ data collected over a three-month period in South Carolina, USA, we found that turbulence during LLJ periods was typically stronger and more well-developed in comparison with periods without a LLJ. We found a local imbalance in the near-surface TKE budget, in which the imbalance (residual) term was typically positive (i.e., energy gain) and nearly in equilibrium with buoyant consumption. Based on a comparison with previous studies, we assume that this residual term represents mostly pressure transport. We found the behaviour of the residual term to be better delineated in the presence of LLJs. We found shear production to adhere to MOST remarkably well during LLJs, except under very stable conditions. Gain of non-local TKE via pressure transport, likely consisting of large-scale fluctuations, could be the cause of the observed deviation from the MOST -less prediction. The fact that this deviation was observed for periods with well-developed turbulence with an inertial subrange slope close to indicates that such Kolmogorov turbulence is not a sufficient condition to guarantee the applicability of the MOST -less concept, as recently suggested in the literature. The implications of these results are discussed.

  9. Resonances and thresholds in the Rydberg-level population of multiply charged ions at solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedeljković, Lj. D.; Nedeljković, N. N.

    1998-12-01

    We present a theoretical study of resonances and thresholds, two specific features of Rydberg-state formation of multiply charged ions (Z=6, 7, and 8) escaping a solid surface at intermediate velocities (v~1 a.u.) in the normal emergence geometry. The resonances are recognized in pronounced maxima of the experimentally observed population curves of Ar VIII ions for resonant values of the principal quantum number n=nres=11 and for the angular momentum quantum numbers l=1 and 2. Absence of optical signals in detectors of beam-foil experiments for n>nthr of S VI and Cl VII ions (with l=0, 1, and 2) and Ar VIII for l=0 is interpreted as a threshold phenomenon. An interplay between resonance and threshold effects is established within the framework of quantum dynamics of the low angular momentum Rydberg-state formation, based on a generalization of Demkov-Ostrovskii's charge-exchange model. In the model proposed, the Ar VIII resonances appear as a consequence of electron tunneling in the very vicinity of the ion-surface potential barrier top and at some critical ion-surface distances Rc. The observed thresholds are explained by means of a decay mechanism of ionic Rydberg states formed dominantly above the Fermi level EF of a solid conduction band. The theoretically predicted resonant and threshold values, nres and nthr of the principal quantum number n, as well as the obtained population probabilities Pnl=Pnl(v,Z), are in sufficiently good agreement with all available experimental findings.

  10. Free surface flow through rock-fill dams analyzed by FEM with level set approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, N. H.; Wiberg, N.-E.; Levenstam, M.

    A stabilized-finite element formulation is coupled with a level set technique for computations of incompressible non-linear flow with interfaces between two immiscible fluids. An interface capturing formulation (ICF) for non-linear, free surface, seepage flow in rock-fill dams is proposed. The formulation is derived for two- and three-dimensional flow within a fixed mesh domain. The resulting formulation is general and applicable for various steady and transient two-phase flow problems. FE-refinement is processed for the entire fixed mesh domains. A general solver is also reviewed for large and non-symmetric non-positive definite linear system of equations with the GMRES-update technique based on a Newton-iterative method. The computational procedure has been implemented in MATLAB. A comparison is performed between the 2-D computed test problem for coarse and refined meshes together with some proposed analytical solutions for nonlinear seepage flow with free surface in rock-fill dams. An expansion of the 2-D program code to a 3-D one for a rectangular rock-fill dam is also developed and simulated in MATLAB. The performance of the computations in 3-D is very promising and its opening the future for possible industrial applications using the same simple technique. Computations for a simple 3-D seepage flow problem with free surface in rock-fill dam are included in present paper. A general mesh generator and solver for large scale and complex 3-D flow problems in a real embankment dam is also under construction in C++.

  11. Evaluation of pressure transducers to measure surface level in the waste storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.J.; Colson, J.B.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes the results of tests conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to determine if pressure transducers can be used to measure the surface level in the waste tanks. A survey was first conducted to evaluate which, if any, commercially available pressure transducers were available that could meet the requirements for use in the waste tanks. More than 35 companies were contacted to determine if they manufactured a pressure transducer that could be used in the 101-SY waste tank. The three basic requirements for a pressure transducer for this application were that they were radiation-hardened, could withstand a caustic environment, and were certified to be intrinsically safe. No manufacturer was able to meet all three of these requirements with a commercially available product. Seven companies were able to meet the requirements for being radiation-hardened and being able to withstand the caustic environment. However, only two of the nine companies were willing to supply a pressure transducer for laboratory testing. The two pressure transducers that were tested in this program were the VEGA D36-38 from HiTech Technologies, Inc., and the KP-1911-A from Kaman Instrumentation Corporation. Pressure transducers operate on the principle that the pressure at the location of a sensor increases directly with the depth of the liquid above it. A liquid is required in order for these devices to operate. For these tests, water was first used to determine the ideal operation of the devices, then the devices were placed in a 101-SY waste tank simulant. The simulant had a specific gravity of 1.96 and had the consistency similar to the convective layer in the 101-SY waste tank. In order to determine the surface level with pressure transducers, the density of the material needs to be known.

  12. A Continuous Liquid-Level Sensor for Fuel Tanks Based on Surface Plasmon Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Pozo, Antonio M.; Pérez-Ocón, Francisco; Rabaza, Ovidio

    2016-01-01

    A standard problem in large tanks at oil refineries and petrol stations is that water and fuel usually occupy the same tank. This is undesirable and causes problems such as corrosion in the tanks. Normally, the water level in tanks is unknown, with the problems that this entails. We propose herein a method based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to detect in real time the interfaces in a tank which can simultaneously contain water, gasoline (or diesel) and air. The plasmonic sensor is composed of a hemispherical glass prism, a magnesium fluoride layer, and a gold layer. We have optimized the structural parameters of the sensor from the theoretical modeling of the reflectance curve. The sensor detects water-fuel and fuel-air interfaces and measures the level of each liquid in real time. This sensor is recommended for inflammable liquids because inside the tank there are no electrical or electronic signals which could cause explosions. The sensor proposed has a sensitivity of between 1.2 and 3.5 RIU−1 and a resolution of between 5.7 × 10−4 and 16.5 × 10−4 RIU. PMID:27213388

  13. Correlation and coherence analysis between sea surface temperature and altimetric sea level anomaly data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zbylut-Górska, Maria; Kosek, Wiesław; Wnęk, Agnieszka; Młocek, Wojciech; Rutkowska, Agnieszka; Popiński, Waldemar; Niedzielski, Tomasz

    2016-04-01

    One of the main causes of the sea level variations is the steric effect caused by changes of local sea surface temperature (SST). To show how the altimetric Sea Level Anomaly (SLA) data are related to the SST data, correlation coefficients between them as a function of geographic location were computed. The analysis showed a high positive correlation (about 0.7), especially in the Northern and South-Eastern parts of the Pacific Ocean and a large part of the Atlantic Ocean. There is a negative correlation of about 0.5 in the South-East part of Indian Ocean, on the Arafura Sea and the Red Sea. In addition the time-frequency coherence and semblance functions between the SLA and SST data were calculated using Fourier transform band pass filter. The maps of such coherence and semblance functions in frequency bands corresponding to the annual oscillation and its integer multiplicities were computed. The most imporntat contribution to the correlation coefficient values has the annual oscillation in the SST and SLA data.

  14. A Continuous Liquid-Level Sensor for Fuel Tanks Based on Surface Plasmon Resonance.

    PubMed

    Pozo, Antonio M; Pérez-Ocón, Francisco; Rabaza, Ovidio

    2016-01-01

    A standard problem in large tanks at oil refineries and petrol stations is that water and fuel usually occupy the same tank. This is undesirable and causes problems such as corrosion in the tanks. Normally, the water level in tanks is unknown, with the problems that this entails. We propose herein a method based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to detect in real time the interfaces in a tank which can simultaneously contain water, gasoline (or diesel) and air. The plasmonic sensor is composed of a hemispherical glass prism, a magnesium fluoride layer, and a gold layer. We have optimized the structural parameters of the sensor from the theoretical modeling of the reflectance curve. The sensor detects water-fuel and fuel-air interfaces and measures the level of each liquid in real time. This sensor is recommended for inflammable liquids because inside the tank there are no electrical or electronic signals which could cause explosions. The sensor proposed has a sensitivity of between 1.2 and 3.5 RIU(-1) and a resolution of between 5.7 × 10(-4) and 16.5 × 10(-4) RIU. PMID:27213388

  15. Levels of organochlorine pesticides and heavy metals in surface waters of Konya closed basin, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Mehmet Emin; Ozcan, Senar; Beduk, Fatma; Tor, Ali

    2013-01-01

    The concentrations of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), including α -, β -, γ -, and δ -hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide, dieldrin, aldrin, endrin, endrin aldehyde, endrin ketone, endosulfan I, endosulfan II, endosulfan sulfate, p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDD, p,p'-DDT, methoxychlor, chlordane I, chlordane II, and heavy metals, such as As, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Ni in surface water samples from the Konya closed basin were determined to evaluate the level of contamination. Among all HCH isomers, β -HCH is the main isomer with a concentration range of 0.015-0.065 μ g/L. DDE, DDD, and DDT were almost determined in all samples, in which DDE isomer had the highest concentration ranged from not detected to 0.037 μ g/L. In all studied OCPs, aldrin showed the highest concentration at 0.220 μ g/L. The concentrations of heavy metals in water samples were observed with order: Mnlevels of both OCPs and heavy metals were also compared with other previously published data. PMID:23533363

  16. Levels of Organochlorine Pesticides and Heavy Metals in Surface Waters of Konya Closed Basin, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Mehmet Emin; Ozcan, Senar; Beduk, Fatma; Tor, Ali

    2013-01-01

    The concentrations of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), including α-, β-, γ-, and δ-hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide, dieldrin, aldrin, endrin, endrin aldehyde, endrin ketone, endosulfan I, endosulfan II, endosulfan sulfate, p,p′-DDE, p,p′-DDD, p,p′-DDT, methoxychlor, chlordane I, chlordane II, and heavy metals, such as As, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Ni in surface water samples from the Konya closed basin were determined to evaluate the level of contamination. Among all HCH isomers, β-HCH is the main isomer with a concentration range of 0.015–0.065 μg/L. DDE, DDD, and DDT were almost determined in all samples, in which DDE isomer had the highest concentration ranged from not detected to 0.037 μg/L. In all studied OCPs, aldrin showed the highest concentration at 0.220 μg/L. The concentrations of heavy metals in water samples were observed with order: Mn < Cu < Ni < As < Cr < Fe. In some samples, As, Fe, and Cr concentrations exceeded the drinking water quality recommended by EU, US EPA, WHO, and Turkish Regulation, while Cu, Ni, and Mn concentrations are below the guideline values. The levels of both OCPs and heavy metals were also compared with other previously published data. PMID:23533363

  17. Non-contact ultrasonic acquisition of femtosecond laser-driven ablative Mbar-level shock waves on Ti alloy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ageev, E. I.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Nikonorov, N. V.; Nuryev, R. K.; Petrov, A. A.; Samokhvalov, A. A.; Veiko, V. P.

    2016-02-01

    Mbar-level ablative plume pressures, produced by single-shot femtosecond laser ablation of a dry Ti alloy surface and driving shock waves in air and in the solid target, were characterized using non-contact broad-band ultrasonic measurements. X-ray diffraction measurements reveal the resulting shock-wave induced sub-GPa residual compressive stresses over multi-micrometer depths inside the target, indicating GPa-level residual compressive stresses on its surface.

  18. Occurrence and levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in surface sediments from the Yellow River Estuary, China.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zijiao; Liu, Guijian; Lam, Michael Hon Wah; Liu, Houqi; Da, Chunnian

    2016-05-01

    A total of 21 surface sediments collected from the Yellow River Estuary, China were analyzed for 40 kinds of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Their levels, spatial distribution, congener profiles and possible sources were investigated. Only ten congeners were detected in the sediments. The total concentrations of the lower brominated BDEs (∑PBDEslow, PBDEs excluding BDE 209) and BDE 209 ranged from 0.482 ng/g to 1.07 ng/g and 1.16-5.40 ng/g, with an average value of 0.690 and 2.79 ng/g, respectively, which were both at the low end of the global contamination level. The congener profiles were dominated by BDE 209, with the average value accounting for 79.2% of the total PBDEs in the sediment samples. Among the nine lower brominated BDE congeners, BDE 47, 99 and 183 had high abundances. Although the commercial Penta/Octa-BDE products have been banned in most countries, the residual commercial Penta/Octa/Deca-BDE products and the debromination of highly brominated BDE compounds such as BDE 209 were still found to be the possible sources for the trace level of PBDEs in the present study area. In spite of the gradual removal of the commercial PBDEs in the world, the present research results further suggested that scientific attention should not be reduced on the issue of environmental contamination caused by these outdated chemical compounds. PMID:26845362

  19. Comparisons of predicted steady-state levels in rooms with extended- and local-reaction bounding surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgson, Murray; Wareing, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    A combined beam-tracing and transfer-matrix model for predicting steady-state sound-pressure levels in rooms with multilayer bounding surfaces was used to compare the effect of extended- and local-reaction surfaces, and the accuracy of the local-reaction approximation. Three rooms—an office, a corridor and a workshop—with one or more multilayer test surfaces were considered. The test surfaces were a single-glass panel, a double-drywall panel, a carpeted floor, a suspended-acoustical ceiling, a double-steel panel, and glass fibre on a hard backing. Each test surface was modeled as of extended or of local reaction. Sound-pressure levels were predicted and compared to determine the significance of the surface-reaction assumption. The main conclusions were that the difference between modeling a room surface as of extended or of local reaction is not significant when the surface is a single plate or a single layer of material (solid or porous) with a hard backing. The difference is significant when the surface consists of multilayers of solid or porous material and includes a layer of fluid with a large thickness relative to the other layers. The results are partially explained by considering the surface-reflection coefficients at the first-reflection angles.

  20. Direct Measurements of Fermi Level Pinning at the Surface of Intrinsically n-Type InGaAs Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Speckbacher, Maximilian; Treu, Julian; Whittles, Thomas J; Linhart, Wojciech M; Xu, Xiaomo; Saller, Kai; Dhanak, Vinod R; Abstreiter, Gerhard; Finley, Jonathan J; Veal, Tim D; Koblmüller, Gregor

    2016-08-10

    Surface effects strongly dominate the intrinsic properties of semiconductor nanowires (NWs), an observation that is commonly attributed to the presence of surface states and their modification of the electronic band structure. Although the effects of the exposed, bare NW surface have been widely studied with respect to charge carrier transport and optical properties, the underlying electronic band structure, Fermi level pinning, and surface band bending profiles are not well explored. Here, we directly and quantitatively assess the Fermi level pinning at the surfaces of composition-tunable, intrinsically n-type InGaAs NWs, as one of the prominent, technologically most relevant NW systems, by using correlated photoluminescence (PL) and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). From the PL spectral response, we reveal two dominant radiative recombination pathways, that is, direct near-band edge transitions and red-shifted, spatially indirect transitions induced by surface band bending. The separation of their relative transition energies changes with alloy composition by up to more than ∼40 meV and represent a direct measure for the amount of surface band bending. We further extract quantitatively the Fermi level to surface valence band maximum separation using XPS, and directly verify a composition-dependent transition from downward to upward band bending (surface electron accumulation to depletion) with increasing Ga-content x(Ga) at a crossover near x(Ga) ∼ 0.2. Core level spectra further demonstrate the nature of extrinsic surface states being caused by In-rich suboxides arising from the native oxide layer at the InGaAs NW surface. PMID:27458736

  1. Analysis of Ultra High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature Level 4 Datasets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Grant

    2011-01-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) studies are often focused on improving accuracy, or understanding and quantifying uncertainties in the measurement, as SST is a leading indicator of climate change and represents the longest time series of any ocean variable observed from space. Over the past several decades SST has been studied with the use of satellite data. This allows a larger area to be studied with much more frequent measurements being taken than direct measurements collected aboard ship or buoys. The Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) is an international project that distributes satellite derived sea surface temperatures (SST) data from multiple platforms and sensors. The goal of the project is to distribute these SSTs for operational uses such as ocean model assimilation and decision support applications, as well as support fundamental SST research and climate studies. Examples of near real time applications include hurricane and fisheries studies and numerical weather forecasting. The JPL group has produced a new 1 km daily global Level 4 SST product, the Multiscale Ultrahigh Resolution (MUR), that blends SST data from 3 distinct NASA radiometers: the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer ? Earth Observing System(AMSRE). This new product requires further validation and accuracy assessment, especially in coastal regions.We examined the accuracy of the new MUR SST product by comparing the high resolution version and a lower resolution version that has been smoothed to 19 km (but still gridded to 1 km). Both versions were compared to the same data set of in situ buoy temperature measurements with a focus on study regions of the oceans surrounding North and Central America as well as two smaller regions around the Gulf Stream and California coast. Ocean fronts exhibit high temperature gradients (Roden, 1976), and thus

  2. Study to investigate the trace levels of contamination on surfaces when narcotic contraband is concealed in a vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Rod; Brittain, Alan H.

    1997-01-01

    When a vehicle is used to transport narcotic contraband material trace levels of that material can be found on surfaces of the vehicle, people associated with the vehicle and surface they contact. The detection of these trace levels can help to target vehicles associated with the smuggling of the contraband. A study to determine the typical levels of narcotic material that can be detected from these surfaces has been performed by personnel from Graseby, using a variety of drug materials. The size and packaging of the drug materials has been prepared to try to reflect that typically found in smuggling operations. These tests show that for all hard drugs easily detectable traces of drug material can be found on the vehicle, the proxy and secondary surfaces handled by the proxy. For detection of cannabis, the condition of the original material had a great bearing ont he reliability of detection.

  3. Strong compensation hinders the p-type doping of ZnO: a glance over surface defect levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, B.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a surface doping model of ZnO to elucidate the p-type doping and compensations in ZnO nanomaterials. With an N-dopant, the effects of N on the ZnO surface demonstrate a relatively shallow acceptor level in the band gap. As the dimension of the ZnO materials decreases, the quantum confinement effects will increase and render the charge transfer on surface to influence the shifting of Fermi level, by evidence of transition level changes of the N-dopant. We report that this can overwhelm the intrinsic p-type conductivity and transport of the ZnO bulk system. This may provide a possible route of using surface doping to modify the electronic transport and conductivity of ZnO nanomaterials.

  4. Levels of methylmercury and controlling factors in surface sediments of the Carson River system, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Bonzongo, J.C.; Miller, G.C.

    1995-12-31

    Spatial and temporal distribution of MeHg, as well as, its relationships with both the biotic and abiotic activities, were determined in surficial sediments collected from a river-reservoir system, severely impacted by Hg-contaminated mine wastes. Despite the fact that total mercury concentrations in surface sediments of the Carson River system were in the {mu}g.g{sup -1} range, levels of MeHg varied from {approximately}1 to 28 ng Hg.g{sup -1} dry weight, representing less than 3% of Total-Hg. Positive relationships were obtained between MeHg concentrations and both the chemical activity and general rate of biotic activity, suggesting the contribution of both the abiotic and biotic processes in the production of MeHg in natural environments, the latter being more important and more significant. Laboratory investigations showed that rates of MeHg production in sediments of the Carson River were affected by factors related to peculiarities of this aquatic system.

  5. High-level ab initio potential energy surfaces and vibrational energies of H2CS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yachmenev, Andrey; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Ribeyre, Tristan; Thiel, Walter

    2011-08-01

    Six-dimensional (6D) potential energy surfaces (PESs) of H2CS have been generated ab initio using the recently proposed explicitly correlated (F12) singles and doubles coupled cluster method including a perturbational estimate of connected triple excitations, CCSD(T)-F12b [T. B. Adler, G. Knizia, and H.-J. Werner, J. Chem. Phys. 127, 221106 (2007)] in conjunction with F12-optimized correlation consistent basis sets. Core-electron correlation, high-order correlation, scalar relativistic, and diagonal Born-Oppenheimer terms were included as additive high-level (HL) corrections. The resulting 6D PESs were represented by analytical functions which were used in variational calculations of the vibrational term values below 5000 cm-1. The best PESs obtained with and without the HL corrections, VQZ-F12* HL and VQZ-F12*, reproduce the fundamental vibrational wavenumbers with mean absolute deviations of 1.13 and 1.22 cm-1, respectively. A detailed analysis of the effects of the HL corrections shows how the VQZ-F12 results benefit from error cancellation. The present purely ab initio PESs will be useful as starting points for empirical refinements towards an accurate "spectroscopic" PES of H2CS.

  6. Measurements of liquid surface fluctuations at sub-shot-noise levels with Michelson interferometry.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Takahisa; Aoki, Kenichiro

    2013-04-01

    Surface fluctuation spectra of liquids are measured to unprecedented precision, down to 3 orders of magnitude below the shot-noise level using averaged correlations of interferometry measurements. This allows us to investigate the limits in our current theoretical understanding of these phenomena. The spectrum derived from hydrodynamical considerations agrees well with the observed results for water. However, for oil, deviations are seen at high frequencies (>/~1 MHz), perhaps indicating its more complex underlying physics. The measurements are made possible by dualizing the Michelson interferometry measurements and employing the averaged correlation of signals, in which the shot noise is statistically reduced. The method works in the presence of the quantum noise of a coherent state of light. The optical part of the experimental setup is essentially the same as that of Michelson interferometry so that the method can be applied when Michelson interferometry can be used. Furthermore, the measurement method requires a relatively low light power and a short time so that it has a wide range of applicability. PMID:23679425

  7. Semi-Automated Detection of Surface Degradation on Bridges Based on a Level Set Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiero, A.; Guarnieri, A.; Pirotti, F.; Vettore, A.

    2015-08-01

    Due to the effect of climate factors, natural phenomena and human usage, buildings and infrastructures are subject of progressive degradation. The deterioration of these structures has to be monitored in order to avoid hazards for human beings and for the natural environment in their neighborhood. Hence, on the one hand, monitoring such infrastructures is of primarily importance. On the other hand, unfortunately, nowadays this monitoring effort is mostly done by expert and skilled personnel, which follow the overall data acquisition, analysis and result reporting process, making the whole monitoring procedure quite expensive for the public (and private, as well) agencies. This paper proposes the use of a partially user-assisted procedure in order to reduce the monitoring cost and to make the obtained result less subjective as well. The developed method relies on the use of images acquired with standard cameras by even inexperienced personnel. The deterioration on the infrastructure surface is detected by image segmentation based on a level sets method. The results of the semi-automated analysis procedure are remapped on a 3D model of the infrastructure obtained by means of a terrestrial laser scanning acquisition. The proposed method has been successfully tested on a portion of a road bridge in Perarolo di Cadore (BL), Italy.

  8. Measurements of liquid surface fluctuations at sub-shot-noise levels with Michelson interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsui, Takahisa; Aoki, Kenichiro

    2013-04-01

    Surface fluctuation spectra of liquids are measured to unprecedented precision, down to 3 orders of magnitude below the shot-noise level using averaged correlations of interferometry measurements. This allows us to investigate the limits in our current theoretical understanding of these phenomena. The spectrum derived from hydrodynamical considerations agrees well with the observed results for water. However, for oil, deviations are seen at high frequencies (≳1 MHz), perhaps indicating its more complex underlying physics. The measurements are made possible by dualizing the Michelson interferometry measurements and employing the averaged correlation of signals, in which the shot noise is statistically reduced. The method works in the presence of the quantum noise of a coherent state of light. The optical part of the experimental setup is essentially the same as that of Michelson interferometry so that the method can be applied when Michelson interferometry can be used. Furthermore, the measurement method requires a relatively low light power and a short time so that it has a wide range of applicability.

  9. Lake Storage Measurements For Water Resources Management: Combining Remotely Sensed Water Levels and Surface Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brakenridge, G. R.; Birkett, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    Presently operating satellite-based radar altimeters have the ability to monitor variations in surface water height for large lakes and reservoirs, and future sensors will expand observational capabilities to many smaller water bodies. Such remote sensing provides objective, independent information where in situ data are lacking or access is restricted. A USDA/NASA (http://www.pecad.fas.usda.gov/cropexplorer/global_reservoir/) program is performing operational altimetric monitoring of the largest lakes and reservoirs around the world using data from the NASA/CNES, NRL, and ESA missions. Public lake-level products from the Global Reservoir and Lake Monitor (GRLM) are a combination of archived and near real time information. The USDA/FAS utilizes the products for assessing international irrigation potential and for crop production estimates; other end-users study climate trends, observe anthropogenic effects, and/or are are involved in other water resources management and regional water security issues. At the same time, the Dartmouth Flood Observatory (http://floodobservatory.colorado.edu/), its NASA GSFC partners (http://oas.gsfc.nasa.gov/floodmap/home.html), and associated MODIS data and automated processing algorithms are providing public access to a growing GIS record of the Earth's changing surface water extent, including changes related to floods and droughts. The Observatory's web site also provide both archival and near real time information, and is based mainly on the highest spatial resolution (250 m) MODIS bands. Therefore, it is now possible to provide on an international basis reservoir and lake storage change measurements entirely from remote sensing, on a frequently updating basis. The volume change values are based on standard numerical procedures used for many decades for analysis of coeval lake area and height data. We provide first results of this combination, including prototype displays for public access and data retrieval of water storage

  10. Measurement of Ambient Ammonia and Surface-level Meteorological Forcing Variables near an Agricultural Emission Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myles, L.; Heuer, M. W.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric ammonia (NH3) is a reduced form of reactive nitrogen that is primarily emitted from agricultural activities. NH3 volatilizes from animal waste and fertilized land directly into the atmosphere where it can either react with other gases to form fine particulate matter or deposit on surfaces through air-surface exchange processes. Field measurements in different ecosystems and under various conditions are necessary to improve the understanding of the complex relationships between ambient NH3 and meteorological parameters, such as temperature and relative humidity, which influence volatilization rates and ultimately, ambient concentrations near emission sources. However, the measurement of ambient NH3 is challenging. NH3 is hydroscopic and reactive, and measurement techniques are subject to errors caused by sampling artifacts and other interferences. Recent advancements have led to improved techniques that allow real-time measurement of ambient NH3. A cavity ring-down spectrometer was deployed at a cattle research facility in Knoxville, TN during spring 2012 to measure ambient NH3, and meteorological instrumentation was collocated to measure 3-D winds, temperature, relative humidity, precipitation and other parameters (z = 2 m). The study site was rolling pasture typical of the eastern Tennessee Valley and included two large barns and approximately 30-40 cattle. Daytime ambient NH3 averaged 15-20 ppb most days with lows of approximately 7 ppb at night. Higher concentrations (greater than 50 ppb) seemed to correlate with higher temperatures (greater than 27 C), although the data are not consistent. Several instances of 100 ppb concentrations were measured when temperatures were high and winds were from the direction of the barns. Overall, the study shows that ambient NH3 levels near agricultural emission sources may vary greatly with time and a variety of factors, including meteorological conditions. The data support the need for real-time measurements of NH

  11. Pesticide levels in surface waters in an agricultural-forestry basin in Southern Chile.

    PubMed

    Palma, Graciela; Sánchez, Alejandra; Olave, Yohana; Encina, Francisco; Palma, Rodrigo; Barra, Ricardo

    2004-11-01

    Residues of five pesticides in surface water were surveyed during 2001 and 2003 in the Traiguen river basin in Southern Chile. Simazine, hexazinone, 2,4-D, picloram herbicides and carbendazim fungicide were selected through a pesticide risk classification index. Six sampling stations along the river were set up based on agricultural and forestry land use. The water sampling was carried out before and after the pesticide application periods and in correspondence to some rain events. Pesticides were analyzed by HPLC with DAD detection in a multiresidue analysis. During 2001, in the first sampling campaign (March), the highest concentrations of pesticides were 3.0 microg l(-1) for simazine and hexazinone and 1.8 microg l(-1) for carbendazim. In the second sampling (September), the highest concentration were 9.7 microg l(-1) for 2,4-D, 0.3 microg l(-1) for picloram and 0.4 microg l(-1) for carbendazim. In the last sampling period (December), samples indicated contamination with carbendazim fungicide at levels of up to 1.2 microg l(-1). In sampling carried out on May 2003, no pesticides were detected. In October 2003, the highest concentrations of pesticides were 4.5 microg l(-1) for carbendazim and 2.9 microg l(-1) for 2,4-D. Data are discussed in function of land use and application periods of the products, showing a clear seasonal pattern pollution in the Traiguen river. Risk assessment for these pesticides was calculated by using a risk quotient (RQ = PNEC/PEC). For picloram the calculated RQ < was 0, which indicates that no adverse effects may occur due to the exposure to this herbicide in the Traiguen river basin. For 2,4-D, simazine, hexazinone, carbendazim RQ > 1, meaning that adverse effects could occur and it is necessary to reduce pesticide exposure in surface waters. It is recommended to continue with a pesticide monitoring program and the implementation of ecotoxicological testing with local and standardized species in order to consider the probability of

  12. Tectonic and climatic significance of a late Eocene low-relief, high-level geomorphic surface, Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Kathryn M.; Chase, Clement G

    1994-01-01

    New paleobotanical data suggest that in the late Eocene the erosion surface which capped the Front Range, Colorado was 2.2-2.3 km in elevation, which is similar to the 2.5-km present elevation of surface remnants. This estimated elevation casts doubt on the conventional belief that the low-relief geomorphic surface was formed by lateral planation of streams to a base level not much higher than sea level and that the present deeply incised canyons must represent Neogene uplift of Colorado. Description of the surface, calculations of sediment volume, and isostatic balance and fluvial landsculpting models demonstrate that while the high elevation of the erosion surface was due to tectonic forces, its smoothness was mostly a result of climatic factors. A sediment balance calculated for the Front Range suggests that from 2 to 4 km of material were eroded by the late Eocene, consistent with fission track ages. This amount of erosion would remove a significant portionof the 7 km of Laramide upper crustal thickening. Isostatic modeling implies that the 2.2-3.3 km elevation was most likely created by lower crustal thickening during the Laramide. A numerical model of fluvial erosion and deposition suggests a way that a late Eocene surface could have formed at this high elevation without incision. A humid climate with a preponderance of small storm events will diffusively smooth topography and is a possible mechanism for formation oflow-relief, high-level surfaces. Paleoclimate models suggest a lack of large strom events in the late Eocene because of cool sea surface temperatures in the equatorial region. Return to a drier but stormier climate post-Eocene could have caused the incision of the surface by young canyons. By this interpretation, regional erosion surfaces may represent regional climatic rather than tectonic conditions.

  13. cGMP decreases surface NKCC2 levels in the thick ascending limb: role of phosphodiesterase 2 (PDE2)

    PubMed Central

    Ares, Gustavo R.; Caceres, Paulo; Alvarez-Leefmans, Francisco J.; Ortiz, Pablo A.

    2008-01-01

    NaCl absorption in the medullary thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle (THAL) is mediated by the apical Na/K/2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2). Hormones that increase cGMP, such as nitric oxide (NO) and natriuretic peptides, decrease NaCl absorption by the THAL. However, the mechanism by which cGMP decreases NaCl absorption in THALs is not known. We hypothesized that cGMP decreases surface NKCC2 levels in the THAL. We used surface biotinylation to measure surface NKCC2 levels in rat THAL suspensions. We tested the effect of the membrane-permeant cGMP analog dibutyryl-cGMP (db-cGMP) on surface NKCC2 levels. Incubating THALs with db-cGMP for 20 min decreased surface NKCC2 levels in a concentration-dependent manner (basal = 100%; db-cGMP 100 μM = 77 ± 7%; 500 μM = 54 ± 10% and 1,000 μM = 61 ± 8%). A different cGMP analog 8-bromo-cGMP (8-Br-cGMP) also decreased surface NKCC2 levels by 25%, (basal = 100%; 8-Br-cGMP = 75 ± 5%). Incubation of isolated, perfused THALs with db-cGMP decreased apical surface NKCC2 labeling levels as measured by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. cGMP-stimulated phosphodiesterase 2 (PDE2) mediates the inhibitory effect of NO on NaCl absorption by THALs. Thus we examined the role of PDE2 and found that PDE2 inhibitors blocked the effect of db-cGMP on surface NKCC2. Also, a nonstimulatory concentration of db-cAMP blocked the cGMP-induced decrease in surface NKCC2. Finally, db-cGMP inhibited THAL net Cl absorption by 48 ± 4%, and this effect was completely blocked by PDE2 inhibition. We conclude that cGMP decreases NKCC2 levels in the apical membrane of THALs and that this effect is mediated by PDE2. This is an important mechanism by which cGMP inhibits NaCl absorption by the THAL. PMID:18684888

  14. Pronounced Surface Band Bending of Thin-Film Silicon Revealed by Modeling Core Levels Probed with Hard X-rays.

    PubMed

    Wippler, David; Wilks, Regan G; Pieters, Bart E; van Albada, Sacha J; Gerlach, Dominic; Hüpkes, Jürgen; Bär, Marcus; Rau, Uwe

    2016-07-13

    Enhancing the probing depth of photoemission studies by using hard X-rays allows the investigation of buried interfaces of real-world device structures. However, it also requires the consideration of photoelectron-signal attenuation when evaluating surface effects. Here, we employ a computational model incorporating surface band bending and exponential photoelectron-signal attenuation to model depth-dependent spectral changes of Si 1s and Si 2s core level lines. The data were acquired from hydrogenated boron-doped microcrystalline thin-film silicon, which is applied in silicon-based solar cells. The core level spectra, measured by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy using different excitation energies, reveal the presence of a 0.29 nm thick surface oxide layer. In the silicon film a downward surface band bending of eVbb = -0.65 eV over ∼6 nm obtained via inverse modeling explains the observed core level shifts and line broadening. Moreover, the computational model allows the extraction of the "real" Si 1s and Si 2s bulk core level binding energies as 1839.13 and 150.39 eV, and their natural Lorentzian line widths as 496 and 859 meV, respectively. These values significantly differ from those directly extracted from the measured spectra. Because band bending usually occurs at material surfaces we highly recommend the detailed consideration of signal integration over depth for quantitative statements from depth-dependent measurements. PMID:27294978

  15. Potentiometric surface, 2013, and water-level differences, 1991-2013, of the Carrizo-Wilcox aquifer in northwest Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fendick, Robert B., Jr.; Carter, Kayla

    2015-01-01

    This report presents data and maps that illustrate the potentiometric surface of the Carrizo-Wilcox aquifer during March–May 2013 and water-level differences from 1991 to 2013. The potentiometric surface map can be used for determining the direction of groundwater flow, hydraulic gradients, and effects of withdrawals on the groundwater resource. The rate of groundwater movement also can be estimated from the gradient when the hydraulic conductivity is applied. Water-level data collected for this study are stored in the USGS National Water Information System (NWIS) (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis) and are on file at the USGS office in Baton Rouge, La.

  16. Mathematical Estimation of the Level of Microbial Contamination on Spacecraft Surfaces by Volumetric Air Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Oxborrow, G. S.; Roark, A. L.; Fields, N. D.; Puleo, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Microbiological sampling methods presently used for enumeration of microorganisms on spacecraft surfaces require contact with easily damaged components. Estimation of viable particles on surfaces using air sampling methods in conjunction with a mathematical model would be desirable. Parameters necessary for the mathematical model are the effect of angled surfaces on viable particle collection and the number of viable cells per viable particle. Deposition of viable particles on angled surfaces closely followed a cosine function, and the number of viable cells per viable particle was consistent with a Poisson distribution. Other parameters considered by the mathematical model included deposition rate and fractional removal per unit time. A close nonlinear correlation between volumetric air sampling and airborne fallout on surfaces was established with all fallout data points falling within the 95% confidence limits as determined by the mathematical model. PMID:4151118

  17. Mathematical estimation of the level of microbial contamination on spacecraft surfaces by volumetric air sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oxborrow, G. S.; Roark, A. L.; Fields, N. D.; Puleo, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Microbiological sampling methods presently used for enumeration of microorganisms on spacecraft surfaces require contact with easily damaged components. Estimation of viable particles on surfaces using air sampling methods in conjunction with a mathematical model would be desirable. Parameters necessary for the mathematical model are the effect of angled surfaces on viable particle collection and the number of viable cells per viable particle. Deposition of viable particles on angled surfaces closely followed a cosine function, and the number of viable cells per viable particle was consistent with a Poisson distribution. Other parameters considered by the mathematical model included deposition rate and fractional removal per unit time. A close nonlinear correlation between volumetric air sampling and airborne fallout on surfaces was established with all fallout data points falling within the 95% confidence limits as determined by the mathematical model.

  18. In-situ surface wettability parameters of submerged in brackish water surfaces derived from captive bubble contact angle studies as indicators of surface condition level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorzelski, S. J.; Mazurek, A. Z.; Szczepanska, A.

    2013-06-01

    The characterization of wetting properties (by contact angles) of several undersea artificial (glass plates,) and natural (stones, sand layers, soft-bottom structures, aquatic macrophytes, sediments, and seafloor communities) solid substrata in the Baltic Sea brackish water (Gulf of Gdansk). The studies were performed under laboratory and field conditions using a novel captive bubble air-pipette computer microscope system. A set of the surface wettability parameters: the apparent surface free energy γSV, adhesive layer film pressure Π, work of adhesion WA, and work of spreading WS were determined to quantify the wetting properties of model substrata using the contact angle hysteresis (CAH) approach. The useful technique to measure in situ the contact angle giving reproducible and accurate values of CA turned out to be a captive bubble method, for fully hydrated interfacial layers of highly hydrophilic and porous nature met at seabed (Rodrigues-Valverde et al., 2002). CA measurements revealed mostly hydrophilic nature of the studied solid material (CA < 90°) where the presence of adsorbed organic matter layer or crude oil film covering lead to surface hydrophobization (CA↑, γSV ↓,WA↓, WS more negative). The adhesion of biofouling was correlated both with CAH and the dispersive interaction term γSVd of the total γSV. Monitoring of the artificial substrata of the hydrophilic nature with a CA technique can be used to observe the development of the organisms community i.e., microfouling, and to carry out a comprehensive study of surfaces of the submerged macrophytes (Potamogeton lucens in particular). Since aquatic macrophytes can act as bio-indicators of water chemistry their surface wettability may reflect plant surface erosion and organic matter accumulation state being of particular value in biological assessment of ecosystems status.

  19. Chemical Environment at Waste Package Surfaces in a High-Level Radioactive Waste Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, S; Alai, M; Craig, L; Gdowski, G; Hailey, P; Nguyen, Q A; Rard, J; Staggs, K; Sutton, M; Wolery, T

    2005-05-26

    We have conducted a series of deliquescence, boiling point, chemical transformation, and evaporation experiments to determine the composition of waters likely to contact waste package surfaces over the thermal history of the repository as it heats up and cools back down to ambient conditions. In the above-boiling period, brines will be characterized by high nitrate to chloride ratios that are stable to higher temperatures than previously predicted. This is clearly shown for the NaCl-KNO{sub 3} salt system in the deliquescence and boiling point experiments in this report. Our results show that additional thermodynamic data are needed in nitrate systems to accurately predict brine stability and composition due to salt deliquescence in dust deposited on waste package surfaces. Current YMP models capture dry-out conditions but not composition for NaCl-KNO{sub 3} brines, and they fail to predict dry-out conditions for NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} brines. Boiling point and deliquescence experiments are needed in NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} and NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3}-Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} systems to directly determine dry-out conditions and composition, because these salt mixtures are also predicted to control brine composition in the above-boiling period. Corrosion experiments are needed in high temperature and high NO{sub 3}:Cl brines to determine if nitrate inhibits corrosion in these concentrated brines at temperatures above 160 C. Chemical transformations appear to be important for pure calcium- and magnesium-chloride brines at temperatures greater than 120 C. This stems from a lack of acid gas volatility in NaCl/KNO{sub 3} based brines and by slow CO{sub 2}(g) diffusion in alkaline brines. This suggests that YMP corrosion models based on bulk solution experiments over the appropriate composition, temperature, and relative humidity range can be used to predict corrosion in thin brine films formed by salt deliquescence. In contrast to the above-boiling period, the

  20. Monitoring of ppm level humic acid in surface water using ZnO-chitosan nano-composite as fluorescence probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basumallick, Srijita; Santra, Swadeshmukul

    2015-05-01

    Surface water contains natural pollutants humic acid (HA) and fulvic acid at ppm level which form carcinogenic chloro-compounds during chlorination in water treatment plants. We report here synthesis of ZnO-chitosan (CS) nano-composites by simple hydrothermal technique and examined their application potential as fluorescent probe for monitoring ppm level HA. These ZnO-CS composites have been characterized by HRTEM, EDX, FTIR, AFM and Fluorescence Spectra. HRTEM images show the formation of ZnO-CS nano-composites of average diameter of 50-250 nm. Aqueous dispersions of these nano-composites show fluorescence emission at 395 nm when excited at 300 nm which is strongly quenched by ppm level HA indicating their possible use in monitoring ppm level HA present in surface water.

  1. Effect of metal surface characteristics on the adhesion performance of the integrated low-level energies method of adhesion.

    PubMed

    Aodai, Toshiyuki; Masuzawa, Toru; Ozeki, Kazuhide; Kishida, Akio; Higami, Tetsuya

    2012-12-01

    We have previously proposed a new method of adhesion using the integrated low-level energy sources heat, vibration, and pressure. This adhesion method can be used to attach biological tissue to a metal object. Effects of surface roughness and energy of the metal subject on adhesion performance were studied by using commercially pure titanium (cpTi) and stainless steel (SUS304). Surface roughness and energy were changed by sandblast treatment and heat treatment, respectively. A porcine aorta was adhered to sandblast-treated SUS304 by use of an adhesion temperature of 80 °C, a vibration amplitude of 15 μm, a pressure of 2.5 MPa, an adhesion time of 120 s, and a surface roughness of an Ra 0.25 μm. The shear tensile strength of the adhesion was 0.45 MPa. The adhesion performance was improved by roughening the surface of the metal specimen. Surface energy has an insignificant effect on adhesive strength. The adhesion performance varied depending on metal material for the same surface roughness, Ra, and energy. Results from analysis of the surface roughness profile suggested that the size of surface asperity has an effect on adhesion performance. PMID:22933053

  2. Potential dose distributions at proposed surface radioactvity clearance levels resulting from occupational scenarios.

    SciTech Connect

    Kamboj, S.; Yu, C.; Rabovsky, J.

    2011-08-02

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the potential dose distribution resulting from surface radioactivity, using occupational radiation exposure scenarios. The surface radioactivity clearance values considered in this analysis may ultimately replace those currently specified in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements and guidance for radiological protection of workers, the public and the environment. The surface contamination values apply to radioactive contamination deposited on a surface (i.e., not incorporated into the interior of the material). For these calculations, the dose coefficients for intake of radionuclides were taken from ICRP Publication 68 (ICRP 1994), and external exposure dose coefficients were taken from the compact disc (CD) that accompanied Federal Guidance Report (FGR) 13 (Eckerman et al. 1999). The ICRP Publication 68 dose coefficients were based on ICRP Publication 60 (ICRP 1990) and were used specifically for worker dose calculations. The calculated dose in this analysis is the 'effective dose' (ED), rather than the 'effective dose equivalent' (EDE).

  3. Limiting Factors for Satellite-Based Retrievals of Surface-Level Carbon Monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Alonso, S.; Deeter, M. N.; Worden, H. M.; Barré, J.

    2015-12-01

    CO is mostly produced in the lower troposphere by incomplete combustion of biomass and fuels. CO oxidation consumes ~75% of the tropospheric OH, which then is not available to remove CH4 and other greenhouse gases. CO oxidation also leads to the production of tropospheric O3. These critical impacts of CO on air quality and climate require accurate determination of the abundance and evolution of CO near the surface.Satellite retrievals would be well-suited to monitor surface CO globally. However, how do they compare to actual surface abundances? Some aspects to be considered include: the vertical sensitivity of retrievals (given by the averaging kernels), or how thick are the atmospheric layers that can be resolved; the vertical correlation length of CO with respect to the thickness of those layers; and the horizontal variability of CO with respect to the instrument's footprint.To investigate these questions we analyze MOPITT retrievals, DISCOVER-AQ and NOAA profiles, as well as WDCGG surface measurements. MOPITT, on board NASA's Terra satellite, has been measuring tropospheric CO since 2000, providing the longest global CO record to date. Its unique multispectral CO product offers enhanced sensitivity to CO near the surface. Vertical profiles of the lower troposphere were acquired during the DISCOVER-AQ airborne campaigns over selected regions of the USA. NOAA's airborne flask sampling program results in a multi-year, multi-seasonal record of vertical profiles from near the surface up to the mid troposphere, acquired over a number of stations, mostly in North America. Long-term, cross-calibrated surface CO data from ground stations worldwide are available through the WDCGG.Statistical analyses of the DISCOVER-AQ and NOAA profiles indicate that surface vertical correlation length varies greatly depending on geographic location. This may explain contrasting results obtained for different ground stations when comparing MOPITT and WDCGG co-located data and timeseries.

  4. Comparison of geographical trend patterns in sea level and sea surface temperature in the Pacific Ocean during 1993-2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanisamy, Hindumathi; Cazenave, Anny; Delcroix, Thierry; Meyssignac, Benoit; Balmaseda, Magdalena; Merchant, Christopher

    2013-04-01

    It is now well established that geographical trend patterns in satellite altimetry-based sea level are mostly caused by non uniform steric trend patterns, the largest contribution being due to the thermosteric component. In the Pacific Ocean, the observed sea level trend pattern over 1993-2011 results from a superposition two types of signals: (1) a strong positive trend V-shaped anomaly located 120°E and 160° E in longitude and ~20°S-20°N in latitude and (2) another V-shaped anomaly of much broader scale -extending to mid-latitudes in the central Pacific-, quite similar to the dominant large-scale trend pattern observed in sea surface temperature (SST). Previous studies have shown that the type (1) signal is related to El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The type (2) signal reflects the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), the dominant component of large-scale SST variability in the Pacific. In this study, we analyze altimetry-based sea level, steric sea level and SST over the 1993-2011 time span to discriminate between the near surface and deeper thermosteric contributions to sea level. The sea level and SST data are based on the recently available products from the ESA Climate Change Initiative project and several other products like HadiSST, ERAINTERIM. Steric data are based on an updated version of the Ishii and Kimoto (2009) data. We compute the thermosteric contribution to sea level in different layers from the surface to the 700 m depth, and through correlation and Empirical Orthogonal Function analyses, explore the spatio-temporal coherence between the three variables (sea level, depth-dependent steric sea level and SST).

  5. Correlating the Local Defect-Level Density with the Macroscopic Composition and Energetics of Chalcopyrite Thin-Film Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bröker, Sebastian; Kück, Dennis; Timmer, Alexander; Lauermann, Iver; Ümsür, Bünyamin; Greiner, Dieter; Kaufmann, Christian A; Mönig, Harry

    2015-06-17

    The unusual defect chemistry of polycrystalline Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) thin films is a main issue for a profound understanding of recombination losses in chalcopyrite thin-film solar cells. Especially, impurity-driven passivation of electronic levels due to point defects segregating at the surface and at grain boundaries is extensively debated. By combining current imaging tunneling spectroscopy with photoelectron spectroscopy, the local defect-level density and unusual optoelectronic grain-boundary properties of this material are correlated with the macroscopic energy levels and surface composition. Vacuum annealing of different CIGSe materials provides evidence that Na diffusion from the glass substrate does not affect the surface defect passivation or grain-boundary properties of standard Cu-poor materials. Furthermore, we find no major impact on the observed thermally activated dipole compensation or the accompanying change in surface band bending (up to 0.6 eV) due to Na. In contrast, Cu-rich CIGSe shows an opposing surface defect chemistry with only minor heat-induced band bending. Our results lead to a comprehensive picture, where the highly desirable type inversion at the p/n interface in standard chalcopyrite thin-film solar cells is dominated by band bending within the CIGSe absorber rather than the result of Na impurities or an n-type defect phase segregating at the interface. This is in accordance with recent studies suggesting a surface reconstruction as the origin for Cu depletion and band-gap widening at the surface of chalcopyrite thin films. PMID:26010380

  6. GSOD Based Daily Global Mean Surface Temperature and Mean Sea Level Air Pressure (1982-2011)

    SciTech Connect

    Xuan Shi, Dali Wang

    2014-05-05

    This data product contains all the gridded data set at 1/4 degree resolution in ASCII format. Both mean temperature and mean sea level air pressure data are available. It also contains the GSOD data (1982-2011) from NOAA site, contains station number, location, temperature and pressures (sea level and station level). The data package also contains information related to the data processing methods

  7. Surface core-level shifts of GaAs(100)(2×4) from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punkkinen, M. P. J.; Laukkanen, P.; Kokko, K.; Ropo, M.; Ahola-Tuomi, M.; Väyrynen, I. J.; Komsa, H.-P.; Rantala, T. T.; Pessa, M.; Kuzmin, M.; Vitos, L.; Kollár, J.; Johansson, B.

    2007-09-01

    First-principles calculations show that measured surface core-level shifts (SCLSs) of the GaAs(100)(2×4) surfaces can be described within the initial state effects. The calculated As3d and Ga3d SCLSs for the β2 and α2 reconstructions of the GaAs(100)(2×4) surfaces are in reasonable agreement with recent measurements. In particular, the results confirm that both the lower and the higher binding energy SCLSs, relative to the bulk emission in the As3d photoelectron spectra, are intrinsic properties of the GaAs(100)(2×4) surfaces. The most positive and most negative As shifts are attributed to the third layer As atoms, which differs from the previous intuitive suggestions. In general, calculations show that significant SCLSs arise from deep layers, and that there are more than two SCLSs. Our previously measured As3d spectra are fitted afresh using the calculated SCLSs. The intensity ratios of the SCLSs, obtained from the fits, show that as the heating temperature of the GaAs(100)(2×4) surface is increased gradually, the area of the α2 reconstruction increases on the surface, but the β2 phase remains within the whole temperature range, in agreement with previous experimental findings. Our results show that the combination of the experimental and theoretical results is a prerequisite for the accurate analysis of the SCLSs of the complex reconstructed surfaces.

  8. Low level ozone exposure induces airways inflammation and modifies cell surface phenotypes in healthy humans

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The effects of low level ozone exposure (0.08 ppm) on pulmonary function in healthy young adults are well known, however much less is known about the inflammatory and immuno-modulatory effects oflow level ozone in the airways. Techniques such as induced sputum and flo...

  9. A method for reducing the level of spurious signals in surface acoustic wave filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodii, Iu. N.; Grankin, I. M.; Zapunnyi, A. P.; Kolomeiko, A. V.

    1986-03-01

    A method for reducing spurious signals in surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters is proposed whereby both bulk and reflected wave signals are attenuated by electrodes of special configuration providing synphase addition of the useful signal and nonsynphase addition of spurious signal components. The electrodes of the input and output converters are made with a common focus point and equal angular apertures. The shape of the electrodes of the focusing converters on anisotropic crystal surfaces is determined by the corresponding SAW group velocity curve. An implementation of the method proposed here is examined together with some test results.

  10. Horizontal and Vertical Surface Displacements in the Upper Rhine Graben Derived from GNSS and Precise Levelling Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, T.; Knöpfler, A.; Masson, F.; Mayer, M.; Ulrich, P.; Westerhaus, M.; Zippelt, K.; Heck, B.

    2012-04-01

    At the Geodetic Institute, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, the Upper Rhine Graben (URG) area is investigated using various geodetic techniques. The recent objective is to gain detailed insight in the horizontal and vertical velocity field of the URG from GNSS and levelling data. In addition, it is planned to integrate InSAR data and to rigorously merge the three geodetic measurement techniques into a combined 3D displacement solution. For the GNSS part, a transnational network called GURN (GNSS Upper Rhine Graben Network) was established in 2008 in close cooperation with the Institute de Physique du Globe de Strasbourg (France). GURN actually consist of more than 80 permanently operating GNSS sites of Germany, France and Switzerland. A continuous database is existing since 2002. The analysis strategy for the determination of horizontal and vertical displacement rates and first results from up to 10 years long GNSS time series will be presented. Besides GNSS, the analysis of precise levelling data enables an accurate determination of vertical displacement rates at levelling benchmarks, if repeated measurements at identical benchmarks are available. The levelling measurements in the URG area were carried out by the ordnance survey of Germany, France and Switzerland along levelling lines. These levelling lines were measured up to five times within the last 100 years. Therefore, at discrete benchmarks a detailed assessment of surface displacements could be carried out. The presentation will compare the results of the two geodetic measurement techniques applied within the research activities in the URG area. As levelling and GNSS are point-wise measurement techniques, the spatial resolution of estimated surface displacements is poor. Therefore, InSAR data is used to fill the gap in the future. A short outlook will point out possibilities and limitations on the combination of GNSS, levelling, and InSAR data for an accurate solution aiming for horizontal and vertical

  11. The SMAP level 4 surface and root zone soil moisture data assimilation product

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is scheduled for launch in January 2015 and will provide L-band radar and radiometer observations that are sensitive to surface soil moisture (in the top few centimeters of the soil column). For several of the key applications targeted by SMAP, ho...

  12. TEMPORAL VARIATION IN PESTICIDE LEVELS IN SURFACE WATERS OF THE SOUTHERN NEVADA, CALIFORNIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    We sampled surface waters in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks in the Sierra Nevada of California from mid June to mid October 2003. Two pesticides found commonly in previous studies of pesticides in Sierra Nevada waters, chlorpyrifos and diazinon, were found only rarely.

  13. The SMAP Level 4 surface and root-zone soil moisture product

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Slated for launch in 2015, the NASA Soil Moisture Active/Passive mission represents a generational advance in our ability to globally observe time and space variations in surface soil moisture fields. The SMAP mission concept is based on the integrated use of L-band active radar and passive radiome...

  14. Program plan for evaluation and remediation of the generation and release of flammable gases in Hanford Site waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.D.

    1991-08-01

    This program plan describes the activities being conducted for the resolution of the flammable gas problem that is associated with 23 high-level waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The classification of the wastes in all of these tanks is not final and some wastes may not be high-level wastes. However, until the characterization and classification is complete, all the tanks are treated as if they contain high-level waste. Of the 23 tanks, Tank 241-SY-101 (referred to as Tank 101-SY) has exhibited significant episodic releases of flammable gases (hydrogen and nitrous oxide) for the past 10 years. The major near-term focus of this program is for the understanding and stabilization of this tank. An understanding of the mechanism for gas generation and the processes for the episodic release will be obtained through sampling of the tank contents, laboratory studies, and modeling of the tank behavior. Additional information will be obtained through new and upgraded instrumentation for the tank. A number of remediation, or stabilization, concepts will be evaluated for near-term (2 to 3 years) applications to Tank 101-SY. Detailed safety assessments are required for all activities that will occur in the tank (sampling, removal of equipment, and addition of new instruments). This program plan presents a discussion of each task, provides schedules for near-term activities, and gives a summary of the expected work for fiscal years 1991, 1992, and 1993. 16 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs.

  15. Optimization of meat level and processing conditions for development of chicken meat noodles using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Khare, Anshul Kumar; Biswas, Asim Kumar; Balasubramanium, S; Chatli, Manish Kumar; Sahoo, Jhari

    2015-06-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) is a mathematical and statistical technique for testing multiple process variables and their interactive, linear and quadratic effects, and useful in solving multivariable equations obtained from experiments simultaneously. In present study optimum meat level and processing conditions for development of shelf stable chicken meat noodles was determined using central composite design of response surface methodology (RSM). Effects of meat level (110-130 g); processing conditions such as steaming time (12-18 min) and drying time (7-9 h) on the water activity, yield, water absorption index, water solubility index, hardness, overall acceptability and total colour change of chicken noodles were investigated. The aim of present study was to optimize meat level and processing conditions for development of chicken noodles. The coefficients of determination, R(2) of all the response variables were higher than 0.8. Based on the response surface and superimposed plots, the optimum conditions such as 60 % meat level, 12 min steaming time and 9 h drying time for development of chicken noodles with desired sensory quality was obtained. PMID:26028756

  16. A new accurate ground-state potential energy surface of ethylene and predictions for rotational and vibrational energy levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delahaye, Thibault; Nikitin, Andrei; Rey, Michaël; Szalay, Péter G.; Tyuterev, Vladimir G.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we report a new ground state potential energy surface for ethylene (ethene) C2H4 obtained from extended ab initio calculations. The coupled-cluster approach with the perturbative inclusion of the connected triple excitations CCSD(T) and correlation consistent polarized valence basis set cc-pVQZ was employed for computations of electronic ground state energies. The fit of the surface included 82 542 nuclear configurations using sixth order expansion in curvilinear symmetry-adapted coordinates involving 2236 parameters. A good convergence for variationally computed vibrational levels of the C2H4 molecule was obtained with a RMS(Obs.-Calc.) deviation of 2.7 cm-1 for fundamental bands centers and 5.9 cm-1 for vibrational bands up to 7800 cm-1. Large scale vibrational and rotational calculations for 12C2H4, 13C2H4, and 12C2D4 isotopologues were performed using this new surface. Energy levels for J = 20 up to 6000 cm-1 are in a good agreement with observations. This represents a considerable improvement with respect to available global predictions of vibrational levels of 13C2H4 and 12C2D4 and rovibrational levels of 12C2H4.

  17. Elevated levels of diesel range organic compounds in groundwater near Marcellus gas operations are derived from surface activities.

    PubMed

    Drollette, Brian D; Hoelzer, Kathrin; Warner, Nathaniel R; Darrah, Thomas H; Karatum, Osman; O'Connor, Megan P; Nelson, Robert K; Fernandez, Loretta A; Reddy, Christopher M; Vengosh, Avner; Jackson, Robert B; Elsner, Martin; Plata, Desiree L

    2015-10-27

    Hundreds of organic chemicals are used during natural gas extraction via high-volume hydraulic fracturing (HVHF). However, it is unclear whether these chemicals, injected into deep shale horizons, reach shallow groundwater aquifers and affect local water quality, either from those deep HVHF injection sites or from the surface or shallow subsurface. Here, we report detectable levels of organic compounds in shallow groundwater samples from private residential wells overlying the Marcellus Shale in northeastern Pennsylvania. Analyses of purgeable and extractable organic compounds from 64 groundwater samples revealed trace levels of volatile organic compounds, well below the Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contaminant levels, and low levels of both gasoline range (0-8 ppb) and diesel range organic compounds (DRO; 0-157 ppb). A compound-specific analysis revealed the presence of bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, which is a disclosed HVHF additive, that was notably absent in a representative geogenic water sample and field blanks. Pairing these analyses with (i) inorganic chemical fingerprinting of deep saline groundwater, (ii) characteristic noble gas isotopes, and (iii) spatial relationships between active shale gas extraction wells and wells with disclosed environmental health and safety violations, we differentiate between a chemical signature associated with naturally occurring saline groundwater and one associated with alternative anthropogenic routes from the surface (e.g., accidental spills or leaks). The data support a transport mechanism of DRO to groundwater via accidental release of fracturing fluid chemicals derived from the surface rather than subsurface flow of these fluids from the underlying shale formation. PMID:26460018

  18. Dynamic factor modeling of ground and surface water levels in an agricultural area adjacent to Everglades National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, A.; Muñoz-Carpena, R.

    2006-02-01

    The extensive eastern boundary of Everglades National Park (ENP) in south Florida (USA) is subject to one the most expensive and ambitious environmental restoration projects in history. Understanding and predicting the interaction between the shallow aquifer and surface water is a key component for fine-tuning the process. The Frog Pond is an intensively instrumented agricultural 2023 ha area adjacent to ENP. The interactions among 21 multivariate daily time series (ground and surface water elevations, rainfall and evapotranspiration) available from this area were studied by means of dynamic factor analysis, a novel technique in the field of hydrology. This method is designed to determine latent or background effects governing variability or fluctuations in non-stationary time series. Water levels in 16 wells and two drainage ditch locations inside the area were selected as response variables, and canal levels and net recharge as explanatory variables. Elevations in the two canals delimiting the Frog Pond area were found to be the main factors explaining the response variables. This influence of canal elevations on water levels inside the area was complementary and inversely related to the distance between the observation point and each canal. Rainfall events do not affect daily water levels significantly but are responsible for instantaneous or localized groundwater responses that in some cases can be directly associated with the risk of flooding. This close coupling between surface and groundwater levels, that corroborates that found by other authors using different methods, could hinder on-going environmental restoration efforts in the area by bypassing the function of wetlands and other surface features. An empirical model with a reduced set of parameters was successfully developed and validated in the area by interpolating the results from the dynamic factor analysis across the spatial domain (coefficient of efficiency across the domain: 0.66-0.99). Although

  19. Unambiguous distinction between diffusion length and surface recombination velocity of solar cells at different excitation levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawer, P.; Rochel, M.; Wagemann, H.-G.

    1999-06-01

    In this work we present a conclusive separation of bulk and surface recombination properties of solar cells. For this purpose, bifacial silicon solar cells were fabricated. The backside differential spectral response of the cells has been measured in the presence of bias light, both with and without backside passivation by means of corona charging on top of a thermal oxide. Employing the common one-dimensional Shockley model, the measurement curves have been simulated. This enables the base diffusion length to be distinguished from the backside surface recombination velocity. As such, their values have been determined individually. Repeating this procedure for different intensities of bias light has yielded the nonlinear behavior of the recombination mechanisms. By applying the Schockley-Read-Hall recombination theory, it was deduced that Fe interstitials presumably are the predominant bulk recombination centers.

  20. Levels of dissolved zinc and cadmium in some surface waters of western Nigeria

    SciTech Connect

    Fatoki, O.S.

    1993-12-31

    Dissolved zinc and cadmium in some surface waters of Western Nigeria were separated and quantified using anion exchange of their chloro-complexes and detected by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Concentrations of zinc and cadmium found in tested water samples ranged from 0.99 to 2.97 mg L{sup {minus}1} and 0.13 to 0.17 mg L{sup {minus}1}, respectively. 35 refs., 2 tabs.

  1. Importance of High-Resolution LiDAR Data in Modeling Runoff Levels Over Impervious Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melosh, C.; Rao, M.

    2013-12-01

    Directly connected impervious areas collect and deliver unfiltered runoff to modified and impacted waterways. Modeling water flow over the landscape is an effective method of observing drainage patterns and predicting pollutant and sediment loadings. Improved models applying high-resolution elevation data can identify key areas with high pollutant output. This is a crucial issue in the Lake Tahoe Basin where lakeshore urban development has increased and lake clarity has been declining for years. This study aims to evaluate an integrated LiDAR and GIS-based modeling approach that uses a fine-scaled ground surface and impervious surface connectivity to predict the pollutant load in the Lake Tahoe Basin This study produced a fine-scaled surface model of nine subset catchments in the South Tahoe basin, including areas of low (below 20%), medium (30% to 50%) and high (above 50%) impervious surface cover. Our method integrated LiDAR, multispectral imagery, and GIS data to develop accurate terrain models, hydrologic routing, and directly connected impervious area layers for the Lake Tahoe basin. The high-density ground and object elevation data collected using Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) creates an accurate picture of water flow over the land, and obstacles to the flow such as buildings. High-resolution LiDAR data was obtained from the Round 10 Lake Tahoe Southern Nevada Public Land Management capital program from the year 2010. This data was processed to create a digital elevation model of the ground surface. Land use classification used object height information from the LiDAR cloud, NAIP 4-band images with 1-meter resolution and a normalized difference vegetation index image derived from the NAIP imagery. The US Army Core of Engineers hydrologic modeling system (HEC-HMS) will be used to model runoff. Based on long-term simulations the effect of directly connected impervious area on rainfall-runoff characteristics for the South Lake Tahoe catchments will be

  2. An acceleration of the characteristics by a space-angle two-level method using surface discontinuity factors

    SciTech Connect

    Grassi, G.

    2006-07-01

    We present a non-linear space-angle two-level acceleration scheme for the method of the characteristics (MOC). To the fine level on which the MOC transport calculation is performed, we associate a more coarsely discretized phase space in which a low-order problem is solved as an acceleration step. Cross sections on the coarse level are obtained by a flux-volume homogenisation technique, which entails the non-linearity of the acceleration. Discontinuity factors per surface are introduced as additional degrees of freedom on the coarse level in order to ensure the equivalence of the heterogeneous and the homogenised problem. After each fine transport iteration, a low-order transport problem is iteratively solved on the homogenised grid. The solution of this problem is then used to correct the angular moments of the flux resulting from the previous free transport sweep. Numerical tests for a given benchmark have been performed. Results are discussed. (authors)

  3. Fungal microcolonies on indoor surfaces — an explanation for the base-level fungal spore counts in indoor air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasanen, A.-L.; Heinonen-Tanski, H.; Kalliokoski, P.; Jantunen, M. J.

    In the subarctic winter, fungal spores are found in indoor air even when outdoor spore levels are very low. The results of this study support an explanation that some indoor airborne fungal spores are derived from unnoticeable fungal microcolonies, which may develop on temporarily wet surfaces. Laboratory experiments on Penicillium verrucosum indicated that the fungus germinated on new wallpaper very quickly (about half an hour) under moist conditions. Hyphal growth and sporulation of the fungus on moist wallpaper occured within one day of incubation. In gravity-settling tape samples from occasionally wet surfaces in a suburban home, large spore aggregates, hyphal fragments with some spores and spores in the germination stage were found, indicating fungal growth. These experiments showed that fungal microcolonies can develop within a week on occasionally wet indoor surfaces.

  4. Development of a precision dual level stage system for the dimensional metrology of large range surface topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong-Ahn; Kim, Jae Wan; Eom, Tae Bong; Kang, Chu-Shik

    2007-09-01

    This paper presents the design and fabrication of a precision dual level stage composing a dimensional metrological system for large range surface topography, such as mask patterns for lithography, fine artifacts on a semi-conductor wafer and micro roughness on a large specular surface. The stage was configured as dual level, a fine stage on a coarse stage, to obtain large moving range and high resolution simultaneously. In the design of the coarse stage, we focused on a simple structure with low profile to achieve insensitivity to vibration and high accuracy. Therefore, a high quality flat surface plate was used as the reference plane of the coarse stage's movement, instead of a conventional simple stacking of two long stroke one-axis stages. The surface plate also has a role of metrological frame for very low thermal expansion coefficient and its size is 800 mm × 800 mm. The coarse stage is guided horizontally by a cross structure with two precision straight bars perpendicularly linked and vertically by the surface plate. The sliding pads made of PTFE are used to guarantee the smooth motion of the coarse stage for both horizontal and vertical directions. The fine stage fixed on the coarse stage generates five-axis fine motion, such as two-axis in-plane translation, one-axis in-plane and two-axis out-of-plane rotation. The fine stage is composed of flexure guided structures and actuated by five PZTs. The developed dual level stage can achieve a large range of 200 mm × 200 mm and a nanometric resolution simultaneously. Its movement is monitored and controlled using a five-axis laser interferometer system to be applied to a dimensional metrology having direct meter-traceability.

  5. Effects of DO levels on surface force, cell membrane properties and microbial community dynamics of activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Ma, Si-Jia; Ding, Li-Li; Huang, Hui; Geng, Jin-Ju; Xu, Ke; Zhang, Yan; Ren, Hong-Qiang

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we employ atomic force microscopy (AFM), fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) technique, phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) and MiSeq analysis to study the effects of traditional dissolved oxygen (DO) levels (0.71-1.32mg/L, 2.13-3.02mg/L and 4.31-5.16mg/L) on surface force, cell membrane properties and microbial community dynamics of activated sludge. Results showed that low DO level enhanced the surface force and roughness of activated sludge; the medium DO level decreased cell membrane fluidity by reducing the synthesis of branched fatty acids in the cell membrane; high DO level resulted in the highest protein content in the effluent by EEM scanning. Abundance of Micropruina, Zoogloea and Nakamurella increased and Paracoccus and Rudaea decreased with the increase of DO levels. RDA analysis suggested that saturated fatty acids (SFA), anteiso-fatty acids (AFA) and iso-fatty acids (IFA) were closely related to effluent quality as well as some genera. PMID:27187569

  6. On the role of sea surface temperature gradients in forcing low-level winds and convergence in the tropics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindzen, Richard S.; Nigam, Sumant

    1987-01-01

    The potential contribution of the SST gradient-driven flow to the low-level (p not less than 700 mb) convergence over tropical oceans is determined using a simple one-layer model of the trade cumulus boundary layer wherein surface temperature gradients are mixed vertically (consistent with the ECMWF analyzed data). The influence of the layers above 700 mb is intentionally suppressed. The results of the study demonstrate the importance of taking account of the fact that cumulonimbus convection takes a small but finite time to adjust to low-level convergence. Failure to consider this effect leads to unreasonably large equatorial convergence.

  7. Pharmaceutical residues in tidal surface sediments of three rivers in southeastern China at detectable and measurable levels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongshan S; Yu, Shen; Hong, Youwei W; Lin, Qiaoying Y; Li, Hongbo B

    2013-12-01

    Pharmaceutical compounds were increasingly detected in environmental matrices but little is known whether these compounds would transport to coastal zones via watersheds. Three typical tidal rivers in southeastern China were selected and 15 surface sediment samples (0-10 cm) were collected along a 50-km tidal section of each river. Surface sediment samples were frozen-drying and then extracted for pharmaceutical compounds by an accelerated solvent extraction system. The pharmaceutical compounds in extracts were scanned using a high-performance liquid chromatography/tandern mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). Three hundred and thirty compounds from nine pharmaceutical groups were detected with signal-to-noise above three (detectable level) in the surface sediments, of which 186 compounds were with a signal-to-noise above ten (measurable level). Of all, 291 and 80 compounds were detectable and measurable in all the three rivers, respectively. The Jiulong River showed a high load of pharmaceutical compounds in surface sediment than other two rivers. Of the nine pharmaceutical groups, the antihistamines and detoxification group and anti-infective drug group contributed five dominant compounds in the surface sediments in all the three rivers. Natures of pharmaceutical compounds rather than the sediment properties (pH, EC, and total carbon content) might influence their residues. The incredible number and intensity of pharmaceutical residues were detected in tidal surface sediments of the three rivers indicating that the pharmaceutical contamination should be strongly considered in China. Source identification and eco-toxicity assessment should be taken into account in the future study. Therapeutic medicine managements need to be strictly improved at a watershed scale to reduce loads of pharmaceuticals into aquatic ecosystems. PMID:23764981

  8. Strain level differences in E. coli transport, cell surface and adhesion characteristics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Given the importance of E. coli as an indicator of fecal contamination, it is imperative that genotypic and phenotypic variability among strains of E. coli from the same host and/or environmental niche are understood. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of strain level differences on t...

  9. Measurement of Local Sodium Ion Levels near Micelle Surfaces with Fluorescent Photoinduced-Electron-Transfer Sensors.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Seiichi; Fukatsu, Eiko; McClean, Gareth D; de Silva, A Prasanna

    2016-01-11

    The Na(+) concentration near membranes controls our nerve signals aside from several other crucial bioprocesses. Fluorescent photoinduced electron transfer (PET) sensor molecules target Na(+) ions in nanospaces near micellar membranes with excellent selectivity against H(+). The Na(+) concentration near anionic micelles was found to be higher than that in bulk water by factors of up to 160. Sensor molecules that are not held tightly to the micelle surface only detected a Na(+) amplification factor of 8. These results were strengthened by the employment of control compounds whose PET processes are permanently "on" or "off". PMID:26503173

  10. Altitude of potentiometric surface, fall 1985, and historic water- level changes in the Memphis aquifer in western Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parks, W.S.; Carmichael, J.K.

    1990-01-01

    Recharge to the Memphis aquifer of Tertiary age is from precipitation on the outcrop, which forms a broad belt across western Tennessee, or by downward infiltration of water from the overlying fluvial deposits of Tertiary and Quaternary age and alluvium of Quaternary age. In the outcrop-recharge belts, where the Memphis aquifer is under water-table conditions, the potentiometric surface is complex and generally resembles the topography. To the west of the outcrop-recharge belt where the Memphis aquifer is confined, the potentiometric surface gently slopes westward, and the water moves slowly in that direction. A major cone of depression in the potentiometric surface in the Memphis area is the result of long-term (1986-present) pumping at municipal and industrial well fields. Water levels in the Memphis aquifer have declined at average rates ranging from less than 0.1 to 1.3 ft/year during the period 1928-85. The largest declines have been in the Memphis area where withdrawals averaged about 191 million gal/day in 1985. Near the center of the major cone of depression in the Memphis area water levels ceased to decline in about 1975, and the center of the cone essentially has stabilized. Away from the center of the cone, water levels are still declining at a low rate, and the cone is still expanding as a result of the long-term effects of pumping. (USGS)

  11. Impact of Interdecadal Sea Level and Sea Surface Temperature Variability on Primary Productivity and Harmful Algal Blooms in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) are increasing in frequency and intensity on global, regional and local scales. Although climate change has been suggested as one of the key factors, very few interdecadal studies comparing HABs to low frequency physical forcing have been performed. Interannual to interdecadal variability in sea level and sea surface temperature along the Southern California Coast have been shown to have high correlation with the El Nino-La Nina signal. This is important in the study of phytoplankton, because abnormally low sea level corresponds to increased sea surface nutrient concentrations in this region. The California current is stronger during these times, and the higher nutrient water found to the north is advected southward. We have determined that primary productivity is most highly correlated with interdecadal sea level variability derived from tide gage data at a lag of approximately 2 months. This is consistent with previous zooplankton studies. In preparation for a potential El Nino event, we have expanded our analysis to include parameters such as sea surface temperature, salinity and nutrient concentrations from spaceborne and in situ instruments. We have also expanded our research to allow for analysis of several of the most prevalent HAB species. This work is the first step in our effort to create a model to predict and locate Southern California HAB events in the future.

  12. An Index of Upper Level Frontogenesis and Climate Variability of Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, M.

    2002-12-01

    This paper proposes a potential vorticity intrusion index (denoted as PVI) as an alternative diagnostic tool to study the observed climate variability/trend of the surface temperature. The PVI index is defined as the percentage area of upper lever PV intrusion in the extratropics at any given time. Abundance (shortage) of extreme cold surface air temperature episodes in high latitudes coincides with a high (low) PVI index. The PVI index has a negative correlation with the AO index. The interannual variability of the PVI index exhibits a strong QBO- like signal. The high (low) PVI index prevails when the equatorial zonal mean zonal wind at 50 hPa is easterly (westerly). The probability distribution map of PV intrusion activities shows a shift of the preferred regions of frontogenesis from the oceans to the continents when the PVI index is high. This explains directly why more extreme cold events are observed over the northern Eurasian and Northern America continents when the PVI index is high or when the AO index is low.

  13. Estimating seepage flux from ephemeral stream channels using surface water and groundwater level data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noorduijn, Saskia L.; Shanafield, Margaret; Trigg, Mark A.; Harrington, Glenn A.; Cook, Peter G.; Peeters, L.

    2014-02-01

    Seepage flux from ephemeral streams can be an important component of the water balance in arid and semiarid regions. An emerging technique for quantifying this flux involves the measurement and simulation of a flood wave as it moves along an initially dry channel. This study investigates the usefulness of including surface water and groundwater data to improve model calibration when using this technique. We trialed this approach using a controlled flow event along a 1387 m reach of artificial stream channel. Observations were then simulated using a numerical model that combines the diffusion-wave approximation of the Saint-Vénant equations for streamflow routing, with Philip's infiltration equation and the groundwater flow equation. Model estimates of seepage flux for the upstream segments of the study reach, where streambed hydraulic conductivities were approximately 101 m d-1, were on the order of 10-4 m3 d-1 m-2. In the downstream segments, streambed hydraulic conductivities were generally much lower but highly variable (˜10-3 to 10-7 m d-1). A Latin Hypercube Monte Carlo sensitivity analysis showed that the flood front timing, surface water stage, groundwater heads, and the predicted streamflow seepage were most influenced by specific yield. Furthermore, inclusion of groundwater data resulted in a higher estimate of total seepage estimates than if the flood front timing were used alone.

  14. Remineralization of root surfaces demineralized in solutions of differing fluoride levels.

    PubMed

    Heilman, J R; Jordan, T H; Warwick, R; Wefel, J S

    1997-01-01

    The beneficial effects of fluoride on enamel have been well documented. However, limited data are available concerning the amount of fluoride required for beneficial effects on tooth root. Although studies have shown that fluoride inhibits root demineralization, the aim of this study was to investigate the location, extent and amount of remineralization on root dentin substrates after demineralization has occurred. The root surfaces of extracted human teeth were demineralized in a pure chemical buffer containing varying concentrations of sodium fluoride. After this lesion initiation, the same root sections were then placed into a remineralizing solution. The root sections were characterized after demineralization, and again after remineralization, by polarized light microscopy (PLM) and microradiography (MRG). Lesion depths after the demineralization phase were found to be inversely proportional to the fluoride concentration. When fluoride was present, bands or lines within the body of the lesion were observed with PLM and MRG. Using quantitative MRG, variations in mineral content and distribution were recorded. Examination of the root sections after the remineralization phase showed remineralization to have occurred on the remaining mineral and not on organic matrix devoid of mineral. The amount and location of mineral deposition may be of great significance in the arrestment and treatment of in vivo root surface caries. PMID:9353581

  15. Nondestructive characterization and enzyme cleaning of painted surfaces: assessment from the macro to nano level.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Catarina; Busani, Tito; Branco, Luis C; Joosten, Ineke; Sandu, Irina Crina Anca

    2013-12-01

    This work establishes a multiscale and multitechnique nondestructive approach as valid methodology for monitoring surface properties and evaluating the effectiveness of enzymatic removal of varnishes from paintings/polychrome artefacts. Mock-up samples (documented reconstructions of oil, tempera, and gilded layers on canvas and wooden supports) were covered with different proteinaceous varnishes (egg white, animal and fish glue, casein) and then characterized before and after the removal of these coatings with enzyme-based solutions. The varnish was cleaned in several steps (two dry swabs and two wet swabs) with a clearance step for removing the residues from proteinaceous varnish or from enzyme solution. Microscopy [stereomicroscopy (SM), optical microscopy (OM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)] and colorimetric (CIE L*a*b* system) techniques were used for characterization of the reconstruction surfaces at different scales (macro-scale by SM and OM; micro-scale by SEM and nano-scale by AFM). These techniques were also used to monitor the cleaning treatment. Although results presented in this work were obtained for the specific treatment of enzyme removal, the methodology could be extended to other types of materials and cleaning. Further experiments on real works of art are needed for a complete validation of the methodology. PMID:23941994

  16. MISR Level 2 Surface parameters (MIL2ASLS_V2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, David J. (Principal Investigator)

    The Land Surface data include bihemispherical and directional-hemispherical reflectances (albedo), hemispherical directional and bidirectional reflectance factors (BRF), BRF model parameters, leaf-area index (LAI), fraction of photosynthetically active radiation (FPAR), and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) on a 1.1 km grid. The land surface data include hemispherical directional reflectance factor, bihemispherical reflectance (i.e., albedo), bidirectional reflectance factor, directional hemispherical reflectance, BRF model parameters, FPAR, and terrain-referenced view and illumination angles. [Location=GLOBAL LAND] [Temporal_Coverage: Start_Date=2000-02-24; Stop_Date=] [Spatial_Coverage: Southernmost_Latitude=-90; Northernmost_Latitude=90; Westernmost_Longitude=-180; Easternmost_Longitude=180] [Data_Resolution: Latitude_Resolution=1.1 km - 17.6 km; Longitude_Resolution=1.1 km - 17.6 km; Horizontal_Resolution_Range=1 km - < 10 km or approximately .01 degree - < .09 degree; Temporal_Resolution=about 15 orbits/day; Temporal_Resolution_Range=Daily - < Weekly, Daily - < Weekly].

  17. Flammable gas project topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.D.

    1997-01-29

    The flammable gas safety issue was recognized in 1990 with the declaration of an unreviewed safety question (USQ) by the U. S. Department of Energy as a result of the behavior of the Hanford Site high-level waste tank 241-SY-101. This tank exhibited episodic releases of flammable gas that on a couple of occasions exceeded the lower flammability limit of hydrogen in air. Over the past six years there has been a considerable amount of knowledge gained about the chemical and physical processes that govern the behavior of tank 241-SY-1 01 and other tanks associated with the flammable gas safety issue. This report was prepared to provide an overview of that knowledge and to provide a description of the key information still needed to resolve the issue. Items covered by this report include summaries of the understanding of gas generation, retention and release mechanisms, the composition and flammability behavior of the gas mixture, the amounts of stored gas, and estimated gas release fractions for spontaneous releases. `Me report also discusses methods being developed for evaluating the 177 tanks at the Hanford Site and the problems associated with these methods. Means for measuring the gases emitted from the waste are described along with laboratory experiments designed to gain more information regarding rates of generation, species of gases emitted and modes of gas storage and release. Finally, the process for closing the USQ is outlined as are the information requirements to understand and resolve the flammable gas issue.

  18. Fiscal year 1992 program plan for evaluation and remediation of the generation and release of flammable gases in Hanford Site waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.D.

    1992-06-01

    The Waste Tank Flammable Gas Stabilization Program was established in 1990 to provide for resolution of a major safety issue identified for 23 of the high-level waste tanks at the Hanford Site. This safety issue involves flammable gas mixtures, consisting mainly of hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and that are generated and periodically released in concentrations that nitrogen, exceed the lower flamability limit. Initial activities of the program have been directed at tank 241-SY-101 because it exhibits the largest risk. Activities conducted in fiscal year (FY) 1991 included waste sampling, waste sample analysis, development of tank models, conducting laboratory tests with synthetic wastes, upgrading of tank instrumentation and ventilation systems, evaluation of new methods for characterizing waste, and development of remedial actions. In addition to the work being conducted to resolve the flammable gas issue, programs have been established (Gasper and Reep 1992) to develop corrective actions for high priority safety issues associated with potential explosive mixtures of ferrocyanides in tanks, potential organic-nitrate reactions in tanks, and for the continued cooling for heat generation in tank 106{degrees}C. The purpose of this document is to provide a brief description of the FY 1992 priorities, logic, work breakdown structure (WBS), and task descriptions for the Waste Tank Flammable Gas Stabilization Program.

  19. Fiscal year 1992 program plan for evaluation and remediation of the generation and release of flammable gases in Hanford Site waste tanks. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.D.

    1992-06-01

    The Waste Tank Flammable Gas Stabilization Program was established in 1990 to provide for resolution of a major safety issue identified for 23 of the high-level waste tanks at the Hanford Site. This safety issue involves flammable gas mixtures, consisting mainly of hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and that are generated and periodically released in concentrations that nitrogen, exceed the lower flamability limit. Initial activities of the program have been directed at tank 241-SY-101 because it exhibits the largest risk. Activities conducted in fiscal year (FY) 1991 included waste sampling, waste sample analysis, development of tank models, conducting laboratory tests with synthetic wastes, upgrading of tank instrumentation and ventilation systems, evaluation of new methods for characterizing waste, and development of remedial actions. In addition to the work being conducted to resolve the flammable gas issue, programs have been established (Gasper and Reep 1992) to develop corrective actions for high priority safety issues associated with potential explosive mixtures of ferrocyanides in tanks, potential organic-nitrate reactions in tanks, and for the continued cooling for heat generation in tank 106{degrees}C. The purpose of this document is to provide a brief description of the FY 1992 priorities, logic, work breakdown structure (WBS), and task descriptions for the Waste Tank Flammable Gas Stabilization Program.

  20. Rheology and retained gas measurements in Hanford tank 101-SY

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, C.L.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Terrones, G.

    1995-12-31

    Several high-level radioactive waste tanks at the Hanford site are known to produce flammable gases. The best known of these tanks is tank 241-SY-101, and to mitigate the safety concerns associated with flammable gas release from this tank, a mixer pump was installed in mid-1993 to mix the waste contents and thereby eliminate or reduce the capability of the waste to retain gas. The mixer pump has proven very effective and only needs to be operated for 30 min about every other day. Large periodic gas release events no longer occur in this tank. However, specific information about the Theological character of the mixed waste and the amount of retained gas has been lacking. In order to determine the amount of gas still retained in the waste and the rheology of the mixed fluid, which is important in establishing the capability of the waste for retaining gas, two instruments were developed to probe the waste in situ. These instruments were the ball rheometer and the void fraction instrument (VFI).

  1. Video requirements plan for the HMT equipment removal system

    SciTech Connect

    Vargo, G.F. Jr.

    1995-02-01

    This document is the plan defining the video coverage requirements for the equipment removal event of the Hydrogen Mitigation Test (HMT) mixer pump currently installed in high level nuclear waste storage Tank 241-SY-101. When the mixer pump fails the removal and installation of a spare pump will be a time critical event. Since the success of the HMT mixer pump has resolved the DOE safety issue it is absolutely essential that mixing be restored to the tank in a short as time possible. Therefore, the removal of the failed pump and the installation of the spare pump must be anticipated and planned well in advance. The removal, containment, transporting, and storage of the failed pump is a very complex and hazardous task. The successful completion of this task will require careful planning and monitoring. Certain events, during the removal and subsequent installation of the new pump, will require video observation and storage for safety, documenting, training, and promotional use. Furthermore, certain events will require close monitoring and observation by the event directors and key supervisory personnel for the execution of specific tasks during the equipment removal event.

  2. Thermal modeling of tanks 241-AW-101 and 241-AN-104 with the TEMPEST code

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniak, Z.I.; Recknagle, K.P.

    1995-07-01

    The TEMPEST code was exercised in a preliminary study of double-shell Tanks 241 -AW-101 and 241-AN-104 thermal behavior. The two-dimensional model used is derived from our earlier studies on heat transfer from Tank 241-SY-101. Several changes were made to the model to simulate the waste and conditions in 241-AW-101 and 241-AN-104. The nonconvective waste layer was assumed to be 254 cm (100 in.) thick for Tank 241-AW-101, and 381 cm (150 in.) in Tank 241-AN-104. The remaining waste was assumed, for each tank, to consist of a convective layer with a 7.6-cm (3-inch) crust on top. The waste heat loads for 241-AW-101 and 241-AN-104 were taken to be 10 kW (3.4E4 Btu/hr) and 12 kW (4.0E4 Btu/hr), respectively. Present model predictions of maximum and convecting waste temperatures are within 1.7{degrees}C (3{degrees}F) of those measured in Tanks 241-AW-101 and 241-AN-104. The difference between the predicted and measured temperature is comparable to the uncertainty of the measurement equipment. These models, therefore, are suitable for estimating the temperatures within the tanks in the event of changing air flows, waste levels, and/or waste configurations.

  3. Site survey of former naval base in Andreyev Bay, northwest-Russia - Radiation levels and radionuclide concentrations on and below the surface level

    SciTech Connect

    Reistad, Ole; Dick, Oeystein B.; Grepstad, Gisle; Hustveit, Styrkaar; Amundsen, Ingar

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents the main results of the program to examine radiation levels and radionuclide concentrations on and below the surface level at the former Russian naval base in Andreyev Bay, Murmansk County. Presently, this base represents an exceptional case regarding future remediation and cleanup operations due to the accident risk (- max. fuel inventory of 100 submarine cores) and degree of contamination (over 25 years with continuous release - still ongoing - of radionuclides into the terrestrial and marine environment). The first part of the survey consists of about 1030 measurement points established as a grid with 10 m and 5 m mesh size for the measurement of dose rate in two heights above the ground level (0.1 m, 1 m), radionuclide concentrations, drilling of 50 boreholes for further examination of the radionuclide releases on site and the establishment of a 1:500 map of the area. These surveys were completed 2002-04. The results for dose rate measurements taken 1 m above the ground level varies between background levels and 3 mSv/h. Additional measurements were completed around the main building structures at the site and as part of a geological survey of the site. The activity concentration levels for Cs-137 and Sr-90 were measured in 250 points being part of the same measurement grid as above. The results for both isotopes range from normal fallout levels from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing to above 1 MBq/kg. The main conclusion is that continuous releases of fission products from spent nuclear fuel and fuel residues in defect storage pools have, together with inadequate storage facilities for large amounts of solid radioactive waste, led to heavy contamination of fission products in large areas. The 1:500 map is not public accessible. Thus, the second part of the survey was to analyse and document the results in adequate maps. These maps, geo-referenced to the UTM WGS84 system, have been established on the basis of commercial available satellite

  4. Optical properties and defect levels in a surface layer found on CuInSe{sub 2} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Abulfotuh, F.; Wangensteen, T.; Ahrenkiel, R.; Kazmerski, L.L.

    1996-05-01

    In this paper the authors have used photoluminescence (PL) and wavelength scanning ellipsometry (WSE) to clarify the relationship among the electro-optical properties of copper indium diselenide (CIS) thin films, the type and origin of dominant defect states, and device performance. The PL study has revealed several shallow acceptor and donor levels dominating the semiconductor. PL emission from points at different depths from the surface of the CIS sample has been obtained by changing the angle of incidence of the excitation laser beam. The resulting data were used to determine the dominant defect states as a function of composition gradient at the surface of the chalcopyrite compound. The significance of this type of measurement is that it allowed the detection of a very thin layer with a larger bandgap (1.15-1.26 eV) than the CIS present on the surface of the CIS thin films. The presence of this layer has been correlated by several groups to improvement of the CIS cell performance. An important need that results from detecting this layer on the surface of the CIS semiconductor is the determination of its thickness and optical constants (n, k) as a function of wavelength. The thickness of this surface layer is about 500 {Angstrom}.

  5. Imaging and Tuning Molecular Levels at the Surface of a Gated Graphene Device

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Gate-controlled tuning of the charge carrier density in graphene devices provides new opportunities to control the behavior of molecular adsorbates. We have used scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS) to show how the vibronic electronic levels of 1,3,5-tris(2,2-dicyanovinyl)benzene molecules adsorbed onto a graphene/BN/SiO2 device can be tuned via application of a backgate voltage. The molecules are observed to electronically decouple from the graphene layer, giving rise to well-resolved vibronic states in dI/dV spectroscopy at the single-molecule level. Density functional theory (DFT) and many-body spectral function calculations show that these states arise from molecular orbitals coupled strongly to carbon–hydrogen rocking modes. Application of a back-gate voltage allows switching between different electronic states of the molecules for fixed sample bias. PMID:24746016

  6. Termination-specific study of oxygen vacancy transition levels on SrTiO3(001) surfaces by scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitaputra, Wattaka; Sivadas, Nikhil; Skowronski, Marek; Xiao, Di; Feenstra, Randall

    2015-03-01

    We have studied the surface electronic structure of oxygen vacancies on SrTiO3(001) surfaces using scanning tunneling spectroscopy and DFT calculations with local spin density approximation (LSDA +U). With high dynamic range measurements, a mid-gap level associated with the surface oxygen vacancies was observed for SrO-terminated surfaces. TiO2-terminated surfaces, on the other hand, did not exhibit observable mid-gap states (this lack of signal is believed to be due to the nature of defect wavefunction involved, as well as possibly involving transport limitations in the STS measurements). Both vacuum-cleaved and MBE-grown surface have been studied. For the former, the Fermi level is pinned near mid-gap owing to disorder-induced surface states. The amount of surface disorder can be controlled in the case of epitaxially grown surfaces. Rougher MBE-grown surfaces were found to exhibit similar spectral characteristics to the cleaved surfaces, while a shift of the Fermi level toward the conduction band was observed for flatter grown surfaces. Notably, with a decreasing number of disorder-induced surface states, the Fermi level is found to be pinned within the observed band of oxygen vacancy levels. This research was supported by AFOSR Grant No. FA9550-12-1-0479, and it used resources of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, supported by the Office of Science, US Department of Energy under Contract No. DEAC02-05CH11231.

  7. Hepatitis B surface antigen levels of cessation of nucleos(t)ide analogs associated with virological relapse in hepatitis B surface antigen-negative chronic hepatitis B patients

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Guo-Hong; Ye, Yun; Zhou, Xin-Bei; Chen, Li; He, Cong; Wen, Dan-Feng; Tan, You-Wen

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the virological relapse rate in hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)-negative patients after antiviral therapy discontinuation and analyze the factors associated with virological relapse. METHODS: Among patients diagnosed with chronic hepatitis B infection between May 2005 and July 2010, 204 were eligible for analysis. The Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test were used to calculate the cumulative rate of relapse and compare cumulative relapse rates between groups. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to evaluate the predictive factor of virological relapse. RESULTS: The 2 and 1 year cumulative risks of virological relapse after antiviral therapy discontinuation were 79.41% (162/204) and 43.82% (71/162), respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that only post treatment hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) level was associated with virological relapse (P = 0.011). The cumulative risk of virological relapse was higher in the patients with HBsAg levels ≥ 1500 IU/L than in those with HBsAg levels < 1500 IU/L (P = 0.0013). The area under the curve was 0.603 (P = 0.033). The cutoff HBsAg value for predicting virological relapse was 1443 IU/L. CONCLUSION: We found that the virological relapse rate remained high after antiviral therapy discontinuation in the HBeAg-negative patients and that the post treatment HBsAg levels predicted virological relapse. PMID:26229407

  8. Modelling the impact of global changes on summer european surface ozone levels at the 2050 horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clain, G.; Szopa, S.; Tripathi, O.; Vautard, R.; Menut, L.; Colette, A.; Bessagnet, B.

    2012-04-01

    As pointed by the IPCC, climate change and evolution of green house gases emissions in the coming decades are likely to affect regional pollution levels as well as the background ozone levels (Jacob et al., 1999): first, the evolution of climate due to the increase of green house gas emissions is liable to induce modifications of the meteorological parameters of crucial interest for air quality. Secondly, the emissions of air pollutants will be affected by changes in population and energy demands as well as policy aiming to reduce global warming or pollution impacts. In order to assess the relative impact of climate change and change in green house gas emissions, a set of regional simulations is conducted using CHIMERE model (Bessagnet et al., 2009). These simulations account for change in anthropogenic emissions of precursors from future scenarii, global background pollutant levels through appropriate boundary conditions from LMDz-INCA model, and future meteorological conditions reflecting AR5 scenario. For consistency, all these forcings are built on the same scenario: the RCP 8.5 (Representative Concentration Pathways, Riahi et al., 2007) developed in IPCC-AR5 framework for climate projections. The RCP85 scenario used in this study is defined by a rising radiative forcing pathway leading to 8.5 W.m-2 in 2100. In the framework of AR5, this scenario refers to the most pessimistic case. Two long term simulations with CHIMERE model are conducted, reproducing present (1995-2005), future (2045-2055) conditions in emissions, climate, and boundary conditions. The simulated periods correspond to summer, running from July 1st to August 31st each year. A third set of simulations involves present climate and boundary conditions with future emissions.

  9. The Sentinel-3 Surface Topography Mission (S-3 STM): Level 2 SAR Ocean Retracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinardo, S.; Lucas, B.; Benveniste, J.

    2015-12-01

    The SRAL Radar Altimeter, on board of the ESA Mission Sentinel-3 (S-3), has the capacity to operate either in the Pulse-Limited Mode (also known as LRM) or in the novel Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) mode. Thanks to the initial results from SAR Altimetry obtained exploiting CryoSat-2 data, lately the interest by the scientific community in this new technology has significantly increased and consequently the definition of accurate processing methodologies (along with validation strategies) has now assumed a capital importance. In this paper, we present the algorithm proposed to retrieve from S-3 STM SAR return waveforms the standard ocean geophysical parameters (ocean topography, wave height and sigma nought) and the validation results that have been so far achieved exploiting the CryoSat-2 data as well as the simulated data. The inversion method (retracking) to extract from the return waveform the geophysical information is a curve best-fitting scheme based on the bounded Levenberg-Marquardt Least-Squares Estimation Method (LEVMAR-LSE). The S-3 STM SAR Ocean retracking algorithm adopts, as return waveform’s model, the “SAMOSA” model [Ray et al, 2014], named after the R&D project SAMOSA (led by Satoc and funded by ESA), in which it has been initially developed. The SAMOSA model is a physically-based model that offers a complete description of a SAR Altimeter return waveform from ocean surface, expressed in the form of maps of reflected power in Delay-Doppler space (also known as stack) or expressed as multilooked echoes. SAMOSA is able to account for an elliptical antenna pattern, mispointing errors in roll and yaw, surface scattering pattern, non-linear ocean wave statistics and spherical Earth surface effects. In spite of its truly comprehensive character, the SAMOSA model comes with a compact analytical formulation expressed in term of Modified Bessel functions. The specifications of the retracking algorithm have been gathered in a technical document (DPM

  10. Role of borehole pressure containment on surface ground vibration levels at close scaled distances

    SciTech Connect

    Taqieddin, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    A total of 84 reduced-scale single-hole test blasts were conducted to study the effects of collar stemming length, primer location, geophone orientation, and indirectly the borehole and detonation pressures on the generation of ground vibrations. Extra 60% dynamite and black powder explosives were tested. Charges of 144.5 and 276.5 gm having diameters of 0.5-, 0.75-, and 1.00-inch were confined within holes drilled in Jefferson City dolomite rock. Three collar stemming lengths, bottom and collar priming and two different orientation of joints were employed. Particle velocity measured by a recording seismograph, with its geophone placed at constant 15 feet, was used throughout this study. It was found at the close scaled-distances employed in this study that collar stemming length has a reciprocal relationship with the levels of ground vibration up to an optimum value beyond which it has minimal effect. Also, the length of collar stemming needed to suppress ground vibration is less than that needed to contain air blast and was dependent on charge diameter. It was also found that collar-primed charges produced higher levels of ground vibration than did the bottom-primed charges, and ground vibrations attenuated more rapidly parallel to the geologic jointing direction. Lastly it was found that the primary cause of ground vibrations was the explosive borehole pressure with little or no effect produced by detonation pressure.

  11. Elevated levels of diesel range organic compounds in groundwater near Marcellus gas operations are derived from surface activities

    PubMed Central

    Drollette, Brian D.; Hoelzer, Kathrin; Warner, Nathaniel R.; Darrah, Thomas H.; Karatum, Osman; O’Connor, Megan P.; Nelson, Robert K.; Fernandez, Loretta A.; Reddy, Christopher M.; Vengosh, Avner; Jackson, Robert B.; Elsner, Martin; Plata, Desiree L.

    2015-01-01

    Hundreds of organic chemicals are used during natural gas extraction via high-volume hydraulic fracturing (HVHF). However, it is unclear whether these chemicals, injected into deep shale horizons, reach shallow groundwater aquifers and affect local water quality, either from those deep HVHF injection sites or from the surface or shallow subsurface. Here, we report detectable levels of organic compounds in shallow groundwater samples from private residential wells overlying the Marcellus Shale in northeastern Pennsylvania. Analyses of purgeable and extractable organic compounds from 64 groundwater samples revealed trace levels of volatile organic compounds, well below the Environmental Protection Agency’s maximum contaminant levels, and low levels of both gasoline range (0–8 ppb) and diesel range organic compounds (DRO; 0–157 ppb). A compound-specific analysis revealed the presence of bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, which is a disclosed HVHF additive, that was notably absent in a representative geogenic water sample and field blanks. Pairing these analyses with (i) inorganic chemical fingerprinting of deep saline groundwater, (ii) characteristic noble gas isotopes, and (iii) spatial relationships between active shale gas extraction wells and wells with disclosed environmental health and safety violations, we differentiate between a chemical signature associated with naturally occurring saline groundwater and one associated with alternative anthropogenic routes from the surface (e.g., accidental spills or leaks). The data support a transport mechanism of DRO to groundwater via accidental release of fracturing fluid chemicals derived from the surface rather than subsurface flow of these fluids from the underlying shale formation. PMID:26460018

  12. Stepwise growth of surface-grafted DNA nanotubes visualized at the single-molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariri, Amani A.; Hamblin, Graham D.; Gidi, Yasser; Sleiman, Hanadi F.; Cosa, Gonzalo

    2015-04-01

    DNA nanotubes offer a high aspect ratio and rigidity, attractive attributes for the controlled assembly of hierarchically complex linear arrays. It is highly desirable to control the positioning of rungs along the backbone of the nanotubes, minimize the polydispersity in their manufacture and reduce the building costs. We report here a solid-phase synthesis methodology in which, through a cyclic scheme starting from a ‘foundation rung’ specifically bound to the surface, distinct rungs can be incorporated in a predetermined manner. Each rung is orthogonally addressable. Using fluorescently tagged rungs, single-molecule fluorescence studies demonstrated the robustness and structural fidelity of the constructs and confirmed the incorporation of the rungs in quantitative yield (>95%) at each step of the cycle. Prototype structures that consisted of up to 20 repeat units, about 450 nm in contour length, were constructed. Combined, the solid-phase synthesis strategy described and its visualization through single-molecule spectroscopy show good promise for the production of custom-made DNA nanotubes.

  13. BOREAS RSS-14 Level -3 Gridded Radiometer and Satellite Surface Radiation Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Hodges, Gary; Smith, Eric A.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-14 team collected and processed GOES-7 and -8 images of the BOREAS region as part of its effort to characterize the incoming, reflected, and emitted radiation at regional scales. This data set contains surface radiation parameters, such as net radiation and net solar radiation, that have been interpolated from GOES-7 images and AMS data onto the standard BOREAS mapping grid at a resolution of 5 km N-S and E-W. While some parameters are taken directly from the AMS data set, others have been corrected according to calibrations carried out during IFC-2 in 1994. The corrected values as well as the uncorrected values are included. For example, two values of net radiation are provided: an uncorrected value (Rn), and a value that has been corrected according to the calibrations (Rn-COR). The data are provided in binary image format data files. Some of the data files on the BOREAS CD-ROMs have been compressed using the Gzip program. See section 8.2 for details. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  14. Experiences with Opto-Mechanical Systems that Affect Optical Surfaces at the Sub-Nanometer Level

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, L C; Taylor, J S

    2008-04-03

    Projection optical systems built for Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) demonstrated the ability to produce, support and position reflective optical surfaces for achieving transmitted wavefront errors of 1 nm or less. Principal challenges included optical interferometry, optical manufacturing processes, multi-layer coating technology and opto mechanics. Our group was responsible for designing, building and aligning two different projection optical systems: a full-field, 0.1 NA, four-mirror system for 70 nm features and a small-field, 0.3 NA, two-mirror system for 30 nm features. Other than physical size and configuration, the two systems were very similar in the way they were designed, built and aligned. A key difference exists in the optic mounts, driven primarily by constraints from the metrology equipment used by different optics manufacturers. As mechanical stability and deterministic position control of optics will continue to play an essential role in future systems, we focus our discussion on opto-mechanics and primarily the optic mounts.

  15. 3-D surface rendering of myocardial SPECT images segmented by level set technique.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwun-Jae; Lee, Sangbock

    2012-06-01

    SPECT(single photon emission computed tomography) myocardial imaging is a diagnosis technique that images the region of interest and examines any change induced by disease using a computer after injects intravenously a radiopharmaceutical drug emitting gamma ray and the drug has dispersed evenly in the heart . Myocardial perfusion imaging, which contains functional information, is useful for non-invasive diagnosis of myocardial disease but noises caused by physical factors and low resolution give difficulty in reading the images. In order to help reading myocardial images, this study proposed a method that segments myocardial images and reconstructs the segmented region into a 3D image. To resolve difficulty in reading, we segmented the left ventricle, the region of interest, using a level set and modeled the segmented region into a 3D image. PMID:20839037

  16. Heterogeneity of Skin Surface Oxygen Level of Wrist in Relation to Acupuncture Point

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Minyoung; Park, Sarah S.; Ha, Yejin; Lee, Jaegeun; Yoo, Kwangsik; Jhon, Gil-Ja; Suh, Minah; Lee, Youngmi

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of partial oxygen pressure (pO2) is analyzed for the anterior aspect of the left wrist with an amperometric oxygen microsensor composed of a small planar Pt disk-sensing area (diameter = 25 μm). The pO2 levels vary depending on the measurement location over the wrist skin, and they are systematically monitored in the analysis for both one-dimensional single line (along the wrist transverse crease) and two-dimensional square area of the wrist region. Relatively higher pO2 values are observed at certain area in close proximity to the position of acupuncture points with statistical significance, indicating strong relationship between oxygen and acupuncture point. The used oxygen microsensor is sensitive enough to detect the pO2 variation depending on the location. This study may provide information helpful to understand possible physiological roles of the acupuncture points. PMID:22666285

  17. Quantitative analysis of molecular-level DNA crystal growth on a 2D surface

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Junwye; Hamada, Shogo; Hwang, Si Un; Amin, Rashid; Son, Junyoung; Dugasani, Sreekantha Reddy; Murata, Satoshi; Park, Sung Ha

    2013-01-01

    Crystallization is an essential process for understanding a molecule's aggregation behavior. It provides basic information on crystals, including their nucleation and growth processes. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has become an interesting building material because of its remarkable properties for constructing various shapes of submicron-scale DNA crystals by self-assembly. The recently developed substrate-assisted growth (SAG) method produces fully covered DNA crystals on various substrates using electrostatic interactions and provides an opportunity to observe the overall crystallization process. In this study, we investigated quantitative analysis of molecular-level DNA crystallization using the SAG method. Coverage and crystal size distribution were studied by controlling the external parameters such as monomer concentration, annealing temperature, and annealing time. Rearrangement during crystallization was also discussed. We expect that our study will provide overall picture of the fabrication process of DNA crystals on the charged substrate and promote practical applications of DNA crystals in science and technology. PMID:23817625

  18. First Results from VIRTIS on Venus Express1. From Surface to Cloud Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccioni, Giuseppe; Drossart, P.; VIRTIS/Venus Express Team

    2006-09-01

    VIRTIS is the imaging spectrometer of the ESA/Venus Express mission, in orbit around Venus since 2006, April 11th. It consists in two channels : VIRTIS-M, an imaging spectrometer with 0.25 mrad instantaneous field of view, working from 0.3 to 1 μm at 2nm spectral sampling (VIRTIS-M-vis) and from 1 to 5.2 μm at 10 nm resolution (VIRTIS-M-ir) and VIRTIS-H, a high resolution spectrometer working from 1.9 to 5.0 μm on an aperture of 0.58 x 1.74 mrad at 2000 resolving power. The main scientific objectives for the lower part of the atmosphere are the following:

    • Surface characteristics
    • Composition of the lower atmosphere, and spatial or temporal variations (night side)
    • Cloud structure (composition, scattering properties, and dynamics)
    • Thermal structure
    An important new result from VIRTIS is the first detailed study of the South polar vortex. This feature exhibits unique characteristics of essential importance for the understanding of the global dynamics of Venus. The rotation of the vortex is observed by VIRTIS at different altitudes for different wavelengths. The vortex has a complex structure, exhibiting high thermal contrasts and filamentary clouds forming an inverse "S” shape. The 1.7 μm and 2.3 μm spectral images, observed in the night side within these deep atmospheric windows, are the first observations of the deep structure of the vortex. Future observations during the Venus Express mission will allow us to continue the vortex observation to study its long term variations.

  19. Observation of core-level binding energy shifts between (100) surface and bulk atoms of epitaxial CuInSe{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A.J.; Berry, G.; Rockett, A.

    1997-04-01

    Core-level and valence band photoemission from semiconductors has been shown to exhibit binding energy differences between surface atoms and bulk atoms, thus allowing one to unambiguously distinguish between the two atomic positions. Quite clearly, surface atoms experience a potential different from the bulk due to the lower coordination number - a characteristic feature of any surface is the incomplete atomic coordination. Theoretical accounts of this phenomena are well documented in the literature for III-V and II-VI semiconductors. However, surface state energies corresponding to the equilibrium geometry of (100) and (111) surfaces of Cu-based ternary chalcopyrite semiconductors have not been calculated or experimental determined. These compounds are generating great interest for optoelectronic and photovoltaic applications, and are an isoelectronic analog of the II-VI binary compound semiconductors. Surface core-level binding energy shifts depend on the surface cohesive energies, and surface cohesive energies are related to surface structure. For ternary compound semiconductor surfaces, such as CuInSe{sub 2}, one has the possibility of variations in surface stoichiometry. Applying standard thermodynamical calculations which consider the number of individual surface atoms and their respective chemical potentials should allow one to qualitatively determine the magnitude of surface core-level shifts and, consequently, surface state energies.

  20. Surface vertical displacements and level plane changes in the front reservoir area caused by filling the Three Gorges Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hansheng

    2000-06-01

    On the basis of the results of geological surveys and seismic prospecting in the Three Gorges area, two Earth models are constructed which are appropriate to the crustal structure in the front Three Gorges Reservoir area. Utilizing load-induced deformation theory, we model the surface vertical displacements and level plane changes in the area caused by increased water loads of the reservoir. The two quantities are needed to determine height changes on the Earth's surface. The numerical results demonstrate that the heights will be significantly changed as the reservoir fills up. For example, when the reservoir water level reaches an elevation of 175 m, the crust subsides by 1.0˜48.3 mm, the level plane uplifts by 1.1˜7.5 mm, and the height falls by 2.1˜45.0 mm. Accordingly, our results provide the reliable corrected values for discriminating between the earthquake-related crustal motion and the height changes that occur due to reservoir impoundment. Moreover, if the height data previously observed in the area need to be used for engineering surveys after the reservoir is filled, they must be corrected.

  1. Variability of Surface pollutants and aerosol concentration over Abu Dhabi, UAE - sources, transport and current levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phanikumar, Devulapalli V.; Basha, Ghouse; Ouarda, Taha B. M. J.

    2015-04-01

    In the view of recent economic, industrial, and rapid development, Abu Dhabi (24.4oN; 54.4oE; 27m msl) has become one of the most populated regions in the world despite of extreme heat, frequent dust storms, and with distinctive topography. The major sources of air pollution are from the dust and sand storms, greenhouse gas emissions, and to some extent from industrial pollution. In order to realize the accurate and comprehensive understanding of air quality and plausible sources over this region, we have made a detailed analysis of three years simultaneous measurements during 2011-13 of pollutants such as O3, SO2, NO2, CO, and PM10 concentrations. Diurnal variation of meteorological parameters such as temperature and wind speed/relative humidity clearly shows daytime maximum/minimum in summer followed by pre-monsoon, post-monsoon and winter. The prevailing winds over this region are mostly from northwesterly direction (Shamal wind). Diurnal wind pattern showed a clear contrast with the majority of the wind pattern during nighttime and early morning is from the westerly/northwesterly and daytime is from southwesterly/southeasterly directions. The diurnal pattern of O3 shows minimum during 08 LT and increases thereafter reaching maximum at 17 LT and decreases during nighttime. However, the diurnal pattern of SO2 and NO2 show a peak at ~ 08 LT and dip at ~ 14 LT during all the seasons with some variability in each season. On the other hand, the diurnal pattern of CO shows a peculiar picture of elevated levels during daytime peaking at ~ 10 LT (prominent in summer and post-monsoon) followed by a sharp decrease and minimum is ~14 LT. PM10 concentration has an early morning peak at ~ 02 LT and then decreases to a minimum value at ~11 LT and again increases in the afternoon hours (maximum at ~17 LT) depicting a forenoon-afternoon asymmetry. Monthly variation of PM10 shows maximum in pre-monsoon season and minimum in winter. Our observations show the diurnal pattern of

  2. Short-term water level forecasts for the Laurentian Great Lakes using coupled atmosphere, land-surface and lake models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortin, Vincent; Mackay, Murray; Casas-Prat, Mercè; Seglenieks, Frank; Dyck, Sarah; Dupont, Frédéric; Roy, François; Smith, Gregory C.

    2015-04-01

    Over the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Environment Canada operates a very successful short-term (48-h) environmental prediction system which includes the GEM atmospheric model, the ISBA land-surface model and the NEMO-CICE ice-ocean model. The positive impact of two-way coupling between the atmosphere and ocean is most clearly seen in winter, due to the presence of a dynamic ice cover and large heat fluxes over the ocean. This system is now being tested over the Laurentian Great Lakes, with the same objective of improving forecasts both for the atmosphere and the water bodies. In order to account for the significant impact of streamflow on the water level and water temperature of the Great Lakes, routing models for river flow and for connecting channels between lakes were added to the system. Offline tests demonstrated the capacity of the system to accurately simulate seasonal and multi-annual fluctuations in water levels and ice cover, as well as the need for consistent heat flux calculations in the atmospheric and ocean models. In this presentation, we focus on the skill of short-term water level forecasts. Over a few days, water levels of the Great Lakes mainly respond to the wind stress, but also change with surface pressure, precipitation, evaporation and river flow. The approach taken to account for each of these factors is described, and the skill of the resulting water level forecast is assessed over the fall of 2014 and the winter of 2015. It is shown that the system can accurately predict storm surges and seiches at the hourly time scale, with a skill that decreases slowly over 48-h, suggesting that skillful forecasts with longer lead times are feasible. A plan for increasing the lead time up to one month is presented.

  3. Estimation of surface-level PM concentration from satellite observation taking into account the aerosol vertical profiles and hygroscopicity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwanchul; Lee, Kwon H; Kim, Ji I; Noh, Youngmin; Shin, Dong H; Shin, Sung K; Lee, Dasom; Kim, Jhoon; Kim, Young J; Song, Chul H

    2016-01-01

    Surface-level PM10 distribution was estimated from the satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) products, taking the account of vertical profiles and hygroscopicity of aerosols over Jeju, Korea during March 2008 and October 2009. In this study, MODIS AOD data from the Terra and Aqua satellites were corrected with aerosol extinction profiles and relative humidity data. PBLH (Planetary Boundary Layer Height) was determined from MPLNET lidar-derived aerosol extinction coefficient profiles. Through statistical analysis, better agreement in correlation (R = 0.82) between the hourly PM10 concentration and hourly average Sunphotometer AOD was the obtained when vertical fraction method (VFM) considering Haze Layer Height (HLH) and hygroscopic growth factor f(RH) was used. The validity of the derived relationship between satellite AOD and surface PM10 concentration clearly demonstrates that satellite AOD data can be utilized for remote sensing of spatial distribution of regional PM10 concentration. PMID:26421659

  4. Assimilation of Smos Observations to Generate a Prototype SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root-Zone Soil Moisture Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.; Crow, Wade T.; Koster, Randal D.; Kimball, John

    2012-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP; [1]) mission is being implemented by NASA for launch in October 2014. The primary science objectives of SMAP are to enhance understanding of land surface controls on the water, energy and carbon cycles, and to determine their linkages. Moreover, the high-resolution soil moisture mapping provided by SMAP has practical applications in weather and seasonal climate prediction, agriculture, human health, drought and flood decision support. The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS; [2]) mission was launched by ESA in November 2009 and has since been observing L-band (1.4 GHz) upwelling passive microwaves. In this paper we describe our use of SMOS brightness temperature observations to generate a prototype of the planned SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root-zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) product [5].

  5. E-cadherin Surface Levels in Epithelial Growth Factor-stimulated Cells Depend on Adherens Junction Protein Shrew-1

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Julia Christina; Schreiner, Alexander; Engels, Knut

    2009-01-01

    Gain- and loss-of-function studies indicate that the adherens junction protein shrew-1 acts as a novel modulator of E-cadherin internalization induced by epithelial growth factor (EGF) or E-cadherin function-blocking antibody during epithelial cell dynamics. Knocking down shrew-1 in MCF-7 carcinoma cells preserves E-cadherin surface levels upon EGF stimulation. Overexpression of shrew-1 leads to preformation of an E-cadherin/EGF receptor (EGFR) HER2/src-kinase/shrew-1 signaling complex and accelerated E-cadherin internalization. Shrew-1 is not sufficient to stimulate E-cadherin internalization, but facilitates the actions of EGFR and thus may promote malignant progression in breast cancer cells with constitutive EGFR stimulation by reducing surface E-cadherin expression. PMID:19515834

  6. Potentiometric surface and water-level difference maps of selected confined aquifers in Southern Maryland and Maryland’s Eastern Shore, 1975-2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Staley, Andrew W.; Andreasen, David C.; Curtin, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    The potentiometric surface maps show water levels ranging from 165 feet above sea level to 199 feet below sea level. Water levels have declined by as much as 113 feet in the Aquia aquifer since 1982, 81 feet in the Magothy aquifer since 1975, and 61 and 95 feet in the Upper Patapsco and Lower Patapsco aquifer systems, respectively, since 1990.

  7. State-level accident rates of surface freight transportation : a reexamination.

    SciTech Connect

    Saricks, C. L.; Tompkins, M. M.

    1999-05-03

    State-level accident rates for truck, rail, and barge transportation have been updated for mid-1990s shipping conditions. The updated accident, fatality, and injury rates reflect multiyear data for interstate-registered highway carriers, American Association of Railroads member carriers (i.e., all Class 1 and Class 2 railroads), and coastal and internal waterway barge traffic. Adjustments have been made to account for the share of highway combination-truck traffic actually attributable to interstate-registered carriers and for duplicated or otherwise inaccurate or unusable entries in the public-use accident data files applied. State-to-state variation in rates, reflecting recent developments in freight flows, the possible effect of speed limit changes on highway rates, and the stability of rates over time, are discussed. Carrier-specific information was used to confirm the general accuracy of the computed rates for highway shipments. Study conclusions suggest that these rates may be used for the next several years. However, further investigation is suggested, within two to three years, to verify or reject the emergence of a trend toward higher truck accident rates in states that raised highway speed limits between 1995 and 1996.

  8. Influence of SHI upon nanohole free volume and micro scale level surface modifications of polyethyleneterephthalate polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Singh, Paramjit

    2015-05-01

    Topographic micro scale and in-depth nano scale level modifications of polymeric materials play an important role in engineering their physical and chemical properties. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) is an important class of semi-crystalline polymers used for gas separation properties. The gas diffusion and permeability parameters are directly related to the free volume fractions and the hole distributions. The controlled and precise ion beam irradiation can be used to induce surface and in-depth modifications in the properties of the polymers which help in modifying free volume holes and their distributions. In the present study, the investigation of free volume (nano scale level) and surface (micro scale level) properties of PET polymeric thin films after SHI treatment were employed by means of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. The PET thin films were irradiated by 50 MeV lithium ions as a function of ion fluence. The value of hole radius (R) and intensity (I3) of o-Ps were observed to be increased after ion beam treatment. The further analyses were employed to calculate the free volume and fractional free volume of holes from the obtained values of R and I3. The AFM studies reveal the surface modifications of the irradiated polymer films. The structural, optical and chemical properties were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-visible (UV-vis) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrophotometry. Different parameters such as crystallite size and band gap energy were calculated from the obtained data of XRD and UV-vis, respectively.

  9. Surface-Level Ozone Variability in the Gulf of Maine during ICARTT 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlins, W. T.; Bauer, A. J.; Sonnenfroh, D. M.; Hintsa, E. J.; Twickler, M. S.; Talbot, R. W.

    2005-12-01

    During July and August 2004, the PSI UV Ozone Photometer was deployed on a commercial cruise ferry to measure temporal and spatial variations in ozone off the New Hampshire coast. The MV Thomas Laighton, operated by the Isles of Shoals Steamship Company in Portsmouth, NH, provided a mobile platform from which to conduct twice daily measurement transects between the coastline and the Isles of Shoals area some 8 km offshore. Ozone mixing ratios, ambient air temperature, and GPS latitude and longitude were sampled at a 1 Hz data rate via a mast and forward-facing air sampling inlet extending into the free stream above the wheelhouse of the vessel. The spatial resolution of the 1 Hz measurements was 5 to 10 m. Previous measurements of this type, during NEAQS 2002, showed extensive spatial variability in off-shore ozone mixing ratios during high-ozone events. The 2004 measurements sampled primarily very low ozone levels associated with clean air from the north and east, as well as a limited set of medium-ozone events associated with southwesterly winds from the polluted urban corridor. As in 2002, the data show substantial spatial variability in ozone mixing ratios for a given transect. These include frequent small-scale depletions in ozone on the scale of tens of meters, due to titration of ozone by localized NOx emissions including the ship's own exhaust, and large scale ozone depletions on the scale of km, associated with medium-high-ozone events. The results are compared to calculated air parcel trajectories, and to ozone measurements from fixed-site instruments on Appledore Island and on a buoy stationed 20 km east of Appledore Island. In general, the off-shore ozone concentrations appear to be greatly elevated only during periods of southerly or southwesterly winds, and are modulated by a complex sea breeze/land breeze effect near the coastline.

  10. Test report for run-in acceptance testing of hydrogen mitigation test pump-2

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, A.K.; Kolowith, R.

    1995-01-01

    This document provides the results of the run-in test of the replacement mixer pump for the Tank 241-SY-101. The test was conducted at the 400 Area MASF facility between August 12 and September 29, 1994. The report includes findings, analysis, recommendations, and corrective actions taken.

  11. Design layout for gas monitoring system II (GMS-2) computer system

    SciTech Connect

    Vo, V.; Philipp, B.L.; Manke, M.P.

    1995-08-02

    This document provides a general overview of the computer systems software that perform the data acquisition and control for the 241-SY-101 Gas Monitoring System II (GMS-2). It outlines the system layout, and contains descriptions of components and the functions they perform. The GMS-2 system was designed and implemented by Los Alamos National Laboratory and supplied to Westinghouse Hanford Company

  12. Minutes of the Tank Waste Science Panel meeting July 9--1, 1991. Hanford Tank Safety Project

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, D.M.

    1992-04-01

    The fifth meeting of the Tank Waste Science Panel was held July 9--11, 1991, in Atlanta, Georgia. The subject areas included the generation, retention, and release of gases from Tank 241-SY-101 and the chemistry of ferrocyanide wastes.

  13. Minutes of the Tank Waste Science Panel meeting July 9--1, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, D.M.

    1992-04-01

    The fifth meeting of the Tank Waste Science Panel was held July 9--11, 1991, in Atlanta, Georgia. The subject areas included the generation, retention, and release of gases from Tank 241-SY-101 and the chemistry of ferrocyanide wastes.

  14. Set Point Calculations for RAPID Project [Removal of Hold for HNF-5087 and HNF-5088 and HNF-5089

    SciTech Connect

    HICKMAN, G.L.

    1999-09-02

    The Respond and Pump in Days (RAPID) project was initiated to pump part of the contents of tank 241-SY-101 into tanks 241-SY-102. This document establishes the basis for all set points and ranges used in the RAPID project.

  15. Flammable gas safety program. Analytical methods development: FY 1994 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.A.; Clauss, S.; Grant, K.; Hoopes, V.; Lerner, B.; Lucke, R.; Mong, G.; Rau, J.; Wahl, K.; Steele, R.

    1994-09-01

    This report describes the status of developing analytical methods to account for the organic components in Hanford waste tanks, with particular focus on tanks assigned to the Flammable Gas Watch List. The methods that have been developed are illustrated by their application to samples obtained from Tank 241-SY-101 (Tank 101-SY).

  16. Minutes of the Tank Waste Science Panel meeting, November 11--13, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, D.M.

    1992-04-01

    The sixth meeting of the Tank Waste Science Panel was held November 11--13, 1991, in Pasco and Richland, Washington. Participating scientists presented the results of recent work on various aspects of issues relating to the generation and release of gases from Tank 241-SY-101 and the presence of ferrocyanide in other tanks at Hanford. Results are discussed.

  17. Minutes of the Tank Waste Science Panel meeting, November 11--13, 1991. Hanford Tank Safety Project

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, D.M.

    1992-04-01

    The sixth meeting of the Tank Waste Science Panel was held November 11--13, 1991, in Pasco and Richland, Washington. Participating scientists presented the results of recent work on various aspects of issues relating to the generation and release of gases from Tank 241-SY-101 and the presence of ferrocyanide in other tanks at Hanford. Results are discussed.

  18. Set point calculations for RAPID project

    SciTech Connect

    HICKMAN, G.L.

    1999-10-18

    The Respond and Pump in Days (RAPID) project was initiated to pump part of the contents of tank 241-SY-101 into tank 241-SY-102. This document establishes the basis for all set points and ranges used in the RAPID project.

  19. Cradle/pump heating system operation and maintenance manual

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, S.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-01

    This is the operation and maintenance manual for the 241-SY-101 Cradle/Pump Heating System. The Heating System provides the means to heat the pump (HMT {number_sign}2) during cold weather to assure safe and smooth pump installation.

  20. System design description for ``Mini-DACS`` data acquisition and control system

    SciTech Connect

    Ermi, A.M.

    1996-10-01

    This document describes the computer software design and associated hardware for the Mini-DACS (Data Acquisition and Control System) in support of testing the second spare pump (HMR-3) for tank 241SY101. The testing of HMR-3 was conducted at the Maintenance and Storage Facility (MASF).

  1. Highly accurate potential energy surface, dipole moment surface, rovibrational energy levels, and infrared line list for ³²S¹⁶O₂ up to 8000 cm⁻¹.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinchuan; Schwenke, David W; Lee, Timothy J

    2014-03-21

    A purely ab initio potential energy surface (PES) was refined with selected (32)S(16)O2 HITRAN data. Compared to HITRAN, the root-mean-squares error (σ(RMS)) for all J = 0-80 rovibrational energy levels computed on the refined PES (denoted Ames-1) is 0.013 cm(-1). Combined with a CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pV(Q+d)Z dipole moment surface (DMS), an infrared (IR) line list (denoted Ames-296K) has been computed at 296 K and covers up to 8000 cm(-1). Compared to the HITRAN and CDMS databases, the intensity agreement for most vibrational bands is better than 85%-90%. Our predictions for (34)S(16)O2 band origins, higher energy (32)S(16)O2 band origins and missing (32)S(16)O2 IR bands have been verified by most recent experiments and available HITRAN data. We conclude that the Ames-1 PES is able to predict (32/34)S(16)O2 band origins below 5500 cm(-1) with 0.01-0.03 cm(-1) uncertainties, and the Ames-296K line list provides continuous, reliable and accurate IR simulations. The K(a)-dependence of both line position and line intensity errors is discussed. The line list will greatly facilitate SO2 IR spectral experimental analysis, as well as elimination of SO2 lines in high-resolution astronomical observations. PMID:24655184

  2. Highly Accurate Potential Energy Surface, Dipole Moment Surface, Rovibrational Energy Levels, and Infrared Line List for (32)S(16)O2 up to 8000 cm(exp -1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Xinchuan; Schwenke, David W.; Lee, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    A purely ab initio potential energy surface (PES) was refined with selected (32)S(16)O2 HITRAN data. Compared to HITRAN, the root-mean-squares error (RMS) error for all J=0-80 rovibrational energy levels computed on the refined PES (denoted Ames-1) is 0.013 cm(exp -1). Combined with a CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pV(Q+d)Z dipole moment surface (DMS), an infrared (IR) line list (denoted Ames-296K) has been computed at 296K and covers up to 8,000 cm(exp -1). Compared to the HITRAN and CDMS databases, the intensity agreement for most vibrational bands is better than 85-90%. Our predictions for (34)S(16)O2 band origins, higher energy (32)S(16)O2 band origins and missing (32)S(16)O2 IR bands have been verified by most recent experiments and available HITRAN data. We conclude that the Ames-1 PES is able to predict (32/34)S(16)O2 band origins below 5500 cm(exp -1) with 0.01-0.03 cm(exp -1) uncertainties, and the Ames-296K line list provides continuous, reliable and accurate IR simulations. The Ka-dependence of both line position and line intensity errors is discussed. The line list will greatly facilitate SO2 IR spectral experimental analysis, as well as elimination of SO2 lines in high-resolution astronomical observations.

  3. Surface gas pollutants in Lhasa, a highland city of Tibet - current levels and pollution implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, L.; Lin, W. L.; Deji, Y. Z.; La, B.; Tsering, P. M.; Xu, X. B.; Wang, W.

    2014-10-01

    Through several years of development, the city of Lhasa has become one of the most populated and urbanized areas on the highest plateau in the world. In the process of urbanization, current and potential air quality issues have been gradually concerned. To investigate the current status of air pollution in Lhasa, various gas pollutants including NOx, CO, SO2, and O3, were continuously measured from June 2012 to May 2013 at an urban site (29.40° N, 91.08° E, 3650 m a.s.l.). The seasonal variations of primary gas pollutants exhibited a peak from November to January with a large variability. High mixing ratios of primary trace gases almost exclusively occurred under low wind speed and showed no distinct dependence on wind direction, implying local urban emissions to be predominant. A comparison of NO2, CO, and SO2 mixing ratios in summer between 1998 and 2012 indicated a significant increase in emissions of these gas pollutants and a change in their intercorrelations, as a result of a substantial growth in the demand of energy consumption using fossil fuels instead of previously widely used biomass. The pronounced diurnal double peaks of primary trace gases in all seasons suggested automobile exhaust to be a major emission source in Lhasa. The secondary gas pollutant O3 displayed an average diurnal cycle of a shallow flat peak for about 4-5 h in the afternoon and a minimum in the early morning. Nighttime O3 was sometimes completely consumed by the high level of NOx. Seasonally, the variations of O3 mixing ratios displayed a low valley in winter and a peak in spring. In autumn and winter, transport largely contributed to the observed O3 mixing ratios, given its dependence on wind speed and wind direction, while in spring and summer photochemistry played an important role. A more efficient buildup of O3 mixing ratios in the morning and a higher peak in the afternoon was found in summer 2012 than in 1998. An enhancement in O3 mixing ratios would be expected in the

  4. Surface gas pollutants in Lhasa, a highland city of Tibet: current levels and pollution implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, L.; Lin, W. L.; Deji, Y. Z.; La, B.; Tsering, P. M.; Xu, X. B.; Wang, W.

    2014-05-01

    Through several years of development, the city of Lhasa has become one of the most populated and urbanized areas on the highest plateau in the world. In the process of urbanization, current and potential air quality issues have been gradually concerned. To investigate the current status of air pollution in Lhasa, various gas pollutants including NOx, CO, SO2 and O3 were continuously measured from June 2012 to May 2013 at an urban site (29.40° N, 91.08° E, 3650 m a.s.l.). The seasonal variations of primary gas pollutants exhibited a peak from November to January with a large variability. High concentrations of primary trace gases almost exclusively occurred under low wind speed and showed no distinct dependence on wind direction, implying local urban emissions to be predominant. A comparison of NO2, CO and SO2 concentrations in summer between 1998 and 2012 indicated a significant increase in emissions of these gas pollutants and a change in their intercorrelations, as a result of a substantial growth in the demand of energy consumption using fossil fuels instead of previously widely used biofuels. The pronounced diurnal double peaks of primary trace gases in all seasons suggested automobile exhaust to be a major emission source in Lhasa. The secondary gas pollutant O3 displayed an average diurnal cycle of a shallow flat peak for about 4-5 h in the afternoon and a minimum in the early morning. Nighttime O3 was sometimes completely consumed by the high level of NOx. Seasonally, the variations of O3 concentrations displayed a low valley in winter and a peak in spring. In autumn and winter, transport largely contributed to the observed O3 concentrations, given its dependence on wind speed and wind direction, while in spring and summer photochemistry played an important role. A more efficient buildup of O3 concentrations in the morning and a higher peak in the afternoon was found in summer 2012 than in 1998. An enhancement in O3 concentrations would be expected in the

  5. A New Model to Construct Ice Stream Surface Elevation Profiles and Calculate Contributions to Sea-Level Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Yosuke

    Sea-level rise is a problem that affects regions worldwide - from the marshlands of the San Francisco Bay Area to the farmlands in coastal Bangladesh. Three-dimensional ice sheet models are the principle tools to evaluate mass loss from ice sheets that contribute to sea-level rise. We recognize that given the current limitations in representing the full extent of dynamical processes that affect ice sheet mass loss in 3-D ice sheet models, we cannot make reliable forecasts of sea-level rise from melting polar land ice. Thus, we take a completely different approach to gaining insight about the potential effects of climate change-induced perturbations on ice sheets. We build a flowline model that resolves the fast-flowing portions of ice sheets (i.e., ice streams). We express the dynamics along the flowline with (a) vertical shear deformation, (b) horizontal shear deformation, and (c) basal slip. Knowledge accumulated from prior force balance analyses performed on some polar ice streams allows us to form relations between (a) and ( c), and between (a) and (c) combined and (b). Based on these relationships, we numerically construct surface elevation profiles along flowlines centered on ten select ice streams in Greenland and Antarctica, by prescribing three climate change-induced perturbations: grounding line retreat, ice stream widening, and surface mass balance increase. Comparing these constructed profiles to the current observed ones allows us to quantify the effect of these perturbations on the various characteristics that these ten ice streams possess. Pine Island Glacier, which flows over a long overdeepening, will lose more than half of its stored ice volume that is contributable to sea-level rise before it reaches a possible steady state. Recovery Ice Stream, with its slippery base, long stretch of streaming-flow, and longest flowline among those we examined, loses the most mass (812 km3/km width). Jutulstraumen, which has little room to widen and a short

  6. Trends in Upper-Level Cloud Cover and Surface Divergence Over the Tropical Indo-Pacific Ocean Between 1952 And 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Joel R.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the spatial pattern of linear trends in surface-observed upper-level (combined mid-level and High-level) cloud cover, precipitation, and surface divergence over the tropical Indo-Pacific Ocean during 1952-1957. Cloud values were obtained from the Extended Edited Cloud Report Archive (EECRA), precipitation values were obtained from the Hulme/Climate Research Unit Data Set, and surface divergence was alternatively calculated from wind reported Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set and from Smith and Reynolds Extended Reconstructed sea level pressure data.

  7. Decreased blood hepatitis B surface antibody levels linked to e-waste lead exposure in preschool children.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xijin; Chen, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Jian; Guo, Pi; Fu, Tingzao; Dai, Yifeng; Lin, Stanley L; Huo, Xia

    2015-11-15

    Lead (Pb) is a widespread environmental contaminant that can profoundly affect the immune system in vaccinated children. To explore the association between blood Pb and HBsAb levels in children chronically exposed to Pb, we measured hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb) titers, to reflect the immune response in the children of Guiyu, an electronic and electrical waste (e-waste) recycling area well known for environmental Pb contamination. We performed secondary exploratory analyses of blood Pb levels and plasma HBsAb titers in samples, taken in two phases between 2011 and 2012, from 590 children from Guiyu (exposed group) and Haojiang (reference group). Children living in the exposed area had higher blood Pb levels and lower HBsAb titers compared with children from the reference area. At each phase, generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs) showed that HBsAb titers were significantly negatively associated with child blood Pb levels. This work shows that a decreased immune response to hepatitis B vaccine and immune system might have potential harm to children with chronic Pb exposure. Importantly, nearly 50% of chronically exposed children failed to develop sufficient immunity to hepatitis in response to vaccination. Thus different vaccination strategies are needed for children living under conditions of chronic Pb exposure. PMID:26022852

  8. Surface Carrier Dynamics on Semiconductor Studied with Femtosecond Core-Level Photoelectron Spectroscopy Using Extreme Ultraviolet High-Order Harmonic Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguri, K.; Tsunoi, T.; Kato, K.; Nakano, H.; Nishikawa, T.; Gotoh, H.; Tateno, K.; Sogawa, T.

    2013-03-01

    We have used a femtosecond time-resolved core-level surface PES system based on the 92-eV harmonic source to study the surface carrier dynamics that induces the transient SPV on semiconductor surfaces. We clarified the temporal evolution of the transient SPV characterized by the time of the photo-generated carrier separation and recombination. This result demonstrates the potential of this technique for clarifying the initial stage of the surface carrier dynamics after photoexcitation.

  9. Skin-depth lattice strain, core-level trap depression and valence charge polarization of Al surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Bo, Maolin; Liu, Yonghui; Guo, Yongling; Wang, Haibin; Yue, Jian; Huang, Yongli

    2016-01-01

    Clarifying the origin for surface core-level shift (SCLS) and gaining quantitative information regarding the coordination-resolved local strain, binding energy (BE) shift and cohesive energy change have been a challenge. Here, we show that a combination of the bond order-length-strength (BOLS) premise, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and the ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculations of aluminum (Al) 2p3/2 energy shift of Al surfaces has enabled us to derive such information, namely, (i) the 2p3/2 energy of an isolated Al atom (72.146 ± 0.003eV) and its bulk shift (0.499 eV); (ii) the skin lattice contracts by up to 12.5% and the BE density increases by 70%; and (iii) the cohesive energy drops up to 38%. It is affirmed that the shorter and stronger bonds between under-coordinated atoms provide a perturbation to the Hamiltonian and hence lead to the local strain, quantum entrapment and valence charge polarization. Findings should help in understanding the phenomena of surface pre-melting and skin-high elasticity, in general.

  10. Influence of surface states on deep level transient spectroscopy in AlGaN/GaN heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Zhu; Xiao-Hua, Ma; Wei-Wei, Chen; Bin, Hou; Jie-Jie, Zhu; Meng, Zhang; Li-Xiang, Chen; Yan-Rong, Cao; Yue, Hao

    2016-06-01

    Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) as a method to investigate deep traps in AlGaN/GaN heterostructure or high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) has been widely utilized. The DLTS measurements under different bias conditions are carried out in this paper. Two hole-like traps with active energies of E v + 0.47 eV, and E v + 0.10 eV are observed, which are related to surface states. The electron traps with active energies of E c ‑ 0.56 eV are located in the channel, those with E c ‑ 0.33 eV and E c ‑ 0.88 eV are located in the AlGaN layer. The presence of surface states has a strong influence on the detection of electron traps, especially when the electron traps are low in density. The DLTS signal peak height of the electron trap is reduced and even disappears due to the presence of plentiful surface state. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CBA00606), the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University, China (Grant No. NCET-12-0915), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61334002 and 61404097).

  11. Trace metal and metalloid levels in surface water of Marcal River before and after the Ajka red mud spill, Hungary.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Andrea Szabó; Szabó, János; Vass, István

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare and assess the dissolved concentrations of trace elements (As, Zn, Hg, Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb and Cu) in surface water of Marcal River before and after the red mud spill that occurred in Ajka, western Hungary, in October 2010. The caustic sludge flooded the surrounding settlements and polluted the nearby Torna Creek, which flows through the Marcal and Raba rivers into the Danube. A total of 92 surface water samples were collected from the Marcal River in the period of 2007-2012 and analysed for dissolved trace metal(loid)s by atomic absorption spectroscopy method. After the spill, the water management authority initially focused on acid dosing of surface waters to lower pH and was effective in lowering both pH and metal(loid) concentrations. Among the dissolved trace metal(loid)s, arsenic and nickel levels were moderately higher in the Marcal River 2 years since the spill compared to that observed in the pre-disaster period. The concentrations of dissolved trace metal(loid)s did not exceed the European water quality standards and the US Environmental Protection Agency aquatic life criteria values (excluding one sample for cadmium). PMID:23975713

  12. Carbon Monoxide, Nitric Oxide, and Nitrogen Dioxide Levels in Gas Ovens Related to Surface Pinking of Cooked Beef and Turkey.

    PubMed

    Cornforth; Rabovitser; Ahuja; Wagner; Hanson; Cummings; Chudnovsky

    1998-01-19

    Carbon monoxide (CO) and total nitrogen oxide (NO(x)()) levels were monitored during meat cookery with a standard Ovenpak and a new ultralow-NO(x)() (ULN) cyclonic gas burner. With the standard burner, CO varied from 103 to 152 ppm, NO(x)() was 1.3-10.7 ppm, and surface pinking was observed on both beef and turkey. The ULN burner at optimal efficiency produced only 6.7 ppm of CO and 1 ppm of NO(x)(), insufficient to cause surface pinking. To determine the relative contribution of CO and NO(x)() to pinking, trials were also conducted in an electric oven with various pure gases. Pinking was not observed with up to 149 ppm of CO or 5 ppm of NO. However, as little as 0.4 ppm of nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) caused pinking of turkey rolls. Beef roasts were pink at >2.5 ppm of NO(2). Thus, pinking previously attributed to CO and NO in gas ovens is instead due to NO(2), which has much greater reactivity than NO with moisture at meat surfaces. PMID:10554228

  13. Cell surface Glut1 levels distinguish human CD4 and CD8 T lymphocyte subsets with distinct effector functions

    PubMed Central

    Cretenet, Gaspard; Clerc, Isabelle; Matias, Maria; Loisel, Severine; Craveiro, Marco; Oburoglu, Leal; Kinet, Sandrina; Mongellaz, Cédric; Dardalhon, Valérie; Taylor, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    CD4 and CD8 T lymphocyte activation requires the generation of sufficient energy to support new biosynthetic demands. Following T cell receptor (TCR) engagement, these requirements are met by an increased glycolysis, due, at least in part, to induction of the Glut1 glucose transporter. As Glut1 is upregulated on tumor cells in response to hypoxia, we assessed whether surface Glut1 levels regulate the antigen responsiveness of human T lymphocytes in both hypoxic and atmospheric oxygen conditions. Notably, Glut1 upregulation in response to TCR stimulation was significantly higher in T lymphocytes activated under hypoxic as compared to atmospheric oxygen conditions. Furthermore, TCR-stimulated human T lymphocytes sorted on the basis of Glut1-Lo and Glut1-Hi profiles maintained distinct characteristics, irrespective of the oxygen tension. While T cells activated in hypoxia divided less than those activated in atmospheric oxygen, Glut1-Hi lymphocytes exhibited increased effector phenotype acquisition, augmented proliferation, and an inverted CD4/CD8 ratio in both oxygen conditions. Moreover, Glut1-Hi T lymphocytes exhibited a significantly enhanced ability to produce IFN-γ and this secretion potential was completely dependent on continued glycolysis. Thus, Glut1 surface levels identify human T lymphocytes with distinct effector functions in both hypoxic and atmospheric oxygen tensions. PMID:27067254

  14. Altitude of potentiometric surface, fall 1985, and historic water-level changes in the Fort Pillow aquifer in western Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parks, W.S.; Carmichael, J.K.

    1990-01-01

    Recharge to the Fort Pillow aquifer of Tertiary age in Tennessee is from precipitation on the outcrop, which forms a narrow belt across western Tennessee, and by downward infiltration of water from the overlying fluvial deposits of Tertiary and Quaternary age and alluvium of Quaternary age or, where the upper confining unit is absent, from the overlying Memphis aquifer of Tertiary age. The potentiometric surface in the Fort Pillow aquifer slopes gently westward from the outcrop-recharge area, and the water moves slowly in that direction. A depression in the potentiometric surface in the Memphis area is the result of past pumping at Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division (MLGW) well fields (1924-74), and past and present pumping at an industrial well field at Memphis, and the municipal well field at West Memphis, Ark. Water levels in areas affected by pumping have declined at average rates ranging from 0.4 to 0. 9 ft/year during the period 1945-85. The greatest rate of decline was as much as 4.0 ft/year between 1945 and 1954 in an observation well in a well field of MLGW at Memphis. In 1971, MLGW ceased pumping from the Fort Pillow aquifer at this well field, and between 1972 and 1976, water levels rose about 28 ft in this well. Withdrawals from the Fort Pillow aquifer in western Tennessee in 1985 averaged about 12 million gal/day. (USGS)

  15. Controlling Knee Swing Initiation and Ankle Plantarflexion With an Active Prosthesis on Level and Inclined Surfaces at Variable Walking Speeds

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Ann M.; Young, Aaron J.; Hargrove, Levi J.

    2014-01-01

    Improving lower-limb prostheses is important to enhance the mobility of amputees. The purpose of this paper is to introduce an impedance-based control strategy (consisting of four novel algorithms) for an active knee and ankle prosthesis and test its generalizability across multiple walking speeds, walking surfaces, and users. The four algorithms increased ankle stiffness throughout stance, decreased knee stiffness during terminal stance, as well as provided powered ankle plantarflexion and knee swing initiation through modifications of equilibrium positions of the ankle and knee, respectively. Seven amputees (knee disarticulation and transfemoral levels) walked at slow, comfortable, and hurried speeds on level and inclined (10°) surfaces. The prosthesis was tuned at their comfortable level ground walking speed. We further quantified trends in prosthetic knee and ankle kinematics, and kinetics across conditions. Subjects modulated their walking speed by ±25% (average) from their comfortable speeds. As speed increased, increasing ankle angles and velocities as well as stance phase ankle power and plantarflexion torque were observed. At slow and comfortable speeds, plantarflexion torque was increased on the incline. At slow and comfortable speeds, stance phase positive knee power was increased and knee torque more flexor on the incline. As speed increased, knee torque became less flexor on the incline. These algorithms were shown to generalize well across speed, produce gait mechanics that compare favorably with non-amputee data, and display evidence of scalable device function. They have the potential to reduce the challenge of clinically configuring such devices and increase their viability during daily use. PMID:27170878

  16. Core-level spectroscopy investigation of the Mo{sub 0.75}Re{sub 0.25}(100) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Lyman, P.F.; Zehner, D.M.

    1993-10-01

    Preferential surface segregation in the Mo{sub 0.75}(100) surface region was investigated using high-resolution core-level spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation. The magnitude and direction of the surface core-level shifts observed in this study can be qualitatively understood by comparison to W and Mo core-level shifts. Measured core-level intensities are found to be consistent with the segregation of Mo to the surface of the alloy, with an enrichment of Re in the second layer (as found in previous investigations). It is inferred that both Tc and Os will segregate to the Mo{sub 0.75}Re{sub 0.25}(100) surface.

  17. Levels of flame retardants HBCD, TBBPA and TBC in surface soils from an industrialized region of East China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jianfeng; Feng, Jiayong; Li, Xinhu; Li, Gang

    2014-05-01

    Hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) are of increasing concern because of their potential environmental persistence, bioaccumulation and toxicity. Tris-(2,3-dibromopropyl)isocyanurate (TBC) is another brominated flame retardant (BFR) which has recently been found in the environment and begun to attract attention. The objective of this study is to determine the concentration of these three BFRs in surface soil samples collected from a heavily industrialized and urbanized region in East China. Levels of ∑HBCDs ranged from below detection limits (0.020 ng g(-1)) to 102.6 ng g(-1) on a dry weight basis (dw) with a median level of 15.8 ng g(-1) dw. For TBBPA, the concentration ranged from below detection limits (0.025 ng g(-1)) to 78.6 ng g(-1) dw with a median level of 9.17 ng g(-1) dw. TBC was found at relatively lower concentrations ranging from below detection limits (0.024 ng g(-1)) to 16.4 ng g(-1) dw with a median level of 0.95 ng g(-1) dw. The concentrations of these three BFRs are significantly positively correlated, indicating a common source. Variable BFRs levels were found in different types of soils, with significantly higher concentrations observed at waste dumping sites and industrial areas. The diastereoisomer profiles of HBCDs in most of the soil samples differed from those of the commercial products. The mass inventories of HBCDs, TBBPA and TBC in this region gave preliminarily estimates of 6.68, 2.67 and 0.85 kg, respectively. Therefore, the ubiquitous contamination of soils by these BFRs may well reflect their widespread usage in the study area. PMID:24599331

  18. The Site Investigation Of Low-Level Radioactive Waste For Sub-Surface Disposal Facility In Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoya, S.; Sasaki, T.

    2006-12-01

    [1.Concept of the sub-surface disposal facility] In Japan, the facilities of Low-Level Radioactive West (LLW) for near-surface disposal have already been in operation. Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited (JNFL) has a plan of a new facility of LLW for sub-surface disposal with engineered barrier, for short "the sub-surface disposal facility".This facility can accept the relatively higher low-level waste from unclear power plant operation and in core materials from the decommissioning, estimated about 20 thousands cubic meter in total.In addition, this will accept transuranim (TRU) slightly contaminated waste from reprocessing plant operation and decommissioning. It shall be located at a sufficient depth enough to avoid normal human activities in future. [2.Site investigation] From 2001 to 2006,the site investigation on geology and hydrogeology has been performed in order to acquire the basic data for the design and the safety assessment for the sub-surface disposal facility.The candidate area is located at the site of JNFL, where Rokkasho-mura, Aomori Prefecture in the northern area of the Mainland of Japan.To confirm geology hydraulic conditions and geo-chemistry, 22 boring survey including 6 holes in swamp and marsh have been performed. The 1km long access tunnel (the entrance level EL 8.0m, incline of 1/10) to the altitude of EL -86m underground, around 100m depth from surface, has excavated. During excavating the tunnel, observation of geology, permeability tests, pore water pressure measurements and so on has been performed in situ.And the large size test cavern of 18m diameters was constructed at the end of the tunnel to demonstrate stability of the tunnel. Prior to the excavation, 3 measuring tunnels were excavated surrounding the test cavern to examine the excavation. [3.Geological features] The sedimentary rock called Takahoko formation at the Neogene period is distributed upper than EL-500m in the candidate area.The quaternary stratum about 10m in thickness is

  19. Links between type E botulism outbreaks, lake levels, and surface water temperatures in Lake Michigan, 1963-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafrancois, Brenda Moraska; Riley, Stephen C.; Blehert, David S.; Ballmann, Anne E.

    2011-01-01

    Relationships between large-scale environmental factors and the incidence of type E avian botulism outbreaks in Lake Michigan were examined from 1963 to 2008. Avian botulism outbreaks most frequently occurred in years with low mean annual water levels, and lake levels were significantly lower in outbreak years than in non-outbreak years. Mean surface water temperatures in northern Lake Michigan during the period when type E outbreaks tend to occur (July through September) were significantly higher in outbreak years than in non-outbreak years. Trends in fish populations did not strongly correlate with botulism outbreaks, although botulism outbreaks in the 1960s coincided with high alewife abundance, and recent botulism outbreaks coincided with rapidly increasing round goby abundance. Botulism outbreaks occurred cyclically, and the frequency of outbreaks did not increase over the period of record. Climate change scenarios for the Great Lakes predict lower water levels and warmer water temperatures. As a consequence, the frequency and magnitude of type E botulism outbreaks in the Great Lakes may increase.

  20. Ab initio potential energy surface and vibration-rotation energy levels of silicon dicarbide, SiC2.

    PubMed

    Koput, Jacek

    2016-10-01

    The accurate ground-state potential energy surface of silicon dicarbide, SiC2 , has been determined from ab initio calculations using the coupled-cluster approach. Results obtained with the conventional and explicitly correlated coupled-cluster methods were compared. The core-electron correlation, higher-order valence-electron correlation, and scalar relativistic effects were taken into account. The potential energy barrier to the linear SiCC configuration was predicted to be 1782 cm(-1) . The vibration-rotation energy levels of the SiC2 , (29) SiC2 , (30) SiC2 , and SiC(13) C isotopologues were calculated using a variational method. The experimental vibration-rotation energy levels of the main isotopologue were reproduced to high accuracy. In particular, the experimental energy levels of the highly anharmonic vibrational ν3 mode of SiC2 were reproduced to within 6.7 cm(-1) , up to as high as the v3  = 16 state. PMID:27481562

  1. Features, events, processes, and safety factor analysis applied to a near-surface low-level radioactive waste disposal facility

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, M.E.; Dolinar, G.M.; Lange, B.A.

    1995-12-31

    An analysis of features, events, processes (FEPs) and other safety factors was applied to AECL`s proposed IRUS (Intrusion Resistant Underground Structure) near-surface LLRW disposal facility. The FEP analysis process which had been developed for and applied to high-level and transuranic disposal concepts was adapted for application to a low-level facility for which significant efforts in developing a safety case had already been made. The starting point for this process was a series of meetings of the project team to identify and briefly describe FEPs or safety factors which they thought should be considered. At this early stage participants were specifically asked not to screen ideas. This initial list was supplemented by selecting FEPs documented in other programs and comments received from an initial regulatory review. The entire list was then sorted by topic and common issues were grouped, and issues were classified in three priority categories and assigned to individuals for resolution. In this paper, the issue identification and resolution process will be described, from the initial description of an issue to its resolution and inclusion in the various levels of the safety case documentation.

  2. Office of River Protection (ORP) Monthly Performance Report for September 2000

    SciTech Connect

    WAGNILD, K.J.

    2000-11-21

    CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) had an outstanding year. The most significant accomplishments that occurred throughout fiscal year (FY) 2000 include the following: On April 24,2000, DOE ORP received BNFL Inc. B-1 deliverables and CHG completed Phase 1 Part B-2 Readiness-to-Proceed (RTP), to demonstrate the ability to provide waste feed to be treated/stored in a long-term disposal facility. The RTP consisted of key enabling assumptions, critical risks, waste handling actions, financial and schedule risk analysis, staffing plans, a project execution plan, and a resource loaded schedule. The Department determined that the BNFL Inc. proposal was unacceptable in many areas and essentially shifted the financial risk from BNFL Inc. back to the Federal government; thus a key benefit of privatization was lost. On May 8,2000, the Secretary announced that the privatization contract be terminated. In the interim, the Department directed the onsite Tank Farm Contractor, CHG, to continue the design work scope for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant until a new waste treatment contract is awarded. DOE ORP released its request for proposals (RFP) for a new Waste Treatment and Immobilization contractor on August 31,2000 and is on schedule to meet award of the contract by January 15,2000. CHG successfully reached 1,000,000 safe work hours without a lost workday injury or illness on Wednesday, September 23,2000. The record was initiated on May 23,2000 and took 114 days to achieve. All Tri-Party Agreement and Consent Decree milestones scheduled for the fiscal year were completed. Along with meeting all enforceable agreement milestones, nineteen out of twenty Performance Incentives (PIS) were successfully completed. The 20 PIS comprised of 114 specific deliverables, of which 107 were met. In addition to the 20 scheduled PIS, six accelerated activities were completed. Tank 241-SY-101 hydrogen generation was successfully mitigated this fiscal year, including a series of

  3. Minutes of the Tank Waste Science Panel Meeting March 25--27, 1992. Hanford Tank Safety Project

    SciTech Connect

    Schutz, W W; Strachan, D M

    1992-08-01

    Discussions from the seventh meeting of the Tank Waste Science are presented in Colorado. The subject areas included the generation of gases in Tank 241-SY-101, the possible use of sonication as a mitigation method, and analysis for organic constituents in core samples. Results presented and discussed include: Ferrocyanides appear to be rapidly dissolved in 1M NaOH; upon standing in the laboratory at ambient conditions oxalate precipitates from simulated wastes containing HEDTA. This suggests that one of the main components in the solids in Tank 241-SY-101 is oxalate; hydrogen evolved from waste samples from Tank 241-SY-101 is five times that observed in the off gas from the tank; data suggest that mitigation of Tank 241-SY-101 will not cause a high release of dissolved N{sub 2}O; when using a slurry for radiation studies, a portion of the generated gases is very difficult to remove. To totally recover the generated gases, the solids must first be dissolved. This result may have an impact on mitigation by mixing if the gases are not released. Using {sup 13}C-labeled organics in thermal degradation studies has allowed researchers to illucidate much of the kinetic mechanism for the degradation of HEDTA and glycolate. In addition to some of the intermediate, more complex organic species, oxalate, formate, and CO{sub 2} were identified; and analytic methods for organics in radioactive complex solutions such as that found in Tank 241-SY-101 have been developed and others continue to be developed.

  4. Progress in our understanding of structure bonding and reactivity of metal surfaces and adsorbed monolayers at the molecular level: A 25 year perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somorjai, G. A.

    1995-12-01

    Over fifty techniques have been developed during the past 25 years that permit molecular level investigation of structure and bonding of the surface monolayer. Among them, low-energy electron diffraction surface crystallography and vibrational spectroscopies using photons and electrons have contributed the lion's share of quantitative experimental data. (Most of these investigations have utilized small area (~1 cm 2) external surfaces, although microporous large internal surface area samples were also scrutinized.) From these studies, the physical picture of the surface which emerges is one of a separate phase with distinct structure, composition, and bonding that is distinguishable from the solid bulk. The new surface phenomena which were discovered include clean surface reconstruction, adsorbate-induced restructuring, ordering and reactivity of surface defects (steps and kinks), cluster-like bonding, the large mobility of adsorbates, and the coadsorption bond. Techniques were also developed that permit in situ molecular level study of surfaces during reactions at high pressures and temperatures with good time resolution (10 -12-10 -3 sec). Molecular surface science has had a great impact in major applications involving surface phenomena-selective adsorption, heterogeneous catalysis, coatings, microelectronics, electrochemistry, and tribology-and spawned new surface technologies. The demands of these applications focus attention on the behavior of the buried interface, both solid-liquid and solid-solid.

  5. High-resolution core-level spectroscopy of Si(100)c(4 × 2) and some metal-induced Si(111)√3 × √3 surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhrberg, R. I. G.

    2001-12-01

    High-resolution core-level spectroscopy has been applied to the Si(100)c(4 × 2) surface. A correct decomposition of the Si 2p spectrum of the clean surface is important for studies of adsorption of different species and the formation of various surface reconstructions. A very well-resolved Si 2p spectrum is presented for the Si(100)c(4 × 2) surface. The decomposition of this spectrum verifies the original decomposition scheme introduced by Landemark et al (Landemark E, Karlsson C J, Chao Y-C and Uhrberg R I G 1992 Phys. Rev. Lett. 69 1588). Core-level spectra of some metal-induced Si(111)√3 × √3 surfaces are also presented. A comparison is made between the √3 × √3 reconstructions formed on Si(111) by In, a group III atom, and by Sn, a group IV atom. Both the 4d core levels of the adatoms and the Si 2p core-level spectra are discussed. Different kinds of deviation from an ideal surface may introduce a significant broadening of the core-level spectra. The effect of additional Ag atoms is discussed in the case of the Ag/Si(111)√3 × √3 surface. By reducing the surplus of Ag atoms on this surface, a Si 2p spectrum with extremely narrow components has been obtained.

  6. Design and operational considerations of United States commercial near-surface low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Birk, S.M.

    1997-10-01

    In accordance with the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, states are responsible for providing for disposal of commercially generated low-level radioactive waste (LLW) within their borders. LLW in the US is defined as all radioactive waste that is not classified as spent nuclear fuel, high-level radioactive waste, transuranic waste, or by-product material resulting from the extraction of uranium from ore. Commercial waste includes LLW generated by hospitals, universities, industry, pharmaceutical companies, and power utilities. LLW generated by the country`s defense operations is the responsibility of the Federal government and its agency, the Department of Energy. The commercial LLRW disposal sites discussed in this report are located near: Sheffield, Illinois (closed); Maxey Flats, Kentucky (closed); Beatty, Nevada (closed); West Valley, New York (closed); Barnwell, South Carolina (operating); Richland, Washington (operating); Ward Valley, California, (proposed); Sierra Blanca, Texas (proposed); Wake County, North Carolina (proposed); and Boyd County, Nebraska (proposed). While some comparisons between the sites described in this report are appropriate, this must be done with caution. In addition to differences in climate and geology between sites, LLW facilities in the past were not designed and operated to today`s standards. This report summarizes each site`s design and operational considerations for near-surface disposal of low-level radioactive waste. The report includes: a description of waste characteristics; design and operational features; post closure measures and plans; cost and duration of site characterization, construction, and operation; recent related R and D activities for LLW treatment and disposal; and the status of the LLW system in the US.

  7. How important is the impact of land-surface inundation on seawater intrusion caused by sea-level rise?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ataie-Ashtiani, Behzad; Werner, Adrian D.; Simmons, Craig T.; Morgan, Leanne K.; Lu, Chunhui

    2013-11-01

    The influence of sea-level rise (SLR) on seawater intrusion (SWI) has been the subject of several publications, which consider collectively a range of functional relationships within various hydrogeological and SLR settings. Most of the recent generalized analyses of SWI under SLR neglect land-surface inundation (LSI) by seawater. A simple analytical method is applied to quantitatively assess the influence and importance of LSI on SLR-SWI problems under idealized conditions. The results demonstrate that LSI induces significantly more extensive SWI, with inland penetration up to an order of magnitude larger in the worst case, compared to the effects of pressure changes at the shoreline in unconfined coastal aquifers with realistic parameters. The study also outlines some of the remaining research challenges in related areas, concluding that LSI impacts are among other important research questions regarding the SLR-SWI problems that have not been addressed, including the effects of aquifer heterogeneities, real-world three dimensionality, and mitigation measures.

  8. Near-field chemical composition of porewaters in a near-surface low-level radioactive waste vault

    SciTech Connect

    Caron, F.; Haas, M.K.; Torok, J.; Manni, G.

    1997-12-31

    A long-term waste degradation experiment has been performed with actual low-level radioactive wastes (LLRW) at the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL), to support the licensing and modelling efforts for near-surface disposal. The wastes consist of paper, mop heads, paper towels, used clothing, etc. The wastes were compacted into bales and sealed into separate steel containers, which were connected to leachate collection systems for sampling. The leachates collected had a composition typical of landfill leachates. The major inorganic ions were Na, Ca, Cl, and Fe, and the ionic strength was {approximately}0.05 M. The relative distribution of inorganic ions in the leachates was remarkably similar between bales. Volatile fatty acids (VFA) were the major species of dissolved organic carbon (DOC; total DOC up to 7,000 mg/L). A typical composition of leachates is proposed, which can be used in geochemical and source term modelling.

  9. Role of Quantum and Surface-State Effects in the Bulk Fermi-Level Position of Ultrathin Bi Films.

    PubMed

    Hirahara, T; Shirai, T; Hajiri, T; Matsunami, M; Tanaka, K; Kimura, S; Hasegawa, S; Kobayashi, K

    2015-09-01

    We performed high-resolution photon-energy and polarization-dependent ARPES measurements on ultrathin Bi(111) films [6-180 bilayers (BL), 2.5-70 nm thick] formed on Si(111). In addition to the extensively studied surface states (SSs), the edge of the bulk valence band was clearly measured by using S-polarized light. We found direct evidence that this valence band edge, which forms a hole pocket in the bulk Bi crystal, does not cross the Fermi level for the 180 BL thick film. This is consistent with the predicted semimetal-to-semiconductor transition due to the quantum-size effect [V.B. Sandomirskii, Sov. Phys. JETP 25, 101 (1967)]. However, it became metallic again when the film thickness was decreased (below 30 BL). A plausible explanation for this phenomenon is the modification of the charge neutrality condition due to the size effect of the SSs. PMID:26382694

  10. Levels and spatial distribution of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in surface soil from the Yangtze River Delta, China.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shuangxin; Zhang, Lifei; Yang, Wenlong; Zhou, Li; Dong, Liang; Huang, Yeru

    2014-12-01

    Surface soil samples were collected from Suzhou, Wuxi and Nantong in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD), China. Eight BDE congeners (BDE-28, 47, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183 and 209) were measured to determine the levels and compositional profiles in the samples. The concentrations of Σ7PBDEs and BDE-209 ranged from 0.04 to 2.23 μg/kg dw and 1.48 to 41.7 μg/kg dw in the samples, respectively. BDE-209 was the predominant congener (contributing to 69.2 %-99.8 % of Σ8PBDEs) in all samples. It was found that small towns and rural economic development zones in this region had also become sources of polybrominated diphenyl ethers pollutants to surrounding areas. Investigation of the pattern of BDE congener profiles showed that deca- and octa- technical formulations as emission sources were identified in the samples collected from the YRD. PMID:25168693

  11. A Wafer-Level Sn-Rich Au—Sn Bonding Technique and Its Application in Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xu; Lv, Xing-Dong; Wei, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Zhe; Yang, Jin-Ling; Qi, Zhi-Mei; Yang, Fu-Hua

    2014-05-01

    Sn-rich Au—Sn solder bonding is systematically investigated. High shear strength (64MPa) and good hermeticity (a leak rate lower than 1 × 10-7 torr·l/s) are obtained for Au—Sn solder with 54 wt% Sn bonded at 310°C. The AuSn2 phase with the highest Vickers-hardness among the four stable intermetallic compounds of the Au—Sn system makes a major contribution to the high bonding strength. This bonding technique has been successfully used to package the Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) sensors. The Sn-rich Au—Sn solder bonding provides a reliable, low-cost, low-temperature and wafer-level hermetic packaging solution for the micro-electromechanical system devices and has potential applications in high-end biomedical sensors.

  12. Levels of Serum Immunoglobulin G Specific to Bacterial Surface Protein A of Tannerella forsythia are Related to Periodontal Status

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Lindsay M.; Dunford, Robert G.; Genco, Robert J.; Sharma, Ashu

    2015-01-01

    Background Tannerella forsythia (Tf) is a Gram-negative anaerobe implicated in the development of periodontal disease. Bacterial surface protein A (BspA) is a surface-expressed and -secreted protein that is recognized as an important virulence factor of Tf. This study was undertaken to determine whether Tf BspA induces an antibody response in periodontal disease. We hypothesized that serum immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibody levels against BspA correlate with the disease of patients. Methods Sera were obtained from 100 patients with cardiac disorders and periodontal disease and 73 patients who experienced myocardial infarction but were periodontally healthy. Sera samples were assayed for anti-BspA antibody (total IgG and IgG subtypes) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Antibody levels were measured in ELISA units by using an arbitrary patient as a standard. Results A negative correlation was found with BspA-specific total IgG antibody titers and the severity of disease measured as the clinical attachment level (CAL) when healthy and diseased groups were analyzed separately (healthy group: [−0.23, correlation value] Student’s t value [73 degrees of freedom] = 1.99; P = 0.05; diseased group: [−0.21] t [100 degrees of freedom] = 2.12; P = 0.03]). However, there was a positive correlation ([0.18 correlation value] Student’s t value [173 degrees of freedom] = 2.39; P = 0.017) when healthy and diseased groups were combined. A strong positive correlation ([0.338 correlation value] Student’s t value [173 degrees of freedom] = 4.69; P <0.0001) between the BspA-specific IgG titers and periodontal probing depth was observed when healthy and disease groups were combined. Conclusions Data demonstrated that antibodies to Tf BspA were elicited in patients with periodontal disease, and antibody levels were associated with the disease severity. Furthermore, data suggested that anti-BspA IgG might have a protective function in periodontal disease by minimizing the

  13. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) Product Specification Document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; Ardizzone, Joseph V.; Kim, Gi-Kong; Lucchesi, Robert A.; Smith, Edmond B.; Weiss, Barry H.

    2015-01-01

    This is the Product Specification Document (PSD) for Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) data for the Science Data System (SDS) of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) project. The L4_SM data product provides estimates of land surface conditions based on the assimilation of SMAP observations into a customized version of the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) land data assimilation system (LDAS). This document applies to any standard L4_SM data product generated by the SMAP Project. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission will enhance the accuracy and the resolution of space-based measurements of terrestrial soil moisture and freeze-thaw state. SMAP data products will have a noteworthy impact on multiple relevant and current Earth Science endeavors. These include: Understanding of the processes that link the terrestrial water, the energy and the carbon cycles, Estimations of global water and energy fluxes over the land surfaces, Quantification of the net carbon flux in boreal landscapes Forecast skill of both weather and climate, Predictions and monitoring of natural disasters including floods, landslides and droughts, and Predictions of agricultural productivity. To provide these data, the SMAP mission will deploy a satellite observatory in a near polar, sun synchronous orbit. The observatory will house an L-band radiometer that operates at 1.40 GHz and an L-band radar that operates at 1.26 GHz. The instruments will share a rotating reflector antenna with a 6 meter aperture that scans over a 1000 km swath.

  14. On using the levelling of the free surface of a Newtonian fluid to measure viscosity and Navier slip length

    PubMed Central

    Gilormini, P.; Teyssèdre, H.

    2013-01-01

    Measuring the relaxation time involved in the levelling of a free surface of a Newtonian fluid laid on a substrate can give access to material parameters. It is shown here how most favourable pattern geometries of the free surface and film thicknesses can be defined for the measures of viscosity and Navier slip length at the fluid–solid interface, respectively. Moreover, we put special emphasis on the conditions required to avoid shear thinning by controlling the maximum shear rate. For initially sinusoidal patterns with infinitesimal amplitudes, an analytical solution including slip at the fluid–solid interface is used, and numerical simulations based on the natural element method allow one to discuss the effect of finite amplitudes. This leads to the definition of a relevance domain for the analytical solution that avoids the need for numerical simulations in practical applications. It is also shown how these results can be applied to crenelated profiles, where Fourier series expansion can be used, but with caution. PMID:24353474

  15. The Direct Calculation of Fluxes and Profiles in the Marine Surface Layer Using Measurements from a Single Atmospheric Level.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou-Fang Lo, Aloysius

    1993-12-01

    This study presents a method that can directly determine the boundary-layer fluxes of heat and momentum, as well as both extrapolated wind and temperature profiles to the surface of a water body. The only input information that is required is a single level of wind and temperature in addition to the water surface skin temperature. The present study features a method that enables one to determine boundary-layer flux parameters directly without having to resort to the use of tabulations or nomograms. Therefore, the present method can be a valuable tool in many practical applications especially for marine boundary layer studies using buoy data as input. In essence, the present method determines the Monin-Obukhov length directly from the bulk Richardson number instead of indirectly through nomograms or being considered as a known input. Thus, the present method is an improvement over the conventional bulk method. Results of the present study agree well with those that appear in the literature.

  16. Rapid detection of polychlorinated biphenyls at trace levels in real environmental samples by surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qin; Zhang, Xian; Huang, Yu; Li, Zhengcao; Zhang, Zhengjun

    2011-01-01

    Detection of trace levels of persistent pollutants in the environment is difficult but significant. Organic pollutant homologues, due to their similar physical and chemical properties, are even more difficult to distinguish, especially in trace amounts. We report here a simple method to detect polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in soil and distilled spirit samples by the surface-enhanced Raman scattering technique using Ag nanorod arrays as substrates. By this method, polychlorinated biphenyls can be detected to a concentration of 5 μg/g in dry soil samples within 1 minute. Furthermore, based on simulation and understanding of the Raman characteristics of PCBs, we recognized homologues of tetrachlorobiphenyl by using the surface-enhance Raman scattering method even in trace amounts in acetone solutions, and their characteristic Raman peaks still can be distinguished at a concentration of 10(-6) mol/L. This study provides a fast, simple and sensitive method for the detection and recognition of organic pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls. PMID:22346675

  17. Characterization of Major Surface Glycoprotein Genes of Human Pneumocystis carinii and High-Level Expression of a Conserved Region

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Qin; Turner, Ross E.; Sorial, Vivian; Klivington, Diane; Angus, C. William; Kovacs, Joseph A.

    1998-01-01

    To facilitate studies of Pneumocystis carinii infection in humans, we undertook to better characterize and to express the major surface glycoprotein (MSG) of human P. carinii, an important protein in host-pathogen interactions. Seven MSG genes were cloned from a single isolate by PCR or genomic library screening and were sequenced. The predicted proteins, like rat MSGs, were closely related but unique variants, with a high level of conservation among cysteine residues. A conserved immunodominant region (of approximately 100 amino acids) near the carboxy terminus was expressed at high levels in Escherichia coli and used in Western blot studies. All 49 of the serum samples, which were taken from healthy controls as well as from patients with and without P. carinii pneumonia, were reactive with this peptide by Western blotting, supporting the hypothesis that most adult humans have been infected with P. carinii at some point. This recombinant MSG fragment, which is the first human P. carinii antigen available in large quantities, may be a useful reagent for investigating the epidemiology of P. carinii infection in humans. PMID:9712777

  18. The Impact of the Parcel-Level Land Architecture on Land Surface Temperature in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LI, X.; Ouyang, Y.; Turner, B. L., II; Harlan, S.; Brazel, A.

    2014-12-01

    The relationship between land surface temperature (LST) and characteristics of the urban land system has received increasing attention in urban heat island research, especially for desert cities. The relationship between the land composition and LST has been widely studied. Such researches generally employ medium or coarser spatial resolution remotely sensed data and primarily focuses on the effects of one land cover type on the LST. In this study, we explore the effects of land system architecture - composition and configuration of different land-cover classes - on LST in the central Arizona-Phoenix metropolitan area at a fine-scale resolution, focused on the composition and configuration of single family residential parcels. A 1 m resolution land-cover map is used to calculate landscape metrics at the parcel level, and 6.8 m resolution data from the MODIS/ASTER are employed to retrieve LST. We introduce the socio-economic factors at neighborhood level as explanatory variables to help control for potential neighborhood effects. Multiple linear regression models examine the effects of landscape configuration on LST at the parcel scale, controlling for the effects of landscape composition and neighborhood characteristics. Results show that the configuration of parcels affects LST, revealing significant variable relationships between that architecture and LST at nighttime and daytime, and the role of the neighborhood effects on the outcomes.

  19. China's air pollution reduction efforts may result in an increase in surface ozone levels in highly polluted areas.

    PubMed

    Anger, Annela; Dessens, Olivier; Xi, Fengming; Barker, Terry; Wu, Rui

    2016-03-01

    China, as a fast growing fossil-fuel-based economy, experiences increasing levels of air pollution. To tackle air pollution, China has taken the first steps by setting emission-reduction targets for nitrogen oxides (NO x ) and sulphur dioxide (SO2) in the 11th and 12th Five Year Plans. This paper uses two models-the Energy-Environment-Economy Model at the Global level (E3MG) and the global Chemistry Transport Model pTOMCAT-to test the effects of these policies. If the policy targets are met, then the maximum values of 32 % and 45 % reductions below 'business as usual' in the monthly mean NO x and SO2 concentrations, respectively, will be achieved in 2015. However, a decrease in NO x concentrations in some highly polluted areas of East, North-East and South-East China can lead to up to a 10% increase in the monthly mean concentrations in surface ozone in 2015. Our study demonstrates an urgent need for the more detailed analysis of the impacts and designs of air pollution reduction guidelines for China. PMID:26409886

  20. Functionally Responsive Self-Reactive B Cells of Low-Affinity Express Reduced Levels of Surface IgM1

    PubMed Central

    Kirchenbaum, Greg A.; St. Clair, James B.; Detanico, Thiago; Aviszus, Katja; Wysocki, Lawrence J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Somatic gene rearrangement generates a diverse repertoire of B cells, including B cell receptors (BCR) possessing a range of affinities for self-Ag. Newly generated B cells express high and relatively uniform amounts of surface IgM (sIgM), while follicular (FO) B cells express sIgM at widely varying levels. It is plausible, therefore, that down-modulation of sIgM serves as a mechanism to maintain weakly self-reactive B cells in a responsive state by decreasing their avidity for self-Ag. We tested this hypothesis by performing comparative functional tests with FO IgMhi and IgMlo B cells from the unrestricted repertoire of wildtype (WT) mice. We found that FO IgMlo B cells mobilized Ca2+ equivalently to IgMhi B cells when the same number of sIgM molecules was engaged. In agreement, FO IgMlo B cells were functionally competent to produce an antibody response following adoptive transfer. The FO IgMlo cell population had elevated levels of Nur77 transcript, and was enriched with nuclear-reactive specificities. Hybridoma sampling revealed that these BCR were of low affinity. Collectively, these results suggest that sIgM down-modulation by low-affinity, self-reactive B cells preserves their immunocompetence and circumvents classical peripheral tolerance mechanisms that would otherwise reduce diversity within the B cell compartment. PMID:24375379

  1. Detection of the transitional layer between laminar and turbulent flow areas on a wing surface. [using an accelerometer to measure pressure levels during wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, W. R.

    1980-01-01

    A system is disclosed for detecting the laminar to turbulent boundary layer transition on a surface while simultaneously taking pressure measurements. The system uses an accelerometer for producing electrical signals proportional to the noise levels along the surface and a transducer for producing electrical signals proportional to pressure along the surface. The signals generated by the accelerometer and transducer are sent to a data reduction system for interpretation and storage.

  2. Effect of sward surface height and level of herbage depletion on bite features of cattle grazing Sorghum bicolor swards.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, L; Carvalho, P C F; Mezzalira, J C; Bremm, C; Galli, J R; Gregorini, P

    2013-09-01

    To maximize herbage DMI, pregrazing sward surface height (SSH) and level of herbage depletion (HD) must be such that variables determining short-term herbage intake such as bite mass (BM) and bite rate (BR) are optimized. The objective of this study was to determine a SSH target and the level of HD as a proportion of the SSH that optimizes BM and BR of beef heifers grazing Sorghum bicolor swards. Two experiments were conducted using 2 S. bicolor swards and 4 beef heifers (25 mo old; 322 kg BW). Experiment 1 compared the effect of 6 pregrazing SSH, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, and 80 cm, on BM, BR, and jaw movements. Experiment 2 assessed the effect of HD level as a proportion of SSH (0.17, 0.34, 0.50, 0.67 and 0.84) on BM, BR, and jaw movements using the optimal pregrazing SSH defined in Exp. 1. Short-term herbage DMI was estimated using a double-weighing technique and corrected for insensible BW loss. Herbage DMI was subsequently used to calculate the BM. Net eating time and jaw movements for apprehension and manipulation + mastication during grazing as well as total jaw movements were determined using the IGER (Institute of Grassland and Environmental Research) behavior recorders. Bite rate and the number of total jaw movements per gram herbage DMI were derived from jaw movement count and measurements of herbage DMI. The results of Exp. 1 showed low and high SSH constraint the ease of herbage harvesting. Greater BM are maintained until a SSH of 50 cm is reached (P < 0.05) and then decline at greater SSH due to herbage dispersion. The nonbiting jaw movement rate increased at greater SSH whereas BR decreased (P < 0.05). For both variables, the turning point was close to a SSH of 50 cm. Experiment 2 showed that such an optimization of BM and BR was maintained until an HD level of 0.34 was reached (P < 0.05). There was a linear increase in both the total jaw movements per unit herbage DMI and the nonbiting jaw movements rate (manipulation + mastication) subsequent to levels

  3. Modulation of the sea-surface temperature in the Southeast Pacific by the atmospheric low-level coastal jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Xiaodong; Wang, Shouping; Holt, Teddy R.; Martin, Paul J.; O'Neill, Larry

    2013-09-01

    The atmospheric low-level coastal jet (LLCJ) in the Southeast Pacific (SEP) region is characterized as either a strong-forcing jet (colder and drier air) or weak-forcing jet (warm and moist) based on the location of the Southeast Pacific high-pressure system (SEPH). The sea-surface temperature (SST) changes corresponding to a particularly strong-forcing jet (29-30 October) and weak-forcing jet (22-23 November) are investigated in this study using the two-way air-ocean coupled model COAMPS® and satellite observation data. Results indicate that the coupled simulation reduces the overall absolute bias 50% for the surface wind speed, 70% for the cloud liquid water path, and 15% for SST as compared to the uncoupled simulation. The coupled simulation reduces excessive SST cooling, especially during the strong-forcing jet period along the coastal area where offshore transport of upwelled cold water is too strong from the uncoupled simulation. The coupled simulation also reduces the excessive warming from the uncoupled simulation by providing better cloud coverage. The prominent mechanisms in cooling SST along the coast are the same for both the strong-forcing and weak-forcing jets, namely vigorous upwelling and horizontal advection. However, the mechanisms along the jet path differ from along the coast, with air-sea heat exchange the most important process, resulting in cooling SST during the strong-forcing jet period but warming SST during the weak-forcing jet period. The advances and differences of the present study as compared with previous studies are discussed in detail in the paper.

  4. Experimental verification of the surface termination in the topological insulator TlBiSe2 using core-level photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Kenta; Ye, Mao; Schwier, Eike F.; Nurmamat, Munisa; Shirai, Kaito; Nakatake, Masashi; Ueda, Shigenori; Miyamoto, Koji; Okuda, Taichi; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki; Ueda, Yoshifumi; Kimura, Akio

    2013-12-01

    The surface termination of the promising topological insulator TlBiSe2 has been studied by surface- and bulk-sensitive probes. Our scanning tunneling microscopy has unmasked for the first time the unusual surface morphology of TlBiSe2 obtained by cleaving, where islands are formed by residual atoms on the cleaved plane. The chemical condition of these islands was identified using core-level spectroscopy. We observed thallium core-level spectra that are strongly deformed by a surface component in sharp contrast to the other elements. We propose a simple explanation for this behavior by assuming that the sample cleaving breaks the bonding between thallium and selenium atoms, leaving the thallium layer partially covering the selenium layer. These findings will assist the interpretation of future experimental and theoretical studies of this surface.

  5. Surface water characteristics and trace metals level of the Bonny/New Calabar River Estuary, Niger Delta, Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onojake, M. C.; Sikoki, F. D.; Omokheyeke, O.; Akpiri, R. U.

    2015-07-01

    Surface water samples from three stations in the Bonny/New Calabar River Estuary were analyzed for the physicochemical characteristics and trace metal level in 2011 and 2012, respectively. Results show pH ranged from 7.56 to 7.88 mg/L; conductivity, 33,489.00 to 33,592.00 µScm-1; salinity, 15.33 to 15.50 ‰; turbidity, 4.35 to 6.65 NTU; total dissolved solids, 22111.00 to 23263.00 gm-3; dissolved oxygen, 4.53 to 6.65 mg/L; and biochemical oxygen demand, 1.72 mg/L. The level of some trace metals (Ca, Mg, K, Zn, Pb, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, and Na) were also analyzed by Atomic absorption spectrometry with K, Zn, and Co being statistically significant (P < 0.05). The results were compared with USEPA and WHO Permissible Limits for water quality standards. It was observed that the water quality parameters in the Bonny Estuary show seasonal variation with higher values for pH, DO, BOD, temperature, and salinity during the dry season than wet season. Concentrations of trace metals such as Pb, Cd, Zn, Ni, and Cr were higher than stipulated limits by WHO (2006). The result of the Metal Pollution Index suggests that the river was slightly affected and therefore continuous monitoring is necessary to avert possible public health implications of these metals on consumers of water and seafood from the study area.

  6. Effects of vegetation and soil-surface cover treatments on the hydrologic behavior of low-level waste trench caps

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, E.A.; Barnes, F.J.; Antonio, E.J.

    1988-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented on a three-year field study at Los Alamos National Laboratory to evaluate the influence of different low-level radioactive waste trench cap designs on water balance under natural precipitation. Erosion plots having two different vegetative covers (shrubs and grasses) and with either gravel-mulched or unmulched soil surface treatments have been established on three different soil profiles on a decommissioned waste site. Total runoff and soil loss from each plot is measured after each precipitation event. Soil moisture is measured biweekly while plant canopy cover is measured seasonally. Preliminary results from the first year show that the application of a gravel mulch reduced runoff by 73 to 90%. Total soil loss was reduced by 83 to 93% by the mulch treatment. On unmulched plots, grass cover reduced both runoff and soil loss by about 50% compared to the shrub plots. Continued monitoring of the study site will provide data that will be used to analyze complex interactions between independent variables such rainfall amount and intensity, antecedent soil moisture, and soil and vegetation factors, as they influence water balance, and soil erosion. 18 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Effects of high CO2 levels on surface temperature and atmospheric oxidation state of the early earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasting, J. F.; Pollack, J. B.; Crisp, D.

    1984-01-01

    One-dimensional radiative and photochemical models are used to determine how much CO2 must have been present to maintain a temperate early climate and to examine the consequences that are implied for the controls on atmospheric oxidation state. It is shown that CO2 concentrations of the order of 1000 PAL are required to keep the average surface temperature close to the present value, if albedo changes and heating by reduced greenhouse gases were relatively unimportant. The oxidation state of such a high-CO2, prebiotic atmosphere should have been largely determined by the balance between the H2O2 rainout rate and the rate at which hydrogen escaped to space, with only a weak dependence on the volcanic outgassing rate or on other speculative sources of H2. The implied upper limit on the ground-level O2 mixing ratio is approximately 10 to the -11th and is subject to less uncertainty than the results of previous models.

  8. C-Band Airport Surface Communications System Engineering-Initial High-Level Safety Risk Assessment and Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelkin, Natalie; Henriksen, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    This document is being provided as part of ITT's NASA Glenn Research Center Aerospace Communication Systems Technical Support (ACSTS) contract: "New ATM Requirements--Future Communications, C-Band and L-Band Communications Standard Development." ITT has completed a safety hazard analysis providing a preliminary safety assessment for the proposed C-band (5091- to 5150-MHz) airport surface communication system. The assessment was performed following the guidelines outlined in the Federal Aviation Administration Safety Risk Management Guidance for System Acquisitions document. The safety analysis did not identify any hazards with an unacceptable risk, though a number of hazards with a medium risk were documented. This effort represents an initial high-level safety hazard analysis and notes the triggers for risk reassessment. A detailed safety hazards analysis is recommended as a follow-on activity to assess particular components of the C-band communication system after the profile is finalized and system rollout timing is determined. A security risk assessment has been performed by NASA as a parallel activity. While safety analysis is concerned with a prevention of accidental errors and failures, the security threat analysis focuses on deliberate attacks. Both processes identify the events that affect operation of the system; and from a safety perspective the security threats may present safety risks.

  9. Concentration Levels and Ecological Risks of Persistent Organic Pollutants in the Surface Sediments of Tianjin Coastal Area, China

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoxia; Chen, Chaoqi; Zhang, Shu; Hou, Zhen; Yang, Junjun

    2013-01-01

    Sediments were sampled from different surface water bodies in Tianjin coastal area, China, and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were measured using GC/MS or GC/ECD. The purposes were to investigate the concentration levels of the POPs and to assess their ecological risks. The results showed that all the 16 priority PAHs were detected from the 10 sediments sampled with the total concentrations of the 16 PAHs ranging from 274.06 μg/kg to 2656.65 μg/kg, while the concentrations of the halogenated POPs were generally low except in the Dagu waste discharging river where the total concentrations of 24 OCPs, 35 PCBs, and 14 PBDEs were 3103.36 μg/kg, 87.31 μg/kg, and 13.88 μg/kg, respectively. In the studied sediments, PAHs exhibited risks to benthonic organisms; particularly the concentrations of naphthalene and/or acenaphthene exceeded their probable effect concentrations in several locations. In comparison, only in the Dagu waste discharging river, OCPs exhibited risks with the concentrations of heptachlor epoxide and lindane exceeding their probable effect concentrations. PCBs and PBDEs posed rare risks in the studied area. PMID:23401668

  10. BAERLIN2014 - the influence of land surface types on and the horizontal heterogeneity of air pollutant levels in Berlin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonn, Boris; von Schneidemesser, Erika; Andrich, Dorota; Quedenau, Jörn; Gerwig, Holger; Lüdecke, Anja; Kura, Jürgen; Pietsch, Axel; Ehlers, Christian; Klemp, Dieter; Kofahl, Claudia; Nothard, Rainer; Kerschbaumer, Andreas; Junkermann, Wolfgang; Grote, Rüdiger; Pohl, Tobias; Weber, Konradin; Lode, Birgit; Schönberger, Philipp; Churkina, Galina; Butler, Tim M.; Lawrence, Mark G.

    2016-06-01

    organic compounds (VOCs) at representative sites for traffic- and vegetation-affected sites. The quantification displayed notable horizontal heterogeneity of the short-lived gases and particle number concentrations. For example, baseline concentrations of the traffic-related chemical species CO and NO varied on average by up to ±22.2 and ±63.5 %, respectively, on the scale of 100 m around any measurement location. Airborne observations revealed the dominant source of elevated urban particulate number and mass concentrations being local, i.e., not being caused by long-range transport. Surface-based observations related these two parameters predominantly to traffic sources. Vegetated areas lowered the pollutant concentrations substantially with ozone being reduced most by coniferous forests, which is most likely caused by their reactive biogenic VOC emissions. With respect to the overall potential to reduce air pollutant levels, forests were found to result in the largest decrease, followed by parks and facilities for sports and leisure. Surface temperature was generally 0.6-2.1 °C lower in vegetated regions, which in turn will have an impact on tropospheric chemical processes. Based on our findings, effective future mitigation activities to provide a more sustainable and healthier urban environment should focus predominantly on reducing fossil-fuel emissions from traffic as well as on increasing vegetated areas.

  11. Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure of the Ni 3p, Cu 3s, and Cu 3p core levels of the respective clean (111) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, W.R. |; Chen, Y.; Kellar, S.A.; Moler, E.J. |; Hussain, Z.; Huang, Z.Q.; Zheng, Y.; Shirley, D.A.

    1997-07-01

    We report a non-s initial-state angle-resolved photoemission extended fine-structure (ARPEFS) study of clean surfaces for the purpose of further understanding the technique. The surface structure sensitivity of ARPEFS applied to clean surfaces and to arbitrary initial states is studied using normal photoemission data taken from the Ni 3p core levels of a Ni(111) single crystal and the Cu 3s and the Cu 3p core levels of a Cu(111) single crystal. The Fourier transforms of these clean surface data are dominated by backscattering. Unlike the s initial-state data, the p initial-state data show a peak in the Fourier transform corresponding to in-plane scattering from the six nearest neighbors to the emitter. Evidence was seen for single-scattering events from the same plane as the emitters and double-scattering events. Using a recently developed, multiple-scattering calculation program, ARPEFS data from clean surfaces and from p initial states can be modeled to high precision. Although there are many layers of emitters when measuring photoemission from a clean surface, test calculations show that the ARPEFS signal is dominated by photoemission from atoms in the first two crystal layers. Thus ARPEFS applied to clean surfaces is sensitive to surface reconstruction. The best-fit calculation for clean Ni(111) indicates an expansion of the first two layers. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Global analytical potential energy surface for the electronic ground state of NH3 from high level ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Marquardt, Roberto; Sagui, Kenneth; Zheng, Jingjing; Thiel, Walter; Luckhaus, David; Yurchenko, Sergey; Mariotti, Fabio; Quack, Martin

    2013-08-15

    The analytical, full-dimensional, and global representation of the potential energy surface of NH(3) in the lowest adiabatic electronic state developed previously (Marquardt, R.; et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2005, 109, 8439–8451) is improved by adjustment of parameters to an enlarged set of electronic energies from ab initio calculations using the coupled cluster method with single and double substitutions and a perturbative treatment of connected triple excitations (CCSD(T)) and the method of multireference configuration interaction (MRCI). CCSD(T) data were obtained from an extrapolation of aug-cc-pVXZ results to the basis set limit (CBS), as described in a previous work (Yurchenko, S.N.; et al. J. Chem. Phys 2005, 123, 134308); they cover the region around the NH3 equilibrium structures up to 20,000 hc cm(–1). MRCI energies were computed using the aug-cc-pVQZ basis to describe both low lying singlet dissociation channels. Adjustment was performed simultaneously to energies obtained from the different ab initio methods using a merging strategy that includes 10,000 geometries at the CCSD(T) level and 500 geometries at the MRCI level. Characteristic features of this improved representation are NH3 equilibrium geometry r(eq)(NH(3)) ≈ 101.28 pm, α(eq)(NH(3)) ≈ 107.03°, the inversion barrier at r(inv)(NH(3)) ≈ 99.88 pm and 1774 hc cm(–1) above the NH(3) minimum, and dissociation channel energies 41,051 hc cm(–1) (for NH(3) → ((2)B(2))NH(2) + ((2)S(1/2))H) and 38,450 hc cm(–1) (for NH(3) → ((3)Σ(–))NH +((1)Σ(g)(+))H(2)); the average agreement between calculated and experimental vibrational line positions is 11 cm(–1) for (14)N(1)H(3) in the spectral region up to 5000 cm(–1). A survey of our current knowledge on the vibrational spectroscopy of ammonia and its isotopomers is also given. PMID:23688044

  13. Structure of the near-surface layer of NiTi on the meso- and microscale levels after ion-beam surface treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Meisner, L. L. Meisner, S. N.; Poletika, T. M. Girsova, S. L.; Tverdichlebova, A. V.; Shulepov, I. A.

    2014-11-14

    Using the EBSD, SEM and TEM methods, the structure of surface layer of polycrystalline NiTi alloy samples was examined after the modification of material surface by the pulsed action of mean-energy silicon ion beam. It was found that the ion beam treatment would cause grain fragmentation of the near-surface layer to a depth 5÷50 μm; a higher extent of fragmentation was observed in grains whose close-packed planes were oriented approximately in the same direction as the ion beam was. The effect of high-intensity ion beam treatment on the anisotropic behavior of polycrystalline NiTi alloy and the mechanisms involved were also examined.

  14. Potentiometric surface, 2012, and water-level differences, 2005-12, of the Sparta Aquifer in north-central Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, Benton D.; Brantly, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    The Sparta aquifer is used in 15 parishes in north-central Louisiana, primarily for public supply and industrial purposes. Of those parishes, eight (Bienville, Claiborne, Jackson, Lincoln, Ouachita, Union, Webster, and Winn) rely on the Sparta aquifer as their principal source of groundwater. In 2010, withdrawals from the Sparta aquifer in Louisiana totaled 63.11 million gallons per day (Mgal/d), a reduction of more than 11 percent from 1995, when the highest rate of withdrawals (71.32 Mgal/d) from the Sparta aquifer were documented. The Sparta aquifer provides water for a variety of purposes which include public supply (34.61 Mgal/d), industrial (25.60 Mgal/d), rural domestic (1.50 Mgal/d), and various agricultural (1.40 Mgal/d). Of the 13 major aquifers or aquifer systems in Louisiana, the Sparta aquifer is currently (2012) the sixth most heavily pumped. The Sparta aquifer is the second most heavily pumped aquifer in Arkansas, which borders Louisiana to the north. In 2005, 170 Mgal/d were withdrawn from the Sparta aquifer in eastern and southern Arkansas; of that total, about 15.55 Mgal/d were withdrawn from the aquifer in Union County, which borders Claiborne and Union Parishes to the north. By 1997, a large cone of depression (a cone-shaped depression in the potentiometric surface caused by and centered on a pumping well or wells) in the Sparta aquifer centered over Union County had merged with the cone of depression at West Monroe. In 2004, the rate of withdrawal from the Sparta aquifer in Union County began to decline and water levels in the aquifer began to rise in nearby areas of Arkansas and Louisiana.

  15. Alternative splice isoforms of small conductance calcium-activated SK2 channels differ in molecular interactions and surface levels

    PubMed Central

    Scholl, Elizabeth Storer; Pirone, Antonella; Cox, Daniel H; Duncan, R Keith; Jacob, Michele H

    2014-01-01

    Small conductance Ca2+-sensitive potassium (SK2) channels are voltage-independent, Ca2+-activated ion channels that conduct potassium cations and thereby modulate the intrinsic excitability and synaptic transmission of neurons and sensory hair cells. In the cochlea, SK2 channels are functionally coupled to the highly Ca2+ permeant α9/10-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) at olivocochlear postsynaptic sites. SK2 activation leads to outer hair cell hyperpolarization and frequency-selective suppression of afferent sound transmission. These inhibitory responses are essential for normal regulation of sound sensitivity, frequency selectivity, and suppression of background noise. However, little is known about the molecular interactions of these key functional channels. Here we show that SK2 channels co-precipitate with α9/10-nAChRs and with the actin-binding protein α-actinin-1. SK2 alternative splicing, resulting in a 3 amino acid insertion in the intracellular 3′ terminus, modulates these interactions. Further, relative abundance of the SK2 splice variants changes during developmental stages of synapse maturation in both the avian cochlea and the mammalian forebrain. Using heterologous cell expression to separately study the 2 distinct isoforms, we show that the variants differ in protein interactions and surface expression levels, and that Ca2+ and Ca2+-bound calmodulin differentially regulate their protein interactions. Our findings suggest that the SK2 isoforms may be distinctly modulated by activity-induced Ca2+ influx. Alternative splicing of SK2 may serve as a novel mechanism to differentially regulate the maturation and function of olivocochlear and neuronal synapses. PMID:24394769

  16. A novel model to assess the efficacy of steam surface pasteurization of cooked surimi gels inoculated with realistic levels of Listeria innocua.

    PubMed

    Skåra, Torstein; Valdramidis, Vasilis P; Rosnes, Jan Thomas; Noriega, Estefanía; Van Impe, Jan F M

    2014-12-01

    Steam surface pasteurization is a promising decontamination technology for reducing pathogenic bacteria in different stages of food production. The effect of the artificial inoculation type and initial microbial load, however, has not been thoroughly assessed in the context of inactivation studies. In order to optimize the efficacy of the technology, the aim of this study was to design and validate a model system for steam surface pasteurization, assessing different inoculation methods and realistic microbial levels. More specifically, the response of Listeria innocua, a surrogate organism of Listeria monocytogenes, on a model fish product, and the effect of different inoculation levels following treatments with a steam surface pasteurization system was investigated. The variation in the resulting inoculation level on the samples was too large (77%) for the contact inoculation procedure to be further considered. In contrast, the variation of a drop inoculation procedure was 17%. Inoculation with high levels showed a rapid 1-2 log decrease after 3-5 s, and then no further inactivation beyond 20 s. A low level inoculation study was performed by analysing the treated samples using a novel contact plating approach, which can be performed without sample homogenization and dilution. Using logistic regression, results from this method were used to model the binary responses of Listeria on surfaces with realistic inoculation levels. According to this model, a treatment time of 23 s will result in a 1 log reduction (for P = 0.1). PMID:25084647

  17. Low levels of specularity support operational color constancy, particularly when surface and illumination geometry can be inferred

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Robert J.; Smithson, Hannah E.

    2016-01-01

    We tested whether surface specularity alone supports operational color constancy – the ability to discriminate changes in illumination or reflectance. Observers viewed short animations of illuminant or reflectance changes in rendered scenes containing a single spherical surface, and were asked to classify the change. Performance improved with increasing specularity, as predicted from regularities in chromatic statistics. Peak performance was impaired by spatial rearrangements of image pixels that disrupted the perception of illuminated surfaces, but was maintained with increased surface complexity. The characteristic chromatic transformations that are available with non-zero specularity are useful for operational color constancy, particularly if accompanied by appropriate perceptual organisation. PMID:26974938

  18. Low levels of specularity support operational color constancy, particularly when surface and illumination geometry can be inferred.

    PubMed

    Lee, Robert J; Smithson, Hannah E

    2016-03-01

    We tested whether surface specularity alone supports operational color constancy-the ability to discriminate changes in illumination or reflectance. Observers viewed short animations of illuminant or reflectance changes in rendered scenes containing a single spherical surface and were asked to classify the change. Performance improved with increasing specularity, as predicted from regularities in chromatic statistics. Peak performance was impaired by spatial rearrangements of image pixels that disrupted the perception of illuminated surfaces but was maintained with increased surface complexity. The characteristic chromatic transformations that are available with nonzero specularity are useful for operational color constancy, particularly if accompanied by appropriate perceptual organization. PMID:26974938

  19. History of surface displacements at the Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming, from leveling surveys and InSAR observations, 1923-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dzurisin, Daniel; Wicks, Charles W.; Poland, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    during June-July 1995 - the strongest swarm since 1985. Rather than a single deformation source as inferred from leveling surveys, the InSAR images revealed two distinct sources - one beneath each resurgent dome on the caldera floor. Subsequently, repeated GPS surveys (sometimes referred to as "campaign" surveys to distinguish them from continuous GPS observations) and InSAR images revealed a third deformation source beneath the north caldera rim. The north-rim source started to inflate in or about 1995, resulting in as much as 80 mm of surface uplift by 2000. Meanwhile, motion of the caldera floor changed from uplift to subsidence during 1997-8. The north rim area rose, while the entire caldera floor (including both domes) subsided until 2002, when both motions paused. Uplift in the northeast part of the caldera resumed in mid-2004 at a historically unprecedented rate of as much as 70 mm/yr, while the north rim area subsided at a lesser rate. Resurveys of the level line across the northeast part of the caldera in 2005 and 2007 indicated the greatest average uplift rate since the initial survey in 1923-53±3 mm/yr. Data from a nearby continuous GPS (CGPS) station showed that the uplift rate slowed to 40-50 mm/yr during 2007-8 and to near zero by September 2009. Following an intense earthquake swarm during January-February 2010, this one near the northwest caldera rim and the strongest since the 1985 swarm in the same general area, CGPS stations recorded the onset of subsidence throughout the entire caldera. Any viable model for the cause(s) of ground deformation at Yellowstone should account for (1) three distinct deformation sources and their association with both resurgent domes and the north caldera rim; (2) interplay among these sources, as suggested by the timing of major changes in deformation mode; (3) migration of the area of greatest subsidence or uplift from the northeast part of the caldera to the southwest part during 1992-95 and 1995-97, respectively; (4

  20. Full-dimensional quantum calculations of vibrational levels of NH4+ and isotopomers on an accurate ab initio potential energy surface

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hua -Gen Yu; Han, Huixian; Guo, Hua

    2016-03-29

    Vibrational energy levels of the ammonium cation (NH4+) and its deuterated isotopomers are calculated using a numerically exact kinetic energy operator on a recently developed nine-dimensional permutation invariant semiglobal potential energy surface fitted to a large number of high-level ab initio points. Like CH4, the vibrational levels of NH4+ and ND4+ exhibit a polyad structure, characterized by a collective quantum number P = 2(v1 + v3) + v2 + v4. As a result, the low-lying vibrational levels of all isotopomers are assigned and the agreement with available experimental data is better than 1 cm–1.

  1. Use of Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy in Inorganic Syntheses for an Upper-Level Exploratory Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seney, Caryn S.; Yelverton, Joshua C.; Eanes, Sharon; Patel, Vikas; Riggs, Julia; Wright, Sarah; Bright, Robin M.

    2007-01-01

    An experiment is designed where students will be using both gold and silver nanoparticles to study the enhancement factors of organic molecules adsorbed to the surface of the nanoparticles during or after synthesis by using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The experiment has helped students learn about the theory and experimental…

  2. Two-dimensional effects at the Fermi level of the c(2×2)-MnCu/Cu( 0 0 1 ) surface alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, S.; Soria, F.; Muñoz, M. C.

    2003-02-01

    A detailed study of the electronic structure of the c(2×2)-MnCu/Cu(0 0 1) surface alloy at the Fermi level is presented. We show that the complex topology of the two-dimensional momentum distribution of the electrons is due to the sum of two effects: the projection of the bulk Fermi surface onto the (2×2) plane, and the presence of new electronic states induced by the minority spin band of Mn. The crucial role of the surface potential in the intensity and dispersion of the states is discussed.

  3. Residue determination and levels of glyphosate in surface waters, sediments and soils associated with oil palm plantation in Tasik Chini, Pahang, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardiana-Jansar, K.; Ismail, B. S.

    2014-09-01

    Levels of glyphosate and its main metabolite were determined in surface water, soil and sediment samples from an oil palm plantation area located at Tasik Chini, Pahang, Malaysia. The optimization analytical method has been developed for the determination of glyphosate herbicide and its metabolite amino-methyl-phosphonic acid (AMPA) in surface waters to a level of 0.1μg/L, while in sediments and soils to a level of 0.5μg/g with a good linearity in the calibration range of 1-100μg/L. The procedure involves a pre-columnderivatization step with 9-fluorenyl-methyl-chloroformate (FMOC-Cl) yielding highly fluorescent derivatives of the analytes which can be determined by HPLC with fluorescence detection. In the field, levels of glyphosate in surface waters ranges from not detected to 1.0mg/L, while in soils and sediments were from not detected to 6.0mg/kg. For AMPA, the residues in surface waters were between not detected to 2.0mg/L, while in soil and sediment samples were from not detected to 5mg/kg. This variation of glyphosate and AMPA levels depended directly on time of pesticide application and the season.

  4. Sea level rise from the Greenland Ice Sheet during the Eemian interglacial: Review of previous work with focus on the surface mass balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plach, Andreas; Hestnes Nisancioglu, Kerim

    2016-04-01

    The contribution from the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) to the global sea level rise during the Eemian interglacial (about 125,000 year ago) was the focus of many studies in the past. A main reason for the interest in this period is the considerable warmer climate during the Eemian which is often seen as an equivalent for possible future climate conditions. Simulated sea level rise during the Eemian can therefore be used to better understand a possible future sea level rise. The most recent assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC AR5) gives an overview of several studies and discusses the possible implications for a future sea level rise. The report also reveals the big differences between these studies in terms of simulated GIS extent and corresponding sea level rise. The present study gives a more exhaustive review of previous work discussing sea level rise from the GIS during the Eemian interglacial. The smallest extents of the GIS simulated by various authors are shown and summarized. A focus is thereby given to the methods used to calculate the surface mass balance. A hypothesis of the present work is that the varying results of the previous studies can largely be explained due to the various methods used to calculate the surface mass balance. In addition, as a first step for future work, the surface mass balance of the GIS for a proxy-data derived forcing ("index method") and a direct forcing with a General Circulation Model (GCM) are shown and discussed.

  5. Cleaning level acceptance criteria and a high pressure liquid chromatography procedure for the assay of Meclizine Hydrochloride residue in swabs collected from pharmaceutical manufacturing equipment surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mirza, T; Lunn, M J; Keeley, F J; George, R C; Bodenmiller, J R

    1999-04-01

    A method using pharmacologically based and visual limit of detection criteria to determine the acceptable residue level for Meclizine Hydrochloride (MH) on pharmaceutical manufacturing equipment surfaces after cleaning is described. A formula was used in order to determine the pharmacologically safe cleaning level for MH. This level was termed as specific residual cleaning Level (SRCL) and calculated to be 50 microg 100 cm(-2). The visual limit of detection (VLOD) was determined by spiking different levels of MH on stainless steel plates and having the plates examined by a group of observers. The lowest level that could be visually detected by the majority of the observers, 62.5 microg 100 cm(-2), was considered as the VLOD for MH. The lower of the SRCL and VLOD values, i.e. 50 microg 100 cm(-2), was therefore chosen as the cleaning acceptance criterion. A sensitive reversed-phase HPLC method was developed and validated for the assay of MH in swabs used to test equipment surfaces. Using this method, the mean recoveries of MH from spiked swabs and '180-Grit' stainless steel plates were 87.0 and 89.5% with relative standard deviations (RSD) of +/- 3.3 and +/- 2.4%, respectively. The method was successfully applied to the assay of actual swab samples collected from the equipment surfaces. The stability of MH on stainless steel plates, on cleaning swabs and in the extraction solution was investigated. PMID:10698538

  6. A WATERSHED-LEVEL APPROACH TO STUDY THE PUTATIVE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN LANDUSE CHANGE AND SURFACE WATER FLOW ALTERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inter-generationally prudent management of watershed resources will require attention to the interdependence between shifting landuse distributions and their effects on watershed hydrology. Development and increased proportion of impervious surface area has been found to alte lan...

  7. Role of deep-level trapping on the surface photovoltage of semi-insulating GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiang; Ruda, Harry E.

    1997-04-01

    Dual-beam (bias and probe) transient surface photovoltage (SPV) measurements were made on undoped semi-insulating GaAs over an extended temperature range. Above 270 K, SPV recovery transients following a bias pulse were shown to reflect near-surface conductivity changes; these are in turn controlled by surface-interface-state thermal emission. Owing to the absence of a strong surface electric field in this material, the emitted carriers are not immediately removed from the near-surface region. The recapturing of the emitted carriers is shown to be responsible for nonexponential conductivity and reciprocal-SPV transients. This behavior is considered to be characteristic of relaxation-type semiconductors with near-surface ungated structures. Below 150 K, the photoinduced transition of EL2 from its ground to metastable state EL2 was shown to change the effective electron and hole mobilities and augment the SPV signals immediately following the bias pulse. Thermally induced EL2 recovery above 120 K decreases the SPV signal from its maximum. This decay transient was analyzed and the decay rate fitted to a single exponential. An activation energy of 0.32 eV and a preexponential constant of 1.9×1012 s-1 were obtained, and attributed to the thermal recovery rate for EL2.

  8. Defining the volume and geometry of the landslide failure surfaces: a review with emphasis on the Sloping Local Base Level (SLBL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaboyedoff, Michel; Daicz, Sergio; Derron, Marc-Henri; Penna, Ivanna; Rudaz, Benjamin

    2013-04-01

    empirical relationships between surface and volume have been proposed for different contexts. In the case of debris-flows, the classical way is to perform surveys multiplying the surface of the section of available sediments by the length of reaches. It is also possible to use polynomial functions to estimate the transversal profile section. Estimation of 3D failure surfaces and volumes is performed nowadays using DEM. Based on the morphometric features providing the limits of the instable volume of rocks, the failure surface can be estimated by interpolation using various techniques such as 3D splines, surface fitting, etc. For rockslides, the observations of major discontinuities defining the instability, using orientation data and extrapolations in the ground, permits to define the geometry of an unstable rock mass. A technique that can be used in any case is the Sloping Local Base Level (SLBL) that comes from the signal processing methods. It joins by an iterative algorithm the limits of the landslide by a surface of a given curvature. This surface can also be constrained by a slope angle limit of the failure surface. The SLBL process "excavates" iteratively the topography. It can be either applied directly to the grid nodes or using local surface fitting. Limiting the iteration permits an application to estimate material available in debris-flows prone torrent reaches. Finally, if an inventory of landslides and a DEM are available, this methodology have as advantage to automatically and in a short period of time, determine volume statistics and estimations of failure surfaces at regional scale. All those methods are important, especially for modelling, because they can provide information when investigations are lacking. The estimated failure surfaces can then be used to check the coherence of the surface movements.

  9. Accurate high level ab initio-based global potential energy surface and dynamics calculations for ground state of CH{sub 2}{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y. Q.; Zhang, P. Y.; Han, K. L.

    2015-03-28

    A global many-body expansion potential energy surface is reported for the electronic ground state of CH{sub 2}{sup +} by fitting high level ab initio energies calculated at the multireference configuration interaction level with the aug-cc-pV6Z basis set. The topographical features of the new global potential energy surface are examined in detail and found to be in good agreement with those calculated directly from the raw ab initio energies, as well as previous calculations available in the literature. In turn, in order to validate the potential energy surface, a test theoretical study of the reaction CH{sup +}(X{sup 1}Σ{sup +})+H({sup 2}S)→C{sup +}({sup 2}P)+H{sub 2}(X{sup 1}Σ{sub g}{sup +}) has been carried out with the method of time dependent wavepacket on the title potential energy surface. The total integral cross sections and the rate coefficients have been calculated; the results determined that the new potential energy surface can both be recommended for dynamics studies of any type and as building blocks for constructing the potential energy surfaces of larger C{sup +}/H containing systems.

  10. Structural origin of Si-2p core-level shifts from Si(100)-c[4x2] surface: A spectral x-ray photoelectron diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Tonner, B.P.; Denlinger, J.

    1997-04-01

    The authors have performed angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) from a Si(100)-c(4x2) surface to study the structural origin of Si-2p core-level shifts. In the experiment, the highly resolved surface Si-2p core-level spectra were measured as a fine grid of hemisphere and photon energies, using the SpectroMicroscopy Facility {open_quotes}ultraESCA{close_quotes} instrument. By carefully decomposing the spectra into several surface peaks, the authors are able to obtain surface-atom resolved XPD patterns. Using a multiple scattering analysis, they derived a detailed atomic model for the Si(100)-c(4x2) surface. In this model, the asymmetric dimers were found tilted by 11.5 plus/minus 2.0 degrees with bond length of 2.32 plus/minus 0.05{angstrom}. By matching model XPD patterns to experiment, the authors can identify which atoms in the reconstructed surface are responsible for specific photoemission lines in the 2p spectrum.

  11. Sensitivity of Fermi level position at Ga-polar, N-polar, and nonpolar m-plane GaN surfaces to vacuum and air ambient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicki, Łukasz; Ramírez-López, Manolo; Misiewicz, Jan; Cywiński, Grzegorz; Boćkowski, Michał; Muzioł, Grzegorz; Chèze, Caroline; Sawicka, Marta; Skierbiszewski, Czesław; Kudrawiec, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Ga-polar, N-polar, and nonpolar m-plane GaN UN+ structures have been examined in air and vacuum ambient by contactless electroreflectance (CER). This technique is very sensitive to the surface electric field that varies with the Fermi level position at the surface. For UN+ GaN structures [i.e., GaN (undoped)/GaN (n-type)/substrate], a homogeneous built-in electric field is expected in the undoped GaN layer that is manifested by Franz–Keldysh oscillation (FKO) in CER spectra. A clear change in FKO has been observed in CER spectra for N-polar and nonpolar m-plane structures when changing from air to vacuum ambient. This means that those surfaces are very sensitive to ambient atmosphere. In contrast to that, only a small change in FKO can be seen in the Ga-polar structure. This clearly shows that the ambient sensitivity of the Fermi level position at the GaN surface varies with the crystallographic orientation and is very high for N-polar and nonpolar m-plane surfaces. This feature of the N-polar and nonpolar m-plane surfaces can be very important for GaN-based devices grown on these crystallographic orientations and can be utilized in some of the devices, e.g., sensors.

  12. All-epitaxial, lithographically defined, current- and mode-confined vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser based on selective interfacial fermi-level pinning

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, J.; Lu, D.; Deppe, D.G.

    2005-01-10

    An approach is presented to fabricate a current- and mode-confined vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser that is all-epitaxial and lithographically defined. The device uses selective Fermi level pinning to self-align the electrical injection to a mode-confining intracavity phase-shifting mesa.

  13. Observation of an electron band above the Fermi level in FeTe₀.₅₅Se₀.₄₅ from in-situ surface doping

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, P.; Richard, P.; Xu, N.; Xu, Y. -M.; Ma, J.; Qian, T.; Fedorov, A. V.; Denlinger, J. D.; Gu, G. D.; Ding, H.

    2014-10-27

    We used in-situ potassium (K) evaporation to dope the surface of the iron-based superconductor FeTe₀.₅₅Se₀.₄₅. The systematic study of the bands near the Fermi level confirms that electrons are doped into the system, allowing us to tune the Fermi level of this material and to access otherwise unoccupied electronic states. In particular, we observe an electron band located above the Fermi level before doping that shares similarities with a small three-dimensional pocket observed in the cousin, heavily-electron-doped KFe₂₋xSe₂ compound.

  14. Observation of an electron band above the Fermi level in FeTe₀.₅₅Se₀.₄₅ from in-situ surface doping

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, P.; Richard, P.; Xu, N.; Xu, Y. -M.; Ma, J.; Qian, T.; Fedorov, A. V.; Denlinger, J. D.; Gu, G. D.; Ding, H.

    2014-10-27

    We used in-situ potassium (K) evaporation to dope the surface of the iron-based superconductor FeTe₀.₅₅Se₀.₄₅. The systematic study of the bands near the Fermi level confirms that electrons are doped into the system, allowing us to tune the Fermi level of this material and to access otherwise unoccupied electronic states. In particular, we observe an electron band located above the Fermi level before doping that shares similarities with a small three-dimensional pocket observed in the cousin, heavily-electron-doped KFe₂₋xSe₂ compound.

  15. Estimated 2008 groundwater potentiometric surface and predevelopment to 2008 water-level change in the Santa Fe Group aquifer system in the Albuquerque area, central New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Falk, Sarah E.; Bexfield, Laura M.; Anderholm, Scott K.

    2011-01-01

    The water-supply requirements of the Albuquerque metropolitan area of central New Mexico have historically been met almost exclusively by groundwater withdrawal from the Santa Fe Group aquifer system. Previous studies have indicated that the large quantity of groundwater withdrawal relative to recharge has resulted in water-level declines in the aquifer system throughout the metropolitan area. Analysis of the magnitude and pattern of water-level change can help improve understanding of how the groundwater system responds to withdrawals and variations in the management of the water supply and can support water-management agencies' efforts to minimize future water-level declines and improve sustainability. This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority, presents the estimated groundwater potentiometric surface during winter (from December to March) of the 2008 water year and the estimated changes in water levels between predevelopment and water year 2008 for the production zone of the Santa Fe Group aquifer system in the Albuquerque and surrounding metropolitan and military areas. Hydrographs from selected wells are included to provide details of historical water-level changes. In general, water-level measurements used for this report were measured in small-diameter observation wells screened over short intervals and were considered to best represent the potentiometric head in the production zone-the interval of the aquifer, about 300 feet below land surface to 1,100 feet or more below land surface, in which production wells generally are screened. Water-level measurements were collected by various local and Federal agencies. The 2008 water year potentiometric surface map was created in a geographic information system, and the change in water-level elevation from predevelopment to water year 2008 was calculated. The 2008 water-level contours indicate that the general direction of

  16. Maps showing altitude of the potentiometric surface and changes in water levels in the aquifer in the Sparta and Memphis Sands in eastern Arkansas, spring 1985

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edds, Joe; Fitzpatrick, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    Aquifers in the Tertiary Sparta and Memphis Sands are a major source of water supply for much of eastern and south-central Arkansas. Major withdrawals occur from the aquifer for industrial and public supply, with generally lesser but locally significant amounts withdrawn for agricultural uses. Water level data from wells tapping the artesian aquifer in the Sparta and Memphis Sands indicate steadily declining water levels in some areas where relatively large withdrawals occur. In addition, a simulation of water levels using projected withdrawals to the year 1990 indicated increasing water level declines in the aquifer. Because of the potential quantity and quality problems, the continual monitoring of water levels in the aquifer in the Sparta and Memphis Sands is essential for proper aquifer management and the continuation of the use of the aquifer as a major source of water for much of eastern and south-central Arkansas. The U.S. Geological Survey with the cooperation of the Arkansas Geological Commission has been monitoring water levels in the aquifer in the Sparta and Memphis Sands annually throughout the aquifer 's extent within the State of Arkansas. This report, prepared in cooperation with the Arkansas Geological Commission and the Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission interprets water level data through hydrologic maps of the potentiometric surface and water level changes. The potentiometric surface map is based on water levels collected in the spring of 1985. The water level change map is based on a comparison of water levels collected in the spring of 1980 and 1985. This report includes the Sparta Sand and most of the Memphis Sand aquifer within the State of Arkansas. Little or no data are available in the northeastern part of the State where limited withdrawals from the aquifer occur. (Lantz-PTT)

  17. High-resolution core-level photoemission measurements on the pentacene single crystal surface assisted by photoconduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Yasuo; Uragami, Yuki; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Yonezawa, Keiichirou; Mase, Kazuhiko; Kera, Satoshi; Ishii, Hisao; Ueno, Nobuo

    2016-03-01

    Upon charge carrier transport behaviors of high-mobility organic field effect transistors of pentacene single crystal, effects of ambient gases and resultant probable ‘impurities’ at the crystal surface have been controversial. Definite knowledge on the surface stoichiometry and chemical composites is indispensable to solve this question. In the present study, high-resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements on the pentacene single crystal samples successfully demonstrated a presence of a few atomic-percent of (photo-)oxidized species at the first molecular layer of the crystal surface through accurate analyses of the excitation energy (i.e. probing depth) dependence of the C1s peak profiles. Particular methodologies to conduct XPS on organic single crystal samples, without any charging nor damage of the sample in spite of its electric insulating character and fragility against x-ray irradiation, is also described in detail.

  18. High-resolution core-level photoemission measurements on the pentacene single crystal surface assisted by photoconduction.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Yasuo; Uragami, Yuki; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Yonezawa, Keiichirou; Mase, Kazuhiko; Kera, Satoshi; Ishii, Hisao; Ueno, Nobuo

    2016-03-01

    Upon charge carrier transport behaviors of high-mobility organic field effect transistors of pentacene single crystal, effects of ambient gases and resultant probable 'impurities' at the crystal surface have been controversial. Definite knowledge on the surface stoichiometry and chemical composites is indispensable to solve this question. In the present study, high-resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements on the pentacene single crystal samples successfully demonstrated a presence of a few atomic-percent of (photo-)oxidized species at the first molecular layer of the crystal surface through accurate analyses of the excitation energy (i.e. probing depth) dependence of the C1s peak profiles. Particular methodologies to conduct XPS on organic single crystal samples, without any charging nor damage of the sample in spite of its electric insulating character and fragility against x-ray irradiation, is also described in detail. PMID:26871646

  19. Measurement of the interaction forces at various pH levels by using AFM for the interpretation of DNA adsorption on silanized surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Seung Pil; Suga, Kosaku; Fujihara, Masamichi; Park, Byung-Eun

    2014-09-01

    Various surfaces have been used for deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) immobilization, one example being a silanized surface. This is useful for determining DNA lengths and, thus, locating specific gene sequences in DNA by using fluorescence microscopy and scanning probe microscopy. In this study, we deposited DNA by using the molecular combing method and, we used fluorescence microscopy to study how the chain lengths of n-alkylsilanes affected the surface density of DNA deposited on the silanized surfaces in a tris-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (TE) buffer. The forces between a cleaned silicon-nitride (Si3N4) tip and each substrate surface in aqueous buffers at various pH levels (1.0 ~ 9.0) were also studied by using atomic force microscopy to measure the force-distance curves. We explain why the density of lambda bacteriophage DNA (λ-DNA) deposited by using the molecular combing method at pH 8 was lower on the silanized surface with the shorter alkyl chain than it was on the silanized surface with the longer alkyl chain in terms of the electrical double layer (EDL) and the adhesive force.

  20. Altitude of the potentiometric surface and changes in water levels in the Sparta-Memphis aquifer in eastern and southern Arkansas, spring 1986

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edds, Joe; Fitzpatrick, Daniel J.

    1989-01-01

    The Sparta-Memphis aquifer is a major source of industrial and public water supplies as well as a source of water for agricultural purposes in eastern and south-central Arkansas. The potentiometric-surface map for this aquifer, compiled from wastewater level measurements made during spring 1986, indicates a generally eastward and southward hydraulic gradient. The potentiometric surface also shows three major cones of depression resulting from groundwater withdrawals for industrial and public supplies; one centered in Columbia County, one in Union County, and one in Jefferson County. The water level change maps for the Sparta-Memphis aquifer for the period between spring 1981 and spring 1986 show large areas of both rise and decline in water levels across the study area. Largest rises occurred in parts of Jefferson, Columbia, and Phillips Counties, whereas largest declines occurred in parts of Union County. (USGS)

  1. Fabrication and qualification of roughness reference samples for industrial testing of surface roughness levels below 0.5 nm Sq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faehnle, O.; Langenbach, E.; Zygalsky, F.; Frost, F.; Fechner, R.; Schindler, A.; Cumme, M.; Biskup, H.; Wünsche, C.; Rascher, R.

    2015-08-01

    Applying reactive ion beam etching (RIBE) processes at the Leibniz Institute of Surface Modification (IOM), several reference samples to be used in industry for calibrating of roughness testing equipment have been generated with the smoothest sample featuring 0.1 nm rms Sq. Subsequently these reference samples have been measured cross-site applying atomic force microscopy (AFM), white light interferometry (WLI), Nomarski1 microscopy (NM) and scatterometry (iTIRM2) determining the appropriate range of measurable rms surface roughness for each industrial measuring device.

  2. Using SMOS observations in the development of the SMAP level 4 surface and root-zone soil moisture project

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS; [1]) mission was launched by ESA in November 2009 and has since been observing L-band (1.4 GHz) upwelling passive microwaves. Along with these brightness temperature observations, ESA also disseminates retrievals of surface soil moisture that are derived ...

  3. Manipulating the Lateral Diffusion of Surface-Anchored EGF Demonstrates that Receptor Clustering Modulates its Phosphorylation Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Stabley, Daniel; Retterer, Scott T; Marshal, Stephen; Salaita, Khalid

    2013-01-01

    Upon activation, the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor becomes phosphorylated and triggers a vast signaling network that has profound effects on cell growth. The EGF receptor is observed to assemble into clusters after ligand binding and tyrosine kinase autophosphorylation, but the role of these assemblies in the receptor signaling pathway remains unclear. To address this question, we measured the phosphorylation of EGFR when the EGF ligand was anchored onto laterally mobile and immobile surfaces. We found that cells generated clusters of ligand-receptor complex on mobile EGF surfaces, and generated a lower ratio of phosphorylated EGFR to EGF than when compared to immobilized EGF that is unable to cluster. This result was verified by tuning the lateral assembly of ligand-receptor complexes on the surface of living cells using patterned supported lipid bilayers. Nanoscale metal lines fabricated into the supported membrane constrained lipid diffusion and EGF receptor assembly into micron and sub-micron scale corrals. Single cell analysis indicated that clustering impacts EGF receptor activation, and larger clusters (> 1 m2) of ligand-receptor complex generated lower EGF receptor phosphorylation per ligand than smaller assemblies (< 1 m2) in HCC1143 cells that were engaged to ligand-functionalized surfaces. We investigated EGFR clustering by treating cells with compounds that disrupt the cytoskeleton (Latrunculin-B), clathrin-mediated endocytosis (Pitstop2), and inhibit EGFR activation (Gefitinib). These results help elucidate the nature of large-scale EGFR clustering, thus underscoring the general significance of receptor spatial organization in tuning function.

  4. The Impact of Surface Albedo on the Retrievals of Low-Level Stratus Cloud Properties: An Updated Parameterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dong, Xiquan

    2005-01-01

    An updated version of Dong et al. (1998, hereafter D98) parameterization is developed from a total of 40 hours of data with a broad range of surface albedos (0.1-0.8) during the 2000-2002 winter seasons at the DOE ARM SGP site. The updated parameterization includes the impact of surface albedo on the retrievals of stratus cloud microphysical and radiative properties, and has a significant improvement over D98 when surface albedo is high. Comparing the retrievals, the cloud-droplet effective radii (r(sub e)) calculated from the updated parameterization have a higher correlation coefficient (0.733) and lower Root-Mean-Square (RMS) error (1.74 m or 17.4%) than those (0.602, 4.0 m or 40%) from the D98. The cloud albedos also have a much higher correlation coefficient (0.983) and lower RMS (3%) than those 0.465, 26%) from the D98. The upper limit of surface albedo is 0.3 in applying the D98.

  5. Using the Response Surface Method (RSM) for Economic and Environmental Tradeoffs Between Economics and Environment at the Farm Level

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Excessive nitrogen use has been associated with the impairment of streams, lakes, and aquifers. The U.S. Geological Survey concluded that large amounts of nitrogen fertilizer applied to croplands is responsible for more than 48% of all nitrogen loads to surface water in areas where nitrogen runoff p...

  6. Surface-Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering and Visible Extinction Spectroscopy of Copper Chlorophyllin: An Upper Level Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnitzer, Cheryl S.; Reim, Candace Lawson; Sirois, John J.; House, Paul G.

    2010-01-01

    Advanced chemistry students are introduced to surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) by studying how sodium copper chlorophyllin (CuChl) adsorbs onto silver colloids (CuChl/Ag) as a function of pH. Using both SERRS and visible extinction spectroscopy, the extent of CuChl adsorption and colloidal aggregation are monitored. Initially at…

  7. Efficacy of a Food-grade Mixture of Volatile Compounds to Reduce Salmonella Levels on Food Contact Surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released from an endophytic fungus, Muscodor crispans, have been shown to have antimicrobial activity against many fungal and bacterial species. These VOCs have been synthesized into a commercial mixture called “B-23”, which may be a useful surface san...

  8. Effect of phosphorus levels on the protein profiles of secreted protein and root surface protein of rice.

    PubMed

    Shinano, Takuro; Yoshimura, Tomoko; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Unno, Yusuke; Osaki, Mitsuru; Nanjo, Yohei; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2013-11-01

    Plant roots are complicated organs that absorb water and nutrients from the soil. Roots also play an essential role in protecting plants from attack by soil pathogens and develop a beneficial role with some soil microorganisms. Plant-derived rhizosphere proteins (e.g., root secretory proteins and root surface binding proteins) are considered to play important roles in developing mutual relationships in the rhizosphere. In the rhizosphere, where plant roots meet the surrounding environment, it has been suggested that root secretory protein and root surface binding protein are important factors. Furthermore, it is not known how the physiological status of the plant affects the profile of these proteins. In this study, rice plants were grown aseptically, with or without phosphorus nutrition, and proteins were obtained from root bathing solution (designated as root secretory proteins) and obtained using 0.2 M CaCl2 solution (designated as root surface binding proteins). The total number of identified proteins in the root bathing solution was 458, and the number of root surface binding proteins was 256. More than half of the proteins were observed in both fractions. Most of the proteins were categorized as either having signal peptides or no membrane transport helix sites. The functional categorization suggested that most of the proteins seemed to have secretory pathways and were involved in defense/disease-related functions. These characteristics seem to be unique to rhizosphere proteins, and the latter might be part of the plants strategy to defeat pathogens in the soil. The low phosphorus treatment significantly increased the number of pathogenesis-related proteins in the root secretory proteins, whereas the change was small in the case of the root surface binding proteins. The results suggested that the roots are actively and selectively secreting protein into the rhizosphere. PMID:24083427

  9. Potentiometric surface and water-level difference maps of selected confined aquifers of Southern Maryland and Maryland's Eastern Shore, 1975-2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curtin, Stephen E.; Andreasen, David C.; Staley, Andrew W.

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater is the principal source of freshwater supply in most of Southern Maryland and Maryland's Eastern Shore. It is also the source of freshwater supply used in the operation of the Calvert Cliffs, Chalk Point, and Morgantown power plants. Increased groundwater withdrawals over the last several decades have caused groundwater levels to decline. This report presents potentiometric surface maps of the Aquia, Magothy, upper Patapsco, lower Patapsco, and Patuxent aquifers using water levels measured during September 2011. Water-level difference maps also are presented for the first four of these aquifers. The water-level differences in the Aquia aquifer are shown using groundwater-level data from 1982 and 2011, whereas the water-level differences in the Magothy aquifer are presented using data from 1975 and 2011. Water-level difference maps in both the upper Patapsco and lower Patapsco aquifers are presented using data from 1990 and 2011. These maps show cones of depression ranging from 25 to 198 feet (ft) below sea level centered on areas of major withdrawals. Water levels have declined by as much as 112 ft in the Aquia aquifer since 1982, 85 ft in the Magothy aquifer since 1975, and 47 and 71 ft in the upper Patapsco and lower Patapsco aquifers, respectively, since 1990.

  10. Multi-scale modeling study of the source contributions to near-surface ozone and sulfur oxides levels over California during the ARCTAS-CARB period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, M.; Carmichael, G. R.; Spak, S. N.; Adhikary, B.; Kulkarni, S.; Cheng, Y.; Wei, C.; Tang, Y.; D'Allura, A.; Wennberg, P. O.; Huey, G. L.; Dibb, J. E.; Jimenez, J. L.; Cubison, M. J.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Kaduwela, A.; Cai, C.; Wong, M.; Pierce, R. Bradley; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Streets, D. G.; Zhang, Q.

    2011-04-01

    Chronic high surface ozone (O3) levels and the increasing sulfur oxides (SOx = SO2+SO4) ambient concentrations over South Coast (SC) and other areas of California (CA) are affected by both local emissions and long-range transport. In this paper, multi-scale tracer, full-chemistry and adjoint simulations using the STEM atmospheric chemistry model are conducted to assess the contribution of local emission sourcesto SC O3 and to evaluate the impacts of transported sulfur and local emissions on the SC sulfur budgetduring the ARCTAS-CARB experiment period in 2008. Sensitivity simulations quantify contributions of biogenic and fire emissions to SC O3 levels. California biogenic and fire emissions contribute 3-4 ppb to near-surface O3 over SC, with larger contributions to other regions in CA. During a long-range transport event from Asia starting from 22 June, high SOx levels (up to ~0.7 ppb of SO2 and ~1.3 ppb of SO4) is observed above ~6 km, but they did not affect CA surface air quality. The elevated SOx observed at 1-4 km is estimated to enhance surface SOx over SC by ~0.25 ppb (upper limit) on ~24 June. The near-surface SOx levels over SC during the flight week are attributed mostly to local emissions. Two anthropogenic SOx emission inventories (EIs) from the California Air Resources Board (CARB) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are compared and applied in 60 km and 12 km chemical transport simulations, and the results are compared withobservations. The CARB EI shows improvements over the National Emission Inventory (NEI) by EPA, but generally underestimates surface SC SOx by about a factor of two. Adjoint sensitivity analysis indicated that SO2 levels at 00:00 UTC (17:00 local time) at six SC surface sites were influenced by previous day maritime emissions over the ocean, the terrestrial emissions over nearby urban areas, and by transported SO2 from the north through both terrestrial and maritime areas. Overall maritime emissions contribute 10-70% of

  11. Photocurrent response of surface-functionalized metal oxides with well-matched energy levels: from nothing to something.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shengxue; Ma, Huiyan; Luo, Yunqing; Gong, Jian

    2012-06-18

    In recent years, an enormous amount of research has been devoted to the study of photosensitive materials from both fundamental and practical viewpoints, due to their wide applications in photocatalytic and optoelectronic devices, ultraviolet (UV) photodetectors, photoswitch microdevices, light-emitting diodes, photovoltaic devices, and photoelectrochemical cells. Metal oxides, such as ZnO, TiO(2), SnO(2), and NiO have been the most investigated photosensitive materials. To enhance and take full advantage of their photosensitivity, functionalizing their surface with a polymer that has a high light absorption ability has become one of the widely used methods. For example, Z. L. Wang et al. reported that the UV photocurrent of a ZnO nanobelt-based sensor was enhanced by close to five orders of magnitude after functionalizing its surface with polystyrene sulfate which has a high UV absorption ability. T. Sasaki et al. reported the assembly of a TiO(2) nanoparticle film with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) and poly(4-styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT-PSS) through layer-by-layer fabrication in the nanometer scale. The electric conductivity of the TiO(2) composite films could be tuned by UV and visible (Vis) light. Thus, sunlight or photon energy can be used and transformed to electrical energy by UV-photosensitive metal oxides after their surfaces have been functionalized with a dye that has a high Vis absorption ability. To date, most of the dye-sensitized solar cells are based on the surface functionalization of UV-photosensitive metal oxides by dyes. However, to the best of our knowledge, all of the reports on surface functionalization enhanced only the UV photosensitivity of the metal oxide. In other words, this method has been used exclusively to enhance the UV photocurrent in metal oxides that already have UV-photosensitive properties, but not to induce UV photocurrent in metal oxides that have no UV-photosensitive properties. In fact, to the best of our knowledge, there

  12. Potentiometric Surfaces and Changes in Groundwater Levels in Selected Bedrock Aquifers in the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, March-August 2008 and 1988-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanocki, Christopher A.; Langer, Susan K.; Menard, Jason C.

    2008-01-01

    This report depicts potentiometric surfaces and groundwater- level changes in three aquifers that underlie the seven-county Twin Cities Metropolitan Area. Approximately 350 groundwater levels were measured in wells from the three aquifers-the Prairie du Chien-Jordan, the Franconia-Ironton-Galesville, and the Mount Simon-Hinckley aquifers-in March and August of 2008. The report presents maps, associated data tables, and 22 geographic information system datasets. The maps presented in this report show the potentiometric surfaces in March and August of 2008 for all three aquifers, groundwater-level changes from March to August 2008 for each aquifer, and revised potentiometric-surface contours for the winter of 1988-89 for the Prairie du Chien-Jordan and the Mount Simon-Hinckley aquifers, and the estimated long-term (winter of 1988-89 to March 2008) groundwater-level changes for the Prairie du Chien-Jordan and Mount Simon-Hinckley aquifers. This report documents the methods used to construct the maps and provides a context for the period of the measurements. Although withdrawal demand is increasing in the Twin Cities Metropolitan area, particularly in the Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer, year-to-year changes in withdrawals can be substantial, and the relation between potentiometric surfaces in the major aquifers and year-to-year withdrawals is not well established. The estimated long-term (19-year) groundwater-level changes for the Prairie du Chien-Jordan and Mount Simon-Hinckley aquifers have not been large based on data and maps produced during this study, despite the large seasonal fluctuations shown by the March and August 2008 synoptic measurements.

  13. Spatial trend patterns of Sea Surface Temperature, 20°C isotherm depth and sea level in the Pacific Ocean during 1993 - 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanisamy, H. K.; Cazenave, A. A.; Delcroix, T. C.; Meyssignac, B.

    2013-12-01

    Analysis and comparison of spatial trend patterns and variability of observed sea level, steric sea level and Sea Surface Temperature (SST) in the Pacific Ocean during the altimetry era (1993-2012) shows that the observed sea level trend patterns in this region result from the superposition of two main signals: (1) a strong broad scale V-shaped positive trend anomaly-extending to mid-latitudes in the central Pacific and (2) another very strong positive trend anomaly located between 120°E and 160° E longitude and ~20°S-20°N latitude (Tropical Pacific). The type (1) signal also observed in SST is characteristic of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and reflects the ocean-atmosphere coupling. The type (2) signal related to El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO), is steric in origin and as shown in several previous studies is mostly due to the deepening of the thermocline. In this study, we further show that the depth of the 20°C isotherm (supposed to represent the thermocline) presents a spatial trend pattern highly correlated to that of observed sea level. The computed steric sea level associated with the 20°C isotherm depth (i.e. steric sea level calculated between 0m and 20°C isotherm depth) explains the observed sea level trend very well. The results imply that PDO and ENSO related signals explain most of the observed sea level trend pattern in the Pacific Ocean. A supplementary study on the impact of geostrophic surface currents on sea level change in the Tropical Pacific is also performed.

  14. Dose-response association between hepatitis B surface antigen levels and liver cancer risk in Chinese men and women

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Gao, Jing; Li, Hong-Lan; Zheng, Wei; Yang, Gong; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Xiao; Tan, Yu-Ting; Rothman, Nat; Gao, Yu-Tang; Chow, Wong-Ho; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Xiang, Yong-Bing

    2016-01-01

    We aimed at evaluating the risk of liver cancer in different levels of HBsAg among Chinese men and women. We carried out a nested case-control study including 363 cases and 3,511 controls in two population-based cohorts in Shanghai. Plasma samples collected at enrollment were quantified for HBsAg levels using the Architect QT assay. Conditional logistic regression was performed to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) for liver cancer, with adjustment for potential confounders. HBsAg was detected in 6.29% of control subjects overall (7.02% in men and 4.98% in women). HBsAg levels were positively associated with liver cancer risk in a dose-response manner (Ptrend<0.001). Such association showed a significant gender disparity. With increasing levels of HBsAg, liver cancer risks rose more steeply in men than in women. In men, the adjusted ORs increased from 7.27 (95%CI: 3.49–15.15) at the lowest detectable level of HBsAg (5–9 IU/ml) to 7.16 (95%CI: 3.21–15.96), 34.30 (95%CI: 16.94–69.44), and 47.33 (95%CI: 23.50–95.34) at the highest level of HBsAg (≥1,000 IU/ml) compared to those negative for HBsAg. The corresponding ORs were much lower for women, from 1.37 (95%CI: 0.25–7.47) to 3.81 (95%CI: 1.09–13.28), 7.36 (95%CI: 2.41–22.46), and 16.86 (95%CI: 7.24–39.27), respectively. HBsAg quantification has potential to distinguish individuals at different risks of liver cancer. Men with the lowest detectable level of HBsAg should still pay attention to their liver cancer risks, but those with a higher level may be given a higher priority in future liver cancer surveillance program. PMID:26990915

  15. Dose-response association between hepatitis B surface antigen levels and liver cancer risk in Chinese men and women.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Gao, Jing; Li, Hong-Lan; Zheng, Wei; Yang, Gong; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Xiao; Tan, Yu-Ting; Rothman, Nathaniel; Gao, Yu-Tang; Chow, Wong-Ho; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Xiang, Yong-Bing

    2016-07-15

    We aimed at evaluating the risk of liver cancer in different levels of HBsAg among Chinese men and women. We carried out a nested case-control study including 363 cases and 3,511 controls in two population-based cohorts in Shanghai. Plasma samples collected at enrollment were quantified for HBsAg levels using the Architect QT assay. Conditional logistic regression was performed to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for liver cancer, with adjustment for potential confounders. HBsAg was detected in 6.29% of control subjects overall (7.02% in men and 4.98% in women). HBsAg levels were positively associated with liver cancer risk in a dose-response manner (ptrend  < 0.001). Such association showed a significant gender disparity. With increasing levels of HBsAg, liver cancer risks rose more steeply in men than in women. In men, the adjusted ORs increased from 7.27 (95% CI: 3.49-15.15) at the lowest detectable level of HBsAg (5-9 IU/ml) to 7.16 (95% CI: 3.21-15.96), 34.30 (95% CI: 16.94-69.44), and 47.33 (95% CI: 23.50-95.34) at the highest level of HBsAg (≥1,000 IU/ml) compared to those negative for HBsAg. The corresponding ORs were much lower for women, from 1.37 (95% CI: 0.25-7.47), 3.81 (95% CI: 1.09-13.28), 7.36 (95% CI: 2.41-22.46) and 16.86 (95% CI: 7.24-39.27), respectively. HBsAg quantification has potential to distinguish individuals at different risks of liver cancer. Men with the lowest detectable level of HBsAg should still pay attention to their liver cancer risks, but those with a higher level may be given a higher priority in future liver cancer surveillance program. PMID:26990915

  16. Liquid-crystal periodic zigzags from geometrical and surface-anchoring-induced confinement: Origin and internal structure from mesoscopic scale to molecular level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Dong Ki; Yoon, Jinhwan; Kim, Yun Ho; Choi, M. C.; Kim, Jehan; Sakata, Osami; Kimura, Shigeru; Kim, Mahn Won; Smalyukh, Ivan I.; Clark, Noel A.; Ree, Moonhor; Jung, Hee-Tae

    2010-10-01

    We figured out periodic undulations of lamellae “zigzags” in liquid crystals under confinement by glass and patterned silicon hybrid cell, but in the absence of applied fields. The optical and internal structures of zigzags have been investigated from mesoscopic scale to molecular level by convoluting real and reciprocal space probes, such as polarized light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and microbeam x-ray diffraction. The homeotropic anchoring happens at air/liquid crystal, while planar one appears at glass or patterned silicon surfaces. The wetting and displacement of lamellae near the glass surface give rise to tilting and bending in the stacking of lamellae. This can provide a solution for the origin of periodic zigzags: asymmetric strain exerted to lamellae at two-dimensional glass surface and one-dimensional-like pattern. This can give a hint for potential photonic applications such as optical gratings and modulators due to its high periodicity.

  17. Data on ground-water levels and ground-water/surface-water relations in the Great Miami River and Little Miami River valleys, southwestern Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yost, William P.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrogeologic data were collected in September, October, and November 1993 to define the ground-water levels and the ground-water/surface-water relations in the vicinity of Dayton, Ohio. In this report, water levels are listed for 678 wells completed in sand and gravel. Data from 101 streamflow measurements made at selected sites along the Great Miami, Stillwater, Mad, and Little Miami Rivers and their tributaries during 2-day gain-loss study also are listed. Surface-water altitudes were determined at 11 stream-gaging stations and 39 other streamflow measurement sites. Discharge data for measurements made at 30 storm-sewer outfalls are given. Streamflow and discharge data obtained during the study were used to calculate the gain or loss of streamflow along 16 selected reaches of the Great Miami, Stillwater, Mad, and Little Miami Rivers. Streambed-conductivity data obtained by use of seepage meters at nine different sites also are given.

  18. Density Functional Theory Study of the Energetics, Electronic Structure, and Core-Level Shifts of NO Adsorption on the Pt(111) Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Z. H.; Da Silva, J. L. F.; Deng, H. Q.; Li, W. X.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we report a first-principles investigation of the energetics, structures, electronic properties, and core-level shifts of NO adsorption on the Pt(111) surface. Our calculations are based on density functional theory within the framework of the ultrasoft pseudopotential plane-wave and the all-electron projected augmented-wave methods. We found that at 0.25, 0.50, and 0.75 monolayer, NO adsorbs preferentially in the fcc, fcc+top, and fcc+top+hcp sites, respectively. The geometric parameters, adsorption energies, vibrational frequencies, and work-function changes are in good agreement with the experimental data. The interaction between NO and Pt(111) was found to follow a donation-back-donation process, in which the NO {sigma} states donate electrons to the substrate Pt d states, while the substrate Pt d states back donate to the NO {pi} states. Though there is an overall net charge transfer from the substrate to the NO adsorbate regardless of the adsorption sites and coverages, the spatial redistribution of the transferred electron is site dependent. The charge accumulation for NO in the top sites occurs closer to the surface than NO in the hollow sites, which results in the reduction of the Pt(111) surface work function for the top NO but an increase for the hollow NO. The core-level shifts of the topmost surface Pt atoms coordinated with top and hollow NO molecules at different coverages are in excellent agreement with experiments. In contrast, the N 1s core-level shifts between top and hollow NO ({approx}0.7 eV) deviated significantly from the zero shift found in experiments. Our analysis indicates that the difference may come from the thermal vibration and rotation of adsorbed NO on the Pt(111) surface.

  19. Salinity-induced reduction in root surface area and changes in major root and shoot traits at the phytomer level in wheat.

    PubMed

    Robin, Arif Hasan Khan; Matthew, Cory; Uddin, Md Jasim; Bayazid, Khandaker Nafiz

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of salinity stress on root growth at the phytomer level in wheat to provide novel site-specific understanding of salinity damage in roots. Seedlings of 13 wheat varieties were grown hydroponically. Plants were exposed to three concentrations of NaCl, 0 (control), 50 and 100mM, from 47 days after sowing. In a destructive harvest 12 days later we determined the number of live leaves, adventitious roots, seminal roots and newly formed roots at the youngest phytomer; length and diameter of main axes; and length and diameter of root hairs and their number per millimetre of root axis. Elongation rate of main axes and root hair density were then derived. Root surface area at each root-bearing phytomer (Pr) was mechanistically modelled. New root formation was increased by salt exposure, while number of live leaves per plant decreased. The greatest salinity effect on root axis elongation was observed at the youngest roots at Pr1 and Pr2. Both the 50mM and the 100mM levels of salinity reduced root hair length by approximately 25% and root hair density by 40% compared with the control whereas root hairs alone contributed around 93% of the estimated total root surface area of an individual tiller. Decrease in main axis length of new roots, root hair density and root hair length combined to reduce estimated root surface area by 36-66% at the higher NaCl concentration. The varietal response towards the three salinity levels was found to be trait-specific. The data highlight reduction in root surface area as a major but previously largely unrecognized component of salinity damage. Salinity resistance is trait-specific. Selection for retention of root surface area at a specific phytomer position following salt exposure might be useful in development of salinity-tolerant crop varieties. PMID:26951370

  20. High levels of molecular orientation of surface azo chromophores can be optically induced even in a wet biological environment.

    PubMed

    Sailer, Miloslav; Fernández, Raquel; Lu, Xiaoyu; Barrett, Christopher J

    2013-12-14

    We have developed polyelectrolyte multilayer bio-films containing azobenzene chromophores that enhance reversible photo-orientation upon irradiation with linearly polarized light, to effect surface photo-switching of adjacent biological systems. When conditions of film preparation and irradiation were optimized, we could observe the highest measured birefringence to date in amorphous systems (Δn > 0.2). This birefringence change to probe orientation was also for the first time measured and determined to be stable completely underwater, permitting optimization for in situ applications immersed in biological conditions. PMID:24153236

  1. Impact of drying surface and raking frequencies on mold incidence, ochratoxin A contamination, and cup quality during preparation of arabica and robusta cherries at the farm level.

    PubMed

    Velmourougane, Kulandaivelu; Bhat, Rajeev; Gopinandhan, Thirukonda Nannier

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact and contribution of various drying surfaces (soil, cement, and tarpaulin) and raking frequencies (1 and 4/day) on the incidence of toxigenic molds, ochratoxin A (OTA) production, and on the overall cup quality during preparation of arabica and robusta coffee cherry in India. Two individual experimental batches (run 1 at the begin of harvest and run 2 at the end of harvest) were set up for the study. Results showed high incidence of molds in coffee dried on soil surface compared with that on cement and tarpaulin surfaces. In both arabica and robusta, OTA could be detected in Aspergillus ochraceus contaminated samples at the end of harvest. Raking of the cherries 4 times/day showed lower fungal incidence with no OTA levels detected. Overall, coffee cherry prepared by drying on tarpaulin surface with 4 rakings/day showed lower OTA and fungal incidence with good and acceptable cup quality, and this is recommended to be practiced at the farm level. PMID:20618072

  2. Hydrogen mitigation Gas Characterization System: System design description

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, T.C.

    1998-07-17

    The Gas Characterization System (GCS) design is described for flammable gas monitoring. Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) is known to experience periodic tank level increases and decreases during which hydrogen gas is released. It is believed that the generated gases accumulate in the solids-containing layer near the bottom of the tank. Solids and gases are also present in the crust and may be present in the interstitial liquid layer. The accumulation of gases creates a buoyancy that eventually overcomes the density and bonding strength of the bottom layer. When this happens, the gas from the bottom layer is released upward through the liquid layer to the vapor space above the tank crust. Previous monitoring of the vapor space gases during such an event indicates hydrogen release concentrations greater than the lower flammability limit (LFL) of hydrogen in a partial nitrous oxide atmosphere. Tanks 241-AN-105, 241-AW-101, and 241-SY-103 have been identified as having the potential to behave similar to SY-101. These waste tanks have been placed on the flammable gas watch list (FGWL). All waste tanks on the FGWL will have a standard hydrogen monitoring system (SHMS) installed to measure hydrogen. In the event that hydrogen levels exceed 0.75% by volume, additional characterization will be required. The purpose of this additional vapor space characterization is to determine the actual lower flammability limit of these tanks, accurately measure low baseline gas release concentrations, and to determine potential hazards associated with larger Gas Release Events (GREs). The instruments to be installed in the GCS for vapor monitoring will allow accurate analysis of samples from the tank vapor space. It will be possible to detect a wide range of hydrogen from parts per million to percent by volume, as well as other gas species suspected to be generated in waste tanks.

  3. Foot kinematics in walking on a level surface and on stairs in patients with hallux rigidus before and after cheilectomy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Walking down stairs is a clinically relevant daily activity for older persons. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the impact of cheilectomy on walking on level ground and on stairs. Methods 3D motion analysis of foot kinematics was performed in eight patients with hallux rigidus and 11 healthy control participants with a 12-camera system, using the Heidelberg foot measurement method before and one year after surgery. The clinical results were documented using the AOFAS Scale. Results The range of motion of the first metatarsophalangeal joint did not improve after the operation under any gait condition. Preoperatively, hallux dorsi-/plantarflexion in level walking was 11.9° lower in patients than in controls (p = 0.006), postoperatively 14.5° lower (p = 0.004). Comparing walking conditions in patients, hallux dorsi-/plantarflexion was significantly higher in level walking than in climbing stairs (difference up stairs – level: -8.1°, p = 0.018). The AOFAS Scale improved significantly from 56.9 ± 19.9 points (mean ± SD), preoperatively, to 75.9 ± 13.9 points, postoperatively (p = 0.027). Conclusions Cheilectomy is appropriate for reducing symptoms of hallux rigidus. However, neither a positive influence on the range of motion in walking on level ground and on stairs nor a functional improvement was observed in this group of patients. Trial registration NCT01804491 PMID:24524773

  4. MEASUREMENTS OF PAST 14C LEVELS AND 13C/12C RATIOS IN THE SURFACE WATERS OF THE WORLD'S SUBPOLAR OCEANS.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, T A

    2010-04-22

    Under this project we have developed methods that allow the reconstruction of past {sup 14}C levels of the surface waters of the subpolar North Pacific Ocean by measuring the {sup 14}C contents of archived salmon scales. The overall goal of this research was to reduce of the uncertainty in the uptake of fossil CO{sub 2} by the oceans and thereby improve the quantification of the global carbon cycle and to elucidate the fate of anthropogenic CO{sub 2}. Ocean General Circulation Models (OGCMs), with their three dimensional global spatial coverage and temporal modeling capabilities, provide the best route to accurately calculating the total uptake of CO{sub 2} by the oceans and, hence, to achieving the desired reduction in uncertainty. {sup 14}C has played, and continues to play, a central role in the validation of the OGCMs calculations, particularly with respect to those model components which govern the uptake of CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere and the transport of this carbon within the oceans. Under this project, we have developed time-series records of the {sup 14}C levels of the surface waters of three areas of the subpolar North Pacific Ocean. As the previously available data on the time-history of oceanic surface water {sup 14}C levels are very limited, these time-series records provide significant new {sup 14}C data to constrain and validate the OGCMs.

  5. Fermi-level stabilization in the topological insulators Bi2Se3 and Bi2Te3: Origin of the surface electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Joonki; Fu, Deyi; Liu, Xinyu; Furdyna, Jacek K.; Yu, Kin Man; Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw; Wu, Junqiao

    2014-03-01

    Two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) coexists with topological states on the surface of topological insulators (TIs), while the origin of the 2DEG remains elusive. In this work, electron density in TI thin films (Bi2Se3,Bi2Te3, and their alloys) were manipulated by controlling the density of electronically active native defects with particle irradiation. The measured electron concentration increases with irradiation dose but saturates at different levels for Bi2Se3 and Bi2Te3. The results are in quantitative agreement with the amphoteric defect model, which predicts that electronically active native defects shift the Fermi energy (EF) toward a Fermi stabilization level (EFS) located universally at ˜4.9 eV below the vacuum level. Combined with thickness-dependent data, it is demonstrated that regardless of the bulk doping, the surface EF is always pinned at EFS, producing a band bending and 2DEG on TI film surfaces. Our work elucidates native defect physics of TIs with a model universally applicable to other semiconductors and has critical implications for potential device applications of TIs.

  6. Solids Mobilization and Suspension by Dual Opposed Mixing Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Fort, James A.; Enderlin, Carl W.

    2012-01-01

    Experiments were performed to support understanding mixing of radioactive waste stored in Tank 241-SY-101 at the Hanford Site in Washington State. These experiments were conducted at 1/12 scale and modeled the tank and proposed mixing pump. The tests investigated solids mobilization and suspension for jets rotated in fixed increments about the tank centerline. Flow visualization tests showed that the supernatant layer was generally too cloudy for effective visualization. Observations of the settled solids interface during a start-up transient showed that the mixing action was always confined within the slurry layer. A 4.57-m/s (15-ft/s) jet velocity was not capable of clearing settled sludge off the tank floor all the way to the tank wall and produced a stratified flow field at steady state; 7.62-m/s (25-ft/s) and higher jet velocities always circulated solids to the tank surface. During the operating parameter tests with jets rotated at fixed increments, the slurry interface rose more slowly than for the fixed location jets. Solids suspension was more effective for the rotated jets than for the fixed location jets. Percent solids suspended with a 7.62-m/s (25-ft/s) jet was 66 to 72% in the high viscosity simulant and 59 to 67% in the low viscosity simulant. Percent solids suspended with a 15.2 m/s (50-ft/s) jet was 74 to 81% in the low viscosity simulant. A 7.62 m/s (25-ft/s) jet velocity was adequate to clear settled solids from the tank floor to the tank wall for both the low and high viscosity simulant.

  7. Structural analysis and evaluation of a mixer pump in a double-shell tank at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Rezvani, M.A.; Strehlow, J.P.; Baliga, R.

    1993-08-01

    The double-shell waste tank 241-SY-101 is a 1,000,000 gallon tank used to store radioactive waste at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. With time the waste has formed two layers of sludge, a convective and a nonconvective layer. In addition, a crest has formed over the surface of the waste, isolating the convective layer from the vapor space. Ongoing reactions in the waste cause a buildup of hydrogen molecules that become trapped within the nonconvective layer and under the crust. Over time, this hydrogen buildup increases pressure on the crest from beneath. Every 100 to 140 days, the pressure is released when the crust lifts upward in what is called a waste rollover. To prevent the release of a large volume of hydrogen to the vapor space, a mixer pump has been designed to be installed in the tank to circulate the waste and reduce or prevent the hydrogen buildup. The structural analysis and evaluation designed as part of the hydrogen mitigation test process and presented herein addresses the response of the mixer pump and the tank dome resulting from expected operational and design loads. The loads include deadweight, waste rollover, asymmetric thrust, and pump vibration, as well as seismic loads. The seismically induced loads take into consideration both the convective and the impulsive effects of the waste-filled tank. The structural evaluations were performed in accordance with applicable national codes and standards. The qualification of the mixer pump required the design of a unique mounting assembly to transfer the loads from the pump to the surrounding soil without overstressing the structural components such as the dome penetration riser. Also, special consideration was given to minimize the additional stresses in the already stressed concrete tank dome.

  8. A parametric study of double-shell tank response to internal high-frequency pressure loading

    SciTech Connect

    Baliga, R.; Choi, K.; Shulman, J.S.; Strehlow, J.P.; Abatt, G.

    1995-02-01

    The double-shell waste tank 241SY101 (SY101) is a 3,785,400-liter tank used to store radioactive waste at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The tank waste has formed two layers of sludge in the tank; a convective and a nonconvective layer. Ongoing reactions in the waste cause a buildup of hydrogen molecules that become trapped within the nonconvective layer of the waste. Various means of preventing the buildup of hydrogen molecules in the nonconvective layer have been investigated, including the use of a sonic probe that would transmit high-frequency acoustic pressure waves into the nonconvective layer of the waste. During the operation of the sonic probe, the pressure waves transmitted from the probe induce pressure time history loading on the inside surface of the primary tank. For low-frequency fluid-structure interaction loads, such as those associated with seismic events, the convective and impulsive effects of the waste-filled tank are well documented. However, for high-frequency loading, such as that associated with acoustic pressure waves, interactions between the waste and the primary tank are not understood. The pressure time history is represented by a harmonic function with a frequency range between 30 and 100 Hz. Structural analyses of the double-shell tank have been performed that address the tank`s response to the sonic probe acoustic pressure loads. This paper addresses the variations in the tank response as a function of percent waste mass considered to be effective in the dynamic excitation of the tank. It also compares results predicted by analyses that discretely model the liquid waste and presents recommendations for the simplified effective mass approach. Also considered in the parametric study is the effect of damping on the tank response for the same pressure loading.

  9. Revealing molecular-level surface structure of amyloid fibrils in liquid by means of frequency modulation atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuma, Takeshi; Mostaert, Anika S.; Serpell, Louise C.; Jarvis, Suzanne P.

    2008-09-01

    We have investigated the surface structure of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) fibrils and α-synuclein protofibrils in liquid by means of frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM). Ångström-resolution FM-AFM imaging of isolated macromolecules in liquid is demonstrated for the first time. Individual β-strands aligned perpendicular to the fibril axis with a spacing of 0.5 nm are resolved in FM-AFM images, which confirms cross-β structure of IAPP fibrils in real space. FM-AFM images also reveal the existence of 4 nm periodic domains along the axis of IAPP fibrils. Stripe features with 0.5 nm spacing are also found in images of α-synuclein protofibrils. However, in contrast to the case for IAPP fibrils, the stripes are oriented 30° from the axis, suggesting the possibility of β-strand alignment in protofibrils different from that in mature fibrils or the regular arrangement of thioflavin T molecules present during the fibril preparation aligned at the surface of the protofibrils.

  10. Limitations of Eddy Current Residual Stress Profiling in Surface-Treated Engine Alloys of Various Hardness Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Nabah, B. A.; Hassan, W. T.; Blodgett, M. P.; Nagy, P. B.

    2010-02-01

    Recent research results indicated that eddy current conductivity measurements might be exploited for nondestructive evaluation of subsurface residual stresses in surface-treated nickel-base superalloy components. This paper presents new results that indicate that in some popular nickel-base superalloys the relationship between the electric conductivity profile and the sought residual stress profile is more tenuous than previously thought. It is shown that in IN718 the relationship is very sensitive to the state of precipitation hardening and, if left uncorrected, could render the eddy current technique unsuitable for residual stress profiling in components of 36 HRC or harder, i.e., in most critical engine applications. The presented experimental results show that the observed dramatic change in the eddy current response of hardened IN718 to surface treatment is caused by very fine nanometer-scale features of the microstructure, such as γ' and γ" precipitates, rather than micrometer-scale features, such as changing grain size or carbide precipitates.

  11. LIMITATIONS OF EDDY CURRENT RESIDUAL STRESS PROFILING IN SURFACE-TREATED ENGINE ALLOYS OF VARIOUS HARDNESS LEVELS

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Nabah, B. A.; Hassan, W. T.; Blodgett, M. P.; Nagy, P. B.

    2010-02-22

    Recent research results indicated that eddy current conductivity measurements might be exploited for nondestructive evaluation of subsurface residual stresses in surface-treated nickel-base superalloy components. This paper presents new results that indicate that in some popular nickel-base superalloys the relationship between the electric conductivity profile and the sought residual stress profile is more tenuous than previously thought. It is shown that in IN718 the relationship is very sensitive to the state of precipitation hardening and, if left uncorrected, could render the eddy current technique unsuitable for residual stress profiling in components of 36 HRC or harder, i.e., in most critical engine applications. The presented experimental results show that the observed dramatic change in the eddy current response of hardened IN718 to surface treatment is caused by very fine nanometer-scale features of the microstructure, such as gamma' and gamma'' precipitates, rather than micrometer-scale features, such as changing grain size or carbide precipitates.

  12. An investigation of environmental levels of cadmium and lead in airborne matter and surface soils within the locality of a municipal waste incinerator.

    PubMed

    Collett, R S; Oduyemi, K; Lill, D E

    1998-01-19

    The results of an investigation into the environmental impact of heavy metals in the airborne emissions from the Baldovie municipal waste incinerator, Scotland, are presented. A sampling network of 1-km grid squares covering a 7 x 9 km area was established over the incinerator plant and its surroundings. Surface soil core samples were collected from within each 1 km2 and analysed for cadmium and lead content. The spatial distribution of lead levels in soils showed a marked variation downwind from the Baldovie incinerator in comparison with the background level for the area but remained well within the typical range of lead in rural, unpolluted, British soils. A comparison of the observed levels of lead in local soils, with the predicted downwind long-term ground level lead distribution in air indicates that atmospheric emissions of lead originating from the Baldovie incinerator directly determine concentrations of lead in soils within a radius of 5 km of the incinerator. An empirical relationship between the levels of lead in soils and the long-term levels in air was established. In the case of cadmium, the spatial distribution of the heavy metal showed neither a marked nor extensive contamination of the sampled area around the incinerator and remained within the typical range of cadmium levels in rural, unpolluted, British soils. The work concludes that atmospheric emissions of lead from the Baldovie incinerator significantly determines the local distribution of lead in soils within the immediate vicinity of the incinerator. PMID:9514037

  13. Continuous-time core-level photon-stimulated desorption spectroscopy for monitoring soft x-ray-induced reactions of molecules adsorbed on a single-crystal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, L.-C.; Wen, C.-R.

    2006-05-15

    Continuous-time core-level photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) spectroscopy was proposed for monitoring the soft x-ray-induced reactions of molecules adsorbed on a single-crystal surface. Monochromatic synchrotron radiation was used as a soft x-ray light source in the photon-induced reactions of CF{sub 3}Cl adsorbed on a Si(111)-7x7 surface at 30 K and also as a probe for studying the produced fluorination states of the bonding surface Si atom in the positive-ion PSD spectroscopy. The F{sup +} PSD spectrum was obtained by monitoring the F{sup +} signal as a function of incident photon energy near the Si(2p) edge (98-110 eV). Sequential F{sup +} PSD spectra were measured as a function of photon exposure at four adsorbate coverages (the first dose=0.3x10{sup 15} molecules/cm{sup 2}, the second dose=0.8x10{sup 15} molecules/cm{sup 2}, the third dose=2.2x10{sup 15} molecules/cm{sup 2}, and the fourth dose=3.2x10{sup 15} molecules/cm{sup 2}). For the first and second CF{sub 3}Cl-dosed surfaces, the sequential F{sup +} PSD spectra show the variation of their shapes with photon exposure and indicate the formation of surface SiF species. The sequential F{sup +} PSD spectra for the third and fourth CF{sub 3}Cl-dosed surfaces also show the variation of their shapes with photon exposure and depict the production of surface SiF and SiF{sub 3} species.

  14. Potential reference measurement procedures for PBDE in surface water at levels required by the EU Water Frame Directive.

    PubMed

    Swart, Claudia; Gantois, Fanny; Petrov, Panayot; Entwisle, John; Goenaga-Infante, Heidi; Nousiainen, Marjaana; Bílsel, Mine; Binici, Burcu; Gonzalez-Gago, Adriana; Pröfrock, Daniel; Gören, Ahmet C

    2016-05-15

    Polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDE), used as flame retardants, are named as priority substances in the Directive 2000/60/EC of the European parliament and of the council establishing a framework for Community action in the field of water policy. An annual average environmental quality standard (EQS) for inland surface waters of 0.0005 µg/L (0.0002 µg/L for other surface waters) for PBDE congeners involved in the technical penta-PBDE mixtures containing PBDE with five bromine atoms has been established. The directives focus especially on the congeners PBDE 28, 47, 99, 100, 153 and 154 contained in the penta-PBDE mixture. Up to now, no reference measurement procedures have been established reaching the limits of quantification (LOQs) and the associated uncertainties as defined in the directives with results traceable to the SI. Within a recent European project on metrology, different approaches for the traceable quantification of PBDE, based on liquid/liquid or solid phase extraction followed by the detection with gas chromatography coupled to either inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry or triple quadrupole mass spectrometry, were investigated and the related LOQs and expanded uncertainties of the results were compared. A complete uncertainty budget for each method was estimated according to the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM). All presented analytical procedures can serve as reference measurement procedures regarding the LOQs and their associated expanded uncertainties for monitoring the six priority PBDEs named above. LOQs as low as 0.026 ng/kg with an associated expanded uncertainty of 0.002 ng/kg could be achieved. PMID:26992518

  15. β-Arrestin1 and distinct CXCR4 structures are required for stromal derived factor-1 to downregulate CXCR4 cell-surface levels in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Clift, Ian C; Bamidele, Adebowale O; Rodriguez-Ramirez, Christie; Kremer, Kimberly N; Hedin, Karen E

    2014-04-01

    CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) located on the cell surface that signals upon binding the chemokine stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1; also called CXCL 12). CXCR4 promotes neuroblastoma proliferation and chemotaxis. CXCR4 expression negatively correlates with prognosis and drives neuroblastoma growth and metastasis in mouse models. All functions of CXCR4 require its expression on the cell surface, yet the molecular mechanisms that regulate CXCR4 cell-surface levels in neuroblastoma are poorly understood. We characterized CXCR4 cell-surface regulation in the related SH-SY5Y and SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma cell lines. SDF-1 treatment caused rapid down-modulation of CXCR4 in SH-SY5Y cells. Pharmacologic activation of protein kinase C similarly reduced CXCR4, but via a distinct mechanism. Analysis of CXCR4 mutants delineated two CXCR4 regions required for SDF-1 treatment to decrease cell-surface CXCR4 in neuroblastoma cells: the isoleucine-leucine motif at residues 328 and 329 and residues 343-352. In contrast, and unlike CXCR4 regulation in other cell types, serines 324, 325, 338, and 339 were not required. Arrestin proteins can bind and regulate GPCR cell-surface expression, often functioning together with kinases such as G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2). Using SK-N-SH cells which are naturally deficient in β-arrestin1, we showed that β-arrestin1 is required for the CXCR4 343-352 region to modulate CXCR4 cell-surface expression following treatment with SDF-1. Moreover, GRK2 overexpression enhanced CXCR4 internalization, via a mechanism requiring both β-arrestin1 expression and the 343-352 region. Together, these results characterize CXCR4 structural domains and β-arrestin1 as critical regulators of CXCR4 cell-surface expression in neuroblastoma. β-Arrestin1 levels may therefore influence the CXCR4-driven metastasis of neuroblastoma as well as prognosis. PMID:24452472

  16. Maps showing altitude of the potentiometric surface and changes in water level of the Sparta sand and Memphis sand aquifers in Eastern Arkansas, spring 1983

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edds, Joe; Fitzpatrick, Daniel J.

    1984-01-01

    The Sparta Sand and the Memphis Sand aquifers are a major source of industrial and public water supply and a minor but locally significant source of water for agricultural purposes in eastern and south-central Arkansas. The potentiometric surface map for this aquifer, compiled from water-level measurements made during the spring of 1983, indicates a generally southward potentiometric gradient. The potentiometric surface also illustrates the existence of three major cones of depression; one centered in Columbia County, one in Union County, and one in Jefferson County. Within the cones of depression, the majority of water withdrawn is utilized for industrial and public supply. The water-level change map for the Sparta Sand and the Memphis aquifer for the period between the springs of 1982 and 1983 shows overall a rise in water levels across the study area, including the cones of depression in Jefferson and Union Counties; however, water levels within the cone depression in Columbia County generally declined. (USGS)

  17. Surface runoff pollution by cattle slurry and inorganic fertilizer spreading: chemical oxygen demand, ortho-phosphates, and electrical conductivity levels for different buffer strip lengths.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Delgado, A; López-Periago, E; Quiroga-Lago, F; Díaz-Fierros Viqueira, F

    2001-01-01

    As a way of dealing with the removal of pollutants from farming practices generated wastewater in the EU, we investigate the effect of spreading cattle slurry and inorganic fertiliser on 8 x 5 m2 and 8 x 3 m2 areas, referred to surface runoff chemical oxygen demand (COD), ortho-phosphates (o-P) and electrical conductivity (EC) levels, and the efficiency of grass buffer strips of various lengths in removing pollutants from runoff. The experimental plot was a 15% sloped Lolium perenne pasture. Surface runoff was generated by means of a rainfall simulator working at 47 mm h-1 rainfall intensity. Runoff was sampled by using Gerlach-type troughs situated 2, 4, 6 and 8 m downslope from the amended areas. During the first rainfall simulation, COD, o-P and EC levels were consistently higher in the slurry zone, more evidently in the larger amended area. During the second and third rainfall simulations, concentration and mass levels show a downslope drift into the buffer zones, with no clear buffer strip length attenuation. Correlation between runoff and mass drift is clearly higher in the slurry zone. Percentage attenuation in COD and o-P levels, referred to initial slurry concentrations--including rainfall dilution--were higher than 98%, and higher than 90% for EC. PMID:11496670

  18. Experimental investigation of the properties and phase state of thick aluminum surfaces pulsed to megagauss level magnetic field in a Z-pinch geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awe, Thomas J.

    Thermal transformation to plasma of an aluminum surface pulsed to multi-megagauss magnetic field is observed to occur when the surface field reaches a threshold level of 2.2 MG. Magnetic field (B) is pulsed on the surface of cylindrical metallic rods. Rods are thick ---with radii (R) exceeding the magnetic field penetration depth (deltaB). Ohmic heating is confined to a skin layer, with deltaB determined by diffusion and hydrodynamic processes. Initial rod diameters (D0) ranging from 2.00 to 0.50 mm are pulsed with 1.0 MA peak current by the Zebra z-pinch. Due to Zebra's high transmission line impedance (1.9 ohm), the current waveform is insensitive to D0. The Zebra current, I( t), consistently rises exponentially to 100 kA (with rise time tau=13 ns), and then linearly from 100 to 900 kA for 70 ns, with dI/d t = 1.1x1013 A/s, to a maximum current of 1.0 MA. By altering D0, a variety of magnetic field and current density profiles are examined. For D0 of 2.00 and 0.50 mm, magnetic field rise rates ∂B/∂ t) vary from 30 and 80 MG/mus, and peak surface fields reach 1.5 and 4 MG, respectively. Novel contact configurations and load surface profiles mitigate plasma formation from contact arcing or electric-field-driven electron avalanche, ensuring that plasma forms thermally---a result of ohmic or compression heating. Aluminum plasma is observed through a variety of independently measured phenomena. First, for rod surfaces pulsed above the magnetic field threshold (Bs > Bthreshold = 2.2 MG), multi-eV brightness temperatures (TBB) are observed, clearly indicating plasma for aluminum. For example, peak TBB reach 20 and 36 eV for 1.00 and 0.50 mm rods, respectively. Plasma forms at lower current and reaches higher temperatures as D0 is decreased. Second, aluminum ion species are distinguished via extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectroscopy. Line spectra from Al3+ and Al4+ ions are obtained. The average ion charge and line ratios depend strongly upon temperature, and taking the

  19. A fourth-order accurate curvature computation in a level set framework for two-phase flows subjected to surface tension forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coquerelle, Mathieu; Glockner, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    We propose an accurate and robust fourth-order curvature extension algorithm in a level set framework for the transport of the interface. The method is based on the Continuum Surface Force approach, and is shown to efficiently calculate surface tension forces for two-phase flows. In this framework, the accuracy of the algorithms mostly relies on the precise computation of the surface curvature which we propose to accomplish using a two-step algorithm: first by computing a reliable fourth-order curvature estimation from the level set function, and second by extending this curvature rigorously in the vicinity of the surface, following the Closest Point principle. The algorithm is easy to implement and to integrate into existing solvers, and can easily be extended to 3D. We propose a detailed analysis of the geometrical and numerical criteria responsible for the appearance of spurious currents, a well known phenomenon observed in various numerical frameworks. We study the effectiveness of this novel numerical method on state-of-the-art test cases showing that the resulting curvature estimate significantly reduces parasitic currents. In addition, the proposed approach converges to fourth-order regarding spatial discretization, which is two orders of magnitude better than algorithms currently available. We also show the necessity for high-order transport methods for the surface by studying the case of the 2D advection of a column at equilibrium thereby proving the robustness of the proposed approach. The algorithm is further validated on more complex test cases such as a rising bubble.

  20. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in surface sediment and oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorae) from mangrove of Guadeloupe: levels, bioavailability, and effects.

    PubMed

    Ramdine, Gaëlle; Fichet, Denis; Louis, Max; Lemoine, Soazig

    2012-05-01

    Surface sediment and oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorae) from the coastlines of Guadeloupe were analysed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) using GC/MS. Biomarkers of oxidative stress were used to assess the response of these oysters to hydrocarbons exposure. The total concentration of PAHs in the sediment ranged from 49 to 1065 ng/g dw, while concentrations in oyster ranged from 66 to 961 ng/g dw. Molecular indices based on isomeric PAHs ratios characterize the pollution sources and show that most of the contaminations in sediment originate from pyrolytic inputs. Bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) have been related to isomeric ratio calculated for oysters in order to refine PAHs sources. The variations of BAFs observed in the different compounds resulted from different uptake pathways in the mangrove oysters according to the type of inputs. Response of biomarkers showed inhibition of catalase and an increase of lipid peroxidation at the station where PAHs concentrations were the highest. Taken together, data obtained point to the relevance of considering environmental conditions as factors influencing biomarker responses in environmental monitoring programs. These data also indicate the need for regular environmental follow-up studies in Guadeloupe. PMID:22209019

  1. Levels and distribution patterns of polychlorinated biphenyl congeners in surface sediments from Galicia coast (Northwestern, Spain) according to granulometric characteristics.

    PubMed

    Carro, N; García, I; Ignacio, M; Moureira, A

    2002-08-01

    In order to know distribution patterns of polychlorinated biphenyl congeners in the marine environment from Galida, PCBs n degrees 31, 28, 52, 101, 118, 153, 105, 138, 156 and 180 were isolated by Soxhlet extraction from three fractions of different particle size (<0.063 mm, 0.063-0.2 mm and >0.2 mm) in surface marine sediments; the quantification was performed using GC-MS and GC-ECD. Distribution of PCB congeners was shifted in favour of higher chlorinated compounds (CBs 138,153 and 180) and highly correlated to TOC content. In general, the finest fractions (<0.063 mm) of sediment presented the highest loadings of PCBs, only the sediment from As Pías zone exhibited the highest concentration of chlorinated congeners in the coarsest fraction. CB 52 concentration, slightly volatile compound, was related to water temperature. By means of multivariate techniques of data exploration as hierarchical duster analysis and principal components analysis, sediment samples from un-contaminated and slightly contaminated areas were clearly separated; groupings between samples from nearby zones appeared. PMID:12211452

  2. Multi-scale modeling study of the source contributions to near-surface ozone and sulfur oxides levels over California during the ARCTAS-CARB period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, M.; Carmichael, G. R.; Spak, S. N.; Adhikary, B.; Kulkarni, S.; Cheng, Y. F.; Wei, C.; Tang, Y.; D'Allura, A.; Wennberg, P. O.; Huey, G. L.; Dibb, J. E.; Jimenez, J. L.; Cubison, M. J.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Kaduwela, A.; Cai, C.; Wong, M.; Pierce, R. B.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Streets, D. G.; Zhang, Q.

    2010-11-01

    Chronic ozone (O3) problems and the increasing sulfur oxides (SOx=SO2+SO4) ambient concentrations over South Coast (SC) and other areas of California (CA) are affected by both local emissions and long-range transport. In this paper, multi-scale tracer and full-chemistry simulations with the STEM atmospheric chemistry model are used to assess the contribution of local emission sources to SC O3 and evaluate the impacts of transported sulfur and local emissions on the SC sulfur budget during the ARCTAS-CARB experiment period in 2008. Sensitivity simulations quantify contributions of biogenic and fire emissions to SC O3 levels. California biogenic and fire emissions contribute 3-4 ppb to near-surface O3 over SC, with larger contributions to other regions in CA. Long-range transport from Asia is estimated to enhance surface SO4 over SC by ~0.5 μg/sm3, and the higher SOx levels (up to ~0.7 ppb of SO2 and ~6 μg/sm3 of SO4) observed above ~6 km did not affect surface air quality in the study region. Enhanced near-surface SOx levels over SC during the flight week were attributed mostly to local emissions. Two anthropogenic SOx emission inventories (EIs) from the California Air Resources Board (CARB) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are compared and applied in 60 km and 12 km chemical transport simulations, and the results are compared with observations. The CARB EI shows improvements over the National Emission Inventory (NEI) by EPA, but generally underestimates surface SC SOx by about a factor of two. Maritime (mostly shipping) emissions contribute to the high SO2 levels over the ocean and on-shore, and fine SO4 over the downwind areas is impacted by maritime sources. Maritime emissions also modify the NOx-VOC limitations over coastal areas. These suggest an important role for shipping emission controls in reducing fine particle and O3 concentrations in SC.

  3. LDRD final report : on the development of hybrid level-set/particle methods for modeling surface evolution during feature-scale etching and deposition processes.

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Cory L.; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Musson, Lawrence Cale

    2005-01-01

    Two methods for creating a hybrid level-set (LS)/particle method for modeling surface evolution during feature-scale etching and deposition processes are developed and tested. The first method supplements the LS method by introducing Lagrangian marker points in regions of high curvature. Once both the particle set and the LS function are advanced in time, minimization of certain objective functions adjusts the LS function so that its zero contour is in closer alignment with the particle locations. It was found that the objective-minimization problem was unexpectedly difficult to solve, and even when a solution could be found, the acquisition of it proved more costly than simply expanding the basis set of the LS function. The second method explored is a novel explicit marker-particle method that we have named the grid point particle (GPP) approach. Although not a LS method, the GPP approach has strong procedural similarities to certain aspects of the LS approach. A key aspect of the method is a surface rediscretization procedure--applied at each time step and based on a global background mesh--that maintains a representation of the surface while naturally adding and subtracting surface discretization points as the surface evolves in time. This method was coded in 2-D, and tested on a variety of surface evolution problems by using it in the ChISELS computer code. Results shown for 2-D problems illustrate the effectiveness of the method and highlight some notable advantages in accuracy over the LS method. Generalizing the method to 3D is discussed but not implemented.

  4. ORAC: a molecular dynamics simulation program to explore free energy surfaces in biomolecular systems at the atomistic level.

    PubMed

    Marsili, Simone; Signorini, Giorgio Federico; Chelli, Riccardo; Marchi, Massimo; Procacci, Piero

    2010-04-15

    We present the new release of the ORAC engine (Procacci et al., Comput Chem 1997, 18, 1834), a FORTRAN suite to simulate complex biosystems at the atomistic level. The previous release of the ORAC code included multiple time steps integration, smooth particle mesh Ewald method, constant pressure and constant temperature simulations. The present release has been supplemented with the most advanced techniques for enhanced sampling in atomistic systems including replica exchange with solute tempering, metadynamics and steered molecular dynamics. All these computational technologies have been implemented for parallel architectures using the standard MPI communication protocol. ORAC is an open-source program distributed free of charge under the GNU general public license (GPL) at http://www.chim.unifi.it/orac. PMID:19824035

  5. Organochlorine compounds in surface sediments from the northern coast of Cyprus, Eastern Mediterranean: Levels, possible sources and potential risk.

    PubMed

    Kucuksezgin, F; Pazi, I; Gonul, L T; Duman, M

    2016-08-15

    Organochlorines (OCs) were determined in sediments collected from different regions of northern coast of Cyprus. The OCPs and Aroclors had a wide range from 2.78 to 306 and 15 to 325ngg(-1), respectively. The highest level was found at Yedi Dalga site. DDE was the most abundant compound. The ratios of metabolites to parent DDT showed that DDTs were derived mostly from the aged and weathered inputs. Comparing our results with the previous studies showed that POPs in sediments were found to be lower than those in samples for Mediterranean and Black Sea coasts. The SQG implied that, Aroclor1254 exceeded the TEL values, showing that adverse biological effects are expected occasionally at some of the sediment samples. DDTs were dominant and more ecotoxicological concern in the northern Cyprus. Altogether, it may be summarized that DDTs will impose ecologically hazardous impacts in the sedimentary environment at the present. PMID:27234367

  6. Body surface potential maps with low-level exercise in isolated left anterior descending coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Montague, T.J.; Johnstone, D.E.; Spencer, C.A.; Miller, R.M.; Mackenzie, B.R.; Gardner, M.J.; Horacek, B.M.

    1988-02-01

    One hundred and twenty-lead body surface potential maps (BSPMs) were recorded at rest, at immediate cessation of exercise and after 1 (early) and 5 minutes (late) of recovery in 14 patients with isolated, critical, left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery stenosis. Exercise endpoints, at an average peak rate of 98 +/- 13, were usual pain worsening in 13 LAD patients, and diagnostic ST depression in lead V5 in 1 patient. Twelve patients also had positive thallium scans. BSPMs were also recorded in 8 normal subjects who exercised to peak heart rates similar to those of the LAD subjects. Spatially, there were similar exercise changes in QRS and ST-segment integral patterns over the precordium and inferior torso in both groups. These were transient in the control group but persisted to late recovery in the LAD group, particularly for ST integral. Quantitatively, multivariate analysis revealed significant temporal differences between the 2 groups. However, the only independent BSPM variable was the sum of ST integral decrease, averaging --2323 +/- 1809 microV.s for normal patients between rest and immediate cessation of exercise, compared with -3828 +/- 2329 microV.s for the LAD patients. Late recovery minus rest difference averaged -1264 +/- 1080 microV.s for normal subjects and -2575 +/- 1844 microV.s for LAD patients. To control for the physiologic changes of exercise, the ST integral temporal differential maps of the normal subjects were subtracted from those of the LAD patients and the sum of negative intergroup differences was assumed to reflect only ischemia. Correlation of ST integral ischemia values at immediate cessation of exercise and late recovery was high; however, intertechnique correlations of the BSPM variables with quantitative angiographic scores and thallium perfusion scan scores revealed generally low r values (range 0 to 0.52).

  7. Particle-on-Film Gap Plasmons on Antireflective ZnO Nanocone Arrays for Molecular-Level Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Sensors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngoh; Lee, Jiwon; Lee, Tae Kyung; Park, Jonghwa; Ha, Minjung; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Ko, Hyunhyub

    2015-12-01

    When semiconducting nanostructures are combined with noble metals, the surface plasmons of the noble metals, in addition to the charge transfer interactions between the semiconductors and noble metals, can be utilized to provide strong surface plasmon effects. Here, we suggest a particle-film plasmonic system in conjunction with tapered ZnO nanowire arrays for ultrasensitive SERS chemical sensors. In this design, the gap plasmons between the metal nanoparticles and the metal films provide significantly improved surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) effects compared to those of interparticle surface plasmons. Furthermore, 3D tapered metal nanostructures with particle-film plasmonic systems enable efficient light trapping and waveguiding effects. To study the effects of various morphologies of ZnO nanostructures on the light trapping and thus the SERS enhancements, we compare the performance of three different ZnO morphologies: ZnO nanocones (NCs), nanonails (NNs), and nanorods (NRs). Finally, we demonstrate that our SERS chemical sensors enable a molecular level of detection capability of benzenethiol (100 zeptomole), rhodamine 6G (10 attomole), and adenine (10 attomole) molecules. This work presents a new design platform based on the 3D antireflective metal/semiconductor heterojunction nanostructures, which will play a critical role in the study of plasmonics and SERS chemical sensors. PMID:26575302

  8. Inactivation of Escherichia coli planktonic cells by multi-walled carbon nanotubes in suspensions: Effect of surface functionalization coupled with medium nutrition level.

    PubMed

    Chi, Mu-Fan; Wu, Wei-Ling; Du, Yuchin; Chin, Ching-Ju M; Lin, Chu-Ching

    2016-11-15

    While earlier studies have identified the antibacterial activity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and proposed that cell membrane damage by direct contact with CNTs is likely the main toxicity mechanism, the relative importance of chemical versus physical properties of CNTs in controlling their bacterial cytotoxicity is understudied. Given that CNT is commonly modified via acid treatment to enhance its dispersivity and surface chemistry, in this study commercially available multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with high purity were processed carefully by acid reflux, resulting in differences in surface charge of MWCNTs without altering their physical properties. The surface condition of MWCNTs was also modified by adsorption of organic matter to compare bacterial toxicity of functionalized and non-functionalized MWCNTs in suspensions. Results show that although overall electrostatic repulsion and steric obstruction resulted from surface modifications led to elevated dispersivity of MWCNTs and mitigated toxicity on planktonic Escherichia coli cultures, no correlation between the dispersivity and bacterial toxicity of MWCNTs was observed, suggesting that dispersity alone may not be a proper index to estimate the CNT antibacterial effect on planktonic cells in the aqueous phase. In addition, viability recovery of MWCNT-treated cells was observed to be nutrition level-dependent, implying that availability of proper nutrients may be another important factor to be considered when assessing the ecotoxicity of CNTs in the aquatic system. PMID:27450343

  9. Development of Novel Anti-Cd20 Monoclonal Antibodies and Modulation in Cd20 Levels on Cell Surface: Looking to Improve Immunotherapy Response

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vijay; Gupta, Damodar; Almasan, Alexandru

    2016-01-01

    Rituximab has been revolutionized and validated CD20 targeting monoclonal antibody. Although, it is widely used for lymphoma therapy and many patients have been benefited. However significant numbers of patients are refractory or developed resistance to current therapies due to low level of CD20 expression and/or availability on cells surface. Thus development of novel anti-CD20 mAbs with great cell killing ability and enhance CD20 levels on cell surface can potentially exploit lymphoma therapy. In this scenario, we are summarizing the recently developed mAbs against CD20 and compounds that have ability to induce CD20 expression at significant level. We also are providing information regarding combination strategy for use of radiation and anti-CD20 mAbs in vitro. However, it will need to be determined by rigorous at pre-clinical and clinic testing. We hope this review will be beneficial for current research in the area of immunotherapy or radio-immunotherapy. PMID:27413424

  10. Surface dust wipes are the best predictors of blood leads in young children with elevated blood lead levels

    SciTech Connect

    Gulson, Brian; Anderson, Phil; Taylor, Alan

    2013-10-15

    Background: As part of the only national survey of lead in Australian children, which was undertaken in 1996, lead isotopic and lead concentration measurements were obtained from children from 24 dwellings whose blood lead levels were ≥15 µg/dL in an attempt to determine the source(s) of their elevated blood lead. Comparisons were made with data for six children with lower blood lead levels (<10 µg/dL). Methods: Thermal ionisation and isotope dilution mass spectrometry were used to determine high precision lead isotopic ratios ({sup 208}Pb/{sup 206}Pb, {sup 207}Pb/{sup 206}Pb and {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb) and lead concentrations in blood, dust from floor wipes, soil, drinking water and paint (where available). Evaluation of associations between blood and the environmental samples was based on the analysis of individual cases, and Pearson correlations and multiple regression analyses based on the whole dataset. Results and discussion: The correlations showed an association for isotopic ratios in blood and wipes (r=0.52, 95% CI 0.19–0.74), blood and soil (r=0.33, 95% CI −0.05–0.62), and blood and paint (r=0.56, 95% CI 0.09–0.83). The regression analyses indicated that the only statistically significant relationship for blood isotopic ratios was with dust wipes (B=0.65, 95% CI 0.35–0.95); there were no significant associations for lead concentrations in blood and environmental samples. There is a strong isotopic correlation of soils and house dust (r=0.53, 95% CI 0.20–0.75) indicative of a common source(s) for lead in soil and house dust. In contrast, as with the regression analyses, no such association is present for bulk lead concentrations (r=−0.003, 95% CI −0.37–0.36), the most common approach employed in source investigations. In evaluation of the isotopic results on a case by case basis, the strongest associations were for dust wipes and blood. -- Highlights: • Children with elevated blood lead ≥15 µg/dL compared with a group with <10

  11. Surface Functionalization of g-C3 N4 : Molecular-Level Design of Noble-Metal-Free Hydrogen Evolution Photocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yin; Lin, Bin; Yu, Weili; Yang, Yong; Bashir, Shahid M; Wang, Hong; Takanabe, Kazuhiro; Idriss, Hicham; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2015-07-13

    A stable noble-metal-free hydrogen evolution photocatalyst based on graphite carbon nitride (g-C3 N4 ) was developed by a molecular-level design strategy. Surface functionalization was successfully conducted to introduce a single nickel active site onto the surface of the semiconducting g-C3 N4 . This catalyst family (with less than 0.1 wt % of Ni) has been found to produce hydrogen with a rate near to the value obtained by using 3 wt % platinum as co-catalyst. This new catalyst also exhibits very good stability under hydrogen evolution conditions, without any evidence of deactivation after 24 h. PMID:26073972

  12. The 210Po and 210Pb levels in surface sediment samples in the Izmir Bay (Aegean Sea-Turkey).

    PubMed

    Saçan, Sezen; Uğur, Aysun; Sunlu, Uğur; Büyükişik, Baha; Aksu, Mehmet; Sunlu, F Sanem

    2010-02-01

    Bottom sediments reflect in general the relative contamination of a sea area. Therefore, a great deal of monitoring work has been dedicated to the analysis of bottom sediments. Izmir Bay is a very important pollution centre in Turkish Aegean coast region due to a densely populated community, industrial complex and maritime transportation, and there are many streams flowing into the bay that pass through a number of industrial and agricultural areas. It had received the majority of domestic and industrial wastewaters until the wastewater treatment plant was constructed. It is well known that sediments play an important role as reservoirs of a fraction of the pollution in aquatic systems. Therefore, sediment samples were collected monthly from three stations which are located in the inner part of the bay during the period January to December 2003. Temporal variations and seasonal changes on their (210)Po and (210)Pb contents were examined, and the activity concentrations of (210)Po and (210)Pb were found to vary from 43+/-6 to 132+/-12 and 27+/-5 to 91+/-9 Bq kg(-1) dry wt, respectively. The highest values of those natural radionuclides were measured at Karşiyaka Station because of the current systems of the bay. Seasonally, the (210)Pb levels were found to increase during the winter time for all the stations. PMID:19242813

  13. Endocrine disrupting chemicals-Linking internal exposure to vitellogenin levels and ovotestis in Abramis brama from Dutch surface waters.

    PubMed

    Reinen, Jelle; Suter, Marc J-F; Vögeli, A Christiane; Fernandez, Mariana F; Kiviranta, Hannu; Eggen, Rik I L; Vermeulen, Nico P E

    2010-11-01

    The exposure of male bream from three Dutch freshwater locations to endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) and corresponding effects are described in this study. Fish specimen displaying reproductive disorders associated with high levels of plasma vitellogenin (VTG) concentrations and occurrence of ovotestis (OT) were investigated. To provide information on the full spectrum of EDCs in fish tissue, adipose tissue samples of individual fish were analyzed for nearly 130 chemicals targeting different compound classes (bisphenols, alkylphenols, pesticides, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), dibenzofurans (PCDFs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls (OH-PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and biphenyls (PBBs)) and steroid hormones. To establish whether tissue from specimen with reproductive disorders shows a spectrum of EDCs that is qualitatively and quantitatively different from that of controls free of symptoms, bioassay-directed fractionation was performed using the recombinant yeast estrogen screen (YES), the E-Screen bioassay, the human sulfotransferase 1E1 (SULT1E1) inhibition assay, and the coumestrol-based estrogen receptor α (ERα) high resolution screening (HRS) assay. No differences in estrogenicity could be observed between the cases and controls and steroidal estrogens accounted for the majority of estrogenicity found in the complex mixtures. In this study, the combination of the different assays employed to measure total estrogenicity and the SULT1E1 inhibition does not predict the outcome of unwanted physiological effects, however, it can be used to determine the presence of EDCs in fish samples and their estrogenic effects. PMID:21787654

  14. PSI Wide Area Product (WAP) for measuring Ground Surface Displacements at regional level for multi-hazards studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duro, Javier; Iglesias, Rubén; Blanco, Pablo; Albiol, David; Koudogbo, Fifamè

    2015-04-01

    The Wide Area Product (WAP) is a new interferometric product developed to provide measurement over large regions. Persistent Scatterers Interferometry (PSI) has largely proved their robust and precise performance in measuring ground surface deformation in different application domains. In this context, however, the accurate displacement estimation over large-scale areas (more than 10.000 km2) characterized by low magnitude motion gradients (3-5 mm/year), such as the ones induced by inter-seismic or Earth tidal effects, still remains an open issue. The main reason for that is the inclusion of low quality and more distant persistent scatterers in order to bridge low-quality areas, such as water bodies, crop areas and forested regions. This fact yields to spatial propagation errors on PSI integration process, poor estimation and compensation of the Atmospheric Phase Screen (APS) and the difficult to face residual long-wavelength phase patterns originated by orbit state vectors inaccuracies. Research work for generating a Wide Area Product of ground motion in preparation for the Sentinel-1 mission has been conducted in the last stages of Terrafirma as well as in other research programs. These developments propose technological updates for keeping the precision over large scale PSI analysis. Some of the updates are based on the use of external information, like meteorological models, and the employment of GNSS data for an improved calibration of large measurements. Usually, covering wide regions implies the processing over areas with a land use which is chiefly focused on livestock, horticulture, urbanization and forest. This represents an important challenge for providing continuous InSAR measurements and the application of advanced phase filtering strategies to enhance the coherence. The advanced PSI processing has been performed out over several areas, allowing a large scale analysis of tectonic patterns, and motion caused by multi-hazards as volcanic, landslide and

  15. Energy-level matching of Fe(III) ions grafted at surface and doped in bulk for efficient visible-light photocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Qiu, Xiaoqing; Miyauchi, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Kazuhito

    2013-07-10

    Photocatalytic reaction rate (R) is determined by the multiplication of light absorption capability (α) and quantum efficiency (QE); however, these two parameters generally have trade-off relations. Thus, increasing α without decreasing QE remains a challenging issue for developing efficient photocatalysts with high R. Herein, using Fe(III) ions grafted Fe(III) doped TiO2 as a model system, we present a novel method for developing visible-light photocatalysts with efficient R, utilizing the concept of energy level matching between surface-grafted Fe(III) ions as co-catalysts and bulk-doped Fe(III) ions as visible-light absorbers. Photogenerated electrons in the doped Fe(III) states under visible-light efficiently transfer to the surface grafted Fe(III) ions co-catalysts, as the doped Fe(III) ions in bulk produced energy levels below the conduction band of TiO2, which match well with the potential of Fe(3+)/Fe(2+) redox couple in the surface grafted Fe(III) ions. Electrons in the surface grafted Fe(III) ions efficiently cause multielectron reduction of adsorbed oxygen molecules to achieve high QE value. Consequently, the present Fe(III)-FexTi1-xO2 nanocomposites exhibited the highest visible-light R among the previously reported photocatalysts for decomposition of gaseous organic compounds. The high R can proceed even under commercial white-light emission diode irradiation and is very stable for long-term use, making it practically useful. Further, this efficient method could be applied in other wide-band gap semiconductors, including ZnO or SrTiO3, and may be potentially applicable for other photocatalysis systems, such as water splitting, CO2 reduction, NOx removal, and dye decomposition. Thus, this method represents a strategic approach to develop new visible-light active photocatalysts for practical uses. PMID:23768256

  16. An investigation of the meteorological and photochemical factors influencing the background rural and marine surface ozone levels in the Central and Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalabokas, P. D.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Ellul, R.; Kleanthous, S.; Repapis, C. C.

    A study on the spatial distribution as well as an investigation of the possible factors influencing the observed variations of summer (JJA) rural and marine surface ozone background in the Central and Eastern Mediterranean is performed, following observations showing that the 60 ppb EU Air Quality Standard for Human Health Protection is frequently exceeded in the area. For this purpose the measurements of the following four Eastern Mediterranean stations are analyzed: Giordan Lighthouse-Gozo, Malta; Aliartos-Central Greece; Finokalia-Crete, Greece and Ag. Marina, Cyprus. The measured summer afternoon rural and marine ozone levels in Central Greece and on Crete Island are quite comparable, but are found to be significantly higher (by about 15-20%) than the corresponding levels in Malta and Cyprus. After investigating the characteristic meteorological conditions associated with high and low rural and marine surface ozone concentrations, it appears that an important factor leading to high tropospheric ozone values in the Eastern Mediterranean area is the anticyclonic influence of the high-pressure domination over the Central Mediterranean and the Balkans. The rural and marine surface ozone stations located across the Aegean Channel are also influenced by the long-range transport of polluted air masses from the European continent in the boundary layer during summer and the subsequent photochemical ozone production. This characteristic northern flow during summer is created by the combination of the Central Mediterranean anticyclone with the Middle-East low-pressure system. On the other hand, the lowest ozone levels, particularly in the Crete and Cyprus stations, are associated with an extension to the west of the Middle-East low and weak pressure gradients over the Eastern Mediterranean and an upper air trough in the North Eastern Europe.

  17. Atmospheric constituents and surface-level UVB: Implications for a paleoaltimetry proxy and attempts to reconstruct UV exposure during volcanic episodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Brian C.; Goracke, Byron D.; Dalton, Sean M.

    2016-11-01

    Chemical and morphological features of spores and pollens have been linked to changes in solar ultraviolet radiation (specifically UVB, 280-315 nm) at Earth's surface. Variation in UVB exposure as inferred from these features has been suggested as a proxy for paleoaltitude; such proxies are important in understanding the uplift history of high altitude plateaus, which in turn is important for testing models of the tectonic processes responsible for such uplift. While UVB irradiance does increase with altitude above sea level, a number of other factors affect the irradiance at any given place and time. In this modeling study we use the TUV atmospheric radiative transfer model to investigate dependence of surface-level UVB irradiance and relative biological impact on a number of constituents in Earth's atmosphere that are variable over long and short time periods. We consider changes in O3 column density, and SO2 and sulfate aerosols due to periods of volcanic activity, including that associated with the formation of the Siberian Traps. We find that UVB irradiance may be highly variable under volcanic conditions and variations in several of these atmospheric constituents can easily mimic or overwhelm changes in UVB irradiance due to changes in altitude. On the other hand, we find that relative change with altitude is not very sensitive to different sets of atmospheric conditions. Any paleoaltitude proxy based on UVB exposure requires confidence that the samples under comparison were located at roughly the same latitude, under very similar O3 and SO2 columns, with similar atmospheric aerosol conditions. In general, accurate estimates of the surface-level UVB exposure at any time and location require detailed radiative transfer modeling taking into account a number of atmospheric factors; this result is important for paleoaltitude proxies as well as attempts to reconstruct the UV environment through geologic time and to tie extinctions, such as the end-Permian mass

  18. Contemporary Surface Seasonal Oscillation and Vertical Deformation in Tibetan Plateau and Nepal Derived from the GPS, Leveling and GRACE Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, W.; Pan, Y.; Hwang, C.; Ding, H.

    2015-12-01

    We use 168 Continuous Global Positioning System (CGPS) stations distributed in the Tibetan Plateau (TP) and Nepal from lengths of 2.5 to 14 years to estimate the present-day velocity field in this area, including the horizontal and vertical deformations under the frame ITRF2008. We estimate and remove common mode errors in regional GPS time series using the principal component analysis (PCA), obtaining a time series with high signal to noise ratio. Following the maximum estimation analysis, a power law plus white noise stochastic model are adopted to estimate the velocity field. The highlight of Tibetan region is the crust vertical deformation. GPS vertical time series present seasonal oscillations caused by temporal mass loads, hence GRACE data from CSR are used to study the mass loads change. After removing the mass load deformations from GPS vertical rates, the results are improved. Leveling data about 48 years in this region are also used to estimate the rates of vertical movements. Our study suggests that the boundary of south Nepal is still sinking due to the fact that the India plate is crashing into the Eurasian plate. The uplift rates from south to north of TP reduce gradually. Himalayas region and north Nepal uplift around 6 mm/yr in average. The uplift rate along East TP in Qinhai is around 2.7 mm/yr in average. In contrast, the southeast of Tibetan Plateau, south Yunnan and Tarim in Xinjiang sink with different magnitudes. Our observation results suggest complicated mechanism of the mass migration in TP. This study is supported by National 973 Project China (grant Nos. 2013CB733302 and 2013CB733305), NSFC (grant Nos. 41174011, 41429401, 41210006, 41128003, 41021061).

  19. Safety assessment for proposed pump mixing operations to mitigate episodic gas releases in tank 241-101-SY: Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Lentsch, J.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-16

    This safety assessment addresses each of the elements required for the proposed action to remove a slurry distributor and to install, operate, and remove a mixing pump in Tank 241-SY-101, which is located within the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The proposed action is required as part of an ongoing evaluation of various mitigation concepts developed to eliminate episodic gas releases that result in hydrogen concentrations in the tank dome space that exceed the lower flammability limit.

  20. System Design Description for the SY-101 Hydrogen Mitigation Test Project Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS-1)

    SciTech Connect

    ERMI, A.M.

    1999-08-25

    This document describes the hardware and software of the computer subsystems for the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) used in mitigation tests conducted on waste tank 241-SY-101 at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation, The original system was designed and implemented by LANL, supplied to WHC, and turned over to LMHC for operation. In 1999, the hardware and software were upgraded to provide a state-of-the-art, Year-2000 compliant system.

  1. The Good the Bad and the Ugly of Single Sensor Error Statistics for Sea Surface Temperature: What Do Spaghetti Westerns and Quality Levels Have in Common?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilpatrick, K. A.; Podesta, G. P.; Evans, R.; Minnett, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Global High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) L2p products are available from many different satellite-based instruments. Assimilation and fusion of SSTs from multiple sources requires knowledge of the expected accuracy and uncertainly of a retrieval and confidence that a pixel is within the uncertainty required by the application. The GHRSST L2p files provide quality levels with labels such as "worst", "acceptable", or "best." But what do these levels actually mean to a user in terms of uncertainty and bias? Does "acceptable" have the same meaning for data providers and users? Currently there is no standard or consensus for the accuracy requirement of a quality level. GHRSST providers rely on matchup databases of satellite and in situ SSTs to provide Single Sensor Error Statistics (SSES). The GHRSST L2P MODIS SSES values currently are stored in a 6-dimensional Look Up Table (LUT) - often referred to as a hypercube. This LUT lists uncertainties stratified by quality level, season, latitude, viewing geometry, surface temperature, and "wet" or "dry" atmospheres. While this approach is more useful than a single aggregate SSES estimate, the coarse nature of the hypercube bins produces obvious discontinuities in uncertainty fields at some bin boundaries when geographically mapped. In reality, the SSES should vary more smoothly as a function of different combinations of factors influencing the accuracy of retrievals. We will present ongoing efforts to model the SST bias and uncertainty as a smooth function of some of the dimensions of the SSES hypercube. Additionally, we aim to classify pixels into quality categories with explicitly defined ranges of bias and uncertainty. The ultimate goal is to develop methods that could be deployed across multiple sensors to establish a standard for objective, quantitative definitions of SST retrieval quality.

  2. Ab initio wavenumber accurate spectroscopy : {sup 1}CH{sub 2} and HCN vibrational levels on automatically generated IMLS potential energy surfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Dawes, R.; Wagner, A. F.; Thompson, D. L.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Univ. of Missouri at Columbia

    2009-04-23

    We report here calculated J = 0 vibrational frequencies for {sup 1}CH{sub 2} and HCN with root-mean-square error relative to available measurements of 2.0 cm{sup -1} and 3.2 cm{sup -1}, respectively. These results are obtained with DVR calculations with a dense grid on ab initio potential energy surfaces (PESs). The ab initio electronic structure calculations employed are Davidson-corrected MRCI calculations with double-, triple-, and quadruple-{zeta} basis sets extrapolated to the complete basis set (CBS) limit. In the {sup 1}CH{sub 2} case, Full CI tests of the Davidson correction at small basis set levels lead to a scaling of the correction with the bend angle that can be profitably applied at the CBS limit. Core-valence corrections are added derived from CCSD(T) calculations with and without frozen cores. Relativistic and non-Born-Oppenheimer corrections are available for HCN and were applied. CBS limit CCSD(T) and CASPT2 calculations with the same basis sets were also tried for HCN. The CCSD(T) results are noticeably less accurate than the MRCI results while the CASPT2 results are much poorer. The PESs were generated automatically using the local interpolative moving least-squares method (L-IMLS). A general triatomic code is described where the L-IMLS method is interfaced with several common electronic structure packages. All PESs were computed with this code running in parallel on eight processors. The L-IMLS method provides global and local fitting error measures important in automatically growing the PES from initial ab initio seed points. The reliability of this approach was tested for {sup 1}CH{sub 2} by comparing DVR-calculated vibrational levels on an L-IMLS ab initio surface with levels generated by an explicit ab initio calculation at each DVR grid point. For all levels ({approx}200) below 20000 cm{sup -1}, the mean unsigned difference between the levels of these two calculations was 0.1 cm{sup -1}, consistent with the L-IMLS estimated mean unsigned

  3. Accurate Potential Energy Surface, Rovibrational Energy Levels, and Transitions of Ammonia C_{3v} Isotopologues: ^{14}NH_3, ^{15}NH_3, ^{14}ND_3 and ^{14}NT_3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xinchuan; Schwenke, David W.; Lee, Timothy J.

    2009-06-01

    A further refined, global potential energy surface (PES) is computed for the C_{3v} symmetry isotopologues of ammonia, including ^{14}NH_3, ^{15}NH_3, ^{14}ND_3 and ^{14}NT_3. The refinement procedure was similar to that used in our previously reported PES, but now extends to higher J energy levels and other isotopologues. Both the diagonal Born-Oppenheimer correction and the non-adiabatic correction were included. J=0-6 rovibrational energy levels and transition frequencies of ^{14}NH_3 computed on this PES are in excellent agreement with HITRAN data. Statistics on nearly 4100 transitions and more than 1000 energy levels demonstrate the accuracy achieved by the state-of-the-art "Best Theory + Experiment" strategy. Most transition frequencies are of ±0.01-0.02 cm^{-1} accuracy. Similar accuracy has been found on ^{15}NH_3 J=0-3 rovibrational energy levels. Several transitions and energy levels in HITRAN have been identified as unreliable or suspicious, and some have been re-assigned. For ^{14}ND_3 and ^{14}NT_3, J=0-3 calculations have been performed. Agreement for pure rotation-inversion transitions is nearly perfect, with more reliable energy levels presented. On the other hand, our J=0 results suggest a re-analysis on the ^{14}ND_3 ν_1 band origin is needed. Finally, we will discuss possible future refinements leading to an even better final PES for Ammonia. X. Huang, D.W. Schwenke, and T.J. Lee, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 214304 (2008).

  4. Rotational energy surface and quasiclassical analysis of the rotational energy level cluster formation in the ground vibrational state of PH 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Sergey V.; Kozlovskii, Borislav M.

    2007-06-01

    We report and substantiate a method for constructing the rotational energy surface (RES) of a molecule as a pure classical object. For an arbitrary molecule we start from the potential energy surface rather than from a conventional "effective Hamiltonian". The method is used for constructing the RES of the PH 3 molecule in its ground vibrational state. We have used an ab initio potential energy surface [D. Wang, Q. Shi, Q.-S. Zhu, J. Chem. Phys. 112 (2000) 9624-9631; S.N. Yurchenko, M. Carvajal, P. Jensen, F. Herregodts, T.R. Huet, Chem. Phys. 290 (2003) 59-67.]. The shape of the RES is shown not to change for J from 0 to 120. The procedure of quasiclassical quantization of the RES was also undertaken, yielding a set of quasiclassical critical values of the angular momentum. The results explain the structure of quantum rotational energy levels obtained by variational calculations [S.N. Yurchenko, W. Thiel, S. Patchkovskii, P. Jensen, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 7 (2005) 573-582].

  5. Influences of vertical transport and scavenging on aerosol particle surface area and radon decay product concentrations at the Jungfraujoch (3454 m above sea level)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugauer, M.; Baltensperger, U.; Furger, M.; GäGgeler, H. W.; Jost, D. T.; Nyeki, S.; Schwikowski, M.

    2000-08-01

    Concentrations of the aerosol particle surface area (SA) and aerosol-attached radon decay products 214Pb and 212Pb have been measured by means of an aerosol and a radon epiphaniometer at the Jungfraujoch research station (JFJ; 3454 m above sea level, Switzerland). These parameters exhibit a pronounced seasonal cycle with minimum values in winter and maximum values in summer. In summer, pronounced diurnal variations with a maximum at 1800 LST are often present. Highest concentrations and most pronounced diurnal variations occur during anticyclonic weather conditions in summer. Thermally driven vertical transport over alpine topography is responsible for this observation. During this synoptic condition, concentrations vary greatly with the 500 hPa wind direction, exhibiting low concentrations for NW-N winds and high concentrations for weak or S-SW winds. Lead-214 and SA are highly correlated during anticyclonic conditions, indicating transport equivalence of the gaseous 214Pb precursor, 222Rn, and of aerosol particles. When cyclonic lifting is the dominant vertical transport, wet scavenging of aerosol particles can explain the weak correlation of 214Pb and SA. This conclusion is corroborated by the 214Pb/SA ratio, being twice as high during cyclonic than during anticyclonic conditions. Lead-212 is a tracer for the influence of surface contact on a local scale due to its short lifetime of 15.35 hours. The analysis of this parameter suggests that high-alpine surfaces play an important role in thermally driven transport to the JFJ.

  6. Cell-surface bound pertussis toxin induces polyclonal T cell responses with high levels of interferon-gamma in the absence of interleukin-12.

    PubMed

    Wakatsuki, Ayako; Borrow, Persephone; Rigley, Kevin; Beverley, Peter C L

    2003-07-01

    Pertussis toxin (PTx), an exotoxin produced by Bordetella pertussis, has long been used as a mucosal adjuvant. We examined the T cell stimulatory properties of PTx in order to dissect its mechanisms of adjuvanticity. PTx or the B-oligomer of PTx (PTxB) failed to activate purified murine CD4+ or CD8+ T cells, as measured by a lack of proliferation or expression of early T cell activation markers. However, these T cells proliferated extensively in response to the toxin in the presence of syngeneic DC, and proliferation was accompanied by a high level of IFN-gamma production in the absence of IL-12. Interestingly, such responses were independent of signals mediated by MHC-TCR interaction. Both PTx and PTxB were found to bind stably to the surface of DC, and increased the adherence of DC to surrounding cells. These data suggest that polyclonal T cell responses mediated by the toxin are likely to be caused by the toxin bound on the surface of APC, either cross-linking cell surface molecules on T cells, or directly stimulating T cells together with the co-stimulatory molecules expressed on APC. B. pertussis may use this toxin as a mechanism to evade a specific immune response. PMID:12811846

  7. Design and Characterization of Next-Generation Micromirrors Fabricated in a Four-Level, Planarized Surface-Micromachined Polycrystalline Silicon Process

    SciTech Connect

    Michalicek, M.A.; Comtois, J.H.; Barron, C.C.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the design and characterization of several types of micromirror devices to include process capabilities, device modeling, and test data resulting in deflection versus applied potential curves. These micromirror devices are the first to be fabricated in the state-of-the-art four-level planarized polysilicon process available at Sandia National Laboratories known as the Sandia Ultra-planar Multi-level MEMS Technology (SUMMiT). This enabling process permits the development of micromirror devices with near-ideal characteristics which have previously been unrealizable in standard three-layer polysilicon processes. This paper describes such characteristics as elevated address electrodes, individual address wiring beneath the device, planarized mirror surfaces using Chemical Mechanical Polishing (CMP), unique post-process metallization, and the best active surface area to date. This paper presents the design, fabrication, modeling, and characterization of several variations of Flexure-Beam (FBMD) and Axial-Rotation Micromirror Devices (ARMD). The released devices are first metallized using a standard sputtering technique relying on metallization guards and masks that are fabricated next to the devices. Such guards are shown to enable the sharing of bond pads between numerous arrays of micromirrors in order to maximize the number of on-chip test arrays. The devices are modeled and then empirically characterized using a laser interferometer setup located at the Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) at Wright-Patterson AFB in Dayton, Ohio. Unique design considerations for these devices and the process are also discussed.

  8. Correlations of cave levels, stream terraces and planation surfaces along the River Mur—Timing of landscape evolution along the eastern margin of the Alps

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Thomas; Fritz, Harald; Stüwe, Kurt; Nestroy, Othmar; Rodnight, Helena; Hellstrom, John; Benischke, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    The transition zone of the Eastern Alps to the Pannonian Basin provides one of the best sources of information on landscape evolution of the Eastern Alpine mountain range. The region was non-glaciated during the entire Pleistocene. Thus, direct influence of glacial carving as a landscape forming process can be excluded and relics of landforms are preserved that date back to at least the Late Neogene. In this study, we provide a correlation between various planation surfaces across the orogen-basin transition. In particular, we use stream terraces, planation surfaces and cave levels that cover a vertical spread of some 700 m. Our correlation is used to show that both sides of the transition zone uplifted together starting at least about 5 Ma ago. For our correlation we use recently published terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (TCN) burial ages from cave sediments, new optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages of a stream terrace and U–Th ages from speleothems. Minimum age constraints of cave levels from burial ages of cave sediments covering the last ~ 4 Ma are used to place age constraints on surface features by parallelizing cave levels with planation surfaces. The OSL results for the top section of the type locality of the Helfbrunn terrace suggest an Early Würm development (80.5 ± 3.7 to 68.7 ± 4.0 ka). The terrace origin as a penultimate gravel deposit (in classical Alpine terminology Riss) is therefore questioned. U-series speleothem ages from caves nearby indicate formation during Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 5c and 5a which are both interstadial warm periods. As OSL ages from the terrace also show a time of deposition during MIS 5a ending at the MIS 5/4 transition, this supports the idea of temperate climatic conditions at the time of deposition. In general, tectonic activity is interpreted to be the main driving force for the formation and evolution of these landforms, whilst climate change is suggested to be of minor importance. Obvious

  9. Correlations of cave levels, stream terraces and planation surfaces along the River Mur-Timing of landscape evolution along the eastern margin of the Alps.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Thomas; Fritz, Harald; Stüwe, Kurt; Nestroy, Othmar; Rodnight, Helena; Hellstrom, John; Benischke, Ralf

    2011-11-01

    The transition zone of the Eastern Alps to the Pannonian Basin provides one of the best sources of information on landscape evolution of the Eastern Alpine mountain range. The region was non-glaciated during the entire Pleistocene. Thus, direct influence of glacial carving as a landscape forming process can be excluded and relics of landforms are preserved that date back to at least the Late Neogene. In this study, we provide a correlation between various planation surfaces across the orogen-basin transition. In particular, we use stream terraces, planation surfaces and cave levels that cover a vertical spread of some 700 m. Our correlation is used to show that both sides of the transition zone uplifted together starting at least about 5 Ma ago. For our correlation we use recently published terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (TCN) burial ages from cave sediments, new optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages of a stream terrace and U-Th ages from speleothems. Minimum age constraints of cave levels from burial ages of cave sediments covering the last ~ 4 Ma are used to place age constraints on surface features by parallelizing cave levels with planation surfaces. The OSL results for the top section of the type locality of the Helfbrunn terrace suggest an Early Würm development (80.5 ± 3.7 to 68.7 ± 4.0 ka). The terrace origin as a penultimate gravel deposit (in classical Alpine terminology Riss) is therefore questioned. U-series speleothem ages from caves nearby indicate formation during Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 5c and 5a which are both interstadial warm periods. As OSL ages from the terrace also show a time of deposition during MIS 5a ending at the MIS 5/4 transition, this supports the idea of temperate climatic conditions at the time of deposition. In general, tectonic activity is interpreted to be the main driving force for the formation and evolution of these landforms, whilst climate change is suggested to be of minor importance. Obvious hiatuses

  10. Multifunction Instrument Tree (MIT) Neutron and Gamma Probe Acceptance for Beneficial Use (ABU)

    SciTech Connect

    CANNON, N.S.

    1999-08-08

    The multifunction instrument tree (MIT) probe program has been developed to modify existing Liquid Observation Well (LOW) neutron and gamma probes for use in the validation shafts of the two MITs installed in Tank 241-SY-101. One of the program objectives is that the modified MIT probes be completely compatible with the existing LOW van instrumentation and procedures. The major program objective is to produce neutron and gamma scans from Tank 241-SY-101 that would assist in evaluating waste feature structure and elevation. The MIT probe program is described in greater detail in the engineering task plan (HNF-3322). In accordance with the engineering task plan, a test plan (HNF-3595) was written, reduced diameter (allowing insertion into the MIT validation tube) neutron and gamma probes were acquired, an acceptance and operational test procedure (HNF-3838) was written, acceptance and operational testing of the MIT probes was performed, and a report of these test results (HNF-4369) has been issued. A number of neutron and gamma probe scans have been obtained from the Tank 241-SY-101 MITs, starting on February 8, 1999, in cooperation with Operations. Now that the MIT probes are fully demonstrated, this document transfers ownership of these probes to Operations, utilizing the final acceptance for beneficial use (ABU) form that follows in Section 3.0.

  11. Assessment of potential positive effects of nZVI surface modification and concentration levels on TCE dechlorination in the presence of competing strong oxidants, using an experimental design.

    PubMed

    Kaifas, Delphine; Malleret, Laure; Kumar, Naresh; Fétimi, Wafa; Claeys-Bruno, Magalie; Sergent, Michelle; Doumenq, Pierre

    2014-05-15

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles are efficient for the remediation of aquifers polluted by trichloroethylene (TCE). But for on-site applications, their reactivity can be affected by the presence of common inorganic co-pollutants, which are equally reduced by nZVI particles. The aim of this study was to assess the potential positive effects of nZVI surface modification and concentration level on TCE removal in the concomitant presence of two strong oxidants, i.e., Cr(VI) and NO3(-). A design of experiments, testing four factors (i.e. nZVI concentration, nZVI surface modification, Cr(VI) concentration and NO3(-) concentration), was used to select the best trials for the identification of the main effects of the factors and of the factors interactions. The effects of these factors were studied by measuring the following responses: TCE removal rates at different times, degradation kinetic rates, and the transformation products formed. As expected, TCE degradation was delayed or inhibited in most of the experiments, due to the presence of inorganics. The negative effects of co-pollutants can be palliated by combining surface modification with a slight increase in nZVI concentration. Encouragingly, complete TCE removal was achieved for some given experimental conditions. Noteworthily, nZVI surface modification was found to promote the efficient degradation of TCE. When degradation occurred, TCE was mainly transformed into innocuous non-chlorinated transformation products, while hazardous chlorinated transformation products accounted for a small percentage of the mass-balance. PMID:24607397

  12. Sodium arsenite accelerates TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in melanoma cells through upregulation of TRAIL-R1/R2 surface levels and downregulation of cFLIP expression

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Vladimir N. . E-mail: vni3@columbia.edu; Hei, Tom K.

    2006-12-10

    AP-1/cJun, NF-{kappa}B and STAT3 transcription factors control expression of numerous genes, which regulate critical cell functions including proliferation, survival and apoptosis. Sodium arsenite is known to suppress both the IKK-NF-{kappa}B and JAK2-STAT3 signaling pathways and to activate the MAPK/JNK-cJun pathways, thereby committing some cancers to undergo apoptosis. Indeed, sodium arsenite is an effective drug for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia with little nonspecific toxicity. Malignant melanoma is highly refractory to conventional radio- and chemotherapy. In the present study, we observed strong effects of sodium arsenite treatment on upregulation of TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in human and mouse melanomas. Arsenite treatment upregulated surface levels of death receptors, TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2, through increased translocation of these proteins from cytoplasm to the cell surface. Furthermore, activation of cJun and suppression of NF-{kappa}B by sodium arsenite resulted in upregulation of the endogenous TRAIL and downregulation of the cFLIP gene expression (which encodes one of the main anti-apoptotic proteins in melanomas) followed by cFLIP protein degradation and, finally, by acceleration of TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Direct suppression of cFLIP expression by cFLIP RNAi also accelerated TRAIL-induced apoptosis in these melanomas, while COX-2 suppression substantially increased levels of both TRAIL-induced and arsenite-induced apoptosis. In contrast, overexpression of permanently active AKTmyr inhibited TRAIL-mediated apoptosis via downregulation of TRAIL-R1 levels. Finally, AKT overactivation increased melanoma survival in cell culture and dramatically accelerated growth of melanoma transplant in vivo, highlighting a role of AKT suppression for effective anticancer treatment.

  13. Variability of surface-water quantity and quality and shallow groundwater levels and quality within the Rio Grande Project Area, New Mexico and Texas, 2009–13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Driscoll, Jessica M.; Sherson, Lauren R.

    2016-01-01

    Drought conditions during the study period of January 1, 2009, to September 30, 2013, caused a reduction in surface-water releases from water-supply storage infrastructure of the Rio Grande Project, which led to changes in surface-water and groundwater (conjunctive) use in downstream agricultural alluvial valleys. Surface water and groundwater in the agriculturally dominated alluvial Rincon and Mesilla Valleys were investigated in this study to measure the influence of drought and subsequent change in conjunctive water use on quantity and quality of these water resources. In 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the New Mexico Environment Department and the New Mexico Interstate Stream Commission, began a study to (1) calculate dissolved-solids loads over the study period at streamgages in the study area where data are available, (2) assess the temporal variability of dissolved-solids loads at and between each streamgage where data are available, and (3) relate the spatiotemporal variability of shallow groundwater data (groundwater levels and quality) within the alluvial valleys of the study area to spatiotemporal variability of surface-water data over the study period. This assessment included the calculation of surface-water dissolved-solids loads at streamgages as well as a mass-balance approach to measure the change in salt load between these streamgages. Bimodal surface-water discharge data led to a temporally-dynamic volumetric definition of release and nonrelease seasons. Continuous surface-water discharge and water-quality data from three streamgages on the Rio Grande were used to calculate daily dissolved-solids loads over the study period, and the results were aggregated annually and seasonally. Results show the majority of dissolved-solids loading occurs during release season; however, decreased duration of the release season over the 5-year study period has resulted in a decrease of the total annual loads at each streamgage

  14. A Novel Conditional Probability Density Distribution Surface for the Analysis of the Drop Life of Solder Joints Under Board Level Drop Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jian; Lei, YongPing; Lin, Jian; Fu, HanGuang; Wu, Zhongwei

    2016-01-01

    The scattering of fatigue life data is a common problem and usually described using the normal distribution or Weibull distribution. For solder joints under drop impact, due to the complicated stress distribution, the relationship between the stress and the drop life is so far unknown. Furthermore, it is important to establish a function describing the change in standard deviation for solder joints under different drop impact levels. Therefore, in this study, a novel conditional probability density distribution surface (CPDDS) was established for the analysis of the drop life of solder joints. The relationship between the drop impact acceleration and the drop life is proposed, which comprehensively considers the stress distribution. A novel exponential model was adopted for describing the change of the standard deviation with the impact acceleration (0 → +∞). To validate the model, the drop life of Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu solder joints was analyzed. The probability density curve of the logarithm of the fatigue life distribution can be easily obtained for a certain acceleration level fixed on the acceleration level axis of the CPDDS. The P- A- N curve was also obtained using the functions μ( A) and σ( A), which can reflect the regularity of the life data for an overall reliability P.

  15. Diversity of enterococcal species and characterization of high-level aminoglycoside resistant enterococci of samples of wastewater and surface water in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Ben Said, Leila; Klibi, Naouel; Lozano, Carmen; Dziri, Raoudha; Ben Slama, Karim; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Torres, Carmen

    2015-10-15

    One hundred-fourteen samples of wastewater (n=64) and surface-water (n=50) were inoculated in Slanetz-Bartley agar plates supplemented or not with gentamicin (SB-Gen and SB plates, respectively) for enterococci recovery. Enterococci were obtained from 75% of tested samples in SB media (72% in wastewater; 78% in surface-water), and 85 enterococcal isolates (one/positive-sample) were obtained. Enterococcus faecium was the most prevalent species (63.5%), followed by Enterococcus faecalis (20%), Enterococcus hirae (9.4%), Enterococcus casseliflavus (4.7%), and Enterococcus gallinarum/Enterococcus durans (2.4%). Antibiotic resistance detected among these enterococci was as follows [percentage/detected gene (number isolates)]: kanamycin [29%/aph(3')-IIIa (n=22)], streptomycin [8%/ant(6)-Ia (n=4)], erythromycin [44%/erm(B) (n=34)], tetracycline [18%/tet(M) (n=6)/tet(M)-tet(L) (n=9)], chloramphenicol [2%/cat(A) (n=1)], ciprofloxacin [7%] and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole [94%]. High-level-gentamicin resistant (HLR-G) enterococci were recovered from 15 samples in SB-Gen or SB plates [12/64 samples of wastewater (19%) and 3/50 samples of surface-water (6%)]; HLR-G isolates were identified as E. faecium (n=7), E. faecalis (n=6), and E. casseliflavus (n=2). These HLR-G enterococci carried the aac(6')-Ie-aph(2")-Ia and erm(B) genes, in addition to aph(3')-IIIa (n=10), ant(6)-Ia (n=9), tet(M) (n=13), tet(L) (n=8) and cat(A) genes (n=2). Three HLR-G enterococci carried the esp virulence gene. Sequence-types detected among HLR-G enterococci were as follows: E. faecalis (ST480, ST314, ST202, ST55, and the new ones ST531 and ST532) and E. faecium (ST327, ST12, ST296, and the new ones ST985 and ST986). Thirty-two different PFGE patterns were detected among 36 high-level-aminoglycoside-resistant enterococci recovered in water samples. Diverse genetic lineages of HLR-G enterococci were detected in wastewater and surface-water in Tunisia. Water can represent an important source for the

  16. Quantifying the level of improvement in discharge estimation from the SRTM-era to the proposed Surface Water Ocean Topography (SWOT)-mission era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikder, M. S.; Hossain, F.

    2014-12-01

    It was almost 15 years ago, when the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) flew for a few days to map the elevation of earth's surface. SRTM has since become the community standard for a global digital elevation model (DEM) and has triggered numerous studies that require elevation information. One particular avenue that has benefited the hydrologic community is the space-borne discharge estimation using water slope information that is afforded by the spatial imaging concept of SRTM. Numerous feasibility studies involving SRTM data for discharge estimation in rivers have led to adopting a similar concept for the proposed Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission (launch date: 2020). Because SWOT is expected to have significantly higher accuracy and smaller spatial scale in resolving the elevation characteristics of a water surface, it is important to understand the extent of improvement that SWOT will afford for discharge estimation once it is launched. In this study, we explored geophysical sources of uncertainty of satellite interferometric-based discharge estimation in Bangladesh delta of the Ganges, Brahmaputra and Meghna (GBM) river basins. This exploration was carried out for two scenarios: A) using SRTM elevation data and B) using SWOT-simulated elevation data. We contextualized the improvement in accuracy as a function of river's geophysical characteristics (river width, reach averaging length, bed/water slope) and also to explored a pragmatic approach to further uncertainty reduction using water level climatology. The discharge was estimated according to the slope-area (Manning's) method using elevation data assuming availability of in-situ river bathymetry (in order to remove uncertainty due to river cross section data). A high resolution hydrodynamic model was accurately calibrated (against in-situ water level data) to simulate water level and flow dynamics along the entire river reaches of the GBM river network and served as reference for

  17. Influence of type and level of water-soluble additives on drug release and surface and mechanical properties of Surelease films.

    PubMed

    Rohera, Bhagwan D; Parikh, Nilesh H

    2002-11-01

    Ethylcellulose in combination with water-soluble additives has been used in the development of microporous membrane-coated dosage forms. In the present study, application of three types of water-soluble additives, namely polyethylene glycols (PEG 400, 3350, and 8000), maltodextrins (Maltrin M150, M100, and M040 in the order of lower to higher average polymer size and molecular weight; dextrose equivalence 16.9, 11.1, and 4.8, respectively), and xylitol, as porosity modifiers in the films of a commercially available aqueous ethylcellulose dispersion (Surelease/E-7-7060 plasticized with glyceryl tricaprylate/caprate) was investigated. The effect of type and level of these additives on drug release characteristics and surface and mechanical properties of the polymeric films was studied. Each additive was incorporated at 20 and 30% levels in the polymeric dispersion based on its solids content. Ibuprofen tablets were coated using the polymeric dispersion with and without additive at 3% w/w coat level in a fluid-bed equipment. The coated tablets were evaluated for their drug release rate, coat reflectivity (gloss), Brinell hardness, and elastic modulus. Differential scanning calorimetric analysis of the films was performed to determine the physico-chemical changes in the applied film-coats. The rate of drug release, hence film porosity, was observed to be dependent on the type and level of the additive added. The molecular weight of the additive and its concentration in the polymeric dispersion had significant influence on the rate of drug release, hardness, and elasticity of the film-coats. PMID:12503524

  18. Role of initial contamination levels, biofilm maturity and presence of salt and fat on desiccation survival of Listeria monocytogenes on stainless steel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hingston, Patricia A; Stea, Emma C; Knøchel, Susanne; Hansen, Truelstrup

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the effect of initial contamination levels, biofilm maturity and presence of salt and fatty food soils on desiccation survival of Listeria monocytogenes on stainless steel (SS) coupons. L. monocytogenes cultures grown (at 15 °C for 48 h) in Tryptic Soy Broth with 1% glucose (TSB-glu) containing either 0.5 or 5% (w/v) NaCl were re-suspended in TSB-glu containing either 0.5 or 5% NaCl and used to contaminate SS coupons at levels of 3.5, 5.5, and 7.5 log CFU/cm². Desiccation (at 15 °C for 20 days, 43% RH) commenced immediately (non-biofilm) or following biofilm formation (at 15 °C for 48 h, 100% RH). To study the impact of food lipids, non-biofilm L. monocytogenes cells were suspended in TSB-glu containing either canola oil (5-10%) or lard (20-60%) and desiccated as above on SS coupons. Following desiccation for 20 days, survivors decreased by 1.4-3.7 log CFU/cm² for non-biofilm L. monocytogenes cells. The contamination level had no significant (p > 0.05) effect on survival kinetics. SEM micrographs showed mature biofilms on coupons initially contaminated with 5.5 and 7.5 log CFU/cm². Mature biofilm cells were significantly (p < 0.05) more desiccation resistant than cells in immature biofilms formed by the lowest contamination level. Besides biofilm maturity/formation, previous osmoadaptation, exposure to lard (20-60%) or salt (5%) during desiccation significantly (p < 0.05) increased the bacterium's survival. In conclusion, L. monocytogenes desiccation survival can be greatly reduced by preventing presence of mature biofilms and salty or fatty soils on food contact surfaces. PMID:23764219

  19. Fossil Shorelines Record Multiple Sea Level Highstands and Surface Deformation on Million Year Timescales at Cape Range National Park, Northwestern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandstrom, R. M.; O'Leary, M.; Barham, M.; Cai, Y.; Jacome, A. P.; Raymo, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    Correcting fossil shorelines for vertical displacement subsequent to deposition is a vital consideration in estimating sea level and ice volume during past warm periods. Field observations of paleo-sea level indicators must be adjusted for local tectonic deformation, subsequent sediment loading, dynamic topography (DT), and glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). Dynamic topography is often the most difficult of these corrections to determine, especially on million year timescales, but is essential when providing constraints on sea level and ice volume changes. GIA effects from high latitude ice sheets minimally impact northwestern Australia, making this region well suited for observing surface displacement due to mantle and tectonic processes. This study presents centimeter accuracy paleo-shoreline data from four distinct marine terraces in the Cape Range National Park, Australia, which document vertical displacement history along 100 kilometers of coastline. The mapped region has an anticlinal structure in the center that has been slowly uplifting the three older reef complexes over the Neogene, constraining the timing of deformation. These neotectonics are probably caused by reactivation of ancient fault zones normal to the principal horizontal compressive stress, resulting in the warping of overlaying units. The elevation data also suggests minimal vertical displacement since the last interglacial highstand. Well-preserved fossil coral were collected from each terrace and will be geochemically dated using Sr isotope and U-series dating methods. This dataset provides a better understanding of DT and neotectonic deformation in this region (useful for improving mantle viscosity models), and offers a means for improving past sea level reconstructions in northwestern Australia.

  20. Type-II vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser with Watt level output powers at 1.2 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, C.; Fuchs, C.; Berger, C.; Ruiz Perez, A.; Koch, M.; Hader, J.; Moloney, J. V.; Koch, S. W.; Stolz, W.

    2016-02-01

    Semiconductor laser characteristics based on type-II band-aligned quantum well heterostructures for the emission at 1.2 μm are presented. Ten "W"-quantum wells consisting of GaAs/(GaIn)As/Ga(AsSb)/(GaIn)As/GaAs are arranged as resonant periodic gain in a vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser. Its structure is analyzed by X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, and reflectance measurements. The laser's power curves and spectra are investigated. Output powers at Watt level are achieved, with a maximum output power of 4 W. It is confirmed that laser operation only involves the type-II transition. A blue shift of the material gain is observed while the modal gain exhibits a red shift.