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Sample records for 241-sy-102 supernate grab

  1. Waste compatibility safety issues and final results for tank 241-SY-102 grab samples

    SciTech Connect

    Nuzum, J.L.

    1997-08-14

    Three grab samples (2SY-96-1, 2SY-96-2, and 2SY-96-3) were taken from Riser 1A of Tank 241-SY 102 on January 14, 1997, and received by 222-S Laboratory on January 14, 1997. These samples were analyzed in accordance with Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) and Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farm Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) in support of the Waste Compatibility Program. No notifications were required based on sample results. Acetone analysis was not performed in accordance with Cancellation of Acetone Analysis for Tank 241-SY-102 Grab Samples.

  2. Tank 241-SY-102 January 2000 Compatibility Grab Samples Analytical Results for the Final Report [SEC 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    BELL, K.E.

    2000-05-11

    This document is the format IV, final report for the tank 241-SY-102 (SY-102) grab samples taken in January 2000 to address waste compatibility concerns. Chemical, radiochemical, and physical analyses on the tank SY-102 samples were performed as directed in Comparability Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan for Fiscal Year 2000 (Sasaki 1999). No notification limits were exceeded. Preliminary data on samples 2SY-99-5, -6, and -7 were reported in ''Format II Report on Tank 241-SY-102 Waste Compatibility Grab Samples Taken in January 2000'' (Lockrem 2000). The data presented here represent the final results.

  3. Report on Electrochemcial Corrosion Testing of 241-SY-102 Grab Samples from the 2012 Grab Sampling Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrwas, Richard B.; Lamothe, Margaret E.

    2013-05-30

    This report describes the results of the electrochemical testing performed on tank 241-SY-102 (SY-102) grab samples that were collected in support of corrosion mitigation. The objective of the work presented here was to determine corrosion resistance of tank SY-102 to the grab samples collected using electrochemical methods up to 50°C as well as to satisfy data quality objectives. Grab samples were collected at multiple elevations from Riser 003. The electrochemical corrosion testing was planned to consist of linear polarization resistance testing (LPR) and cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) testing at 50°C. The temperature would be lowered to 40 °C and the test repeated if the CPP curve indicated pitting corrosion at 50°C. Ifno pitting was indicated by the CPP curve, then a duplicate scan would be repeated at 50°C to confirm the first result. The testing would be complete if the duplicate CPP scan was consistent with the first. This report contains the CPP results of the testing of grab sample 2SY-12-03 and 2SY-12-03DUP composite sample tested under these conditions. There was no indication of pitting at 50°C, and the duplicate scan was in agreement with the first scan. Since no further testing was required, a third scan with a shorter rest time was performed and is present in this report.

  4. Tank characterization report for Double-Shell Tank 241-SY-102

    SciTech Connect

    DiCenso, A.T.; Amato, L.C.; Winters, W.I.

    1995-06-09

    This tank characterization report presents an overview of Double-Shell Tank 241-SY-102 (hereafter, Tank 241-SY-102) and its waste contents. It provides estimated concentrations and inventories for the waste components based on the latest sampling and analysis activities and background tank information. This report describes the results of three sampling events. The first core sample was taken in October 1988. The tank supernate and sludge were next core sampled in February and March of 1990 (Tingey and Sasaki 1995). A grab sample of the supernate was taken in March of 1994. Tank 241-SY-102 is in active service and can be expected to have additional transfers to and from the tank that will alter the composition of the waste. The concentration and inventory estimates reported in this document no longer reflect the exact composition of the waste but represent the best estimates based on the most recent and available data. This report supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Milestone M-44-08 (Ecology, EPA, DOE 1994).

  5. ELECTROCHEMICAL CORROSION TEST RESULTS FOR TANK 241-SY-102 SUPERNATE GRAB SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN JB

    2007-04-09

    This report describes the electrochemical corrosion scans and conditions for testing of SY-102 supernatant samples taken December 2004. The testing was performed because the tank was under a Justification for Continued Operation allowing the supernatant composition to be outside the chemistry limits of Administrative Control 5.16, 'Corrosion Mitigation program'. A new electrochemical working electrode of A516 Grade 60 carbon steel was used for each scan; all scans were measured against a saturated calomel electrode, with carbon counter electrodes, and all scans were carried out at 50 C. The samples were scanned twice, once as received and once sparged with argon to deoxygenate the sample. For those scans conducted after argon purging, the corrosion rates ranged from 0.012 to 0.019 mpy. A test for stress corrosion cracking was carried out on one sample (2SY-04-07) with negative results.

  6. Engineer/constructor description of work for Tank 241-SY-102 retrieval system, project W-211, initial tank retrieval systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rieck, C.A.

    1996-02-01

    This document provides a description of work for the design and construction of a waste retrieval system for Tank 241-SY-102. The description of work includes a working estimate and schedule, as well as a narrative description and sketches of the waste retrieval system. The working estimate and schedule are within the established baselines for the Tank 241-SY-102 retrieval system. The technical baseline is provided in Functional Design Criteria, WHC-SD-W211-FDC-001, Revision 2.

  7. Ultrasonic Examination of Double-Shell Tank 241-SY-102. Examination Completed June 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Pardini, Allan F.; Posakony, Gerald J.

    2004-07-20

    COGEMA Engineering Corporation (COGEMA), under a contract from CH2M Hill Hanford Group (CH2M Hill), has performed an ultrasonic nondestructive examination of selected portions of Double-Shell Tank 241-SY-102. The purpose of this examination was to provide information that could be used to evaluate the integrity of the wall of the primary tank. The requirements for the ultrasonic examination of Tank 241-SY-102 were to detect, characterize (identify, size, and locate), and record measurements made of any wall thinning, pitting, or cracks that might be present in the wall of the primary tank. Any measurements that exceed the requirements set forth in the Engineering Task Plan (ETP), RPP-17750 (Jensen 2003) and summarized on page 1 of this document, are reported to CH2M Hill and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for further evaluation. Under the contract with CH2M Hill, all data is to be recorded on disk and paper copies of all measurements are provided to PNNL for third-party evaluation. PNNL is responsible for preparing a report that describes the results of the COGEMA

  8. Hazard evaluation for transfer of waste from tank 241-SY-101 to tank 241-SY-102

    SciTech Connect

    SHULTZ, M.V.

    1999-04-05

    Tank 241-SY-101 waste level growth is an emergent, high priority issue. The purpose of this document is to record the hazards evaluation process and document potential hazardous conditions that could lead to the release of radiological and toxicological material from the proposed transfer of a limited quantity (approximately 100,000 gallons) of waste from Tank 241-SY-101 to Tank 241-SY-102. The results of the hazards evaluation were compared to the current Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Basis for Interim Operation (HNF-SD-WM-BIO-001, 1998, Revision 1) to identify any hazardous conditions where Authorization Basis (AB) controls may not be sufficient or may not exist. Comparison to LA-UR-92-3196, A Safety Assessment for Proposed Pump Mixing Operations to Mitigate Episodic Gas Releases in Tank 241-SY-101, was also made in the case of transfer pump removal activities. Revision 1 of this document deletes hazardous conditions no longer applicable to the current waste transfer design and incorporates hazardous conditions related to the use of an above ground pump pit and overground transfer line. This document is not part of the AB and is not a vehicle for requesting authorization of the activity; it is only intended to provide information about the hazardous conditions associated with this activity. The AB Control Decision process will be used to determine the adequacy of controls and whether the proposed activity is within the AB. This hazard evaluation does not constitute an accident analysis.

  9. Hazard evaluation for transfer of waste from tank 241-SY-101 to tank 241-SY-102

    SciTech Connect

    SHULTZ, M.V.

    1999-02-12

    Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) waste level growth is an emergent, high priority issue. The purpose of this document is to record the hazards evaluation process and document potential hazardous conditions that could lead to the release of radiological and toxicological material from the proposed transfer of a limited quantity (approximately 100,000 gallons) of waste from SY-101 to 241-SY-102 (SY-102). The results of the hazards evaluation will be compared to the current Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Basis for Interim Operation (HNF-SD-WM-BIO-001, 1998, Revision 1) to identify any hazardous conditions where Authorization Basis (AB) controls may not be sufficient or may not exist. Comparison to LA-UR-92-3196, A Safety Assessment for Proposed Pump Mixing Operations to Mitigate Episodic Gas Releases in Tank 241-SY-101, was also made in the case of transfer pump removal activities. This document is not intended to authorize the activity or determine the adequacy of controls; it is only intended to provide information about the hazardous conditions associated with this activity. The Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) process will be used to determine the adequacy of controls and whether the proposed activity is within the AB. This hazard evaluation does not constitute an accident analysis.

  10. The Potential for Buoyant Displacement Gas Release Events in Tank 241-SY-102 after Waste Transfer from Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Beric E.; Meyer, Perry A.; Chen, Guang

    2000-04-10

    Tank 241-SY-101 is a double-shell radioactive waste storage tank containing waste that, before recent transfer and water back-dilution operations, was capable of retaining gas and producing flammable buoyant displacement gas release events (BD GREs). A BD GRE occurs when a portion of the nonconvective layer waste retains enough gas to become buoyant, rises to the waste surface, breaks up, and releases some of the stored gas. Installing the mixer pump in 1993 successfully mitigated gas retention in the settled solids layer in SY-101 and has prevented BD GREs. Gas retention in the floating drust layer and the corresponding accelerated waste level growth made it necessary to begin waste removal and back-dilution with water in December 1999. During these operations, some of the SY-101 mixed slurry layer is removed and transferred into Tank 241-SY-102. There was some concern that adding the SY-101 waste into SY-102 could create a waste configuration in SY-102 capable of BD GREs. This report updates and extends earlier assessments of the potential for BD GRE conditions in SY-102 after waste is transferred from SY-101. We determined that, under the given assumptions, no possibility of BD GREs exists in SY-102 from the SY-101 waste being added during from December 1999 through March 2000.

  11. The potential for buoyant displacement gas release events in Tank 241-SY-102 after waste transfer from Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    BE Wells; PE Meyer; G Chen

    2000-05-10

    Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) is a double-shell, radioactive waste storage tank with waste that, before the recent transfer and water back-dilution operations, was capable of retaining gas and producing buoyant displacement (BD) gas release events (GREs). Some BD GREs caused gas concentrations in the tank headspace to exceed the lower flammability limit (LFL). A BD GRE occurs when a portion of the nonconvective layer retains enough gas to become buoyant, rises to the waste surface, breaks up, and releases some of its stored gas. The installation of a mixer pump in 1993 successfully mitigated gas retention in the settled solids layer in SY-101 and has since prevented BD GREs. However, operation of the mixer pump over the years caused gas retention in the floating crust layer and a corresponding accelerated waste level growth. The accelerating crust growth trend observed in 1997--98 led to initiation of sequences of waste removal and water back-dilutions in December 1999. Waste is removed from the mixed slurry layer in Tank SY-101 and transferred into Tank 241-Sy-102 (SY-102). Water is then added back to dissolve soluble solids that retain gas. The initial transfer of 89,500 gallons of SY-101 waste, diluted in-line at 0.94:1 by volume with water, to SY-102 was conducted in December 1999. The second transfer of 230,000 gallons of original SY-101 waste, diluted approximately 0.9:1, was completed in January 2000, and the third transfer of 205,500 gallons of original SY-101 waste diluted at 0.9:1 was completed in March 2000.

  12. GRAB MECHANISMS

    DOEpatents

    Dent, K.H.

    1948-03-01

    This patent relates to a device for ltfting objects having specially designed arms that fit into aligned slots within concentric sleeves of the grab mechanism. Upon the application of an electric current the sleeves are rotated relative to one another to the aforesaid aligned position, aliowing the entry or removal of the arms of the lifted object. The sleeves are spring biased to an unailgned positione thus locking the arms within the grab mechanism when the current is off. This arrangement provides a device that will remotely secure, life, and release an object, wtth the assurance that the object wiil remain securely locked during the lifting operation.

  13. DWPF DECON FRIT SUPERNATE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, D.; Crawford, C.

    2010-09-22

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been requested to perform analyses on samples of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) decon frit slurry (i.e., supernate samples and sump solid samples). Four 1-L liquid slurry samples were provided to SRNL by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) from the 'front-end' decon activities. Additionally, two 1-L sump solids samples were provided to SRNL for compositional and physical analysis. This report contains the results of the supernate analyses, while the solids (sump and slurry) results will be reported in a supplemental report. The analytical data from the decon frit supernate indicate that all of the radionuclide, organic, and inorganic concentrations met the limits in Revision 4 of the Effluent Treatment Plant (ETP) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) with the exception of boron. The ETP WAC limit for boron is 15.0 mg/L while the average measured concentration (based on quadruplicate analysis) was 15.5 mg/L. The measured concentrations of Li, Na, and Si were also relatively high in the supernate analysis. These results are consistent with the relatively high measured value of B given the compositional make-up of Frit 418. Given these results, it was speculated that either (a) Frit 418 was dissolving into the supernate or aqueous fraction and/or (b) fine frit particulates were carried forward to the analytical instrument based on the sampling procedure used (i.e., the supernate samples were not filtered - only settled with the liquid fraction being transferred with a pipette). To address this issue, a filtered supernate sample (using a 0.45 um filter) was prepared and submitted for analysis. The results of the filtered sample were consistent with 'unfiltered or settled' sample - relatively high values of B, Li, Na, and Si were found. This suggests that Frit 418 is dissolving in the liquid phase which could be enhanced by the high surface area of the frit fines or particulates in suspension. Based on the results

  14. Results of Waste Transfer and Back-Dilution in Tanks 241-SY-101 and 241-SY-102

    SciTech Connect

    LA Mahoney; ZI Antoniak; WB Barton; JM Conner; NW Kirch; CW Stewart; BE Wells

    2000-07-26

    This report chronicles the process of remediation of the flammable gas hazard in Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) by waste transfer and back-dilution from December 18, 1999 through April 2, 2000. A brief history is given of the development of the flammable gas retention and release hazard in this tank, and the transfer and dilution systems are outlined. A detailed narrative of each of the three transfer and dilution campaigns is given to provide structure for the balance of the report. Details of the behavior of specific data are then described, including the effect of transfer and dilution on the waste levels in Tanks SY-101 and SY-102, data from strain gauges on equipment suspended from the tank dome, changes in waste configuration as inferred from neutron and gamma logs, headspace gas concentrations, waste temperatures, and the mixerpump operating performance. Operating data and performance of the transfer pump in SY-101 are also discussed.

  15. ISDP salt batch #2 supernate qualification

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T. B.; Nash, C. A.; Fink, S. D.

    2009-01-05

    This report covers the laboratory testing and analyses of the second Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) salt supernate samples, performed in support of initial radioactive operations of Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Major goals of this work include characterizing Tank 22H supernate, characterizing Tank 41H supernate, verifying actinide and strontium adsorption with a standard laboratory-scale test using monosodium titanate (MST) and filtration, and checking cesium mass transfer behavior for the MCU solvent performance when contacted with the liquid produced from MST contact. This study also includes characterization of a post-blend Tank 49H sample as part of the Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluation (NCSE). This work was specified by Task Technical Request and by Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP). In addition, a sampling plan will be written to guide analytical future work. Safety and environmental aspects of the work were documented in a Hazard Assessment Package.

  16. Revised final report for tank 241-AN-101, grab samples 1AN-95-1 through 1AN-95-7. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, R.A.

    1996-01-17

    Six supernate grab samples and one field blank were taken from tank 241-AN-101. This report documents analyses performed in support of the Safety Screening program: differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), density by specific gravity (Sp.G.), and total alpha activity (AT).

  17. Global land and water grabbing

    PubMed Central

    Rulli, Maria Cristina; Saviori, Antonio; D’Odorico, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Societal pressure on the global land and freshwater resources is increasing as a result of the rising food demand by the growing human population, dietary changes, and the enhancement of biofuel production induced by the rising oil prices and recent changes in United States and European Union bioethanol policies. Many countries and corporations have started to acquire relatively inexpensive and productive agricultural land located in foreign countries, as evidenced by the dramatic increase in the number of transnational land deals between 2005 and 2009. Often known as “land grabbing,” this phenomenon is associated with an appropriation of freshwater resources that has never been assessed before. Here we gather land-grabbing data from multiple sources and use a hydrological model to determine the associated rates of freshwater grabbing. We find that land and water grabbing are occurring at alarming rates in all continents except Antarctica. The per capita volume of grabbed water often exceeds the water requirements for a balanced diet and would be sufficient to improve food security and abate malnourishment in the grabbed countries. It is found that about 0.31 × 1012 m3⋅y−1 of green water (i.e., rainwater) and up to 0.14 × 1012 m3⋅y−1 of blue water (i.e., irrigation water) are appropriated globally for crop and livestock production in 47 × 106 ha of grabbed land worldwide (i.e., in 90% of the reported global grabbed land). PMID:23284174

  18. 60-day waste compatibility safety issue and final results for 244-TX DCRT, grab samples TX-95-1, TX-95-2, and TX-95-3

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    Three grab samples (TX-95-1, TX-95-2, and TX-95-3) were taken from tank 241- TX-244 riser 8 on November 7, 1995 and received by the 222-S Laboratory on that same day. Samples TX-95-1 and TX-95-2 were designated as supernate liquids, and sample TX-95-3 was designated as a supernate/sludge. These samples were analyzed to support the waste compatibility safety program. Accuracy and precision criteria were met for all analyses. No notifications were required based on sample results. This document provides the analysis to support the waste compatibility safety program.

  19. Final report for tank 241-AP-101, grab samples 1AP-95-1, 1AP-95-2, 1AP-95-3, 1AP-95-4, 1AP-95-5, and 1AP-95-6

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, R.A.

    1996-03-04

    Six supernate grab samples (1AP-95-1 through 6) and one field blank (1AP-95-7) were taken from tank 241-AP-101, on Nov. 10 and 13, 1995. Analyses were performed in support of the Safety Screening and the Waste Compatibility Safety programs. All analytical results were within the action limits stated in the TSAP.

  20. Tank 214-AW-105, grab samples, analytical results for the finalreport

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, R.A.

    1997-02-20

    This document is the final report for tank 241-AW-105 grab samples. Twenty grabs samples were collected from risers 10A and 15A on August 20 and 21, 1996, of which eight were designated for the K Basin sludge compatibility and mixing studies. This document presents the analytical results for the remaining twelve samples. Analyses were performed in accordance with the Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) and the Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DO). The results for the previous sampling of this tank were reported in WHC-SD-WM-DP-149, Rev. 0, 60-Day Waste Compatibility Safety Issue and Final Results for Tank 241-A W-105, Grab Samples 5A W-95-1, 5A W-95-2 and 5A W-95-3. Three supernate samples exceeded the TOC notification limit (30,000 microg C/g dry weight). Appropriate notifications were made. No immediate notifications were required for any other analyte. The TSAP requested analyses for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) for all liquids and centrifuged solid subsamples. The PCB analysis of the liquid samples has been delayed and will be presented in a revision to this document.

  1. Water Grabbing analysis at global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rulli, M.; Saviori, A.; D'Odorico, P.

    2012-12-01

    "Land grabbing" is the acquisition of agricultural land by foreign governments and corporations, a phenomenon that has greatly intensified over the last few years as a result of the increase in food prices and biofuel demand. Land grabbing is inherently associated with an appropriation of freshwater resources that has never been investigated before. Here we provide a global assessment of the total grabbed land and water resources. Using process-based agro-hydrological models we estimate the rates of freshwater grabbing worldwide. We find that this phenomenon is occurring at alarming rates in all continents except Antarctica. The per capita volume of grabbed water often exceeds the water requirements for a balanced diet and would be sufficient to abate malnourishment in the grabbed countries. High rates of water grabbing are often associated with deforestation and the increase in water withdrawals for irrigation.

  2. Treatability studies for decontamination of Melton Valley Storage Tank supernate

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, W.D.; Fowler, V.L.; Perona, J.J.; McTaggart, D.R.

    1992-08-01

    Liquid low-level waste, primarily nitric acid contaminated with radionuclides and minor concentrations of organics and heavy metals, is neutralized with sodium hydroxide, concentrated by evaporation, and stored for processing and disposal. The evaporator concentrate separates into sludge and supernate phases upon cooling. The supernate is 4 to 5 mol/L sodium nitrate contaminated with soluble radionuclides, principally {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, and {sup 14}C, while the sludge consists of precipitated carbonates and hydroxides of metals and transuranic elements. Methods for treatment and disposal of this waste are being developed. In studies to determine the feasibility of removing {sup 137}Cs from the supernates before solidification campaigns, batch sorption measurements were made from four simulated supernate solutions with four different samples of potassium hexacyanocobalt ferrate (KCCF). Cesium decontamination factors of 1 to 8 were obtained with different KCCF batches from a highly-salted supernate at pH 13. Decontamination factors as high as 50 were measured from supernates with lower salt content and pH, in fact, the pH had a greater effect than the solution composition on the decontamination factors. The decontamination factors were highest after 1 to 2 d of mixing and decreased with longer mixing times due to decomposition of the KCCF in the alkaline solution. The decontamination factors decreased with settling time and were lower for the same total contact time (mixing + settling) for the longer mixing times, indicating more rapid KCCF decomposition during mixing than during settling. There was no stratification of cesium in the tubes as the KCCF decomposed.

  3. Bacterial detachment from salivary conditioning films by dentifrice supernates.

    PubMed

    van der Mei, Henny C; White, Donald J; Cox, Ed R; Geertsema-Doornbusch, Gesinda I; Busscher, Henk J

    2002-01-01

    This study compared the detachment by supernates of nine different dentifrices of four oral bacterial strains adhering to a salivary pellicle in a parallel plate flow chamber. Ultra-thin bovine enamel slabs were coated for 1.5 h with human whole saliva. Following buffer rinsing, a bacterial suspension of Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus mutans or Actinomyces naeslundii was perfused through the flow chamber at a shear rate of 30 s-1 for four hours, and the number of adhering bacteria n4h was enumerated by image analysis after buffer rinsing at the same shear rate. Then, a 25 wt%-dentifrice/water supernate was perfused through the flow chamber for four minutes, followed by eight minutes of buffer rinsing and another enumeration of the number of bacteria that had remained adhering nad. Finally, an air-bubble was passed through the flow chamber to mimic the occasionally high detachment forces occurring in the oral cavity, and the adhering bacteria nab were counted again. On average, S. sanguis was the easiest to detach (73% averaged over all dentifrice supernates), while A. naeslundii was the most difficult (22% on average). The combined detachment of bacteria by dentifrice supernates and air-bubble ranged from a low of 16% to a high of 80%. Dentifrices containing pyrophosphate and polymeric polyphosphate (hexametaphosphate) surface active ingredients appeared to produce the most consistent and strongest desorption effects on plaque bacteria. Factors apparently important to bacterial detachment from pellicle-covered tooth surfaces by dentifrice formulations include the nature of adhesion of bacterial strains and chemical composition of the dentifrice formulations, including pH, surfactant system and the effect of added ingredients (dispersants, metal ions, peroxides, baking soda). PMID:11507932

  4. Toxicity testing results on increased supernate treatment rate of 3700 gallons/batch. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, J.B.; Martin, H.L.; Diener, G.A.

    1992-07-06

    In July, 1991, Reactor Materials increased the supernate treatment concentration in the M-Area Dilute Effluent Treatment Facility from 2700 gallons of supernate per 36000 gallon dilute wastewater batch to 3700 gallons/batch. This report summarizes the toxicity testing on the effluents of the increased treatment rate.(JL)

  5. Toxicity testing results on increased supernate treatment rate of 3700 gallons/batch

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, J.B.; Martin, H.L.; Diener, G.A.

    1992-07-06

    In July, 1991, Reactor Materials increased the supernate treatment concentration in the M-Area Dilute Effluent Treatment Facility from 2700 gallons of supernate per 36000 gallon dilute wastewater batch to 3700 gallons/batch. This report summarizes the toxicity testing on the effluents of the increased treatment rate.(JL)

  6. Precipitation-adsorption process for the decontamination of nuclear waste supernates

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Lien-Mow; Kilpatrick, Lester L.

    1984-01-01

    High-level nuclear waste supernate is decontaminated of cesium by precipitation of the cesium and potassium with sodium tetraphenyl boron. Simultaneously, strontium-90 is removed from the waste supernate sorption of insoluble sodium titanate. The waste solution is then filtered to separate the solution decontaminated of cesium and strontium.

  7. Precipitation-adsorption process for the decontamination of nuclear waste supernates

    DOEpatents

    Lee, L.M.; Kilpatrick, L.L.

    1982-05-19

    High-level nuclear waste supernate is decontaminated of cesium by precipitation of the cesium and potassium with sodium tetraphenyl boron. Simultaneously, strontium-90 is removed from the waste supernate sorption of insoluble sodium titanate. The waste solution is then filtered to separate the solution decontaminated of cesium and strontium.

  8. Access to Bathtub Grab Bars: Evidence of a Policy Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birkett, Nicholas; Nair, Rama; Murphy, Maureen; Roberge, Ginette; Lockett, Donna

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines access to bathtub grab bars in privately and publicly owned apartment buildings and explores the profile of seniors who have access to bathtub grab bars. Results indicate that bathtub grab bars were significantly more prevalent in apartments that were publicly owned (91.3%) as compared to privately owned (37.8%) (p lesser than…

  9. The solubilities of significant organic compounds in HLW tank supernate solutions -- FY 1995 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Barney, G.S.

    1996-04-26

    At the Hanford Site organic compounds were measured in tank supernate simulant solutions during FY 1995. This solubility information will be used to determine if these organic salts could exist in solid phases (saltcake or sludges) in the waste where they might react violently with the nitrate or nitrite salts present in the tanks. Solubilities of sodium glycolate, succinate, and caproate salts; iron and aluminum and butylphosphate salts; and aluminum oxalate were measured in simulated waste supernate solutions at 25 {degree}C, 30 {degree}C, 40 {degree}C, and 50 {degree}C. The organic compounds were selected because they are expected to exist in relatively high concentrations in the tanks. The solubilities of sodium glycolate, succinate, caproate, and butylphosphate in HLW tank supernate solutions were high over the temperature and sodium hydroxide concentration ranges expected in the tanks. High solubilities will prevent solid sodium salts of these organic acids from precipitating from tank supernate solutions. The total organic carbon concentrations (YOC) of actual tank supernates are generally much lower than the TOC ranges for simulated supernate solutions saturated (at the solubility limit) with the organic salts. This is so even if all the dissolved carbon in a given tank and supernate is due to only one of these eight soluble compounds (an unlikely situation). Metal ion complexes of and butylphosphate and oxalate in supernate solutions were not stable in the presence of the hydroxide concentrations expected in most tanks. Iron and aluminum dibutylphosphate compounds reacted with hydroxide to form soluble sodium dibutylphosphate and precipitated iron and aluminum hydroxides. Aluminum oxalate complexes were also not stable in the basic simulated supernate solutions. Solubilities of all the organic salts decrease with increasing sodium hydroxide concentration because of the common ion effect of Na+. Increasing temperatures raised the solubilities of the organic

  10. Grab a Byte. Courseware Evaluation for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Vila M.; And Others

    This courseware evaluation rates the "Grab a Byte" program developed by tne National Dairy Council. (The program--not included in this document--is divided into three sections: Grab-a-Grape uses a quiz-show format to examine students' knowledge of food groups; Nutrition Sleuth reinforces students' nutrient knowledge; and Have-a-Byte analyzes meals…

  11. Characterization of hazardous constituents in HLW supernate and implications for solid LLW generation

    SciTech Connect

    Georgeton, G.K.

    1994-10-10

    High Level Waste (HLW) generated during Separations processing in the F- and H-Canyons is transferred to the Tank Farms for stage in 51 underground, million gallon storage tanks. The waste is an aqueous solution containing dissolved sodium salts and insoluble metal oxides/hydroxides. The waste solution is evaporated to reduce the volume, and the resulting saltcake and residual supernate are stored. Over the 40 year history of the Tank Farm, routine supernate sampling has been conducted in support of the primary goal of safe storage of HLW. As a result of routine and non-routine activities that are part of managing these highly radioactive wastes, secondary solid waste is generated. Radioactive contamination of over 90% of the solid waste generated is due to contact with BLW supernate or saltcake. In order to comply with the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) for of solid waste in the E-Area Vaults (EAV), the quantity of certain radioisotopes must be manifested for each waste container and a declaration made of whether or not the waste is hazardous. However, solid waste is not amenable to routine analysis, this forces a reliance on analytical data from supernate samples to characterize the contamination. To provide the manifest information, process knowledge in combination with the limited amount of analytical data will be used. This report documents the characterization of hazardous components in the HLW supernate associated with the waste storage, evaporation and sludge processing facilities. The hazardous constituents of HLW are identified and the fate of the constituents is tracked based on knowledge of each phase of the process. The limited amount of sample data that includes analyses for hazardous species is then used to establish average and maximum characterization values. Finally, a screening based on an average supernate is compared to the criteria for the individual streams to evaluate the amount of conservatism introduced for the individual streams.

  12. Solubilities of significant compounds in HLW tank supernate solutions - FY 1996 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Barney, G.S.

    1996-09-30

    The solubilities of two sodium salts of organic acids that are thought to exist in high-level waste at the Hanford Site were measured in tank supernate simulant solutions during FY1996 This solubility information will be used to determine if these organic salts could exist in solid phases (saltcake or sludges) in the waste where they might react violently with the nitrate or nitrite salts present in the tanks. Solubilities of sodium butyrate and trisodium N-(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediaminetriacetate were measured in simulated waste supernate solutions at 25 {degrees}C, 30 {degrees}C, 40 {degrees}C, and 50 {degrees}C. The organic compounds were selected because they are expected to exist in relatively high concentrations in the tanks. Two types of tank supernate simulants were used - a 4.O M sodium nitrate - 0.97 M sodium nitrite solution with sodium hydroxide concentrations ranging from O.00003 M to 2.O M and a 2.O M sodium nitrite solution saturated with crystalline sodium nitrate with sodium hydroxide concentrations ranging from 0.1 M to 2. 0 M. The solubilities of sodium butyrate and trisodium N-(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylene- diaminetriacetate in both types of HLW tank supernate solutions were high over the temperature and sodium hydroxide concentration ranges expected in the tanks. The solubilities of these compounds are similar (in terms of total organic carbon) to sodium glycolate, succinate, caproate, dibutylphosphate, citrate, formate, ethylenediaminetetraacetate, and nitrilotriacetate which were measured previously. High solubilities will prevent solid sodium salts of these organic acids from precipitating from tank supernate solutions. The total organic carbon concentrations (TOC) of actual tank supernates are generaly much lower than the TOC ranges for the simulated supernate solutions saturated (at the solubility limit) with the organic salts. This is true even if all the dissolved carbon in a given tank supernate is due to only one of these eight soluble

  13. Improving benthic monitoring by combining trawl and grab surveys.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Lis Lindal; Renaud, Paul E; Cochrane, Sabine K J

    2011-06-01

    Environmental monitoring is performed on seafloor communities since these organisms are relatively stationary and integrate the environmental conditions over many years. Standard practices involve sampling by grab. Epifaunal taxa, often missed by grab sampling, are likely to have different ecological functions. We investigate how current environmental assessments represent the benthic community as a whole by comparing taxonomic and functional components sampled by grabs and epibenthic trawls. Faunal communities sampled by trawl (filtrating or predator, epifauna) and grab (infaunal, detrivore) differs widely by sampling distinct functional components, and these may be expected to respond to different human-induced stressors. Neither component appears to be a good surrogate for the community as a whole. We suggest a benthic monitoring by combining both techniques. Sustainable ecosystem functioning is intimately tied to the health of both components of the benthic community, and is recognized as an important goal by signatories of the Convention on Biological Diversity. PMID:21507428

  14. Technetium in alkaline, high-salt, radioactive tank waste supernate: Preliminary characterization and removal

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, D.L. Jr.; Brown, G.N.; Conradson, S.D.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the initial work conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to study technetium (Tc) removal from Hanford tank waste supernates and Tc oxidation state in the supernates. Filtered supernate samples from four tanks were studied: a composite double shell slurry feed (DSSF) consisting of 70% from Tank AW-101, 20% from AP-106, and 10% from AP-102; and three complexant concentrate (CC) wastes (Tanks AN-107, SY-101, ANS SY-103) that are distinguished by having a high concentration of organic complexants. The work included batch contacts of these waste samples with Reillex{trademark}-HPQ (anion exchanger from Reilly Industries) and ABEC 5000 (a sorbent from Eichrom Industries), materials designed to effectively remove Tc as pertechnetate from tank wastes. A short study of Tc analysis methods was completed. A preliminary identification of the oxidation state of non-pertechnetate species in the supernates was made by analyzing the technetium x-ray absorption spectra of four CC waste samples. Molybdenum (Mo) and rhenium (Re) spiked test solutions and simulants were tested with electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry to evaluate the feasibility of the technique for identifying Tc species in waste samples.

  15. Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan for Determining Uranium and Plutonium Solubility in Actual Tank Waste Supernates

    SciTech Connect

    King, William D.

    2005-06-28

    Savannah River Site tank waste supernates contain small quantities of dissolved uranium and plutonium. Due to the large volume of supernates, significant quantities of dissolved uranium and plutonium are managed as part of waste transfers, evaporation and pretreatment at the Savannah River Site in tank farm operations, the Actinide Removal Project (ARP), and the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). Previous SRNL studies have investigated the effect of temperature and major supernate components on the solubility of uranium and plutonium. Based on these studies, equations were developed for the prediction of U and Pu solubility in tank waste supernates. The majority of the previous tests were conducted with simulated waste solutions. The current testing is intended to determine solubility in actual tank waste samples (as-received, diluted, and combinations of tank samples) as a function of composition and temperature. Results will be used to validate and build on the existing solubility equations.

  16. High level waste characterization in support of low level waste certification. I. HLW supernate radionuclide characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Jamison, M.E.; d`Entremont, P.D.; Clemmons, J.S.; Bess, C.E.; Brown, D.F.

    1994-07-08

    High Level Waste Programs has radioactive waste storage, treatment and processing facilities that are located in the F and H Areas at the Savannah River Site. These facilities include the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF), F and H Area Tank Farms, Extended Sludge Processing (ESP), and In-Tank Precipitation (ITP). Job wastes are generated from operation, maintenance, and construction activities inside radiological areas. These items may have been contaminated with radioactive supernate, salt, and sludge material. Most of these wastes will be disposed of in the E-area Vaults. Therefore, an isotopic and hazardous characterization must be performed. The characterization of HLW supernate radionuclides is discussed in Chapter I. The characterization for salt and sludge phases, which can also contaminate LLW, will be included in other Chapters.

  17. Evaluation Of FWENC Process For Treatment Of MVST Sludges, Supernates, And Surrogates

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, JW

    2003-01-30

    In 1998, the Foster Wheeler Environmental Corporation (FWENC) was awarded an 11-year contract to treat transuranic waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, including Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) waste. Their baseline tank waste process consists of: (1) Separating the supernate from the sludge, (2) Washing the sludge with water and adding this wash water to the supernate, (3) Stabilizing the supernate/wash water or the washed sludge with additives if either are projected to fail Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) Toxic Characteristics Leaching Protocol (TCLP) criteria, and (4) Stabilizing both the washed sludge and supernate/wash water by vacuum evaporation. An ''Optimum'' treatment procedure consisted of adding a specified quantity of two stabilizers--ThioRed{reg_sign} and ET Soil Polymer{reg_sign}--and an ''Alternate'' treatment simply increased the amount of ThioRed{reg_sign} added. This report presents the results of a study funded by the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) to provide Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) with independent laboratory data on the performance of the baseline process for treating the sludges, including washing the sludge and treating the wash water (although supernates were not included in the wash water tests). Two surrogate and seven actual tank wastes were used in this evaluation. Surrogate work, as well as the initial work with actual tank sludge, was based on an existing sludge sample from Bethel Valley Evaporator Storage Tank (BVEST) W23. One surrogate was required to be based on a surrogate previously developed to mimic the weighted average chemical composition of the MVST-BVEST using a simple mix of reagent grade chemicals and water, called the ''Quick and Dirty'' surrogate (QnD). The composition of this surrogate was adjusted toward the measured composition of W23 samples. The other surrogate was prepared to be more representative of the W23 sludge sample by precipitation of a nitrate solution at high pH, separating the solution

  18. 33. REPAIRMEN ARE AT WORK ON THE HULETT'S GRAB BUCKET. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. REPAIRMEN ARE AT WORK ON THE HULETT'S GRAB BUCKET. BUCKET IS SEEN HERE IN ITS FULL OPEN POSITION. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  19. Tank 241-AX-101 grab samples 1AX-97-1 through 1AX-97-3 analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, R.A.

    1997-11-13

    This document is the final report for tank 241-AX-101 grab samples. Four grab samples were collected from riser 5B on July 29, 1997. Analyses were performed on samples 1AX-97-1, 1AX-97-2 and 1AX-97-3 in accordance with the Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) and the Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) (Rev. 1: Fowler, 1995; Rev. 2: Mulkey and Miller, 1997). The analytical results are presented in Table 1. No notification limits were exceeded. All four samples contained settled solids that appeared to be large salt crystals that precipitated upon cooling to ambient temperature. Less than 25 % settled solids were present in the first three samples, therefore only the supernate was sampled and analyzed. Sample 1AX-97-4 contained approximately 25.3 % settled solids. Compatibility analyses were not performed on this sample. Attachment 1 is provided as a cross-reference for relating the tank farm customer identification numbers with the 222-S Laboratory sample numbers and the portion of sample analyzed. Table 2 provides the appearance information. All four samples contained settled solids that appeared to be large salt crystal that precipitated upon cooling to ambient temperature. The settled solids in samples 1AX-97-1, 1AX-97-2 and 1AX-97-3 were less than 25% by volume. Therefore, for these three samples, two 15-mL subsamples were pipetted to the surface of the liquid and submitted to the laboratory for analysis. In addition, a portion of the liquid was taken from each of the these three samples to perform an acidified ammonia analysis. No analysis was performed on the settled solid portion of the samples. Sample 1AX-97-4 was reserved for the Process Chemistry group to perform boil down and dissolution testing in accordance with Letter of Instruction for Non-Routine Analysis of Single-Shell Tank 241-AX-101 Grab Samples (Field, 1997) (Correspondence 1). However, prior to the analysis, the sample was inadvertently

  20. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING TECHNOLOGY FOR ORGANIC AND NITRATE SALT SUPERNATE

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C; Michael02 Smith, M

    2007-03-30

    About two decades ago a process was developed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to remove Cs137 from radioactive high level waste (HLW) supernates so the supernates could be land disposed as low activity waste (LAW). Sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) was used to precipitate Cs{sup 137} as CsTPB. The flowsheet called for destruction of the organic TPB by acid hydrolysis so that the Cs{sup 137} enriched residue could be mixed with other HLW sludge, vitrified, and disposed of in a federal geologic repository. The precipitation process was demonstrated full scale with actual HLW waste and a 2.5 wt% Cs137 rich precipitate containing organic TPB was produced admixed with 240,000 gallons of salt supernate. Organic destruction by acid hydrolysis proved to be problematic and other disposal technologies were investigated. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR), which destroys organics by pyrolysis, is the current baseline technology for destroying the TPB and the waste nitrates prior to vitrification. Bench scale tests were designed and conducted at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to reproduce the pyrolysis reactions. The formation of alkali carbonate phases that are compatible with DWPF waste pre-processing and vitrification were demonstrated in the bench scale tests. Test parameters were optimized for a pilot scale FBSR demonstration that was performed at the SAIC Science & Technology Application Research (STAR) Center in Idaho Falls, ID by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and SRNL in 2003. An engineering scale demonstration was completed by THOR{reg_sign} Treatment Technologies (TTT) and SRNL in 2006 at the Hazen Research, Inc. test facility in Golden, CO. The same mineral carbonate phases, the same organic destruction (>99.99%) and the same nitrate/nitrite destruction (>99.99%) were produced at the bench scale, pilot scale, and engineering scale although different sources of carbon were used during testing.

  1. Tank 41H Post-Dissolution Saltcake Core and Supernate SampleAnalysis

    SciTech Connect

    MARTINO, CHRISTOPHERJ

    2004-07-07

    This report provides analyses of the samples from Tank 41H. The characterization also includes supernate samples pulled from the surface (347 inch) and 250 inch levels of the salt supernate. The three saltcake samples (HTF-E-03-145, 146, and 147) were filled to nearly their capacity with saltcake and free liquid, with an average saltcake bulk density of 2.06 g/cm3. The undrained saltcake from the bottom of the middle sample (HTF-E-03-146) had a water content of 4.1 percentage weight, a 137Cs activity of 0.14 Ci per gallon of saltcake, and an alpha content of 1.4E+4 pCi/g. The undrained saltcake from the bottom of the bottom sample (HTF-E-03-147) had a water content of 8.5 percentage weight, a 137Cs activity of 0.17 Ci per gallon of saltcake, and an alpha content of 3.0E+4 pCi/g. Interstitial liquid drained from the middle sample (HTF-E-03-146) had a density of 1.43 g/cm3, a soluble solids content of 45.4 percentage weight, a 137Cs activity of 0.78 Ci per gallon of interstitial liquid, a nd an alpha content of 1.1E+4 pCi/mL. An analysis of material from the top of the top sample (HTF-E-03-145) is provided in support of Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluations. The as-received saltcake and the residual insoluble solids had a uranium-235 enrichment of approximately 12.2 per cent. Characterization focused on providing information on fissile radionuclides, potential neutron poisons, and other potential diluents. Supernate samples pulled from the surface and from the 250 in. levels of the C1 and C3 risers yielded information on the vertical and lateral tank supernate homogeneity. The 137Cs content of these Tank 41H samples averaged 0.56 Ci/gal for the C3 riser and 0.65 Ci/gal for the C1 riser. The 238Pu content of the four unfiltered samples ranged from 1.41E+4 pCi/mL to 2.21E+4 pCi/mL. Scanning electron microscopy of saltcake from sample HTF-E-03-146 revealed several features consistent with mineral dissolution: sub-rounded appearance of grains, lack of coatings by

  2. Intermediate-Scale Ion Exchange Removal of Technetium from Savannah River Site Tank 44 F Supernate Solution

    SciTech Connect

    King, W.D.

    2000-08-23

    As part of the Hanford River Protection Project waste Treatment facility design contracted to BNFL, Inc., a sample of Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 4 F waste solution was treated for the removal of technetium (as pertechnetate ion). Interest in treating the SRS sample for Tc removal resulted from the similarity between the Tank 44 F supernate composition and Hanford Envelope A supernate solutions. The Tank 44 F sample was available as a by-product of tests already conducted at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) as part of the Alternative Salt Disposition Program for treatment of SRS wastes. Testing of the SRS sample resulted in considerable cost-savings since it was not necessary to ship a sample of Hanford supernate to SRS.

  3. Cesium removal demonstration utilizing crystalline silicotitanate sorbent for processing Melton Valley Storage Tank supernate: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.F. Jr.; Taylor, P.A.; Cummins, R.L.

    1998-03-01

    This report provides details of the Cesium Removal Demonstration (CsRD), which was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on radioactive waste from the Melton Valley Storage Tanks. The CsRD was the first large-scale use of state-of-the-art sorbents being developed by private industry for the selective removal of cesium and other radionuclides from liquid wastes stored across the DOE complex. The crystalline silicotitanate sorbent used in the demonstration was chosen because of its effectiveness in laboratory tests using bench-scale columns. The demonstration showed that the cesium could be removed from the supernate and concentrated on a small-volume, solid waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Nevada Test Site. During this project, the CsRD system processed > 115,000 L (30,000 gal) of radioactive supernate with minimal operational problems. Sluicing, drying, and remote transportation of the sorbent, which could not be done on a bench scale, were successfully demonstrated. The system was then decontaminated to the extent that it could be contact maintained with the use of localized shielding only. By utilizing a modular, transportable design and placement within existing facilities, the system can be transferred to different sites for reuse. The initial unit has now been removed from the process building and is presently being reinstalled for use in baseline operations at ORNL.

  4. Final report for tank 241-AN-102, grab samples 2AN-95-1 through 2AN-95-6 and 102-AN-1 through 102-AN-4

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, R.A.

    1996-03-21

    Ten grab samples (2AN-95-1, 2, 3, 4A, 5A; 102-AN-1, 2, 3(A), 3(B), and 4) and one field blank (2AN-95-6) were taken from tank 241-AN-102. In support of the safety screening program, total organic carbon and cyanide were performed as secondary analyses because the differential scanning calorimetry results exceeded the notification limit. These were compared to safety screening limits at a confidence level of 95%. Waste compatibility analyses were performed on the 3 supernate samples and the field blank from the latest sampling event. Results presented in the 45 day and in this report show that the waste in Tank 241-AN-1D2 has energetics greater than 480 J/g (dry) and total organic carbon > 3 wt%; however, with a moisture content > 17 wt%, the tank may be considered ``conditionally`` safe in accordance with the Data Quality Objective to Support Resolution of the Organic Complexant Safety Issue.

  5. Assessment of fission product content of high-level liquid waste supernate on E-Area vault package criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.F.

    1994-06-30

    This report assesses the tank farm`s high level waste supernate to determine any potential impacts on waste certification for the E-Area vaults (EAV). The Waste Acceptance Criteria procedure (i.e., WAC 3.10 of the 1S manual) imposes administrative controls on radioactive material in waste packages sent to the EAV, specifically on six fission products. Waste tank supernates contain various fission products, so any waste package containing material contaminated with supernate will contain these radioactive isotopes. This report develops the process knowledge basis for characterizing the supernate composition for these isotopes, so that appropriate controls can be implemented to ensure that the EAV WAC is met. Six fission products are listed in the SRS 1S Manual WAC 3.10: Se-79, which decays to bromine; Sr-90, which decays to niobium; Tc-99, which decays to ruthenium; Sn-126, which decays to tellurium; I-129, which decays to xenon; and Cs-137, which decays to barium.

  6. Fluidized Bed Stream Reforming of Organic and Nitrate Containing Salt Supernate

    SciTech Connect

    JANTZEN, CAROLM.

    2004-05-17

    A salt supernate waste (Tank 48H) generated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during demonstration of In Tank Precipitation (ITP) process for Cs removal contains nitrates, nitrites, and sodium tetraphenyl borate (NaTPB). This slurry must be pre-processed in order to reduce the impacts of the nitrate and organic species on subsequent vitrification in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is a candidate technology for destroying the nitrates, nitrites, and organics (NaTPB) prior to melting. Bench scale tests were designed and conducted at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to demonstrate that bench scale testing can adequately reproduce the CO/CO2 and H2/H2O fugacities representative of the FBSR process and form the appropriate product phases. Carbonate and silicate product phases that were compatible with DWPF vitrification were achieved in the bench scale testing and test parameters were optimized for a pilot scale FBSR demonstration.

  7. Treatment options and flow sheets for ORNL low-level liquid waste supernate

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, D.O.; Lee, D.D.

    1991-12-01

    Low-level liquid waste (LLLW) is currently contained in ten 50,000-gal storage and process tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and as residual heels in an number of older tanks that are no longer in active use. Plans are being formulated to treat these wastes, along with similar LLLW that will be generated in the future, to yield decontaminated effluents that can be disposed of and stable solid waste forms that can be permanently stored. The primary purpose of this report is to summarize the performance of the most promising separations processes that are appropriate for treatment of the LLLW supernate solution to remove the two dominant radionuclides, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr; to indicate how they can be integrated into an effective flowsheet; and to estimate the expected performance of such flowsheets in comparison to waste treatment requirements.

  8. 40 CFR 90.423 - Exhaust gas analytical system; CVS grab sample.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... grab sample. 90.423 Section 90.423 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... KILOWATTS Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.423 Exhaust gas analytical system; CVS grab sample. (a... following requirements: (1) The CLD (or HCLD) requires that the nitrogen dioxide present in the sample...

  9. 40 CFR 90.423 - Exhaust gas analytical system; CVS grab sample.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... grab sample. 90.423 Section 90.423 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... KILOWATTS Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.423 Exhaust gas analytical system; CVS grab sample. (a... following requirements: (1) The CLD (or HCLD) requires that the nitrogen dioxide present in the sample...

  10. 40 CFR 90.423 - Exhaust gas analytical system; CVS grab sample.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... grab sample. 90.423 Section 90.423 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... KILOWATTS Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.423 Exhaust gas analytical system; CVS grab sample. (a... following requirements: (1) The CLD (or HCLD) requires that the nitrogen dioxide present in the sample...

  11. 40 CFR 90.423 - Exhaust gas analytical system; CVS grab sample.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... grab sample. 90.423 Section 90.423 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... KILOWATTS Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.423 Exhaust gas analytical system; CVS grab sample. (a... following requirements: (1) The CLD (or HCLD) requires that the nitrogen dioxide present in the sample...

  12. 40 CFR 91.423 - Exhaust gas analytical system; CVS grab sample.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... grab sample. 91.423 Section 91.423 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Procedures § 91.423 Exhaust gas analytical system; CVS grab sample. (a) Schematic drawings. Figure 4 in...) The CLD (or HCLD) requires that the nitrogen dioxide present in the sample be converted to...

  13. 40 CFR 91.423 - Exhaust gas analytical system; CVS grab sample.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... grab sample. 91.423 Section 91.423 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Procedures § 91.423 Exhaust gas analytical system; CVS grab sample. (a) Schematic drawings. Figure 4 in...) The CLD (or HCLD) requires that the nitrogen dioxide present in the sample be converted to...

  14. 40 CFR 91.423 - Exhaust gas analytical system; CVS grab sample.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... grab sample. 91.423 Section 91.423 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Procedures § 91.423 Exhaust gas analytical system; CVS grab sample. (a) Schematic drawings. Figure 4 in...) The CLD (or HCLD) requires that the nitrogen dioxide present in the sample be converted to...

  15. 40 CFR 91.423 - Exhaust gas analytical system; CVS grab sample.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... grab sample. 91.423 Section 91.423 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Procedures § 91.423 Exhaust gas analytical system; CVS grab sample. (a) Schematic drawings. Figure 4 in...) The CLD (or HCLD) requires that the nitrogen dioxide present in the sample be converted to...

  16. 46 CFR 28.410 - Deck rails, lifelines, storm rails, and hand grabs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Deck rails, lifelines, storm rails, and hand grabs. 28..., lifelines, storm rails, and hand grabs. (a) Except as otherwise provided in paragraph (d) of this section... weather decks accessible to individuals. Where space limitations make deck rails impractical, hand...

  17. 46 CFR 28.810 - Deck rails, lifelines, storm rails and hand grabs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Deck rails, lifelines, storm rails and hand grabs. 28..., storm rails and hand grabs. (a) Except as otherwise provided in paragraph (d) of this section, deck... weather decks accessible to individuals. Where space limitations make deck rails impractical, hand...

  18. 46 CFR 28.810 - Deck rails, lifelines, storm rails and hand grabs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Deck rails, lifelines, storm rails and hand grabs. 28..., storm rails and hand grabs. (a) Except as otherwise provided in paragraph (d) of this section, deck... weather decks accessible to individuals. Where space limitations make deck rails impractical, hand...

  19. 46 CFR 28.810 - Deck rails, lifelines, storm rails and hand grabs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Deck rails, lifelines, storm rails and hand grabs. 28..., storm rails and hand grabs. (a) Except as otherwise provided in paragraph (d) of this section, deck... weather decks accessible to individuals. Where space limitations make deck rails impractical, hand...

  20. 46 CFR 28.410 - Deck rails, lifelines, storm rails, and hand grabs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Deck rails, lifelines, storm rails, and hand grabs. 28..., lifelines, storm rails, and hand grabs. (a) Except as otherwise provided in paragraph (d) of this section... weather decks accessible to individuals. Where space limitations make deck rails impractical, hand...

  1. 46 CFR 28.410 - Deck rails, lifelines, storm rails, and hand grabs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Deck rails, lifelines, storm rails, and hand grabs. 28..., lifelines, storm rails, and hand grabs. (a) Except as otherwise provided in paragraph (d) of this section... weather decks accessible to individuals. Where space limitations make deck rails impractical, hand...

  2. 46 CFR 28.810 - Deck rails, lifelines, storm rails and hand grabs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Deck rails, lifelines, storm rails and hand grabs. 28..., storm rails and hand grabs. (a) Except as otherwise provided in paragraph (d) of this section, deck... weather decks accessible to individuals. Where space limitations make deck rails impractical, hand...

  3. 46 CFR 28.410 - Deck rails, lifelines, storm rails, and hand grabs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Deck rails, lifelines, storm rails, and hand grabs. 28..., lifelines, storm rails, and hand grabs. (a) Except as otherwise provided in paragraph (d) of this section... weather decks accessible to individuals. Where space limitations make deck rails impractical, hand...

  4. 46 CFR 28.810 - Deck rails, lifelines, storm rails and hand grabs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Deck rails, lifelines, storm rails and hand grabs. 28..., storm rails and hand grabs. (a) Except as otherwise provided in paragraph (d) of this section, deck... weather decks accessible to individuals. Where space limitations make deck rails impractical, hand...

  5. 46 CFR 28.410 - Deck rails, lifelines, storm rails, and hand grabs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Deck rails, lifelines, storm rails, and hand grabs. 28..., lifelines, storm rails, and hand grabs. (a) Except as otherwise provided in paragraph (d) of this section... weather decks accessible to individuals. Where space limitations make deck rails impractical, hand...

  6. Supplemental Report: Technetium-99 On-Line Monitoring by Beta Counting for Hanford Supernate Waste Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Sigg, R.A.

    2000-08-23

    SRTC is investigating approaches for near-real-time monitoring of 99Tc at selected points in the proposed pretreatment process for Hanford supernate waste solutions. The desired monitoring points include both the feed to and decontaminated product from a technetium-removal column. A Cs-removal column precedes technetium decontamination in the proposed process. Our earlier report (Ref. 1) showed that a simple flow-through beta counting system can easily meet 99Tc detection limit goals for solutions that do not contain interfering radionuclides; however, concentrations of residual interferences were too high in process solutions at the desired monitoring points. That is, technetium can not be measured without additional purification. In this supplement, ADS evaluated ion exchange cartridges to remove radionuclides that interfere with 99Tc beta measurements. Tests on radioactive standard solutions and on Hanford Envelope B (AZ-102) pretreated process solutions show that 99Tc passes through the cation removal cartridge to an on-line beta counter, and that interfering radionuclides were nearly totally removed. Envelope B solutions included both the process's Cs-removed feed to the Tc-removal column and product from the column. Analyses of these solutions before and after the cation exchange cartridge show that the concentration of the primary interference, 137Cs, was reduced to about 1/250th of the feed concentration.

  7. Tank 49H salt batch supernate qualification for ARP/MCU

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C. A.; Peters, T.; Fink, S.; Foster, T.

    2008-08-25

    This report covers the laboratory testing and analyses of Tank 49H Qualification Sample Sets A and C, performed in support of initial radioactive operations of Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Major goals of this work include checking that Tank 49H was well mixed after the last receipt of Tank 23H, characterizing Tank 49H supernate after solids are settled so that its composition can be compared to waste acceptance and hazard criteria, verifying actinide and strontium adsorption with a small scale test using monosodium titanate (MST) and filtration, checking MCU solvent performance when applied to the liquid produced from MST contact, and verifying that in-tank settling after a minimum of 30 days was at least as good or better at reducing solids content after a Tank 49H to Tank 50H transfer occurred than what was observed in less time in the lab. The first four items were covered by Sample Set A. The fifth item was covered by Sample Set C, which had several analyses after compositing as required in the nuclear criticality safety evaluation (NCSE).

  8. Effective Swimmer’s Action during the Grab Start Technique

    PubMed Central

    Mourão, Luis; de Jesus, Karla; Roesler, Hélio; Machado, Leandro J.; Fernandes, Ricardo J.; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo; Vaz, Mário A. P.

    2015-01-01

    The external forces applied in swimming starts have been often studied, but using direct analysis and simple interpretation data processes. This study aimed to develop a tool for vertical and horizontal force assessment based on the swimmers’ propulsive and structural forces (passive forces due to dead weight) applied during the block phase. Four methodological pathways were followed: the experimented fall of a rigid body, the swimmers’ inertia effect, the development of a mathematical model to describe the outcome of the rigid body fall and its generalization to include the effects of the inertia, and the experimental swimmers’ starting protocol analysed with the inclusion of the developed mathematical tool. The first three methodological steps resulted in the description and computation of the passive force components. At the fourth step, six well-trained swimmers performed three 15 m maximal grab start trials and three-dimensional (3D) kinetic data were obtained using a six degrees of freedom force plate. The passive force contribution to the start performance obtained from the model was subtracted from the experimental force due to the swimmers resulting in the swimmers’ active forces. As expected, the swimmers’ vertical and horizontal active forces accounted for the maximum variability contribution of the experimental forces. It was found that the active force profile for the vertical and horizontal components resembled one another. These findings should be considered in clarifying the active swimmers’ force variability and the respective geometrical profile as indicators to redefine steering strategies. PMID:25978370

  9. Presence of unsedimented precipitate in visually non-turbid supernates in the heparin-manganese method for HDL-cholesterol quantitation.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Z; Simo, I E; Ooi, T C; Meuffels, M; Hindmarsh, J T

    1986-08-01

    An inherent problem with the heparin-manganese precipitation procedure for high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) quantitation is the inability to sediment all the precipitated lipoproteins, especially in hypertriglyceridemic samples. This results in overestimation of HDL-C. Thus ultrafiltration has been recommended for turbid supernates. We have investigated 47 non-turbid supernates for possible presence of unsedimented precipitate. Optical turbidity in these samples was found to correlate with the serum triglyceride level. With ultrafiltration of the supernates, there was a significant decrease in cholesterol, optical turbidity and apoprotein A-I. The percent change in turbidity correlated with the percent change in cholesterol. There was also correlation between percent change in cholesterol and the prefiltration supernate turbidity. These results indicate that visually clear supernates may show optical turbidity; the turbidity is likely due to triglyceride-rich particles, which contain cholesterol; the fall in cholesterol with ultrafiltration is due to removal of these floating particles and some adsorbance of HDL particles to the filters. PMID:3093118

  10. Experimental Determination and Thermodynamic Modeling of Electrical Conductivity of SRS Waste Tank Supernate

    SciTech Connect

    Pike, J.; Reboul, S.

    2015-06-01

    SRS High Level Waste Tank Farm personnel rely on conductivity probes for detection of incipient overflow conditions in waste tanks. Minimal information is available concerning the sensitivity that must be achieved such that that liquid detection is assured. Overly sensitive electronics results in numerous nuisance alarms for these safety-related instruments. In order to determine the minimum sensitivity required of the probe, Tank Farm Engineering personnel need adequate conductivity data to improve the existing designs. Little or no measurements of liquid waste conductivity exist; however, the liquid phase of the waste consists of inorganic electrolytes for which the conductivity may be calculated. Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Tank Farm Facility Engineering requested SRNL to determine the conductivity of the supernate resident in SRS waste Tank 40 experimentally as well as computationally. In addition, SRNL was requested to develop a correlation, if possible, that would be generally applicable to liquid waste resident in SRS waste tanks. A waste sample from Tank 40 was analyzed for composition and electrical conductivity as shown in Table 4-6, Table 4-7, and Table 4-9. The conductivity for undiluted Tank 40 sample was 0.087 S/cm. The accuracy of OLI Analyzer™ was determined using available literature data. Overall, 95% of computed estimates of electrical conductivity are within ±15% of literature values for component concentrations from 0 to 15 M and temperatures from 0 to 125 °C. Though the computational results are generally in good agreement with the measured data, a small portion of literature data deviates as much as ±76%. A simplified model was created that can be used readily to estimate electrical conductivity of waste solution in computer spreadsheets. The variability of this simplified approach deviates up to 140% from measured values. Generally, this model can be applied to estimate the conductivity within a factor of two. The comparison of the

  11. Development of a new Global RAdiation Belt model: GRAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicard-Piet, Angelica; Lazaro, Didier; Maget, Vincent; Rolland, Guy; Ecoffet, Robert; Bourdarie, Sébastien; Boscher, Daniel; Standarovski, Denis

    2016-07-01

    The well known AP8 and AE8 NASA models are commonly used in the industry to specify the radiation belt environment. Unfortunately, there are some limitations in the use of these models, first due to the covered energy range, but also because in some regions of space, there are discrepancies between the predicted average values and the measurements. Therefore, our aim is to develop a radiation belt model, covering a large region of space and energy, from LEO altitudes to GEO and above, and from plasma to relativistic particles. The aim for the first version is to correct the AP8 and AE8 models where they are deficient or not defined. At geostationary, we developed ten years ago for electrons the IGE-2006 model which was proven to be more accurate than AE8, and used commonly in the industry, covering a broad energy range, from 1keV to 5MeV. From then, a proton model for geostationary orbit was also developed for material applications, followed by the OZONE model covering a narrower energy range but the whole outer electron belt, a SLOT model to asses average electron values for 2GRAB model, as Global Radiation Belt model. We will present first beta version during this conference.

  12. Mass load estimation errors utilizing grab sampling strategies in a karst watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fogle, A.W.; Taraba, J.L.; Dinger, J.S.

    2003-01-01

    Developing a mass load estimation method appropriate for a given stream and constituent is difficult due to inconsistencies in hydrologic and constituent characteristics. The difficulty may be increased in flashy flow conditions such as karst. Many projects undertaken are constrained by budget and manpower and do not have the luxury of sophisticated sampling strategies. The objectives of this study were to: (1) examine two grab sampling strategies with varying sampling intervals and determine the error in mass load estimates, and (2) determine the error that can be expected when a grab sample is collected at a time of day when the diurnal variation is most divergent from the daily mean. Results show grab sampling with continuous flow to be a viable data collection method for estimating mass load in the study watershed. Comparing weekly, biweekly, and monthly grab sampling, monthly sampling produces the best results with this method. However, the time of day the sample is collected is important. Failure to account for diurnal variability when collecting a grab sample may produce unacceptable error in mass load estimates. The best time to collect a sample is when the diurnal cycle is nearest the daily mean.

  13. 60-Day waste compatibility safety issues and final results for AY-102 grab samples

    SciTech Connect

    Nuzum, J.L.

    1997-01-31

    Four grab samples (2AY-96-15, 2AY-96-16, 2AY-96-17, and 2AY-96-18) were taken from Riser 15D of Tank 241-AY-102 on October 8, 1996, and received by 222-S Laboratory on October 8, 1996. These samples were analyzed in accordance with Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) and Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) in support of the Waste Compatibility Program. No notifications were required based on sample results.

  14. 60-day waste compatibility safety issues and final results for TX-244 grab samples

    SciTech Connect

    Nuzum, J.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-05

    Three grab samples (244-TX-96-1, 244-TX-96-2, and 244-TX-96-3) were taken from Riser 8 of Tank 241-TX-244 on October 18, 1996, and received by 222-S Laboratory on October 18, 1996. These samples were analyzed in accordance with Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) and Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) in support ofthe Waste Compatibility Program. Notifications were made in accordance with TSAP for pH and OH- analyses. Upon further review, the pH notification was deemed unnecessary, as the notification limit did not apply to this tank.

  15. Ion exchange removal of cesium from simulated and actual supernate from Hanford tanks 241-SY-101 and 241-SY-103

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.N.; Bontha, J.R.; Carlson, C.D.

    1995-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), in conjunction with the Process Chemistry and Statistics Section of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), conducted this study as part of the Supernatant Treatment Development Task for the Initial Pretreatment Module (IPM) Applied Engineering Project. The study assesses the performance of the CS-100 ion exchange material for removing cesium from simulated and actual alkaline supernate from Hanford tanks 241-SY-101 and 241-SY-103. The objective of these experiments is to compare the cesium ion exchange loading and elution profiles of actual and simulated wastes. Specific experimental objectives include (1) demonstration of decontamination factors (DF) for cesium removal, 92) verification of simulant performance, (3) investigation of waste/exchanger chemistry, and (4) determination of the radionuclide content of the regenerated CS-100 resin prior to disposal.

  16. 40 CFR 91.423 - Exhaust gas analytical system; CVS grab sample.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... sample. 91.423 Section 91.423 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Procedures § 91.423 Exhaust gas analytical system; CVS grab sample. (a) Schematic drawings. Figure 4 in...) The CLD (or HCLD) requires that the nitrogen dioxide present in the sample be converted to...

  17. 40 CFR 90.423 - Exhaust gas analytical system; CVS grab sample.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... sample. 90.423 Section 90.423 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.423 Exhaust gas analytical system; CVS grab sample. (a) Schematic... following requirements: (1) The CLD (or HCLD) requires that the nitrogen dioxide present in the sample...

  18. Using SPMDs for monitoring hydrophobic organic compounds in urban river water in Korea compared with using conventional water grab samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, Un-Jung; Kim, Hee Young; Alvarez, David A.; Lee, In-Seok; Oh, Jeong-Eun

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to verify the effectiveness of semi-permeablemembrane devices (SPMDs) formonitoring hydrophobic organic compounds, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), that are not easy to detect using conventional grab samples (because of their low concentrations), in water.We used SPMDs and grab samples to monitor PCBs and PBDEs upstream and downstream of a sewage treatment plant (STP) in the Suyeong River in Busan, Korea. Concentrations in three different phases (freely dissolved, apparently dissolved, and particulate) were measured, to investigate the aquatic fate of PCBs and PBDEs. The freely dissolved (SPMD) concentrations were 2–3 times higher than the apparently dissolved and particulate phase (grab sample) concentrations. No meaningful relationships were found between the total PCB and PBDE concentrations of the grab sample and SPMD sample because of the different partitioning behaviors and detection frequencies of the individual chemicals. However, the summed concentrations of specific PCB and PBDE congeners (that were abundant in all samples) in the grab and SPMD samples correlated well (r2 = 0.7451 for PCBs 28 + 52 + 153, r2 = 0.9987 for PBDEs 28 + 47 + 99). The PBDE concentrations measured using SPMDs decreased with increasing distance from the STP, but no apparent dilution effect was found in the grab samples. Our results show that SPMDs could be used to support grab sampling for specific chemicals, or to trace chemical sources (such as STPs) to the aquatic environment.

  19. Using SPMDs for monitoring hydrophobic organic compounds in urban river water in Korea compared with using conventional water grab samples.

    PubMed

    Kim, Un-Jung; Kim, Hee Young; Alvarez, David; Lee, In-Seok; Oh, Jeong-Eun

    2014-02-01

    We aimed to verify the effectiveness of semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMDs) for monitoring hydrophobic organic compounds, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), that are not easy to detect using conventional grab samples (because of their low concentrations), in water. We used SPMDs and grab samples to monitor PCBs and PBDEs upstream and downstream of a sewage treatment plant (STP) in the Suyeong River in Busan, Korea. Concentrations in three different phases (freely dissolved, apparently dissolved, and particulate) were measured, to investigate the aquatic fate of PCBs and PBDEs. The freely dissolved (SPMD) concentrations were 2-3 times higher than the apparently dissolved and particulate phase (grab sample) concentrations. No meaningful relationships were found between the total PCB and PBDE concentrations of the grab sample and SPMD sample because of the different partitioning behaviors and detection frequencies of the individual chemicals. However, the summed concentrations of specific PCB and PBDE congeners (that were abundant in all samples) in the grab and SPMD samples correlated well (r(2)=0.7451 for PCBs 28+52+153, r(2)=0.9987 for PBDEs 28+47+99). The PBDE concentrations measured using SPMDs decreased with increasing distance from the STP, but no apparent dilution effect was found in the grab samples. Our results show that SPMDs could be used to support grab sampling for specific chemicals, or to trace chemical sources (such as STPs) to the aquatic environment. PMID:23845507

  20. COMPARISON OF FOUR ARTIFICIAL SUBSTRATES AND THE PONAR GRAB FOR BENTHIC INVERTEBRATE COLLECTION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, Keith V.; Ferreira, Rodger F.; Averett, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    Four different bottom-placed artificial substrates were compared with the Ponar grab for collecting benthic invertebrates. Artificial substrate samples of organisms were larger and more diverse than those of the grab. Barbeque Basket samplers caught the most taxa and individuals and Beak Trays caught the least. Chironomids and crustaceans were dominant in artificial substrate samples. Exposure habitat (left or right bank) determined taxa availability, whereas sampler design determined suitability for colonization by the taxa. Diversity for Beak Tray samples was lower than that for other artificial substrates but higher than for Ponar samples. The Barbeque Basket, Bull Basket, and Multiple Plate samples were taxonomically similar. Ponar samples were different, and Beak Trays were of intermediate similarity. Additional study results are discussed.

  1. Capillarity driven contact line motion in cyclic bridge-drop grab-release events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Lengerich, Henrik; Steen, Paul

    2009-11-01

    Motivated by a reversible adhesion device which uses capillary forces to adhere to a substrate, we study the mechanical work done in a grab-release cycle. That is, the volume of a drop is increased until it grabs the substrate and forms a bridge and then shrunk until it goes unstable and releases from the substrate and forms a drop again. In the instant that a drop becomes a bridge (or vice versa) no work is done on the system, however, energy is dissipated due to the decrease in interfacial energy. This dissipation can be compared with the mechanical dissipation based on the fluid flow. For viscous fluids, a wedge model shows that most of the dissipation occurs in the vicinity of the contact line. The thermodynamic dissipation is compared with that expected in the fluid without the need of static contact angle or slip length.

  2. A comparison of surface-grab and cross sectionally integrated stream-water-quality sampling methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, G.R.; Smoot, J.L.; White, K.D.

    1992-01-01

    Stream sampling for water quality data has commonly employed simple surface-grab procedures as opposed to more involved, cross sectionally integrated techniques. Paired samples for analysis of selected constituents were collected over various flow conditions at four sites to evaluate differences between the two sampling methods. Concentrations of dissolved constituents were not consistently different. However, concentrations of suspended sediment and the total forms of some sediment-associated constituents, such as phosphorus, iron, and manganese, were significantly lower in the surface-grab samples than in the cross sectionally integrated samples. The largest median percent difference in concentration for a site was 60% (total recoverable manganese). Median percent differences in concentration for sediment-associated constituents considering all sites grouped were in the range of 20-25%. The surface-grab samples underrepresented concentrations of suspended sediment and some sediment-associated constituents, thus limiting the applicability of such data for certain purposes. An association was also demonstrated between site streamflow characteristics and the observed differences.

  3. GRAbB: Selective Assembly of Genomic Regions, a New Niche for Genomic Research

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; van Diepeningen, Anne D.; van der Lee, Theo A. J.; Waalwijk, Cees; de Hoog, G. Sybren

    2016-01-01

    GRAbB (Genomic Region Assembly by Baiting) is a new program that is dedicated to assemble specific genomic regions from NGS data. This approach is especially useful when dealing with multi copy regions, such as mitochondrial genome and the rDNA repeat region, parts of the genome that are often neglected or poorly assembled, although they contain interesting information from phylogenetic or epidemiologic perspectives, but also single copy regions can be assembled. The program is capable of targeting multiple regions within a single run. Furthermore, GRAbB can be used to extract specific loci from NGS data, based on homology, like sequences that are used for barcoding. To make the assembly specific, a known part of the region, such as the sequence of a PCR amplicon or a homologous sequence from a related species must be specified. By assembling only the region of interest, the assembly process is computationally much less demanding and may lead to assemblies of better quality. In this study the different applications and functionalities of the program are demonstrated such as: exhaustive assembly (rDNA region and mitochondrial genome), extracting homologous regions or genes (IGS, RPB1, RPB2 and TEF1a), as well as extracting multiple regions within a single run. The program is also compared with MITObim, which is meant for the exhaustive assembly of a single target based on a similar query sequence. GRAbB is shown to be more efficient than MITObim in terms of speed, memory and disk usage. The other functionalities (handling multiple targets simultaneously and extracting homologous regions) of the new program are not matched by other programs. The program is available with explanatory documentation at https://github.com/b-brankovics/grabb. GRAbB has been tested on Ubuntu (12.04 and 14.04), Fedora (23), CentOS (7.1.1503) and Mac OS X (10.7). Furthermore, GRAbB is available as a docker repository: brankovics/grabb (https://hub.docker.com/r/brankovics/grabb/). PMID

  4. Power Grab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Paula

    2009-01-01

    Peter Pistorino says there is a name for the way he thinks a school district should launch an energy conservation initiative: an "envelope" approach. The term refers to looking at the outside package of a structure to check for inefficiencies: Examine the observable, external sources of energy loss such as the doors, windows, insulation, and…

  5. Grab Bag

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article presents brief items of interest to counselors and students. It presents a preview of internships and how to build careers for veterans. It also features the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program which helps an individual to repay federal student loans with public service. Lastly, it presents data from the most recent survey for the…

  6. Estimating the biological value of soft-bottom sediments with sediment profile imaging and grab sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hoey, Gert; Birchenough, Silvana N. R.; Hostens, Kris

    2014-02-01

    Biological value estimation is based on a set of assessment questions and several thresholds to delineate areas of ecological importance (e.g. biodiversity). An existing framework, that was specifically designed to assess the ecosystem biodiversity, was expanded by adding new questions on the productivity, functionality and biogeochemical status of benthic habitats. The additional ecological and sedimentological information was collected by using sediment profile imagery (SPI) and grab sampling. Additionally, information on the performance and comparability of both techniques is provided in this study. The research idea was tested at a site near the harbor of Zeebrugge, an area under consideration as a new disposal site for dredged material from the harbor entrance. The sedimentology of the area can be adequately described based on the information from both SPI and Van Veen grab samples, but only the SPI revealed structural information on the physical habitat (layering, a-RPD). The latter information represented the current status of the benthic habitat, which was confirmed by the Van Veen grab samples. All information was summarized through the biological valuation framework, and provided clear evidence of the differences in biological value for the different sediment types within the area. We concluded that the installation of a new dredged material disposal site in this area was not in conflict with the benthic ecology. This area has a low biological value and the benthic system is adapted to changing conditions, which was signaled by the dominance of mobile, short living and opportunistic species. This study showed that suitable sedimentological and ecological information can be gathered by these traditional and complementary techniques, to estimate the biological value of an area in the light of marine spatial planning and environmental impact assessments.

  7. Body Composition and Kinematic Analysis of the Grab Start in Youth Swimmers

    PubMed Central

    Alptekin, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to compare the kinematic variables in youth swimmers during the grab start between sexes and to investigate the relationship between body composition and kinematic variables of the participants. Six female (Mage = 13.71 ± 0.49 yrs) and seven male (Mage = 14.00 ± 1.07 yrs) swimmers participated in this study. All participants were required to perform grab start tests in random order (three trials by each participant), while the best attempt was analyzed. Nineteen kinematic parameters consisting of block time, flight time, flight distance, total time, total distance, horizontal and vertical displacement of the center of mass (CM) at take-off, horizontal and vertical displacement of the CM at entry, height of take-off and entry, relative height of take-off, horizontal and vertical velocity of the CM at take-off, horizontal and vertical velocity of the CM at entry, angle of take-off, angle of entry and angle of knee at block were analyzed. Out of the 19 evaluated kinematic parameters, a statistical difference between the female and male group was found only in the total distance. Therefore, both female and male groups are considered as only one group and merged after analyzing the results. Statistical analysis showed positive and negative correlations between horizontal / vertical velocity of CM at take-off and several kinematic variables (e.g. angle of entry (rhorizontal = −.868, p=.000 / rvertical = .591, p=.02), total distance (rhorizontal = .594, p=.02 / rvertical = .54, p=.04), and height of take-off (rvertical = .888, p=.000), respectively). On the other hand, positive and negative correlations were found between somatotype components and several kinematic variables (e.g. horizontal displacement of CM at entry (rendomorphy = −.626, p=.013), angle of entry (rmesomorphy = −.686, p=.005 / rectomorphy = .52, p=.047), total distance (rendomorphy = −.626, p=.012), and height of take-off (rendomorphy = −.633, p=.011

  8. Procedure manual for the estimation of average indoor radon-daughter concentrations using the radon grab-sampling method

    SciTech Connect

    George, J.L.

    1986-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology established the Technical Measurements Center to provide standardization, calibration, comparability, verification of data, quality assurance, and cost-effectiveness for the measurement requirements of DOE remedial action programs. One of the remedial-action measurement needs is the estimation of average indoor radon-daughter concentration. One method for accomplishing such estimations in support of DOE remedial action programs is the radon grab-sampling method. This manual describes procedures for radon grab sampling, with the application specifically directed to the estimation of average indoor radon-daughter concentration (RDC) in highly ventilated structures. This particular application of the measurement method is for cases where RDC estimates derived from long-term integrated measurements under occupied conditions are below the standard and where the structure being evaluated is considered to be highly ventilated. The radon grab-sampling method requires that sampling be conducted under standard maximized conditions. Briefly, the procedure for radon grab sampling involves the following steps: selection of sampling and counting equipment; sample acquisition and processing, including data reduction; calibration of equipment, including provisions to correct for pressure effects when sampling at various elevations; and incorporation of quality-control and assurance measures. This manual describes each of the above steps in detail and presents an example of a step-by-step radon grab-sampling procedure using a scintillation cell.

  9. REPORT ON ELECTROCHEMICAL CORROSION TESTING FOR TANK 241-AN-106 USING 2009 SAMPLING CAMPAIGN GRAB SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    WYRWAS RB

    2010-05-11

    Based on an ENRAF waste surface measurement taken February 1, 2009, double-shell tank (DST) 24l-AN-l06 (AN-106) contained approximately 278.98 inches (793 kgal) of waste. A zip cord measurement from the tank on February 1, 2009, indicated a settled solids layer of 9l.7 inches in height (280 kgal). The supernatant layer in February 2009, by difference, was approximately 187 inches deep (514 kgal). Laboratory results from AN-l06 February 1, 2009 (see Table 2) grab samples indicated the supernatant was below the chemistry limit that applied at the time as identified in HNF-SD-WM-TSR-006, 'Tank Farms Technical Safety Requirements', Administrative Control (AC) 5.16, 'Corrosion Mitigation Controls.' The limits have since been removed from the Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) and are captured in OSD-T-15l-00007, 'Operating Specifications for the Double-Shell Storage Tanks.' Problem evaluation request WRPS-PER-2009-0218 was submitted February 9,2009, to document the finding that the supernatant chemistry for grab samples taken from the middle and upper regions of the supernatant was noncompliant with the chemistry control limits. The lab results for the samples taken from the bottom region of the supernatant met AC 5.16 limits.

  10. Uncertainty in predictions of seabed sediment classes based on grab samples and acoustic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lark, Murray; Dove, Dayton; Green, Sophie; Stewart, Heather; Marchant, Ben; Diesing, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Mapping seabed habitats is an essential prerequisite to policy and management decisions. The texture of the seabed sediments, defined with respect to the proportions of gravel, sand and mud size fractions, is a basic property that distinguishes sedimentary seabed habitats under the EUNIS habitat classification scheme. EUNIS sediment habitats are defined on this 2-D texture triangle. The composition of the seabed sediments at an unsampled site can be predicted by additive log-ratio cokriging from grab samples, and it is possible to include acoustic backscatter and bathymetry data to improve the precision of these predictions. In this presentation we shall show how this is achieved. The prediction distribution on the texture triangle can be summarized to express the uncertainty of these kriging predictions. Probabilities can be computed for each EUNIS texture class, and the uncertainty expressed with respect either to the probability of the most probable class, or the information content of the set of class probabilities summarized by their entropy.

  11. RECOMMENDED OPERATING PROCEDURE NO. 56: COLLECTION OF GASEOUS GRAB SAMPLES FROM COMBUSTION SOURCES FOR NITROUS OXIDE MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document is a recommended operating procedure, prepare or use in research activities conducted by EPA's Air and Energy Engineering Research Laboratory (AEERL). The procedure applies to the collection of gaseous grab samples from fossil fuel combustion sources for subsequent a...

  12. Distributions of 14 elements on 60 selected absorbers from two simulant solutions (acid-dissolved sludge and alkaline supernate) for Hanford HLW Tank 102-SY

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.F.; Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M.

    1993-10-01

    Sixty commercially available or experimental absorber materials were evaluated for partitioning high-level radioactive waste. These absorbers included cation and anion exchange resins, inorganic exchangers, composite absorbers, and a series of liquid extractants sorbed on porous support-beads. The distributions of 14 elements onto each absorber were measured from simulated solutions that represent acid-dissolved sludge and alkaline supernate solutions from Hanford high-level waste (HLW) Tank 102-SY. The selected elements, which represent fission products (Ce, Cs, Sr, Tc, and Y); actinides (U, Pu, and Am); and matrix elements (Cr, Co, Fe, Mn, Zn, and Zr), were traced by radionuclides and assayed by gamma spectrometry. Distribution coefficients for each of the 1680 element/absorber/solution combinations were measured for dynamic contact periods of 30 min, 2 h, and 6 h to provide sorption kinetics information for the specified elements from these complex media. More than 5000 measured distribution coefficients are tabulated.

  13. Comparison of Grab, Air, and Surface Results for Radiation Site Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glassford, Eric Keith

    2011-12-01

    The use of proper sampling methods and sample types for evaluating sites believed to be contaminated with radioactive materials is necessary to avoid misrepresenting conditions at the site. This study was designed to investigate if the site characterization, based upon uranium contamination measured in different types of samples, is dependent upon the mass of the sample collected. A bulk sample of potentially contaminated interior dirt was collected from an abandoned metal processing mill that rolled uranium between 1948 and 1956. The original mill dates from 1910 and has a dirt floor. The bulk sample was a mixture of dirt, black and yellow particles of metal dust, and small fragments of natural debris. Small mass (approximately 0.75 grams (g)) and large mass (approximately 70g) grab samples were prepared from the bulk sample material to simulate collection of a "grab" type sample. Air sampling was performed by re-suspending a portion of the bulk sample material using a vibration table to simulate airborne contamination that might be present during site remediation. Additionally, samples of removable contaminated surface dust were collected on 47 mm diameter filter paper by wiping the surfaces of the exposure chamber used to resuspend the bulk material. Certified reference materials, one containing a precisely known quantity of U 3O8 and one containing a known quantity of natural uranium, were utilized to calibrate the gamma spectrometry measurement system. Non-destructive gamma spectrometry measurements were used to determine the content of uranium-235 (235U) at 185 keV and 143 keV, thorium-234 (234Th) at 63 keV, and protactinium-234m (234mPa) at 1001 keV in each sample. Measurement of natural uranium in small, 1 g samples is usually accomplished by radiochemical analysis in order to measure alpha particles emitted by 238U, 235U, and 234U. However, uranium in larger bulk samples can also be measured non-destructively using gamma spectrometry to detect the low

  14. Tank 241-AN-101, grab samples, 1AN-98-1, 1AN-98-2 and 1AN-98-3 analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect

    FULLER, R.K.

    1999-02-24

    This document is the final report for tank 241-AN-101 grab samples. Three grab samples 1AN-98-1, 1AN-98-2 and 1AN-98-3 were taken from riser 16 of tank 241-AN-101 on April 8, 1998 and received by the 222-S Laboratory on April 9, 1998. Analyses were performed in accordance with the ''Compatability Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan'' (TSAP) and the ''Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatability Program'' (DQO). The analytical results are presented in the data summary report. No notification limits were exceeded.

  15. Tank 241-U-103, grab samples 3U-99-1, 3u-99-2 and 3U-99-3

    SciTech Connect

    STEEN, F.H.

    1999-08-25

    This document is the final report for tank 241-U-103 grab samples. Three grab samples were collected from riser 13 on March 12, 1999 and received by the 222-S laboratory on March 15, 1999. Analyses were performed in accordance with the Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan for Fiscal year 1999 (TSAP) and the Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO). The analytical results are presented in the data summary report. None of the subsamples submitted for differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), total organic carbon (TOC) and plutonium 239 (Pu239) analyses exceeded the notification limits as stated in TSAP.

  16. Tank 241-S-304, Grab samples, 304S-98-1, 304S-98-2 and 304S-98-3 analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect

    STEEN, F.H.

    1999-02-23

    This document is the final report for tank 241-S-304 grab samples. Four grab samples were collected from riser 4 on July 30, 1998. Analyses were performed in accordance with the Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Sasaki, 1998) and the Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO). The analytical results are presented in the data summary report (Table 1). None of the subsamples submitted for differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), total organic carbon (TOC) and plutonium 239 (Pu239) analyses exceeded the notification limits as stated in TSAP (Saaaki, 1998).

  17. Advanced surface treatment and cleaning techniques for the US EPA method TO-14 grab sampling containers

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnec, J.

    1994-12-31

    Increased demands and an expanding list of toxic organic compounds, including oxygenated organics and other special groups, e.g., organic sulfur compounds, require modifications and improvements to the existing sampling and measurement hardware. One critical area is the passivated stainless steel surface of the grab sampling containers. The established and proven electropolishing (SUMMA passivation) works well for the sampling of hundreds of organic and inorganic volatile compounds. However, there are instances (i.e., some oxygenated organics) where the normal passivation falls short of the required stability and storability requirements. Recent R and D efforts show some promising avenues of improvement for the surface treatment and cleaning of the sampling containers. The passivated surface can be coated with several inorganic materials to enhance its performance. The initial work shows performance improvements for some groups of organics, but not an across-the-board enhancement. The effect of surface saturation with water vapor and other materials has also been investigated. Some novel surface cleaning techniques have been explored with encouraging results. This paper will attempt to bring the audience up to date on some of the above discussed efforts.

  18. Interaction of Helicobacter pylori with C-Type Lectin Dendritic Cell-Specific ICAM Grabbing Nonintegrin

    PubMed Central

    Miszczyk, Eliza; Rudnicka, Karolina; Moran, Anthony P.; Fol, Marek; Kowalewicz-Kulbat, Magdalena; Druszczyńska, Magdalena; Matusiak, Agnieszka; Walencka, Maria; Rudnicka, Wiesława; Chmiela, Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    In this study we asked whether Helicobacter pylori whole cells and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) utilize sugar moieties of Lewis (Le) antigenic determinants to interact with DC-SIGN (dendritic cell specific ICAM grabbing nonintegrin) receptor on dendritic cells (DCs). For this purpose the soluble DC-SIGN/Fc adhesion assay and the THP-1 leukemia cells with induced expression of DC-SIGN were used. We showed that the binding specificity of DC-SIGN with H. pylori LeX/Y positive whole cells and H. pylori LPS of LeX/Y type was fucose dependent, whereas in LeXY negative H. pylori strains and LPS preparations without Lewis determinants, this binding was galactose dependent. The binding of soluble synthetic LeX and LeY to the DC-SIGN-like receptor on THP-1 cells was also observed. In conclusion, the LeXY dependent as well as independent binding of H. pylori whole cells and H. pylori LPS to DC-SIGN was described. Moreover, we demonstrated that THP-1 cells may serve as an in vitro model for the assessment of H. pylori-DC-SIGN interactions mediated by LeX and LeY determinants. PMID:22550396

  19. Waste compatibility and final report for Tank 241-A-101, Grab Samples 1A-96-1, 1A-96-2, and 1A-96-3

    SciTech Connect

    Steen, F.H., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-25

    This document is the final report deliverable for tank 241-A- 101 grab samples. Three grab samples (IA-96-1, IA-96-2 and IA-96-3) were taken from riser 4 of tank 241-A-101. Samples were collected on April 3, 1996 and received by the 222-S Laboratory on April 4, 1996. Analyses were performed in accordance with the Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) and the Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO). The samples were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the TSAP. Two of the three grab samples contained a significant amount of solids and special analyses were requested. None of the samples exceeded notification limits. No similarities in sample appearance were noted; this could be an explanation for the varying analytical results. Quality control issues are discussed in each analytical subheading. The raw data for all analyses are included in this report.

  20. Characterization of the Tank 19F Closure Grab and Core Samples and the Tank 18F Dip Sample

    SciTech Connect

    Swingle, R.F.

    2002-05-02

    The results of analyses of the Tank 19F closure characterization samples are included herein. The samples analyzed include the two Tank 19F grab samples (FTF-075 and FTF-077) and a Tank 18F dip sample (FTF-076) taken in September 2001 and a Tank 19F core sample (FTF-118) taken in December 2001. The FTF-075 and FTF-077 grab samples were pulled from Tank 19F and the FTF-076 dip sample was pulled from Tank 18F in September 2001 as part of the characterization process for closure of Tank 19F. The samples were delivered to the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) Shielded Cells on September 28, 2001 and placed in the Shielded Cells on October 2, 2001. The samples were opened and both grab samples were found to contain plenty of material to allow completion of the analyses. The samples were dark and resembled marsh muck (see Figures 1 and 2). The dip sample was also found to contain plenty of material. The sample looked like muddy water (Figure 4). The FTF-118F core sample was pulled from Tank 19F in December 2001 as part of the characterization process for closure of the tank. The sample was delivered to the SRTC Shielded Cells on December 6, 2001 and placed in the Shielded Cells on December 7, 2001. The sample was opened and found to contain plenty of material to allow completion of the analyses. As evident in Figure 3, the sample resembled a somewhat drier version of the previous grab samples FTF-075 and FTF-077. A group consisting of SRTC Waste Processing Technology (WPT) section personnel and High Level Waste Engineering (HLWE) personnel viewed the sample when it was opened and came to the consensus that the sample appeared to be homogeneous. The decision was made to treat the sample as a single phase and analyze accordingly. Initially, small portions were archived from the top, middle and bottom of the sample in case it is later decided to analyze the levels of the sample separately. The analytical results from the two grab samples and the core sample were all

  1. Controls on Bacterial Concentrations in Sediment Grab Samples from the Hudson River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batta, J.; Mailloux, B. J.; Nitsche, F. O.; Kenna, T. C.; Ferguson, A. S.; Cheung, J.; Layton, A.

    2010-12-01

    High levels of fecal bacteria resulting from sewage-related pollution are often present in the Hudson River Estuary. Die-off of the fecal bacteria in surface waters is relatively rapid but the fecal bacteria can also attach to particles and settle. It is known that fecal bacteria are present in the shallow sediments but controls on their distribution have not been closely examined. The goal of this work is to examine the relationship between the concentration of fecal indicator bacteria and sediment properties including estimates of sediment age. Forty sediment surface grabs were obtained from the Hudson River Estuary. Twenty samples were collected from near the George Washington Bridge (GWB) and twenty samples from a 15 mile transect near Hudson New York. Concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria were determined by the cultured based Enterolert and Colilert tests (Idexx Laboratories) and molecular based techniques for E. coli and Bacteroides. Sediments were analyzed for total metals, total organic carbon, grain size, and gamma emitting radionuclides including Beryllium-7, Lead-210, and Cesium-137. Enterococcus was present in the samples with a geometric mean of 88 cells/g and a range of 4 to 817 cells /g. Culturable E. Coli was present in the samples with a geometric mean of 168 cells /g and a range of 5 to 2247 cells /g. Enterococcus concentrations were significantly higher (p<0.05) in the northern transect. Molecular based concentrations were determined for the GWB samples and were significantly higher than culture based concentrations. Bacteroides was present in the samples with a geometric mean of 1.1x106 copies/g and a range of 3.9x104 to 4.7x106 copies /g. Molecular E. Coli was present in the samples with a geometric mean of 3.0x106 copies/g and a range of 8.7x104 to 8.9x107 copies /g. The results clearly show that a significant amount of fecal bacteria are present in the sediments. Simple linear correlations between bacterial concentrations and sediment

  2. Analysis of isotopic signals in the Danube River water at Tulln, Austria, based on daily grab samples in 2012.

    PubMed

    Wyhlidal, Stefan; Rank, Dieter; Schott, Katharina; Heiss, Gerhard; Goetz, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Results of stable isotope measurements (δ(2)H, δ(18)O) of daily grab samples, taken from the Danube River at Tulln (river km 1963) during 2012, show seasonal and short-term variations depending on the climatic/hydrological conditions and changes in the catchment area (temperature changes, heavy rains and snow melt processes). Isotope ratios in river water clearly reflect the isotopic composition of precipitation water in the catchment area since evaporation influences play a minor role. Average δ(2)H and δ(18)O values in 2012 are-78‰ and-11.0‰, respectively, deuterium excess averages 10‰. The entire variation amounts to 1.8‰ in δ(18)O and 15‰ in δ(2)H. Quick changes of the isotopic composition within a few days emphasise the necessity of daily sampling for the investigation of hydrological events, while monthly grab sampling seems sufficient for the investigation of long-term hydro-climatic trends. (3)H results show peaks (half-width 1-2 days, up to about 150 TU) exceeding the regional environmental level of about 9 TU, probably due to releases from nuclear power plants. PMID:24678624

  3. Tank 241-AP-106, Grab samples, 6AP-98-1, 6AP-98-2 and 6AP-98-3 Analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect

    FULLER, R.K.

    1999-02-23

    This document is the final report for tank 241-AP-106 grab samples. Three grab samples 6AP-98-1, 6AP-98-2 and 6AP-98-3 were taken from riser 1 of tank 241-AP-106 on May 28, 1998 and received by the 222-S Laboratory on May 28, 1998. Analyses were performed in accordance with the ''Compatability Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan'' (TSAP) (Sasaki, 1998) and the ''Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatability Program (DQO). The analytical results are presented in the data summary report. No notification limits were exceeded. The request for sample analysis received for AP-106 indicated that the samples were polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) suspects. The results of this analysis indicated that no PCBs were present at the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) regulated limit of 50 ppm. The results and raw data for the PCB analysis are included in this document.

  4. Tank 241-AP-106, grab samples, 6AP-96-1 through 6AP-96-3 analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, R.A., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-12-11

    This document is the final report for tank 241-AP-106 grab samples. This document presents the analytical results for three samples (6AP-96-1, 6AP-96-2 and 6AP-96-3) taken from riser 1 @ 150{degrees} of tank 241-AP-1 06 on September 12, 1996. Analyses were performed in accordance with the Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Sasaki, 1996) and the Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) (Fowler, 1995).

  5. Tank 241-S-111 08/1999 Compatibility Grab Samples and Analytical Results for the Final Report [SEC 1 and SEC 2

    SciTech Connect

    STEEN, F.H.

    1999-12-01

    This document is the format IV, final report for the tank 241-S-111 (S-111) grab samples taken in August 1999 to address waste compatibility concerns. Chemical, radiochemical, and physical analyses on the tank S-111 samples were performed as directed in Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan for Fiscal Year 1999 (Sasaki 1999a,b). Any deviations from the instructions provided in the tank sampling and analysis plan (TSAP) were discussed in this narrative. The notification limit for {sup 137}Cs was exceeded on two samples. Results are discussed in Section 5.3.2. No other notification limits were exceeded.

  6. Concentration comparison of selected constituents between groundwater samples collected within the Missouri River alluvial aquifer using purge and pump and grab-sampling methods, near the city of Independence, Missouri, 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krempa, Heather M.

    2015-01-01

    Relative percent differences between methods were greater than 10 percent for most analyzed trace elements. Barium, cobalt, manganese, and boron had concentrations that were significantly different between sampling methods. Barium, molybdenum, boron, and uranium method concentrations indicate a close association between pump and grab samples based on bivariate plots and simple linear regressions. Grab sample concentrations were generally larger than pump concentrations for these elements and may be because of using a larger pore sized filter for grab samples. Analysis of zinc blank samples suggests zinc contamination in filtered grab samples. Variations of analyzed trace elements between pump and grab samples could reduce the ability to monitor temporal changes and potential groundwater contamination threats. The degree of precision necessary for monitoring potential groundwater threats and application objectives need to be considered when determining acceptable variation amounts.

  7. Characterization Of Supernate Samples From High Level Waste Tanks 13H, 30H, 37H, 39H, 45F, 46F and 49H

    SciTech Connect

    Stallings, M. E.; Barnes, M. J.; Peters, T. B.; Diprete, D. P.; Hobbs, D. T.; Fink, S. D.

    2005-06-15

    This document presents work conducted in support of technical needs expressed, in part, by the Engineering, Procurement, and Construction Contractor for the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The Department of Energy (DOE) requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyze and characterize supernate waste from seven selected High Level Waste (HLW) tanks to allow: classification of feed to be sent to the SWPF; verification that SWPF processes will be able to meet Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC); and updating of the Waste Characterization System (WCS) database. This document provides characterization data of samples obtained from Tanks 13H, 30H, 37H, 39H, 45F, 46F, and 49H and discusses results. Characterization of the waste tank samples involved several treatments and analysis at various stages of sample processing. These analytical stages included as-received liquid, post-dilution to 6.44 M sodium (target), post-acid digestion, post-filtration (at 3 filtration pore sizes), and after cesium removal using ammonium molybdophosphate (AMP). All tanks will require cesium removal as well as treatment with Monosodium Titanate (MST) for {sup 90}Sr (Strontium) decontamination. A small filtration effect for 90Sr was observed for six of the seven tank wastes. No filtration effects were observed for Pu (Plutonium), Np (Neptunium), U (Uranium), or Tc (Technetium); {sup 137}Cs (Cesium) concentration is ~E+09 pCi/mL for all the tank wastes. Tank 37H is significantly higher in {sup 90}Sr than the other six tanks. {sup 237}Np in the F-area tanks (45F and 46F) are at least 1 order of magnitude less than the H-Area tank wastes. The data indicate a constant ratio of {sup 99}Tc to Cs in the seven tank wastes. This indicates the Tc remains largely soluble in Savannah River Site (SRS) waste and partitions similarly with Cs. {sup 241}Am (Americium) concentration was low in the seven tank wastes. The majority of data were detection limit values, the largest being

  8. GrabBlur - a framework to facilitate the secure exchange of whole-exome and -genome SNV data using VCF files

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) of whole exomes or genomes is increasingly being used in human genetic research and diagnostics. Sharing NGS data with third parties can help physicians and researchers to identify causative or predisposing mutations for a specific sample of interest more efficiently. In many cases, however, the exchange of such data may collide with data privacy regulations. GrabBlur is a newly developed tool to aggregate and share NGS-derived single nucleotide variant (SNV) data in a public database, keeping individual samples unidentifiable. In contrast to other currently existing SNV databases, GrabBlur includes phenotypic information and contact details of the submitter of a given database entry. By means of GrabBlur human geneticists can securely and easily share SNV data from resequencing projects. GrabBlur can ease the interpretation of SNV data by offering basic annotations, genotype frequencies and in particular phenotypic information - given that this information was shared - for the SNV of interest. Tool description GrabBlur facilitates the combination of phenotypic and NGS data (VCF files) via a local interface or command line operations. Data submissions may include HPO (Human Phenotype Ontology) terms, other trait descriptions, NGS technology information and the identity of the submitter. Most of this information is optional and its provision at the discretion of the submitter. Upon initial intake, GrabBlur merges and aggregates all sample-specific data. If a certain SNV is rare, the sample-specific information is replaced with the submitter identity. Generally, all data in GrabBlur are highly aggregated so that they can be shared with others while ensuring maximum privacy. Thus, it is impossible to reconstruct complete exomes or genomes from the database or to re-identify single individuals. After the individual information has been sufficiently "blurred", the data can be uploaded into a publicly accessible domain where

  9. Results of a detailed infill lake-sediment survey in the Snow Lake area: Evaluation and comparison of grab sample and short core data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friske, P.W.B.

    1996-01-01

    As part of the Exploration Science and Technology Initiative (EXTECH) program a detailed infill lake-sediment and water survey was undertaken in the Snow Lake area during the fall of 1991. This involved the collection of 346 lake sediment grab samples and concomitant waters. In 1993, additional work was undertaken involving the collection of 23 short cores from selected grab sample sites. The primary objectives of the infill survey and short core work were to: 1) evaluate the effectiveness of lake sediment geochemistry in detecting known mineralization in the Snow Lake area; 2) evaluate and develop new approaches in the use of lake sediment geochemistry; and, 3) define, if possible, new exploration targets. At most sites, data from the cores verify the original grab sample results. However, at a few sites the original anomalous grab sample results are interpreted as being related to contamination as opposed to naturally elevated levels. An unusually thick sequence of contaminated surface sediments with extremely high concentrations of trace metals is a likely contributing factor, a condition which is restricted to lakes in the immediate vicinity of local anthropogenic activity. Collection of lake cores provides a useful new approach to the follow-up of grab sample data and to the application of lake sediment geochemistry, particularly in areas with significant local contamination. Much of the known mineralization in the area is clearly reflected by the lake sediment data. Character of the anomalies mirror the composition of the nearby mineralization. The lake sediment data also identify a number of areas that warrant further investigation, several of which are discussed.

  10. A Framework for Applying Point Clouds Grabbed by Multi-Beam LIDAR in Perceiving the Driving Environment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Liang, Huawei; Wang, Zhiling; Chen, Xiangcheng

    2015-01-01

    The quick and accurate understanding of the ambient environment, which is composed of road curbs, vehicles, pedestrians, etc., is critical for developing intelligent vehicles. The road elements included in this work are road curbs and dynamic road obstacles that directly affect the drivable area. A framework for the online modeling of the driving environment using a multi-beam LIDAR, i.e., a Velodyne HDL-64E LIDAR, which describes the 3D environment in the form of a point cloud, is reported in this article. First, ground segmentation is performed via multi-feature extraction of the raw data grabbed by the Velodyne LIDAR to satisfy the requirement of online environment modeling. Curbs and dynamic road obstacles are detected and tracked in different manners. Curves are fitted for curb points, and points are clustered into bundles whose form and kinematics parameters are calculated. The Kalman filter is used to track dynamic obstacles, whereas the snake model is employed for curbs. Results indicate that the proposed framework is robust under various environments and satisfies the requirements for online processing. PMID:26404290

  11. A Framework for Applying Point Clouds Grabbed by Multi-Beam LIDAR in Perceiving the Driving Environment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Liang, Huawei; Wang, Zhiling; Chen, Xiangcheng

    2015-01-01

    The quick and accurate understanding of the ambient environment, which is composed of road curbs, vehicles, pedestrians, etc., is critical for developing intelligent vehicles. The road elements included in this work are road curbs and dynamic road obstacles that directly affect the drivable area. A framework for the online modeling of the driving environment using a multi-beam LIDAR, i.e., a Velodyne HDL-64E LIDAR, which describes the 3D environment in the form of a point cloud, is reported in this article. First, ground segmentation is performed via multi-feature extraction of the raw data grabbed by the Velodyne LIDAR to satisfy the requirement of online environment modeling. Curbs and dynamic road obstacles are detected and tracked in different manners. Curves are fitted for curb points, and points are clustered into bundles whose form and kinematics parameters are calculated. The Kalman filter is used to track dynamic obstacles, whereas the snake model is employed for curbs. Results indicate that the proposed framework is robust under various environments and satisfies the requirements for online processing. PMID:26404290

  12. Spatial and temporal distribution of Au and other trace elements in an estuary using the diffusive gradients in thin films technique and grab sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Andrew R.; Salmon, S. Ursula; Rate, Andrew W.; Larsen, Sarah; Kilminster, Kieryn

    2015-12-01

    This study reports the first surface water evaluation of the temporal and spatial variability of Au in an estuary, using recently developed modifications to the diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) and grab sampling techniques. At the two study sites in the Swan River estuary that were more marine in character, the DGT-measured concentrations of Au (26.3 and 31.3 ng/L) were within the range of total concentrations measured on individual days (13.2-30.6 ng/L and 11.2-37.2 ng/L, respectively). In contrast, at an upstream site, Au concentrations measured by DGT were significantly lower than totals (3.9 ng/L for DGT, compared with 13.2-28.8 ng/L for grab sampling), likely due to either size exclusion of colloids (>70 nm) by DGT or formation of a dissolved, non-DGT-labile Au species (<0.45 μm). DGT-measured concentrations of other metals (Cu, Co, Cr, U, V, Mo and As) were also lower than total concentrations, although in contrast to DGT-measured Au, this phenomenon occurred at all sites. Furthermore, daily grab samples for Au, taken over the 10-day deployment (which included a rain event), showed that Au concentrations could spike substantially (from 15.1 ng/L to 37.2 ng/L) over intervals as short as one day. The combination of simultaneous deployment of different DGT devices and grab sampling represents a new development in efforts to understand the transport and fate of Au together with other elements in dynamic environments such as estuaries.

  13. Final report for tank 241-AP-108, grab samples 8AP-96-1, 8AP-96-2 and 8AP-96-FB

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, R.A.

    1996-04-19

    This document is the final report deliverable for the tank 241-AP-108 grab samples. The samples were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the TSAP. Included in this report are the results for the Waste Compatibility analyses, with the exception of DSC and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) results which were presented in the 45 Day report (Part 2 of this document). The raw data for all analyses, with the exception of DSC and TGA, are also included in this report.

  14. Tank 241-AP-107, grab samples 7AP-97-1, 7AP-97-2 and 7AP-97-3 analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect

    Steen, F.H.

    1997-12-22

    This document is the final report for tank 241-AP-107 grab samples. Three grab samples were collected from riser 1 on September 11, 1997. Analyses were performed on samples 7AP-97-1, 7AP-97-2 and 7AP-97-3 in accordance with the Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Sasaki, 1997) and the Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) (Rev. 1: Fowler, 1995; Rev. 2: Mulkey and Nuier, 1997). The analytical results are presented in the data summary report (Table 1). A notification was made to East Tank Farms Operations concerning low hydroxide in the tank and a hydroxide (caustic) demand analysis was requested. The request for sample analysis (RSA) (Attachment 2) received for AP-107 indicated that the samples were polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) suspects. Therefore, prior to performing the requested analyses, aliquots were made to perform PCB analysis in accordance with the 222-S Laboratory administrative procedure, LAP-101-100. The results of this analysis indicated that no PCBs were present at 50 ppm and analysis proceeded as non-PCB samples. The results and raw data for the PCB analysis will be included in a revision to this document. The sample breakdown diagrams (Attachment 1) are provided as a cross-reference for relating the tank farm customer identification numbers with the 222-S Laboratory sample numbers and the portion of sample analyzed.

  15. Characterizing mineral dusts and other aerosols from the Middle East--Part 2: grab samples and re-suspensions.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, Johann P; McDonald, Eric V; Gillies, John A; Jayanty, R K M Jay; Casuccio, Gary; Gertler, Alan W

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of the Enhanced Particulate Matter Surveillance Program was to provide scientifically founded information on the chemical and physical properties of dust collected during a period of approximately 1 year in Djibouti, Afghanistan (Bagram, Khowst), Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Iraq (Balad, Baghdad, Tallil, Tikrit, Taji, Al Asad), and Kuwait (northern, central, coastal, and southern regions). To fully understand mineral dusts, their chemical and physical properties, as well as mineralogical inter-relationships, were accurately established. In addition to the ambient samples, bulk soil samples were collected at each of the 15 sites. In each case, approximately 1 kg of soil from the top 10 mm at a previously undisturbed area near the aerosol sampling site was collected. The samples were air-dried and sample splits taken for soil analysis. Further sample splits were sieved to separate the < 38 micro m particle fractions for mineralogical analysis. Examples of major-element and trace-element chemistry, mineralogy, and other physical properties of the 15 grab samples are presented. The purpose of the trace-element analysis was to measure levels of potentially harmful metals while the major-element and ion-chemistry analyses provided an estimate of mineral components. X-ray diffractometry provided a measure of the mineral content of the dust. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy was used to analyze chemical composition of small individual particles. From similarities in the chemistry and mineralogy of re-suspended and ambient sample sets, it is evident that portions of the ambient dust are from local soils. PMID:19235611

  16. FINAL REPORT FOR THE INITIAL SOLID PHASE CHARACTERIZATION OF THE 2011 GRAB SAMPLES AND COMPOSITE FOR THE C-109 HARD HEEL STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    PAGE JS; COOKE G; PESTOVICH JA

    2011-12-01

    On May 3, 2011, solid phase characterization subsamples were taken from six of the eight grab samples that had been collected from tank 241-C-109 in April, 2011 and delivered to the 222-S Laboratory. These subsamples were characterized in order to guide the creation of the composite for the C-109 hard heel study. Visual observation showed that there was a large variability in the physical characteristics of the eight individual grab samples. Several of the grab samples consisted of 'stone-like' cobbles (several > 25 mm in diameter) while the other grab samples were of a finer granular composition referred to as 'bulk material'. Half of the six subsamples taken for this initial SPC were of crushed cobbles and half were of the bulk material. Scanning electron microscopy was performed on all six subsamples, and X-ray diffraction was performed on all three of the 'bulk material' samples and one of the crushed cobble samples. The crushed cobbles were found to be composed primarily of gibbsite (Al[OHh]{sub 3}). Analysis by X-ray diffraction indicated gibbsite to be the only crystalline phase detected, and scanning electron microscopy showed the crushed cobbles to consist primarily of aggregates of euhedral to subhedral gibbsite crystals that were 20 to 100 {mu}m in size. The aggregates, having a moderate amount of pore space, were cemented primarily by recrystallized gibbsite making them resistant to crushing. The bulk material consisted of coarse to fine-grained pebble-sized (2 to 20 mm) particles. The X-ray diffraction analysis showed them to be a mixture of natrophosphate (Na{sub 7}[PO{sub 4}]{sub 2}F{center_dot}19[H{sub 2}O]) and gibbsite crystals in varying amounts in each of the three subsamples (i.e., some grab samples were primarily natrophosphate while others were mixed with gibbsite). The scanning electron microscopy analysis of the bulk material showed the crystals to be euhedral to anhedral (rounded) in shape. Trace phases, too minor to be detected by XRD

  17. Federal Power Grab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Henry

    1998-01-01

    Constant attention by all Americans is needed to preserve what little local control in education remains. Chief among dangerous federal legislation moving the country toward a federal education system is the Goals 2000: Educate America Act. The paper examines Goals 2000 and other federal legislation that seeks to remove parental control, noting…

  18. The Administrative Power Grab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorenson, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Administrative power for some school teachers can be an aphrodisiac that can be applied negatively, especially when a leader has devastating instinct for the weaknesses of others. A leader's intellect and heart closes shop and ceases to function when drunk on power. In this article, the author describes how the use of administrative power can be…

  19. Antarctica: up for grabs

    SciTech Connect

    Shapley, D.

    1982-11-01

    Antarctica is viewed as a special area, requiring meticulous diplomacy to develop international agreements for exploiting its resources. Little exploration has been accomplished, but oil, gas, and marine krill resources are protected by a 14-nation treaty dating from 1961. The treaty fixed national claims on specific territories and launched scientific activities that reflect national interests. Studies of meteorology, climatology, oceanography, upper-atmospheric physics, and territorial biology have revealed Antarctica's resource potential for krill, minerals, and even ice. 4 figures. (DCK)

  20. A universal approach for automatic organ segmentations on 3D CT images based on organ localization and 3D GrabCut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiangrong; Ito, Takaaki; Zhou, Xinxin; Chen, Huayue; Hara, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Ryujiro; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Hoshi, Hiroaki; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes a universal approach to automatic segmentation of different internal organ and tissue regions in three-dimensional (3D) computerized tomography (CT) scans. The proposed approach combines object localization, a probabilistic atlas, and 3D GrabCut techniques to achieve automatic and quick segmentation. The proposed method first detects a tight 3D bounding box that contains the target organ region in CT images and then estimates the prior of each pixel inside the bounding box belonging to the organ region or background based on a dynamically generated probabilistic atlas. Finally, the target organ region is separated from the background by using an improved 3D GrabCut algorithm. A machine-learning method is used to train a detector to localize the 3D bounding box of the target organ using template matching on a selected feature space. A content-based image retrieval method is used for online generation of a patient-specific probabilistic atlas for the target organ based on a database. A 3D GrabCut algorithm is used for final organ segmentation by iteratively estimating the CT number distributions of the target organ and backgrounds using a graph-cuts algorithm. We applied this approach to localize and segment twelve major organ and tissue regions independently based on a database that includes 1300 torso CT scans. In our experiments, we randomly selected numerous CT scans and manually input nine principal types of inner organ regions for performance evaluation. Preliminary results showed the feasibility and efficiency of the proposed approach for addressing automatic organ segmentation issues on CT images.

  1. Measurements of concentrations of chlorofluoromethanes (CFMs) carbon dioxide and carbon isotope ratio in stratospheric and tropospheric air by grab-sampling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Itoh, T.; Kubo, H.; Honda, H.; Tominaga, T.; Makide, Y.; Yakohata, A.; Sakai, H.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of concentrations of chlorofluoromethanes (CFMs), carbon dioxide and carbon isotope ratio in stratospheric and tropospheric air by grab-sampling systems are reported. The balloon-borne grab-sampling system has been launched from Sanriku Balloon Center three times since 1981. It consists of: (1) six sampling cylinders, (2) eight motor driven values, (3) control and monitor circuits, and (4) pressurized housing. Particular consideration is paid to the problem of contamination. Strict requirements are placed on the choice of materials and components, construction methods, cleaning techniques, vacuum integrity, and sampling procedures. An aluminum pressurized housing and a 4-m long inlet line are employed to prevent the sampling air from contamination by outgassing of sampling and control devices. The sampling is performed during the descent of the system. Vertical profiles of mixing ratios of CF2Cl2, CFCl3 and CH4 are given. Mixing ratios of CF2Cl2 and CFCl3 in the stratosphere do not show the discernible effect of the increase of those in the ground level background, and decrease with altitude. Decreasing rate of CFCl3 is larger than that of CF2Cl2. CH4 mixing ratio, on the other hand, shows diffusive equilibrium, as the photodissociation cross section of CH4 is small and concentrations of OH radical and 0(sup I D) are low.

  2. Tank 241U102 Grab Samples 2U-99-1 and 2U-99-2 and 2U-99-3 Analytical Results for the Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    STEEN, F.H.

    1999-08-03

    This document is the final report for tank 241-U-102 grab samples. Five grab samples were collected from riser 13 on May 26, 1999 and received by the 222-S laboratory on May 26 and May 27, 1999. Samples 2U-99-3 and 2U-99-4 were submitted to the Process Chemistry Laboratory for special studies. Samples 2U-99-1, 2U-99-2 and 2U-99-5 were submitted to the laboratory for analyses. Analyses were performed in accordance with the Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan for Fiscal year 1999 (TSAP) (Sasaki, 1999) and the Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) (Fowler 1995, Mulkey and Miller 1998). The analytical results are presented in the data summary report. None of the subsamples submitted for differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), total organic carbon (TOC) and plutonium 239 (Pu239) analyses exceeded the notification limits as stated in TSAP.

  3. Tank 241S109 Grab Samples 9S-99-1 and 9S-99-2 and 9S-99-3 Analytical Results for the Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    STEEN, F.H.

    1999-11-23

    This document is the final report for tank 2414-109 grab samples. Three grab samples were collected from riser 13 on July 28, 1999 and received by the 222-S laboratory on July 28, 1999. Analyses were performed in accordance with the Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan for Fiscal Year 1999 (TSAP) (Sasaki, 1999) and the Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) (Fowler 1995, Mulkey and Miller 1998). The analytical results are presented in the data summary report (Table 1). None of the subsamples submitted for differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), total organic carbon (TOC) and plutonium 239 (Pu239) analyses exceeded the notification limits as stated in TSAP (Sasaki, 1999).

  4. 45-Day safety screen results for single shell tank 241-AP-106, liquid grab samples, riser 1, 30{degrees} and 150{degrees} in conjunction with evaporator campaign 95-1

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.L.

    1994-12-14

    This is the 45-Day report for the fiscal year 1995 safety screening characterization of three liquid grab samples from single shell tank 241-AP-106. The required analyses are differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and appearance (APPR). No analytes exceeded the notification limits, therefore, secondary analyses (RSST, cyanide, and hot persulfate-total organic carbon) were not required. Summary data tables 2, 3 and 4 present the appearance, DSC and TGA data, respectively. Total alpha analyses are not included in this report, because it is not required for liquid grab samples.

  5. Set Point Calculations for RAPID Project [Removal of Hold for HNF-5087 and HNF-5088 and HNF-5089

    SciTech Connect

    HICKMAN, G.L.

    1999-09-02

    The Respond and Pump in Days (RAPID) project was initiated to pump part of the contents of tank 241-SY-101 into tanks 241-SY-102. This document establishes the basis for all set points and ranges used in the RAPID project.

  6. Set point calculations for RAPID project

    SciTech Connect

    HICKMAN, G.L.

    1999-10-18

    The Respond and Pump in Days (RAPID) project was initiated to pump part of the contents of tank 241-SY-101 into tank 241-SY-102. This document establishes the basis for all set points and ranges used in the RAPID project.

  7. Electrochemical Studies of Carbon Steel Corrosion in Hanford Double-Shell Tank Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, James B.; Windisch, Charles F.; Divine, James R.

    2007-03-11

    This paper reports on the electrochemical scans for the supernatant of Hanford double shell tank 241-SY-102 and the electrochemical scans for the bottom saltcake layer for Hanford double shell tank 241-AZ-102. It further reports on the development of electrochemical test cells adapted to both sample volume and hot cell constraints.

  8. ELECTROCHEMICAL STUDIES OF CARBON STEEL CORROSION IN HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN, J.B.; WINDISCH, C.F.

    2006-10-13

    This paper reports on the electrochemical scans for the supernatant of Hanford double-shell tank (DST) 241-SY-102 and the electrochemical scans for the bottom saltcake layer for Hanford DST 241-AZ-102. It further reports on the development of electrochemical test cells adapted to both sample volume and hot cell constraints.

  9. 222-S Analytical services final results for Tank 241-U-101, grab samples 1U-96-1 through 1U-96-4

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.L., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-23

    This document is the final, format IV, laboratory report for characterization of tank 241-U-101 (U-101) grab samples from risers 1 and 7. It transmits additional analytical data for specific gravity (Sp.G.), and all raw analytical data which were not provided in the 45-day report. The 45-day report is attached to this final report as Part II. Secondary analyses were not performed on any of the U-101 samples. This is because none of the primary analyte limits, which trigger the performance of secondary analyses, were exceeded. Grab samples were taken on May 29, 1996 and May 30, 1996 from risers 1 and 7, respectively, and were received at the 222-S Laboratory on the same days that they were collected. Analyses were performed in accordance with the Tank Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) for this tank and the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO). The samples were analyzed for differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), total alpha activity (AT), visual appearance, bulk density, and specific gravity. A sample data summary table, includes sample analytical data accompanied by quality control data (for example, duplicate, spike, blank and standard results and detection limits and counting efforts). The table includes data for DSC, TGA, AT, bulk density, volume percent solids and Sp.G. analyses. Data regarding the visual appearance of samples, volume percent solids and density of the solids are provided in tabular form of the 45-day report (attached as Part II). The table of the 45-day report also associates the original customer sample number with corresponding laboratory sample numbers. The TSAP specified notification limits for only DSC and total alpha. Notification limits were not exceeded for DSC or total alpha analyses for any of the samples, consequently immediate notifications were not necessary and were not made.

  10. "I'm ready to eat and grab whatever I can get": Determinants and patterns of African American men's eating practices.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Derek M; Wooley, Alana M; Allen, Julie Ober

    2013-03-01

    This article examines determinants and patterns of African American men's dietary practices. Thematic content analysis was used to analyze data from nine exploratory focus groups conducted with 83 urban, middle-aged and older African American men from southeast Michigan. The men distinguished between healthy and unhealthy foods and "meals" versus other instances of eating. Eating patterns and content differed depending on the meal, work and family schedules, food availability, and whether it was a weekday or weekend. When eating alone or outside the home, men prioritized convenience and preferences for tasty, unhealthy foods. Men often reported skipping breakfast or lunch and grabbing snacks or fast food during the day. They emphasized sharing dinner with their spouses and families-usually a home-cooked, "healthy" meal. On weekends, spouses often cooked less and men snacked and dined out more frequently. Sunday dinners involving favorite, unhealthy comfort foods were the highlight of men's eating practices. African American men tended not to follow healthy eating recommendations because of their busy lives, reliance on spouses to prepare food, and preferences for unhealthy foods. These findings suggest that healthy eating interventions must consider how the contexts of African American men's lives shape their eating practices. PMID:22773618

  11. Addition of a Single gp120 Glycan Confers Increased Binding to Dendritic Cell-Specific ICAM-3-Grabbing Nonintegrin and Neutralization Escape to Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Lue, James; Hsu, Mayla; Yang, David; Marx, Preston; Chen, Zhiwei; Cheng-Mayer, Cecilia

    2002-01-01

    The potential role of dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) binding in human immunodeficiency virus transmission across the mucosal barrier was investigated by assessing the ability of simian-human immunodeficiency chimeric viruses (SHIVs) showing varying degrees of mucosal transmissibility to bind the DC-SIGN expressed on the surface of transfected cells. We found that gp120 of the highly transmissible, pathogenic CCR5-tropic SHIVSF162P3 bound human and rhesus DC-SIGN with an efficiency threefold or greater than that of gp120 of the nonpathogenic, poorly transmissible parental SHIVSF162, and this increase in binding to the DC-SIGN of the SHIVSF162P3 envelope gp120 translated into an enhancement of T-cell infection in trans. The presence of an additional glycan at the N-terminal base of the V2 loop of SHIVSF162P3 gp120 compared to that of the parental virus was shown to be responsible for the increase in binding to DC-SIGN. Interestingly, this glycan also conferred escape from autologous neutralization, raising the possibility that the modification occurred as a result of immune selection. Our data suggest that more-efficient binding of envelope gp120 to DC-SIGN could be relevant to the enhanced mucosal transmissibility of SHIVSF162P3 compared to that of parental SHIVSF162. PMID:12239306

  12. Blood glutamate grabbing does not reduce the hematoma in an intracerebral hemorrhage model but it is a safe excitotoxic treatment modality.

    PubMed

    da Silva-Candal, Andrés; Vieites-Prado, Alba; Gutiérrez-Fernández, María; Rey, Ramón I; Argibay, Bárbara; Mirelman, David; Sobrino, Tomás; Rodríguez-Frutos, Berta; Castillo, José; Campos, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that blood glutamate grabbing is an effective strategy to reduce the excitotoxic effect of extracellular glutamate released during ischemic brain injury. The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of two of the most efficient blood glutamate grabbers (oxaloacetate and recombinant glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase 1: rGOT1) in a rat model of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Intracerebral hemorrhage was produced by injecting collagenase into the basal ganglia. Three treatment groups were developed: a control group treated with saline, a group treated with oxaloacetate, and a final group treated with human rGOT1. Treatments were given 1 hour after hemorrhage. Hematoma volume (analyzed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)), neurologic deficit, and blood glutamate and GOT levels were quantified over a period of 14 days after surgery. The results observed showed that the treatments used induced a significant reduction of blood glutamate levels; however, they did not reduce the hematoma, nor did they improve the neurologic deficit. In the present experimental study, we have shown that this novel therapeutic strategy is not effective in case of ICH pathology. More importantly, these findings suggest that blood glutamate grabbers are a safe treatment modality that can be given in cases of suspected ischemic stroke without previous neuroimaging. PMID:25735920

  13. Tank 241-TX-302C grab samples 302C-TX-97-1A through 302C-TX-97-3B analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, R.A.

    1998-03-12

    This document is the final report for tank 241-TX-302C grab samples. Six grabs samples (302C-TX-97-1A, 302C-TX-97-1B, 302C-TX-97-2A, 302C-TX-97-2B, 302C-TX-97-3A, and 302C-TX-97-3B) were collected from the catch tank level gauge riser on December 19, 1997. The ``A`` and ``B`` portions from each sample location were composited and analyses were performed on the composites in accordance with the Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Sasaki, 1997) and the Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) (Rev. 1: Fowler, 1995; Rev. 2: Mulkey and Miller, 1997). The analytical results are presented in Table 1. No notification limits were exceeded. Appearance and Sample Handling Attachment 1 is provided as a cross-reference for relating the tank farm customer identification numbers with the 222-S Laboratory sample numbers and the portion of sample analyzed. Table 2 provides the appearance information.

  14. GeoMapApp Learning Activities: Grab-and-go inquiry-based geoscience activities that bring cutting-edge technology to the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwillie, A. M.; Kluge, S.

    2011-12-01

    NSF-funded GeoMapApp Learning Activities (http://serc.carleton.edu/geomapapp) provide self-contained learning opportunities that are centred around the principles of guided inquiry. The activities allow students to interact with and analyse research-quality geoscience data to explore and enhance student understanding of underlying geoscience content and concepts. Each activity offers ready-to-use step-by-step student instructions and answer sheets that can be downloaded from the web page. Also provided are annotated teacher versions of the worksheets that include teaching tips, additional content and suggestions for further work. Downloadable pre- and post- quizzes tied to each activity help educators gauge the learning progression of their students. Short multimedia tutorials and details on content alignment with state and national teaching standards round out the package of material that comprises each "grab-and-go" activity. GeoMapApp Learning Activities expose students to content and concepts typically found at the community college, high school and introductory undergraduate levels. The activities are based upon GeoMapApp (http://www.geomapapp.org), a free, easy-to-use map-based data exploration and visualisation tool that allows students to access a wide range of geoscience data sets in a virtual lab-like environment. Activities that have so far been created under this project include student exploration of seafloor spreading rates, a study of mass wasting as revealed through geomorphological evidence, and an analysis of plate motion and hotspot traces. The step-by-step instructions and guided inquiry approach lead students through each activity, thus reducing the need for teacher intervention whilst also boosting the time that students can spend on productive exploration and learning. The activities can be used, for example, in a classroom lab with the educator present and as self-paced assignments in an out-of-class setting. GeoMapApp Learning Activities

  15. Vitamin C Attenuates Hemorrhagic Shock-induced Dendritic Cell-specific Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 3-grabbing Nonintegrin Expression in Tubular Epithelial Cells and Renal Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li; Fei, Jian; Chen, Ying; Zhao, Bing; Yang, Zhi-Tao; Wang, Lu; Sheng, Hui-Qiu; Chen, Er-Zhen; Mao, En-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Background: The expression of dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) in renal tubular epithelial cells has been thought to be highly correlated with the occurrence of several kidney diseases, but whether it takes place in renal tissues during hemorrhagic shock (HS) is unknown. The present study aimed to investigate this phenomenon and the inhibitory effect of Vitamin C (VitC). Methods: A Sprague–Dawley rat HS model was established in vivo in this study. The expression level and location of DC-SIGN were observed in kidneys. Also, the degree of histological damage, the concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in the renal tissues, and the serum concentration of blood urea nitrogen and creatinine at different times (2–24 h) after HS (six rats in each group), with or without VitC treatment before resuscitation, were evaluated. Results: HS induced DC-SIGN expression in rat tubular epithelial cells. The proinflammatory cytokine concentration, histological damage scores, and functional injury of kidneys had increased. All these phenomena induced by HS were relieved when the rats were treated with VitC before resuscitation. Conclusions: The results of the present study illustrated that HS could induce tubular epithelial cells expressing DC-SIGN, and the levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the kidney tissues improved correspondingly. The results also indicated that VitC could suppress the DC-SIGN expression in the tubular epithelial cells induced by HS and alleviate the inflammation and functional injury in the kidney. PMID:27411463

  16. Black Hole Grabs Starry Snack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster Version

    This artist's concept shows a supermassive black hole at the center of a remote galaxy digesting the remnants of a star. NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer had a 'ringside' seat for this feeding frenzy, using its ultraviolet eyes to study the process from beginning to end.

    The artist's concept chronicles the star being ripped apart and swallowed by the cosmic beast over time. First, the intact sun-like star (left) ventures too close to the black hole, and its own self-gravity is overwhelmed by the black hole's gravity. The star then stretches apart (middle yellow blob) and eventually breaks into stellar crumbs, some of which swirl into the black hole (cloudy ring at right). This doomed material heats up and radiates light, including ultraviolet light, before disappearing forever into the black hole. The Galaxy Evolution Explorer was able to watch this process unfold by observing changes in ultraviolet light.

    The area around the black hole appears warped because the gravity of the black hole acts like a lens, twisting and distorting light.

  17. An intercomparison between gross α counting and gross β counting for grab-sampling determination of airborne radon progeny and thoron progeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, Z.

    2006-03-01

    The instantaneous values of the airborne activity concentrations of radon progeny and thoron progeny have been determined 34 times in a closed and windowless room in a cellar using two independent grab-sampling methods in order to compare the performance of the methods. The activity concentration of radon ( 222Rn) was also measured and it varied between 200 and 650 Bq m -3. Two samples of radon and thoron progeny were collected simultaneously from roughly the same air volume by filtering. For the first method, the isotopes were collected on membrane filter and gross α counting was applied over several successive time intervals. This method was a slightly improved version of the methods that are applied generally for this reason for decades. For the second method, the isotopes were collected on glass-fibre filter and gross β counts were registered over several time intervals. This other method was developed a few years ago and the above series of measurements was the first opportunity to make an intercomparison between it and another similar method based on α counting. Individual radon progeny and thoron progeny activity concentrations (for the isotopes 218Po, 214Pb, 214Bi and 212Pb) were evaluated by both methods. The detailed investigation of the results showed that the systematic deviation of the methods is small but significant and isotope-dependent. The weighted averages of the β/α activity concentration ratios for 218Po, 214Pb, 214Bi, EEDC 222 (Equilibrium-Equivalent Decay-product Concentration of radon progeny) and 212Pb were 0.99±0.03, 0.90±0.02, 1.03±0.02, 0.96±0.02 and 0.80±0.03, respectively. The source of the systematic deviation is probably the inaccurate knowledge of the counting efficiencies mainly in the case of the α-counting method. A significant random-type difference between the results obtained with the two methods has also been revealed. For example, the β/α ratio for EEDC 222 varied between 0.81±0.01 and 1.22±0.03, where the

  18. Cesium Ion Exchange Using Tank 241-AN-104 Supernate

    SciTech Connect

    Adu-Wusu, K.

    2003-12-22

    The River Protection Project is to design and build a high level nuclear waste treatment facility. The waste treatment plant is to process millions of gallons of radioactive waste stored in tanks at the Hanford Site. The high level nuclear waste treatment process includes various unit operations, such as ultrafiltration, precipitation, evaporation, ion exchange, and vitrification. Ion exchange is identified as the optimal treatment method for removal of cesium-137 and Tc-99 from the waste. Extensive ion exchange testing was performed using small-scale columns with actual waste samples. The objectives of this study were to: demonstrate SuperLig 644 ion exchange performance and process steps for the removal of cesium from actual AN-104 tank waste; pretreat actual AN-104 tank waste to reduce the concentration of cesium-137 in the waste below LAW vitrification limit; produce and characterize cesium eluate solutions for use in eluate evaporation tests. The experiments consisted of batch contact and small-scale column tests. The batch contact tests measured sorption partition coefficients Kds. The Kds were used to predict the effective resin capacity. The small-scale column tests, which closely mimic plant conditions, generated loading and elution profile data used to determine whether removal targets and design requirements were met.

  19. Pretreatment/Radionuclide Separations of Cs/Tc from Supernates

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M.C.

    1998-09-01

    Significant improvements have been made in ion exchange and solvent extraction materials and processes available for separation of the radionuclides cesium and technetium from both acid and alkaline waste solutions. New ion exchange materials and solvent extraction reagents are more selective for Cs over sodium and potassium than previous materials. The higher selectivity gives higher Cs capacity and improved separation processes. Technetium removal has been improved by new ion exchange resins, which have either improved capacity or easier elution. Several different crown ethers have been shown to extract pertechnetate ion selectively over other anions. Organic complexants in some waste solutions reduce pertechnetate ion and stabilize the reduced species. Selective oxidation allows conversion to pertechnetate without oxidation of the organic complexants.

  20. MicroRNA-155 modulates the pathogen binding ability of dendritic cells (DCs) by down-regulation of DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN).

    PubMed

    Martinez-Nunez, Rocio T; Louafi, Fethi; Friedmann, Peter S; Sanchez-Elsner, Tilman

    2009-06-12

    MicroRNA-155 (miR-155) has been involved in the response to inflammation in macrophages and lymphocytes. Here we show how miR-155 participates in the maturation of human dendritic cells (DC) and modulates pathogen binding by down-regulating DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN), after directly targeting the transcription factor PU.1. During the maturation of DCs, miR-155 increases up to 130-fold, whereas PU.1 protein levels decrease accordingly. We establish that human PU.1 is a direct target for miR-155 and localize the target sequence for miR-155 in the 3'-untranslated region of PU.1. Also, overexpression of miR-155 in the THP1 monocytic cell line decreases PU.1 protein levels and DC-SIGN at both the mRNA and protein levels. We prove a link between the down-regulation of PU.1 and reduced transcriptional activity of the DC-SIGN promoter, which is likely to be the basis for its reduced mRNA expression, after miR-155 overexpression. Finally, we show that, by reducing DC-SIGN in the cellular membrane, miR-155 is involved in regulating pathogen binding as dendritic cells exhibited the lower binding capacity for fungi and HIV protein gp-120 when the levels of miR-155 were higher. Thus, our results suggest a mechanism by which miR-155 regulates proteins involved in the cellular immune response against pathogens that could have clinical implications in the way pathogens enter the human organism. PMID:19386588

  1. Grab a MOOC by the Horns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lokey-Vega, Anissa

    2014-01-01

    MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) have been barreling through the field of higher education since the first MOOC was launched in 2008. These free courses were initially believed to be a way to provide a high-caliber education to anyone with Internet access and a will to learn. Although research so far has shown that MOOCs aren't living up…

  2. Authority Grab Eroding Stature of State Boards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on the eroding power of state school boards in the U.S. as lawmakers and governors are seeking to expand their authority over K-12 education and, in some cases, reverse education policy set in motion by elected or appointed panels. This year alone, state boards in Florida, Ohio, and Vermont are targets of legislation that…

  3. The water footprint of land grabbing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rulli, Maria Cristina; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2013-12-01

    increasing global demand for food, fibers, and biofuels has made investments in agriculture a priority for some governments and corporations eager to expand their agricultural production while securing good profits. Here we calculate the water appropriation associated with land deals at different negotiation and implementation stages. Using estimates of actual and potential evapotranspiration for the crops planted in the acquired land, we calculate the green and blue water appropriated by land investors under a variety of irrigation scenarios. We also determine the grey water footprint as the amount of water required to dilute to allowable standards the pollution resulting from fertilizer applications. We found that about 380 × 109 m3 yr-1 of rainwater is appropriated with the 43 million ha of reported contract area acquired by agri-investors (>240 × 109 m3 yr-1 in the 29 million ha of foreign acquisitions only). This water would be sufficient to feed ≈ 300-390 million people.

  4. A Grab-Bag of Diagnostic Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Muriel

    1983-01-01

    Describes several diagnostic tools used to determine specific problems of students referred to a writing lab, including structured interviews, protocols (asking a student to compose aloud for 15 to 20 minutes on a short topic), and back-pedaling (questioning what a student already knows about a given topic). (AEA)

  5. 241-SY Tank Farm Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Travis J.; Boomer, Kayle D.; Gunter, Jason R.; Venetz, Theodore J.

    2013-07-25

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for tanks 241-SY-101, 241-SY-102, and 241-SY-103. The construction history of the 241-SY tank farm has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank 241-AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank 241-AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In the 241-SY tank farm, the third DST farm constructed, refractory quality and stress relief were improved, while similar tank and liner fabrication issues remained.

  6. Transport of Tank 241-SY-101 Waste Slurry: Effects of Dilution and Temperature on Critical Pipeline Velocity

    SciTech Connect

    KP Recknagle; Y Onishi

    1999-06-15

    This report presents the methods and results of calculations performed to predict the critical velocity and pressure drop required for the two-inch pipeline transfer of solid/liquid waste slurry from underground waste storage Tank 241-SY-101 to Tank 241-SY- 102 at the Hanford Site. The effects of temperature and dilution on the critical velocity were included in the analysis. These analyses show that Tank 241-SY-101 slurry should be diluted with water prior to delivery to Tank 241-SY-102. A dilution ratio of 1:1 is desirable and would allow the waste to be delivered at a critical velocity of 1.5 ft/sec. The system will be operated at a flow velocity of 6 ft/sec or greater therefore, this velocity will be sufficient to maintain a stable slurry delivery through the pipeline. The effect of temperature on the critical velocity is not a limiting factor when the slurry is diluted 1:1 with water. Pressure drop at the critical velocity would be approximately two feet for a 125-ft pipeline (or 250-ft equivalent straight pipeline). At 6 ft/sec, the pressure drop would be 20 feet over a 250-ft equivalent straight pipeline.

  7. Grabbing the Brass Ring: Who Shapes Teacher Policy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koppich, Julia E.; Esch, Camille

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the shift in the locus of decision-making authority across more than 25 years of policy efforts to improve teaching effectiveness. Previously the province of local government, states assumed the lion's share of authority for teaching policy during the 1980s and 1990s. As states and the federal government rose to education…

  8. Game, Water, and People Up for Grabs: A Review Essay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Robert H.

    1979-01-01

    This article asserts if Americans continue to pump, mine and extract natural resources they will inevitably confront the harsh but intractable facts of nature, and that a salvageable future must be one of limits, of new social controls and of recovering an old ethic which honors foresight, forebearance and sharing. (Author/RTS)

  9. Grab a coffee: your aerial images are already analyzed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garetto, Anthony; Rademacher, Thomas; Schulz, Kristian

    2015-07-01

    For over 2 decades the AIMTM platform has been utilized in mask shops as the standard for actinic review of photomask sites in order to perform defect disposition and repair review. Throughout this time the measurement throughput of the systems has been improved in order to keep pace with the requirements demanded by a manufacturing environment, however the analysis of the sites captured has seen little improvement and remained a manual process. This manual analysis of aerial images is time consuming, subject to error and unreliability and contributes to holding up turn-around time (TAT) and slowing process flow in a manufacturing environment. AutoAnalysis, the first application available for the FAVOR® platform, offers a solution to these problems by providing fully automated data transfer and analysis of AIMTM aerial images. The data is automatically output in a customizable format that can be tailored to your internal needs and the requests of your customers. Savings in terms of operator time arise from the automated analysis which no longer needs to be performed. Reliability is improved as human error is eliminated making sure the most defective region is always and consistently captured. Finally the TAT is shortened and process flow for the back end of the line improved as the analysis is fast and runs in parallel to the measurements. In this paper the concept and approach of AutoAnalysis will be presented as well as an update to the status of the project. A look at the benefits arising from the automation and the customizable approach of the solution will be shown.

  10. Grab a Great Resource: Using Educational Resources in the Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb.

    A guide to teaching resources in three northern Illinois counties was created by 28 teachers in a graduate course entitled "Integrating Community Resources into Curriculum and Instruction." The first part of the guide provides contact information and a brief description for approximately 100 people, places, and things that could be resources to…

  11. Land Grabbing and the Commodification of Agricultural Land in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Odorico, P.; Rulli, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    The increasing global demand for farmland products is placing unprecedented pressure on the global agricultural system. The increasing demand can be met through either the intensification or the expansion of agricultural production at the expenses of other ecosystems. The ongoing escalation of large scale land acquisitions in the developing world may contribute to both of these two processes. Investments in agriculture have become a priority for a number of governments and corporations that are trying to expand their agricultural production while securing good profits. It is unclear however to what extent these investments are driving the intensification or the expansion of agriculture. In the last decade large scale land acquisitions by external investors have increased at unprecedented rates. This global land rush was likely enhanced by recent food crises, when prices skyrocketed in response to crop failure, new bioenergy policies, and the increasing demand for agricultural products by a growing and increasingly affluent human population. Corporations recognized the potential for high return investments in agricultural land, while governments started to enhance their food security by purchasing large tracts of land in foreign countries. It has been estimated that, to date, about 35.6 million ha of cropland - more than twice the agricultural land of Germany - have been acquired by foreign investors worldwide. As an effect of these land deals the local communities lose legal access to the land and its products. Here we investigate the effect of large scale land acquisition on agricultural intensification or expansion in African countries. We discuss the extent to which these investments in agriculture may increase crop production and stress how this phenomenon can greatly affect the local communities, their food security, economic stability and the long term resilience of their livelihoods, regardless of whether the transfer of property rights is the result of an informed decision and the land was paid at market value.

  12. Global land and water grabbing for food and bioenergy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rulli, M. C.; D'Odorico, P.

    2014-12-01

    The increasing demand for food, fibers and biofuels, the consequently escalating prices of agricultural products, and the uncertainty of international food markets have recently drawn the attention of governments and corporations toward investments in productive agricultural land, mostly in developing countries. Since 2000 more than 37 million hectares of arable land have been purchased or leased by foreign investors worldwide. The targeted regions are typically located in areas where crop yields are relatively low because of lack of modern technology. It is expected that in the long run large scale investments in agriculture and the consequent development of commercial farming will bring the technology required to close the existing crop yield gaps. Recently, a number of studies and reports have documented the process of foreign land acquisition, while the associated appropriation of land based resources (e.g., water and crops) has remained poorly investigated. The amount of food this land can produce and the number of people it could feed still needs to be quantified. It is also unclear to what extent the acquired land will be used to for biofuel production and the role played by U.S. and E.U. bioenergy policies as drivers of the ongoing land rush. The environmental impacts of these investments in agriculture require adequate investigation. Here we provide a global quantitative assessment of the rates of water and crop appropriation potentially associated with large scale land acquisitions. We evaluate the associated impacts on the food and energy security of both target and investors' countries, and highlight the societal and environmental implications of the land rush phenomenon.

  13. Accounting for "land-grabbing" from a biocapacity viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Coscieme, Luca; Pulselli, Federico M; Niccolucci, Valentina; Patrizi, Nicoletta; Sutton, Paul C

    2016-01-01

    The comparison of the Ecological Footprint and its counterpart (i.e. biocapacity) allow for a classification of the world's countries as ecological creditors (Ecological Footprint lower than biocapacity) or debtors (Ecological Footprint higher than biocapacity). This classification is a national scale assessment on an annual time scale that provides a view of the ecological assets appropriated by the local population versus the natural ecological endowment of a country. We show that GDP per capita over a certain threshold is related with the worsening of the footprint balance in countries classified as ecological debtors. On the other hand, this correlation is lost when ecological creditor nations are considered. There is evidence that governments and investors from high GDP countries are playing a crucial role in impacting the environment at the global scale which is significantly affecting the geography of sustainability and preventing equal opportunities for development. In particular, international market dynamics and the concentration of economic power facilitate the transfer of biocapacity related to “land grabbing”, i.e. large scale acquisition of agricultural land. This transfer mainly occurs from low to high GDP countries, regardless of the actual need of foreign biocapacity, as expressed by the national footprint balance. A first estimation of the amount of biocapacity involved in this phenomenon is provided in this paper in order to better understand its implications on global sustainability and national and international land use policy. PMID:26383857

  14. Characterization of Tank 23H Supernate Per Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria Analysis Requirements -2005

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L

    2005-05-05

    Variable depth Tank 23H samples (22-inch sample [HTF-014] and 185-inch sample [HTF-013]) were pulled from Tank 23H in February, 2005 for characterization. The characterization of the Tank 23H low activity waste is part of the overall liquid waste processing activities. This characterization examined the species identified in the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) for the transfer of waste into the Salt-Feed Tank (SFT). The samples were delivered to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and analyzed. Apart from radium-226 with an average measured detection limit of < 2.64E+03 pCi/mL, which is about the same order of magnitude as the WAC limit (< 8.73E+03 pCi/mL), none of the species analyzed was found to approach the limits provided in the Saltstone WAC. The concentration of most of the species analyzed for the Tank 23H samples were 2-5 orders of magnitude lower than the WAC limits. The achievable detection limits for a number of the analytes were several orders of magnitude lower than the WAC limits, but one or two orders of magnitude higher than the requested detection limits. Analytes which fell into this category included plutonium-241, europium-154/155, antimony-125, tin-126, ruthenium/rhodium-106, selenium-79, nickel-59/63, ammonium ion, copper, total nickel, manganese and total organic carbon.

  15. Characterization of Tank 23H Supernate Per Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria Analysis Requirements-2005

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L

    2005-06-01

    Variable depth Tank 23H samples (22-inch sample [HTF-014] and 185-inch sample [HTF-013]) were pulled from Tank 23H in February, 2005 for characterization. The characterization of the Tank 23H low activity waste is part of the overall liquid waste processing activities. This characterization examined the species identified in the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) for the transfer of waste into the Salt-Feed Tank (SFT). The samples were delivered to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and analyzed. Apart from radium-226 with an average measured detection limit of < 2.64E+03 pCi/mL, which is about the same order of magnitude as the WAC limit (< 8.73E+03 pCi/mL), none of the species analyzed was found to approach the limits provided in the Saltstone WAC. The concentration of most of the species analyzed for the Tank 23H samples were 2-5 orders of magnitude lower than the WAC limits. The achievable detection limits for a number of the analytes were several orders of magnitude lower than the WAC limits, but one or two orders of magnitude higher than the requested detection limits. Analytes which fell into this category included plutonium-241, europium-154/155, antimony-125, tin-126, ruthenium/rhodium-106, selenium-79, nickel-59/63, ammonium ion, copper, total nickel, manganese and total organic carbon.

  16. Separation, Concentration, and Immobilization of Technetium and Iodine from Alkaline Supernate Waste

    SciTech Connect

    James Harvey; Michael Gula

    1998-12-07

    Development of remediation technologies for the characterization, retrieval, treatment, concentration, and final disposal of radioactive and chemical tank waste stored within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex represents an enormous scientific and technological challenge. A combined total of over 90 million gallons of high-level waste (HLW) and low-level waste (LLW) are stored in 335 underground storage tanks at four different DOE sites. Roughly 98% of this waste is highly alkaline in nature and contains high concentrations of nitrate and nitrite salts along with lesser concentrations of other salts. The primary waste forms are sludge, saltcake, and liquid supernatant with the bulk of the radioactivity contained in the sludge, making it the largest source of HLW. The saltcake (liquid waste with most of the water removed) and liquid supernatant consist mainly of sodium nitrate and sodium hydroxide salts. The main radioactive constituent in the alkaline supernatant is cesium-137, but strontium-90, technetium-99, and transuranic nuclides are also present in varying concentrations. Reduction of the radioactivity below Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) limits would allow the bulk of the waste to be disposed of as LLW. Because of the long half-life of technetium-99 (2.1 x 10 5 y) and the mobility of the pertechnetate ion (TcO 4 - ) in the environment, it is expected that technetium will have to be removed from the Hanford wastes prior to disposal as LLW. Also, for some of the wastes, some level of technetium removal will be required to meet LLW criteria for radioactive content. Therefore, DOE has identified a need to develop technologies for the separation and concentration of technetium-99 from LLW streams. Eichrom has responded to this DOE-identified need by demonstrating a complete flowsheet for the separation, concentration, and immobilization of technetium (and iodine) from alkaline supernatant waste.

  17. Laboratory Report on Performance Evaluation of Key Constituents during Pre-Treatment of High Level Waste Direct Feed

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Heinz J.

    2013-06-24

    The analytical capabilities of the 222-S Laboratory are tested against the requirements for an optional start up scenario of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant on the Hanford Site. In this case, washed and in-tank leached sludge would be sent directly to the High Level Melter, bypassing Pretreatment. The sludge samples would need to be analyzed for certain key constituents in terms identifying melter-related issues and adjustment needs. The analyses on original tank waste as well as on washed and leached material were performed using five sludge samples from tanks 241-AY-102, 241-AZ-102, 241-AN-106, 241-AW-105, and 241-SY-102. Additionally, solid phase characterization was applied to determine the changes in mineralogy throughout the pre-treatment steps.

  18. Tank characterization report for double-shell tank 241-AN-102

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-29

    This characterization report summarizes the available information on the historical uses, current status, and sampling and analysis results of waste stored in double-shell underground storage tank 241- AN-102. This report supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, Milestone M-44-09 (Ecology et al. 1996). Tank 241-AN-102 is one of seven double-shell tanks located in the AN Tank Farm in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. The tank was hydrotested in 1981, and when the water was removed, a 6-inch heel was left. Tank 241-AN-102 began receiving waste from tank 241-SY-102 beginning in 1982. The tank was nearly emptied in the third quarter of 1983, leaving only 125 kL (33 kgal) of waste. Between the fourth quarter of 1983 and the first quarter of 1984, tank 241-AN-102 received waste from tanks 241-AY-102, 241-SY-102, 241-AW-105, and 241- AN-101. The tank was nearly emptied in the second quarter of 1984, leaving a heel of 129 kL (34 kgal). During the second and third quarters of 1984, the tank was filled with concentrated complexant waste from tank 241-AW-101. Since that time, only minor amounts of Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant miscellaneous waste and water have been received; there have been no waste transfer to or from the tank since 1992. Therefore, the waste currently in the tank is considered to be concentrated complexant waste. Tank 241-AN-102 is sound and is not included on any of the Watch Lists.

  19. GLYCOLIC-NITRIC ACID FLOWSHEET DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF CHEMICAL PROCESSING CELL WITH MATRIX SIMULANTS AND SUPERNATE

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.; Stone, M.; Newell, J.; Best, D.

    2012-05-07

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is evaluating changes to its current DWPF flowsheet to improve processing cycle times. This will enable the facility to support higher canister production while maximizing waste loading. Higher throughput is needed in the CPC since the installation of the bubblers into the melter has increased melt rate. Due to the significant maintenance required for the DWPF gas chromatographs (GC) and the potential for production of flammable quantities of hydrogen, reducing or eliminating the amount of formic acid used in the CPC is being developed. Earlier work at Savannah River National Laboratory has shown that replacing formic acid with an 80:20 molar blend of glycolic and formic acids has the potential to remove mercury in the SRAT without any significant catalytic hydrogen generation. This report summarizes the research completed to determine the feasibility of processing without formic acid. In earlier development of the glycolic-formic acid flowsheet, one run (GF8) was completed without formic acid. It is of particular interest that mercury was successfully removed in GF8, no formic acid at 125% stoichiometry. Glycolic acid did not show the ability to reduce mercury to elemental mercury in initial screening studies, which is why previous testing focused on using the formic/glycolic blend. The objective of the testing detailed in this document is to determine the viability of the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet in processing sludge over a wide compositional range as requested by DWPF. This work was performed under the guidance of Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TT and QAP). The details regarding the simulant preparation and analysis have been documented previously.

  20. GLYCOLIC-NITRIC ACID FLOWSHEET DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF CHEMICAL PROCESS CELL WITH SLUDGE AND SUPERNATE SIMULANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.; Stone, M.; Newell, J.; Best, D.; Zamecnik, J.

    2012-08-28

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is evaluating changes to its current Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) flowsheet to improve processing cycle times. This will enable the facility to support higher canister production while maximizing waste loading. Higher throughput is needed in the Chemical Process Cell (CPC) since the installation of the bubblers into the melter has increased melt rate. Due to the significant maintenance required for the DWPF gas chromatographs (GC) and the potential for production of flammable quantities of hydrogen, reducing or eliminating the amount of formic acid used in the CPC is being developed. Earlier work at Savannah River National Laboratory has shown that replacing formic acid with an 80:20 molar blend of glycolic and formic acids has the potential to remove mercury in the SRAT without any significant catalytic hydrogen generation. This report summarizes the research completed to determine the feasibility of processing without formic acid. In earlier development of the glycolic-formic acid flowsheet, one run (GF8) was completed without formic acid. It is of particular interest that mercury was successfully removed in GF8, no formic acid at 125% stoichiometry. Glycolic acid did not show the ability to reduce mercury to elemental mercury in initial screening studies, which is why previous testing focused on using the formic/glycolic blend. The objective of the testing detailed in this document is to determine the viability of the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet in processing sludge over a wide compositional range as requested by DWPF. This work was performed under the guidance of Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TT&QAP). The details regarding the simulant preparation and analysis have been documented previously.

  1. Vitrification of M-Area Mixed (Hazardous and Radioactive) F006 Wastes: I. Sludge and Supernate Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.

    2001-10-05

    Technologies are being developed by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Facility sites to convert low-level and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) wastes to a solid stabilized waste form for permanent disposal. One of the alternative technologies is vitrification into a borosilicate glass waste form. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has declared vitrification the Best Demonstrated Available Technology (BDAT) for high-level radioactive mixed waste and produced a Handbook of Vitrification Technologies for Treatment of Hazardous and Radioactive Waste. The DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) has taken the position that mixed waste needs to be stabilized to the highest level reasonably possible to ensure that the resulting waste forms will meet both current and future regulatory specifications. Stabilization of low level and hazardous wastes in glass are in accord with the 1988 Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), then the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL), Professional Planning Committee (PPC) recommendation that high nitrate containing (low-level) wastes be incorporated into a low temperature glass (via a sol-gel technology). The investigation into this new technology was considered timely because of the potential for large waste volume reduction compared to solidification into cement.

  2. Teaching Outside the Box: How to Grab Your Students by Their Brains, 2nd Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, LouAnne

    2011-01-01

    This second edition of the bestselling book includes practical suggestions for arranging your classroom, talking to students, avoiding the misbehavior cycle, and making your school a place where students learn and teachers teach. The book also contains enlivening Q&A from teachers, letters from students, and tips for grading. This new edition has…

  3. Grab H.O.L.D.: Help Overcome Learner Dropouts. Classroom Guidance Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoker, Joan

    This manual is intended as a sourcebook for classroom counselors and teachers who include guidance activities in their secondary school classrooms. Developed by a secondary guidance project designed to maintain enrollment of potential dropouts, this manual offers basic classroom guidance strategies and techniques to coordinate home, school, and…

  4. Visual Attention to Antismoking PSAs: Smoking Cues versus Other Attention-Grabbing Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders-Jackson, Ashley N.; Cappella, Joseph N.; Linebarger, Deborah L.; Piotrowski, Jessica Taylor; O'Keeffe, Moira; Strasser, Andrew A.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines how addicted smokers attend visually to smoking-related public service announcements (PSAs) in adults smokers. Smokers' onscreen visual fixation is an indicator of cognitive resources allocated to visual attention. Characteristic of individuals with addictive tendencies, smokers are expected to be appetitively activated by…

  5. Up for Grabs: The Gains and Prospects of First- and Second-Generation Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batalova, Jeanne; Fix, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Youth and young adults from immigrant families today represent one in four people in the United States between the ages of 16 and 26--up from one in five just 15 years ago. This population will assume a greater role as the US workforce ages, and how it fares in the classroom and in the workplace is of signal importance not just for these…

  6. Automatic vigilance: the attention-grabbing power of negative social information.

    PubMed

    Pratto, F; John, O P

    1991-09-01

    One of the functions of automatic stimulus evaluation is to direct attention toward events that may have undesirable consequences for the perceiver's well-being. To test whether attentional resources are automatically directed away from an attended task to undesirable stimuli, Ss named the colors in which desirable and undesirable traits (e.g., honest, sadistic) appeared. Across 3 experiments, color-naming latencies were consistently longer for undesirable traits but did not differ within the desirable and undesirable categories. In Experiment 2, Ss also showed more incidental learning for undesirable traits, as predicted by the automatic vigilance (but not a perceptual defense) hypothesis. In Experiment 3, a diagnosticity (or base-rate) explanation of the vigilance effect was ruled out. The implications for deliberate processing in person perception and stereotyping are discussed. PMID:1941510

  7. Automatic vigilance: the attention-grabbing power of approach- and avoidance-related social information.

    PubMed

    Wentura, D; Rothermund, K; Bak, P

    2000-06-01

    The automatic processing of information was investigated, varying valence (positive vs. negative) and relevance (other-relevant traits [ORT] vs. possessor-relevant traits [PRT]; G. Peeters, 1983) of stimuli. ORTs denote unconditionally positive or negative consequences for persons in the social environment of the holder of the trait (e.g., honest, brutal) whereas PRTs denote unconditionally positive or negative consequences for the trait holder (e.g., happy, depressive). In 2 experiments using the Stroop paradigm, larger interference effects were found for ORTs than PRTs. This is due to the behavior-relatedness of ORTs. In a go/no-go lexical decision task (Experiment 3), participants either had to withdraw their finger from a pressed key (i.e., "avoid") or had to press a key (i.e., "approach") if a word was presented. Responses to negative ORTs were relatively faster in the withdraw condition, whereas positive ORTs were relatively faster in the press condition. PMID:10870906

  8. Stimulus Patching Budgets: Local Officials Crying Foul as Governors Grab for Aid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNell, Michele

    2009-01-01

    Desperate for cash to fill growing budget deficits, state governments are starting to tangle with federal and local officials over a $39.8 billion pot of economic-stimulus money that was designed to prop up the budgets of local school districts, but is increasingly being eyed as a patch for states' own financial woes. Vague language and loopholes…

  9. Taking an Attention-Grabbing "Headlines First!" Approach to Engage Students in a Lecture Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, G. Keith; Stevenson, Clint; Joyner, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Let's face it. Traditional lectures do not consistently capture our students' attention, especially when they are PowerPoint-driven and lack student/instructor interaction. Most of us have had the unfortunate feeling that our students were not fully engaged in our lectures, despite hours of preparation on our part. This sense of "wasted"…

  10. Navigating the current job market--grab hold of your future now!

    PubMed

    Durham, Holiday A; McDermott, Ann Y

    2013-11-01

    Although the U.S. federal government, the National Science Foundation, and other influential groups have called for American universities to educate and train more scientists, a recent article in the Washington Post and broadcasting on National Public Radio affirmed a harsh reality: there are too few jobs for today's young scientists. Essentially, landing a job in science doesn't just happen, you must prepare! The intent of this education track session, targeted to students, postdoctorates, junior faculty, and other early- to midcareer professionals was to provide insights on trends in the current job market and offer strategies and resources to be competitive. The session featured speakers representing different work environments, such as academia, industry, health care institutions, public relations, and entrepreneurial positions. PMID:24228196

  11. Land grab. More investors offer hospitals cash for their real estate as providers hunt for capital.

    PubMed

    Evans, Melanie

    2011-03-01

    More real estate investors are offering hospitals cash for real estate as providers tap into their assets for capital. But if REITs are banking on providers cashing in their real estate chips, that's not happening yet, says Mike O'Keefe, left, of Navigant Consulting. The capital flooding into healthcare real estate has met with a limited supply of sellers. "That's what's driving some of this consolidation," O'Keefe said. PMID:21452424

  12. "And Then a Huge, Huge Giant Grabbed Me!" Aggression in Children's Stories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacigalupa, Chiara; Wright, Cheryl

    2009-01-01

    Children's stories, like children's play, often contain aggressive elements. This research study identified the themes and ideas that children between the ages of 2 and 6 years old included in 290 dictated stories with aggressive elements. Among the stories that contained aggressive elements, 42% were dictated by girls, and 57% were dictated by…

  13. Children's Performance on the "Give X" Task: A Microgenetic Analysis of "Counting" and "Grabbing" Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chetland, Elizabeth; Fluck, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Children's understanding of the cardinal significance of counting is often assessed by the "give x" task, in which they are categorized as "counters" or "grabbers". Previous research indicates a sudden stage-like shift, implying insight into a principle. Employing a microgenetic approach, the present study was designed to explore whether this…

  14. What grabs his attention but not hers? Estrogen correlates with neurophysiological measures of vocal change detection.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, Annett; Escoffier, Nicolas; Li, Qing Yang; Li, Hui; Strafford-Wilson, Jennifer; Li, Wan-I

    2008-07-01

    Prior research revealed sex differences in the processing of unattended changes in speaker prosody. The present study aimed at investigating the role of estrogen in mediating these effects. To this end, the electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded while participants watched a silent movie with subtitles and passively listened to a syllable sequence that contained occasional changes in speaker prosody. In one block, these changes were neutral, whereas in another block they were emotional. Estrogen values were obtained for each participant and correlated with the mismatch negativity (MMN) amplitude elicited in the EEG. As predicted, female listeners had higher estrogen values than male listeners and showed reduced MMN amplitudes to neutral as compared to emotional change in speaker prosody. Moreover, in both, male and female listeners, MMN amplitudes were negatively correlated with estrogen when the change in speaker prosody was neutral, but not when it was emotional. This suggests that estrogen is associated with reduced distractibility by neutral, but not emotional, events. Emotional events are spared from this reduction in distractibility and more likely to penetrate voluntary attention directed elsewhere. Taken together, the present findings provide evidence for a role of estrogen in human cognition and emotion. PMID:18395352

  15. Hazardous Asteroids: Cloaking STEM Skills Training within an Attention-Grabbing Science/Math Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Eileen V.; Ryan, William H.

    2015-11-01

    A graduate-level course was designed and taught during the summer months from 2009 - 2015 in order to contribute to the training and professional development of K-12 teachers residing in the Southwest. The teachers were seeking Master’s degrees via the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology’s (NMT’s) Masters of Science Teaching (MST) program, and the course satisfied a science or math requirement. The MST program provides opportunities for in-service teachers to enhance their content backgrounds in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology (SMET). The ultimate goal is to assist teachers in gaining knowledge that has direct application in the classroom.The engaging topic area of near-Earth object (NEO) characterization studies was used to create a fun and exciting framework for mastering basic skills and concepts in physics and astronomy. The objective was to offer a class that had the appropriate science rigor (with an emphasis on mathematics) within a non-threatening format. The course, entitled “Hazardous Asteroids”, incorporates a basic planetary physics curriculum, with challenging laboratories that include a heavy emphasis on math and technology. Since the authors run a NASA-funded NEO research and follow-up program, also folded into the course is the use of the Magdalena Ridge Observatory’s 2.4-meter telescope so participants can take and reduce their own data on a near-Earth asteroid.In exit assessments, the participants have given the course excellent ratings for design and implementation, and the overall degree of satisfaction was high. This validates that a well-constructed (and rigorous) course can be effective in receptively reaching teachers in need of basic skills refreshment. Many of the teachers taking the course were employed in school districts serving at-risk or under-prepared students, and the course helped provide them with the confidence vital to developing new strategies for successful teaching.

  16. Power Grab: How the National Education Association Is Betraying Our Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moo, G. Gregory

    Public education stands as a monolith in a world alive with fruitful change. Across the 50 states, the changes that parents and taxpayers want in public education are being misdirected and blocked by a powerful and self-serving union that has been taking control of public education since 1857. Evidence is presented in this book that the National…

  17. Grab 'em while They're Young: (Before They become Disillusioned and Cynical)!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broughton, Sally

    2010-01-01

    In the pre-Internet world of 1992, a new organization called Project Vote Smart used the highest technology available--a toll-free Voter's Research Hotline--to help voters get the facts about candidates and elected officials. Designed to give voters the tools they needed to "Vote Smart," the Hotline connected voters with questions to 50 student…

  18. Teaching Outside the Box: How to Grab Your Students By Their Brains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, LouAnne

    2005-01-01

    This book offers strategies to help both new teachers and seasoned veterans create dynamic classroom environments where students enjoy learning and teachers enjoy teaching. In addition to no-nonsense advice, checklists, and handouts, the book includes: (1) A step-by-step plan to make the first week of school a success; (2) Approaches for creating…

  19. An Attention-Grabbing Approach to Introducing Students to Argumentation in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wojdak, Jeremy M.

    2010-01-01

    Argumentation and basic logic are foundations of scientific inquiry, and thus should be foundations of science education. Students often are uninterested in formal logic, and do not understand the connection to science or society. I describe a way to engage students in the study of argumentation and to help develop student's ability to critically…

  20. Standard-B auto grab sampler hydrogen monitoring system, Acceptance Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lott, D.T.

    1995-05-18

    Project W-369, Watch List Tank Hydrogen Monitors, installed a Standard-C Hydrogen Monitoring System (SHMS) on the Flammable gas waste tank AN-104. General Support Projects (8K510) was support by Test Engineering (7CH30) in the performance of the Acceptance Test Procedures (ATP) to qualify the SHMS cabinets on the waste tank. The ATP`s performance was controlled by Tank Farm work package. This completed ATP is transmitted by EDT-601748 as an Acceptance Test Report (ATR) in accordance with WHC-6-1, EP 4.2 and EP 1.12.

  1. Hanford Double-Shell Tank Extent-of-Condition Construction Review

    SciTech Connect

    Venetz, Theodore J.; Johnson, Jeremy M.; Gunter, Jason R.; Barnes, Travis J.; Washenfelder, Dennis J.; Boomer, Kayle D.

    2013-11-14

    During routine visual inspections of Hanford double-shell waste tank 241-AY-102 (AY-102), anomalies were identified on the annulus floor which resulted in further evaluations. Following a formal leak assessment in October 2012, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) determined that the primary tank of AY-102 was leaking. The formal leak assessment, documented in RPP-ASMT-53793,Tank 241-AY-102 Leak Assessment Report, identified first-of-a-kind construction difficulties and trial-and-error repairs as major contributing factors to tank failure. To determine if improvements in double-shell tank (DST) construction occurred after construction of tank AY-102, a detailed review and evaluation of historical construction records were performed for the first three DST tank farms constructed, which included tanks 241-AY-101, 241-AZ-101, 241-AZ-102, 241-SY-101, 241-SY-102, and 241-SY-103. The review for these six tanks involved research and review of dozens of boxes of historical project documentation. These reviews form a basis to better understand the current condition of the three oldest Hanford DST farms. They provide a basis for changes to the current tank inspection program and also provide valuable insight into future tank use decisions. If new tanks are constructed in the future, these reviews provide valuable "lessons-learned" information about expected difficulties as well as construction practices and techniques that are likely to be successful.

  2. Process Control Plan for Tank 241-SY-101 Surface Level Rise Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    ESTEY, S.D.

    1999-09-28

    The tank 241-SY-101 transfer system was conceived and designed to address the immediate needs presented by rapidly changing waste conditions in tank 241-SY-101. Within the last year or so, the waste in this tank has exhibited unexpected behavior (Rassat et al. 1999) in the form of rapidly increasing crust growth. This growth has been brought about by a rapidly increasing rate of gas entrapment within the crust. It has been conceived that the lack of crust agitation beginning upon the advent of mixer pump operations may have set-up a more consolidated, gas impermeable barrier when compared to a crust regularly broken up by the prior buoyant displacement events within the tank. As a result, a series of level-growth remediation activities have been developed for tank 241-SY-101. The initial activities are also known as near-term crust mitigation. The first activity of near-term mitigation is to perform the small transfer of convective waste from tank 241-SY-101 into tank 241-SY-102. A 100 kgal transfer represents about a 10% volume reduction allowing a 10% water in-tank dilution. Current thinking holds that this should be enough to dissolve nitrite solids in the crust and perhaps largely eliminate gas retention problem in the crust (Raymond 1999).

  3. Evaluation and comparison of SuperLig{reg_sign} 644, resorcinol-formaldehyde and CS-100 ion exchange materials for the removal of cesium from simulated alkaline supernate

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.N.; Bray, L.A.; Eloviche, R.J.; Bruening, R.L.; Decker, R.M.; Kafka, T.M.; White, L.R.

    1995-03-01

    PNL evaluated three polymeric materials for Cs removal efficiency from a simulated Hanford Neutralized Current Acid Waste (NCAW) supernatant liquid using 200 mL ion exchange columns. Cs loadings (mmole Cs/g resin) were 0.20, 0.18, and 0.039 for Super Lig 644, R-F, and CS-100 (0.045, 0.070, 0.011 mmole Cs/mL resin). Elution of each resin material with 0.5 M HNO{sub 3} required 3.5, 7.0, and 3.2 cv to reach 0.1 C/C{sub 0} for the respective materials, resulting in volume compressions of 27, 20, and 6.9. Peak Cs concentrations during elution was 185, 38.5, and 27.8 C/C{sub 0}. SuperLig 644 had the highest Cs loading per gram in NCAW and the greatest volume compression on aci elution. Because of high density and poor elution, R-F had the highest Cs loading per unit volume and lower volume compression. CS-100, the baseline material for Cs removal at Hanford, was inferior to both SuperLig 644 and R-F in terms of Cs loading and selectivity over sodium.

  4. Breaking in and grabbing a meal: Anaplasma phagocytophilum cellular invasion, nutrient acquisition, and promising tools for their study.

    PubMed

    Truchan, Hilary K; Seidman, David; Carlyon, Jason A

    2013-12-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum invades neutrophils to cause the emerging infection, human granulocytic anaplasmosis. Here, we provide a focused review of the A. phagocytophilum invasin-host cell receptor interactions that promote bacterial entry and the degradative and membrane traffic pathways that the organism exploits to route nutrients to the organelle in which it resides. Because its obligatory intracellular nature hinders knock out-complementation approaches, we also discuss the current methods used to study A. phagocytophilum gene function and the potential benefit of applying novel tools that have advanced studies of other obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens. PMID:24141091

  5. Clinical Trial Transparency Is Up for Grabs: The FDA and Congress Are Expanding Public Access to Data.

    PubMed

    Barlas, Stephen

    2015-07-01

    Years of complaints about poor access to information on "compassionate use" of experimental drugs and a lack of transparency in clinical trials are driving reform efforts by the National Library of Medicine, the Food and Drug Administration, and Congress. PMID:26185404

  6. Splash and grab: biomechanics of peridiole ejection and function of the funicular cord in bird's nest fungi.

    PubMed

    Hassett, Maribeth O; Fischer, Mark W F; Sugawara, Zachary T; Stolze-Rybczynski, Jessica; Money, Nicholas P

    2013-10-01

    The bird's nest fungi (Basidiomycota, Agaricales) package millions of spores into peridioles that are splashed from their basidiomata by the impact of raindrops. In this study we report new information on the discharge mechanism in Crucibulum and Cyathus species revealed with high-speed video. Peridioles were ejected at speeds of 1-5 m per second utilizing less than 2 % of the kinetic energy in falling raindrops. Raindrops that hit the rim of the basidiome were most effective at ejecting peridioles. The mean angle of ejection varied from 67 to 73° and the peridioles travelled over an estimated maximum horizontal distance of 1 m. Each peridiole carried a cord or funiculus that remained in a condensed form during flight. The cord unravelled when its adhesive surface stuck to a surrounding obstacle and acted as a brake that quickly reduced the velocity of the projectile. In nature, this elaborate mechanism tethers peridioles to vegetation in a perfect location for browsing by herbivores. PMID:24119409

  7. Liberate and Grab It, Ingest and Digest It: the GbdR Regulon of the Pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The compatible solute glycine betaine is a powerful osmostress protectant, but many microorganisms can also use it as a nutrient. K. J. Hampel et al. (J. Bacteriol. 196:7–15, 2014) defined a regulon in the notorious pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa that comprises modules for the harvest and import of the glycine betaine biosynthetic precursor choline and its subsequent catabolism to pyruvate. The reported data link the GbdR activator with the metabolism of host-derived compounds (e.g., phosphocholine) and virulence traits of P. aeruginosa. PMID:24163344

  8. Power Grab: At the NCAA's Annual Convention, Smaller Division I Colleges Unite to Overturn a Controversial Rule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolverton, Brad

    2006-01-01

    One issue that drew a great deal of interest at the annual conference of the National Collegiate Athletic Association in Indianapolis January 2006 was how escalating costs are leading to increasing competitive imbalances between smaller colleges and their larger, wealthier rivals. Concern over these inequities led to a group of mostly smaller…

  9. Engineering work plan and design basis for 241-SY ventilation improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, J.A.

    1997-05-19

    There are three tanks in the 241-SY tank farm. Tank 241-SY101 and 241-SY-103 are flammable gas watch list tanks. Tank 241-SY-102 is included in the ventilation improvement process in an effort to further control air flow in the tank farm. This tank farm has only one outlet ventilation port for all three tanks. Flammable gas is released (may be steady and/or periodic) from the waste in the primary tank vapor space. The gas is removed from the tank by an active ventilation system. However, maintaining consistent measurable flow through the tank can be problematic due to the poor control capabilities of existing equipment. Low flow through the tank could allow flammable gas to build up in the tank and possibly exceed the lower flammability limit (LFL), prevent the most rapid removal of flammable gas from the tank after a sudden gas release, and/or cause high vacuum alarms to sound. Using the inlet and outlet down stream butterfly valves performs the current method of controlling flow in tank farm 241-SY. A filter station is installed on the inlet of each tank, but controlling air flow with its 12 inch butterfly valve is difficult. There is also in-leakage through pump and valve pits. Butterfly valves on the downstream side of each tank could also be used to control air flow. However, their large size and the relatively low air velocity make this control method also ineffective. The proposed method of optimizing tank air flow and pressure control capability is to install an air flow controller on the inlet of each existing filter station in SY farm, and seal as best as practical all other air leakage paths. Such air flow controllers have been installed on 241-AN and 241-AW tanks (see drawing H-2-85647).

  10. Pretreatment of Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) sludge: Report for the period October 1990--March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, G.J.; Swanson, J.L.

    1993-04-01

    The current mission of the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site is one of environmental restoration. A major task within this mission is the disposal of large volumes of high-level wastes (HLW) that are stored in underground tanks on the site. Under the current planning assumptions, all high-level tank waste will be vitrified as borosilicate glass and then disposed of in a geologic repository. The costs associated with this disposal scheme are very high. Thus, methods to reduce the volume of glass required to vitrify these wastes are currently being investigated. Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) sludge is a unique transuranic waste that is stored in tank 241- SY-102 on the Hanford site. As the name implies, the bulk of this material consists of waste from operations at the Plutonium Finishing Plant; but, other wastes have also been added (e.g., wastes from decontamination activities). Because the quantities of plutonium and americium in the PFP sludge are greater than 100 nCi/g, this sludge must be handled as a HLW. Approximately 6000 glass canisters would result from vitrifying this waste directly. Sludge washing would reduce the required number of canisters to [approximately]2500, with the volume of glass being driven by the low allowable concentration limit for Cr in the vitrification plant feed. The cost of production and subsequent geologic disposal of each canister of glass is expected to be $0.5 M to $1 M. Thus, an economic incentive exists to develop methods of pretreating the sludge to reduce the number of glass canisters needed to contain the final vitrified product.

  11. Pretreatment of Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) sludge: Report for the period October 1990--March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, G.J.; Swanson, J.L.

    1993-04-01

    The current mission of the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site is one of environmental restoration. A major task within this mission is the disposal of large volumes of high-level wastes (HLW) that are stored in underground tanks on the site. Under the current planning assumptions, all high-level tank waste will be vitrified as borosilicate glass and then disposed of in a geologic repository. The costs associated with this disposal scheme are very high. Thus, methods to reduce the volume of glass required to vitrify these wastes are currently being investigated. Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) sludge is a unique transuranic waste that is stored in tank 241- SY-102 on the Hanford site. As the name implies, the bulk of this material consists of waste from operations at the Plutonium Finishing Plant; but, other wastes have also been added (e.g., wastes from decontamination activities). Because the quantities of plutonium and americium in the PFP sludge are greater than 100 nCi/g, this sludge must be handled as a HLW. Approximately 6000 glass canisters would result from vitrifying this waste directly. Sludge washing would reduce the required number of canisters to {approximately}2500, with the volume of glass being driven by the low allowable concentration limit for Cr in the vitrification plant feed. The cost of production and subsequent geologic disposal of each canister of glass is expected to be $0.5 M to $1 M. Thus, an economic incentive exists to develop methods of pretreating the sludge to reduce the number of glass canisters needed to contain the final vitrified product.

  12. Double-Shell Tank Visual Inspection Changes Resulting from the Tank 241-AY-102 Primary Tank Leak

    SciTech Connect

    Girardot, Crystal L.; Washenfelder, Dennis J.; Johnson, Jeremy M.; Engeman, Jason K.

    2013-11-14

    As part of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Integrity Program, remote visual inspections are utilized to perform qualitative in-service inspections of the DSTs in order to provide a general overview of the condition of the tanks. During routine visual inspections of tank 241-AY-102 (AY-102) in August 2012, anomalies were identified on the annulus floor which resulted in further evaluations. In October 2012, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC determined that the primary tank of AY-102 was leaking. Following identification of the tank AY-102 probable leak cause, evaluations considered the adequacy of the existing annulus inspection frequency with respect to the circumstances of the tank AY-102 1eak and the advancing age of the DST structures. The evaluations concluded that the interval between annulus inspections should be shortened for all DSTs, and each annulus inspection should cover > 95 percent of annulus floor area, and the portion of the primary tank (i.e., dome, sidewall, lower knuckle, and insulating refractory) that is visible from the annulus inspection risers. In March 2013, enhanced visual inspections were performed for the six oldest tanks: 241-AY-101, 241-AZ-101,241-AZ-102, 241-SY-101, 241-SY-102, and 241-SY-103, and no evidence of leakage from the primary tank were observed. Prior to October 2012, the approach for conducting visual examinations of DSTs was to perform a video examination of each tank's interior and annulus regions approximately every five years (not to exceed seven years between inspections). Also, the annulus inspection only covered about 42 percent of the annulus floor.

  13. Thermal and combined thermal and radiolytic reactions involving nitrous oxide, hydrogen, and nitrogen in the gas phase; comparison of gas generation rates in supernate and solid fractions of Tank 241-SY-101 simulated waste

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.

    1995-03-01

    This report summarizes progress made in evaluating me by which flammable gases are generated in Hanford double-shell tank wastes, based on the results of laboratory tests using simulated waste mixtures. Work described in this report. was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the Flammable Gas Safety Project, the purpose of which is to develop information needed to support Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) in their efforts to ensure the safe interim storage of wastes at the Hanford Site. This work is related to gas generation studies being performed at Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), under subcontract to PNL, using simulated wastes, and to studies being performed at VMC using actual wastes.

  14. Biological Physics Prize talk: Grabbing the Cat by the Tail: Studies of DNA Packaging by Single φ 29 Bacteriophage Particles Using Optical Tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustamante, Carlos

    2002-03-01

    I will present our recent results on the packaging of DNA by the connector motor at the base of the head of bacteriophage φ 29. As part of their infection cycle, many viruses must package their newly replicated genomes inside a protein capsid to insure its proper transport and delivery to other host cells. Bacteriophage φ 29 packages its 6.6 mm long double-stranded DNA into a 42 nm dia. x 54 nm high capsid via a portal complex that hydrolyses ATP. This process is remarkable because entropic, electrostatic, and bending energies of the DNA must be overcome to package the DNA to near-crystalline density. We have used optical tweezers to pull on single DNA molecules as they are packaged, thus demonstrating that the portal complex is a force generating motor. We find that this motor can work against loads of up to ~57 picoNewtons on average, making it one of the strongest molecular motors ever reported. Movements of over 5 mm are observed, indicating high processivity. Pauses and slips also occur, particularly at higher forces. We establish the force-velocity relationship of the motor and find that the rate-limiting step of the motor's cycle is force dependent even at low loads. Interestingly, the packaging rate decreases as the prohead is filled, indicating that an internal pressure builds up due to DNA compression. We estimate that at the end of the packaging the capsid pressure is ~15 MegaPascals, corresponding to an internal force of ~50 pN acting on the motor. The biological implications of this internal pressure and the mechano-chemical efficiency of the engine are discussed.

  15. Some Insights into Analytical Bias Involved in the Application of Grab Sampling for Volatile Organic Compounds: A Case Study against Used Tedlar Bags

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Samik; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Sohn, Jong Ryeul

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we have examined the patterns of VOCs released from used Tedlar bags that were once used for the collection under strong source activities. In this way, we attempted to account for the possible bias associated with the repetitive use of Tedlar bags. To this end, we selected the bags that were never heated. All of these target bags were used in ambient temperature (typically at or below 30°C). These bags were also dealt carefully to avoid any mechanical abrasion. This study will provide the essential information regarding the interaction between VOCs and Tedlar bag materials as a potential source of bias in bag sampling approaches. PMID:22235175

  16. Some insights into analytical bias involved in the application of grab sampling for volatile organic compounds: a case study against used Tedlar bags.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Samik; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Sohn, Jong Ryeul

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we have examined the patterns of VOCs released from used Tedlar bags that were once used for the collection under strong source activities. In this way, we attempted to account for the possible bias associated with the repetitive use of Tedlar bags. To this end, we selected the bags that were never heated. All of these target bags were used in ambient temperature (typically at or below 30°C). These bags were also dealt carefully to avoid any mechanical abrasion. This study will provide the essential information regarding the interaction between VOCs and Tedlar bag materials as a potential source of bias in bag sampling approaches. PMID:22235175

  17. Determination of Temperature Limits for Radioactive Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.J.

    1999-08-31

    This document provides a systematic approach for determining the temperature limits for a tank given that the supernate concentration is known, or for ''dry'' tanks, given that the supernate concentration from the last sample of free supernate that was collected is known. A decision tree was developed to provide the logic for the temperature limit determination.

  18. Into the Curriculum. Reading/Language Arts: Literacy Promotion-Who Wants To Be a Millionaire?; Science: Spiders; Social Studies: American Symbols; Social Studies: Arts: Grab the Duct Tape!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bikhazi, Cristi; Payne, Linda M.; Barwick, Martha

    2002-01-01

    Provides four fully developed library media activities that are designed for use with specific curriculum units in reading, language arts, science, and social studies. Library media skills, curriculum objectives, grade levels, instructional roles, procedures, evaluation, and follow-up are described for each activity. (LRW)

  19. Zero tolerance. With health IT money up for grabs, many EHR vendors are offering financing deals to attract business. But, just like shopping for a car, experts warn about reading the fine print before buying.

    PubMed

    Blesch, Gregg; Carlson, Joe

    2010-03-01

    The government, by way of federal stimulus incentives, wants to boost the use of electronic health records. However, physician practices must be careful about low or no-interest offers when buying an EHR system, experts say. "The ultimate power a buyer has--I use the analogy of buying a car--is the ability to say 'no thanks' and walk out of the showroom", says Steven Fox, left, a partner at Post & Schell. PMID:20336867

  20. Adsorption of bacteriocins by ingestible silica compounds.

    PubMed

    Wan, J; Gordon, J; Hickey, M W; Mawson, R F; Coventry, M J

    1996-08-01

    Bacteriocins including nisin, pediocin PO2, brevicin 286 and piscicolin 126 were adsorbed from culture supernates by various food-grade porous silica anti-caking agents and the food colourant, titanium dioxide. All the porous silica (calcium silicate or silicon dioxide) materials showed substantial capacity in adsorbing bacteriocin activities from the culture supernate and biological activity was recovered in the adsorbents. In contrast, the food colourant titanium dioxide adsorbed most of the bacteriocin activity from the supernate, with minimal biological activity retained in the adsorbent. Experiments with piscicolin 126 showed that optimum adsorption could be achieved with Micro-Cel E within 30 min, independent of the supernate pH (2.0-10.0). Piscicolin activity of up to 5 x 10(7) AU g(-1) of Micro-Cel E was obtained after adsorption from culture supernates and the adsorbed piscicolin demonstrated substantial biological activity against Listeria monocytogenes in both broth and a milk growth medium. PMID:8926221

  1. 36 CFR Appendix to Part 1192 - Advisory Guidance

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... grab bar at least 24 inches (610 mm) long should be mounted behind the water closet, and a horizontal grab bar at least 40 inches (1015 mm) long should be mounted on at least one side wall, with one...

  2. Getting your home ready - after the hospital

    MedlinePlus

    ... bars in the bathroom to help steady yourself Bathroom Setup Raising the toilet seat height may make ... have safety bars, or grab bars, in your bathroom: Grab bars should be secured vertically or horizontally ...

  3. WSRC-TR-2003-00130

    SciTech Connect

    O'Bryant, R. F.

    2005-08-03

    High level waste at the SRS F- and H-Area Tank Farms consists of both sludge and supernate fractions. Supernate contains soluble species. Sludge contains both insoluble species and entrained supernate. The nature and extent of contamination present on waste generated during operation of the F- and H-Area Tank Farms is a function of the tank, the nature of the job generating the waste, variability in waste handling techniques, and other factors. Historically, supernate-contaminated waste had been segregated and manifested as supernate waste. A single, comprehensive characterization for supernate has been developed previously (Reference 4). Sludge-contaminated waste has been manifested by combining sludge and supernate waste streams to account for entrained supernate present in sludge. Separate sludge waste stream characterizations have been developed for each of the F- and H-Area Tank Farms (Ref. 1 and 2). Low-activity waste (LAW) consists of both sludge and supernate fractions. Routine LAW is waste that has a maximum dose rate of 50mrem/hr at 5cm for Sealands and 35mrem/hr at 5 cm for Roll-Offs. However, it is intended that routine, low-activity waste not be segregated; therefore, individual low-activity waste cuts may consist of items contaminated with either supernate or sludge in the same container. Historical waste generation rates of the two waste streams will be used to develop a single waste stream distribution representative of low-activity waste. The single distribution is based on the assumption that the actual contamination present on waste in a series of containers from these tanks will be representative of the average supernate/sludge radionuclide distribution. This document develops a characterization for low-activity waste consisting of both radioactive and hazardous constituents. The characterization includes quantification of the average Sealand and Roll-Off containers of routine, low-activity waste. This characterization will apply only to low

  4. Treatment of radioactive wastes from DOE underground storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, J.L.; Egan, B.Z.; Spencer, B.B.; Chase, C.W.; Anderson, K.K.; Bell, J.T.

    1994-06-01

    Bench-scale batch tests have been conducted with sludge and supernate tank waste from the Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to evaluate separation technology process for use in a comprehensive sludge processing flow sheet as a means of concentrating the radionuclides and reducing the volumes of storage tank waste at national sites for final disposal. This paper discusses the separation of the sludge solids and supernate, the basic washing of the sludge solids, the acidic dissolution of the sludge solids, and the removal of the radionuclides from the supernate.

  5. Phase I and II Results from Sr and TRU Precipitation Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, W.

    2000-07-27

    The BNFL removal processes for strontium and transuranic components from the AN-102 and AN-107 supernate originally proposed are co-precipitation methods. In initial testing, the precipitates formed during the strontium and ferric nitrate additions were not filterable.

  6. Splinter removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... remove a splinter, first wash your hands with soap and water. Use tweezers to grab the splinter. Carefully pull it out at the same angle it went in. If the splinter is under the skin or hard to grab: Sterilize a pin or needle by ...

  7. 46 CFR 160.076-21 - Component materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... by § 160.076-25(d)(2)(iii). (c) The average grab breaking strength and tear strength of the inflation....076-25(d)(2)(ii), must be at least 90% of the grab breaking strength and tear strength determined from... Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND...

  8. Engineering Study of 500 ML Sample Bottle Transportation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-08-25

    This engineering study reviews and evaluates all available methods for transportation of 500-mL grab sample bottles, reviews and evaluates transportation requirements and schedules and analyzes and recommends the most cost-effective method for transporting 500-mL grab sample bottles.

  9. Analysis of tank 23H samples in support of salt batch planning

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M. S.; Coleman, C. J.; Diprete, D. P.

    2015-08-14

    Savannah River Remediation obtained three samples from different heights within Tank 23H. The samples were analyzed by Savannah River National Laboratory to support salt batch planning. The results from the analysis indicate the top two samples from the tank appear similar in composition. The lowest sample from the tank contained significantly more solids and a more concentrated salt solution. The filtered supernate from the bottom sample showed ~60% lower Sr-90 and Pu-238 concentrations than the decanted (unfiltered) supernate results which may indicate the presence of some small amount of entrained solid particles in the decanted sample. The mercury concentrations measured in the filtered supernate were fairly low for all three samples ranging from 11.2 to 42.3 mg/L.

  10. Separation of strontium from fecal matter

    DOEpatents

    Kester, Dianne K.

    1995-01-01

    A method of separating strontium from a sample of biomass potentially contaminated with various radionuclides. After the sample is reduced, dissociated, and carried on a first precipitate of actinides, the first precipitate is removed to leave a supernate. Next, oxalic acid is added to the supernate to cause a second precipitate of strontium and calcium. Then, after separating the second precipitate, nitric acid is added to the second precipitate to cause a third precipitate of strontium. The calcium remains in solution and is discarded to leave essentially the precipitate of strontium.

  11. Separation of strontium from fecal matter

    DOEpatents

    Kester, D.K.

    1995-01-03

    A method is presented of separating strontium from a sample of biomass potentially contaminated with various radionuclides. After the sample is reduced, dissociated, and carried on a first precipitate of actinides, the first precipitate is removed to leave a supernate. Next, oxalic acid is added to the supernate to cause a second precipitate of strontium and calcium. Then, after separating the second precipitate, nitric acid is added to the second precipitate to cause a third precipitate of strontium. The calcium remains in solution and is discarded to leave essentially the precipitate of strontium.

  12. Electro-thermally actuated microgrippers with integrated force-feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mølhave, Kristian; Hansen, Ole

    2005-06-01

    Microfabricated grippers and tweezers are promising tools for manipulation of micro- and nanoscale objects. As with ordinary macroscale grippers, the ability to sense the forces involved in grabbing would be advantageous for controlling the operation as well as for measuring the mechanical properties of the grabbed object. A simple design is presented for an electro-thermally actuated microfabricated gripper capable of providing a piezoresistive read-out of the gripper deflection, which can be used to measure the forces applied to the grabbed object. Measurements of actuation of test devices are presented and found to be in reasonable agreement with expected values. Finally, piezoresistive measurements of the gripper deflection are demonstrated.

  13. Interim Report for Crucible-Scale Active Vitrification Testing Envelope B (AZ-102)

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.L.

    2002-08-23

    The purposes of this work were to demonstrate the evaporation of AZ-102 supernate, demonstrate the vitrification of the evaporated concentrate in a crucible melt, and to demonstrate acceptance of the resulting glass by analysis (chemical and radionuclides) and durability testing.

  14. On the sense of the physical laws and the frontiers of knowledge.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrynkiewicz, A. Z.

    1996-12-01

    The development of modern physics tends to limit the area of irrationalism. The explanation of the structure and dynamics of the phenomena of the world around us is working against superstitions and faith in the activity of supernational forces. However, it remains a question whether ultimate limits of our knowledge do still exist.

  15. Short communication: Improved method for centrifugal recovery of bacteria from raw milk applied to sensitive real-time quantitative PCR detection of Salmonella spp

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Centrifugation of milk is widely used as a separation/concentration step in assays for pathogenic microorganisms. Separation of the cream and liquid supernate from the pellet containing sedimented solids, somatic cells and microorganisms eliminates many interfering substances, and resuspension of th...

  16. Mitsuokella jalaludinii inhibits growth of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella continues to be a significant human health threat, and the objective of this study was to identify microorganisms with the potential to improve porcine food-safety through their antagonism of Salmonella. Anaerobic culture supernates of 973 bacterial isolates from the gastrointestinal trac...

  17. 40 CFR 63.457 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... starch indicator solution and continue titrating until the blue color disappears. The normality of the...: ER15ap98.000 (6) To prepare the starch indicator solution, add a small amount of cold water to 5 g starch..., and let settle overnight. Use clear supernate for starch indicator solution. (7) To prepare the...

  18. Characterization of Samples from the 3H Evaporator System Including Effects of Recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, W.R.

    2001-05-15

    Analysis of several series of samples from the 3H Evaporator System have been completed. The goal of this work was to determine the effects of 3H operation including recycle of concentrated supernate from Tank 30H into the sludge layer of Tank 32H.

  19. Bases, Assumptions, and Results of the Flowsheet Calculations for the Decision Phase Salt Disposition Alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Elder, H.H.

    2001-07-11

    The HLW salt waste (salt cake and supernate) now stored at the SRS must be treated to remove insoluble sludge solids and reduce the soluble concentration of radioactive cesium radioactive strontium and transuranic contaminants (principally Pu and Np). These treatments will enable the salt solution to be processed for disposal as saltstone, a solid low-level waste.

  20. Borehole Miner - Extendible Nozzle Development for Radioactive Waste Dislodging and Retrieval from Underground Storage Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    CW Enderlin; DG Alberts; JA Bamberger; M White

    1998-09-25

    This report summarizes development of borehole-miner extendible-nozzle water-jetting technology for dislodging and retrieving salt cake, sludge} and supernate to remediate underground storage tanks full of radioactive waste. The extendible-nozzle development was based on commercial borehole-miner technology.

  1. Actin filament barbed-end capping activity in neutrophil lysates: the role of capping protein-beta 2.

    PubMed

    DiNubile, M J; Cassimeris, L; Joyce, M; Zigmond, S H

    1995-12-01

    A barbed-end capping activity was found in high speed supernates of neutrophils lysed in submicromolar calcium. In dilute supernate (> or = 100-fold dilution of cytoplasm), this activity accounted for most of the inhibition of barbed-end elongation of pyrenyl-G-actin from spectrin-F-actin seeds. Pointed-end elongation from gelsolin-capped F-actin seeds was not inhibited at comparable concentrations of supernate, thus excluding actin monomer sequestration as a cause of the observed inhibition. Most of the capping activity was due to capping protein-beta 2 (a homologue of cap Z). Thus, while immunoadsorption of > or = 95% of the gelsolin in the supernate did not decrease capping activity, immunoadsorption of capping protein-beta 2 reduced capping activity proportionally to the amount of capping protein-beta 2 adsorbed. Depletion of > 90% of capping protein-beta 2 from the supernate removed 90% of its capping activity. The functional properties of the capping activity were defined. The dissociation constant for binding to barbed ends (determined by steady state and kinetic analyses) was approximately 1-2 nM; the on-rate of capping was between 7 x 10(5) and 5 x 10(6) M-1 s-1; and the off-rate was approximately 2 x 10(-3) s-1. The concentration of capper free in the intact cell (determined by adsorption of supernate with spectrin-actin seeds) was estimated to be approximately 1-2 microM. Thus, there appeared to be enough high affinity capper to cap all the barbed ends in vivo. Nevertheless, immediately after lysis with detergent, neutrophils contained sites that nucleate barbed-end elongation of pyrenyl-G-actin. These barbed ends subsequently become capped with a time course and concentration dependence similar to that of spectrin-F-actin seeds in high speed supernates. These observations suggest that, despite the excess of high affinity capper, some ends either are not capped in vivo or are transiently uncapped upon lysis and dilution. PMID:8590796

  2. Tank 26F-2F Evaporator Study

    SciTech Connect

    Adu-Wusu, K.

    2012-12-19

    Tank 26F supernate sample was sent by Savannah River Remediation to Savannah River National Laboratory for evaporation test to help understand the underlying cause of the recent gravity drain line (GDL) pluggage during operation of the 2F Evaporator system. The supernate sample was characterized prior to the evaporation test. The evaporation test involved boiling the supernate in an open beaker until the density of the concentrate (evaporation product) was between 1.4 to 1.5 g/mL. It was followed by filtering and washing of the precipitated solids with deionized water. The concentrate supernate (or concentrate filtrate), the damp unwashed precipitated solids, and the wash filtrates were characterized. All the precipitated solids dissolved during water washing. A semi-quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis on the unwashed precipitated solids revealed their composition. All the compounds with the exception of silica (silicon oxide) are known to be readily soluble in water. Hence, their dissolution during water washing is not unexpected. Even though silica is a sparingly water-soluble compound, its dissolution is also not surprising. This stems from its small fraction in the solids as a whole and also its relative freshness. Assuming similar supernate characteristics, flushing the GDL with water (preferably warm) should facilitate dissolution and removal of future pluggage events as long as build up/aging of the sparingly soluble constituent (silica) is limited. On the other hand, since the amount of silica formed is relatively small, it is quite possible dissolution of the more soluble larger fraction will cause disintegration or fragmentation of the sparingly soluble smaller fraction (that may be embedded in the larger soluble solid mass) and allow its removal via suspension in the flushing water.

  3. CHARACTERIZATION AND ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION DEMONSTRATION WITH A 3 LITER TANK 51H SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M; John Pareizs, J; Cj Bannochie, C; Michael Stone, M; Damon Click, D; Daniel McCabe, D

    2008-02-29

    A 3-liter sludge slurry sample was sent to SRNL for demonstration of a low temperature aluminum dissolution process. The sludge was characterized before and after the aluminum dissolution. Post aluminum dissolution sludge settling and the stability of the decanted supernate were also observed. The characterization of the as-received 3-liter sample of Tank 51H sludge slurry shows a typical high aluminum HM sludge. The XRD analysis of the dried solids indicates Boehmite is the predominant crystalline form of aluminum in the sludge solids. However, amorphous phases of aluminum present in the sludge would not be identified using this analytical technique. The low temperature (55 C) aluminum dissolution process was effective at dissolving aluminum from the sludge. Over the three week test, {approx}42% of the aluminum was dissolved out of the sludge solids. The process appears to be selective for aluminum with no other metals dissolving to any appreciable extent. At the termination of the three week test, the aluminum concentration in the supernate had not leveled off indicating more aluminum could be dissolved from the sludge with longer contact times or higher temperatures. The slow aluminum dissolution rate in the test may indicate the dissolution of the Boehmite form of aluminum however; insufficient kinetic data exists to confirm this hypothesis. The aluminum dissolution process appears to have minimal impact on the settling rate of the post aluminum dissolution sludge. However, limited settling data were generated during the test to quantify the effects. The sludge settling was complete after approximately twelve days. The supernate decanted from the settled sludge after aluminum dissolution appears stable and did not precipitate aluminum over the course of several months. A mixture of the decanted supernate with Tank 11 simulated supernate was also stable with respect to precipitation.

  4. GY SAMPLING THEORY IN ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 1: ASSESSING SOIL SPLITTING PROTOCOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five soil sample splitting methods (riffle splitting, paper cone riffle splitting, fractional shoveling, coning and quartering, and grab sampling) were evaluated with synthetic samples to verify Pierre Gy sampling theory expectations. Individually prepared samples consisting of l...

  5. SAMPLING OIL-WATER MIXTURES AT OHMSETT (OIL AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SIMULATED ENVIRONMENTAL TEST TANK)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes procedures developed at the Oil and Hazardous Material Simulated Environmental Test Tank (OHMSETT) for sampling oil and water mixtures. Two procedures for sampling in containers are discussed: grab and stratified sampling. Both of these techniques require str...

  6. Soyuz 27 Return Samples: Air Quality Aboard the International Space Station: Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2012-01-01

    The toxicological assessment of 6 GSCs from the ISS is shown. The average recoveries of the 3 surrogate standards from the grab sample containers were as follows: C-13-acetone, 115%; fluorobenzene, 108%; and chlorobenzene, 93%.

  7. First Aid and Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... First-Aid Kit Food Safety for Your Family Gun Safety Halloween Candy Hints Household Safety Checklists Household ... Climbing, and Grabbing Household Safety: Preventing Injuries From Firearms Household Safety: Preventing Injuries in the Crib Household ...

  8. The Amphipoda of Sea City, Kuwait.-The Senticaudata (Crustacea).

    PubMed

    Myers, Alan A; Nithyanandan, Manickam

    2016-01-01

    Thirteen species of Amphipoda Senticaudata were collected in Sea City, Kuwait using a Van Veen grab and an Ocklemann sledge. Of these seven species were new to science and are described and figured in this contribution. PMID:27395936

  9. Occurrence of pesticides and contaminants of emerging concern in surface waters: Influence of surrounding land use and evaluation of sampling methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biologically active compounds originating from agricultural, residential, and industrial sources have been detected in surface waters, which have invoked concern of their potential ecological and human health effects. Automated and grab surface water samples, passive water samples - Polar Organic Co...

  10. 46 CFR 164.019-7 - Non-standard components; acceptance criteria and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Grab Strap (applies to buoyant cushions only); (vii) Tie Tape; (viii) Reinforcing Tape; (ix) Thread: (x... which differ in any way, e.g., size, material composition, construction, may utilize the...

  11. 46 CFR 164.019-7 - Non-standard components; acceptance criteria and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Grab Strap (applies to buoyant cushions only); (vii) Tie Tape; (viii) Reinforcing Tape; (ix) Thread: (x... which differ in any way, e.g., size, material composition, construction, may utilize the...

  12. STS 125 Samples: the Hubble Servicing Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2010-01-01

    The toxicological assessments of 2 grab sample canisters (GSCs) from the Shuttle are reported in a table. Based on the end-of-mission sample, the Shuttle atmosphere was acceptable for human respiration.

  13. Overcoming Obstacles While Toilet Training an Older Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... an adult-size toilet as she imagines monsters crawling out to grab her or fears that she ... Academy of Pediatrics) The information contained on this Web site should not be used as a substitute ...

  14. Soyuz 24 Return Samples: Assessment of Air Quality Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Fifteen mini-grab sample containers (m-GSCs) were returned aboard Soyuz. This is the first time all samples were acquired with the mini-grab samplers. The toxicological assessment of 15 m-GSCs from the ISS is shown. The recoveries of the 3 internal standards, C(13)-acetone, fluorobenzene, and chlorobenzene, from the GSCs averaged 75, 97 and 79%, respectively. Formaldehyde badges were not returned on Soyuz 24

  15. Monitoring and control systems for an EB flue gas treatment pilot plant—Part I. Analytical system and methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licki, J.; Chmielewski, A. G.; Zakrzewska-Trznadel, G.; Frank, N. W.

    The methods and system used for determination of the gas composition at the inlet and outlet of the pilot installation are presented. The concentrations of SO 2, NO, NO x( NO + NO2) and O 2 are measured continuously by two independent emission monitoring systems (one at the inlet and another at the outlet) and occasionally by the grab sample system, i.e. by manual analytical methods. The remaining components of the gas are determined only by the grab sample system.

  16. Characterization of Core Samples from a Hardened Crust Layer in Tank 4F

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M. L.

    2005-09-28

    Waste removal operations in Tank 4F are scheduled to begin in late 2005 to provide material for Sludge Batch 5. Mining/probing operations to support installation of submersible mixer pumps encountered a hard layer of material at {approx}45'' to 50'' from the bottom of the tank. Attempts at penetrating the hard layer using a manual mining tool in several different risers were not successful. A core-sampling tool was used to obtain samples of the hard crust layer in Tank 4F for characterization. Three 12'' core samples and a dip sample of the supernate near the surface of the hard layer were sent to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for characterization. X-ray Diffraction (XRD) results for the crystalline solids from both sample FTF-434 and FTF-435 identifies the major component of both samples as Burkeite (Na{sub 6}(CO{sub 3})(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}). All of the other data collected on the crystalline solids from the Tank 4F core samples support this conclusion. The conditions in Tank 4F for the last twenty years have been ideal for Burkeite formation. The tank has been largely undisturbed with a tank temperature consistently above 30 C, a carbonate to sulfate molar ratio in the supernate conducive to Burkeite formation, and slow evaporation of the supernate phase. Thermodynamic modeling and the results of a Burkeite solubility test confirm that a ratio of 1:1:12 for the volumes of Burkeite solids, supernate, and inhibited water will dissolve all of the Burkeite. These ratios could be used to remove the 6'' layer of Burkeite from Tank 4F with no mixing. However, the thermodynamic modeling and the solubility test neglect the sludge layer beneath the Burkeite crust in Tank 4F. Settled sludge in Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste tanks usually contains greater than 75% interstitial supernate by volume. If the supernate in the sludge layer should mix into the solution used to dissolve the Burkeite, significantly more inhibited water would be needed to

  17. Improved estimation of cholesteryl ester transfer/exchange activity in serum or plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Groener, J.E.; Pelton, R.W.; Kostner, G.M.

    1986-02-01

    This simple, routine assay for measuring cholesteryl ester transfer/exchange activity in human plasma is based on the removal of interfering lipoproteins--very-low-density (VLDL) and low-density lipoproteins (LDL)--by precipitation with polyethylene glycol. High-density lipoproteins (HDL) in the samples do not affect the results. The supernate after precipitation is mixed with (/sup 14/C)cholesteryl ester-labeled LDL as donor and with HDL as the acceptor for the cholesteryl ester. After incubation for 16 h at 37 degrees C, LDL is separated from HDL by precipitation with dextran sulfate and the radioactivity measured in the supernate, which contains the HDL. The assay is applicable to samples containing as much as 10 mmol of triglycerides per liter. The within-assay CV was 2.7%, the day-to-day CV 6.8%. Results compared well with those by conventional procedures.

  18. CHARACTERIZATION OF TANK 11H AND TANK 51H POST ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION PROCESS SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M; Daniel McCabe, D

    2008-05-16

    A dip sample of the liquid phase from Tank 11H and a 3-L slurry sample from Tank 51H were obtained and sent to Savannah River National Laboratory for characterization. These samples provide data to verify the amount of aluminum dissolved from the sludge as a result of the low temperature aluminum dissolution process conducted in Tank 51H. The characterization results for the as-received Tank 11H and Tank 51H supernate samples and the total dried solids of the Tank 51H sludge slurry sample appear quite good with respect to the precision of the sample replicates and minimal contamination present in the blank. The two supernate samples show similar concentrations for the major components as expected.

  19. Statement of work for Los Alamos National Laboratory on ferrocyanide studies

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, R.D.

    1990-11-01

    During management of the Hanford Single-Shell Waste Tanks (SST), the site operator precipitated cesium from the supernate as nickel cesium ferrocyanide to allow disposal of the supernate as low-level waste. This freed valuable tank storage space for receipt of additional radioactive waste generated by Hanford defense operations. Concern has arisen that the ferrocyanide could react explosively with nitrate, another waste component, and/or its radiolysis product nitrite. The current Hanford Principal Contractor, Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), has requested that the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluate the potential for explosive ferrocyanide reactions on a worst case basis. The worst case is believed, at this time, to be a mixture of nickel cesium ferrocyanide and a mixture of nitrate and nitrite without any dilution by inert waste constituents. PNL will perform energetic and small-scale explosion tests. The large-scale explosion tests (s) will be performed by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

  20. Decomposition of tetraphenylborate precipitates used to isolate Cs-137 from Savannah River Site high-level waste

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrara, D.M.; Bibler, N.E.; Ha, B.C.

    1993-03-01

    This paper presents results of the radioactive demonstration of the Precipitate Hydrolysis Process (PHP) that will be performed in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site. The PHP destroys the tetraphenylborate precipitate that is used at SRS to isolate Cs-137 from caustic High-Level Waste (HLW) supernates. This process is necessary to decrease the amount of organic compounds going to the melter in the DWPF. Actual radioactive precipitate containing Cs-137 was used for this demonstration.

  1. Decanting of Neutralized H-Canyon Unirradiated Nuclear Material High Activity Waste Streams

    SciTech Connect

    BRONIKOWSKI, MICHAELG.

    2004-08-05

    An option to dispose of the High Activity Waste (HAW) stream from the processing of unirradiated materials directly to Saltstone is being evaluated to conserve High Level Waste (HLW) tank farm space and to reduce the future production of HLW glass logs. To meet the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), decanting the supernate from precipitated solids was proposed to reduce mercury and radionuclide levels in the waste. Only the caustic supernate will then be sent to Saltstone. Verification that the Saltstone WAC will be met has involved a series of laboratory studies using surrogate and actual HAW solutions from H-Canyon. The initial experiment involved addition of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) to a surrogate HAW test solution and subsequent decanting of the supernate away from the precipitated solids. The chemical composition of the surrogate solution was based on a composition defined from analyses of actual HAW solutions generated during dissolution of unirradiated nuclear materials in H-Canyon [1]. Results from testing the surrogate HAW solution were reported in Reference [2]. Information obtained from the surrogate test solution study was used to define additional experiments on actual HAW solutions obtained from H-Canyon. These experiments were conducted with samples from three different batches of HAW solutions. The first and third HAW samples (HAW No.1 and HAW No.3 solutions) contained the centrifuge filter cake material from a gelatin strike that is periodically added to the waste stream. The second HAW sample (HAW No.2 solution) did not contain filter cake material. Monosodium titanate (MST) was added to the HAW No.2 and HAW No.3 solutions after addition of NaOH was complete and before the settling step. The addition of MST was to improve the decontamination of alpha and beta emitters (primarily plutonium and strontium) from the supernate. The addition of excess NaOH and the addition of MST were expected to result in sufficient alpha and beta

  2. Chemical derivatization to enhance chemical/oxidative stability of resorcinol-formaldehyde resin

    SciTech Connect

    Hubler, T.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop modified resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) resin with enhanced chemical/oxidative stability in conditions typically encountered in the remediation of radioactive waste tanks. R-F resin is a regenerable organic ion-exchanger developed at Savannah River Technology Center that is being considered for use in the selective removal of radioactive cesium from alkaline waste tank supernates at both the Hanford and Savannah River sites.

  3. Liquid Nitrogen Cryo-Impacting: a New Concept for Cell Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Smucker, Richard A.; Pfister, Robert M.

    1975-01-01

    High-efficiency disruption of bacteria can be accomplished in 2 or more min by the new procedure of liquid nitrogen cryo-impacting. Release of the dipicolinic acid-Ca2+ chelate paralleled the breakage of Bacillus megaterium endospores. Lactate dehydrogenase activity was much better in supernates from liquid nitrogen cryo-impacting-broken Escherichia coli cells than in those from sonically treated and broken E. coli cells. Images PMID:810088

  4. Glass formulation requirements for DWPF coupled operations using crystalline silicotitanates

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J.R.; Andrews, M.K.

    1997-01-09

    The design basis DWPF flowsheet couples the vitrification of two waste streams: (1) a washed sludge and (2) a hydrolyzed sodium tetraphenylborate precipitate product, PHA. The PHA contains cesium-137 which had been precipitated from the tank supernate with sodium tetraphenylborate. Smaller amounts of strontium and plutonium adsorbed on sodium titanate are also present with the PHA feed. Currently, DWPF is running a sludge-only flowsheet while working towards solutions to the problems encountered with In Tank Precipitation (ITP). The sludge loading for the sludge-only flowsheet and for the anticipated coupled operations is 28 wt% on an oxide basis. For the coupled operation, it is essential to balance the treatment of the two waste streams such that no supernate remains after immobilization of all the sludge. An alternative to ITP and sodium titanate is the removal of Cs-137, Sr-90, and plutonium from the tank supernate by ion exchange using crystalline silicotitanate (CST). This material has been shown to effectively sorb these elements from the supernate. It is also known that CST sorbs plutonium. The loaded CST could then be immobilized with the sludge during vitrification. It has recently been demonstrated that CST loadings approaching 70 wt% for a CST-only glass can be achieved using a borosilicate glass formulation which can be processed by the DWPF melter. Initial efforts on coupled waste streams with simulated DWPF sludge show promise that a borosilicate glass formulation can incorporate both sludge and CST. This paper presents the bases for research efforts to develop a glass formulation which will incorporate sludge and CST at loadings appropriate for DWPF operation.

  5. Preliminary technical data summary No. 3 for the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Landon, L.F.

    1980-05-01

    This document presents an update on the best information presently available for the purpose of establishing the basis for the design of a Defense Waste Processing Facility. Objective of this project is to provide a facility to fix the radionuclides present in Savannah River Plant (SRP) high-level liquid waste in a high-integrity form (glass). Flowsheets and material balances reflect the alternate CAB case including the incorporation of low-level supernate in concrete. (DLC)

  6. Generation and detection of metal ions and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emissions from the pretreatment processes for recycling spent lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Wang, Guangxu; Xu, Zhenming

    2016-06-01

    The recycling of spent lithium-ion batteries brings benefits to both economic and environmental terms, but it can also lead to contaminants in a workshop environment. This study focused on metals, non-metals and volatile organic compounds generated by the discharging and dismantling pretreatment processes which are prerequisite for recycling spent lithium-ion batteries. After discharging in NaCl solution, metal contents in supernate and concentrated liquor were detected. Among results of condition #2, #3, #4 and #5, supernate and concentrated liquor contain high levels of Na, Al, Fe; middle levels of Co, Li, Cu, Ca, Zn; and low levels of Mn, Sn, Cr, Zn, Ba, K, Mg, V. The Hg, Ag, Cr and V are not detected in any of the analyzed supernate. 10wt% NaCl solution was a better discharging condition for high discharge efficiency, less possible harm to environment. To collect the gas released from dismantled LIB belts, a set of gas collecting system devices was designed independently. Two predominant organic vapour compounds were dimethyl carbonate (4.298mgh(-1)) and tert-amylbenzene (0.749mgh(-1)) from one dismantled battery cell. To make sure the concentrations of dimethyl carbonate under recommended industrial exposure limit (REL) of 100mgL(-1), for a workshop on dismantling capacity of 1000kg spent LIBs, the minimum flow rate of ventilating pump should be 235.16m(3)h(-1). PMID:27021697

  7. Coagglutination and counter immunoelectrophoresis in the rapid diagnosis of typhoid fever.

    PubMed

    Shetty, N P; Srinivasa, H; Bhat, P

    1985-07-01

    The efficacy of two methods--coagglutination (COAG) and counter immunoelectrophoresis (CIE)--in the rapid diagnosis of typhoid fever was studied in parallel with blood and clot cultures on 114 clinically suspected cases. Retrospective analysis showed that only 58 eventually were discharged and had typhoid fever. Antigen detection on their sera was done by both methods, concomitant with antigen detection on culture supernates by CIE. Sera from 50 controls were subjected to both tests. Agglutinating anti-serum being unsatisfactory in the CIE system, anti-serum to the LPS fraction of Salmonella typhi "O" 901 was used in both tests after absorption with Escherichia coli and Salmonella paratyphi A. Analysis of data with reference to retrospectively confirmed typhoid cases show that S. typhi was isolated in 58.6% and 58.3% of blood and clot cultures; antigen detection by CIE in their supernates was 81.1% and 79.2%, respectively. This correlated closely with serum COAG (81.0%) in contrast to serum CIE (5.7%). Thus, COAG was superior to CIE for serology. However, CIE done on culture supernates precludes such tedious procedures as absorption of staphylococcal agglutinins and the confirmatory blocking test. PMID:4014078

  8. [Using Excess Activated Sludge Treated 4-Chlorophenol Contained Waste Water to Cultivate Chlorella vulgaris].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Chen, Xiu-rong; Yan, Long; He, Yi-xuan; Shi, Zhen-dong

    2015-04-01

    Using different rations of sludge extracts and supernate from 4-Chlorophenol (4-CP) simulated wastewater's excess sludge after centrifugation to cultivate the Chlorella vulgaris to achieve the goal of excess sludge utilization together with chlorella cultivating. The experiments were performed in 500 mL flasks with different rations of sludge extracts & BG-11 and supernate & BG-11 in a light growth chamber respectively. Number of algal cells, Chlorophyll, enzyme activity, oil and water total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), total organic carbon (TOC), toxicity index were investigated. Result showed that the nutrition supplies and toxicity in the excess sludge were removed efficiently via Chlorella vulgaris, the removal rates of TN and TP were at least 40% and 90% respectively; After 10 days cultivation, the density growth of 50% sludge extracts was 20 times higher of the beginning while its chlorophyll content was lower than that of the blank group. Sludge extracts could promote the proliferation of algae, but were not conducive to the synthesis of chlorophyll. The quantity of SOD in per cell showed Chlorella vulgaris gave a positive response via stimulation from toxicant in sludge extracts and supernate. The best time for collecting chlorella vulgaris was the fifth day of cultivation, taking neutral oil accumulation as the evaluating indicator for its utilization combined with the removal of supplies and toxicity. PMID:26164919

  9. Chemical species of plutonium in Hanford radioactive tank waste

    SciTech Connect

    Barney, G.S.

    1997-10-22

    Large quantities of radioactive wastes have been generated at the Hanford Site over its operating life. The wastes with the highest activities are stored underground in 177 large (mostly one million gallon volume) concrete tanks with steel liners. The wastes contain processing chemicals, cladding chemicals, fission products, and actinides that were neutralized to a basic pH before addition to the tanks to prevent corrosion of the steel liners. Because the mission of the Hanford Site was to provide plutonium for defense purposes, the amount of plutonium lost to the wastes was relatively small. The best estimate of the amount of plutonium lost to all the waste tanks is about 500 kg. Given uncertainties in the measurements, some estimates are as high as 1,000 kg (Roetman et al. 1994). The wastes generally consist of (1) a sludge layer generated by precipitation of dissolved metals from aqueous wastes solutions during neutralization with sodium hydroxide, (2) a salt cake layer formed by crystallization of salts after evaporation of the supernate solution, and (3) an aqueous supernate solution that exists as a separate layer or as liquid contained in cavities between sludge or salt cake particles. The identity of chemical species of plutonium in these wastes will allow a better understanding of the behavior of the plutonium during storage in tanks, retrieval of the wastes, and processing of the wastes. Plutonium chemistry in the wastes is important to criticality and environmental concerns, and in processing the wastes for final disposal. Plutonium has been found to exist mainly in the sludge layers of the tanks along with other precipitated metal hydrous oxides. This is expected due to its low solubility in basic aqueous solutions. Tank supernate solutions do not contain high concentrations of plutonium even though some tanks contain high concentrations of complexing agents. The solutions also contain significant concentrations of hydroxide which competes with other

  10. Shaping self-initiated toileting in infants.

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, P M; Lancioni, G E; Ball, T S; Oliva, D S

    1985-01-01

    We evaluated a method for training infants to cue their mothers on the need to eliminate. The program consisted of three phases: Phase I was directed at establishing a close temporal relationship between body signals (straining) and subsequent defecations on the potty; Phase II was designed to establish a relationship between prompted and unprompted potty reaching/grabbing responses and eliminations (defecations and urinations) on the potty; and Phase III served to establish unprompted potty reaching/grabbing responses as reliable precursors of eliminations. Four babies, between 3.1 and 6.6 months old, all completed the training before age 1 year, with no negative side effects. PMID:4086412

  11. Polychaeta of the Kara and Pechora seas: Data of the 2012 trawl survey.

    PubMed

    Frolova, E A; Syomin, V L

    2016-07-01

    The species composition of the polychaetes derived from ichthyological and Sigsbee trawls in the Pechora and Kara seas in 2012 was studied and compared with the grab survey data of 1993-1995. The distribution of the large sabellidae, nektobenthic, and bathypelagic species that are poorly caught by a grab has been determined for the first time. Changes that were observed in the biogeographical polychaete structure in the Kara Sea (a higher proportion of the boreal species and a lower proportion of the Arctic species) may reflect a response of zoobenthos to the Arctic warming in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. PMID:27595826

  12. Boildown Study on Supernatant Liquid Retrieved from AW-106 in December 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Page, Jason S.

    2013-06-04

    This document reports the results of a boildown study using a composite created from supernatant liquid grab samples retrieved from tank 241-AW-106 in December of 2012. The composite was made using predetermined volumes of the grab samples which accounted for layering of the supernatant liquid in the tank. The finished composite was a clear, yellow liquid containing no visible solids at hot cell ambient temperatures (24 - 27 °C). The density of the test composite was measured in the hot cell immediately before the boildown study and was 1.266 g/mL at 27.1 °C.

  13. Toxicological Assessment of ISS Air Quality: SpaceX-2 First Ingress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    One mini-grab sample container (M-GSC) was collected by crew members onboard ISS during first ingress into SpaceX-2 on March 3, 2013, three days after late cargo loading and a pre-launch clean air purge. Recoveries of the three surrogate standards from the m-GSC were: 13C-acetone, 97%; fluorobenzene, 95%; and chlorobenzene, 68%.

  14. Harnessing online tools to track-and treat-pediatric illness: new tools are giving researchers, physicians, and child-care centers insight into the spread of disease.

    PubMed

    Grifantini, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Measles. A strange polio-like paralysis. Ebola. In the last year, the spread of infectious disease has become standard fare for the nightly news. As such diseases grab headlines, child-care providers, families, schools, and public health officials are turning to new ways of understanding and coping with the spread of disease. PMID:25974910

  15. Thirty Frames per Second

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    Analyzing real motion with frame-by-frame precision can be conducted using modestly priced digital-video camcorders. Although well below the 1,000 frames-per-second threshold of high-speed cameras, commercially available camcorders grab 30 frames per second. A replay dissected at this lower frequency is fun to watch, challenges students'…

  16. Control & competition square off for primacy in the uranium market

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    Who dominates? Who competes? How level is the playing field? And how free is the free market? Of more than academic interest, these questions are being thrashed out by a bevy of market participants. But resolution is no dainty game of croquet; it looks more like a rugby scrum. So grab your binoculars and let the games begin.

  17. A Probe Intermix Procedure for Fading Response Prompts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billingsley, Felix F.

    1987-01-01

    A prompt fading method was employed to teach an eight-year-old student with severe behavior disorders the self-paced use of a functional behavior (requesting rather than grabbing food items). Initial pairing of prompts and natural cues was followed by a mix of prompted and probe (unprompted) trials. (Author/JW)

  18. How to Serve Content to PDA Users on-the-Go

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuddy, Colleen

    2006-01-01

    Fans of mobile devices are everywhere, and they are using their PDAs, smart phones, and mobile phones to access Web-based content. Chances are that they are trying to access your library's Web site or find library-based content for their devices. In this article, the author presents some tips on how to serve those who wants to grab some fast info…

  19. Praying Mantis Bending Core Breakoff and Retention Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Bao, Xiaoqi; Lindermann, Randel A.

    2011-01-01

    Sampling cores requires the controlled breakoff of the core at a known location with respect to the drill end. An additional problem is designing a mechanism that can be implemented at a small scale, yet is robust and versatile enough to be used for a variety of core samples. The new design consists of a set of tubes (a drill tube, an outer tube, and an inner tube) and means of sliding the inner and outer tubes axially relative to each other. Additionally, a sample tube can be housed inside the inner tube for storing the sample. The inner tube fits inside the outer tube, which fits inside the drill tube. The inner and outer tubes can move axially relative to each other. The inner tube presents two lamellae with two opposing grabbing teeth and one pushing tooth. The pushing tooth is offset axially from the grabbing teeth. The teeth can move radially and their motion is controlled by the outer tube. The outer tube presents two lamellae with radial extrusions to control the inner tube lamellae motion. In breaking the core, the mechanism creates two support points (the grabbing teeth and the bit tip) and one push point. The core is broken in bending. The grabbing teeth can also act as a core retention mechanism. The praying mantis that is disclosed herein is an active core breaking/retention mechanism that requires only one additional actuator other than the drilling actuator. It can break cores that are attached to the borehole bottom as

  20. Soyuz 25 Return Samples: Assessment of Air Quality Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Six mini-grab sample containers (m-GSCs) were returned aboard Soyuz 25. The toxicological assessment of 6 m-GSCs from the ISS is shown. The recoveries of the 3 internal standards, C-13-acetone, fluorobenzene, and chlorobenzene, from the GSCs averaged 76, 108 and 88%, respectively. Formaldehyde badges were not returned aboard Soyuz 25.

  1. Selected Readings on School Reform Summer 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selected Readings on School Reform, 1999

    1999-01-01

    This compilation of reprinted journal and newspaper articles covers the following topics: (1) The Front Lines; (2) Federal Policy; (3) Charter Schools; (4) School Choice; (5) Standards, Tests, and Accountability; (6) Teacher Quality; (7) Curriculum and Content; (8) Higher Education; and (9) Grab Bag. Each section is preceded by commentaries on…

  2. Teaching Bayesian Statistics to Undergraduate Students through Debates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Sepideh; Stewart, Wayne

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a lecturer's approach to teaching Bayesian statistics to students who were only exposed to the classical paradigm. The study shows how the lecturer extended himself by making use of ventriloquist dolls to grab hold of students' attention and embed important ideas in revealing the differences between the Bayesian and…

  3. Further research on the biological activities and the safety of raspberry ketone are needed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Raspberry ketone supplements have grabbed consumer attention with the possibility they might help burn fat and aid weight loss. While raspberry ketone occurs naturally, and is found in raspberry fruit, most is synthetically produced for use in commercial products as flavorings, fragrances, or dietar...

  4. Evaluating Retirement Income Security for Illinois Public School Teachers. Public Pension Project Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Richard W.; Southgate, Benjamin G.

    2014-01-01

    The financial problems afflicting the Illinois teacher pension plan have grabbed headlines. An equally important problem, though underappreciated, is that relatively few teachers benefit much from the plan. This report evaluates the pension benefits provided to Illinois public school teachers. The researchers project annual and lifetime pension…

  5. Investing in Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Governors Association, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Investing in Innovation" provides a snapshot of trends in the states and identifies a wide range of strategies now employed. California's big investments, such as $3 billion for stem cell research, have already grabbed national headlines. But states like Arizona, Indiana and North Dakota, which haven't historically been big research and…

  6. Increasing Appropriate Social Interactions of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders Using Social Stories[TM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scattone, Dorothy; Tingstrom, Daniel H.; Wilczynski, Susan M.

    2006-01-01

    To date there are more than one dozen studies that validate the use of Social Stories[TM] as an effective behavioral intervention. Many of these studies focused on decreasing inappropriate behaviors (e.g., aggression, screaming, and grabbing toys), and most combined Social Stories with another intervention. The present study used a multiple…

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF SAMPLING AND ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF NITROUS OXIDE FROM FOSSIL FUEL COMBUSTION SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report documents the technical approach and results achieved while developing a grab sampling method and an automated, on-line gas chromatography method suitable to characterize nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from fossil fuel combustion sources. The two methods developed have...

  8. A MORE COST-EFFECTIVE EMAP-W BENTHIC MACROFAUNAL SAMPLE UNIT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The standard EPA West Coast Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP-W) benthic macrofaunal sampling protocol is to collect 30-50 random benthic samples per reporting unit (e.g., estuary, region) using a 0.1 m2 grab and to sort out macrofauna using a 1.0 mm mesh scre...

  9. Systematic paleontology of Quaternary ostracode assemblages from the Gulf of Alaska; Part 3, Family Cytheruridae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brouwers, E.M.

    1994-01-01

    Forty-six species of podocopid ostracodes, most belonging to the Family Cytheruridae, are reported from Quaternary continental-shelf sediments of the Gulf of Alaska. Descriptions and illustrations are provided for 27 new species, 11 previously described species, and 8 species retained in open nomenclature. This report is based on 198 bottom grab samples collected during 1975, 1979, and 1980.

  10. Benefits of a Game-Based Review Module in Chemistry Courses for Nonmajors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stringfield, Thomas W.; Kramer, Eugene F.

    2014-01-01

    Review sessions provide an opportunity for students to reflect on the material they have learned. Game shows can grab the students' interest and make them invested in the outcomes of their learning. A module developed around game show review was studied in chemistry courses for nonmajors to determine whether benefits could be found in…

  11. Using Multimedia for Admission Recruitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gudema, Louis

    1995-01-01

    Multimedia can grab the attention of prospective students in an engaging, appealing way, while giving admission officers the opportunity to deliver information about every facet of campus life. Describes multimedia, its potential, and the production process as well as five current distribution methods. Discusses appropriateness of multimedia for…

  12. STS 117 Return Samples: Assessment of Air Quality aboard the Shuttle (STS-117) and International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2007-01-01

    The toxicological assessments of 2 grab sample canisters (GSCs) and one pair of formaldehyde badges from the Shuttle are reported. Analytical methods have not changed from earlier reports. The recoveries of the 3 surrogates (C-13-acetone, fluorobenzene, and chlorobenzene) from the 2 GSCs averaged 109, 95, and 97%, respectively. Three formaldehyde controls averaged 93% recovery. The Shuttle atmosphere was acceptable for human respiration.

  13. Online Learning 2.0: Strategies for a Mature Market

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Sean; LaBrie, John

    2012-01-01

    It is an exciting time for online education. Lately, there has been breathless talk of a "revolution" and massive "disruption," largely based on Massively Open Online Course (MOOC) models pioneered by universities such as MIT and Stanford, and headline-grabbing start-up companies such as Udacity and Coursera. Meanwhile, university professional and…

  14. Youngsters' Mental Health and Pyschosocial Problems: What are the Data?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Mental Health in Schools at UCLA, 2008

    2008-01-01

    In many arenas, the demand for data has outstripped the availability of good data and has increased the tendency to grab for whatever numbers are being circulated in the literature. As a result, when someone says: "This is the best data available," it is essential to remember that "best" does not always mean good. This caution is particularly…

  15. Teaching the Great War through Peace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shortell, Catherine K.; Paddock, Troy R. E.

    2011-01-01

    With all of the time constraints and institutional pressures that teachers face, it may seem odd to suggest using an anomalous event such as the Christmas Truce to study the first World War. However, the uniqueness of this event helps grab the attention of students and, as the authors demonstrate, can be used both to illustrate the common…

  16. An inexpensive flow-proportional sampler for tipping buckets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reliable evaluation of water quality requires accurate assessment of contaminant concentrations, often in conjunction with quantification of flow volume. Short-duration, high-concentration flow events can be missed with occasional grab sampling. Although powered, programmable units that collect samp...

  17. Practitioner Review: Beyond Shaken Baby Syndrome--What Influences the Outcomes for Infants following Traumatic Brain Injury?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashton, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) in infancy is relatively common, and is likely to lead to poorer outcomes than injuries sustained later in childhood. While the headlines have been grabbed by infant TBI caused by abuse, often known as shaken baby syndrome, the evidence base for how to support children following TBI in infancy is thin.…

  18. 40 CFR 122.21 - Application for a permit (applicable to State programs, see § 123.25).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... pollutant under 40 CFR subchapters N or O. When no analytical method is approved under Part 136 or required..., must be used unless specified otherwise at 40 CFR Part 136. However, a minimum of one grab sample may... II at 40 CFR 136.3 (e)) may be composited in the laboratory, provided that container,...

  19. Capacity for DNA-barcode based taxonomy in support of Great Lakes biological monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enumerating organisms collected via nets and sediment grabs is a mainstay of aquatic ecology. Since morphological taxonomy can require considerable resources and expertise, DNA barcode-based identification of mixed-organism samples offers a valuable tool in support of biological...

  20. Creating a Culture of Language Awareness in Content-Based Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindahl, Kristen; Watkins, Naomi M.

    2015-01-01

    A "toolkit" approach to professional development is frequently used to assist teachers of English language learners (ELLs), wherein teachers are provided a grab bag of activities and strategies to implement in their classrooms. However, today's heightened language demands call for teachers to develop teacher language awareness (TLA), a…

  1. Ethics in the Superintendency: The Actions of Malfeasance by a Few Superintendents Undermine the Credibility of Honest, Hard-Working Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardini, Priscilla

    2004-01-01

    Experts suggest that moral and ethical lapses are undermining public trust in schools and their leaders--institutions and individuals long held to a higher standard of behavior than their peers in corporate and political arenas. Incidents of financial kickbacks, nepotism and conflicts of interest may grab the news media's attention. Yet…

  2. Why Latina/os Need More than Twenty-Five of Affirmative Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Kevin R.

    2004-01-01

    A time limit ensures periodic review of a race-based program to make sure that it is maintained only if needed or, if necessary, modified to better achieve its goals. The 25-year time limit announced by Justice O'Connor grabbed public attention which shows that University of Michigan affirmative action cases would be of monumental importance to…

  3. Collection and measurement of atmospheric contaminants during Skylab AM/MDA unmanned altitude chamber test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The analytical data obtained from both cryogenic and grab sampling of the atmosphere of the Skylab AM/MDA during an 84 hour unmanned chamber run are reported. The level of contaminants found at different points of the test chamber are tabulated. The results indicate that there was no clear trend of increasing or decreasing contaminant levels during the test run.

  4. 46 CFR 177.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Storm rails. 177.920 Section 177.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  5. 46 CFR 116.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Storm rails. 116.920 Section 116.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150... and Guards § 116.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must be installed where...

  6. 46 CFR 116.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Storm rails. 116.920 Section 116.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150... and Guards § 116.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must be installed where...

  7. 46 CFR 116.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Storm rails. 116.920 Section 116.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150... and Guards § 116.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must be installed where...

  8. 46 CFR 177.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Storm rails. 177.920 Section 177.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  9. 46 CFR 177.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Storm rails. 177.920 Section 177.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  10. 46 CFR 177.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Storm rails. 177.920 Section 177.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  11. 46 CFR 177.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Storm rails. 177.920 Section 177.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  12. 46 CFR 116.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Storm rails. 116.920 Section 116.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150... and Guards § 116.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must be installed where...

  13. 46 CFR 116.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Storm rails. 116.920 Section 116.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150... and Guards § 116.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must be installed where...

  14. Best of 2009 Sci-Tech Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sapp, Gregg

    2010-01-01

    Science often reflects society's concerns, and a number of the top books of 2009 address two of the biggest headline-grabbing topics--climate change and health-care reform. This article presents a list of 35 titles that address climate change and health-care reform. Some titles cover the entirety of the global-warming threat (James Lovelock's "The…

  15. In vivo and in vitro neurochemical-based assessments of wastewater effluents from the Maumee River area of concern.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were caged for four days at multiple locations upstream and downstream of a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) discharge into the Maumee River (USA, OH). Grab water samples collected at the same location were extracted using several different ...

  16. Expertise Increases the Functional Overlap between Face and Object Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeeff, Thomas J.; McGugin, Rankin W.; Tong, Frank; Gauthier, Isabel

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that expertise with objects can interfere with face processing. Although competition occurs between faces and objects of expertise, it remains unclear whether this reflects an expertise-specific bottleneck or the fact that objects of expertise grab attention and thereby consume more central resources. We investigated the…

  17. 40 CFR 98.264 - Monitoring and QA/QC requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... measure total mass flow of phosphorous-bearing feed under 40 CFR part 60 or part 63. ... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Phosphoric Acid Production § 98.264 Monitoring and QA/QC... monthly grab sample of phosphate rock (consumed in the production of phosphoric acid) using the...

  18. 40 CFR 98.264 - Monitoring and QA/QC requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... used to measure total mass flow of phosphorous-bearing feed under 40 CFR part 60 or part 63. ... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Phosphoric Acid Production § 98.264 Monitoring and QA/QC... content of each monthly grab sample of phosphate rock (consumed in the production of phosphoric acid)....

  19. 40 CFR 98.264 - Monitoring and QA/QC requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... that is used to measure total mass flow of phosphorous-bearing feed under 40 CFR part 60 or part 63. ... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Phosphoric Acid Production § 98.264 Monitoring and QA/QC... carbon content of each monthly grab sample of phosphate rock (consumed in the production of...

  20. 40 CFR 98.264 - Monitoring and QA/QC requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... used to measure total mass flow of phosphorous-bearing feed under 40 CFR part 60 or part 63. ... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Phosphoric Acid Production § 98.264 Monitoring and QA/QC... content of each monthly grab sample of phosphate rock (consumed in the production of phosphoric acid)....

  1. 40 CFR 98.264 - Monitoring and QA/QC requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... used to measure total mass flow of phosphorous-bearing feed under 40 CFR part 60 or part 63. ... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Phosphoric Acid Production § 98.264 Monitoring and QA/QC... content of each monthly grab sample of phosphate rock (consumed in the production of phosphoric acid)....

  2. Pushing the limit. Minnesota probe of Accretive's collection practices raises new questions on hospital billing policies.

    PubMed

    Evans, Melanie

    2012-04-30

    The collection practices of hospitals once again grabbed the spotlight, with a report from Minnesota Attorney General Lori Swanson, left, that raises questions about aggressive techniques used by Accretive Health at Fairview Health Services in Minneapolis. While Fairview has already ended its contract with Accretive, a number of large systems still use the Chicago-based billing company. PMID:22667032

  3. Big Science and Big Big Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Steve

    2012-01-01

    In his introduction to the science shows feature in "Primary Science" 115, Ian B. Dunne asks the question "Why have science shows?" He lists a host of very sound reasons, starting with because "science is fun" so why not engage and entertain, inspire, grab attention and encourage them to learn? He goes onto to state that: "Even in today's…

  4. Split Decision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guhin, Paula

    2010-01-01

    This article describes an art project designed for middle- and high-school students to (1) understand the meaning of the terms composite and photomontage, and be able to use them correctly; (2) select and evaluate a range of subject matter; (3) combine three different photographs to create an attention-grabbing, entertaining work; and (4) mount…

  5. STS 119 Return Samples: Assessment of Air Quality aboard the Shuttle (STS-119) and International Space Station (15A)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2009-01-01

    The toxicological assessments of 2 grab sample canisters (GSCs) from the Shuttle are reported. Analytical methods have not changed from earlier reports. The recoveries of the 3 surrogates (C-13-acetone, fluorobenzene, and chlorobenzene) from the 2 GSCs averaged 106, 106, and 101 %,respectively. Based on the end-of-mission sample, the Shuttle atmosphere was acceptable for human respiration.

  6. STS 120 Return Samples: Assessment of Air Quality Aboard the Shuttle (STS-120) and International Space Station (10A)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2008-01-01

    The toxicological assessments of 2 grab sample canisters (GSCs) from the Shuttle are reported. Formaldehyde badges were not used. Analytical methods have not changed from earlier reports. The recoveries of the 3 surrogates (C-13-acetone, fluorobenzene, and chlorobenzene) from the 2 GSCs averaged 111, 82, and 78%, respectively. The Shuttle atmosphere was acceptable for human respiration.

  7. New Technology and Intermodal Competition I: Technical Possibilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Switzer, Israel

    The development of a news delivery system capable of implementation with current technologies and usable on most cable television systems is described. The choice of digital frame grabbing and high speed digital transmission is justified. Then the choice of hardware for home terminals and transmission equipment is explained. It is claimed that…

  8. Hands-On English: A Periodical for Teachers and Tutors of Adult English as a Second Language, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silliman, Anna, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    These six issues of the periodical offer teachers and tutors practical ideas for teaching English as a Second Language (ESL) to adults. The publications include such teaching activities as multilevel crossword puzzles, multilevel dictation, a grammar grab-bag, role play games, an ESL board game, and a newspaper search activity. They also offer…

  9. They Dig It!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallett, Rachel

    2005-01-01

    The first few years of the author's career, she struggled to find a science experience that would grab her sixth-grade students from the start--something that would let them know that coming to class would be worth their time and that they would be learning in an exciting environment. She finally found it: The perfect project idea bubbled up as…

  10. Embedded Advertising on Television: Classic Legal Environment and Business Law Content "Brought to You by ..."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cain, Rita Marie

    2010-01-01

    Students are familiar with some or all depictions of branded products in popular television shows. But they probably have no idea the number of legal and public policy issues these product appearances are generating. This article explains how embedded advertising in television shows can be the attention-grabbing vehicle for teaching numerous…

  11. Revisiting First-Year Teacher Burnout: New South Carolina Educators in the Era of Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilagan, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    Forty-six percent of the nation's teachers are expected to leave the profession by their fifth year in the classroom. This alarming statistic has grabbed the attention of federal, state, and local leaders. In South Carolina alone, 28,500 teachers left the profession in the last five years, or an average of 5,700 per year. This translates to a…

  12. NASA targets asteroid mission as a step towards Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2015-05-01

    NASA is planning an ambitious mission to a near-Earth asteroid that will involve a robotic craft grabbing a large boulder from the body and moving it into a stable orbit around the Moon, where it will then be studied in detail by astronauts.

  13. Reading, Writing and Radicalism: Right-Wing Women and Education in the Post-War Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benowitz, June Melby

    2009-01-01

    The headlines "Who's Trying to Ruin Our Schools?" and "Danger's Ahead in the Public Schools" grabbed the attention of the American public during the early 1950s as mainstream publications reacted to efforts by right-wing organizations to influence the curricula of America's elementary and secondary schools. "A bewildering disease that threatens to…

  14. Diagnostic accuracy of rectoanal mucosal swab of feedlot cattle for detection and enumeration of Salmonella enterica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cattle are noted carriers of the foodborne pathogen Salmonella enterica. The perceived need to decrease the potential human health risk posed by excretion of this pathogen has resulted in numerous studies examining the factors that influence cattle shedding of Salmonella. Fecal grab (FG) samples hav...

  15. Friend Finder (Game)

    MedlinePlus

    ... form Search Español Vea esta página en español Video and Media Friend Finder (Game) Email Embed Grab ... Might Also Like 1:02 The Protection Connection (Video) Teaches kids how to protect themselves online with ...

  16. Drum Circles and the National Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fidyk, Steve

    2009-01-01

    The beauty of hand drums is that a child of nearly any age can grab one and get a sound. So how can classroom teachers incorporate this enjoyable activity into something that's actually educational? For young students especially, a drum circle can be liberating. Children can be given various responsibilities--as participants, circle organizers,…

  17. 46 CFR 160.002-3 - Materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... in the filling, and shall have a breaking strength (grab method) of not less than 105 pounds in the... strength of 200 pounds. The tie tapes and drawstrings shall be treated with a mildew-inhibitor of the type... webbing having a minimum breaking strength of 400 pounds. One-inch cotton webbing meeting the...

  18. 46 CFR 160.005-3 - Materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the filling, and shall have a breaking strength (grab method) of not less than 105 pounds in the warp... strength of 200 pounds. The tie tapes and drawstrings shall be treated with a mildew-inhibitor of the type... webbing having a minimum breaking strength of 400 pounds. One-inch cotton webbing meeting the...

  19. 46 CFR 160.002-3 - Materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... in the filling, and shall have a breaking strength (grab method) of not less than 105 pounds in the... strength of 200 pounds. The tie tapes and drawstrings shall be treated with a mildew-inhibitor of the type... webbing having a minimum breaking strength of 400 pounds. One-inch cotton webbing meeting the...

  20. 46 CFR 160.005-3 - Materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the filling, and shall have a breaking strength (grab method) of not less than 105 pounds in the warp... strength of 200 pounds. The tie tapes and drawstrings shall be treated with a mildew-inhibitor of the type... webbing having a minimum breaking strength of 400 pounds. One-inch cotton webbing meeting the...

  1. Chesapeake Bay Critters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackay-Atha, Lynne

    2005-01-01

    When students enter the author's classroom on the first day of school, they are greeted with live crabs scuttling around in large bins. The crabs are her way of grabbing students' attention and launching the unit on the Chesapeake Bay watershed. She chooses to start the year with this unit because, despite the fact that the Potomac River can be…

  2. Universities Have a Key Role in Global Access to Medicines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panjabi, Rajesh; Rajkumar, Rahul; Kim, Jim Yong

    2008-01-01

    Around the world, the fight for affordable medical treatment is intensifying. Headline-grabbing battles are being waged in India, where the Chennai High Court recently decided a major constitutional case over access to lifesaving cancer medication. In Thailand, Abbott Laboratories, a multinational pharmaceutical giant, has withdrawn registration…

  3. Environmental Stewardship through Service Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaye, Cathryn Berger

    2011-01-01

    New school buildings often grab headlines that highlight their green features and LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification, yet nearly 90% of schools in the United States were built before 1985, with the largest portion built from 1950-69 to accommodate the baby boom generation (National Clearinghouse for Educational…

  4. Viewing Volcanoes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wighting, Mervyn J.

    2005-01-01

    When Mount St. Helens threatened to erupt again in 2004, it grabbed headlines and captured the imagination of the country. Science classrooms nationwide used the event as an opportunity to make real-world connections to Earth science concepts introduced in the classroom. Thanks to modern technology, teachers no longer have to wait for the next…

  5. School Bus Safety: What Can Our Schools Do to Protect Our Children?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dargan, Thomas J.; Silverstone, Adam H.

    2014-01-01

    School districts and school bus contractors are entrusted with the most important of all road users--our nation's children. In the wake of recent newsworthy accidents and attention grabbing headlines regarding unfit bus drivers, claims premised upon school bus accidents have become increasingly tangential and, in turn, personal injury attorneys…

  6. Teaching a Child with Autism and Severe Language Delays to Reject: Direct and Indirect Effects of Functional Communication Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Christian A.; Drasgow, Erik; Halle, James W.; Brucker, Jennifer M.

    2005-01-01

    We used functional communication training to teach Bob, a 10-year-old student with autism and severe language delays, to reject items by touching an icon. Our initial assessment revealed that Bob's behaviours serving a rejecting function consisted of pushing away, yelling, bear hugging-grabbing, and leaving. We used prompting, differential…

  7. SOIL-GAS MEASUREMENT FOR DETECTION OF SUBSURFACE ORGANIC CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Lockheed Gas Analysis System (LGAS) grab-sampling method and the PETREX Static Surface Trapping Pyrolysis/Mass Spectrometry (SST-Py/MS) passive sampling technique for soil-gas measurement have been field tested at the Pittman Lateral near Henderson, Nevada. This site has unco...

  8. A ``Limited First Sample'' Approach to Mars Sample Return — Lessons from the Apollo Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppler, D. B.; Draper, D.; Gruener, J.

    2012-06-01

    Complex, multi-opportunity Mars sample return approaches have failed to be selected as a new start twice since 1985. We advocate adopting a simpler strategy of "grab-and-go" for the initial sample return, similar to the approach taken on Apollo 11.

  9. Releasable High-Mechanical-Advantage Linear Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Gordon H.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed linear actuator includes ball-screw mechanism made to engage or disengage piston as needed. Requires low power to maintain release and no power to maintain engagement. Pins sliding radially in solenoids in yoke engage or disengage slot in piston. With help of optoelectronic feedback, yoke made to follow free piston during disengagement so always in position to "grab" piston.

  10. 15 CFR 970.701 - Significant adverse environmental effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... under a license of scale-model mining systems which simulate commercial recovery could adversely affect... setting of instruments; (7) Sampling by box core, small diameter core or grab sampler, to determine seabed... mining tests under exploration licenses will be extremely small. (ii) Blanketing of benthic fauna...

  11. 15 CFR 970.701 - Significant adverse environmental effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... under a license of scale-model mining systems which simulate commercial recovery could adversely affect... setting of instruments; (7) Sampling by box core, small diameter core or grab sampler, to determine seabed... mining tests under exploration licenses will be extremely small. (ii) Blanketing of benthic fauna...

  12. 26. INSIDE THE 'DOG HOUSE' AT THE REAR END OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. INSIDE THE 'DOG HOUSE' AT THE REAR END OF THE WALKING BEAM. HERE ARE HOUSED THE HOIST ENGINE, WHICH CONTROLS MOVEMENT OF THE BEAM; AND THE ENGINES THAT CONTROL THE OPENING AND CLOSING AND SWIVEL OF THE GRAB BUCKET. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  13. With "Restorative Justice," Colleges Strive to Educate Student Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipka, Sara

    2009-01-01

    Student-conduct administrators around the country are hailing restorative justice as the next big thing. A blend of mediation and restitution, it seeks to resolve a conflict by identifying the harms caused and devising, with suggestions from both victims and offenders, an agreement to repair them. That approach to discipline grabs campus officials…

  14. 474 Science Activities for Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Moira D.

    This book uses a child-initiated, whole language approach to help children have fun while exploring the world of science. The activities are divided into 23 units. Each unit begins with an "Attention Getter," the purpose of which is to introduce the unit to children in a way that grabs their attention, stimulates their interest, and creates…

  15. NATIONAL SCREENING SURVEY OF EDCS IN MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2002 and 2003 the USEPA's Office of Research and Development asked Regional EPA inspectors, state EPA inspectors and municipal plant operators to collect four gallons effluent, either as a grab or composite sample, from up to 50 wastewater treatment plants (WWTP), and ship the...

  16. Motivational Videos and the Library Media Specialist: Teachers and Students on Film--Take 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohot, Cameron Brooke; Pfortmiller, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    Today's students are bombarded with digital imagery and sound nearly 24 hours of the day. Video use in the classroom is engaging, and a teacher can instantly grab her students' attention. The content of the videos comes from many sources; the curriculum, the student handbook, and even the school rules. By creating the videos, teachers are not only…

  17. VOCS IN AMBIENT AIR NEAR WORLD TRADE CENTER SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Beginning on September 22, 2001 and continuing through February 2002, ambient air samples were collected at three sites within a block of ground zero and at a fourth site on the 16th floor of a building at 290 Broadway. Grab samples were collected in evacuated, electro-polished...

  18. How to Select Children's Shoes

    MedlinePlus

    ... shoe be shaped like the child's foot. Your child can go barefoot in a protected environment such as indoors. Toddler Shoes Shoes for toddlers, ... t grab the floor, which could cause your child to fall. Choose a light-weight shoe, since children use a ... School-Age Children's Shoes Style ...

  19. STS 127 Return Samples: Assessment of Air Quality aboard the Shuttle (STS-127) and International Space Station (2J/A)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2010-01-01

    The toxicological assessments of 2 grab sample canisters (GSCs) from the Shuttle are reported. The toxicological assessment of 9 GSCs and 6 pairs of formaldehyde badges from the ISS is also reported. Other than a problem with traces of acrolein in the samples, the air quality was acceptable for respiration.

  20. Reforming telecommunications: How utilities fare on Capitol Hill

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, S.A.

    1994-06-15

    While the traditional players in the telephone and cable industries have grabbed headlines and jockeyed for the inside track on the [open quotes]information superhighway,[close quotes] electric and gas utilities and natural gas pipelines have been quietly positioning themselves to play a strategic role in the actual construction of the [open quotes]National Information Infrastructure[close quotes] (NII).

  1. Let's Play Supermarket "Evidential" Sweep: Developing Students' Awareness of the Need to Select Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Rachel; Gadd, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Despite having built a sustained focus on historical thinking into their planning for progression across Years 7 to 13, Rachel Foster and Sarah Gadd remained frustrated with stubborn weaknesses in the evidential thinking of students in examination classes. Students slipped too easily into grabbing any fact or source extract as evidence, and failed…

  2. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS MEASUREMENTS IN NEW YORK CITY IN RESPONSE TO THE EVENTS OF 9/11

    EPA Science Inventory

    From September 22, 2001 through February 2002, ambient air was sampled in lower Manhattan, New York at three sites within a block of ground zero and at a fourth site 500-m northwest of the World Trade Center. Over 190 grab samples were collected in evacuated, electro-polished s...

  3. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN LEVELS OF HETEROTROPHIC BACTERIA AND WATER QUALITY PARAMETERS IN A DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conventional plating methods were used to quantify heterotrophic bacteria from a drinking water distribution system. Three media, plate count agar (PCA), R2A agar and sheep blood agar (TSA-SB) were used to determine heterotrophic plate count (HPC) levels. Grab samples were collec...

  4. Governors Face Political Hurdles in Seeking Power to Appoint Chiefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2008-01-01

    Convinced of the connection between the quality of their schools and the future of their states--not to mention their own political reputations--some governors are seeking a bigger role in shaping education policy by grabbing for more control over their state schools chiefs. Governors note that they are responsible for managing state budgets, of…

  5. Wrist sprain - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... your wrist starts to feel better, try the ball drill. With your palm up, place a rubber ball in your hand and grab it with your ... and wrist still while you gently squeeze the ball. Squeeze for about 30 seconds, then release. Repeat ...

  6. Assessing potential effects of highway runoff on receiving-water quality at selected sites in Oregon with the Stochastic Empirical Loading and Dilution Model (SELDM)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Risley, John C.; Granato, Gregory E.

    2014-01-01

    6. An analysis of the use of grab sampling and nonstochastic upstream modeling methods was done to evaluate the potential effects on modeling outcomes. Additional analyses using surrogate water-quality datasets for the upstream basin and highway catchment were provided for six Oregon study sites t

  7. 40 CFR 61.107 - Emission determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... shall be made. For relatively constant flow rates only periodic measurements are necessary. (2... operation. Periodic sampling (grab samples) may be used only with EPA's prior approval. Such approval may be... potential to release radionuclides into the air, periodic confirmatory measurements should be made to...

  8. 40 CFR 61.93 - Emission monitoring and test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... or frequent flow rate measurements shall be made. For relatively constant flow rates only periodic... applicable to batch processes when the unit is in operation. Periodic sampling (grab samples) may be used... have a potential to release radionuclides into the air, periodic confirmatory measurements shall...

  9. Books, Biodiversity, and Beyond!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Governor, Donna; Helms, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Reading in science class does not have to be boring, but it is no secret to students or teachers that textbooks are not much fun to read. It is always a challenge for teachers to find reading materials that would grab the interests of their students. In this article, the author relates how she used Biodiversity, a nonfiction book by Dorothy…

  10. Low-Carbon Computing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hignite, Karla

    2009-01-01

    Green information technology (IT) is grabbing more mainstream headlines--and for good reason. Computing, data processing, and electronic file storage collectively account for a significant and growing share of energy consumption in the business world and on higher education campuses. With greater scrutiny of all activities that contribute to an…

  11. A Look Ahead: Supreme Court Likely to Have a Blockbuster Term

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawke, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    It is not often that Supreme Court watchers agree; however, right now, it seems that most agree on one thing: the Supreme Court term that started in October 2013 is going to be a blockbuster. The docket over the last couple of years has had more than its fair share of headline-grabbing cases, from gay marriage to Obamacare to the Voting Rights…

  12. A MORE COST-EFFECTIVE EMAP-ESTUARIES BENTHIC MACROFAUNAL SAMPLING PROTOCOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The standard benthic macrofaunal sampling protocol in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Pacific Coast Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) is to collect a minimum of 30 random benthic samples per reporting unit (e.g., estuary) using a 0.1 m2 grab and to...

  13. 76 FR 32340 - Federal Travel Regulation; Temporary Duty (TDY) Travel Allowances (Taxes); Relocation Allowances...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-06

    ... Relocation Advisory Board (GRAB) concerning calculation of reimbursements for taxes on relocation expenses... agencies can and will perform all of the calculations accurately, so that employees can verify the calculations, and so that employees will be more likely to believe that they are being treated fairly...

  14. Lake Michigan: Nearshore variability and a nearshore-offshore distinction in water quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a high-resolution survey of the Lake Michigan nearshore using towed electronic instrumentation and fixed station sampling (1049 km at the approximate 20-m depth contour and grab samples at 15 sites). The principal variability in the alongshore reach was generally re...

  15. A Year in Review 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    "Summers To Step Down, Ending Tumult at Harvard" kicked off in 2006 as one of the most talked about news stories in higher education. Only a few months later, an event involving another elite institution would grab even more headlines, and with more serious ramifications. Three Duke University men's lacrosse players were indicted on rape charges.…

  16. Insights into the Hydrology of the Willamette River Basin Using d18O of Water during Summer Baseflow Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of different water sources on the Willamette River, Oregon were characterized using d18O of water during summer baseflow conditions in August 2006. We collected samples from the entire length of the Willamette River, a distance of more than 275 km. Mid-river grab-samples were collected...

  17. Is Managing by Wandering around Still Relevant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckner, Terrie M.

    2008-01-01

    Administrators sometimes let themselves get locked into the "front end" of their buildings. There are phone calls to take, emails to answer, payments to post, and events to plan. It's easy to find the day coming to a close and they haven't even taken time to grab lunch or venture beyond the lobby of the building. In this article, the author…

  18. Report on sampling and analysis of ambient air at the central waste complex

    SciTech Connect

    Stauffer, M., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-13

    Over 160 ambient indoor air samples were collected from warehouses at the Central Waste Complex used for the storage of low- level radioactive and mixed wastes. These grab (SUMMA) samples were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using a modified EPA TO-14 procedure. The data from this survey suggest that several buildings had elevated concentrations of volatile organic compounds.

  19. 40 CFR 61.174 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... with § 61.172(c), the owner or operator shall use reference methods in 40 CFR part 60, appendix A, as... Arsenic Emissions From Primary Copper Smelters § 61.174 Test methods and procedures. (a) To determine... converter arsenic charging rate as follows: (1) Collect daily grab samples of copper matte and any...

  20. 40 CFR 61.174 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... with § 61.172(c), the owner or operator shall use reference methods in 40 CFR part 60, appendix A, as... Arsenic Emissions From Primary Copper Smelters § 61.174 Test methods and procedures. (a) To determine... converter arsenic charging rate as follows: (1) Collect daily grab samples of copper matte and any...

  1. 40 CFR 61.174 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... with § 61.172(c), the owner or operator shall use reference methods in 40 CFR part 60, appendix A, as... Arsenic Emissions From Primary Copper Smelters § 61.174 Test methods and procedures. (a) To determine... converter arsenic charging rate as follows: (1) Collect daily grab samples of copper matte and any...

  2. 40 CFR 61.174 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... with § 61.172(c), the owner or operator shall use reference methods in 40 CFR part 60, appendix A, as... Arsenic Emissions From Primary Copper Smelters § 61.174 Test methods and procedures. (a) To determine... converter arsenic charging rate as follows: (1) Collect daily grab samples of copper matte and any...

  3. 40 CFR 61.174 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... with § 61.172(c), the owner or operator shall use reference methods in 40 CFR part 60, appendix A, as... Arsenic Emissions From Primary Copper Smelters § 61.174 Test methods and procedures. (a) To determine... converter arsenic charging rate as follows: (1) Collect daily grab samples of copper matte and any...

  4. A COMPARISON OF ARGO MERCHANT OIL AND SEDIMENT HYDROCARBONS FROM NANTUCKET SHOALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface sediment samples collected from the Nantucket Shoals Argo Merchant wreck site area in February, 1977, were analyzed for hydrocarbon content by gas chromatography. Analysis of sediment grab subsections revealed no clear trend of hydrocarbon contamination as a function of d...

  5. The World at Your Fingerprints!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zohni, Hebatallah

    2011-01-01

    The author was teaching Arabic and Translation to 16-year-old students in a French-Egyptian school in Cairo, Egypt during a full academic year. It was the first time that the school had offered this compulsory course. There were quite some challenges: first the students were teenagers so grabbing their attention for a language class was not the…

  6. 36 CFR 1192.107 - Restrooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., provided such fixtures do not interfere with access to the water closet. Fold-down or retractable seats or... out of the way. (2) The height of the water closet shall be 17 inches to 19 inches measured to the top... 24 inches long shall be mounted behind the water closet, and a horizontal grab bar at least 40...

  7. Prejudice, Pride, and Sectarian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArthur, Benjamin

    2005-01-01

    In an era when the gods of diversity are supreme--enforcing an arbitrary sensitivity on campus and tossing all other moral propositions up for grabs--here and there the Protestant principles that shaped American still assert their institutional role "in loco parentis." Benjamin McArthur recognizes that loyalty to scripture seems anathema to…

  8. STEM Education: A Deficit Framework for the Twenty First Century? A Sociocultural Socioscientific Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeidler, Dana L.

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitous of STEM education initiatives in recent years has created a bandwagon that has moved at nearly light speed. The impulse of the science education community and policy-makers is to grab hold for dear life or be marginalized from subsequent discussions about the necessity and consequences of using STEM initiatives to prepare and inform…

  9. 24 CFR 100.203 - Reasonable modifications of existing premises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... handicap asks his or her landlord for permission to install grab bars in the bathroom at his or her own... for the modification on the tenant agreeing to restore the bathroom to the condition that existed.... Example (2): An applicant for rental housing has a child who uses a wheelchair. The bathroom door in...

  10. 24 CFR 100.203 - Reasonable modifications of existing premises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... handicap asks his or her landlord for permission to install grab bars in the bathroom at his or her own... for the modification on the tenant agreeing to restore the bathroom to the condition that existed.... Example (2): An applicant for rental housing has a child who uses a wheelchair. The bathroom door in...

  11. 46 CFR 127.310 - Where rails required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (391/2 inches) from the deck except that, where this height would interfere with the normal operation of the vessel, the cognizant OCMI may approve a lesser height. (b) At exposed peripheries of the... rail of the required height would be impracticable, the cognizant OCMI may accept hand grabs or a...

  12. Simple Ways to Make Real Capacitors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Rhett

    2014-01-01

    Many of us have grabbed two pieces of aluminum foil and a paper towel, quickly sandwiched them together, and exclaimed in lecture, "Look! It's easy to make a capacitor!" Then we move on from there, calculating things such as capacitances with various dielectrics or plate sizes, the capacitance of capacitor networks, RC circuits,…

  13. 76 FR 18325 - Federal Travel Regulation; FTR Cases 2007-304 and 2003-309, Relocation Allowances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ... primarily on the RBPC's recommendations, was published in the Federal Register on November 23, 2004 (69 FR... published in the Federal Register on August 3, 2007 (72 FR 43216). Due to the long policy-development... RBPC proposed rule (69 FR 68111, November 23, 2004) and the GRAB proposed rule (72 FR 43216, August...

  14. NAEP and Policy: Chasing the Tail of the Assessment Tiger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diket, Read M.; Brewer, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper grabs hold of the "assessment tiger" by considering the history of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) "Arts Report Cards" for the visual arts, which were constructed and have been administered four times within thirty-five years. Two purposes of the NAEP have persisted since its founding: (1) measuring learning and…

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF SAMPLING AND ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF NITROUS OXIDE FROM FOSSIL FUEL COMBUSTION SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report documents the technical approach and results achieved while developing a grab sampling method and an automated, on-line gas chromatography method suitable to characterize nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from fossil fuel combustion sources. he two methods developed have b...

  16. Trends & Indicators: Enrollment Period

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harney, John O.

    2011-01-01

    Since New England Board of Higher Education (NEBHE) began publishing tables and charts exploring "Trends & Indicators" in New England higher education more than a half-century ago, few figures have grabbed as much attention as college "enrollment" data. These local, state, regional and national data go beyond simple headcounts of students going to…

  17. Security: An Emerging Fundamental Value in Educational Policy Making?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMitchell, Todd A.

    1994-01-01

    Education, like other governmental activities, is characterized by a competition for scarce resources. Security, whether in the form of metal detectors or condom availability, is an additional fundamental value that has grabbed center stage in the struggle among competing fundamental values (efficiency, equity, liberty, and quality) in educational…

  18. What's the Next Step?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zenchak, John; Lynch, Mary Jean

    2011-01-01

    The authors developed a demonstration with two similar setups that provide students with both the prior experience to form an expectation and the discrepancy to grab their attention. They follow the demonstration with a structured exploration format that gives students a method for experimenting to find the one built-in difference (i.e., the…

  19. Secrets in Full View: Sexual Harassment in Our K-12 Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Nan

    Sexual harassment can range from touching, tickling, pinching, patting, or grabbing; to comments about one's body; to sexual remarks, innuendoes, and jokes that cause discomfort; to obscene gestures, staring, or leering; to assault and rape. This paper addresses student testimonies of harassment, provides a profile of harassment behaviors, and…

  20. Effectiveness of Breakfast in the Classroom in Five Exemplary Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainville, Alice Jo; King, Amber D.; Nettles, Mary Frances

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: A national trend to improve school breakfast participation is the integration of breakfast within the school day. Breakfast in the classroom programs increase student access to school breakfast. Service models include "grab and go," distribution of breakfasts to each classroom, and mobile breakfast carts in hallways.…

  1. 46 CFR 169.329 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Storm rails. 169.329 Section 169.329 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Rails and Guards § 169.329 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  2. 46 CFR 169.329 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Storm rails. 169.329 Section 169.329 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Rails and Guards § 169.329 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  3. 46 CFR 169.329 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Storm rails. 169.329 Section 169.329 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Rails and Guards § 169.329 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  4. 46 CFR 169.329 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Storm rails. 169.329 Section 169.329 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Rails and Guards § 169.329 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  5. 46 CFR 169.329 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Storm rails. 169.329 Section 169.329 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Rails and Guards § 169.329 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  6. Stepping Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scully, Maura King

    2011-01-01

    "Vice president for advancement becomes college president." Once headline-grabbing news, the so-called "advancement presidency" is not as rare as it was 25 years ago. Still, it is by no means commonplace. Beyond established relationships with the board of trustees, chief advancement officers--by personality and training--bring valuable skills to…

  7. Myth of the "Last-In" Superstar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesley, Gary M.; Hartman, Diane M.

    2011-01-01

    In the new political landscape, lawmakers in state after state are anxiously sponsoring legislation eliminating "last-in, first-out" policies. News reports would have people believe every untenured teacher, with just a few months of experience, is a "Teacher of the Year" candidate, while every tenured professional is a money-grabbing, lazy and…

  8. 40 CFR 122.21 - Application for a permit (applicable to State programs, see § 123.25).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... pollutant under 40 CFR subchapters N or O. When no analytical method is approved under Part 136 or required..., must be used unless specified otherwise at 40 CFR Part 136. However, a minimum of one grab sample may... II at 40 CFR 136.3 (e)) may be composited in the laboratory, provided that container,...

  9. Integrating the Curriculum: Faux Fall Repousse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kernan, Christine

    2012-01-01

    When introducing a new unit, art teachers know that sometimes a little "bling" can really grab students' attention. The author received "ooohs" and "aaahs" from her fourth-graders when they learned they would be creating "Faux Fall Repousse." The dazzling shine of the aluminum foil and the beautiful array of autumnal colors were impossible for…

  10. A Qualitative Survey of Five Antibiotics in a Water Treatment Plant in Central Plateau of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Mohsen; Kazemipour, Maryam; Bina, Bijan; Ansari, Mehdi; Ghasemian, Mohammad; Amin, Mohammad Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. This study aimed to survey a total of five common human and veterinary antibiotics based on SPE-LC-MS-MS technology in a water treatment plant at central plateau of Iran. Also two sampling techniques, passive and grab samplings, were compared in the detection of selected antibiotics. Materials and Methods. In January to March 2012, grab and passive samples were taken from the influent and effluent of a water treatment plant. The samples were prepared using solid-phase extraction (SPE), and extracts were analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). Results. The results showed that enrofloxacin, oxytetracycline, and tylosin were not detected in none of the samples. However, ampicillin was detected in the grab and passive samples taken from the influent (source water) of the plant, and ciprofloxacin was detected in passive samples taken from the influent and effluent (finished water) of the plant. Conclusion. The results imply that passive sampling is a better approach than grab sampling for the investigation of antibiotics in aquatic environments. The presence of ampicillin and ciprofloxacin in source water and finished water of the water treatment plant may lead to potential emergence of resistant bacteria that should be considered in future studies. PMID:23690801

  11. TOXICITY EVALUATION OF LOWER FOX RIVER WATER AND SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many persistent, xenobiotic compounds have been identified from Lower Fox River water, biota, sediment, and effluent discharges; some of which are suspected of causing adverse effects to aquatic organisms. Water and sediment were collected as grab samples from the Lower Fox River...

  12. General Christopher C. Andrews: Leading the Minnesota Forestry Revolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Anna M.

    2002-01-01

    In the nineteenth century, America's burgeoning population certainly did grab all the timber it could. Vast pine forests stretched from Maine to Dakota, and the lumber industry voraciously consumed them from east to west. In 1800, the Minnesota territory was sparsely sprinkled with fur traders and American Indians. By 1850, its bounteous forests…

  13. BASELINE SEDIMENT CHARACTERISTICS AND SEDIMENTATION PATTERNS ON THE VIRGINIA PORTION OF THE CHESAPEAKE BAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The distribution patterns of sediment physical properties, deposition patterns, and sediment accumulation rates provide an integrating framework for investigations of toxic substance concentration and distribution. Over 2,000 surface-sediment grab samples (1.4 km grid) reveal tha...

  14. Professing the New Rhetorics (Polylog).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Stuart C.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Includes statements and discussion by six college educators about the new rhetorics. Underscores the need for both new approaches to rhetoric and understanding of its history. Suggests that the term "rhetoric" may have become a grab bag of assorted concepts. Argues that disagreement over rhetoric is preferable to general acceptance of a single…

  15. From Barney to Super Nintendo: What to Do When Your Child Wants It All.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Ellen

    1994-01-01

    Parents must help their children distinguish between wants and needs and put them in a balanced perspective. Children need to learn to respect differences in people rather than base their judgments on socioeconomic status. The article suggests ways parents can grab teachable moments to reinforce their values and decisions. (SM)

  16. The solubilities of significant organic compounds in HLW tanks upernate solutions - FY 1997 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Barney, G.S.

    1997-09-16

    The solubilities of seven sodium salts of organic acids that are thought to exist in high-level waste at the Hanford Site were measured in tank supernatant simulant solutions during FY 1997. This solubility information will be used to determine if these organic salts could exist in solid phases (saltcake or sludges) in the waste where they might react violently with the nitrate or nitrite salts present in the tanks. The solubility of sodium acetate was measured in simulated waste supernate solutions at 25C, 30C, 40C, and 50C that were both unsaturated and saturated with sodium nitrate. Solubilities of sodium glycolate, citrate, ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), nitrilotriacetate (NTA), formate, and oxalate were measured in simulated waste supernate solutions that were saturated with sodium nitrate. In addition, solubilities of sodium EDTA, citrate, glycolate, and NTA were measured in a complex waste matrix. The organic compounds were selected because they are expected to exist in relatively high concentrations in the tanks. The solubilities of sodium glycolate citrate, EDTA, NTA, and formate were high over the temperature and sodium hydroxide concentration ranges expected in the tanks. The solubility of sodium oxalate in solutions saturated with sodium nitrate were quite low. The presence of additional sodium in the waste simulant solutions that were saturated with sodium nitrate slightly lowered the solubilities of each of the organic salts. Solubilities were, however, high enough to prevent solid sodium salts of all the organic acids from precipitating from tank supernate solutions, except for sodium oxalate. The total organic carbon concentrations (TOC) of actual tank supernates are generally much lower than the TOC ranges for the simulated supernate solutions saturated (at the solubility limit) with the organic salts. This is true even if all the dissolved carbon in a given tank supernate is due to only one of these soluble compounds (an unlikely situation

  17. Characterization of Radionuclides in Purex Waste Sludges from the F-Area High Level Waste Tanks (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Obryant, R

    2005-06-13

    Sludge-contaminated waste consists of waste contaminated with both insoluble species (the sludge fraction) and entrained supernate. The WCS is based on the assumption that approximately 70% of the weight of what is commonly referred to as sludge is interstitial supernate; the remaining approximately 30% consists of the insoluble species (Reference 1). Development of a method for characterization of sludge-contaminated waste must consider both fractions. Separate waste cuts may contain sludge and supernate fractions in varying proportions due to the nature of the job generating the waste and the variability in waste handling techniques. Development of a distribution representative of all sludge-contaminated waste cuts must allow for varying fractions of sludge and supernate contamination. This document will develop a radionuclide distribution in accordance with the methodology outlined in WSRC 1S SRS Waste Acceptance Criteria Manual, Procedure 2.02, Revision 8 for the sludge fraction of sludge-contaminated waste generated in the F-Area Tank Farm This distribution was based on the assumption that sludge-contaminated waste from F-Area Tank Farm Waste Tanks could be co-mingled, and the actual contamination present on waste in a series of containers from these tanks will be representative of the mean radionuclide distribution. The original characterization was based primarily on process knowledge and fill histories (Reference 6). A single, comprehensive characterization for supernate has been developed previously (Reference 9). This document also describes the methodology for application of radionuclide distributions representative of the sludge and supernate fractions of sludge-contaminated waste to individual waste packages. Most of the waste contaminated with sludge from the F-Area Tank Farm will be categorized as Low Level Waste (LLW) and disposed of in the E-area trenches. The waste does, however, have the potential to be categorized as TRU and/or mixed waste

  18. Dose rate analysis for Tank 101 AZ (Project W151)

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, R.A.; Hillesland, K.E.; Carter, L.L.

    1994-11-01

    This document describes the expected dose rates for modification to tank 101 AZ including modifications to the steam coil, mixer pump, and temperature probes. The thrust of the effort is to determine dose rates from: modification of a steam coil and caisson; the installation of mixer pumps; the installation of temperature probes; and estimates of dose rates that will be encountered while making these changes. Because the dose rates for all of these configurations depend upon the photon source within the supernate and sludge, comparisons were also made between measured dose rates within a drywell and the corresponding calculated dose rates. The calculational tool used is a Monte Carlo (MCNP{sub 2}) code since complicated three dimensional geometries are involved. A summary of the most important results of the entire study is given in Section 2. The basic calculational geometry model of the tank is discussed in Section 3, along with a tabulation of the photon sources that were used within the supernate and the sludge, and a discussion of uncertainties. The calculated dose rates around the steam coil and caisson before and after modification are discussed in Section 4. The configuration for the installation of the mixer pumps and the resulting dose rates are given in Section 5. The predicted changes in dose rates due to a possible dilution of the supernate source are given in Section 6. The calculational configuration used to model the installation of temperature probes and the resulting predicted dose rates are discussed in Section 7. Finally, comparisons of measured to calculated dose rates within a drywell are summarized in Section 8. Extended discussions of calculational models and Monte Carlo optimization techniques used are included in Appendix A.

  19. Growth performance of early-weaned pigs is enhanced by feeding epidermal growth factor-expressing Lactococcus lactis fermentation product.

    PubMed

    Bedford, Andrea; Huynh, Evanna; Fu, Molei; Zhu, Cuilan; Wey, Doug; de Lange, Cornelis; Li, Julang

    2014-03-10

    We have previously generated epidermal growth factor expressing Lactococcus lactis (EGF-LL) using bioengineering approach, and shown that feeding newly-weaned piglets EGF-LL improves digestive function. To address concerns over the use of genetically modified organisms (GMO), the objective of the current study was to investigate the effect of feeding the EGF-LL fermentation product, after removal of the genetically modified EGF-LL, on growth performance and intestine development of newly-weaned piglets. One hundred and twenty newly-weaned piglets were fed ad libitum according to a 2-phase feeding program. Four pens were assigned to each of three treatments: (1) complete EGF-LL fermentation product (Ferm), (2) supernatant of EGF-LL fermentation product, after removal of EGF-LL (Supern), or (3) blank M17GE media (Control). EGF-LL or its fermented supernatant was administrated to piglets in the first 3 weeks post-weaning; their growth performance was monitored throughout treatment, and for the following week. Daily body weight gain (254.8g vs. 200.5g) and Gain:Feed (0.541kg/kg vs. 0.454kg/kg) of pigs on the Supern group were significantly improved compared to that of Control, although no difference was observed between the Ferm and Control pigs. Intestinal sucrase activity was increased in Supern- compared to Control group (166.3±62.1 vs. 81.4±56.5nmol glucose released/mg protein; P<0.05). The lack of growth response with Ferm pigs may be attributed to an overload of bacteria (daily dose included 4.56×10(10)CFU/kg BW/day EGF-LL). These results suggest that GMO-free EGF-LL fermentation product is effective in increasing growth performance of early-weaned piglets. PMID:24445174

  20. Ferrocyanide safety project ferrocyanide aging studies FY 1995 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Lilga, M.A.; Alderson, E.V.; Hallen, R.T.

    1995-09-01

    This annual report gives the results of the work conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory in FY 1995 on Task 3 of the Ferrocyanide Safety Project, Ferrocyanide Aging Studies. Aging refers to the dissolution and hydrolysis of simulated Hanford ferrocyanide waste in alkaline aqueous solutions by radiolytic and chemical means. The ferrocyanide simulant primarily used in these studies was dried In-Farm-1B, Rev. 7, prepared by Westinghouse Hanford Company to simulate the waste generated when the In-Farm flowsheet was used to remove radiocesium from waste supernates in single-shell tanks at the Hanford Site. In the In-Farm flowsheet, nickel ion and ferrocyanide anion were added to waste supernates to precipitate sodium nickel ferrocyanide, Na{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6}, and co-precipitate radiocesium. Once the radiocesium was removed, supernates were pumped from the tanks, and new wastes from cladding removal processes or from evaporators were added. These new wastes were typically highly caustic, having hydroxide ion concentrations of over 1 M and as high as 4 M. The Aging Studies task is investigating reactions this caustic waste may have had with the precipitated ferrocyanide waste in a radiation field. In previous Aging Studies research, Na{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6} in simulants was shown to dissolve in basic solutions, forming insoluble Ni(OH){sub 2} and soluble Na{sub 4}Fe(CN){sub 6}. The influence on solubility of base strength, sodium ion concentration, anions, and temperature was previously investigated. The results may indicate that even ferrocyanide sludge that did not come into direct contact with highly basic wastes may also have aged significantly.

  1. Wastewater Triad Project: Solid-Liquid Separator FY 2000 Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.F.

    2001-01-11

    The Wastewater Triad Project (WTP) consists of three operational units: the cesium removal (CsR) system, the out-of-tank evaporator (OTE) system, and the solid/liquid separation (SLS) system. These systems were designed to reduce the volume and radioactivity of low-level liquid waste (LLLW) stored in the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs) and are operated independently or in series in order to accomplish the treatment goals. Each is a modular, skid-mounted system that is self-contained, individually shielded, and designed to be decontaminated and removed once the project has been completed. The CsR and OTE systems are installed inside Building 7877; the SLS system is installed adjacent to the east side of the MVST 7830 vault cover. The CsR, which consists of ion-exchange equipment for removing {sup 137}Cs from LLLW, was demonstrated in 1997. During the Cesium Removal Demonstration, 30,853 gal of radioactive supernate was processed and 1142 Ci of {sup 137}Cs was removed from the supernate and loaded onto 70 gal of a crystalline silicotitanate sorbent manufactured by UOP, Inc. The OTE system is a subatmospheric single-stage evaporator system designed to concentrate LLLW to smaller volumes. It was previously demonstrated in 1996 and was operated in 1998 to process about 80,000 gal of LLLW. The SLS system was designed to filter and remove suspended solids from LLLW in order to minimize further accumulation of sludge in new storage tanks or to prevent fouling of CsR and OTE systems. The SLS was installed and demonstrated in 1999; {approximately}45,000 gal of radioactive supernate was processed during the demonstration.

  2. Radioactive and hazardous wastewater treatment and sludge stabilization by filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, H.L.; Pickett, J.B.; Langton, C.A.

    1991-12-31

    Concentrated effluents from batch discharges of spent process solutions are mixed with filter cake from treatment of the dilute effluents and stored in a large tank at the optimum high pH for hydroxide precipitation of heavy metals. Supernate is decanted from the storage tanks and mixed with the dilute effluents before treatment. A filtration and stabilization process has been developed to treat and stored sludge as well as the concentrated wastewater slurry as it is generated. A 94% waste volume reduction over conventional technology can be achieved. Furthermore, leachate from the solidified waste filter cake meets the EPA land disposal restrictions.

  3. Radioactive and hazardous wastewater treatment and sludge stabilization by filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, H.L.; Pickett, J.B.; Langton, C.A.

    1991-01-01

    Concentrated effluents from batch discharges of spent process solutions are mixed with filter cake from treatment of the dilute effluents and stored in a large tank at the optimum high pH for hydroxide precipitation of heavy metals. Supernate is decanted from the storage tanks and mixed with the dilute effluents before treatment. A filtration and stabilization process has been developed to treat and stored sludge as well as the concentrated wastewater slurry as it is generated. A 94% waste volume reduction over conventional technology can be achieved. Furthermore, leachate from the solidified waste filter cake meets the EPA land disposal restrictions.

  4. Gunite and associated tanks remediation project recycling and waste minimization effort

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hoesen, S.D.; Saunders, A.D.

    1998-05-01

    The Department of Energy`s Environmental Management Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has initiated clean up of legacy waste resulting from the Manhattan Project. The gunite and associated tanks project has taken an active pollution prevention role by successfully recycling eight tons of scrap metal, reusing contaminated soil in the Area of Contamination, using existing water (supernate) to aid in sludge transfer, and by minimizing and reusing personal protective equipment (PPE) and on-site equipment as much as possible. Total cost savings for Fiscal Year 1997 activities from these efforts are estimated at $4.2 million dollars.

  5. DEPOSITION TANK CORROSION TESTING FOR ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING POST OXALIC ACID DESTRUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.

    2011-08-29

    An Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process is being developed to aid in the high level waste tank closure at the Savannah River Site. The ECC process uses an advanced oxidation process (AOP) to destroy the oxalic acid that is used to remove residual sludge from a waste tank prior to closure. The AOP process treats the dissolved sludge with ozone to decompose the oxalic acid through reactions with hydroxyl radicals. The effluent from this oxalic acid decomposition is to be sent to a Type III waste tank and may be corrosive to these tanks. As part of the hazardous simulant testing that was conducted at the ECC vendor location, corrosion testing was conducted to determine the general corrosion rate for the deposition tank and to assess the susceptibility to localized corrosion, especially pitting. Both of these factors impact the calculation of hydrogen gas generation and the structural integrity of the tanks, which are considered safety class functions. The testing consisted of immersion and electrochemical testing of A537 carbon steel, the material of construction of Type III tanks, and 304L stainless steel, the material of construction for transfer piping. Tests were conducted in solutions removed from the destruction loop of the prototype ECC set up. Hazardous simulants, which were manufactured at SRNL, were used as representative sludges for F-area and H-area waste tanks. Oxalic acid concentrations of 1 and 2.5% were used to dissolve the sludge as a feed to the ECC process. Test solutions included the uninhibited effluent, as well as the effluent treated for corrosion control. The corrosion control options included mixing with an inhibited supernate and the addition of hydroxide. Evaporation of the uninhibited effluent was also tested since it may have a positive impact on reducing corrosion. All corrosion testing was conducted at 50 C. The uninhibited effluent was found to increase the corrosion rate by an order of magnitude from less than 1 mil per year (mpy

  6. Functional design criteria, Project W-211, Initial Tank Retrieval Systems. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Rieck, C.A.

    1995-02-07

    This document provides the technical baseline for retrieval of waste from ten double-shell tanks in the SY, AN, AP, AW, AY, and AZ tank farms. In order to retrieve waste from these tanks, systems are needed to mix the sludge with the supernate and pump the waste mixture from the tank. For 101-SY, the existing mitigation pump will be used to mix the waste and Project W-211 will provide for waste removal. The retrieval scope for the other nine tanks includes both the waste mixing and removal functions.

  7. AEA Fluidic Pulse Jet Mixer. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-08-01

    AEA's Fluidic Pulse Jet Mixer was developed to mix and maintain the suspension of solids and to blend process liquids. The mixer can be used to combine a tank's available supernate with the sludge into a slurry that is suitable for pumping. The system uses jet nozzles in the tank coupled to a charge vessel. Then, a jet pump creates a partial vacuum in the charge vessel allowing it to be filled with waste. Next, air pressure is applied to the charge vessel, forcing sludge back into the tank and mixing it with the liquid waste. When the liquid waste contains 10% solids, a batch is pumped out of the tank.

  8. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing: Piping calculations. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-07-25

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the FDNW calculations for Project W-320 readily retrievable. The objectives of this calculation are (1) To perform static and Safety Class 2 dynamic stress analysis of the Slurry and Supernate Process (inner) piping connecting Tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102 in order to be in compliance with the Code requirements; (2) To assure the thermal expansion of the process pipe not be strained by the outer encasement pipe; and (3) To furnish process pipe support to the Civil Engineering group.

  9. Recovery of transplutonium elements from nuclear reactor waste

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, David O.; Buxton, Samuel R.

    1977-05-24

    A method of separating actinide values from nitric acid waste solutions resulting from reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuels comprises oxalate precipitation of the major portion of actinide and lanthanide values to provide a trivalent fraction suitable for subsequent actinide/lanthanide partition, exchange of actinide and lanthanide values in the supernate onto a suitable cation exchange resin to provide an intermediate-lived raffinate waste stream substantially free of actinides, and elution of the actinide values from the exchange resin. The eluate is then used to dissolve the trivalent oxalate fraction prior to actinide/lanthanide partition or may be combined with the reprocessing waste stream and recycled.

  10. Investigations in Ceramicrete Stabilization of Hanford Tank Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Wagh, A. S.; Antink, A.; Maloney, M. D.; Thomson, G. H.

    2003-02-26

    This paper provides a summary of investigations done on feasibility of using Ceramicrete technology to stabilize high level salt waste streams typical of Hanford and other sites. We used two non-radioactive simulants that covered the range of properties from low activity to high level liquids and sludges. One represented tank supernate, containing Cr, Pb, and Ag as the major hazardous metals, and Cs as the fission products; the other, a waste sludge, contained Cd, Cr, Ag, Ni, and Ba as the major hazardous contaminants, and Cs, and Tc as the fission products.

  11. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT ENGINEERED CONTAINER RETRIEVAL AND TRANSFER SYSTEM PRELMINARY DESIGN HAZARD AND OPERABILITY STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    CARRO CA

    2011-07-15

    This Hazard and Operability (HAZOP) study addresses the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) preliminary design for retrieving sludge from underwater engineered containers located in the 105-K West (KW) Basin, transferring the sludge as a sludge-water slurry (hereafter referred to as 'slurry') to a Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC) located in a Modified KW Basin Annex, and preparing the STSC for transport to T Plant using the Sludge Transport System (STS). There are six, underwater engineered containers located in the KW Basin that, at the time of sludge retrieval, will contain an estimated volume of 5.2 m{sup 3} of KW Basin floor and pit sludge, 18.4 m{sup 3} of 105-K East (KE) Basin floor, pit, and canister sludge, and 3.5 m{sup 3} of settler tank sludge. The KE and KW Basin sludge consists of fuel corrosion products (including metallic uranium, and fission and activation products), small fuel fragments, iron and aluminum oxide, sand, dirt, operational debris, and biological debris. The settler tank sludge consists of sludge generated by the washing of KE and KW Basin fuel in the Primary Clean Machine. A detailed description of the origin of sludge and its chemical and physical characteristics can be found in HNF-41051, Preliminary STP Container and Settler Sludge Process System Description and Material Balance. In summary, the ECRTS retrieves sludge from the engineered containers and hydraulically transfers it as a slurry into an STSC positioned within a trailer-mounted STS cask located in a Modified KW Basin Annex. The slurry is allowed to settle within the STSC to concentrate the solids and clarify the supernate. After a prescribed settling period the supernate is decanted. The decanted supernate is filtered through a sand filter and returned to the basin. Subsequent batches of slurry are added to the STSC, settled, and excess supernate removed until the prescribed quantity of sludge is collected

  12. Decontamination of Dissolved Salt Solution from Tank 19F Using Duolite CS-100 and Amberlite IRC-718 Resins

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, L.M.

    2001-10-17

    In this study actual Savannah River Plant liquid supernate solutions were processed to refine and verify these synthetic solution studies. The main objectives were: (1) confirm high decontamination factors (DFs) for cesium-137 and strontium-90 using Duolite CS-100 and Amberlite IRC-718 ion exchange resins, (2) obtain DFs for other minor radioactive isotopes such as plutonium, technetium and ruthenium, (3) provide ion exchange elutriant containing cesium-137, strontium-90 and other radioactive isotopes for ''hot'' melter studies, (4) determine the quality of the decontaminated salt solution, and (5) provide actual decontaminated salt solution for saltcrete development programs.

  13. Analysis Of Tank 38H (HTF-38-14-6, 7) And Tank 43H (HTF-43-14-8, 9) Samples For Support Of The Enrichment Control And Corrosion Control Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, C. J.

    2014-02-27

    SRNL performed analysis on Tanks 38H and 43H surface and subsurface supernate samples to support ECP and CCP. The U-235 mass divided by the total U mass ranged from 0.0059 to 0.0060. Uranium concentration ranged from 53.1 mg/L in the Tank 43H surface sample to the 85.1 mg/L in the Tank 38H subsurface sample. The U-235/U and uranium concentration are in line with the prior 2H-Evaporator System ECP samples.

  14. EVALUATION OF ALTERNATIVE STRONIUM AND TRANSURANIC SEPARATION PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    SMALLEY CS

    2011-04-25

    In order to meet contract requirements on the concentrations of strontium-90 and transuranic isotopes in the immobilized low-activity waste, strontium-90 and transuranics must be removed from the supernate of tanks 241-AN-102 and 241-AN-107. The process currently proposed for this application is an in-tank precipitation process using strontium nitrate and sodium permanganate. Development work on the process has not proceeded since 2005. The purpose of the evaluation is to identify whether any promising alternative processes have been developed since this issue was last examined, evaluate the alternatives and the baseline process, and recommend which process should be carried forward.

  15. High-level waste tank modifications, installation of mobilization equipment/check out

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffhauer, M.A.; Thompson, S.C.

    1992-08-31

    PUREX high-level waste (HLW) is contained at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) in an underground carbon-steel storage tank. The HLW consists of a precipitated sludge and an alkaline supernate. This report describes the system that the WVDP has developed and implemented to resuspend and wash the HLW sludge from the tank. The report discusses Sludge Mobilization and Wash System (SMWS) equipment design, installation, and testing. The storage tank required modifications to accommodate the SMWS. These modifications are discussed as well.

  16. MEASUREMENT OF ENTRAINED ORGANIC DROPLET SIZES AND TOTAL CONCENTRATION FOR AQUEOUS STREAMS FROM THE CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C; Samuel Fink, S; Michael Restivo, M; Dan Burns, D; Wallace Smith, W; S Crump, S; Zane Nelson, Z; Thomas Peters, T; Fernando Fondeur, F; Michael Norato, M

    2007-02-01

    The Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) and the Salt Waste Processing Facility will remove radioactive cesium from Savannah River Site supernate wastes using an organic solvent system. Both designs include decanters and coalescers to reduce carryover of organic solvent droplets. Savannah River National Laboratory personnel conducted experimental demonstrations using a series of four 2-cm centrifugal contactors. They also examined organic carryover during operation of a CINC (Costner Industries Nevada Corporation) V-5 contactor under prototypical conditions covering the range of expected MCU operation. This report details the findings from those studies and the implications on design for the MCU.

  17. ELECTROCHEMICAL CORROSION TESTING OF TANKS 241-AN-102 & 241-AP-107 & 241-AP-108 IN SUPPORT OF ULTRASONIC TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    WYRWAS RB; DUNCAN JB

    2008-11-20

    This report presents the results of the corrosion rates that were measured using electrochemical methods for tanks 241-AN-102 (AN-102), 241-AP-107 (AP 107), and 241-AP-108 (AP-108) performed under test plant RPP-PLAN-38215. The steel used as materials of construction for AN and AP tank farms was A537 Class 1. Test coupons of A537 Class 1 carbon steel were used for corrosion testing in the AN-107, AP-107, and AP-108 tank waste. Supernate will be tested from AN-102, AP-107, and Ap-108. Saltcake testing was performed on AP-108 only.

  18. Mixing Envelope D Sludge with LAW Intermediate Products with and without Glass Formers

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, E.K.

    2001-09-21

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection is in the process of designing a waste treatment system to process the Hanford Reservation High Level Waste (HLW). Envelope D sludge slurries will be blended with the concentrated Cs/Ts eluates, and the Sr/TRU intermediates separated from Envelope A, B, and C feeds. This study produced two washed simulated sludges (representing tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 sludge), a Sr/TRU washed precipitate produced from tank 241-AN-107 simulant, and a concentrated blended eluate simulant based upon eluates from processing 241-AZ-102 supernate.

  19. Immunochemical identification of the major cell surface agglutinogen of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus RAG-92.

    PubMed

    Bayer, E A; Skutelsky, E; Goldman, S; Rosenberg, E; Gutnick, D L

    1983-04-01

    The immunochemical and immunocytochemical characteristics of three Acinetobacter calcoaceticus RAG strains were compared in order to clarify the relationship between antibody-induced agglutination and the production of polyanionic extracellular emulsifier (termed emulsan). In addition to the parent, RAG-92, two mutant strains were examined: (1) a non-agglutinating emulsan-producer (AB15), and (2) an agglutinating mutant (16TLU) defective in the production of emulsan. A combined genetic-immunochemical approach was employed. This included the comparison of crossed immunoelectrophoresis patterns of parent and mutant supernates and the effect of absorption of anti-whole cell antiserum with mutant cells. In addition, agglutinability and competition studies were performed as well as electron microscopic cytochemistry. The results demonstrated that three major antigenic components were associated with the cell surface and the supernate. Mutant cells were altered both in their cell surface properties and in their extracellular products. One antigenic component, termed component C3, was the major cell surface agglutinogen; this component was absent in non-agglutinating mutants. Component C3 may be identical with or attached to the 300 nm projections on the parent cell surface, but it is not directly related to the presence of emulsan. It appears that emulsan plays little or no role in the phenomenon of antibody-induced agglutination of this organism. PMID:6688443

  20. Method for processing aqueous wastes

    DOEpatents

    Pickett, J.B.; Martin, H.L.; Langton, C.A.; Harley, W.W.

    1993-12-28

    A method is presented for treating waste water such as that from an industrial processing facility comprising the separation of the waste water into a dilute waste stream and a concentrated waste stream. The concentrated waste stream is treated chemically to enhance precipitation and then allowed to separate into a sludge and a supernate. The supernate is skimmed or filtered from the sludge and blended with the dilute waste stream to form a second dilute waste stream. The sludge remaining is mixed with cementitious material, rinsed to dissolve soluble components, then pressed to remove excess water and dissolved solids before being allowed to cure. The dilute waste stream is also chemically treated to decompose carbonate complexes and metal ions and then mixed with cationic polymer to cause the precipitated solids to flocculate. Filtration of the flocculant removes sufficient solids to allow the waste water to be discharged to the surface of a stream. The filtered material is added to the sludge of the concentrated waste stream. The method is also applicable to the treatment and removal of soluble uranium from aqueous streams, such that the treated stream may be used as a potable water supply. 4 figures.

  1. Determination of uranium distribution in the evaporation of simulated Savannah River Site waste

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.J.; Chandler, G.T.

    1995-01-01

    The results of an experimental program addressing the distribution of uranium in saltcake and supernate for two Savannah River Site waste compositions are presented. Successive batch evaporations were performed on simulated H-Area Modified Purex low-heat and post-aluminum dissolution wastes spiked with depleted uranium. Waste compositions and physical data were obtained for supernate and saltcake samples. For the H-Area Modified Purex low-heat waste, the product saltcake contained 42% of the total uranium from the original evaporator feed solution. However, precipitated solids only accounted for 10% of the original uranium mass; the interstitial liquid within the saltcake matrix contained the remainder of the uranium. In the case of the simulated post-aluminum dissolution waste; the product saltcake contained 68% of the total uranium from the original evaporator feed solution. Precipitated solids accounted for 52% of the original uranium mass; again, the interstitial liquid within the saltcake matrix contained the remainder of the uranium. An understanding of the distribution of uranium between supernatant liquid, saltcake, and sludge is required to develop a material balance for waste processing operations. This information is necessary to address nuclear criticality safety concerns.

  2. Method for processing aqueous wastes

    DOEpatents

    Pickett, John B.; Martin, Hollis L.; Langton, Christine A.; Harley, Willie W.

    1993-01-01

    A method for treating waste water such as that from an industrial processing facility comprising the separation of the waste water into a dilute waste stream and a concentrated waste stream. The concentrated waste stream is treated chemically to enhance precipitation and then allowed to separate into a sludge and a supernate. The supernate is skimmed or filtered from the sludge and blended with the dilute waste stream to form a second dilute waste stream. The sludge remaining is mixed with cementitious material, rinsed to dissolve soluble components, then pressed to remove excess water and dissolved solids before being allowed to cure. The dilute waste stream is also chemically treated to decompose carbonate complexes and metal ions and then mixed with cationic polymer to cause the precipitated solids to flocculate. Filtration of the flocculant removes sufficient solids to allow the waste water to be discharged to the surface of a stream. The filtered material is added to the sludge of the concentrated waste stream. The method is also applicable to the treatment and removal of soluble uranium from aqueous streams, such that the treated stream may be used as a potable water supply.

  3. MODELING RESULTS FROM CESIUM ION EXCHANGE PROCESSING WITH SPHERICAL RESINS

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.; Hang, T.; Aleman, S.

    2011-01-03

    Ion exchange modeling was conducted at the Savannah River National Laboratory to compare the performance of two organic resins in support of Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX). In-tank ion exchange (IX) columns are being considered for cesium removal at Hanford and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The spherical forms of resorcinol formaldehyde ion exchange resin (sRF) as well as a hypothetical spherical SuperLig{reg_sign} 644 (SL644) are evaluated for decontamination of dissolved saltcake wastes (supernates). Both SuperLig{reg_sign} and resorcinol formaldehyde resin beds can exhibit hydraulic problems in their granular (nonspherical) forms. SRS waste is generally lower in potassium and organic components than Hanford waste. Using VERSE-LC Version 7.8 along with the cesium Freundlich/Langmuir isotherms to simulate the waste decontamination in ion exchange columns, spherical SL644 was found to reduce column cycling by 50% for high-potassium supernates, but sRF performed equally well for the lowest-potassium feeds. Reduced cycling results in reduction of nitric acid (resin elution) and sodium addition (resin regeneration), therefore, significantly reducing life-cycle operational costs. These findings motivate the development of a spherical form of SL644. This work demonstrates the versatility of the ion exchange modeling to study the effects of resin characteristics on processing cycles, rates, and cold chemical consumption. The value of a resin with increased selectivity for cesium over potassium can be assessed for further development.

  4. Identification of a major, CsrRS-regulated secreted protein of Group A streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Heath, A; Miller, A; DiRita, V J; Engleberg, C N

    2001-08-01

    CsrR/CsrS (CovR/CovS) is a two-component regulator of extracellular virulence factors in Group A streptococcus, but the full range of regulated exoproteins is unknown. Since CsrR represses expression of regulated factors, culture supernates of wild-type and CsrR(-)mutant strains were compared by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DGE) to identify regulated exoproteins. Supernates of DeltacsrRS(-)mutant, but not wild-type, bacteria contained an abundant 23 kDa protein. The N-terminal sequence of this spot corresponded to a putative open reading frame (ORF) in the streptococcal genome. In a mobility shift assay, phosphorylated CsrR bound to a PCR amplicon that included sequences upstream of this ORF. By primer extension analysis, the ORF (designated mspA, for Mucoidy-associated Secreted Protein) was expressed in mid- and late-exponential phase in a DeltacsrRS(-)mutant. The presence of an in-frame deletion in mspA did not affect colony appearance, mucoidy or in vitro growth, and there was no difference between DeltamspA and wild-type strains in a mouse model of skin infection. MspA is co-regulated with other factors required for dermonecrosis (e.g. capsule, streptolysin S and purogenic exotoxin B); however, deletion of this gene does not affect expression of hyaluronic acid capsule or severity of skin infection in mice. PMID:11453703

  5. Low melting high lithia glass compositions and methods

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2004-11-02

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  6. Methods of vitrifying waste with low melting high lithia glass compositions

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2001-01-01

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  7. Low melting high lithia glass compositions and methods

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2003-10-07

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  8. Low melting high lithia glass compositions and methods

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2000-01-01

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  9. Demonstration of fluidic pulse jet mixing for a horizontal waste storage tank

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, T.E.; Taylor, S.A.; Moore, J.W.; Stellern, J.L.; Billingsley, K.M.

    1998-01-01

    A fluidic pulse jet mixing system, designed and fabricated by AEA Technology of the United Kingdom, was successfully demonstrated for mobilization and retrieval of remote handled transuranic (RH-TRU) sludge from a 50,000-gal horizontal waste storage tank at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The pulse jet system, consisting of seven modular equipment skids, was installed and commissioned in about 7 weeks and operated remotely for 52 days to remove about 88% of the sludge in the tank. The system used specially designed fluidic jet pumps and pulse vessels, along with existing submerged nozzles for mixing the settled sludges with existing supernate in the tank. The operation also used existing piping and progressive cavity pumps for retrieval and transfer of the mixture. A total of 64,000 gal of liquid was required to transfer 6300 gal of sludge to the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs) designated for consolidation of all ORNL RH-TRU sludges. Of the liquid used for the retrieval, 88% was existing or recycled tank supernate and only 7770 gal of additional process water was added to the system. Minimizing the addition of process water is extremely important at ORNL, where tank system storage capacity is limited. A simple manual sluicer was used periodically to wash down and aid the removal of localized sludge heels.

  10. Dose potential of sludge contaminated and/or TRU contaminated waste in B-25s for tornado and straight wind events

    SciTech Connect

    Aponte, C.I.

    2000-02-17

    F and H Tank Farms generate supernate and sludge contaminated Low-Level Waste. The waste is collected, characterized, and packaged for disposal. Before the waste can be disposed of, however, it must be properly characterized. Since the radionuclide distribution in typical supernate is well known, its characterization is relatively straight forward and requires minimal effort. Non-routine waste, including potentially sludge contaminated, requires much more effort to effectively characterize. The radionuclide distribution must be determined. In some cases the waste can be contaminated by various sludge transfers with unique radionuclide distributions. In these cases, the characterization can require an extensive effort. Even after an extensive characterization effort, the container must still be prepared for shipping. Therefore a significant amount of time may elapse from the time the waste is generated until the time of disposal. During the time it is possible for a tornado or high wind scenario to occur. The purpose of this report is to determine the effect of a tornado on potential sludge contaminated waste, or Transuranic (TRU) waste in B-25s [large storage containers], to evaluate the potential impact on F and H Tank Farms, and to help establish a B-25 control program for tornado events.

  11. Quarterly progress report for the chemical development section of the Chemical Technology Division: October--December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1996-03-01

    This quarterly report is intended to provide a timely summary of the major activities being conducted in the Chemical Development Section of the Chemical Technology Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period September-December 1995. The report summarizes ten major tasks conducted within five major areas of research and development within the section. The first major research area-Chemical Processes for Waste Management-includes the following tasks: Comprehensive Supernate Treatment, Partitioning of Sludge Compounds by Caustic Leaching, Studies on Treatment of Dissolved MVST Sludge Using TRUEX Process, ACT*DE*CON{sup SM} Test Program, Hot Demonstration of Proposed Commercial Nuclide Removal Technology, and Sludge Washing and Dissolution of ORNL Waste: Data for Modeling Sludge Science. The Comprehensive Supernate task is currently evaluating several sorbents in batch tests for removing strontium, technetium, and cesium from ORNL Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) supernatant solutions. Nine sorbents have been evaluated for removing strontium from MVST W-29 supernatant, and seven have been tested for technetium removal. All planned batch testing of cesium sorbents has been completed; however, additional cesium tests may be made as new sorbents become available. At the request of Hanford personnel, some batch tests were made to evaluate the effect on cesium distribution of selected sorbents which had been treated with an organic such as tributyl phosphate.

  12. Immunomodulatory effect of prednisolone (PRD) induced soluble suppressor factor(s) (PRD-SSF) on natural killer (NK) cell activity

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, M.P.N.; Cilik, J.M.; Schwartz, S.A.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have previously reported that peripheral blood lymphocytes precultured for 24 hrs with PRD showed significant suppression of their NK activity. Purified HNK-1/sup +/ lymphocytes were treated either directly with PRD or with supernates from allogeneic lymphocytes precultured with 10/sup -6/ to 10/sup -9/M PRD and examined for any inhibition of NK activity. For the NK assay K562 and U937 cell lines were used as targets in a 4 hr /sup 51/Cr release assay. HNK-1/sup +/ lymphocytes precultured with PRD showed significantly lower level of NK activity. In a single cell assay, both HNK-1/sup +/ and HNK-1/sup -/ subpopulations of PBL precultured with PRD also suppressed the target binding and lytic capacity of allogeneic fresh large granular lymphocytes, suggesting that NK cells/T cells or their precursors can be stimulated by PRD to inhibit NK activity. PBL precultured with increasing concentrations of culture supernates containing PRD-SSF showed a dose dependent inhibitory effect of their NK activity. This data suggest that PRD activated suppressor cells function through the release of soluble mediators. These findings may be of clinical significance to patients receiving corticosteroids for a variety of disorders including malignant, autoimmune and atopic diseases.

  13. Immunologic mechanism of Patchouli alcohol anti-H1N1 influenza virus may through regulation of the RLH signal pathway in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xian-Lin; Ju, Da-Hong; Chen, Jia; Yu, Bin; Liu, Kang-Li; He, Jin-Xiong; Dai, Cong-Qi; Wu, Sha; Chang, Zhou; Wang, You-Ping; Chen, Xiao-Yin

    2013-10-01

    Patchouli alcohol (PA) is a kind of methanol extracted from traditional Chinese medicine Pogostemonis Herba. Our research aimed to observe the anti-influenza virus role of PA in vitro. 16HBE (human respiratory epithelial cell) was infected by H1N1 (A/FM1/1/47) to set the cell model. Then the 16HBE was co-cultivated with three kinds of immune cells: dendritic cells, macrophages, and monocytes, PA (the concentration is 10 μg/mL) was added as a treatment intervention for 24 h. The immune cells and the supernate were collected for RT-PCR and ELISA detection related to RLH (RIG-1-like helicases) pathway. Results showed that the IL-4 and IFN-γ in supernate were increased after H1N1 infection, and the PA treatment suppressed the expression of cytokines and the mRNA of RLH pathway. PA anti-influenza virus may through regulate the RLH singal pathway. PMID:23680974

  14. Nuclear safety of extended sludge processing on tank 42 and 51 sludge (DWPF sludge feed batch one)

    SciTech Connect

    Clemons, J.S.

    1993-02-26

    The sludge in tanks 42 and 51 is to be washed with inhibited water to remove soluble salts and combined in tank 51 in preparation for feed to DWPF. Since these tanks contain uranium and plutonium, the process of washing must be evaluated to ensure subcriticality is maintained. When the sludge is washed, inhibited water is added, the tank contents are slurried and allowed to settle. The sludge wash water is then decanted to the evaporator feed tank where it is fed to the evaporator to reduce the volume. The resulting evaporator concentrate is sent to a salt tank where it cools and forms crystallized salt cake. This salt cake will later be dissolved, processed in ITP and sent to Z-Area. This report evaluates the supernate and sludge during washing, the impact on the evaporator during concentration of decanted wash water, and the salt tank where the concentrated supernate is deposited. The conclusions generated in this report are specific to the sludge currently contained in tanks 42 and 51.

  15. Enhancement of basophil chemotaxis in vitro by virus-induced interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Lett-Brown, M A; Aelvoet, M; Hooks, J J; Georgiades, J A; Thueson, D O; Grant, J A

    1981-01-01

    It is well established that viral infections may precipitate or worsen attacks of bronchial asthma. Furthermore, in symptomatic atopic subjects, the local accumulation of basophils and the production of a basophil chemotactic factor have been reported. We have investigated the effect of cell-free supernates from viral stimulated cultures of human mononuclear cells on the in vitro migration of human basophils. Our results show the presence of a factor in these culture supernates that enhances the migration of basophils toward two separate chemoattractants, a peptide from C5 and a lymphokine. The enhancing activity, while affecting basophil migration, did not change the response of monocytes. The enhancing activity resembled viral-induced interferon when (a) pH 2 stability, (b) heat resistance, (c) trypsin sensitivity, and (d) species-specificity were compared. Finally, the enhancing activity for basophil chemotaxis and the interferon titer were highly correlated in preparations with a 10(4)-fold difference in interferon specific activity. Our studies show that viral-induced interferon can augment the in vitro chemotactic response of basophils. Because mediators present in basophils may be involved in the pathogenesis of immediate hypersensitivity, the modulation of basophil movement by interferon suggests a possible mechanism for the association between viral infections and atopic disorders. PMID:6161946

  16. Effluent variability study for the 200 area treated effluent disposal facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, C.J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-12

    The variability of permitted constituents in grab samples and 24-hr composites of liquid effluent discharged to the Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site was evaluated for the period July 1995 through April 1996. The variability study was required as a condition of the wastewater discharge permit issued by the State of Washington Department of Ecology. Results of the statistical evaluation indicated that (1) except for iron, and possibly chloride, there is a very low probability of exceeding existing permit limits, (2) seasonal effects related to intake water quality account for the variability in several chemical constituents and (3) sample type (grab vs 24-hr composite) have little if any effect on monthly mean constituent concentrations.

  17. Measuring radon source magnitude in residential buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Nazaroff, W.W.; Boegel, M.L.; Nero, A.V.

    1981-08-01

    A description is given of procedures used in residences for rapid grab-sample and time-dependent measurements of the air-exchange rate and radon concentration. The radon source magnitude is calculated from the results of simultaneous measurements of these parameters. Grab-sample measurements in three survey groups comprising 101 US houses showed the radon source magnitude to vary approximately log-normally with a geometric mean of 0.37 and a range of 0.01 to 6.0 pCi 1/sup -1/ h/sup -1/. Successive measurements in six houses in the northeastern United States showed considerable variability in source magnitude within a given house. In two of these houses the source magnitude showed a strong correlation with the air-exchange rate, suggesting that soil gas influx can be an important transport process for indoor radon.

  18. The theoretical background to BS7167: 1990 - specification for Bordeaux connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorley, T. A. E.

    1992-03-01

    The theoretical background to the specification of Bordeaux connections (components of lifting gear used to join together wire rope and a chain, or two lengths of wire rope, where the joined lengths have to run over a sheave as in the case of grabbing cranes) is documented. Decisions taken in the drafting of earlier specifications are not documented. The design criteria for BS7167:1990 are addressed. The various parts of the Bordeaux connection specified in the standard are discussed in turn: the link portion, the rope portion, and the grab shackle. Some tests on the new design undertaken by the Health and Safety Executive confirm the new design criteria to be adequate for the strengths of rope to be used with this component.

  19. Sampling and Analysis Plan for Flammable Gases in Inactive Miscellaneous Underground Storage Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    NGUYEN, D.M.

    2000-02-01

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies the field measurements for a screening of flammable gases in the vapor space of the inactive miscellaneous underground storage tanks (IMUSTs) currently assigned to the River Protection Project (RPP). If a measurement exceeds 25% of the lower flammability limit (LFL), vapor grab samples will be collected for laboratory analysis. This SAP also specifies the sample collection, laboratory analysis, quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC), and reporting objectives for grab sampling. Technical bases for the sampling objectives are provided in the Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objectives (Dukelow et al 1995). The screening data will be used to determine if additional data are needed to support closure of a flammable gas unreviewed safety question for these facilities.

  20. High-frequency, long-duration water sampling in acid mine drainage studies: a short review of current methods and recent advances in automated water samplers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapin, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Hand-collected grab samples are the most common water sampling method but using grab sampling to monitor temporally variable aquatic processes such as diel metal cycling or episodic events is rarely feasible or cost-effective. Currently available automated samplers are a proven, widely used technology and typically collect up to 24 samples during a deployment. However, these automated samplers are not well suited for long-term sampling in remote areas or in freezing conditions. There is a critical need for low-cost, long-duration, high-frequency water sampling technology to improve our understanding of the geochemical response to temporally variable processes. This review article will examine recent developments in automated water sampler technology and utilize selected field data from acid mine drainage studies to illustrate the utility of high-frequency, long-duration water sampling.

  1. Saliency region and density maximization for salient object detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xin; Jing, Huiyun

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we propose an alternative salient object detection method based on maximum saliency region and density. The proposed approach can automatically detect the salient object with a well-defined boundary. Saliency region and density maximization is used as the quality function to find the optimal window containing a salient object. And for efficiently executing window search, a branch-and-bound search algorithm based on saliency region and density is proposed. Then the located window is used to initialize the GrabCut method, and the salient object with a well- defined boundary is extracted through applying GrabCut. Experimental results show that the proposed salient object detection approach outperforms the state-of-the-art methods.

  2. Spatial and Temporal Variability in Pesticide Exposure Downstream of a Heavily Irrigated Cropping Area: Application of Different Monitoring Techniques.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Dominique; Lewis, Stephen; Davis, Aaron; Gallen, Christie; Smith, Rachael; Turner, Ryan; Warne, Michael; Turner, Scott; Caswell, Stewart; Mueller, Jochen F; Brodie, Jon

    2016-05-25

    Pesticide exposure threatens many freshwater and estuarine ecosystems around the world. This study examined the temporal and spatial trends of pesticide concentrations in a waterway within an agriculturally developed dry-tropics catchment using a combination of grab and passive sampling methods over a continuous two-year monitoring program. A total of 43 pesticide residues were detected with 7 pesticides exceeding ecologically relevant water quality guidelines/trigger values during the study period and 4 (ametryn, atrazine, diuron, and metolachlor) of these exceeding guidelines for several months. The presence and concentration of the pesticides in the stream coincided with seasonal variability in rainfall, harvest timing/cropping cycle, and management changes. The sampling approach used demonstrates that the application of these complementary sampling techniques (both grab and passive sampling methods) was effective in establishing pesticide usage patterns in upstream locations where application data are unavailable. PMID:26755130

  3. EMAP/NS and T pilot studies in the Carolinian Province: Indicator testing and evaluation in the southeastern estuaries. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Ringwood, A.H.; Holland, A.F.; Kneib, R.T.; Ross, P.E.

    1996-06-01

    Indicator development studies were conducted during a pilot year program designed to evaluate existing EMAP indicators as well as to identify and develop new indicators of environmental quality for southeastern Atlantic estuaries. EMAP sampling activities were conducted at 24 stations throughout the Carolinian Province. Hydrolab Datasonde 3s were deployed in situ for >= 23 hr for water quality data (temperature, salinity, pH, dissolved oxygen, and depth). Sediment grabs were collected for infaunal community analyses. The top 2 cm of sediments from multiple grabs were composited and used for a variety of analyses (sediment contaminants, toxicity, sediment characterization). A limited suite of metals and PAHs were determined from sediment samples. Trawls were conducted for fish and shellfish community analyses.

  4. Let me tell you about bedpans.

    PubMed

    Mason, V

    1997-01-01

    You see, it worked. This title grabbed your attention just like Suzanne Gordon said it would. Suzanne Gordon is a journalist, not a nurse, so she ought to know something about grabbing a reader's attention. As it happens, she also knows something about nursing. If you want to be convinced, read her widely praised new book Life Support--Three Nurses on the Front Lines (Little, Brown 1997). So how does it happen that she is able to write and speak with authority about nursing? Because nurses talked with her about what they do, how they do it, and why. And now she talks back to nurses. Tells us that our passion and anger are all that stand between us and the death of care giving. Challenging things like that. PMID:9369700

  5. Fluid sampling system for a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Lau, L.K.; Alper, N.I.

    1994-11-22

    A system of extracting fluid samples, either liquid or gas, from the interior of a nuclear reactor containment utilizes a jet pump. To extract the sample fluid, a nonradioactive motive fluid is forced through the inlet and discharge ports of a jet pump located outside the containment, creating a suction that draws the sample fluid from the containment through a sample conduit connected to the pump suction port. The mixture of motive fluid and sample fluid is discharged through a return conduit to the interior of the containment. The jet pump and means for removing a portion of the sample fluid from the sample conduit can be located in a shielded sample grab station located next to the containment. A non-nuclear grade active pump can be located outside the grab sampling station and the containment to pump the nonradioactive motive fluid through the jet pump. 1 fig.

  6. Fluid sampling system for a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Lau, Louis K.; Alper, Naum I.

    1994-01-01

    A system of extracting fluid samples, either liquid or gas, from the interior of a nuclear reactor containment utilizes a jet pump. To extract the sample fluid, a nonradioactive motive fluid is forced through the inlet and discharge ports of a jet pump located outside the containment, creating a suction that draws the sample fluid from the containment through a sample conduit connected to the pump suction port. The mixture of motive fluid and sample fluid is discharged through a return conduit to the interior of the containment. The jet pump and means for removing a portion of the sample fluid from the sample conduit can be located in a shielded sample grab station located next to the containment. A non-nuclear grade active pump can be located outside the grab sampling station and the containment to pump the nonradioactive motive fluid through the jet pump.

  7. C-104 Solid Phase Characterization of Sample 4C-13-1 From Tank 241-C-104 Closure Sampling Event

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, Gary A.; Pestovich, John A.

    2013-06-12

    One solid grab sample from closure sampling in Riser 7 of tank 214-C-I04 (C-I04) was examined to determine the solid phases that were present. The sample was analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The purpose of this analysis was to see if the presence of hydrated phases could provide a possible explanation for the high moisture content obtained from thermogravimetric analysis (TGA).

  8. Navigating the Race to the Top Traffic Jam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Teacher Quality, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Early last week the U.S. Department of Education announced an unexpected 16 finalists for the first round of Race to the Top (RTT) funding--a veritable traffic jam in the Race to the Top. The finalists have requested a total of $6.5 billion in funds, but only $4.3 billion is up for grabs, and that needs to be spread over two rounds of competition.…

  9. Toxicological Assessment of ISS Air Quality: September 2012 - October 2012 with Formaldehyde Supplement from May-October 2012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2013-01-01

    A summary of the analytical results from 6 grab sample containers (GSCs) and 12 pairs of formaldehyde badges collected on ISS and returned aboard 29S or 31 S is shown in an accompanying table. The average recoveries of the 3 surrogate standards from the GSCs were as follows: C-l3-acetone, 128%; fluorobenzene, 114%; and chlorobenzene, 78%. Recoveries of two lab-control formaldehyde badges averaged 95%.

  10. Results of gas monitoring of double-shell flammable gas watch list tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, N.E.

    1995-01-19

    Tanks 103-SY; 101-AW; 103-, 104-, and 105-AN are on the Flammable Gas Watch List. Recently, standard hydrogen monitoring system (SHMS) cabinets have been installed in the vent header of each of these tanks. Grab samples have been taken once per week, and a gas chromatograph was installed on tank 104-AN as a field test. The data that have been collected since gas monitoring began on these tanks are summarized in this document.

  11. Building a 19th Century climate chronology for the Karoo: 1840-1870

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupini, Athanasia

    2016-04-01

    The need to increase knowledge of global climate change has led to a drive to create long term climatic data sets for countries and smaller regions. With these data sets it is possible to identify patterns in past recent climate and use these to model future climate. The science of historical climatology allows this without having to rely on instrumental data, which may not be available or reliable. Documentary sources usually provide exact dates in which climatic events occur, which can then be utilized to compare to climatic events in neighbouring regions. This study provides the first reconstruction and extended chronology for climate and precipitation for the Albany region in the Eastern Karoo, for 1840-1870, using historical documentary sources. Methodologies were adopted from similar investigations, where any references to the climate were extracted, digitized and categorized according to an index for both rainfall and temperature (Grab and Nash 2010; Nash and Grab, 2010). The data was categorized into an October to September year due to the study site receiving year long rainfall, and final indexes were created for the warm and dry seasons. Droughts that were recorded in this investigation occurred during 1848-1849, 1861-1862, 1862-1863. Floods were identified in 1847-1848, and in 1867-1868. The study site was found to experience significantly drier than wet periods, and the damage described in the accounts from drought was far more severe than that described during periods of flooding. The findings of this study were also compared to several similar studies conducted in neighbouring regions, and a general consistency was found (Grab and Nash 2010; Nash and Grab, 2010; Nash and Endfield, 2002; Vogel, 1989). Further work examining the socio-economic impacts, patterns of locust visitations and comparing modern day to past recent rainfall is also identified.

  12. Assessment of tumour response with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography using three-dimensional measures compared to SUVmax--a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Boucek, J A; Francis, R J; Jones, C G; Khan, N; Turlach, B A; Green, A J

    2008-08-21

    SUVmax is currently the most common semi-quantitative method of response assessment on FDG PET. By defining the tumour volume of interest (VOI), a measure of total glycolytic volume (TGV) may be obtained. We aimed to comprehensively examine, in a phantom setting, the accuracy of TGV in reflecting actual lesion activity and to compare TGV with SUVmax for response assessment. The algorithms for VOI generation from which TGV was derived included fixed threshold techniques at 50% of maximum (MAX50), 70% of maximum (MAX70), an adaptive threshold of 50% of (maximum + background)/2 (BM50) and a semi-automated iterative region-growing algorithm, GRAB. Comparison with both actual lesion activity and response scenarios was performed. SUVmax correlated poorly with actual lesion activity (r = 0.651) and change in lesion activity (r = 0.605). In a response matrix scenario SUVmax performed poorly when all scenarios were considered, but performed well when only clinically likely scenarios were included. The TGV derived using MAX50 and MAX70 algorithms performed poorly in evaluation of lesion change. The TGV derived from BM50 and GRAB algorithms however performed extremely well in correlation with actual lesion activity (r = 0.993 and r = 0.982, respectively), change in lesion activity (r = 0.972 and r = 0.963, respectively) and in the response scenario matrix. TGV(GRAB) demonstrated narrow confidence bands when modelled with actual lesion activity. Measures of TGV generated by iterative algorithms such as GRAB show potential for increased sensitivity of metabolic response monitoring compared to SUVmax, which may have important implications for improved patient care. PMID:18653927

  13. Photonics industry in China: from current status and trends to the importance of innovation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Chongcheng

    2011-12-01

    Current status and trends in various sectors of photonics industry in Mainland China are reviewed, which includes optical fiber communication, optical preform, fiber and cable, photonic devices and chips, LED illumination and display, and photovoltaics. Then, from the challenges and risks they are facing, critical importance of innovation is discussed. In the evolving Innovation Economy, the core competence of a company, an industry or a country is its innovation power and the capability to grab (and manage) talented people.

  14. Space X1 First Entry Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2012-01-01

    One mini-grab sample container (m-GSC) was returned aboard Space X1 because of the importance of quickly knowing first-entry conditions in this new commercial module. This sample was analyzed alongside samples of the portable clean room (PCR) used in the Space X complex at KSC. The recoveries of C-13-acetone, fluorobenzene, and chlorobenzene from the GSCs averaged 130, 129, and 132 %, respectively.

  15. 46 CFR 160.048-4 - Construction and workmanship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... which are inserted in an outer cover fitted with grab straps. The primary purpose of such cushions is to... cover material will be allowed provided it is for decorative purposes only. Gusset or boxing materials... 37 39 41 43 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39 41 43 45 47 24 26 28 30 32 34 36 38 41 43 45 47 49 51 25 27...

  16. 46 CFR 160.048-4 - Construction and workmanship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... which are inserted in an outer cover fitted with grab straps. The primary purpose of such cushions is to... cover material will be allowed provided it is for decorative purposes only. Gusset or boxing materials... 37 39 41 43 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39 41 43 45 47 24 26 28 30 32 34 36 38 41 43 45 47 49 51 25 27...

  17. 46 CFR 160.048-4 - Construction and workmanship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... which are inserted in an outer cover fitted with grab straps. The primary purpose of such cushions is to... cover material will be allowed provided it is for decorative purposes only. Gusset or boxing materials... 37 39 41 43 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39 41 43 45 47 24 26 28 30 32 34 36 38 41 43 45 47 49 51 25 27...

  18. 46 CFR 160.048-4 - Construction and workmanship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... which are inserted in an outer cover fitted with grab straps. The primary purpose of such cushions is to... cover material will be allowed provided it is for decorative purposes only. Gusset or boxing materials... 37 39 41 43 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39 41 43 45 47 24 26 28 30 32 34 36 38 41 43 45 47 49 51 25 27...

  19. 16. THREEQUARTER VIEW TAKEN FROM THE REAR OF A HULETT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. THREE-QUARTER VIEW TAKEN FROM THE REAR OF A HULETT ORE UNLOADER AS IT DESCENDS INTO THE HOLD. THE WALKING BEAM AND ITS GRAB BUCKET ARE OPERATED BY MEANS OF ROPES WOUND ON DRUMS, WHICH IN TURN ARE GEARED TO ELECTRIC MOTORS. ROUND TRIP FROM BOAT TO HOPPER CAN BE MADE IN 50 SECONDS. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  20. Gold anomalies and magnetometer profile data, Ester Dome area, Fairbanks district, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stevens, D.L.; Forbes, Robert B.; Hawkins, D.B.

    1969-01-01

    Gold analysis of grab and auger samples of bedrock taken along the new Ester Dome Road reveals that this road cuts several mineralized zones characterized by anomalous concentrations of gold. The results of a magnetometer traverse along this road indicate that the negative magnetic anomalies along the traverse may be correlative with the gold anomalies. The presence of previously unreported gold anomalies indicates that additional prospecting may be warranted.

  1. STS 131 Return Samples: Assessment of Air Quality Aboard the Shuttle (STS-131) and International Space Station (19A)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2010-01-01

    The toxicological assessments of 1 grab sample canister (GSC) from the Shuttle are reported in Table 1. Analytical methods have not changed from earlier reports. The recoveries of the 3 surrogates (C-13-acetone, fluorobenzene, and chlorobenzene) from the Shuttle GSC were 100%, 93%, and 101%, respectively. Based on the historical experience using end-of-mission samples, the Shuttle atmosphere was acceptable for human respiration.

  2. STS 130 Return Samples: Assessment of Air Quality Aboard the Shuttle (STS-130) and International Space Station (20A)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2010-01-01

    The toxicological assessments of 3 grab sample canisters (GSCs) from the Shuttle are reported in Table 1. Analytical methods have not changed from earlier reports. The recoveries of the 3 surrogates ( 13C-acetone, fluorobenzene, and chlorobenzene) from the 3 Shuttle GSCs averaged 96, 90, and 85 %, respectively. Based on the end-of-mission sample, the Shuttle atmosphere was acceptable for human respiration.

  3. Where Is the Center of Mass of Florida?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    An attention-grabbing center-of-mass demonstration uses the map of a state mounted on a sheet of heavy cardboard and cut out along the boundaries. The two-dimensional object is hung from a hole punched into a city near the edge, and a string with a pendulum bob attached to it passes through the center of mass. The process is repeated with a…

  4. Mannosyl Glycodendritic Structure Inhibits DC-SIGN-Mediated Ebola Virus Infection in cis and in trans

    PubMed Central

    Lasala, Fátima; Arce, Eva; Otero, Joaquín R.; Rojo, Javier; Delgado, Rafael

    2003-01-01

    We have designed a glycodendritic structure, BH30sucMan, that blocks the interaction between dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) and Ebola virus (EBOV) envelope. BH30sucMan inhibits DC-SIGN-mediated EBOV infection at nanomolar concentrations. BH30sucMan may counteract important steps of the infective process of EBOV and, potentially, of microorganisms shown to exploit DC-SIGN for cell entry and infection. PMID:14638512

  5. 30. HULETT NO. 2 IN MOTION; OPERATOR HAS JUST DUMPED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. HULETT NO. 2 IN MOTION; OPERATOR HAS JUST DUMPED A GRAB BUCKET OF ORE INTO THE RECEIVING HOPPER AND IS READY TO RETURN FOR ANOTHER LOAD. A ROUND TRIP FROM THE BOAT TO THE HOPPER AND BACK CAN BE MADE IN 50 SECONDS. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  6. Image digitizer system for bubble chamber laser

    SciTech Connect

    Haggerty, H

    1986-12-08

    An IBM PC-based image digitizer system has been assembled to monitor the laser flash used for holography at the 15 foot bubble chamber. The hardware and the operating software are outlined. For an operational test of the system, an array of LEDs was flashed with a 10 microsecond pulse and the image was grabbed by one of the operating programs and processed. (LEW)

  7. 40 CFR 60.74 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., 7C, or 7D may be used. If Method 7C or 7D is used, the sampling time shall be at least 1 hour. (d...) Method 7 shall be used to determine the NOX concentration of each grab sample. Method 1 shall be used to... (Cs). (3) Method 2 shall be used to determine the volumetric flow rate (Qsd) of the effluent gas....

  8. Quantitative assessment of the distribution of dissolved Au, As and Sb in groundwater using the diffusive gradients in thin films technique.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Andrew R; Reid, Nathan; Salmon, S Ursula; Rate, Andrew W

    2014-10-21

    The mobility of groundwater and its reactivity with subsurface lithologies makes it an ideal medium for investigating both the mineralogy of the extensive volume of the rocks and soils that it comes into contact with, including the distribution of potential commodities, and the presence of contaminants. Groundwater grab sampling is potentially an effective tool for evaluating metal and metalloid concentrations but can suffer from poor replication and high detection limits. This study evaluates the diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique to detect signatures of Au mineralization in groundwater, as well as associated pathfinder and potential contaminant elements (As and Sb). The DGT technique was modified for Au by evaluating a "gel-less" configuration, with diffusion onto an activated carbon binding layer being controlled by the 0.13 mm thick filter membrane (0.45 μm porosity) only, in order to increase sensitivity in quiescent solutions. Laboratory-based measurements indicated that the diffusive boundary layer (DBL) was ∼ 0.40 mm in thickness in quiescent solutions. The modified DGT samplers were then deployed alongside ferrihydrite DGT devices (fitted with 0.8 mm diffusive gels) to simultaneously measure Au, As and Sb in groundwaters surrounding a known arsenopyrite-hosted Au ore body. DGT-measured Au concentrations ranged from 2.0 ng/L to 38.5 ng/L, and were within a factor of 5 of grab sample concentrations. DGT-measured concentrations of As and Sb were above the detection limits, while grab sample concentrations of As and Sb were often close to or below detection. The DGT technique demonstrated methodological improvement over grab sampling of groundwater for the investigated elements with respect to sensitivity, replication, and portability, although DGT requires further evaluation in a wider range of groundwater environments and conditions. PMID:25252140

  9. Drawing a Regression Line between Spaghetti & Basketball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozgun-Koca, S. Asli; Edwards, Thomas G.

    2010-01-01

    "I liked to grab things on the graphics and see it first hand, see what we were doing on the problem. It makes more sense." These words were from a student who completed a series of lessons on lines of best fit. She made this comment after comparing a hands-on approach using a strand of spaghetti with a high-tech approach using a calculator. To…

  10. A simple resonance Rayleigh scattering method for determination of trace CA125 using immuno-AuRu nanoalloy as probe via ultrasonic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Meiling; Wen, Guiqing; Luo, Yanghe; Liang, Aihui; Jiang, Zhiliang

    2015-01-25

    AuRu nanoalloy (GR) with Au/Ru molar ratio of 32/1 was prepared by the sodium borohydride reduction method. It was used to label the CA125 antibody (Ab) to obtain an immunonanoprobe (GRAb) for cancer antigen 125 (CA125). In pH 7.0 citric acid-Na2HPO4 buffer solution and irradiation of ultrasound, the probes were aggregated nonspecifically to big clusters that showed a strong resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) peak at 278 nm. Upon addition of CA125, GRAb reacted specifically with CA125 to form dispersive immunocomplexes of CA125-GRAb in the solution and this process enhanced by the ultrasonic cavitation effect, which led to the RRS intensity decreased greatly. The decreased RRS intensity was linear to the concentration of CA125 in the range of 1.3-80 U/mL, with a detection limit of 0.6 U/mL. The proposed method was applied to detect CA125 in real sample, with satisfactory results. PMID:25173519

  11. Occurrence of herbicides and pharmaceutical and personal care products in surface water and groundwater around Liberty Bay, Puget Sound, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dougherty, Jennifer A.; Swarzenski, Peter W.; Dinicola, Richard S.; Reinhard, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Organic contaminants, such as pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), pose a risk to water quality and the health of ecosystems. This study was designed to determine if a coastal community lacking point sources, such as waste water treatment plant effluent, could release PPCPs, herbicides, and plasticizers at detectable levels to their surface water and groundwater. Research was conducted in Liberty Bay, an embayment within Puget Sound, where 70% of the population (∼10,000) uses septic systems. Sampling included collection of groundwater and surface water with grab samples and the use of polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS). We analyzed for a broad spectrum of 25 commonly used compounds, including PPCPs, herbicides, and a flame retardant. Twelve contaminants were detected at least once; only N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide, caffeine, and mecoprop, a herbicide not attributed to septic systems, were detected in more than one grab sample. The use of POCIS was essential because contaminants were present at very low levels (nanograms), which is common for PPCPs in general, but particularly so in such a small community. The use of POCIS allowed the detection of five compounds that were not present in grab samples. Data suggest that the community is contaminating local water with PPCPs; this effect is likely to increase as the population and product usage increase. The results presented here are a first step toward assessing the transport of herbicides and PPCPs into this coastal system.

  12. The Water Footprint of Food Aid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, N. D.; Konar, M.; Hoekstra, A. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Food aid is a critical component of the global food system, particularly when emergency situations arise. For the first time, we evaluate the water footprint of food aid. To do this, we draw on food aid data from theWorld Food Programme and virtual water content estimates from WaterStat. We find that the total water footprint of food aid was 10 km3 in 2005, which represents approximately 0.5% of the water footprint of food trade and 2.0% of the water footprint of land grabbing (i.e., water appropriation associated with large agricultural land deals). The United States is by far the largest food aid donor and contributes 82% of the water footprint of food aid. The countries that receive the most water embodied in aid are Ethiopia, Sudan, North Korea, Bangladesh and Afghanistan. Notably, we find that there is significant overlap between countries that receive food aid and those that have their land grabbed. Multivariate regression results indicate that donor water footprints are driven by political and environmental variables, whereas recipient water footprints are driven by land grabbing and food indicators.

  13. Evolution of High Trophic Diversity Based on Limited Functional Disparity in the Feeding Apparatus of Marine Angelfishes (f. Pomacanthidae)

    PubMed Central

    Konow, Nicolai; Bellwood, David R.

    2011-01-01

    The use of biting to obtain food items attached to the substratum is an ecologically widespread and important mode of feeding among aquatic vertebrates, which rarely has been studied. We did the first evolutionary analyses of morphology and motion kinematics of the feeding apparatus in Indo-Pacific members of an iconic family of biters, the marine angelfishes (f. Pomacanthidae). We found clear interspecific differences in gut morphology that clearly reflected a wide range of trophic niches. In contrast, feeding apparatus morphology appeared to be conserved. A few unusual structural innovations enabled angelfishes to protrude their jaws, close them in the protruded state, and tear food items from the substratum at a high velocity. Only one clade, the speciose pygmy angelfishes, showed functional departure from the generalized and clade-defining grab-and-tearing feeding pattern. By comparing the feeding kinematics of angelfishes with wrasses and parrotfishes (f. Labridae) we showed that grab-and-tearing is based on low kinematics disparity. Regardless of its restricted disparity, the grab-and-tearing feeding apparatus has enabled angelfishes to negotiate ecological thresholds: Given their widely different body sizes, angelfishes can access many structurally complex benthic surfaces that other biters likely are unable to exploit. From these surfaces, angelfishes can dislodge sturdy food items from their tough attachments. Angelfishes thus provide an intriguing example of a successful group that appears to have evolved considerable trophic diversity based on an unusual yet conserved feeding apparatus configuration that is characterized by limited functional disparity. PMID:21909414

  14. Study of temporal variation of radon concentrations in public drinking water supplies

    SciTech Connect

    York, E.L.

    1995-12-31

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed a Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for radon-222 in public drinking water supplies of 300 pCi/L. Proposed monitoring requirements include collecting quarterly grab samples for the first year, then annual samples for the remainder of the compliance cycle provided first year quarterly samples average below the MCL. The focus of this research was to study the temporal variation of groundwater radon concentrations to investigate how reliably one can predict an annual average radon concentration based on the results of grab samples. Using a {open_quotes}slow-flow{close_quotes} collection method and liquid scintillation analysis, biweekly water samples were taken from ten public water supply wells in North Carolina (6 month - 11 month sampling periods). Based on study results, temporal variations exist in groundwater radon concentrations. Statistical analysis performed on the data indicates that grab samples taken from each of the ten wells during the study period would exhibit groundwater radon concentrations within 30% of their average radon concentration.

  15. Rainfall, Streamflow, and Water-Quality Data During Stormwater Monitoring, Halawa Stream Drainage Basin, Oahu, Hawaii, July 1, 2003 to June 30, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, Stacie T.M.; Ball, Marcael T.J.

    2004-01-01

    Storm runoff water-quality samples were collected as part of the State of Hawaii Department of Transportation Stormwater Monitoring Program. This program is designed to assess the effects of highway runoff and urban runoff on Halawa Stream. For this program, rainfall data were collected at two sites, continuous streamflow data at three sites, and water-quality data at five sites, which include the three streamflow sites. This report summarizes rainfall, streamflow, and water-quality data collected between July 1, 2003 and June 30, 2004. A total of 30 samples was collected over four storms during July 1, 2003 to June 30, 2004. In general, an attempt was made to collect grab samples nearly simultaneously at all five sites, and flow-weighted time-composite samples were collected at the three sites equipped with automatic samplers. However, all four storms were partially sampled because either not all stations were sampled or only grab samples were collected. Samples were analyzed for total suspended solids, total dissolved solids, nutrients, chemical oxygen demand, and selected trace metals (cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc). Grab samples were additionally analyzed for oil and grease, total petroleum hydrocarbons, fecal coliform, and biological oxygen demand. Quality-assurance/quality-control samples, collected during storms and during routine maintenance, were also collected to verify analytical procedures and check the effectiveness of equipment-cleaning procedures.

  16. Rainfall, Streamflow, and Water-Quality Data During Stormwater Monitoring, Halawa Stream Drainage Basin, Oahu, Hawaii, July 1, 2002 to June 30, 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, Stacie T.M.; Ball, Marcael T.J.

    2003-01-01

    Storm runoff water-quality samples were collected as part of the State of Hawaii Department of Transportation Stormwater Monitoring Program. This program is designed to assess the effects of highway runoff and urban runoff on Halawa Stream. For this program, rainfall data was collected at two sites, continuous streamflow data at three sites, and water-quality data at five sites, which include the three streamflow sites. This report summarizes rainfall, streamflow, and water-quality data collected between July 1, 2002 to June 30, 2003. A total of 28 samples were collected over five storms during July 1, 2002 to June 30, 2003. For two of the five storms, five grab samples and three flow-weighted timecomposite samples were collected. Grab samples were collected nearly simultaneously at all five sites, and flow-weighted timecomposite samples were collected at the three sites equipped with automatic samplers. The other three storms were partially sampled, where only flow-weighted time-composite samples were collected and/or not all stations were sampled. Samples were analyzed for total suspended solids, total dissolved solids, nutrients, chemical oxygen demand, and selected trace metals (cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc). Grab samples were additionally analyzed for oil and grease, total petroleum hydrocarbons, fecal coliform, and biological oxygen demand. Quality-assurance/qualitycontrol samples, collected during storms and during routine maintenance, were also collected to verify analytical procedures and insure proper cleaning of equipment.

  17. A simple resonance Rayleigh scattering method for determination of trace CA125 using immuno-AuRu nanoalloy as probe via ultrasonic irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Meiling; Wen, Guiqing; Luo, Yanghe; Liang, Aihui; Jiang, Zhiliang

    2015-01-01

    AuRu nanoalloy (GR) with Au/Ru molar ratio of 32/1 was prepared by the sodium borohydride reduction method. It was used to label the CA125 antibody (Ab) to obtain an immunonanoprobe (GRAb) for cancer antigen 125 (CA125). In pH 7.0 citric acid-Na2HPO4 buffer solution and irradiation of ultrasound, the probes were aggregated nonspecifically to big clusters that showed a strong resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) peak at 278 nm. Upon addition of CA125, GRAb reacted specifically with CA125 to form dispersive immunocomplexes of CA125-GRAb in the solution and this process enhanced by the ultrasonic cavitation effect, which led to the RRS intensity decreased greatly. The decreased RRS intensity was linear to the concentration of CA125 in the range of 1.3-80 U/mL, with a detection limit of 0.6 U/mL. The proposed method was applied to detect CA125 in real sample, with satisfactory results.

  18. Acoustic seafloor discrimination with echo shape parameters: A comparison with the ground truth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Walree, Paul A.; Tęgowski, Jaroslaw; Laban, Cees; Simons, Dick G.

    2005-11-01

    Features extracted from echosounder bottom returns are compared with the ground truth in a North Sea survey area. The ground truth consists of 50 grab samples for which the grain size distribution, and the gravel and shell contents were determined. Echo envelopes are analysed for two single-beam echosounders, operated at frequencies of 66 and 150 kHz. It is shown that a set of six energetic, statistical, spectral and fractal parameters carries useful information that can be exploited for seafloor characterization and classification purposes. A quantitative comparison of the individual features with the grab sample mean grain size reveals significant correlations. The echo features are also subjected to a principal component analysis in tandem with a cluster analysis. Four sediment classes with different geo-acoustic properties are examined and compared with the grab samples and existing geological information. A subtle difference between the two sounder frequencies is observed in the rendition of an isolated trench with a soft infill of clay and Holocene channel deposits. The acoustic transition from the valley to neighbouring sand and gravel fields occurs more rapidly at the lower of the two examined frequencies. A direct comparison of the acoustic sediment classes with the ground truth reveals that the main sediment types mud, sand, and gravel are more clearly separated at 150 kHz. The acoustic bottom classification scheme also appears particularly sensitive to the presence of gravel at this sounder frequency.

  19. Upwelling of Acidified Water: Not Just an Issue for Shellfish Hatcheries on the West Coast of the US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poach, M.; Munroe, D.; Abrahamsen, I.

    2014-12-01

    Periodic upwelling events are known to occur off the coast of New Jersey during the summer. As with upwelling off the US West Coast, these events can transport acidified water to the surface and shoreward. To determine if upwelling events have the potential to impact shellfish hatcheries in New Jersey, a monitoring study was conducted at the Aquaculture Innovation Center (AIC) of Rutgers University. The AIC is an important hatchery supporting the New Jersey oyster aquaculture industry through the production of disease resistant seed oysters. Starting in June of 2014, temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen and pH were continuously monitored at the AIC's intake pipe. Periodic grab samples were also collected at the intake and at locations within the facility. Grab samples were preserved and analyzed for pH and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). DIC and pH were used to calculate the aragonite saturation state of the sampled water. During an upwelling event in early July a drop in pH was measured at the intake. Grab samples showed that water of lower pH and aragonite saturation was entering the facility. These results show that hatcheries along the NJ coast need to be aware that upwelling events may bring conditions detrimental for shellfish production.

  20. Impact of approach used to determine removal levels of drugs of abuse during wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Rodayan, Angela; Majewsky, Marius; Yargeau, Viviane

    2014-07-15

    In this study the levels of 19 drugs of abuse were estimated throughout a wastewater treatment plant using polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS), 24h composite samples and grab samples. Overall removal efficiencies and removals in between each treatment unit were calculated using load data for each sampling technique as well as removals that take into account the hydraulic residence time distribution of the treatment plant (time-shifted mass balancing approach). Amphetamine-type stimulants, cocaine and its major metabolite, benzoylecgonine and opioid levels determined with 24h composite samples were generally comparable to those obtained with POCIS and grab samples. Negative mass balances resulting from the estimation of overall removal efficiencies by POCIS, day-to-day mass balancing of 24h composite and grab sample data did not occur when the hydraulic retention time (HRT) distributions of the plant were taken into account for calculation. Among the compounds investigated, cocaine exhibited the highest overall removal (90%) while codeine had the lowest with 13%, respectively. Sampling between the treatment units revealed that highest removal occurs during biological treatment as compared to primary or secondary clarification. Methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), fentanyl, dihydrocodeine and heroin were not detected in wastewater at any of the sampling locations at the treatment plant regardless of the sampling technique. The study demonstrates the benefits of applying the time-shifted mass balancing approach to the calculation of removals of drugs of abuse during wastewater treatment. PMID:24726517

  1. Linking Near Real-Time Water Quality Measurements to Fecal Coliforms and Trace Organic Pollutants in Urban Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henjum, M.; Wennen, C.; Hondzo, M.; Hozalski, R. M.; Novak, P. J.; Arnold, W. A.

    2009-05-01

    Anthropogenic pollutants, including pesticides, herbicides, pharmaceuticals, and estrogens are detected in urban water bodies. Effective examination of dilute organic and microbial pollutant loading rates within surface waters is currently prohibitively expensive and labor intensive. Effort is being placed on the development of improved monitoring methodologies to more accurately assess surface water quality and evaluate the effectiveness of water quality management practices. Throughout the summer and fall of 2008 a "real-time" wireless network equipped with high frequency fundamental water quality parameter sensors measured turbidity, conductivity, pH, depth, temperature, dissolved oxygen and nitrate above and below stormwater inputs at two urban stream locations. At each location one liter grab samples were concurrently collected by ISCO automatic samplers at two hour intervals for 24 hour durations during three dry periods and five rain events. Grab samples were analyzed for fecal coliforms, atrazine (agricultural herbicide), prometon (residential herbicide) and caffeine (wastewater indicator). Surrogate relationships between easy-to-measure water quality parameters and difficult-to-measure pollutants were developed, subsequently facilitating monitoring of these pollutants without the development of new, and likely costly, technologies. Additionally, comparisons were made between traditional grab sampling techniques and the "real-time" monitoring to assess the accuracy of Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) calculations.

  2. Plasminogen activator activity in cultures from human tissues. An immunological and histochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Bernik, Maria B.; Kwaan, Hau C.

    1969-01-01

    Human tissues and cells from pre- and postnatal life were cultivated and studied for plasminogen activator activity. Cultures were obtained from kidney, renal blood vessels, ureter, bladder, lung, and heart. Local activator activity of cells was demonstrated by histochemical techniques. Activator released by cells into the supernatant culture media was assayed by fibrin plate techniques and was investigated for immunological identity using specific antisera to an activator of human origin, urokinase (UK). Plasminogen activator was produced in primary cultures where cells retain specific functions and generally reflect the enzyme pattern of the tissues of origin. Cells from fetal and adult sources were found to yield activator antigenically identical to UK, as well as activator activity which differed from that of UK in immunoassays and which may represent tissue type activator. Such activity was released after injury or death of cells while UK was produced in cultures containing live, metabolizing cells. Primary cultures of kidney confirmed that this organ is a rich source of UK and demonstrated, in addition, that UK is produced from the early stages of gestation and in increasing amounts thereafter. However, primary cultures also demonstrated that the ability to produce UK is not limited to the kidney but is a function of cells which are distributed widely in body tissues. Thus, activator antigenically identical to UK accumulated progressively after many refeedings in culture supernates of fetal lung and ureter, as well as in supernates of renal blood vessels of adults. These findings indicate continuous formation of UK by the cultured cells and, furthermore, provide evidence of UK production in blood vessels. In cultures from other tissues, particularly those from fetal heart and adult lung and bladder, investigation of activator was hindered by inhibitory activity which accumulated in the supernates. Such activity was derived from cells in culture and was

  3. Reducing the Detection Limit for Tetraphenylborate in Tank 50H Waste

    SciTech Connect

    WHITE, THOMASL.

    2004-07-14

    SRTC personnel are developing a technique that can determine the concentration of tetraphenylborate (TPB) at 300 grams in 100,000 gallons of salt solution (0.8 mg/L) in the presence of0.378 Ci/gal of Cs-137. The current High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) method of analysis can determine the TPB concentration at 5 mg/L and higher. The limit of quantitation was lowered by modification of the sample preparation steps. The HPLC sample preparation method currently used requires neutralization of the tank waste sample followed by extraction with acetonitrile. This method dilutes the tank waste sample 6.5 to 1 increasing the limit of quantitation. The method described in this report concentrates the sample two-fold lowering the limit of quantitation from 5 mg/L to 0.25mg/L. Researchers used solvent extraction of undiluted tank waste to isolate, and concentrate (two-fold) samples of tank supernate and Plant Inhibited Water (PIW) that simulated tank supernate at the cesium level of approximately 0.3 Ci/gal. The 137Cs content in the tank supernate measured 0.65 Ci/gal prior to a two-fold dilution with PIW. The concentration of the TPB was determined by HPLC on a reversed-phase HPLC column using methanol, acetonitrile, and buffered water as the mobile phase. Important Findings: The 0.8 mg/L quantitation limit was met in the presence of radioactive cesium. A 93 per cent reduction in activity in the acetonitrile layer was achieved. A five-mL acetonitrile aliquot from the extraction of a tank waste sample containing 0.378 Ci/gal of Cs-137 could be handled in a radiological hood and comply with the less than 5 mR/hr hood limit. This method is applicable to tank waste solutions of high ionic strength (greater than 2.0 M Na). The ionic strength of tank waste solutions of low ionic strength will need to be adjusted by the addition of NaOH or 5.6 M average salt solution to facilitate the formation of two layers (organic and aqueous). Increasing the ionic strength of tank

  4. THERMAL ANALYSIS FOR IN-TANK ION-EXCHANGE COLUMN PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Frank02 Smith, F

    2009-01-05

    High Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is stored in three forms: sludge, saltcake, and supernate. A small column ion-exchange (SCIX) process is being designed to treat dissolved saltcake waste before feeding it to the saltstone facility to be made into grout. The waste is caustic with high concentrations of various sodium salts and lower concentrations of radionuclides. Two cation exchange media being considered are a granular form of crystalline silicotitanate (CST) and a spherical form of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin. CST is an inorganic material highly selective for cesium that is not elutable. Through this process, radioactive cesium from the salt solution is absorbed into ion exchange media (either CST or RF) which is packed within a flow-through column. A packed column loaded with radioactive cesium generates significant heat from radiolytic decay. If engineering designs cannot handle this thermal load, hot spots may develop locally which could degrade the performance of the ion-exchange media. Performance degradation with regard to cesium removal has been observed between 50 and 80 C for CST [1] and at 65 C for RF resin [2]. In addition, the waste supernate solution will boil around 130 C. If the columns boiled dry, the sorbent material could plug the column and lead to replacement of the entire column module. Alternatively, for organic resins such as RF there is risk of fire at elevated temperatures. The objective of the work is to compute temperature distributions across CST- and RF-packed columns immersed in waste supernate under accident scenarios involving loss of salt solution flow through the beds and, in some cases, loss of coolant system flow. For some cases, temperature distributions are determined as a function of time after the initiation of a given accident scenario and in other cases only the final steady-state temperature distributions are calculated. In general, calculations are conducted to ensure conservative and

  5. Intermediate-Scale Ion Exchange Removal of Cesium and Technetium from Hanford Tank 241-AN-102

    SciTech Connect

    King, W.D.

    2001-02-15

    Ion exchange tests have been completed at the Savannah River Technology Center for British Nuclear Fuels Limited, Inc. as part of the Hanford River Protection Project. Radioactive cesium and technetium (pertechnetate form only) were removed by ion exchange from a sample of Envelope C salt solution from Hanford Tank 241-AN-102 (sample volume: approximately 17 L at 4.8 M Na plus). The original sample was diluted and subjected to strontium/transuranics (Sr/TRU) precipitation and filtration processes before ion exchange processing was performed. Batch contact and column tests for the ion exchange removal of cesium and technetium were then completed on the Sr/TRU-decontaminated product. Previous ion exchange tests were conducted on a smaller portion (0.5 L) of the Tank 241-AN-102 supernate sample, which had been similarly pretreated, and the results were reported in a separate document.

  6. Intermediate-Scale Ion Exchange Removal of Cesium and Technetium from Hanford Tank 241-AN-102

    SciTech Connect

    King, W.D.

    2001-09-10

    Ion exchange tests have been completed at the Savannah River Technology Center for British Nuclear Fuels Limited, Inc. as part of the Hanford River Protection Project. Radioactive cesium and technetium (pertechnetate form only) were removed by ion exchange from a sample of Envelope C salt solution from Hanford Tank 241-AN-102 (sample volume: approximately 18 L at 4.8 M Na plus). The original sample was diluted and subjected to strontium/transuranics (Sr/TRU) precipitation and filtration processes before ion exchange processing was performed. Batch contact and column tests for the ion exchange removal of cesium and technetium were then completed on the Sr/TRU-decontaminated product. Previous ion exchange tests were conducted on a smaller portion (0.5 L) of the Tank 241-AN-102 supernate sample, which had been similarly pretreated, and the results were reported in a separate document.

  7. Bacillus subtilis GSY 1057 assay for aflatoxin B activation by rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri).

    PubMed

    Schoenhard, G L; Bishop, P E; Lee, D J; Sinnhuber, R O

    1975-09-01

    A rapid and sensitive microbial assay was developed to detect lethal products of aflatoxin B metabolism by rainbow trout (Salmon gairdneri) Mt. Shasta strain. Bacillus subtilis GSY 1057 (hisA1, uvr-1, metB4), a DNA repair deficient strain, was incubated for 20 min in the 20,000 times g supernate from trout liver homogenates which had been preincubated for 10 min with various levels of aflatoxin B. Serial dilutions of the incubation mixture were plated in triplicate on tryptose blood agar base plates and colonies were counted after 12 hr at 37 degrees C. One mumole aflatoxin B in 3.2 ml incubation mixture reduced viability 60%. PMID:808527

  8. Optimization of conditions for the efficient production of mutan in streptococcal cultures and post-culture liquids.

    PubMed

    Wiater, A; Szczodrak, J; Pleszczyńska, M

    2005-01-01

    The strain Streptococcus sobrinus CCUG 21020 was found to produce water-insoluble and adhesive mutan. The factors influencing both stages of the mutan production, i.e. streptococcal cultures and glucan synthesis in post-culture supernatants were standardized. The application of optimized process parameters for mutan production on a larger scale made it possible to obtain approximately 2.2 g of water-insoluble glucan per 11 of culture supernate--this productivity was higher than the best reported in the literature. It was shown that some of the tested beet sugars might be successfully utilized as substitutes for pure sucrose in the process of mutan synthesis. Nuclear magnetic resonance analyses confirmed that the insoluble biopolymer synthesized by a mixture of crude glucosyltransferases was a mixed-linkage (1-->3), (1-->6)-alpha-D-glucan (the so-called mutan) with a greater proportion of 1,3 to 1,6 linkages. PMID:15813222

  9. FY 1995 separation studies for liquid low-level waste treatment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Bostick, D.T.; Arnold, W.D.; Burgess, M.W.

    1995-01-01

    During FY 1995, studies were continued to develop improved methods for centralized treatment of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Focus in this reporting period was on (1) identifying the parameters that affect the selective removal of {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs, two of the principal radioactive contaminants expected in the waste; (2) validating the effectiveness of the treatment methods by testing an ac Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) supernate; (3) evaluating the optimum solid/liquid separation techniques for the waste; (4) identifying potential treatment methods for removal of technetium from LLLW; and (5) identifying potential methods for stabilizing the high-activity secondary solid wastes generated by the treatment.

  10. Engineering evaluation of neutralization and precipitation processes applicable to sludge treatment project

    SciTech Connect

    Klem, M.J.

    1998-08-25

    Engineering evaluations have been performed to determine likely unit operations and methods required to support the removal, storage, treatment and disposal of solids/sludges present in the K Basins at the Hanford Site. This evaluation was initiated to select a neutralization process for dissolver product solution resulting from nitric acid treatment of about 50 m{sup 3} of Hanford Site K Basins sludge. Neutralization is required to meet Tank Waste Remediation Waste System acceptance criteria for storage of the waste in the double shell tanks after neutralization, the supernate and precipitate will be transferred to the high level waste storage tanks in 200E Area. Non transuranic (TRU) solids residue will be transferred to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). This report presents an overview of neutralization and precipitation methods previously used and tested. This report also recommends a neutralization process to be used as part of the K Basins Sludge Treatment Project and identifies additional operations requiring further evaluation.

  11. Recovery of Am-Cm from high-activity waste concentrate by in-canyon-tank precipitation as oxalates

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, L W; Burney, G A; Wilson, T W; McKibben, J M

    1980-01-01

    Savannah River Laboratory and Savannah River Plant have been separating actinides for more than 25 years. Work continues to upgrade processes and to initiate new processes. This report summarizes work on a precipitation process to separate kg amounts of Am and Cm from hundreds of kilograms of NaNO/sub 3/ and Al(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/. The developed process includes formic acid denitration of the Am-Cm bearing streams for acid adjustment; oxalate precipitation of the Am-Cm; and Mn/sup +2/ catalyzed oxidation of oxalate in both the decanted supernate and the precipitated actinides. The new process generates one fourth the radioactive waste as the solvent extraction process which it replaced, and produces a cleaner feed solution for downstream processing to separate the Am and Cm before conversion to their respective oxides.

  12. Preoperational test report, cross-site transfer system integrated test (POTR-007)

    SciTech Connect

    Pacquet, E.A.

    1998-04-02

    This report documents the results obtained during the performance of Preoperational Test POTP-007, from December 12, 1997 to March 27, 1998. The main objectives were to demonstrate the operation of the following Cross-Site Transfer System components: Booster pumps P-3125A and P-3125B interlocks and controls, both local and remote; Booster pump P-3125A and P-3125B and associated variable speed drives VSD-1 and VSD-2 performance in both manual and automatic modes; and Water filling, circulation, venting and draining of the transfer headers (supernate and slurry line). As described in reference 1, the following components of the Cross-Site Transfer System that would normally be used during an actual waste transfer, are not used in this specific test: Water Flush System; Valving and instrumentation associated with the 241-SY-A valve pit jumpers; and Valving and instrumentation associated with the 244-A lift station.

  13. Radioactive tank waste remediation focus area

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    EM`s Office of Science and Technology has established the Tank Focus Area (TFA) to manage and carry out an integrated national program of technology development for tank waste remediation. The TFA is responsible for the development, testing, evaluation, and deployment of remediation technologies within a system architecture to characterize, retrieve, treat, concentrate, and dispose of radioactive waste stored in the underground stabilize and close the tanks. The goal is to provide safe and cost-effective solutions that are acceptable to both the public and regulators. Within the DOE complex, 335 underground storage tanks have been used to process and store radioactive and chemical mixed waste generated from weapon materials production and manufacturing. Collectively, thes tanks hold over 90 million gallons of high-level and low-level radioactive liquid waste in sludge, saltcake, and as supernate and vapor. Very little has been treated and/or disposed or in final form.

  14. SIMULANT DEVELOPMENT FOR SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M; Russell Eibling, R; David Koopman, D; Dan Lambert, D; Paul Burket, P

    2007-09-04

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site vitrifies High Level Waste (HLW) for repository internment. The process consists of three major steps: waste pretreatment, vitrification, and canister decontamination/sealing. The HLW consists of insoluble metal hydroxides (primarily iron, aluminum, magnesium, manganese, and uranium) and soluble sodium salts (carbonate, hydroxide, nitrite, nitrate, and sulfate). The HLW is processed in large batches through DWPF; DWPF has recently completed processing Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) and is currently processing Sludge Batch 4 (SB4). The composition of metal species in SB4 is shown in Table 1 as a function of the ratio of a metal to iron. Simulants remove radioactive species and renormalize the remaining species. Supernate composition is shown in Table 2.

  15. Research on interfacial polymerization of pyrrole assist with Span80 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q. H.; Tu, Z. Y.; Zhao, N. Y.

    2016-07-01

    With assistance of surfactants, self-assembled Polypyrrole (PPy) film was prepared via oil / water interfacial polymerization. The chemical structure and morphologies of the obtained samples have been characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), respectively. The electrochemical performance recorded on an electrochemical workstation, mainly includes cyclic voltammetry (CV) tests. The prepared PPy film has its own extremely vesicular structures from results and indicates by using different concentration surfactant Span80. The PPy film prepared 25 °C with 3.32 g/L Span80 (surpass its critical micelle concentration) as a surfactant possess a supernal specific capacitance of 368.18 F/g at a scan rate 50 mV/s in 1 M NaNO3 aqueous solution at.

  16. A closed loop system for the conversion of uranium turnings to uranyl oxy-hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Forman, T.M.; Sauer, N.N.; Smith, W.H.; Ogden, G.

    1997-12-31

    The machine shops at Los Alamos National Laboratory generate up to 5 Kgs of uranium turnings daily. Presently, the turnings are packed in diesel fuel in 55 gallon drums and shipped off site for treatment and disposal. In response to a request for an in-situ generator treatment plan, a three-part closed loop system has been designed to dissolve the turnings and leave them in a non-reactive form for either storage or disposal. The system uses electrochemically generated sodium hypochlorite to dissolve the turnings, converting them to uranyl oxy-hydroxide precipitate. The precipitate is continually centrifuged to separate the liquids from solids. The supernant, spent hypochlorite, feeds into the electrochemical cell, the hypochlorite is regenerated and pumped back into the dissolution reactor. This closed loop system accomplishes both conversion of the uranium turnings to an acceptable form and minimizes the treatment wastestream.

  17. Determination of total cyanide in Hanford Site high-level wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.I.; Pool, K.H.

    1994-05-01

    Nickel ferrocyanide compounds (Na{sub 2-x}Cs{sub x}NiFe (CN){sub 6}) were produced in a scavenging process to remove {sup 137}Cs from Hanford Site single-shell tank waste supernates. Methods for determining total cyanide in Hanford Site high-level wastes are needed for the evaluation of potential exothermic reactions between cyanide and oxidizers such as nitrate and for safe storage, processing, and management of the wastes in compliance with regulatory requirements. Hanford Site laboratory experience in determining cyanide in high-level wastes is summarized. Modifications were made to standard cyanide methods to permit improved handling of high-level waste samples and to eliminate interferences found in Hanford Site waste matrices. Interferences and associated procedure modifications caused by high nitrates/nitrite concentrations, insoluble nickel ferrocyanides, and organic complexants are described.

  18. Characterization and decant of Tank 42H sludge sample ESP-200

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M.S.

    2000-04-25

    DWPF Engineering requested that the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) provide a demonstration of the DWPF flowsheet on sludge from Tank 42H in the Shielded Cell facility. A 5 liter sample of the Tank 42H sludge (ESP-200), obtained with the tank contents fully mixed, arrived at SRTC on January 20, 1998. This report details receipt of the 5 liter sample at SRTC, the decant of the sample, and the characterization of the pre- and post-decant Tank 42H sludge. Evaluation of the measured composition of the supernate indicates Sample ESP-200 became diluted approximately 20 percent by volume prior to receipt. This dilution complicates the relationship of the characterization of Post-Decant ESP-200 to the current contents of Tank 42H. For the purposes of modeling the current tank contents of Tank 42H, this report provides an estimated composition based on analytical data of recent samples from Tank 42H.

  19. THERMAL MODELING ANALYSIS OF CST MEDIA IN THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.

    2010-11-01

    immersed in waste supernate or filled with dry air under various accident scenarios. Accident scenarios evaluated included loss of salt solution flow through the bed (a primary heat transfer mechanism), inadvertent column drainage, and loss of active cooling in the column. The calculation results showed that for a wet CST column with active cooling through one central and four outer tubes and 35 C ambient external air, the peak temperature for the fully-loaded column is about 63 C under the loss of fluid flow accident, which is well below the supernate boiling point. The peak temperature for the naturally-cooled (no active, engineered cooling) wet column is 156 C under fully-loaded conditions, exceeding the 130 C boiling point. Under these conditions, supernate boiling would maintain the column temperature near 130 C until all supernate was vaporized. Without active engineered cooling and assuming a dry column suspended in unventilated air at 35 C, the fully-loaded column is expected to rise to a maximum of about 258 C due to the combined loss-of coolant and column drainage accidents. The modeling results demonstrate that the baseline design using one central and four outer cooling tubes provides a highly efficient cooling mechanism for reducing the maximum column temperature. Results for the in-tank modeling calculations clearly indicate that when realistic heat transfer boundary conditions are imposed on the bottom surface of the tank wall, as much as 450 gallons of ground CST (a volume equivalent to two ion exchange processing cycles) in an ideal hemispherical shape (the most conservative geometry) can be placed in the tank without exceeding the 100 C wall temperature limit. Furthermore, in the case of an evenly-distributed flat layer, the tank wall reaches the temperature limit after the ground CST material reaches a height of approximately 8 inches.

  20. EVALUATION OF AP-FARM SIMULANT COMPOSITION FOR ROTARY MICROFILTER TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    HUBER HJ

    2011-09-19

    This document identifies the feed composition of a Hanford AP tank farm simulant for rotary microfiltration testing. The composition is based on an Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) model run in combination with Tank Waste Information Network (TWINS) data and mineralogical studies of actual waste solids. The feed simulant is intended to be used in test runs at SRNL. The simulant will be prepared in two parts: (1) A supernate, composed of water-soluble salts and (2) The undissolved (actually, undissolvable) solids. Test slurries with distinct solids concentrations (e.g., 0.5, 5 and 10 wt%) are then prepared as needed. The base for the composition of supernate and solids is the modeled feed sequence for a deployment scenario of the Supplemental Pretreatment units within AP-farm. These units comprise a filtration part, the RMF, and a Cesium-removal part, a Small Column Ion Exchange. The primary use of this simulant is for filtration testing - however, in case that it is also used for ion-exchange tests, the amount of Cs-137 that would need to be added is available in Table 1 and Attachment 3. A modified model run (MMR-049) of the Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) system plan 6 case 3 was performed to identify the feed sequence. Case 3 assumed supplemental treatment besides the low activity waste (LAW) melter with supplemental pretreatment supporting the pretreatment facility. The MMR did not cap the duration of supplemental pretreatment to 15 months, but rather used it throughout the entire treatment mission as an add-on option to the pretreatment facility at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Tank 241-AP-105 (AP-105) was chosen as the feed tank to the filtration unit. Other parameters included a fixed minimum of 0.5 wt% solids in the feed and a maximum Na-concentration of 5M in the supernate. The solids rejection from the filtration unit was set to 99.99% and the maximum allowed amount of solids within tank AP-105 was set