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Sample records for 241-z-361 vapor sampling

  1. Tank 241-Z-361 vapor sampling and analysis plan

    SciTech Connect

    BANNING, D.L.

    1999-02-23

    Tank 241-Z-361 is identified in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (commonly referred to as the Tri-Party Agreement), Appendix C, (Ecology et al. 1994) as a unit to be remediated under the authority of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). As such, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will serve as the lead regulatory agency for remediation of this tank under the CERCLA process. At the time this unit was identified as a CERCLA site under the Tri-Party Agreement, it was placed within the 200-ZP-2 Operable Unit. In 1997, The Tri-parties redefined 200 Area Operable Units into waste groupings (Waste Site Grouping for 200 Areas Soils Investigations [DOE-RL 1992 and 1997]). A waste group contains waste sites that share similarities in geological conditions, function, and types of waste received. Tank 241-Z-361 is identified within the CERCLA Plutonium/Organic-rich Process Condensate/Process Waste Group (DOE-RL 1992). The Plutonium/Organic-rich Process Condensate/Process Waste Group has been prioritized for remediation beginning in the year 2004. Results of Tank 216-Z-361 sampling and analysis described in this Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) and in the SAP for sludge sampling (to be developed) will determine whether expedited response actions are required before 2004 because of the hazards associated with tank contents. Should data conclude that remediation of this tank should occur earlier than is planned for the other sites in the waste group, it is likely that removal alternatives will be analyzed in a separate Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA). Removal actions would proceed after the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) signs an Action Memorandum describing the selected removal alternative for Tank 216-Z-361. If the data conclude that there is no immediate threat to human health and the environment from this tank, remedial actions for the tank will be defined in a

  2. Tank Vapor Sampling and Analysis Data Package for Tank 241-Z-361 Sampled 09/22/1999 and 09/271999 During Sludge Core Removal

    SciTech Connect

    VISWANATH, R.S.

    1999-12-29

    This data package presents sampling data and analytical results from the September 22 and 27, 1999, headspace vapor sampling of Hanford Site Tank 241-2-361 during sludge core removal. The Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LMHC) sampling team collected the samples and Waste Management Laboratory (WML) analyzed the samples in accordance with the requirements specified in the 241-2361 Sludge Characterization Sampling and Analysis Plan, (SAP), HNF-4371, Rev. 1, (Babcock and Wilcox Hanford Corporation, 1999). Six SUMMA{trademark} canister samples were collected on each day (1 ambient field blank and 5 tank vapor samples collected when each core segment was removed). The samples were radiologically released on September 28 and October 4, 1999, and received at the laboratory on September 29 and October 6, 1999. Target analytes were not detected at concentrations greater than their notification limits as specified in the SAP. Analytical results for the target analytes and tentatively identified compounds (TICs) are presented in Section 2.2.2 starting on page 2B-7. Three compounds identified for analysis in the SAP were analyzed as TICs. The discussion of this modification is presented in Section 2.2.1.2.

  3. 241-Z-361 Sludge Characterization Sampling and Analysis Plan

    SciTech Connect

    BANNING, D.L.

    1999-07-29

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies the type, quantity, and quality of data needed to support characterization of the sludge that remains in Tank 241-2-361. The procedures described in this SAP are based on the results of the 241-2-361 Sludge Characterization Data Quality Objectives (DQO) (BWHC 1999) process for the tank. The primary objectives of this project are to evaluate the contents of Tank 241-2-361 in order to resolve safety and safeguards issues and to assess alternatives for sludge removal and disposal.

  4. 241-Z-361 Sludge Characterization Sampling and Analysis Plan

    SciTech Connect

    BANNING, D.L.

    1999-08-05

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies the type, quantity, and quality of data needed to support characterization of the sludge that remains in Tank 241-2-361. The procedures described in this SAP are based on the results of the 241-2-361 Sludge Characterization Data Quality Objectives (DQO) (BWHC 1999) process for the tank. The primary objectives of this project are to evaluate the contents of Tank 241-2-361 in order to resolve safety and safeguards issues and to assess alternatives for sludge removal and disposal.

  5. Tank 241-Z-361 process and characterization history

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.A.

    1998-08-06

    An Unreviewed Safety Question (Wagoner, 1997) was declared based on lack of adequate authorization basis for Tank 241-Z-361 in the 200W Area at Hanford. This document is a summary of the history of Tank 241-Z-361 through December 1997. Documents reviewed include engineering files, laboratory notebooks from characterization efforts, waste facility process procedures, supporting documents and interviews of people`s recollections of over twenty years ago. Records of transfers into the tank, past characterization efforts, and speculation were used to estimate the current condition of Tank 241-Z-361 and its contents. Information about the overall waste system as related to the settling tank was included to help in understanding the numbering system and process relationships. The Plutonium Finishing Plant was built in 1948 and began processing plutonium in mid-1949. The Incinerator (232-Z) operated from December 1961 until May 1973. The Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF, 236-Z) began operation in May 1964. The Waste Treatment Facility (242-Z) operated from August 1964 until August 1976. Waste from some processes went through transfer lines to 241-Z sump tanks. High salt and organic waste under normal operation were sent to Z-9 or Z-18 cribs. Water from the retention basin may have also passed through this tank. The transfer lines to 241-Z were numbered D-4 to D-6. The 241-Z sump tanks were numbered D-4 through D-8. The D-4, 5, and 8 drains went to the D-6 sump tank. When D-6 tank was full it was transferred to D-7 tank. Prior to transfer to cribs, the D-7 tank contents was sampled. If the plutonium content was analyzed to be more than 10 g per batch, the material was (generally) reprocessed. Below the discard limit, caustic was added and the material was sent to the cribs via the 241-Z-361 settling tank where solids settled out and the liquid overflowed by gravity to the cribs. Waste liquids that passed through the 241-Z-361 settling tank flowed from PFP to ground in

  6. Engineering study of the criticality issues associated with Hanford tank 241-Z-361

    SciTech Connect

    Lipke, E.J.

    1997-12-22

    Tank 241-Z-361 is associated with the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). Uncertainty about the contents of the tank have led to the declaration of an Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) and the preparation of a Justification for Continued Operation (JCO) to address flammable gas and other authorization basis issued. A Criticality Safety Team was assembled to review old data, determine its validity, and reevaluate the tank. It was concluded that the tank has a sufficient margin of safety to allow opening, sampling, and other characterizing activities. The team concluded that a criticality in Tank 241-Z-361 was extremely unlikely.

  7. Tank 241-Z-361 process and characterization history

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.A.

    1997-12-23

    This document is a summary of the history of Tank 241-Z-361 through December 1997. Documents reviewed include engineering files, laboratory notebooks from characterization efforts, waste facility process procedures, supporting documents and interviews of people`s recollections of 20 plus years ago. Records of transfers into the tank, past characterization efforts, and speculation will be used to estimate the current condition of Tank 241-Z-361 and its contents.

  8. Tank 241-Z-361 Sludge Retrieval and Treatment Alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    HAMPTON, B.K.

    2000-05-24

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Tank 241-Z-361 (Z-361) contains legacy sludge resulting from waste discharges from past missions at PFP. A sketch of the tank is shown in Figure 1. In this view various risers and penetrations are shown along with the sludge level depicted by the horizontal line halfway up the tank, and the ground level depicted by the horizontal line above the tank. The HEPA filter installed for breathing is also shown on one of the risers.

  9. Justification for Continued Operation for Tank 241-Z-361

    SciTech Connect

    BOGEN, D.M.

    1999-09-01

    This justification for continued operations (JCO) summarizes analyses performed to better understand and control the potential hazards associated with Tank 241-2-361. This revision to the JCO has been prepared to identify and control the hazards associated with sampling the tank using techniques developed and approved for use in the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) at Hanford.

  10. Vapor sampling and analysis plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Homi, C.S.

    1995-10-10

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from both SST and DST tanks

  11. Tubing For Sampling Hydrazine Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Travis, Josh; Taffe, Patricia S.; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan L.; Wyatt, Jeffrey R.

    1993-01-01

    Report evaluates flexible tubing used for transporting such hypergolic vapors as those of hydrazines for quantitative analysis. Describes experiments in which variety of tubing materials, chosen for their known compatibility with hydrazine, flexibility, and resistance to heat.

  12. Vapor port and groundwater sampling well

    DOEpatents

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Wylie, Allan H.

    1996-01-01

    A method and apparatus has been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing.

  13. Vapor port and groundwater sampling well

    DOEpatents

    Hubbell, J.M.; Wylie, A.H.

    1996-01-09

    A method and apparatus have been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing. 10 figs.

  14. Vapor and gas sampling of single-shell tank 241-S-106 using the in situ vapor sampling system

    SciTech Connect

    Lockrem, L.L.

    1997-08-05

    The Vapor Issue Resolution Program tasked the Vapor Team (VT) to collect representative headspace samples from Hanford Site single-shell tank (SST) 241-S-106. This document presents In Situ vapor Sampling System (ISVS) data resulting from the June 13, 1996 sampling of SST 241-S-106. Analytical results will be presented in separate reports issued by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) which`supplied and analyzed the sample media.

  15. Data Report for Catch Tank Vapor Sampling

    SciTech Connect

    NGUYEN, D.M.

    2000-09-28

    CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) is responsible for developing and maintaining the authorization basis for River Protection Project (RPP) facilities and operations. This responsibility includes closure of the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) for waste tank ancillary equipment such as catch tanks, double-contained receiver tanks, 244-AR and 244-CR vaults, 242-S and 242-T Evaporators, and inactive miscellaneous underground storage tanks. To support closure of the Flammable Gas USQ for catch tanks, an analysis of the flammable gas hazard was performed. This document provides a summary of flammable gas data obtained from RPP active catch tanks in FY 2000. Flammable gas level measurements for each catch tank (other than 241-AX-152) are discussed on a tank-by-tank basis in Section 3.0. Conclusions based on the data are provided in Section 4.0. This section also includes recommendations that would be useful when conducting vapor sampling for other miscellaneous tanks (e.g., inactive miscellaneous underground storage tanks).

  16. Vapor sampling of the headspace of radioactive waste storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, D.A., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-22

    This paper recants the history of vapor sampling in the headspaces of radioactive waste storage tanks at Hanford. The first two tanks to receive extensive vapor pressure sampling were Tanks 241-SY-101 and 241-C-103. At various times, a gas chromatography, on-line mass spectrometer, solid state hydrogen monitor, FTIR, and radio acoustic ammonia monitor have been installed. The head space gas sampling activities will continue for the next few years. The current goal is to sample the headspace for all the tanks. Some tank headspaces will be sampled several times to see the data vary with time. Other tanks will have continuous monitors installed to provide additional data.

  17. Mercury Source Zone Identification using Soil Vapor Sampling and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, David B; Miller, Carrie L; Lester, Brian P; Lowe, Kenneth Alan; Southworth, George R; Bogle, Mary Anna; Liang, Liyuan; Pierce, Eric M

    2014-01-01

    Development and demonstration of reliable measurement techniqes that can detect and help quantify the nature and extent of elemental mercury (Hg(0)) in the subsurface are needed to reduce certainties in the decision making process and increase the effectiveness of remedial actions. We conducted field tests at the Y-12 National Security Complex (NSC) in Oak Ridge, TN, to determine if sampling and analysis of Hg(0) vapors in the shallow subsurface (<0.3 m depth) can be used to as an indicator of the location and extent of Hg(0) releases in the subsurface. We constructed a rigid PVC pushprobe assembly, which was driven into the ground. Soil gas samples were collected through a sealed inner tube of the assembly and analyzed immediately in the field with a Lumex and/or Jerome Hg(0) analyzer. Time-series sampling showed that Hg vapor concentrations were fairly stable over time suggesting that the vapor phase Hg(0) was not being depleted and that sampling results were not dependent on the soil gas purge volume. Hg(0) vapor data collected at over 200 pushprobe locations at 3 different release sites correlated well to areas of known Hg(0) contamination. Vertical profiling of Hg(0) vapor concentrations conducted at 2 locations provided information on the vertical distribution of Hg(0) contamination in the subsurface. We concluded from our studies that soil gas sampling and analysis can be conducted rapidly and inexpensively at a large scale to help identify areas contaminated with Hg(0).

  18. Operability test report for the in SITU vapor sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, J.E., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-31

    This report documents the successful completion of testing for the In Situ Vapor Sampling (ISVS) system. The report includes the test procedure (WHC-SD-WM-OTP-196, Rev OA), data sheets, exception resolutions, and a test report summary. This report conforms to the guidelines established in WHC-IP-1026, `Engineering Practice Guidelines,` Appendix L, `Operability Test Procedures and Reports.`

  19. An opacity-sampled treatment of water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, David R.; Augason, Gordon C.; Johnson, Hollis R.

    1989-01-01

    Although the bands of H2O are strong in the spectra of cool stars and calculations have repeatedly demonstrated their significance as opacity sources, only approximate opacities are currently available, due both to the difficulty of accounting for the millions of lines involved and to the inadequacy of laboratory and theoretical data. To overcome these obstacles, a new treatment is presented, based upon a statistical representation of the water vapor spectrum derived from available laboratory data. This statistical spectrum of water vapor employs an exponential distribution of line strengths and random positions of lines whose overall properties are forced to reproduce the mean opacities observed in the laboratory. The resultant data set is then treated by the opacity-sampling method exactly as are all other lines, both molecular and atomic. Significant differences are found between the results of this improved treatment and the results obtained with previous treatments of water-vapor opacity.

  20. Water vapor measurement system in global atmospheric sampling program, appendix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englund, D. R.; Dudzinski, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    The water vapor measurement system used in the NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP) is described. The system used a modified version of a commercially available dew/frostpoint hygrometer with a thermoelectrically cooled mirror sensor. The modifications extended the range of the hygrometer to enable air sample measurements with frostpoint temperatures down to -80 C at altitudes of 6 to 13 km. Other modifications were made to permit automatic, unattended operation in an aircraft environment. This report described the hygrometer, its integration with the GASP system, its calibration, and operational aspects including measurement errors. The estimated uncertainty of the dew/frostpoint measurements was + or - 1.7 Celsius.

  1. Comparison of vapor sampling system (VSS) and in situ vapor sampling (ISVS) methods on Tanks C-107, BY-108, and S-102. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Edwards, J.A.; Evans, J.C.

    1996-08-01

    This report discusses comparison tests for two methods of collecting vapor samples from the Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tank headspaces. The two sampling methods compared are the truck-mounted vapor sampling system (VSS) and the cart-mounted in-situ vapor sampling (ISVS). Three tanks were sampled by both the VSS and ISVS methods from the same access risers within the same 8-hour period. These tanks have diverse headspace compositions and they represent the highest known level of several key vapor analytes.

  2. GUIDELINES FOR INSTALLATION AND SAMPLING OF SUB-SLAB VAPOR PROBES TO SUPPORT ASSESSMENT OF VAPOR INTRUSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this paper is to provide guidelines for sub-slab sampling using dedicated vapor probes. Use of dedicated vapor probes allows for multiple sample events before and after corrective action and for vacuum testing to enhance the design and monitoring of a corrective m...

  3. Determination of mercury in fish samples by slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaw, Ming-Jyh; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen; Li, Yi-Ching

    1997-06-01

    Ultrasonic slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (USS-ETV-ICP-MS) has been applied to the determination of mercury in several fish samples. The effects of instrument operating conditions and slurry preparation on the ion signals are reported. Palladium was used as modifier to delay the vaporization of mercury in this study. As the vaporization behavior of mercury in fish slurry and aqueous solution is quite different, the standard addition method was used for the determination of mercury in reference materials. The detection limit of mercury estimated from the standard addition curve was in the range 0.002-0.004 μg g -1 for different samples. This method has been applied to the determination of mercury in dogfish muscle reference material (DORM-1 and DORM-2) and dogfish liver reference material (DOLT-1). Accuracy was better than 4% and precision was better than 7% with the USS-ETV-ICP-MS method.

  4. Tank 241-SX-106 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories.

  5. Tank 241-T-107 Headspace Gas and Vapor Characterization Results for Samples Collected in January 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-26

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  6. Tank 241-TY-104 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in April 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories.

  7. Tank 241-S-111 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories.

  8. Tank 241-C-104 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-28

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  9. Tank 241-AX-102 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories.

  10. Tank 241-C-102 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories.

  11. Tank 241-U-103 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in February 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-27

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories.

  12. Tank 241-TX-105 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-25

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  13. Tank 241-B-103 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in February 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-27

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  14. Tank 241-A-101 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories.

  15. Tank 241-C-110 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories.

  16. Sample introduction into a direct current plasma by filament vaporization

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, B.T.

    1989-01-01

    This dissertation describes sample introduction into a direct current plasma by a tungsten filament vaporizer. The filament heater was designed to resistively heat a 0.1 mm diameter tungsten wire quickly and efficiently. The heating system is under microprocessor control for precise power application to the filament. The cell volume is small, less than 4 mL, and the accessibility of the primary emission zone allowed placement of the filament less than 5 cm from the confluence point of the plasma. The first study describes some of the fundamental design considerations, as well as performance of the interface. The absolute mass detection limits for Ca, Fe, Al, and Cu are 80, 2,000, 90, and 200 fg respectively. The blackbody emission temperature of the filament was measured. The initial heating rate was 50,000{degree}C/s. Observations are reported for optimization of operating parameters, as well as how to locate the region of maximum analyte emission intensity. Finally, the application of this technique to the analysis of a biological sample, swine blood, is reported. The second study examines the sources of noise and their components. Noise is grouped into additive and multiplicative noise occurring in three frequency ranges. The largest contribution, greater than 90%, was shot to shot multiplicative variations in sample vaporization and excitation. The third study examines the effect of addition of concomitant substances to the analyte. The substances were added both as metal salts to the aqueous analyte solution and as dopant gases to the carrier gas. Measured transport efficiencies ranged from 60 to 103% for manganese under various concomitant conditions. A 1% doping of the carrier gas with hydrogen caused significant enhancement of the emission signal of three metals, Fe, Al, and Ca. Enhancement correlated with volatility of the reduced form of the element.

  17. GROUND WATER SAMPLING OF VOCS IN THE WATER/CAPILLARY FRINGE AREA FOR VAPOR INTRUSION ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vapor intrusion has recently been considered a major pathway for increased indoor air contamination from certain volatile organic contaminants (VOCs). The recent Draft EPA Subsurface Vapor Intrusion Guidance Document states that ground water samples should be obtained from the u...

  18. Vapor space sampling of ferrocyanide tanks, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    Environmental assessment (EA), to assess environmental impacts associated with tank vapor space (dome) gas sampling of 24 Hanford Site single-shell waste tanks that contain ferrocyanide-nitrate compounds to determine whether or not the tanks contain flammable or toxic gases. The proposed action would be conducted using non-sparking materials, sparkless tools, and a portable containment shelter (greenhouse) and plastic ground cover. DOE needs to take this action to help define the required controls to prevent or mitigate the potential for an accident during future, more intrusive sampling of these tanks. Based on the evaluation in the EA (which examined the environmental impacts of the proposed action and reasonable alternatives), DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  19. SAMPLING-BASED APPROACH TO INVESTIGATING VAPOR INTRUSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vapor intrusion is defined as the migration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into occupied buildings from contaminated soil or ground water. EPA recently developed guidance to facilitate assessment of vapor intrusion at sites regulated by RCRA and CERCLA. The EPA guidance e...

  20. Review of Various Air Sampling Methods for Solvent Vapors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maykoski, R. T.

    Vapors of trichloroethylene, toluene, methyl ethyl ketone, and butyl cellosolve in air were collected using Scotchpac and Tedlar bags, glass prescription bottles, and charcoal adsorption tubes. Efficiencies of collection are reported. (Author/RH)

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF A SUB-SLAB AIR SAMPLING PROTOCOL TO SUPPORT ASSESSMENT OF VAPOR INTRUSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary purpose of this research effort is to develop a methodology for sub-slab sampling to support the EPA guidance and vapor intrusion investigations after vapor intrusion has been established at a site. Methodologies for sub-slab air sampling are currently lacking in ref...

  2. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-S-108: Results from samples collected on December 6, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, B.L.; Evans, J.C.; McVeety, B.D.

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-S-108 (Tank S-108) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was {open_quotes}Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan{close_quotes}, and the sample job was designated S5086. Samples were collected by WHC on December 6, 1995, using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace.

  3. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-A-103: Results from samples collected on November 9, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.C.; Thomas, B.L.; Pool, K.H.; Olsen, K.B.

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-A-103 (Tank A-103) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was {open_quotes}Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan{close_quotes}, and the sample job was designated S5073. Samples were collected by WHC on November 9, 1995, using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace.

  4. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank SX-102: Results from samples collected on July 19, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    McVeety, B.D.; Evans, J.C.; Clauss, T.W.; Pool, K.H.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-SX-102 (Tank SX-102) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed under the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was {open_quotes}Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan{close_quotes}, and the sample job was designated S5046. Samples were collected by WHC on July 19, 1995, using the vapor sampling system (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace.

  5. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-T-110: Results from samples collected on August 31, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    McVeety, B.D.; Thomas, B.L.; Evans, J.C.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-T-110 (Tank T-110) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was {open_quotes}Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan{close_quotes}, and the sample job was designated S5056. Samples were collected by WHC on August 31, 1995, using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace.

  6. Sampling and Analysis Plan for Catch Tank 241ER311 Vapor

    SciTech Connect

    NGUYEN, D.M.

    1999-11-15

    This tank sampling and analysis plan (TSAF') identifies the sample collection, laboratory analysis, quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) objectives for the characterization of catch tank 241-ER-311 vapor space. Data to be collected under this revision (Revision 2) of the TSAP will be used to evaluate the effectiveness of the portable exhauster recently installed for the tank. Vapor samples taken previous to the issuance of this revision shall be analyzed in accordance with Revision 1.

  7. Tank 241-BY-106 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-05-31

    Tank 241-BY-106 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in {open_quotes}Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.{close_quotes} Tank 241-BY-106 was vapor sampled in accordance with {open_quotes}Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.{close_quotes}

  8. Tank 241-BY-105 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-05-31

    Tank 241-BY-105 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in {open_quotes}Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.{close_quotes} Tank 241-BY-105 was vapor sampled in accordance with {open_quotes}Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.{close_quotes}

  9. Techniques for avoiding discrimination errors in the dynamic sampling of condensable vapors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lincoln, K. A.

    1983-01-01

    In the mass spectrometric sampling of dynamic systems, measurements of the relative concentrations of condensable and noncondensable vapors can be significantly distorted if some subtle, but important, instrumental factors are overlooked. Even with in situ measurements, the condensables are readily lost to the container walls, and the noncondensables can persist within the vacuum chamber and yield a disproportionately high output signal. Where single pulses of vapor are sampled this source of error is avoided by gating either the mass spectrometer ""on'' or the data acquisition instrumentation ""on'' only during the very brief time-window when the initial vapor cloud emanating directly from the vapor source passes through the ionizer. Instrumentation for these techniques is detailed and its effectiveness is demonstrated by comparing gated and nongated spectra obtained from the pulsed-laser vaporization of several materials.

  10. Tank 241-C-109 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-05-31

    This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank C-109. The drivers and objectives of the waste tank headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedures that were presented in other reports.

  11. Tank 241-BY-106 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in May 1994 and July 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories.

  12. Tank 241-C-105 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in February 1994. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories.

  13. Tank 241-C-111 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in August 1993 and September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories.

  14. Tank 241-C-109 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in August 1994. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories.

  15. Tank 241-BY-104 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in April 1994 and June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories.

  16. Tank 241-TX-118 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in September 1994 and December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-27

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  17. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-BY-108: Results from samples collected January 23, 1996. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Thomas, B.L.; Olsen, K.B.

    1996-07-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples obtained to compare vapor sampling of the tank headspace using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS) and In Situ Vapor Sampling System (ISVS) with and without particulate prefiltration. Samples were collected from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-BY-108 (Tank BY-108) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was contracted by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for water, ammonia, permanent gases, total nonmethane hydrocarbons (TNMHCs, also known as TO-12), and organic analytes in samples collected in SUMMA{trademark} canisters and on triple sorbent traps (TSTs) from the tank headspace. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sampling and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was {open_quotes}Sampling and Analysis Plan for Tank Vapor Sampling Comparison Test{close_quotes}, and the sample jobs were designated S6004, S6005, and S6006. Samples were collected by WHC on January 23, 1996, using the VSS, a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe; and the ISVS with and without particulate prefiltration.

  18. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-S-102: Results from samples collected on January 26, 1996. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.C.; Thomas, B.L.; Pool, K.H.

    1996-07-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples obtained to compare vapor sampling of the tank headspace using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS) and In Situ Vapor Sampling System (ISVS) with and without particulate prefiltration. Samples were collected from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-S-102 (Tank S-102) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was contracted by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for water, ammonia, permanent gases, total nonmethane hydrocarbons (TNMHCs, also known as TO-12), and organic analytes in samples collected in SUMMA{trademark} canisters and on triple sorbent traps (TSTs) from the tank headspace. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sampling and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was {open_quotes}Sampling and Analysis Plan for Tank Vapor Sampling Comparison Test{close_quote}, and the sample jobs were designated S6007, S6008, and S6009. Samples were collected by WHC on January 26, 1996, using the VSS, a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe; and the ISVS with and without particulate prefiltration.

  19. Tank 241-C-110 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-05-31

    This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-C-110. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedure that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank.

  20. Tank 241-C-109 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-05-10

    This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-C-109. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedures that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank.

  1. Tank 241-SX-106 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-05-31

    This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-SX-106. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedure that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank.

  2. Tank 241-C-107 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-05-31

    This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-C-107. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedures that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank.

  3. Tank 241-C-102 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-05-31

    This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-C-102. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedures that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank.

  4. EVALUATION OF VAPOR EQUILIBRATION AND IMPACT OF PURGE VOLUME ON SOIL-GAS SAMPLING RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sequential sampling was utilized at the Raymark Superfund site to evaluate attainment of vapor equilibration and the impact of purge volume on soil-gas sample results. A simple mass-balance equation indicates that removal of three to five internal volumes of a sample system shou...

  5. Sampling Impacts on the NVAP-M Global Water Vapor Climate Data Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonder Haar, T. H.; Forsythe, J. M.; Cronk, H. Q.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric water vapor is a fundamental ingredient both for regulating climate as a greenhouse gas and as a necessary precursor for high impact weather events such as heavy precipitation. Water vapor concentration varies geographically because of its close linkage with surface temperature and as a component of synoptic and mesoscale weather systems. Satellite observations provide the only means to quantify the global occurrence and variability of water vapor. In common with other long-term climate data records such as clouds and precipitation, intercalibrating and blending diverse measurements of water vapor to create a consistent record through time is a challenge. The NASA Making Earth Science Data Records for Research Environments (MEaSUREs) program supported the development of the NASA Water Vapor Project (NVAP-M) dataset. The dataset was released to the science community in 2013 via the NASA Langley Atmospheric Science Data Center. The dataset is a global (land and ocean) water vapor dataset created by merging multiple satellite infrared and microwave sources of atmospheric water vapor along with surface data to form global gridded fields of total and layered precipitable water vapor. NVAP-M spans 22 years (1988-2009) of data. The challenges in creating this multisensor, multidecadal satellite-driven climate data record are illustrative of challenges for all satellite climate data records. While advances in sensor intercalibration and retrieval algorithms have improved the quality of the global water vapor climate data record, uncertainties arise due to sampling biases of the input sensors. These biases are particularly evident on a regional scale, in cloudy regions or over desert surfaces. The changing mixture of sensors with varying sensitivity to clear/cloudy, land/ocean and even day/night conditions can lead to different results on trends and variability of water vapor. We explore this variability via the NVAP-M data set. Connections and collaborations

  6. Tank vapor characterization project. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford waste tank 241-BY-108: Second comparison study results from samples collected on 3/28/96

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, B.L.; Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-BY-108 (Tank BY-108) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report is the second in a series comparing vapor sampling of the tank headspace using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS) and In Situ Vapor Sampling (ISVS) system without high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) prefiltration. The results include air concentrations of water (H{sub 2}O) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}), permanent gases, total non-methane organic compounds (TO-12), and individual organic analytes collected in SUMMA{trademark} canisters and on triple sorbent traps (TSTs). Samples were collected by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volume measurements provided by WHC.

  7. Tank vapor characterization project: Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-S-102: Second comparison study results from samples collected on 04/04/96

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Thomas, B.J.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-S-102 (Tank S-102) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report is the second in a series comparing vapor sampling of the tank headspace using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS) and In Situ Vapor Sampling (ISVS) system without high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) prefiltration. The results include air concentrations of water (H{sub 2}O) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}), permanent gases, total non-methane organic compounds (TO-12), and individual organic analytes collected in SUMMA{trademark} canisters and on triple sorbent traps (TSTs). Samples were collected by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volume measurements provided by WHC.

  8. Tank vapor characterization project - headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-C-107: Second comparison study results from samples collected on 3/26/96

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-C-107 (Tank C-107) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report is the second in a series comparing vapor sampling of the tank headspace using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS) and In Situ Vapor Sampling (ISVS) system without high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) prefiltration. The results include air concentrations of water (H{sub 2}O) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}), permanent gases, total non-methane organic compounds (TO-12), and individual organic analytes collected in SUMMA{trademark} canisters and on triple sorbent traps (TSTs). Samples were collected by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volume measurements provided by WHC.

  9. Tank Vapor Characterization Project -- Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford waste Tank 241-C-107: Results from samples collected on 01/17/96

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, B.L.; Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Silvers, K.L.

    1996-07-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-C-107 (Tank C-107) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to compare vapor sampling of the tank headspace using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS) and In Situ Vapor Sampling (ISVS) system with and without high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) prefiltration. The results include air concentrations of water (H{sub 2}O) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}), permanent gases, total non-methane hydrocarbons (TO-12), and individual organic analytes collected in SUMMA{trademark} canisters and on triple sorbent traps (TSTs). Samples were collected by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volume measurements provided by WHC.

  10. Evidence That Certain Waste Tank Headspace Vapor Samples Were Contaminated by Semivolatile Polymer Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, James L.

    2006-02-09

    Vapor samples collected from the headspaces of the Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks in 1994 and 1995 using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS) were reported to contain trace levels of phthalates, antioxidants, and certain other industrial chemicals that did not have a logical origin in the waste. This report examines the evidence these chemicals were sampling artifacts (contamination) and identifies the chemicals reported as headspace constituents that may instead have been contaminants. Specific recommendations are given regarding the marking of certain chemicals as suspect on the basis they were sampling manifold contaminants.

  11. Apparatus and process for collection of gas and vapor samples

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Dennis G.; Peterson, Kurt D.; Riha, Brian D.

    2008-04-01

    A gas sampling apparatus and process is provided in which a standard crimping tool is modified by an attached collar. The collar permits operation of the crimping tool while also facilitating the introduction of a supply of gas to be introduced into a storage vial. The introduced gas supply is used to purge ambient air from a collection chamber and an interior of the sample vial. Upon completion of the purging operation, the vial is sealed using the crimping tool.

  12. VAPOR PRESSURE ISOTOPE EFFECTS IN THE MEASUREMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL TRITIUM SAMPLES.

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhne, W.

    2012-12-03

    Standard procedures for the measurement of tritium in water samples often require distillation of an appropriate sample aliquot. This distillation process may result in a fractionation of tritiated water and regular light water due to the vapor pressure isotope effect, introducing either a bias or an additional contribution to the total tritium measurement uncertainty. The magnitude of the vapor pressure isotope effect is characterized as functions of the amount of water distilled from the sample aliquot and the heat settings for the distillation process. The tritium concentration in the distillate is higher than the tritium concentration in the sample early in the distillation process, it then sharply decreases due to the vapor pressure isotope effect and becomes lower than the tritium concentration in the sample, until the high tritium concentration retained in the boiling flask is evaporated at the end of the process. At that time, the tritium concentration in the distillate again overestimates the sample tritium concentration. The vapor pressure isotope effect is more pronounced the slower the evaporation and distillation process is conducted; a lower heat setting during the evaporation of the sample results in a larger bias in the tritium measurement. The experimental setup used and the fact that the current study allowed for an investigation of the relative change in vapor pressure isotope effect in the course of the distillation process distinguish it from and extend previously published measurements. The separation factor as a quantitative measure of the vapor pressure isotope effect is found to assume values of 1.034 {+-} 0.033, 1.052 {+-} 0.025, and 1.066 {+-} 0.037, depending on the vigor of the boiling process during distillation of the sample. A lower heat setting in the experimental setup, and therefore a less vigorous boiling process, results in a larger value for the separation factor. For a tritium measurement in water samples, this implies that

  13. Double Shell Tank (DST) Ventilation System Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan

    SciTech Connect

    SASAKI, L.M.

    2000-06-08

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for vapor samples from the primary ventilation systems of the AN, AP, AW, and AY/AZ tank farms. Sampling will be performed in accordance with Data Quality Objectives for Regulatory Requirements for Hazardous and Radioactive Air Emissions Sampling and Analysis (Air DQO) (Mulkey 1999). The sampling will verify if current air emission estimates used in the permit application are correct and provide information for future air permit applications. Vapor samples will be obtained from tank farm ventilation systems, downstream from the tanks and upstream of any filtration. Samples taken in support of the DQO will consist of SUMMA{trademark} canisters, triple sorbent traps (TSTs), sorbent tube trains (STTs), polyurethane foam (PUF) samples. Particulate filter samples and tritium traps will be taken for radiation screening to allow the release of the samples for analysis. The following sections provide the general methodology and procedures to be used in the preparation, retrieval, transport, analysis, and reporting of results from the vapor samples.

  14. VAPOR SAMPLING DEVICE FOR INTERFACE WITH MICROTOX ASSAY FOR SCREENING TOXIC INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A time-integrated sampling system interfaced with a toxicity-based assay is reported for monitoring volatile toxic industrial chemicals (TICs). Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as the fill solvent accumulated each of 17 TICs from the vapor...

  15. Tank vapor sampling and analysis data package for tank 241-C-106 waste retrieval sluicing system process test phase III

    SciTech Connect

    LOCKREM, L.L.

    1999-08-13

    This data package presents sampling data and analytical results from the March 28, 1999, vapor sampling of Hanford Site single-shell tank 241-C-106 during active sluicing. Samples were obtained from the 296-C-006 ventilation system stack and ambient air at several locations. Characterization Project Operations (CPO) was responsible for the collection of all SUMMATM canister samples. The Special Analytical Support (SAS) vapor team was responsible for the collection of all triple sorbent trap (TST), sorbent tube train (STT), polyurethane foam (PUF), and particulate filter samples collected at the 296-C-006 stack. The SAS vapor team used the non-electrical vapor sampling (NEVS) system to collect samples of the air, gases, and vapors from the 296-C-006 stack. The SAS vapor team collected and analyzed these samples for Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LMHC) and Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) in accordance with the sampling and analytical requirements specified in the Waste Retrieval Sluicing System Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for Evaluation of Organic Emissions, Process Test Phase III, HNF-4212, Rev. 0-A, (LMHC, 1999). All samples were stored in a secured Radioactive Materials Area (RMA) until the samples were radiologically released and received by SAS for analysis. The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) performed the radiological analyses. The samples were received on April 5, 1999.

  16. The contribution of nitro- and methylnitronaphthalenes to the vapor-phase mutagenicity of ambient air samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Pamela; Harger, William P.; Arey, Janet

    1- and 2-Nitronaphthalene (NN) and the 14 methylnitronaphthalene (MNN) isomers were identified and quantified in ambient vapor-phase samples collected in Redlands, CA during moderate photochemical air pollution. The mutagenic activities of NN and MNN standards were determined using a microsuspension-preincubation modification of the Ames Salmonella bacterial reversion assay in strain TA98 without microsomal activation. The calculated contributions of the NNs and MNNs to the total vapor-phase ambient mutagenic activity were ˜ 18 and ˜ 32% for daytime and nighttime composite samples, respectively. Enhanced mutagenic activity in the nighttime sample was attributed to NN and MNN formation from nighttime N03 radical-initiated reactions of naphthalene and the methylnaphthalenes.

  17. Synergy or dichotomy: vapor and particle sampling in the detection of contraband

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, William R.; Stott, William R.; Sleeman, Richard; Akery, Alan K.

    1994-03-01

    Chemical detection techniques for explosive and illicit drug identification were originally directed towards the detection of vapors, with research groups aiming toward the specific target of creating a mechanical dog. With the advent of the mass spectrometry based contraband detection systems, exemplified by the CONDORTM which relies on both the detection of vapors and particles, research groups and instrument manufacturers changed direction and began to develop techniques mainly oriented toward the detection of trace particles. The major advantage to the use of trace particulate residues in the detection of hazardous material is that the actual substance can be identified in nearly all cases. On the other hand, as is discussed in detail in later sections of this document, sampling of complex items can be difficult. Both vapor and particulate sampling can be invaluable in the detection of hazardous materials. In many instances the techniques offer complementary information, and results obtained via one route may lead to the use of the alternative method (for example, the vapor detection of taggants as a screening technique followed by particulate analysis for the actual target). The concepts discussed in the remainder of this paper focus on the use of tandem mass spectrometry as an analytical device in the detection of contraband materials.

  18. Tank 241-BY-105 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-05-10

    Tank BY-105 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. Tank BY-105 is on the Ferrocyanide Watch List. Samples were collected from Tank BY-105 using the vapor sampling system (VSS) on July 7, 1994 by WHC Sampling and Mobile Laboratories. The tank headspace temperature was determined to be 26 C. Air from the Tank BY-105 headspace was withdrawn via a heated sampling probe mounted in riser 10A, and transferred via heated tubing to the VSS sampling manifold. All heated zones of the VSS were maintained at approximately 65 C. Sampling media were prepared and analyzed by WHC, Oak Ridge National Laboratories, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, and Oregon Graduate Institute of Science and Technology through a contract with Sandia National Laboratories. The 46 tank air samples and 2 ambient air control samples collected are listed in Table X-1 by analytical laboratory. Table X-1 also lists the 10 trip blanks provided by the laboratories.

  19. Tank 241-BY-106 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-05-10

    Tank BY-106 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. Tank BY-106 is on the Ferrocyanide Watch List. Samples were collected from Tank BY-106 using the vapor sampling system (VSS) on July 8, 1994 by WHC Sampling and Mobile Laboratories. The tank headspace temperature was determined to be 27 C. Air from the Tank BY-106 headspace was withdrawn via a heated sampling probe mounted in riser 10B, and transferred via heated tubing to the VSS sampling manifold. All heated zones of the VSS were maintained at approximately 65 C. Sampling media were prepared and analyzed by WHC, Oak Ridge National Laboratories, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, and Oregon Graduate Institute of Science and Technology through a contract with Sandia National Laboratories. The 46 tank air samples and 2 ambient air control samples collected are listed in Table X-1 by analytical laboratory. Table X-1 also lists the 10 trip blanks provided by the laboratories.

  20. Determination of cadmium in water samples by fast pyrolysis-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingya; Fang, Jinliang; Duan, Xuchuan

    2016-08-01

    A pyrolysis-vapor generation procedure to determine cadmium by atomic fluorescence spectrometry has been established. Under fast pyrolysis, cadmium ion can be reduced to volatile cadmium species by sodium formate. The presence of thiourea enhanced the efficiency of cadmium vapor generation and eliminated the interference of copper. The possible mechanism of vapor generation of cadmium was discussed. The optimization of the parameters for pyrolysis-chemical vapor generation, including pyrolysis temperature, amount of sodium formate, concentration of hydrochloric acid, and carrier argon flow rate were carried out. Under the optimized conditions, the absolute and concentration detection limits were 0.38 ng and 2.2 ng ml- 1, respectively, assuming that 0.17 ml of sample was injected. The generation efficiency of was 28-37%. The method was successfully applied to determine trace amounts of cadmium in two certified reference materials of Environmental Water (GSB07-1185-2000 and GSBZ 50009-88). The results were in good agreement with the certified reference values.

  1. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford waste tank 241-S-101: Results from samples collected on 06/06/96

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, B.L.; Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Silvers, K.L.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-S-101. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases, and total non-methane organic compounds is listed.

  2. Assessment of the SAGE sampling strategy in the derivation of tropospheric water vapor distribution in a general circulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, M.H.

    1995-06-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II has provided unprecedented information of water vapor distribution in the upper troposphere. For the purpose of comparison with output from climate models, the present study assesses the impact of the SAGE II sampling strategy on the tropospheric water vapor climatology in a general circulation model. Since water vapor is sampled only in {open_quotes}non-cloudy{close_quotes} regions in the SAGE strategy, the sampled water vapor concentration is smaller than the real climatology. This difference is associated with two factors. One is the water-vapor sampling frequency, the other is the humidity variability inside and outside the clouds. It is shown that maximum difference is at around 300 to 500 mb where it reaches up to 40% in the zonal mean humidity. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Tank 241-S-107: Results from samples collected on 06/18/96

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Thomas, B.L.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-S-107 (Tank S-107) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National. Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, on sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases, and total non-methane organic compounds is listed in Table S.1. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the appendices.

  4. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank U-204, Results from samples collected on August 8, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Clauss, T.W.; Evans, J.C.; McVeety, B.D.; Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Ligotke, M.W.

    1995-11-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-U-204 (Tank U-204) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank-farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary of the results is listed. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the text.

  5. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-S-109: Results from samples collected on 06/04/96

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L.; Evans, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-S-109 (Tank S-109) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, on sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases, and total non-methane organic compounds is listed in Table S.1. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the appendices.

  6. Tank 241-BX-104 third temporal study: Headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on February 6, 1997. Tank vapor characterization project

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Hayes, J.C.

    1997-09-01

    This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-BX-104 (Tank BX-104) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by SGN Eurisys Service Corporation (SESC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by SESC. Ammonia was determined to be above the immediate notification limit specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Hydrogen was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank BX-104 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 0.178 % of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <0.458% of the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

  7. Tank vapor characterization project: Tank 241-BX-104 fifth temporal study: Headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on June 10, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Olsen, K.B.

    1997-07-01

    This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-BX-104 (Tank BX-104) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by SGN Eurisys Service Corporation (SESC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by SESC. Ammonia was determined to be above the immediate notification limit specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Hydrogen was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank BX-104 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 0.270% of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <0.675% of the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

  8. Tank 241-BY-108 fifth temporal study: Headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on January 30, 1997. Tank vapor characterization project

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Olsen, K.B.

    1997-09-01

    This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from tile headspace of waste storage tank 241-B-108 (Tank BY - 108) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by SGN Eurisys Services Corporation (SESC) and analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by SESC. Ammonia was determined to be above the immediate notification limit of 150 ppm specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Hydrogen was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank BY-108 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 0.888% of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <1.979% of tile LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

  9. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Tank 241-S-102 fourth temporal study: Headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on December 19, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Olsen, K.B.; Hayes, J.C.

    1997-08-01

    This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-S-102 (Tank S-102) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by SGN Eurisys Service Corporation (SESC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by SESC. Ammonia was determined to be above the immediate notification limit of 150 ppm as specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Hydrogen was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank S-102 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 2.410% of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <2.973% of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <2.973% of the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

  10. Tank vapor characterization project: Tank 241-BY-101 headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on August 29, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L.; Olsen, K.B.

    1997-08-01

    This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-BY-101 (Tank BY-101) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by WHC. No analytes were determined to be above the immediate notification limits specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Total non-methane organic compounds (TNMOCs) were the principal flammable constituent of the Tank By-101 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 0.136% of the LFL. Averaged measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

  11. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Tank 241-BX-111 headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on August 27, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Thomas, B.L.; Sklarew, D.S. Edwards, J.A.

    1997-08-01

    This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-BX-111 (Tank BX-111) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by WHC. No analytes were determined to be above the immediate notification limits specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Ammonia was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank BX-111 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 0.042 of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <0.157% of the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

  12. Tank 241-C-107 fifth temporal study: Headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on February 7, 1997. Tank vapor characterization project

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.

    1997-08-01

    This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-C-107 (Tank C-107) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by SGN Eurisys Services Corporation (SESC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by SESC. No analytes were determined to be above the immediate notification limits specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Hydrogen was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank C-107 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 3.233% of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <3.342% of the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

  13. Tank 241-BX-104 fourth temporal study: Headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on April 7, 1997. Tank vapor characterization project

    SciTech Connect

    Mitroshkov, A.V.; Hayes, J.C.; Evans, J.C.

    1997-09-01

    This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-BX-04 (Tank BX-104) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by SGN Eurisys Service Corporation (SESC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by SESC. Ammonia was determined to be above the immediate notification limit specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Hydrogen was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank BX-104 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 0.208% of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <0.536% of the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

  14. Vapor space characterization of waste Tank 241-C-108: Results from samples collected through the vapor sampling system on 8/5/94

    SciTech Connect

    Lucke, R.B.; Ligotke, M.W.; Pool, K.H.; Clauss, T.W.; Sharma, A.K.; McVeety, B.D.; McCulloch, M.; Fruchter, J.S.; Goheen, S.C.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-C-108 (referred to as Tank C-108). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water vapor (H{sub 2}O). Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. Organic compounds were also quantitatively determined. Two organic tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the detection limit of (ca.) 10 ppbv, but standards for most of these were not available at the time of analysis, and the reported concentrations are semiquantitative estimates. In addition, the authors looked for the 41 standard TO-14 analytes. Of these, only a few were observed above the 2-ppbv detection limit. The five organic analytes with the highest estimated concentrations are listed in Table 1. The five analytes account for approximately 85% of the total organic components in Tank C-108.

  15. Direct determination of bromine in plastics by electrothermal vaporization/inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using a tungsten boat furnace vaporizer and an exchangeable sample cuvette system.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Yasuaki; Komori, Hiromi; Kataoka, Hiroko; Tsukahara, Satoshi; Fujiwara, Terufumi

    2010-05-15

    A tungsten boat furnace vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (TBF/ICP-MS) method has been applied to the direct determination of bromine in plastic samples. In the pretreatment, the plastic sample is spread over a small sample cuvette made of tungsten by treating it with a strongly basic organic solution, e.g., octanol or diisobutyl ketone in the presence of potassium hydroxide. The cuvette is placed on a tungsten boat furnace, with which the electrothermal vaporizer is equipped. At the vaporization step, a widely spread thin layer of the sample facilitates its efficient evaporation and introduction into an ICP mass spectrometer. The most remarkable feature is that all the bromine species in plastic samples are decomposed to form a thermally stable inorganic salt during the pretreatment procedure. Therefore, the bromine content in plastic samples can be measured by a calibration curve method constructed with an aqueous standard solution of potassium bromate(V). The detection limit (3sigma) was estimated to be 0.77 pg of bromine, which corresponds to a concentration of 0.31 ng g(-1) of bromine in plastic samples when a sample amount taken of 2.5 mg is studied. The relative standard deviation was calculated to be 2.2%. Analytical results of some plastic samples, which contained both inorganic bromide salts and also organic bromine species, are given. PMID:20391597

  16. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Tank 241-BX-102 headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on July 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Thomas, B.L.; Olsen, K.B. Edwards, J.A.

    1997-08-01

    This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-BX-102 (Tank BX-102) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured volumes provided by WHC. No analytes were determined to be above the immediate notification limits specified by the sampling and and analysis plan. Ammonia and TNMOCs were the principal flammable constituents of the Tank BX-102 headspace, each determined to be present at approximately 0.002% of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <0.107% of the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

  17. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Tank 241-BY-108 temporal study headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on September 10, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L.; Sklarew, D.S.

    1997-08-01

    This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-BY-108 (Tank BY-108) at the Hanford Company (WHC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by WHC. Ammonia was determined to be above the immediate notification limit of 150 ppm specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Hydrogen was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank BY-108 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 1.463% of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <2.940% of the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

  18. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionizataion and triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry for explosives vapor detection

    SciTech Connect

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Asano, K.G.; Hart, K.J.; Glish, G.L.; Grant, B.C.; Chambers, D.M.

    1993-08-01

    The detection and identification of trace vapors of hidden high explosives is an excellent example of a targeted analysis problem. It is desirable to push to ever lower levels the quantity or concentration of explosives material that provides an analytical signal, while at the same time discriminating against all other uninteresting material. The detection system must therefore combine high sensitivity with high specificity. This report describes the philosophy behind the use of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization, which is a sensitive, rugged, and convenient means for forming anions from explosives molecules, with tandem mass spectrometry, which provides unparalleled specificity in the identification of explosives-related ions. Forms of tandem mass spectrometry are compared and contrasted to provide a summary of the characteristics to be expected from an explosives detector employing mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. The instrument developed for the FAA, an atmospheric sampling glow discharge/triple quadrupole mass spectrometer, is described in detail with particular emphasis on the ion source/spectrometer interface and on the capabilities of the spectrometer. Performance characteristics of the system are also described as they pertain to explosives of interest including a description of an automated procedure for the detection and identification of specific explosives. A comparison of various tandem mass spectrometers mated with atmospheric sampling glow discharge is then described and preliminary studies with a vapor preconcentration system provided by the FAA will be described.

  19. Tank 241-BY-105 Headspace Gas and Vapor Characterization Results for Samples Collected in May 1994 and July 1994. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  20. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-U-112: Results from samples collected on 7/09/96

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Silvers, K.L.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-U-112 at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company.

  1. Tank 241-B-103 headspace gas and vapor characterization: Results for homogeneity samples collected on October 16, 1996. Tank vapor characterization project

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, K.B.; Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.

    1997-06-01

    This report presents the results of analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-B-103 (Tank B-103) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Samples were collected to determine the homogeneity of selected inorganic and organic headspace constituents. Two risers (Riser 2 and Riser 7) were sampled at three different elevations (Bottom, Middle, and Top) within the tank. Tank headspace samples were collected by SGN Eurisys Service Corporation (SESC) and were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL.

  2. ANALYSIS OF VAPORS FROM METHYLENE CHLORIDE EXTRACTS OF NUCLEAR GRADE HEPA FILTER FIBERGLASS SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    FRYE JM; ANASTOS HL; GUTIERREZ FC

    2012-06-07

    While several organic compounds were detected in the vapor samples used in the reenactment of the preparation of mounts from the extracts of nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air filter fiberglass samples, the most significant species present in the samples were methylene chloride, phenol, phenol-d6, and 2-fluorophenol. These species were all known to be present in the extracts, but were expected to have evaporated during the preparation of the mounts, as the mounts appeared to be dry before any vapor was collected. These species were present at the following percentages of their respective occupational exposure limits: methylene chloride, 2%; phenol, 0.4%; and phenol-d6, 0.6%. However, there is no established limit for 2-fluorophenol. Several other compounds were detected at low levels for which, as in the case of 2-fluorophenol, there are no established permissible exposure limits. These compounds include 2-chlorophenol; N-nitroso-1-propanamine; 2-fluoro-1,1{prime}-biphenyl; 1,2-dihydroacenaphthylene; 2,5-cyclohexadiene-1,4-dione,2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl); trimethyl oxirane; n-propylpropanamine; 2-(Propylamino)ethanol; 4-methoxy-1-butene; 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one; and 3,4-dimethylpyridine. Some of these were among those added as surrogates or spike standards as part ofthe Advanced Technologies and Laboratories International, Inc. preparation ofthe extract of the HEPA filter media and are indicated as such in the data tables in Section 2, Results; other compounds found were not previously known to be present. The main inorganic species detected (sulfate, sodium, and sulfur) are also consistent with species added in the preparation of the methylene chloride extract of the high-efficiency particulate air sample.

  3. Tank vapor characterization project. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford waste Tank SX-101: Results from samples collected on 07/21/95

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.C.; Clauss, T.W.; McVeety, B.D.; Pool, K.H.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Silvers, K.L.

    1996-05-01

    Results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank-farm operations. They include air concentrations of inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples. The vapor concentrations are based either on whole-volume samples or on sorbent traps exposed to sample flow. No immediate notifications were needed because analytical results indicated no specific analytes exceeded notification levels. Summary of results: NH3, 3.8 ppmv; NO2, 0.10 ppmv; NO, 0.13 ppm; H2O, 11.8 mg/L; CO2, 338 ppmv; CO, <25 ppmv; CH4, <25 ppmv; H2, <25 ppmv; N20, <25 ppmv; hydrocarbons, 0.98 mg/m{sup 3}; methanol, 0.060 ppmv; acetone, 0.033 ppmv; trichlorofluoromethane, 0.023 ppmv; and acetone, 0.034 ppmv.

  4. Waste tank vapor project: Vapor space characterization of waste tank 241-BY-104: Results from samples collected on June 24, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Clauss, T.W.; Ligotke, M.W.; McVeety, B.D.; Pool, K.H.; Lucke, R.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Goheen, S.C.

    1994-11-01

    This report describes results of the analyses of tank-headspace samples taken from Hanford waste Tank 241-BY-104 (referred to as Tank BY-104) on June 24, 1994. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze inorganic and organic samples collected from the tank headspace. The sample job was designated S4019 and was performed by WHC on June 24, 1994 using the vapor sampling system (VSS). The results of the analyses are expected to be used in the determination of safety and toxicological issues related to the tank-headspace gas as described in the WHC report entitled Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Vapor Issue Resolution, WHC-SD-WM-DQO-002, Rev. 0. Sampling devices, including 16 sorbent trains (for inorganic analyses), and 5 SUMMA{trademark} canisters (for organic analyses), were supplied to the WHC sampling staff on June 20, 1994. Samples were taken (by WHC) on June 24. The samples were returned from the field on June 27. The inorganic samples delivered to PNL on chain-of-custody (COC) 006893 included 16 sorbent trains as described in Tables 2.2, 2.3, and 2.4. Additional inorganic blank spikes were obtained from related sample jobs. SUMMA{trademark} samples delivered to PNL on COC 006896 included one ambient air sample, one ambient-air sample through the sampling system, and three tank-headspace SUMMA{trademark} canister samples. The samples were inspected upon delivery to the 326/23B laboratory and logged into PNL laboratory record book 55408. Custody of the sorbent trains was transferred to PNL personnel performing the inorganic analysis and stored at refrigerated ({le}10{degrees}C) temperature until the time of analysis. Access to the 326/23B laboratory is limited to PNL personnel working on the waste-tank safety program.

  5. Effects of cesium ions and cesium vapor on selected ATS-F samples. [thermal control coating degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemp, R. F.; Beynon, J. C.; Hall, D. F.; Luedke, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    Thermal control coating samples were subjected to cesium ion beam and vapor exposures. Degradation of solar absorptance and infrared emittance were measured. Solar cells and samples selected from surfaces on the ATS-F spacecraft likely to experience ion or vapor impingement were bombarded by 10-volt cesium ions. Other samples were subjected to high levels of cesium vapor. Aluminum and white paint were backsputtered by 550-volt cesium ions onto selected samples. For direct bombardment, the threshold for ion-induced property changes was above five-thousand trillion ions/sq cm. With material sputtered from a 450-sq cm target onto samples 36 cm distant, the threshold for noticeable effects was above 5 times 10 to the 17-th power ions/sq cm.

  6. EFFECTS OF THE VARIATION OF SELECT SAMPLING PARAMETERS ON SOIL VAPOR CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Currently soil vapor surveys are commonly used as a screening technique to delineate subsurface volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminant plumes and to provide information for vapor intrusion and contaminated site evaluations. To improve our understanding of the fate and transp...

  7. Slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for steelmaking flue dust analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coedo, A. G.; Dorado, T.; Padilla, I.; Maibusch, R.; Kuss, H.-M.

    2000-02-01

    A commercial atomic absorption graphite furnace (AAGF), with a self-made adapter and valve system, was used as a slurry sampling cell for electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS). The system was applied to the determination of As, Sn, Sb, Se, Te, Bi, Cd, V, Ti and Mo in steelmaking flue dusts. Experimental conditions with respect to ETV and ICP-MS operating parameters were optimized. Compared to aqueous solutions, slurry samples were found to present better analyte transport. Microgram amounts of Rh were used to reduce the difference in analyte response in sensitivity for aqueous solutions of the tested analytes. No such increasing effect was observed for slurry samples and aqueous standards. An added quantity of Rh acting as modifier/carrier resulted in an increase for the same analytes in matrix-slurry solutions, even the addition of an extra Rh quantity has resulted in a decrease in the signals. The effect of Triton X-100 (used as a dispersant agent) on analyte intensity and precision was also studied. External calibration from aqueous standards spiked with 100 μg ml -1 Rh was performed to quantified 0.010 g/100 ml slurry samples. Results are presented for a certified reference electrical arc furnace flue dust (EAF): CRM-876-1 (Bureau of Analysis Samples Ltd., Cleveland, UK), a reference sample of coke ashes X-3705 (from AG der Dillinger Hüttenwerke, Germany), and a representative sample of EAF flue dust from a Spanish steelmaking company (CENIM-1). For the two reference materials an acceptable agreement with certificate values was achieved, and the results for the CENIM sample matched with those obtained from conventional nebulization solution.

  8. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-C-204: Results from samples collected on 07/02/96

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, B.L.; Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-C-204 (Tank C-204) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases, and total non-methane organic compounds is listed in Table S.1. The three highest concentration analytes detected in SUMMA{trademark} canister and triple sorbent trap samples are also listed in Table S.1. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the appendices.

  9. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Tank 241-B-105: Results from samples collected on 07/30/96

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Thomas, B.L.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-B-105 (Tank B-105) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases, and total non-methane organic compounds is listed in Table S.1. The three highest concentration analytes detected in SUMMA{trademark} canister and triple sorbent trap samples are also listed in Table S.1. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the appendices.

  10. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-S-103: Results from samples collected on 06/12/96

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-S-103 (Tank S-103) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases, and total non-methane organic compounds is listed in Table S.1. The three highest concentration analytes detected in SUMMA{trademark} canister and triple sorbent trap samples are also listed in Table S.1. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the appendices.

  11. Electrothermal Vaporization Sample Introduction for Spaceflight Water Quality Monitoring via Gas Chromatography-Differential Mobility Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wallace, William T; Gazda, Daniel B; Limero, Thomas F; Minton, John M; Macatangay, Ariel V; Dwivedi, Prabha; Fernández, Facundo M

    2015-06-16

    In the history of manned spaceflight, environmental monitoring has relied heavily on archival sampling. However, with the construction of the International Space Station (ISS) and the subsequent extension in mission duration up to one year, an enhanced, real-time method for environmental monitoring is necessary. The station air is currently monitored for trace volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using gas chromatography-differential mobility spectrometry (GC-DMS) via the Air Quality Monitor (AQM), while water is analyzed to measure total organic carbon and biocide concentrations using the Total Organic Carbon Analyzer (TOCA) and the Colorimetric Water Quality Monitoring Kit (CWQMK), respectively. As mission scenarios extend beyond low Earth orbit, a convergence in analytical instrumentation to analyze both air and water samples is highly desirable. Since the AQM currently provides quantitative, compound-specific information for air samples and many of the targets in air are also common to water, this platform is a logical starting point for developing a multimatrix monitor. Here, we report on the interfacing of an electrothermal vaporization (ETV) sample introduction unit with a ground-based AQM for monitoring target analytes in water. The results show that each of the compounds tested from water have similar GC-DMS parameters as the compounds tested in air. Moreover, the ETV enabled AQM detection of dimethlsilanediol (DMSD), a compound whose analysis had proven challenging using other sample introduction methods. Analysis of authentic ISS water samples using the ETV-AQM showed that DMSD could be successfully quantified, while the concentrations obtained for the other compounds also agreed well with laboratory results. PMID:25971650

  12. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford waste Tank 241-C-201: Results from samples collected on 06/19/96

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, B.L.; Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Silvers, K.L.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-C-201 (Tank C-201) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, on sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary, of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases, and total non-methane organic compounds is listed in a table. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the appendices.

  13. Tank vapor characterization project - Tank 241-U-112 headspace gas and vapor characterization: Results for homogeneity samples collected on December 6, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Sklarew, D.S.; Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Hayes, J.C.

    1997-09-01

    This report presents the results of analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-U-112 (Tank U-112) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Samples were collected to determine the homogeneity of selected inorganic and organic headspace constitutents. Two risers (Riser 3 and Riser 6) were sampled at three different elevations (Bottom, Middle, and Top) within the tank. Tank headspace samples were collected by SGN Eurisys Service Corporation (SESC) and were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Ammonia was determined to be above the immediate notification limit specified by the sampling and analysis plan.

  14. Sample transport efficiency with electrothermal vaporization and electrostatic deposition technique in multielement solid sample analysis of plant and cereal materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, Jens; Buchkamp, Thomas; Hermann, Gerd; Lasnitschka, Georg

    2000-05-01

    A graphite furnace of the boat-in-tube type as electrothermal vaporizer (ETV) and an electrostatic precipitator were used for determining analyte transport efficiencies and dependencies on plant and cereal matrices, and on carrier elements. All analytical measurements were carried out with coherent forward scattering (CFS) using simultaneous multielement determinations. Transport efficiencies of up to 19% for Cu, 21% for Fe and Mn, and 36% for Pb from the ETV boat to the L'vov platform were obtained for the standard reference materials BCR CRM 281 rye grass, BCR CRM 189 wholemeal flour and NIST SRM 1567 wheat flour and multielement standard solutions containing approximately the same element ratios as certified for the solid samples. The analytical accuracy of the procedure including the ETV process and the electrostatic deposition was tested with Cu, Fe and Pb in BCR CRM 281, Cu, Fe and Mn in BCR CRM 189, and Fe and Mn in NIST SRM 1567 by weighing the solid sample onto the ETV-boat and calibrating against multielement standard solutions dosed into the ETV-boat as well. The analyte addition technique was tested with Cu, Fe and Mn in wholemeal flour. The deviations of the results were below 10% and the relative standard deviations (R.S.D.) values were typically 3-10%. The influence of added potassium and palladium nitrates as physical carriers on the transport efficiencies of Ag, Al, Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb and Zn standard solutions was investigated with simultaneous multielement determination. Using K and Pd as carriers increased transport efficiencies by factors up to 1.74 in comparison to measurements without an added carrier.

  15. Vapor space sampling of ferrocyanide tanks, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    Environmental assessment (EA), to assess environmental impacts associated with tank vapor space (dome) gas sampling of 24 Hanford Site single-shell waste tanks that contain ferrocyanide-nitrate compounds to determine whether or not the tanks contain flammable or toxic gases. The proposed action would be conducted using non-sparking materials, sparkless tools, and a portable containment shelter (greenhouse) and plastic ground cover. DOE needs to take this action to help define the required controls to prevent or mitigate the potential for an accident during future, more intrusive sampling of these tanks. Based on the evaluation in the EA (which examined the environmental impacts of the proposed action and reasonable alternatives), DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  16. Direct solid sampling system for electrothermal vaporization and its application to the determination of chlorine in nanopowder samples by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Kenichi; Hashimoto, Bunji; Uchihara, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Yasuaki; Ishizaka, Syoji; Fujiwara, Terufumi

    2015-06-01

    An electrothermal vaporization (ETV) system using a tungsten boat furnace (TBF) sample cuvette was designed for the direct determination of chlorine in metallic nanopowders and fine powder samples with detection by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). A portion of a powder or particle sample was placed into a small tungsten sample cuvette and weighed accurately. A modifier solution of aqueous or alcoholic potassium hydroxide was added to it. Then, the cuvette was positioned on the TBF incorporated into the ETV apparatus. The analyte was vaporized and introduced into the ICP optical emission spectrometer with a carrier gas stream of argon and hydrogen. The metal samples were analyzed by using an external calibration curve prepared from aqueous standard solutions. Few chemical species including analyte and some chlorine-free species were introduced into the ICP, because the analyte has been separated from the matrix before introduction. Under such dry plasma conditions, the energy of plasma discharge was focused on the excitation of chlorine atoms, and as a result, lower detection limits were achieved. A detection limit of 170 ng g(-1) of chlorine in solid metal samples was established when 60 mg sample was used. The relative standard deviation for 16 replicate measurements obtained with 100 ng chlorine was 8.7%. Approximately 30 batches could be vaporized per hour. The analytical results for various nanopowders (iron (III) oxide, copper, silver, and gold) and metallic fine powder samples (silver and gold) are described. PMID:25863402

  17. ASSESSMENT OF VAPOR INTRUSION IN HOMES NEAR THE RAYMARK SUPERFUND SITE USING BASEMENT AND SUB-SLAB AIR SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the results of an investigation conducted to assist EPA’s New England Regional Office in evaluating vapor intrusion at 15 homes and one commercial building near the Raymark Superfund Site in Stratford, Connecticut. Methods were developed to sample sub-slab ...

  18. Estimating Sampling Biases and Measurement Uncertainties of AIRS-AMSU-A Temperature and Water Vapor Observations Using MERRA Reanalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hearty, Thomas J.; Savtchenko, Andrey K.; Tian, Baijun; Fetzer, Eric; Yung, Yuk L.; Theobald, Michael; Vollmer, Bruce; Fishbein, Evan; Won, Young-In

    2014-01-01

    We use MERRA (Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research Applications) temperature and water vapor data to estimate the sampling biases of climatologies derived from the AIRS/AMSU-A (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder/Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A) suite of instruments. We separate the total sampling bias into temporal and instrumental components. The temporal component is caused by the AIRS/AMSU-A orbit and swath that are not able to sample all of time and space. The instrumental component is caused by scenes that prevent successful retrievals. The temporal sampling biases are generally smaller than the instrumental sampling biases except in regions with large diurnal variations, such as the boundary layer, where the temporal sampling biases of temperature can be +/- 2 K and water vapor can be 10% wet. The instrumental sampling biases are the main contributor to the total sampling biases and are mainly caused by clouds. They are up to 2 K cold and greater than 30% dry over mid-latitude storm tracks and tropical deep convective cloudy regions and up to 20% wet over stratus regions. However, other factors such as surface emissivity and temperature can also influence the instrumental sampling bias over deserts where the biases can be up to 1 K cold and 10% wet. Some instrumental sampling biases can vary seasonally and/or diurnally. We also estimate the combined measurement uncertainties of temperature and water vapor from AIRS/AMSU-A and MERRA by comparing similarly sampled climatologies from both data sets. The measurement differences are often larger than the sampling biases and have longitudinal variations.

  19. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford waste tank 241-B-107: Results from samples collected on 7/23/96

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Silvers, K.L.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-B-107 (Tank B-107) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwestern National Laboratory (PNNL). A summary of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases, and total non-methane organic compounds is listed in a table. The three highest concentration analytes detected in SUMMA{trademark} canister and triple sorbent trap samples are also listed in the same table. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the appendices.

  20. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford waste tank 241-S-106: Results from samples collected on 06/13/96

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Silvers, K.L.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-S-106 (Tank S-106) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). A summary of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases, and total non-methane organic compounds is listed in a table. The three highest concentration analytes detected in SUMMA{trademark} canister and triple sorbent trap samples are also listed in the same table. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the appendices.

  1. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford waste tank 241-U-109: Results from samples collected on 8/10/95

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.C.; Thomas, B.L.; Pool, K.H.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Silvers, K.L.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-U-109 (Tank U-109) At the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. This tank is on the Hydrogen Waste List. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases and total non-methane hydrocarbons is listed in a table. The three highest concentration analytes detected in SUMMA{trademark} canister and triple sorbent trap samples is also listed in the table. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the text.

  2. Explosive detection using high-volume vapor sampling and analysis by trained canines and ultra-trace detection equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Mark; Sikes, John; Prather, Mark

    2004-09-01

    The dog's nose is an effective, highly-mobile sampling system, while the canine olfactory organs are an extremely sensitive detector. Having been trained to detect a wide variety of substances with exceptional results, canines are widely regarded as the 'gold standard' in chemical vapor detection. Historically, attempts to mimic the ability of dogs to detect vapors of explosives using electronic 'dogs noses' has proven difficult. However, recent advances in technology have resulted in development of detection (i.e., sampling and sensor) systems with performance that is rapidly approaching that of trained canines. The Nomadics Fido was the first sensor to demonstrate under field conditions the detection of landmines with performance approaching that of canines. More recently, comparative testing of Fido against canines has revealed that electronic vapor detection, when coupled with effective sampling methods, can produce results comparable to that of highly-trained canines. The results of these comparative tests will be presented, as will recent test results in which explosives hidden in cargo were detected using Fido with a high-volume sampling technique. Finally, the use of canines along with electronic sensors will be discussed as a means of improving the performance and expanding the capabilities of both methods.

  3. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford waste Tank 241-BX-110: Results from samples collected on 04/30/96

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Silvers, K.L.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-BX-110 (Tank BX-110) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases, and total non-methane organic compounds is listed in a table. The three highest concentration analytes detected in SUMMA{trademark} canister and triple sorbent trap samples are also listed in the table. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the appendices.

  4. Tank 241-AZ-101 and Tank 241-AZ-102 Airlift Circulator Operation Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan

    SciTech Connect

    TEMPLETON, A.M.

    1999-12-07

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for vapor samples obtained during the operation of the tank 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 airlift circulators (ALCs) and during the initial operation (''bump'') of the tank 241-AZ-101 mixer pumps. The purpose of the ALC operation is to support portions of the operational test procedure (OTP) for Project W-030 (OTP-W030-001) and to perform functional test in support of Project W-151. Project W-030 is the 241-A-702 ventilation upgrade project (241-142-702) and Project W-151 is the 241-AZ-101 Mixer Pump Test. The functional tests will check the operability of the tank 241-AZ-101 ALCs. Process Memo's No. 2E98-082 and No. 2E99-001 (LMHC 1999a, LMHC 1999b) direct the operation of the ALCs and the Industrial Hygiene monitoring respectively. A series of tests will be conducted in which the ALCs in tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 will be operated at different air flow rates. Vapor samples will be obtained to determine constituents that may be present in the tank headspace during ALC operation at tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 as the waste is disturbed. During the testing, vapor samples will be obtained from the headspace of tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 via the unused port on the standard hydrogen monitoring system (SHMS). In addition the last two vapor samples will be collected from the headspace of tank 241-AZ-101 during the operation of the mixer pumps. Each mixer pump will be operated for approximately 5 minutes. Results will be used to provide the waste feed delivery program with environmental air permitting data for tank waste disturbing activities. Because of radiological concerns, the samples will be filtered for particulates. It is recognized that this may remove some organic compounds. The following sections provide the general methodology and procedures to be used in the preparation, retrieval

  5. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford waste tank 241-B-202: Results from samples collected on 7/18/96

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, B.L.; Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Silvers, K.L.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-B-202 (Tank B-202) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). A summary of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases, and total non-methane organic compounds is listed in a table. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the appendices.

  6. Speciation of inorganic and organometallic compounds in solid biological samples by thermal vaporization and plasma emission spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hanamura, S.; Smith, B.W.; Winefordner, J.D.

    1983-11-01

    By means of thermal vaporization, inorganic, organic, and metallorganic species are separated and elemental emission in a microwave plasma is detected as a function of vaporization temperature. Solid samples of 250 mg or more are used to avoid problems with sample heterogeneity. The precision of characteristic appearance temperatures is +/-2/sup 0/C. The single electrode atmosphere pressure microwave plasma system is extremely tolerant to the introduction of water, organic solvents, and air. The measurement system contained a repetition wavelength scan device to allow background correction. The plasma temperature was 5500 K. The system was used to measure C, H, N, O, and Hg in orchard leaves and in tuna fish. 9 figures, 5 tables.

  7. Direct determination of trace rare earth elements in ancient porcelain samples with slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Guoqiang; Jiang, Zucheng; He, Man; Hu, Bin

    2005-10-01

    A method for the direct determination of trace rare earth elements in ancient porcelain samples by slurry sampling fluorinating electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was developed with the use of polytetrafluoroethylene as fluorinating reagent. It was found that Si, as a main matrix element in ancient porcelain sample, could be mostly removed at the ashing temperature of 1200 °C without considerable losses of the analytes. However, the chemical composition of ancient porcelain sample is very complicated, which makes the influences resulting from other matrix elements not be ignored. Therefore, the matrix effect of ancient porcelain sample was also investigated, and it was found that the matrix effect is obvious when the matrix concentration was larger than 0.8 g l - 1 . The study results of particle size effect indicated that when the sample particle size was less than 0.057 mm, the particle size effect is negligible. Under the optimized operation conditions, the detection limits for rare earth elements by fluorinating electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry were 0.7 ng g - 1 (Eu)-33.3 ng g - 1 (Nd) with the precisions of 4.1% (Yb)-10% (La) ( c = 1 μg l - 1 , n = 9). The proposed method was used to directly determine the trace rare earth elements in ancient porcelain samples produced in different dynasty (Sui, Ming and Qing), and the analytical results are satisfactory.

  8. Apparatus and method for maintaining multi-component sample gas constituents in vapor phase during sample extraction and cooling

    DOEpatents

    Felix, Larry Gordon; Farthing, William Earl; Irvin, James Hodges; Snyder, Todd Robert

    2010-05-11

    A dilution apparatus for diluting a gas sample. The apparatus includes a sample gas conduit having a sample gas inlet end and a diluted sample gas outlet end, and a sample gas flow restricting orifice disposed proximate the sample gas inlet end connected with the sample gas conduit and providing fluid communication between the exterior and the interior of the sample gas conduit. A diluted sample gas conduit is provided within the sample gas conduit having a mixing end with a mixing space inlet opening disposed proximate the sample gas inlet end, thereby forming an annular space between the sample gas conduit and the diluted sample gas conduit. The mixing end of the diluted sample gas conduit is disposed at a distance from the sample gas flow restricting orifice. A dilution gas source connected with the sample gas inlet end of the sample gas conduit is provided for introducing a dilution gas into the annular space, and a filter is provided for filtering the sample gas. The apparatus is particularly suited for diluting heated sample gases containing one or more condensable components.

  9. Tank 241-C-103 vapor and gas sampling Data Quality Objectives

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, J.W.; Huckaby, J.L.; Rudolph, T.P.; Hewitt, E.R.; Mahulum, D.D.; Young, J.Y.; Anderson, C.M.

    1994-02-28

    Two problems are addressed in this report: Potential flammability of gases, vapors, and an aerosol in tank 241-C-103 (hereafter identified as C-103) and potential worker health and safety hazards associated with the toxicity of constituents in C-103. Previous work indicated the potential presence of a fog in the tank, and the fuel content of the tank gases, vapors, and aerosol may be too high to permit work in the tank. Ten reports of adverse health effects associated with vapor exposures near C-103 or in C-Farm have been made by workers. Reported symptoms include headaches, burning sensations in nose and throat, nausea, and impaired pulmonary function. Data are needed to identify and quantify constituents of the C-103 headspace to address potential vapor toxicity. When the compounds of toxicological interest in the tank headspace are identified, industry hygienists can assess ``worst-case`` worker exposure levels and focus their industrial hygiene monitoring strategy on these target compounds. Final recommendations on the required level of personal protective equipment will be based on the worker breathing zone levels of these chemicals.

  10. Tank 241-AZ-101 and tank 241-AZ-102, airlift circulator operation vapor sampling and analysis plan

    SciTech Connect

    TEMPLETON, A.M.

    1999-06-02

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for vapor samples obtained during the operation of the tank 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 airlift circulators (ALCs). The purpose of the ALC operation is to support portions of the operational test procedure (OTP) for Project W-030 (OTP-W030-001) and to perform functional test in support of Project W-151. Project W-030 is the 241-A-702 ventilation upgrade project (241-AZ-702) and Project W-151 is the 241-AZ-101 Mixer Pump Test. The functional tests will check the operability of the tank 241-AZ-101 ALCs. Process Memo's No.2E98-082 and No.2E99-001 (LMHC 1999a, LMHC 1999b) direct the operation of the ALCs and the Industrial Hygiene monitoring respectively. A series of tests will be conducted in which the ALCs in tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 will be operated at different air flow rates. Vapor samples will be obtained to determine constituents that may be present in the tank headspace during ALC operation at tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 as the waste is disturbed. During the testing, vapor samples will be obtained from the headspace of tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 via the unused port on the standard hydrogen monitoring system (SHMS). Results will be used to provide the waste feed delivery program with environmental air permitting data for tank waste disturbing activities. Because of radiological concerns, the samples will be filtered for particulates. It is recognized that this may remove some organic compounds.

  11. Vapor Space Characterization of Waste Tank 241-C-111: Results from Samples Collected with the Vapor Sampling System on 9/13/94

    SciTech Connect

    Lucke, R. B.; Ligotke, M. W.; McVeety, B. D.; McCulloch, M.; Goheen, S. C.; Clauss, T. W.; Pool, K. H.; Young, J. S.; Fruchter, J. S.

    1995-05-01

    This report describes inorganic and orgajc analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-C-111 (referred to as Tank C-111). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water (H{sub 2}O). Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. Organic compounds were quantitatively determined. Six organic tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the detection limit of (ca.) 10 ppbv, but standards for most of these were not available at the time of analysis, and the reported concentrations are semiquantitative estimates. In addition, we looked for the 40 standard TO-14 analytes. None were observed above the 2-ppbv calibrated instrument detection limit.

  12. Vapor space characterization of waste Tank 241-BY-111: Results from samples collected on November 15, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Lucke, R.B.; Ligotke, M.W.; McVeety, B.D.

    1995-06-01

    This report describes results of the analyses of tank-headspace samples taken from the Hanford waste Tank 241-BY-111 (referred to as Tank By-111). Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and to analyze inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The target analytes for TO- 14 compounds were extended to include 14 analytes identified by the Toxicological Review Panel for Tank C-103 and reported by Mahlum et al. (1994). Program management included these analytes for future tank analyses as identified in the fiscal year work plan. This plan is attached to a letter dated 9/30/94 and addressed to Mr. T.J. Kelly of WHC. The plan also requires PNL to analyze for the permanent gases as shown in Table 3.7. The sample job was designated S4083, and samples wee collected by WHC on November 16, 1994, using the vapor sampling system (VSS). The results of the analyses are expected to be used to estimate the potential toxicity of tank-headspace gas as described in Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Vapor Issue Resolution, WHC-SD-WM-DQO-002, Rev. 0.

  13. Development and characterization of induction heating electrothermal vaporization (IH-ETV) sample introduction for inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybak, Michael E.; Salin, Eric D.

    2001-03-01

    A general study of performance attributes was conducted for a prototypical electrothermal vaporization (ETV) sample introduction system, in which induction heating (IH) was used to facilitate the drying, pyrolysis, and vaporization of samples from long, undercut graphite cup probes in a radio-frequency (RF) induction field. In the first part of this study, experiments were carried out to determine the heating characteristics and temperature control aspects of an IH-ETV arrangement. Using a remote-sensing infrared thermocouple, it was determined that a 3/8-inch (9.53-mm) outer diameter graphite cup sample probe could be heated to a maximum temperature of 1860°C in the induction field of the IH-ETV under full forward power (1.5 kW). The IH-ETV device was found to have a rapid heating response (1/ e time-constant of 2.0±0.2 s) that was independent of the initial/final temperatures chosen. Linear temperature control was possible by regulating either the DC voltage applied to the plate or the current flowing to the grid of the RF generator oscillator tube. The second part of this work consisted of studies to establish benchmarks, such as limits of detection (LOD) with inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and transport efficiency for analyte vaporization under several x-Ar mixed gas atmospheres [where x=15% N 2, 10% O 2, HCl (sparged), or 15% SF 6 (v/v)]. In general, reproducible transient signals with evolution times of 5-15 s were seen for the vaporization of most elements studied, with peak area intensity and reproducibility generally being the best with SF 6-Ar. A 10-fold increase in transport efficiency was seen for refractory carbide-forming analytes (Cr, V) when vaporization was conducted in a halogenous ( x=HCl, SF 6) versus non-halogenous ( x=N 2, O 2) environment, with a two-fold improvement being observed for most other non-refractory elements (Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn). The transport of arsenic proved to be a special case

  14. Determination of thallium in cadmium and lead by graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry with sample vaporization from a platform.

    PubMed

    Fazakas, J; Marinescu, D M

    1983-11-01

    When the sample is vaporized from the wall of a graphite furnace it is not possible to determine thallium in cadmium and lead by AAS without matrix matching of the standards. In the case of a lead matrix and vaporization from the wall, the thallium signal is barely distinguishable from the base-line. When the sample is vaporized from a platform, and the peak area is used for measurement, pure aqueous standards may be used for instrument calibration. The peak heights and areas of the thallium signals are considerably enhanced by vaporization from a platform (peak height 1.7-fold and peak area 2.6-fold in pure aqueous solutions as compared to vaporization from the wall). The enhancement factors are larger in presence of the cadmium or lead matrix since here the reduced interference also makes a contribution. PMID:18963481

  15. Detection of cocaine in cargo containers by high-volume vapor sampling: field test at Port of Miami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neudorfl, Pavel; Hupe, Michael; Pilon, Pierre; Lawrence, Andre H.; Drolet, Gerry; Su, Chih-Wu; Rigdon, Stephen W.; Kunz, Terry D.; Ulwick, Syd; Hoglund, David E.; Wingo, Jeff J.; Demirgian, Jack C.; Shier, Patrick

    1997-02-01

    The use of marine containers is a well known smuggling method for large shipments of drugs. Such containers present an ideal method of smuggling as the examination method is time consuming, difficult and expensive for the importing community. At present, various methods are being studied for screening containers which would allow to rapidly distinguish between innocent and suspicious cargo. Air sampling is one such method. Air is withdrawn for the inside of containers and analyzed for telltale vapors uniquely associated with the drug. The attractive feature of the technique is that the containers could be sampled without destuffing and opening, since air could be conveniently withdrawn via ventilation ducts. In the present paper, the development of air sampling methodology for the detection of cocaine hydrochloride will be discussed, and the results from a recent field test will be presented. The results indicated that vapors of cocaine and its decomposition product, ecgonidine methyl ester, could serve as sensitive indicators of the presence of the drug in the containers.

  16. MACRO- MICRO-PURGE SOIL GAS SAMPLING METHODS FOR THE COLLECTION OF CONTAMINANT VAPORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purging influence on soil gas concentrations for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as affected by sampling tube inner diameter and sampling depth (i.e., dead-space purge volume), was evaluated at different field sites. A macro-purge sampling system consisted of a standard hollo...

  17. Vapor-phase and particulate-associated pesticides and PCB concentrations in eastern North Dakota air samples

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, S.B.; Miller, D.J.; Louie, P.K.K.

    1996-05-01

    Vapor-phase and suspended particulate (<50 {mu}m) samples were collected on polyurethane foam (PUF) and quartz fiber filters in rural North Dakota to determine the air concentrations of pesticides in an area where agriculture is a primary source of semivolatile pollutants. Samples were collected at two sites from 1992 to 1994 that were at least 0.4 km from the nearest farmed fields and known application of pesticides, and analyzed for 22 different organochlorine, triazine, and acid herbicide pesticides. Fourteen pesticides were found above the detection limits (typically <1 pg/m{sup 3}). Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners were much lower (<50 pg/m{sup 3} in all cases) than many of the pesticides. These results demonstrate that pesticides are among the most prevalent chlorinated semivolatile pollutants present in rural North Dakota, that significant transport of pesticides occurs both in the vapor-phase and on suspended particulate matter, and that blown soil may be a significant mechanism for introducing pesticides into surface and ground waters. 32 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Headspace-programmed temperature vaporizer-mass spectrometry and pattern recognition techniques for the analysis of volatiles in saliva samples.

    PubMed

    Pérez Antón, Ana; Del Nogal Sánchez, Miguel; Crisolino Pozas, Ángel Pedro; Pérez Pavón, José Luis; Moreno Cordero, Bernardo

    2016-11-01

    A rapid method for the analysis of volatiles in saliva samples is proposed. The method is based on direct coupling of three components: a headspace sampler (HS), a programmable temperature vaporizer (PTV) and a quadrupole mass spectrometer (qMS). Several applications in the biomedical field have been proposed with electronic noses based on different sensors. However, few contributions have been developed using a mass spectrometry-based electronic nose in this field up to date. Samples of 23 patients with some type of cancer and 32 healthy volunteers were analyzed with HS-PTV-MS and the profile signals obtained were subjected to pattern recognition techniques with the aim of studying the possibilities of the methodology to differentiate patients with cancer from healthy controls. An initial inspection of the contained information in the data by means of principal components analysis (PCA) revealed a complex situation were an overlapped distribution of samples in the score plot was visualized instead of two groups of separated samples. Models using K-nearest neighbors (KNN) and Soft Independent Modeling of Class Analogy (SIMCA) showed poor discrimination, specially using SIMCA where a small distance between classes was obtained and no satisfactory results in the classification of the external validation samples were achieved. Good results were obtained when Mahalanobis discriminant analysis (DA) and support vector machines (SVM) were used obtaining 2 (false positives) and 0 samples misclassified in the external validation set, respectively. No false negatives were found using these techniques. PMID:27591583

  19. Vapor space characterization of waste tank 241-C-109: Results from samples collected on 8/10/94

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Clauss, T.W.; Ligotke, M.W.

    1995-06-01

    This report describes results of the analyses of tank-headspace samples taken from the Hanford waste Tank 241-C-109 (referred to as Tank C-109). Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and to analyze inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The sample job was designated S4053, and samples were collected by WHC on August 10, 1994, using the vapor sampling system (VSS). Sampling devices, including six sorbent trains (for inorganic analyses) and five SUMMA{sup {trademark}} canisters (for organic analyses) were supplied to the WHC sampling staff on August 8. Samples were taken (by WHC) from the tank headspace on August 10 and were returned to PNL from the field on August 12. The samples were inspected upon delivery to the 326/23B laboratory and logged into PNL record book 55408 before implementation of PNL Technical Procedure PNL-TVP-07. Custody of the sorbent traps was transferred to PNL personnel performing the inorganic analysis and stored at refrigerated ({<=}10{degrees}C) temperature until the time of analysis. The canister was stored in the 326/23B laboratory at ambient (25{degrees}C) temperature until time of analysis. Access to the 326/23B laboratory is limited to PNL personnel working on the waste-tank safety program. Analyses described in this report were performed at PNL in the 300 area of the Hanford Reservation. Analytical methods that were used are described in the text. In summary, sorbent traps for inorganic analyses containing sample materials were either weighed (for water analysis) or desorbed with the appropriate aqueous solutions (for ammonia (NH{sub 3}) or nitrite (NO{sub 2}) analyses). The aqueous extracts were analyzed either by selective electrode or by ion chromatography (IC). Organic analyses were performed using cryogenic preconcentration followed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS).

  20. Vapor space characterization of waste tank 241-BY-107: Results from samples collected on 10/26/94

    SciTech Connect

    Clauss, T.W.; Ligotke, M.W.; Pool, K.H.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes results of the analyses of tank-headspace samples taken from the Hanford waste Tank 241-BY-107 (referred to as Tank BY-107). Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and to analyze inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The organic analytes for TO-14 compounds were extended to include 15 analytes identified by the Toxicological Review Panel for Tank C-103 and reported in Toxicological Evaluation of Analytes from Tank 241-C-103 PAE-10189. While these analytes are only of toxicological concern for Tank C-103, program management included these analytes for future tank analyses as identified in the fiscal year work plan. This plan is attached to a letter dated 9/30/94 and addressed to Mr. T. J. Kelly of WHC. The plan also requires PNL to analyze for the permanent gases as shown in Table 3.5. The sample job was designated S4077, and samples were collected by WHC on October 26, 1994, using the vapor sampling system (VSS). Sampling devices, including six sorbent trains (for inorganic analyses), and six SUMMA{trademark} canisters (for organic analyses) were supplied to the WHC sampling staff on October 24. Samples were taken (by WHC) from the tank headspace on October 26 and were returned to PNL from the field on November 8. Inorganic (sorbent trap) samples were delivered to PNL on chain of custody (COC) 008071. The SUMMA{trademark} canisters were delivered on COC 008070. Three SUMMA{trademark} canister samples were stored at the PNL 326/23B laboratory pending further instruction from WHC to send them to the Oregon Graduate Institute (OGI) for analysis.

  1. Partitioning evapotranspiration via continuous sampling of water vapor isotopes over common row crops and candidate biofuel crops.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. N.; Black, C. K.; Bernacchi, C.

    2014-12-01

    Global demand for renewable energy is accelerating land conversion from common row crops such as maize and soybean to cellulosic biofuel crops such as miscanthus and switchgrass. This land conversion is expected to alter ecohydrology via changes in evapotranspiration (ET). However, the direction in which evapotranspiration will shift, either partitioning more moisture through soil evaporation (E) or through plant transpiration (T) is uncertain. To investigate how land conversion from maize to miscanthus affects ET partitioning we measured the isotopic composition of water vapor via continuous air sampling. We obtained continuous diurnal measurements of δ2H and δ18O for miscanthus and maize on multiple days over the course of the growing season. Water vapor isotopes drawn from two heights were measured at 2 Hz using a cavity ringdown spectrometer and partitioned into components of E and T using a simple mixing equation. A second approach to partitioning was accomplished by subtracting transpiration measurements, obtained through sap flow sensors, from total ET, measured via eddy covariance. Preliminary results reveal that both methods compare favorably and that transpiration dominates variations in ET in miscanthus fields more so than in fields of maize.

  2. Vapor space characterization of waste Tank 241-BY-108: Results from samples collected on 10/27/94

    SciTech Connect

    McVeety, B.D.; Clauss, T.W.; Ligotke, M.W.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-BY-108 (referred to as Tank BY-108). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water vapor (H{sub 2}O). Trends in NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O samples indicated a possible sampling problem. Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. In addition, the authors looked for the 40 TO-14 compounds plus an additional 15 analytes. Of these, 17 were observed above the 5-ppbv reporting cutoff. Also, eighty-one organic tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the reporting cutoff (ca.) 10 ppbv, and are reported with concentrations that are semiquantitative estimates based on internal standard response factors. The nine organic analytes with the highest estimated concentrations are listed in Summary Table 1 and account for approximately 48% of the total organic components in the headspace of Tank BY-108. Three permanent gases, hydrogen (H{sub 2}), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) were also detected. Tank BY-108 is on the Ferrocyanide Watch List.

  3. Vapor space characterization of waste tank 241-C-101: Results from samples collected on 9/1/94

    SciTech Connect

    Lucke, R.B.; Clauss, T.W.; Ligotke, M.W.

    1995-11-01

    This report describes results of the analyses of tank-headspace samples taken from the Hanford waste Tank 241-C-101 (referred to as Tank C-101) and the ambient air collected - 30 ft upwind near the tank and through the VSS near the tank. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and to analyze inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The sample job was designated S4056, and samples were collected by WHC on September 1, 1994, using the vapor sampling system (VSS). The samples were inspected upon delivery to the 326/23B laboratory and logged into PNL record book 55408 before implementation of PNL Technical Procedure PNL-TVP-07. Custody of the sorbent traps was transferred to PNL personnel performing the inorganic analysis and stored at refrigerated ({le} 10{degrees}C) temperature until the time of analysis. The canisters were stored in the 326/23B laboratory at ambient (25{degrees}C) temperature until the time of the analysis. Access to the 326/23B laboratory is limited to PNL personnel working on the waste-tank safety program. Analyses described in this report were performed at PNL in the 300 area of the Hanford Reservation. Analytical methods that were used are described in the text. In summary, sorbent traps for inorganic analyses containing sample materials were either weighed (for water analysis) or desorbed with the appropriate aqueous solutions (for NH{sub 3}, NO{sub 2}, and NO analyses). The aqueous extracts were analyzed either by selective electrode or by ion chromatography (IC). Organic analyses were performed using cryogenic preconcentration followed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS).

  4. Vapor space characterization of waste tank 241-BY-105: Results from samples collected on 7/7/94

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Ligotke, M.W.; Clauss, T.W.; Lucke, R.B.; McVeety, B.D.; McCulloch, M.; Fruchter, J.S.; Goheen, S.C.

    1995-05-01

    This report describes organic and inorganic results from vapors of the Hanford single-shell waste storage Tank 241-BY-105 (referred to as Tank BY-105). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water (H{sub 2}O). Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. Several organic analytes were quantitatively determined, but quantities of non-TO-14 analytes were only estimated. Approximately 40 tentatively identified organic analytes were observed above the detection limit of (ca.) 10 ppb, but standards for most of these were not available at the time of analysis, and their quantitative determination is beyond the scope of this study. The SUMMA{trademark} Canisters were also analyzed for components listed in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) compendium Method TO-14. Of these only a few were observed above the 2-ppb detection limits. These are summarized in Table 3.1. Estimated quantitations also determined were of tentatively identified compounds (TICs). A summary of these results shows quantities of all TICs above the concentration of ca. 10 ppb. This consists of more than 40 organic analytes. The 6 organic analytes with the highest estimated concentrations are shown in Table 1. These 6 analytes account for approximately 45% of the total organic components in Tank BY-105. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Unlike tanks previously studied, normal paraffin hydrocarbons (NPHs) did not contribute significantly to the total organic concentration of the vapor headspace of Tank BY-105. The total concentration of TICs detected in the tank headspace samples was also much lower than that seen in other reported tanks averaging 6.5 Mg/m{sup 3} for all three canisters collected.

  5. High explosives vapor detection by atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization/tandem mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Asano, K.G.

    1996-02-01

    The combination of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization with tandem mass spectrometry for the detection of traces of high explosives is described. Particular emphasis is placed on use of the quadrupole ion trap as the type of tandem mass spectrometer. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge provides a simple, rugged, and efficient means for anion formation while the quadrupole ion trap provides for efficient tandem mass spectrometry. Mass selective ion accumulation and non-specific ion activation methods can be used to overcome deleterious effects arising from ion/ion interactions. Such interactions constitute the major potential technical barrier to the use of the ion trap for real-time monitoring of targeted compounds in uncontrolled and highly variable matrices. Tailored waveforms can be used to effect both mass selective ion accumulation and ion activation. Concatenated tailored waveforms allow for both functions in a single experiment thereby providing the capability for monitoring several targeted species simultaneously. The combination of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization with a state-of-the-art analytical quadrupole ion trap is a highly sensitive and specific detector for traces of high explosives. The combination is also small and inexpensive relative to virtually any other form of tandem mass spectrometry. The science and technology underlying the glow discharge/ion trap combination is sufficiently mature to form the basis for an engineering effort to make the detector portable. 85 refs.

  6. Simple, Efficient, and Rapid Methods to Determine the Potential for Vapor Intrusion into the Home: Temporal Trends, Vapor Intrusion Forecasting, Sampling Strategies, and Contaminant Migration Routes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current practice for evaluating the vapor intrusion pathway involves a multiple line of evidence approach based on direct measurements of volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in groundwater, external soil gas, subslab soil gas, and/or indoor air. No single line of evide...

  7. Vapor space characterization of waste Tank 241-SX-103: Results from samples collected on 3/23/95

    SciTech Connect

    Ligotke, M.W.; Clauss, T.W.; Pool, K.H.; McVeety, B.D.; Klinger, G.S.; Olsen, K.B.; Bredt, O.P.; Fruchter, J.S.; Goheen, S.C.

    1995-11-01

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage tank 241-SX-103 (referred to as Tank SX-103). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water vapor (H{sub 2}O). Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. In addition, quantitative results were obtained for the 39 TO-14 compounds plus an additional 14 analytes. Of these, two were observed above the 5-ppbv reporting cutoff. Two tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the reporting cutoff of (ca.) 10 ppbv and are reported with concentrations that are semiquantitative estimates based on internal-standard response factors. The four organic analytes identified are listed in Table 1 and account for approximately 100% of the total organic components in Tank SX-103. Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) was the only permanent gas detected in the tank-headspace samples. Tank SX-103 is on the Hydrogen Watch List.

  8. Determination of filbertone in spiked olive oil samples using headspace-programmed temperature vaporization-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pérez Pavón, José Luis; del Nogal Sánchez, Miguel; Fernández Laespada, María Esther; Moreno Cordero, Bernardo

    2009-07-01

    A sensitive method for the fast analysis of filbertone in spiked olive oil samples is presented. The applicability of a headspace (HS) autosampler in combination with a gas chromatograph (GC) equipped with a programmable temperature vaporizer (PTV) and a mass spectrometric (MS) detector is explored. A modular accelerated column heater (MACH) was used to control the temperature of the capillary gas chromatography column. This module can be heated and cooled very rapidly, shortening total analysis cycle times to a considerable extent. The proposed method does not require any previous analyte extraction, filtration and preconcentration step, as in most methods described to date. Sample preparation is reduced to placing the olive oil sample in the vial. This reduces the analysis time and the experimental errors associated with this step of the analytical process. By using headspace generation, the volatiles of the sample are analysed without interference by the non-volatile matrix, and by using injection in solvent-vent mode at the PTV inlet, most of the compounds that are more volatile than filbertone are purged and the matrix effect is minimised. Use of a liner packed with Tenax-TA allowed the compound of interest to be retained during the venting process. The limits of detection and quantification were as low as 0.27 and 0.83 microg/L, respectively, and precision (measured as the relative standard deviation) was 5.7%. The method was applied to the determination of filbertone in spiked olive oil samples and the results revealed the good accuracy obtained with the method. PMID:19396589

  9. Tank vapor characterization project. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford waste tank 241-T-104: Results from samples collected on 02/07/96

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Thomas, B.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Silvers, K.L.

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the analytical results, which were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds; the analyses were performed by PNNL`s Vapor Analytical Laboratory. Results are summarized as: NH{sub 3} 105{+-}3 ppmv, NO{sub 2} 0.3{+-}0.1 ppmv, NO 0.3{+-}0.2 ppmv, H{sub 2}O 12.0{+-}0.5 mg/L, CO{sub 2} 241 ppmv, CO undetected, CH{sub 4} undetected, H{sub 2} detected, N{sub 2}O detected, and hydrocarbons 1.93 mg/m{sub 3}.

  10. Vapor space characterization of waste Tank 241-BY-107: Results from in situ sample collected on 3/25/94

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, A.K.; Lucke, R.B.; Clauss, T.W.; McVeety, B.D.; Fruchter, J.S.; Goheen, S.C.

    1995-06-01

    This report describes organic results from vapors of the Hanford single-shell waste storage Tank 241-BY-107 (referred to as Tank BY-107). Samples for selected inorganic compounds were obtained but not anlayzed (Section 2.0). Quantitative results were obtained for several organic analytes, but quantities of analytes not listed in US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) compendium Method TO-14 were estimated. Approximately 80 tentatively identified organic analytes were observed above the detection limit of (ca.) 10 ppbv, but standards for most of these were not available at the time of analysis, and their quantitative determination is beyond the scope of this study. The SUMMATM canister samples were also analyzed for the 41 organic compounds listed in EPA compendium Method TO-14. Of these, only a few were observed above the 2-ppbv detection limits. These are summarized in Table 3.1. Estimated quantities were determined of tentatively identified compounds (TICs). A summary of these results shows quantities of all TICs above the concentration of ca. 10 ppbv. This consists of more than 80 organic analytes. The 12 organic analytes with the highest estimated concentrations are shown.

  11. Vapor space characterization of waste Tank 241-B-103: Results from samples collected on 2/8/95

    SciTech Connect

    Ligotke, M.W.; Pool, K.H.; Lucke, R.B.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-B-103 (referred to as Tank B-103). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water vapor (H{sub 2}O). Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. In addition, quantitative results were obtained for the 39 TO-14 compounds plus an additional 14 analytes. Of these, five were observed above the 5-ppbv reporting cutoff. Twenty-six organic tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the reporting cutoff of (ca.) 10 ppbv, and are reported with concentrations that are semiquantitative estimates based on internal standard response factors. Twenty-three TICs were measured in two or more SUMMA{trademark} canisters. The 10 organic analytes with the highest estimated concentrations are listed in Table 1 and account for approximately 66% of the total organic components in Tank BB-103. Two permanent gases, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), were also detected. Tank B-103 is on the Organic Watch List.

  12. Influence of sample matrix components on the selection of calibration strategies in electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, R. W.; Miller-Ihli, N. J.

    1996-11-01

    Quantification of both digested and slurry samples were studied using ultrasonic slurry electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (USS-ETV-ICP-MS). The results of external calibration using aqueous standards, method of additions, and In as an internal standard were compared. The elements studied include: Mn, Ni and Cu and the materials analyzed include: NIST SRM 1548 total diet and SRM 1549 milk powder. Palladium was used as a physical carrier and oxygen ashing was used to remove the organic part of the slurry matrix. Different degrees of matrix suppression effects were observed when different skimmer cones were employed. Aging of the skimmer cone and consequent loss of its original circular symmetry and decrease in orifice size resulted in differences in sampling of the ion beam and changes in the degree of matrix effects were observed as the skimmer cone was rotated. The presence of matrix suppression effects is evidenced by strong suppressions in the Ar 2, C and analyte signals. When matrix suppression effects were present, the method of external calibration provided low recoveries (average accuracy 73 ± 12%), therefore it was necessary to use the method of additions to compensate for these problems, providing an average accuracy of 108 ± 13%. When matrix effects were absent, the external calibration method resulted in an average accuracy of 101 ± 16%.

  13. Vapor space characterization of waste Tank 241-C-107: Results from samples collected on 9/29/94

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Clauss, T.W.; Ligotke, M.W.

    1995-11-01

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-C-107 (referred to as Tank C-107). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water vapor (H{sub 2}O). Sampling for sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. Organic compounds were also quantitatively determined. Twenty organic tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the detection limit of (ca.) 10 ppbv, but standards for most of these were not available at the time of analysis, and the reported concentrations are semiquantitative estimates. In addition, the authors looked for the 55 TO-14 extended analytes. Of these, 3 were observed above the 5-ppbv detection limit. The 10 organic analytes with the highest estimated concentrations are listed in Summary Table 1 and account for approximately 96% of the total organic components in Tank C-107. Two permanent gases, carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide, were also detected.

  14. Vapor space characterization of waste Tank 241-U-103: Results from samples collected on 2/15/95

    SciTech Connect

    Ligotke, M.W.; Pool, K.H.; Clauss, T.W.; McVeety, B.D.; Klinger, G.S.; Olsen, K.B.; Bredt, O.P.; Fruchter, J.S.; Goheen, S.C.

    1995-11-01

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-U-103 (referred to as Tank U-103). The results described her were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water vapor (H{sub 2}O). Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. In addition, quantitative results were obtained for the 39 TO-14 compounds plus an additional 14 analytes. Of these, 11 were observed above the 5-ppbv reporting cutoff. Eleven tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the reporting cutoff of (ca.) 10 ppbv and are reported with concentrations that are semiquantitative estimates based on internal-standard response factors. The 10 organic analytes with the highest estimated concentrations are listed in Table 1 and account for approximately 90% of the total organic components in Tank U-103. Two permanent gases, hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), were also detected. Tank U-103 is on the Hydrogen Watch List.

  15. Vapor space characterization of waste Tank 241-C-111 (in situ): Results from samples collected on 6/20/94

    SciTech Connect

    Ligotke, M.W.; Pool, K.H.; Lucke, R.B.; McVeety, B.D.; Clauss, T.W.; McCulloch, M.; Young, J.S.; Fruchter, J.S.; Goheen, S.C.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from in situ samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-C-111 (referred to as Tank C-111). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Summary Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), and water vapor (H{sub 2}O). Sampling for sulfur oxides was not requested. Organic compounds were quantitatively determined. Five organic tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the detection limit of (ca.) 10 ppbv, but standards for most of these were not available at the time of analysis, and the reported concentrations are semiquantitative estimates. In addition, the authors looked for the 40 standard TO-14 analytes and observed 39. None of these compounds were above the 2-ppbv calibrated instrumental detection limit. However, it is believed that the detection of dichlorodifluoromethane and methyl benzene are real at these low concentrations. The five organic analytes with the highest estimated concentrations are listed in Summary Table 1. The five analytes account for approximately 100% of the total organic components in Tank C-111.

  16. Vapor space characterization of waste Tank 241-TY-101: Results from samples collected on 4/6/95

    SciTech Connect

    Klinger, G.S.; Clauss, T.W.; Ligotke, M.W.; Pool, K.H.; McVeety, B.D.; Olsen, K.B.; Bredt, O.P.; Fruchter, J.S.; Goheen, S.C.

    1995-11-01

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-TY-101 (referred to as Tank TY-101). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water vapor (H{sub 2}O). Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. In addition, quantitative results were obtained for the 39 TO-14 compounds plus an additional 14 analytes. Off these, 5 were observed above the 5-ppbv reporting cutoff. One tentatively identified compound (TIC) was observed above the reporting cutoff of (ca.) 10 ppbv and are reported with concentrations that are semiquantitative estimates based on internal-standard response factors. The six organic analyses identified are listed in Table 1 and account for approximately 100% of the total organic components in Tank TY-101. Two permanent gases, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), were also detected. Tank TY-101 is on the Ferrocyanide Watch List.

  17. Development, evaluation and comparison of two independent sampling and analytical methods for ortho-phthalaldehyde vapors and condensation aerosols in air† ‡

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Two independent sampling and analytical methods for ortho-phthalaldehyde (OPA) in air have been developed, evaluated and compared (1) a reagent-coated solid sorbent HPLC-UV method and (2) an impinger-fluorescence method. In the first method, air sampling is conducted at 1.0 L min−1 with a sampler containing 350 mg of silica gel coated with 1 mg of acidified 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH). After sampling, excess DNPH in ethyl acetate is added to the sampler prior to storage for 68 hours. The OPA-DNPH derivative is eluted with 4.0 mL of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for measurement by HPLC with a UV detector set at 3S5 nm. The estimated detection limit is 0.016 µg per sample or 0.067 µg m−3 (0.012 ppb) for a 240 L air sample. Recoveries of vapor spikes at levels of 1.2 to 6.2 µg were 96 to 101%. Recoveries of spikes as mixtures of vapor and condensation aerosols were 97 to 100%. In the second method, air sampling is conducted at 1.0 L mm−1 with a midget impinger containing 10 mL of DMSO solution containing N-acetyl-l-cysteine and ethylenediamine. The fluorescence reading is taken 80 min after the completion of air sampling. Since the time of taking the fluorescence reading is critical, the reading is taken with a portable fluorometer. The estimated detection limit is 0.024 µg per sample or 0.1 µg m−3 (0.018 ppb) for a 240 L air sample. Recoveries of OPA vapor spikes at levels of 1.4 to 5.0 µg per sample were 97 to 105%. Recoveries of spikes as mixtures of vapors and condensation aerosols were 95 to 99%. The collection efficiency for a mixture of vapor and condensation aerosol was 99.4%. The two methods were compared side-by-side in a generation system constructed for producing controlled atmospheres of OPA vapor in air. Average air concentrations of OPA vapor found by both methods agreed within ±10%. PMID:26346658

  18. Vapor space characterization of Waste Tank 241-C-103: Inorganic results from sample Job 7B (May 12-25, 1994)

    SciTech Connect

    Ligotke, M.W.; Pool, K.H.; Lerner, B.D.

    1994-10-01

    This report is to provide analytical results for use in safety and toxicological evaluations of the vapor space of Hanford single-shell waste storage tanks C-103. Samples were analysed to determine concentrations of ammonia, nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur oxides, and hydrogen cyanide. In addition to the samples, controls were analyzed that included blanks, spiked blanks, and spiked samples. These controls provided information about the suitability of sampling and analytical methods. Also included are the following: information describing the methods and sampling procedures used; results of sample analyses; and Conclusions and recommendations.

  19. Transport of explosives II: use of headspace-SPME/GC μ-ECD and TEEM GC/MS for detection of TNT vapors from sand buried samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baez, Bibiana; Correa, Sandra N.; Hernandez-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2005-06-01

    The detection of hidden explosives using vapors emanating from explosives has been considered an area in explosives technology that requires high sensitivity and selectivity. In this work is reported the results of two methods for vapor explosive detection, GC-μECD and GC/MS coupled to a Tunable Electron Energy Monochromator (TEEM-GC/MS). Both used Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) in Headspace (HS) mode to collect vapors above the samples. Optimum parameters for SPME were determined with the purpose of obtaining a high-quality extraction. The parameters were: type of SPME fiber, exposure time and desorption time at the injection port of the GC. Headspace SPME procedure was carried out in samples with crystals of TNT buried in soil. These samples were analyzed under important environmental conditions such as temperature and water content. Analyses at contact times after the TNT-soil mix preparation were carried out during 1 month. A comparison of results from both techniques was performed. Vapors of TNT and 2,4-DNT were found predominantly in the samples. HS-SPME coupled with GC-μ ECD and TEEM GC/MS exhibited excellent selectivity and sensitivity.

  20. COMPARISON OF GEOPROBE PRT AND AMS GVP SOIL-GAS SAMPLING SYSTEMS WITH DEDICATED VAPOR PROBES IN SANDY SOILS AT THE RAYMARK SUPERFUND SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted near the Raymark Superfund Site in Stratford, Connecticut to compare results of soil-gas sampling using dedicated vapor probes, a truck-mounted direct-push technique - the Geoprobe Post-Run-Tubing (PRT) system, and a hand-held rotary hammer technique - the A...

  1. Occupational dimethylformamide exposure. 1. Diffusive sampling of dimethylformamide vapor for determination of time-weighted average concentration in air.

    PubMed

    Yasugi, T; Kawai, T; Mizunuma, K; Horiguchi, S; Iguchi, H; Ikeda, M

    1992-01-01

    A diffusive sampling method with water as absorbent was examined in comparison with 3 conventional methods of diffusive sampling with carbon cloth as absorbent, pumping through National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) charcoal tubes, and pumping through NIOSH silica gel tubes to measure time-weighted average concentration of dimethylformamide (DMF). DMF vapors of constant concentrations at 3-110 ppm were generated by bubbling air at constant velocities through liquid DMF followed by dilution with fresh air. Both types of diffusive samplers could either absorb or adsorb DMF in proportion to time (0.25-8 h) and concentration (3-58 ppm), except that the DMF adsorbed was below the measurable amount when carbon cloth samplers were exposed at 3 ppm for less than 1 h. When both diffusive samplers were loaded with DMF and kept in fresh air, the DMF in water samplers stayed unchanged for at least for 12 h. The DMF in carbon cloth samplers showed a decay with a half-time of 14.3 h. When the carbon cloth was taken out immediately after termination of DMF exposure, wrapped in aluminum foil, and kept refrigerated, however, there was no measurable decrease in DMF for at least 3 weeks. When the air was drawn at 0.2 l/min, a breakthrough of the silica gel tube took place at about 4,000 ppm.min (as the lower 95% confidence limit), whereas charcoal tubes could tolerate even heavier exposures, suggesting that both tubes are fit to measure the 8-h time-weighted average of DMF at 10 ppm. PMID:1577523

  2. Determination of copper in airborne particulate matter using slurry sampling and chemical vapor generation atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Silva, Laiana O B; Leao, Danilo J; dos Santos, Debora C; Matos, Geraldo D; de Andrade, Jailson B; Ferreira, Sergio L C

    2014-09-01

    The present paper describes the development of a method for the determination of copper in airborne particulate matter using slurry sampling and chemical vapor generation atomic absorption spectrometry (CVG AAS). Chemometric tools were employed to characterize the influence of several factors on the generation of volatile copper species. First, a two-level full factorial design was performed that included the following chemical variables: hydrochloric acid concentration, tetrahydroborate concentration, sulfanilamide concentration and tetrahydroborate volume, using absorbance as the response. Under the established experimental conditions, the hydrochloric acid concentration had the greatest influence on the generation of volatile copper species. Subsequently, a Box-Behnken design was performed to determine the optimum conditions for these parameters. A second chemometric study employing a two-level full factorial design was performed to evaluate the following physical factors: tetrahydroborate flow rate, flame composition, alcohol volume and sample volume. The results of this study demonstrated that the tetrahydroborate flow rate was critical for the process. The chemometric experiments determined the following experimental conditions for the method: hydrochloric acid concentration, 0.208 M; tetrahydroborate concentration, 4.59%; sulfanilamide concentration, 0.79%; tetrahydroborate volume, 2.50 mL; tetrahydroborate flow rate, 6.50 mL min(-1); alcohol volume, 200 µL; and sample volume, 7.0 mL. Thus, this method, using a slurry volume of 500 µL and a final dilution of 7 mL, allowed for the determination of copper with limits of detection and quantification of 0.30 and 0.99 µg L(-1), respectively. Precisions, expressed as RSD%, of 4.6 and 2.8% were obtained using copper solutions at concentrations of 5.0 and 50.0 µg L(-1), respectively. The accuracy was evaluated by the analysis of a certified reference material of urban particulate matter. The copper concentration

  3. Single drop solution electrode glow discharge for plasma assisted-chemical vapor generation: sensitive detection of zinc and cadmium in limited amounts of samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-ang; Tan, Qing; Hou, Xiandeng; Xu, Kailai; Zheng, Chengbin

    2014-12-16

    A simple and sensitive approach is proposed and evaluated for determination of ultratrace Zn and Cd in limited amounts of samples or tens of cells based on a novel single drop (5-20 μL) solution electrode glow discharge assisted-chemical vapor generation technique. Volatile species of Zn and Cd were immediately generated and separated from the liquid phase for transporting to atomic fluorescence or atomic mass spectrometric detectors for their determination only using hydrogen when the glow discharge was ignited between the surface of a liquid drop and the tip of a tungsten electrode. Limits of detection are better than 0.01 μg L(-1) (0.2 pg) for Cd and 0.1 μg L(-1) (2 pg) for Zn, respectively, and comparable or better than the previously reported results due to only a 20 μL sampling volume required, which makes the proposed technique convenient for the determination of Zn and Cd in limited amounts of samples or even only tens of cells. The proposed method not only retains the advantages of conventional chemical vapor generation but also provides several unique advantages, including better sensitivity, lower sample and power consumption, higher chemical vapor generation efficiencies and simpler setup, as well as greener analytical chemistry. The utility of this technique was demonstrated by the determination of ultratrace Cd and Zn in several single human hair samples, Certified Reference Materials GBW07601a (human hair powder) and paramecium cells. PMID:25409265

  4. Direct determination of cadmium in foods by solid sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using a tungsten coil trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Mao, Xuefei; Liu, Jixin; Wang, Min; Qian, Yongzhong; Gao, Chengling; Qi, Yuehan

    2016-04-01

    In this work, a solid sampling device consisting of a tungsten coil trap, porous carbon vaporizer and on-line ashing furnace of a Ni-Cr coil was interfaced with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). A modified double gas circuit system was employed that was composed of carrier and supplemental gas lines controlled by separate gas mass flow controllers. For Cd determination in food samples using the assembled solid sampling ICP-MS, the optimal ashing and vaporization conditions, flow rate of the argon-hydrogen (Ar/H2) (v:v = 24:1) carrier gas and supplemental gas, and minimum sampling mass were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, the limit of quantification was 0.5 pg and the relative standard deviation was within a 10.0% error range (n = 10). Furthermore, the mean spiked recoveries for various food samples were 99.4%-105.9% (n = 6). The Cd concentrations measured by the proposed method were all within the certified values of the reference materials or were not significantly different (P > 0.05) from those of the microwave digestion ICP-MS method, demonstrating the good accuracy and precision of the solid sampling ICP-MS method for Cd determination in food samples.

  5. SEAMIST{trademark} in-situ instrumentation and vapor sampling system applications in the Sandia Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration program: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C.; Lowry, W.; Cremer, D.; Dunn, S.D.

    1995-09-01

    The Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration was tasked with demonstrating innovative technologies for the cleanup of chemical and mixed waste landfills that are representive of sites occurring throughout the DOE complex and the nation. The SEAMIST{trademark} inverting membrane deployment system has been used successfully at the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID) for multipoint vapor sampling, pressure measurement, permeability measurement, sensor integration demonstrations, and borehole lining. Several instruments were deployed inside the SEAMIST{trademark}-lined boreholes to detect metals, radionuclides, moisture, and geologic variations. The liner protected the instruments from contamination, maintained support of the uncased borehole wall, and sealed the total borehole from air circulation. Recent activities included the installation of three multipoint vapor sampling systems and sensor integration systems in 100-foot-deep vertical boreholes. A long term pressure monitoring program has recorded barometric pressure effects at depth with relatively high spatial resolution. The SEAMIST{trademark} system has been integrated with a variety of hydrologic and chemical sensors for in-situ measurements, demonstrating its versatility as an instrument deployment system that allows easy emplacement and removal. Standard SEAMIST{trademark} vapor sampling systems were also integrated with state-of-the-art volatile organic compound analysis technologies. The results and status of these demonstration tests are presented.

  6. Vapor space characterization of waste Tank 241-BY-108: Results from in situ sample collected on March 24, 1994. Waste Tank Vapor Project

    SciTech Connect

    McVeety, B.D.; Lucke, R.B.; Clauss, T.W.; Fruchter, J.S.; Goheen, S.C.

    1995-06-01

    This document presents the details of the organic analysis that was performed on samples from the headspace of Hanford waste tank 241-BY-108. The results described were obtained to support the safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for the organic analytes is included, as well as, a detailed description of the results which appears in the text.

  7. METHOD AND LOCATION OF GROUND WATER SAMPLING: IMPACT ON ATTENUATION FACTORS FOR ASSESSING IMPACT ON VAPOR INTRUSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Draft EPA Subsurface Vapor Intrusion Guidance Document was established to "address the incremental increases in exposures and risks from subsurface contaminants that my be intruding into indoor air". The document utilizes attenuation factors based on indoor air/soil gas or i...

  8. Vapor space characterization of waste tank 241-TX-105: Results from samples collected on December 20, 1994. Waste Tank Vapor Project

    SciTech Connect

    Klinger, G.S.; Ligotke, M.W.; Lucke, R.B.

    1995-06-01

    This document presents the details of the inorganic and organic analysis that was performed on samples from the headspace of Hanford waste tank 241-TX-105. The results described were obtained to support the safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for the inorganic and organic analytes is included, as well as, a detailed description of the results which appears in the text.

  9. Vapor space characterization of waste tank 241-TY-101 (in situ): Results from samples collected on August 5, 1994. Waste Tank Vapor Program

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Ligotke, M.W.; McVeety, B.D.; McCulloch, M.; Goheen, S.C.; Clauss, T.W.; Lucke, R.B.; Young, J.S.; Fruchter, J.S.

    1995-07-01

    This document presents the details of the inorganic and organic analysis that was performed on samples from the headspace of Hanford waste tank 241-TY-101. The results described were obtained to support the safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for the inorganic and organic analytes is included, as well as, a detailed description of the results which appears in the text.

  10. Vapor space characterization of waste tank 241-U-111: Results from samples collected on February 28, 1995. Waste Tank Vapor Program

    SciTech Connect

    Clauss, T.W.; Pool, K.H.; McVeety, B.D.; Bredt, O.P.; Goheen, S.C.; Ligotke, M.W.; Lucke, R.B.; Klinger, G.S.; Fruchter, J.S.

    1995-07-01

    This document presents the details of the inorganic and organic analysis that was performed on samples from the headspace of Hanford waste tank 241-U-111. The results described were obtained to support the safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for the inorganic and organic analytes is included, as well as, a detailed description of the results which appears in the text.

  11. Waste Tank Vapor Program: Vapor space characterization of Waste Tank 241-T-107. Results from samples collected on January 18, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Lucke, R.B.; McVeety, B.D.

    1995-06-01

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-T-107 (referred to as Tank T-107). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water (H{sub 2}O). Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. In addition, quantitative results were obtained for the 39 TO-14 compounds plus an additional 14 analytes. Of these, I was observed above the 5-ppbv reporting cutoff. Six organic tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the reporting cutoff of (ca.) 10 ppbv and are reported with concentrations that are semiquantitative estimates based on internal-standard response factors. The estimated concentration of all 7 organic analytes observed in the tank headspace are listed in Table I and account for approximately 100% of the total organic components in Tank T-107. Two permanent gases, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), were also detected in the tank-headspace samples.

  12. Vapor space characterization of waste Tank 241-U-106: Results from samples collected on March 7, 1995. Waste Tank Vapor Program

    SciTech Connect

    Klinger, G.S.; Lucke, R.B.; McVeety, B.D.

    1995-07-01

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-U-106 (referred to as Tank U-106). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water (H{sub 2}O) Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. The NH{sub 3} concentration was 16% greater than that determined from an ISS sample obtained in August 1994; the H{sub 2}O concentration was about 10% less. In addition, quantitative results were obtained for the 39 TO-14 compounds plus an additional 14 analytes. Of these, 5 were observed in two or more canisters above the 5-ppbv reporting cutoff. Eleven organic tentatively identified compounds (TICS) were observed in two or more canisters above the reporting cutoff of (ca.) 10 ppbv and are reported with concentrations that are semiquantitative estimates based on internal-standard response factors. The 10 organic analytes with the highest estimated concentrations account for approximately 90% of the total organic components in Tank U-106. Three permanent gases, nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and carbon dioxide (COD were also detected.

  13. Slurry sampling flow injection chemical vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the determination of As, Cd, and Hg in cereals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng-Yi; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen

    2009-08-12

    A slurry sampling inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) method has been developed for the determination of As, Cd, and Hg in cereals using flow injection chemical vapor generation (VG) as the sample introduction system. A slurry containing 6% m/v flour, 0.7% m/v thiourea, 0.4 microg mL(-1) Co(II), and 2.5% v/v HCl was injected into a VG-ICP-MS system for the determination of As, Cd, and Hg without dissolution and mineralization. Because the sensitivities of the elements studied in the slurry and that of aqueous solution were quite different, a standard addition method and an isotope dilution method were used for the determination of As, Cd, and Hg in selected cereal samples. The influences of vapor generation conditions and slurry preparation on the ion signals were reported. The effectiveness of the vapor generation sample introduction technique in alleviating various spectral interferences in ICP-MS analysis has been demonstrated. This method has been applied for the determination of As, Cd, and Hg in NIST SRM 1567a Wheat Flour reference material, NIST SRM 1568a Rice Flour reference material, and cereal samples obtained from local market. The As, Cd, and Hg analysis results of the reference materials agreed with the certified values. The method detection limits estimated from standard addition curves were about 0.10, 0.16, and 0.07 ng g(-1) for As, Cd, and Hg, respectively, in the original cereal samples. PMID:19606866

  14. Vapor spill monitoring method

    DOEpatents

    Bianchini, Gregory M.; McRae, Thomas G.

    1985-01-01

    Method for continuous sampling of liquified natural gas effluent from a spill pipe, vaporizing the cold liquified natural gas, and feeding the vaporized gas into an infrared detector to measure the gas composition. The apparatus utilizes a probe having an inner channel for receiving samples of liquified natural gas and a surrounding water jacket through which warm water is flowed to flash vaporize the liquified natural gas.

  15. Sensitive determination of bromine and iodine in aqueous and biological samples by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using tetramethylammonium hydroxide as a chemical modifier.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Hiroko; Tanaka, Sachiko; Konishi, Chie; Okamoto, Yasuaki; Fujiwara, Terufumi; Ito, Kazuaki

    2008-06-01

    A procedure for the simultaneous determination of bromine and iodine by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometry was investigated. In order to prevent the decrease in the ionization efficiencies of bromine and iodine atoms caused by the introduction of water mist, electrothermal vaporization was used for sample introduction into the ICP mass spectrometer. To prevent loss of analytes during the drying process, a small amount of tetramethylammonium hydroxide solution was placed as a chemical modifier into the tungsten boat furnace. After evaporation of the solvent, the analytes instantly vaporized and were then introduced into the ICP ion source to detect the (79)Br(+), (81)Br(+), and (127)I(+) ions. By using this system, detection limits of 0.77 pg and 0.086 pg were achieved for bromine and iodine, respectively. These values correspond to 8.1 pg mL(-1) and 0.91 pg mL(-1) of the aqueous bromide and iodide ion concentrations, respectively, for a sampling volume of 95 microL. The relative standard deviations for eight replicate measurements were 2.2% and 2.8% for 20 pg of bromine and 2 pg of iodine, respectively. Approximately 25 batches were vaporizable per hour. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of various certified reference materials and practical situations as biological and aqueous samples. There is further potential for the simultaneous determination of fluorine and chlorine. PMID:18496883

  16. Simultaneous determination of bromine and chlorine in coal using electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and direct solid sample analysis.

    PubMed

    de Gois, Jefferson S; Pereira, Éderson R; Welz, Bernhard; Borges, Daniel L G

    2014-12-10

    A new method for the direct analysis of coal using electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and direct solid sample analysis was developed, aiming at the determination of Br and Cl. The procedure does not require any significant sample pretreatment and allows simultaneous determination of both elements to be carried out, requiring small mass aliquots of sample (about 0.5 mg). All operating parameters, including carrier gas flow-rate and RF power, were optimized for maximum sensitivity. The use of modifiers/aerosol carriers (Pd, Pd+Al and Pd+Ca) was evaluated, and the mixture of Pd and Ca was chosen, allowing pyrolysis and vaporization temperatures of 700°C and 1900°C, respectively. Chlorine was accurately determined using calibration against solid standards, whereas Br could also be determined using calibration against aqueous standard solutions. The limits of quantification were 0.03 μg g(-1) for Br and 7 μg g(-1) for Cl, and no spectral interferences were observed. PMID:25441883

  17. Vapor pressure measured with inflatable plastic bag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Deflated plastic bag in a vacuum chamber measures initial low vapor pressures of materials. The bag captures the test sample vapors and visual observation of the vapor-inflated bag under increasing external pressures yields pertinent data.

  18. Determination of Se in biological samples by axial view inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry after digestion with aqua regia and on-line chemical vapor generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Éder José; Herrmann, Amanda Beatriz; de Caires, Suzete Kulik; Frescura, Vera Lúcia Azzolin; Curtius, Adilson José

    2009-06-01

    A simple and fast method for the determination of Se in biological samples, including food, by axial view inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry using on-line chemical vapor generation (CVG-ICP OES) is proposed. The concentrations of HCl and NaBH 4, used in the chemical vapor generation were optimized by factorial analysis. Six certified materials (non-fat milk powder, lobster hepatopancreas, human hair, whole egg powder, oyster tissue, and lyophilised pig kidney) were treated with 10 mL of aqua regia in a microwave system under reflux for 15 min followed by additional 15 min in an ultrasonic bath. The solutions were transferred to a 100 mL volumetric flask and the final volume was made up with water. The Se was determined directly in these solutions by CVG-ICP OES, using the analytical line at 196.026 nm. Calibration against aqueous standards in 10% v/v aqua regia in the concentration range of 0.5-10.0 µg L - 1 Se(IV) was used for the analysis. The quantification limit, considering a 0.5 g sample weight in a final volume of 100 mL - 1 was 0.10 µg g - 1. The obtained concentration values were in agreement with the total certified concentrations, according to the t-test for a 95% confidence level.

  19. [Determination of total mercury in water samples, sediments and solids in suspension in aquatic systems by cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometry].

    PubMed

    Vieira, J L; Passarelli, M M

    1996-06-01

    The use of metallic mercury in the extraction and concentration of gold causes the discarding of tons of this metal in the environment, leading to a considerable increase in the natural levels of the same and the contamination of the surrounding areas. Thus it is extremely important to monitor the presence of this metal in various sectors of the environment with a view aiming to preventing human exposure to excessive concentrations which can result in serious episodes of mercury poisoning. It is also important to estimate the possibility of river sediments becoming potential sources of contamination of human beings. The determination of total mercury was undertaken by using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. River waters, as well as sediments and suspended solids were used as samples for the standardization of the analytical procedure. Later on, this method was tested on samples originating in gold mining areas for the purpose of assessing its validity. PMID:9110471

  20. Scientific objectives of the primitive body sample return missions: An approach from the light-induced effect on water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimizu, Mikio

    1994-01-01

    Water is undoubtedly one of the most crucial components of the solar nebula for determining planetary composition: planets were formed from the accretion of the dust particles in the nebula, and the redox state of Fe in the particles can be determined by the reaction of Fe with water vapor diffused into the interior of the particle in the early stage of solar system formation. It has been discussed from various observations that the cores of Mercury, Venus, and the Earth might be metallic Fe, although the core of the Earth may be somewhat oxidized by the high pressure and temperature reaction of liquid Fe with perovskite at the boundary of the mantle and the core, whereas the core of Mars may be highly oxidized, as suggested by its low density. Isotopic anomalies of various elements have frequently been observed in the solar system (in planetary atmospheres and in meteorites) and some of them can be attributed to the injection of exotic particles formed in other stars into the solar nebula. Hydrogen and D anomalies in planetary atmospheres were frequently believed to correlate with the differential escape of H and D from the exospheres of Venus and Mars, although no one knows the primordial D/H ratios before thermal escape. This paper explains the decrease of the observed D/H ratios with distance from the sun by considering the light-induced drift effect to displace H2(16)O alone to the outside in the solar nebula.

  1. Automatic flow-batch system for cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy determination of mercury in honey from Argentina using online sample treatment.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Marina A; Grünhut, Marcos; Pistonesi, Marcelo F; Di Nezio, María S; Centurión, María E

    2012-05-16

    An automatic flow-batch system that includes two borosilicate glass chambers to perform sample digestion and cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy determination of mercury in honey samples was designed. The sample digestion was performed by using a low-cost halogen lamp to obtain the optimum temperature. Optimization of the digestion procedure was done using a Box-Behnken experimental design. A linear response was observed from 2.30 to 11.20 μg Hg L(-1). The relative standard deviation was 3.20% (n = 11, 6.81 μg Hg L(-1)), the sample throughput was 4 sample h(-1), and the detection limit was 0.68 μg Hg L(-1). The obtained results with the flow-batch method are in good agreement with those obtained with the reference method. The flow-batch system is simple, allows the use of both chambers simultaneously, is seen as a promising methodology for achieving green chemistry goals, and is a good proposal to improving the quality control of honey. PMID:22540901

  2. Methylmercury in water samples at the pg/L level by online preconcentration liquid chromatography cold vapor-atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brombach, Christoph-Cornelius; Chen, Bin; Corns, Warren T.; Feldmann, Jörg; Krupp, Eva M.

    2015-03-01

    Ultra-traces of methylmercury at the sub-ppt level can be magnified in the foodweb and is of concern. In environmental monitoring a routine robust analytical method is needed to determine methylmercury in water. The development of an analytical method for ultra-trace speciation analysis of methylmercury (MeHg) in water samples is described. The approach is based on HPLC-CV-AFS with on-line preconcentration of water samples up to 200 mL, resulting in a detection limit of 40 pg/L (ppq) for MeHg, expressed as Hg. The unit consists of an optimized preconcentration column filled with a sulfur-based sorption material, on which mercury species are preconcentrated and subsequently eluted, separated and detected via HPLC-CV-AFS (high performance liquid chromatography-cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry). During the method development a type of adsorbate material, the pH dependence, the sample load rate and the carry-over were investigated using breakthrough experiments. The method shows broad pH stability in the range of pH 0 to 7, without the need for buffer addition and shows limited matrix effects so that MeHg is quantitatively recovered from sewage, river and seawater directly in the acidified samples without sample preparation.

  3. Time-multiplexed open-path TDLAS spectrometer for dynamic, sampling-free, interstitial H2 18O and H2 16O vapor detection in ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnreich, B.; Wagner, S.; Habig, J. C.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Ebert, V.

    2015-04-01

    An advanced in situ diode laser hygrometer for simultaneous, sampling-free detection of interstitial H2 16O and H2 18O vapor was developed and tested in the aerosol interaction and dynamics in atmosphere (AIDA) cloud chamber during dynamic cloud formation processes. The spectrometer to measure isotope-resolved water vapor concentrations comprises two rapidly time-multiplexed DFB lasers near 1.4 and 2.7 µm and an open-path White cell with 227-m absorption path length and 4-m mirror separation. A dynamic water concentration range from 2.6 ppb to 87 ppm for H2 16O and 87 ppt to 3.6 ppm for H2 18O could be achieved and was used to enable a fast and direct detection of dynamic isotope ratio changes during ice cloud formation in the AIDA chamber at temperatures between 190 and 230 K. Relative changes in the H2 18O/H2 16O isotope ratio of 1 % could be detected and resolved with a signal-to-noise ratio of 7. This converts to an isotope ratio resolution limit of 0.15 % at 1-s time resolution.

  4. Vapor space characterization of waste tank 241-BY-105 (in situ): Results from samples collected on May 9, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    McVeety, B.D.; Pool, K.H.; Ligotke, M.W.; Clauss, T.W.; Lucke, R.B.; Sharma, A.K.; McCulloch, M.; Fruchter, J.S.; Goheen, S.C.

    1995-05-01

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from in situ samples obtained from the tank headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-BY-105 (referred to as Tank BY-105). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds NH{sub 3}, NO{sub 2}, NO, HCN, and H{sub 2}O. Sampling for sulfur oxides was not requested. Results of the inorganic samples were affected by sampling errors that led to an undefined uncertainty in sample volume. Consequently, tank-headspace concentrations are estimated only. Thirty-nine tentatively identified organic analytes were observed above the detection limit of (ca.) 10 ppbv, but standards for most of these were not available at the time of analysis, and their quantitation is beyond the scope of this study. In addition, we looked for the 41 standard TO-14 analytes. Of these, only a few were observed above the 2-ppbv detection limit. The 16 organic analytes with the highest estimated concentrations are listed. These 16 analytes account for approximately 68% of the total or organic components in Tank BY-105.

  5. Imaging of elements in leaves of tobacco by solid sampling-electrothermal vaporization-inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Pierre

    2014-12-01

    Plants take up and store elements according to the environment in which they are growing. Because plants are at the base of the food chain, the determination of essential elements or toxic elements in plant materials is of importance. However, it is assumed that the element content determined on selected tissues may provide more specific information than that derived from the whole plant analysis. In this work, we assessed the feasibility of solid sampling-electrothermal vaporization-inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry analyses for quantitative imaging of Cd and Mg in plant leaves. Leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) were selected to be used as samples. To produce a two dimensional image, sections cut from leaf samples were analyzed. Cellulose doped with multi-element solution standards was used as calibration samples. Two certified reference materials (NIST SRM 1547 Peach Leaves and NIST SRM 1573a Tomato leaves) were used to verify the accuracy of measurements with good agreement between the measured concentrations and the certified values. Quantitative imaging revealed the inhomogeneous distribution of the selected elements. Excess of Cd and Mg tended to be focused on peripheral regions and the tip of the leaf.

  6. Vapor space characterization of waste tank 241-C-105: Results from samples collected on 2/16/94

    SciTech Connect

    Clauss, T.W.; Lucke, R.B.; McVeety, B.D.

    1995-06-01

    This report describes results of the analyses of tank-headspace samples taken from the Hanford waste Tank 241-C-105 (referred to as Tank C-105). Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and to analyze inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace. For organic analyses, six SUMMA{trademark} canisters were delivered to WHC on COC 0061 11 on 2/14/94. At the request of WHC, an additional six SUMMA{trademark} canisters were supplied on COC 005127 on 2/16/94. Samples were collected by WHC from the headspace of Tank C-105 through the VSS on 2/16/94, but only three SUMMA{sup {trademark}} canisters were returned to PNL using COC 0061 11 on 2/18/94. The canisters were stored in the 326/23B laboratory at ambient (25{degrees}C) temperature until the time of the analysis. Analyses described in this report were performed at PNL in the 300 area of the Hanford Reservation. Analytical methods that were used are described in the text. In summary, sorbent traps for inorganic analyses containing sample materials were either weighed (for water analysis) or desorbed with the appropriate aqueous solutions. The aqueous extracts were analyzed either by selective electrode or by ion chromatography (IC). Organic analyses were performed using cryogenic preconcentration followed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS).

  7. COMPARISON OF PORTABLE GAS CHROMATOGRAPHS AND PASSIVATED CANISTERS FOR FIELD SAMPLING AIRBORNE TOXIC ORGANIC VAPORS IN USA AND USSR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Collection of samples in passivated canisters is widely used for analysis of trace volatile organic compounds in air because a preconcentration step is usually required prior to analysis. ample integrity can be compromised by deterioration or artifact formation during storage and...

  8. Ultrasonic slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the determination of Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in cereals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shih-Yi; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen; Sahayam, A. C.

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasonic slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (USS-ETV-ICP-MS) has been applied to determine Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in several cereal samples. Thioacetamide was used as the modifier to enhance the ion signals. The background ions at the masses of interest were reduced in intensity significantly by using 1.0 mL min- 1 methane (CH4) as reaction cell gas in the dynamic reaction cell (DRC). Since the sensitivities of Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in different matrices were quite different, standard addition and isotope dilution methods were used for the determination of Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in these cereal samples. The method detection limits estimated from standard addition curves were about 1, 10, 4, 12 and 2 ng g- 1 for Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se, respectively, in original cereal samples. This procedure has been applied to the determination of Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se whose concentrations are in μg g- 1 (except Cr and Se) in standard reference materials (SRM) of National institute of standards and technology (NIST), NIST SRM 1568a Rice Flour and NIST SRM 1567a Wheat Flour and two cereal samples purchased from a local market. The analysis results of reference materials agreed with certified values at 95% confidence level according to Student's T-test. The results for the real world cereal samples were also found to be in good agreement with the pneumatic nebulization DRC ICP-MS results of the sample solutions.

  9. Vapor space characterization of waste Tank 241-BY-103: Results from samples collected on 11/1/94

    SciTech Connect

    McVeety, B.D.; Klinger, G.S.; Clauss, T.W.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-BY-103 (referred to as Tank BY-103). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water (H{sub 2}O). Trends in NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O samples indicated a possible minor sampling problem. Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. In addition, quantitative results were obtained for target organic analytes, 39 TO-14 compounds, plus an additional 14 analytes. Of these, four were observed above the 5-ppbv reporting cutoff. Fourteen organic tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the reporting cutoff of (ca.) 10 ppbv, and are reported with concentrations that are semiquantitative estimates based on internal-standard response factors. The 10 organic analytes with the highest estimated concentrations are listed in Table 1 and account for approximately 88% of the total organic components in Tank BY-103. Two permanent gases, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), were also detected in the tank headspace. Carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) were detected in the ambient air sample. Tank BY-103 is on the Ferrocyanide Watch List.

  10. Vapor space characterization of waste tank 241-BY-103 (in situ): Results from samples collected on May 5, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Ligotke, M.W.; Sharma, A.K.; McVeety, B.D.; Fruchter, J.S.; Pool, K.H.; Lucke, R.B.; McCulloch, M.; Goheen, S.C.

    1995-06-01

    This document presents the details of the inorganic and organic analysis that was performed on samples from the headspace of Hanford waste tank 241-BY-103. The results described were obtained to support the safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for the inorganic and organic analytes is included, as well as, a detailed description of the results which appears in the text.

  11. Vapor space characterization of waste tank 241-TY-103 (in situ): Results from samples collected on August 5, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; McVeety, B.D.; Clauss, T.W.

    1995-06-01

    This document presents the details of the inorganic and organic analysis that was performed on samples from the headspace of Hanford waste tank 241-TY-103. The results described were obtained to support the safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for the inorganic and organic analytes is included, as well as, a detailed description of the results which appears in the text.

  12. Vapor space characterization of Waste Tank 241-U-106 (in situ): Results from samples collected on 8/25/94

    SciTech Connect

    Ligotke, M.W.; Lucke, R.B.; Pool, K.H.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from in situ samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-U-106 (referred to as Tank U-106). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water (H{sub 2}O). Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not performed. In addition, the authors looked for the 39 TO-14 compounds plus an additional 14 target analytes. Of these, six were observed above the 5-ppbv reporting cutoff. Ten organic tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the reporting cutoff of (ca.) 10 ppbv in two or more of the three samples collected and are reported with concentrations that are semiquantitative estimates based on internal standard response factors. The 10 organic analytes with the highest estimated concentrations are listed in Table 1 and account for approximately 89% of the total organic components in Tank U-106. Methyl isocyanate, a compound of possible concern in Tank U-106, was not detected. Tank U-106 is on the Organic Watch List.

  13. Vapor space characterization of waste Tank 241-TX-118 (in situ): Results from samples collected on 9/7/94

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, B.L.; Clauss, T.W.; Ligotke, M.W.; Pool, K.H.; McVeety, B.D.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Goheen, S.C.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from in situ samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-TX-118 (referred to as Tank TX-118). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), hydrogen cyanide (CHN), and water (H{sub 2}O). Sampling for sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. In addition, quantitative results were obtained for the 39 TO-14 compounds plus an additional 13 analytes. Hexane, normally included in the additional analytes, was removed because a calibration standard was not available during analysis of Tank TX-118 SUMMA{trademark} canisters. Of these, 12 were observed above the 5-ppbv reporting cutoff. Fourteen tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the reporting cutoff of (ca.) 10 ppbv and are reported with concentrations that are semiquantitative estimates based on internal-standard response factors. The 10 organic analytes with the highest estimated concentrations are listed in Table 1 and account for approximately 86% of the total organic components in Tank TX-118. Permanent gas analysis was not conducted on the tank-headspace samples. Tank TX-118 is on both the Ferrocyanide and Organic Watch List.

  14. Vapor space characterization of Waste Tank 241-U-107: Results from samples collected on 2/17/95

    SciTech Connect

    McVeety, B.D.; Clauss, T.W.; Ligotke, M.W.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-U-107 (referred to as Tank U-107). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water (H{sub 2}O). Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. In addition, quantitative results were obtained for the 39 TO-14 compounds plus an additional 14 analytes. Of these, 10 were observed above the 5-ppbv reporting cutoff. Sixteen organic tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the reporting cutoff of (ca.) 10 ppbv, and are reported with concentrations that are semiquantitative estimates based on internal-standard response factors. The 10 organic analytes with the highest estimated concentrations are listed in Table 1 and account for approximately 88% of the total organic components in Tank U-107. Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) was the only permanent gas detected in the tank-headspace samples. Tank U-107 is on the Organic and the Hydrogen Watch Lists.

  15. Vapor space characterization of Waste Tank 241-U-105: Results from samples collected on 2/24/95

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Clauss, T.W.; Ligotke, M.W.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-U-105 (referred to as Tank U-105). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water (H{sub 2}O). Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. In addition, quantitative results were obtained for the 39 TO-14 compounds plus an additional 14 analytes. Of these, six were observed above the 5-ppbv reporting cutoff. Three tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the reporting cutoff of (ca.) 10 ppbv and are reported with concentrations that are semiquantitative estimates based on internal-standard response factors. All nine of the organic analytes identified are listed in Table 1 and account for 100% of the total organic components in Tank U-105. Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) was the only permanent gas detected in the tank-headspace sample. Tank U-105 is on the Hydrogen Watch List.

  16. Vapor space characterization of Waste Tank 241-TY-104: Results from samples collected on 4/27/95

    SciTech Connect

    Klinger, G.S.; Olsen, K.B.; Clauss, T.W.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-TY-104 (referred to as Tank TY-104). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water (H{sub 2}O). Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. In addition, quantitative results were obtained for the 39 TO-14 compounds plus an additional 14 analytes. Of these, 8 were observed above the 5-ppbv reporting cutoff. Five tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the reporting cutoff of (ca.) 10 ppbv and are reported with concentrations that are semiquantitative estimates based on internal-standard response factors. The 10 organic analytes with the highest estimated concentrations are listed in Table 1 and account for approximately 94% of the total organic components in Tank TY-104. Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) was the only permanent gas detected in the tank-headspace samples. Tank TY-104 is on the Ferrocyanide Watch List.

  17. Near real time vapor detection and enhancement using aerosol adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Novick, V.J.; Johnson, S.A.

    1999-08-03

    A vapor sample detection method is described where the vapor sample contains vapor and ambient air and surrounding natural background particles. The vapor sample detection method includes the steps of generating a supply of aerosol that have a particular effective median particle size, mixing the aerosol with the vapor sample forming aerosol and adsorbed vapor suspended in an air stream, impacting the suspended aerosol and adsorbed vapor upon a reflecting element, alternatively directing infrared light to the impacted aerosol and adsorbed vapor, detecting and analyzing the alternatively directed infrared light in essentially real time using a spectrometer and a microcomputer and identifying the vapor sample. 13 figs.

  18. Near real time vapor detection and enhancement using aerosol adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Novick, Vincent J.; Johnson, Stanley A.

    1999-01-01

    A vapor sample detection method where the vapor sample contains vapor and ambient air and surrounding natural background particles. The vapor sample detection method includes the steps of generating a supply of aerosol that have a particular effective median particle size, mixing the aerosol with the vapor sample forming aerosol and adsorbed vapor suspended in an air stream, impacting the suspended aerosol and adsorbed vapor upon a reflecting element, alternatively directing infrared light to the impacted aerosol and adsorbed vapor, detecting and analyzing the alternatively directed infrared light in essentially real time using a spectrometer and a microcomputer and identifying the vapor sample.

  19. Vapor space characterization of Waste Tank 241-TY-104 (in situ): Results from samples collected on 8/5/94

    SciTech Connect

    Ligotke, M.W.; Pool, K.H.; Lucke, R.B.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from in situ samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-TY-104 (referred to as Tank TY-104). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water (H{sub 2}O). Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not performed. In addition, the authors looked for the 39 TO-14 compounds plus an additional 14 analytes. Of these, eight were observed above the 5-ppbv reporting cutoff. Twenty-four organic tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the reporting cutoff of (ca.) 10 ppbv and are reported with concentrations that are semiquantitative estimates based on internal standard response factors. The 10 organic analytes with the highest estimated concentrations are listed in Table 1 and account for approximately 86% of the total organic components in Tank TY-104. Tank TY-104 is on the Ferrocyanide Watch List.

  20. Vapor space characterization of waste Tank 241-SX-106: Results from samples collected on 3/24/95

    SciTech Connect

    Klinger, G.S.; Clauss, T.W.; Litgotke, M.W.

    1995-11-01

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-SX-106 (referred to as Tank SX-106). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water (H{sub 2}O). Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. In addition, quantitative results were obtained for the 39 TO-14 compounds plus an additional 14 analytes. Of these, 4 were observed above the 5-ppbv reporting cutoff. Three tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the reporting cutoff of (ca.) 10 ppbv and are reported with concentrations that are semiquantitative estimates based on internal-standard response factors. The 7 organic analytes identified are listed in Table 1 and account for approximately 100% of the total organic components in Tank SX-106. Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) was the only permanent gas detected. Tank SX-106 is on the Ferrocyanide Watch List.

  1. Vapor space characterization of waste tank 241-S-102: Results from samples collected on 3/14/95

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; McVeety, B.D.; Clauss, T.W.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-S-102 (referred to as Tank S-102). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water (H{sub 2}O). Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. In addition, quantitative results were obtained for the 39 TO-14 compounds plus an additional 14 analytes. Of these, 11 were observed above the 5-ppbv reporting cutoff. Eleven tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the reporting cutoff of (ca.) 10 ppbv and are reported with concentrations that are semiquantitative estimates based on internal-standard response factors. The 10 organic analytes with the highest estimated concentrations are listed in Table 1 and account for approximately 95% of the total organic components in Tank S-102. Two permanent gases, hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), were also detected.

  2. Vapor space characterization of waste tank 241-TX-118: Results from samples collected on 12/16/94

    SciTech Connect

    Lucke, R.B.; Ligotke, M.W.; McVeety, B.D.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-TX-118 (referred to as Tank TX-118). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water (H{sub 2}O). Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. In addition, quantitative results were obtained for the 39 TO-14 compounds plus an additional 14 analytes. Of these, 3 were observed above the 5-ppbv reporting cutoff. Twenty three organic tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the reporting cutoff of (ca.) 10 ppbv, and are reported with concentrations that are semiquantitative estimates based on internal-standard response factors. The 10 organic analytes with the highest estimated concentrations are listed in Table 1 and account for approximately 84% of the total organic components in Tank TX-118. Two permanent gases, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), were also detected.

  3. Vapor space characterization of Waste Tank 241-S-111: Results from samples collected on 3/21/95

    SciTech Connect

    Klinger, G.S.; Clauss, T.W.; Ligotke, M.W.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-S-111 (referred to as Tank S-111). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water (H{sub 2}O). Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. In addition, quantitative results were obtained for the 39 TO-14 compounds plus an additional 14 analytes. Of these, seven were observed above the 5-ppbv reporting cutoff. Five tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the reporting cutoff of (ca.) 10 ppbv and are reported with concentrations that are semiquantitative estimates based on internal-standard response factors. The 10 organic analytes with the highest estimated concentrations are listed in Table 1 and account for approximately 98% of the total organic components in Tank S-111. Two permanent gases, hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), were also detected. Tank S-111 is on the Hydrogen Watch List.

  4. Vapor space characterization of waste tank 241-C-112: Results from samples collected on 8/11/94

    SciTech Connect

    Ligotke, M.W.; McVeety, B.D.; Pool, K.H.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes organic analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-C-112 (referred to as Tank C-112). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water (H{sub 2}O). Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. Organic compounds were also quantitatively determined. Five organic tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the detection limit of (ca.) 10 ppbv, but standards for most of these were not available at the time of analysis, and the reported concentrations are semiquantitative estimates. In addition, we looked for the 40 standard TO-14 analytes. None were observed above the 2-ppbv detection limit. The five organic analytes with the highest concentration are listed in Table 1 and account for 100% of the total organic components in Tank C-112.

  5. Vapor space characterization of waste tank 241-BX-104: Results from samples collected on 12/30/94

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Ligotke, M.W.; McVeety, B.D.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-BX-104 (referred to as Tank BX-104). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained. for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water (H{sub 2}O). Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SOx) was not requested. In addition, quantitative results were obtained for the 39 TO-14 compounds plus an additional 14 analytes. Of these, 13 were observed above the 5-ppbv reporting cutoff. Sixty-six organic tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the reporting cutoff of (ca.) 10 ppbv and are reported with concentrations that are semiquantitative estimates based on internal-standard response factors. The 10 organic analytes, with the highest estimated concentrations are listed in Table 1 and account for approximately 70% of the total organic components in Tank BX-104. Two permanent gases, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), were also detected.

  6. Vapor space characterization of waste tank 241-BY-110: Results for samples collected on 11/11/94

    SciTech Connect

    Clauss, T.W.; Ligotke, M.W.; Pool, K.H.

    1995-06-01

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-BY-110 (referred to as Tank BY-110). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}, nitric oxide (NO), and water (H{sub 2}O). Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. In addition, we looked for the 40 TO-14 compounds plus an additional 15 analytes. Of these, 10 were observed above the 5-ppbv reporting cutoff. Forty-six organic tentatively identified compounds (TICS) were observed above the reporting cutoff of (ca.) 10 ppbv, and are reported with concentrations that are semiquantative estimates based on internal standard response factors. The 10 organic analytes with the highest estimated concentrations are listed and account for approximately 78% of the total organic components in Tank BY-110. Two permanent gases, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), were also detected.

  7. Vapor space characterization of waste tank 241-TY-103: Results from samples collected on 4/11/95

    SciTech Connect

    Ligotke, M.W.; Clauss, T.W.; Pool, K.H.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-TY-103 (referred to as Tank TY-103). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water (H{sub 2}O). Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. In addition, quantitative results were obtained for the 39 TO-14 compounds plus an additional 14 analytes. Of these, 16 were observed above the 5-ppbv reporting cutoff. Sixteen tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the reporting cutoff of (ca.) 10 ppbv and are reported with concentrations that are semiquantitative estimates based on internal-standard response factors. The 10 organic analytes with the highest estimated concentrations are listed in Table 1 and account for approximately 95% of the total organic components in Tank TY-103. Two permanent gases, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), were also detected.

  8. Vapor space characterization of waste tank 241-BY-109 (in situ): Results from samples collected on 9/22/94

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Clauss, T.W.; Ligotke, M.W.

    1995-06-01

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from in situ samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-BY-109 (referred to as Tank BY-109). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Summary Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water (H{sub 2}O). Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. Organic compounds were also quantitatively determined. Twenty-three organic tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the detection limit of (ca.) 10 ppbv, but standards for most of these were not available at the time of analysis, and the reported concentrations are semiquantitative estimates. In addition, we looked for the 40 standard TO-14 analytes. We observed 38. Of these, only a few were observed above the 2-ppbv calibrated instrument detection limit. The ten organic analytes with the highest estimated concentrations are listed in Summary Table 1. The ten analytes account for approximately 84% of the total organic components in Tank BY-109.

  9. Vapor space characterization of waste Tank 241-BY-104 (in situ): Results from samples collected on 4/22/94

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Ligotke, M.W.; Clauss, T.W.; Lucke, R.B.; McVeety, B.D.; Sharma, A.K.; McCulloch, M.; Fruchter, J.S.; Goheen, S.C.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from in situ samples obtained from the space of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-BY-104 (referred to as Tank BY-104). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds NH{sub 3}, NO{sub 2}, NO, HCN, and H{sub 2}O. Sampling for sulfur oxides was not requested. Several organic compounds were also quantitatively determined. Eighty-nine tentatively identified organic analytes were observed above the detection limit of (ca.) 10 ppbv, but standards for most of these were not available at the time of analysis, and the reported concentrations are semi-quantitative estimates. In addition, the 41 standard TO 14 analytes were sought. Of these, only a few were observed above the 2-ppbv detection limit. The 10 organic analytes with the highest estimated concentrations are listed in Table 1. These 10 analytes account for approximately 48% of the total organic components in the headspace of Tank BY-104. Detailed results appear in the text. Tank BY-104 is on the Ferrocyanide Watch List.

  10. Simultaneous speciation of inorganic arsenic, selenium and tellurium in environmental water samples by dispersive liquid liquid microextraction combined with electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2015-09-01

    A new method based on dispersive liquid liquid microextraction (DLLME) combined with electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS) was developed for the simultaneous speciation of inorganic arsenic (As), selenium (Se) and tellurium (Te) with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) as both chelating reagent and chemical modifier. As(III), Se(IV) and Te(IV) were transformed into DDTC-chelates at pH 7 and extracted into the fine droplets formed by injecting the binary solution of bromobenzene (extraction solvent) and methanol (dispersive solvent) into the sample solution. After phase separation by centrifugation, As(III), Se(IV) and Te(IV) preconcentrated in the organic phase were determined by ETV-ICP-MS. Total inorganic As, Se and Te were obtained by reducing As(V), Se(VI) and Te(VI) to As(III), Se(IV) and Te(IV) with L-cysteine, which were then subjected to the same DLLME-ETV-ICP-MS process. The concentration of As(V), Se(VI), Te(VI) were calculated by subtracting the concentration of As(III), Se(IV) and Te(IV) from the total inorganic As, Se and Te, respectively. The main factors affecting the microextraction efficiency and the vaporization behavior of target species were investigated in detail. Under the optimal conditions, the limits of detection were 2.5, 8.6 and 0.56 ng L(-1) for As(III), Se(IV) and Te(IV), respectively, with the relative standard deviations (n=7) of 8.5-9.7%. The developed method was applied to the speciation of inorganic As, Se and Te in Certified Reference Materials of GSBZ50004-88, GBW(E)080395 and GBW(E)080548 environmental waters, and the determined values are in good agreement with the certified values. The method was also successfully applied to the simultaneous speciation of inorganic As, Se and Te in different environmental water samples with the recoveries in the range of 86.3-107% for the spiked samples. PMID:26003714

  11. Vapor space characterization of waste Tank 241-C-109 (in situ): Results from samples collected on 6/23/94

    SciTech Connect

    Clauss, T.W.; Ligotke, M.W.; Pool, K.H.; Lucke, R.B.; McVeety, B.D.; Sharma, A.K.; McCulloch, M.; Fruchter, J.S.; Goheen, S.C.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes organic analyses results from in situ samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-C-109 (referred to as Tank C-109). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. Organic compounds were quantitatively determined. Thirteen organic tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the detection limit of (ca.) 10 ppbv, but standards for most of these were not available at the time of analysis, and the reported concentrations are semiquantitative estimates. In addition, the authors looked for the 40 standard TO-14 analytes. Of these, only one was observed above the 2-ppbv calibrated instrumental detection limit. However, it is believed, even though the values for dichlorodifluoromethane and trichlorofluoromethane are below the instrumental detection limit, they are accurate at these low concentrations. The six analytes account for approximately 100% of the total organic components in Tank C-109. These six organic analytes with the highest estimated concentrations are listed in Summary Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text.

  12. Application of direct solid sample analysis for the determination of chlorine in biological materials using electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gois, Jefferson Santos; Pereira, Éderson R.; Welz, Bernhard; Borges, Daniel L. G.

    2015-03-01

    This work describes a methodology developed to carry out Cl determination in biological materials using electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and direct solid sample analysis. The solid samples were directly weighed into graphite 'cups' and inserted into the graphite furnace. The RF power and the carrier gas flow rate were optimized at 1300 W and 0.7 L min- 1, respectively. Calibration could be carried out using aqueous standard solutions with pre-dried modifiers (Pd + Nd or Pd + Ca) or using solid certified reference materials with the same pre-dried modifiers or without the use of modifiers. The limit of quantification was determined as 5 μg g- 1 under optimized conditions and the Cl concentration was determined in five certified reference materials with certified concentrations for Cl, in addition to three certified reference materials, for which certified values for Cl were unavailable; in the latter case, the results were compared with those obtained using high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry. Good agreement at a 95% statistical confidence level was achieved between determined and certified or reference values.

  13. Slurry sampling flow injection chemical vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the determination of trace Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in cosmetic lotions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Ni; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen; Chen, Yen-Ling; Sahayam, A C

    2015-02-20

    A slurry sampling inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) method has been developed for the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in cosmetic lotions using flow injection (FI) vapor generation (VG) as the sample introduction system. A slurry containing 2% m/v lotion, 2% m/v thiourea, 0.05% m/v L-cysteine, 0.5 μg mL(-1) Co(II), 0.1% m/v Triton X-100 and 1.2% v/v HCl was injected into a VG-ICP-MS system for the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi without dissolution and mineralization. Because the sensitivities of the analytes in the slurry and that of aqueous solution were quite different, an isotope dilution method and a standard addition method were used for the determination. This method has been validated by the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in GBW09305 Cosmetic (Cream) reference material. The method was also applied for the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in three cosmetic lotion samples obtained locally. The analysis results of the reference material agreed with the certified value and/or ETV-ICP-MS results. The detection limit estimated from the standard addition curve was 0.025, 0.1, 0.2, 0.1, 0.15, and 0.03 ng g(-1) for Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi, respectively, in original cosmetic lotion sample. PMID:25682241

  14. Sorption of N2 and EGME vapors on some soils, clays, and mineral oxides and determination of sample surface areas by use of sorption data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chiou, C.T.; Rutherford, D.W.; Manes, M.

    1993-01-01

    Vapor sorption isotherms of ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (EGME) at room temperature and isotherms of N2 gas at liquid nitrogen temperature were determined for various soils and minerals. The N2 monolayer capacities [Qm (N2)] were calculated from the BET equation and used to determine the surface areas. To examine whether EGME is an appropriate adsorbate for determination of surface areas, the apparent EGME monolayer capacities [Qm (EGME)ap] were also obtained by use of the BET equation. For sand, aluminum oxide, kaolinite, hematite, and synthetic hydrous iron oxide, which are relatively free of organic impurity and expanding/solvating minerals, the Qm (EGME)ap values are in good conformity with the corresponding Qm (N2) values and would give surface areas consistent with BET (N2) values. For other samples (Woodburn soil, a natural hydrous iron oxide, illite, and montmorillonite), the Qm (EGME)ap values overestimate the Qm (N2) values from a moderate to a large extent, depending on the sample. A high-organic-content peat shows a very small BET (N2) surface area; the EGME/ peat isotherm is linear and does not yield a calculation of the surface area. Large discrepancies between results of the two methods for some samples are attributed to the high solubility of polar EGME in soil organic matter and/ or to the cation solvation of EGME with solvating clays. The agreement for other samples is illustrative of the consistency of the BET method when different adsorbates are used, so long as they do not exhibit bulk penetration and/or cation solvation. ?? 1993 American Chemical Society.

  15. Phase transfer hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction combined with electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the determination of trace heavy metals in environmental and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xueqin; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2012-11-15

    A new method of phase transfer hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction (PT-HF-LPME) combined with electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS) has been developed for the determination of trace Co, Pd, Cd and Bi in environmental and biological samples. In PT-HF-LPME, an intermediate solvent (1-butanol) was added into the sample solution to ensure the maximum contact area between the target metal ions and the chelating reagent (8-hydroxyquinoline, 8-HQ), which accelerated the formation of 8-HQ-metal complexes and their subsequent extraction by extraction solvent (toluene). The experimental parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of PT-HF-LPME for the target metals were studied by simplex optimization and orthogonal array design (OAD) experiments. Under the optimized conditions, the enrichment factors for Co, Pd, Cd and Bi were 110, 393, 121 and 111-fold, respectively, the limits of detection (LODs, 3σ) ranged from 3.7 to 8.3 ng L(-1). The relative standard deviations (RSDs, c=0.5 ng mL(-1), n=7) were 8.7, 6.2, 12.4 and 12.9% for Co, Pd, Cd and Bi, respectively. To validate the accuracy of the proposed method, two Certified Reference Materials of GSBZ50009-88 Environment Water and GBW09103 Human Urine were analyzed, and the results obtained for Cd were in good agreement with the certified values. Finally, the developed method was successfully applied to the analysis of Co, Pd, Cd and Bi in lake water and human urine samples. PMID:23158357

  16. Vapor concentration monitor

    DOEpatents

    Bayly, John G.; Booth, Ronald J.

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus for monitoring the concentration of a vapor, such as heavy water, having at least one narrow bandwidth in its absorption spectrum, in a sample gas such as air. The air is drawn into a chamber in which the vapor content is measured by means of its radiation absorption spectrum. High sensitivity is obtained by modulating the wavelength at a relatively high frequency without changing its optical path, while high stability against zero drift is obtained by the low frequency interchange of the sample gas to be monitored and of a reference sample. The variable HDO background due to natural humidity is automatically corrected.

  17. Determination of As, Hg and Pb in herbs using slurry sampling flow injection chemical vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tai, Chia-Yi; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen; Sahayam, A C

    2016-02-01

    Analysis of herbs for As, Hg and Pb has been carried out using slurry sampling inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) with flow injection vapor generation. Slurry containing 0.5% m/v herbal powder, 0.1% m/v citric acid and 2% v/v HCl was injected into the VG-ICP-MS system for the determination of As, Hg and Pb that obviate dissolution and mineralization. Standard addition and isotope dilution methods were used for quantifications in selected herbal powders. This method has been validated by the determination of As, Hg and Pb in NIST standard reference materials SRM 1547 Peach Leaves and SRM 1573a Tomato Leaves. The As, Hg and Pb analysis results of the reference materials agreed with the certified values. The precision obtained by the reported procedure was better than 7% for all determinations. The detection limit estimated from standard addition curve was 0.008, 0.003, and 0.007 ng mL(-1) for As, Hg and Pb, respectively. PMID:26304347

  18. Vapor space characterization of waste Tank 241-C-104: Results from samples collected on 2/17/94 and 3/3/94

    SciTech Connect

    Lucke, R.B.; McVeety, B.D.; Clauss, T.W.; Pool, K.H.; Young, J.S.; McCulloch, M.; Ligotke, M.W.; Fruchter, J.S.; Goheen, S.C.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-C-104 (referred to as Tank C-104). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Summary Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}), and water vapor (H{sub 2}O). Organic compounds were also quantitatively determined. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) versatile sampler (OVS) tubes were analyzed for tributyl phosphate. Twenty-four organic tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the detection limit of (ca.) 10 ppbv, but standards for most of these were not available at the time of analysis, and the reported concentrations are semiquantitative estimates. In addition, the authors looked for the 40 standard TO-14 analytes. Of these, two were observed above the 2-ppbv calibrated instrument detection limit. The 10 organic analytes with the highest estimated concentrations are listed in Summary Table 1. These 10 analytes account for approximately 88% of the total organic components in Tank C 104. Tank C-104 is not on any of the Watch Lists.

  19. Direct determination of arsenic in soil samples by fast pyrolysis-chemical vapor generation using sodium formate as a reductant followed by nondispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xuchuan; Zhang, Jingya; Bu, Fanlong

    2015-09-01

    This new study shows for the first time that sodium formate can react with trace arsenic to form volatile species via fast pyrolysis - chemical vapor generation. We found that the presence of thiourea greatly enhanced the generation efficiency and eliminated the interference of copper. We studied the reaction temperature, the volume of sodium formate, the reaction acidity, and the carried argon rate using nondispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Under optimal conditions of T = 500 °C, the volumes of 30% sodium formate and 10% thiourea were 0.2 ml and 0.05 ml, respectively. The carrier argon rate was 300 ml min- 1 and the detection limit and precision of arsenic were 0.39 ng and 3.25%, respectively. The amount of arsenic in soil can be directly determined by adding trace amount of hydrochloric acid as a decomposition reagent without any sample pretreatment. The method was successfully applied to determine trace amount of arsenic in two soil-certified reference materials (GBW07453 and GBW07450), and the results were found to be in agreement with certified reference values.

  20. High-speed tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy for sampling-free in-cylinder water vapor concentration measurements in an optical IC engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witzel, O.; Klein, A.; Wagner, S.; Meffert, C.; Schulz, C.; Ebert, V.

    2012-11-01

    A novel, fiber-optic in situ laser hygrometer was developed to measure water vapor with microsecond time resolution directly inside an internal combustion (IC) engine. The instrument is intended for sampling-free quantification of recirculated exhaust gas in combustion engines. Direct tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy was employed to allow absolute and self-calibrating H2O measurements. The compact and user-friendly instrument combines a fiber-coupled, 1.37 μm distributed feedback diode laser with kHz-fast, continuous wavelength scanning. Only small, typically 10 mm, optical access ports in the engine are needed. The new in situ hygrometer was tested via measurements in a motored optical research engine operated on ambient air, without any artificial humidification. Scanning the laser at 4 kHz resulted in a time resolution of 250 μs (i.e., 3° crank angle at 2,000 rpm), while the DC-coupled detector signals are digitized with a 4MSamples/s 16-bit data acquisition system. Absolute water vapor concentrations around 1 vol.% could be measured and quantified during the full compression stroke, i.e., over a pressure/temperature range of 0.07-0.52 MPa/300-500 K. Without any scan averaging or bandwidth filtering we could demonstrate signal-to-noise ratios between 51 (at p = 0.1 MPa) and 33 (at p = 0.4 MPa), which corresponds to H2O detection limits between 0.02 and 0.035 vol.% or length and bandwidth normalized detectivities of 285 and 477 ppb m Hz-½, respectively. Comparison of the dynamic H2O behavior during the compression stroke across several engine cycles and different operating conditions showed good reproducibility and absolute accuracy of the results, consistent with the boundary conditions, i.e., motored air operation. This new sensor therefore opens up new possibilities for engine cycle-resolved, calibration-free in situ AGR quantification and optimization in engine applications.

  1. Polymer-supported ionic liquid solid phase extraction for trace inorganic and organic mercury determination in water samples by flow injection-cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Leticia B; Olsina, Roberto A; Wuilloud, Rodolfo G

    2013-11-15

    A simple and green technique named polymer-supported ionic liquid solid phase extraction (PSIL-SPE) was developed for mercury (Hg) species determination. Inorganic Hg (InHg) species was complexed with chloride ions followed by its introduction into a flow injection on-line system to quantitatively retain the anionic chlorocomplex (HgCl4(2-)) in a column packed with CYPHOS(®) IL 101-impregnated resin. The trapped InHg was then reduced with stannous chloride (SnCl2) and eluted with the same flow of reducing agent followed by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS) detection. Organic mercury species (OrgHg) did not interact with the impregnated resin and were not retained into the column. Total concentration of OrgHg was evaluated by difference between total Hg and InHg concentration. A 95% extraction efficiency was achieved for InHg when the procedure was developed under optimal experimental conditions. The limit of detection obtained for preconcentration of 40 mL of sample was 2.4 ng L(-1) InHg. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was 2.7% (at 1 µg L(-1) InHg and n=10) calculated from the peak height of absorbance signals (Gaussian-shape and reproducible peaks). This work reports the first polymer-supported IL solid phase extraction approach implemented in a flow injection on-line system for determination of Hg species in mineral, tap and river water samples. PMID:24148384

  2. Vaporizer performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C. H.; Perez-Ortiz, B. M.; Whitelaw, J. H.

    This paper examines the nature of the flow leaving a vaporizer, its dependence on the flowrates of air and kerosene fuel, the inlet air temperature, and the possible consequences for the performance of a combustor fueled by the vaporizer. A phase Doppler velocimeter was used to examine the distribution of droplet diameters, velocities of the droplets, and the liquid-fuel flux at the exit. Measurements are also reported which show the nature of the two-phase flow away from the vaporizer exits and in important regions within a combustor corresponding to a one-sixth annular sector of a reverse-flow arrangement. The distribution of droplets within the combustor was observed and photographs of the combusting flow are presented.

  3. Vapor fragrancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Q. Tran; Bryant, Timothy D.

    1987-05-01

    This invention relates to a vapor fragrancer for continuously, uniformly, and economically odorizing or deodorizing an environment. Homes, offices, automobiles, and space stations require either odorizing or deodorizing of the atmosphere to create pleasant conditions for work or leisure. A vapor fragrancer is provided to accomplish these goals. A supplier continuously supplies a predetermined amount of desired liquid fragrance from a container to a retaining material, which is positioned in the circulation path of the atmosphere. The supplier is either a low powered pump or a gravity dispenser. The atmosphere flowing in a circulation path passes over the retaining material containing the liquid fragrance and lifts a fragrant vapor from the retaining material. The atmosphere is thereby continuously and uniformly fragranced.

  4. Method and apparatus for vapor detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerner, Melvin (Inventor); Hood, Lyal V. (Inventor); Rommel, Marjorie A. (Inventor); Pettitt, Bruce C. (Inventor); Erikson, Charles M. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The method disclosed herein may be practiced by passing the vapors to be sampled along a path with halogen vapor, preferably chlorine vapor, heating the mixed vapors to halogenate those of the sampled vapors subject to halogenation, removing unreacted halogen vapor, and then sensing the vapors for organic halogenated compounds. The apparatus disclosed herein comprises means for flowing the vapors, both sample and halogen vapors, into a common path, means for heating the mixed vapors to effect the halogenation reaction, means for removing unreacted halogen vapor, and a sensing device for sensing halogenated compounds. By such a method and means, the vapors of low molecular weight hydrocarbons, ketones and alcohols, when present, such as methane, ethane, acetone, ethanol, and the like are converted, at least in part, to halogenated compounds, then the excess halogen removed or trapped, and the resultant vapors of the halogenated compounds sensed or detected. The system is highly sensitive. For example, acetone in a concentration of 30 parts per billion (volume) is readily detected.

  5. Fuel Vaporization Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosque, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    A study of the effects of fuel-air preparation characteristics on combustor performance and emissions at temperature and pressure ranges representative of actual gas turbine combustors is discussed. The effect of flameholding devices on the vaporization process and NOx formation is discussed. Flameholder blockage and geometry are some of the elements that affect the recirculation zone characteristics and subsequently alter combustion stability, emissions and performance. A water cooled combustor is used as the test rig. Preheated air and Jet A fuel are mixed at the entrance of the apparatus. A vaporization probe is used to determine percentage of vaporization and a gas sample probe to determine concentration of emissions in the exhaust gases. The experimental design is presented and experimental expected results are discussed.

  6. An assessment of the liquid-gas partitioning behavior of major wastewater odorants using two comparative experimental approaches: liquid sample-based vaporization vs. impinger-based dynamic headspace extraction into sorbent tubes.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Mohammad Asif; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Szulejko, Jan E; Cho, Jinwoo

    2014-01-01

    The gas-liquid partitioning behavior of major odorants (acetic acid, propionic acid, isobutyric acid, n-butyric acid, i-valeric acid, n-valeric acid, hexanoic acid, phenol, p-cresol, indole, skatole, and toluene (as a reference)) commonly found in microbially digested wastewaters was investigated by two experimental approaches. Firstly, a simple vaporization method was applied to measure the target odorants dissolved in liquid samples with the aid of sorbent tube/thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. As an alternative method, an impinger-based dynamic headspace sampling method was also explored to measure the partitioning of target odorants between the gas and liquid phases with the same detection system. The relative extraction efficiency (in percent) of the odorants by dynamic headspace sampling was estimated against the calibration results derived by the vaporization method. Finally, the concentrations of the major odorants in real digested wastewater samples were also analyzed using both analytical approaches. Through a parallel application of the two experimental methods, we intended to develop an experimental approach to be able to assess the liquid-to-gas phase partitioning behavior of major odorants in a complex wastewater system. The relative sensitivity of the two methods expressed in terms of response factor ratios (RFvap/RFimp) of liquid standard calibration between vaporization and impinger-based calibrations varied widely from 981 (skatole) to 6,022 (acetic acid). Comparison of this relative sensitivity thus highlights the rather low extraction efficiency of the highly soluble and more acidic odorants from wastewater samples in dynamic headspace sampling. PMID:24271272

  7. Vapor Pressure Measurements in a Closed System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iannone, Mark

    2006-01-01

    An alternative method that uses a simple apparatus to measure vapor pressure versus temperature in a closed system, in which the total pressure is the vapor pressure of the liquid sample, is described. The use of this apparatus gives students a more direct picture of vapor pressure than the isoteniscope method and results have generally been quite…

  8. Vapor generation methods for explosives detection research

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W.; Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.

    2012-12-01

    The generation of calibrated vapor samples of explosives compounds remains a challenge due to the low vapor pressures of the explosives, adsorption of explosives on container and tubing walls, and the requirement to manage (typically) multiple temperature zones as the vapor is generated, diluted, and delivered. Methods that have been described to generate vapors can be classified as continuous or pulsed flow vapor generators. Vapor sources for continuous flow generators are typically explosives compounds supported on a solid support, or compounds contained in a permeation or diffusion device. Sources are held at elevated isothermal temperatures. Similar sources can be used for pulsed vapor generators; however, pulsed systems may also use injection of solutions onto heated surfaces with generation of both solvent and explosives vapors, transient peaks from a gas chromatograph, or vapors generated by s programmed thermal desorption. This article reviews vapor generator approaches with emphasis on the method of generating the vapors and on practical aspects of vapor dilution and handling. In addition, a gas chromatographic system with two ovens that is configurable with up to four heating ropes is proposed that could serve as a single integrated platform for explosives vapor generation and device testing. Issues related to standards, calibration, and safety are also discussed.

  9. Method and apparatus for transport, introduction, atomization and excitation of emission spectrum for quantitative analysis of high temperature gas sample streams containing vapor and particulates without degradation of sample stream temperature

    DOEpatents

    Eckels, David E.; Hass, William J.

    1989-05-30

    A sample transport, sample introduction, and flame excitation system for spectrometric analysis of high temperature gas streams which eliminates degradation of the sample stream by condensation losses.

  10. Hydrazine-Vapor Samplers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Rebecca; Mcbrearty, Charles; Curran, Dan; Leavitt, Nilgun

    1994-01-01

    Active sampling unit capable of detecting hydrazine and monomethyl hydrazine vapors at levels as low as 10 ppb in air developed. Includes detachable badge holder and pump which draws air through badge holder at selectable rate of 1 or 2 L/min. Coated strip in each badge designed to align with air passage in badge holder. Two types of badge holders constructed: one has open-face design for general monitoring of air in open spaces, while other has closed-face design with viewing window and intended for sampling through small openings to detect leaks.

  11. Application of hydrocyanic acid vapor generation via focused microwave radiation to the preparation of industrial effluent samples prior to free and total cyanide determinations by spectrophotometric flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Quaresma, Maria Cristina Baptista; de Carvalho, Maria de Fátima Batista; Meirelles, Francis Assis; Santiago, Vânia Maria Junqueira; Santelli, Ricardo Erthal

    2007-02-01

    A sample preparation procedure for the quantitative determination of free and total cyanides in industrial effluents has been developed that involves hydrocyanic acid vapor generation via focused microwave radiation. Hydrocyanic acid vapor was generated from free cyanides using only 5 min of irradiation time (90 W power) and a purge time of 5 min. The HCN generated was absorbed into an accepting NaOH solution using very simple glassware apparatus that was appropriate for the microwave oven cavity. After that, the cyanide concentration was determined within 90 s using a well-known spectrophotometric flow injection analysis system. Total cyanide analysis required 15 min irradiation time (90 W power), as well as chemical conditions such as the presence of EDTA-acetate buffer solution or ascorbic acid, depending on the effluent to be analyzed (petroleum refinery or electroplating effluents, respectively). The detection limit was 0.018 mg CN l(-1) (quantification limit of 0.05 mg CN l(-1)), and the measured RSD was better than 8% for ten independent analyses of effluent samples (1.4 mg l(-1) cyanide). The accuracy of the procedure was assessed via analyte spiking (with free and complex cyanides) and by performing an independent sample analysis based on the standard methodology recommended by the APHA for comparison. The sample preparation procedure takes only 10 min for free and 20 min for total cyanide, making this procedure much faster than traditional methodologies (conventional heating and distillation), which are time-consuming (they require at least 1 h). Samples from oil (sour and stripping tower bottom waters) and electroplating effluents were analyzed successfully. PMID:17143595

  12. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    A chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor system with a vertical deposition chamber was used for the growth of Si films on glass, glass-ceramic, and polycrystalline ceramic substrates. Silicon vapor was produced by pyrolysis of SiH4 in a H2 or He carrier gas. Preliminary deposition experiments with two of the available glasses were not encouraging. Moderately encouraging results, however, were obtained with fired polycrystalline alumina substrates, which were used for Si deposition at temperatures above 1,000 C. The surfaces of both the substrates and the films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, reflection electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy optical microscopy, and surface profilometric techniques. Several experiments were conducted to establish baseline performance data for the reactor system, including temperature distributions on the sample pedestal, effects of carrier gas flow rate on temperature and film thickness, and Si film growth rate as a function of temperature.

  13. Method and apparatus for transport, introduction, atomization and excitation of emission spectrum for quantitative analysis of high temperature gas sample streams containing vapor and particulates without degradation of sample stream temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Eckels, D.E.; Hass, W.J.

    1989-05-30

    A sample transport, sample introduction, and flame excitation system is described for spectrometric analysis of high temperature gas streams which eliminates degradation of the sample stream by condensation losses. 4 figs.

  14. Solid Phase Extraction of Inorganic Mercury Using 5-Phenylazo-8-hydroxyquinoline and Determination by Cold Vapor Atomic Fluorescence Spectroscopy in Natural Water Samples

    PubMed Central

    Daye, Mirna; Halwani, Jalal; Hamzeh, Mariam

    2013-01-01

    8-Hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) was chosen as a powerful ligand for Hg solid phase extraction. Among several chelating resins based on 8-HQ, 5-phenylazo-8-hydroxyquinoline (5Ph8HQ) is used for mercury extraction in which the adsorption dynamics were fully studied. It has been shown that Hg(II) is totally absorbed by 5Ph8HQ within the first 30 minutes of contact time with t1/2 5 minutes, following Langmuir adsorption model. At pH 4, the affinity of mercury is unchallenged by other metals except, for Cu(II), which have shown higher Kd value. With these latter characteristics, 5Ph8HQ was examined for the preconcentration of trace levels of Hg(II). The developed method showed quantitative recoveries of Hg(II) with LOD = 0.21 pg mL−1 and RSD = 3–6% using cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (CV-AFS) with a preconcentration factor greater than 250. PMID:24459417

  15. Portable vapor diffusion coefficient meter

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Clifford K.

    2007-06-12

    An apparatus for measuring the effective vapor diffusion coefficient of a test vapor diffusing through a sample of porous media contained within a test chamber. A chemical sensor measures the time-varying concentration of vapor that has diffused a known distance through the porous media. A data processor contained within the apparatus compares the measured sensor data with analytical predictions of the response curve based on the transient diffusion equation using Fick's Law, iterating on the choice of an effective vapor diffusion coefficient until the difference between the predicted and measured curves is minimized. Optionally, a purge fluid can forced through the porous media, permitting the apparatus to also measure a gas-phase permeability. The apparatus can be made lightweight, self-powered, and portable for use in the field.

  16. Sequential photocatalyst-assisted digestion and vapor generation device coupled with anion exchange chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for speciation analysis of selenium species in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yun-ni; Lin, Cheng-hsing; Hsu, I-hsiang; Sun, Yuh-chang

    2014-01-01

    We have developed an on-line sequential photocatalyst-assisted digestion and vaporization device (SPADVD), which operates through the nano-TiO2-catalyzed photo-oxidation and reduction of selenium (Se) species, for coupling between anion exchange chromatography (LC) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) systems to provide a simple and sensitive hyphenated method for the speciation analysis of Se species without the need for conventional chemical digestion and vaporization techniques. Because our proposed on-line SPADVD allows both organic and inorganic Se species in the column effluent to be converted on-line into volatile Se products, which are then measured directly through ICP-MS, the complexity of the procedure and the probability of contamination arising from the use of additional chemicals are both low. Under the optimized conditions for SPADVD - using 1g of nano-TiO2 per liter, at pH 3, and illuminating for 80 s - we found that Se(IV), Se(VI), and selenomethionine (SeMet) were all converted quantitatively into volatile Se products. In addition, because the digestion and vaporization efficiencies of all the tested selenicals were improved when using our proposed on-line LC/SPADVD/ICP-MS system, the detection limits for Se(IV), Se(VI), and SeMet were all in the nanogram-per-liter range (based on 3σ). A series of validation experiments - analysis of neat and spiked extracted samples - indicated that our proposed methods could be applied satisfactorily to the speciation analysis of organic and inorganic Se species in the extracts of Se-enriched supplements. PMID:24331052

  17. Identification of chemical warfare agents from vapor samples using a field-portable capillary gas chromatography/membrane-interfaced electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry instrument with Tri-Bed concentrator.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Hisayuki; Kondo, Tomohide; Nagoya, Tomoki; Ikeda, Toru; Kurimata, Naoko; Unoke, Shohei; Seto, Yasuo

    2015-08-01

    A field-portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (Hapsite ER system) was evaluated for the detection of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) in the vapor phase. The system consisted of Tri-Bed concentrator gas sampler (trapping time: 3s(-1)min), a nonpolar low thermal-mass capillary gas chromatography column capable of raising temperatures up to 200°C, a hydrophobic membrane-interfaced electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometer evacuated by a non-evaporative getter pump for data acquisition, and a personal computer for data analysis. Sample vapors containing as little as 22μg sarin (GB), 100μg soman (GD), 210μg tabun (GA), 55μg cyclohexylsarin (GF), 4.8μg sulfur mustard, 390μg nitrogen mustard 1, 140μg of nitrogen mustard 2, 130μg nitrogen mustard 3, 120μg of 2-chloroacetophenone and 990μg of chloropicrin per cubic meter could be confirmed after Tri-Bed micro-concentration (for 1min) and automated AMDIS search within 12min. Using manual deconvolution by background subtraction of neighboring regions on the extracted ion chromatograms, the above-mentioned CWAs could be confirmed at lower concentration levels. The memory effects were also examined and we found that blister agents showed significantly more carry-over than nerve agents. Gasoline vapor was found to interfere with the detection of GB and GD, raising the concentration limits for confirmation in the presence of gasoline by both AMDIS search and manual deconvolution; however, GA and GF were not subject to interference by gasoline. Lewisite 1, and o-chlorobenzylidene malononitrile could also be confirmed by gas chromatography, but it was hard to quantify them. Vapors of phosgene, chlorine, and cyanogen chloride could be confirmed by direct mass spectrometric detection at concentration levels higher than 2, 140, and 10mg/m(3) respectively, by bypassing the micro-concentration trap and gas chromatographic separation. PMID:26118803

  18. Method and Apparatus for Concentrating Vapors for Analysis

    DOEpatents

    Grate, Jay W.; Baldwin, David L.; Anheier, Jr., Norman C.

    2008-10-07

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for pre-concentrating gaseous vapors for analysis. The invention finds application in conjunction with, e.g., analytical instruments where low detection limits for gaseous vapors are desirable. Vapors sorbed and concentrated within the bed of the apparatus can be thermally desorbed achieving at least partial separation of vapor mixtures. The apparatus is suitable, e.g., for preconcentration and sample injection, and provides greater resolution of peaks for vapors within vapor mixtures, yielding detection levels that are 10-10,000 times better than for direct sampling and analysis systems. Features are particularly useful for continuous unattended monitoring applications.

  19. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOEpatents

    Davies, J.P.; Larson, R.A.; Goodrich, L.D.; Hall, H.J.; Stoddard, B.D.; Davis, S.G.; Kaser, T.G.; Conrad, F.J.

    1995-09-26

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet. 10 figs.

  20. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOEpatents

    Davies, John P.; Larson, Ronald A.; Goodrich, Lorenzo D.; Hall, Harold J.; Stoddard, Billy D.; Davis, Sean G.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Conrad, Frank J.

    1995-01-01

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet.

  1. Quantitative organic vapor-particle sampler

    DOEpatents

    Gundel, Lara; Daisey, Joan M.; Stevens, Robert K.

    1998-01-01

    A quantitative organic vapor-particle sampler for sampling semi-volatile organic gases and particulate components. A semi-volatile organic reversible gas sorbent macroreticular resin agglomerates of randomly packed microspheres with the continuous porous structure of particles ranging in size between 0.05-10 .mu.m for use in an integrated diffusion vapor-particle sampler.

  2. Assessment of the Halogen Content of Brazilian Inhalable Particulate Matter (PM10) Using High Resolution Molecular Absorption Spectrometry and Electrothermal Vaporization Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry, with Direct Solid Sample Analysis.

    PubMed

    de Gois, Jefferson S; Almeida, Tarcisio S; Alves, Jeferson C; Araujo, Rennan G O; Borges, Daniel L G

    2016-03-15

    Halogens in the atmosphere play an important role in climate change and also represent a potential health hazard. However, quantification of halogens is not a trivial task, and methods that require minimum sample preparation are interesting alternatives. Hence, the aim of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of direct solid sample analysis using high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry (HR-CS MAS) for F determination and electrothermal vaporization-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS) for simultaneous Cl, Br, and I determination in airborne inhalable particulate matter (PM10) collected in the metropolitan area of Aracaju, Sergipe, Brazil. Analysis using HR-CS MAS was accomplished by monitoring the CaF molecule, which was generated at high temperatures in the graphite furnace after the addition of Ca. Analysis using ETV-ICP-MS was carried out using Ca as chemical modifier/aerosol carrier in order to avoid losses of Cl, Br, and I during the pyrolysis step, with concomitant use of Pd as a permanent modifier. The direct analysis approach resulted in LODs that were proven adequate for halogen determination in PM10, using either standard addition calibration or calibration against a certified reference material. The method allowed the quantification of the halogens in 14 PM10 samples collected in a northeastern coastal city in Brazil. The results demonstrated variations of halogen content according to meteorological conditions, particularly related to rainfall, humidity, and sunlight irradiation. PMID:26192198

  3. Vapor space characterization of waste Tank 241-BY-106 (in situ): Results from samples collected on 5/4/94 and 5/5/94

    SciTech Connect

    Clauss, T.W.; Ligotke, M.W.; Pool, K.H.; Lucke, R.B.; McVeety, B.D.; Sharma, A.K.; McCulloch, M.; Fruchter, J.S.; Goheen, S.C.

    1995-04-01

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from in situ samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-BY-106 (referred to as Tank BY-106). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds NH{sub 3}, NO{sub 2}, NO, HCN, and H{sub 2}O. Sampling for sulfur oxides was not requested. Organic compounds were also quantitatively determined. Twenty-three organic tentatively identified compounds (TICS) were observed above the detection limit of (ca.) 10 ppbv, but standards for most of these were not available at the time of analysis, and the reported concentrations are semiquantitative estimates. In addition, the authors looked for the 41 standard TO-14 analytes. Of these, only a few were observed above the 2-ppbv detection limit. The 10 organic analytes with the highest estimated concentrations are listed in Table 1. The 10 analytes account for approximately 64% of the total organic components in Tank BY-106. Tank BY-106 is on the Ferrocyanide Watch List.

  4. Synthesis and application of ion-imprinted polymer nanoparticles for the extraction and preconcentration of mercury in water and food samples employing cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Roushani, Mahmoud; Abbasi, Shahryar; Khani, Hossein

    2015-09-01

    We describe a nanosized Hg(II)-imprinted polymer that was prepared from methacrylic acid as functional monomer, ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate as cross-linker, 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as radical initiator, 2, 2'-di pyrydyl amine as a specific ligand, and Hg (II) as the template ions by precipitation polymerization method in methanol as the progeny solvent. Batch adsorption experiments were carried out as a function of pH, Hg (II) imprinted polymer amount, adsorption and desorption time, volume, and concentration of eluent. The synthesized polymer particles were characterized physically and morphologically by using infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopic techniques. The maximum adsorption capacity of the ion-imprinted and non-imprinted sorbent was 27.96 and 7.89 mg g(-1), respectively. Under optimal conditions, the detection limit for mercury was 0.01 μg L(-1) and the relative standard deviation was 3.2 % (n = 6) at the 1.00 μg L(-1). The procedure was applied to determination of mercury in fish and water samples with satisfactory results. PMID:26318321

  5. Colorometric detection of ethylene glycol vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helm, C.; Mosier, B.; Verostko, C. E.

    1970-01-01

    Very low concentrations of ethylene glycol in air or other gases are detected by passing a sample through a glass tube with three partitioned compartments containing reagents which successively convert the ethylene glycol vapor into a colored compound.

  6. Vapor spill pipe monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchini, G. M.; McRae, T. G.

    1983-06-01

    The invention is a method and apparatus for continually monitoring the composition of liquefied natural gas flowing from a spill pipe during a spill test by continually removing a sample of the LNG by means of a probe, gasifying the LNG in the probe, and sending the vaporized LNG to a remote IR gas detector for analysis. The probe comprises three spaced concentric tubes surrounded by a water jacket which communicates with a flow channel defined between the inner and middle, and middle and outer tubes. The inner tube is connected to a pump for providing suction, and the probe is positioned in the LNG flow below the spill pipe with the tip oriented partly downward so that LNG is continuously drawn into the inner tube through a small orifice. The probe is made of a high thermal conductivity metal. Hot water is flowed through the water jacket and through the flow channel between the three tubes to provide the necessary heat transfer to flash vaporize the LNG passing through the inner channel of the probe. The gasified LNG is transported through a connected hose or tubing extending from the probe to a remote IR sensor which measures the gas composition.

  7. Vapor spill pipe monitor

    DOEpatents

    Bianchini, G.M.; McRae, T.G.

    1983-06-23

    The invention is a method and apparatus for continually monitoring the composition of liquefied natural gas flowing from a spill pipe during a spill test by continually removing a sample of the LNG by means of a probe, gasifying the LNG in the probe, and sending the vaporized LNG to a remote ir gas detector for analysis. The probe comprises three spaced concentric tubes surrounded by a water jacket which communicates with a flow channel defined between the inner and middle, and middle and outer tubes. The inner tube is connected to a pump for providing suction, and the probe is positioned in the LNG flow below the spill pipe with the tip oriented partly downward so that LNG is continuously drawn into the inner tube through a small orifice. The probe is made of a high thermal conductivity metal. Hot water is flowed through the water jacket and through the flow channel between the three tubes to provide the necessary heat transfer to flash vaporize the LNG passing through the inner channel of the probe. The gasified LNG is transported through a connected hose or tubing extending from the probe to a remote ir sensor which measures the gas composition.

  8. Biofiltration of methanol vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Shareefdeen, Z.; Baltzis, B.C. ); Oh, Youngsook; Bartha, R. )

    1993-03-05

    Biofiltration of solvent and fuel vapors may offer a cost-effective way to comply with increasingly strict air emission standards. An important step in the development of this technology is to derive and validate mathematical models of the biofiltration process for predictive and scaleup calculations. For the study of methanol vapor biofiltration, an 8-membered bacterial consortium was obtained from methanol-exposed soil. The bacteria were immobilized on solid support and packed into a 5-cm diameter, 60-cm-high column provided with appropriate flowmeters and sampling ports. The solid support was prepared by mixing two volumes of peat with three volumes of perlite particles. Two series of experiments were performed. In the first, the inlet methanol concentration was kept constant while the superficial air velocity was varied from run to run. In the second series, the air flow rate (velocity) was kept constant while the inlet methanol concentration was varied. The unit proved effective in removing methanol at rates up to 112.8 g h[sup [minus]1] m[sup [minus]3] packing. A mathematical model has been derived and validated. The model described and predicted experimental results closely. Both experimental data and model predictions suggest that the methanol biofiltration process was limited by oxygen diffusion and methanol degradation kinetics.

  9. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method for the growth of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials is investigated. The objective is to develop CVD techniques for producing large areas of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials, with sheet properties suitable for fabricating solar cells meeting the technical goals of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Specific areas covered include: (1) modification and test of existing CVD reactor system; (2) identification and/or development of suitable inexpensive substrate materials; (3) experimental investigation of CVD process parameters using various candidate substrate materials; (4) preparation of Si sheet samples for various special studies, including solar cell fabrication; (5) evaluation of the properties of the Si sheet material produced by the CVD process; and (6) fabrication and evaluation of experimental solar cell structures, using standard and near-standard processing techniques.

  10. Vapor phase pyrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steurer, Wolfgang

    1992-01-01

    The vapor phase pyrolysis process is designed exclusively for the lunar production of oxygen. In this concept, granulated raw material (soil) that consists almost entirely of metal oxides is vaporized and the vapor is raised to a temperature where it dissociates into suboxides and free oxygen. Rapid cooling of the dissociated vapor to a discrete temperature causes condensation of the suboxides, while the oxygen remains essentially intact and can be collected downstream. The gas flow path and flow rate are maintained at an optimum level by control of the pressure differential between the vaporization region and the oxygen collection system with the aid of the environmental vacuum.

  11. A Simple Experiment for Determining Vapor Pressure and Enthalpy of Vaporization of Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levinson, Gerald S.

    1982-01-01

    Laboratory procedures, calculations, and sample results are described for a freshman chemistry experiment in which the Clausius-Clapeyron equation is introduced as a means of describing the variation of vapor pressure with temperature and for determining enthalpy of vaporization. (Author/SK)

  12. Waste Tank Vapor Project: Tank vapor database development

    SciTech Connect

    Seesing, P.R.; Birn, M.B.; Manke, K.L.

    1994-09-01

    The objective of the Tank Vapor Database (TVD) Development task in FY 1994 was to create a database to store, retrieve, and analyze data collected from the vapor phase of Hanford waste tanks. The data needed to be accessible over the Hanford Local Area Network to users at both Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The data were restricted to results published in cleared reports from the laboratories analyzing vapor samples. Emphasis was placed on ease of access and flexibility of data formatting and reporting mechanisms. Because of time and budget constraints, a Rapid Application Development strategy was adopted by the database development team. An extensive data modeling exercise was conducted to determine the scope of information contained in the database. a A SUN Sparcstation 1000 was procured as the database file server. A multi-user relational database management system, Sybase{reg_sign}, was chosen to provide the basic data storage and retrieval capabilities. Two packages were chosen for the user interface to the database: DataPrism{reg_sign} and Business Objects{trademark}. A prototype database was constructed to provide the Waste Tank Vapor Project`s Toxicology task with summarized and detailed information presented at Vapor Conference 4 by WHC, PNL, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Oregon Graduate Institute. The prototype was used to develop a list of reported compounds, and the range of values for compounds reported by the analytical laboratories using different sample containers and analysis methodologies. The prototype allowed a panel of toxicology experts to identify carcinogens and compounds whose concentrations were within the reach of regulatory limits. The database and user documentation was made available for general access in September 1994.

  13. Optical monitor for water vapor concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Kebabian, Paul

    1998-01-01

    A system for measuring and monitoring water vapor concentration in a sample uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to a water vapor absorption line. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split by a magnetic field parallel to the direction of light propagation from the lamp into sets of components of downshifted and upshifted frequencies of approximately 1575 Gauss. The downshifted components are centered on a water vapor absorption line and are thus readily absorbed by water vapor in the sample; the upshifted components are moved away from that absorption line and are minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the upshifted components or downshifted components and passes the selected components to the sample. After transmission through the sample, the transmitted intensity of a component of the argon line varies as a result of absorption by the water vapor. The system then determines the concentration of water vapor in the sample based on differences in the transmitted intensity between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments alternate selection of sets of components is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to the emitting plasma.

  14. Optical monitor for water vapor concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Kebabian, P.

    1998-06-02

    A system for measuring and monitoring water vapor concentration in a sample uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to a water vapor absorption line. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split by a magnetic field parallel to the direction of light propagation from the lamp into sets of components of downshifted and upshifted frequencies of approximately 1575 Gauss. The downshifted components are centered on a water vapor absorption line and are thus readily absorbed by water vapor in the sample; the upshifted components are moved away from that absorption line and are minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the upshifted components or downshifted components and passes the selected components to the sample. After transmission through the sample, the transmitted intensity of a component of the argon line varies as a result of absorption by the water vapor. The system then determines the concentration of water vapor in the sample based on differences in the transmitted intensity between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments alternate selection of sets of components is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to the emitting plasma. 5 figs.

  15. Electrothermal vaporization, part 1: gas phase chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majidi, Vahid; Xu, Ning; Smith, Robert G.

    2000-01-01

    This manuscript is the first of a two-part publication on evaluation of vaporization and atomization processes in electrothermal vaporizers (ETV). Part 1 is specifically focused on gas phase (and heterogeneous) chemistry in ETVs. Molecular absorption spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (in conjunction with gas-phase mass spectrometry) are used to investigate the vaporization of Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Co and Ni (chloride and nitrate salts). Graphite, Pt, and Ta were used as substrate material for vaporizers to elucidate some observations of gas-phase chemistry. The experiments in Part I and II of this series are intentionally performed using wall vaporization to closely mimic the conditions used when ETV is employed as a sample introduction device.

  16. Dynamic headspace generation and quantitation of triacetone triperoxide vapor.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Braden C; Lubrano, Adam L; Field, Christopher R; Collins, Greg E

    2014-02-28

    Two methods for quantitation of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) vapor using a programmable temperature vaporization (PTV) inlet coupled to a gas chromatography/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) have been demonstrated. The dynamic headspace of bulk TATP was mixed with clean humid air to produce a TATP vapor stream. Sampling via a heated transfer line to a PTV inlet with a Tenax-TA™ filled liner allowed for direct injection of the vapor stream to a GC/MS for vapor quantitation. TATP was extracted from the vapor stream and subsequently desorbed from the PTV liner for splitless injection on the GC column. Calibration curves were prepared using solution standards with a standard split/splitless GC inlet for quantitation of the TATP vapor. Alternatively, vapor was sampled onto a Tenax-TA™ sample tube and placed into a thermal desorption system. In this instance, vapor was desorbed from the tube and subsequently trapped on a liquid nitrogen cooled PTV inlet. Calibration curves for this method were prepared from direct liquid injection of standards onto samples tube with the caveat that a vacuum is applied to the tube during deposition to ensure that the volatile TATP penetrates into the tube. Vapor concentration measurements, as determined by either GC/MS analysis or mass gravimetry of the bulk TATP, were statistically indistinguishable. Different approaches to broaden the TATP vapor dynamic range, including diluent air flow, sample chamber temperature, sample vial orifice size, and sample size are discussed. Vapor concentrations between 50 and 5400ngL(-1) are reported, with stable vapor generation observed for as long as 60 consecutive hours. PMID:24508355

  17. Explosive vapor detection payload for small robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stimac, Phil J.; Pettit, Michael; Wetzel, John P.; Haas, John W.

    2013-05-01

    Detection of explosive hazards is a critical component of enabling and improving operational mobility and protection of US Forces. The Autonomous Mine Detection System (AMDS) developed by the US Army RDECOM CERDEC Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) is addressing this challenge for dismounted soldiers. Under the AMDS program, ARA has developed a vapor sampling system that enhances the detection of explosive residues using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) sensors. The Explosives Hazard Trace Detection (EHTD) payload is designed for plug-and-play installation and operation on small robotic platforms, addressing critical Army needs for more safely detecting concealed or exposed explosives in areas such as culverts, walls and vehicles. In this paper, we describe the development, robotic integration and performance of the explosive vapor sampling system, which consists of a sampling "head," a vapor transport tube and an extendable "boom." The sampling head and transport tube are integrated with the boom, allowing samples to be collected from targeted surfaces up to 7-ft away from the robotic platform. During sample collection, an IR lamp in the sampling head is used to heat a suspected object/surface and the vapors are drawn through the heated vapor transport tube to an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for detection. The EHTD payload is capable of quickly (less than 30 seconds) detecting explosives such as TNT, PETN, and RDX at nanogram levels on common surfaces (brick, concrete, wood, glass, etc.).

  18. Automated Test Systems for Toxic Vapor Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattson, C. B.; Hammond, T. A.; Schwindt, C. J.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Toxic Vapor Detection Laboratory (TVDL) at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, has been using Personal Computer based Data Acquisition and Control Systems (PCDAS) for about nine years. These systems control the generation of toxic vapors of known concentrations under controlled conditions of temperature and humidity. The PCDAS also logs the test conditions and the test article responses in data files for analysis by standard spreadsheets or custom programs. The PCDAS was originally developed to perform standardized qualification and acceptance tests in a search for a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) toxic vapor detector to replace the hydrazine detectors for the Space Shuttle launch pad. It has since become standard test equipment for the TVDL and is indispensable in producing calibration standards for the new hydrazine monitors at the 10 part per billion (ppb) level. The standard TVDL PCDAS can control two toxic vapor generators (TVG's) with three channels each and two flow/temperature/humidity (FIFH) controllers and it can record data from up to six toxic vapor detectors (TVD's) under test and can deliver flows from 5 to 50 liters per minute (L/m) at temperatures from near zero to 50 degrees Celsius (C) using an environmental chamber to maintain the sample temperature. The concentration range for toxic vapors depends on the permeation source installed in the TVG. The PCDAS can provide closed loop control of temperature and humidity to two sample vessels, typically one for zero gas and one for the standard gas. This is required at very low toxic vapor concentrations to minimize the time required to passivate the sample delivery system. Recently, there have been several requests for information about the PCDAS by other laboratories with similar needs, both on and off KSC. The purpose of this paper is to inform the toxic vapor detection community of the current status and planned upgrades to the automated testing of toxic vapor detectors at the Kennedy

  19. Automated Test Systems for Toxic Vapor Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattson, C. B.; Hammond, T. A.; Schwindt, C. J.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Toxic Vapor Detection Laboratory (TVDL) at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, has been using Personal Computer based Data Acquisition and Control Systems (PCDAS) for about nine years. These systems control the generation of toxic vapors of known concentrations under controlled conditions of temperature and humidity. The PCDAS also logs the test conditions and the test article responses in data files for analysis by standard spreadsheets or custom programs. The PCDAS was originally developed to perform standardized qualification and acceptance tests in a search for a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) toxic vapor detector to replace the hydrazine detectors for the Space Shuttle launch pad. It has since become standard test equipment for the TVDL and is indispensable in producing calibration standards for the new hydrazine monitors at the 10 part per billion (ppb) level. The standard TVDL PCDAS can control two toxic vapor generators (TVG's) with three channels each and two flow/ temperature / humidity (FTH) controllers and it can record data from up to six toxic vapor detectors (TVD's) under test and can deliver flows from 5 to 50 liters per minute (L/m) at temperatures from near zero to 50 degrees Celsius (C) using an environmental chamber to maintain the sample temperature. The concentration range for toxic vapors depends on the permeation source installed in the TVG. The PCDAS can provide closed loop control of temperature and humidity to two sample vessels, typically one for zero gas and one for the standard gas. This is required at very low toxic vapor concentrations to minimize the time required to passivate the sample delivery system. Recently, there have been several requests for information about the PCDAS by other laboratories with similar needs, both on and off KSC. The purpose of this paper is to inform the toxic vapor detection community of the current status and planned upgrades to the automated testing of toxic vapor detectors at the

  20. Supplemental fuel vapor system

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, P.M.

    1991-01-08

    This patent describes a supplemental fuel system utilizing fuel vapor. It comprises: an internal combustion engine including a carburetor and an intake manifold; a fuel tank provided with air vents; a fuel conduit having a first end connected to the fuel tank and in communication with liquid fuel in the tank and a second end connected to the carburetor; the fuel conduit delivering the liquid fuel to the carburetor from the fuel tank; a fuel vapor conduit having a first end connected to the fuel tank at a location displaced from contact with the liquid fuel and a second end connected to a carbon canister; a PCV conduit having a first end connected to a pollution control valve and a second end connected to the intake manifold; and, an intermediate fuel vapor conduit having a first end connected to the fuel vapor conduit and a second end connected to the PCV conduit; wherein the air vents continuously provide air to the tank to mix with the liquid fuel and form fuel vapor. The fuel vapor drawn from the fuel tank by vacuum developed in the intake manifold and flows through the fuel vapor conduit. The intermediate fuel vapor conduit and the intake manifold to combustion chambers of the internal combustion engine so as to supplement fuel delivered to the engine by the fuel conduit. The liquid fuel and the fuel vapor constantly delivered to the engine during normal operation.

  1. HANFORD CHEMICAL VAPORS WORKER CONCERNS & EXPOSURE EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect

    ANDERSON, T.J.

    2006-12-20

    Chemical vapor emissions from underground hazardous waste storage tanks on the Hanford site in eastern Washington State are a potential concern because workers enter the tank farms on a regular basis for waste retrievals, equipment maintenance, and surveillance. Tank farm contractors are in the process of retrieving all remaining waste from aging single-shell tanks, some of which date to World War II, and transferring it to newer double-shell tanks. During the waste retrieval process, tank farm workers are potentially exposed to fugitive chemical vapors that can escape from tank headspaces and other emission points. The tanks are known to hold more than 1,500 different species of chemicals, in addition to radionuclides. Exposure assessments have fully characterized the hazards from chemical vapors in half of the tank farms. Extensive sampling and analysis has been done to characterize the chemical properties of hazardous waste and to evaluate potential health hazards of vapors at the ground surface, where workers perform maintenance and waste transfer activities. Worker concerns. risk communication, and exposure assessment are discussed, including evaluation of the potential hazards of complex mixtures of chemical vapors. Concentrations of vapors above occupational exposure limits-(OEL) were detected only at exhaust stacks and passive breather filter outlets. Beyond five feet from the sources, vapors disperse rapidly. No vapors have been measured above 50% of their OELs more than five feet from the source. Vapor controls are focused on limited hazard zones around sources. Further evaluations of vapors include analysis of routes of exposure and thorough analysis of nuisance odors.

  2. Petroleum Vapor - Field Technical

    EPA Science Inventory

    The screening approach being developed by EPA OUST to evaluate petroleum vapor intrusion (PVI) requires information that has not be routinely collected in the past at vapor intrusion sites. What is the best way to collect this data? What are the relevant data quality issues and ...

  3. Water vapor pressure calculation.

    PubMed

    Hall, J R; Brouillard, R G

    1985-06-01

    Accurate calculation of water vapor pressure for systems saturated with water vapor can be performed using the Goff-Gratch equation. A form of the equation that can be adapted for computer programming and for use in electronic databases is provided. PMID:4008425

  4. Active Hydrazine Vapor Sampler (AHVS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Rebecca C.; Mcbrearty, Charles F.; Curran, Daniel J.

    1993-01-01

    The Active Hydrazine Vapor Sampler (AHVS) was developed to detect vapors of hydrazine (HZ) and monomethylhydrazine (MMH) in air at parts-per-billion (ppb) concentration levels. The sampler consists of a commercial personal pump that draws ambient air through paper tape treated with vanillin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde). The paper tape is sandwiched in a thin cardboard housing inserted in one of the two specially designed holders to facilitate sampling. Contaminated air reacts with vanillin to develop a yellow color. The density of the color is proportional to the concentration of HZ or MMH. The AHVS can detect 10 ppb in less than 5 minutes. The sampler is easy to use, low cost, and intrinsically safe and contains no toxic material. It is most beneficial for use in locations with no laboratory capabilities for instrumentation calibration. This paper reviews the development, laboratory test, and field test of the device.

  5. Advancing Explosives Detection Capabilities: Vapor Detection

    ScienceCinema

    Atkinson, David

    2014-07-24

    A new, PNNL-developed method provides direct, real-time detection of trace amounts of explosives such as RDX, PETN and C-4. The method selectively ionizes a sample before passing the sample through a mass spectrometer to detect explosive vapors. The method could be used at airports to improve aviation security.

  6. Advancing Explosives Detection Capabilities: Vapor Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, David

    2012-10-15

    A new, PNNL-developed method provides direct, real-time detection of trace amounts of explosives such as RDX, PETN and C-4. The method selectively ionizes a sample before passing the sample through a mass spectrometer to detect explosive vapors. The method could be used at airports to improve aviation security.

  7. Stratospheric water vapor feedback

    PubMed Central

    Dessler, A. E.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Wang, T.; Davis, S. M.; Rosenlof, K. H.

    2013-01-01

    We show here that stratospheric water vapor variations play an important role in the evolution of our climate. This comes from analysis of observations showing that stratospheric water vapor increases with tropospheric temperature, implying the existence of a stratospheric water vapor feedback. We estimate the strength of this feedback in a chemistry–climate model to be +0.3 W/(m2⋅K), which would be a significant contributor to the overall climate sensitivity. One-third of this feedback comes from increases in water vapor entering the stratosphere through the tropical tropopause layer, with the rest coming from increases in water vapor entering through the extratropical tropopause. PMID:24082126

  8. Stratospheric water vapor feedback.

    PubMed

    Dessler, A E; Schoeberl, M R; Wang, T; Davis, S M; Rosenlof, K H

    2013-11-01

    We show here that stratospheric water vapor variations play an important role in the evolution of our climate. This comes from analysis of observations showing that stratospheric water vapor increases with tropospheric temperature, implying the existence of a stratospheric water vapor feedback. We estimate the strength of this feedback in a chemistry-climate model to be +0.3 W/(m(2)⋅K), which would be a significant contributor to the overall climate sensitivity. One-third of this feedback comes from increases in water vapor entering the stratosphere through the tropical tropopause layer, with the rest coming from increases in water vapor entering through the extratropical tropopause. PMID:24082126

  9. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Campbell, A. G.; Johnson, R. E.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Shaw, G. L.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The objective was to investigate and develop chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques for the growth of large areas of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials, with resulting sheet properties suitable for fabricating solar cells that would meet the technical goals of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. The program involved six main technical tasks: (1) modification and test of an existing vertical-chamber CVD reactor system; (2) identification and/or development of suitable inexpensive substrate materials; (3) experimental investigation of CVD process parameters using various candidate substrate materials; (4) preparation of Si sheet samples for various special studies, including solar cell fabrication; (5) evaluation of the properties of the Si sheet material produced by the CVD process; and (6) fabrication and evaluation of experimental solar cell structures, using impurity diffusion and other standard and near-standard processing techniques supplemented late in the program by the in situ CVD growth of n(+)/p/p(+) sheet structures subsequently processed into experimental cells.

  10. A novel capillary microextraction on ordered mesoporous titania coating combined with electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the determination of V, Cr and Cu in environmental and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yiwei; Hu, Bin; Hu, Wenling; Jiang, Zucheng; Li, Boyangzi

    2007-04-01

    In this work, an ordered mesoporous titania film was introduced to coat a capillary by means of sol-gel technique. Sol-gel titania coating was developed for the preconcentration/separation of trace V, Cr and Cu by capillary microextraction (CME), and the adsorbed analytes were eluted for electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS) detection. By immobilizing sol-gel titania on the inner surface of a fused-silica microextraction capillary, the sol-gel titania coating was prepared easily. Its adsorption properties, stability and the factors affecting the adsorption behaviors of V, Cr and Cu were investigated in detail. At pH range of 7 to 9, the titania-coated capillary (50 cm x 0.25 mm) is selective towards V, Cr and Cu, and the target analytes could be desorbed quantitatively with 50 microl of 1.0 mol l(-1) HNO3 at the rate of 0.05 ml min(-1). With a consumption of 2 ml sample solution, an enrichment factor of 33.3, and a detection limit (3 s) of 1.1 pg ml(-1) (10.5 fg) for V; 3.3 pg ml(-1) (33.0 fg) for Cr and 6.3 pg ml(-1) (63.1 fg) for Cu respectively were obtained. The precisions Relative Standard Deviations (RSDs) for nine replicate measurements of 1 ng ml(-1) V, Cr and Cu were 3.4, 5.1 and 6.4%, respectively. The proposed method has been applied to the determination of V, Cr and Cu in human urine and lake water, and the recoveries for these elements were 89.2 approximately 105%. The developed method was also applied to the determination of the target elements in NIES No. 10-a (rice flour-unpolished) and NIES No. 9 (sargasso) certified reference materials, and the results found are in good agreement with the certified values. PMID:17256811

  11. Vacuum vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poorman, Richard M. (Inventor); Weeks, Jack L. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for vapor deposition of a thin metallic film utilizing an ionized gas arc directed onto a source material spaced from a substrate to be coated in a substantial vacuum while providing a pressure differential between the source and the substrate so that, as a portion of the source is vaporized, the vapors are carried to the substrate. The apparatus includes a modified tungsten arc welding torch having a hollow electrode through which a gas, preferably inert, flows and an arc is struck between the electrode and the source. The torch, source, and substrate are confined within a chamber within which a vacuum is drawn. When the arc is struck, a portion of the source is vaporized and the vapors flow rapidly toward the substrate. A reflecting shield is positioned about the torch above the electrode and the source to ensure that the arc is struck between the electrode and the source at startup. The electrode and the source may be confined within a vapor guide housing having a duct opening toward the substrate for directing the vapors onto the substrate.

  12. Vapor resistant arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaubach, Robert M. (Inventor); Dussinger, Peter M. (Inventor); Buchko, Matthew T. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A vapor block resistant liquid artery structure for heat pipes. A solid tube artery with openings is encased in the sintered material of a heat pipe wick. The openings are limited to that side of the artery which is most remote from the heat source. The liquid in the artery can thus exit the artery through the openings and wet the sintered sheath, but vapor generated at the heat source is unlikely to move around the solid wall of the artery and reverse its direction in order to penetrate the artery through the openings. An alternate embodiment uses finer pore size wick material to resist vapor entry.

  13. Method and apparatus for concentrating vapors for analysis

    DOEpatents

    Grate, Jay W.; Baldwin, David L.; Anheier, Jr., Norman C.

    2012-06-05

    A pre-concentration device and a method are disclosed for concentrating gaseous vapors for analysis. Vapors sorbed and concentrated within the bed of the pre-concentration device are thermally desorbed, achieving at least partial separation of the vapor mixtures. The pre-concentration device is suitable, e.g., for pre-concentration and sample injection, and provides greater resolution of peaks for vapors within vapor mixtures, yielding detection levels that are 10-10,000 times better than direct sampling and analysis systems. Features are particularly useful for continuous unattended monitoring applications. The invention finds application in conjunction with, e.g., analytical instruments where low detection limits for gaseous vapors are desirable.

  14. AMTEC vapor-vapor series connected cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, Mark L. (Inventor); Williams, Roger M. (Inventor); Ryan, Margaret A. (Inventor); Nakamura, Barbara J. (Inventor); Oconnor, Dennis E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An alkali metal thermoelectric converter (AMTEC) having a plurality of cells structurally connected in series to form a septum dividing a plenum into two chambers, and electrically connected in series, is provided with porous metal anodes and porous metal cathodes in the cells. The cells may be planar or annular, and in either case a metal alkali vapor at a high temperature is provided to the plenum through one chamber on one side of the wall and returned to a vapor boiler after condensation at a chamber on the other side of the wall in the plenum. If the cells are annular, a heating core may be placed along the axis of the stacked cells. This arrangement of series-connected cells allows efficient generation of power at high voltage and low current.

  15. Method and apparatus for sampling atmospheric mercury

    DOEpatents

    Trujillo, Patricio E.; Campbell, Evan E.; Eutsler, Bernard C.

    1976-01-20

    A method of simultaneously sampling particulate mercury, organic mercurial vapors, and metallic mercury vapor in the working and occupational environment and determining the amount of mercury derived from each such source in the sampled air. A known volume of air is passed through a sampling tube containing a filter for particulate mercury collection, a first adsorber for the selective adsorption of organic mercurial vapors, and a second adsorber for the adsorption of metallic mercury vapor. Carbon black molecular sieves are particularly useful as the selective adsorber for organic mercurial vapors. The amount of mercury adsorbed or collected in each section of the sampling tube is readily quantitatively determined by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

  16. Continuous Determination of High-Vapor Phase Concentrations of Tetrachloroethylene Using On-Line Mass Spectrometry

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method was developed to determine the vapor concentration of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) at and below its equilibrium vapor phase concentration, 168,000 μg/L (25°C). Vapor samples were drawn by vacuum into a six-port sampling valve and injected through a jet separator into an io...

  17. Waste Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Annual status report for FY 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Ligotke, M.W.; Fruchter, J.S.; Huckaby, J.L.; Birn, M.B.; McVeety, B.D.; Evans, J.C. Jr.; Pool, K.H.; Silvers, K.L.; Goheen, S.C.

    1995-11-01

    This report compiles information collected during the Fiscal Year 1995 pertaining to the waste tank vapor characterization project. Information covers the following topics: project management; organic sampling and analysis; inorganic sampling and analysis; waste tank vapor data reports; and the waste tanks vapor database.

  18. Second Vapor-Level Sensor For Vapor Degreaser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Painter, Nance M.; Burley, Richard K.

    1990-01-01

    Second vapor-level sensor installed at lower level in vapor degreaser makes possible to maintain top of vapor at that lower level. Evaporation reduced during idle periods. Provides substantial benefit, without major capital cost of building new vapor degreaser with greater freeboard height.

  19. Gasoline Vapor Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Gasoline is volatile and some of it evaporates during storage, giving off hydrocarbon vapor. Formerly, the vapor was vented into the atmosphere but anti-pollution regulations have precluded that practice in many localities, so oil companies and storage terminals are installing systems to recover hydrocarbon vapor. Recovery provides an energy conservation bonus in that most of the vapor can be reconverted to gasoline. Two such recovery systems are shown in the accompanying photographs (mid-photo at right and in the foreground below). They are actually two models of the same system, although.configured differently because they are customized to users' needs. They were developed and are being manufactured by Edwards Engineering Corporation, Pompton Plains, New Jersey. NASA technological information proved useful in development of the equipment.

  20. Quantitative Detection of Trace Explosive Vapors by Programmed Temperature Desorption Gas Chromatography-Electron Capture Detector

    PubMed Central

    Field, Christopher R.; Lubrano, Adam; Woytowitz, Morgan; Giordano, Braden C.; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan L.

    2014-01-01

    The direct liquid deposition of solution standards onto sorbent-filled thermal desorption tubes is used for the quantitative analysis of trace explosive vapor samples. The direct liquid deposition method yields a higher fidelity between the analysis of vapor samples and the analysis of solution standards than using separate injection methods for vapors and solutions, i.e., samples collected on vapor collection tubes and standards prepared in solution vials. Additionally, the method can account for instrumentation losses, which makes it ideal for minimizing variability and quantitative trace chemical detection. Gas chromatography with an electron capture detector is an instrumentation configuration sensitive to nitro-energetics, such as TNT and RDX, due to their relatively high electron affinity. However, vapor quantitation of these compounds is difficult without viable vapor standards. Thus, we eliminate the requirement for vapor standards by combining the sensitivity of the instrumentation with a direct liquid deposition protocol to analyze trace explosive vapor samples. PMID:25145416

  1. Raman spectroscopy of vapors at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laane, Jaan; Haller, Kristjan; Sakurai, Sachie; Morris, Kevin; Autrey, Daniel; Arp, Zane; Chiang, Whe-Yi; Combs, Amanda

    2003-05-01

    The most effective way to obtain high quality vapor-phase Raman spectra is to heat the samples to increase their vapor pressure. Many samples can be heated to 350 °C and higher without decomposition. We have designed a simple Raman cell to allow these high temperature studies to be carried out. The high-temperature Raman spectra of nine molecules will be presented and discussed. Most of these are non-rigid molecules containing aromatic rings for which vibrational potential energy surfaces have been determined from their spectra. Two molecules ( p-cresol and 3-methylindole) are model compounds for amino acids and their vapor-phase spectra are characteristic of environments with no hydrogen bonding.

  2. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Annual status report for FY 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Silvers, K.L.; Fruchter, J.S.; Huckaby, J.L.; Almeida, T.L.; Evans, J.C. Jr.; Pool, K.H.; Simonen, C.A.; Thornton, B.M.

    1997-01-01

    In Fiscal Year 1996, staff at the Vapor Analytical Laboratory at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performed work in support of characterizing the vapor composition of the headspaces of radioactive waste tanks at the Hanford Site. Work performed included support for technical issues and sampling methodologies, upgrades for analytical equipment, analytical method development, preparation of unexposed samples, analyses of tank headspaces samples, preparation of data reports, and operation of the tank vapor database. Progress made in FY 1996 included completion and issuance of 50 analytical data reports. A sampling system comparison study was initiated and completed during the fiscal year. The comparison study involved the vapor sampling system (VSS), a truck-based system, and the in situ vapor sampling system (ISVS), a cart-based system. Samples collected during the study were characterized for inorganic, permanent gases, total non-methane organic compounds and organic speciation by SUMMA{trademark} and TST methods. The study showed comparable sampling results between the systems resulting in the program switching from the VSS to the less expensive ISVS methodology in late May 1996. A temporal study was initiated in January 1996 in order to understand the influences seasonal temperatures changes have on the vapors in the headspace of Hanford waste tanks. A holding time study was initiated in the fourth quarter of FY 1996. Samples were collected from tank S-102 and rushed to the laboratory for time zero analysis. Additional samples will be analyzed at 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 32 weeks.

  3. Vapor characterization of Tank 241-C-103

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Story, M.S.

    1994-06-01

    The Westinghouse Hanford Company Tank Vapor Issue Resolution Program has developed, in cooperation with Northwest Instrument Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oregon Graduate Institute of Science and Technology, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratory, the equipment and expertise to characterize gases and vapors in the high-level radioactive waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site in south central Washington State. This capability has been demonstrated by the characterization of the tank 241-C-103 headspace. This tank headspace is the first, and for many reasons is expected to be the most problematic, that will be characterized (Osborne 1992). Results from the most recent and comprehensive sampling event, sample job 7B, are presented for the purpose of providing scientific bases for resolution of vapor issues associated with tank 241-C-103. This report is based on the work of Clauss et al. 1994, Jenkins et al. 1994, Ligotke et al. 1994, Mahon et al. 1994, and Rasmussen and Einfeld 1994. No attempt has been made in this report to evaluate the implications of the data presented, such as the potential impact of headspace gases and vapors to tank farm workers health. That and other issues will be addressed elsewhere. Key to the resolution of worker health issues is the quantitation of compounds of toxicological concern. The Toxicology Review Panel, a panel of Pacific Northwest Laboratory experts in various areas, of toxicology, has chosen 19 previously identified compounds as being of potential toxicological concern. During sample job 7B, the sampling and analytical methodology was validated for this preliminary list of compounds of toxicological concern. Validation was performed according to guidance provided by the Tank Vapor Conference Committee, a group of analytical chemists from academic institutions and national laboratories assembled and commissioned by the Tank Vapor Issue Resolution Program.

  4. A smart sensor system for trace organic vapor detection using a temperature-controlled array of surface acoustic wave vapor sensors, automated preconcentrator tubes, and pattern recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, J.W.; Rose-Pehrsson, S.L.; Klusty, M.; Wohltjen, H.

    1993-05-01

    A smart sensor system for the detection, of toxic organophosphorus and toxic organosulfur vapors at trace concentrations has been designed, fabricated, and tested against a wide variety of vapor challenges. The key features of the system are: An array of four surface acoustic wave (SAW) vapor sensors, temperature control of the vapor sensors, the use of pattern recognition to analyze the sensor data, and an automated sampling system including thermally-desorbed preconcentrator tubes (PCTs).

  5. Vapor core propulsion reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaz, Nils J.

    1991-01-01

    Many research issues were addressed. For example, it became obvious that uranium tetrafluoride (UF4) is a most preferred fuel over uranium hexafluoride (UF6). UF4 has a very attractive vaporization point (1 atm at 1800 K). Materials compatible with UF4 were looked at, like tungsten, molybdenum, rhenium, carbon. It was found that in the molten state, UF4 and uranium attacked most everything, but in the vapor state they are not that bad. Compatible materials were identified for both the liquid and vapor states. A series of analyses were established to determine how the cavity should be designed. A series of experiments were performed to determine the properties of the fluid, including enhancement of the electrical conductivity of the system. CFD's and experimental programs are available that deal with most of the major issues.

  6. Electrolyte vapor condenser

    DOEpatents

    Sederquist, Richard A.; Szydlowski, Donald F.; Sawyer, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    A system is disclosed for removing electrolyte from a fuel cell gas stream. The gas stream containing electrolyte vapor is supercooled utilizing conventional heat exchangers and the thus supercooled gas stream is passed over high surface area passive condensers. The condensed electrolyte is then drained from the condenser and the remainder of the gas stream passed on. The system is particularly useful for electrolytes such as phosphoric acid and molten carbonate, but can be used for other electrolyte cells and simple vapor separation as well.

  7. Electrolyte vapor condenser

    DOEpatents

    Sederquist, R.A.; Szydlowski, D.F.; Sawyer, R.D.

    1983-02-08

    A system is disclosed for removing electrolyte from a fuel cell gas stream. The gas stream containing electrolyte vapor is supercooled utilizing conventional heat exchangers and the thus supercooled gas stream is passed over high surface area passive condensers. The condensed electrolyte is then drained from the condenser and the remainder of the gas stream passed on. The system is particularly useful for electrolytes such as phosphoric acid and molten carbonate, but can be used for other electrolyte cells and simple vapor separation as well. 3 figs.

  8. Shock melting and vaporization of metals.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, T. J.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of initial porosity on shock induction of melting and vaporization is investigated for Ba, Sr, Li, Fe, Al, U, and Th. For the less compressible of these metals, it is found that for a given strong shock-generation system (explosive in contact, or flyer-plate impact) an optimum initial specific volume exists such that the total entropy production, and hence the amount of metal liquid or vapor, is a maximum. Initial volumes from 1.4 to 2.0 times crystal volumes, depending on the metal sample and shock-inducing system, will result in optimum post-shock entropies.

  9. Calibration of an explosives vapor generator based on vapor diffusion from a condensed phase

    SciTech Connect

    Parmeter, J.E.; Rhykerd, L. Jr.; Conrad, F.J.; Tiano, G.S.; Preston, D.; Eiceman, G.A.; Arnold, J.T.

    1995-12-31

    Development of a vapor generator for consistently producing accurate amounts of vapor from low vapor pressure explosive materials is a pressing need within the explosives detection community. Of particular importance for reproducibility and widespread acceptance of results is the correlation of such a vapor generator to a National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) mass standard. This paper describes an explosives vapor generator recently developed at Varian in which a solid explosive sample in a precision bore glass tube is put in an oven at constant temperature, and vapor diff-using from the top of the tube is entrained in a carrier gas flow. The rate of vapor output is thus dependent on both the equilibrium vapor pressure of the solid at oven temperature and the rate of diffusion up the length of the tube. Correlation to a NIST mass standard is achieved by periodic weighing of the sample tube on a microbalance. We report results obtained with the explosives TNT and RDX. Results for TNT show that the mass output rate is constant over hundreds of hours of continuous use, with outputs of {approximately} 10--2000 pg/sec for oven temperatures in the range of 60--120{degrees}C. Both the mass loss experiments and calibration with an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) give a TNT mass output value of 85 pg/sec at 79{degrees}C, and this result is supported by transport theory calculations. Mass loss curves for RDX are also linear with time, and show the expected exponential increase of mass output with oven temperature.

  10. BTSC VAPOR INSTRUSION PRIMER "VAPOR INTRUSION CONSIDERATION FOR REDEVELOPMENT"

    EPA Science Inventory

    This primer is designed for brownfields stakeholders concerned about vapor intrusion, including property owners, real estate developers, and contractors performing environmental site investigations. It provides an overview of the vapor intrusion issue and how it can impact the ap...

  11. Vaporization characteristics of carbon heat shields under radiative heating.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davy, W. C.; Bar-Nun, A.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the vaporization characteristics of samples of ATJ graphite, a material that has been considered for use on a Jovian probe. These samples were subjected to radiative heating loads of approximately 2 kW/sq cm in argon atmospheres of pressures from 0.00046 to 1 atm. Surface temperatures, mass loss rates, and spatially resolved emission spectral data were recorded. These data are analyzed to determine carbon vapor pressure as a function of temperature and are compared with current models for the vapor pressure of carbon. The effects of finite vaporization (i.e., nonequilibrium) rates are considered and compared with experiment. Estimates of the heat of vaporization from an energy balance are also presented.

  12. Passive Vaporizing Heat Sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowles, TImothy R.; Ashford, Victor A.; Carpenter, Michael G.; Bier, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    A passive vaporizing heat sink has been developed as a relatively lightweight, compact alternative to related prior heat sinks based, variously, on evaporation of sprayed liquids or on sublimation of solids. This heat sink is designed for short-term dissipation of a large amount of heat and was originally intended for use in regulating the temperature of spacecraft equipment during launch or re-entry. It could also be useful in a terrestrial setting in which there is a requirement for a lightweight, compact means of short-term cooling. This heat sink includes a hermetic package closed with a pressure-relief valve and containing an expendable and rechargeable coolant liquid (e.g., water) and a conductive carbon-fiber wick. The vapor of the liquid escapes when the temperature exceeds the boiling point corresponding to the vapor pressure determined by the setting of the pressure-relief valve. The great advantage of this heat sink over a melting-paraffin or similar phase-change heat sink of equal capacity is that by virtue of the =10x greater latent heat of vaporization, a coolant-liquid volume equal to =1/10 of the paraffin volume can suffice.

  13. Water vapor lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellingson, R.; Mcilrath, T.; Schwemmer, G.; Wilkerson, T. D.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility was studied of measuring atmospheric water vapor by means of a tunable lidar operated from the space shuttle. The specific method evaluated was differential absorption, a two-color method in which the atmospheric path of interest is traversed by two laser pulses. Results are reported.

  14. Water vapor diffusion membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, F. F., Jr.; Smith, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    The program is reported, which was designed to define the membrane technology of the vapor diffusion water recovery process and to test this technology using commercially available or experimental membranes. One membrane was selected, on the basis of the defined technology, and was subjected to a 30-day demonstration trial.

  15. Solvent vapor collector

    DOEpatents

    Ellison, Kenneth; Whike, Alan S.

    1979-01-30

    A solvent vapor collector is mounted on the upstream inlet end of an oven having a gas-circulating means and intended for curing a coating applied to a strip sheet metal at a coating station. The strip sheet metal may be hot and solvent vapors are evaporated at the coating station and from the strip as it passes from the coating station to the oven. Upper and lower plenums within a housing of the collector are supplied with oven gases or air from the gas-circulating means and such gases or air are discharged within the collector obliquely in a downstream direction against the strip passing through that collector to establish downstream gas flows along the top and under surfaces of the strip so as, in turn, to induct solvent vapors into the collector at the coating station. A telescopic multi-piece shroud is usefully provided on the housing for movement between an extended position in which it overlies the coating station to collect solvent vapors released thereat and a retracted position permitting ready cleaning and adjustment of that coating station.

  16. Enthalpy of Vaporization and Vapor Pressures: An Inexpensive Apparatus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battino, Rubin; Dolson, David A.; Hall, Michael A.; Letcher, Trevor M.

    2007-01-01

    A simple and inexpensive method to determine the enthalpy of vaporization of liquids by measuring vapor pressure as a function of temperature is described. The vapor pressures measured with the stopcock cell were higher than the literature values and those measured with the sidearm rubber septum cell were both higher and lower than literature…

  17. FIELD TRAPPING OF SUBSURFACE VAPOR PHASE PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil gas samples from intact soil cores were collected on adsorbents at a field site, then thermally desorbed and analyzed by laboratory gas chromatography (GC). ertical concentration profiles of predominant vapor phase petroleum hydrocarbons under ambient conditions were obtaine...

  18. Chemiluminescence detection of hydrazine vapor.

    PubMed

    Collins, G E; Latturner, S; Rose-Pehrsson, S L

    1995-04-01

    An efficient, real-time chemiluminescence detector for hydrazine vapor, N(2)H(4)(g), is described, capable of monitoring sub part-per-billion levels of hydrazine in air. The catalytic oxidation of hydrazine by colloidal platinum forms an intermediate, oxidizing agent (e.g. OH or OOH) which subsequently oxidizes luminol, generating a chemiluminescence signal that is proportional to the hydrazine concentration. Major components of the instrument include a photomultiplier tube (PMT), a short length of glass tubing coiled directly in front of the PMT cathode surface, a vacuum pump for sampling the air, and a peristaltic pump for circulating the liquid reagent. The liquid reagent, a basic solution (pH 13) of luminol and colloidal platinum, is continuously recycled. The detection sequence is initiated by pumping the hydrazine vapor through a short length of teflon tubing that is concurrently transporting the liquid reagent. The liquid is separated from the gas stream in an impinger and quickly pumped to the PMT. We have evaluated the effect of solution pH, luminol and platinum concentrations, and air and liquid flow rates on the analytical characteristics of this system. A linear, dynamic detection range for hydrazine has been obtained from 1 to 2000 ppb in air, with an instrument response that is fully reversible and achieves plateau response in less than 2 min. PMID:18966262

  19. BioVapor Model Evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    General background on modeling and specifics of modeling vapor intrusion are given. Three classical model applications are described and related to the problem of petroleum vapor intrusion. These indicate the need for model calibration and uncertainty analysis. Evaluation of Bi...

  20. Quality Assurance Project Plan for waste tank vapor characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Suydam, C.D. Jr.

    1993-12-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan, WHC-SD-WM-QAPP-013, applies to four separate vapor sampling tasks associated with Phases 1 and 2 of the Tank Vapor Issue Resolution Program and support of the Rotary Mode Core Drilling Portable Exhauster Permit. These tasks focus on employee safety concerns and tank ventilation emission control design requirements. Previous characterization efforts and studies are of insufficient accuracy to adequately define the problem. It is believed that the technology and maturity of sampling and analytical methods can be sufficiently developed to allow the characterization of the constituents of the tank vapor space.

  1. Stratified vapor generator

    DOEpatents

    Bharathan, Desikan; Hassani, Vahab

    2008-05-20

    A stratified vapor generator (110) comprises a first heating section (H.sub.1) and a second heating section (H.sub.2). The first and second heating sections (H.sub.1, H.sub.2) are arranged so that the inlet of the second heating section (H.sub.2) is operatively associated with the outlet of the first heating section (H.sub.1). A moisture separator (126) having a vapor outlet (164) and a liquid outlet (144) is operatively associated with the outlet (124) of the second heating section (H.sub.2). A cooling section (C.sub.1) is operatively associated with the liquid outlet (144) of the moisture separator (126) and includes an outlet that is operatively associated with the inlet of the second heating section (H.sub.2).

  2. Water vaporization on Ceres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    A'Hearn, Michael F.; Feldman, Paul D.

    1992-01-01

    A search is presently conducted for OH generated by the photodissociation of atmospheric water vapor in long-exposure IUE spectra of the region around Ceres. A statistically significant detection of OH is noted in an exposure off the northern limb of Ceres after perihelion. The amount of OH is consistent with a polar cap that might be replenished during winter by subsurface percolation, but which dissipates in summer.

  3. Filter vapor trap

    DOEpatents

    Guon, Jerold

    1976-04-13

    A sintered filter trap is adapted for insertion in a gas stream of sodium vapor to condense and deposit sodium thereon. The filter is heated and operated above the melting temperature of sodium, resulting in a more efficient means to remove sodium particulates from the effluent inert gas emanating from the surface of a liquid sodium pool. Preferably the filter leaves are precoated with a natrophobic coating such as tetracosane.

  4. The vapor pressures of explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Robert G.; Waltman, Melanie J.; Atkinson, David A.; Grate, Jay W.; Hotchkiss, Peter

    2013-01-05

    The vapor pressures of many explosive compounds are extremely low and thus determining accurate values proves difficult. Many researchers, using a variety of methods, have measured and reported the vapor pressures of explosives compounds at single temperatures, or as a function of temperature using vapor pressure equations. There are large variations in reported vapor pressures for many of these compounds, and some errors exist within individual papers. This article provides a review of explosive vapor pressures and describes the methods used to determine them. We have compiled primary vapor pressure relationships traceable to the original citations and include the temperature ranges for which they have been determined. Corrected values are reported as needed and described in the text. In addition, after critically examining the available data, we calculate and tabulate vapor pressures at 25 °C.

  5. Vapor core turbulence in annular two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Trabold, T.A.; Kumar, R.

    1998-06-01

    This paper reports a new technique to measure vapor turbulence in two-phase flows using hot-film anemometry. Continuous vapor turbulence measurements along with local void fraction, droplet frequency, droplet velocity and droplet diameter were measured in a thin, vertical duct. By first eliminating the portion of the output voltage signal resulting from the interaction of dispersed liquid droplets with the HFA sensor, the discrete voltage samples associated with the vapor phase were separately analyzed. The data revealed that, over the range of liquid droplet sizes and concentrations encountered, the presence of the droplet field acts to enhance vapor turbulence. In addition, there is evidence that vapor turbulence is significantly influenced by the wall-bounded liquid film. The present results are qualitatively consistent with the limited data available in the open literature.

  6. [Latent heat of vaporization in amaranth (Amaranthus hybridus)].

    PubMed

    Alvarado, J D; Toaza, E; Coloma, G

    1990-09-01

    The vapor pressure at four temperatures and 10 moisture contents in a range between 26.8 and 3.6 g/100 dry matter, were determined by the manometric method in two samples of milled amaranth seeds, known as "ataco" or "sangoracha". For each humidity, the relationship between vapor pressure of the flour and vapor pressure of water at different temperatures is satisfactorily described by power equations, which are herein presented. The slope was used in the determination of latent heat of vaporization, according to Othmer's law. An exponential equation describing the relationship between the rate of latent heat and moisture content on a dry basis are established and discussed. This allows calculation with sufficient exactitude of the latent heat of vaporization values in amaranth, particularly at low moisture contents. The data are useful in calculations for drying or extrusion operations, largely applied in cereals. PMID:2134140

  7. Thermogravimetric study of vapor pressure of TATP synthesized without recrystallization.

    PubMed

    Mbah, Jonathan; Knott, Debra; Steward, Scott

    2014-11-01

    This study aims at characterizing the vapor pressure signatures generated by triacetone triperoxide (TATP) that was synthesized without recrystallization by thermogravimmetric analysis (TGA) for exploitation by standoff detection technologies of explosive devices. The thermal behavior of the nonrecrystallized sample was compared with reported values. Any phase change, melting point and decomposition identification were studied by differential scanning calorimeter. Vapor pressures were estimated by the Langmuir method of evaporation from an open surface in a vacuum. Vapor pressures of TATP at different temperatures were calculated using the linear logarithmic relationship obtained from benzoic acid reference standard. Sublimation of TATP was found to follow apparent zero-order kinetics and sublimes at steady rates at 298 K and above. While the enthalpy of sublimation found, 71.7 kJ mol(-1), is in agreement with reported values the vapor pressures deviated significantly. The differences in the vapor pressures behavior are attributable to the synthesis pathway chosen in this study. PMID:25127637

  8. VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS

    SciTech Connect

    Eric M. Suuberg; Vahur Oja

    1997-07-01

    This project had as its main focus the determination of vapor pressures of coal pyrolysis tars. It involved performing measurements of these vapor pressures and from them, developing vapor pressure correlations suitable for use in advanced pyrolysis models (those models which explicitly account for mass transport limitations). This report is divided into five main chapters. Each chapter is a relatively stand-alone section. Chapter A reviews the general nature of coal tars and gives a summary of existing vapor pressure correlations for coal tars and model compounds. Chapter B summarizes the main experimental approaches for coal tar preparation and characterization which have been used throughout the project. Chapter C is concerned with the selection of the model compounds for coal pyrolysis tars and reviews the data available to us on the vapor pressures of high boiling point aromatic compounds. This chapter also deals with the question of identifying factors that govern the vapor pressures of coal tar model materials and their mixtures. Chapter D covers the vapor pressures and heats of vaporization of primary cellulose tars. Chapter E discusses the results of the main focus of this study. In summary, this work provides improved understanding of the volatility of coal and cellulose pyrolysis tars. It has resulted in new experimentally verified vapor pressure correlations for use in pyrolysis models. Further research on this topic should aim at developing general vapor pressure correlations for all coal tars, based on their molecular weight together with certain specific chemical characteristics i.e. hydroxyl group content.

  9. Role of Co-Vapors in Vapor Deposition Polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ji Eun; Lee, Younghee; Ahn, Ki-Jin; Huh, Jinyoung; Shim, Hyeon Woo; Sampath, Gayathri; Im, Won Bin; Huh, Yang–Il; Yoon, Hyeonseok

    2015-02-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy)/cellulose (PPCL) composite papers were fabricated by vapor phase polymerization. Importantly, the vapor-phase deposition of PPy onto cellulose was assisted by employing different co-vapors namely methanol, ethanol, benzene, water, toluene and hexane, in addition to pyrrole. The resulting PPCL papers possessed high mechanical flexibility, large surface-to-volume ratio, and good redox properties. Their main properties were highly influenced by the nature of the co-vaporized solvent. The morphology and oxidation level of deposited PPy were tuned by employing co-vapors during the polymerization, which in turn led to change in the electrochemical properties of the PPCL papers. When methanol and ethanol were used as co-vapors, the conductivities of PPCL papers were found to have improved five times, which was likely due to the enhanced orientation of PPy chain by the polar co-vapors with high dipole moment. The specific capacitance of PPCL papers obtained using benzene, toluene, water and hexane co-vapors was higher than those of the others, which is attributed to the enlarged effective surface area of the electrode material. The results indicate that the judicious choice and combination of co-vapors in vapor-deposition polymerization (VDP) offers the possibility of tuning the morphological, electrical, and electrochemical properties of deposited conducting polymers.

  10. Headspace gas and vapor characterization summary for the 43 vapor program suspect tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-10-05

    During the time period between February 1994 and September 1995, Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) sampled the waste tank headspace of 43 single-shell tanks for a variety of gaseous and/or volatile and semi-volatile compounds. This report summarizes the results of analyses of those sampling activities with respect to both the Priority 1 Safety Issues and relative to the detection in the headspace of significant concentrations of target analytes relating to worker breathing space considerations as recommended by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Toxicology Review Panel. The information contained in the data tables was abstracted from the vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization reports. Selected results are tabulated and summarized. Sampling equipment and methods, as well as sample analyses, are briefly described. Vapor sampling of passively ventilated single-shell tanks (tanks C-105, C-106, and SX-106 were sampled and are actively ventilated) has served to highlight or confirm tank headspace conditions associated with both priority 1 safety issues and supports source term analysis associated with protecting worker health and safety from noxious vapors.

  11. Warm Vapor Atom Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biedermann, Grant; Wheeler, David; Jau, Yuan-Yu; McGuinness, Hayden

    2014-05-01

    We present a light pulse atom interferometer using room temperature rubidium vapor. Doppler sensitive stimulated Raman transitions forming the atom optical elements inherently select a cold velocity group for the interferometer. The interferometer is configured to be sensitive to accelerations. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. In-well vapor stripping drilling and characterization work plan

    SciTech Connect

    Koegler, K.J.

    1994-03-13

    This work plan provides the information necessary for drilling, sampling, and hydrologic testing of wells to be completed in support of a demonstration of the in-well vapor stripping system. The in-well vapor stripping system is a remediation technology designed to preferentially extract volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from contaminated groundwater by converting them to a vapor phase. Air-lift pumping is used to lift and aerate groundwater within the well. The volatiles escaping the aerated water are drawn off by a slight vacuum and treated at the surface while the water is allowed to infiltrate the vadose zone back to the watertable.

  13. Design and test of porous-tungsten mercury vaporizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerslake, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    New design requirements for porous plug-type vaporizers used with Kaufman thrusters and thruster arrays are discussed. The results of testing samples of porous tungsten for mercury flow rate, liquid intrusion pressure level, and mechanical strength are presented. Nitrogen gas was used instead of mercury vapor for approximate calibration. Liquid intrusion pressure levels will require that flight thruster systems with long feedlines have restrictions in the dynamic line during launch.

  14. Worker Protection from Chemical Vapors: Hanford Tank Farms

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, T.J.

    2007-07-01

    Chemical vapor emissions from underground hazardous waste storage tanks on the Hanford site in eastern Washington State are a potential concern because workers enter the tank farms on a regular basis for waste retrievals, equipment maintenance, and surveillance. Tank farm contractors are in the process of retrieving all remaining waste from aging single-shell tanks, some of which date to World War II, and transferring it to newer double-shell tanks. During the waste retrieval process, tank farm workers are potentially exposed to fugitive chemical vapors that can escape from tank head-spaces and other emission points. The tanks are known to hold more than 1,500 different species of chemicals, in addition to radionuclides. Exposure assessments have fully characterized the hazards from chemical vapors in half of the tank farms. Extensive sampling and analysis has been done to characterize the chemical properties of hazardous waste and to evaluate potential health hazards of vapors at the ground surface, where workers perform maintenance and waste transfer activities. Worker concerns, risk communication, and exposure assessment are discussed, including evaluation of the potential hazards of complex mixtures of chemical vapors. Concentrations of vapors above occupational exposure limits (OEL) were detected only at exhaust stacks and passive breather filter outlets. Beyond five feet from the sources, vapors disperse rapidly. No vapors have been measured above 50% of their OELs more than five feet from the source. Vapor controls are focused on limited hazard zones around sources. Further evaluations of vapors include analysis of routes of exposure and thorough analysis of nuisance odors. (authors)

  15. Vapor pressures of acetylene at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masterson, C. M.; Allen, John E., Jr.; Kraus, G. F.; Khanna, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    The atmospheres of many of the outer planets and their satellites contain a large number of hydrocarbon species. In particular, acetylene (C2H2) has been identified at Jupiter, Saturn and its satellite Titan, Uranus and Neptune. In the lower atmospheres of these planets, where colder temperatures prevail, the condensation and/or freezing of acetylene is probable. In order to obtain accurate models of the acetylene in these atmospheres, it is necessary to have a complete understanding of its vapor pressures at low temperatures. Vapor pressures at low temperatures for acetylene are being determined. The vapor pressures are measured with two different techniques in order to cover a wide range of temperatures and pressures. In the first, the acetylene is placed in a sample tube which is immersed in a low temperature solvent/liquid nitrogen slush bath whose temperature is measured with a thermocouple. The vapor pressure is then measured directly with a capacitance manometer. For lower pressures, a second technique which was called the thin-film infrared method (TFIR) was developed. It involves measuring the disappearance rate of a thin film of acetylene at a particular temperature. The spectra are then analyzed using previously determined extinction coefficient values, to determine the disappearance rate R (where R = delta n/delta t, the number of molecules that disappear per unit time). This can be related to the vapor pressure directly. This technique facilitates measurement of the lower temperatures and pressures. Both techniques have been calibrated using CO2, and have shown good agreement with the existing literature data.

  16. Determination of inorganic mercury and total mercury in biological and environmental samples by flow injection-cold vapor-atomic absorption spectrometry using sodium borohydride as the sole reducing agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Río Segade, Susana; Tyson, Julian F.

    2003-05-01

    A simple, fast, precise and accurate method to determine inorganic mercury and total mercury in biological and environmental samples was developed. The optimized flow-injection mercury system permitted the separate determination of inorganic mercury and total mercury using sodium borohydride as reducing agent. Inorganic mercury was selectively determined after reduction with 10 -4% w/v sodium borohydride, while total mercury was determined after reduction with 0.75% w/v sodium borohydride. The calibration graphs were linear up to 30 ng ml -1. The detection limits of the method based on three times the standard deviation of the blank were 24 and 3.9 ng l -1 for total mercury and inorganic mercury determination, respectively. The relative standard deviation was less than 1.5% for a 10 ng ml -1 mercury standard. As a means of checking method performance, deionized water and pond water samples were spiked with methylmercury and inorganic mercury; quantitative recovery for total mercury and inorganic mercury was obtained. The accuracy of the method was verified by analyzing alkaline and acid extracts of five biological and sediment reference materials. Microwave-assisted extraction procedures resulted in higher concentrations of recovered mercury species, lower matrix interference with mercury determination and less time involved in sample treatment than conventional extraction procedures. The standard addition method was only needed for calibration when biological samples were analyzed. The detection limits were in the range of 1.2-19 and 6.6-18 ng g -1 in biological and sediment samples for inorganic mercury and total mercury determination, respectively.

  17. AEROBIC SOIL MICROCOSMS FOR LONG-TERM BIODEGRADATION OF HYDROCARBON VAPORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aims of this research project included the development of laboratory protocols for the preparation of aerobic soil microcosms using aseptic field soil samples, and for the gas chromatographic analysis of hydrocarbon vapor biodegradation based on vapor samples obtained from th...

  18. Vapor compression distillation module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuccio, P. P.

    1975-01-01

    A Vapor Compression Distillation (VCD) module was developed and evaluated as part of a Space Station Prototype (SSP) environmental control and life support system. The VCD module includes the waste tankage, pumps, post-treatment cells, automatic controls and fault detection instrumentation. Development problems were encountered with two components: the liquid pumps, and the waste tank and quantity gauge. Peristaltic pumps were selected instead of gear pumps, and a sub-program of materials and design optimization was undertaken leading to a projected life greater than 10,000 hours of continuous operation. A bladder tank was designed and built to contain the waste liquids and deliver it to the processor. A detrimental pressure pattern imposed upon the bladder by a force-operated quantity gauge was corrected by rearranging the force application, and design goals were achieved. System testing has demonstrated that all performance goals have been fulfilled.

  19. THERMALLY OPERATED VAPOR VALVE

    DOEpatents

    Dorward, J.G. Jr.

    1959-02-10

    A valve is presented for use in a calutron to supply and control the vapor to be ionized. The invention provides a means readily operable from the exterior of the vacuum tank of the apparatuss without mechanical transmission of forces for the quick and accurate control of the ionizing arc by a corresponding control of gas flow theretos thereby producing an effective way of carefully regulating the operation of the calutron. The invention consists essentially of a tube member extending into the charge bottle of a calutron devices having a poppet type valve closing the lower end of the tube. An electrical heating means is provided in the valve stem to thermally vary the length of the stem to regulate the valve opening to control the flow of material from the charge bottle.

  20. Constrained Vapor Bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J.; Karthikeyan, M.; Plawsky, J.; Wayner, P. C., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The nonisothermal Constrained Vapor Bubble, CVB, is being studied to enhance the understanding of passive systems controlled by interfacial phenomena. The study is multifaceted: 1) it is a basic scientific study in interfacial phenomena, fluid physics and thermodynamics; 2) it is a basic study in thermal transport; and 3) it is a study of a heat exchanger. The research is synergistic in that CVB research requires a microgravity environment and the space program needs thermal control systems like the CVB. Ground based studies are being done as a precursor to flight experiment. The results demonstrate that experimental techniques for the direct measurement of the fundamental operating parameters (temperature, pressure, and interfacial curvature fields) have been developed. Fluid flow and change-of-phase heat transfer are a function of the temperature field and the vapor bubble shape, which can be measured using an Image Analyzing Interferometer. The CVB for a microgravity environment, has various thin film regions that are of both basic and applied interest. Generically, a CVB is formed by underfilling an evacuated enclosure with a liquid. Classification depends on shape and Bond number. The specific CVB discussed herein was formed in a fused silica cell with inside dimensions of 3x3x40 mm and, therefore, can be viewed as a large version of a micro heat pipe. Since the dimensions are relatively large for a passive system, most of the liquid flow occurs under a small capillary pressure difference. Therefore, we can classify the discussed system as a low capillary pressure system. The studies discussed herein were done in a 1-g environment (Bond Number = 3.6) to obtain experience to design a microgravity experiment for a future NASA flight where low capillary pressure systems should prove more useful. The flight experiment is tentatively scheduled for the year 2000. The SCR was passed on September 16, 1997. The RDR is tentatively scheduled for October, 1998.

  1. Student Exposure to Mercury Vapors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Joyce

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the problem of mercury vapors caused by spills in high school and college laboratories. Describes a study which compared the mercury vapor levels of laboratories in both an older and a newer building. Concludes that the mercurial contamination of chemistry laboratories presents minimal risks to the students. (TW)

  2. Experimental vaporization of the Holbrook chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, J. L.; Muenow, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    The vapor phase composition obtained by heating samples of the Holbrook L6 chondrite to 1300 C was determined quantitatively by Knudsen cell-quadrupole mass spectrometry. Maximum observed vapor pressures, produced at 1200 C, are reported for Na, K, Fe, and Ni, and the implications of the Na/K ratio are considered. The Fe and Ni data are discussed with attention to their migration in individual equilibrated chondrites. S2 (with minor SO2), H2O, and CO2 were also present in the high-temperature gas phase. Vesicles formed by the release of intrinsically derived volatiles are compared with vesicles in the Ibitira eucrite. Chondrite evolution is briefly discussed.

  3. Oxidation/vaporization of silicide coated columbium base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.

    1971-01-01

    Mass spectrometric and target collection experiments were made at 1600 K to elucidate the mode of oxidative vaporization of two columbium alloys, fused-slurry-coated with a complex silicide former (Si-20Cr-Fe). At oxygen pressures up to 0.0005 torr the major vapor component detected by mass spectrometry for oxidized samples was gaseous silicon monoxide. Analysis of condensates collected at oxygen pressures of 0.1, 1.0 and 10 torr revealed that chromium-, silicon-, iron- and tungsten- containing species were the major products of vaporization. Equilibrium thermochemical diagrams were constructed for the metal-oxygen system corresponding to each constituent metal in both the coating and base alloy. The major vaporizing species are expected to be the gaseous oxides of chromium, silicon, iron and tungsten. Plots of vapor phase composition and maximum vaporization rate versus oxygen pressure were calculated for each coating constituent. The major contribution to weight loss by vaporization at oxygen pressures above 1 torr was shown to be the chromium-containing species.

  4. Adsorption and Desorption of Nitrogen and Water Vapor by clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Deshan; Chen, Qiong; Xiang, Wei; Huang, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Adsorption and desorption of nitrogen and water vapor by clay has a significant impact on unsaturated soil physical and mechanical properties. In order to study the adsorption and desorption characteristics of nitrogen and water vapor by montmorillonite, kaolin and sliding zone soils, the Autosorb-iQ specific surface area and pore size analyzer instrument of United State was taken to carry out the analysis test. The adsorption and desorption of nitrogen at 77K and water vapor at 293K on clay sample were conducted. The theories of BET, FHH and hydration energy were taken to calculate the specific surface, surface fractal dimension and adsorption energy. The results show that the calculated specific surface of water vapor by clay is bigger than nitrogen adsorption test because clay can adsorb more water vapor molecule than nitrogen. Smaller and polar water vapor molecule can access the micropore and then adsorb on the mineral surface and mineral intralayer, which make the mineral surface cations hydrate and the mineral surface smoother. Bigger and nonpolar nitrogen molecule can not enter into the micropore as water vapor molecule and has weak interaction with clay surface.

  5. A simple method for vapor dosing of charcoal sorbent tubes.

    PubMed

    Thomas, M L; Cohen, B S

    1995-01-01

    A method for vapor-dosing of charcoal sorbent tubes (CST) that does not require the expense and effort of a test chamber was used to test the desorption efficiency (DE) of seven solvent vapors, representing six classes of solvents as follows: aromatic hydrocarbons (m-xylene); ether/alcohol (2-ethoxyethanol); vinyl monomers (styrene monomer, vinyl acetate); aliphatic hydrocarbons (n-hexane); aliphatic esters (n-butyl acetate); and aliphatic acrylic monomers (methyl methacrylate). The quantities of the solvents used in these experiments would represent eight-hour exposures to concentrations of approximately 0.2 to 10 ppm. The vapor-dosing experimental system consisted of a loaded filter cassette connected directly to a CST. Vapor was generated by injecting liquid solvent onto the glass fiber filter and drawing air through the system. The solvent was desorbed from the filter and charcoal for analysis. Vapor desorption efficiency was determined from the fraction of the injected solvent evaporated from the filter and the amount recovered from the charcoal. The measured DEs were similar to those reported for liquid dosed charcoal. Vapor dosing of sorbent tubes is more representative of samples collected for industrial hygiene exposure assessment. The system is simple to use and applicable for vapor dosing of any sorbent tube. PMID:7872204

  6. SOFIA Water Vapor Monitor Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, R.; Roellig, T. L.; Yuen, L.; Shiroyama, B.; Meyer, A.; Devincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The SOFIA Water Vapor Monitor (WVM) is a heterodyne radiometer designed to determine the integrated amount of water vapor along the telescope line of sight and directly to the zenith. The basic technique that was chosen for the WVM uses radiometric measurements of the center and wings of the 183.3 GHz rotational line of water to measure the water vapor. The WVM reports its measured water vapor levels to the aircraft Mission Controls and Communication System (MCCS) while the SOFIA observatory is in normal operation at flight altitude. The water vapor measurements are also available to other scientific instruments aboard the observatory. The electrical, mechanical and software design of the WVM are discussed.

  7. Determination of some refractory elements and Pb by fluorination assisted electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with platform and wall vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuefei; Hu, Bin

    2011-02-01

    Platform and wall vaporization for electrothermal vaporization (ETV)-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) determination of some refractory elements (Ti, V, Cr, Mo, La and Zr) and Pb were comparatively studied with the use of poly (tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) as fluorinating reagent. The factors affecting the vaporization behaviors of the target analytes in the platform and tube wall vaporization including vaporization temperature and time, pyrolytic temperature and time were studied in detail, and the flow rates of carrier gas/auxiliary carrier gas, were carefully optimized. Under the optimal conditions, the signal profiles, signal intensity, interferences of coexisting ions and analytical reproducibility for wall and platform vaporization ETV-ICP-MS were compared. It was found that both wall and platform vaporization could give very similar detection limits, but the platform vaporization provided higher signal intensity and better precision for some refractory elements and Pb than the wall vaporization. Especially for La, the signal intensity obtained by platform vaporization was 3 times higher than that obtained by wall vaporization. For platform vaporization ETV-ICP-MS, the limits of detection (LODs) of 0.001 μg L -1 (La) ~ 0.09 μg L - 1 (Ti) with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 1.5% (Pb) ~ 15.5% (Zr) were obtained. While for wall vaporization ETV-ICP-MS, LODs of 0.005 μg L - 1 (La) ~ 0.4 μg L - 1 (Pb) with RSDs of 3.2% (Mo) ~ 12.8% (Zr) were obtained. Both platform and tube wall vaporization techniques have been used for slurry sampling fluorination assisted ETV-ICP-MS direct determination of Ti, V, Cr, Mo, La, Zr and Pb in certified reference materials of NIES No. 8 vehicle exhaust particulates and GBW07401 soil, and the analytical results obtained are in good agreement with the certified values.

  8. TEMPORAL MOISTURE CONTENT VARIABILITY BENEATH AND EXTERNAL TO A BUILDING AND THE POTENTIAL EFFECTS ON VAPOR INTRUSION RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Migration of vapors from organic chemicals residing in the subsurface into overlying buildings is known as vapor intrusion. Because of the difficulty in evaluating vapor intrusion by indoor air sampling, models are often employed to determine if a potential indoor inhalation exp...

  9. Tested Demonstrations. Gasoline Vapor: An Invisible Pollutant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Edgar R.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a demonstration concerning the air pollution aspects of gasoline vapor which provides an estimation of the vapor pressure of test fuel, the molecular weight of the vapor, and illustrates a method of controlling the pollution. (SL)

  10. Direct real-time detection of vapors from explosive compounds.

    PubMed

    Ewing, Robert G; Clowers, Brian H; Atkinson, David A

    2013-11-19

    The real-time detection of vapors from low volatility explosives including PETN, tetryl, RDX, and nitroglycerine along with various compositions containing these substances was demonstrated. This was accomplished with an atmospheric flow tube (AFT) using a nonradioactive ionization source coupled to a mass spectrometer. Direct vapor detection was accomplished in less than 5 s at ambient temperature without sample preconcentration. The several seconds of residence time of analytes in the AFT provided a significant opportunity for reactant ions to interact with analyte vapors to achieve ionization. This extended reaction time, combined with the selective ionization using the nitrate reactant ions (NO3(-) and NO3(-)·HNO3), enabled highly sensitive explosives detection from explosive vapors present in ambient laboratory air. Observed signals from diluted explosive vapors indicated detection limits below 10 ppqv using selected ion monitoring (SIM) of the explosive-nitrate adduct at m/z 349, 378, 284, and 289 for tetryl, PETN, RDX, and NG, respectively. Also provided is a demonstration of the vapor detection from 10 different energetic formulations sampled in ambient laboratory air, including double base propellants, plastic explosives, and commercial blasting explosives using SIM for the NG, PETN, and RDX product ions. PMID:24090362

  11. Vapor Pressure, Vapor Composition and Fractional Vaporization of High Temperature Lavas on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegley, B., Jr.; Schaefer, L.; Kargel, J. S.

    2003-01-01

    Observations show that Io's atmosphere is dominated by SO2 and other sulfur and sulfur oxide species, with minor amounts of Na, K, and Cl gases. Theoretical modeling and recent observations show that NaCl, which is produced volcanically, is a constituent of the atmosphere. Recent Galileo, HST and ground-based observations show that some volcanic hot spots on Io have extremely high temperatures, in the range 1400-1900 K. At similar temperatures in laboratory experiments, molten silicates and oxides have significant vapor pressures of Na, K, SiO, Fe, Mg, and other gases. Thus vaporization of these species from high temperature lavas on Io seems likely. We therefore modeled the vaporization of silicate and oxide lavas suggested for Io. Our results for vapor chemistry are reported here. The effects of fractional vaporization on lava chemistry are given in a companion abstract by Kargel et al.

  12. Passive vapor extraction feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Rohay, V.J.

    1994-06-30

    Demonstration of a passive vapor extraction remediation system is planned for sites in the 200 West Area used in the past for the disposal of waste liquids containing carbon tetrachloride. The passive vapor extraction units will consist of a 4-in.-diameter pipe, a check valve, a canister filled with granular activated carbon, and a wind turbine. The check valve will prevent inflow of air that otherwise would dilute the soil gas and make its subsequent extraction less efficient. The granular activated carbon is used to adsorb the carbon tetrachloride from the air. The wind turbine enhances extraction rates on windy days. Passive vapor extraction units will be designed and operated to meet all applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements. Based on a cost analysis, passive vapor extraction was found to be a cost-effective method for remediation of soils containing lower concentrations of volatile contaminants. Passive vapor extraction used on wells that average 10-stdft{sup 3}/min air flow rates was found to be more cost effective than active vapor extraction for concentrations below 500 parts per million by volume (ppm) of carbon tetrachloride. For wells that average 5-stdft{sup 3}/min air flow rates, passive vapor extraction is more cost effective below 100 ppm.

  13. The lithium vapor box divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldston, R. J.; Myers, R.; Schwartz, J.

    2016-02-01

    It has long been recognized that volumetric dissipation of the plasma heat flux from a fusion power system is preferable to its localized impingement on a material surface. Volumetric dissipation mitigates both the anticipated very high heat flux and intense particle-induced damage due to sputtering. Recent projections to a tokamak demonstration power plant suggest an immense upstream parallel heat flux, of order 20 GW m-2, implying that fully detached operation may be a requirement for the success of fusion power. Building on pioneering work on the use of lithium by Nagayama et al and by Ono et al as well as earlier work on the gas box divertor by Watkins and Rebut, we present here a concept for a lithium vapor box divertor, in which lithium vapor extracts momentum and energy from a fusion-power-plant divertor plasma, using fully volumetric processes. At the high powers and pressures that are projected this requires a high density of lithium vapor, which must be isolated from the main plasma in order to avoid lithium build-up on the chamber walls or in the plasma. Isolation is achieved through a powerful multi-box differential pumping scheme available only for condensable vapors. The preliminary box-wise calculations are encouraging, but much more work is required to demonstrate the practical viability of this scheme, taking into account at least 2D plasma and vapor flows within and between the vapor boxes and out of the vapor boxes to the main plasma.

  14. Methods for the characterization of Jet Propellent-8: vapor and aerosol.

    PubMed

    Gregg, S D; Campbell, J L; Fisher, J W; Bartlett, M G

    2007-05-01

    Jet Propellant-8 (JP-8) has been responsible for the majority of reported chemical exposures by the US Department of Defense. Concerns related to human exposure to JP-8 are relatively new; therefore, there is a lack of literature data. Additionally, health effects related to the composition of the exposure have only recently been considered. Two major questions exist: (1) what is the compositional difference between the aerosol and vapor portions of JP-8 under controlled conditions and (2) what is the most representative method to sample JP-8 aerosol and vapor? Thirty-seven standards, representing more than 40% of the mass of JP-8, were used for characterization of the neat fuel, vapor and aerosol portions. JP-8 vapor samples at a concentration of 1600 mg/m(3) were prepared in Tedlar bags. A portion of the vapor samples was adsorbed on charcoal, Tenax and custom mixed phase sorbents. These samples were then extracted using organic solvent and analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The vapor samples extracted from the sorbent tubes were directly compared with a vapor bag. The samples collected using Tenax sorbent tubes were found to be most representative of the composition of the vapor bags. In another set of experiments, aerosolized JP-8 was generated using a collision nebulizer. Aerosol samples were collected and the chemical composition was characterized. The entire aerosol distribution was collected on a glass filter, extracted into solvent, and analyzed by GC-MS. Finally, the composition of the vapor and aerosol was compared. The vapor was found to represent the lower molecular weight components of JP-8, while the aerosol was composed of higher molecular weight components. Therefore, the vapor and aerosol should be treated as two discrete forms of exposure to JP-8. PMID:17345570

  15. Archimedes Mass Filter Vaporizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putvinski, S.; Agnew, A. F.; Cluggish, B. P.; Ohkawa, T.; Sevier, L.; Umstadter, K. R.; Dresvin, S. V.; Kuteev, B. V.; Feygenson, O. N.; Ivanov, D. V.; Zverev, S. G.; Miroshnikov, I. V.; Egorov, S. M.; Kiesewetter, D. V.; Maliugin, V. I.

    2001-10-01

    Archimedes Technology Group, Inc., is developing a plasma mass separator called the Archimedes Filter that separates waste oxide mixtures ion by ion into two mass groups: light and heavy. Since high-level waste at Hanford has 99.9its radioactivity associated with heavy elements, the Archimedes Filter can effectively decontaminate over three-quarters of that waste. The Filter process involves some preprocessing followed by volatilization and separation by the magnetic and electric fields of the main plasma. This presentation describes the approach to volatilization of the waste oxy-hydroxide mixture by means of a very high heat flux (q > 10 MW/m2). Such a high heat flux is required to ensure congruent evaporation of the complex oxy-hydroxide mixture and is achieved by injection of small droplets of molten waste into an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) torch. This presentation further addresses different issues related to evaporation of the waste including modeling of droplet evaporation, estimates of parameters of plasma torch, and 2D modeling of the plasma. The experimental test bed for oxide vaporization and results of the initial experiments on oxide evaporation in 60 kW ICP torch will also be described.

  16. Supercritical microgravity droplet vaporization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, J.; Curtis, E.; Farrell, P.

    1990-01-01

    Supercritical droplet vaporization is an important issue in many combustion systems, such as liquid fueled rockets and compression-ignition (diesel) engines. In order to study the details of droplet behavior at these conditions, an experiment was designed to provide a gas phase environment which is above the critical pressure and critical temperature of a single liquid droplet. In general, the droplet begins as a cold droplet in the hot, high pressure environment. In order to eliminate disruptions to the droplet by convective motion in the gas, forced and natural convection gas motion are required to be small. Implementation of this requirement for forced convection is straightforward, while reduction of natural convection is achieved by reduction in the g-level for the experiment. The resulting experiment consists of a rig which can stably position a droplet without restraint in a high-pressure, high temperature gas field in microgravity. The microgravity field is currently achieved by dropping the device in the NASA Lewis 2.2 second drop tower. The performance of the experimental device and results to date are presented.

  17. Precision ozone vapor pressure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, D.; Mauersberger, K.

    1985-01-01

    The vapor pressure above liquid ozone has been measured with a high accuracy over a temperature range of 85 to 95 K. At the boiling point of liquid argon (87.3 K) an ozone vapor pressure of 0.0403 Torr was obtained with an accuracy of + or - 0.7 percent. A least square fit of the data provided the Clausius-Clapeyron equation for liquid ozone; a latent heat of 82.7 cal/g was calculated. High-precision vapor pressure data are expected to aid research in atmospheric ozone measurements and in many laboratory ozone studies such as measurements of cross sections and reaction rates.

  18. VAPOR SHIELD FOR INDUCTION FURNACE

    DOEpatents

    Reese, S.L.; Samoriga, S.A.

    1958-03-11

    This patent relates to a water-cooled vapor shield for an inductlon furnace that will condense metallic vapors arising from the crucible and thus prevent their condensation on or near the induction coils, thereby eliminating possible corrosion or shorting out of the coils. This is accomplished by placing, about the top, of the crucible a disk, apron, and cooling jacket that separates the area of the coils from the interior of the cruclbIe and provides a cooled surface upon whlch the vapors may condense.

  19. Vapor-Driven Propulsion of Catalytic Micromotors

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Renfeng; Li, Jinxing; Rozen, Isaac; Ezhilan, Barath; Xu, Tailin; Christianson, Caleb; Gao, Wei; Saintillan, David; Ren, Biye; Wang, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Chemically-powered micromotors offer exciting opportunities in diverse fields, including therapeutic delivery, environmental remediation, and nanoscale manufacturing. However, these nanovehicles require direct addition of high concentration of chemical fuel to the motor solution for their propulsion. We report the efficient vapor-powered propulsion of catalytic micromotors without direct addition of fuel to the micromotor solution. Diffusion of hydrazine vapor from the surrounding atmosphere into the sample solution is instead used to trigger rapid movement of iridium-gold Janus microsphere motors. Such operation creates a new type of remotely-triggered and powered catalytic micro/nanomotors that are responsive to their surrounding environment. This new propulsion mechanism is accompanied by unique phenomena, such as the distinct off-on response to the presence of fuel in the surrounding atmosphere, and spatio-temporal dependence of the motor speed borne out of the concentration gradient evolution within the motor solution. The relationship between the motor speed and the variables affecting the fuel concentration distribution is examined using a theoretical model for hydrazine transport, which is in turn used to explain the observed phenomena. The vapor-powered catalytic micro/nanomotors offer new opportunities in gas sensing, threat detection, and environmental monitoring, and open the door for a new class of environmentally-triggered micromotors. PMID:26285032

  20. Vapor-Driven Propulsion of Catalytic Micromotors.

    PubMed

    Dong, Renfeng; Li, Jinxing; Rozen, Isaac; Ezhilan, Barath; Xu, Tailin; Christianson, Caleb; Gao, Wei; Saintillan, David; Ren, Biye; Wang, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Chemically-powered micromotors offer exciting opportunities in diverse fields, including therapeutic delivery, environmental remediation, and nanoscale manufacturing. However, these nanovehicles require direct addition of high concentration of chemical fuel to the motor solution for their propulsion. We report the efficient vapor-powered propulsion of catalytic micromotors without direct addition of fuel to the micromotor solution. Diffusion of hydrazine vapor from the surrounding atmosphere into the sample solution is instead used to trigger rapid movement of iridium-gold Janus microsphere motors. Such operation creates a new type of remotely-triggered and powered catalytic micro/nanomotors that are responsive to their surrounding environment. This new propulsion mechanism is accompanied by unique phenomena, such as the distinct off-on response to the presence of fuel in the surrounding atmosphere, and spatio-temporal dependence of the motor speed borne out of the concentration gradient evolution within the motor solution. The relationship between the motor speed and the variables affecting the fuel concentration distribution is examined using a theoretical model for hydrazine transport, which is in turn used to explain the observed phenomena. The vapor-powered catalytic micro/nanomotors offer new opportunities in gas sensing, threat detection, and environmental monitoring, and open the door for a new class of environmentally-triggered micromotors. PMID:26285032

  1. Vapor-Driven Propulsion of Catalytic Micromotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Renfeng; Li, Jinxing; Rozen, Isaac; Ezhilan, Barath; Xu, Tailin; Christianson, Caleb; Gao, Wei; Saintillan, David; Ren, Biye; Wang, Joseph

    2015-08-01

    Chemically-powered micromotors offer exciting opportunities in diverse fields, including therapeutic delivery, environmental remediation, and nanoscale manufacturing. However, these nanovehicles require direct addition of high concentration of chemical fuel to the motor solution for their propulsion. We report the efficient vapor-powered propulsion of catalytic micromotors without direct addition of fuel to the micromotor solution. Diffusion of hydrazine vapor from the surrounding atmosphere into the sample solution is instead used to trigger rapid movement of iridium-gold Janus microsphere motors. Such operation creates a new type of remotely-triggered and powered catalytic micro/nanomotors that are responsive to their surrounding environment. This new propulsion mechanism is accompanied by unique phenomena, such as the distinct off-on response to the presence of fuel in the surrounding atmosphere, and spatio-temporal dependence of the motor speed borne out of the concentration gradient evolution within the motor solution. The relationship between the motor speed and the variables affecting the fuel concentration distribution is examined using a theoretical model for hydrazine transport, which is in turn used to explain the observed phenomena. The vapor-powered catalytic micro/nanomotors offer new opportunities in gas sensing, threat detection, and environmental monitoring, and open the door for a new class of environmentally-triggered micromotors.

  2. Vapor Condensed and Supercooled Glassy Nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Qi, Weikai; Bowles, Richard K

    2016-03-22

    We use molecular simulation to study the structural and dynamic properties of glassy nanoclusters formed both through the direct condensation of the vapor below the glass transition temperature, without the presence of a substrate, and via the slow supercooling of unsupported liquid nanodroplets. An analysis of local structure using Voronoi polyhedra shows that the energetic stability of the clusters is characterized by a large, increasing fraction of bicapped square antiprism motifs. We also show that nanoclusters with similar inherent structure energies are structurally similar, independent of their history, which suggests the supercooled clusters access the same low energy regions of the potential energy landscape as the vapor condensed clusters despite their different methods of formation. By measuring the intermediate scattering function at different radii from the cluster center, we find that the relaxation dynamics of the clusters are inhomogeneous, with the core becoming glassy above the glass transition temperature while the surface remains mobile at low temperatures. This helps the clusters sample the highly stable, low energy structures on the potential energy surface. Our work suggests the nanocluster systems are structurally more stable than the ultrastable glassy thin films, formed through vapor deposition onto a cold substrate, but the nanoclusters do not exhibit the superheating effects characteristic of the ultrastable glass states. PMID:26866858

  3. Detection of explosives, narcotics, and taggant vapors by an ion mobility spectrometry particle detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, Robert K.; Thomson, Paul C.; DeBono, Reno F.; Danylewich-May, Lucy L.; Kim, Lena

    1994-03-01

    Methods of analyzing vapors in an IMS explosives/narcotics detector that is primarily designed for particle collection were investigated, with emphasis on nitroglycerin explosive, and acetic and benzoic acid contaminants in narcotics. A preconcentration step is required because expected vapor concentrations are low. NG adsorption and retention behavior on coated teflon filters that are compatible with the IMS sample desorption system is reported, including the effects of adsorbent, and sampling flow rate, time and volume. Similar investigations were carried out for acetic and benzoic acid vapors, and a gold-plated nickel mesh was selected as the most appropriate IMS-compatible filter for these materials. Vapor sampling flow rates and volumes are much lower than those used in particle sampling. Examples of NG and benzoic acid vapor detection in real and simulated applications are discussed.

  4. Alkylammonium montmorillonites as adsorbents for organic vapors from air

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, M.; Purnell, C.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Montmorillonite clays may be modified by the exchange of the inorganic interlayer cations with alkylammonium ions, resulting in a fixed internal porosity. The pore size and shape depend on the nature of the alkylammonium ion. A number of different ions were used to prepare adsorbents with varying properties, and these were examined for their potential application to sampling organic vapors in air. Characterization involved determination of nitrogen and water contents, surface area, interlayer spacing, thermal stability, and breakthrough volumes of organic vapors. The adsorbent that showed the most promise (tetramethylammonium montmorillonite (TMA)) was further evaluated for use as an adsorbent in both thermal- and solvent-desorable sampling systems.

  5. A stratospheric water vapor feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessler, A. E.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Wang, T.; Davis, S. M.; Rosenlof, K. H.

    2013-12-01

    Variations in stratospheric water vapor play a role in the evolution of our climate. We show here that variations in water vapor since 2004 can be traced to tropical tropopause layer (TTL) temperature perturbations from at least three processes: the quasi-biennial oscillation, the strength of the Brewer-Dobson circulation, and the temperature of the troposphere. The connection between stratospheric water vapor and the temperature of the troposphere implies the existence of a stratospheric water vapor feedback. We estimate the feedback in a chemistry-climate model to have a magnitude of +0.3 W/m2/K, which could be a significant contributor to the overall climate sensitivity. About two-thirds of the feedback comes from the extratropical stratosphere below ~16 km (the lowermost stratosphere), with the rest coming from the stratosphere above ~16 km (the overworld).

  6. Understanding Latent Heat of Vaporization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linz, Ed

    1995-01-01

    Presents a simple exercise for students to do in the kitchen at home to determine the latent heat of vaporization of water using typical household materials. Designed to stress understanding by sacrificing precision for simplicity. (JRH)

  7. Water vapor diffusion membranes, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, F. F.; Klein, E.; Smith, J. K.; Eyer, C.

    1976-01-01

    Transport mechanisms were investigated for the three different types of water vapor diffusion membranes. Membranes representing porous wetting and porous nonwetting structures as well as dense diffusive membrane structures were investigated for water permeation rate as a function of: (1) temperature, (2) solids composition in solution, and (3) such hydrodynamic parameters as sweep gas flow rate, solution flow rate and cell geometry. These properties were measured using nitrogen sweep gas to collect the effluent. In addition, the chemical stability to chromic acid-stabilized urine was measured for several of each type of membrane. A technology based on the mechanism of vapor transport was developed, whereby the vapor diffusion rates and relative susceptibility of membranes to fouling and failure could be projected for long-term vapor recovery trials using natural chromic acid-stabilized urine.

  8. Packed Alumina Absorbs Hypergolic Vapors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. J.; Mauro, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    Beds of activated alumina effective as filters to remove hypergolic vapors from gas streams. Beds absorb such substances as nitrogen oxides and hydrazines and may also absorb acetylene, ethylene, hydrogen sulfide, benzene, butadiene, butene, styrene, toluene, and xoylene. Bed has no moving parts such as pumps, blowers and mixers. Reliable and energy-conservative. Bed readily adapted to any size from small portable units for use where little vapor release is expected to large stationary units for extensive transfer operations.

  9. Vapor deposition of hardened niobium

    DOEpatents

    Blocher, Jr., John M.; Veigel, Neil D.; Landrigan, Richard B.

    1983-04-19

    A method of coating ceramic nuclear fuel particles containing a major amount of an actinide ceramic in which the particles are placed in a fluidized bed maintained at ca. 800.degree. to ca. 900.degree. C., and niobium pentachloride vapor and carbon tetrachloride vapor are led into the bed, whereby niobium metal is deposited on the particles and carbon is deposited interstitially within the niobium. Coating apparatus used in the method is also disclosed.

  10. Chemical vapor deposition sciences

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-31

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a widely used method for depositing thin films of a variety of materials. Applications of CVD range from the fabrication of microelectronic devices to the deposition of protective coatings. New CVD processes are increasingly complex, with stringent requirements that make it more difficult to commercialize them in a timely fashion. However, a clear understanding of the fundamental science underlying a CVD process, as expressed through computer models, can substantially shorten the time required for reactor and process development. Research scientists at Sandia use a wide range of experimental and theoretical techniques for investigating the science of CVD. Experimental tools include optical probes for gas-phase and surface processes, a range of surface analytic techniques, molecular beam methods for gas/surface kinetics, flow visualization techniques and state-of-the-art crystal growth reactors. The theoretical strategy uses a structured approach to describe the coupled gas-phase and gas-surface chemistry, fluid dynamics, heat and mass transfer of a CVD process. The software used to describe chemical reaction mechanisms is easily adapted to codes that model a variety of reactor geometries. Carefully chosen experiments provide critical information on the chemical species, gas temperatures and flows that are necessary for model development and validation. This brochure provides basic information on Sandia`s capabilities in the physical and chemical sciences of CVD and related materials processing technologies. It contains a brief description of the major scientific and technical capabilities of the CVD staff and facilities, and a brief discussion of the approach that the staff uses to advance the scientific understanding of CVD processes.

  11. Transdermal Diagnosis of Malaria Using Vapor Nanobubbles.

    PubMed

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina; Bezek, Sarah; Szigeti, Reka; Khodarev, Alexander; Kelley, Thomas; Hurrell, Andrew; Berba, Michail; Kumar, Nirbhay; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Lapotko, Dmitri

    2015-07-01

    A fast, precise, noninvasive, high-throughput, and simple approach for detecting malaria in humans and mosquitoes is not possible with current techniques that depend on blood sampling, reagents, facilities, tedious procedures, and trained personnel. We designed a device for rapid (20-second) noninvasive diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum infection in a malaria patient without drawing blood or using any reagent. This method uses transdermal optical excitation and acoustic detection of vapor nanobubbles around intraparasite hemozoin. The same device also identified individual malaria parasite-infected Anopheles mosquitoes in a few seconds and can be realized as a low-cost universal tool for clinical and field diagnoses. PMID:26079141

  12. Transdermal Diagnosis of Malaria Using Vapor Nanobubbles

    PubMed Central

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina; Bezek, Sarah; Szigeti, Reka; Khodarev, Alexander; Kelley, Thomas; Hurrell, Andrew; Berba, Michail; Kumar, Nirbhay; D’Alessandro, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    A fast, precise, noninvasive, high-throughput, and simple approach for detecting malaria in humans and mosquitoes is not possible with current techniques that depend on blood sampling, reagents, facilities, tedious procedures, and trained personnel. We designed a device for rapid (20-second) noninvasive diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum infection in a malaria patient without drawing blood or using any reagent. This method uses transdermal optical excitation and acoustic detection of vapor nanobubbles around intraparasite hemozoin. The same device also identified individual malaria parasite–infected Anopheles mosquitoes in a few seconds and can be realized as a low-cost universal tool for clinical and field diagnoses. PMID:26079141

  13. Characterization and mitigation of water vapor effects in the measurement of ozone by chemiluminescence with nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boylan, P.; Helmig, D.; Park, J.-H.

    2013-10-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of water vapor on the reaction of nitric oxide with ozone in a chemiluminescence instrument used for fast response and high sensitivity detection of atmospheric ozone. Water vapor was introduced into a constant level ozone standard and both ozone and water vapor signals were recorded at 10 Hz. The presence of water vapor was found to reduce, i.e. quench the ozone signal. A correction factor was determined to be 4.15 ± 0.14 × 10-3, which corresponds to a 4.15% increase in the measured ozone signal per 10 mmol mol-1 co-sampled water vapor. An ozone-inert water vapor permeable membrane (Nafion dryer) was installed in the sampling line and was shown to remove the bulk of the water vapor mole fraction in the sample air. At water vapor mole fractions above 25 mmol mol-1, the Nafion dryer removed over 75% of the water vapor in the sample. This reduced the ozone signal correction from over 11% to less than 2.5%. The Nafion dryer was highly effective at reducing the fast fluctuations of the water vapor signal (more than 97%) while leaving the ozone signal unaffected, which is a crucial improvement for minimizing the interference of water vapor fluxes on the ozone flux determination by the eddy covariance technique.

  14. Characterization and mitigation of water vapor effects in the measurement of ozone by chemiluminescence with nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boylan, P.; Helmig, D.; Park, J.-H.

    2014-05-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of water vapor on the reaction of nitric oxide with ozone in a gas-phase chemiluminescence instrument used for fast response and high sensitivity detection of atmospheric ozone. Water vapor was introduced into a constant level ozone standard and both ozone and water vapor signals were recorded at 10 Hz. The presence of water vapor was found to reduce, i.e. quench, the ozone signal. A dimensionless correction factor was determined to be 4.15 ± 0.14 × 10-3, which corresponds to a 4.15% increase in the corrected ozone signal per 10 mmol mol-1 of co-sampled water vapor. An ozone-inert water vapor permeable membrane (a Nafion dryer with a counterflow of dry air from a compressed gas cylinder) was installed in the sampling line and was shown to remove the bulk of the water vapor in the sample air. At water vapor mole fractions above 25 mmol mol-1, the Nafion dryer removed over 75% of the water vapor in the sample. This reduced the required ozone signal correction from over 11% to less than 2.5%. The Nafion dryer was highly effective at reducing the fast fluctuations of the water vapor signal (more than 97%) while leaving the ozone signal unaffected, which is a crucial improvement for minimizing the quenching interference of water vapor fluxes and required density correction in the determination of ozone fluxes by the eddy covariance technique.

  15. Impact Vaporization of Planetesimal Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, R. G.; Root, S.; Lemke, R. W.; Stewart, S. T.; Jacobsen, S. B.; Mattsson, T. R.

    2013-12-01

    The degree of mixing and chemical equilibration between the iron cores of planetesimals and the mantle of the growing Earth has important consequences for understanding the end stages of Earth's formation and planet formation in general. At the Sandia Z machine, we developed a new shock-and-release technique to determine the density on the liquid-vapor dome of iron, the entropy on the iron shock Hugoniot, and the criteria for shock-induced vaporization of iron. We find that the critical shock pressure to vaporize iron is 507(+65,-85) GPa and show that decompression from a 15 km/s impact will initiate vaporization of iron cores, which is a velocity that is readily achieved at the end stages of planet formation. Vaporization of the iron cores increases dispersal of planetesimal cores, enables more complete chemical equilibration of the planetesimal cores with Earth's mantle, and reduces the highly siderophile element abundance on the Moon relative to Earth due to the expanding iron vapor exceeding the Moon's escape velocity. Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Securities Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Trace Explosives Vapor Generation and Quantitation at Parts per Quadrillion Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Braden C; Field, Christopher R; Andrews, Benjamin; Lubrano, Adam; Woytowitz, Morgan; Rogers, Duane; Collins, Greg E

    2016-04-01

    The generation of trace 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) vapors using a pneumatically modulated liquid delivery system (PMLDS) coupled to a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) total-consumption micronebulizer is presented. The vapor generator operates in a continuous manner with final vapor concentrations proportional to the explosive concentration in aqueous solution delivered through the nebulizer and the diluent air flow rate. For quantitation of concentrations in the parts per billionvolume (ppbv) to parts per trillionvolume (pptrv) range, Tenax-TA thermal desorption tubes were used for vapor collection with subsequent analysis on a thermal-desorption system programmable-temperature vaporization gas chromatograph (TDS-PTV-GC) with a μ-ECD detector. With 30 min sample times and an average sampling rate of 100 mL min(-1), vapor concentrations of 38 pptrv for TNT, 25 pptrv for RDX, and 26 pptrv for PETN were determined. For parts per quadrillionvolume (ppqv) vapor quantitation of TNT and RDX, an online PTV-GC system with a negative-ion chemical ionization mass spectrometer (methane reagent gas) was used for direct sampling and capture of the vapor on the PTV inlet. Vapor concentrations as low as 160 ppqv and 710 ppqv for TNT and RDX were quantified, respectively, with an instrument duty cycle as low as 4 min. PMID:26971624

  17. Developmental toxicity evaluation of unleaded gasoline vapor in the rat.

    PubMed

    Roberts, L; White, R; Bui, Q; Daughtrey, W; Koschier, F; Rodney, S; Schreiner, C; Steup, D; Breglia, R; Rhoden, R; Schroeder, R; Newton, P

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the potential of unleaded gasoline vapor for developmental toxicity, a sample was prepared by slowly heating API 94-02 (1990 industry average gasoline) and condensing the vapor. The composition of this vapor condensate, which comprises 10.4% by volume of the starting gasoline, is representative of real-world exposure to gasoline vapor encountered at service stations and other occupational settings and consists primarily of volatile short chain (C4-C6) aliphatic hydrocarbons (i.e. paraffins) with small amounts of cycloparaffins and aromatic hydrocarbons. A preliminary study in rats and mice resulted in no developmental toxicity in either species. However, a slight reduction in maternal body weight gain in rats led to the selection of rats for this guideline study. Groups of pregnant rats (n = 24/group) were exposed to unleaded gasoline vapor at concentrations of 0, 1000, 3000, or 9000 (75% lower explosive limit) ppm equivalent to 0, 2653, 7960, or 23,900 mg/m3, for 6 h/day on gestation days 6-19. All rats were sacrificed on gestation day 20. No maternal toxicity was observed. Developmentally, there were no differences between treated and control groups in malformations, total variations, resorptions, fetal body weight, or viability. The maternal and developmental NOAEL is 9000 ppm. Under conditions of this study, unleaded gasoline vapors did not produce evidence of developmental toxicity. PMID:11780956

  18. Evaluation of vapor intrusion using controlled building pressure.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Thomas E; Beckley, Lila; Bailey, Danielle; Gorder, Kyle; Dettenmaier, Erik; Rivera-Duarte, Ignacio; Brock, Samuel; MacGregor, Ian C

    2012-05-01

    The use of measured volatile organic chemical (VOC) concentrations in indoor air to evaluate vapor intrusion is complicated by (i) indoor sources of the same VOCs and (ii) temporal variability in vapor intrusion. This study evaluated the efficacy of utilizing induced negative and positive building pressure conditions during a vapor intrusion investigation program to provide an improved understanding of the potential for vapor intrusion. Pressure control was achieved in five of six buildings where the investigation program was tested. For these five buildings, the induced pressure differences were sufficient to control the flow of soil gas through the building foundation. A comparison of VOC concentrations in indoor air measured during the negative and positive pressure test conditions was sufficient to determine whether vapor intrusion was the primary source of VOCs in indoor air at these buildings. The study results indicate that sampling under controlled building pressure can help minimize ambiguity caused by both indoor sources of VOCs and temporal variability in vapor intrusion. PMID:22486634

  19. Direct detection of RDX vapor using a conjugated polymer network.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Deepti; Dichtel, William R

    2013-06-01

    1,3,5-Trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) is a principal component of plastic explosives used in acts of terrorism and within improvised explosive devices, among others. Approaches to detect RDX compatible with remote, "stand-off" sampling that do not require preconcentration strategies, such as the swabs commonly employed in airports, will benefit military and civilian security. Such detection remains a significant challenge because RDX is 10(3) less volatile than 1,3,5-trinitrotoluene (TNT), corresponding to a parts-per-trillion vapor pressure under ambient conditions. Therefore, while fluorescence quenching of conjugated polymers is sufficiently sensitive to detect TNT vapors, RDX vapor detection is undemonstrated. Here we report a cross-linked phenylene vinylene polymer network whose fluorescence is quenched by trace amounts of RDX introduced from solution or the vapor phase. Fluorescence quenching is reduced, but remains significant, when partially degraded RDX is employed, suggesting that the polymer responds to RDX itself. The polymer network also responds to TNT and PETN similarly introduced from solution or the vapor phase. Pure solvents, volatile amines, and the outgassed vapors from lipstick or sunscreen do not quench polymer fluorescence. The established success of TNT sensors based on fluorescence quenching makes this a material of interest for real-world explosive sensors and will motivate further interest in cross-linked polymers and framework materials for sensing applications. PMID:23641956

  20. 21 CFR 868.5880 - Anesthetic vaporizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anesthetic vaporizer. 868.5880 Section 868.5880...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5880 Anesthetic vaporizer. (a) Identification. An anesthetic vaporizer is a device used to vaporize liquid anesthetic and deliver a...

  1. 21 CFR 868.5880 - Anesthetic vaporizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anesthetic vaporizer. 868.5880 Section 868.5880...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5880 Anesthetic vaporizer. (a) Identification. An anesthetic vaporizer is a device used to vaporize liquid anesthetic and deliver a...

  2. 21 CFR 868.5880 - Anesthetic vaporizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anesthetic vaporizer. 868.5880 Section 868.5880...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5880 Anesthetic vaporizer. (a) Identification. An anesthetic vaporizer is a device used to vaporize liquid anesthetic and deliver a...

  3. 21 CFR 868.5880 - Anesthetic vaporizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anesthetic vaporizer. 868.5880 Section 868.5880...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5880 Anesthetic vaporizer. (a) Identification. An anesthetic vaporizer is a device used to vaporize liquid anesthetic and deliver a...

  4. 21 CFR 868.5880 - Anesthetic vaporizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthetic vaporizer. 868.5880 Section 868.5880...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5880 Anesthetic vaporizer. (a) Identification. An anesthetic vaporizer is a device used to vaporize liquid anesthetic and deliver a...

  5. FURTHER CHARACTERIZATION OF SORBENTS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an ongoing experimental program to evaluate the breakthrough characteristics of sorbent resins for sampling of organic vapors using an elution analysis chromatographic technique. The effects of water vapor and CO2, at levels typical of gaseous effluent...

  6. A water vapor monitor using differential infrared absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burch, D. E.; Goodsell, D. S.

    1981-09-01

    A water vapor monitor was developed with adequate sensitivity and versatility for a variety of applications. Two applications are the continuous monitoring of water in ambient air and the measuring of the mass of water desorbed from aerosol filters. The sample gas may be held static, or flow continuously through the 56 cc sample cell, temperature controlled at 45 C. Infrared energy from a tungsten-iodide bulb passes through a rotating filter wheel and the sample cell to a PbS detector. The infrared beam passes through the sample gas twice to produce a total optical path of 40 cm. The infrared beam passes alternately through two semicircular narrow bandpass filters. Absorption by the water vapor in the sample produces a 30-Hz modulation of the detector signal that is proportional to the water concentration. The maximum concentration that can be measured accurately is approximately 5%.

  7. Experimental determination of ablation vapor species from carbon phenolic heat-shield materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lincoln, K. A.

    1981-01-01

    The relative concentrations of vapors produced from carbon phenolic composites under thermal loadings approximating those expected at peak heating during vehicle entry into the atmospheres of the outer planets have been determined. The technique of vaporizing the surface of bulk samples by laser irradiation while measuring in situ the vapor species by mass spectrometry is described. Results show that vapor composition varies with irradiance level and with depth of heating (or extent of pyrolysis). Attempts are made to compare these experimental results with the theoretical predictions from computer codes.

  8. Inferring water vapor amounts with solar spectral irradiance: Measurements, modeling, and comparisons with in situ water vapor profiles in the upper troposphere lower stratosphere from ATTREX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindel, B. C.; Pilewskie, P.; Schmidt, S.; Thornberry, T. D.; Rollins, D. W.; LeBlanc, S. E.; Bui, T. V.

    2013-12-01

    The Airborne Tropical TRopopause Experiment (ATTREX) flew six science missions on the NASA Global Hawk aircraft from NASA Dryden, California to the Pacific tropics to sample the upper troposphere, lower stratosphere (UTLS) during February and March of 2013. After transit to the tropics, the aircraft performed a series of vertical profiles from the cruising altitude of about 18 km down to 14 km sampling the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). A science focus of ATTREX is to examine water vapor and its transport through the TTL. The extremely cold temperatures found in the TTL act to limit the transport of water vapor from the troposphere to stratosphere, making this region critical to the water vapor budget of the stratosphere. Here we investigate the use of the strong water bands centered at 1400 and 1900 nm in the telluric solar spectrum to infer the small water vapor amounts through the TTL. Measurements of spectral irradiance from the Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR) at the top and bottom of the aircraft profiles are used to produce transmission spectra. These are compared with atmospheric radiative transfer calculations of transmission through the layer. The measured water vapor profile from the NOAA water vapor instrument, as well as temperature and pressure, were used in the modeling, providing a rare opportunity to compare water vapor amount inferred from solar transmittance to in situ measurements. Prospects for the use of these bands for determining the total column water vapor amount from the UTLS to the top of the atmosphere from aircraft are also discussed.

  9. Engineering Task Plan for Preparing the Type 4 In Situ Vapor Samplers (ISVS) for Use

    SciTech Connect

    BOGER, R.M.

    2000-01-06

    The DOE has identified a need to sample vapor space and exhaust ducts of several waste tanks The In-Situ Vapor Sampling (ISVS) Type IV vapor sampling cart has been identified as the appropriate monitoring tool. The ISVS carts have been out of service for a number of years. This ETP outlines the work to be performed to ready the type IV gas sampler for operation Characterization Engineering will evaluate the Type IV gas sampler carts to determine their state of readiness and will proceed to update procedures and equipment documentation to make the sampler operationally acceptable.

  10. Vapor pressures of new fluorocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, H.; Yamashita, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Makita, T. )

    1989-05-01

    The vapor pressures of four fluorocarbons have been measured at the following temperature ranges: R123 (2,2-dichloro-1,1,1-trifluoroethane), 273-457 K; R123a (1,2-dichloro-1,1,2-trifluoroethane), 303-458 K; R134a (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane), 253-373 K; and R132b (1,2-dichloro-1,1-difluoroethane), 273-398 K. Determinations of the vapor pressure were carried out by a constant-volume apparatus with an uncertainty of less than 1.0%. The vapor pressures of R123 and R123a are very similar to those of R11 over the whole experimental temperature range, but the vapor pressures of R134a and R132b differ somewhat from those of R12 and R113, respectively, as the temperature increases. The numerical vapor pressure data can be fitted by an empirical equation using the Chebyshev polynomial with a mean deviation of less than 0.3%.

  11. The Lithium Vapor Box Divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldston, Robert; Hakim, Ammar; Hammett, Gregory; Jaworski, Michael; Myers, Rachel; Schwartz, Jacob

    2015-11-01

    Projections of scrape-off layer width to a demonstration power plant suggest an immense parallel heat flux, of order 12 GW/m2, which will necessitate nearly fully detached operation. Building on earlier work by Nagayama et al. and by Ono et al., we propose to use a series of differentially pumped boxes filled with lithium vapor to isolate the buffering vapor from the main plasma chamber, allowing stable detachment. This powerful differential pumping is only available for condensable vapors, not conventional gases. We demonstrate the properties of such a system through conservation laws for vapor mass and enthalpy, and then include plasma entrainment and ultimately an estimate of radiated power. We find that full detachment should be achievable with little leakage of lithium to the main plasma chamber. We also present progress towards solving the Navier-Stokes equation numerically for the chain of vapor boxes, including self-consistent wall boundary conditions and fully-developed shocks, as well as concepts for an initial experimental demonstration-of-concept. This work supported by DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  12. Final Report for ARM Project Measuring 4-D Water Vapor Fields with GPS

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, John

    2006-02-06

    Water vapor is a primary element in the Earth’s climate system. Atmospheric water vapor is central to cloud processes, radiation transfer, and the hydrological cycle. Using funding from Department of Energy (DOE) grant DE-FG03-02ER63327, the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) developed new observational techniques to measure atmospheric water vapor and applied these techniques to measure four dimensional water vapor fields throughout the United States Southern Great Plains region. This report summarizes the development of a new observation from ground based Global Positioning System (GPS) stations called Slant Water Vapor (SW) and it’s utilization in retrieving four dimensional water vapor fields. The SW observation represents the integrated amount of water vapor between a GPS station and a transmitting satellite. SW observations provide improved temporal and spatial sampling of the atmosphere when compared to column-integrated quantities such as preciptitable water vapor (PW). Under funding from the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program, GPS networks in the Southern Great Plains (SGP) region were deployed to retrieve SW to improve the characterization of water vapor throughout the region. These observations were used to estimate four dimensional water vapor fields using tomographic approaches and through assimilation into the MM5 numerical weather model.

  13. Enthalpy of Vaporization by Gas Chromatography: A Physical Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, Herbert R.

    2005-01-01

    An experiment is conducted to measure the enthalpy of vaporization of volatile compounds like methylene chloride, carbon tetrachloride, and others by using gas chromatography. This physical property was measured using a very tiny quantity of sample revealing that it is possible to measure the enthalpies of two or more compounds at the same time.

  14. Marine loading vapor control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Babet, F.H.

    1996-09-01

    The EPA and State air quality control boards have mandated the collection and destruction or recovery of vapors generated by the loading of some hydrocarbons and chemicals into marine vessels. This is a brief overview of the main US Coast Guard requirements for marine vapor control systems. As with most regulations, they are open to interpretation. In an attempt to more clearly define the intent of the regulations, the US Coast Guard has issued guidelines to assist the certifying entities in ensuring compliance with intended regulations. If a company is contemplating the installation of a marine loading vapor control system, the authors strongly recommend that one engage the services of a certifying entity, either as the designer, or an advisor and ultimately the certifier of the system. This should be done well up front in the design of the system to avoid costly mistakes which can occur as a result of lack of knowledge or misinterpretation of the regulations and guidelines.

  15. Release of mercury vapor from coal combustion ash.

    PubMed

    Heebink, Loreal V; Hassett, David J

    2002-08-01

    The long-term stability of Hg in coal combustion by-products (CCBs) was evaluated at ambient and near-ambient temperatures. Six CCB samples with atypically high levels of total Hg were selected for study assuming a greater potential for release of measurable amounts of Hg vapor. The samples selected included two fly ash samples from U.S. eastern bituminous coal, two fly ash samples from South African low-rank coal, one fly ash from Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal blended with petroleum coke, and one PRB subbituminous coal fly ash incorporated with flue gas desulfurization material. Air scrubbed of Hg was passed through compacted 100-g aliquots of each sample at 1 mL/min and vented to a gold-coated quartz trap to collect released Hg vapor. The samples were maintained at ambient and near-ambient (37 degrees C) temperatures. All samples released low-picogram levels of Hg after 90 days. No pattern was evident to link the total Hg content to the rate of release of Hg vapor. An average of 0.030 pg Hg/g CCB/day was released from the samples, which equates to 2.2 x 10(-8) lb Hg/ton CCB/year. If this were applied to a coal-fired power plant production of 200,000 tons of fly ash per year, there would be a maximum potential release of 0.0044 lb, or 2.00 g, of Hg per year. Experiments are continuing to determine long-term vapor release of Hg from CCBs. All samples have been set up in duplicate at ambient temperature with an improved apparatus to reevaluate results reported in this article. PMID:12184691

  16. Vapor deposition of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Smith, David C.; Pattillo, Stevan G.; Laia, Jr., Joseph R.; Sattelberger, Alfred P.

    1992-01-01

    A highly pure thin metal film having a nanocrystalline structure and a process of preparing such highly pure thin metal films of, e.g., rhodium, iridium, molybdenum, tungsten, rhenium, platinum, or palladium by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition of, e.g., rhodium(allyl).sub.3, iridium(allyl).sub.3, molybdenum(allyl).sub.4, tungsten(allyl).sub.4, rhenium(allyl).sub.4, platinum(allyl).sub.2, or palladium(allyl).sub.2 are disclosed. Additionally, a general process of reducing the carbon content of a metallic film prepared from one or more organometallic precursor compounds by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition is disclosed.

  17. Transport of Elements By Geothermal And Volcanic Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaasalainen, H. S.; Stefánsson, A.; Prapaipong, P.; Giroud, N.; Arnórsson, S.; Shock, E.

    2009-12-01

    Volatile species provide information on physical and chemical origin and processes in volcanic geothermal systems. Volatile metals and metalloids may be transported by both liquid and vapor phases that are often present in these systems, and some elements (e.g. As, Hg, Pb) may even be enriched in the vapor phases. The speciation and transport mechanism, as well as the origin of the elements in vapor is often poorly understood. Our aim is to characterize elemental concentrations and transport mechanism in the vapor phase in active geothermal systems. Samples of geothermal and volcanic vapor were collected from two-phase well discharges from Iceland and high temperature fumaroles in Vulcano Island and Solfatara field in Italy. Vapor and liquid phases were analyzed for major components and trace elements. Single phase volcanic vapor discharges had temperatures between 144 and 407°C. Their composition was dominated by H2O, but contained significant amounts of CO2 and acid gases (SO2, HCl, HF) whereas also H2S, H2 and N2 were present. In geothermal steam, with discharge pressures up to 42 bars, acid gases were absent and the steam consisted of 99% H2O, the rest being CO2, H2S, N2, and H2. Volcanic vapor condensates were analyzed for over 50 trace elements. Precipitation of condensate samples upon sampling and storage is commonly encountered problem. Different sampling protocols and sample treatments were tested to avoid and study their effects on the measured concentrations. The measured concentrations of some elements (e.g. Mg, Al, Sb) were found to show significant differences depending on the treatment, where as others (e.g. B, Ni, Zn) were not affected. In volcanic vapor, metals and metalloids were found in concentrations from lower ppb level up to tens of ppm. B shows highest concentrations followed by e.g. As, Pb, Zn, Mn, Ni, and Cu. In two phase well discharges, however, metals and metalloids were observed to be depleted in vapor compared to the liquid phase

  18. Vaporization and compatibility of SiGe radioisotope thermoelectric generators.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staley, H. G.; Rovner, L. H.; Snowden, D.; Elsner, N. B.

    1972-01-01

    The limiting operating temperatures of SiGe thermoelectrics designed for extended operation are set by sublimation process of the elements and by considerations of their compatibility with the surrounding insulating elements. Mass spectrometric Knudsen cell and Langmuir vaporization modes of operation have been utilized in the study of the equilibrium vapor species and in the time evaluation of the sublimation process. Isothermal high-vacuum (1 ntorr) anneals of samples have extended observations to long-time spans. The time variations follow the formation of surface depletion layers due to disproportional rates of sublimation of the various species.

  19. Low level vapor verification of monomethyl hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Narinder

    1990-01-01

    The vapor scrubbing system and the coulometric test procedure for the low level vapor verification of monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) are evaluated. Experimental data on precision, efficiency of the scrubbing liquid, instrument response, detection and reliable quantitation limits, stability of the vapor scrubbed solution, and interference were obtained to assess the applicability of the method for the low ppb level detection of the analyte vapor in air. The results indicated that the analyte vapor scrubbing system and the coulometric test procedure can be utilized for the quantitative detection of low ppb level vapor of MMH in air.

  20. Frequency domain fluorimetry using a mercury vapor lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohn, Matthew J.; Lundin, Michael A.; Marciniak, Michael A.

    2009-04-01

    Frequency Domain (FD) fluorimetry, capitalizes on the frequency response function of a fluorophore and offers independence from light scatter and excitation/emission intensity variations in order to extract the sample's fluorescent lifetime. Mercury vapor lamps, a common source of industrial facility lighting, emit radiation that overlaps the UV/blue absorption spectrum of many fluorophores and may be used as an efficient and portable excitation source. The AC power modulation of mercury vapor lamps modulates the lamp's intensity at 120 Hz (in the United States) and higher harmonics. The fluorescent lifetimes for 3 different materials (willemite, uranium doped glass and U3O8) are measured with conventional techniques and compared with the FD technique using the power harmonics from a mercury vapor lamp. The mercury lamp measurements agree to within 25% of the conventional methods.

  1. Hydrazine vapor inactivates Bacillus spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Wayne W.; Engler, Diane L.; Beaudet, Robert A.

    2016-05-01

    NASA policy restricts the total number of bacterial spores that can remain on a spacecraft traveling to any planetary body which might harbor life or have evidence of past life. Hydrazine, N2H4, is commonly used as a propellant on spacecraft. Hydrazine as a liquid is known to inactivate bacterial spores. We have now verified that hydrazine vapor also inactivates bacterial spores. After Bacillus atrophaeus ATCC 9372 spores deposited on stainless steel coupons were exposed to saturated hydrazine vapor in closed containers, the spores were recovered from the coupons, serially diluted, pour plated and the surviving bacterial colonies were counted. The exposure times required to reduce the spore population by a factor of ten, known as the D-value, were 4.70 ± 0.50 h at 25 °C and 2.85 ± 0.13 h at 35 °C. These inactivation rates are short enough to ensure that the bioburden of the surfaces and volumes would be negligible after prolonged exposure to hydrazine vapor. Thus, all the propellant tubing and internal tank surfaces exposed to hydrazine vapor do not contribute to the total spore count.

  2. Acoustic Behavior of Vapor Bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea; Oguz, Hasan N.

    1996-01-01

    In a microgravity environment vapor bubbles generated at a boiling surface tend to remain near it for a long time. This affects the boiling heat transfer and in particular promotes an early transition to the highly inefficient film boiling regime. This paper describes the physical basis underlying attempts to remove the bubbles by means of pressure radiation forces.

  3. INDOOR AIR VAPOR INTRUSION SEMINAR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This seminar is sponsored by the ORD in collaboration with the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response. The goal of this seminar is to present information and guidance to evaluate, assess and characterize chemical vapor pathways migrating into structures resulting from conta...

  4. Laser using lead chloride vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. J.

    1975-01-01

    By applying electric discharge, lead chloride vapor in tube is dissociated into lead and chlorine atoms. Population inversion of lead atoms is attained subsequently by second discharge, before chemical recombination of lead and chlorine has occurred. Optimum time interval between two discharges is required for maximum laser output.

  5. Vacuum vapor deposition gun assembly

    DOEpatents

    Zeren, Joseph D.

    1985-01-01

    A vapor deposition gun assembly includes a hollow body having a cylindrical outer surface and an end plate for holding an adjustable heat sink, a hot hollow cathode gun, two magnets for steering the plasma from the gun into a crucible on the heat sink, and a shutter for selectively covering and uncovering the crucible.

  6. Vapor phase explosions: elementary detonations?

    PubMed

    Fowles, G R

    1979-04-13

    Although liquid-vapor explosions are widely observed, there is no established explanation for their initiation and propagation. Thermodynamics admits the possibility that superheated liquids can support detonations analogous to those that occur in chemical explosives. For liquid methane superheated 50 K above its boiling point at 1 atmosphere, the energy of explosion is 2 to 3 percent of that of TNT. PMID:17738085

  7. Simple Chemical Vapor Deposition Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process commonly used for the synthesis of thin films for several important technological applications, for example, microelectronics, hard coatings, and smart windows. Unfortunately, the complexity and prohibitive cost of CVD equipment makes it seldom available for undergraduate chemistry students. Here, a…

  8. Direct Real-Time Detection of Vapors from Explosive Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Robert G.; Clowers, Brian H.; Atkinson, David A.

    2013-10-03

    The real-time detection of vapors from low volatility explosives including PETN, tetryl, RDX and nitroglycerine along with various compositions containing these substances is demonstrated. This was accomplished with an atmospheric flow tube (AFT) using a non-radioactive ionization source and coupled to a mass spectrometer. Direct vapor detection was demonstrated in less than 5 seconds at ambient temperature without sample pre-concentration. The several seconds of residence time of analytes in the AFT provides a significant opportunity for reactant ions to interact with analyte vapors to achieve ionization. This extended reaction time, combined with the selective ionization using the nitrate reactant ions (NO3- and NO3-•HNO3), enables highly sensitive explosives detection. Observed signals from diluted explosive vapors indicate detection limits below 10 ppqv using selected ion monitoring (SIM) of the explosive-nitrate adduct at m/z 349, 378, 284 and 289 for tetryl, PETN, RDX and NG respectively. Also provided is a demonstration of the vapor detection from 10 different energetic formulations, including double base propellants, plastic explosives and commercial blasting explosives using SIM for the NG, PETN and RDX product ions.

  9. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Johnson, R. E.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    A laboratory type CVD reactor system with a vertical deposition chamber and sample pedestal heated by an external RF coil has been extensively modified by installation of mass flow controllers, automatic process sequence timers, and special bellows-sealed air-operated valves for overall improved performance. Various film characterization procedures, including classical metallography, SEM analyses, X ray diffraction analyses, surface profilometry, and electrical measurements (resistivity, carrier concentration, mobility, spreading resistance profiles, and minority-carrier lifetime by the C-V-t method) area used to correlate Si sheet properties with CVD parameters and substrate properties. Evaluation procedures and measurements are given. Experimental solar cell structures were made both in epitaxial Si sheet (on sapphire substrates) and in polycrystalline material on alumina substrates, the former to provide an indication of what might be an upper limit on performance of the latter. Preliminary results are given, as obtained in cell structures not specially designed to allow for the unique properties of the sheet material, and fabricated in material known to be far from optimum for photovoltaic performance. Low power conversion efficiencies have been obtained in the epitaxial as well as the polycrystalline Si sheet.

  10. Vapor Pressure Plus: An Experiment for Studying Phase Equilibria in Water, with Observation of Supercooling, Spontaneous Freezing, and the Triple Point

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Liquid-vapor, solid-vapor, and solid-liquid-vapor equilibria are studied for the pure substance water, using modern equipment that includes specially fabricated glass cells. Samples are evaporatively frozen initially, during which they typically supercool to -5 to -10 [degrees]C before spontaneously freezing. Vacuum pumping lowers the temperature…

  11. Sampling and Sample Preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morawicki, Rubén O.

    Quality attributes in food products, raw materials, or ingredients are measurable characteristics that need monitoring to ensure that specifications are met. Some quality attributes can be measured online by using specially designed sensors and results obtained in real time (e.g., color of vegetable oil in an oil extraction plant). However, in most cases quality attributes are measured on small portions of material that are taken periodically from continuous processes or on a certain number of small portions taken from a lot. The small portions taken for analysis are referred to as samples, and the entire lot or the entire production for a certain period of time, in the case of continuous processes, is called a population. The process of taking samples from a population is called sampling. If the procedure is done correctly, the measurable characteristics obtained for the samples become a very accurate estimation of the population.

  12. Potassium permanganate for mercury vapor environmental control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuivinen, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    Potassium permanganate (KMnO4) was evaluated for application in removing mercury vapor from exhaust air systems. The KMnO4 may be used in water solution with a liquid spray scrubber system or as a solid adsorber bed material when impregnated onto a zeolite. Air samples contaminated with as much as 112 mg/cu m of mercury were scrubbed to 0.06mg/cum with the KMnO4-impregnated zeolite (molecular sieve material). The water spray solution of permanganate was also found to be as effective as the impregnated zeolite. The KMnO4-impregnated zeolite was applied as a solid adsorber material to (1) a hardware decontamination system, (2) a model incinerator, and (3) a high vacuum chamber for ion engine testing with mercury as the propellant. A liquid scrubber system was also applied in an incinerator system. Based on the results of these experiments, it is concluded that the use of KMnO4 can be an effective method for controlling noxious mercury vapor.

  13. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation process

    DOEpatents

    Wyeth, R.W.; Paisner, J.A.; Story, T.

    1990-08-21

    A laser spectroscopy system is utilized in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. The system determines spectral components of an atomic vapor utilizing a laser heterodyne technique. 23 figs.

  14. Boiler for generating high quality vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, V. H.; Marto, P. J.; Joslyn, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    Boiler supplies vapor for use in turbines by imparting a high angular velocity to the liquid annulus in heated rotating drum. Drum boiler provides a sharp interface between boiling liquid and vapor, thereby, inhibiting the formation of unwanted liquid droplets.

  15. Potentiometric detection of chemical vapors using molecularly imprinted polymers as receptors

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Rongning; Chen, Lusi; Qin, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Ion-selective electrode (ISE) based potentiometric gas sensors have shown to be promising analytical tools for detection of chemical vapors. However, such sensors are only capable of detecting those vapors which can be converted into ionic species in solution. This paper describes for the first time a polymer membrane ISE based potentiometric sensing system for sensitive and selective determination of neutral vapors in the gas phase. A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) is incorporated into the ISE membrane and used as the receptor for selective adsorption of the analyte vapor from the gas phase into the sensing membrane phase. An indicator ion with a structure similar to that of the vapor molecule is employed to indicate the change in the MIP binding sites in the membrane induced by the molecular recognition of the vapor. The toluene vapor is used as a model and benzoic acid is chosen as its indicator. Coupled to an apparatus manifold for preparation of vapor samples, the proposed ISE can be utilized to determine volatile toluene in the gas phase and allows potentiometric detection down to parts per million levels. This work demonstrates the possibility of developing a general sensing principle for detection of neutral vapors using ISEs. PMID:26215887

  16. Inclusion of high resolution MODIS maps on a 3D tropospheric water vapor GPS tomography model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benevides, Pedro; Catalao, Joao; Nico, Giovanni; Miranda, Pedro M. A.

    2015-10-01

    Observing the water vapor distribution on the troposphere remains a challenge for the weather forecast. Radiosondes provide precise water vapor profiles of the troposphere, but lack geographical and temporal coverage, while satellite meteorological maps have good spatial resolution but even poorer temporal resolution. GPS has proved its capacity to measure the integrated water vapor in all weather conditions with high temporal sampling frequency. However these measurements lack a vertical water vapor discretization. Reconstruction of the slant path GPS observation to the satellite allows oblique water vapor measurements. Implementation of a 3D grid of voxels along the troposphere over an area where GPS stations are available enables the observation ray tracing. A relation between the water vapor density and the distanced traveled inside the voxels is established, defining GPS tomography. An inverse problem formulation is needed to obtain a water vapor solution. The combination of precipitable water vapor (PWV) maps obtained from MODIS satellite data with the GPS tomography is performed in this work. The MODIS PWV maps can have 1 or 5 km pixel resolution, being obtained 2 times per day in the same location at most. The inclusion of MODIS PWV maps provides an enhanced horizontal resolution for the tomographic solution and benefits the stability of the inversion problem. A 3D tomographic grid was adjusted over a regional area covering Lisbon, Portugal, where a GNSS network of 9 receivers is available. Radiosonde measurements in the area are used to evaluate the 3D water vapor tomography maps.

  17. Potentiometric detection of chemical vapors using molecularly imprinted polymers as receptors.

    PubMed

    Liang, Rongning; Chen, Lusi; Qin, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Ion-selective electrode (ISE) based potentiometric gas sensors have shown to be promising analytical tools for detection of chemical vapors. However, such sensors are only capable of detecting those vapors which can be converted into ionic species in solution. This paper describes for the first time a polymer membrane ISE based potentiometric sensing system for sensitive and selective determination of neutral vapors in the gas phase. A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) is incorporated into the ISE membrane and used as the receptor for selective adsorption of the analyte vapor from the gas phase into the sensing membrane phase. An indicator ion with a structure similar to that of the vapor molecule is employed to indicate the change in the MIP binding sites in the membrane induced by the molecular recognition of the vapor. The toluene vapor is used as a model and benzoic acid is chosen as its indicator. Coupled to an apparatus manifold for preparation of vapor samples, the proposed ISE can be utilized to determine volatile toluene in the gas phase and allows potentiometric detection down to parts per million levels. This work demonstrates the possibility of developing a general sensing principle for detection of neutral vapors using ISEs. PMID:26215887

  18. Potentiometric detection of chemical vapors using molecularly imprinted polymers as receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Rongning; Chen, Lusi; Qin, Wei

    2015-07-01

    Ion-selective electrode (ISE) based potentiometric gas sensors have shown to be promising analytical tools for detection of chemical vapors. However, such sensors are only capable of detecting those vapors which can be converted into ionic species in solution. This paper describes for the first time a polymer membrane ISE based potentiometric sensing system for sensitive and selective determination of neutral vapors in the gas phase. A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) is incorporated into the ISE membrane and used as the receptor for selective adsorption of the analyte vapor from the gas phase into the sensing membrane phase. An indicator ion with a structure similar to that of the vapor molecule is employed to indicate the change in the MIP binding sites in the membrane induced by the molecular recognition of the vapor. The toluene vapor is used as a model and benzoic acid is chosen as its indicator. Coupled to an apparatus manifold for preparation of vapor samples, the proposed ISE can be utilized to determine volatile toluene in the gas phase and allows potentiometric detection down to parts per million levels. This work demonstrates the possibility of developing a general sensing principle for detection of neutral vapors using ISEs.

  19. Surface conductivity of the single crystal aluminum oxide in vacuum and caesium vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilchenko, A.V.; Izhvanov, O.L.

    1996-03-01

    Results of measurements of surface conductivity of single-crystal aluminum oxide samples in vacuum and cesium vapors at T=620{endash}830 K and P{sub Cs}=0.13{endash}2 Pa are shown in the paper. Analysis of caesium vapor influence is carried out and ultimate characteristics of samples conductivity under operation conditions in thermionic nuclear power system (NPP) TFE are estimated. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Water Vapor Feedbacks to Climate Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, David

    1999-01-01

    The response of water vapor to climate change is investigated through a series of model studies with varying latitudinal temperature gradients, mean temperatures, and ultimately, actual climate change configurations. Questions to be addressed include: what role does varying convection have in water vapor feedback; do Hadley Circulation differences result in differences in water vapor in the upper troposphere; and, does increased eddy energy result in greater eddy vertical transport of water vapor in varying climate regimes?

  1. Remote sensing of water vapor features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, Henry E.

    1991-01-01

    The three major objectives of the project are outlined: (1) to describe atmospheric water vapor features as functions of space and time; (2) to evaluate remotely sensed measurements of water vapor content; and (3) to study relations between fine-scale water vapor fields and convective activity. Data from several remote sensors were used. The studies used the GOES/VAS, HIS, and MAMS instruments have provided a progressively finer scale view of water vapor features.

  2. Imaging spectrometer measurement of water vapor in the 400 to 2500 nm spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Roberts, Dar A.; Conel, James E.; Dozier, Jeff

    1995-01-01

    The Airborne Visible-Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) measures the total upwelling spectral radiance from 400 to 2500 nm sampled at 10 nm intervals. The instrument acquires spectral data at an altitude of 20 km above sea level, as images of 11 by up to 100 km at 17x17 meter spatial sampling. We have developed a nonlinear spectral fitting algorithm coupled with a radiative transfer code to derive the total path water vapor from the spectrum, measured for each spatial element in an AVIRIS image. The algorithm compensates for variation in the surface spectral reflectance and atmospheric aerosols. It uses water vapor absorption bands centered at 940 nm, 1040 nm, and 1380 nm. We analyze data sets with water vapor abundances ranging from 1 to 40 perceptible millimeters. In one data set, the total path water vapor varies from 7 to 21 mm over a distance of less than 10 km. We have analyzed a time series of five images acquired at 12 minute intervals; these show spatially heterogeneous changes of advocated water vapor of 25 percent over 1 hour. The algorithm determines water vapor for images with a range of ground covers, including bare rock and soil, sparse to dense vegetation, snow and ice, open water, and clouds. The precision of the water vapor determination approaches one percent. However, the precision is sensitive to the absolute abundance and the absorption strength of the atmospheric water vapor band analyzed. We have evaluated the accuracy of the algorithm by comparing several surface-based determinations of water vapor at the time of the AVIRIS data acquisition. The agreement between the AVIRIS measured water vapor and the in situ surface radiometer and surface interferometer measured water vapor is 5 to 10 percent.

  3. Vapor-Resistant Heat-Pipe Artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dussinger, Peter M.; Shaubach, Robert M.; Buchko, Matt

    1991-01-01

    Vapor lock in heat pipe delayed or prevented. Modifications of wick prevent flow of vapor into, or formation of vapor in, liquid-return artery. Small pores of fine-grained sintered wick help to prevent formation of large bubbles. Slotted tube offers few nucleation sites for bubbles. Improves return of liquid in heat pipe.

  4. 40 CFR 796.1950 - Vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vapor pressure. 796.1950 Section 796... (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL FATE TESTING GUIDELINES Physical and Chemical Properties § 796.1950 Vapor pressure. (a... the vapor pressure of chemical and on environmental conditions which influence diffusion from...

  5. 40 CFR 796.1950 - Vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vapor pressure. 796.1950 Section 796... (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL FATE TESTING GUIDELINES Physical and Chemical Properties § 796.1950 Vapor pressure. (a... the vapor pressure of chemical and on environmental conditions which influence diffusion from...

  6. 40 CFR 796.1950 - Vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Vapor pressure. 796.1950 Section 796... (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL FATE TESTING GUIDELINES Physical and Chemical Properties § 796.1950 Vapor pressure. (a... the vapor pressure of chemical and on environmental conditions which influence diffusion from...

  7. Preparation Of Sources For Plasma Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, William J.; Sliney, Hal; Kowalski, D.

    1993-01-01

    Multicomponent metal targets serving as sources of vapor for plasma vapor deposition made in modified pressureless-sintering process. By use of targets made in modified process, one coats components with materials previously plasma-sprayed or sintered but not plasma-vapor-deposited.

  8. Reactive vaporization of oxides in solid oxide fuel cell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, Camas Fought

    800°C in humid oxidizing environments, where large amounts of Si and other elements were vaporizing. Mass transport rate versus flow rate experiments on pure Cr2O3 indicated that sample surface area influences the measured Cr vapor pressure. This finding helps explain the range of values reported in literature for the equilibrium rate constant of the most common Cr vaporization reaction in SOFC environments.

  9. Liquid-phase compositions from vapor-phase analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, W. Jr.; Cochran, H.D.; Leitnaker, J.M.

    1989-09-01

    In the safe handling and processing of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}), it is often desirable to calculate vapor composition and pressure from known liquid composition and temperature. Furthermore, the ability to use analyses of equilibrium vapor-phase samples to calculate liquid-phase compositions would be economically advantageous to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in its international safeguards program and to uranium enrichment operators. The latter technique is projected to save the IAEA on the order of $1500 or more per sample. Either type of calculation could be performed with a multicomponent vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) model if this model were shown to apply to UF{sub 6} and its common impurities. This report is concerned with the distribution of four potential impurities in UF{sub 6} between liquid and vapor phases. The impurities are carbon dioxide, sulfur hexafluoride, chloryl fluoride, and Freon-114 (CClF{sub 2}CClF{sub 2}). There are no binary equilibrium data on the first three of these impurities; hence, the VLE calculations are based entirely on the thermodynamic properties of the pure components. There are two sets of binary equilibrium data for the system Freon-114-UF{sub 6} that are analyzed in terms of the model of Prausnitz et al. Calculations based on these data are compared with those based solely on the thermodynamic properties of pure Freon-114 and pure UF{sub 6}. 23 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Mass spectrometric detection of solid and vapor explosive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stott, William R.; Green, D.; Mercado, Alvaro G.

    1994-10-01

    The detection by chemical sensors of explosive devices in a terrorist or contraband scenario usually involves the acquisition of material in the vapor or solid form. Whether in the vapor form in ambient air or in solid form in a matrix of innocuous material, the chemical compounds may be present at very low concentrations or may be present in concentrations higher by orders of magnitude. In this study, a characterization of a tandem mass spectrometer detection system has been made to evaluate a variety of parameters as it relates to explosive chemicals in both the vapor and solid phases. In particular, a range of concentrations of standard solutions of RDX, PETN and TNT have been injected in determine the sensitivity, dynamic range, and lower level of detection of the SCIEX contraband tandem quadrupole mass spectrometer. Techniques for the introduction of samples include heated nebulization and direct injection/thermal desorption from a real time sampler belt. As well, explosive vapors produced by a special generator were injected in a 1 l/min stream of room air and used to characterize instrumental performance. Solid material was presented in a form simulating fingerprint material and then transferred to the detector using a real time sampling system and then thermally desorbed into the mass spectrometer ionization chamber.

  11. Selective laser vaporization of polypropylene sutures and mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burks, David; Rosenbury, Sarah B.; Kennelly, Michael J.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2012-02-01

    Complications from polypropylene mesh after surgery for female stress urinary incontinence (SUI) may require tedious surgical revision and removal of mesh materials with risk of damage to healthy adjacent tissue. This study explores selective laser vaporization of polypropylene suture/mesh materials commonly used in SUI. A compact, 7 Watt, 647-nm, red diode laser was operated with a radiant exposure of 81 J/cm2, pulse duration of 100 ms, and 1.0-mm-diameter laser spot. The 647-nm wavelength was selected because its absorption by water, hemoglobin, and other major tissue chromophores is low, while polypropylene absorption is high. Laser vaporization of ~200-μm-diameter polypropylene suture/mesh strands, in contact with fresh urinary tissue samples, ex vivo, was performed. Non-contact temperature mapping of the suture/mesh samples with a thermal camera was also conducted. Photoselective vaporization of polypropylene suture and mesh using a single laser pulse was achieved with peak temperatures of 180 and 232 °C, respectively. In control (safety) studies, direct laser irradiation of tissue alone resulted in only a 1 °C temperature increase. Selective laser vaporization of polypropylene suture/mesh materials is feasible without significant thermal damage to tissue. This technique may be useful for SUI procedures requiring surgical revision.

  12. Crystallization of Membrane Proteins by Vapor Diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Delmar, Jared A.; Bolla, Jani Reddy; Su, Chih-Chia; Yu, Edward W.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray crystallography remains the most robust method to determine protein structure at the atomic level. However, the bottlenecks of protein expression and purification often discourage further study. In this chapter, we address the most common problems encountered at these stages. Based on our experiences in expressing and purifying antimicrobial efflux proteins, we explain how a pure and homogenous protein sample can be successfully crystallized by the vapor diffusion method. We present our current protocols and methodologies for this technique. Case studies show step-by-step how we have overcome problems related to expression and diffraction, eventually producing high quality membrane protein crystals for structural determinations. It is our hope that a rational approach can be made of the often anecdotal process of membrane protein crystallization. PMID:25950974

  13. Mechanical vapor recompression for waste energy recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, F.E.; Zakak, A.I.

    1985-03-01

    This paper is concerned with energy recovery in petroleum distillation processes utilizing mechanical vapor recompression. Several examples illustrating recompression of head vapors for heating the reboiler of a distillation tower are presented. The advantages of the mechanical vapor recompression system using a screw compressor are discussed in detail. The system is economically attractive with simple payback periods often less than two years. The paper describes the merits of mechanical vapor recompression, using a screw-type compressor for recovering energy at the distillation tower, and how it can be accomplished by using an intermediary fluid such as steam or by recompressing the distillation column vapors directly.

  14. What Good is Raman Water Vapor Lidar?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitman, David

    2011-01-01

    Raman lidar has been used to quantify water vapor in the atmosphere for various scientific studies including mesoscale meteorology and satellite validation. Now the international networks of NDACC and GRUAN have interest in using Raman water vapor lidar for detecting trends in atmospheric water vapor concentrations. What are the data needs for addressing these very different measurement challenges. We will review briefly the scientific needs for water vapor accuracy for each of these three applications and attempt to translate that into performance specifications for Raman lidar in an effort to address the question in the title of "What good is Raman water vapor Iidar."

  15. Vapor deposition of tantalum and tantalum compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Trkula, M.

    1996-04-01

    Tantalum, and many of its compounds, can be deposited as coatings with techniques ranging from pure, thermal chemical vapor deposition to pure physical vapor deposition. This review concentrates on chemical vapor deposition techniques. The paper takes a historical approach. The authors review classical, metal halide-based techniques and current techniques for tantalum chemical vapor deposition. The advantages and limitations of the techniques will be compared. The need for new lower temperature processes and hence new precursor chemicals will be examined and explained. In the last section, they add some speculation as to possible new, low-temperature precursors for tantalum chemical vapor deposition.

  16. Vaporization Would Cool Primary Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Miyake, Robert N.

    1991-01-01

    Temperature of discharging high-power-density primary battery maintained below specified level by evaporation of suitable liquid from jacket surrounding battery, according to proposal. Pressure-relief valve regulates pressure and boiling temperature of liquid. Less material needed in cooling by vaporization than in cooling by melting. Technique used to cool batteries in situations in which engineering constraints on volume, mass, and location prevent attachment of cooling fins, heat pipes, or like.

  17. Advanced Vapor-Supply Manifold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, I. O.; Debnam, William J., Jr.; Fripp, Archibald L., Jr.; Crouch, R. K.

    1986-01-01

    Advanced vapor-supply manifold solves problem of manifold purging. Design virtually eliminates dead gas volumes in manifold system. System incorporates special valve into manifold in way that leaks and contamination problems of previous systems, which use tees and three-port valves, are minimized or eliminated in both main manifold line and in supply line. Of considerable use in gas manifold systems where even small amounts of gaseous impurities constitute problem or where more than one gaseous material used in single system.

  18. Studies on Vapor Adsorption Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamsundar, N.; Ramotowski, M.

    1998-01-01

    The project consisted of performing experiments on single and dual bed vapor adsorption systems, thermodynamic cycle optimization, and thermal modeling. The work was described in a technical paper that appeared in conference proceedings and a Master's thesis, which were previously submitted to NASA. The present report describes some additional thermal modeling work done subsequently, and includes listings of computer codes developed during the project. Recommendations for future work are provided.

  19. Evaporation by mechanical vapor recompression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iverson, C. H.; Coury, G. E.

    1980-04-01

    Progress in the development of a study of the application of the technologies of mechanical vapor recompression and falling film evaporation as applied to the beet sugar industry is reported. Progress is reported in the following areas: technical literature search; report on visit to European factories using these technologies; energy balance studies of factories offered by the industry as candidates for the demonstration plants; and report on energy balance studies and the recommendations as to the site for the demonstration plant.

  20. Chemical vapor deposition of sialon

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, R.L.; Casey, A.W.

    A laminated composite and a method for forming the composite by chemical vapor deposition are described. The composite includes a layer of sialon and a material to which the layer is bonded. The method includes the steps of exposing a surface of the material to an ammonia containing atmosphere; heating the surface to at least about 1200/sup 0/C; and impinging a gas containing N/sub 2/, SiCl/sub 4/, and AlCl/sub 3/ on the surface.

  1. Water vapor diffusion membrane development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, M. K.

    1977-01-01

    An application of the water vapor diffusion technique is examined whereby the permeated water vapor is vented to space vacuum to alleviate on-board waste storage and provide supplemental cooling. The work reported herein deals primarily with the vapor diffusion-heat rejection (VD-HR) as it applies to the Space Shuttle. A stack configuration was selected, designed and fabricated. An asymmetric cellulose acetate membrane, used in reverse osmosis application was selected and a special spacer was designed to enhance mixing and promote mass transfer. A skid-mount unit was assembled from components used in the bench unit although no attempt was made to render it flight-suitable. The operating conditions of the VD-HR were examined and defined and a 60-day continuous test was carried out. The membranes performed very well throughout the test; no membrane rupture and no unusual flux decay was observed. In addition, a tentative design for a flight-suitable VD-HR unit was made.

  2. Acoustic Droplet Vaporization in Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, David; Fabiilli, Mario; Kripfgans, Oliver; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Bull, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    Gas embolotherapy is a proposed cancer therapy where gas bubbles acting as embolic agents are selectively generated near the tumor site to block blood supply, resulting to tumor necrosis. The gas bubbles are generated by using focused ultrasound to selective vaporize intravenously injected microdroplets. In this study, albumin encapsulated dodecafluorocarbon microdroplets were isolated in 25 to 100 micron diameter polydimethylsiloxane microchannels. The droplets were vaporized at 37 °C using a single pulse from a 7.5 MHz single element focused transducer with 8-32 cycles at 2.2 to 5.6 MPa peak negative pressure. The vaporization process was recorded using an ultra-high speed camera attached to an inverted microscope. A theoretical Rayleigh-Plesset like model was derived to describe the both the expansion of small spherical bubbles as well as cylindrical bubbles in a long microchannel. The gas phase was described as an ideal gas and the liquid DDFP and bulk fluid were viscous Newtonian fluids. Additionally, surface tension, viscous losses from the channel, and the phase change process were included in the model. The theoretical model matched very well to experiments with channel diameters or 50 micron or less. This work was supported by NIH Grant R01EB006476.

  3. Critical points of metal vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Khomkin, A. L. Shumikhin, A. S.

    2015-09-15

    A new method is proposed for calculating the parameters of critical points and binodals for the vapor–liquid (insulator–metal) phase transition in vapors of metals with multielectron valence shells. The method is based on a model developed earlier for the vapors of alkali metals, atomic hydrogen, and exciton gas, proceeding from the assumption that the cohesion determining the basic characteristics of metals under normal conditions is also responsible for their properties in the vicinity of the critical point. It is proposed to calculate the cohesion of multielectron atoms using well-known scaling relations for the binding energy, which are constructed for most metals in the periodic table by processing the results of many numerical calculations. The adopted model allows the parameters of critical points and binodals for the vapor–liquid phase transition in metal vapors to be calculated using published data on the properties of metals under normal conditions. The parameters of critical points have been calculated for a large number of metals and show satisfactory agreement with experimental data for alkali metals and with available estimates for all other metals. Binodals of metals have been calculated for the first time.

  4. Means and method for vapor generation

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Larry W.

    1984-01-01

    A liquid, in heat transfer contact with a surface heated to a temperature well above the vaporization temperature of the liquid, will undergo a multiphase (liquid-vapor) transformation from 0% vapor to 100% vapor. During this transition, the temperature driving force or heat flux and the coefficients of heat transfer across the fluid-solid interface, and the vapor percentage influence the type of heating of the fluid--starting as "feedwater" heating where no vapors are present, progressing to "nucleate" heating where vaporization begins and some vapors are present, and concluding with "film" heating where only vapors are present. Unstable heating between nucleate and film heating can occur, accompanied by possibly large and rapid temperature shifts in the structures. This invention provides for injecting into the region of potential unstable heating and proximate the heated surface superheated vapors in sufficient quantities operable to rapidly increase the vapor percentage of the multiphase mixture by perhaps 10-30% and thereby effectively shift the multiphase mixture beyond the unstable heating region and up to the stable film heating region.

  5. Means and method for vapor generation

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, L.W.

    A liquid, in heat transfer contact with a surface heated to a temperature well above the vaporization temperature of the liquid, will undergo a multiphase (liquid-vapor) transformation from 0% vapor to 100% vapor. During this transition, the temperature driving force or heat flux and the coefficients of heat transfer across the fluid-solid interface, and the vapor percentage influence the type of heating of the fluid - starting as feedwater heating where no vapors are present, progressing to nucleate heating where vaporization begins and some vapors are present, and concluding with film heating where only vapors are present. Unstable heating between nucleate and film heating can occur, accompanied by possibly large and rapid temperature shifts in the structures. This invention provides for injecting into the region of potential unstable heating and proximate the heated surface superheated vapors in sufficient quantities operable to rapidly increase the vapor percentage of the multiphase mixture by perhaps 10 to 30% and thereby effectively shift the multiphase mixture beyond the unstable heating region and up to the stable film heating region.

  6. U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve Vapor Pressure Committee 2009 annual report.

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Ray; Eldredge, Lisa; DeLuca, Charles; Mihalik, Patrick; Maldonado, Julio; Lord, David L.; Rudeen, David Keith; Berndsen, Gerard

    2010-05-01

    This report comprises an annual summary of activities under the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Vapor Pressure Committee in FY2009. The committee provides guidance to senior project management on the issues of crude oil vapor pressure monitoring nd mitigation. The principal objectives of the vapor pressure program are, in the event of an SPR drawdown, to minimize the impact on the environment and assure worker safety and public health from crude oil vapor emissions. The annual report reviews key program areas ncluding monitoring program status, mitigation program status, new developments in measurements and modeling, and path forward including specific recommendations on cavern sampling for the next year. The contents of this report were first presented to SPR senior anagement in December 2009, in a deliverable from the vapor pressure committee. The current SAND report is an adaptation for the Sandia technical audience.

  7. Dielectric Spectroscopy Study of ZnSe Grown by Physical Vapor Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kokan, J.; Gerhardt, R.; Su, Ching-Hua

    1997-01-01

    The dielectric properties of ZnSe samples grown by physical vapor transport were measured as a function of frequency. Differences can be seen in the dielectric properties of samples grown under different conditions. The spectra of heat treated samples were also acquired and were found to exhibit significant deviations from those of the as grown crystals.

  8. Diurnal variations in water vapor over Central and South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meza, Amalia; Mendoza, Luciano; Bianchi, Clara

    2016-07-01

    Diurnal variations in atmospheric integrated water vapor (IWV) are studied employing IWV estimates, with a 30 minutes sampling rate, derived from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) observations during the period 2007-2013. The analysis was performed in 73 GNSS tracking sites (GPS + GLONASS) which have more than 5 years of data. The selected area involves different climate types, from polar to tropical, with different diurnal variations of the integrated total humidity content. There are many processes that could induce diurnal variations in atmospheric water vapor (Dai et al, 1999 a,b), the most relevant causes are: surface evapotranspiration, atmospheric large-scale vertical motion, atmospheric low-level moisture convergence and precipitation and vertical mixing (which affects the vertical distribution of water vapor but does not affect the IWV). The numerical tools, Singular Value Decomposition and classical Multidimensional Scaling methods, are used to study these variations, considering the measurements made at each stations, as sample in the analysis. The aim of this investigation is to identify the IWV variability with respect to the local time associated to the different climate regions. In order to improve our analysis, all available weather information, such as radiosondes measurements (which are few), measurements of pressure and temperature and Numerical Weather Models reanalysis data, are used. Reference: Dai, A., K. E. Trenberth, and T. R. Karl, 1999 a: Effects of clouds, soil moisture, precipitation and water vapor on diurnal temperature range. J. Climate, 12, 2451-2473. Dai, A., F. Giorgi, and K. E. Trenberth, 1999 b: Observed and model simulated precipitation diurnal cycle over the contiguous United States.J. Geophys. Res., 104, 6377-6402. KEYWORDS: water vapor, diurnal cycle, GNSS

  9. Optical stabilization of Rb vapor density above thermal equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchianti, A.; Bogi, A.; Marinelli, C.; Mariotti, E.; Moi, L.

    2010-08-01

    We stabilize the Rb vapor density above its thermal equilibrium value in sealed glass cells, which are generally used in atomic physics experiments. The method relies on light-induced desorption of Rb atoms from dielectric surfaces. The process does not demand high light intensities so that LEDs or laser diodes can be used as desorbing sources. The experiments are carried out in Pyrex cells either coated with a polydimethylsiloxane film or containing a porous glass sample. Under illumination both the organic coating and the porous sample release a large amount of Rb atoms into the cell volume. We show that the Rb vapor density can be maintained to a preset value, using a desorbing light intensity controlled by a feedback signal given by the Rb absorption or fluorescence level. Moreover, we find that the stabilization technique does not depend on the microscopic mechanisms underlying photodesorption.

  10. Levels of formaldehyde vapor released from embalmed cadavers in each dissection stage.

    PubMed

    Sugata, Yota; Miyaso, Hidenobu; Odaka, Yoko; Komiyama, Masatoshi; Sakamoto, Noboru; Mori, Chisato; Matsuno, Yoshiharu

    2016-08-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) is an aldehyde used in antiseptics and adhesives. The World Health Organization (WHO) and other institutes have linked FA to sick building syndrome and allergic diseases. Recent studies have reported that cadavers embalmed using formalin and ethanol-based preservative solutions release FA vapor during dissection and that FA vapor may adversely affect students and lecturers in gross anatomy laboratories. However, few details have been reported correlating dissection stage with increased FA vapor release. In this study, we evaluated the vapor level of FA released in each dissection stage. Six cadavers for which consent was given for use in anatomy research and education were examined in this study. Using an active sampling method, FA vapor was collected above the thoracoabdominal region of each dissected cadaver. FA was eluted from each sampler using acetonitrile and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Our data show that FA levels significantly increase after skin incision and that the vapor level of FA released differs between male and female cadavers. We also found that subcutaneous adipose tissues of the thoracoabdominal-region release FA vapor and that female cadavers release significantly higher levels of FA per kilogram of subcutaneous adipose tissue than do male cadavers. Based on these data, we propose the methods be developed to prevent exposure to FA vapors released from cadavers. PMID:27151243

  11. Process for recovering organic vapors from air

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Richard W.

    1985-01-01

    A process for recovering and concentrating organic vapor from a feed stream of air having an organic vapor content of no more than 20,000 ppm by volume. A thin semipermeable membrane is provided which has a feed side and a permeate side, a selectivity for organic vapor over air of at least 50, as measured by the ratio of organic vapor permeability to nitrogen permeability, and a permeability of organic vapor of at least 3.times.10.sup.-7 cm.sup.3 (STP) cm/cm.sup.2 sec.cm Hg. The feed stream is passed across the feed side of the thin semipermeable membrane while providing a pressure on the permeate side which is lower than the feed side by creating a partial vacuum on the permeate side so that organic vapor passes preferentially through the membrane to form an organic vapor depleted air stream on the feed side and an organic vapor enriched stream on the permeate side. The organic vapor which has passed through the membrane is compressed and condensed to recover the vapor as a liquid.

  12. A simple mercury vapor detector for geochemical prospecting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vaughn, William W.

    1967-01-01

    The detector utilizes a large-volume atomic-absorption technique for quantitative determinations of mercury vapor thermally released from crushed rock. A quartz-enclosed noble-metal amalgamative stage, which is temperature controlled and is actuated by a radio-frequency induction heater, selectively traps the mercury and eliminates low-level contamination. As little as 1 part per billion of mercury can be detected in a 1-gram sample in a 1-minute analytical period.

  13. Validation of Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's OMI Water Vapor Product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Gonzalez Abad, G.; Liu, X.; Chance, K.

    2015-12-01

    We perform a comprehensive validation of SAO's OMI water vapor product. The SAO OMI water vapor slant column is retrieved using the 430 - 480 nm wavelength range. In addition to water vapor, the retrieval considers O3, NO2, liquid water, O4, C2H2O2, the Ring effect, water ring, 3rd order polynomial, common mode and under-sampling. The slant column is converted to vertical column using AMF. AMF is calculated using GEOS-Chem water vapor profile shape, OMCLDO2 cloud information and OMLER surface albedo information. We validate our product using NCAR's GPS network data over the world and RSS's gridded microwave data over the ocean. We also compare our product with the total precipitable water derived from the AERONET ground-based sun photometer data, the GlobVapour gridded product, and other datasets. We investigate the influence of sub-grid scale variability and filtering criteria on the comparison. We study the influence of clouds, aerosols and a priori profiles on the retrieval. We also assess the long-term performance and stability of our product and seek ways to improve it.

  14. Wick for metal vapor laser

    DOEpatents

    Duncan, David B.

    1992-01-01

    An improved wick for a metal vapor laser is made of a refractory metal cylinder, preferably molybdenum or tungsten for a copper laser, which provides the wicking surface. Alternately, the inside surface of the ceramic laser tube can be metalized to form the wicking surface. Capillary action is enhanced by using wire screen, porous foam metal, or grooved surfaces. Graphite or carbon, in the form of chunks, strips, fibers or particles, is placed on the inside surface of the wick to reduce water, reduce metal oxides and form metal carbides.

  15. Vapor Compression Distillation Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchens, Cindy F.

    2002-01-01

    One of the major requirements associated with operating the International Space Station is the transportation -- space shuttle and Russian Progress spacecraft launches - necessary to re-supply station crews with food and water. The Vapor Compression Distillation (VCD) Flight Experiment, managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., is a full-scale demonstration of technology being developed to recycle crewmember urine and wastewater aboard the International Space Station and thereby reduce the amount of water that must be re-supplied. Based on results of the VCD Flight Experiment, an operational urine processor will be installed in Node 3 of the space station in 2005.

  16. Chemical vapor deposition of sialon

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, Richard L.; Casey, Alton W.

    1982-01-01

    A laminated composite and a method for forming the composite by chemical vapor deposition. The composite includes a layer of sialon and a material to which the layer is bonded. The method includes the steps of exposing a surface of the material to an ammonia containing atmosphere; heating the surface to at least about 1200.degree. C.; and impinging a gas containing in a flowing atmosphere of air N.sub.2, SiCl.sub.4, and AlCl.sub.3 on the surface.

  17. Advanced Raman water vapor lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Melfi, S. Harvey; Ferrare, Richard A.; Evans, Keith A.; Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis; Staley, O. Glenn; Disilvestre, Raymond W.; Gorin, Inna; Kirks, Kenneth R.; Mamakos, William A.

    1992-01-01

    Water vapor and aerosols are important atmospheric constituents. Knowledge of the structure of water vapor is important in understanding convective development, atmospheric stability, the interaction of the atmosphere with the surface, and energy feedback mechanisms and how they relate to global warming calculations. The Raman Lidar group at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) developed an advanced Raman Lidar for use in measuring water vapor and aerosols in the earth's atmosphere. Drawing on the experience gained through the development and use of our previous Nd:YAG based system, we have developed a completely new lidar system which uses a XeF excimer laser and a large scanning mirror. The additional power of the excimer and the considerably improved optical throughput of the system have resulted in approximately a factor of 25 improvement in system performance for nighttime measurements. Every component of the current system has new design concepts incorporated. The lidar system consists of two mobile trailers; the first (13m x 2.4m) houses the lidar instrument, the other (9.75m x 2.4m) is for system control, realtime data display, and analysis. The laser transmitter is a Lambda Physik LPX 240 iCC operating at 400 Hz with a XeF gas mixture (351 nm). The telescope is a .75m horizontally mounted Dall-Kirkham system which is bore sited with a .8m x 1.1m elliptical flat which has a full 180 degree scan capability - horizon to horizon within a plane perpendicular to the long axis of the trailer. The telescope and scan mirror assembly are mounted on a 3.65m x .9m optical table which deploys out the rear of the trailer through the use of a motor driven slide rail system. The Raman returns from water vapor (403 nm), nitrogen (383 nm) and oxygen (372 nm) are measured in addition to the direct Rayleigh/Mie backscatter (351). The signal from each of these is split at about a 5/95 ratio between two photomultiplier detectors. The 5 percent detector is used for

  18. Water vapor diffusion membrane development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, M. K.

    1976-01-01

    A total of 18 different membranes were procured, characterized, and tested in a modified bench-scale vapor diffusion water reclamation unit. Four membranes were selected for further studies involving membrane fouling. Emphasis was placed on the problem of flux decline due to membrane fouling. This is discussed in greater details under "Summary and Discussion on Membrane Fouling Studies" presented in pages 47-51. The system was also investigated for low temperature application on wash-water where the permeated water is not recovered but vented into space vacuum.

  19. Interplay of vapor adsorption and liquid imbibition in nanoporous Vycor glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiepsch, Sebastian; Pelster, Rolf

    2016-04-01

    We have studied the kinetics of spontaneous capillary rise and of the concurrent vapor adsorption in nanoporous, monolithic samples of Vycor glass with a mean pore diameter of 7.5 nm. As liquids, we have chosen n -alcohols (n =4 -10 ) whose vapor pressures at room temperature range from p0=965 Pa down to p0=0.743 Pa. Dielectric measurements allow us to achieve spatial selectivity to predefined parts of the porous Vycor glass. In this way, we are able to measure the overall uptake of molecules as well as vapor adsorption from the surroundings in unfilled parts of the pore network, i.e., above the liquid menisci of the rising imbibition front. We show that the latter process is unaltered compared to free adsorption in samples suspended above a liquid reservoir. Only at low vapor pressures, i.e., for long alcohols, vapor adsorption can be neglected and the capillary rise follows the theoretical predictions of the Lucas-Washburn √{t } law. The more volatile the alcohol, the more important the additional adsorption of molecules becomes. We show that the overall filling process in the pore network is well described by a superposition of the Lucas-Washburn law and the measured vapor adsorption. In addition, the experiments give insight into the vapor diffusion dynamics in the porous matrix.

  20. Linearization of calibration curves by aerosol carrier effect of CCl 4 vapor in electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kántor, Tibor; de Loos-Vollebregt, Margaretha T. C.

    2005-03-01

    Carbon tetrachloride vapor as gaseous phase modifier in a graphite furnace electrothermal vaporizer (GFETV) converts heavy volatile analyte forms to volatile and medium volatile chlorides and produces aerosol carrier effect, the latter being a less generally recognized benefit. However, the possible increase of polyatomic interferences in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (GFETV-ICP-MS) by chlorine and carbon containing species due to CCl 4 vapor introduction has been discouraging with the use of low resolution, quadrupole type MS equipment. Being aware of this possible handicap, it was aimed at to investigate the feasibility of the use of this halogenating agent in ICP-MS with regard of possible hazards to the instrument, and also to explore the advantages under these specific conditions. With sample gas flow (inner gas flow) rate not higher than 900 ml min -1 Ar in the torch and 3 ml min -1 CCl 4 vapor flow rate in the furnace, the long-term stability of the instrument was ensured and the following benefits by the halocarbon were observed. The non-linearity error (defined in the text) of the calibration curves (signal versus mass functions) with matrix-free solution standards was 30-70% without, and 1-5% with CCl 4 vapor introduction, respectively, at 1 ng mass of Cu, Fe, Mn and Pb analytes. The sensitivity for these elements increased by 2-4-fold with chlorination, while the relative standard deviation (RSD) was essentially the same (2-5%) for the two cases in comparison. A vaporization temperature of 2650 °C was required for Cr in Ar atmosphere, while 2200 °C was sufficient in Ar + CCl 4 atmosphere to attain complete vaporization. Improvements in linear response and sensitivity were the highest for this least volatile element. The pyrolytic graphite layer inside the graphite tube was protected by the halocarbon, and tube life time was further increased by using traces of hydrocarbon vapor in the external sheath gas of the graphite furnace. Details

  1. Control of flow through a vapor generator

    DOEpatents

    Radcliff, Thomas D.

    2005-11-08

    In a Rankine cycle system wherein a vapor generator receives heat from exhaust gases, provision is made to avoid overheating of the refrigerant during ORC system shut down while at the same time preventing condensation of those gases within the vapor generator when its temperature drops below a threshold temperature by diverting the flow of hot gases to ambient and to thereby draw ambient air through the vapor generator in the process. In one embodiment, a bistable ejector is adjustable between one position, in which the hot gases flow through the vapor generator, to another position wherein the gases are diverted away from the vapor generator. Another embodiment provides for a fixed valve ejector with a bias towards discharging to ambient, but with a fan on the downstream side of said vapor generator for overcoming this bias.

  2. The Oxidation Rate of SiC in High Pressure Water Vapor Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Robinson, R. Craig

    1999-01-01

    CVD SiC and sintered alpha-SiC samples were exposed at 1316 C in a high pressure burner rig at total pressures of 5.7, 15, and 25 atm for times up to 100h. Variations in sample emittance for the first nine hours of exposure were used to determine the thickness of the silica scale as a function of time. After accounting for volatility of silica in water vapor, the parabolic rate constants for Sic in water vapor pressures of 0.7, 1.8 and 3.1 atm were determined. The dependence of the parabolic rate constant on the water vapor pressure yielded a power law exponent of one. Silica growth on Sic is therefore limited by transport of molecular water vapor through the silica scale.

  3. APPLICATION OF STIR BAR SORPTIVE EXTRACTION TO ANALYSIS OF VOLATILE AND SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICALS OF POTENTIAL CONCERN IN SOLIDS AND AQUEOUS SAMPLES FROM THE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect

    FRYE JM; KUNKEL JM

    2009-03-05

    Stir bar sorptive extraction was applied to aqueous and solid samples for the extraction and analysis of organic compounds from the Hanford chemicals of potential concern list, as identified in the vapor data quality objectives. The 222-S Laboratory analyzed these compounds from vapor samples on thermal desorption tubes as part of the Hanford Site industrial hygiene vapor sampling effort.

  4. Mechanical Vapor Recompression for waste energy recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, F.E.; Zakak, A.I.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes energy recovery in petroleum refineries utilizing mechanical vapor recompression. Several examples illustrating recompression of waste steam or vapors from turbine exhausts, vents and distillation towers are presented. The advantages of the Mechanical Vapor Recompression System (MVRS) using a screw compressor are discussed in detail. Significant energy savings can be achieved by integration of the MVRS into the steam flow loop. Attractive simple payback periods, often less than two years, can be achieved.

  5. Novel methods of copper vapor laser excitation

    SciTech Connect

    McColl, W.B.; Ching, H.; Bosch, R.; Brake, M.; Gilgenbach, R.

    1990-12-31

    Microwave and intense electron beam excitation of copper vapor are being investigated to be used in copper vapor lasers for isotope separation. Both methods use copper chloride vapor by heating copper chloride. Helium was used as the buffer gas at 2 to 100 torr. In the microwave system, intense copperlines at 510 nm and 578 nm were observed. Initial electron beam results indicate that light emission follows the beam current.

  6. Profiling atmospheric water vapor by microwave radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Wilheit, T. T.; Szejwach, G.; Gesell, L. H.; Nieman, R. A.; Niver, D. S.; Krupp, B. M.; Gagliano, J. A.; King, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    High-altitude microwave radiometric observations at frequencies near 92 and 183.3 GHz were used to study the potential of retrieving atmospheric water vapor profiles over both land and water. An algorithm based on an extended kalman-Bucy filter was implemented and applied for the water vapor retrieval. The results show great promise in atmospheric water vapor profiling by microwave radiometry heretofore not attainable at lower frequencies.

  7. Droplet Vaporization in a Supercritical Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, E. W.; Farrell, P. V.

    1987-01-01

    A model is presented which describes single liquid droplet vaporization at nearly critical liquid pressures and temperatures. A modified Redlich-Kwong equation of state is used to evaluate the fugacities and liquid and vapor mole fractions at the interface under the assumption of interface equilibrium. Results obtained for different droplet sizes and conditions indicate significant differences in behavior in comparison with low-pressure quasi-steady droplet vaporization.

  8. Water vapor, whence comest thou.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, J. W., Jr.; Hills, H. K.; Vondrak, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    During a 14-hour period on Mar. 7, 1971, the Apollo 14 ALSEP suprathermal ion detector experiment (SIDE) observed an intense, prolonged series of bursts of 48.6-eV ions at the lunar surface. The SIDE mass analyzer showed the mass per unit charge of these ions to be characteristic of water vapor if singly ionized. The event was also observed by the SIDE total ion detectors (TIDs) at the Apollo 14 site and at Apollo 12 (located 183 km to the west). The TID data from SIDE 14 indicate that the energy spectrum was narrower than the 20-eV interval between energy channels. Ion spectra due to the LM exhaust gases are shown to be readily identified by the SIDE and are distinctly different in character from the spectra obtained on March 7. Detailed consideration of other possible sources of water, including the Apollo 14 CSM, leads to the conclusion that the water vapor did not come from a man-made source. Also, it is estimated that the event may have involved a quantity of water much greater than that which has been artificially introduced into the lunar environment. Consequently, it appears to be of lunar origin.

  9. The Callaway Plant's airborne tritium sampling cart

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, C.C.; Roselius, R.R. )

    1986-07-01

    The water vapor condensation method for sampling airborne tritium offers significant advantages over other methods, including minimal sample preparation, high sensitivity, and independence from collection efficiency and sample flow rate. However, it does have disadvantages that must be overcome in the design of a sampler. This article describes a cart-mounted, portable airborne tritium sampler used at the Callaway Nuclear Plant that incorporates the advantages of the condensation technique while minimizing its shortcomings. The key elements in the design of the sampler are the use of a refrigerated bath to cool a series of three water vapor collection traps and the use of an optical condensation dew point hygrometer to measure the moisture content of the sample. Design considerations for the proper operation of dew point hygrometers are presented, and the method used to convert due point readings to water vapor content is described.

  10. Chemistry of vaporization of refractory materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilles, P. W.

    1975-01-01

    A discussion is given of the principles of physical chemistry important in vaporization studies, notably the concepts of equilibrium, phase behavior, thermodynamics, solid solution, and kinetics. The important factors influencing equilibrium vaporization phenomena are discussed and illustrated. A proper course of a vaporization study consisting of 9 stages is proposed. The important experimental techniques of Knudsen effusion, Langmuir vaporization and mass spectrometry are discussed. The principles, the factors, the course of a study and the experimental techniques and procedures are illustrated by recent work on the Ti-O system.

  11. X-ray-induced water vaporization

    SciTech Connect

    Weon, B. M.; Lee, J. S.; Je, J. H.; Fezzaa, K.

    2011-09-15

    We present quantitative evidence for x-ray-induced water vaporization: water is vaporized at a rate of 5.5 pL/s with the 1-A-wavelength x-ray irradiation of {approx}0.1 photons per A{sup 2}; moreover, water vapor is reversibly condensed during pauses in irradiation. This result fundamentally suggests that photoionization induces vaporization. This phenomenon is attributed to surface-tension reduction by ionization and would be universally important in radiological and electrohydrodynamic situations.

  12. High altitude aircraft water vapor measurements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, E.

    1973-01-01

    A hygrometer for water vapor measurements from an aircraft was developed. An aluminum oxide hygrometer mounted in an aircraft Rosemount air temperature scoop was flown on the NASA Convair 990 and on a USAF B-57 aircraft. Water vapor measurements from the Convair 990 were conducted up to 40,000 ft with penetration into the stratosphere. Good agreement was obtained with simultaneously flown remote sounders of water vapor. During transcontinental flights the hygrometer demonstrated adequate response to measure the natural variability of water vapor near the tropopause. Rapid response was demonstrated in pursuit of the jet wake of an F-104 at 35,000 ft.

  13. Mars water vapor, near-surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. A.; Sharman, R. D.; Lucich, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    In a previous paper we concluded that the temperature sensors aboard the Viking landers (VL-1 and VL-2) were detecting the water vapor frost point. Analysis of one Mars year of data at both lander sites substantiates this conclusion. At VL-1 it is found that the water vapor mixing ratio is constant with height through the bulk of the atmosphere, most of the time. Exceptions are during the onset phases of the two major dust storms when temporary enhancement of near-surface vapor occurs (the same phenomenon is observed at VL-2), and some depletion of near-surface vapor during the decay phase of the first storm, possibly the second storm as well. The former suggests near-surface, northward transport of water vapor with the storms. The latter suggests adsorption of vapor on dust particles followed by surface deposition. At VL-2, severe near-surface depletion of water vapor occurs during northern autumn and winter. The residual vapor is in equilibrium with the surface condensate observed at the site during this period, indicating that the source region for the condensate must be aloft with downward transport by dust fall-out. Since the near-surface water vapor mixing ratio and concentration at VL-1 generally parallels the column abundance over VL-1 obtained by the orbiters, this suggests that VL-1 can be used to give a measure of column abundance for as long as the temperature sensors remain operational.

  14. Gravity sensitivity of a resistojet water vaporizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morren, W. Earl

    1993-01-01

    A laboratory model of a water vaporizer for resistojet applications was designed, fabricated, and steady and transient characteristics were measured. Vaporizer operation was not impacted by rotation about a horizontal axis normal to its own. The vaporizer was operated under low and high accelerations aboard a jet aircraft for periods up to 25 s at flow rates ranging from 159(10)(exp -6) to 230(10)(exp -6) kg/s. Slight changes in inlet and outlet pressures and some heat exchanger temperatures were observed during the low-gravity tests. However, the results of these tests indicated probable compatibility of the vaporizer design tested with a low-gravity environment.

  15. A vapor generator for transonic flow visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruce, Robert A.; Hess, Robert W.; Rivera, Jose A., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A vapor generator was developed for use in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT). Propylene glycol was used as the vapor material. The vapor generator system was evaluated in a laboratory setting and then used in the TDT as part of a laser light sheet flow visualization system. The vapor generator provided satisfactory seeding of the air flow with visible condensate particles, smoke, for tests ranging from low subsonic through transonic speeds for tunnel total pressures from atmospheric pressure down to less than 0.1 atmospheric pressure.

  16. Data quality objectives for generic in-tank health and safety vapor issue resolution. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, J.W.

    1995-04-28

    Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) for generic waste storage tank vapor and gas sampling were developed in facilitated meetings and a stakeholder review session, using the most recent US EPA DQO guidelines. These meetings elicited DQOs for two major vapor problem areas: flammability and toxicity. This is a summary of the outputs of the planning team for each of the 7 steps of the DQO process.

  17. A model for chemical and isotopic fractionation in the lunar regolith by impact vaporization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housley, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    Up until now there has been no complete model of chemical and isotopic fractionation effects which could occur in the lunar regolith as a result of hypervelocity impact vaporization. Previous work on the outlines for such a model are extended and show that impact vaporization could be an efficient mechanism for producing heavy isotope enrichments. Rough qualitative predictions based on the model show a general similarity to the observations on lunar samples.

  18. Development of a Surface Plasmon Resonance n-dodecane Vapor Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Narcizo Muñoz; Pérez, Lilia Martínez; Colín, Jose Alfredo; Buenrostro-Gonzalez, Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    Using a high density polyethylene thin film over gold layer, a Surface Plasmon Resonance sensor for detecting n-dodecane vapor is developed. Preliminary results will be presented, showing that samples in the range of a few hundred ppm(V) of n-dodecane vapor in butane gas can be sensed. Also, studying the response as a function of time, it is demonstrated that the sensing process is quickly reversible.

  19. Speciation and quantification of vapor phases in soy biodiesel and waste cooking oil biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chiung-Yu; Lan, Cheng-Hang; Dai, Yu-Tung

    2006-12-01

    This study characterizes the compositions of two biodiesel vapors, soy biodiesel and waste cooking oil biodiesel, to provide a comprehensive understanding of biodiesels. Vapor phases were sampled by purging oil vapors through thermal desorption tubes which were then analyzed by the thermal desorption/GC/MS system. The results show that the compounds of biodiesel vapors can be divided into four groups. They include methyl esters (the main biodiesel components), oxygenated chemicals, alkanes and alkenes, and aromatics. The first two chemical groups are only found in biodiesel vapors, not in the diesel vapor emissions. The percentages of mean concentrations for methyl esters, oxygenated chemicals, alkanes and alkenes, and aromatics are 66.1%, 22.8%, 4.8% and 6.4%, respectively for soy biodiesel, and 35.8%, 35.9%, 27.9% and 0.3%, respectively for waste cooking oil biodiesel at a temperature of 25+/-2 degrees C. These results show that biodiesels have fewer chemicals and lower concentrations in vapor phase than petroleum diesel, and the total emission rates are between one-sixteenth and one-sixth of that of diesel emission, corresponding to fuel evaporative emissions of loading losses of between 106 microg l(-1) and 283 microg l(-1). Although diesels generate more vapor phase emissions, biodiesels still generate considerable amount of vapor emissions, particularly the emissions from methyl esters and oxygenated chemicals. These two chemical groups are more reactive than alkanes and aromatics. Therefore, speciation and quantification of biodiesel vapor phases are important. PMID:16904162

  20. Acute and repeated vapor exposure toxicology of 3-(methylthio)propionaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Ballantyne, B; Cawley, T J

    2000-12-01

    .5 ppm (6 h/d); no acrolein could be detected in the chamber air samples. There were no differences between the controls (air alone) and 3-MTP exposed animals with respect to signs, body weights, food consumption, hematology, serum chemistry, urinalysis, and gross and microscopic pathology. Without detectable acrolein vapor, 50.5 ppm 3-MTP was a no observable effects level. PMID:11111937

  1. G-Band Vapor Radiometer Precipitable Water Vapor (GVRPWV) Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, A; Cadeddu, M

    2012-12-05

    The G-Band Vapor Radiometer Precipitable Water Vapor (GVRPWV) value-added product (VAP) computes precipitable water vapor using neural network techniques from data measured by the GVR. The GVR reports time-series measurements of brightness temperatures for four channels located at 183.3 ± 1, 3, 7, and 14 GHz.

  2. Tropospheric water vapor and climate sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, E.K.; Kirtman, B.P.; Lindzen, R.S.

    1999-06-01

    Estimates are made of the effect of changes in tropospheric water vapor on the climate sensitivity to doubled carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) using a coarse resolution atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a slab mixed layer ocean. The sensitivity of the model to doubled CO{sub 2} is found as the difference between the equilibrium responses for control and doubled CO{sub 2} cases. Clouds are specified to isolate the water vapor feedback. Experiments in which the water vapor distribution is specified rather than internally calculated are used to find the contribution of water vapor in various layers and latitude belts to the sensitivity. The contribution of water vapor in layers of equal mass to the climate sensitivity varies by about a factor of 2 with height, with the largest contribution coming from layers between 450 and 750 mb, and the smallest from layers above 230 mb. The positive feedback on the global mean surface temperature response to doubled CO{sub 2} from water vapor above 750 mb is about 2.6 times as large as that from water vapor below 750 mb. The feedback on global mean surface temperature due to water vapor in the extratropical free troposphere is about 50% larger than the feedback due to the lower-latitude free troposphere water vapor. Several important sources of nonlinearity of the radiative heating rates were identified in the process of constructing the specified cloud and water vapor fields. These are (1) the interaction of clouds and solar radiation, which produces much more reflection of solar radiation for time mean clouds than for the instantaneous clouds; (2) the correlation of clouds and water vapor, which produces less downward longwave radiation at the ground for correlated clouds and water vapor than when these fields are independent; and (3) the interaction of water vapor with long wave radiation, which produces less downward longwave radiation at the ground of the average over instantaneous water vapor distributions than of

  3. Dosimeter for monitoring vapors and aerosols of organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1987-01-01

    A dosimeter is provided for collecting and detecting vapors and aerosols of organic compounds. The dosimeter comprises a lightweight, passive device that can be conveniently worn by a person as a badge or placed at a stationary location. The dosimeter includes a sample collector comprising a porous web treated with a chemical for inducing molecular displacement and enhancing phosphorescence. Compounds are collected onto the web by molecular diffusion. The web also serves as the sample medium for detecting the compounds by a room temperature phosphorescence technique.

  4. Dosimeter for monitoring vapors and aerosols of organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1987-07-14

    A dosimeter is provided for collecting and detecting vapors and aerosols of organic compounds. The dosimeter comprises a lightweight, passive device that can be conveniently worn by a person as a badge or placed at a stationary location. The dosimeter includes a sample collector comprising a porous web treated with a chemical for inducing molecular displacement and enhancing phosphorescence. Compounds are collected onto the web by molecular diffusion. The web also serves as the sample medium for detecting the compounds by a room temperature phosphorescence technique. 7 figs.

  5. Method of and apparatus for measuring vapor density

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, L.D.; Cerni, T.A.

    1989-10-17

    Apparatus and method are disclosed which determine the concentration of an individual component, such as water vapor, of a multi-component mixture, such as a gaseous mixture for cooling a nuclear reactor. A hygrometer apparatus includes an infrared source for producing a broadband infrared energy beam that includes a strong water vapor absorption band and a weak water vapor absorption region. The beam is chopped to select infrared pulses. A temporally first pulse has a wavelength in the weakly absorbing region, a temporally second pulse has a wavelength in the strong band and a temporally third pulse has a wavelength in the weakly absorbing region. A fourth reference pulse representing background radiation is interposed in such chopped pulses. An indium arsenide infrared sensor is responsive to the pulses for generating an output signal in proportion to an equation given in the patent where N1 is proportional to the transmission through the sample of the first signal, N4 is related to the background radiation, and [K2 (N2-N4) + K3 (N3-N4)] is the time-weighted average of the transmission through the sample of the second and third pulses applicable at the time of the second pulse, with the reference pulse N4 being subtracted in each case to render the ratio independent of variations in the background radiation. 11 figs.

  6. Method of and apparatus for measuring vapor density

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Loren D.; Cerni, Todd A.

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus and method determine the concentration of an individual component, such as water vapor, of a multi-component mixture, such as a gaseous mixture for cooling a nuclear reactor. A hygrometer apparatus includes an infrared source for producing a broadband infrared energy beam that includes a strong water vapor absorption band and a weak water vapor absorption region. The beam is chopped to select infrared pulses. A temporally first pulse has a wavelength in the weakly absorbing region, a temporally second pulse has a wavelength in the strong band and a temporally third pulse has a wavlength in the weakly absorbing region. A fourth reference pulse representing background radiation is interposed in such chopped pulses. An indium arsenide infrared sensor is responsive to the pulses for generating an output signal in proportion to: ##EQU1## where N1 is proportional to the transmission through the sample of the first signal, N4 is related to the background radiation, and [K2 (N2-N4)+K3 (N3-N4)] is the time-weighted average of the transmission through the sample of the second and third pulses applicable at the time of the second pulse, with the reference pulse N4 being subtracted in each case to render the ratio independent of variations in the background radiation.

  7. Eyeing the Sky's Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image, and many like it, are one way NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander is measuring trace amounts of water vapor in the atmosphere over far-northern Mars. Phoenix's Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) uses solar filters, or filters designed to image the sun, to make these images. The camera is aimed at the sky for long exposures.

    SSI took this image as a test on June 9, 2008, which was the Phoenix mission's 15th Martian day, or sol, since landing, at 5:20 p.m. local solar time. The camera was pointed about 38 degrees above the horizon. The white dots in the sky are detector dark current that will be removed during image processing and analysis.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space

  8. Vapor-aerosol physicochemical laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lore, J.D.; Skeen, L.M.

    1985-10-01

    A laboratory capable of generating and characterizing vapors and aerosols at typical ambient concentration levels observed in chemical processing operations has been established at the ORGD Plant, operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. for the USDOE. A three-stage generation system (TSGS), originally developed by SRI, International, for the analytical methods validation studies sponsored by NIOSH, has been installed. Several aerosol/particulate monitors, controlled by microcomputers, provide the means for semi-real-time particle size and mass concentration measurements over the size range 0.1 to 10 ..mu..m. A full complement of chemical analysis instrumentation including laser Raman spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is available for in-situ or sequential measurements of TSGS diluents. 2 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Soil vapor extraction with dewatering

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, N.R.

    1996-08-01

    The physical treatment technology of soil vapor extraction (SVE) is reliable, safe, robust, and able to remove significant amounts of mass at a relatively low cost. SVE combined with a pump-and-treat system to create a dewatered zone has the opportunity to remove more mass with the added cost of treating the extracted groundwater. Various limiting processes result in a significant reduction in the overall mass removal rates from a SVE system in porous media. Only pilot scale, limited duration SVE tests conducted in low permeability media have been reported in the literature. It is expected that the presence of a fracture network in low permeability media will add another complexity to the limiting conditions surrounding the SVE technology. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael T.; Harper, Lynn D. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction (VPCAR) teststand and the results of an experimental program designed to evaluate the potential of the technology as a water purification process. In the experimental program the technology is evaluated based upon product water purity, water recovery rate, and power consumption. The experimental work demonstrates that the technology produces high purity product water and attains high water recovery rates at a relatively high specific power consumption. The experimental program was conducted in 3 phases. In phase I an Igepon(TM) soap and water mixture was used to evaluate the performance of an innovative Wiped-Film Rotating-Disk evaporator and associated demister. In phase II a phenol-water solution was used to evaluate the performance of the high temperature catalytic oxidation reactor. In phase III a urine analog was used to evaluate the performance of the combined distillation/oxidation functions of the processor.

  11. Interaction of gases with lunar materials. [surface properties of lunar fines, especially on exposure to water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, H. F.; Gammage, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    The surface properties of lunar fines were investigated. Results indicate that, for the most part, these properties are independent of the chemical composition and location of the samples on the lunar surface. The leaching of channels and pores by adsorbed water vapor is a distinguishing feature of their surface chemistry. The elements of air, if adsorbed in conjunction with water vapor or liquid water, severely impedes the leaching process. In the absence of air, liquid water is more effective than water vapor in attacking the grains. The characteristics of Apollo 17 orange fines were evaluated and compared with those of other samples. The interconnecting channels produced by water vapor adsorption were found to be wider than usual for other types of fines. Damage tracks caused by heavy cosmic ray nuclei and an unusually high halogen content might provide for stronger etching conditions upon exposure to water vapor.

  12. Experimental study of flash boiling spray vaporization through quantitative vapor concentration and liquid temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gaoming; Hung, David L. S.; Xu, Min

    2014-08-01

    Flash boiling sprays of liquid injection under superheated conditions provide the novel solutions of fast vaporization and better air-fuel mixture formation for internal combustion engines. However, the physical mechanisms of flash boiling spray vaporization are more complicated than the droplet surface vaporization due to the unique bubble generation and boiling process inside a superheated bulk liquid, which are not well understood. In this study, the vaporization of flash boiling sprays was investigated experimentally through the quantitative measurements of vapor concentration and liquid temperature. Specifically, the laser-induced exciplex fluorescence technique was applied to distinguish the liquid and vapor distributions. Quantitative vapor concentration was obtained by correlating the intensity of vapor-phase fluorescence with vapor concentration through systematic corrections and calibrations. The intensities of two wavelengths were captured simultaneously from the liquid-phase fluorescence spectra, and their intensity ratios were correlated with liquid temperature. The results show that both liquid and vapor phase of multi-hole sprays collapse toward the centerline of the spray with different mass distributions under the flash boiling conditions. Large amount of vapor aggregates along the centerline of the spray to form a "gas jet" structure, whereas the liquid distributes more uniformly with large vortexes formed in the vicinity of the spray tip. The vaporization process under the flash boiling condition is greatly enhanced due to the intense bubble generation and burst. The liquid temperature measurements show strong temperature variations inside the flash boiling sprays with hot zones present in the "gas jet" structure and vortex region. In addition, high vapor concentration and closed vortex motion seem to have inhibited the heat and mass transfer in these regions. In summary, the vapor concentration and liquid temperature provide detailed information

  13. Stacked vapor fed amtec modules

    DOEpatents

    Sievers, Robert K.

    1989-01-01

    The present invention pertains to a stacked AMTEC module. The invention includes a tubular member which has an interior. The member is comprised of a ion conductor that substantially conducts ions relative to electrons, preferably a beta"-alumina solid electrolyte, positioned about the interior. A porous electrode for conducting electrons and allowing sodium ions to pass therethrough, and wherein electrons and sodium ions recombine to form sodium is positioned about the beta"-alumina solid electrolyte. The electrode is operated at a temperature and a pressure that allows the recombined sodium to vaporize. Additionally, an outer current collector grid for distributing electrons throughout the porous electrode is positioned about and contacts the porous electrode. Also included in the invention is transporting means for transporting liquid sodium to the beta"-alumina solid electrolyte of the tubular member. A transition piece is positioned about the interior of the member and contacts the transporting means. The transition piece divides the member into a first cell and a second cell such that each first and second cell has a beta"-alumina solid electrolyte, a first and second porous electrode and a grid. The transition piece conducts electrons from the interior of the tubular member. There is supply means for supplying sodium to the transporting means. Preferably the supply means is a shell which surrounds the tubular member and is operated at a temperature such that the vaporized sodium condenses thereon. Returning means for returning the condensed sodium from the shell to the transporting means provides a continuous supply of liquid sodium to the transporting means. Also, there are first conducting means for conducting electric current from the transition piece which extends through the shell, and second conducting means for conducting electric current to the grid of the first cell which extends through the shell.

  14. An application of oil vaporization evaluation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Fleckenstein, W.W.; Bouck, L.S.; Hudgens, D.; Querin, M.; Williams, L.

    1992-02-01

    This paper describes and quantifies the benefits of residual oil vaporization in an enhanced recovery gas injection project. Vaporized oil is recovered as natural gas liquid (NGL) when the injected gas is produced. In the reservoir application studied, 20% of the liquid hydrocarbons produced were being recovered as NGL. (VC)

  15. Risk assessment of metal vapor arcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Monika C. (Inventor); Leidecker, Henning W. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method for assessing metal vapor arcing risk for a component is provided. The method comprises acquiring a current variable value associated with an operation of the component; comparing the current variable value with a threshold value for the variable; evaluating compared variable data to determine the metal vapor arcing risk in the component; and generating a risk assessment status for the component.

  16. Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Guastad, Krista; Riihimaki, Laura; none,

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of the Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio (TWRMR) value-added product (VAP) is to calculate water-vapor mixing ratio at the 25-meter and 60-meter levels of the meteorological tower at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility.

  17. 40 CFR 796.1950 - Vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Vapor pressure. 796.1950 Section 796.1950 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL FATE TESTING GUIDELINES Physical and Chemical Properties § 796.1950 Vapor pressure. (a) Introduction—(1) Background and...

  18. 40 CFR 796.1950 - Vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Vapor pressure. 796.1950 Section 796.1950 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL FATE TESTING GUIDELINES Physical and Chemical Properties § 796.1950 Vapor pressure. (a) Introduction—(1) Background...

  19. LNG fire and vapor control system technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Konzek, G.J.; Yasutake, K.M.; Franklin, A.L.

    1982-06-01

    This report provides a review of fire and vapor control practices used in the liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry. Specific objectives of this effort were to summarize the state-of-the-art of LNG fire and vapor control; define representative LNG facilities and their associated fire and vapor control systems; and develop an approach for a quantitative effectiveness evaluation of LNG fire and vapor control systems. In this report a brief summary of LNG physical properties is given. This is followed by a discussion of basic fire and vapor control design philosophy and detailed reviews of fire and vapor control practices. The operating characteristics and typical applications and application limitations of leak detectors, fire detectors, dikes, coatings, closed circuit television, communication systems, dry chemicals, water, high expansion foam, carbon dioxide and halogenated hydrocarbons are described. Summary descriptions of a representative LNG peakshaving facility and import terminal are included in this report together with typical fire and vapor control systems and their locations in these types of facilities. This state-of-the-art review identifies large differences in the application of fire and vapor control systems throughout the LNG industry.

  20. Vapor Wall Deposition in Chambers: Theoretical Considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McVay, R.; Cappa, C. D.; Seinfeld, J.

    2014-12-01

    In order to constrain the effects of vapor wall deposition on measured secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields in laboratory chambers, Zhang et al. (2014) varied the seed aerosol surface area in toluene oxidation and observed a clear increase in the SOA yield with increasing seed surface area. Using a coupled vapor-particle dynamics model, we examine the extent to which this increase is the result of vapor wall deposition versus kinetic limitations arising from imperfect accommodation of organic species into the particle phase. We show that a seed surface area dependence of the SOA yield is present only when condensation of vapors onto particles is kinetically limited. The existence of kinetic limitation can be predicted by comparing the characteristic timescales of gas-phase reaction, vapor wall deposition, and gas-particle equilibration. The gas-particle equilibration timescale depends on the gas-particle accommodation coefficient αp. Regardless of the extent of kinetic limitation, vapor wall deposition depresses the SOA yield from that in its absence since vapor molecules that might otherwise condense on particles deposit on the walls. To accurately extrapolate chamber-derived yields to atmospheric conditions, both vapor wall deposition and kinetic limitations must be taken into account.

  1. ON-LINE CALCULATOR: VAPOR INTRUSION MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Migration of volatile chemicals from the subsurface into overlying buildings is called vapor intrusion (VI). Volatile organic chemicals in contaminated soils or groundwater can emit vapors, which may migrate through subsurface soils and may enter the indoor air of overlying build...

  2. Vapor diffusion electrode improves fuel cell operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. O.

    1966-01-01

    Vapor diffusion type fuel cell electrode presents a nonwetting barrier to the liquid feedstocks so they may contact the electrolyte only in the vapor state. Thus, it effects feedstock mixing with the electrolyte at the electrolyte/catalyst interface but prevents feedstock decomposition and catalyst poisoning from liquid mingling.

  3. Boron carbide whiskers produced by vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Boron carbide whiskers have an excellent combination of properties for use as a reinforcement material. They are produced by vaporizing boron carbide powder and condensing the vapors on a substrate. Certain catalysts promote the growth rate and size of the whiskers.

  4. High bandwidth vapor density diagnostic system

    DOEpatents

    Globig, Michael A.; Story, Thomas W.

    1992-01-01

    A high bandwidth vapor density diagnostic system for measuring the density of an atomic vapor during one or more photoionization events. The system translates the measurements from a low frequency region to a high frequency, relatively noise-free region in the spectrum to provide improved signal to noise ratio.

  5. SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGY: REFERENCE HANDBOOK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) systems are being used in increasing numbers due to many advantages these systems hold over other soil treatment technologies. VE systems appear to be simple in design and operation, yet the fundamentals governing subsurface vapor transport are quite c...

  6. SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGY: REFERENCE HANDBOOK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) systems are being used in Increasing numbers because of the many advantages these systems hold over other soil treatment technologies. SVE systems appear to be simple in design and operation, yet the fundamentals governing subsurface vapor transport ar...

  7. 75 FR 65151 - Marine Vapor Control Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-21

    ... Act notice regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008 issue of the Federal Register (73 FR... Coast Guard regulations (final rule, 55 FR 25396; June 21, 1990) relating to facility and vessel vapor... Homeland Security Coast Guard 33 CFR Parts 154, 155, and 156 46 CFR Parts 35 and 39 Marine Vapor...

  8. Condensation coefficient of methanol vapor near vapor-liquid equilibrium states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikawa, S.; Yano, T.; Ichijo, M.; Iwanami, K.

    This paper is concerned with the nonequilibrium condensation from a vapor to a liquid phase on the plate endwall of a shock tube behind a reflected shock wave. The growth of a liquid film on the endwall is measured by an optical interferometer using a laser beam. The experiment is carefully conducted on the precisely designed apparatus, and thereby the condensation coefficient of methanol vapor is determined in a wide range of vapor-liquid conditions from near to far from equilibrium states. The result shows that the condensation coefficient increases with the increase of the ratio of number densities of vapor and saturated vapor at the interface.

  9. Vapor Inhalation of Alcohol in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gilpin, Nicholas W.; Richardson, Heather N.; Cole, Maury; Koob, George F.

    2008-01-01

    Alcohol dependence constitutes a neuroadaptive state critical for understanding alcoholism, and various methods have been utilized to induce alcohol dependence in animals, one of which is alcohol vapor exposure. Alcohol vapor inhalation provides certain advantages over other chronic alcohol exposure procedures that share the ultimate goal of producing alcohol dependence in rats. Chronic alcohol vapor inhalation allows the experimenter to control the dose, duration, and pattern of alcohol exposure. Also, this procedure facilitates testing of somatic and motivational aspects of alcohol dependence. Chronic exposure to alcohol vapor produces increases in alcohol-drinking behavior, increases in anxiety-like behavior, and reward deficits in rats. Alcohol vapor inhalation as a laboratory protocol is flexible, and the parameters of this procedure can be adjusted to accommodate the specific aims of different experiments. This unit describes the options available to investigators using this procedure for dependence induction, when different options are more or less appropriate, and the implications of each. PMID:18634001

  10. Vapor-barrier Vacuum Isolation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Leonard M. (Inventor); Taminger, Karen M. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A system includes a collimated beam source within a vacuum chamber, a condensable barrier gas, cooling material, a pump, and isolation chambers cooled by the cooling material to condense the barrier gas. Pressure levels of each isolation chamber are substantially greater than in the vacuum chamber. Coaxially-aligned orifices connect a working chamber, the isolation chambers, and the vacuum chamber. The pump evacuates uncondensed barrier gas. The barrier gas blocks entry of atmospheric vapor from the working chamber into the isolation chambers, and undergoes supersonic flow expansion upon entering each isolation chamber. A method includes connecting the isolation chambers to the vacuum chamber, directing vapor to a boundary with the working chamber, and supersonically expanding the vapor as it enters the isolation chambers via the orifices. The vapor condenses in each isolation chamber using the cooling material, and uncondensed vapor is pumped out of the isolation chambers via the pump.

  11. Vapor-Phase Stoichiometry and Heat Treatment of CdTe Starting Material for Physical Vapor Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Sha, Yi-Gao; Lehoczky, S. L.; Liu, Hao-Chieh; Fang, Rei; Brebrick, R. F.

    1998-01-01

    Six batches of CdTe, having total amounts of material from 99 to 203 g and gross mole fraction of Te, X(sub Te), 0.499954-0.500138, were synthesized from pure Cd and Te elements. The vapor-phase stoichiometry of the assynthesized CdTe batches was determined from the partial pressure of Te2, P(sub Te2) using an optical absorption technique. The measured vapor compositions at 870 C were Te-rich for all of the batches with partial pressure ratios of Cd to Te2, P(sub Cd)/P(sub Te2), ranging from 0.00742 to 1.92. After the heat treatment of baking under dynamic vacuum at 870 C for 8 min, the vapor-phase compositions moved toward that of the congruent sublimation, i.e. P(sub Cd)/P(sub Te2) = 2.0, with the measured P(sub Cd)/P(sub Te2) varying from 1.84 to 3.47. The partial pressure measurements on one of the heat-treated samples also showed that the sample remained close to the congruent sublimation condition over the temperature range 800-880 C.

  12. FTIR instrumentation to monitor vapors from Shuttle tile waterproofing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattson, C. B.; Schwindt, C. J.

    1995-11-01

    conditions in controlled laboratory tests. The combination of laboratory and field tests with the FTIR instrument demonstrated superior sensitivity, ability to reject interference from water and ethanol vapors, ruggedness to be transported from the lab to the OPF and set up without special procedures or degradation of performance. The multiple component vapor analysis algorithm was developed at KSC and incorporates automatic baseline correction and shape fitting of the spectra. The analysis for DMES, TetraMethylDiSiloxane (TMDS), ethanol, methanol, isopropanol, and baseline parameters uses 161 points per sample at 4 cm(exp -1) resolution, and processes an eight scan sample every ten seconds. The standard deviation of the measurements is 0.013 ppm and the upper linear limit is 125 ppm DMES.

  13. FTIR instrumentation to monitor vapors from Shuttle tile waterproofing materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattson, C. B.; Schwindt, C. J.

    1995-01-01

    conditions in controlled laboratory tests. The combination of laboratory and field tests with the FTIR instrument demonstrated superior sensitivity, ability to reject interference from water and ethanol vapors, ruggedness to be transported from the lab to the OPF and set up without special procedures or degradation of performance. The multiple component vapor analysis algorithm was developed at KSC and incorporates automatic baseline correction and shape fitting of the spectra. The analysis for DMES, TetraMethylDiSiloxane (TMDS), ethanol, methanol, isopropanol, and baseline parameters uses 161 points per sample at 4 cm(exp -1) resolution, and processes an eight scan sample every ten seconds. The standard deviation of the measurements is 0.013 ppm and the upper linear limit is 125 ppm DMES. Based on successful demonstration of capabilities we produced three mobile instrument carts to be used in each OPF to support future waterproofing operations. The design and building of the 'DMES Carts' were accomplished in Fiscal year 1995.

  14. Estimates of abundance of vapor condensate from the impacts of asteroids and comets on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetsov, Vladimir; Shuvalov, Valery

    The hypervelocity impacts of asteroids and comets on the Moon and planets can vaporize a substantial mass of target rock comparable with the mass of a projectile. The vapor expands, forming a vapor plume, and, when it cools and reaches the liquid-vapor coexistence curve, molten spherules can condense from the vapor. Ejecta layers bearing condensate spherules have been found on the Earth along with melt droplet spherules, however, the impact-vapor condensate is extremely rare among the lunar samples. The current average impact velocities on the Moon and Earth differ only slightly, and the main distinction is probably that the vapor plume expands to the atmosphere on the Earth and into vacuum on the Moon. Using available ANEOS equations of states for quartz and dunite we have determined parameters behind shock waves for impact velocities from 9 to 30 km/s and calculated release adiabats from various points on the Hugoniot curves to very low pressures. For impacts of quartz projectiles on quartz targets at velocities 9-16 km/s the release adiabats come to the liquid branch of the two-phase curve and, during the following expansion of two-phase mixture, the shock-compressed material vaporizes and does not condense. The condensate can appear during the plume expansion only at higher impact velocities. Using our hydrocode SOVA, we have made numerical simulations of the impacts of quartz and dunite spherical projectiles on the targets from the same materials. Along with the masses of condensates we calculated the masses of melted material. The calculated ratio of vaporized mass to the melted mass proved to be of the order of 0.1. However, we obtained that at velocities below 20 km/s the condensate mass is only a small fraction of vapor and melt masses and, consequently, the major part of vapor disperses in vacuum in the form of separate molecules. At impact velocity 15 km/s the relative abundance of silicate condensates is 0.001 - 0.0001 in accordance with the studies of

  15. Improved measurement for volatile particles: vapor-particle separator design and laboratory tests.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Meng-Dawn; Allman, Steve E

    2011-12-01

    Sampling and measurement of volatile particles is a challenging task. It has been hampered by lack of a reliable technique capable of accurately capturing the phase-partition process of the pollutants without generating bias and artifacts in the data. The objective of this research is to design a new vapor-particle separation technique for performing the phase separation on-line (the sampling aspect), which, simultaneously, enables characterization of the vapors and particles. The new vapor-particle separator (VPS) consists of a thin metallic microporous membrane for (1) extraction of vapor molecules that are thermally desorbed from the condensed particulate phases and (2) collection of the vapors for subsequent chemical analysis. We evaluated this new separator using synthetic particles made of nonvolatile and or semi-volatile chemicals, and reported the laboratory test results in this paper. The laboratory particle test results showed reasonably high particle transmission efficiency across all particle sizes. The thermal dynamics of nanoparticles was succinctly observed on-line. The results successfully demonstrated the ability of VPS to separate particles and vapors thus enabling a faithful observation of the thermal behavior. We believe the new technology will make a great contribution to the measurement of volatile particles. PMID:22225248

  16. Development and Application of a Three-Dimensional Finite Element Vapor Intrusion Model

    PubMed Central

    Pennell, Kelly G.; Bozkurt, Ozgur; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2010-01-01

    Details of a three-dimensional finite element model of soil vapor intrusion, including the overall modeling process and the stepwise approach, are provided. The model is a quantitative modeling tool that can help guide vapor intrusion characterization efforts. It solves the soil gas continuity equation coupled with the chemical transport equation, allowing for both advective and diffusive transport. Three-dimensional pressure, velocity, and chemical concentration fields are produced from the model. Results from simulations involving common site features, such as impervious surfaces, porous foundation sub-base material, and adjacent structures are summarized herein. The results suggest that site-specific features are important to consider when characterizing vapor intrusion risks. More importantly, the results suggest that soil gas or subslab gas samples taken without proper regard for particular site features may not be suitable for evaluating vapor intrusion risks; rather, careful attention needs to be given to the many factors that affect chemical transport into and around buildings. PMID:19418819

  17. Comparison of Upper Tropospheric Water Vapor from AIRS and Cryogenic Frostpoint Hygrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetzer, Eric J.; Vomel, Holger

    2004-01-01

    Upper tropospheric water vapor (UTWV) from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) experiment on NASA's Aqua spacecraft has the potential of addressing several important climate questions. The specified AIRS system measurement uncertainty for water vapor is 20 percent absolute averaged over 2 km layers. Cryogenic frostpoint hygrometers (CFH) are balloon-borne water vapor sensors responsive from the surface into the lower stratosphere. Several dozen coincident, collocated CFH profiles have been obtained for AlRS validation. The combination of CFH sensitivity and sample size offers a statistically compelling picture of AIRS UTWV measurement capability. We present a comparison between CFH observations and AlRS retrievals. We focus on the altitude range from the middle troposphere up to heights at the limits of AlRS sensitivity to water vapor, believed to be around 100-1 50 hPa.

  18. Remote Sensing of Water Vapor and Thin Cirrus Clouds using MODIS Near-IR Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Bo-Cai; Kaufman, Yoram J.

    2001-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), a major facility instrument on board the Terra Spacecraft, was successfully launched into space in December of 1999. MODIS has several near-IR channels within and around the 0.94 micrometer water vapor bands for remote sensing of integrated atmospheric water vapor over land and above clouds. MODIS also has a special near-IR channel centered at 1.375-micron with a width of 30 nm for remote sensing of cirrus clouds. In this paper, we describe briefly the physical principles on remote sensing of water vapor and cirrus clouds using these channels. We also present sample water vapor images and cirrus cloud images obtained from MODIS data.

  19. Development and application of a three-dimensional finite element vapor intrusion model.

    PubMed

    Pennell, Kelly G; Bozkurt, Ozgur; Suuberg, Eric M

    2009-04-01

    Details of a three-dimensional finite element model of soil vapor intrusion, including the overall modeling process and the stepwise approach, are provided. The model is a quantitative modeling tool that can help guide vapor intrusion characterization efforts. It solves the soil gas continuity equation coupled with the chemical transport equation, allowing for both advective and diffusive transport. Three-dimensional pressure, velocity, and chemical concentration fields are produced from the model. Results from simulations involving common site features, such as impervious surfaces, porous foundation sub-base material, and adjacent structures are summarized herein. The results suggest that site-specific features are important to consider when characterizing vapor intrusion risks. More importantly, the results suggest that soil gas or subslab gas samples taken without proper regard for particular site features may not be suitable for evaluating vapor intrusion risks; rather, careful attention needs to be given to the many factors that affect chemical transport into and around buildings. PMID:19418819

  20. Temperature and water vapor pressure effects on the friction coefficient of hydrogenated diamondlike carbon films.

    SciTech Connect

    Dickrell, P. L.; Sawyer, W. G.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Erdemir, A.; Energy Technology; Univ. of Florida

    2009-07-01

    Microtribological measurements of a hydrogenated diamondlike carbon film in controlled gaseous environments show that water vapor plays a significant role in the friction coefficient. These experiments reveal an initial high friction transient behavior that does not reoccur even after extended periods of exposure to low partial pressures of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2}. Experiments varying both water vapor pressure and sample temperature show trends of a decreasing friction coefficient as a function of both the decreasing water vapor pressure and the increasing substrate temperature. Theses trends are examined with regard to first order gas-surface interactions. Model fits give activation energies on the order of 40 kJ/mol, which is consistent with water vapor desorption.