Science.gov

Sample records for 25-27 portland oregon

  1. Urban carbon dioxide in Portland, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostrom, G. A.; Brooks, M.; Rice, A. L.

    2010-12-01

    Ambient concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) are reported for the Portland, Oregon (USA) metropolitan region since late July, 2009. Three stationary locations were established: a downtown location on the campus of Portland State University; a residential site in southeast Portland; and a rural station on Sauvie Island, located ~30km northwest of Portland in the Columbia River Gorge. Continuous measurements of CO2 at the sites average 400-410ppm and show considerable variability due to CO2 sources, sinks and meteorological drivers of ventilation. Within this variability, a marked 20-30ppm diurnal cycle is observed due to photosynthetic activity and variations in the planetary boundary layer. In-city CO2 concentrations are on average enhanced by 5-6ppm over the Sauvie Island site during upgorge wind conditions, a difference which is greatest in the afternoon. Measurements of the 13C/12C ratio of CO2 in downtown Portland are significantly depleted in 13C relative to 12C compared with background air and suggest that regional CO2 is dominated by petroleum sources (70-80%). High degrees of relationship between CO2 variability and primary air pollutants CO and NO (r2=0.70 to 0.80), measured by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality at the Southeast Portland location, corroborate this finding and illustrate the importance of traffic emissions on elevated ambient CO2 concentrations. In addition to CO2 at the fixed sites, measurements of street-level CO2 concentrations were obtained using a mobile instrument mounted in a bike trailer. Results from these field data show relatively homogenous CO2 concentrations throughout residential Portland neighborhoods with significant enhancements in CO2 on busy roadways or near areas of traffic congestion.

  2. 77 FR 4006 - Foreign-Trade Zone 45-Portland, Oregon; Expansion of Manufacturing Authority; Epson Portland, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 45--Portland, Oregon; Expansion of Manufacturing Authority; Epson Portland, Inc. (Inkjet Ink Manufacturing); Portland, OR An application has been submitted to the... of the scope of manufacturing authority approved within Subzone 45F, on behalf of Epson Portland,...

  3. Portland, Oregon: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Portland, OR, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  4. Analysis of street sweepings, Portland, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Timothy L.; Rinella, Joseph F.; McKenzie, Stuart W.; Parmenter, Jerry

    1977-01-01

    A brief study involving collection and analysis of street sweepings was undertaken to provide the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers with data on physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of dust and dirt accumulating on Portland streets. Most of the analyses selected were based on the pollutant loads predicted by the Storage, Treatment, Overflow, and Runoff Model (STORM). Five different basins were selected for sampling, and samples were collected three times in each basin. Because the literature reports no methodology for analysis of dust and dirt, the analytical methodology is described in detail. Results of the analyses are summarized in table 1.

  5. 75 FR 52369 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-25

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland, OR... Science and Industry, Portland, OR. The human remains were removed from an area in the vicinity of The... Oregon Museum of Science and Industry professional staff in consultation with representatives of...

  6. 33 CFR 100.1302 - Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon. 100.1302 Section 100.1302 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... § 100.1302 Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon. (a) Regulated area. All... south by the Marquam Bridge. (b) Definition. For purposes of this section, race area means an area...

  7. 33 CFR 100.1302 - Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon. 100.1302 Section 100.1302 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... § 100.1302 Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon. (a) Regulated area. All... south by the Marquam Bridge. (b) Definition. For purposes of this section, race area means an area...

  8. 33 CFR 100.1302 - Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon. 100.1302 Section 100.1302 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... § 100.1302 Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon. (a) Regulated area. All... south by the Marquam Bridge. (b) Definition. For purposes of this section, race area means an area...

  9. CONSENSUS AGREEMENT REGARDING PROTOCOL ISSUES DISCUSSED DURING THE MOUSE LYMPHOMA WORKSHOP: PORTLAND, OREGON, MAY 7, 1994

    EPA Science Inventory

    On May 7, 1994, in Portland Oregon, a workshop brought together some sixty recognized experts from universities, governmental research laboratories, pharmaceutical industry, contract laboratories, and regulatory agencies from all over the world to discuss issues linked with the c...

  10. 77 FR 26252 - Foreign-Trade Zone 45-Portland, Oregon, Expansion of Manufacturing Authority, Epson Portland, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... Hillsboro, Oregon, submitted by the Port of Portland (77 FR 4006-4007, 1/26/2012 and 77 FR 21082, 4/9/2012... (original and one electronic copy) shall be addressed to the Board's Executive Secretary at:...

  11. Portland, Mount Hood, & Columbia River Gorge, Oregon, Perspective View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Portland, the largest city in Oregon, is located on the Columbia River at the northern end of the Willamette Valley. On clear days, Mount Hood highlights the Cascade Mountains backdrop to the east. The Columbia is the largest river in the American Northwest and is navigable up to and well beyond Portland. It is also the only river to fully cross the Cascade Range, and has carved the Columbia River Gorge, which is seen in the left-central part of this view. A series of dams along the river, at topographically favorable sites, provide substantial hydroelectric power to the region.

    This perspective view was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), a Landsat satellite image, and a false sky. Topographic expression is vertically exaggerated two times.

    Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data substantially help in analyzing Landsat images by revealing the third dimension of Earth's surface, topographic height. The Landsat archive is managed by the U.S. Geological Survey's Eros Data Center (USGS EDC).

    Elevation data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet

  12. 77 FR 2965 - City of Portland, Oregon; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and Soliciting Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    ... Run Water Supply Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP). Environmental impacts related to selective water... Manager, Portland Water Bureau, City of Portland, Oregon, Room 530, 1120 SW 5th Avenue, Portland, OR 97204... agency. k. Description of proposed amendment: The licensee proposes to modify the North Tower intake...

  13. Evaluation of flood inundation in Crystal Springs Creek, Portland, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stonewall, Adam; Hess, Glen

    2016-01-01

    Efforts to improve fish passage have resulted in the replacement of six culverts in Crystal Springs Creek in Portland, Oregon. Two more culverts are scheduled to be replaced at Glenwood Street and Bybee Boulevard (Glenwood/Bybee project) in 2016. Recently acquired data have allowed for a more comprehensive understanding of the hydrology of the creek and the topography of the watershed. To evaluate the impact of the culvert replacements and recent hydrologic data, a Hydrologic Engineering Center-River Analysis System hydraulic model was developed to estimate water-surface elevations during high-flow events. Longitudinal surface-water profiles were modeled to evaluate current conditions and future conditions using the design plans for the culverts to be installed in 2016. Additional profiles were created to compare with the results from the most recent flood model approved by the Federal Emergency Management Agency for Crystal Springs Creek and to evaluate model sensitivity.Model simulation results show that water-surface elevations during high-flow events will be lower than estimates from previous models, primarily due to lower estimates of streamflow associated with the 0.01 and 0.002 annual exceedance probability (AEP) events. Additionally, recent culvert replacements have resulted in less ponding behind crossings. Similarly, model simulation results show that the proposed replacement culverts at Glenwood Street and Bybee Boulevard will result in lower water-surface elevations during high-flow events upstream of the proposed project. Wider culverts will allow more water to pass through crossings, resulting in slightly higher water-surface elevations downstream of the project during high-flows than water-surface elevations that would occur under current conditions. For the 0.01 AEP event, the water-surface elevations downstream of the Glenwood/Bybee project will be an average of 0.05 ft and a maximum of 0.07 ft higher than current conditions. Similarly, for the 0

  14. Coordination of Organic Curriculum Development in the Public Schools of Portland, Oregon. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayers, Lawrence W., Jr.

    This document describes the efforts of program administrators to implement an organic curriculum in the John Adams High School in Portland, Oregon. The chief program administrator coordinated efforts to develop individualized instructional materials, to revamp school organization, and to create a fully differentiated staff. Organic curriculum is a…

  15. Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority Project Abstracts; May 25-27, Portland, Oregon, 1997 Annual Review.

    SciTech Connect

    Allee, Brian J.

    1997-06-26

    Abstracts are presented from the 1997 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Review of Projects. The purpose was to provide information and education on the approximate 127 million dollars in Northwest electric ratepayer fish and wildlife mitigation projects funded annually.

  16. Inspection of surveillance activities and administrative leave policy at Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The authors conducted an inspection of surveillance activities and administrative leave policy at the Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, Oregon. The purpose of their inspection was to determine if a covert video surveillance operation conducted at Bonneville Power Administration was consistent with Department of Energy policies and procedures and other applicable regulations and procedures, and to determine if administrative leave policies and procedures used at Bonneville Power Administration in a specific instance were consistent with Department of Energy requirements and the Code of Federal Regulations. This inspection focused on a specific incident that occurred in 1989 on the 5th floor of the BPA Headquarters Building located in Portland, Oregon. The incident involved the soiling of an employee`s personal property with what appeared to be urine.

  17. Analysis of bottom material from the Willamette River, Portland Harbor, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenzie, Stuart W.

    1977-01-01

    The bottom material of the Willamette River, Portland Harbor, Oregon, was sampled in duplicate on February 1, 1977. Results are reported on the following analyses of the material: immediate and long-term oxygen demand; particle size; percent moisture; residue, loss on ignition; and chemical. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (Corps), collected and analyzed duplicate samples of bottom material from Portland Harbor. The analyses were selected jointly by the Corps and USGS and include chemical, oxygen-demand, and particle-size analyses of the bottom material. The National Maine Fisheries Service (NMFS) indicated that, at present, the Columbia River downstream from Bonneville Dam receives very little organic material. The bottom material is 5 to 8 percent organic, and NMFS indicated that this material could stimulate the Columbia River aquatic system, with the dumping sites serving as feeder sites for aquatic organisms. (Woodard-USGS)

  18. Tabular data base construction and analysis from thematic classified Landsat imagery of Portland, Oregon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, N. A.; George, A. J., Jr.; Hegdahl, R.

    1977-01-01

    A systematic verification of Landsat data classifications of the Portland, Oregon metropolitan area has been undertaken on the basis of census tract data. The degree of systematic misclassification due to the Bayesian classifier used to process the Landsat data was noted for the various suburban, industrialized and central business districts of the metropolitan area. The Landsat determinations of residential land use were employed to estimate the number of automobile trips generated in the region and to model air pollution hazards.

  19. Existing Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Deep Energy Retrofit of 1910 House, Portland, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-12-01

    This case study lists project information, cost and energy efficiency performance data, energy efficiency measures and lessons learned for a 100-year-old home in Portland, Oregon, audited by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for a deep energy retrofit. New HVAC and extensive insulation upgrades including rigid XPS and new siding over the old lead painted siding, and EPS on the basement walls and in cathedral ceiling helped bring HERS down to 68.

  20. Basic data on urban storm-water quality, Portland, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenzie, Stuart W.; Miller, Timothy L.

    1976-01-01

    To assess urban storm-water-quality characteristics in the metropolitan area of Portland, Oreg., seven drainage basins were selected with varying drainage areas, basin slopes, impervious areas, land uses, and active construction areas.  Automatic water-quality samplers, rain gages, and stream gages were installed in each basin.  From September 1, 1975, to may 1, 1976, data were collected to determine rainfall intensities and define discharge hydrographs.  Almost 500 samples from the seven basins were analyzed to describe pollutographs for at least four complete storms on each of the basins.  In addition to the storm samples, several base-flow samples were collected and analyzed for each site.

  1. CONTRASTING CONCEPTS IN CAMPUS PLANNING. SELECTED PAPERS FROM THE FIRST ANNUAL CONFERENCE, SOCIETY FOR COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY PLANNING (PORTLAND STATE COLLEGE, PORTLAND, OREGON, AUGUST 13-14, 1966.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MAYER, FREDERICK W.

    THE PAPERS SUMMARIZED IN THIS DOCUMENT WERE GIVEN AT A S.C.U.P. CONFERENCE AND WERE BASED UPON EXPERIENCES AT COLLEGES IN SANTA CRUZ, CALIFORNIA, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, AND PORTLAND, OREGON. CENTRAL TO ALL THE CONCEPTS OF PLANNING WAS THE LOCATION OF THE INSTITUTION, WITH THE ENSUING GEOPOLITICAL RESTRICTIONS. OTHER PLANNING CONSIDERATIONS VARIED IN…

  2. Prevalence of Baylisascaris procyonis in raccoons (Procyon lotor) in Portland, Oregon, USA.

    PubMed

    Yeitz, Jennifer L; Gillin, Colin M; Bildfell, Rob J; Debess, Emilio E

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the prevalence of Baylisascaris procyonis in raccoons living in the metropolitan area of Portland, Oregon, USA, in order to assess the potential public health risk involved in the transmission of B. procyonis to humans and companion animals. Sixty-nine euthanized raccoons were collected from Portland wildlife-control agencies. Infection with B. procyonis was determined through the harvesting of adult worms from raccoon intestines during necropsy and by fecal analysis using modified double-centrifugation technique with a sugar-flotation solution. Fifty-eight percent of sampled raccoons were found to be infected with B. procyonis. Juveniles represented a greater percentage (64%) of raccoons captured by wildlife-control agents and were found to have the highest prevalence (70%) and heavier adult worm burdens (mean=35 worms). No gender bias was evident. This is one of the few studies of Baylisascaris prevalence in the Pacific Northwest, and it demonstrates that there is a high prevalence of B. procyonis in raccoons inhabiting the Portland area. This factor should be considered in raccoon relocation and management. The data also suggest that juvenile raccoons are the major potential source of B. procyonis contamination in the Portland community and may merit special attention to minimize their interaction with humans. PMID:19204331

  3. Tritium/Helium-3 Apparent Ages of Shallow Ground Water, Portland Basin, Oregon, 1997-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinkle, Stephen R.

    2009-01-01

    Water samples for tritium/helium-3 age dating were collected from 12 shallow monitoring wells in the Portland basin, Oregon, in 1997, and again in 1998. Robust tritium/helium-3 apparent (piston-flow) ages were obtained for water samples from 10 of the 12 wells; apparent ages ranged from 1.1 to 21.2 years. Method precision was demonstrated by close agreement between data collected in 1997 and 1998. Tritium/helium-3 apparent ages generally increase with increasing depth below the water table, and agree well with age/depth relations based on assumptions of effects of recharge rate on vertical ground-water movement.

  4. Close-in blasting at the TRI-MET light rail tunnels in Portland, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Revey, G.F.; Painter, D.Z.

    1995-12-31

    Frontier/Traylor Joint Venture is presently constructing a section of the Tri-County Metropolitan Transit District of Oregon`s (TRI-MET) Westside Light Rail System. This new section will extend Portland`s existing transit system to the western suburbs of Beaverton and Hillsboro. The drill-blast excavations at this project include 10,000 feet of 20 foot tunnel, 18 cross passages, three shafts, an underground railway station, and a U-wall open cut. From a blast designer`s perspective, this job has been extremely challenging. Blast vibration is limited to 0.5 ips at 200 feet or at the nearest structure, and airblast is limited to 129 dB--linear peak and 96 dB--C scale. The tunnels pass under heavily built up areas and have top of tunnel to surface cover distances as low as 70 feet. Surface blasting in the 26,000 cubic yard U-wall excavation was limited to five short nighttime periods due to its proximity to the very busy highway 26. This paper describes the techniques that were used to develop safe blasting designs for the TRI-MET Surface blasts and tunnel rounds. It also discusses the measures that were necessary to mitigate noise, vibration, and flyrock.

  5. 33 CFR 165.1323 - Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Oregon Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...: Willamette River Portland, Oregon Captain of the Port Zone. 165.1323 Section 165.1323 Navigation and..., Oregon Captain of the Port Zone. (a) Location. The following is a regulated navigation area (RNA): All...°34′39″ N, 122°44′43″ W thence to 45°34′44″ N, 122°44′51″ W thence to 45°34′45″ N, 122°44′53″ W...

  6. Comparative approaches to measuring food access in urban areas: the case of Portland, Oregon.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Andrea L; Bania, Neil; Leete, Laura

    2011-01-01

    GIS methods are used to construct measures of food access for neighbourhoods in the Portland, Oregon, US metropolitan area and the sensitivity of such measures to methodological variation is examined. The level of aggregation of data inputs is varied and the effect of using both Euclidean and street network distances is tested. It is found that, regardless of the level of geographical disaggregation, distance-based measures generate approximately the same conclusions about the distribution of food access in the area. It is also found that, while the relationship between street network and Euclidean distances varies with population density, measures computed with either construct generate the same relative patterns of food access. These findings suggest that results from food access studies employing disparate methodologies can often be compared. PMID:21954485

  7. Food mirages: geographic and economic barriers to healthful food access in Portland, Oregon.

    PubMed

    Breyer, Betsy; Voss-Andreae, Adriana

    2013-11-01

    This paper investigated the role of grocery store prices in structuring food access for low-income households in Portland, Oregon. We conducted a detailed healthful foods market basket survey and developed an index of store cost based on the USDA Thrifty Food Plan. Using this index, we estimated the difference in street-network distance between the nearest low-cost grocery store and the nearest grocery store irrespective of cost. Spatial regression of this metric in relation to income, poverty, and gentrification at the census tract scale lead to a new theory regarding food access in the urban landscape. Food deserts are sparse in Portland, but food mirages are abundant, particularly in gentrifying areas where poverty remains high. In a food mirage, grocery stores are plentiful but prices are beyond the means of low-income households, making them functionally equivalent to food deserts in that a long journey to obtain affordable, nutritious food is required in either case. Results suggested that evaluation of food environments should, at a minimum, consider both proximity and price in assessing healthy food access for low-income households. PMID:24100236

  8. Comparison of chlorofluorocarbon-age dating with particle-tracking results of a regional ground-water flow model of the Portland Basin, Oregon and Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinkle, Stephen R.; Snyder, Daniel T.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the results of a study in which chlorofluorocarbon-age dating was used to evaluate the results of a ground-water particle tracker for the Portland Basin in Oregon and Washington.

  9. Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Commercial Garage Lights In the Providence Portland Medical Center, Portland, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Ton, My K.; Richman, Eric E.; Gilbride, Theresa L.

    2008-11-11

    This U.S. Department of Energy GATEWAY Demonstration project studied the applicability of light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires for commercial parking garage applications. High-pressure sodium (HPS) area luminaires were replaced with new LED area luminaires. The project was supported under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid State Lighting Program. Other participants in the demonstration project included Providence Portland Medical Center in Portland, Oregon, the Energy Trust of Oregon, and Lighting Sciences Group (LSG) Inc. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted the measurements and analysis of the results. PNNL manages GATEWAY demonstrations for DOE and represents their perspective in the conduct of the work. Quantitative and qualitative measurements of light and electrical power were taken at the site for both HPS and LED light sources. Economic costs were estimated and garage users’ responses to the new light sources were gauged with a survey. Six LED luminaires were installed in the below-ground parking level A, replacing six existing 150W HPS lamps spread out over two rows of parking spaces. Illuminance measurements were taken at floor level approximately every 4 ft on a 60-ft x 40-ft grid to measure light output of these LED luminaires which were termed the “Version 1” luminaires. PNNL conducted power measurements of the circuit in the garage to which the 6 luminaires were connected and determined that they drew an average of 82 W per lamp. An improved LED luminaire, Version 2, was installed in Level B of the parking garage. Illuminance measurements were not made of this second luminaire on site due to higher traffic conditions, but photometric measurements of this lamp and Version 1 were made in an independent testing laboratory and power usage for Version 2 was also measured. Version 1 was found to produce 3600 lumens and Version 2 was found to produce 4700 lumens of light and to consume 78 Watts. Maximum and minimum light

  10. AN EVALUATION OF LOCAL EDUCATIONAL EXTENSION TELEVISION PROGRAMS BY RURAL PEOPLE AND AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION AGENTS IN THE METROPOLITAN AREA OF PORTLAND, OREGON.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BARON, LLOYD C.

    OBJECTIVES OF THIS STUDY WERE TO DETERMINE THE EXTENT TO WHICH SELECTED GROUPS OF RURAL PEOPLE IN METROPOLITAN PORTLAND, OREGON, VIEWED AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION TELECASTS ON PORTLAND COMMERCIAL STATIONS AND USED THE INFORMATION GAINED TO GET SUGGESTIONS FOR IMPROVING THE SCHEDULING, TYPES, AND CONTENT OF FUTURE PROGRAMS. QUESTIONNAIRES WERE SENT TO…

  11. Computer-Assisted Instruction Adult Literacy Workshop. A 310/Special Demonstration Project, 1986-87 (Corvallis, Oregon, August 25-27, 1986). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanis, Mary I.; Gesin, Janet

    In order to provide the personnel of Rio Salado Community College's Adult Basic Education Program (RSCC/ABE) with the most up-to-date experience in software selection and usage, a proposal was written for two persons to attend the Computer-Assisted Instruction Adult Literacy Workshop at Oregon State University, which afforded participants an…

  12. Wastewater recycling and heat reclamation project: Red Lion Central Laundry, Portland, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Garlick, T.F.; Halverson, M.A.; Ledbetter, M.R.

    1997-06-01

    This report discusses water, energy, and cost savings that can be achieved in a commercial laundry through the use of a wastewater recycling and heat recovery system. Cost savings are achieved through reductions in water use, reduction in sewage charges (typically based on water use), reductions in water heating energy, and potential reductions in water treatment chemicals because the recycled water has already been treated with soaps and conditioners. A recovery system saves water by recycling wash water that would normally be dumped into the city sewage system. Recycling the wash water produces considerable energy savings because the recycled water has a higher temperature than fresh water. As a result, a hot water heater consumes less energy to heat the recycled water. The demonstration project discussed in this report was based in a large commercial laundry in Portland, Oregon. The laundry serves a large hotel/motel chain and processes an average of 25,000 pounds of laundry per day. A wastewater recovery system using a membrane microfiltration unit (MFU) was installed in the laundry in September 1995. Time series data of the water and energy consumption of the laundry were taken before and after installation of the MFU. Energy savings were measured by performing a thermal energy balance around the washing machines. Water savings were calculated by metering volumetric flow rates. After a period of approximately five months, the MFU has achieved final results of 52 percent savings in water consumption and 44 percent savings in energy to heat water. This five-month period represents a learning curve during which several small technical improvements were made to the MFU and laundry staff adjusted laundry operations to maximize the benefits of the MFU. An economic analysis discusses the impact of capital investment, daily consumption, and local utility rates on the payback period.

  13. Estimated average annual ground-water pumpage in the Portland Basin, Oregon and Washington 1987-88

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, C.A.; Broad, T.M.

    1993-01-01

    Data for ground-water pumpage were collected during an inventory of wells in 1987-88 in the Portland Basin located in northwestern Oregon and southwestern Washington. Estimates of annual ground-water pumpage were made for the three major categories of use: public supply, industry, and irrigation. A large rapidly expanding metropolitan area is situated within the Portland Basin, along with several large industries that use significant quantities of ground water. The estimated total average annual ground-water pumpage for 1987 was about 127,800 acre-feet. Of this quantity, about 50 percent was pumped for industrial use, about 40 percent for public supply and about 10 percent for irrigation. Domestic use from individual wells is a small part of the total and is not included.

  14. Public health assessment for McCormick and Baxter Creosoting Company (Portland), Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon, Region 10. Cerclis No. ORD009020603. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-13

    The McCormick and Baxter Creosoting site is located on the Willamette River in Portland, Oregon. ATSDR considers the site to have been a public health hazard for former plant workers because of past ingestion exposure to arsenic, creosote, pentachlorophenol, polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, and dibenzofurans at levels of public health concern. The site also poses an ongoing and future public health hazard because people might encounter hazardous chemicals along the shoreline on or near the site at levels that can damage the skin, as was reported to have happened to two boys. Finally, dioxin levels would pose a public health hazard if people subsist on crayfish and suckers contaminated with polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans.

  15. Microbial dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyls, dibenzo-p-dioxins, and -furans at the Portland Harbor Superfund site, Oregon, USA.

    PubMed

    Rodenburg, Lisa A; Krumins, Valdis; Curran, Joanna Crowe

    2015-06-16

    The Portland Harbor (Oregon, USA) has been declared a "Superfund" site because it is impacted by a variety of contaminants, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and -furans (PCDD/Fs). Using data collected in the remedial investigation, concentrations of PCBs and PCDD/Fs in sediment and water were examined using positive matrix factorization to look for evidence that PCBs and PCDD/Fs are dechlorinated by anaerobic bacteria. This process has long been known to occur in sediments. Recently, it has been recognized that PCB and PCDD/F dechlorination may also occur in other anaerobic environments, such as in landfills, sewers, and groundwater. The results indicate that a factor related to the dechlorination of PCBs and PCDD/Fs was present in the water but not in the sediment. Spatial patterns in dechlorination products suggest that they come primarily from groundwater. Dechlorination products comprise 22% of the PCBs in the water. The Portland Harbor therefore represents the third major US watershed in which PCBs appear to undergo dechlorination in an environment other than sediment, suggesting that the microbial dechlorination of PCBs and PCDD/Fs is more common than previously assumed. In addition, the Portland Harbor is impacted by PCBs generated inadvertently during the production of pigments, such as PCB 11, which alone exceeded the 64 pg/L federal water quality standard for the sum of PCBs in two of 120 whole water samples. PMID:26010118

  16. From Effectiveness to Excellence: State School Improvement Policies and Programs. Proceedings of a Seminar (Portland, Oregon, September 12-13, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR. Goal Based Education Program.

    This report constitutes proceedings of a seminar held in Portland, Oregon (September 1983), by representatives of 15 state education agencies, conceived as a forum for exploring state-level policy and program options. Four topical areas were the subject of speaker presentations: "The Effective Schooling Research Base," by Ronald M. Smith…

  17. Mental Health, Health, and Substance Abuse Service Needs for the Native American Rehabilitation Association Northwest (NARA NW) in the Portland, Oregon Metropolitan Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crofoot, Thomas L.; Harris, Naomi; Plumb, Mary Anne; Smith, Keri Slingerland; Gault, Jaime; Brooks, Gloria; Hungry, Lisa; Geary, Artice; Holland, Irene

    2008-01-01

    Consistent with results of previous needs assessments for urban American Indian and Alaska Native populations, a needs assessment in the Portland, Oregon metropolitan area for the Native American Rehabilitation Association Northwest revealed high levels of co-occurring conditions for American Indian and Alaska Native clients, often combining…

  18. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 84-415-1688, Precision Castparts Corporation, Portland, Oregon. [2-ethoxyethanol exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Ratcliffe, J.M.; Clapp, D.E.; Schrader, S.M.; Turner, T.W.; Oser, J.

    1986-05-01

    A cross-sectional evaluation of semen quality (sperm concentration, pH, volume, viability, motility, velocity and morphology) was made among men employed at the Precision Castparts Corporation, Portland, Oregon in response to a management request to evaluate effects of exposure to 2-ethoxyethanol (2EE). About 80 male workers were potentially exposed to 2EE, used as a binder in investment casting. Full-shift breathing-zone airborne exposures to 2EE ranged from not detectable to 23.8 ppm. The average sperm count per ejaculate among the exposed workers was significantly lower than that of the unexposed comparison group, 113 versus 154 million sperm/ejaculate. Average sperm concentrations of both groups were significantly lower than the average for other occupational populations. The authors conclude that there is a possible effect of 2EE exposure on sperm count among these workers, but other factors may be affecting semen quality of both exposed and unexposed workers.

  19. Behavior, passage, and downstream migration of juvenile Chinook salmon from Detroit Reservoir to Portland, Oregon, 2014–15

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kock, Tobias J.; Beeman, John W.; Hansen, Amy C.; Hansel, Hal C.; Hansen, Gabriel S.; Hatton, Tyson W.; Kofoot, Eric E.; Sholtis, Matthew D.; Sprando, Jamie M.

    2015-01-01

    A Cormack-Jolly-Seber mark-recapture model was developed to provide reach-specific survival estimates for juvenile Chinook salmon. A portion of the tagged population overwintered in the Willamette River Basin and outmigrated several months after release. As a result, survival estimates from the model would have been negatively biased by factors such as acoustic tag failure and tag loss. Data from laboratory studies were incorporated into the model to provide survival estimates that accounted for these factors. In the North Santiam River between Minto Dam and the Bennett Dam complex, a distance of 37.2 kilometers, survival was estimated to be 0.844 (95-percent confidence interval 0.795–0.893). The survival estimate for the 203.7 kilometer reach between the Bennett Dam complex and Portland, Oregon, was 0.279 (95-percent confidence interval 0.234–0.324), and included portions of the North Santiam, Santiam, and Willamette Rivers. The cumulative survival estimate in the 240.9 kilometer reach from the Minto Dam tailrace to Portland was 0.236 (95-percent confidence interval 0.197–0.275).

  20. Analysis of bottom material from the Willamette River, Portland Harbor, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenzie, Stuart W.

    1977-01-01

    The bottom material of the Willamette River, Portland Harbor, was sampled in duplicate on February 1, 1977. Results are reported on the following analyses of the material: immediate and long-term oxygen demand; particle size; percent moisture; residue, loss on ignition; and chemical.

  1. Storm runoff as related to urbanization based on data collected in Salem and Portland, and generalized for the Willamette Valley, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius

    1983-01-01

    Storm runoff as related to urbanization is defined by a series of regression equations for Salem and for the Willamette Valley, Oregon. In addition to data from 17 basins monitored in the Salem area, data from 24 basins gaged in a previous study in Portland, Oregon - Vancouver, Washington were used defining the Willamette Valley equations. Basins used to define equations ranged in size from 0.2 to 26 square miles. Rainfall intensity varied from 1.8 to 2.2 inches for the 6 hour, 0.2 exceedance probability. Sensitivity analyses of equations indicate that urbanization of an undeveloped basin can increase peak discharge more than three times and almost double runoff volume. Much of Portland and Vancouver are located on porous river terraces where dry wells are used to shunt runoff. Much of East Salem is located on previously farmed land where drain tiles used to dewater soils still connect directly to streams. (USGS)

  2. High Resolution Modeling of Anthropogenic and Biogenic Carbon Dioxide Fluxes From the Portland Oregon Metropolitan Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butenhoff, C. L.; Powell, J.; Tran, D.; Rice, A. L.

    2013-12-01

    The future of the North American carbon cycle is heavily dependent on urban ecosystems and their development. Around 75-80% of the current U.S. population is urbanized and this percentage is likely to increase in the future. Despite the lack of national climate policy, cities nationwide are developing their own plans to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The city of Portland OR for example (along with Multnomah County) has in place an ambitious goal of reducing CO2 emissions by 80% by the year 2050. Monitoring and verifying emission reductions will be integral to the successful operation of this and other mitigation policies. To do so requires both the modeling and measurement of CO2 at high spatial and temporal resolution. To this effort we developed gridded inventories of anthropogenic and biogenic fluxes of CO2 from Portland and the surrounding metropolitan region at 1-km resolution and at hourly time steps. Mobile emissions were estimated using traffic count data, a land-use regression model, and the EPA MOVES model. Biogenic fluxes of CO2 were calculated using high resolution remote sensing vegetation maps and the Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration Model coupled to the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF-VPRM). This is part of an on-going effort to constrain emission estimates using measurements of CO2 from throughout the region. Here we compare simulated concentrations of CO2 with data available from three sites, representing upwind, downwind, and city center conditions.

  3. Estimated Depth to Ground Water and Configuration of the Water Table in the Portland, Oregon Area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, Daniel T.

    2008-01-01

    Reliable information on the configuration of the water table in the Portland metropolitan area is needed to address concerns about various water-resource issues, especially with regard to potential effects from stormwater injection systems such as UIC (underground injection control) systems that are either existing or planned. To help address these concerns, this report presents the estimated depth-to-water and water-table elevation maps for the Portland area, along with estimates of the relative uncertainty of the maps and seasonal water-table fluctuations. The method of analysis used to determine the water-table configuration in the Portland area relied on water-level data from shallow wells and surface-water features that are representative of the water table. However, the largest source of available well data is water-level measurements in reports filed by well constructors at the time of new well installation, but these data frequently were not representative of static water-level conditions. Depth-to-water measurements reported in well-construction records generally were shallower than measurements by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in the same or nearby wells, although many depth-to-water measurements were substantially deeper than USGS measurements. Magnitudes of differences in depth-to-water measurements reported in well records and those measured by the USGS in the same or nearby wells ranged from -119 to 156 feet with a mean of the absolute value of the differences of 36 feet. One possible cause for the differences is that water levels in many wells reported in well records were not at equilibrium at the time of measurement. As a result, the analysis of the water-table configuration relied on water levels measured during the current study or used in previous USGS investigations in the Portland area. Because of the scarcity of well data in some areas, the locations of select surface-water features including major rivers, streams, lakes, wetlands, and

  4. Analysis of urban storm-water quality for seven basins near Portland, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Timothy L.; McKenzie, Stuart W.

    1978-01-01

    Over a 1.5-year period, water-quality data were collected for seven small drainage basins in urban aeas of Portland, Oreg. Analysis of the data followed three approaches. First, the constituent concentrations were analyzed. Average concentrations of suspended sediment, settleable solids, and fecal coliform bacteria generally exceeded levels expected for secondary waste-treatment plant effluent, whereas biochemical oxygen demand concentrations were lower than expected. The second analytical approach established correlations and bivariate regression relationships between constituents for individual storms in each basin, for all storms in each basin, and for all storms in all basins. Generally, correlation coefficients decreased when progressing from data for individual storms in each basin, to data for all storms in each basin, to data for all storms in all basins. In the third approach, storm yields for 10 constituents were related to basin and precipitation characteristics by use of multiple-linear-regression techniques. Storm yields for suspended sediment varied by about four orders of magnitude. Generally, results of the multiple-regression analysis indicated that variations in storm yields were highly dependent on precipitation characteristics, with total rainfall of the storm frequently explaining most of the variation of the dependent variable. (Woodard-USGS)

  5. Analysis of urban storm-water quality for seven basins near Portland, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Timothy L.; McKenzie, Stuart W.

    1978-01-01

    Over a 1.5-year period, water-quality data were collected for seven small drainage basins in urban aeas of Portland, Oreg. Analysis of the data followed three approaches. First, the constituent concentrations were analyzed. Average concentrations of suspended sediment, settleable solids, and fecal coliform bacteria generally exceeded levels expected for secondary waste-treatment plant effluent, whereas biochemical oxygen demand concentrations were lower than expected. The second analytical approach established correlations and bivariate regression relationships between constituents for individual storms in each basin, for all storms in each basin, and for all storms in all basins. Generally, correlation coefficients decreased when progressing from data for individual storms in each basin, to data for all storms in each basin, to data for all storms in all basins. In the third approach, storm yields for 10 constituents were related to basin and precipitation characteristics by use of multiple-linear-regression techniques. Storm yields for suspended sediment varied by about four orders of magnitude. Generally, results of the multiple-regression analysis indicated that variations in storm yields were highly dependent on precipitation characteristics, with total rainfall of the storm frequently explaining most of the variation of the dependent variable.

  6. Storm runoff as related to urbanization in the Portland, Oregon-Vancouver, Washington area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius

    1980-01-01

    A series of equations was developed to provide a better method of determining flood frequencies in the Portland-Vancouver urban area than is now available. The resulting regression equations can be used to compute peak discharge and storm runoff with a standard error of estimate of approximately 30 percent. Basins used to define the regression equations ranged in size from 0.2 to 26 square miles. Those physical basin parameters that proved to be significant are: drainage area, effective impervious area, storage, rainfall intensity, basin slope, and soil infiltration. The equations indicate that total urbanization of an undeveloped basin can increase peak discharge as much as 3? times and almost double the volume of storm runoff. Impervious area, as delineated by mapping techniques, proved to be an inadequate physical parameter for use in the regression equations because builders and planners have devised many methods of routing storm runoff from impervious areas to the main channel (in effect, speeding up or slowing down the response to the storm). In some parts of the study area, storm runoff was diverted into dry wells and never entered the main channel. To define the effect of this rerouting, the digital model was used to find an effective impervious area that would 'best fit' the rainfall-runoff data. Field estimates to verify the effectiveness of the impervious area for two of the basins showed that optimizations were within 20 percent of those shown by the digital model. Users of these data who may find the effective impervious area a difficult, expensive, and time-consuming parameter to obtain have an alternative. The combination of land-use type I (parks, forests, and vacant lots) and Type II (agriculture) proved to be an excellent inverse indicator of impervious area. Land-use types I and II, coupled with the street-gutter density, an indication of effective routing, provide the user with alternative indices of urbanization.

  7. Radon in homes of the Portland, Oregon Area: Radon data from local radon testing companies collected by CRM (Continuous Radon Measurement) machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, H.; Lindsey, K.; Linde, T.; Burns, S. F.

    2013-12-01

    Students from the Department of Geology at Portland State University paired up with the Oregon Health Authority to better understand radon gas values in homes of the Portland metropolitan area. This study focuses on radon values collected by continuous radon measurement (CRM) machines, taken by local radon testing companies. The local companies participating in this study include Alpha Environmental Services, Inc., Cascade Radon, Environmental Works, The House Detectives, LLC, and Soil Solutions Environmental Services, Inc. In total, 2491 radon readings spanning across 77 zip codes were collected from local companies in the Portland metropolitan area. The maximum value, average value, percentage of homes greater than 4 pCi/L and total rank sum was calculated and used to determine the overall radon potential for each zip code (Burns et al., 1998). A list and four maps were produced showing the results from each category. Out of the total records, 24 zip codes resulted in high radon potential and the average reading for the entire Portland Metropolitan area was 3.7 pCi/L. High potential zip codes are thought to be a result of sand and gravel (Missoula Flood deposits) and faults present in the subsurface. The CRM data was compared with both long-term and short-term data provided by the Oregon Health Authority to validate radon potentials in each zip code. If a home is located in a zip code with high or moderate radon potential across two types of data sets, it is recommended that those homes be tested for radon gas.

  8. 14. Photocopy of photograph (from Station 'L' office files, Portland, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Photocopy of photograph (from Station 'L' office files, Portland, Oregon) Photographer unknown, c.1930 HISTORIC VIEW OF STEPHENS SUBSTATION - Portland General Electric Company, Station "L", 1841 Southeast Water Street, Portland, Multnomah County, OR

  9. Building on Family Strengths: Research and Services in Support of Children and Their Families. Proceedings of the Building on Family Strengths Annual Conference (12th, Portland, Oregon, June 23-25, 2005)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Lyn, Ed.; Bradley, Jennifer, Ed.; Aue, Nicole, Ed.; Holman, Ariel, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    The 12th Annual Building on Family Strengths Conference was held from June 23rd through June 25th 2005 in Portland, Oregon. Highlights included: (1) An information-packed keynote address by Dr. Richard M. Lerner on promoting positive youth development through enhancing the assets of communities; (2) An exciting research plenary panel session that…

  10. Building on Family Strengths: Research and Services in Support of Children and Their Families. Proceedings of the Building on Family Strengths Annual Conference (11th, Portland, Oregon, May 6-8, 2004)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Lynwood J., Ed.; Tullis, Kathryn, Ed.; Hanson, Andrea, Ed.; Sowders, Stacey, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    The 11th Annual Building on Family Strengths Conference was held from May 6th through May 8th, 2004, in Portland, Oregon. Highlights included: (1) The revival of a pre-conference training session; this year featured "Understanding Research and Evaluation in Relation to Social Change," presented by Elaine Slaton and Shannon CrossBear of the…

  11. Annual Review of BPA-Funded Projects in Natural and Artificial Propagation of Salmonids, March 27-29, 1985, Holiday Inn Airport, Portland, Oregon.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1985-04-01

    The Fish and Wildlife Division of Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) hosted a meeting for contractors to present the results of fiscal year 1984 research conducted to implement the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program. The meeting focused on those projects specifically related to natural and artificial propagation of salmonids. The presentations were held at the Holiday Inn Airport in Portland, Oregon, on March 27-29, 1985. This document contains abstracts of the presentations from that meeting. Section 1 contains abstracts on artificial propagation, fish health, and downstream migration, and Section 2 contains abstracts on natural propagation and habitat improvement. The abstracts are indexed by BPA Project Number and by Fish and Wildlife Program Measure. The registered attendees at the meeting are listed alphabetically in Appendix A and by affiliation in Appendix B.

  12. Estimation of ground-water recharge from precipitation, runoff into drywells, and on-site waste-disposal systems in the Portland Basin, Oregon and Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, D.T.; Morgan, D.S.; McGrath, T.S.

    1994-01-01

    The average recharge rate in the Portland Basin, in northwestern Oregon and southwestern Washington, is estimated to be about 22.0 inches per year. Of that amount, precipitation accounts for about 20.8 inches per year, runoff into drywells 0.9 inches per year, and on-site waste disposal about 0.4 inches per year. Recharge is highest, about 49 inches per year, in the Cascade Range. Recharge is lowest, near zero, along and between the Columbia and Willamette Rivers. Recharge is higher locally in discrete areas owing to recharge from runoff into drywells and on-site, waste-disposal systems in urbanized parts of the study area. In these urbanized areas, recharge ranges from 0 to 49 inches per year.

  13. Vulnerability of Water Systems to the Effects of Climate Change and Urbanization: A Comparison of Phoenix, Arizona and Portland, Oregon (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Kelli L.; Polsky, Colin; Gober, Patricia; Chang, Heejun; Shandas, Vivek

    2013-07-01

    The coupled processes of climate change and urbanization pose challenges for water resource management in cities worldwide. Comparing the vulnerabilities of water systems in Phoenix, Arizona and Portland, Oregon, this paper examines (1) exposures to these stressors, (2) sensitivities to the associated impacts, and (3) adaptive capacities for responding to realized or anticipated impacts. Based on a case study and survey-based approach, common points of vulnerability include: rising exposures to drier, warmer summers, and suburban growth; increasing sensitivities based on demand hardening; and limited capacities due to institutional and pro-growth pressures. Yet each region also exhibits unique vulnerabilities. Comparatively, Portland shows: amplified exposures to seasonal climatic extremes, heightened sensitivity based on less diversified municipal water sources and policies that favor more trees and other irrigated vegetation, and diminished adaptive capacities because of limited attention to demand management and climate planning for water resources. Phoenix exhibits elevated exposure from rapid growth, heightened sensitivities due to high water demands and widespread increases in residential and commercial uses, and limited adaptive capacities due to weak land use planning and "smart growth" strategies. Unique points of vulnerability suggest pathways for adapting to urban-environmental change, whether through water management or land planning. Greater coordination between the land and water sectors would substantially reduce vulnerabilities in the study regions and beyond.

  14. Vulnerability of water systems to the effects of climate change and urbanization: a comparison of Phoenix, Arizona and Portland, Oregon (USA).

    PubMed

    Larson, Kelli L; Polsky, Colin; Gober, Patricia; Chang, Heejun; Shandas, Vivek

    2013-07-01

    The coupled processes of climate change and urbanization pose challenges for water resource management in cities worldwide. Comparing the vulnerabilities of water systems in Phoenix, Arizona and Portland, Oregon, this paper examines (1) exposures to these stressors, (2) sensitivities to the associated impacts, and (3) adaptive capacities for responding to realized or anticipated impacts. Based on a case study and survey-based approach, common points of vulnerability include: rising exposures to drier, warmer summers, and suburban growth; increasing sensitivities based on demand hardening; and limited capacities due to institutional and pro-growth pressures. Yet each region also exhibits unique vulnerabilities. Comparatively, Portland shows: amplified exposures to seasonal climatic extremes, heightened sensitivity based on less diversified municipal water sources and policies that favor more trees and other irrigated vegetation, and diminished adaptive capacities because of limited attention to demand management and climate planning for water resources. Phoenix exhibits elevated exposure from rapid growth, heightened sensitivities due to high water demands and widespread increases in residential and commercial uses, and limited adaptive capacities due to weak land use planning and "smart growth" strategies. Unique points of vulnerability suggest pathways for adapting to urban-environmental change, whether through water management or land planning. Greater coordination between the land and water sectors would substantially reduce vulnerabilities in the study regions and beyond. PMID:23694972

  15. Annual Review of BPA-Funded Anadromous Fish Projects, March 18-20, 1986, Holiday Inn Airport, Portland, Oregon.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1986-02-01

    This report contains descriptions of projects specifically related to anadromous salmonids. They include projects in the following categories: (1) fish and wildlife projects in western Montana; (2) fish health and physiology; (3) habitat enhancement and passage improvement - Oregon I; (4) passage improvement and natural propagation - Washington; (5) habitat enhancement and passage improvements - Oregon II; (6) future hydroelectric assessments; (7) habitat enhancement and passage improvement - Idaho; (8) downstream migration: flows and monitoring; (9) downstream migration: reservoir impacts; and (10) habitat evaluation and monitoring. (ACR)

  16. Gravity study through the Tualatin Mountains, Oregon: Understanding crustal structure and earthquake hazards in the Portland urban area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakely, R.J.; Beeson, M.H.; Cruikshank, K.; Wells, R.E.; Johnson, Aaron H.; Walsh, K.

    2004-01-01

    A high-resolution gravity survey through the Tualatin Mountains (Portland Nills) west of downtown Portland exhibits evidence of faults previously identified from surface geologic and aeromagnetic mapping. The gravity survey was conducted in 1996 along the 4.5-km length of a twin-bore tunnel, then under construction and now providing light-rail service between downtown Portland and communities west of the Portland Hills. Gravitational attraction gradually increases from west to east inside the tunnel, which reflects the tunnel's location between low-density sedimentary deposits of the Tualatin basin to the west and high-density, mostly concealed Eocene basalt to the east. Superimposed on this gradient are several steplike anomalies that we interpret as evidence for faulted contacts between rocks of contrasting density. The largest of these anomalies occurs beneath Sylvan Creek, where a fault had previously been mapped inside the tunnel. Another occurs 1200 m from the west portal, at the approximate intersection of the tunnel with an aeromagnetic anomaly associated with the Sylvan fault (formerly called the Oatfield fault). Lithologic cross sections based on these gravity data show that the steplike anomalies are consistent with steeply dipping reverse faults, although strike-slip displacements also may be important. Three gravity lows correspond with topographic lows directly overhead and may reflect zones of shearing. Several moderate earthquakes (M ??? 3.5) occurred near the present-day location of the tunnel in 1991, suggesting that some of these faults or other faults in the Portland Hills fault zone are seismically active.

  17. Low-cost computer classification of land cover in the Portland area, Oregon, by signature extension techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaydos, Leonard

    1978-01-01

    The cost of classifying 5,607 square kilometers (2,165 sq. mi.) in the Portland area was less than 8 cents per square kilometer ($0.0788, or $0.2041 per square mile). Besides saving in costs, this and other signature extension techniques may be useful in completing land use and land cover mapping in other large areas where multispectral and multitemporal Landsat data are available in digital form but other source materials are generally lacking.

  18. 33 CFR 165.1322 - Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Oregon Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Oregon Captain of the Port Zone. (a) Location. The following is a regulated navigation area (RNA): All waters of the Willamette River encompassed by a line commencing at 45°34′.47″ N, 122°45′28″ W along the... regulated area. (2) All vessels transiting or accessing the regulated area shall do so at a no wake speed...

  19. Proceedings. Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges Annual Convention (63rd, Hilton Hotel, Portland, Oregon, December 1-4, 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges, Seattle, WA.

    The proceedings of the 1979 annual meeting of the Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges begins by listing the officers, trustees, and commissioners of the association, and outlining the program of the meeting. The minutes from the Commission on Schools include reports from: the state committees of Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon,…

  20. Tectonic setting of the Portland-Vancouver area, Oregon and Washington: constraints from low-altitude aeromagnetic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakely, R.J.; Wells, R.E.; Yelin, T.S.; Madin, I.P.; Beeson, M.H.

    1995-01-01

    Seismic activity in the Portland-Vancouver metropolitan area may be associated with various mapped faults that locally offset volcanic basement of Eocene age and younger. This volcanic basement is concealed in most places by young deposits, vegetation, and urban development. The US Geological Survey conducted an aeromagnetic survey in September 1992 to investigate the extent of these mapped faults and possibly to help identify other seismic and volcanic hazards in the area. The survey was flown approximately 240 m above terrain, along flight lines spaced 460 m apart, and over an area about 50 ?? 50 km. -from Authors

  1. Portland Magnet Project 1989-1991. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thacker, Peter

    In 1989, the Portland (Oregon) Public Schools received a grant to create an elementary arts magnet school and to enhance magnet programs at four other schools in Portland (Oregon). The Portland Magnet Program emphasized improvements in programing, marketing, and articulation between magnet programs, allowing the schools to purchase…

  2. 12 CFR 25.27 - Strategic plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... been operating under an approved plan for at least one year. (b) Data reporting. The OCC's approval of...) Plans in general—(1) Term. A plan may have a term of no more than five years, and any multi-year plan... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Strategic plan. 25.27 Section 25.27 Banks...

  3. 12 CFR 25.27 - Strategic plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... been operating under an approved plan for at least one year. (b) Data reporting. The OCC's approval of...) Plans in general—(1) Term. A plan may have a term of no more than five years, and any multi-year plan... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Strategic plan. 25.27 Section 25.27 Banks...

  4. 12 CFR 25.27 - Strategic plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... been operating under an approved plan for at least one year. (b) Data reporting. The OCC's approval of...) Plans in general—(1) Term. A plan may have a term of no more than five years, and any multi-year plan... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Strategic plan. 25.27 Section 25.27 Banks...

  5. 12 CFR 25.27 - Strategic plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... been operating under an approved plan for at least one year. (b) Data reporting. The OCC's approval of...) Plans in general—(1) Term. A plan may have a term of no more than five years, and any multi-year plan... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Strategic plan. 25.27 Section 25.27 Banks...

  6. Advocating for active living on the rural-urban fringe: a case study of planning in the Portland, Oregon, metropolitan area.

    PubMed

    Adler, Sy; Dobson, Noelle; Fox, Karen Perl; Weigand, Lynn

    2008-06-01

    This case study is about the politics of incorporating active-living elements into a concept plan for a new community of about 68,000 people on the edge of the Portland, Oregon, metropolitan area. Development on the rural-urban fringe is ongoing in metropolitan areas around the United States. In this article, we evaluate the product of the concept-planning process from the standpoint of the extent to which environmental elements conducive to active living were included. We also analyze four issues in which challenges to the incorporation of active-living features surfaced: choices related to transportation facilities, the design and location of retail stores, the location of schools and parks, and the location of a new town center. Overall, the Damascus/Boring Concept Plan positions the area well to promote active living. Analyses of the challenges that emerged yielded lessons for advocates regarding ways to deal with conflicts between facilitating active living and local economic development and related tax-base concerns and between active-living elements and school-district planning autonomy as well as the need for advocates to have the capacity to present alternatives to the usual financial and design approaches taken by private- and public-sector investors. PMID:18469172

  7. Building a Collaborative Educational Research Center: The Portland Public Schools & Portland State University Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nave, Gary R.

    The Center for Urban Research in Education (CURE), jointly conceived by the Portland (Oregon) Public Schools and Portland State University, was established in 1987 by the Oregon State Legislature to explore solutions to the educational problems of at-risk student populations, especially those in urban settings. This paper shares the results of…

  8. 75 FR 20778 - Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival Fleet Week, Willamette River, Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-21

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival Fleet Week... Hawthorne and Steel Bridges in Portland, Oregon during the Portland Rose Festival Fleet Week from June 2... Rose Festival Fleet Week, and there is insufficient time to publish a notice of proposed...

  9. Number and size of last-glacial Missoula floods in the Columbia River valley between the Pasco Basin, Washington, and Portland, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benito, G.; O'Connor, J. E.

    2003-01-01

    Field evidence and radiocarbon age dating, combined with hydraulic flow modeling, provide new information on the magnitude, frequency, and chronology of late Pleistocene Missoula floods in the Columbia River valley between the Pasco Basin, Washington, and Portland, Oregon. More than 25 floods had discharges of > 1.0 ?? 106 m3/s. At least 15 floods had discharges of >3.0 ?? 106 m3/s. At least six or seven had peak discharges of >6.5 ?? 106 m3/s, and at least one flood had a peak discharge of ???10 ?? 106 m3/s, a value consistent with earlier results from near Wallula Gap, but better defined because of the strong hydraulic controls imposed by critical flow at constrictions near Crown and Mitchell Points in the Columbia River Gorge. Stratigraphy and geomorphic position, combined with 25 radiocarbon ages and the widespread occurrence of the ca. 13 ka (radiocarbon years) Mount St. Helens set-S tephra, show that most if not all the Missoula flood deposits exposed in the study area were emplaced after 19 ka (radiocarbon years), and many were emplaced after 15 ka. More than 13 floods perhaps postdate ca. 13 ka, including at least two with discharges of >6 ?? 106 m3/s. From discharge and stratigraphic relationships upstream, we hypothesize that the largest flood in the study reach resulted from a Missoula flood that predated blockage of the Columbia River valley by the Cordilleran ice sheet. Multiple later floods, probably including the majority of floods recorded by fine- and coarse-grained deposits in the study area, resulted from multiple releases of glacial Lake Missoula that spilled into a blocked and inundated Columbia River valley upstream of the Okanogan lobe and were shunted south across the Channeled Scabland.

  10. Reconstruction of radionuclide concentrations in the Columbia River from Hanford, Washington to Portland, Oregon, January 1950--January 1971. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, W.H.; Gilmore, B.G.; Richmond, M.C.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, this report addresses the radioactivity in the Columbia River. The Columbia River received cooling-water effluent from the eight Hanford single-pass reactors and was the major pathway for waterborne radionuclides. The pathway began at the Hanford Site and continued downstream past the mouth of the Columbia River to the adjacent coastal and ocean areas. The objective of the HEDR Project`s Surface-Water Transport Task is to provide monthly average radionuclide concentrations in river water at specific locations along the Columbia River. These concentrations will be used in final estimates of radiation doses that individuals may have received from the Columbia River pathway. Under this task, a river hydraulic computer model was used to simulate transport of specific radionuclides from the Hanford reactors to Portland, Oregon. The model output consisted of monthly average water concentrations of radionuclides computed for 12 locations over 253 months (January 1950--January 1971). These water concentrations were forwarded to the staff of the Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates Task for calculating dose estimates. The model used a source term input data file developed by the staff of the Source Terms Task which provided monthly average releases from each of the eight reactors, from January 1950 through January 1971. The Environmental Monitoring Task staff provided historical river monitoring data for use in validating computed water concentrations. The purpose of this report is to document the mathematical modeling required to reconstruct concentrations of radionuclides in Columbia River water. Modeling was required because available monitoring data are limited. The specific radionuclides considered are sodium-24, phosphorus-32, zinc-65, arsenic-76, and neptunium-239, determined by their relative contribution to dose for the river pathway (Napier 1993).

  11. 54. Photocopy of diagram (from Station 'L' office files, Portland, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. Photocopy of diagram (from Station 'L' office files, Portland, Oregon) General Electric Company pamphlet, c.1930 SECTIONAL ELEVATION OF THE 35,000 KW GENERATOR BUILDING L5 - Portland General Electric Company, Station "L", 1841 Southeast Water Street, Portland, Multnomah County, OR

  12. 51. Photocopy of diagram (from Station 'L' office files, Portland, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. Photocopy of diagram (from Station 'L' office files, Portland, Oregon) General Electric Company pamphlet, c.1923 SECTIONAL ARRANGEMENT OF THE 6,000 KW TURBINE GENERATOR BUILDING L1 - Portland General Electric Company, Station "L", 1841 Southeast Water Street, Portland, Multnomah County, OR

  13. 53. Photocopy of diagram (from Station 'L' office files, Portland, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. Photocopy of diagram (from Station 'L' office files, Portland, Oregon) General Electric Company pamphlet, c.1925 SECTIONAL ELEVATION OF THE 20,000 KW GENERATOR BUILDING L1 - Portland General Electric Company, Station "L", 1841 Southeast Water Street, Portland, Multnomah County, OR

  14. 78 FR 18480 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Willamette River, Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Willamette River, Portland, OR... across the Willamette River, miles 12.4, at Portland, Oregon. This deviation is necessary to accommodate..., crossing the Willamette River at Portland, OR. The Burnside Bridge provides a vertical clearance of 64...

  15. 23. Photocopy of photograph (from Station 'L' office files, Portland, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Photocopy of photograph (from Station 'L' office files, Portland, Oregon) Photographer unknown, c.1930 BUCKET USED TO UNLOAD SAWDUST FROM BARGES ONTO CONVEYORS, CONVEYORS LED TO EITHER THE SAWDUST PILE OR DIRECTLY TO THE BOILER FURNACES - Portland General Electric Company, Station "L", 1841 Southeast Water Street, Portland, Multnomah County, OR

  16. 40 CFR 81.51 - Portland Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.51 Portland Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Portland Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Oregon-Washington) has been revised to consist of the territorial area... Portland Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Oregon-Washington) will be referred to by...

  17. Optimizing Dam Operations for Power and for Fish: an Overview of the US Department of Energy and US Army Corps of Engineers ADvanced Turbine Development R&D. A Pre-Conference Workshop at HydroVision 2006, Oregon Convention Center, Portland, Oregon July 31, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Dauble, Dennis D.

    2006-08-01

    This booklet contains abstracts of presentations made at a preconference workshop on the US Department of Energy and US Army Corps of Engineers hydroturbine programs. The workshop was held in conjunction with Hydrovision 2006 July 31, 2006 at the Oregon Convention Center in Portland Oregon. The workshop was organized by the Corps of Engineers, PNNL, and the DOE Wind and Hydropower Program. Presenters gave overviews of the Corps' Turbine Survival Program and the history of the DOE Advanced Turbine Development Program. They also spoke on physical hydraulic models, biocriteria for safe fish passage, pressure investigations using the Sensor Fish Device, blade strike models, optimization of power plant operations, bioindex testing of turbine performance, approaches to measuring fish survival, a systems view of turbine performance, and the Turbine Survival Program design approach.

  18. 77 FR 46112 - Call for Nominations for Advisory Groups, Oregon/Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-02

    ... CONTACT: Matt Christenson, BLM Oregon State Office, 333 Southwest 1st Avenue; Portland, Oregon 97204, or P.... Nominations should be sent to: Matt Christenson, Oregon State Office, BLM, 333 SW. First Avenue,...

  19. 14 CFR 25.27 - Center of gravity limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Center of gravity limits. 25.27 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight General § 25.27 Center of gravity limits. The extreme forward and the extreme aft center of gravity limitations must be established for each...

  20. 14 CFR 25.27 - Center of gravity limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Center of gravity limits. 25.27 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight General § 25.27 Center of gravity limits. The extreme forward and the extreme aft center of gravity limitations must be established for each...

  1. 14 CFR 25.27 - Center of gravity limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Center of gravity limits. 25.27 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight General § 25.27 Center of gravity limits. The extreme forward and the extreme aft center of gravity limitations must be established for each...

  2. 14 CFR 25.27 - Center of gravity limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Center of gravity limits. 25.27 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight General § 25.27 Center of gravity limits. The extreme forward and the extreme aft center of gravity limitations must be established for each...

  3. 14 CFR 25.27 - Center of gravity limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Center of gravity limits. 25.27 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight General § 25.27 Center of gravity limits. The extreme forward and the extreme aft center of gravity limitations must be established for each...

  4. 77 FR 29897 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Willamette River, Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-21

    ... efficient movement of light rail and roadway traffic associated with the Rose Parade in Portland, Oregon... roadway traffic associated with the Rose Parade. The Steel Bridge crosses the Willamette River at mile...

  5. FIELD AND LABORATORY OPERATIONS REPORT FOR THE OREGON WETLANDS STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Oregon Wetlands Study (OWS) was designed to provide detailed characterizations of natural, created, and restored freshwater wetlands which is located in the urban environment of Portland, Oregon. his document discusses training the elementary, middle and high school teachers ...

  6. Oregon State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, Rebecca A.; Ketcham, Patricia L.

    2009-01-01

    Oregon State University (OSU) is located in Corvallis, a community of 53,000 people situated in the heart of the Willamette Valley between Portland and Eugene. Approximately 15,700 undergraduate and 3,400 graduate students, including 2,600 U.S. students of color and 950 international students, are currently enrolled at OSU across 11 academic…

  7. Case studies of the legal and institutional obstacles and incentives to the development of small-scale hydroelectric power: Bull Run, Portland, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    1980-05-01

    The National Conference of State Legislatures' Small-Scale Hydroelectric Policy Project is designed to assist selected state legislatures in looking at the benefits that a state can derive from the development of small-scale hydro, and in carrying out a review of state laws and regulations that affect the development of the state's small-scale hydro resources. The successful completion of the project should help establish state statutes and regulations that are consistent with the efficient development of small-scale hydro. As part of the project's work with state legislatures, seven case studies of small-scale hydro sites were conducted to provide a general analysis and overview of the significant problems and opportunities for the development of this energy resource. The case study approach was selected to expose the actual difficulties and advantages involved in developing a specific site. Such an examination of real development efforts will clearly reveal the important aspects about small-scale hydro development which could be improved by statutory or regulatory revision. Moreover, the case study format enables the formulation of generalized opportunities for promoting small-scale hydro based on specific development experiences. The case study for small-scale hydro power development at the City of Portland's water reserve in the Bull Run Forest is presented with information included on the Bull Run hydro power potential, current water usage, hydro power regulations and plant licensing, technical and economic aspects of Bull Run project, and the environmental impact. (LCL)

  8. Pre-and post-Missoula flood geomorphology of the Pre-Holocene ancestral Columbia River Valley in the Portland forearc basin, Oregon and Washington, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Curt D.; Minor, Rick; Peterson, Gary L.; Gates, Edward B.

    2011-06-01

    Geomorphic landscape development in the pre-Holocene ancestral Columbia River Valley (1-5 km width) in the Portland forearc basin (~ 50 km length) is established from depositional sequences, which pre-date and post-date the glacial Lake Missoula floods. The sequences are observed from selected borehole logs (150 in number) and intact terrace soil profiles (56 in number) in backhoe trenches. Four sequences are widespread, including (1) a vertically aggraded Pleistocene alluvial plain, (2) a steep sided valley that is incised (125-150 m) into the Pleistocene gravel plain, (3) Missoula flood terraces (19-13 ka) abandoned on the sides of the ancestral valley, and (4) Holocene flooding surfaces (11-8 ka) buried at 70-30 m depth in the axial Columbia River Valley. Weathering rims and cementation are used for relative dating of incised Pleistocene gravel units. Soil development on the abandoned Missoula flood terraces is directly related to terrace deposit lithology, including thin Bw horizons in gravel, irregular podzols in sand, and multiple Bw horizons in thicker loess-capping layers. Radiocarbon dating of sand and mud alluvium in the submerged axial valley ties Holocene flooding surfaces to a local sea level curve and establishes Holocene sedimentation rates of 1.5 cm year- 1 during 11-9 ka and 0.3 cm year- 1 during 9-0 ka. The sequences of Pleistocene gravel aggradation, river valley incision, cataclysmic Missoula flooding, and Holocene submergence yield complex geomorphic landscapes in the ancestral lower Columbia River Valley.

  9. 76 FR 78020 - Filing of Plats of Survey: Oregon/Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-15

    ...The plats of survey of the following described lands are scheduled to be officially filed in the Bureau of Land Management Oregon/Washington State Office, Portland, Oregon, 30 days from the date of this...

  10. Private Alternative School Programs in the Portland Public Schools. 1985-86 Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yagi, Kan

    This report evaluates four off-campus private alternative schools in Portland, Oregon, serving students mainly of high school age and supported by the Portland Public Schools. The students are largely dropouts or on the verge of dropping out; many are referred from other schools and law enforcement agencies. Since 1966, the Albina Youth…

  11. 40 CFR 81.51 - Portland Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Control Region. 81.51 Section 81.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Quality Control Regions § 81.51 Portland Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Portland Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Oregon-Washington) has been revised to consist of the territorial...

  12. LLW Forum meeting report, April 25--27, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The Low-Level radioactive Waste Forum is an association of representatives of states and compacts established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies. LLW Forum participants include representatives from regional compacts, designated host states, unaffiliated states, and states with currently-operating low-level radioactive waste facilities. This quarterly meeting was held April 25-27, 1994 and activities during the first quarter of 1994 are detailed..

  13. Portland Area Office Bureau of Indian Affairs: 1980 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Portland, OR.

    In 1980 the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Portland Area Office served 43,500 Indians of 33 federally recognized tribes, bands, and groups living on or near 4 million acres of reservation land in Idaho, Washington, and Oregon. Highlights of the fiscal 1980 BIA/tribal partnership included the joint review of overall Office operations and…

  14. Building on Family Strengths: Research and Services in Support of Children and Their Families. Proceedings of the Building on Family Strengths Annual Conference (14th, Portland, Oregon, May 31-June 2, 2007) and State of the Science Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swart, Sandra, Ed.; Friesen, Barbara, Ed.; Holman, Ariel, Ed.; Aue, Nicole, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    The State of the Science conference was held in May, 2007 as part of the ongoing series of national conferences, "Building on Family Strengths," conducted by the Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children's Mental Health at Portland State University. The theme of this State-of-the Science conference was "Effective services for all…

  15. Connecting Rural Oregon Libraries to the Internet, or "Will it Fit in My Car?".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleton, Cheryl; Cross, Judy

    1998-01-01

    Describes Jumpstart, a Web site providing remote access to government information in CD-ROM format, developed by Oregon State University's Valley Library, as a joint venture with the Oregon State Library and the Portland Area Library System to provide hardware, software, and training to rural school and public libraries in Oregon that have limited…

  16. Getting Ahead in Oregon: Expanding Higher Education Opportunities for Minorities and Nontraditional Students. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Regulation, Business Opportunities, and Energy of the Committee on Small Business. House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session (Portland, OR).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Small Business.

    As part of a series of field hearings examining the issue of education reform and the preparedness of the work force, testimony was heard on the need to expand higher education opportunities for minorities and nontraditional college students. Oregon, in particular, faces these questions because the state's economy is expected to change from…

  17. Report on Substance Use among Portland Public Schools Students. Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Stephanie J.

    This report describes an assessment of substance abuse among Portland (Oregon) Public School students in grades 7 and 10, determining the relationship between early and later substance use for planning and development of alcohol and drug education, prevention, and intervention. The survey was administered in 17 middle schools, 10 high schools, and…

  18. The Portland State University Mentoring Program for Freshmen: The "PSU Minority Leadership Program" (MLP).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Brenda J.

    This paper describes a minority leadership program, developed at Portland State University, Oregon, that is designed to increase the retention rate of minority and other underrepresented college students by helping them to adjust to the social and academic climate of the university. The program utilizes minority students who have successfully…

  19. They Did It Their Way: Administrative Transformation at Portland State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desrochers, Lindsay Ann

    1994-01-01

    Portland State University (Oregon) has substantially changed its administrative organization through multiple, interrelated strategies: consolidation of units; streamlining of middle management; staff training and professional development; a quality initiative; campus technological conversion; and joint ventures with a sister institution. A clear…

  20. 76 FR 26314 - Filing of Plats of Survey: Oregon/Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ... Bureau of Land Management Filing of Plats of Survey: Oregon/Washington AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The plats of survey of the following described lands are scheduled to be..., Portland, Oregon 97204, upon required payment. A person or party who wishes to protest against a...

  1. Early chiropractic education in Oregon

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Joseph C

    2002-01-01

    Chiropractic education in the northwestern United States has its origins in the Marsh School & Cure in 1904. Most of the early schools were located in Portland, Oregon, including the D.D. Palmer College of Chiropractic (1908-1910), and several of these had merged by 1912 or 1913 to form the Pacific Chiropractic College, forerunner of today's Western States College. The latter was organized as a non-profit institution during the Great Depression, and struggled not only to survive but to create a higher standard. The early broad-scope of chiropractic training in the state probably encouraged the liberal scope of practice enjoyed in Oregon to this day. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 14Figure 15Figure 16Figure 18Figure 19Figure 20Figure 21Figure 22Figure 24

  2. Final environmental impact statement, Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project, Morrow County, Oregon - appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    Portland General Electric Company (PGE) has submitted an Application for Site Certification (ASC) to the Oregon Department of Energy for development of the Coyote Springs cogeneration power plant in the Port of Morrow, Oregon. This document includes the appendixes for the Environmental Impact Statement. Appendix topics include the following: A-Wildlife and vegetation surveys; B-EMF Supplement; C-Biological Assessment; D-Oregon DOE proposed order, in the matter of the Application for Site Certificate of Portland General Electric Company; E-Ecological Monitoring Program; F-Air contaminant Discharge permit; G-National Pollution Discharge Elimination System Storm Water Discharge Permit; H-Erosion and Sedimentation Control Plan.

  3. Clean Energy Works Oregon Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, Andria; Cyr, Shirley

    2013-12-31

    In April 2010, the City of Portland received a $20 million award from the U.S. Department of Energy, as part of the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant program. This award was appropriated under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), passed by President Obama in 2009. DOE’s program became known as the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP). The BBNP grant objectives directed the City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability (BPS) as the primary grantee to expand the BPS-led pilot program, Clean Energy Works Portland, into Clean Energy Works Oregon (CEWO), with the mission to deliver thousands of home energy retrofits, create jobs, save energy and reduce carbon dioxide emissions.The Final Technical Report explores the successes and lessons learned from the first 3 years of program implementation.

  4. Anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the Portland metropolitan region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, A. L.; Bostrom, G. A.; Brooks, M. K.; Hill, L.; Shandas, V.

    2011-12-01

    The Portland metropolitan region, located in the Columbia River Gorge, is the most populous region in Oregon. Greenhouse gas emissions inventories for Multnomah County (population ~710k) estimate 2008 emissions to be 8.5 million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent, of which CO2 is the dominant source. These inventories suggest that County-wide greenhouse gas emissions are near 1990 levels, despite a 22% growth in population. This contrasts with US National greenhouse gas emissions, which are estimated to have grown ~14% since 1990. Despite this apparent progress, there has been no validation of either emissions inventories for the Portland metropolitan region or their trends in time. We present more than two years of measurements of CO2 at three stationary locations in the Portland metropolitan region: a downtown location on the campus of Portland State University; a residential site in southeast Portland; and a rural station on Sauvie Island, located ~30km northwest of Portland in the Columbia River Gorge. Beginning in July 2009, continuous measurements of CO2 at the sites show considerable variability due to global and regional CO2 sources, sinks and boundary layer meteorology. Here we focus on the enhancement of in-city concentrations above the rural Sauvie Island site (CO2 excess), a difference which averages ~6ppm during upgorge wind conditions. The southeast Portland residential site shows a significant enhancement of ~5ppm in CO2 concentration throughout the day. The downtown site shows a substantial diurnal cycle in CO2 excess with 10-15ppm higher values during the day and negative values for CO2 excess during the early morning hours, the cause of which is not well understood. Both in-city sites show an increase in CO2 excess centered around 7-8 am and 5-6 pm during the two rush-hour periods. To examine spatial variability, measurements of street-level CO2 concentrations were obtained using a mobile instrument mounted in a bike trailer during a summer

  5. Japanese Immersion: A Successful Program in Portland, Oregon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilzow, Douglas F.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a successful early start, long sequence Japanese foreign language in the elementary school (FLES) program that was identified as one of seven model programs in a national project funded by the U.S. Department of Education. Highlights literacy instruction in Japanese, student assessment, language camps, visits to Japan, parent…

  6. Schools Uniting Neighborhoods: The SUN Initiative in Portland, Oregon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iverson, Dianne

    2005-01-01

    The Schools Uniting Neighborhoods (SUN) Community Schools Initiative is a community-driven model that allows each school community to design the programs that fit neighborhood needs, while working toward core goals that stretch across all SUN Community Schools. In this article, the author describes the history of SUN Community Schools and its core…

  7. Student Mentoring Program 1989-1992. Program Report. Lewis and Clark College, Reed College, University of Portland, Warner Pacific College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huisman, Cate

    This report, one of a set of three, examines the initial 3 years of a student mentoring project in Portland, Oregon, that brought together college students from four private universities and a number of eighth grade students from four middle schools in mentoring relationships. During the first year of the project the students were described as "at…

  8. IMPACT OF AIR POLLUTION ON THE CONSUMPTION OF MEDICAL SERVICES COSTS OF HOSPITALIZATION IN THE PORTLAND METROPOLITAN AREA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study was undertaken to ascertain the possibility of measuring from available data the impact of air pollution on the consumption of inpatient services which patients consume per hospital stay. The study area was the Portland, Oregon metropolitan area, and the period of study...

  9. The Early Experience in Vouchering On-The-Job Training: A Report on Progress in the Portland Voucher Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Ann; Sharp, Laure M.

    The report describes the first few months of operation of an experimental Work Incentive Program (WIN) in Portland, Oregon to test the feasibility of the use of vouchers for on-the-job training (OJT). Voucher holders were required to decide on a training occupation, and then locate and negotiate for an employer to provide the training. WIN staff…

  10. Renewal of Portland Community College and Area High School Career and Technical Education Partnerships: Conceiving the Next Generation of PAVTEC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoelkopf, James

    2010-01-01

    Portland Community College has a firmly rooted career and technical education (CTE) partnership with its service area high schools. However, the partnership was continuing to operate as it had for many years. Given the rapid pace of change in the region's workforce, Oregon's secondary and postsecondary educational initiatives, and a shared…

  11. Service Networks and Patterns of Utilization: Mental Health Programs, Indian Health Service (IHS). Volume 9: Portland Area, 1966-1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attneave, Carolyn L.; Beiser, Morton

    The ninth volume in a 10-volume report on the historical development (1966-1973) of the 8 administrative Area Offices of the Indian Health Service (IHS) Mental Health Programs, this report presents information on the Portland Area Office. Included in this document are: (1) The Context (early history of the Oregon Territory, geography and tribal…

  12. Mapping of a Gene for Long QT Syndrome to Chromosome 4q25-27

    PubMed Central

    Schott, Jean-Jacques; Charpentier, Flavien; Peltier, Sophie; Foley, Patrick; Drouin, Emmanuel; Bouhour, Jean-Brieuc; Donnelly, Patricia; Vergnaud, Gilles; Bachner, Lucien; Moisan, Jean-Paul; Le Marec, Hervé; Pascal, Olivier

    1995-01-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a heterogeneous inherited disorder causing syncope and sudden death from ventricular arrhythmias. A first locus for this disorder was mapped to chromosome 11p15.5. However, locus heterogeneity has been demonstrated in several families, and two other loci have recently been located on chromosomes 7q35-36 and 3p21-24. We used linkage analysis to map the locus in a 65-member family in which LQTS was associated with more marked sinus bradycardia than usual, leading to sinus node dysfunction. Linkage to chromosome 11p15.5, 7q35-36, or 3p21-24 was excluded. Positive linkage was obtained for markers located on chromosome 4q25-27. A maximal LOD score of 7.05 was found for marker D4S402. The identification of a fourth locus for LQTS confirms its genetic heterogeneity. Locus 4q25-27 is associated with a peculiar phenotype within the LQTS entity. PMID:7485162

  13. Mapping of a gene for long QT syndrome to chromosome 4q25-27

    SciTech Connect

    Schott, J.J.; Charpentier, F.; Peltier, S.

    1995-11-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a heterogeneous inherited disorder causing syncope and sudden death from ventricular arrhythmias. A first locus for this disorder was mapped to chromosome 11p15.5. However, locus heterogeneity has been demonstrated in several families, and two other loci have recently been located on chromosomes 7q35-36 and 3p21-24. We used linkage analysis to map the locus in a 65-member family in which LQTS was associated with more marked sinus bradycardia than usual, leading to sinus node dysfunction. Linkage to chromosome 11p15.5, 7q35-36, or 3p21-24 was excluded. Positive linkage was obtained for markers located on chromosome 4q25-27. A maximal LOD score of 7.05 was found for marker D4S402. The identification of a fourth locus for LQTS confirms its genetic heterogeneity. Locus 4q25-27 is associated with a peculiar phenotype within the LQTS entity. 42 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Iterated transportation simulations for Dallas and Portland

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, K.; Simon, P.; Rickert, M.; Esser, J.

    1998-09-02

    The goal of the TRansportation ANalysis and SIMulation System (TRANSIMS) is to combine the most important aspects of human decision-making related to transportation, from activities planning (sleep, work, eat, shop,...) via modal and route planning to driving, into a single, consistent methodological and software framework. This is meant to combine the functionalities of activities-based travel demand generation, modal choice and route assignment, and micro-simulation. TRANSIMS attempts to employ advanced methodologies in all these modules. Yet, it is probably the overall framework that is the most important part of this attempt. It is, for example, possible to replace the TRANSIMS microsimulation by another micro-simulation that uses the same input and generates the same output. TRANSIMS uses specific regions as examples in order to ensure that the technology is rooted in the real world. Until about the middle of 1997, an approximately five miles by five miles area in Dallas/Texas was used. Since then, TRANSIMS has moved to using data from Portland/Oregon; a case study for this region is planned to be completed by the end of the year 2000. In this paper the authors give short descriptions of these projects and give references to related publications.

  15. 78 FR 4331 - Safety Zone; Sellwood Bridge Move; Willamette River, Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-22

    ...The Coast Guard is establishing of a temporary safety zone around the Sellwood Bridge, located on the Willamette River in Portland, Oregon, while it is being relocated 66 feet downriver as part of the new Sellwood Bridge construction project. This action is necessary to ensure the safety of persons and vessels transiting the Willamette River in the vicinity of the Sellwood Bridge as it is......

  16. Workforce: Oregon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This fact sheet states that in 2006, a good education is no longer just a way for an individual to get ahead. It is also the best way a state can get ahead -- and therefore a real economic priority. A state must ensure that all of its citizens have access to a college education. In Oregon, a state recovering from the 2000-03 recession, the demand…

  17. Oregon Fires

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Smoke Plumes from the B&B Complex Fires, Oregon     ... The results indicate that the tops of the two main plumes originating from the B&B complex differ in altitude by about 1-2 ... The  animation  depicts a "multi-angle fly-over" of the plumes, and was generated using red-band data from MISR's vertical and ...

  18. 77 FR 15263 - Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River; Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-15

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River; Portland... will enforce the Portland Rose Festival Security Zone in 33 CFR 165.1312 from 11 a.m. on June 6, 2012..., including the public vessels present on the Willamette River during the Portland Rose festival. During...

  19. 75 FR 44304 - Noise Exposure Map Notice, Portland International Airport, Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-28

    ... Noise Exposure Map Notice, Portland International Airport, Portland, OR AGENCY: Federal Aviation... determination that the noise exposure maps submitted by Port of Portland for Portland International Airport... the FAA's determination on the noise exposure maps is July 21, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  20. Faculty Handbook. University of Portland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portland Univ., OR.

    Various faculty services and policies are described in the Spring 1975 edition of the Portland handbook. Specific areas covered include: faculty fringe benefits, credit union, Academic Senate, library services, public relations and information, Instructional Media Center, Continuing Education Center, Computer Center, administrative services,…

  1. First report of Phaeobotryon cupressi causing canker of Calocedrus decurrens in Oregon.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since the early 2000’s a canker disease has been noticed with increasing frequency on landscape specimens of native incense cedar (Calocedrus decurrens) planted throughout the Willamette Valley (from Portland south to Eugene) in western Oregon. Symptoms initially appear as dead and flagging small-di...

  2. Research in Medical Education: Proceedings of the Annual Conference (38th, Washington, DC, October 25-27, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, M. Brownell, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    The Proceedings of the 38th Annual Conference on Research in Medical Education (Washington, DC, October 25-27, 1999) contain 43 research papers on innovative curricula, diagnostic reasoning, student evaluations of faculty, practicing physicians, prediction, licensing examinations, admissions, faculty development, managed care, technology-enhanced…

  3. 75 FR 20523 - Regulated Navigation Areas; Port of Portland Terminal 4, Willamette River, Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ..., Portland, OR'' in the Federal Register (74 FR 69047). We received one comment on the proposed rule. There... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA11 Regulated Navigation Areas; Port of Portland Terminal 4... establishing two Regulated Navigation Areas (RNA) at the Port of Portland Terminal 4 on the Willamette River...

  4. 13. VIEW OF PORTLAND RESERVOIR NO. 2, LOOKING EAST FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW OF PORTLAND RESERVOIR NO. 2, LOOKING EAST FROM NORTHWEST CORNER OF RESERVOIR. POST OF ORIGINAL FENCE IS IN FOREGROUND - Portland Reservoir No. 2, 6007 Southeast Division Street, Portland, Multnomah County, OR

  5. 9. VIEW OF PORTLAND RESERVOIR NO. 2, LOOKING SOUTHWEST, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF PORTLAND RESERVOIR NO. 2, LOOKING SOUTHWEST, SHOWING CHAIN-LINK FENCE IN FOREGROUND AND FOUNDATION STRUCTURE IN THE MIDDLE OF RESERVOIR BASIN - Portland Reservoir No. 2, 6007 Southeast Division Street, Portland, Multnomah County, OR

  6. A Statistical Portrait of the Multicultural/Multiethnic Student Population in Portland Public Schools. 1986-87.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portland Public Schools, OR. Research and Evaluation Dept.

    This second annual consolidated report of key statistics covers the status of culturally diverse children in the Portland (Oregon) School District during the 1986-87 school year. The district enrollment by ethnic group as of October 1, 1986, included 37,907 White, 7,913 Black, 3,881 Asian, 1,111 Hispanic, and 1,068 American Indian students, with a…

  7. Network Level Carbon Dioxide Emissions From On-road Sources in the Portland OR, (USA) Metropolitan Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, J.; Butenhoff, C. L.; Rice, A. L.

    2014-12-01

    To mitigate climate change, governments at multiple levels are developing policies to decrease anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The City of Portland (Oregon) and Multnomah County have adopted a Climate Action Plan with a stated goal of reducing emissions to 80% below 1990 levels by 2050. The transportation sector alone accounts for about 40% of total emissions in the Portland metropolitan area. Here we show a new street-level model of on-road mobile CO2 emissions for the Portland, OR metropolitan region. The model uses hourly traffic counter recordings made by the Portland Bureau of Transportation at 9,352 sites over 21 years (1986-2006), augmented with freeway loop detector data from the Portland Regional Transportation Archive Listing (PORTAL) transportation data archive. We constructed a land use regression model to fill in traffic network gaps with traffic counts as the dependent variable using GIS data such as road class (32 categories) and population density. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) MOtor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) model was used to estimate transportation CO2 emissions. The street-level emissions can be aggregated and gridded and used as input to atmospheric transport models for comparison with atmospheric measurements. This model also provides an independent assessment of top-down inventories that determine emissions from fuel sales, while being an important component of our ongoing effort to assess the effectiveness of emission mitigation strategies at the urban scale.

  8. 77 FR 49854 - Tier 1 Environmental Impact Statement for the Oregon Portion of the Pacific Northwest Rail...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-17

    ...). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The federally designated PNWRC has been the subject of high-speed passenger rail... Pacific Northwest Rail Corridor (Portland to Eugene) AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), U.S... Oregon portion of the Pacific Northwest Rail Corridor (PNWRC). The objective of the Tier 1 EIS is...

  9. 75 FR 28316 - Notice of Buy America Waiver Request by Oregon Department of Transportation for Steel Roof Tiles...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-20

    ... Transportation for Steel Roof Tiles To Be Used in Union Station Roof Rehabilitation AGENCY: Federal Railroad... purchase of metal roof tiles made of 40/45 KSI 2, 24 Gauge (0.0276'') Galvanized ``Non-Fluting'' Steel... to complete the rehabilitation of the historic Union Station roof in Portland, Oregon as...

  10. Education for the Gifted: Patterns for the Future. Proceedings, Annual Summer Conference (4th, Eugene, Oregon, July 25-27, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon Univ., Eugene. Coll. of Education.

    This collection consists of 11 conference papers on issues pertaining to education of talented and gifted children; 6 are from "general interest" sessions and 5 are from "special interest" sessions. The general interest papers are primarily theoretical in focus. Titles include: Julian C. Stanley's "Finding Intellectually Talented Youths and…

  11. 33 CFR 165.1326 - Regulated Navigation Areas; Port of Portland Terminal 4, Willamette River, Portland, OR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of Portland Terminal 4, Willamette River, Portland, OR. 165.1326 Section 165.1326 Navigation and... Areas Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1326 Regulated Navigation Areas; Port of Portland Terminal 4... navigation area: (1) All waters of the Willamette River in the head of the Port of Portland's Terminal 4...

  12. Oregon Trail Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Park Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    The road to the U.S. West, known as the Oregon Trail, had its first real traffic in 1843 when a group of about 1000 people left Independence, Missouri and traveled west. This teacher's guide contains short descriptions of the main landmarks and stopping points that were significant along the northwest portion of the Oregon Trail. The guide is…

  13. Biological science in Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorsteinson, Lyman

    2005-01-01

    Fishing is an important part of Oregon's culture. The Western Fisheries Research Center (WFRC) has been conducting research in Oregon for many years to provide information that can be used by managers to help keep fish and other parts of the ecosystem healthy. Below are examples of some of WFRC's studies.

  14. Paleomagnetic Evidence for Spatially Distributed Post-Miocene Rotation of Western Washington and Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheriff, Steven D.

    1984-06-01

    Anomalous paleomagnetic directions have been determined for 17 sites in the Frenchmans Springs member of the Wanapum basalt formation, Columbia River basalt group. These sites are located in the Ginkgo flows from near Vantage, Washington, to Portland, Oregon, a distance of approximately 300 km. The average paleomagnetic direction for six of these sites, centered around Vantage is D = 147°, I = 41°, α95 = 4.5°. The expected Miocene field direction is D = 355°, I = 65°. At some localities there are two distinct Ginkgo flows, in direct stratigraphic succession, with statistically identical anomalous directions. Their anomalous paleomagnetic direction makes these flows a valuable marker horizon in the Columbia River basalt group. The nondipole field direction of the Ginkgo flows correlates well with available results from the Miocene Cape Foulweather basalts of Oregon. This correlation strongly supports the hypothesis that these coastal basalts of Oregon are the distal ends of Columbia Plateau derived basalt flows. The spatial distribution of these anomalous field directions suggests about 14° of clockwise rotation between Vantage and Portland. Combining these data with data from the Oregon Coast basalts allows a maximum declination difference of about 35°. The increase in declination can be best explained by clockwise rotation, about nearby vertical axes, increasing to the southwest across the Columbia Plateau and Oregon coast.

  15. Environmental Science Conference for State Supervisors of Science (Portland State University, Portland, Oregon, May 1-5, 1970).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portland State Univ., OR.

    The Conference report reviewed the status of man's environment and drafted guidelines for state education agencies to use for developing state programs related to environmental education. The six featured speakers and topics were: Kessler Cannon--"Report of the Governor's Committee on Natural Resources;" Dr. Harry Kramer--"Environmental Problems…

  16. Sedimentary Basins: A Deeper Look at Seattle and Portland's Earthquake Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, M.; Frankel, A. D.; Wirth, E. A.; Vidale, J. E.; Han, J.

    2015-12-01

    Seattle, Washington and Portland, Oregon, two major metropolitan areas in the Pacific Northwest, are vulnerable to earthquakes on active local faults, deep intraslab earthquakes, and megathrust earthquakes on the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ). Both cities are located within sedimentary basins that could increase this hazard. The Seattle basin is ~8 km in depth and is located beneath downtown Seattle. The 6-km-deep Tualatin basin (McPhee et al., 2014) sits below and west of downtown Portland with the shallow Portland basin to the northeast. Unlike other West Coast sedimentary basins, the Tualatin contains a higher-velocity Columbia River basalt layer between sediment layers. The velocity contrast between stiff bedrock surrounding the basins and soft sediment within can cause seismic waves to amplify greatly, increasing shaking intensity and duration at the surface. For example, our observations show amplification of seismic waves by factors of 2 - 4 within the Seattle basin. Basin geometry can also increase local shaking by converting incident S-waves to surface waves, and focusing S-waves at basin edges. We characterize effects of the Seattle, Tualatin and Portland basins by modeling with 3-D numerical methods. To evaluate these effects, we use data from the 2001 M6.8 Nisqually, the 2009 M4.5 Kingston, and the 2006 M3.8 Vancouver earthquakes recorded by stations operated by the US Geological Survey (10 - 25 stations) and the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network (7 - 81 stations). Time differences between S-waves and S-converted-to-P-waves at basin/bedrock interfaces as well as reverberations from teleseisms (global earthquakes) are used to constrain the basin depth and structure of the three basins. Basin effects are modeled using a 3D finite difference program to generate synthetic seismograms. Results will be used to improve the Seattle and Portland 3D velocity models and to better understand and predict amplification of strong motion. We also plan similar analyses

  17. Fires Scorch Oregon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On Wednesday, August 7, 2002, two large Oregon fires merged into a single massive fire of more than 333,000 acres. In southwest Oregon, the Sour Biscuit fire on the Oregon-California state line, and the larger Florence Fire to its north closed the gap between them and created an enormous blaze that retained the name Biscuit Fire. The fire has burned over the Oregon state line into California. This image of the fires and thick smoke was captured by the landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus on August 14, 2002. In this false-color iamge, vegetation is green, burned areas are deep magenta, actively burning fire is bright pink, and smoke is blue. Credit:Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch.

  18. Geologic Map of the Camas Quadrangle, Clark County, Washington, and Multnomah County, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evarts, Russell C.; O'Connor, Jim E.

    2008-01-01

    The Camas 7.5' quadrangle is in southwestern Washington and northwestern Oregon approximately 20 km east of Portland. The map area, bisected by the Columbia River, lies on the eastern margin of the Portland Basin, which is part of the Puget-Willamette Lowland that separates the Cascade Range from the Oregon Coast Range. Since late Eocene time, the Cascade Range has been the locus of an episodically active volcanic arc associated with underthrusting of oceanic lithosphere beneath the North American continent along the Cascadia Subduction Zone. Bedrock consists largely of basalt and basaltic andesite flows that erupted during late Oligocene time from one or more vents located outside the map area. These rocks crop out only north of the Columbia River: at the base of Prune Hill in Camas, where they dip southward at about 5?; and east of Lacamas Creek, where they dip to the southeast at 15 to 30?. The volcanic bedrock is unconformably overlain by Neogene sediments that accumulated as the Portland Basin subsided. In the Camas quadrangle, most of these sediments consist of basaltic hyaloclastic debris generated in the volcanic arc to the east and carried into the Portland Basin by the ancestral Columbia River. The dominant structures in the map area are northwest-striking dextral strike-slip faults that offset the Paleogene basin floor as well as the lower part of the basin fill. The Oligocene rocks at Prune Hill and to the east were uplifted in late Pliocene to early Pleistocene time within a restraining bend along one of these dextral faults. In Pleistocene time, basaltic andesite flows issued from a volcano centered on the west side of Prune Hill; another flow entered the map area from the east. These flows are part of the Boring volcanic field, which comprises several dozen late Pliocene and younger monogenetic volcanoes scattered throughout the greater Portland region. In latest Pleistocene time, the Missoula floods of glacial-outburst origin inundated the Portland

  19. Seasonal Agricultural Labor in Oregon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Univ., Corvallis.

    Requested by the governor of Oregon, this 1968 report focuses on seasonal agricultural labor in Oregon. The task force, appointed by the president of Oregon State University, reported on the following areas: (1) the problem in terms of potential unionization, population trends, existing state programs and agencies for the migrants; (2) regulations…

  20. Assessing effects of PCB exposure on American mink (Mustela vison) abundance in Portland Harbor.

    PubMed

    Luxon, Matt; Toll, John; Hanson, Craig

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an integrated analysis using a Monte Carlo exposure model, dose–response effects model and habitat,and population dynamics models, all of which allow us to quantitatively estimate the effects of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)exposure on American mink (Mustela vison) abundance at the Portland Harbor Superfund Site (Site), and the associated uncertainties. The Site extends from river mile 1.9 of the Lower Willamette River, near its confluence with the Columbia River, to river mile 11.8, just downstream of downtown Portland, Oregon. The potential effects of PCBs on the American mink population were evaluated in the Baseline Ecological Risk Assessment (BERA) due to the historical presence of mink in the are a and because mink are known to be highly sensitive to the effects of PCBs. Hazard quotients (HQs) calculated in the BERA indicated that PCB concentrations measured in Portland Harbor fish were above levels known to cause reproductive effects in mink. Further analysis was needed to evaluate the potential magnitude of effects on the Site mink population. The integrated analysis presented herein demonstrates that if an effect of PCB exposure is a less than 30% reduction in kit production, then PCB remediation is not expected to have any effect on mink abundance. This is a Site‐specific conclusion that depends on the quality, abundance, and distribution of mink habitat in Portland Harbor. The PCB dose associated with a 30% reduction in kit production was calculated as 101 mg/kg bw/d (90% CI ¼ 69–146 mg/kg bw/d). The mink PCB dose estimates from the Portland Harbor BERA indicate that if mink are present, their baseline exposure levels probably exceed 101 mg/kg bw/d. Therefore, some level of reduction in PCB exposure could be beneficial to the species if the study area provides sufficient habitat to support a mink population. This analysis demonstrates that risk analysis for population‐level assessment endpoints benefits from analyses

  1. Oregon trails revisted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, A. J.; Alexander, C. J.; Hall, M. J.; Isaacson, D. L.; Murray, R. J.; Schrumpf, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    Oregon State University's Environmental Remote Sensing Applications Laboratory (ERSAL) has six full-time researchers with expertise in a variety of biological, Earth, atmospheric and computer sciences as well as image interpretation and statistical techniques. The primary emphasis of the ERSAL research and demonstration program is the development and application of remote sensing technology in operational resource management programs. LANDSAT multi-spectral, multi-date digital data and imagery are utilized in concert with high altitude NASA-acquired photography, low altitude ERSAL-acquired photography, and field observations and data to provide customized, inexpensive and useful final products. Synopses are given of 9 applications projects conducted in Oregon.

  2. Registration of MD25-26ne, MD25-27, and MD25-87 germplasm lines of cotton with superior yield, fiber quality, and pest resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three non-commercial cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) lines which were released by the USDA-ARS are MD25-26ne (PI 666042), MD25-27 (PI 666043), and MD25-87 (PI 666044). The three lines are reselections out of MD25 (Reg. No GP-929; PI 659505). The objective of this research was to select lines that h...

  3. Proceedings of the International Conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in Digital Age (CELDA) (11th, Porto, Portugal, October 25-27, 2014)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, Demetrios G., Ed.; Spector, J. Michael, Ed.; Ifenthaler, Dirk, Ed.; Isaias, Pedro, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    These proceedings contain the papers of the 11th International Conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in the Digital Age (CELDA 2014), October 25-27, 2014, which has been organized by the International Association for Development of the Information Society (IADIS) and endorsed by the Japanese Society for Information and Systems in…

  4. Urban decision making for transportation investments: Portland's light-rail transit system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Edner, S.M.; Arrington, G.B.

    1985-03-01

    This report is a detailed case study of the various decisions which led to the investment in Portland, Oregon's light-rail transit system. The study reviews the alternatives that were considered, the factors that led to the choices made, and the impacts and secondary effects the choices triggered. Topics discussed include the withdrawal of the Mount Hood Freeway, the substitution of transit and the options considered, the changing political infrastructure that affected decision making, citizen participation in the process, financing of the system, involvement of the private sector downtown, and the actual building of the light-rail line. The report should be of special interest to staffs of local officials involved in making major transportation investment decisions.

  5. The Oregon Walkabout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parnell, Dale

    1974-01-01

    Too often American schools aim to satisfy the self-actualizing and higher-level needs in Maslow's hierarchy, while ignoring survival and security needs. The new State curriculum seeks to correct that deficit. To graduate, an Oregon student in the Class of 1978 will be expected to demonstrate the competencies to function effectively on the job, as…

  6. Oregon hydrologic landscape regions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Individuals who spend time working with streams intuitively come to understand that stream hydrologic and ecological characteristics are related to the attributes of the watersheds in which they occur. This is easy to see in Oregon with its large climatic and geologic variations ...

  7. Oregon: Biscuit Wildfire

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... Fire was the most expensive fire fighting effort in Oregon's history, with more than 6,000 personnel assisting the battle to suppress the ... NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Terra spacecraft is managed ...

  8. Oregon's first wind park

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The bringing on-line of the 1.25 MW wind park at Whiskey Run, Oregon, is reported. The park features twenty-five 50 KW wind turbine generators and is expected to produce about three million kilowatt-hours per year for the Pacific Power and Light system.

  9. OREGON ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH PROFILE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In response to Executive Order 12898: Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority and Low Income Populations, and in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, this project will profile the state of Oregon to identify environmental justice communi...

  10. Oregon Social Sciences Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    The study of the social sciences includes: history, civics, geography, and economics to prepare students for responsible citizenship. The Oregon state standards for social sciences sets out common curriculum goals, content standards, information for Benchmark 1 (grade three), Benchmark 2 (grade five), Benchmark 3 (grade eight), and Certificate of…

  11. Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus) ammocoetes exposed to contaminated Portland Harbor sediments: Method development and effects on survival, growth, and behavior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Unrein, Julia R.; Morris, Jeffrey M.; Chitwood, Rob S.; Lipton, Joshua; Peers, Jennifer; van de Wetering, Stan; Schreck, Carl B.

    2016-01-01

    Many anthropogenic disturbances have contributed to the decline of Pacific lampreys (Entosphenus tridentatus), but potential negative effects of contaminants on lampreys are unclear. Lamprey ammocoetes are the only detritivorous fish in the lower Willamette River, Oregon, USA, and have been observed in Portland Harbor sediments. Their long benthic larval stage places them at risk from the effects of contaminated sediment. The authors developed experimental methods to assess the effects of contaminated sediment on the growth and behavior of field-collected ammocoetes reared in a laboratory. Specifically, they developed methods to assess individual growth and burrowing behavior. Burrowing performance demonstrated high variability among contaminated sediments; however, ammocoetes presented with noncontaminated reference sediment initiated burrowing more rapidly and completed it faster. Ammocoete reemergence from contaminated sediments suggests avoidance of some chemical compounds. The authors conducted long-term exposure experiments on individually held ammocoetes using sediment collected from their native Siletz River, which included the following: contaminated sediments collected from 9 sites within Portland Harbor, 2 uncontaminated reference sediments collected upstream, 1 uncontaminated sediment with characteristics similar to Portland Harbor sediments, and clean sand. They determined that a 24-h depuration period was sufficient to evaluate weight changes and observed no mortality or growth effects in fish exposed to any of the contaminated sediments. However, the effect on burrowing behavior appeared to be a sensitive endpoint, with potentially significant implications for predator avoidance.

  12. Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus) ammocoetes exposed to contaminated Portland Harbor sediments: Method development and effects on survival, growth, and behavior.

    PubMed

    Unrein, Julia R; Morris, Jeffrey M; Chitwood, Rob S; Lipton, Joshua; Peers, Jennifer; van de Wetering, Stan; Schreck, Carl B

    2016-08-01

    Many anthropogenic disturbances have contributed to the decline of Pacific lampreys (Entosphenus tridentatus), but potential negative effects of contaminants on lampreys are unclear. Lamprey ammocoetes are the only detritivorous fish in the lower Willamette River, Oregon, USA, and have been observed in Portland Harbor sediments. Their long benthic larval stage places them at risk from the effects of contaminated sediment. The authors developed experimental methods to assess the effects of contaminated sediment on the growth and behavior of field-collected ammocoetes reared in a laboratory. Specifically, they developed methods to assess individual growth and burrowing behavior. Burrowing performance demonstrated high variability among contaminated sediments; however, ammocoetes presented with noncontaminated reference sediment initiated burrowing more rapidly and completed it faster. Ammocoete reemergence from contaminated sediments suggests avoidance of some chemical compounds. The authors conducted long-term exposure experiments on individually held ammocoetes using sediment collected from their native Siletz River, which included the following: contaminated sediments collected from 9 sites within Portland Harbor, 2 uncontaminated reference sediments collected upstream, 1 uncontaminated sediment with characteristics similar to Portland Harbor sediments, and clean sand. They determined that a 24-h depuration period was sufficient to evaluate weight changes and observed no mortality or growth effects in fish exposed to any of the contaminated sediments. However, the effect on burrowing behavior appeared to be a sensitive endpoint, with potentially significant implications for predator avoidance. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2092-2102. © 2016 SETAC. PMID:26762215

  13. Case Study: Calling the Question Portland Schools Foundation (PSF) Portland, OR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chrismer, Sara Schwartz

    2007-01-01

    Procuring resources for public school reform can be a powerful focusing incentive. The Portland Schools Foundation (PSF), an independent, community-based organization, has learned how to leverage its funding and relationships to call the question and bring local and national attention to bear on local educational issues. PSF has been diligent…

  14. Actual Problems in Celestial Mechanics and Dynamical Astronomy, International Conference Cluj/Napoca, Romania, May 25-27, 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Érdi, B.; Szenkovits, F.

    2007-05-01

    In 25--27 May 2006 an International Conference on Actual Problems in Celestial Mechanics and Dynamical Astronomy was organized at Cluj-Napoca. The Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science of the Babeş-Bolyai University, the host of this conference, organized this scientific meeting in collaboration with the Loránd Eötvös University (Budapest, Hungary), Sapientia University (Miercuria Ciuc, Romania), Astronomical Institute of the Romanian Academy (Bucharest, Romania) and Institute for Space Science (Bucharest, Romania). The main topics covered by the meeting were: - Solar-System dynamics, stability, resonances, chaos; - Dynamics of populations in the Solar System: NEAs, MBAs, Centaurs, KBOs, TNOs: observations, orbits, theoretical models; - Galactic and extragalactic dynamics; - Problems, models, methods and techniques in contemporary celestial mechanics and dynamical astronomy. The conference was structured into seven sessions of oral presentations, a poster session and a round table discussion. Each of the seven main sessions began with an invited lecture. These lectures reviewed the following fields: the Sitnikov problem (R. Dvorak, Austria); the age of the asteroid families (Z. Knezevic, Serbia and Montenegro); stability of exoplanetary systems (B. Érdi, Hungary); Saari's conjecture (Diacu, Canada); integrability from direct and inverse standpoints (G. Bozis, Greece); stability of exact solutions in restricted many-body problems (E. Grebenicov, Russia); actual Romanian research in post-Newtonian dynamics (V. Mioc, Romania). Beside the invited lectures, the 21 oral presentations covered the most various domains of celestial mechanics and dynamical astronomy. Chaotic behaviour was a premier topic. It was approached and studied by analytical, geometrical and numerical methods in many astronomical problems: the restricted three-body problem (with examples in the Solar System), the Gylden's model and its generalizations, capture domain, resonances, etc

  15. Fires Scorch Oregon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In southwestern Oregon, the Florence Fire (north) and the Sour Biscuit Fire (south) continued to burn virtually out of control on July 21, 2002. Numerous evacuation notices have been issued for residents in the area as the fires remain difficult to control due to the steep, rugged terrain of the Klamath Mountains. This image is from the Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper. Credit:Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch.

  16. DIAMOND PEAK WILDERNESS, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, David R.; Moyle, Phillip R.

    1984-01-01

    No metallic mineral resources were identified during a mineral survey of the Diamond Peak Wilderness in Oregon. Cinder cones within the wilderness contain substantial cinder resources, but similar deposits that are more accessible occur outside the wilderness. The area could have geothermal resources, but available data are insufficient to evaluate their potential. Several deep holes could be drilled in areas of the High Cascades outside the wilderness, from which extrapolations of the geothermal potential of the several Cascade wilderness could be made.

  17. Surgical and Functional Results of Hybrid 25-27-Gauge Vitrectomy Combined with Coaxial 2.2 mm Small Incision Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Höhn, Fabian; Kretz, Florian; Pavlidis, Mitrofanis

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate outcomes after coaxial 2.2 mm small incision cataract surgery combined with hybrid 25-27-gauge vitrectomy in eyes with vitreoretinal disease and age-related cataract. Methods. A single-center, retrospective case series study of 55 subjects (55 eyes) with a mean age of 70 years who underwent combined small incision phacoemulsification, intraocular lens (IOL) implantation, and hybrid 25-27-gauge vitrectomy during the 12-month period to December 2014. Intraoperative and postoperative complications and visual results were the main outcome measures. Results. The mean follow-up period was 6 months (range: 2–18 months). Intraoperative findings were 3 retinal breaks (5.5%). No cases required corneal or scleral suture or conversion to larger-gauge vitrectomy. Postoperative complications consisted of posterior capsule opacification (12.7%), elevated intraocular pressure >30 mmHg (1.8%), and fibrin reaction (5.5%). There were no cases of hypotony (<7 mmHg), IOL decentration, or postoperative endophthalmitis. Visual acuity (mean ± SD) improved from 0.52 ± 0.6 logMAR preoperatively to 0.22 ± 0.46 logMAR at final postoperative visit (P < 0.0001). Conclusion. Surgical and visual outcomes suggest hybrid 25-27-gauge vitrectomy combined with small incision phacoemulsification and IOL implantation is feasible, safe, and effective as a one-step surgical procedure for the management of vitreoretinal pathologies and concurrent cataract. PMID:26966558

  18. Surgical and Functional Results of Hybrid 25-27-Gauge Vitrectomy Combined with Coaxial 2.2 mm Small Incision Cataract Surgery.

    PubMed

    Höhn, Fabian; Kretz, Florian; Pavlidis, Mitrofanis

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate outcomes after coaxial 2.2 mm small incision cataract surgery combined with hybrid 25-27-gauge vitrectomy in eyes with vitreoretinal disease and age-related cataract. Methods. A single-center, retrospective case series study of 55 subjects (55 eyes) with a mean age of 70 years who underwent combined small incision phacoemulsification, intraocular lens (IOL) implantation, and hybrid 25-27-gauge vitrectomy during the 12-month period to December 2014. Intraoperative and postoperative complications and visual results were the main outcome measures. Results. The mean follow-up period was 6 months (range: 2-18 months). Intraoperative findings were 3 retinal breaks (5.5%). No cases required corneal or scleral suture or conversion to larger-gauge vitrectomy. Postoperative complications consisted of posterior capsule opacification (12.7%), elevated intraocular pressure >30 mmHg (1.8%), and fibrin reaction (5.5%). There were no cases of hypotony (<7 mmHg), IOL decentration, or postoperative endophthalmitis. Visual acuity (mean ± SD) improved from 0.52 ± 0.6 logMAR preoperatively to 0.22 ± 0.46 logMAR at final postoperative visit (P < 0.0001). Conclusion. Surgical and visual outcomes suggest hybrid 25-27-gauge vitrectomy combined with small incision phacoemulsification and IOL implantation is feasible, safe, and effective as a one-step surgical procedure for the management of vitreoretinal pathologies and concurrent cataract. PMID:26966558

  19. 33 CFR 110.134 - Portland Harbor, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Portland Harbor, Maine. 110.134 Section 110.134 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.134 Portland Harbor, Maine. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1) Anchorage A (general). Beginning...

  20. 77 FR 41685 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Willamette River, Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-16

    ...The Coast Guard has issued a temporary deviation from the operating schedule that governs the Hawthorne Bridge across the Willamette River, mile 13.1, at Portland, OR. This deviation is necessary to accommodate Portland's Big Float event. This deviation allows the bridge to remain in the closed position to allow safe movement of event...

  1. 33 CFR 110.128 - Columbia River at Portland, Oreg.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Columbia River at Portland, Oreg... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.128 Columbia River at Portland, Oreg. The waters of the Columbia River between Sand Island and Government Island, bounded on the west by pile...

  2. 75 FR 72939 - Modification of Class E Airspace; Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E. O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Modification of Class E Airspace; Portland, OR AGENCY... Class E airspace at Portland, OR, to accommodate aircraft using the Localizer/Distance...

  3. 77 FR 58491 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Willamette River, Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ... Portland Marathon. This deviation allows the bridge to remain in the down or closed position during the marathon. DATES: This deviation is effective from 7:30 a.m. October 7, 2012 through 3 p.m. October 7, 2012..., uninterrupted roadway passage of participants of the Portland Marathon. The Broadway Bridge crosses...

  4. 33 CFR 100.1302 - Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS... life and property. (3) A succession of sharp, short signals by whistle or horn from vessels...

  5. Celebrating 24 years of Public Outreach of Science and Engineering in Portland Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristol, Terry

    2012-02-01

    There have been several core strategies in our highly successful 24-year Science, Technology and Society outreach program. However, the strategy for each season is also dynamic, requiring innovation and novel coalitions. As Bob Dylan put it so succinctly, ``He not busy being born is busy dying.'' Public outreach programs - as the Chautauquas of the past - should be positioned in the cultural milieu along with the opera, symphony and theatre. Support for the enterprise needs to be a broad and diverse coalition, based ideally on the creative formation of win-win relationship. You want people to see your success as their success: ``Together we can enhance the intellectual environment in ways that none of us could do alone.'' Being multi-disciplinary presents challenges but has considerable advantages. For instance, enlightened managers of established organizations recognize the value of exposing their employees to a diversity of problem solving approaches. Instead of inviting speakers for one large lecture we now invite them to be Resident Scholars for two-three days and develop a range of additional smaller public engagements. Science and engineering topics must be relevant - placed in the broader Science, Technology and Society framework. We avoid ``gee-whiz'' in favor of what stimulates reflection on who we are, where we came from, and our role in the universe. I will briefly review how we have survived and thrived and, finally, what I see as future trends and opportunities.

  6. Wastewater recycling and heat reclamation at the Red Lion Central Laundry, Portland, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Garlick, T.F.; Halverson, M.A.; Ledbetter, M.R.

    1996-09-01

    This report discusses water, energy, and cost savings that can be achieved in a commercial laundry through the use of a wastewater recycling and heat recovery system. Cost savings are achieved through reductions in water use, reduction in sewage charges, reductions in water heating energy, and potential reductions in water treatment chemicals. This report provides an economic analysis of the impact of capital investment, daily consumption, and local utility rates on the payback period.

  7. 33 CFR 100.1302 - Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the Markham bridge to the east pier of the center span. The center span is left open to allow commercial traffic through during the event. The course then continues from the west Pier of the center...

  8. TRACKING CHANGES IN WETLANDS WITH URBANIZATION: SIXTEEN YEARS OF EXPERIENCE IN PORTLAND, OREGON, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Long-term studies of the wetland resource in urbanizing areas are essential to understanding the effects of urbanization on wetlands and the effectiveness of management actions. Using data from the National Wetland Inventory (NWI) in combination with field surveys, we tracked ch...

  9. Development of a CE-QUAL-W2 temperature model for Crystal Springs Lake, Portland, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buccola, Norman L.; Stonewall, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    Model simulations (scenarios) were run with lower water surface elevations in Crystal Springs Lake and increased shading to the lake to assess the relative effect the lake and pond characteristics have on water temperature. The Golf Pond was unaltered in all scenarios. The models estimated that lower lake elevations would result in cooler water downstream of the Golf Pond and shorter residence times in the lake. Increased shading to the lake would also provide substantial cooling. Most management scenarios resulted in a decrease in 7-day average of daily maximum values by about 2.0– 4.7 °F (1.1 –2.6 °C) for outflow from Crystal Springs Lake during the period of interest. Outflows from the Golf Pond showed a net temperature reduction of 0.5–2.7 °F (0.3–1.5 °C) compared to measured values in 2014 because of solar heating and downstream warming in the Golf Pond resulting from mixing with inflow from Reed Lake.

  10. Vocational Fisheries Education Workshop Proceedings (Portland, Oregon, April 18-19, 1973).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Univ., Corvallis. Cooperative Extension Service.

    This publication is a compilation of nine studies presented at the Vocational Fisheries Education Workshop where commercial fishermen, educators, government officials, and extension agents were gathered for examination of the subject of vocational fisheries training. The studies dealt with commercial fisheries and current training programs. An…

  11. 78 FR 4381 - Foreign-Trade Zone 45-Portland, Oregon; Application for Reorganization and Expansion Under...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-22

    ... FR 60323, 12/27/1978) and expanded on April 5, 1991 (Board Order 518, 56 FR 16067, 04/19/1991). The... Expansion Under Alternative Site Framework An application has been submitted to the Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZ... expand the zone under the alternative site framework (ASF) adopted by the Board (15 CFR Sec....

  12. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Street Lighting Host Site: Lija Loop, Portland, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael

    2009-11-01

    This report describes the process and results of a demonstration of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology in a residential street lighting application, under the U.S. Department of Energy GATEWAY Solid-State Lighting Technology Demonstration Program. In this project, eight 100W (nominal) high-pressure sodium cobra head fixtures were replaced with a like number of LED street light luminaires manufactured by Leotek, Inc. The Leotek product achieved an estimated payback in the Lija Loop installation of about 20 years for replacement scenarios and a much shorter 7.6 years for new installations. Much of the associated energy savings (55%) supporting these payback periods, however, were achieved by reducing average horizontal photopic illuminance a similar amount (53%). Examined from a different perspective, the measured performance suggests that the Leotek product is at approximate parity with the HPS cobra head in terms of average delivered photopic illumination for a given power consumption. HPS comprises the second most efficacious street lighting technology available, exceeded only by low pressure sodium (LPS). LPS technology is not considered suitable for most street lighting applications due to its monochromatic spectral output and poor color rendering ability; therefore, this LED product is performing at an efficiency level comparable to its primary competition in this application.

  13. TRACKING CHANGES IN WETLANDS WITH URBANIZATION: SIXTEEN YEARS OF EXPERIENCE IN PORTLAND, OREGON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urban wetlands can provide valuable ecological and societal services. They also can experience rapid change with development. Data from National Wetland Inventory Maps (NWI) and a series of field studies conducted between 1987 and 1998 were used to track changes over 16 years i...

  14. Indians In Oregon Today. Oregon Middle School - High School Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pepper, Floy

    2004-01-01

    The main purpose of this publication is to provide current, accurate information to teachers and students about the Indian tribes living in the state of Oregon. Too often information about Indian tribes is stereotypic, inaccurate, and outdated. A number of Indian tribes have worked on the development of this document, using the "Oregon Indians:…

  15. NW Oregon radon potential based on soil radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Ashbaugh, S.G.; Burns, S.F. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Analysis of soil by gamma spectroscopy for Bi-214 (Ra-226) suggests low to moderate radon potentials for northwest Oregon in areas with low to moderate soil permeabilities. Very low radon potential zones (0.2 to 0.7 pCi/g) comprise 58% of the study area. These zones are frequently associated with soils developed from undifferentiated basalts and andesites of the Cascade Range, and basalts and undifferentiated mafic intrusives of the Coast Range. Low radon potential zones (0.7 to 1.2 pCi/g) comprise 28% of the study area. These zones are generally associated with Missoula Flood sediments, pre-Holocene loess in the Portland area, and Eocene/Oligocene marine sediments low in mica and/or tuff along the foothills of the Willamette Valley. Moderate radon potential zones (1.2 to 3.0 pCi/g) comprise 14% of the study area. These zones are often associated with the lateritic soils derived from Columbia River Basalts and Eocene/Oligocene marine sediments high in mica and/or tuff along the western edges of the Willamette Valley. A closer examination of soils in the Portland and Salem areas shows that: (1) Bi-214/K-40 ratios increase from 0.07 to 0.35 with respect to solid development, indicating K-40 to be preferentially leached over Ra-226; (2) clay development within B-horizons does not reflect a significant increase in Ra-226 mobility; and (3) elevated indoor radon within the Portland and Salem areas can be attributed to high soil permeabilities rather than soil chemistry.

  16. 33 CFR 110.6 - Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). 110.6 Section 110.6 Navigation and Navigable... Areas § 110.6 Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). Beginning at the southeasterly corner of the wharf, at the most southerly point of Great Diamond Island...

  17. 33 CFR 110.6 - Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). 110.6 Section 110.6 Navigation and Navigable... Areas § 110.6 Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). Beginning at the southeasterly corner of the wharf, at the most southerly point of Great Diamond Island...

  18. 33 CFR 110.6 - Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). 110.6 Section 110.6 Navigation and Navigable... Areas § 110.6 Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). Beginning at the southeasterly corner of the wharf, at the most southerly point of Great Diamond Island...

  19. 33 CFR 110.6 - Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). 110.6 Section 110.6 Navigation and Navigable... Areas § 110.6 Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). Beginning at the southeasterly corner of the wharf, at the most southerly point of Great Diamond Island...

  20. 33 CFR 110.6 - Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). 110.6 Section 110.6 Navigation and Navigable... Areas § 110.6 Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). Beginning at the southeasterly corner of the wharf, at the most southerly point of Great Diamond Island...

  1. Lyme Disease in Oregon

    PubMed Central

    Doggett, J. Stone; Kohlhepp, Sue; Gresbrink, Robert; Metz, Paul; Gleaves, Curt; Gilbert, David

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of Lyme disease in Oregon is calculated from cases reported to the Oregon State Health Division. We reviewed the exposure history of reported cases of Lyme disease and performed field surveys for infected Ixodes pacificus ticks. The incidence of Lyme disease correlated with the distribution of infected I. pacificus ticks. PMID:18448697

  2. Hispanics in Oregon's Workforce, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Brenda; Wood, Mary

    This report describes the Latino workforce in Oregon, outlining employment, income, education, and unemployment data. A brief history of Hispanics in the state notes that most of Oregon's Hispanics are of Mexican origin and that the state's Hispanic population grew 66 percent between 1990 and 1997. The history of migrant agricultural labor in…

  3. Fires Scorch Oregon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In southwestern Oregon, the Florence Fire (north) and the Sour Biscuit Fire (south) continue to burn virtually out of control. Numerous evacuation notices have been issued for residents in the area as the fires remain difficult to control due to the steep, rugged terrain of the Klamath Mountains. This false-color image from the Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper was acquired on July 21, 2002. In the image, vegetation is green, burned areas are deep magenta, active fire is bright pink, and smoke is light blue. Credit:Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch.

  4. Fires Scorch Oregon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In southwestern Oregon, the Florence Fire (north) and the Sour Biscuit Fire (south) continue to grow explosively. This image from the Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus was captured on July 29, 2002. The Florence Fire had grown to 50,000 acres and the Sour Biscuit Fire had grown to 16,000 acres. Numerous evacuation notices remain in effect. Thick smoke from the actively burning eastern perimeter of the Florence Fire is billowing southward and mingling with the Biscuit Fire smoke. Credit:Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch.

  5. Fires Scorch Oregon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In southwestern Oregon, the Florence Fire (north) and the Sour Biscuit Fire (south) continue to grow explosively. This image from the Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus was captured on July 29, 2002. The Florence Fire had grown to 50,000 acres and the Sour Biscuit Fire had grown to 16,000 acres. Numerous evacuation notices remain in effect. In this false-color image, vegetation is green, burned areas are deep magenta, actively burning fronts are bright pink, and smoke is blue. Credit:Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch.

  6. On the Oregon trail.

    PubMed

    Kitzhaber, J; Kemmy, A M

    1995-10-01

    On the eve of the 21st century, governments around the world are struggling to resolve the dual problems of health care cost and access. My own experience in addressing these issues as they manifest themselves in the US, and particularly in the state of Oregon, convinces me that successful health care reform, anywhere in the world, must sooner or later grapple with two questions: what are we buying with our health care dollars, and how do these expenditures relate to health? PMID:8556290

  7. STRAWBERRY MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thayer, T.P.; Stotelmeyer, Ronald B.

    1984-01-01

    The Strawberry Mountain Wilderness extends 18 mi along the crest of the Strawberry Range and comprises about 53 sq mi in the Malheur National Forest, Grant County, Oregon. Systematic geologic mapping, geochemical sampling and detailed sampling of prospect workings was done. A demonstrated copper resource in small quartz veins averaging at most 0. 33 percent copper with traces of silver occurs in shear zones in gabbro. Two small areas with substantiated potential for chrome occur near the northern edge of the wilderness. There is little promise for the occurrence of additional mineral or energy resources in the Strawberry Mountain Wilderness.

  8. Earthquake Hazards and Lifelines in the Interstate 5 Urban Corridor - Cottage Grove to Woodburn, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnett, E.A.; Weaver, C.S.; Meagher, K.L.; Haugerud, R.A.; Wang, Z.; Madin, I.P.; Wang, Y.; Wells, R.E.; Blakely, R.J.; Ballantyne, D.B.; Darienzo, M.

    2009-01-01

    The Interstate 5 highway (I-5) corridor, which stretches from Mexico to Canada, is both the main economic artery of the Pacific Northwest and home to the majority of Oregonians and Washingtonians. Accordingly, most regional utility and transportation systems have major components located within the I-5 corridor. For the purposes of this map, we refer to these essential systems as lifeline systems. The Pacific Northwest section of I-5, the I-5 urban corridor, extends from Eugene, Oregon, to the border of Canada. The population of this region is rapidly increasing with the bulk of growth and economic development centered in the cities of Eugene, Salem, and Portland, Oregon, and Olympia, Tacoma, Seattle, Everett, and Bellingham, Washington.

  9. Earthquake Hazards and Lifelines in the Interstate 5 Urban Corridor - Woodburn, Oregon, to Centralia, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnett, E.A.; Weaver, C.S.; Meagher, K.L.; Haugerud, R.A.; Wang, Z.; Madin, I.P.; Wang, Y.; Wells, R.E.; Blakely, R.J.; Ballantyne, D.B.; Darienzo, M.

    2009-01-01

    The Interstate 5 highway (I-5) corridor, which stretches from Mexico to Canada, is both the main economic artery of the Pacific Northwest and home to the majority of Oregonians and Washingtonians. Accordingly, most regional utility and transportation systems have major components located within the I-5 corridor. For the purposes of this map, we refer to these essential systems as lifeline systems. The Pacific Northwest section of I-5, the I-5 urban corridor, extends from Eugene, Oregon, to the border of Canada. The population of this region is rapidly increasing with the bulk of growth and economic development centered in the cities of Eugene, Salem, and Portland, Oregon, and Olympia, Tacoma, Seattle, Everett, and Bellingham, Washington.

  10. Ambulatory Research and Education Center Oregon Health Science University. Environmental Assesment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-21

    DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-0921) evaluating the proposed construction and operation of the Ambulatory Research and Education Center (AREC), which would be located on the top seven floors of the existing NeuroSensory Research Center (NRC) on the campus of the Oregon Health Sciences University (OHSU) at Portland, Oregon. The proposed action would combine activities scattered across the campus into a central facility. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 USC 4321 et seq. Therefore, an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  11. Swelling and Stress Relaxation in Portland Brownstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, I.; Scherer, G.

    2003-04-01

    Portland Brownstone (PB) is an arkose sandstone extensively used in the northeast-ern USA during the nineteenth century. This reddish-brown stone contains a fraction of swelling clays that are thought to contribute to its degradation upon cycles of wet-ting and drying. During drying events, contraction of the drying surface leads to stresses approaching the tensile strength of the stone. However, we have found that the magnitude of these stresses is limited by the ability of the stone to undergo stress relaxation. In this paper we describe novel methods to determine the magnitude of the stresses and the rate at which they develop and relax. We also discuss the influ-ence of surfactants on the magnitude of swelling and the rate of the stress relaxation of PB. The implications of our findings for the understanding of damage due to swelling of clays are discussed.

  12. Distribution of hypertension and renal disease in Oregon.

    PubMed Central

    Morton, W E; Knudsen, J C; Porter, G A

    1975-01-01

    Expecting to find agreement between the geographic distribution of hypertension and renal disease, we developed regional mortality rates for 1950-72 and prevalence rates for a Selective Service cohort born in 1939-41 and examined during 1957-69. For this purpose the State's counties were grouped into eight geographically homogeneous regions. The general decline in hypertension mortality was most pronounced in Portland, Oregon's major urban center. However, the decline halted during 1968-72 in the southern Cascade region which has become an area of relatively higher risk within the State. During these 23 years nephritis mortality fell, kidney infection mortality was stable, and both syndromes showed peak mortality in other, different regions of the State. The geographic pattern of hypertension prevalence among the draftee cohort resembled the 1963-67 hypertension mortality pattern, but more recent morbidity data are needed to confirm the southern Cascade region's recent change to a high-risk area. Of 529 draftees with diagnosed hypertension, only 35 percent of the cases were previously known, only 7 percent has had any previous treatment, and only 7 percent were associated with known renal conditions. Among 521 registrants with a history of renal disorders, the prevalence of hypertension was increased for all categories of renal disease but was significantly high only for those with a history of glomerulonephritis. To date in Oregon we have found no evidence that renal disorders are major determinants of hypertension morbidity or mortality. PMID:803695

  13. Oregon Coastal Observing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosro, M.; Allen, J. S.; Barth, J. A.; Egbert, G. D.; Huyer, A.; Smith, R. L.; Grantham, B. A.; Lubchenco, J.; Menge, B. A.

    2002-12-01

    Since 1997, a growing system of sustained coastal measurements, together with a high-resolution, data-assimilating coastal modeling program, have been used off Oregon to study the response of the coastal ocean to forcing at a range of space and time scales. The measurements include a large array of HF radars, which permit time-series mapping of the surface circulation over most of the Oregon coast; both long-term and short-term moored components, which provide time-series sampling through the water column; and repeat hydrographic, ADCP and surface drifter sampling, including the Newport Hydrographic Line (which has been sampled since the 1960s). At interannual frequencies, these measurements show changes in the alongshore circulation over the continental slope accompanying ENSO. At seasonal and storm frequencies, the strength and persistence of spatial patterns in wind-driven currents and the importance of bathymetry in steering the circulation are seen. Discovery of episodic phenomena, such as the recent finding of a hypoxic pool and associated die-off of fish and crabs on the continental shelf off Heceta Head, are made possible by repeated sampling.

  14. Preterm delivery among people living around Portland cement plants.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun-Yuh; Chang, Chih-Ching; Tsai, Shang-Shyue; Chuang, Hung-Yi; Ho, Chi-Kung; Wu, Trong-Neng; Sung, Fung-Chang

    2003-05-01

    The Portland cement industry is the main source of particulate air pollution in Kaohsiung city. Data in this study concern outdoor air pollution and the health of individuals living in communities in close proximity to Portland cement plants. The prevalence of delivery of preterm birth infants was significantly higher in mothers living within 0-2 km of a Portland cement plant than in mothers living within 2-4 km. After controlling for several possible confounders (including maternal age, season, marital status, maternal education, and infant sex), the adjusted odds ratio was 1.30 (95% CI=1.09-1.54) for the delivery of preterm infants for mothers living close to the Portland cement plants, chosen at the start to be from 0 to 2 km. These data provide further support for the hypothesis that air pollution can affect the outcome of pregnancy. PMID:12706757

  15. 91. VIEW OF PORTLAND FILTER VACUUM RECEIVER FROM NORTHWEST. AGITATORS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    91. VIEW OF PORTLAND FILTER VACUUM RECEIVER FROM NORTHWEST. AGITATORS No. 4 AND No. 5 VISIBLE IN BACKGROUND. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  16. 77 FR 26437 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Willamette River, Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-04

    ... of Portland's Rock-n-Roll Half Marathon. This deviation allows the bridge to remain in the closed... facilitate safe, uninterrupted roadway passage of participants of the Rock-n-Roll Half Marathon event....

  17. 78 FR 21064 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Willamette River, Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ... Portland's Rock-n-Roll Half Marathon. This deviation allows the bridge to remain in the closed position to... roadway passage of participants of the Rock-n-Roll Half Marathon event. The Hawthorne Bridge crosses...

  18. Synthesis and DFT calculation of a novel 5,17-di(2-antracenylazo)-25,27-di(ethoxycarbonylmethoxy)-26,28-dihydroxycalix[4]arene.

    PubMed

    Bayrakdar, A; Kart, H H; Elcin, S; Deligoz, H; Karabacak, M

    2015-02-01

    In this study, 5,17-di(2-antracenylazo)-25,27-di(ethoxycarbonylmethoxy)-26,28-dihydroxycalix[4]arene has been synthesized from 2-aminoantracene and 25,27-dihydroxy-26,28-diethylacetate calix[4]arene. In order to identify the molecular structure and vibrational features of the prepared azocalix[4]arene, FT-IR and (1)H NMR spectral data have been used. FT-IR spectrum of the studied molecule is recorded in the region 4000-400 cm(-1). (1)H NMR spectrum is recorded for 0.1-0.2 M solutions in DMSO-d6 solution. The molecular geometry, infrared spectrum are calculated by the density functional method employing B3LYP level with different basis sets, including 6-31G(d) and LanL2DZ. The chemical shifts calculation for (1)H NMR of the title molecule is calculated by using by Gauge-Invariant Atomic Orbital method by utilizing the same basis sets. The total density of state, the partial density of state and the overlap population density of state diagram analysis are done via GaussSum 3.0 program. Frontier molecular orbital (HOMO-LUMO) and molecular electrostatic potential surface on the title molecule are carried out for various intramolecular interactions that are responsible for the stabilization of the molecule. The experimental results and theoretical calculations have been compared, and they are found to be in good agreement. PMID:25448961

  19. Development of Conductometric Sensor Based on 25,27-Di-(5-thio-octyloxy)calix[4]arene-crown-6 for Determination of Ammonium.

    PubMed

    Saiapina, O Y; Kharchenko, S G; Vishnevskii, S G; Pyeshkova, V M; Kalchenko, V I; Dzyadevych, S V

    2016-12-01

    The conductometric sensor based on 25,27-di-(5-thio-octyloxy)calix[4]arene-crown-6 was developed for the quantitative analysis of ammonium. The calixarene was immobilized on the surface of the planar interdigitated electrodes by attachment of its dialkyl sulfide groups to the surface of the gold electrodes. The intrinsic ability of the calixarene to capture ammonium was studied in the conductometric measuring mode and by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The developed sensor showed high selectivity to ammonium in the presence of mono-, di-, and trivalent cations. Selective and highly sensitive detection of ammonium resulted from the complexation between the ammonium ions and a crown-ether fragment of the upper rim of the 25,27-di-(5-thio-octyloxy)calix[4]arene-crown-6 macrocycle. The developed sensor had high signal repeatability. Its sensitivity was found to be satisfactory for the forthcoming sensor application in the water-sample analysis; the linear range was 0.01-1.5 mM and limit of detection 10 μM. PMID:26911569

  20. Development of Conductometric Sensor Based on 25,27-Di-(5-thio-octyloxy)calix[4]arene-crown-6 for Determination of Ammonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiapina, O. Y.; Kharchenko, S. G.; Vishnevskii, S. G.; Pyeshkova, V. M.; Kalchenko, V. I.; Dzyadevych, S. V.

    2016-02-01

    The conductometric sensor based on 25,27-di-(5-thio-octyloxy)calix[4]arene-crown-6 was developed for the quantitative analysis of ammonium. The calixarene was immobilized on the surface of the planar interdigitated electrodes by attachment of its dialkyl sulfide groups to the surface of the gold electrodes. The intrinsic ability of the calixarene to capture ammonium was studied in the conductometric measuring mode and by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The developed sensor showed high selectivity to ammonium in the presence of mono-, di-, and trivalent cations. Selective and highly sensitive detection of ammonium resulted from the complexation between the ammonium ions and a crown-ether fragment of the upper rim of the 25,27-di-(5-thio-octyloxy)calix[4]arene-crown-6 macrocycle. The developed sensor had high signal repeatability. Its sensitivity was found to be satisfactory for the forthcoming sensor application in the water-sample analysis; the linear range was 0.01-1.5 mM and limit of detection 10 μM.

  1. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Retrofit Lamps at the Lobby of the Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Naomi

    2011-07-01

    This report describes the process and results of a demonstration of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology in the lobby of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) headquarters building in Portland, Oregon. The project involved a simple retrofit of 32 track lights used to illuminate historical black-and-white photos and printed color posters from the 1930s and 1940s. BPA is a federal power marketing agency in the Northwestern United States, and selected this prominent location to demonstrate energy efficient light-emitting diode (LED) retrofit options that not only can reduce the electric bill for their customers but also provide attractive alternatives to conventional products, in this case accent lighting for BPA's historical artwork.

  2. OLALLIE ROADLESS AREA, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, George W.; Neumann, Terry R.

    1984-01-01

    The Olallie Roadless Area, Oregon, is devoid of mines and mineral prospects, and a mineral-resource evaluation of the area did not identify any mineral-resource potential. There is no evidence that fossil fuels are present in the roadless area. Nearby areas in Clackamas, Marion, Jefferson, and Wasco Counties are characterized by higher-than-normal heat flow and by numerous thermal springs, some of which have been partly developed. this may indicate that the region has some, as yet undefined, potential for the development of geothermal energy. Lack of thermal springs or other evidence of localized geothermal anomalies within the roadless area may be the result of masking by young, nonconductive rock units and by the flooding out and dilution of rising thermal waters by cool meteoric water.

  3. Status of Oregon's Bull Trout.

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, David V.; Hanson, Mary L.; Hooton, Robert M.

    1997-10-01

    Limited historical references indicate that bull trout Salvelinus confluentus in Oregon were once widely spread throughout at least 12 basins in the Klamath River and Columbia River systems. No bull trout have been observed in Oregon's coastal systems. A total of 69 bull trout populations in 12 basins are currently identified in Oregon. A comparison of the 1991 bull trout status (Ratliff and Howell 1992) to the revised 1996 status found that 7 populations were newly discovered and 1 population showed a positive or upgraded status while 22 populations showed a negative or downgraded status. The general downgrading of 32% of Oregon's bull trout populations appears largely due to increased survey efforts and increased survey accuracy rather than reduced numbers or distribution. However, three populations in the upper Klamath Basin, two in the Walla Walla Basin, and one in the Willamette Basin showed decreases in estimated population abundance or distribution.

  4. Mount St. Helens ash fall in the Bull Run watershed, Oregon, May-June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Shulters, M.V.; Clifton, D.G.

    1980-07-01

    On May 25-26, May 30-June 2, and June 12-13, 1980, strong, high-altitude winds from the north occurred during periods of volcanic-ash eruption at Mount St. Helens in southwestern Washington. As a result, ash fell in the Bull Run watershed, Oregon, some 50 miles to the south, the principal water-supply source for the Portland area. Samples from precipitation collectors and from stream sites in the Bull Run watershed were collected on several dates during May and June 1980. Analyses were made and are tabulated for pH, conductivity, acidity, sulfate, and nitrate plus nitrite. Field pH values of the precipitation ranged from 4.0 to 5.6 pH units and the stream samples from 6.7 to 7.5 units. Particle-size analyses for ash samples collected in the Bull Run watershed and Portland, Oregon, are also shown. Volcanic events, precipitation and high-altitude speeds for northerly winds are given for May 18-June 15, 1980. 6 references, 5 figures, 3 tables.

  5. A tunnel runs through it: an inside view of the Tualatin Mountains, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, Ken; Peterson, Gary L.; Beeson, Marvin H.; Wells, Ray E.; Fleck, Robert J.; Evarts, Russell C.; Duvall, Alison; Blakely, Richard J.; Burns, Scott

    2011-01-01

    The Tualatin Mountains form a northwest-striking ridge about 350 m high that separates Portland, Oregon, from the cities of the Tualatin Valley to the west. Known informally as the Portland Hills, the ridge is a late Cenozoic anticline, bounded by reverse faults that dip toward the anticlinal axis. The anticline is a broad, open fold consisting chiefly of Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group, with remnants of Miocene-Pliocene Troutdale Formation and Pleistocene basalt of the Boring Volcanic Field on the flanks of the anticline. Anticlinal structures similar to the Tualatin Mountains are characteristic of the northern Willamette Valley, where the structures accommodate margin-parallel shortening of the Cascadia fore arc. Global Positioning System (GPS) results indicate that the shortening is due to the northward motion of Oregon at several millimeters per year with respect to stable North America. Some of the uplifts may contain active faults, but the structures are poorly exposed and are overlain by thick Pleistocene loess and Missoula flood deposits. Between 1993 and 1998, construction of the 3-mile-long (4500-m-long) TriMet MAX Light Rail tunnel through the Tualatin Mountains provided an unusual opportunity to investigate the geological structure and history of the Tualatin Mountains. This report is a collaborative effort among the tunnel geologists and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to document the geologic story and quantify late Cenozoic and Quaternary deformation rates of the Tualatin Mountains.

  6. Respiratory effects of portland cement dust

    SciTech Connect

    Abrons, H.L.; Sanderson, W.T.; Petersen, M.R.

    1985-01-01

    An epidemiologic study of the respiratory effects of Portland cement dust was conducted. The cohort consisted of 2,736 cement workers at 16 facilities in the United States. The comparisons consisted of 2,213 individuals in activities not involving dust exposure. Spirometry testing was performed. Respiratory-symptom questionnaires were administered. Chest x-rays were taken and examined. Personal sampling for total and respirable dust, quartz, and oxides of sulfur and nitrogen was performed. Cement workers had a significantly elevated adjusted-odds ratio for dyspnea, rounded and irregular small x-ray opacities, and pleural abnormalities. None of the ventilatory-function variables were significantly different between cement workers and the comparisons. The authors conclude that cement dust exerts little adverse effect on respiratory symptoms and ventilatory function. To determine whether the increase in x-ray abnormalities represents pneumoconiosis or another pathological process would require histological study. There is insufficient evidence to suggest a change in the exposure limit for cement dust.

  7. Odor investigation of a Portland cement plant

    SciTech Connect

    Pleus, R.C.

    1998-12-31

    The main concern expressed by Smithville residents is whether the odors they were smelling during odor events were due to chemicals that could cause adverse health effects. Odors were allegedly emanating from the town`s Portland cement plant. The purpose of the study was to measure the ambient air for 20 reduced sulfur, 50 volatile organic compounds, and air samples for olfactometric analysis. Carbonyl sulfide was found to be at a concentration that could create a sense of odor and irritation. This sense of irritation may be due to a physiological response by the central nervous system, and is not associated with any known adverse effects. This physiological response could account for some or all of the irritation experienced by residents during odor events. Comparing chemical concentrations that were detected in air samples to standard and recognized guidelines for acceptable exposure, all measured concentrations were found to be well below the acceptable criteria. From these data the authors conclude that no acute or chronic adverse health effects are expected at the concentrations of the chemicals detected downwind of the cement plant, either routinely or during odor events.

  8. Alternative Fuel for Portland Cement Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, Anton K; Duke, Steve R; Burch, Thomas E; Davis, Edward W; Zee, Ralph H; Bransby, David I; Hopkins, Carla; Thompson, Rutherford L; Duan, Jingran; Venkatasubramanian, Vignesh; Stephen, Giles

    2012-06-30

    The production of cement involves a combination of numerous raw materials, strictly monitored system processes, and temperatures on the order of 1500 °C. Immense quantities of fuel are required for the production of cement. Traditionally, energy from fossil fuels was solely relied upon for the production of cement. The overarching project objective is to evaluate the use of alternative fuels to lessen the dependence on non-renewable resources to produce portland cement. The key objective of using alternative fuels is to continue to produce high-quality cement while decreasing the use of non-renewable fuels and minimizing the impact on the environment. Burn characteristics and thermodynamic parameters were evaluated with a laboratory burn simulator under conditions that mimic those in the preheater where the fuels are brought into a cement plant. A drop-tube furnace and visualization method were developed that show potential for evaluating time- and space-resolved temperature distributions for fuel solid particles and liquid droplets undergoing combustion in various combustion atmospheres. Downdraft gasification has been explored as a means to extract chemical energy from poultry litter while limiting the throughput of potentially deleterious components with regards to use in firing a cement kiln. Results have shown that the clinkering is temperature independent, at least within the controllable temperature range. Limestone also had only a slight effect on the fusion when used to coat the pellets. However, limestone addition did display some promise in regards to chlorine capture, as ash analyses showed chlorine concentrations of more than four times greater in the limestone infused ash as compared to raw poultry litter. A reliable and convenient sampling procedure was developed to estimate the combustion quality of broiler litter that is the best compromise between convenience and reliability by means of statistical analysis. Multi-day trial burns were conducted

  9. Fires Scorch Oregon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In southwest Oregon, the Biscuit Fire continues to grow. This Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) image from August 14, 2002, shows the burn scar associated with the enormous blaze. The visualization uses ASTER's 30-meter-resolution, short-wave infrared bands to minimize smoke contamination and enhance the burn scar, which appears purple amid green vegetation. Actively burning areas of the fire appear very light purple. More than 6,000 fire personnel are assigned to the Biscuit Fire, which was 390, 276 acres as of Friday morning, August 15, and only 26 percent contained. Among the resources threatened are thousands of homes, three nationally designated wild and scenic rivers, and habitat for several categories of plants and animals at risk of extinction. Firefighters currently have no estimate as to when the fire might be contained. Credit: This image was acquired on an expedited basis as part of NASA Wildfire Response Team activities. Image courtesy Mike Abrams, Simon Hook, and the ASTER team at EROS Data Center DAAC.

  10. Teenage Suicide in Oregon 1983-1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Human Resources, Portland.

    During the 3-year period from 1983 through 1985, 80 Oregon teenagers intentionally took their own lives, making suicide second only to accidents as the leading cause of death among Oregon teenagers. Data on suicides committed by individuals between the ages of 10 and 19 were retrieved from death certificates on file with the Oregon Health Division…

  11. Population Structure of Phytophthora ramorum in Oregon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora ramorum is infecting plants in Oregon forests and nurseries. In this study, we analyzed the population structure of P. ramorum in Oregon from 2001 to 2004, using microsatellites. The P. ramorum population in Oregon is characterized by low genetic diversity, significant genetic differenc...

  12. Apatite formation on calcined kaolin-white Portland cement geopolymer.

    PubMed

    Pangdaeng, S; Sata, V; Aguiar, J B; Pacheco-Torgal, F; Chindaprasirt, P

    2015-06-01

    In this study, calcined kaolin-white Portland cement geopolymer was investigated for use as biomaterial. Sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate were used as activators. In vitro test was performed with simulated body fluid (SBF) for bioactivity characterization. The formation of hydroxyapatite bio-layer on the 28-day soaked samples surface was tested using SEM, EDS and XRD analyses. The results showed that the morphology of hydroxyapatite was affected by the source material composition, alkali concentration and curing temperature. The calcined kaolin-white Portland cement geopolymer with relatively high compressive strength could be fabricated for use as biomaterial. The mix with 50% white Portland cement and 50% calcined kaolin had 28-day compressive strength of 59.0MPa and the hydroxyapatite bio-layer on the 28-day soaked sample surface was clearly evident. PMID:25842101

  13. 78 FR 37212 - Portland General Electric Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Motions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-20

    ... Water Rights, Portland General Electric Company, 121 SW Salmon Street, Portland, OR 97204, (503) 464... locations: 1) a powerhouse at the base of Timothy Lake Dam housing two approximately 0.85-megawatt...

  14. The Oregon Geothermal Planning Conference

    SciTech Connect

    1980-10-02

    Oregon's geothermal resources represent a large portion of the nation's total geothermal potential. The State's resources are substantial in size, widespread in location, and presently in various stages of discovery and utilization. The exploration for, and development of, geothermal is presently dependent upon a mixture of engineering, economic, environmental, and legal factors. In response to the State's significant geothermal energy potential, and the emerging impediments and incentives for its development, the State of Oregon has begun a planning program intended to accelerate the environmentally prudent utilization of geothermal, while conserving the resource's long-term productivity. The program, which is based upon preliminary work performed by the Oregon Institute of Technology's Geo-Heat Center, will be managed by the Oregon Department of Energy, with the assistance of the Departments of Economic Development, Geology and Mineral Industries, and Water Resources. Funding support for the program is being provided by the US Department of Energy. The first six-month phase of the program, beginning in July 1980, will include the following five primary tasks: (1) coordination of state and local agency projects and information, in order to keep geothermal personnel abreast of the rapidly expanding resource literature, resource discoveries, technological advances, and each agency's projects. (2) Analysis of resource commercialization impediments and recommendations of incentives for accelerating resource utilization. (3) Compilation and dissemination of Oregon geothermal information, in order to create public and potential user awareness, and to publicize technical assistance programs and financial incentives. (4) Resource planning assistance for local governments in order to create local expertise and action; including a statewide workshop for local officials, and the formulation of two specific community resource development plans. (5) Formulation and

  15. Lee v. State of Oregon.

    PubMed

    1995-08-01

    The U.S. District Court for the District of Oregon found unconstitutional the Oregon Death with Dignity Act, which allows a terminally ill patient to obtain a doctor's prescription for a fatal drug dosage in order to commit suicide. The court held that the state law, which classified competent terminally ill patients as a group and established procedures for them to opt for assisted suicide, was not rationally related to any legitimate state interest for purposes of the equal protection clause of the Fourteenth Ammendment. The law did not ensure rational and voluntary decision making by the terminally ill. PMID:11648436

  16. Stabilizing coal-water mixtures with portland cement

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.; Krishna, C.R.

    1986-07-29

    A coal-water mix is described for use as a fossil fuel containing up to 70% by weight coal particles, based on the total weight of the mix, stabilized by the presence in the mix of up to 15% by weight, based on the weight of the coal, of portland cement, the portland cement stabilizing the mix by greatly extending the time that the coal particles remain in suspension, thus eliminating problems of transporting and storing the mix which result when the coal particles come out of suspension.

  17. Is Oregon's Future at Risk? A Profile of Oregon's Youth...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Human Resources, Salem.

    This publication focuses on the youth-at-risk problems of young people who are not successfully making the transition to adulthood in Oregon. It provides information needed by the state's educational, government, and religious leaders, as well as parents, employers, and youth. In 26 tables and graphs, the report provides information on population,…

  18. 76 FR 28315 - Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River AGENCY... Portland Rose Festival Security Zone in 33 CFR 165.1312 from 11 a.m. on June 8, 2011 until 11 a.m. on June... vessels present, on the Willamette River during the Portland Rose festival. During the enforcement...

  19. 40 CFR 81.51 - Portland Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Portland Interstate Air Quality...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.51 Portland Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Portland...

  20. 40 CFR 81.51 - Portland Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Portland Interstate Air Quality...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.51 Portland Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Portland...

  1. Appraisal of storm-water quality near Salem, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, T.L.

    1987-01-01

    Stormwater runoff for the period December 1979 to May 1981, at 13 sites (12 basins) in the vicinity of Salem, Oregon, was sampled and analyzed for water quality. Constituent concentrations for urban storm water were relatively small when compared to samples from Portland and Medford, Oregon and to samples from Denver, Colorado. The data indicated that levels of suspended sediment, ultimate CBOD (carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand), and total lead increased with increased urbanization. Much of the suspended sediment and related turbidity result from transport of basin soils rather than from the wash-off of dry fallout solids from impervious areas. Because of small chemical concentrations and winter high flow and low temperature conditions in the Willamette River, Salem storm water probably has little effect on biological or on most chemical conditions in the Willamette River. An analysis of data from a stormwater detention pond (originally designed to reduce peak flows) indicated that the facility was about 47% efficient in reducing suspended sediment loads. The facility also reduced such sediment-related constituent loads as total lead and total phosphorus. Total Kjeldahl nitrogen and ultimate CBOD loads that are transported mostly in the dissolved phase were not measurably affected by the detention pond. Precipitation samples collected at one site for a year were found to be acidic, with a median pH of 4.6. Median total lead concentration was 8 micrograms/L (ug/L) in precipitation, whereas the median total lead concentration in runoff from the 12 basins ranged from 8 to 110 ug/L. The median dissolved ammonia concentration in precipitation was larger than the median dissolved ammonia concentration at all 13 sites. In contrast, the median total Kjeldahl nitrogen concentration in precipitation samples was about half the median for streamwater concentrations. Median ratios of sulfate to chloride and nitrate to chloride in precipitation were much higher than ratios

  2. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 85-309-1739, Oregon Department of Human Resources, Health Division, Gypsy Moth Control Project, Eugene, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, L.J.; Huemann, M.; Sokolow, R.; Elefant, S.

    1986-10-01

    Evaluation of occupational and general public exposure to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) during application of this microbial agent for control of the gypsy moth was requested by the Oregon State Department of Human Resources, Health Division, located in Portland. Bt was applied by helicopter on about 250,000 acres of forest, rural, and urban areas in 1985 and 1986. Project operational plans, accident prevention, safety plans, personal protective-equipment usage, and work practices were reviewed and evaluated. Personal exposure and area air monitoring for Bt was carried out during application. Air sampling indicated there was a widespread exposure potential. The author recommends that care be taken by those employees handling Bt in solution and that splashing of Bt to the eye be avoided due to possible corneal ulcer development. The dispersing-agent Plyac is recommended for use in handling the waste-disposal problem. Access to the mixing and application areas should be restricted.

  3. Cascade Mtns. Oregon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The ground near one of the long-dormant Three Sisters volcanoes in the Cascade Mountains of west-central Oregon has risen approximately 10centimeters in a 10-by-20-km parcel since 1996, meaning that magma or underground lava is slowly flowing into the area, according to a research team from the U.S. Geological Survey. The Three Sisters area -- which contains five volcanoes -- is only about 170 miles from Mount St. Helens, which erupted in 1980. Both are part of the Cascades Range, a line of 27volcanoes stretching from British Columbia in Canada to northern California. This perspective view was created by draping a simulated natural color ASTER image over digital topography from the U.S. Geological Survey National Elevation Dataset.

    This image was acquired on May 28, 2000 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, along-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical

  4. 76 FR 81475 - Foreign-Trade Zone 45-Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-28

    ... plant (16.6 acres) located at 3950 NW Aloclek Place, Hillsboro, Oregon (Board Order 1406, 70 FR 55106, 9... hydroxide, surfactants, 1,2 hexanediol, Tri-isoproanolamine, solvents, glycerin, triethylene...

  5. Life on the Oregon Trail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middle Level Learning: Teaching and Learning Social Studies in the Middle Grades, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This supplement to "Social Education" and "Social Studies & the Young Learner" seeks to support creative and rigorous social studies teaching in middle schools. The articles show how students can revisit the Oregon Trail through the diaries of children, learn about the five themes of geography (location, place, human/environment interaction,…

  6. MAP OF ECOREGIONS OF OREGON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ecoregions of Oregon have been identified, mapped, and described and provide a geographic structure for environmental resources research, assessment, monitoring, and management. This project is part of a larger effort by the U.S. EPA to create a national, hierarchical ecoregi...

  7. Oregon Schools Begin Inspection, Cleanup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, James F.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the need for environmental health inspections in schools. Reports on the results of a survey of Clackamas County (Oregon) school kitchens, in relation to a high incidence of hepatitis A. Describes the variety of violations found and urges that schools no longer be exempt from state health division regulations. (TW)

  8. Oregon Agriculture I Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Univ., Corvallis. Dept. of Agricultural Education.

    This curriculum package was developed to be used as a guide for high school vocational agriculture teachers in Oregon preparing a curriculum to meet local community/regional needs. A second goal of this curriculum is to eliminate sex-bias or sex-role stereotyping in vocational agriculture classes. The curriculum contains 20 units. Topics covered…

  9. Record Conversion at Oregon State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Deane

    1985-01-01

    Describes the conversion of card catalog records at William Jasper Kerr Library, Oregon State University, to an online system. Discussion covers the use of OCLC and student assistants, procedures and specifications, and problems associated with massive retrospective conversion needs and uncertain budget allocations. Eight sources are recommended.…

  10. Westward Expansion: The Oregon Trail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salisbury, James F.

    This 8-week interdisciplinary unit for fourth- and fifth-grade students helps children address the U.S. westward expansion in the 1840's using the interactive software program, The Oregon Trail. The unit provides connections to literature, geography, computer/mathematics skills, language arts, and research skills. The work is done in cooperative…

  11. 90. PORTLAND FILTER FLOOR FROM SOUTHEAST. CYANIDE FEED TOWER TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    90. PORTLAND FILTER FLOOR FROM SOUTHEAST. CYANIDE FEED TOWER TO SUMP, LOWER RIGHT QUADRANT. DIAGONAL PIPE IN UPPER RIGHT IS AIR LINE TO AGITATORS. LAUNDER PARALLEL TO LEFT EDGE (FILLED WITH DEBRIS) RUNS FROM PRIMARY THICKENER No. 2 TO GOLD TANK No. 2. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  12. 169. PORTLAND FILTER FLOOR FROM SOUTHEAST. CYANIDE FEED TOWER TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    169. PORTLAND FILTER FLOOR FROM SOUTHEAST. CYANIDE FEED TOWER TO SUMP, LOWER RIGHT QUADRANT. DIAGONAL PIPE IN UPPER RIGHT IS AIR LINE TO AGITATORS. LAUNDER PARALLEL TO LEFT EDGE (FILLED WITH DEBRIS) RUNS FROM PRIMARY THICKENER No. 2 TO GOLD TANK No. 2 - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  13. Portland Public Schools Project Chrysalis: Year 2 Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Stephanie J.; Gabriel, Roy M.; Hahn, Karen J.; Laws, Katherine E.

    In 1994, the Chrysalis Project in Portland Public Schools received funding to prevent or delay the onset of substance abuse among a special target population: high-risk, female adolescents with a history of childhood abuse. Findings from the evaluation of the project's second year of providing assistance to these students are reported here. During…

  14. 75 FR 39197 - Safety Zone; Fireworks Display, Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may... is a safety zone: All waters of the Willamette River bounded by the Hawthorne Bridge to the north... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Fireworks Display, Portland, OR...

  15. 77 FR 29897 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Willamette River, Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-21

    ... efficient movement of light rail and roadway traffic associated with the Starlight Parade in Portland... of the Steel Bridge remain closed to vessel traffic to facilitate safe efficient movement of light rail and roadway traffic associated with the Starlight Parade. The Steel Bridge crosses the...

  16. Bed Mobility on the Deschutes River, Oregon: Tracer Gravel Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondolf, G. M.; Williams, J.

    2003-12-01

    The Deschutes River, drainage area 20,250 km2 near Madras, Oregon, is a gravel-bedded river, impounded since 1957 by three dams in the Pelton-Round Butte hydroelectric project, operated by Portland General Electric (PGE). Salmon spawning has declined in the reach below the dams since their construction, so possible project effects on spawning habitat are an issue of concern in relicensing of the project. Consultants to PGE applied the Parker bedload transport function to several sites below the hydroelectric dams; they concluded that the entrainment threshold flow was 340 m3s-1, and that the bed had been mobile only 25 days in the 72-year period of record from 1925-1996. However, their model was not calibrated with any actual field data of bed mobility or bedload transport, and the calculations were for full bed mobility, ignoring potentially significant bedload transport that might occur at a condition of partial mobility. To redress that lack of field data, we placed tracer gravels in the bed at three sites below the dams. In 2002 tracer gravels moved at one of the three sites after a flow of 150 m3s-1 (128-mm stones moved up to 1 m). The minor movement suggests that the bed is just beginning to move at 150 m3s-1, but indicates that the previously assumed entrainment threshold of 340 m3s-1 is too high.

  17. 77 FR 17409 - Foreign-Trade Zone 45-Portland, OR Expansion of Manufacturing Authority Epson Portland, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-26

    ...-2011, 76 FR 81475-81476, 12/ 28/2011). Section 400.32(b)(1) of the FTZ Board's regulations (15 CFR part... CFR 146.42), will continue to be reviewed and processed under FTZ Docket 7-2012 (77 FR 4006, 1/26/2012... Portland, Inc. (Inkjet Ink); Notice of Approval of Restricted Authority On December 22, 2011, the Port...

  18. F-region ionospheric perturbations in the low-latitude ionosphere during the geomagnetic storm of 25-27 August 1987

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A.; Fukao, S.; Kawamura, S.

    2004-10-01

    We have presented a comparison between the modeled NmF2 and hmF2, and NmF2 and hmF2 which were observed at the equatorial anomaly crest and close to the geomagnetic equator simultaneously by the Akita, Kokubunji, Yamagawa, Okinawa, Manila, Vanimo, and Darwin ionospheric sounders and by the middle and upper atmosphere (MU) radar (34.85° N, 136.10° E) during the 25-27 August 1987 geomagnetically storm-time period at low solar activity near 201°, geomagnetic longitude. A comparison between the electron and ion temperatures measured by the MU radar and those produced by the model of the ionosphere and plasmasphere is presented. The corrections of the storm-time zonal electric field, EΛ, from 16:30 UT to 21:00 UT on 25 August bring the modeled and measured hmF2 into reasonable agreement. In both hemispheres, the meridional neutral wind, W, taken from the HWW90 wind model and the NRLMSISE-00 neutral temperature, Tn, and densities are corrected so that the model results agree with the ionospheric sounders and MU radar observations. The geomagnetic latitude variations in NmF2 on 26 August differ significantly from those on 25 and 27 August. The equatorial plasma fountain undergoes significant inhibition on 26 August. This suppression of the equatorial anomaly on 26 August is not due to a reduction in the meridional component of the plasma drift perpendicular to the geomagnetic field direction, but is due to the action of storm-time changes in neutral winds and densities on the plasma fountain process. The asymmetry in W determines most of the north-south asymmetry in hmF2 and NmF2 on 25 and 27 August between about 01:00-01:30 UT and about 14:00 UT when the equatorial anomaly exists in the ionosphere, while asymmetries in W, Tn, and neutral densities relative to the geomagnetic equator are responsible for the north-south asymmetry in NmF2 and hmF2 on 26 August. A theory of the primary mechanisms causing the morning and evening peaks in the electron temperature, Te, is

  19. Tsunami Preparedness in Oregon (video)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Filmed and edited by: Loeffler, Kurt; Gesell, Justine

    2010-01-01

    Tsunamis are a constant threat to the coasts of our world. Although tsunamis are infrequent along the West coast of the United States, it is possible and necessary to prepare for potential tsunami hazards to minimize loss of life and property. Community awareness programs are important, as they strive to create an informed society by providing education and training. This video about tsunami preparedness in Oregon distinguishes between a local tsunami and a distant event and focus on the specific needs of this region. It offers guidelines for correct tsunami response and community preparedness from local emergency managers, first-responders, and leading experts on tsunami hazards and warnings, who have been working on ways of making the tsunami affected regions safer for the people and communities on a long-term basis. This video was produced by the US Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI).

  20. MOUNT JEFFERSON PRIMITIVE AREA, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, George W.; Pattee, Eldon C.

    1984-01-01

    Mineral and reconnaissance geothermal surveys of the Mount Jefferson Primitive Area in the Cascade Range of Oregon indicate little likelihood that metallic or nonmetallic mineral or energy resources exist in the area. Several mining claims, presumably located for gold, are present, but analyses of samples from the claims failed to detect the presence of gold or other valuable metals. Rock for construction purposes is abundantly present, but better and more accessible deposits are available in adjacent areas.

  1. PINE CREEK ROADLESS AREA, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, George W.; Denton, David K., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Examination of the Pine Creek Roadless Area, Oregon indicates that there is little likelihood for the occurrence of energy or metallic mineral resources in the area. No mines or mineral prospects were identified during the investigation. Although nearby parts of Harney Basin are characterized by higher than normal heat flow, indicating that the region as a whole may have some as yet undefined potential for the occurrence of the geothermal energy resources, no potential for this resource was identified in the roadless area.

  2. Lee v. State of Oregon.

    PubMed

    Devlin, M M

    1996-01-01

    HELD: Oregon's Death with Dignity Act, Measure 16, which legalizes physician-assisted suicide for certain terminally ill persons, violates the equal protection clause of the fourteenth amendment to the United States Constitution. Measure 16 fails to withstand even the lowest level of judicial scrutiny because the disparate treatment afforded the class of terminally ill persons does not further any legitimate state interest. PMID:8934861

  3. Arsenic levels in Oregon waters.

    PubMed Central

    Stoner, J C; Whanger, P D; Weswig, P H

    1977-01-01

    The arsenic content of well water in certain areas of Oregon can range up to 30 to 40 times the U.S.P.H.S. Drinking Water Standard of 1962, where concentrations in excess of 50 ppb are grounds for rejection. The elevated arsenic levels in water are postulated to be due to volcanic deposits. Wells in central Lane County, Oregon, that are known to contain arsenic rich water are in an area underlain by a particular group of sedimentary and volcanic rocks, which geologists have named the Fischer formation. The arsenic levels in water from wells ranged from no detectable amounts to 2,000 ppb. In general the deeper wells contained higher arsenic water. The high arsenic waters are characterized by the small amounts of calcium and magnesium in relation to that of sodium, a high content of boron, and a high pH. Water from some hot springs in other areas of Oregon was found to range as high as 900 ppb arsenic. Arsenic blood levels ranged from 32 ppb for people living in areas where water is low in arsenic to 250 ppb for those living in areas where water is known to contain high levels of arsenic. Some health problems associated with consumption of arsenic-rich water are discussed. PMID:908291

  4. Evaluation of Fish Passage Conditions for Juvenile Salmonids Using Sensor Fish at Detroit Dam, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, Joanne P.

    2010-01-29

    Fish passage conditions through two spillways at Detroit Dam on the North Santiam River in Oregon were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objective of the study was to describe and compare passage exposure conditions through Spillbay 3 and Spillbay 6 at 1.5- and 3.5-ft gate openings, identifying potential fish injury regions of the routes. The study was performed in July 2009, concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish and live fish were deployed at elevations approximately 3 ft above structure at depths determined using a computational fluid dynamics model. Data collected were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe collision and shear events by passage route sub-regions; 2) differences in passage conditions between passage routes; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates.

  5. Lifelines and Earthquake Hazards in the Interstate 5 Urban Corridor: Cottage Grove to Woodburn, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnett, E.A.; Weaver, C.S.; Meagher, K.L.; Wang, Z.; Madin, I.P.; Wang, M.; Haugerud, R.A.; Wells, R.E.; Ballantyne, D.B.; Darienzo, M.; Southern Willamette Valley Working Group

    2004-01-01

    The Interstate 5 highway corridor, stretching from Mexico to Canada, is not only the economic artery of the Pacific Northwest, but is also home to the majority of Oregonians and Washingtonians. Accordingly, most regional utility and transportation systems, such as railroads and electrical transmission lines, have major components in the I-5 corridor. The section of I-5 from Cottage Grove, Oregon, to Blaine, Washington, is rapidly urbanizing, with population growth and economic development centered around the cities of Eugene, Salem, Portland, Olympia, Tacoma, Seattle, Everett, and Bellingham. For the purposes of this map, we refer to this area as the I-5 Urban Corridor. This publicaton consists of two large sheets: A map and a text-and-figures poster.

  6. City of Portland: Businesses for an environmentally sustainable tomorrow

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    The sustainable business development program in Portland (OR) is known as BEST. BEST stands for Businesses for an Environmentally Sustainable Tomorrow. The Portland Energy Office operates BEST as a {open_quotes}one-stop service center{close_quotes} for business owners and managers. BEST provides information and assistance on resource efficient buildings and business practices. The results of BEST`s two years of operation have been generally impressive. Nearly 150 new or expanding businesses have been connected with utility design assistance programs. Businesses have also received assistance with water conservation, telecommuting, construction debris recycling, and alternative fuel vehicles. BEST has received local and national publicity and BEST services have been the topic at more than a dozen conferences, meetings, or other speaking engagements. A guidebook for communities wishing to start a similar program will be available in early 1996.

  7. Utilization of gold tailings as an additive in Portland cement.

    PubMed

    Celik, Ozlem; Elbeyli, Iffet Yakar; Piskin, Sabriye

    2006-06-01

    Mine tailings are formed as an industrial waste during coal and ore mining and processing. In the investigated process, following the extraction of gold from the ore, the remaining tailings are subjected to a two-stage chemical treatment in order to destroy the free cyanide and to stabilize and coagulate heavy metals prior to discharge into the tailings pond. The aim of this study was the investigation of the feasibility of utilization of the tailings as an additive material in Portland cement production. For this purpose, the effects of the tailings on the compressive strength properties of the ordinary Portland cement were investigated. Chemical and physical properties, mineralogical composition, particle size distribution and microstructure of the tailings were determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), particle size analyzer (Mastersizer) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Following the characterization of the tailings, cement mortars were prepared by intergrinding Portland cement with dried tailings. Composition of the cement clinkers were adjusted to contain 5, 15, 25% (wt/wt) dried tailings and also silica fume and fly ash samples (C and F type) were added to clinker in different ratios. The mortars produced with different amounts of tailings, silica fume, fly ashes and also mixtures of them were tested for compressive strength values after 2, 7, 28 and 56 days according to the European Standard (EN 196-1). The results indicated that gold tailings up to 25% in clinker could be beneficially used as an additive in Portland cement production. It is suggested that the gold tailings used in the cement are blended with silica fume and C-type fly ash to obtain higher compressive strength values. PMID:16784164

  8. Tectonic evolution of the Tualatin basin, northwest Oregon, as revealed by inversion of gravity data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McPhee, Darcy K.; Langenheim, Victoria E.; Wells, Ray; Blakely, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    The Tualatin basin, west of Portland (Oregon, USA), coincides with a 110 mGal gravity low along the Puget-Willamette lowland. New gravity measurements (n = 3000) reveal a three-dimensional (3-D) subsurface geometry suggesting early development as a fault-bounded pull-apart basin. A strong northwest-trending gravity gradient coincides with the Gales Creek fault, which forms the southwestern boundary of the Tualatin basin. Faults along the northeastern margin in the Portland Hills and the northeast-trending Sherwood fault along the southeastern basin margin are also associated with gravity gradients, but of smaller magnitude. The gravity low reflects the large density contrast between basin fill and the mafic crust of the Siletz terrane composing basement. Inversions of gravity data indicate that the Tualatin basin is ∼6 km deep, therefore 6 times deeper than the 1 km maximum depth of the Miocene Columba River Basalt Group (CRBG) in the basin, implying that the basin contains several kilometers of low-density pre-CRBG sediments and so formed primarily before the 15 Ma emplacement of the CRBG. The shape of the basin and the location of parallel, linear basin-bounding faults along the southwest and northeast margins suggest that the Tualatin basin originated as a pull-apart rhombochasm. Pre-CRBG extension in the Tualatin basin is consistent with an episode of late Eocene extension documented elsewhere in the Coast Ranges. The present fold and thrust geometry of the Tualatin basin, the result of Neogene compression, is superimposed on the ancestral pull-apart basin. The present 3-D basin geometry may imply stronger ground shaking along basin edges, particularly along the concealed northeast edge of the Tualatin basin beneath the greater Portland area.

  9. The Oregon Career and Technical Education Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Steven; Richards, Amanda

    2008-01-01

    Oregon educators, policymakers, and business people are working together to increase the number and quality of Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs in secondary and postsecondary institutions. CTE is an integral component of Oregon's education and workforce development system and prepares students for careers in areas ranging from the…

  10. 21 CFR 808.87 - Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oregon. 808.87 Section 808.87 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EXEMPTIONS FROM FEDERAL PREEMPTION OF STATE AND LOCAL MEDICAL DEVICE REQUIREMENTS Listing of Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.87 Oregon. (a)...

  11. On the Oregon Trail. [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    In this lesson, students work with primary documents and latter-day photographs to recapture the experience of traveling on the Oregon Trail. The learning objectives of the lesson are: (1) to learn about the pioneer experience on the Oregon Trail; (2) to evaluate a historical re-enactment in light of documentary evidence; and (3) to synthesize…

  12. Endangered Plants in Oregon and Washington.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Rhoda M.

    1985-01-01

    Presents a partial list of the 132 Oregon and Washington plants which have been proposed for federal protection under the Endangered Species Act. Suggestions for student/citizen involvement in preserving these species and a description of a videotape about rare/endangered species of the Willamette Valley (Oregon) are included. (DH)

  13. Oregon University System Fact Book 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon University System, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This compendium of narrative and statistical information is an overview of the Oregon University System (OUS) and is the last Fact Book published under the auspices of the Oregon University System. The introduction includes a mission statement, a listing of OUS campuses and centers, a roster of the members of the State Board of Higher Education,…

  14. Steller Cove. Oregon Zoo Teacher Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Kristin

    The goal of this teacher guide is to promote education by providing resources and information to aid classroom teachers in using the Oregon Zoo as an educational setting. The unit also emphasizes the integration of science, mathematics, reading, writing, speaking, and problem solving. It is designed for grades 3-5 and is based on the Oregon State…

  15. Oregon School Bond Manual. Sixth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem. Office of School District Services.

    Given that purchasers of Oregon school bonds rely on recommendations of accredited bond attorneys, this document is designed to assist school districts in complying with state statutes regulating the issuance of school bond issues in order that attorney opinions may be favorable. Six initial steps toward a bond sale and Oregon laws regarding bonds…

  16. Oregon Migrant Health Project, 1970 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Board of Health, Portland.

    The 1970 annual report on the Oregon Migrant Health Project discusses health services for migrant agricultural workers and their families (approximately 30,000 individuals) who worked and lived temporarily in various Oregon counties. As noted, some 9,000 of the 30,000 migrants were estimated to be in need of some type of medical service. Thus, the…

  17. 50 CFR 32.56 - Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Oregon. 32.56 Section 32.56 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM HUNTING AND FISHING Refuge-Specific Regulations for Hunting and Fishing § 32.56 Oregon. The following refuge units have...

  18. 50 CFR 32.56 - Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Oregon. 32.56 Section 32.56 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM HUNTING AND FISHING Refuge-Specific Regulations for Hunting and Fishing § 32.56 Oregon. The following refuge units have...

  19. Oregon Migrant Health Project, 1971 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Board of Health, Portland.

    In its 9th year of providing migrant health services through a U.S. Public Health Service Continuing Migrant Health Act grant, this Oregon Migrant Health Project annual report is concerned with (1) the health services provided during the 1970-71 harvest season through a contractual arrangement between the Oregon State Health Division and 10 county…

  20. Directory and Statistics of Oregon Libraries 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheppke, Jim, Comp.; And Others.

    This directory and statistical information report provides data on 217 public libraries in Oregon, 64 academic libraries, and 172 special libraries within the state, as well as information on the Oregon State Library profiling each library within its appropriate type. Each of the four sections provides directory information (e..g, the library's…

  1. Dissolved Oxygen Data for Coos Estuary (Oregon)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this product is the transmittal of dissolved oxygen data collected in the Coos Estuary, Oregon to Ms. Molly O'Neill (University of Oregon), for use in her studies on the factors influencing spatial and temporal patterns in dissolved oxygen in this estuary. These d...

  2. Oregon Community College 2001-2002 Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon Dept. of Community Colleges and Workforce Development, Salem.

    This document provides numerous tables and graphs illustrating information regarding Oregon community colleges. The four sections of this 2001/2002 Oregon Community College Profile provide information on: (1) students; (2) faculty and staff; (3) finances; and (4) programs and services. The information regarding the student section summarizes…

  3. Ordering Chaos: Eva Miller--Multnomah County Library, Portland, OR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Eva Miller has a knack for creating order out of disorder. She single-handedly brought Oregon's virtual reference service, Answerland, live in just under 90 days, says Rivkah Sass, now director of the Omaha Public Library. Miller created its web site, designed the graphics, developed marketing materials, and recruited and trained librarians--all…

  4. Landslide assessment of Newell Creek Canyon, Oregon City, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Growney, L.; Burris, L.; Garletts, D.; Walsh, K. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    A study has been conducted in Newell Creek Canyon near Oregon City, Oregon, T3S, T2S, R2E. A landslide inventory has located 53 landslides in the 2.8 km[sup 2] area. The landslides range in area from approximately 15,000m[sup 2] to 10m[sup 2]. Past slides cover an approximate 7% of the canyon area. Landslide processes include: slump, slump-translational, slump-earthflow and earthflow. Hard, impermeable clay-rich layers in the Troutdale Formation form the failure planes for most of the slides. Slopes composed of Troutdale material may seem to be stable, but when cuts and fills are produced, slope failure is common because of the perched water tables and impermeable failure planes. Good examples of cut and fill failures are present on Highway 213 which passes through Newell Creek Canyon. Almost every cut and fill has failed since the road construction began. The latest failure is in the fill located at mile-post 2.1. From data gathered, a slope stability risk map was generated. Stability risk ratings are divided into three groups: high, moderate and low. High risk of slope instability is designated to all landslides mapped in the slide inventory. Moderate risk is designated to slopes in the Troutdale Formation greater than 8[degree]. Low risk is designated to slopes in the Troutdale Formation less than 8[degree].

  5. DESCHUTES CANYON ROADLESS AREA, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, George W.; Winters, Richard A.

    1984-01-01

    An examination of the Deschutes Canyon Roadless Area, Oregon indicated that the area is devoid of mines and active mineral prospects or claims and that there is little likelihood for the occurrence of metallic or nonmetallic mineral resources. There is no evidence to indicate that mineral fuels are present in the roadless area. Nearby parts of central Jefferson County on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation are characterized by higher-than-normal heat flow and by numerous thermal springs, some of which have been partly developed. This may indicate that the region has some as yet undefined potential for the development of geothermal energy.

  6. Portland cement: A solidification agent for low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.

    1991-10-01

    This bulletin discusses the solidification of waste streams using portland-type cement to provide the structural stability required by 10 CFR 61. Portland cement has been used in this role since early in the commercial nuclear program as a simple and inexpensive solidification medium for immobilization of radioactive wastes. Through the use of additives, most waste streams can be satisfactorily immobilized with portland cement. However, some problem waste streams can not be solidified with portland cement at this time, and those are discussed in this document.

  7. LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE OF EPA-CERTIFIED PHASE 2 WOODSTOVES, KLAMATH FALLS AND PORTLAND, OREGON: 1998/1999

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of the condition and air emissions from old, phase-2-certified wood heaters installed in homes and used regularly for hoe heating since the 1992/1993 heating season or earlier. (NOTE: Wood stoves have been identified as a major source of ...

  8. Creative Responses to Changing Realities: A Conference for Northwest Postsecondary and Higher Education (Portland, Oregon, November 3-5, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Highline Community Coll., Midway, WA. Northwest Program Development and Coordination Center.

    Proceedings of the 1981 Creative Responses Conference, which explored approaches to the rapidly changing realities of postsecondary and higher education, are presented. The following major addresses and authors are included: "Hard Times: Constraints or Opportunities," Dale Parnell; "Leadership in the Challenge of Global Competition," George B.…

  9. National College Physical Education Association for Men. Proceedings of Annual Meeting (74th, Portland, Oregon, December 27-30, 1970).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, C. E., Ed.

    In addition to the special addresses, the proceedings contain speeches on (1) research, (2) international relations, (3) intercollegiate athletics, (4) the history of sport, (5) teacher education, (6) basic instruction, and (7) intramural athletics. In the area of research, papers on philosophical, experimental, sociological, and historical…

  10. Using Data and Information Systems to Support School Improvement and Accountability. Conference Proceedings (Portland, Oregon, October 31-November 1, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR. Assessment and Evaluation Program.

    This report comprises edited versions of the presentations from the 17 participants in a conference under the sponsoreship of the Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory. The conference was designed to enable policy-makers, educators, and business people to share perspectives on the most effective methods for identifying and collecting data that…

  11. Indian Health Service Mental Health Program Review Plenary Session (Portland, Oregon, January 17-19, 1984). Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Listening Post, 1984

    1984-01-01

    This special edition summarizes the discussions which proceeded during the Indian Health Service (IHS) Mental Health Plenary Session. Following introductory comments by four session participants are seven discussion topics: mental health status of American Indians and Alaska Natives; history and description of the program; services for children…

  12. The Challenge of Change. Annual National SOICC Conference Summary (10th, Portland, Oregon, July 27-30, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Occupational Information Coordinating Committee (DOL/ETA), Washington, DC.

    This document contains summaries of 43 presentations given at the state Occupational Information Coordinating Committee (SOICC) conference: "DoD Career Information Resources" (Wright, Sellman); "Public Relations in a Changing Political Environment: Strategies for SOICCs" (Walker); "Updating Career Exploration and Educational Planning"…

  13. Seaside, Oregon Tsunami Pilot Study - modernization of FEMA flood hazard maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tsunami Pilot Study Working Group

    2006-01-01

    FEMA Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) guidelines do not currently exist for conducting and incorporating tsunami hazard assessments that reflect the substantial advances in tsunami research achieved in the last two decades; this conclusion is the result of two FEMA-sponsored workshops and the associated Tsunami Focused Study. Therefore, as part of FEMA's Map Modernization Program, a Tsunami Pilot Study was carried out in the Seaside/Gearhart, Oregon, area to develop an improved Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Assessment (PTHA) methodology and to provide recommendations for improved tsunami hazard assessment guidelines. The Seaside area was chosen because it is typical of many coastal communities in the section of the Pacific Coast from Cape Mendocino to the Strait of Juan de Fuca, and because State Agencies and local stakeholders expressed considerable interest in mapping the tsunami threat to this area. The study was an interagency effort by FEMA, U.S. Geological Survey and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, in collaboration with the University of Southern California, Middle East Technical University. Portland State University, Horning Geosciences, Northwest Hydraulics Consultants, and the Oregon Department of Geological and Mineral Industries. Draft copies and a briefing on the contents, results and recommendations of this document were provided to FEMA officials before final publication.

  14. GIS data for the Seaside, Oregon, Tsunami Pilot Study to modernize FEMA flood hazard maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wong, Florence L.; Venturato, Angie J.; Geist, Eric L.

    2007-01-01

    A Tsunami Pilot Study was conducted for the area surrounding the coastal town of Seaside, Oregon, as part of the Federal Emergency Management's (FEMA) Flood Insurance Rate Map Modernization Program (Tsunami Pilot Study Working Group, 2006). The Cascadia subduction zone extends from Cape Mendocino, California, to Vancouver Island, Canada. The Seaside area was chosen because it is typical of many coastal communities subject to tsunamis generated by far- and near-field (Cascadia) earthquakes. Two goals of the pilot study were to develop probabilistic 100-year and 500-year tsunami inundation maps using Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Analysis (PTHA) and to provide recommendations for improving tsunami hazard assessment guidelines for FEMA and state and local agencies. The study was an interagency effort by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Geological Survey, and FEMA, in collaboration with the University of Southern California, Middle East Technical University, Portland State University, Horning Geoscience, Northwest Hydraulics Consultants, and the Oregon Department of Geological and Mineral Industries. The pilot study model data and results are published separately as a geographic information systems (GIS) data report (Wong and others, 2006). The flood maps and GIS data are briefly described here.

  15. Seaside, Oregon, Tsunami Pilot Study-Modernization of FEMA Flood Hazard Maps: GIS Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wong, Florence L.; Venturato, Angie J.; Geist, Eric L.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Federal Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) guidelines do not currently exist for conducting and incorporating tsunami hazard assessments that reflect the substantial advances in tsunami research achieved in the last two decades; this conclusion is the result of two FEMA-sponsored workshops and the associated Tsunami Focused Study (Chowdhury and others, 2005). Therefore, as part of FEMA's Map Modernization Program, a Tsunami Pilot Study was carried out in the Seaside/Gearhart, Oregon, area to develop an improved Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Analysis (PTHA) methodology and to provide recommendations for improved tsunami hazard assessment guidelines (Tsunami Pilot Study Working Group, 2006). The Seaside area was chosen because it is typical of many coastal communities in the section of the Pacific Coast from Cape Mendocino to the Strait of Juan de Fuca, and because State agencies and local stakeholders expressed considerable interest in mapping the tsunami threat to this area. The study was an interagency effort by FEMA, U.S. Geological Survey, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), in collaboration with the University of Southern California, Middle East Technical University, Portland State University, Horning Geoscience, Northwest Hydraulics Consultants, and the Oregon Department of Geological and Mineral Industries. We present the spatial (geographic information system, GIS) data from the pilot study in standard GIS formats and provide files for visualization in Google Earth, a global map viewer.

  16. Synthesis report: D-cracking in portland cement concrete pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S. R.; Olsen, M. P. J.; Dempsey, B. J.

    1980-06-01

    The mechanisms and testing procedures for D-cracking in portland cement concrete pavements are examined. Benefication procedures are also investigated. The three general responses to freezing in the aggregate/paste system include elastic accommodation, high internal pressure, and high external pressure. It is found that the critical aggregate parameters influencing D-cracking are degree of saturation, maximum particle size, permeability, porosity, and pore size distribution. Evaluation of present laboratory testing procedures indicated that the ASTM C666, VPI slow-cool, Mercury Porosimetry, and Iowa Pore Index Tests correlated the best with field performance of concrete with respect to D-cracking.

  17. Predation by Oregon spotted frogs (Rana pretiosa) on Western toads (Bufo boreas) in Oregon, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearl, Christopher A.; Hayes, M.P.

    2002-01-01

    Toads of the genus Bufo co-occur with true frogs (family Ranidae) throughout their North American ranges. Yet, Bufo are rarely reported as prey for ranid frogs, perhaps due to dermal toxins that afford them protection from some predators. We report field observations from four different localities demonstrating that Oregon spotted frogs (Rana pretiosa) readily consume juvenile western toads (Bufo boreas) at breeding sites in Oregon. Unpalatability thought to deter predators of selected taxa and feeding mode may not protect juvenile stages of western toads from adult Oregon spotted frogs. Activity of juvenile western toads can elicit ambush behavior by Oregon spotted frog adults. Our review of published literature suggests that regular consumption of toadlets sets Oregon spotted frogs apart from most North American ranid frogs. Importance of the trophic context of juvenile western toads as a seasonally important resource to Oregon spotted frogs needs critical investigation.

  18. Google Earth Views of Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Analysis Pilot Study, Seaside, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, F. L.; Venturato, A. J.; Geist, E. L.

    2006-12-01

    Virtual globes such as Google Earth provide immediate geographic context for research data for coastal hazard planning. We present Google Earth views of data from a Tsunami Pilot Study conducted within and near Seaside and Gearhart, Oregon, as part of FEMA's Flood Insurance Rate Map Modernization Program (Tsunami Pilot Study Working Group, 2006). Two goals of the pilot study were to develop probabilistic 100- year and 500-year tsunami inundation maps using Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Analysis (PTHA) and to provide recommendations for improved tsunami hazard assessment guidelines. The Seaside area was chosen because it is typical of many coastal communities along the Cascadia subduction zone that extends from Cape Mendocino, California, to the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Washington. State and local stakeholders also expressed considerable interest in mapping the tsunami threat to this area. The study was an interagency effort by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Geological Survey, and FEMA, in collaboration with the University of Southern California, Middle East Technical University, Portland State University, Horning Geoscience, Northwest Hydraulics Consultants, and the Oregon Department of Geological and Mineral Industries. The pilot study report will be augmented by a separate geographic information systems (GIS) data publication that provides model data and results. In addition to traditional GIS data formats, Google Earth kmz files are available to provide rapid visualization of the data against the rich base map provided by the interface. The data include verbal and geologic observations of historic tsunami events, newly constructed DEMs, historic shorelines, earthquake sources, models of tsunami wave heights, and maps of the estimated 100- and 500-year probabilistic floods. Tsunami Pilot Study Working Group, 2006, Seaside, Oregon Tsunami Pilot Study - Modernization of FEMA Flood Hazard Maps: U.S. Geological Survey Open-file Report 2006

  19. Increasing Diversity in the Earth Sciences - Impact of the IDES Program in Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Silva, S. L.; Guerrero, E. F.; Duncan, R. A.; de Silva, L. L.; Eriksson, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    The NSF-OEDG funded Increasing Diversity in the Earth Sciences (IDES) program hosted at Oregon State University targets undergraduate students from diverse backgrounds and diverse ethnicity to engage in research. Partnering with local community colleges, non-traditional students are the hallmark of this program. The IDES program has several components to support the students in the transition from community college to the four-year universities of Oregon State University and Portland State University. Over the four years, the program has adapted while adhering to its primary goals: (1) to increase the number of students from underrepresented groups who prepare for and pursue careers in Earth Science research and education, and (2) to strengthen the understanding of Earth Sciences and their relevance to society among broad and diverse segments of the population. Now in its final year under an extension, 53 participants have participated in the program. An ongoing external evaluation of the program reveals that the various stakeholders consider IDES very successful. Participant surveys and interviews document several impacts: expanded opportunities, making professional contacts, building self-confidence, enhanced ability to be employable, and personal acknowledgement. Research mentors and administrators from partner institutions see positive impacts on the students and on their organizations. Challenges include better communication between the IDES program, mentors, and students. IDES is poised to move forward with its current experiences and successes as a foundation for further funding. IDES-like activities can be funded from private sources and it is a good fit for funding from Research Experiences for Undergraduates at NSF. The new emphasis on education and research at community colleges is an exciting opportunity and Oregon State University has already used aspects of the IDES program in current grant proposals to obtain funds for more undergraduate research.

  20. 77 FR 33267 - Eric Temple-Control Exemption-Portland Vancouver Junction Railroad, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-05

    ... published in the Federal Register (77 FR 10,618). The exemption became effective on March 7, 2012. On April... Surface Transportation Board Eric Temple--Control Exemption--Portland Vancouver Junction Railroad, LLC... verified notice of exemption to acquire direct control of Portland Vancouver Junction Railroad, LLC...

  1. 33 CFR 165.1312 - Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River. 165.1312 Section 165.1312 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.1312 Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River. (a) Location. The following...

  2. 33 CFR 165.1312 - Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River. 165.1312 Section 165.1312 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.1312 Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River. (a) Location. The following...

  3. 33 CFR 165.1312 - Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River. 165.1312 Section 165.1312 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.1312 Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River. (a) Location. The following...

  4. 33 CFR 165.1312 - Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River. 165.1312 Section 165.1312 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.1312 Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River. (a) Location. The following...

  5. 33 CFR 165.1312 - Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River. 165.1312 Section 165.1312 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.1312 Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River. (a) Location. The following...

  6. 76 FR 78240 - Gray Portland Cement and Clinker From Japan: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ... Japan, 56 FR 21658 (May 10, 1991), and Amended Final Determination of Sales at Less Than Fair Value and Antidumping Order: Gray Portland Cement and Clinker From Japan, 60 FR 39150 (August 1, 1995). As a result of... Gray Portland Cement and Clinker From Japan, 76 FR 76760 (December 8, 2011), and USITC Publication...

  7. 76 FR 28318 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From the Portland Cement Manufacturing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ...The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA or Agency) is denying in part and granting in part the petitions to reconsider the final revised National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants emitted by the Portland Cement Industry and the New Source Performance Standards for Portland Cement Plants issued under sections 112(d) and 111(b) of the Clean Air Act, respectively. The EPA is also......

  8. 77 FR 42367 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for the Portland Cement Manufacturing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-18

    ...The EPA is proposing amendments to the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for the Portland cement industry for Portland cement plants issued under sections 112(d) of the Clean Air Act. Specifically, the EPA is proposing to amend the existing and new source standards for particulate matter (PM). The EPA is also proposing amendments with respect to issues on which it......

  9. 77 FR 53880 - Portland General Electric Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Motions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-04

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Portland General Electric Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing... Electric Company. e. Name of Project: Clackamas River Hydroelectric Project. f. Location: On the Oak Grove..., Director of Hydro Licensing and Water Rights, Portland General Electric Company, 121 SW Salmon...

  10. Portland State University's Second (R)evolution: Partnering to Anchor the Institution in Sustainable Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiewel, Wim; Kecskes, Kevin; Martin, Sheila

    2011-01-01

    Portland State University has become internationally known for its whole-university approach to community-university engagement. Many academic leaders from around the world are now drawing on models for engagement that originated at Portland State. As the university takes stock of its successes, of changing economic conditions, and of the…

  11. 40 CFR 81.51 - Portland Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Portland Interstate Air Quality Control Region. 81.51 Section 81.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.51 Portland...

  12. Survey of Youth Needs in Southwest Portland. Research Report No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portland State Univ., OR. School of Urban Affairs.

    This report provides the results of a survey conducted by the Southwest Research Team whose goal was to provide information concerning the issues and concerns of young people in Southwest Portland. The study was part of an attempt to set a foundation for an on-going process of involving Southwest Portland youth in the planning activities of the…

  13. 78 FR 45863 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Willamette River at Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ... bridges: The Broadway Bridge, mile 11.7, the Burnside Bridge, mile 12.4, the Morrison Bridge, mile 12.8, and the Hawthorne Bridge, mile 13.1, all crossing the Willamette River at Portland, OR. This deviation is necessary to accommodate the annual Portland Providence Bridge Pedal event. This deviation...

  14. Lee v. State of Oregon.

    PubMed

    1997-02-27

    The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit ordered the dismissal of a challenge to Oregon's Death with Dignity Act because competent, terminally ill patients, physicians, and nursing homes all lacked standing. None were entitled to a judicial decision because all failed to assert an "injury in fact" resulting from violations against the Equal Protection or Due Process clauses, the Americans with Disabilities Act, or the Rehabilitation Act. The patient's claim of depression to the degree of being unable to make an informed decision about ending her life was too speculative. Nor would the conjectural nature of the claim have changed if it were asserted by either the doctors or the residential care facilities. PMID:11648316

  15. Portland cement gives concrete support to solidification/stabilization technology

    SciTech Connect

    Wilk, C.

    1995-05-01

    One waste-treatment method that advanced in the wake of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act`s land-disposal restrictions--cement-based solidification and stabilization technology--rests on a concrete premise. Calcium hydroxide and calcium silicate hydrate formed during hydration of portland cement have chemical and physical properties that can safely stabilize hazardous compounds and solidify the varied waste forms in which they occur. Due to the complexity of waste streams, cement-based solidification-stabilization offers no single recipe for all wastes and conditions, and its precise chemical reactions have yet to be determined. However, reports from the federal government, waste generators and treaters underscore the utility of portland cement as a reagent for stabilizing and solidifying waste. Like most solidification systems, cement-based treatment economically eliminates free liquids, reduces hazardous constituent mobility by lowering waste permeability, minimizes constituent leachability, and provides physical stability for handling, transport and disposal. Inorganic wastes amenable to cement-based stabilization include: arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, selenium, silver, copper, nickel, and zinc.

  16. Differentiating seawater and groundwater sulfate attack in Portland cement mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Santhanam, Manu . E-mail: manus@iitm.ac.in; Cohen, Menashi; Olek, Jan

    2006-12-15

    The study reported in this article deals with understanding the physical, chemical and microstructural differences in sulfate attack from seawater and groundwater. Portland cement mortars were completely immersed in solutions of seawater and groundwater. Physical properties such as length, mass, and compressive strength were monitored periodically. Thermal analysis was used to study the relative amounts of phases such as ettringite, gypsum, and calcium hydroxide, and microstructural studies were conducted by scanning electron microscopy. Portland cement mortars performed better in seawater solution compared to groundwater solution. The difference in performance could be attributed to the reduction in the quantity of the expansive attack products (gypsum and ettringite). The high Cl concentration of seawater could have played an important role by binding the C{sub 3}A to form chloroaluminate compounds, such as Friedel's salt (detected in the microstructural studies), and also by lowering the expansive potential of ettringite. Furthermore, the thicker layer of brucite forming on the specimens in seawater could have afforded better protection against ingress of the solution than in groundwater.

  17. Characterization of Slag, Fly Ash and Portland Cement for Saltstone

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J

    2006-02-01

    Batch-to-batch variability in the chemical and physical properties of the fly ash, slag and portland cement (binders) will be an ongoing concern over the many years that salt waste from Tank 50 will be processed into grout at the Saltstone Processing Facility. This batch-to-batch variability in the properties of the binder materials translates to variability in the fresh and cured properties of Saltstone. Therefore, it is important to quantify the batch-to-batch variability of the binder materials and the resultant variation in grout properties. This report is the starting point for that process by providing the baseline (reference point) binder properties to which future batches of binder materials can be compared. For this characterization effort, properties of fly ash, slag and portland cement were obtained and documented in this report. These properties included particle size distribution by laser light scattering and dry sieving, particle size and morphology by scanning electron microscopy, true, aerated and tapped densities, chemical composition, rheological properties of the water based slurries made from individual binder material, and volatility through thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis. The properties presented in this report also provide a baseline data set to assist in problem solving efforts when or if unanticipated and/or unwanted processing events occur at the Saltstone Processing Facility.

  18. Oregon Salt Marshes: How Blue are They?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two important ecosystem services of wetlands are carbon sequestration and filtration of nutrients and particulates. We quantified the carbon and nitrogen accumulation rates in salt marshes at 135 plots distributed across eight estuaries located in Oregon, USA. Net carbon and ...

  19. LIVE CERTIFICATION PROGRAM FOR OREGON VINEYARDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA Region 10 has funded the Oregon Winegrape Commission in a project that promotes the LIVE (Low Input Viticulture and Enology) certification program. LIVE is an integrated winegrape production system that promotes ecologically sensible production techniques. For example, cer...

  20. Oregon State University Governmental Impact Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Univ., Corvallis.

    Interactions between the government and Oregon State University were assessed with attention to the following areas: employment and personnel administration (regulations regarding equal opportunity, affirmative action, and nondiscrimination); students and student life (regulations regarding admissions, financial aid, records management, special…

  1. 33 CFR 3.65-15 - Sector Portland Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.65-15 Section 3.65-15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 3.65-15 Sector Portland Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector Portland's office is located in Portland, OR. The boundaries...

  2. Oregon Health Go Local: A Retrospective Look.

    PubMed

    Ford, Emily; Hannon, Todd

    2010-04-01

    MedlinePlus® Go Local is the National Library of Medicine and National Institutes of Health's Internet resource that allows individuals to find health services in their local communities. Oregon Health Go Local recently joined the network of active Go Local projects. This paper describes the planning and development of Oregon Health Go Local, with a discussion of the success and challenges of initiating such a project. Funding, marketing, volunteer coordination, data acquisition, and taxonomy are discussed. PMID:20640231

  3. Oregon Health Go Local: A Retrospective Look

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Emily; Hannon, Todd

    2010-01-01

    MedlinePlus® Go Local is the National Library of Medicine and National Institutes of Health's Internet resource that allows individuals to find health services in their local communities. Oregon Health Go Local recently joined the network of active Go Local projects. This paper describes the planning and development of Oregon Health Go Local, with a discussion of the success and challenges of initiating such a project. Funding, marketing, volunteer coordination, data acquisition, and taxonomy are discussed. PMID:20640231

  4. Low-temperature geothermal database for Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Black, G.

    1994-11-01

    The goals of the low-temperature assessment project, performed by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) is aimed primarily at updating the inventory of the nation's low and moderate temperature geothermal resources. The study has begun in Oregon, where the areas of Paisley, Lakeview, Burns/Hines, Lagrande, and Vale were identified over 40 sites as having potential for direct heat utilization. Specifics sites are outlined, detailing water temperature, flow, and current uses of the sites.

  5. Report of the Cent Gardes HIV Vaccines Conference. Part 1: The antibody response; Fondation Mérieux Conference Center, Veyrier-du-Lac, France, 25-27 October 2015.

    PubMed

    Girard, Marc P; Le-Grand, Roger; Picot, Valentina; Longuet, Christophe; Nabel, Gary J

    2016-06-30

    The 2015 Cent Gardes Conference on HIV vaccines took place on October 25-27 at the Merieux Foundation Conference Center in Veyrier du Lac, near Annecy, France. The meeting reviewed progress in the development of HIV vaccines and identified new directions of future research. The field has advanced incrementally over the past year but major progress will require additional information from new clinical trials. In this article, we review the presentations on humoral immune responses to HIV, and highlight the difficulty of eliciting broadly neutralizing antibodies by vaccination. Advances in cellular immunity for HIV prevention will be reviewed separately, in a following article. PMID:27216761

  6. Physical evaluation of a new pulp capping material developed from portland cement

    PubMed Central

    Negm, Ahmed; Hassanien, Ehab; Abu-Seida, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Background This study examined the effects of addition of 10% and 25% by weight calcium hydroxide on the physicochemical properties of Portland cement associated with 20% bismuth oxide in order to develop a new pulp capping material. Material and Methods The solubility, pH value, setting time, compressive strength, and push out bond strength of modified Portland were evaluated and compared to those of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Portland cement containing 20% bismuth oxide. Results The statistical analysis was performed with ANOVA and Duncan’s post-hoc test. The results show that the strength properties and push out bond strength of Portland cement were adversely affected by addition of calcium hydroxide especially with a ratio of 25 wt%, however, the setting time and pH were not affected. MTA showed a statistically significant lower setting time than other cements (P≤0.001). Portland cement with bismuth oxide and Port Cal I showed a statistically significant higher Push out Bond strength than MTA and Port Cal II (P=0.001). Conclusions Taking the setting time, push out bond strength and pH value into account, addition of 10 wt% calcium hydroxide to Portland cement associated with 20% bismuth oxide produces a new pulp capping material with acceptable physical and adhesive properties. Further studies are recommended to test this cement biologically as a new pulp capping material. Key words:Calcium hydroxide, MTA, Portland cement, setting time, solubility, strength. PMID:27398178

  7. Hydration of Portland cement with additions of calcium sulfoaluminates

    SciTech Connect

    Le Saout, Gwenn; Lothenbach, Barbara; Hori, Akihiro; Higuchi, Takayuki; Winnefeld, Frank

    2013-01-15

    The effect of mineral additions based on calcium aluminates on the hydration mechanism of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) was investigated using isothermal calorimetry, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, solid state nuclear magnetic resonance and pore solution analysis. Results show that the addition of a calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSA) to the OPC does not affect the hydration mechanism of alite but controls the aluminate dissolution. In the second blend investigated, a rapid setting cement, the amorphous calcium aluminate reacts very fast to ettringite. The release of aluminum ions strongly retards the hydration of alite but the C-S-H has a similar composition as in OPC with no additional Al to Si substitution. As in CSA-OPC, the aluminate hydration is controlled by the availability of sulfates. The coupling of thermodynamic modeling with the kinetic equations predicts the amount of hydrates and pore solution compositions as a function of time and validates the model in these systems.

  8. Early hydration of portland cement with crystalline mineral additions

    SciTech Connect

    Rahhal, V. . E-mail: vrahhal@fio.unicen.edu.ar; Talero, R.

    2005-07-01

    This research presents the effects of finely divided crystalline mineral additions (quartz and limestone), commonly known as filler, on the early hydration of portland cements with very different mineralogical composition. The used techniques to study the early hydration of blended cements were conduction calorimeter, hydraulicity (Fratini's test), non-evaporable water and X-ray diffraction. Results showed that the stimulation and the dilution effects increase when the percentage of crystalline mineral additions used is increased. Depending on the replacement proportion, the mineralogical cement composition and the type of crystalline addition, at 2 days, the prevalence of the dilution effect or the stimulation effect shows that crystalline mineral additions could act as sites of heat dissipation or heat stimulation, respectively.

  9. Rapid setting of portland cement by greenhouse carbon dioxide capture

    SciTech Connect

    Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.; Knox, L.J.

    1994-04-01

    Following the work by Berger et al. on rapid setting of calcium silicates by carbonation, a method of high-volume capture of CO{sub 2} in portland cement has been developed. Typically, 10--24 wt. % of CO{sub 2} produced by the calcination of calcium carbonate during clinkering, may be captured, and the set cement acquires most of its full strength in less than a day. The approach will have economic advantages in fabrication of precast structures, in emergency development of infrastructure during natural disasters, and in defense applications. Moreover, it will help the cement industry comply with the Clean Air Act of 1990 by sequestering the greenhouse carbon dioxide.

  10. Symptoms, ventilatory function, and environmental exposures in Portland cement workers.

    PubMed Central

    Abrons, H L; Petersen, M R; Sanderson, W T; Engelberg, A L; Harber, P

    1988-01-01

    Data on respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function were obtained for 2736 Portland cement plant workers and 755 controls. Personal dust samples contained a geometric mean concentration of 0.57 mg/m3 for respirable dust and 2.90 mg/m3 for total dust. Cement workers and controls had similar prevalences of symptoms, except that 5.4% of the cement workers had dyspnoea compared with 2.7% of the controls. The mean pulmonary function indices were similar for the two groups. Among cement plant workers, the prevalence of chronic phlegm increased with tenure whereas the prevalence of wheezing increased with both tenure and current dust level. Other symptoms and pulmonary function indices were not significantly related to exposure. PMID:3260798

  11. Detecting flaws in Portland cement concrete using TEM horn antennae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Qadi, Imad L.; Riad, Sedki M.; Su, Wansheng; Haddad, Rami H.

    1996-11-01

    To understand the dielectric properties of PCC and better correlate them with type and severity of PCC internal defects, a study was conducted to evaluate PCC complex permittivity and magnetic permeability over a wideband of frequencies using both time domain and frequency domain techniques. Three measuring devices were designed and fabricated: a parallel plate capacitor, a coaxial transmission line, and transverse electromagnetic (TEM) horn antennae. The TEM horn antenna covers the microwave frequencies. The measurement technique involves a time domain setup that was verified by a frequency domain measurement. Portland cement concrete slabs, 60 by 75 by 14 cm, were cast; defects include delamination, delamination filled with water, segregation, and chloride contamination. In this paper, measurements using the TEM horn antennae and the feasibility of detecting flaws at microwave frequency are presented.

  12. Klamath Falls geothermal field, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Lienau, P.J.; Culver, G.; Lund, J.W.

    1989-09-01

    Klamath Falls, Oregon, is located in a Known Geothermal Resource Area which has been used by residents, principally to obtain geothermal fluids for space heating, at least since the turn of the century. Over 500 shallow-depth wells ranging from 90 to 2,000 ft (27 to 610 m) in depth are used to heat (35 MWt) over 600 structures. This utilization includes the heating of homes, apartments, schools, commercial buildings, hospital, county jail, YMCA, and swimming pools by individual wells and three district heating systems. Geothermal well temperatures range from 100 to 230{degree}F (38 to 110{degree}C) and the most common practice is to use downhole heat exchangers with city water as the circulating fluid. Larger facilities and district heating systems use lineshaft vertical turbine pumps and plate heat exchangers. Well water chemistry indicates approximately 800 ppM dissolved solids, with sodium sulfate having the highest concentration. Some scaling and corrosion does occur on the downhole heat exchangers (black iron pipe) and on heating systems where the geo-fluid is used directly. 73 refs., 49 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. 36. MYRTLE CREEK BRIDGE, OREGON STATE HIGHWAY 199, AT END ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. MYRTLE CREEK BRIDGE, OREGON STATE HIGHWAY 199, AT END OF STOUT GROVE ROAD. JOSEPHINE COUNTY, OREGON LOOKING WNW. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  14. 71. MYRTLE CREED BRIDGE, OREGON STATE HIGHWAY 199, AT END ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    71. MYRTLE CREED BRIDGE, OREGON STATE HIGHWAY 199, AT END OF STOUT GROVE ROAD. JOSEPHINE COUNTY, OREGON. LOOKING WNW. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  15. 77 FR 54608 - Southeast Oregon Resource Advisory Council (RAC); Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... will be held at the BLM Burns District Office, 28910 Hwy 20 West, in Hines, Oregon 97738. FOR FURTHER..., 28910 Highway 20 West, Hines, Oregon 97738, (541) 573-4519 or email tmartina@blm.gov . Persons who use...

  16. 1. General view of Oregon Electric Railway, view looking north ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. General view of Oregon Electric Railway, view looking north at Hedges Creek trestle. - Oregon Electric Railroad, Hedges Creek Trestle, Garden Home to Wilsonville Segment, Milepost 38.7, Garden Home, Washington County, OR

  17. Potential impact of lava flows on regional water supplies: case study of central Oregon Cascades volcanism and the Willamette Valley, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deligne, Natalia; Cashman, Katharine; Grant, Gordon; Jefferson, Anne

    2013-04-01

    Lava flows are often considered to be natural hazards with localized bimodal impact - they completely destroy everything in their path, but apart from the occasional forest fire, cause little or no damage outside their immediate footprint. However, in certain settings, lava flows can have surprising far reaching impacts with the potential to cause serious problems in distant urban areas. Here we present results from a study of the interaction between lava flows and surface water in the central Oregon Cascades, USA, where we find that lava flows in the High Cascades have the potential to cause considerable water shortages in Eugene, Oregon (Oregon's second largest metropolitan area) and the greater Willamette Valley (home to ~70% of Oregon's population). The High Cascades host a groundwater dominated hydrological regime with water residence times on the order of years. Due to the steady output of groundwater, rivers sourced in the High Cascades are a critical water resource for Oregon, particularly in August and September when it has not rained for several months. One such river, the McKenzie River, is the sole source of drinking water for Eugene, Oregon, and prior to the installation of dams in the 1960s accounted for ~40% of late summer river flow in the Willamette River in Portland, 445 river km downstream of the source of the McKenzie River. The McKenzie River has been dammed at least twice by lava flows during the Holocene; depending the time of year that these eruptions occurred, we project that available water would have decreased by 20% in present-day Eugene, Oregon, for days to weeks at a time. Given the importance of the McKenzie River and its location on the margin of an active volcanic area, we expect that future volcanic eruptions could likewise impact water supplies in Eugene and the greater Willamette Valley. As such, the urban center of Eugene, Oregon, and also the greater Willamette Valley, is vulnerable to the most benign of volcanic hazards, lava

  18. 77 FR 16047 - Oregon; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-19

    ... State of Oregon have been designated as adversely affected by this major disaster: Benton, Columbia... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Oregon; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY... declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oregon (FEMA-4055-DR), dated March 2, 2012, and...

  19. Oregon geology - parent of the soil, foundation for the vine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, Ray

    2006-01-01

    This presentation describes USGS geologic mapping in western Oregon, geologic map products, a thumbnail sketch of geologic history, a discussion of new mapping in progress in northwest Oregon, a tour of northwest Oregon geologic units, their relation to new American Viticultural Areas, and online sources of information.

  20. Oregon School and District Report Card Policy and Technical Manual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The school and district report cards were created by the 1999 Oregon Legislature. The legislation requires that the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) produce and issue a report card to all public schools and districts in the state. The report cards are designed to: (1) Communicate the many good things occurring in Oregon's public schools; (2)…

  1. The existence of amorphous phase in Portland cements: Physical factors affecting Rietveld quantitative phase analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Snellings, Ruben Bazzoni, Amélie Scrivener, Karen

    2014-05-01

    Rietveld quantitative phase analysis has become a widespread tool for the characterization of Portland cement, both for research and production control purposes. One of the major remaining points of debate is whether Portland cements contain amorphous content or not. This paper presents detailed analyses of the amorphous phase contents in a set of commercial Portland cements, clinker, synthetic alite and limestone by Rietveld refinement of X-ray powder diffraction measurements using both external and internal standard methods. A systematic study showed that the sample preparation and comminution procedure is closely linked to the calculated amorphous contents. Particle size reduction by wet-grinding lowered the calculated amorphous contents to insignificant quantities for all materials studied. No amorphous content was identified in the final analysis of the Portland cements under investigation.

  2. 16. INTERIOR, PORTLAND FILTER FROM SOUTHEAST, PRE1934. FILTERS WERE IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. INTERIOR, PORTLAND FILTER FROM SOUTHEAST, PRE-1934. FILTERS WERE IN USE FROM 1918 TO 1934. CREDIT WR. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  3. Active channel for Fanno Creek, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sobieszczyk, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Fanno Creek is a tributary to the Tualatin River and flows though parts of the southwest Portland metropolitan area. The stream is heavily influenced by urban runoff and shows characteristic flashy streamflow and poor water quality commonly associated with urban streams. This data set represents the active, wetted channel as derived from light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data and aerial photographic imagery. The wetted channel boundary is equivalent to the extent of water observed during a 2-yr high flow event.

  4. A Sediment Budget for the Deschutes River, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, J. E.; Grant, G. E.; Haluska, T. L.

    2001-12-01

    The Deschutes River drains 28,000 km2 of north-central Oregon before joining the Columbia River 160 km east of Portland. Relicensing of Portland General Electric's Pelton-Round Butte complex, a set of three hydroelectric dams 160-180 km upstream from the Columbia River confluence, has motivated assessment of the roles of these impoundments as well as those of upstream dams on the volume of sediment available to the lower river. To accomplish this, we applied a relatively simple procedure of determining spatially explicit sediment yield by combining GIS-calculated indices of relative sediment production with sediment-yield measurements derived from reservoir surveys. Estimates of relative unit-area sediment production (sediment production index, SPI) were calculated for each of 100 similar sized subbasins on the basis of the product of the subbasin drainage density and mean hillslope gradient. Digital stream data were acquired from 1:100,000 hydrography, and mean hillslope gradients were determined from 30-meter resolution digital elevation data. Such an approach is reasonable for basins such as the Deschutes, where hillslope sediment transport is dominated by diffusive processes such as biogenic activity, rainsplash, soil creep, and freeze-thaw action, and, consequently, sediment flux per unit stream length is proportional to hillslope gradient. Calculated SPI values were empirically related to regional sediment yield by regressing against surveyed volumes of sediment accumulated in basin reservoirs, including the Deschutes and Crooked River arms of Lake Billy Chinook, Ochoco Reservoir, and Prineville Reservoir (in total, capturing sediment from about 60 percent of the entire Deschutes River watershed). The resulting regression is Qs = 3.74(SPI)2.13 (r2 = 0.98; p = 0.015), where Qs is sediment yield, in tonnes per square kilometer per year, and SPI is in units of km-1. This result is only strictly applicable to transported bedload and suspended sand and silt that

  5. The Investigation of Properties of Insulating Refractory Concrete with Portland Cement Binder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudžma, A.; Antonovič, V.; Stonys, R.; Škamat, J.

    2015-11-01

    The present work contains the results of experimental study on properties of insulating refractory concrete created on the basis of Portland cement (PC) binder and modified with microsilica (MS). The experimental compositions were made using Portland cement, lightweight aggregates (expanded clay and vermiculite) and microsilica additives. It was established that MS additives enable significant improvement of mechanical properties and thermal shock resistance of PC-based insulating concrete with values comparable to insulating refractory concrete based on calcium aluminate cement.

  6. 76 FR 37059 - Siuslaw National Forest; Oregon; Oregon Dunes NRA Management Area 10 (C) Route and Area Designation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... Forest Service Siuslaw National Forest; Oregon; Oregon Dunes NRA Management Area 10 (C) Route and Area... Dunes Plan) in order to: (1) Designate Off Highway Vehicle (OHV), also called Off Road Vehicle (ORV) routes within Management Area (MA) 10 (C) of the Oregon Dunes National Recreation Area (ODNRA) beyond...

  7. Superplasticized Portland cement: Production and compressive strength of mortars and concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Bouzoubaa, N.; Zhang, M.H.; Malhotra, V.M.

    1998-12-01

    This paper deals with the effect of intergrinding different percentages of a naphthalene-based superplasticizer with Portland cement clinker and gypsum on the fineness of the product, and on the water requirement and the compressive strength of the mortars made with the superplasticized cement. The properties of the fresh and hardened concrete made with the superplasticized cements were also investigated. The results showed that the intergrinding of a given amount of a naphthalene-based superplasticizer with Portland clinker and gypsum reduced the grinding time required for obtaining the same Blaine fineness as that of the control Portland cement without the superplasticizer. The water requirement of the mortars made with the superplasticized cements was similar to that of the mortars made with the control Portland cements when the same amount of the superplasticizer was added at the mortar mixer; for a given grinding time and a Blaine fineness of {approximately}4500 cm{sup 2}/g, the mortars made with the superplasticized cement had higher compressive strength than those made with the control Portland cement. For a given grinding time or Blaine fineness of cement {ge}5000 cm{sup 2}/g, the slump loss, air content stability, bleeding, autogenous temperature rise, setting times, and compressive strength of the concrete made with the superplasticized cements were generally comparable to those of the concrete made with the control Portland cements when the superplasticizer was added at the concrete mixer.

  8. Confirmatory chemical analyses and solid phase bioassays on sediment from the Columbia River Estuary at Tongue Point, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.S.; Word, J.Q.; Apts, C.W.; Barrows, M.E.; Cullinan, V.I.; Kohn, N.P.

    1988-12-01

    The Department of Economic Development, Ports Division, of the state of Oregon plans to develop a former ship supply and storage site near Tongue Point, Oregon, for commercial shipping. The development would require dredging the adjacent waterway to the Columbia River 40-foot channel to admit commercials vessels. The Portland District of the US Army Corps of Engineers requested the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to conduct confirmatory solid-phase bioassays that would provide technical data for an evaluation of the potential environmental impact of ocean disposal of the dredged material. These confirmatory studies provided chemical and biological information required by ocean dumping regulations to determine suitability of Tongue Point sediments for ocean disposal. Sediment core samples were collected from Cathlamet Bay at Tongue Point in the upper Columbia River estuary. Sediment surface grab samples were collected at reference/control sites offshore from the mouth of the Columbia River (Disposal Site F) and at West Beach, Whidbey Island, Washington. The Tongue Point sediments were mixed into two composited batches. The MSL conducted solid-phase bioassays with these composites and reference sediments on four species of organisms.

  9. Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project, Morrow County, Oregon: Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1994-01-01

    BPA is considering whether to transfer (wheel) electrical power from a proposed privately-owned, combustion-turbine electrical generation plant in Oregon. The plant would be fired by natural gas and would use combined-cycle technology to generate up to 440 average megawatts (aMW) of energy. The plant would be developed, owned, and operated by Portland General Electric Company (PGE). The project would be built in eastern Oregon, just east of the City of Boardman in Morrow County. The proposed plant would be built on a site within the Port of Morrow Industrial Park. The proposed use for the site is consistent with the County land use plan. Building the transmission line needed to interconnect the power plant to BPA`s transmission system would require a variance from Morrow County. BPA would transfer power from the plant to its McNary-Slatt 500-kV transmission line. PGE would pay BPA for wheeling services. Key environmental concerns identified in the scoping process and evaluated in the draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) include these potential impacts: (1) air quality impacts, such as emissions and their contributions to the {open_quotes}greenhouse{close_quotes} effect; (2) health and safety impacts, such as effects of electric and magnetic fields, (3) noise impacts, (4) farmland impacts, (5) water vapor impacts to transportation, (6) economic development and employment impacts, (7) visual impacts, (8) consistency with local comprehensive plans, and (9) water quality and supply impacts, such as the amount of wastewater discharged, and the source and amount of water required to operate the plant. These and other issues are discussed in the DEIS. The proposed project includes features designed to reduce environmental impacts. Based on studies completed for the DEIS, adverse environmental impacts associated with the proposed project were identified, and no evidence emerged to suggest that the proposed action is controversial.

  10. Newberry Volcano (Oregon, USA) Revised

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Grove, T. L.

    2015-12-01

    Newberry Volcano (NV) located E. of the Cascades arc axis is often interpreted as (1) a High Lava Plains (NW Basin & Range -- B&R) volcano hosting rhyolites generated by a traveling plume, (2) a shield volcano built of basalt, or (3) an enigma unrelated to the adjacent High Cascades. Recent work shows that these interpretations are incorrect. Petrologic, geochemical, isotopic, drill hole, & seismic data indicate that the NV magma system results from arc-related processes at the NW corner of the B&R, where this major extensional province impinges on the Cascades arc. NV rhyolites are geochemically distinct and lower in SiO2 than those to the east where a general NW-younging trend of rhyolite ages has suggested a traveling hotspot -- a consequence instead of propagation of B&R extension. NV lies ~90 km above the downgoing slab based on seismic evidence (McCrory et al. 2012), ~15 km deeper than under the Three Sisters (TS) volcanic complex 60 km to the NW on the arc axis. NV & TS exhibit a range of compositions and both have generated rhyodacite with unusually high Na2O contents (~7 wt. %; Mandler et al. 2014), exhibiting similar petrogenetic processes. Silicic lavas and tuffs of the caldera-centric NV make up a significant component (~20% of drill core) of its 600 km3, although basaltic andesite is the dominant composition. Basalts of calcalkaline affinity erupted on the edifice as recently as early Holocene time. These basalts contain petrologic evidence for high pre-eruptive H2O contents, have strong arc-like trace element signatures, and are isotopically Cascadian and distinct from basalts to the east in the B&R that have much higher 3/4He (Graham et al. 2009). NV is one variety of Cascades arc volcano among which are a range of stratovolcanoes including Mt. Baker (15 km3) and Mt. Shasta (500 km3), a Holocene caldera (Crater Lake), and the many basaltic andesite shield volcanoes that make up most of the Oregon High Cascades.

  11. Proceedings of Conference VI: Methodology for identifying seismic gaps and soon-to-break gaps: Convened under auspicies of National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program, 25-27 May, 1978

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Isacks, Bryan L.; Plafker, George

    1978-01-01

    The fifth conference in the continuing series under the Earthquake Hazard Reduction Program was held at Massachusetts Institute of Technology on May 25- 27, 1978. Its theme was "Methodology for Defining Seismic Gaps and Soon-to-Break Seismic Gaps." One of the proposed strategies for acquiring critical data on earthquake prediction is to identify soon-to-break gaps and to deploy a variety of instruments in the expected epicentral region. The Conference had as one of its major purposes the evaluation of our present capability to define gaps in general and soon-to-break gaps in particular, and thus to determine if the first step in the strategy proposed above could be fulfilled today.

  12. Textiles & Clothing. Home Economics for Oregon Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    This curriculum guide on textiles and clothing is one of a set of five Oregon goal-based home economics curriculum guides. Provided in this guide are the following: one suggested district goal (students will be able to make textile and clothing decisions which meet individual and family needs); four suggested program goals (e.g., the student will…

  13. 77 FR 14853 - Oregon Disaster #OR-00041

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Benton, Columbia, Coos, Curry, Douglas, Hood River... ADMINISTRATION Oregon Disaster OR-00041 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for...

  14. Identification of commonly encountered Pratylenchus in Oregon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pratylenchus species are commonly encountered in soil samples collected from a diversity of economically important crops in Oregon, including potato and small fruits. Proper identification is critical to the selection of an appropriate management strategy since, in many cases, populations are an as...

  15. Oregon Intellectual Freedom Clearinghouse: Third Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Library, Salem. Intellectual Freedom Clearinghouse.

    The Oregon Intellectual Freedom Clearinghouse received reports of formal challenges to 25 books and 1 recording during the time period between July 1, 1989, and June 30, 1990. It is noted that 17 of the challenged items were held by public libraries and 9 by school library media centers, with 21 items designated as children's and young adult…

  16. Strawberry Cultivars for Oregon (EC 1618)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This Extension publication gives an overview of the types of strawberries (June-bearing, everbearing and day-neutral) and cultivars that might be grown in Oregon or elsewhere in the Pacific Northwest. Harvest season, plant durability, fruit characteristics, yield potential, suitability for fresh or...

  17. Oregon University System Fact Book 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon University System, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This compendium of narrative and statistical information is an overview of the Oregon University System (OUS) and is produced every two years. The introduction includes a mission and vision statement, OUS Governance Change Move, a listing of OUS campuses and centers, a roster of the members of the State Board of Higher Education, and Access and…

  18. Oregon University System Fact Book 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon University System, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This compendium of narrative and statistical information is an overview of the Oregon University System (OUS) and is produced every two years. The introduction includes a mission and vision statement, strategic priorities, a listing of OUS campuses and centers, a roster of the members of the State Board of Higher Education, OUS degree partnership…

  19. Oregon University System Fact Book 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon University System, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This compendium of narrative and statistical information is an overview of the Oregon University System (OUS) and is produced every two years. The introduction includes a mission and vision statement, OUS Governance Change Proposal, a listing of OUS campuses and centers, a roster of the members of the State Board of Higher Education, and Access…

  20. History of successful ballot initiatives--Oregon.

    PubMed

    Weller, J

    1998-12-15

    In this report, the author traces the background of Ballot Measure 44, which raised taxes on cigarette and other tobacco products in Oregon. He highlights the effect of a positive coalescing of different forces (nonprofit health groups and medical groups) despite initial differences in program strategy. PMID:9874379

  1. Marketing Cluster Brief. [Vocational Education in Oregon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stamps, Margaret McDonnall

    This guide sets forth minimum approval criteria for marketing/distributive education programs in Oregon. The information in the guide is intended for use by district-level curriculum planners, teachers, regional coordinators, or state education department staff involved with new program development or revisions of existing programs. The guide…

  2. Oregon Students Help Prepare Impact Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Tom

    1973-01-01

    Describes a field-biology research project conducted at Coos Bay, Oregon by high school students attending the summer sessions at Terramar Field Science Facility during the summer of 1972. Discusses the value of this type of environmental survey for both the students and the community. (JR)

  3. Metals Cluster Brief. Vocational Education in Oregon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Ralph

    This guide sets forth minimum approval criteria for metals occupational clusters training programs in Oregon. The information in the guide is intended for use by district-level curriculum planners, teachers, regional coordinators, or state education department staff involved with new program development or revisions of existing programs. The guide…

  4. Foodservice Cluster Brief. [Vocational Education in Oregon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Pauline

    This guide sets forth minimum approval criteria for vocational education food service training programs in Oregon. The information in the guide is intended for use by district-level curriculum planners, teachers, regional coordinators, or state education department staff involved with new program development or revisions of existing programs. The…

  5. Oregon University System Fact Book 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayfield, Vern; North, Tom; Kieran, Bob

    2007-01-01

    This compendium of narrative and statistical information is an overview of the Oregon University System (OUS) and is produced every two years. The introduction includes a mission and vision statement, a listing of OUS campuses and centers, a history of the institutions, OUS degree partnership programs, and distance education degree programs, OUS…

  6. Agriculture Cluster Brief. Vocational Education in Oregon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galbraith, Gordon

    This guide sets forth minimum approval criteria for vocational agriculture cluster programs in Oregon. The agriculture cluster program includes instruction in six areas: animal science, soil science, plant science, agricultural economics, agriculture mechanics, and leadership development. The information in the guide is intended for use by…

  7. Blueberry Cultivars for Oregon (EC 1308)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This Extension publication gives an overview of the types of blueberries and the blueberry cultivars that might be grown in Oregon or elsewhere in the Pacific Northwest. Bush and berry characteristics, yield potential, and suitability for commercial or home garden production are given for over 30 bl...

  8. 27 CFR 9.229 - Elkton Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 1990; (3) Devils Graveyard Quadrangle, Oregon-Douglas Co., Provisional Edition 1990; (4) Elkton... onto the Devils Graveyard map, across the Umpqua River, to the intersection of the R8W/R9W common line... map, back to the Devils Graveyard map, returning to the Elkton map, and then continuing generally...

  9. 27 CFR 9.229 - Elkton Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 1990; (3) Devils Graveyard Quadrangle, Oregon-Douglas Co., Provisional Edition 1990; (4) Elkton... onto the Devils Graveyard map, across the Umpqua River, to the intersection of the R8W/R9W common line... map, back to the Devils Graveyard map, returning to the Elkton map, and then continuing generally...

  10. 40 CFR 81.425 - Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...,476 88-577 USDA-FS Gearhart Mountain Wild 18,709 88-577 USDA-FS Hells Canyon Wild 1 108,900 94-199... Hells Canyon Wilderness, 192,700 acres overall, of which 108,900 acres are in Oregon, and 83,800...

  11. 40 CFR 81.425 - Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...,476 88-577 USDA-FS Gearhart Mountain Wild 18,709 88-577 USDA-FS Hells Canyon Wild 1 108,900 94-199... Hells Canyon Wilderness, 192,700 acres overall, of which 108,900 acres are in Oregon, and 83,800...

  12. 40 CFR 81.425 - Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...,476 88-577 USDA-FS Gearhart Mountain Wild 18,709 88-577 USDA-FS Hells Canyon Wild 1 108,900 94-199... Hells Canyon Wilderness, 192,700 acres overall, of which 108,900 acres are in Oregon, and 83,800...

  13. 40 CFR 81.425 - Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...,476 88-577 USDA-FS Gearhart Mountain Wild 18,709 88-577 USDA-FS Hells Canyon Wild 1 108,900 94-199... Hells Canyon Wilderness, 192,700 acres overall, of which 108,900 acres are in Oregon, and 83,800...

  14. 40 CFR 81.425 - Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...,476 88-577 USDA-FS Gearhart Mountain Wild 18,709 88-577 USDA-FS Hells Canyon Wild 1 108,900 94-199... Hells Canyon Wilderness, 192,700 acres overall, of which 108,900 acres are in Oregon, and 83,800...

  15. Directory and Statistics of Oregon Libraries 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheppke, Jim, Comp.; Vogt, Valerie, Comp.

    This report provides directory and statistical information that characterizes libraries in Oregon, profiling each library within its appropriate library type, i.e., public, academic, special, or state. Each of the four sections provides directory information (e.g., the library's address, telephone number, and contact librarian) and statistical…

  16. Raspberry Cultivars for Oregon (EC 1310)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This Extension publication gives an overview of the types of raspberries (summer and fall bearing, red, yellow, black, and purple) and cultivars that might be grown in Oregon or elsewhere in the Pacific Northwest. Disease problems, plant vigor, fruit characteristics, potential yield, suitability to...

  17. Change Planning and Implementation at Oregon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hassel, H. J.; Retzlaff, A. E.

    1990-01-01

    The strategic plan developed for the future of Oregon Health Sciences University School of Dentistry has as a major thrust the addition of a fifth-year extramural preceptorship to the program. Reinvigoration of the minority recruitment program, initiation of an early entry admissions track, and curriculum revision are additional goals. (MLW)

  18. Algal conditions and the potential for future algal problems in the Willamette River, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rickert, David A.; Petersen, R.R.; McKenzie, S.W.; Hines, W.G.; Wille, S.A.

    1977-01-01

    For nearly half a century the Willamette River in Oregon experienced severe dissolved-oxygen problems related to large loads of organically rich waste waters from industries and municipalities. Since the mid-1950 's dissolved oxygen quality has gradually improved owing to low-flow augmentation, the achievement of basinwide secondary treatment, and the use of other waste-management practices. As a result, summer dissolved-oxygen levels have increased, salmon runs have returned, and the overall effort is widely regarded as a singular water-quality success. To document the improved dissolved-oxygen regimen, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted intensive studies of the Willamette during the summer low-flow seasons of 1973 and 1974. During each summer the mean daily dissolved-oxygen levels were found to be higher than 5 milligrams per liter throughout the river. Because of the basinwide secondary treatment, carbonaceous deoxygenation rates were low. In addition, almost half of the biochemical oxygen demand entering the Willamette was from diffuse (nonpoint) sources rather than outfalls. These results indicated that point-source biochemical oxygen demand was no longer the primary cause of dissolved-oxygen depletion. Instead, the major causes of deoxygenation were nitrification in a shallow ' surface active ' reach below Salem and an anomalous oxygen demand (believed to be primarily of benthal origin) in Portland Harbor. (Woodard-USGS)

  19. Dissolved-oxygen regimen of the Willamette River, Oregon, under conditions of basinwide secondary treatment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hines, Walter G.; McKenzie, S.W.; Rickert, D.A.; Rinella, F.A.

    1977-01-01

    For nearly half a century the Willamette River in Oregon experienced severe dissolved-oxygen problems related to large loads of organically rich waste waters from industries and municipalities. Since the mid-1950 's dissolved oxygen quality has gradually improved owing to low-flow augmentation, the achievement of basinwide secondary treatment, and the use of other waste-management practices. As a result, summer dissolved-oxygen levels have increased, salmon runs have returned, and the overall effort is widely regarded as a singular water-quality success. To document the improved dissolved-oxygen regimen, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted intensive studies of the Willamette during the summer low-flow seasons of 1973 and 1974. During each summer the mean daily dissolved-oxygen levels were found to be higher than 5 milligrams per liter throughout the river. Because of the basinwide secondary treatment, carbonaceous deoxygenation rates were low. In addition, almost half of the biochemical oxygen demand entering the Willamette was from diffuse (nonpoint) sources rather than outfalls. These results indicated that point-source biochemical oxygen demand was no longer the primary cause of dissolved-oxygen depletion. Instead, the major causes of deoxygenation were nitrification in a shallow ' surface active ' reach below Salem and an anomalous oxygen demand (believed to be primarily of benthal origin) in Portland Harbor. (Woodard-USGS)

  20. A synoptic survey of trace metals in bottom sediments of the Willamette River, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rickert, David A.; Kennedy, V.C.; McKenzie, S.W.; Hines, W.G.

    1977-01-01

    For nearly half a century the Willamette River in Oregon experienced severe dissolved-oxygen problems related to large loads of organically rich waste waters from industries and municipalities. Since the mid-1950 's dissolved oxygen quality has gradually improved owing to low-flow augmentation, the achievement of basinwide secondary treatment, and the use of other waste-management practices. As a result, summer dissolved-oxygen levels have increased, salmon runs have returned, and the overall effort is widely regarded as a singular water-quality success. To document the improved dissolved-oxygen regimen, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted intensive studies of the Willamette during the summer low-flow seasons of 1973 and 1974. During each summer the mean daily dissolved-oxygen levels were found to be higher than 5 milligrams per liter throughout the river. Because of the basinwide secondary treatment, carbonaceous deoxygenation rates were low. In addition, almost half of the biochemical oxygen demand entering the Willamette was from diffuse (nonpoint) sources rather than outfalls. These results indicated that point-source biochemical oxygen demand was no longer the primary cause of dissolved-oxygen depletion. Instead, the major causes of deoxygenation were nitrification in a shallow ' surface active ' reach below Salem and an anomalous oxygen demand (believed to be primarily of benthal origin) in Portland Harbor. (Woodard-USGS)

  1. Methodology for river-quality assessment with application to the Willamette River basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rickert, David A.; Hines, Walter G.; McKenzie, Stuart W.

    1976-01-01

    For nearly half a century the Willamette River in Oregon experienced severe dissolved-oxygen problems related to large loads of organically rich waste waters from industries and municipalities. Since the mid-1950 's dissolved oxygen quality has gradually improved owing to low-flow augmentation, the achievement of basinwide secondary treatment, and the use of other waste-management practices. As a result, summer dissolved-oxygen levels have increased, salmon runs have returned, and the overall effort is widely regarded as a singular water-quality success. To document the improved dissolved-oxygen regimen, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted intensive studies of the Willamette during the summer low-flow seasons of 1973 and 1974. During each summer the mean daily dissolved-oxygen levels were found to be higher than 5 milligrams per liter throughout the river. Because of the basinwide secondary treatment, carbonaceous deoxygenation rates were low. In addition, almost half of the biochemical oxygen demand entering the Willamette was from diffuse (nonpoint) sources rather than outfalls. These results indicated that point-source biochemical oxygen demand was no longer the primary cause of dissolved-oxygen depletion. Instead, the major causes of deoxygenation were nitrification in a shallow ' surface active ' reach below Salem and an anomalous oxygen demand (believed to be primarily of benthal origin) in Portland Harbor. (Woodard-USGS)

  2. Steady-state dissolved oxygen model of the Willamette River, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenzie, Stuart W.; Hines, W.G.; Rickert, D.A.; Rinella, F.A.

    1979-01-01

    For nearly half a century the Willamette River in Oregon experienced severe dissolved-oxygen problems related to large loads of organically rich waste waters from industries and municipalities. Since the mid-1950 's dissolved oxygen quality has gradually improved owing to low-flow augmentation, the achievement of basinwide secondary treatment, and the use of other waste-management practices. As a result, summer dissolved-oxygen levels have increased, salmon runs have returned, and the overall effort is widely regarded as a singular water-quality success. To document the improved dissolved-oxygen regimen, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted intensive studies of the Willamette during the summer low-flow seasons of 1973 and 1974. During each summer the mean daily dissolved-oxygen levels were found to be higher than 5 milligrams per liter throughout the river. Because of the basinwide secondary treatment, carbonaceous deoxygenation rates were low. In addition, almost half of the biochemical oxygen demand entering the Willamette was from diffuse (nonpoint) sources rather than outfalls. These results indicated that point-source biochemical oxygen demand was no longer the primary cause of dissolved-oxygen depletion. Instead, the major causes of deoxygenation were nitrification in a shallow ' surface active ' reach below Salem and an anomalous oxygen demand (believed to be primarily of benthal origin) in Portland Harbor. (Woodard-USGS)

  3. Evaluation of planning alternatives for maintaining desirable dissolved-oxygen concentrations in the Willamette River, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rickert, David A.; Rinella, F.A.; Hines, W.G.; McKenzie, S.W.

    1980-01-01

    For nearly half a century the Willamette River in Oregon experienced severe dissolved-oxygen problems related to large loads of organically rich waste waters from industries and municipalities. Since the mid-1950 's dissolved oxygen quality has gradually improved owing to low-flow augmentation, the achievement of basinwide secondary treatment, and the use of other waste-management practices. As a result, summer dissolved-oxygen levels have increased, salmon runs have returned, and the overall effort is widely regarded as a singular water-quality success. To document the improved dissolved-oxygen regimen, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted intensive studies of the Willamette during the summer low-flow seasons of 1973 and 1974. During each summer the mean daily dissolved-oxygen levels were found to be higher than 5 milligrams per liter throughout the river. Because of the basinwide secondary treatment, carbonaceous deoxygenation rates were low. In addition, almost half of the biochemical oxygen demand entering the Willamette was from diffuse (nonpoint) sources rather than outfalls. These results indicated that point-source biochemical oxygen demand was no longer the primary cause of dissolved-oxygen depletion. Instead, the major causes of deoxygenation were nitrification in a shallow ' surface active ' reach below Salem and an anomalous oxygen demand (believed to be primarily of benthal origin) in Portland Harbor. (Woodard-USGS)

  4. Project development and data programs for assessing the quality of the Willamette River, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rickert, David A.; Hines, Walter G.; McKenzie, Stuart W.

    1976-01-01

    For nearly half a century the Willamette River in Oregon experienced severe dissolved-oxygen problems related to large loads of organically rich waste waters from industries and municipalities. Since the mid-1950 's dissolved oxygen quality has gradually improved owing to low-flow augmentation, the achievement of basinwide secondary treatment, and the use of other waste-management practices. As a result, summer dissolved-oxygen levels have increased, salmon runs have returned, and the overall effort is widely regarded as a singular water-quality success. To document the improved dissolved-oxygen regimen, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted intensive studies of the Willamette during the summer low-flow seasons of 1973 and 1974. During each summer the mean daily dissolved-oxygen levels were found to be higher than 5 milligrams per liter throughout the river. Because of the basinwide secondary treatment, carbonaceous deoxygenation rates were low. In addition, almost half of the biochemical oxygen demand entering the Willamette was from diffuse (nonpoint) sources rather than outfalls. These results indicated that point-source biochemical oxygen demand was no longer the primary cause of dissolved-oxygen depletion. Instead, the major causes of deoxygenation were nitrification in a shallow ' surface active ' reach below Salem and an anomalous oxygen demand (believed to be primarily of benthal origin) in Portland Harbor. (Woodard-USGS)

  5. Injectable citrate-modified Portland cement for use in vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Wynn-Jones, Gareth; Shelton, Richard M; Hofmann, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    The injectability of Portland cement (PC) with several citrate additives was investigated for use in clinical applications such as vertebroplasty (stabilization of a fractured vertebra with bone cement) using a syringe. A 2-wt % addition of sodium or potassium citrate with PC significantly improved cement injectability, decreased cement setting times from over 2 h to below 25 min, while increasing the compressive strength to a maximum of 125 MPa. Zeta-potential measurements indicated that the citrate anion was binding to one or more of the positively charged species causing charged repulsion between cement particles which dispersed aggregates and caused the liquefying effect of the anion. Analysis of the hydrating phases of PC indicated that the early strength producing PC phase (ettringite) developed within the first 2 h of setting following addition of the citrate anion, while this did not occur in the control cement (PC only). Within 24 h ettringite developed in PC as well as calcium–silicate–hydrate (C–S–H), the major setting phase of PC, whereas cements containing citrate did not develop this phase. The evidence suggested that in the presence of citrate the cements limited water supply appeared to be utilized for ettringite formation, producing the early strength of the citrate cements. The present study has demonstrated that it is possible to modify PC with citrate to both improve the injectability and crucially reduce the setting times of PC while improving the strength of the cement. © 2014 The Authors Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 102B: 1799–1808, 2014. PMID:24711245

  6. 12 CFR 25.27 - Strategic plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... needs of low- and moderate-income geographies and low- and moderate-income individuals, through lending... activities, including, as appropriate, the distribution of loans among different geographies, businesses...

  7. State of Oregon 4th biennial energy plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    State law directs the Oregon Department of Energy (ODOE) to prepare an energy plan every two years. This is the Fourth Biennial Energy Plan. The Plan is a policy blueprint for how to best meet Oregon's future energy needs. It identifies the key energy issues facing the state and sets forth policies and actions to achieve our energy goals of reliable, least-cost, and environmentally safe supply. This book presents: Oregon's demand and supply picture today. The progress Oregon has made toward energy efficiency. Oregon's energy demand and supply outlook for the next 20 years. Estimates of cost-effective conservation and other resources that could contribute to the state's energy supply. The major energy-related health, safety, and environmental issues facing the state. A strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 20 percent from 1988 levels by 2005. A two-year Action Plant that spells out ODOE's recommended actions for achieving Oregon's energy goals.

  8. The Scientific and Institutional Context for the Removal of Marmot Dam, Sandy River, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, G. E.; Major, J. J.; O'Connor, J.; Wallick, J. R.; Marr, J.; Wilcock, P.; Podolack, C.

    2008-12-01

    Dam removal has been widely viewed as an important river restoration strategy and an interesting scientific opportunity, the latter because it represents a real-time, full-scale field experiment on fluvial adjustment. Removals therefore offer an excellent setting for testing analytical models of sediment transport, morphologic change, and our capacity to predict short- and medium-term channel evolution in response to changing water and sediment transport regimes. Most dam removals to date have involved relatively small structures and modest releases of sediment stored in pre-removal reservoirs. The largest instantaneous and uncontrolled release of sediment accompanying a dam removal occurred with the breaching of the Marmot coffer dam on the Sandy River in Oregon in October 2007. Marmot Dam was a 14-m-high by 50-m-wide diversion dam built in 1913 as part of a larger hydroelectric project. It was located on the Sandy River, an energetic gravel to cobble-bed river that naturally carries copious quantities of sand and gravel, ~45 km upstream from its confluence with the Columbia River near Portland, Oregon. At the time of removal, the reservoir upstream of the dam was completely filled with ~750,000 m3 of sand (40%) and gravel (60%). The river below the dam includes bedrock gorges, mixed bedrock/alluvial reaches, and alluvial reaches with well-developed gravel and sand bars. The decision to remove the dam was motivated by a combination of increasing maintenance costs and an unfavorable future economic return due to the necessity of installing expensive fish passage facilities to meet relicensing requirements. Portland General Electric, the dam's owner, surrendered the dam's license in 1999, and removal commenced in summer 2007. To remove the concrete structure, a temporary coffer dam was constructed 70 m upstream. In October 2007 the coffer dam was breached and the river allowed to erode the remaining impounded sediment (~730,000 m3). Physical modeling conducted at

  9. 77 FR 51565 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Southern Oregon Historical Society, Medford, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Southern Oregon Historical Society, Medford, OR AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Southern Oregon Historical Society... culturally affiliated with the human remains may contact the Southern Oregon Historical Society....

  10. Rhabdochlamydia spp. in an Oregon raptor.

    PubMed

    Jouffroy, Sophie J; Schlueter, Andrew H; Bildfell, Robert J; Rockey, Daniel D

    2016-07-01

    PCR-based approach was used to examine the rate of Chlamydia positivity in raptors from wild bird rehabilitation centers in Oregon. Three of 82 birds were identified as positive for Chlamydia with this PCR. Sequence analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA from 2 of these birds confirmed the presence of DNA from phylum Chlamydiae. One bird was positive for Chlamydia psittaci in both choanal and cloacal swabs. The second bird, a louse-infested red-tailed hawk, had evidence of choanal colonization by "Candidatus Rhabdochlamydia" spp. Our study describes evidence of this Chlamydia-like organism in the United States. This survey also suggests that the carriage rate of C. psittaci is low in raptors in Oregon wild bird rehabilitation centers, and that care must be taken in the design of PCR primers for phylum Chlamydiae such that colonization by insect endosymbionts is not mistaken for an infection by known chlamydial pathogens. PMID:27154318

  11. Hydration kinetics modeling of Portland cement considering the effects of curing temperature and applied pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Feng Meyer, Christian

    2009-04-15

    A hydration kinetics model for Portland cement is formulated based on thermodynamics of multiphase porous media. The mechanism of cement hydration is discussed based on literature review. The model is then developed considering the effects of chemical composition and fineness of cement, water-cement ratio, curing temperature and applied pressure. The ultimate degree of hydration of Portland cement is also analyzed and a corresponding formula is established. The model is calibrated against the experimental data for eight different Portland cements. Simple relations between the model parameters and cement composition are obtained and used to predict hydration kinetics. The model is used to reproduce experimental results on hydration kinetics, adiabatic temperature rise, and chemical shrinkage of different cement pastes. The comparisons between the model reproductions and the different experimental results demonstrate the applicability of the proposed model, especially for cement hydration at elevated temperature and high pressure.

  12. Oregon Health Decisions. An experiment with informed community consent.

    PubMed

    Crawshaw, R; Garland, M J; Hines, B; Lobitz, C

    1985-12-13

    Oregon Health Decisions is a citizen-based project intended to develop statewide awareness of severe bioethical dilemmas. The project has set in motion civic means for addressing and resolving problems in Oregon's health provision system associated with personal autonomy, equity of access, prevention of illness, and humane cost containment. The process of civic involvement with consequent results is described together with the implications for future health policy in Oregon and elsewhere. PMID:3840847

  13. Seaside, Oregon, Tsunami Vulnerability Assessment Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, P. K.; Dominey-Howes, D.; Varner, J.

    2006-12-01

    The results of a pilot study to assess the risk from tsunamis for the Seaside-Gearhart, Oregon region will be presented. To determine the risk from tsunamis, it is first necessary to establish the hazard or probability that a tsunami of a particular magnitude will occur within a certain period of time. Tsunami inundation maps that provide 100-year and 500-year probabilistic tsunami wave height contours for the Seaside-Gearhart, Oregon, region were developed as part of an interagency Tsunami Pilot Study(1). These maps provided the probability of the tsunami hazard. The next step in determining risk is to determine the vulnerability or degree of loss resulting from the occurrence of tsunamis due to exposure and fragility. The tsunami vulnerability assessment methodology used in this study was developed by M. Papathoma and others(2). This model incorporates multiple factors (e.g. parameters related to the natural and built environments and socio-demographics) that contribute to tsunami vulnerability. Data provided with FEMA's HAZUS loss estimation software and Clatsop County, Oregon, tax assessment data were used as input to the model. The results, presented within a geographic information system, reveal the percentage of buildings in need of reinforcement and the population density in different inundation depth zones. These results can be used for tsunami mitigation, local planning, and for determining post-tsunami disaster response by emergency services. (1)Tsunami Pilot Study Working Group, Seaside, Oregon Tsunami Pilot Study--Modernization of FEMA Flood Hazard Maps, Joint NOAA/USGS/FEMA Special Report, U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency, 2006, Final Draft. (2)Papathoma, M., D. Dominey-Howes, D.,Y. Zong, D. Smith, Assessing Tsunami Vulnerability, an example from Herakleio, Crete, Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences, Vol. 3, 2003, p. 377-389.

  14. Oregon earthquakes increase local landslide risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2014-11-01

    Coastal Oregon is home to a number of slow, recurrent landslides. During bouts of heavy rain, water gets into the soil, reducing friction and causing the ground to slip. Often, these landslides creep along at a barely perceptible rate—less than a centimeter per day. Yet the landslides are a lurking threat, as past events that have damaged infrastructure and cut communities off for months at a time have demonstrated.

  15. Corrosion prevention of Oregon's reinforced coastal bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Cryer. C.B; Gallardo, M. L.

    2004-06-01

    The Oregon Department of Transportation (Oregon DOT) maintains more than 120 coastal bridges; many are reinforced concrete structures over 15 m (50 ft) in length. Twelve of these bridges are historic structures. Oregon DOT is concerned about the ongoing deterioration of these bridges, rising maintenance and repair costs, and the need to protect Oregon’s large investment in coastal bridges. Over 80,000 m2 (850,000 ft2) of coastal bridge surface have been repaired and protected from further chloride-induced corrosion damage by using conductive coating anodes. Most of the anode area is thermal-sprayed (TS) Zn. Other anode materials include TS Ti, Zn-hydrogel, and conductive carbon paint. TS Zn anodes are estimated to have a service life exceeding 25 years but exhibit increasing anode polarization with age. Catalyzed TS Ti anodes develop no significant anode polarization and have exhibited stable long-term performance over 8 years of service. Galvanic Zn-hydrogel anodes produce a stable protection current with no evidence of aging effects over 6 years of service. The conductive carbon paint anode operates at a low anode current density and consumption rate with a low rate of acidification at the anode-concrete interface, which has contributed to a stable protection current over 17 years of service.

  16. Geothermal research, Oregon Cascades: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Priest, G.R.; Black, G.L.

    1988-10-27

    Previous USDOE-funded geothermal studies have produced an extensive temperature gradient and heat flow data base for the State of Oregon. One of the important features identified as a result of these studies is a rapid transition from heat flow values on the order of 40 mW/m/sup 2/ in the Willamette Valley and Western Cascades to values of greater than or equal to100 mW/m/sup 2/ in the High Cascades and the eastern portion of the Western Cascades. These data indicate that the Cascade Range in Oregon has potential as a major geothermal province and stimulated much of the later work completed by government agencies and private industry. Additional data generated as a result of this grant and published in DOGAMI Open-File Report 0-86-2 further define the location and magnitude of this transition zone. In addition, abundant data collected from the vicinity of Breitenbush and Austin Hot Springs have permitted the formulation of relatively detailed models of these hydrothermal systems. These models are published in DOGAMI Open-File Report 0-88-5. Task 1.2 of the Deliverables section of Amendment M001 is fulfilled by DOGAMI publication GMS-48, Geologic map of the McKenzie Bridge quadrangle, Lane County, Oregon. This map was printed in October, 1988, and is part of the final submission to USDOE. 8 refs.

  17. Petroleum potential of Oregon and Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Billo, S.M. )

    1990-06-01

    The states of Oregon and Washington border the Pacific Ocean within an area of diverse topography, climate, and vegetation with altitudes ranging from sea level to more than 8,000 ft. The Mesozoic and Paleozoic rocks are quasi-eugeosynclinal but badly indurated and/or metamorphosed, implying that almost all the pre-Tertiary rocks were unfavorable for oil and gas except some 700 mi{sup 2} of outcropping Mesozoic rocks exposed through windows in the overlying volcanics along the SW extension of the Blue and the Klamath mountains, accordingly. A profound angular and erosional unconformity separates the Tertiary sediments and volcanics from the older rocks. During Late Mesozoic and Tertiary time, uplift accompanied by erosion caused the removal of large areas of metamorphosed sediments and the development of pre-Miocene surface of large relief. Crustal movements of Late Miocene age produced NW-SE folds in Washington, and NS folds in the Coast range of Oregon. Some of the exploration methods (excluding wildcat drilling) were inconvenient. Seismic and gravity methods are impeded, the first by glacial till, basalt flows, sills, and dikes, and the second by laccoliths. Although the region is not the best place for hustling, drilling activity for development of potential oil and gas ushered 78% success rate in Oregon, and Shell and Exxon earned significant bonus bids in Washington.

  18. Oregon: a guide to geothermal energy development. [Includes glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Justus, D.; Basescu, N.; Bloomquist, R.G.; Higbee, C.; Simpson, S.

    1980-06-01

    The following subjects are covered: Oregons' geothermal potential, exploration methods and costs, drilling, utilization methods, economic factors of direct use projects, and legal and institutional setting. (MHR)

  19. 33 CFR 165.103 - Safety and Security Zones; LPG Vessel Transits in Portland, Maine, Captain of the Port Zone...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Captain of the Port zone, as defined in 33 CFR 3.05-15, one mile ahead, one half mile astern, and 1000... Vessel Transits in Portland, Maine, Captain of the Port Zone, Portsmouth Harbor, Portsmouth, New... and Security Zones; LPG Vessel Transits in Portland, Maine, Captain of the Port Zone,...

  20. 33 CFR 165.103 - Safety and Security Zones; LPG Vessel Transits in Portland, Maine, Captain of the Port Zone...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Captain of the Port zone, as defined in 33 CFR 3.05-15, one mile ahead, one half mile astern, and 1000... Vessel Transits in Portland, Maine, Captain of the Port Zone, Portsmouth Harbor, Portsmouth, New... and Security Zones; LPG Vessel Transits in Portland, Maine, Captain of the Port Zone,...

  1. 78 FR 19698 - Lucid Energy, Inc., The City of Portland Water Bureau; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-02

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Lucid Energy, Inc., The City of Portland Water Bureau; Notice of Application.... Date filed: February 13, 2013. d. Applicant: Lucid Energy, Inc., The City of Portland Water Bureau. e.... Applicant Contact: Ms. Jan Lee, Water & Energy Resource Services P.O. Box 2517, Clackamas, OR 97105, Cell...

  2. 77 FR 28353 - Foreign-Trade Zone 45-Portland, OR, Notification of Proposed Production Activity, Shimadzu USA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 45--Portland, OR, Notification of Proposed Production Activity, Shimadzu USA Manufacturing, Inc. (Chromatograph and Mass Spectrometer Production), Canby, OR The Port of Portland, grantee of FTZ 45, submitted a notification of proposed production activity on...

  3. Sulfate impurities from deicing salt and durability of Portland cement mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Schluter, M.C.

    1987-06-01

    This thesis reports research on the effects of calcium sulfate in halite on Portland cement durability. Much has been published about sulfate ions causing expansion reactions in Portland cement concrete, on scaling caused by sodium chloride, and the participation of magnesium sulfate in seawater attack. However, little work has been done on the influence of sodium chloride and calcium sulfate solutions as they are found combined in natural halite. Durability studies were conducted using brines containing different amounts of gypsum as an impurity. Damage mechanisms, reaction products and pore structure changes were evaluated. 16 refs., 27 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. Home Energy Assistance Act. Hearings before the Committee on Labor and Human Resources, United States Senate, Ninety-Sixth Congress, first session, 25-27 September and 6 October 1979, Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    At the hearings in Washington, DC, on September 25-27, testimony was given concerning Federal assistance to low-, middle-, and fixed-income households to offset rising home energy costs. The witnesses included Energy Department officials, state officials, representatives of the energy industry, and others who have analyzed the problem. The hearing at Madison, WI, State Capitol Building on October 6 was the first of six field hearings scheduled, and included testimony from state and local officials, low income, and older citizens, and from agencies serving the poor and older persons. This volume includes the many statements and texts of the following bills: S. 1724, Home Energy Assistance Act; S. 1725, Economic Opportunity Amendments of 1979; S. 1331, Emergency Fuel Assistance Act of 1979; S. 771, Energy Stamp Act of 1979; S. 1270, Basic Fuel Assistance Act of 1979; and S. 1603, Home-Heating Stamp Act of 1979. Also, much additional material was submitted for the record including articles, publications, etc., and communications submitted to Senator Javits.

  5. pH and Antimicrobial Activity of Portland Cement Associated with Different Radiopacifying Agents

    PubMed Central

    Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane Maria; Cornélio, Ana Lívia G.; Andolfatto, Carolina; Salles, Loise P.; Tanomaru-Filho, Mário

    2012-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity and pH changes induced by Portland cement (PC) alone and in association with radiopacifiers. Methods. The materials tested were pure PC, PC + bismuth oxide, PC + zirconium oxide, PC + calcium tungstate, and zinc oxide and eugenol cement (ZOE). Antimicrobial activity was evaluated by agar diffusion test using the following strains: Micrococcus luteus, Streptococcus mutans, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. After 24 hours of incubation at 37°C, inhibition of bacterial growth was observed and measured. For pH analysis, material samples (n = 10) were placed in polyethylene tubes and immersed in 10 mL of distilled water. After 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours, the pH of the solutions was determined using a pH meter. Results. All microbial species were inhibited by the cements evaluated. All materials composed of PC with radiopacifying agents promoted pH increase similar to pure Portland cement. ZOE had the lowest pH values throughout all experimental periods. Conclusions. All Portland cement-based materials with the addition of different radiopacifiers (bismuth oxide, calcium tungstate, and zirconium oxide) presented antimicrobial activity and pH similar to pure Portland cement. PMID:23119173

  6. The Arabic Version of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory 4: A Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamed, Razan; Tariah, Hashem Abu; Malkawi, Somaya; Holm, Margo B.

    2012-01-01

    The Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory 4 (MPAI-4) is a valid and reliable assessment tool to detect clinical impairments in patients with acquired brain injury. The tool is widely used by rehabilitation therapists worldwide, given its good psychometric properties and its availability in several languages. The purpose of this study was to…

  7. STUDY OF AMMONIA SOURCE AT A PORTLAND CEMENT PRODUCTION PLANT (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A source and process sampling study was conducted at a dry process Portland Cement production plant. One aspect of the study focused on the source or point of NH3 within the production process. An extensive number of process solids from raw feeds to baghouse solids were collected...

  8. INVESTIGATION OF THE FORMATION OF A PORTLAND CEMENT PLANT DETACHED PLUME

    EPA Science Inventory

    A gaseous and particulate source emissions sampling program has been conducted at a Portland Cement production plant in Rapid City South Dakota. The study was conducted to determine the cause of the formation of an opaque detached plume from the plants' dry process kiln. The inst...

  9. Steel foundry electric arc furnace dust management: stabilization by using lime and Portland cement.

    PubMed

    Salihoglu, Guray; Pinarli, Vedat

    2008-05-30

    The purpose of this study was to determine an appropriate treatment for steel foundry electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) prior to permanent disposal. Lime and Portland cement (PC)-based stabilization was applied to treat the EAFD that contains lead and zinc above the landfilling limits, and is listed by USEPA as hazardous waste designation K061 and by EU as 10 02 07. Three types of paste samples were prepared with EAFD content varying between 0 and 90%. The first type contained the EAFD and Portland cement, the second contained the EAFD, Portland cement, and lime, and the third contained the EAFD and lime. All the samples were subjected to toxicity characteristics leaching procedure (TCLP) after an air-curing period of 28 days. pH changes were monitored and acid neutralization capacity of the samples were examined. Treatment effectiveness was evaluated in terms of reducing the heavy metal leachability to the levels below the USEPA landfilling criteria. An optimum composition for the EAFD stabilization was formulated as 30% EAFD +35% lime +35% Portland cement to achieve the landfilling criteria. The pH interval, where the solubility of the heavy metals in the EAFD was minimized, was found to be between 8.2 and 9.4. PMID:17977656

  10. Chromium stabilization chemistry of paint removal wastes in Portland cement and blast furnace slag

    SciTech Connect

    Boy, J.H.; Race, T.D.; Reinbold, K.A.

    1995-12-31

    The use of cement based systems for solidification and stabilization of hazardous wastes has been proposed. The stabilization of Cr contaminated paint removal wastes in ordinary Portland cement and in a Portland cement and blast furnace slag matrix was investigated. A loading by volume of 75% waste and 25% cement (or cement + slag) was used. The expression of pore solution was utilized to determine the chemical environment encountered by the waste species in the cement matrix. The highly alkaline conditions of ordinary Portland cement determined the stability of the metal species, with Cr being highly soluble. The replacement of 25% of the Portland cement by blast furnace slag was found to decrease the [OH-] of the pore solution resulting in a decrease of the Cr concentration. For cement wastes forms hydrated for 28 days, the Cr concentration decreased in the expressed pore solution. During the TCLP tests the cement waste form and extraction solution were found to react, changing the chemistry of the extraction solution. The expression of pore solution was found to give a direct measure of the chemistry of the waste species in the cement matrix. This avoids the reaction of the TCLP extraction solution with the cement matrix which changes the solubility of the hazardous metals. 15 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. 76 FR 76760 - Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-08

    ... review. Background The Commission instituted this review on May 2, 2011 (76 FR 24519) and determined on August 5, 2011 that it would conduct an expedited review (76 FR 50252, August 12, 2011). The Commission... COMMISSION Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan Determination On the basis of the record...

  12. 33 CFR 80.115 - Portland Head, ME to Cape Ann, MA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Portland Head, ME to Cape Ann, MA. 80.115 Section 80.115 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY..., MA. (a) Except inside lines specifically described in this section, the 72 COLREGS shall apply on...

  13. 33 CFR 80.115 - Portland Head, ME to Cape Ann, MA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Portland Head, ME to Cape Ann, MA. 80.115 Section 80.115 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY..., MA. (a) Except inside lines specifically described in this section, the 72 COLREGS shall apply on...

  14. 33 CFR 80.115 - Portland Head, ME to Cape Ann, MA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Portland Head, ME to Cape Ann, MA. 80.115 Section 80.115 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY..., MA. (a) Except inside lines specifically described in this section, the 72 COLREGS shall apply on...

  15. 33 CFR 80.115 - Portland Head, ME to Cape Ann, MA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Portland Head, ME to Cape Ann, MA. 80.115 Section 80.115 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY..., MA. (a) Except inside lines specifically described in this section, the 72 COLREGS shall apply on...

  16. 33 CFR 80.115 - Portland Head, ME to Cape Ann, MA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Portland Head, ME to Cape Ann, MA. 80.115 Section 80.115 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY..., MA. (a) Except inside lines specifically described in this section, the 72 COLREGS shall apply on...

  17. Radiopacity evaluation of Portland and MTA-based cements by digital radiographic system

    PubMed Central

    BORGES, Alvaro Henrique; PEDRO, Fabio Luiz Miranda; SEMANOFF-SEGUNDO, Alex; MIRANDA, Carlos Eduardo Saraiva; PÉCORA, Jesus Djalma; CRUZ FILHO, Antônio Miranda

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to evaluate the radiopacity of Portland and MTA-based cements using the Digora TM digital radiographic system. Material and Methods The performed tests followed specification number 57 from the American National Standard Institute/American Dental Association (2000) for endodontic sealing materials. The materials were placed in 5 acrylic plates, especially designed for this experiment, along with a graduated aluminum stepwedge varying from 1 to 10 mm in thickness. The set was radiographed at a 30 cm focus-object distance and with 0.2 s exposure time. After the radiographs were taken, the optical laser readings of radiographs were performed by Digora TM system. Five radiographic density readings were performed for each studied material and for each step of the aluminum scale. Results White ProRoot MTA (155.99±8.04), gray ProRoot MTA (155.96±16.30) and MTA BIO (143.13±16.94) presented higher radiopacity values (p<0.05), while white non-structural Portland (119.76±22.34), gray Portland (109.71±4.90) and white structural Portland (99.59±12.88) presented lower radiopacity values (p<0.05). Conclusions It was concluded that MTA-based cements were the only materials presenting radiopacity within the ANSI/ADA specifications. PMID:21625738

  18. Portland Public Schools Burglary Prevention Project (73-DF-10-0104). Final Evaluation Report (No. 2).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Dennis A.; Goff, Clinton

    This project was part of the Portland High Impact Program and had as its goal a 60 percent reduction in burglary losses over a three-year period to be attained by installing centrally-monitored, silent, anti-intrusion devices in eleven schools. Comparison with eleven control schools indicates that the alarm system has demonstrated effectiveness in…

  19. pH and Antimicrobial Activity of Portland Cement Associated with Different Radiopacifying Agents.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane Maria; Cornélio, Ana Lívia G; Andolfatto, Carolina; Salles, Loise P; Tanomaru-Filho, Mário

    2012-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity and pH changes induced by Portland cement (PC) alone and in association with radiopacifiers. Methods. The materials tested were pure PC, PC + bismuth oxide, PC + zirconium oxide, PC + calcium tungstate, and zinc oxide and eugenol cement (ZOE). Antimicrobial activity was evaluated by agar diffusion test using the following strains: Micrococcus luteus, Streptococcus mutans, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. After 24 hours of incubation at 37°C, inhibition of bacterial growth was observed and measured. For pH analysis, material samples (n = 10) were placed in polyethylene tubes and immersed in 10 mL of distilled water. After 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours, the pH of the solutions was determined using a pH meter. Results. All microbial species were inhibited by the cements evaluated. All materials composed of PC with radiopacifying agents promoted pH increase similar to pure Portland cement. ZOE had the lowest pH values throughout all experimental periods. Conclusions. All Portland cement-based materials with the addition of different radiopacifiers (bismuth oxide, calcium tungstate, and zirconium oxide) presented antimicrobial activity and pH similar to pure Portland cement. PMID:23119173

  20. 78 FR 10005 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for the Portland Cement Manufacturing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ... Reporting Tool FR Federal Register gr/dscf grains per dry standard cubic foot HAP hazardous air pollutants...) (d,w) parts per million (by volume) (dry, wet) RATA Relative Accuracy Test Audit RfD reference dose... Information Document. On July 18, 2012 (77 FR 42368), the EPA proposed to amend the Portland...

  1. ...And How Not To: A Critique of the Portland Baseline Essays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martel, Erich

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the inaccuracies and distortions found within the Portland Baseline Essays, one of the most widespread Afrocentric teacher resource materials in use. Specific distortions examined are that ancient Egypt was a Black nation and that the achievements of ancient Greece had African origins. (GLR)

  2. Portland Public Schools Touchstone Project: Final Evaluation Report, 1994-1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Stephanie J.

    In today's complicated world, it is difficult to raise healthy, safe, and drug-free children. The Portland Touchstone Project tries to address this challenge by improving the resiliency of at-risk youth. The program is described in this report. It is based on a model that attempts to strengthen families and increase safety, security, and stability…

  3. 75 FR 61354 - Safety Zone; Interstate 5 Bridge Repairs, Columbia River, Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Interstate 5 Bridge Repairs, Columbia River... Interstate 5 Bridge. The safety zone is necessary to ensure the safety of the workers involved as well as the...; Interstate 5 Bridge Repairs, Columbia River, Portland, OR. (a) Location. The following area is a safety...

  4. 33 CFR 165.T13-207 - Safety Zones; Sellwood Bridge project, Willamette River; Portland, OR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safety Zones; Sellwood Bridge... Coast Guard District § 165.T13-207 Safety Zones; Sellwood Bridge project, Willamette River; Portland, OR...) Regulations. In accordance with the general regulations in 33 CFR Part 165, subpart C, no person may enter...

  5. 77 FR 25080 - Safety Zones; TriMet Bridge Project, Willamette River, Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ...The Coast Guard is establishing safety zones encompassing the work trestles and construction cranes involved in the construction of the TriMet Bridge on the Willamette River, in Portland, OR. This action is necessary to ensure the safety of recreational vessels and commercial vessels transiting in close proximity to cranes and overhead work associated with this construction project. These......

  6. 33 CFR 165.T13-207 - Safety Zones; Sellwood Bridge project, Willamette River; Portland, OR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety Zones; Sellwood Bridge... Coast Guard District § 165.T13-207 Safety Zones; Sellwood Bridge project, Willamette River; Portland, OR...) Regulations. In accordance with the general regulations in 33 CFR Part 165, subpart C, no person may enter...

  7. 33 CFR 165.T13-207 - Safety Zones; Sellwood Bridge project, Willamette River; Portland, OR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety Zones; Sellwood Bridge project, Willamette River; Portland, OR. 165.T13-207 Section 165.T13-207 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS...

  8. 33 CFR 167.51 - In the approaches to Portland, ME: Precautionary area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...: Precautionary area. 167.51 Section 167.51 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Separation Schemes and Precautionary Areas § 167.51 In the approaches to Portland, ME: Precautionary area. A precautionary area is established with a radius of 5.45 miles centered upon geographical position 43°31.60′...

  9. 33 CFR 167.51 - In the approaches to Portland, ME: Precautionary area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...: Precautionary area. 167.51 Section 167.51 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Separation Schemes and Precautionary Areas § 167.51 In the approaches to Portland, ME: Precautionary area. A precautionary area is established with a radius of 5.45 miles centered upon geographical position 43°31.60′...

  10. 33 CFR 167.51 - In the approaches to Portland, ME: Precautionary area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...: Precautionary area. 167.51 Section 167.51 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Separation Schemes and Precautionary Areas § 167.51 In the approaches to Portland, ME: Precautionary area. A precautionary area is established with a radius of 5.45 miles centered upon geographical position 43°31.60′...

  11. 33 CFR 167.51 - In the approaches to Portland, ME: Precautionary area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...: Precautionary area. 167.51 Section 167.51 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Separation Schemes and Precautionary Areas § 167.51 In the approaches to Portland, ME: Precautionary area. A precautionary area is established with a radius of 5.45 miles centered upon geographical position 43°31.60′...

  12. 75 FR 54057 - Proposed Modification of Class E Airspace; Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    ... ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does....S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1... Equipment (LOC/DME) for Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) at Portland International...

  13. 40 CFR 81.78 - Metropolitan Portland Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Metropolitan Portland Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.78 Section 81.78 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions §...

  14. 40 CFR 81.78 - Metropolitan Portland Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Metropolitan Portland Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.78 Section 81.78 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation...

  15. 40 CFR 81.78 - Metropolitan Portland Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Metropolitan Portland Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.78 Section 81.78 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation...

  16. 40 CFR 81.78 - Metropolitan Portland Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Metropolitan Portland Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.78 Section 81.78 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation...

  17. 40 CFR 81.78 - Metropolitan Portland Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Metropolitan Portland Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.78 Section 81.78 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation...

  18. Portland Community College, Rock Creek: A Community Based Educational Shopping Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Bernardis, Amo

    An overview is presented of Portland Community College's plans to create the Rock Creek campus, scheduled to open in January 1976. The physical environment is considered to be an important factor in a student's cultural and aesthetic experience, and all facilities have been designed with this in mind. The philosophy guiding campus planning is one…

  19. From Capstones to Strategic Partnerships: The Evolution of Portland State University's Community Engagement and Partnership Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Erin

    2015-01-01

    Portland State University's (PSU) reputation as an engaged, urban-serving university continues to distinguish it both nationally and locally. Key partnerships with local, public, and private partners provide students, faculty, and staff with remarkable opportunities to contribute to the physical, social, and economic development of the Portland…

  20. Portland cement for SO/sub 2/ control in coal-fired power plants

    DOEpatents

    Steinberg, M.

    1984-10-17

    A method is described for removing oxides of sulfur from the emissions of fossil fuel combustion by injecting portland cement into the boiler with the fuel, the combustion air, or downstream with the combustion gases. The cement products that result from this method is also described. 1 tab.

  1. 77 FR 55182 - Foreign-Trade Zone 45-Portland, OR, Authorization of Production Activity, Shimadzu USA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-07

    ...-52-2012, 77 FR 48127, 8/13/2012). The notification was processed in accordance with the regulations... (77 FR 28353, 5/14/2012). The FTZ Board has determined that no further review of the activity is... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 45--Portland, OR, Authorization of Production...

  2. The Relationship of Inservice Education to Program Improvement Within the Portland Consortium Training Complex.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gourley, Mary

    The salient features of the Portland Consortium Training Complex (P.C.T.C.) include: (1) cooperative planning by the local school district, the institution of higher education, the local teacher association, and the community; (2) management consistent with a collaborative decision-making model; and (3) community, preservice, and inservice program…

  3. Solidification of microbiologically treated ion-exchange resins using Portland cement-based systems

    SciTech Connect

    Voima Oy, I.

    1993-12-31

    Pretreated inactive ion exchange resins from the Loviisa nuclear power plant (NPP) were first reduced to one tenth of the original volume through microbiological treatment. During the process, the granular ion exchange resins were decomposed to result in dregs, which were solidified with two types of Portland cements. The objective of the present experiments was to investigate whether commercial cements are suitable solidification agents for this kind of waste. A total of ten mixtures were pretested for their rheological and setting properties. On the basis of the pretest results, four additional mixtures were chosen and tested for the spread value, density, air content, setting time and bleeding of the fresh waste product and for the dimensional stability and compressive strength of the hardened waste product. The cementing systems incorporated in the tests were ASTM type V Portland cement and ASTm type P Portland Composite cements. The dregs used in the tests were taken from a Pilot-Plant experiment at the Loviisa NPP and contained 2 wt-% solids. The test results were promising in showing that microbiological dregs can very easily be soldified with Portland cements to form a high-quality waste product. Thus, the microbiological treatment of spent ion exchange resins will drastically decrease the amount of solidified waste to be disposed of at the Loviisa NPP.

  4. Portland cement for SO.sub.2 control in coal-fired power plants

    DOEpatents

    Steinberg, Meyer

    1985-01-01

    There is described a method of removing oxides of sulfur from the emissions of fossil fuel combustion by injecting portland cement into the boiler with the fuel, the combustion air, or downstream with the combustion gases. There is also described the cement products that result from this method.

  5. Oregon American Indian/Alaska Native Education State Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    The Oregon State Plan for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) education was developed by AI/AN communities and educators, the State Board of Education, and the State Department of Education. The plan includes 11 major educational goals: (1) the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) should promote effective education for AI/AN children; (2)…

  6. Oregon American Indian Alaska Native Education State Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castillo, Susan

    This state plan presents Oregon's 11 educational goals for American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) education, which have been revised and detailed by the statewide Indian Education Council. The goals support the policy of the Oregon Department of Education (ODE), the educational philosophy of the AI/AN community, and the Indian Student Bill of…

  7. The Oregon Death With Dignity Act: implementation issues.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, M A

    1997-01-01

    Passage of the Oregon Death With Dignity Act in 1994 raises nationally relevant questions for health care organization, state agencies, and clinicians. As debate over physician-assisted suicide continues in the United States, the experiences in Oregon may offer insight into the clinical complexities of legalizing physician-assisted suicide. PMID:9217452

  8. 75 FR 62690 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Grants Pass, Oregon

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Grants Pass, Oregon AGENCY: Federal Communications..., allots FM Channel 257A at Grants Pass, Oregon, as the community's second commercial FM transmission service. Channel 257A can be allotted at Grants Pass, consistent with the minimum distance...

  9. School-Based Adolescent Health Programs: The Oregon Approach. Innovations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Kate M.

    Oregon has implemented a successful school-based clinic demonstration program. It was the first state to fund directly school-based clinics that provide comprehensive health services, including birth control counseling, to high school students. The program is administered through the Health Division of the Oregon Department of Human Resources,…

  10. 75 FR 13252 - Oregon Coast Provincial Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Oregon Coast Provincial Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Oregon Coast Province Advisory Committee will meet at the Siuslaw National...

  11. Oregon's High School Dropouts: Examining the Economic and Social Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    House, Emily Anne

    2010-01-01

    This analysis presents the public costs of high school dropouts in Oregon. It examines how dropouts in the state dramatically impact state finances through reduced tax revenues, increased Medicaid costs, and high incarceration rates. This study describes how much high school dropouts cost Oregon's tax-payers each year, and how much could be saved…

  12. The New Oregon Trail: Accountability for Results. Special Report #7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Anne; Dunkle, Margaret

    This report was designed to help policy makers and concerned citizens understand the context, culture, and history that set the stage for Oregon's efforts to reform state government, including those areas of government that affect education. This text offers a "snapshot" of what Oregon is doing to improve results, such as setting benchmarks to…

  13. Go West: Imagining the Oregon Trail. [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Endowment for the Humanities (NFAH), Washington, DC.

    In this lesson plan, students in grades 3-5 compare imagined travel experiences of their own with the actual experiences of 19th-century pioneers on the Oregon Trail. After the 4 lessons students will have: (1) learned about the pioneer experience on the Oregon Trail; (2) compared and contrasted modern-day travel experiences with those of the 19th…

  14. 30 CFR 937.700 - Oregon Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-468.997, pertaining to the control of water pollution. (2) ORS 498.002 and ORS 498.705, protecting... Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.700 Oregon...

  15. Selected Collective Bargaining Agreements of Oregon Two-Year Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association, Washington, DC.

    Twelve collective bargaining agreements between selected community colleges in Oregon and their respective faculty associations are presented, representing contracts in effect in 1987. Contracts for the following colleges are provided: Blue Mountain Community College, Central Oregon Community College, Chemeketa Community College, Clackamas…

  16. LEVEL AND EXTENT OF MERCURY CONTAMINATION IN OREGON LOTIC FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the U.S. EPA's EMAP Oregon Pilot project, we conducted a probability survey of 154 Oregon streams and rivers to assess the spatial extent of mercury (Hg) contamination in fish tissue across the state. Samples consisted of whole fish analyses of both small (< 120 mm) a...

  17. In Oregon, Colleges Hope to Care for Themselves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulley, John L.

    2006-01-01

    A group of seven private colleges in Oregon, frustrated with the erratic pricing of health care in the state, decided to band together, drop their health-plan providers, and create a consortium to self-insure their employees. The Oregon Independent Colleges Employee Benefits Trust came into existence on May 1, 2003 and offers a collective…

  18. Oregon Online: Automated Document Management of an Infobase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Ernest

    1995-01-01

    Describes Oregon Online, the gopher developed for Oregon to provide efficient public access and distribution of government information to citizens via Internet as well as by dial-up access. System development and planning, including the use of ASCII (American Standard Code Information Interchange) format rather than HTML (hypertext mark-up…

  19. The Whiz Kid: Terry Reese--Oregon State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2005

    2005-01-01

    We should be grateful that Terry Reese had to work his way through college. As a work-study student, taught to do cartographic cataloging in the University, of Oregon's map library, he discovered the mental challenges libraries offered. Later he became Oregon State University (OSU)'s cataloger for networked resources and digital unit production…

  20. Oregon School Districts Respond to Increased Tax Limitations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Toole, Daniel; Stipak, Brian

    2000-01-01

    Passage of a 1990 tax limitation measure made Oregon one of few states since 1978 to mandate reductions in local property taxes. A survey of Oregon school superintendents revealed their fears about reduced local discretion and use of revenue management/forecasting tools and rational, goal-oriented cutback approaches. (Contains 36 footnotes.) (MLH)

  1. 30 CFR 937.700 - Oregon Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.700 Oregon Federal program. (a) This part contains all rules that are applicable to surface coal mining operations in...

  2. 30 CFR 937.700 - Oregon Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.700 Oregon Federal program. (a) This part contains all rules that are applicable to surface coal mining operations in...

  3. Guidelines for Personnel Policy Formulation in the Oregon Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Board of Education, Salem.

    In order to insure a measure of consistency in the area of personnel relations, while retaining the flexibility necessary to meet local needs, the Oregon Board of Education has published this list of guidelines for personnel policy formulation in the Oregon community colleges. Based on statutory authority, the guidebook outlines required personnel…

  4. Oregon Pre-Engineering Learning Outcomes Study: Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conley, David T.; Langan, Holly; Veach, Darya; Farkas, Virginia

    2007-01-01

    The Oregon Pre-engineering Learning Outcomes Project was conducted by the Educational Policy Improvement Center (EPIC) with grant funding from the Engineering and Technology Industry Council (ETIC). The study sought to improve student preparation and success in pre-engineering programs through the development of the Oregon Pre-engineering Learning…

  5. Potential effects of climate change on Oregon crops

    EPA Science Inventory

    This talk will discuss: 1) potential changes in the Pacific Northwest climate with global climate change, 2) how climate change can affect crops, 3) the diversity of Oregon agriculture, 4) examples of potential response of Oregon crops – especially dryland winter wheat, and 5) br...

  6. Geothermal Gradients in Oregon, 1985-1994

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, D.D.

    1995-01-01

    This data set is comprised of three groups of temperature-depth data. All the sites are located in southeastern Oregon. The first is a set of 7 wells logged during 1993 in south central Oregon in the Basin and Range province. All these wells, with the exception of the Blue Mountain Oil well, are water wells. These wells were part of a geothermal reconnaissance of this area. The Blue Mountain oil well of this set has been described by Sass et al. (1971) as well. Gannet in the vicinity of the Vale, Oregon (Bowen and Blackwell, 1972; Blackwell et al., 1978) geothermal system in Malheur County. These wells were logged in 1986 during a study of the area described by Gannett (1988). There are 17 wells (plus one relog) in this data set. All these wells are in a small area just east of the town of Vale in Malheur County. The second set of data consists of a group of wells that were logged by Marshall The third set of data represents the results of an exploration project in the general area of the Lake Owyhee thermal area in Malheur County. This data set is comprised of 16 wells. This data set was collected by Hunt Energy Corporation and made available though the efforts of Roger Bowers. A small scale map of the locations of the wells is shown in Figure 1. The well location and some pertinent information about the wells is shown in Table 1. The detailed lists of temperature-depth data and plots for each well, either individually or with a group, follow the list of references cited.

  7. Evaluation of Malolactic Bacteria Isolated from Oregon Wines †

    PubMed Central

    Henick-Kling, T.; Sandine, W. E.; Heatherbell, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    Oregon is a cool wine-producing region where grapes characteristically contain high concentrations of organic acids. To reduce the natural acidity and increase the microbiological stability and flavor complexity of the wine, malolactic fermentation is encouraged. In this study, strains of Leuconostoc oenos indigenous to Oregon wines were evaluated for their suitability to conduct malolactic fermentation in Oregon wines. Tests determined the malolactic activity of the Oregon isolates in comparison with commercial strains ML-34, PSU-1, MLT-kli, and ens 44-40 under various temperature and pH conditions. Sensitivities to sulfur dioxide, ethanol, and fumaric acid also were determined. Two Oregon strains, Er-1a and Ey-2d, were selected for commercial winemaking tests because they had greater malolactic activity under conditions of low pH (3.0) and low temperature (15 and 8°C), respectively. PMID:16347992

  8. A Forest Vegetation Database for Western Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Busing, Richard T.

    2004-01-01

    Data on forest vegetation in western Oregon were assembled for 2323 ecological survey plots. All data were from fixed-radius plots with the standardized design of the Current Vegetation Survey (CVS) initiated in the early 1990s. For each site, the database includes: 1) live tree density and basal area of common tree species, 2) total live tree density, basal area, estimated biomass, and estimated leaf area; 3) age of the oldest overstory tree examined, 4) geographic coordinates, 5) elevation, 6) interpolated climate variables, and 7) other site variables. The data are ideal for ecoregional analyses of existing vegetation.

  9. HELLS CANYON STUDY AREA, OREGON AND IDAHO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simmons, George C.; Close, Terry J.

    1984-01-01

    The Hells Canyon study area occupies nearly 950 sq mi along and near Hells Canyon of the Snake River in northeast Oregon and west-central Idaho. Geologic, geochemical, aeromagnetic, and mine and prospect investigations to determine the mineral-resource potential of the area were carried out. As a result, 42 sq mi or about 4 percent of the lands, in 21 separate areas, were classified as having probable or substantiated resource potential for base and precious metals, molybdenum, and tungsten. No energy resource potential was identified in this study.

  10. Pulp tissue response to Portland cement associated with different radio pacifying agents on pulpotomy of human primary molars.

    PubMed

    Marques, N; Lourenço Neto, N; Fernandes, A P; Rodini, C; Hungaro Duarte, M; Rios, D; Machado, M A; Oliveira, T

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the response of Portland cement associated with different radio pacifying agents on pulp treatment of human primary teeth by clinical and radiographic exams and microscopic analysis. Thirty mandibular primary molars were randomly divided into the following groups: Group I - Portland cement; Group II - Portland cement with iodoform (Portland cement + CHI3 ); Group III - Portland cement with zirconium oxide (Portland cement + ZrO2 ); and treated by pulpotomy technique (removal of a portion of the pulp aiming to maintain the vitally of the remaining radicular pulp tissue using a therapeutic dressing). Clinical and radiographic evaluations were recorded at 6, 12 and 24 months follow-up. The teeth at the regular exfoliation period were extracted and processed for histological analysis. Data were tested using statistical analysis with a significance level of 5%. The microscopic findings were descriptively analysed. All treated teeth were clinically and radiographically successful at follow-up appointments. The microscopic analysis revealed positive response to pulp repair with hard tissue barrier formation and pulp calcification in the remaining roots of all available teeth. The findings of this study suggest that primary teeth pulp tissue exhibited satisfactory biological response to Portland cement associated with radio pacifying agents. However, further studies with long-term follow-up are needed to determine the safe clinical indication of this alternative material for pulp therapy of primary teeth. PMID:26258985

  11. Radical State Legislation and School Restructuring: Oregon Educator's Reactions to the Oregon Educational Act for the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conley, David T.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Findings of a 1992 survey that examined Oregon educators' perceptions of the Oregon Educational Act for the 21st Century, a law designed to bring about fundamental change and radical restructuring in public education, are presented in this journal article. Data were derived from questionnaires that were mailed to 2,140 teachers and 120…

  12. Statewide Report Card: An Annual Report to the Legislature on Oregon Public Schools, 2013-2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Oregon Statewide Report Card is an annual publication required by law (ORS 329.115), which reports on the state of public schools and their progress towards the goals of the Oregon Educational Act for the 21st Century. The purpose of the Oregon Report Card is to monitor trends among school districts and Oregon's progress toward achieving the…

  13. Statewide Report Card: An Annual Report to the Legislature on Oregon Public Schools, 2011-2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Oregon Statewide Report Card is an annual publication required by law (ORS 329.115), which reports on the state of public schools and their progress towards the goals of the Oregon Educational Act for the 21st Century. The purpose of the Oregon Report Card is to monitor trends among school districts and Oregon's progress toward achieving the…

  14. To evaluate the biocompatibility of the Indian Portland cement with potential for use in dentistry: An animal study

    PubMed Central

    Mangala, M G; Chandra, S M Sharath; Bhavle, Radhika M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: This study evaluated the biocompatibility of the Indian Portland cement with potential for use in dentistry. Materials and Methods: This study was performed in Swiss albino mice, by implanting the Indian Portland cement pellets subcutaneously. After 1, 3, and 6 weeks the tissue specimens were prepared for histological examination. Results: The histological analysis showed moderate to severe inflammation at 1 week. The inflammation gradually decreased by 6 weeks, with most of the specimens showing the absence of inflammatory reaction. Conclusions: According to these experimental conditions, the tested Indian Portland cement was biocompatible. PMID:26752835

  15. Field study of moisture damage in walls insulated without a vapor barrier. Final report for the Oregon Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsongas, G.A.

    1980-05-01

    Considerable uncertainty has existed over whether or not wall insulation installed without a vapor barrier causes an increased risk of moisture damage (wood decay) within walls. This report describes the results of one of the first major studies in the country aimed at finding out if such a moisture problem really exists. The exterior walls of a total of 96 homes in Portland, Oregon were opened, of which 70 had retrofitted insulation and 26 were uninsulated and were a control group. The types of insulation included urea-formaldehyde foam (44), mineral wool (16), and cellulose (10). In each opened wall cavity the moisture content of wood was measured and insulation and wood samples were taken for laboratory analysis of moisture content and for the determination of the presence of absence of decay fungi. Foam shrinkage was also measured. To evaluate the possible influence of the relative air tightness of the homes, fan depressurization tests were run using a door blower unit. The field and laboratory test results indicating the lack of a moisture damage problem in existing homes with wood siding in climates similar to that of western Oregon are described along with results of a statistical analysis of the data. Related problems of interest to homeowners and insulation installers are noted. The standard operating procedures used throughout the study are discussed, including the home selection process, quantitative and qualitative techniques used to identify wall locations with the highest moisture content, wall opening and data/sample collection methodology, laboratory analysis of samples, data processing and analysis, and applicability of the results. Recommendations for furutre tests are made. Finally, the potential and desirability for future retrofitting of wall insulation is explored.

  16. Quantitative Mineralogical Characterization of Oregon Erionite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, A.; Dogan, M.; Ballirano, P.

    2006-12-01

    Erionite has been classified as Group-I Human Carcinogen by the IARC Working Group. Fibrogenetic potential of erionite varies from low to high yield of mesothelioma. This may require quantitative characterization of physicochemical properties of erionite before any experimental design. The toxicity of the mineral is such that quantitative characterization of erionite is extremely important. Yet, often the erionite specimens were incompletely or incorrectly characterized throwing doubt on the results of the work. For example, none of the Turkish erionite published until recently had balance error (E%) less than 10%, and Mg cation of the type specimen of erionite-Ca from Maze, Niigita Prefecture, Japan is more than 0.8. In the present study, erionite sample near Rome, Oregon have been quantitatively characterized using powder x-ray diffraction, Reitveld refinement, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma - mass spectroscopy, and Massbauer spectroscopy. The cell parameters of the erionite-K from Oregon is computed as a=13.2217(2) Å and c=15.0671 Å; chemical composition of the erionite as major oxides, rare earth elements and other trace elements, are characterized quantitatively. Crystal chemistries of the erionite are computed based upon the quidelines of the IMAA zeolite report of 1997.

  17. Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project, Final Siting Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Montgomery

    1995-03-01

    This report presents the results of site analysis for the Bonneville Power Administration Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of hatchery facilities for the Bonneville Power Administration. The hatchery project consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in three adjacent tributaries to the Columbia River in northeast Oregon: the Grande Ronde, Walla Walla, and Imnaha River drainage basins. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult capture and holding facilities; spawning incubation, and early rearing facilities; full-term rearing facilities; and direct release or acclimation facilities. The evaluation includes consideration of a main production facility for one or more of the basins or several smaller satellite production facilities to be located within major subbasins. The historic and current distribution of spring and fall chinook salmon and steelhead was summarized for the Columbia River tributaries. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Among the three tributaries, forty seven sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed.

  18. Advanced practice politics and the Oregon nurses' trail.

    PubMed

    Bifano, L C

    1996-01-01

    As health care reform continues to evolve, it is important to consider the context of politics, practice, and power through an examination of nursing's recent history and participation in legislative events. Through a retrospective chronicle that includes interviews, recorded events, and article reviews, the political and legislative history of Oregon nurses in establishing advanced practice for nurse practitioners within the Oregon Nurse Practice Act is described. Prescriptive authority, hospital admitting privileges, and important elements contained in the Oregon Health Plan and Medicare reform are discussed. Questions are posed for the future of health care reform, such as the role of government in determining the quality of care in managed health care. PMID:8710224

  19. Synergistic use of Lagrangian dispersion and radiative transfer modelling with satellite and surface remote sensing measurements for the investigation of volcanic plumes: the Mount Etna eruption of 25-27 October 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellitto, Pasquale; di Sarra, Alcide; Corradini, Stefano; Boichu, Marie; Herbin, Hervé; Dubuisson, Philippe; Sèze, Geneviève; Meloni, Daniela; Monteleone, Francesco; Merucci, Luca; Rusalem, Justin; Salerno, Giuseppe; Briole, Pierre; Legras, Bernard

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we combine SO2 and ash plume dispersion modelling with satellite and surface remote sensing observations to study the regional influence of a relatively weak volcanic eruption from Mount Etna on the optical and micro-physical properties of Mediterranean aerosols. We analyse the Mount Etna eruption episode of 25-27 October 2013. The evolution of the plume along the trajectory is investigated by means of the FLEXible PARTicle Lagrangian dispersion (FLEXPART) model. The satellite data set includes true colour images, retrieved values of volcanic SO2 and ash, estimates of SO2 and ash emission rates derived from MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) observations and estimates of cloud top pressure from SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager). Surface remote sensing measurements of aerosol and SO2 made at the ENEA Station for Climate Observations (35.52° N, 12.63° E; 50 m a.s.l.) on the island of Lampedusa are used in the analysis. The combination of these different data sets suggests that SO2 and ash, despite the initial injection at about 7.0 km altitude, reached altitudes around 10-12 km and influenced the column average aerosol particle size distribution at a distance of more than 350 km downwind. This study indicates that even a relatively weak volcanic eruption may produce an observable effect on the aerosol properties at the regional scale. The impact of secondary sulfate particles on the aerosol size distribution at Lampedusa is discussed and estimates of the clear-sky direct aerosol radiative forcing are derived. Daily shortwave radiative forcing efficiencies, i.e. radiative forcing per unit AOD (aerosol optical depth), are calculated with the LibRadtran model. They are estimated between -39 and -48 W m-2 AOD-1 at the top of the atmosphere and between -66 and -49 W m-2 AOD-1 at the surface, with the variability in the estimates mainly depending on the aerosol single scattering albedo. These results suggest that

  20. Oregon Trail Mushrooms geothermal loan guaranty application, Malheur County, Oregon: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    The action assessed is the guaranty of a loan by the Geothermal Loan Guaranty Office of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to finance the construction and operation of a mushroom-growing facility that will use geothermal (hot) water for process and space heat. The project consists of two separate facilities: a growing facility located just outside of the eastern limit of the city of Vale, Oregon (Malheur County, Oregon) and a composting facility located about 6.4 km (4 miles) southwest of the city limits (also in Malheur County, Oregon). Five test wells have been drilled into the geothermal resource at the growing site. Either well No. 4 or well No. 5 will serve as a production well. All geothermal fluids will be reinjected into the geothermal aquifer, so either well No. 3 will be used for this purpose, wells Nos. 1 and 2 will be deepened, or a new well will be drilled on the site. A cold-water well will be drilled at the growing site, and another will be drilled at the composting site. The environmental effects of the proposed project are not expected to be significant.

  1. Galvanic corrosion of Mg-Zr fuel cladding and steel immobilized in Portland cement and geopolymer at early ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooses, Adrien; Lambertin, David; Chartier, David; Frizon, Fabien

    2013-04-01

    Galvanic corrosion behaviour of Mg-Zr alloy fuel cladding and steel has been studied in Ordinary Portland cement and Na-geopolymer. Portland cements implied the worse magnesium corrosion performances due to the negative effects of cement hydrates, grinding agents and gypsum on the galvanic corrosion. Galvanic corrosion in Na-geopolymer paste remains very low. Silicates and fluoride from the geopolymer activation solution significantly improve the corrosion resistance of the magnesium alloy while coupling with a cathode.

  2. How Do Social Service Providers View Recent Immigrants? Perspectives from Portland, Maine, and Olympia, Washington

    PubMed Central

    CLEVENGER, CASEY; DERR, AMELIA SERAPHIA; CADGE, WENDY; CURRAN, SARA

    2014-01-01

    This article explores how social service providers in two small, geographically distinct cities—Portland, Maine, and Olympia, Washington—understand the importance of welcoming and incorporating new immigrants in their cities. We focus on how providers characterize their responsibilities, how they understand the importance of responding to new immigrants, and what they describe as the challenges and opportunities presented by recent immigration to their cities. Despite differences in Portland and Olympia, we find that providers in both cities combine a sense of moral responsibility to help immigrants, with an emphasis on the economic and cultural resources immigrants bring to cities. These insights expand recent immigration scholarship from a focus on immigrants alone to include the perspectives and logics of social service workers who are often their first points of contact in new places. PMID:25110469

  3. Natural cement as the precursor of Portland cement: Methodology for its identification

    SciTech Connect

    Varas, M.J. . E-mail: mjvaras@geo.ucm.es; Alvarez de Buergo, M.; Fort, R.

    2005-11-15

    When cements appeared in the 19th century, they took the place of traditional binding materials (lime, gypsum, and hydraulic lime) which had been used until that time. Early cements can be divided into two groups, natural and artificial (Portland) cements. Natural cements were introduced first, but their widespread usage was short-lived as they were quickly replaced by artificial cements (Portland), still the most important and predominant today. The main differences between natural and artificial cements arise during the manufacturing process. The final properties of the cements are greatly influenced by differences in the raw materials and burning temperatures employed. The aim of this paper is to assess the efficiency of traditional analytical techniques (petrographic microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR)) used to differentiate natural and artificial cements.

  4. Comparative investigation of corrosion resistance of steel reinforcement in alinite and Portland cement mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Kostogloudis, G.C.; Kalogridis, D.; Ftikos, C.; Malami, C.; Georgali, B.; Kaloidas, V.

    1998-07-01

    The corrosion resistance of steel-reinforced mortar specimens made from alinite cement was investigated using ordinary Portland cement (OPC) specimens as reference. The specimens were prepared and exposed in three different environments: continuous exposure in tap water, interrupted exposure in tap water, and interrupted exposure in 3.5% NaCl solution. The steel weight loss and the half cell potential were measured vs. exposure time, up to the age of 12 months. Pore solution extraction and analysis and porosity determination were also performed. In continuous exposure in tap water, alinite cement provided adequate protection against corrosion. In interrupted exposure in tap water, a higher corrosion was observed for alinite cement compared to OPC. In the case of interrupted exposure in 3.5% NaCl solution, the simultaneous action of free chlorides and oxygen resulted in the depassivation of steel reinforcing bars in alinite and Portland cement mortars, and led to severe corrosion effect.

  5. Performance Characteristics of Waste Glass Powder Substituting Portland Cement in Mortar Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kara, P.; Csetényi, L. J.; Borosnyói, A.

    2016-04-01

    In the present work, soda-lime glass cullet (flint, amber, green) and special glass cullet (soda-alkaline earth-silicate glass coming from low pressure mercury-discharge lamp cullet and incandescent light bulb borosilicate glass waste cullet) were ground into fine powders in a laboratory planetary ball mill for 30 minutes. CEM I 42.5N Portland cement was applied in mortar mixtures, substituted with waste glass powder at levels of 20% and 30%. Characterisation and testing of waste glass powders included fineness by laser diffraction particle size analysis, specific surface area by nitrogen adsorption technique, particle density by pycnometry and chemical analysis by X-ray fluorescence spectrophotometry. Compressive strength, early age shrinkage cracking and drying shrinkage tests, heat of hydration of mortars, temperature of hydration, X-ray diffraction analysis and volume stability tests were performed to observe the influence of waste glass powder substitution for Portland cement on physical and engineering properties of mortar mixtures.

  6. Effect of blastfurnace slag addition to Portland cement for cationic exchange resins encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafond, E.; Cau Dit Coumes, C.; Gauffinet, S.; Chartier, D.; Le Bescop, P.; Stefan, L.; Nonat, A.

    2013-07-01

    In the nuclear industry, cement-based materials are extensively used to encapsulate spent ion exchange resins (IERs) before their final disposal in a repository. It is well known that the cement has to be carefully selected to prevent any deleterious expansion of the solidified waste form, but the reasons for this possible expansion are not clearly established. This work aims at filling the gap. The swelling pressure of IERs is first investigated as a function of ions exchange and ionic strength. It is shown that pressures of a few tenths of MPa can be produced by decreases in the ionic strength of the bulk solution, or by ion exchanges (2Na+ instead of Ca2+, Na+ instead of K+). Then, the chemical evolution of cationic resins initially in the Na+ form is characterized in CEM I (Portland cement) and CEM III (Portland cement + blastfurnace slag) cements at early age and an explanation is proposed for the better stability of CEM III material.

  7. Flow properties of MK-based geopolymer pastes. A comparative study with standard Portland cement pastes.

    PubMed

    Favier, Aurélie; Hot, Julie; Habert, Guillaume; Roussel, Nicolas; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-02-28

    Geopolymers are presented in many studies as alternatives to ordinary Portland cement. Previous studies have focused on their chemical and mechanical properties, their microstructures and their potential applications, but very few have focussed on their rheological behaviour. Our work highlights the fundamental differences in the flow properties, which exist between geopolymers made from metakaolin and Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC). We show that colloidal interactions between metakaolin particles are negligible and that hydrodynamic effects control the rheological behaviour. Metakaolin-based geopolymers can then be described as Newtonian fluids with the viscosity controlled mainly by the high viscosity of the suspending alkaline silicate solution and not by the contribution of direct contacts between metakaolin grains. This fundamental difference between geopolymers and OPC implies that developments made in cement technology to improve rheological behaviour such as plasticizers will not be efficient for geopolymers and that new research directions need to be explored. PMID:24795966

  8. Newberry Volcano—Central Oregon's Sleeping Giant

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Stovall, Wendy K.; Ramsey, David W.; Ewert, John W.; Jensen, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Hidden in plain sight, Oregon's massive Newberry Volcano is the largest volcano in the Cascades volcanic arc and covers an area the size of Rhode Island. Unlike familiar cone-shaped Cascades volcanoes, Newberry was built into the shape of a broad shield by repeated eruptions over 400,000 years. About 75,000 years ago a major explosion and collapse event created a large volcanic depression (caldera) at its summit. Newberry last erupted about 1,300 years ago, and present-day hot springs and geologically young lava flows indicate that it could reawaken at any time. Because of its proximity to nearby communities, frequency and size of past eruptions, and geologic youthfulness, U.S. Geological Survey scientists are working to better understand volcanic activity at Newberry and closely monitor the volcano for signs of unrest.

  9. A field guide to Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenson, Robert A.; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; McKay, Daniele

    2009-01-01

    Newberry Volcano is located in central Oregon at the intersection of the Cascade Range and the High Lava Plains. Its lavas range in age from ca. 0.5 Ma to late Holocene. Erupted products range in composition from basalt through rhyolite and cover ~3000 km2. The most recent caldera-forming eruption occurred ~80,000 years ago. This trip will highlight a revised understanding of the volcano's history based on new detailed geologic work. Stops will also focus on evidence for ice and flooding on the volcano, as well as new studies of Holocene mafic eruptions. Newberry is one of the most accessible U.S. volcanoes, and this trip will visit a range of lava types and compositions including tholeiitic and calc-alkaline basalt flows, cinder cones, and rhyolitic domes and tuffs. Stops will include early distal basalts as well as the youngest intracaldera obsidian flow.

  10. Mount Hood Wilderness and adjacent areas, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, T.E.C.; Causey, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Mount Hood Wilderness, Oregon, was conducted in 1980. Geochemical data indicate two areas of substantiated mineral-resource potential containing weak epithermal mineralization: an area on the north side of Zigzag Mountain, where vein-type lead-zinc-silver deposits occur and an area on the south side of Zigzag Mountain, where the upper part of a quartz diorite pluton has propylitic alteration associated with mineralization of copper, gold, silver, lead, and zinc in discontinuous veins. Geothermal-resource potential for low- to intermediate-temperature (less than 248/sup 0/F) hot-water systems in the wilderness is probable in three areas. Part of the wilderness is classified as a Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA), which is considered to have probable geothermal-resource potential, and two parts of the wilderness have been included in geothermal lease areas.

  11. Passage and behavior of radio-tagged adult Pacific lampreys (Entosphenus tridentatus) at the Willamette Falls Project, Oregon.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mesa, Matthew G.; Magie, Robert J.; Copeland, Elizabeth S.

    2010-01-01

    Populations of Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus) in the Columbia River basin have declined and passage problems at dams are a contributing factor. We used radio telemetry to monitor the passage of adult Pacific lampreys at the Willamette Falls Project (a hydroelectric dam integrated into a natural falls) on the Willamette River near Portland, Oregon. In 2005 and 2006, fish were captured at the Project, implanted with a radio tag, and released downstream. We tagged 136 lampreys in 2005 and 107 in 2006. Over 90% of the fish returned to the Project in 7 – 9 h and most were detected from 2000 – 2300 h. In 2005, 43 fish (34%) passed the dam via the fishway, with peak passage in August. No fish passed over the falls, but 13% ascended at least partway up the falls. In 2006, 24 fish (23%) passed the Project using the fishway, with most prior to 9 June when the powerhouse was off. Although 19 lampreys ascended the falls, only two passed via this route. The time for fish to pass through the fishway ranged from 4 – 74 h, depending on route. Many fish stayed in the tailrace for hours to almost a year and eventually moved downstream. Our results indicate that passage of lampreys at the Project is lower than that for lampreys at dams on the Columbia River. Low passage success may result from low river flows, impediments in fishways, delayed tagging effects, changing environmental conditions, or performance or behavioral constraints.

  12. Principal Facts of Gravity data in the Northern Willamette Valley and Vicinity, Northwestern Oregon and Southwestern Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morin, Robert L.; Wheeler, Karen L.; McPhee, Darcy K.; Dinterman, Philip A.; Watt, Janet T.

    2007-01-01

    Gravity data were collected from 2004 through 2006 to assist in mapping subsurface geology in the northern Willamette Valley and vicinity, northwestern Oregon and southwestern Washington. Prior to this effort to improve the gravity data coverage in the study area, very little regional data were available. This report gives the principle facts for 2710 new gravity stations and 1446 preexisting gravity stations. Much of the study area is now covered with data of sufficient density to define basin boundaries and correlate with many of the larger fault systems. ,p> The study area lies between 44? 52.5 and 46? N latitude and between 122? 15 and 123? 37.5 W longitude. Although this is a continuing project and more gravity data is expected to be collected, this report is being published to show the progress of the data collection. The majority of these data are spaced at about 1.6 km (1 mile), but three closely spaced profiles were measured in the Portland area across several faults. To obtain a 1.6 km grid of data points would require about 5120 gravity stations. To date we have collected 2710 stations. Including the preexisting data points, the total number of stations is 4156, and complete regional coverage is about 80 percent at this time.

  13. Reconstruction of radionuclide concentrations in the Columbia River from Hanford, Washington to Portland, Oregon, January 1950--January 1971. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, W.H.; Gilmore, B.G.; Richmond, M.C.

    1994-05-01

    Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories conducted this study of the Columbia River for the Technical Steering Panel (TSP) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The HEDR Project was established to estimate the radiation dose that individuals may have received from operations that began at the Hanford Site in 1944. The purpose of the study was to reconstruct concentrations of radionuclides in Columbia River water for estimating doses to humans from the river pathway.

  14. Meeting the Needs of Youth at Risk: Public Policy and Interagency Collaboration. Conference Proceedings (Portland, Oregon, March 4-5, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crohn, Leslie

    This document contains materials from a conference designed to examine policy issues related to potential dropouts, youth offenders, drug and alcohol abusers, teenage parents, young children at risk, unemployed youth, and compensatory education. A brief overview of the 2-day conference is followed by summaries of each of the conference's…

  15. Work Now and in the Future: Implications for Education, Business and Training. Conference Proceedings (5th, Portland, Oregon, November 14-15, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotton, Kathleen, Ed.

    These proceedings provide a summary of a conference for business and industry representatives, educators, and others concerned with the changing world of work. They present an overview of the over 100 speeches, panel discussions, film and video presentations, displays, participant sharing sessions, and hands-on demonstrations. These presentations…

  16. In-reservoir behavior, dam passage, and downstream migration of juvenile Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead from Detroit Reservoir and Dam to Portland, Oregon, February 2013-February 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeman, John W.; Adams, Noah S.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the evaluations conducted at Detroit Dam, we continued to refine and improve methods for monitoring fish movements in the Willamette River. The goal was to develop stable, cost-effective, long-term monitoring arrays suitable for detection of any Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS)-tagged fish in the Willamette River. These data then could be used to estimate timing, migration rates, and survival of JSATS-tagged fish from various studies in the Willamet

  17. Pacific Circle Consortium: A Regional Project of OECD/CERI. Report of Annual Meeting (5th, Portland, Oregon, September 28-October 3, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France). Centre for Educational Research and Innovation.

    Efforts, including exchange activities and curriculum development projects, undertaken by Pacific region countries in 1981 to improve intercultural understanding were the main focus of the meeting. The report begins with a very brief description of what transpired during the sessions. Papers and reports presented are contained in the appendices,…

  18. A surface study of the chemistry of zinc, cadmium, and mercury in Portland cement

    SciTech Connect

    McWhinney, H.G. . Dept. of Chemistry); Cocke, D.L. )

    1993-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), a surface sensitive technique, is employed in the elucidation of chemical information regarding the environment of the priority metal pollutants; zinc, cadmium, and mercury, solidified in Portland cement. The metals were added as the aqueous solution for the salts [Zn(NO[sub 3])[sub 2], Cd(NO[sub 3])[sub 2], Hg(NO[sub 3])[sub 2

  19. Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Portland Cement for Direct Pulp Capping in Dog: A Histopathological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Bidar, Maryam; Naghavi, Neda; Mohtasham, Nooshin; Sheik-Nezami, Mahshid; Fallahrastegar, Amir; Afkhami, Farzaneh; Attaran Mashhadi, Negin; Nargesi, Iman

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Mineral trioxide aggregate and calcium hydroxide are considered the gold standard pulp-capping materials. Recently, Portland cement has been introduced with properties similar to those of mineral trioxide aggregate. Histopathological effects of direct pulp capping using mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cements on dog dental pulp tissue were evaluated in the present study. Materials and methods. This histopatological study was carried out on 64 dog premolars. First, the pulp was exposed with a sterile bur. Then, the exposed pulp was capped with white or gray mineral trioxide aggregates and white or gray Portland cements in each quadrant and sealed with glass-ionomer. The specimens were evaluated under a light microscope after 6 months. Statistical analysis was carried out using Kruskal-Wallis test. Statistical significance was defined at α=5%. Results. There was no acute inflammation in any of the specimens. Chronic inflammation in white and gray mineral trioxide aggregates and white and gray Portland cements was reported to be 45.5%, 27.3%, 57.1% and 34.1%, respectively. Although the differences were not statistically significant, severe inflammation was observed mostly adjacent to white mineral trioxide aggregate. The largest extent of increased vascularization (45%) and the least increase in fibrous tissue were observed adjacent to white mineral trioxide aggregate, with no significant differences. In addition, the least calcified tissue formed adjacent to white mineral trioxide aggregate, although the difference was not significant. Conclusion. The materials used in this study were equally effective as pulp protection materials following direct pulp capping in dog teeth. PMID:25346831

  20. 76 FR 53054 - Safety Zone; TriMet Bridge Project, Willamette River; Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-25

    ...The U.S. Coast Guard will establish a safety zone during the construction of the TriMet Bridge on the Willamette River, in Portland, OR. This action is necessary to ensure the safety of recreational vessels and commercial vessels transiting in close proximity to cranes and overhead work associated with this construction project. During the enforcement period, all vessels will be required to......

  1. Thermal analysis of borogypsum and its effects on the physical properties of Portland cement

    SciTech Connect

    Elbeyli, Iffet Yakar; Derun, Emek Moeroeydor; Guelen, Jale; Piskin, Sabriye

    2003-11-01

    Borogypsum, which consists mainly of gypsum crystals, B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and some impurities, is formed during the production of boric acid from colemanite, which is an important borate ore. In this study, the effect of borogypsum and calcined borogypsum on the physical properties of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) has been investigated. The calcination temperature and transformations in the structures of borogypsum and natural gypsum were determined by differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. Thermal experiments were carried out between ambient temperature and 500 deg. C in an air atmosphere at a heating rate of 10 deg. C min{sup -1}. After calculation of enthalpy and determination of conversion temperatures, borogypsum (5% and 7%), hemihydrate borogypsum (5%) and natural gypsum (5%) were added separately to Portland cement clinker and cements were ground in the laboratory. The final products were tested for chemical analysis, compressive strength, setting time, Le Chatelier expansion and fineness properties according to the European Standard (EN 196). The results show that increasing the borogypsum level in Portland cement from 5% to 7% caused an increase in setting time and a decrease in soundness expansion and compressive strength. The cement prepared with borogypsum (5%) was found to have similar strength properties to those obtained with natural gypsum, whereas a mixture containing 5% of hemihydrate borogypsum was found to develop 25% higher compressive strength than the OPC control mixtures at 28 days. For this reason, utilization of calcined borogypsum in cement applications is expected to give better results than untreated borogypsum. It is concluded that hemihydrate borogypsum could be used as a retarder for Portland cement as an industrial side. This would play an important role in reducing environmental pollution.

  2. Thermodynamic modelling of the effect of temperature on the hydration and porosity of Portland cement

    SciTech Connect

    Lothenbach, Barbara Matschei, Thomas; Moeschner, Goeril; Glasser, Fred P.

    2008-01-15

    The composition of the phase assemblage and the pore solution of Portland cements hydrated between 0 and 60 deg. C were modelled as a function of time and temperature. The results of thermodynamic modelling showed a good agreement with the experimental data gained at 5, 20, and 50 deg. C. At 5 and at 20 deg. C, a similar phase assemblage was calculated to be present, while at approximately 50 deg. C, thermodynamic calculations predicted the conversion of ettringite and monocarbonate to monosulphate. Modelling showed that in Portland cements which have an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SO{sub 3} ratio of > 1.3 (bulk weight), above 50 deg. C monosulphate and monocarbonate are present. In Portland cements which contain less Al (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SO{sub 3} < 1.3), above 50 deg. C monosulphate and small amounts of ettringite are expected to persist. A good correlation between calculated porosity and measured compressive strength was observed.

  3. Comparative Analysis of Selected Physicochemical Properties of Pozzolan Portland and MTA-Based Cements

    PubMed Central

    Dorileo, Maura Cristiane Gonçales Orçati; Villa, Ricardo Dalla; Guedes, Orlando Aguirre; Aranha, Andreza Maria Fábio; Semenoff-Segundo, Alex; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Borges, Alvaro Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Physicochemical properties of pozzolan Portland cement were compared to ProRoot MTA and MTA BIO. To test the pH, the samples were immersed in distilled water for different periods of time. After the pH analysis, the sample was retained in the plastic recipient, and the electrical conductivity of the solution was measured. The solubility and radiopacity properties were evaluated according to specification 57 of the American National Standard Institute/American Dental Association (ANSI/ADA). The statistical analyses were performed using ANOVA and Tukey's test at a 5% level of significance. Pozzolan Portland cement exhibited pH and electrical conductivity mean values similar to those of the MTA-based cements. The solubilities of all tested materials were in accordance with the ANSI/ADA standards. Only the MTA-based cements met the ANSI/ADA recommendations for radiopacity. It might be concluded that the pH and electrical conductivity of pozzolan Portland cement are similar to and comparable to those of MTA-based cements. PMID:27437473

  4. Possibility of using waste tire rubber and fly ash with Portland cement as construction materials.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Arin; Degirmenci, Nurhayat

    2009-05-01

    The growing amount of waste rubber produced from used tires has resulted in an environmental problem. Recycling waste tires has been widely studied for the last 20 years in applications such as asphalt pavement, waterproofing systems and membrane liners. The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing fly ash and rubber waste with Portland cement as a composite material for masonry applications. Class C fly ash and waste automobile tires in three different sizes were used with Portland cement. Compressive and flexural strength, dry unit weight and water absorption tests were performed on the composite specimens containing waste tire rubber. The compressive strength decreased by increasing the rubber content while increased by increasing the fly ash content for all curing periods. This trend is slightly influenced by particle size. For flexural strength, the specimens with waste tire rubber showed higher values than the control mix probably due to the effect of rubber fibers. The dry unit weight of all specimens decreased with increasing rubber content, which can be explained by the low specific gravity of rubber particles. Water absorption decreased slightly with the increase in rubber particles size. These composite materials containing 10% Portland cement, 70% and 60% fly ash and 20% and 30% tire rubber particles have sufficient strength for masonry applications. PMID:19110410

  5. Yaquina Bay, Oregon, Intertidal Sediment Temperature Database, 1998 - 2006.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detailed, long term sediment temperature records were obtained and compiled in a database to determine the influence of daily, monthly, seasonal and annual temperature variation on eelgrass distribution across the intertidal habitat in Yaquina Bay, Oregon. Both currently and hi...

  6. University of Oregon: GPS-based Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Vignola, F.; Andreas, A.

    2013-08-22

    A partnership with the University of Oregon and U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) data to compliment existing resource assessment data collection by the university.

  7. Comparison of Nutrient Drivers and Response Metrics in Oregon Estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    With the goal of assessing sensitivity to nutrient enrichment, we present a cross-estuary comparison of nutrient sources, levels, and biological responses (phytoplankton and macroalgae) for thirteen Oregon estuaries. Nitrogen levels in the upstream portions of the estuaries are ...

  8. DOWNSTREAM MIGRATION OF SALMONID SMOLTS IN OREGON RIVERS AND ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Migratory fish passage is an important designated use for many Oregon estuaries. Acoustic transmitters were implanted in coho smolts in 2004 and 2006 to evaluate how estuarine habitat, and habitat loss, might affect population health. Acoustic receivers that identified individu...

  9. STRUCTURAL FLOOR PLAN, SHEET 2 OF 6. Oregon Inlet ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    STRUCTURAL FLOOR PLAN, SHEET 2 OF 6. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  10. INTERIOR TOWER ROOM LOOKING NORTHEAST. Oregon Inlet Coast Guard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR TOWER ROOM LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  11. LOOKOUT TOWER DETAILS, SHEET 5 OF 6. Oregon Inlet ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LOOKOUT TOWER DETAILS, SHEET 5 OF 6. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  12. 76 FR 12363 - Oregon; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-07

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Oregon; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of the Presidential....046, Fire Management Assistance Grant; 97.048, Disaster Housing Assistance to Individuals...

  13. CONTROLS ON WATER CHEMISTRY OF AN OREGON COAST RANGE STREAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous factors may control losses of dissolved nutrients from forested basins in the Oregon Coast Range. Potentially important factors include forest composition, stand age, forest management, grazing, agriculture, sewage inputs and bedrock types, as well as others perhaps not...

  14. A Geographically Variable Water Quality Index Used in Oregon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunnette, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the procedure developed in Oregon to formulate a valid water quality index which accounts for the specific conditions in the water body of interest. Parameters selected include oxygen depletion, BOD, eutrophication, dissolved substances, health hazards, and physical characteristics. (CS)

  15. ALTERNATIVE FUTURES FOR THE WILLAMETTE RIVER BASIN, OREGON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alternative futures analysis is an assessment approach designed to inform community decisions regarding land and water use. We conducted an alternative futures analysis in the Willamette River Basin in western Oregon. Based on detailed input from local stakeholders, three alter...

  16. Oregon Cascades Play Fairway Analysis: Faults and Heat Flow maps

    SciTech Connect

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    This submission includes a fault map of the Oregon Cascades and backarc, a probability map of heat flow, and a fault density probability layer. More extensive metadata can be found within each zip file.

  17. Nekton-habitat associations in Yaquina Bay, Oregon - March 2008

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a 3-year field study to determine the relative nekton usage of 4 intertidal habitats (eelgrass [Zostera marina], mud shrimp [Upogebia pugettensis], ghost shrimp [Neotrypaea californiensis], and unvegetated sand) in Yaquina Bay, Oregon. Nekton samples were collected u...

  18. Oregon Wildlife Planning Coordination Project, October 1, 1998 to September 30, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Susan P.

    1999-10-05

    The intent of the Oregon Wildlife Planning Coordination project is to fund Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) staff to facilitate wildlife mitigation coordination and planning between Oregon wildlife managers. The primary goal of ODFW wildlife mitigation planning/coordination staff is to foster, facilitate, and manage a statewide cooperative wildlife mitigation planning and implementation effort between the Oregon wildlife managers (the Oregon Wildlife Coalition or OWC) to mitigate for wildlife losses in Oregon caused by the development and operation of the hydropower system.

  19. "It's In My Veins": Exploring the Role of an Afrocentric, Popular Education-Based Training Program in the Empowerment of African American and African Community Health Workers in Oregon.

    PubMed

    Bridgeman-Bunyoli, Arika; Mitchell, S Renee; Bin Abdullah, AbdulʼHafeedh M; Schwoeffermann, Ty; Phoenix, Toliver; Goughnour, Cat; Hines-Norwood, Richard; Wiggins, Noelle

    2015-01-01

    The role racism and other social determinants of health play in the creation of health inequities in African American communities in the United States is increasingly understood. In this article, we explore the effectiveness of an Afrocentric, popular education-based community health worker (CHW) training program in creating positive change among CHW participants and their communities in Portland, Oregon. Findings suggest that CHW participants experienced 4 types of awakening, in addition to changes in their interaction with their family members and increased community involvement. The CHWs identified group bond, Afrocentrism, public health knowledge, popular education, facilitators, and time management as important elements of an effective training program for this community. Psychological empowerment, self-reported health status, and health behavior among participants generally increased over time, but changes were not statistically significant. PMID:26353023

  20. Flow-banded Rhyolite of the Northern Oregon Cascades: Graveyard and Gordon Buttes, Tygh Valley, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westby, E.; Streck, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    One of the most structurally complex areas along the northeastern margin of the Oregon Cascades is in Tygh Valley. Crustal shortening produced folds and extensional tectonics resulted in rifting during the Miocene/Pliocene. Rhyolite, exposed in channel cuts and river canyon, records this transition, summarized in new, more detailed research. Tygh Valley, Oregon, is a synclinal basin bordered by the Tygh Ridge anticline to the north, Mutton Mountains to the south, and the Cascade Range (with Mt. Hood) to the west. The stratigraphy of the basin consists of epi- and volcaniclastic deposits mostly derived from the Cascades Range, in addition to ash flow tuffs and surficial basalt lava flows. Rhyolite lava flows are found at two dome complexes in the Tygh Valley area, Graveyard Butte and Gordon Butte. At Graveyard Butte, the White River has cut a winding canyon 140 meters deep, exposing at its base, a 40-meter thick outcrop of flow-banded rhyolite (73 wt.% SiO2) that laterally extends along the canyon walls for about 1 km. Stratigraphically above the flow-banded rhyolites are locally-erupted Fe-rich andesites (lava flows, agglutinate and other pyroclastic rocks as well as clastic debris), a rhyolitic ash-flow tuff (74 wt.% SiO2) and the 2.7 My basalt lava flows of Juniper Flat. At Gordon Butte, compositionally similar rhyolite lavas are exposed in channel cuts but flows are less constrained on ridge tops due to heavy vegetation. Ongoing age dating experiments will likely reveal a late Miocene/Pliocene age for these rhyolite lava flows. The rhyolite lavas flows at both buttes are chemically nearly indistinguishable but contrast with the stratigraphically younger rhyolitic ash-flow tuff at Graveyard Butte. Rhyolite lavas are richer in Nb and Zr than the younger rhyolitic tuff (Nb 30-40 versus 13 ppm; Zr 490 versus 240 ppm) and share characteristics with much older (~30 Ma) rhyolites of the Western Cascades and John Day Formation of central and eastern Oregon as well as