Science.gov

Sample records for 2d electronic structure

  1. Electronic structure study on 2D hydrogenated Icosagens nitride nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, S.; Marutheeswaran, S.; Ramaclus, Jerald V.; Paul, Dolon Chapa

    2014-12-01

    Metal nitride nanosheets has attracted remarkable importance in surface catalysis due to its characteristic ionic nature. In this paper, using density functional theory, we investigate geometric stability and electronic properties of hydrogenated Icosagen nitride nanosheets. Binding energy of the sheets reveals hydrogenation is providing more stability. Band structure of the hydrogenated sheets is found to be n-type semiconductor. Partial density of states shows metals (B, Al, Ga and In) and its hydrogens dominating in the Fermi region. Mulliken charge analysis indications that hydrogenated nanosheets are partially hydridic surface nature except boron nitride.

  2. Local electronic structures and 2D topological phase transition of ultrathin Sb films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunghwan; Jin, Kyung-Hwan; Park, Joonbum; Kim, Jun Sung; Jhi, Seung-Hoon; Yeom, Han Woong

    We investigate local electronic structures of ultrathin Sb islands and their edges grown on Bi2Te2Se by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The Sb islands of various thickness are grown with atomically well ordered edge structure over the 3 bilayers (BL). On the surfaces and edges of these islands, we clearly resolve edge-localized electronic states by STS measurements, which depend on the thickness. The DFT calculations identify that the strongly localized edge states of 4 and 5 BL films correspond to a quantum spin Hall (QSH) states while the edge states of 3 BL are trivial. Our experimental and theoretical results confirm the 2D topological phase transition of the ultrathin Sb films from trivial to QSH phase. Center for Artificial Low Dimensional Electronic Systems, Institute for Basic Science and Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Korea.

  3. Correlating Structural and Electronic Degrees of Freedom in 2D Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, I.-Cheng; Zhang, Z.; Seyler, K. L.; Jones, A. M.; Clark, G.; Xiao, D.; Laanait, N.; Xu, X.; Wen, H.

    We have conducted a microscopic study of the interplay between structural and electronic degrees of freedom in two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) monolayers, multilayers and heterostructures. Using the recently developed full field x-ray reflection interface microscopy with the photoluminescence microscopic probe capability at the Advanced Photon Source, we demonstrated the x-ray reflection imaging of a monolayer 2D material for the first time. The structural variation across an exfoliated WSe2 monolayer is quantified by interlayer spacing relative to the crystal substrate and the smoothness of the layer. This structural information is correlated with the electronic properties of TMDs characterized by the in-situ photoluminescence measurements. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-SC0012509. The use of Advanced Photon Source is supported by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  4. A Fast Parallel Algorithm for Selected Inversion of Structured Sparse Matrices with Application to 2D Electronic Structure Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Lin; Yang, Chao; Lu, Jiangfeng; Ying, Lexing; E, Weinan

    2009-09-25

    We present an efficient parallel algorithm and its implementation for computing the diagonal of $H^-1$ where $H$ is a 2D Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian discretized on a rectangular domain using a standard second order finite difference scheme. This type of calculation can be used to obtain an accurate approximation to the diagonal of a Fermi-Dirac function of $H$ through a recently developed pole-expansion technique \\cite{LinLuYingE2009}. The diagonal elements are needed in electronic structure calculations for quantum mechanical systems \\citeHohenbergKohn1964, KohnSham 1965,DreizlerGross1990. We show how elimination tree is used to organize the parallel computation and how synchronization overhead is reduced by passing data level by level along this tree using the technique of local buffers and relative indices. We analyze the performance of our implementation by examining its load balance and communication overhead. We show that our implementation exhibits an excellent weak scaling on a large-scale high performance distributed parallel machine. When compared with standard approach for evaluating the diagonal a Fermi-Dirac function of a Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian associated a 2D electron quantum dot, the new pole-expansion technique that uses our algorithm to compute the diagonal of $(H-z_i I)^-1$ for a small number of poles $z_i$ is much faster, especially when the quantum dot contains many electrons.

  5. Electronic structure of disordered CuPd alloys by positron-annihilation 2D-ACAR

    SciTech Connect

    Smedskjaer, L.C.; Benedek, R.; Siegel, R.W.; Legnini, D.G.; Stahulak, M.D.; Bansil, A.

    1988-01-01

    We report 2D-ACAR experiments and KKR CPA calculations on alpha-phase single-crystal Cu/sub 1-x/Pd/sub x/ in the range x less than or equal to 0.25. The flattening of the Fermi surface near (110) with increasing x predicted by theory is confirmed by our experimental results. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Theoretical predictions on the electronic structure and charge carrier mobility in 2D Phosphorus sheets

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jin; Long, Mengqiu; Zhang, Xiaojiao; Ouyang, Jun; Xu, Hui; Gao, Yongli

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the electronic structure and carrier mobility of four types of phosphorous monolayer sheet (α-P, β-P,γ-P and δ-P) using density functional theory combined with Boltzmann transport method and relaxation time approximation. It is shown that α-P, β-P and γ-P are indirect gap semiconductors, while δ-P is a direct one. All four sheets have ultrahigh carrier mobility and show anisotropy in-plane. The highest mobility value is ~3 × 105 cm2V−1s−1, which is comparable to that of graphene. Because of the huge difference between the hole and electron mobilities, α-P, γ-P and δ-P sheets can be considered as n-type semiconductors, and β-P sheet can be considered as a p-type semiconductor. Our results suggest that phosphorous monolayer sheets can be considered as a new type of two dimensional materials for applications in optoelectronics and nanoelectronic devices. PMID:26035176

  7. Electronic structural Moiré pattern effects on MoS2/MoSe2 2D heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jun; Li, Jingbo; Li, Shu-Shen; Xia, Jian-Bai; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2013-01-01

    The structural and electronic properties of MoS2/MoSe2 bilayers are calculated using first-principles methods. It is found that the interlayer van der Waals interaction is not strong enough to form a lattice-matched coherent heterostructure. Instead, a nanometer-scale Moiré pattern structure will be formed. By analyzing the electronic structures of different stacking configurations, we predict that the valence-band maximum (VBM) state will come from the Γ point due to interlayer electronic coupling. This is confirmed by a direct calculation of a Moiré pattern supercell containing 6630 atoms using the linear scaling three-dimensional fragment method. The VBM state is found to be strongly localized, while the conduction band minimum (CBM) state is only weakly localized, and it comes from the MoS2 layer at the K point. We predict such wave function localization can be a general feature for many two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals heterostructures and can have major impacts on the carrier mobility and other electronic and optical properties. PMID:24079953

  8. 2D transition-metal diselenides: phase segregation, electronic structure, and magnetism.

    PubMed

    Manchanda, Priyanka; Skomski, Ralph

    2016-02-17

    Density-functional theory is used to investigate the phase-segregation behavior of two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides, which are of current interest as beyond-graphene materials for optoelectronic and spintronic applications. Our focus is on the behavior of W1-x V x Se2 monolayers, whose end members are semiconducting WSe2 and ferromagnetic VSe2. The energetics favors phase segregation, but the spinodal decomposition temperature is rather low, about 420 K. The addition of V leads to a transition from a nonmagnetic semiconductor to a metallic ferromagnet, with a ferromagnetic moment of about 1.0 μ B per V atom. The transition is caused by a p-type doping mechanism, which shifts the Fermi level into the valence band. The finite-temperature structure and magnetism of the diselenide systems are discussed in terms of Onsager-type critical fluctuations and Bruggeman effective-medium behavior. PMID:26794410

  9. 2D transition-metal diselenides: phase segregation, electronic structure, and magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchanda, Priyanka; Skomski, Ralph

    2016-02-01

    Density-functional theory is used to investigate the phase-segregation behavior of two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides, which are of current interest as beyond-graphene materials for optoelectronic and spintronic applications. Our focus is on the behavior of W1-x V x Se2 monolayers, whose end members are semiconducting WSe2 and ferromagnetic VSe2. The energetics favors phase segregation, but the spinodal decomposition temperature is rather low, about 420 K. The addition of V leads to a transition from a nonmagnetic semiconductor to a metallic ferromagnet, with a ferromagnetic moment of about 1.0 μ B per V atom. The transition is caused by a p-type doping mechanism, which shifts the Fermi level into the valence band. The finite-temperature structure and magnetism of the diselenide systems are discussed in terms of Onsager-type critical fluctuations and Bruggeman effective-medium behavior.

  10. Electronic band structure and charge density wave transition in quasi-2D KMo6O17 purple bronze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valbuena, M. A.; Avila, J.; Vyalikh, D. V.; Guyot, H.; Laubschat, C.; Molodtsov, S. L.; Asensio, M. C.

    2008-03-01

    High resolution angle-resolved photoemission of quasi-2D KMo6O17 purple bronze has been performed in the range from room temperature to 130 K, slightly above the charge density wave (CDW) transition (Tc = 110 K), and down to 35 K (well below Tc). In this paper we report a detailed study of how electronic band structure is affected by this transition driven by the hidden nesting scenario. The expected spectroscopic fingerprints of the CDW phase transition have been found and discussed according to the hidden one dimension and the development of a quasi-commensurate CDW. The excellent agreement between theory and our experimental results makes of potassium purple bronze a reference system for studying this type of instabilities.

  11. 2D electronic materials for army applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Regan, Terrance; Perconti, Philip

    2015-05-01

    The record electronic properties achieved in monolayer graphene and related 2D materials such as molybdenum disulfide and hexagonal boron nitride show promise for revolutionary high-speed and low-power electronic devices. Heterogeneous 2D-stacked materials may create enabling technology for future communication and computation applications to meet soldier requirements. For instance, transparent, flexible and even wearable systems may become feasible. With soldier and squad level electronic power demands increasing, the Army is committed to developing and harnessing graphene-like 2D materials for compact low size-weight-and-power-cost (SWAP-C) systems. This paper will review developments in 2D electronic materials at the Army Research Laboratory over the last five years and discuss directions for future army applications.

  12. Gold-induced nanowires on the Ge(100) surface yield a 2D and not a 1D electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, N.; Heimbuch, R.; Eliëns, S.; Smit, S.; Frantzeskakis, E.; Caux, J.-S.; Zandvliet, H. J. W.; Golden, M. S.

    2016-06-01

    Atomic nanowires on semiconductor surfaces induced by the adsorption of metallic atoms have attracted a lot of attention as possible hosts of the elusive, one-dimensional Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid. The Au/Ge(100) system in particular is the subject of controversy as to whether the Au-induced nanowires do indeed host exotic, 1D (one-dimensional) metallic states. In light of this debate, we report here a thorough study of the electronic properties of high quality nanowires formed at the Au/Ge(100) surface. The high-resolution ARPES data show the low-lying Au-induced electronic states to possess a dispersion relation that depends on two orthogonal directions in k space. Comparison of the E (kx,ky) surface measured using high-resolution ARPES to tight-binding calculations yields hopping parameters in the two different directions that differ by approximately factor of two. Additionally, by pinpointing the Au-induced surface states in the first, second, and third surface Brillouin zones and analyzing their periodicity in k||, the nanowire propagation direction seen clearly in STM can be imported into the ARPES data. We find that the larger of the two hopping parameters corresponds, in fact, to the direction perpendicular to the nanowires (tperp). This proves that the Au-induced electron pockets possess a two-dimensional, closed Fermi surface, and this firmly places the Au/Ge(100) nanowire system outside potential hosts of a Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid. We combine these ARPES data with scanning tunneling spectroscopic measurements of the spatially resolved electronic structure and find that the spatially straight—wirelike—conduction channels observed up to energies of order one electron volt below the Fermi level do not originate from the Au-induced states seen in the ARPES data. The former are rather more likely to be associated with bulk Ge states that are localized to the subsurface region. Despite our proof of the 2D (two-dimentional) nature of the Au

  13. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W. Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Tobias, B. J.

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  14. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W.; Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Tobias, B. J.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2014-11-01

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  15. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics.

    PubMed

    Spear, A G; Domier, C W; Hu, X; Muscatello, C M; Ren, X; Tobias, B J; Luhmann, N C

    2014-11-01

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program. PMID:25430247

  16. 2D 31P solid state NMR spectroscopy, electronic structure and thermochemistry of PbP7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benndorf, Christopher; Hohmann, Andrea; Schmidt, Peer; Eckert, Hellmut; Johrendt, Dirk; Schäfer, Konrad; Pöttgen, Rainer

    2016-03-01

    Phase pure polycrystalline PbP7 was prepared from the elements via a lead flux. Crystalline pieces with edge-lengths up to 1 mm were obtained. The assignment of the previously published 31P solid state NMR spectrum to the seven distinct crystallographic sites was accomplished by radio-frequency driven dipolar recoupling (RFDR) experiments. As commonly found in other solid polyphosphides there is no obvious correlation between the 31P chemical shift and structural parameters. PbP7 decomposes incongruently under release of phosphorus forming liquid lead as remainder. The thermal decomposition starts at T>550 K with a vapor pressure almost similar to that of red phosphorus. Electronic structure calculations reveal PbP7 as a semiconductor according to the Zintl description and clearly shows the stereo-active Pb-6s2 lone pairs in the electron localization function ELF.

  17. Can fractional quantum Hall effect be due to the formation of coherent wave structures in a 2D electron gas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, Babur M.

    2016-05-01

    A microscopic theory of integer and fractional quantum Hall effects is presented here. In quantum density wave representation of charged particles, it is shown that, in a two-dimensional electron gas coherent structures form under the low temperature and high density conditions. With a sufficiently high applied magnetic field, the combined N particle quantum density wave exhibits collective periodic oscillations. As a result the corresponding quantum Hall voltage function shows a step-wise change in multiples of the ratio h/e2. At lower temperatures further subdivisions emerge in the Hall resistance, exhibiting the fractional quantum Hall effect.

  18. Theoretical study of the thermodynamic stability and electronic structure of thin films of 3 C, 2 H, and 2 D silicon carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzubov, A. A.; Eliseeva, N. S.; Krasnov, P. O.; Tomilin, F. N.; Fedorov, A. S.; Tolstaya, A. V.

    2014-08-01

    Silicon carbide is among the most common materials used in semiconductor engineering. Silicon carbide thin films are attractive from the standpoint of designing devices based on heterojunctions. This is due to a characteristic feature of this compound, such as polytypism, leading to the difference in the physical properties and also hampering the preparation of high-quality material samples. In this work, the thermodynamic stability and electronic structure of thin films based on the polytypes 3 C, 2 H, and 2 D with a thickness of a few nanometers have been studied.

  19. Correlated Electron Phenomena in 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Joseph G.

    In this thesis, I present experimental results on coherent electron phenomena in layered two-dimensional materials: single layer graphene and van der Waals coupled 2D TiSe2. Graphene is a two-dimensional single-atom thick sheet of carbon atoms first derived from bulk graphite by the mechanical exfoliation technique in 2004. Low-energy charge carriers in graphene behave like massless Dirac fermions, and their density can be easily tuned between electron-rich and hole-rich quasiparticles with electrostatic gating techniques. The sharp interfaces between regions of different carrier densities form barriers with selective transmission, making them behave as partially reflecting mirrors. When two of these interfaces are set at a separation distance within the phase coherence length of the carriers, they form an electronic version of a Fabry-Perot cavity. I present measurements and analysis of multiple Fabry-Perot modes in graphene with parallel electrodes spaced a few hundred nanometers apart. Transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) TiSe2 is part of the family of materials that coined the term "materials beyond graphene". It contains van der Waals coupled trilayer stacks of Se-Ti-Se. Many TMD materials exhibit a host of interesting correlated electronic phases. In particular, TiSe2 exhibits chiral charge density waves (CDW) below TCDW ˜ 200 K. Upon doping with copper, the CDW state gets suppressed with Cu concentration, and CuxTiSe2 becomes superconducting with critical temperature of T c = 4.15 K. There is still much debate over the mechanisms governing the coexistence of the two correlated electronic phases---CDW and superconductivity. I will present some of the first conductance spectroscopy measurements of proximity coupled superconductor-CDW systems. Measurements reveal a proximity-induced critical current at the Nb-TiSe2 interfaces, suggesting pair correlations in the pure TiSe2. The results indicate that superconducting order is present concurrently with CDW in

  20. Contrasting 1D tunnel-structured and 2D layered polymorphs of V2O5: relating crystal structure and bonding to band gaps and electronic structure.

    PubMed

    Tolhurst, Thomas M; Leedahl, Brett; Andrews, Justin L; Marley, Peter M; Banerjee, Sarbajit; Moewes, Alexander

    2016-06-21

    New V2O5 polymorphs have risen to prominence as a result of their open framework structures, cation intercalation properties, tunable electronic structures, and wide range of applications. The application of these materials and the design of new, useful polymorphs requires understanding their defining structure-property relationships. We present a characterization of the band gap and electronic structure of nanowires of the novel ζ-phase and the orthorhombic α-phase of V2O5 using X-ray spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. The band gap is found to decrease from 1.90 ± 0.20 eV in the α-phase to 1.50 ± 0.20 eV in the ζ-phase, accompanied by the loss of the α-phase's characteristic split-off dxy band in the ζ-phase. States of dxy origin continue to dominate the conduction band edge in the new polymorph but the inequivalence of the vanadium atoms and the increased local symmetry of [VO6] octahedra results in these states overlapping with the rest of the V 3d conduction band. ζ-V2O5 exhibits anisotropic conductivity along the b direction, defining a 1D tunnel, in contrast to α-V2O5 where the anisotropic conductivity is along the ab layers. We explain the structural origins of the differences in electronic properties that exist between the α- and ζ-phase. PMID:27230816

  1. Electronic structures and magnetic stabilities of 2D Mn-doped GaAs nanosheets: The role of long-range exchange interactions and doping strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Mu; Xiang, Gang Zhang, Xi

    2014-08-28

    We investigate the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Mn atoms doped two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal GaAs nanosheets (GaAsNSs) using both first-principle calculations and Monte Carlo simulations. The first-principle molecular dynamics is first used to test the structural stability of Mn-doped GaAsNS ((Ga,Mn)AsNS). The analysis of spin-resolved electronic structures and determination of magnetic exchange interactions based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveals the existence of long-range exchange interaction in the system. Finally, Metropolis Monte Carlo simulation is employed to estimate Curie temperatures (T{sub C}s) of (Ga,Mn)AsNSs with different doping concentrations by different doping strategies. The results indicate that a T{sub C} up to 82 K can be obtained in regularly-doped (Ga,Mn)AsNSs and doping strategies have prominent impact on T{sub C}s of the systems, which emphasizes the importance of both long-range interactions and doping strategies in reduced dimensional diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMSs)

  2. Electronic Structure and Fermi Surface of the Quaternary Intermetallic Borocarbide Superconductor YNi2B2C from 2D-ACAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, A. S.

    We measured the angular momentum density distribution of YNi2B2C to acquire information about its electronic structure. The measurements were performed using the full-scale utility of the two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR). The measured spectra clarified that Ni (3d) like state, predominantly, affected the Fermi surface of YNi2B2C. Further, s- and p-like-states enhanced its superconducting properties. The Fermi surface of YNi2B2C. was reconstructed using Fourier transformation followed by the LCW (Loucks, Crisp and West) folding procedure. It showed a large and complex surface similar to that of the high temperature superconductors HTS, with anisotropic properties. It also disclosed the effect of d-like state. Nevertheless, the current Fermi surface could deliver the needed topological information to isolate its features. The general layouts of this Fermi surface are; two large electron surfaces running along Γ-Z direction; as well as an additional large electron surface centered on X point; beside one hole surface centered on 100 point. This Fermi surface was interpreted in view of the earlier results.

  3. High-throughput critical dimensions uniformity (CDU) measurement of two-dimensional (2D) structures using scanning electron microscope (SEM) systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullam, Jennifer; Boye, Carol; Standaert, Theodorus; Gaudiello, John; Tomlinson, Derek; Xiao, Hong; Fang, Wei; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Fei; Ma, Long; Zhao, Yan; Jau, Jack

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we tested a novel methodology of measuring critical dimension (CD) uniformity, or CDU, with electron beam (e-beam) hotspot inspection and measurement systems developed by Hermes Microvision, Inc. (HMI). The systems were used to take images of two-dimensional (2D) array patterns and measure CDU values in a custom designated fashion. Because this methodology combined imaging of scanning micro scope (SEM) and CD value averaging over a large array pattern of optical CD, or OCD, it can measure CDU of 2D arrays with high accuracy, high repeatability and high throughput.

  4. Materials for Flexible, Stretchable Electronics: Graphene and 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Jin; Choi, Kyoungjun; Lee, Bora; Kim, Yuna; Hong, Byung Hee

    2015-07-01

    Recently, 2D materials have been intensively studied as emerging materials for future electronics, including flexible electronics, photonics, and electrochemical energy storage devices. Among representative 2D materials (such as graphene, boron nitride, and transition metal dichalcogenides) that exhibit extraordinary properties, graphene stands out in the flexible electronics field due to its combination of high electron mobility, high thermal conductivity, high specific surface area, high optical transparency, excellent mechanical flexibility, and environmental stability. This review covers the synthesis, transfer, and characterization methods of graphene and 2D materials and graphene's application to flexible devices as well as comparison with other competing materials.

  5. Electron dynamics and valley relaxation in 2D semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundogdu, Kenan

    2015-03-01

    Single layer transition metal dichalcogenides are 2D semiconducting systems with unique electronic band structure. Two-valley energy bands along with strong spin-orbital coupling lead to valley dependent career spin polarization, which is the basis for recently proposed valleytronic applications. Since the durations of valley population provide the time window in which valley specific processes take place, it is an essential parameter for developing valleytronic devices. These systems also exhibit unusually strong many body affects, such as strong exciton and trion binding, due to reduced dielectric screening of Coulomb interactions. But there is not much known about the impact of strong many particle correlations on spin and valley polarization dynamics. Here we report direct measurements of ultrafast valley specific relaxation dynamics in single layer MoS2 and WS2. We found that excitonic many body interactions significantly contribute to the relaxation process. Biexciton formation reveals hole valley spin relaxation time. Our results also suggest initial fast intervalley electron scattering and electron spin relaxation leads to loss of electron valley polarization, which then facilitates hole valley relaxation via excitonic spin exchange interaction.

  6. 2-D Imaging of Electron Temperature in Tokamak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    T. Munsat; E. Mazzucato; H. Park; C.W. Domier; M. Johnson; N.C. Luhmann Jr.; J. Wang; Z. Xia; I.G.J. Classen; A.J.H. Donne; M.J. van de Pol

    2004-07-08

    By taking advantage of recent developments in millimeter wave imaging technology, an Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) instrument, capable of simultaneously measuring 128 channels of localized electron temperature over a 2-D map in the poloidal plane, has been developed for the TEXTOR tokamak. Data from the new instrument, detailing the MHD activity associated with a sawtooth crash, is presented.

  7. Transport Experiments on 2D Correlated Electron Physics in Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, Daniel

    2014-03-24

    This research project was designed to investigate experimentally the transport properties of the 2D electrons in Si and GaAs, two prototype semiconductors, in several new physical regimes that were previously inaccessible to experiments. The research focused on the strongly correlated electron physics in the dilute density limit, where the electron potential energy to kinetic energy ratio rs>>1, and on the fractional quantum Hall effect related physics in nuclear demagnetization refrigerator temperature range on samples with new levels of purity and controlled random disorder.

  8. Resonances of piezoelectric plate with embedded 2D electron system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suslov, A. V.

    2009-02-01

    A thin GaAs/AlGaAs plate was studied by the resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) in the temperature range 0.3-10 K and in magnetic fields of up to 18 T. The resonance frequencies and linewidths were measured. Quantum oscillations of both these values were observed and were associated with the quantum Hall effect occurred in the 2D electron system. For an analysis the sample was treated as a dielectric piezoelectric plate covered on one side by a film with a field dependent conductivity. Screening of the strain-driven electric field was changed due to the variation of the electron relaxation time in the vicinity of the metal-dielectric transitions caused by the magnetic field in the 2D system. The dielectric film does not affect properties of GaAs and thus the resonance frequencies are defined only by the elastic, piezoelectric and dielectric constants of GaAs. A metallic 2D sheet effectively screens the parallel electric field, so the ultrasound wave velocities and resonance frequencies decrease when the sheet conductivity increases. Oscillations of the resonance linewidth reflect the influence of the 2D system on the ultrasound attenuation, which is proportional to the linewidth. A metallic film as well as a dielectric one does not affect this attenuation but at some finite nonzero value of the conductivity the linewidth approaches a maximum. In high magnetic field each oscillation of the conductivity produces one oscillation of a resonance frequency and two linewidth peaks. The observed phenomena can be described by the relaxation type equations and the resonant ultrasound spectroscopy opens another opportunity for contactless studies on 2D electron systems.

  9. Universal Fabrication of 2D Electron Systems in Functional Oxides.

    PubMed

    Rödel, Tobias Chris; Fortuna, Franck; Sengupta, Shamashis; Frantzeskakis, Emmanouil; Fèvre, Patrick Le; Bertran, François; Mercey, Bernard; Matzen, Sylvia; Agnus, Guillaume; Maroutian, Thomas; Lecoeur, Philippe; Santander-Syro, Andrés Felipe

    2016-03-01

    2D electron systems (2DESs) in functional oxides are promising for applications, but their fabrication and use, essentially limited to SrTiO3 -based heterostructures, are hampered by the need for growing complex oxide overlayers thicker than 2 nm using evolved techniques. It is demonstrated that thermal deposition of a monolayer of an elementary reducing agent suffices to create 2DESs in numerous oxides. PMID:26753522

  10. Quantum Oscillations in an Interfacial 2D Electron Gas.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bingop; Lu, Ping; Liu, Henan; Lin, Jiao; Ye, Zhenyu; Jaime, Marcelo; Balakirev, Fedor F.; Yuan, Huiqiu; Wu, Huizhen; Pan, Wei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it has been predicted that topological crystalline insulators (TCIs) may exist in SnTe and Pb1-xSnxTe thin films [1]. To date, most studies on TCIs were carried out either in bulk crystals or thin films, and no research activity has been explored in heterostructures. We present here the results on electronic transport properties of the 2D electron gas (2DEG) realized at the interfaces of PbTe/ CdTe (111) heterostructures. Evidence of topological state in this interfacial 2DEG was observed.

  11. Electron Energy Levels in the 1D-2D Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepper, Michael; Sanjeev, Kumar; Thomas, Kalarikad; Creeth, Graham; English, David; Ritchie, David; Griffiths, Jonathan; Farrer, Ian; Jones, Geraint

    Using GaAs-AlGaAs heterostructures we have investigated the behaviour of electron energy levels with relaxation of the potential confining a 2D electron gas into a 1D configuration. In the ballistic regime of transport, when the conductance shows quantized plateaux, different types of behaviour are found according to the spins of interacting levels, whether a magnetic field is applied and lifting of the momentum degeneracy with a source-drain voltage. We have observed both crossing and anti-crossing of levels and have investigated the manner in which they can be mutually converted. In the presence of a magnetic field levels can cross and lock together as the confinement is altered in a way which is characteristic of parallel channels. The overall behaviour is discussed in terms of electron interactions and the wavefunction flexibility allowed by the increasing two dimensionality of the electron distribution as the confinement is weakened. Work supported by UK EPSRC.

  12. Nonlinear Heat Transfer 2d Structure

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1987-09-01

    DOT-BPMD is a general-purpose, finite-element, heat-transfer program used to predict thermal environments. The code considers linear and nonlinear transient or steady-state heat conduction in two-dimensional planar or axisymmetric representations of structures. Capabilities are provided for modeling anisotropic heterogeneous materials with temperature-dependent thermal properties and time-dependent temperature, heat flux, convection and radiation boundary conditions, together with time-dependent internal heat generation. DOT-BPMD may be used in the evaluation of steady-state geothermal gradients as well as in themore » transient heat conduction analysis of repository and waste package subsystems. Strengths of DOT-BPMD include its ability to account for a wide range of possible boundary conditions, nonlinear material properties, and its efficient equation solution algorithm. Limitations include the lack of a three-dimensional analysis capability, no radiative or convective internal heat transfer, and the need to maintain a constant time-step in each program execution.« less

  13. Homogenization models for 2-D grid structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Cioranescu, D.; Rebnord, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    In the past several years, we have pursued efforts related to the development of accurate models for the dynamics of flexible structures made of composite materials. Rather than viewing periodicity and sparseness as obstacles to be overcome, we exploit them to our advantage. We consider a variational problem on a domain that has large, periodically distributed holes. Using homogenization techniques we show that the solution to this problem is in some topology 'close' to the solution of a similar problem that holds on a much simpler domain. We study the behavior of the solution of the variational problem as the holes increase in number, but decrease in size in such a way that the total amount of material remains constant. The result is an equation that is in general more complex, but with a domain that is simply connected rather than perforated. We study the limit of the solution as the amount of material goes to zero. This second limit will, in most cases, retrieve much of the simplicity that was lost in the first limit without sacrificing the simplicity of the domain. Finally, we show that these results can be applied to the case of a vibrating Love-Kirchhoff plate with Kelvin-Voigt damping. We rely heavily on earlier results of (Du), (CS) for the static, undamped Love-Kirchhoff equation. Our efforts here result in a modification of those results to include both time dependence and Kelvin-Voigt damping.

  14. Graphene as a platform to study 2D electronic transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchiat, Vincent; Kessler, Brian; Girit, Caglar; Zettl, Alex

    2010-03-01

    The easily accessible 2D electron gas in graphene provides an ideal platform on which to tune, via application of an electrostatic gate, the coupling between electronically ordered dopants deposited on its surface. To demonstrate this concept, we have measured arrays of superconducting clusters deposited on Graphene capable to induce via the proximity effect a gate-tunable superconducting transition. Using a simple fabrication procedure based on metal layer dewetting, doped graphene sheets can be decorated with a non percolating network on nanoscale tin clusters. This hybrid material displays a two-step superconducting transition. The higher transition step is gate independent and corresponds to the transition of the tin clusters to the superconducting state. The lower transition step towards a real zero resistance state exhibiting a well developped supercurrent, is strongly gate-tunable and is quantitatively described by Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless 2D vortex unbinding. Our simple self-assembly method and tunable coupling can readily be extended to other electronic order parameters such as ferro/antiferromagnetism, charge/spin density waves using similar decoration techniques. [1] B. M. Kessler, C.O. Girit, A. Zettl, and V. Bouchiat, Tunable Superconducting Phase Transition in Metal-Decorated Graphene Sheets submitted to PRL, arXiv:0907.3661

  15. Engineering the Electronic Structure of 2D WS2 Nanosheets Using Co Incorporation as Cox W(1- x ) S2 for Conspicuously Enhanced Hydrogen Generation.

    PubMed

    Shifa, Tofik Ahmed; Wang, Fengmei; Liu, Kaili; Xu, Kai; Wang, Zhenxing; Zhan, Xueying; Jiang, Chao; He, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), as one of potential electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), have been extensively studied. Such TMD-based ternary materials are believed to engender optimization of hydrogen adsorption free energy to thermoneutral value. Theoretically, cobalt is predicted to actively promote the catalytic activity of WS2 . However, experimentally it requires systematic approach to form Cox W(1- x ) S2 without any concomitant side phases that are detrimental for the intended purpose. This study reports a rational method to synthesize pure ternary Cox W(1- x ) S2 nanosheets for efficiently catalyzing HER. Benefiting from the modification in the electronic structure, the resultant material requires overpotential of 121 mV versus reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE) to achieve current density of 10 mA cm(-2) and shows Tafel slope of 67 mV dec(-1) . Furthermore, negligible loss of activity is observed over continues electrolysis of up to 2 h demonstrating its fair stability. The finding provides noticeable experimental support for other computational reports and paves the way for further works in the area of HER catalysis based on ternary materials. PMID:27322598

  16. Generating a 2D Representation of a Complex Data Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A computer program, designed to assist in the development and debugging of other software, generates a two-dimensional (2D) representation of a possibly complex n-dimensional (where n is an integer >2) data structure or abstract rank-n object in that other software. The nature of the 2D representation is such that it can be displayed on a non-graphical output device and distributed by non-graphical means.

  17. Electronic structure of charge-density-wave state in quasi-2D KMo6O17 purple bronze characterized by angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valbuena, M. A.; Avila, J.; Drouard, S.; Guyot, H.; Asensio, M. C.

    2006-01-01

    We report on an angle-resolved-photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) investigation of layered quasi-two dimensional (2D) Molybdenum purple bronze KMo6O17 in order to study and characterizes the transition to a charge-density-wave (CDW) state. We have performed photoemission temperature dependent measurements cooling down from room temperature (RT) to 32 K, well below the Peierls transition for this material, with CDW transition temperature Tc =110 K. The spectra have been taken at a selected kF point of the Fermi surface (FS) that satisfies the nesting condition of the FS, looking for the characteristic pseudo-gap opening in this kind of materials. The pseudogap has been estimated and it result to be in agreement with our previous works. The shift to lower binding energy of crossing Fermi level ARPES feature have been also confirmed and studied as a function of temperature, showing a rough like BCS behaviour. Finally we have also focused on ARPES measurements along ΓM¯ high symmetry direction for both room and low temperature states finding some insight for ‘shadow’ or back folded bands indicating the new periodicity of real lattice after the CDW lattice distortion.

  18. Nano-scale electronic and optoelectronic devices based on 2D crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wenjuan

    In the last few years, the research community has been rapidly growing interests in two-dimensional (2D) crystals and their applications. The properties of these 2D crystals are diverse -- ranging from semi-metal such as graphene, semiconductors such as MoS2, to insulator such as boron nitride. These 2D crystals have many unique properties as compared to their bulk counterparts due to their reduced dimensionality and symmetry. A key difference is the band structures, which lead to distinct electronic and photonic properties. The 2D nature of the material also plays an important role in defining their exceptional properties of mechanical strength, surface sensitivity, thermal conductivity, tunable band-gap and their interaction with light. These unique properties of 2D crystals open up a broad territory of applications in computing, communication, energy, and medicine. In this talk, I will present our work on understanding the electrical properties of graphene and MoS2, in particular current transport and band-gap engineering in graphene, interface between gate dielectrics and graphene, and gap states in MoS2. I will also present our work on the nano-scale electronic devices (RF and logic devices) and photonic devices (plasmonic devices and photo-detectors) based on these 2D crystals.

  19. 2D ice from first principles: structures and phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ji; Schusteritsch, Georg; Pickard, Chris J.; Salzmann, Christoph G.; Michaelides, Angelos

    Despite relevance to disparate areas such as cloud microphysics and tribology, major gaps in the understanding of the structures and phase transitions of low-dimensional water ice remain. Here we report a first principles study of confined 2D ice as a function of pressure. We find that at ambient pressure hexagonal and pentagonal monolayer structures are the two lowest enthalpy phases identified. Upon mild compression the pentagonal structure becomes the most stable and persists up to ca. 2 GPa at which point square and rhombic phases are stable. The square phase agrees with recent experimental observations of square ice confined within graphene sheets. We also find a double layer AA stacked square ice phase, which clarifies the difference between experimental observations and earlier force field simulations. This work provides a fresh perspective on 2D confined ice, highlighting the sensitivity of the structures observed to both the confining pressure and width.

  20. 2D imaging of functional structures in perfused pig heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, Manfred D.; Cristea, Paul D.; Hiller, Michael; Trinks, Tobias

    2002-06-01

    In 2000 by 2D-imaging we were able for the first time to visualize in subcellular space functional structures of myocardium. For these experiments we used hemoglobin-free perfused pig hearts in our lab. Step by step we learned to understand the meaning of subcellular structures. Principally, the experiment revealed that in subcellular space very fast changes of light scattering can occur. Furthermore, coefficients of different parameters were determined on the basis of multicomponent system theory.

  1. Baby universes and fractal structure of 2d gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorleifsson, Gudmar

    1994-04-01

    We extract the string susceptibility exponent γstr by measuring the distribution of baby universes on surfaces in the case of various matter fields coupled to discrete 2d quantum gravity. For c <= 1 the results are in good agreement with the KPZ-formula, if logarithmic corrections are taken into account for c = 1. For c > 1 it is not as clear how to extract γstr but universality with respect to c is observed in the fractal structure.

  2. In-Cell Protein Structures from 2D NMR Experiments.

    PubMed

    Müntener, Thomas; Häussinger, Daniel; Selenko, Philipp; Theillet, Francois-Xavier

    2016-07-21

    In-cell NMR spectroscopy provides atomic resolution insights into the structural properties of proteins in cells, but it is rarely used to solve entire protein structures de novo. Here, we introduce a paramagnetic lanthanide-tag to simultaneously measure protein pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) and residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) to be used as input for structure calculation routines within the Rosetta program. We employ this approach to determine the structure of the protein G B1 domain (GB1) in intact Xenopus laevis oocytes from a single set of 2D in-cell NMR experiments. Specifically, we derive well-defined GB1 ensembles from low concentration in-cell NMR samples (∼50 μM) measured at moderate magnetic field strengths (600 MHz), thus offering an easily accessible alternative for determining intracellular protein structures. PMID:27379949

  3. 2D Carbon Nanotube Network: A New material for Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruner, George

    2006-03-01

    This talk will focus on the electronic properties of two dimensional carbon nanotube networks, and on their application potential. Percolation issues, together with the frequency, and temperature dependent activity will be discussed. The network can be tuned from having semiconducting to metallic like behavior, and doping with electron withdrawing and donating species leads to networks with tailor-made electronic properties. The network is also highly transparent in the visible spectral range, this attribute -- together with simple room temperature fab processes -- opens up application opportunities in the area of electronics, opto-electronics, photovoltaics and sensors. Recent results on solar cells, OLEDs and smart windows will be reviewed. Field effect transistors that incorporate nanotube network conducting channels, together with complex functional devices that incorporate networks and functional molecules will also be discussed. Finally a comparison will be made with conventional and emerging materials that compete area of disposable, flexible and printable electronics.

  4. HEXAGONAL ARRAY STRUCTURE FOR 2D NDE APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Dziewierz, J.; Ramadas, S. N.; Gachagan, A.; O'Leary, R. L.

    2010-02-22

    This paper describes a combination of simulation and experimentation to evaluate the advantages offered by utilizing a hexagonal shaped array element in a 2D NDE array structure. The active material is a 1-3 connectivity piezoelectric composite structure incorporating triangular shaped pillars--each hexagonal array element comprising six triangular pillars. A combination of PZFlex, COMSOL and Matlab has been used to simulate the behavior of this device microstructure, for operation around 2.25 MHz, with unimodal behavior and low levels of mechanical cross-coupling predicted. Furthermore, the application of hexagonal array elements enables the array aperture to increase by approximately 30%, compared to a conventional orthogonal array matrix and hence will provide enhanced volumetric coverage and SNR. Prototype array configurations demonstrate good corroboration of the theoretically predicted mechanical cross-coupling between adjacent array elements (approx23 dB).

  5. 2D electron temperature diagnostic using soft x-ray imaging technique

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, K. Sanpei, A. Tanaka, H.; Ishii, G.; Kodera, R.; Ueba, R.; Himura, H.; Masamune, S.; Ohdachi, S.; Mizuguchi, N.

    2014-03-15

    We have developed a two-dimensional (2D) electron temperature (T{sub e}) diagnostic system for thermal structure studies in a low-aspect-ratio reversed field pinch (RFP). The system consists of a soft x-ray (SXR) camera with two pin holes for two-kinds of absorber foils, combined with a high-speed camera. Two SXR images with almost the same viewing area are formed through different absorber foils on a single micro-channel plate (MCP). A 2D T{sub e} image can then be obtained by calculating the intensity ratio for each element of the images. We have succeeded in distinguishing T{sub e} image in quasi-single helicity (QSH) from that in multi-helicity (MH) RFP states, where the former is characterized by concentrated magnetic fluctuation spectrum and the latter, by broad spectrum of edge magnetic fluctuations.

  6. Corbino Disk Viscometer for 2D Quantum Electron Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomadin, Andrea; Vignale, Giovanni; Polini, Marco

    2014-12-01

    The shear viscosity of a variety of strongly interacting quantum fluids, ranging from ultracold atomic Fermi gases to quark-gluon plasmas, can be accurately measured. On the contrary, no experimental data exist, to the best of our knowledge, on the shear viscosity of two-dimensional quantum electron liquids hosted in a solid-state matrix. In this work we propose a Corbino disk device, which allows a determination of the viscosity of a quantum electron liquid from the dc potential difference that arises between the inner and the outer edge of the disk in response to an oscillating magnetic flux.

  7. Corbino disk viscometer for 2D quantum electron liquids.

    PubMed

    Tomadin, Andrea; Vignale, Giovanni; Polini, Marco

    2014-12-01

    The shear viscosity of a variety of strongly interacting quantum fluids, ranging from ultracold atomic Fermi gases to quark-gluon plasmas, can be accurately measured. On the contrary, no experimental data exist, to the best of our knowledge, on the shear viscosity of two-dimensional quantum electron liquids hosted in a solid-state matrix. In this work we propose a Corbino disk device, which allows a determination of the viscosity of a quantum electron liquid from the dc potential difference that arises between the inner and the outer edge of the disk in response to an oscillating magnetic flux. PMID:25526137

  8. Electron phase coherent effects in nanostructures and coupled 2D systems

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, J.A.; Lyo, S.K.; Klem, J.F.; Sherwin, M.E.; Harff, N.E.; Eiles, T.M.; Wendt, J.R.

    1995-05-01

    This report describes the research accomplishments achieved under the LDRD Project ``Electron Phase Coherent Effects in Nanostructures and Coupled 2D Systems.`` The goal of this project was to discover and characterize novel quantum transport phenomena in small semiconductor structures at low temperatures. Included is a description of the purpose of the research, the various approaches used, and a detailed qualitative description of the numerous new results obtained. The first appendix gives a detailed listing of publications, presentations, patent applications, awards received, and various other measures of the LDRD project success. Subsequent appendices consist of reprinted versions of several specific,`` scientific journal publications resulting from this LDRD project.

  9. Wavelet characterization of 2D turbulence and intermittency in magnetized electron plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romé, M.; Chen, S.; Maero, G.

    2016-06-01

    A study of the free relaxation of turbulence in a two-dimensional (2D) flow is presented, with a focus on the role of the initial vorticity conditions. Exploiting a well-known analogy with 2D inviscid incompressible fluids, the system investigated here is a magnetized pure electron plasma. The dynamics of this system are simulated by means of a 2D particle-in-cell code, starting from different spiral density (vorticity) distributions. A wavelet multiresolution analysis is adopted, which allows the coherent and incoherent parts of the flow to be separated. Comparison of the turbulent evolution in the different cases is based on the investigation of the time evolution of statistical properties, including the probability distribution functions and structure functions of the vorticity increments. It is also based on an analysis of the enstrophy evolution and its spectrum for the two components. In particular, while the statistical features assess the degree of flow intermittency, spectral analysis allows us not only to estimate the time required to reach a state of fully developed turbulence, but also estimate its dependence on the thickness of the initial spiral density distribution, accurately tracking the dynamics of both the coherent structures and the turbulent background. The results are compared with those relevant to annular initial vorticity distributions (Chen et al 2015 J. Plasma Phys. 81 495810511).

  10. Measurement of electrostatic potential variations between 2D materials using low-energy electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Barrera, Sergio; Mende, Patrick; Li, Jun; Feenstra, Randall; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Robinson, Joshua; Vishwanath, Suresh; Xing, Huili

    Among the many properties that evolve as isolated 2D materials are brought together to form a heterostructure, rearrangement of charges between layers due to unintentional doping results in dipole fields at the interface, which critically affect the electronic properties of the structure. Here we report a method for directly measuring work function differences, and hence electrostatic potential variations, across the surface of 2D materials and heterostructures thereof using low energy electron microscopy (LEEM). Study of MoSe2 grown by molecular beam epitaxy on epitaxial graphene on SiC with LEEM reveals a large work function difference between the MoSe2 and the graphene, indicating charge transfer between the layers and a subsequent dipole layer. In addition to quantifying dipole effects between transition metal dichalcogenides and graphene, direct imaging of the surface, diffraction information, and the spectroscopic dependence of electron reflectivity will be discussed. This work was supported in part by the Center for Low Energy Systems Technology (LEAST), one of the six SRC STARnet Centers, sponsored by MARCO and DARPA.

  11. 2D NMR Methods for Structural Delineation of Copper(II) Complexes of Penicillin and Pilocarpine

    PubMed Central

    Gaggelli, Elena; Gaggelli, Nicola

    1994-01-01

    A method was developed for delineating the structure of paramagnetic metal complexes. The selective disappearance of cross-peaks in proton-carbon shift correlated 2D NMR maps was shown to uniquely depend upon the scalar and/or dipolar interaction between ligand nuclei and the unpaired electron(s), thus providing a means of identifying binding sites. Copper(II) was shown to form metal complexes with both Penicillin (PNC) and Pilocarpine (PLC) and the structure of the two 1:2 complexes in water solution at physiological pH were determined. PMID:18476239

  12. Imaging Excited State Dynamics with 2d Electronic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Gregory S.

    2012-06-01

    Excited states in the condensed phase have extremely high chemical potentials making them highly reactive and difficult to control. Yet in biology, excited state dynamics operate with exquisite precision driving solar light harvesting in photosynthetic complexes though excitonic transport and photochemistry through non-radiative relaxation to photochemical products. Optimized by evolution, these biological systems display manifestly quantum mechanical behaviors including coherent energy transfer, steering wavepacket trajectories through conical intersections and protection of long-lived quantum coherence. To image the underlying excited state dynamics, we have developed a new spectroscopic method allowing us to capture excitonic structure in real time. Through this method and other ultrafast multidimensional spectroscopies, we have captured coherent dynamics within photosynthetic antenna complexes. The data not only reveal how biological systems operate, but these same spectral signatures can be exploited to create new spectroscopic tools to elucidate the underlying Hamiltonian. New data on the role of the protein in photosynthetic systems indicates that the chromophores mix strongly with some bath modes within the system. The implications of this mixing for excitonic transport will be discussed along with prospects for transferring underlying design principles to synthetic systems.

  13. Dual-mode operation of 2D material-base hot electron transistors

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Yann-Wen; Torres, Jr., Carlos M.; Zhu, Xiaodan; Qasem, Hussam; Adleman, James R.; Lerner, Mitchell B.; Tsai, Shin-Hung; Shi, Yumeng; Li, Lain-Jong; Yeh, Wen-Kuan; Wang, Kang L.

    2016-01-01

    Vertical hot electron transistors incorporating atomically-thin 2D materials, such as graphene or MoS2, in the base region have been proposed and demonstrated in the development of electronic and optoelectronic applications. To the best of our knowledge, all previous 2D material-base hot electron transistors only considered applying a positive collector-base potential (VCB > 0) as is necessary for the typical unipolar hot-electron transistor behavior. Here we demonstrate a novel functionality, specifically a dual-mode operation, in our 2D material-base hot electron transistors (e.g. with either graphene or MoS2 in the base region) with the application of a negative collector-base potential (VCB < 0). That is, our 2D material-base hot electron transistors can operate in either a hot-electron or a reverse-current dominating mode depending upon the particular polarity of VCB. Furthermore, these devices operate at room temperature and their current gains can be dynamically tuned by varying VCB. We anticipate our multi-functional dual-mode transistors will pave the way towards the realization of novel flexible 2D material-based high-density and low-energy hot-carrier electronic applications. PMID:27581550

  14. Dual-mode operation of 2D material-base hot electron transistors.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yann-Wen; Torres, Carlos M; Zhu, Xiaodan; Qasem, Hussam; Adleman, James R; Lerner, Mitchell B; Tsai, Shin-Hung; Shi, Yumeng; Li, Lain-Jong; Yeh, Wen-Kuan; Wang, Kang L

    2016-01-01

    Vertical hot electron transistors incorporating atomically-thin 2D materials, such as graphene or MoS2, in the base region have been proposed and demonstrated in the development of electronic and optoelectronic applications. To the best of our knowledge, all previous 2D material-base hot electron transistors only considered applying a positive collector-base potential (VCB > 0) as is necessary for the typical unipolar hot-electron transistor behavior. Here we demonstrate a novel functionality, specifically a dual-mode operation, in our 2D material-base hot electron transistors (e.g. with either graphene or MoS2 in the base region) with the application of a negative collector-base potential (VCB < 0). That is, our 2D material-base hot electron transistors can operate in either a hot-electron or a reverse-current dominating mode depending upon the particular polarity of VCB. Furthermore, these devices operate at room temperature and their current gains can be dynamically tuned by varying VCB. We anticipate our multi-functional dual-mode transistors will pave the way towards the realization of novel flexible 2D material-based high-density and low-energy hot-carrier electronic applications. PMID:27581550

  15. Enhancement of low-energy electron emission in 2D radioactive films.

    PubMed

    Pronschinske, Alex; Pedevilla, Philipp; Murphy, Colin J; Lewis, Emily A; Lucci, Felicia R; Brown, Garth; Pappas, George; Michaelides, Angelos; Sykes, E Charles H

    2015-09-01

    High-energy radiation has been used for decades; however, the role of low-energy electrons created during irradiation has only recently begun to be appreciated. Low-energy electrons are the most important component of radiation damage in biological environments because they have subcellular ranges, interact destructively with chemical bonds, and are the most abundant product of ionizing particles in tissue. However, methods for generating them locally without external stimulation do not exist. Here, we synthesize one-atom-thick films of the radioactive isotope (125)I on gold that are stable under ambient conditions. Scanning tunnelling microscopy, supported by electronic structure simulations, allows us to directly observe nuclear transmutation of individual (125)I atoms into (125)Te, and explain the surprising stability of the 2D film as it underwent radioactive decay. The metal interface geometry induces a 600% amplification of low-energy electron emission (<10 eV; ref. ) compared with atomic (125)I. This enhancement of biologically active low-energy electrons might offer a new direction for highly targeted nanoparticle therapies. PMID:26076306

  16. Enhancement of low-energy electron emission in 2D radioactive films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pronschinske, Alex; Pedevilla, Philipp; Murphy, Colin J.; Lewis, Emily A.; Lucci, Felicia R.; Brown, Garth; Pappas, George; Michaelides, Angelos; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2015-09-01

    High-energy radiation has been used for decades; however, the role of low-energy electrons created during irradiation has only recently begun to be appreciated. Low-energy electrons are the most important component of radiation damage in biological environments because they have subcellular ranges, interact destructively with chemical bonds, and are the most abundant product of ionizing particles in tissue. However, methods for generating them locally without external stimulation do not exist. Here, we synthesize one-atom-thick films of the radioactive isotope 125I on gold that are stable under ambient conditions. Scanning tunnelling microscopy, supported by electronic structure simulations, allows us to directly observe nuclear transmutation of individual 125I atoms into 125Te, and explain the surprising stability of the 2D film as it underwent radioactive decay. The metal interface geometry induces a 600% amplification of low-energy electron emission (<10 eV; ref. ) compared with atomic 125I. This enhancement of biologically active low-energy electrons might offer a new direction for highly targeted nanoparticle therapies.

  17. Synthesis and structure of high-quality films of copper polyphthalocyanine – 2D conductive polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlovets, Darya M.; Shuvalov, Maksim V.; Vishnevskiy, Yury V.; Volkov, Vladimir T.; Khodos, Igor I.; Trofimov, Oleg V.; Korepanov, Vitaly I.

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • 2D polymers show a big promise for science and technology. • We develop a new procedure for the direct synthesis of copper polyphthalocyanine. • We obtain reliable experimental data on the CuPPC structure. • With the support of quantum chemical calculations we describe electronic structure of CuPPC. - Abstract: Copper polyphthalocyanine (CuPPC), a 2D conjugated polymer, is a promising material for electronics and photovoltaics, but its applications were hindered by a poor processability. We propose an experimental approach, by which thin films of CuPPC, can be directly synthesized in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) set-up at mild temperature (420 °C). High polymerization degree and high crystallinity of the films were confirmed by TEM, FTIR and UV–vis studies. From XRD and TEM electron diffraction, we conclude that the polymer has AA layer stacking with the inter-layer distance of 0.32 nm. The assignment of X-ray and TEM diffraction patterns was based on quantum-chemical calculations. Based on the latter, we also discuss electronic structure and conclude that CuPPC is rather a semi-metal than semi-conductor.

  18. 2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y. H.; Yang, X. Y.; Lin, C. E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, X. G.; Xiao, C. J. E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, L.; Xu, M.

    2014-11-15

    A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed.

  19. Design of 2D chitosan scaffolds via electrochemical structuring

    PubMed Central

    Altomare, Lina; Guglielmo, Elena; Varoni, Elena Maria; Bertoldi, Serena; Cochis, Andrea; Rimondini, Lia; De Nardo, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Chitosan (CS) is a versatile biopolymer whose morphological and chemico-physical properties can be designed for a variety of biomedical applications. Taking advantage of its electrolytic nature, cathodic polarization allows CS deposition on electrically conductive substrates, resulting in thin porous structures with tunable morphology. Here we propose an easy method to obtain CS membranes with highly oriented micro-channels for tissue engineering applications, relying on simple control of process parameters and cathodic substrate geometry.   Cathodic deposition was performed on two different aluminum grids in galvanostatic conditions at 6.25 mA cm−2 from CS solution [1g L−1] in acetic acid (pH 3.5). Self-standing thin scaffolds were cross linked either with genipin or epichlorohydrin, weighted, and observed by optical and electron microscopy. Swelling properties at pH 5 and pH 7.4 have been also investigated and tensile tests performed on swollen samples at room temperature. Finally, direct and indirect assays have been performed to evaluate the cytotoxicity at 24 and 72 h. Thin scaffolds with two different oriented porosities (1000µm and 500µm) have been successfully fabricated by electrochemical techniques. Both cross-linking agents did not affected the mechanical properties and cytocompatibility of the resulting structures. Depending on the pH, these structures show interesting swelling properties that can be exploited for drug delivery systems. Moreover, thanks to the possibility of controlling the porosity and the micro-channel orientation, they should be used for the regeneration of tissues requiring a preferential cells orientation, e.g., cardiac patches or ligament regeneration. PMID:25093705

  20. Two-dimensional B-C-O alloys: a promising class of 2D materials for electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Si; Zhao, Jijun

    2016-04-21

    Graphene, a superior 2D material with high carrier mobility, has limited application in electronic devices due to zero band gap. In this regard, boron and nitrogen atoms have been integrated into the graphene lattice to fabricate 2D semiconducting heterostructures. It is an intriguing question whether oxygen can, as a replacement of nitrogen, enter the sp(2) honeycomb lattice and form stable B-C-O monolayer structures. Here we explore the atomic structures, energetic and thermodynamic stability, and electronic properties of various 2D B-C-O alloys using first-principles calculations. Our results show that oxygen can be stably incorporated into the graphene lattice by bonding with boron. The B and O species favor forming alternate patterns into the chain- or ring-like structures embedded in the pristine graphene regions. These B-C-O hybrid sheets can be either metals or semiconductors depending on the B : O ratio. The semiconducting (B2O)nCm and (B6O3)nCm phases exist under the B- and O-rich conditions, and possess a tunable band gap of 1.0-3.8 eV and high carrier mobility, retaining ∼1000 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) even for half coverage of B and O atoms. These B-C-O alloys form a new class of 2D materials that are promising candidates for high-speed electronic devices. PMID:27072060

  1. Oscillations of light absorption in 2D macroporous silicon structures with surface nanocoatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachevtseva, L.; Kuchmii, S.; Lytvynenko, O.; Sizov, F.; Stronska, O.; Stroyuk, A.

    2011-02-01

    We investigated the near-IR light absorption oscillations in 2D macroporous silicon structures with microporous silicon layers and CdTe, ZnO surface nanocrystals. The electro-optical effect was taken into account within the strong electric field approximation. Well-separated oscillations were observed in the spectral ranges of the surface bonds of macroporous silicon structures with surface nanocrystals. The model of the resonant electron scattering on impurity states in electric field of heterojunction “silicon-nanocoating” on macropore surface as well as realization of Wannier-Stark effect on the randomly distributed surface bonds were considered. The Wannier-Stark ladders are not broken by impurities because of the longer scattering lifetime as compared with the period of electron oscillations in an external electric field, in all spectral regions considered for macroporous silicon structures with CdTe and ZnO surface nanocrystals.

  2. Electronic and geometrical properties of monoatomic and diatomic 2D honeycomb lattices. A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Ángela; Rey, Rafael; Fonseca, Karen; Grupo de Óptica e Información Cuántica Team

    Since the discovery of graphene by Geim and Novoselov at 2004, several analogous systems have been theoretically and experimentally studied, due to their technological interest. Both monoatomic lattices, such as silicine and germanene, and diatomic lattices (h-GaAs and h-GaN) have been studied. Using Density Functional Theory we obtain and confirm the chemical stability of these hexagonal 2D systems through the total energy curves as a function of interatomic distance. Unlike graphene, silicine and germanene, gapless materials, h-GaAs and h-GaN exhibit electronic gaps, different from that of the bulk, which could be interesting for the industry. On the other hand, the ab initio band structure calculations for graphene, silicene and germanene show a non-circular cross section around K points, at variance with the prediction of usual Tight-binding models. In fact, we have found that Dirac cones display a dihedral group symmetry. This implies that Fermi speed can change up to 30 % due to the orientation of the wave vector, for both electrons and holes. Traditional analytic studies use the Dirac equation for the electron dynamics at low energies. However, this equation assumes an isotropic, homogeneous and uniform space. Authors would like to thank the División de Investigación Sede Bogotá for their financial support at Universidad Nacional de Colombia. A. M. Rojas-Cuervo would also like to thank the Colciencias, Colombia.

  3. Spin-Orbit Interaction and Related Transport Phenomena in 2d Electron and Hole Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaetskii, A.

    Spin-orbit interaction is responsible for many physical phenomena which are under intensive study currently. Here we discuss several of them. The first phenomenon is the edge spin accumulation, which appears due to spin-orbit interaction in 2D mesoscopic structures in the presence of a charge current. We consider the case of a strong spin-orbit-related splitting of the electron spectrum, i.e. a spin precession length is small compared to the mean free path l. The structure can be either in a ballistic regime (when the mean free path is the largest scale in the problem) or quasi-ballistic regime (when l is much smaller than the sample size). We show how physics of edge spin accumulation in different situations should be understood from the point of view of unitarity of boundary scattering. Using transparent method of scattering states, we are able to explain some previous puzzling theoretical results. We clarify the important role of the form of the spin-orbit Hamiltonian, the role of the boundary conditions, etc., and reveal the wrong results obtained in the field by other researchers. The relation between the edge spin density and the bulk spin current in different regimes is discussed. The detailed comparison with the existing theoretical works is presented. Besides, we consider several new transport phenomena which appear in the presence of spin-orbit interaction, for example, magnetotransport phenomena in an external classical magnetic field. In particular, new mechanism of negative magneto-resistance appears which is due to destruction of spin fluxes by the magnetic field, and which can be really pronounced in 2D systems with strong scatterers.

  4. Grazing incidence neutron diffraction from large scale 2D structures

    SciTech Connect

    Toperverg, B. P.; Felcher, G. P.; Metlushko, V. V.; Leiner, V.; Siebrecht, R.; Nikonov, O.

    2000-01-13

    The distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) is applied to evaluate the diffraction pattern of neutrons (or X-rays) from a 2D array of dots deposited onto a dissimilar substrate. With the radiation impinging on the surface at a grazing incidence angle {alpha}, the intensities diffracted both in and out the plane of specular reflection are calculated as a function of the periodicity of the array, height and diameter of the dots. The results are presented in the form of diffracted intensity contours in a plane with coordinates {alpha} and {alpha}{prime}, the latter being the glancing angle of scattering. The optimization of the experimental conditions for polarized neutron experiments on submicron dots is discussed. The feasibility of such measurements is confirmed by a test experiment.

  5. Bonding-restricted structure search for novel 2D materials with dispersed C2 dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cunzhi; Zhang, Shunhong; Wang, Qian

    2016-07-01

    Currently, the available algorithms for unbiased structure searches are primarily atom-based, where atoms are manipulated as the elementary units, and energy is used as the target function without any restrictions on the bonding of atoms. In fact, in many cases such as nanostructure-assembled materials, the structural units are nanoclusters. We report a study of a bonding-restricted structure search method based on the particle swarm optimization (PSO) for finding the stable structures of two-dimensional (2D) materials containing dispersed C2 dimers rather than individual C atoms. The C2 dimer can be considered as a prototype of nanoclusters. Taking Si-C, B-C and Ti-C systems as test cases, our method combined with density functional theory and phonon calculations uncover new ground state geometrical structures for SiC2, Si2C2, BC2, B2C2, TiC2, and Ti2C2 sheets and their low-lying energy allotropes, as well as their electronic structures. Equally important, this method can be applied to other complex systems even containing f elements and other molecular dimers such as S2, N2, B2 and Si2, where the complex orbital orientations require extensive search for finding the optimal orientations to maximize the bonding with the dimers, predicting new 2D materials beyond MXenes (a family of transition metal carbides or nitrides) and dichalcogenide monolayers.

  6. Bonding-restricted structure search for novel 2D materials with dispersed C2 dimers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cunzhi; Zhang, Shunhong; Wang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the available algorithms for unbiased structure searches are primarily atom-based, where atoms are manipulated as the elementary units, and energy is used as the target function without any restrictions on the bonding of atoms. In fact, in many cases such as nanostructure-assembled materials, the structural units are nanoclusters. We report a study of a bonding-restricted structure search method based on the particle swarm optimization (PSO) for finding the stable structures of two-dimensional (2D) materials containing dispersed C2 dimers rather than individual C atoms. The C2 dimer can be considered as a prototype of nanoclusters. Taking Si-C, B-C and Ti-C systems as test cases, our method combined with density functional theory and phonon calculations uncover new ground state geometrical structures for SiC2, Si2C2, BC2, B2C2, TiC2, and Ti2C2 sheets and their low-lying energy allotropes, as well as their electronic structures. Equally important, this method can be applied to other complex systems even containing f elements and other molecular dimers such as S2, N2, B2 and Si2, where the complex orbital orientations require extensive search for finding the optimal orientations to maximize the bonding with the dimers, predicting new 2D materials beyond MXenes (a family of transition metal carbides or nitrides) and dichalcogenide monolayers. PMID:27403589

  7. Bonding-restricted structure search for novel 2D materials with dispersed C2 dimers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cunzhi; Zhang, Shunhong; Wang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the available algorithms for unbiased structure searches are primarily atom-based, where atoms are manipulated as the elementary units, and energy is used as the target function without any restrictions on the bonding of atoms. In fact, in many cases such as nanostructure-assembled materials, the structural units are nanoclusters. We report a study of a bonding-restricted structure search method based on the particle swarm optimization (PSO) for finding the stable structures of two-dimensional (2D) materials containing dispersed C2 dimers rather than individual C atoms. The C2 dimer can be considered as a prototype of nanoclusters. Taking Si-C, B-C and Ti-C systems as test cases, our method combined with density functional theory and phonon calculations uncover new ground state geometrical structures for SiC2, Si2C2, BC2, B2C2, TiC2, and Ti2C2 sheets and their low-lying energy allotropes, as well as their electronic structures. Equally important, this method can be applied to other complex systems even containing f elements and other molecular dimers such as S2, N2, B2 and Si2, where the complex orbital orientations require extensive search for finding the optimal orientations to maximize the bonding with the dimers, predicting new 2D materials beyond MXenes (a family of transition metal carbides or nitrides) and dichalcogenide monolayers. PMID:27403589

  8. Broadband 2D Electronic Spectroscopy Reveals Coupling Between Dark 1Bu- State of Carotenoid and Qx State of Bacteriochlorophyll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostroumov, Evgeny E.; Jumper, Chanelle C.; Mulvaney, Rachel M.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Scholes, Gregory D.

    2013-03-01

    The study of LH2 protein of purple bacteria by broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy is presented. The dark 1Bu- carotenoid state is directly observed in 2D spectra and its role in carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll interaction is discussed.

  9. Control of electronic properties of 2D carbides (MXenes) by manipulating their transition metal layers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Anasori, Babak; Shi, Chenyang; Moon, Eun Ju; Xie, Yu; Voigt, Cooper A.; Kent, Paul R. C.; May, Steven J.; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Barsoum, Michel W.; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-02-24

    In this paper, a transition from metallic to semiconducting-like behavior has been demonstrated in two-dimensional (2D) transition metal carbides by replacing titanium with molybdenum in the outer transition metal (M) layers of M3C2 and M4C3 MXenes. The MXene structure consists of n + 1 layers of near-close packed M layers with C or N occupying the octahedral site between them in an [MX]nM arrangement. Recently, two new families of ordered 2D double transition metal carbides MXenes were discovered, M'2M"C2 and M'2M"2C3 – where M' and M" are two different early transition metals, such as Mo, Cr, Ta, Nb, V, andmore » Ti. The M' atoms only occupy the outer layers and the M" atoms fill the middle layers. In other words, M' atomic layers sandwich the middle M"–C layers. Using X-ray atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis on Mo2TiC2 and Mo2Ti2C3 MXenes, we present the first quantitative analysis of structures of these novel materials and experimentally confirm that Mo atoms are in the outer layers of the [MC]nM structures. The electronic properties of these Mo-containing MXenes are compared with their Ti3C2 counterparts, and are found to be no longer metallic-like conductors; instead the resistance increases mildly with decreasing temperatures. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest that OH terminated Mo–Ti MXenes are semiconductors with narrow band gaps. Measurements of the temperature dependencies of conductivities and magnetoresistances have confirmed that Mo2TiC2Tx exhibits semiconductor-like transport behavior, while Ti3C2Tx is a metal. Finally, this finding opens new avenues for the control of the electronic and optical applications of MXenes and for exploring new applications, in which semiconducting properties are required.« less

  10. Experiments on 2D Vortex Patterns with a Photoinjected Pure Electron Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkin, Daniel; Fajans, Joel

    1998-11-01

    The equations governing the evolution of a strongly magnetized pure electron plasma are analogous to those of an ideal 2D fluid; plasma density is analogous to fluid vorticity. Therefore, we can study vortex dynamics with pure electron plasmas. We generate our electron plasma with a photocathode electron source. The photocathode provides greater control over the initial profile than previous thermionic sources and allows us to create complicated initial density distributions, corresponding to complicated vorticity distributions in a fluid. Results on the stability of 2D vortex patterns will be presented: 1) The stability of N vortices arranged in a ring; 2) The stability of N vortices arranged in a ring with a central vortex; 3) The stability of more complicated vortex patterns.(http://socrates.berkeley.edu/ )fajans/

  11. 2-D simulation of a waveguide free electron laser having a helical undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.K.; Lee, B.C.; Jeong, Y.U.

    1995-12-31

    We have developed a 2-D simulation code for the calculation of output power from an FEL oscillator having a helical undulator and a cylindrical waveguide. In the simulation, the current and the energy of the electron beam is 2 A and 400 keV, respectively. The parameters of the permanent-magnet helical undulator are : period = 32 mm, number of periods = 20, magnetic field = 1.3 kG. The gain per pass is 10 and the output power is calculated to be higher than 10 kW The results of the 2-D simulation are compared with those of 1-D simulation.

  12. Imaging 2-D Structures With Receiver Functions Using Harmonic Stripping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte-Pelkum, V.

    2010-12-01

    I present a novel technique to image dipping and anisotropic structures using receiver functions. Receiver functions isolate phase conversions from interfaces close to the seismic station. Standard analysis assumes a quasi-flat layered structure and dampens arrivals from dipping interfaces and anisotropic layers, with attempts to extract information on such structures relying on cumbersome and nonunique forward modeling. I use a simple relationship between the radial and transverse component receiver function to detect dipping and anisotropic layers and map their depth and orientation. For dipping interfaces, layers with horizontal or plunging axis anisotropy, and point scatterers, the following relationships hold: After subtracting the azimuthally invariant portion of the radial receiver functions, the remaining signal is an azimuthally shifted version of the transverse receiver functions. The strike of the dipping interface or anisotropy is given by the azimuth of polarity reversals, and the type of structure can be inferred from the amount of phase shift between the components. For a known structure type, the phase shift between the two components provides pseudoevents from back-azimuths with little seismicity. The technique allows structural mapping at depth akin to geological mapping of rock fabric and dipping layers at the surface. It reduces complex wavefield effects to two simple and geologically meaningful parameters, similar to shear wave splitting. I demonstrate the method on the Wind River Thrust as well as other structures within the Transportable Array footprint.

  13. Structure of a randomly grown 2-d network.

    PubMed

    Ajazi, Fioralba; Napolitano, George M; Turova, Tatyana; Zaurbek, Izbassar

    2015-10-01

    We introduce a growing random network on a plane as a model of a growing neuronal network. The properties of the structure of the induced graph are derived. We compare our results with available data. In particular, it is shown that depending on the parameters of the model the system undergoes in time different phases of the structure. We conclude with a possible explanation of some empirical data on the connections between neurons. PMID:26375356

  14. Two-dimensional B-C-O alloys: a promising class of 2D materials for electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Si; Zhao, Jijun

    2016-04-01

    Graphene, a superior 2D material with high carrier mobility, has limited application in electronic devices due to zero band gap. In this regard, boron and nitrogen atoms have been integrated into the graphene lattice to fabricate 2D semiconducting heterostructures. It is an intriguing question whether oxygen can, as a replacement of nitrogen, enter the sp2 honeycomb lattice and form stable B-C-O monolayer structures. Here we explore the atomic structures, energetic and thermodynamic stability, and electronic properties of various 2D B-C-O alloys using first-principles calculations. Our results show that oxygen can be stably incorporated into the graphene lattice by bonding with boron. The B and O species favor forming alternate patterns into the chain- or ring-like structures embedded in the pristine graphene regions. These B-C-O hybrid sheets can be either metals or semiconductors depending on the B : O ratio. The semiconducting (B2O)nCm and (B6O3)nCm phases exist under the B- and O-rich conditions, and possess a tunable band gap of 1.0-3.8 eV and high carrier mobility, retaining ~1000 cm2 V-1 s-1 even for half coverage of B and O atoms. These B-C-O alloys form a new class of 2D materials that are promising candidates for high-speed electronic devices.Graphene, a superior 2D material with high carrier mobility, has limited application in electronic devices due to zero band gap. In this regard, boron and nitrogen atoms have been integrated into the graphene lattice to fabricate 2D semiconducting heterostructures. It is an intriguing question whether oxygen can, as a replacement of nitrogen, enter the sp2 honeycomb lattice and form stable B-C-O monolayer structures. Here we explore the atomic structures, energetic and thermodynamic stability, and electronic properties of various 2D B-C-O alloys using first-principles calculations. Our results show that oxygen can be stably incorporated into the graphene lattice by bonding with boron. The B and O species favor

  15. Crystal structure of the cowpox virus-encoded NKG2D ligand OMCP.

    PubMed

    Lazear, Eric; Peterson, Lance W; Nelson, Chris A; Fremont, Daved H

    2013-01-01

    The NKG2D receptor is expressed on the surface of NK, T, and macrophage lineage cells and plays an important role in antiviral and antitumor immunity. To evade NKG2D recognition, herpesviruses block the expression of NKG2D ligands on the surface of infected cells using a diverse repertoire of sabotage methods. Cowpox and monkeypox viruses have taken an alternate approach by encoding a soluble NKG2D ligand, the orthopoxvirus major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-like protein (OMCP), which can block NKG2D-mediated cytotoxicity. This approach has the advantage of targeting a single conserved receptor instead of numerous host ligands that exhibit significant sequence diversity. Here, we show that OMCP binds the NKG2D homodimer as a monomer and competitively blocks host ligand engagement. We have also determined the 2.25-Å-resolution crystal structure of OMCP from the cowpox virus Brighton Red strain, revealing a truncated MHC class I-like platform domain consisting of a beta sheet flanked with two antiparallel alpha helices. OMCP is generally similar in structure to known host NKG2D ligands but has notable variations in regions typically used to engage NKG2D. Additionally, the determinants responsible for the 14-fold-higher affinity of OMCP for human than for murine NKG2D were mapped to a single loop in the NKG2D ligand-binding pocket. PMID:23115291

  16. A Bioactive Carbon Nanotube-Based Ink for Printing 2D and 3D Flexible Electronics.

    PubMed

    Shin, Su Ryon; Farzad, Raziyeh; Tamayol, Ali; Manoharan, Vijayan; Mostafalu, Pooria; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Akbari, Mohsen; Jung, Sung Mi; Kim, Duckjin; Comotto, Mattia; Annabi, Nasim; Al-Hazmi, Faten Ebrahim; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-05-01

    The development of electrically conductive carbon nanotube-based inks is reported. Using these inks, 2D and 3D structures are printed on various flexible substrates such as paper, hydrogels, and elastomers. The printed patterns have mechanical and electrical properties that make them beneficial for various biological applications. PMID:26915715

  17. Metal Decoration Effects on the Gas-Sensing Properties of 2D Hybrid-Structures on Flexible Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Byungjin; Yoon, Jongwon; Lim, Sung Kwan; Kim, Ah Ra; Choi, Sun-Young; Kim, Dong-Ho; Lee, Kyu Hwan; Lee, Byoung Hun; Ko, Heung Cho; Hahm, Myung Gwan

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of metal decoration on the gas-sensing properties of a device with two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) flake channels and graphene electrodes. The 2D hybrid-structure device sensitively detected NO2 gas molecules (>1.2 ppm) as well as NH3 (>10 ppm). Metal nanoparticles (NPs) could tune the electronic properties of the 2D graphene/MoS2 device, increasing sensitivity to a specific gas molecule. For instance, palladium NPs accumulate hole carriers of graphene/MoS2, electronically sensitizing NH3 gas molecules. Contrarily, aluminum NPs deplete hole carriers, enhancing NO2 sensitivity. The synergistic combination of metal NPs and 2D hybrid layers could be also applied to a flexible gas sensor. There was no serious degradation in the sensing performance of metal-decorated MoS2 flexible devices before/after 5000 bending cycles. Thus, highly sensitive and endurable gas sensor could be achieved through the metal-decorated 2D hybrid-structure, offering a useful route to wearable electronic sensing platforms. PMID:26404279

  18. Speckle lithography for fabricating Gaussian, quasi-random 2D structures and black silicon structures.

    PubMed

    Bingi, Jayachandra; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2015-01-01

    Laser speckle pattern is a granular structure formed due to random coherent wavelet interference and generally considered as noise in optical systems including photolithography. Contrary to this, in this paper, we use the speckle pattern to generate predictable and controlled Gaussian random structures and quasi-random structures photo-lithographically. The random structures made using this proposed speckle lithography technique are quantified based on speckle statistics, radial distribution function (RDF) and fast Fourier transform (FFT). The control over the speckle size, density and speckle clustering facilitates the successful fabrication of black silicon with different surface structures. The controllability and tunability of randomness makes this technique a robust method for fabricating predictable 2D Gaussian random structures and black silicon structures. These structures can enhance the light trapping significantly in solar cells and hence enable improved energy harvesting. Further, this technique can enable efficient fabrication of disordered photonic structures and random media based devices. PMID:26679513

  19. Speckle lithography for fabricating Gaussian, quasi-random 2D structures and black silicon structures

    PubMed Central

    Bingi, Jayachandra; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2015-01-01

    Laser speckle pattern is a granular structure formed due to random coherent wavelet interference and generally considered as noise in optical systems including photolithography. Contrary to this, in this paper, we use the speckle pattern to generate predictable and controlled Gaussian random structures and quasi-random structures photo-lithographically. The random structures made using this proposed speckle lithography technique are quantified based on speckle statistics, radial distribution function (RDF) and fast Fourier transform (FFT). The control over the speckle size, density and speckle clustering facilitates the successful fabrication of black silicon with different surface structures. The controllability and tunability of randomness makes this technique a robust method for fabricating predictable 2D Gaussian random structures and black silicon structures. These structures can enhance the light trapping significantly in solar cells and hence enable improved energy harvesting. Further, this technique can enable efficient fabrication of disordered photonic structures and random media based devices. PMID:26679513

  20. The effect of hydrazine intercalation on the structure and capacitance of 2D titanium carbide (MXene)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashtalir, O.; Lukatskaya, M. R.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Raymundo-Piñero, E.; Naguib, M.; Barsoum, M. W.; Gogotsi, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Herein we show that hydrazine intercalation into 2D titanium carbide (Ti3C2-based MXene) results in changes in its surface chemistry by decreasing the amounts of fluorine, OH surface groups and intercalated water. It also creates a pillaring effect between Ti3C2Tx layers pre-opening the structure and improving the accessability to active sites. The hydrazine treated material has demonstrated a greatly improved capacitance of 250 F g-1 in acidic electrolytes with an excellent cycling ability for electrodes as thick as 75 μm.Herein we show that hydrazine intercalation into 2D titanium carbide (Ti3C2-based MXene) results in changes in its surface chemistry by decreasing the amounts of fluorine, OH surface groups and intercalated water. It also creates a pillaring effect between Ti3C2Tx layers pre-opening the structure and improving the accessability to active sites. The hydrazine treated material has demonstrated a greatly improved capacitance of 250 F g-1 in acidic electrolytes with an excellent cycling ability for electrodes as thick as 75 μm. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Characterization methods, additional XRD patterns (Fig. S1) and INS spectra (Fig. S2-S4). See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01462c

  1. Topologic connection between 2-D layered structures and 3-D diamond structures for conventional semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-04-01

    When coming to identify new 2D materials, our intuition would suggest us to look from layered instead of 3D materials. However, since graphite can be hypothetically derived from diamond by stretching it along its [111] axis, many 3D materials can also potentially be explored as new candidates for 2D materials. Using a density functional theory, we perform a systematic study over the common Group IV, III–V, and II–VI semiconductors along different deformation paths to reveal new structures that are topologically connected to but distinctly different from the 3D parent structure. Specifically, we explore two major phase transition paths, originating respectively from wurtzite and NiAs structure, by applying compressive and tensile strain along the symmetry axis, and calculating the total energy changes to search for potential metastable states, as well as phonon spectra to examine the structural stability. Each path is found to further split into two branches under tensile strain–low buckled and high buckled structures, which respectively lead to a low and high buckled monolayer structure. Most promising new layered or planar structures identified include BeO, GaN, and ZnO on the tensile strain side, Ge, Si, and GaP on the compressive strain side.

  2. Topologic connection between 2-D layered structures and 3-D diamond structures for conventional semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    When coming to identify new 2D materials, our intuition would suggest us to look from layered instead of 3D materials. However, since graphite can be hypothetically derived from diamond by stretching it along its [111] axis, many 3D materials can also potentially be explored as new candidates for 2D materials. Using a density functional theory, we perform a systematic study over the common Group IV, III–V, and II–VI semiconductors along different deformation paths to reveal new structures that are topologically connected to but distinctly different from the 3D parent structure. Specifically, we explore two major phase transition paths, originating respectively from wurtzite and NiAs structure, by applying compressive and tensile strain along the symmetry axis, and calculating the total energy changes to search for potential metastable states, as well as phonon spectra to examine the structural stability. Each path is found to further split into two branches under tensile strain–low buckled and high buckled structures, which respectively lead to a low and high buckled monolayer structure. Most promising new layered or planar structures identified include BeO, GaN, and ZnO on the tensile strain side, Ge, Si, and GaP on the compressive strain side. PMID:27090430

  3. Topologic connection between 2-D layered structures and 3-D diamond structures for conventional semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    When coming to identify new 2D materials, our intuition would suggest us to look from layered instead of 3D materials. However, since graphite can be hypothetically derived from diamond by stretching it along its [111] axis, many 3D materials can also potentially be explored as new candidates for 2D materials. Using a density functional theory, we perform a systematic study over the common Group IV, III-V, and II-VI semiconductors along different deformation paths to reveal new structures that are topologically connected to but distinctly different from the 3D parent structure. Specifically, we explore two major phase transition paths, originating respectively from wurtzite and NiAs structure, by applying compressive and tensile strain along the symmetry axis, and calculating the total energy changes to search for potential metastable states, as well as phonon spectra to examine the structural stability. Each path is found to further split into two branches under tensile strain-low buckled and high buckled structures, which respectively lead to a low and high buckled monolayer structure. Most promising new layered or planar structures identified include BeO, GaN, and ZnO on the tensile strain side, Ge, Si, and GaP on the compressive strain side. PMID:27090430

  4. Pair interaction energy for a 12-electron 2D square Quantum Dot.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissenbaum, Daniel; Barbiellini, Bernardo; Bansil, Arun

    2004-03-01

    We have investigated a system of 12 electrons enclosed in a 2D square well representing a quantum dot. We employ a Jastrow-type wavefunction with Slater determinants and optimize the Jastrow parameter using the variational Monte Carlo method. We use the Metropolis algorithm to select a large distribution of configuration points and to perform a relatively noiseless calculation of the radial distribution function and to obtain insight into the contrast between the Fermi hole for the same-spin electrons and the Coulomb hole for the opposite-spin electrons. The calculated pair interaction energy provides a handle for constructing a model Hamiltonian useful for the study of spontaneous spin magnetization of the system. Work supported in part by the USDOE.

  5. Electron Microscopy: From 2D to 3D Images with Special Reference to Muscle

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This is a brief and necessarily very sketchy presentation of the evolution in electron microscopy (EM) imaging that was driven by the necessity of extracting 3-D views from the essentially 2-D images produced by the electron beam. The lens design of standard transmission electron microscope has not been greatly altered since its inception. However, technical advances in specimen preparation, image collection and analysis gradually induced an astounding progression over a period of about 50 years. From the early images that redefined tissues, cell and cell organelles at the sub-micron level, to the current nano-resolution reconstructions of organelles and proteins the step is very large. The review is written by an investigator who has followed the field for many years, but often from the sidelines, and with great wonder. Her interest in muscle ultrastructure colors the writing. More specific detailed reviews are presented in this issue. PMID:26913146

  6. Electron-positron momentum density distribution of Gd from 2D ACAR data via Maximum Entropy and Cormack's methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pylak, M.; Kontrym-Sznajd, G.; Dobrzyński, L.

    2011-08-01

    A successful application of the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) to the reconstruction of electron-positron momentum density distribution in gadolinium out of the experimental of 2D ACAR data is presented. Formally, the algorithm used was prepared for two-dimensional reconstructions from line integrals. For the first time the results of MEM, applied to such data, are compared in detail with the ones obtained by means of Cormack's method. It is also shown how the experimental uncertainties may influence the results of the latter analysis. Preliminary calculations, using WIEN2k code, of band structure and Fermi surface have been done as well.

  7. Optical and Electronic Properties of 2D Graphitic Carbon-Nitride and Carbon Enriched Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Therrien, Joel; Li, Yancen; Schmidt, Daniel; Masaki, Michael; Syed, Abdulmannan

    The two-dimensional form of graphitic carbon-nitride (gCN) has been successfully synthesized using a simple CVD process. In it's pure form, the carbon to nitrogen ratio is 0.75. By adding a carbon bearing gas to the growth environment, the C/N ratio can be increased, ultimately reaching the pure carbon form: graphene. Unlike attempts at making a 2D alloy system out of BCN, the CN system does not suffer from phase segregation and thus forms a homogeneous alloy. The synthesis approach and electronic and optical properties will be presented for the pure gCN and a selection of alloy compositions.

  8. A series of 2D metal-quinolone complexes: Syntheses, structures, and physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiang-Hong; Xiao, Dong-Rong; Chen, Hai-Yan; Sun, Dian-Zhen; Yan, Shi-Wei; Wang, Xin; Ye, Zhong-Li; Luo, Qun-Li; Wang, En-Bo

    2013-02-01

    Six novel 2D metal-quinolone complexes, namely [Cd(cfH)(bpdc)]rad H2O (1), [M(norfH)(bpdc)]rad H2O (M=Cd (2) and Mn (3)), [Mn2(cfH)(odpa)(H2O)3]rad 0.5H2O (4), [Co2(norfH)(bpta)(μ2-H2O)(H2O)2]rad H2O (5) and [Co3(saraH)2(Hbpta)2(H2O)4]rad 9H2O (6) (cfH=ciprofloxacin, norfH=norfloxacin, saraH=sarafloxacin, bpdc=4,4'-biphenyldicarboxylate, odpa=4,4'-oxydiphthalate, bpta=3,3',4,4'-biphenyltetracarboxylate) have been synthesized and characterized. Compounds 1-3 consist of 2D arm-shaped layers based on the 1D {M(COO)}nn+ chains. Compounds 4 and 5 display 2D structures based on tetranuclear manganese or cobalt clusters with (3,6)-connected kgd topology. Compound 6 exhibits a 2D bilayer structure, which represents the first example of metal-quinolone complexes with 2D bilayer structure. By inspection of the structures of 1-6, it is believed that the long aromatic polycarboxylate ligands are important for the formation of 2D metal-quinolone complexes. The magnetic properties of compounds 3-6 was studied, indicating the existence of antiferromagnetic interactions. Furthermore, the luminescent properties of compounds 1-2 are discussed.

  9. Topological evolutionary computing in the optimal design of 2D and 3D structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burczynski, T.; Poteralski, A.; Szczepanik, M.

    2007-10-01

    An application of evolutionary algorithms and the finite-element method to the topology optimization of 2D structures (plane stress, bending plates, and shells) and 3D structures is described. The basis of the topological evolutionary optimization is the direct control of the density material distribution (or thickness for 2D structures) by the evolutionary algorithm. The structures are optimized for stress, mass, and compliance criteria. The numerical examples demonstrate that this method is an effective technique for solving problems in computer-aided optimal design.

  10. Hall-Effect Thruster Simulations with 2-D Electron Transport and Hydrodynamic Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard H.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2009-01-01

    A computational approach that has been used extensively in the last two decades for Hall thruster simulations is to solve a diffusion equation and energy conservation law for the electrons in a direction that is perpendicular to the magnetic field, and use discrete-particle methods for the heavy species. This "hybrid" approach has allowed for the capture of bulk plasma phenomena inside these thrusters within reasonable computational times. Regions of the thruster with complex magnetic field arrangements (such as those near eroded walls and magnets) and/or reduced Hall parameter (such as those near the anode and the cathode plume) challenge the validity of the quasi-one-dimensional assumption for the electrons. This paper reports on the development of a computer code that solves numerically the 2-D axisymmetric vector form of Ohm's law, with no assumptions regarding the rate of electron transport in the parallel and perpendicular directions. The numerical challenges related to the large disparity of the transport coefficients in the two directions are met by solving the equations in a computational mesh that is aligned with the magnetic field. The fully-2D approach allows for a large physical domain that extends more than five times the thruster channel length in the axial direction, and encompasses the cathode boundary. Ions are treated as an isothermal, cold (relative to the electrons) fluid, accounting for charge-exchange and multiple-ionization collisions in the momentum equations. A first series of simulations of two Hall thrusters, namely the BPT-4000 and a 6-kW laboratory thruster, quantifies the significance of ion diffusion in the anode region and the importance of the extended physical domain on studies related to the impact of the transport coefficients on the electron flow field.

  11. Laser fabrication of 2D and 3D metal nanoparticle structures and arrays.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, A I; Kiyan, R; Chichkov, B N

    2010-09-27

    A novel method for fabrication of 2D and 3D metal nanoparticle structures and arrays is proposed. This technique is based on laser-induced transfer of molten metal nanodroplets from thin metal films. Metal nanoparticles are produced by solidification of these nanodroplets. The size of the transferred nanoparticles can be controllably changed in the range from 180 nm to 1500 nm. Several examples of complex 2D and 3D microstructures generated form gold nanoparticles are demonstrated. PMID:20941016

  12. Dosimetric verification of gated delivery of electron beams using a 2D ion chamber array.

    PubMed

    Yoganathan, S A; Das, K J Maria; Raj, D Gowtham; Kumar, Shaleen

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric characteristics; such as beam output, symmetry and flatness between gated and non-gated electron beams. Dosimetric verification of gated delivery was carried for all electron beams available on Varian CL 2100CD medical linear accelerator. Measurements were conducted for three dose rates (100 MU/min, 300 MU/min and 600 MU/min) and two respiratory motions (breathing period of 4s and 8s). Real-time position management (RPM) system was used for the gated deliveries. Flatness and symmetry values were measured using Imatrixx 2D ion chamber array device and the beam output was measured using plane parallel ion chamber. These detector systems were placed over QUASAR motion platform which was programmed to simulate the respiratory motion of target. The dosimetric characteristics of gated deliveries were compared with non-gated deliveries. The flatness and symmetry of all the evaluated electron energies did not differ by more than 0.7 % with respect to corresponding non-gated deliveries. The beam output variation of gated electron beam was less than 0.6 % for all electron energies except for 16 MeV (1.4 %). Based on the results of this study, it can be concluded that Varian CL2100 CD is well suitable for gated delivery of non-dynamic electron beams. PMID:26170552

  13. Dosimetric verification of gated delivery of electron beams using a 2D ion chamber array

    PubMed Central

    Yoganathan, S. A.; Das, K. J. Maria; Raj, D. Gowtham; Kumar, Shaleen

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric characteristics; such as beam output, symmetry and flatness between gated and non-gated electron beams. Dosimetric verification of gated delivery was carried for all electron beams available on Varian CL 2100CD medical linear accelerator. Measurements were conducted for three dose rates (100 MU/min, 300 MU/min and 600 MU/min) and two respiratory motions (breathing period of 4s and 8s). Real-time position management (RPM) system was used for the gated deliveries. Flatness and symmetry values were measured using Imatrixx 2D ion chamber array device and the beam output was measured using plane parallel ion chamber. These detector systems were placed over QUASAR motion platform which was programmed to simulate the respiratory motion of target. The dosimetric characteristics of gated deliveries were compared with non-gated deliveries. The flatness and symmetry of all the evaluated electron energies did not differ by more than 0.7 % with respect to corresponding non-gated deliveries. The beam output variation of gated electron beam was less than 0.6 % for all electron energies except for 16 MeV (1.4 %). Based on the results of this study, it can be concluded that Varian CL2100 CD is well suitable for gated delivery of non-dynamic electron beams. PMID:26170552

  14. A series of 2D metal-quinolone complexes: Syntheses, structures, and physical properties

    SciTech Connect

    He, Jiang-Hong; Xiao, Dong-Rong; Chen, Hai-Yan; Sun, Dian-Zhen; Yan, Shi-Wei; Wang, Xin; Ye, Zhong-Li; Luo, Qun-Li; Wang, En-Bo

    2013-02-15

    Six novel 2D metal-quinolone complexes, namely [Cd(cfH)(bpdc)]{center_dot}H{sub 2}O (1), [M(norfH)(bpdc)]{center_dot}H{sub 2}O (M=Cd (2) and Mn (3)), [Mn{sub 2}(cfH)(odpa)(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}]{center_dot}0.5H{sub 2}O (4), [Co{sub 2}(norfH)(bpta)({mu}{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{center_dot}H{sub 2}O (5) and [Co{sub 3}(saraH){sub 2}(Hbpta){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}]{center_dot}9H{sub 2}O (6) (cfH=ciprofloxacin, norfH=norfloxacin, saraH=sarafloxacin, bpdc=4,4 Prime -biphenyldicarboxylate, odpa=4,4 Prime -oxydiphthalate, bpta=3,3 Prime ,4,4 Prime -biphenyltetracarboxylate) have been synthesized and characterized. Compounds 1-3 consist of 2D arm-shaped layers based on the 1D {l_brace}M(COO){r_brace}{sub n}{sup n+} chains. Compounds 4 and 5 display 2D structures based on tetranuclear manganese or cobalt clusters with (3,6)-connected kgd topology. Compound 6 exhibits a 2D bilayer structure, which represents the first example of metal-quinolone complexes with 2D bilayer structure. By inspection of the structures of 1-6, it is believed that the long aromatic polycarboxylate ligands are important for the formation of 2D metal-quinolone complexes. The magnetic properties of compounds 3-6 was studied, indicating the existence of antiferromagnetic interactions. Furthermore, the luminescent properties of compounds 1-2 are discussed. - Graphical abstract: Six novel 2D metal-quinolone complexes have been prepared by self-assemblies of the quinolones and metal salts in the presence of long aromatic polycarboxylates. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compounds 1-3 consist of novel 2D arm-shaped layers based on the 1D {l_brace}M(COO){r_brace}{sub n}{sup n+} chains. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compounds 4 and 5 are two novel 2D layers based on tetranuclear Mn or Co clusters with kgd topology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compound 6 is the first example of metal-quinolone complexes with 2D bilayer structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compounds 1-6 represent six unusual

  15. Neutrino-electron Scattering in 2-D Models of Supernova Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeNisco, K. R.; Swesty, F. D.; Myra, E. S.

    2005-12-01

    We present results from 2-D supernova simulations which include the effects of neutrino-electron scattering. The importance of neutrino-electron scattering in stellar collapse has been known for two decades. Yet it has often been neglected in multidimensional simulations due to the difficulty of implementing it consistently. The inclusion of this process is numerically challenging because of the extremely short scattering timescales involved. The stiffness resulting from this short timescale precludes an explicit numerical treatment of this phenomenon, such as those that have recently been utilized in some 2-D models. We describe our fully-implicit treatment of this process and present our initial results. This work was performed at the State University of New York at Stony Brook as part of the TeraScale Supernova Initiative, and is funded by SciDAC grant DE-FC02-01ER41185 from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science High-Energy, Nuclear, and Advanced Scientific Computing Research Programs. We gratefully acknowledge support of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) for computational and consulting support.

  16. Learning structured models for segmentation of 2-D and 3-D imagery.

    PubMed

    Lucchi, Aurelien; Marquez-Neila, Pablo; Becker, Carlos; Li, Yunpeng; Smith, Kevin; Knott, Graham; Fua, Pascal

    2015-05-01

    Efficient and accurate segmentation of cellular structures in microscopic data is an essential task in medical imaging. Many state-of-the-art approaches to image segmentation use structured models whose parameters must be carefully chosen for optimal performance. A popular choice is to learn them using a large-margin framework and more specifically structured support vector machines (SSVM). Although SSVMs are appealing, they suffer from certain limitations. First, they are restricted in practice to linear kernels because the more powerful nonlinear kernels cause the learning to become prohibitively expensive. Second, they require iteratively finding the most violated constraints, which is often intractable for the loopy graphical models used in image segmentation. This requires approximation that can lead to reduced quality of learning. In this paper, we propose three novel techniques to overcome these limitations. We first introduce a method to "kernelize" the features so that a linear SSVM framework can leverage the power of nonlinear kernels without incurring much additional computational cost. Moreover, we employ a working set of constraints to increase the reliability of approximate subgradient methods and introduce a new way to select a suitable step size at each iteration. We demonstrate the strength of our approach on both 2-D and 3-D electron microscopic (EM) image data and show consistent performance improvement over state-of-the-art approaches. PMID:25438309

  17. Optical Signatures from Magnetic 2-D Electron Gases in High Magnetic Fields to 60 Tesla

    SciTech Connect

    Crooker, S.A.; Kikkawa, J.M.; Awschalom, D.D.; Smorchikova, I.P.; Samarth, N.

    1998-11-08

    We present experiments in the 60 Tesla Long-Pulse magnet at the Los Alamos National High Magnetic Field Lab (NHMFL) focusing on the high-field, low temperature photoluminescence (PL) from modulation-doped ZnSe/Zn(Cd,Mn)Se single quantum wells. High-speed charge-coupled array detectors and the long (2 second) duration of the magnet pulse permit continuous acquisition of optical spectra throughout a single magnet shot. High-field PL studies of the magnetic 2D electron gases at temperatures down to 350mK reveal clear intensity oscillations corresponding to integer quantum Hall filling factors, from which we determine the density of the electron gas. At very high magnetic fields, steps in the PL energy are observed which correspond to the partial unlocking of antiferromagnetically bound pairs of Mn2+ spins.

  18. Structural dynamics inside a functionalized metal–organic framework probed by ultrafast 2D IR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Jun; Tamimi, Amr; Fei, Honghan; Pullen, Sonja; Ott, Sascha; Cohen, Seth M.; Fayer, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    The structural elasticity of metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) is a key property for their functionality. Here, we show that 2D IR spectroscopy with pulse-shaping techniques can probe the ultrafast structural fluctuations of MOFs. 2D IR data, obtained from a vibrational probe attached to the linkers of UiO-66 MOF in low concentration, revealed that the structural fluctuations have time constants of 7 and 670 ps with no solvent. Filling the MOF pores with dimethylformamide (DMF) slows the structural fluctuations by reducing the ability of the MOF to undergo deformations, and the dynamics of the DMF molecules are also greatly restricted. Methodology advances were required to remove the severe light scattering caused by the macroscopic-sized MOF particles, eliminate interfering oscillatory components from the 2D IR data, and address Förster vibrational excitation transfer. PMID:25512539

  19. Phase Diagram of Bilayer 2D Electron Systems at νT = 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champagne, Alexandre

    2009-03-01

    Bilayer 2D electron systems at total filling fraction νT = 1 and small interlayer spacing can support a strongly correlated phase which exhibits spontaneous interlayer phase coherence and may be described as an excitonic Bose condensate. We use electron interlayer tunnelling and transport to explore the phase diagram of bilayer 2D electron systems at νT = 1, and find that phase transitions between the excitonic νT = 1 phase and bilayer states which lack significant interlayer correlations can be induced in three different ways: by increasing the effective interlayer spacing, d/l, the temperature, T, or the charge imbalance, δν=ν1-ν2. First, for the balanced (δν = 0) system we find that the amplitude of the resonant tunneling in the coherent νT = 1 phase obeys an empirical power law scaling versus d/l at various T, and the layer separation where the tunneling disappears scales linearly with T. Our results [1] offer strong evidence that a finite temperature phase transition separates the balanced interlayer coherent phase from incoherent phases which lack strong interlayer correlations. Secondly, we observe [2] that close to the phase boundary the coherent νT = 1 phase can be absent at δν = 0, present at intermediate δν, and absent again at large δν, thus indicating an intricate phase competition between it and incoherent quasi-independent layer states. Lastly, at δν = 1/3 we report [2] the observation of a direct phase transition between the coherent νT = 1 bilayer integer quantum Hall phase and the pair of single layer fractional quantized Hall states at ν1 = 2/3 and ν2 = 1/3.[4pt] [1] A.R. Champagne, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 096801 (2008).[0pt] [2] A.R. Champagne, et al, Phys. Rev. B 78, 205310 (2008)

  20. 2D and 3D multipactor modeling in dielectric-loaded accelerator structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitsyn, Oleksandr; Nusinovich, Gregory; Antonsen, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    Multipactor (MP) is known as the avalanche growth of the number of secondary electrons emitted from a solid surface exposed to an RF electric field under vacuum conditions. MP is a severe problem in modern rf systems and, therefore, theoretical and experimental studies of MP are of great interest to the researchers working in various areas of physics and engineering. In this work we present results of MP studies in dielectric-loaded accelerator (DLA) structures. First, we show simulation results obtained with the use of the 2D self-consistent MP model (O. V. Sinitsyn, et. al., Phys. Plasmas, vol. 16, 073102 (2009)) and compare those to experimental ones obtained during recent extensive studies of DLA structures performed by Argonne National Laboratory, Naval Research Laboratory, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Euclid TechLabs (C. Jing, et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci., vol. 38, pp. 1354-1360 (2010)). Then we present some new results of 3D analysis of MP which include studies of particle trajectories and studies of MP development at the early stage.

  1. Applications of Ultrafast Terahertz Pulses for Intra-ExcitonicSpectroscopy of Quasi-2D Electron-Hole Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Kaindl, Robert A.; Carnahan, Marc A.; Hagele, Daniel; Chemla, D.S.

    2006-09-02

    Excitons are of fundamental interest and of importance foropto-electronic applications of bulk and nano-structured semiconductors.This paper discusses the utilization of ultrafast terahertz (THz) pulsesfor the study of characteristic low-energy excitations of photoexcitedquasi 2D electron-hole (e-h) gases. Optical-pump THz-probe spectroscopyat 250-kHz repetition rate is employed to detect characteristic THzsignatures of excitons and unbound e-h pairs in GaAs quantum wells.Exciton and free-carrier densities are extracted from the data using atwo-component model. We report the detailed THz response and pairdensities for different photoexcitation energies resonant to heavy-holeexcitons, light-hole excitons, or the continuum of unbound pairs. Suchexperiments can provide quantitative insights into wavelength, time, andtemperature dependence of the low-energy response and composition ofoptically excited e-h gases in low-dimensionalsemiconductors.

  2. 2D array of cold-electron nanobolometers with double polarised cross-dipole antennas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A novel concept of the two-dimensional (2D) array of cold-electron nanobolometers (CEB) with double polarised cross-dipole antennas is proposed for ultrasensitive multimode measurements. This concept provides a unique opportunity to simultaneously measure both components of an RF signal and to avoid complicated combinations of two schemes for each polarisation. The optimal concept of the CEB includes a superconductor-insulator-normal tunnel junction and an SN Andreev contact, which provides better performance. This concept allows for better matching with the junction gate field-effect transistor (JFET) readout, suppresses charging noise related to the Coulomb blockade due to the small area of tunnel junctions and decreases the volume of a normal absorber for further improvement of the noise performance. The reliability of a 2D array is considerably increased due to the parallel and series connections of many CEBs. Estimations of the CEB noise with JFET readout give an opportunity to realise a noise equivalent power (NEP) that is less than photon noise, specifically, NEP = 4 10−19 W/Hz1/2 at 7 THz for an optical power load of 0.02 fW. PMID:22512950

  3. Dynamical symmetry breaking in a 2D electron gas with a spectral node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Klaus

    2013-09-01

    We study a disordered 2D electron gas with a spectral node in a vicinity of the node. After identifying the fundamental dynamical symmetries of this system, the spontaneous breaking of the latter by a Grassmann field is studied within a nonlinear sigma model approach. This allows us to reduce the average two-particle Green's function to a diffusion propagator with a random diffusion coefficient. The latter has non-degenerate saddle points and is treated by the conventional self-consistent Born approximation. This leads to a renormalized chemical potential and a renormalized diffusion coefficient, where the DC conductivity increases linearly with the density of quasiparticles. Applied to the special case of Dirac fermions, our approach provides a comprehensive description of the minimal conductivity at the Dirac node as well as for the V-shape conductivity inside the bands.

  4. 2D MEMS scanning for LIDAR with sub-Nyquist sampling, electronics, and measurement procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giese, Thorsten; Janes, Joachim

    2015-05-01

    Electrostatic driven 2D MEMS scanners resonantly oscillate in both axes leading to Lissajous trajectories of a digitally modulated laser beam reflected from the micro mirror. A solid angle of about 0.02 is scanned by a 658nm laser beam with a maximum repetition rate of 350MHz digital pulses. Reflected light is detected by an APD with a bandwidth of 80MHz. The phase difference between the scanned laser light and the light reflected from an obstacle is analyzed by sub-Nyquist sampling. The FPGA-based electronics and software for the evaluation of distance and velocity of objects within the scanning range are presented. Furthermore, the measures to optimize the Lidar accuracy of about 1mm and the dynamic range of up to 2m are examined. First measurements demonstrating the capability of the system and the evaluation algorithms are discussed.

  5. Finite-size scaling in a 2D disordered electron gas with spectral nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinner, Andreas; Ziegler, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    We study the DC conductivity of a weakly disordered 2D electron gas with two bands and spectral nodes, employing the field theoretical version of the Kubo–Greenwood conductivity formula. Disorder scattering is treated within the standard perturbation theory by summing up ladder and maximally crossed diagrams. The emergent gapless (diffusion) modes determine the behavior of the conductivity on large scales. We find a finite conductivity with an intermediate logarithmic finite-size scaling towards smaller conductivities but do not obtain the logarithmic divergence of the weak-localization approach. Our results agree with the experimentally observed logarithmic scaling of the conductivity in graphene with the formation of a plateau near {{e}2}/π h .

  6. Finite-size scaling in a 2D disordered electron gas with spectral nodes.

    PubMed

    Sinner, Andreas; Ziegler, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    We study the DC conductivity of a weakly disordered 2D electron gas with two bands and spectral nodes, employing the field theoretical version of the Kubo-Greenwood conductivity formula. Disorder scattering is treated within the standard perturbation theory by summing up ladder and maximally crossed diagrams. The emergent gapless (diffusion) modes determine the behavior of the conductivity on large scales. We find a finite conductivity with an intermediate logarithmic finite-size scaling towards smaller conductivities but do not obtain the logarithmic divergence of the weak-localization approach. Our results agree with the experimentally observed logarithmic scaling of the conductivity in graphene with the formation of a plateau near [Formula: see text]. PMID:27270084

  7. Beyond Graphene: Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Defective 2-D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrones, Humberto

    One of the challenges in the production of 2-D materials is the synthesis of defect free systems which can achieve the desired properties for novel applications. However, the reality so far indicates that we need to deal with defective systems and understand their main features in order to perform defect engineering in such a way that we can engineer a new material. In this talk I discuss first, the introduction of defects in a hierarchic way starting from 2-D graphene to form giant Schwarzites or graphene foams, which also can exhibit further defects, thus we can have several levels of defectiveness. In this context, it will be shown that giant Schwarzites, depending on their symmetry, can exhibit Dirac-Fermion behavior and further, possess protected topological states as shown by other authors. Regarding the mechanical properties of these systems, it is possible to tune the Poisson Ratio by the addition of defects, thus shedding light to the explanation of the almost zero Poisson ratios in experimentally obtained graphene foams. Second, the idea of Haeckelites, a planar sp2 graphene-like structure with heptagons and pentagons, can be extended to transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) with square and octagonal-like defects, finding semi-metallic behaviors with Dirac-Fermions, and even topological insulating properties. National Science Foundation (EFRI-1433311).

  8. Hartree-Fock Solutions of 2d Interacting Tight-Binding Electrons: Mott Properties and Room Temperature Superconductivity Indications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabo Montes de Oca, A.; March, N. H.; Cabo-Bizet, A.

    2014-12-01

    Former results for a tight-binding (TB) model of CuO planes in La2CuO4 are reinterpreted here to underline their wider implications. It is noted that physical systems being appropriately described by the TB model can exhibit the main strongly correlated electron system (SCES) properties, when they are solved in the HF approximation, by also allowing crystal symmetry breaking effects and noncollinear spin orientations of the HF orbitals. It is argued how a simple 2D square lattice system of Coulomb interacting electrons can exhibit insulator gaps and pseudogap states, and quantum phase transitions as illustrated by the mentioned former works. A discussion is also presented here indicating the possibility of attaining room temperature superconductivity, by means of a surface coating with water molecules of cleaved planes of graphite, being orthogonal to its c-axis. The possibility that 2D arrays of quantum dots can give rise to the same effect is also proposed to consideration. The analysis also furnishes theoretical insight to solve the Mott-Slater debate, at least for the La2CuO4 and TMO band structures. The idea is to apply a properly noncollinear GW scheme to the electronic structure calculation of these materials. The fact is that the GW approach can be viewed as a HF procedure in which the screening polarization is also determined. This directly indicates the possibility of predicting the assumed dielectric constant in the previous works. Thus, the results seem to identify that the main correlation properties in these materials are determined by screening. Finally, the conclusions also seem to be of help for the description of the experimental observations of metal-insulator transitions and Mott properties in atoms trapped in planar photonic lattices.

  9. A 2-D orientation-adaptive prediction filter in lifting structures for image coding.

    PubMed

    Gerek, Omer N; Cetin, A Enis

    2006-01-01

    Lifting-style implementations of wavelets are widely used in image coders. A two-dimensional (2-D) edge adaptive lifting structure, which is similar to Daubechies 5/3 wavelet, is presented. The 2-D prediction filter predicts the value of the next polyphase component according to an edge orientation estimator of the image. Consequently, the prediction domain is allowed to rotate +/-45 degrees in regions with diagonal gradient. The gradient estimator is computationally inexpensive with additional costs of only six subtractions per lifting instruction, and no multiplications are required. PMID:16435541

  10. Kinetic electron bounce instability in a 2D current sheet - Implication for substorm dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruit, G.; Tur, A.; Louarn, P.

    2013-12-01

    In the general context of understanding the possible destabilization of the magnetotail before a substorm, we propose a kinetic model for electromagnetic ballooning-type instabilities in resonant interaction with trapped bouncing electrons in a 2D current sheet. Tur et al. 2010 and Fruit et al. 2013 already used this model to investigate the possibilities of electrostatic instabilities. Here, we generalize the model for full electromagnetic perturbations. Starting with a modified Harris sheet as equilibrium state, the linearized gyrokinetic Vlasov equation is solved for electromagnetic fluctuations with period of the order of the electron bounce period. The particle motion is restricted to its first Fourier component along the magnetic field and this allows the complete time integration of the non local perturbed distribution functions. The dispersion relation for electromagnetic modes is finally obtained through the quasineutrality condition and the Ampere's law for the current density. It is found that for mildly stretched current sheet (Bz > 0.1 Blobes) undamped and stable modes oscillate at typical electron bounce frequency with wavelength (in y) of the order of the plasma sheet thickness. As the stretching of the plasma sheet becomes more intense, the frequency of these normal modes decreases and beyond a certain threshold in epsilon=Bz/Blobes < 0.05 typically, the mode becomes explosive (pure imaginary frequency) with typical growing rate of a few tens of seconds. The free energy contained in the electron bouncing motion could thus trigger and drive an electromagnetic instability able to disrupt the cross-tail current in a few seconds. The role of the temperature ratio Te/Ti is also evaluated.

  11. A salt-bridge structure in solution revealed by 2D-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Huerta-Viga, Adriana; Domingos, Sérgio R; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Woutersen, Sander

    2014-08-14

    Salt bridges are important interactions for the stability of protein conformations, but up to now it has been difficult to determine salt-bridge geometries in solution. Here we characterize the spatial structure of a salt bridge between guanidinium (Gdm(+)) and acetate (Ac(-)) using two-dimensional vibrational (2D-IR) spectroscopy. We find that as a result of salt bridge formation there is a significant change in the infrared response of Gdm(+) and Ac(-), and cross peaks between them appear in the 2D-IR spectrum. From the 2D-IR spectrum we determine the relative orientation of the transition-dipole moments of the vibrational modes of Gdm(+) and Ac(-), as well as the coupling between them. PMID:24676430

  12. 2D Optical Streaking for Ultra-Short Electron Beam Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.T.; Huang, Z.; Wang, L.; /SLAC

    2011-12-14

    field ionization, which occurs in plasma case, gases species with high field ionization threshold should be considered. For a linear polarized laser, the kick to the ionized electrons depends on the phase of the laser when the electrons are born and the unknown timing jitter between the electron beam and laser beam makes the data analysis very difficult. Here we propose to use a circular polarized laser to do a 2-dimensional (2D) streaking (both x and y) and measure the bunch length from the angular distribution on the screen, where the phase jitter causes only a rotation of the image on the screen without changing of the relative angular distribution. Also we only need to know the laser wavelength for calibration. A similar circular RF deflecting mode was used to measure long bunches. We developed a numerical particle-in-Cell (PIC) code to study the dynamics of ionization electrons with the high energy beam and the laser beam.

  13. Multiple triangulation analysis: application to determine the velocity of 2-D structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.-Z.; Zong, Q.-G.; Wang, J.; Pu, Z. Y.; Zhang, X. G.; Shi, Q. Q.; Cao, J. B.

    2006-11-01

    In order to avoid the ambiguity of the application of the Triangulation Method (multi-spacecraft timing method) to two-dimensional structures, another version of this method, the Multiple Triangulation Analysis (MTA) is used, to calculate the velocities of these structures based on 4-point measurements. We describe the principle of MTA and apply this approach to a real event observed by the Cluster constellation on 2 October 2003. The resulting velocity of the 2-D structure agrees with the ones obtained by some other methods fairly well. So we believe that MTA is a reliable version of the Triangulation Method for 2-D structures, and thus provides us a new way to describe their motion.

  14. Mercury (I) nitroprusside: A 2D structure supported on homometallic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Osiry, H.; Cano, A.; Reguera, L.; Lemus-Santana, A.A.; Reguera, E.

    2015-01-15

    The pentacyanonitrosylferrate complex anion, [Fe(CN){sub 5}NO]{sup 2−}, forms an insoluble solid with Hg(I) ion, of formula unit Hg{sub 2}[Fe(CN){sub 5}NO]·2H{sub 2}O, whose crystal structure and related properties are unknown. This contribution reports the preparation of that compound by the precipitation method and its structural study from X-ray powder patterns complemented with spectroscopic information from IR, Raman, and UV–vis techniques. The crystal structure was solved ab initio and then refined using the Rietveld method. The solid crystallizes with a triclinic unit cell, in the P−1 space group, with cell parameters a=10.1202(12), b=10.1000(13), c=7.4704(11) Å; α=110.664(10), β=110.114(10), γ=104.724(8) °. Within the unit cell, two formula units are accommodated (Z=2). It adopts a layered structure related with the coordination of the equatorial CN groups at their N end to the Hg atoms while the axial CN ligand remains unlinked. Within the layers neighboring Hg{sub 2}[Fe(CN){sub 5}NO] building units remain linked through four relatively strong Hg–Hg interactions, with an interatomic distance of 2.549(3) Å. The charge donation from the equatorial CN groups through their 5σ orbitals results into an increase for the electron density on the Hg atoms, which strengths the Hg–Hg bond. In the Raman spectrum, that metal–metal bond is detected as a stretching vibration band at 167 cm{sup −1}. The available free volume between neighboring layers accommodates two water molecules, which are stabilized within the framework through hydrogen bonds with the N end of the unlinked axial CN group. The removal of these weakly bonded water molecules results in structural disorder for the material 3D framework. - Graphical abstract: Assembling of Hg{sub 2}[Fe(CN){sub 5}NO] units through Hg–Hg interactions. - Highlights: • Homometallic Hg–Hg interactions in metal nitroprusside. • 2D structure supported on metal–metal interactions. • Crystal

  15. Origin of long-lived oscillations in 2D-spectra of a quantum vibronic model: Electronic versus vibrational coherence

    SciTech Connect

    Plenio, M. B.; Almeida, J.; Huelga, S. F.

    2013-12-21

    We demonstrate that the coupling of excitonic and vibrational motion in biological complexes can provide mechanisms to explain the long-lived oscillations that have been obtained in nonlinear spectroscopic signals of different photosynthetic pigment protein complexes and we discuss the contributions of excitonic versus purely vibrational components to these oscillatory features. Considering a dimer model coupled to a structured spectral density we exemplify the fundamental aspects of the electron-phonon dynamics, and by analyzing separately the different contributions to the nonlinear signal, we show that for realistic parameter regimes purely electronic coherence is of the same order as purely vibrational coherence in the electronic ground state. Moreover, we demonstrate how the latter relies upon the excitonic interaction to manifest. These results link recently proposed microscopic, non-equilibrium mechanisms to support long lived coherence at ambient temperatures with actual experimental observations of oscillatory behaviour using 2D photon echo techniques to corroborate the fundamental importance of the interplay of electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom in the dynamics of light harvesting aggregates.

  16. Strongly Metallic Electron and Hole 2D Transport in an Ambipolar Si-Vacuum Field Effect Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Binhui; Yazdanpanah, M. M.; Kane, B. E.; Hwang, E. H.; Das Sarma, S.

    2015-07-01

    We report experiment and theory on an ambipolar gate-controlled Si(111)-vacuum field effect transistor where we study electron and hole (low-temperature 2D) transport in the same device simply by changing the external gate voltage to tune the system from being a 2D electron system at positive gate voltage to a 2D hole system at negative gate voltage. The electron (hole) conductivity manifests strong (moderate) metallic temperature dependence with the conductivity decreasing by a factor of 8 (2) between 0.3 K and 4.2 K with the peak electron mobility (˜18 m2/V s ) being roughly 20 times larger than the peak hole mobility (in the same sample). Our theory explains the data well using random phase approximation screening of background Coulomb disorder, establishing that the observed metallicity is a direct consequence of the strong temperature dependence of the effective screened disorder.

  17. Metal-organic extended 2D structures: Fe-PTCDA on Au(111).

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Lucía; Peláez, Samuel; Caillard, Renaud; Serena, Pedro A; Martín-Gago, José A; Méndez, Javier

    2010-07-30

    In this work we combine organic molecules of 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) with iron atoms on an Au (111) substrate in ultra-high vacuum conditions at different temperatures. By means of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) we study the formation of stable 2D metal-organic structures. We show that at certain growth conditions (temperature, time and coverage) stable 'ladder-like' nanostructures are obtained. These are the result of connecting together two metal-organic chains through PTCDA molecules placed perpendicularly, as rungs of a ladder. These structures, stable up to 450 K, can be extended in a 2D layer covering the entire surface and presenting different rotation domains. STM images at both polarities show a contrast reversal between the two molecules at the unit cell. By means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we confirm the stability of these structures and that their molecular orbitals are placed separately at the different molecules. PMID:20603531

  18. Destabilization of 2D magnetic current sheets by resonance with bouncing electron - a new theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruit, Gabriel; Louarn, Philippe; Tur, Anatoly

    2016-07-01

    In the general context of understanding the possible destabilization of the magnetotail before a substorm, we propose a kinetic model for electromagnetic instabilities in resonant interaction with trapped bouncing electrons. The geometry is clearly 2D and uses Harris sheet profile. Fruit et al. 2013 already used this model to investigate the possibilities of electrostatic instabilities. Tur et al. 2014 generalizes the model for full electromagnetic perturbations. Starting with a modified Harris sheet as equilibrium state, the linearized gyrokinetic Vlasov equation is solved for electromagnetic fluctuations with period of the order of the electron bounce period (a few seconds). The particle motion is restricted to its first Fourier component along the magnetic field and this allows the complete time integration of the non local perturbed distribution functions. The dispersion relation for electromagnetic modes is finally obtained through the quasi neutrality condition and the Ampere's law for the current density. The present talk will focus on the main results of this theory. The electrostatic version of the model may be applied to the near-Earth environment (8-12 R_{E}) where beta is rather low. It is showed that inclusion of bouncing electron motion may enhance strongly the growth rate of the classical drift wave instability. This model could thus explain the generation of strong parallel electric fields in the ionosphere and the formation of aurora beads with wavelength of a few hundreds of km. In the electromagnetic version, it is found that for mildly stretched current sheet (B_{z} > 0.1 B _{lobes}) undamped modes oscillate at typical electron bounce frequency with wavelength of the order of the plasma sheet thickness. As the stretching of the plasma sheet becomes more intense, the frequency of these normal modes decreases and beyond a certain threshold in B_{z}/B _{lobes}, the mode becomes explosive (pure imaginary frequency) with typical growing rate of a few

  19. Oxide 2D electron gases as a route for high carrier densities on (001) Si

    SciTech Connect

    Kornblum, Lior; Jin, Eric N.; Kumah, Divine P.; Walker, Fred J.; Ernst, Alexis T.; Broadbridge, Christine C.; Ahn, Charles H.

    2015-05-18

    Two dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) formed at the interfaces of oxide heterostructures draw considerable interest owing to their unique physics and potential applications. Growing such heterostructures on conventional semiconductors has the potential to integrate their functionality with semiconductor device technology. We demonstrate 2DEGs on a conventional semiconductor by growing GdTiO{sub 3}-SrTiO{sub 3} on silicon. Structural analysis confirms the epitaxial growth of heterostructures with abrupt interfaces and a high degree of crystallinity. Transport measurements show the conduction to be an interface effect, ∼9 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2} electrons per interface. Good agreement is demonstrated between the electronic behavior of structures grown on Si and on an oxide substrate, validating the robustness of this approach to bridge between lab-scale samples to a scalable, technologically relevant materials system.

  20. Effective Mass and g-factor of 2D Electrons in a HgTe Quantum Well from THz Photoresponse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakmehr, Mehdi; Stier, A. V.; Zhang, H. D.; Bruene, C.; Buhmann, H.; Molenkamp, L.; McCombe, B. D.

    2013-03-01

    There is current interest in HgTe because of its interesting ``inverted'' band structure and large spin-orbit interaction, and because it is a topological insulator under quantum confinement, Well-widths close to that at which the band structure goes from the ``inverted'' to the normal structure are of particular interest. We have used photoresponse excited by several lines from an optically pumped THz laser and magnetotransport measurements to determine the cyclotron effective mass and g-factor of 2D electrons in the gamma_6 conduction band of a high quality HgTe quantum well (ns = 1.55 x 1012 cm-2; 6 nm well) at low temperatures. One of the two samples studied was gated, which allowed density to be varied by over 30%. We find m* =0.039me and g = -18 at the highest density from fits to the PR with the field normal to the plane of the QW, and separately from CR transmission measurements and tilted field experiments. We will also discuss electron spin resonance measurements near filling factors 7 and 9. Supported in part by NSF DMR 1008138

  1. Quantitative nanoscale visualization of heterogeneous electron transfer rates in 2D carbon nanotube networks.

    PubMed

    Güell, Aleix G; Ebejer, Neil; Snowden, Michael E; McKelvey, Kim; Macpherson, Julie V; Unwin, Patrick R

    2012-07-17

    Carbon nanotubes have attracted considerable interest for electrochemical, electrocatalytic, and sensing applications, yet there remains uncertainty concerning the intrinsic electrochemical (EC) activity. In this study, we use scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM) to determine local heterogeneous electron transfer (HET) kinetics in a random 2D network of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on an Si/SiO(2) substrate. The high spatial resolution of SECCM, which employs a mobile nanoscale EC cell as a probe for imaging, enables us to sample the responses of individual portions of a wide range of SWNTs within this complex arrangement. Using two redox processes, the oxidation of ferrocenylmethyl trimethylammonium and the reduction of ruthenium (III) hexaamine, we have obtained conclusive evidence for the high intrinsic EC activity of the sidewalls of the large majority of SWNTs in networks. Moreover, we show that the ends of SWNTs and the points where two SWNTs cross do not show appreciably different HET kinetics relative to the sidewall. Using finite element method modeling, we deduce standard rate constants for the two redox couples and demonstrate that HET based solely on characteristic defects in the SWNT side wall is highly unlikely. This is further confirmed by the analysis of individual line profiles taken as the SECCM probe scans over an SWNT. More generally, the studies herein demonstrate SECCM to be a powerful and versatile method for activity mapping of complex electrode materials under conditions of high mass transport, where kinetic assignments can be made with confidence. PMID:22635266

  2. Residual resistance of 2D and 3D structures and Joule heat release.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, V L; Kozub, V I

    2011-06-22

    We consider a residual resistance and Joule heat release in 2D nanostructures as well as in ordinary 3D conductors. We assume that elastic scattering of conduction electrons by lattice defects is predominant. Within a rather intricate situation in such systems we discuss in detail two cases. (1) The elastic scattering alone (i.e. without regard of inelastic mechanisms of scattering) leads to a transition of the mechanical energy (stored by the electrons under the action of an electric field) into heat in a traditional way. This process can be described by the Boltzmann equation where it is possible to do the configuration averaging over defect positions in the electron-impurity collision term. The corresponding conditions are usually met in metals. (2) The elastic scattering can be considered with the help of the standard electron-impurity collision integral only in combination with some additional averaging procedure (possibly including inelastic scattering or some mechanisms of electron wavefunction phase destruction). This situation is typical for degenerate semiconductors with a high concentration of dopants and conduction electrons. Quite often, heat release can be observed via transfer of heat to the lattice, i.e. via inelastic processes of electron-phonon collisions and can take place at distances much larger than the size of the device. However, a direct heating of the electron system can be registered too by, for instance, local measurements of the current noise or direct measurement of an electron distribution function. PMID:21628783

  3. Self-Consistent Interpretation of the 2D Structure of the Liquid Au82Si18 Surface: Bending Rigidity and the Debye-Waller Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechler, S.; Pershan, P. S.; Yahel, E.; Stoltz, S. E.; Shpyrko, O. G.; Lin, B.; Meron, M.; Sellner, S.

    2010-10-01

    The structural and mechanical properties of 2D crystalline surface phases that form at the surface of liquid eutectic Au82Si18 are studied using synchrotron x-ray scattering over a large temperature range. In the vicinity of the eutectic temperature the surface consists of a 2D atomic bilayer crystalline phase that transforms into a 2D monolayer crystalline phase during heating. The latter phase eventually melts into a liquidlike surface on further heating. We demonstrate that the short wavelength capillary wave fluctuations are suppressed due to the bending rigidity of 2D crystalline phases. The corresponding reduction in the Debye-Waller factor allows for measured reflectivity to be explained in terms of an electron density profile that is consistent with the 2D surface crystals.

  4. The influence of pressure on the structure of a 2D uranium(VI) carboxyphosphonoate compound

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Elinor C.; Ross, Nancy L.; Surbella, Robert G.; Cahill, Christopher L.

    2014-10-15

    We report the first quantitative analysis of the structural evolution of a uranyl bearing coordination polymer in response to pressure. The material that is central to this study, (UO{sub 2})(O{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}CO{sub 2}H) (1), is constructed from rigid 2D inorganic layers comprising edge sharing UO{sub 7} pentagonal bipyramids cross-linked by [PO{sub 3}(COOH)]{sup 2−} anions. Strong hydrogen bonding interactions exist between the pendent carboxylic acid groups on adjacent layers. Under pressure, 1 exhibits compressional behaviour primarily in the direction perpendicular to the inorganic layers, which is aided by a reduction in the interlayer distance and shifting of the layers with respect to each other. The bulk modulus for the 2D compound 1 is unexpectedly high [18.1(1) GPa] and is within the range reported for 3D CPs assembled from Zn{sup II} cations and inflexible imidazolate anions, and is at the lower end of the range of moduli observed for aluminosilicate zeolites (19–59 GPa). - Graphical Abstract: The compression mechanism and elastic constants for a 2D Uranium(VI) carboxyphosphonoate compound are reported. - Highlights: • The response to pressure of a uranium carboxyphosphonoate compound has been studied. • High-pressure single-crystal XRD data for this 2D uranium compound were collected. • Elastic constants for this material have been determined. • The compression mechanism for the compound has been elucidated.

  5. Electron-beam induced photoresist shrinkage influence on 2D profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunday, Benjamin; Cordes, Aaron; Allgair, John; Aguilar, Daniel Bellido; Tileli, Vasiliki; Thiel, Bradley; Avitan, Yohanan; Peltinov, Ram; Bar-Zvi, Mayaan; Adan, Ofer; Chirko, Konstantin

    2010-03-01

    For many years, lithographic resolution has been the main obstacle in keeping the pace of transistor densification to meet Moore's Law. For the 32 nm node and beyond, new lithography techniques will be used, including immersion ArF (iArF) lithography and extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL). As in the past, these techniques will use new types of photoresists with the capability to print smaller feature widths and pitches. Also, such smaller feature sizes will require thinner layers of photoresists, such as under 100 nm. In previous papers, we focused on ArF and iArF photoresist shrinkage. We evaluated the magnitude of shrinkage for both R&D and mature resists as a function of chemical formulation, lithographic sensitivity, scanning electron microscope (SEM) beam condition, and feature size. Shrinkage results were determined by the well accepted methodology described in ISMI's CD-SEM Unified Specification. A model for resist shrinkage, while derived elsewhere, was presented, that can be used to curve-fit to the shrinkage data resulting from multiple repeated measurements of resist features. Parameters in the curve-fit allow for metrics quantifying total shrinkage, shrinkage rate, and initial critical dimension (CD) before e-beam exposure. With these parameters and exhaustive measurements, a fundamental understanding of the phenomenology of the shrinkage trends was achieved, including how the shrinkage behaves differently for different sized features. This work was extended in yet another paper in which we presented a 1-D model for resist shrinkage that can be used to curve-fit to shrinkage curves. Calibration of parameters to describe the photoresist material and the electron beam were all that were required to fit the model to real shrinkage data, as long as the photoresist was thick enough that the beam could not penetrate the entire layer of resist. In this paper, we extend this work yet again to a 2-D model of a trapezoidal photoresist profile. This model thus

  6. Validation of a 2-D semi-coupled numerical model for fluid-structure-seabed interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jianhong; Jeng, Dongsheng; Wang, Ren; Zhu, Changqi

    2013-10-01

    A 2-D semi-coupled model PORO-WSSI 2D (also be referred as FSSI-CAS 2D) for the Fluid-Structure-Seabed Interaction (FSSI) has been developed by employing RANS equations for wave motion in fluid domain, VARANS equations for porous flow in porous structures; and taking the dynamic Biot's equations (known as "u - p" approximation) for soil as the governing equations. The finite difference two-step projection method and the forward time difference method are adopted to solve the RANS, VARANS equations; and the finite element method is adopted to solve the "u - p" approximation. A data exchange port is developed to couple the RANS, VARANS equations and the dynamic Biot's equations together. The analytical solution proposed by Hsu and Jeng (1994) and some experiments conducted in wave flume or geotechnical centrifuge in which various waves involved are used to validate the developed semi-coupled numerical model. The sandy bed involved in these experiments is poro-elastic or poro-elastoplastic. The inclusion of the interaction between fluid, marine structures and poro-elastoplastic seabed foundation is a special point and highlight in this paper, which is essentially different with other previous coupled models The excellent agreement between the numerical results and the experiment data indicates that the developed coupled model is highly reliablefor the FSSI problem.

  7. 2D and 3D X-Ray Structural Microscopy Using Submicron-Resolution Laue Microdiffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Budai, John D.; Yang, Wenge; Larson, Bennett C.; Tischler, Jonathan Z.; Liu, Wenjun; Ice, Gene E.

    2010-11-10

    We have developed a scanning, polychromatic x-ray microscopy technique with submicron spatial resolution at the Advanced Photon Source. In this technique, white undulator radiation is focused to submicron diameter using elliptical mirrors. Laue diffraction patterns scattered from the sample are collected with an area detector and then analyzed to obtain the local crystal structure, lattice orientation, and strain tensor. These new microdiffraction capabilities have enabled both 2D and 3D structural studies of materials on mesoscopic length-scales of tenths-to-hundreds of microns. For thin samples such as deposited films, 2D structural maps are obtained by step-scanning the area of interest. For example, 2D x-ray microscopy has been applied in studies of the epitaxial growth of oxide films. For bulk samples, a 3D differential-aperture x-ray microscopy technique has been developed that yields the full diffraction information from each submicron volume element. The capabilities of 3D x-ray microscopy are demonstrated here with measurements of grain orientations and grain boundary motion in polycrystalline aluminum during 3D thermal grain growth. X-ray microscopy provides the needed, direct link between the experimentally measured 3D microstructural evolution and the results of theory and modeling of materials processes on mesoscopic length scales.

  8. Kohn-Sham Band Structure Benchmark Including Spin-Orbit Coupling for 2D and 3D Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huhn, William; Blum, Volker

    2015-03-01

    Accurate electronic band structures serve as a primary indicator of the suitability of a material for a given application, e.g., as electronic or catalytic materials. Computed band structures, however, are subject to a host of approximations, some of which are more obvious (e.g., the treatment of the exchange-correlation of self-energy) and others less obvious (e.g., the treatment of core, semicore, or valence electrons, handling of relativistic effects, or the accuracy of the underlying basis set used). We here provide a set of accurate Kohn-Sham band structure benchmarks, using the numeric atom-centered all-electron electronic structure code FHI-aims combined with the ``traditional'' PBE functional and the hybrid HSE functional, to calculate core, valence, and low-lying conduction bands of a set of 2D and 3D materials. Benchmarks are provided with and without effects of spin-orbit coupling, using quasi-degenerate perturbation theory to predict spin-orbit splittings. This work is funded by Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft.

  9. Structure-approximating inverse protein folding problem in the 2D HP model.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Arvind; Manuch, Ján; Stacho, Ladislav

    2005-12-01

    The inverse protein folding problem is that of designing an amino acid sequence which has a particular native protein fold. This problem arises in drug design where a particular structure is necessary to ensure proper protein-protein interactions. In this paper, we show that in the 2D HP model of Dill it is possible to solve this problem for a broad class of structures. These structures can be used to closely approximate any given structure. One of the most important properties of a good protein (in drug design) is its stability--the aptitude not to fold simultaneously into other structures. We show that for a number of basic structures, our sequences have a unique fold. PMID:16379538

  10. Locally adaptive 2D-3D registration using vascular structure model for liver catheterization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihye; Lee, Jeongjin; Chung, Jin Wook; Shin, Yeong-Gil

    2016-03-01

    Two-dimensional-three-dimensional (2D-3D) registration between intra-operative 2D digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and pre-operative 3D computed tomography angiography (CTA) can be used for roadmapping purposes. However, through the projection of 3D vessels, incorrect intersections and overlaps between vessels are produced because of the complex vascular structure, which makes it difficult to obtain the correct solution of 2D-3D registration. To overcome these problems, we propose a registration method that selects a suitable part of a 3D vascular structure for a given DSA image and finds the optimized solution to the partial 3D structure. The proposed algorithm can reduce the registration errors because it restricts the range of the 3D vascular structure for the registration by using only the relevant 3D vessels with the given DSA. To search for the appropriate 3D partial structure, we first construct a tree model of the 3D vascular structure and divide it into several subtrees in accordance with the connectivity. Then, the best matched subtree with the given DSA image is selected using the results from the coarse registration between each subtree and the vessels in the DSA image. Finally, a fine registration is conducted to minimize the difference between the selected subtree and the vessels of the DSA image. In experimental results obtained using 10 clinical datasets, the average distance errors in the case of the proposed method were 2.34±1.94mm. The proposed algorithm converges faster and produces more correct results than the conventional method in evaluations on patient datasets. PMID:26824922

  11. Structural transformation in monolayer materials: a 2D to 1D transformation.

    PubMed

    Momeni, Kasra; Attariani, Hamed; LeSar, Richard A

    2016-07-20

    Reducing the dimensions of materials to atomic scales results in a large portion of atoms being at or near the surface, with lower bond order and thus higher energy. At such scales, reduction of the surface energy and surface stresses can be the driving force for the formation of new low-dimensional nanostructures, and may be exhibited through surface relaxation and/or surface reconstruction, which can be utilized for tailoring the properties and phase transformation of nanomaterials without applying any external load. Here we used atomistic simulations and revealed an intrinsic structural transformation in monolayer materials that lowers their dimension from 2D nanosheets to 1D nanostructures to reduce their surface and elastic energies. Experimental evidence of such transformation has also been revealed for one of the predicted nanostructures. Such transformation plays an important role in bi-/multi-layer 2D materials. PMID:27388501

  12. 2D-CELL: image processing software for extraction and analysis of 2-dimensional cellular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righetti, F.; Telley, H.; Leibling, Th. M.; Mocellin, A.

    1992-01-01

    2D-CELL is a software package for the processing and analyzing of photographic images of cellular structures in a largely interactive way. Starting from a binary digitized image, the programs extract the line network (skeleton) of the structure and determine the graph representation that best models it. Provision is made for manually correcting defects such as incorrect node positions or dangling bonds. Then a suitable algorithm retrieves polygonal contours which define individual cells — local boundary curvatures are neglected for simplicity. Using elementary analytical geometry relations, a range of metric and topological parameters describing the population are then computed, organized into statistical distributions and graphically displayed.

  13. LOCA hydroloads calculations with multidimensional nonlinear fluid/structure interaction. Volume 2: STEALTH 2D/WHAMSE 2D single-phse fluid and elastic structure studies. Final report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, F.H.; Santee, G.E. Jr.; Mortensen, G.A.; Brockett, G.F.; Gross, M.B.; Silling, S.A.; Belytschko, T.

    1981-03-01

    This report, the second in a series of reports for RP-1065, describes the second step in the stepwise approach for developing the three-dimensional, nonlinear, fluid/structure interaction methodology to assess the hydroloads on a large PWR during the subcooled portions of a hypothetical LOCA. The second step in the methodology considers enhancements and special modifications to the 2D STEALTH-HYDRO computer program and the 2D WHAMSE computer program. The 2D STEALTH-HYDRO enhancements consist of a fluid-fluid coupling control-volume model and an orifice control-volume model. The enhancements to 2D WHAMSE include elimination of the implicit integration routines, material models, and structural elements not required for the hydroloads application. In addition the logic for coupling the 2D STEALTH-HYDRO computer program to the 2D WHAMSE computer program is discussed.

  14. Impact of environmentally induced fluctuations on quantum mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational pigment states in photosynthetic energy transfer and 2D electronic spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujihashi, Yuta; Fleming, Graham R.; Ishizaki, Akihito

    2015-06-01

    Recently, nuclear vibrational contribution signatures in two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy have attracted considerable interest, in particular as regards interpretation of the oscillatory transients observed in light-harvesting complexes. These transients have dephasing times that persist for much longer than theoretically predicted electronic coherence lifetime. As a plausible explanation for this long-lived spectral beating in 2D electronic spectra, quantum-mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational states (vibronic excitons) were proposed by Christensson et al. [J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 7449 (2012)] and have since been explored. In this work, we address a dimer which produces little beating of electronic origin in the absence of vibronic contributions, and examine the impact of protein-induced fluctuations upon electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures by calculating the electronic energy transfer dynamics and 2D electronic spectra in a numerically accurate manner. It is found that, at cryogenic temperatures, the electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures are rather robust, even under the influence of the fluctuations and despite the small Huang-Rhys factors of the Franck-Condon active vibrational modes. This results in long-lasting beating behavior of vibrational origin in the 2D electronic spectra. At physiological temperatures, however, the fluctuations eradicate the mixing, and hence, the beating in the 2D spectra disappears. Further, it is demonstrated that such electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures do not necessarily play a significant role in electronic energy transfer dynamics, despite contributing to the enhancement of long-lived quantum beating in 2D electronic spectra, contrary to speculations in recent publications.

  15. Impact of environmentally induced fluctuations on quantum mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational pigment states in photosynthetic energy transfer and 2D electronic spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Fujihashi, Yuta; Ishizaki, Akihito; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-06-07

    Recently, nuclear vibrational contribution signatures in two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy have attracted considerable interest, in particular as regards interpretation of the oscillatory transients observed in light-harvesting complexes. These transients have dephasing times that persist for much longer than theoretically predicted electronic coherence lifetime. As a plausible explanation for this long-lived spectral beating in 2D electronic spectra, quantum-mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational states (vibronic excitons) were proposed by Christensson et al. [J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 7449 (2012)] and have since been explored. In this work, we address a dimer which produces little beating of electronic origin in the absence of vibronic contributions, and examine the impact of protein-induced fluctuations upon electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures by calculating the electronic energy transfer dynamics and 2D electronic spectra in a numerically accurate manner. It is found that, at cryogenic temperatures, the electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures are rather robust, even under the influence of the fluctuations and despite the small Huang-Rhys factors of the Franck-Condon active vibrational modes. This results in long-lasting beating behavior of vibrational origin in the 2D electronic spectra. At physiological temperatures, however, the fluctuations eradicate the mixing, and hence, the beating in the 2D spectra disappears. Further, it is demonstrated that such electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures do not necessarily play a significant role in electronic energy transfer dynamics, despite contributing to the enhancement of long-lived quantum beating in 2D electronic spectra, contrary to speculations in recent publications.

  16. 2D-ordered dielectric sub-micron bowls on a metal surface: a useful hybrid plasmonic-photonic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Yue; Wang, Shiqiang; Yin, Xianpeng; Liang, Yun; Dong, Hao; Gao, Ning; Li, Jian; Wang, Hui; Li, Guangtao

    2016-07-01

    -micron bowls on a flat gold surface was proposed, prepared, and theoretically and experimentally characterized. This hybrid structure supports two types of modes: surface plasmon polaritons bound at the metallic surface and waveguided mode of light confined in the cavity of bowls. Optical responses of this hybrid structure as well as the spatial electric field distribution of each mode are found to be strongly dependent on the structural parameters of this system, and thus could be widely modified on demand. Importantly, compared to the widely studied hybrid systems, namely the flat metallic surface coated with a monolayer array of latex spheres, the waveguided mode with strong field enhancement appearing in the cavities of bowls is more facilely accessible and thus suitable for practical use. For demonstration, a 2D-ordered silica sub-micron bowl array deposited on a flat gold surface was fabricated and used as a regenerable platform for fluorescence enhancement by simply accommodating emitters in bowls. All the simulation and experiment results indicate that the 2D-ordered dielectric sub-micron bowls on a metal surface should be a useful hybrid plasmonic-photonic system with great potential for applications such as sensors or tunable emitting devices if appropriate periods and materials are employed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02898e

  17. Structure and decompression melting of a novel, high-pressure nanoconfined 2-D ice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianwei; Kalinichev, Andrey G; Kirkpatrick, R James

    2005-08-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of water confined in nanospaces between layers of talc (system composition Mg(3)Si(4)O(10)(OH)(2) + 2H(2)O) at 300 K and pressures of approximately 0.45 GPa show the presence of a novel 2-D ice structure, and the simulation results at lower pressures provide insight into the mechanisms of its decompression melting. Talc is hydrophobic at ambient pressure and temperature, but weak hydrogen bonding between the talc surface and the water molecules plays an important role in stabilizing the hydrated structure at high pressure. The simulation results suggest that experimentally accessible elevated pressures may cause formation of a wide range of previously unknown water structures in nanoconfinement. In the talc 2-D ice, each water molecule is coordinated by six O(b) atoms of one basal siloxane sheet and three water molecules. The water molecules are arranged in a buckled hexagonal array in the a-b crystallographic plane with two sublayers along [001]. Each H(2)O molecule has four H-bonds, accepting one from the talc OH group and one from another water molecule and donating one to an O(b) and one to another water molecule. In plan view, the molecules are arranged in six-member rings reflecting the substrate talc structure. Decompression melting occurs by migration of water molecules to interstitial sites in the centers of six-member rings and eventual formation of separate empty and water-filled regions. PMID:16852798

  18. Final LDRD report : the physics of 1D and 2D electron gases in III-nitride heterostructure NWs.

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Andrew M.; Arslan, Ilke; Upadhya, Prashanth C.; Morales, Eugenia T.; Leonard, Francois Leonard; Li, Qiming; Wang, George T.; Talin, Albert Alec; Prasankumar, Rohit P.; Lin, Yong

    2009-09-01

    The proposed work seeks to demonstrate and understand new phenomena in novel, freestanding III-nitride core-shell nanowires, including 1D and 2D electron gas formation and properties, and to investigate the role of surfaces and heterointerfaces on the transport and optical properties of nanowires, using a combined experimental and theoretical approach. Obtaining an understanding of these phenomena will be a critical step that will allow development of novel, ultrafast and ultraefficient nanowire-based electronic and photonic devices.

  19. Synthesis, structure and luminescence property of 2D lanthanide complexes with 3-fluorophthalate and oxalate

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Yu-E; Li, Xia; Song, Shuang

    2012-12-15

    Complexes [Ln{sub 2}(fpht){sub 2}(ox)(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}]{center_dot}H{sub 2}O (Ln=Sm 1, Eu 2, Tb 3 and Dy 4; fpht=3-fluorophthalate and ox=oxalate) have been synthesized and structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The four complexes possess similar 2D framework structures constructed from Ln-fpht double-stranded helices and ox linkages. Complexes 2 and 3 display the characteristic emission {sup 5}D{sub 0}{yields}{sup 7}F{sub J} (J=0-4) transitions of Eu(III) ion and {sup 5}D{sub 4}{yields}{sup 7}F{sub J} (J=6-3) transitions of Tb(III) ion, respectively. The emission decay curves reveal a monoexponential behavior yielding the lifetime values of 0.266{+-}0.002 ms for 2 and 0.733{+-}0.002 ms for 3. The emission spectrum of 1 shows three weak bands corresponding to the characteristic emission {sup 4}G{sub 5/2}{yields}{sup 6}H{sub 5/2}, {sup 4}G{sub 5/2}{yields}{sup 6}H{sub 7/2} and {sup 4}G{sub 5/2}{yields}{sup 6}H{sub 9/2} transitions of Sm(III) ion. The emission spectrum of 4 displays a broad band centered at 438 nm, which comes from the {pi}{sup Low-Asterisk }-{pi} transition of the ligand. - Graphical abstract: Complexes [Ln{sub 2}(fpht){sub 2}(ox)(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}]{center_dot}H{sub 2}O (fpht=3-fluorophthalate, ox=oxalate) possess 2D structures. Sm(III), Eu(III) and Tb(III) complexes show the characteristic fluorescent emission of the Ln(III). Dy(III) complex displays ligand-based luminescent behavior. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer [Ln{sub 2}(fpht){sub 2}(ox)(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}]{center_dot}H{sub 2}O (fpht=3-fluorophthalate; ox=oxalate) show 2D structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The 2D structures are constructed from Ln-fpht double-stranded helices and ox linkage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Sm(III), Eu(III) and Tb(III) complexes show the characteristic emission of the Ln(III) ions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dy(III) complex displays ligand-based luminescent behavior.

  20. Photoluminescence and the gallium problem for highest-mobility GaAs/AlGaAs-based 2d electron gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schläpfer, F.; Dietsche, W.; Reichl, C.; Faelt, S.; Wegscheider, W.

    2016-05-01

    The quest for extremely high mobilities of 2d electron gases in MBE-grown heterostructures is hampered by the available purity of the starting materials, particularly of the gallium. Here we compare the role of different Ga lots having nominally the highest possible quality on the mobility and the photoluminescence (PL) of modulation doped single interface structures and find significant differences. A weak exciton PL reveals that the purity of the Ga is insufficient. No high mobility can be reached with such a lot with a reasonable effort. On the other hand, a strong exciton PL indicates a high initial Ga purity, allowing to reach mobilities of 15 million (single interface) or 28 million cm2/V s (doped quantum wells) in our MBE systems. We discuss possible origins of the inconsistent Ga quality. Furthermore, we compare samples grown in different MBE systems over a period of several years and find that mobility and PL are correlated if similar structures and growth procedures are used.

  1. Parametric analysis of 2D guided-wave photonic band gap structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciminelli, C.; Peluso, F.; Armenise, M. N.

    2005-11-01

    The parametric analysis of the electromagnetic properties of 2D guided wave photonic band gap structures is reported with the aim of providing a valid tool for the optimal design. The modelling approach is based on the Bloch-Floquet method. Different lattice configurations and geometrical parameters are considered. An optimum value for the ratio between the hole (or rod) radius and the lattice constant does exist and the calculation demonstrated that it is almost independent from the etching depth, only depending on the lattice type. The results are suitable for the design optimisation of photonic crystal reflectors to be used in integrated optical devices.

  2. Parametric analysis of 2D guided-wave photonic band gap structures.

    PubMed

    Ciminelli, C; Peluso, F; Armenise, M

    2005-11-28

    The parametric analysis of the electromagnetic properties of 2D guided wave photonic band gap structures is reported with the aim of providing a valid tool for the optimal design. The modelling approach is based on the Bloch-Floquet method. Different lattice configurations and geometrical parameters are considered. An optimum value for the ratio between the hole (or rod) radius and the lattice constant does exist and the calculation demonstrated that it is almost independent from the etching depth, only depending on the lattice type. The results are suitable for the design optimisation of photonic crystal reflectors to be used in integrated optical devices. PMID:19503180

  3. Nonlinear soil-structure interaction calculations simulating the SIMQUAKE experiment using STEALTH 2D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, H. T.; Hofmann, R.; Yee, G.; Vaughan, D. K.

    1980-01-01

    Transient, nonlinear soil-structure interaction simulations of an Electric Power Research Institute, SIMQUAKE experiment were performed using the large strain, time domain STEALTH 2D code and a cyclic, kinematically hardening cap soil model. Results from the STEALTH simulations were compared to identical simulations performed with the TRANAL code and indicate relatively good agreement between all the STEALTH and TRANAL calculations. The differences that are seen can probably be attributed to: (1) large (STEALTH) vs. small (TRANAL) strain formulation and/or (2) grid discretization differences.

  4. The effect of hydrazine intercalation on the structure and capacitance of 2D titanium carbide (MXene)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mashtalir, O.; Lukatskaya, Maria R.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Raymundo-Pinero, E.; Naguib, Michael; Barsoum, M. W.; Gogotsi, Yury G.

    2016-03-25

    Herein we show that hydrazine intercalation into 2D titanium carbide (Ti3C2-based MXene) results in changes in its surface chemistry by decreasing the amounts of fluorine, OH surface groups and intercalated water. It also creates a pillaring effect between Ti3C2Tx layers pre-opening the structure and improving the accessability to active sites. Furthermore, the hydrazine treated material has demonstrated a greatly improved capacitance of 250 F g–1 in acidic electrolytes with an excellent cycling ability for electrodes as thick as 75 μm.

  5. The effect of hydrazine intercalation on the structure and capacitance of 2D titanium carbide (MXene).

    PubMed

    Mashtalir, O; Lukatskaya, M R; Kolesnikov, A I; Raymundo-Piñero, E; Naguib, M; Barsoum, M W; Gogotsi, Y

    2016-04-28

    Herein we show that hydrazine intercalation into 2D titanium carbide (Ti3C2-based MXene) results in changes in its surface chemistry by decreasing the amounts of fluorine, OH surface groups and intercalated water. It also creates a pillaring effect between Ti3C2Tx layers pre-opening the structure and improving the accessability to active sites. The hydrazine treated material has demonstrated a greatly improved capacitance of 250 F g(-1) in acidic electrolytes with an excellent cycling ability for electrodes as thick as 75 μm. PMID:27088300

  6. Broadband 7-fs diffractive-optic-based 2D electronic spectroscopy using hollow-core fiber compression.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaonan; Dostál, Jakub; Brixner, Tobias

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate noncollinear coherent two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy for which broadband pulses are generated in an argon-filled hollow-core fiber pumped by a 1-kHz Ti:Sapphire laser. Compression is achieved to 7 fs duration (TG-FROG) using dispersive mirrors. The hollow fiber provides a clean spatial profile and smooth spectral shape in the 500-700 nm region. The diffractive-optic-based design of the 2D spectrometer avoids directional filtering distortions and temporal broadening from time smearing. For demonstration we record data of cresyl-violet perchlorate in ethanol and use phasing to obtain broadband absorptive 2D spectra. The resulting quantum beating as a function of population time is consistent with literature data. PMID:27607681

  7. Iterative Stable Alignment and Clustering of 2D Transmission Electron Microscope Images

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhengfan; Fang, Jia; Chittuluru, Johnathan; Asturias, Francisco J.; Penczek, Pawel A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Identification of homogeneous subsets of images in a macromolecular electron microscopy (EM) image data set is a critical step in single-particle analysis. The task is handled by iterative algorithms, whose performance is compromised by the compounded limitations of image alignment and K-means clustering. Here we describe an approach, iterative stable alignment and clustering (ISAC) that, relying on a new clustering method and on the concepts of stability and reproducibility, can extract validated, homogeneous subsets of images. ISAC requires only a small number of simple parameters and, with minimal human intervention, can eliminate bias from two-dimensional image clustering and maximize the quality of group averages that can be used for ab initio three-dimensional structural determination and analysis of macromolecular conformational variability. Repeated testing of the stability and reproducibility of a solution within ISAC eliminates heterogeneous or incorrect classes and introduces critical validation to the process of EM image clustering. PMID:22325773

  8. Adaptive finite element modeling of direct current resistivity in 2-D generally anisotropic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bo; Li, Yuguo; Liu, Ying

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present an adaptive finite element (FE) algorithm for direct current (DC) resistivity modeling in 2-D generally anisotropic conductivity structures. Our algorithm is implemented on an unstructured triangular mesh that readily accommodates complex structures such as topography and dipping layers and so on. We implement a self-adaptive, goal-oriented grid refinement algorithm in which the finite element analysis is performed on a sequence of refined grids. The grid refinement process is guided by an a posteriori error estimator. The problem is formulated in terms of total potentials where mixed boundary conditions are incorporated. This type of boundary condition is superior to the Dirichlet type of conditions and improves numerical accuracy considerably according to model calculations. We have verified the adaptive finite element algorithm using a two-layered earth with azimuthal anisotropy. The FE algorithm with incorporation of mixed boundary conditions achieves high accuracy. The relative error between the numerical and analytical solutions is less than 1% except in the vicinity of the current source location, where the relative error is up to 2.4%. A 2-D anisotropic model is used to demonstrate the effects of anisotropy upon the apparent resistivity in DC soundings.

  9. Structural description of acid-denatured cytochrome c by hydrogen exchange and 2D NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Jeng, Meifen; Englander, S.W.; Elove, G.A.; Wand, A.J.; Roder, H. )

    1990-11-01

    Hydrogen exchange and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) techniques were used to characterize the structure of oxidized horse cytochrome c at acid pH and high ionic strength. Under these conditions, cytochrome c is known to assume a globular conformation (A state) with properties resembling those of the molten globule state described for other proteins. In order to measure the rate of hydrogen-deuterium exchange for individual backbone amide protons in the A state, samples of oxidized cytochrome c were incubated at 20 {degree}C in D{sub 2}O buffer for time periods ranging from 2 min to 500 h. The exchange reaction was then quenched by transferring the protein to native conditions. The extent of exchange for 44 amide protons trapped in the refolded protein was measured by 2D NMR spectroscopy. The results show that this approach can provide detailed information on H-bonded secondary and tertiary structure in partially folded equilibrium forms of a protein. All of the slowly exchanging amide protons in the three major helices of native cytochrome c are strongly protected from exchange at acid pH, indicating that the A state contains native-like elements of helical secondary structure. By contrast, a number of amide protons involved in irregular tertiary H-bonds of the native structure are only marginally protected in the A state, indicating that these H-bonds are unstable or absent. The H-exchange results suggest that the major helices of cytochrome c and their common hydrophobic domain are largely preserved in the globular acidic form while the loop region of the native structure is flexible and partly disordered.

  10. A simple configuration for fabrication of 2D and 3D photonic quasicrystals with complex structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, XiaoHong; Wang, Shuai; Liu, Wei; Jiang, LiuDi

    2016-06-01

    A simple method using a single-prism common-path interferometer is presented for the fabrication of complex quasicrystals in sub-micrometer scales. Multiple types of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) quasicrystalline structures are designed and their diffraction patterns are obtained by using Fourier Transform method. Multi-fold rotational symmetries are demonstrated and compared. By using this method, a wide range of quasicrystals types can be produced with arbitrary complexities and rotational symmetries. The transmittance studies of 12-fold and 18-fold structures also reveal the existence of complete photonic bandgaps, which also demonstrates increased symmetry and significantly improved characteristics of photonic band-gaps.

  11. Observation of excitonic fine structure in a 2D transition-metal dichalcogenide semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jingzhi; Shen, Xiaonan; Cong, Chunxiao; Peimyoo, Namphung; Cao, Bingchen; Eginligil, Mustafa; Yu, Ting

    2015-01-27

    Two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors, such as transition-metal dichalcogenide monolayers (TMD 1Ls), have attracted increasing attention owing to the underlying fundamental physics (e.g., many body effects) and the promising optoelectronic applications such as light-emitting diodes. Though much progress has been made, intrinsic excitonic states of TMD 1Ls are still highly debated in theory, which thirsts for direct experimental determination. Here, we report unconventional emission and excitonic fine structure in 1L WS2 revealed by electrical doping and photoexcitation, which reflects the interplay of exciton, trion, and other excitonic states. Tunable excitonic emission has been realized in a controllable manner via electrical and/or optical injection of charge carriers. Remarkably enough, the superlinear (i.e., quadratic) emission is unambiguously observed which is attributed to biexciton states, indicating the strong Coulomb interactions in such a 2D material. In a nearly neutral 1L WS2, trions and biexcitons possess large binding energies of ∼ 10-15 and 45 meV, respectively. Moreover, our finding of electrically induced robust emission opens up a possibility to boost the luminous efficiency of emerging 1L TMD light emitting diodes. PMID:25560634

  12. Impact of Structural Differences in Galactocerebrosides on the Behavior of 2D Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Stefaniu, Cristina; Ries, Annika; Gutowski, Olof; Ruett, Uta; Seeberger, Peter H; Werz, Daniel B; Brezesinski, Gerald

    2016-03-15

    The molecular interactions of three biologically important galactocerebrosides have been studied in monolayers formed at the soft air/water interface as 2D model membranes. Highly surface-sensitive techniques as GIXD (grazing incidence X-ray diffraction), IRRAS (infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy), and BAM (Brewster angle microscopy) have been used. The study reveals that small differences in the chemical structure have a relevant impact on the physical-chemical properties and intermolecular interactions. The presence of a 2-d-hydroxyl group in the fatty acid favored for GalCer C24:0 (2-OH) monolayers a higher hydration state of the headgroup at low lateral pressures (<25 mN/m) and a higher condensation effect above 30 mN/m. An opposite behavior was recorded for GalCer C24:0 and GalCer C24:1, for which the intermolecular interactions are defined by the weakly hydrated but strong H-bonded interconnected head groups. Additionally, the 15-cis-double bond in the fatty acid chain (nervonic acid) of GalCer C24:1 stabilized the LE phase but did not disturb the packing parameters of the LC phase as compared with the saturated compound GalCer C24:0. PMID:26907993

  13. The influence of pressure on the structure of a 2D uranium(VI) carboxyphosphonoate compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Elinor C.; Ross, Nancy L.; Surbella, Robert G.; Cahill, Christopher L.

    2014-10-01

    We report the first quantitative analysis of the structural evolution of a uranyl bearing coordination polymer in response to pressure. The material that is central to this study, (UO2)(O3PCH2CO2H) (1), is constructed from rigid 2D inorganic layers comprising edge sharing UO7 pentagonal bipyramids cross-linked by [PO3(COOH)]2- anions. Strong hydrogen bonding interactions exist between the pendent carboxylic acid groups on adjacent layers. Under pressure, 1 exhibits compressional behaviour primarily in the direction perpendicular to the inorganic layers, which is aided by a reduction in the interlayer distance and shifting of the layers with respect to each other. The bulk modulus for the 2D compound 1 is unexpectedly high [18.1(1) GPa] and is within the range reported for 3D CPs assembled from ZnII cations and inflexible imidazolate anions, and is at the lower end of the range of moduli observed for aluminosilicate zeolites (19-59 GPa).

  14. Effect of the Nuclear Hyperfine Field on the 2D Electron Conductivity in the Quantum Hall Regime

    SciTech Connect

    VITKALOV,S.A.; BOWERS,C.R.; SIMMONS,JERRY A.; RENO,JOHN L.

    2000-07-13

    The effect of the nuclear hyperfine interaction on the dc conductivity of 2D electrons under quantum Hall effect conditions at filling factor v= 1 is observed for the first time. The local hyperfine field enhanced by dynamic nuclear polarization is monitored via the Overhauser shift of the 2D conduction electron spin resonance in AlGaAs/GaAs multiquantum-well samples. The experimentally observed change in the dc conductivity resulting from dynamic nuclear polarization is in agreement with a thermal activation model incorporating the Zeeman energy change due to the hyperfine interaction. The relaxation decay time of the dc conductivity is, within experimental error, the same as the relaxation time of the nuclear spin polarization determined from the Overhauser shift. These findings unequivocally establish the nuclear spin origins of the observed conductivity change.

  15. Structure and interaction in 2D assemblies of tobacco mosaic viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, L.; Wang. S.; Masafumi, F.; Checco, A.; Zhongwei, N.; Wang, Q.

    2009-08-27

    We created two-dimensional (2D) assemblies of tobacco mosaic viruses (TMVs) and characterized their structures using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and X-ray scattering. The TMVs were adsorbed on an oppositely charged, fluid lipid monolayer supported by a solid substrate and submerged in a buffer solution. The lipid monolayer confined the viral particles within a plane, while providing them with lateral mobility so that overall the TMV assembly behaved like a 2D liquid. We controlled the inter-particle interaction by adjusting the chemical condition in the buffer to induce ordered TMV assemblies. We found that the presence of the lipid layer was essential for forming ordered TMV assemblies. Packed TMV assemblies formed on the lipid layer, with an average inter-particle spacing of 42 nm. By introducing Ca2+ ions into the buffer solution, we were able to improve the in-plane order within the TMV assemblies and reduce the average inter-particle spacing to 20 nm, compared to the TMV diameter of 18 nm. Quantitative analysis of the X-ray scattering data shows that the structural order within the TMV assemblies prepared under a Ca{sup 2+}-free buffer solution is consistent with purely repulsive, electrostatic inter-particle interaction. In contrast, the structural order within Ca{sup 2+}-induced TMV assemblies is consistent with the behavior of a fluid of sticky rods, implying the presence of a strong attraction between TMVs. In addition to the screening of Coulomb repulsion, this behavior is likely the result of counterion-induced as well as membrane-mediated attractions.

  16. Structure and Interaction in 2D Assemblies of Tobacco Mosaic Viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuto, M.; Yang, L.; Wang, S.; Fukuto, M.; Checco, A.; Niu, Z.; Wang, Q.

    2009-12-07

    We created two-dimensional (2D) assemblies of tobacco mosaic viruses (TMVs) and characterized their structures using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and X-ray scattering. The TMVs were adsorbed on an oppositely charged, fluid lipid monolayer supported by a solid substrate and submerged in a buffer solution. The lipid monolayer confined the viral particles within a plane, while providing them with lateral mobility so that overall the TMV assembly behaved like a 2D liquid. We controlled the inter-particle interaction by adjusting the chemical condition in the buffer to induce ordered TMV assemblies. We found that the presence of the lipid layer was essential for forming ordered TMV assemblies. Packed TMV assemblies formed on the lipid layer, with an average inter-particle spacing of 42 nm. By introducing Ca{sup 2+} ions into the buffer solution, we were able to improve the in-plane order within the TMV assemblies and reduce the average inter-particle spacing to 20 nm, compared to the TMV diameter of 18 nm. Quantitative analysis of the X-ray scattering data shows that the structural order within the TMV assemblies prepared under a Ca{sup 2+}-free buffer solution is consistent with purely repulsive, electrostatic inter-particle interaction. In contrast, the structural order within Ca{sup 2+}-induced TMV assemblies is consistent with the behavior of a fluid of sticky rods, implying the presence of a strong attraction between TMVs. In addition to the screening of Coulomb repulsion, this behavior is likely the result of counterion-induced as well as membrane-mediated attractions.

  17. Temperature-dependent quantum electron transport in 2D point contacts.

    PubMed

    Krishtop, T V; Nagaev, K E

    2013-02-01

    We consider the transmission of electrons through a two-dimensional ballistic point contact in the low-conductance regime near the pinch-off region. The scattering of electrons by Friedel oscillations of charge density results in a contribution to the conductance proportional to the temperature. The sign of this linear term depends on the range of the electron-electron interaction and appears to be negative for the relevant experimental parameters. PMID:23288558

  18. Exact ground state for the four-electron problem in a 2D finite honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trencsényi, Réka; Glukhov, Konstantin; Gulácsi, Zsolt

    2014-07-01

    Working in a subspace with dimensionality much smaller than the dimension of the full Hilbert space, we deduce exact four-particle ground states in 2D samples containing hexagonal repeat units and described by Hubbard type of models. The procedure identifies first a small subspace ? in which the ground state ? is placed, than deduces ? by exact diagonalization in ?. The small subspace is obtained by the repeated application of the Hamiltonian ? on a carefully chosen starting wave vector describing the most interacting particle configuration, and the wave vectors resulting from the application of ?, till the obtained system of equations closes in itself. The procedure which can be applied in principle at fixed but arbitrary system size and number of particles is interesting on its own since it provides exact information for the numerical approximation techniques which use a similar strategy, but apply non-complete basis for ?. The diagonalization inside ? provides an incomplete image of the low lying part of the excitation spectrum, but provides the exact ?. Once the exact ground state is obtained, its properties can be easily analysed. The ? is found always as a singlet state whose energy, interestingly, saturates in the ? limit. The unapproximated results show that the emergence probabilities of different particle configurations in the ground state presents 'Zittern' (trembling) characteristics which are absent in 2D square Hubbard systems. Consequently, the manifestation of the local Coulomb repulsion in 2D square and honeycomb types of systems presents differences, which can be a real source in the differences in the many-body behaviour.

  19. Layer-by-Layer Assembled 2D Montmorillonite Dielectrics for Solution-Processed Electronics.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian; Liu, Xiaolong; Geier, Michael L; McMorrow, Julian J; Jariwala, Deep; Beck, Megan E; Huang, Wei; Marks, Tobin J; Hersam, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    Layer-by-layer assembled 2D montmorillonite nanosheets are shown to be high-performance, solution-processed dielectrics. These scalable and spatially uniform sub-10 nm thick dielectrics yield high areal capacitances of ≈600 nF cm(-2) and low leakage currents down to 6 × 10(-9) A cm(-2) that enable low voltage operation of p-type semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube and n-type indium gallium zinc oxide field-effect transistors. PMID:26514248

  20. Enantiomeric Excess-Tuned 2D Structural Transition: From Heterochiral to Homochiral Supramolecular Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Ying; Chen, Ting; Wang, Lin; Sun, Bing; Wang, Dong; Wan, Li-Jun

    2016-07-12

    Spontaneous resolution of enantiomers is an intriguing and important phenomenon in surface chirality studies. Herein, we report on a two-dimensional (2D) structural transition from the heterochiral to homochiral assembly tuned by changing the enantiomeric excess (ee) of enantiomers in the solution phase. Enantiomers cocrystallize as racemates on the surface when the ee of the R-enantiomer (or S-enantiomer) remains below a critical value, whereas chiral segregation is achieved, and globally homochiral surfaces composed of exclusively one enantiomer are obtained as the critical ee is exceeded. The heterochiral-homochiral transition is ascribed to the formation of energetically unfavored homochiral molecular dimers under the control of the majority-rules principle at high ee values. Such results present an intriguing phenomenon in chiral ordering at surfaces, promising a new enlightenment toward understanding chiral resolution and the evolution of chirality. PMID:27287273

  1. Binary and ternary recombination of H2D(+) and HD2(+) ions with electrons at 80 K.

    PubMed

    Dohnal, Petr; Kálosi, Ábel; Plašil, Radek; Roučka, Štěpán; Kovalenko, Artem; Rednyk, Serhiy; Johnsen, Rainer; Glosík, Juraj

    2016-08-24

    The recombination of deuterated trihydrogen cations with electrons has been studied in afterglow plasmas containing mixtures of helium, argon, hydrogen and deuterium. By monitoring the fractional abundances of H3(+), H2D(+), HD2(+) and D3(+) as a function of the [D2]/[H2] ratio using infrared absorption observed in a cavity ring down absorption spectrometer (CRDS), it was possible to deduce effective recombination rate coefficients for H2D(+) and HD2(+) ions at a temperature of 80 K. From pressure dependences of the measured effective recombination rate coefficients the binary and the ternary recombination rate coefficients for both ions have been determined. The inferred binary and ternary recombination rate coefficients are: αbinH2D(80 K) = (7.1 ± 4.2) × 10(-8) cm(3) s(-1), αbinHD2(80 K) = (8.7 ± 2.5) × 10(-8) cm(3) s(-1), KH2D(80 K) = (1.1 ± 0.6) × 10(-25) cm(6) s(-1) and KHD2(80 K) = (1.5 ± 0.4) × 10(-25) cm(6) s(-1). PMID:27506912

  2. A novel simple procedure to consider seismic soil structure interaction effects in 2D models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, Juan Diego; Gómez, Juan David; Restrepo, Doriam; Rivera, Santiago

    2014-09-01

    A method is proposed to estimate the seismic soil-structure-interaction (SSI) effects for use in engineering practice. It is applicable to 2D structures subjected to vertically incident shear waves supported by homogenous half-spaces. The method is attractive since it keeps the simplicity of the spectral approach, overcomes some of the difficulties and inaccuracies of existing classical techniques and yet it considers a physically consistent excitation. This level of simplicity is achieved through a response spectra modification factor that can be applied to the free-field 5%-damped response spectra to yield design spectral ordinates that take into account the scattered motions introduced by the interaction effects. The modification factor is representative of the Transfer Function (TF) between the structural relative displacements and the free-field motion, which is described in terms of its maximum amplitude and associated frequency. Expressions to compute the modification factor by practicing engineers are proposed based upon a parametric study using 576 cases representative of actual structures. The method is tested in 10 cases spanning a wide range of common fundamental vibration periods.

  3. Electron Momentum Distribution Mapping of Trans-Stilbene Projected to [101] by Positron 2D-ACAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvakumar, S.; Sivaji, K.; Smith, S. V.

    Electron momentum distribution (EMD) on trans-stilbene single crystal projected along [101] direction has been studied by using positron two dimensional -angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR). The projected EMD is explained with respect to the molecular arrangement in the plane. The EMD features reflected the delocalized electronic states in [101] direction. The results of EMD mapping did not show a characteristic ellipsoidal distribution at lower momentum region (LMR) as observed in trans-stilbene projected to [010] direction at room temperature. The LMR region exhibits a hexagonal contour projected to [101] direction.

  4. Dynamics of quiescent prominence fine structures analyzed by 2D non-LTE modelling of the Hα line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunár, S.; Mein, P.; Schmieder, B.; Heinzel, P.; Mein, N.

    2012-07-01

    Aims: We analyze the dynamics of the prominence fine structures of a quiescent prominence observed on April 26, 2007 during a coordinated campaign of several spaceborne and ground-based instruments. We use Lyman spectra observed by SOHO/SUMER and the Hα line spectra obtained by MSDP spectrograph working at the Meudon Solar Tower. Methods: We employ the 2D multi-thread prominence fine-structure modelling that includes randomly distributed line-of-sight (LOS) velocities of individual threads to derive models producing synthetic Lyman lines in good agreement with the SOHO/SUMER observations. We then use these models to produce synthetic Hα line spectra that we compare with the observed spectra using three statistical parameters: the line integrated intensity, the line full-width at half-maximum (FWHM), and the Doppler velocity derived from shifts of the line profiles. Results: We demonstrate that the 2D multi-thread models that produce synthetic Lyman spectra in agreement with observations also generate synthetic Hα spectra in good agreement with the observed ones. The statistical analysis of the FWHM and Doppler velocities of the synthetic Hα line profiles show that the overall LOS velocities in the April 26, 2007 prominence at the time of the observations were below 15 km s-1 and in the prominence core were close to 10 km s-1. In combination with the analysis of the Lyman spectra, we determine several physical parameters of the observed prominence fine-structures that show that the April 26, 2007 prominence had a relatively low-mass weakly magnetized structure. We are also able to impose some constraints on the prominence core temperature, which may be relatively low, with values below 6000 K. Conclusions: The combination of 2D non-LTE prominence fine-structure modelling with the statistical analysis of the observed and synthetic Lyman and Hα spectra allows us to analyze the influence of the model input parameters and the velocity fields on the synthetic H

  5. Increasing the lego of 2D electronics materials: silicene and germanene, graphene's new synthetic cousins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Lay, Guy; Salomon, Eric; Angot, Thierry; Eugenia Dávila, Maria

    2015-05-01

    The realization of the first Field Effect Transistors operating at room temperature, based on a single layer silicene channel, open up highly promising perspectives, e.g., typically, for applications in digital electronics. Here, we describe recent results on the growth, characterization and electronic properties of novel synthetic two-dimensional materials beyond graphene, namely silicene and germanene, its silicon and germanium counterparts.

  6. Methods to determine the Orientation and Velocity of 2-D structures based on multi- spacecraft data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Pu, Z.; Zhou, X.; Wang, J.; Zong, Q.; Shi, Q.

    2006-12-01

    Many techniques have been developed to study the axial orientation and/or velocity of 2-D structures (flux ropes), by analyzing in situ data from single or multiple spacecraft. To obtain the axial orientation, there are magnetic based MVA (BMVA), current based MVA (CMVA), Minimum Direction Derivative (MDD) and Multiple Triangulation Analysis (MTA) as a modified version of timing method. To further calculate the velocity, we have DeHoffmann-Teller analysis, Spatio-Temporal Difference (STD) and several version of timing method including MTA. After a brief introduction on the principle of these methods, we theoretically estimate their error ranges based on modeled structures to examine the validity of these techniques. Because of their different principles, their error bars are shown to be distinct, depending on the parameters (such as radius, model selected and even the satellite crossing path) of the certain structure. The error estimation thus provides us some clue on the selection of methods under different conditions. Some real events are further analyzed using these techniques as the example.

  7. Prominence fine-structure dynamics as inferred from 2D non-LTE models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunar, Stanislav; Schmieder, Brigitte; Mein, Pierre; Heinzel, Petr

    2012-07-01

    2D multi-thread prominence fine structure models are able to produce synthetic Lyman spectra in very good agreement with spectral observations by SOHO/SUMER including the spectral line asymmetries. The synthetic differential emission measure curves derived from these models are also in a good agreement with observations. Now we show that these models are also able to produce synthetic H-alpha line profiles in very good agreement with observations which allows us to analyze not only the physical parameters of the prominence fine-structure plasma but also some aspects of its dynamical behaviour. We compare the synthetic H-alpha spectra with the observed spectra of the April 26, 2007 prominence using three statistical parameters: the line integrated intensity, the line full-width at the half-maximum (FWHM), and the Doppler velocity derived from shifts of the line profiles. This statistical analysis allows us to conclude that the overall statistical distribution of the LOS velocities in the April 26, 2007 prominence at the time of the observations was below +/-15 km/s and in the prominence core was close to +/-10 km/s. In combination with the analysis of the Lyman spectra we determine several physical parameters of the observed prominence fine structures which show that the April 26, 2007 prominence was relatively less massive. We are also able to put some constrains on the prominence core temperature that might be relatively low, reaching values below 6000 K.

  8. High-resolution mapping of 1D and 2D dose distributions using X-band electron paramagnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kolbun, N; Adolfsson, E; Gustafsson, H; Lund, E

    2014-06-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) was performed to visualise 2D dose distributions of homogenously irradiated potassium dithionate tablets and to demonstrate determination of 1D dose profiles along the height of the tablets. Mathematical correction was applied for each relative dose profile in order to take into account the inhomogeneous response of the resonator using X-band EPRI. The dose profiles are presented with the spatial resolution of 0.6 mm from the acquired 2D images; this value is limited by pixel size, and 1D dose profiles from 1D imaging with spatial resolution of 0.3 mm limited by the intrinsic line-width of potassium dithionate. In this paper, dose profiles from 2D reconstructed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) images using the Xepr software package by Bruker are focussed. The conclusion is that using potassium dithionate, the resolution 0.3 mm is sufficient for mapping steep dose gradients if the dosemeters are covering only ±2 mm around the centre of the resonator. PMID:24748487

  9. Reorientation of the Stripe Phase of 2D Electrons by a Minute Density Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueed, M. A.; Hossain, Md. Shafayat; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.; Baldwin, K. W.; Shayegan, M.

    2016-08-01

    Interacting two-dimensional electrons confined in a GaAs quantum well exhibit isotropic transport when the Fermi level resides in the first excited (N =1 ) Landau level. Adding an in-plane magnetic field (B||) typically leads to an anisotropic, stripelike (nematic) phase of electrons with the stripes oriented perpendicular to the B|| direction. Our experimental data reveal how a periodic density modulation, induced by a surface strain grating from strips of negative electron-beam resist, competes against the B||-induced orientational order of the stripe phase. Even a minute (<0.25 %) density modulation is sufficient to reorient the stripes along the direction of the surface grating.

  10. Electronic Transport Properties of New 2-D Materials GeH and NaSn2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bin; Cultrara, Nicholas; Arguilla, Maxx; Goldberger, Joshua; Heremans, Joseph

    2-D materials potentially have superior thermoelectric properties compared to traditional 3-D materials due to their layered structure. Here we present electrical and thermoelectric transport properties of 2 types of 2-D materials, GeH and NaSn2As2. GeH is a graphane analog which is prepared using chemical exfoliation of CaGe2 crystals. Intrinsic GeH is proven to be a highly resistive material at room temperature. Resistance and Seebeck coefficient of Ga doped GeH are measured in a cryostat with a gating voltage varying from -100V to 100V. NaSn2As2 is another 2-D system, with Na atom embedded between nearly-2D Sn-As layers. Unlike GeH, NaSn2As2 is a metal based of Hall measurements, with p-type behavior, and with van der Pauw resistances on the order of 5m Ω/square. Thermoelectric transport properties of NaSn2As2 will be reported. This work is support by the NSF EFRI-2DARE project EFRI-1433467.

  11. Computational Study and Analysis of Structural Imperfections in 1D and 2D Photonic Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    K.R. Maskaly

    2005-06-01

    increasing RMS roughness. Again, the homogenization approximation is able to predict these results. The problem of surface scratches on 1D photonic crystals is also addressed. Although the reflectivity decreases are lower in this study, up to a 15% change in reflectivity is observed in certain scratched photonic crystal structures. However, this reflectivity change can be significantly decreased by adding a low index protective coating to the surface of the photonic crystal. Again, application of homogenization theory to these structures confirms its predictive power for this type of imperfection as well. Additionally, the problem of a circular pores in 2D photonic crystals is investigated, showing that almost a 50% change in reflectivity can occur for some structures. Furthermore, this study reveals trends that are consistent with the 1D simulations: parameter changes that increase the absolute reflectivity of the photonic crystal will also increase its tolerance to structural imperfections. Finally, experimental reflectance spectra from roughened 1D photonic crystals are compared to the results predicted computationally in this thesis. Both the computed and experimental spectra correlate favorably, validating the findings presented herein.

  12. Fringe structures and tunable bandgap width of 2D boron nitride nanosheets

    PubMed Central

    Sajjad, Muhammad; Li, Eric Yiming; Zhang, Hongxin; Chu, Jin; Aldalbahi, Ali; Morell, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    Summary We report studies of the surface fringe structures and tunable bandgap width of atomic-thin boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs). BNNSs are synthesized by using digitally controlled pulse deposition techniques. The nanoscale morphologies of BNNSs are characterized by using scanning electron microscope (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In general, the BNNSs appear microscopically flat in the case of low temperature synthesis, whereas at high temperature conditions, it yields various curved structures. Experimental data reveal the evolutions of fringe structures. Functionalization of the BNNSs is completed with hydrogen plasma beam source in order to efficiently control bandgap width. The characterizations are based on Raman scattering spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and FTIR transmittance spectra. Red shifts of spectral lines are clearly visible after the functionalization, indicating the bandgap width of the BNNSs has been changed. However, simple treatments with hydrogen gas do not affect the bandgap width of the BNNSs. PMID:25161852

  13. A review of MBE grown 0D, 1D and 2D quantum structures in a nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Mata, Maria; Zhou, Xiang; Furtmayr, Florian; Teubert, Jörg; Gradecak, Silvija; Eickhoff, Martin; Fontcuberta i Morral, Anna; Arbiol, Jordi

    2013-05-01

    We review different strategies to achieve a three-dimensional energy bandgap modulation in a nanowire (NW) by the introduction of self-assembled 0D, 1D and 2D quantum structures, quantum dots (QDs), quantum wires (QWRs) and quantum wells (QWs). Starting with the well-known axial, radial (coaxial/prismatic) or polytypic quantum wells in GaN/AlN, GaAs/AlAs or wurtzite/zinc-blende systems, respectively, we move to more sophisticated structures by lowering their dimensionality. New recent approaches developed for the self-assembly of GaN quantum wires and InAs or AlGaAs quantum dots on single nanowire templates are reported and discussed. Aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microcopy is presented as a powerful tool to determine the structure and morphology at the atomic scale allowing for the creation of 3D atomic models that can help us to understand the enhanced optical properties of these advanced quantum structures.

  14. Self-Assembly of Graphene Single Crystals with Uniform Size and Orientation: The First 2D Super-Ordered Structure.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Mengqi; Wang, Lingxiang; Liu, Jinxin; Zhang, Tao; Xue, Haifeng; Xiao, Yao; Qin, Zhihui; Fu, Lei

    2016-06-29

    The challenges facing the rapid developments of highly integrated electronics, photonics, and microelectromechanical systems suggest that effective fabrication technologies are urgently needed to produce ordered structures using components with high performance potential. Inspired by the spontaneous organization of molecular units into ordered structures by noncovalent interactions, we succeed for the first time in synthesizing a two-dimensional superordered structure (2DSOS). As demonstrated by graphene, the 2DSOS was prepared via self-assembly of high-quality graphene single crystals under mutual electrostatic force between the adjacent crystals assisted by airflow-induced hydrodynamic forces at the liquid metal surface. The as-obtained 2DSOS exhibits tunable periodicity in the crystal space and outstanding uniformity in size and orientation. Moreover, the intrinsic property of each building block is preserved. With simplicity, scalability, and continuously adjustable feature size, the presented approach may open new territory for the precise assembly of 2D atomic crystals and facilitate its application in structurally derived integrated systems. PMID:27313075

  15. Hydrothermal Synthesis, Crystal Structure and Electrochemical Behavior of 2d Hybrid Coordination Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Weiqiang; Zhu, Lin; Shi, Weidong; Chen, Fuxiao; Bai, Hongye; Song, Shuyan; Yan, Yongsheng

    2013-06-01

    A novel metal-organic coordination polymer [Cu(phen)(L)0.5(H2O)]n (H4L = (N,N‧-5,5‧-bis(isophthalic acid)-p-xylylenediamine, and phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) has been hydrothermally synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, TGA, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The crystallographic data show that the title compound crystallizes in monoclinic space group P21/n with a = 10.682(2), b = 15.682(3), c = 11.909(2) Å, β = 91.39(3)°, V = 1994.3(7) Å3, C24H17CuN3O5, Mr = 490.95, Dc = 1.635 g/cm3, F(000) = 1004, Z = 4, μ(MoKα) = 1.141 mm-1, the final R = 0.0418 and wR = 0.0983 for 3578 observed reflections (I > 2σ(I)). The structural analyses reveal that the title compound exhibits shows a 2D layer structure, which are further linked by hydrogen bonding interactions to form a three-dimensional supramolecular network. In addition, the thermal stability and electrochemical behavior of title compound has been studied. CCDC: 900413.

  16. Identifying Key Structural Features and Spatial Relationships in Archean Microbialites Using 2D and 3D Visualization Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, E. W.; Sumner, D. Y.

    2009-12-01

    Microbialites in the 2521 ± 3 Ma Gamohaan Formation, South Africa, have several different end-member morphologies which show distinct growth structures and spatial relationships. We characterized several growth structures and spatial relationships in two samples (DK20 and 2_06) using a combination of 2D and 3D analytical techniques. There are two main goals in studying complicated microbialites with a combination of 2D and 3D methods. First, one can better understand microbialite growth by identifying important structures and structural relationships. Once structures are identified, the order in which the structures formed and how they are related can be inferred from observations of crosscutting relationships. Second, it is important to use both 2D and 3D methods to correlate 3D observations with those in 2D that are more common in the field. Combining analysis provides significantly more insight into the 3D morphology of microbial structures. In our studies, 2D analysis consisted of describing polished slabs and serial sections created by grinding down the rock 100 microns at a time. 3D analysis was performed on serial sections visualized in 3D using Vrui and 3DVisualizer software developed at KeckCAVES, UCD (http://keckcaves.org). Data were visualized on a laptop and in an immersive cave system. Both samples contain microbial laminae and more vertically orients microbial "walls" called supports. The relationships between these features created voids now filled with herringbone and blocky calcite crystals. DK20, a classic plumose structure, contains two types of support structures. Both are 1st order structures (1st order structures with organic inclusions and 1st without organic inclusions) interpreted as planar features based on 2D analysis. In the 2D analysis the 1st order structures show v branching relationships as well as single cuspate relationships (two 1st order structures with inclusions merging upward), and single tented relationships (three supports

  17. Perspective: Probing 2-D magnetic structures in a 3-D world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grutter, A. J.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic interfaces have been identified as promising systems upon which to base next-generation spintronic devices. In these nearly two-dimensional systems, deviations from bulk electronic structure and competition between nearly degenerate magnetic ground states allow the stabilization of widely tunable emergent properties. However, ever smaller length scales pose new challenges which must be overcome in order to understand and control magnetic properties at the atomic level. Using recent examples in oxide heterostructures and topological insulators, we discuss how combining techniques such as neutron scattering, X-ray scattering, X-ray spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy enables the probing of magnetism on the Angstrom scale.

  18. Interlayer tunneling studies of highly imbalanced bilayer 2D electron systems at νT= 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champagne, A. R.; Eisenstein, J. P.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    2007-03-01

    When the separation between two parallel 2-dimensional electron systems (2DES) becomes comparable to the average distance between electrons within a single layer, the system can support a quantum Hall state with total filling factor νT=1. This state can be described as a Bose condensate of excitons. Previous studies [1] have shown that close to the νT=1 phase boundary, a small imbalance in the number of electrons in each layer can strengthen the condensate. We report on interlayer tunneling measurements of the effect of large imbalances as a function of the interlayer spacing. We explore the possibility of competing order between the excitonic state and the (1/3, 2/3) fractional states in the individual layers. This work was supported by the NSF and the DOE. [1] I. B. Spielman, et al., Phys. Rev. B 70, 081303 (2004).

  19. Anomalous giant piezoresistance in AlAs 2D electron systems with antidot lattices.

    PubMed

    Gunawan, O; Gokmen, T; Shkolnikov, Y P; De Poortere, E P; Shayegan, M

    2008-01-25

    An AlAs two-dimensional electron system patterned with an antidot lattice exhibits a giant piezoresistance effect at low temperatures, with a sign opposite to the piezoresistance observed in the unpatterned region. We suggest that the origin of this anomalous giant piezoresistance is the nonuniform strain in the antidot lattice and the exclusion of electrons occupying the two conduction-band valleys from different regions of the sample. This is analogous to the well-known giant magnetoresistance effect, with valley playing the role of spin and strain the role of magnetic field. PMID:18233015

  20. The development and testing of a 2D laboratory seismic modelling system for heterogeneous structure investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Yike; Greenhalgh, Stewart A.; Robertsson, Johan O. A.; Karaman, Hakki

    2015-05-01

    Lateral velocity variations and low velocity near-surface layers can produce strong scattered and guided waves which interfere with reflections and lead to severe imaging problems in seismic exploration. In order to investigate these specific problems by laboratory seismic modelling, a simple 2D ultrasonic model facility has been recently assembled within the Wave Propagation Lab at ETH Zurich. The simulated geological structures are constructed from 2 mm thick metal and plastic sheets, cut and bonded together. The experiments entail the use of a piezoelectric source driven by a pulse amplifier at ultrasonic frequencies to generate Lamb waves in the plate, which are detected by piezoelectric receivers and recorded digitally on a National Instruments recording system, under LabVIEW software control. The 2D models employed were constructed in-house in full recognition of the similitude relations. The first heterogeneous model features a flat uniform low velocity near-surface layer and deeper dipping and flat interfaces separating different materials. The second model is comparable but also incorporates two rectangular shaped inserts, one of low velocity, the other of high velocity. The third model is identical to the second other than it has an irregular low velocity surface layer of variable thickness. Reflection as well as transmission experiments (crosshole & vertical seismic profiling) were performed on each model. The two dominant Lamb waves recorded are the fundamental symmetric mode (non-dispersive) and the fundamental antisymmetric (flexural) dispersive mode, the latter normally being absent when the source transducer is located on a model edge but dominant when it is on the flat planar surface of the plate. Experimental group and phase velocity dispersion curves were determined and plotted for both modes in a uniform aluminium plate. For the reflection seismic data, various processing techniques were applied, as far as pre-stack Kirchhoff migration. The

  1. Guided Lamb wave based 2-D spiral phased array for structural health monitoring of thin panel structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Byungseok

    2011-12-01

    In almost all industries of mechanical, aerospace, and civil engineering fields, structural health monitoring (SHM) technology is essentially required for providing the reliable information of structural integrity of safety-critical structures, which can help reduce the risk of unexpected and sometimes catastrophic failures, and also offer cost-effective inspection and maintenance of the structures. State of the art SHM research on structural damage diagnosis is focused on developing global and real-time technologies to identify the existence, location, extent, and type of damage. In order to detect and monitor the structural damage in plate-like structures, SHM technology based on guided Lamb wave (GLW) interrogation is becoming more attractive due to its potential benefits such as large inspection area coverage in short time, simple inspection mechanism, and sensitivity to small damage. However, the GLW method has a few critical issues such as dispersion nature, mode conversion and separation, and multiple-mode existence. Phased array technique widely used in all aspects of civil, military, science, and medical industry fields may be employed to resolve the drawbacks of the GLW method. The GLW-based phased array approach is able to effectively examine and analyze complicated structural vibration responses in thin plate structures. Because the phased sensor array operates as a spatial filter for the GLW signals, the array signal processing method can enhance a desired signal component at a specific direction while eliminating other signal components from other directions. This dissertation presents the development, the experimental validation, and the damage detection applications of an innovative signal processing algorithm based on two-dimensional (2-D) spiral phased array in conjunction with the GLW interrogation technique. It starts with general backgrounds of SHM and the associated technology including the GLW interrogation method. Then, it is focused on the

  2. Hydrothermal synthesis and structural characterization of two 1-D and 2-D Dawson-based phosphotungstates

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Junwei; Zheng Shoutian; Liu Wei; Yang Guoyu

    2008-03-15

    Two new Dawson-based phosphotungstates (H{sub 2}en){sub 0.5}H[Cu(en){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]{sub 2}{l_brace}[Cu(en){sub 2}]({alpha}{sub 1}-P{sub 2}W{sub 17}CuO{sub 61}){r_brace}.8H{sub 2}O (1) (en=ethylenediamine) and [4,4'-H{sub 2}bpy]{sub 2}{l_brace}[Cu(4,4'-bpy){sub 3}][Cu(4,4'-bpy){sub 4}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub 2}[Cu(4,4'-bpy)][{alpha}-P{sub 2}W{sub 1=} 8O{sub 62}]{sub 2}{r_brace}.6H{sub 2}O (2) (4,4'-bpy=4,4'-bipyridine) have been hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. 1 crystallizes in the triclinic space group P-1 with a=11.7626(17), b=13.246(2), c=29.350(5) A, {alpha}=87.355(5), {beta}=79.583(5), {gamma}=66.993(3){sup o}, V=4138.3(11) A{sup 3}, Z=2, GOF=1.089, R{sub 1}=0.0563 and wR{sub 2}=0.1505, whereas 2 belongs to the orthorhombic space group Iba2 with a=22.277(8), b=47.04(2), c=22.153(8) A, V=23215(17) A{sup 3}, Z=4, GOF=1.051, R{sub 1}=0.0627 and wR{sub 2}=0.1477. 1 consists of a 1-D linear chain structure constructed from monocopper{sup II}-substituted Dawson polyoxoanions, while 2 represents the first 2-D sheet-like structure with a (4,4)-connected topological net built up from plenary Dawson-type polyoxoanions and Cu{sup II}-4,4'-bpy complex cations in polyoxometalate chemistry. - Graphical abstract: Two Dawson-based phosphotungstates (H{sub 2}en){sub 0.5}H[Cu(en){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]{sub 2}{l_brace}[Cu(en){sub 2}]({alpha}{sub 1}-P{sub 2}W{sub 17}CuO{sub 61}){r_brace}.8H{sub 2}O (1) and [4,4'-H{sub 2}bpy]{sub 2}{l_brace}[Cu(4,4'-bpy){sub 3}][Cu(4,4'-bpy){sub 4}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub 2}[Cu(4,4'-bpy)][{alpha}-P{sub 2}W{sub 1=} 8O{sub 62}]{sub 2}{r_brace}.6H{sub 2}O (2) have been hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. 1 consists of a 1-D linear chain structure constructed from monocopper-substituted Dawson polyoxoanions, while 2 represents the first 2-D sheet-like structure with a (4,4)-connected topological net built up from saturated Dawson-type polyoxoanions and Cu{sup II}-4,4'-bpy complex cations in

  3. Diverse 2D structures obtained by adsorption of charged ABA triblock copolymer on different surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontturi, Katri S.; Vesterinen, Arja-Helena; Seppälä, Jukka; Laine, Janne

    2012-11-01

    In the larger context of 2D polymeric structures, the morphologies obtained by adsorption and subsequent drying of charged, ABA type amphiphilic triblock copolymer of poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl metacrylate] (PDMAEMA) and poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) were investigated with atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy as well as in situ adsorption analysis with quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. Hydrophilic silica and hydrophobic polystyrene (PS) were used as substrates for adsorption. The structures emerging from the self-assembly of adsorbing polymer were profoundly influenced by composition of the aqueous solution and the choice of substrate. When adsorbed from dilute polymer solution where the concentration is so low that the polymer does not yet show surface-active behavior, the triblock copolymer unimers associated on hydrophilic silica surface forming large, irregular clustered aggregates, with sizes increasing with electrolyte concentration of the solution. On a hydrophobic PS substrate, on the other hand, unimers spread much more evenly, forming clear surface patterns. The roughness of these patterned structures was tuned with the electrolyte concentration of the solution. Adsorption from a more concentrated polymer solution, where the surface-activity of the polymer is perceptible, resulted in the formation of a smooth film with complete coverage over the hydrophilic silica substrate when the electrolyte concentration was high. On PS, on the other hand, nucleation of evenly scattered globular, disk-like micelles was induced. Besides the dry film morphology, the even distribution of the irreversibly adsorbed polymer over the PS surface was likely to serve as an optimal platform for the build-up of reversible hydrophobically bound multilayers at high electrolyte concentration. The multilayer formation was reversible because a decrease in the electrolyte concentration of the solution re-introduces strong electrostatic

  4. Temperature and Pinning Effects on Driving a 2D Electron System on a Helium Film: A Numerical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damasceno, Pablo F.; Dasilva, Cláudio José; Rino, José Pedro; Cândido, Ladir

    2010-07-01

    Using numerical simulations we investigated the dynamic response to an externally driven force of a classical two-dimensional (2D) electron system on a helium film at finite temperatures. A potential barrier located at the center of the system behaves as a pinning center that results in an insulator state below a threshold driving force. We have found that the current-voltage characteristic obeys the scaling relation I= f ξ , with ξ ranging from ˜(1.0-1.7) for different pinning strengths and temperatures. Our results may be used to understand the spread range of ξ in experiments with typical characteristic of plastic depinning.

  5. Electronic structure in the crossover regimes in lower dimensional structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batabyal, R.; Dev, B. N.

    2014-11-01

    Modern growth and fabrication techniques can produce lower dimensional structures in the crossover regimes. Such structures in the crossover regimes can provide tunability of various properties of materials. For example, a zero-dimensional (0-D) structure (quantum dot) evolving towards a 3-D structure (bulk) shows electronic structure, which is neither 0-D-like, nor 3-D-like in the dimensional crossover regime. Within the crossover regime the electronic density of states (DOS) at Fermi level (Ef) keeps on changing as the size of the system changes. DOS at Ef determines many properties of materials, such as electronic specific heat, spin susceptibility, etc. Such properties can be tuned by controlling the size of the system in the crossover regimes. Keeping the importance of DOS at Ef in mind, we determine their values and other details of electronic structure of lower dimensional structures, in the 0-D to 1-D, 1-D to 2-D, 2-D to 3-D, 0-D to 2-D, 0-D to 3-D and 1-D to 3-D crossover regimes, in a simple free electron model. We compare our results with analytical theory and experimental results, wherever available. We also present some results obtained by scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements on Ag islands on Si(1 1 1) substrates evolving from a 0-D to a 2-D structure. This simple model is quite useful in understanding lower dimensional structures in the crossover regimes and, in general, in nanoscale science. Fabrication of such structures would provide control on materials properties.

  6. Selective MBE growth of nonalloyed ohmic contacts to 2D electron gas in high-electron-mobility transistors based on GaN/AlGaN heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiboroda, I. O.; Andreev, A. A.; Perminov, P. A.; Fedorov, Yu. V.; Zanaveskin, M. L.

    2014-06-01

    Specific features of how nonalloyed ohmic contacts to the 2D conducting channel of high-electron-mobility transistors based on AlGaN/(AlN)/GaN heterostructures are fabricated via deposition of heavily doped n +-GaN through a SiO2 mask by ammonia molecular-beam epitaxy have been studied. The technique developed makes it possible to obtain specific resistances of contacts to the 2D gas as low as 0.11 Ω mm on various types of Ga-face nitride heterostructures, which are several times lower than the resistance of conventional alloyed ohmic contacts.

  7. Effective mass from microwave photoresistance in high-mobility 2D electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zudov, Michael; Hatke, Anthony; Watson, John; Manfra, Michael; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Kenneth

    2013-03-01

    We have performed microwave photoresistance measurements in high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells and investigated the value of the effective mass. Surprisingly, the effective mass, obtained from the period of microwave-induced resistance oscillations, is found to be considerably lower than the band mass in GaAs. This finding provides evidence for electron-electron interactions which can be probed by microwave photoresistance in very high Landau levels. In contrast, the measured magneto-plasmon dispersion revealed an effective mass which is close to the band mass, in accord with previous studies. The work at Minnesota and Purdue was supported by the DOE Grant Nos. DE-SC002567 and DE-SC0006671, respectively. The work at Princeton was partially funded by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation Foundation and the NSF MRSEC Program..

  8. Parallel FE Electron-Photon Transport Analysis on 2-D Unstructured Mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Drumm, C.R.; Lorenz, J.

    1999-03-02

    A novel solution method has been developed to solve the coupled electron-photon transport problem on an unstructured triangular mesh. Instead of tackling the first-order form of the linear Boltzmann equation, this approach is based on the second-order form in conjunction with the conventional multi-group discrete-ordinates approximation. The highly forward-peaked electron scattering is modeled with a multigroup Legendre expansion derived from the Goudsmit-Saunderson theory. The finite element method is used to treat the spatial dependence. The solution method is unique in that the space-direction dependence is solved simultaneously, eliminating the need for the conventional inner iterations, a method that is well suited for massively parallel computers.

  9. Prestack depth migration for complex 2D structure using phase-screen propagators

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, P.; Huang, Lian-Jie; Burch, C.; Fehler, M.; Hildebrand, S.

    1997-11-01

    We present results for the phase-screen propagator method applied to prestack depth migration of the Marmousi synthetic data set. The data were migrated as individual common-shot records and the resulting partial images were superposed to obtain the final complete Image. Tests were performed to determine the minimum number of frequency components required to achieve the best quality image and this in turn provided estimates of the minimum computing time. Running on a single processor SUN SPARC Ultra I, high quality images were obtained in as little as 8.7 CPU hours and adequate images were obtained in as little as 4.4 CPU hours. Different methods were tested for choosing the reference velocity used for the background phase-shift operation and for defining the slowness perturbation screens. Although the depths of some of the steeply dipping, high-contrast features were shifted slightly the overall image quality was fairly insensitive to the choice of the reference velocity. Our jests show the phase-screen method to be a reliable and fast algorithm for imaging complex geologic structures, at least for complex 2D synthetic data where the velocity model is known.

  10. Melting Temperatures of 2D Electron Solids in the Lowest Landau Level from Microwave Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. P.; Ganapathy, S.; Lewis, R. M.; Engel, L. W.; Tsui, D. C.; Wang, Z. H.; Ye, P. D.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    2005-03-01

    We studied the temperature(T) dependence of the microwave conductivity spectra of two dimensional electron systems in the high magnetic field (B) insulating phase (HBIP) for Landau filling factor ν<˜1/5. Such an insulating phase, believed to be a pinned electron solid, supports a characteristic pinning resonance in the conductivity spectrum. Two samples were studied. Sample 1 is a heterojunction with density n˜7x10^10 cm^ -2 and mobility μ˜5x10^6cm^2/Vs and has a single resonance in the HBIP. Sample 2 is a 65nm-wide QW with n˜6x10 ^10cm-2 and μ˜10x10^6cm^2/V and was recently found to have two resonances in the HBIP, interpreted as corresponding to two different solid phases, with one crossing over to the other as ν is reduced [1]. We studied the higher-T behavior of the resonances at many different combinations of n (through backgating) and B, and measured the characteristic temperatures Tc at which the resonances disappear. We foundTc is a non-increasing function of ν for either sample, although the function differs significantly for both samples. We interpret Tc as the melting temperature of the electron solid(s) to a quantum liquid, for which ν captures the importance of inter-electron quantum correlation. [1] Y.P. Chen et al., Phys.Rev.Lett. 93, 206805 (2004)

  11. Negative huge magnetoresistance in high-mobility 2D electron gases: DC-current dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iñarrea, J.; Bockhorn, L.; Haug, R. J.

    2016-07-01

    Two-dimensional electron gases with very high mobility show a huge or giant negative magnetoresistance at low temperatures and low magnetic fields. We present an experimental and theoretical work on the influence of the applied current on the negative huge magnetoresistance of these systems. We obtain an unexpected and strong nonlinear behavior consisting in an increase of the negative huge magnetoresistance with increasing current, in other words, for increasing current the magnetoresistance collapses at small magnetic fields. This nonlinearity is explained by the subtle interplay of elastic scattering within Landau levels and between Landau levels.

  12. Tunable Plasmonic Reflection by Bound 1D Electron States in a 2D Dirac Metal.

    PubMed

    Jiang, B-Y; Ni, G X; Pan, C; Fei, Z; Cheng, B; Lau, C N; Bockrath, M; Basov, D N; Fogler, M M

    2016-08-19

    We show that the surface plasmons of a two-dimensional Dirac metal such as graphene can be reflected by linelike perturbations hosting one-dimensional electron states. The reflection originates from a strong enhancement of the local optical conductivity caused by optical transitions involving these bound states. We propose that the bound states can be systematically created, controlled, and liquidated by an ultranarrow electrostatic gate. Using infrared nanoimaging, we obtain experimental evidence for the locally enhanced conductivity of graphene induced by a carbon nanotube gate, which supports this theoretical concept. PMID:27588873

  13. Tunable Plasmonic Reflection by Bound 1D Electron States in a 2D Dirac Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, B.-Y.; Ni, G. X.; Pan, C.; Fei, Z.; Cheng, B.; Lau, C. N.; Bockrath, M.; Basov, D. N.; Fogler, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    We show that the surface plasmons of a two-dimensional Dirac metal such as graphene can be reflected by linelike perturbations hosting one-dimensional electron states. The reflection originates from a strong enhancement of the local optical conductivity caused by optical transitions involving these bound states. We propose that the bound states can be systematically created, controlled, and liquidated by an ultranarrow electrostatic gate. Using infrared nanoimaging, we obtain experimental evidence for the locally enhanced conductivity of graphene induced by a carbon nanotube gate, which supports this theoretical concept.

  14. 2D and 3D GPR imaging of structural ceilings in historic and existing constructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colla, Camilla

    2014-05-01

    GPR applications in civil engineering are to date quite diversified. With respect to civil constructions and monumental buildings, detection of voids, cavities, layering in structural elements, variation of geometry, of moisture content, of materials, areas of decay, defects, cracks have been reported in timber, concrete and masonry elements. Nonetheless, many more fields of investigation remain unexplored. This contribution gives an account of a variety of examples of structural ceilings investigation by GPR radar in reflection mode, either as 2D or 3D data acquisition and visualisation. Ceilings have a pre-eminent role in buildings as they contribute to a good structural behaviour of the construction. Primarily, the following functions can be listed for ceilings: a) they carry vertical dead and live loads on floors and distribute such loads to the vertical walls; b) they oppose to external horizontal forces such as wind loads and earthquakes helping to transfer such forces from the loaded element to the other walls; c) they contribute to create the box skeleton and behaviour of a building, connecting the different load bearing walls and reducing the slenderness and flexural instability of such walls. Therefore, knowing how ceilings are made in specific buildings is of paramount importance for architects and structural engineers. According to the type of building and age of construction, ceilings may present very different solutions and materials. Moreover, in existing constructions, ceilings may have been substituted, modified or strengthened due to material decay or to change of use of the building. These alterations may often go unrecorded in technical documentation or technical drawings may be unavailable. In many cases, the position, orientation and number of the load carrying elements in ceilings may be hidden or not be in sight, due for example to the presence of false ceilings or to technical plants. GPR radar can constitute a very useful tool for

  15. Parallel Finite Element Electron-Photon Transport Analysis on 2-D Unstructured Mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Drumm, C.R.

    1999-01-01

    A computer code has been developed to solve the linear Boltzmann transport equation on an unstructured mesh of triangles, from a Pro/E model. An arbitriwy arrangement of distinct material regions is allowed. Energy dependence is handled by solving over an arbitrary number of discrete energy groups. Angular de- pendence is treated by Legendre-polynomial expansion of the particle cross sections and a discrete ordinates treatment of the particle fluence. The resulting linear system is solved in parallel with a preconditioned conjugate-gradients method. The solution method is unique, in that the space-angle dependence is solved si- multaneously, eliminating the need for the usual inner iterations. Electron cross sections are obtained from a Goudsrnit-Saunderson modifed version of the CEPXS code. A one-dimensional version of the code has also been develop@ for testing and development purposes.

  16. Influence of weak vibrational-electronic couplings on 2D electronic spectra and inter-site coherence in weakly coupled photosynthetic complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Monahan, Daniele M.; Whaley-Mayda, Lukas; Fleming, Graham R.; Ishizaki, Akihito

    2015-08-14

    Coherence oscillations measured in two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectra of pigment-protein complexes may have electronic, vibrational, or mixed-character vibronic origins, which depend on the degree of electronic-vibrational mixing. Oscillations from intrapigment vibrations can obscure the inter-site coherence lifetime of interest in elucidating the mechanisms of energy transfer in photosynthetic light-harvesting. Huang-Rhys factors (S) for low-frequency vibrations in Chlorophyll and Bacteriochlorophyll are quite small (S ≤ 0.05), so it is often assumed that these vibrations influence neither 2D spectra nor inter-site coherence dynamics. In this work, we explore the influence of S within this range on the oscillatory signatures in simulated 2D spectra of a pigment heterodimer. To visualize the inter-site coherence dynamics underlying the 2D spectra, we introduce a formalism which we call the “site-probe response.” By comparing the calculated 2D spectra with the site-probe response, we show that an on-resonance vibration with Huang-Rhys factor as small as S = 0.005 and the most strongly coupled off-resonance vibrations (S = 0.05) give rise to long-lived, purely vibrational coherences at 77 K. We moreover calculate the correlation between optical pump interactions and subsequent entanglement between sites, as measured by the concurrence. At 77 K, greater long-lived inter-site coherence and entanglement appear with increasing S. This dependence all but vanishes at physiological temperature, as environmentally induced fluctuations destroy the vibronic mixing.

  17. Structural and Functional Analysis of JMJD2D Reveals Molecular Basis for Site-Specific Demethylation among JMJD2 Demethylases

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Swathi; Trievel, Raymond C.

    2013-01-08

    We found that JMJD2 lysine demethylases (KDMs) participate in diverse genomic processes. Most JMJD2 homologs display dual selectivity toward H3K9me3 and H3K36me3, with the exception of JMJD2D, which is specific for H3K9me3. Here, we report the crystal structures of the JMJD2D•2-oxoglutarate•H3K9me3 ternary complex and JMJD2D apoenzyme. Utilizing structural alignments with JMJD2A, molecular docking, and kinetic analysis with an array of histone peptide substrates, we elucidate the specific signatures that permit efficient recognition of H3K9me3 by JMJD2A and JMJD2D, and the residues in JMJD2D that occlude H3K36me3 demethylation. Surprisingly, these results reveal that JMJD2A and JMJD2D exhibit subtle yet important differences in H3K9me3 recognition, despite the overall similarity in the substrate-binding conformation. Further, we show that H3T11 phosphorylation abrogates demethylation by JMJD2 KDMs. These studies reveal the molecular basis for JMJD2 site specificity and provide a framework for structure-based design of selective inhibitors of JMJD2 KDMs implicated in disease.

  18. Conductance based characterization of structure and hopping site density in 2D molecule-nanoparticle arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCold, Cliff E.; Fu, Qiang; Howe, Jane Y.; Hihath, Joshua

    2015-09-01

    Composite molecule-nanoparticle hybrid systems have recently emerged as important materials for applications ranging from chemical sensing to nanoscale electronics. However, creating reproducible and repeatable composite materials with precise properties has remained one of the primary challenges to the implementation of these technologies. Understanding the sources of variation that dominate the assembly and transport behavior is essential for the advancement of nanoparticle-array based devices. In this work, we use a combination of charge-transport measurements, electron microscopy, and optical characterization techniques to determine the role of morphology and structure on the charge transport properties of 2-dimensional monolayer arrays of molecularly-interlinked Au nanoparticles. Using these techniques we are able to determine the role of both assembly-dependent and particle-dependent defects on the conductivities of the films. These results demonstrate that assembly processes dominate the dispersion of conductance values, while nanoparticle and ligand features dictate the mean value of the conductance. By performing a systematic study of the conductance of these arrays as a function of nanoparticle size we are able to extract the carrier mobility for specific molecular ligands. We show that nanoparticle polydispersity correlates with the void density in the array, and that because of this correlation it is possible to accurately determine the void density within the array directly from conductance measurements. These results demonstrate that conductance-based measurements can be used to accurately and non-destructively determine the morphological and structural properties of these hybrid arrays, and thus provide a characterization platform that helps move 2-dimensional nanoparticle arrays toward robust and reproducible electronic systems.Composite molecule-nanoparticle hybrid systems have recently emerged as important materials for applications ranging from

  19. Thermal Solitons in 1d and 2d Anharmonic Lattices - Solectrons and the Organization of Non-Linear Fluctuations in Long-Living Dynamical Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velarde, M. G.; Ebeling, W.; Chetverikov, A. P.

    2013-01-01

    We study the thermal excitation of intrinsic localized modes in the form of solitons in 1d and 2d anharmonic lattices at moderately high temperatures. Such finite-amplitude fluctuations form long-living dynamical structures with life-time in the pico-second range thus surviving a relatively long time in comparison to other thermal fluctuations. Further we discuss the influence of such long-living fluctuations on the dynamics of added excess free electrons. The atomic lattice units are treated as quasi-classical objects interacting by Morse forces and stochastically moving according to Langevin equations. In 2d the atoms are initially organized in a triangular lattice. The electron distributions are in a first estimate represented by equilibrium adiabatic distributions in the actual polarization fields. Computer simulations show that in 2d systems such excitations are moving with supersonic velocities along lattice rows oriented with the cristallographic axes. By following the electron distributions we have also been able to study the excitations of solectron type (electron-soliton dynamic bound states) and estimate their life times.

  20. Negative Magnetoresistance in 2D Electron System in the Hopping Regime.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudalov, V. M.; Voiskovskii, A. E.

    1996-03-01

    Strong negative magnetoresistance δ ρ_xx(H) ∝ -H^2 was found in low-disorder Si-MOSFET structures in the hopping regime. As magnetic field increases, the diagonal resistance first decreases, then passes through a minimum, and, finally, rises exponentially. The field position of the minima Ht is about independent of temperature in the range 1.4 to 4.2 K. The observed features are consistent with the theoretical predictions (M.E. Raikh and L.I. Glazman, Phys.Rev. Lett. 75, 128 (1995).) for the tunneling conduction in a smooth random potential. As the sample mobility decreases, the magnetoresistance is crossing over to the 1/2-power law: ρ_xx(H) ∝ -H^1/2, similar to that observed earlier (H.W. Jiang, C.E. Johnson, K.L. Wang, Phys.Rev. B 46, 12830 (1992).) in disordered GaAs/Al(Ga)As heterojunctions.

  1. Electron Structure of Francium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koufos, Alexander

    2012-02-01

    This talk presents the first calculations of the electronic structure of francium for the bcc, fcc and hcp structures, using the Augmented Plane Wave (APW) method in its muffin-tin and linearized general potential forms. Both the Local Density Approximation (LDA) and Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA), were used to calculate the electronic structure and total energy of francium (Fr). The GGA and LDA both found the total energy of the hcp structure slightly below that of the fcc and bcc structure, respectively. This is in agreement with similar results for the other alkali metals using the same methodology. The equilibrium lattice constant, bulk modulus and superconductivity parameters were calculated. We found that under pressures, in the range of 1-5 GPa, Fr could be a superconductor at a critical temperature of about 4K.

  2. Syntheses, structures, and properties of two novel cadmium coordination polymers with 1D and 2D structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Li; Li, Chuanbi; Zhu, Dongsheng; Xu, Lin

    2011-09-01

    Two novel complexes [Cd 2(MIP) 2(BDC) 2]n ( 1) [MIP = 2-(3-methoxyphenyl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline, BDC = terephthalic acid] and [Cd(IPM)(NDC)]n ( 2) [IPM = 4-(1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthrolin-2-yl)-2-methoxyphenol, NDC = naphthalene-1,4-dicarboxylic acid] have been synthesized by hydrothermal reaction and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, single-crystal X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Complex 1 exhibits 1D zigzag chain structure and complex 2 shows 2D layer topology. The intermolecular C sbnd H⋯O interactions extend the complex 1 into 2D networks, and the existing H-bonds further stabilized the complexes 1-2, which can be proved by TGA experiment. Furthermore, the solid-state fluorescence spectrum of the complex 2 was studied, as well as the ligand IPM. The complex 2 exhibits intense broad emission at 540 nm at room temperature, which is red-shifted by 45 nm relative to that of free ligand IPM.

  3. Magneto-transport characteristics of a 2D electron system driven to negative magneto-conductivity by microwave photoexcitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Ramesh; Kriisa, A.

    2015-03-01

    Negative diagonal magneto-conductivity/resistivity is a spectacular- and thought provoking- property of driven, far-from-equilibrium, low dimensional electronic systems. The physical response of this exotic electronic state is not yet fully understood since it is rarely encountered in experiment. The microwave-radiation-induced zero-resistance state in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron system is believed to be an example where negative magneto-conductivity/resistivity is responsible for the observed phenomena. Here, we examine the magneto-transport characteristics of this negative conductivity/resistivity state in the microwave photo-excited two-dimensional electron system (2DES) through a numerical solution of the associated boundary value problem. The results suggest, surprisingly, that a bare negative diagonal conductivity/resistivity state in the 2DES under photo-excitation should yield a positive diagonal resistance with a concomitant sign reversal in the Hall voltage. Transport measurements are supported by the DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Material Sciences and Engineering Division under DE-SC0001762. Additional support by the ARO under W911NF-07-01-015.

  4. Mercury (I) nitroprusside: A 2D structure supported on homometallic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osiry, H.; Cano, A.; Reguera, L.; Lemus-Santana, A. A.; Reguera, E.

    2015-01-01

    The pentacyanonitrosylferrate complex anion, [Fe(CN)5NO]2-, forms an insoluble solid with Hg(I) ion, of formula unit Hg2[Fe(CN)5NO]·2H2O, whose crystal structure and related properties are unknown. This contribution reports the preparation of that compound by the precipitation method and its structural study from X-ray powder patterns complemented with spectroscopic information from IR, Raman, and UV-vis techniques. The crystal structure was solved ab initio and then refined using the Rietveld method. The solid crystallizes with a triclinic unit cell, in the P-1 space group, with cell parameters a=10.1202(12), b=10.1000(13), c=7.4704(11) Å; α=110.664(10), β=110.114(10), γ=104.724(8) °. Within the unit cell, two formula units are accommodated (Z=2). It adopts a layered structure related with the coordination of the equatorial CN groups at their N end to the Hg atoms while the axial CN ligand remains unlinked. Within the layers neighboring Hg2[Fe(CN)5NO] building units remain linked through four relatively strong Hg-Hg interactions, with an interatomic distance of 2.549(3) Å. The charge donation from the equatorial CN groups through their 5σ orbitals results into an increase for the electron density on the Hg atoms, which strengths the Hg-Hg bond. In the Raman spectrum, that metal-metal bond is detected as a stretching vibration band at 167 cm-1. The available free volume between neighboring layers accommodates two water molecules, which are stabilized within the framework through hydrogen bonds with the N end of the unlinked axial CN group. The removal of these weakly bonded water molecules results in structural disorder for the material 3D framework.

  5. A Stochastic Hill Climbing Approach for Simultaneous 2D Alignment and Clustering of Cryogenic Electron Microscopy Images.

    PubMed

    Reboul, Cyril F; Bonnet, Frederic; Elmlund, Dominika; Elmlund, Hans

    2016-06-01

    A critical step in the analysis of novel cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) single-particle datasets is the identification of homogeneous subsets of images. Methods for solving this problem are important for data quality assessment, ab initio 3D reconstruction, and analysis of population diversity due to the heterogeneous nature of macromolecules. Here we formulate a stochastic algorithm for identification of homogeneous subsets of images. The purpose of the method is to generate improved 2D class averages that can be used to produce a reliable 3D starting model in a rapid and unbiased fashion. We show that our method overcomes inherent limitations of widely used clustering approaches and proceed to test the approach on six publicly available experimental cryo-EM datasets. We conclude that, in each instance, ab initio 3D reconstructions of quality suitable for initialization of high-resolution refinement are produced from the cluster centers. PMID:27184214

  6. Robust Level Coincidences in the Subband Structure of Quasi 2D Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, R.; Wang, L. Y.; Lin, Y. H.; Chu, C. S.

    2011-03-01

    Recently, level crossings in the energy bands of crystals have been identified as a key signature for topological phase transitions. In general, three independent parameters must be tuned appropriately to bring two quantum levels into degeneracy. Using realistic models we show that for Bloch electrons in a crystal the parameter space controlling the occurrence of level coincidences has a much richer structure than anticipated previously. In particular, we identify cases where level coincidences depend on only two independent parameters thus making the level coincidences robust, i.e., they cannot be removed by a small perturbation of the Hamiltonian compatible with the crystal symmetry. We consider HgTe/CdTe quantum wells as a specific example. (See arXiv:1011.xxxx) Work supported by Taiwan NSC (Contract No. 99-2112-M-009-006) and a MOE-ATU grant. Work at Argonne supported by DOE BES under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  7. Structure and properties of phosphorene-like IV-VI 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhinan; Wang, Bo; Ou, Liangkai; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Xu; Zhou, Zhen

    2016-10-14

    Because of the excellent physical and chemical properties of phosphorene, phosphorene and phosphorene-like materials have attracted extensive attention. Since phosphorus belongs to group V, some group IV-VI compounds could also form phosphorene-like configurations. In this work, GeO, SnO, GeS, and SnS monolayers were constructed to investigate the structural and electronic properties by employing first-principles computations. Phonon spectra suggest that these monolayers are dynamically stable and could be realized in experiments. These monolayers are all semiconductors with the band gaps of 2.26 ∼ 4.13 eV. Based on the monolayers, GeO, SnO, GeS, and SnS bilayers were also constructed. The band gaps of these bilayers are smaller than those of the corresponding monolayers. Moreover, the optical properties of these monolayers and bilayers were calculated, and the results indicate that the SnO, GeS and SnS bilayers exhibit obvious optical absorption in the visible spectrum. All the results suggest that phosphorene-like IV-VI materials are promising candidates for electronic and optical devices. PMID:27608201

  8. Watching Silica's Dance: Imaging the Structure and Dynamics of the Atomic (Re-) Arrangements in 2D Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, David

    2014-03-01

    Even though glasses are almost ubiquitous--in our windows, on our iPhones, even on our faces--they are also mysterious. Because glasses are notoriously difficult to study, basic questions like: ``How are the atoms arranged? Where and how do glasses break?'' are still under contention. We use aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to image the atoms in a new two-dimensional phase of silica glass - freestanding it becomes the world's thinnest pane of glass at only 3-atoms thick, and take a unique look into these questions. Using atom-by-atom imaging and spectroscopy, we are able to reconstruct the full structure and bonding of this 2D glass and identify it as a bi-tetrahedral layer of SiO2. Our images also strikingly resemble Zachariasen's original cartoon models of glasses, drawn in 1932. As such, our work realizes an 80-year-old vision for easily understandable glassy systems and introduces promising methods to test theoretical predictions against experimental data. We image atoms in the disordered solid and track their motions in response to local strain. We directly obtain ring statistics and pair distribution functions that span short-, medium-, and long-range order, and test these against long-standing theoretical predictions of glass structure and dynamics. We use the electron beam to excite atomic rearrangements, producing surprisingly rich and beautiful videos of how a glass bends and breaks, as well as the exchange of atoms at a solid/liquid interface. Detailed analyses of these videos reveal a complex dance of elastic and plastic deformations, phase transitions, and their interplay. These examples illustrate the wide-ranging and fundamental materials physics that can now be studied at atomic-resolution via transmission electron microscopy of two-dimensional glasses. Work in collaboration with: S. Kurasch, U. Kaiser, R. Hovden, Q. Mao, J. Kotakoski, J. S. Alden, A. Shekhawat, A. A. Alemi, J. P. Sethna, P. L. McEuen, A.V. Krasheninnikov

  9. Designing molecular structure to achieve ductile fracture behavior in a stiff and strong 2D polymer, ``graphylene''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoz-Rosado, E.; Beaudet, T. D.; Balu, R.; Wetzel, E. D.

    2016-05-01

    As the simplest two-dimensional (2D) polymer, graphene has immensely high intrinsic strength and elastic stiffness but has limited toughness due to brittle fracture. We use atomistic simulations to explore a new class of graphene/polyethylene hybrid 2D polymer, ``graphylene'', that exhibits ductile fracture mechanisms and has a higher fracture toughness and flaw tolerance than graphene. A specific configuration of this 2D polymer hybrid, denoted ``GrE-2'' for the two-carbon-long ethylene chains connecting benzene rings in the inherent framework, is prioritized for study. MD simulations of crack propagation show that the energy release rate to propagate a crack in GrE-2 is twice that of graphene. We also demonstrate that GrE-2 exhibits delocalized failure and other energy-dissipating fracture mechanisms such as crack branching and bridging. These results demonstrate that 2D polymers can be uniquely tailored to achieve a balance of fracture toughness with mechanical stiffness and strength.As the simplest two-dimensional (2D) polymer, graphene has immensely high intrinsic strength and elastic stiffness but has limited toughness due to brittle fracture. We use atomistic simulations to explore a new class of graphene/polyethylene hybrid 2D polymer, ``graphylene'', that exhibits ductile fracture mechanisms and has a higher fracture toughness and flaw tolerance than graphene. A specific configuration of this 2D polymer hybrid, denoted ``GrE-2'' for the two-carbon-long ethylene chains connecting benzene rings in the inherent framework, is prioritized for study. MD simulations of crack propagation show that the energy release rate to propagate a crack in GrE-2 is twice that of graphene. We also demonstrate that GrE-2 exhibits delocalized failure and other energy-dissipating fracture mechanisms such as crack branching and bridging. These results demonstrate that 2D polymers can be uniquely tailored to achieve a balance of fracture toughness with mechanical stiffness and

  10. Novel quantum Monte Carlo methods for spin-orbit Hamiltonians: 2D interacting electron gas with the Rashba interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shi; Zhu, Minyi; Hu, Shuming; Mitas, Lubos

    2013-03-01

    Very recently, a quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) method was proposed for Rashba spin-orbit operators which expands the applicability of QMC to systems with variable spins. It is based on incorporating the spin-orbit into the Green's function and thus samples (ie, rotates) the spinors in the antisymmetric part of the trial function [1]. Here we propose a new alternative for both variational and diffusion Monte Carlo algorithms for calculations of systems with variable spins. Specifically, we introduce a new spin representation which allows us to sample the spin configurations efficiently and without introducing additional fluctuations. We develop the corresponding Green's function which treats the electron spin as a dynamical variable and we use the fixed-phase approximation to eliminate the negative probabilities. The trial wave function is a Slater determinant of spinors and spin-indepedent Jastrow correlations. The method also has the zero variance property. We benchmark the method on the 2D electron gas with the Rashba interaction and we find very good overall agreement with previously obtained results. Research supported by NSF and ARO.

  11. Energy transfer dynamics in trimers and aggregates of light-harvesting complex II probed by 2D electronic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Enriquez, Miriam M.; Zhang, Cheng; Tan, Howe-Siang; Akhtar, Parveen; Garab, Győző; Lambrev, Petar H.

    2015-06-07

    The pathways and dynamics of excitation energy transfer between the chlorophyll (Chl) domains in solubilized trimeric and aggregated light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) are examined using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). The LHCII trimers and aggregates exhibit the unquenched and quenched excitonic states of Chl a, respectively. 2DES allows direct correlation of excitation and emission energies of coupled states over population time delays, hence enabling mapping of the energy flow between Chls. By the excitation of the entire Chl b Q{sub y} band, energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a states is monitored in the LHCII trimers and aggregates. Global analysis of the two-dimensional (2D) spectra reveals that energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a occurs on fast and slow time scales of 240–270 fs and 2.8 ps for both forms of LHCII. 2D decay-associated spectra resulting from the global analysis identify the correlation between Chl states involved in the energy transfer and decay at a given lifetime. The contribution of singlet–singlet annihilation on the kinetics of Chl energy transfer and decay is also modelled and discussed. The results show a marked change in the energy transfer kinetics in the time range of a few picoseconds. Owing to slow energy equilibration processes, long-lived intermediate Chl a states are present in solubilized trimers, while in aggregates, the population decay of these excited states is significantly accelerated, suggesting that, overall, the energy transfer within the LHCII complexes is faster in the aggregated state.

  12. 3D structural measurements of the proximal femur from 2D DXA images using a statistical atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Omar M.; Ramamurthi, Krishna; Wilson, Kevin E.; Engelke, Klaus; Bouxsein, Mary; Taylor, Russell H.

    2009-02-01

    A method to obtain 3D structural measurements of the proximal femur from 2D DXA images and a statistical atlas is presented. A statistical atlas of a proximal femur was created consisting of both 3D shape and volumetric density information and then deformably registered to 2D fan-beam DXA images. After the registration process, a series of 3D structural measurements were taken on QCT-estimates generated by transforming the registered statistical atlas into a voxel volume. These measurements were compared to the equivalent measurements taken on the actual QCT (ground truth) associated with the DXA images for each of 20 human cadaveric femora. The methodology and results are presented to address the potential clinical feasibility of obtaining 3D structural measurements from limited angle DXA scans and a statistical atlas of the proximal femur in-vivo.

  13. A novel 2-D transition metal cyanide membrane: Modeling, structural, magnetic, and functional characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goss, Marcus

    A novel 2-dimensional crystalline material composed of cyanide-bridged metal nanosheets with a square planar framework has been prepared. This material, similar to Hofmann clathrates, has a variety of interesting properties. The material is crystalline and possesses characteristics that include magnetic properties, electronic properties and useful structural features. They have recently been exfoliated into individual crystalline sheets. These sheets show a strong potential for use as ion selective membranes. Performance improvements in water purification and desalination by reverse osmosis methods owing to their single atom thickness is possible. A series of dynamic molecular simulations has provided an understanding of the mechanism for water permeability and salt rejection. Energy profiles for the passage of water and ionic species through the porous areas of these nanosheets have been built and reported. Performance estimates of the efficacy of this novel material for use as an ion selective membrane such as an improved desalination RO membrane are presented. Experiments in synthesis and exfoliation of this class of cyanide-bridged transition metal complex were conducted and the results are presented. A preliminary investigation into the magnetic properties of these materials is included.

  14. Epitaxial MoS2/GaN structures to enable vertical 2D/3D semiconductor heterostructure devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzmetov, D.; Zhang, K.; Stan, G.; Kalanyan, B.; Eichfeld, S.; Burke, R.; Shah, P.; O'Regan, T.; Crowne, F.; Birdwell, A. G.; Robinson, J.; Davydov, A.; Ivanov, T.

    MoS2/GaN structures are investigated as a building block for vertical 2D/3D semiconductor heterostructure devices that utilize a 3D substrate (GaN) as an active component of the semiconductor device without the need of mechanical transfer of the 2D layer. Our CVD-grown monolayer MoS2 has been shown to be epitaxially aligned to the GaN lattice which is a pre-requisite for high quality 2D/3D interfaces desired for efficient vertical transport and large area growth. The MoS2 coverage is nearly 50 % including isolated triangles and monolayer islands. The GaN template is a double-layer grown by MOCVD on sapphire and allows for measurement of transport perpendicular to the 2D layer. Photoluminescence, Raman, XPS, Kelvin force probe microscopy, and SEM analysis identified high quality monolayer MoS2. The MoS2/GaN structures electrically conduct in the out-of-plane direction and across the van der Waals gap, as measured with conducting AFM (CAFM). The CAFM current maps and I-V characteristics are analyzed to estimate the MoS2/GaN contact resistivity to be less than 4 Ω-cm2 and current spreading in the MoS2 monolayer to be approx. 1 μm in diameter. Epitaxial MoS2/GaN heterostructures present a promising platform for the design of energy-efficient, high-speed vertical devices incorporating 2D layered materials with 3D semiconductors.

  15. Study on molecular structure and hydration mechanism of Domyoji-ko starch by IR and NIR hetero 2D analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Norihisa; Kondo, Miyuki; Miyazawa, Mitsuhiro

    2010-06-01

    The hydration structure of starch molecule in Domyoji-ko, which is made from gluey rice, was investigated by hetero 2D correlation analysis of IR and NIR spectroscopy. The feature near 1020 cm -1 in the IR spectra of Domyoji-ko is changed by rehydration process, indicating that the molecular structure of amylopectin in the starch has been varied by the hydration without heating. The intensity of a band at 4770 cm -1 in NIR spectra is decreasing with the increasing of either the heating time with water or rehydration time without heating. These results suggest that the hydration of Domyoji-ko has proceeded in similar mechanisms on these processes. The generalized hetero 2D IR-NIR correlation analysis for rehydration of Domyoji-ko has supported the assignments for NIR bands concerning the gelatinization of starch.

  16. REVIEW ARTICLE: Slow light modes for optical delay lines: 2D photonic crystal-based design structures, performances and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talneau, A.

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents an overview of 2D photonic crystal-based structures designed to display low group velocity as well as reduced group velocity dispersions. Their main envisioned applications are optical delay lines for telecom transmissions at 1.55 µm. Optical mechanisms responsible for slowing down the optical modes and encountered in the slow light regime serve as a guideline for this paper.

  17. Hybrid platforms of graphane-graphene 2D structures: prototypes for atomically precise nanoelectronics.

    PubMed

    Mota, F de B; Rivelino, R; Medeiros, P V C; Mascarenhas, A J S; de Castilho, C M C

    2014-11-21

    First-principles calculations demonstrate that line/ribbon defects, resulting from a controlled dehydrogenation in graphane, lead to the formation of low-dimensional electron-rich tracks in a monolayer. The present simulations point out that hybrid graphane-graphene nanostructures exhibit important elements, greatly required for the fabrication of efficient electronic circuits at the atomic level. PMID:25285905

  18. Image restoration using 2D autoregressive texture model and structure curve construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronin, V. V.; Marchuk, V. I.; Petrosov, S. P.; Svirin, I.; Agaian, S.; Egiazarian, K.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper an image inpainting approach based on the construction of a composite curve for the restoration of the edges of objects in an image using the concepts of parametric and geometric continuity is presented. It is shown that this approach allows to restore the curved edges and provide more flexibility for curve design in damaged image by interpolating the boundaries of objects by cubic splines. After edge restoration stage, a texture restoration using 2D autoregressive texture model is carried out. The image intensity is locally modeled by a first spatial autoregressive model with support in a strongly causal prediction region on the plane. Model parameters are estimated by Yule-Walker method. Several examples considered in this paper show the effectiveness of the proposed approach for large objects removal as well as recovery of small regions on several test images.

  19. Increase of spin dephasing times in a 2D electron system with degree of initial spin polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stich, D.; Korn, T.; Schulz, R.; Schuh, D.; Wegscheider, W.; Schüller, C.

    2008-03-01

    We report on time-resolved Faraday/Kerr rotation measurements on a high-mobility 2D electron system. A variable initial spin polarization is created in the sample by a circularly polarized pump pulse, and the spin polarization is tracked by measuring the Faraday/Kerr rotation of a time-delayed probe pulse. By varying the pump intensity, the initial spin polarization is changed from the low-polarization limit to a polarization degree of several percent. The observed spin dephasing time increases from less than 20 ps to more than 200 ps as the initial spin polarization is increased. To exclude sample heating effects, additional measurements with constant pump intensity and variable degree of circular polarization are performed. The results confirm the theoretical prediction by Weng and Wu [Phys. Rev. B 68 (2003) 075312] that the spin dephasing strongly depends on the initial spin polarization degree. The microscopic origin for this is the Hartree-Fock term in the Coulomb interaction, which acts as an effective out-of plane magnetic field.

  20. Charge balancing in GaN-based 2-D electron gas devices employing an additional 2-D hole gas and its influence on dynamic behaviour of GaN-based heterostructure field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Herwig Reuters, Benjamin; Geipel, Sascha; Schauerte, Meike; Kalisch, Holger; Vescan, Andrei; Benkhelifa, Fouad; Ambacher, Oliver

    2015-03-14

    GaN-based heterostructure FETs (HFETs) featuring a 2-D electron gas (2DEG) can offer very attractive device performance for power-switching applications. This performance can be assessed by evaluation of the dynamic on-resistance R{sub on,dyn} vs. the breakdown voltage V{sub bd}. In literature, it has been shown that with a high V{sub bd}, R{sub on,dyn} is deteriorated. The impairment of R{sub on,dyn} is mainly driven by electron injection into surface, barrier, and buffer traps. Electron injection itself depends on the electric field which typically peaks at the gate edge towards the drain. A concept suitable to circumvent this issue is the charge-balancing concept which employs a 2-D hole gas (2DHG) on top of the 2DEG allowing for the electric field peak to be suppressed. Furthermore, the 2DEG concentration in the active channel cannot decrease by a change of the surface potential. Hence, beside an improvement in breakdown voltage, also an improvement in dynamic behaviour can be expected. Whereas the first aspect has already been demonstrated, the second one has not been under investigation so far. Hence, in this report, the effect of charge-balancing is discussed and its impact on the dynamic characteristics of HFETs is evaluated. It will be shown that with appropriate device design, the dynamic behaviour of HFETs can be improved by inserting an additional 2DHG.

  1. 2D-ordered dielectric sub-micron bowls on a metal surface: a useful hybrid plasmonic-photonic structure.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yue; Wang, Shiqiang; Yin, Xianpeng; Liang, Yun; Dong, Hao; Gao, Ning; Li, Jian; Wang, Hui; Li, Guangtao

    2016-07-21

    Recently, it has been demonstrated that the combination of periodic dielectric structures with metallic structures provides an efficient means to yield a synergetic optical response or functionality in the resultant hybrid plasmonic-photonic systems. In this work, a new hybrid plasmonic-photonic structure of 2D-ordered dielectric sub-micron bowls on a flat gold surface was proposed, prepared, and theoretically and experimentally characterized. This hybrid structure supports two types of modes: surface plasmon polaritons bound at the metallic surface and waveguided mode of light confined in the cavity of bowls. Optical responses of this hybrid structure as well as the spatial electric field distribution of each mode are found to be strongly dependent on the structural parameters of this system, and thus could be widely modified on demand. Importantly, compared to the widely studied hybrid systems, namely the flat metallic surface coated with a monolayer array of latex spheres, the waveguided mode with strong field enhancement appearing in the cavities of bowls is more facilely accessible and thus suitable for practical use. For demonstration, a 2D-ordered silica sub-micron bowl array deposited on a flat gold surface was fabricated and used as a regenerable platform for fluorescence enhancement by simply accommodating emitters in bowls. All the simulation and experiment results indicate that the 2D-ordered dielectric sub-micron bowls on a metal surface should be a useful hybrid plasmonic-photonic system with great potential for applications such as sensors or tunable emitting devices if appropriate periods and materials are employed. PMID:27349558

  2. The use of 2D fingerprint methods to support the assessment of structural similarity in orphan drug legislation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In the European Union, medicines are authorised for some rare disease only if they are judged to be dissimilar to authorised orphan drugs for that disease. This paper describes the use of 2D fingerprints to show the extent of the relationship between computed levels of structural similarity for pairs of molecules and expert judgments of the similarities of those pairs. The resulting relationship can be used to provide input to the assessment of new active compounds for which orphan drug authorisation is being sought. Results 143 experts provided judgments of the similarity or dissimilarity of 100 pairs of drug-like molecules from the DrugBank 3.0 database. The similarities of these pairs were also computed using BCI, Daylight, ECFC4, ECFP4, MDL and Unity 2D fingerprints. Logistic regression analyses demonstrated a strong relationship between the human and computed similarity assessments, with the resulting regression models having significant predictive power in experiments using data from submissions of orphan drug medicines to the European Medicines Agency. The BCI fingerprints performed best overall on the DrugBank dataset while the BCI, Daylight, ECFP4 and Unity fingerprints performed comparably on the European Medicines Agency dataset. Conclusions Measures of structural similarity based on 2D fingerprints can provide a useful source of information for the assessment of orphan drug status by regulatory authorities. PMID:24485002

  3. Cyano-bridged coordination polymer hydrogel-derived Sn-Fe binary oxide nanohybrids with structural diversity: from 3D, 2D, to 2D/1D and enhanced lithium-storage performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiyu; Zhu, Xiaoshu; Chen, Xuguang; Zhou, Yiming; Tang, Yawen; Ding, Liangxin; Wu, Ping

    2016-05-01

    Metal oxide nanohybrids with uniform dimensions and controlled architectures possess unique compositional and structural superiorities, and thus harbor promising potential for a series of applications in energy, catalysis, and sensing systems. Herein, we propose a facile, general, and scalable cyano-bridged coordination polymer hydrogel-derived thermal-oxidation route for the construction of main-group metal and transition-metal heterometallic oxide nanohybrids with controlled constituents and architectures. The formation of Sn-Fe binary oxide nanohybrids has been demonstrated as an example by using cyano-bridged Sn(iv)-Fe(ii) bimetallic coordination polymer hydrogels (i.e., SnCl4-K4Fe(CN)6 cyanogels, Sn-Fe cyanogels) as precursors. The physicochemical properties of Sn-Fe cyanogels with different Sn/Fe ratios have been systematically examined, and it is found that perfect Sn-Fe cyanogels without unbridged Sn(iv) or Fe(ii) can be formed with Sn/Fe ratios from 2 : 1 to 1 : 2. More importantly, the simple adjustment of Sn/Fe ratios in the Sn-Fe cyanogel precursors can realize flexible dimensional control of the Sn-Fe binary oxide nanohybrids, and 2D/1D SnO2-Fe2O3 hierarchitectures, 2D SnO2-Fe2O3 nanosheets, and 3D SnO2-Fe2O3 networks have been synthesized using the Sn-Fe 1 : 2, Sn-Fe 1 : 1, and Sn-Fe 2 : 1 cyanogels as precursors, respectively. To demonstrate their compositional/structural superiorities and potential applications, the lithium-storage utilization of the Sn-Fe binary oxide nanohybrids has been selected as an objective application, and the nanohybrids exhibit Sn/Fe ratio-dependent lithium-storage performance. As a representative example, the 2D/1D SnO2-Fe2O3 hierarchitectures manifest markedly enhanced Li-storage performance in terms of reversible capacities and cycling stability in comparison with their constituent units, i.e., bare SnO2 nanosheets and Fe2O3 nanorods. The proposed cyanogel-derived thermal-oxidation strategy could open up new

  4. Image inpainting on the basis of spectral structure from 2-D nonharmonic analysis.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Masaya; Kako, Takahiro; Hirobayashi, Shigeki; Misawa, Tadanobu; Yoshizawa, Toshio; Inazumi, Yasuhiro

    2013-08-01

    The restoration of images by digital inpainting is an active field of research and such algorithms are, in fact, now widely used. Conventional methods generally apply textures that are most similar to the areas around the missing region or use a large image database. However, this produces discontinuous textures and thus unsatisfactory results. Here, we propose a new technique to overcome this limitation by using signal prediction based on the nonharmonic analysis (NHA) technique proposed by the authors. NHA can be used to extract accurate spectra, irrespective of the window function, and its frequency resolution is less than that of the discrete Fourier transform. The proposed method sequentially generates new textures on the basis of the spectrum obtained by NHA. Missing regions from the spectrum are repaired using an improved cost function for 2D NHA. The proposed method is evaluated using the standard images Lena, Barbara, Airplane, Pepper, and Mandrill. The results show an improvement in MSE of about 10-20 compared with the examplar-based method and good subjective quality. PMID:23549889

  5. 2D metamaterials with hexagonal structure: spatial resonances and near field imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhuromskyy, O; Shamonina, E; Solymar, L

    2005-11-14

    The current and field distribution in a 2D metamaterial consisting of resonant elements in a hexagonal arrangement are found assuming magnetic interaction between the elements. The dispersion equation of magnetoinductive (MI) waves is derived with the aid of the direct and reciprocal lattice familiar from solid state theory. A continuous model for the current variation in the elements is introduced leading to the familiar wave equation in the form of a second order differential equation. The current distributions are shown to exhibit a series of spatial resonances for rectangular, circular and hexagonal boundaries. The axial and radial components of the resulting magnetic field are compared with previously obtained experimental results on a Swiss Roll metamaterial with hexagonal boundaries. Experimental and theoretical results are also compared for the near field image of an object in the shape of the letter M followed by a more general discussion of imaging. It is concluded that a theoretical formulation based on the propagation of MI waves can correctly describe the experimental results. PMID:19503131

  6. Micro PIV measurements of turbulent flow over 2D structured roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartenberger, Joel; Perlin, Marc

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the turbulent boundary layer over surfaces with 2D spanwise square and triangular protrusions having nominal heights of 100 - 300 microns for Reynolds numbers ranging from Reτ ~ 1500 through Reτ ~ 4500 using a high speed, high magnification imaging system. Micro PIV analysis gives finely resolved velocity fields of the flow (on the order of 10 microns between vectors) enabling a detailed look at the inner region as well as the flow in the immediate vicinity of the roughness elements. Additionally, planar PIV with lower resolution is performed to capture the remainder of the boundary layer to the freestream flow. Varying the streamwise distance between individual roughness elements from one to ten times the nominal heights allows investigation of k-type and d-type roughness in both the transitionally rough and fully rough regimes. Preliminary results show a shift in the mean velocity profile similar to the results of previous studies. Turbulent statistics will be presented also. The authors would like to acknowledge the support of NAVSEA which funded this project through the Naval Engineering Education Center (NEEC).

  7. Titanium trisulfide (TiS3): a 2D semiconductor with quasi-1D optical and electronic properties.

    PubMed

    Island, Joshua O; Biele, Robert; Barawi, Mariam; Clamagirand, José M; Ares, José R; Sánchez, Carlos; van der Zant, Herre S J; Ferrer, Isabel J; D'Agosta, Roberto; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres

    2016-01-01

    We present characterizations of few-layer titanium trisulfide (TiS3) flakes which, due to their reduced in-plane structural symmetry, display strong anisotropy in their electrical and optical properties. Exfoliated few-layer flakes show marked anisotropy of their in-plane mobilities reaching ratios as high as 7.6 at low temperatures. Based on the preferential growth axis of TiS3 nanoribbons, we develop a simple method to identify the in-plane crystalline axes of exfoliated few-layer flakes through angle resolved polarization Raman spectroscopy. Optical transmission measurements show that TiS3 flakes display strong linear dichroism with a magnitude (transmission ratios up to 30) much greater than that observed for other anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) materials. Finally, we calculate the absorption and transmittance spectra of TiS3 in the random-phase-approximation (RPA) and find that the calculations are in qualitative agreement with the observed experimental optical transmittance. PMID:26931161

  8. Titanium trisulfide (TiS3): a 2D semiconductor with quasi-1D optical and electronic properties

    PubMed Central

    Island, Joshua O.; Biele, Robert; Barawi, Mariam; Clamagirand, José M.; Ares, José R.; Sánchez, Carlos; van der Zant, Herre S. J.; Ferrer, Isabel J.; D’Agosta, Roberto; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres

    2016-01-01

    We present characterizations of few-layer titanium trisulfide (TiS3) flakes which, due to their reduced in-plane structural symmetry, display strong anisotropy in their electrical and optical properties. Exfoliated few-layer flakes show marked anisotropy of their in-plane mobilities reaching ratios as high as 7.6 at low temperatures. Based on the preferential growth axis of TiS3 nanoribbons, we develop a simple method to identify the in-plane crystalline axes of exfoliated few-layer flakes through angle resolved polarization Raman spectroscopy. Optical transmission measurements show that TiS3 flakes display strong linear dichroism with a magnitude (transmission ratios up to 30) much greater than that observed for other anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) materials. Finally, we calculate the absorption and transmittance spectra of TiS3 in the random-phase-approximation (RPA) and find that the calculations are in qualitative agreement with the observed experimental optical transmittance. PMID:26931161

  9. Titanium trisulfide (TiS3): a 2D semiconductor with quasi-1D optical and electronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Island, Joshua O.; Biele, Robert; Barawi, Mariam; Clamagirand, José M.; Ares, José R.; Sánchez, Carlos; van der Zant, Herre S. J.; Ferrer, Isabel J.; D'Agosta, Roberto; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres

    2016-03-01

    We present characterizations of few-layer titanium trisulfide (TiS3) flakes which, due to their reduced in-plane structural symmetry, display strong anisotropy in their electrical and optical properties. Exfoliated few-layer flakes show marked anisotropy of their in-plane mobilities reaching ratios as high as 7.6 at low temperatures. Based on the preferential growth axis of TiS3 nanoribbons, we develop a simple method to identify the in-plane crystalline axes of exfoliated few-layer flakes through angle resolved polarization Raman spectroscopy. Optical transmission measurements show that TiS3 flakes display strong linear dichroism with a magnitude (transmission ratios up to 30) much greater than that observed for other anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) materials. Finally, we calculate the absorption and transmittance spectra of TiS3 in the random-phase-approximation (RPA) and find that the calculations are in qualitative agreement with the observed experimental optical transmittance.

  10. Image quality improvement for a 3D structure exhibiting multiple 2D patterns and its implementation.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Ryuji; Nakayama, Hirotaka; Shiraki, Atsushi; Kakue, Takashi; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2016-04-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) structure designed by our proposed algorithm can simultaneously exhibit multiple two-dimensional patterns. The 3D structure provides multiple patterns having directional characteristics by distributing the effects of the artefacts. In this study, we proposed an iterative algorithm to improve the image quality of the exhibited patterns and have verified the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm using numerical simulations. Moreover, we fabricated different 3D glass structures (an octagonal prism, a cube and a sphere) using the proposed algorithm. All 3D structures exhibit four patterns, and different patterns can be observed depending on the viewing direction. PMID:27137021

  11. An algorithm for computing the 2D structure of fast rotating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieutord, Michel; Espinosa Lara, Francisco; Putigny, Bertrand

    2016-08-01

    Stars may be understood as self-gravitating masses of a compressible fluid whose radiative cooling is compensated by nuclear reactions or gravitational contraction. The understanding of their time evolution requires the use of detailed models that account for a complex microphysics including that of opacities, equation of state and nuclear reactions. The present stellar models are essentially one-dimensional, namely spherically symmetric. However, the interpretation of recent data like the surface abundances of elements or the distribution of internal rotation have reached the limits of validity of one-dimensional models because of their very simplified representation of large-scale fluid flows. In this article, we describe the ESTER code, which is the first code able to compute in a consistent way a two-dimensional model of a fast rotating star including its large-scale flows. Compared to classical 1D stellar evolution codes, many numerical innovations have been introduced to deal with this complex problem. First, the spectral discretization based on spherical harmonics and Chebyshev polynomials is used to represent the 2D axisymmetric fields. A nonlinear mapping maps the spheroidal star and allows a smooth spectral representation of the fields. The properties of Picard and Newton iterations for solving the nonlinear partial differential equations of the problem are discussed. It turns out that the Picard scheme is efficient on the computation of the simple polytropic stars, but Newton algorithm is unsurpassed when stellar models include complex microphysics. Finally, we discuss the numerical efficiency of our solver of Newton iterations. This linear solver combines the iterative Conjugate Gradient Squared algorithm together with an LU-factorization serving as a preconditioner of the Jacobian matrix.

  12. Analysis of simple 2-D and 3-D metal structures subjected to fragment impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witmer, E. A.; Stagliano, T. R.; Spilker, R. L.; Rodal, J. J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Theoretical methods were developed for predicting the large-deflection elastic-plastic transient structural responses of metal containment or deflector (C/D) structures to cope with rotor burst fragment impact attack. For two-dimensional C/D structures both, finite element and finite difference analysis methods were employed to analyze structural response produced by either prescribed transient loads or fragment impact. For the latter category, two time-wise step-by-step analysis procedures were devised to predict the structural responses resulting from a succession of fragment impacts: the collision force method (CFM) which utilizes an approximate prediction of the force applied to the attacked structure during fragment impact, and the collision imparted velocity method (CIVM) in which the impact-induced velocity increment acquired by a region of the impacted structure near the impact point is computed. The merits and limitations of these approaches are discussed. For the analysis of 3-d responses of C/D structures, only the CIVM approach was investigated.

  13. Self-assembly of 2D sandwich-structured MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/graphene composites for high-performance lithium storage

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Songmei Wang, Bo; Li, Bin; Liu, Jianhua; Yu, Mei; Wu, Xiaoyu

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • MFO/GN composites were synthesized by a facile in situ solvothermal approach. • The MFO microspheres are sandwiched between the graphene layers. • Each MFO microsphere is an interstitial cluster of nanoparticles. • The MFO/GN electrode exhibits an enhanced cyclability for Li-ion batteries anodes. - Abstract: In this study, two-dimensional (2D) sandwich-structured MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/graphene (MFO/GN) composites are synthesized by a facile in situ solvothermal approach, using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as cationic surfactant. As a consequence, the nanocomposites of MFO/GN self-assembled into a 2D sandwich structure, in which the interstitial cluster structure of microsphere-type MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} is sandwiched between the graphene layers. This special structure of the MFO/GN composites used as anodes for lithium-ion batteries will be favorable for the maximum accessible surface of electroactive materials, fast diffusion of lithium ions and migration of electron, and elastomeric space to accommodate volume changes during the discharge–charge processes. The as-synthesized MFO/GN composites deliver a high specific reversible capacity of 987.95 mA h g{sup −1} at a current density of 200 mA g{sup −1}, a good capacity retention of 69.27% after 80 cycles and excellent rate performance for lithium storage.

  14. Electronic structures and optical properties of two-dimensional ScN and YN nanosheets

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jian; Li, Xi-Bo; Zhang, Hui; Yin, Wen-Jin; Liu, Li-Min E-mail: limin.liu@csrc.ac.cn; Zhang, Hai-Bin; Peng, Ping E-mail: limin.liu@csrc.ac.cn

    2014-03-07

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials exhibit different electronic properties than their bulk materials. Here, we present a systematic study of 2D tetragonal materials of ScN and YN using density functional theory calculations. Several thermodynamically stable 2D tetragonal structures were determined, and such novel tetragonal structures have good electronic and optical properties. Both bulk ScN and YN are indirect band gap semiconductors while the electronic structures of 2D ScN and YN are indirect gap semiconductors, with band gaps of 0.62–2.21 eV. The calculated optical spectra suggest that 2D tetragonal ScN and YN nanosheets have high visible light absorption efficiency. These electronic properties indicate that 2D ScN and YN have great potential for applications in photovoltaics and photocatalysis.

  15. Buckling in 2D periodic, soft and porous structures: effect of pore shape and lattice pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Sicong; Bertoldi, Katia; Shim, Jongmin; Overvelde, Johannes T. B.; Kang, Sung Hoon

    2013-03-01

    Adaptive structures allowing dramatic shape changes offer unique opportunities for the design of responsive and reconfigurable devices. Traditional morphing and foldable structures with stiff structural members and mechanical joints remains a challenge in manufacturing at small length scales. Soft structures where the folding mechanisms are induced by a mechanical instability represent a new class of novel adaptive materials which can be easily manufactured over a wide range of length scales. More specifically, soft porous structures with deliberately designed patterns can significantly change their architecture in response to diverse stimuli, opening avenues for reconfigurable devices that change their shapes to respond to their environment. While so far only two-dimensional periodic porous structures with circular holes arranged on a square or triangular lattice have been investigated, here we investigate both numerically and experimentally the effects of pore shape and lattice pattern on the macroscopic properties of the structures. Our results show that both the pore shape and lattice pattern can be used to effectively design desired materials and pave the way for the development of a new class of soft, active and reconfigurable devices over a wide range of length scales.

  16. Four divalent transition metal carboxyarylphosphonate compounds: Hydrothermal synthesis, structural chemistry and generalized 2D FTIR correlation spectroscopy studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Ran; Chai, Xiaochuan; Mei, Hongxin; Zhang, Hanhui; Chen, Yiping; Sun, Yanqiong

    2010-07-01

    Four divalent transition metal carboxyarylphosphonates, [Ni(4,4'-bipy)H 2L 1(HL 1) 2(H 2O) 2]·2H 2O 1, [Ni 2(4,4'-bipy)(L 2)(OH)(H 2O) 2]·3H 2O 2, Mn(phen) 2(H 2L 1) 23 and Mn(phen)(HL 2) 4 (H 3L 1= p-H 2O 3PCH 2-C 6H 4-COOH, H 3L 2= m-H 2O 3PCH 2-C 6H 4-COOH, 4,4'-bipy=4,4'-bipyridine, phen=1,10-phenanthroline) were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. 1 features 1D linear chains built from Ni(II) ions bridging 4,4'-bipy. In 2, neighboring Ni 4 cluster units are connected by pairs of H 3L 2 ligands to form 1D double-crankshaft chains, which are interconnected by pairs of 4,4'-bipy into 2D sheets. 3 exhibits 2D supramolecular layers via the R 22(8) ringed hydrogen bonding units. 4 has 1D ladderlike chains, in which the 4-membered rings are cross-linked by the organic moieties of the H 3L 2 ligands. Additionally, 2D FTIR correlation analysis is applied with thermal and magnetic perturbation to clarify the structural changes of functional groups from H 3L 1 and H 3L 2 ligands in the compounds more efficiently.

  17. Influence of cell wall shape and density on the mechanical behaviour of 2D foam structures

    SciTech Connect

    Harders, Harald . E-mail: h.harders@tu-bs.de; Hupfer, Knut; Roesler, Joachim

    2005-03-01

    This article describes simulations on the influence of the cell wall shape as well as the density on the elastic stiffness of regular and stochastic honeycomb structures. Starting from an equation by Gibson and Ashby for regular honeycombs, an analytical model is developed that describes the influence of different cell wall shapes on the elastic response of these structures. In addition, this analytical model is modified in order to use free parameters that can be fitted to finite element simulation results of stochastic Voronoi honeycomb structures. The model describes the results well. Young's modulus depends strongly on the cell wall shape, achieving a maximum for slightly concave shapes.

  18. 2D and 3D reconstruction and geomechanical characterization of kilometre-scale complex folded structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanchi, Andrea; Agliardi, Federico; Crosta, Giovanni B.; Villa, Alberto; Bistacchi, Andrea; Iudica, Gaetano

    2015-04-01

    The geometrical, structural and geomechanical characterization of large-scale folded structures in sedimentary rocks is an important issue for different geological and geo-hazard applications (e.g. hydrocarbon and geothermal reservoir exploitation, natural rock slope stability, mining, and tunnelling). Fold geometry controls topography and the spatial distribution of rock types with different strength and permeability. Fold-related fracture systems condition the fracture intensity, degree of freedom, and overall strength of rock masses. Nevertheless, scale issues and limited accessibility or partial exposure of structures often hamper a complete characterization of these complex structures. During the last years, advances in remote survey techniques as terrestrial Lidar (TLS) allowed significant improvements in the geometrical and geological characterization of large or inaccessible outcrops. However, sound methods relating structures to rock mass geomechanical properties are yet to be developed. Here we present results obtained by integrating remote survey and field assessment techniques to characterize a folded sedimentary succession exposed in unreachable vertical rock walls. The study area is located in the frontal part of the Southern Alps near Bergamo, Italy. We analysed large-scale detachment folds developed in the Upper Triassic sedimentary cover in the Zu Limestone. Folds are parallel and disharmonic, with regular wavelengths and amplitudes of about 200-250 m. We used a Riegl VZ-1000 long-range laser scanner to obtain points clouds with nominal spacings between 5 cm and 20 cm from 9 scan positions characterized by range between 350 m and 1300 m. We fixed shadowing and occlusion effects related to fold structure exposure by filling point clouds with data collected by terrestrial digital photogrammetry (TDP). In addition, we carried out field surveys of fold-related brittle structures and their geomechanical attributes at key locations. We classified cloud

  19. Positron 2D-ACAR experiments and electron-positron momentum density in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x}

    SciTech Connect

    Smedskjaer, L.C.; Welp, U.; Fang, Y.; Bailey, K.G.; Bansil, A.

    1991-12-01

    We discuss positron annihilation (2D-ACAR) measurements in the C- projection on an untwinned metallic single crystal of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} as a function of temperature, for five temperatures ranging from 30K to 300K. The measured 2D-ACAR intensities are interpreted in terms of the electron-positron momentum density obtained within the KKR-band theory framework. The temperature dependence of the 2D-ACAR spectra is used to extract a ``background corrected`` experimental spectrum which is in remarkable accord with the corresponding band theory predictions, and displays in particular clear signatures of the electron ridge Fermi surface.

  20. Positron 2D-ACAR experiments and electron-positron momentum density in YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7-x

    SciTech Connect

    Smedskjaer, L.C.; Welp, U.; Fang, Y.; Bailey, K.G. ); Bansil, A. . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-12-01

    We discuss positron annihilation (2D-ACAR) measurements in the C- projection on an untwinned metallic single crystal of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} as a function of temperature, for five temperatures ranging from 30K to 300K. The measured 2D-ACAR intensities are interpreted in terms of the electron-positron momentum density obtained within the KKR-band theory framework. The temperature dependence of the 2D-ACAR spectra is used to extract a background corrected'' experimental spectrum which is in remarkable accord with the corresponding band theory predictions, and displays in particular clear signatures of the electron ridge Fermi surface.

  1. Computational Amide I 2D IR Spectroscopy as a Probe of Protein Structure and Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Reppert, Mike; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2016-05-27

    Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy of amide I vibrations is increasingly being used to study the structure and dynamics of proteins and peptides. Amide I, a primarily carbonyl stretching vibration of the protein backbone, provides information on secondary structures as a result of vibrational couplings and on hydrogen-bonding contacts when isotope labeling is used to isolate specific sites. In parallel with experiments, computational models of amide I spectra that use atomistic structures from molecular dynamics simulations have evolved to calculate experimental spectra. Mixed quantum-classical models use spectroscopic maps to translate the structural information into a quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian for the spectroscopically observed vibrations. This allows one to model the spectroscopy of large proteins, disordered states, and protein conformational dynamics. With improvements in amide I models, quantitative modeling of time-dependent structural ensembles and of direct feedback between experiments and simulations is possible. We review the advances in developing these models, their theoretical basis, and current and future applications. PMID:27023758

  2. Learning the 3-D structure of objects from 2-D views depends on shape, not format

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Moqian; Yamins, Daniel; Grill-Spector, Kalanit

    2016-01-01

    Humans can learn to recognize new objects just from observing example views. However, it is unknown what structural information enables this learning. To address this question, we manipulated the amount of structural information given to subjects during unsupervised learning by varying the format of the trained views. We then tested how format affected participants' ability to discriminate similar objects across views that were rotated 90° apart. We found that, after training, participants' performance increased and generalized to new views in the same format. Surprisingly, the improvement was similar across line drawings, shape from shading, and shape from shading + stereo even though the latter two formats provide richer depth information compared to line drawings. In contrast, participants' improvement was significantly lower when training used silhouettes, suggesting that silhouettes do not have enough information to generate a robust 3-D structure. To test whether the learned object representations were format-specific or format-invariant, we examined if learning novel objects from example views transfers across formats. We found that learning objects from example line drawings transferred to shape from shading and vice versa. These results have important implications for theories of object recognition because they suggest that (a) learning the 3-D structure of objects does not require rich structural cues during training as long as shape information of internal and external features is provided and (b) learning generates shape-based object representations independent of the training format. PMID:27153196

  3. Computational Amide I 2D IR Spectroscopy as a Probe of Protein Structure and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reppert, Mike; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy of amide I vibrations is increasingly being used to study the structure and dynamics of proteins and peptides. Amide I, a primarily carbonyl stretching vibration of the protein backbone, provides information on secondary structures as a result of vibrational couplings and on hydrogen-bonding contacts when isotope labeling is used to isolate specific sites. In parallel with experiments, computational models of amide I spectra that use atomistic structures from molecular dynamics simulations have evolved to calculate experimental spectra. Mixed quantum-classical models use spectroscopic maps to translate the structural information into a quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian for the spectroscopically observed vibrations. This allows one to model the spectroscopy of large proteins, disordered states, and protein conformational dynamics. With improvements in amide I models, quantitative modeling of time-dependent structural ensembles and of direct feedback between experiments and simulations is possible. We review the advances in developing these models, their theoretical basis, and current and future applications.

  4. Learning the 3-D structure of objects from 2-D views depends on shape, not format.

    PubMed

    Tian, Moqian; Yamins, Daniel; Grill-Spector, Kalanit

    2016-05-01

    Humans can learn to recognize new objects just from observing example views. However, it is unknown what structural information enables this learning. To address this question, we manipulated the amount of structural information given to subjects during unsupervised learning by varying the format of the trained views. We then tested how format affected participants' ability to discriminate similar objects across views that were rotated 90° apart. We found that, after training, participants' performance increased and generalized to new views in the same format. Surprisingly, the improvement was similar across line drawings, shape from shading, and shape from shading + stereo even though the latter two formats provide richer depth information compared to line drawings. In contrast, participants' improvement was significantly lower when training used silhouettes, suggesting that silhouettes do not have enough information to generate a robust 3-D structure. To test whether the learned object representations were format-specific or format-invariant, we examined if learning novel objects from example views transfers across formats. We found that learning objects from example line drawings transferred to shape from shading and vice versa. These results have important implications for theories of object recognition because they suggest that (a) learning the 3-D structure of objects does not require rich structural cues during training as long as shape information of internal and external features is provided and (b) learning generates shape-based object representations independent of the training format. PMID:27153196

  5. Formation of 2D nanoparticles with block structure in simultaneous electric explosion of conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Kryzhevich, Dmitrij S. E-mail: kost@ispms.ru; Zolnikov, Konstantin P. E-mail: kost@ispms.ru; Abdrashitov, Andrei V.; Lerner, Marat I.; Psakhie, Sergey G.

    2014-11-14

    A molecular dynamics simulation of nanoparticle formation in simultaneous electric explosion of conductors is performed. Interatomic interaction is described using potentials calculated in the framework of the embedded atom method. High-rate heating results in failure of the conductors with the formation of nanoparticles. The influence of the heating rate, temperature distribution over the specimen cross-section and the distance between simultaneously exploded conductors on the structure of formed nanoparticles is studied. The calculation results show that the electric explosion of conductors allows the formation of nanoparticles with block structure.

  6. Structural Disorder of Folded Proteins: Isotope-Edited 2D IR Spectroscopy and Markov State Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Baiz, Carlos R.; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    The conformational heterogeneity of the N-terminal domain of the ribosomal protein L9 (NTL91-39) in its folded state is investigated using isotope-edited two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy. Backbone carbonyls are isotope-labeled (13C=18O) at five selected positions (V3, V9, V9G13, G16, and G24) to provide a set of localized spectroscopic probes of the structure and solvent exposure at these positions. Structural interpretation of the amide I line shapes is enabled by spectral simulations carried out on structures extracted from a recent Markov state model. The V3 label spectrum indicates that the β-sheet contacts between strands I and II are well folded with minimal disorder. The V9 and V9G13 label spectra, which directly probe the hydrogen-bond contacts across the β-turn, show significant disorder, indicating that molecular dynamics simulations tend to overstabilize ideally folded β-turn structures in NTL91-39. In addition, G24-label spectra provide evidence for a partially disordered α-helix backbone that participates in hydrogen bonding with the surrounding water. PMID:25863066

  7. Pores of the toxin FraC assemble into 2D hexagonal clusters in both crystal structures and model membranes.

    PubMed

    Mechaly, Ariel E; Bellomio, Augusto; Morante, Koldo; Agirre, Jon; Gil-Cartón, David; Valle, Mikel; González-Mañas, Juan Manuel; Guérin, Diego M A

    2012-11-01

    The recent high-resolution structure of the toxin FraC derived from the sea anemone Actinia fragacea has provided new insight into the mechanism of pore formation by actinoporins. In this work, we report two new crystal forms of FraC in its oligomeric prepore conformation. Together with the previously reported structure, these two new structures reveal that ring-like nonamers of the toxin assemble into compact two-dimensional hexagonal arrays. This supramolecular organization is maintained in different relative orientations adopted by the oligomers within the crystal layers. Analyses of the aggregation of FraC pores in both planar and curved (vesicles) model membranes show similar 2D hexagonal arrangements. Our observations support a model in which hexagonal pore-packing is a clustering mechanism that maximizes toxin-driven membrane damage in the target cell. PMID:22728830

  8. Tuning the Structural Color of a 2D Photonic Crystal Using a Bowl-like Nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Umh, Ha Nee; Yu, Sungju; Kim, Yong Hwa; Lee, Su Young; Yi, Jongheop

    2016-06-22

    Structural colors of the ordered photonic nanostructures are widely used as an effective platform for manipulating the propagation of light. Although several approaches have been explored in attempts to mimic the structural colors, improving the reproducibility, mechanical stability, and the economic feasibility of sophisticated photonic crystals prepared by complicated processes continues to pose a challenge. In this study, we report on an alternative, simple method for fabricating a tunable photonic crystal at room temperature. A bowl-like nanostructure of TiO2 was periodically arranged on a thin Ti sheet through a two-step anodization process where its diameters were systemically controlled by changing the applied voltage. Consequently, they displayed a broad color distribution, ranging from red to indigo, and the principal reason for color generation followed the Bragg diffraction theory. This noncolorant method was capable of reproducing a Mondrian painting on a centimeter scale without the need to employ complex architectures, where the generated structural colors were highly stable under mechanical or chemical influence. Such a color printing technique represents a potentially promising platform for practical applications for anticounterfeit trademarks, wearable sensors, and displays. PMID:27245939

  9. Reverse modeling of 2D and 3D diapiric salt structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, N.; Kaus, B.

    2013-12-01

    Mechanical forward modeling of salt diapirs formed by two different processes (differential loading and buoyancy driven) has been widely performed with numerical codes in many studies, whereas works focusing on the dynamic retro-deformation of such structures remain scarce. Buoyancy driven diapirs, in which the density difference between salt and overburden induces upward motion of salt, have been successfully retro-deformed in two and three dimensions using simple rheologies for the salt and overburden (e.g., Kaus & Podladchikov 2001). However, retro-deformation of down-building diapirs (syndepositional process in which salt structures grow while sediments are being deposited) using mechanical codes has only been done in two dimensions (e.g., Ismael-Zadeh et al. 2001), even though the importance of three-dimensionality in salt diapirism is accepted. We have used the two-dimensional visco-elasto-plastic finite element code MILAMIN_VEP to perform both forward and backward simulations and to check the validity of a reversed time step method (Kaus & Podladchikov 2001 and Ismael-Zadeh et al. 2001) for a wide range of parameters, variable sedimentation rates, and for non-linear rheologies. Forward simulations are run until the salt layer is exhausted and then a reverse time step is applied in order to retro-deform the model. Down-building process was mimicked using a fast-erosion condition at the surface, which keeps it flat and redistributes material at every time step. Initially, we have tested our method by retro-deforming salt structures that develop from an interface that is sinusoidally perturbed. More realistic simulations were performed by starting with randomly perturbed salt interface and using different rheological parameters for the salt and the overburden as well as variable sedimentation rates. Once the method has been proved successful for different parameters in two dimensions, the finite differences parallel code LaMEM has also been used to dynamically

  10. Investigation of 2D laterally dispersive photonic crystal structures : LDRD 33602 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Subramania,Ganapathi Subramanian; Vawter, Gregory Allen; Wendt, Joel Robert; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Guo, Junpeng; Peters, David William; Hadley, G. Ronald

    2003-12-01

    Artificially structured photonic lattice materials are commonly investigated for their unique ability to block and guide light. However, an exciting aspect of photonic lattices which has received relatively little attention is the extremely high refractive index dispersion within the range of frequencies capable of propagating within the photonic lattice material. In fact, it has been proposed that a negative refractive index may be realized with the correct photonic lattice configuration. This report summarizes our investigation, both numerically and experimentally, into the design and performance of such photonic lattice materials intended to optimize the dispersion of refractive index in order to realize new classes of photonic devices.

  11. Quasi 2D electronic states with high spin-polarization in centrosymmetric MoS2 bulk crystals

    PubMed Central

    Gehlmann, Mathias; Aguilera, Irene; Bihlmayer, Gustav; Młyńczak, Ewa; Eschbach, Markus; Döring, Sven; Gospodarič, Pika; Cramm, Stefan; Kardynał, Beata; Plucinski, Lukasz; Blügel, Stefan; Schneider, Claus M.

    2016-01-01

    Time reversal dictates that nonmagnetic, centrosymmetric crystals cannot be spin-polarized as a whole. However, it has been recently shown that the electronic structure in these crystals can in fact show regions of high spin-polarization, as long as it is probed locally in real and in reciprocal space. In this article we present the first observation of this type of compensated polarization in MoS2 bulk crystals. Using spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we directly observed a spin-polarization of more than 65% for distinct valleys in the electronic band structure. By additionally evaluating the probing depth of our method, we find that these valence band states at the point in the Brillouin zone are close to fully polarized for the individual atomic trilayers of MoS2, which is confirmed by our density functional theory calculations. Furthermore, we show that this spin-layer locking leads to the observation of highly spin-polarized bands in ARPES since these states are almost completely confined within two dimensions. Our findings prove that these highly desired properties of MoS2 can be accessed without thinning it down to the monolayer limit. PMID:27245646

  12. Quasi 2D electronic states with high spin-polarization in centrosymmetric MoS2 bulk crystals.

    PubMed

    Gehlmann, Mathias; Aguilera, Irene; Bihlmayer, Gustav; Młyńczak, Ewa; Eschbach, Markus; Döring, Sven; Gospodarič, Pika; Cramm, Stefan; Kardynał, Beata; Plucinski, Lukasz; Blügel, Stefan; Schneider, Claus M

    2016-01-01

    Time reversal dictates that nonmagnetic, centrosymmetric crystals cannot be spin-polarized as a whole. However, it has been recently shown that the electronic structure in these crystals can in fact show regions of high spin-polarization, as long as it is probed locally in real and in reciprocal space. In this article we present the first observation of this type of compensated polarization in MoS2 bulk crystals. Using spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we directly observed a spin-polarization of more than 65% for distinct valleys in the electronic band structure. By additionally evaluating the probing depth of our method, we find that these valence band states at the point in the Brillouin zone are close to fully polarized for the individual atomic trilayers of MoS2, which is confirmed by our density functional theory calculations. Furthermore, we show that this spin-layer locking leads to the observation of highly spin-polarized bands in ARPES since these states are almost completely confined within two dimensions. Our findings prove that these highly desired properties of MoS2 can be accessed without thinning it down to the monolayer limit. PMID:27245646

  13. Quasi 2D electronic states with high spin-polarization in centrosymmetric MoS2 bulk crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehlmann, Mathias; Aguilera, Irene; Bihlmayer, Gustav; Młyńczak, Ewa; Eschbach, Markus; Döring, Sven; Gospodarič, Pika; Cramm, Stefan; Kardynał, Beata; Plucinski, Lukasz; Blügel, Stefan; Schneider, Claus M.

    2016-06-01

    Time reversal dictates that nonmagnetic, centrosymmetric crystals cannot be spin-polarized as a whole. However, it has been recently shown that the electronic structure in these crystals can in fact show regions of high spin-polarization, as long as it is probed locally in real and in reciprocal space. In this article we present the first observation of this type of compensated polarization in MoS2 bulk crystals. Using spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we directly observed a spin-polarization of more than 65% for distinct valleys in the electronic band structure. By additionally evaluating the probing depth of our method, we find that these valence band states at the point in the Brillouin zone are close to fully polarized for the individual atomic trilayers of MoS2, which is confirmed by our density functional theory calculations. Furthermore, we show that this spin-layer locking leads to the observation of highly spin-polarized bands in ARPES since these states are almost completely confined within two dimensions. Our findings prove that these highly desired properties of MoS2 can be accessed without thinning it down to the monolayer limit.

  14. Two novel 2D lanthanide sulfate frameworks: Syntheses, structures, and luminescence properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhong-Yi; Zhang, Chi; Zhang, Fu-Li; Zhang, Fu-Qiang; Zhang, Xiang-Fei; Li, Su-Zhi; Cao, Guang-Xiu; Zhai, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Two novel lanthanide-sulfate compounds, [Ln2(SO4)3(H2O)8] (Ln = Tb (1) and Dy (2)), have been synthesized under hydrothermal reactions. X-ray crystal structure analyses reveal that 1 and 2 are isomorphous and crystallize in monoclinic C2/c pace group, showing a layered structure. The layers bear a rare quasi-honeycomb metal arrangement, which is fastened by μ3 = η1:η1:η1 and μ2 = η1:η1 sulfates. If assigning the μ3 = η1:η1:η1 sulfate as a 3-connected node and the Ln3+ ion as a 4-connected node, the network can be rationalized as a binodal (3,4)-connected V2O5 topology with a Schäfli symbol of (42·63·8) (42·6). In addition, the infrared, thermogravimetric analysis and luminescent properties were also studied. Complexes 1 and 2 exhibit outstanding thermal stability and characteristic terbium and dysprosium luminescence.

  15. ADDENDUM: Addendum to `On the singularity structure of the 2D Ising model susceptibility'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickel, Bernie

    2000-03-01

    A remarkable product formula first derived by Palmer and Tracy (1981 Adv. Appl. Math. 2 329) for the integrand of the two-dimensional Ising model susceptibility expansion coefficients icons/Journals/Common/chi" ALT="chi" ALIGN="TOP"/> (2n ) for temperatures T less than the critical T c is shown to apply equally for icons/Journals/Common/chi" ALT="chi" ALIGN="TOP"/> (2n +1) for T >T c and agrees with formulae derived by Yamada (1984 Prog. Theor. Phys. 71 1416). This new representation simplifies the derivation of the results in the original paper of this title (1999 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 32 3889) to the extent that the leading series behaviour and the singularity structure can be deduced almost by inspection. The derivation of series is also simplified and I show, using extended series and knowledge of the singularity structure, that there is now unambiguous evidence for correction to scaling terms in the susceptibility beyond those inferred from a nonlinear scaling field analysis.

  16. Morphometric structural diversity of a natural armor assembly investigated by 2D continuum strain analysis.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Swati; Song, Juha; Li, Yaning; Boyce, Mary C; Ortiz, Christine

    2015-12-01

    Many armored fish scale assemblies use geometric heterogeneity of subunits as a design parameter to provide tailored biomechanical flexibility while maintaining protection from external penetrative threats. This study analyzes the spatially varying shape of individual ganoid scales as a structural element in a biological system, the exoskeleton of the armored fish Polypterus senegalus (bichir). X-ray microcomputed tomography is used to generate digital 3D reconstructions of the mineralized scales. Landmark-based geometric morphometrics is used to measure the geometric variation among scales and to define a set of geometric parameters to describe shape variation. A formalism using continuum mechanical strain analysis is developed to quantify the spatial geometry change of the scales and illustrate the mechanisms of shape morphing between scales. Five scale geometry variants are defined (average, anterior, tail, ventral, and pectoral fin) and their functional implications are discussed in terms of the interscale mobility mechanisms that enable flexibility within the exoskeleton. The results suggest that shape variation in materials design, inspired by structural biological materials, can allow for tunable behavior in flexible composites made of segmented scale assemblies to achieve enhanced user mobility, custom fit, and flexibility around joints for a variety of protective applications. PMID:26481418

  17. Scaling Analysis of Ocean Surface Turbulent Heterogeneities from Satellite Remote Sensing: Use of 2D Structure Functions

    PubMed Central

    Renosh, P. R.; Schmitt, Francois G.; Loisel, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing observations allow the ocean surface to be sampled synoptically over large spatio-temporal scales. The images provided from visible and thermal infrared satellite observations are widely used in physical, biological, and ecological oceanography. The present work proposes a method to understand the multi-scaling properties of satellite products such as the Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), and the Sea Surface Temperature (SST), rarely studied. The specific objectives of this study are to show how the small scale heterogeneities of satellite images can be characterised using tools borrowed from the fields of turbulence. For that purpose, we show how the structure function, which is classically used in the frame of scaling time series analysis, can be used also in 2D. The main advantage of this method is that it can be applied to process images which have missing data. Based on both simulated and real images, we demonstrate that coarse-graining (CG) of a gradient modulus transform of the original image does not provide correct scaling exponents. We show, using a fractional Brownian simulation in 2D, that the structure function (SF) can be used with randomly sampled couple of points, and verify that 1 million of couple of points provides enough statistics. PMID:26017551

  18. Scaling Analysis of Ocean Surface Turbulent Heterogeneities from Satellite Remote Sensing: Use of 2D Structure Functions.

    PubMed

    Renosh, P R; Schmitt, Francois G; Loisel, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing observations allow the ocean surface to be sampled synoptically over large spatio-temporal scales. The images provided from visible and thermal infrared satellite observations are widely used in physical, biological, and ecological oceanography. The present work proposes a method to understand the multi-scaling properties of satellite products such as the Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), and the Sea Surface Temperature (SST), rarely studied. The specific objectives of this study are to show how the small scale heterogeneities of satellite images can be characterised using tools borrowed from the fields of turbulence. For that purpose, we show how the structure function, which is classically used in the frame of scaling time series analysis, can be used also in 2D. The main advantage of this method is that it can be applied to process images which have missing data. Based on both simulated and real images, we demonstrate that coarse-graining (CG) of a gradient modulus transform of the original image does not provide correct scaling exponents. We show, using a fractional Brownian simulation in 2D, that the structure function (SF) can be used with randomly sampled couple of points, and verify that 1 million of couple of points provides enough statistics. PMID:26017551

  19. X-ray study of femtosecond structural dynamics in the 2D charge density wave compound 1T-TaS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laulhé, C.; Cario, L.; Corraze, B.; Janod, E.; Huber, T.; Lantz, G.; Boulfaat, S.; Ferrer, A.; Mariager, S. O.; Johnson, J. A.; Grübel, S.; Lübcke, A.; Ingold, G.; Beaud, P.; Johnson, S. L.; Ravy, S.

    2015-03-01

    1T-TaS2 is a 2D metallic compound which undergoes a series of electronically driven phase transitions toward charge density wave and Mott phases. Its intricate electron-phonon interactions and electron-electron correlations have been promising peculiar out-of-equilibrium dynamics. In this paper, we provide the first direct information on the atomic structure response to an ultra-fast infrared laser pulse in the commensurate phase of 1T-TaS2, by using femtosecond time-resolved X-ray diffraction. We show that ultra-fast excitation with near-infrared photons drives a displacive excitation of the amplitude mode of the commensurate charge density wave. About 3 ps after laser excitation, the system reaches a new, photo-induced state that is maintained for at least 10 ps. We give evidence that this long-lived state exhibits the same structural modulation as in the thermodynamically stable commensurate phase, with a large correlation length. Only the average amplitude of the modulation is found to decrease. We propose that the long-lived state is formed from the commensurate phase by reducing the modulation amplitude on few superlattice nodes. The underlying mechanism proposed is the annihilation of self-trapped polarons.

  20. Structure elucidation of organic compounds from natural sources using 1D and 2D NMR techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topcu, Gulacti; Ulubelen, Ayhan

    2007-05-01

    In our continuing studies on Lamiaceae family plants including Salvia, Teucrium, Ajuga, Sideritis, Nepeta and Lavandula growing in Anatolia, many terpenoids, consisting of over 50 distinct triterpenoids and steroids, and over 200 diterpenoids, several sesterterpenoids and sesquiterpenoids along with many flavonoids and other phenolic compounds have been isolated. For Salvia species abietanes, for Teucrium and Ajuga species neo-clerodanes for Sideritis species ent-kaurane diterpenes are characteristic while nepetalactones are specific for Nepeta species. In this review article, only some interesting and different type of skeleton having constituents, namely rearranged, nor- or rare diterpenes, isolated from these species will be presented. For structure elucidation of these natural diterpenoids intensive one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques ( 1H, 13C, APT, DEPT, NOE/NOESY, 1H- 1H COSY, HETCOR, COLOC, HMQC/HSQC, HMBC, SINEPT) were used besides mass and some other spectroscopic methods.

  1. Algorithms for the automatic generation of 2-D structured multi-block grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenfeld, Thilo; Weinerfelt, Per; Jenssen, Carl B.

    1995-01-01

    Two different approaches to the fully automatic generation of structured multi-block grids in two dimensions are presented. The work aims to simplify the user interactivity necessary for the definition of a multiple block grid topology. The first approach is based on an advancing front method commonly used for the generation of unstructured grids. The original algorithm has been modified toward the generation of large quadrilateral elements. The second method is based on the divide-and-conquer paradigm with the global domain recursively partitioned into sub-domains. For either method each of the resulting blocks is then meshed using transfinite interpolation and elliptic smoothing. The applicability of these methods to practical problems is demonstrated for typical geometries of fluid dynamics.

  2. Four divalent transition metal carboxyarylphosphonate compounds: Hydrothermal synthesis, structural chemistry and generalized 2D FTIR correlation spectroscopy studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lei Ran; Chai Xiaochuan; Mei Hongxin; Zhang Hanhui; Chen Yiping; Sun Yanqiong

    2010-07-15

    Four divalent transition metal carboxyarylphosphonates, [Ni(4,4'-bipy)H{sub 2}L{sup 1}(HL{sup 1}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].2H{sub 2}O 1, [Ni{sub 2}(4,4'-bipy)(L{sup 2})(OH)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].3H{sub 2}O 2, Mn(phen){sub 2}(H{sub 2}L{sup 1}){sub 2}3 and Mn(phen)(HL{sup 2}) 4 (H{sub 3}L{sup 1}=p-H{sub 2}O{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-COOH, H{sub 3}L{sup 2}=m-H{sub 2}O{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-COOH, 4,4'-bipy=4,4'-bipyridine, phen=1,10-phenanthroline) were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. 1 features 1D linear chains built from Ni(II) ions bridging 4,4'-bipy. In 2, neighboring Ni{sub 4} cluster units are connected by pairs of H{sub 3}L{sup 2} ligands to form 1D double-crankshaft chains, which are interconnected by pairs of 4,4'-bipy into 2D sheets. 3 exhibits 2D supramolecular layers via the R{sub 2}{sup 2}(8) ringed hydrogen bonding units. 4 has 1D ladderlike chains, in which the 4-membered rings are cross-linked by the organic moieties of the H{sub 3}L{sup 2} ligands. Additionally, 2D FTIR correlation analysis is applied with thermal and magnetic perturbation to clarify the structural changes of functional groups from H{sub 3}L{sup 1} and H{sub 3}L{sup 2} ligands in the compounds more efficiently. - Graphical abstract: A series of divalent transition metal carboxyarylphosphonate compounds were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. The figure displays 2D sheet structure with large windows in compound 2.

  3. Unusual Domain Structure and Filamentary Superfluidity for 2D Hard-Core Bosons in Insulating Charge-Ordered Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, Yu. D.; Moskvin, A. S.; Rybakov, F. N.; Borisov, A. B.

    2016-01-01

    We made use of a special algorithm for compute unified device architecture for NVIDIA graphics cards, a nonlinear conjugate-gradient method to minimize energy functional, and Monte-Carlo technique to directly observe the forming of the ground state configuration for the 2D hard-core bosons by lowering the temperature and its evolution with deviation away from half-filling. The novel technique allowed us to examine earlier implications and uncover novel features of the phase transitions, in particular, look upon the nucleation of the odd domain structure, emergence of filamentary superfluidity nucleated at the antiphase domain walls of the charge-ordered phase, and nucleation and evolution of different topological structures.

  4. Bifurcations of edge states—topologically protected and non-protected—in continuous 2D honeycomb structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fefferman, C. L.; Lee-Thorp, J. P.; Weinstein, M. I.

    2016-03-01

    Edge states are time-harmonic solutions to energy-conserving wave equations, which are propagating parallel to a line-defect or ‘edge’ and are localized transverse to it. This paper summarizes and extends the authors’ work on the bifurcation of topologically protected edge states in continuous two-dimensional (2D) honeycomb structures. We consider a family of Schrödinger Hamiltonians consisting of a bulk honeycomb potential and a perturbing edge potential. The edge potential interpolates between two different periodic structures via a domain wall. We begin by reviewing our recent bifurcation theory of edge states for continuous 2D honeycomb structures (http://arxiv.org/abs/1506.06111). The topologically protected edge state bifurcation is seeded by the zero-energy eigenstate of a one-dimensional Dirac operator. We contrast these protected bifurcations with (more common) non-protected bifurcations from spectral band edges, which are induced by bound states of an effective Schrödinger operator. Numerical simulations for honeycomb structures of varying contrasts and ‘rational edges’ (zigzag, armchair and others), support the following scenario: (a) for low contrast, under a sign condition on a distinguished Fourier coefficient of the bulk honeycomb potential, there exist topologically protected edge states localized transverse to zigzag edges. Otherwise, and for general edges, we expect long lived edge quasi-modes which slowly leak energy into the bulk. (b) For an arbitrary rational edge, there is a threshold in the medium-contrast (depending on the choice of edge) above which there exist topologically protected edge states. In the special case of the armchair edge, there are two families of protected edge states; for each parallel quasimomentum (the quantum number associated with translation invariance) there are edge states which propagate in opposite directions along the armchair edge.

  5. Time-structuring in the evolution of 2D nanopatterns through interactions with substrate.

    PubMed

    Choudhuri, Madhumita; Datta, Alokmay

    2016-07-21

    intermediate length scale, in almost all the films coinciding with the emergence of the ρ state. The growth of this sub-diffusive regime is slower for stronger FNMA and FMMA, the interactions thus acting as control parameters in dictating the time structure of the spatio-temporal patterns. PMID:27313149

  6. Synthesis of 2D/2D Structured Mesoporous Co3O4 Nanosheet/N-Doped Reduced Graphene Oxide Composites as a Highly Stable Negative Electrode for Lithium Battery Applications.

    PubMed

    Sennu, Palanichamy; Kim, Hyo Sang; An, Jae Youn; Aravindan, Vanchiappan; Lee, Yun-Sung

    2015-08-01

    Mesoporous Co3O4 nanosheets (Co3 O4 -NS) and nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (N-rGO) are synthesized by a facile hydrothermal approach, and the N-rGO/Co3O4 -NS composite is formulated through an infiltration procedure. Eventually, the obtained composites are subjected to various characterization techniques, such as XRD, Raman spectroscopy, surface area analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and TEM. The lithium-storage properties of N-rGO/Co3O4 -NS composites are evaluated in a half-cell assembly to ascertain their suitability as a negative electrode for lithium-ion battery applications. The 2D/2D nanostructured mesoporous N-rGO/Co3O4 -NS composite delivered a reversible capacity of about 1305 and 1501 mAh g(-1) at a current density of 80 mA g(-1) for the 1st and 50th cycles, respectively. Furthermore, excellent cyclability, rate capability, and capacity retention characteristics are noted for the N-rGO/Co3O4 -NS composite. This improved performance is mainly related to the existence of mesoporosity and a sheet-like 2D hierarchical morphology, which translates into extra space for lithium storage and a reduced electron pathway. Also, the presence of N-rGO and carbon shells in Co3O4 -NS should not be excluded from such exceptional performance, which serves as a reliable conductive channel for electrons and act as synergistically to accommodate volume expansion upon redox reactions. Ex-situ TEM, impedance spectroscopy, and XPS, are also conducted to corroborate the significance of the 2D morphology towards sustained lithium storage. PMID:26033848

  7. Dihydrofolate reductase: Sequential resonance assignments using 2D and 3D NMR and secondary structure determination in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, M.D.; Birdsall, B.; Jimenez-Barbero, J.; Polshakov, V.I.; McCormick, J.E.; Feeney, J.; Frenkiel, T.A.; Bauer, C.J. ); Roberts, G.C.K. )

    1991-06-25

    Three-dimensional (3D) heteronuclear NMR techniques have been used to make sequential {sup 1}H and {sup 15}H resonance assignments for most of the residues of Lactobacillus casei dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), a monomeric protein of molecular mass 18,300 Da. A uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled sample of the protein was prepared and its complex with methotrexate (MTX) studied by 3D {sup 15}N/{sup 1}H nuclear Overhauserheteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (NOESY-HMQC), Harmann-Hahn-heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (HOHAHA-HMQC), and HMQC-NOESY-HMQC experiments. These experiments overcame most of the spectral overlap problems caused by chemical shift degeneracies in 2D spectra and allowed the {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H through-space and through-bond connectivities to be identified unambiguously, leading to the resonance assignments. The novel HMQC-NOESY-HMQC experiment allows NOE cross peaks to be detected between NH protons even when their {sup 1}H chemical shifts are degenerate as long as the amide {sup 15}N chemical shifts are nondegenerate. The 3D experiments, in combination with conventional 2D NOESY, COSY, and HOHAHA experiments on unlabelled and selectively deuterated DHFR, provide backbone assignments for 146 of the 162 residues and side-chain assignments for 104 residues of the protein. Data from the NOE-based experiments and identification of the slowly exchanging amide protons provide detailed information about the secondary structure of the binary complex of the protein with methotrexate.

  8. Ab Initio Based 2D Continuum Mechanics - Sensitivity Prediction for Contact Resonance Atomic Force Microscopy Based Structure Fingerprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Qing; Lange, Björn; Lopes, J. Marcelo J.; Zauscher, Stefan; Blum, Volker

    Contact resonance AFM is demonstrated as a powerful tool for mapping differences in the mechanical properties of 2D materials and heterostructures, permitting to resolve surface and subsurface structural differences of different domains. Measured contact resonance frequencies are related to the contact stiffness of the combined tip-sample system. Based on first principles predicted elastic properties and a continuum approach to model the mechanical impedance, we find contact stiffness ratios between different domains of few-layer graphene on 3C-SiC(111) in excellent agreement with experiment. We next demonstrate that the approach is able to quantitatively resolve differences between other 2D materials domains, e.g., for h-BN, MoS2 and MoO3 on graphene on SiC. We show that the combined effect of several materials parameters, especially the in-plane elastic properties and the layer thickness, determines the contact stiffness, therefore boosting the sensitivity even if the out-of-plane elastic properties are similar.

  9. MIA-QSAR: a simple 2D image-based approach for quantitative structure activity relationship analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Matheus P.; Brown, Steven D.; Martins, José A.

    2005-03-01

    An accessible and quite simple QSAR method, based on 2D image analysis, is reported. A case study is carried out in order to compare this model with a previously reported sophisticated methodology. A well known set of ( S)- N-[(1-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)methyl]-6-methoxybenzamides, compounds with affinity to the dopamine D 2 receptor subtype, was divided in 40 calibration compounds and 18 test compounds and the descriptors were generated from pixels of 2D structures of each compound, which can be drawn with aid of any appropriate program. Bilinear (conventional) PLS was utilized as the regression method and leave-one-out cross-validation was performed using the NIPALS algorithm. The good predicted Q2 value obtained for the series of test compounds (0.58), together with the similar prediction quality obtained to other data sets (nAChR ligands, HIV protease inhibitors, COX-2 inhibitors and anxiolytic agents), suggests that the model is robust and seems to be as applicable as more complex methods.

  10. The effect of electron-hole scattering on transport properties of a 2D semimetal in the HgTe quantum well

    SciTech Connect

    Entin, M. V.; Magarill, L. I.; Olshanetsky, E. B. Kvon, Z. D.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Dvoretsky, S. A.

    2013-11-15

    The influence of e-h scattering on the conductivity and magnetotransport of 2D semimetallic HgTe is studied both theoretically and experimentally. The presence of e-h scattering leads to the friction between electrons and holes resulting in a large temperature-dependent contribution to the transport coefficients. The coefficient of friction between electrons and holes is determined. The comparison of experimental data with the theory shows that the interaction between electrons and holes based on the long-range Coulomb potential strongly underestimates the e-h friction. The experimental results are in agreement with the model of strong short-range e-h interaction.

  11. PM2D code simulation of electronic dynamics and electro-magnetic fields generation by ultra-short laser pulses interaction with matter

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, I. A.; Lykov, V. A.

    1997-04-15

    The results of numerical simulation of fast electrons motion and generated electro-magnetic fields at the picosecond pulse laser interaction with flat target are presented. The calculations were performed with PM2D code, where relativistic equation of electron motion joint with Maxwell equations is solved by particle method in cells. The efficiency of fast electrons energy conversion to the transverse electromagnetic wave of picosecond duration can reach the value 10{sup -4} for the intensity of ultrashort laser pulse at the target 10{sup 16}-10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}.

  12. A hybrid wave-mode formulation for the vibro-acoustic analysis of 2D periodic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droz, C.; Zhou, C.; Ichchou, M. N.; Lainé, J.-P.

    2016-02-01

    In the framework of vibrational analysis of 2D periodic waveguides, Floquet-Bloch theorem is widely applied for the determination of wave dispersion characteristics. In this context, the Wave Finite Element Method (WFEM) combines Periodic Structure Theory (PST) with standard FE packages, enabling wave dispersion analysis of waveguides involving structurally realistic unit-cells. For such applications, the computational efficiency of the WFEM depends on the choice of the formulation and can lead to numerical issues, worsen by extensive computational cost. This paper presents a coupled wave-mode approach for the determination of wave dispersion characteristics in structurally advanced periodic structures. It combines two scales of model order reduction. At the unit-cell's scale, Component Mode Synthesis (CMS) provides the displacement field associated with local resonances of the periodic structure, while the free wave propagation is considered using a spectral problem projection on a reduced set of shape functions associated with propagating waves, thus providing considerable reduction of the computational cost. An application is provided for a bi-directionally stiffened panel and the influence of reduction parameters is discussed, as well as the robustness of the numerical results.

  13. An unambiguous identification of 2D electron gas features in the photoluminescence spectrum of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Dipankar; Sharma, T. K.

    2016-07-01

    A fast and non-destructive method for probing the true signatures of 2D electron gas (2DEG) states in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures is presented. Two broad features superimposed with interference oscillations are observed in the low temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectrum. The two features are identified as the ground and excited 2DEG states which are confirmed by comparing the PL spectra of as-grown and top barrier layer etched samples. Broad PL features disappear at a certain temperature along with the associated interference oscillations. Furthermore, the two broad PL features depicts specific temperature and excitation intensity dependencies which make them easily distinguishable from the bandedge excitonic or defect related PL features. The presence of strong interference oscillations associated with the 2DEG PL features is explained by considering the localized generation of PL signal at the AlGaN/GaN heterointerface. Finally, a large value of the polarization induced electric field of ~1.01 MV cm‑1 is reported from PL measurements for AlGaN/GaN HEMT structures. It became possible only when the true identification of 2DEG features was made possible by the proposed method.

  14. Acentric 2-D Ensembles of D-br-A Electron-Transfer Chromophores via Vectorial Orientation within Amphiphilic n-Helix Bundle Peptides for Photovoltaic Device Applications

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Jaseung; Park, Jaehong; Tronin, Andrey; Zhang, Ruili; Krishnan, Venkata; Strzalka, Joseph; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Fry, H. Christopher; Therien, Michael J.; Blasie, J. Kent

    2012-01-01

    We show that simply designed amphiphilic 4-helix bundle peptides can be utilized to vectorially-orient a linearly-extended Donor-bridge-Acceptor (D-br-A) electron transfer (ET) chromophore within its core. The bundle’s interior is shown to provide a unique solvation environment for the D-br-A assembly not accessible in conventional solvents, and thereby control the magnitudes of both light-induced ET and thermal charge recombination rate constants. The amphiphilicity of the bundle’s exterior was employed to vectorially-orient the peptide-chromophore complex at a liquid-gas interface, and its ends tailored for subsequent covalent attachment to an inorganic surface, via a “directed assembly” approach. Structural data, combined with evaluation of the excited state dynamics exhibited by these peptide-chromophore complexes, demonstrates that densely-packed, acentrically ordered 2-D monolayer ensembles of such complexes at high in-plane chromophore densities approaching 1/200Å2 offer unique potential as active layers in binary heterojucntion photovoltaic devices. PMID:22242787

  15. An Improved Analytic Signal Technique for the Depth and Structural Index from 2D Magnetic Anomaly Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Guoqing; Du, Xiaojuan

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a new inversion method for the interpretation of 2D magnetic anomaly data, which uses the combination of the analytic signal and its total gradient to estimate the depth and the nature (structural index) of an isolated magnetic source. However, our proposed method is sensitive to noise. In order to lower the effect of noise, we apply upward continuation technique to smooth the anomaly. Tests on synthetic noise-free and noise corrupted magnetic data show that the new method can successfully estimate the depth and the nature of the causative source. The practical application of the technique is applied to measured magnetic anomaly data from Jurh area, northeast China, and the inversion results are in agreement with the inversion results from Euler deconvolution of the analytic signal.

  16. Anion-induced structural transformation of a sulfate-incorporated 2D Cd(II)-organic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Li-Wei; Luo, Tzuoo-Tsair; Wang, Chih-Min; Lee, Gene-Hsiang; Peng, Shie-Ming; Liu, Yen-Hsiang; Lee, Sheng-Long; Lu, Kuang-Lieh

    2016-07-01

    A Cd(II)-organic framework {[Cd2(tpim)4(SO4)(H2O)2]·(SO4)·21H2O}n (1) was synthesized by reacting CdSO4·8/3H2O and 2,4,5-tri(4-pyridyl)imidazole (tpim) under hydrothermal conditions. A structural analysis showed that compound 1 adopts a layered structure in which the [Cd(tpim)2]n chains are linked by sulfate anions. These 2D layers are further packed into a 3D supramolecular framework via π-π interactions. The structure contains two types of SO42- anions, i.e., bridging SO42- and free SO42- anions, the latter of which are included in the large channels of the framework. Compound 1 exhibits interesting anion exchange behavior. In the presence of SCN- anions, both the bridging and free SO42- anions in 1 were completely exchanged by SCN- ligands to form a 1D species [Cd(tpim)2(SCN)2] (1A), in which the SCN- moieties function as a monodentate ligand. On the other hand, when compound 1 was ion exchanged with N3- anions in aqueous solution, the bridging SO42- moieties remained intact, and only the free guest SO42- were replaced by N3- anions. The gas adsorption behavior of the activated compound 1 was also investigated.

  17. Comparison of 2D and 3D Fourier modal methods for modeling subwavelength-structured silicon waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiecien, Pavel; Richter, Ivan; Čtyroký, Jiří

    2012-02-01

    Frequency-domain Fourier modal methods have recently evolved into efficient tools for rigorous numerical modeling of a wide class of photonic and plasmonic structures and devices. In this contribution we describe the application of our 2D and 3D in-house tools, namely aperiodic rigorous coupled wave analysis (aRCWA) and bi-directional mode expansion propagation method using harmonic expansion (BEXX), on a recently described novel type of subwavelength grating (SWG) waveguides. They are created by means of periodically interlacing silicon segments with a superstrate material with a lower refractive index. It has been shown recently, both theoretically and experimentally, that for a suitable choice of SWG parameters such as grating period and duty cycle, the structure can support low-loss guided (Bloch) mode. Its effective index, mode profile and dispersion characteristics can thus be tailored to specific needs without the necessity of changing material composition. In our methods, either complex coordinate transformation or uniaxial anisotropic perfectly matched layers have been applied as efficient absorption boundary conditions. In order to reduce the number of expansion terms needed to reach required accuracy, the adaptive spatial resolution technique has been implemented. Structural symmetries of the devices can be fully utilized to this aim, too. Propagation constants of Bloch modes are also compared with those obtained with a full-vector film mode matching (FiMM) mode solver using the very simple effective medium theory (EMT).

  18. Comparison of 2D and 3D Fourier modal methods for modeling subwavelength-structured silicon waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiecien, Pavel; Richter, Ivan; Čtyroký, Jiří

    2011-09-01

    Frequency-domain Fourier modal methods have recently evolved into efficient tools for rigorous numerical modeling of a wide class of photonic and plasmonic structures and devices. In this contribution we describe the application of our 2D and 3D in-house tools, namely aperiodic rigorous coupled wave analysis (aRCWA) and bi-directional mode expansion propagation method using harmonic expansion (BEXX), on a recently described novel type of subwavelength grating (SWG) waveguides. They are created by means of periodically interlacing silicon segments with a superstrate material with a lower refractive index. It has been shown recently, both theoretically and experimentally, that for a suitable choice of SWG parameters such as grating period and duty cycle, the structure can support low-loss guided (Bloch) mode. Its effective index, mode profile and dispersion characteristics can thus be tailored to specific needs without the necessity of changing material composition. In our methods, either complex coordinate transformation or uniaxial anisotropic perfectly matched layers have been applied as efficient absorption boundary conditions. In order to reduce the number of expansion terms needed to reach required accuracy, the adaptive spatial resolution technique has been implemented. Structural symmetries of the devices can be fully utilized to this aim, too. Propagation constants of Bloch modes are also compared with those obtained with a full-vector film mode matching (FiMM) mode solver using the very simple effective medium theory (EMT).

  19. Electronics for Piezoelectric Smart Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warkentin, D. J.; Tani, J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper briefly presents work addressing some of the basic considerations for the electronic components used in smart structures incorporating piezoelectric elements. After general remarks on the application of piezoelectric elements to the problem of structural vibration control, three main topics are described. Work to date on the development of techniques for embedding electronic components within structural parts is presented, followed by a description of the power flow and dissipation requirements of those components. Finally current work on the development of electronic circuits for use in an 'active wall' for acoustic noise is introduced.

  20. Optical properties and structural phase transitions of lead-halide based inorganic-organic 3D and 2D perovskite semiconductors under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuishi, K.; Ishihara, T.; Onari, S.; Chang, Y. H.; Park, C. H.

    2004-11-01

    Optical absorption, photoluminescence and Raman scattering of lead-halide based inorganic-organic perovskite semiconductors were measured under quasi-hydrostatic pressure at room temperature. For the 3D perovskite semiconductor, (CH3NH3)PbBr3, the free exciton photoluminescence band exhibits red-shifts with pressure, and jumps to a higher energy by 0.07 eV at 0.8 GPa, which is associated with a phase transition from a cubic to an orthorhombic structure confirmed by Raman scattering. Above the phase transition pressure, the exciton band shows blue-shifts with further increasing pressure, and eventually disappears above 4.7 GPa. The results are compared with those for the 2D perovskite semiconductor, (C4H9NH3)2PbI4. First principles pseudopotential calculations were performed to investigate changes in octahedral distortion and electronic band structures with pressure. The calculations have explained the origins of the intriguing changes in the electronic states with pressure in view of bonding characters between atomic orbitals in octahedra.

  1. Inertial solvation in femtosecond 2D spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hybl, John; Albrecht Ferro, Allison; Farrow, Darcie; Jonas, David

    2001-03-01

    We have used 2D Fourier transform spectroscopy to investigate polar solvation. 2D spectroscopy can reveal molecular lineshapes beneath ensemble averaged spectra and freeze molecular motions to give an undistorted picture of the microscopic dynamics of polar solvation. The transition from "inhomogeneous" to "homogeneous" 2D spectra is governed by both vibrational relaxation and solvent motion. Therefore, the time dependence of the 2D spectrum directly reflects the total response of the solvent-solute system. IR144, a cyanine dye with a dipole moment change upon electronic excitation, was used to probe inertial solvation in methanol and propylene carbonate. Since the static Stokes' shift of IR144 in each of these solvents is similar, differences in the 2D spectra result from solvation dynamics. Initial results indicate that the larger propylene carbonate responds more slowly than methanol, but appear to be inconsistent with rotational estimates of the inertial response. To disentangle intra-molecular vibrations from solvent motion, the 2D spectra of IR144 will be compared to the time-dependent 2D spectra of the structurally related nonpolar cyanine dye HDITCP.

  2. Internal Photoemission Spectroscopy of 2-D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Li, Mingda; Vishwanath, Suresh; Yan, Rusen; Xiao, Shudong; Xing, Huili; Cheng, Guangjun; Hight Walker, Angela; Zhang, Qin

    Recent research has shown the great benefits of using 2-D materials in the tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET), which is considered a promising candidate for the beyond-CMOS technology. The on-state current of TFET can be enhanced by engineering the band alignment of different 2D-2D or 2D-3D heterostructures. Here we present the internal photoemission spectroscopy (IPE) approach to determine the band alignments of various 2-D materials, in particular SnSe2 and WSe2, which have been proposed for new TFET designs. The metal-oxide-2-D semiconductor test structures are fabricated and characterized by IPE, where the band offsets from the 2-D semiconductor to the oxide conduction band minimum are determined by the threshold of the cube root of IPE yields as a function of photon energy. In particular, we find that SnSe2 has a larger electron affinity than most semiconductors and can be combined with other semiconductors to form near broken-gap heterojunctions with low barrier heights which can produce a higher on-state current. The details of data analysis of IPE and the results from Raman spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements will also be presented and discussed.

  3. 3D spin-flop transition in enhanced 2D layered structure single crystalline TlCo2Se2.

    PubMed

    Jin, Z; Xia, Z-C; Wei, M; Yang, J-H; Chen, B; Huang, S; Shang, C; Wu, H; Zhang, X-X; Huang, J-W; Ouyang, Z-W

    2016-10-01

    The enhanced 2D layered structure single crystalline TlCo2Se2 has been successfully fabricated, which exhibits field-induced 3D spin-flop phase transitions. In the case of the magnetic field parallel to the c-axis (B//c), the applied magnetic field induces the evolution of the noncollinear helical magnetic coupling into a ferromagnetic (FM) state with all the magnetization of the Co ion parallel to the c-axis. A striking variation of the field-induced strain within the ab-plane is noticed in the magnetic field region of 20-30 T. In the case of the magnetic field perpendicular to the c-axis (B  ⊥  c), the inter-layer helical antiferromagnetic (AFM) coupling may transform to an initial canted AFM coupling, and then part of it transforms to an intermediate metamagnetic phase with the alignment of two-up-one-down Co magnetic moments and finally to an ultimate FM coupling in higher magnetic fields. The robust noncollinear AFM magnetic coupling is completely destroyed above 30 T. In combination with the measurements of magnetization, magnetoresistance and field-induced strain, a complete magnetic phase diagram of the TlCo2Se2 single crystal has been depicted, demonstrating complex magnetic structures even though the crystal geometry itself gives no indication of the magnetic frustration. PMID:27485370

  4. PHOTOELECTRON AND AUGER ELECTRON ASYMMETRIES: ALIGNMENT OF Xe{sup +}({sup 2}D{sub 5/2}) BY PHOTOIONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Southworth, S. H.; Kobrin, P. H.; Truesdale, C. M.; Lindle, D.; Owaki, S.; Shirley, D. A.

    1980-12-01

    Angular distributions of photoelectrons from the Xe 4d subshell, and N{sub 4,5}oo Auger electrons, have been measured using synchrotron radiation. The 4d asymmetry parameter exhibits strong oscillations with energy, in agreement with several theoretical calculations. The Auger electrons show large asymmetries due to alignment of Xe{sup +} by photoionization.

  5. Analytic modeling of temperature dependence of 2D carrier mobility in as-grown and annealed GaInNAs/GaAs quantum well structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donmez, O.; Sarcan, F.; Lisesivdin, S. B.; Vaughan, M. P.; Erol, A.; Gunes, M.; Arikan, M. C.; Puustinen, J.; Guina, M.

    2014-12-01

    Temperature and nitrogen dependence of 2D carrier mobility in as-grown and annealed Ga1-xInxNyAs1-y/GaAs quantum well (QW) structures (x = 0.32 y = 0, 0.009, and 0.012) are investigated. An analytical model that accounts for the most prominent scattering mechanisms is used to explain the characteristic of temperature dependence of the carrier mobility. An expression for alloy scattering-limited mobility in N-related alloys is developed to explain the behavior of hole mobility for N-containing p-type samples. Analytical modeling of temperature dependence of the electron mobility indicates that N-related alloy scattering and interface roughness scattering are the dominant mechanism at the entire temperature range of interest. The temperature insensitivity of the electron mobility is explained in terms of the overriding effect of N-related alloy scattering and high 2D electron density. A deviation between theoretical and experimental electron mobility at low temperatures is observed not to have any dependency on N concentration. We, therefore, suggest that CNM interaction parameter of the band anti-crossing (BAC) model must be defined as temperature dependent in order to explain the observed low temperature characteristics of electron mobility. The hole mobility is mainly restricted by interface roughness and alloy scatterings at temperatures lower than 100 K, whilst high temperature hole mobility is drastically affected from optical phonon scattering. Moreover, the hole mobility at high temperatures exhibits an N-independent characteristic and hole density starts to increase at temperatures above 70 K, which is explained using the concept of parallel conduction. Extraction of the hole density in each transport channel (QW and barrier) by using a simple parallel conduction extraction method (SPCEM) shows that, in p-type samples, low temperature hole mobility takes place in quantum well, while as temperature increases barrier channel also contribute to the hole

  6. Large structure rearrangement of colicin ia channel domain after membrane binding from 2D 13C spin diffusion NMR.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wenbin; Yao, Xiaolan; Hong, Mei

    2005-05-01

    One of the main mechanisms of membrane protein folding is by spontaneous insertion into the lipid bilayer from the aqueous environment. The bacterial toxin, colicin Ia, is one such protein. To shed light on the conformational changes involved in this dramatic transfer from the polar to the hydrophobic milieu, we carried out 2D magic-angle spinning (13)C NMR experiments on the water-soluble and membrane-bound states of the channel-forming domain of colicin Ia. Proton-driven (13)C spin diffusion spectra of selectively (13)C-labeled protein show unequivocal attenuation of cross-peaks after membrane binding. This attenuation can be assigned to distance increases but not reduction of the diffusion coefficient. Analysis of the statistics of the interhelical and intrahelical (13)C-(13)C distances in the soluble protein structure indicates that the observed cross-peak reduction is well correlated with a high percentage of short interhelical contacts in the soluble protein. This suggests that colicin Ia channel domain becomes open and extended upon membrane binding, thus lengthening interhelical distances. In comparison, cross-peaks with similar intensities between the two states are dominated by intrahelical contacts in the soluble state. This suggests that the membrane-bound structure of colicin Ia channel domain may be described as a "molten globule", in which the helical secondary structure is retained while the tertiary structure is unfolded. This study demonstrates that (13)C spin diffusion NMR is a valuable tool for obtaining qualitative long-range distance constraints on membrane protein folding. PMID:15853348

  7. A zero-equation turbulent electron transport model for cross-field migration and its implementation in a 2-D hybrid plasma Hall thruster simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappelli, Mark; Young, Chris; Cha, Eusnun; Fernandez, Eduardo; Stanford Plasma Physics Laboratory Collaboration; Eckerd College Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    We present a simple, zero-equation turbulence model for electron transport across the magnetic field of a plasma Hall thruster and integrate this model into 2-D hybrid particle-in-cell simulations of a 72 mm diameter laboratory thruster operating at 400 W. The turbulent transport model is based on the assumption that the primary means of electron energy dissipation is the turbulent eddy cascade in the electron fluid to smaller scales. Implementing the model into 2-D hybrid simulations is relatively straightforward and leverages the existing framework for solving the electron fluid equations. We find that the model captures the strong axial variation in the mobility seen in experiments. In particular, it predicts the existence of a strong transport barrier which anchors the region of plasma acceleration. The model also captures the time-averaged experimental discharge current and its fluctuations due to ionization instabilities. We observe quantitative agreement with recent laser induced fluorescence measurements of time-averaged xenon ion and neutral velocities along the channel centerline. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  8. Crystal structure and characterization of a novel luminescent 2D metal-organic framework, poly[aquaitaconatocalcium(II)] possessing an open framework structure with hydrophobic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Remya M.; Sudarsanakumar, M. R.; Suma, S.; Prathapachandra Kurup, M. R.

    2016-02-01

    A novel 2D metal-organic framework poly[aquaitaconatocalcium(II)] with an open framework structure has been successfully grown by single gel diffusion technique. Sodium metasilicate was used for gel preparation. The structure was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The compound crystallizes in monoclinic space group P21/c with hydrophobic 1D channels. The obtained crystals were further characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR and UV-Visible spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetry. The luminescent property of the complex was also discussed.

  9. Terrace Zone Structure in the Chicxulub Impact Crater Based on 2-D Seismic Reflection Profiles: Preliminary Results From EW#0501

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, M. A.; Gulick, S. P.; Gorney, D. L.; Christeson, G. L.; Barton, P. J.; Morgan, J. V.; Warner, M. R.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Melosh, H. J.; Vermeesch, P. M.; Surendra, A. T.; Goldin, T.; Mendoza, K.

    2005-05-01

    Terrace zones, central peaks, and flat floors characterize complex craters like the Chicxulub impact crater located near the northeast coast of the Yucatan Peninsula. The subsurface crater structure was studied using seismic reflection surveying in Jan/Feb 2005 by the R/V Maurice Ewing. We present 2-D seismic profiles including constant radius, regional, and grid profiles encompassing the 195 km width of the crater. These diversely oriented lines clearly show the terrace zones and aid in the search for crater ejecta as we investigate the formation of the crater including the incidence angle and direction of the extraterrestrial object that struck the Yucatan Peninsula 65 million years ago (K-T boundary). Terrace zones form in complex craters after the modification stage as a result of the gravitational collapse of overextended sediment back into the crater cavity. The terrace zone is clearly imaged on seismic profiles confirming the complex structure of the Chixculub crater. Recent work on reprocessed 1996 profiles found different sizes and spacing of the terraces and concluded that the variations in radial structure are a result of an oblique impact. A SW-NE profile from this study was the only line to show a concentration of deformation near the crater rim hinting that the northeast was the downrange direction of impact. We confirm this narrowing in terrace spacing using a profile with a similar orientation in the 2005 images. Through integration of the new dense grid of profiles and radial lines from the 1996 and 2005 surveys we map the 3-D variability of the terrace zones to further constrain impact direction and examine the formative processes of the Chixculub and other large impact craters.

  10. Atomic structures and electronic properties of phosphorene grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yu; Zhou, Si; Zhang, Junfeng; Bai, Yizhen; Zhao, Jijun

    2016-06-01

    Grain boundary (GB) is one main type of defects in two-dimensional (2D) crystals, and has significant impact on the physical properties of 2D materials. Phosphorene, a recently synthesized 2D semiconductor, possesses a puckered honeycomb lattice and outstanding electronic properties. It is very interesting to know the possible GBs present in this novel material, and how their properties differ from those in the other 2D materials. Based on first-principles calculations, we explore the atomic structure, thermodynamic stability, and electronic properties of phosphorene GBs. A total of 19 GBs are predicted and found to be energetically stable with formation energies much lower than those in graphene. These GBs do not severely affect the electronic properties of phosphorene: the band gap of perfect phosphorene is preserved, and the electron mobilities are only moderately reduced in these defective systems. Our theoretical results provide vital guidance for experimental tailoring the electronic properties of phosphorene as well as the device applications using phosphorene materials.

  11. Two 2D metal-organic frameworks based on N-heterocyclic and polycarboxylates ligands: Syntheses, structures, and photoluminescent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Li; Li, Chuanbi; Zhu, Dongsheng

    2013-02-01

    Two novel complexes constructed from aromatic acid and N-heterocyclic ligands have been synthesized by hydrothermal reaction: {[Mn(dipt)(BDC)3ṡH2O]n (1) [dipt = 2-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline, BDC = terephthalic acid] and [Pb(dnpt)(BDC)2]n (2) [dnpt = 2-(4-nitrophenyl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline]. Complexes 1 and 2 were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, single crystal X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results suggest that complexes 1-2 exhibit 1D chain structure. The intermolecular C-H⋯O and N-H⋯O interactions extend the complexes into 2D networks, and the existing H-bonds further stabilized the title complexes, which can be proved by TGA experiment. Furthermore, the solid-state fluorescence spectrum of complexes 1 and 2 were also investigated, as well as the ligands dipt and dnpt.

  12. 2D double-layer-tube-shaped structure Bi2S3/ZnS heterojunction with enhanced photocatalytic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiaoming; Wang, Zihang; Fu, Feng; Li, Xiang; Li, Wenhong

    2015-10-01

    Bi2S3/ZnS heterojunction with 2D double-layer-tube-shaped structures was prepared by the facile synthesis method. The corresponding relationship was obtained among loaded content to phase, morphology, and optical absorption property of Bi2S3/ZnS composite. The results shown that Bi2S3 loaded could evidently change the crystallinity of ZnS, enhance the optical absorption ability for visible light of ZnS, and improve the morphologies and microstructure of ZnS. The photocatalytic activities of the Bi2S3/ZnS sample were evaluated for the photodegradation of phenol and desulfurization of thiophene under visible light irradiation. The results showed that Bi2S3 loaded greatly improved the photocatalytic activity of ZnS, and the content of loaded Bi2S3 had an impact on the catalytic activity of ZnS. Moreover, the mechanism of enhanced photocatalytic activity was also investigated by analysis of relative band positions of Bi2S3 and ZnS, and photo-generated hole was main active radicals during photocatalytic oxidation process.

  13. Time resolved, 2-D hard X-ray imaging of relativistic electron-beam target interactions on ETA-II

    SciTech Connect

    Crist, C.E.; Sampayan, S.; Westenskow, G.; Caporaso, G.; Houck, T.; Weir, J.; Trimble, D.; Krogh, M.

    1998-11-01

    Advanced radiographic applications require a constant source size less than 1 mm. To study the time history of a relativistic electron beam as it interacts with a bremsstrahlung converter, one of the diagnostics they use is a multi-frame time-resolved hard x-ray camera. They are performing experiments on the ETA-II accelerator at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to investigate details of the electron beam/converter interactions. The camera they are using contains 6 time-resolved images, each image is a 5 ns frame. By starting each successive frame 10 ns after the previous frame, they create a 6-frame movie from the hard x-rays produced from the interaction of the 50-ns electron beam pulse.

  14. Structural environments of carboxyl groups in natural organic molecules from terrestrial systems. Part 2: 2D NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Ashish P.; Pacheco, Carlos; Hay, Michael B.; Myneni, Satish C. B.

    2007-07-01

    Carboxyl groups are abundant in natural organic molecules (NOM) and play a major role in their reactivity. The structural environments of carboxyl groups in IHSS soil and river humic samples were investigated using 2D NMR (heteronuclear and homonuclear correlation) spectroscopy. Based on the 1H- 13C heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation (HMBC) spectroscopy results, the carboxyl environments in NOM were categorized as Type I (unsubstituted and alkyl-substituted aliphatic/alicyclic), Type II (functionalized carbon substituted), Type IIIa, b (heteroatom and olefin substituted), and Type IVa, b (5-membered heterocyclic aromatic and 6-membered aromatic). The most intense signal in the HMBC spectra comes from the Type I carboxyl groups, including the 2JCH and 3JCH couplings of unsubstituted aliphatic and alicyclic acids, though this spectral region also includes the 3JCH couplings of Type II and III structures. Type II and III carboxyls have small but detectable 2JCH correlations in all NOM samples except for the Suwannee River humic acid. Signals from carboxyls bonded to 5-membered aromatic heterocyclic fragments (Type IVa) are observed in the soil HA and Suwannee River FA, while correlations to 6-membered aromatics (Type IVb) are only observed in Suwannee River HA. In general, aromatic carboxylic acids may be present at concentrations lower than previously imagined in these samples. Vibrational spectroscopy results for these NOM samples, described in an accompanying paper [Hay M. B. and Myneni S. C. B. (2007) Structural environments of carboxyl groups in natural organic molecules from terrestrial systems. Part 1: Infrared spectroscopy. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta (in press)], suggest that Type II and Type III carboxylic acids with α substituents (e.g., -OH, -OR, or -CO 2H) constitute the majority of carboxyl structures in all humic substances examined. Furoic and salicylic acid structures (Type IV) are also feasible fragments, albeit as minor constituents. The

  15. Orbital dependent Rashba splitting and electron-phonon coupling of 2D Bi phase on Cu(100) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Gargiani, Pierluigi; Lisi, Simone; Betti, Maria Grazia; Ibrahimi, Amina Taleb; Bertran, François; Le Fèvre, Patrick; Chiodo, Letizia

    2013-11-14

    A monolayer of bismuth deposited on the Cu(100) surface forms a highly ordered c(2×2) reconstructed phase. The low energy single particle excitations of the c(2×2) Bi/Cu(100) present Bi-induced states with a parabolic dispersion in the energy region close to the Fermi level, as observed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The electronic state dispersion, the charge density localization, and the spin-orbit coupling have been investigated combining photoemission spectroscopy and density functional theory, unraveling a two-dimensional Bi phase with charge density well localized at the interface. The Bi-induced states present a Rashba splitting, when the charge density is strongly localized in the Bi plane. Furthermore, the temperature dependence of the spectral density close to the Fermi level has been evaluated. Dispersive electronic states offer a large number of decay channels for transitions coupled to phonons and the strength of the electron-phonon coupling for the Bi/Cu(100) system is shown to be stronger than for Bi surfaces and to depend on the electronic state symmetry and localization.

  16. Engineering the electronic and magnetic properties of d(0) 2D dichalcogenide materials through vacancy doping and lattice strains.

    PubMed

    Ao, L; Pham, A; Xiao, H Y; Zu, X T; Li, S

    2016-03-14

    We have systematically investigated the effects of different vacancy defects in 2D d(0) materials SnS2 and ZrS2 using first principles calculations. The theoretical results show that the single cation vacancy and the vacancy complex like V-SnS6 can induce large magnetic moments (3-4 μB) in these single layer materials. Other defects, such as V-SnS3, V-S, V-ZrS3 and V-ZrS6, can result in n-type conductivity. In addition, the ab initio studies also reveal that the magnetic and conductive properties from the cation vacancy and the defect complex V-SnS6 can be modified using the compressive/tensile strain of the in-plane lattices. Specifically, the V-Zr doped ZrS2 monolayer can be tuned from a ferromagnetic semiconductor to a metallic/half-metallic material with decreasing/increasing magnetic moments depending on the external compressive/tensile strains. On the other hand, the semiconducting and magnetic properties of V-Sn doped SnS2 is preserved under different lattice compression and tension. For the defect complex like V-SnS6, only the lattice compression can tune the magnetic moments in SnS2. As a result, by manipulating the fabrication parameters, the magnetic and conductive properties of SnS2 and ZrS2 can be tuned without the need for chemical doping. PMID:26888010

  17. Analysis of bell-shape negative giant-magnetoresistance in high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron systems using multi-conduction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaraweera, Rasanga; Liu, Han-Chun; Wegscheider, Werner; Mani, Ramesh

    Recent advancements in the growth techniques of the GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional electron system (2DES) routinely yield high quality heterostructures with enhanced physical and electrical properties, including devices with 2D electron mobilities well above 107 cm2/Vs. These improvements have opened new pathways to study interesting physical phenomena associated with the 2D electron system. Negative giant-magnetoresistance (GMR) is one such phenomenon which can observed in the high mobility 2DES. However, the negative GMR in the GaAs/AlGaAs 2DES is still not fully understood. In this contribution, we present an experimental study of the bell-shape negative GMR in high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs devices and quantitatively analyze the results utilizing the multi-conduction model. The multi-conduction model includes interesting physical characteristics such as negative diagonal conductivity, non-vanishing off-diagonal conductivity, etc. The aim of the study is to examine GMR over a wider experimental parameter space and determine whether the multi-conduction model serves to describe the experimental results.

  18. Large-area 2D periodic crystalline silicon nanodome arrays on nanoimprinted glass exhibiting photonic band structure effects.

    PubMed

    Becker, C; Lockau, D; Sontheimer, T; Schubert-Bischoff, P; Rudigier-Voigt, E; Bockmeyer, M; Schmidt, F; Rech, B

    2012-04-01

    Two-dimensional silicon nanodome arrays are prepared on large areas up to 50 cm² exhibiting photonic band structure effects in the near-infrared and visible wavelength region by downscaling a recently developed fabrication method based on nanoimprint-patterned glass, high-rate electron-beam evaporation of silicon, self-organized solid phase crystallization and wet-chemical etching. The silicon nanodomes, arranged in square lattice geometry with 300 nm lattice constant, are optically characterized by angular resolved reflection measurements, allowing the partial determination of the photonic band structure. This experimentally determined band structure agrees well with the outcome of three-dimensional optical finite-element simulations. A 16% photonic bandgap is predicted for an optimized geometry of the silicon nanodome arrays. By variation of the duration of the selective etching step, the geometry as well as the optical properties of the periodic silicon nanodome arrays can be controlled systematically. PMID:22422473

  19. Real-time observation of multiexcitonic states in ultrafast singlet fission using coherent 2D electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bakulin, Artem A; Morgan, Sarah E; Kehoe, Tom B; Wilson, Mark W B; Chin, Alex W; Zigmantas, Donatas; Egorova, Dassia; Rao, Akshay

    2016-01-01

    Singlet fission is the spin-allowed conversion of a spin-singlet exciton into a pair of spin-triplet excitons residing on neighbouring molecules. To rationalize this phenomenon, a multiexcitonic spin-zero triplet-pair state has been hypothesized as an intermediate in singlet fission. However, the nature of the intermediate states and the underlying mechanism of ultrafast fission have not been elucidated experimentally. Here, we study a series of pentacene derivatives using ultrafast two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy and unravel the origin of the states involved in fission. Our data reveal the crucial role of vibrational degrees of freedom coupled to electronic excitations that facilitate the mixing of multiexcitonic states with singlet excitons. The resulting manifold of vibronic states drives sub-100 fs fission with unity efficiency. Our results provide a framework for understanding singlet fission and show how the formation of vibronic manifolds with a high density of states facilitates fast and efficient electronic processes in molecular systems. PMID:26673260

  20. Real-time observation of multiexcitonic states in ultrafast singlet fission using coherent 2D electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakulin, Artem A.; Morgan, Sarah E.; Kehoe, Tom B.; Wilson, Mark W. B.; Chin, Alex W.; Zigmantas, Donatas; Egorova, Dassia; Rao, Akshay

    2016-01-01

    Singlet fission is the spin-allowed conversion of a spin-singlet exciton into a pair of spin-triplet excitons residing on neighbouring molecules. To rationalize this phenomenon, a multiexcitonic spin-zero triplet-pair state has been hypothesized as an intermediate in singlet fission. However, the nature of the intermediate states and the underlying mechanism of ultrafast fission have not been elucidated experimentally. Here, we study a series of pentacene derivatives using ultrafast two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy and unravel the origin of the states involved in fission. Our data reveal the crucial role of vibrational degrees of freedom coupled to electronic excitations that facilitate the mixing of multiexcitonic states with singlet excitons. The resulting manifold of vibronic states drives sub-100 fs fission with unity efficiency. Our results provide a framework for understanding singlet fission and show how the formation of vibronic manifolds with a high density of states facilitates fast and efficient electronic processes in molecular systems.

  1. The solid-state structures of two photoluminescent 2D silver(I) arenedisulfonate incorporating aminopyrimidyl ligands: Substituents influence on π⋯π interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Di; Zhang, Na; Wei, Zhan-Hua; Yang, Cheng-Feng; Huang, Rong-Bin; Zheng, Lan-Sun

    2010-09-01

    Two silver(I) arenedisulfonate incorporating aminopyrimidyl ligands of the formula [Ag(apym)(nds) 0.5] n ( 1) and [Ag(dmapym)(nds) 0.5] n ( 2) (apym = 2-aminopyrimidine, dmapym = 2-amino-4,6-dimethylpyrimidine, H2nds = 1,5-naphthalenedisulfonic acid) were synthesized and characterized by element analysis, IR spectroscopy and X-ray single-crystal diffraction. Both 1 and 2 are undulated 2D 4 4- sql nets constructed by μ 2-nds and μ 2-aminopyrimidyl ligands incorporating Ag(I) centers. When apym was replaced by dmapym, no obvious change of structures from 1 to 2 was observed, however, substituent effect on the structures was unambiguously presented in π⋯π interactions. The shortest centroid⋯centroid distances between pyrimidyl and naphthyl of 1 and 2 are 3.623(5) and 4.091(3) Å, respectively, which is due to the combination of steric and electronic effect of two more methyl groups. Moreover, the photoluminescence properties of 1 and 2 were investigated in the solid state at room temperature.

  2. Automated structure verification based on a combination of 1D (1)H NMR and 2D (1)H - (13)C HSQC spectra.

    PubMed

    Golotvin, Sergey S; Vodopianov, Eugene; Pol, Rostislav; Lefebvre, Brent A; Williams, Antony J; Rutkowske, Randy D; Spitzer, Timothy D

    2007-10-01

    A method for structure validation based on the simultaneous analysis of a 1D (1)H NMR and 2D (1)H - (13)C single-bond correlation spectrum such as HSQC or HMQC is presented here. When compared with the validation of a structure by a 1D (1)H NMR spectrum alone, the advantage of including a 2D HSQC spectrum in structure validation is that it adds not only the information of (13)C shifts, but also which proton shifts they are directly coupled to, and an indication of which methylene protons are diastereotopic. The lack of corresponding peaks in the 2D spectrum that appear in the 1D (1)H spectrum, also gives a clear picture of which protons are attached to heteroatoms. For all these benefits, combined NMR verification was expected and found by all metrics to be superior to validation by 1D (1)H NMR alone. Using multiple real-life data sets of chemical structures and the corresponding 1D and 2D data, it was possible to unambiguously identify at least 90% of the correct structures. As part of this test, challenging incorrect structures, mostly regioisomers, were also matched with each spectrum set. For these incorrect structures, the false positive rate was observed as low as 6%. PMID:17694570

  3. Cyano-bridged coordination polymer hydrogel-derived Sn-Fe binary oxide nanohybrids with structural diversity: from 3D, 2D, to 2D/1D and enhanced lithium-storage performance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiyu; Zhu, Xiaoshu; Chen, Xuguang; Zhou, Yiming; Tang, Yawen; Ding, Liangxin; Wu, Ping

    2016-05-14

    Metal oxide nanohybrids with uniform dimensions and controlled architectures possess unique compositional and structural superiorities, and thus harbor promising potential for a series of applications in energy, catalysis, and sensing systems. Herein, we propose a facile, general, and scalable cyano-bridged coordination polymer hydrogel-derived thermal-oxidation route for the construction of main-group metal and transition-metal heterometallic oxide nanohybrids with controlled constituents and architectures. The formation of Sn-Fe binary oxide nanohybrids has been demonstrated as an example by using cyano-bridged Sn(iv)-Fe(ii) bimetallic coordination polymer hydrogels (i.e., SnCl4-K4Fe(CN)6 cyanogels, Sn-Fe cyanogels) as precursors. The physicochemical properties of Sn-Fe cyanogels with different Sn/Fe ratios have been systematically examined, and it is found that perfect Sn-Fe cyanogels without unbridged Sn(iv) or Fe(ii) can be formed with Sn/Fe ratios from 2 : 1 to 1 : 2. More importantly, the simple adjustment of Sn/Fe ratios in the Sn-Fe cyanogel precursors can realize flexible dimensional control of the Sn-Fe binary oxide nanohybrids, and 2D/1D SnO2-Fe2O3 hierarchitectures, 2D SnO2-Fe2O3 nanosheets, and 3D SnO2-Fe2O3 networks have been synthesized using the Sn-Fe 1 : 2, Sn-Fe 1 : 1, and Sn-Fe 2 : 1 cyanogels as precursors, respectively. To demonstrate their compositional/structural superiorities and potential applications, the lithium-storage utilization of the Sn-Fe binary oxide nanohybrids has been selected as an objective application, and the nanohybrids exhibit Sn/Fe ratio-dependent lithium-storage performance. As a representative example, the 2D/1D SnO2-Fe2O3 hierarchitectures manifest markedly enhanced Li-storage performance in terms of reversible capacities and cycling stability in comparison with their constituent units, i.e., bare SnO2 nanosheets and Fe2O3 nanorods. The proposed cyanogel-derived thermal-oxidation strategy could

  4. 2D/3D electron temperature fluctuations near explosive MHD instabilities accompanied by minor and major disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M. J.; Park, H. K.; Yun, G. S.; Lee, W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Lee, K. D.; Ko, W.-H.; Park, Y.-S.; Park, B. H.; In, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Minor and major disruptions by explosive MHD instabilities were observed with the novel quasi 3D electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) system in the KSTAR plasma. The fine electron temperature (T e) fluctuation images revealed two types of minor disruptions: a small minor disruption is a q∼ 2 localized fast transport event due to a single m/n  =  2/1 magnetic island growth, while a large minor disruption is partial collapse of the q≤slant 2 region with two successive fast heat transport events by the correlated m/n  =  2/1 and m/n  =  1/1 instabilities. The m/n  =  2/1 magnetic island growth during the minor disruption is normally limited below the saturation width. However, as the additional interchange-like perturbation grows near the inner separatrix of the 2/1 island, the 2/1 island can expand beyond the limit through coupling with the cold bubble formed by the interchange-like perturbation.

  5. Mesh2d

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Flach, Frank Smith

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assigns an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.

  6. Mesh2d

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assignsmore » an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.« less

  7. Theoretical electronic structure of structurally modified graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, Marc David

    Graphene has emerged as a promising replacement for silicon in next-generation electronics and optoelectronic devices. If graphene is to be used in semiconductor devices, however, it must acquire an electronic band gap. Numerous approaches have been proposed to control the band gap of graphene, including the periodic patterning of defects. However, the mechanism for band gap opening and the associated physics in graphene patterned with defects remain unclear. Using both analytic theory and first-principles calculations, we show that periodic patterning of defects on graphene can open a large and tunable band gap, induce strong absorption peaks at optical wavelengths, and host a giant band gap quantum spin Hall phase. First, a geometric rule is analytically derived for the arrangements of defects that open a band gap in graphene, with one ninth of all possible patterns opening a band gap. Next, we perform ab-initio density functional calculations to compare the effects of structural vacancies, hexagonal BN dopants, and passivants on the electronic structure of graphene. Qualitatively, these three types of structural defects behave the same, with only slight differences in their resulting band structures. By adjusting the shape of structural defects, we show how to move the Dirac cones in reciprocal space in accordance with the tight-binding model for the anisotropic honeycomb lattice, while the fundamental mechanism for band gap opening remains the same. To quantitatively predict the band gap and optical properties of these materials, we employ many-body perturbation theory with Green's functions (GW/Bethe-Salpeter equation) to directly include electron-electron and electron-hole interactions. Structurally modified graphene shows a strong renormalization of the fundamental band gap over single particle descriptions, and a strong electron-hole interaction as indicated by strong exciton binding energies (> 0.5 eV). Finally, we show that structurally modified graphene

  8. Electron momentum distribution and singlet-singlet annihilation in the organic anthracene molecular crystals using positron 2D-ACAR and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, Sellaiyan; Sivaji, Krishnan; Arulchakkaravarthi, Arjunan; Sankar, Sambasivam

    2014-08-14

    We present the mapping of electron momentum distribution (EMD) in a single crystal of anthracene by two-dimensional angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR). The projected EMD is explained on the basis of the crystallographic features of the material. The EMD spectra provide information about the positron states and their behavior and also about the hindrance of the positronium (Ps) formation in this material. The EMD has exhibited evidence for the absence of free volume defects. The characteristic EMD features regarding the delocalized electronic states are explained. Further, scintillation characteristics such as fluorescence and time-correlated single photon counting have also been studied. The emission peaks are attributed to vibrational bands of fluorescence emission from the singlet excitons and lifetime components are observed to be due to singlet fission and the singlet-singlet excitons annihilation. PMID:24963608

  9. Numerical simulations - Some results for the 2- and 3-D Hubbard models and a 2-D electron phonon model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scalapino, D. J.; Sugar, R. L.; White, S. R.; Bickers, N. E.; Scalettar, R. T.

    1989-01-01

    Numerical simulations on the half-filled three-dimensional Hubbard model clearly show the onset of Neel order. Simulations of the two-dimensional electron-phonon Holstein model show the competition between the formation of a Peierls-CDW state and a superconducting state. However, the behavior of the partly filled two-dimensional Hubbard model is more difficult to determine. At half-filling, the antiferromagnetic correlations grow as T is reduced. Doping away from half-filling suppresses these correlations, and it is found that there is a weak attractive pairing interaction in the d-wave channel. However, the strength of the pair field susceptibility is weak at the temperatures and lattice sizes that have been simulated, and the nature of the low-temperature state of the nearly half-filled Hubbard model remains open.

  10. Electronic structure and correlation effects in actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Albers, R.C.

    1998-12-01

    This report consists of the vugraphs given at a conference on electronic structure. Topics discussed are electronic structure, f-bonding, crystal structure, and crystal structure stability of the actinides and how they are inter-related.

  11. Electron Scattering and Nuclear Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trower, W. P.; Ficenec, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    Presents information about the nucleus gained by studies of electron scattering. Discusses what can be implied about the shape of the charge distribution, the nucleus positions, the vibrational modes of the nucleus, the momentum of the nucleus, and the granularity and core structures of the nucleus. (DS)

  12. Electronic Structure Principles and Aromaticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chattaraj, P. K.; Sarkar, U.; Roy, D. R.

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between aromaticity and stability in molecules on the basis of quantities such as hardness and electrophilicity is explored. The findings reveal that aromatic molecules are less energetic, harder, less polarizable, and less electrophilic as compared to antiaromatic molecules, as expected from the electronic structure principles.

  13. Designing molecular structure to achieve ductile fracture behavior in a stiff and strong 2D polymer, "graphylene".

    PubMed

    Sandoz-Rosado, E; Beaudet, T D; Balu, R; Wetzel, E D

    2016-06-01

    As the simplest two-dimensional (2D) polymer, graphene has immensely high intrinsic strength and elastic stiffness but has limited toughness due to brittle fracture. We use atomistic simulations to explore a new class of graphene/polyethylene hybrid 2D polymer, "graphylene", that exhibits ductile fracture mechanisms and has a higher fracture toughness and flaw tolerance than graphene. A specific configuration of this 2D polymer hybrid, denoted "GrE-2" for the two-carbon-long ethylene chains connecting benzene rings in the inherent framework, is prioritized for study. MD simulations of crack propagation show that the energy release rate to propagate a crack in GrE-2 is twice that of graphene. We also demonstrate that GrE-2 exhibits delocalized failure and other energy-dissipating fracture mechanisms such as crack branching and bridging. These results demonstrate that 2D polymers can be uniquely tailored to achieve a balance of fracture toughness with mechanical stiffness and strength. PMID:26996950

  14. Large Area Synthesis of 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Eric

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have generated significant interest for numerous applications including sensors, flexible electronics, heterostructures and optoelectronics due to their interesting, thickness-dependent properties. Despite recent progress, the synthesis of high-quality and highly uniform TMDs on a large scale is still a challenge. In this talk, synthesis routes for WSe2 and MoS2 that achieve monolayer thickness uniformity across large area substrates with electrical properties equivalent to geological crystals will be described. Controlled doping of 2D semiconductors is also critically required. However, methods established for conventional semiconductors, such as ion implantation, are not easily applicable to 2D materials because of their atomically thin structure. Redox-active molecular dopants will be demonstrated which provide large changes in carrier density and workfunction through the choice of dopant, treatment time, and the solution concentration. Finally, several applications of these large-area, uniform 2D materials will be described including heterostructures, biosensors and strain sensors.

  15. The role of electronic coupling between substrate and 2D MoS2 nanosheets in electrocatalytic production of hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Voiry, Damien; Fullon, Raymond; Yang, Jieun; de Carvalho Castro E Silva, Cecilia; Kappera, Rajesh; Bozkurt, Ibrahim; Kaplan, Daniel; Lagos, Maureen J; Batson, Philip E; Gupta, Gautam; Mohite, Aditya D; Dong, Liang; Er, Dequan; Shenoy, Vivek B; Asefa, Tewodros; Chhowalla, Manish

    2016-09-01

    The excellent catalytic activity of metallic MoS2 edges for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) has led to substantial efforts towards increasing the edge concentration. The 2H basal plane is less active for the HER because it is less conducting and therefore possesses less efficient charge transfer kinetics. Here we show that the activity of the 2H basal planes of monolayer MoS2 nanosheets can be made comparable to state-of-the-art catalytic properties of metallic edges and the 1T phase by improving the electrical coupling between the substrate and the catalyst so that electron injection from the electrode and transport to the catalyst active site is facilitated. Phase-engineered low-resistance contacts on monolayer 2H-phase MoS2 basal plane lead to higher efficiency of charge injection in the nanosheets so that its intrinsic activity towards the HER can be measured. We demonstrate that onset potentials and Tafel slopes of ∼-0.1 V and ∼50 mV per decade can be achieved from 2H-phase catalysts where only the basal plane is exposed. We show that efficient charge injection and the presence of naturally occurring sulfur vacancies are responsible for the observed increase in catalytic activity of the 2H basal plane. Our results provide new insights into the role of contact resistance and charge transport on the performance of two-dimensional MoS2 nanosheet catalysts for the HER. PMID:27295098

  16. Quantification of transition dipole strengths using 1D and 2D spectroscopy for the identification of molecular structures via exciton delocalization: Application to α-helices

    PubMed Central

    Grechko, Maksim; Zanni, Martin T.

    2012-01-01

    Vibrational and electronic transition dipole strengths are often good probes of molecular structures, especially in excitonically coupled systems of chromophores. One cannot determine transition dipole strengths using linear spectroscopy unless the concentration is known, which in many cases it is not. In this paper, we report a simple method for measuring transition dipole moments from linear absorption and 2D IR spectra that does not require knowledge of concentrations. Our method is tested on several model compounds and applied to the amide I′ band of a polypeptide in its random coil and α-helical conformation as modulated by the solution temperature. It is often difficult to confidently assign polypeptide and protein secondary structures to random coil or α-helix by linear spectroscopy alone, because they absorb in the same frequency range. We find that the transition dipole strength of the random coil state is 0.12 ± 0.013 D2, which is similar to a single peptide unit, indicating that the vibrational mode of random coil is localized on a single peptide unit. In an α-helix, the lower bound of transition dipole strength is 0.26 ± 0.03 D2. When taking into account the angle of the amide I′ transition dipole vector with respect to the helix axis, our measurements indicate that the amide I′ vibrational mode is delocalized across a minimum of 3.5 residues in an α-helix. Thus, one can confidently assign secondary structure based on exciton delocalization through its effect on the transition dipole strength. Our method will be especially useful for kinetically evolving systems, systems with overlapping molecular conformations, and other situations in which concentrations are difficult to determine. PMID:23163364

  17. Quantification of transition dipole strengths using 1D and 2D spectroscopy for the identification of molecular structures via exciton delocalization: Application to α-helices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechko, Maksim; Zanni, Martin T.

    2012-11-01

    Vibrational and electronic transition dipole strengths are often good probes of molecular structures, especially in excitonically coupled systems of chromophores. One cannot determine transition dipole strengths using linear spectroscopy unless the concentration is known, which in many cases it is not. In this paper, we report a simple method for measuring transition dipole moments from linear absorption and 2D IR spectra that does not require knowledge of concentrations. Our method is tested on several model compounds and applied to the amide I' band of a polypeptide in its random coil and α-helical conformation as modulated by the solution temperature. It is often difficult to confidently assign polypeptide and protein secondary structures to random coil or α-helix by linear spectroscopy alone, because they absorb in the same frequency range. We find that the transition dipole strength of the random coil state is 0.12 ± 0.013 D2, which is similar to a single peptide unit, indicating that the vibrational mode of random coil is localized on a single peptide unit. In an α-helix, the lower bound of transition dipole strength is 0.26 ± 0.03 D2. When taking into account the angle of the amide I' transition dipole vector with respect to the helix axis, our measurements indicate that the amide I' vibrational mode is delocalized across a minimum of 3.5 residues in an α-helix. Thus, one can confidently assign secondary structure based on exciton delocalization through its effect on the transition dipole strength. Our method will be especially useful for kinetically evolving systems, systems with overlapping molecular conformations, and other situations in which concentrations are difficult to determine.

  18. Fitting of Diverging Thermoelectric Power in a Strongly Interacting 2D Electron System of Si-MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Tak

    2013-03-01

    The diverging-effective mass (DEM) in a metallic system is evidence of strong correlation between fermions in strongly correlated systems. The identification of the DEM still remains to be revealed The effective mass, m* =mo/(1-ρ4) where ρ is band filling helps clarify the diverging thermoelectric power, S, measured in inhomogeneous Si-MOSFET systems. As a carrier density ns decreases, S increases rapidly This is regarded as the metal-insulator transition (MIT) near nc ~ 79x10-1cm-2, where nc is about 0.02% to nSi ~ 3.4x10-14cm-2 in Si. This can be solved in assuming that ρ = nc/ns increases as ns decreases. nc is an excited(doped) carrier density in the semiconductor induced by gate and can be also regarded as a metallic carrier density, that is, nc ≡ nseminon = nmetal. ns is given as ntot ≡ ns = nc + nseminon where nseminon is a carrier density in a nonmetallic phase. The carrier density measured by Hall effect is the sum of carriers both induced by gate field and generated by MIT. Moreover, a larger metallic phase is not made due to a conducting path in the field-effect structure after a metallic phase is formed. Thus, increasing ns indicates increasing nnon; this corresponds to an over-doping to increase inhomogeneity. It's fitting is given from S = (απ3 kB2T/3e)(1/EF)= (α 8π3kB2T/3h2)(m*/e*nc) =So(1/ ρ) (1/(1-ρ4)) , where e* = ρ e, ρ = nc/ns, T =0.8K, m* =mo/(1-ρ4), α = 0.6, and So = (α 8π3kB2T/3h2)(mo/enc) ~12.36 are used. The data S are closely fitted by m*

  19. Discrimination of adulterated milk based on two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) combined with kernel orthogonal projection to latent structure (K-OPLS).

    PubMed

    Yang, Renjie; Liu, Rong; Xu, Kexin; Yang, Yanrong

    2013-12-01

    A new method for discrimination analysis of adulterated milk and pure milk is proposed by combining two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) with kernel orthogonal projection to latent structure (K-OPLS). Three adulteration types of milk with urea, melamine, and glucose were prepared, respectively. The synchronous 2D spectra of adulterated milk and pure milk samples were calculated. Based on the characteristics of 2D correlation spectra of adulterated milk and pure milk, a discriminant model of urea-tainted milk, melamine-tainted milk, glucose-tainted milk, and pure milk was built by K-OPLS. The classification accuracy rates of unknown samples were 85.7, 92.3, 100, and 87.5%, respectively. The results show that this method has great potential in the rapid discrimination analysis of adulterated milk and pure milk. PMID:24359648

  20. Residue-Specific Structural Kinetics of Proteins through the Union of Isotope Labeling, Mid-IR Pulse Shaping, and Coherent 2D IR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Chris T.; Woys, Ann Marie; Mukherjee, Sudipta S.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a methodology for studying protein kinetics using a rapid-scan technology for collecting 2D IR spectra. In conjunction with isotope labeling, 2D IR spectroscopy is able to probe the secondary structure and environment of individual residues in polypeptides and proteins. It is particularly useful for membrane and aggregate proteins. Our rapid-scan technology relies on a mid-IR pulse shaper that computer generates the pulse shapes, much like in an NMR spectrometer. With this device, data collection is faster, easier, and more accurate. We describe our 2D IR spectrometer, as well as protocols for 13C=18O isotope labeling, and then illustrate the technique with an application to the aggregation of the human islet amyloid polypeptide form type 2 diabetes. PMID:20472067

  1. 2D modeling of DC potential structures induced by RF sheaths with transverse currents in front of ICRF antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Faudot, E.; Heuraux, S.; Colas, L.

    2005-09-26

    Understanding DC potential generation in front of ICRF antennas is crucial for long pulse high RF power systems. DC potentials are produced by sheath rectification of these RF potentials. To reach this goal, near RF parallel electric fields have to be computed in 3D and integrated along open magnetic field lines to yield a 2D RF potential map in a transverse plane. DC potentials are produced by sheath rectification of these RF potentials. As RF potentials are spatially inhomogeneous, transverse polarization currents are created, modifying RF and DC maps. Such modifications are quantified on a 'test map' having initially a Gaussian shape and assuming that the map remains Gaussian near its summit,the time behavior of the peak can be estimated analytically in presence of polarization current as a function of its width r0 and amplitude {phi}0 (normalized to a characteristic length for transverse transport and to the local temperature). A 'peaking factor' is built from the DC peak potential normalized to {phi}0, and validated with a 2D fluid code and a 2D PIC code (XOOPIC). In an unexpected way transverse currents can increase this factor. Realistic situations of a Tore Supra antenna are also studied, with self-consistent near fields provided by ICANT code. Basic processes will be detailed and an evaluation of the 'peaking factor' for ITER will be presented for a given configuration.

  2. 2D hydrodynamic simulations of a variable length gas target for density down-ramp injection of electrons into a laser wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononenko, O.; Lopes, N. C.; Cole, J. M.; Kamperidis, C.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Najmudin, Z.; Osterhoff, J.; Poder, K.; Rusby, D.; Symes, D. R.; Warwick, J.; Wood, J. C.; Palmer, C. A. J.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic simulations of a variable length gas cell were performed using the open source fluid code OpenFOAM. The gas cell was designed to study controlled injection of electrons into a laser-driven wakefield at the Astra Gemini laser facility. The target consists of two compartments: an accelerator and an injector section connected via an aperture. A sharp transition between the peak and plateau density regions in the injector and accelerator compartments, respectively, was observed in simulations with various inlet pressures. The fluid simulations indicate that the length of the down-ramp connecting the sections depends on the aperture diameter, as does the density drop outside the entrance and the exit cones. Further studies showed, that increasing the inlet pressure leads to turbulence and strong fluctuations in density along the axial profile during target filling, and consequently, is expected to negatively impact the accelerator stability.

  3. Off-axis electron holography with a dual-lens imaging system and its usefulness in 2-D potential mapping of semiconductor devices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Y; Kawasaki, M; Bruley, J; Gribelyuk, M; Domenicucci, A; Gaudiello, J

    2004-11-01

    A variable magnification electron holography, applicable for two-dimensional (2-D) potential mapping of semiconductor devices, employing a dual-lens imaging system is described. Imaging operation consists of a virtual image formed by the objective lens (OL) and a real image formed in a fixed imaging plane by the objective minilens. Wide variations in field of view (100-900 nm) and fringe spacing (0.7-6 nm) were obtained using a fixed biprism voltage by varying the total magnification of the dual OL system. The dual-lens system allows fringe width and spacing relative to the object to be varied roughly independently from the fringe contrast, resulting in enhanced resolution and sensitivity. The achievable fringe width and spacing cover the targets needed for devices in the semiconductor technology road map from the 350 to 45 nm node. Two-D potential maps for CMOS devices with 220 and 70 nm gate lengths were obtained. PMID:15450653

  4. Giant piezoresistance of p-type nano-thick silicon induced by interface electron trapping instead of 2D quantum confinement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongliang; Li, Xinxin

    2011-01-01

    The p-type silicon giant piezoresistive coefficient is measured in top-down fabricated nano-thickness single-crystalline-silicon strain-gauge resistors with a macro-cantilever bending experiment. For relatively thicker samples, the variation of piezoresistive coefficient in terms of silicon thickness obeys the reported 2D quantum confinement effect. For ultra-thin samples, however, the variation deviates from the quantum-effect prediction but increases the value by at least one order of magnitude (compared to the conventional piezoresistance of bulk silicon) and the value can change its sign (e.g. from positive to negative). A stress-enhanced Si/SiO(2) interface electron-trapping effect model is proposed to explain the 'abnormal' giant piezoresistance that should be originated from the carrier-concentration change effect instead of the conventional equivalent mobility change effect for bulk silicon piezoresistors. An interface state modification experiment gives preliminary proof of our analysis. PMID:21135460

  5. The Integer and Fractional Quantum Hall Effect in the Lowest Landau Level of Valley Degenerate 2D Electrons on Hydrogen Terminated Si(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kott, Tomasz M.; Hu, Binhui; Brown, S. H.; Kane, B. E.

    2013-03-01

    We report low temperature magnetotransport measurements on a high mobility (μ = 325 000 cm2/Vsec) 2D electron system on a H-terminated Si(111) surface. In Si(111), there are six degenerate, anisotropic valleys which can affect the magnetotransport in unexpected ways. While low magnetic field data indeed show a six-fold valley degenerate system, we observe the integral quantum Hall effect at all filling factors ν <= 6 , indicating a magnetic-field-induced breaking of the valley degeneracy. Additionally, we find that ν = 2 develops in an unusually narrow temperature range, which might indicate the existence of a novel broken-symmetry valley phase. Finally, we observe an extended, exclusively even numerator, fractional quantum Hall hierarchy surrounding ν = 3 / 2 with denominators up to 15. This hierarchy is consistent with two-fold valley-degenerate composite fermions. We determine activation energies and provide the first estimate the composite fermion mass in a multi-valley system.

  6. Electronic structure of black sodalite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankey, Otto F.; Demkov, Alexander A.; Lenosky, Thomas

    1998-06-01

    The electronic structure of black sodalite, Na8(AlSiO4)6, is determined in the local-spin-density approximation (LSDA). This structure has six Na atoms to compensate the six Al atoms, leaving two excess Na atoms. A band-gap electronic state is induced in the wide oxide gap by the excess sodium, and has ``particle in a box'' behavior. Magnetic orderings of these gap states are studied. Analytic models show that an antiferromagnetic ordering is lowest in energy in the LSDA. A self-consistent LSDA calculation shows the system to change from a metal to an antiferromagnetic insulator when spin orderings are allowed. Hopping and Hubbard-U parameters are estimated, and the many-body correlated Hubbard model is solved using a constrained path Monte Carlo technique, which again predicts the system to be antiferromagnetic with a Tc of order 50 K.

  7. Electronic structure of Calcium hexaborides

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Byounghak; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2005-06-15

    We present a theoretical study of crystal and electronic structures of CaB6 within a screened-exchange local density approximation (sX-LDA). Our ab initio total energy calculations show that CaB6 is a semiconductor with a gap of >1.2 eV, in agreement with recent experimental observations. We show a very sensitive band gap dependence on the crystal internal parameter, which might partially explain the scatter of previous theoretical results. Our calculation demonstrates that it is essential to study this system simultaneously for both crystal structures and electronic properties, and that the sX-LDA provides an ideal method for this problem.

  8. Controlled Confinement of Half-metallic 2D Electron Gas in BaTiO3/Ba2FeReO6/BaTiO3 Heterostructures: A First-principles Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha-Dasgupta, Tanusri; Baidya, Santu; Waghmare, Umesh; Paramekanti, Arun

    Using density functional theory calculations, we establish that the half-metallicity of bulk Ba2FeReO6 survives down i to 1 nm thickness in BaTiO3/Ba2FeReO6/BaTiO3 heterostructures grown along the (001) and (111) directions. The confinement of the two-dimensional (2D) electron gas in this quantum well structure arises from the suppressed hybridization between Re/Fe d states and unoccupied Ti d states, and it is further strengthened by polar fields for the (111) direction. This mechanism, distinct from the polar catastrophe, leads to an order of magnitude stronger confinement of the 2D electron gas than that at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface. We further show low-energy bands of (111) heterostructure display nontrivial topological character. Our work opens up the possibility of realizing ultra-thin spintronic devices. Journal Ref: Phys. Rev. B 92, 161106(R) (2015) S.B. and T.S.D thank Department of Science and Technology, India for the support through Thematic Unit of Excellence. AP was supported by NSERC (Canada).

  9. The structure of salt bridges between Arg+ and Glu- in peptides investigated with 2D-IR spectroscopy: Evidence for two distinct hydrogen-bond geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta-Viga, Adriana; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Domingos, Sérgio R.; Meuzelaar, Heleen; Rupenyan, Alisa; Woutersen, Sander

    2015-06-01

    Salt bridges play an important role in protein folding and in supramolecular chemistry, but they are difficult to detect and characterize in solution. Here, we investigate salt bridges between glutamate (Glu-) and arginine (Arg+) using two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy. The 2D-IR spectrum of a salt-bridged dimer shows cross peaks between the vibrational modes of Glu- and Arg+, which provide a sensitive structural probe of Glu-⋯Arg+ salt bridges. We use this probe to investigate a β-turn locked by a salt bridge, an α-helical peptide whose structure is stabilized by salt bridges, and a coiled coil that is stabilized by intra- and intermolecular salt bridges. We detect a bidentate salt bridge in the β-turn, a monodentate one in the α-helical peptide, and both salt-bridge geometries in the coiled coil. To our knowledge, this is the first time 2D-IR has been used to probe tertiary side chain interactions in peptides, and our results show that 2D-IR spectroscopy is a powerful method for investigating salt bridges in solution.

  10. Isolation and structural and pharmacological characterization of α-elapitoxin-Dpp2d, an amidated three finger toxin from black mamba venom.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-I Anderson; Reeks, Timothy; Vetter, Irina; Vergara, Irene; Kovtun, Oleksiy; Lewis, Richard J; Alewood, Paul F; Durek, Thomas

    2014-06-17

    We isolated a novel, atypical long-chain three-finger toxin (TFT), α-elapitoxin-Dpp2d (α-EPTX-Dpp2d), from black mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis) venom. Proteolytic digestion with trypsin and V8 protease, together with MS/MS de novo sequencing, indicated that the mature toxin has an amidated C-terminal arginine, a posttranslational modification rarely observed for snake TFTs. α-EPTX-Dpp2d was found to potently inhibit α7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR; IC₅₀, 58 ± 24 nM) and muscle-type nAChR (IC₅₀, 114 ± 37 nM) but did not affect α3β2 and α3β4 nAChR isoforms at 1 μM concentrations. Competitive radioligand binding assays demonstrated that α-EPTX-Dpp2d competes with epibatidine binding to the Lymnea stagnalis acetylcholine-binding protein (Ls-AChBP; IC₅₀, 4.9 ± 2.3 nM). The activity profile and binding data are reminiscent of classical long-chain TFTs with a free carboxyl termini, suggesting that amidation does not significantly affect toxin selectivity. The crystal structure of α-EPTX-Dpp2d was determined at 1.7 Å resolution and displayed a dimeric toxin assembly with each monomer positioned in an antiparallel orientation. The dimeric structure is stabilized by extensive intermolecular hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions, which raised the possibility that the toxin may exist as a noncovalent homodimer in solution. However, chemical cross-linking and size-exclusion chromatography coupled with multiangle laser light scattering (MALLS) data indicated that the toxin is predominantly monomeric under physiological conditions. Because of its high potency and selectivity, we expect this toxin to be a valuable pharmacological tool for studying the structure and function of nAChRs. PMID:24867092

  11. The impact of pore structure and surface roughness on capillary trapping for 2-D and 3-D porous media: Comparison with percolation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geistlinger, Helmut; Ataei-Dadavi, Iman; Mohammadian, Sadjad; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2015-11-01

    We study the impact of pore structure and surface roughness on capillary trapping of nonwetting gas phase during imbibition with water for capillary numbers between 10-7 and 5 × 10-5, within glass beads, natural sands, glass beads monolayers, and 2-D micromodels. The materials exhibit different roughness of the pore-solid interface. We found that glass beads and natural sands, which exhibit nearly the same grain size distribution, pore size distribution, and connectivity, showed a significant difference of the trapped gas phase of about 15%. This difference can be explained by the microstructure of the pore-solid interface. Based on the visualization of the trapping dynamics within glass beads monolayers and 2-D micromodels, we could show that bypass trapping controls the trapping process in glass beads monolayers, while snap-off trapping controls the trapping process in 2-D micromodels. We conclude that these different trapping processes are the reason for the different trapping efficiency, when comparing glass beads packs with natural sand packs. Moreover, for small capillary numbers of 10-6, we found that the cluster size distribution of trapped gas clusters of all 2-D and 3-D porous media can be described by a universal power law behavior predicted from percolation theory. This cannot be expected a priori for 2-D porous media, because bicontinuity of the two bulk phases is violated. Obviously, bicontinuity holds for the thin-film water phase and the bulk gas phase. The snap-off trapping process leads to ordinary bond percolation in front of the advancing bulk water phase and is the reason for the observed universal power law behavior in 2-D micromodels with rough surfaces.

  12. Reduced dimensionality (3,2)D NMR experiments and their automated analysis: implications to high-throughput structural studies on proteins.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Jithender G; Kumar, Dinesh; Hosur, Ramakrishna V

    2015-02-01

    Protein NMR spectroscopy has expanded dramatically over the last decade into a powerful tool for the study of their structure, dynamics, and interactions. The primary requirement for all such investigations is sequence-specific resonance assignment. The demand now is to obtain this information as rapidly as possible and in all types of protein systems, stable/unstable, soluble/insoluble, small/big, structured/unstructured, and so on. In this context, we introduce here two reduced dimensionality experiments – (3,2)D-hNCOcanH and (3,2)D-hNcoCAnH – which enhance the previously described 2D NMR-based assignment methods quite significantly. Both the experiments can be recorded in just about 2-3 h each and hence would be of immense value for high-throughput structural proteomics and drug discovery research. The applicability of the method has been demonstrated using alpha-helical bovine apo calbindin-D9k P43M mutant (75 aa) protein. Automated assignment of this data using AUTOBA has been presented, which enhances the utility of these experiments. The backbone resonance assignments so derived are utilized to estimate secondary structures and the backbone fold using Web-based algorithms. Taken together, we believe that the method and the protocol proposed here can be used for routine high-throughput structural studies of proteins. PMID:25178811

  13. revealing H{sub 2}D{sup +} depletion and compact structure in starless and protostellar cores with ALMA

    SciTech Connect

    Friesen, R. K.; Di Francesco, J.; Bourke, T. L.; Caselli, P.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Pineda, J. E.; Wong, M.

    2014-12-10

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of the submillimeter dust continuum and H{sub 2}D{sup +} 1{sub 10}-1{sub 11} emission toward two evolved, potentially protostellar cores within the Ophiuchus molecular cloud, Oph A SM1 and SM1N. The data reveal small-scale condensations within both cores, with mass upper limits of M ≲ 0.02 M {sub ☉} (∼20 M {sub Jup}). The SM1 condensation is consistent with a nearly symmetric Gaussian source with a width of only 37 AU. The SM1N condensation is elongated and extends 500 AU along its major axis. No evidence for substructure is seen in either source. A Jeans analysis indicates that these sources are unlikely to fragment, suggesting that both will form single stars. H{sub 2}D{sup +} is only detected toward SM1N, offset from the continuum peak by ∼150-200 AU. This offset may be due to either heating from an undetected, young, low-luminosity protostellar source or first hydrostatic core, or HD (and consequently H{sub 2}D{sup +}) depletion in the cold center of the condensation. We propose that SM1 is protostellar and that the condensation detected by ALMA is a warm (T ∼ 30-50 K) accretion disk. The less concentrated emission of the SM1N condensation suggests that it is still starless, but we cannot rule out the presence of a low-luminosity source, perhaps surrounded by a pseudodisk. These data observationally reveal the earliest stages of the formation of circumstellar accretion regions and agree with theoretical predictions that disk formation can occur very early in the star formation process, coeval with or just after the formation of a first hydrostatic core or protostar.

  14. Hamiltonian structure of Dubrovin{close_quote}s equation of associativity in 2-d topological field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Galvao, C.A.; Nutku, Y.

    1996-12-01

    mA third order Monge-Amp{grave e}re type equation of associativity that Dubrovin has obtained in 2-d topological field theory is formulated in terms of a variational principle subject to second class constraints. Using Dirac{close_quote}s theory of constraints this degenerate Lagrangian system is cast into Hamiltonian form and the Hamiltonian operator is obtained from the Dirac bracket. There is a new type of Kac-Moody algebra that corresponds to this Hamiltonian operator. In particular, it is not a W-algebra. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Synthesis and structure of a 2D → 3D framework with coexistence of hydrogen bonds and polythreading character

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ming-Dao Zhuang, Qi-Fan; Xu, Jing; Cao, Hui

    2015-12-15

    The title complex, ([Co(BPPA)(5-OH-bdc)] · (H{sub 2}O)){sub n} was prepared under hydrothermal conditions based on two ligands, namely, bis(4-(pyridin-4-yl)phenyl)amine (BPPA) and 5-hydroxyisophthalic acid (5-OH-H{sub 2}bdc). 5-OH-bdc{sup 2–} anions coordinated to Co atoms to give layers in crystal. BPPA ligands coordinate to Co atoms and thread into the adjacent layers. There are hydrogen bonds between adjacent layers, giving rise to a 2D → 3D framework.

  16. Schottky diodes from 2D germanane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Nanda Gopal; Esteves, Richard J.; Punetha, Vinay Deep; Pestov, Dmitry; Arachchige, Indika U.; McLeskey, James T.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of a Schottky diode made using 2D germanane (hydrogenated germanene). When compared to germanium, the 2D structure has higher electron mobility, an optimal band-gap, and exceptional stability making germanane an outstanding candidate for a variety of opto-electronic devices. One-atom-thick sheets of hydrogenated puckered germanium atoms have been synthesized from a CaGe2 framework via intercalation and characterized by XRD, Raman, and FTIR techniques. The material was then used to fabricate Schottky diodes by suspending the germanane in benzonitrile and drop-casting it onto interdigitated metal electrodes. The devices demonstrate significant rectifying behavior and the outstanding potential of this material.

  17. Effects of the electron-electron interaction in the spin resonance in 2D systems with Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Krishtopenko, S. S.

    2015-02-15

    The effect of the electron-electron interaction on the spin-resonance frequency in two-dimensional electron systems with Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling is investigated. The oscillatory dependence of many-body corrections on the magnetic field is demonstrated. It is shown that the consideration of many-body interaction leads to a decrease or an increase in the spin-resonance frequency, depending on the sign of the g factor. It is found that the term cubic in quasimomentum in Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling partially decreases exchange corrections to the spin resonance energy in a two-dimensional system.

  18. Structural Dynamics of Electronic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhir, E.

    2013-03-01

    The published work on analytical ("mathematical") and computer-aided, primarily finite-element-analysis (FEA) based, predictive modeling of the dynamic response of electronic systems to shocks and vibrations is reviewed. While understanding the physics of and the ability to predict the response of an electronic structure to dynamic loading has been always of significant importance in military, avionic, aeronautic, automotive and maritime electronics, during the last decade this problem has become especially important also in commercial, and, particularly, in portable electronics in connection with accelerated testing of various surface mount technology (SMT) systems on the board level. The emphasis of the review is on the nonlinear shock-excited vibrations of flexible printed circuit boards (PCBs) experiencing shock loading applied to their support contours during drop tests. At the end of the review we provide, as a suitable and useful illustration, the exact solution to a highly nonlinear problem of the dynamic response of a "flexible-and-heavy" PCB to an impact load applied to its support contour during drop testing.

  19. Synthesizing 2D and 3D Selenidostannates in Ionic Liquids: The Synergistic Structure-Directing Effects of Ionic Liquids and Metal-Amine Complexes.

    PubMed

    Du, Cheng-Feng; Shen, Nan-Nan; Li, Jian-Rong; Hao, Min-Ting; Wang, Zi; Huang, Xiao-Ying

    2016-05-20

    Presented are the ionothermal syntheses, characterizations, and properties of a series of two- and three-dimensional selenidostannate compounds synergistically directed by metal-amine complex (MAC) cations and ionic liquids (ILs) of [Bmmim]Cl (Bmmim=1-butyl-2,3-dimethylimidazolium). Four selenidostannates, namely, 2D-(Bmmim)3 [Ni(en)3 ]2 [Sn9 Se21 ]Cl (1, en=ethylenediamine), 2D-(Bmmim)8 [Ni2 (teta)2 (μ-teta)]Sn18 Se42 (2, teta=triethylenetetramine), 2D-(Bmmim)4 [Ni(tepa)Cl]2 [Ni(tepa)Sn12 Se28 ] (3, tepa=tetraethylenepentamine), and 3D-(Bmmim)2 [Ni(1,2-pda)3 ]Sn8 Se18 (4, 1,2-pda=1,2-diaminopropane), were obtained. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that compounds 1 and 2 possess a lamellar anionic [Sn3 Se7 ]n (2n-) structure comprising distinct eight-membered ring units, whereas 3 features a MAC-decorated anionic [Ni(tepa)Sn12 Se28 ]n (6n-) layered structure. In contrast to 1-3, compound 4 exhibits a 3D open framework of anionic [Sn4 Se9 ]n (2n-) . The structural variation from 1 to 4 clearly indicates that on the basis of the synergistic structure-directing ability of the MACs and ILs, variation of the organic polyamine ligand has a significant impact on the formation of selenidostannates. PMID:27037731

  20. Electronic structure of graphite oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hae Kyung; Yang, Cheolsoo; Kim, Bong Soo; Kim, Ki-Jeong

    2011-03-01

    We have investigated the electronic structure of graphite oxide by photoelectron spectroscopy at the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Korea. The typical sp 2 hybridization states found in graphite were also seen in graphite oxide. However, the π state disappeared near the Fermi level because of bonding between the π and oxygen-related states originating from graphite oxide, indicating electron transfer from graphite to oxygen and resulting in a downward shift of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) state to higher binding energies. The band gap opening increased to about 1.8 eV, and additional oxygen-related peaks were observed at 8.5 and 27 eV. This research was supported by the Basic Science Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF), funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (2010-0004592), and partly by the MEST (2009-0087138). Experiments at the PLS were supported in part by POSTECH and MEST.

  1. Electronic instrumentation for smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanar, George J.

    1995-04-01

    The requirements of electronic instrumentation for smart structures are similar to those of data acquisition systems at our national particle physics laboratories. Modern high energy and heavy ion physics experiments may have tens of thousands of channels of data sources producing data that must be converted to digital form, compacted, stored and interpreted. In parallel, multiple sensors distributed in and around smart structures generate either binary or analog signals that are voltage, charge, or time like in their information content. In all cases, they must be transmitted, converted and preserved into a unified digital format for real-time processing. This paper will review the current status of practical large scale electronic measurement systems with special attention to architectures and physical organization. Brief surveys of the current state of the art will include preamplifiers and amplifiers, comparators and discriminators, voltage or charge analog-to-digital converters, time internal meters or time-to-digital converters, and finally, counting or scalar systems. The paper will conclude by integrating all of these ideas in a concept for an all-digital readout of a smart structure using the latest techniques used in physics research today.

  2. Structural requirements of pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-one as CDK4/D inhibitors: 2D autocorrelation, CoMFA and CoMSIA analyses.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Julio; Fernández, Michael; González-Nilo, Fernando D

    2008-06-01

    2D autocorrelation, comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) were undertaken for a series of pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-ones to correlate cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) cyclin D/CDK4 inhibition with 2D and 3D structural properties of 60 known compounds. QSAR models with considerable internal as well as external predictive ability were obtained. The relevant 2D autocorrelation descriptors for modeling CDK4/D inhibitory activity were selected by linear and nonlinear genetic algorithms (GAs) using multiple linear regression (MLR) and Bayesian-regularized genetic neural network (BRGNN) approaches, respectively. Both models showed good predictive statistics; but BRGNN model enables better external predictions. A weight-based input ranking scheme and Kohonen self-organized maps (SOMs) were carried out to interpret the final net weights. The 2D autocorrelation space brings different descriptors for CDK4/D inhibition, and suggests the atomic properties relevant for the inhibitors to interact with CDK4/D active site. CoMFA and CoMSIA analyses were developed with a focus on interpretative ability using coefficient contour maps. CoMSIA produced significantly better results. The results indicate a strong correlation between the inhibitory activity of the modeled compounds and the electrostatic and hydrophobic fields around them. PMID:18468903

  3. Efficient Decoding of 2D Structured Illumination with Linear Phase Stepping in X-Ray Phase Contrast and Dark-Field Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Harmon, Katherine J.; Bennett, Eric E.; Gomella, Andrew A.; Wen, Han

    2014-01-01

    The ability to map the phase distribution and lateral coherence of an x-ray wavefront offers the potential for imaging the human body through phase contrast, without the need to deposit significant radiation energy. The classic means to achieve this goal is structured illumination, in which a periodic intensity modulation is introduced into the image, and changes in the phase distribution of the wavefront are detected as distortions of the modulation pattern. Two-dimensional periodic patterns are needed to fully characterize a transverse wavefront. Traditionally, the information in a 2D pattern is retrieved at high resolution by acquiring multiple images while shifting the pattern over a 2D matrix of positions. Here we describe a method to decode 2D periodic patterns with single-axis phase stepping, without either a loss of information or increasing the number of sampling steps. The method is created to reduce the instrumentation complexity of high-resolution 2D wavefront sensing in general. It is demonstrated with motionless electromagnetic phase stepping and a flexible processing algorithm in x-ray dark-field and phase contrast imaging. PMID:24489853

  4. Efficient decoding of 2D structured illumination with linear phase stepping in X-ray phase contrast and dark-field imaging.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Katherine J; Bennett, Eric E; Gomella, Andrew A; Wen, Han

    2014-01-01

    The ability to map the phase distribution and lateral coherence of an x-ray wavefront offers the potential for imaging the human body through phase contrast, without the need to deposit significant radiation energy. The classic means to achieve this goal is structured illumination, in which a periodic intensity modulation is introduced into the image, and changes in the phase distribution of the wavefront are detected as distortions of the modulation pattern. Two-dimensional periodic patterns are needed to fully characterize a transverse wavefront. Traditionally, the information in a 2D pattern is retrieved at high resolution by acquiring multiple images while shifting the pattern over a 2D matrix of positions. Here we describe a method to decode 2D periodic patterns with single-axis phase stepping, without either a loss of information or increasing the number of sampling steps. The method is created to reduce the instrumentation complexity of high-resolution 2D wavefront sensing in general. It is demonstrated with motionless electromagnetic phase stepping and a flexible processing algorithm in x-ray dark-field and phase contrast imaging. PMID:24489853

  5. Unraveling the dynamics and structure of functionalized self-assembled monolayers on gold using 2D IR spectroscopy and MD simulations.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chang; Yuan, Rongfeng; Pfalzgraff, William C; Nishida, Jun; Wang, Lu; Markland, Thomas E; Fayer, Michael D

    2016-05-01

    Functionalized self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are the focus of ongoing investigations because they can be chemically tuned to control their structure and dynamics for a wide variety of applications, including electrochemistry, catalysis, and as models of biological interfaces. Here we combine reflection 2D infrared vibrational echo spectroscopy (R-2D IR) and molecular dynamics simulations to determine the relationship between the structures of functionalized alkanethiol SAMs on gold surfaces and their underlying molecular motions on timescales of tens to hundreds of picoseconds. We find that at higher head group density, the monolayers have more disorder in the alkyl chain packing and faster dynamics. The dynamics of alkanethiol SAMs on gold are much slower than the dynamics of alkylsiloxane SAMs on silica. Using the simulations, we assess how the different molecular motions of the alkyl chain monolayers give rise to the dynamics observed in the experiments. PMID:27044113

  6. Two-Dimensional Crystallization of Gastric H(+),K(+)-ATPase for Structural Analysis by Electron Crystallography.

    PubMed

    Abe, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Electron crystallography of two-dimensional (2D) crystals has provided important information on the structural biology of P-type ATPases. Here, I describe the procedure for making 2D crystals of gastric H(+),K(+)-ATPase purified from pig stomach. The 2D crystals are produced by dialyzing detergent-solubilized H(+),K(+)-ATPase mixed with synthetic phospholipids. Removal of the detergent induces the reconstitution of H(+),K(+)-ATPase molecules into the lipid bilayer. In the presence of fluorinated phosphate analogs, or in combination with transporting cations or the specific antagonist SCH28080, H(+),K(+)-ATPase forms crystalline 2D arrays. The molecular conformation and morphology of the 2D crystals vary depending on the crystallizing conditions. Using these 2D crystals, three-dimensional structures of H(+),K(+)-ATPase can be generated by data correction from ice-embedded 2D crystals using cryo-electron microscopy, followed by processing the recorded images using electron crystallography methods. PMID:26695054

  7. Electronic structure of lithium amide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamakura, N.; Takeda, Y.; Saitoh, Y.; Yamagami, H.; Tsubota, M.; Paik, B.; Ichikawa, T.; Kojima, Y.; Muro, T.; Kato, Y.; Kinoshita, T.

    2011-01-01

    The electronic structure of the insulator lithium amide (LiNH2), which is a lightweight complex hydride being considered as a high-capacity hydrogen storage material, is investigated by N 1s soft x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The XES and XAS spectra show a band gap between the valence and conduction bands. The valence band in the XES spectrum consists of three peaks, which extend up to ~-8 eV from the valence band top. The band calculation within the local-density approximation (LDA) for LiNH2shows energetically separated three peaks in the occupied N 2p partial density of states (pDOS) and the band gap. The energy distribution of three peaks in the XES spectrum agrees with that in the calculated pDOS except for the peak at the highest binding energy, which is attributed to the strongly hybridized state between N 2p and H 1s. The XES experiment has clarified that the strongly hybridized state with H 1s in LiNH2is located at binding energy higher than that of the LDA calculation, while the overall feature of the electronic structure of LiNH2experimentally obtained by XES and XAS is consistent with the calculated result.

  8. Tailoring the nature and strength of electron-phonon interactions in the SrTiO3(001) 2D electron liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; McKeown Walker, S.; Tamai, A.; Wang, Y.; Ristic, Z.; Bruno, F. Y.; de la Torre, A.; Riccò, S.; Plumb, N. C.; Shi, M.; Hlawenka, P.; Sánchez-Barriga, J.; Varykhalov, A.; Kim, T. K.; Hoesch, M.; King, P. D. C.; Meevasana, W.; Diebold, U.; Mesot, J.; Moritz, B.; Devereaux, T. P.; Radovic, M.; Baumberger, F.

    2016-08-01

    Surfaces and interfaces offer new possibilities for tailoring the many-body interactions that dominate the electrical and thermal properties of transition metal oxides. Here, we use the prototypical two-dimensional electron liquid (2DEL) at the SrTiO3(001) surface to reveal a remarkably complex evolution of electron-phonon coupling with the tunable carrier density of this system. At low density, where superconductivity is found in the analogous 2DEL at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface, our angle-resolved photoemission data show replica bands separated by 100 meV from the main bands. This is a hallmark of a coherent polaronic liquid and implies long-range coupling to a single longitudinal optical phonon branch. In the overdoped regime the preferential coupling to this branch decreases and the 2DEL undergoes a crossover to a more conventional metallic state with weaker short-range electron-phonon interaction. These results place constraints on the theoretical description of superconductivity and allow a unified understanding of the transport properties in SrTiO3-based 2DELs.

  9. Tailoring the nature and strength of electron-phonon interactions in the SrTiO3(001) 2D electron liquid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; McKeown Walker, S; Tamai, A; Wang, Y; Ristic, Z; Bruno, F Y; de la Torre, A; Riccò, S; Plumb, N C; Shi, M; Hlawenka, P; Sánchez-Barriga, J; Varykhalov, A; Kim, T K; Hoesch, M; King, P D C; Meevasana, W; Diebold, U; Mesot, J; Moritz, B; Devereaux, T P; Radovic, M; Baumberger, F

    2016-08-01

    Surfaces and interfaces offer new possibilities for tailoring the many-body interactions that dominate the electrical and thermal properties of transition metal oxides. Here, we use the prototypical two-dimensional electron liquid (2DEL) at the SrTiO3(001) surface to reveal a remarkably complex evolution of electron-phonon coupling with the tunable carrier density of this system. At low density, where superconductivity is found in the analogous 2DEL at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface, our angle-resolved photoemission data show replica bands separated by 100 meV from the main bands. This is a hallmark of a coherent polaronic liquid and implies long-range coupling to a single longitudinal optical phonon branch. In the overdoped regime the preferential coupling to this branch decreases and the 2DEL undergoes a crossover to a more conventional metallic state with weaker short-range electron-phonon interaction. These results place constraints on the theoretical description of superconductivity and allow a unified understanding of the transport properties in SrTiO3-based 2DELs. PMID:27064529

  10. Interplay between the structural and magnetic probes in the elucidation of the structure of a novel 2D layered [V4O4(OH)2(O2CC6H4CO2)4]·DMF.

    PubMed

    Djerdj, Igor; Škapin, Srečo D; Ceh, Miran; Jagličić, Zvonko; Pajić, Damir; Kozlevčar, Bojan; Orel, Bojan; Orel, Zorica Crnjak

    2012-01-14

    The title compound has been synthesized under solvothermal conditions by reacting vanadium(V) oxytriisopropoxide with terephthalic acid in N,N-dimethylformamide. A combination of synchrotron powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and thermal and chemical analysis elucidated the chemical, structural and microstructural features of a new 2D layered inorganic-organic framework. Due to the low-crystallinity of the final material, its crystal structure has been solved from synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data using a direct space global optimization technique and subsequent constraint Rietveld refinement. [V(4)O(4)(OH)(2)(O(2)CC(6)H(4)CO(2))(4)]·DMF crystallizes in the monoclinic system (space group P2/m (No. 10)); cell parameters: a = 20.923(4) Å, b = 5.963(4) Å, c = 20.425(1) Å, β = 123.70(6)°, V = 2120.1(9) Å(3), Z = 2. The overall structure can be described as an array of parallel 2D layers running along [-101] direction, consisting of two types of vanadium oxidation states and coordination polyhedra: face-shared trigonal prisms (V(4+)) and distorted corner-shared square pyramids (V(5+)). Both configurations form independent parallel chains oriented along the 2-fold symmetry crystallographic b-axis mutually interlinked with terephthalate ligands in a monodentate mode perpendicular to it. The morphology of the compound exhibits long nanofibers, with the growth direction along the layered [-101] axis. The magnetic susceptibility measurements show that the magnetic properties of [V(4)O(4)(OH)(2)(O(2)CC(6)H(4)CO(2))(4)]·DMF can be described by a linear antiferromagnetic chain model, with the isotropic exchange interaction of J = -75 K between the nearest V(4+) neighbours of S = 1/2. PMID:22042096

  11. Manifestation of Structure of Electron Bands in Double-Resonant Raman Spectra of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubrov, Yurii; Nikolenko, Andrii; Gubanov, Viktor; Strelchuk, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Micro-Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes in the range of two-phonon 2D bands are investigated in detail. The fine structure of two-phonon 2D bands in the low-temperature Raman spectra of the mixture and individual single-walled carbon nanotubes is considered as the reflection of structure of their π-electron zones. The dispersion behavior of 2D band fine structure components in the resonant Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotube mixture is studied depending on the energy of excitating photons. The role of incoming and outgoing electron-phonon resonances in the formation of 2D band fine structure in Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes is analyzed. The similarity of dispersion behavior of 2D phonon bands in single-walled carbon nanotubes, one-layer graphene, and bulk graphite is discussed.

  12. Manifestation of Structure of Electron Bands in Double-Resonant Raman Spectra of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Stubrov, Yurii; Nikolenko, Andrii; Gubanov, Viktor; Strelchuk, Viktor

    2016-12-01

    Micro-Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes in the range of two-phonon 2D bands are investigated in detail. The fine structure of two-phonon 2D bands in the low-temperature Raman spectra of the mixture and individual single-walled carbon nanotubes is considered as the reflection of structure of their π-electron zones. The dispersion behavior of 2D band fine structure components in the resonant Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotube mixture is studied depending on the energy of excitating photons. The role of incoming and outgoing electron-phonon resonances in the formation of 2D band fine structure in Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes is analyzed. The similarity of dispersion behavior of 2D phonon bands in single-walled carbon nanotubes, one-layer graphene, and bulk graphite is discussed. PMID:26729220

  13. Structural modifications of Tilia cordata wood during heat treatment investigated by FT-IR and 2D IR correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Maria-Cristina; Froidevaux, Julien; Navi, Parviz; Popescu, Carmen-Mihaela

    2013-02-01

    It is known that heat treatment of wood combined with a low percent of relative humidity causes transformations in the chemical composition of it. The modifications and/or degradation of wood components occur by hydrolysis, oxidation, and decarboxylation reactions. The aim of this study was to give better insights on wood chemical modifications during wood heat treatment under low temperature at about 140 °C and 10% percentage of relative humidity, by infrared, principal component analysis and two dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy. For this purpose, hardwood samples of lime (Tilia cordata) were investigated and analysed. The infrared spectra of treated samples were compared with the reference ones, the most important differences being observed in the "fingerprint" region. Due to the complexity of this region, which have contributions from all the wood constituents the chemical changes during hydro-thermal treatment were examined in detail using principal component analysis and 2D IR correlation spectroscopy. By hydro-thermal treatment of wood results the formation of acetic acid, which catalyse the hydrolysis reactions of hemicelluloses and amorphous cellulose. The cleavage of the β-O-4 linkages and splitting of the aliphatic methoxyl chains from the aromatic lignin ring was also observed. For the first treatment interval, a higher extent of carbohydrates degradation was observed, then an increase of the extent of the lignin degradation also took place.

  14. Structural and magnetic properties of quasi-1 and 2D pyrazine-containing spin-1/2 antiferromagnets.

    SciTech Connect

    Manson, J. L.; Connor, M. M.; Schlueter, J. A.; Hyzer, K. A.; Kykeem, A.; Materials Science Division; Eastern Washington Univ.

    2007-06-01

    Aqueous reaction of Cu(BF{sub 4}){sub 2}, NH{sub 4}HF{sub 2}, and pyrazine leads to formation of a novel 3D framework, [Cu(HF{sub 2})(pyz){sub 2}]BF{sub 4} (1), where 2D [Cu(pyz){sub 2}]{sup 2+} square layers are connected via HF{sub 2}{sup -}. A second compound, Cu(ReO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(pyz) (2), was the result of our attempt to create the perrhenate analog of 1; a linear chain compound consisting of CuO{sub 4}N{sub 2} octahedra linked through pyrazine ligands formed instead. Both compounds exhibit extensive hydrogen bonding interactions where bifluoride, F...H...F{sup -}, and O-H...O link layers and chains together in 1 and 2, respectively. Broad maxima indicative of short-range magnetic ordering (SRO) were observed in the magnetic susceptibility at 5.5 (1) and 7.7 K (2) while no evidence for the transition to long-range magnetic ordering (LRO) was detected above 2 K.

  15. New dicyano cyclometalated compounds containing Pd(II)-Tl(I) bonds as building blocks in 2D extended structures: synthesis, structure, and luminescence studies.

    PubMed

    Sicilia, Violeta; Forniés, Juan; Fuertes, Sara; Martín, Antonio

    2012-10-15

    New mixed metal complexes [PdTl(C^N)(CN)(2)] [C^N = 7,8-benzoquinolinate (bzq, 3); 2-phenylpyridinate (ppy, 4)] have been synthesized by reaction of their corresponding precursors (NBu(4))[Pd(C^N)(CN)(2)] [C^N = bzq (1), ppy (2)] with TlPF(6). Compounds 3 and 4 were studied by X-ray diffraction, showing the not-so-common Pd(II)-Tl(I) bonds. Both crystal structures exhibit 2-D extended networks fashioned by organometallic "PdTl(C^N)(CN)(2)" units, each one containing a donor-acceptor Pd(II)-Tl(I) bond, which are connected through additional Tl···N≡C contacts and weak Tl···π (bzq) contacts in the case of 3. Solid state emissions are red-shifted compared with those of the precursors and have been assigned to metal-metal'-to-ligand charge transfer (MM'LCT [d/s σ*(Pd,Tl) → π*(C^N)]) mixed with some intraligand ((3)IL[π(C^N) → π*(C^N)]) character. In diluted solution either at room temperature or 77 K, the Pd-Tl bond is no longer retained as confirmed by mass spectrometry, NMR, and UV-vis spectroscopic techniques. PMID:22998590

  16. Transverse instability and magnetic structures associated with electron phase space holes

    SciTech Connect

    Du Aimin; Wu Mingyu; Lu Quanming; Huang Can; Wang Shui

    2011-03-15

    Electron phase space holes (electron holes) are found to be unstable to the transverse instability. Two-dimensional (2D) electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations are performed to investigate the structures of the fluctuating magnetic field associated with electron holes. The combined actions between the transverse instability and the stabilization by the background magnetic field (B{sub 0}=B{sub 0}e-vector{sub x}) lead a one-dimensional electron hole into several 2D electron holes which are isolated in both the x and y directions. The electrons trapped in these 2D electron holes suffer the electric field drift v{sub E}=ExB{sub 0}/B{sub 0}{sup 2} due to the existence of the perpendicular electric field E{sub y}, which generates the current along the z direction. Then, the unipolar and bipolar structures are formed for the parallel cut of the fluctuating magnetic field along the x and y directions, respectively. At the same time, these 2D electron holes move along the x direction, and the unipolar structures are formed for the parallel cut of the fluctuating magnetic field along the z direction.

  17. Structure-Activity Relationships and Pharmacophore Model of a Non-Competitive Pyrazoline Containing Class of GluN2C/GluN2D Selective Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Acker, Timothy M.; Khatri, Alpa; Vance, Katie M.; Slabber, Cathryn; Bacsa, John; Snyder, James P.; Traynelis, Stephen F.; Liotta, Dennis C.

    2013-01-01

    Here we describe the synthesis and structure-activity relationship for a class of pyrazoline-containing dihydroquinolone negative allosteric modulators of the NMDA receptor that show strong subunit-selectivity for GluN2C- and GluN2D-containing receptors over GluN2A-and GluN2B-containing receptors. Several members of this class inhibit NMDA receptor responses in the nanomolar range, and are more than 50-fold selective over GluN1/GluN2A and GluN1/GluN2B NMDA receptors, as well as AMPA, kainate, GABA, glycine, nicotinic, serotonin, and purinergic receptors. Analysis of the purified enantiomers of one of the more potent and selective compounds shows that the S-enantiomer is both more potent and more selective than the R-enantiomer. The S-enantiomer had an IC50 value of 0.17–0.22 µM at GluN2D- and GluN2C-containing receptors, respectively, and showed over 70-fold selectivity over other NMDA receptor subunits. The subunit-selectivity of this class of compounds should be useful in defining the role of GluN2C- and GluN2D-containing receptors in specific brain circuits in both physiological and patho-physiological conditions. PMID:23909910

  18. Band structure of a 2D photonic crystal based on ferrofluids of Co(1-x)Znx Fe2O4 nanoparticles under perpendicular applied magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Javier; Gonzalez, Luz Esther; Quinonez, Mario; Porras, Nelson; Zambrano, Gustavo; Gomez, Maria Elena

    2014-03-01

    Using a ferrfluid of cobalt-zinc ferrite nanoparticles Co(1 - x)ZnxFe2O4 coated with oleic acid and suspended in ethanol, we have fabricated a 2D photonic crystal (PC) by the application of an external magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of the ferrofluid. The 2D PC is made by rods of nanoparticles organized in a hexagonal structure. By means of the plane-wave expansion method, we study its photonic band structure (PBS) which depends on the effective permittivity and on the area ratio of the liquid phase. Additionaly, taking into account the Maxwell-Garnett theory we calculated the effective permittivity of the rods. We have found that the effective refractive index of the ferrofluid increases with its magnetization. Using these results we calculate the band structure of the photonic crystal at different applied magnetic fields, finding that the increase of the applied magnetic field shifts the band structure to lower frequencies with the appearance of more band gaps. Departamento de Física, Universidad del Valle, A.A. 25360, Cali, Colombia

  19. Electronic structure and relaxation dynamics in a superconducting topological material

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Neupane, Madhab; Ishida, Yukiaki; Sankar, Raman; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Sanchez, Daniel S.; Belopolski, Ilya; Xu, Su-Yang; Alidoust, Nasser; Hosen, M. Mofazzel; Shin, Shik; et al

    2016-03-03

    Topological superconductors host new states of quantum matter which show a pairing gap in the bulk and gapless surface states providing a platform to realize Majorana fermions. Recently, alkaline-earth metal Sr intercalated Bi2Se3 has been reported to show superconductivity with a Tc~3K and a large shielding fraction. Here we report systematic normal state electronic structure studies of Sr0.06Bi2Se3 (Tc~2.5K) by performing photoemission spectroscopy. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we observe a quantum well confined two-dimensional (2D) state coexisting with a topological surface state in Sr0.06Bi2Se3. Furthermore, our time-resolved ARPES reveals the relaxation dynamics showing different decay mechanism between the excitedmore » topological surface states and the two-dimensional states. Our experimental observation is understood by considering the intra-band scattering for topological surface states and an additional electron phonon scattering for the 2D states, which is responsible for the superconductivity. Our first-principles calculations agree with the more effective scattering and a shorter lifetime of the 2D states. In conclusion, our results will be helpful in understanding low temperature superconducting states of these topological materials.« less

  20. Electronic structure and relaxation dynamics in a superconducting topological material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neupane, Madhab; Ishida, Yukiaki; Sankar, Raman; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Sanchez, Daniel S.; Belopolski, Ilya; Xu, Su-Yang; Alidoust, Nasser; Hosen, M. Mofazzel; Shin, Shik; Chou, Fangcheng; Hasan, M. Zahid; Durakiewicz, Tomasz

    2016-03-01

    Topological superconductors host new states of quantum matter which show a pairing gap in the bulk and gapless surface states providing a platform to realize Majorana fermions. Recently, alkaline-earth metal Sr intercalated Bi2Se3 has been reported to show superconductivity with a Tc ~ 3 K and a large shielding fraction. Here we report systematic normal state electronic structure studies of Sr0.06Bi2Se3 (Tc ~ 2.5 K) by performing photoemission spectroscopy. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we observe a quantum well confined two-dimensional (2D) state coexisting with a topological surface state in Sr0.06Bi2Se3. Furthermore, our time-resolved ARPES reveals the relaxation dynamics showing different decay mechanism between the excited topological surface states and the two-dimensional states. Our experimental observation is understood by considering the intra-band scattering for topological surface states and an additional electron phonon scattering for the 2D states, which is responsible for the superconductivity. Our first-principles calculations agree with the more effective scattering and a shorter lifetime of the 2D states. Our results will be helpful in understanding low temperature superconducting states of these topological materials.

  1. Electronic structure and relaxation dynamics in a superconducting topological material

    PubMed Central

    Neupane, Madhab; Ishida, Yukiaki; Sankar, Raman; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Sanchez, Daniel S.; Belopolski, Ilya; Xu, Su-Yang; Alidoust, Nasser; Hosen, M. Mofazzel; Shin, Shik; Chou, Fangcheng; Hasan, M. Zahid; Durakiewicz, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Topological superconductors host new states of quantum matter which show a pairing gap in the bulk and gapless surface states providing a platform to realize Majorana fermions. Recently, alkaline-earth metal Sr intercalated Bi2Se3 has been reported to show superconductivity with a Tc ~ 3 K and a large shielding fraction. Here we report systematic normal state electronic structure studies of Sr0.06Bi2Se3 (Tc ~ 2.5 K) by performing photoemission spectroscopy. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we observe a quantum well confined two-dimensional (2D) state coexisting with a topological surface state in Sr0.06Bi2Se3. Furthermore, our time-resolved ARPES reveals the relaxation dynamics showing different decay mechanism between the excited topological surface states and the two-dimensional states. Our experimental observation is understood by considering the intra-band scattering for topological surface states and an additional electron phonon scattering for the 2D states, which is responsible for the superconductivity. Our first-principles calculations agree with the more effective scattering and a shorter lifetime of the 2D states. Our results will be helpful in understanding low temperature superconducting states of these topological materials. PMID:26936229

  2. Electronic structure and relaxation dynamics in a superconducting topological material.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Madhab; Ishida, Yukiaki; Sankar, Raman; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Sanchez, Daniel S; Belopolski, Ilya; Xu, Su-Yang; Alidoust, Nasser; Hosen, M Mofazzel; Shin, Shik; Chou, Fangcheng; Hasan, M Zahid; Durakiewicz, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Topological superconductors host new states of quantum matter which show a pairing gap in the bulk and gapless surface states providing a platform to realize Majorana fermions. Recently, alkaline-earth metal Sr intercalated Bi2Se3 has been reported to show superconductivity with a Tc ~ 3 K and a large shielding fraction. Here we report systematic normal state electronic structure studies of Sr0.06Bi2Se3 (Tc ~ 2.5 K) by performing photoemission spectroscopy. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we observe a quantum well confined two-dimensional (2D) state coexisting with a topological surface state in Sr0.06Bi2Se3. Furthermore, our time-resolved ARPES reveals the relaxation dynamics showing different decay mechanism between the excited topological surface states and the two-dimensional states. Our experimental observation is understood by considering the intra-band scattering for topological surface states and an additional electron phonon scattering for the 2D states, which is responsible for the superconductivity. Our first-principles calculations agree with the more effective scattering and a shorter lifetime of the 2D states. Our results will be helpful in understanding low temperature superconducting states of these topological materials. PMID:26936229

  3. 2D dual permeability modeling of flow and transport in a two-scale structured lignitic mine soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusek, J.; Gerke, H. H.; Vogel, T.; Maurer, T.; Buczko, U.

    2009-04-01

    Two-dimensional single- and dual-permeability simulations are used to analyze water and solute fluxes in heterogeneous lignitic mine soil at a forest-reclaimed mine spoil heap. The soil heterogeneity on this experimental site "Bärenbrücker Höhe" resulted from inclined dumping structures and sediment mixtures that consist of sand with lignitic dust and embedded lignitic fragments. Observations on undisturbed field suction-cell lysimeters including tracer experiments revealed funneling-type preferential flow with lateral water and bromide movement along inclined sediment structures. The spatial distribution of soil structures and fragment distributions was acquired by a digital camera and identified by a supervised classification of the digital profile image. First, a classical single-domain modeling approach was used, with spatially variable scaling factors inferred from image analyses. In the next step, a two-continuum scenario was constructed to examine additional effects of nonequilibrium on the flow regime. The scaling factors used for the preferential flow domain are here obtained from the gradient of the grayscale images. So far, the single domain scenarios failed to predict the bromide leaching patterns although water effluent could be described. Dual-permeability model allows the incorporation of structural effects and can be used as a tool to further testing other approaches that account for structure effects. The numerical study suggests that additional experiments are required to obtain better understanding of the highly complex transport processes on this experimental site.

  4. Controls on the Flow Regime and Thermal Structure of the Subduction Zone Mantle Wedge: A Systematic 2-D and 3-D Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Voci, Giuseppe; Davies, Rhodri; Goes, Saskia; Kramer, Stephan; Wilson, Cian

    2014-05-01

    Arc volcanism at subduction zones is likely regulated by the mantle wedge's flow regime and thermal structure and, hence, numerous studies have attempted to quantify the principal controls on mantle wedge conditions. Here, we build on these previous studies by undertaking the first systematic 2-D and 3-D numerical investigation, across a wide parameter-space, into how hydration and thermal buoyancy influence the wedge's flow regime and associated thermal structure, above a kinematically driven subducting plate. We find that small-scale convection (SSC), resulting from Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, or drips, off the base of the overriding lithosphere, is a typical occurrence, if: (i) viscosities are < 5×1018 Pa s; and (ii) hydrous weakening of wedge rheology extends at least 100-150 km from the trench. In 2-D models, instabilities generally take the form of 'drips'. Although along-strike averages of wedge velocities and temperature in 3-D structure are consistent with those in 2-D, fluctuations are larger in 3-D. Furthermore, in 3-D, two separate, but interacting, longitudinal Richter roll systems form (with their axes aligned perpendicular to the trench), the first below the arc region and the second below the back-arc region. These instabilities result in transient and spatial temperature fluctuations of 100-150K, which are sufficient to influence melting, the stability of hydrous minerals and the dehydration of crustal material. Furthermore, they are efficient at eroding the overriding lithosphere, particularly in 3-D and, thus, provide a means to explain observations of high heat flow and thin back-arc lithosphere at many subduction zones, if back-arc mantle is hydrated.

  5. Investigation of mechanical strength of 2D nanoscale structures using a molecular dynamics based computational intelligence approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, A.; Vijayaraghavan, V.; Wong, C. H.; Tai, K.; Singru, Pravin M.; Mahapatra, S. S.; Sangwan, K. S.

    2015-09-01

    A molecular dynamics (MD) based computational intelligence (CI) approach is proposed to investigate the Young modulus of two graphene sheets: Armchair and Zigzag. In this approach, the effect of aspect ratio, the temperature, the number of atomic planes and the vacancy defects on the Young modulus of two graphene sheets are first analyzed using the MD simulation. The data obtained using the MD simulation is then fed into the paradigm of a CI cluster comprising of genetic programming, which was specifically designed to formulate the explicit relationship of Young modulus of two graphene structures. We find that the MD-based-CI model is able to model the Young modulus of two graphene structures very well, which compiles in good agreement with that of experimental results obtained from the literature. Additionally, we also conducted sensitivity and parametric analysis and found that the number of defects has the most dominating influence on the Young modulus of two graphene structures.

  6. Finite Element Method for Analysis of Band Structures of 2D Phononic Crystals with Archimedean-like tilings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianbao; Wang, Yue-Sheng; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, a finite element method based on the ABAQUS code and user subroutine is presented to evaluate the propagation of acoustic waves in the two-dimensional phononic crystals with Archimedean-like tilings. Two systems composed of cylinder scatters embedded in a host in Ladybug and Bathroom lattices are considered. Complete and accurate band structures and transmission spectra are obtained to identify the band gaps and eigenmodes. We found that Archimedean-like structures can have some advantages over the traditional square lattice regarding the completeness of the gap and its position and width. Also, due to the same square primitive unit cell and the first Brillouin zone, the two square-like lattices have similar acoustic response in lower bands. The results indicate that the finite element method is precise for the band structure computation of the complex phononic crystals with Archimedean tilings.

  7. Effects of Pauli, Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions on electronic states in 2D circular hydrogenic anti-dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abuali, Z.; Golshan, M. M.; Davatolhagh, S.

    2016-09-01

    The present work is concerned with a report on the effects of Pauli, Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions (SOI) on the energy levels of a 2D circular hydrogenic quantum anti-dot(QAD). To pursue this aim, we first present a brief review on the analytical solutions to the Schrödinger equation of electronic states in a quantum anti-dot when a hydrogenic donor is placed at the center, revealing the degeneracies involved in the ground, first and second excited states. We then proceed by adding the aforementioned spin-orbit interactions to the Hamiltonian and treat them as perturbation, thereby, calculating the energy shifts to the first three states. As we show, the Rashba spin-orbit interaction gives rise to a shift in the energies of the ground and second excited states, while it partially lifts the degeneracy of the first excited state. Our calculations also indicate that the Dresselhaus effect, while keeping the degeneracy of the ground and second excited states intact, removes the degeneracy of the first excited state in the opposite sense. The Pauli spin-orbit interaction, on the other hand, is diagonal in the appropriate bases, and thus its effect is readily calculated. The results show that degeneracy of ℓ = 0 (prevailing in the ground and second excited state) remains but the degeneracy of ℓ = 1 (prevailing in the first excited state) is again partially lifted. Moreover, we present the energy corrections due to the three spin-orbit interactions as functions of anti-dot's radius, Rashba and Dresselhaus strengths discussing how they affect the corresponding states. The material presented in the article conceives the possibility of generating spin currents in the hydrogenic circular anti-dots.

  8. Sparsity-based Ankylography for Recovering 3D molecular structures from single-shot 2D scattered light intensity

    PubMed Central

    Mutzafi, Maor; Shechtman, Yoav; Eldar, Yonina C.; Cohen, Oren; Segev, Mordechai

    2015-01-01

    Deciphering the three-dimensional (3D) structure of complex molecules is of major importance, typically accomplished with X-ray crystallography. Unfortunately, many important molecules cannot be crystallized, hence their 3D structure is unknown. Ankylography presents an alternative, relying on scattering an ultrashort X-ray pulse off a single molecule before it disintegrates, measuring the far-field intensity on a two-dimensional surface, followed by computation. However, significant information is absent due to lower dimensionality of the measurements and the inability to measure the phase. Recent Ankylography experiments attracted much interest, but it was counter-argued that Ankylography is valid only for objects containing a small number of volume pixels. Here, we propose a sparsity-based approach to reconstruct the 3D structure of molecules. Sparsity is natural for Ankylography, because molecules can be represented compactly in stoichiometric basis. Utilizing sparsity, we surpass current limits on recoverable information by orders of magnitude, paving the way for deciphering the 3D structure of macromolecules. PMID:26289358

  9. Temperature-driven disorder-order transitions in 2D copper-intercalated MoO3 revealed using dynamic transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Bryan W.; Chung, Frank R.; Wang, Mengjing; LaGrange, Thomas; Koski, Kristie J.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate two different classes of disorder-order phase transitions in two-dimensional layered nanomaterial MoO3 intercalated with ˜9-15 atomic percent zero-valent copper using conventional in situ electron diffraction and dynamic transmission electron microscopy. Heating to ˜325 °C on a time scale of minutes produces a superlattice consistent with the formation of a charge density wave stabilized by nanometer-scale ordering of the copper intercalant. Unlike conventional purely electronic charge-density-wave states which form, reform, and disappear on picosecond scales as the temperature is changed, once it forms the observed structure in Cu-MoO3 is stable indefinitely over a very large temperature range (30 °C to the decomposition temperature of 450 °C). Nanosecond-scale heating to ˜380-400 °C produced a completely different structure, replacing the disordered as-fabricated Cu-MoO3 with a much more crystallographically ordered metastable state that, according to a precession electron diffraction reconstruction, resembles the original MoO3 lattice apart from an asymmetric distortion that appears to expand parts of the van der Waals gaps to accommodate the copper intercalant. Control experiments in Cu-free material exhibited neither transformation, thus it appears the copper is a necessary part of the phase dynamics. This work shows how the combination of high-density metal atom intercalation and heat treatment over a wide range of time scales can produce nanomaterials of high crystalline quality in unique structural states that cannot be accessed through other methods.

  10. Deducing the subsurface geological conditions and structural framework of the NE Gulf of Suez area, using 2-D and 3-D seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahra, Hesham Shaker; Nakhla, Adel Mokhles

    2015-06-01

    An interpretation of the seismic data of Ras Budran and Abu Zenima oil fields, northern central Gulf of Suez, is carried out to evaluate its subsurface tectonic setting. The structural configuration, as well as the tectonic features of the concerned area is criticized through the study of 2D and 3D seismic data interpretation with the available geological data, in which the geo-seismic depth maps for the main interesting levels (Kareem, Nukhul, Matulla, Raha and Nubia Formations) are depicted. Such maps reflect that, the Miocene structure of Ras Budran area is a nearly NE-SW trending anticlinal feature, which broken into several panels by a set of NWSE and NE-SW trending faults. The Pre-Miocene structure of the studied area is very complex, where Ras Budran area consists of step faults down stepping to the south and southwest, which have been subjected to cross faults of NE-SW trend with lateral and vertical displacements.

  11. Quantitative Subsurface Atomic Structure Fingerprint for 2D Materials and Heterostructures by First-Principles-Calibrated Contact-Resonance Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tu, Qing; Lange, Björn; Parlak, Zehra; Lopes, Joao Marcelo J; Blum, Volker; Zauscher, Stefan

    2016-07-26

    Interfaces and subsurface layers are critical for the performance of devices made of 2D materials and heterostructures. Facile, nondestructive, and quantitative ways to characterize the structure of atomically thin, layered materials are thus essential to ensure control of the resultant properties. Here, we show that contact-resonance atomic force microscopy-which is exquisitely sensitive to stiffness changes that arise from even a single atomic layer of a van der Waals-adhered material-is a powerful experimental tool to address this challenge. A combined density functional theory and continuum modeling approach is introduced that yields sub-surface-sensitive, nanomechanical fingerprints associated with specific, well-defined structure models of individual surface domains. Where such models are known, this information can be correlated with experimentally obtained contact-resonance frequency maps to reveal the (sub)surface structure of different domains on the sample. PMID:27263541

  12. A time series generalized functional model based method for vibration-based damage precise localization in structures consisting of 1D, 2D, and 3D elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaris, C. S.; Sakellariou, J. S.; Fassois, S. D.

    2016-06-01

    This study focuses on the problem of vibration-based damage precise localization via data-based, time series type, methods for structures consisting of 1D, 2D, or 3D elements. A Generalized Functional Model Based method is postulated based on an expanded Vector-dependent Functionally Pooled ARX (VFP-ARX) model form, capable of accounting for an arbitrary structural topology. The FP model's operating parameter vector elements are properly constrained to reflect any given topology. Damage localization is based on operating parameter vector estimation within the specified topology, so that the location estimate and its uncertainty bounds are statistically optimal. The method's effectiveness is experimentally demonstrated through damage precise localization on a laboratory spatial truss structure using various damage scenarios and a single pair of random excitation - vibration response signals in a low and limited frequency bandwidth.

  13. Elucidating structural characteristics of biomass using solution-state 2 D NMR with a mixture of deuterated dimethylsulfoxide and hexamethylphosphoramide

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pu, Yunqiao; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Yoo, Chang Geun; Li, Mi

    2016-04-26

    In recent developments of NMR methods for characterization of lignocellulosic biomass allow improved understanding of plant cell-wall structures with minimal deconstruction and modification of biomass. This study introduces a new NMR solvent system composed of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO-d6) and hexamethylphosphoramide (HMPA-d18). HMPA as a co-solvent enhanced swelling and mobility of the biomass samples; thereby it allowed enhancing signals of NMR spectra. Moreover, the structural information of biomass was successfully analyzed by the proposed NMR solvent system (DMSO-d6/HMPA-d18; 4:1, v/v) with different biomass. The proposed bi-solvent system does not require derivatization or isolation of biomass, facilitating a facile sample preparation and involvingmore » with no signals overlapping with biomass peaks. Furthermore, it also allows analyzing biomass with a room-temperature NMR probe instead of cryo-probes, which are traditionally used for enhancing signal intensities.« less

  14. Deterministic sub-micron 2D grating structures on steel by UV-fs-laser interference patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekesi, J.; Simon, P.; Ihlemann, J.

    2014-01-01

    Large area linear and crossed grating structures on steel surfaces are obtained by UV-femtosecond-laser ablation at 248 nm. High resolution on large areas is secured using a beam delivery system based on a two-grating interferometer. Thus, deterministic gratings with periods down to 330 nm and modulation depths of more than 100 nm are fabricated on tool steel and stainless steel. Areas of up to mm can be processed without stitching errors.

  15. Ag (I)-based 2D metal frameworks with helical structures decorated by the homochiral camphor-10-sulfonic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Peng; Wang, Jing; Wang, Jun; Pan, Daocheng; Xu, Guohai

    2010-12-01

    Two two-dimension homochiral Ag (I) metal frameworks constructed from enantiopure camphor-10-sulfonic acid and hexamethylenetetramine have been synthesized at the room temperature. These two complexes with (6, 3) topology decorated by the homochiral camphor-10-sulfonic acid possess the unique helical structures. The result of Circular Dichroism (CD) spectroscopy confirms that the bulk materials are homochiral and also indicates the handedness of the single crystals can be controlled by the chirality of the camphor-10-sulfonic acid.

  16. 2-D differential quadrature solution for vibration analysis of functionally graded conical, cylindrical shell and annular plate structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornabene, Francesco; Viola, Erasmo; Inman, Daniel J.

    2009-12-01

    This paper focuses on the dynamic behavior of functionally graded conical, cylindrical shells and annular plates. The last two structures are obtained as special cases of the conical shell formulation. The first-order shear deformation theory (FSDT) is used to analyze the above moderately thick structural elements. The treatment is developed within the theory of linear elasticity, when materials are assumed to be isotropic and inhomogeneous through the thickness direction. The two-constituent functionally graded shell consists of ceramic and metal that are graded through the thickness, from one surface of the shell to the other. Two different power-law distributions are considered for the ceramic volume fraction. The homogeneous isotropic material is inferred as a special case of functionally graded materials (FGM). The governing equations of motion, expressed as functions of five kinematic parameters, are discretized by means of the generalized differential quadrature (GDQ) method. The discretization of the system leads to a standard linear eigenvalue problem, where two independent variables are involved without using the Fourier modal expansion methodology. For the homogeneous isotropic special case, numerical solutions are compared with the ones obtained using commercial programs such as Abaqus, Ansys, Nastran, Straus, Pro/Mechanica. Very good agreement is observed. Furthermore, the convergence rate of natural frequencies is shown to be very fast and the stability of the numerical methodology is very good. Different typologies of non-uniform grid point distributions are considered. Finally, for the functionally graded material case numerical results illustrate the influence of the power-law exponent and of the power-law distribution choice on the mechanical behavior of shell structures.

  17. Thermopower enhancement by fractional layer control in 2D oxide superlattices.

    PubMed

    Choi, Woo Seok; Ohta, Hiromichi; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2014-10-22

    Precise tuning of the 2D carrier density by using fractional δ-doping of d electrons improves the thermoelectric properties of oxide heterostructures. This promising result can be attributed to the anisotropic band structure in the 2D system, indicating that δ-doped oxide superlattices are good candidates for advanced thermoelectrics. PMID:25066105

  18. Synthesis and structure of a 2D Zn complex with mixed ligands stacked in offset ABAB manner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Ling; Wang, Yan-Qing; Ni, Gang

    2016-07-01

    The title complex, {[Zn(ODIB)1/2( bpdc)]·2DMF} n was prepared under hydrothermal conditions (dimethylformamide and water) based on two ligands, namely, 1,1'-oxy-bis[3,5-diimidazolyl-benzene] (ODIB) and biphenyldicarboxylic acid (H2 bpdc). ODIB ligands link Zn cations to give layers in crystal. bpdc 2- anions coordinate to Zn atoms, however, their introduction does not increase the dimension of the structure. Each layer is partially passes through the adjacent layers in the offset ABAB manner.

  19. Sensitivity analysis of the non-linear dynamic viscoplastic response of 2-d structures with respect to material parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Makarand; Noor, Ahmed K.

    1995-01-01

    A computational procedure is presented for evaluating the sensitivity coefficients of the viscoplastic response of structures subjected to dynamic loading. A state of plane stress is assumed to exist in the structure, a velocity strain-Cauchy stress formulation is used, and the geometric non-linearities arising from large strains are incorporated. The Jaumann rate is used as a frame indifferent stress rate. The material model is chosen to be isothermal viscoplasticity, and an associated flow rule is used with a von Mises effective stress. The equations of motion emanating from a finite element semi-discretization are integrated using an explicit central difference scheme with an implicit stress update. The sensitivity coefficients are evaluated using a direct differentiation approach. Since the domain of integration is the current configuration, the sensitivity coefficients of the spatial derivatives of the shape functions must be included. Numerical results are presented for a thin plate with a central cutout subjected to an in-plane compressive loading. The sensitivity coefficients are generated by evaluating the derivatives of the response quantities with respect to Young's modulus, and two of the material parameters characterizing the viscoplastic response. Time histories of the response and sensitivity coefficients, and spatial distributions at selected times are presented.

  20. Crystal structures and fluorescence properties of two 2D MnII/CdII trimellitic complexes containing terpyridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yixia; Chai, Hongmei; Hou, Xiangyang; Wang, Jijiang; Fu, Feng

    2015-12-01

    Hydrothermal reactions of manganese (II)/cadmium(II) salts with 1,2,4-trimellitic acid (H3tma) and 2,2‧:6‧,2-terpyridine (tpy) result in two novel complexes formulated with [M(Htma)(tpy)]·H2O (M = Mn(1) and Cd(2)). X-ray diffraction structural analyses of two complexes reveal they are isomorphic except for the different center metal ions and crystallize in the monoclinic crystal system of P(2)/n space group. The metal ion lies in a six-coordinated distorted octahedral environment coordinated with three Htma2- anions and one tpy ligand. There is an infinite two-dimensional rhombic network based on the metallic dimmers and Htma2- anions with the tpy ligands in void. Furthermore, the tpy ligands from the adjacent network weakly interact each other by π⋯π packing interactions into 3D supramolecular structure. The fluorescence properties could be assigned to the π - π* transition of organic ligands.

  1. Electronic structure of herbicides: Atrazine and bromoxynil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Igor; Kovač, Branka

    2011-06-01

    The electronic structures of herbicides atrazine and bromoxynil have been investigated by UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), quantum chemical calculations and comparison with X-ray diffraction, molecular docking and molecular dynamics studies. Their electronic and molecular structures are discussed in the context of their biological activity. This is the first report which correlates the molecular mechanism of biological activity of these herbicides with their experimentally determined electronic and molecular structures.

  2. Syntheses and crystal structures of four 1-D or 2-D coordination polymers based on 1-((benzotriazol-1-yl)methyl)-1 H-1,3-imidazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoli; Li, Weiqiang; Jin, Guanghua; Zhao, Dong; Zhu, Xiaoqing; Meng, Xiangru; Hou, Hongwei

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, four coordination polymers, {[Ag(bmi)]·NO 3} n ( 1), [Co(N 3) 2(bmi) 2] n ( 2), [Cu(SCN) 2(bmi) 2] n ( 3), and {[Cu(bmi) 2(CH 3OH)(H 2O)]·(ClO 4) 2} n ( 4) have been synthesized through the reactions of an unsymmetrical ligand 1-((benzotriazol-1-yl)methyl)-1 H-1,3-imidazole (bmi) with Ag(I), Co(II) and Cu(II) salts at room temperature. X-ray diffraction analyses showed that compound 1 exhibits double-stranded helical chain. Compounds 2- 4 display 2-D rhombus grid network structure. The rhombus grid consists of 32-membered rings, and gives the dimensions of ca. 8.9 × 8.9 Å for compound 2, ca. 10.1 × 10.1 Å for compound 3, and ca. 9.7 × 9.5 Å for compound 4. In addition, the 2-D layers of compound 3 are stacked into 3-D structure via π- π interactions, while the 3-D architecture of compound 4 is realized through complicated hydrogen bonds and π- π interactions. The thermal analyses of compounds 1 and 3 indicate that they have high thermal stability and are stable up to 259 °C.

  3. Phosphorene: A New High-Mobility 2D Semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Han; Neal, Adam; Zhu, Zhen; Tomanek, David; Ye, Peide

    2014-03-01

    The rise of 2D crystals has opened various possibilities for future electrical and optical applications. MoS2 n-type transistors are showing great potential in ultra-scaled and low-power electronics. Here, we introduce phosphorene, a name we coined for 2D few-layer black phosphorus, a new 2D material with layered structure. We perform ab initio band structure calculations and show that the fundamental band gap depends sensitively on the number of layers. We observe transport behavior, which shows a mobility variation in the 2D plane. High on-current of 194 mA/mm, high hole mobility up to 286 cm2/V .s and on/off ratio up to 104 was achieved with phosphorene transistors at room temperature. Schottky barrier height at the metal/phosphorene interface was also measured as a function of temperature. We demonstrate a CMOS inverter with combination to MoS2 NMOS transistors, which shows great potential for semiconducting 2D crystals in future electronic, optoelectronic and flexible electronic devices.

  4. Iterative closest curve: a framework for curvilinear structure registration application to 2D/3D coronary arteries registration.

    PubMed

    Benseghir, Thomas; Malandain, Grégoire; Vaillant, Régis

    2013-01-01

    Treatment coronary arteries endovascular involves catheter navigation through patient vasculature. The projective angiography guidance is limited in the case of chronic total occlusion where occluded vessel can not be seen. Integrating standard preoperative CT angiography information with live fluoroscopic images addresses this limitation but requires alignment of both modalities. This article proposes a structure-based registration method that intrinsically preserves both the geometrical and topological coherencies of the vascular centrelines to be registered, by the means of a dedicated curve-to-curve distance pairs of closest curves are identified, while pairing their points. Preliminary experiments demonstrate that the proposed approach performs better than the standard Iterative Closest Point method giving a wider attraction basin and improved accuracy. PMID:24505664

  5. Structure of the Human Dopamine D3 Receptor in Complex with a D2/D3 Selective Antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Ellen Y.T.; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Qiang; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Hanson, Michael A.; Shi, Lei; Newman, Amy Hauck; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2010-11-30

    Dopamine modulates movement, cognition, and emotion through activation of dopamine G protein-coupled receptors in the brain. The crystal structure of the human dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) in complex with the small molecule D2R/D3R-specific antagonist eticlopride reveals important features of the ligand binding pocket and extracellular loops. On the intracellular side of the receptor, a locked conformation of the ionic lock and two distinctly different conformations of intracellular loop 2 are observed. Docking of R-22, a D3R-selective antagonist, reveals an extracellular extension of the eticlopride binding site that comprises a second binding pocket for the aryl amide of R-22, which differs between the highly homologous D2R and D3R. This difference provides direction to the design of D3R-selective agents for treating drug abuse and other neuropsychiatric indications.

  6. Probing the 2D temperature structure of protoplanetary disks with Herschel observations of high-J CO lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, D.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Kama, M.; Bruderer, S.; Hogerheijde, M. R.

    2016-06-01

    The gas temperature structure of protoplanetary disks is a key ingredient for interpreting various disk observations and for quantifying the subsequent evolution of these systems. The comparison of low- and mid-J CO rotational lines is a powerful tool for assessing the temperature gradient in the warm molecular layer of disks. Spectrally resolved high-J (Ju> 14) CO lines probe intermediate distances and heights from the star that are not sampled by (sub-)millimeter CO spectroscopy. This paper presents new Herschel/HIFI and archival PACS observations of 12CO, 13CO, and [C ii] emission in four Herbig AeBe disks (HD 100546, HD 97048, IRS 48, HD 163296) and three T Tauri disks (AS 205, S CrA, TW Hya). In the case of the T Tauri systems AS 205 and S CrA, the CO emission has a single-peaked profile, likely due to a slow wind. For all the other systems, the Herschel CO spectra are consistent with pure disk emission and the spectrally resolved lines (HIFI) and the CO rotational ladder (PACS) are analyzed simultaneously assuming power-law temperature and column density profiles, using the velocity profile to locate the emission in the disk. The temperature profile varies substantially from disk to disk. In particular, Tgas in the disk surface layers can differ by up to an order of magnitude among the four Herbig AeBe systems; HD 100546 is the hottest and HD 163296 the coldest disk in the sample. Clear evidence of a warm disk layer where Tgas>Tdust is found in all the Herbig Ae disks. The observed CO fluxes and line profiles are compared to predictions of physical-chemical models. The primary parameters affecting the disk temperature structure are the flaring angle, the gas-to-dust mass ratio, the scale height, and the dust settling.

  7. Tuning the structures based on polyoxometalates from 1-D to 2-D by using different secondary organic ligands.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yang-Yang; Xiao-Zhang; Zhao, De-Chuan; Guo, Hai-Yang; Fu, Li-Wei; Guo, Lan-Lan; Cui, Xiao-Bing; Huo, Qi-Sheng; Xu, Ji-Qing

    2015-09-01

    Six new organic-inorganic hybrid compounds based on [XM12O40](4-) (X = heteroatom, M = metal atom), namely [Cu(pic)2][H2XM12O40]·2Hapy·2apy (X = Si, M = W for , X = Ge, M = W for and X = Si, M = Mo for ), [Cu(2,2'-bpy)2][Cu(2,2'-bpy)(H2O)][Cu(pic)2]0.5[XM12O40]·nH2O (X = Si, M = Mo, n = 0.5 for , X = Ge, M = W, n = 1 for ) and [Cu(phen)(H2O)]2[Cu(pic)2][GeW12O40]·2.5H2O () (pic = deprotonated picolinic acid, apy = 2-aminopyridine, 2,2'-bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, phen = phenanthroline), have been synthesized and characterized by IR, UV-Vis, XRD, cyclic voltammetric measurements and single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Single crystal X-ray analysis reveals that compounds are isomorphous and isostructural, in which each is based on [H2XM12O40](2-) and [Cu(pic)2]. Compounds and are also isomorphous and isostructural, of which the structures are more interesting than those of compounds . Both structures are constructed from [XM12O40](4-) and metal mixed-organic-ligand complexes. Compound is also constructed from Keggin ions and metal mixed-organic-ligand complexes, which are, however, thoroughly different from those of compounds and . The photodegradation properties of compounds have been analyzed. Compounds also exhibit rapid absorption properties for RhB (Rhodamine B). Detailed analysis of the photodegradation properties of compounds reveals that the molybdate POM has stronger degradation ability for RhB than the tungstate one. PMID:26223513

  8. Structural Variations in the Uranyl/4,4'-Biphenyldicarboxylate System. Rare Examples of 2D → 3D Polycatenated Uranyl-Organic Networks.

    PubMed

    Thuéry, Pierre; Harrowfield, Jack

    2015-08-17

    4,4'-Biphenyldicarboxylic acid (H2L) was reacted with uranyl ions under solvo-hydrothermal conditions with variations in the experimental procedure (organic cosolvent, presence of additional 3d-block metal cations, and N-donor species), thus giving six complexes of the fully deprotonated acid that were characterized by their crystal structure and, in most cases, their emission spectrum. The three complexes [UO2(L)(DMA)] (1), [UO2(L)(NMP)] (2), and [UO2(L)(NMP)] (3) include the cosolvent as a coligand, and they crystallize as two-dimensional (2D) assemblies, with different combinations of the chelating and bridging-bidentate carboxylate coordination modes, resulting in two different topologies. Complex 4, [Ni(bipy)3][(UO2)2(L)2(C2O4)]·H2O, includes oxalate coligands generated in situ and contains an anionic planar two-dimensional (2D) assembly with a {6(3)} honeycomb topology. The same hexagonal geometry is found in the homoleptic complexes [Ni(bipy)3][(UO2)2(L)3]·6H2O (5) and [Ni(phen)3][(UO2)2(L)3]·4H2O (6), but the large size of the hexagonal rings in these cases (∼27 Å in the longest dimension) allows 2D → three-dimensional (3D) inclined polycatenation to occur, with the two families of networks either orthogonal in tetragonal complex 5 or at an angle of 73.4° in orthorhombic complex 6. The parallel networks are arranged in closely spaced groups of two, with possible π···π stacking interactions, and as many as four rods from four parallel nets pass through each ring of the inclined family of nets, an unusually high degree of catenation. These are the second cases only of 2D → 3D inclined polycatenation in uranyl-organic species. Emission spectra measured in the solid state show the usual vibronic fine structure, with variations in intensity and positions of maxima that are not simply connected with the number of equatorial donors and the presence of additional metal cations. PMID:26241368

  9. Perspectives for spintronics in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wei

    2016-03-01

    The past decade has been especially creative for spintronics since the (re)discovery of various two dimensional (2D) materials. Due to the unusual physical characteristics, 2D materials have provided new platforms to probe the spin interaction with other degrees of freedom for electrons, as well as to be used for novel spintronics applications. This review briefly presents the most important recent and ongoing research for spintronics in 2D materials.

  10. Organic carboxylate ligands tuned structural variations of two new Cd(II) coordination polymers: From 2D layer to 3D framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Chang-Wei; Li, Jing; Liu, Yan-Wu; Li, Xia; Yuan, Zhi

    2015-11-01

    Two new Cd(II) coordination polymers, namely [Cd(4,4‧-sdb) (biimpy)]n·1.5n(H2O) (1) and [Cd2(Htci)2(biimpy)2]n (2) (4,4‧-H2sdb = 4,4‧-sulfonyldibenzoate, H3tci = tri(2-carboxyethyl)isocyanurate and biimpy = 2,6-bis(1-imdazoly)pyridine), have been synthesized by the hydrothermal reactions of Cd(NO3)2 and the mixed ligands of 4,4‧-H2sdb and biimpy or H3tci and biimpy. Single crystal X-ray structural analyses reveal that compound 1 features a 2D layered structure with 3-connected topology, and compound 2 features a 3D framework with 6-connected 6T8 topology. In addition, the thermal stabilities and luminescent properties of compounds 1 and 2 were also investigated.

  11. Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates with transition metal as a central atom: Crystal structure and magnetic study with 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, Feng; Chen, YiPing; You, ZhuChai; Xia, ZeMin; Ge, SuZhi; Sun, YanQiong; Huang, BiHua

    2013-06-01

    Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates, [Co(phen)₃]₃[CoW₁₂O₄₀]·9H₂O 1 (phen=1,10-phenanthroline) and [Fe(phen)₃]₂[FeW₁₂O₄₀]·H₃O·H₂O 2, have been synthesized via the hydrothermal technique and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses, IR, XPS, TG analysis, UV–DRS, XRD, thermal-dependent and magnetic-dependent 2D-COS IR (two-dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy). Crystal structure analysis reveals that the polyanions in compound 1 are linked into 3D supramolecule through hydrogen bonding interactions between lattice water molecules and terminal oxygen atoms of polyanion units, and [Co(phen)₃]²⁺ cations distributed in the polyanion framework with many hydrogen bonding interactions. The XPS spectra indicate that all the Co atoms in 1 are +2 oxidation state, the Fe atoms in 2 existing with +2 and +3 mixed oxidation states. - Graphical abstract: The magnetic-dependent synchronous 2D correlation IR spectra of 1 (a), 2 (b) over 0–50 mT in the range of 600–1000 cm⁻¹, the obvious response indicate two Keggin polyanions skeleton susceptible to applied magnetic field. Highlights: • Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates with transition metal as a central atom has been obtained. • Compound 1 forms into 3D supramolecular architecture through hydrogen bonding between water molecules and polyanions. • Magnetic-dependent 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy was introduced to discuss the magnetism of polyoxometalate.

  12. Self-assembly of three new coordination complexes: Formation of 2-D square grid, 1-D chain and tape structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indrani, Murugan; Ramasubramanian, Ramasamy; Fronczek, Frank R.; Vasanthacharya, N. Y.; Kumaresan, Sudalaiandi

    2009-08-01

    Three distinct coordination complexes, viz., [Co(imi) 2(tmb) 2] ( 1) [where imi = imidazole], {[Ni(tmb) 2(H 2O) 3]·2H 2O} n ( 2) and [Cu 2(μ-tmb) 4(CH 3OH) 2] ( 3), have been synthesized hydrothermally by the reactions of metal acetates, 2,4,6-trimethylbenzoic acid (Htmb) and with or without appropriate amine. The Ni analogue of 1 and the Co analogue of 2 have also been synthesized. X-ray single-crystal diffraction suggests that complex 1 represents discrete mononuclear species and complex 2 represents a 1D chain coordination polymer in which the Ni(II) ions are connected by the bridging water molecules. Complex 3 represents a neutral dinuclear complex. In 1, the central metal ions are associated by the carboxylate moiety and imidazole ligands, whereas the central metal atom is coordinated to the carboxylate moiety and the respective solvent molecules in 2 and 3. In 3, the four 2,4,6-trimethylbenzoate moieties act as a bridge connecting two copper (II) ions and the O atoms of methanol coordinate in an anti arrangement to form a square pyramidal geometry, with the methanol molecule at the apical position. In all the three structures the central metal atom sits on a crystallographic inversion centre. In all the cases, the coordination entities are further organized via hydrogen bonding interactions to generate multifarious supramolecular networks. Complexes 1, 2 and 3 have also been characterized by spectroscopic (UV/Vis and IR) and thermal analysis (TGA). In addition, the complexes were found to exhibit antimicrobial activity.The magnetic susceptibility measurements, measured from 8 to 300 K, revealed antiferromagnetic interactions between the Co(II) ions in compound 1 and the Ni(II) ions in 1a, respectively.

  13. Electronic structures and electronic spectra of all-boron fullerene B40.

    PubMed

    He, Rongxing; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2015-02-21

    This study is motivated by the recent discovery of the first all-boron fullerene analogue, a B40 cluster with D(2d) point-group symmetry, dubbed borospherene (Nat. Chem., 2014, 6, 727). Insight into the electronic structures and spectral properties of B40 is timely and important to understand the borospherene and the transition from open-ended plate or ribbon-like structures to a hollow-cage structure at B40. Optimized geometries of borospherene B40 for both the ground state and the first excited state allow us to compute spectral properties including UV-vis absorption, infrared (IR) and Raman spectra. Highly resolved absorption and emission spectra are obtained, for the first time, for the fullerene at the time-dependent density-functional theory (TD-DFT) level within the Franck-Condon approximation and including the Herzberg-Teller effect. Assigned vibrational modes in absorption and emission spectra are readily compared with future spectroscopy measurements to distinguish the hollow-cage structure of D(2d)-B40 from other quasi-planar boron structures. PMID:25604937

  14. Electronic correlation contributions to structural energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haydock, Roger

    2015-03-01

    The recursion method is used to calculate electronic excitation spectra including electron-electron interactions within the Hubbard model. The effects of correlation on structural energies are then obtained from these spectra and applied to stacking faults. http://arxiv.org/abs/1405.2288 Supported by the Richmond F. Snyder Fund and Gifts.

  15. Electronic structure of lithium tetraborate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, David J.

    Due to many of its attributes, Li2B4O7 provides a possible material for incorporation as either a primary or companion material in future solid state neutron detectors. There is however a lack of fundamental characterization information regarding this useful material, particularly its electronic configuration. To address this, an investigation of Li2B4O7(110) and Li2B 4O7(100) was undertaken, utilizing photoemission and inverse photoemission spectroscopic techniques. The measured band gap depended on crystallographic direction with the band gaps ranging from 8.9+/-0.5 eV to 10.1+/-0.5 eV. The measurement yielded a density of states that qualitatively agreed with the theoretical results from model bulk band structure calculations for Li2B4O7; albeit with a larger band gap than predicted, but consistent with the known deficiencies of Local Density Approximation and Density Functional Theory calculations. The occupied states of both surfaces were extremely flat; to the degree that resolving periodic dispersion of the occupied states was inconclusive, within the resolution of the system. However, both surfaces demonstrated clear periodic dispersion within the empty states very close to theoretical Brillouin zone values. These attributes also translated to a lighter charge carrier effective mass in the unoccupied states. Of the two surfaces, Li2B4O 7(110) yielded the more consistent values in orthogonal directions for energy states. The presence of a bulk band gap surface state and image potential state in Li2B4O7(110) was indicative of a defect-free surface. The absence of both in the more polar, more dielectric Li2B4O7(100) was attributed to the presence of defects determined to be O vacancies. The results from Li2B 4O7(110) were indicative of a more stable surface than Li 2B4O7(100). In addition, Li 1s bulk and surface core level components were determined at the binding energies of -56.5+0.4 and -53.7+0.5 eV. Resonance features were observed along the [001

  16. Hyperfine structure and lifetime measurements in the 4s2nd 2D3/2 Rydberg sequence of Ga I by time-resolved laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunqing; Tian, Yanshan; Yu, Qi; Bai, Wanshuang; Wang, Xinghao; Wang, Chong; Dai, Zhenwen

    2016-05-01

    The hyperfine structure (HFS) constants of the 4s2nd 2D3/2 (n=6-18) Rydberg sequence and the 4s26p 2P3/2 level for two isotopes of 69Ga and 71Ga atoms were measured by means of the time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TR-LIF) technique and the quantum beat method. The observed hyperfine quantum beat spectra were analyzed and the magnetic-dipole HFS constants A as well as the electric-quadrupole HFS constants B of these levels were obtained by Fourier transform and a program for multiple regression analysis. Also using TR-LIF method radiative lifetimes of the above sequence states were determined at room temperature. The measured lifetime values range from 69 to 2279 ns with uncertainties no more than 10%. To our knowledge, the HFS constants of this Rydberg sequence and the lifetimes of the 4s2nd 2D3/2 (n=10-18) levels are reported for the first time. Good agreement between our results and the previous is achieved.

  17. Analysis of the rotational structure in the high-resolution infrared spectra of trans-hexatriene-2-d1 and -3-d1

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, Norman C.; Chen, Yihui; van Besien, Herman; Blake, Thomas A.

    2014-09-01

    The 2-d1 and 3-d1 isotopologues of trans-hexatriene have been synthesized, and their high-resolution (0.0015 cm-1) IR spectra have been recorded. For each of the isotopologues the rotational structure in four C-type bands for out-of-plane vibrational modes has been analyzed, and the ground state combination differences (GSCDs) have been pooled. Ground state rotational constants have been fitted to the GSCDs. For the 2-d species, A0, B0, and C0 values of 0.7837254(5), 0.0442806(3), and 0.0419299(2) cm-1 were fitted to 2450 GSCDs. For the 3-d species, A0, B0, and C0 values of 0.7952226(8), 0.0446149(7), and 0.0422661(4) cm-1 were fitted to 2234 GSCDs. For the eleven out-of-plane modes of the two isotopologues, predictions of anharmonic wavenumbers and harmonic intensities have been computed and compared with experiment where possible.

  18. Crystal structure and antiferromagnetic ordering of quasi-2D [Cu(HF{sub 2})(pyz){sub 2}]TaF{sub 6} (pyz = pyrazine).

    SciTech Connect

    Manson, J. L.; Schlueter, J. A.; McDonald, R. D.; Singleton, J.; Materials Science Division; Eastern Washington Univ.; LANL

    2010-04-01

    The crystal structure of the title compound was determined by X-ray diffraction at 90 and 295 K. Copper(II) ions are coordinated to four bridging pyz ligands to form square layers in the ab-plane. Bridging HF{sub 2}{sup -} ligands join the layers together along the c-axis to afford a tetragonal, three-dimensional (3D) framework that contains Taf{sub 6}{sup -} anions in every cavity. At 295 K, the pyz rings lie exactly perpendicular to the layers and cooling to 90 K induces a canting of those rings. Magnetically, the compound exhibits 2D antiferromagnetic correlations within the 2D layers with an exchange interaction of -13.1(1) K. Weak interlayer interactions, as mediated by Cu-F-H-F-Cu, leads to long-range magnetic order below 4.2 K. Pulsed-field magnetization data at 0.5 K show a concave curvature with increasing B and reveal a saturation magnetization at 35.4 T.

  19. Transformation from a 2D stacked layer to 3D interpenetrated framework by changing the spacer functionality: synthesis, structure, adsorption, and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Maji, Tapas Kumar; Ohba, Masaaki; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2005-12-12

    Two novel coordination polymers of Cu(II), viz. [Cu(bipy)(1,4-napdc)(H2O)2]n and {[Cu(bpe)1.5(1,4-napdc)](H2O)}n (bipy=4,4'-bipyridine; bpe=1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethane; 1,4-napdc2-=1,4-naphthalenedicarboxylate), have been synthesized and structurally characterized by changing only the pillar motifs. Both the compounds crystallize by slow evaporation from the ammoniacal solution of the as-synthesized solid. Framework 1 crystallizes in monoclinic crystal system, space group P2/n (No. 13), with a=11.028(19) A, b=11.16(3) A, c=7.678(13) A, beta=103.30(5) degrees, and Z=2. Framework 2 crystallizes in triclinic system, space group, P (No. 2), a=10.613(4) A, b=10.828(10) A, c=13.333(9) A, alpha=85.25(9) degrees, beta=82.59(6) degrees, gamma=60.37(5) degrees, and Z=2. The structure determination reveals that has a 2D network based on rectangular grids, where each Cu(II) is in 4+2 coordination mode. The 2D networks stacked in a staggered manner through the pi-pi interaction to form a 3D supramolecular network. In the case of, a {Cu(bpe)1.5}n ladder connected by 1,4-napdc2- results a 2D cuboidal bilayer network and each bilayer network is interlocked by two adjacent identical network (upper and lower) forming 3-fold interpenetrated 3D framework with small channel along the c-axis, which accommodates two water molecules. The TGA and XRPD measurements reveal that both the frameworks are stable after dehydration. Adsorption measurements (N2, CO2, and different solvents, like H2O, MeOH, etc.) were carried out for both frameworks. Framework shows type-II sorption profile with N2 in contrast to H2O and MeOH, which are chemisorbed in the framework. In case of, only H2O molecules can diffuse into the micropore, whereas N2, CO2, and MeOH cannot be adsorbed, as corroborated by the smaller channel aperture. The low-temperature (300-2 K) magnetic measurement of and reveals that both are weakly antiferromagnetically coupled (J=-1.85 cm-1, g=2.02; J=-0.153 cm-1, g=2.07), which is correlated

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulations to Investigate the Influences of Amino Acid Mutations on Protein Three-Dimensional Structures of Cytochrome P450 2D6.1, 2, 10, 14A, 51, and 62

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yurie; Hiratsuka, Masahiro; Yamaotsu, Noriyuki; Hirono, Shuichi; Manabe, Noriyoshi; Takahashi, Ohgi; Oda, Akifumi

    2016-01-01

    Many natural mutants of the drug metabolizing enzyme cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 have been reported. Because the enzymatic activities of many mutants are different from that of the wild type, the genetic polymorphism of CYP2D6 plays an important role in drug metabolism. In this study, the molecular dynamics simulations of the wild type and mutants of CYP2D6, CYP2D6.1, 2, 10, 14A, 51, and 62 were performed, and the predictions of static and dynamic structures within them were conducted. In the mutant CYP2D6.10, 14A, and 61, dynamic properties of the F-G loop, which is one of the components of the active site access channel of CYP2D6, were different from that of the wild type. The F-G loop acted as the “hatch” of the channel, which was closed in those mutants. The structure of CYP2D6.51 was not converged by the simulation, which indicated that the three-dimensional structure of CYP2D6.51 was largely different from that of the wild type. In addition, the intramolecular interaction network of CYP2D6.10, 14A, and 61 was different from that of the wild type, and it is considered that these structural changes are the reason for the decrease or loss of enzymatic activities. On the other hand, the static and dynamic properties of CYP2D6.2, whose activity was normal, were not considerably different from those of the wild type. PMID:27046024

  1. Electron tomography of dislocation structures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, G.S.; House, S.D.; Kacher, J.; Tanaka, M.; Higashida, K.; Robertson, I.M.

    2014-01-15

    Recent developments in the application of electron tomography for characterizing microstructures in crystalline solids are described. The underlying principles for electron tomography are presented in the context of typical challenges in adapting the technique to crystalline systems and in using diffraction contrast imaging conditions. Methods for overcoming the limitations associated with the angular range, the number of acquired images, and uniformity of image contrast are introduced. In addition, a method for incorporating the real space coordinate system into the tomogram is presented. As the approach emphasizes development of experimental solutions to the challenges, the solutions developed and implemented are presented in the form of examples.

  2. Crystal structure and temperature-dependent fluorescent property of a 2D cadmium (II) complex based on 3,6-dibromobenzene-1,2,4,5-tetracarboxylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang-Liang; Guo, Yu; Wei, Yan-Hui; Guo, Jie; Wang, Xing-Po; Sun, Dao-Feng

    2013-04-01

    A new cadmium (II) organic coordination polymers [Cd(dbtec)0.5(H2O)3]·H2O (1), has been constructed based on 3,6-dibromobenzene-1,2,4,5-tetracarboxylic acid (H4dbtec), and characterized by elemental analysis (EA), infrared spectroscopy (IR), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and single crystal X-ray diffraction. In 1, μ2-η1:η1 and μ4-η2:η2 dbtec ligands link four hepta-coordinated CdII ions to form a 2D 44 topological layer structure, which is further connected into an interesting 3D network by hydrogen bond and Br⋯O halogen bond. Moreover, the thermal stabilities, solid ultraviolet spectroscopy and temperature-dependent fluorescent properties of 1 were investigated.

  3. The pH-Dependent Picosecond Structural Dynamics in the Distal Pocket of Nitrophorin 4 Investigated by 2D IR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Mark; Brookes, Jennifer F.; Montfort, William R.; Khalil, Munira

    2013-01-01

    Nitrophorin 4 (NP4) belongs to a family of pH-sensitive, nitric oxide (NO) transporter proteins which undergo a large structural change from a closed to an open conformation at high pH to allow for NO delivery. Measuring the pH-dependent structural dynamics in NP4–NO around the ligand binding site is crucial for developing a mechanistic understanding of NO binding and release. In this study we use coherent two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy to measure picosecond structural dynamics sampled by the nitrosyl stretch in NP4–NO as a function of pH at room temperature. Our results show that both the closed and open conformers of the protein are present at low (pD 5.1) and high (pD 7.9) pH conditions. The closed and open conformers are characterized by two frequencies of the nitrosyl stretching vibration labeled A0 and A1, respectively. Analysis of the 2D IR lineshapes reveals that at pD 5.1, the closed conformer experiences structural fluctuations arising from solvation dynamics on a ∼3 ps timescale. At pD 7.9, both the open and closed conformers exhibit fluctuations on a ∼1 ps timescale. At both pD conditions, the closed conformers maintain a static distribution of structures within the experimental time window of 100 ps. This is in contrast to the open conformer, which is able to interconvert among its sub-states on a ∼100 ps timescale. Our results directly measure the timescales of solvation dynamics in the distal pocket, the flexibility of the open conformation at high pH, and the rigidity of the closed conformers at both pH conditions. We discuss how the pH dependent equilibrium structural fluctuations of the nitrosyl ligand measured in this study are related to the uptake and delivery of nitric oxide in Nitrophorin 4. PMID:23885811

  4. Cellulose Structural Polymorphism in Plant Primary Cell Walls Investigated by High-Field 2D Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Calculations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Yang, Hui; Kubicki, James D; Hong, Mei

    2016-06-13

    The native cellulose of bacterial, algal, and animal origins has been well studied structurally using X-ray and neutron diffraction and solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and is known to consist of varying proportions of two allomorphs, Iα and Iβ, which differ in hydrogen bonding, chain packing, and local conformation. In comparison, cellulose structure in plant primary cell walls is much less understood because plant cellulose has lower crystallinity and extensive interactions with matrix polysaccharides. Here we have combined two-dimensional magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (solid-state NMR) spectroscopy at high magnetic fields with density functional theory (DFT) calculations to obtain detailed information about the structural polymorphism and spatial distributions of plant primary-wall cellulose. 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation spectra of uniformly (13)C-labeled cell walls of several model plants resolved seven sets of cellulose chemical shifts. Among these, five sets (denoted a-e) belong to cellulose in the interior of the microfibril while two sets (f and g) can be assigned to surface cellulose. Importantly, most of the interior cellulose (13)C chemical shifts differ significantly from the (13)C chemical shifts of the Iα and Iβ allomorphs, indicating that plant primary-wall cellulose has different conformations, packing, and hydrogen bonding from celluloses of other organisms. 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation experiments with long mixing times and with water polarization transfer revealed the spatial distributions and matrix-polysaccharide interactions of these cellulose structures. Celluloses f and g are well mixed chains on the microfibril surface, celluloses a and b are interior chains that are in molecular contact with the surface chains, while cellulose c resides in the core of the microfibril, outside spin diffusion contact with the surface. Interestingly, cellulose d, whose chemical shifts differ most significantly from those of

  5. Investigation of 2D photonic crystal structure based channel drop filter using quad shaped photonic crystal ring resonator for CWDM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhipa, Mayur Kumar; Dusad, Lalit Kumar

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the design & performance of two dimensional (2-D) photonic crystal structure based channel drop filter is investigated using quad shaped photonic crystal ring resonator. In this paper, Photonic Crystal (PhC) based on square lattice periodic arrays of Gallium Indium Phosphide (GaInP) rods in air structure have been investigated using Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method and photonic band gap is being calculated using Plane Wave Expansion (PWE) method. The PhC designs have been optimized for telecommunication wavelength λ= 1571 nm by varying the rods lattice constant. The number of rods in Z and X directions is 21 and 20, with lattice constant 0.540 nm it illustrates that the arrangement of Gallium Indium Phosphide (GaInP) rods in the structure which gives the overall size of the device around 11.4 µm × 10.8 µm. The designed filter gives good dropping efficiency using 3.298, refractive index. The designed structure is useful for CWDM systems. This device may serve as a key component in photonic integrated circuits. The device is ultra compact with the overall size around 123 µm2.

  6. Electron gun controlled smart structure

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Jeffrey W.; Main, John Alan; Redmond, James M.; Henson, Tammy D.; Watson, Robert D.

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and system for actively controlling the shape of a sheet of electroactive material; the system comprising: one or more electrodes attached to the frontside of the electroactive sheet; a charged particle generator, disposed so as to direct a beam of charged particles (e.g. electrons) onto the electrode; a conductive substrate attached to the backside of the sheet; and a power supply electrically connected to the conductive substrate; whereby the sheet changes its shape in response to an electric field created across the sheet by an accumulation of electric charge within the electrode(s), relative to a potential applied to the conductive substrate. Use of multiple electrodes distributed across on the frontside ensures a uniform distribution of the charge with a single point of e-beam incidence, thereby greatly simplifying the beam scanning algorithm and raster control electronics, and reducing the problems associated with "blooming". By placing a distribution of electrodes over the front surface of a piezoelectric film (or other electroactive material), this arrangement enables improved control over the distribution of surface electric charges (e.g. electrons) by creating uniform (and possibly different) charge distributions within each individual electrode. Removal or deposition of net electric charge can be affected by controlling the secondary electron yield through manipulation of the backside electric potential with the power supply. The system can be used for actively controlling the shape of space-based deployable optics, such as adaptive mirrors and inflatable antennae.

  7. Aniso2D

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-07-01

    Aniso2d is a two-dimensional seismic forward modeling code. The earth is parameterized by an X-Z plane in which the seismic properties Can have monoclinic with x-z plane symmetry. The program uses a user define time-domain wavelet to produce synthetic seismograms anrwhere within the two-dimensional media.

  8. 2D and 3D Shear-Wave Velocity Structure to >1 Km Depth from Ambient and Active Surface Waves: Three "Deep Remi" Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louie, J. N.; Pancha, A.; Pullammanappallil, S. K.

    2014-12-01

    Refraction microtermor routinely assesses 1D and 2D velocity-depth profiles to shallow depths of approximately 100 m primarily for engineering applications. Estimation of both shallow and deep (>100 m) shear-velocity structure are key elements in the assessment of urban areas for potential earthquake ground shaking, damage, and the calibration of recorded ground motions. Three independent studies investigated the ability of the refraction microtremor technology to image deep velocity structure, to depths exceeding 1 km (Deep ReMi). In the first study, we were able to delineate basin thicknesses of up to 900 m and the deep-basin velocity structure beneath the Reno-area basin. Constraints on lateral velocity changes in 3D as well as on velocity profiles extended down to 1500 m, and show a possible fault offset. This deployment used 30 stand-alone wireless instruments mated to 4.5 Hz geophones, along each of five arrays 2.9 to 5.8 km long. Rayleigh-wave dispersion was clear at frequencies as low as 0.5 Hz using 120 sec ambient urban noise records. The results allowed construction of a 3D velocity model, vetted by agreement with gravity studies. In a second test, a 5.8 km array delimited the southern edge of the Tahoe Basin, with constraints from gravity. There, bedrock depth increased by 250 m in thickness over a distance of 1600 m, with definition of the velocity of the deeper basin sediments. The third study delineated the collapse region of an underground nuclear explosion within a thick sequence of volcanic extrusives, using a shear-wave minivibe in a radial direction, and horizontal geophones. Analysis showed the cavity extends to 620 m depth, with a width of 180 m and a height of 220 m. Our results demonstrate that deep velocity structure can be recovered using ambient noise. This technique offers the ability to define 2D and 3D structural representations essential for seismic hazard evaluation.

  9. Structural change of graphite during electron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, J. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Pedraza, D.F. )

    1992-01-01

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite was irradiated at room temperature with 300-keV electrons. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy were employed to study the structure of electron-irradiated graphite. Results consistently indicated absence of long-range order periodicity in the basal plane, and loose retention of the c-axis periodicity. Structure was modeled based on a mixture of sixfold and non-sixfold atom rings. Formation of non-sixfold atom rings was related to the observed buckling and discontinuity of the original graphite basal plane.

  10. Structural change of graphite during electron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, J.; Pedraza, D.F.

    1992-12-31

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite was irradiated at room temperature with 300-keV electrons. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy were employed to study the structure of electron-irradiated graphite. Results consistently indicated absence of long-range order periodicity in the basal plane, and loose retention of the c-axis periodicity. Structure was modeled based on a mixture of sixfold and non-sixfold atom rings. Formation of non-sixfold atom rings was related to the observed buckling and discontinuity of the original graphite basal plane.

  11. About zitterbewegung and electron structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Waldyr A.; Vaz, Jayme; Recami, Erasmo; Salesi, Giovanni

    1993-12-01

    We start from the spinning electron model by Barut and Zanghi, which has been recently translated into the Clifford algebra language. We ``complete'' such a translation, first of all, by expressing in the Clifford formalism a particular Barut-Zanghi (BZ) solution, which refers (at the classical limit) to an ``internal'' helical motion with a time-like speed (and is here shown to originate from the superposition of positive and negative frequency solutions of the Dirac equation). Then, we show how to construct solutions of the Dirac equation describing helical motions with light-like speed, which meet very well the standard interpretation of the velocity operator in the Dirac equation theory (and agree with the solution proposed by Hestenes, on the basis - however - of ad-hoc assumptions that are unnecessary in the present approach). The above results appear to support the conjecture that the zitterbewegung motion (a helical motion, at the classical limit) is responsible for the electron spin.

  12. Electronic structure of metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Oelhafen, P.; Lapka, R.; Gubler, U.; Krieg, J.; DasGupta, A.; Guentherodt, H.J.; Mizoguchi, T.; Hague, C.; Kuebler, J.; Nagel, S.R.

    1981-01-01

    This paper is organized in six sections and deals with (1) the glassy transition metal alloys, their d-band structure, the d-band shifts on alloying and their relation to the alloy heat of formation (..delta..H) and the glass forming ability, (2) the glass to crystal phase transition viewed by valence band spectroscopy, (3) band structure calculations, (4) metallic glasses prepared by laser glazing, (5) glassy normal metal alloys, and (6) glassy hydrides.

  13. Structural physiology based on electron crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    There are many questions in brain science, which are extremely interesting but very difficult to answer. For example, how do education and other experiences during human development influence the ability and personality of the adult? The molecular mechanisms underlying such phenomena are still totally unclear. However, technological and instrumental advancements of electron microscopy have facilitated comprehension of the structures of biological components, cells, and organelles. Electron crystallography is especially good for studying the structure and function of membrane proteins, which are key molecules of signal transduction in neural and other cells. Electron crystallography is now an established technique to analyze the structures of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, which are close to their natural biological environment. By utilizing cryo-electron microscopes with helium cooled specimen stages, which were developed through a personal motivation to understand functions of neural systems from a structural point of view, structures of membrane proteins were analyzed at a resolution higher than 3 Å. This review has four objectives. First, it is intended to introduce the new research field of structural physiology. Second, it introduces some of the personal struggles, which were involved in developing the cryo-electron microscope. Third, it discusses some of the technology for the structural analysis of membrane proteins based on cryo-electron microscopy. Finally, it reviews structural and functional analyses of membrane proteins. PMID:21416541

  14. Electron-phonon renormalization of the electronic structure of diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giustino, Feliciano; Louie, Steven G.; Cohen, Marvin L.

    2011-03-01

    The calculation of band structures from first-principles has reached a high level of accuracy. Calculations combining density-functional theory with many-body perturbation theory often are in good agreement with measurements by photoemission, tunneling, and other spectroscopic probes. While significant efforts have been devoted to improving the description of electron-electron interactions in these calculations, the effect of lattice vibrations has largely been overlooked so far. In this work we study from first principles the electron-phonon renormalization of the band gap of diamond. The calculated temperature dependence of the gap and the broadening of the absorption edge are in excellent agreement with spectroscopic ellipsometry data. Interestingly we find a gap renormalization due to zero-point vibrations as large as 0.6 eV. We discuss the implications of our findings for the electronic structure of other carbon-based bulk materials and nanostructures.

  15. 2D magnetotelluric imaging of the Anqing-Guichi ore district, Yangtze metallogenic belt, eastern China: An insight into the crustal structure and tectonic units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiangbin; Yan, Jiayong

    2016-08-01

    Two parallel NW-trending magnetotelluric (MT) profiles were placed perpendicularly to the main structures of the Anqing-Guichi ore district, one of the seven ore districts in the middle-lower Yangtze River metallogenic belt of eastern China. In October-December 2013, the MT data acquisition was carried out at 117 sites with 0.5-1 km site spacing. The MT data has a good quality in the frequency range between 320 and 0.01 Hz. The dimensionality analysis and 2D resistivity inversion results indicate that: (1) the deep of the ore district with three-dimensional structural characteristics, but two-dimensional structural characteristics for shallow; (2) there is a clear correlation between resistivity and the main geological units of the ore district, as well as correlation with mapped surface faults; (3) the Gandan deep fault (GDF) and Jiangnan deep fault (JNF) extend from the surface to 10 km deep, with dip of NW45°, and dip angles larger than 60°. A series of NE-trending acidic intrusive rocks were controlled by the GDF.

  16. Phosphorene Nanoribbons: Electronic Structure and Electric Field Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soleimanikahnoj, Sina; Knezevic, Irena

    Phosphorene, a newcomer among the 2D van der Waals materials, has attracted the attention of many scientists due to its promising electronic properties. Monolayer phosphorene has a direct band gap of 2 eV located at the Gamma point of the Brillouin zone. Increasing the number of layers reduces the bandgap due to the van der Waals interaction. The direct nature of the bandgap makes phosphorene particularly favorable for electronic transport and optoelectronic applications. While multilayer phosphorene sheets have been studied, the electronic properties of their 1D counterparts are still unexplored. An accurate tight-binding model was recently proposed for multilayer phosphorene nanoribbons. Employing this model along with the non-equilibrium Green's function method, we calculate the band structure and electronic properties of phosphorene nanoribbons. We show that, depending on the edge termination, phosphorene nanoribbons can be metallic or semiconducting. Our analysis also shows that the electronic properties of phosphorene nanoribbons are highly tunable by in-plane and out-of-plane electric fields. In metallic ribbons, the conductance can be switched off by a threshold electric field, similar to field effect devices. Support by the NSF through the University of Wisconsin MRSEC Seed (NSF Award DMR-1121288).

  17. Vertical 2D Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-07-01

    Graphene's legacy has become an integral part of today's condensed matter science and has equipped a whole generation of scientists with an armory of concepts and techniques that open up new perspectives for the postgraphene area. In particular, the judicious combination of 2D building blocks into vertical heterostructures has recently been identified as a promising route to rationally engineer complex multilayer systems and artificial solids with intriguing properties. The present review highlights recent developments in the rapidly emerging field of 2D nanoarchitectonics from a materials chemistry perspective, with a focus on the types of heterostructures available, their assembly strategies, and their emerging properties. This overview is intended to bridge the gap between two major—yet largely disjunct—developments in 2D heterostructures, which are firmly rooted in solid-state chemistry or physics. Although the underlying types of heterostructures differ with respect to their dimensions, layer alignment, and interfacial quality, there is common ground, and future synergies between the various assembly strategies are to be expected.

  18. Transmission electron microscopy in molecular structural biology: A historical survey.

    PubMed

    Harris, J Robin

    2015-09-01

    In this personal, historic account of macromolecular transmission electron microscopy (TEM), published data from the 1940s through to recent times is surveyed, within the context of the remarkable progress that has been achieved during this time period. The evolution of present day molecular structural biology is described in relation to the associated biological disciplines. The contribution of numerous electron microscope pioneers to the development of the subject is discussed. The principal techniques for TEM specimen preparation, thin sectioning, metal shadowing, negative staining and plunge-freezing (vitrification) of thin aqueous samples are described, with a selection of published images to emphasise the virtues of each method. The development of digital image analysis and 3D reconstruction is described in detail as applied to electron crystallography and reconstructions from helical structures, 2D membrane crystals as well as single particle 3D reconstruction of icosahedral viruses and macromolecules. The on-going development of new software, algorithms and approaches is highlighted before specific examples of the historical progress of the structural biology of proteins and viruses are presented. PMID:25475529

  19. Instructional Approach to Molecular Electronic Structure Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dykstra, Clifford E.; Schaefer, Henry F.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a graduate quantum mechanics projects in which students write a computer program that performs ab initio calculations on the electronic structure of a simple molecule. Theoretical potential energy curves are produced. (MLH)

  20. Computational Chemistry Using Modern Electronic Structure Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Stephen; Dines, Trevor J.; Chowdhry, Babur Z.; Withnall, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Various modern electronic structure methods are now days used to teach computational chemistry to undergraduate students. Such quantum calculations can now be easily used even for large size molecules.

  1. Mapping the Electronic States of One Dimensional Peapod Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornbaker, D. J.

    2003-03-01

    A key issue of potential technological importance is how the electronic properties of single wall carbon nanotubes are altered by their interactions with other molecules. We address this question by examining the properties of carbon heterostructures formed by the encapsulation of C_60 molecules within the hollow interiors of single wall nanotubes.^1 We study the properties of these novel macromolecules (dubbed 'peapods') using a low temperature, ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Our experiments reveal that while no discernable change in the atomic structure of the encapsulating nanotubes is evident, the presence of interior C_60 molecules can dramatically affect the electronic structure of the nanotube cage. Constant current STM images of peapods display pronounced spatial modulation of the electronic density at sample biases greater than 1V, with a periodicity consistent with the intermolecular spacing of close-packed C_60 molecules inside the nanotube. This effect has been observed on peapods displaying both semiconducting and metallic densities of states. Coincident with this modulation is the appearance of characteristic features in the electronic band structure measured via tunneling spectroscopy. Theoretical modeling^2,3 indicates these features arise from coupling between the valence states of the encapsulated fullerenes, leading to the formation of a hybrid electronic band. Our experiments demonstrate that encapsulation of molecules is a viable route for selectively altering the electronic properties of carbon nanotubes. ^1B.W. Smith and D.E. Luzzi, Chem. Phys. Lett. 321, 169 (2000). ^2D.J. Hornbaker et al. Science 295, 828 (2002). ^3C. Kane et al. Phys. Rev. B (submitted).

  2. Electronic structure and photophysical properties of polyimides

    SciTech Connect

    LaFemina, J.P.; Kafafi, S.A.

    1992-04-01

    The quantum mechanical AM1 and CNDO/S3 models were used to examine the effect of isoelectronic substitutions on the conformation, electronic structure, and optical absorption spectra for a series of aromatic polyimides. An analysis of the geometric changes at the substitution site and its effect on the electronic structure allowed for the prediction of changes in the ICT band of the optical absorption spectra.

  3. Bifurcation structure of the special class of nonstationary regimes emerging in the 2D inertially coupled, unit-cell model: Analytical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorotnikov, K.; Starosvetsky, Y.

    2016-09-01

    Present work is devoted to the analytical investigation of the bifurcation structure of special class of nonstationary low-energy regimes emerging in the locally resonant unit-cell model. System under consideration comprises an outer mass with internal rotator and subject to the 2D, nonlinear local potential. These regimes are characterized by the slow, purely rotational motion of the rotator synchronized with the periodic energy beats between the axial and the lateral vibrations of the outer element. Thus the angular speed of the rotator and the beating frequency of the outer element satisfy the 1:2 resonance condition. In the present study these regimes are referred to as regimes of synchronous nonlinear beats (RSNB). Using the regular muti-scale analysis in the limit of low energy excitation we derive the slow-flow model. To showcase the evolution of RSNBs we used the special Poincaré map technique applied on the slow-flow model. Results of the Poincaré sections unveiled some interesting local bifurcations undergone by these regimes. Further analysis of the slow-flow model enabled us to describe the RSNBs analytically as well as exposed their entire bifurcation structure. The bifurcation analysis has shown the coexistence of several branches of RSNBs corresponding to the regimes of weak and strong, two-dimensional, recurrent energy channeling. We substantiate the results of the analytical study with numerical simulations of the full model and find them to be in the very good agreement.

  4. Five novel transition metal coordination polymers with 2D/3D framework structure based on flexible H{sub 2}tzda and ancillary ligand bpe

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yuting; Xu Yan; Fan Yaoting; Hou Hongwei

    2009-10-15

    Five new transition metal coordination polymers based on H{sub 2}tzda and co-ligand bpe, {l_brace}[M(tzda)(bpe)].H{sub 2}O{r_brace}{sub n} [M=Zn(1), Cd(2), Mn(3), Co(4)] and [Ni{sub 2}(tzda){sub 2}(bpe){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]{sub n} (5) [H{sub 2}tzda=(1,3,4-thiadiazole-2,5-diyldithio)diacetic acid, bpe=1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethane], have been hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Compounds 1-4 feature a 2D-layered architecture generated from [M(tzda)]{sub n} moiety with double-chain structure cross-linking bpe spacers. However, the conformations bpe adopts in 3 and 4 are different from those in 1 and 2 due to the rotation of C-C single bond in bpe. Polymer 5 exhibits an interesting 3D porous framework with 2-fold interpenetration, in which intriguing 1D double helix chains are observed. The photoluminescence properties of 1 and 2 in the solid-state at room temperature are investigated. In addition, variable-temperature magnetic data show weak antiferromagnetic behavior in 3-5. - Graphical abstract: Five new transition metal coordination polymers based on flexible H{sub 2}tzda and bpe have been hydrothermally synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction, luminescent emission spectra and low-temperature magnetic measurements, respectively.

  5. MCSNA: Experimental Benchmarking of Pu Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G

    2007-01-29

    The objective of this work is to develop and/or apply advanced diagnostics to the understanding of aging of Pu. Advanced characterization techniques such as photoelectron and x-ray absorption spectroscopy will provide fundamental data on the electronic structure of Pu phases. These data are crucial for the validation of the electronic structure methods. The fundamental goal of this project is to narrow the parameter space for the theoretical modeling of Pu aging. The short-term goal is to perform experiments to validate electronic structure calculations of Pu. The long-term goal is to determine the effects of aging upon the electronic structure of Pu. Many of the input parameters for aging models are not directly measurable. These parameters will need to be calculated or estimated. Thus a First Principles-Approach Theory is needed, but it is unclear what terms are important in the Hamiltonian. (H{Psi} = E{Psi}) Therefore, experimental data concerning the 5f electronic structure are needed, to determine which terms in the Hamiltonian are important. The data obtained in this task are crucial for reducing the uncertainty of Task LL-01-developed models and predictions. The data impact the validation of electronic structure methods, the calculation of defect properties, the evaluation of helium diffusion, and the validation of void nucleation models. The importance of these activities increases if difficulties develop with the accelerating aging alloy approach.

  6. A molecular dynamics study on the structural and electronic properties of two-dimensional icosahedral B12 cluster based structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kah, Cherno Baba; Yu, M.; Jayanthi, C. S.; Wu, S. Y.

    2014-03-01

    Our previous study on one-dimensional icosahedral B12 cluster (α-B12) based chain [Bulletin of APS Annual Meeting, p265 (2013)] and ring structures has prompted us to study the two-dimensional (2D) α-B12 based structures. Recently, we have carried out a systematic molecular dynamics study on the structural stabilities and electronic properties of the 2D α-B12 based structures using the SCED-LCAO method [PRB 74, 15540 (2006)]. We have considered several types of symmetry for these 2D structures such as δ3, δ4, δ6 (flat triangular), and α' types. We have found that the optimized structures are energetically in the order of δ6 < α' < δ3 < δ4 which is different from the energy order of α'< δ6 < δ4 < δ3 found in the 2D boron monolayer sheets [ACS Nano 6, 7443 (2012)]. A detailed discussion of this study will be presented. The first author acknowledges the McSweeny Fellowship for supporting his research in this work.

  7. WN4 longitudinal structure in the O (5S - 3P) and O+ (2P - 2D) ionospheric emissions as simulated by the C-IAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynenko, Oleg; Ward, William E.; Shepherd, Gordon; Cho, Young-Min; Namgaladze, Alexander; Fomichev, Victor; McConnell, John; Semeniuk, Kirill; Beagley, Stephen

    A newly developed Canadian Ionosphere and Atmosphere Model (C-IAM) is introduced. It is being developed on the basis of two existing first principle models: the extended Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (CMAM) and the ionospheric part of the Upper Atmosphere Model (UAM). The model extends from the surface to the inner magnetosphere and hence, is able to describe in a self-consistent way how lower atmosphere dynamical variability propagates into and affects the upper atmosphere and ionosphere. The C-IAM was applied to model the spatial structure of two different ionospheric emissions: the nighttime 135.6 nm O ( (5) S - (3) P) and daytime 732 nm O (+) ( (2) P - (2) D) emissions. The IMAGE satellite observations showed a wave number 4 (WN4) longitudinal structure in the 135.6 nm ionospheric emission emanating from the equatorial ionization anomaly at 350-400 km near 20:00 local time at each longitude. C-IAM simulations are in a good agreement with the observations. Model result analysis reveals that the main mechanism for generating the WN4 structure in the 135.6 nm emission is a modification of the ionospheric dynamo field caused by longitudinal variation of the zonal wind due to waves penetrating from the lower atmosphere. It was also shown, that during geomagnetic storms and substorms the high-latitudinal electric field fully suppresses the dynamo, so that the emission intensity dramatically decreases and the WN4 structure does not appear. The 732 nm emission simulated with the C-IAM also reveals the WN4 structure. Similar to the 135.6 nm emission, this structure is caused by waves penetrating from the lower atmosphere. However, the mechanism of excitation is quite different. The 732 nm emission is produced by the instant local ionization and excitation, and, hence, its variation is caused by the neutral density variability in the F2 region (above 200 km) without any involvement of the electric field effects. Correspondingly, latitudinal distribution of this

  8. Foil support structure for large electron guns

    SciTech Connect

    Brucker, J.P.; Rose, E.A.

    1993-08-01

    This paper describes a novel support structure for a vacuum diode used to pump a gaseous laser with an electron beam. Conventional support structures are designed to hold a foil flat and rigid. This new structure takes advantage of the significantly greater strength of metals in pure tension, utilizing curved shapes for both foil and support structure. The shape of the foil is comparable to the skin of a balloon, and the shape of the support structures is comparable to the cables of a suspension bridge. This design allows a significant reduction in foil thickness and support structure mass, resulting in a lower electron-beam loss between diode and laser gas. In addition, the foil is pre-formed in the support structure at pressures higher than operating pressure. Therefore, the foil is operated far from the yield point. Increased reliability is anticipated.

  9. Electronic structure calculations in arbitrary electrostatic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Mark A.; Rappoport, Dmitrij; Lee, Elizabeth M. Y.; Olivares-Amaya, Roberto; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2012-01-01

    Modeling of electronic structure of molecules in electrostatic environments is of considerable relevance for surface-enhanced spectroscopy and molecular electronics. We have developed and implemented a novel approach to the molecular electronic structure in arbitrary electrostatic environments that is compatible with standard quantum chemical methods and can be applied to medium-sized and large molecules. The scheme denoted CheESE (chemistry in electrostatic environments) is based on the description of molecular electronic structure subject to a boundary condition on the system/environment interface. Thus, it is particularly suited to study molecules on metallic surfaces. The proposed model is capable of describing both electrostatic effects near nanostructured metallic surfaces and image-charge effects. We present an implementation of the CheESE model as a library module and show example applications to neutral and negatively charged molecules.

  10. Syntheses, crystal structures, and characterization of three 1D, 2D and 3D complexes based on mixed multidentate N- and O-donor ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Huai-Xia; Liang, Zhen; Hao, Bao-Lian; Meng, Xiang-Ru

    2014-10-15

    Three new 1D to 3D complexes, namely, ([Ni(btec)(Himb){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]·6H{sub 2}O){sub n} (1), ([Cd(btec){sub 0.5}(imb)(H{sub 2}O)]·1.5H{sub 2}O){sub n} (2), and ([Zn(btec){sub 0.5}(imb)]·H{sub 2}O){sub n} (3) (H{sub 4}btec=1,2,4,5-benzenetetracarboxylic acid, imb=2-(1H-imidazol-1-methyl)-1H-benzimidazole) have been synthesized by adjusting the central metal ions. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that complex 1 possesses a 1D chain structure which is further extended into the 3D supramolecular architecture via hydrogen bonds. Complex 2 features a 2D network with Schla¨fli symbol (5{sup 3}·6{sup 2}·7)(5{sup 2}·6{sup 4}). Complex 3 presents a 3D framework with a point symbol of (4·6{sup 4}·8)(4{sup 2}·6{sup 2}·8{sup 2}). Moreover, their IR spectra, PXRD patterns, thermogravimetric curves, and luminescent emissions were studied at room temperature. - Graphical abstract: Three new 1D to 3D complexes with different structural and topological motifs have been obtained by modifying the central metal ions. Additionally, their IR, TG analyses and fluorescent properties are also investigated. - Highlights: • Three complexes based on mixed multidentate N- and O-donor ligands. • The complexes are characterized by IR, luminescence and TGA techniques. • Benzenetetracarboxylates display different coordination modes in complexes 1–3. • Changing the metal ions can result in complexes with completely different structures.

  11. The structure and stratigraphy of the sedimentary succession in the Swedish sector of the Baltic Basin: New insights from vintage 2D marine seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sopher, Daniel; Erlström, Mikael; Bell, Nicholas; Juhlin, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    We present five interpreted regional seismic profiles, describing the full sedimentary sequence across the Swedish sector of the Baltic Sea. The data for the study are part of an extensive and largely unpublished 2D seismic dataset acquired between 1970 and 1990 by the Swedish Oil Prospecting Company (OPAB). The Baltic Basin is an intracratonic basin located in northern Europe. Most of the Swedish sector of the basin constitutes the NW flank of a broad synclinal depression, the Baltic Basin. In the SW of the Swedish sector lies the Hanö Bay Basin, formed by subsidence associated with inversion of the Tornquist Zone during the Late Cretaceous. The geological history presented here is broadly consistent with previously published works. We observe an area between the Hanö Bay and the Baltic Basin where the Palaeozoic strata has been affected by transpression and subsequent inversion, associated with the Tornquist Zone during the late Carboniferous-Early Permian and Late Cretaceous, respectively. We propose that the Christiansø High was a structural low during the Late Jurassic, which was later inverted in the Late Cretaceous. We suggest that a fan shaped feature in the seismic data, adjacent to the Christiansø Fault within the Hanö Bay Basin, represents rapidly deposited, coarse-grained sediments eroded from the inverted Christiansø High during the Late Cretaceous. We identify a number of faults within the deeper part of the Baltic Basin, which we also interpret to be transpressional in nature, formed during the Caledonian Orogeny in the Late Silurian-Early Devonian. East of Gotland a number of sedimentary structures consisting of Silurian carbonate reefs and Ordovician carbonate mounds, as well as a large Quaternary glacial feature are observed. Finally, we use the seismic interpretation to infer the structural and stratigraphic history of the Baltic and Hanö Bay basins within the Swedish sector.

  12. Transmission electron microscopy of structural disorder in two-dimensional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Pinshane Yeh

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of two-dimensional materials (2D) offers an unprecedented opportunity to study disordered systems down to the single-atom level. The reduced dimensionality of these systems provides a two-fold opportunity: first, 2D materials serve as model systems for exploring direct correlations between the structure and properties of individual atomic features. Second, these studies enable the development of new 2D materials and devices with precisely tailored optical, electronic, and mechanical properties. The experiments presented in this thesis show the first atomic-resolution images of extended one- and two-dimensional disorder in 2D materials and the extraordinary range of consequences they have on the local materials properties. The thesis begins with studies that probe the structure and properties of the 1D defects that make up grain boundaries in atomically-thin layers of graphene and molybdenum disulfide. These experiments span length scales across five orders of magnitude to image every atom at the grain boundaries through atomic-resolution scanning TEM and rapidly map the location, orientation, and shape of several hundred grains with dark-field TEM. Correlating these images with local probes of electrical, mechanical, and optical properties reveals that grain boundaries have effects that range from the unmeasurable to the extreme. A second set of projects utilizes aberration-corrected electron microscopy of a newly discovered 2D polymorph of SiO2 to conduct some of the first atomic resolution studies of glass. Images of the atomic structure of 2D SiO2 strikingly resemble Zachariasen's foundational cartoon models of glasses and reveal distributions of medium-range ordering that will be critical for refining theoretical models for how and why glasses form. Additional experiments use the electron beam to excite and image atomic rearrangements in this 2D SiO2, producing dramatic videos that visualize the structural building blocks

  13. 2D Modelling of the Gorkha earthquake through the joint exploitation of Sentinel 1-A DInSAR measurements and geological, structural and seismological information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Novellis, Vincenzo; Castaldo, Raffaele; Solaro, Giuseppe; De Luca, Claudio; Pepe, Susi; Bonano, Manuela; Casu, Francesco; Zinno, Ivana; Manunta, Michele; Lanari, Riccardo; Tizzani, Pietro

    2016-04-01

    A Mw 7.8 earthquake struck Nepal on 25 April 2015 at 06:11:26 UTC, killing more than 9,000 people, injuring more than 23,000 and producing extensive damages. The main seismic event, known as the Gorkha earthquake, had its epicenter localized at ~82 km NW of the Kathmandu city and the hypocenter at a depth of approximately 15 km. After the main shock event, about 100 aftershocks occurred during the following months, propagating toward the south-east direction; in particular, the most energetic shocks were the Mw 6.7 and Mw 7.3 occurred on 26 April and 12 May, respectively. In this study, we model the causative fault of the earthquake by jointly exploiting surface deformation retrieved by the DInSAR measurements collected through the Sentinel 1-A (S1A) space-borne sensor and the available geological, structural and seismological information. We first exploit the analytical solution performing a back-analysis of the ground deformation detected by the first co-seismic S1A interferogram, computed by exploiting the 17/04/2015 and 29/04/2015 SAR acquisitions and encompassing the main earthquake and some aftershocks, to search for the location and geometry of the fault plane. Starting from these findings and by benefiting from the available geological, structural and seismological data, we carry out a Finite Element (FE)-based 2D modelling of the causative fault, in order to evaluate the impact of the geological structures activated during the seismic event on the distribution of the ground deformation field. The obtained results show that the causative fault has a rather complex compressive structure, dipping northward, formed by segments with different dip angles: 6° the deep segment and 60° the shallower one. Therefore, although the hypocenters of the main shock and most of the more energetic aftershocks are located along the deeper plane, corresponding to a segment of the Main Himalayan Thrust (MHT), the FE solution also indicates the contribution of the shallower

  14. The impact of structural deformation in a 2D basin and petroleum system model of the East Coast Basin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgreen, B.; Graham, S. A.; Meisling, K. E.

    2013-12-01

    The East Coast Basin of New Zealand is a petroliferous forearc basin that has eluded commercial development largely because of challenges related to its complex structural and tectonic history. Basin formation is associated with three tectonic phases: 1) a Cretaceous convergent margin phase, 2) a Late Cretaceous to Paleogene rifting to passive margin phase, and 3) a Neogene to present convergent margin phase. Beginning in Neogene time, the basin underwent multiple stages of structural deformation including low angle thrust faulting, listric normal faulting, and inversion. This complex basin history provides an ideal situation to test the influence of tectonics on petroleum system development. This study focuses on offshore Hawke Bay where a regional 2D seismic line has been interpreted, palinspastically reconstructed, and incorporated into a basin and petroleum system model. In the model, several paleo-heat flow scenarios are developed to represent the tectonic evolution of the basin. Higher heat flow is modeled during the rifting to passive margin phase, and a reduction in heat flow is modeled during the Neogene phase to account for cold slab subduction. Heat flow scenarios are calibrated to temperature, apatite-fission track data, and vitrinite-intertinite reflectance and fluorescence data from the Hawke Bay-1 and Opoutama-1 wells. The palinspastic reconstructions are integrated into the basin and petroleum system model to assess the impact of different styles of deformation. Faults play a key role in the burial history/rate of burial, fluid migration, and pressure compartmentalization. The relative timing of paleo-heat flow and structural events are tested in the model to understand how they enhance and/or negate effects on petroleum generation. For example, models with early Miocene low angle thrusts (i.e. structural thickening) contemporaneous with remnant high heat flow from the passive margin phase create a scenario for mid-Miocene petroleum generation

  15. Graph Structure-Based Simultaneous Localization and Mapping Using a Hybrid Method of 2D Laser Scan and Monocular Camera Image in Environments with Laser Scan Ambiguity

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Taekjun; Lee, Donghwa; Kim, Hyungjin; Myung, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Localization is an essential issue for robot navigation, allowing the robot to perform tasks autonomously. However, in environments with laser scan ambiguity, such as long corridors, the conventional SLAM (simultaneous localization and mapping) algorithms exploiting a laser scanner may not estimate the robot pose robustly. To resolve this problem, we propose a novel localization approach based on a hybrid method incorporating a 2D laser scanner and a monocular camera in the framework of a graph structure-based SLAM. 3D coordinates of image feature points are acquired through the hybrid method, with the assumption that the wall is normal to the ground and vertically flat. However, this assumption can be relieved, because the subsequent feature matching process rejects the outliers on an inclined or non-flat wall. Through graph optimization with constraints generated by the hybrid method, the final robot pose is estimated. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, real experiments were conducted in an indoor environment with a long corridor. The experimental results were compared with those of the conventional GMappingapproach. The results demonstrate that it is possible to localize the robot in environments with laser scan ambiguity in real time, and the performance of the proposed method is superior to that of the conventional approach. PMID:26151203

  16. Graph Structure-Based Simultaneous Localization and Mapping Using a Hybrid Method of 2D Laser Scan and Monocular Camera Image in Environments with Laser Scan Ambiguity.

    PubMed

    Oh, Taekjun; Lee, Donghwa; Kim, Hyungjin; Myung, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Localization is an essential issue for robot navigation, allowing the robot to perform tasks autonomously. However, in environments with laser scan ambiguity, such as long corridors, the conventional SLAM (simultaneous localization and mapping) algorithms exploiting a laser scanner may not estimate the robot pose robustly. To resolve this problem, we propose a novel localization approach based on a hybrid method incorporating a 2D laser scanner and a monocular camera in the framework of a graph structure-based SLAM. 3D coordinates of image feature points are acquired through the hybrid method, with the assumption that the wall is normal to the ground and vertically flat. However, this assumption can be relieved, because the subsequent feature matching process rejects the outliers on an inclined or non-flat wall. Through graph optimization with constraints generated by the hybrid method, the final robot pose is estimated. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, real experiments were conducted in an indoor environment with a long corridor. The experimental results were compared with those of the conventional GMappingapproach. The results demonstrate that it is possible to localize the robot in environments with laser scan ambiguity in real time, and the performance of the proposed method is superior to that of the conventional approach. PMID:26151203

  17. Syntheses, crystal structures, and characterization of three 1D, 2D and 3D complexes based on mixed multidentate N- and O-donor ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huai-Xia; Liang, Zhen; Hao, Bao-Lian; Meng, Xiang-Ru

    2014-10-01

    Three new 1D to 3D complexes, namely, {[Ni(btec)(Himb)2(H2O)2]·6H2O}n (1), {[Cd(btec)0.5(imb)(H2O)]·1.5H2O}n (2), and {[Zn(btec)0.5(imb)]·H2O}n (3) (H4btec=1,2,4,5-benzenetetracarboxylic acid, imb=2-(1H-imidazol-1-methyl)-1H-benzimidazole) have been synthesized by adjusting the central metal ions. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that complex 1 possesses a 1D chain structure which is further extended into the 3D supramolecular architecture via hydrogen bonds. Complex 2 features a 2D network with Schla¨fli symbol (53·62·7)(52·64). Complex 3 presents a 3D framework with a point symbol of (4·64·8)(42·62·82). Moreover, their IR spectra, PXRD patterns, thermogravimetric curves, and luminescent emissions were studied at room temperature.

  18. A frequency-based approach to locate common structure for 2D-3D intensity-based registration of setup images in prostate radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Munbodh, Reshma; Chen Zhe; Jaffray, David A.; Moseley, Douglas J.; Knisely, Jonathan P. S.; Duncan, James S.

    2007-07-15

    In many radiotherapy clinics, geometric uncertainties in the delivery of 3D conformal radiation therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy of the prostate are reduced by aligning the patient's bony anatomy in the planning 3D CT to corresponding bony anatomy in 2D portal images acquired before every treatment fraction. In this paper, we seek to determine if there is a frequency band within the portal images and the digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) of the planning CT in which bony anatomy predominates over non-bony anatomy such that portal images and DRRs can be suitably filtered to achieve high registration accuracy in an automated 2D-3D single portal intensity-based registration framework. Two similarity measures, mutual information and the Pearson correlation coefficient were tested on carefully collected gold-standard data consisting of a kilovoltage cone-beam CT (CBCT) and megavoltage portal images in the anterior-posterior (AP) view of an anthropomorphic phantom acquired under clinical conditions at known poses, and on patient data. It was found that filtering the portal images and DRRs during the registration considerably improved registration performance. Without filtering, the registration did not always converge while with filtering it always converged to an accurate solution. For the pose-determination experiments conducted on the anthropomorphic phantom with the correlation coefficient, the mean (and standard deviation) of the absolute errors in recovering each of the six transformation parameters were {theta}{sub x}:0.18(0.19) deg., {theta}{sub y}:0.04(0.04) deg., {theta}{sub z}:0.04(0.02) deg., t{sub x}:0.14(0.15) mm, t{sub y}:0.09(0.05) mm, and t{sub z}:0.49(0.40) mm. The mutual information-based registration with filtered images also resulted in similarly small errors. For the patient data, visual inspection of the superimposed registered images showed that they were correctly aligned in all instances. The results presented in this

  19. 2D materials for nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Renjing; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, Shuang; Pei, Jiajie; Lu, Yuerui

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have become very important building blocks for electronic, photonic, and phononic devices. The 2D material family has four key members, including the metallic graphene, transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) layered semiconductors, semiconducting black phosphorous, and the insulating h-BN. Owing to the strong quantum confinements and defect-free surfaces, these atomically thin layers have offered us perfect platforms to investigate the interactions among photons, electrons and phonons. The unique interactions in these 2D materials are very important for both scientific research and application engineering. In this talk, I would like to briefly summarize and highlight the key findings, opportunities and challenges in this field. Next, I will introduce/highlight our recent achievements. We demonstrated atomically thin micro-lens and gratings using 2D MoS2, which is the thinnest optical component around the world. These devices are based on our discovery that the elastic light-matter interactions in highindex 2D materials is very strong. Also, I would like to introduce a new two-dimensional material phosphorene. Phosphorene has strongly anisotropic optical response, which creates 1D excitons in a 2D system. The strong confinement in phosphorene also enables the ultra-high trion (charged exciton) binding energies, which have been successfully measured in our experiments. Finally, I will briefly talk about the potential applications of 2D materials in energy harvesting.

  20. The Electronic Structure of Amorphous Carbon Nanodots.

    PubMed

    Margraf, Johannes T; Strauss, Volker; Guldi, Dirk M; Clark, Timothy

    2015-06-18

    We have studied hydrogen-passivated amorphous carbon nanostructures with semiempirical molecular orbital theory in order to provide an understanding of the factors that affect their electronic properties. Amorphous structures were first constructed using periodic calculations in a melt/quench protocol. Pure periodic amorphous carbon structures and their counterparts doped with nitrogen and/or oxygen feature large electronic band gaps. Surprisingly, descriptors such as the elemental composition and the number of sp(3)-atoms only influence the electronic structure weakly. Instead, the exact topology of the sp(2)-network in terms of effective conjugation defines the band gap. Amorphous carbon nanodots of different structures and sizes were cut out of the periodic structures. Our calculations predict the occurrence of localized electronic surface states, which give rise to interesting effects such as amphoteric reactivity and predicted optical band gaps in the near-UV/visible range. Optical and electronic gaps display a dependence on particle size similar to that of inorganic colloidal quantum dots. PMID:25731776

  1. Nanoimprint lithography: 2D or not 2D? A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schift, Helmut

    2015-11-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is more than a planar high-end technology for the patterning of wafer-like substrates. It is essentially a 3D process, because it replicates various stamp topographies by 3D displacement of material and takes advantage of the bending of stamps while the mold cavities are filled. But at the same time, it keeps all assets of a 2D technique being able to pattern thin masking layers like in photon- and electron-based traditional lithography. This review reports about 20 years of development of replication techniques at Paul Scherrer Institut, with a focus on 3D aspects of molding, which enable NIL to stay 2D, but at the same time enable 3D applications which are "more than Moore." As an example, the manufacturing of a demonstrator for backlighting applications based on thermally activated selective topography equilibration will be presented. This technique allows generating almost arbitrary sloped, convex and concave profiles in the same polymer film with dimensions in micro- and nanometer scale.

  2. Structure and Dynamics with Ultrafast Electron Microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siwick, Bradley

    In this talk I will describe how combining ultrafast lasers and electron microscopes in novel ways makes it possible to directly `watch' the time-evolving structure of condensed matter, both at the level of atomic-scale structural rearrangements in the unit cell and at the level of a material's nano- microstructure. First, I will briefly describe my group's efforts to develop ultrafast electron diffraction using radio- frequency compressed electron pulses in the 100keV range, a system that rivals the capabilities of xray free electron lasers for diffraction experiments. I will give several examples of the new kinds of information that can be gleaned from such experiments. In vanadium dioxide we have mapped the detailed reorganization of the unit cell during the much debated insulator-metal transition. In particular, we have been able to identify and separate lattice structural changes from valence charge density redistribution in the material on the ultrafast timescale. In doing so we uncovered a previously unreported optically accessible phase/state of vanadium dioxide that has monoclinic crystallography like the insulator, but electronic structure and properties that are more like the rutile metal. We have also combined these dynamic structural measurements with broadband ultrafast spectroscopy to make detailed connections between structure and properties for the photoinduced insulator to metal transition. Second, I will show how dynamic transmission electron microscopy (DTEM) can be used to make direct, real space images of nano-microstructural evolution during laser-induced crystallization of amorphous semiconductors at unprecedented spatio-temporal resolution. This is a remarkably complex process that involves several distinct modes of crystal growth and the development of intricate microstructural patterns on the nanosecond to ten microsecond timescales all of which can be imaged directly with DTEM.

  3. Electronic structure of disordered conjugated polymers: Polythiophenes

    SciTech Connect

    Vukmirovic, Nenad; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2008-11-26

    Electronic structure of disordered semiconducting conjugated polymers was studied. Atomic structure was found from a classical molecular dynamics simulation and the charge patching method was used to calculate the electronic structure with the accuracy similar to the one of density functional theory in local density approximation. The total density of states, the local density of states at different points in the system and the wavefunctions of several states around the gap were calculated in the case of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and polythiophene (PT) systems to gain insight into the origin of disorder in the system, the degree of carrier localization and the role of chain interactions. The results indicated that disorder in the electronic structure of alkyl substituted polythiophenes comes from disorder in the conformation of individualchains, while in the case of polythiophene there is an additional contribution due to disorder in the electronic coupling between the chains. Each of the first several wavefunctions in the conduction and valence band of P3HT is localized over several rings of a single chain. It was shown that the localization can be caused in principle both by ring torsions and chain bending, however the effect of ring torsions is much stronger. PT wavefunctions are more complicated due to larger interchain electronic coupling and are not necessarily localized on a single chain.

  4. Defect Induced Electronic Structure of Uranofullerene

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xing; Cheng, Cheng; Zhang, Wei; Xin, Minsi; Huai, Ping; Zhang, Ruiqin; Wang, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    The interaction between the inner atoms/cluster and the outer fullerene cage is the source of various novel properties of endohedral metallofullerenes. Herein, we introduce an adatom-type spin polarization defect on the surface of a typical endohedral stable U2@C60 to predict the associated structure and electronic properties of U2@C61 based on the density functional theory method. We found that defect induces obvious changes in the electronic structure of this metallofullerene. More interestingly, the ground state of U2@C61 is nonet spin in contrast to the septet of U2@C60. Electronic structure analysis shows that the inner U atoms and the C ad-atom on the surface of the cage contribute together to this spin state, which is brought about by a ferromagnetic coupling between the spin of the unpaired electrons of the U atoms and the C ad-atom. This discovery may provide a possible approach to adapt the electronic structure properties of endohedral metallofullerenes. PMID:23439318

  5. Membrane protein structure determination by electron crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Ubarretxena-Belandia, Iban; Stokes, David L.

    2012-01-01

    During the past year, electron crystallography of membrane proteins has provided structural insights into the mechanism of several different transporters and into their interactions with lipid molecules within the bilayer. From a technical perspective there have been important advances in high-throughput screening of crystallization trials and in automated imaging of membrane crystals with the electron microscope. There have also been key developments in software, and in molecular replacement and phase extension methods designed to facilitate the process of structure determination. PMID:22572457

  6. The Electronic Structure of Heavy Element Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bursten, Bruce E.

    2000-07-25

    The area of study is the bonding in heavy element complexes, and the application of more sophisticated electronic structure theories. Progress is recounted in several areas: (a) technological advances and current methodologies - Relativistic effects are extremely important in gaining an understanding of the electronic structure of compounds of the actinides, transactinides, and other heavy elements. Therefore, a major part of the continual benchmarking was the proper inclusion of the appropriate relativistic effects for the properties under study. (b) specific applications - These include organoactinide sandwich complexes, CO activation by actinide atoms, and theoretical studies of molecules of the transactinide elements. Finally, specific directions in proposed research are described.

  7. HOTCFGM-2D: A Coupled Higher-Order Theory for Cylindrical Structural Components with Bi-Directionally Components with Bi-Directionally Graded Microstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Aboudi, Jacob

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this two-year project was to develop and deliver to the NASA-Glenn Research Center a two-dimensional higher-order theory, and related computer codes, for the analysis and design of cylindrical functionally graded materials/structural components for use in advanced aircraft engines (e.g., combustor linings, rotor disks, heat shields, brisk blades). To satisfy this objective, two-dimensional version of the higher-order theory, HOTCFGM-2D, and four computer codes based on this theory, for the analysis and design of structural components functionally graded in the radial and circumferential directions were developed in the cylindrical coordinate system r-Theta-z. This version of the higher-order theory is a significant generalization of the one-dimensional theory, HOTCFGM-1D, developed during the FY97 for the analysis and design of cylindrical structural components with radially graded microstructures. The generalized theory is applicable to thin multi-phased composite shells/cylinders subjected to steady-state thermomechanical, transient thermal and inertial loading applied uniformly along the axial direction such that the overall deformation is characterized by a constant average axial strain. The reinforcement phases are uniformly distributed in the axial direction, and arbitrarily distributed in the radial and circumferential direction, thereby allowing functional grading of the internal reinforcement in the r-Theta plane. The four computer codes fgmc3dq.cylindrical.f, fgmp3dq.cylindrical.f, fgmgvips3dq.cylindrical.f, and fgmc3dq.cylindrical.transient.f are research-oriented codes for investigating the effect of functionally graded architectures, as well as the properties of the multi-phase reinforcement, in thin shells subjected to thermomechanical and inertial loading, on the internal temperature, stress and (inelastic) strain fields. The reinforcement distribution in the radial and circumferential directions is specified by the user. The thermal

  8. Synthesis and characterization of a new metal organic framework structure with a 2D porous system: (H 2NEt 2) 2[Zn 3(BDC) 4]ṡ3DEF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biemmi, Enrica; Bein, Thomas; Stock, Norbert

    2006-03-01

    A new open-framework zinc terephthalate (H 2NEt 2) 2[Zn 3(BDC) 4]ṡ3DEF (BDC = 1,4-benzendicarboxylate, DEF=N,N-diethylformamide) was obtained under slightly acidic condition by reacting 1,4-benzendicarboxylic acid (H 2BDC) with ZnO in a DEF solution. The structure was obtained by single crystal X-ray diffraction and consists of trimetallic zinc building units, that are interconnected by eight BDC units each (crystal data: monoclinic, C2/c, a=3337.24(5), b=983.17(2), c=1819.67(2) pm, β=92.455(1, V=5965.0(2)×10 pm, Z=4, R=0.0395, wR=0.0843 for 4533 reflections I>2σ(I)). Six BDC ions together with the trimetallic zinc units form a two-dimensional (3,6)-net while the other two BDC unit pillar these layers. Thus a three-dimensional anionic framework with a 2D pore system is formed. The pore space is occupied by solvent molecules (DEF) and diethylammonium ions, produced by in situ hydrolysis of DEF. These are interconnected as well as connected to the framework by hydrogen-bonds. The TG investigation in combination with powder X-ray diffraction and vibrational-spectroscopy show a two-step loss of the pore filling molecules as well as one H 2BDC molecule leading to crystalline phases which are stable up to 250 and 400 °C, respectively. In addition, 13C MAS-NMR data of the title compound is presented.

  9. Electronic structure of LaPt2Si2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, I.; Yanagisawa, T.

    2013-01-01

    Iron-pnictide superconductor (Ba, K)Fe2As2 has the ThCr2Si2-type crystal structure. On the other hand, recently found arsenide superconductor SrPt2As2 has the CaBe2Ge2-type structure, which is a different polymorphic form of the ThCr2Si2-type structure. LaPt2Si2 shows superconductivity with Tc = 2.2 K and the above-shown two different crystal structures have been reported previously. In this paper we have calculated the electronic structure of LaPt2Si2 from first-principles. From the total energy calculation, we show that the CaBe2Ge2-type structure is more stable in this compound. The density of states at the Fermi level (D(EF)) mainly consists of Pt1-d orbitals, while the Pt2-d orbitals contribute to D(EF) only half of Pt1-d orbitals. In contrast to iron-pnictide system, the total density of states at the Fermi level does not depend so much on the distortion of the PtX4 tetrahedra and/or the height of the X atom from the two-dimensional Pt plane. The calculated electronic specific heat coefficient is 7.0 mJ/mol K2 for LaPt2Si2, which is comparable with that of SrPt2As2, but larger than the experimental value 4 mJ/mol K2.

  10. 2dx--user-friendly image processing for 2D crystals.

    PubMed

    Gipson, Bryant; Zeng, Xiangyan; Zhang, Zi Yan; Stahlberg, Henning

    2007-01-01

    Electron crystallography determines the structure of two-dimensional (2D) membrane protein crystals and other 2D crystal systems. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy records high-resolution electron micrographs, which require computer processing for three-dimensional structure reconstruction. We present a new software system 2dx, which is designed as a user-friendly, platform-independent software package for electron crystallography. 2dx assists in the management of an image-processing project, guides the user through the processing of 2D crystal images, and provides transparence for processing tasks and results. Algorithms are implemented in the form of script templates reminiscent of c-shell scripts. These templates can be easily modified or replaced by the user and can also execute modular stand-alone programs from the MRC software or from other image processing software packages. 2dx is available under the GNU General Public License at 2dx.org. PMID:17055742

  11. Synthesis, X-ray crystal structure, optical properties and DFT studies of a new 2D layered iodide bridged Pb(II) coordination polymer with 2,3-bis(2-pyridyl)pyrazine

    SciTech Connect

    Saghatforoush, Lotfali Bakhtiari, Akbar; Gheleji, Hojjat

    2015-01-15

    The synthesis of two dimensional (2D) coordination polymer [Pb{sub 2}(µ-I){sub 2}(µ-dpp-N,N,N,N)(µ-dpp-N,N)I{sub 2}]{sub n} (dpp=2,3-bis(2-pyridyl)pyrazine) is reported. As determined by X-ray diffraction of a twinned crystal, the dpp ligand simultaneously adopts a bis–bidentate and bis–monodentate coordination mode in the crystal structure of compound. The electronic band structure along with density of states (DOS) calculated by the DFT method indicates that the compound is an indirect band gap semiconductor. According to the DFT calculations, the observed emission of the compound at 600 nm in solid phase could be attributed to arise from an excited LLCT state (dpp-π{sup ⁎} [C-2p and N-2p states, CBs] to I-6p state [VBs]). The linear optical properties of the compound are also calculated by DFT method. The structure of the compound in solution phase is discussed based on the measured {sup 1}H NMR and fluorescence spectra in DMSO. TGA studies indicate that the compound is thermally stable up to 210 °C. - Graphical abstract: The synthesis, crystal structure and emission spectra of [Pb{sub 2}(µ-I){sub 2}(µ-dpp-N,N,N,N)(µ-dpp-N,N)I{sub 2}]{sub n} is presented. The electronic band structure and linear optical properties of the compound are calculated by the DFT method. - Highlights: • Two dimensional [Pb{sub 2}(µ-I){sub 2}(µ-dpp-N,N,N,N)(µ-dpp-N,N)I{sub 2}]{sub n} has been prepared. • The structure of the compound is determined by XRD of a twinned crystal. • DFT calculations indicate that the compound is an indirect band gap semiconductor. • As shown by DFT calculations, the emission band of the compound is LLCT. • Solution phase structure of compound is explored by {sup 1}H NMR and emission spectra.

  12. Structure refinement from precession electron diffraction data.

    PubMed

    Palatinus, Lukáš; Jacob, Damien; Cuvillier, Priscille; Klementová, Mariana; Sinkler, Wharton; Marks, Laurence D

    2013-03-01

    Electron diffraction is a unique tool for analysing the crystal structures of very small crystals. In particular, precession electron diffraction has been shown to be a useful method for ab initio structure solution. In this work it is demonstrated that precession electron diffraction data can also be successfully used for structure refinement, if the dynamical theory of diffraction is used for the calculation of diffracted intensities. The method is demonstrated on data from three materials - silicon, orthopyroxene (Mg,Fe)(2)Si(2)O(6) and gallium-indium tin oxide (Ga,In)(4)Sn(2)O(10). In particular, it is shown that atomic occupancies of mixed crystallographic sites can be refined to an accuracy approaching X-ray or neutron diffraction methods. In comparison with conventional electron diffraction data, the refinement against precession diffraction data yields significantly lower figures of merit, higher accuracy of refined parameters, much broader radii of convergence, especially for the thickness and orientation of the sample, and significantly reduced correlations between the structure parameters. The full dynamical refinement is compared with refinement using kinematical and two-beam approximations, and is shown to be superior to the latter two. PMID:23403968

  13. Positron annihilation studies of the electronic structure and fermiology of the high-{Tc} superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Smedskjaer, L.C.; Bansil, A.

    1992-09-01

    We discuss the application of the positron annihilation angular correlation (ACAR) spectroscopy for investigating the electronic structure and Fermiology of the high-T{sub c} superconductors, with focus on the YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} system where most of the experimental and theoretical work has to date been concentrated. Comparisons between measured 2D-ACAR positron spectra and band theory predictions show a remarkable agreement (for the normal state), indicating that the electronic structure and Fermi surface of this material is described reasonably by the conventional picture.

  14. Positron annihilation studies of the electronic structure and fermiology of the high-[Tc] superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Smedskjaer, L.C. ); Bansil, A. . Dept. of Physics)

    1992-09-01

    We discuss the application of the positron annihilation angular correlation (ACAR) spectroscopy for investigating the electronic structure and Fermiology of the high-T[sub c] superconductors, with focus on the YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7] system where most of the experimental and theoretical work has to date been concentrated. Comparisons between measured 2D-ACAR positron spectra and band theory predictions show a remarkable agreement (for the normal state), indicating that the electronic structure and Fermi surface of this material is described reasonably by the conventional picture.

  15. Electronic structure engineering of various structural phases of phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sumandeep; Kumar, Ashok; Srivastava, Sunita; Tankeshwar, K

    2016-07-21

    We report the tailoring of the electronic structures of various structural phases of phosphorene (α-P, β-P, γ-P and δ-P) based homo- and hetero-bilayers through in-plane mechanical strains, vertical pressure and transverse electric field by employing density functional theory. In-plane biaxial strains have considerably modified the electronic bandgap of both homo- and hetero-bilayers while vertical pressure induces metallization in the considered structures. The γ-P homo-bilayer structure showed the highest ultimate tensile strength (UTS ∼ 6.21 GPa) upon in-plane stretching. Upon application of a transverse electric field, the variation in the bandgap of hetero-bilayers was found to be strongly dependent on the polarity of the applied field which is attributed to the counterbalance between the external electric field and the internal field induced by different structural phases and heterogeneity in the arrangements of atoms of each surface of the hetero-bilayer system. Our results demonstrate that the electronic structures of the considered hetero- and homo-bilayers of phosphorene could be modified by biaxial strain, pressure and electric field to achieve the desired properties for future nano-electronic devices. PMID:27334095

  16. Electronic structure and electron momentum density in TiSi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaleb, A. M.; Mohammad, F. M.; Sahariya, Jagrati; Sharma, Mukesh; Ahuja, B. L.

    2013-03-01

    We report the electron momentum density in titanium monosilicide using 241Am Compton spectrometer. Experimental Compton profile has been compared with the theoretical profiles computed using linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO). The energy bands, density of states and Fermi surface structures of TiSi are reported using the LCAO and the full potential linearized augmented plane wave methods. Theoretical anisotropies in directional Compton profiles are interpreted in terms of energy bands. To confirm the conducting behavior, we also report the real space analysis of experimental Compton profile of TiSi.

  17. Metrology for graphene and 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-09-01

    The application of graphene, a one atom-thick honeycomb lattice of carbon atoms with superlative properties, such as electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and strength, has already shown that it can be used to benefit metrology itself as a new quantum standard for resistance. However, there are many application areas where graphene and other 2D materials, such as molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), may be disruptive, areas such as flexible electronics, nanocomposites, sensing and energy storage. Applying metrology to the area of graphene is now critical to enable the new, emerging global graphene commercial world and bridge the gap between academia and industry. Measurement capabilities and expertise in a wide range of scientific areas are required to address this challenge. The combined and complementary approach of varied characterisation methods for structural, chemical, electrical and other properties, will allow the real-world issues of commercialising graphene and other 2D materials to be addressed. Here, examples of metrology challenges that have been overcome through a multi-technique or new approach are discussed. Firstly, the structural characterisation of defects in both graphene and MoS2 via Raman spectroscopy is described, and how nanoscale mapping of vacancy defects in graphene is also possible using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). Furthermore, the chemical characterisation and removal of polymer residue on chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown graphene via secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is detailed, as well as the chemical characterisation of iron films used to grow large domain single-layer h-BN through CVD growth, revealing how contamination of the substrate itself plays a role in the resulting h-BN layer. In addition, the role of international standardisation in this area is described, outlining the current work ongoing in both the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) and the

  18. Electronic structure of bacterial surface protein layers

    SciTech Connect

    Maslyuk, Volodymyr V.; Mertig, Ingrid; Bredow, Thomas; Mertig, Michael; Vyalikh, Denis V.; Molodtsov, Serguei L.

    2008-01-15

    We report an approach for the calculation of the electronic density of states of the dried two-dimensional crystalline surface protein layer (S layer) of the bacterium Bacillus sphaericus NCTC 9602. The proposed model is based on the consideration of individual amino acids in the corresponding conformation of the peptide chain which additively contribute to the electronic structure of the entire protein complex. The derived results agree well with the experimental data obtained by means of photoemission (PE), resonant PE, and near-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

  19. A new family of 1D, 2D and 3D frameworks aggregated from Ni5, Ni4 and Ni7 building units: synthesis, structure, and magnetism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya-Hui; Lu, Li-Ping; Zhu, Miao-Li; Feng, Si-Si; Su, Feng

    2016-05-31

    Three new Ni(ii)-clusters based on a Y-shaped ligand (biphenyl-3,4',5-tricarboxylate, H3BPT), [Ni5(HBPT)4(OH)2(H2O)12]n (), [Ni4(BPT)2(OH)2(H2O)6]n·4nH2O (), and [Ni7(BPT)2(1,4-bib)2(OH)6(HCO2)2]n·3nH2O () (1,4-bib = 1,4-bi(1H-imidazol-1-yl)benzene), have been synthesized under solvothermal conditions. They were studied by infrared spectroscopy (IR), single crystal X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and magnetochemistry. The complexes contain low nuclear Ni-clusters as building units (BUs). Structurally, in , the cluster BUs of [Ni5(μ3-OH)2](8+) can be viewed as two reverse triangles sharing a common vertex, which are connected by the partially deprotonated μ2-η(1):η(1)-HBPT(2-) forming 1D chains. The BUs of [Ni4(μ3-OH)2](6+) clusters in can be considered as two reverse triangles sharing a common edge and extended by deprotonated μ6-η(1):η(1):η(1):η(1):η(2)-BPT(3-) constructing a 2D framework. The 3D framework of complex consists of a [Ni7(μ3-OH)4(R-COO)7(HCO2)3] cluster BUs with fully deprotonated μ5-η(1):η(1):η(1):η(1):η(1):η(1)-BPT(3-) and 1,4-bib ligands. In addition, TGA reveals that the complexes are stable in the range of 293-548 K. Magnetostructural analyses indicate ferromagnetic coupling of J1 = 1.85(3) and J2 = 2.25(4) cm(-1) in and J = 5.76(6) cm(-1) in , whereas magnetic parameters J1 = -2.64(3), J2 = -23.22(19) and J3 = 12.02(5) cm(-1) indicate an alternating magnetic chain (AF/F) in . PMID:27180871

  20. Energy of the quasi-free electron in H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and O{sub 2}: Probing intermolecular potentials within the local Wigner-Seitz model

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, C. M. Krynski, Kamil; Streeter, Zachary; Findley, G. L.

    2015-12-14

    We present for the first time the quasi-free electron energy V{sub 0}(ρ) for H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} from gas to liquid densities, on noncritical isotherms and on a near critical isotherm in each fluid. These data illustrate the ability of field enhanced photoemission (FEP) to determine V{sub 0}(ρ) accurately in strongly absorbing fluids (e.g., O{sub 2}) and fluids with extremely low critical temperatures (e.g., H{sub 2} and D{sub 2}). We also show that the isotropic local Wigner-Seitz model for V{sub 0}(ρ) — when coupled with thermodynamic data for the fluid — can yield optimized parameters for intermolecular potentials, as well as zero kinetic energy electron scattering lengths.

  1. Electronic structures of carbon nanotube peopods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuk, Young

    2003-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been successfully used for nanometer-sized devices such as diodes and transistors. These discrete devices utilize the spatially varying electronic structures of processed nanotubes by creating defect junctions or introducing substitutional or interstitial dopants. It was recently found that adsorption or insertion of molecules inside or outside of a nanotube modifies the electronic structure as observed with a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope (LTSTM). We report a method to form spatial variation of the electronic structure by inserting various molecules such as fullerenes, metallo-fullerenes, metals or insulators. The results suggest that one can synthesize this band gap-engineered 1-dimensional wire by self-assembly instead of epitaxial growth. We propose a new type of device structure made by this processing technology. 1. J. Lee, H.J. Kim, G. Kim, Y.-W. Son, J. Ihm, S.J. Kahng, H. Kato, Z.W. Wang, T. Okazaki, H. Shinohara, and Y. Kuk, Nature, 415, 1005 (2002)

  2. Small-angle shubnikov-de haas measurements in a 2D electron system: the effect of a strong In-plane magnetic field

    PubMed

    Vitkalov; Zheng; Mertes; Sarachik; Klapwijk

    2000-09-01

    Measurements in magnetic fields applied at small angles relative to the electron plane in silicon MOSFETs indicate a factor of 2 increase of the frequency of Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations at H>H(sat). This signals the onset of full spin polarization above H(sat), the parallel field above which the resistivity saturates to a constant value. For H

  3. 2-D Interferometric Measurements of Electron Density in an Air Breakdown Plasma Using a 124.5 GHz, 1 MW Gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaub, S. C.; Hummelt, J. S.; Guss, W. C.; Shapiro, M. A.; Temkin, R. J.

    2015-11-01

    A 1 MW, 124.5 GHz gyrotron was used to produce a linearly polarized, quasioptical beam in 2.2 μs pulses. The beam was focused to a 2.6 mm spot size, producing a peak electric field of 70 kV/cm, after transmission losses. This electric field is great enough to produce a breakdown plasma in air at pressures ranging from a few Torr up to atmospheric pressure. The resulting breakdown plasma spontaneously forms a two-dimensional array of filaments, oriented parallel to the polarization of the beam, that propagate toward the microwave source. A needlepoint initiator was placed at the focal point of the beam, creating highly reproducible plasma arrays. An intensified CCD, with a minimum exposure of 2 ns, was combined with a two-wavelength laser interferometer, operating at 532 and 635 nm, to make spatially and temporally resolved electron density measurements of the plasma array.

  4. Positron beam optics for the 2D-ACAR spectrometer at the NEPOMUC beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceeh, H.; Weber, J. A.; Hugenschmidt, C.; Leitner, M.; Boni, P.

    2014-04-01

    In the last year a conventional 2D-ACAR spectrometer has been set up and brought to operation at TUM. Once the NEPOMUC beamline is extended to the new experimental hall at the research reactor FRM-II the conventional 2D-ACAR spectrometer will be upgraded with a second sample chamber in order to be integrated to the NEPOMUC beamline facility. This spectrometer will add a complete new quality to 2D-ACAR experiments as it allows to track the evolution of the electronic structure from the surface to the bulk. We present the design features of the positron beam optics and the sample environment.

  5. First 2D-ACAR Measurements on Cu with the new Spectrometer at TUM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, J. A.; Böni, P.; Ceeh, H.; Leitner, M.; Hugenschmidt, Ch

    2013-06-01

    The two-dimensional measurement of the angular correlation of the positron annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) is a powerful tool to investigate the electronic structure of materials. Here we report on the first results obtained with the new 2D-ACAR spectrometer at the Technische Universitat München (TUM). To get experience in processing and interpreting 2D-ACAR data, first measurements were made on copper. The obtained data are treated with standard procedures and compared to theoretical calculations. It is shown that the measurements are in good agreement with the calculations and that the Fermi surface can be entirely reconstructed using three projections only.

  6. Electronic structure theory: Applications and geometrical aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coh, Sinisa

    This thesis contains several applications of the first-principles electronic-structure theory with special emphasis in parts of the thesis on the geometrical aspects of the theory. We start by reviewing the basics of the first-principles electronic-structure methods which are then used throughout the thesis. The first application of these methods is on the analysis of the stability and lattice dynamics of alpha- and beta-cristobalite phases of SiO2. We also map the complete low-energy landscape connecting these two structures and give implications on the phase transition in this compound. Next we study a family of Pbnm perovskites that are promising candidates for silicon-compatible high-K dielectrics. We calculate their structure and dielectric response, and compare with experimental results where available. The third application of these methods is to the large isosymmetric reorientation of oxygen octahedra rotation axes in epitaxially strained perovskites. We explain the origin of the peculiar energy landscape topology as a function of epitaxial strain. In the part of the thesis devoted to the geometrical aspects of electronic structure theory, we begin by extending the concept of electronic polarization to a Chern insulators. These insulators are characterized by a non-zero off-diagonal sigma_xy conductivity tensor component, quantized in units of e 2/h. Finally we discuss another geometrical quantity, the Chern-Simons orbital magnetoelectric coupling. We present a first-principles based calculation of this quantity in several compounds, and motivated by recent developments in the theory of topological insulators, we speculate about the existence of "large-theta materials," in which this kind of coupling could be unusually large.

  7. Electronic structure of oxygen functionalized graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simbeck, Adam; Gu, Deyang; Kharche, Neerav; Nayak, Saroj

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the electronic and magnetic properties of armchair graphene nanoribbons whose edges are passivated by oxygen. Using a first-principles density functional approach and the many-body GW method we find that oxygen-passivation results in a rich geometrical environment which in turn determines the electronic and magnetic properties of the ribbon. For planar systems we report magnetic ground states whose electronic structure depends upon the magnetic coupling between edges. For non-planar ribbons we report a nonmagnetic ground state with a band gap that decreases as a function of increasing ribbon width. Our results will be discussed in light of previous experimental and computational studies. Interconnect Focus Center (MARCO program), State of New York, NSF IGERT program, Grant no. 0333314, and computing resources of the Computationial Center for Nanotechnology Innovation (CCNI), RPI

  8. Probing Structural and Electronic Dynamics with Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Plemmons, DA; Suri, PK; Flannigan, DJ

    2015-05-12

    In this Perspective, we provide an overview,of the field of ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM). We begin by briefly discussing the emergence of methods for probing ultrafast structural dynamics and the information that can be obtained. Distinctions are drawn between the two main types a probes for femtosecond (fs) dynamics fast electrons and X-ray photons and emphasis is placed on hour the nature of charged particles is exploited in ultrafast electron-based' experiments:. Following this, we describe the versatility enabled by the ease with which electron trajectories and velocities can be manipulated with transmission electron microscopy (TEM): hardware configurations, and we emphasize how this is translated to the ability to measure scattering intensities in real, reciprocal, and energy space from presurveyed and selected rianoscale volumes. Owing to decades of ongoing research and development into TEM instrumentation combined with advances in specimen holder technology, comprehensive experiments can be conducted on a wide range of materials in various phases via in situ methods. Next, we describe the basic operating concepts, of UEM, and we emphasize that its development has led to extension of several of the formidable capabilities of TEM into the fs domain, dins increasing the accessible temporal parameter spade by several orders of magnitude. We then divide UEM studies into those conducted in real (imaging), reciprocal (diffraction), and energy (spectroscopy) spate. We begin each of these sections by providing a brief description of the basic operating principles and the types of information that can be gathered followed by descriptions of how these approaches are applied in UM, the type of specimen parameter space that can be probed, and an example of the types of dynamics that can be resolved. We conclude with an Outlook section, wherein we share our perspective on some future directions of the field pertaining to continued instrument development and

  9. Positron annihilation study for cadmium (electronic structure and enhancement effect)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, A.

    2003-12-01

    The three dimensional electron density in momentum space ρ(p) and in wave vector space n(k) was reconstructed for cadmium (Cd). The measurements were performed using the two dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) technique. Enhanced contributions in the spectra were observed around 5.5 mrad, discussed in terms of a Kahana-like enhancement effect. From another viewpoint, Fermi radii were analyzed in the (λM K), (ALM) and (AHK) planes, and they showed a maximum deviation of about 4% from the free electron Fermi radius. Moreover, comparisons to a radio-frequency size effect (RFSE) experiment and theoretical band structure calculations (using augmented plane wave (APW), linear combination of atomic orbital (LCAO) and linear muffin tin orbital (LMTO) methods) were examined. The results showed a qualitative agreement with both APW and LCAO calculations. However, a favorable agreement with the APW method was determined via Fermi surface dimensions. The differences of bands' occupation of n(k) between the current work and the APW method were argued in view of positron wave function in Cd.

  10. Electronic Structure of Iridium Clusters on Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Bradford A.; Bradley, Aaron J.; Ugeda, Miguel M.; Coh, Sinisa; Zettl, Alex; Crommie, Michael F.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Louie, Steven G.

    2015-03-01

    Graphene was predicted to exhibit non-trivial Z2 topology, but its exceedingly weak spin-orbit coupling prevented this from being observed. Previous theoretical work has proposed enhancing the spin-orbit coupling strength by depositing individual adatoms adsorbed onto the surface of graphene. We show experimental evidence that the iridium adatoms cluster, with a cluster size of at least two atoms. We investigate through theoretical calculations the orientation of the iridium dimers on graphene, contrast the electronic structure of iridium dimers with iridium monomers, and compare the theoretical iridium dimer electronic structure calculations with the experimental results determined via scanning tunneling spectroscopy. This work was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR10-1006184 and U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Computational resources have been provided by DOE at LBNL's NERSC facility.

  11. Electronic structure of the multivacancies in Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Shang Yuan; Mao, Deqiang; Li, Mingfu

    A complete set of equations for determining the energy levels and the wavefunctions with different symmetries of electronic states of several well-known multivacancies in Si is given using the Koster-Slater Green's function method. By using an empirical tight binding Hamiltonian for the band structure of the host and the central-cell perturbation approximation for the defect, only the on-site and the off-site Green's functions of the host and their derivatives with respect to energy E appear in these equations. The electronic structure of the ideal multivacancies, especially the divacancy, are investigated and compared with known experimental results and previous qualitative analyses. Some misunderstandings of the experimental results are analyzed. The wavefunctions of some multivacancy states are accurately evaluated and compared with the EPR and ENDOR data for the first time.

  12. Electronic structure tuning of diamondoids through functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rander, Torbjörn; Staiger, Matthias; Richter, Robert; Zimmermann, Tobias; Landt, Lasse; Wolter, David; Dahl, Jeremy E.; Carlson, Robert M. K.; Tkachenko, Boryslav A.; Fokina, Natalie A.; Schreiner, Peter R.; Möller, Thomas; Bostedt, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the changes in electronic structures induced by chemical functionalization of the five smallest diamondoids using valence photoelectron spectroscopy. Through the variation of three parameters, namely functional group (thiol, hydroxy, and amino), host cluster size (adamantane, diamantane, triamantane, [121]tetramantane, and [1(2,3)4]pentamantane), and functionalization site (apical and medial) we are able to determine to what degree these affect the electronic structures of the overall systems. We show that unlike, for example, in the case of halobenzenes, the ionization potential does not show a linear dependence on the electronegativity of the functional group. Instead, a linear correlation exists between the HOMO-1 ionization potential and the functional group electronegativity. This is due to localization of the HOMO on the functional group and the HOMO-1 on the diamondoid cage. Density functional theory supports our interpretations.

  13. Structural and electronic properties of sodium nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Luis A.; Reyes-Nava, Juan A.; Garzon, Ignacio L.

    2006-03-01

    Recent advances on mass selection of sodium nanoclusters and their characterization by photoemission electron spectroscopy [1] have given useful data for a variety of clusters sizes. These data may lead to assignments of the relevant structures by comparing the measured photoelectron spectra (PES) with the electronic density of states (DOS) obtained from DFT calculations. In this work, the lowest energy structures modeled by the many-body Gupta potential, are obtained by using molecular dynamics simulations for Nan (n= 178, 204, 271, 298-300, 309). DFT calculations were then performed for neutral, positively- and negatively-charged Nan clusters. A comparison between the DOS of clusters of the same size but different charge will be presented, as well as between the available experimental PES and the theoretical obtained DOS.[1] H. Haberland, T. Hippler, J. Donges, O. Kostko, M. Schmidt, B. von Issendorff, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 035701 (2005).

  14. Collective electronic excitations in the ultra violet regime in 2-D and 1-D carbon nanostructures achieved by the addition of foreign atoms

    PubMed Central

    Bangert, U.; Pierce, W.; Boothroyd, C.; Pan, C.-T.; Gwilliam, R.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmons in the visible/UV energy regime have attracted great attention, especially in nano-materials, with regards to applications in opto-electronics and light harvesting; tailored enhancement of such plasmons is of particular interest for prospects in nano-plasmonics. This work demonstrates that it is possible, by adequate doping, to create excitations in the visible/UV regime in nano-carbon materials, i.e., carbon nanotubes and graphene, with choice of suitable ad-atoms and dopants, which are introduced directly into the lattice by low energy ion implantation or added via deposition by evaporation. Investigations as to whether these excitations are of collective nature, i.e., have plasmonic character, are carried out via DFT calculations and experiment-based extraction of the dielectric function. They give evidence of collective excitation behaviour for a number of the introduced impurity species, including K, Ag, B, N, and Pd. It is furthermore demonstrated that such excitations can be concentrated at nano-features, e.g., along nano-holes in graphene through metal atoms adhering to the edges of these holes. PMID:27271352

  15. Microwave polarization angle study of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in the GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron system under dc current bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Muhammad-Zahir; Liu, Han-Chun; Heimbeck, Martin S.; Everitt, Henry O.; Wegscheider, Werner; Mani, Ramesh G.

    Microwave-induced magnetoresistance oscillations followed by the vanishing resistance states are a prime representation of non-equilibrium transport phenomena in two-dimensional electron systems (2DES). The effect of a dc current bias on the nonlinear response of 2DES with microwave polarization angle under magnetic field is a subject of interest. Here, we have studied the effect of various dc current bias on microwave radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in a high mobility 2DES. Further, we systematically investigate the effect of the microwave polarization angle on the magneto-resistance oscillations at two different frequencies 152.78 GHz and 185.76 GHz. This study aims to better understand the effects of both dc current and microwave polarization angle in the GaAs/AlGaAs system, both of which modify the observed magneto-transport properties DOE-BES, Mat'l. Sci. & Eng. Div., DE-SC0001762; ARO W911NF-14-2-0076; ARO W911NF-15-1-0433.

  16. Study of microwave reflection in the regime of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriisa, Annika; Liu, H.-C.; Samaraweera, R. L.; Heimbeck, M. S.; Everitt, H. O.; Wegscheider, W.; Mani, R. G.

    Microwave-induced zero-resistance-states in the photo-excited GaAs/AlGaAs system evolve from the minima of microwave photo-excited ``quarter-cycle shifted'' magnetoresistance oscillations. Such magnetoresistance oscillations are known to exhibit nodes at cyclotron resonance (hf = ℏωc) and cyclotron resonance harmonics (hf = nℏωc). Further, the effective mass extracted from the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations is known to differ from the canonical effective mass ratio for electrons in the GaAs/AlGaAs system. In an effort to reconcile this difference, we have looked for cyclotron resonance in the microwave reflection from the high mobility 2DES and attempted to correlate the observations with observed oscillatory magnetoresistance over the 30 <= f <= 330 GHz band. The results of such a study will be reported here. DOE-BES, Mat'l. Sci. & Eng. Div., DE-SC0001762; ARO W911NF-14-2-0076; ARO W911NF-15-1-0433.

  17. Ultra-broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy of carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll interactions in the LH1 complex of a purple bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiuri, Margherita; Réhault, Julien; Carey, Anne-Marie; Hacking, Kirsty; Garavelli, Marco; Lüer, Larry; Polli, Dario; Cogdell, Richard J.; Cerullo, Giulio

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the excitation energy transfer (EET) pathways in the photosynthetic light harvesting 1 (LH1) complex of purple bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum with ultra-broadband two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). We employ a 2DES apparatus in the partially collinear geometry, using a passive birefringent interferometer to generate the phase-locked pump pulse pair. This scheme easily lends itself to two-color operation, by coupling a sub-10 fs visible pulse with a sub-15-fs near-infrared pulse. This unique pulse combination allows us to simultaneously track with extremely high temporal resolution both the dynamics of the photoexcited carotenoid spirilloxanthin (Spx) in the visible range and the EET between the Spx and the B890 bacterio-chlorophyll (BChl), whose Qx and Qy transitions peak at 585 and 881 nm, respectively, in the near-infrared. Global analysis of the one-color and two-color 2DES maps unravels different relaxation mechanisms in the LH1 complex: (i) the initial events of the internal conversion process within the Spx, (ii) the parallel EET from the first bright state S2 of the Spx towards the Qx state of the B890, and (iii) the internal conversion from Qx to Qy within the B890.

  18. Ultra-broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy of carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll interactions in the LH1 complex of a purple bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Maiuri, Margherita; Réhault, Julien; Polli, Dario; Cerullo, Giulio; Carey, Anne-Marie; Hacking, Kirsty; Cogdell, Richard J.; Garavelli, Marco; Lüer, Larry

    2015-06-07

    We investigate the excitation energy transfer (EET) pathways in the photosynthetic light harvesting 1 (LH1) complex of purple bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum with ultra-broadband two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). We employ a 2DES apparatus in the partially collinear geometry, using a passive birefringent interferometer to generate the phase-locked pump pulse pair. This scheme easily lends itself to two-color operation, by coupling a sub-10 fs visible pulse with a sub-15-fs near-infrared pulse. This unique pulse combination allows us to simultaneously track with extremely high temporal resolution both the dynamics of the photoexcited carotenoid spirilloxanthin (Spx) in the visible range and the EET between the Spx and the B890 bacterio-chlorophyll (BChl), whose Q{sub x} and Q{sub y} transitions peak at 585 and 881 nm, respectively, in the near-infrared. Global analysis of the one-color and two-color 2DES maps unravels different relaxation mechanisms in the LH1 complex: (i) the initial events of the internal conversion process within the Spx, (ii) the parallel EET from the first bright state S{sub 2} of the Spx towards the Q{sub x} state of the B890, and (iii) the internal conversion from Q{sub x} to Q{sub y} within the B890.

  19. Ultra-broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy of carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll interactions in the LH1 complex of a purple bacterium.

    PubMed

    Maiuri, Margherita; Réhault, Julien; Carey, Anne-Marie; Hacking, Kirsty; Garavelli, Marco; Lüer, Larry; Polli, Dario; Cogdell, Richard J; Cerullo, Giulio

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the excitation energy transfer (EET) pathways in the photosynthetic light harvesting 1 (LH1) complex of purple bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum with ultra-broadband two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). We employ a 2DES apparatus in the partially collinear geometry, using a passive birefringent interferometer to generate the phase-locked pump pulse pair. This scheme easily lends itself to two-color operation, by coupling a sub-10 fs visible pulse with a sub-15-fs near-infrared pulse. This unique pulse combination allows us to simultaneously track with extremely high temporal resolution both the dynamics of the photoexcited carotenoid spirilloxanthin (Spx) in the visible range and the EET between the Spx and the B890 bacterio-chlorophyll (BChl), whose Qx and Qy transitions peak at 585 and 881 nm, respectively, in the near-infrared. Global analysis of the one-color and two-color 2DES maps unravels different relaxation mechanisms in the LH1 complex: (i) the initial events of the internal conversion process within the Spx, (ii) the parallel EET from the first bright state S2 of the Spx towards the Qx state of the B890, and (iii) the internal conversion from Qx to Qy within the B890. PMID:26049453

  20. 2-D time evolution of T/sub e/ during sawtooth crash based on fast ECE (electron cyclotron emission) measurements on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo-Petravic, G.

    1988-12-01

    Electron cyclotron emission measurements taken at 20 locations in the horizontal midplane during a sawtooth crash have been analysed based on the assumption of fast rigid rotation of the plasma. Due to this fast rotation (approx.100..mu..sec), which remains fairly constant throughout the sawtooth crash, we have been able to make time-to-space reconstructions of half the poloidal plane using points which are separated in time by not more than 40..mu..sec. The existence of a temperature flattening in the precursor phase, which we interpret as an m = 1 temperature island, is clearly demonstrated, and its location and width agree well with local emissivity measurements from soft x-ray tomography viewing the same poloidal plane. The rotating temperature island in the precursor phase, the outward movement of the region of high T/sub c/ during the crash phase, and the shape of T/sub e/ during the crash phase, and the shape of T/sub e/ distribution after the crash during the successor phase have all been documented in a time sequence of color contours. 4 refs., 10 figs.

  1. Collective electronic excitations in the ultra violet regime in 2-D and 1-D carbon nanostructures achieved by the addition of foreign atoms.

    PubMed

    Bangert, U; Pierce, W; Boothroyd, C; Pan, C-T; Gwilliam, R

    2016-01-01

    Plasmons in the visible/UV energy regime have attracted great attention, especially in nano-materials, with regards to applications in opto-electronics and light harvesting; tailored enhancement of such plasmons is of particular interest for prospects in nano-plasmonics. This work demonstrates that it is possible, by adequate doping, to create excitations in the visible/UV regime in nano-carbon materials, i.e., carbon nanotubes and graphene, with choice of suitable ad-atoms and dopants, which are introduced directly into the lattice by low energy ion implantation or added via deposition by evaporation. Investigations as to whether these excitations are of collective nature, i.e., have plasmonic character, are carried out via DFT calculations and experiment-based extraction of the dielectric function. They give evidence of collective excitation behaviour for a number of the introduced impurity species, including K, Ag, B, N, and Pd. It is furthermore demonstrated that such excitations can be concentrated at nano-features, e.g., along nano-holes in graphene through metal atoms adhering to the edges of these holes. PMID:27271352

  2. Collective electronic excitations in the ultra violet regime in 2-D and 1-D carbon nanostructures achieved by the addition of foreign atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangert, U.; Pierce, W.; Boothroyd, C.; Pan, C.-T.; Gwilliam, R.

    2016-06-01

    Plasmons in the visible/UV energy regime have attracted great attention, especially in nano-materials, with regards to applications in opto-electronics and light harvesting; tailored enhancement of such plasmons is of particular interest for prospects in nano-plasmonics. This work demonstrates that it is possible, by adequate doping, to create excitations in the visible/UV regime in nano-carbon materials, i.e., carbon nanotubes and graphene, with choice of suitable ad-atoms and dopants, which are introduced directly into the lattice by low energy ion implantation or added via deposition by evaporation. Investigations as to whether these excitations are of collective nature, i.e., have plasmonic character, are carried out via DFT calculations and experiment-based extraction of the dielectric function. They give evidence of collective excitation behaviour for a number of the introduced impurity species, including K, Ag, B, N, and Pd. It is furthermore demonstrated that such excitations can be concentrated at nano-features, e.g., along nano-holes in graphene through metal atoms adhering to the edges of these holes.

  3. Structural and electronic properties of thallium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliwal, Neetu; Srivastava, Vipul

    2016-05-01

    The tight binding linear muffin-tin-orbital (TB-LMTO) method within the local density approximation (LDA has been used to calculate structural and electronic properties of thallium pnictides TlX (X=Sb, Bi) at high pressure. As a function of volume, the total energy is evaluated. Apart from this, the lattice parameter (a0), bulk modulus (B0), band structure (BS) and density of states (DOS) are calculated. From energy band diagram we observed metallic behaviour in TlSb and TlBi compounds. The values of equilibrium lattice constants and bulk modulus are agreed well with the available data.

  4. Structure and Electronic Properties of Polycrystalline Dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Mckenna, Keith P.; Shluger, AL

    2013-07-07

    We present an overview of the theoretical approaches that can be employed to model polycrystalline oxides along with a discussion of their limitations and associated challenges. We then present results for two metal oxide materials, MgO and HfO2, where theory and experiment have come together to provide insight into the structure and electronic properties of grain boundaries. Finally, we conclude with a discussion and outlook.

  5. Polycrystalline graphene with single crystalline electronic structure.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lola; Lochocki, Edward B; Avila, José; Kim, Cheol-Joo; Ogawa, Yui; Havener, Robin W; Kim, Dong-Ki; Monkman, Eric J; Shai, Daniel E; Wei, Haofei I; Levendorf, Mark P; Asensio, María; Shen, Kyle M; Park, Jiwoong

    2014-10-01

    We report the scalable growth of aligned graphene and hexagonal boron nitride on commercial copper foils, where each film originates from multiple nucleations yet exhibits a single orientation. Thorough characterization of our graphene reveals uniform crystallographic and electronic structures on length scales ranging from nanometers to tens of centimeters. As we demonstrate with artificial twisted graphene bilayers, these inexpensive and versatile films are ideal building blocks for large-scale layered heterostructures with angle-tunable optoelectronic properties. PMID:25207847

  6. Smart electronics and MEMS for aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, Vijay K.; Varadan, Vasundara V.

    1995-09-01

    In this paper, smart electronics and MEMS are employed to sense and control the drag in aircraft structures. The sensors are fabricated with interdigital transducers printed on a piezoelectric polymer. They in turn are mounted onto an ultra thin Penn State's novel RF antenna (Patent field). The sensor are designed to measure both pressure and shear of the fluid flow on aerospace structures. The wave form measurements may be monitored at a remote location either at the cockpit or elsewhere via the antennas in the sensors and an outside antenna. The integrated MEMS actuators which comprise of cantilever-, diaphram- and microbridge-based MEMS with suitable smart electronics etched onto the structure are controlled by the built-in antennas through feedback and feedforward control architecture. The integration of such materials and smart electronics into the skin of airfoil is ideal for sensing and controlling drag. The basic idea of this concept involves detection of the point of transition from laminar to turbulent flow and transmitting acoustical energy into the boundary layer so that the low energy fluid particles accelerate in the transverse direction and mix with the high energy flow outside of the boundary layer. 3D microriblets can be fabricated using stereo lithography and UV curable conducting polymers. The control of drag using these active microriblets are outlined.

  7. Structure, Electronic and Nonlinear Optical Properties of Furyloxazoles and Thienyloxazoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagli, Ozlem; Gok, Rabia; Bahat, Mehmet; Ozbay, Akif

    2016-04-01

    Geometry optimization, electronic and nonlinear optical properties of isomers of furyloxazole and thienyloxazole molecules are carried out at the B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,p) level. The conformational analysis of 12 compounds have been studied as a function of torsional angle between rings. Electronic and NLO properties such as dipole moment, energy gap, polarizability and first hyperpolarizability were also calculated.

  8. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forcesmore » along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.« less

  9. NUBOW-2D Inelastic

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2002-01-31

    This program solves the two-dimensional mechanical equilbrium configuration of a core restraint system, which is subjected to radial temperature and flux gradients, on a time increment basis. At each time increment, the code calculates the irradiation creep and swelling strains for each duct from user-specified creep and swelling correlations. Using the calculated thermal bowing, inelastic bowing and the duct dilation, the corresponding equilibrium forces, beam deflections, total beam displacements, and structural reactivity changes are calculated.

  10. Thermal transfer structures coupling electronics card(s) to coolant-cooled structure(s)

    DOEpatents

    David, Milnes P; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Parida, Pritish R; Schmidt, Roger R

    2014-12-16

    Cooling apparatuses and coolant-cooled electronic systems are provided which include thermal transfer structures configured to engage with a spring force one or more electronics cards with docking of the electronics card(s) within a respective socket(s) of the electronic system. A thermal transfer structure of the cooling apparatus includes a thermal spreader having a first thermal conduction surface, and a thermally conductive spring assembly coupled to the conduction surface of the thermal spreader and positioned and configured to reside between and physically couple a first surface of an electronics card to the first surface of the thermal spreader with docking of the electronics card within a socket of the electronic system. The thermal transfer structure is, in one embodiment, metallurgically bonded to a coolant-cooled structure and facilitates transfer of heat from the electronics card to coolant flowing through the coolant-cooled structure.

  11. Electronic structure theory of the superheavy elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliav, Ephraim; Fritzsche, Stephan; Kaldor, Uzi

    2015-12-01

    High-accuracy calculations of atomic properties of the superheavy elements (SHE) up to element 122 are reviewed. The properties discussed include ionization potentials, electron affinities and excitation energies, which are associated with the spectroscopic and chemical behavior of these elements, and are therefore of considerable interest. Accurate predictions of these quantities require high-order inclusion of relativity and electron correlation, as well as large, converged basis sets. The Dirac-Coulomb-Breit Hamiltonian, which includes all terms up to second order in the fine-structure constant α, serves as the framework for the treatment; higher-order Lamb shift terms are considered in some selected cases. Electron correlation is treated by either the multiconfiguration self-consistent-field approach or by Fock-space coupled cluster theory. The latter is enhanced by the intermediate Hamiltonian scheme, allowing the use of larger model (P) spaces. The quality of the calculations is assessed by applying the same methods to lighter homologs of the SHEs and comparing with available experimental information. Very good agreement is obtained, within a few hundredths of an eV, and similar accuracy is expected for the SHEs. Many of the properties predicted for the SHEs differ significantly from what may be expected by straightforward extrapolation of lighter homologs, demonstrating that the structure and chemistry of SHEs are strongly affected by relativity. The major scientific challenge of the calculations is to find the electronic structure and basic atomic properties of the SHE and assign its proper place in the periodic table. Significant recent developments include joint experimental-computational studies of the excitation spectrum of Fm and the ionization energy of Lr, with excellent agreement of experiment and theory, auguring well for the future of research in the field.

  12. High divergent 2D grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Ma, Jianyong; Zhou, Changhe

    2014-11-01

    A 3×3 high divergent 2D-grating with period of 3.842μm at wavelength of 850nm under normal incidence is designed and fabricated in this paper. This high divergent 2D-grating is designed by the vector theory. The Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) in association with the simulated annealing (SA) is adopted to calculate and optimize this 2D-grating.The properties of this grating are also investigated by the RCWA. The diffraction angles are more than 10 degrees in the whole wavelength band, which are bigger than the traditional 2D-grating. In addition, the small period of grating increases the difficulties of fabrication. So we fabricate the 2D-gratings by direct laser writing (DLW) instead of traditional manufacturing method. Then the method of ICP etching is used to obtain the high divergent 2D-grating.

  13. Resolving Presynaptic Structure by Electron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Guy A.; Jackson, Dakota R.; Spirou, George A.

    2016-01-01

    A key goal in neurobiology is to generate a theoretical framework that merges structural, physiological and molecular explanations of brain function. These categories of explanation do not advance in synchrony; advances in one category define new experiments in other categories. For example, the synapse was defined physiologically and biochemically before it was visualized using electron microscopy. Indeed, the original descriptions of synapses in the 1950s were lent credence by the presence of spherical vesicles in presynaptic terminals that were considered to be the substrate for quantal neurotransmission. In the last few decades, our understanding of synaptic function has again been driven by physiological and molecular techniques. The key molecular players for synaptic vesicle structure, mobility and fusion were identified and applications of the patch clamp technique permitted physiological estimation of neurotransmitter release and receptor properties. These advances demand higher resolution structural images of synapses. During the 1990s a second renaissance in cell biology driven by EM was fueled by improved techniques for electron tomography (ET) with the ability to compute virtual images with nm resolution between image planes. Over the last fifteen years, ET has been applied to the presynaptic terminal with special attention to the active zone and organelles of the nerve terminal. In this review, we first summarize the technical improvements that have led to a resurgence in utilization of ET and then we summarize new insights gained by the application of ET to reveal the high-resolution structure of the nerve terminal. PMID:25683026

  14. Resolving presynaptic structure by electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Guy A; Jackson, Dakota R; Spirou, George A

    2015-05-01

    A key goal in neurobiology is to generate a theoretical framework that merges structural, physiological, and molecular explanations of brain function. These categories of explanation do not advance in synchrony; advances in one category define new experiments in other categories. For example, the synapse was defined physiologically and biochemically before it was visualized using electron microscopy. Indeed, the original descriptions of synapses in the 1950s were lent credence by the presence of spherical vesicles in presynaptic terminals that were considered to be the substrate for quantal neurotransmission. In the last few decades, our understanding of synaptic function has again been driven by physiological and molecular techniques. The key molecular players for synaptic vesicle structure, mobility and fusion were identified and applications of the patch clamp technique permitted physiological estimation of neurotransmitter release and receptor properties. These advances demand higher resolution structural images of synapses. During the 1990s a second renaissance in cell biology driven by EM was fueled by improved techniques for electron tomography (ET) with the ability to compute virtual images with nm resolution between image planes. Over the last 15 years, ET has been applied to the presynaptic terminal with special attention to the active zone and organelles of the nerve terminal. In this review, we first summarize the technical improvements that have led to a resurgence in utilization of ET and then we summarize new insights gained by the application of ET to reveal the high-resolution structure of the nerve terminal. PMID:25683026

  15. Tuning the electronic structures and magnetism of two-dimensional porous C2N via transition metal embedding.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Xia, Congxin; Xiong, Wenqi; Zhao, Xu; Wang, Tianxing; Jia, Yu

    2016-08-10

    Based on first-principles calculations, the electronic structures and magnetism are investigated in 3d transition metal (TM)-embedded porous two-dimensional (2D) C2N monolayers. Numerical results indicate that except Mn and Co atoms, other TM atoms can be embedded stably in the 2D C2N monolayer. Moreover, the magnetic moments of the TM-embedded C2N monolayer depend highly on the atomic number of the TM atoms. The Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co and Ni atom-embedded C2N monolayers possess a ferromagnetic ground state, while embedding Cu can induce paramagnetic characteristics in the 2D C2N monolayer. Meanwhile, the Zn-embedded C2N monolayer exhibits a nonmagnetic ground state. These results indicate that the magnetism of 2D C2N monolayers can be tuned via embedding TM atoms. PMID:27476579

  16. Optical modulators with 2D layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhipei; Martinez, Amos; Wang, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Light modulation is an essential operation in photonics and optoelectronics. With existing and emerging technologies increasingly demanding compact, efficient, fast and broadband optical modulators, high-performance light modulation solutions are becoming indispensable. The recent realization that 2D layered materials could modulate light with superior performance has prompted intense research and significant advances, paving the way for realistic applications. In this Review, we cover the state of the art of optical modulators based on 2D materials, including graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus. We discuss recent advances employing hybrid structures, such as 2D heterostructures, plasmonic structures, and silicon and fibre integrated structures. We also take a look at the future perspectives and discuss the potential of yet relatively unexplored mechanisms, such as magneto-optic and acousto-optic modulation.

  17. Electronic structure theory of weakly interacting bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Shiang; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2016-06-01

    We derive electronic structure models for weakly interacting bilayers such as graphene-graphene and graphene-hexagonal boron nitride, based on density functional theory calculations followed by Wannier transformation of electronic states. These transferable interlayer coupling models can be applied to investigate the physics of bilayers with arbitrary translations and twists. The functional form, in addition to the dependence on the distance, includes the angular dependence that results from higher angular momentum components in the Wannier pz orbitals. We demonstrate the capabilities of the method by applying it to a rotated graphene bilayer, which produces the analytically predicted renormalization of the Fermi velocity, Van Hove singularities in the density of states, and moiré pattern of the electronic localization at small twist angles. We further extend the theory to obtain the effective couplings by integrating out neighboring layers. This approach is instrumental for the design of van der Walls heterostructures with desirable electronic features and transport properties and for the derivation of low-energy theories for graphene stacks, including proximity effects from other layers.

  18. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials. PMID:25169938

  19. Spin Structure Functions from Electron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Seonho Choi

    2012-09-01

    The spin structure of the nucleon can play a key testing ground for Quantum Chromo-Dynamics (QCD) at wide kinematic ranges from smaller to large four momentum transfer Q{sup 2}. The pioneering experiments have confirmed several QCD sum rules at high Q{sup 2} where a perturbative picture holds. For a full understanding of QCD at various scales, various measurements were made at intermediate and small Q{sup 2} region and their interpretation would be a challenging task due to the non-perturbative nature. Jefferson Lab has been one of the major experimental facilities for the spin structure with its polarized electron beams and various polarized targets. A few QCD sum rules have been compared with the measured spin structure functions g{sub 1}(x, Q{sup 2}) and g{sub 2}(x, Q{sup 2}) at low Q{sup 2} and surprising results have been obtained for the spin polarizabilities, {gamma}{sub 0} and {delta}{sub LT} . As for the proton spin structure functions, the lack of data for g{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) structure functions has been complemented with a new experiment at Jefferson Lab, SANE. The results from SANE will provide a better picture of the proton spin structure at a wide kinematic range in x and Q{sup 2}.

  20. Extraordinary electronic properties in uncommon structure types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mazhar Nawaz

    In this thesis I present the results of explorations into several uncommon structure types. In Chapter 1 I go through the underlying idea of how we search for new compounds with exotic properties in solid state chemistry. The ideas of exploring uncommon structure types, building up from the simple to the complex, using chemical intuition and thinking by analogy are discussed. Also, the history and basic concepts of superconductivity, Dirac semimetals, and magnetoresistance are briefly reviewed. In chapter 2, the 1s-InTaS2 structural family is introduced along with the discovery of a new member of the family, Ag0:79VS2; the synthesis, structure, and physical properties of two different polymorphs of the material are detailed. Also in this chapter, we report the observation of superconductivity in another 1s structure, PbTaSe2. This material is especially interesting due to it being very heavy (resulting in very strong spin orbit coulping (SOC)), layered, and noncentrosymmetric. Electronic structure calculations reveal the presence of a bulk 3D Dirac cone (very similar to graphene) that is gapped by SOC originating from the hexagonal Pb layer. In Chapter 3 we show the re-investigation of the crystal structure of the 3D Dirac semimetal, Cd3As2. It is found to be centrosymmetric, rather than noncentrosymmetric, and as such all bands are spin degenerate and there is a 4-fold degenerate bulk Dirac point at the Fermi level, making Cd3As2 a 3D electronic analog to graphene. Also, for the first time, scanning tunneling microscopy experiments identify a 2x2 surface reconstruction in what we identify as the (112) cleavage plane of single crystals; needle crystals grow with a [110] long axis direction. Lastly, in chapter 4 we report the discovery of "titanic" (sadly dubbed ⪉rge, nonsaturating" by Nature editors and given the acronym XMR) magnetoresistance (MR) in the non-magnetic, noncentrosymmetric, layered transition metal dichalcogenide WTe2; over 13 million% at 0.53 K in