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Sample records for 2ghz homodyne sensors

  1. Human speech articulator measurements using low power, 2GHz Homodyne sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, T; Burnett, G C; Holzrichter, J F

    1999-06-29

    Very low power, short-range microwave ''radar-like'' sensors can measure the motions and vibrations of internal human speech articulators as speech is produced. In these animate (and also in inanimate acoustic systems) microwave sensors can measure vibration information associated with excitation sources and other interfaces. These data, together with the corresponding acoustic data, enable the calculation of system transfer functions. This information appears to be useful for a surprisingly wide range of applications such as speech coding and recognition, speaker or object identification, speech and musical instrument synthesis, noise cancellation, and other applications.

  2. Pulse homodyne field disturbance sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1997-01-01

    A field disturbance sensor operates with relatively low power, provides an adjustable operating range, is not hypersensitive at close range, allows co-location of multiple sensors, and is inexpensive to manufacture. The sensor includes a transmitter that transmits a sequence of transmitted bursts of electromagnetic energy. The transmitter frequency is modulated at an intermediate frequency. The sequence of bursts has a burst repetition rate, and each burst has a burst width and comprises a number of cycles at a transmitter frequency. The sensor includes a receiver which receives electromagnetic energy at the transmitter frequency, and includes a mixer which mixes a transmitted burst with reflections of the same transmitted burst to produce an intermediate frequency signal. Circuitry, responsive to the intermediate frequency signal indicates disturbances in the sensor field. Because the mixer mixes the transmitted burst with reflections of the transmitted burst, the burst width defines the sensor range. The burst repetition rate is randomly or pseudo-randomly modulated so that bursts in the sequence of bursts have a phase which varies. A second range-defining mode transmits two radio frequency bursts, where the time spacing between the bursts defines the maximum range divided by two.

  3. Pulse homodyne field disturbance sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1997-10-28

    A field disturbance sensor operates with relatively low power, provides an adjustable operating range, is not hypersensitive at close range, allows co-location of multiple sensors, and is inexpensive to manufacture. The sensor includes a transmitter that transmits a sequence of transmitted bursts of electromagnetic energy. The transmitter frequency is modulated at an intermediate frequency. The sequence of bursts has a burst repetition rate, and each burst has a burst width and comprises a number of cycles at a transmitter frequency. The sensor includes a receiver which receives electromagnetic energy at the transmitter frequency, and includes a mixer which mixes a transmitted burst with reflections of the same transmitted burst to produce an intermediate frequency signal. Circuitry, responsive to the intermediate frequency signal indicates disturbances in the sensor field. Because the mixer mixes the transmitted burst with reflections of the transmitted burst, the burst width defines the sensor range. The burst repetition rate is randomly or pseudo-randomly modulated so that bursts in the sequence of bursts have a phase which varies. A second range-defining mode transmits two radio frequency bursts, where the time spacing between the bursts defines the maximum range divided by two. 12 figs.

  4. Full-wave receiver architecture for the homodyne motion sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Haugen, Peter C.; Dallum, Gregory E.; Welsh, Patrick A.; Romero, Carlos E.

    2015-09-29

    A homodyne motion sensor or detector based on ultra-wideband radar utilizes the entire received waveform through implementation of a voltage boosting receiver. The receiver includes a receiver input and a receiver output. A first diode is connected to the receiver output. A first charge storage capacitor is connected from between the first diode and the receiver output to ground. A second charge storage capacitor is connected between the receiver input and the first diode. A second diode is connected from between the second charge storage capacitor and the first diode to ground. The dual diode receiver performs voltage boosting of a RF signal received at the receiver input, thereby enhancing receiver sensitivity.

  5. Full-wave receiver architecture for the homodyne motion sensor

    DOEpatents

    Haugen, Peter C; Dallum, Gregory E; Welsh, Patrick A; Romero, Carlos E

    2013-11-19

    A homodyne motion sensor or detector based on ultra-wideband radar utilizes the entire received waveform through implementation of a voltage boosting receiver. The receiver includes a receiver input and a receiver output. A first diode is connected to the receiver output. A first charge storage capacitor is connected from between the first diode and the receiver output to ground. A second charge storage capacitor is connected between the receiver input and the first diode. A second diode is connected from between the second charge storage capacitor and the first diode to ground. The dual diode receiver performs voltage boosting of a RF signal received at the receiver input, thereby enhancing receiver sensitivity.

  6. Application of homodyne demodulation system in fiber optic sensors using phase generated carrier based on LabVIEW in pipeline leakage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Cunfu; Hang, Lijun; Wu, Bin

    2006-02-01

    Phase generated carrier (PGC) homodyne demodulation technique is frequently used in optical fiber interferometric sensors for demodulating sensing signals. However, it is difficult for the system to achieve optimum performance because the electronic components which constitute the analog circuit of a PGC homodyne demodulation system have some problems such as overload, improper resistance, etc. all those will bring noise to the system. Therefore, the system could not be allowed to work well for those noises introduced by electronic components. For overcoming these disadvantages of the analog circuit mentioned above, a digital PGC demodulation system based on LabVIEW is described in this paper, and it is applied to demodulate the sensing signals from all fiber oil pipeline leakage detection system based on Sagnac interferometer. The results verify that this system can well demodulate sensing signals.

  7. Multichannel homodyne receiver

    DOEpatents

    Landt, Jeremy A.

    1982-01-01

    A homodyne radar transmitter/receiver device which produces a single combined output which contains modulated backscatter information for all phase conditions of both modulated and unmodulated backscatter signals. The device utilizes taps along coaxial transmission lines, strip transmission line, and waveguides which are spaced by 1/8 wavelength or 1/6 wavelength, etc. This greatly reduces costs by eliminating separate transmission and reception antennas and an expensive arrangement of power splitters and mixers utilized in the prior art.

  8. Multichannel homodyne receiver

    DOEpatents

    Landt, J.A.

    1981-01-19

    A homodyne radar transmitter/receiver device which produces a single combined output which contains modulated backscatter information for all phase conditions of both modulated and unmodulated backscatter signals is described. The device utilizes taps along coaxial transmission lines, strip transmission line, and waveguides which are spaced by 1/8 wavelength or 1/6 wavelength, etc. This greatly reduces costs by eliminating separate transmission and reception antennas and an expensive arrangement of power splitters and mixers utilized in the prior art.

  9. Dynamic light scattering homodyne probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V. (Inventor); Cannell, David S. (Inventor); Smart, Anthony E. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An optical probe for analyzing a sample illuminated by a laser includes an input optical fiber operably connectable to the laser where the input optical fiber has an entrance end and an exit end. The probe also includes a first beam splitter where the first beam splitter is adapted to transmit an alignment portion of a light beam from the input fiber exit end and to reflect a homodyning portion of the light beam from the input fiber. The probe also includes a lens between the input fiber exit end and the first beam splitter and a first and a second output optical fiber, each having an entrance end and an exit end, each exit end being operably connectable to respective optical detectors. The probe also includes a second beam splitter which is adapted to reflect at least a portion of the reflected homodyning portion into the output fiber entrance ends and to transmit light from the laser scattered by the sample into the entrance ends.

  10. Homodyne measurement of the average photon number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, J. G.; Ralph, T. C.; Huntington, E. H.

    2006-03-01

    We describe a scheme for measurement of the mean photon flux at an arbitrary optical sideband frequency using homodyne detection. Experimental implementation of the technique requires an acousto-optic modulator in addition to the homodyne detector, and does not require phase locking. The technique exhibits polarization and frequency and spatial mode selectivity, as well as much improved speed, resolution, and dynamic range when compared to linear photodetectors and avalanche photodiodes, with potential application to quantum-state tomography and information encoding using an optical frequency basis. Experimental data also support a quantum-mechanical description of vacuum noise.

  11. Terahertz homodyne self-mixing transmission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, Till Breuer, Stefan; Blömer, Dominik; Patel, Sanketkumar; Schlosser, Malte; Birkl, Gerhard; Elsäßer, Wolfgang; Simonetta, Marcello; Deninger, Anselm; Giuliani, Guido

    2015-02-09

    A compact homodyne self-mixing terahertz spectroscopy concept is experimentally investigated and confirmed by calculations. This method provides amplitude and phase information of the terahertz radiation emitted by a photoconductive antenna in a transmission experiment where a rotating chopper wheel serves as a feedback mirror. As a proof-of-principle experiment the frequency-dependent refractive index of Teflon is measured.

  12. Homodyning and heterodyning the quantum phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dariano, Giacomo M.; Macchiavello, C.; Paris, M. G. A.

    1994-01-01

    The double-homodyne and the heterodyne detection schemes for phase shifts between two synchronous modes of the electromagnetic field are analyzed in the framework of quantum estimation theory. The probability operator-valued measures (POM's) of the detectors are evaluated and compared with the ideal one in the limit of strong local reference oscillator. The present operational approach leads to a reasonable definition of phase measurement, whose sensitivity is actually related to the output r.m.s. noise of the photodetector. We emphasize that the simple-homodyne scheme does not correspond to a proper phase-shift measurements as it is just a zero-point detector. The sensitivity of all detection schemes are optimized at fixed energy with respect to the input state of radiation. It is shown that the optimal sensitivity can be actually achieved using suited squeezed states.

  13. Homodyne impulse radar hidden object locator

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    An electromagnetic detector is designed to locate an object hidden behind a separator or a cavity within a solid object. The detector includes a PRF generator for generating 2 MHz pulses, a homodyne oscillator for generating a 2 kHz square wave, and for modulating the pulses from the PRF generator. A transmit antenna transmits the modulated pulses through the separator, and a receive antenna receives the signals reflected off the object. The receiver path of the detector includes a sample and hold circuit, an AC coupled amplifier which filters out DC bias level shifts in the sample and hold circuit, and a rectifier circuit connected to the homodyne oscillator and to the AC coupled amplifier, for synchronously rectifying the modulated pulses transmitted over the transmit antenna. The homodyne oscillator modulates the signal from the PRF generator with a continuous wave (CW) signal, and the AC coupled amplifier operates with a passband centered on that CW signal. The present detector can be used in several applications, including the detection of metallic and non-metallic objects, such as pipes, studs, joists, nails, rebars, conduits and electrical wiring, behind wood wall, ceiling, plywood, particle board, dense hardwood, masonry and cement structure. The detector is portable, light weight, simple to use, inexpensive, and has a low power emission which facilitates the compliance with Part 15 of the FCC rules.

  14. Homodyne impulse radar hidden object locator

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-04-30

    An electromagnetic detector is designed to locate an object hidden behind a separator or a cavity within a solid object. The detector includes a PRF generator for generating 2 MHz pulses, a homodyne oscillator for generating a 2 kHz square wave, and for modulating the pulses from the PRF generator. A transmit antenna transmits the modulated pulses through the separator, and a receive antenna receives the signals reflected off the object. The receiver path of the detector includes a sample and hold circuit, an AC coupled amplifier which filters out DC bias level shifts in the sample and hold circuit, and a rectifier circuit connected to the homodyne oscillator and to the AC coupled amplifier, for synchronously rectifying the modulated pulses transmitted over the transmit antenna. The homodyne oscillator modulates the signal from the PRF generator with a continuous wave (CW) signal, and the AC coupled amplifier operates with a passband centered on that CW signal. The present detector can be used in several applications, including the detection of metallic and non-metallic objects, such as pipes, studs, joists, nails, rebars, conduits and electrical wiring, behind wood wall, ceiling, plywood, particle board, dense hardwood, masonry and cement structure. The detector is portable, light weight, simple to use, inexpensive, and has a low power emission which facilitates the compliance with Part 15 of the FCC rules. 15 figs.

  15. Review of the homodyne technique for coherent radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, E. Lintz; Madsen, S. Norvang; Skou, N.

    The merits of using homodyne techniques for coherent radar are examined. The influence of various component deficiencies is discussed with relation to the choice between homodyne and heterodyne. The use of digital IQ signal generation and processing to correct for some of the problems of modulator and demodulator design by predistortion, offset correction, etc. is briefly addressed. A 5.3-GHz synthetic aperture radar designed for strip mapping at High resolution is then considered to illustrate the use of the homodyne approach. Measurement results on quadrature modulators and demodulators at 300 MHz and 5.3 GHz are given to support the contention that the homodyne technique can be applied successfully.

  16. Optical homodyne tomography with polynomial series expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Benichi, Hugo; Furusawa, Akira

    2011-09-15

    We present and demonstrate a method for optical homodyne tomography based on the inverse Radon transform. Different from the usual filtered back-projection algorithm, this method uses an appropriate polynomial series to expand the Wigner function and the marginal distribution, and discretize Fourier space. We show that this technique solves most technical difficulties encountered with kernel deconvolution-based methods and reconstructs overall better and smoother Wigner functions. We also give estimators of the reconstruction errors for both methods and show improvement in noise handling properties and resilience to statistical errors.

  17. Decoy-state quantum key distribution using homodyne detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shams Mousavi, S. H.; Gallion, P.

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, we propose to use the decoy-state technique to improve the security of the quantum key distribution (QKD) systems based on homodyne detection against the photon number splitting attack. The decoy-state technique is a powerful tool that can significantly boost the secure transmission range of the QKD systems. However, it has not yet been applied to the systems that use homodyne detection. After adapting this theory to the systems based on homodyne detection, we quantify the secure performance and transmission range of the resulting system.

  18. Decoy-state quantum key distribution using homodyne detection

    SciTech Connect

    Shams Mousavi, S. H.; Gallion, P.

    2009-07-15

    In this paper, we propose to use the decoy-state technique to improve the security of the quantum key distribution (QKD) systems based on homodyne detection against the photon number splitting attack. The decoy-state technique is a powerful tool that can significantly boost the secure transmission range of the QKD systems. However, it has not yet been applied to the systems that use homodyne detection. After adapting this theory to the systems based on homodyne detection, we quantify the secure performance and transmission range of the resulting system.

  19. Balanced homodyne readout for quantum limited gravitational wave detectors.

    PubMed

    Fritschel, Peter; Evans, Matthew; Frolov, Valery

    2014-02-24

    Balanced homodyne detection is typically used to measure quantum-noise-limited optical beams, including squeezed states of light, at audio-band frequencies. Current designs of advanced gravitational wave interferometers use some type of homodyne readout for signal detection, in part because of its compatibility with the use of squeezed light. The readout scheme used in Advanced LIGO, called DC readout, is however not a balanced detection scheme. Instead, the local oscillator field, generated from a dark fringe offset, co-propagates with the signal field at the anti-symmetric output of the beam splitter. This article examines the alternative of a true balanced homodyne detection for the readout of gravitational wave detectors such as Advanced LIGO. Several practical advantages of the balanced detection scheme are described. PMID:24663746

  20. A cooled 1-2 GHz balanced HEMT amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padin, Stephen; Ortiz, Gerardo G.

    1991-07-01

    The design details and measurement results for a cooled 1-GHz-bandwidth L-band HEMT amplifier are presented. The HEMT noise parameters were measured at a physical temperature of 12 K, and a balanced configuration was adopted. This has the advantage of providing a good input match even though the amplifiers in the two arms of the balanced circuit are poorly matched. However, there are disadvantages. The loss of the input hybrid degrades the noise temperature and coupling errors in the hybrids, and differences between the amplifiers reduce the gain and result in a noise contribution from the input load. In the amplifier described, these effects degrade the noise temperature by less than 1 K. The amplifier uses commercially available packaged HEMT devices. At a physical temperature of 12 K the amplifier achieves noise temperatures between 3 and 6 K over the 1-2-GHz band. The associated gain is about 20 dB.

  1. Homodyne digital interferometry for a sensitive fiber frequency reference.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Silvie; McRae, Terry G; Gray, Malcolm B; Shaddock, Daniel A

    2014-07-28

    Digitally enhanced homodyne interferometry enables robust interferometric sensitivity to be achieved in an optically simple configuration by shifting optical complexity into the digital signal processing regime. We use digitally enhanced homodyne interferometry in a simple, all-fiber Michelson interferometer to achieve a frequency reference stability of better than 20 Hz/√Hz from 10 mHz to 1 Hz, satisfying, for the first time in an all fiber system, the stability requirements for the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow On mission. In addition, we have demonstrated stability that satisfies the future mission objectives at frequencies down to 1 mHz. This frequency domain stability translates into a fractional Allan deviation of 3.3 × 10(-17) for an integration time of 55 seconds. PMID:25089435

  2. Noise characteristics of heterodyne/homodyne frequency-domain measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Dongyel; Kupinski, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically develop and experimentally validate the noise characteristics of heterodyne and/or homodyne measurements that are widely used in frequency-domain diffusive imaging. The mean and covariance of the modulated heterodyne output are derived by adapting the random amplification of a temporal point process. A multinomial selection rule is applied to the result of the temporal noise analysis to additionally model the spatial distribution of intensified photons measured by a charge-coupled device (CCD), which shows that the photon detection efficiency of CCD pixels plays an important role in the noise property of detected photons. The approach of using a multinomial probability law is validated from experimental results. Also, experimentally measured characteristics of means and variances of homodyne outputs are in agreement with the developed theory. The developed noise model can be applied to all photon amplification processes.

  3. Homodyne detection with on-off detector systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipfert, T.; Sperling, J.; Vogel, W.

    2015-11-01

    Phase-sensitive properties of light play a crucial role in a variety of quantum optical phenomena, which have been mostly discussed in the framework of photoelectric detection theory. However, modern detection schemes, such as arrays of on-off detectors, are not based on photoelectric counting. We demonstrate that the theory of homodyning with such click-counting detectors can be established by using a proper detection model. For practical applications, a variety of typically occurring imperfections are rigorously analyzed and directly observable nonclassicality criteria are studied. Fundamental examples demonstrate the general functionality of our technique. Thus, our approach of homodyne detection with on-off detector systems is able to bridge the gap between imperfect detection and the phase resolution demands for modern applications of quantum light.

  4. Maximum-likelihood estimation of photon-number distribution from homodyne statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banaszek, Konrad

    1998-06-01

    We present a method for reconstructing the photon-number distribution from the homodyne statistics based on maximization of the likelihood function derived from the exact statistical description of a homodyne experiment. This method incorporates in a natural way the physical constraints on the reconstructed quantities, and the compensation for the nonunit detection efficiency.

  5. Towards higher precision and operational use of optical homodyne tomograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, M.; Coelho, A. S.; Filippov, S. N.; Man'ko, V. I.; Zavatta, A.

    2012-05-01

    We present the results of an operational use of experimentally measured optical tomograms to determine state characteristics (purity) avoiding any reconstruction of quasiprobabilities. We also develop a natural way how to estimate the errors (including both statistical and systematic ones) by an analysis of the experimental data themselves. Precision of the experiment can be increased by postselecting the data with minimal (systematic) errors. We demonstrate those techniques by considering coherent and photon-added coherent states measured via the time-domain improved homodyne detection. The operational use and precision of the data allowed us to check purity-dependent uncertainty relations and uncertainty relations for Shannon and Rényi entropies.

  6. A novel solution of frequency locking in homodyne coherent receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Limeng; Zhang, Yang'an; Hong, Yan; Ma, Huihui; Zhang, Yue

    2015-08-01

    A novel solution of frequency locking based on beat frequency detection in homodyne coherent receiver is presented and experimentally demonstrated. The beat frequency detection, using two beat frequency signals generated by a balance detector module, is easily to eliminate the noise introduced during long distance transmission. Furthermore, FPGA, as the core of the control unit, is adopted to change the resulting frequency of OVCO on the basis of the frequency deviation. The proposed scheme is tested more efficiency and higher stability than the previously single path feedback loop.

  7. Phase stabilized homodyne of infrared scattering type scanning near-field optical microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xiaoji G.; Gilburd, Leonid; Walker, Gilbert C.

    2014-12-29

    Scattering type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) allows sub diffraction limited spatial resolution. Interferometric homodyne detection in s-SNOM can amplify the signal and extract vibrational responses based on sample absorption. A stable reference phase is required for a high quality homodyne-detected near-field signal. This work presents the development of a phase stabilization mechanism for s-SNOM to provide stable homodyne conditions. The phase stability is found to be better than 0.05 rad for the mid infrared light source. Phase stabilization results in improved near field images and vibrational spectroscopies. Spatial inhomogeneities of the boron nitride nanotubes are measured and compared.

  8. Quantum hacking on quantum key distribution using homodyne detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jing-Zheng; Kunz-Jacques, Sébastien; Jouguet, Paul; Weedbrook, Christian; Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Wang, Shuang; Chen, Wei; Guo, Guang-Can; Han, Zheng-Fu

    2014-03-01

    Imperfect devices in commercial quantum key distribution systems open security loopholes that an eavesdropper may exploit. An example of one such imperfection is the wavelength-dependent coupling ratio of the fiber beam splitter. Utilizing this loophole, the eavesdropper can vary the transmittances of the fiber beam splitter at the receiver's side by inserting lights with wavelengths different from what is normally used. Here, we propose a wavelength attack on a practical continuous-variable quantum key distribution system using homodyne detection. By inserting light pulses at different wavelengths, this attack allows the eavesdropper to bias the shot-noise estimation even if it is done in real time. Based on experimental data, we discuss the feasibility of this attack and suggest a prevention scheme by improving the previously proposed countermeasures.

  9. Distributed birefringence, strain and temperature measurement by homodyne BOTDR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yuangang; Bao, Xiaoyi; Chen, Liang

    A novel distributed fiber birefringence, strain and temperature measurement based on homodyne Brillouin optical time domain reflectometry (BOTDR) is proposed. Birefringence measurement is based on the beat period detection of Brillouin beat of the same acoustic mode. Strain and temperature are obtained by measuring the power changes of Brillouin beat spectrum (BBS), which corresponds to the optical interaction of different acoustic modes in a complex profile fiber. The birefringence of a 4.3 km large-effective-area fiber (LEAF) was measured with 0.6-m spatial resolution, and strain and temperature at the end of a 4.5 km LEAF were measured at 1.5-m resolution in 140s.

  10. Witnessing trustworthy single-photon entanglement with local homodyne measurements.

    PubMed

    Morin, Olivier; Bancal, Jean-Daniel; Ho, Melvyn; Sekatski, Pavel; D'Auria, Virginia; Gisin, Nicolas; Laurat, Julien; Sangouard, Nicolas

    2013-03-29

    Single-photon entangled states, i.e., states describing two optical paths sharing a single photon, constitute the simplest form of entanglement. Yet they provide a valuable resource in quantum information science. Specifically, they lie at the heart of quantum networks, as they can be used for quantum teleportation, swapped, and purified with linear optics. The main drawback of such entanglement is the difficulty in measuring it. Here, we present and experimentally test an entanglement witness allowing one to say whether a given state is path entangled and also that entanglement lies in the subspace, where the optical paths are each filled with one photon at most, i.e., refers to single-photon entanglement. It uses local homodyning only and relies on no assumption about the Hilbert space dimension of the measured system. Our work provides a simple and trustworthy method for verifying the proper functioning of future quantum networks. PMID:23581297

  11. Dual diode detector for homodyne EPR microwave bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koscielniak, Janusz; Berliner, Lawrence J.

    1994-07-01

    After low noise FET amplifiers found widespread use in both X-band and low-frequency systems, it became possible to use multidiode mixers for signal detection. Here, a novel dual diode mixer is described for use in homodyne microwave bridges for both cw and pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometers. The structure is composed of a 90° hybrid coupler and separate detectors in two arms. The device provides common mode rejection of noise-like regular balanced mixers but, by making diode dc currents accessible, offers big advantages for tuning of the bridge when low Q sample probes are used. Although the use of this detector does not affect sensitivity directly, tuning precision and increased long-term stability leads to unexpected improvements.

  12. Homodyne displacement measuring interferometer probe for optical coordinate measuring machine with tip and tilt sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Sam C.; Ricci, Michael A.; Wang, Chen; Wei, Qun; Ellis, Jonathan D.

    2015-10-01

    In this proceedings, we present a 3DoF (one linear, two angular) optical probe for measuring freeform optics in conjunction with an optical coordinate measuring machine (OCMM). This probe uses homodyne interferometry in a Michelson configuration and position sensing detection to simultaneously measure displacement, tip, and tilt. The goal of this work is to investigate point-to-point methods for measuring freeform optics and establish a probing methodology that can perform self-alignment with respect to the local optical surface. We present the design and preliminary benchtop validation of the probe's performance. Benchtop validation shows successful measurements with 5 nm linear and 20 μrad angular noise levels, with a 15 μm spot size. A CMOS sensor is used for visual confirmation of proper focus on measurement surface to minimize initial defocus error. A PSD detects linear horizontal and vertical displacement of the reflected beam from the measurement surface using autocollimation. In-phase and quadrature signals are measured by two photodetectors and post-processed to obtain displacement information. Periodic error caused by polarization effects and beam mixing is compensated by FPGA-based signal processing.

  13. Theoretical study on balanced homodyne detection technique in preparation of squeezed states of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Wenyan; Feng, Fei; Song, Jia-zheng; Zhang, Tong-yi

    2013-08-01

    We analyze the balanced homodyne detection technique in the detection of squeezed light, which is controlled by dither locking scheme. We discuss how the balanced homodyne detection efficiency influences the detected degree of squeezing. Also, fluctuation in the relative phase between the local beam and the squeezed light is discussed, since a little phase fluctuation would decrease the detected degree of squeezing greatly. Then, the dither locking technique is studied in detail, which is used to lock the relative phase between the local beam and the squeezed light. The simulation experiments and theoretically results show that the balanced homodyne detection technique and the dither locking scheme are efficient methods to get more accurate degree of squeezing in the preparation of the squeezed states of light.

  14. Super-resolving angular rotation measurement using binary-outcome homodyne detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zijing; Qiao, Tianyuan; Ma, Kun; Zhang, Jiandong; Cen, Longzhu; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Yuan

    2016-08-01

    There has been much recent interest in high precision angular rotation measurement using photon orbital angular momentum to realize super-resolving angular rotation measurement. It is well known that quantum detection strategies can obtain a quantum-enhanced performance. Here, we prove that binary-outcome homodyne detection method can obtain a narrower signal peak, showing better resolution compared with the existing data processing method. Since the photon loss is unavoidable in the actual non-ideal optical system, this paper further discusses the impact of photon loss on the resolution and sensitivity of angular rotation measurement with binary-outcome homodyne detection method. PMID:27505811

  15. M-ary-state phase-shift-keying discrimination below the homodyne limit

    SciTech Connect

    Becerra, F. E.; Fan, J.; Polyakov, S. V.; Migdall, A.; Baumgartner, G.; Goldhar, J.; Kosloski, J. T.

    2011-12-15

    We investigate a strategy for M-ary discrimination of nonorthogonal phase states with error rates below the homodyne limit. This strategy uses feed forward to update a reference field and signal nulling for the state discrimination. We experimentally analyze the receiver performance using postprocessing and a Bayesian strategy to emulate the feed-forward process. This analysis shows that for a moderate system detection efficiency, it is possible to surpass the homodyne error limit for quadrature phase-shift keying signals using feed forward.

  16. Structure of multiphoton quantum optics. I. Canonical formalism and homodyne squeezed states

    SciTech Connect

    Dell'Anno, Fabio; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2004-03-01

    We introduce a formalism of nonlinear canonical transformations for general systems of multiphoton quantum optics. For single-mode systems the transformations depend on a tunable free parameter, the homodyne local-oscillator angle; for n-mode systems they depend on n heterodyne mixing angles. The canonical formalism realizes nontrivial mixing of pairs of conjugate quadratures of the electromagnetic field in terms of homodyne variables for single-mode systems, and in terms of heterodyne variables for multimode systems. In the first instance the transformations yield nonquadratic model Hamiltonians of degenerate multiphoton processes and define a class of non-Gaussian, nonclassical multiphoton states that exhibit properties of coherence and squeezing. We show that such homodyne multiphoton squeezed states are generated by unitary operators with a nonlinear time evolution that realizes the homodyne mixing of a pair of conjugate quadratures. Tuning of the local-oscillator angle allows us to vary at will the statistical properties of such states. We discuss the relevance of the formalism for the study of degenerate (up-)down-conversion processes. In a companion paper [F. Dell'Anno, S. De Siena, and F. Illuminati, 69, 033813 (2004)], we provide the extension of the nonlinear canonical formalism to multimode systems, we introduce the associated heterodyne multiphoton squeezed states, and we discuss their possible experimental realization.

  17. Structure of multiphoton quantum optics. I. Canonical formalism and homodyne squeezed states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dell'Anno, Fabio; de Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2004-03-01

    We introduce a formalism of nonlinear canonical transformations for general systems of multiphoton quantum optics. For single-mode systems the transformations depend on a tunable free parameter, the homodyne local-oscillator angle; for n -mode systems they depend on n heterodyne mixing angles. The canonical formalism realizes nontrivial mixing of pairs of conjugate quadratures of the electromagnetic field in terms of homodyne variables for single-mode systems, and in terms of heterodyne variables for multimode systems. In the first instance the transformations yield nonquadratic model Hamiltonians of degenerate multiphoton processes and define a class of non-Gaussian, nonclassical multiphoton states that exhibit properties of coherence and squeezing. We show that such homodyne multiphoton squeezed states are generated by unitary operators with a nonlinear time evolution that realizes the homodyne mixing of a pair of conjugate quadratures. Tuning of the local-oscillator angle allows us to vary at will the statistical properties of such states. We discuss the relevance of the formalism for the study of degenerate (up-)down-conversion processes. In a companion paper [

    F. Dell’Anno, S. De Siena, and F. Illuminati, 69, 033813 (2004)
    ], we provide the extension of the nonlinear canonical formalism to multimode systems, we introduce the associated heterodyne multiphoton squeezed states, and we discuss their possible experimental realization.

  18. 12.2-GHz methanol maser MMB follow-up catalogue - IV. Longitude range 20°-60°

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breen, S. L.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Caswell, J. L.; Green, J. A.; Voronkov, M. A.; Avison, A.; Fuller, G. A.; Quinn, L. J.

    2016-07-01

    This is the fourth and final instalment of a series of catalogues presenting 12.2-GHz methanol maser observations made towards each of the 6.7-GHz methanol masers detected in the Methanol Multibeam (MMB) survey. This final portion of the survey covers the 20°-60° longitude range, increasing the 12.2-GHz follow-up range to the full MMB coverage of 186° ≥ l ≤ 60° and |b| ≤ 2°. Towards a total of 260 6.7-GHz MMB methanol masers (we were unable to observe five of the MMB sources in this longitude range) we detect 116 12.2-GHz masers counterparts, 64 of which were discovered in this survey. Including data from the literature, we find that there are 12.2-GHz methanol masers towards 47.1 per cent of the 6.7-GHz methanol masers in this portion of the Galaxy. Across the entire MMB survey range, we find a detection rate of 45.3 per cent. We find that the detection rate of 12.2-GHz methanol masers as a function of Galactic longitude is not uniform and there is an excess of masers with broad velocity ranges at longitudes near 30° and 330°. Comparing the occurrence of 12.2-GHz methanol masers with MMB-targeted CO observations has shown that those outflows associated with a 12.2-GHz source have a larger average dynamical time-scale than those associated with only 6.7-GHz methanol masers, supporting the notion that the 12.2-GHz masers are associated with a later phase of high-mass star formation.

  19. A comparison between heterodyne and homodyne interferometry to realise the SI unit of acoustic pressure in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukoulas, Triantafillos; Robinson, Stephen; Rajagopal, Srinath; Zeqiri, Bajram

    2016-04-01

    Optical approaches for hydrophone calibrations offer significant advantages over existing methods based on reciprocity. In particular, heterodyne and homodyne interferometry can accurately measure particle velocity and displacements at a specific point in space thus enabling the acoustical pressure to be measured in an absolute, direct, assumption-free manner, with traceability through the SI definition of the metre. The calibration of a hydrophone can then be performed by placing the active element of the sensor at the point where the acoustic pressure field was measured and monitoring its electrical output. However, it is crucial to validate the performance and accuracy of such optical methods by direct comparison rather than through device calibration. Here we report on the direct comparison of two such optical interferometers used in underwater acoustics and ultrasonics in terms of acoustic pressure estimation and their associated uncertainties in the frequency range 200 kHz-3.5 MHz, with results showing agreement better than 1% in terms of pressure and typical expanded uncertainties better than 3% for both reported methods.

  20. A 2-GHz discrete-spectrum waveband-division microscopic imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Fangjian; Chen, Hongwei; Lei, Cheng; Chen, Minghua; Yang, Sigang; Xie, Shizhong

    2015-03-01

    Limited by dispersion-induced pulse overlap, the frame rate of serial time-encoded amplified microscopy is confined to the megahertz range. Replacing the ultra-short mode-locked pulse laser by a multi-wavelength source, based on waveband-division technique, a serial time stretch microscopic imaging system with a line scan rate of in the gigahertz range is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In this study, we present a surface scanning imaging system with a record line scan rate of 2 GHz and 15 pixels. Using a rectangular spectrum and a sufficiently large wavelength spacing for waveband-division, the resulting 2D image is achieved with good quality. Such a superfast imaging system increases the single-shot temporal resolution towards the sub-nanosecond regime.

  1. Exposure to high-frequency electromagnetic fields (100 kHz-2 GHz) in Extremadura (Spain).

    PubMed

    Rufo, M Montaña; Paniagua, Jesús M; Jiménez, Antonio; Antolín, Alicia

    2011-12-01

    The last decade has seen a rapid increase in people's exposure to electromagnetic fields. This paper reports the measurements of radiofrequency (RF) total power densities and power density spectra in 35 towns of the region of Extremadura, Spain. The spectra were taken with three antennas covering frequencies from 100 kHz to 2.2 GHz. This frequency range includes AM/FM radio broadcasting, television, and cellular telephone signals. The power density data and transmitting antenna locations were stored in a geographic information system (GIS) as an aid in analyzing and interpreting the results. The results showed the power density levels to be below the reference level guidelines for human exposure and that the power densities are different for different frequency ranges and different size categories of towns. PMID:22048492

  2. 1/f frequency noise of 2-GHZ high-Q thin-film sapphire resonators.

    PubMed

    Ferre-Pikal, E S; Delgado Arámburo, M C; Walls, F L; Lakin, K M

    2001-03-01

    We present experimental results on intrinsic 1/f frequency modulation (FM) noise in high-overtone thin-film sapphire resonators that operate at 2 GHz. The resonators exhibit several high-Q resonant modes approximately 100 kHz apart, which repeat every 13 MHz. A loaded Q of approximately 20,000 was estimated from the phase response. The results show that the FM noise of the resonators varied between Sy (10 Hz) = -202 dB relative (rel) to 1/Hz and -210 dB rel to 1/Hz. The equivalent phase modulation (PM) noise of an oscillator using these resonators (assuming a noiseless amplifier) would range from [symbol: see text](10 Hz) = -39 to -47 dBc/Hz. PMID:11370364

  3. Self-homodyne free-space optical communication system based on orthogonally polarized binary phase shift keying.

    PubMed

    Cai, Guangyu; Sun, Jianfeng; Li, Guangyuan; Zhang, Guo; Xu, Mengmeng; Zhang, Bo; Yue, Chaolei; Liu, Liren

    2016-06-10

    A self-homodyne laser communication system based on orthogonally polarized binary phase shift keying is demonstrated. The working principles of this method and the structure of a transceiver are described using theoretical calculations. Moreover, the signal-to-noise ratio, sensitivity, and bit error rate are analyzed for the amplifier-noise-limited case. The reported experiment validates the feasibility of the proposed method and demonstrates its advantageous sensitivity as a self-homodyne communication system. PMID:27409006

  4. The 2.2 GHz Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) oscillator development Ku-band frequency source development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Two 2.2 GHz SAW oscillators using aluminum nitride on sapphire (AlN/Al2O3) delay lines were fabricated. The oscillators were electronically temperature compensated and characterized. One of the oscillators was used as the frequency reference for the Ku band source; the second oscillator is available for continued evaluation. A 15 GHz frequency source was designed and fabricated. The 15 GHz source consists of a Ku band FET oscillator which is phase locked to the frequency multiplied (X7) output of the 2.2 GHz SAW reference source. The Ku band source was built using microstrip circuit designs, which are hybrid compatible. Two wafer runs of 2.2 GHz TED devices were fabricated and evaluated. The devices were mounted on microstrip test substrates and evaluated as 15 GHz divide by 7 circuits. The device evaluation indicated that in their present form the TED is not a practical circuit element.

  5. Coherent homodyne receiver with a compensator of Doppler shifts for inter orbit optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Toshiyuki; Haraguchi, Eisuke; Tajima, Kenichi; Hirano, Yoshihito; Hanada, Tatsuyuki; Yamakawa, Shiro

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents Bread Board Model (BBM) of coherent homodyne receiver with an optical phase locked loop and a frequency compensator of Doppler shifts for inter satellite optical communication link. 2.5Gbps BPSK data has been demodulated with sensitivity of -49.1dBm at bit rate of 1e-6 under initial frequency offset of +/-7 GHz simulated as Doppler shifts due to variation of distance between each satellite.

  6. Graphical rule of transforming continuous-variable graph states by local homodyne detection

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jing

    2010-09-15

    Graphical rule, describing that any single-mode homodyne detection turns a given continuous-variable (CV) graph state into a new one, is presented. Employing two simple graphical rules--local complement operation and vertex deletion (single quadrature-amplitude x measurement)--the graphical rule for any single-mode quadrature component measurement can be obtained. The shape of CV weighted graph state may be designed and constructed easily from a given larger graph state by applying this graphical rule.

  7. Deterministic creation and stabilization of entanglement in circuit QED by homodyne-mediated feedback control

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zhuo; Kuang Luelin; Hu Kai; Xu Luting; Wei Suhua; Guo Lingzhen; Li Xinqi

    2010-09-15

    In a solid-state circuit QED system, we demonstrate that a homodyne-current-based feedback can create and stabilize highly entangled two-qubit states in the presence of a moderate noisy environment. Particularly, we present an extended analysis for the current-based Markovian feedback, which leads to an improved feedback scheme. We show that this is essential to achieve a desirable control effect by the use of dispersive measurement.

  8. A higher dimensional homodyne filter for phase sensitive partial Fourier reconstruction of magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Paul, Joseph Suresh; Krishna Swamy Pillai, Uma

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce procedural steps for extension of the 1D homodyne phase correction for k-space truncation in all gradient encoding directions. Compared to the existing method applied to 2D partial k-space, signal losses introduced by the phase correction filter are observed to be minimal for the modified approach. In addition, the modified form of phase correction retains the inherent property of homodyne filtering for elimination of incidental phase artifacts due to truncation. In parallel imaging, this new form of homodyne filtering is shown to be effective for minimizing the signal losses, when each of the channel k-spaces is truncated along both phase and frequency-encode directions. This is illustrated with 2D partial k-space for flow compensated multichannel susceptibility weighted imaging. Extension of this method to 3D partial k-space shows improved reconstruction of flow information in phase contrast magnetic resonance angiography with reduced blur and enhanced background suppression. PMID:26117692

  9. Continuum sources from the THOR survey between 1 and 2 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bihr, S.; Johnston, K. G.; Beuther, H.; Anderson, L. D.; Ott, J.; Rugel, M.; Bigiel, F.; Brunthaler, A.; Glover, S. C. O.; Henning, T.; Heyer, M. H.; Klessen, R. S.; Linz, H.; Longmore, S. N.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Menten, K. M.; Plume, R.; Schierhuber, T.; Shanahan, R.; Stil, J. M.; Urquhart, J. S.; Walsh, A. J.

    2016-04-01

    We carried out a large program with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA): "THOR: The H i, OH, Recombination line survey of the Milky Way". We observed a significant portion (~100 deg2) of the Galactic plane in the first quadrant of the Milky Way in the 21 cm H i line, 4 OH transitions, 19 radio recombination lines, and continuum from 1 to 2 GHz. In this paper we present a catalog of the continuum sources in the first half of the survey (l = 14.0-37.9° and l = 47.1-51.2°, | b | ≤ 1.1°) at a spatial resolution of 10-25″, depending on the frequency and sky position with a spatially varying noise level of ~0.3-1 mJy beam-1. The catalog contains ~4400 sources. Around 1200 of these are spatially resolved, and ~1000 are possible artifacts, given their low signal-to-noise ratios. Since the spatial distribution of the unresolved objects is evenly distributed and not confined to the Galactic plane, most of them are extragalactic. Thanks to the broad bandwidth of the observations from 1 to 2 GHz, we are able to determine a reliable spectral index for ~1800 sources. The spectral index distribution reveals a double-peaked profile with maxima at spectral indices of α ≈ -1 and α ≈ 0, corresponding to steep declining and flat spectra, respectively. This allows us to distinguish between thermal and non-thermal emission, which can be used to determine the nature of each source. We examine the spectral index of ~300 known H ii regions, for which we find thermal emission with spectral indices around α ≈ 0. In contrast, supernova remnants (SNR) show non-thermal emission with α ≈ -0.5 and extragalactic objects generally have a steeper spectral index of α ≈ -1. Using the spectral index information of the THOR survey, we investigate potential SNR candidates. We classify the radiation of four SNR candidates as non-thermal, and for the first time, we provide strong evidence for the SNR origin of these candidates. Full Table C.1 is only available at the CDS via

  10. Ionospheric effects on synthetic aperture radar at 100 MHz to 2 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimaru, Akira; Kuga, Yasuo; Liu, Jun; Kim, Yunjin; Freeman, Tony

    1999-01-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in the use of spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) for measuring forest biomass. However, it is noted that conventional SAR using C-band or higher frequencies cannot penetrate into foliage, and therefore the biomass measurements require longer wavelengths, typically P-band (500 MHz). It is also known that the ionosphere is highly dispersive, causing group delay and broadening of pulses. The variance of the refractive index fluctuations due to turbulence is approximately proportional toƒ-4. In addition, the Faraday rotation due to the geomagnetic field in the ionosphere becomes significant. This paper presents an analysis with numerical examples of the following effects in the frequency range from 100 MHz to 2 GHz in order to show the frequency dependence and the effects of total electron content (TEC) of the ionosphere. First, the ionospheric turbulence can reduce the coherent length below the equivalent aperture size, and the azimuthal resolution becomes greater than D/2 where D is the antenna aperture size. Second, the ionospheric dispersion causes a shift of the imagery due to the group velocity. Third, the dispersion also creates broadening of the pulse. In addition, multiple scattering due to ionospheric turbulence gives rise to pulse broadening. Fourth, we consider the Faraday rotation effect and show that the ellipticity change is negligible, but the orientation angle changes significantly at P-band. Numerical examples are shown using typical ionospheric parameters, turbulence spectrum, and TEC values.

  11. Human oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets imaging with high-resolution phase-diversity homodyne OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senda, Naoko; Osawa, Kentaro

    2015-03-01

    There is a need for development of non-invasive technique to evaluate regenerative tissues such as cell sheets for transplantation. We demonstrated non-invasive imaging inside living cell sheets of human oral mucosal epithelial cells by phase-diversity homodyne optical coherence tomography (OCT). The new method OCT developed in Hitachi enables cell imaging because of high resolution (axial resolution; ~2.6 μm, lateral resolution; ~1 μm, in the air). Nuclei inside cell sheets were imaged with sufficient spatial resolution to identify each cell. It suggested that the new method OCT could be useful for non-invasive cell sheet evaluation test.

  12. Coherent Φ-OTDR based on I/Q demodulation and homodyne detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zinan; Zhang, Li; Wang, Song; Xue, Naitian; Peng, Fei; Fan, Mengqiu; Sun, Wei; Qian, Xianyang; Rao, Jiarui; Rao, Yunjiang

    2016-01-25

    We demonstrate a novel distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) system based on phase-sensitive optical time-domain reflectometry (Φ-OTDR). Both the phase and the amplitude of the Rayleigh scattering (RS) light can be demodulated in real-time. The technique is based on I/Q demodulation and homodyne detection using a 90° optical hybrid. The theoretical analysis is given, and as a proof of the concept, the dynamic strain sensing is experimentally demonstrated, with a sensing range of 12.566 km and a spatial resolution of 10 m. PMID:26832468

  13. Reconstruction of photon number conditioned states using phase randomized homodyne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowski, H. M.; Assad, S. M.; Bernu, J.; Hage, B.; Lund, A. P.; Ralph, T. C.; Lam, P. K.; Symul, T.

    2013-05-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the reconstruction of a photon number conditioned state without using a photon number discriminating detector. By using only phase randomized homodyne measurements, we reconstruct up to the three photon subtracted squeezed vacuum state. The reconstructed Wigner functions of these states show regions of pronounced negativity, signifying the non-classical nature of the reconstructed states. The techniques presented allow for complete characterization of the role of a conditional measurement on an ensemble of states, and might prove useful in systems where photon counting still proves technically challenging.

  14. Balanced homodyne detection of Bragg microholograms in photopolymer for data storage.

    PubMed

    Guattari, Frédéric; Maire, Guillaume; Contreras, Kevin; Arnaud, Carole; Pauliat, Gilles; Roosen, Gérald; Jradi, Safi; Carré, Christiane

    2007-03-01

    Wavelength multiplexed holographic bit oriented memories are serious competitors for high capacity data storage systems. For data recording, two interfering beams are required whereas one of them should be blocked for readout in previously proposed systems. This makes the system complex. To circumvent this difficulty and make the device simpler, we validated an architecture for such memories in which the same two beams are used for recording and reading out. This balanced homodyne scheme is validated by recording holograms in a Lippmann architecture. PMID:19532458

  15. Homodyne detection of coherence and phase shift of a quantum dot in a cavity.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Morten P; Snijders, Henk; Löffler, Wolfgang; Barve, Ajit V; Coldren, Larry A; Bouwmeester, Dirk; van Exter, Martin P

    2015-07-01

    A homodyne measurement technique is demonstrated that enables direct observation of the coherence and phase of light that passed through a coupled quantum dot (QD)-microcavity system, which in turn enables clear identification of coherent and incoherent QD transitions. As an example, we study the effect of power-induced decoherence, where the QD transition saturates and incoherent emission from the excited state dominates at higher power. Further, we show that the same technique allows measurement of the quantum phase shift induced by a single QD in the cavity, which is strongly enhanced by cavity quantum electrodynamics effects. PMID:26125395

  16. 47 CFR 25.136 - Licensing provisions for user transceivers in the 1.6/2.4 GHz, 1.5/1.6 GHz, and 2 GHz Mobile...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the 1.6/2.4 GHz, 1.5/1.6 GHz, and 2 GHz Mobile Satellite Services. 25.136 Section 25.136 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS..., 1.5/1.6 GHz, and 2 GHz Mobile Satellite Services. In addition to the technical...

  17. 80 Gbit/s, 256 QAM coherent transmission over 150 km with an injection-locked homodyne receiver.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Keisuke; Wang, Yixin; Beppu, Shohei; Yoshida, Masato; Nakazawa, Masataka

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate an 80 Gbit/s, 5 Gsymbol/s 256 QAM coherent optical transmission by employing an injection-locked homodyne detection circuit based on both fiber lasers and LDs. With either circuit, low phase noise carrier-phase synchronization between the transmitted data signal and an LO were achieved with a phase noise variance of only 0.2 degrees. As a result, we have successfully transmitted an 80 Gbit/s data signal over 150 km with a simple receiver configuration. This is the highest QAM multiplicity yet realized with injection-locked homodyne detection. PMID:26561187

  18. 0.8-5.2GHz Broad-Band SiGe-MMIC Quadrature Mixer for Software Defined Radio Receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Keishi; Suematsu, Noriharu; Tsutsumi, Koji; Kanazawa, Gakushi; Sekine, Tomotsugu; Kubo, Hiroshi; Isota, Yoji

    For the next generation wireless terminals used in the software defined radio (SDR), multi-band / multi-mode transceivers and their MMIC are required which cover the wide RF frequency range from several hundreds MHz up to several GHz. In this paper, 0.8-5.2GHz broad-band SiGe-MMIC quadrature mixer (Q-MIX) for multi-band / multi-mode direct conversion receiver has been developed. By using a static type frequency divider as a 90 degrees local (LO) power divider, measured error vector magnitude (EVM) of less than 3.1% can be achieved in the cases of 0.8/2.1GHz W-CDMA and 5.2GHz wireless Local Area Network (LAN) (IEEE 802.11a) reception. This Q-MIX also shows broad-band characteristic for base-band signal and is applicable for 4G cellular. By using fabricated Q-MIX, a multi-band / multi-mode (1.9GHz (3rd generation cellular (W-CDMA)) / 5.2GHz (4th generation cellular (Multi-Carrier (MC)-CDMA))) receiver has been developed and it has firstly demonstrated the successful reception of motion picture via W-CDMA and MC-CDMA.

  19. Analysis of link performance and robustness of homodyne BPSK for airborne backbone laser communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Shang-hong; Zhao, Wei-hu; Li, Yong-jun; Liu, Yun; Li, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    The high altitude turbulence is described by the "Clear 1" model in terms of refractive-index structure. The outage and Bit Error Rate (BER) performance of airborne communication links under atmospheric turbulence and aero-optics effects of homodyne binary phase shift keying (BPSK) system is deduced in the high altitude turbulence channel, the relation of probability of fade, mean fade time with flight altitude and transmission distance is analyzed, the Bit Error Rate (BER) vary characteristic along with the mean signal noise rate signal noise rate (SNR) of different modulates is discussed in the gamma-gamma turbulence channel. The results show that atmospheric turbulence and aero-optic effects can greatly reduce the SNR that would occur in the absence of optical turbulence, leading in some cases to unacceptable fade levels or BERs. The average SNR is 26 dB for BPSK to achieve a BER of 10-6. A bit error rate of 5.94×10-10 at 200 km propagation distance was achieved employing a homodyne BPSK based modem.

  20. Atomic homodyne detection of continuous-variable entangled twin-atom states.

    PubMed

    Gross, C; Strobel, H; Nicklas, E; Zibold, T; Bar-Gill, N; Kurizki, G; Oberthaler, M K

    2011-12-01

    Historically, the completeness of quantum theory has been questioned using the concept of bipartite continuous-variable entanglement. The non-classical correlations (entanglement) between the two subsystems imply that the observables of one subsystem are determined by the measurement choice on the other, regardless of the distance between the subsystems. Nowadays, continuous-variable entanglement is regarded as an essential resource, allowing for quantum enhanced measurement resolution, the realization of quantum teleportation and quantum memories, or the demonstration of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox. These applications rely on techniques to manipulate and detect coherences of quantum fields, the quadratures. Whereas in optics coherent homodyne detection of quadratures is a standard technique, for massive particles a corresponding method was missing. Here we report the realization of an atomic analogue to homodyne detection for the measurement of matter-wave quadratures. The application of this technique to a quantum state produced by spin-changing collisions in a Bose-Einstein condensate reveals continuous-variable entanglement, as well as the twin-atom character of the state. Our results provide a rare example of continuous-variable entanglement of massive particles. The direct detection of atomic quadratures has applications not only in experimental quantum atom optics, but also for the measurement of fields in many-body systems of massive particles. PMID:22139418

  1. Self-homodyne measurement of a dynamic Mollow triplet in the solid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Kevin A.; Müller, Kai; Rundquist, Armand; Sarmiento, Tomas; Piggott, Alexander Y.; Kelaita, Yousif; Dory, Constantin; Lagoudakis, Konstantinos G.; Vučković, Jelena

    2016-03-01

    The study of the light-matter interaction at the quantum scale has been enabled by the cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) architecture, in which a quantum two-level system strongly couples to a single cavity mode. Originally implemented with atoms in optical cavities, CQED effects are now also observed with artificial atoms in solid-state environments. Such realizations of these systems exhibit fast dynamics, making them attractive candidates for devices including modulators and sources in high-throughput communications. However, these systems possess large photon out-coupling rates that obscure any quantum behaviour at large excitation powers. Here, we have used a self-homodyning interferometric technique that fully employs the complex mode structure of our nanofabricated cavity to observe a quantum phenomenon known as the dynamic Mollow triplet. We expect this interference to facilitate the development of arbitrary on-chip quantum state generators, thereby strongly influencing quantum lithography, metrology and imaging.

  2. Détection homodyne pour mémoires holographiques à stockage bit à bit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maire, G.; Pauliat, G.; Roosen, G.

    2006-10-01

    Les mémoires holographiques à stockage bit à bit sont une alternative intéressante à l'approche holographique conventionnelle par pages de données du fait de leur architecture optique simplifiée. Nous proposons et validons ici une procédure de lecture adaptée à de telles mémoires et basée sur une détection homodyne de l'amplitude diffractée par les hologrammes. Ceci permet d'augmenter la quantité de signal utile détecté et s'avère donc prometteur pour accroître le taux de transfert de données de ces mémoires.

  3. Homodyne laser interferometer involving minimal quadrature phase error to obtain subnanometer nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Junning; He, Zhangqiang; Jiu, Yuanwei; Tan, Jiubin; Sun, Tao

    2016-09-01

    The demand for minimal cyclic nonlinearity error in laser interferometry is increasing as a result of advanced scientific research projects. Research shows that the quadrature phase error is the main effect that introduces cyclic nonlinearity error, and polarization-mixing cross talk during beam splitting is the main error source that causes the quadrature phase error. In this paper, a new homodyne quadrature laser interferometer configuration based on nonpolarization beam splitting and balanced interference between two circularly polarized laser beams is proposed. Theoretical modeling indicates that the polarization-mixing cross talk is elaborately avoided through nonpolarizing and Wollaston beam splitting, with a minimum number of quadrature phase error sources involved. Experimental results show that the cyclic nonlinearity error of the interferometer is up to 0.6 nm (peak-to-valley value) without any correction and can be further suppressed to 0.2 nm with a simple gain and offset correction method. PMID:27607285

  4. Surpassing the shot-noise limit by homodyne-mediated feedback.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guofeng; Zhu, Hanjie

    2016-09-01

    Entangled systems with large quantum Fisher information (QFI) can be used to outperform the standard quantum limit of the separable systems in quantum metrology. However, the interaction between the system and the environments inevitably leads to decoherence and decrease of the QFI, and it is not clear whether the entanglement systems can be a better resource than separable systems in the realistic physical condition. In this work, we study the steady QFI of two driven and collectively damped qubits with homodyne-mediated feedback. We show that the steady QFI can be significantly enhanced both in the cases of symmetric feedback and nonsymmetric feedback, and the shot-noise limit of separable states can be surpassed in both cases. The QFI can even achieve the Heisenberg limit for appropriate feedback parameters and initial conditions in the case of symmetric feedback. We also show that an initial-condition-independent steady QFI can be obtained by using nonsymmetric feedback. PMID:27607940

  5. A novel implementation of homodyne time interval analysis method for primary vibration calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiao; Zhou, Ling; Cai, Chenguang; Hu, Hongbo

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, the shortcomings and their causes of the conventional homodyne time interval analysis (TIA) method is described with respect to its software algorithm and hardware implementation, based on which a simplified TIA method is proposed with the help of virtual instrument technology. Equipped with an ordinary Michelson interferometer and dual channel synchronous data acquisition card, the primary vibration calibration system using the simplified method can perform measurements of complex sensitivity of accelerometers accurately, meeting the uncertainty requirements laid down in pertaining ISO standard. The validity and accuracy of the simplified TIA method is verified by simulation and comparison experiments with its performance analyzed. This simplified method is recommended to apply in national metrology institute of developing countries and industrial primary vibration calibration labs for its simplified algorithm and low requirements on hardware.

  6. Two-dimensional tomographic terahertz imaging by homodyne self-mixing.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Till; Breuer, Stefan; Giuliani, G; Elsäßer, Wolfgang

    2015-10-19

    We realize a compact two-dimensional tomographic terahertz imaging experiment involving only one photoconductive antenna (PCA) simultaneously serving as a transmitter and receiver of the terahertz radiation. A hollow-core Teflon cylinder filled with α-Lactose monohydrate powder is studied at two terahertz frequencies, far away and at a specific absorption line of the powder. This sample is placed between the antenna and a chopper wheel, which serves as back reflector of the terahertz radiation into the PCA. Amplitude and phase information of the continuous-wave (CW) terahertz radiation are extracted from the measured homodyne self-mixing (HSM) signal after interaction with the cylinder. The influence of refraction is studied by modeling the set-up utilizing ZEMAX and is discussed by means of the measured 1D projections. The tomographic reconstruction by using the Simultaneous Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (SART) allows to identify both object geometry and α-Lactose filling. PMID:26480382

  7. 47 CFR 25.139 - NGSO FSS coordination and information sharing between MVDDS licensees in the 12.2 GHz to 12.7 GHz...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ....2 GHz to 12.7 GHz band. (a) NGSO FSS licensees shall maintain a subscriber database in a format that... database to enable the MVDDS licensee to determine whether the proposed MVDDS transmitting site meets...

  8. 47 CFR 25.139 - NGSO FSS coordination and information sharing between MVDDS licensees in the 12.2 GHz to 12.7 GHz...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ....2 GHz to 12.7 GHz band. (a) NGSO FSS licensees shall maintain a subscriber database in a format that... database to enable the MVDDS licensee to determine whether the proposed MVDDS transmitting site meets...

  9. 47 CFR 25.139 - NGSO FSS coordination and information sharing between MVDDS licensees in the 12.2 GHz to 12.7 GHz...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....2 GHz to 12.7 GHz band. (a) NGSO FSS licensees shall maintain a subscriber database in a format that... database to enable the MVDDS licensee to determine whether the proposed MVDDS transmitting site meets...

  10. 47 CFR 25.139 - NGSO FSS coordination and information sharing between MVDDS licensees in the 12.2 GHz to 12.7 GHz...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ....2 GHz to 12.7 GHz band. (a) NGSO FSS licensees shall maintain a subscriber database in a format that... database to enable the MVDDS licensee to determine whether the proposed MVDDS transmitting site meets...

  11. 47 CFR 25.139 - NGSO FSS coordination and information sharing between MVDDS licensees in the 12.2 GHz to 12.7 GHz...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ....2 GHz to 12.7 GHz band. (a) NGSO FSS licensees shall maintain a subscriber database in a format that... database to enable the MVDDS licensee to determine whether the proposed MVDDS transmitting site meets...

  12. 47 CFR 25.136 - Licensing provisions for user transceivers in the 1.6/2.4 GHz, 1.5/1.6 GHz, and 2 GHz Mobile...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .../2.4 GHz Mobile-Satellite Service or 2 GHz Mobile-Satellite Service may not be operated on civil... rules and regulations in this Part and the applicable engineering standards. Prior to engaging in...

  13. 47 CFR 25.136 - Licensing provisions for user transceivers in the 1.6/2.4 GHz, 1.5/1.6 GHz, and 2 GHz Mobile...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .../2.4 GHz Mobile-Satellite Service or 2 GHz Mobile-Satellite Service may not be operated on civil... rules and regulations in this Part and the applicable engineering standards. Prior to engaging in...

  14. STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF 12.2 GHz METHANOL MASERS ASSOCIATED WITH A COMPLETE SAMPLE OF 6.7 GHz METHANOL MASERS

    SciTech Connect

    Breen, S. L.; Caswell, J. L.; Green, J. A.; Voronkov, M. A.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Fuller, G. A.; Quinn, L. J.; Avison, A.

    2011-06-01

    We present definitive detection statistics for 12.2 GHz methanol masers toward a complete sample of 6.7 GHz methanol masers detected in the Methanol Multibeam survey south of declination -20{sup 0}. In total, we detect 250 12.2 GHz methanol masers toward 580 6.7 GHz methanol masers. This equates to a detection rate of 43.1%, which is lower than that of previous significant searches of comparable sensitivity. Both the velocity ranges and the flux densities of the target 6.7 GHz sources surpass that of their 12.2 GHz companion in almost all cases. Eighty percent of the detected 12.2 GHz methanol maser peaks are coincident in velocity with the 6.7 GHz maser peak. Our data support an evolutionary scenario whereby the 12.2 GHz sources are associated with a somewhat later evolutionary stage than the 6.7 GHz sources devoid of this transition. Furthermore, we find that the 6.7 GHz and 12.2 GHz methanol sources increase in luminosity as they evolve. In addition to this, evidence for an increase in velocity range with evolution is presented. This implies that it is not only the luminosity but also the volume of gas conducive to the different maser transitions that increases as the sources evolve. Comparison with GLIMPSE mid-infrared sources has revealed a coincidence rate between the locations of the 6.7 GHz methanol masers and GLIMPSE point sources similar to that achieved in previous studies. Overall, the properties of the GLIMPSE sources with and without 12.2 GHz counterparts are similar. There is a higher 12.2 GHz detection rate toward those 6.7 GHz methanol masers that are coincident with extended green objects.

  15. A 0.8-4.2 GHz monolithic all-digital PLL based frequency synthesizer for wireless communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuanxin, Zhao; Yuanpei, Gao; Wei, Li; Ning, Li; Junyan, Ren

    2015-01-01

    A 0.8-4.2 GHz monolithic all-digital PLL based frequency synthesizer for wireless communications is successfully realized by the 130 nm CMOS process. A series of novel methods are proposed in this paper. Two band DCOs with high frequency resolution are utilized to cover the frequency band of interest, which is as wide as 2.5 to 5 GHz. An overflow counter is proposed to prevent the “pulse-swallowing” phenomenon so as to significantly reduce the locking time. A NTW-clamp digital module is also proposed to prevent the overflow of the loop control word. A modified programmable divider is presented to prevent the failure operation at the boundary. The measurement results show that the output frequency range of this frequency synthesizer is 0.8-4.2 GHz. The locking time achieves a reduction of 84% at 2.68 GHz. The best in-band and out-band phase noise performances have reached -100 dBc/Hz, and -125 dBc/Hz respectively. The lowest reference spur is -58 dBc.

  16. SINGLE LOOP - MULTI GAP RESONATOR FOR WHOLE BODY EPR IMAGING OF MICE AT 1.2 GHZ

    PubMed Central

    Petryakov, Sergey; Samouilov, Alexandre; Kesselring, Eric; Wasowicz, Tomasz; Caia, George L.; Zweier, Jay L.

    2009-01-01

    For whole body EPR imaging of small animals, typically low frequencies of 250–750 MHz have been used due to the microwave losses at higher frequencies and the challenges in designing suitable resonators to accommodate these large lossy samples. However, low microwave frequency limits the obtainable sensitivity. L-band frequencies can provide higher sensitivity, and have been commonly used for localized in vivo EPR spectroscopy. Therefore, it would be highly desirable to develop an L-band microwave resonator suitable for in vivo whole body EPR imaging of small animals such as living mice. A 1.2 GHz 16 gap resonator with inner diameter of 43 mm and 48 mm length was designed and constructed for whole body EPR imaging of small animals. The resonator has good field homogeneity and stability to animal induced motional noise. Resonator stability was achieved with electrical and mechanical design utilizing a fixed position double coupling loop of novel geometry, thus minimizing the number of moving parts. Using this resonator, high quality EPR images of lossy phantoms and living mice were obtained. This design provides good sensitivity, ease of sample access, excellent stability and uniform B1 field homogeneity for in vivo whole body EPR imaging of mice at 1.2 GHz. PMID:17625940

  17. Signal strength variations at 2 GHz for three sea paths in the British Channel Islands: Detailed discussion and propagation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunashekar, S. D.; Warrington, E. M.; Siddle, D. R.; Valtr, P.

    2007-08-01

    Signal strength measurements at 2 GHz have recently been made on three over-sea paths in the British Channel Islands. This paper focuses on explaining the propagation characteristics during periods of normal reception and periods of enhanced signal strength with particular emphasis on a 48.5 km transhorizon path between Jersey and Alderney. Evaporation ducting and diffraction appear to be the dominant propagation mechanisms at most times. The influence of the evaporation duct during periods of normal propagation has been confirmed by modeling the over-sea propagation conditions using Paulus-Jeske evaporation duct refractivity profiles as input to the parabolic equation method. During periods of enhanced propagation, which occur approximately 8% of the time on the longest path (48.5 km), the presence of additional higher-altitude ducting/super-refractive structures has been verified and their influence has been modeled with reasonable success.

  18. EPR of Cu2+ Prion Protein Constructs at 2 GHz Using the g⊥ Region to Characterize Nitrogen Ligation

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, James S.; Bennett, Brian; Walter, Eric D.; Millhauser, Glenn L.; Sidabras, Jason W.; Antholine, William E.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract A double octarepeat prion protein construct, which has two histidines, mixed with copper sulfate in a 3:2 molar ratio provides at most three imidazole ligands to each copper ion to form a square-planar Cu2+ complex. This work is concerned with identification of the fourth ligand. A new (to our knowledge) electron paramagnetic resonance method based on analysis of the intense features of the electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum in the g⊥ region at 2 GHz is introduced to distinguish between three and four nitrogen ligands. The methodology was established by studies of a model system consisting of histidine imidazole ligation to Cu2+. In this spectral region at 2 GHz (S-band), g-strain and broadening from the possible rhombic character of the Zeeman interaction are small. The most intense line is identified with the MI = +1/2 extra absorption peak. Spectral simulation demonstrated that this peak is insensitive to cupric Ax and Ay hyperfine interaction. The spectral region to the high-field side of this peak is uncluttered and suitable for analysis of nitrogen superhyperfine couplings to determine the number of nitrogens. The spectral region to the low-field side of the intense extra absorption peak in the g⊥ part of the spectrum is sensitive to the rhombic distortion parameters Ax and Ay. Application of the method to the prion protein system indicates that two species are present and that the dominant species contains four nitrogen ligands. A new loop-gap microwave resonator is described that contains ∼1 mL of frozen sample. PMID:19383478

  19. A Homodyne Quadrature Laser Interferometer for Micro-Asperity Deformation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    PogaČnik, Aljaž; Požar, Tomaž; Kalin, Mitjan; Možina, Janez

    2013-01-01

    We report on the successful realization of a contactless, non-perturbing, displacement-measuring system for characterizing the surface roughness of polymer materials used in tribological applications. A single, time-dependent, scalar value, dubbed the collective micro-asperity deformation, is extracted from the normal-displacement measurements of normally loaded polymer samples. The displacement measurements with a sub-nanometer resolution are obtained with a homodyne quadrature laser interferometer. The measured collective micro-asperity deformation is critical for a determination of the real contact area and thus for the realistic contact conditions in tribological applications. The designed measuring system senses both the bulk creep as well as the micro-asperity creep occurring at the roughness peaks. The final results of our experimental measurements are three time-dependent values of the collective micro-asperity deformation for the three selected surface roughnesses. These values can be directly compared to theoretical deformation curves, which can be derived using existing real-contact-area models. PMID:23296328

  20. Highly sensitive simple homodyne phase detector for ultrasonic pulse-echo measurements.

    PubMed

    Grossmann, John; Suslov, Alexey; Yong, Grace; Boatner, Lynn A; Svitelskiy, Oleksiy

    2016-04-01

    We have designed and built a modern versatile research-grade instrument for ultrasound pulse-echo probing of the elastic properties of a wide range of materials under laboratory conditions. The heart of the instrument lies in an AD8302 microchip: a gain and phase detector from Analog Devices, Inc. To construct the device, we have implemented a schematic that utilizes the homodyne principle for signal processing instead of the traditional superheterodyne approach. This design allows one to measure phase shifts with high precision and linearity over the entire range of 0°-360°. The system is simple in construction and usage; it makes ultrasound measurements easily accessible to a broad range of researchers. It was tested by measuring the temperature dependence of the ultrasound speed and attenuation in a KTa0.92Nb0.08O3 (KTN) single crystal at a frequency of ∼40 MHz. The tests were performed in the vicinity of the ferroelectric transitions where the large variations of the speed and attenuation demand a detector with outstanding characteristics. The described detector has a wide dynamic range and allows for measuring in a single run over the whole temperature range of the ferroelectric transitions, rather than just in limited intervals available previously. Moreover, due to the wide dynamic range of the gain measurements and high sensitivity this instrument was able to reveal previously unresolvable features associated with the development of the ferroelectric transitions of KTN crystals. PMID:27131694

  1. Highly sensitive simple homodyne phase detector for ultrasonic pulse-echo measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossmann, John; Suslov, Alexey; Yong, Grace; Boatner, Lynn A.; Svitelskiy, Oleksiy

    2016-04-01

    We have designed and built a modern versatile research-grade instrument for ultrasound pulse-echo probing of the elastic properties of a wide range of materials under laboratory conditions. The heart of the instrument lies in an AD8302 microchip: a gain and phase detector from Analog Devices, Inc. To construct the device, we have implemented a schematic that utilizes the homodyne principle for signal processing instead of the traditional superheterodyne approach. This design allows one to measure phase shifts with high precision and linearity over the entire range of 0°-360°. The system is simple in construction and usage; it makes ultrasound measurements easily accessible to a broad range of researchers. It was tested by measuring the temperature dependence of the ultrasound speed and attenuation in a KTa0.92Nb0.08O3 (KTN) single crystal at a frequency of ˜40 MHz. The tests were performed in the vicinity of the ferroelectric transitions where the large variations of the speed and attenuation demand a detector with outstanding characteristics. The described detector has a wide dynamic range and allows for measuring in a single run over the whole temperature range of the ferroelectric transitions, rather than just in limited intervals available previously. Moreover, due to the wide dynamic range of the gain measurements and high sensitivity this instrument was able to reveal previously unresolvable features associated with the development of the ferroelectric transitions of KTN crystals.

  2. Optical beat interference noise reduction in OFDMA optical access link using self-homodyne balanced detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sang-Min; Won, Yong-Yuk; Han, Sang-Kook

    2013-12-01

    A Novel technique for reducing the OBI noise in optical OFDMA-PON uplink is presented. OFDMA is a multipleaccess/ multiplexing scheme that can provide multiplexing operation of user data streams onto the downlink sub-channels and uplink multiple access by means of dividing OFDM subcarriers as sub-channels. The main issue of high-speed, single-wavelength upstream OFDMA-PON arises from optical beating interference noise. Because the sub-channels are allocated dynamically to multiple access users over same nominal wavelength, it generates the optical beating interference among upstream signals. In this paper, we proposed a novel scheme using self-homodyne balanced detection in the optical line terminal (OLT) to reduce OBI noise which is generated in the uplink transmission of OFDMA-PON system. When multiple OFDMA sub-channels over the same nominal wavelength are received at the same time in the proposed architecture, OBI noises can be removed using balanced detection. Using discrete multitone modulation (DMT) to generate real valued OFDM signals, the proposed technique is verified through experimental demonstration.

  3. DUAL FREQUENCY RESONATOR FOR 1.2 GHZ EPR/16.2 MHZ NMR CO-IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Petryakov, Sergey; Samouilov, Alexandre; Kesselring, Eric; Caia, George L.; Sun, Ziqi; Zweier, Jay L.

    2010-01-01

    The development of a dual frequency resonator that enables both EPR and proton NMR imaging within the same resonator, magnet and gradient system is described. A novel design allows the same resonator to perform both EPR and proton NMR operation without moving resonator cables or switches. The resonator is capable of working at frequencies of 16.18 MHz for proton NMR and 1.2 GHz for EPR and is optimized for isolated rat heart experiments, measuring 22 mm in inner diameter and 19 mm in length. In EPR mode, the resonator functions as a one loop two gap resonator, electrically coupled through a half wavelength inverter. In NMR mode, it functions a single turn coil. Using the same loop for both modalities maximizes filling factor at both frequencies. Placing the tuning and switching controls away from the resonator prevents any inadvertent movement that would cause errors of EPR and NMR co-imaging registration. The resonator enabled good quality EPR and proton MRI of isolated rat hearts with precise registration. PMID:20434379

  4. 47 CFR 25.136 - Licensing provisions for user transceivers in the 1.6/2.4 GHz, 1.5/1.6 GHz, and 2 GHz Mobile...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Footnote 5.353A in 47 CFR 2.106 and the priority and real-time preemption requirements imposed by Footnote... the 1.6/2.4 GHz, 1.5/1.6 GHz, and 2 GHz Mobile-Satellite Services. 25.136 Section 25.136 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE...

  5. 47 CFR 25.143 - Licensing provisions for the 1.6/2.4 GHz Mobile-Satellite Service and 2 GHz Mobile-Satellite...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-Satellite Service and 2 GHz Mobile-Satellite Service. 25.143 Section 25.143 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Applications and Licenses Space Stations § 25.143 Licensing provisions for the 1.6/2.4 GHz Mobile-Satellite Service and 2...

  6. 47 CFR 25.143 - Licensing provisions for the 1.6/2.4 GHz mobile-satellite service and 2 GHz mobile-satellite...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the Licensee are parties. (i) Incorporation of ancillary terrestrial component base stations into a 1.6/2.4 GHz mobile-satellite service network or a 2 GHz mobile-satellite service network. Any licensee... terrestrial component (ATC) base stations as defined in § 25.201 at its own risk and subject to the...

  7. Demonstration of a low bandwidth 1.06-micron optical phase-locked loop for coherent homodyne communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, T.; Farinas, A. D.; Byer, R. L.

    1990-01-01

    A type II 1.06-micron optical phase-locked loop (OPLL) for use in a coherent homodyne receiver is discussed. Diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers are used for both the local oscillator and transmitter, because their phase noise is significantly lower than that of diode lasers. Closed-loop RMS phase noise of less than 12 mrad (0.69 deg) is achieved, and modulation-demodulation in bulk modulators at rates from 20 kHz to 20 MHz with less than 19 deg of modulation depth is demonstrated.

  8. 120 Gbit/s injection-locked homodyne coherent transmission of polarization-multiplexed 64 QAM signals over 150 km.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yixin; Kasai, Keisuke; Yoshida, Masato; Nakazawa, Masataka

    2014-12-15

    We describe an injection-locked 64 QAM homodyne coherent transmission, which is the highest QAM multiplicity realized with an injection locking technique. The frequency locking range of the local oscillator (LO) was as wide as 1 GHz. The phase noise was only 0.2 deg, which is 1/3 of that obtained with our previous OVCO-based OPLL (0.6 deg.). As a result, a 120 Gbit/s polarization-multiplexed 64 QAM signal was successfully transmitted over 150 km with a simple receiver configuration and low DSP complexity. PMID:25607079

  9. Prediction of ionizing radiation effects induced performance degradation in homodyne BPSK based inter-satellite optical communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yun; Zhao, Shanghong; Gong, Zizheng; Zhao, Jing; Li, Xuan; Dong, Chen

    2016-03-01

    Ionizing radiation effects induced on-orbit performance degradation in homodyne binary phase shift keying (BPSK) based inter-satellite optical communication system is predicted in this paper. Essential optoelectronic devices involved in optical communication system were irradiated by Co60 gamma ray and ionizing radiation environment of three general orbits was analyzed. On this basis, variations of terminal performance loss and system BER degradation along with on-orbit working time were simulated. Influences of terminal location and orbit environment were further discussed. Radiation protection on laser transmitters requires more strengthening, especially for those located in MEO and GEO satellites.

  10. The effect of the light size and telecommunication rate on homodyne detection efficiency in the satellite-to-ground laser communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoping; Sun, Jianfeng; Zhi, Yanan; Lu, Wei; Xu, Qian; Liu, Liren

    2013-09-01

    Atmospheric turbulence influences the wave-front, and reduces homodyne detection efficiency and bit error rate in the Satellite-to-Ground Laser Communication. Free-space differential interference structure based on differential phase shift keying (DPSK) is applied in the optical signal receiver. The free-space Mach-Zehnder delay interferometer without lens is suited for differential delay which is equal to the one bit period. Differential information is obtained by the subtraction of the two successive wave-front phases when made to interfere. Differential distance at the interference receiver is varied with transmission rate from satellite to ground. And through the receiving telescope, the spot size of incident signal light within the interference became small than before, which influences the interference efficiency of the two unequal branches. So that, it is significant for increasing homodyne efficiency to determine the optical signal rate and choose the magnification of receiving telescope. In this paper, the effect of the spot size of incident light and transmission data rate on homodyne detection efficiency is analysed. By the simulation result of efficiency in different spot size and transmission date of incident light, the homodyne efficiency will be predicted in the given data rate and light spot size on the basis of experiment setup. And application condition of free-space differential structure at DPSK differential receiver is proposed.

  11. Super-resolving quantum radar: Coherent-state sources with homodyne detection suffice to beat the diffraction limit

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Kebei; Lee, Hwang; Gerry, Christopher C.; Dowling, Jonathan P.

    2013-11-21

    There has been much recent interest in quantum metrology for applications to sub-Raleigh ranging and remote sensing such as in quantum radar. For quantum radar, atmospheric absorption and diffraction rapidly degrades any actively transmitted quantum states of light, such as N00N states, so that for this high-loss regime the optimal strategy is to transmit coherent states of light, which suffer no worse loss than the linear Beer's law for classical radar attenuation, and which provide sensitivity at the shot-noise limit in the returned power. We show that coherent radar radiation sources, coupled with a quantum homodyne detection scheme, provide both longitudinal and angular super-resolution much below the Rayleigh diffraction limit, with sensitivity at shot-noise in terms of the detected photon power. Our approach provides a template for the development of a complete super-resolving quantum radar system with currently available technology.

  12. Gamma radiation impact on performance of OOK, DPSK and homodyne BPSK based optical inter-satellite communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yun; Zhao, Shanghong; Gong, Zizheng; Hou, Rui; Qiang, Ruoxin

    2015-09-01

    Performance of optical inter-satellite communication system is influenced by the harsh space radiation environment. Gamma radiation effects on main devices of communication system are analyzed and on the basis of existing experimental data, performance degradation of on off keying (OOK), differential phase shift keying (DPSK) and homodyne binary phase shift keying (BPSK) based system under 1 kGy gamma irradiation is simulated. Variation of Q factors and bit error ratio of these systems with different radiation position are achieved and discussed. The result shows that it is more urgent to improve the radiation hardness of transmitter, and the introduction of local laser is a considerable method to reduce gamma radiation impact on system performance.

  13. Novel MDM-PON scheme utilizing self-homodyne detection for high-speed/capacity access networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuanxiang; Li, Juhao; Zhu, Paikun; Wu, Zhongying; Zhou, Peng; Tian, Yu; Ren, Fang; Yu, Jinyi; Ge, Dawei; Chen, Jingbiao; He, Yongqi; Chen, Zhangyuan

    2015-12-14

    In this paper, we propose a cost-effective, energy-saving mode-division-multiplexing passive optical network (MDM-PON) scheme utilizing self-homodyne detection for high-speed/capacity access network based on low modal-crosstalk few-mode fiber (FMF) and all-fiber mode multiplexer/demultiplexer (MUX/DEMUX). In the proposed scheme, one of the spatial modes is used to transmit a portion of signal carrier (namely pilot-tone) as the local oscillator (LO), while the others are used for signal-bearing channels. At the receiver, the pilot-tone and the signal can be separated without strong crosstalk and sent to the receiver for coherent detection. The spectral efficiency (SE) is significantly enhanced when multiple spatial channels are used. Meanwhile, the self-homodyne detection scheme can effectively suppress laser phase noise, which relaxes the requirement for the lasers line-width at the optical line terminal or optical network units (OLT/ONUs). The digital signal processing (DSP) at the receiver is also simplified since it removes the need for frequency offset compensation and complex phase correction, which reduces the computational complexity and energy consumption. Polarization division multiplexing (PDM) that offers doubled SE is also supported by the scheme. The proposed scheme is scalable to multi-wavelength application when wavelength MUX/DEMUX is utilized. Utilizing the proposed scheme, we demonstrate a proof of concept 4 × 40-Gb/s orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) transmission over 55-km FMF using low modal-crosstalk two-mode FMF and MUX/DEMUX with error free operation. Compared with back to back case, less than 1-dB Q-factor penalty is observed after 55-km FMF of the four channels. Signal power and pilot-tone power are also optimized to achieve the optimal transmission performance. PMID:26698996

  14. Cell sheets image validation of phase-diversity homodyne OCT and effect of the light irradiation on cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senda, Naoko; Osawa, Kentaro

    2016-04-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is one of powerful 3D tissue imaging tools with no fluorescence staining. We have reported that Phase-Diversity Homodyne OCT developed in Hitachi could be useful for non-invasive regeneration tissue evaluation test. The OCT enables cell imaging because of high resolution (axial resolution; ~2.6 μm, lateral resolution; ~1 μm, in the air), whereas conventional OCT was not used for cell imaging because of low resolution (10~20 μm). Furthermore, the OCT has advantage over other 3D imaging devices in cost because the light source and the objective were originally used as an optical pickup of compact disc. In this report, we aimed to assess effectiveness and safety of Phase-Diversity Homodyne OCT cell imaging. Effectiveness of OCT was evaluated by imaging a living cell sheet of human oral mucosal epithelial cells. OCT images were compared with reflection confocal microscopy (RCM) images, because confocal optical system is the highest resolution (<1 μm) 3D in vivo imaging technique. Similar nuclei images were confirmed with OCT and RCM, which suggested the OCT has enough resolution to image nuclei inside a cell sheet. Degree of differentiation could be estimated using OCT images, which becomes possible because the size of cells depends on distribution of differentiation. Effect of the OCT light irradiation on cells was studied using NIH/3T3 cells. Light irradiation, the exposure amount of which is equivalent to OCT, had no impact on cell shape, cell viability, and proliferation rate. It suggested that the light irradiation has no cell damage under the condition.

  15. Spatial averaging of fields from half-wave dipole antennas and corresponding SAR calculations in the NORMAN human voxel model between 65 MHz and 2 GHz.

    PubMed

    Findlay, R P; Dimbylow, P J

    2009-04-21

    If an antenna is located close to a person, the electric and magnetic fields produced by the antenna will vary in the region occupied by the human body. To obtain a mean value of the field for comparison with reference levels, the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) and International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) recommend spatially averaging the squares of the field strength over the height the body. This study attempts to assess the validity and accuracy of spatial averaging when used for half-wave dipoles at frequencies between 65 MHz and 2 GHz and distances of lambda/2, lambda/4 and lambda/8 from the body. The differences between mean electric field values calculated using ten field measurements and that of the true averaged value were approximately 15% in the 600 MHz to 2 GHz range. The results presented suggest that the use of modern survey equipment, which takes hundreds rather than tens of measurements, is advisable to arrive at a sufficiently accurate mean field value. Whole-body averaged and peak localized SAR values, normalized to calculated spatially averaged fields, were calculated for the NORMAN voxel phantom. It was found that the reference levels were conservative for all whole-body SAR values, but not for localized SAR, particularly in the 1-2 GHz region when the dipole was positioned very close to the body. However, if the maximum field is used for normalization of calculated SAR as opposed to the lower spatially averaged value, the reference levels provide a conservative estimate of the localized SAR basic restriction for all frequencies studied. PMID:19336844

  16. Wide-band polarization-insensitive fiber optic acoustic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Sung-Tsun

    1998-03-01

    A polarization-insensitive fiber optic acoustic sensor is constructed with a 3 X 3 coupler and Faraday rotator mirrors. This system deals with the polarization-induced signal fading by a passive method. The method is eliminating polarization-induced signal fading and the output intensities of this system are described and demonstrated. The homodyne symmetric demodulation system used to recover the sensing signal is also analyzed in detail with experimental verification. The sensing head of this sensor is made of single mode optical fiber wound in to a cylindrical shell with cast polyurethane rubber as the acoustic window. The sensitivity of this sensor is measured in anechoic water tank. The results show that this senor has a stable receiving sensitivity of - 145.5 dB re 1V/(mu) Pa and the bandwidth extends from 2 to 50 kHz. This sensor configuration can be used as a high sensitivity, wide band underwater acoustic sensor.

  17. Heterodyne laser-Doppler vibrometer with a slow-shear-mode Bragg cell for vibration measurements up to 1.2 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rembe, Christian; Boedecker, Sebastian; Dräbenstedt, Alexander; Pudewills, Fred; Siegmund, Georg

    2008-06-01

    Several new applications for optical ultra-high frequency (UHF) measurements have been evolved during the last decade by advancements in ultra-sonic filters and actuators as well as by the progress in micro- and nanotechnology. These new applications require new testing methods. Laser-based, non-influencing optical testing is the best choice. In this paper we present a laser-Doppler vibrometer for vibration measurements at frequencies up to 1.2 GHz. The frequency-shifter in the heterodyne interferometer is a slow-shear-mode Bragg cell. The light source in the interferometer is a green DPSS (diode pumped solid state) laser. At this wavelength the highest possible frequency shift between zero and first diffraction order is a few MHz above 300 MHz for a slow shear-mode Bragg cell and, therefore, the highest possible bandwidth of the laser-Doppler vibrometer should usually be around 300 MHz. A new optical arrangement and a novel signal processing of the digitized photo-detector signal is employed to expand the bandwidth to 1.2 GHz. We describe the utilized techniques and present the characterization of the new ultra-high-frequency (UHF) vibrometer. An example measurement on a surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonator oscillating at 262 MHz is also demonstrated. The light-power of the measurement beam can be switched on rapidly by a trigger signal to avoid thermal influences on the sample.

  18. System simulation method for fiber-based homodyne multiple target interferometers using short coherence length laser sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Maik; Beuth, Thorsten; Streck, Andreas; Stork, Wilhelm

    2015-09-01

    Homodyne laser interferometers for velocimetry are well-known optical systems used in many applications. While the detector power output signal of such a system, using a long coherence length laser and a single target, is easily modelled using the Doppler shift, scenarios with a short coherence length source, e.g. an unstabilized semiconductor laser, and multiple weak targets demand a more elaborated approach for simulation. Especially when using fiber components, the actual setup is an important factor for system performance as effects like return losses and multiple way propagation have to be taken into account. If the power received from the targets is in the same region as stray light created in the fiber setup, a complete system simulation becomes a necessity. In previous work, a phasor based signal simulation approach for interferometers based on short coherence length laser sources has been evaluated. To facilitate the use of the signal simulation, a fiber component ray tracer has since been developed that allows the creation of input files for the signal simulation environment. The software uses object oriented MATLAB code, simplifying the entry of different fiber setups and the extension of the ray tracer. Thus, a seamless way from a system description based on arbitrarily interconnected fiber components to a signal simulation for different target scenarios has been established. The ray tracer and signal simulation are being used for the evaluation of interferometer concepts incorporating delay lines to compensate for short coherence length.

  19. Homodyne-detected ferromagnetic resonance of in-plane magnetized nanocontacts: Composite spin-wave resonances and their excitation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazlali, Masoumeh; Dvornik, Mykola; Iacocca, Ezio; Dürrenfeld, Philipp; Haidar, Mohammad; Åkerman, Johan; Dumas, Randy K.

    2016-04-01

    This work provides a detailed investigation of the measured in-plane field-swept homodyne-detected ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectra of an extended Co/Cu/NiFe pseudo-spin-valve stack using a nanocontact (NC) geometry. The magnetodynamics are generated by a pulse-modulated microwave current, and the resulting rectified dc mixing voltage, which appears across the NC at resonance, is detected using a lock-in amplifier. Most notably, we find that the measured spectra of the NiFe layer are composite in nature and highly asymmetric, consistent with the broadband excitation of multiple modes. Additionally, the data must be fit with two Lorentzian functions in order to extract a reasonable value for the Gilbert damping of the NiFe. Aided by micromagnetic simulations, we conclude that (i) for in-plane fields the rf Oersted field in the vicinity of the NC plays the dominant role in generating the observed spectra, (ii) in addition to the FMR mode, exchange-dominated spin waves are also generated, and (iii) the NC diameter sets the mean wave vector of the exchange-dominated spin wave, in good agreement with the dispersion relation.

  20. Chemical sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Janata, J.; Josowicz, M.; DeVaney, D.M. )

    1994-06-15

    This review of chemical sensors contains the following topics of interest: books and reviews; reviews of sensors by their type; fabrication and selectivity; data processing; thermal sensors; mass sensors (fabrication, gas sensors, and liquid sensors); electrochemical sensors (potentiometric sensors, amperometric sensors, and conductometric sensors); and optical sensors (fabrication, liquid sensors, biosensors, and gas sensors). 795 refs., 1 tab.

  1. Prism-pair interferometry by homodyne interferometers with a common light source for high-accuracy measurement of the absolute refractive index of glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Hori, Yasuaki; Hirai, Akiko; Minoshima, Kaoru

    2011-03-10

    A prism-pair interferometer comprising two homodyne interferometers with a common light source was developed for high-precision measurements of the refractive index of optical glasses with an uncertainty of the order of 10{sup -6}. The two interferometers measure changes in the optical path length in the glass sample and in air, respectively. Uncertainties in the absolute wavelength of the common light source are cancelled out by calculating a ratio between the results from the interferometers. Uncertainties in phase measurement are suppressed by a quadrature detection system. The combined standard uncertainty of the developed system is evaluated as 1.1x10{sup -6}.

  2. Statistical determination of whole-body average SARs in a 2 GHz whole-body exposure system for unrestrained pregnant and newborn rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianqing; Wake, Kanako; Kawai, Hiroki; Watanabe, Soichi; Fujiwara, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    A 2 GHz whole-body exposure to rats over a multigeneration has been conducted as part of bio-effect research in Japan. In this study, the rats moved freely in the cage inside the exposure system. From observation of the activity of rats in the cage, we found that the rats do not stay in each position with uniform possibility. In order to determine the specific absorption rate (SAR) during the entire exposure period with high accuracy, we present a new approach to statistically determine the SAR level in an exposure system. First, we divided the rat cage in the exposure system into several small areas, and derived the fraction of time the rats spent in each small area based on the classification of the documentary photos of rat activity. Then, using the fraction of time spent in each small area as a weighting factor, we calculated the statistical characteristics of the whole-body average SAR for pregnant rats and young rats during the entire exposure period. As a result, this approach gave the statistical distribution as well as the corresponding mean value, median value and mode value for the whole-body SAR so that we can reasonably clarify the relationship between the exposure level and possible biological effect.

  3. Demonstrations of 10 and 40 Gbps upstream transmissions using 1.2 GHz RSOA-based ONU in long-reach access networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, C. H.; Chow, C. W.; Wu, Y. F.; Chen, H. Y.

    2012-03-01

    Carrier-distributed long-reach passive optical network (LR-PON) is a promising candidate for future access networks. In this work, we analyze and compare the 4 × 2.5 Gb/s and 4 × 10 Gb/s upstream traffics in a carrier-distributed LR-PON using four wavelength-multiplexed 2.5 Gb/s on-off keying (OOK) and 10 Gb/s optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing-quadrature amplitude modulation (OFDM-QAM) signals. Four commercial 1.2 GHz bandwidth reflective semiconductor optical amplifiers (RSOAs) are used in each optical networking unit (ONU) for the generation of the upstream signal. Due to the limited bandwidth of the RSOA, only up to 2.5 Gb/s upstream OOK signal can be generated. However, by using the spectral efficient modulation, such as OFDM-QAM, 10 Gb/s data rate can be achieved. 20, 50 and 75 km fiber transmissions are also compared using the two different kinds of modulation respectively.

  4. Fiber Optic Sensors for Smart Materials and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, H.; Chang, C. C.; Boyer, T.; Sirkis, J. S.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we describe recently developed fiber sensors which are capable of monitoring the health of smart-structures. The unobstrusive geometry of these sensors make them an excellent choice for embedding the sensor in composite materials to measure internal states of strain in structures and materials. Some of these sensors have gage lengths that can be tailored from tens of microns to many meters. We will describe various demodulation schemes (Pseudo-Heterodyne, Synthetic-Heterodyne, Homodyne, Differential-Cross Multiplier, and Single Channel Phase-Tracker) to obtain high bandwidth measurements, enabling measurement of static to high frequency impact generated strains with a dynamic response exceeding tens of thousands of microstrains. In addition, we will show that we can tailor the fiber sensor to either measure only strain and reject temperature response or measure only the temperature, or measure both temperature and strain simultaneously. We will also demonstrate the ability to measure multiple strain components inside a host simultaneously using a single fiber sensor embedded in the host using a certain sensor type and transverse strain immunity using another sensor type. Additionally we will show the ability to measure temperature up to 100 C using fiber optic sensors.

  5. A deep/wide 1-2 GHz snapshot survey of SDSS Stripe 82 using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array in a compact hybrid configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heywood, I.; Jarvis, M. J.; Baker, A. J.; Bannister, K. W.; Carvalho, C. S.; Hardcastle, M.; Hilton, M.; Moodley, K.; Smirnov, O. M.; Smith, D. J. B.; White, S. V.; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-08-01

    We have used the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array to image ˜100 deg2 of SDSS Stripe 82 at 1-2 GHz. The survey consists of 1026 snapshot observations of 2.5 min duration, using the hybrid CnB configuration. The survey has good sensitivity to diffuse, low surface brightness structures and extended radio emission, making it highly synergistic with existing 1.4 GHz radio observations of the region. The principal data products are continuum images, with 16 × 10 arcsec resolution, and a catalogue containing 11 782 point and Gaussian components resulting from fits to the thresholded Stokes-I brightness distribution, forming approximately 8948 unique radio sources. The typical effective 1σ noise level is 88 μJy beam-1. Spectral index estimates are included, as derived from the 1 GHz of instantaneous bandwidth. Astrometric and photometric accuracy are in excellent agreement with existing narrowband observations. A large-scale simulation is used to investigate clean bias, which we extend into the spectral domain. Clean bias remains an issue for snapshot surveys with the VLA, affecting our total intensity measurements at the ˜1σ level. Statistical spectral index measurements are in good agreement with existing measurements derived from matching separate surveys at two frequencies. At flux densities below ˜35σ the median in-band spectral index measurements begin to exhibit a bias towards flatness that is dependent on both flux density and the intrinsic spectral index. In-band spectral curvature measurements are likely to be unreliable for all but the very brightest components. Image products and catalogues are publicly available via an FTP server.

  6. A deep/wide 1-2 GHz snapshot survey of SDSS Stripe 82 using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array in a compact hybrid configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heywood, I.; Jarvis, M. J.; Baker, A. J.; Bannister, K. W.; Carvalho, C. S.; Hardcastle, M.; Hilton, M.; Moodley, K.; Smirnov, O. M.; Smith, D. J. B.; White, S. V.; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-08-01

    We have used the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array to image ~100 sq. deg. of SDSS Stripe 82 at 1-2 GHz. The survey consists of 1,026 snapshot observations of 2.5 minutes duration, using the hybrid CnB configuration. The survey has good sensitivity to diffuse, low surface brightness structures and extended radio emission, making it highly synergistic with existing 1.4 GHz radio observations of the region. The principal data products are continuum images, with 16 x 10 arcsecond resolution, and a catalogue containing 11,782 point and Gaussian components resulting from fits to the thresholded Stokes-I brightness distribution, forming approximately 8,948 unique radio sources. The typical effective 1{\\sigma} noise level is 88 {\\mu}Jy / beam. Spectral index estimates are included, as derived from the 1 GHz of instantaneous bandwidth. Astrometric and photometric accuracy are in excellent agreement with existing narrowband observations. A large-scale simulation is used to investigate clean bias, which we extend into the spectral domain. Clean bias remains an issue for snapshot surveys with the VLA, affecting our total intensity measurements at the ~1{\\sigma} level. Statistical spectral index measurements are in good agreement with existing measurements derived from matching separate surveys at two frequencies. At flux densities below ~35{\\sigma} the median in-band spectral index measurements begin to exhibit a bias towards flatness that is dependent on both flux density and the intrinsic spectral index. In-band spectral curvature measurements are likely to be unreliable for all but the very brightest components. Image products and catalogues are publicly available via an FTP server.

  7. 330 GHz FMCW Image Sensor for Homeland Security Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapilevich, Boris; Pinhasi, Yosef; Arusi, Ruth; Anisimov, Michael; Hardon, Danny; Litvak, Boris; Wool, Yan

    2010-11-01

    A single-pixel imaging remote sensor operating at 330 GHz is described. It is based on a frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) and aimed at detection of concealed objects for ranges up to 40 m. The system consists of 2 horn-lens antennas integrated with a homodyne transceiver. The synthesized linear FMCW signal at X-band is multiplied by a factor of 32 to generate the transmitted signal. An intermediate frequency (IF) signal obtained in the output port of the 2-nd harmonic mixer is employed for image processing. Distance measurements were made by performing data acquisition unit based on LabView interface and resulting in a range resolution about 1 cm. Examples of 2D and 3D images reconstructed with this sensor are presented.

  8. Suppression of optical beat interference-noise in orthogonal frequency division multiple access-passive optical network link using self-homodyne balanced detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Yong-Yuk; Jung, Sang-Min; Han, Sang-Kook

    2014-08-01

    A new technique, which reduces optical beat interference (OBI) noise in orthogonal frequency division multiple access-passive optical network (OFDMA-PON) links, is proposed. A self-homodyne balanced detection, which uses a single laser for the optical line terminal (OLT) as well as for the optical network unit (ONU), reduces OBI noise and also improves the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the discrete multi-tone (DMT) signal. The proposed scheme is verified by transmitting quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK)-modulated DMT signal over a 20-km single mode fiber. The optical signal to noise ratio (OSNR), that is required for BER of 10-5, is reduced by 2 dB in the balanced detection compared with a single channel due to the cancellation of OBI noise in conjunction with the local laser.

  9. A 5.4-9.2 GHz 19.5 dB Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Ultrawide-Band Receiver Front-End Low-Noise Amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azhari, Afreen; Kubota, Shinichi; Toya, Akihiro; Sasaki, Nobuo; Kikkawa, Takamaro

    2011-04-01

    In this work, we present an ultrawide-band (UWB) complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) low-noise amplifier (LNA) for wireless communication in the upper UWB band, that is, from 5.4-9.2 GHz bandwidth with a wide-band 50 Ω input matching network in front of the LNA. A three-stage cascode-topology-based LNA with high-transconductance MOS transistors, was employed to improve the voltage gain up to 23 dB at 7.5 GHz, with 4.5-9.2 GHz 3 dB bandwidth. The maximum output power S21 was 19.5 dB at 7.3 GHz, with 5.4-9.2 GHz 3 dB bandwidth. The input matching circuit was designed with a reduced number of passive elements, resulting in an input reflection coefficient S11 of less than -10 dB from 4.5-9.2 GHz. The noise figure of the LNA was as low as 3.5 dB and the input-referred third-order intercept point (IIP3) was -8 dBm. The LNA has output reflection coefficient S22 of less than -10 dB from 5-7 GHz and a good reverse isolation, that is, S12 of < -45 dB in the entire UWB, due to a cascode topology. The LNA was fabricated using 180 nm CMOS technology, which consumes 56 mW power at 1.8 V power supply. In this paper, we also demonstrate a wireless communication of 7 GHz Gaussian monocycle pulse (GMP) by horn antennas and the LNA from 20 cm transmission distance.

  10. Direct and indirect measures of speech articulator motions using low power EM sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, T; Burnett, G; Gable, T; Holzrichter, J F; Ng, L

    1999-05-12

    Low power Electromagnetic (EM) Wave sensors can measure general properties of human speech articulator motions, as speech is produced. See Holzrichter, Burnett, Ng, and Lea, J.Acoust.Soc.Am. 103 (1) 622 (1998). Experiments have demonstrated extremely accurate pitch measurements (< 1 Hz per pitch cycle) and accurate onset of voiced speech. Recent measurements of pressure-induced tracheal motions enable very good spectra and amplitude estimates of a voiced excitation function. The use of the measured excitation functions and pitch synchronous processing enable the determination of each pitch cycle of an accurate transfer function and, indirectly, of the corresponding articulator motions. In addition, direct measurements have been made of EM wave reflections from articulator interfaces, including jaw, tongue, and palate, simultaneously with acoustic and glottal open/close signals. While several types of EM sensors are suitable for speech articulator measurements, the homodyne sensor has been found to provide good spatial and temporal resolution for several applications.

  11. Microwave Deflection Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shores, Paul; Kobayashi, Herb; Ngo, Phong; Lichtenberg, C. L.

    1988-01-01

    Doppler-radar instrument measures small deflections or vibrations of reflecting surface. Acting as interferometric micrometer, instrument includes combination of analog and digital circuits measuring change in phase of radar return due to movement of reflecting surface along signal-propagation path. Includes homodyne Doppler-radar transceiver and digital signal-processing circuitry to measure change in phase shift as target deflects.

  12. Measurement of air-refractive-index fluctuation from frequency change using a phase modulation homodyne interferometer and an external cavity laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishige, Masashi; Aketagawa, Masato; Banh Quoc, Tuan; Hoshino, Yuta

    2009-08-01

    We present a method for air-refractive-index (nair) fluctuation measurement using a laser interferometer. The method is based on a combination of a phase modulation homodyne interferometer (PMHI), an external cavity laser diode (ECLD) and an ultralow thermal expansion material (ULTEM). The PMHI utilizes a Michelson interferometer which is constructed on the ULTEM plate under the condition of an air temperature fluctuation of less than 10 mK, so that the optical path change or the air-refractive-index fluctuation (Δnair) caused by the thermal disturbance can be neglected. Meanwhile, the ECLD is controlled by adjusting its frequency to track some of the dark fringes of the interferometer, so that Δnair can be derived from the ECLD frequency change. The uncertainty of the Δnair measurement in the experiment is of 10-8 order. However, it will be possible to decrease the uncertainty to 10-9 or less if the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the control system is improved.

  13. Speech Articulator and User Gesture Measurements Using Micropower, Interferometric EM-Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Holzrichter, J F; Ng, L C

    2001-02-06

    Very low power, GHz frequency, ''radar-like'' sensors can measure a variety of motions produced by a human user of machine interface devices. These data can be obtained ''at a distance'' and can measure ''hidden'' structures. Measurements range from acoustic induced, 10-micron amplitude vibrations of vocal tract tissues, to few centimeter human speech articulator motions, to meter-class motions of the head, hands, or entire body. These EM sensors measure ''fringe motions'' as reflected EM waves are mixed with a local (homodyne) reference wave. These data, when processed using models of the system being measured, provide real time states of interface positions or other targets vs. time. An example is speech articulator positions vs. time in the user's body. This information appears to be useful for a surprisingly wide range of applications ranging from speech coding synthesis and recognition, speaker or object identification, noise cancellation, hand or head motions for cursor direction, and other applications.

  14. Speech Articulator and User Gesture Measurements Using Micropower, Interferometric EM-Sensore

    SciTech Connect

    Holzrichter, J.F.

    2000-09-15

    Very low power, GHz frequency, ''radar-like'' sensors can measure a variety of motions produced by a human user of machine interface devices. These data can be obtained ''at a distance'' and can measure ''hidden'' structures. Measurements range from acoustic induced 10-micron amplitude vibrations of vocal tract tissues, to few centimeter human speech articulator motions, to meter-class motions of the head, hands, or entire body. These EM sensors measure ''fringe motions' as reflected EM waves are mixed with a local (homodyne) reference wave. These data, when processed using models of the system being measured, provide real time states of interface positions vs. time. An example is speech articulator positions vs. time in the user's body. This information appears to be useful for a surprisingly wide range of applications ranging from speech coding and recognition, speaker or object identification, noise cancellation, hand or head motions for cursor direction, and other applications.

  15. Laser Truss Sensor for Segmented Telescope Phasing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Duncan T.; Lay, Oliver P.; Azizi, Alireza; Erlig, Herman; Dorsky, Leonard I.; Asbury, Cheryl G.; Zhao, Feng

    2011-01-01

    A paper describes the laser truss sensor (LTS) for detecting piston motion between two adjacent telescope segment edges. LTS is formed by two point-to-point laser metrology gauges in a crossed geometry. A high-resolution (<30 nm) LTS can be implemented with existing laser metrology gauges. The distance change between the reference plane and the target plane is measured as a function of the phase change between the reference and target beams. To ease the bandwidth requirements for phase detection electronics (or phase meter), homodyne or heterodyne detection techniques have been used. The phase of the target beam also changes with the refractive index of air, which changes with the air pressure, temperature, and humidity. This error can be minimized by enclosing the metrology beams in baffles. For longer-term (weeks) tracking at the micron level accuracy, the same gauge can be operated in the absolute metrology mode with an accuracy of microns; to implement absolute metrology, two laser frequencies will be used on the same gauge. Absolute metrology using heterodyne laser gauges is a demonstrated technology. Complexity of laser source fiber distribution can be optimized using the range-gated metrology (RGM) approach.

  16. Current sensor

    DOEpatents

    Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul; Brubaker, Michael Allen; Yakymyshyn, Pamela Jane

    2007-01-16

    A current sensor is described that uses a plurality of magnetic field sensors positioned around a current carrying conductor. The sensor can be hinged to allow clamping to a conductor. The current sensor provides high measurement accuracy for both DC and AC currents, and is substantially immune to the effects of temperature, conductor position, nearby current carrying conductors and aging.

  17. Displacement damage in bit error ratio performance of on-off keying, pulse position modulation, differential phase shift keying, and homodyne binary phase-shift keying-based optical intersatellite communication system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Zhao, Shanghong; Gong, Zizheng; Zhao, Jing; Dong, Chen; Li, Xuan

    2016-04-10

    Displacement damage (DD) effect induced bit error ratio (BER) performance degradations in on-off keying (OOK), pulse position modulation (PPM), differential phase-shift keying (DPSK), and homodyne binary phase shift keying (BPSK) based systems were simulated and discussed under 1 MeV neutron irradiation to a total fluence of 1×1012  n/cm2 in this paper. Degradation of main optoelectronic devices included in communication systems were analyzed on the basis of existing experimental data. The system BER degradation was subsequently simulated and the variations of BER with different neutron irradiation location were also achieved. The result shows that DD on an Er-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) is the dominant cause of system degradation, and a BPSK-based system performs better than the other three systems against DD. In order to improve radiation hardness of communication systems against DD, protection and enhancement of EDFA are required, and the use of a homodyne BPSK modulation scheme is a considered choice. PMID:27139876

  18. Terahertz refractive index sensors using dielectric pipe waveguides.

    PubMed

    You, Borwen; Lu, Ja-Yu; Yu, Chin-Ping; Liu, Tze-An; Peng, Jin-Long

    2012-03-12

    A dielectric pipe waveguide is successfully demonstrated as a terahertz refractive index sensor for powder and liquid-vapor sensing. Without additional engineered structures, a simple pipe waveguide can act as a terahertz resonator based on anti-resonant reflecting guidance, forming multiple resonant transmission-dips. Loading various powders in the ring-cladding or inserting different vapors into the hollow core of the pipe waveguide leads to a significant shift of resonant frequency, and the spectral shift is related to the refractive-index change. The proven detection limit of molecular density could be reduced to 1.6nano-mole/mm3 and the highest sensitivity is demonstrated at around 22.2GHz/refractive-index-unit (RIU), which is comparable to the best THz molecular sensor [Appl. Phys. Lett. 95, 171113 (2009)]. PMID:22418463

  19. Optimal Signal Filtration in Optical Sensors with Natural Squeezing of Vacuum Noises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gusev, A. V.; Kulagin, V. V.

    1996-01-01

    The structure of optimal receiver is discussed for optical sensor measuring a small displacement of probe mass. Due to nonlinear interaction of the field and the mirror, a reflected wave is in squeezed state (natural squeezing), two quadratures of which are correlated and therefore one can increase signal-to-noise ratio and overcome the SQL. A measurement procedure realizing such correlation processing of two quadratures is clarified. The required combination of quadratures can be produced via mixing of pump field reflected from the mirror with local oscillator phase modulated field in duel-detector homodyne scheme. Such measurement procedure could be useful not only for resonant bar gravitational detector but for laser longbase interferometric detectors as well.

  20. Photoelastic sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Kulakov, G.I.

    1985-07-01

    This paper presents the result of a study of photoelastic sensors which makes it possible to explain many mechanical and physical features of the operation of annular photoelastic borehole sensors and to plan ways of utilizing these features for interpreting the sensor readings.

  1. Sensor web

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delin, Kevin A. (Inventor); Jackson, Shannon P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A Sensor Web formed of a number of different sensor pods. Each of the sensor pods include a clock which is synchronized with a master clock so that all of the sensor pods in the Web have a synchronized clock. The synchronization is carried out by first using a coarse synchronization which takes less power, and subsequently carrying out a fine synchronization to make a fine sync of all the pods on the Web. After the synchronization, the pods ping their neighbors to determine which pods are listening and responded, and then only listen during time slots corresponding to those pods which respond.

  2. Life signal detection using an on-chip split-ring based solid state microwave sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, H. J.; Kaur, S.; Fu, L.; Yao, B. M.; Li, X.; Gong, H. M.; Gui, Y. S.; Hu, C.-M.

    2014-09-01

    A technique for measuring the amplitude and frequency of breathing and heartbeat has been developed using an on-chip solid state sensor integrating a semiconductor microwave sensor and a split ring operating at a resonance frequency of 4.2 GHz. This technique allows the lock-in amplifier to make real-time measurements, analogous to measurements taken by a vector network analyser through an antenna, but with the advantage of being portable and having a user friendly DC output. The effectiveness of this approach is shown by performing several experiments to determine the breathing and heartbeat frequency with and without the presence of an obstacle between the test subject and the microwave sensor and transducer. The experimental results demonstrate the high sensitivity and large dynamic range over which the proposed system can be used for practical applications.

  3. Fiber optic sensor for hydrostatic pressure and temperature measurement in riverbanks monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenato, Luca; Aneesh, Rajendran; Palmieri, Luca; Galtarossa, Andrea; Pasuto, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    An optical fiber sensor for the simultaneous measurement of hydrostatic pressure and temperature in soil embankments is presented. It exploits the differential strain induced on a fiber in a dual-chamber case, constituting the sensor body. The strain, either induced by the pressure or by the temperature, is optically measured by means of coherent frequency domain reflectometry and variations induced by the two physical phenomena are discriminated because of the different behavior of the two chambers. Characterization of the sensor is presented and discussed. The prototype shows promising performance: temperature and pressure sensitivities are approximately -7 GHz/°C and -3.2 GHz/kPa, respectively, with accuracies of 0.5 °C and 0.3 kPa.

  4. Temperature Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Weed Instrument Inc. produces a line of thermocouples - temperature sensors - for a variety of industrial and research uses. One of the company's newer products is a thermocouple specially designed for high accuracy at extreme temperatures above 3,000 degrees Fahrenheit. Development of sensor brought substantial increases in Weed Instrument sales and employment.

  5. Chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1991-07-02

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed. The sensors comprise a mechanochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment. They are operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical response. 9 figures.

  6. Chemical sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, C.W.; Gordon, R.L.

    1987-05-01

    The revolution in analytical chemistry promised by recent developments in the field of chemical sensors has potential for significant positive impact on both research and production activities conducted by and for the Department of Energy. Analyses which were, in the past, performed only with a roomful of expensive equipment can now be performed with miniature solid-state electronic devices or small optical probes. Progress in the development of chemical sensors has been rapid, and the field is currently growing at a great rate. In accordance, Pacific Northwest Laboratory initiated a survey of recent literature so that contributors to active programs in research on analytical methods could be made aware of principles and applications of this new technology. This report presents the results of that survey. The sensors discussed here are divided into three types: micro solid-state devices, optical sensors, and piezoelectric crystal devices. The report is divided into three corresponding sections. The first section, ''Micro Solid-State Devices,'' discusses the design, operation, and application of electronic sensors that are produced in much the same way as standard solid-state electronic devices. The second section, ''Optrodes,'' covers the design and operation of chemical sensors that use fiber optics to detect chemically induced changes in optical properties. The final section, ''Piezoelectric Crystal Detectors,'' discusses two types of chemical sensors that depend on the changes in the properties of an oscillating piezoelectric crystal to detect the presence of certain materials. Advantages and disadvantages of each type of sensor are summarized in each section.

  7. Sensor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokoloski, Martin M.

    1988-01-01

    The objective is to provide necessary expertise and technology to advance space remote sensing of terrestrial, planetary, and galactic phenomena through the use of electromagnetic and electro-optic properties of gas, liquid, and solid state materials technology. The Sensor Technology Program is divided into two subprograms: a base research and development part and a Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) part. The base research and development consists of research on artificially grown materials such as quantum well and superlattice structure with the potential for new and efficient means for detecting electromagnetic phenomena. Research is also being done on materials and concepts for detector components and devices for measuring high energy phenomena such as UV, X-, and gamma rays that are required observables in astrophysis and solar physics missions. The CSTI program is more mission driven and is balanced among four major disciplines: detector sensors; submillimeter wave sensors; LIDAR/DIAL sensors; and cooler technology.

  8. Wireless sensor

    DOEpatents

    Lamberti, Vincent E.; Howell, JR, Layton N.; Mee, David K.; Sepaniak, Michael J.

    2016-02-09

    Disclosed is a sensor for detecting a target material. The sensor includes a ferromagnetic metal and a molecular recognition reagent coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The molecular recognition reagent is operable to expand upon exposure to vapor or liquid from the target material such that the molecular recognition reagent changes a tensile stress upon the ferromagnetic metal. The target material is detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the changes in the tensile stress.

  9. Vibration sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Amita; Singh, Ranvir; Ahmad, Amir; Kumar, Mahesh

    2003-10-01

    Today, vibration sensors with low and medium sensitivities are in great demand. Their applications include robotics, navigation, machine vibration monitoring, isolation of precision equipment & activation of safety systems e.g. airbags in automobiles. Vibration sensors have been developed at SSPL, using silicon micromachining to sense vibrations in a system in the 30 - 200 Hz frequency band. The sensing element in the silicon vibration sensor is a seismic mass suspended by thin silicon hinges mounted on a metallized glass plate forming a parallel plate capacitor. The movement of the seismic mass along the vertical axis is monitored to sense vibrations. This is obtained by measuring the change in capacitance. The movable plate of the parallel plate capacitor is formed by a block connected to a surrounding frame by four cantilever beams located on sides or corners of the seismic mass. This element is fabricated by silicon micromachining. Several sensors in the chip sizes 1.6 cm x 1.6 cm, 1 cm x 1 cm and 0.7 cm x 0.7 cm have been fabricated. Work done on these sensors, techniques used in processing and silicon to glass bonding are presented in the paper. Performance evaluation of these sensors is also discussed.

  10. Research sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englund, David R.

    1988-05-01

    The work described is part of a program (Englund and Seasholtz, 1988) to develop sensors and sensing techniques for research applications on aircraft turbine engines. In general, the sensors are used to measure the environment at a given location within a turbine engine or to measure the response of an engine component to the imposed environment. Locations of concern are generally in the gas path and, for the most part, are within the hot section. Specific parameters of concern are dynamic gas temperature, heat flux, airfoil surface temperature, and strain on airfoils and combustor liners. To minimize the intrusiveness of surface-mounted sensors, a considerable effort was expended to develop thin-film sensors for surface temperature, strain, and heat flux measurements. In addition, an optical system for viewing the interior of an operating combustor was developed. Most of the work described is sufficiently advanced that the sensors were used and useful data were obtained. The notable exception is the work to develop a high-temperature static strain measuring capability; the work is still in progress.

  11. Water Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Mike Morris, former Associate Director of STAC, formed pHish Doctor, Inc. to develop and sell a pH monitor for home aquariums. The monitor, or pHish Doctor, consists of a sensor strip and color chart that continually measures pH levels in an aquarium. This is important because when the level gets too high, ammonia excreted by fish is highly toxic; at low pH, bacteria that normally break down waste products stop functioning. Sales have run into the tens of thousands of dollars. A NASA Tech Brief Technical Support Package later led to a salt water version of the system and a DoE Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant for development of a sensor for sea buoys. The company, now known as Ocean Optics, Inc., is currently studying the effects of carbon dioxide buildup as well as exploring other commercial applications for the fiber optic sensor.

  12. Multi-band polarization independent cylindrical metamaterial absorber and sensor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dincer, Furkan; Karaaslan, Muharrem; Colak, Sule; Tetik, Erkan; Akgol, Oguzhan; Altıntas, Olcay; Sabah, Cumali

    2016-03-01

    A multi-band perfect metamaterial absorber (MA) based on a cylindrical waveguide with polarization independency is numerically presented and investigated in detail. The proposed absorber has a very simple configuration, and it operates at flexible frequency ranges within the microwave frequency regime by simply tuning the dimensions of the structure. The maximum absorption values are obtained as 99.9%, 97.5%, 85.8%, 68.2% and 40.2% at the frequencies of 1.34 GHz, 2.15 GHz, 3.2 GHz, 4.31 GHz and 5.41 GHz, respectively. The numerical studies verify that the proposed model can provide multi-band perfect absorptions at wide polarization and incident angles due to its rotational symmetry feature. We have also realized sensor and parametric study applications in order to show additional features of the suggested model. The suggested MA enables myriad potential applications in medical technologies, sensors and in defense industry etc.

  13. Microcantilever sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Thundat, T.; Warmack, R.J.; Oden, P.I. |; Dasktos, P.G.; Chen, G.Y. |

    1996-04-01

    Novel sensors based on bending and resonance frequency changes of (coated silicon) microcantilevers are discussed. Adsorption-induced resonance frequency changes of microcantilevers can be due to a combination of mass loading and change of spring constant resulting from adsorption of chemicals on the surface. Cantilevers also undergo static bending due to adsorption-induced differential surface stress if the adsorption is confined to one surface. Hence cantilever deflection as well as resonance frequency change can be used as the basis for development of novel chemcal sensors.

  14. Gas sensor

    DOEpatents

    Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

    2014-09-09

    A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

  15. Chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Lowell, Jr., James R.; Edlund, David J.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Rayfield, George W.

    1991-01-01

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising (a) a mechanochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, operatively coupled to (b) a transducer capable of directly converting said expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical response.

  16. Chemical sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauh, R. David (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A sensor for detecting a chemical substance includes an insertion element having a structure which enables insertion of the chemical substance with a resulting change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element under conditions sufficient to permit effective insertion; the change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element is detected as an indication of the presence of the chemical substance.

  17. Sensor apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A [Idaho Falls, ID; Telschow, Kenneth L [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-12-22

    A sensor apparatus and method for detecting an environmental factor is shown that includes an acoustic device that has a characteristic resonant vibrational frequency and mode pattern when exposed to a source of acoustic energy and, futher, when exposed to an environmental factor, produces a different resonant vibrational frequency and/or mode pattern when exposed to the same source of acoustic energy.

  18. Pressure sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Mee, David K.; Ripley, Edward B.; Nienstedt, Zachary C.; Nienstedt, Alex W.; Howell, Jr., Layton N.

    2015-09-29

    Disclosed is a passive, in-situ pressure sensor. The sensor includes a sensing element having a ferromagnetic metal and a tension inducing mechanism coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The tension inducing mechanism is operable to change a tensile stress upon the ferromagnetic metal based on a change in pressure in the sensing element. Changes in pressure are detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal when subjected to an alternating magnetic field caused by the change in the tensile stress. The sensing element is embeddable in a closed system for detecting pressure changes without the need for any penetrations of the system for power or data acquisition by detecting changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the tensile stress.

  19. Corrosion sensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, R.S.; Clarke, W.L. Jr.; Ciarlo, D.R.

    1994-04-26

    A corrosion sensor array is described incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis. 7 figures.

  20. Corrosion sensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Robert S.; Clarke, Jr., Willis L.; Ciarlo, Dino R.

    1994-01-01

    A corrosion sensor array incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis.

  1. Sensor assembly

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Thomas E.; Nelson, Drew V.

    2004-04-13

    A ribbon-like sensor assembly is described wherein a length of an optical fiber embedded within a similar lengths of a prepreg tow. The fiber is ""sandwiched"" by two layers of the prepreg tow which are merged to form a single consolidated ribbon. The consolidated ribbon achieving a generally uniform distribution of composite filaments near the embedded fiber such that excess resin does not ""pool"" around the periphery of the embedded fiber.

  2. Gas Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    High Technology Sensors, Inc.'s Model SS-250 carbon dioxide detector uses a patented semiconductor optical source that efficiently creates infrared radiation, which is focused through an airway on a detector. Carbon dioxide passing through the airway absorbs the radiation causing the detector to generate a signal. The small size and low power requirements of the SS-250 make it attractive for incorporation in a variety of medical instruments.

  3. Chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Lowell, Jr., James R.; Edlund, David J.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Rayfield, George W.

    1992-01-01

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising a mechanicochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, either operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical or optical response, or adhered to a second inert polymeric strip, or doped with a conductive material.

  4. Chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1992-06-09

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising a mechanicochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, either operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical or optical response, or adhered to a second inert polymeric strip, or doped with a conductive material. 12 figs.

  5. Position sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, Siegfried (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A radiant energy angle sensor is provided wherein the sensitive portion thereof comprises a pair of linear array detectors with each detector mounted normal to the other to provide X and Y channels and a pair of slits spaced from the pair of linear arrays with each of the slits positioned normal to its associated linear array. There is also provided electrical circuit means connected to the pair of linear array detectors and to separate X and Y axes outputs.

  6. Influenza sensor

    DOEpatents

    Swanson, Basil I.; Song, Xuedong; Unkefer, Clifford; Silks, III, Louis A.; Schmidt, Jurgen G.

    2003-09-30

    A sensor for the detection of tetrameric multivalent neuraminidase within a sample is disclosed, where a positive detection indicates the presence of a target virus within the sample. Also disclosed is a trifunctional composition of matter including a trifunctional linker moiety with groups bonded thereto including (a) an alkyl chain adapted for attachment to a substrate, (b) a fluorescent moiety capable of generating a fluorescent signal, and (c) a recognition moiety having a spacer group of a defined length thereon, the recognition moiety capable of binding with tetrameric multivalent neuraminidase.

  7. Influenza Sensor

    DOEpatents

    Swanson, Basil I.; Song, Xuedong; Unkefer, Clifford; Silks, III, Louis A.; Schmidt, Jurgen G.

    2006-03-28

    A sensor for the detection of tetrameric multivalent neuraminidase within a sample is disclosed, where a positive detection indicates the presence of a target virus within the sample. Also disclosed is a trifunctional composition of matter including a trifunctional linker moiety with groups bonded thereto including (a) an alkyl chain adapted for attachment to a substrate, (b) a fluorescent moiety capable of generating a fluorescent signal, and (c) a recognition moiety having a spacer group of a defined length thereon, the recognition moiety capable of binding with tetrameric multivalent neuraminidase.

  8. Influenza Sensor

    DOEpatents

    Swanson, Basil I.; Song, Xuedong; Unkefer, Clifford; Silks, III, Louis A.; Schmidt, Jurgen G.

    2005-05-17

    A sensor for the detection of tetrameric multivalent neuraminidase within a sample is disclosed, where a positive detection indicates the presence of a target virus within the sample. Also disclosed is a trifunctional composition of matter including a trifunctional linker moiety with groups bonded thereto including (a) an alkyl chain adapted for attachment to a substrate, (b) a fluorescent moiety capable of generating a fluorescent signal, and (c) a recognition moiety having a spacer group of a defined length thereon, the recognition moiety capable of binding with tetrameric multivalent neuraminidase.

  9. Hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  10. Microcantilever sensor

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Wachter, Eric A.

    1998-01-01

    An improved microcantilever sensor is fabricated with at least one microcantilever attached to a piezoelectric transducer. The microcantilever is partially surface treated with a compound selective substance having substantially exclusive affinity for a targeted compound in a monitored atmosphere. The microcantilever sensor is also provided with a frequency detection means and a bending detection means. The frequency detection means is capable of detecting changes in the resonance frequency of the vibrated microcantilever in the monitored atmosphere. The bending detection means is capable of detecting changes in the bending of the vibrated microcantilever in the monitored atmosphere coactively with the frequency detection means. The piezoelectric transducer is excited by an oscillator means which provides a signal driving the transducer at a resonance frequency inducing a predetermined order of resonance on the partially treated microcantilever. Upon insertion into a monitored atmosphere, molecules of the targeted chemical attach to the treated regions of the microcantilever resulting in a change in oscillating mass as well as a change in microcantilever spring constant thereby influencing the resonant frequency of the microcantilever oscillation. Furthermore, the molecular attachment of the target chemical to the treated regions induce areas of mechanical strain in the microcantilever consistent with the treated regions thereby influencing microcantilever bending. The rate at which the treated microcantilever accumulates the target chemical is a function of the target chemical concentration. Consequently, the extent of microcantilever oscillation frequency change and bending is related to the concentration of target chemical within the monitored atmosphere.

  11. Semiconductor sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, Harry C. (Inventor); Lagowski, Jacek (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A semiconductor sensor adapted to detect with a high degree of sensitivity small magnitudes of a mechanical force, presence of traces of a gas or light. The sensor includes a high energy gap (i.e., .about. 1.0 electron volts) semiconductor wafer. Mechanical force is measured by employing a non-centrosymmetric material for the semiconductor. Distortion of the semiconductor by the force creates a contact potential difference (cpd) at the semiconductor surface, and this cpd is determined to give a measure of the force. When such a semiconductor is subjected to illumination with an energy less than the energy gap of the semiconductors, such illumination also creates a cpd at the surface. Detection of this cpd is employed to sense the illumination itself or, in a variation of the system, to detect a gas. When either a gas or light is to be detected and a crystal of a non-centrosymmetric material is employed, the presence of gas or light, in appropriate circumstances, results in a strain within the crystal which distorts the same and the distortion provides a mechanism for qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the gas or the light, as the case may be.

  12. Force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1993-01-01

    A force sensor and related method for determining force components. The force sensor includes a deformable medium having a contact surface against which a force can be applied, a signal generator for generating signals that travel through the deformable medium to the contact surface, a signal receptor for receiving the signal reflected from the contact surface, a generation controller, a reception controller, and a force determination apparatus. The signal generator has one or more signal generation regions for generating the signals. The generation controller selects and activates the signal generation regions. The signal receptor has one or more signal reception regions for receiving signals and for generating detections signals in response thereto. The reception controller selects signal reception regions and detects the detection signals. The force determination apparatus measures signal transit time by timing activation and detection and, optionally, determines force components for selected cross-field intersections. The timer which times by activation and detection can be any means for measuring signal transit time. A cross-field intersection is defined by the overlap of a signal generation region and a signal reception region.

  13. Force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, A.R.

    1993-05-11

    A force sensor and related method for determining force components is described. The force sensor includes a deformable medium having a contact surface against which a force can be applied, a signal generator for generating signals that travel through the deformable medium to the contact surface, a signal receptor for receiving the signal reflected from the contact surface, a generation controller, a reception controller, and a force determination apparatus. The signal generator has one or more signal generation regions for generating the signals. The generation controller selects and activates the signal generation regions. The signal receptor has one or more signal reception regions for receiving signals and for generating detections signals in response thereto. The reception controller selects signal reception regions and detects the detection signals. The force determination apparatus measures signal transit time by timing activation and detection and, optionally, determines force components for selected cross-field intersections. The timer which times by activation and detection can be any means for measuring signal transit time. A cross-field intersection is defined by the overlap of a signal generation region and a signal reception region.

  14. Microcantilever sensor

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, T.G.; Wachter, E.A.

    1998-02-17

    An improved microcantilever sensor is fabricated with at least one microcantilever attached to a piezoelectric transducer. The microcantilever is partially surface treated with a compound selective substance having substantially exclusive affinity for a targeted compound in a monitored atmosphere. The microcantilever sensor is also provided with a frequency detection means and a bending detection means. The frequency detection means is capable of detecting changes in the resonance frequency of the vibrated microcantilever in the monitored atmosphere. The bending detection means is capable of detecting changes in the bending of the vibrated microcantilever in the monitored atmosphere coactively with the frequency detection means. The piezoelectric transducer is excited by an oscillator means which provides a signal driving the transducer at a resonance frequency inducing a predetermined order of resonance on the partially treated microcantilever. Upon insertion into a monitored atmosphere, molecules of the targeted chemical attach to the treated regions of the microcantilever resulting in a change in oscillating mass as well as a change in microcantilever spring constant thereby influencing the resonant frequency of the microcantilever oscillation. Furthermore, the molecular attachment of the target chemical to the treated regions induce areas of mechanical strain in the microcantilever consistent with the treated regions thereby influencing microcantilever bending. The rate at which the treated microcantilever accumulates the target chemical is a function of the target chemical concentration. Consequently, the extent of microcantilever oscillation frequency change and bending is related to the concentration of target chemical within the monitored atmosphere. 16 figs.

  15. Sensors, Update 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltes, Henry; Göpel, Wolfgang; Hesse, Joachim

    1996-12-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field. Built upon the series Sensors, it presents an overview of highlights in the field. Treatments include current developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles. Furthermore, the sensor market as well as peripheral aspects such as standards are covered. Each volume is divided into four sections. Sensor Technology, reviews highlights in applied and basic research, Sensor Applications, covers new or improved applications of sensors, Sensor Markets, provides an overview of suppliers and market trends for a particular section, and Sensor Standards, reviews recent legislation and requirements for sensors. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update will be of value for scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  16. Mass Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, B.E.

    2001-01-18

    The purpose of this CRADA was to use Honeywell's experience in low temperature cofire ceramics and traditional ceramics to assemble a relatively low-cost, mass-producible miniature mass analyzer. The specific design, given to us by Mass Sensors, LLC, was used to test for helium. The direct benefit for the participant was to have a prototype unit assembled for the purpose of proof of concept and the ability to secure venture capital investors. From that, the company would begin producing their own product for sale. The consumer/taxpayer benefits come from the wide variety of industries that can utilize this technology to improve quality of life. Medical industry can use this technology to improve diagnostic ability; manufacturing industry can use it for improved air, water, and soil monitoring to minimize pollution; and the law enforcement community can use this technology for identification of substances. These are just a few examples of the benefit of this technology. The benefits to DOE were in the area of process improvement for cofire and ceramic materials. From this project we demonstrated nonlinear thickfilm fine lines and spaces that were 5-mil wide with 5-mil spaces; determined height-to diameter-ratios for punched and filled via holes; demonstrated the ability to punch and fill 5-mil microvias; developed and demonstrated the capability to laser cut difficult geometries in 40-mil ceramic; developed and demonstrated coupling LTCC with standard alumina and achieving hermetic seals; developed and demonstrated three-dimensional electronic packaging concepts; and demonstrated printing variable resistors within 1% of the nominal value and within a tightly defined ratio. The capability of this device makes it invaluable for many industries. The device could be used to monitor air samples around manufacturing plants. It also could be used for monitoring automobile exhaust, for doing blood gas analysis, for sampling gases being emitted by volcanoes, for studying

  17. Phase coded, micro-power impulse radar motion sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-05-21

    A motion sensing, micro-power impulse radar MIR impresses on the transmitted signal, or the received pulse timing signal, one or more frequencies lower than the pulse repetition frequency, that become intermediate frequencies in a ``IF homodyne`` receiver. Thus, many advantages of classical RF receivers can be thereby be realized with ultra-wide band radar. The sensor includes a transmitter which transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal at a nominal pulse repetition frequency. A receiver samples echoes of the sequence of electromagnetic pulses from objects within the field with controlled timing, in response to a receive timing signal, and generates a sample signal in response to the samples. A timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The relative timing of the transmit timing signal and the receive timing signal is modulated between a first relative delay and a second relative delay at an intermediate frequency, causing the receiver to sample the echoes such that the time between transmissions of pulses in the sequence and samples by the receiver is modulated at the intermediate frequency. Modulation may be executed by modulating the pulse repetition frequency which drives the transmitter, by modulating the delay circuitry which controls the relative timing of the sample strobe, or by modulating amplitude of the transmitted pulses. The electromagnetic pulses will have a nominal center frequency related to pulse width, and the first relative delay and the second relative delay between which the timing signals are modulated, differ by less than the nominal pulse width, and preferably by about one-quarter wavelength at the nominal center frequency of the transmitted pulses. 5 figs.

  18. Phase coded, micro-power impulse radar motion sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    A motion sensing, micro-power impulse radar MIR impresses on the transmitted signal, or the received pulse timing signal, one or more frequencies lower than the pulse repetition frequency, that become intermediate frequencies in a "IF homodyne" receiver. Thus, many advantages of classical RF receivers can be thereby be realized with ultra-wide band radar. The sensor includes a transmitter which transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal at a nominal pulse repetition frequency. A receiver samples echoes of the sequence of electromagnetic pulses from objects within the field with controlled timing, in response to a receive timing signal, and generates a sample signal in response to the samples. A timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The relative timing of the transmit timing signal and the receive timing signal is modulated between a first relative delay and a second relative delay at an intermediate frequency, causing the receiver to sample the echoes such that the time between transmissions of pulses in the sequence and samples by the receiver is modulated at the intermediate frequency. Modulation may be executed by modulating the pulse repetition frequency which drives the transmitter, by modulating the delay circuitry which controls the relative timing of the sample strobe, or by modulating amplitude of the transmitted pulses. The electromagnetic pulses will have a nominal center frequency related to pulse width, and the first relative delay and the second relative delay between which the timing signals are modulated, differ by less than the nominal pulse width, and preferably by about one-quarter wavelength at the nominal center frequency of the transmitted pulses.

  19. Using a 1.2 GHz bandwidth reflective semiconductor optical amplifier with seeding light by 64-quadrature amplitude modulation orthogonal frequency division multiplexing modulation to achieve a 10-gbits/s upstream rate in long-reach passive optical network access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chien-Hung; Chen, Hsing-Yu; Chow, Chi-Wai; Wu, Yu-Fu

    2012-01-01

    We use a commercially available 1.2 GHz bandwidth reflective semiconductor optical amplifier (RSOA)--based optical network unit (ONU) to achieve 10-gbits/s upstream traffic for an optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) long-reach passive optical network (LR-PON). This is the first time the 64--quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) OFDM format has been applied to RSOA-ONU to achieve a 75 km fiber transmission length. In the proposed LR-PON, the upstream power penalty of 5.2 dB at the bit error rate of 3.8×10-3 is measured by using a 64-QAM OFDM modulation after the 75 km fiber transmission without dispersion compensation.

  20. Sensor response rate accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Vogt, Michael C.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for sensor signal prediction and for improving sensor signal response time, is disclosed. An adaptive filter or an artificial neural network is utilized to provide predictive sensor signal output and is further used to reduce sensor response time delay.

  1. EDITORIAL: Humidity sensors Humidity sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regtien, Paul P. L.

    2012-01-01

    produced at relatively low cost. Therefore, they find wide use in lots of applications. However, the method requires a material that possesses some conflicting properties: stable and reproducible relations between air humidity, moisture uptake and a specific property (for instance the length of a hair, the electrical impedance of the material), fast absorption and desorption of the water vapour (to obtain a short response time), small hysteresis, wide range of relative humidity (RH) and temperature-independent output (only responsive to RH). For these reasons, much research is done and is still going on to find suitable materials that combine high performance and low price. In this special feature, three of the four papers report on absorption sensors, all with different focus. Aziz et al describe experiments with newly developed materials. The surface structure is extensively studied, in view of its ability to rapidly absorb water vapour and exhibit a reproducible change in the resistance and capacitance of the device. Sanchez et al employ optical fibres coated with a thin moisture-absorbing layer as a sensitive humidity sensor. They have studied various coating materials and investigated the possibility of using changes in optical properties of the fibre (here the lossy mode resonance) due to a change in humidity of the surrounding air. The third paper, by Weremczuk et al, focuses on a cheap fabrication method for absorption-based humidity sensors. The inkjet technology appears to be suitable for mass fabrication of such sensors, which is demonstrated by extensive measurements of the electrical properties (resistance and capacitance) of the absorbing layers. Moreover, they have developed a model that describes the relation between humidity and the electrical parameters of the moisture-sensitive layer. Despite intensive research, absorption sensors still do not meet the requirements for high accuracy applications. The dew-point temperature method is more appropriate

  2. Fiber optic sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, J.; Sohler, W.

    1984-01-01

    A survey of the developments in the field of fiber optics sensor technology is presented along with a discussion of the advantages of optical measuring instruments as compared with electronic sensors. The two primary types of fiber optics sensors, specifically those with multiwave fibers and those with monowave fibers, are described. Examples of each major sensor type are presented and discussed. Multiwave detectors include external and internal fiber optics sensors. Among the monowave detectors are Mach-Zender interferometers, Michelson interferometers, Sagnac interferometers (optical gyroscopes), waveguide resonators, and polarimeter sensors. Integrated optical sensors and their application in spectroscopy are briefly discussed.

  3. Crossflow vorticity sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J. (Inventor); Carraway, Debra L. (Inventor); Holmes, Harlan K. (Inventor); Moore, Thomas C. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A crossflow vorticity sensor for the detection of crossflow vorticity characteristics is described. The sensor is comprised of crossflow sensors which are noninvasively adhered to a swept wing laminar surface either singularly, in multi-element strips, in polar patterns, or in orthogonal patterns. These crossflow sensors are comprised of hot-film sensor elements which operate as a constant temperature anemometer circuit to detect heat transfer rate changes. Accordingly, crossflow vorticity characteristics are determined via cross-correlation. In addition, the crossflow sensors have a thickness which does not exceed a maximum value h in order to avoid contamination of downstream crossflow sensors.

  4. Sensors, Update 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltes, Henry; Göpel, Wolfgang; Hesse, Joachim

    1996-10-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field. Built upon the series Sensors, it presents an overview of highlights in the field. Coverage includes current developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles. Furthermore, the sensor market as well as peripheral aspects such as standards are covered. Each volume is divided into four sections. Sensor Technology, reviews highlights in applied and basic research, Sensor Applications, covers new or improved applications of sensors, Sensor Markets, provides a survey of suppliers and market trends for a particular area. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update will be of value for scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  5. Advanced Sensor Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, D. C.; Howard, D. E.; Smith, D. A.

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Sensor Concepts project was conducted under the Center Director's Discretionary Fund at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Its objective was to advance the technology originally developed for the Glovebox Integrated Microgravity Isolation Technology project. The objective of this effort was to develop and test several new motion sensors. To date, the investigators have invented seven new technologies during this endeavor and have conceived several others. The innovative basic sensor technology is an absolute position sensor. It employs only two active components, and it is simple, inexpensive, reliable, repeatable, lightweight, and relatively unobtrusive. Two sensors can be utilized in the same physical space to achieve redundancy. The sensor has micrometer positional accuracy and can be configured as a two- or three-dimensional sensor. The sensor technology has the potential to pioneer a new class of linear and rotary sensors. This sensor is the enabling technology for autonomous assembly of modular structures in space and on extraterrestrial locations.

  6. Sensor sentinel computing device

    DOEpatents

    Damico, Joseph P.

    2016-08-02

    Technologies pertaining to authenticating data output by sensors in an industrial environment are described herein. A sensor sentinel computing device receives time-series data from a sensor by way of a wireline connection. The sensor sentinel computing device generates a validation signal that is a function of the time-series signal. The sensor sentinel computing device then transmits the validation signal to a programmable logic controller in the industrial environment.

  7. Sensor Authentication in Collaborating Sensor Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Bielefeldt, Jake Uriah

    2014-11-01

    In this thesis, we address a new security problem in the realm of collaborating sensor networks. By collaborating sensor networks, we refer to the networks of sensor networks collaborating on a mission, with each sensor network is independently owned and operated by separate entities. Such networks are practical where a number of independent entities can deploy their own sensor networks in multi-national, commercial, and environmental scenarios, and some of these networks will integrate complementary functionalities for a mission. In the scenario, we address an authentication problem wherein the goal is for the Operator Oi of Sensor Network Si to correctly determine the number of active sensors in Network Si. Such a problem is challenging in collaborating sensor networks where other sensor networks, despite showing an intent to collaborate, may not be completely trustworthy and could compromise the authentication process. We propose two authentication protocols to address this problem. Our protocols rely on Physically Unclonable Functions, which are a hardware based authentication primitive exploiting inherent randomness in circuit fabrication. Our protocols are light-weight, energy efficient, and highly secure against a number of attacks. To the best of our knowledge, ours is the first to addresses a practical security problem in collaborating sensor networks.

  8. Sensors, Update 12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltes, Henry; Fedder, Gary K.; Korvink, Jan G.

    2003-04-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field. Built upon the series Sensors, it presents an overview of highlights in the field. Coverage includes current developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles. Each volume is divided into three sections. Sensor Technology, reviews highlights in applied and basic research, Sensor Applications, covers new or improved applications of sensors, Sensor Markets, provides a survey of suppliers and market trends for a particular area. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update will be of value for scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  9. Sensors, Update 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltes, Henry; Göpel, Wolfgang; Hesse, Joachim

    2001-02-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field. Built upon the series Sensors, it presents an overview of highlights in the field. Coverage includes current developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles. Each volume is divided into three sections: Sensor Technology reviews highlights in applied and basic research, while Sensor Applications covers new or improved applications of sensors, and Sensor Markets provides a survey of suppliers and market trends for a particular area. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update will be invaluable to scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  10. Sensors, Update 11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltes, Henry; Fedder, Gary K.; Korvink, Jan G.

    2003-03-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field, presenting the current highlights of sensor and related microelectromechanical systems technology. Coverage includes most recent developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles based on micro- and nanotechnology. Each volume is divided into three sections: Sensor Technology reviews highlights in applied and basic research, Sensor Applications covers new or improved applications of sensors and Sensor Markets provides a survey of suppliers and market trends for a particular area. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update is of must-have value for scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  11. Sensors, Update 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltes, Henry; Fedder, Gary K.; Korvink, Jan G.

    2002-04-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field. Built upon the series Sensors, it presents an overview of highlights in the field. Coverage includes current developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles. Each volume is divided into three sections. Sensor Technology, reviews highlights in applied and basic research, Sensor Applications, covers new or improved applications of sensors, Sensor Markets, provides a survey of suppliers and market trends for a particular area. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update will be of value for scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  12. Sensors, Update 9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltes, Henry; Göpel, Wolfgang; Hesse, Joachim

    2001-10-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field. Built upon the series Sensors, it presents an overview of highlights in the field. Coverage includes current developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles. Each volume is divided into three sections. Sensor Technology, reviews highlights in applied and basic research, Sensor Applications, covers new or improved applications of sensors, Sensor Markets, provides a survey of suppliers and market trends for a particular area. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update will be of value for scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  13. Silicon sensor integration to form smart sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourdeas, Leon; James, Daniel A.; Thiel, David V.; See, Le Lian

    2002-11-01

    The use of silicon-based sensors requires the addition of external support electronics to allow for compatibility with external logging and display instruments. The development of a smart sensor technology, where the support electronics are incorporated into the sensor allows for a simpler interface. To achieve this integration techniques are required for the connection of substrate sensors with drive and support circuitry (operational amplifiers and CMOS circuitry), for effective encapsulation into a single packaged device. In this paper a literature review of basic peripheral and internal interconnect techniques is presented. Three techniques for interconnects were experimentally investigated (wraparound, thermomigration and etched micro via"s) using in-house fabrication equipment and the results presented and discussed. An integrated "smart" light sensor was constructed by forming a schotkey diode on n-type silicon. The sensor was integrated with a commercially available LM324 quad operational amplifier die and etched micro via`s were used to connect between the electronics on one side and the silicon sensor on the other side so forming a smart sensor. The light level sensor was calibrated and tested for suitability as a solar intensity monitor.

  14. Acoustic particle acceleration sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, J.B.; Barry, P.J.

    1996-04-01

    A crossed dipole array provides a directional receiving capability in a relatively small sensor package and is therefore very attractive for many applications in acoustics. Particle velocity measurements on two axes perpendicular to each other are required to provide the dipole signals. These can be obtained directly using particle velocity sensors or via simple transfer functions using acceleration and displacement sensors. Also, the derivative of the acoustic pressure with respect to space provides a signal proportional to the particle acceleration and gives rise to the pressure gradient sensor. Each of these sensors has strengths and drawbacks depending on the frequency regime of interest, the noise background, and whether a point or a line configuration of dipole sensors is desired. In this paper, the performance of acceleration sensors is addressed using a sensor concept developed at DREA. These sensors exploit bending stresses in a cantilever beam of piezoelectric material to obtain wide bandwidth and high sensitivity. Models which predict the acceleration sensitivity, pressure sensitivity, and natural frequency for this type of sensor are described. Experimental results obtained using several different versions of these sensors are presented and compared with theory. The predicted performance of acceleration sensors are compared with that of pressure gradient arrays and particle velocity sensors. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Fiber optic chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Chuck C.; McCrae, David A.; Saaski, Elric W.

    1998-09-01

    This paper provides a broad overview of the field of fiber optic chemical sensors. Several different types of fiber optic sensors and probes are described, and references are cited for each category discussed.

  16. Giant magnetoresistive sensor

    DOEpatents

    Stearns, Daniel G.; Vernon, Stephen P.; Ceglio, Natale M.; Hawryluk, Andrew M.

    1999-01-01

    A magnetoresistive sensor element with a three-dimensional micro-architecture is capable of significantly improved sensitivity and highly localized measurement of magnetic fields. The sensor is formed of a multilayer film of alternately magnetic and nonmagnetic materials. The sensor is optimally operated in a current perpendicular to plane mode. The sensor is useful in magnetic read/write heads, for high density magnetic information storage and retrieval.

  17. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Homuth, Emil F.

    1991-01-01

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects.

  18. Secure Sensor Platform

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2010-08-25

    The Secure Sensor Platform (SSP) software provides a framework of functionality to support the development of low-power autonomous sensors for nuclear safeguards. This framework provides four primary functional blocks of capabilities required to implement autonomous sensors. The capabilities are: communications, security, power management, and cryptography. Utilizing this framework establishes a common set of functional capabilities for seamless interoperability of any sensor based upon the SSP concept.

  19. Acoustic Humidity Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shakkottai, Parthasarathy; Kwack, Eug Y.; Venkateshan, Shakkottai

    1990-01-01

    Industrial humidity sensor measures volume fraction of water in air via its effect on speed of sound. Only portion of sensor exposed to sensed atmosphere is pair of stainless-steel tubes, one containing dry air and other containing moist air. Counters measure intervals between reflected pulses. Sensor rugged enough for use in harsh environments like those used to control drying of paper in paper mills, where most humidity sensors do not survive.

  20. Digital Sensor Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst; Ken Thomas

    2013-07-01

    The nuclear industry has been slow to incorporate digital sensor technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns with digital qualification issues. However, the benefits of digital sensor technology for nuclear plant instrumentation are substantial in terms of accuracy, reliability, availability, and maintainability. This report demonstrates these benefits in direct comparisons of digital and analog sensor applications. It also addresses the qualification issues that must be addressed in the application of digital sensor technology.

  1. Ice depolarization on low-angle 2 GHz satellite downlinks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutzman, W. L.; Bostian, C. W.; Tsolakis, A.; Pratt, T.

    1984-01-01

    The impact of ice depolarization on the statistical performance of satellite downlinks were investigated. Propagation data recorded during 1979 and 1980 to see what impact of ice depolarization on link performance were analyzed. The effects on the cross polarization discrimination (XPD) statistics amounted to at most a 2 to 4 dB reduction in the XPD values which rain would have produced for a given percentage of time. Ice depolarization had no effect on the statistics of XPD values below the 0.01% level. Most of the severe ice depolarization events were associated with drops in barometric pressure and the passage of intense cold fronts through our area. Ice contents as the product of three individually undetermined quantities were defined: ice particle density, ice cloud thickness, and the average volume of the ice crystals. It is indicated that populations of ice particle with ice contents on the order of 0.002 m4/m3 are probably responsible for the lower values of measured XPD.

  2. Sensor readout detector circuit

    DOEpatents

    Chu, D.D.; Thelen, D.C. Jr.

    1998-08-11

    A sensor readout detector circuit is disclosed that is capable of detecting sensor signals down to a few nanoamperes or less in a high (microampere) background noise level. The circuit operates at a very low standby power level and is triggerable by a sensor event signal that is above a predetermined threshold level. A plurality of sensor readout detector circuits can be formed on a substrate as an integrated circuit (IC). These circuits can operate to process data from an array of sensors in parallel, with only data from active sensors being processed for digitization and analysis. This allows the IC to operate at a low power level with a high data throughput for the active sensors. The circuit may be used with many different types of sensors, including photodetectors, capacitance sensors, chemically-sensitive sensors or combinations thereof to provide a capability for recording transient events or for recording data for a predetermined period of time following an event trigger. The sensor readout detector circuit has applications for portable or satellite-based sensor systems. 6 figs.

  3. High temperature sensor

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1982-01-01

    A high temperature sensor includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1,000 to 2,000 K.). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

  4. Sensor readout detector circuit

    DOEpatents

    Chu, Dahlon D.; Thelen, Jr., Donald C.

    1998-01-01

    A sensor readout detector circuit is disclosed that is capable of detecting sensor signals down to a few nanoamperes or less in a high (microampere) background noise level. The circuit operates at a very low standby power level and is triggerable by a sensor event signal that is above a predetermined threshold level. A plurality of sensor readout detector circuits can be formed on a substrate as an integrated circuit (IC). These circuits can operate to process data from an array of sensors in parallel, with only data from active sensors being processed for digitization and analysis. This allows the IC to operate at a low power level with a high data throughput for the active sensors. The circuit may be used with many different types of sensors, including photodetectors, capacitance sensors, chemically-sensitive sensors or combinations thereof to provide a capability for recording transient events or for recording data for a predetermined period of time following an event trigger. The sensor readout detector circuit has applications for portable or satellite-based sensor systems.

  5. Touch Sensor for Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primus, H. C.

    1986-01-01

    Touch sensor for robot hands provides information about shape of grasped object and force exerted by gripper on object. Pins projecting from sensor create electrical signals when pressed. When grasped object depresses pin, it contacts electrode under it, connecting electrode to common electrode. Sensor indicates where, and how firmly, gripper has touched object.

  6. Sensors for Entertainment

    PubMed Central

    Lamberti, Fabrizio; Sanna, Andrea; Rokne, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Sensors are becoming ubiquitous in all areas of science, technology, and society. In this Special Issue on “Sensors for Entertainment”, developments in progress and the current state of application scenarios for sensors in the field of entertainment is explored. PMID:27428981

  7. Automotive vehicle sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, S.H.; Raptis, A.C.; Moscynski, M.J.

    1995-09-01

    This report is an introduction to the field of automotive vehicle sensors. It contains a prototype data base for companies working in automotive vehicle sensors, as well as a prototype data base for automotive vehicle sensors. A market analysis is also included.

  8. Sensors for Entertainment.

    PubMed

    Lamberti, Fabrizio; Sanna, Andrea; Rokne, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Sensors are becoming ubiquitous in all areas of science, technology, and society. In this Special Issue on "Sensors for Entertainment", developments in progress and the current state of application scenarios for sensors in the field of entertainment is explored. PMID:27428981

  9. Sensor-Failure Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, Kevin J.; Delaat, John C.; Merrill, Walter C.; Oberle, Lawrence G.; Sadler, Gerald G.

    1988-01-01

    Outputs of defective sensors simulated for studies of reliability of control systems. Real-time sensor-failure simulator (SFS) designed and built for use with Advance Detection, Isolation, and Accommodation (ADIA) program. Equipment consists of IBM PC/XT computer and associated analog circuitry. User defines failure scenarios to determine which sensor signals fail and method(s) used to simulate failure.

  10. Sensor system scaling issues

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1996-07-01

    A model for IR sensor performance is used to compare estimates of sensor cost effectiveness. Although data from aircraft sensors indicate a weaker scaling, their agreement is adequate to support the assessment of the benefits of operating up to the maximum altitude of most current UAVs.

  11. Micro sun sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebe, C. C.; Mobasser, S.; Wrigley, C. J.; Bae, Y.; Howard, A.; Schroeder, J.

    2002-01-01

    A new generation of sun sensors is emerging. These sun sensors utilize an imaging detector and the sun sensor determines the sun angles based on an image of fringes or centroids on the detector plane. Typically determines the sun angle in two axes.

  12. Photoelectric sensor with PSD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuan; Dai, Yong-Jiang; Cai, Xi-Ping; Li, Chun-Fei

    1991-12-01

    The photoelectric sensor with the Position Sensitive Detector (PSD) for Rendezvous and Docking (RVD) is described. The principle of measuring relative position and attitude of the target spacecraft by the sensor is given. Measuring the target by the principle, the experiment result is presented. The result indicates that it is practical using PSD as photoelectric sensor for RVD in close range.

  13. Virtual Sensor Test Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Roy

    2011-01-01

    Virtual Sensor Test Instrumentation is based on the concept of smart sensor technology for testing with intelligence needed to perform sell-diagnosis of health, and to participate in a hierarchy of health determination at sensor, process, and system levels. A virtual sensor test instrumentation consists of five elements: (1) a common sensor interface, (2) microprocessor, (3) wireless interface, (4) signal conditioning and ADC/DAC (analog-to-digital conversion/ digital-to-analog conversion), and (5) onboard EEPROM (electrically erasable programmable read-only memory) for metadata storage and executable software to create powerful, scalable, reconfigurable, and reliable embedded and distributed test instruments. In order to maximize the efficient data conversion through the smart sensor node, plug-and-play functionality is required to interface with traditional sensors to enhance their identity and capabilities for data processing and communications. Virtual sensor test instrumentation can be accessible wirelessly via a Network Capable Application Processor (NCAP) or a Smart Transducer Interlace Module (STIM) that may be managed under real-time rule engines for mission-critical applications. The transducer senses the physical quantity being measured and converts it into an electrical signal. The signal is fed to an A/D converter, and is ready for use by the processor to execute functional transformation based on the sensor characteristics stored in a Transducer Electronic Data Sheet (TEDS). Virtual sensor test instrumentation is built upon an open-system architecture with standardized protocol modules/stacks to interface with industry standards and commonly used software. One major benefit for deploying the virtual sensor test instrumentation is the ability, through a plug-and-play common interface, to convert raw sensor data in either analog or digital form, to an IEEE 1451 standard-based smart sensor, which has instructions to program sensors for a wide variety of

  14. Multifuctional integrated sensors (MFISES).

    SciTech Connect

    Homeijer, Brian D.; Roozeboom, Clifton

    2015-10-01

    Many emerging IoT applications require sensing of multiple physical and environmental parameters for: completeness of information, measurement validation, unexpected demands, improved performance. For example, a typical outdoor weather station measures temperature, humidity, barometric pressure, light intensity, rainfall, wind speed and direction. Existing sensor technologies do not directly address the demand for cost, size, and power reduction in multi-paramater sensing applications. Industry sensor manufacturers have developed integrated sensor systems for inertial measurements that combine accelerometers, gyroscopes, and magnetometers, but do not address environmental sensing functionality. In existing research literature, a technology gap exists between the functionality of MEMS sensors and the real world applications of the sensors systems.

  15. Combustion pressure sensor arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Sawamoto, K.; Nagaishi, H.; Takeuchi, K.

    1986-07-29

    A combustion pressure sensor arrangement in an internal combustion engine having a cylinder head, comprising: a plug seating formed in the cylinder head; an annular pressure sensor; an ignition plug screwed into the cylinder head in such a manner that the pressure sensor is clamped between the ignition plug and the plug seating; an ignition plug accommodation hole formed in the cylinder head for accommodating therein the ignition plug; and a guide sleeve joined at one end thereof to the outer periphery of the pressure sensor and fitted in the ignition plug accommodation hole, wherein the one end of the guide sleeve is fitted on the outer periphery of the pressure sensor.

  16. Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Miller, David H.

    2012-04-10

    Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies are provided. In an embodiment, by way of example only, a sensor mount assembly includes a busbar, a main body, a backing surface, and a first finger. The busbar has a first end and a second end. The main body is overmolded onto the busbar. The backing surface extends radially outwardly relative to the main body. The first finger extends axially from the backing surface, and the first finger has a first end, a second end, and a tooth. The first end of the first finger is disposed on the backing surface, and the tooth is formed on the second end of the first finger.

  17. Silicon force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Galambos, Paul C.; Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Nishida, Erik E.; Burnett, Damon J.; Lantz, Jeffrey W.

    2016-07-05

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a sensor for measurement of high forces and/or high load shock rate(s), whereby the sensor utilizes silicon as the sensing element. A plate of Si can have a thinned region formed therein on which can be formed a number of traces operating as a Wheatstone bridge. The brittle Si can be incorporated into a layered structure comprising ductile and/or compliant materials. The sensor can have a washer-like configuration which can be incorporated into a nut and bolt configuration, whereby tightening of the nut and bolt can facilitate application of a compressive preload upon the sensor. Upon application of an impact load on the bolt, the compressive load on the sensor can be reduced (e.g., moves towards zero-load), however the magnitude of the preload can be such that the load on the sensor does not translate to tensile stress being applied to the sensor.

  18. Smart temperature sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Martinez, David R.

    1999-07-01

    This paper discusses the conceptual design of a family of specially-designed temperature surety sensors made with shape-memory alloys (SMA). These sensors are capable of detecting a one time temperature excursion or variance form a predetermined temperature range. The propose designs can also be used to detect a one-time temperature rise and persistence above a certain pre-selected critical temperature. In that respect, these sensors relate to a family of one-time thaw sensors detecting whether or not frozen food items or other frozen products or objects experience a thawing-refreezing process in their journey from point A to point B. The proposed sensor can also detect a one time temperature excursion into non-allowable temperatures for non-frozen food, as well as pharmaceutical or other medical products. The essential design of these smart sensor is a lever arm attached to an SMA wire whose temperature is initially below Austenite start temperature or well into the Martensite region. As a given product experiences an undesirable temperature range which pushes the SMA material into the Austenite region the wire contracts and moves the lever arm outside a display window area and exposes either a red working indicator or a graduated scale calibrated to the range of temperature excursion experienced by the product. The sensor is designed such that if the temperature returns to normal the excursion indication will not disappear, but will permanently shown the amount of excursion above the temperature surety region for that product. Several possible design variations are presented and discussed. The proposed embodiments include a rupture type thaw sensor made with short SMA springs or bellows, SMA foil roll-up type sensors, SMA wire-loaded shutter type thaw sensors, SMA torsion strut-loaded shutter type thaw sensors, multiple shutter SMA wire-loaded thaw sensors, multiple shutter, SMA torsion-rod-loaded thaw sensors, and rupture-Type SMA spring-loaded thaw sensors.

  19. Digital Sensor Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Ken D.; Quinn, Edward L.; Mauck, Jerry L.; Bockhorst, Richard M.

    2015-02-01

    The nuclear industry has been slow to incorporate digital sensor technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns with digital qualification issues. However, the benefits of digital sensor technology for nuclear plant instrumentation are substantial in terms of accuracy and reliability. This paper, which refers to a final report issued in 2013, demonstrates these benefits in direct comparisons of digital and analog sensor applications. Improved accuracy results from the superior operating characteristics of digital sensors. These include improvements in sensor accuracy and drift and other related parameters which reduce total loop uncertainty and thereby increase safety and operating margins. An example instrument loop uncertainty calculation for a pressure sensor application is presented to illustrate these improvements. This is a side-by-side comparison of the instrument loop uncertainty for both an analog and a digital sensor in the same pressure measurement application. Similarly, improved sensor reliability is illustrated with a sample calculation for determining the probability of failure on demand, an industry standard reliability measure. This looks at equivalent analog and digital temperature sensors to draw the comparison. The results confirm substantial reliability improvement with the digital sensor, due in large part to ability to continuously monitor the health of a digital sensor such that problems can be immediately identified and corrected. This greatly reduces the likelihood of a latent failure condition of the sensor at the time of a design basis event. Notwithstanding the benefits of digital sensors, there are certain qualification issues that are inherent with digital technology and these are described in the report. One major qualification impediment for digital sensor implementation is software common cause failure (SCCF).

  20. Compliant Tactile Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres-Jara, Eduardo R.

    2011-01-01

    Tactile sensors are currently being designed to sense interactions with human hands or pen-like interfaces. They are generally embedded in screens, keyboards, mousepads, and pushbuttons. However, they are not well fitted to sense interactions with all kinds of objects. A novel sensor was originally designed to investigate robotics manipulation where not only the contact with an object needs to be detected, but also where the object needs to be held and manipulated. This tactile sensor has been designed with features that allow it to sense a large variety of objects in human environments. The sensor is capable of detecting forces coming from any direction. As a result, this sensor delivers a force vector with three components. In contrast to most of the tactile sensors that are flat, this one sticks out from the surface so that it is likely to come in contact with objects. The sensor conforms to the object with which it interacts. This augments the contact's surface, consequently reducing the stress applied to the object. This feature makes the sensor ideal for grabbing objects and other applications that require compliance with objects. The operational range of the sensor allows it to operate well with objects found in peoples' daily life. The fabrication of this sensor is simple and inexpensive because of its compact mechanical configuration and reduced electronics. These features are convenient for mass production of individual sensors as well as dense arrays. The biologically inspired tactile sensor is sensitive to both normal and lateral forces, providing better feedback to the host robot about the object to be grabbed. It has a high sensitivity, enabling its use in manipulation fingers, which typically have low mechanical impedance in order to be very compliant. The construction of the sensor is simple, using inexpensive technologies like silicon rubber molding and standard stock electronics.

  1. MITRE sensor layer prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, Francis; McGarry, Donald; Zasada, David; Foote, Scott

    2009-05-01

    The MITRE Sensor Layer Prototype is an initial design effort to enable every sensor to help create new capabilities through collaborative data sharing. By making both upstream (raw) and downstream (processed) sensor data visible, users can access the specific level, type, and quantities of data needed to create new data products that were never anticipated by the original designers of the individual sensors. The major characteristic that sets sensor data services apart from typical enterprise services is the volume (on the order of multiple terabytes) of raw data that can be generated by most sensors. Traditional tightly coupled processing approaches extract pre-determined information from the incoming raw sensor data, format it, and send it to predetermined users. The community is rapidly reaching the conclusion that tightly coupled sensor processing loses too much potentially critical information.1 Hence upstream (raw and partially processed) data must be extracted, rapidly archived, and advertised to the enterprise for unanticipated uses. The authors believe layered sensing net-centric integration can be achieved through a standardize-encapsulate-syndicateaggregate- manipulate-process paradigm. The Sensor Layer Prototype's technical approach focuses on implementing this proof of concept framework to make sensor data visible, accessible and useful to the enterprise. To achieve this, a "raw" data tap between physical transducers associated with sensor arrays and the embedded sensor signal processing hardware and software has been exploited. Second, we encapsulate and expose both raw and partially processed data to the enterprise within the context of a service-oriented architecture. Third, we advertise the presence of multiple types, and multiple layers of data through geographic-enabled Really Simple Syndication (GeoRSS) services. These GeoRSS feeds are aggregated, manipulated, and filtered by a feed aggregator. After filtering these feeds to bring just the type

  2. Cloud cover sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laue, E. G. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An apparatus is described which provides a numerical indication of the cloudiness at a particular time of a day. The apparatus includes a frame holding several light sensors such as photovoltaic cells, with a direct sensor mounted to directly face the Sun and indirect sensors mounted to face different portions of the sky not containing the Sun. A light shield shields the direct sensor from most of the sky except a small portion containing the Sun, and also shields each of the indirect sensors from direct sunlight. The relative values of the outputs from the direct and indirect sensors, enables the generation of a numerical indication of the degree of cloudiness at a particular time of day.

  3. Intelligent Sensors Security

    PubMed Central

    Bialas, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    The paper is focused on the security issues of sensors provided with processors and software and used for high-risk applications. Common IT related threats may cause serious consequences for sensor system users. To improve their robustness, sensor systems should be developed in a restricted way that would provide them with assurance. One assurance creation methodology is Common Criteria (ISO/IEC 15408) used for IT products and systems. The paper begins with a primer on the Common Criteria, and then a general security model of the intelligent sensor as an IT product is discussed. The paper presents how the security problem of the intelligent sensor is defined and solved. The contribution of the paper is to provide Common Criteria (CC) related security design patterns and to improve the effectiveness of the sensor development process. PMID:22315571

  4. Capacitive chemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P; Moorman, Matthew W; Wheeler, David R

    2014-05-27

    A microfabricated capacitive chemical sensor can be used as an autonomous chemical sensor or as an analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator in a larger microanalytical system. The capacitive chemical sensor detects changes in sensing film dielectric properties, such as the dielectric constant, conductivity, or dimensionality. These changes result from the interaction of a target analyte with the sensing film. This capability provides a low-power, self-heating chemical sensor suitable for remote and unattended sensing applications. The capacitive chemical sensor also enables a smart, analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator. After sorption of the sample by the sensing film, the film can be rapidly heated to release the sample for further analysis. Therefore, the capacitive chemical sensor can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

  5. Clementine sensor suite

    SciTech Connect

    Ledebuhr, A.G.

    1994-11-15

    LLNL designed and built the suite of six miniaturized light-weight space-qualified sensors utilized in the Clementine mission. A major goal of the Clementine program was to demonstrate technologies originally developed for Ballistic Missile Defense Organization Programs. These sensors were modified to gather data from the moon. This overview presents each of these sensors and some preliminary on-orbit performance estimates. The basic subsystems of these sensors include optical baffles to reject off-axis stray light, light-weight ruggedized optical systems, filter wheel assemblies, radiation tolerant focal plane arrays, radiation hardened control and readout electronics and low mass and power mechanical cryogenic coolers for the infrared sensors. Descriptions of each sensor type are given along with design specifications, photographs and on-orbit data collected.

  6. Magnetic current sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, Jr., William C. (Inventor); Hermann, Theodore M. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A current determiner having an output at which representations of input currents are provided having an input conductor for the input current and a current sensor supported on a substrate electrically isolated from one another but with the sensor positioned in the magnetic fields arising about the input conductor due to any input currents. The sensor extends along the substrate in a direction primarily perpendicular to the extent of the input conductor and is formed of at least a pair of thin-film ferromagnetic layers separated by a non-magnetic conductive layer. The sensor can be electrically connected to a electronic circuitry formed in the substrate including a nonlinearity adaptation circuit to provide representations of the input currents of increased accuracy despite nonlinearities in the current sensor, and can include further current sensors in bridge circuits.

  7. Liquid level sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Atul; Karekar, R.N.; Aiyer, R.C.

    2005-10-15

    The article reports an idea of using a simple, cantilever-type load cell with a rod as a level sensor for continuous liquid level measurements. The sensor is based on the principle of the Archimedes buoyancy principle. The density and geometry of the rod govern the choice of the load cell. The length of the rod is governed by the height of the tank. A series of cyclic tests have demonstrated a highly repeatable response of the sensor. The accuracy of this low-cost sensor is field tested and found to be {+-}0.5% of the full range, for a 10 m level of water in a tank, and is working reliably for the period of 18 months. The sensor range can be easily extended to lower and higher tank heights. The sensor is crowned by its easy installation and calibration.

  8. Working Group Report: Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Artuso, M.; et al.,

    2013-10-18

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  9. Bioinspired sensor systems.

    PubMed

    Del Valle, Manel

    2011-01-01

    This editorial summarizes and classifies the contributions presented by different authors to the special issue of the journal Sensors dedicated to Bioinspired Sensor Systems. From the coupling of sensor arrays or networks, plus computer processing abilities, new applications to mimic or to complement human senses are arising in the context of ambient intelligence. Principles used, and illustrative study cases have been presented permitting readers to grasp the current status of the field. PMID:22346637

  10. Rolamite acceleration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Joseph P.; Briner, Clifton F.; Martin, Samuel B.

    1993-01-01

    A rolamite acceleration sensor which has a failsafe feature including a housing, a pair of rollers, a tension band wrapped in an S shaped fashion around the rollers, wherein the band has a force-generation cut out and a failsafe cut out or weak portion. The failsafe cut out or weak portion breaks when the sensor is subjected to an excessive acceleration so that the sensor fails in an open circuit (non-conducting) state permanently.

  11. Rolamite acceleration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P.; Briner, C.F.; Martin, S.B.

    1993-12-21

    A rolamite acceleration sensor is described which has a failsafe feature including a housing, a pair of rollers, a tension band wrapped in an S shaped fashion around the rollers, wherein the band has a force-generation cut out and a failsafe cut out or weak portion. The failsafe cut out or weak portion breaks when the sensor is subjected to an excessive acceleration so that the sensor fails in an open circuit (non-conducting) state permanently. 6 figures.

  12. Video guidance sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard

    1991-01-01

    A Martin-Marietta study comparing the application of laser, video, or RF sensors was conducted in 1982. The study concluded that video was the most attractive sensor (the video also could be used for operator monitoring). The Retro-Reflector field Tracker from the Solar Array Flight Experiment was chosen as a 'first generation' sensor and integrated with guidance algorithms for evaluation on the air-bearing vehicle. Results indicated that this sensor was not applicable for the noise environment posed by the multi-layer insulation used on most spacecraft. A 'second generation' sensor was developed to be used with a modified RMS target. This sensor utilized two sets of laser diodes to acquire three optically filtered targets. The targets were illuminated first with a 780 nanometer diode, followed by illumination with a 830 nm diode. The second digitized picture was subtracted from the first to get a low-noise image. The centroids of the retroreflectors were used then to uniquely derive target attitude and range. The sensor presently operates to 80 feet and within +/- 40 degrees in pitch and yaw. Sensor operability is a concern if the sun is within a +/- 40 degree cone angle to the target. The present sensor performance characteristics are less than 1 percent range error and less than 1 degree angle error. Future sensor development is anticipated to extend the operating range to 150 feet and reduce the cone angle of sensor inoperability to within +/- 10 degrees of direct sunlight. Performance improvements also are anticipated. TRW currently is developing a system that utilizes dual cameras with simultaneous diode illumination. Although further development is being pursued, the basic system has proven sound, and the sensor is essentially ready for application.

  13. High-temperature sensor

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1981-01-29

    A high temperature sensor is described which includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1000 to 2000/sup 0/K). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

  14. Beam imaging sensor

    DOEpatents

    McAninch, Michael D.; Root, Jeffrey J.

    2016-07-05

    The present invention relates generally to the field of sensors for beam imaging and, in particular, to a new and useful beam imaging sensor for use in determining, for example, the power density distribution of a beam including, but not limited to, an electron beam or an ion beam. In one embodiment, the beam imaging sensor of the present invention comprises, among other items, a circumferential slit that is either circular, elliptical or polygonal in nature.

  15. Networked Sensor Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    R. J. Tighe

    2002-10-01

    A set of independent radiation sensors, coupled with real-time data telemetry, offers the opportunity to run correlation algorithms for the sensor array as well as to incorporate non-radiological data into the system. This may enhance the overall sensitivity of the sensors and provide an opportunity to project the location of a source within the array. In collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), we have conducted field experiments to test a prototype system. Combining the outputs of a set of distributed sensors permits the correlation that the independent sensor outputs. Combined with additional information such as traffic patterns and velocities, this can reduce random/false detections and enhance detection capability. The principle components of such a system include: (1) A set of radiation sensors. These may be of varying type and complexity, including gamma and/or neutron detectors, gross count and spectral-capable sensors, and low to high energy-resolution sensors. (2) A set of non-radiation sensors. These may include sensors such as vehicle presence and imaging sensors. (3) A communications architecture for near real-time telemetry. Depending upon existing infrastructure and bandwidth requirements, this may be a radio or hard-wire based system. (4) A central command console to pole the sensors, correlate their output, and display the data in a meaningful form to the system operator. Both sensitivity and selectivity are important considerations when evaluating the performance of a detection system. Depending on the application, the optimization of sensitivity as well as the rejection of ''nuisance'' radioactive sources may or may not be critical.

  16. Beam imaging sensor

    SciTech Connect

    McAninch, Michael D; Root, Jeffrey J

    2015-03-31

    The present invention relates generally to the field of sensors for beam imaging and, in particular, to a new and useful beam imaging sensor for use in determining, for example, the power density distribution of a beam including, but not limited to, an electron beam or an ion beam. In one embodiment, the beam imaging sensor of the present invention comprises, among other items, a circumferential slit that is either circular, elliptical or polygonal in nature.

  17. Contact stress sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kotovsky, Jack

    2014-02-11

    A method for producing a contact stress sensor that includes one or more MEMS fabricated sensor elements, where each sensor element of includes a thin non-recessed portion, a recessed portion and a pressure sensitive element adjacent to the recessed portion. An electric circuit is connected to the pressure sensitive element. The circuit includes a pressure signal circuit element configured to provide a signal upon movement of the pressure sensitive element.

  18. Contact stress sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kotovsky, Jack

    2012-02-07

    A contact stress sensor includes one or more MEMS fabricated sensor elements, where each sensor element of includes a thin non-recessed portion, a recessed portion and a pressure sensitive element adjacent to the recessed portion. An electric circuit is connected to the pressure sensitive element. The circuit includes a thermal compensator and a pressure signal circuit element configured to provide a signal upon movement of the pressure sensitive element.

  19. Bioinspired Sensor Systems

    PubMed Central

    del Valle, Manel

    2011-01-01

    This editorial summarizes and classifies the contributions presented by different authors to the special issue of the journal Sensors dedicated to Bioinspired Sensor Systems. From the coupling of sensor arrays or networks, plus computer processing abilities, new applications to mimic or to complement human senses are arising in the context of ambient intelligence. Principles used, and illustrative study cases have been presented permitting readers to grasp the current status of the field. PMID:22346637

  20. Air Conditioning Overflow Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Technology Transfer Office at Stennis Space Center helped a local inventor develop a prototype of an attachment for central air conditioners and heat pumps that helps monitor water levels to prevent condensation overflow. The sensor will indicate a need for drain line maintenance and prevent possible damage caused by drain pan water spillover. An engineer in the Stennis Space Center prototype Development Laboratory used SSC sensor technology in the development of the sensor.

  1. Remote electrochemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Joseph; Olsen, Khris; Larson, David

    1997-01-01

    An electrochemical sensor for remote detection, particularly useful for metal contaminants and organic or other compounds. The sensor circumvents technical difficulties that previously prevented in-situ remote operations. The microelectrode, connected to a long communications cable, allows convenient measurements of the element or compound at timed and frequent intervals and instrument/sample distances of ten feet to more than 100 feet. The sensor is useful for both downhole groundwater monitoring and in-situ water (e.g., shipboard seawater) analysis.

  2. Ion mobility sensor

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jackson C.; Yu, Conrad M.

    2005-08-23

    An ion mobility sensor which can detect both ion and molecules simultaneously. Thus, one can measure the relative arrival times between various ions and molecules. Different ions have different mobility in air, and the ion sensor enables measurement of ion mobility, from which one can identify the various ions and molecules. The ion mobility sensor which utilizes a pair of glow discharge devices may be designed for coupling with an existing gas chromatograph, where various gas molecules are already separated, but numbers of each kind of molecules are relatively small, and in such cases a conventional ion mobility sensor cannot be utilized.

  3. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Homuth, E.F.

    1991-03-19

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor is described in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figures.

  4. Microfabricated Formaldehyde Gas Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Flueckiger, Jonas; Ko, Frank K.; Cheung, Karen C.

    2009-01-01

    Formaldehyde is a volatile organic compound that is widely used in textiles, paper, wood composites, and household materials. Formaldehyde will continuously outgas from manufactured wood products such as furniture, with adverse health effects resulting from prolonged low-level exposure. New, microfabricated sensors for formaldehyde have been developed to meet the need for portable, low-power gas detection. This paper reviews recent work including silicon microhotplates for metal oxide-based detection, enzyme-based electrochemical sensors, and nanowire-based sensors. This paper also investigates the promise of polymer-based sensors for low-temperature, low-power operation. PMID:22291561

  5. Multi-sensor electrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gompf, Raymond (Inventor); Buehler, Martin C. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An array of triboelectric sensors is used for testing the electrostatic properties of a remote environment. The sensors may be mounted in the heel of a robot arm scoop. To determine the triboelectric properties of a planet surface, the robot arm scoop may be rubbed on the soil of the planet and the triboelectrically developed charge measured. By having an array of sensors, different insulating materials may be measured simultaneously. The insulating materials may be selected so their triboelectric properties cover a desired range. By mounting the sensor on a robot arm scoop, the measurements can be obtained during an unmanned mission.

  6. Smart Sensor Demonstration Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmalzel, John; Bracey, Andrew; Rawls, Stephen; Morris, Jon; Turowski, Mark; Franzl, Richard; Figueroa, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Sensors are a critical element to any monitoring, control, and evaluation processes such as those needed to support ground based testing for rocket engine test. Sensor applications involve tens to thousands of sensors; their reliable performance is critical to achieving overall system goals. Many figures of merit are used to describe and evaluate sensor characteristics; for example, sensitivity and linearity. In addition, sensor selection must satisfy many trade-offs among system engineering (SE) requirements to best integrate sensors into complex systems [1]. These SE trades include the familiar constraints of power, signal conditioning, cabling, reliability, and mass, and now include considerations such as spectrum allocation and interference for wireless sensors. Our group at NASA s John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC) works in the broad area of integrated systems health management (ISHM). Core ISHM technologies include smart and intelligent sensors, anomaly detection, root cause analysis, prognosis, and interfaces to operators and other system elements [2]. Sensor technologies are the base fabric that feed data and health information to higher layers. Cost-effective operation of the complement of test stands benefits from technologies and methodologies that contribute to reductions in labor costs, improvements in efficiency, reductions in turn-around times, improved reliability, and other measures. ISHM is an active area of development at SSC because it offers the potential to achieve many of those operational goals [3-5].

  7. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawatari, Takeo (Inventor); Gaubis, Philip A. (Inventor); Mattes, Brenton L. (Inventor); Charnetski, Clark J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A fiber optic temperature sensor uses a light source which transmits light through an optical fiber to a sensor head at the opposite end of the optical fiber from the light source. The sensor head has a housing coupled to the end of the optical fiber. A metallic reflective surface is coupled to the housing adjacent the end of the optical fiber to form a gap having a predetermined length between the reflective surface and the optical fiber. A detection system is also coupled to the optical fiber which determines the temperature at the sensor head from an interference pattern of light which is reflected from the reflective surface.

  8. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawatari, Takeo (Inventor); Gaubis, Philip A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A fiber optic temperature sensor uses a light source which transmits light through an optical fiber to a sensor head at the opposite end of the optical fiber from the light source. The sensor head has a housing coupled to the end of the optical fiber. A metallic reflective surface is coupled to the housing adjacent the end of the optical fiber to form a gap having a predetermined length between the reflective surface and the optical fiber. A detection system is also coupled to the optical fiber which determines the temperature at the sensor head from an interference pattern of light which is reflected from the reflective surface.

  9. Smart and Intelligent Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansaw, John; Schmalzel, John; Figueroa, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC) provides rocket engine propulsion testing for NASA's space programs. Since the development of the Space Shuttle, every Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) has undergone acceptance testing at SSC before going to Kennedy Space Center (KSC) for integration into the Space Shuttle. The SSME is a large cryogenic rocket engine that uses Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) as the fuel. As NASA moves to the new ARES V launch system, the main engines on the new vehicle, as well as the upper stage engine, are currently base lined to be cryogenic rocket engines that will also use LH2. The main rocket engines for the ARES V will be larger than the SSME, while the upper stage engine will be approximately half that size. As a result, significant quantities of hydrogen will be required during the development, testing, and operation of these rocket engines.Better approaches are needed to simplify sensor integration and help reduce life-cycle costs. 1.Smarter sensors. Sensor integration should be a matter of "plug-and-play" making sensors easier to add to a system. Sensors that implement new standards can help address this problem; for example, IEEE STD 1451.4 defines transducer electronic data sheet (TEDS) templates for commonly used sensors such as bridge elements and thermocouples. When a 1451.4 compliant smart sensor is connected to a system that can read the TEDS memory, all information needed to configure the data acquisition system can be uploaded. This reduces the amount of labor required and helps minimize configuration errors. 2.Intelligent sensors. Data received from a sensor be scaled, linearized; and converted to engineering units. Methods to reduce sensor processing overhead at the application node are needed. Smart sensors using low-cost microprocessors with integral data acquisition and communication support offer the means to add these capabilities. Once a processor is embedded, other features can be added; for example, intelligent sensors can make

  10. Improved Capacitive Liquid Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldman, Francis A.

    1992-01-01

    Improved capacitive sensor used to detect presence and/or measure thickness of layer of liquid. Electrical impedance or admittance of sensor measured at prescribed frequency, and thickness of liquid inferred from predetermined theoretical or experimental relationship between impedance and thickness. Sensor is basically a three-terminal device. Features interdigitated driving and sensing electrodes and peripheral coplanar ground electrode that reduces parasitic effects. Patent-pending because first to utilize ground plane as "shunting" electrode. System less expensive than infrared, microwave, or refractive-index systems. Sensor successfully evaluated in commercial production plants to characterize emulsions, slurries, and solutions.

  11. Panoramic attitude sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meek, I. C.

    1976-01-01

    Each subassembly, design analysis, and final calibration data on all assemblies for the Panormic Attitude Sensor (PAS) are described. The PAS is used for course attitude determination on the International Ultraviolet Explorer Spacecraft (IUE). The PAS contains a sun sensor which is sensitive only to the sun's radiation and a mechanically scanned sensor which is sensitive to the earth, moon, and the sun. The signals from these two sensors are encoded and sent back in the telemetry data stream to determine the spacecraft attitude.

  12. Semantic Sensor Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, A.; Henson, C.; Thirunarayan, K.

    2008-12-01

    Sensors are distributed across the globe leading to an avalanche of data about our environment. It is possible today to utilize networks of sensors to detect and identify a multitude of observations, from simple phenomena to complex events and situations. The lack of integration and communication between these networks, however, often isolates important data streams and intensifies the existing problem of too much data and not enough knowledge. With a view to addressing this problem, the Semantic Sensor Web (SSW) [1] proposes that sensor data be annotated with semantic metadata that will both increase interoperability and provide contextual information essential for situational knowledge. Kno.e.sis Center's approach to SSW is an evolutionary one. It adds semantic annotations to the existing standard sensor languages of the Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) defined by OGC. These annotations enhance primarily syntactic XML-based descriptions in OGC's SWE languages with microformats, and W3C's Semantic Web languages- RDF and OWL. In association with semantic annotation and semantic web capabilities including ontologies and rules, SSW supports interoperability, analysis and reasoning over heterogeneous multi-modal sensor data. In this presentation, we will also demonstrate a mashup with support for complex spatio-temporal-thematic queries [2] and semantic analysis that utilize semantic annotations, multiple ontologies and rules. It uses existing services (e.g., GoogleMap) and semantics enhanced SWE's Sensor Observation Service (SOS) over weather and road condition data from various sensors that are part of Ohio's transportation network. Our upcoming plans are to demonstrate end to end (heterogeneous sensor to application) semantics support and study scalability of SSW involving thousands of sensors to about a billion triples. Keywords: Semantic Sensor Web, Spatiotemporal thematic queries, Semantic Web Enablement, Sensor Observation Service [1] Amit Sheth, Cory Henson, Satya

  13. A low power on-chip class-E power amplifier for remotely powered implantable sensor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ture, Kerim; Kilinc, Enver G.; Dehollain, Catherine

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a low power fully integrated class-E power amplifier and its integration with remotely powered sensor system. The class-E power amplifier is suitable solution for low-power applications due to its high power efficiency. However, the required high inductance values which make the on-chip integration of the power amplifier difficult. The designed power amplifier is fully integrated in the remotely powered sensor system and fabricated in 0.18 μm CMOS process. The power is transferred to the implantable sensor system at 13.56 MHz by using an inductively coupled remote powering link. The induced AC voltage on the implant coil is converted into a DC voltage by a passive full-wave rectifier. A voltage regulator is used to suppress the ripples and create a clean and stable 1.8 V supply voltage for the sensor and communication blocks. The data collected from the sensors is transmitted by on-off keying modulated low-power transmitter at 1.2 GHz frequency. The transmitter is composed of a LC tank oscillator and a fully on-chip class-E power amplifier. An additional output network is used for the power amplifier which makes the integration of the power amplifier fully on-chip. The integrated power amplifier with 0.2 V supply voltage has a drain efficiency of 31.5% at -10 dBm output power for 50 Ω load. The measurement results verify the functionality of the power amplifier and the remotely powered implantable sensor system. The data communication is also verified by using a commercial 50 Ω chip antenna and has 600 kbps data rate at 1 m communication distance.

  14. Attitude Sensor Pseudonoise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashmall, Joseph A.; Lennox, Scott E.

    2005-01-01

    Even assuming perfect attitude sensors and gyros, sensor measurements on a vibrating spacecraft have apparent errors. These apparent sensor errors, referred to as pseudonoise, arise because gyro and sensor measurements are performed at discrete times. This paper explains the concept of pseudonoise, quantifies its behavior, and discusses the effect of vibrations that are nearly commensurate with measurement periods. Although pseudonoise does not usually affect attitude determination it does affect sensor performance evaluation. Attitude rates are usually computed from differences between pairs of accumulated angle measurements at different times and are considered constant in the periods between measurements. Propagation using these rates does not reproduce exact instantaneous spacecraft attitudes except at the gyro measurement times. Exact sensor measurements will therefore be inconsistent with estimates based on the propagated attitude. This inconsistency produces pseudonoise. The characteristics of pseudonoise were determined using a simple, one-dimensional model of spacecraft vibration. The statistical properties of the deviations of measurements from model truth were determined using this model and a range of different periods of sensor and rate measurements. This analysis indicates that the magnitude of pseudonoise depends on the ratio of the spacecraft vibration period to the time between gyro measurements and can be as much as twice the amplitude of the vibration. In cases where the vibration period and gyro or sensor measurement period are nearly commensurate, unexpected changes in pseudonoise occur.

  15. Sensors Workshop summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A review of the efforts of three workshops is presented. The presentation describes those technological developments that would contribute most to sensor subsystem optimization and improvement of NASA's data acquisition capabilities, and summarizes the recommendations of the sensor technology panels from the most recent workshops.

  16. Wearable Optical Chemical Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobnik, Aleksandra

    Wearable sensors can be used to provide valuable information about the wearer's health and/or monitor the wearer's surroundings, identify safety concerns and detect threats, during the wearer's daily routine within his or her natural environment. The "sensor on a textile", an integrated sensor capable of analyzing data, would enable early many forms of detection. Moreover, a sensor connected with a smart delivery system could simultaneously provide comfort and monitoring (for safety and/or health), non-invasive measurements, no laboratory sampling, continuous monitoring during the daily activity of the person, and possible multi-parameter analysis and monitoring. However, in order for the technology to be accessible, it must remain innocuous and impose a minimal intrusion on the daily activities of the wearer. Therefore, such wearable technologies should be soft, flexible, and washable in order to meet the expectations of normal clothing. Optical chemical sensors (OCSs) could be used as wearable technology since they can be embedded into textile structures by using conventional dyeing, printing processes and coatings, while fiber-optic chemical sensors (FOCSs) as well as nanofiber sensors (NFSs) can be incorporated by weaving, knitting or laminating. The interest in small, robust and sensitive sensors that can be embedded into textile structures is increasing and the research activity on this topic is an important issue.

  17. Dragonfly directional sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geary, Joe; Blackwell, Lisa; Edwards, Tim; Dargie, Mike

    2013-02-01

    This paper discusses the concept and hardware development of an all fiber-based, solid state, coherent array directional sensor that can locate and track bright objects against a darker background. This sensor is not an imager. It relies on the inherent structure of the global fiber distribution. Methods for characterizing and calibrating hardware embodiments are also presented.

  18. Wireless Sensors Network (Sensornet)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perotti, J.

    2003-01-01

    The Wireless Sensor Network System presented in this paper provides a flexible reconfigurable architecture that could be used in a broad range of applications. It also provides a sensor network with increased reliability; decreased maintainability costs, and assured data availability by autonomously and automatically reconfiguring to overcome communication interferences.

  19. Advancing Sensor Web Interoperability

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar, Mallikarjun; Gorman, Bryan L.; Smith, Cyrus M.

    2005-01-01

    SensorNet is a framework being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to tie together sensor data from all over the country to create a real-time detection and alert system for various threats, whether they are chemical, radiological, biological, nuclear, or explosive.

  20. Air Sensor Guidebook

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Air Sensor Guidebook has been developed by the U.S. EPA to assist those interested in potentially using lower cost air quality sensor technologies for air quality measurements. Its development was in direct response to a request for such a document following a recent scienti...

  1. Steerable Capacitive Proximity Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenstrom, Del T.; Mcconnell, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    Steerable capacitive proximity sensor of "capaciflector" type based partly on sensing units described in GSC-13377 and GSC-13475. Position of maximum sensitivity adjusted without moving sensor. Voltage of each driven shield adjusted separately to concentrate sensing electric field more toward one side or other.

  2. New Sensor Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Covault, Craig

    2005-01-01

    The three instruments on the Orbiter Boom Sensor System (OBSS) will use a mix of U.S. and Canadian developed laser, television, infrared, and 3D imaging technologies. The sensors are the: 1) Laser Dynamic Range Imager (LDRI); 2) Intensified Television Camera (ITVC); 3) Laser Camera System (LCS).

  3. Fiber optic gas sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Peng (Inventor); Buric, Michael P. (Inventor); Swinehart, Philip R. (Inventor); Maklad, Mokhtar S. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A gas sensor includes an in-fiber resonant wavelength device provided in a fiber core at a first location. The fiber propagates a sensing light and a power light. A layer of a material is attached to the fiber at the first location. The material is able to absorb the gas at a temperature dependent gas absorption rate. The power light is used to heat the material and increases the gas absorption rate, thereby increasing sensor performance, especially at low temperatures. Further, a method is described of flash heating the gas sensor to absorb more of the gas, allowing the sensor to cool, thereby locking in the gas content of the sensor material, and taking the difference between the starting and ending resonant wavelengths as an indication of the concentration of the gas in the ambient atmosphere.

  4. Analytical sensor redundancy assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulcare, D. B.; Downing, L. E.; Smith, M. K.

    1988-01-01

    The rationale and mechanization of sensor fault tolerance based on analytical redundancy principles are described. The concept involves the substitution of software procedures, such as an observer algorithm, to supplant additional hardware components. The observer synthesizes values of sensor states in lieu of their direct measurement. Such information can then be used, for example, to determine which of two disagreeing sensors is more correct, thus enhancing sensor fault survivability. Here a stability augmentation system is used as an example application, with required modifications being made to a quadruplex digital flight control system. The impact on software structure and the resultant revalidation effort are illustrated as well. Also, the use of an observer algorithm for wind gust filtering of the angle-of-attack sensor signal is presented.

  5. Integrated IR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tom, Michael; Trujillo, Edward

    1994-06-01

    Integrated infrared (IR) sensors which exploit modular avionics concepts can provide features such as operational flexibility, enhanced stealthiness, and ease of maintenance to meet the demands of tactical, airborne sensor systems. On-board, tactical airborne sensor systems perform target acquisition, tracking, identification, threat warning, missile launch detection, and ground mapping in support of situation awareness, self-defense, navigation, target attack, weapon support, and reconnaissance activities. The use of sensor suites for future tactical aircraft such as US Air Force's multirole fighter require a blend of sensor inputs and outputs that may vary over time. It is expected that special-role units of these tactical aircraft will be formed to conduct tasks and missions such as anti-shipping, reconnaissance, or suppression of enemy air defenses.

  6. Pressure Measurement Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    FFPI Industries Inc. is the manufacturer of fiber-optic sensors that furnish accurate pressure measurements in internal combustion chambers. Such an assessment can help reduce pollution emitted by these engines. A chief component in the sensor owes its seven year- long development to Lewis Research Center funding to embed optical fibers and sensors in metal parts. NASA support to Texas A&M University played a critical role in developing this fiber optic technology and led to the formation of FFPI Industries and the production of fiber sensor products. The simple, rugged design of the sensor offers the potential for mass production at low cost. Widespread application of the new technology is forseen, from natural gas transmission, oil refining and electrical power generation to rail transport and the petrochemical paper product industry.

  7. Cryogenic High Pressure Sensor Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  8. Nanowire sensor, sensor array, and method for making the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, Minhee (Inventor); Myung, Nosang (Inventor); Vasquez, Richard (Inventor); Homer, Margie (Inventor); Ryan, Margaret (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Pin (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor); Bugga, Ratnakumar (Inventor); Choi, Daniel (Inventor); Goddard, William (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to a nanowire sensor and method for forming the same. More specifically, the nanowire sensor comprises at least one nanowire formed on a substrate, with a sensor receptor disposed on a surface of the nanowire, thereby forming a receptor-coated nanowire. The nanowire sensor can be arranged as a sensor sub-unit comprising a plurality of homogeneously receptor-coated nanowires. A plurality of sensor subunits can be formed to collectively comprise a nanowire sensor array. Each sensor subunit in the nanowire sensor array can be formed to sense a different stimulus, allowing a user to sense a plurality of stimuli. Additionally, each sensor subunit can be formed to sense the same stimuli through different aspects of the stimulus. The sensor array is fabricated through a variety of techniques, such as by creating nanopores on a substrate and electrodepositing nanowires within the nanopores.

  9. Chemochromic Hydrogen Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiggins, Bryan C.

    2007-01-01

    As fossil fuel supplies decline, hydrogen is quickly becoming an increasingly important fuel source. Currently hydrogen is the prime fuel of today's space vehicles (e.g., Space Shuttle) and featured as a fuel for some prototype vehicles such as the BMW seven series model. Hydrogen is a colorless, odorless gas with a 4% lower explosive limit which makes leak detection a priority. In an effort to support the use of hydrogen, a chemochromic (color changing) sensor was developed that is robust, simple to use, and does not require active operation. It can be made into a thin tape which can be conveniently used for leak detection at flanges, valves, or outlets. Chemochromic sensors can be either reversible or irreversible; however, irreversible chemochromic sensors will be analyzed in this report. The irreversible sensor is useful during hazardous operations when personnel cannot be present. To actively monitor leaks, testing of the irreversible sensor against environmental effects was completed and results indicated this material is suitable for outdoor use in the harsh beachside environment of Kennedy Space Center. The experiments in this report will give additional results to the environmental testing by adding solid rocket booster residue as a variable. The primary motivation for these experiments is to prepare the sensors for the launch pad environment at the Kennedy Space Center. In an effort to simulate the atmosphere at the pads before and after launch, the chemochromic sensors are exposed to solid rocket residue under various conditions.

  10. RF current sensor

    DOEpatents

    Moore, James A.; Sparks, Dennis O.

    1998-11-10

    An RF sensor having a novel current sensing probe and a voltage sensing probe to measure voltage and current. The current sensor is disposed in a transmission line to link all of the flux generated by the flowing current in order to obtain an accurate measurement. The voltage sensor is a flat plate which operates as a capacitive plate to sense voltage on a center conductor of the transmission line, in which the measured voltage is obtained across a resistance leg of a R-C differentiator circuit formed by the characteristic impedance of a connecting transmission line and a capacitance of the plate, which is positioned proximal to the center conductor.

  11. Future Imaging Sensor Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carver, K. R.; Ando, K. J.

    1983-01-01

    Advanced imaging sensor technologies that are being developed for future NASA earth observation missions are discussed. These include the multilinear array, the Shuttle imaging spectrometer, and the Shuttle imaging radar. The principal specifications and functional descriptions of the instruments are presented, and it is shown that the advanced technologies will enable a synergistic approach to the use of VIS/IR and microwave imaging sensors for remote sensing research and applications. The key problems posed by these future imaging sensor technologies are discussed, with particular attention given to data rates, power consumption, and data processing.

  12. Urodynamic pressure sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    A transducer system was developed for measuring the closing pressure profile along the female urethra, which provides up to five sensors within the functional length of the urethra. This new development is an improvement over an earlier measurement method that has a smaller sensor area and was unable to respond to transient events. Three sensors were constructed; one of them was subjected to approximately eight hours of use in a clinical setting during which 576 data points were obtained. The complete instrument system, including the signal conditioning electronics, data acquisition unit, and the computer with its display and printer is described and illustrated.

  13. RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS SENSORS

    SciTech Connect

    Mayo, Robert M.; Stephens, Daniel L.

    2009-09-15

    Providing technical means to detect, prevent, and reverse the threat of potential illicit use of radiological or nuclear materials is among the greatest challenges facing contemporary science and technology. In this short article, we provide brief description and overview of the state-of-the-art in sensor development for the detection of radioactive materials, as well as an identification of the technical needs and challenges faced by the detection community. We begin with a discussion of gamma-ray and neutron detectors and spectrometers, followed by a description of imaging sensors, active interrogation, and materials development, before closing with a brief discussion of the unique challenges posed in fielding sensor systems.

  14. Stellar figure sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, W. N.

    1973-01-01

    A compilation of analytical and experimental data is presented concerning the stellar figure sensor. The sensor is an interferometric device which is located in the focal plane of an orbiting large space telescope (LST). The device was designed to perform interferometry on the optical wavefront of a single star after it has propagated through the LST. An analytical model of the device was developed and its accuracy was verified by an operating laboratory breadboard. A series of linear independent control equations were derived which define the operations required for utilizing a focal plane figure sensor in the control loop for the secondary mirror position and for active control of the primary mirror.

  15. Photonic hydrogel sensors.

    PubMed

    Yetisen, Ali K; Butt, Haider; Volpatti, Lisa R; Pavlichenko, Ida; Humar, Matjaž; Kwok, Sheldon J J; Koo, Heebeom; Kim, Ki Su; Naydenova, Izabela; Khademhosseini, Ali; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Analyte-sensitive hydrogels that incorporate optical structures have emerged as sensing platforms for point-of-care diagnostics. The optical properties of the hydrogel sensors can be rationally designed and fabricated through self-assembly, microfabrication or laser writing. The advantages of photonic hydrogel sensors over conventional assay formats include label-free, quantitative, reusable, and continuous measurement capability that can be integrated with equipment-free text or image display. This Review explains the operation principles of photonic hydrogel sensors, presents syntheses of stimuli-responsive polymers, and provides an overview of qualitative and quantitative readout technologies. Applications in clinical samples are discussed, and potential future directions are identified. PMID:26485407

  16. Electrochemical micro sensor

    DOEpatents

    Setter, Joseph R.; Maclay, G. Jordan

    1989-09-12

    A micro-amperometric electrochemical sensor for detecting the presence of a pre-determined species in a fluid material is disclosed. The sensor includes a smooth substrate having a thin coating of solid electrolytic material deposited thereon. The working and counter electrodes are deposited on the surface of the solid electrolytic material and adhere thereto. Electrical leads connect the working and counter electrodes to a potential source and an apparatus for measuring the change in an electrical signal caused by the electrochemical oxidation or reduction of the species. Alternatively, the sensor may be fabricated in a sandwich structure and also may be cylindrical, spherical or other shapes.

  17. Wireless passive radiation sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeifer, Kent B; Rumpf, Arthur N; Yelton, William G; Limmer, Steven J

    2013-12-03

    A novel measurement technique is employed using surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, passive RF, and radiation-sensitive films to provide a wireless passive radiation sensor that requires no batteries, outside wiring, or regular maintenance. The sensor is small (<1 cm.sup.2), physically robust, and will operate unattended for decades. In addition, the sensor can be insensitive to measurement position and read distance due to a novel self-referencing technique eliminating the need to measure absolute responses that are dependent on RF transmitter location and power.

  18. Electrocatalytic cermet sensor

    DOEpatents

    Shoemaker, E.L.; Vogt, M.C.

    1998-06-30

    A sensor is described for O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} gases. The gas sensor includes a plurality of layers driven by a cyclic voltage to generate a unique plot characteristic of the gas in contact with the sensor. The plurality of layers includes an alumina substrate, a reference electrode source of anions, a lower electrical reference electrode of Pt coupled to the reference source of anions, a solid electrolyte containing tungsten and coupled to the lower reference electrode, a buffer layer for preventing flow of Pt ions into the solid electrolyte and an upper catalytically active Pt electrode coupled to the buffer layer. 16 figs.

  19. Electrocatalytic cermet sensor

    DOEpatents

    Shoemaker, Erika L.; Vogt, Michael C.

    1998-01-01

    A sensor for O.sub.2 and CO.sub.2 gases. The gas sensor includes a plurality of layers driven by a cyclic voltage to generate a unique plot characteristic of the gas in contact with the sensor. The plurality of layers includes an alumina substrate, a reference electrode source of anions, a lower electrical reference electrode of Pt coupled to the reference source of anions, a solid electrolyte containing tungsten and coupled to the lower reference electrode, a buffer layer for preventing flow of Pt ions into the solid electrolyte and an upper catalytically active Pt electrode coupled to the buffer layer.

  20. Advanced sensors technology survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Tommy G.; Costello, David J.; Davis, Jerry G.; Horst, Richard L.; Lessard, Charles S.; Peel, H. Herbert; Tolliver, Robert

    1992-01-01

    This project assesses the state-of-the-art in advanced or 'smart' sensors technology for NASA Life Sciences research applications with an emphasis on those sensors with potential applications on the space station freedom (SSF). The objectives are: (1) to conduct literature reviews on relevant advanced sensor technology; (2) to interview various scientists and engineers in industry, academia, and government who are knowledgeable on this topic; (3) to provide viewpoints and opinions regarding the potential applications of this technology on the SSF; and (4) to provide summary charts of relevant technologies and centers where these technologies are being developed.

  1. Remote electrochemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Wang, J.; Olsen, K.; Larson, D.

    1997-10-14

    An electrochemical sensor is described for remote detection, particularly useful for metal contaminants and organic or other compounds. The sensor circumvents technical difficulties that previously prevented in-situ remote operations. The microelectrode, connected to a long communications cable, allows convenient measurements of the element or compound at timed and frequent intervals and instrument/sample distances of ten feet to more than 100 feet. The sensor is useful for both downhole groundwater monitoring and in-situ water (e.g., shipboard seawater) analysis. 21 figs.

  2. The acoustic vector sensor: a versatile battlefield acoustics sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bree, Hans-Elias; Wind, Jelmer W.

    2011-06-01

    The invention of the Microflown sensor has made it possible to measure acoustic particle velocity directly. An acoustic vector sensor (AVS) measures the particle velocity in three directions (the source direction) and the pressure. The sensor is a uniquely versatile battlefield sensor because its size is a few millimeters and it is sensitive to sound from 10Hz to 10kHz. This article shows field tests results of acoustic vector sensors, measuring rifles, heavy artillery, fixed wing aircraft and helicopters. Experimental data shows that the sensor is suitable as a ground sensor, mounted on a vehicle and on a UAV.

  3. Electronic Nose System Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has designed and built an electronic nose system -- ENose -- to take on the duty of staying alert for smells that could indicate hazardous conditions in a closed spacecraft environment. Its sensors (shown here) are tailored so they conduct electricity differently when an air stream carries a particular chemical across them. JPL has designed and built a 3-pound flight version. The active parts are 32 sensors, each with a different mix of polymers saturated with carbon. When certain chemicals latch onto a sensor, they change how the sensor conducts electricity. This signal tells how much of a compound is in the air. The electronic nose flown aboard STS-95 in 1998 was capable of successfully detecting 10 toxic compounds.

  4. Integrated optical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Watkins, A.D.; Smartt, H.B.; Taylor, P.L.

    1994-01-04

    An integrated optical sensor for arc welding having multifunction feedback control is described. The sensor, comprising generally a CCD camera and diode laser, is positioned behind the arc torch for measuring weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and post-weld centerline cooling rate. Computer process information from this sensor is passed to a controlling computer for use in feedback control loops to aid in the control of the welding process. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint. Sensor standoff distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to determine the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby controlling post-weld mechanical properties. 6 figures.

  5. Capacitance pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Eaton, William P.; Staple, Bevan D.; Smith, James H.

    2000-01-01

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) capacitance pressure sensor integrated with electronic circuitry on a common substrate and a method for forming such a device are disclosed. The MEM capacitance pressure sensor includes a capacitance pressure sensor formed at least partially in a cavity etched below the surface of a silicon substrate and adjacent circuitry (CMOS, BiCMOS, or bipolar circuitry) formed on the substrate. By forming the capacitance pressure sensor in the cavity, the substrate can be planarized (e.g. by chemical-mechanical polishing) so that a standard set of integrated circuit processing steps can be used to form the electronic circuitry (e.g. using an aluminum or aluminum-alloy interconnect metallization).

  6. Modular sensor network node

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Jesse Harper Zehring; Stark, Jr., Douglas Paul; Kershaw, Christopher Patrick; Kyker, Ronald Dean

    2008-06-10

    A distributed wireless sensor network node is disclosed. The wireless sensor network node includes a plurality of sensor modules coupled to a system bus and configured to sense a parameter. The parameter may be an object, an event or any other parameter. The node collects data representative of the parameter. The node also includes a communication module coupled to the system bus and configured to allow the node to communicate with other nodes. The node also includes a processing module coupled to the system bus and adapted to receive the data from the sensor module and operable to analyze the data. The node also includes a power module connected to the system bus and operable to generate a regulated voltage.

  7. Integrated optical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Watkins, Arthur D.; Smartt, Herschel B.; Taylor, Paul L.

    1994-01-01

    An integrated optical sensor for arc welding having multifunction feedback control. The sensor, comprising generally a CCD camera and diode laser, is positioned behind the arc torch for measuring weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and post-weld centerline cooling rate. Computer process information from this sensor is passed to a controlling computer for use in feedback control loops to aid in the control of the welding process. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint. Sensor standoff distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to determine the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby controlling post-weld mechanical properties.

  8. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Field, M.E.; Sullivan, W.H.

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge.

  9. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Chuck C.; Saaski, Elric W.; McCrae, David A.

    1998-09-01

    This paper describes a novel fiber optic-based hydrogen sensor. The sensor consists of a thin-film etalon, constructed on the distal end of a fiber optic. The exterior mirror of the etalon is palladium or a palladium-alloy, which undergoes an optical change upon exposure to hydrogen. Data is presented on fiber optic sensors constructed with palladium and several alloys of palladium. The linearity of the optical response of these sensors to hydrogen is examined. Etalons made with pure palladium are found to be desirable for sensing low concentrations of hydrogen, or for one-time exposure to high concentrations of hydrogen. Etalons made from palladium alloys are found to be more desirable in applications were repeated cycling in high concentrations of hydrogen occurs.

  10. Uncooled tunneling infrared sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Thomas W. (Inventor); Kaiser, William J. (Inventor); Podosek, Judith A. (Inventor); Vote, Erika C. (Inventor); Rockstad, Howard K. (Inventor); Reynolds, Joseph K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An uncooled infrared tunneling sensor in which the only moving part is a diaphragm which is deflected into contact with a micromachined silicon tip electrode prepared by a novel lithographic process. Similarly prepared deflection electrodes employ electrostatic force to control the deflection of a silicon nitride, flat diaphragm membrane. The diaphragm exhibits a high resonant frequency which reduces the sensor's sensitivity to vibration. A high bandwidth feedback circuit controls the tunneling current by adjusting the deflection voltage to maintain a constant deflection of the membrane which would otherwise change deflection depending upon incident infrared radiation. The resulting infrared sensor will meet or exceed the performance of all other broadband, uncooled, infrared sensors and can be miniaturized to pixel dimensions smaller than 100 .mu.m. The technology is readily implemented as a small-format linear array suitable for commercial and spacecraft applications.

  11. Microsoft Kinect Sensor Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billie, Glennoah

    2011-01-01

    My summer project evaluates the Kinect game sensor input/output and its suitability to perform as part of a human interface for a spacecraft application. The primary objective is to evaluate, understand, and communicate the Kinect system's ability to sense and track fine (human) position and motion. The project will analyze the performance characteristics and capabilities of this game system hardware and its applicability for gross and fine motion tracking. The software development kit for the Kinect was also investigated and some experimentation has begun to understand its development environment. To better understand the software development of the Kinect game sensor, research in hacking communities has brought a better understanding of the potential for a wide range of personal computer (PC) application development. The project also entails the disassembly of the Kinect game sensor. This analysis would involve disassembling a sensor, photographing it, and identifying components and describing its operation.

  12. Complex pendulum biomass sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hoskinson, Reed L.; Kenney, Kevin L.; Perrenoud, Ben C.

    2007-12-25

    A complex pendulum system biomass sensor having a plurality of pendulums. The plurality of pendulums allow the system to detect a biomass height and density. Each pendulum has an angular deflection sensor and a deflector at a unique height. The pendulums are passed through the biomass and readings from the angular deflection sensors are fed into a control system. The control system determines whether adjustment of machine settings is appropriate and either displays an output to the operator, or adjusts automatically adjusts the machine settings, such as the speed, at which the pendulums are passed through the biomass. In an alternate embodiment, an entanglement sensor is also passed through the biomass to determine the amount of biomass entanglement. This measure of entanglement is also fed into the control system.

  13. Uncooled tunneling infrared sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Thomas W. (Inventor); Kaiser, William J. (Inventor); Podosek, Judith A. (Inventor); Vote, Erika C. (Inventor); Muller, Richard E. (Inventor); Maker, Paul D. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An uncooled infrared tunneling sensor in which the only moving part is a diaphragm which is deflected into contact with a micromachined silicon tip electrode prepared by a novel lithographic process. Similarly prepared deflection electrodes employ electrostatic force to control the deflection of a silicon nitride, flat diaphragm membrane. The diaphragm exhibits a high resonant frequency which reduces the sensor's sensitivity to vibration. A high bandwidth feedback circuit controls the tunneling current by adjusting the deflection voltage to maintain a constant deflection of the membrane. The resulting infrared sensor can be miniaturized to pixel dimensions smaller than 100 .mu.m. An alternative embodiment is implemented using a corrugated membrane to permit large deflection without complicated clamping and high deflection voltages. The alternative embodiment also employs a pinhole aperture in a membrane to accommodate environmental temperature variation and a sealed chamber to eliminate environmental contamination of the tunneling electrodes and undesireable accoustic coupling to the sensor.

  14. Magnetic infrasound sensor

    DOEpatents

    Mueller, Fred M.; Bronisz, Lawrence; Grube, Holger; Nelson, David C.; Mace, Jonathan L.

    2006-11-14

    A magnetic infrasound sensor is produced by constraining a permanent magnet inside a magnetic potential well above the surface of superconducting material. The magnetic infrasound sensor measures the position or movement of the permanent magnet within the magnetic potential well, and interprets the measurements. Infrasound sources can be located and characterized by combining the measurements from one or more infrasound sensors. The magnetic infrasound sensor can be tuned to match infrasound source types, resulting in better signal-to-noise ratio. The present invention can operate in frequency modulation mode to improve sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio. In an alternate construction, the superconductor can be levitated over a magnet or magnets. The system can also be driven, so that time resolved perturbations are sensed, resulting in a frequency modulation version with improved sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio.

  15. Biomimetic sensor design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ju Hun; Jin, Hyo-Eon; Desai, Malav S.; Ren, Shuo; Kim, Soyoun; Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2015-11-01

    Detection of desired target chemicals in a sensitive and selective manner is critically important to protect human health, environment and national security. Nature has been a great source of inspiration for the design of sensitive and selective sensors. In this mini-review, we overview the recent developments in bio-inspired sensor development. There are four major components of sensor design: design of receptors for specific targets; coating materials to integrate receptors to transducing machinery; sensitive transducing of signals; and decision making based on the sensing results. We discuss the biomimetic methods to discover specific receptors followed by a discussion about bio-inspired nanocoating material design. We then review the recent developments in phage-based bioinspired transducing systems followed by a discussion of biomimetic pattern recognition-based decision making systems. Our review will be helpful to understand recent approaches to reverse-engineer natural systems to design specific and sensitive sensors.

  16. Biomimetic sensor design.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju Hun; Jin, Hyo-Eon; Desai, Malav S; Ren, Shuo; Kim, Soyoun; Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2015-11-28

    Detection of desired target chemicals in a sensitive and selective manner is critically important to protect human health, environment and national security. Nature has been a great source of inspiration for the design of sensitive and selective sensors. In this mini-review, we overview the recent developments in bio-inspired sensor development. There are four major components of sensor design: design of receptors for specific targets; coating materials to integrate receptors to transducing machinery; sensitive transducing of signals; and decision making based on the sensing results. We discuss the biomimetic methods to discover specific receptors followed by a discussion about bio-inspired nanocoating material design. We then review the recent developments in phage-based bioinspired transducing systems followed by a discussion of biomimetic pattern recognition-based decision making systems. Our review will be helpful to understand recent approaches to reverse-engineer natural systems to design specific and sensitive sensors. PMID:26498660

  17. Thermal microphotonic sensor and sensor array

    DOEpatents

    Watts, Michael R.; Shaw, Michael J.; Nielson, Gregory N.; Lentine, Anthony L.

    2010-02-23

    A thermal microphotonic sensor is disclosed for detecting infrared radiation using heat generated by the infrared radiation to shift the resonant frequency of an optical resonator (e.g. a ring resonator) to which the heat is coupled. The shift in the resonant frequency can be determined from light in an optical waveguide which is evanescently coupled to the optical resonator. An infrared absorber can be provided on the optical waveguide either as a coating or as a plate to aid in absorption of the infrared radiation. In some cases, a vertical resonant cavity can be formed about the infrared absorber to further increase the absorption of the infrared radiation. The sensor can be formed as a single device, or as an array for imaging the infrared radiation.

  18. MEMS Graphene Strain Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Clinton Wen-Chieh

    Graphene is a two dimensional honeycomb structure of sp2 hybridized carbon atoms that has possibilities in many applications due to its excellent mechanical and electrical properties. One application for Graphene is in the field of sensors. Graphene's electronic properties do not degrade when it undergoes mechanical strain which is advantageous for strain sensors. In this thesis, certain properties, such as the piezo-resistivity and flexibility, of graphene will be explored to show how they can be utilized to make a strain sensing device. Our original fabrication process of patterning graphene and the transfer process of graphene onto a flexible substrate will be discussed. The development of a stretchable and flexible graphene based rosette strain sensor will also be detailed. Developing a novel, reliable patterning process for the graphene is the first step to manufacture a stretchable graphene based sensor. The graphene was patterned using a photolithography and etching process that was developed by our research team, then it was transferred to a flexible polymer substrate with the use of a combination of soft lithography and wet etching of the Ni foil with ferric chloride solution. Graphene patterning is an essential step in fabricating reliable and sensitive sensors. With this process, graphene can be consistently patterned into different shapes and sizes. To utilize the graphene as the sensing material it also needs to be transferred onto a flexible substrate. The innovative transfer process developed by our research team consistently adheres graphene to a flexible PDMS substrate while removing the original nickel substrate. In the end, the graphene was transferred from the metal substrate to the desired flexible substrate. This process was repeated multiple times to create a stack and multilayer device. While many graphene-based strain sensors have been developed, they are uni-directional and can only measure the strain applied on the sensor in a principle

  19. Small infrared sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Stuart B.; Lohrmann, Dieter; Miller, James E.; McCormack, Kent; Newsome, Gwendolyn W.; Brown, James C.; Campbell, James, Jr.; Perconti, Philip; Klager, Gene A.

    2001-09-01

    Small, low cost, low poer infrared imaging sensors are relatively recent innovation, employing the most advanced MEMS processing techniques, integrated circuit design, optical materials, and focal plane array packaging. We will review the rationale behind the development of low cost, small IR cameras, discuss several of the medium performance applications for these sensors via a modeling analysis, discuss the goals and status of our applied research uncooled focal plane array technology programs, and discuss the future of uncooled focal plane arrays.

  20. Cognitive Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Thomas C.

    Our overall goal is to develop a cognitive architecture which will allow autonomous and robust operation of sensor-actuator networks. To achieve this, the perception, concept formation, action cycle will be informed by domain theories of signal analysis, physical phenomena, and behavior. Example scenarios include cognitive vehicles and buildings in which the system understands itself and the activities in and around it by means of distributed video and other sensors. This includes discovery of the cognitive system's own sensing and actuation capabilities.

  1. Electron tunnel sensor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, T. W.; Waltman, S. B.; Reynolds, J. K.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1991-01-01

    Researchers designed and constructed a novel electron tunnel sensor which takes advantage of the mechanical properties of micro-machined silicon. For the first time, electrostatic forces are used to control the tunnel electrode separation, thereby avoiding the thermal drift and noise problems associated with piezoelectric actuators. The entire structure is composed of micro-machined silicon single crystals, including a folded cantilever spring and a tip. The application of this sensor to the development of a sensitive accelerometer is described.

  2. Sensor Characteristics Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of the guide is to inform building owners and operators of the current status, capabilities, and limitations of sensor technologies. It is hoped that this guide will aid in the design and procurement process and result in successful implementation of building sensor and control systems. DOE will also use this guide to identify research priorities, develop future specifications for potential market adoption, and provide market clarity through unbiased information.

  3. Precise linear sun sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, D. D.

    1972-01-01

    An evaluation of the precise linear sun sensor relating to future mission applications was performed. The test procedures, data, and results of the dual-axis, solid-state system are included. Brief descriptions of the sensing head and of the system's operational characteristics are presented. A unique feature of the system is that multiple sensor heads with various fields of view may be used with the same electronics.

  4. Distributed proximity sensor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sukhan (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    The invention relates to sensors embedded on the surface of a robot hand, or other moving member. By distributing proximity sensors capable of detecting distances and angles to points on the surface of an object, information is obtained for achieving noncontacting shape and distance perception, i.e., for automatic determination of the object's shape, direction, and distance, as well as the orientation of the object relative to the robot hand or other moving member.

  5. Passive fetal monitoring sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Hall, Earl T.; Baker, Donald A.; Bryant, Timothy D.

    1992-08-01

    An ambulatory, passive sensor for use in a fetal monitoring system is discussed. The invention is comprised of a piezoelectric polymer film, combined with a metallic mounting plate fastened to a belt, and electrically connected to a signal processing unit by means of a shielded cable. The purpose of the sensor is to receive pressure pulses emitted by a fetus inside an expectant mother. Additionally, the monitor will filter out pressure pulses arising from other sources, such as the maternal heart.

  6. Vibratory gyroscopic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, C. H. J.; Hardie, D. J. W.

    The paper describes the principles of operation of vibratory gyroscopic sensors based on simple oscillators, balanced oscillators, and vibrating shells with particular emphasis on the third type. Error mechanisms are discussed and the relative merits of the three types are considered leading to the conclusion that vibrating shell sensors offer substantial advantages over the other types in terms of their immunity to external vibration and the relatively weak interaction between the basic sensing vibration of the shell and the instrument mounting.

  7. Passive fetal monitoring sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Hall, Earl T. (Inventor); Baker, Donald A. (Inventor); Bryant, Timothy D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An ambulatory, passive sensor for use in a fetal monitoring system is discussed. The invention is comprised of a piezoelectric polymer film, combined with a metallic mounting plate fastened to a belt, and electrically connected to a signal processing unit by means of a shielded cable. The purpose of the sensor is to receive pressure pulses emitted by a fetus inside an expectant mother. Additionally, the monitor will filter out pressure pulses arising from other sources, such as the maternal heart.

  8. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, Fernando H.; Brosha, Eric L.

    1997-01-01

    A potentiometric oxygen sensor is formed having a logarithmic response to a differential oxygen concentration while operating as a Nernstian-type sensor. Very thin films of mixed conducting oxide materials form electrode services while permitting diffusional oxygen access to the interface between the zirconia electrolyte and the electrode. Diffusion of oxygen through the mixed oxide is not rate-limiting. Metal electrodes are not used so that morphological changes in the electrode structure do not occur during extended operation at elevated temperatures.

  9. Wireless radiation sensor

    DOEpatents

    Lamberti, Vincent E.; Howell, Jr, Layton N.; Mee, David K.; Kress, Reid L.

    2016-08-09

    Disclosed is a sensor for detecting radiation. The sensor includes a ferromagnetic metal and a radiation sensitive material coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The radiation sensitive material is operable to change a tensile stress of the ferromagnetic metal upon exposure to radiation. The radiation is detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the changes in the tensile stress.

  10. Miniature Intelligent Sensor Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beech, Russell S.

    2007-01-01

    An electronic unit denoted the Miniature Intelligent Sensor Module performs sensor-signal-conditioning functions and local processing of sensor data. The unit includes four channels of analog input/output circuitry, a processor, volatile and nonvolatile memory, and two Ethernet communication ports, all housed in a weathertight enclosure. The unit accepts AC or DC power. The analog inputs provide programmable gain, offset, and filtering as well as shunt calibration and auto-zeroing. Analog outputs include sine, square, and triangular waves having programmable frequencies and amplitudes, as well as programmable amplitude DC. One innovative aspect of the design of this unit is the integration of a relatively powerful processor and large amount of memory along with the sensor-signalconditioning circuitry so that sophisticated computer programs can be used to acquire and analyze sensor data and estimate and track the health of the overall sensor-data-acquisition system of which the unit is a part. The unit includes calibration, zeroing, and signalfeedback circuitry to facilitate health monitoring. The processor is also integrated with programmable logic circuitry in such a manner as to simplify and enhance acquisition of data and generation of analog outputs. A notable unique feature of the unit is a cold-junction compensation circuit in the back shell of a sensor connector. This circuit makes it possible to use Ktype thermocouples without compromising a housing seal. Replicas of this unit may prove useful in industrial and manufacturing settings - especially in such large outdoor facilities as refineries. Two features can be expected to simplify installation: the weathertight housings should make it possible to mount the units near sensors, and the Ethernet communication capability of the units should facilitate establishment of communication connections for the units.

  11. Physical Intelligent Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandhil, Pavan; Chitikeshi, Sanjeevi; Mahajan, Ajay; Figueroa, Fernando

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes the development of intelligent sensors as part of an integrated systems approach, i.e. one treats the sensors as a complete system with its own sensing hardware (the traditional sensor), A/D converters, processing and storage capabilities, software drivers, self-assessment algorithms, communication protocols and evolutionary methodologies that allow them to get better with time. Under a project being undertaken at the NASA s Stennis Space Center, an integrated framework is being developed for the intelligent monitoring of smart elements. These smart elements can be sensors, actuators or other devices. The immediate application is the monitoring of the rocket test stands, but the technology should be generally applicable to the Integrated Systems Health Monitoring (ISHM) vision. This paper outlines progress made in the development of intelligent sensors by describing the work done till date on Physical Intelligent Sensors (PIS). The PIS discussed here consists of a thermocouple used to read temperature in an analog form which is then converted into digital values. A microprocessor collects the sensor readings and runs numerous embedded event detection routines on the collected data and if any event is detected, it is reported, stored and sent to a remote system through an Ethernet connection. Hence the output of the PIS is data coupled with confidence factor in the reliability of the data which leads to information on the health of the sensor at all times. All protocols are consistent with IEEE 1451.X standards. This work lays the foundation for the next generation of smart devices that have embedded intelligence for distributed decision making capabilities.

  12. Sensors across the Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Medvedev, Ivan R.

    2011-06-01

    A resurgence of interest in spectroscopic sensors has been fueled by increases in performance made possible by technological advancements and applications in medicine, environmental monitoring, and national security. Often this research is technology driven, without enough consideration of the spectroscopic signatures available to be probed. We will compare several current spectroscopic sensors across the electromagnetic spectrum, with an eye towards the fundamental spectroscopic considerations important at each wavelength.

  13. Attitude measurement: Principles and sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duchon, P.; Vermande, M. P.

    1981-01-01

    Tools used in the measurement of satellite attitude are described. Attention is given to the elements that characterize an attitude sensor, the references employed (stars, moon, Sun, Earth, magnetic fields, etc.), and the detectors (optical, magnetic, and inertial). Several examples of attitude sensors are described, including sun sensors, star sensors, earth sensors, triaxial magnetometers, and gyrometers. Finally, sensor combinations that make it possible to determine a complete attitude are considered; the SPOT attitude measurement system and a combined CCD star sensor-gyrometer system are discussed.

  14. Geographically distributed environmental sensor system

    DOEpatents

    French, Patrick; Veatch, Brad; O'Connor, Mike

    2006-10-03

    The present invention is directed to a sensor network that includes a number of sensor units and a base unit. The base station operates in a network discovery mode (in which network topology information is collected) in a data polling mode (in which sensed information is collected from selected sensory units). Each of the sensor units can include a number of features, including an anemometer, a rain gauge, a compass, a GPS receiver, a barometric pressure sensor, an air temperature sensor, a humidity sensor, a level, and a radiant temperature sensor.

  15. Sensors for linear referencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Cecil W. H.; Lau, John W.

    1998-01-01

    Two solutions to the vehicle location problem are commonly discussed for Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS): active roadside beacons and global positioning system (GPS) satellites. This paper present requirements for new linear referencing sensors, defined as sensors that will identify a vehicle's location along a roadway in terms of distance along the roadway from known points or by the automatic identification of known points. Requirements for linear referencing sensors come from new national location referencing standards being developed by initiatives of the US Department of Transportation, and from international location referencing standardization activities. Linear referencing sensors can extract information from the visual scene presented by the roadside environment, or from the environment illuminated by laser or microwave radiation. They can also be based on new, low cost techniques for labeling roads or by modulating lane reflectors or other regular road infrastructure components. Such sensors, singly and in combination, avoid the map matching problem common to vehicle navigation systems that rely on GPS, and can be deployed at much lower cost than roadside beacons, particularly when designed as one function of multi-purpose in-vehicle sensors and computers.

  16. Sensors feel digital pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, J.

    1996-05-01

    Anyone who has connected a field instrument to an analog input card for a DCS, PLC or PC-based data acquisition or control system has faced the issue of analog-to-digital (A/D) conversion. Signal conversion always involves compromises in accuracy and speed. Digital communication with fieldbus eliminates the problem, right? Not exactly; fieldbus may simply move the A/D interface from the control room to the field. The vast majority of measuring instruments have analog sensors with signals that must be converted to strings of bits somewhere, somehow. Instrument manufacturers must embrace digital technology in sensor design, not just in transmitter design. One way to address the issue is to use microsystems technology, such as microelectro-mechanical systems (MEMS). Research at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands, for example, is aimed at fabricating devices in silicon with all the components of a data-acquisition unit integrated on one chip. These smart sensors would host the sensor itself along with signal conditioning and A/D conversion circuits, and circuits for digital interfacing with a data processor. A/D conversion is still there, but encapsulated within and characterized as part of the sensor. Single-chip integration allows more signal processing within a manageable-sized package. Also, eliminating transmission of the analog signal, even within an instrument, reduces the chance for noise pickup. Less noise means instrument accuracy closer to actual sensor accuracy. 2 figs.

  17. Catalytic Membrane Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, T.J.; Brinker, C.J.; Gardner, T.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Sault, A.G.

    1998-12-01

    The proposed "catalytic membrane sensor" (CMS) was developed to generate a device which would selectively identify a specific reagent in a complex mixture of gases. This was to be accomplished by modifying an existing Hz sensor with a series of thin films. Through selectively sieving the desired component from a complex mixture and identifying it by decomposing it into Hz (and other by-products), a Hz sensor could then be used to detect the presence of the select component. The proposed "sandwich-type" modifications involved the deposition of a catalyst layered between two size selective sol-gel layers on a Pd/Ni resistive Hz sensor. The role of the catalyst was to convert organic materials to Hz and organic by-products. The role of the membraneo was to impart both chemical specificity by molecukir sieving of the analyte and converted product streams, as well as controlling access to the underlying Pd/Ni sensor. Ultimately, an array of these CMS elements encompassing different catalysts and membranes were to be developed which would enable improved selectivity and specificity from a compiex mixture of organic gases via pattern recognition methodologies. We have successfully generated a CMS device by a series of spin-coat deposited methods; however, it was determined that the high temperature required to activate the catalyst, destroys the sensor.

  18. NOx Sensor Development

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

    2010-11-01

    NO{sub x} compounds, specifically NO and NO{sub 2}, are pollutants and potent greenhouse gases. Compact and inexpensive NO{sub x} sensors are necessary in the next generation of diesel (CIDI) automobiles to meet government emission requirements and enable the more rapid introduction of more efficient, higher fuel economy CIDI vehicles. Because the need for a NO{sub x} sensor is recent and the performance requirements are extremely challenging, most are still in the development phase. Currently, there is only one type of NO{sub x} sensor that is sold commercially, and it seems unlikely to meet more stringent future emission requirements. Automotive exhaust sensor development has focused on solid-state electrochemical technology, which has proven to be robust for in-situ operation in harsh, high-temperature environments (e.g., the oxygen stoichiometric sensor). Solid-state sensors typically rely on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as the oxygen-ion conducting electrolyte and then target different types of metal or metal-oxide electrodes to optimize the response. Electrochemical sensors can be operated in different modes, including amperometric (a current is measured) and potentiometric (a voltage is measured), both of which employ direct current (dc) measurements. Amperometric operation is costly due to the electronics necessary to measure the small sensor signal (nanoampere current at ppm NO{sub x} levels), and cannot be easily improved to meet the future technical performance requirements. Potentiometric operation has not demonstrated enough promise in meeting long-term stability requirements, where the voltage signal drift is thought to be due to aging effects associated with electrically driven changes, both morphological and compositional, in the sensor. Our approach involves impedancemetric operation, which uses alternating current (ac) measurements at a specified frequency. The approach is described in detail in previous reports and several publications

  19. "Smart" Sensor Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahajan, Ajay

    2007-01-01

    An assembly that contains a sensor, sensor-signal-conditioning circuitry, a sensor-readout analog-to-digital converter (ADC), data-storage circuitry, and a microprocessor that runs special-purpose software and communicates with one or more external computer(s) has been developed as a prototype of "smart" sensor modules for monitoring the integrity and functionality (the "health") of engineering systems. Although these modules are now being designed specifically for use on rocket-engine test stands, it is anticipated that they could also readily be designed to be incorporated into health-monitoring subsystems of such diverse engineering systems as spacecraft, aircraft, land vehicles, bridges, buildings, power plants, oilrigs, and defense installations. The figure is a simplified block diagram of the "smart" sensor module. The analog sensor readout signal is processed by the ADC, the digital output of which is fed to the microprocessor. By means of a standard RS-232 cable, the microprocessor is connected to a local personal computer (PC), from which software is downloaded into a randomaccess memory in the microprocessor. The local PC is also used to debug the software. Once the software is running, the local PC is disconnected and the module is controlled by, and all output data from the module are collected by, a remote PC via an Ethernet bus. Several smart sensor modules like this one could be connected to the same Ethernet bus and controlled by the single remote PC. The software running in the microprocessor includes driver programs for operation of the sensor, programs that implement self-assessment algorithms, programs that implement protocols for communication with the external computer( s), and programs that implement evolutionary methodologies to enable the module to improve its performance over time. The design of the module and of the health-monitoring system of which it is a part reflects the understanding that the main purpose of a health

  20. Rain Drop Charge Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Sreekanth T.

    begin{center} Large Large Rain Drop Charge Sensor Sreekanth T S*, Suby Symon*, G. Mohan Kumar (1) , S. Murali Das (2) *Atmospheric Sciences Division, Centre for Earth Science Studies, Thiruvananthapuram 695011 (1) D-330, Swathi Nagar, West Fort, Thiruvananthapuram 695023 (2) Kavyam, Manacaud, Thiruvananthapuram 695009 begin{center} ABSTRACT To study the inter-relations with precipitation electricity and precipitation microphysical parameters a rain drop charge sensor was designed and developed at CESS Electronics & Instrumentation Laboratory. Simultaneous measurement of electric charge and fall speed of rain drops could be done using this charge sensor. A cylindrical metal tube (sensor tube) of 30 cm length is placed inside another thick metal cover opened at top and bottom for electromagnetic shielding. Mouth of the sensor tube is exposed and bottom part is covered with metal net in the shielding cover. The instrument is designed in such a way that rain drops can pass only through unhindered inside the sensor tube. When electrically charged rain drops pass through the sensor tube, it is charged to the same magnitude of drop charge but with opposite polarity. The sensor tube is electrically connected the inverted input of a current to voltage converter operational amplifier using op-amp AD549. Since the sensor is electrically connected to the virtual ground of the op-amp, the charge flows to the ground and the generated current is converted to amplified voltage. This output voltage is recorded using a high frequency (1kHz) voltage recorder. From the recorded pulse, charge magnitude, polarity and fall speed of rain drop are calculated. From the fall speed drop diameter also can be calculated. The prototype is now under test running at CESS campus. As the magnitude of charge in rain drops is an indication of accumulated charge in clouds in lightning, this instrument has potential application in the field of risk and disaster management. By knowing the charge

  1. Semantically-Enabled Sensor Plug & Play for the Sensor Web

    PubMed Central

    Bröring, Arne; Maúe, Patrick; Janowicz, Krzysztof; Nüst, Daniel; Malewski, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Environmental sensors have continuously improved by becoming smaller, cheaper, and more intelligent over the past years. As consequence of these technological advancements, sensors are increasingly deployed to monitor our environment. The large variety of available sensor types with often incompatible protocols complicates the integration of sensors into observing systems. The standardized Web service interfaces and data encodings defined within OGC’s Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) framework make sensors available over the Web and hide the heterogeneous sensor protocols from applications. So far, the SWE framework does not describe how to integrate sensors on-the-fly with minimal human intervention. The driver software which enables access to sensors has to be implemented and the measured sensor data has to be manually mapped to the SWE models. In this article we introduce a Sensor Plug & Play infrastructure for the Sensor Web by combining (1) semantic matchmaking functionality, (2) a publish/subscribe mechanism underlying the SensorWeb, as well as (3) a model for the declarative description of sensor interfaces which serves as a generic driver mechanism. We implement and evaluate our approach by applying it to an oil spill scenario. The matchmaking is realized using existing ontologies and reasoning engines and provides a strong case for the semantic integration capabilities provided by Semantic Web research. PMID:22164033

  2. Engineering workstation: Sensor modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavel, M; Sweet, B.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the engineering workstation is to provide an environment for rapid prototyping and evaluation of fusion and image processing algorithms. Ideally, the algorithms are designed to optimize the extraction of information that is useful to a pilot for all phases of flight operations. Successful design of effective fusion algorithms depends on the ability to characterize both the information available from the sensors and the information useful to a pilot. The workstation is comprised of subsystems for simulation of sensor-generated images, image processing, image enhancement, and fusion algorithms. As such, the workstation can be used to implement and evaluate both short-term solutions and long-term solutions. The short-term solutions are being developed to enhance a pilot's situational awareness by providing information in addition to his direct vision. The long term solutions are aimed at the development of complete synthetic vision systems. One of the important functions of the engineering workstation is to simulate the images that would be generated by the sensors. The simulation system is designed to use the graphics modeling and rendering capabilities of various workstations manufactured by Silicon Graphics Inc. The workstation simulates various aspects of the sensor-generated images arising from phenomenology of the sensors. In addition, the workstation can be used to simulate a variety of impairments due to mechanical limitations of the sensor placement and due to the motion of the airplane. Although the simulation is currently not performed in real-time, sequences of individual frames can be processed, stored, and recorded in a video format. In that way, it is possible to examine the appearance of different dynamic sensor-generated and fused images.

  3. Hairlike Percutaneous Photochemical Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Thomas; Loeb, Gerald

    2004-01-01

    Instrumentation systems based on hairlike fiber-optic photochemical sensors have been proposed as minimally invasive means of detecting biochemicals associated with cancer and other diseases. The fiber-optic sensors could be mass-produced as inexpensive, disposable components. The sensory tip of a fiber-optic sensor would be injected through the patient's skin into subcutaneous tissue. A biosensing material on the sensory tip would bind or otherwise react with the biochemical(s) of interest [the analyte(s)] to produce a change in optical properties that would be measured by use of an external photonic analyzer. After use, a fiber-optic sensor could be simply removed by plucking it out with tweezers. A fiber-optic sensor according to the proposal would be of the approximate size and shape of a human hair, and its sensory tip would resemble a follicle. Once inserted into a patient's subcutaneous tissue, the sensor would even more closely resemble a hair growing from a follicle (see Figure 1). The biosensing material on the sensory tip could consist of a chemical and/or cells cultured and modified for the purpose. The biosensing material would be contained within a membrane that would cover the tip. If the membrane were not permeable by an analyte, then it would be necessary to create pores in the membrane that would be large enough to allow analyte molecules to diffuse to the biosensing material, but not so large as to allow cells (if present as part of the biosensing material) to diffuse out. The end of the fiber-optic sensor opposite the sensory tip would be inserted in a fiberoptic socket in the photonic analyzer.

  4. Underwater Sensor Nodes and Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lloret, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Sensor technology has matured enough to be used in any type of environment. The appearance of new physical sensors has increased the range of environmental parameters for gathering data. Because of the huge amount of unexploited resources in the ocean environment, there is a need of new research in the field of sensors and sensor networks. This special issue is focused on collecting recent advances on underwater sensors and underwater sensor networks in order to measure, monitor, surveillance of and control of underwater environments. On the one hand, from the sensor node perspective, we will see works related with the deployment of physical sensors, development of sensor nodes and transceivers for sensor nodes, sensor measurement analysis and several issues such as layer 1 and 2 protocols for underwater communication and sensor localization and positioning systems. On the other hand, from the sensor network perspective, we will see several architectures and protocols for underwater environments and analysis concerning sensor network measurements. Both sides will provide us a complete view of last scientific advances in this research field. PMID:24013489

  5. Sensor Characteristics Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Cree, Johnathan V.; Dansu, A.; Fuhr, P.; Lanzisera, Steven M.; McIntyre, T.; Muehleisen, Ralph T.; Starke, M.; Banerjee, Pranab; Kuruganti, T.; Castello, C.

    2013-04-01

    The Buildings Technologies Office (BTO), within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), is initiating a new program in Sensor and Controls. The vision of this program is: • Buildings operating automatically and continuously at peak energy efficiency over their lifetimes and interoperating effectively with the electric power grid. • Buildings that are self-configuring, self-commissioning, self-learning, self-diagnosing, self-healing, and self-transacting to enable continuous peak performance. • Lower overall building operating costs and higher asset valuation. The overarching goal is to capture 30% energy savings by enhanced management of energy consuming assets and systems through development of cost-effective sensors and controls. One step in achieving this vision is the publication of this Sensor Characteristics Reference Guide. The purpose of the guide is to inform building owners and operators of the current status, capabilities, and limitations of sensor technologies. It is hoped that this guide will aid in the design and procurement process and result in successful implementation of building sensor and control systems. DOE will also use this guide to identify research priorities, develop future specifications for potential market adoption, and provide market clarity through unbiased information

  6. Tier-scalable reconnaissance: the challenge of sensor optimization, sensor deployment, sensor fusion, and sensor interoperability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Wolfgang; George, Thomas; Tarbell, Mark A.

    2007-04-01

    Robotic reconnaissance operations are called for in extreme environments, not only those such as space, including planetary atmospheres, surfaces, and subsurfaces, but also in potentially hazardous or inaccessible operational areas on Earth, such as mine fields, battlefield environments, enemy occupied territories, terrorist infiltrated environments, or areas that have been exposed to biochemical agents or radiation. Real time reconnaissance enables the identification and characterization of transient events. A fundamentally new mission concept for tier-scalable reconnaissance of operational areas, originated by Fink et al., is aimed at replacing the engineering and safety constrained mission designs of the past. The tier-scalable paradigm integrates multi-tier (orbit atmosphere surface/subsurface) and multi-agent (satellite UAV/blimp surface/subsurface sensing platforms) hierarchical mission architectures, introducing not only mission redundancy and safety, but also enabling and optimizing intelligent, less constrained, and distributed reconnaissance in real time. Given the mass, size, and power constraints faced by such a multi-platform approach, this is an ideal application scenario for a diverse set of MEMS sensors. To support such mission architectures, a high degree of operational autonomy is required. Essential elements of such operational autonomy are: (1) automatic mapping of an operational area from different vantage points (including vehicle health monitoring); (2) automatic feature extraction and target/region-of-interest identification within the mapped operational area; and (3) automatic target prioritization for close-up examination. These requirements imply the optimal deployment of MEMS sensors and sensor platforms, sensor fusion, and sensor interoperability.

  7. Whispering gallery mode sensors

    PubMed Central

    Foreman, Matthew R.; Swaim, Jon D.; Vollmer, Frank

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive overview of sensor technology exploiting optical whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonances. After a short introduction we begin by detailing the fundamental principles and theory of WGMs in optical microcavities and the transduction mechanisms frequently employed for sensing purposes. Key recent theoretical contributions to the modeling and analysis of WGM systems are highlighted. Subsequently we review the state of the art of WGM sensors by outlining efforts made to date to improve current detection limits. Proposals in this vein are numerous and range, for example, from plasmonic enhancements and active cavities to hybrid optomechanical sensors, which are already working in the shot noise limited regime. In parallel to furthering WGM sensitivity, efforts to improve the time resolution are beginning to emerge. We therefore summarize the techniques being pursued in this vein. Ultimately WGM sensors aim for real-world applications, such as measurements of force and temperature, or alternatively gas and biosensing. Each such application is thus reviewed in turn, and important achievements are discussed. Finally, we adopt a more forward-looking perspective and discuss the outlook of WGM sensors within both a physical and biological context and consider how they may yet push the detection envelope further. PMID:26973759

  8. Electrically modulated magnetoelectric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, P.; Salzer, S.; Reermann, J.; Yarar, E.; Röbisch, V.; Piorra, A.; Meyners, D.; Höft, M.; Knöchel, R.; Schmidt, G.; Quandt, E.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetoelectric thin film composites have demonstrated their potential to detect sub-pT magnetic fields if mechanical resonances (typically few hundred Hz to a few kHz) are utilized. At low frequencies (1-100 Hz), magnetic field-induced frequency conversion has enabled wideband measurements with resonance-enhanced sensitivities by using the nonlinear characteristics of the magnetostriction curve. Nevertheless, the modulation with a magnetic field with a frequency close to the mechanical resonance results in a number of drawbacks, which are, e.g., size and energy consumption of the sensor as well as potential crosstalk in sensor arrays. In this work, we demonstrate the feasibility of an electric frequency conversion of a magnetoelectric sensor which would overcome the drawbacks of magnetic frequency conversion. This magnetoelectric sensor consists of three functional layers: an exchange biased magnetostrictive multilayer showing a high piezomagnetic coefficient without applying a magnetic bias field, a non-linear piezoelectric actuation layer and a linear piezoelectric sensing layer. In this approach, the low frequency magnetic signal is shifted into the mechanical resonance of the sensor, while the electric modulation frequency is chosen to be either the difference or the sum of the resonance and the signal frequency. Using this electric frequency conversion, a limit of detection in the low nT/Hz1/2 range was shown for signals of low frequency.

  9. Sensor models and a framework for sensor management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskell, Alex P.; Probert, Penelope J.

    1993-08-01

    We describe the use of Bayesian belief networks and decision theoretic principles for sensor management in multi-sensor systems. This framework provides a way of representing sensory data and choosing actions under uncertainty. The work considers how to distribute functionality between sensors and the controller. Use is made of logical sensors based on complementary physical sensors to provide information at the task level of abstraction represented within the network. We are applying these methods in the area of low level planning in mobile robotics. A key feature of the work is the development of quantified models to represent diverse sensors, in particular the sonar array and infra-red triangulation sensors we use on our AGV. We need to develop a model which can handle these very different sensors but provides a common interface to the sensor management process. We do this by quantifying the uncertainty through probabilistic models of the sensors, taking into account their physical characteristics and interaction with the expected environment. Modelling the sensor characteristics to an appropriate level of detail has the advantage of giving more accurate and robust mapping between the physical and logical sensor, as well as a better understanding of environmental dependency and its limitations. We describe a model of a sonar array, which explicitly takes into account features such as beam-width and ranging errors, and its integration into the sensor management process.

  10. Autonomous sensor manager agents (ASMA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osadciw, Lisa A.

    2004-04-01

    Autonomous sensor manager agents are presented as an algorithm to perform sensor management within a multisensor fusion network. The design of the hybrid ant system/particle swarm agents is described in detail with some insight into their performance. Although the algorithm is designed for the general sensor management problem, a simulation example involving 2 radar systems is presented. Algorithmic parameters are determined by the size of the region covered by the sensor network, the number of sensors, and the number of parameters to be selected. With straight forward modifications, this algorithm can be adapted for most sensor management problems.

  11. Capacitive proximity sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A proximity sensor based on a closed field circuit. The circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plates that creates an oscillating displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of objects to the plate array. Preferably the plates are in the form of a group of three pair of symmetric plates having a common center, arranged in a hexagonal pattern with opposing plates linked as a pair. The sensor produces logic level pulses suitable for interfacing with a computer or process controller. The proximity sensor can be incorporated into a load cell, a differential pressure gauge, or a device for measuring the consistency of a characteristic of a material where a variation in the consistency causes the dielectric constant of the material to change.

  12. Lightning mapping sensor study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norwood, V.

    1983-01-01

    A technology assessment to determine how a world-wide, continuous measurement of lightning could be achieved from a geostationary platform is provided. Various approaches to the detector sensors are presented. It was first determined that any existing detector chips would require some degree of modification in order to meet the lightning mapper sensor requirements. The elements of the system were then analyzed, categorized, and graded for study emphasis. The recommended approach for the lightning mapper sensor is to develop a monolithic array in which each detector cell has circuitry that implements a two-step photon-collecting method for a very high dynamic range with good measurement accuracy. The efficiency of the array is compatible with the use of a conventional refractive optics design having an aperture in the neighborhood of 7 to 10 cm.

  13. Magnetic Nanoparticle Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Isaac; Josephson, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Many types of biosensors employ magnetic nanoparticles (diameter = 5–300 nm) or magnetic particles (diameter = 300–5,000 nm) which have been surface functionalized to recognize specific molecular targets. Here we cover three types of biosensors that employ different biosensing principles, magnetic materials, and instrumentation. The first type consists of magnetic relaxation switch assay-sensors, which are based on the effects magnetic particles exert on water proton relaxation rates. The second type consists of magnetic particle relaxation sensors, which determine the relaxation of the magnetic moment within the magnetic particle. The third type is magnetoresistive sensors, which detect the presence of magnetic particles on the surface of electronic devices that are sensitive to changes in magnetic fields on their surface. Recent improvements in the design of magnetic nanoparticles (and magnetic particles), together with improvements in instrumentation, suggest that magnetic material-based biosensors may become widely used in the future. PMID:22408498

  14. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, J.B.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W.

    1995-01-10

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity. 2 figures.

  15. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, Joseph B.; Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Tobin, Kenneth W.

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

  16. Optical displacement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Dustin W.

    2008-04-08

    An optical displacement sensor is disclosed which uses a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) coupled to an optical cavity formed by a moveable membrane and an output mirror of the VCSEL. This arrangement renders the lasing characteristics of the VCSEL sensitive to any movement of the membrane produced by sound, vibrations, pressure changes, acceleration, etc. Some embodiments of the optical displacement sensor can further include a light-reflective diffractive lens located on the membrane or adjacent to the VCSEL to control the amount of lasing light coupled back into the VCSEL. A photodetector detects a portion of the lasing light from the VCSEL to provide an electrical output signal for the optical displacement sensor which varies with the movement of the membrane.

  17. Optical rate sensor algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uhde-Lacovara, Jo A.

    1989-01-01

    Optical sensors, in particular Charge Coupled Device (CCD) arrays, will be used on Space Station to track stars in order to provide inertial attitude reference. Algorithms are presented to derive attitude rate from the optical sensors. The first algorithm is a recursive differentiator. A variance reduction factor (VRF) of 0.0228 was achieved with a rise time of 10 samples. A VRF of 0.2522 gives a rise time of 4 samples. The second algorithm is based on the direct manipulation of the pixel intensity outputs of the sensor. In 1-dimensional simulations, the derived rate was with 0.07 percent of the actual rate in the presence of additive Gaussian noise with a signal to noise ratio of 60 dB.

  18. Capacitive proximity sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31

    A proximity sensor based on a closed field circuit is disclosed. The circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plates that creates an oscillating displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of objects to the plate array. Preferably the plates are in the form of a group of three pair of symmetric plates having a common center, arranged in a hexagonal pattern with opposing plates linked as a pair. The sensor produces logic level pulses suitable for interfacing with a computer or process controller. The proximity sensor can be incorporated into a load cell, a differential pressure gauge, or a device for measuring the consistency of a characteristic of a material where a variation in the consistency causes the dielectric constant of the material to change. 14 figs.

  19. Self-powered sensors.

    PubMed

    Arechederra, Robert L; Minteer, Shelley D

    2011-06-01

    One of the problems associated with miniaturization and portability of sensors is the power supply. Power supplies, such as batteries, are difficult to miniaturize and require a sensor design that allows for easy replacement or recharging. This review describes the field of self-powered sensing, where the sensor itself provides the power for the sensing device. Most self-powered-sensing strategies employ either nuclear energy conversion or electrochemical energy conversion. Nuclear energy conversion is employed for radioisotope or nuclear reactor sensing. Electrochemical energy conversion is employed for chemical and biological sensing. This review details the common strategies for self-powered nuclear, chemical, and biological sensing and discusses the future of the technology. PMID:21359574

  20. Chemiresistor urea sensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Robert S.

    1997-01-01

    A sensor to detect and quantify urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures, and in blood and other body fluids. The sensor is based upon a chemiresistor, which consists of an interdigitated array of metal fingers between which a resistance measured. The interdigitated array is fabricated on a suitable substrate. The surface of the array of fingers is covered with a coating containing the enzyme urease which catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to form the ammonium ion, the bicarbonate ion, and hydroxide-chemical products which provide the basis for the measured signal. In a typical application, the sensor could be used at bedside, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. Also, the chemiresistor used to detect urea, can be utilized with a reference chemiresistor which does not contain urease, and connected in a differential measurement arrangement, such that the reference chemiresistor would cancel out any fluctuations due to background effects.

  1. Adaptive sensor fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadar, Ivan

    1995-07-01

    A perceptual reasoning system adaptively extracting, associating, and fusing information from multiple sources, at various levels of abstraction, is considered as the building block for the next generation of surveillance systems. A system architecture is presented which makes use of both centralized and distributed predetection fusion combined with intelligent monitor and control coupling both on-platform and off-board track and decision level fusion results. The goal of this system is to create a `gestalt fused sensor system' whose information product is greater than the sum of the information products from the individual sensors and has performance superior to either individual or a sub-group of combined sensors. The application of this architectural concept to the law enforcement arena (e.g. drug interdiction) utilizing multiple spatially and temporally diverse surveillance platforms and/or information sources, is used to illustrate the benefits of the adaptive perceptual reasoning system concept.

  2. Environmental exposure tracking sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havens, Teresa; Everhart, Joel; McFerran, Jace

    2009-03-01

    Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) has developed environmental exposure tracking (EET) sensors using shape memory polymer (SMP) to monitor the degradation of perishable items, such as munitions, medicines or foods, by measuring the cumulative exposure to temperature and moisture. SMPs are polymers whose qualities have been altered to give them dynamic shape "memory" properties. Under thermal or moisture stimuli, SMP exhibits a radical change from a rigid thermoset to a highly flexible, elastic state. The dynamic response of the SMP can be tailored to match the degradation profile of the perishable item. SMP-based EET sensors require no digital memory or internal power supply and provide the capability of inexpensive, long-term life cycle monitoring thermal and moisture exposure over time. In a Phase I and II SBIR effort with the Navy, CRG demonstrated the feasibility of SMP-based EET sensor with two material systems. These material systems required different activation stimuli, heat or water vapor pressure. CRG developed the ability to tailor these materials to customize the dynamic response to match various degradation profiles of munitions. CRG optimized and characterized the SMP formulations and sensor design configuration to develop a suite of data from which any degradation profile can be met. CRG's EET sensors are capable of monitoring temperatures from -30 °C to 260 °C. The prototypes monitor cumulative thermal exposure and provide real-time information in a visually readable or a remotely interrogated version. CRG is currently scaling up the manufacture of the sensors for munitions reliability applications with the Navy.

  3. Distributed Sensors Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, Sean M.

    2003-08-30

    The Distributed Sensors Simulator (DSS) is an infrastructure that allows the user to debug and test software for distributed sensor networks without the commitment inherent in using hardware. The flexibility of DSS allows developers and researchers to investigate topological, phenomenological, networking, robustness, and scaling issues; explore arbitrary algorithms for DSNs; and is particularly useful as a proof-of-concept tool. The user provides data on node location and specifications, defines event phenomena, and plugs in the application(s) to run. DSS in turn provides the virtual environmental embedding — but exposed to the user like no true embedding could ever be.

  4. Implantable medical sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Darrow, Christopher B.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Lane, Stephen M.; Lee, Abraham P.; Wang, Amy W.

    2001-01-01

    An implantable chemical sensor system for medical applications is described which permits selective recognition of an analyte using an expandable biocompatible sensor, such as a polymer, that undergoes a dimensional change in the presence of the analyte. The expandable polymer is incorporated into an electronic circuit component that changes its properties (e.g., frequency) when the polymer changes dimension. As the circuit changes its characteristics, an external interrogator transmits a signal transdermally to the transducer, and the concentration of the analyte is determined from the measured changes in the circuit. This invention may be used for minimally invasive monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

  5. Chemical sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Darrow, Christopher B.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Lane, Stephen M.; Lee, Abraham P.; Wang, Amy W.

    2002-01-01

    An implantable chemical sensor system for medical applications is described which permits selective recognition of an analyte using an expandable biocompatible sensor, such as a polymer, that undergoes a dimensional change in the presence of the analyte. The expandable polymer is incorporated into an electronic circuit component that changes its properties (e.g., frequency) when the polymer changes dimension. As the circuit changes its characteristics, an external interrogator transmits a signal transdermally to the transducer, and the concentration of the analyte is determined from the measured changes in the circuit. This invention may be used for minimally invasive monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

  6. Advanced sensors and instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calloway, Raymond S.; Zimmerman, Joe E.; Douglas, Kevin R.; Morrison, Rusty

    1990-01-01

    NASA is currently investigating the readiness of Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation to meet the requirements of new initiatives in space. The following technical objectives and technologies are briefly discussed: smart and nonintrusive sensors; onboard signal and data processing; high capacity and rate adaptive data acquisition systems; onboard computing; high capacity and rate onboard storage; efficient onboard data distribution; high capacity telemetry; ground and flight test support instrumentation; power distribution; and workstations, video/lighting. The requirements for high fidelity data (accuracy, frequency, quantity, spatial resolution) in hostile environments will continue to push the technology developers and users to extend the performance of their products and to develop new generations.

  7. Integrated rate isolation sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, Tye (Inventor); Henderson, Timothy (Inventor); Phillips, Richard (Inventor); Zimpfer, Doug (Inventor); Crain, Tim (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    In one embodiment, a system for providing fault-tolerant inertial measurement data includes a sensor for measuring an inertial parameter and a processor. The sensor has less accuracy than a typical inertial measurement unit (IMU). The processor detects whether a difference exists between a first data stream received from a first inertial measurement unit and a second data stream received from a second inertial measurement unit. Upon detecting a difference, the processor determines whether at least one of the first or second inertial measurement units has failed by comparing each of the first and second data streams to the inertial parameter.

  8. Small obstacle avoidance sensor.

    PubMed

    Vollmerhausen, Richard H

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a laser ranging sensor that is suitable for applications like small unmanned aerial vehicles. The hardware consists of a diode emitter array and line-scan charge coupled devices. A structured-light technique measures ranges up to 30 meters for 64 field angles in a 90 degree field of view. Operation is eye safe, and the laser wavelength is not visible to night vision goggles. This paper describes a specific sensor design in order to illustrate performance for a given package size. PMID:23878527

  9. Noninvasive biomedical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Daniel; Bullock, Audra

    2003-07-01

    A non-invasive biomedical sensor for monitoring glucose levels is described. The sensor utilizes laser light to determine glucose levels in urine, but could also be used for drug screening and diagnosis of other medical conditions. The glucose measurement is based on modulation spectroscopy with harmonic analysis. Active signal processing and filtering are used to increase the signal-to-noise ratio and decreases the measurement time to allow for real time sample analysis. Preliminary data are given which show the concentration of glucose in a control sample. Future applications of this technology, for example, as a portable multipurpose bio-medical analysis tool, are explored.

  10. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; Hoffheins, Barbara S.; Fleming, Pamela H.

    1994-01-01

    A hydrogen sensor element comprises an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having a thin-film metallization deposited thereon which forms at least two resistors on the substrate. The metallization comprises a layer of Pd or a Pd alloy for sensing hydrogen and an underlying intermediate metal layer for providing enhanced adhesion of the metallization to the substrate. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors, and at least one of the resistors is left uncovered. The difference in electrical resistances of the covered resistor and the uncovered resistor is related to hydrogen concentration in a gas to which the sensor element is exposed.

  11. Distributed Sensors Simulator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2003-08-30

    The Distributed Sensors Simulator (DSS) is an infrastructure that allows the user to debug and test software for distributed sensor networks without the commitment inherent in using hardware. The flexibility of DSS allows developers and researchers to investigate topological, phenomenological, networking, robustness, and scaling issues; explore arbitrary algorithms for DSNs; and is particularly useful as a proof-of-concept tool. The user provides data on node location and specifications, defines event phenomena, and plugs in the application(s)more » to run. DSS in turn provides the virtual environmental embedding — but exposed to the user like no true embedding could ever be.« less

  12. Novel nanostructured oxygen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boardman, Alan James

    New government regulations and industry requirements for medical oxygen sensors require the development of alternate materials and process optimization of primary sensor components. Current oxygen sensors are not compliant with the Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) Directive. This work focused on two areas. First, was finding suitable readily available materials for the sensor anodes. Second was optimizing the processing of the sensor cathode membrane for reduced delamination. Oxygen sensors were made using tin (Sn) and bismuth (Bi) electrodes, potassium hydroxide (KOH) and acetic acid (CH3COOH) electrolytes with platinum (Pt) and gold (Au) reference electrodes. Bi electrodes were fabricated by casting and pressing processes. Electrochemical characterization of the Sn and Bi electrodes was performed by Cyclic Voltammetry (CV), Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and sensing characterization per BSEN ISO 21647:2009 at various oxygen percentages, 0%, 20.9% and 100% oxygen levels with an automated test apparatus. The Sn anode with both electrolyte solutions showed good oxygen sensing properties and performance in a sensor. This system shows promise for replacement of Pb electrodes as required by the RoHS Directive. The Bi anode with Au cathode in both KOH and CH3COOH electrolytes showed acceptable performance and oxygen sensing properties. The Bi anodes fabricated by separate manufacturing methods demonstrated effectiveness for use in medical oxygen sensors. Gold thin films were prepared by magnetron sputtering on Flouroethylene Polymer (FEP) films. The FEP substrate temperature ranged from -77°C to 50°C. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and 4-point resistivity characterized the effects of substrate temperature to Au thin film particle size. XRD peak broadening and resistivity measurements showed a strong correlation of particle size to FEP substrate temperature. Particle size at 50°C was 594A and the -77°C particle size was 2.4 x 103A. Substrate

  13. Fluorescent temperature sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Gary A; Baker, Sheila N; McCleskey, T Mark

    2009-03-03

    The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  14. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, F.H.; Brosha, E.L.

    1997-12-09

    A potentiometric oxygen sensor is formed having a logarithmic response to a differential oxygen concentration while operating as a Nernstian-type sensor. Very thin films of mixed conducting oxide materials form electrode services while permitting diffusional oxygen access to the interface between the zirconia electrolyte and the electrode. Diffusion of oxygen through the mixed oxide is not rate-limiting. Metal electrodes are not used so that morphological changes in the electrode structure do not occur during extended operation at elevated temperatures. 6 figs.

  15. Nonintrusive shaft speed sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkhoudarian, S.; Wyett, L.; Maram, J.

    1985-01-01

    Reusable rocket engines such as the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME), the Orbital Transfer Vehicles (OTV), etc., have throttling capabilities that require real-time, closed-loop control systems of engine propellant flows, combustion temperatures and pressures, and turbopump rotary speeds. In the case of the SSME, there are four turbopumps that require real-time measurement and control of their rotary speeds. Variable-reluctance magnetic speed sensors were designed, fabricated, and tested for all four turbopumps, resulting in the successful implementation and operation of three of these speed sensors during each of the 12 Shuttle flights.

  16. Torque sensor having a spoked sensor element support structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, Boris J. (Inventor); Schier, J. Alan (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Piezoelectric sensor devices are attached across pairs of circularly arranged spokes arrayed on the periphery of an annular ring. The sensor devices each include a preloaded steel ball mounting arrangement for mounting a piezoelectric sensor element. A first circular interface plate on one side of the sensor structure attaches to alternate one of the spokes, and a circular interface plate on the opposite side of the same diameter as the first interface plate attaches to the remaining spokes.

  17. New Generation Sensor Web Enablement

    PubMed Central

    Bröring, Arne; Echterhoff, Johannes; Jirka, Simon; Simonis, Ingo; Everding, Thomas; Stasch, Christoph; Liang, Steve; Lemmens, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Many sensor networks have been deployed to monitor Earth’s environment, and more will follow in the future. Environmental sensors have improved continuously by becoming smaller, cheaper, and more intelligent. Due to the large number of sensor manufacturers and differing accompanying protocols, integrating diverse sensors into observation systems is not straightforward. A coherent infrastructure is needed to treat sensors in an interoperable, platform-independent and uniform way. The concept of the Sensor Web reflects such a kind of infrastructure for sharing, finding, and accessing sensors and their data across different applications. It hides the heterogeneous sensor hardware and communication protocols from the applications built on top of it. The Sensor Web Enablement initiative of the Open Geospatial Consortium standardizes web service interfaces and data encodings which can be used as building blocks for a Sensor Web. This article illustrates and analyzes the recent developments of the new generation of the Sensor Web Enablement specification framework. Further, we relate the Sensor Web to other emerging concepts such as the Web of Things and point out challenges and resulting future work topics for research on Sensor Web Enablement. PMID:22163760

  18. Automotive Sensors and MEMS Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonomura, Yutaka

    - Automotive sensors are used for emission gas purification, energy conservation, car kinematic performance, safety and ITS (intelligent transportation system). The comparison of the sensor characteristics was made for their application area. Many kinds of the principles are applied for the sensors. There are two types of sensors, such as physical and chemical one. Many of the automotive sensors are physical type such as mechanical sensors. And a gas sensor is a chemical type. The sensors have been remarkably developed with the advancement of the MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems) technology. In this paper, gas, pressure, combustion pressure, acceleration, magnetic, and angular rate sensors for automotive use are explained with their features. The sensors are key devices to control cars in the engine, power train, chassis and safety systems. The environment resistance, long term reliability, and low cost are required for the automotive sensors. They are very hard to be resolved. However, the sensor technology contributes greatly to improving global environment, energy conservation, and safety. The applications of automotive sensors will be expanded with the automobile developments.

  19. Coaxial line measurement and analysis of electromagnetic properties of soils for sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folks, William R.; North, Ryan E.; Kelley, Julie R.; Cunningham, Amy L.; McKenna, Jason R.

    2011-06-01

    We report complex permittivity, conductivity, magnetic susceptibility, and attenuation for soils collected from a typical site in a current theater of operations. Our experimental setup consists of three network analyzers along with custombuilt sample holders and data reduction and analysis software. The sample holder has the advantage of large sample volume and a resulting higher signal to noise ratio. This system was developed to determine the electrical properties of soils over a wide frequency range from 100 Hz to 8 GHz. The lower frequencies are applicable to capacitive sensors for small shallow targets, while the higher frequencies are applicable to ground-penetrating radar (GPR) from 50 MHz to 2 GHz and beyond. S-parameter data is collected and reduced using a method, initially developed by Nicolson and Ross (1970)1, for the determination of dielectric permittivity, magnetic permeability, and loss tangent from measured Sparameter data. Experimental results are compared with site geology and mineralogy. Applications include detection of tunnels, land mines, unexploded ordinance (UXO), concrete reinforcements, and other shallow compact targets.

  20. Aerospace Sensor Systems: From Sensor Development To Vehicle Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of years of sensor system development and application for aerospace systems. The emphasis of this work is on developing advanced capabilities for measurement and control of aeropropulsion and crew vehicle systems as well as monitoring the safety of those systems. Specific areas of work include chemical species sensors, thin film thermocouples and strain gages, heat flux gages, fuel gages, SiC based electronic devices and sensors, space qualified electronics, and MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) as well as integrated and multifunctional sensor systems. Each sensor type has its own technical challenges related to integration and reliability in a given application. The general approach has been to develop base sensor technology using microfabrication techniques, integrate sensors with "smart" hardware and software, and demonstrate those systems in a range of aerospace applications. Descriptions of the sensor elements, their integration into sensors systems, and examples of sensor system applications will be discussed. Finally, suggestions related to the future of sensor technology will be given. It is concluded that smart micro/nano sensor technology can revolutionize aerospace applications, but significant challenges exist in maturing the technology and demonstrating its value in real-life applications.

  1. Cryogenic Multichannel Silicon Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The dark squares are silicon pressure sensors. They are bonded to a pre-drilled substrate which supports the sensors and multiplex chips. The substrate is bonded to a metallic tubing plate which has individual pressure ports.

  2. Gait Analysis Using Wearable Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Weijun; Liu, Tao; Zheng, Rencheng; Feng, Hutian

    2012-01-01

    Gait analysis using wearable sensors is an inexpensive, convenient, and efficient manner of providing useful information for multiple health-related applications. As a clinical tool applied in the rehabilitation and diagnosis of medical conditions and sport activities, gait analysis using wearable sensors shows great prospects. The current paper reviews available wearable sensors and ambulatory gait analysis methods based on the various wearable sensors. After an introduction of the gait phases, the principles and features of wearable sensors used in gait analysis are provided. The gait analysis methods based on wearable sensors is divided into gait kinematics, gait kinetics, and electromyography. Studies on the current methods are reviewed, and applications in sports, rehabilitation, and clinical diagnosis are summarized separately. With the development of sensor technology and the analysis method, gait analysis using wearable sensors is expected to play an increasingly important role in clinical applications. PMID:22438763

  3. Applications of Microbial Cell Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura-Shimizu, Mifumi; Karube, Isao

    Since the first microbial cell sensor was studied by Karube et al. in 1977, many types of microbial cell sensors have been developed as analytical tools. The microbial cell sensor utilizes microbes as a sensing element and a transducer. The characteristics of microbial cell sensors as sensing devices are a complete contrast to those of enzyme sensors or immunosensors, which are highly specific for the substrates of interest, although the specificity of the microbial cell sensor has been improved by genetic modification of the microbe used as the sensing element. Microbial cell sensors have the advantages of tolerance to measuring conditions, a long lifetime, and good cost performance, and have the disadvantage of a long response time. In this review, applications of microbial cell sensors are summarized.

  4. Gait analysis using wearable sensors.

    PubMed

    Tao, Weijun; Liu, Tao; Zheng, Rencheng; Feng, Hutian

    2012-01-01

    Gait analysis using wearable sensors is an inexpensive, convenient, and efficient manner of providing useful information for multiple health-related applications. As a clinical tool applied in the rehabilitation and diagnosis of medical conditions and sport activities, gait analysis using wearable sensors shows great prospects. The current paper reviews available wearable sensors and ambulatory gait analysis methods based on the various wearable sensors. After an introduction of the gait phases, the principles and features of wearable sensors used in gait analysis are provided. The gait analysis methods based on wearable sensors is divided into gait kinematics, gait kinetics, and electromyography. Studies on the current methods are reviewed, and applications in sports, rehabilitation, and clinical diagnosis are summarized separately. With the development of sensor technology and the analysis method, gait analysis using wearable sensors is expected to play an increasingly important role in clinical applications. PMID:22438763

  5. Thick film hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hoffheins, Barbara S.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors.

  6. Thick film hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hoffheins, B.S.; Lauf, R.J.

    1995-09-19

    A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors. 8 figs.

  7. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Field, M.E.; Sullivan, W.H.

    1985-01-29

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge. 2 figs.

  8. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Field, Michael E.; Sullivan, William H.

    1985-01-01

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge.

  9. Gas Sensor Test Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M.; Ryan, M.

    1995-01-01

    A new test chip is being developed to characterize conducting polymers used in gas sensors. The chip, a seven-layer cofired alumina substrate with gold electrodes, contains 11 comb and U- bend test structures. These structures are designed to measure the sheet resistance, conduction anisotropy, and peripheral conduction of spin-coated films that are not subsequently patterned.

  10. Lean blowoff detection sensor

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, Jimmy; Straub, Douglas L.; Chorpening, Benjamin T.; Huckaby, David

    2007-04-03

    Apparatus and method for detecting incipient lean blowoff conditions in a lean premixed combustion nozzle of a gas turbine. A sensor near the flame detects the concentration of hydrocarbon ions and/or electrons produced by combustion and the concentration monitored as a function of time are used to indicate incipient lean blowoff conditions.

  11. Wireless Sensor Networks Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perotti, Jose M.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on hardware and software configurations for a network architecture for sensors. The hardware configuration uses a central station and remote stations. The software configuration uses the 'lost station' software algorithm. The presentation profiles a couple current examples of this network architecture in use.

  12. Optical Pointing Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Joel F.; Metz, Brandon C.

    2010-01-01

    The optical pointing sensor provides a means of directly measuring the relative positions of JPL s Formation Control Testbed (FCT) vehicles without communication. This innovation is a steerable infrared (IR) rangefinder that gives measurements in terms of range and bearing to a passive retroreflector.

  13. Sensor Evaluation Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report is the result of low cost air quality sensor performance trials conducted in the NERL’s on-site laboratories located in the Research Triangle Park, NC during 2012-2013. Such trials were viewed as highly valuable for all parties following the conclusion of the U.S. E...

  14. Electron tunnel sensor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waltman, S. B.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1989-01-01

    The recent development of Scanning Tunneling Microscopy technology allows the application of electron tunneling to position detectors for the first time. The vacuum tunnel junction is one of the most sensitive position detection mechanisms available. It is also compact, simple, and requires little power. A prototype accelerometer based on electron tunneling, and other sensor applications of this promising new technology are described.

  15. Cloud shadow speed sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, V.; Bosch, J. L.; Roberts, S. W.; Kleissl, J.

    2014-06-01

    Changing cloud cover is a major source of solar radiation variability and poses challenges for the integration of solar energy. A compact and economical system is presented that measures cloud shadow motion vectors to estimate power plant ramp rates and provide short-term solar irradiance forecasts. The cloud shadow speed sensor (CSS) is constructed using an array of luminance sensors and a high-speed data acquisition system to resolve the progression of cloud passages across the sensor footprint. An embedded microcontroller acquires the sensor data and uses a cross-correlation algorithm to determine cloud shadow motion vectors. The CSS was validated against an artificial shading test apparatus, an alternative method of cloud motion detection from ground-measured irradiance (linear cloud edge, LCE), and a UC San Diego sky imager (USI). The CSS detected artificial shadow directions and speeds to within 15° and 6% accuracy, respectively. The CSS detected (real) cloud shadow directions and speeds with average weighted root-mean-square difference of 22° and 1.9 m s-1 when compared to USI and 33° and 1.5 m s-1 when compared to LCE results.

  16. Cloud speed sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, V.; Bosch, J. L.; Roberts, S. W.; Kleissl, J.

    2013-10-01

    Changing cloud cover is a major source of solar radiation variability and poses challenges for the integration of solar energy. A compact and economical system that measures cloud motion vectors to estimate power plant ramp rates and provide short term solar irradiance forecasts is presented. The Cloud Speed Sensor (CSS) is constructed using an array of luminance sensors and high-speed data acquisition to resolve the progression of cloud passages across the sensor footprint. An embedded microcontroller acquires the sensor data and uses a cross-correlation algorithm to determine cloud motion vectors. The CSS was validated against an artificial shading test apparatus, an alternative method of cloud motion detection from ground measured irradiance (Linear Cloud Edge, LCE), and a UC San Diego Sky Imager (USI). The CSS detected artificial shadow directions and speeds to within 15 and 6% accuracy, respectively. The CSS detected (real) cloud directions and speeds without average bias and with average weighted root mean square difference of 22° and 1.9 m s-1 when compared to USI and 33° and 1.5 m s-1 when compared to LCE results.

  17. Supramolecular Based Membrane Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Norouzi, Parviz; Rezapour, Morteza; Faridbod, Farnoush; Pourjavid, Mohammad Reza

    2006-01-01

    Supramolecular chemistry can be defined as a field of chemistry, which studies the complex multi-molecular species formed from molecular components that have relatively simpler structures. This field has been subject to extensive research over the past four decades. This review discusses classification of supramolecules and their application in design and construction of ion selective sensors.

  18. Near infrared testbed sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanderson, R. B.; McCalmont, J. F.; Montgomery, J. B.; Johnson, R. S.; McDermott, D. J.

    2007-04-01

    A new tactical airborne multicolor missile warning testbed was developed and fielded as part of an Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) initiative focusing on clutter and missile signature measurements for algorithm development. Multicolor discrimination is one of the most effective ways of improving the performance of infrared missile warning sensors, particularly for heavy clutter situations. Its utility has been demonstrated in multiple fielded sensors. Traditionally, multicolor discrimination has been performed in the mid-infrared, 3-5 μm band, where the molecular emission of CO and CO2 characteristic of a combustion process is readily distinguished from the continuum of a black body radiator. Current infrared warning sensor development is focused on near infrared (NIR) staring mosaic detector arrays that provide similar spectral discrimination in different bands to provide a cost effective and mechanically simpler system. This, in turn, has required that multicolor clutter data be collected for both analysis and algorithm development. The developed sensor test bed is a multi-camera system 1004x1004 FPA coupled with optimized filters integrated with the optics. The collection portion includes a ruggedized field-programmable gate array processor coupled with with an integrated controller/tracker and fast disk array capable of real-time processing and collection of up to 60 full frames per second. This configuration allowed the collection and real-time processing of temporally correlated, radiometrically calibrated data in multiple spectral bands that was then compared to background and target imagery taken previously

  19. Carbon dioxide sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dutta, Prabir K.; Lee, Inhee; Akbar, Sheikh A.

    2011-11-15

    The present invention generally relates to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor that incorporates lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3). In another embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor has a reduced sensitivity to humidity due to a sensing electrode with a layered structure of lithium carbonate and barium carbonate. In still another embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of producing carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors having lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3).

  20. Composite sensor membrane

    DOEpatents

    Majumdar, Arun; Satyanarayana, Srinath; Yue, Min

    2008-03-18

    A sensor may include a membrane to deflect in response to a change in surface stress, where a layer on the membrane is to couple one or more probe molecules with the membrane. The membrane may deflect when a target molecule reacts with one or more probe molecules.

  1. Fiber Sagnac interferometer temperature sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Starodumov, A.N.; Zenteno, L.A.; Monzon, D.; De La Rosa, E.

    1997-01-01

    A modified Sagnac interferometer-based fiber temperature sensor is proposed. Polarization independent operation and high temperature sensitivity of this class of sensors make them cost effective instruments for temperature measurements. A comparison of the proposed sensor with Bragg grating and long-period grating fiber sensors is derived. A temperature-induced spectral displacement of 0.99 nm/K is demonstrated for an internal stress birefringent fiber-based Sagnac interferometer. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Sensor arrays for detecting microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Nathan S. (Inventor); Freund, Michael S. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A sensor array for detecting a microorganism comprising first and second sensors electrically connected to an electrical measuring apparatus, wherein the sensors comprise a region of nonconducting organic material and a region of conducting material compositionally that is different than the nonconducting organic material and an electrical path through the regions of nonconducting organic material and the conducting material. A system for identifying microorganisms using the sensor array, a computer and a pattern recognition algorithm, such as a neural net are also disclosed.

  3. Mesh networked unattended ground sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colling, Kent; Calcutt, Wade; Winston, Mark; Jones, Barry

    2006-05-01

    McQ has developed a family of low cost unattended ground sensors that utilize self-configured, mesh network communications for wireless sensing. Intended for use in an urban environment, the area monitored by the sensor system poses a communication challenge. A discussion into the sensor's communication performance and how it affects sensor installation and the operation of the system once deployed is presented.

  4. Capacitive Position Sensor For Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, Thomas R.; Kaiser, William J.; Kenny, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    Capacitive position sensor measures displacement of proof mass in prototype accelerometer described in "Single-Crystal Springs for Accelerometers" (NPO-18795). Sensor is ultrasensitive, miniature device operating at ultra-high frequency and described in more detail in "Ultra-High-Frequency Capacitive Displacement Sensor," (NPO-18675). Advances in design and fabrication of prototype accelerometer also applicable to magnetometers and other sensors in which sensed quantities measured in terms of deflections of small springs.

  5. Wireless Sensor Networks: Monitoring and Control

    SciTech Connect

    Hastbacka, Mildred; Ponoum, Ratcharit; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-05-31

    The article discusses wireless sensor technologies for building energy monitoring and control. This article, also, addresses wireless sensor networks as well as benefits and challenges of using wireless sensors. The energy savings and market potential of wireless sensors are reviewed.

  6. Emissive sensors and devices incorporating these sensors

    DOEpatents

    Swager, Timothy M; Zhang, Shi-Wei

    2013-02-05

    The present invention generally relates to luminescent and/or optically absorbing compositions and/or precursors to those compositions, including solid films incorporating these compositions/precursors, exhibiting increased luminescent lifetimes, quantum yields, enhanced stabilities and/or amplified emissions. The present invention also relates to sensors and methods for sensing analytes through luminescent and/or optically absorbing properties of these compositions and/or precursors. Examples of analytes detectable by the invention include electrophiles, alkylating agents, thionyl halides, and phosphate ester groups including phosphoryl halides, cyanides and thioates such as those found in certain chemical warfare agents. The present invention additionally relates to devices and methods for amplifying emissions, such as those produced using the above-described compositions and/or precursors, by incorporating the composition and/or precursor within a polymer having an energy migration pathway. In some cases, the compositions and/or precursors thereof include a compound capable of undergoing a cyclization reaction.

  7. Shape memory alloy thaw sensors

    DOEpatents

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Martinez, David R.

    1998-01-01

    A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the Austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states.

  8. Handbook of sensor technical characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, S.

    1982-01-01

    Space and terrestrial applications remote sensor systems are described. Each sensor is presented separately. Information is included on its objectives, description, technical characteristics, data products obtained, data archives location, period of operation, and measurement and potential derived parameters. Each sensor is cross indexed.

  9. Sensor system for web inspection

    DOEpatents

    Sleefe, Gerard E.; Rudnick, Thomas J.; Novak, James L.

    2002-01-01

    A system for electrically measuring variations over a flexible web has a capacitive sensor including spaced electrically conductive, transmit and receive electrodes mounted on a flexible substrate. The sensor is held against a flexible web with sufficient force to deflect the path of the web, which moves relative to the sensor.

  10. SensorNet Node Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-09-01

    The software in the SensorNet Node adopts and builds on IEEE 1451 interface principles to read data from and control sensors, stores the data in internal database structures, and transmits it in adapted Web Feature Services protocol packets to the SensorNet database. Failover software ensures that at least one available mode of communication remains alive.

  11. Evaluation of soil moisture sensors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated the measurement accuracy and repeatability of the EC-5 and 5TM soil volumetric water content (SVWC) sensors, MPS-2 and 200SS soil water potential (SWP) sensors, and 200TS soil temperature sensor. Six 183cm x 183cm x 71cm wooden compartments were built inside a greenhouse, and e...

  12. Level Sensor for Cryogenic Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, N. E.; Schroff, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Hot wire sensor combined with voltage-comparator circuit monitors liquid level in cryogenic-fluid storage tanks. Sensor circuit adaptable to different liquids and sensors. Constant-current source drives current through sensing probe and fixed resistor. Voltage comparator circuits interpret voltage drops to tell whether probe is immersed in liquid and is current in probe.

  13. MEMS Rate Sensors for Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gambino, Joel P.

    1999-01-01

    Micromachined Electro Mechanical System Rate sensors offer many advantages that make them attractive for space use. They are smaller, consume less power, and cost less than the systems currently available. MEMS Rate Sensors however, have not been optimized for use on spacecraft. This paper describes an approach to developing MEMS Rate Sensors systems for space use.

  14. Time-domain fiber loop ringdown sensor and sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Malik

    Optical fibers have been mostly used in fiber optic communications, imaging optics, sensing technology, etc. Fiber optic sensors have gained increasing attention for scientific and structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. In this study, fiber loop ringdown (FLRD) sensors were fabricated for scientific, SHM, and sensor networking applications. FLRD biosensors were fabricated for both bulk refractive index (RI)- and surface RI-based DNA sensing and one type of bacteria sensing. Furthermore, the effect of glucose oxidase (GOD) immobilization at the sensor head on sensor performance was evaluated for both glucose and synthetic urine solutions with glucose concentration between 0.1% and 10%. Detection sensitivities of the glucose sensors were achieved as low as 0.05%. For chemical sensing, heavy water, ranging from 97% to 10%, and several elemental solutions were monitored by using the FLRD chemical sensors. Bulk index-based FLRD sensing showed that trace elements can be detected in deionized water. For physical sensing, water and cracking sensors were fabricated and embedded into concrete. A partially-etched single-mode fiber (SMF) was embedded into a concrete bar for water monitoring while a bare SMF without any treatment was directly embedded into another concrete bar for monitoring cracks. Furthermore, detection sensitivities of water and crack sensors were investigated as 10 ml water and 0.5 mm surface crack width, respectively. Additionally fiber loop ringdown-fiber Bragg grating temperature sensors were developed in the laboratory; two sensor units for water, crack, and temperature sensing were deployed into a concrete cube in a US Department of Energy test bed (Miami, FL). Multi-sensor applications in a real concrete structure were accomplished by testing the six FLRD sensors. As a final stage, a sensor network was assembled by multiplexing two or three FLRD sensors in series and parallel. Additionally, two FLRD sensors were combined in series and

  15. Passive-sensor data fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolitz, Stephan E.

    1991-08-01

    Problems in multi-sensor data fusion are addressed for passive (angle-only) sensors; the example used is a constellation of IR sensors on satellites in low-earth orbit, viewing up to several hundred ballistic missile targets. The sensor data used in the methodology of the report is 'post-detection,' with targets resolved on single pixels (it is possible for several targets to be resolved on the same pixel). A 'scan' by a sensor is modeled by the formation of a rectangular focal plane image of lit pixels (bits with value 1), representing the presence of at least one target, and unlit pixels (bits with value 0), representing the absence of a target, at a particular time. Approaches and algorithmic solutions are developed which address the following passive sensor data fusion problems: scan-to-scan target association, and association classification. The ultimate objective is to estimate target states, for use in a larger battle management system. Results indicate that successful scan-to-scan target association is feasible at scan rates >=2 Hz, independent of resolution. Sensor-to-sensor target association is difficult at low resolution; even with high-resolution sensors the performance of a standard two-sensor single scan approach is variable and unpredictable, since it is a function of the relative geometry of sensors and targets. A single-scan approach using the Varad algorithm and three sensors is not as sensitive to this relative geometry, but is usable only for high-resolution sensors. Innovative multi-scan and multi-sensor modifications of the three- sensor Varad algorithm are developed which provide excellent performance for a wide range of sensor resolutions. The multi-sensor multi-scan methodology also provides accurate information on the classification of target associations as correct or incorrect. For the scenarios examined with resolution cell sizes ranging from 300 m to 2 km, association errors are less than 5% and essentially no classification errors

  16. Distributed estimation for adaptive sensor selection in wireless sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Magdi S.; Hassan Hamid, Matasm M.

    2014-05-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are usually deployed for monitoring systems with the distributed detection and estimation of sensors. Sensor selection in WSNs is considered for target tracking. A distributed estimation scenario is considered based on the extended information filter. A cost function using the geometrical dilution of precision measure is derived for active sensor selection. A consensus-based estimation method is proposed in this paper for heterogeneous WSNs with two types of sensors. The convergence properties of the proposed estimators are analyzed under time-varying inputs. Accordingly, a new adaptive sensor selection (ASS) algorithm is presented in which the number of active sensors is adaptively determined based on the absolute local innovations vector. Simulation results show that the tracking accuracy of the ASS is comparable to that of the other algorithms.

  17. Open Standards for Sensor Information Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Pouchard, Line Catherine; Poole, Stephen W; Lothian, Josh

    2009-07-01

    This document explores sensor standards, sensor data models, and computer sensor software in order to determine the specifications and data representation best suited for analyzing and monitoring computer system health using embedded sensor data. We review IEEE 1451, OGC Sensor Model Language and Transducer Model Language (TML), lm-sensors and Intelligent Platform Management Inititative (IPMI).

  18. Alarm sensor apparatus for closures

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, James A.; Stoddard, Lawrence M.

    1986-01-01

    An alarm sensor apparatus for closures such as doors and windows, and particularly for closures having loose tolerances such as overhead doors, garage doors or the like, the sensor apparatus comprising a pair of cooperating bracket members, one being attached to the door facing or frame work and the other to the door member, two magnetic sensor elements carried by said bracket members, the bracket members comprising a pair of cooperating orthogonal guide slots and plates and a stop member engageable with one of the sensors for aligning the sensors with respect to each other in all three orthogonal planes when the door is closed.

  19. CMOS Integrated Carbon Nanotube Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, M. S.; Lerner, B.; Boselli, A.; Lamagna, A.; Obregon, P. D. Pareja; Julian, P. M.; Mandolesi, P. S.; Buffa, F. A.

    2009-05-23

    Recently carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been gaining their importance as sensors for gases, temperature and chemicals. Advances in fabrication processes simplify the formation of CNT sensor on silicon substrate. We have integrated single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with complementary metal oxide semiconductor process (CMOS) to produce a chip sensor system. The sensor prototype was designed and fabricated using a 0.30 um CMOS process. The main advantage is that the device has a voltage amplifier so the electrical measure can be taken and amplified inside the sensor. When the conductance of the SWCNTs varies in response to media changes, this is observed as a variation in the output tension accordingly.

  20. A miniature optical breathing sensor

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Jinesh; Semenova, Yuliya; Farrell, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel miniature optical breathing sensor based on an Agarose infiltrated photonic crystal fiber interferometer. The sensor detects the variation in relative humidity that occurs between inhaled and exhaled breath. The sensor interrogation system can determine the breathing pattern in real time and can also predict the breathing rate and the breathing status during respiration. The sensor is suitable for monitoring patients during a magnetic resonance imaging scan where use of sedatives and anesthetics necessitates breathing monitoring; electronic sensors are not suitable in such an environment and a visual observation of the patient's respiratory efforts is often difficult. PMID:23243581

  1. Alarm sensor apparatus for closures

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, J.A.; Stoddard, L.M.

    1984-01-31

    An alarm sensor apparatus for closures such as doors and windows, and particularly for closures having loose tolerances such as overhead doors, garage doors or the like, the sensor apparatus comprising a pair of cooperating bracket members, one being attached to the door facing or framework and the other to the door member, two magnetic sensor elements carried by said bracket members, the bracket members comprising a pair of cooperating orthogonal guide slots and plates and a stop member engageable with one of the sensors for aligning the sensors with respect to each other in all three orthogonal planes when the door is closed.

  2. Smart Sensors for Smart Hands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, A. K.

    1978-01-01

    Proximity, force-torque, touch and slippage sensors developed or applied by the JPL Teleoperator Project for remote manipulator control are described, including sensor data handling by computers for display and control. Examples are quoted showing the significance of these sensors for manual or computer control of manipulators. An interesting example is a proximity sensor system implemented for a four-claw JSC end effector and tested at the Shuttle Manipulator Training Facility of JSC. New sensing concepts aimed at simplifying the implementation of 'Smart Sensors for Smart Hands' in the space environment are discussed.

  3. Communications for unattended sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemeroff, Jay L.; Angelini, Paul; Orpilla, Mont; Garcia, Luis; DiPierro, Stefano

    2004-07-01

    The future model of the US Army's Future Combat Systems (FCS) and the Future Force reflects a combat force that utilizes lighter armor protection than the current standard. Survival on the future battlefield will be increased by the use of advanced situational awareness provided by unattended tactical and urban sensors that detect, identify, and track enemy targets and threats. Successful implementation of these critical sensor fields requires the development of advanced sensors, sensor and data-fusion processors, and a specialized communications network. To ensure warfighter and asset survivability, the communications must be capable of near real-time dissemination of the sensor data using robust, secure, stealthy, and jam resistant links so that the proper and decisive action can be taken. Communications will be provided to a wide-array of mission-specific sensors that are capable of processing data from acoustic, magnetic, seismic, and/or Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear (CBRN) sensors. Other, more powerful, sensor node configurations will be capable of fusing sensor data and intelligently collect and process data images from infrared or visual imaging cameras. The radio waveform and networking protocols being developed under the Soldier Level Integrated Communications Environment (SLICE) Soldier Radio Waveform (SRW) and the Networked Sensors for the Future Force Advanced Technology Demonstration are part of an effort to develop a common waveform family which will operate across multiple tactical domains including dismounted soldiers, ground sensor, munitions, missiles and robotics. These waveform technologies will ultimately be transitioned to the JTRS library, specifically the Cluster 5 requirement.

  4. Two terminal micropower radar sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-11-07

    A simple, low power ultra-wideband radar motion sensor/switch configuration connects a power source and load to ground. The switch is connected to and controlled by the signal output of a radar motion sensor. The power input of the motion sensor is connected to the load through a diode which conducts power to the motion sensor when the switch is open. A storage capacitor or rechargeable battery is connected to the power input of the motion sensor. The storage capacitor or battery is charged when the switch is open and powers the motion sensor when the switch is closed. The motion sensor and switch are connected between the same two terminals between the source/load and ground. 3 figs.

  5. Two terminal micropower radar sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    A simple, low power ultra-wideband radar motion sensor/switch configuration connects a power source and load to ground. The switch is connected to and controlled by the signal output of a radar motion sensor. The power input of the motion sensor is connected to the load through a diode which conducts power to the motion sensor when the switch is open. A storage capacitor or rechargeable battery is connected to the power input of the motion sensor. The storage capacitor or battery is charged when the switch is open and powers the motion sensor when the switch is closed. The motion sensor and switch are connected between the same two terminals between the source/load and ground.

  6. Nuclear sensor signal processing circuit

    DOEpatents

    Kallenbach, Gene A.; Noda, Frank T.; Mitchell, Dean J.; Etzkin, Joshua L.

    2007-02-20

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for a compact and temperature-insensitive nuclear sensor that can be calibrated with a non-hazardous radioactive sample. The nuclear sensor includes a gamma ray sensor that generates tail pulses from radioactive samples. An analog conditioning circuit conditions the tail-pulse signals from the gamma ray sensor, and a tail-pulse simulator circuit generates a plurality of simulated tail-pulse signals. A computer system processes the tail pulses from the gamma ray sensor and the simulated tail pulses from the tail-pulse simulator circuit. The nuclear sensor is calibrated under the control of the computer. The offset is adjusted using the simulated tail pulses. Since the offset is set to zero or near zero, the sensor gain can be adjusted with a non-hazardous radioactive source such as, for example, naturally occurring radiation and potassium chloride.

  7. Hydrocarbon sensors and materials therefor

    DOEpatents

    Pham, Ai Quoc; Glass, Robert S.

    2000-01-01

    An electrochemical hydrocarbon sensor and materials for use in sensors. A suitable proton conducting electrolyte and catalytic materials have been found for specific application in the detection and measurement of non-methane hydrocarbons. The sensor comprises a proton conducting electrolyte sandwiched between two electrodes. At least one of the electrodes is covered with a hydrocarbon decomposition catalyst. Two different modes of operation for the hydrocarbon sensors can be used: equilibrium versus non-equilibrium measurements and differential catalytic. The sensor has particular application for on-board monitoring of automobile exhaust gases to evaluate the performance of catalytic converters. In addition, the sensor can be utilized in monitoring any process where hydrocarbons are exhausted, for instance, industrial power plants. The sensor is low cost, rugged, sensitive, simple to fabricate, miniature, and does not suffer cross sensitivities.

  8. Fiber optic flocculation sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Lun K.; Stelwagen, Uilke

    1994-02-01

    A fiber optic flocculation sensor based on measuring the intensity of light reflected by solid particles in suspension (i.e. paper pulp) in a well defined measurement volume, was constructed. This sensor is designed for monitoring the flocculation state of paper pulp in the papermaking process. The flocculation determines to a great extent the quality of the final product, the paper. Tests with different types of pulp were performed in both a closed loop system and a small paper machine. In this investigation the flocculation state is expressed as a root mean square flocculation index. The flocculation index delivered by this fiber optic system shows a very high correlation with the flocculation index provided by a camera system `looking at' the same pulp, while the latter has a great resemblance with the human perception of the flocculation.

  9. Internal pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dowalo, James A [Blackfoot, ID

    2010-03-16

    A pressure sensor for sensing changes in pressure in an enclosed vessel may include a first chamber having at least one expandable section therein that allows that first chamber to change in length. A reference member mounted within the first chamber moves as a result of changes in length of the first chamber. A second chamber having an expandable section therein allows the second chamber to change in length in response to changes in pressure in the enclosed vessel. The second chamber is operatively associated with the first chamber so that changes in length of the second chamber result in changes in length of the first chamber. A sensor operatively associated with the reference member detects changes in position of the reference member. Changes in position of the reference member are related to changes in pressure in the enclosed vessel.

  10. Spectrally tunable pixel sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langfelder, G.; Buffa, C.; Longoni, A. F.; Zaraga, F.

    2013-01-01

    They are here reported the developments and experimental results of fully operating matrices of spectrally tunable pixels based on the Transverse Field Detector (TFD). Unlike several digital imaging sensors based on color filter arrays or layered junctions, the TFD has the peculiar feature of having electrically tunable spectral sensitivities. In this way the sensor color space is not fixed a priori but can be real-time adjusted, e.g. for a better adaptation to the scene content or for multispectral capture. These advantages come at the cost of an increased complexity both for the photosensitive elements and for the readout electronics. The challenges in the realization of a matrix of TFD pixels are analyzed in this work. First experimental results on an 8x8 (x 3 colors) and on a 64x64 (x 3 colors) matrix will be presented and analyzed in terms of colorimetric and noise performance, and compared to simulation predictions.

  11. Microbial sensor cell arrays.

    PubMed

    Melamed, Sahar; Elad, Tal; Belkin, Shimshon

    2012-02-01

    Motivated by the advantages endowed by high-throughput analysis, researchers have succeeded in incorporating multiple reporter cells into a single platform; the technology now allows the simultaneous scrutiny of a large collection of sensor strains. We review current aspects in cell array technology with emphasis on microbial sensor arrays. We consider various techniques for patterning live cells on solid surfaces, describe different array-based applications and devices, and highlight recent efforts for live cell storage. We review mathematical approaches for deciphering the data emanating from bioreporter collections, and discuss the future of single cell arrays. Innovative technologies for cell patterning, preservation and interpretation are continuously being developed; when they all mature, cell arrays may become an efficient analytical tool, in a scope resembling that of DNA microarray biochips. PMID:22176747

  12. Microelectromechanical inertial sensor

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N.

    2012-06-26

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) inertial sensor is disclosed which can be used to sense a linear acceleration, or a Coriolis acceleration due to an angular rotation rate, or both. The MEM inertial sensor has a proof mass which is supported on a bridge extending across an opening through a substrate, with the proof mass being balanced on the bridge by a pivot, or suspended from the bridge by the pivot. The proof mass can be oscillated in a tangential direction in the plane of the substrate, with any out-of-plane movement of the proof mass in response to a sensed acceleration being optically detected using transmission gratings located about an outer edge of the proof mass to generate a diffracted light pattern which changes with the out-of-plane movement of the proof mass.

  13. INSENS sensor system

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.W.; Baker, J.; Benzel, D.M.; Fuess, D.A.

    1993-09-29

    This paper describes an unattended ground sensor system that has been developed for the immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). The system, known as INSENS, was developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for use by the United States Border Patrol. This system assists in the detection of illegal entry of aliens and contraband (illegal drugs, etc.) into the United States along its land borders. Key to the system is its flexible modular design which allows future software and hardware enhancements to the system without altering the fundamental architecture of the system. Elements of the system include a sensor system capable of processing signals from multiple directional probes, a repeater system, and a handheld monitor system. Seismic, passive infrared (PIR), and magnetic probes are currently supported. The design of the INSENS system elements and their performance are described.

  14. Rigid particulate matter sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Matthew

    2011-02-22

    A sensor to detect particulate matter. The sensor includes a first rigid tube, a second rigid tube, a detection surface electrode, and a bias surface electrode. The second rigid tube is mounted substantially parallel to the first rigid tube. The detection surface electrode is disposed on an outer surface of the first rigid tube. The detection surface electrode is disposed to face the second rigid tube. The bias surface electrode is disposed on an outer surface of the second rigid tube. The bias surface electrode is disposed to face the detection surface electrode on the first rigid tube. An air gap exists between the detection surface electrode and the bias surface electrode to allow particulate matter within an exhaust stream to flow between the detection and bias surface electrodes.

  15. Shaft Position Optical Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth A. (Inventor); Hakum, Claef F. (Inventor); Johnson, Clarence S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is an optical sensor that senses the movement of a shaft. Detection of radial movement is made when a portion of light incident on the shaft sensor-target is blocked. For detection of axial movement, a disk with flat surface is mounted and used to block a portion of light. The variation in the amount of light allowed to pass through is a measure of the position of the shaft. As proposed by this invention, significant improvement is made with respect to sensitivity and linearity of the system when the light is permanently partially blocked. To accomplish this goal this invention adds a boss to the system. To eliminate possible drift of system performance due to LED degradation or temperature variation, a feedback feature is added to the system.

  16. Welding Sensor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A system originally designed for welding components of the huge Space Shuttle external tank led to a laser-based automated welder for industrial use. A laser sensor tracks the seam where two pieces of metal are to be joined, measures gaps, misfits and automatically corrects welding of torch distance and height. A small industrial computer translates the sensor's information to the weld head and records and displays weld data for control purposes and analysis. The system was modified for commercial use by Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Martin Marietta and Applied Research, Inc., which produces the commercial system. Applications are in industrial welding processes that require repetitive operations and a high degree of reliability.

  17. Thin film temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, H. P.; Przybyszewski, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Thin film surface temperature sensors were developed. The sensors were made of platinum-platinum/10 percent rhodium thermocouples with associated thin film-to-lead wire connections and sputtered on aluminum oxide coated simulated turbine blades for testing. Tests included exposure to vibration, low velocity hydrocarbon hot gas flow to 1250 K, and furnace calibrations. Thermal electromotive force was typically two percent below standard type S thermocouples. Mean time to failure was 42 hours at a hot gas flow temperature of 1250 K and an average of 15 cycles to room temperature. Failures were mainly due to separation of the platinum thin film from the aluminum oxide surface. Several techniques to improve the adhesion of the platinum are discussed.

  18. Sensor Validation Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Under a Small Business Innovation Research contract from Lewis Research Center, Expert Microsystems, Inc. developed SureSense, real-time sensor data validation software. This ultra-reliable control and sensing system product was produced through a partnership in 1994 between Expert Microsystems and Intelligent Software Associates, Inc. SureSense was created in response to a NASA need for verifying the reliability of sensor input that operated advanced automation and control systems. The immediate applications included improving the safety and reliability of Space Shuttle Main Engine operations. The company has structured the software to enable application to virtually any process control environment, such as computer integrated manufacturing, power plants, and hazardous gas sensing and control systems.

  19. Fluidic angular velocity sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdahl, C. M. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A fluidic sensor providing a differential pressure signal proportional to the angular velocity of a rotary input is described. In one embodiment the sensor includes a fluid pump having an impeller coupled to a rotary input. A housing forming a constricting fluid flow chamber is connected to the fluid input of the pump. The housing is provided with a fluid flow restrictive input to the flow chamber and a port communicating with the interior of the flow chamber. The differential pressure signal measured across the flow restrictive input is relatively noise free and proportional to the square of the angular velocity of the impeller. In an alternative embodiment, the flow chamber has a generally cylindrical configuration and plates having flow restrictive apertures are disposed within the chamber downstream from the housing port. In this embodiment, the differential pressure signal is found to be approximately linear with the angular velocity of the impeller.

  20. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, M.A.; Sanchez, R.; Dulleck, G.R.

    1996-05-01

    This report covers the development of fiber optic hydrogen and temperature sensors for monitoring dissolved hydrogen gas in transformer oil. The concentration of hydrogen gas is a measure of the corona and spark discharge within the transformer and reflects the state of health of the transformer. Key features of the instrument include use of palladium alloys to enhance hydrogen sensitivity, a microprocessor controlled instrument with RS-232, liquid crystal readout, and 4-20 ma. current loop interfaces. Calibration data for both sensors can be down loaded to the instrument through the RS-232 interface. This project was supported by the Technology Transfer Initiative in collaboration with J. W. Harley, Inc. through the mechanism of a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA).

  1. Single nanoparticle plasmonic sensors.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Manish; Zong, Kelly; Vivekchand, S R C; Gooding, J Justin

    2015-01-01

    The adoption of plasmonic nanomaterials in optical sensors, coupled with the advances in detection techniques, has opened the way for biosensing with single plasmonic particles. Single nanoparticle sensors offer the potential to analyse biochemical interactions at a single-molecule level, thereby allowing us to capture even more information than ensemble measurements. We introduce the concepts behind single nanoparticle sensing and how the localised surface plasmon resonances of these nanoparticles are dependent upon their materials, shape and size. Then we outline the different synthetic approaches, like citrate reduction, seed-mediated and seedless growth, that enable the synthesis of gold and silver nanospheres, nanorods, nanostars, nanoprisms and other nanostructures with tunable sizes. Further, we go into the aspects related to purification and functionalisation of nanoparticles, prior to the fabrication of sensing surfaces. Finally, the recent developments in single nanoparticle detection, spectroscopy and sensing applications are discussed. PMID:26473866

  2. Single Nanoparticle Plasmonic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Manish; Zong, Kelly; Vivekchand, S. R. C.; Gooding, J. Justin

    2015-01-01

    The adoption of plasmonic nanomaterials in optical sensors, coupled with the advances in detection techniques, has opened the way for biosensing with single plasmonic particles. Single nanoparticle sensors offer the potential to analyse biochemical interactions at a single-molecule level, thereby allowing us to capture even more information than ensemble measurements. We introduce the concepts behind single nanoparticle sensing and how the localised surface plasmon resonances of these nanoparticles are dependent upon their materials, shape and size. Then we outline the different synthetic approaches, like citrate reduction, seed-mediated and seedless growth, that enable the synthesis of gold and silver nanospheres, nanorods, nanostars, nanoprisms and other nanostructures with tunable sizes. Further, we go into the aspects related to purification and functionalisation of nanoparticles, prior to the fabrication of sensing surfaces. Finally, the recent developments in single nanoparticle detection, spectroscopy and sensing applications are discussed. PMID:26473866

  3. Microfabricated Chemical Gas Sensors and Sensor Arrays for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.

    2005-01-01

    Aerospace applications require the development of chemical sensors with capabilities beyond those of commercially available sensors. In particular, factors such as minimal sensor size, weight, and power consumption are particularly important. Development areas which have potential aerospace applications include launch vehicle leak detection, engine health monitoring, and fire detection. Sensor development for these applications is based on progress in three types of technology: 1) Micromachining and microfabrication (Microsystem) technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors; 2) The use of nanocrystalline materials to develop sensors with improved stability combined with higher sensitivity; 3) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. This presentation discusses the needs of space applications as well as the point-contact sensor technology and sensor arrays being developed to address these needs. Sensors to measure hydrogen, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides (NO,), carbon monoxide, oxygen, and carbon dioxide are being developed as well as arrays for leak, fire, and emissions detection. Demonstrations of the technology will also be discussed. It is concluded that microfabricated sensor technology has significant potential for use in a range of aerospace applications.

  4. Reputation-Based Secure Sensor Localization in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    He, Jingsha; Xu, Jing; Zhu, Xingye; Zhang, Yuqiang; Zhang, Ting; Fu, Wanqing

    2014-01-01

    Location information of sensor nodes in wireless sensor networks (WSNs) is very important, for it makes information that is collected and reported by the sensor nodes spatially meaningful for applications. Since most current sensor localization schemes rely on location information that is provided by beacon nodes for the regular sensor nodes to locate themselves, the accuracy of localization depends on the accuracy of location information from the beacon nodes. Therefore, the security and reliability of the beacon nodes become critical in the localization of regular sensor nodes. In this paper, we propose a reputation-based security scheme for sensor localization to improve the security and the accuracy of sensor localization in hostile or untrusted environments. In our proposed scheme, the reputation of each beacon node is evaluated based on a reputation evaluation model so that regular sensor nodes can get credible location information from highly reputable beacon nodes to accomplish localization. We also perform a set of simulation experiments to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed reputation-based security scheme. And our simulation results show that the proposed security scheme can enhance the security and, hence, improve the accuracy of sensor localization in hostile or untrusted environments. PMID:24982940

  5. Rotational rate sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hunter, Steven L.

    2002-01-01

    A rate sensor for angular/rotational acceleration includes a housing defining a fluid cavity essentially completely filled with an electrolyte fluid. Within the housing, such as a toroid, ions in the fluid are swept during movement from an excitation electrode toward one of two output electrodes to provide a signal for directional rotation. One or more ground electrodes within the housing serve to neutralize ions, thus preventing any effect at the other output electrode.

  6. Bolt-Tension Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldie, James H.; Bushko, Dariusz A.; Gerver, Michael J.

    1995-01-01

    In technique for measuring tensile force of bolt, specially fabricated magnetostrictive washer used as force transducer. Compact, portable inductive electronic sensor placed against washer to measure tension force. New system provides accurate, economical, and convenient way to measure bolt tension in field. Measurements on test assembly shows that tension can be measured to accuracy of about plus or minus 1 percent of load capacity of typical bolt.

  7. NOx Sensor Development

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

    2009-10-27

    The objectives of this report are: (1) Develop an inexpensive, rapid-response, high-sensitivity and selective electrochemical sensor for oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) for compression-ignition, direct-injection (CIDI) exhaust gas monitoring; (2) Explore and characterize novel, effective sensing methodologies based on impedance measurements; (3) Explore designs and manufacturing methods that could be compatible with mass fabrication; and (4) Collaborate with industry in order to (ultimately) transfer the technology to a supplier for commercialization.

  8. Microparticle Flow Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    2005-01-01

    The microparticle flow sensor (MFS) is a system for identifying and counting microscopic particles entrained in a flowing liquid. The MFS includes a transparent, optoelectronically instrumented laminar-flow chamber (see figure) and a computer for processing instrument-readout data. The MFS could be used to count microparticles (including micro-organisms) in diverse applications -- for example, production of microcapsules, treatment of wastewater, pumping of industrial chemicals, and identification of ownership of liquid products.

  9. Heat Flux Sensor Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, D. W.

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the following objectives: Developing secondary calibration capabilities for MSFC's (Marshall Space Flight Center) Hot Gas Facility (HGF), a Mach 4 Aerothermal Wind Tunnel; Evaluating ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) slug/ thinskin calorimeters against current HGF heat flux sensors; Providing verification of baselined AEDC (Arnold Engineering Development Center) / Medtherm gage calibrations; Addressing future calibration issues involving NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) certified radiant gages.

  10. Steering capaciflector sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenstrom, Del T. (Inventor); Mcconnell, Robert L. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A capacitive type proximity sensor having substantial range and sensitivity between a machine and an intruding object in the immediate vicinity of the machine and having a steerable sensing field has an outer electrical conductor on the machine forming one electrode of a sensor capacitor, the other electrode is the object. The outer conductor is a thin sheet of conductive material with a pair (or more) of intermediate electrical conductors located between the outer conductor and the machine. The pair of intermediate electrical conductors are in close proximity to each other and together form a surface having a size substantially larger than the outer conductor to act as a shield for reducing the parasitic capacitance between the outer conductor and the machine and to steer the sensor field. The pair of intermediate conductors are thin sheets of conductive material substantially wider than the first conductor. The outer and pair of intermediate conductors are attached to a surface on the machine in electrical isolation and with no gaps between the conductors and no gap between the surface and the pair of intermediate conductors. The outer and pair of intermediate conductors are also in conformance with each other and the surface of the machine, and the surface of the machine acts as a ground plane. Variable gain voltage follower circuits are used for coupling, in phase, the instantaneous voltage at the outer electrical conductor to the pair of intermediate electrical conductors and a signal generator is coupled to the outer conductor and is responsive to the capacitance of the sensor capacitor for generating a control signal to the machine.

  11. Nanoparticles as biochemical sensors

    PubMed Central

    El-Ansary, Afaf; Faddah, Layla M

    2010-01-01

    There is little doubt that nanoparticles offer real and new opportunities in many fields, such as biomedicine and materials science. Such particles are small enough to enter almost all areas of the body, including cells and organelles, potentially leading to new approaches in nanomedicine. Sensors for small molecules of biochemical interest are of critical importance. This review is an attempt to trace the use of nanomaterials in biochemical sensor design. The possibility of using nanoparticles functionalized with antibodies as markers for proteins will be elucidated. Moreover, capabilities and applications for nanoparticles based on gold, silver, magnetic, and semiconductor materials (quantum dots), used in optical (absorbance, luminescence, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, surface plasmon resonance), electrochemical, and mass-sensitive sensors will be highlighted. The unique ability of nanosensors to improve the analysis of biochemical fluids is discussed either through considering the use of nanoparticles for in vitro molecular diagnosis, or in the biological/biochemical analysis for in vivo interaction with the human body. PMID:24198472

  12. remote sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Unold, Georg; Junker, Astrid; Altmann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    High-throughput (HT) plant phenotyping systems enable the quantitative analysis of a variety of plant features in a fully automated fashion. The comprehensive phenomics infrastructure at IPK comprises three LemnaTec conveyor belt-based (plant-to-sensor) systems for the simultaneous analysis of large numbers of individual plants of different sizes. For monitoring of environmental conditions within the plant growth area and soil conditions in individual pots, highly modular and flexible remote sensing devices are required. We present the architecture of a wireless sensor network implemented in the HT plant phenotyping systems at IPK in the frame of the German Plant Phenotyping Network (DPPN). This system comprises 350 soil monitoring modules, each measuring water content, water matrix potential, temperature and electric conductivity. Furthermore small and large sensor platforms enable the continuous monitoring of environmental parameters such as incident photosynthetic active radiation, total radiation balance, relative humidity and CO2 concentration and more. Finally we present an introduction into data management and maintenance."

  13. Hydrogen Optical Fiber Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, Robert A.; Beshay, Manal; Cordero, Steven R.

    2008-07-28

    Optically-based hydrogen sensors promise to deliver an added level of safety as hydrogen and fuel cell technologies enter the mainstream. More importantly, they offer reduced power consumption and lower cost, which are desirable for mass production applications such as automobiles and consumer appliances. This program addressed two of the major challenges previously identified in porous optrode-based optical hydrogen sensors: sensitivity to moisture (ambient humidity), and interference from the oxygen in air. Polymer coatings to inhibit moisture and oxygen were developed in conjunction with newer and novel hydrogen sensing chemistries. The results showed that it is possible to achieve sensitive hydrogen detection and rapid response with minimal interference from oxygen and humidity. As a result of this work, a new and more exciting avenue of investigation was developed: the elimination of the porous optrode and deposition of the sensor chemistry directly into the polymer film. Initial results have been promising, and open up a wider range of potential applications from extended optical fiber sensing networks, to simple plastic "stickers" for use around the home and office.

  14. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey, W. W.; Glenn, W. H.; Snitzer, E.

    1983-01-01

    A temperature sensor has been developed that utilizes the temperature dependent absorption of a rare earth doped optical fiber. The temperature measurement is localized at a remote position by splicing a short section of the rare earth fiber into a loop of commercial data communication fiber that sends and returns an optical probe signal to the temperature sensitive section of fiber. The optical probe signal is generated from two different wavelength filtered LED sources. A four port fiber optic coupler combines the two separate wavelength signals into the fiber sensing loop. Time multiplexing is used so that each signal wavelength is present at a different time. A reference signal level measurement is also made from the LED sources and a ratio taken with the sensor signal to produce a transmission measurement of the fiber loop. The transmission is affected differently at each wavelength by the rare earth temperature sensitive fiber. The temperature is determined from a ratio of the two transmission measurements. This method eliminates any ambiguity with respect to changes in signal level in the fiber loop such as mating and unmating optical connectors. The temperature range of the sensor is limited to about 800 C by the temperature limit fo the feed fibers.

  15. Piezoelectric cantilever sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Wan Y. (Inventor); Shih, Wei-Heng (Inventor); Shen, Zuyan (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A piezoelectric cantilever with a non-piezoelectric, or piezoelectric tip useful as mass and viscosity sensors. The change in the cantilever mass can be accurately quantified by monitoring a resonance frequency shift of the cantilever. For bio-detection, antibodies or other specific receptors of target antigens may be immobilized on the cantilever surface, preferably on the non-piezoelectric tip. For chemical detection, high surface-area selective absorbent materials are coated on the cantilever tip. Binding of the target antigens or analytes to the cantilever surface increases the cantilever mass. Detection of target antigens or analytes is achieved by monitoring the cantilever's resonance frequency and determining the resonance frequency shift that is due to the mass of the adsorbed target antigens on the cantilever surface. The use of a piezoelectric unimorph cantilever allows both electrical actuation and electrical sensing. Incorporating a non-piezoelectric tip (14) enhances the sensitivity of the sensor. In addition, the piezoelectric cantilever can withstand damping in highly viscous liquids and can be used as a viscosity sensor in wide viscosity range.

  16. CCD and CMOS sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltham, Nick

    The charge-coupled device (CCD) has been developed primarily as a compact image sensor for consumer and industrial markets, but is now also the preeminent visible and ultraviolet wavelength image sensor in many fields of scientific research including space-science and both Earth and planetary remote sensing. Today"s scientific or science-grade CCD will strive to maximise pixel count, focal plane coverage, photon detection efficiency over the broadest spectral range and signal dynamic range whilst maintaining the lowest possible readout noise. The relatively recent emergence of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor technology is arguably the most important development in solid-state imaging since the invention of the CCD. CMOS technology enables the integration on a single silicon chip of a large array of photodiode pixels alongside all of the ancillary electronics needed to address the array and digitise the resulting analogue video signal. Compared to the CCD, CMOS promises a more compact, lower mass, lower power and potentially more radiation tolerant camera.

  17. Foveating infrared image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarley, Paul L.; Massie, Mark A.; Curzan, Jon P.

    2007-09-01

    Nova Sensors, under sponsorship of the Munitions Directorate of the Air Force Research Laboratory, has developed a readout integrated circuit (ROIC) technology for focal plane arrays (FPAs) that permits an intelligent use of the available image data; this is especially effective for dealing with the large volume of data produced by today's large format FPAs. The "Variable Acuity Superpixel Imaging" (VASI TM) ROIC architecture allows for coverage of the entire field of view at high frame rates by permitting larger "superpixels" to be dynamically formed on the FPA in regions of relative unimportance, thus reducing the total number of pixel values required to be multiplexed off the FPA. In addition, multiple high-resolution "foveal" regions may be "flown" around the imager's field of view at a frame rate such that high-value targets may be sampled at the highest possible spatial resolution that the imager can produce. Nova Sensors has built numerous camera systems using 320 x 256 and 1K x 1K pixel versions of visible and infrared VASI TM FPAs. This paper reviews the technology and discusses numerous applications for this new class of imaging sensors.

  18. Chemiresistor urea sensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, R.S.

    1997-12-16

    A sensor is disclosed to detect and quantify urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures, and in blood and other body fluids. The sensor is based upon a chemiresistor, which consists of an interdigitated array of metal fingers between which a resistance measured. The interdigitated array is fabricated on a suitable substrate. The surface of the array of fingers is covered with a coating containing the enzyme urease which catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to form the ammonium ion, the bicarbonate ion, and hydroxide-chemical products which provide the basis for the measured signal. In a typical application, the sensor could be used at bedside, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. Also, the chemiresistor used to detect urea, can be utilized with a reference chemiresistor which does not contain urease, and connected in a differential measurement arrangement, such that the reference chemiresistor would cancel out any fluctuations due to background effects. 16 figs.

  19. a Submillimeter Chemical Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neese, Christopher F.; Medvedev, Ivan R.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Plummer, Grant M.; Ball, Christopher D.; Frank, Aaron J.

    2010-06-01

    Rotational spectroscopy has been recognized a potentially powerful tool for chemical analysis since the very beginnings of the field. A typical rotational fingerprint consists of 10^5 resolvable spectral channels, leading to `absolute' specificity, even in complex mixtures. Furthermore, rotational spectroscopy requires very small amounts of sample with detection limits as low as picograms. Nevertheless, this technique has not yet been widely applied to analytical science because of the size, cost, and complexity of traditional spectrometers. A resurgence of interest in spectroscopic sensors has been fueled by increases in performance made possible by advances in laser systems and applications in medicine, environmental monitoring, and national security. Most of these new approaches make use of the optical/infrared spectral regions and their well established, but still rapidly evolving technology base. The submillimeter (SMM) spectral region, while much less well known, has also seen significant technological advances, allowing the design of powerful spectroscopic sensors. Using modern solid-state multiplier technology we have built a small bench top SMM spectrometer designed for use as a chemical sensor. This spectrometer includes a sample acquisition system including the vacuum equipment to provide the ideal pressures (1--10 mtorr) for SMM spectroscopy and a sorbent tube for analyte collection and preconcentration. The entire spectrometer, including power supplies, frequency synthesizers, a 1.2 m folded sample cell, and a computer for data analysis fits into a cubic foot box.

  20. Hydra Rendezvous and Docking Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roe, Fred; Carrington, Connie

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. technology to support a CEV AR&D activity is mature and was developed by NASA and supporting industry during an extensive research and development program conducted during the 1990's and early 2000 time frame at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development and demonstration of a rendezvous/docking sensor was identified early in the AR&D Program as the critical enabling technology that allows automated proxinity operations and docking. A first generation rendezvous/docking sensor, the Video Guidance Sensor (VGS) was developed and successfully flown on STS 87 and again on STS 95, proving the concept of a video-based sensor. Advances in both video and signal processing technologies and the lessons learned from the two successful flight experiments provided a baseline for the development of a new generation of video based rendezvous/docking sensor. The Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AVGS) has greatly increased performance and additional capability for longer-range operation. A Demonstration Automatic Rendezvous Technology (DART) flight experiment was flown in April 2005 using AVGS as the primary proximity operations sensor. Because of the absence of a docking mechanism on the target satellite, this mission did not demonstrate the ability of the sensor to coltrold ocking. Mission results indicate that the rendezvous sensor operated successfully in "spot mode" (2 km acquisition of the target, bearing data only) but was never commanded to "acquire and track" the docking target. Parts obsolescence issues prevent the construction of current design AVGS units to support the NASA Exploration initiative. This flight proven AR&D technology is being modularized and upgraded with additional capabilities through the Hydra project at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Hydra brings a unique engineering approach and sensor architecture to the table, to solve the continuing issues of parts obsolescence and multiple sensor integration. This paper presents an approach to

  1. Molecular sensors for MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chih-Yung

    Molecular sensors, known as pressure-sensitive paint and temperature-sensitive paint, are applied inside MEMS devices to obtain the internal and external flow fields. The spatial resolution for the PSP and TSP measurements has improved to 5 mum. The low-pressure PSP sensor has been investigated for use in MEMS measurements, with an application range from continuum flow to transition flow. PSP and TSP measurements in different micro devices have been obtained with the flow fields covering steady and unsteady, subsonic and supersonic flow. In microchannel measurements, the pressure distributions inside the microchannel have been obtained for Knudsen number from 0.006 to 0.8. Compressibility and rarefaction effects can be observed in the PSP data. Detailed information at the channel inlet was also collected to discuss the entrance effect for different flow regimes. For micronozzle experiments, four different micronozzles have been fabricated to study geometry effects at the micro scale. The pressure maps inside the micronozzle devices have been obtained with PSP sensors. A modified schlieren technique is used to compare the PSP results and investigate the shock wave behavior at high- and low-pressure conditions. Thick viscous layers in the micronozzle have been observed in the low-pressure measurements. For microjet impingements, heat transfer measurements have been collected with different microjet devices by using TSP sensors. For supersonic impinging microjet measurements, both pressure and temperature data have been obtained at different pressure ratios, impingement angles and impingement distances. Measurements reveal that the magnitude and number of shock cells decreases in the micro scale due to strong viscous effects. For microturbine measurements, averaged results of PSP and TSP measurements have been obtained for a rotation speed from 1300 to 4000 rpm. Phase-averaged results have been collected by using a laser triggering system at rotation speed of 1400 rpm

  2. Hail Monitor Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Younquist, Robert; Haskell, William; Immer, Christopher; Cox, Bobby; Lane, John

    2009-01-01

    An inexpensive and simple hail monitor design has been developed that has a single piezoelectric ceramic disc and uses a metal plate as a sounding board. The structure is durable and able to withstand the launch environment. This design has several advantages over a multi-ceramic sensor, including reduced cost and complexity, increased durability, and improvement in impact response uniformity over the active surface. However, the most important characteristic of this design is the potential to use frequency discrimination between the spectrum created from raindrop impact and a hailstone impact. The sound of hail hitting a metal plate is distinctly different from the sound of rain hitting the same plate. This fortuitous behavior of the pyramid sensor may lead to a signal processing strategy, which is inherently more reliable than one depending on amplitude processing only. The initial concept has been im proved by forming a shallow pyramid structure so that hail is encouraged to bounce away from the sensor so as not to be counted more than once. The sloped surface also discourages water from collecting. Additionally, the final prototype version includes a mounting box for the piezo-ceramic, which is offset from the pyramid apex, thus helping to reduce non-uniform response (see Figure 2). The frequency spectra from a single raindrop impact and a single ice ball impact have been compared. The most notable feature of the frequency resonant peaks is the ratio of the 5.2 kHz to 3.1 kHz components. In the case of a raindrop, this ratio is very small. But in the case of an ice ball, the ratio is roughly one third. This frequency signature of ice balls should provide a robust method for discriminating raindrops from hailstones. Considering that hail size distributions (HSDs) and fall rates are roughly 1 percent that of rainfall, hailstone sizes range from a few tenths of a centimeter to several centimeters. There may be considerable size overlap between large rain and small

  3. Ripeness sensor development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    About 20--25% of the total production of fruits and vegetables in the USA must be discarded after harvest About 25--30% of this loss is the result of over-ripening and this loss represents about 8.39 [times] 10[sup 12] BTU of invested energy every year. This invested energy could be saved by non-destructive ripeness sensing. Sweetness is an important indicator of fruit quality and highly correlated with ripeness in most fruits. Research to develop a non-destructive fruit ripeness sensor has been conducted in the Agricultural Engineering Department at Purdue University. It is based on [sup 1]H-MR (proton Magnetic Resonance). A first generation prototype of the ripeness sensor based on [sup 1]H-MR was built and tested with. Results show that the sensor can discriminate small fruit (0.75 in diameter or smaller) differing in sugar content by 6%. This prototype can separate the fruit into at least two groups: one ripe and the other not ripe. The estimated cost for such a ripeness sensor is around $4,000. The signal sensitivity of the prototype can be improved to enable it to differentiate between fruits varying in sugar content by only 1 or 2% by using water peak suppression techniques to recover relatively weak sugar resonance signals in intact fruits, modifying circuits to eliminate noise, leakage and distortion of input/output signals, improving the magnetic console to get a higher magnetic field and better homogeneity, and designing a probe to achieve a higher signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. As research continues a second generation ripeness sensor will be developed which will incorporate many of the improvements and which will be suitable for commercial use. Additional research will allow application of the technique to a wider range of fruit sizes (from blueberries to watermelons). This report describes estimated energy savings, feasibility studies, development of the initial prototype, and preliminary evaluation of the first generation prototype.

  4. Small, Inexpensive Combined NOx Sensor and O2 Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    W. N. Lawless; C. F. Clark, Jr.

    2008-09-08

    It has been successfully demonstrated in this program that a zirconia multilayer structure with rhodium-based porous electrodes performs well as an amperometric NOx sensor. The sensitivity of the sensor bodies operating at 650 to 700 C is large, with demonstrated current outputs of 14 mA at 500 ppm NOx from sensors with 30 layers. The sensor bodies are small (4.5 x 4.2 x 3.1 mm), rugged, and inexpensive. It is projected the sensor bodies will cost $5 - $10 in production. This program has built on another successful development program for an oxygen sensor based on the same principles and sponsored by DOE. This oxygen sensor is not sensitive to NOx. A significant technical hurdle has been identified and solved. It was found that the 100% Rh electrodes oxidize rapidly at the preferred operating temperatures of 650 - 700 C, and this oxidation is accompanied by a volume change which delaminates the sensors. The problem was solved by using alloys of Rh and Pt. It was found that a 10%/90% Rh/Pt alloy dropped the oxidation rate of the electrodes by orders of magnitude without degrading the NOx sensitivity of the sensors, allowing long-term stable operation at the preferred operating temperatures. Degradation in the sensor output caused by temperature cycling was identified as a change in resistance at the junction between the sensor body and the external leads attached to the sensor body. The degradation was eliminated by providing strong mechanical anchors for the wire and processing the junctions to obtain good electrical bonds. The NOx sensors also detect oxygen and therefore the fully-packaged sensor needs to be enclosed with an oxygen sensor in a small, heated zirconia chamber exposed to test gas through a diffusion plug which limits the flow of gas from the outside. Oxygen is pumped from the interior of the chamber to lower the oxygen content and the combination of measurements from the NOx and oxygen sensors yields the NOx content of the gas. Two types of

  5. Ultra-wideband impedance sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1999-01-01

    The ultra-wideband impedance sensor (UWBZ sensor, or Z-sensor) is implemented in differential and single-ended configurations. The differential UWBZ sensor employs a sub-nanosecond impulse to determine the balance of an impedance bridge. The bridge is configured as a differential sample-and-hold circuit that has a reference impedance side and an unknown impedance side. The unknown impedance side includes a short transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The single-ended UWBZ sensor eliminates the reference side of the bridge and is formed of a sample and hold circuit having a transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The sensing range of the transmission line is bounded by the two-way travel time of the impulse, thereby eliminating spurious Doppler modes from large distant objects that would occur in a microwave CW impedance bridge. Thus, the UWBZ sensor is a range-gated proximity sensor. The Z-sensor senses the near proximity of various materials such as metal, plastic, wood, petroleum products, and living tissue. It is much like a capacitance sensor, yet it is impervious to moisture. One broad application area is the general replacement of magnetic sensors, particularly where nonferrous materials need to be sensed. Another broad application area is sensing full/empty levels in tanks, vats and silos, e.g., a full/empty switch in water or petroleum tanks.

  6. Ultra-wideband impedance sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1999-03-16

    The ultra-wideband impedance sensor (UWBZ sensor, or Z-sensor) is implemented in differential and single-ended configurations. The differential UWBZ sensor employs a sub-nanosecond impulse to determine the balance of an impedance bridge. The bridge is configured as a differential sample-and-hold circuit that has a reference impedance side and an unknown impedance side. The unknown impedance side includes a short transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The single-ended UWBZ sensor eliminates the reference side of the bridge and is formed of a sample and hold circuit having a transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The sensing range of the transmission line is bounded by the two-way travel time of the impulse, thereby eliminating spurious Doppler modes from large distant objects that would occur in a microwave CW impedance bridge. Thus, the UWBZ sensor is a range-gated proximity sensor. The Z-sensor senses the near proximity of various materials such as metal, plastic, wood, petroleum products, and living tissue. It is much like a capacitance sensor, yet it is impervious to moisture. One broad application area is the general replacement of magnetic sensors, particularly where nonferrous materials need to be sensed. Another broad application area is sensing full/empty levels in tanks, vats and silos, e.g., a full/empty switch in water or petroleum tanks. 2 figs.

  7. Multifunction sensor for target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, William M.; Lindberg, Perry C.

    1993-09-01

    The U.S. Army has a critical need for the capability provided by a multifunction sensor. This is (in effect) a smart sensor system that can adapt to environmental conditions and adjust its mode of operation to effectively counter any threat it meets. It will have an intelligent signal processor which has all of the system's sensor signals to choose from. The processor chooses the appropriate signal information to rapidly detect, acquire, track, and automatically identify all targets in the vicinity of the sensor under a wide variety of battlefield scenarios and environmental conditions. The multiphenomenology signal information provides the flexibility to overcome the adverse effects of clutter, countermeasures (both active and passive), illumination, obscurants, target orientation, and weather. It should be noted, however, that the types of sensory information required is dependent on the mission and the operating environment. For instance, a strategic defense sensor operating in space can use (and will need) different types of sensor data than the multifunction sensor employed on an attack helicopter. In fact, the sensor configuration on a helicopter operating in Saudi Arabia may be quite different from one that is deployed to Vietnam. For the purpose of this paper we generalize about the technologies desired for an adaptable, `smart' sensor system. We do not specify a particular mission nor define a specific threat. However, in any case, we can assume the need to fuse sensor signal information in an intelligent processor to provide robust performance in the battlefield environment. 12

  8. Feature-level sensor fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peli, Tamar; Young, Mon; Knox, Robert; Ellis, Kenneth K.; Bennett, Frederick

    1999-03-01

    This paper describes two practical fusion techniques for automatic target cueing that combine features derived from each sensor data ta the object-level. In the hybrid fusion method each of the input sensor data is prescreened before the fusion stage. The cued fusion method assumes that one of the sensors is designated as a primary sensor, and thus ATC is only applied to its input data. If one of the sensors exhibits a higher Pd and/or a lower false alarm rate, it can be selected as the primary sensor. However, if the ground coverage can be segmented to regions in which one of the sensors is known to exhibit better performance, then the cued fusion can be applied locally/adaptively by switching the choice of a primary sensor. Otherwise, the cued fusion is applied both ways and the outputs of each cued mode are combined. Both fusion approaches use a back-end discrimination stage that is applied to a combined feature vector to reduce false alarms. The two fusion processes were applied to spectral and radar sensor data nd were shown to provide substantial false alarm reduction. The approaches are easily extendable to more than two sensors.

  9. A Piezoelectric Shear Stress Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Taeyang; Saini, Aditya; Kim, Jinwook; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; Zhu, Yong; Palmieri, Frank L.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a piezoelectric sensor with a floating element was developed for shear stress measurement. The piezoelectric sensor was designed to detect the pure shear stress suppressing effects of normal stress generated from the vortex lift-up by applying opposite poling vectors to the: piezoelectric elements. The sensor was first calibrated in the lab by applying shear forces and it showed high sensitivity to shear stress (=91.3 +/- 2.1 pC/Pa) due to the high piezoelectric coefficients of PMN-33%PT (d31=-1330 pC/N). The sensor also showed almost no sensitivity to normal stress (less than 1.2 pC/Pa) because of the electromechanical symmetry of the device. The usable frequency range of the sensor is 0-800 Hz. Keywords: Piezoelectric sensor, shear stress, floating element, electromechanical symmetry

  10. Airborne Sensor Thermal Management Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K. K.

    2015-06-03

    The customer wants to outfit aircraft (de Havilland Twin Otter) with optical sensors. In previous product generations the sensor line-of-sight direction was fixed – the sensor’s direction relied on the orientation of the aircraft. The next generation sensor will be packaged in a rotatable turret so that the line-of-sight is reasonably independent of the aircraft’s orientation. This turret will be mounted on a boom protruding from the side of the aircraft. The customer wants to outfit aircraft (de Havilland Twin Otter) with optical sensors. In previous product generations the sensor line-of-sight direction was fixed – the sensor’s direction relied on the orientation of the aircraft. The next generation sensor will be packaged in a rotatable turret so that the line-of-sight is reasonably independent of the aircraft’s orientation. This turret will be mounted on a boom protruding from the side of the aircraft.

  11. Wearable sensors for health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suciu, George; Butca, Cristina; Ochian, Adelina; Halunga, Simona

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we describe several wearable sensors, designed for monitoring the health condition of the patients, based on an experimental model. Wearable sensors enable long-term continuous physiological monitoring, which is important for the treatment and management of many chronic illnesses, neurological disorders, and mental health issues. The system is based on a wearable sensors network, which is connected to a computer or smartphone. The wearable sensor network integrates several wearable sensors that can measure different parameters such as body temperature, heart rate and carbon monoxide quantity from the air. After the portable sensors measuring parameter values, they are transmitted by microprocessor through the Bluetooth to the application developed on computer or smartphone, to be interpreted.

  12. Distributed multi-sensor fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheffel, Peter; Fish, Robert; Knobler, Ron; Plummer, Thomas

    2008-03-01

    McQ has developed a broad based capability to fuse information in a geographic area from multiple sensors to build a better understanding of the situation. The paper will discuss the fusion architecture implemented by McQ to use many sensors and share their information. This multi sensor fusion architecture includes data sharing and analysis at the individual sensor, at communications nodes that connect many sensors together, at the system server/user interface, and across multi source information available through networked services. McQ will present a data fusion architecture that integrates a "Feature Information Base" (FIB) with McQ's well known Common Data Interchange Format (CDIF) data structure. The distributed multi sensor fusion provides enhanced situation awareness for the user.

  13. Flexible Transparent Electronic Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Guo, Yunlong; Wan, Pengbo; Zhang, Han; Chen, Xiaodong; Sun, Xiaoming

    2016-07-01

    Flexible and transparent electronic gas sensors capable of real-time, sensitive, and selective analysis at room-temperature, have gained immense popularity in recent years for their potential to be integrated into various smart wearable electronics and display devices. Here, recent advances in flexible transparent sensors constructed from semiconducting oxides, carbon materials, conducting polymers, and their nanocomposites are presented. The sensing material selection, sensor device construction, and sensing mechanism of flexible transparent sensors are discussed in detail. The critical challenges and future development associated with flexible and transparent electronic gas sensors are presented. Smart wearable gas sensors are believed to have great potential in environmental monitoring and noninvasive health monitoring based on disease biomarkers in exhaled gas. PMID:27276698

  14. Engineering Genetically Encoded FRET Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Lindenburg, Laurens; Merkx, Maarten

    2014-01-01

    Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) between two fluorescent proteins can be exploited to create fully genetically encoded and thus subcellularly targetable sensors. FRET sensors report changes in energy transfer between a donor and an acceptor fluorescent protein that occur when an attached sensor domain undergoes a change in conformation in response to ligand binding. The design of sensitive FRET sensors remains challenging as there are few generally applicable design rules and each sensor must be optimized anew. In this review we discuss various strategies that address this shortcoming, including rational design approaches that exploit self-associating fluorescent domains and the directed evolution of FRET sensors using high-throughput screening. PMID:24991940

  15. Sensor Compendium - A Snowmass Whitepaper-

    SciTech Connect

    Artuso, M.; Battaglia, M.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Caberera, B.; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C. L.; Cooper, W.; Da Via, C.; Demarteau, M.; Fast, J.; Frisch, H.

    2013-10-01

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  16. An ontology for sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, Michael; Neuhaus, Holger; Bermudez, Luis; Cox, Simon

    2010-05-01

    Sensors and networks of sensors are important ways of monitoring and digitizing reality. As the number and size of sensor networks grows, so too does the amount of data collected. Users of such networks typically need to discover the sensors and data that fit their needs without necessarily understanding the complexities of the network itself. The burden on users is eased if the network and its data are expressed in terms of concepts familiar to the users and their job functions, rather than in terms of the network or how it was designed. Furthermore, the task of collecting and combining data from multiple sensor networks is made easier if metadata about the data and the networks is stored in a format and conceptual models that is amenable to machine reasoning and inference. While the OGC's (Open Geospatial Consortium) SWE (Sensor Web Enablement) standards provide for the description and access to data and metadata for sensors, they do not provide facilities for abstraction, categorization, and reasoning consistent with standard technologies. Once sensors and networks are described using rich semantics (that is, by using logic to describe the sensors, the domain of interest, and the measurements) then reasoning and classification can be used to analyse and categorise data, relate measurements with similar information content, and manage, query and task sensors. This will enable types of automated processing and logical assurance built on OGC standards. The W3C SSN-XG (Semantic Sensor Networks Incubator Group) is producing a generic ontology to describe sensors, their environment and the measurements they make. The ontology provides definitions for the structure of sensors and observations, leaving the details of the observed domain unspecified. This allows abstract representations of real world entities, which are not observed directly but through their observable qualities. Domain semantics, units of measurement, time and time series, and location and mobility

  17. A high accuracy sun sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokhove, H.

    The High Accuracy Sun Sensor (HASS) is described, concentrating on measurement principle, the CCD detector used, the construction of the sensorhead and the operation of the sensor electronics. Tests on a development model show that the main aim of a 0.01-arcsec rms stability over a 10-minute period is closely approached. Remaining problem areas are associated with the sensor sensitivity to illumination level variations, the shielding of the detector, and the test and calibration equipment.

  18. Shape memory alloy thaw sensors

    DOEpatents

    Shahinpoor, M.; Martinez, D.R.

    1998-04-07

    A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states. 16 figs.

  19. Rare Earth Optical Temperature Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L. (Inventor); Jenkins, Phillip (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A rare earth optical temperature sensor is disclosed for measuring high temperatures. Optical temperature sensors exist that channel emissions from a sensor to a detector using a light pipe. The invention uses a rare earth emitter to transform the sensed thermal energy into a narrow band width optical signal that travels to a detector using a light pipe. An optical bandpass filter at the detector removes any noise signal outside of the band width of the signal from the emitter.

  20. Advanced border monitoring sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobler, Ronald A.; Winston, Mark A.

    2008-04-01

    McQ has developed an advanced sensor system tailored for border monitoring that has been delivered as part of the SBInet program for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). Technology developments that enhance a broad range of features are presented in this paper, which address the overall goal of the system to improving unattended ground sensor system capabilities for border monitoring applications. Specifically, this paper addresses a system definition, communications architecture, advanced signal processing to classify targets, and distributed sensor fusion processing.

  1. Precision digital solar aspect sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherer, H. P.

    1972-01-01

    The development of a digital solar aspect sensor with a resolution of approximately 14 arc-seconds is discussed. An interpolation technique was used to generate the fine angle measurements. The sensor and its mode of operation are described. The electronic and mechanical design of the sensor were completed, and two flight units, one for the OAO 4 and the other for determining the attitude of a spinning spacecraft, are being fabricated.

  2. Alignment Tool For Welding Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Steffins, Alfred P.

    1992-01-01

    Alignment tool enables accurate positioning of optoelectronic sensor measuring weld penetration. Designed for use on tungsten/inert-gas welding apparatus, used to adjust position of sensor so photodiode puts out maximum signal. Tangs of slotted cap bent slightly inward to provide spring force holding cap snugly on sensor mount. Tool installed and removed without aid of other tools. Length of pointer adjusted with set-screws. Used with variety of gas cup and electrode lengths.

  3. Cryogenic Flow Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justak, John

    2010-01-01

    An acousto-optic cryogenic flow sensor (CFS) determines mass flow of cryogens for spacecraft propellant management. The CFS operates unobtrusively in a high-pressure, high-flowrate cryogenic environment to provide measurements for fluid quality as well as mass flow rate. Experimental hardware uses an optical plane-of-light (POL) to detect the onset of two-phase flow, and the presence of particles in the flow of water. Acousto-optic devices are used in laser equipment for electronic control of the intensity and position of the laser beam. Acousto-optic interaction occurs in all optical media when an acoustic wave and a laser beam are present. When an acoustic wave is launched into the optical medium, it generates a refractive index wave that behaves like a sinusoidal grating. An incident laser beam passing through this grating will diffract the laser beam into several orders. Its angular position is linearly proportional to the acoustic frequency, so that the higher the frequency, the larger the diffracted angle. If the acoustic wave is traveling in a moving fluid, the fluid velocity will affect the frequency of the traveling wave, relative to a stationary sensor. This frequency shift changes the angle of diffraction, hence, fluid velocity can be determined from the diffraction angle. The CFS acoustic Bragg grating data test indicates that it is capable of accurately determining flow from 0 to 10 meters per second. The same sensor can be used in flow velocities exceeding 100 m/s. The POL module has successfully determined the onset of two-phase flow, and can distinguish vapor bubbles from debris.

  4. Collision avoidance sensor skin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to totally eliminate the possibility of a robot (or any mechanism for that matter) inducing a collision in space operations. We were particularly concerned that human beings were safe under all circumstances. This was apparently accomplished, and it is shown that GSFC has a system that is ready for space qualification and flight. However, it soon became apparent that much more could be accomplished with this technology. Payloads could be made invulnerable to collision avoidance and the blind spots behind them eliminated. This could be accomplished by a simple, non-imaging set of 'Capaciflector' sensors on each payload. It also is evident that this system could be used to align and dock the system with a wide margin of safety. Throughout, lighting problems could be ignored, and unexpected events and modeling errors taken in stride. At the same time, computational requirements would be reduced. This can be done in a simple, rugged, reliable manner that will not disturb the form factor of space systems. It will be practical for space applications. The lab experiments indicate we are well on the way to accomplishing this. Still, the research trail goes deeper. It now appears that the sensors can be extended to end effectors to provide precontact information and make robot docking (or any docking connection) very smooth, with minimal loads impacted back into the mating structures. This type of ability would be a major step forward in basic control techniques in space. There are, however, baseline and restructuring issues to be tackled. The payloads must get power and signals to them from the robot or from the astronaut servicing tool. This requires a standard electromechanical interface. Any of several could be used. The GSFC prototype shown in this presentation is a good one. Sensors with their attendant electronics must be added to the payloads, end effectors, and robot arms and integrated into the system.

  5. Vision Sensors and Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefflinger, Bernd

    Silicon charge-coupled-device (CCD) imagers have been and are a specialty market ruled by a few companies for decades. Based on CMOS technologies, active-pixel sensors (APS) began to appear in 1990 at the 1 μm technology node. These pixels allow random access, global shutters, and they are compatible with focal-plane imaging systems combining sensing and first-level image processing. The progress towards smaller features and towards ultra-low leakage currents has provided reduced dark currents and μm-size pixels. All chips offer Mega-pixel resolution, and many have very high sensitivities equivalent to ASA 12.800. As a result, HDTV video cameras will become a commodity. Because charge-integration sensors suffer from a limited dynamic range, significant processing effort is spent on multiple exposure and piece-wise analog-digital conversion to reach ranges >10,000:1. The fundamental alternative is log-converting pixels with an eye-like response. This offers a range of almost a million to 1, constant contrast sensitivity and constant colors, important features in professional, technical and medical applications. 3D retino-morphic stacking of sensing and processing on top of each other is being revisited with sub-100 nm CMOS circuits and with TSV technology. With sensor outputs directly on top of neurons, neural focal-plane processing will regain momentum, and new levels of intelligent vision will be achieved. The industry push towards thinned wafers and TSV enables backside-illuminated and other pixels with a 100% fill-factor. 3D vision, which relies on stereo or on time-of-flight, high-speed circuitry, will also benefit from scaled-down CMOS technologies both because of their size as well as their higher speed.

  6. Field emission chemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Panitz, J.A.

    1983-11-22

    A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

  7. Chemoresistive gas sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, Tomas B.

    1987-01-01

    A chemoresistive gas sensor is provided which has improved sensitivity. A layer of organic semiconductor is disposed between two electrodes which, in turn, are connected to a voltage source. High conductivity material is dispersed within the layer of organic semiconductor in the form of very small particles, or islands. The average interisland spacing is selected so that the predominant mode of current flow is by way of electron funneling. Adsorption of gaseous contaminant onto the layer of organic semiconductor modulates the tunneling current in a quantitative manner.

  8. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Cheng, Y.T.; Poli, A.A.; Meltser, M.A.

    1999-03-23

    A thin film hydrogen sensor includes a substantially flat ceramic substrate with first and second planar sides and a first substrate end opposite a second substrate end; a thin film temperature responsive resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the first substrate end; a thin film hydrogen responsive metal resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the fist substrate end and proximate to the temperature responsive resistor; and a heater on the second planar side of the substrate proximate to the first end. 5 figs.

  9. Microfabricated AC impedance sensor

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter; Ackler, Harold D.; Becker, Frederick; Boser, Bernhard E.; Eldredge, Adam B.; Fuller, Christopher K.; Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Hamilton, Julie K.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Wang, Xiao-Bo

    2002-01-01

    A microfabricated instrument for detecting and identifying cells and other particles based on alternating current (AC) impedance measurements. The microfabricated AC impedance sensor includes two critical elements: 1) a microfluidic chip, preferably of glass substrates, having at least one microchannel therein and with electrodes patterned on both substrates, and 2) electrical circuits that connect to the electrodes on the microfluidic chip and detect signals associated with particles traveling down the microchannels. These circuits enable multiple AC impedance measurements of individual particles at high throughput rates with sufficient resolution to identify different particle and cell types as appropriate for environmental detection and clinical diagnostic applications.

  10. Fluorescent sensor for mercury

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zidong; Lee, Jung Heon; Lu, Yi

    2011-11-22

    The present invention provides a sensor for detecting mercury, comprising: a first polynucleotide, comprising a first region, and a second region, a second polynucleotide, a third polynucleotide, a fluorophore, and a quencher, wherein the third polynucleotide is optionally linked to the second region; the fluorophore is linked to the first polynucleotide and the quencher is linked to the second polynucleotide, or the fluorophore is linked to the second polynucleotide and the quencher is linked to the first polynucleotide; the first region and the second region hybridize to the second polynucleotide; and the second region binds to the third polynucleotide in the presence of Hg.sup.2+ ions.

  11. Interferometric rotation sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, T. M. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An interferometric rotation sensor and control system is provided which includes a compound prism interferometer and an associated direction control system. Light entering the interferometer is split into two paths with the light in the respective paths being reflected an unequal number of times, and then being recombined at an exit aperture in phase differing relationships. Incoming light is deviated from the optical axis of the device by an angle, alpha. The angle causes a similar displacement of the two component images at the exit aperture which results in a fringe pattern. Fringe numbers are directly related to angle alpha. Various control systems of the interferometer are given.

  12. Chemoresistive gas sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1985-09-30

    A chemoresistive gas sensor is provided which has improved sensitivity. A layer of organic semiconductor is disposed between two electrodes which, in turn, are connected to a voltage source. High conductivity material is dispersed within the layer of organic semiconductor in the form of very small particles, or islands. The average interisland spacing is selected so that the predominant mode of current flow is by way of electron tunneling. Adsorption of gaseous contaminant onto the layer of organic semiconductor modulates the tunneling current in a quantitative manner.

  13. Chemoresistive gas sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1987-06-23

    A chemoresistive gas sensor is provided which has improved sensitivity. A layer of organic semiconductor is disposed between two electrodes which, in turn, are connected to a voltage source. High conductivity material is dispersed within the layer of organic semiconductor in the form of very small particles, or islands. The average interisland spacing is selected so that the predominant mode of current flow is by way of electron funneling. Adsorption of gaseous contaminant onto the layer of organic semiconductor modulates the tunneling current in a quantitative manner. 2 figs.

  14. Sensors Locate Radio Interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    After receiving a NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract from Kennedy Space Center, Soneticom Inc., based in West Melbourne, Florida, created algorithms for time difference of arrival and radio interferometry, which it used in its Lynx Location System (LLS) to locate electromagnetic interference that can disrupt radio communications. Soneticom is collaborating with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to install and test the LLS at its field test center in New Jersey in preparation for deploying the LLS at commercial airports. The software collects data from each sensor in order to compute the location of the interfering emitter.

  15. Expendable oceanographic sensor apparatus

    DOEpatents

    McCoy, Kim O.; Downing, Jr., John P.; DeRoos, Bradley G.; Riches, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    An expendable oceanographic sensor apparatus is deployed from an airplane or a ship to make oceanographic observations in a profile of the surface-to-ocean floor, while deployed on the floor, and then a second profile when returning to the ocean surface. The device then records surface conditions until on-board batteries fail. All data collected is stored and then transmitted from the surface to either a satellite or other receiving station. The apparatus is provided with an anchor that causes descent to the ocean floor and then permits ascent when the anchor is released. Anchor release is predetermined by the occurrence of a pre-programmed event.

  16. Thermocooling of GMR Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Despina (Inventor); Bellamkonda, Ramya (Inventor); Mannam, Raja Sekharam (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A thermoelectrically cooled GMR sensor having a first thermoelectric layer with an array of nanowires, wherein the nanowires include a diameter of about 1 nanometer to about 1000 nanometers. A plurality of alternating layers of magnetic and nonmagnetic material are positioned over and extend the nanowires to form a GMR assembly. A second thermoelectric layer is positioned over the GMR assembly and extends the nanowires, such that the nanowires have a length of between about 100 nanometers and about 500 microns. Conductors are placed in contact with the first and second thermoelectric layers for connecting the thermoelectric layers to a voltage source.

  17. Wide area sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Nix, Tricia; Junker, Robert; Brentano, Josef; Khona, Dhiren

    2006-05-01

    The technical concept for this project has existed since the Chernobyl accident in 1986. A host of Eastern European nations have developed countrywide grid of sensors to monitor airborne radiation. The objective is to build a radiological sensor network for real-time monitoring of environmental radiation levels in order to provide data for warning, and consequentially the assessment of a nuclear event. A network of radiation measuring equipment consisting of gamma, neutron, alpha, and beta counters would be distributed over a large area (preferably on fire station roof tops) and connected by a wireless network to the emergency response center. The networks would be deployed in urban environments and would supply first responders and federal augmentation teams (including those from the U.S. Departments of Energy, Defense, Justice, and Homeland Security) with detailed, accurate information regarding the transport of radioactive environmental contaminants, so the agencies can provide a safe and effective response. A networked sensor capability would be developed, with fixed sensors deployed at key locations and in sufficient numbers, to provide adequate coverage for early warning, and input to post-event emergency response. An overall system description and specification will be provided, including detector characteristics, communication protocols, infrastructure and maintenance requirements, and operation procedures. The system/network can be designed for a specifically identified urban area, or for a general urban area scalable to cities of specified size. Data collected via the network will be transmitted directly to the appropriate emergency response center and shared with multiple agencies via the Internet or an Intranet. The data collected will be managed using commercial off - the - shelf Geographical Information System (GIS). The data will be stored in a database and the GIS software will aid in analysis and management of the data. Unique features of the

  18. Automatic sensor placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidi, Besma R.

    1995-10-01

    Active sensing is the process of exploring the environment using multiple views of a scene captured by sensors from different points in space under different sensor settings. Applications of active sensing are numerous and can be found in the medical field (limb reconstruction), in archeology (bone mapping), in the movie and advertisement industry (computer simulation and graphics), in manufacturing (quality control), as well as in the environmental industry (mapping of nuclear dump sites). In this work, the focus is on the use of a single vision sensor (camera) to perform the volumetric modeling of an unknown object in an entirely autonomous fashion. The camera moves to acquire the necessary information in two ways: (a) viewing closely each local feature of interest using 2D data; and (b) acquiring global information about the environment via 3D sensor locations and orientations. A single object is presented to the camera and an initial arbitrary image is acquired. A 2D optimization process is developed. It brings the object in the field of view of the camera, normalizes it by centering the data in the image plane, aligns the principal axis with one of the camera's axes (arbitrarily chosen), and finally maximizes its resolution for better feature extraction. The enhanced image at each step is projected along the corresponding viewing direction. The new projection is intersected with previously obtained projections for volume reconstruction. During the global exploration of the scene, the current image as well as previous images are used to maximize the information in terms of shape irregularity as well as contrast variations. The scene on the borders of occlusion (contours) is modeled by an entropy-based objective functional. This functional is optimized to determine the best next view, which is recovered by computing the pose of the camera. A criterion based on the minimization of the difference between consecutive volume updates is set for termination of the

  19. The Lightning Imaging Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, Hugh J.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Goodman, Steven J.; Mach, Douglas A.; Stewart, Michael F.; Buechler, Dennis E.; Koshak, William J.; Hall, John M.; Boeck, William; Driscoll, Kevin T.; Boccippio, Dennis J.

    1999-01-01

    The Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) is a NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) instrument on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) platform designed to acquire and investigate the distribution and variability of total lightning (i.e., cloud-to-ground and intracloud) between q35' in latitude. Since lightning is one of the responses of the atmosphere to thermodynamic and dynamic forcing, the LIS data is being used to detect deep convection without land-ocean bias, estimate the precipitation mass in the mixed phased region of thunderclouds, and differentiate storms with strong updrafts from those with weak vertical motion.

  20. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, Fernando H.; Chung, Brandon W.; Raistrick, Ian D.; Brosha, Eric L.

    1996-01-01

    Solid state oxygen sensors are provided with a yttria-doped zirconia as an electrolyte and use the electrochemical oxygen pumping of the zirconia electrolyte. A linear relationship between oxygen concentration and the voltage arising at a current plateau occurs when oxygen accessing the electrolyte is limited by a diffusion barrier. A diffusion barrier is formed herein with a mixed electronic and oxygen ion-conducting membrane of lanthanum-containing perovskite or zirconia-containing fluorite. A heater may be used to maintain an adequate oxygen diffusion coefficient in the mixed conducting layer.

  1. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, F.H.; Chung, B.W.; Raistrick, I.D.; Brosha, E.L.

    1996-08-06

    Solid state oxygen sensors are provided with a yttria-doped zirconia as an electrolyte and use the electrochemical oxygen pumping of the zirconia electrolyte. A linear relationship between oxygen concentration and the voltage arising at a current plateau occurs when oxygen accessing the electrolyte is limited by a diffusion barrier. A diffusion barrier is formed herein with a mixed electronic and oxygen ion-conducting membrane of lanthanum-containing perovskite or zirconia-containing fluorite. A heater may be used to maintain an adequate oxygen diffusion coefficient in the mixed conducting layer. 4 figs.

  2. Optical humidity sensor

    DOEpatents

    Tarvin, J.A.

    1987-02-10

    An optical dielectric humidity sensor is disclosed which includes a dielectric mirror having multiple alternating layers of two porous water-adsorbent dielectric materials with differing indices of refraction carried by a translucent substrate. A narrow-band polarized light source is positioned to direct light energy onto the mirror, and detectors are positioned to receive light energy transmitted through and reflected by the mirror. A ratiometer indicates humidity in the atmosphere which surrounds the dielectric mirror as a function of a ratio of light energies incident on the detectors. 2 figs.

  3. Optical humidity sensor

    DOEpatents

    Tarvin, Jeffrey A.

    1987-01-01

    An optical dielectric humidity sensor which includes a dielectric mirror having multiple alternating layers of two porous water-adsorbent dielectric materials with differing indices of refraction carried by a translucent substrate. A narrow-band polarized light source is positioned to direct light energy onto the mirror, and detectors are positioned to receive light energy transmitted through and reflected by the mirror. A ratiometer indicates humidity in the atmosphere which surrounds the dielectric mirror as a function of a ratio of light energies incident on the detectors.

  4. Heat Flux Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A heat flux microsensor developed under a NASP Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) has a wide range of potential commercial applications. Vatell Corporation originally designed microsensors for use in very high temperatures. The company then used the technology to develop heat flux sensors to measure the rate of heat energy flowing in and out of a surface as well as readings on the surface temperature. Additional major advantages include response to heat flux in less than 10 microseconds and the ability to withstand temperatures up to 1,200 degrees centigrade. Commercial applications are used in high speed aerodynamics, supersonic combustion, blade cooling, and mass flow measurements, etc.

  5. Biomimetic Receptors and Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Dickert, Franz L.

    2014-01-01

    In biomimetics, living systems are imitated to develop receptors for ions, molecules and bioparticles. The most pertinent idea is self-organization in analogy to evolution in nature, which created the key-lock principle. Today, modern science has been developing host-guest chemistry, a strategy of supramolecular chemistry for designing interactions of analytes with synthetic receptors. This can be realized, e.g., by self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) or molecular imprinting. The strategies are used for solid phase extraction (SPE), but preferably in developing recognition layers of chemical sensors. PMID:25436653

  6. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Cheng, Yang-Tse; Poli, Andrea A.; Meltser, Mark Alexander

    1999-01-01

    A thin film hydrogen sensor, includes: a substantially flat ceramic substrate with first and second planar sides and a first substrate end opposite a second substrate end; a thin film temperature responsive resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the first substrate end; a thin film hydrogen responsive metal resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the fist substrate end and proximate to the temperature responsive resistor; and a heater on the second planar side of the substrate proximate to the first end.

  7. Image Sensors Enhance Camera Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    In the 1990s, a Jet Propulsion Laboratory team led by Eric Fossum researched ways of improving complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors in order to miniaturize cameras on spacecraft while maintaining scientific image quality. Fossum s team founded a company to commercialize the resulting CMOS active pixel sensor. Now called the Aptina Imaging Corporation, based in San Jose, California, the company has shipped over 1 billion sensors for use in applications such as digital cameras, camera phones, Web cameras, and automotive cameras. Today, one of every three cell phone cameras on the planet feature Aptina s sensor technology.

  8. Network compensation for missing sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, Albert J., Jr.; Mulligan, Jeffrey B.

    1991-01-01

    A network learning translation invariance algorithm to compute interpolation functions is presented. This algorithm with one fixed receptive field can construct a linear transformation compensating for gain changes, sensor position jitter, and sensor loss when there are enough remaining sensors to adequately sample the input images. However, when the images are undersampled and complete compensation is not possible, the algorithm need to be modified. For moderate sensor losses, the algorithm works if the transformation weight adjustment is restricted to the weights to output units affected by the loss.

  9. Unpowered wireless analog resistance sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andringa, Matthew M.; Neikirk, Dean P.; Wood, Sharon L.

    2004-07-01

    Our society depends heavily on a network of buildings, bridges and roadways. In order to properly maintain this civil infrastructure and avoid damage and costly repairs due to structural failure, it is necessary to monitor the health of these structures. Sensors must frequently be placed in inaccessible locations under harsh conditions and should ideally last the lifetime of the structure the sensors are monitoring. This paper presents the development of a low cost, passive, un-powered wireless analog resistance sensor. The sensor was originally designed for monitoring corrosion in concrete, but there are many other potential applications including remote temperature monitoring, embedded accelerometers, and embedded strain gauges. The passive wireless nature makes the sensor ideally suited for embedding in inaccessible locations under harsh conditions. The sensor consists of a resonant inductor-capacitor circuit containing a resistive transducer. The sensor is interrogated by measuring the impedance through a remote, magnetically coupled reader loop. The width of the resonance is directly related to the resistance of the transducer. The sensor has been simulated under a variety of conditions using a circuit model and compared to actual test sensors built and evaluated in the laboratory.

  10. JSC Wireless Sensor Network Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Sensor nodes composed of three basic components... radio module: COTS radio module implementing standardized WSN protocol; treated as WSN modem by main board main board: contains application processor (TI MSP430 microcontroller), memory, power supply; responsible for sensor data acquisition, pre-processing, and task scheduling; re-used in every application with growing library of embedded C code sensor card: contains application-specific sensors, data conditioning hardware, and any advanced hardware not built into main board (DSPs, faster A/D, etc.); requires (re-) development for each application.

  11. Ultrafast graphene oxide humidity sensors.

    PubMed

    Borini, Stefano; White, Richard; Wei, Di; Astley, Michael; Haque, Samiul; Spigone, Elisabetta; Harris, Nadine; Kivioja, Jani; Ryhänen, Tapani

    2013-12-23

    Sensors allow an electronic device to become a gateway between the digital and physical worlds, and sensor materials with unprecedented performance can create new applications and new avenues for user interaction. Graphene oxide can be exploited in humidity and temperature sensors with a number of convenient features such as flexibility, transparency and suitability for large-scale manufacturing. Here we show that the two-dimensional nature of graphene oxide and its superpermeability to water combine to enable humidity sensors with unprecedented response speed (∼30 ms response and recovery times). This opens the door to various applications, such as touchless user interfaces, which we demonstrate with a 'whistling' recognition analysis. PMID:24206232

  12. Non-intrusive speed sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyett, L.

    1986-01-01

    In Phase I of the Non-Intrusive Speed Sensor program, a computerized literature search was performed to identify candidate technologies for remote, non-intrusive speed sensing applications in Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps. The three most promising technologies were subjected to experimental evaluation to quantify their performance characteristics under the harsh environmental requirements within the turbopumps. Although the infrared and microwave approaches demonstrated excellent cavitation immunity in laboratory tests, the variable-source magnetic speed sensor emerged as the most viable approach. Preliminary design of this speed sensor encountered no technical obstacles and resulted in viable and feasible speed nut, sensor housing, and sensor coil designs. Phase II of this program developed the variable-source magnetic speed sensor through the detailed design task and guided the design into breadboard fabrication. The speed sensor and its integral speed nut were evaluated at both unit and system level testing. The final room-temperature and cryogenic spin testing of the hardware demonstrated that the sensor was capable of generating sufficient output signal to enable remote speed sensing from 1500 to 40000 rpm over a speed nut/sensor separation of 3.5 inches.

  13. Sensor Applications and Data Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiley, John

    2008-01-01

    The mechanical configuration of automobiles have changed marginally while improvements in sensors and control have dramatically improved engine efficiency, reliability and useful life. The aviation industry has also taken advantage of sensors and control systems to reduce operational costs. Sensors and high fidelity control systems fly planes at levels of performance beyond human capability. Sophisticated environmental controls allow a greater level of comfort and efficiency in our homes. Sensors have given the medical field a better understanding of the human body and the environment in which we live.

  14. Optical technologies for space sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hu; Liu, Jie; Xue, Yaoke; Liu, Yang; Liu, Meiying; Wang, Lingguang; Yang, Shaodong; Lin, Shangmin; Chen, Su; Luo, Jianjun

    2015-10-01

    Space sensors are used in navigation sensor fields. The sun, the earth, the moon and other planets are used as frame of reference to obtain stellar position coordinates, and then to control the attitude of an aircraft. Being the "eyes" of the space sensors, Optical sensor system makes images of the infinite far stars and other celestial bodies. It directly affects measurement accuracy of the space sensor, indirectly affecting the data updating rate. Star sensor technology is the pilot for Space sensors. At present more and more attention is paid on all-day star sensor technology. By day and night measurements of the stars, the aircraft's attitude in the inertial coordinate system can be provided. Facing the requirements of ultra-high-precision, large field of view, wide spectral range, long life and high reliability, multi-functional optical system, we integration, integration optical sensors will be future space technology trends. In the meantime, optical technologies for space-sensitive research leads to the development of ultra-precision optical processing, optical and precision test machine alignment technology. It also promotes the development of long-life optical materials and applications. We have achieved such absolute distortion better than ±1um, Space life of at least 15years of space-sensitive optical system.

  15. Measuring Vibrations With Nonvibration Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Arthur J.

    1988-01-01

    Information about vibrations of structure and/or of nonvibration sensor attached to structure extracted from output of sensor. Sensor operated in usual way except, output fed to power-spectral-density analyzer. Vibrational components easily distinguishable in analyzer output because they have frequencies much higher than those of more-slowly-varying temperature, pressure, or other normally desired components. Spectral-analysis technique applied successfully to high-frequency resistance changes in output of platinum-wire resistance thermometer: vibrational peaks in resistance frequency spectrum confirmed by spectrum from accelerometer. Technique also showed predicted 17-kHz vibrational resonance in strain-guage-supporting beam in pressure sensor.

  16. In-Flow Acoustic Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Christopher S. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An acoustic sensor for measuring acoustic waves contained in fluid flow flowing over the sensor is introduced. The acoustic sensor reduces any unwanted self-noise associated with the flowing fluid by providing a nose cone having proper aerodynamic properties and by positioning the diaphragm of a microphone of the sensor at a location where any unwanted noise is at a relatively low level. The nose cone has a rounded, blunt or even sharp tip neither of which creates any major disturbances in the flowing fluid which it intercepts.

  17. Terminal Descent Sensor Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Curtis W.

    2009-01-01

    Sulcata software simulates the operation of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) radar terminal descent sensor (TDS). The program models TDS radar antennas, RF hardware, and digital processing, as well as the physics of scattering from a coherent ground surface. This application is specific to this sensor and is flexible enough to handle end-to-end design validation. Sulcata is a high-fidelity simulation and is used for performance evaluation, anomaly resolution, and design validation. Within the trajectory frame, almost all internal vectors are represented in whatever coordinate system is used to represent platform position. The trajectory frame must be planet-fixed. The platform body frame is specified relative to arbitrary reference points relative to the platform (spacecraft or test vehicle). Its rotation is a function of time from the trajectory coordinate system specified via dynamics input (file for open loop, callback for closed loop). Orientation of the frame relative to the body is arbitrary, but constant over time. The TDS frame must have a constant rotation and translation from the platform body frame specified at run time. The DEM frame has an arbitrary, but time-constant, rotation and translation with respect to the simulation frame specified at run time. It has the same orientation as sigma0 frame, but is possibly translated. Surface sigma0 has the same arbitrary rotation and translation as DEM frame.

  18. SQUID position sensor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, Rodney

    1996-11-01

    I describe the development of an inductance position sensor for the STEP (satellite test of the equivalence principle) accelerometer. I have measured the inductance (with an experimental error of 0.5%) of a single-turn thin-film niobium pick-up coil as a function of the distance from a thin-film niobium disc (both at 4.2 K and superconducting). The circular pick-up coil had a diameter of 4 cm with a track width of 0264-9381/13/11A/022/img1. The disc (mock test mass) had a diameter of 4 cm. The distance range between the coil and disc was set by the range of a low-temperature differential capacitance sensor: 0 - 2 mm with a resolution of 0264-9381/13/11A/022/img2. The full range of the low-temperature translation stage was 0 - 4 mm. The inductance was measured using an LCR meter in a four-wire configuration. The measured inductance was compared to the inductance of a circular loop above a superconducting plane. Due to the fact that the thin-film disc is of finite size, the calculation differed from experiment by as much as 12%. I have also calculated the inductance by segmenting the thin-film niobium disc into 500 concentric rings (each with a width of 0264-9381/13/11A/022/img3). A discrepancy between calculation and experiment of approximately 3% was found.

  19. Fiber optic light sensor.

    PubMed

    Chudyk, Wayne; Flynn, Kyle F

    2015-06-01

    We describe a low-cost fiber optic sensor for measuring photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) in turbulent flow. Existing technology was combined in a novel way for probe development addressing the need for a small but durable instrument for use in flowing water. Optical components including fiber optics and a wide-spectrum light detector were used to separate light collection from electronic detection so that measurements could be completed in either the field or laboratory, in air or underwater. Connection of the detector to Arduino open-source electronics and a portable personal computer (PC) enabled signal processing and allowed data to be stored in a spreadsheet for ease of analysis. Calibration to a commercial cosine-corrected instrument showed suitable agreement with the added benefit that the small sensor face allowed measurements in tight spaces such as close to the streambed or within leafy or filamentous plant growth. Subsequently, we applied the probe in a separate study where over 35 experiments were successfully completed to characterize downward light attenuation in filamentous algae in turbulent flow. PMID:26009160

  20. Sensor image prediction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenger, A. J.; Stone, W. R.; Berry, L.; Murray, T. J.

    1981-02-01

    The preparation of prediction imagery is a complex, costly, and time consuming process. Image prediction systems which produce a detailed replica of the image area require the extensive Defense Mapping Agency data base. The purpose of this study was to analyze the use of image predictions in order to determine whether a reduced set of more compact image features contains enough information to produce acceptable navigator performance. A job analysis of the navigator's mission tasks was performed. It showed that the cognitive and perceptual tasks he performs during navigation are identical to those performed for the targeting mission function. In addition, the results of the analysis of his performance when using a particular sensor can be extended to the analysis of this mission tasks using any sensor. An experimental approach was used to determine the relationship between navigator performance and the type of amount of information in the prediction image. A number of subjects were given image predictions containing varying levels of scene detail and different image features, and then asked to identify the predicted targets in corresponding dynamic flight sequences over scenes of cultural, terrain, and mixed (both cultural and terrain) content.

  1. Fiber Sensor Technology Today

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotate, Kazuo

    2006-08-01

    Fiber sensor technologies are overviewed. Since the early 1970s, this field has been developed, on the basis of the same devices and photonic principles as fiber communication technologies. Besides simple configurations, in which the fiber acts only as a data transmission line, sophisticated configurations have also been developed, in which the fiber is used as a device to realize unique sensing mechanisms. The fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) is a good example, and has been developed as an absolute rotation sensor used, for example, for navigation and/or attitude control applications. Compared with traditional spinning-mass gyroscopes, the FOG has advantages, such as a short warming-up time, a light weight, and easy handling. A Japanese satellite, which was launched in August 2005 with a mission to observe the aurora, is controlled with a FOG. The FOG has also been used in consumer applications, such as the camera stabilizer, radio-controlled (RC) helicopter navigation, and the control of humanoid robots. Recently, distributed and multiplexed sensing schemes, in particular, have been studied and developed, in which a long fiber acts like a “nerve” for feeling the strain and/or the temperature distribution along the fiber. Performances of artificial nerve systems have markedly improved within the last couple of years, in spatial resolution and measurement speed. By embedding the “fiber-optic nerve system” in aircraft wings, bridges and tall buildings, these materials and structures can sense damage to prevent disasters.

  2. Echosonography with proximity sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaisiam, W.; Laithong, T.; Meekhun, S.; Chaiwathyothin, N.; Thanlarp, P.; Danworaphong, S.

    2013-03-01

    We propose the use of a commercial ultrasonic proximity sensor kit for profiling an altitude-varying surface by employing echosonography. The proximity sensor kit, two identical transducers together with its dedicated operating circuit, is used as a profiler for the construction of an image. Ultrasonic pulses are emitted from one of the transducers and received by the other. The time duration between the pulses allows us to determine the traveling distance of each pulse. In the experiment, the circuit is used with the addition of two copper wires for directing the outgoing and incoming signals to an oscilloscope. The time of flight of ultrasonic pulses can thus be determined. Square grids of 5 × 5 cm2 are made from fishing lines, forming pixels in the image. The grids are designed to hold the detection unit in place, about 30 cm above a flat surface. The surface to be imaged is constructed to be height varying and placed on the flat surface underneath the grids. Our result shows that an image of the profiled surface can be created by varying the location of the detection unit along the grid. We also investigate the deviation in relation to the time of flight of the ultrasonic pulse. Such an experiment should be valuable for conveying the concept of ultrasonic imaging to physical and medical science undergraduate students. Due to its simplicity, the setup could be made in any undergraduate laboratory relatively inexpensively and it requires no complex parts. The results illustrate the concept of echosonography.

  3. Metallic glass velocity sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.L.; Butler, S.C.; Massa, D.P.; Cavanagh, G.H.

    1996-04-01

    A metallic glass accelerometer has been developed for use as an underwater sound velocity sensor. The device uses the metallic glass material Metglas 2605SC which has been processed to achieve a virgin coupling coefficient of 0.96. The mechanical to electrical conversion is based on the detection of the change in the inductance of the device as a result of bending motion. The detection method uses a carrier frequency signal which is amplitude modulated by the received signal. This scheme was originally described by Wun-Fogle, Savage and Clark [{open_quote}{open_quote}Sensitive wide frequency range magnetostrictive strain gauge,{close_quote}{close_quote} Sensors and Actuators, 1{underscore}2{underscore}, 323{endash}331 (1987)]. The bender is in the form of a three layered laminate with a closed magnetic path window frame structure. The theory of operation along with measured and calculated results are presented for a prototype element with approximate dimensions 1.5{times}1.0{times}0.1 inches. Calculated and measured results agree for a reduced effective coupling coefficient of 0.72 and operation with a carrier field intensity of 0.87 Oe and carrier frequency of 20 kHz. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Particle sensor array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin G. (Inventor); Blaes, Brent R. (Inventor); Lieneweg, Udo (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A particle sensor array which in a preferred embodiment comprises a static random access memory having a plurality of ion-sensitive memory cells, each such cell comprising at least one pull-down field effect transistor having a sensitive drain surface area (such as by bloating) and at least one pull-up field effect transistor having a source connected to an offset voltage. The sensitive drain surface area and the offset voltage are selected for memory cell upset by incident ions such as alpha-particles. The static random access memory of the present invention provides a means for selectively biasing the memory cells into the same state in which each of the sensitive drain surface areas is reverse biased and then selectively reducing the reversed bias on these sensitive drain surface areas for increasing the upset sensitivity of the cells to ions. The resulting selectively sensitive memory cells can be used in a number of applications. By way of example, the present invention can be used for measuring the linear energy transfer of ion particles, as well as a device for assessing the resistance of CMOS latches to Cosmic Ray induced single event upsets. The sensor of the present invention can also be used to determine the uniformity of an ion beam.

  5. Passive blast pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    King, Michael J.; Sanchez, Roberto J.; Moss, William C.

    2013-03-19

    A passive blast pressure sensor for detecting blast overpressures of at least a predetermined minimum threshold pressure. The blast pressure sensor includes a piston-cylinder arrangement with one end of the piston having a detection surface exposed to a blast event monitored medium through one end of the cylinder and the other end of the piston having a striker surface positioned to impact a contact stress sensitive film that is positioned against a strike surface of a rigid body, such as a backing plate. The contact stress sensitive film is of a type which changes color in response to at least a predetermined minimum contact stress which is defined as a product of the predetermined minimum threshold pressure and an amplification factor of the piston. In this manner, a color change in the film arising from impact of the piston accelerated by a blast event provides visual indication that a blast overpressure encountered from the blast event was not less than the predetermined minimum threshold pressure.

  6. Infrared Fiber Optic Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Successive years of Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from Langley Research Center to Sensiv Inc., a joint venture between Foster-Miller Inc. and Isorad, Ltd., assisted in the creation of remote fiber optic sensing systems. NASA's SBIR interest in infrared, fiber optic sensor technology was geared to monitoring the curing cycles of advanced composite materials. These funds helped in the fabrication of an infrared, fiber optic sensor to track the molecular vibrational characteristics of a composite part while it is being cured. Foster-Miller ingenuity allowed infrared transmitting optical fibers to combine with Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy to enable remote sensing. Sensiv probes operate in the mid-infrared range of the spectrum, although modifications to the instrument also permits its use in the near-infrared region. The Sensiv needle-probe is built to be placed in a liquid or powder and analyze the chemicals in the mixture. Other applications of the probe system include food processing control; combustion control in furnaces; and maintenance problem solving.

  7. Graphene nanophotonic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Alexander Y.; Cubukcu, Ertugrul

    2015-09-01

    Graphene is known to possess a host of remarkable properties such as a zero bandgap at its Dirac point, broadband saturable optical absorption, ballistic carrier transport at room temperature, as well as extremely high stiffness and thermal conductivity. This has in turn made it a material of interest for many applications, ranging from fundamental physics studies to electronic devices. From a photonics perspective, graphene’s ability to support surface plasmon-polaritons with extremely small mode volumes in the infrared spectral regime and beyond renders it an ideal platform for strongly enhanced light-matter interactions at deeply subwavelength size scales. Together with its large bandwidth of operation, as well as intrinsic chemical stability and affinity to organic molecules, graphene serves as a natural candidate for numerous optics-based sensing applications. This article reviews recent works that highlight the various advantages of graphene in an optical sensing context. Specifically, it focuses on how the passive functionalization of graphene can improve the performance of existing optical sensors, and how its use as an active signal transduction element could lead to various novel or hybrid devices that extend the functionalities of traditional sensors.

  8. Wavefront image sensor chip.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiquan; Ren, Jian; Tearney, Guillermo J; Yang, Changhuei

    2010-08-01

    We report the implementation of an image sensor chip, termed wavefront image sensor chip (WIS), that can measure both intensity/amplitude and phase front variations of a light wave separately and quantitatively. By monitoring the tightly confined transmitted light spots through a circular aperture grid in a high Fresnel number regime, we can measure both intensity and phase front variations with a high sampling density (11 microm) and high sensitivity (the sensitivity of normalized phase gradient measurement is 0.1 mrad under the typical working condition). By using WIS in a standard microscope, we can collect both bright-field (transmitted light intensity) and normalized phase gradient images. Our experiments further demonstrate that the normalized phase gradient images of polystyrene microspheres, unstained and stained starfish embryos, and strongly birefringent potato starch granules are improved versions of their corresponding differential interference contrast (DIC) microscope images in that they are artifact-free and quantitative. Besides phase microscopy, WIS can benefit machine recognition, object ranging, and texture assessment for a variety of applications. PMID:20721059

  9. Characterization of NCPA Infrasound Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, D. M.; Jones, K. R.; Sauter, A.

    2011-12-01

    By adding NCPA (National Center for Physical Acoustics) Infrasound sensors to the eastern-half of the Transportable Array, the scientific community has gained another powerful tool for studying natural processes. In an effort to characterize the sensors, including the effect of the wind filter and acoustical porting, researchers at Sandia National Labs (SNL) FACT Site and IRIS PASSCAL have performed a series of tests that resulted in good agreement with the NCPA-provided response (20mV/Pa +-10%, .007Hz high-pass corner frequency). Through independent testing and verification we have gained confidence in the sensor's linearity over the pressure range tested, a measure of power usage, and a measure of the dynamic range the sensors are capable of delivering, indicating the instruments can measure signals well below the Bowman (2005) Acoustic Low Noise Model up to 8Hz. Researchers at the SNL Fact site have the capabilities not only to test the NCPA sensor in an acoustic pressure chamber, but also to test the equivalent of the entire infrasound system used in the TA stations: NCPA sensor, tubing, and wind reduction design (a PVC filter buried in a bag of pumice stone). SNL tests with this fully-ported infrasound system characterize the full system response. We found that the tubing used to port the sensor to the external wind reduction device adds a measurable 15Hz resonance to the response and influences the high-frequency roll-off point. At PASSCAL, we have performed an acceptance test on more than 350 NCPA sensors, and in the process, have collected statistics on their relative gains. The standard deviation of the relative gain for all measured sensors is 5.32%. For 59 repeated tests of the two NCPA sensors used as references, the standard deviation is .15%, which suggests that acceptance testing can be used to constrain the gain of individual NCPA sensors much tighter than the population deviation.

  10. REVIEW ARTICLE: A taste sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toko, Kiyoshi

    1998-12-01

    A multichannel taste sensor, namely an electronic tongue, with global selectivity is composed of several kinds of lipid/polymer membranes for transforming information about substances producing taste into electrical signals, which are input to a computer. The sensor output exhibits different patterns for chemical substances which have different taste qualities such as saltiness, sourness and bitterness, whereas it exhibits similar patterns for chemical substances with similar tastes. The sensor responds to the taste itself, as can be understood from the fact that taste interactions such as the suppression effect, which appears for mixtures of sweet and bitter substances, can be reproduced well. The suppression of the bitterness of quinine and a drug substance by sucrose can be quantified. Amino acids can be classified into several groups according to their own tastes on the basis of sensor outputs. The tastes of foodstuffs such as beer, coffee, mineral water, milk, sake, rice, soybean paste and vegetables can be discussed quantitatively using the taste sensor, which provides the objective scale for the human sensory expression. The flavour of a wine is also discriminated using the taste-odour sensory fusion conducted by combining the taste sensor and an odour-sensor array using conducting polymer elements. The taste sensor can also be applied to measurements of water pollution. Miniaturization of the taste sensor using FET produces the same characteristics as those of the above taste sensor by measuring the gate-source voltage. Use of the taste sensor will lead to a new era of food and environmental sciences.

  11. Sensors Applications, Volume 6, Sensors in Aerospace Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeser, Hans Peter; von Schoenermark, Maria; Young, Erick T.

    2005-08-01

    This volume gives a detailed overview of the sensor systems employed in aerospace technology, such as sensors for different spectral ranges from the UV to NIR, temperature measuring, radio- and microwave detection and satellite positioning systems. Furthermore, atmospheric measurements for meteorological and deep space exploration purposes as well as land surveys and geological applications are treated in detail. The book series Sensors Applications covers the application of up-to-date sensor principles in key areas, such as process monitoring, building control, household appliances, health care, automobile, aerospace, or environmental technology. Microelectronics have become indispensable in measurement and control technology, meeting the increasing demand for sophisticated sensor systems. The series covers the growing need for comprehensive information on the wide variety of available systems and their purposes, potentials, applications and limitations.

  12. Sensors Applications, Volume 3, Sensors in Medicine and Health Care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öberg, P. Åke; Togawa, Tatsuo; Spelman, Francis A.

    2004-08-01

    Taken as a whole, this series covers all major fields of application for commercial sensors, as well as their manufacturing techniques and major types. As such the series does not treat bulk sensors, but rather places strong emphasis on microsensors, microsystems and integrated electronic sensor packages. Each of the individual volumes is tailored to the needs and queries of readers from the relevant branch of industry. A review of applications for point-of-care diagnostics, their integration into portable systems and the comfortable, easy-to-use sensors that allow patients to monitor themselves at home. The book covers such advanced topics as minimal invasive surgery, implantable sensors and prostheses, as well as biocompatible sensing.

  13. The optical slit sensor as a standard sensor for spacecraft attitude determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wertz, J.

    1975-01-01

    The basic concept of an optical slit sensor as a standard altitude sensor is considered for any missions using a spinning spacecraft or where rotating sensors or mirrors could be used. Information available from a single sensor or from two sensors is analyzed. A standard slit sensor package is compared with the altitude package flown on the first synchronous meteorological satellite.

  14. Development of an unattended ground sensor array using piezoresistive sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kelly; Gupta, Neelam; Sartain, Ronald B.

    2009-05-01

    This paper discusses the development of an Unattended Ground Sensor based on an array of pressure sensors designed to be buried in the ground. This sensor array, along with the required software (still under development), will have the ability to distinguish between humans and animals based on the size and shape of the foot print. The technology may also be applied to determine the weight and type of vehicle traveling on a road. The sensor array consists of pressure sensitive resistors (piezoresistors) on 0.8 inch centers printed on a sheet of polyimide film. Although very large arrays might one day be screen printed, the arrays for this study have been printed using a syringe dispenser and a precision x-y computer controlled table. For the preliminary development, the array has been sized to 8X10 inches. The piezoresistive properties of the sensors are discussed and preliminary test data is presented. It is shown that the piezoresistive gauge factor (ΔR/R/ΔL/L) is roughly 10 times that of conventional metal strain gauges. Because the change in resistance is large compared to metal strain gauges, lower cost electronics can be used. The small net size and low mass enables sensing elements with fast response time. The fact that these piezoresistive elements are directly printed, as opposed to being adhesively attached to a surface, eliminates many of the issues associated with bonded discrete sensors. It is anticipated that the piezoresistive sensor approach presented in this paper will be well suited to extremely rugged environmental conditions compared to the commercially available sensor arrays which rely on surface contact resistance or capacitive sensors which can be easily destroyed by moisture. Environmental testing will be done in a future phase of the project. The final system, which is still under development, will consist of a sensor array, information processing, and RF signal transmission. The system is anticipated to be low cost and environmentally

  15. The piezoelectronic stress transduction switch for very large-scale integration, low voltage sensor computation, and radio frequency applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdǎu, I.-B.; Liu, X.-H.; Kuroda, M. A.; Shaw, T. M.; Crain, J.; Solomon, P. M.; Newns, D. M.; Martyna, G. J.

    2015-08-01

    The piezoelectronic transduction switch is a device with potential as a post-CMOS transistor due to its predicted multi-GHz, low voltage performance on the VLSI-scale. However, the operating principle of the switch has wider applicability. We use theory and simulation to optimize the device across a wide range of length scales and application spaces and to understand the physics underlying its behavior. We show that the four-terminal VLSI-scale switch can operate at a line voltage of 115 mV while as a low voltage-large area device, ≈200 mV operation at clock speeds of ≈2 GHz can be achieved with a desirable 104 On/Off ratio—ideal for on-board computing in sensors. At yet larger scales, the device is predicted to operate as a fast (≈250 ps) radio frequency (RF) switch exhibiting high cyclability, low On resistance and low Off capacitance, resulting in a robust switch with a RF figure of merit of ≈4 fs. These performance benchmarks cannot be approached with CMOS which has reached fundamental limits. In detail, a combination of finite element modeling and ab initio calculations enables prediction of switching voltages for a given design. A multivariate search method then establishes a set of physics-based design rules, discovering the key factors for each application. The results demonstrate that the piezoelectronic transduction switch can offer fast, low power applications spanning several domains of the information technology infrastructure.

  16. Enhanced performance PIR security sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddiard, Kevin C.

    2008-04-01

    Previous presentations to this forum have described a new technology initiative for low cost passive IR security sensors based on novel microbolometer FPA design, low cost optics and simplified packaging. The primary objective of this initiative is to develop a smart (intelligent) security sensor having a number of improvements over current pyroelectric PIR sensors, including imaging. However the same core technology can also be employed for an enhanced performance PIR sensor in the form of a upgrade retrofit for current sensors. This paper addresses the latter initiative. The enhanced performance PIR upgrade sensor has two significant advantages over current technology: extended detection range and ability to detect developing fire or equipment failure. It may thus be seen as an IR fire detection device complementing other sensors whilst having an extended range for human detection. It does not have the full capability of the smart security sensor, but has the advantages of simplicity and low cost short term development. Performance is described for a 4 x 4 FPA designed specifically for this application.

  17. Remote sensors - Prospects and limitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehmann, J.

    1973-01-01

    Review of the history, present status, and future prospects and limitations of remote sensing systems for satellite-based earth resources surveys. The objectives and special areas of interest of ongoing sensor development experiments are summarized, and the measurement and performance goals of current potential sensor research is discussed.

  18. Driven shielding capacitive proximity sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor); McConnell, Robert L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A capacitive proximity sensing element, backed by a reflector driven at the same voltage as and in phase with the sensor, is used to reflect the field lines away from a grounded robot arm towards an intruding object, thus dramatically increasing the sensor's range and sensitivity.

  19. Implicit collaboration of sensor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintz, Kenneth J.

    2004-08-01

    The concept of goal lattices for the evaluation of potential sensor actions can be used to cause a multiplicity of heterogeneous sensor systems to collaborate. Previously goal lattices have been used to compute the value to a sensor system of taking a particular action in terms of how well that action contributes to the accomplishment of the topmost goals. This assumes that each sensor system is autonomous and only responsible to itself. If the topmost goals of each sensor system's goal lattice has adjoined to it two additional goals, namely "collaboration" and "altruism", then the value system is extended to include servicing requests from other systems. Two aircraft on a common mission can each benefit from measurements taken by the other aircraft either to confirm their own measurements, to create a pseudo-sensor, or to extend the area of coverage. The altruism goal indicates how much weight a sensor management system (SMS) will give in responding to a measurement request from any other system. The collaboration goal indicates how much weight will be given to responding to a measurement request from specific systems which are defined as being part of a collaborating group. By varying the values of the altruism and collaboration goals of each system, either locally or globally, various levels of implicit cooperation among sensor systems can be caused to emerge.

  20. Implementing fault-tolerant sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzullo, Keith

    1989-01-01

    One aspect of fault tolerance in process control programs is the ability to tolerate sensor failure. A methodology is presented for transforming a process control program that cannot tolerate sensor failures to one that can. Additionally, a hierarchy of failure models is identified.