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Sample records for 2p2 1sedouble excitation

  1. CCQE, 2p2h excitations and ν—energy reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Nieves, J.; Simo, I. Ruiz; Sánchez, F.; Vacas, M. J. Vicente

    2015-05-15

    We analyze the MiniBooNE muon neutrino CCQE-like dσ/dT{sub μ} d cos θ{sub μ} data using a theoretical model that, among other nuclear effects, includes RPA correlations and 2p2h (multinucleon) mechanisms. These corrections turn out to be essential for the description of the data. We find that MiniBooNE CCQE-like data are fully compatible with former determinations of the nucleon axial mass M{sub A} ∼ 1.05 GeV. This is in sharp contrast with several previous analysis where anomalously large values of M{sub A} ∼ 1.4 GeV have been suggested. We also show that because of the the multinucleon mechanism effects, the algorithm used to reconstruct the neutrino energy is not adequate when dealing with quasielastic-like events. Finally, we analyze the MiniBooNE unfolded cross section, and show that it exhibits an excess (deficit) of low (high) energy neutrinos, which is an artifact of the unfolding process that ignores 2p2h mechanisms.

  2. Blue-green luminescence in Hg free excited Sr2P2O7:Tb3+ pyrophosphate phosphor for NUV excited LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohale, R. L.; Chimankar, O. P.; Dhoble, S. J.

    2015-02-01

    Tb3+ activated Sr2P2O7 phosphor was prepared by modified solid state diffusion technique at 700°C. The XRD pattern of Sr2P2O7 is in well argument with the standard ICDD File (24-1011) available. Surface morphology of the present phosphor has been studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM). In photoluminescence investigation, the excitation spectra of the phosphor extends from 200 to 400 nm gives optimum absorption at 352 nm, which is mercury free excitation and characteristics of NUV excited LED. Under the excitation of 352 nm, Sr2P2O7 doped with trivalent terbium ions produces weak blue emission between 400-500 nm owing to the 5D3 to the 7FJ transitions of Tb3+ and strong green emission in 500650 nm region of the visible spectrum due to the 4f-4f transitions from the 5D4 to 7FJ (J=6, 5, 4, 3) states of Tb3+. The entire study reveals that the present phosphor have promising applications in the lamp industry especially for solid state lighting (mercury free excited lamp phosphor) and NUV LEDs.

  3. Decay of ^10C excited states above the 2p + 2α threshold and the contribution from ``democratic'' two-proton emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercurio, K. M.; Charity, R. J.; Shane, R.; Sobotka, L. G.; Elson, J.; Famiano, M.; Wuosmaa, A.; Banu, A.; Fu, C.; Trache, L.; Tribble, R. E.

    2008-04-01

    The decay of ^10C excited states to the 2p +2α exit channel has been studied using an E/A = 10.7 MeV ^10C beam inelastically scattered from a ^9Be target. Levels associated with the two-proton decay to the ground state of ^8Be have been observed. These include states at 5.18 and 6.54 MeV which decay by sequential two-proton emission through the long-lived intermediate state of ^9B. In addition, these two states have branches, or there exist other states at almost the same energies, for which there is no long-lived intermediate state between the two proton emissions. For the 6.57 MeV state, the two protons are preferably emitted on the same side of the decaying ^10C fragment. Evidence is found for a state at E^*= 8.4 MeV in ^10C which decays through the 2.35 MeV second excited state of ^9B. A large data set of kinematically complete ^6Be->2p + α events was also collected.

  4. 2p2 Team News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, H.

    2000-12-01

    In September we welcomed new team member Lisa Germany from Australia. Lisa is a new ESO Fellow and has interests in supernovae and their use in cosmological distance determinations. S e p t e m b e r, however, was also a month for departures when we said goodbye to long-time team member James Brewer. James was a pivotal member of the 2p2 Team since his arrival at ESO in 1996. He has returned to Canada to take up a position at the University of British Columbia, in Vancouver, Canada. We wish him all the best under northern skies.

  5. 2p2 Team News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, H.

    2000-06-01

    The 2p2 Team continued towards the implementation at the 2.2-m of the same BOB (Broker for Observation Blocks) observing interface as seen at other ESO telescopes. This requires an interface to be written between the existing BOB software and the non-VLT compatible control software for the Wide-Field Imager (WFI) and 2.2-m. Cristian Urrutia, Tatiana Paz and Eduardo Robledo are heading its development. With this software in place, observers can use the VLT Phase 2 Proposal Preparation System (P2PP) for definition of their exposures, whether they are for Visitor or Service Mode.

  6. Electronic states of BP, BP +, BP -, B 2P 2, B2P2- and B2P2+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linguerri, Roberto; Komiha, Najia; Oswald, Rainer; Mitrushchenkov, Alexander; Rosmus, Pavel

    2008-05-01

    Using augmented sextuple zeta basis sets and internally contracted multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) wavefunctions, potential energy, electric dipole and transition moments have been computed for the X 3Π, a 1Σ +, b 1Π and A 3Σ - states of BP, X 2Σ + and A 2Π states of BP - and X 4Σ - and A 4Π states of BP +. From these data spectroscopic constants, radiative transition probabilities and photoelectron spectra of BP - and BP have been evaluated. The non-vanishing spin-orbit coupling elements between the four low lying triplet and singlet states of the neutral BP have also been calculated from MRCI wavefunctions. The treatment of the corresponding perturbations in the manifold of dense rovibrational states in the three lowest states would require a precise knowledge of the electronic excitation energies. Our best singlet-triplet separations (X-a) are calculated to be 2412 cm -1 (MRCI) and 2482 cm -1 (restricted coupled cluster with perturbative triples (RCCSD(T))) with an estimated error bound of about ±200 cm -1. All three states have long radiative lifetimes with cascading among the rovibrational levels of different states. The ionization energy IE e of BP is calculated to be 9.22 eV (MRCI) and 9.48 eV (RCCSD(T)), the electron affinity EA e 2.51 eV (MRCI) and 2.74 eV (RCCSD(T)). The photoelectron spectra of BP and BP - have been obtained from the Franck-Condon factors of the MRCI potentials. For the UV spectroscopy the dipole allowed radiative transition probabilities are given for A 3Σ - ↔ X 3Π, b 1Π ↔ a 1Σ + of BP, A 2Π ↔ X 2Σ + of BP - and A 4Π ↔ X 4Σ - of BP +. The ionization energy IE e of B 2P 2 of 8.71 eV and the electron affinity EA e of 2.34 eV have been calculated by the RCCSD(T)/aVQZ approach. Also the harmonic vibrational wavenumbers for the electronic ground states of the ions B2P2+ and B2P2- are given.

  7. Femtosecond induced transparency and absorption in the extremeultraviolet by coherent coupling of the He 2s2p (1Po) and 2p2 (1Se)double excitation states with 800 nm light

    SciTech Connect

    Loh, Z.-H.; Greene, C.H.; Leone, S.R.

    2007-08-01

    Femtosecond high-order harmonic transient absorption spectroscopy is used to observe electromagnetically induced transparency-like behavior as well as induced absorption in the extreme ultraviolet by laser dressing of the He 2s2p ({sup 1}P{sup 0}) and 2p{sup 2} ({sup 1}S{sup e}) double excitation states with an intense 800 nm field. Probing in the vicinity of the 1s{sup 2} {yields} 2s2p transition at 60.15 eV reveals the formation of an Autler-Townes doublet due to coherent coupling of the double excitation states. Qualitative agreement with the experimental spectra is obtained only when optical field ionization of both double excitation states into the N = 2 continuum is included in the theoretical model. Because the Fano q-parameter of the unperturbed probe transition is finite, the laser-dressed He atom exhibits both enhanced transparency and absorption at negative and positive probe energy detunings, respectively.

  8. Accurate variational calculations of the ground 2Po(1s22s22p) and excited 2S(1s22s2p2) and 2Po(1s22s23p) states of singly ionized carbon atom.

    PubMed

    Bubin, Sergiy; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2011-12-01

    In this article we report accurate nonrelativistic variational calculations of the ground and two excited states of C(+) ion. We employ extended and well optimized basis sets of all-electron explicitly correlated Gaussians to represent the wave functions of the states. The optimization of the basis functions is performed with a procedure employing the analytic gradient of the energy with respect to the nonlinear parameters of the Gaussians. The calculations explicitly include the effects due to the finite nuclear mass. The calculated transition energies between the three states are compared to the experimentally derived values. Finally, we present expectation values of some small positive and negative powers of the interparticle distances and contact densities. PMID:22149776

  9. EuCo2P2 : A model molecular-field helical Heisenberg antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangeetha, N. S.; Cuervo-Reyes, Eduardo; Pandey, Abhishek; Johnston, D. C.

    2016-07-01

    The metallic compound EuCo2P2 with the body-centered tetragonal ThCr2Si2 structure containing Eu spins-7/2 was previously shown from single-crystal neutron diffraction measurements to exhibit a helical antiferromagnetic (AFM) structure below TN=66.5 K with the helix axis along the c axis and with the ordered moments aligned within the a b plane. Here we report crystallography, electrical resistivity, heat capacity, magnetization, and magnetic susceptibility measurements on single crystals of this compound. We demonstrate that EuCo2P2 is a model molecular-field helical Heisenberg antiferromagnet from comparisons of the anisotropic magnetic susceptibility χ , high-field magnetization, and magnetic heat capacity of EuCo2P2 single crystals at temperature T ≤TN with the predictions of our recent formulation of molecular-field theory. Values of the Heisenberg exchange interactions between the Eu spins are derived from the data. The low-T magnetic heat capacity ˜T3 arising from spin-wave excitations with no anisotropy gap is calculated and found to be comparable to the lattice heat capacity. The density of states at the Fermi energy of EuCo2P2 and the related compound BaCo2P2 are found from the heat capacity data to be large, 10 and 16 states/eV per formula unit for EuCo2P2 and BaCo2P2 , respectively. These values are enhanced by a factor of ˜2.5 above those found from DFT electronic structure calculations for the two compounds. The calculations also find ferromagnetic Eu-Eu exchange interactions within the a b plane and AFM interactions between Eu spins in nearest- and next-nearest planes, in agreement with the MFT analysis of χa b(T ≤TN) .

  10. EuCo2P2: A model molecular-field helical Heisenberg antiferromagnet

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sangeetha, N. S.; Cuervo-Reyes, Eduardo; Pandey, Abhishek; Johnston, D. C.

    2016-07-19

    Here, the metallic compound EuCo2P2 with the body-centered tetragonal ThCr2Si2 structure containing Eu spins-7/2 was previously shown from single-crystal neutron diffraction measurements to exhibit a helical antiferromagnetic (AFM) structure below TN=66.5 K with the helix axis along the c axis and with the ordered moments aligned within the ab plane. Here we report crystallography, electrical resistivity, heat capacity, magnetization, and magnetic susceptibility measurements on single crystals of this compound. We demonstrate that EuCo2P2 is a model molecular-field helical Heisenberg antiferromagnet from comparisons of the anisotropic magnetic susceptibility χ, high-field magnetization, and magnetic heat capacity of EuCo2P2 single crystals at temperaturemore » T ≤ TN with the predictions of our recent formulation of molecular-field theory. Values of the Heisenberg exchange interactions between the Eu spins are derived from the data. The low-T magnetic heat capacity ~T3 arising from spin-wave excitations with no anisotropy gap is calculated and found to be comparable to the lattice heat capacity. The density of states at the Fermi energy of EuCo2P2 and the related compound BaCo2P2 are found from the heat capacity data to be large, 10 and 16 states/eV per formula unit for EuCo2P2 and BaCo2P2, respectively. These values are enhanced by a factor of ~2.5 above those found from DFT electronic structure calculations for the two compounds. The calculations also find ferromagnetic Eu–Eu exchange interactions within the ab plane and AFM interactions between Eu spins in nearest- and next-nearest planes, in agreement with the MFT analysis of χab(T ≤ TN).« less

  11. Faraday effect in Sn2P2S6 crystals.

    PubMed

    Krupych, Oleh; Adamenko, Dmytro; Mys, Oksana; Grabar, Aleksandr; Vlokh, Rostyslav

    2008-11-10

    We have revealed a large Faraday rotation in tin thiohypodiphosphate (Sn(2)P(2)S(6)) crystals, which makes this material promising for magneto-optics. The effective Faraday tensor component and the Verdet constant for the direction of the optic axis have been determined by measuring the pure Faraday rotation in Sn(2)P(2)S(6) crystals with both the single-ray and small-angular polarimetric methods at the normal conditions and a wavelength of 632.8 nm. The effective Verdet constant is found to be equal to 115 rad/T x m. PMID:19002228

  12. Energy calculation of 2s2 1S, 2p2 1D, 3s2 1S, 3p2 1D, 3d2 1G, 4p2 1D, 4d2 1D, 4f2 1I doubly excited states using a new wave function to four terms for 2 ≤ Z ≤ 15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sow, B.; Sow, M.; Gning, Y.; Traore, A.; Ndao, A. S.; Wague, A.

    2016-06-01

    Calculation of the energy levels of atoms and ions with 2 ≤ Z ≤ 15 are carried out in this paper using a Hyllerass approximation. The method used is one of Screen Constant by Nuclear Charge Unit to calculate the total energy of two-electron atomic systems in ground and different doubly excited states. Employing a new wave function including correlation, we were able to calculate excited states (nl)2 (n ≤ 4). The Comparison of these results with the ones of other methods shows a good agreement.

  13. α and 2 p 2 n emission in fast neutron-induced reactions on 60Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotiades, N.; Devlin, M.; Haight, R. C.; Nelson, R. O.; Kunieda, S.; Kawano, T.

    2015-06-01

    Background: The cross sections for populating the residual nucleus in the reaction ZAX(n,x) Z -2 A -4Y exhibit peaks as a function of incident neutron energy corresponding to the (n ,n'α ) reaction and, at higher energy, to the (n ,2 p 3 n ) reaction. The relative magnitudes of these peaks vary with the Z of the target nucleus. Purpose: Study fast neutron-induced reactions on 60Ni. Locate experimentally the nuclear charge region along the line of stability where the cross sections for α emission and for 2 p 2 n emission in fast neutron-induced reactions are comparable as a further test of reaction models. Methods: Data were taken by using the Germanium Array for Neutron-Induced Excitations. The broad-spectrum pulsed neutron beam of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center's Weapons Neutron Research facility provided neutrons in the energy range from 1 to 250 MeV. The time-of-flight technique was used to determine the incident-neutron energies. Results: Absolute partial cross sections for production of seven discrete Fe γ rays populated in 60Ni (n ,α /2 p x n γ ) reactions with 2 ≤x ≤5 were measured for neutron energies 1 MeV2 p 2 n and 2 p 3 n emission at higher incident energies in the nuclear charge region around Fe.

  14. Electron excitation cross sections for the 2s^2 2p ^2p^o-2s2p^2 ^4p and 2s2p^2 ^2D transitions in O^3+

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. J.; Lozano, J. A.; Tayal, S. S.; Chutjian, A.

    2003-01-01

    Comparison is made with results of new calculations in a 25-state R-matrix theory and with results in a previous eight-state R-matrix calculation. The presence of rich resonance structure is confirmed in both experiment and theory.

  15. NMR study of heavy fermion compound EuNi2P2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magishi, K.; Watanabe, R.; Hisada, A.; Saito, T.; Koyama, K.; Fujiwara, T.

    2015-03-01

    We report the results of 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements on heavy fermion compound EuNi2P2 in order to investigate the magnetic properties at low temperatures from a microscopic view point. The Knight shift has a negative value in an entire temperature range, and the absolute value increases with decreasing temperature but exhibits a broad maximum around 40 K, which is similar to the behavior of the magnetic susceptibility. Also, the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 is almost constant at high temperatures above 200 K, which is reminiscent of the relaxation mechanism dominated by the interaction of the 31P nucleus with fluctuating Eu-4f moments. Below 200 K, 1/T1 gradually decreases on cooling due to the change of the valence in the Eu ion. At low temperatures, 1/T1 does not obey the Korringa relation, in contrast to typical heavy fermion compounds. The nuclear spin-spin relaxation rate 1/T2 shows the similar behavior as 1/T1 at high temperatures. But, below 50 K, 1/T2 increases upon cooling due to the development of the magnetic excitation.

  16. High pressure studies of the phase transition in the ferroelectric Sn2P2S6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhavadov, Leonid N.; Ryzhov, Valentin N.

    2016-06-01

    We apply a method of pulse-adiabatic modulation of pressure to obtain heat capacity and thermal expansion of ferroelectric Sn2P2S6 in the vicinity of the second order phase transition at pressures to 5 kbar. The phase transition in Sn2P2S6 does not change its nature and stays second order in the whole range of pressure currently studied. The earlier conclusion on the tricritical features of the phase transition in Sn2P2S6 cannot be confirmed. Discontinuities of heat capacity and thermal expansion perfectly fit the Ehrenfest equation that expected in the mean field theories. An excellent performance of the Ehrenfest formula in a wide range of pressures establishes phase transition in Sn2P2S6 as an almost ideal mean field phase transition.

  17. Raman spectroscopic study of (Ph 2P) 2CCH 2 and [(Ph 2P) 2CCH 2]W(CO) 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fickert, C.; Posset, U.; Kiefer, W.

    1997-06-01

    The Raman and IR spectra of 1,1-bis[diphenylphosphino]ethene (Ph 2P) 2CCH 2 (vdpp) and the tetracarbonyl tungsten complex (vdpp)W(CO) 4 have been recorded. Vibrational assignments are proposed based on local symmetry considerations. For the vinylidene stretching mode a coordination shift is observed from 1588 cm -1 in polycrystalline vdpp to 1581 cm -1 in its tetracarbonyl tungsten complex. From a comparison of the v(CO) splitting pattern with those of related complexes monoclinic structure with factor group C2h and four formula units per unit cell is concluded.

  18. Large-Scale Mini-Magnetosphere Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Slough, J.; Ziemba, T.; Euripides, P.; Adrian, M. L.; Gallagher, D.; Craven, P.; Tomlinson, W.; Cravens, J.; Burch, J.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Mini-Magnetosphere Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) is an innovative plasma propulsion system that has the potential to propel spacecraft at unprecedented speeds of 50 to 80 km per second with a low-power requirement of approx. 1 kW per 100 kg of payload and approx. 1 kg of neutral gas [fuel] consumption per day of acceleration. Acceleration periods from several days to a few months are envisioned. High specific impulse and efficiency are achieved through coupling of the spacecraft to the 400 km per second solar wind through an artificial magnetosphere. The mini-magnetosphere or inflated magnetic bubble is produced by the injection of cold dense plasma into a spacecraft-generated magnetic field envelope. Magnetic bubble inflation is driven by electromagnetic processes thereby avoiding the material and deployment problems faced by mechanical solar sail designs, Here, we present the theoretical design of M2P2 as well as initial results from experimental testing of an M2P2 prototype demonstrating: 1) inflation of the dipole magnetic field geometry through the internal injection of cold plasma; and 2) deflection of and artificial solar wind by the prototype M2P2 system. In addition, we present plans for direct laboratory measurement of thrust imparted to a prototype M2P2 by an artificial solar wind during the summer of 2001.

  19. Large-Scale Mini-Magnetosphere Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Slough, J.; Ziemba, T.; Euripides, P.; Gallagher, D.; Craven, P.; Adrian, M. L.; Tomlinson, W.; Cravens, J.; Burch, J.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Mini-Magnetosphere Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) is an innovative plasma propulsion system that has the potential to propel spacecraft at unprecedented speeds of 50 to 80 km/s, with a low power requirement of approx. 1 kW per 100 kg of payload and -1 kg of neutral gas [fuel] consumption per day of acceleration. Acceleration periods from several days to a few months are envisioned. High specific impulse and efficiency are achieved through coupling of the spacecraft to the 400 km/s. solar wind through an artificial magnetosphere. The mini-magnetosphere or inflated magnetic bubble is produced by the injection of cold dense plasma into a spacecraft-generated magnetic field envelope. Magnetic bubble inflation is driven by electromagnetic processes thereby avoiding the material and deployment problems faced by mechanical solar sail designs. Here, we present the theoretical design of M2P2 as well as initial results from experimental testing of an M2P2 prototype demonstrating: 1) inflation of the dipole magnetic field geometry through the internal injection of cold plasma; and 2) deflection of and artificial solar wind by the prototype M2P2 system. In addition, we present plans for direct laboratory measurement of thrust imparted to a prototype M2P2 by an artificial solar wind during the summer of 2001.

  20. Highly efficient acousto-optic diffraction in Sn2P2S6 crystals.

    PubMed

    Martynyuk-Lototska, I Yu; Mys, O G; Grabar, A A; Stoika, I M; Vysochanskii, Yu M; Vlokh, R O

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the acousto-optic (AO) diffraction in Sn2P2S6 crystals and found that they manifest high values of an AO figure of merit. The above crystals may therefore be used as highly efficient materials in different AO applications. PMID:18157276

  1. A study of a sector spectrophotometer and auroral O+(2P-2D) emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, G. R.

    1976-01-01

    The metastable O+(2P-2D) auroral emission was investigated. The neighboring OH contaminants and low intensity levels of the emission itself necessitated the evolution of an instrument capable of separating the emission from the contaminants and having a high sensitivity in the wavelength region of interest. A new type of scanning photometer was developed and its properties are discussed. The theoretical aspects of auroral electron interaction with atomic oxygen and the resultant O+(2P-2D) emissions were examined in conjunction with N2(+)1NEG emissions. Ground based measurements of O+(2P-2D) auroral emission intensities were made using the spatial scanning photometer (sector spectrophotometer). Simultaneous measurements of N2(+)1NEG sub 1,0 emission intensity were made in the same field of view using a tilting photometer. Time histories of the ratio of these two emissions made in the magnetic zenith during auroral breakup periods are given. Theories of I sub 7319/I sub 4278 of previous investigators were presented. A rocket measurement of N2(+)1NEG sub 0,0 and O+(2P-2D) emission in aurora was examined in detail and was found to agree with the ground based measurements. Theoretical examination resulted in the deduction of the electron impact efficiency generating O+(2P) and also suggests a large source of O+(2P) at low altitude. A possible source is charge exchange of N+(1S) with OI(3P).

  2. Gamow-Teller decay studies with 2p-2h configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severyukhin, A. P.; Voronov, V. V.; Borzov, I. N.; Arsenyev, N. N.; Van Giai, Nguyen

    2016-06-01

    Starting from a Skyrme interaction with tensor terms, the β-decay rates have been studied within a microscopic model including the 2p-2h configuration effects. As an application we present the evolution of the neutron-rich Ni isotopes near 78Ni that are important for stellar nucleosynthesis.

  3. Static and dynamical magnetic properties of the itinerant ferromagnet LaCo2P2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Masaki; Michioka, Chishiro; Ueda, Hiroaki; Yoshimura, Kazuyoshi

    2015-05-01

    We synthesized single crystals of an itinerant ferromagnet LaCo2P2 with ThCr2Si2 -type structure and studied their magnetism by magnetization and 31P NMR measurements. We measured Knight shift K and spin-lattice relaxation rate divided by temperature 1 /T1T with the applied fields parallel to the a and c axes, and estimated spin fluctuations in the a b plane and c . In addition, we evaluated spin fluctuations from the result of magnetization data with a three-dimensional ferromagnetic model. There is little anisotropy in evaluated spin fluctuations in the a b plane and c . Spin fluctuations of LaCo2P2 have a three-dimensional character and can be understood in the framework of the self-consistent renormalization theory of spin fluctuations.

  4. Structural, elastic, electronic and optical properties of new layered semiconductor BaGa2P2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhemadou, A.; Khenata, R.; Bin-Omran, S.; Murtaza, G.; Al-Douri, Y.

    2015-08-01

    We report the results of a detailed first-principles based density functional theory study of the structural, elastic, electronic and optical properties of a recently synthesized layered semiconductor BaGa2P2. The optimized structural parameters are in excellent agreement with the experimental structural findings, which validates the used theoretical method. The single crystal and polycrystalline elastic constants are numerically estimated using the strain-stress method and Voigt-Reuss-Hill approximations. Predicted values of the elastic constants suggest that the considered material is mechanically stable, brittle and very soft material. The three-dimensional surface and its planar projections of Young's modulus are visualized to illustrate the elastic anisotropy. It is found that Young's modulus of BaGa2P2 show strong dependence on the crystallographic directions. Band structure calculation reveals that BaGa2P2 is a direct energy band gap semiconductor. The effective masses of electrons and holes at the minimum of the conduction band and maximum of the valence band are numerically estimated. The density of state, charge density distribution and charge transfers are calculated and analyzed to determine the chemical bonding nature. Dielectric function, refractive index, extinction coefficient, absorption coefficient, reflectivity and electron-loss energy function spectra are computed for a wide photon energy range up to 20 eV. Calculated optical spectra exhibit a noticeable anisotropy.

  5. Acoustic and elastic properties of Sn(2)P(2)S(6) crystals.

    PubMed

    Mys, O; Martynyuk-Lototska, I; Grabar, A; Vlokh, R

    2009-07-01

    We present the results concerned with acoustic and elastic properties of Sn(2)P(2)S(6) crystals. The complete matrices of elastic stiffness and compliance coefficients are determined in both the crystallographic coordinate system and the system associated with eigenvectors of the elastic stiffness tensor. The acoustic slowness surfaces are constructed and the propagation and polarization directions of the slowest acoustic waves promising for acousto-optic interactions are determined on this basis. The acoustic obliquity angle and the deviation of polarization of the acoustic waves from purely transverse or longitudinal states are quantitatively analysed. PMID:21828470

  6. Electronic Structure and Phase Transition in Ferroelectic Sn2P2S6 Crystal

    PubMed Central

    Glukhov, Konstantin; Fedyo, Kristina; Banys, Juras; Vysochanskii, Yulian

    2012-01-01

    An analysis of the P2S6 cluster electronic structure and its comparison with the crystal valence band in the paraelectric and ferroelectric phases has been done by first-principles calculations for Sn2P2S6 ferroelectrics. The origin of ferroelectricity has been outlined. It was established that the spontaneous polarization follows from the stereochemical activity of the electron lone pair of tin cations, which is determined by hybridization with P2S6 molecular orbitals. The chemical bonds covalence increase and rearrangement are related to the valence band changes at transition from the paraelectric phase to the ferroelectric phase. PMID:23203069

  7. Pressure Induced Enhancement of Superconductivity in LaRu2P2

    PubMed Central

    Li, Baoxuan; Liu, Jianzhong; Sun, Jian; Li, Sheng; Zhu, Xiyu; Wen, Hai-Hu

    2016-01-01

    To explore new superconductors beyond the copper-based and iron-based systems is very important. The Ru element locates just below the Fe in the periodic table and behaves like the Fe in many ways. One of the common thread to induce high temperature superconductivity is to introduce moderate correlation into the system. In this paper, we report the significant enhancement of superconducting transition temperature from 3.8 K to 5.8 K by using a pressure only of 1.74 ± 0.05 GPa in LaRu2P2 which has an iso-structure of the iron-based 122 superconductors. The ab-initio calculation shows that the superconductivity in LaRu2P2 at ambient pressure can be explained by the McMillan’s theory with strong electron-phonon coupling. However, it is difficult to interpret the enhancement of Tc versus pressure within this picture. Detailed analysis of the pressure induced evolution of resistivity and upper critical field Hc2(T) reveals that the increase of Tc with pressure may be accompanied by the involvement of extra electron-boson interaction. This suggests that the Ru-based system has some commonality as the Fe-based superconductors. PMID:27086696

  8. Pressure Induced Enhancement of Superconductivity in LaRu2P2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baoxuan; Lu, Pengchao; Liu, Jianzhong; Sun, Jian; Li, Sheng; Zhu, Xiyu; Wen, Hai-Hu

    2016-04-01

    To explore new superconductors beyond the copper-based and iron-based systems is very important. The Ru element locates just below the Fe in the periodic table and behaves like the Fe in many ways. One of the common thread to induce high temperature superconductivity is to introduce moderate correlation into the system. In this paper, we report the significant enhancement of superconducting transition temperature from 3.8 K to 5.8 K by using a pressure only of 1.74 ± 0.05 GPa in LaRu2P2 which has an iso-structure of the iron-based 122 superconductors. The ab-initio calculation shows that the superconductivity in LaRu2P2 at ambient pressure can be explained by the McMillan’s theory with strong electron-phonon coupling. However, it is difficult to interpret the enhancement of Tc versus pressure within this picture. Detailed analysis of the pressure induced evolution of resistivity and upper critical field Hc2(T) reveals that the increase of Tc with pressure may be accompanied by the involvement of extra electron-boson interaction. This suggests that the Ru-based system has some commonality as the Fe-based superconductors.

  9. Pressure Induced Enhancement of Superconductivity in LaRu2P2.

    PubMed

    Li, Baoxuan; Lu, Pengchao; Liu, Jianzhong; Sun, Jian; Li, Sheng; Zhu, Xiyu; Wen, Hai-Hu

    2016-01-01

    To explore new superconductors beyond the copper-based and iron-based systems is very important. The Ru element locates just below the Fe in the periodic table and behaves like the Fe in many ways. One of the common thread to induce high temperature superconductivity is to introduce moderate correlation into the system. In this paper, we report the significant enhancement of superconducting transition temperature from 3.8 K to 5.8 K by using a pressure only of 1.74 ± 0.05 GPa in LaRu2P2 which has an iso-structure of the iron-based 122 superconductors. The ab-initio calculation shows that the superconductivity in LaRu2P2 at ambient pressure can be explained by the McMillan's theory with strong electron-phonon coupling. However, it is difficult to interpret the enhancement of Tc versus pressure within this picture. Detailed analysis of the pressure induced evolution of resistivity and upper critical field Hc2(T) reveals that the increase of Tc with pressure may be accompanied by the involvement of extra electron-boson interaction. This suggests that the Ru-based system has some commonality as the Fe-based superconductors. PMID:27086696

  10. Electron-phonon interaction and superconductivity in BaIr2P2.

    PubMed

    Billington, D

    2016-10-01

    Detailed calculations of the electronic structure, phonons and electron-phonon coupling of the superconducting compound BaIr2P2 were performed from first-principles. The electronic structure showed excellent agreement with the available experimental data. The total electron-phonon coupling constant was [Formula: see text] and the logarithmically averaged phonon frequency was [Formula: see text] K. From the Allen-Dynes formula, with [Formula: see text], the superconducting critical temperature was estimated to be [Formula: see text] K, which is in excellent agreement with the experiment. These results indicate that the electron-phonon coupling is of moderate strength and is easily capable of supporting the observed superconductivity. PMID:27494506

  11. 1s2s2p2 5p3 5S transition in B ii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannervik, S.; Cederquist, H.; Martinson, I.; Brage, T.; Froese Fischer, C.

    1987-04-01

    An experimental and theoretical study has been made of the 1s2s2p2 5P-1s2p3 5S transition in B ii. The experimental wavelength and lifetime (1323.92+/-0.07 Å and 0.65+/-0.01 ns), determined by beam-foil spectroscopy, are more than five times more accurate than previous experimental results. Our theoretical data, from multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock calculations, 1311.6 Å and 0.601 ns, are in excellent agreement with previous theoretical predictions of Beck and Nicolaides [Phys. Lett. 61A, 227 (1977)]. We have also observed the 1s2p3 5S-1s2p23s 5P transition, at 857.7+/-0.2 Å, in accord with the theoretical value 859.1 Å.

  12. A Simple Pythagorean Interpretation of E2 = p2 c2 + (mc2)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobar, J. A.; Guillen, C. I.; Vargas, E. L.; Andrianarijaona, V. M.

    2015-04-01

    We are considering the relationship between the relativistic energy, the momentum, and the rest energy, E2 =p2c2 + (mc2)2 , and using geometrical means to analyze each individual portion in a spatial setting. The aforementioned equation suggests that pc and mc2 could be thought of as the two axis of a plane. According to de Broglie's hypothesis λ = h / p therefore suggesting that the pc-axis is connected to the wave properties of a moving object, and subsequently, the mc2-axis is connected to the particle properties such as its moment of inertia. Consequently, these two axes could represent the particle (matter) and wave properties of the moving object. An overview of possible models and meaningful interpretations, which agree with Dirac's prediction of the electron's magnetic moment, will be presented. Authors wish to give special thanks to Pacific Union College Student Senate in Angwin, California, for their financial support.

  13. A Simple Pythagorean Interpretation of E2 = p2c2 + (mc2)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobar, J. A.; Vargas, E. L.; Andrianarijaona, V. M.

    2015-03-01

    We are considering the relationship between the relativistic energy, the momentum, and the rest energy, E2 =p2c2 + (mc2)2 , and using geometrical means to analyze each individual portion in a spatial setting. The aforementioned equation suggests that pc and mc2 could be thought of as the two axis of a plane. According to de Broglie's hypothesis λ = h / p therefore suggesting that the pc-axis is connected to the wave properties of a moving object, and subsequently, the mc2-axis is connected to the particle properties. Consequently, these two axis could represent the particle and wave properties of the moving object. An overview of possible models and meaningful interpretations will be presented. Authors wish to give special thanks to Pacific Union College Student Senate in Angwin, California, for their financial support.

  14. Electron-phonon superconductivity in the ternary phosphides Ba M2P2 (M =Ni,Rh,and Ir)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaca, Ertuǧrul; Tütüncü, H. M.; Srivastava, G. P.; Uǧur, S.

    2016-08-01

    Ab initio plane-wave pseudopotential calculations of electronic and vibrational properties have been carried out for the ternary phosphides Ba M2P2 (M =Ni,Rh and Ir) with a ThCr2Si2 -type structure. The calculated electronic results show the metallic character of Ba M2P2 , and the plots of total and partial density of states of Ba M2P2 exhibit strong hybridization between the d states of the M atom and the p states of the P atom below the Fermi energy. Differences in the phonon spectrum and density of states both in the acoustical and optical ranges for these compounds are presented and discussed. The Eliashberg spectral function for these compounds has been calculated by using a linear response approach based on the density functional theory. By integrating the Eliashberg spectral function, the average electron-phonon coupling parameter (λ ) is determined to be 0.61 for BaNi2P2 , 0.55 for BaIr2P2 , and 0.43 for BaRh2P2 . Using the calculated values of λ and the logarithmically averaged phonon frequency ωln the superconducting critical temperature (Tc) values for BaNi2P2,BaIr2P2 , and BaRh2P2 are obtained to be 2.80, 1.97, and 0.70 K, respectively, which compare very well with their experimental values of 3.0, 2.1, and 1.0 K.

  15. Efficient Plasma Production in Low Background Neutral Pressures with the M2P2 Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemba, T.; Euripides, P.; Winglee, R.; Slough, J.; Giersch, L.

    2003-01-01

    Mini-Magnetospheric Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) seeks the creation of a large-scale (10 km radius) magnetic wall or bubble (i.e. a magnetosphere) by the electromagnetic inflation of a small-scale (20 cm radius) dipole magnet. The inflated magnetosphere will intercept the solar wind and thereby provide high-speed propulsion with modest power and fuel requirements due to the gain provided by the ambient medium. Magnetic field inflation is produced by the injection of plasma onto the dipole magnetic field eliminating the need for large mechanical structures and added material weight at launch. For successful inflation of the magnetic bubble a beta near unity must be achieved along the imposed dipole field. This is dependent on the plasma parameters that can be achieved with a plasma source that provide continuous operation at the desired power levels of 1 to 2 kilowatts. Over the last two years we have been developing a laboratory prototype to demonstrate the inflation of the magnetic field under space-like conditions. In this paper we will present some of the latest results from the prototype development at the University of Washington and show that the prototype can produce high ionization efficiencies while operating in near space like neutral background pressures producing electron temperatures of a few tens of electron volts. This allows for operation with propellant expenditures lower than originally estimated.

  16. Suppression of antiferromagnetism by pressure in CaCo2P2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumbach, R. E.; Sidorov, V. A.; Lu, Xin; Ghimire, N. J.; Ronning, F.; Scott, B. L.; Williams, D. J.; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.

    2014-03-01

    We report magnetization M, heat capacity C, and electrical resistivity ρ for single crystals of the itinerant electron antiferromagnet CaCo2P2 (TN ≈ 110 K). Measurements at ambient pressure reveal rich magnetic behavior, where ferromagnetic correlations are present in the paramagnetic state and a subsequent feature is seen at T1 ≈ 22 K within the ordered state. Heat-capacity measurements additionally reveal moderately enhanced electronic correlations, as evidenced by the electronic coefficient of the specific heat γ = 23 mJ/mol·K2, which is large by comparison to closely related 122 analogs and the value predicted by electronic structure calculations. Upon the application of pressure, TN is suppressed toward zero. For P ≥ 0.89 GPa, another phase transition appears at T2 < TN which is also suppressed by P. At Pc ≈ 1.4-1.5 GPa, TN and T2 drop abruptly to zero at a putative quantum phase transition. For P > Pc, a broad shoulder in ρ (T) appears at T*, which moves to higher T and broadens with increasing P. We discuss possible scenarios to understand the phase diagram and compare to other compounds which show similar P-driven behavior.

  17. Magnetic phase diagram of Sr1-xCaxCo2P2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, J.; Nozaki, H.; Umegaki, I.; Harada, M.; Higuchi, Y.; Ansaldo, E. J.; Brewer, J. H.; Imai, M.; Michioka, C.; Yoshimura, K.; Månsson, M.

    2014-12-01

    In order to study the phase diagram from a microscopic viewpoint, we have measured wTF- and ZF-μ+SR spectra for the Sr1-xCaxCo2P2 powder samples with x = 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.8, and 1. Due to a characteristic time window and spatial resolution of μ+SR, the obtained phase diagram was found to be rather different from that determined by magnetization measurements. That is, as x increases from 0, a Pauli-paramagnetic phase is observed even at the lowest T measured (1.8 K) until x = 0.4, then, a spin-glass like phase appears at 0.5 <= x <= 0.6, and then, a phase with wide field distribution probably due to incommensurate AF order is detected for x = 0.8, and finally, a commensurate A-type AF ordered phase (for x = 1) is stabilized below TN ~ 80 K. Such change is most likely reasonable and connected to the shrink of the c-axis length with x, which naturally enhances the magnetic interaction between the two adjacent Co planes.

  18. Characteristics of the O+(2P-2D) 732.0 and 733.0 nm airglow emissions observed with WINDII and simulated with the C-IAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Gordon G.; Cho, Young-Min; Fomichev, Victor I.; Martynenko, Oleg V.

    2014-08-01

    This paper provides new data on the O+(2P-2D) 732 nm and 733 nm daytime airglow emissions that enhance our understanding of the role that local and conjugate photoelectrons play in the excitation of this emission, updating earlier investigations of its production by solar EUV photoionization of neutral atomic oxygen. The Wind Imaging Interferometer on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite, launched in 1991, retrieved these emissions using a filter primarily intended for observations of the hydroxyl P1(2) line but with invalid results. The first corrected results are presented here and compared with simulations by the Canadian Ionosphere and Atmosphere Model. Reasonable agreement is obtained in terms of vertical profiles, solar flux, and solar zenith angle variations. Observations made during local twilight demonstrate that conjugate photoelectrons do not contribute to the excitation of this emission. This paves the way for future determinations of atomic oxygen concentrations.

  19. Hydrostatic High-Pressure Studies to 25 GPA on the Model Superconducting Pnictide LaRu2P2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jinhyuk; Forouzani, Neda; Schilling, James; Fotovat, Roxanna; Zheng, Chong; Hoffmann, Roald

    2014-03-01

    Prior to the discovery of the Fe-pnictides in 2008, the ruthenium phosphide LaRu2P2 possessed the highest value of the su- perconducting transition temperature, Tc ~ 4 K, in the entire pnictide family. Recently, there has been renewed interest in this compound in an effort to better understand why the Fe-pnictides have much higher values of Tc. In related phosphides superconductivity appears to only be present if the separation be- tween the phosphor ions dp-p in neigh- boring Ru2P2 planes is greater than the critical value 2.8 Å, too great for a P-P covalent bond to be formed. For example, in superconducting LaRu2P2, the value of dp-p is 3.0 Å. To test these ideas directly, we have carried out hydro- static high-pressure studies on single-crystalline LaRu2P2 in a diamond-anvil cell using He pressure medium to pres- sures as high as 25 GPa and temperatures as low as 1.5 K. We find that Tc initially increases under pressure, but suddenly disappears above 2.1 GPa. Since dp-p decreases under pressure, the sudden disappearance of superconductivity is likely due to the formation of a covalent P-P bond between adjacent Ru2P2 planes and a possible structural phase transition. Work at Washington University is supported by the NSF through Grant No. DMR-1104742 and by the Carnegie/DOE through NNSA/DOE Grant No. DE-FC52-08NA28554.

  20. 2P2Idb v2: update of a structural database dedicated to orthosteric modulation of protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Basse, Marie-Jeanne; Betzi, Stéphane; Morelli, Xavier; Roche, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    2P2Idb is a hand-curated structural database dedicated to protein-protein interactions with known small molecule orthosteric modulators. It compiles the structural information related to orthosteric inhibitors and their target [i.e. related 3D structures available in the RCSB Protein Data Bank (PDB)] and provides links to other useful databases. 2P2Idb includes all interactions for which both the protein-protein and protein-inhibitor complexes have been structurally characterized. Since its first release in 2010, the database has grown constantly and the current version contains 27 protein-protein complexes and 274 protein-inhibitor complexes corresponding to 242 unique small molecule inhibitors which represent almost a 5-fold increase compared to the previous version. A number of new data have been added, including new protein-protein complexes, binding affinities, molecular descriptors, precalculated interface parameters and links to other webservers. A new query tool has been implemented to search for inhibitors within the database using standard molecular descriptors. A novel version of the 2P2I-inspector tool has been implemented to calculate a series of physical and chemical parameters of the protein interfaces. Several geometrical parameters including planarity, eccentricity and circularity have been added as well as customizable distance cutoffs. This tool has also been extended to protein-ligand interfaces. The 2P2I database thus represents a wealth of structural source of information for scientists interested in the properties of protein-protein interactions and the design of protein-protein interaction modulators. Database URL: http://2p2idb.cnrs-mrs.fr. PMID:26980515

  1. 2P2Idb v2: update of a structural database dedicated to orthosteric modulation of protein–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Basse, Marie-Jeanne; Betzi, Stéphane; Morelli, Xavier; Roche, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    2P2Idb is a hand-curated structural database dedicated to protein–protein interactions with known small molecule orthosteric modulators. It compiles the structural information related to orthosteric inhibitors and their target [i.e. related 3D structures available in the RCSB Protein Data Bank (PDB)] and provides links to other useful databases. 2P2Idb includes all interactions for which both the protein–protein and protein–inhibitor complexes have been structurally characterized. Since its first release in 2010, the database has grown constantly and the current version contains 27 protein–protein complexes and 274 protein–inhibitor complexes corresponding to 242 unique small molecule inhibitors which represent almost a 5-fold increase compared to the previous version. A number of new data have been added, including new protein–protein complexes, binding affinities, molecular descriptors, precalculated interface parameters and links to other webservers. A new query tool has been implemented to search for inhibitors within the database using standard molecular descriptors. A novel version of the 2P2I-inspector tool has been implemented to calculate a series of physical and chemical parameters of the protein interfaces. Several geometrical parameters including planarity, eccentricity and circularity have been added as well as customizable distance cutoffs. This tool has also been extended to protein–ligand interfaces. The 2P2I database thus represents a wealth of structural source of information for scientists interested in the properties of protein–protein interactions and the design of protein–protein interaction modulators. Database URL: http://2p2idb.cnrs-mrs.fr PMID:26980515

  2. Simulation of Mini-Magnetospheric Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) Interacting with an External Plasma Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Euripides, P.; Ziemba, T.; Slough, J.; Giersch, L.

    2003-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made over the last year in the development of the laboratory Mini-Magnetospheric Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) prototype. The laboratory testing has shown that that the plasma can be produced at high neutral gas efficiency, at high temperatures (a few tens of eV) with excellent confinement up to the point where chamber wall interactions dominate the physics. This paper investigates the performance of the prototype as it is opposed by an external plasma acting as a surrogate for the solar wind. The experiments were performed in 5ft diameter by 6ft long vacuum chamber at the University of Washington. The solar wind source comprised of a 33 kWe arc jet attached to a 200 kWe inductively generated plasma source. The dual plasma sources allow the interaction to be studied for different power levels, shot duration and production method. It is shown that plasma from the solar wind source (SWS) is able to penetrate the field of the M2P2 magnetic when no plasma is present. With operation of the M2P2 plasma source at only 1.5 kWe, the penetration of the SWS even at the highest power of operation at 200 kWe is stopped. This deflection is shown to be greatly enhanced over that produced by the magnet alone. In addition it is shown that with the presence of the SWS, M2P2 is able to produce enhanced magnetized plasma production out to at least 10 magnet radii where the field strength is only marginally greater than the terrestrial field. The results are consistent with the initial predictions that kWe M2P2 systems would be able to deflect several hundred kWe plasma winds to produce enhanced propulsion for a spacecraft.

  3. Deletion of GOLGA2P3Y but not GOLGA2P2Y is a risk factor for oligozoospermia.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sanjukta; Agarwal, Rupesh; Ambulkar, Prafulla; Hinduja, Indira; Zaveri, Kusum; Gokral, Jyotsna; Pal, Asoke; Modi, Deepak

    2016-02-01

    The AZFc locus on the human Y chromosome harbours several multicopy genes, some of which are required for spermatogenesis. It is believed that deletion of one or more copies of these genes is a cause of infertility in some men. GOLGA2LY is one of the genes in the AZFc locus and it exists in two copies, GOLGA2P2Y and GOLGA2P3Y. The involvement of GOLGA2LY gene copy deletions in male infertility, however, is unknown. This study aimed to investigate the association of deletions of GOLGA2P2Y and GOLGA2P3Y gene copies with male infertility and with sperm concentration and motility. The frequency of GOLGA2P3Y deletion was significantly higher in oligozoospermic men compared with normozoospermic men (7.7% versus 1.2%; P = 0.0001), whereas the frequency of GOLGA2P2Y deletion was comparable between oligozoospermic and normozoospermic men (10.3% versus 11.3%). The deletion of GOLGA2P3Y but not GOLGA2P2Y was significantly higher (P = 0.03) in men with gr/gr rearrangements, indicating that GOLGA2P3Y deletions increase the susceptibility of men with gr/gr rearrangements to oligozoospermia. Furthermore, men with GOLGA2P3Y deletion had reduced sperm concentration and motility compared with men without deletion or with deletion of GOLGA2P2Y. These findings indicate GOLGA2P3Y gene copy may be candidate AZFc gene for male infertility. PMID:26655651

  4. Unconventional magnetism in ThCr2Si2-type phosphides, La1 xNdxCo2P2

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Corey; Kovnir, Kirill; Garlea, Vasile O; Choi, E.; Zhou, Haidong; Shatruk, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Quaternary phases La1 xNdxCo2P2 (x = 0, 0.12, 0.25, 0.37, 0.50, 0.63, 0.75, 0.88, 1.0) have been synthesized from Sn flux to investigate the origins of drastic differences in properties between ferromagnetic LaCo2P2 and antiferromagnetic NdCo2P2. Powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction indicate that all La1 xNdxCo2P2 samples are isostructural and crystallize in the ThCr2Si2 structure type. The unit cell parameters and volume change non-linearly with the Nd content (x), with the x < 0.50 10 samples being closer to LaCo2P2 and the ones with x > 0.50 being closer to NdCo2P2. These structural differences are also reflected in the magnetic behavior. The samples with lower Nd content are characterized by ferromagnetic ordering in the Co sublattice with the TC increasing from 132 K for x = 0 to 262 K for x = 0.50, while the samples with higher Nd content exhibit suppressed magnetization in the Co sublattice and canted antiferromagnetic ordering with TC ~ 270 K. Refinement of neutron powder 15 diffraction patterns for x = 0.50 and 0.75 reveals a gradual ordering of the Nd 4f moments under the influence of Co 3d moments below 100 K. At low temperatures and zero field, these samples exhibit antiferromagnetic ordering of both Nd and Co magnetic moments, but under applied field they demonstrate the stabilization of a ferrimagnetic state with antiparallel alignment of the 4f and 3d moments, as indicated by isothermal magnetization measurements. The re-entrant ferrimagnetic transition 20 is also observed in samples with x > 0.50 if the temperature is lowered below 5 K. The occurrence of this low-temperature magnetic transition was confirmed by alternating-current susceptibility measurements.

  5. Coralloid Co2P2O7 Nanocrystals Encapsulated by Thin Carbon Shells for Enhanced Electrochemical Water Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yingxue; Shi, Nai-En; Zhao, Shulin; Xu, Dongdong; Liu, Chunyan; Tang, Yu-Jia; Dai, Zhihui; Lan, Ya-Qian; Han, Min; Bao, Jianchun

    2016-08-31

    Core-shell nanohybrids containing cheap inorganic nanocrystals and nanocarbon shells are promising electrocatalysts for water splitting or other renewable energy options. Despite that great progress has been achieved, biomimetic synthesis of metal phosphates@nanocarbon core-shell nanohybrids remains a challenge, and their use for electrocatalytic oxygen evolution reaction (OER) has not been explored. In this paper, novel nanohybrids composed of coralloid Co2P2O7 nanocrystal cores and thin porous nanocarbon shells are synthesized by combination of the structural merits of supramolecular polymer gels and a controllable thermal conversion technique, i.e., temperature programmable annealing of presynthesized supramolecular polymer gels that contain cobalt salt and phytic acid under a proper gas atmosphere. Electrocatalytic tests in alkaline solution show that such nanohybrids exhibit greatly enhanced electrocatalytic OER performance compared with that of Co2P2O7 nanostructure. At a current density of 10 mA cm(-2), their overpotential is 0.397 V, which is much lower than that of Co2P2O7 nanostructures, amorphous Co-Pi nanomaterials, Co(PO3)2 nanosheets, Pt/C, and some reported OER catalysts, and close to that of commercial IrO2. Most importantly, both of their current density at the overpotential over 0.40 V and durability are superior to those of IrO2 catalyst. As revealed by a series of spectroscopic and electrochemical analyses, their enhanced electrocatalytic performance results from the presence of thin porous nanocarbon shells, which not only improve interfacial electron penetration or transfer dynamics but also vary the coordination environment and increase the number of active 5-coordinated Co(2+) sites in Co2P2O7 cores. PMID:27500553

  6. Nqrs Data for C24H46I2N6O2P2Sn (Subst. No. 1589)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume B 'Substances Containing C10H16 … Zn' of Volume 48 'Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section '3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter '3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for C24H46I2N6O2P2Sn (Subst. No. 1589)

  7. Estimation of a 2p2h effect on Gamow-Teller transitions within the second Tamm-Dancoff approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minato, F.

    2016-04-01

    Two-particle two-hole (2p2h) effect on the Gamow-Teller (GT) transition for neutron-rich nuclei is studied by the second Tamm-Dancoff approximation (STDA) with the Skyrme interaction. Unstable 24O and 34Si and stable 48Ca nuclei are chosen to study the quenching and fragmentation of the GT strengths. Correlation of the 2p2h configurations causes about 20 % quenching and downward shift of GT giant resonances (GTGRs). The residual interaction changing relative angular momentum that appeared in the tensor force part gives a meaningful effect to the GT strength distributions. In this work, 17 - 26 % of the total GT strengths are brought to high-energy region above GTGRs. In particular, the tensor force brings strengths to high energy more than 50 MeV. STDA calculation within a small model space for 2p2h configuration is also performed and experimental data of 48Ca is reproduced reasonably.

  8. Electronic structure and defect properties of selenophosphate Pb2P2Se6 for γ-ray detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontsevoi, Oleg Y.; Im, Jino; Wessels, Bruce W.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Freeman, Arthur J.

    Heavy metal chalco-phosphate Pb2P2Se6 has shown a significant promise as an X-ray and γ-ray detector material. To assess the fundamental physical properties important for its performance as detector, theoretical calculations were performed for the electronic structure, band gaps, electron and hole effective masses, and static dielectric constants. The calculations were based on first-principles density functional theory (DFT) and employ the highly precise full potential linearized augmented plane wave method and the projector augmented wave method and include nonlocal exchange-correlation functionals to overcome the band gap underestimation in DFT calculations. The calculations show that Pb2P2Se6 is an indirect band gap material with the calculated band gap of 2.0 eV, has small effective masses, which could result in a good carrier mobility-lifetime product μτ , and a very high static dielectric constant, which could lead to high mobility of carriers by screening of charged scattering centers. We further investigated a large set of native defects in Pb2P2Se6 to determine the optimal growth conditions for application as γ-ray detectors. The results suggest that the prevalent intrinsic defects are selenium vacancies, followed by lead vacancies, then phosphorus vacancies and antisite defects. The effect of various chemical environments on defect properties was examined and the optimal conditions for material synthesis were suggested. Supported by DHS (Grant No. 2014-DN-077-ARI086-01).

  9. Soft-Chemistry Forms of Sn 2P 2S 6and CuInP 2S 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdon, X.; Cajipe, V. B.

    1998-11-01

    We present our attempts to prepare lamellar SnP2S6and CuInP2S6by metathesis reactions in aqueous media. Use of a SnCl4precursor unexpectedly led to the formation of the three-dimensional compound SnII2P2S6rather than SnIVP2S6. The crystallites thus obtained were about 65 nm in size, i.e., much larger than those previously synthesized from SnCl2. We correlate this with the smaller Sn/P ratio (<1), which implies fewer nucleation sites and probably enhanced particle growth in the present case. The product tested positive for second-harmonic generation (SHG) at room temperature (RT). Initial31P NMR-MAS spectroscopy data indicate that this material is in an intermediate state between the ferroelectric and paraelectric phases of crystalline Sn2P2S6. An analogous solution method readily yielded CuInP2S6, the first quaternary thiophosphate prepared via this soft-chemistry route. A rather small coherence length ≈27Å, equivalent to four layers, is found for this product; band broadening is also observed in the Raman spectrum. SHG measurements likewise revealed a signal for this material at RT; a non polar macroscopic state may, however, not be precluded, given the known order-disorder nature of the ferroelectric-paraelectric transition in crystalline CuInP2S6.

  10. Application of Novel Molecular Field Theory to Helical Antiferromagnetic Ordering in EuCo2P2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, D. C.; Sangeetha, N. S.

    A formulation of Weiss molecular field theory (MFT) was recently advanced for antiferromagnetic (AFM) systems of identical crystallographically-equivalent local moments interacting by Heisenberg exchange that does not utilize the concept of magnetic sublattices.1 This formulation has the attractive feature that the magnetic and thermal properties in magnetic fields H --> 0 depend only on the interactions of a representative spin with its neighbors, and thus allows the properties of collinear and coplanar noncollinear AFM structures to be understood and modeled on the same footing. Neutron diffraction measurements showed that EuCo2P2 with the bct ThCr2Si2 -type structure undergoes an AFM transition to a coplanar noncollinear c-axis helical AFM structure below the ordering temperature TN = 66 . 5 K.2 Here we report the properties and apply our MFT to model the anisotropic magnetic susceptibility of single-crystal EuCo2P2 below TN. Research supported by U.S. Department of Energy, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358.

  11. 2P2IHUNTER: a tool for filtering orthosteric protein–protein interaction modulators via a dedicated support vector machine

    PubMed Central

    Hamon, Véronique; Bourgeas, Raphael; Ducrot, Pierre; Theret, Isabelle; Xuereb, Laura; Basse, Marie Jeanne; Brunel, Jean Michel; Combes, Sebastien; Morelli, Xavier; Roche, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Over the last 10 years, protein–protein interactions (PPIs) have shown increasing potential as new therapeutic targets. As a consequence, PPIs are today the most screened target class in high-throughput screening (HTS). The development of broad chemical libraries dedicated to these particular targets is essential; however, the chemical space associated with this ‘high-hanging fruit’ is still under debate. Here, we analyse the properties of 40 non-redundant small molecules present in the 2P2I database (http://2p2idb.cnrs-mrs.fr/) to define a general profile of orthosteric inhibitors and propose an original protocol to filter general screening libraries using a support vector machine (SVM) with 11 standard Dragon molecular descriptors. The filtering protocol has been validated using external datasets from PubChem BioAssay and results from in-house screening campaigns. This external blind validation demonstrated the ability of the SVM model to reduce the size of the filtered chemical library by eliminating up to 96% of the compounds as well as enhancing the proportion of active compounds by up to a factor of 8. We believe that the resulting chemical space identified in this paper will provide the scientific community with a concrete support to search for PPI inhibitors during HTS campaigns. PMID:24196694

  12. Formation and characterisation of the silver hydride nanocluster cation [Ag3H2((Ph2 P)2CH2)](+) and its release of hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Girod, Marion; Krstić, Marjan; Antoine, Rodolphe; MacAleese, Luke; Lemoine, Jérome; Zavras, Athanasios; Khairallah, George N; Bonačić-Koutecký, Vlasta; Dugourd, Philippe; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2014-12-01

    Multistage mass spectrometry and density functional theory (DFT) were used to characterise the small silver hydride nanocluster, [Ag3 H2 L](+) (where L=(Ph2 P)2 CH2 ) and its gas-phase unimolecular chemistry. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) yields [Ag2 HL](+) as the major product while laser-induced dissociation (LID) proceeds via H2 formation and subsequent release from [Ag3 H2 L](+) , giving rise to [Ag3 L](+) as the major product. Deuterium labelling studies on [Ag3 D2 L](+) prove that the source of H2 is from the hydrides and not from the ligand. Comparison of TD-DFT absorption patterns obtained for the optimised structures with action spectroscopy results, allows assignment of the measured features to structures of precursors and products. Molecular dynamics "on the fly" reveal that AgH loss is favoured in the ground state, but H2 formation and loss is preferred in the first excited state S1 , in agreement with CID and LID experimental findings. This indicates favourable photo-induced formation of H2 and subsequent release from [Ag3 H2 L](+) , an important finding in context of metal hydrides as a hydrogen storage medium, which can subsequently be released by heating or irradiation with light. PMID:25324009

  13. De Haas-van Alphen Effect and Fermi Surface Properties in Ferromagnet LaCo2P2 and Related Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teruya, Atsushi; Nakamura, Ai; Takeuchi, Tetsuya; Honda, Fuminori; Aoki, Dai; Harima, Hisatomo; Uchima, Kiyoharu; Hedo, Msato; Nakama, Takao; Ōnuki, Yoshichika

    We grew single crystals of a ferromagnet LaCo2P2 and an antiferromagnet CaCo2P2, and clarified the magnetic properties by measuring the electrical resistivity, specific heat, magnetic susceptibility, and magnetization. For LaCo2P2, we also carried out the de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) experiment. Detected dHvA branches are well explained by the results of energy band calculations using a full-potential linearized augmented plane wave method within the local spin density approximation, where the ferromagnetic state is assumed. The cyclotron effective masses are (2-3)m0 (m0: rest mass of an electron). The present relatively large cyclotron masses in LaCo2P2 are due to ferromagnetic correlations of Co-3d conduction electrons, which are compared with much larger cyclotron masses of (3-7)m0 for a nearly ferromagnet SrCo2P2.

  14. Magnetization and transport properties of single RPd2P2 (R=Y, La-Nd, Sm-Ho, Yb)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drachuck, Gil; Boehmer, Anna; Bud'Ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul

    Single crystals of RPd2P2 (R=Y, La-Nd, Sm-Ho, Yb) were grown using a self-flux method and were characterized by room-temperature powder X-ray diffraction, anisotropic temperature and field dependent magnetization and temperature dependent in-plane resistivity. Anisotropic magnetic properties, arising mostly from crystal electric field (CEF) effects, were observed for most magnetic rare earths. The experimentally estimated CEF parameters B02 were calculated from the anisotropic paramagnetic θab and θcvalues. Ordering temperatures, as well as the polycrystalline averaged paramagnetic Curie-Weiss temperature, θave, were extracted from magnetization and resistivity measurements. Work done at Ames Laboratory was supported by US Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH111358.

  15. Radiative lifetimes of the 2s2p2(4P) metastable levels of N III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Z.; Kwong, Victor H. S.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1993-01-01

    The radiative decay rates of N III 175 nm intersystem lines were measured in the laboratory by recording the time dependence of photon intensities emitted as the 2s2p2(4P) metastable term of N(2+) ions decay to the 2s22p(2P0) ground term. A cylindrical radio frequency ion trap was used to store the electron impact-produced N(2+) ions. The radiative decay signals were analyzed by multiexponential least-squares fits to the data. The measured radiative decay rates to the ground term are 1019(+/- 64)/s for 4P sub 1/2, 74.5(+/- 5.4)/s for 4P sub 3/2, and 308( +/- 22)/s for 4P sub 5/2. Comparisons of the measured values with theoretical values are presented.

  16. Dielectric spectra of Li 2O-CaF 2-P 2O 5 glasses doped by silver ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambasiva Rao, K.; Srinivasa Reddy, M.; Ravi Kumar, V.; Veeraiah, N.

    2007-06-01

    Dielectric constant ε‧, loss tan δ and a.c. conductivity σ( ω) Li 2O-CaF 2-P 2O 5 glasses doped with small concentrations of Ag 2O (ranging from 0 to 1.0 mol%) are studied as a function of frequency and temperature over moderately wide ranges. The variation of dielectric loss with temperature for these glasses has exhibited dielectric relaxation effects. The relaxation effects have been analyzed by a pseudo Cole-Cole plot method and the spreading of relaxation times has been established. The variation of a.c. conductivity with the concentration of Ag 2O pass through a minimum at 0.6 mol% Ag 2O. In the high-temperature region, the a.c. conduction seems to be connected with the mixed conduction, viz., electronic and ionic conduction. The low-temperature part of the a.c. conductivity which is observed to be nearly temperature independent has been explained on the basis of quantum mechanical-tunneling (QMT) model. The results have been further analyzed in detail with the aid of the data on optical absorption, IR and Raman spectral studies.

  17. Tricritical Lifshitz point in the temperature-pressure-composition diagram for (PbySn1-y)2P2(SexS1-x)6 ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, O.; Chobal, O.; Rizak, I.; Rizak, V.

    2009-11-01

    The heat capacity of Sn2P2S6 ferroelectric crystals has been measured under quasihydrostatic pressures up to 0.7 GPa. The analysis of the heat-capacity and literature data for the birefringence shows that the tricritical point of Sn2P2S6 is in the 0.20-0.25 GPa range. Moreover, in the approximation of a linear change in the free-energy expansion coefficients, with respect to concentration and pressure, thermodynamic trajectories have been constructed for (PbySn1-y)2P2(SexS1-x)6 solid solutions. We have thereby identified the region of the T-p-y-x diagram for (PbySn1-y)2P2(SexS1-x)6 showing the tricritical Lifshitz point.

  18. Cross sections for production of H(2p, 2s, 1s) by electron collisional dissociation of H2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajello, J. M.; James, G. K.; Shemansky, D. E.

    1991-01-01

    The excitation function of H Ly-alpha from the astrophysically important dissociation of electron-excited H2 over the range 10-700 eV has been measured. The analysis predicts the cross section to energies higher than the present experimental limit, and it is found that the predicted shape is in close agreement with measured results. At 6 eV the cross section is dominated by the electric dipole first Born component, while at 100 eV the electric dipole component constitutes 73 percent of the total H(2p) cross section. The cross sections of the H(2s) and H(1s) components are calculated.

  19. WN4 longitudinal structure in the O (5S - 3P) and O+ (2P - 2D) ionospheric emissions as simulated by the C-IAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynenko, Oleg; Ward, William E.; Shepherd, Gordon; Cho, Young-Min; Namgaladze, Alexander; Fomichev, Victor; McConnell, John; Semeniuk, Kirill; Beagley, Stephen

    A newly developed Canadian Ionosphere and Atmosphere Model (C-IAM) is introduced. It is being developed on the basis of two existing first principle models: the extended Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (CMAM) and the ionospheric part of the Upper Atmosphere Model (UAM). The model extends from the surface to the inner magnetosphere and hence, is able to describe in a self-consistent way how lower atmosphere dynamical variability propagates into and affects the upper atmosphere and ionosphere. The C-IAM was applied to model the spatial structure of two different ionospheric emissions: the nighttime 135.6 nm O ( (5) S - (3) P) and daytime 732 nm O (+) ( (2) P - (2) D) emissions. The IMAGE satellite observations showed a wave number 4 (WN4) longitudinal structure in the 135.6 nm ionospheric emission emanating from the equatorial ionization anomaly at 350-400 km near 20:00 local time at each longitude. C-IAM simulations are in a good agreement with the observations. Model result analysis reveals that the main mechanism for generating the WN4 structure in the 135.6 nm emission is a modification of the ionospheric dynamo field caused by longitudinal variation of the zonal wind due to waves penetrating from the lower atmosphere. It was also shown, that during geomagnetic storms and substorms the high-latitudinal electric field fully suppresses the dynamo, so that the emission intensity dramatically decreases and the WN4 structure does not appear. The 732 nm emission simulated with the C-IAM also reveals the WN4 structure. Similar to the 135.6 nm emission, this structure is caused by waves penetrating from the lower atmosphere. However, the mechanism of excitation is quite different. The 732 nm emission is produced by the instant local ionization and excitation, and, hence, its variation is caused by the neutral density variability in the F2 region (above 200 km) without any involvement of the electric field effects. Correspondingly, latitudinal distribution of this

  20. Measurement of the metastable lifetime for the 2s^2 2p^2 ^1So level in O^2+

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. J.; Cadez, I.; Chutjian, A.; Niimura, M.

    2004-01-01

    The radiative lifetime of the 1S0 level was found to be 540 +/- 27 ms. This is in good agreement with a previous measurement and with a number of theoretical calculations. Metastable lifetimes, when combined with collisional excitation rates, can provide a diagnostic for electron density Ne in a stellar or solar plasma.

  1. Crystal and electronic structure changes during the charge-discharge process of Na4Co3(PO4)2P2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriwake, Hiroki; Kuwabara, Akihide; Fisher, Craig A. J.; Nose, Masafumi; Nakayama, Hideki; Nakanishi, Shinji; Iba, Hideki; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2016-09-01

    Sodium-ion batteries offer a potential solution to the problem of limited lithium resources, and the newly developed positive electrode material Na4Co3(PO4)2P2O7 is attracting significant attention due to its high rate, high capacity, and high voltage compared to other sodium-ion battery materials. However, details of its electronic structure and its charge/discharge behavior are still uncertain. Here we report detailed first-principles calculations of the desodiation behavior of Na4Co3(PO4)2P2O7 using the GGA + U formalism of density functional theory. Assuming a stepwise desodiation process, removal of Na down to NaCo3(PO4)2P2O7 is found to be accompanied by oxidation of Co2+ to Co3+. Further removal of Na to give Co3(PO4)2P2O7 requires oxidation of oxygen 2p orbitals in the P2O7 polyhedra instead of Co3+ being oxidized to Co4+. The holes thus formed are expected to be strongly self-trapped, rendering them immobile at room temperature. At the same time, a large volume shrinkage is observed during this last desodiation step, constricting the Na migration channels. These two factors may explain the difficulty encountered experimentally in removing all Na from Na4Co3(PO4)2P2O7.

  2. Electron impact excitation cross sections for carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganas, P. S.

    1981-04-01

    A realistic analytic atomic independent particle model is used to generate wave functions for the valence and excited states of carbon. Using these wave functions in conjunction with the Born approximation and the Russell-Saunders LS-coupling scheme, we calculate generalized oscillator strengths and integrated cross sections for various excitations from the 2p 2( 3P O) valence state.

  3. Double P2X2/P2X3 Purinergic Receptor Knockout Mice Do Not Taste NaCl or the Artificial Sweetener SC45647

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, Meghan C.; Eschle, Benjamin K.; Barrows, Jennell; Hallock, Robert M.; Finger, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    The P2X ionotropic purinergic receptors, P2X2 and P2X3, are essential for transmission of taste information from taste buds to the gustatory nerves. Mice lacking both P2X2 and P2X3 purinergic receptors (P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/−) exhibit no taste-evoked activity in the chorda tympani and glossopharyngeal nerves when stimulated with taste stimuli from any of the 5 classical taste quality groups (salt, sweet, sour, bitter, and umami) nor do the mice show taste preferences for sweet or umami, or avoidance of bitter substances (Finger et al. 2005. ATP signaling is crucial for communication from taste buds to gustatory nerves. Science. 310[5753]:1495–1499). Here, we compare the ability of P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice and P2X2/P2X3Dbl+/+ wild-type (WT) mice to detect NaCl in brief-access tests and conditioned aversion paradigms. Brief-access testing with NaCl revealed that whereas WT mice decrease licking at 300 mM and above, the P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice do not show any change in lick rates. In conditioned aversion tests, P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice did not develop a learned aversion to NaCl or the artificial sweetener SC45647, both of which are easily avoided by conditioned WT mice. The inability of P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice to show avoidance of these taste stimuli was not due to an inability to learn the task because both WT and P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice learned to avoid a combination of SC45647 and amyl acetate (an odor cue). These data suggest that P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice are unable to respond to NaCl or SC45647 as taste stimuli, mirroring the lack of gustatory nerve responses to these substances. PMID:19833661

  4. The effect of Li(+) ions on the luminescent properties of a single-phase white light-emitting phosphor α-Sr2P2O7:Dy(3.).

    PubMed

    Han, Bing; Li, Pengju; Zhang, Jingtao; Zhang, Jie; Xue, Yongfei; Shi, Hengzhen

    2015-05-01

    Two series of phosphors, α-Sr2(1-x)Dy2xP2O7 and α-Sr2(1-2x)Dy2xLi2xP2O7, with different x values were synthesized successfully using a conventional solid-state method at high temperature for the first time, and their luminescence properties were investigated comparatively. The effect of Li(+) ions on the luminescence properties of Dy(3+) in α-Sr2P2O7 host, including luminescence intensity, optimal doping concentration, concentration quenching mechanism, and decay behavior, was discussed in detail by considering the defect generation in α-Sr2P2O7:Dy(3+), the charge compensation of Li(+) ions and the role of Li2CO3 as solid flux expected in phosphors. The obtained excitation and emission spectra indicate that these as-prepared phosphors can be excited by ultraviolet light and show white light emission due to the combination of the (4)F9/2→(6)H15/2 and (4)F9/2→(6)H13/2 transitions of Dy(3+) ions. The CIE chromaticity coordinates and color correlated temperature of Dy(3+) emission in the phosphor α-Sr2(1-2x)Dy2xLi2xP2O7 (x = 0.03) with optimal fluorescence intensity was also calculated. The present work could be helpful for understanding the effect of the charge compensator (e.g. Li(+) ion) on the luminescent properties of phosphors with non-equivalent ion-displacement and the design of novel phosphors by efficiently taking advantage of charge compensator (e.g. Li(+) ion). PMID:25820378

  5. The splitting and oscillator strengths for the 2S/2/S-2p/2/P/0/ doublet in lithium-like sulfur. [during Skylab observed solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pegg, D. J.; Forester, J. P.; Elston, S. B.; Griffin, P. M.; Peterson, R. S.; Thoe, R. S.; Vane, C. R.; Sellin, I. A.; Groeneveld, K.-O.

    1977-01-01

    The beam-foil technique has been used to study the 2S(2)S-2p(2)P(0) doublet in S XIV. The results confirm the doublet splitting measured aboard Skylab during solar flare events. In addition, the oscillator strengths for the resonance transitions comprising this doublet have been measured and found to agree well with recent relativistic f-value calculations.

  6. Bacteria Absorption-Based Mn2P2O7-Carbon@Reduced Graphene Oxides for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Battery Anodes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuhua; Wang, Bin; Zhu, Jingyi; Zhou, Jun; Xu, Zhi; Fan, Ling; Zhu, Jian; Podila, Ramakrishna; Rao, Apparao M; Lu, Bingan

    2016-05-24

    The development of freestanding flexible electrodes with high capacity and long cycle-life is a central issue for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). Here, we use bacteria absorption of metallic Mn(2+) ions to in situ synthesize natural micro-yolk-shell-structure Mn2P2O7-carbon, followed by the use of vacuum filtration to obtain Mn2P2O7-carbon@reduced graphene oxides (RGO) papers for LIBs anodes. The Mn2P2O7 particles are completely encapsulated within the carbon film, which was obtained by carbonizing the bacterial wall. The resulting carbon microstructure reduces the electrode-electrolyte contact area, yielding high Coulombic efficiency. In addition, the yolk-shell structure with its internal void spaces is ideal for sustaining volume expansion of Mn2P2O7 during charge/discharge processes, and the carbon shells act as an ideal barrier, limiting most solid-electrolyte interphase formation on the surface of the carbon films (instead of forming on individual particles). Notably, the RGO films have high conductivity and robust mechanical flexibility. As a result of our combined strategies delineated in this article, our binder-free flexible anodes exhibit high capacities, long cycle-life, and excellent rate performance. PMID:27139149

  7. Modulation of K2P2.1 and K2P10.1 K+ channel sensitivity to carvedilol by alternative mRNA translation initiation

    PubMed Central

    Kisselbach, J; Seyler, C; Schweizer, P A; Gerstberger, R; Becker, R; Katus, H A; Thomas, D

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The β-receptor antagonist carvedilol blocks a range of ion channels. K2P2.1 (TREK1) and K2P10.1 (TREK2) channels are expressed in the heart and regulated by alternative translation initiation (ATI) of their mRNA, producing functionally distinct channel variants. The first objective was to investigate acute effects of carvedilol on human K2P2.1 and K2P10.1 channels. Second, we sought to study ATI-dependent modulation of K2P K+ current sensitivity to carvedilol. Experimental Approach Using standard electrophysiological techniques, we recorded currents from wild-type and mutant K2P2.1 and K2P10.1 channels in Xenopus oocytes and HEK 293 cells. Key Results Carvedilol concentration-dependently inhibited K2P2.1 channels (IC50,oocytes = 20.3 μM; IC50,HEK = 1.6 μM) and this inhibition was frequency-independent. When K2P2.1 isoforms generated by ATI were studied separately in oocytes, the IC50 value for carvedilol inhibition of full-length channels (16.5 μM) was almost 5-fold less than that for the truncated channel variant (IC50 = 79.0 μM). Similarly, the related K2P10.1 channels were blocked by carvedilol (IC50,oocytes = 24.0 μM; IC50,HEK = 7.6 μM) and subject to ATI-dependent modulation of drug sensitivity. Conclusions and Implications Carvedilol targets K2P2.1 and K2P10.1 K+ channels. This previously unrecognized mechanism supports a general role of cardiac K2P channels as antiarrhythmic drug targets. Furthermore, the work reveals that the sensitivity of the cardiac ion channels K2P2.1 and K2P10.1 to block was modulated by alternative mRNA translation initiation. PMID:25168769

  8. Fusion protein His-Hsp65-6IA2P2 prevents type 1 diabetes through nasal immunization in NOD Mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shiping; Li, Guoliang; Liu, Kunfeng; Yang, Xue; Cao, Rongyue; Zong, Li; Long, Jun; Jin, Liang; Wu, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Human heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60), is an endogenous β-cells autoantigen, it could postpone the onset of insulitis and sooner type 1 diabetes mellitus. P277 is one of Hsp65 determinants at position 437-469 of amino acids cascaded. Meanwhile, it's already well-known that there were several better anti-diabetic B epitopes, such as insulinoma antigen-2 (IA-2). Currently, fusion protein IA2P2 has constructed in order to enhance its pharmacological efficacy. In addition, added homologous bacterial-derived Hsp65 and His tag were beneficial to protein immunogenicity and purification separately. So, finally we examined a fusion protein His-Hsp65-6IA2P2 could regulate Th2 immune response and reduce natural diabetic incidence in NOD mice. We constructed two express vector pET28a-His-Hsp65-6P277 and pET28a-His-Hsp65-6IA2P2. After purification, we observed that triple intranasal administration of these two fusion protein in 4-week-old NOD mice maintained normal blood glucose and weight, with a lower diabetic or insulitis incidence. Consistent with induced splenic T cells proliferation and tolerance, His-Hsp65-6IA2P2-treated mice performed reduced IFN-γ and increased IL-10 level. In conclusion, we suggested that fusion protein His-Hsp65-6IA2P2 could be reconstructed and purified successively. Furthermore, nasal administration of this fusion protein could rebalance T cells population and prevent T1DM. PMID:27082999

  9. Penta­cobalt(II) divanadium(III) tetrakis(diphosphate), Co5V2(P2O7)4

    PubMed Central

    Bronova, Anna; Glaum, Robert; Litterscheid, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Co5V2(P2O7)4 was crystallized by chemical vapour transport using HCl as transport agent. Its crystal structure is isotypic to that of FeII 5FeIII 2(P2O7)4 and can be regarded as a member of the thortveitite structure family with corrugated layers of metal–oxygen polyhedra extending parallel to (010). Significant occupational disorder between cobalt(II) and vanadium(III) is observed. Four of the five cation sites are occupied by both cobalt and vanadium. The fifth cation site (Co1) is occupied by cobalt only. Sites Co1, M3 and M4 are located on twofold axes. Sites Co1, M2, M3 and M4 show o­cta­hedral coordination by oxygen; M5 has a square-pyramidal environment. PMID:23723750

  10. Protein–protein interaction inhibition (2P2I) combining high throughput and virtual screening: Application to the HIV-1 Nef protein

    PubMed Central

    Betzi, Stéphane; Restouin, Audrey; Opi, Sandrine; Arold, Stefan T.; Parrot, Isabelle; Guerlesquin, Françoise; Morelli, Xavier; Collette, Yves

    2007-01-01

    Protein–protein recognition is the cornerstone of multiple cellular and pathological functions. Therefore, protein–protein interaction inhibition (2P2I) is endowed with great therapeutic potential despite the initial belief that 2P2I was refractory to small-molecule intervention. Improved knowledge of complex molecular binding surfaces has recently stimulated renewed interest for 2P2I, especially after identification of “hot spots” and first inhibitory compounds. However, the combination of target complexity and lack of starting compound has thwarted experimental results and created intellectual barriers. Here we combined virtual and experimental screening when no previously known inhibitors can be used as starting point in a structure-based research program that targets an SH3 binding surface of the HIV type I Nef protein. High-throughput docking and application of a pharmacophoric filter on one hand and search for analogy on the other hand identified drug-like compounds that were further confirmed to bind Nef in the micromolar range (isothermal titration calorimetry), to target the Nef SH3 binding surface (NMR experiments), and to efficiently compete for Nef–SH3 interactions (cell-based assay, GST pull-down). Initial identification of these compounds by virtual screening was validated by screening of the very same library of compounds in the cell-based assay, demonstrating that a significant enrichment factor was attained by the in silico screening. To our knowledge, our results identify the first set of drug-like compounds that functionally target the HIV-1 Nef SH3 binding surface and provide the basis for a powerful discovery process that should help to speed up 2P2I strategies and open avenues for new class of antiviral molecules. PMID:18042718

  11. Dynamically reconfigurable characteristics of a double phase conjugate mirror using Sn2P2S6 crystals and their application to optical inter-satellite communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimaki, Kaori; Okamoto, Atsushi; Shibukawa, Atsushi; Takabayashi, Masanori; Tomita, Akihisa; Takayama, Yoshihisa

    2014-05-01

    A double phase conjugate mirror (DPCM), created by two mutually incoherent beams entering photorefractive nonlinear materials, can generate a phase conjugate beam whose reflectivity may be greater than 100%. Even though the conditions of the incident beams are changed, the DPCM can be dynamically reconfigured by using a Sn2P2S6 crystal with a high response speed. These features of the DPCM are advantageous, particularly in an optical inter-satellite communication system. In particular, use of the phase conjugate beam from the DPCM offers wavefront compensation and amplification in satellite communication. In addition, the dynamically reconfigurable DPCM using a Sn2P2S6 crystal relaxes the acquisition accuracy of the signal beam in the system. In this study, the temporal and spatial operating characteristics of the DPCM using a Sn2P2S6 crystal were first clarified. Next, an inter-satellite system based on the DPCM was proposed, and it was demonstrated that our system significantly improves the tolerance of the acquisition accuracy and tracking time.

  12. Experimental visualization of the diffusion pathway of sodium ions in the Na3[Ti2P2O10F] anode for sodium-ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhaohui; Wang, Yuesheng; Sun, Chunwen; Alonso, J. A.; Fernández-Díaz, M. T.; Chen, Liquan

    2014-11-01

    Sodium-ion batteries have attracted considerable interest as an alternative to lithium-ion batteries for electric storage applications because of the low cost and natural abundance of sodium resources. The materials with an open framework are highly desired for Na-ion insertion/extraction. Here we report on the first visualization of the sodium-ion diffusion path in Na3[Ti2P2O10F] through high-temperature neutron powder diffraction experiments. The evolution of the Na-ion displacements of Na3[Ti2P2O10F] was investigated with high-temperature neutron diffraction (HTND) from room temperature to 600°C difference Fourier maps were utilized to estimate the Na nuclear-density distribution. Temperature-driven Na displacements indicates that sodium-ion diffusion paths are established within the ab plane. As an anode for sodium-ion batteries, Na3[Ti2P2O10F] exhibits a reversible capacity of ~100 mAh g-1 with lower intercalation voltage. It also shows good cycling stability and rate capability, making it promising applications in sodium-ion batteries.

  13. Experimental visualization of the diffusion pathway of sodium ions in the Na3[Ti2P2O10F] anode for sodium-ion battery.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhaohui; Wang, Yuesheng; Sun, Chunwen; Alonso, J A; Fernández-Díaz, M T; Chen, Liquan

    2014-01-01

    Sodium-ion batteries have attracted considerable interest as an alternative to lithium-ion batteries for electric storage applications because of the low cost and natural abundance of sodium resources. The materials with an open framework are highly desired for Na-ion insertion/extraction. Here we report on the first visualization of the sodium-ion diffusion path in Na3[Ti2P2O10F] through high-temperature neutron powder diffraction experiments. The evolution of the Na-ion displacements of Na3[Ti2P2O10F] was investigated with high-temperature neutron diffraction (HTND) from room temperature to 600°C; difference Fourier maps were utilized to estimate the Na nuclear-density distribution. Temperature-driven Na displacements indicates that sodium-ion diffusion paths are established within the ab plane. As an anode for sodium-ion batteries, Na3[Ti2P2O10F] exhibits a reversible capacity of ~100 mAh g(-1) with lower intercalation voltage. It also shows good cycling stability and rate capability, making it promising applications in sodium-ion batteries. PMID:25427677

  14. A novel pyrophosphate BaCr2(P2O7)2 as green pigment with high NIR solar reflectance and durable chemical stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Zhengxu; Zhang, Wanqi; Huang, Yanlin; Wei, Donglei; Seo, Hyo Jin

    2014-08-01

    A novel pyrophosphate BaCr2(P2O7)2 was synthesized by the conventional solid-state reaction. The X-ray diffraction (XRD), FTIR spectrum, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) near infrared (NIR) reflectance spectra were applied to characterize the powders. The refractive indexes and nature of the VB and CB were determined. The structure, color properties and application were investigated. The results reveal that the anomalist bodies with smooth surfaces were obtained at 1200 °C with a mean size of 3 μm. A high reflectance peak at 535 nm was observed in the visible region, which is associated with the brilliant and deep green color of this pigment. With all the acids, alkali and deionized water treatment, the polycrystalline pigment BaCr2(P2O7)2 was found to be durable in chemical stability. The significantly high NIR solar reflectance of BaCr2(P2O7)2 is 90.0%, a higher cooling ability, so it has been selected to be tested as cool green pigment in ceramics. Moreover, this novel pyrophosphate pigment has great potential as cool pigment for surface coating applications.

  15. Control of magnetic ordering by altering Co-Co distances in La0.9R0.1Co2P2 (R=Ce, Pr, Nd, and Sm) phases with ThCr2Si2-type structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Corey M.; Arico, Alexandra A.; Kovnir, Kirill; Shatruk, Michael

    2010-05-01

    To clarify the origins of different magnetic behavior in ferromagnetic LaCo2P2 and antiferromagnetic RCo2P2 (R=Ce, Pr, Nd, and Sm), quaternary phases La0.9R0.1Co2P2 have been investigated. While LaCo2P2 orders ferromagnetically at 132 K, the introduction of the small amount of R into the La sublattice increases the ferromagnetic ordering temperature, which correlates with the size of the R3+ ion (TC=144 K, 150 K, 161 K, and 165 K for Ce, Pr, Nd, and Sm, respectively). This change is attributed to the increasing Co-Co separation within the [Co2P2] layer, which results in higher spin polarization of the Co 3d subband. The low-temperature magnetism of La0.9R0.1Co2P2 strongly depends on the nature of the rare-earth metal.

  16. Induction of MDM2-P2 Transcripts Correlates with Stabilized Wild-Type p53 in Betel- and Tobacco-Related Human Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ralhan, Ranju; Sandhya, Agarwal; Meera, Mathur; Bohdan, Wasylyk; Nootan, Shukla K.

    2000-01-01

    MDM2, a critical element of cellular homeostasis mechanisms, is involved in complex interactions with important cell-cycle and stress-response regulators including p53. The mdm2-P2 promoter is a transcriptional target of p53. The aim of this study was to determine the association between mdm2-P2 transcripts and the status of the p53 gene in betel- and tobacco-related oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) to understand the mechanism of deregulation of MDM2 and p53 expression and their prognostic implications in oral tumorigenesis. Elevated levels of MDM2 proteins were observed in 11 of 25 (44%) oral hyperplastic lesions, nine of 15 (60%) dysplastic lesions, and 71 of 100 (71%) SCCs. The intriguing feature of the study was the identification and different subcellular localization of three isoforms of MDM2 (ie, 90 kd, 76 kd, and 57 kd) in oral SCCs and their correlation with p53 overexpression in each tumor. The hallmark of the study was the detection of mdm2-P2 transcripts in 12 of 20 oral SCCs overexpressing both MDM2 and p53 proteins while harboring wild-type p53 alleles. Furthermore, mdm2 amplification was an infrequent event in betel- and tobacco-associated oral tumorigenesis. The differential compartmentalization of the three isoforms of MDM2 suggests that each has a distinct function, potentially in the regulation of p53 and other gene products implicated in oral tumorigenesis. In conclusion, we report herein the first evidence suggesting that enhanced translation of mdm2-P2 transcripts (S-mdm2) may represent an important mechanism of overexpression and consequent stabilization and functional inactivation of wild-type p53 serving as an adverse prognosticator in betel- and tobacco-related oral cancer. The clinical significance of the functional inactivation of wild-type p53 by MDM2 is underscored by the significantly shorter median disease-free survival time (16 months) observed in p53/MDM2-positive cases as compared to those which did not show co-expression of

  17. Photorefractive acousto-optic imaging in thick scattering media at 790 nm with a Sn(2)P(2)S(6):Te crystal.

    PubMed

    Farahi, Salma; Montemezzani, Germano; Grabar, Alexander A; Huignard, Jean-Pierre; Ramaz, François

    2010-06-01

    Acousto-optic imaging is based on ultrasound modulation of multiply scattered light in thick media. We experimentally demonstrate the possibility to perform a self-adaptive wavefront holographic detection at 790nm, within the optical therapeutic window where absorption of biological tissues is minimized. A high-gain Te-doped Sn(2)P(2)S(6) crystal is used for this purpose. Optical absorbing objects embedded within a thick scattering phantom are imaged by use of pulsed ultrasound to get a dynamic millimetric axial resolution. Our technique represents an interesting approach for breast cancer detection. PMID:20517420

  18. Induction of MDM2-P2 transcripts correlates with stabilized wild-type p53 in betel- and tobacco-related human oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Ralhan, R; Sandhya, A; Meera, M; Bohdan, W; Nootan, S K

    2000-08-01

    MDM2, a critical element of cellular homeostasis mechanisms, is involved in complex interactions with important cell-cycle and stress-response regulators including p53. The mdm2-P2 promoter is a transcriptional target of p53. The aim of this study was to determine the association between mdm2-P2 transcripts and the status of the p53 gene in betel- and tobacco-related oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) to understand the mechanism of deregulation of MDM2 and p53 expression and their prognostic implications in oral tumorigenesis. Elevated levels of MDM2 proteins were observed in 11 of 25 (44%) oral hyperplastic lesions, nine of 15 (60%) dysplastic lesions, and 71 of 100 (71%) SCCs. The intriguing feature of the study was the identification and different subcellular localization of three isoforms of MDM2 (ie, 90 kd, 76 kd, and 57 kd) in oral SCCs and their correlation with p53 overexpression in each tumor. The hallmark of the study was the detection of mdm2-P2 transcripts in 12 of 20 oral SCCs overexpressing both MDM2 and p53 proteins while harboring wild-type p53 alleles. Furthermore, mdm2 amplification was an infrequent event in betel- and tobacco-associated oral tumorigenesis. The differential compartmentalization of the three isoforms of MDM2 suggests that each has a distinct function, potentially in the regulation of p53 and other gene products implicated in oral tumorigenesis. In conclusion, we report herein the first evidence suggesting that enhanced translation of mdm2-P2 transcripts (S-mdm2) may represent an important mechanism of overexpression and consequent stabilization and functional inactivation of wild-type p53 serving as an adverse prognosticator in betel- and tobacco-related oral cancer. The clinical significance of the functional inactivation of wild-type p53 by MDM2 is underscored by the significantly shorter median disease-free survival time (16 months) observed in p53/MDM2-positive cases as compared to those which did not show co-expression of

  19. Structural stability, electronic, mechanical and thermodynamical properties of CaNi2P2 and CaNi2Sb2 compounds by band structure calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harish, R. Sugan; Jayalakshmi, D. S.; Viswanathan, E.; Sundareswari, M.

    2016-05-01

    The mechanical, electronic, thermodynamic properties and structural stability of tetragonal structured CaNi2P2 and CaNi2Sb2 intermetallic compounds has been studied using the FP-LAPW method based on density functional theory. The PBE-GGA exchange correlation has been applied. Using the computed elastic constants, various elastic moduli such as bulk, shear, Young’s modulus, Poisson’s ratio and anisotropy constant are calculated and discussed. Stability of the compounds is confirmed by using their elastic constants. Pugh’s ratio is calculated to analyze the mechanical nature of the compound.

  20. Oral administration of Lactococcus lactis-expressing heat shock protein 65 and tandemly repeated IA2P2 prevents type 1 diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun-Feng; Liu, Xiao-Rui; Li, Guo-Liang; Lu, Shi-Ping; Jin, Liang; Wu, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the destruction of insulin-secreting β cells upon autoreactive T cell attack. Oral administration of autoantigens is an attractive approach to treating T1DM, but an effective carrier should be used in order to protect antigens. Lactococcus lactis, a safe engineering strain, was used for this task in the present study. Two recombinant L. lactis expressing protein HSP65-6IA2P2 were used and be investigated the effects and mechanisms against T1DM in NOD mice. Our findings demonstrate that recombinant L. lactis strains can successfully both deliver antigens to intestinal mucosa and maintain the epitopes for a long time in NOD mice. Oral administration of recombinant L. lactis could prevent hyperglycemia, improve glucose tolerance, and reduce insulitis by inhibiting antigen-specific proliferation of T cells, augmenting regulatory immune reactions, and balancing ratios of Th17/Tregs and Th1/Th2. These results prove that orally administrated L. lactis expressing HSP65-6IA2P2 is an effective approach for the prevention of T1DM in NOD mice. PMID:27085380

  1. Dielectric properties of Li2O-CaF2-P2O5 glass ceramic system doped with NiO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, G. Murali; Venkateswararao, G.; Srikumar, T.; Sambasiva Rao, K.; Ram Prasad, Ch

    2009-07-01

    Studies on various physical properties viz., dielectric properties (dielectric constant, loss tan δ, a.c conductivity σ) over a wide range of frequency and temperature, of Li2O-CaF2-P2O5: NiO glass ceramics have been reported. The dielectric constant and loss variation with the concentration of NiO have been explained on the basis of space charge polarization mechanism. The dielectric relaxation effects exhibited by these samples have been analyzed by a graphical method and the spreading of dielectric relaxation has been established. The a.c conductivity in the high temperature region seems to be connected both with electronic transfer and ionic movements.

  2. Degradation behaviour of a new bioceramic: Ca2P2O7 with addition of Na4P2O7.10H2O.

    PubMed

    Lin, F H; Liao, C J; Chen, K S; Sun, J S; Liu, H C

    1997-07-01

    A newly produced bioceramic, beta-Ca2P2O7 with addition of Na4P2O7.10H2O (SDCP), has been implanted into the femoral condyle of rabbits. Within 6 weeks after implantation, most of the bioceramic is replaced by new woven bone. On the contrary, block from hydroxyapatite (HA) and beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP), which are osteoconductible, do not resorb within a short period of time. We believe that the biodegradable behaviour of SDCP may occur in two steps. The first and most important step is the digestion of particles and migration of the particles by phagocytosis. The object of this study is to examine the change in morphologies, chemical compositions and crystal structure of SDCP after soaking in distilled water for a certain period of time. The SDCP ceramic was also co-cultured with leucocytes to observe how the SDCP particles were digested by the leucocytes, so that the mechanism of biodegradable behaviour of SDCP ceramic in vivo might be clarified. Four types of sintered calcium phosphate ceramics were tested in the experiment: SDCP, pure beta-Ca2P2O7 (DCP), HA and beta-TCP. They wee soaked in distilled water at 37 degrees C for up to 30 days. The microstructure and morphology of crystals deposited on the surface were observed using scanning electron microscopy. Sodium, calcium and phosphorus ion contents in the supernatant solution were detected by atomic absorption analysis and ion coupled plasma. In summary, HA and DCP showed no significant evidence of dissolution in distilled water. In static distilled water, calcium ions may be released from beta-TCP into solution during the initial 7 days and then converted into HA by reprecipitation. The results showed that the SDCP was firstly dissolved into small grains or fragments by the solution. The small fragments should be so small as to be digested by the phagocytes in a physiological environment. PMID:9199761

  3. In vivo evaluation of CaO-SiO2-P2O5-B2O3 glass-ceramics coating on Steinman pins.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hyup; Hong, Kug Sun; Baek, Hae-Ri; Seo, Jun-Hyuk; Lee, Kyung Mee; Ryu, Hyun-Seung; Lee, Hyun-Kyung

    2013-07-01

    Surface coating using ceramics improves the bone bonding strength of an implant. We questioned whether a new type of glass-ceramics (BGS-7) coating (CaO-SiO2 -P2 O5 -B2 O3 ) would improve the osseointegration of Steinman pins (S-pins) both biomechanically and histomorphometrically. An in vivo study was performed using rabbits by inserting three S-pins into each iliac bone. The pins were 2.2-mm S-pins with a coating of 30-μm-thick BGS-7 and 550-nm-thick hydroxyapatite (HA), as opposed to an S-pin without coating. A tensile strength test and histomorphometrical evaluation was performed. In the 2-week group, the BGS-7 implant showed a significantly higher tensile strength than the S-pin. In the 4- and 8-week groups, the BGS-7 implants had significantly higher tensile strengths than the S-pins and HA implants. The histomorphometrical study revealed that the BGS-7 implant had a significantly higher contact ratio than the S-pin and HA implants in the 4-week group. The biomechanical and histomorphometrical tests showed that the BGS-7 coating had superior bone bonding properties than the groups without the coating from the initial stage of insertion. The BGS-7 coating of an S-pin will enhance the bone bonding strength, and there might also be an advantage in human bone bonding. PMID:23639194

  4. New hypodiphosphates of the alkali metals: Synthesis, crystal structure and vibrational spectra of the hypodiphosphates(IV) M2[(H2P2O6)(H4P2O6)] (M=Rb and Cs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Peng; Wiegand, Thomas; Eckert, Hellmut; Gjikaj, Mimoza

    2012-10-01

    The new hypodiphosphates(IV) Rb2[(H2P2O6)(H4P2O6)] (1) and Cs2[(H2P2O6)(H4P2O6)] (2) were synthesized by soft chemistry reactions from aqueous solutions of hypophosphoric acid and the corresponding heavy alkali-metal carbonates. Their crystal structures were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Both compounds crystallize isotypic in the triclinic space group P-1 with one formula unit in the unit cell. The structures are built up by discrete (H2P2O6)2- and (H4P2O6) units in staggered conformation for the P2O6 skeleton and the corresponding alkali-metal cations. In the (H2P2O6)2- ion the hydrogen atoms are in a "trans-trans" conformation. O·H-O hydrogen bonds between the (H2P2O6)2- and (H4P2O6) groups consolidate the structures into a three-dimensional network. The FT-Raman and 31P and 1H and MAS NMR spectra of the title compounds have been recorded and interpreted, especially with respect to their assignment to the (H2P2O6)2- and (H4P2O6) groups. Thermogravimetric data of 2 have been interpreted in terms of a thermal decomposition model.

  5. Structural and thermal characterization of CaO-MgO-SiO2-P2O5-CaF2 glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Kansal, Ishu; Goel, Ashutosh; Tulyaganov, Dilshat U.; Rajagopal, Raghu R.; Ferreira, Jose M.

    2012-08-01

    The paper presents the influence of varying CaO/MgO ratio on the structure and thermal properties of CaO-MgO-SiO2-P2O5-CaF2 glasses. A series of eight glass compositions in the glass forming region of diopside (CaMgSi2O6) - fluorapatite [Ca5(PO4)3F] - wollastonite (CaSiO3) ternary system have been designed and synthesized by varying diopside/wollastonite ratio in glasses. The as prepared melt-quenched glasses have been characterized for their structure by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and magic angle spinning (MAS)-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Silicon is predominantly present as Q2 (Si) species, while phosphorus tends to coordinate in orthophosphate environment in all the investigated glasses. The change in CaO/MgO ratio had an insignificant affect on the structure of glasses. The thermal sintering and crystallization parameters for the studied glasses have been obtained from differential thermal analysis (DTA) while crystalline phase fractions in the sintered glass-ceramics have been analyzed by X-ray diffraction adjoined with Rietveld refinement. Diopside, fluorapatite, wollastonite and pseudowollastonite have crystallized as the main crystalline phases in all the glass-ceramics with their content varying with respect to variation in CaO/MgO ratio in glasses. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has been used to shed light on the microstructure of glass-ceramics. The possible implications of structure and sintering behaviour of glasses on their bioactivity have been discussed.

  6. Influence of fluoride additions on biological and mechanical properties of Na2O-CaO-SiO2-P2O5 glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Li, H C; Wang, D G; Hu, J H; Chen, C Z

    2014-02-01

    Two series of Na2O-CaO-SiO2-P2O5 glass-ceramics doped with NH4HF2 (G-NH4HF2) or CaF2 (G-CaF2) have been prepared by sol-gel method. The glass-ceramic phase composition and morphology were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS). The mechanical properties and thermal expansion coefficient were measured by a microhardness tester, an electronic tensile machine and a thermal expansion coefficient tester. The structure difference between these two glass-ceramics was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and the in vitro bioactivity of the glass-ceramics was determined by in vitro simulated body fluid (SBF) immersion test. The hemolysis test, in vitro cytotoxicity test, systemic toxicity test and the implanted experiment in animals were used to evaluate the biocompatibility of the glass-ceramics. The mechanical properties of sample G-NH4HF2 are lower than that of sample G-CaF2, and the bioactivity of sample G-NH4HF2 is better than that of sample G-CaF2. The thermal expansion coefficients of these two glass-ceramics are all closer to that of Ti6Al4V. After 7 days of SBF immersion, apatites were induced on glass-ceramic surface, indicating that the glass-ceramics have bioactivity. The hemolysis test, in vitro cytotoxicity test and systemic toxicity test demonstrate that the glass-ceramics do not cause hemolysis reaction, and have no toxicity to cell and living animal. The implanted experiment in animals shows that bone tissue can form a good osseointegration with the implant after implantation for two months, indicating that the glass-ceramics are safe to serve as implants. PMID:24411365

  7. Structural variety in zinc telluro-phosphates: syntheses, crystal structures and characterizations of Sr2Zn3Te2P2O14, Pb2Zn3Te2P2O14 and Ba2Zn2TeP2O11.

    PubMed

    Xia, Mingjun; Li, R K

    2016-05-01

    Three new zinc telluro-phosphates, Sr2Zn3Te2P2O14 (1), Pb2Zn3Te2P2O14 (2) and Ba2Zn2TeP2O11 (3), were grown by flux method, and their crystal structures were solved by X-ray diffraction method. Although all three crystals crystallize into the same space group P21/c with similar chemical compositions, they exhibit different topology structure types. 1 features a two-dimensional layered structure with the connection of TeO4 and (Zn3TeP2O18)(16-) 12-membered rings (MRs), which are composed of planar square and tetrahedral configuration ZnO4 groups, tetrahedral PO4 and seesaw TeO4. Due to lone-pair Coulomb repulsion of Pb(2+), the structure of 2, which is also composed of unbalanced seesaw TeO4 and ZnO4 groups and distorted PO4 tetrahedra, is slightly different from that of its analog 1. Compound 3 exhibits a complicated three-dimensional network with (Zn2PO9)(9-) 6-MRs and (Zn2Te2O10)(8-) 8-MRs built from distorted tetrahedral ZnO4 and PO4 groups and trigonal pyramidal TeO3 units. According to UV-vis-NIR diffuse reflectance spectra, compounds 1, 2 and 3 are highly transparent in the range of 450 to 2500 nm with a UV cut-off of 275 nm, 330 nm and 278 nm, respectively. In addition, the characterizations, including thermal analyses, XPS measurement and dipole moment calculations, are also reported. PMID:27046132

  8. Optical phase conjugation of picosecond pulses at 1.06 mum in Sn(2)P(2)S(6):Te for wavefront correction in high-power Nd-doped amplifier systems.

    PubMed

    Bach, Tobias; Nawata, Kouji; Jazbinsek, Mojca; Omatsu, Takashige; Günter, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We report, for the first time to our knowledge, on picosecondpulse optical phase conjugation using photorefractive Sn(2)P(2)S(6) crystals. For 7.2-ps pulses at 1.06 mum, we have achieved phase-conjugate reflectivities of up to 45% with very fast build-up times, about 15 ms at an intensity of 23 W/cm(2) using Te-doped Sn(2)P(2)S(6). We furthermore demonstrate aberration-free 5 W optical output of 8-ps pulses at 1.06 mum from a side pumped Nd:YVO(4) amplifier using the Sn(2)P(2)S(6)-based phase-conjugate feedback. PMID:20173826

  9. Cryogenic exciter

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, James William; Garces, Luis Jose

    2012-03-13

    The disclosed technology is a cryogenic static exciter. The cryogenic static exciter is connected to a synchronous electric machine that has a field winding. The synchronous electric machine is cooled via a refrigerator or cryogen like liquid nitrogen. The static exciter is in communication with the field winding and is operating at ambient temperature. The static exciter receives cooling from a refrigerator or cryogen source, which may also service the synchronous machine, to selected areas of the static exciter and the cooling selectively reduces the operating temperature of the selected areas of the static exciter.

  10. Relativistic electron-correlation on the 2p-2s transitions in Li-like to F-like Xe ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Liang-huan; Liu, Jing-jing; Kang, Xiao-ping

    2016-06-01

    Energy levels, wavelengths, transition rates and line strengths are reported for transitions in Li-like to F-like Xe ions, Xe LII-XLVI. For the calculations, a fully relativistic GRASP2k code based on the multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock (MCDHF) method has been adopted, Valence and core-Valence correlation effects were accounted for through single- and double-excitation expansions to increasing sets of active orbitals. The fine-structure energy levels and wavelengths are compared with experimental data and with values from other calculations. The calculated values including core-valence correlation are found to be similar and compare very well with other theoretical and experimental values for Xe ions. Our calculated wavelengths for Li-, Be- and B-like ions are much more precise than some available theoretical data and reveal significant shortcomings of the various theoretical predictions.

  11. Accurate ab initio potential energy surface, thermochemistry, and dynamics of the Br(2P, 2P3/2) + CH4 → HBr + CH3 reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czakó, Gábor

    2013-04-01

    Chemically accurate full-dimensional non-spin-orbit and spin-orbit (SO) ground-state potential energy surfaces (PESs) are obtained for the Br + CH4 → HBr + CH3 reaction by fitting 21 574 composite ab initio energy points. The composite method considers electron correlation methods up to CCSD(T), basis sets up to aug-cc-pwCVTZ-PP, correlation of the core electrons, scalar relativistic effects via an effective core potential (ECP), and SO corrections, thereby achieving an accuracy better than 0.5 kcal/mol. Benchmark structures and relative energies are computed for the stationary points using the ab initio focal-point analysis (FPA) scheme based on both ECP and Douglas-Kroll approaches providing all-electron relativistic CCSDT(Q)/complete-basis-set quality energies. The PESs accurately describe the saddle point of the abstraction reaction and the van der Waals complexes in the entrance and product channels. The SO-corrected PES provides a classical barrier height of 7285(7232 ± 50) cm-1, De values of 867(799 ± 10) and 399(344 ± 10) cm-1 for the complexes CH3-HBr and CH3-BrH, respectively, and reaction endothermicity of 7867(7857 ± 50) cm-1, in excellent agreement with the new, FPA-based benchmark data shown in parentheses. The difference between the Br + CH4 asymptotes of the non-SO and SO PESs is 1240 cm-1, in good agreement with the experiment (1228 cm-1). Quasiclassical trajectory calculations based on more than 13 million trajectories for the late-barrier Br + CH4(vk = 0, 1) [k = 1, 2, 3, 4] reactions show that the vibrational energy, especially the excitation of the stretching modes, activates the reaction much more efficiently than translational energy, in agreement with the extended Polanyi rules. Angular distributions show dominant backward scattering for the ground-state reaction and forward scattering for the stretching-excited reactions. The reactivity on the non-SO PES is about 3-5 times larger than that on the SO PES in a wide collision energy

  12. Ekectron-Impact Excitation of C+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, A. J.; Ballance, C. P.; Loch, S. D.; Pindzola, M. S.

    2015-05-01

    Electron-impact excitation cross sections are calculated for ground and excited states of C+ using the R-matrix with pseudo-states method. We used the configurations 1s2 2s2 nl (3 s <= nl <= 12 g) , 1s2 2 s 2 pnl (2 p <= nl <= 12 g) , 1s2 2p2 nl (2 p <= nl <= 12 g) , 1s2 2 s 3s2 , and 1s2 2 s 3d2 , resulting in 890 LS terms and 2048 LSJ levels. Excitation cross sections for the 1s2 2s2 2 p2 P -->4 P,2 D,2 S transitions are in good agreement with experiment. Combined with previous calculations for C and Cq+ (q = 2- 5), sufficient excitation, ionization, and recombination atomic data is now available to generate high quality collisional-radiative coefficients for the entire C isonuclear sequence. Work supported in part by grants from NASA, NSF, and DOE.

  13. p53-independent activation of the hdm2-P2 promoter through multiple transcription factor response elements results in elevated hdm2 expression in estrogen receptor alpha-positive breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Phelps, Monika; Darley, Matthew; Primrose, John N; Blaydes, Jeremy P

    2003-05-15

    The negative-regulatory feedback loop between p53 and hdm2 forms part of a finely balanced regulatory network of proteins that controls cell cycle progression and commitment to apoptosis. Expression of hdm2, and its mouse orthologue mdm2, is known to be induced by p53, but recent evidence has demonstrated mdm2 expression can also be regulated via p53-independent pathways. However the p53 independent mechanisms that control transcription of the human hdm2 gene have not been studied. Differential levels of hdm2 mRNA and protein expression have been reported in several types of human malignancy, including breast cancers in which hdm2 expression correlates with positive estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) status. Experimental models have demonstrated that hdm2 overexpression can promote breast cancer development. Here, we show that the elevated level of hdm2 protein in ERalpha(+ve) breast cancer cell lines such as MCF-7 and T47D is because of transcription from the p53-inducible P2 promoter of hdm2. The P2 promoter is inactive in ERalpha(-ve) cell lines such as SKBr3. Hdm2-P2 promoter activity in T47D cells is independent of p53, as well as of known regulators of the mouse mdm2-P2 promoter, including ERalpha and ras-raf-mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. We show that hdm2-P2 activity in T47D cells is dependent on the integrity of both an evolutionarily conserved composite binding site for AP1 and ETS family transcription factors (AP1-ETS) and a nonconserved upstream (nnGGGGC)(5) repeat sequence. Lack of hdm2-P2 activity in ERalpha(-ve) cells is shown to be a consequence of reduced transcriptional activation through the AP1-ETS element. Overexpression of ETS2 in SKBr3 cells reconstitutes AP1-ETS element-dependent hdm2-P2 promoter activity, resulting in increased levels of hdm2 protein in the cells. Our findings support the hypothesis that the elevated levels of hdm2 expression reported

  14. Excited intruder states in {sup 32}Mg

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, Vandana; Tabor, S. L.; Bender, P.; Hoffman, C. R.; Lee, Sangjin; Pepper, K.; Perry, M.; Utsuno, Y.; Otsuka, T.; Mantica, P. F.; Pinter, J. S.; Stoker, J. B.; Cook, J. M.; Pereira, J.; Weisshaar, D.

    2008-03-15

    The low energy level structure of N=20 {sup 32}Mg obtained via {beta}-delayed {gamma} spectroscopy is reported. The level structure of {sup 32}Mg is found to be completely dominated by intruders. An inversion between the 1p-1h and 3p-3h states is observed for the negative parity states, similar to the 0p-0h and 2p-2h inversion for the positive parity states in these N{approx}20 nuclei. The intruder excited states, both positive and negative parity, are reasonably explained by Monte Carlo shell model calculations, which suggest a shrinking N=20 shell gap with decreasing Z.

  15. Sol-gel synthesis of Na4Fe3(PO4)2(P2O7)/C nanocomposite for sodium ion batteries and new insights into microstructural evolution during sodium extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xuehang; Zhong, Guiming; Tang, Zheng; Yang, Yong

    2016-09-01

    A mixed polyanionic Na4Fe3(PO4)2(P2O7)/C nanocomposite is synthesized via a sol-gel route. The phosphate raw material is transformed to the mixed phosphate-pyrophosphate with high phase purity via a self-condensation reaction at 500 °C. Na4Fe3(PO4)2(P2O7)/C can deliver an initial capacity of 110 mAh g-1 at 0.05C with the average discharge voltage approaching 3.1 V. The nanocomposite shows excellent rate capability because of the presence of an in-situ formed 3-D network of carbon. At 10 C rate, the nanocomposite delivers a discharge capacity of 78 mAh g-1 at 25 mAh °C and 82 mAh g-1 at 55 °C. The nanocomposite has a good long-term cycling stability, retaining 89% of the initial discharge capacity after 300 cycles. In-situ XRD results demonstrate that the sodium insertion/extraction process in Na4Fe3(PO4)2(P2O7) is an imperfect solid-solution reaction with an obvious local lattice distortion instead of an ideal solid-solution reaction. Using a solid-state NMR technique, it is further found that the sodium extraction from the Na1, Na3, and Na4 sites causes an obvious change in local structure. However, the local structure of Na2 remains unchanged, which may aid the stability of the host structure.

  16. Application of the Dimensional Reduction Formalism to Pb12[Li2(P2O7)2(P4O13)2](P4O13): a Phosphate Containing Three Types of Isolated P-O Groups.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangyu; Wu, Hongping; Wang, Ying; Dong, Xiaoyu; Han, Shujuan; Pan, Shilie

    2016-08-01

    A new phosphate, Pb12[Li2(P2O7)2(P4O13)2](P4O13), containing three types of isolated polyphosphate anionic groups [P2O7], and two types of [P4O13] has been successfully synthesized by using Li2O as dimensional reduction agent to dismantle Pb3P4O13. The isolation of [P2O7] and two types of [P4O13] with different symmetries in the title compound mainly benefits from the large number and flexible coordination of the Pb(2+) cations. PMID:27399881

  17. Facile aqueous synthesis and electromagnetic properties of novel 3D urchin-like glass/Ni-Ni(3)P/Co(2)P(2)O(7) core/shell/shell composite hollow structures.

    PubMed

    An, Zhenguo; Zhang, Jingjie; Pan, Shunlong

    2010-04-14

    Novel 3D urchin-like glass/Ni-Ni(3)P/Co(2)P(2)O(7) core/shell/shell composite hollow structures are fabricated for the first time by controlled stepwise assembly of granular Ni-Ni(3)P alloy and ribbon-like Co(2)P(2)O(7) nanocrystals on hollow glass spheres in aqueous solutions at mild conditions. It is found that the shell structure and the overall morphology of the products can be tailored by properly tuning the annealing temperature. The as-obtained composite core/shell/shell products possess low density (ca. 1.18 g cm(-3)) and shape-dependent magnetic and microwave absorbing properties, and thus may have some promising applications in the fields of low-density magnetic materials, microwave absorbers, etc. Based on a series of contrast experiments, the probable formation mechanism of the core/shell/shell hierarchical structures is proposed. This work provides an additional strategy to prepare core/shell composite spheres with tailored shell morphology and electromagnetic properties. PMID:20379530

  18. Excited Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Asia; Ahern, Terence L.; Henderson, Sean O.

    2011-01-01

    Excited (or agitated) delirium is characterized by agitation, aggression, acute distress and sudden death, often in the pre-hospital care setting. It is typically associated with the use of drugs that alter dopamine processing, hyperthermia, and, most notably, sometimes with death of the affected person in the custody of law enforcement. Subjects typically die from cardiopulmonary arrest, although the cause is debated. Unfortunately an adequate treatment plan has yet to be established, in part due to the fact that most patients die before hospital arrival. While there is still much to be discovered about the pathophysiology and treatment, it is hoped that this extensive review will provide both police and medical personnel with the information necessary to recognize and respond appropriately to excited delirium. PMID:21691475

  19. Excited baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    The status of the theory of the low-energy approach to hadron structure is reviewed briefly by surveying a few relevant models. A few examples of tests needed to sort out the predictions of different models pertaining to the quark-gluon structure of hadrons are discussed, and given the resulting physics objectives, a few experimental options for excited baryon research at CFBAF are suggested. (LEW)

  20. Effects of Substitution of K2O for Na2O on the Bioactivity of CaO-Na2O-SiO2-P2O5 glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taehee; Hwang, Chawon; Gwoo, Donggun; Park, Hoyyul; Ryu, Bong-Ki

    2012-10-01

    The compositional dependences of bioactivity, thermal properties, atomic structure, and surface morphology have been investigated in the CaO-Na2O-SiO2-P2O5 system; this system is known as a bioglass. 45S5 Bioglass® is known to be a general and highly bioactive material. However, the bioactivity of this glassy material is expected to be improved by modifying the alkali-metal composition. Thermal properties, density, and molar volume were measured to investigate the structural packing. FT-IR spectra and X-ray diffraction were used to confirm the structures of these glasses. The morphology was examined using field emission electron microscopy, and the formation of a Ca-P layer was studied using an energy-dispersive system. This study shows that the tendency to form a calcium phosphate layer is increased with the substitution of K2O for Na2O.

  1. Effect of ZnO addition on bioactive CaO-SiO2-P2O5-CaF2 glass-ceramics containing apatite and wollastonite.

    PubMed

    Kamitakahara, M; Ohtsuki, C; Inada, H; Tanihara, M; Miyazaki, T

    2006-07-01

    Some ceramics show bone-bonding ability, i.e. bioactivity. Apatite formation on ceramics is an essential condition to bring about direct bonding to living bone when implanted into bony defects. A controlled surface reaction of the ceramic is an important factor governing the bioactivity and biodegradation of the implanted ceramic. Among bioactive ceramics, glass-ceramic A-W containing apatite and wollastonite shows high bioactivity, as well as high mechanical strength. In this study, glass-ceramics containing zinc oxide were prepared by modification of the composition of the glass-ceramic A-W. Zinc oxide was selected to control the reactivity of the glass-ceramics since zinc is a trace element that shows stimulatory effects on bone formation. Glass-ceramics were prepared by heat treatment of glasses with the general composition: xZnOx(57.0-x)CaOx35.4SiO(2)x7.2P(2)O(5)x0.4CaF(2) (where x=0-14.2mol.%). Addition of ZnO increased the chemical durability of the glass-ceramics, resulting in a decrease in the rate of apatite formation in a simulated body fluid. On the other hand, the release of zinc from the glass-ceramics increased with increasing ZnO content. Addition of ZnO may provide bioactive CaO-SiO(2)-P(2)O(5)-CaF(2) glass-ceramics with the capacity for appropriate biodegradation, as well as enhancement of bone formation. PMID:16765885

  2. Dicobalt-μ-oxo polyoxometalate compound, [(α(2)-P2W17O61Co)2O](14-): a potent species for water oxidation, C-H bond activation, and oxygen transfer.

    PubMed

    Barats-Damatov, Delina; Shimon, Linda J W; Weiner, Lev; Schreiber, Roy E; Jiménez-Lozano, Pablo; Poblet, Josep M; de Graaf, Coen; Neumann, Ronny

    2014-02-01

    High-valent oxo compounds of transition metals are often implicated as active species in oxygenation of hydrocarbons through carbon-hydrogen bond activation or oxygen transfer and also in water oxidation. Recently, several examples of cobalt-catalyzed water oxidation have been reported, and cobalt(IV) species have been suggested as active intermediates. A reactive species, formally a dicobalt(IV)-μ-oxo polyoxometalate compound [(α2-P2W17O61Co)2O](14-), [(POMCo)2O], has now been isolated and characterized by the oxidation of a monomeric [α2-P2W17O61Co(II)(H2O)](8-), [POMCo(II)H2O], with ozone in water. The crystal structure shows a nearly linear Co-O-Co moiety with a Co-O bond length of ∼1.77 Å. In aqueous solution [(POMCo)2O] was identified by (31)P NMR, Raman, and UV-vis spectroscopy. Reactivity studies showed that [(POMCo)2O]2O] is an active compound for the oxidation of H2O to O2, direct oxygen transfer to water-soluble sulfoxides and phosphines, indirect epoxidation of alkenes via a Mn porphyrin, and the selective oxidation of alcohols by carbon-hydrogen bond activation. The latter appears to occur via a hydrogen atom transfer mechanism. Density functional and CASSCF calculations strongly indicate that the electronic structure of [(POMCo)2O]2O] is best defined as a compound having two cobalt(III) atoms with two oxidized oxygen atoms. PMID:24437566

  3. Sexual excitement.

    PubMed

    Stoller, R J

    1976-08-01

    Sexual excitement depends on a scenario the person to be aroused has been writing since childhood. The story is an adventure, an autobiography disguised as fiction, in which the hero/heroine hides crucial intrapsychic conflicts, mysteries, screen memories of actual traumatic events and the resolution of these elements into a happy ending, best celebrated by orgasm. The function of the fantasy is to take these painful experiences and convert them to pleasure-triumph. In order to sharpen excitement-the vibration between the fear of original traumas repeating and the hope of a pleasurable conclusion this time-one introduces into the story elements of risk (approximations of the trauma) meant to prevent boredom and safety factors (sub-limnal signals to the storyteller that the risk are not truly dangerous). Sexual fantasy can be studied by means of a person's daydreams (including those chosen in magazines, books, plays, television, movies, and outright pornography), masturbatory behavior, object choice, foreplay, techniques of intercourse, or postcoital behavior. PMID:949223

  4. Effect of ZrO(2) additions on the crystallization, mechanical and biological properties of MgO-CaO-SiO(2)-P(2)O(5)-CaF(2) bioactive glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Li, H C; Wang, D G; Meng, X G; Chen, C Z

    2014-06-01

    A series of ZrO(2) doped MgO-CaO-SiO(2)-P(2)O(5)-CaF(2) bioactive glass-ceramics were obtained by sintering method. The crystallization behavior, phase composition, morphology and structure of glass-ceramics were characterized. The bending strength, elastic modulus, fracture toughness, micro-hardness and thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of glass-ceramics were investigated. The in vitro bioactivity and cytotoxicity tests were used to evaluate the bioactivity and biocompatibility of glass-ceramics. The sedimentation mechanism and growth process of apatites on sample surface were discussed. The results showed that the mainly crystalline phases of glass-ceramics were Ca(5)(PO4)3F (fluorapatite) and β-CaSiO(3). (β-wollastonite). m-ZrO(2) (monoclinic zirconia) declined the crystallization temperatures of glasses. t-ZrO(2) (tetragonal zirconia) increased the crystallization temperature of Ca(5)(PO4)(3)F and declined the crystallization temperature of β-CaSiO(3). t-ZrO(2) greatly increased the fracture toughness, bending strength and micro-hardness of glass-ceramics. The nanometer apatites were induced on the surface of glass-ceramic after soaking 28 days in SBF (simulated body fluid), indicating the glass-ceramic has good bioactivity. The in vitro cytotoxicity test demonstrated the glass-ceramic has no toxicity to cell. PMID:24780435

  5. Influence of heat treatments upon the mechanical properties and in vitro bioactivity of ZrO2-toughened MgO-CaO-SiO2-P2O5-CaF2 glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Li, Huan-Cai; Wang, Dian-Gang; Meng, Xiang-Guo; Chen, Chuan-Zhong

    2014-09-01

    Zirconia-toughened MgO-CaO-SiO2-P2O5-CaF2 glass-ceramics are prepared using sintering techniques, and a series of heat treatment procedures are designed to obtain a glass-ceramic with improved properties. The crystallization behavior, phase composition, and morphology of the glass-ceramics are characterized. The bending strength, elastic modulus, fracture toughness, and microhardness of the glass-ceramics are investigated, and the effect mechanism of heat treatments upon the mechanical properties is discussed. The bioactivity of glass-ceramics is then evaluated using the in vitro simulated body fluid (SBF) soaking test, and the mechanism whereby apatite forms on the glass-ceramic surfaces in the SBF solution is discussed. The results indicate that the main crystal phase of the G-24 sample undergoing two heat treatment procedures is Ca5(PO4)3F (fluorapatite), and those of the G-2444 sample undergoing four heat treatment procedures are Ca5(PO4)3F and β-CaSiO3 (β-wollastonite). The heat treatment procedures are found to greatly influence the mechanical properties of the glass-ceramic, and an apatite layer is induced on the glass-ceramic surface after soaking in the SBF solution. PMID:25280855

  6. Effects of sodium and potassium ions on a novel SeO2-B2O3-SiO2-P2O5-CaO bioactive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trandafir, D. L.; Ponta, O.; Ciceo-Lucacel, R.; Simon, V.

    2015-01-01

    The study is focused on Na2O and/or K2O influence on a new sol-gel derived SeO2-B2O3-SiO2-P2O5-CaO bioactive system. The structural changes induced by Na2O and/or K2O addition were correlated with the samples behavior in simulated biological media. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to characterize the structure and the type of the chemical bonds. The morphology of the samples was characterized through scanning electron microscopy (SEM). XRD results pointed out a prevalent vitreous structure with an incipient hydroxyapatite (HA) crystalline phase. FTIR results revealed a complex network consisting of silicate, phosphate and borate units, as well as the development of both A- and B-type of carbonate-substituted HA. The bioactivity of the samples was tested in vitro following the evolution of the apatite layers self-assembled on the samples surface in simulated body fluid. Their biocompatibility was investigated after samples surface functionalization with protein. The results indicate that sodium and potassium addition improves the biocompatibility by enhancement of protein adherence on samples surface and without to prevent the samples bioactivity.

  7. Characterization and physical properties of Li 2O-CaF 2-P 2O 5 glass ceramics with Cr 2O 3 as a nucleating agent—Physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali Krishna, G.; Anila Kumari, B.; Srinivasa Reddy, M.; Veeraiah, N.

    2007-10-01

    In this paper, studies on various physical properties, viz., dielectric properties (dielectric constant, loss tan δ, a.c. conductivity σ) over a wide range of frequency and temperature, optical absorption, ESR at liquid nitrogen temperature and magnetic susceptibility at room temperature of Li 2O-CaF 2-P 2O 5: Cr 2O 3 glass ceramics, have been reported. The optical absorption, ESR and magnetic susceptibility studies indicate that the chromium ions exist in Cr 5+, Cr 4+ and Cr 6+ states in addition to Cr 3+ state in these samples. The dielectric constant and loss variation with the concentration of Cr 2O 3 have been explained on the basis of space charge polarization mechanism. The dielectric relaxation effects exhibited by these samples have been analysed by a graphical method and the spreading of dielectric relaxation has been established. The a.c. conductivity in the high-temperature region seems to be connected both with electronic and ionic movements.

  8. Electron Impact Excitation Of Ti XIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Kanti M.; Keenan, F. P.

    2012-05-01

    Emission lines of Ti XIX are important for the modeling and diagnostics of lasing, fusion and astrophysical plasmas, for which atomic data are required for a variety of parameters, such as energy levels, radiative rates (A- values), and excitation rates or equivalently the effective collision strengths (Υ), which are obtained from the electron impact collision strengths (Ω). Experimentally, energy levels are available for Ti XIX on the NIST website, but there is paucity for accurate collisional atomic data. Therefore, here we report a complete set of results (namely energy levels, radiative rates, and effective collision strengths) for all transitions among the lowest 98 levels of Ti XIX. These levels belong to the (1s2) 2s2, 2s2p, 2p2, 2s3l, 2p3l, 2s4l, and 2p4l configurations. Finally, we also report the A- values for four types of transitions, namely electric dipole (E1), electric quadrupole (E2), magnetic dipole (M1), and magnetic quadrupole (M2), because these are also required for plasma modeling. For our calculations of wavefunctions, we have adopted the fully relativistic GRASP code, and for the calculations of Ω, the Dirac atomic R-matrix code (DARC) of PH Norrington and IP Grant. Additionally, parallel calculations have also been performed with the Flexible Atomic Code (FAC) of Gu, so that all atomic parameters can be rigorously assessed for accuracy.

  9. Accurate ab initio potential energy surface, thermochemistry, and dynamics of the Cl(2P, 2P3/2) + CH4 → HCl + CH3 and H + CH3Cl reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czakó, Gábor; Bowman, Joel M.

    2012-01-01

    We report a high-quality, ab initio, full-dimensional global potential energy surface (PES) for the Cl(2P, 2P3/2) + CH4 reaction, which describes both the abstraction (HCl + CH3) and substitution (H + CH3Cl) channels. The analytical PES is a least-squares fit, using a basis of permutationally invariant polynomials, to roughly 16 000 ab initio energy points, obtained by an efficient composite method, including counterpoise and spin-orbit corrections for the entrance channel. This composite method is shown to provide accuracy almost equal to all-electron CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pCVQZ results, but at much lower computational cost. Details of the PES, as well as additional high-level benchmark characterization of structures and energetics are reported. The PES has classical barrier heights of 2650 and 15 060 cm-1 (relative to Cl(2P3/2) + CH4(eq)), respectively, for the abstraction and substitution reactions, in good agreement with the corresponding new computed benchmark values, 2670 and 14 720 cm-1. The PES also accurately describes the potential wells in the entrance and exit channels for the abstraction reaction. Quasiclassical trajectory calculations using the PES show that (a) the inclusion of the spin-orbit corrections in the PES decreases the cross sections by a factor of 1.5-2.5 at low collision energies (Ecoll); (b) at Ecoll ≈ 13 000 cm-1 the substitution channel opens and the H/HCl ratio increases rapidly with Ecoll; (c) the maximum impact parameter (bmax) for the abstraction reaction is ˜6 bohr; whereas bmax is only ˜2 bohr for the substitution; (d) the HCl and CH3 products are mainly in the vibrational ground state even at very high Ecoll; and (e) the HCl rotational distributions are cold, in excellent agreement with experiment at Ecoll = 1280 cm-1.

  10. Quantification of Entanglement Entropies for Doubly Excited States in Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chien-Hao; Ho, Yew Kam

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we study the quantum entanglement for doubly excited resonance states in helium by using highly correlated Hylleraas type functions to represent such states of the two-electron system. The doubly-excited resonance states are determined by calculation of density of resonance states under the framework of the stabilization method. The spatial (electron-electron orbital) entanglement measures for the low-lying doubly excited 2 s 2, 2 s3 s, and 2 p 2 1 S e states are carried out. Once a resonance state wave function is obtained, the linear entropy and von Neumann entropy for such a state are quantified using the Schmidt-Slater decomposition method. To check the consistence, linear entropy is also determined by solving analytically the needed four-electron (12-dimensional) integrals.

  11. Fabrication and evaluation of osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells on novel CaO-SiO2-P2O5-B2O3 glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hyup; Seo, Jun-Hyuk; Lee, Kyung Mee; Ryu, Hyun-Seung; Baek, Hae-Ri

    2013-07-01

    Apatite-wollastonite glass-ceramics have high mechanical strength, and CaO-SiO2 -B2 O3 glass-ceramics showed excellent bioactivity and high biodegradability. A new type of CaO-SiO2 -P2 O5 -B2 O3 system of bioactive glass-ceramics (BGS-7) was fabricated, and the effect and usefulness was evaluated via bioactivity using simulated body fluid and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The purpose of this study was to compare BGS-7 and hydroxyapatite (HA) using hMSCs in order to evaluate the bioactivity of BGS-7 and its possibility as a bone graft extender. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining, ALP activity, cell proliferation 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt (MTS) assay, Alizarin Red-S (AR-S) staining, calcium levels, the mRNA expression of ALP, osteocalcin, osteopontin, and runt-related transcription factor 2 (runx-2) using reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and the protein expression of osteocalcin and runx-2 using Western blot were measured by transplanting hMSC onto a tissue culture plate, HA, and BGS-7. The ALP staining and AR-S staining of BGS-7 was greater than that of HA and control. The ALP value of BGS-7 was significantly higher than that of HA and control. The MTS results showed that BGS-7 had a higher value than the groups transplanted onto HA and control on day 15. The calcium level was higher than the control in both HA and BGS-7, and was especially high in BGS-7. There were more mineral products on BGS-7 than on the HA when analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The mRNA expression of ALP, osteopontin, osteocalcin, and runx-2 were higher on BGS-7 than on HA and the control when analyzed by RT-PCR. The relative gene expression of osteopontin and runx-2 were found to be higher on BGS-7 than on HA and the control by Western blot. Accordingly, it is predicted that BGS-7 would have high biocompatibility and good osteoconductivity, and presents a possibility as a new

  12. Reactivity of the anionic diphosphorus complex [Mo2Cp2(μ-PCy2)(μ-κ(2):κ(2)-P2)(CO)2]- toward phosphorus- and transition metal-based electrophiles.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, M Angeles; García, M Esther; García-Vivó, Daniel; Lozano, Raquel; Ramos, Alberto; Ruiz, Miguel A

    2013-08-01

    The reactions of the Li(+) salt of the title anion with chlorophosphines PR2Cl (R = Cy, Ph, (t)Bu) led in all cases to products of formula [Mo2Cp2(μ-PCy2)(μ-κ(2)(P,P)':κ(2)(P,P″)-P2PR2)(CO)2], with the PR2 group inserted in one of the Mo-P(basal) bonds of the anion to give novel tridentate phosphinodiphosphenyl ligands, as confirmed by the solid-state structure of the PCy2 compound. When R was the bulky (t)Bu group, this product was in equilibrium with an isomer of formula [Mo2Cp2(μ-PCy2)(μ-κ(2)(P,P)':κ(2)(P,P')-P2P(t)Bu2)(CO)2], in which the diphosphorus ligand of the anion binds the P(t)Bu2 group through the lone pair of electrons at the basal P atom in an "end-on" fashion (computed P-P-P(t)Bu2 = 114.7°); the latter isomer was more stable than the former, according to the NMR data and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The title anion reacted with halide complexes of the type [MXLn] (MLn = FeCp(CO)2, MoCp(CO)3, ZrCpCl, Mn(CO)5, Re(CO)5) to give compounds of formula [Mo2MCp2(μ-PCy2)(μ-κ(2):κ(2):κ(1)-P2)(CO)2Ln] incorporating the organometallic fragment MLn also in an "end-on" position at the basal P atom of the anion, as confirmed by the solid-state structure of the Fe compound (P-P = 2.089(2) Å; P-P-Fe = 124.6(1)°). All these complexes, except the Zr compound, underwent a fluxional process in solution involving a swing of the P2 ligand around the Mo-Mo axis with concomitant exchange of the MLn fragment between the P atoms of the diphosphorus ligand, as revealed by variable-temperature NMR experiments. Thermal decarbonylation of the Mn and Re compounds gave hexanuclear derivatives of formula [Mo4M2Cp4(μ-PCy2)2(μ4-κ(1):κ(2):κ(2):κ(1)-P2)2(CO)12] (M = Mn, Re) as a mixture of two isomers derived from the different assembly of the asymmetric Mo2P2 subunits, as confirmed through X-ray analyses of both compounds. Each of the P2 ligands in these two complexes bind two Mo and two M atoms (M = Mn, Re), with the latter defining central P4M

  13. Acoustically excited heated jets. 1: Internal excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; Ahuja, K. K.; Brown, W. H.; Salikuddin, M.; Morris, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of relatively strong upstream acoustic excitation on the mixing of heated jets with the surrounding air are investigated. To determine the extent of the available information on experiments and theories dealing with acoustically excited heated jets, an extensive literature survey was carried out. The experimental program consisted of flow visualization and flowfield velocity and temperature measurements for a broad range of jet operating and flow excitation conditions. A 50.8-mm-diam nozzle was used for this purpose. Parallel to the experimental study, an existing theoretical model of excited jets was refined to include the region downstream of the jet potential core. Excellent agreement was found between theory and experiment in moderately heated jets. However, the theory has not yet been confirmed for highly heated jets. It was found that the sensitivity of heated jets to upstream acoustic excitation varies strongly with the jet operating conditions and that the threshold excitation level increases with increasing jet temperature. Furthermore, the preferential Strouhal number is found not to change significantly with a change of the jet operating conditions. Finally, the effects of the nozzle exit boundary layer thickness appear to be similar for both heated and unheated jets at low Mach numbers.

  14. Double-electron excitation of H- by fast proton and antiproton impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, Ken-Ichi; Nagase, Mamoru; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Morishita, Toru; Matsuzawa, Michio; Kimura, Mineo

    1994-05-01

    A theoretical investigation is carried out for double-electron excitation processes of H- induced by proton and antiproton impact at the enegy of 1.5 MeV. Excitation cross sections to the 2s2 1Se, 2s2p 1Po, and 2p2 1De states are calculated by using the plane-wave Born approximation, the distorted-wave Born approximation, and the close-coupling method. Wave functions of H- are generated employing the hyperspherical coordinate method. It is shown that the low-lying continuum 1skp 1Po is identified as an important intermediate state in the double-electron excitation process to the 2p2 1De state. We have also evaluated the ejected-electron spectra from the 2s2p 1Po shape-resonance state. It is found that its spectral shape is close to the observed line profile of the photodetachment of H- since the excitation mechanism to this state is mostly dominated by the optically allowed transition at the projectile energy concerned here.

  15. RESONANT CAVITY EXCITATION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.

    1959-08-01

    A cavity excitation circuit is described for rapidly building up and maintaining high-level oscillations in a resonant cavity. The circuit overcomes oscillation buildup slowing effects such as ion locking in the cavity by providing for the selective application of an amplified accelerating drive signal to the main cavity exciting oscillator during oscillation buildup and a direct drive signal to the oscillator thereafter.

  16. 8. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 1 IN FOREGROUND, EXCITER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 1 IN FOREGROUND, EXCITER No. 2., AND GENERATOR UNITS BEHIND EXCITER No. 2 IN BACKGROUND. EXCITER No. 1 GENERATOR HAS A COVER OVER TOP HALF OF COMMUTATOR ELEMENT. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse Exciters, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  17. Excited Charm States

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, S.

    1994-12-31

    Characteristics of mass spectra and decays of orbitally excited charm mesons and baryons, expected on the basis of quark models and Heavy Quark Symmetry, are briefly described. The difficulties associated with measurements on these excited states are discussed. The accuracy and reliability of currently available experimental information is examined. The reasons, for the widely accepted spin-parity assignments to the observed excited mesons and baryons, are stated. Finally, the experimental data, with the accepted spin-parity assignments, is compared with expectations based on quark models and Heavy Quark Symmetry.

  18. Superconductivity in SrNi2P2 single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Ronning, Filip; Bauer, Eric D; Park, Tuscon; Thompson, Joe D

    2009-01-01

    Heat capacity, magnetic susceptibility, and resistivity of SrNi{sub 2}P{sub 2} single crystals are presented, illustrating the structural transition at 325 K, and bulk superconductivity at 1.4 K. The magnitude of {Tc}, fits to the heat capacity data, the small upper critical field H{sub c2} = 390 Oe, and {kappa} = 2.1 suggests a conventional fully gapped superconductor. With applied pressure we find that superconductivity persists into the so-called 'collapsed tetragonal' phase, although the transition temperature is monotonically suppressed with increasing pressure. This argues that reduced dimensionality can be a mechanism for increasing the transition temperatures of layered NiP, as well as layered FeAs and NiAs, superconductors.

  19. Energies and E1, M1, E2, M2 transition rates for states of the 2s{sup 2}2p, 2s2p{sup 2}, and 2p{sup 3} configurations in boron-like ions between N III and Zn XXVI

    SciTech Connect

    Rynkun, P.; Joensson, P.; Gaigalas, G.; Froese Fischer, C.

    2012-07-15

    Energies, E1, M1, E2, M2 transition rates, line strengths, oscillator strengths, and lifetimes from relativistic configuration interaction calculations are reported for the states of the (1s{sup 2})2s{sup 2}2p, 2s2p{sup 2}, and 2p{sup 3} configurations in all boron-like ions between N III and Zn XXVI. Valence, core-valence, and core-core correlation effects were accounted for through single-double multireference (SD-MR) expansions to increasing sets of active orbitals.

  20. Excitation by rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tammadge, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Standard methods of excitation are not always practical when a single mode of known frequency requires investigation. This form of investigation is often required on a modified aircraft. A new method of excitation was developed and proved in flight, which consists of firing small rocket charges attached to the aircraft structure. Damping values at gradually increasing airspeeds are obtained, as in Stick Jerk tests, and flutter speeds predicted.

  1. Neutral resonant ionization in a H- plasma source: Potential of doubly excited **H-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, J. S.

    2016-02-01

    Hydrogen plasmas are optically dense to Lyman-α radiation, maintaining *H(n = 2) neutral atoms that may undergo neutral resonant ionization to **H-. One state, **H-(2p2 3Pe), is thought bound at 9.7 meV with a several nanosecond lifetime while all others are unbound resonances. Collision dynamics of two *H(2s) shows that an ionic pair of (p, **H-) resolves at least three long-standing collision experiments. The doubly excited anion also has a path to the unexcited ion pair whose only physical distinction is that both (p, H-) have energy of 3.7 eV.

  2. Excitation Methods for Bridge Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.R.; Duffy, T.A.; Cornwell, P.J.; Doebling, S.W.

    1999-02-08

    This paper summarizes the various methods that have been used to excited bridge structures during dynamic testing. The excitation methods fall into the general categories of ambient excitation methods and measured-input excitation methods. During ambient excitation the input to the bridge is not directly measured. In contrast, as the category label implies, measured-input excitations are usually applied at a single location where the force input to the structure can be monitored. Issues associated with using these various types of measurements are discussed along with a general description of the various excitation methods.

  3. Positron excitation of neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parcell, L. A.; Mceachran, R. P.; Stauffer, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    The differential and total cross section for the excitation of the 3s1P10 and 3p1P1 states of neon by positron impact were calculated using a distorted-wave approximation. The results agree well with experimental conclusions.

  4. Keeping Excitement in Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Ronald D.

    1987-01-01

    A discussion of the importance of faculty renewal and positive attitudes toward teaching suggests five ways to keep energy and excitement in teaching, including focusing more on students, allowing students more responsibility, using varied teaching methods, taking on teaching challenges, and planning periodic activities away from the classroom.…

  5. Measurements of defect structures by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy of the tellurite glass TeO2-P2O5-ZnO-LiNbO3 doped with ions of rare earth elements: Er3+, Nd3+ and Gd3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golis, E.; Yousef, El. S.; Reben, M.; Kotynia, K.; Filipecki, J.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the study was the structural analysis of the TeO2-P2O5-ZnO-LiNbO3 tellurite glasses doped with ions of the rare-earth elements: Er3+, Nd3+ and Gd3+ based on the PALS (Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy) method of measuring positron lifetimes. Values of positron lifetimes and the corresponding intensities may be connected with the sizes and number of structural defects, such as vacancies, mono-vacancies, dislocations or pores, the sizes of which range from a few angstroms to a few dozen nanometres. Experimental positron lifetime spectrum revealed existence of two positron lifetime components τ1 and τ2. Their interpretation was based on two-state positron trapping model where the physical parameters are the annihilation velocity and positron trapping rate.

  6. Fluorescence polarization of helium negative-ion resonances excited by polarized electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maseberg, J. W.; Gay, T. J.

    2006-12-01

    We have investigated helium (1s3d) 3D → (1s2p) 3P (588 nm) fluorescence produced by electron impact excitation in the vicinity of the (2s22p) 2P and (2s2p2) 2D negative-ion resonances at 57.2 and 58.3 eV, respectively. In contrast to previous work, we use spin-polarized incident electrons and report the relative Stokes parameters P1, P2 and P3 in the 55-60 eV region. Our failure to see discernable resonance effects in P2 indicates that even though the lifetime of these resonances is significant (~10 fs), magnetic forces acting on the temporarily captured electron are small. Resonant structures in the values of P1 and P3 are observed because the polarization contributions of resonant states are generally different than those from direct excitation of the 3 3D state.

  7. Magnetostrictive resonance excitation

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, Ricardo B.; Kuokkala, Veli-Tapani

    1992-01-01

    The resonance frequency spectrum of a magnetostrictive sample is remotely determined by exciting the magnetostrictive property with an oscillating magnetic field. The permeability of a magnetostrictive material and concomitant coupling with a detection coil varies with the strain in the material whereby resonance responses of the sample can be readily detected. A suitable sample may be a magnetostrictive material or some other material having at least one side coated with a magnetostrictive material. When the sample is a suitable shape, i.e., a cube, rectangular parallelepiped, solid sphere or spherical shell, the elastic moduli or the material can be analytically determined from the measured resonance frequency spectrum. No mechanical transducers are required and the sample excitation is obtained without contact with the sample, leading to highly reproducible results and a measurement capability over a wide temperature range, e.g. from liquid nitrogen temperature to the Curie temperature of the magnetostrictive material.

  8. Harmonically excited orbital variations

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, T.

    1985-08-06

    Rephrasing the equations of motion for orbital maneuvers in terms of Lagrangian generalized coordinates instead of Newtonian rectangular cartesian coordinates can make certain harmonic terms in the orbital angular momentum vector more readily apparent. In this formulation the equations of motion adopt the form of a damped harmonic oscillator when torques are applied to the orbit in a variationally prescribed manner. The frequencies of the oscillator equation are in some ways unexpected but can nonetheless be exploited through resonant forcing functions to achieve large secular variations in the orbital elements. Two cases are discussed using a circular orbit as the control case: (1) large changes in orbital inclination achieved by harmonic excitation rather than one impulsive velocity change, and (2) periodic and secular changes to the longitude of the ascending node using both stable and unstable excitation strategies. The implications of these equations are also discussed for both artificial satellites and natural satellites. For the former, two utilitarian orbits are suggested, each exploiting a form of harmonic excitation. 5 refs.

  9. Aperture excited dielectric antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosswell, W. F.; Chatterjee, J. S.; Mason, V. B.; Tai, C. T.

    1974-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the effect of placing dielectric objects over the aperture of waveguide antennas are presented. Experimental measurements of the radiation patterns, gain, impedance, near-field amplitude, and pattern and impedance coupling between pairs of antennas are given for various Plexiglas shapes, including the sphere and the cube, excited by rectangular, circular, and square waveguide feed apertures. The waveguide excitation of a dielectric sphere is modeled using the Huygens' source, and expressions for the resulting electric fields, directivity, and efficiency are derived. Calculations using this model show good overall agreement with experimental patterns and directivity measurements. The waveguide under an infinite dielectric slab is used as an impedance model. Calculations using this model agree qualitatively with the measured impedance data. It is concluded that dielectric loaded antennas such as the waveguide excited sphere, cube, or sphere-cylinder can produce directivities in excess of that obtained by a uniformly illuminated aperture of the same cross section, particularly for dielectric objects with dimensions of 2 wavelengths or less. It is also shown that for certain configurations coupling between two antennas of this type is less than that for the same antennas without dielectric loading.

  10. Apparatus for photon excited catalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saffren, M. M. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus is described for increasing the yield of photonically excited gas phase reactions by extracting excess energy from unstable, excited species by contacting the species with the surface of a finely divided solid.

  11. Search for Gluonic Excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Eugenio

    2007-10-01

    Studies of meson spectra via strong decays provide insight regarding QCD at the confinement scale. These studies have led to phenomenological models for QCD such as the constituent quark model. However, QCD allows for a much richer spectrum of meson states which include extra states such as exotics, hybrids, multi-quarks, and glueballs. First discussion of the status of exotic meson searches is given followed by a discussion of plans at Jefferson Lab to double the energy of the machine to 12 GeV, which will allow us to access photoproduction of mesons in search for gluonic excited states.

  12. Search for Gluonic Excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Eugenio, Paul

    2007-10-26

    Studies of meson spectra via strong decays provide insight regarding QCD at the confinement scale. These studies have led to phenomenological models for QCD such as the constituent quark model. However, QCD allows for a much richer spectrum of meson states which include extra states such as exotics, hybrids, multi-quarks, and glueballs. First discussion of the status of exotic meson searches is given followed by a discussion of plans at Jefferson Lab to double the energy of the machine to 12 GeV, which will allow us to access photoproduction of mesons in search for gluonic excited states.

  13. SHOCK-EXCITED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Creveling, R.

    1957-12-17

    S> A shock-excited quartz crystal oscillator is described. The circuit was specifically designed for application in micro-time measuring work to provide an oscillator which immediately goes into oscillation upon receipt of a trigger pulse and abruptly ceases oscillation when a second pulse is received. To achieve the instant action, the crystal has a prestressing voltage applied across it. A monostable multivibrator receives the on and off trigger pulses and discharges a pulse through the crystal to initiate or terminate oscillation instantly.

  14. Nuclear excited xenon flashlamp

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    The optical emissions of nuclear excited Xenon plasmas were investigated to determine basic parameters important to photolytic pumping of lasers. Gas mixtures of Helium-3 and Xenon were irradiated in the steady state mode in the University of Florida Training Reactor at neutron flux levels of about 10/sup 12//cm/sup 2/.s, generating a power density in the gas of approximately 3 milliwatts/cm/sup 3/. Optical emissions from the gas were primarily due to Xe/sub 2/* band emission at 172 nm with a few Xell lines in the visible and ir. Energy transfer from the /sup 3/He(n,p)T reaction to the Xe/sub 2/* 172 nm band was 67.0% +- 10%. High pressure gas mixtures (4 atm.) of Helium-3 and Xenon were irradiated in the pulse mode (250 ..mu..s FWHM) at the fast burst reactor at the Aberdeen Pulsed Radiation Facility at thermal neutron flux levels of about 10/sup 17//cm/sup 2/.s, generating a power density in the gas of about 1 kilowatt/cm/sup 3/. Optical emissions from the gas extended from the vacuum ultraviolet through the visible to the infrared, resembling a discharge excited lamp with a current density of about 1500 amp./cm/sup 2/. Such a lamp could pump a Neodymium YAG or liquid laser.

  15. Effect of temperature of Li2O-Al2O3-TiO2-P2O5 solid-state electrolyte coating process on the performance of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yu-Feng; Zhao, Shi-Xi; Xu, Ya-Hui; Nan, Ce-Wen

    2015-11-01

    Electrochemical performance of spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) at elevated temperature is improved by solid-state electrolyte Li2O-Al2O3-TiO2-P2O5 (LATP) coating. Crystallinity and thickness of coatings are controlled by adjusting the coating process at two different temperatures (550 and 650 °C). 2.0 wt.% LATP-modified LNMO cathode materials obtained at 650 °C exhibits remarkably promoted electrochemical performance compared to that of the pristine one in terms of cycling and rate ability at 55 °C. The enhanced performance of the surface-modified samples can be accounted for the suppressed side reactions between the cathode materials and electrolyte solution. What is more important is that LATP cannot only protect the active materials from electrolyte solution but also improve Li+ mobility. The higher crystallinity of glass-ceramic LATP coating layer with thinner thickness implies more unobstructed, stable and shorter diffusion path of Li+ transport. It is found that the coating process is in favor of the disordered to ordered phase transition, implying that the heating process of coating plays a role of anneal as well.

  16. Fission fragment excited laser system

    DOEpatents

    McArthur, David A.; Tollefsrud, Philip B.

    1976-01-01

    A laser system and method for exciting lasing action in a molecular gas lasing medium which includes cooling the lasing medium to a temperature below about 150 K and injecting fission fragments through the lasing medium so as to preferentially excite low lying vibrational levels of the medium and to cause population inversions therein. The cooled gas lasing medium should have a mass areal density of about 5 .times. 10.sup.-.sup.3 grams/square centimeter, relaxation times of greater than 50 microseconds, and a broad range of excitable vibrational levels which are excitable by molecular collisions.

  17. Pattern Formation in Excitable Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, William Nash

    1992-01-01

    The phenomenon of excitability is observed in a wide variety of physical and biological systems. In this work, spatially extended excitable systems are examined from several different perspectives. First, a pedagogical introduction is used to motivate the derivation of the dynamics of one dimensional excitable pulses. In the second part, coupled map techniques for numerical simulation of excitable media and other interfacial systems are described. Examples are given for both excitable media and crystal growth. The third chapter addresses the phenomenon of spiral formation in excitable media. Exact rotating solutions are found for a class of models of excitable media. The solutions consist of two regions: an outer region, consisting of the spiral proper, which exhibits a singularity at its tip, and the core region, obtained by rescaling space in the vicinity of the tip. The tip singularity is resolved in the core region, leading to a consistent solution in all of space. The stability of both the spiral and the core is investigated, with the result that the spiral is found to be stable, and the core unstable. Finally, the stability of excitable waves of the chemical cAMP traveling over aggregating colonies of the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum is examined by coupling the excitable dynamics of the cAMP signalling system to a simple model of chemotaxis, with result that cellular motion is found to destabilize the waves, causing the initially uniform field of cells to break up into streams.

  18. The Excitable Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Offner, Franklin F.

    1972-01-01

    The model of the excitable membrane assumes common channels for Na+ and K+; the two ion species interact within the pores through their electrostatic forces. The electric field varies across the membrane and with time, as a result of ionic redistribution. Ionic flow is primarily controlled by energy barriers at the two interfaces and by Ca++ adsorption at the external interface. When the membrane is polarized, the high electric field at the external interface acting on the membrane fixed charge keeps the effective channel diameter small, so that only dihydrated ions can cross the interface. The higher energy required to partially dehydrate Na+ accounts for its lower permeability when polarized. Depolarized, the channel entrance can expand, permitting quadrihydrated ions to pass; the large initial Na+ flow is the result of the large concentration ratio across the interface. The effect at the internal interface is symmetric; Na+ crosses with greater difficulty when the membrane is depolarized. Na+ inactivation occurs when the ion distribution within the membrane has assumed its new steady-state value. Calculations based on parameters consistent with physicochemical data agree generally with a wide range of experiments. The model does not obey the two fundamental Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) postulates (independence principle, ion flow proportional to thermodynamic potential). In several instances the model predicts experimental results which are not predicted by the HH equations. ImagesFIGURE 12 PMID:4655662

  19. Topological excitations in magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazeia, D.; Doria, M. M.; Rodrigues, E. I. B.

    2016-05-01

    In this work we propose a new route to describe topological excitations in magnetic systems through a single real scalar field. We show here that spherically symmetric structures in two spatial dimensions, which map helical excitations in magnetic materials, admit this formulation and can be used to model skyrmion-like structures in magnetic materials.

  20. Excited waves in shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechert, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    The generation of instability waves in free shear layers is investigated. The model assumes an infinitesimally thin shear layer shed from a semi-infinite plate which is exposed to sound excitation. The acoustical shear layer excitation by a source further away from the plate edge in the downstream direction is very weak while upstream from the plate edge the excitation is relatively efficient. A special solution is given for the source at the plate edge. The theory is then extended to two streams on both sides of the shear layer having different velocities and densities. Furthermore, the excitation of a shear layer in a channel is calculated. A reference quantity is found for the magnitude of the excited instability waves. For a comparison with measurements, numerical computations of the velocity field outside the shear layer were carried out.

  1. [Biophysics of nerve excitation].

    PubMed

    Kol'e, O R; Maksimov, G V

    2010-01-01

    The studies testifying to the presence of the interrelation between the physiological functions of the organism and physical and chemical processes in nerves are discussed. Changes in some physical and chemical parameters observed both upon elicited rhythmic exaltation of nerves and during the spontaneous rhythmic activity of neurons are analyzed. Upon rhythmic exaltation, a complex of physical and chemical processes is triggered, and reversible structural and metabolic rearrangements at the subcellular and molecular levels occur that do not take place during the generation of a single action potential. Thus, only in conditions of rhythmic exaltation of a nerve, it is possible to reveal those processes that provide exaltation of nerves in the organism. The future possibilities of the investigations combining the biophysical and physiological approaches are substantiated. Characteristic changes in physicochemical parameters are observed in nerves during the generation of a series of action potentials of different frequency and duration ("frequency dependence") under normal physiological conditions, as well as in extreme situations and in nerve pathology. The structural and metabolic rearrangements are directly related to the mode of rhythmic exaltation and proceed both in the course of rhythmic exaltation and after its termination. Participation and the basic components of the nervous fulcrum (an axon, Shwan cell, myelin, subcellular organelles) in the realization of rhythmic exaltation is shown. In the coordination of all processes involved in rhythmic exaltation, the main role is played by the systems of redistribution and transport of intercellular and endocellular calcium. The idea is put forward that myelin of nerve fibers is not only an isolator, but also an "intercellular depot" of calcium and participates in the redistribution of different ions. Thus, the rhythmic excitation is of great importance in the realization of some physiological functions, the

  2. Electronic state-lifetime interference in resonant Auger spectra: a tool to disentangle overlapping core-excited states.

    PubMed

    Goldsztejn, Gildas; Marchenko, Tatiana; Céolin, Denis; Journel, Loïc; Guillemin, Renaud; Rueff, Jean-Pascal; Kushawaha, Rajesh K; Püttner, Ralph; Piancastelli, Maria Novella; Simon, Marc

    2016-06-01

    We have measured resonant-Auger decay following Cl 1s(-1) excitations in HCl and CH3Cl molecules, and extracted the pseudo-cross sections of different Cl 2p(-2) final states. These cross sections show clear evidence of shake processes as well as contributions of electronic state-lifetime interference (ELI). To describe the spectra we developed a fit approach that takes into account ELI contributions and ultrafast nuclear dynamics in dissociative core-excited states. Using this approach we utilized the ELI contributions to obtain the intensity ratios of the overlapping states Cl 1s(-1)4pπ/1s(-1)4pσ in HCl and Cl 1s(-1)4pe/1s(-1)4pa1 in CH3Cl. The experimental value for HCl is compared with theoretical results showing satisfactory agreement. PMID:27199185

  3. First excited states in doubly-odd {sup 110}Sb: Smooth band termination in the A {approx} 110 region

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, G.J.; Fossan, D.B.; Thorslund, I.

    1996-11-01

    Excited states have been identified for the first time in {sup 110}Sb in a comprehensive series of {gamma}-spectroscopy experiments, including recoil-mass and neutron-field measurements. Three high-spin decoupled bands with configurations based on 2p-2h excitations across the Z = 50 shell gap, are observed to show the features of smooth band termination, the first such observation in an odd-odd nucleus. The yrast intruder band has been connected to the low spin levels and is tentatively identified up to its predicred termination at I{sup {pi}} = (45{sup +}). Detailed configuration assignments are made through comparison with configuration-dependent cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky calculations; excellent agreement with experiment is obtained. The systematic occurrence of smoothly terminating bands in the neighboring isotopes is discussed.

  4. Multiphonon excitations in 62Zn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, M.; Mücher, D.; Bernards, C.; Blazhev, A.; Fransen, C.; Heinze, S.; Jolie, J.; Lisetskiy, A.; Petkov, P.; Radeck, D.; Zell, K. O.

    2010-12-01

    We studied excited states in 62Zn up to an excitation energy of 5.5 MeV via the 61Ni( 3He, 2n γ) reaction at the Cologne Tandem accelerator with the high-efficiency HORUS cube spectrometer. We identified several multi-phonon excitations, especially two fragments of the one-phonon mixed-symmetry state 21,MS+ based on effective M1 and E2 transition strengths. The quantities were obtained from γγ angular correlation and Doppler-shift measurements. Shell-model calculations performed for 62Zn give clear support for the fragmentation of the one-phonon mixed-symmetry 21,MS+ state. The assumption of 62Zn being a vibrator-like nucleus is supported by calculations of excitation energies and E2 and M1 transition strengths within the U(5) limit of the neutron-proton Interacting Boson Model.

  5. [Ambient modulation of neuronal excitability].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Zhang

    2016-08-25

    Although the modulation of synaptic activity plays an important role in the modulation of neuronal excitability, the significance of the ambient modulation (AM) of neuronal excitability should be emphasized. The AM refers to the alterations of membrane potential of neuron resulted from distinct neural activities, such as the tonic inhibition and excitation through activation of extra-synaptic receptors, the paracrine actions of nearby neural and non-neural cells, endocrinal actions of blood borne hormones and other active chemical substances. The AM of neuronal excitability may have important bearings on distinct brain functions, such as the regulation and switching of cortical states, the appearance of chaotic and vague feelings, which are usually the characteristic features in many mental and neural disorders. PMID:27546499

  6. Exciting Polaritons with Quantum Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Carreño, J. C.; Sánchez Muñoz, C.; Sanvitto, D.; del Valle, E.; Laussy, F. P.

    2015-11-01

    We discuss the excitation of polaritons—strongly coupled states of light and matter—by quantum light, instead of the usual laser or thermal excitation. As one illustration of the new horizons thus opened, we introduce "Mollow spectroscopy"—a theoretical concept for a spectroscopic technique that consists of scanning the output of resonance fluorescence onto an optical target—from which weak nonlinearities can be read with high precision even in strongly dissipative environments.

  7. Collisional excitation of interstellar formaldehyde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, S.; Garrison, B. J.; Lester, W. A., Jr.; Miller, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    Previous calculations for rates of excitation of ortho-H2CO by collisions with He have been extended to higher rotational levels and kinetic temperatures to 80 K. Rates for para-H2CO have also been computed. Pressure-broadening widths for several spectral lines have been obtained from these calculations and are found to agree with recent data within the experimental uncertainty of 10%. Excitation of formaldehyde by collisions with H2 molecules is also discussed.

  8. Redox Control of Cardiac Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Nitin T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been associated with various human diseases, and considerable attention has been paid to investigate their physiological effects. Various ROS are synthesized in the mitochondria and accumulate in the cytoplasm if the cellular antioxidant defense mechanism fails. The critical balance of this ROS synthesis and antioxidant defense systems is termed the redox system of the cell. Various cardiovascular diseases have also been affected by redox to different degrees. ROS have been indicated as both detrimental and protective, via different cellular pathways, for cardiac myocyte functions, electrophysiology, and pharmacology. Mostly, the ROS functions depend on the type and amount of ROS synthesized. While the literature clearly indicates ROS effects on cardiac contractility, their effects on cardiac excitability are relatively under appreciated. Cardiac excitability depends on the functions of various cardiac sarcolemal or mitochondrial ion channels carrying various depolarizing or repolarizing currents that also maintain cellular ionic homeostasis. ROS alter the functions of these ion channels to various degrees to determine excitability by affecting the cellular resting potential and the morphology of the cardiac action potential. Thus, redox balance regulates cardiac excitability, and under pathological regulation, may alter action potential propagation to cause arrhythmia. Understanding how redox affects cellular excitability may lead to potential prophylaxis or treatment for various arrhythmias. This review will focus on the studies of redox and cardiac excitation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 432–468. PMID:22897788

  9. Cross sections and rate coefficients for excitation of Δn = 1 transitions in Li-like ions with 6 < Z < 42.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronova, U. I.; Safronova, M. S.; Kato, T.

    Excitation cross sections and rate coefficients by electron impact were calculated for the 1s22s - 1s2s2p, 1s22s - 1s2s2 and 1s22s - 1s2p2 transitions of the Li-like ions (C IV, N V, O VI, Ne VIII, Mg X, Al XI, Si XII, S XIV, Ar XVI, Ca XVIII, Ti XX, Fe XXIV, Ni XXVI, Zn XXVIII, Ge XXX, Se XXXII, Kr XXXIIV and Mo XXXX) by a Coulomb-Born approximation with exchange and including relativistic effects and configuration interactions. Level energies, mixing coefficients and transition wavelengths and probabilities were also computed.

  10. Indirect excitation of ultrafast demagnetization

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vodungbo, Boris; Tudu, Bahrati; Perron, Jonathan; Delaunay, Renaud; Müller, Leonard; Berntsen, Magnus H.; Grübel, Gerhard; Malinowski, Grégory; Weier, Christian; Gautier, Julien; et al

    2016-01-06

    Does the excitation of ultrafast magnetization require direct interaction between the photons of the optical pump pulse and the magnetic layer? Here, we demonstrate unambiguously that this is not the case. For this we have studied the magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic cobalt/palladium multilayer capped by an IR-opaque aluminum layer. Upon excitation with an intense femtosecond-short IR laser pulse, the film exhibits the classical ultrafast demagnetization phenomenon although only a negligible number of IR photons penetrate the aluminum layer. In comparison with an uncapped cobalt/palladium reference film, the initial demagnetization of the capped film occurs with a delayed onset andmore » at a slower rate. Both observations are qualitatively in line with energy transport from the aluminum layer into the underlying magnetic film by the excited, hot electrons of the aluminum film. As a result, our data thus confirm recent theoretical predictions.« less

  11. Indirect excitation of ultrafast demagnetization

    PubMed Central

    Vodungbo, Boris; Tudu, Bahrati; Perron, Jonathan; Delaunay, Renaud; Müller, Leonard; Berntsen, Magnus H.; Grübel, Gerhard; Malinowski, Grégory; Weier, Christian; Gautier, Julien; Lambert, Guillaume; Zeitoun, Philippe; Gutt, Christian; Jal, Emmanuelle; Reid, Alexander H.; Granitzka, Patrick W.; Jaouen, Nicolas; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Moeller, Stefan; Minitti, Michael P.; Mitra, Ankush; Carron, Sebastian; Pfau, Bastian; von Korff Schmising, Clemens; Schneider, Michael; Eisebitt, Stefan; Lüning, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Does the excitation of ultrafast magnetization require direct interaction between the photons of the optical pump pulse and the magnetic layer? Here, we demonstrate unambiguously that this is not the case. For this we have studied the magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic cobalt/palladium multilayer capped by an IR-opaque aluminum layer. Upon excitation with an intense femtosecond-short IR laser pulse, the film exhibits the classical ultrafast demagnetization phenomenon although only a negligible number of IR photons penetrate the aluminum layer. In comparison with an uncapped cobalt/palladium reference film, the initial demagnetization of the capped film occurs with a delayed onset and at a slower rate. Both observations are qualitatively in line with energy transport from the aluminum layer into the underlying magnetic film by the excited, hot electrons of the aluminum film. Our data thus confirm recent theoretical predictions. PMID:26733106

  12. Indirect excitation of ultrafast demagnetization.

    PubMed

    Vodungbo, Boris; Tudu, Bharati; Tudu, Bahrati; Perron, Jonathan; Delaunay, Renaud; Müller, Leonard; Berntsen, Magnus H; Grübel, Gerhard; Malinowski, Grégory; Weier, Christian; Gautier, Julien; Lambert, Guillaume; Zeitoun, Philippe; Gutt, Christian; Jal, Emmanuelle; Reid, Alexander H; Granitzka, Patrick W; Jaouen, Nicolas; Dakovski, Georgi L; Moeller, Stefan; Minitti, Michael P; Mitra, Ankush; Carron, Sebastian; Pfau, Bastian; von Korff Schmising, Clemens; Schneider, Michael; Eisebitt, Stefan; Lüning, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Does the excitation of ultrafast magnetization require direct interaction between the photons of the optical pump pulse and the magnetic layer? Here, we demonstrate unambiguously that this is not the case. For this we have studied the magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic cobalt/palladium multilayer capped by an IR-opaque aluminum layer. Upon excitation with an intense femtosecond-short IR laser pulse, the film exhibits the classical ultrafast demagnetization phenomenon although only a negligible number of IR photons penetrate the aluminum layer. In comparison with an uncapped cobalt/palladium reference film, the initial demagnetization of the capped film occurs with a delayed onset and at a slower rate. Both observations are qualitatively in line with energy transport from the aluminum layer into the underlying magnetic film by the excited, hot electrons of the aluminum film. Our data thus confirm recent theoretical predictions. PMID:26733106

  13. Excitation optimization for damage detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bement, Matthew T; Bewley, Thomas R

    2009-01-01

    A technique is developed to answer the important question: 'Given limited system response measurements and ever-present physical limits on the level of excitation, what excitation should be provided to a system to make damage most detectable?' Specifically, a method is presented for optimizing excitations that maximize the sensitivity of output measurements to perturbations in damage-related parameters estimated with an extended Kalman filter. This optimization is carried out in a computationally efficient manner using adjoint-based optimization and causes the innovations term in the extended Kalman filter to be larger in the presence of estimation errors, which leads to a better estimate of the damage-related parameters in question. The technique is demonstrated numerically on a nonlinear 2 DOF system, where a significant improvement in the damage-related parameter estimation is observed.

  14. Calculation of molecular excitation rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, George

    1993-01-01

    State-to-state collisional excitation rates for interstellar molecules observed by radio astronomers continue to be required to interpret observed line intensities in terms of local temperatures and densities. A problem of particular interest is collisional excitation of water which is important for modeling the observed interstellar masers. In earlier work supported by a different NASA Grant, excitation of water in collisions with He atoms was studied; after many years of successively more refined calculations that problem now seems to be well understood, and discrepancies with earlier experimental data for related (pressure broadening) phenomena are believed to reflect experimental errors. Because of interstellar abundances, excitation by H2, the dominant interstellar species, is much more important than excitation by He, although it has been argued that rates for excitation by these are similar. Under the current grant theoretical study of this problem has begun which is greatly complicated by the additional degrees of freedom which must be included both in determining the interaction potential and also in the molecular scattering calculation. We have now computed the interaction forces for nearly a thousand molecular geometries and are close to having an acceptable global fit to these points which is necessary for the molecular dynamics calculations. Also, extensive modifications have been made to the molecular scattering code, MOLSCAT. These included coding the rotational basis sets and coupling matrix elements required for collisions of an asymmetric top with a linear rotor. A new method for numerical solution of the coupled equations has been incorporated. Because of the long-ranged nature of the water-hydrogen interaction it is necessary to integrate the equations to rather large intermolecular separations, and the integration methods previously available in MOLSCAT are not ideal for such cases. However, the method used by Alexander in his HIBRIDON code is

  15. Autoresonant Excitation of Antiproton Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Hayden, M. E.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; So, C.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Humphries, A. J.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Carpenter, P. T.; Hurt, J. L.; Robicheaux, F.; Cesar, C. L.

    2011-01-14

    We demonstrate controllable excitation of the center-of-mass longitudinal motion of a thermal antiproton plasma using a swept-frequency autoresonant drive. When the plasma is cold, dense, and highly collective in nature, we observe that the entire system behaves as a single-particle nonlinear oscillator, as predicted by a recent theory. In contrast, only a fraction of the antiprotons in a warm plasma can be similarly excited. Antihydrogen was produced and trapped by using this technique to drive antiprotons into a positron plasma, thereby initiating atomic recombination.

  16. Autoresonant excitation of antiproton plasmas.

    PubMed

    Andresen, G B; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Carpenter, P T; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hurt, J L; Hydomako, R; Jonsell, S; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2011-01-14

    We demonstrate controllable excitation of the center-of-mass longitudinal motion of a thermal antiproton plasma using a swept-frequency autoresonant drive. When the plasma is cold, dense, and highly collective in nature, we observe that the entire system behaves as a single-particle nonlinear oscillator, as predicted by a recent theory. In contrast, only a fraction of the antiprotons in a warm plasma can be similarly excited. Antihydrogen was produced and trapped by using this technique to drive antiprotons into a positron plasma, thereby initiating atomic recombination. PMID:21405235

  17. 46 CFR 111.12-3 - Excitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1), except that those for mobile offshore drilling units must meet... 46 CFR 110.10-1). In particular, no static exciter may be used for excitation of an emergency... REQUIREMENTS Generator Construction and Circuits § 111.12-3 Excitation. In general, excitation must...

  18. 46 CFR 111.12-3 - Excitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1), except that those for mobile offshore drilling units must meet... 46 CFR 110.10-1). In particular, no static exciter may be used for excitation of an emergency... REQUIREMENTS Generator Construction and Circuits § 111.12-3 Excitation. In general, excitation must...

  19. 46 CFR 111.12-3 - Excitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1), except that those for mobile offshore drilling units must meet... 46 CFR 110.10-1). In particular, no static exciter may be used for excitation of an emergency... REQUIREMENTS Generator Construction and Circuits § 111.12-3 Excitation. In general, excitation must...

  20. 46 CFR 111.12-3 - Excitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1), except that those for mobile offshore drilling units must meet... 46 CFR 110.10-1). In particular, no static exciter may be used for excitation of an emergency... REQUIREMENTS Generator Construction and Circuits § 111.12-3 Excitation. In general, excitation must...

  1. 46 CFR 111.12-3 - Excitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1), except that those for mobile offshore drilling units must meet... 46 CFR 110.10-1). In particular, no static exciter may be used for excitation of an emergency... REQUIREMENTS Generator Construction and Circuits § 111.12-3 Excitation. In general, excitation must...

  2. Transfer Excitation Processes Observed in N3+-He and O3+-He Collisions at Elab = 33 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Yoh

    2016-09-01

    We measured the relative state-selective differential cross sections (DCSs) for one-electron capture reactions using a crossed-beam apparatus. The scattering angle θlab studied in the laboratory frame ranged from -3.0 to 22° and the laboratory collision energy Elab was 33 eV. Only the transfer excitation processes, i.e., the electron capture reactions with the simultaneous excitation of the projectile, were observed. The DCSs were determined for the following reactions: N3+ (1s2 2s2 1S) + He (1s2 1S) → N2+ (1s2 2s2p2 2D) + He+ (1s 2S) + 10.3 eV, O3+ (1s2 2s2 2p 2P) + He (1s2 1S) → O2+ (1s2 2s 2p3 3P) + He+ (1s 2S) + 12.7 eV, and O3+ (1s2 2s2 2p 2P) + He (1s2 1S) → O2+ (1s2 2s 2p3 3D) + He+ (1s 2S) + 15.5 eV. In the N3+-He system, the DCSs for the reaction are zero at the center-of-mass angle θcm = 0 and show a peak at a certain angle and a shoulder at a larger angle. In the O3+-He system, the DCSs are again zero at θcm = 0. The capture process to the O2+ (1s2 2s 2p3 3P) state is mainly observed at smaller scattering angles, and the reaction to the O2+ (1s2 2s 2p3 3D) state becomes dominant with increasing scattering angle. A classical trajectory analysis within the two-state approximation based on the ab initio potentials for (NHe)3+ revealed that the transfer excitation of a two-electron process takes place through a single crossing of the relevant potentials.

  3. Communicating the Excitement of Science

    ScienceCinema

    Michael Turner

    2010-01-08

    In this talk (which will include some exciting science) I will discuss some lessons I have learned about communicating science to scientists (in my own field and others), students, the public, the press, and policy makers in giving 500+ colloquia and seminars, 300+ public lectures and many informal presentations (including cocktail parties).

  4. Elementary Excitations in Quantum Liquids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pines, David

    1981-01-01

    Discusses elementary excitations and their role in condensed matter physics, focusing on quantum plasma, helium liquids, and superconductors. Considers research primarily conducted in the 1950s and concludes with a brief survey of some closely related further developments. (Author/JN)

  5. Pseudorandom selective excitation in NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, Jamie D.; Coomes, Alexandra

    2011-09-01

    In this work, average Hamiltonian theory is used to study selective excitation under a series of small flip-angle θ-pulses θ ≪ {π}/{3} applied either periodically [corresponding to the DANTE pulse sequence] or aperiodically to a spin-1/2 system. First, an average Hamiltonian description of the DANTE pulse sequence is developed that is valid for frequencies either at or very far from integer multiples of {1}/{τ}, where τ is the interpulse delay. For aperiodic excitation, a single resonance, νsel, can be selectively excited if the θ-pulse phases are modulated in concert with the interpulse delays. The conditions where average Hamiltonian theory can be accurately applied to describe the dynamics under aperiodic selective pulses, which are referred to as pseudorandom-DANTE or p-DANTE sequences, are similar to those found for the DANTE sequence. Signal averaging over different p-DANTE sequences improves the apparent selectivity at νsel by reducing the excitations at other frequencies. Experimental demonstrations of p-DANTE sequences and comparisons with the theory are presented.

  6. Perceptual Load Alters Visual Excitability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmel, David; Thorne, Jeremy D.; Rees, Geraint; Lavie, Nilli

    2011-01-01

    Increasing perceptual load reduces the processing of visual stimuli outside the focus of attention, but the mechanism underlying these effects remains unclear. Here we tested an account attributing the effects of perceptual load to modulations of visual cortex excitability. In contrast to stimulus competition accounts, which propose that load…

  7. Launch Excitement with Water Rockets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Juan Carlos; Penick, John

    2007-01-01

    Explosions and fires--these are what many students are waiting for in science classes. And when they do occur, students pay attention. While we can't entertain our students with continual mayhem, we can catch their attention and cater to their desires for excitement by saying, "Let's make rockets." In this activity, students make simple, reusable…

  8. Band Excitation Kelvin probe force microscopy utilizing photothermal excitation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Wisinger, Nina Balke; Rodriguez, Brian; Kalinin, Sergei; Li, Qian

    2015-01-01

    A multifrequency open loop Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) approach utilizing photothermal as opposed to electrical excitation is developed. Photothermal band excitation (PthBE)-KPFM is implemented here in a grid mode on a model test sample comprising a metal-insulator junction with local charge-patterned regions. Unlike the previously described open loop BE-KPFM, which relies on capacitive actuation of the cantilever, photothermal actuation is shown to be highly sensitive to the electrostatic force gradient even at biases close to the contact potential difference (CPD). PthBE-KPFM is further shown to provide a more localized measurement of true CPD in comparison to the gold standardmore » ambient KPFM approach, amplitude modulated KPFM. Finally, PthBE-KPFM data contain information relating to local dielectric properties and electronic dissipation between tip and sample unattainable using conventional single frequency KPFM approaches.« less

  9. Band excitation Kelvin probe force microscopy utilizing photothermal excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Balke, Nina; Rodriguez, Brian J.; Kalinin, Sergei; Li, Qian

    2015-03-01

    A multifrequency open loop Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) approach utilizing photothermal as opposed to electrical excitation is developed. Photothermal band excitation (PthBE)-KPFM is implemented here in a grid mode on a model test sample comprising a metal-insulator junction with local charge-patterned regions. Unlike the previously described open loop BE-KPFM, which relies on capacitive actuation of the cantilever, photothermal actuation is shown to be highly sensitive to the electrostatic force gradient even at biases close to the contact potential difference (CPD). PthBE-KPFM is further shown to provide a more localized measurement of true CPD in comparison to the gold standard ambient KPFM approach, amplitude modulated KPFM. Finally, PthBE-KPFM data contain information relating to local dielectric properties and electronic dissipation between tip and sample unattainable using conventional single frequency KPFM approaches.

  10. Band excitation Kelvin probe force microscopy utilizing photothermal excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Liam E-mail: liq1@ORNL.gov; Rodriguez, Brian J.; Jesse, Stephen; Balke, Nina; Kalinin, Sergei; Li, Qian E-mail: liq1@ORNL.gov

    2015-03-09

    A multifrequency open loop Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) approach utilizing photothermal as opposed to electrical excitation is developed. Photothermal band excitation (PthBE)-KPFM is implemented here in a grid mode on a model test sample comprising a metal-insulator junction with local charge-patterned regions. Unlike the previously described open loop BE-KPFM, which relies on capacitive actuation of the cantilever, photothermal actuation is shown to be highly sensitive to the electrostatic force gradient even at biases close to the contact potential difference (CPD). PthBE-KPFM is further shown to provide a more localized measurement of true CPD in comparison to the gold standard ambient KPFM approach, amplitude modulated KPFM. Finally, PthBE-KPFM data contain information relating to local dielectric properties and electronic dissipation between tip and sample unattainable using conventional single frequency KPFM approaches.

  11. Mixing of Triaxial and Intruder Configurations in 72,76Ge Studied via Multistep Coulomb Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayangeakaa, A. D.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Anl Collaboration; Llnl Collaboration; Lbnl Collaboration; U. Of Maryland Collaboration; Csnsm Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The low-lying states in even-even Ge isotopes have been a subject of intense scrutiny for many years due to the inherent challenge of interpreting their low-energy structure. While several explanations such as vibrational-rotational coupling, 2p-2h intruder mixing and shape coexistence have been proposed, none have been able to satisfactorily reproduce the properties of these low-lying excitations. Recent theoretical calculations have, however, emphasized the importance of the triaxial degree of freedom and, indeed, 76Ge is proposed to exhibit static triaxiality. In this study, the electromagnetic properties of low-lying states in 72,76Ge were investigated via sub-barrier multiple Coulomb excitation with GRETINA and CHICO-2. In the case of 72Ge, the extracted matrix elements seem to agree with the shape coexistence interpretation between the 01+ and 02+ states. However, significant mixing between the wavefunctions of these two states and triaxiality are required to reproduce the overall data. These results and calculations based on a triaxial rotor model with configuration mixing will be presented, and the role of triaxiality will be discussed. Preliminary results for 76Ge will also be highlighted. This work is supported by the DOE, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics under Contract Number DE-AC02-06CH11357, and Grant No. DE-FG02-94ER40834 and DE-FG02-08ER41556.

  12. Variable frequency microwave excited plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gathi, Z.; Wei, J.; Garard, S.; Lauf, R.J.; Clausing, R.; McMillan, A.

    1995-12-31

    This paper reports on the use of an agile frequency source in generating plasma. A Traveling Wave Tube (TWT) provides approximately one octave bandwidth and variable power level up to 2 KW. By controlling the frequency, efficient coupling to the load (materials and/or plasma) can be maintained even as the load is changing in properties or position. Furthermore, the variable frequency power source allows the localization of the plasma discharge in precise areas of interest to specific processes. The excitation frequencies can be continuously swept to scan the plasma across an arbitrary-shaped target surface. Plasma generation and position control is reviewed and experimental results on variable frequency microwave excited plasma are presented.

  13. Multiphoton-Excited Serotonin Photochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Gostkowski, Michael L.; Allen, Richard; Plenert, Matthew L.; Okerberg, Eric; Gordon, Mary Jane; Shear, Jason B.

    2004-01-01

    We report photochemical and photophysical studies of a multiphoton-excited reaction of serotonin that previously has been shown to generate a photoproduct capable of emitting broadly in the visible spectral region. The current studies demonstrate that absorption of near-infrared light by an intermediate state prepared via three-photon absorption enhances the photoproduct formation yield, with the largest action cross sections (∼10−19 cm2) observed at the short-wavelength limit of the titanium:sapphire excitation source. The intermediate state is shown to persist for at least tens of nanoseconds and likely to be different from a previously reported oxygen-sensitive intermediate. In addition, the two-photon fluorescence action spectrum for the fluorescent photoproduct was determined and found to have a maximum at ∼780 nm (3.2 eV). A general mechanism for this photochemical process is proposed. PMID:15111435

  14. Receiver-exciter controller design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansma, P. A.

    1982-06-01

    A description of the general design of both the block 3 and block 4 receiver-exciter controllers for the Deep Space Network (DSN) Mark IV-A System is presented along with the design approach. The controllers are designed to enable the receiver-exciter subsystem (RCV) to be configured, calibrated, initialized and operated from a central location via high level instructions. The RECs are designed to be operated under the control of the DMC subsystem. The instructions are in the form of standard subsystem blocks (SSBs) received via the local area network (LAN). The centralized control provided by RECs and other DSCC controllers in Mark IV-A is intended to reduce DSN operations costs from the Mark III era.

  15. Receiver-exciter controller design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansma, P. A.

    1982-01-01

    A description of the general design of both the block 3 and block 4 receiver-exciter controllers for the Deep Space Network (DSN) Mark IV-A System is presented along with the design approach. The controllers are designed to enable the receiver-exciter subsystem (RCV) to be configured, calibrated, initialized and operated from a central location via high level instructions. The RECs are designed to be operated under the control of the DMC subsystem. The instructions are in the form of standard subsystem blocks (SSBs) received via the local area network (LAN). The centralized control provided by RECs and other DSCC controllers in Mark IV-A is intended to reduce DSN operations costs from the Mark III era.

  16. Spatiotemporal control of nanooptical excitations

    PubMed Central

    Aeschlimann, Martin; Bauer, Michael; Bayer, Daniela; Brixner, Tobias; Cunovic, Stefan; Dimler, Frank; Fischer, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Walter; Rohmer, Martin; Schneider, Christian; Steeb, Felix; Strüber, Christian; Voronine, Dmitri V.

    2010-01-01

    The most general investigation and exploitation of light-induced processes require simultaneous control over spatial and temporal properties of the electromagnetic field on a femtosecond time and nanometer length scale. Based on the combination of polarization pulse shaping and time-resolved two-photon photoemission electron microscopy, we demonstrate such control over nanoscale spatial and ultrafast temporal degrees of freedom of an electromagnetic excitation in the vicinity of a nanostructure. The time-resolved cross-correlation measurement of the local photoemission yield reveals the switching of the nanolocalized optical near-field distribution with a lateral resolution well below the diffraction limit and a temporal resolution on the femtosecond time scale. In addition, successful adaptive spatiotemporal control demonstrates the flexibility of the method. This flexible simultaneous control of temporal and spatial properties of nanophotonic excitations opens new possibilities to tailor and optimize the light–matter interaction in spectroscopic methods as well as in nanophotonic applications. PMID:20212153

  17. Collisional excitation of interstellar cyclopropenylidene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Sheldon; Defrees, D. J.; Mclean, A. D.

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical rotational excitation rates were computed for C3H2 in collisions with He atoms at temperatures from 30 to 120 K. The intermolecular forces were obtained from accurate self-consistent field and perturbation theory calculations, and collision dynamics were treated within the infinite-order sudden approximation. The accuracy of the latter was examined by comparing with the more exact coupled states approximation.

  18. Excitation of heliumlike B IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolk, K.-H.; Koenig, R.; Kunze, H.-J.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements are reported for line-intensity ratios emitted from heliumlike B IV ions in a plasma with electron density, N(e) = 1.5 x 10 to the 16th/cu cm and electron temperature, kT(e) = 175 eV. The plasma was produced in a theta-pinch discharge. The analysis supports theoretical excitation rates calculated in the distorted-wave approximation, which include the effect of resonances.

  19. Channelopathies of skeletal muscle excitability

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    Familial disorders of skeletal muscle excitability were initially described early in the last century and are now known to be caused by mutations of voltage-gated ion channels. The clinical manifestations are often striking, with an inability to relax after voluntary contraction (myotonia) or transient attacks of severe weakness (periodic paralysis). An essential feature of these disorders is fluctuation of symptoms that are strongly impacted by environmental triggers such as exercise, temperature, or serum K+ levels. These phenomena have intrigued physiologists for decades, and in the past 25 years the molecular lesions underlying these disorders have been identified and mechanistic studies are providing insights for therapeutic strategies of disease modification. These familial disorders of muscle fiber excitability are “channelopathies” caused by mutations of a chloride channel (ClC-1), sodium channel (NaV1.4), calcium channel (CaV1.1) and several potassium channels (Kir2.1, Kir2.6, Kir3.4). This review provides a synthesis of the mechanistic connections between functional defects of mutant ion channels, their impact on muscle excitability, how these changes cause clinical phenotypes, and approaches toward therapeutics. PMID:25880512

  20. Entanglement entropy of electronic excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plasser, Felix

    2016-05-01

    A new perspective into correlation effects in electronically excited states is provided through quantum information theory. The entanglement between the electron and hole quasiparticles is examined, and it is shown that the related entanglement entropy can be computed from the eigenvalue spectrum of the well-known natural transition orbital (NTO) decomposition. Non-vanishing entanglement is obtained whenever more than one NTO pair is involved, i.e., in the case of a multiconfigurational or collective excitation. An important implication is that in the case of entanglement it is not possible to gain a complete description of the state character from the orbitals alone, but more specific analysis methods are required to decode the mutual information between the electron and hole. Moreover, the newly introduced number of entangled states is an important property by itself giving information about excitonic structure. The utility of the formalism is illustrated in the cases of the excited states of two interacting ethylene molecules, the conjugated polymer para-phenylene vinylene, and the naphthalene molecule.

  1. Synaptic Control of Motoneuronal Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Rekling, Jens C.; Funk, Gregory D.; Bayliss, Douglas A.; Dong, Xiao-Wei; Feldman, Jack L.

    2016-01-01

    Movement, the fundamental component of behavior and the principal extrinsic action of the brain, is produced when skeletal muscles contract and relax in response to patterns of action potentials generated by motoneurons. The processes that determine the firing behavior of motoneurons are therefore important in understanding the transformation of neural activity to motor behavior. Here, we review recent studies on the control of motoneuronal excitability, focusing on synaptic and cellular properties. We first present a background description of motoneurons: their development, anatomical organization, and membrane properties, both passive and active. We then describe the general anatomical organization of synaptic input to motoneurons, followed by a description of the major transmitter systems that affect motoneuronal excitability, including ligands, receptor distribution, pre- and postsynaptic actions, signal transduction, and functional role. Glutamate is the main excitatory, and GABA and glycine are the main inhibitory transmitters acting through ionotropic receptors. These amino acids signal the principal motor commands from peripheral, spinal, and supraspinal structures. Amines, such as serotonin and norepinephrine, and neuropeptides, as well as the glutamate and GABA acting at metabotropic receptors, modulate motoneuronal excitability through pre- and postsynaptic actions. Acting principally via second messenger systems, their actions converge on common effectors, e.g., leak K+ current, cationic inward current, hyperpolarization-activated inward current, Ca2+ channels, or presynaptic release processes. Together, these numerous inputs mediate and modify incoming motor commands, ultimately generating the coordinated firing patterns that underlie muscle contractions during motor behavior. PMID:10747207

  2. Entanglement entropy of electronic excitations.

    PubMed

    Plasser, Felix

    2016-05-21

    A new perspective into correlation effects in electronically excited states is provided through quantum information theory. The entanglement between the electron and hole quasiparticles is examined, and it is shown that the related entanglement entropy can be computed from the eigenvalue spectrum of the well-known natural transition orbital (NTO) decomposition. Non-vanishing entanglement is obtained whenever more than one NTO pair is involved, i.e., in the case of a multiconfigurational or collective excitation. An important implication is that in the case of entanglement it is not possible to gain a complete description of the state character from the orbitals alone, but more specific analysis methods are required to decode the mutual information between the electron and hole. Moreover, the newly introduced number of entangled states is an important property by itself giving information about excitonic structure. The utility of the formalism is illustrated in the cases of the excited states of two interacting ethylene molecules, the conjugated polymer para-phenylene vinylene, and the naphthalene molecule. PMID:27208936

  3. Convective Excitation of Internal Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecoanet, Daniel; Le Bars, Michael; Burns, Keaton; Vasil, Geoffrey; Quataert, Eliot; Brown, Benjamin; Oishi, Jeffrey

    2015-11-01

    We will present a joint experimental & computational study of internal wave generation by convection. First we describe an experiment using the peculiar property of water that its density maximum is at 4° C . A tank of water cooled from below and heated from above develops a cold, convective layer near 4° C at the bottom of the tank, adjacent to a hot stably stratified layer at the top of the tank. We simulate this setup in 2D using the open-source Dedalus code (dedalus-project.org). Our simulations show that waves are excited from within the convection zone, opposed to at the interface between the convective and stably stratified regions. Finally, we will present 3D simulations of internal wave excitation by convection in a fully compressible atmosphere with multiple density scaleheights. These simulations provide greater freedom in choosing the thermal equilibrium of the system, and are run at higher Rayleigh number. The simulated waves are then compared to analytic predictions of the bulk excitation model.

  4. Wedding ring shaped excitation coil

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Tsai, Peter

    2001-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and/or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency.

  5. Resource Paper: Molecular Excited State Relaxation Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, William

    1979-01-01

    Develops the concept of oscillatory v dissipative limits as it applies to electronic excited state processes in molecular systems. Main emphasis is placed on the radiative and nonradiative dynamics of the excited state of a molecule prepared by interaction with light or some other excitation source. (BT)

  6. Speech synthesis by glottal excited linear prediction.

    PubMed

    Childers, D G; Hu, H T

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes a linear predictive (LP) speech synthesis procedure that resynthesizes speech using a 6th-order polynomial waveform to model the glottal excitation. The coefficients of the polynomial model form a vector that represents the glottal excitation waveform for one pitch period. A glottal excitation code book with 32 entries for voiced excitation is designed and trained using two sentences spoken by different speakers. The purpose for using this approach is to demonstrate that quantization of the glottal excitation waveform does not significantly degrade the quality of speech synthesized with a glottal excitation linear predictive (GELP) synthesizer. This implementation of the LP synthesizer is patterned after both a pitch-excited LP speech synthesizer and a code excited linear predictive (CELP) speech coder. In addition to the glottal excitation codebook, we use a stochastic codebook with 256 entries for unvoiced noise excitation. Analysis techniques are described for constructing both codebooks. The GELP synthesizer, which resynthesizes speech with high quality, provides the speech scientist a simple speech synthesis procedure that uses established analysis techniques, that is able to reproduce all speed sounds, and yet also has an excitation model waveform that is related to the derivative of the glottal flow and the integral of the residue. It is conjectured that the glottal excitation codebook approach could provide a mechanism for quantitatively comparing the differences in glottal excitation codebooks for male and female speakers and for speakers with vocal disorders and for speakers with different voice types such as breathy and vocal fry voices. Conceivably, one could also convert the voice of a speaker with one voice type, e.g., breathy, to the voice of a speaker with another voice type, e.g., vocal fry, by synthesizing speech using the vocal tract LP parameters for the speaker with the breathy voice excited by the glottal excitation

  7. Volumetric Light-Field Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Schedl, David C.; Bimber, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    We explain how to concentrate light simultaneously at multiple selected volumetric positions by means of a 4D illumination light field. First, to select target objects, a 4D imaging light field is captured. A light field mask is then computed automatically for this selection to avoid illumination of the remaining areas. With one-photon illumination, simultaneous generation of complex volumetric light patterns becomes possible. As a full light-field can be captured and projected simultaneously at the desired exposure and excitation times, short readout and lighting durations are supported. PMID:27363565

  8. Volumetric Light-Field Excitation.

    PubMed

    Schedl, David C; Bimber, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    We explain how to concentrate light simultaneously at multiple selected volumetric positions by means of a 4D illumination light field. First, to select target objects, a 4D imaging light field is captured. A light field mask is then computed automatically for this selection to avoid illumination of the remaining areas. With one-photon illumination, simultaneous generation of complex volumetric light patterns becomes possible. As a full light-field can be captured and projected simultaneously at the desired exposure and excitation times, short readout and lighting durations are supported. PMID:27363565

  9. Multiarmed Spirals in Excitable Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiev, Bakthier; Siegert, Florian; Weijer, Cornelis

    1997-03-01

    Numerical studies of the properties of multiarmed spirals show that they can form spontaneously in low excitability media. The maximum number of arms in a multiarmed spiral is proportional to the ratio of the single spiral period to the refractoriness of the medium. Multiarmed spirals are formed due to attraction of single spirals if these spirals rotate in the same direction and their tips are less than one wavelength apart, i.e., a spiral broken not far from its tip can evolve into a 2-armed spiral. We propose this mechanism to be responsible for the formation of multiarmed spirals in mounds of the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum.

  10. Nuclear excitations at constant temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Voinov, A. V.; Oginni, B. M.; Grimes, S. M.; Brune, C. R.; Massey, T. N.; Schiller, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Siem, S.

    2009-03-15

    Neutron and proton evaporation spectra from the {sup 6}Li+{sup 55}Mn and d+{sup 59}Co reactions have been analyzed with the Hauser-Feshbach approach using different input models for nuclear level densities of {sup 60}Ni and {sup 60}Co nuclei. It has been found that models with a Fermi-gas like temperature dependence fail to reproduce particle spectra from both reactions simultaneously. We obtained the surprising result that the only way to describe our data is to assume the independence of the nuclear temperature on the excitation energy up to about the 20 MeV energy range.

  11. [Neurosteroids. Neuromodulators of cerebral excitability].

    PubMed

    Calixto González, E; Brailowsky, S

    1998-01-01

    Steroids which are produced by the brain are called neurosteroids, and they are able to modulate neurotransmissions: GABAergic; glutamatergic; glycinergic, and cholinergic (nicotine receptor). These effects are of short latency and duration, and do not implicate the cellular genome. The interaction of these neurosteroids with membrane receptors contribute to the regulation of neuronal excitability, and their study has allowed a better understanding of cognitive, hormonal, and epileptic phenomena as well as the development of new drugs with anxiolytic, antidepressive, anesthetic and anti-epileptic effects. PMID:9658699

  12. Theoretical studies of electronically excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Besley, Nicholas A.

    2014-10-06

    Time-dependent density functional theory is the most widely used quantum chemical method for studying molecules in electronically excited states. However, excited states can also be computed within Kohn-Sham density functional theory by exploiting methods that converge the self-consistent field equations to give excited state solutions. The usefulness of single reference self-consistent field based approaches for studying excited states is demonstrated by considering the calculation of several types of spectroscopy including the infrared spectroscopy of molecules in an electronically excited state, the rovibrational spectrum of the NO-Ar complex, core electron binding energies and the emission spectroscopy of BODIPY in water.

  13. Peculiarities of collisional excitation transfer with excited screened energy levels of atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gerasimov, V. A.; Gerasimov, V. V.; Pavlinskiy, A. V.

    2007-09-15

    We report an experimental discovery of deviations from the known regularities in collisional excitation transfer processes for metal atoms. The collisional excitation transfer with excited screened energy levels of thulium and dysprosium atoms is studied. The selecting role of the screening 6s shell in collisional excitation transfer is shown.

  14. Wavelet excited measurement of system transfer function.

    PubMed

    Olkkonen, H; Olkkonen, J T

    2007-02-01

    This article introduces a new method, which is referred to as the wavelet excitation method (WEM), for the measurement of the system transfer function. Instead of commonly used impulse or sine wave excitations, the method uses a sequential excitation by biorthogonal symmetric wavelets. The system transfer function is reconstructed from the output measurements. In the WEM the signals can be designed so that if N different excitation sequences are used and the excitation rate is f, the sampling rate of the analog-to-digital converter can be reduced to f/N. The WEM is especially advantageous in testing systems, where high quality impulse excitation cannot be applied. The WEM gave consistent results in transfer function measurements of various multistage amplifiers with the linear circuit analysis (SPICE) and the sine wave excitation methods. The WEM makes available new high speed sensor applications, where the sampling rate of the sensor may be considerably lower compared with the system bandwidth. PMID:17578145

  15. Neutrino-induced nuclear excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belusevic, R.

    1995-04-01

    We present an improved, compared to that of Belusevic and Rein, theoretical value of the cross section for the neutrino-induced nuclear excitation of iron. This result is based on a measurement of the photoabsorption cross section on the same nucleus, which can be related to the transverse part of the neutrino cross section via the conserved vector current hypothesis. The longitudinal part is related to the pion absorption cross section through the partial conservation of the axial-vector current, and thus reflects the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry. A general formula for the excitation cross section is derived, which is valid for both low and high incident neutrino energies. When caused by a weak neutral current, this process may play an important role in core-collapse supernovae. It can also be detected using low-temperature techniques with the purpose of cosmological and weak-interaction studies. A new estimate of the cross sections for neutrino-induced nonscaling processes described by Belusevic and Rein is discussed in the context of two experiments using iron targets, but at very different beam energies.

  16. New Insights in 4f(12)5d(1) Excited States of Tm(2+) through Excited State Excitation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Mathijs; Biner, Daniel; Krämer, Karl W; Barandiarán, Zoila; Seijo, Luis; Meijerink, Andries

    2016-07-21

    Optical excitation of ions or molecules typically leads to an expansion of the equilibrium bond lengths in the excited electronic state. However, for 4f(n-1)5d(1) excited states in lanthanide ions both expansion and contraction relative to the 4f(n) ground state have been reported, depending on the crystal field and nature of the 5d state. To probe the equilibrium distance offset between different 4f(n-1)5d(1) excited states, we report excited state excitation (ESE) spectra for Tm(2+) doped in CsCaBr3 and CsCaCl3 using two-color excited state excitation spectroscopy. The ESE spectra reveal sharp lines at low energies, confirming a similar distance offset for 4f(n-1)5d(t2g)(1) states. At higher energies, broader bands are observed, which indicate the presence of excited states with a different offset. On the basis of ab initio embedded-cluster calculations, the broad bands are assigned to two-photon d-d absorption from the excited state. In this work, we demonstrate that ESE is a powerful spectroscopic tool, giving access to information which cannot be obtained through regular one-photon spectroscopy. PMID:27347766

  17. Multiphoton excitation of fluorescent DNA base analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katilius, Evaldas; Woodbury, Neal W.

    2006-07-01

    Multiphoton excitation was used to investigate properties of the fluorescent DNA base analogs, 2-aminopurine (2AP) and 6-methylisoxanthopterin (6MI). 2-aminopurine, a fluorescent analog of adenine, was excited by three-photon absorption. Fluorescence correlation measurements were attempted to evaluate the feasibility of using three-photon excitation of 2AP for DNA-protein interaction studies. However, high excitation power and long integration times needed to acquire high signal-to-noise fluorescence correlation curves render three-photon excitation FCS of 2AP not very useful for studying DNA base dynamics. The fluorescence properties of 6-methylisoxanthopterin, a guanine analog, were investigated using two-photon excitation. The two-photon absorption cross-section of 6MI was estimated to be about 2.5×10-50 cm4s (2.5 GM units) at 700 nm. The two-photon excitation spectrum was measured in the spectral region from 700 to 780 nm; in this region the shape of the two-photon excitation spectrum is very similar to the shape of single-photon excitation spectrum in the near-UV spectral region. Two-photon excitation of 6MI is suitable for fluorescence correlation measurements. Such measurements can be used to study DNA base dynamics and DNA-protein interactions over a broad range of time scales.

  18. Excited Baryons in Holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    de Teramond, Guy F.; Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins

    2011-11-08

    The light-front holographic QCD approach is used to describe baryon spectroscopy and the systematics of nucleon transition form factors. Baryon spectroscopy and the excitation dynamics of nucleon resonances encoded in the nucleon transition form factors can provide fundamental insight into the strong-coupling dynamics of QCD. The transition from the hard-scattering perturbative domain to the non-perturbative region is sensitive to the detailed dynamics of confined quarks and gluons. Computations of such phenomena from first principles in QCD are clearly very challenging. The most successful theoretical approach thus far has been to quantize QCD on discrete lattices in Euclidean space-time; however, dynamical observables in Minkowski space-time, such as the time-like hadronic form factors are not amenable to Euclidean numerical lattice computations.

  19. Excitation of interstellar hydrogen chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufild, David A.; Green, Sheldon

    1994-01-01

    We have computed new rate coefficients for the collisional excitation of HCl by He, in the close-coupled formalism and using an interaction potential determined recently by Willey, Choong, & DeLucia. Results have been obtained for temperatures between 10 K and 300 K. With the use of the infinite order sudden approximation, we have derived approximate expressions of general applicability which may be used to estimate how the rate constant for a transition (J to J prime) is apportioned among the various hyperfine states F prime of the final state J prime. Using these new rate coefficients, we have obtained predictions for the HCl rotational line strengths expected from a dense clump of interstellar gas, as a function of the HCl fractional abundance. Over a wide range of HCl abundances, we have found that the line luminosities are proportional to abundance(exp 2/3), a general result which can be explained using a simple analytical approximation. Our model for the excitation of HCl within a dense molecular cloud core indicates that the J = 1 goes to 0 line strengths measured by Blake, Keene, & Phillips toward the Orion Molecular Cloud (OMC-1) imply a fractional abundance n(HCl)/n(H2) approximately 2 x 10(exp -9), a value which amounts to only approximately 0.3% of the cosmic abundance of chlorine nuclei. Given a fractional abundance of 2 x 10(exp -9), the contribution of HCl emission to the total radiative cooling of a dense clump is small. For Orion, we predict a flux approximately 10(exp -19) W/sq cm for the HCl J = 3 goes to 2 line near 159.8 micrometers, suggesting that the strength of this line could be measured using the Infrared Space Observatory.

  20. Importance of the completeness of the configuration interaction and close coupling expansions in R-matrix calculations for highly charged ions: electron-impact excitation of Fe20+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Menchero, L.; Giunta, A. S.; Del Zanna, G.; Badnell, N. R.

    2016-04-01

    We have carried out two intermediate coupling frame transformation (ICFT) R-matrix calculations for the electron-impact excitation of {{C}}-like {{Fe}}20+, both of which use the same expansions for their configuration interaction (CI) and close-coupling (CC) representations. The first expansion arises from the configurations 2{{{s}}}2 2{{{p}}}2,2{{s}} 2{{{p}}}3,2{{{p}}}4, \\{2{{{s}}}2 2{{p}},2{{s}} 2{{{p}}}2,2{{{p}}}3\\} {nl}, with n = 3, 4, for l=0-3, which give rise to 564 CI/CC levels. The second adds configurations 2{{{s}}}2 2{{p}} 5{{l}}, for l=0-2, which give rise to 590 CI/CC levels in total. Comparison of oscillator strengths and effective collision strengths from these two calculations demonstrates the lack of convergence in data for n = 4 from the smaller one. Comparison of results for the 564 CI/CC level calculation with an earlier ICFT R-matrix calculation which used the exact same CI expansion but truncated the CC expansion to only 200 levels demonstrates the lack of convergence of the earlier data, particularly for n = 3 levels. Also, we find that the results of our 590 CC R-matrix calculation are significantly and systematically larger than those of an earlier comparable DW-plus-resonances calculation. Thus, it is important still to take note of the (lack of) convergence in both atomic structural and collisional data, even in such a highly charged ion as Fe20+, and to treat resonances non-perturbatively. This is of particular importance for Fe ions given their importance in the spectroscopic diagnostic modelling of astrophysical plasmas.

  1. Production of excited neutral and ionic photofragments following core-level excitation in molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, R. A.; Wen, C.-R.; Tan, K.; Chen, J.-M.

    1990-05-01

    We have performed the first experiments to examine the neutral fragmentation paths following direct core-level excitation in a molecule. Using monochromatized synchrotron radiation in the range 100-140 eV, we have monitored the dispersed UV/optical fluorescence resulting from excitation of a Si 2p electron in SiF4. The main features in the fluorescence spectrum have been identified as emission from the SiF+4 D state and from excited SiF, Si, F, and Si+. Features in the fluorescence excitation spectra are assigned to excitation of a Si 2p electron to unoccupied valence orbitals, Rydberg orbitals, and shape resonances. There is a large enhancement in the yield of excited-state fragments following core-to-Rydberg excitation, which is due to the greater probability of the core-excited Rydberg state decaying, via a resonant Auger process, to highly excited, unbound states of SiF+4.

  2. Circadian regulation of human cortical excitability.

    PubMed

    Ly, Julien Q M; Gaggioni, Giulia; Chellappa, Sarah L; Papachilleos, Soterios; Brzozowski, Alexandre; Borsu, Chloé; Rosanova, Mario; Sarasso, Simone; Middleton, Benita; Luxen, André; Archer, Simon N; Phillips, Christophe; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Maquet, Pierre; Massimini, Marcello; Vandewalle, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged wakefulness alters cortical excitability, which is essential for proper brain function and cognition. However, besides prior wakefulness, brain function and cognition are also affected by circadian rhythmicity. Whether the regulation of cognition involves a circadian impact on cortical excitability is unknown. Here, we assessed cortical excitability from scalp electroencephalography (EEG) responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation in 22 participants during 29 h of wakefulness under constant conditions. Data reveal robust circadian dynamics of cortical excitability that are strongest in those individuals with highest endocrine markers of circadian amplitude. In addition, the time course of cortical excitability correlates with changes in EEG synchronization and cognitive performance. These results demonstrate that the crucial factor for cortical excitability, and basic brain function in general, is the balance between circadian rhythmicity and sleep need, rather than sleep homoeostasis alone. These findings have implications for clinical applications such as non-invasive brain stimulation in neurorehabilitation. PMID:27339884

  3. Circadian regulation of human cortical excitability

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Julien Q. M.; Gaggioni, Giulia; Chellappa, Sarah L.; Papachilleos, Soterios; Brzozowski, Alexandre; Borsu, Chloé; Rosanova, Mario; Sarasso, Simone; Middleton, Benita; Luxen, André; Archer, Simon N.; Phillips, Christophe; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Maquet, Pierre; Massimini, Marcello; Vandewalle, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged wakefulness alters cortical excitability, which is essential for proper brain function and cognition. However, besides prior wakefulness, brain function and cognition are also affected by circadian rhythmicity. Whether the regulation of cognition involves a circadian impact on cortical excitability is unknown. Here, we assessed cortical excitability from scalp electroencephalography (EEG) responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation in 22 participants during 29 h of wakefulness under constant conditions. Data reveal robust circadian dynamics of cortical excitability that are strongest in those individuals with highest endocrine markers of circadian amplitude. In addition, the time course of cortical excitability correlates with changes in EEG synchronization and cognitive performance. These results demonstrate that the crucial factor for cortical excitability, and basic brain function in general, is the balance between circadian rhythmicity and sleep need, rather than sleep homoeostasis alone. These findings have implications for clinical applications such as non-invasive brain stimulation in neurorehabilitation. PMID:27339884

  4. Dynamics of quantum excitations in square ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelnovo, Claudio; Kourtis, Stefanos

    The study of emergent excitations in classical spin ice has culminated in the discovery of a condensed-matter realization of magnetic monopoles. In spin-ice materials where quantum fluctuations play an important role, excitations acquire quantum properties that promote them to more complicated and exciting objects. To understand these quantum excitations better in a relatively simple context, we construct a toy model of excited square ice and solve it both exactly by tuning it to a Rokhsar-Kivelson point and numerically for small clusters. We furthermore numerically evaluate the dynamic spin structure factor and compare it to effective free-particle theories. Our results offer a useful point of comparison for further theoretical and experimental work. Supported by ICAM branch contributions, EPSRC Grant No. EP/G049394/1, the Helmholtz Virtual Institute ``New States of Matter and Their Excitations'' and the EPSRC NetworkPlus on ``Emergence and Physics far from Equilibrium''.

  5. Design evaluation: S-band exciters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A design evaluation study was conducted to produce S-band exciter (SBE) system to provide a highly stable phase or modulated carrier for transmission to spacecraft. The exciter is part of an S-band receiver/exciter/ranging system at Spaceflight Tracking and Data Network (STDN) ground stations. The major features of the system are defined. Circuit diagrams of the electronic components are provided.

  6. Spatially encoded multiple-quantum excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridge, Clark D.; Borvayeh, Leila; Walls, Jamie D.

    2013-05-01

    In this work, we present a simple method to spatially encode the transition frequencies of nuclear spin transitions and to read out these frequencies within a single scan. The experiment works by combining pulsed field gradients with an excitation sequence that selectively excites spin transitions within certain sample regions. After the initial excitation, imaging the resulting widehat{z}-magnetization is used to determine the locations where the excitations occurred, from which the corresponding transition frequencies are determined. Simple experimental demonstrations of this technique on one- and two-spin systems are presented.

  7. Excitations of quantum gases in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesilada, Emek

    This thesis describes experiments that studied the excitations of an ultra-cold atomic Rb gas in an optical lattice using Bragg spectroscopy. A Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of 87Rb was formed in a cloverleaf trap. An optical lattice of cubic symmetry, formed by the interference of six laser beams, was superimposed on the Rb BEC and turned on adiabatically. Such a system is well described by the Bose-Hubbard model, which predicts a quantum phase transition from a superfluid to a Mott insulator state at a critical lattice depth. In the first experiment, we studied the superfluid regime. The superfluid admits sound waves as phonon excitations. In two photon Bragg spectroscopy two laser beams intersecting at angle on the condensate create such excitations. The excitation spectrum of BEC was measured in a three dimensional optical lattice as a function of lattice strength. In the second experiment we studied the excitation spectrum of the Mott insulator. The lowest energy excitations in such a system are particle-hole excitations. These correspond to the hopping of atoms from one lattice site to another. The insulating phase is characterized by a gap in the excitation spectrum and we measured this particle-hole gap by Bragg spectroscopy. The precise nature of our measurement allowed us to study the opening of the excitation gap that has previously eluded experimental verification.

  8. Laser Excited Fluorescence Studies Of Black Liquor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, J. J.; Semerjian, H. G.

    1986-10-01

    Laser excited fluorescence of black liquor was investigated as a possible monitoring technique for pulping processes. A nitrogen pumped dye laser was used to examine the fluorescence spectrum of black liquor solutions. Various excitation wavelengths were used between 290 and 403 nm. Black liquor fluorescence spectra were found to vary with both excitation wavelength and black liquor concentration. Laser excited fluorescence was found to be a sensitive technique for measurement of black liquor with good detection limits and linear response over a large dynamic range.

  9. Many-body calculations of the core excitation spectra of CO and NiCO: Disappearance of the giant shake-up satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, M.; Decleva, P.

    1993-05-01

    The carbon and oxygen 1s core excitation spectra of free CO and NiCO are calculated by ab initio 1h1p/1h1p and 2h2p/2h2p configuration interaction (CI) method using an extended basis set. We employed the ground state as well as core-hole relaxed orbitals. For free CO, we obtain a reasonably good description of the electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) spectra. The present interpretation of the spectra agrees with others. For NiCO, we obtain a reasonably good description of the near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of the CO/Ni(100) system and that of the electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) spectra of the gas phase Ni(CO)4 . We show the existence of the Rydberg-derived additional excited states in the NEXAFS spectra of the chemisorbed molecule and give an interpretation of these states. The disappearance of the giant shake-up satellite in the NEXAFS spectra of the adsorbate is explained in terms of the hindrance of the cooperative core-hole screening mechanism in the π* resonantly excited state. The core-hole screening mechanism in the σ* resonantly excited state is also investigated.

  10. Transverse excitations in liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, S.; Munejiri, S.; Inui, M.; Kajihara, Y.; Pilgrim, W.-C.; Baron, A. Q. R.; Shimojo, F.; Hoshino, K.

    2013-02-01

    The transverse acoustic excitation modes were detected by inelastic x-ray scattering in liquid Ga, Cu and Fe in the Q range around 10 nm-1 using a third-generation synchrotron radiation facility, SPring-8, although these liquid metals are mostly described by a simple hard-sphere liquid. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations clearly support this finding for liquid Ga. From the detailed analyses for the S(Q,ω) spectra with good statistic qualities, the lifetime of less than 1 ps and the propagating length of less than 1 nm can be estimated for the transverse acoustic phonon modes, which correspond to the lifetime and size of cages formed instantaneously in these liquid metals. The microscopic Poisson's ratio estimated from the dynamic velocities of sound is 0.42 for liquid Ga and about -0.2 for liquid transition metals, indicating a rubber-like soft and extremely hard elastic properties of the cage clusters, respectively. The origin of these microscopic elastic properties is discussed in detail.

  11. Excited delirium: A psychiatric review.

    PubMed

    Lipsedge, Maurice

    2016-04-01

    The term 'excited delirium' (ED) is used to explain sudden and unexpected restraint-related deaths. Since the 1990s, ED has often been identified as the principal cause of death in restrained individuals, rather than the restraint procedure itself. Forensic pathologists and psychiatrists attach different meanings to the term delirium. For psychiatrists, delirium is a specific technical term, which implies a grave and potentially life-threatening underlying physical illness. If a patient dies during a bout of delirium, psychiatrists assume that there will be autopsy evidence to demonstrate the primary underlying organic cause. Conversely, pathologists appear to be using the term ED to refer to restraint-related deaths in either highly disturbed cocaine users or psychiatric patients in a state of extreme agitation. In these cases, there is no underlying physical disorder other than a terminal cardiac arrhythmia. As the term ED has different meanings for psychiatrists and for pathologists, it would be helpful for these two professional groups to develop a mutually agreed terminology. PMID:26055153

  12. Multi-photon excitation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Diaspro, Alberto; Bianchini, Paolo; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Faretta, Mario; Ramoino, Paola; Usai, Cesare

    2006-01-01

    Multi-photon excitation (MPE) microscopy plays a growing role among microscopical techniques utilized for studying biological matter. In conjunction with confocal microscopy it can be considered the imaging workhorse of life science laboratories. Its roots can be found in a fundamental work written by Maria Goeppert Mayer more than 70 years ago. Nowadays, 2PE and MPE microscopes are expected to increase their impact in areas such biotechnology, neurobiology, embryology, tissue engineering, materials science where imaging can be coupled to the possibility of using the microscopes in an active way, too. As well, 2PE implementations in noninvasive optical bioscopy or laser-based treatments point out to the relevance in clinical applications. Here we report about some basic aspects related to the phenomenon, implications in three-dimensional imaging microscopy, practical aspects related to design and realization of MPE microscopes, and we only give a list of potential applications and variations on the theme in order to offer a starting point for advancing new applications and developments. PMID:16756664

  13. Multi-photon excitation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Diaspro, Alberto; Bianchini, Paolo; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Faretta, Mario; Ramoino, Paola; Usai, Cesare

    2006-01-01

    Multi-photon excitation (MPE) microscopy plays a growing role among microscopical techniques utilized for studying biological matter. In conjunction with confocal microscopy it can be considered the imaging workhorse of life science laboratories. Its roots can be found in a fundamental work written by Maria Goeppert Mayer more than 70 years ago. Nowadays, 2PE and MPE microscopes are expected to increase their impact in areas such biotechnology, neurobiology, embryology, tissue engineering, materials science where imaging can be coupled to the possibility of using the microscopes in an active way, too. As well, 2PE implementations in noninvasive optical bioscopy or laser-based treatments point out to the relevance in clinical applications. Here we report about some basic aspects related to the phenomenon, implications in three-dimensional imaging microscopy, practical aspects related to design and realization of MPE microscopes, and we only give a list of potential applications and variations on the theme in order to offer a starting point for advancing new applications and developments. PMID:16756664

  14. Coulomb excitation of radioactive {sup 79}Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Lister, C.J.; Blumenthal, D.; Davids, C.N.

    1995-08-01

    The technical challenges expected in experiments with radioactive beams can already be explored by using ions produced in primary reactions. In addition, the re-excitation of these ions by Coulomb excitation allows a sensitive search for collective states that are well above the yrast line. We are building an experiment to study Coulomb excitation of radioactive ions which are separated from beam particles by the Fragment Mass Analyzer. An array of gamma detectors will be mounted at the focal plane to measure the gamma radiation following re-excitation. Five Compton-suppressed Ge detectors and five planar LEPS detectors will be used. The optimum experiment of this type appears to be the study of {sup 79}Rb following the {sup 24}Mg ({sup 58}Ni,3p) reaction. We calculate that about 5 x 10{sup 5} {sup 79}Rb nuclei/second will reach the excitation foil. This rubidium isotope was selected for study as it is strongly produced and is highly deformed, so easily re-excited. The use of a {sup 58}Ni re-excitation foil offers the best yields. After re-excitation the ions will be subsequently transported into a shielded beamdump to prevent the accumulation of activity.

  15. Control of shear flows by artificial excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. J.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    1987-01-01

    Investigations involving artificial excitation of various shear flows are reviewed. Potential applications of excitation in flow control, e.g., in enhancing mixing, and in delaying transition and separation are discussed. An account is given of the current activities at NASA Lewis Research Center in this regard.

  16. Making Excited Oxygen Molecules And Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Richard P.

    1989-01-01

    Oxidation of semiconductors and high-temperature superconductors achieved at lower temperatures by use of oxygen molecules or atoms raised into specific excited states. Use of excited oxygen (or other species) of interest in research on kinetics and mechanisms of chemical reactions. Used in ultra-high-vacuum chamber also equipped for such surface-analytical techniques as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  17. Excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging microscope.

    PubMed

    Favreau, Peter F; Hernandez, Clarissa; Heaster, Tiffany; Alvarez, Diego F; Rich, Thomas C; Prabhat, Prashant; Leavesley, Silas J

    2014-04-01

    Hyperspectral imaging is a versatile tool that has recently been applied to a variety of biomedical applications, notably live-cell and whole-tissue signaling. Traditional hyperspectral imaging approaches filter the fluorescence emission over a broad wavelength range while exciting at a single band. However, these emission-scanning approaches have shown reduced sensitivity due to light attenuation from spectral filtering. Consequently, emission scanning has limited applicability for time-sensitive studies and photosensitive applications. In this work, we have developed an excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging microscope that overcomes these limitations by providing high transmission with short acquisition times. This is achieved by filtering the fluorescence excitation rather than the emission. We tested the efficacy of the excitation-scanning microscope in a side-by-side comparison with emission scanning for detection of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing endothelial cells in highly autofluorescent lung tissue. Excitation scanning provided higher signal-to-noise characteristics, as well as shorter acquisition times (300  ms/wavelength band with excitation scanning versus 3  s/wavelength band with emission scanning). Excitation scanning also provided higher delineation of nuclear and cell borders, and increased identification of GFP regions in highly autofluorescent tissue. These results demonstrate excitation scanning has utility in a wide range of time-dependent and photosensitive applications. PMID:24727909

  18. Study of excited nucleons and their structure

    SciTech Connect

    Burkert, Volker D.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the study of excited nucleons are discussed. Much of the progress has been achieved due to the availability of high precision meson production data in the photoproduction and electroproduction sectors, the development of multi-channel partial wave analysis techniques, and advances in Lattice QCD with predictions of the full excitation spectrum.

  19. Excitation of helium ion by positron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, P.; Ghosh, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    Three (1s,2s,2p) and five (1s,2s,2p,3s-bar,3p-bar) -state close-coupling methods have been employed to calculate the n = 2 excitation cross sections of helium ion by positron impact. The effect of pseudostate is found to be very pronounced in the case of 1s-2s excitation.

  20. Resonances in periodically forced excitable systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dolnik, M. |; Marek, M.; Epstein, I.R.

    1992-04-16

    Using a phase excitation curve, this paper studies single and periodic pulse perturbations in two model excitable systems, a four-variable extended Oregonator and a six-variable model of the chlorite-iodide reaction. 12 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Peak structural response to nonstationary random excitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinozuka, M.; Yang, J.-N.

    1971-01-01

    Study establishes distribution function of peak response values, based on frequency interpretation. Excitations considered include impact loading on landing gears and aircraft gust loading. Because of relative severity of excitations, prediction of fatigue and maximum response characteristics is important part of task of structural analysis and design.

  2. What Gets a Cell Excited? Kinky Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Hodgkin and Huxley's (5) revealing the origins of cellular excitability is one of the great triumphs of physiology. In an extraordinarily deft series of papers, they were able to measure the essential electrical characteristics of neurons and synthesize them into a quantitative model that accounts for the excitability of neurons and other…

  3. Twokink excitation in a spiral magnetic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, V. V.; Raskovalov, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    Twokink excitations in the spiral structures of magnets and multiferroics are found and analyzed within the framework for the sine-Gordon model. It is shown that the movement and interaction of the kinks is accompanied by macroscopic translations of the spiral structure. The ways of observing and exciting kinks in the external magnetic field are discussed.

  4. Vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen near Herschel 36

    SciTech Connect

    Rachford, Brian L.; Snow, Theodore P.; Ross, Teresa L.

    2014-05-10

    We present the first high resolution UV spectra toward Herschel 36, a Trapezium-like system of high-mass stars contained within the Lagoon Nebula (M8, NGC 6523). The spectra reveal extreme rovibrational excitation of molecular hydrogen in material at a single velocity or very small range of velocities, with this component presumably lying near the star system and undergoing fluorescent excitation. The overall H{sub 2} excitation is similar to, but apparently larger than, that seen toward HD 37903 which previously showed the largest vibrationally excited H{sub 2} column densities seen in UV absorption spectra. While the velocities of the highly excited H{sub 2} lines are consistent within each observation, it appears that they underwent a ∼60 km s{sup –1} redshift during the 3.6 yr between observations. In neither case does the velocity of the highly excited material match the velocity of the bulk of the line-of-sight material which appears to mostly be in the foreground of M8. Recent work shows unusually excited CH and CH{sup +} lines and several unusually broad diffuse interstellar bands toward Herschel 36. Along with the H{sub 2} excitation, all of these findings appear to be related to the extreme environment within ∼0.1 pc of the massive young stellar system.

  5. Ensemble density functional theory method correctly describes bond dissociation, excited state electron transfer, and double excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Filatov, Michael; Huix-Rotllant, Miquel; Burghardt, Irene

    2015-05-14

    State-averaged (SA) variants of the spin-restricted ensemble-referenced Kohn-Sham (REKS) method, SA-REKS and state-interaction (SI)-SA-REKS, implement ensemble density functional theory for variationally obtaining excitation energies of molecular systems. In this work, the currently existing version of the SA-REKS method, which included only one excited state into the ensemble averaging, is extended by adding more excited states to the averaged energy functional. A general strategy for extension of the REKS-type methods to larger ensembles of ground and excited states is outlined and implemented in extended versions of the SA-REKS and SI-SA-REKS methods. The newly developed methods are tested in the calculation of several excited states of ground-state multi-reference systems, such as dissociating hydrogen molecule, and excited states of donor–acceptor molecular systems. For hydrogen molecule, the new method correctly reproduces the distance dependence of the lowest excited state energies and describes an avoided crossing between the doubly excited and singly excited states. For bithiophene–perylenediimide stacked complex, the SI-SA-REKS method correctly describes crossing between the locally excited state and the charge transfer excited state and yields vertical excitation energies in good agreement with the ab initio wavefunction methods.

  6. NMR with excitation modulated by Frank sequences.

    PubMed

    Blümich, Bernhard; Gong, Qingxia; Byrne, Eimear; Greferath, Marcus

    2009-07-01

    Miniaturized NMR is of growing importance in bio-, chemical, and -material sciences. Other than the magnet, bulky components are the radio-frequency power amplifier and the power supply or battery pack. We show that constant flip-angle excitation with phase modulation following a particular type of polyphase perfect sequences results in low peak excitation power at high response peak power. It has ideal power distribution in both the time domain and the frequency domain. A savings in peak excitation power of six orders of magnitude has been realized compared to conventionally pulsed excitation. Among others, the excitation promises to be of use for button-cell operated miniature NMR devices as well as for complying with specific-absorption-rate regulations in high-field medical imaging. PMID:19386525

  7. Electronic excitation of CO by positron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Euclimar P. da; Varella, Marcio T. do N; Lima, Marco A. P.

    2005-12-15

    We report calculated cross sections for the electronic excitation of carbon monoxide by positron impact. The calculations were carried out with the Schwinger multichannel method and included six collision channels, namely the ground (X {sup 1}{sigma}{sup +}) and five electronically excited (A {sup 1}{pi}, I {sup 1}{sigma}{sup -} and D {sup 1}{delta}) states. Present calculated excitation cross sections to the A {sup 1}{pi} state did not present any resonant features, being in this sense consistent with previous calculations for the isoelectronic nitrogen molecule. The experimental a {sup 1}{pi}{sub g} excitation cross section of N{sub 2} presented a resonantlike structure which would also be expected in the A {sup 1}{pi} excitation of CO. We discuss possible reasons for the disagreement between experiment and theory.

  8. M1 excitation scheme in deformed nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Takaharu; Morrison, Iain

    1991-10-01

    We present the M1 excitation scheme in even-even deformed nuclei from the sum-rule viewpoint based on the Nilsson+BCS approach. The sum-rule states are introduced for the Scissors, spin and spin-flip modes. The functional form of the B(M1) sum rule of the Scissors mode is obtained, and its actual value is shown to be 4˜6(μN2). The spin excitation B(M1) is 10˜15(μN2) including the spin-flip transitions. The total B(M1) is 15˜20(μN2). The effect of the SD and SDG pair truncation is studied to test IBM-2 for M1 excitations. The SDG truncation reproduces very well the calculation without truncation. The SD truncation reproduces the orbital excitation, whereas yields some deviations for the spin excitation.

  9. Effects of core turbulence on jet excitability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mankbadi, Reda R.; Raman, Ganesh; Rice, Edward J.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of varying freestream core turbulence on the evolution of a circular jet with and without tonal excitation are examined. Measurements are made on an 8.8 cm diameter jet at a Mach number of 0.3. The jet is excitated by plane waves at Strouhal number 0.5. For the excited and unexcited cases the turbulence level is varied by screens and grids placed upstream of the nozzle exit. The experiment results are compared with a theoretical model which incorporates a variable core turbulence and considers the energy interactions between the mean flow, the turbulence and the forced component. Both data and theory indicate that increasing the freestream turbulence diminishes the excitability of the jet and reduces the effect of excitation on the spreading rate of the jet.

  10. Excited States of Non-Isolated Chromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsika, S.; Kozak, C.; Kistler, K.

    2009-06-01

    The photophysical and photochemical behavior of nucleobases is very important because of their biological role as the building blocks in DNA and RNA. Great progress has been made in understanding the excited-state properties of single bases. In order to understand the photophysical properties of nucleobases in complex environments we have investigated their excited states (a) in aqueous solutions and (b) as π-stacked dimers in DNA. The solvatochromic shifts of the excited states of pyrimidine nucleobases in aqueous solution have been investigated using a combined QM/MM procedure where the quantum mechanical solute is described using high level multireference configuration interaction methods while molecular dynamics simulations are used to obtain the structure of the solvent around the solute in an average way. The excited states of π-stacked nucleobases have also been investigated using various ab initio methods. The effect of the environment on the excited states and conical intersections is investigated.

  11. Materials Data on Hg2P2H4O9 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-10-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on Li2Bi2P2O9 (SG:4) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-10-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on Hg2P2S7 (SG:5) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-04

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on MnAl2P2(HO)18 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. K2P2— A Photometry Pipeline for the K2 Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Mikkel N.; Handberg, Rasmus; Davies, Guy R.; Chaplin, William J.; Jones, Caitlin D.

    2015-06-01

    With the loss of a second reaction wheel, resulting in the inability to point continuously and stably at the same field of view, the NASA Kepler satellite recently entered a new mode of observation known as the K2 mission. The data from this redesigned mission present a specific challenge; the targets systematically drift in position on an ∼6 hr timescale, inducing a significant instrumental signal in the photometric time series—this greatly impacts the ability to detect planetary signals and perform asteroseismic analysis. Here we detail our version of a reduction pipeline for K2 target pixel data, which automatically defines masks for all targets in a given frame; extracts the target’s flux and position time series; corrects the time series based on the apparent movement on the CCD (either in 1D or 2D), combined with the correction of instrumental and/or planetary signals via the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Operations Center (KASOC) filter, thus rendering the time series ready for asteroseismic analysis; computes power spectra for all targets and identifies potential contaminations between targets. From a test of our pipeline on a sample of targets from the K2 campaign 0, the recovery of data for multiple targets increases the amount of potential light curves by a factor of ≥slant 10. Our pipeline could be applied to the upcoming TESS and PLATO 2.0 missions.

  16. Materials Data on Sm(Ni2P)2 (SG:58) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on K2P2WO9 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Radiative transitions involving the (2p2)(3 Pe) metastable autodetaching of H(-)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, V. L.; Bhatia, A. K.; Temkin, A.

    1974-01-01

    The absorption coefficient for the free-bound transition H (ls) + e(-)+ h omega yields H(-)(2 sq p,(3)P(e)) is calculated (together with the differential emission rate for the inverse process) using ls - 2s - 2p close coupling continuum wave functions and a Hylleraas bound state wave function. A maximum in the absorption and emission spectra is found to occur at a photon wavelength of 1219.5 A, which is 2 A closer to the Lyman alpha line than predicted by the calculations of Drake, and is in closer agreement with the stellar absorption feature identified by Heap and Stecher. The free-bound absorption process appears to be a significant source of continuous ultraviolet opacity.

  19. α and 2p2n emission in fast neutron-induced reactions on Ni60

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fotiades, N.; Devlin, M.; Haight, R. C.; Nelson, R. O.; Kunieda, S.; Kawano, T.

    2015-06-19

    The cross sections for populating the residual nucleus in the reaction AZX(n,x)A-4Z-2Y exhibit peaks as a function of incident neutron energy corresponding to the (n,n'α) reaction and, at higher energy, to the (n,2p3n) reaction. In addition, the relative magnitudes of these peaks vary with the Z of the target nucleus.

  20. Materials Data on MgFe2P2(HO)18 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on Ca2P2O7 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-04

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Co2P2H4O9 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on Al2P2H9NO11 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-05

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on U(Ni2P)2 (SG:136) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on CaV2P2O9 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. 2p2h effects on the weak pion production cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Mariano, A.; Barbero, C.

    2015-05-15

    The ν{sub l}n → l{sup −}p QE reaction on the A-target is used as a signal event or/and to reconstruct the neutrino energy, using two-body kinematics. Competition of another processes could lead to misidentification of the arriving neutrinos, being important the fake events coming from the CC1π background. A precise knowledge of cross sections is a prerequisite in order to make simulations in event generators to substract the fake ones from the QE countings, and in this contribution we analyze the different nuclear effects on the CC1π channel. Our calculations also can be extended for the NC case.

  7. 2p2h effects on the weak pion production cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariano, A.; Barbero, C.

    2015-05-01

    The νln → l-p QE reaction on the A-target is used as a signal event or/and to reconstruct the neutrino energy, using two-body kinematics. Competition of another processes could lead to misidentification of the arriving neutrinos, being important the fake events coming from the CC1π background. A precise knowledge of cross sections is a prerequisite in order to make simulations in event generators to substract the fake ones from the QE countings, and in this contribution we analyze the different nuclear effects on the CC1π channel. Our calculations also can be extended for the NC case.

  8. THE SYNTHESIS OF LEAD PYROPHOSPHATE, PB2P2O7, IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polyphosphates are used in the drinking water to prevent the precipitation of cations such as calcium and iron. The possible negative impact of using polyphosphates is the undesirable complexation of lead which could result in elevated lead levels in consumer’s tap water. Altho...

  9. Materials Data on NaZn2P2HO8 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on Fe2P2H9NO11 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on Fe2P2H4O9 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on SrV2P2O9 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on CaV2P2O9 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibition (2P2I)-Oriented Chemical Library Accelerates Hit Discovery.

    PubMed

    Milhas, Sabine; Raux, Brigitt; Betzi, Stéphane; Derviaux, Carine; Roche, Philippe; Restouin, Audrey; Basse, Marie-Jeanne; Rebuffet, Etienne; Lugari, Adrien; Badol, Marion; Kashyap, Rudra; Lissitzky, Jean-Claude; Eydoux, Cécilia; Hamon, Véronique; Gourdel, Marie-Edith; Combes, Sébastien; Zimmermann, Pascale; Aurrand-Lions, Michel; Roux, Thomas; Rogers, Catherine; Müller, Susanne; Knapp, Stefan; Trinquet, Eric; Collette, Yves; Guillemot, Jean-Claude; Morelli, Xavier

    2016-08-19

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) represent an enormous source of opportunity for therapeutic intervention. We and others have recently pinpointed key rules that will help in identifying the next generation of innovative drugs to tackle this challenging class of targets within the next decade. We used these rules to design an oriented chemical library corresponding to a set of diverse "PPI-like" modulators with cores identified as privileged structures in therapeutics. In this work, we purchased the resulting 1664 structurally diverse compounds and evaluated them on a series of representative protein-protein interfaces with distinct "druggability" potential using homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF) technology. For certain PPI classes, analysis of the hit rates revealed up to 100 enrichment factors compared with nonoriented chemical libraries. This observation correlates with the predicted "druggability" of the targets. A specific focus on selectivity profiles, the three-dimensional (3D) molecular modes of action resolved by X-ray crystallography, and the biological activities of identified hits targeting the well-defined "druggable" bromodomains of the bromo and extraterminal (BET) family are presented as a proof-of-concept. Overall, our present study illustrates the potency of machine learning-based oriented chemical libraries to accelerate the identification of hits targeting PPIs. A generalization of this method to a larger set of compounds will accelerate the discovery of original and potent probes for this challenging class of targets. PMID:27219844

  15. Materials Data on Nd(Cu2P)2 (SG:58) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on Mo2P2O11 (SG:11) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Impact of ground- and excited-state aromaticity on cyclopentadiene and silole excitation energies and excited-state polarities.

    PubMed

    Jorner, Kjell; Emanuelsson, Rikard; Dahlstrand, Christian; Tong, Hui; Denisova, Aleksandra V; Ottosson, Henrik

    2014-07-21

    A new qualitative model for estimating the properties of substituted cyclopentadienes and siloles in their lowest ππ* excited states is introduced and confirmed through quantum chemical calculations, and then applied to explain earlier reported experimental excitation energies. According to our model, which is based on excited-state aromaticity and antiaromaticity, siloles and cyclopentadienes are cross-hyperconjugated "aromatic chameleons" that adapt their electronic structures to conform to the various aromaticity rules in different electronic states (Hückel's rule in the π(2) electronic ground state (S0) and Baird's rule in the lowest ππ* excited singlet and triplet states (S1 and T1)). By using pen-and-paper arguments, one can explain polarity changes upon excitation of substituted cyclopentadienes and siloles, and one can tune their lowest excitation energies by combined considerations of ground- and excited-state aromaticity/antiaromaticity effects. Finally, the "aromatic chameleon" model can be extended to other monocyclic compound classes of potential use in organic electronics, thereby providing a unified view of the S0, T1, and S1 states of a range of different cyclic cross-π-conjugated and cross-hyperconjugated compound classes. PMID:25043523

  18. Seismic excitation by space shuttles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kanamori, H.; Mori, J.; Sturtevant, B.; Anderson, D.L.; Heaton, T.

    1992-01-01

    Shock waves generated by the space shuttles Columbia (August 13, 1989), Atlantis (April 11, 1991) and Discovery (September 18, 1991) on their return to Edwards Air Force Base, California, were recorded by TERRAscope (Caltech's broadband seismic network), the Caltech-U.S.G.S Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN), and the University of Southern California (USC) Los Angeles Basin Seismic Network. The spatial pattern of the arrival times exhibits hyperbolic shock fronts from which the path, velocity and altitude of the space shuttle could be determined. The shock wave was acoustically coupled to the ground, converted to a seismic wave, and recorded clearly at the broadband TERRAscope stations. The acoustic coupling occurred very differently depending on the conditions of the Earth's surface surrounding the station. For a seismic station located on hard bedrock, the shock wave (N wave) was clearly recorded with little distortion. Aside from the N wave, very little acoustic coupling of the shock wave energy to the ground occurred at these sites. The observed N wave record was used to estimate the overpressure of the shock wave accurately; a pressure change of 0.5 to 2.2 mbars was obtained. For a seismic station located close to the ocean or soft sedimentary basins, a significant amount of shock wave energy was transferred to the ground through acoustic coupling of the shock wave and the oceanic Rayleigh wave. A distinct topography such as a mountain range was found effective to couple the shock wave energy to the ground. Shock wave energy was also coupled to the ground very effectively through large man made structures such as high rise buildings and offshore oil drilling platforms. For the space shuttle Columbia, in particular, a distinct pulse having a period of about 2 to 3 seconds was observed, 12.5 s before the shock wave, with a broadband seismograph in Pasadena. This pulse was probably excited by the high rise buildings in downtown Los Angeles which were

  19. Pulse Vector-Excitation Speech Encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Grant; Gersho, Allen

    1989-01-01

    Proposed pulse vector-excitation speech encoder (PVXC) encodes analog speech signals into digital representation for transmission or storage at rates below 5 kilobits per second. Produces high quality of reconstructed speech, but with less computation than required by comparable speech-encoding systems. Has some characteristics of multipulse linear predictive coding (MPLPC) and of code-excited linear prediction (CELP). System uses mathematical model of vocal tract in conjunction with set of excitation vectors and perceptually-based error criterion to synthesize natural-sounding speech.

  20. Collisional excitation of interstellar sulfur dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palma, Amedeo

    1987-01-01

    State-to-state rotational excitation rates for the asymmetric top molecule SO2 in collisions with low-energy He atoms have been computed. The intermolecular forces were obtained from an electron gas model, and collision dynamics were treated with the finite-order sudden approximation. The total excitation rate is probably accurate to better than 50 percent; however, individual state-to-state rates may be in error by factors of 2 or 3, and some smaller rates may be accurate only to an order of magnitude. Present results are expected to reflect within the same level of accuracy rates for excitation by collisions with H2 molecules.

  1. Helicon wave excitation with helical antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Light, M.; Chen, F.F.

    1995-04-01

    Components of the wave magnetic field in a helicon discharge have been measured with a single-turn, coaxial magnetic probe. Left- and right-handed helical antennas, as well as plane-polarized antennas, were used; and the results were compared with the field patterns computed for a nonuniform plasma. The results show that the right-hand circularly polarized mode is preferentially excited with all antennas, even those designed to excite the left-hand mode. For right-hand excitation, the radial amplitude profiles are in excellent agreement with computations. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  2. Electron-impact excitation of holmium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, Yu M

    2000-06-30

    The electron-impact excitation of holmium atoms was studied by the method of extended crossing beams. The cross sections and the optical excitation functions were obtained for odd levels of Ho I, including the 22014 cm{sup -1} laser level. Over 99% of the atoms were shown to reside in the ground level prior to collisions with electrons. Also measured were the excitation cross sections for six even levels, which presumably participate in the formation of inversion population in a gas-discharge holmium vapour laser. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  3. Students Excited by Stellar Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-02-01

    In the constellation of Ophiuchus, above the disk of our Milky Way Galaxy, there lurks a stellar corpse spinning 30 times per second -- an exotic star known as a radio pulsar. This object was unknown until it was discovered last week by three high school students. These students are part of the Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC) project, run by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, WV, and West Virginia University (WVU). The pulsar, which may be a rare kind of neutron star called a recycled pulsar, was discovered independently by Virginia students Alexander Snider and Casey Thompson, on January 20, and a day later by Kentucky student Hannah Mabry. "Every day, I told myself, 'I have to find a pulsar. I better find a pulsar before this class ends,'" said Mabry. When she actually made the discovery, she could barely contain her excitement. "I started screaming and jumping up and down." Thompson was similarly expressive. "After three years of searching, I hadn't found a single thing," he said, "but when I did, I threw my hands up in the air and said, 'Yes!'." Snider said, "It actually feels really neat to be the first person to ever see something like that. It's an uplifting feeling." As part of the PSC, the students analyze real data from NRAO's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to find pulsars. The students' teachers -- Debra Edwards of Sherando High School, Leah Lorton of James River High School, and Jennifer Carter of Rowan County Senior High School -- all introduced the PSC in their classes, and interested students formed teams to continue the work. Even before the discovery, Mabry simply enjoyed the search. "It just feels like you're actually doing something," she said. "It's a good feeling." Once the pulsar candidate was reported to NRAO, Project Director Rachel Rosen took a look and agreed with the young scientists. A followup observing session was scheduled on the GBT. Snider and Mabry traveled to West Virginia to assist in the

  4. Broadband single-molecule excitation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Piatkowski, Lukasz; Gellings, Esther; van Hulst, Niek F.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, single-molecule spectroscopy has developed into a widely used tool in multiple disciplines of science. The diversity of routinely recorded emission spectra does underpin the strength of the single-molecule approach in resolving the heterogeneity and dynamics, otherwise hidden in the ensemble. In early cryogenic studies single molecules were identified by their distinct excitation spectra, yet measuring excitation spectra at room temperature remains challenging. Here we present a broadband Fourier approach that allows rapid recording of excitation spectra of individual molecules under ambient conditions and that is robust against blinking and bleaching. Applying the method we show that the excitation spectra of individual molecules exhibit an extreme distribution of solvatochromic shifts and distinct spectral shapes. Importantly, we demonstrate that the sensitivity and speed of the broadband technique is comparable to that of emission spectroscopy putting both techniques side-by-side in single-molecule spectroscopy. PMID:26794035

  5. Faraday Waves under Time-Reversed Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietschmann, Dirk; Stannarius, Ralf; Wagner, Christian; John, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Do parametrically driven systems distinguish periodic excitations that are time mirrors of each other? Faraday waves in a Newtonian fluid are studied under excitation with superimposed harmonic wave forms. We demonstrate that the threshold parameters for the stability of the ground state are insensitive to a time inversion of the driving function. This is a peculiarity of some dynamic systems. The Faraday system shares this property with standard electroconvection in nematic liquid crystals [J. Heuer , Phys. Rev. E 78, 036218 (2008)PLEEE81539-3755]. In general, time inversion of the excitation affects the asymptotic stability of a parametrically driven system, even when it is described by linear ordinary differential equations. Obviously, the observed symmetry has to be attributed to the particular structure of the underlying differential equation system. The pattern selection of the Faraday waves above threshold, on the other hand, discriminates between time-mirrored excitation functions.

  6. How to excite a rogue wave

    SciTech Connect

    Akhmediev, N.; Ankiewicz, A.; Soto-Crespo, J. M.

    2009-10-15

    We propose initial conditions that could facilitate the excitation of rogue waves. Understanding the initial conditions that foster rogue waves could be useful both in attempts to avoid them by seafarers and in generating highly energetic pulses in optical fibers.

  7. The aeronomy of vibrationally excited ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, J. E.; Allen, J. E., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical calculations show that above 80 km in the earth's atmosphere the production of vibrationally excited ozone by chemical processes leads to number densities which are usually larger than those expected for local thermodynamic equilibrium. Quenching of highly excited molecules produced in O+O2+M, O3+M provided a significant source of the lower lying states above the mesopause while the 9.6 microns emission of O3 (0,0,1) was a major sink. Analysis of available laboratory results implied that reactions involving excited ozone play a significant role in the global ozone balance despite the relatively small abundance of the molecule. However, this effect is implicit in many of the rate coefficients currently used in stratospheric calculations. In the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere, where the excited state populations differ from those for thermal equilibrium, published reaction rate data are not necessarily applicable to aeronomic calculations.

  8. Ultrafast optical excitation of magnetic skyrmions.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, N; Seki, S; Tokura, Y

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic skyrmions in an insulating chiral magnet Cu2OSeO3 were studied by all-optical spin wave spectroscopy. The spins in the conical and skyrmion phases were excited by the impulsive magnetic field from the inverse-Faraday effect, and resultant spin dynamics were detected by using time-resolved magneto-optics. Clear dispersions of the helimagnon were observed, which is accompanied by a distinct transition into the skyrmion phase, by sweeping temperature and magnetic field. In addition to the collective excitations of skyrmions, i.e., rotation and breathing modes, several spin precession modes were identified, which would be specific to optical excitation. The ultrafast, nonthermal, and local excitation of the spin systems by photons would lead to the efficient manipulation of nano-magnetic structures. PMID:25897634

  9. Ultrafast optical excitation of magnetic skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, N.; Seki, S.; Tokura, Y.

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic skyrmions in an insulating chiral magnet Cu2OSeO3 were studied by all-optical spin wave spectroscopy. The spins in the conical and skyrmion phases were excited by the impulsive magnetic field from the inverse-Faraday effect, and resultant spin dynamics were detected by using time-resolved magneto-optics. Clear dispersions of the helimagnon were observed, which is accompanied by a distinct transition into the skyrmion phase, by sweeping temperature and magnetic field. In addition to the collective excitations of skyrmions, i.e., rotation and breathing modes, several spin precession modes were identified, which would be specific to optical excitation. The ultrafast, nonthermal, and local excitation of the spin systems by photons would lead to the efficient manipulation of nano-magnetic structures.

  10. The DSS-14 C-band exciter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan, D. R.

    1989-01-01

    The development and implementation of a C-band exciter for use with the Block IV Receiver-Exciter Subsystem at Deep Space Station 14 (DSS-14) has been completed. The exciter supplements the standard capabilities of the Block IV system by providing a drive signal for the C-band transmitter while generating coherent translation frequencies for C-band (5-GHz) to S-band (2.2- to 2.3-GHz) Doppler extraction, C-band to L-band (1.6-GHz) zero delay measurements, and a level calibrated L-band test signal. Exciter functions are described, and a general explanation and description of the C-band uplink controller is presented.

  11. The DSS-14 C-band exciter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowan, D. R.

    1989-05-01

    The development and implementation of a C-band exciter for use with the Block IV Receiver-Exciter Subsystem at Deep Space Station 14 (DSS-14) has been completed. The exciter supplements the standard capabilities of the Block IV system by providing a drive signal for the C-band transmitter while generating coherent translation frequencies for C-band (5-GHz) to S-band (2.2- to 2.3-GHz) Doppler extraction, C-band to L-band (1.6-GHz) zero delay measurements, and a level calibrated L-band test signal. Exciter functions are described, and a general explanation and description of the C-band uplink controller is presented.

  12. Generic two-variable model of excitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, A. C.; Mindlin, G. B.; Dawson, S. Ponce

    2002-04-01

    We present a simple model that displays all classes of two-dimensional excitable regimes. One of the variables of the model displays the usual spikes observed in excitable systems. Since the model is written in terms of a ``standard'' vector field, it is always possible to fit it to experimental data displaying spikes in an algorithmic way. In fact, we use it to fit a series of membrane potential recordings obtained in the medicinal leech and time series generated with the FitzHugh-Nagumo equations and the excitability model of Eguía et al. [Phys. Rev. E 58, 2636 (1998)]. In each case, we determine the excitability class of the corresponding system.

  13. Acoustics of Excited Jets: A Historical Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Cliffard A.

    2005-01-01

    The idea that a jet may be excited by external forcing is not new. The first published demonstration of a jet responding to external pressure waves occurred in the mid-1800's. It was not, however, until the 1950's, with the advent of commercial jet aircraft, that interest in the subject greatly increased. Researchers first used excited jets to study the structure of the jet and attempt to determine the nature of the noise sources. The jet actuators of the time limited the range (Reynolds and Mach numbers) of jets that could be excited. As the actuators improved, more realistic jets could be studied. This has led to a better understanding of how jet excitation may be used not only as a research tool to understand the flow properties and noise generation process, but also as a method to control jet noise.

  14. Mode Selective Excitation Using Coherent Control Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ajay K.; Konradi, Jakow; Materny, Arnulf; Sarkar, Sisir K.

    2008-11-14

    Femtosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (fs-CARS) gives access to ultrafast molecular dynamics. However, femtosecond laser pulses are spectrally broad and therefore coherently excite several molecular modes. While the temporal resolution is high, usually no mode-selective excitation is possible. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of selectively exciting specific molecular vibrations in solution phase with shaped fs laser excitation using a feedback-controlled optimization technique guided by an evolutionary algorithm. This approach is also used to obtain molecule-specific CARS spectra from a mixture of different substances. The optimized phase structures of the fs pulses are characterized to get insight into the control process. Possible applications of the spectrum control are discussed.

  15. Broadband single-molecule excitation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatkowski, Lukasz; Gellings, Esther; van Hulst, Niek F.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, single-molecule spectroscopy has developed into a widely used tool in multiple disciplines of science. The diversity of routinely recorded emission spectra does underpin the strength of the single-molecule approach in resolving the heterogeneity and dynamics, otherwise hidden in the ensemble. In early cryogenic studies single molecules were identified by their distinct excitation spectra, yet measuring excitation spectra at room temperature remains challenging. Here we present a broadband Fourier approach that allows rapid recording of excitation spectra of individual molecules under ambient conditions and that is robust against blinking and bleaching. Applying the method we show that the excitation spectra of individual molecules exhibit an extreme distribution of solvatochromic shifts and distinct spectral shapes. Importantly, we demonstrate that the sensitivity and speed of the broadband technique is comparable to that of emission spectroscopy putting both techniques side-by-side in single-molecule spectroscopy.

  16. Fear, excitement, and financial risk-taking.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chan Jean; Andrade, Eduardo B

    2015-01-01

    Can fear trigger risk-taking? In this paper, we assess whether fear can be reinterpreted as a state of excitement as a result of contextual cues and promote, rather than discourage, risk-taking. In a laboratory experiment, the participants' emotional states were induced (fear vs. control), followed by a purportedly unrelated financial task. The task was framed as either a stock market investment or an exciting casino game. Our results showed that incidental fear (vs. control) induced risk-averse behaviour when the task was framed as a stock investment decision. However, fear encouraged risk-taking when the very same task was framed as an exciting casino game. The impact of fear on risk-taking was partially mediated by the excitement felt during the financial task. PMID:24661027

  17. Nonlinear excited waves on the interventricular septum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekki, Naoaki; Harada, Yoshifumi; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2012-11-01

    Using a novel ultrasonic noninvasive imaging method, we observe some phase singularities in propagating excited waves on a human cardiac interventricular septum (IVS) for a healthy young male. We present a possible physical model explaining one-dimensional dynamics of phase singularities in nonlinearly excited waves on the IVS. We show that at least one of the observed phase singularities in the excited waves on the IVS can be explained by the Bekki-Nozaki hole solution of the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation without any adjustable parameters. We conclude that the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation is such a suitable model for one-dimensional dynamics of cardiac phase singularities in nonlinearly excited waves on the IVS.

  18. Geophysical excitation of nutation and geomagnetic jerks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondrák, Jan; Ron, Cyril

    2014-05-01

    Recently Zinovy Malkin (2013) proposed that the observed changes of Free Core Nutation parameters (phase, amplitude) might be related to geomagnetic jerks (rapid changes of the secular variations of geomagnetic field). We tested this hypothesis and found that if the numerical integration of Brzezinski broad-band Liouville equations of atmospheric/oceanic excitations is re-initialized at the epochs of geomagnetic jerks, the agreement between the integrated and observed celestial pole offsets is improved significantly. This approach however tacitly assumes that the influence of geomagnetic jerks has a stepwise character, which is physically not acceptable. The present study continues in this effort by introducing a simple continuous excitation function (hypothetically due to geomagnetic jerks). The results of numerical integration of atmospheric/oceanic excitations plus this newly introduced excitation are then compared with the observed celestial pole offsets.

  19. Magnetic Excitation for Spin Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dexter; Mehmed, Oral; Brown, Gerald V.

    1997-01-01

    The Dynamic Spin Rig Laboratory (DSRL) at the NASA Lewis Research Center is a facility used for vibration testing of structures under spinning conditions. The current actuators used for excitation are electromagnetic shakers which are configured to apply torque to the rig's vertical rotor. The rotor is supported radially and axially by conventional bearings. Current operation is limited in rotational speed, excitation capability, and test duration. In an effort to enhance its capabilities, the rig has been initially equipped with a radial magnetic bearing which provides complementary excitation and shaft support. The new magnetic feature has been used in actual blade vibration tests and its performance has been favorable. Due to the success of this initial modification further enhancements are planned which include making the system fully magnetically supported. This paper reports on this comprehensive effort to upgrade the DSRL with an emphasis on the new magnetic excitation capability.

  20. Faraday waves under time-reversed excitation.

    PubMed

    Pietschmann, Dirk; Stannarius, Ralf; Wagner, Christian; John, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Do parametrically driven systems distinguish periodic excitations that are time mirrors of each other? Faraday waves in a Newtonian fluid are studied under excitation with superimposed harmonic wave forms. We demonstrate that the threshold parameters for the stability of the ground state are insensitive to a time inversion of the driving function. This is a peculiarity of some dynamic systems. The Faraday system shares this property with standard electroconvection in nematic liquid crystals [J. Heuer et al., Phys. Rev. E 78, 036218 (2008)]. In general, time inversion of the excitation affects the asymptotic stability of a parametrically driven system, even when it is described by linear ordinary differential equations. Obviously, the observed symmetry has to be attributed to the particular structure of the underlying differential equation system. The pattern selection of the Faraday waves above threshold, on the other hand, discriminates between time-mirrored excitation functions. PMID:23496716

  1. Plasmoelectronics: coupling plasmonic excitation with electron flow.

    PubMed

    Warren, Scott C; Walker, David A; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2012-06-19

    Explorations of the coupling of light and charge via localized surface plasmons have led to the discovery that plasmonic excitation can influence macroscopic flows of charge and, conversely, that charging events can change the plasmonic excitation. We discuss recent theory and experiments in the emerging field of plasmoelectronics, with particular emphasis on the application of these materials to challenges in nanotechnology, energy use, and sensing. PMID:22385329

  2. Fast pulsed excitation wiggler or undulator

    DOEpatents

    van Steenbergen, Arie

    1990-01-01

    A fast pulsed excitation, electromagnetic undulator or wiggler, employing geometrically alternating substacks of thin laminations of ferromagnetic material, together with a single turn current loop excitation of the composite assembly, of such shape and configuration that intense, spatially alternating, magnetic fields are generated; for use as a pulsed mode undulator or wiggler radiator, for use in a Free Electron Laser (FEL) type radiation source or, for use in an Inverse Free Electron Laser (IFEL) charged particle accelerator.

  3. Electron impact vibrational excitation of methyl chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaamini, Ahmad; Hargreaves, Leigh; Khakoo, Murtadha

    2016-05-01

    Low energy differential cross sections and excitation functions for vibrational excitation of CH3 Cl are presented for five vibrational features in the electron energy loss spectrum of this molecule. Electron energies range from 1 eV to 15 eV and scattering angles from 10o to 125o. Results will be compared to existing data for CH3 Cl in the literature. Funded by a NSF-AMOP-RUI Grant.

  4. Oscillatory traveling waves in excitable media

    SciTech Connect

    Zemskov, E. P. Loskutov, A. Yu.

    2008-08-15

    A new type of waves in an excitable medium, characterized by oscillatory profile, is described. The excitable medium is modeled by a two-component activator-inhibitor system. Reaction-diffusion systems with diagonal and cross diffusion are examined. As an example, a front (kink) represented by a heteroclinic orbit in the phase space is considered. The wave shape and velocity are analyzed with the use of exact analytical solutions for wave profiles.

  5. Adjustable, Broadband, Selective Excitation with Uniform Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cano, Kristin E.; Smith, Mari A.; Shaka, A. J.

    2002-03-01

    An advance in the problem of achieving broadband, selective, and uniform-phase excitation in NMR spectroscopy of liquids is outlined. Broadband means that, neglecting relaxation, any frequency bandwidth may be excited even when the available radiofrequency (RF) field strength is strictly limited. Selective means that sharp transition edges can be created between pure-phase excitation and no excitation at all. Uniform phase means that, neglecting spin-spin coupling, all resonance lines have nearly the same phase. Conventional uniform-phase excitation pulses (e.g., E-BURP), mostly based on amplitude modulation of the RF field, are not broadband: they have an achievable bandwidth that is strictly limited by the peak power available. Other compensated pulses based on adiabatic half-passage, like BIR-4, are not selective. By contrast, inversion pulses based on adiabatic fast passage can be broadband (and selective) in the sense above. The advance outlined is a way to reformulate these frequency modulated (FM) pulses for excitation, rather than just inversion.

  6. Adjustable, broadband, selective excitation with uniform phase.

    PubMed

    Cano, Kristin E; Smith, Mari A; Shaka, A J

    2002-03-01

    An advance in the problem of achieving broadband, selective, and uniform-phase excitation in NMR spectroscopy of liquids is outlined. Broadband means that, neglecting relaxation, any frequency bandwidth may be excited even when the available radiofrequency (RF) field strength is strictly limited. Selective means that sharp transition edges can be created between pure-phase excitation and no excitation at all. Uniform phase means that, neglecting spin-spin coupling, all resonance lines have nearly the same phase. Conventional uniform-phase excitation pulses (e.g., E-BURP), mostly based on amplitude modulation of the RF field, are not broadband: they have an achievable bandwidth that is strictly limited by the peak power available. Other compensated pulses based on adiabatic half-passage, like BIR-4, are not selective. By contrast, inversion pulses based on adiabatic fast passage can be broadband (and selective) in the sense above. The advance outlined is a way to reformulate these frequency modulated (FM) pulses for excitation, rather than just inversion. PMID:11945042

  7. Recombination and collisionally excited Balmer lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raga, A. C.; Castellanos-Ramírez, A.; Esquivel, A.; Rodríguez-González, A.; Velázquez, P. F.

    2015-10-01

    We present a model for the statistical equilibrium of the levels of H, considering recombinations to excited levels, collisional excitations up from the ground state and spontaneous radiative transitions. This problem has a simple "cascade matrix" solution, describing a cascade of downwards spontaneous transitions fed by both recombinations and collisional excitations. The resulting predicted Balmer line ratios show a transition between a low temperature and a high temperature regime (dominated by recombinations and by collisional excitations, respectively), both with only a weak line ratio vs. temperature dependence. This clear characteristic allows a direct observational identification of regions in which the Balmer lines are either recombination or collisionally excited transitions. We find that for a gas in coronal ionization equilibrium the Halpha and Hbeta lines are collisionally excited for all temperatures. In order to have recombination Halpha and Hbeta it is necessary to have higher ionization fractions of H than the ones obtained from coronal equilibrium (e.g., such as the ones found in a photoionized gas).

  8. Electron excitation from ground state to first excited state: Bohmian mechanics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Song; Shuang, Zhao; Fu-Ming, Guo; Yu-Jun, Yang; Su-Yu, Li

    2016-03-01

    The excitation process of electrons from the ground state to the first excited state via the resonant laser pulse is investigated by the Bohmian mechanics method. It is found that the Bohmian particles far away from the nucleus are easier to be excited and are excited firstly, while the Bohmian particles in the ground state is subject to a strong quantum force at a certain moment, being excited to the first excited state instantaneously. A detailed analysis for one of the trajectories is made, and finally we present the space and energy distribution of 2000 Bohmian particles at several typical instants and analyze their dynamical process at these moments. Project supported by the Doctoral Research Start-up Funding of Northeast Dianli University, China (Grant No. BSJXM-201332), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11547114, 11534004, 11474129, 11274141, 11447192, and 11304116), and the Graduate Innovation Fund of Jilin University, China (Grant No. 2015091).

  9. Geometric and electronic structure of ground and excited states of group VA diatomics. A theoretical LCGTO-MP-LSD study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toscano, M.; Russo, N.

    1992-12-01

    LCGTO-MP-LSD calculation was performed for the ground and several low-lying excited states of homo- (N2, P2, As2, and Sb2) and hetero-nuclear (PN, AsN, AsP, AsSb, SbN, and SbP) group VA diatomics. For all the systems the ground state is found to be1Σ+. For N2 and P2, the1Σ{/g +} ground state is followed by the3Σ{/u +},3Π g ,3Δ u ,1Π g , and1Δ u low-lying exited states while for As2 the order is found to be3Σ{/u +},3Δ u ,3Π g ,1Δ u ,1Π g . Finally for Sb2 the relative stability of excited states is3Σ{/u +},3Δ u ,1Δ u ,3Π g ,1Π g . For the hetero-nuclear diatomics the1Σ+ ground state is, in the case of PN, AsN, AsP, SbN, and SbP, followed by the3Σ+,3Δ,3Π,1Π and1Δ low-lying excited states while for the AsSb diatomic an inversion of stability of the two last singlets occurs. The calculated spectroscopic parameters ( Re, ω e, and De) are in good agreement with all the available experimental results while, the Te values are overestimated by about 0.5 eV. Mulliken population analysis shows that both homo- and hetero-nuclear group VA diatomics are essentially triple bonded systems.

  10. Convoy electron emission following ionization of highly-charged ions excited by resonant coherent excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, S.; Nakano, Y.; Metoki, K.; Shindo, T.; Ohtsuki, S.; Azuma, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Komaki, K.; Nakai, Y.; Takada, E.; Murakami, T.

    2012-11-01

    Projectile ionization of highly-charged Ar and Fe ions in the excited states passing relativistically fast through a thin crystalline foil was experimentally studied. We selectively controlled the population of the excited states of the projectiles, and their alignment by choosing a specific m-state through three-dimensional resonant coherent excitation technique by periodical electric fields in a crystalline. We measured energy-differential spectra of electron emission released from projectiles at zero degree. Under the resonance condition, we found an evident enhancement of the convoy electron yield, which reflects the electron momentum distribution of the initial bound state of the excited ions.

  11. Tailoring Dye-sensitized Upconversion Nanoparticles Excitation Bands towards Excitation Wavelength Selective Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiang; Lee, Hyungseok; Bilsel, Osman; Zhang, Yuanwei; Li, Zhanjun; Chen, Teresa; Liu, Yi; Duan, Chunying; Shen, Jie; Punjabi, Amol; Han, Gang

    2015-01-01

    One of key roadblocks in UCNP development is its extremely limited choices of excitation wavelengths. We report a generic design to program UCNPs to possess highly tunable dye characteristic excitation bands. Using such distinctive properties, we were able to develop a new excitation wavelength selective security imaging. This work unleashed the greater freedom of the excitation wavelengths of the upconversion nanoparticles and we believe it is a game-changer in the field and this method will enable numerous applications that are currently limited by existing UCNPs. PMID:26499208

  12. Tailoring dye-sensitized upconversion nanoparticle excitation bands towards excitation wavelength selective imaging

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wu, Xiang; Lee, Hyungseok; Bilsel, Osman; Zhang, Yuanwei; Li, Zhanjun; Chen, Teresa; Liu, Yi; Duan, Chunying; Shen, Jie; Punjabi, Amol; et al

    2015-01-01

    One of the key roadblocks in UCNP development is its extremely limited choices of excitation wavelengths. We report a generic design to program UCNPs to possess highly tunable dye characteristic excitation bands. Using such distinctive properties, we were able to develop a new excitation wavelength selective security imaging. Finally, this work unleashed the greater freedom of the excitation wavelengths of the upconversion nanoparticles and we believe it is a game-changer in the field and this method will enable numerous applications that are currently limited by existing UCNPs.

  13. Theory and computation of the attosecond dynamics of pairs of electrons excited by high-frequency short light pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Mercouris, Th.; Komninos, Y.; Nicolaides, C.A.

    2004-03-01

    By defining and solving from first principles, using the state-specific expansion approach, a time-dependent pump-probe problem with real atomic states, we show computationally that, if time resolution reaches the attosecond regime, strongly correlated electronic ''motion'' can be probed and can manifest itself in terms of time-dependent mixing of symmetry-adapted configurations. For the system that was chosen in this study, these configurations, the He 2s2p,2p3d, and 3s3p P{sup o1}, whose radials are computed by solving multiconfigurational Hartree-Fock equations, label doubly excited states (DES) of He inside the 1s{epsilon}p P{sup o1} scattering continuum and act as nonstationary states that mix, and simultaneously decay exponentially to 1s{epsilon}p P{sup o1} via the atomic Hamiltonian, H{sub A}. The herein presented theory and analysis permitted the computation of attosecond snapshots of pairs of electrons in terms of time-dependent probability distributions of the angle between the position vectors of the two electrons. The physical processes were determined by solving ab initio the time-dependent Schroedinger equation, using as initial states either the He 1s{sup 2} or the 1s2s S{sup 1} discrete states and two femtosecond Gaussian pulses of 86 fs full width at half-maximum, having frequencies in resonance with the energies of the correlated states represented by the 2s2p and 2p3d configurations. We calculated the probability of photoabsorption and of two-photon resonance ionization and of the simultaneous oscillatory mixing of the configurations 2s2p,2p3d,3s3p, and 1s{epsilon}p P{sup o1}, within the attosecond scale, via the interactions present in H{sub A}. Among the possible channels for observing the attosecond oscillations of the occupation probabilities of the DES, is the de-excitation path of the transition to the He 1s3d D{sup 1} discrete state, which emits at 6680 A.

  14. Electron impact excitation of Kr XXXII

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, K.M. Keenan, F.P.; Lawson, K.D.

    2009-09-15

    Collision strengths ({omega}) have been calculated for all 7750 transitions among the lowest 125 levels belonging to the 2s{sup 2}2p,2s2p{sup 2},2p{sup 3},2s{sup 2}3l,2s2p3l, and 2p{sup 2}3l configurations of boron-like krypton, Kr XXXII, for which the Dirac Atomic R-matrix Code has been adopted. All partial waves with angular momentum J{<=}40 have been included, sufficient for the convergence of {omega} for forbidden transitions. For allowed transitions, a top-up has been included in order to obtain converged values of {omega} up to an energy of 500 Ryd. Resonances in the thresholds region have been resolved in a narrow energy mesh, and results for effective collision strengths (Y) have been obtained after averaging the values of {omega} over a Maxwellian distribution of electron velocities. Values of Y are reported over a wide temperature range below 10{sup 7.3}K, and the accuracy of the results is assessed. Values of Y are also listed in the temperature range 7.3{<=}logT{sub e}(K){<=}9.0, obtained from the nonresonant collision strengths from the Flexible Atomic Code.

  15. Atmospheric Excitation of Planetary Normal Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanimoto, Toshiro

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to: (1) understand the phenomenon of continuous free oscillations of the Earth and (2) examine the idea of using this phenomenon for planetary seismology. We first describe the results on (1) and present our evaluations of the idea (2) in the final section. In 1997, after almost forty years since the initial attempt by Benioff et al, continuous free oscillations of the Earth were discovered. Spheroidal fundamental modes between 2 and 7 millihertz are excited continuously with acceleration amplitudes of about 0.3-0.5 nanogals. The signal is now commonly found in virtually all data recorded by STS-1 type broadband seismometers at quiet sites. Seasonal variation in amplitude and the existence of two coupled modes between the atmosphere and the solid Earth support that these oscillations are excited by the atmosphere. Stochastic excitation due to atmospheric turbulence is a favored mechanism, providing a good match between theory and data. The atmosphere has ample energy to support this theory because excitation of these modes require only 500-10000 W whereas the atmosphere contains about 117 W of kinetic energy. An application of this phenomenon includes planetary seismology, because other planets may be oscillating due to atmospheric excitation. The interior structure of planets could be learned by determining the eigenfrequencies in the continuous free oscillations. It is especially attractive to pursue this idea for tectonically quiet planets, since quakes may be too infrequent to be recorded by seismic instruments.

  16. Femtosecond Timescale Evolution of Pyrrole Electronic Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero, Raul; Conde, Alvaro Peralta; Ovejas, Virginia; Castano, Fernando; Longarte, Asier

    2012-06-01

    Pyrrole is a simple aromatic molecule with relevantchromophoric properties in biology. Although its apparent simplicity, it shows a complicated dynamics after excitation in the near part of the UV absorption spectrum, which results from the interplay between the bright ππ^* and the dark dissociative πσ^* electronic transitions. Herein, we present a time resolved study with ultrafast resolution on the relaxation dynamics of isolated pyrrole, after excitation in the 265-217 nm range. Two lifetimes of 19 and 15 fs, which are associated with the internal conversion from the bright 1B2 ππ^* state and the propagation of the wavepacket on the πσ^* state, respectively, are found in the studied energy interval. The work also explores the consequences of non resonant adiabatic excitation of the system when broadband femtosecond pulses are employed to prepare the molecule in the targeted electronic states, revealing the key implication of this type of coherent phenomena. The collected data reveal that the bright 1B2 ππ^* state is adiabatically populated at excitation wavelengths far away from resonance, providing an efficient way to reach the πσ^* state. The recorded transients are fit employing a coherent model that provides a comprehensive view of the dynamical processes pyrrole undergoes after excitation by ultrashort light pulses. M. N. R. Ashfold, B. Cronin, A. L. Devine, R. N. Dixon and M. G. D. Nix Science, 312, 1637-1640, 2006.

  17. Tone-excited jet: Theory and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Lepicovsky, J.; Tam, C. K. W.; Morris, P. J.; Burrin, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    A detailed study to understand the phenomenon of broadband jet-noise amplification produced by upstream discrete-tone sound excitation has been carried out. This has been achieved by simultaneous acquisition of the acoustic, mean velocity, turbulence intensities, and instability-wave pressure data. A 5.08 cm diameter jet has been tested for this purpose under static and also flight-simulation conditions. An open-jet wind tunnel has been used to simulate the flight effects. Limited data on heated jets have also been obtained. To improve the physical understanding of the flow modifications brought about by the upstream discrete-tone excitation, ensemble-averaged schlieren photographs of the jets have also been taken. Parallel to the experimental study, a mathematical model of the processes that lead to broadband-noise amplification by upstream tones has been developed. Excitation of large-scale turbulence by upstream tones is first calculated. A model to predict the changes in small-scale turbulence is then developed. By numerically integrating the resultant set of equations, the enhanced small-scale turbulence distribution in a jet under various excitation conditions is obtained. The resulting changes in small-scale turbulence have been attributed to broadband amplification of jet noise. Excellent agreement has been found between the theory and the experiments. It has also shown that the relative velocity effects are the same for the excited and the unexcited jets.

  18. Electronically excited states of PANH anions.

    PubMed

    Theis, Mallory L; Candian, Alessandra; Tielens, Alexander G G M; Lee, Timothy J; Fortenberry, Ryan C

    2015-06-14

    The singly deprotonated anion derivatives of nitrogenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PANHs) are investigated for their electronically excited state properties. These include single deprotonation of the two unique arrangements of quinoline producing fourteen different isomers. This same procedure is also undertaken for single deprotonation of the three nitrogenation isomers of acridine and the three of pyrenidine. It is shown quantum chemically that the quinoline-class of PANH anion derivatives can only produce a candidate dipole-bound excited state each, a state defined as the interaction of an extra electron with the dipole moment of the corresponding neutral. However, the acridine- and pyrenidine-classes possess valence excited states as well as the possible dipole-bound excited states where the latter is only possible if the dipole moment is sufficiently large to retain the extra electron; the valence excitation is independent of the radical dipolar strength. As a result, the theoretical vertically computed electronic spectra of deprotonated PANH anion derivatives is fairly rich in the 1.5 eV to 2.5 eV range significantly opening the possibilities for these molecules to be applied to longer wavelength studies of visible and near-IR spectroscopy. Lastly, the study of these systems is also enhanced by the inclusion of informed orbital arrangements in a simply constructed basis set that is shown to be more complete and efficient than standard atom-centered functions. PMID:25975430

  19. Work excitement in nursing: an examination of the relationship between work excitement and burnout.

    PubMed

    Sadovich, Juliana M

    2005-01-01

    The results of this study found a significant relationship between burnout and the Work Excitement Model. This suggests that utilization of the Work Excitement Model by health care organizations may reduce nursing burnout and improve productivity and quality of care. PMID:15881495

  20. Triplet excitations in graphene-based systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posvyanskiy, V.; Arnarson, L.; Hedegård, P.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we investigate the excitations in a single graphene layer and in a single-walled carbon nanotube, i.e. the spectrum of magnetic excitations is calculated. In the absence of interactions in these systems there is a unique gap in the electron-hole continuum. We show that in the presence of Coulomb correlations bound states, magnons, appear in this forbidden region. The Coulomb interaction is examined in the context of the Pariser-Parr-Pople (PPP) model which takes into account the long-range nature of the interaction. The energy of the new bound states depends on the strength of the Coulomb forces. The calculations are performed for arbitrary electron-hole (e\\text-h) momentum q . In the end, this work finally settles the discussion sabout the existence of triplet excitations in graphene which has been lasting for a decade in the literature.

  1. Charge-displacement analysis for excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Ronca, Enrico Tarantelli, Francesco; Pastore, Mariachiara Belpassi, Leonardo; De Angelis, Filippo; Angeli, Celestino; Cimiraglia, Renzo

    2014-02-07

    We extend the Charge-Displacement (CD) analysis, already successfully employed to describe the nature of intermolecular interactions [L. Belpassi et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 13046 (2010)] and various types of controversial chemical bonds [L. Belpassi et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 130, 1048 (2008); N. Salvi et al., Chem. Eur. J. 16, 7231 (2010)], to study the charge fluxes accompanying electron excitations, and in particular the all-important charge-transfer (CT) phenomena. We demonstrate the usefulness of the new approach through applications to exemplary excitations in a series of molecules, encompassing various typical situations from valence, to Rydberg, to CT excitations. The CD functions defined along various spatial directions provide a detailed and insightful quantitative picture of the electron displacements taking place.

  2. Excited Biexcitons in Transition Metal Dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, David K; Kidd, Daniel W; Varga, Kálmán

    2015-10-14

    The Stochastic Variational Method (SVM) is used to show that the effective mass model correctly estimates the binding energies of excitons and trions but fails to predict the experimental binding energy of the biexciton. Using high-accuracy variational calculations, it is demonstrated that the biexciton binding energy in transition metal dichalcogenides is smaller than the trion binding energy, contradicting experimental findings. It is also shown that the biexciton has bound excited states and that the binding energy of the L = 0 excited state is in very good agreement with experimental data. This excited state corresponds to a hole attached to a negative trion and may be a possible resolution of the discrepancy between theory and experiment. PMID:26422057

  3. Ultrasoft fermionic excitation at finite chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaizot, Jean-Paul; Satow, Daisuke

    2014-05-01

    It has been suggested previously that an ultrasoft fermionic excitation develops, albeit with a small spectral weight, in a system of massless fermions and scalar bosons with Yukawa interaction at high temperature T. In this paper we study how this excitation is modified at finite chemical potential μ. We relate the existence of the ultrasoft mode to symmetries, in particular charge conjugation, and a supersymmetry of the free system which is spontaneously broken by finite temperature and finite density effects, as argued earlier by Lebedev and Smilga. A nonvanishing chemical potential breaks both symmetries explicitly and maximally at zero temperature where the mode ceases to exist. A detailed calculation indicates that the ultrasoft excitation persists as long as T≥0.71μ.

  4. Low-spin excitations in 100Pd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radeck, D.; Albers, M.; Bernards, C.; Bettermann, L.; Blazhev, A.; Fransen, C.; Heinze, S.; Jolie, J.; Mü; cher, D.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years collectivity in the mass region around A = 100 has become the focus of increased interest. The N = 52 isotones were investigated in detail and phonon excitations -especially one- and two-phonon mixed-symmetry states—were identified. In order to investigate how vibrator-like behavior and states with mixed-symmetry character evolve with increasing neutron number it is interesting to study the N = 54 isotones. Therefore an experiment to measure the low-spin excitations of 100Pd was performed at the FN-Tandem accelerator with the HORUS cube spectrometer. Besides the determination of excitation and transition energies and branching ratios, spins and multipole mixing ratios resulted from the γγ angular correlation analysis. The newly gained data were compared with predictions from theory both from collective models and from shell model.

  5. Artificial Excitation of Schumann Resonance with HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streltsov, A. V.; Chang, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    We report results from the experiment aimed at the artificial excitation of extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic waves with frequencies corresponding to the frequency of Schumann resonance (typically, 7.5 - 8.0 Hz frequency range). Electromagnetic waves with these frequencies can form a standing pattern inside the spherical cavity formed by the surface of the earth and the ionosphere. In the experiment the ELF waves were excited by heating the ionosphere with X-mode HF electromagnetic waves generated by the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska. The experiment demonstrates that heating of the ionosphere can excite relatively large-amplitude electromagnetic waves with frequencies in the range of the Schumann resonance, when the ionosphere has a strong F-layer and an electric field greater than 5 mV/m is present in the E-region.

  6. Resonance Raman excitation profiles of lycopene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskins, L. C.

    1981-01-01

    The resonance Raman spectrum of lycopene has been examined in acetone solvent and excitation profiles of the three fundamentals ν1, ν2, and ν3 have been determined. The excitation data and the visible spectrum have been analyzed using two-mode and three-mode vibrational models, with the two-mode model involving virtual states of ν1 and ν2 giving the best fit to the data. This mode mixing or Duskinsky effect was not observed for β-carotene. The single-mode and three-mode theories which have been used to explain the corresponding data for β-carotene are shown to be inconsistent with the experimental data of lycopene. Equations for calculating excitation profiles and visible spectra are given.

  7. Testing the excitability of human motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    McNeil, Chris J.; Butler, Jane E.; Taylor, Janet L.; Gandevia, Simon C.

    2013-01-01

    The responsiveness of the human central nervous system can change profoundly with exercise, injury, disuse, or disease. Changes occur at both cortical and spinal levels but in most cases excitability of the motoneuron pool must be assessed to localize accurately the site of adaptation. Hence, it is critical to understand, and employ correctly, the methods to test motoneuron excitability in humans. Several techniques exist and each has its advantages and disadvantages. This review examines the most common techniques that use evoked compound muscle action potentials to test the excitability of the motoneuron pool and describes the merits and limitations of each. The techniques discussed are the H-reflex, F-wave, tendon jerk, V-wave, cervicomedullary motor evoked potential (CMEP), and motor evoked potential (MEP). A number of limitations with these techniques are presented. PMID:23630483

  8. Nanoscale control of phonon excitations in graphene

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo Won; Ko, Wonhee; Ku, JiYeon; Jeon, Insu; Kim, Donggyu; Kwon, Hyeokshin; Oh, Youngtek; Ryu, Seunghwa; Kuk, Young; Hwang, Sung Woo; Suh, Hwansoo

    2015-01-01

    Phonons, which are collective excitations in a lattice of atoms or molecules, play a major role in determining various physical properties of condensed matter, such as thermal and electrical conductivities. In particular, phonons in graphene interact strongly with electrons; however, unlike in usual metals, these interactions between phonons and massless Dirac fermions appear to mirror the rather complicated physics of those between light and relativistic electrons. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of the underlying physics through systematic studies of phonon interactions and excitations in graphene is crucial for realising graphene-based devices. In this study, we demonstrate that the local phonon properties of graphene can be controlled at the nanoscale by tuning the interaction strength between graphene and an underlying Pt substrate. Using scanning probe methods, we determine that the reduced interaction due to embedded Ar atoms facilitates electron–phonon excitations, further influencing phonon-assisted inelastic electron tunnelling. PMID:26109454

  9. Shear layer excitation, experiment versus theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechert, D. W.; Stahl, B.

    1984-01-01

    The acoustical excitation of shear layers is investigated. Acoustical excitation causes the so-called orderly structures in shear layers and jets. Also, the deviations in the spreading rate between different shear layer experiments are due to the same excitation mechanism. Measurements in the linear interaction region close to the edge from which the shear layer is shed are examined. Two sets of experiments (Houston 1981 and Berlin 1983/84) are discussed. The measurements were carried out with shear layers in air using hot wire anemometers and microphones. The agreement between these measurements and the theory is good. Even details of the fluctuating flow field correspond to theoretical predictions, such as the local occurrence of negative phase speeds.

  10. Excited light meson spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Thomas, Hadron Spectrum Collaboration

    2012-04-01

    I report on recent progress in calculating excited meson spectra using lattice QCD, emphasizing results and phenomenology. With novel techniques we can now extract extensive spectra of excited mesons with high statistical precision, including spin-four states and those with exotic quantum numbers. As well as isovector meson spectra, I will present new calculations of the spectrum of excited light isoscalar mesons, something that has up to now been a challenge for lattice QCD. I show determinations of the flavor content of these mesons, including the eta-eta' mixing angle, providing a window on annihilation dynamics in QCD. I will also discuss recent work on using lattice QCD to map out the energy-dependent phase shift in pi-pi scattering and future applications of the methodology to the study of resonances and decays.

  11. Collective excitations in itinerant spiral magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Kampf, A.P.

    1996-01-01

    We investigate the coupled charge and spin collective excitations in the spiral phases of the two-dimensional Hubbard model using a generalized random-phase approximation. Already for small doping the spin-wave excitations are strongly renormalized due to low-energy particle-hole excitations. Besides the three Goldstone modes of the spiral state the dynamical susceptibility reveals an extra zero mode for low doping and strong coupling values signaling an intrinsic instability of the homogeneous spiral state. In addition, near-zero modes are found in the vicinity of the spiral pitch wave number for out-of-plane spin fluctuations. Their origin is found to be the near degeneracy with staggered noncoplanar spiral states which, however, are not the lowest energy Hartree-Fock solutions among the homogeneous spiral states. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  12. Asymmetric Magnon Excitation by Spontaneous Toroidal Ordering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayami, Satoru; Kusunose, Hiroaki; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2016-05-01

    The effects of spontaneous toroidal ordering on magnetic excitation are theoretically investigated for a localized spin model that includes a staggered Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction and anisotropic exchange interactions, which arise from the antisymmetric spin-orbit coupling and the multiorbital correlation effect. We show that the model exhibits a Néel-type antiferromagnetic order, which simultaneously accompanies a ferroic toroidal order. We find that the occurrence of toroidal order modulates the magnon dispersion in an asymmetric way with respect to the wave number: a toroidal dipole order on the zigzag chain leads to a band-bottom shift, while a toroidal octupole order on the honeycomb lattice gives rise to a valley splitting. These asymmetric magnon excitations could be a source of unusual magnetic responses, such as nonreciprocal magnon transport. A variety of modulations are discussed while changing the lattice and magnetic symmetries. The implications regarding candidate materials for asymmetric magnon excitations are presented.

  13. Self-excitation of surface plasmon polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordo, V. G.

    2016-04-01

    The novel effect of self-excitation of surface plasmons (SESP) in a plasmonic nanocavity is predicted, and its theory is developed from first principles. It is assumed that the cavity is formed by a nanogap between two metals and contains polarizable inclusions. Basing on the dyadic Green's function of the structure, the equations for the field in the cavity are investigated. It is shown that under certain conditions the field becomes unstable that leads to its self-excitation. The threshold criterion for self-excitation as well as the frequency of self-oscillation are derived in an analytical form. The SESP effect is explained in terms of a positive feedback for the polarization of inclusions provided by the field reflected from the cavity walls. These findings suggest a principally new avenue to surface plasmon generation which does not employ stimulated emission and is different from SPASER or plasmon laser.

  14. Charge-displacement analysis for excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronca, Enrico; Pastore, Mariachiara; Belpassi, Leonardo; De Angelis, Filippo; Angeli, Celestino; Cimiraglia, Renzo; Tarantelli, Francesco

    2014-02-01

    We extend the Charge-Displacement (CD) analysis, already successfully employed to describe the nature of intermolecular interactions [L. Belpassi et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 13046 (2010)] and various types of controversial chemical bonds [L. Belpassi et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 130, 1048 (2008); N. Salvi et al., Chem. Eur. J. 16, 7231 (2010)], to study the charge fluxes accompanying electron excitations, and in particular the all-important charge-transfer (CT) phenomena. We demonstrate the usefulness of the new approach through applications to exemplary excitations in a series of molecules, encompassing various typical situations from valence, to Rydberg, to CT excitations. The CD functions defined along various spatial directions provide a detailed and insightful quantitative picture of the electron displacements taking place.

  15. NMR solvent peak suppression by nonlinear excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitt, Malcolm H.

    1988-03-01

    Most existing NMR solvent peak suppression sequences provide a satisfactory dependence of the intensity of excited signals on frequency but poor phase characteristics. In practice this leads to spectral distortions which generally become more severe as the frequency selectivity of the sequence is increased. However, it is shown that by working well outside the linear response regime, excitation schemes which combine high frequency selectivity with good phase properties may be devised. Sequences of six rectangular radio-frequency pulses were discovered using a combination of coherent averaging theory to treat the near-resonant behavior and numerical simulation further from resonance. Extensive use of symmetry greatly simplifies both the coherent averaging calculations and the numerical simulations. The new pulse sequences have been given the acronym NERO (nonlinear excitation rejecting on-resonance). Experimental spectra of an enzyme in dilute aqueous solution are shown.

  16. Initial state dependence of convoy electrons emitted from the excited ions by resonant coherent excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, T.; Nakano, Y.; Metoki, K.; Hatakeyama, A.; Nakai, Y.; Komaki, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Takada, E.; Murakami, T.

    2009-11-01

    Convoy electrons emitted from 416 MeV/u heliumlike Ar16+ ions excited by three-dimensional resonant coherent excitation (3D-RCE) have been explored. The 1s electron in the ground state was excited to the 2p state by a periodic crystal field during the passage through a Si crystal and released into the continuum by collisions with target atoms to form a cusp-shaped peak in the energy distribution, referred to as convoy electron. Under the resonance condition, we found not only enhancement of the convoy electron yield but also significant narrowing in the energy distribution, reflecting the initial bound state momentum distribution of the excited ions. This suggests that RCE is well-suited to study fast ion collisions involving the specific excited state.

  17. Characterization of weakly excited final states by shakedown spectroscopy of laser-excited potassium

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, J.; Heinaesmaeki, S.; Aksela, S.; Aksela, H.; Sankari, R.; Rander, T.; Lindblad, A.; Bergersen, H.; Oehrwall, G.; Svensson, S.; Kukk, E.

    2006-07-15

    3p shakedown spectra of laser excited potassium atoms as well as direct 3p photoemission of ground state potassium have been studied. These two excitation schemes lead to the same final states and thereby provide a good basis for a detailed study of the 3p{sup 5}(4s3d){sup 1} configurations of singly ionized potassium and the photoemission processes leading to these configurations. The comparison of direct photoemission from the ground state and conjugate shakedown spectra from 4p{sub 1/2} laser excited potassium made it possible to experimentally determine the character of final states that are only weakly excited in the direct photoemission but have a much higher relative intensity in the shakedown spectrum. Based on considerations of angular momentum and parity conservation the excitation scheme of the final states can be understood.

  18. BROADBAND EXCITATION IN NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Tycko, R.

    1984-10-01

    Theoretical methods for designing sequences of radio frequency (rf) radiation pulses for broadband excitation of spin systems in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are described. The sequences excite spins uniformly over large ranges of resonant frequencies arising from static magnetic field inhomogeneity, chemical shift differences, or spin couplings, or over large ranges of rf field amplitudes. Specific sequences for creating a population inversion or transverse magnetization are derived and demonstrated experimentally in liquid and solid state NMR. One approach to broadband excitation is based on principles of coherent averaging theory. A general formalism for deriving pulse sequences is given, along with computational methods for specific cases. This approach leads to sequences that produce strictly constant transformations of a spin system. The importance of this feature in NMR applications is discussed. A second approach to broadband excitation makes use of iterative schemes, i.e. sets of operations that are applied repetitively to a given initial pulse sequences, generating a series of increasingly complex sequences with increasingly desirable properties. A general mathematical framework for analyzing iterative schemes is developed. An iterative scheme is treated as a function that acts on a space of operators corresponding to the transformations produced by all possible pulse sequences. The fixed points of the function and the stability of the fixed points are shown to determine the essential behavior of the scheme. Iterative schemes for broadband population inversion are treated in detail. Algebraic and numerical methods for performing the mathematical analysis are presented. Two additional topics are treated. The first is the construction of sequences for uniform excitation of double-quantum coherence and for uniform polarization transfer over a range of spin couplings. Double-quantum excitation sequences are demonstrated in a liquid crystal system. The

  19. Electron-impact vibrational excitation of cyclopropane

    SciTech Connect

    Čurík, R. Čársky, P.; Allan, M.

    2015-04-14

    We report a very detailed test of the ab initio discrete momentum representation (DMR) method of calculating vibrational excitation of polyatomic molecules by electron impact, by comparison of its results with an extensive set of experimental data, covering the entire range of scattering angles from 10{sup ∘} to 180{sup ∘} and electron energies from 0.4 to 20 eV. The DMR calculations were carried out by solving the two-channel Lippmann-Schwinger equation in the momentum space, and the interaction between the scattered electron and the target molecule was described by exact static-exchange potential corrected by a density functional theory (DFT) correlation-polarization interaction that models target’s response to the field of incoming electron. The theory is found to quantitatively reproduce the measured spectra for all normal modes, even at the difficult conditions of extreme angles and at low energies, and thus provides full understanding of the excitation mechanism. It is shown that the overlap of individual vibrational bands caused by limited experimental resolution and rotational excitation must be properly taken into account for correct comparison of experiment and theory. By doing so, an apparent discrepancy between published experimental data could be reconciled. A substantial cross section is found for excitation of the non-symmetric HCH twisting mode ν{sub 4} of A{sub 1}{sup ″} symmetry by the 5.5 eV A{sub 2}{sup ′} resonance, surprisingly because the currently accepted selection rules predict this process to be forbidden. The DMR theory shows that the excitation is caused by an incoming electron in an f-wave of A{sub 2}{sup ′} symmetry which causes excitation of the non-symmetric HCH twisting mode ν{sub 4} of the A{sub 1}{sup ″} symmetry and departs in p- and f-waves of A{sub 2}{sup ″} symmetry.

  20. Charmonium excited state spectrum in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek; Robert Edwards; Nilmani Mathur; David Richards

    2008-02-01

    Working with a large basis of covariant derivative-based meson interpolating fields we demonstrate the feasibility of reliably extracting multiple excited states using a variational method. The study is performed on quenched anisotropic lattices with clover quarks at the charm mass. We demonstrate how a knowledge of the continuum limit of a lattice interpolating field can give additional spin-assignment information, even at a single lattice spacing, via the overlap factors of interpolating field and state. Excited state masses are systematically high with respect to quark potential model predictions and, where they exist, experimental states. We conclude that this is most likely a result of the quenched approximation.

  1. Four-body model for transfer excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, A. L.; Peacher, J. L.; Madison, D. H.; Colgan, J.

    2009-12-15

    We present here a four-body model for transfer-excitation collisions, which we call the four-body transfer-excitation (4BTE) model. Each two-body interaction is explicitly included in the 4BTE model, allowing us to study the effects of individual two-body interactions. We apply our model to fully differential cross sections for proton+helium collisions, and study the effect of the incident projectile-atom interaction, the scattered projectile-ion interaction, the projectile-nuclear interaction, and electron correlation within the target atom.

  2. Search for excited leptons at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akrawy, M. Z.; Alexander, G.; Allison, J.; Allport, P. P.; Anderson, K. J.; Armitage, J. C.; Arnison, G. T. J.; Ashton, P.; Azuelos, G.; Baines, J. T. M.; Ball, A. H.; Banks, J.; Barker, G. J.; Barlow, R. J.; Batley, J. R.; Becker, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, K. W.; Bella, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Binder, U.; Bloodworth, I. J.; Bock, P.; Breuker, H.; Brown, R. M.; Brun, R.; Buijs, A.; Burckhart, H. J.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R. K.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Chang, C. Y.; Charlton, D. G.; Chrin, J. T. M.; Cohen, I.; Collins, W. J.; Conboy, J. E.; Couch, M.; Coupland, M.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Debu, P.; Deninno, M. M.; Dieckmann, A.; Dittmar, M.; Dixit, M. S.; Duchovni, E.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Dumas, D.; El Mamouni, H.; Elcombe, P. A.; Estabrooks, P. G.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Farthouat, P.; Fischer, H. M.; Fong, D. G.; French, M. T.; Fukunaga, C.; Gaidot, A.; Ganel, O.; Gary, J. W.; Gascon, J.; Geddes, N. I.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Gensler, S. W.; Gentit, F. X.; Giacomelli, G.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W. R.; Gillies, J. D.; Goldberg, J.; Goodrick, M. J.; Gorn, W.; Granite, D.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Wiesmann, P.; Grunhaus, J.; Hagedorn, H.; Hagemann, J.; Hansroul, M.; Hargrove, C. K.; Hart, J.; Hattersley, P. M.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Heflin, E.; Hemingway, R. J.; Heuer, R. D.; Hill, J. C.; Hillier, S. J.; Ho, C.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hobson, P. R.; Hochman, D.; Holl, B.; Homer, R. J.; Hou, S. R.; Howarth, C. P.; Hughes-Jones, R. E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ihssen, H.; Imrie, D. C.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P. W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jobes, M.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jovanovic, P.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kennedy, B. W.; Kleinwort, C.; Klem, D. E.; Knop, G.; Kobayashi, T.; Kokott, T. P.; Köpke, L.; Kowalewski, R.; Kreutzmann, H.; von Krogh, J.; Kroll, J.; Kuwano, M.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lamarche, F.; Larson, W. J.; Layter, J. G.; Le Du, P.; Leblanc, P.; Lee, A. M.; Lellouch, D.; Lennert, P.; Lessard, L.; Levinson, L.; Lloyd, S. L.; Loebinger, F. K.; Lorah, J. M.; Lorazo, B.; Losty, M. J.; Ludwig, J.; Lupu, N.; Ma, J.; MacBeth, A. A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Maringer, G.; Martin, A. J.; Martin, J. P.; Mashimo, T.; Mättig, P.; Maur, U.; McMahon, T. J.; McPherson, A. C.; Meijers, F.; Menszner, D.; Merritt, F. S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Middleton, R. P.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D. J.; Milstene, C.; Minowa, M.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Moss, M. W.; Murphy, P. G.; Murray, W. J.; Nellen, B.; Nguyen, H. H.; Nozaki, M.; O'Dowd, A. J. P.; O'Neale, S. W.; O'Neill, B. P.; Oakham, F. G.; Odorici, F.; Ogg, M.; Oh, H.; Oreglia, M. J.; Orito, S.; Pansart, J. P.; Patrick, G. N.; Pawley, S. J.; Pfister, P.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pinfold, J. L.; Plane, D. E.; Poli, B.; Pouladdej, A.; Pritchard, T. W.; Quast, G.; Raab, J.; Redmond, M. W.; Rees, D. L.; Regimbald, M.; Riles, K.; Roach, C. M.; Robins, S. A.; Rollnik, A.; Roney, J. M.; Rossberg, S.; Rossi, A. M.; Routenburg, P.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Sanghera, S.; Sansum, R. A.; Sasaki, M.; Saunders, B. J.; Schaile, A. D.; Schappert, W.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; von der Schmitt, H.; Schreiber, S.; Schwarz, J.; Shapira, A.; Shen, B. C.; Sherwood, P.; Simon, A.; Singh, P.; Siroli, G. P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A. M.; Smith, T. J.; Snow, G. A.; Spreadbury, E. J.; Springer, R. W.; Sproston, M.; Stephens, K.; Stier, H. E.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Tsukamoto, T.; Turner, M. F.; Tysarczyk-Niemeyer, G.; van den Plas, D.; Vandalen, G. J.; Vasseur, G.; Virtue, C. J.; Wagner, A.; Wahl, C.; Ward, C. P.; Ward, D. R.; Waterhouse, J.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Weber, M.; Weisz, S.; Wermes, N.; Weymann, M.; Wilson, G. W.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter, I.; Winterer, V.-H.; Wood, N. C.; Wotton, S.; Wuensch, B.; Wyatt, T. R.; Yaari, R.; Yang, Y.; Yekutieli, G.; Yoshida, T.; Zeuner, W.; Zorn, G. T.

    1990-07-01

    Excited leptons have been searched for using data recorded by the OPAL detector at LEP. No evidence for such particles has been found. From the study of e+e- --> l+l-γγ events, lower limits on the masses of spin-1/2 excited leptons are found to be 44.9 GeV at 95% confidence level. From the study of e+e- -->l+l-γ events, upper limits on their couplings are set up to l* masses close to the mass of the Z0 boson.

  3. Inviscid fluid in high frequency excitation field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of high frequency excitations (HFE) on a fluid is investigated. The response to these excitations is decomposed in two parts: 'slow' motion, which practically remains unchanged during the vanishingly small period tau, and 'fast' motion whose value during this period is negligible in terms of displacements, but is essential in terms of the kinetic energy. After such a decomposition the 'slow' and 'fast' motions become nonlinearly coupled by the corresponding governing equations. This coupling leads to an 'effective' potential energy which imparts some 'elastic' properties to the fluid and stabilizes laminar flows.

  4. Excitation of atomic nitrogen by electron impact.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. J.; Zipf, E. C.

    1973-01-01

    Measurement of the absolute cross sections for the excitation of a number of N I multiplets by electron impact on atomic nitrogen. Two of these cross sections - 1134 and 1200 A - are found to be large, reaching 2.0 x 10 to the minus 16th and 2.5 x 10 to the minus 16th sq cm at their peaks, respectively. The presence of vibrationally excited molecular nitrogen in the discharged gas is confirmed, and its effect on the measurements is discussed. The ratio of the oscillator strengths of the 1200- and 1134-A resonance transitions is measured to be 2.6 plus or minus 0.3.

  5. Gluonic excitations in the hadronic spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, Jozef J.

    2014-06-01

    QCD at low energy features a gluonic field that is strongly coupled to itself and to quarks. I will present a summary of what we know about the role that excitations of the gluonic field play in determining the spectrum of meson resonances. Recent studies using lattice techniques have suggested a phenomenology of gluonic excitations within QCD that leads to hybrid mesons with both exotic and non-exotic quantum numbers. I will discuss these calculations and describe their relationship to current experimental knowledge and to forthcoming experiments at Jefferson Lab and elsewhere.

  6. Exciting baryons: Now and in the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, M. R.

    2012-04-01

    This is the final talk of NSTAR2011 conference. It is not a summary talk, but rather a looking forward to what still needs to be done in excited baryon physics. In particular, we need to hone our tools connecting experimental inputs with QCD. At present we rely on models that often have doubtful connections with the underlying theory, and this needs to be dramatically improved, if we are to reach definitive conclusions about the relevant degrees of freedom of excited baryons. Conclusions that we want to have by NSTAR2021.

  7. Optimal Parametric Feedback Excitation of Nonlinear Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, David J.

    2016-01-01

    An optimal parametric feedback excitation principle is sought, found, and investigated. The principle is shown to provide an adaptive resonance condition that enables unprecedentedly robust movement generation in a large class of oscillatory dynamical systems. Experimental demonstration of the theory is provided by a nonlinear electronic circuit that realizes self-adaptive parametric excitation without model information, signal processing, and control computation. The observed behavior dramatically differs from the one achievable using classical parametric modulation, which is fundamentally limited by uncertainties in model information and nonlinear effects inevitably present in real world applications.

  8. Optimal Parametric Feedback Excitation of Nonlinear Oscillators.

    PubMed

    Braun, David J

    2016-01-29

    An optimal parametric feedback excitation principle is sought, found, and investigated. The principle is shown to provide an adaptive resonance condition that enables unprecedentedly robust movement generation in a large class of oscillatory dynamical systems. Experimental demonstration of the theory is provided by a nonlinear electronic circuit that realizes self-adaptive parametric excitation without model information, signal processing, and control computation. The observed behavior dramatically differs from the one achievable using classical parametric modulation, which is fundamentally limited by uncertainties in model information and nonlinear effects inevitably present in real world applications. PMID:26871336

  9. Universality of Plasmon Excitations in Dirac Semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharzeev, Dmitri E.; Pisarski, Robert D.; Yee, Ho-Ung

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the properties of the collective plasmon excitations in Dirac semimetals by using the methods of relativistic field theory. We find a strong and narrow plasmon excitation whose frequency is in the terahertz (THz) range which may be important for practical applications. The properties of the plasmon appear universal for all Dirac semimetals, due to the large degeneracy of the quasiparticles and the small Fermi velocity, vF≪c . This universality is closely analogous to the phenomenon of "dimensional transmutation" that is responsible for the emergence of dimensionful scales in relativistic field theories such as quantum chromodynamics.

  10. Universality of Plasmon Excitations in Dirac Semimetals.

    PubMed

    Kharzeev, Dmitri E; Pisarski, Robert D; Yee, Ho-Ung

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the properties of the collective plasmon excitations in Dirac semimetals by using the methods of relativistic field theory. We find a strong and narrow plasmon excitation whose frequency is in the terahertz (THz) range which may be important for practical applications. The properties of the plasmon appear universal for all Dirac semimetals, due to the large degeneracy of the quasiparticles and the small Fermi velocity, v_{F}≪c. This universality is closely analogous to the phenomenon of "dimensional transmutation" that is responsible for the emergence of dimensionful scales in relativistic field theories such as quantum chromodynamics. PMID:26684129

  11. Excitation Chains at the Glass Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Langer, J. S.

    2006-09-15

    The excitation-chain theory of the glass transition, proposed in an earlier publication, predicts diverging, super-Arrhenius relaxation times and, via a similarly diverging length scale, suggests a way of understanding the relations between dynamic and thermodynamic properties of glass-forming liquids. I argue here that critically large excitation chains play a role roughly analogous to that played by critical clusters in the droplet model of vapor condensation. Unlike a first-order condensation point in a vapor, the glass transition is not a conventional phase transformation, and may not be a thermodynamic transition at all.

  12. Collective charge excitations along cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manousakis, E.

    2005-07-01

    A significant part of the thin layers of counter-ions adjacent to the exterior and interior surfaces of a cell membrane form quasi-two-dimensional (2D) layers of mobile charge. Collective charge density oscillations, known as plasmon modes, in these 2D charged systems of counter-ions are predicted in the present paper. This is based on a calculation of the self-consistent response of this system to a fast electric field fluctuation. The possibility that the membrane channels might be using these excitations to carry out fast communication is suggested and experiments are proposed to reveal the existence of such excitations.

  13. Laser Excited Fluorescence For Forensic Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinney, Robert E.

    1986-07-01

    The application of laser excited fluorescence to the detection and identification of latent fingerprints was first accomplished ten years ago. The development of the technology has progressed rapidly with the introduction of commercial equipment by several manufacturers. Systems based on Argon-ion, Copper-vapor, and frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers are compared. The theoretical basis of detection by fluorescence is discussed along with the more useful techniques of dye staining. Other applications of the laser excited fluorescence in forensic investigation include gunshot residue analysis, serology, collection of trace evidence, and document examination.

  14. Double Photoionization of excited Lithium and Beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, Frank L.; McCurdy, C. William; Rescigno, Thomas N.

    2010-05-20

    We present total, energy-sharing and triple differential cross sections for one-photon, double ionization of lithium and beryllium starting from aligned, excited P states. We employ a recently developed hybrid atomic orbital/ numerical grid method based on the finite-element discrete-variable representation and exterior complex scaling. Comparisons with calculated results for the ground-state atoms, as well as analogous results for ground-state and excited helium, serve to highlight important selection rules and show some interesting effects that relate to differences between inter- and intra-shell electron correlation.

  15. Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2015-08-04

    Scanning probe microscopy may include a method for generating a band excitation (BE) signal and simultaneously exciting a probe at a plurality of frequencies within a predetermined frequency band based on the excitation signal. A response of the probe is measured across a subset of frequencies of the predetermined frequency band and the excitation signal is adjusted based on the measured response.

  16. The photodissociation and reaction dynamics of vibrationally excited molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    We have used combined vibrational overtone excitation and laser induced fluorescence detection to study dissociation dynamics of hydroxylamine (NH[sub 2]OH), have performed our first laser induced grating experiments on water, and have begun assembling a new apparatus for preparing vibrationally excited molecules with simulated Raman excitation. We study role of vibrational excitation in photodissociation dynamics by using a vibrational state preparation technique, such as vibrational overtone excitation or stimulated Raman excitation, to create molecules with particular nuclear motions and then to excite that molecule to a dissociative electronic state.

  17. Relaxation channels of multi-photon excited xenon clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Serdobintsev, P. Yu.; Melnikov, A. S.; Rakcheeva, L. P. Murashov, S. V.; Khodorkovskii, M. A.; Lyubchik, S.; Timofeev, N. A.; Pastor, A. A.

    2015-09-21

    The relaxation processes of the xenon clusters subjected to multi-photon excitation by laser radiation with quantum energies significantly lower than the thresholds of excitation of atoms and ionization of clusters were studied. Results obtained by means of the photoelectron spectroscopy method showed that desorption processes of excited atoms play a significant role in the decay of two-photon excited xenon clusters. A number of excited states of xenon atoms formed during this process were discovered and identified.

  18. Relaxation channels of multi-photon excited xenon clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serdobintsev, P. Yu.; Rakcheeva, L. P.; Murashov, S. V.; Melnikov, A. S.; Lyubchik, S.; Timofeev, N. A.; Pastor, A. A.; Khodorkovskii, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    The relaxation processes of the xenon clusters subjected to multi-photon excitation by laser radiation with quantum energies significantly lower than the thresholds of excitation of atoms and ionization of clusters were studied. Results obtained by means of the photoelectron spectroscopy method showed that desorption processes of excited atoms play a significant role in the decay of two-photon excited xenon clusters. A number of excited states of xenon atoms formed during this process were discovered and identified.

  19. Dielectronic recombination and resonant transfer excitation processes for helium-like krypton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiao-Li; Qu, Yi-Zhi; Zhang, Song-Bin; Zhang, Yu

    2012-10-01

    The relativistic configuration interaction method is employed to calculate the dielectronic recombination (DR) cross sections of helium-like krypton via the 1s2lnl' (n = 2, 3, ..., 15) resonances. Then, the resonant transfer excitation (RTE) processes of Kr34+ colliding with H, He, H2, and CHx (x = 0-4) targets are investigated under the impulse approximation. The needed Compton profiles of targets are obtained from the Hartree—Fock wave functions. The RTE cross sections are strongly dependent on DR resonant energies and strengths, and the electron momentum distributions of the target. For H2 and H targets, the ratio of their RTE cross sections changes from 1.85 for the 1s2l2l' to 1.88 for other resonances, which demonstrates the weak molecular effects on the Compton profiles of H2. For CHx (x = 0-4) targets, the main contribution to the RTE cross section comes from the carbon atom since carbon carries 6 electrons; as the number of hydrogen increases in CHx, the RTE cross section almost increases by the same value, displaying the strong separate atom character for the hydrogen. However, further comparison of the individual orbital contributions of C(2p, 2s, 1s) and CH4(1t2, 2a1, 1a1) to the RTE cross sections shows that the molecular effects induce differences of about 25.1%, 19.9%, and 0.2% between 2p-1t2, 2s-2a1, and 1s-1a1 orbitals, respectively.

  20. Collective excitations in neutron-star crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamel, N.; Page, D.; Reddy, S.

    2016-01-01

    We explore the spectrum of low-energy collective excitations in the crust of a neutron star, especially in the inner region where neutron-proton clusters are immersed in a sea of superfluid neutrons. The speeds of the different modes are calculated systematically from the nuclear energy density functional theory using a Skyrme functional fitted to essentially all experimental atomic mass data.

  1. On the Electronically Excited States of Uracil

    SciTech Connect

    Epifanovsky, Evgeny; Kowalski, Karol; Fan, Peng-Dong; Valiev, Marat; Matsika, Spiridoula; Krylov, Anna

    2008-10-09

    Vertical excitation energies in uracil in the gas phase and in water solution are investigated by the equation-of-motion coupled-cluster and multi-reference configuration interaction methods. Basis set effects are found to be important for converged results. The analysis of electronic wave functions reveals that the lowest singlet states are predominantly of a singly excited character and are therefore well described by single-reference equation-of-motion methods augmented by a perturbative triples correction to account for dynamical correlation. Our best estimates for the vertical excitation energies for the lowest singlet n and are 5.0±0.1 eV and 5.3±0.1 eV, respectively. The solvent effects for these states are estimated to be +0.5 eV and ±0.1 eV, respectively. We attribute the difference between the computed vertical excitations and the maximum of the experimental absorption to strong vibronic interaction between the lowest A00 and A0 states leading to intensity borrowing by the forbidden transition.

  2. Persistent histamine excitation of glutamatergic preoptic neurons.

    PubMed

    Tabarean, Iustin V

    2012-01-01

    Thermoregulatory neurons of the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) represent a target at which histamine modulates body temperature. The mechanism by which histamine excites a population of MnPO neurons is not known. In this study it was found that histamine activated a cationic inward current and increased the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, actions that had a transient component as well as a sustained one that lasted for tens of minutes after removal of the agonist. The sustained component was blocked by TRPC channel blockers. Single-cell reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed expression of TRPC1, TRPC5 and TRPC7 subunits in neurons excited by histamine. These studies also established the presence of transcripts for the glutamatergic marker Vglut2 and for the H1 histamine receptor in neurons excited by histamine. Intracellular application of antibodies directed against cytoplasmic sites of the TRPC1 or TRPC5 channel subunits decreased the histamine-induced inward current. The persistent inward current and elevation in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration could be reversed by activating the PKA pathway. This data reveal a novel mechanism by which histamine induces persistent excitation and sustained intracellular Ca(2+) elevation in glutamatergic MnPO neurons. PMID:23082195

  3. Persistent Histamine Excitation of Glutamatergic Preoptic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tabarean, Iustin V.

    2012-01-01

    Thermoregulatory neurons of the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) represent a target at which histamine modulates body temperature. The mechanism by which histamine excites a population of MnPO neurons is not known. In this study it was found that histamine activated a cationic inward current and increased the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, actions that had a transient component as well as a sustained one that lasted for tens of minutes after removal of the agonist. The sustained component was blocked by TRPC channel blockers. Single-cell reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed expression of TRPC1, TRPC5 and TRPC7 subunits in neurons excited by histamine. These studies also established the presence of transcripts for the glutamatergic marker Vglut2 and for the H1 histamine receptor in neurons excited by histamine. Intracellular application of antibodies directed against cytoplasmic sites of the TRPC1 or TRPC5 channel subunits decreased the histamine-induced inward current. The persistent inward current and elevation in intracellular Ca2+ concentration could be reversed by activating the PKA pathway. This data reveal a novel mechanism by which histamine induces persistent excitation and sustained intracellular Ca2+ elevation in glutamatergic MnPO neurons. PMID:23082195

  4. Human Cortical Excitability Increases with Time Awake

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Reto; Mäki, Hanna; Rosanova, Mario; Casarotto, Silvia; Canali, Paola; Casali, Adenauer G.; Tononi, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged wakefulness is associated not only with obvious changes in the way we feel and perform but also with well-known clinical effects, such as increased susceptibility to seizures, to hallucinations, and relief of depressive symptoms. These clinical effects suggest that prolonged wakefulness may be associated with significant changes in the state of cortical circuits. While recent animal experiments have reported a progressive increase of cortical excitability with time awake, no conclusive evidence could be gathered in humans. In this study, we combine transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electroencephalography (EEG) to monitor cortical excitability in healthy individuals as a function of time awake. We observed that the excitability of the human frontal cortex, measured as the immediate (0–20 ms) EEG reaction to TMS, progressively increases with time awake, from morning to evening and after one night of total sleep deprivation, and that it decreases after recovery sleep. By continuously monitoring vigilance, we also found that this modulation in cortical responsiveness is tonic and not attributable to transient fluctuations of the level of arousal. The present results provide noninvasive electrophysiological evidence that wakefulness is associated with a steady increase in the excitability of human cortical circuits that is rebalanced during sleep. PMID:22314045

  5. Contemporary continuum QCD approaches to excited hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Bennich, Bruno; Rojas, Eduardo

    2016-03-01

    Amongst the bound states produced by the strong interaction, radially excited meson and nucleon states offer an important phenomenological window into the long-range behavior of the coupling constant in Quantum Chromodynamics. We here report on some technical details related to the computation of the bound state's eigenvalue spectrum in the framework of Bethe-Salpeter and Faddeev equations.

  6. An Artificial Ising System with Phononic Excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffari, Hamed; Griffith, W. Ashley; Benson, Philip; Nasseri, M. H. B.; Young, R. Paul

    Many intractable systems and problems can be reduced to a system of interacting spins. Here, we report mapping collective phononic excitations from different sources of crystal vibrations to spin systems. The phononic excitations in our experiments are due to micro and nano cracking (yielding crackling noises due to lattice distortion). We develop real time mapping of the multi-array senores to a network-space and then mapping the excitation- networks to spin-like systems. We show that new mapped system satisfies the quench (impulsive) characteristics of the Ising model in 2D classical spin systems. In particular, we show that our artificial Ising system transits between two ground states and approaching the critical point accompanies with a very short time frozen regime, inducing formation of domains separated by kinks. For a cubic-test under a true triaxial test (3D case), we map the system to a 6-spin ring under a transversal-driving field where using functional multiplex networks, the vector components of the spin are inferred (i.e., XY model). By visualization of spin patterns of the ring per each event, we demonstrate that ``kinks'' (as defects) proliferate when system approach from above to its critical point. We support our observations with employing recorded acoustic excitations during distortion of crystal lattices in nano-indentation tests on different crystals (silicon and graphite), triaxial loading test on rock (poly-crystal) samples and a true 3D triaxial test.

  7. Contour Line Portraits: Excited about Artistic Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, Kari Gertz

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a self-portrait project that encouraged students, boosted their self-confidence, and got them excited about their artistic abilities--while producing amazing results. This lesson effectively develops artistic ability by compelling students to see that drawing is quite simply breaking down objects into the…

  8. Extracting excited mesons from the finite volume

    SciTech Connect

    Doring, Michael

    2014-12-01

    As quark masses come closer to their physical values in lattice simulations, finite volume effects dominate the level spectrum. Methods to extract excited mesons from the finite volume are discussed, like moving frames in the presence of coupled channels. Effective field theory can be used to stabilize the determination of the resonance spectrum.

  9. Coherent phonons excited by two optical pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, A. L.; Bezbat'ko, D. N.

    2016-02-01

    Theoretical dependences of the amplitude A and phase φ of photoinduced coherent oscillations of the crystal lattice on the delay time μ between two exciting optical pulses have been derived. It has been shown that φ(μ) is a periodic or decreasing function depending on the experimental conditions. Comparison with the experiment on Bi has been carried out.

  10. Excitation of XUV radiation in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. Gordon

    1992-01-01

    The goal of the proposed research was to understand the means by which XUV radiation in solar flares is excited, and to use this radiation as diagnostics of the energy release and transport processes occurring in the flare. Significant progress in both of these areas, as described, was made.

  11. Concepts of Highly Excited Electronic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berakdar, Jamal

    2003-05-01

    Knowledge of the excitation characteristics of matter is decisive for the descriptions of a variety of dynamical processes, which are of significant technological interest. E.g. transport properties and the optical response are controlled by the excitation spectrum. This self-contained work is a coherent presentation of the quantum theory of correlated few-particle excitations in electronic systems. It begins with a compact resume of the quantum mechanics of single particle excitations. Particular emphasis is put on Green function methods, which offer a natural tool to unravel the relations between the physics of small and large electronic systems. The book contains explicit expressions for the Coulomb Green function of two charge particles and a generalization to three-body systems. Techniques for the many-body Green function of finite systems are introduced and some explicit calculations of the Green functions are given. Concrete examples are provided and the theories are contrasted with experimental data, when available. The second volume presents an up-to-date selection of applications of the developed concepts and a comparison with available experiments is made

  12. Excitations in the chiral spin liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeter, Darrell

    2009-03-01

    Recently, a spin-Hamiltonian was presented [Schroeter et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 097202 (2007)] for which the chiral spin liquid is the exact ground state. This poster will present a numerical study of the excitations of the model, including results obtained by exact diagonalization of the model on 16 and 25-site lattices.

  13. Excited Random Walk in One Dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antal, Tibor

    2005-03-01

    We study the k-excited random walk, in which each site initially contains k cookies, and a random walk that is at a site that contains at least one cookie eats a cookie and then hops to the right with probability p and to the left with probability q=1-p. If the walk hops from an empty site, there is no bias. For the 1-excited walk on the half-line (each site initially contains one cookie), the probability of first returning to the starting point at time t scales as t-1-q. We also derive the probability distribution of the position of the leftmost uneaten cookie in the large time limit. For the infinite line, the probability distribution of the position of the 1-excited walk has an unusual anomaly at the origin and the distributions of positions for the leftmost and rightmost uneaten cookie develop a power-law singularity at the origin. The 2-excited walk on the infinite line exhibits peculiar features in the regime p>3/4, where the walk is transient, including a mean displacement that grows as t^ν, with ν>12 dependent on p, and a breakdown of scaling for the probability distribution of the walk.

  14. The excited random walk in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antal, T.; Redner, S.

    2005-03-01

    We study the excited random walk, in which a walk that is at a site that contains cookies eats one cookie and then hops to the right with probability p and to the left with probability q = 1 - p. If the walk hops onto an empty site, there is no bias. For the 1-excited walk on the half-line (one cookie initially at each site), the probability of first returning to the starting point at time t scales as t-(2-p). Although the average return time to the origin is infinite for all p, the walk eats, on average, only a finite number of cookies until this first return when p < 1/2. For the infinite line, the probability distribution for the 1-excited walk has an unusual anomaly at the origin. The positions of the leftmost and rightmost uneaten cookies can be accurately estimated by probabilistic arguments and their corresponding distributions have power-law singularities. The 2-excited walk on the infinite line exhibits peculiar features in the regime p > 3/4, where the walk is transient, including a mean displacement that grows as tν, with \

  15. The CLAS Excited Baryon Program at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Crede, Volker

    2007-10-26

    Nucleons are complex systems of confined quarks and exhibit characteristic spectra of excited states. Highly excited nucleon states are sensitive to details of quark confinement which is poorly understood within Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the fundamental theory of strong interactions. Thus, measurements of excited states and the corresponding determination of their properties are needed to come to a better understanding of how confinement works in nucleons. However, the excited states of the nucleon cannot simply be inferred from cleanly separated spectral lines. Quite the contrary, a spectral analysis in nucleon resonance physics is challenging because of the fact that the resonances are broadly overlapping states which decay into a multitude of final states involving mesons and baryons. To provide a consistent and complete picture of an individual nucleon resonance, the various possible production and decay channels must be treated in a multichannel framework that permits separating resonance from background contributions. Very often, resonances reveal themselves more clearly through interference with dominant amplitudes. These interference terms can be isolated via polarization observables. The current CLAS effort is to utilize highly-polarized hydrogen and deuterium targets as well as polarized photon beams toward a complete measurement of a large number of reaction channels.

  16. The CLAS Excited Baryon Program at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Volker Crede

    2007-10-01

    Nucleons are complex systems of confined quarks and exhibit characteristic spectra of excited states. Highly excited nucleon states are sensitive to details of quark confinement which is poorly understood within Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the fundamental theory of strong interactions. Thus, measurements of excited states and the corresponding determination of their properties are needed to come to a better understanding of how confinement works in nucleons. However, the excited states of the nucleon cannot simply be inferred from cleanly separated spectral lines. Quite the contrary, a spectral analysis in nucleon resonance physics is challenging because of the fact that the resonances are broadly overlapping states which decay into a multitude of final states involving mesons and baryons. To provide a consistent and complete picture of an individual nucleon resonance, the various possible production and decay channels must be treated in a multichannel framework that permits separating resonance from background contributions. Very often, resonances reveal themselves more clearly through interference with dominant amplitudes. These interference terms can be isolated via polarization observables. The current CLAS effort is to utilize highly-polarized hydrogen and deuterium targets as well as polarized photon beams toward a complete measurement of a large number of reaction channels.

  17. New Logic Circuit with DC Parametric Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugahara, Masanori; Kaneda, Hisayoshi

    1982-12-01

    It is shown that dc parametric excitation is possible in a circuit named JUDO, which is composed of two resistively-connected Josephson junctions. Simulation study proves that the circuit has large gain and properties suitable for the construction of small, high-speed logic circuits.

  18. Nuclear excitation and precompound nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    De, A.; Ray, S.; Ghosh, S.K.

    1988-06-01

    The angular distribution of nucleons emitted in nucleon-induced precompound nuclear reactions are calculated taking into account the effect of excitation on the kinematics of nucleon-nucleon scattering inside the target-plus-projectile system. The results are compared with quantum mechanical calculations and those of reaction models based on a pure nucleon-nucleon collision picture.

  19. Excitation system for rotating synchronous machines

    DOEpatents

    Umans, Stephen D.; Driscoll, David J.

    2002-01-01

    A system for providing DC current to a rotating superconducting winding is provided. The system receives current feedback from the superconducting winding and determines an error signal based on the current feedback and a reference signal. The system determines a control signal corresponding to the error signal and provides a positive and negative superconducting winding excitation voltage based on the control signal.

  20. Contextual fear conditioning depresses infralimbic excitability.

    PubMed

    Soler-Cedeño, Omar; Cruz, Emmanuel; Criado-Marrero, Marangelie; Porter, James T

    2016-04-01

    Patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) show hypo-active ventromedial prefrontal cortices (vmPFC) that correlate with their impaired ability to discriminate between safe and dangerous contexts and cues. Previously, we found that auditory fear conditioning depresses the excitability of neurons populating the homologous structure in rodents, the infralimbic cortex (IL). However, it is undetermined if IL depression was mediated by the cued or contextual information. The objective of this study was to examine whether contextual information was sufficient to depress IL neuronal excitability. After exposing rats to context-alone, pseudoconditioning, or contextual fear conditioning, we used whole-cell current-clamp recordings to examine the excitability of IL neurons in prefrontal brain slices. We found that contextual fear conditioning reduced IL neuronal firing in response to depolarizing current steps. In addition, neurons from contextual fear conditioned animals showed increased slow afterhyperpolarization potentials (sAHPs). Moreover, the observed changes in IL excitability correlated with contextual fear expression, suggesting that IL depression may contribute to the encoding of contextual fear. PMID:26860438

  1. Dynamics of double-pulse photoacoustic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkashin, Maxim; Brenner, Carsten; Göring, Lena; Döpke, Benjamin; Gerhardt, Nils C.; Hofmann, Martin R.

    2016-03-01

    In contrast to the well-established and widely used theory of photoacoustic signal generation by single delta-like pulses, the field of multiple pulse excitation is not yet studied well. Using double-pulse excitation can be beneficial, but as ultrasound transducers have a certain waveform duration, the inter-pulse delays used might be limited. In order to assess the strength of the transducer influence at short delay times and develop data analysis procedure, we investigate the photoacoustic responses of a phantom sample to double-pulse excitation measured with different transducers. Both focused and flat surface single element transducers are used in the study. The central frequencies are chosen in the low-frequency band as they are most widely used in clinical ultrasound and one higher frequency transducer is taken for comparison. Despite not observing signal amplification due to Grueneisen relaxation effect, we show that transducer influence is not exceeding measurement error. Additionally we prove that single pulse subtraction procedure can be used to restore the second pulse waveform in double pulse excitation scheme. We believe using this procedure can be beneficial when transducer's waveform duration is longer than used inter-pulse delays.

  2. Multipurpose exciter with low phase noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conroy, B.; Le, D.

    1989-01-01

    Results of an effort to develop a lower-cost exciter with high stability, low phase noise, and controllable phase and frequency for use in Deep Space Network and Goldstone Solar System Radar applications are discussed. Included is a discussion of the basic concept, test results, plans, and concerns.

  3. Nuclear Excitation by Electronic Transition - NEET

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, J.A.

    2002-06-10

    Experiments seeking to demonstrate nuclear excitation induced by synchrotron radiation have been enabled by the development of intense synchrotron radiation. The phenomena has been demonstrated in {sup 197}Au, while realistic upper limits for {sup 189}Os have been established. A new experiment in {sup 189}Os is described. The experimental claim of NEET in isomeric {sup 178}Hf is not credible.

  4. Collisional excitation of intersteller molecules: Ammonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, S.

    1981-01-01

    Theoretical rate constants are presented for excitation of NH3 by collisions with He. The lowest 22 levels of ortho-NH3 and the lowest 16 levels of para-NH3 are considered at kinetic temperatures of 15 to 300 K.

  5. Spectroscopy of Optical Excitations in Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yingzhong

    2006-03-01

    Understanding the optical spectra and electronic excited state dynamics of carbon naotubes is important both for fundamental research and a wide variety of potential applications. In this presentation, we will report the results of a systematic study on semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) obtained by utilizing complementary femtosecond spectroscopic techniques, including fluorescence up-conversion, frequency-resolved transient absorption, and three-pulse photon echo peakshift (3PEPS) spectroscopy. Our efforts have focused on optically selective detection of the spectra and dynamics associated with structurally distinct semiconducting SWNT species. Using individual nanotube enriched micelle-dispersed SWNT preparations, in combination with resonant excitation and detection, has enabled us to independently access selected species, such as the (8,3), (6,5), (7,5), (11,0), (7,6) and (9,5) nanotubes. We will discuss the following topics: (1) the excitonic nature of the elementary excitation and its unambiguous identification from direct determination of the exciton binding energy for a selected semiconducting nanotube, the (8,3) tube; (2) the spectroscopic and dynamical signatures of exciton-exciton annihilation and its predominant role in governing ultrafast excited state relaxation; (3) the annihilation-concomitant exciton dissociation and the spectroscopic and dynamic features of the resulting electron-hole continuum; (4) timescales characterizing the ultrafast thermalization processes. In addition, we will demonstrate the power of 3PEPS spectroscopy to elucidate the spectral properties and dynamics of SWNTs. This work was supported by the NSF.

  6. Excited states in the soliton bag model

    SciTech Connect

    Saly, R.; Sundaresan, M.K.

    1984-02-01

    Numerical analysis of the solutions of the soliton bag model of Friedberg and Lee is performed. The recent analysis of Goldflam and Wilets is extended to include even-parity as well as odd-parity radially excited states. It is shown that the existence of the solutions (especially the odd-parity ones) restrict severely the allowed range of parameters.

  7. Electron-impact excitation of nitric oxide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. J.; Zipf, E. C.

    1972-01-01

    The absolute cross sections for the excitation of the nitrosyl cation Baer-Miescher bands, two nitric oxide bands, and several atomic nitrogen multiplets in the vacuum UV by electron impact on NO have been measured over an energy range extending from threshold to 300 eV. The variation of the dipole transition moment for the nitrosyl cation band system was also determined.

  8. Magnetic performance of a fast excitation wiggler

    SciTech Connect

    Gallardo, J.C.; Romano, T.; van Steenbergen, A.

    1993-03-01

    With the objective of performing an inverse free-electron laser accelerator experiment, an iron dominated (Vanadium Permendur), fast excitation, high K planar wiggler has been built and measured. The authors present in this report an analysis of a constant period wiggler and several tapering configurations (gap=4 mm; 3.0 cm < [lambda][sub [omega

  9. Ionic electrostatic excitations along biological membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Afshin

    2011-02-01

    A theoretical analysis of ionic electrostatic excitations of a charged biological membrane is presented within the framework of the fluid theory for surface ions inside and outside the cell, in conjunction with the Poisson's equation. General expressions of dispersion relations are obtained for electrostatic oscillations of intrinsic cellular with different shapes and symmetries.

  10. Hexadecapolar excitation in sup 100 Ru

    SciTech Connect

    Sirota, S.; Duarte, J.L.M.; Horodynski-Matsushigue, L.B.; Borello-Lewin, T. )

    1989-09-01

    Attention is drawn to the strong collective {ital L}=4 direct excitation of the state at 2.367 MeV in {sup 100}Ru by inelastic scattering of 16 MeV protons characterized by a deformation parameter {beta}{sub 4}=0.10, one of the highest reported for any region of the mass table.

  11. Radiation-induced impairment of neuronal excitability

    SciTech Connect

    Pellmar, T.C.; Tolliver, J.M.; Neel, K.L.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation causes a decrease in the synaptically evoked activity of CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells. This effect is dose and dose-rate dependent. Hydrogen peroxide, which produces hydroxyl free radicals when combined with FE + 2, produces similar damage. In contrast, the radioprotectant, dithiothreitol, increases the excitability of hippocampal neurons. These studies indicate that radiation can directly affect the function of central neurons.

  12. "Fast Excitation" CID in Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Murrell, J.; Despeyroux, D.; Lammert, Stephen {Steve} A; Stephenson Jr, James {Jim} L; Goeringer, Doug

    2003-01-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer is usually performed by applying a small amplitude excitation voltage at the same secular frequency as the ion of interest. Here we disclose studies examining the use of large amplitude voltage excitations (applied for short periods of time) to cause fragmentation of the ions of interest. This process has been examined using leucine enkephalin as the model compound and the motion of the ions within the ion trap simulated using ITSIM. The resulting fragmentation information obtained is identical with that observed by conventional resonance excitation CID. ''Fast excitation'' CID deposits (as determined by the intensity ratio of the a{sub 4}/b{sub 4} ion of leucine enkephalin) approximately the same amount of internal energy into an ion as conventional resonance excitation CID where the excitation signal is applied for much longer periods of time. The major difference between the two excitation techniques is the higher rate of excitation (gain in kinetic energy) between successive collisions with helium atoms with ''fast excitation'' CID as opposed to the conventional resonance excitation CID. With conventional resonance excitation CID ions fragment while the excitation voltage is still being applied whereas for ''fast excitation'' CID a higher proportion of the ions fragment in the ion cooling time following the excitation pulse. The fragmentation of the (M + 17H){sup 17+} of horse heart myoglobin is also shown to illustrate the application of ''fast excitation'' CID to proteins.

  13. Lattice, spin, and charge excitations in cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wei-Sheng

    2014-03-01

    Tracking doping evolution of elementary excitations is a crucial approach to understand the complex phenomena exhibited in cuprates. In the first part of my talk, I will discuss the role of the lattice in the quasi-one-dimensional edge-sharing cuprate Y2+xCa2-xCu5O10. Using O K-edge RIXS, we resolve site-dependent harmonic phonon excitations of a 70 meV mode. Coupled with theory, this provides a direct measurement of electron-lattice coupling strength. We show that such electron-lattice coupling causes doping-dependent distortions of the Cu-O-Cu bond angle, which sets the intra-chain spin exchange interactions. In the second part of my talk, I will discuss collective excitations in the electron-doped superconducting cuprate, Nd2-xCexCuO4 observed using Cu L-edge RIXS. Surprisingly, despite the fact that the spin stiffness is zero and the AFM correlations are short-ranged, magnetic excitations harden significantly across the AFM-HTSC phase boundary, in stark contrast with the hole-doped cuprates. Furthermore, we found an unexpected and highly dispersive mode emanating from the zone center in superconducting NCCO that is undetected in the hole-doped compounds. This may signal a quantum phase distinct from superconductivity. Thus, our results indicate an asymmetry of the collective excitations in electron- and hole-doped cuprates, providing a new perspective on the doping evolution of the cuprate ground state. This work is supported by DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division, under Contract DE-AC02-76SF00515.

  14. Cascadable excitability in optically injected microdisks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Vaerenbergh, Thomas; Alexander, Koen; Fiers, Martin; Mechet, Pauline; Dambre, Joni; Bienstman, Peter

    2014-05-01

    All-optical spiking neural networks would allow high speed parallelized processing of time-encoded information, using the same energy efficient computational principles as our brain. As the neurons in these networks need to be able to process pulse trains, they should be excitable. Using simulations, we demonstrate Class 1 excitability in optically injected microdisk lasers, and propose a cascadable optical spiking neuron design. The neuron has a clear threshold and an integrating behavior. In addition, we show that the optical phase of the input pulses can be used to create inhibitory, as well as excitatory perturbations. Furthermore, we incorporate our optical neuron design in a topology that allows a disk to react on excitations from other disks. Phase tuning of the intermediate connections allows to control the disk response. Additionally, we investigate the sensitivity of the disk circuit to deviations in driving current and locking signal wavelength detuning. Using state-of-the-art fabrication techniques for microdisk laser, the standard deviation of the lasing wavelength is still about one order of magnitude too large. Finally, as the dynamical behavior of the microdisks is identical to the behavior in Semiconductor Ring Lasers (SRL), we compare the excitability mechanism due to optically injection with the previously proposed excitability due to asymmetry in the intermodal coupling in SRLs, as the latter mechanism can also be induced in disks due to, e.g., asymmetry in the external reaction. In both cases, the symmetry between the two counter-propagating modes of the cavity needs to be broken to prevent switching to the other mode, and allow the system to relax to its initial state after a perturbation. However, the asymmetry due to optical injection results in an integrating spiking neuron, whereas the asymmetry in the intermodal coupling is known to result in a resonating spiking neuron.

  15. Accelerating slow excited state proton transfer.

    PubMed

    Stewart, David J; Concepcion, Javier J; Brennaman, M Kyle; Binstead, Robert A; Meyer, Thomas J

    2013-01-15

    Visible light excitation of the ligand-bridged assembly [(bpy)(2)Ru(a)(II)(L)Ru(b)(II)(bpy)(OH(2))(4+)] (bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine; L is the bridging ligand, 4-phen-tpy) results in emission from the lowest energy, bridge-based metal-to-ligand charge transfer excited state (L(-•))Ru(b)(III)-OH(2) with an excited-state lifetime of 13 ± 1 ns. Near-diffusion-controlled quenching of the emission occurs with added HPO(4)(2-) and partial quenching by added acetate anion (OAc(-)) in buffered solutions with pH control. A Stern-Volmer analysis of quenching by OAc(-) gave a quenching rate constant of k(q) = 4.1 × 10(8) M(-1) • s(-1) and an estimated pK(a)* value of ~5 ± 1 for the [(bpy)(2)Ru(a)(II)(L(•-))Ru(b)(III)(bpy)(OH(2))(4+)]* excited state. Following proton loss and rapid excited-state decay to give [(bpy)(2)Ru(a)(II)(L)Ru(b)(II)(bpy)(OH)(3+)] in a H(2)PO(4)(-)/HPO(4)(2-) buffer, back proton transfer occurs from H(2)PO(4)(-) to give [(bpy)(2)Ru(a)(II)(L)Ru(b)(bpy)(OH(2))(4+)] with k(PT,2) = 4.4 × 10(8) M(-1) • s(-1). From the intercept of a plot of k(obs) vs. [H(2)PO(4)(-)], k = 2.1 × 10(6) s(-1) for reprotonation by water providing a dramatic illustration of kinetically limiting, slow proton transfer for acids and bases with pK(a) values intermediate between pK(a)(H(3)O(+)) = -1.74 and pK(a)(H(2)O) = 15.7. PMID:23277551

  16. Cross sections and rate coefficients for inner-shell excitation of Li-like ions with 6 < Z < 42

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronova, U. I.; Safronova, M. S.; Kato, T.

    1996-07-01

    Excitation cross sections and rate coefficients by electron impact were calculated for the 1s22s-1s2s2p, 1s22s-1s2s2 and 1s22s-1s2p2 transitions of the Li-like ions (C IV, N V, O VI, Ne VIII, Mg X, Al XI, Si XII, S XIV, Ar XVI, Ca XVIII, Ti XX, Fe XXIV, Ni XXVI, Zn XXVIII, Ge XXX, Se XXXII, Kr XXXIV and Mo XXXX) in the Coulomb-Born approximation with exchange including relativistic effects and configuration interaction. Level energies, mixing coefficients and transition wavelengths and probabilities were also computed. Calculations performed by the 1/Z perturbation theory and Coulomb-Born approximation are compared with the R-matrix method and the distorted-wave approximation were Z is the nuclear charge. Formulae obtained for the angular factors of n-electron atomic system allow one to generalize this method to an arbitrary system of highly charged ions.

  17. Superposition of Fragment Excitations for Excited States of Large Clusters with Application to Helium Clusters.

    PubMed

    Closser, Kristina D; Ge, Qinghui; Mao, Yuezhi; Shao, Yihan; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2015-12-01

    We develop a local excited-state method, based on the configuration interaction singles (CIS) wave function, for large atomic and molecular clusters. This method exploits the properties of absolutely localized molecular orbitals (ALMOs), which strictly limits the total number of excitations, and results in formal scaling with the third power of the system size for computing the full spectrum of ALMO-CIS excited states. The derivation of the equations and design of the algorithm are discussed in detail, with particular emphasis on the computational scaling. Clusters containing ∼500 atoms were used in evaluating the scaling, which agrees with the theoretical predictions, and the accuracy of the method is evaluated with respect to standard CIS. A pioneering application to the size dependence of the helium cluster spectrum is also presented for clusters of 25-231 atoms, the largest of which results in the computation of 2310 excited states per sampled cluster geometry. PMID:26609558

  18. Peroxyacetyl radical: Electronic excitation energies, fundamental vibrational frequencies, and symmetry breaking in the first excited state

    SciTech Connect

    Copan, Andreas V.; Wiens, Avery E.; Nowara, Ewa M.; Schaefer, Henry F.; Agarwal, Jay

    2015-02-07

    Peroxyacetyl radical [CH{sub 3}C(O)O{sub 2}] is among the most abundant peroxy radicals in the atmosphere and is involved in OH-radical recycling along with peroxyacetyl nitrate formation. Herein, the ground (X{sup ~}) and first (A{sup ~}) excited state surfaces of cis and trans peroxyacetyl radical are characterized using high-level ab initio methods. Geometries, anharmonic vibrational frequencies, and adiabatic excitation energies extrapolated to the complete basis-set limit are reported from computations with coupled-cluster theory. Excitation of the trans conformer is found to induce a symmetry-breaking conformational change due to second-order Jahn-Teller interactions with higher-lying excited states. Additional benchmark computations are provided to aid future theoretical work on peroxy radicals.

  19. A scalable piezoelectric impulse-excited energy harvester for human body excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillatsch, P.; Yeatman, E. M.; Holmes, A. S.

    2012-11-01

    Harvesting energy from low-frequency and non-harmonic excitations typical of human motion presents specific challenges. While resonant devices do have an advantage in environments where the excitation frequency is constant, and while they can make use of the entire proof mass travel range in the case of excitation amplitudes that are smaller than the internal displacement limit, they are not suitable for body applications since the frequencies are random and the amplitudes tend to be larger than the device size. In this paper a piezoelectric, impulse-excited approach is presented. A cylindrical proof mass actuates an array of piezoelectric bi-morph beams through magnetic attraction. After the initial excitation these transducers are left to vibrate at their natural frequency. This increases the operational frequency range as well as the electromechanical coupling. The principle of impulse excitation is discussed and a centimetre-scale functional model is introduced as a proof of concept. The obtained data show the influence of varying the frequency, acceleration and proof mass. Finally, a commercially available integrated circuit for voltage regulation is tested. At a frequency of 2 Hz and an acceleration of 2.7 m s-2 a maximal power output of 2.1 mW was achieved.

  20. Excitation and photon decay of giant resonances excited by intermediate energy heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Bertrand, F.E.; Beene, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Inelastic scattering of medium energy heavy ions provides very large cross sections and peak-to-continuum ratios for excitation of giant resonances. For energies above about 50 MeV/nucleon, giant resonances are excited primarily through Coulomb excitation, which is indifferent to isospin, thus providing a good probe for the study of isovector giant resonances. The extremely large cross sections available from heavy ion excitation permit the study of rare decay modes of the giant resonances. In particular, recent measurements have been made of the photon decay of giant resonances following excitation by 22 and 84 MeV/nucleon /sup 17/O projectiles. The singles results at 84 MeV/nucleon yield peak cross sections for the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance and the isovector giant dipole resonance of approximately 0.8 and 3 barns/sr, respectively. Data on the ground state decay of the isoscalar giant quadrupole and isovector giant dipole resonances are presented and compared with calculations. Decays to low-lying excited states are also discussed. Preliminary results from an experiment to isolate the /sup 208/Pb isovector quadrupole resonance using its gamma decay are presented. 22 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Diversity improves performance in excitable networks

    PubMed Central

    Copelli, Mauro; Roberts, James A.

    2016-01-01

    As few real systems comprise indistinguishable units, diversity is a hallmark of nature. Diversity among interacting units shapes properties of collective behavior such as synchronization and information transmission. However, the benefits of diversity on information processing at the edge of a phase transition, ordinarily assumed to emerge from identical elements, remain largely unexplored. Analyzing a general model of excitable systems with heterogeneous excitability, we find that diversity can greatly enhance optimal performance (by two orders of magnitude) when distinguishing incoming inputs. Heterogeneous systems possess a subset of specialized elements whose capability greatly exceeds that of the nonspecialized elements. We also find that diversity can yield multiple percolation, with performance optimized at tricriticality. Our results are robust in specific and more realistic neuronal systems comprising a combination of excitatory and inhibitory units, and indicate that diversity-induced amplification can be harnessed by neuronal systems for evaluating stimulus intensities. PMID:27168961

  2. Excitation of millimeter and submillimeter water masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Melnick, Gary J.

    1991-01-01

    The excitation of maser emission in millimeter and submillimeter transitions of interstellar and circumstellar water is considered. An escape probability method is used to determine the equilibrium populations in 349 rotational states of both ortho- and para-water under varying conditions of gas temperature, density, water abundance, and radiation field. It is shown that, under those conditions believed to prevail around late-type stars and within star-forming regions, strong millimeter and submillimeter water maser emission can be generated by collisional excitations by H2. Several maser transitions can have strengths close to that of the 22 GHz line. The water maser line which can be observed from mountaintop facilities and those which will require air- or space-borne platforms are indicated. The exact portion of parameter space in which each maser transition exhibits peak emission is shown.

  3. Intermediate Excited States in Rhodopsin Photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothberg, L. J.; Yan, M.; Jedju, T. M.; Callender, R. H.; Chao, H.; Alfano, R. R.

    1996-03-01

    Recent work by Wang et.al. footnote Q. Wang et.al., Science 266, 422 (1994) reports rapid coherent photoisomerization in rhodopsin. The bathorhodopsin photoproduct appears in 200 fs and exhibits torsional oscillations which remain synchronized with the initial photoexcitation. We report transient absorption experiments which suggest that the fraction of excited rhodopsin molecules which does not isomerize in this fashion (approximately 1/3) remains in an electronically excited state, probably the twisted state described by Birge and Hubbard,footnote R. R. Birge and L. M. Hubbard, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 102, 2195 (1980) for ~ 3 ps and then reforms rhodopsin. This picture explains the long bleaching recovery time for rhodopsin and the controversial spectral dynamics which are observed in the red.

  4. Liquid storage tanks under vertical excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Philippacopoulos, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    Until recently, the hydrodynamic effects on liquid storage tanks induced by an earthquake excitation were basically treated for the horizontal component of the earthquake. Recent studies, however, showed that the hydrodynamic effects due to the vertical component of an earthquake may be significant. In these studies the tank is assumed to be fixed at the bottom. This paper is concerned with the hydrodynamic behavior of liquid storage tanks induced by vertical earthquake input excitation. First, the fluid-tank system is treated as a fixed-base system and a simple formula is obtained for the coupled fluid-structure natural frequency. Second, additional interaction effects due to the foundation flexibility on the fluid-tank system are investigated. It is concluded that the foundation flexibility may have a significant effect on the hydrodynamic behavior of the liquid storage tanks under a vertical ground shaking.

  5. Calculations of coincident ionization plus excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    For Li- and Be-like ions, K x-ray yields, together with detection that the ionic charge has increased, give the cross section for ionization plus excitation (IE), a process which can exhibit electron-electron correlations. Measurements of IE for /sub 14/Si/sup 11 +/ + He stimulated our coupled-channels calculations in the independent-Fermi-particle model (IFPM), which includes Pauli correlations. We discuss how the IFPM expressions, generalized here to include an open shell, differ from those for distinguishable electrons. The sensitivity of sigma/sub IE/ to correlations is shown. Recent additional measurements and future ones giving excitation functions for resolved configurations and complementary Auger data will provide even more sensitive tests of collisional correlation theory. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Excitation and Characterization of Chladni Plate Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourke, Shannon; Behringer, Ernest

    2011-04-01

    When a thin metal plate with a small amount of sand on it is made to vibrate, aesthetically pleasing sand patterns can form along the nodal lines of the plate. These symmetric patterns are called Chladni Patterns. Students taking PHY 101 Physical Science in the Arts at Eastern Michigan University create these patterns by pulling a violin bow across the edge of a plate, or by using a mechanical oscillator to drive the center of a plate. These two methods only allow a small subset of all possible points on the plate to be excited. We designed and built an electronic device that allows its user to excite the plate at any point. We present patterns created with this electronic device and other methods, and describe ways to model the observed patterns.

  7. Search for excited electrons at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H1 Collaboration; Adloff, C.; Andreev, V.; Andrieu, B.; Anthonis, T.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Bähr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J. C.; Böhme, J.; Boudry, V.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Bröker, H.-B.; Brown, D. P.; Bruncko, D.; Büsser, F. W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Clarke, D.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J. G.; Coppens, Y. R.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cox, B. E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Dau, W. D.; Daum, K.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; de Roeck, A.; de Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J. D.; Droutskoi, A.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y. H.; Flügge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formánek, J.; Franke, G.; Frising, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, J.; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, S.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Grab, C.; Grabski, V.; Grässler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Hladký, J.; Höting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hurling, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Işsever, Ç.; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, D. P.; Jones, M. A. S.; Jung, H.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Karschnick, O.; Katzy, J.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Kjellberg, P.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S. D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S. K.; Koutouev, R.; Koutov, A.; Kroseberg, J.; Krüger, K.; Kuhr, T.; Lamb, D.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebailly, E.; Lebedev, A.; Leißner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Loginov, A.; Loktionova, N.; Lubimov, V.; Lüders, S.; Lüke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Maraček, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.-U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S. J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michine, S.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mohrdieck, S.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Phillips, J. P.; Pitzl, D.; Pöschl, R.; Potachnikova, I.; Povh, B.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Schätzel, S.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schörner, T.; Schröder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlák, K.; Sefkow, F.; Shekelyan, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Tchetchelnitski, S.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truöl, P.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J. E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Uraev, A.; Urban, M.; Usik, A.; Valkár, S.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vassiliev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vichnevski, A.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Wallny, R.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; White, G.; Wiesand, S.; Wilksen, T.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.-G.; Wissing, Ch.; Wobisch, M.; Woehrling, E.-E.; Wünsch, E.; Wyatt, A. C.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; Zur Nedden, M.

    2002-11-01

    A search for excited electron (e*) production is described in which the electroweak decays e*-->eγ, e*-->eZ and e*-->νW are considered. The data used correspond to an integrated luminosity of 120 pb-1 taken in e+/-p collisions from 1994 to 2000 with the H1 detector at HERA at centre-of-mass energies of 300 and 318 GeV. No evidence for a signal is found. Mass dependent exclusion limits are derived for the ratio of the couplings to the compositeness scale, /f/Λ. These limits extend the excluded region to higher masses than has been possible in previous direct searches for excited electrons.

  8. Search for excited electrons at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adloff, C.; Andreev, V.; Andrieu, B.; Anthonis, T.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Bähr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J. C.; Böhme, J.; Boudry, V.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Bröker, H.-B.; Brown, D. P.; Bruncko, D.; Büsser, F. W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Clarke, D.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J. G.; Coppens, Y. R.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cox, B. E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Dau, W. D.; Daum, K.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J. D.; Droutskoi, A.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y. H.; Flügge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formánek, J.; Franke, G.; Frising, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, J.; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, S.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Grab, C.; Grabski, V.; Grässler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Hladký, J.; Höting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hurling, S.; Ibbotson, M.; İşsever, Ç.; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, D. P.; Jones, M. A. S.; Jung, H.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Karschnick, O.; Katzy, J.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Kjellberg, P.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S. D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S. K.; Koutouev, R.; Koutov, A.; Kroseberg, J.; Krüger, K.; Kuhr, T.; Lamb, D.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebailly, E.; Lebedev, A.; Leißner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Loginov, A.; Loktionova, N.; Lubimov, V.; Lüders, S.; Lüke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Maraček, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.-U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S. J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michine, S.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mohrdieck, S.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Phillips, J. P.; Pitzl, D.; Pöschl, R.; Potachnikova, I.; Povh, B.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Schätzel, S.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schörner, T.; Schröder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlák, K.; Sefkow, F.; Shekelyan, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Tchetchelnitski, S.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truöl, P.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J. E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Uraev, A.; Urban, M.; Usik, A.; Valkár, S.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vassiliev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vichnevski, A.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Wallny, R.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; White, G.; Wiesand, S.; Wilksen, T.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.-G.; Wissing, Ch.; Wobisch, M.; Woehrling, E.-E.; Wünsch, E.; Wyatt, A. C.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; zur Nedden, M.; H1 Collaboration

    2002-11-01

    A search for excited electron (e∗) production is described in which the electroweak decays e∗→eγ, e∗→eZ and e∗→νW are considered. The data used correspond to an integrated luminosity of 120 pb-1 taken in e±p collisions from 1994 to 2000 with the H1 detector at HERA at centre-of-mass energies of 300 and 318 GeV. No evidence for a signal is found. Mass dependent exclusion limits are derived for the ratio of the couplings to the compositeness scale, f/Λ. These limits extend the excluded region to higher masses than has been possible in previous direct searches for excited electrons.

  9. The excitation of O2 in auroras.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartwright, D. C.; Trajmar, S.; Williams, W.

    1972-01-01

    Newly measured electron impact cross sections for excitation of the a super 1 Delta sub g and b super 1 Sigma (plus) sub g electronic states of O2 have been employed to predict the absolute volume emission rates from these states under auroral conditions. A secondary electron flux typical of an IBC II nighttime aurora was used, and the most important quenching processes were included in the calculations. The new excitation cross sections for the a super 1 Delta sub g and b super 1 Sigma (plus) sub g states are more than an order of magnitude larger than previous estimates and lead to correspondingly greater intensities in the atmospheric and IR atmospheric band systems. The calculated intensity ratios of the volume emission rates of 7621 A and 1.27 micron to that for 3914 A are smaller than those obtained from aircraft observations and recent rocket experiments.

  10. Earth Rotational Variations Excited by Geophysical Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.

    2004-01-01

    Modern space geodetic measurement of Earth rotation variations, particularly by means of the VLBI technique, has over the years allowed studies of Earth rotation dynamics to advance in ever-increasing precision, accuracy, and temporal resolution. A review will be presented on our understanding of the geophysical and climatic causes, or "excitations". for length-of-day change, polar motion, and nutations. These excitations sources come from mass transports that constantly take place in the Earth system comprised of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, lithosphere, mantle, and the cores. In this sense, together with other space geodetic measurements of time-variable gravity and geocenter motion, Earth rotation variations become a remote-sensing tool for the integral of all mass transports, providing valuable information about the latter on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Future prospects with respect to geophysical studies with even higher accuracy and resolution will be discussed.

  11. Linear response to nonstationary random excitation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasselman, T.

    1972-01-01

    Development of a method for computing the mean-square response of linear systems to nonstationary random excitation of the form given by y(t) = f(t) x(t), in which x(t) = a stationary process and f(t) is deterministic. The method is suitable for application to multidegree-of-freedom systems when the mean-square response at a point due to excitation applied at another point is desired. Both the stationary process, x(t), and the modulating function, f(t), may be arbitrary. The method utilizes a fundamental component of transient response dependent only on x(t) and the system, and independent of f(t) to synthesize the total response. The role played by this component is analogous to that played by the Green's function or impulse response function in the convolution integral.

  12. The tongue as an excitable medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiden, Gabriel; Curland, Sofia

    2015-03-01

    Geographic tongue (GT) is a medical condition affecting approximately 2% of the population, whereby the papillae covering the upper part of the tongue are lost due to a slowly expanding inflammation. The resultant dynamical appearance of the tongue has striking similarities with well known out-of-equilibrium phenomena observed in excitable media, such as forest fires, cardiac dynamics, chemically driven reaction-diffusion systems and morphogenesis in multicellular organisms. Here we identify GT as a novel example of excitable media dynamics and explore the evolution of the condition from a dynamical systems perspective. We focus on two characteristic aspects of GT in particular: anisotropic expansion of lesions and re-entry of the inflammation into recovering regions. Our investigation sheds light on the evolution of the inflammation and suggests a practical way to classify the severity of the condition, based on the characteristic patterns observed in GT patients.

  13. Viscous flow drag reduction by acoustic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, Robert T.

    1986-12-01

    An experimental program in which the effectiveness of a single large eddy break up (LEBU) blade is enhanced by proper acoustic excitation is described. Acoustic waves are generated in response to the incident large scale eddies and directed at the blade trailing edge through the test surface floor below the manipulator blade. The acoustic input is phase locked to the incident flow. Control of the acoustic input apparently allows enhancement of the large eddy cancellation process leading to a decrease of skin friction coefficient. Control of this process with acoustic excitation indicates that vortex unwinding is the mechanism for large eddy destruction in the boundary layer. A deeper understanding of this phenomena could lead to better drag reduction technology and further understanding of the physics of the turbulent boundary layer.

  14. Enhanced production of excited neutrals following core-to-Rydberg excitation in molecules: SiCl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, R. A.; Wen, C.-R.; Tan, K.; Chen, J.-M.

    1990-04-01

    Using monochromatized synchrotron radiation in the range 103 to 112 eV we have monitored the dispersed UV/optical fluorescence resulting from excitation of a Si 2p electron in SiCl4. The main features in the fluorescence spectrum have been identified as emission from the SiCl4+ C state and from excited Si atoms. Features in the fluorescence excitation spectra are assigned to excitation of a Si 2p electron to unoccupied valence and Rydberg orbitals. For the SiCl4+ C state emission there is significant enhancement in the yield following excitation to valence orbitals and very little enhancement as a result of Rydberg excitation. The opposite is true for emission from excited Si atoms. Enhancement in the SiCl4+ C state production upon valence excitation results from autoionization of the core-excited state. The relatively large yield of excited Si atoms following Rydberg excitation is due to the greater probability of the core-excited Rydberg state decaying, via a resonant Auger process, to highly excited, unbound states of SiCl4+. The molecular ion then fragments before the excited Rydberg electron can relax.

  15. Spiral core in singly diffusive excitable media

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, D.A. ); Levine, H.; Reynolds, W.N. )

    1992-01-20

    We formulate the problem of finding the spiral core which smoothly matches onto the asymptotic rotating solution of the FitzHugh-Nagumo model. We prove that the inner problem (with scale {epsilon}, the ratio of the reaction rates) has a solution for all possible outer solutions on scale {epsilon}{sup 2/3}; furthermore, we explicitly determine this solution via a simple numerical procedure. This completes the rigorous demonstration of the existence of rotating spiral solutions in singly diffusive excitable systems.

  16. Novel methods of copper vapor laser excitation

    SciTech Connect

    McColl, W.B.; Ching, H.; Bosch, R.; Brake, M.; Gilgenbach, R.

    1990-12-31

    Microwave and intense electron beam excitation of copper vapor are being investigated to be used in copper vapor lasers for isotope separation. Both methods use copper chloride vapor by heating copper chloride. Helium was used as the buffer gas at 2 to 100 torr. In the microwave system, intense copperlines at 510 nm and 578 nm were observed. Initial electron beam results indicate that light emission follows the beam current.

  17. Multiphonon excitations in boson quantum films

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, B.E. |; Krotscheck, E. |; Tymczak, C.J.

    1996-05-01

    Dynamical excitations in thin liquid films of {sup 4}He adsorbed to a substrate are investigated by using a microscopic theory of excitations that includes multiple-phonon scattering. We study the dispersion relation, excitation mechanisms, transition densities, and particle currents as a function of surface coverage. A primary new result is that we have included three-phonon scattering processes in the calculation of the dynamic structure function and the one-body current densities. With the exception that our ground state is determined by our variational theory, rather than taken from experiment, our work on the dynamic structure function is the generalization of that of Jackson [Phys. Rev. A {bold 4}, 2386 (1971)] to inhomogeneous systems (films). Using sum rules for the dynamic structure function as a guide, we suggest a simple scaling argument for improving the agreement between our dynamic structure function and the experimental one. The addition of three-phonon contributions bring about the following changes. First, the energy of most modes is lowered by a non-negligible amount for finite momentum excitations. Second, the film{close_quote}s surface mode is the exception; it is only slightly affected. Third, for monolayer films there is large scattering at high energies at intermediate values of momenta. This scattering can be traced back to an anomalously large contribution to the two-particle density of states. Fourth, all modes with energy above a critical energy decay, and the associated peaks of the dynamic structure function are broadened. Fifth, the maxonlike character is enhanced in the bulklike modes. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  18. Love waves excited by a moving source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaslavskii, Yu. M.

    2016-01-01

    The study analyzes the characteristics of surface Love waves excited by the moment of an oscillating torsional force with a point of action that moves uniformly and rectilinearly along the free flat boundary of a medium having the structure of a "layer on a half-space." The azimuthal-angular distribution of the amplitude and Doppler shift in frequency of the wave modes is studied as a function of the motion velocity of a vibrating source and the parameters of the medium.

  19. Information resonance in a model excitable system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorecki, Jerzy; Gorecki, Adam; Lemarchand, Annie; Nowakowski, Bogdan

    2013-06-01

    We consider a simple mesoscopic model of an excitable thermochemical system for which the system temperature as a function of time has a form of irregular spikes. The interspike intervals are mapped onto elements of a formal alphabet. The time evolution of system temperature is represented by a string over this alphabet. We demonstrate that the entropy of such string reaches a minimum for the values of model parameters where the coherence resonance of interspike intervals is observed.

  20. Collisional energy transfer in highly excited molecules.

    PubMed

    Houston, Paul L; Conte, Riccardo; Bowman, Joel M

    2014-09-11

    The excitation/de-excitation step in the Lindemann mechanism is investigated in detail using model development and classical trajectory studies based on a realistic potential energy surface. The model, based on a soft-sphere/line-of-centers approach and using elements of Landau-Teller theory and phase space theory, correctly predicts most aspects of the joint probability distribution P(ΔE,ΔJ) for the collisional excitation and de-excitation process in the argon-allyl system. The classical trajectories both confirm the validity of the model and provide insight into the energy transfer. The potential employed was based on a previously available ab initio intramolecular potential for the allyl fit to 97418 allyl electronic energies and an intermolecular potential fit to 286 Ar-allyl energies. Intramolecular energies were calculated at the CCSD(T)/AVTZ level of theory, while intermolecular energies were calculated at the MP2/AVTZ level of theory. Trajectories were calculated for each of four starting allyl isomers and for an initial rotational level of Ji = 0 as well as for Ji taken from a microcanonical distribution. Despite a dissimilarity in Ar-allyl potentials for fixed Ar-allyl geometries, energy transfer properties starting from four different isomers were found to be remarkably alike. A contributing factor appears to be that the orientation-averaged potentials are almost identical. The model we have developed suggests that most hydrocarbons should have similar energy transfer properties, scaled by differences in the potential offset of the atom-hydrogen interaction. Available data corroborate this suggestion. PMID:25116732

  1. Collisional excitation of interstellar methyl cyanide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Sheldon

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical calculations are used to determine the collisional excitation rates of methyl cyanide under interstellar molecular cloud conditions. The required Q(L,M) as a function of kinetic temperature were determined by averaging fixed energy IOS (infinite order sudden) results over appropriate Boltzmann distributions of collision energies. At a kinetic temperature of 40 K, rates within a K ladder were found to be accurate to generally better than about 30 percent.

  2. Dynamical analysis of highly excited molecular spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Kellman, M.E.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is new methods for analysis of spectra and dynamics of highly excited vibrational states of molecules. In these systems, strong mode coupling and anharmonicity give rise to complicated classical dynamics, and make the simple normal modes analysis unsatisfactory. New methods of spectral analysis, pattern recognition, and assignment are sought using techniques of nonlinear dynamics including bifurcation theory, phase space classification, and quantization of phase space structures. The emphasis is chaotic systems and systems with many degrees of freedom.

  3. Frequency-modulated excitation of potassium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xianzhou; Jiang, Hongmin; Rao, Jianguo; Li, Baiwen

    2003-08-01

    A time-dependent perturbation method is proposed to study the properties of the frequency-modulated excitation of a potassium atom. Rabi oscillations in the absence of a modulation, square-wave oscillations in the presence of slow modulation, and radio-frequency multiphoton resonances in the presence of fast modulation have been calculated using this method. The numerical results are in excellent agreement with those of the experiment; novel explanations have been given to understand some of the experimental results.

  4. STIRAP on helium: Excitation to Rydberg states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Deqian

    Research in optically induced transitions between dierent atomic levels has a long history. For transitions between states driven by a coherent optical eld, the theoretical eciency could be ideally high as 100% but there could be many factors preventing this. In the three state helium atom excitation process, i.e. 23S→33P→nL , the stimulated emission from intermediate state makes it hard to achieve ecient population transfer to the nal state through an intuitive excitation order. One technique to achieve a higher eciency is Stimulated Raman Adiabatic Passage (STIRAP) which is being studied and under research in our lab. Unlike traditional three level excitation processes, STIRAP actually uses a counter intuitive pulsed laser beams timing arrangement. The excitation objects are metastable helium atoms traveling in a vacuum system with a longitudinal velocity of ~ 1070 m/s. We are using a 389 nm UV laser to connect the 23S and the 33P state and a frequency tunable ~790 nm IR laser to connect the 33P state and the dierent Rydberg states. A third 1083 nm wavelength laser beam drives the 23S → 23P transition to transversely separate the residual metastable atoms and the Rydberg atoms for eciency measurements. The data is taken by a stainless steel detector in the vacuum system. As the Rydberg atoms will get ionized by blackbody radiation under room temperature, we can utilize this for their detection. An ion detector sitting on the eld plate is capable to collect the ion signals of the Rydberg atoms for detection. So far the whole system has not been ready for data collection and measurement, so here we are using data and results from previous theses for discussions. The highest transition frequency that has ever been achieved in our lab is around 70% after corrections.

  5. Excitation of terahertz nanoantennas by Rabi waves

    SciTech Connect

    Slepyan, G. Ya.; Yerchak, Y. D.; Maksimenko, S. A.; Hoffmann, A.; Bass, F. G.

    2011-10-03

    Theoretical model of quantum dot ring, strongly coupled with classical electromagnetic field, is developed. We demonstrate, that tunnel current in the QD-ring has low-frequency component, excited by Rabi waves, propagating into the ring, and the ring can be considered as a candidate for role of terahertz magnetic loop antenna. The low-frequency current is inspired by the asymmetry of electron tunneling.

  6. Fast excitation wiggler field measurement results

    SciTech Connect

    Armendariz, J.; Gallardo, J.; Romano, T.; van Steenbergen, A.

    1992-08-01

    As part of the program of Inverse Free Electron Laser (IFEL) Accelerator Development, the development of fast excitation, planar wigglers with high K magnitude has been pursued. This paper discusses the observed characteristics of a variable period length, tapered, wiggler as well as the procedures of measurement. The behaviour of a constant period length magnet with varying Vanadium Permendur (VaP) and field reflector thickness is also discussed.

  7. Magnetic performance of a fast excitation wiggler

    SciTech Connect

    Gallardo, J.C.; Romano, T.; van Steenbergen, A.

    1993-03-01

    With the objective of performing an inverse free-electron laser accelerator experiment, an iron dominated (Vanadium Permendur), fast excitation, high K planar wiggler has been built and measured. The authors present in this report an analysis of a constant period wiggler and several tapering configurations (gap=4 mm; 3.0 cm < {lambda}{sub {omega}} < 5. cm) when they are driven to a peak field of B{sub max} {approx}1.4 T.

  8. New photocalorimetric references for UV excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgida, D. H.; Erra-Balsells, R.; Bilmes, G. M.

    1996-02-01

    A set of calorimetric references for excitation at λ = 266 nm in acetonitrile solutions is proposed. Theophylline and several purinic compounds (purine, 6-methylpurine, 6-methoxypurine, 6-chloropurine, and 6-aminopurine) were investigated using pulsed laser optoacoustic spectroscopy with resolution times between 150 ns and 1 μs and compared with 2-hydroxybenzophenone. At room temperature, all these compounds show no fluorescence, good stability and no photochemical processes as photodegradation or multiphotonic effects below fluences of 1000 J/m 2.

  9. Experiments on shells under base excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellicano, Francesco; Barbieri, Marco; Zippo, Antonio; Strozzi, Matteo

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present paper is a deep experimental investigation of the nonlinear dynamics of circular cylindrical shells. The specific problem regards the response of circular cylindrical shells subjected to base excitation. The shells are mounted on a shaking table that furnishes a vertical vibration parallel to the cylinder axis; a heavy rigid disk is mounted on the top of the shells. The base vibration induces a rigid body motion, which mainly causes huge inertia forces exerted by the top disk to the shell. In-plane stresses due to the aforementioned inertias give rise to impressively large vibration on the shell. An extremely violent dynamic phenomenon suddenly appears as the excitation frequency varies up and down close to the linear resonant frequency of the first axisymmetric mode. The dynamics are deeply investigated by varying excitation level and frequency. Moreover, in order to generalise the investigation, two different geometries are analysed. The paper furnishes a complete dynamic scenario by means of: (i) amplitude frequency diagrams, (ii) bifurcation diagrams, (iii) time histories and spectra, (iv) phase portraits and Poincaré maps. It is to be stressed that all the results presented here are experimental.

  10. Low-spin excitations in ^100Pd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radeck, D.; Bettermann, L.; Blazhev, A.; Bernards, C.; Dewald, A.; Fransen, C.; Heinze, S.; Jolie, J.; Muecher, D.; Pissulla, T.; Zell, K. O.; Moeller, O.

    2009-10-01

    In the context of investigating collectivity in the A=100 mass region the nucleus ^100Pd was measured at the Cologne Tandem facility using the HORUS and the plunger setups. Detailed data exists for the N=52 isotones and the evolution of collectivity - especially of the symmetric and mixed-symmetric phonon states - was discussed. To extend the knowledge of the evolution in this region it is important to measure the N=54 isotones. Up to now the low-energy part of the excitation spectrum of ^100Pd was known sparsely and only the lifetime of an 8^+ isomer was known. Using the HORUS data the level scheme was extended, clarified and multipole mixing ratios were determined for the first time. The plunger experiment yielded lifetimes of the yrast states up to 12^+1. Both, the experimental excitation spectrum and electric transition strengths, were compared to predictions of theoretical models, i.e. the anharmonic vibrator model, the Interacting Boson Model and the shell model. A candidate for the one-phonon mixed-symmetry excitation 2^+1,ms was identified due to its dominating M1 transition to the symmetric 2^+1 state. The results will be presented and discussed. Supported by DFG, grant Jo 391/3-2 and US DOE DE-FG02-91ER40609.

  11. Excitation equilibria in plasmas; a classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Mullen, J. A. M.

    1990-07-01

    This review gives a classification of the excitation kinetics ruled by electrons in plasmas. It is a study on the atomic state distribution function (ASDF) and its relation with underlying processes, which, for the case of an electron excitation kinetics (EEK) plasma, is merely a competition between free and bound electrons, the same particles in different circumstances. In a quasi steady state the population density of an atomic state results from production-destruction balances in equilibrium. If all balances are proper, i.e., consist of each other's inverse processes, then the ASDF is described by the Boltzmann-Saha relation. In other cases the balance will be denoted as improper, the ASDF will deviate from the equilibrium shape, but reflecting the underlying improper balances, it may give information about the plasma. Four improper balances and their impact on the ASDF are dealt with. An important feature is that improper balances are associated with particle transport. Special attention is paid to the distribution function of the excitation saturation balance in which the overpopulated bound electrons are subjected to frequent interactions with free electrons and the energy distribution of the free electrons is taken over. This distribution, denoted as the bound Maxwell distribution, is experimentally found in several ionizing plasmas. Its recombining counterpart, the deexcitation saturation balance, creates under certain conditions inversion in the ASDF, the basis for the recombination laser.

  12. Volcanic termor: Nonlinear excitation by fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julian, Bruce R.

    1994-06-01

    A nonlinear process analogous to the excitation mechanism of musical wind instruments and human vocal cords can explain many characteristics of volcanic tremor, including (1) periodic and 'chaotic' oscillations, with peaked and irregular spectra respectively, (2) rapid pulsations in eruptions occurring at the same frequency as tremor, (3) systematic changes in tremor amplitude as channel geometry evolves during an eruption, (4) the period doubling reported for Hawaiian deep tremor, and (5) the fact that the onset of termor can be either gradual or abrupt. Volcanic 'long-period' earthquakes can be explained as oscillations excited by transient disturbances produced by nearby earthquakes, fluid heterogeneity, or changes in channel geometry, when the magma flow rate is too low to excite continuous tremor. A simple lumped-parameter tremor model involving the flow of an incompressible viscous fluid through a channel with movable elastic walls leads to a third-order system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. For different driving fluid pressures, numerical solutions exhibit steady flow, simple limit-cycle oscillations, a cascade of period-doubling subharmonic bifurcations, and chaotic oscillations controlled by a strange attractor of Rossler type. In this model, tremor occurs most easily at local constrictions, and fluid discharge is lower than would occur in unstable steady flow.

  13. Excitation of vortex meandering in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröttle, Josef; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Schumann, Ulrich

    2015-06-01

    This paper investigates the evolution of a streamwise aligned columnar vortex with vorticity {\\boldsymbol{ ω }} in an axial background shear of magnitude Ω by means of linear stability analysis and numerical simulations. A long wave mode of vorticity normal to the plane spanned by the background shear vector {\\boldsymbol{ Ω }} and the vorticity of the vortex are excited by an instability. The stationary wave modes of the vertical and lateral vorticity are amplified. In order to form a helical vortex, the lateral and vertical vorticity can be phase shifted by half a wavelength. The linear and nonlinear evolutions of the vortex in the shear flow are studied numerically. Linearized simulations confirm the results of the stability analysis. The nonlinear simulations reveal further evolution of the helix in the shear flow. The linearly excited mode persists in co-existence with evolving smaller scale instabilities until the flow becomes fully turbulent at the time of O(100 {{Ω }-1}). Turbulent mixing dampens the amplifying mode. The described phenomenon of vortex meandering may serve as an alternative explanation for the excitation of wind turbine wake meandering in the atmospheric boundary layer.

  14. Spin-flavor composition of excited baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, Ishara; Goity, Jose

    2015-10-01

    The excited baryon masses are analyzed in the framework of the 1 /Nc expansion using the available physical masses and also the masses obtained in lattice QCD for different quark masses. The baryon states are organized into irreducible representations of SU (6) × O (3) , where the [ 56 ,lP =0+ ] ground state and excited baryons, and the [ 56 ,2+ ] and [ 70 ,1- ] excited states are analyzed. The analyses are carried out to O 1 /Nc and first order in the quark masses. The issue of state identifications is discussed. Numerous parameter independent mass relations result at those orders, among them the well known Gell-Mann-Okubo and Equal Spacing relations, as well as additional relations involving baryons with different spins. It is observed that such relations are satisfied at the expected level of precision. Predictions for physically unknown states for each multiplet are obtained. From the quark-mass dependence of the coefficients in the baryon mass formulas an increasingly simpler picture of the spin-flavor composition of the baryons is observed with increasing pion mass (equivalently, increasing mu , d masses), as measured by the number of significant mass operators. This work was supported in part by DOE Contract No. DE-AC05-06OR23177 under which JSA operates the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (J. L. G.), and by the NSF (USA) through Grant PHY-0855789 and PHY-1307413 (I. P. F and J. L. G).

  15. Unravelling the Excitation Spectrum of the Nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Sandorfi, Andrew M.

    2013-03-01

    The low-energy structure of QCD lies encoded in the excited states of the nucleon, a complicated overlap of many resonances. Recent Lattice calculations have confirmed the longstanding quark model predictions of many more excited states than have been identified. Reactions that probe the spectrum are clouded by effects that dress the interactions and complicate the identification of excited levels and the interpretation of their structure. Recent theoretical work has exposed dramatic effects from such dressings. On the experimental side, new complete measurements of pseudoscalar meson photo-production are being pursued at several laboratories, where here the designation of complete refers to measurements of most if not all of the 16 possible reaction observables. This has been the focus of a series of experiments at Jefferson Lab culminating in the recently completed g9/FROST and g14/HDice runs which are now under analysis. With realistic errors, the number of observables needed to constrain the production amplitude is many more than required of a mathematical solution.

  16. Nematic electroconvection under time-reversed excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietschmann, Dirk; John, Thomas; Stannarius, Ralf

    2010-10-01

    We study nematic electrohydrodynamic convection (EHC) under excitation with superimposed harmonic wave forms. Within the standard model for EHC, a time reversal of the excitation does not affect threshold voltages and pattern wavelengths obtained in a linear stability analysis. This was confirmed in experiments with superimposed square waves [Heuer , Phys. Rev. E 78, 036218 (2008)10.1103/PhysRevE.78.036218]. We show here that this symmetry with respect to time reversal of the excitation breaks down close to the transition from the conduction regime to the dielectric regime. The EHC standard model without flexoelectric terms fails to predict quantitatively correct threshold curves and wavelengths in a certain parameter range below the transition. This is an indication that a more elaborate description of the EHC mechanism is necessary in this range. We suggest that the weak electrolyte model has to be employed for a correct description. This is in accordance with observations of traveling rolls and of localized structures at onset of the convection in earlier experiments described in literature.

  17. Excitation picture of an interacting Bose gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kira, M.

    2014-12-15

    Atomic Bose–Einstein condensates (BECs) can be viewed as macroscopic objects where atoms form correlated atom clusters to all orders. Therefore, the presence of a BEC makes the direct use of the cluster-expansion approach–lucrative e.g. in semiconductor quantum optics–inefficient when solving the many-body kinetics of a strongly interacting Bose. An excitation picture is introduced with a nonunitary transformation that describes the system in terms of atom clusters within the normal component alone. The nontrivial properties of this transformation are systematically studied, which yields a cluster-expansion friendly formalism for a strongly interacting Bose gas. Its connections and corrections to the standard Hartree–Fock–Bogoliubov approach are discussed and the role of the order parameter and the Bogoliubov excitations are identified. The resulting interaction effects are shown to visibly modify number fluctuations of the BEC. Even when the BEC has a nearly perfect second-order coherence, the BEC number fluctuations can still resolve interaction-generated non-Poissonian fluctuations. - Highlights: • Excitation picture expresses interacting Bose gas with few atom clusters. • Semiconductor and BEC many-body investigations are connected with cluster expansion. • Quantum statistics of BEC is identified in terms of atom clusters. • BEC number fluctuations show extreme sensitivity to many-body correlations. • Cluster-expansion friendly framework is established for an interacting Bose gas.

  18. Seismic Excitation of the Polar Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin Fong; Gross, Richard S.; Han, Yan-Ben

    1996-01-01

    The mass redistribution in the earth as a result of an earthquake faulting changes the earth's inertia tensor, and hence its rotation. Using the complete formulae developed by Chao and Gross (1987) based on the normal mode theory, we calculated the earthquake-induced polar motion excitation for the largest 11,015 earthquakes that occurred during 1977.0-1993.6. The seismic excitations in this period are found to be two orders of magnitude below the detection threshold even with today's high precision earth rotation measurements. However, it was calculated that an earthquake of only one tenth the size of the great 1960 Chile event, if happened today, could be comfortably detected in polar motion observations. Furthermore, collectively these seismic excitations have a strong statistical tendency to nudge the pole towards approx. 140 deg E, away from the actually observed polar drift direction. This non-random behavior, similarly found in other earthquake-induced changes in earth rotation and low-degree gravitational field by Chao and Gross (1987), manifests some geodynamic behavior yet to be explored.

  19. Vacuum-excited surface plasmon polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naylor, Wade

    2015-05-01

    We separate Maxwell's equations for background media that allow for both electric and magnetic time dependence in a generalized Lorenz gauge. In a process analogous to the dynamical Casimir effect (DCE) we discuss how surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) can be created out of vacuum via the time-dependent variation of a dielectric and magnetic insulator at a metal interface for TM and TE branches, respectively. We suggest how to extend currently proposed DCE experiments to set up and detect these excitations. Numerical simulations (without any approximation) indicate that vacuum-excited SPPs can be of a similar magnitude to the photon creation rate in such experiments. Potential benefits of detecting vacuum-excited SPPs, as opposed to DCE photons, are that parametric enhancement does not require a sealed cavity in the axial direction and the detection apparatus might be able to use simple phase-matching techniques. For the case of constant permeability μ , TM branch SPPs and photons do not suffer from detuning and attenuation like TE photons.

  20. Excitation energy transfer in the photosystem I

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, Andrew N

    2012-09-25

    Photosystem I is a multimeric pigment protein complex in plants, green alage and cyanobacteria that functions in series with Photosystem II to use light energy to oxidize water and reduce carbon dioxide. The Photosystem I core complex contains 96 chlorophyll a molecules and 22 carotenoids that are involved in light harvesting and electron transfer. In eucaryotes, PSI also has a peripheral light harvesting complex I (LHCI). The role of specific chlorophylls in excitation and electron transfer are still unresolved. In particular, the role of so-called bridging chlorophylls, located between the bulk antenna and the core electron transfer chain, in the transfer of excitation energy to the reaction center are unknown. During the past funding period, site directed mutagenesis has been used to create mutants that effect the physical properties of these key chlorophylls, and to explore how this alters the function of the photosystem. Studying these mutants using ultrafast absorption spectroscopy has led to a better understanding of the process by which excitation energy is transferred from the antenna chlorophylls to the electron transfer chain chlorophylls, and what the role of connecting chlorophylls and A_0 chlorophylls is in this process. We have also used these mutants to investigate whch of the central group of six chlorophylls are involved in the primary steps of charge separation and electron transfer.

  1. Charge transfer excitations from excited state Hartree-Fock subsequent minimization scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Theophilou, Iris; Tassi, M.; Thanos, S.

    2014-04-28

    Photoinduced charge-transfer processes play a key role for novel photovoltaic phenomena and devices. Thus, the development of ab initio methods that allow for an accurate and computationally inexpensive treatment of charge-transfer excitations is a topic that nowadays attracts a lot of scientific attention. In this paper we extend an approach recently introduced for the description of single and double excitations [M. Tassi, I. Theophilou, and S. Thanos, Int. J. Quantum Chem. 113, 690 (2013); M. Tassi, I. Theophilou, and S. Thanos, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 124107 (2013)] to allow for the description of intermolecular charge-transfer excitations. We describe an excitation where an electron is transferred from a donor system to an acceptor one, keeping the excited state orthogonal to the ground state and avoiding variational collapse. These conditions are achieved by decomposing the space spanned by the Hartree-Fock (HF) ground state orbitals into four subspaces: The subspace spanned by the occupied orbitals that are localized in the region of the donor molecule, the corresponding for the acceptor ones and two more subspaces containing the virtual orbitals that are localized in the neighborhood of the donor and the acceptor, respectively. Next, we create a Slater determinant with a hole in the subspace of occupied orbitals of the donor and a particle in the virtual subspace of the acceptor. Subsequently we optimize both the hole and the particle by minimizing the HF energy functional in the corresponding subspaces. Finally, we test our approach by calculating the lowest charge-transfer excitation energies for a set of tetracyanoethylene-hydrocarbon complexes that have been used earlier as a test set for such kind of excitations.

  2. Charge transfer excitations from excited state Hartree-Fock subsequent minimization scheme.

    PubMed

    Theophilou, Iris; Tassi, M; Thanos, S

    2014-04-28

    Photoinduced charge-transfer processes play a key role for novel photovoltaic phenomena and devices. Thus, the development of ab initio methods that allow for an accurate and computationally inexpensive treatment of charge-transfer excitations is a topic that nowadays attracts a lot of scientific attention. In this paper we extend an approach recently introduced for the description of single and double excitations [M. Tassi, I. Theophilou, and S. Thanos, Int. J. Quantum Chem. 113, 690 (2013); M. Tassi, I. Theophilou, and S. Thanos, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 124107 (2013)] to allow for the description of intermolecular charge-transfer excitations. We describe an excitation where an electron is transferred from a donor system to an acceptor one, keeping the excited state orthogonal to the ground state and avoiding variational collapse. These conditions are achieved by decomposing the space spanned by the Hartree-Fock (HF) ground state orbitals into four subspaces: The subspace spanned by the occupied orbitals that are localized in the region of the donor molecule, the corresponding for the acceptor ones and two more subspaces containing the virtual orbitals that are localized in the neighborhood of the donor and the acceptor, respectively. Next, we create a Slater determinant with a hole in the subspace of occupied orbitals of the donor and a particle in the virtual subspace of the acceptor. Subsequently we optimize both the hole and the particle by minimizing the HF energy functional in the corresponding subspaces. Finally, we test our approach by calculating the lowest charge-transfer excitation energies for a set of tetracyanoethylene-hydrocarbon complexes that have been used earlier as a test set for such kind of excitations. PMID:24784248

  3. 69. Credit TCL. Housing of Pelton exciter impulse wheel and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. Credit TCL. Housing of Pelton exciter impulse wheel and attached General Electric 60 kW exciter generator. - Battle Creek Hydroelectric System, Battle Creek & Tributaries, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  4. Strong decays of excited baryons in Large Nc QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Goity, J. L.; Scoccola, N. N.

    2007-02-12

    We present the analysis of the strong decays widths of excited baryons in the framework of the 1/Nc expansion of QCD. These studies are performed up to order 1/Nc and include both positive and negative parity excited baryons.

  5. Strong decays of excited baryons in Large Nc QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Goity, Jose; Scoccola, Norberto

    2007-02-01

    We present the analysis of the strong decays widths of excited baryons in the framework of the 1/Nc expansion of QCD. These studies are performed up to order 1/Nc and include both positive and negative parity excited baryons.

  6. 14. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR, EXCITER No. 2 SHOWING GENERAL ELECTRIC INDUCTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR, EXCITER No. 2 SHOWING GENERAL ELECTRIC INDUCTION MOTOR IN SERIES BETWEEN PELTON-DOBLE IMPULSE WHEEL AND GENERAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR. VIEW TO EAST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse Exciters, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  7. 12. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 2 SMALL PELTONDOBLE IMPULSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 2 SMALL PELTON-DOBLE IMPULSE WHEEL, HAND-CONTROLLED GATE VALVE, AND NOZZLE. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse Exciters, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  8. 6. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 1. HANDCONTROLLED GATE VALVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 1. HAND-CONTROLLED GATE VALVE SHOWN ON NOZZLE TO PELTON-DOBLE IMPULSE WHEEL. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse Exciters, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  9. Simultaneous two-photon excitation of photodynamic therapy agents

    SciTech Connect

    Wachter, E.A.; Fisher, W.G. |; Partridge, W.P.; Dees, H.C.; Petersen, M.G.

    1998-01-01

    The spectroscopic and photochemical properties of several photosensitive compounds are compared using conventional single-photon excitation (SPE) and simultaneous two-photon excitation (TPE). TPE is achieved using a mode-locked titanium:sapphire laser, the near infrared output of which allows direct promotion of non-resonant TPE. Excitation spectra and excited state properties of both type 1 and type 2 photodynamic therapy (PDT) agents are examined.

  10. Dynamic analysis of parametrically excited system under uncertainties and multi-frequency excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Sha; Han, Qinkai; Peng, Zhike; Chu, Fulei

    2016-05-01

    Some system parameters in mechanical systems are always uncertain due to uncertainties in geometric and material properties, lubrication condition and wear. For a more reasonable estimation of dynamic analysis of the parametrically excited system, the effect of uncertain parameters should be taken into account. This paper presents a new non-probabilistic analysis method for solving the dynamic responses of parametrically excited systems under uncertainties and multi-frequency excitations. By using the multi-dimensional harmonic balance method (MHBM) and the Chebyshev inclusion function (CIF), an interval multi-dimensional harmonic balance method (IMHBM) is obtained. To illustrate the accuracy of the proposed method, a time-varying geared system of wind turbine with different kinds of uncertainties is demonstrated. By comparing with the results of the scanning method, it is shown that the presented method is valid and effective for the parametrically excited system with uncertainties and multi-frequency excitations. The effects of some uncertain system parameters including uncertain mesh stiffnesses and uncertain bearing stiffnesses on the frequency responses of the system are also discussed in detail. It is shown that the dynamic responses of the system are insensitive to the uncertain mesh stiffness and bearing stiffnesses of the planetary gear stage. The uncertain bearing stiffnesses of the intermediate and high-speed stages will lead to relatively large uncertainties in the dynamic responses around resonant regions. It will provide valuable guidance for the optimal design and condition monitoring of wind turbine gearboxes.

  11. Excitation Spectra and Brightness Optimization of Two-Photon Excited Probes

    PubMed Central

    Mütze, Jörg; Iyer, Vijay; Macklin, John J.; Colonell, Jennifer; Karsh, Bill; Petrášek, Zdeněk; Schwille, Petra; Looger, Loren L.; Lavis, Luke D.; Harris, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    Two-photon probe excitation data are commonly presented as absorption cross section or molecular brightness (the detected fluorescence rate per molecule). We report two-photon molecular brightness spectra for a diverse set of organic and genetically encoded probes with an automated spectroscopic system based on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The two-photon action cross section can be extracted from molecular brightness measurements at low excitation intensities, while peak molecular brightness (the maximum molecular brightness with increasing excitation intensity) is measured at higher intensities at which probe photophysical effects become significant. The spectral shape of these two parameters was similar across all dye families tested. Peak molecular brightness spectra, which can be obtained rapidly and with reduced experimental complexity, can thus serve as a first-order approximation to cross-section spectra in determining optimal wavelengths for two-photon excitation, while providing additional information pertaining to probe photostability. The data shown should assist in probe choice and experimental design for multiphoton microscopy studies. Further, we show that, by the addition of a passive pulse splitter, nonlinear bleaching can be reduced—resulting in an enhancement of the fluorescence signal in fluorescence correlation spectroscopy by a factor of two. This increase in fluorescence signal, together with the observed resemblance of action cross section and peak brightness spectra, suggests higher-order photobleaching pathways for two-photon excitation. PMID:22385865

  12. Radiative transitions of excited ions moving slowly in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Hongwei Chen, Wencong; Li, Peng; Zhao, Yongtao; Zhou, Xianming; Li, Zhen; Li, Fuli; Dong, Chenzhong

    2014-12-15

    The electric dipole transitions of excited ions moving slowly in plasmas are studied. The results show that some transitions forbidden for excited ions at rest become allowed for moving excited ions. The transition rates change with varying speed of the ions. Forbidden transitions are strongly influenced by the speed, non-forbidden transitions are weakly influenced.

  13. Spectroscopy, reaction, and photodissociation in highly vibrationally excited molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Highly vibrationally excited molecules often control the course of chemical reactions in the atmosphere, combustion, plasmas, and many other environments. The research described in this Progress Report uses laser excitation and interrogation techniques to study and control the dynamics of highly vibrationally excited molecules. In particular, they show that it is possible to unravel the details and influence the course of photodissociation and bimolecular reaction. The experiments use laser excitation of overtone vibrations to prepare highly vibrationally excited molecules, frequently with single quantum state resolution, and laser spectroscopy to monitor the subsequent behavior of the excited molecule. We have studied the vibrationally mediated photodissociation and the bond- and state-selected bimolecular reaction of highly vibrationally excited molecules. In the first process, one photon creates a highly excited molecule, a second photon from another laser dissociates it, and light from a third laser detects the population of individual product quantum states. This approach allows us to explore otherwise inaccessible regions of the ground and excited state potential energy surface and, by exciting to the proper regions of the surface, to control the breaking of a selected chemical bond. In the second process, the highly vibrationally excited molecule reacts with an atom formed either in a microwave discharge or by photolysis and another laser interrogates the products. We have used this approach to demonstrate mode- and bond-selected bimolecular reactions in which the initial excitation controls the subsequent chemistry. 30 refs., 8 figs.

  14. LASERS IN MEDICINE: Two-photon excitation of aluminium phthalocyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshalkin, Yu P.; Alfimov, E. E.; Vasil'ev, N. E.; Denisov, A. N.; Makukha, V. K.; Ogirenko, A. P.

    1999-12-01

    A demonstration is given of the feasibility of two-photon excitation of aluminium phthalocyanine and of the pharmaceutical preparation 'Fotosens', used in photodynamic therapy. The excitation source was an Nd:YAG laser emitting at the 1064 nm wavelength. The spectra of the two-photon-excited luminescence were obtained and the two-photon absorption cross sections were determined.

  15. Nonlinear dynamics and collective excitations in layered superconducting structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zel'Tser, A. S.; Kivshar', Iu. S.; Soboleva, T. K.

    1991-06-01

    Nonlinear excitations in layered superconducting structures representing a system of interacting extended Josephson junctions are investigated theoretically. The possibility of the propagation of dynamic supersolitons, localized vortex lattice density excitations, in such a system is demonstrated. Particular attention is given to soliton excitations of two types: kinks and envelope solitons. The relaxation of dynamic kinks is investigated numerically.

  16. Nuclear excitation by electronic transition of 235U

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chodash, P. A.; Norman, E. B.; Burke, J. T.; Casperson, R. J.; Fisher, S. E.; Holliday, K. S.; Jeffries, J. R.; Wakeling, M. A.; Wilks, S. C.

    2016-03-11

    Here, nuclear excitation by electronic transition (NEET) is a rare nuclear excitation that can occur in isotopes containing a low-lying nuclear excited state. Over the past 40 yr, several experiments have attempted to measure NEET of 235U and those experiments have yielded conflicting results.

  17. Remote changes in cortical excitability after stroke.

    PubMed

    Bütefisch, Cathrin M; Netz, Johannes; Wessling, Marion; Seitz, Rüdiger J; Hömberg, Volker

    2003-02-01

    Changes in the cerebral metabolism and the excitability of brain areas remote from an ischaemic brain lesion have been reported in animals and humans and implicated as a mechanism relevant to functional recovery. The aim of the present study was to determine whether changes in the inhibitory and excitatory activity in motor cortex of the non-affected hemisphere are present in stroke patients, and whether these changes are related to the extent of the patients' recovery of function. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to study the first dorsal interosseus muscle (FDI) of the non-affected hand in 13 patients with good recovery of hand function after stroke, and was compared with left hemispheric stimulation in 13 healthy age-matched volunteers. In the first experiment, paired-pulse TMS with the conditioning stimulus (CS) set at 80% of the subject's motor threshold (MT) and interstimulus intervals (ISIs) of 2, 3, 10 and 15 ms was used. In the second experiment, different intensities of CS were used to study its inhibitory effect on a succeeding suprathreshold test stimulus at an ISI that was kept constant at 2 ms. In a third experiment, the rise in motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes with increasing stimulus intensities was measured. In two additional control experiments, the effect of left versus right hemispheric stimulation in normal volunteers and good versus poor recovery of hand function in patients after stroke on the excitability of inhibitory and excitatory activity was studied. MT, mean test MEP and recruitment curves were similar in patients and healthy volunteers. In those patients with good recovery, paired-pulse excitability was increased at ISIs of 2 and 3 ms, similar to healthy volunteers at ISIs of 10 and 15 ms. When tested with different CS intensities at an ISI of 2 ms, inhibitory activity was similar in patients and healthy subjects at small CS intensities, but faded rapidly at higher CS intensities in patients. In contrast, in

  18. Real-time analysis of two-photon excitation by correlated photons: Pulse-width dependence of excitation efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Hisaki

    2010-05-15

    We theoretically investigate the dynamics of two-photon excitation by correlated photons with energy anticorrelation in terms of how the excitation efficiency depends on incident pulse width. A three-level atomic system having an intermediate state is used to evaluate the efficiency of two-photon excitation. It is shown that for shorter pulses closer to a monocycle pulse the excitation efficiency by correlated photons is enhanced to become 100 times as large as that by uncorrelated photons.

  19. Electron-impact excitation and ionization cross sections for ground state and excited helium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Ralchenko, Yu. Janev, R.K.; Kato, T.; Fursa, D.V.; Bray, I.; Heer, F.J. de

    2008-07-15

    Comprehensive and critically assessed cross sections for the electron-impact excitation and ionization of ground state and excited helium atoms are presented. All states (atomic terms) with n{<=}4 are treated individually, while the states with n{>=}5 are considered degenerate. For the processes involving transitions to and from n{>=}5 levels, suitable cross section scaling relations are presented. For a large number of transitions, from both ground and excited states, convergent close coupling calculations were performed to achieve a high accuracy of the data. The evaluated/recommended cross section data are presented by analytic fit functions, which preserve the correct asymptotic behavior of the cross sections. The cross sections are also displayed in graphical form.

  20. Lifetime and g-factor measurements of excited states using Coulomb excitation and alpha transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara, Z. E.; Torres, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution the challenges in the use of a setup to simultaneously measure lifetimes and g-factor values will be presented. The simultaneous use of the transient field technique and the Doppler Shift Attenuation Method, to measure magnetic moments and lifetimes respectively, allows to obtain a complete characterization of the currents of nucleons and the deformation in excited states close to the ground state. The technique is at the moment limited to Coulomb excitation and alpha-transfer reactions, what opens an interesting perspective to consider this type of experiments with radioactive beams. The use of deep-inelastic and fusion-evaporation reactions will be discussed. An example of a setup that makes use of a beam of 106Cd to study excited states of 110Sn and the beam nuclei itself will be presented.

  1. Fluorescence lifetime excitation cytometry by kinetic dithering.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyan; Vacca, Giacomo; Castillo, Maryann; Houston, Kevin D; Houston, Jessica P

    2014-07-01

    Flow cytometers are powerful high-throughput devices that capture spectroscopic information from individual particles or cells. These instruments provide a means of multi-parametric analyses for various cellular biomarkers or labeled organelles and cellular proteins. However, the spectral overlap of fluorophores limits the number of fluorophores that can be used simultaneously during experimentation. Time-resolved parameters enable the quantification of fluorescence decay kinetics, thus circumventing common issues associated with intensity-based measurements. This contribution introduces fluorescence lifetime excitation cytometry by kinetic dithering (FLECKD) as a method to capture multiple fluorescence lifetimes using a hybrid time-domain approach. The FLECKD approach excites fluorophores by delivering short pulses of light to cells or particles by rapid dithering and facilitates measurement of complex fluorescence decay kinetics by flow cytometry. Our simulations demonstrated a resolvable fluorescence lifetime value as low as 1.8 ns (±0.3 ns) with less than 20% absolute error. Using the FLECKD instrument, we measured the shortest average fluorescence lifetime value of 2.4 ns and found the system measurement error to be ±0.3 ns (SEM), from hundreds of monodisperse and chemically stable fluorescent microspheres. Additionally, we demonstrate the ability to detect two distinct excited state lifetimes from fluorophores in single cells using FLECKD. This approach presents a new ability to resolve multiple fluorescence lifetimes while retaining the fluidic throughput of a cytometry system. The ability to discriminate more than one average fluorescence lifetime expands the current capabilities of high-throughput and intensity-based cytometry assays as the need to tag one single cell with multiple fluorophores is now widespread. PMID:24668857

  2. Neostriatal modulation of motor cortex excitability.

    PubMed

    Ryan, L J; Sanders, D J

    1994-07-18

    The influence of the basal ganglia motor loop on motor cortex function was examined by pharmacologically altering neostriatal activity while monitoring the electrical stimulation thresholds for eliciting movements of the ipsilateral and contralateral motor cortex in ketamine anesthetized rats. Repeated unilateral intraneostriatal infusions (1-3) of the glutamate agonist, kainic acid (0.1 microliter, 75 ng), or glutamate (0.3 microliter, 1.65 micrograms) reliably increased ipsilateral but not contralateral cortical thresholds. Single infusions of kainic acid (0.3 microliter, 150 or 225 ng) elevated ipsilateral cortical thresholds for 30-45 min; with glutamate (0.3 microliter, 1.65 micrograms), the change lasted less than 10 min. Antidromically identified striatonigral projection neurons (n = 8) located approximately 500 microM from the infusion cannula, showed either increased firing (n = 4) for less than 10 min following glutamate infusion or no change from their non-firing state (n = 4). Non-antidromically activated neurons (n = 3) were all excited by the infusion, although an interval of inhibition preceded or followed the excitation in two cases. Infusions (0.3 microliter) of inhibitory agents (GABA, 31 and 310 ng; muscimol 34.2 ng; and DNQX 34.2 ng) did not alter cortical threshold, nor did saline vehicle. Lesion of the ventrolateral but not ventromedial thalamic nucleus prevented the modulation of cortical thresholds following intraneostriatal infusion of 225 ng kainic acid. Thus the neostriatal alteration of cortical thresholds indicates a modulation of cortical excitability via thalamic projections and not the outcome of competing descending cortical and neonstriatal influences converging on motorneurons. These results suggest that tonic feedforward modulation of the motor cortex and the pyramidal tract by the basal ganglia can be inhibitory. PMID:7922571

  3. Fluorescence lifetime excitation cytometry by kinetic dithering

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenyan; Vacca, Giacomo; Castillo, Maryann; Houston, Kevin D; Houston, Jessica P

    2014-01-01

    Flow cytometers are powerful high-throughput devices that capture spectroscopic information from individual particles or cells. These instruments provide a means of multi-parametric analyses for various cellular biomarkers or labeled organelles and cellular proteins. However, the spectral overlap of fluorophores limits the number of fluorophores that can be used simultaneously during experimentation. Time-resolved parameters enable the quantification of fluorescence decay kinetics, thus circumventing common issues associated with intensity-based measurements. This contribution introduces fluorescence lifetime excitation cytometry by kinetic dithering (FLECKD) as a method to capture multiple fluorescence lifetimes using a hybrid time-domain approach. The FLECKD approach excites fluorophores by delivering short pulses of light to cells or particles by rapid dithering and facilitates measurement of complex fluorescence decay kinetics by flow cytometry. Our simulations demonstrated a resolvable fluorescence lifetime value as low as 1.8 ns (±0.3 ns) with less than 20% absolute error. Using the FLECKD instrument, we measured the shortest average fluorescence lifetime value of 2.4 ns and found the system measurement error to be ±0.3 ns (SEM), from hundreds of monodisperse and chemically stable fluorescent microspheres. Additionally, we demonstrate the ability to detect two distinct excited state lifetimes from fluorophores in single cells using FLECKD. This approach presents a new ability to resolve multiple fluorescence lifetimes while retaining the fluidic throughput of a cytometry system. The ability to discriminate more than one average fluorescence lifetime expands the current capabilities of high-throughput and intensity-based cytometry assays as the need to tag one single cell with multiple fluorophores is now widespread. PMID:24668857

  4. Coherent motion in excited free shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wygnanski, Israel J.; Petersen, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    The application of the inviscid instability approach to externally excited turbulent free shear flows at high Reynolds numbers is explored. Attention is given to the cases of a small-deficit plane turbulent wake, a plane turbulent jet, an axisymmetric jet, the nonlinear evolution of instabilities in free shear flows, the concept of the 'preferred mode', vortex pairing in turbulent mixing layers, and experimental results for the control of free turbulent shear layers. The special features often attributed to pairing or to the preferred mode are found to be difficult to comprehend; the concept of feedback requires further substantiation in the case of incompressible flow.

  5. Rabi resonances in the {lambda} excitation scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Godone, Aldo; Micalizio, Salvatore; Levi, Filippo

    2002-12-01

    We consider the interaction of a three-level system with phase-modulated resonant fields in the {lambda} excitation scheme. We treat theoretically the case of a sinusoidal phase modulation, a phase step perturbation, and a stochastic phase modulation. The appearance of a Rabi resonance both in the spectrum of the optical transmitted signal (electromagnetically induced transparency) and in the spectrum of the microwave emission (coherent population trapping maser) is considered in detail. All the theoretical results are compared with the analogous ones reported for the two-level system and with our experimental observations obtained for the case of rubidium in a buffer gas.

  6. Excitations in disordered bosonic optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Knap, Michael; Arrigoni, Enrico; Linden, Wolfgang von der

    2010-11-15

    Spectral excitations of ultracold gases of bosonic atoms trapped in one-dimensional optical lattices with disorder are investigated by means of the variational cluster approach applied to the Bose-Hubbard model. Qualitatively different disorder distributions typically employed in experiments are considered. The computed spectra exhibit a strong dependence on the shape of the disorder distribution and the disorder strength. We compare alternative results for the Mott gap obtained from its formal definition and from the minimum peak distance, which is the quantity available from experiments.

  7. Two photon excitation of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindzola, M. S.

    1977-01-01

    A standard perturbation expansion in the atom-radiation field interaction is used to calculate the two photon excitation cross section for 1s(2) 2s(2) 2p(4) p3 to 1s(2) 2s(2) 2p(3) (s4) 3p p3 transition in atomic oxygen. The summation over bound and continuum intermediate states is handled by solving the equivalent inhomogeneous differential equation. Exact summation results differ by a factor of 2 from a rough estimate obtained by limiting the intermediate state summation to one bound state. Higher order electron correlation effects are also examined.

  8. Automatic cytometric device using multiple wavelength excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rongeat, Nelly; Ledroit, Sylvain; Chauvet, Laurence; Cremien, Didier; Urankar, Alexandra; Couderc, Vincent; Nérin, Philippe

    2011-05-01

    Precise identification of eosinophils, basophils, and specific subpopulations of blood cells (B lymphocytes) in an unconventional automatic hematology analyzer is demonstrated. Our specific apparatus mixes two excitation radiations by means of an acousto-optics tunable filter to properly control fluorescence emission of phycoerythrin cyanin 5 (PC5) conjugated to antibodies (anti-CD20 or anti-CRTH2) and Thiazole Orange. This way our analyzer combining techniques of hematology analysis and flow cytometry based on multiple fluorescence detection, drastically improves the signal to noise ratio and decreases the spectral overlaps impact coming from multiple fluorescence emissions.

  9. Excitation of solar p-modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldreich, Peter; Murray, Norman; Kumar, Pawan

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the rates at which energy is supplied to individual p-modes as a function of their frequencies nu and angular degrees l. The observationally determined rates are compared with those calculated on the hypothesis that the modes are stochastically excited by turbulent convection. The observationally determined excitation rate is assumed to be equal to the product of the mode's energy E and its (radian) line width Gamma. We obtain E from the mode's mean square surface velocity with the aid of its velocity eigenfuction. We assume that Gamma measures the mode's energy decay rate, even though quasi-elastic scattering may dominate true absorption. At fixed l, E(Gamma) arises as nu(exp 7) at low nu, reaches a peak at nu approximately equal 3.5 mHz, and then declines as nu(exp 4.4) at higher nu . At fixed nu, E(Gamma) exhibits a slow decline with increasing l. To calculate energy input rates, P(sub alpha), we rely on the mixing-length model of turbulent convection. We find entropy fluctuations to be about an order of magnitude more effective than the Reynolds stress in exciting p-modes . The calculated P(sub alpha) mimic the nu(exp 7) dependence of E(Gamma) at low nu and the nu(exp -4.4) dependence at high nu. The break of 11.4 powers in the nu-dependence of E(Gamma) across its peak is attributed to a combination of (1) the reflection of high-frequency acoustic waves just below the photosphere where the scale height drops precipitously and (2) the absence of energy-bearing eddies with short enough correlation times to excite high-frequency modes. Two parameters associated with the eddy correlation time are required to match the location and shape of the break. The appropriate values of these parameters, while not unnatural, are poorly constrained by theory. The calculated P(sub alpha) can also be made to fit the magnitude of E(Gamma) with a reasonable value for the eddy aspect ratio. Our resutls suggest a possible explanation for the decline of mode energy

  10. Excited light isoscalar mesons from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Thomas

    2011-07-01

    I report a recent lattice QCD calculation of an excited spectrum of light isoscalar mesons, something that has up to now proved challenging for lattice QCD. With novel techniques we extract an extensive spectrum with high statistical precision, including spin-four states and, for the first time, light isoscalars with exotic quantum numbers. In addition, the hidden flavour content of these mesons is determined, providing a window on annihilation dynamics in QCD. I comment on future prospects including applications to the study of resonances.

  11. He photoionization dominated by doubly excited resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, T.N.; Zhen, M.

    1993-05-01

    We present the theoretical He photoionization, cross sections from the ground and the {sup 1,3}S bound excited states using a B-spline based configuration-interaction procedure for continuum (CIC). The resonant structures associated with selected sp,2n{sup {plus_minus}} and 2pnd {sup 1,3}P autoionization series below the He{sup +} N=2 threshold will be expressed quantitatively in terms of their resonant energies, widths, and peak cross sections. Comparisons with earlier theoretical results and recent experimental measurement will be presented. The nonresonant spectra from the 1s2s {sup 1,3}S metastable states will also be reexamined.

  12. Quasiparticle excitations of adsorbates on doped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lischner, Johannes; Wickenburg, Sebastian; Wong, Dillon; Karrasch, Christoph; Wang, Yang; Lu, Jiong; Omrani, Arash A.; Brar, Victor; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Wu, Qiong; Corsetti, Fabiano; Mostofi, Arash; Kawakami, Roland K.; Moore, Joel; Zettl, Alex; Louie, Steven G.; Crommie, Mike

    Adsorbed atoms and molecules can modify the electronic structure of graphene, but in turn it is also possible to control the properties of adsorbates via the graphene substrate. In my talk, I will discuss the electronic structure of F4-TCNQ molecules on doped graphene and present a first-principles based theory of quasiparticle excitations that captures the interplay of doping-dependent image charge interactions between substrate and adsorbate and electron-electron interaction effects on the molecule. The resulting doping-dependent quasiparticle energies will be compared to experimental scanning tunnelling spectra. Finally, I will also discuss the effects of charged adsorbates on the electronic structure of doped graphene.

  13. Dynamics of excitation energy transfer in phycobiliproteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiguang; Wang, He Z.; Zhao, Fuli; Gao, Zhaolan; Yu, Zhenxin

    1994-08-01

    Theoretical descriptions of excitation energy transfer between chromophores in allophycocyanin are presented, including bilateral energy transfer paths between chromophores, and are expressed, based on Foster interaction mechanism, as Pauli master equations. Group analysis in C3 symmetry is performed to carry out analytic expressions for fluorescence decays which is generally of triexponential with effects of chromophore coupling and exciton splitting taken account. It is pointed out that the time constant of each decay component contains mixed information of different energy transfer paths, and therefore show its dependence on subtle configuration of chromophores, probably related to site heterogeneity and thus to inhomogeneous broadening previously observed.

  14. Collisional quenching of highly rotationally excited HF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, B.; Walker, K. M.; Forrey, R. C.; Stancil, P. C.; Balakrishnan, N.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Collisional excitation rate coefficients play an important role in the dynamics of energy transfer in the interstellar medium. In particular, accurate rotational excitation rates are needed to interpret microwave and infrared observations of the interstellar gas for nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium line formation. Aims: Theoretical cross sections and rate coefficients for collisional deexcitation of rotationally excited HF in the vibrational ground state are reported. Methods: The quantum-mechanical close-coupling approach implemented in the nonreactive scattering code MOLSCAT was applied in the cross section and rate coefficient calculations on an accurate 2D HF-He potential energy surface. Estimates of rate coefficients for H and H2 colliders were obtained from the HF-He collisional data with a reduced-potential scaling approach. Results: The calculation of state-to-state rotational quenching cross sections for HF due to He with initial rotational levels up to j = 20 were performed for kinetic energies from 10-5 to 15 000 cm-1. State-to-state rate coefficients for temperatures between 0.1 and 3000 K are also presented. The comparison of the present results with previous work for lowly-excited rotational levels reveals significant differences. In estimating HF-H2 rate coefficients, the reduced-potential method is found to be more reliable than the standard reduced-mass approach. Conclusions: The current state-to-state rate coefficient calculations are the most comprehensive to date for HF-He collisions. We attribute the differences between previously reported data and our results to differences in the adopted interaction potential energy surfaces. The new He rate coefficients can be used in a variety of applications. The estimated H2 and H collision rates can also augment the smaller datasets previously developed for H2 and electrons. Rate coefficient tables are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130

  15. Radiative and Excited State Charmonium Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek

    2007-07-30

    Renewed interest in the spectroscopy of charmonium has arisen from recent unexpected observations at $e^+e^-$ colliders. Here we report on a series of works from the previous two years examining the radiative physics of charmonium states as well as the mass spectrum of states of higher spin and internal excitation. Using new techniques applied to Domain-Wall and Clover quark actions on quenched isotropic and anisotropic lattices, radiative transitions and two-photon decays are considered for the first time. Comparisons are made with experimental results and with model approaches. Forthcoming application to the light-quark sector of relevance to experiments like Jefferson Lab's GlueX is discussed.

  16. Tilted excitation implies odd periodic resonances.

    PubMed

    Depetri, G I; Sartorelli, J C; Marin, B; Baptista, M S

    2016-07-01

    Our aim is to unveil how resonances of parametric systems are affected when symmetry is broken. We showed numerically and experimentally that odd resonances indeed come about when the pendulum is excited along a tilted direction. Applying the Melnikov subharmonic function, we not only determined analytically the loci of saddle-node bifurcations delimiting resonance regions in parameter space but also explained these observations by demonstrating that, under the Melnikov method point of view, odd resonances arise due to an extra torque that appears in the asymmetric case. PMID:27575118

  17. Tilted excitation implies odd periodic resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depetri, G. I.; Sartorelli, J. C.; Marin, B.; Baptista, M. S.

    2016-07-01

    Our aim is to unveil how resonances of parametric systems are affected when symmetry is broken. We showed numerically and experimentally that odd resonances indeed come about when the pendulum is excited along a tilted direction. Applying the Melnikov subharmonic function, we not only determined analytically the loci of saddle-node bifurcations delimiting resonance regions in parameter space but also explained these observations by demonstrating that, under the Melnikov method point of view, odd resonances arise due to an extra torque that appears in the asymmetric case.

  18. Mirroring Doubly Excited Resonances in Argon

    SciTech Connect

    Canton-Rogan, S. E.; Wills, A. A.; Gorczyca, T. W.; Wiedenhoeft, M.; Nayandin, O.; Liu, Chien-Nan; Berrah, N.

    2000-10-09

    New features are revealed in the low-energy photoionization spectrum of Ar by critically combining high photon resolution and differential photoelectron spectroscopic techniques. Two LS -forbidden doubly excited resonances are seen in the 3p{sup -1}{sub 3/2,1/2} partial cross sections which exhibit mirroring profiles, resulting in complete cancellation in the total photoionization cross section, as was predicted by Liu and Starace [Phys.Rev.A 59, R1731 (1999)]. These results demonstrate that a new class of weakly spin-orbit induced, mirroring resonances should be observable in partial, but not in total, collisional cross sections involving atoms, molecules, and solids in general.

  19. Damping of Bogoliubov excitations at finite temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastukhov, Volodymyr

    2015-10-01

    We present a simple and efficient method to calculate the damping for the excitation spectrum of a uniform D-dimensional Bose gas. Starting from the original Popov’s hydrodynamic description and integrating out phase variables, we obtained the effective action of amplitude fluctuations. Within this approach, the lifetime of quasi-particles with a finite momentum is calculated at a wide temperature range. It is shown that the correct use of the hydrodynamic approach leads to the damping rate, which coincides with results obtained by means of the perturbation theory.

  20. Excitation energy of {sup 9}Be

    SciTech Connect

    Pachucki, Krzysztof; Komasa, Jacek

    2006-05-15

    The high precision relativistic and radiative corrections to the energy of the excited 3 {sup 1}S state of the beryllium atom are obtained. The nonrelativistic wave function, expanded in a basis of exponentially correlated Gaussian functions, yields the lowest upper bounds to the energy of 2 {sup 1}S and 3 {sup 1}S states. By means of the integral representation, a reference-quality Bethe logarithm has been obtained. The resulting theoretical 2 {sup 1}S-3 {sup 1}S transition energy amounts to 54 677.78(45) cm{sup -1} and differs from the known experimental value by about 0.5 cm{sup -1}.

  1. Recent Theoretical Studies On Excitation and Recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pradhan, Anil K.

    2000-01-01

    New advances in the theoretical treatment of atomic processes in plasmas are described. These enable not only an integrated, unified, and self-consistent treatment of important radiative and collisional processes, but also large-scale computation of atomic data with high accuracy. An extension of the R-matrix work, from excitation and photoionization to electron-ion recombination, includes a unified method that subsumes both the radiative and the di-electronic recombination processes in an ab initio manner. The extensive collisional calculations for iron and iron-peak elements under the Iron Project are also discussed.

  2. Collective Excitations in Electron-Hole Bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Kalman, G. J.; Hartmann, P.; Donko, Z.; Golden, K. I.

    2007-06-08

    We report a combined analytic and molecular dynamics analysis of the collective mode spectrum of a bipolar (electron-hole) bilayer in the strong coupling classical limit. A robust, isotropic energy gap is identified in the out-of-phase spectra, generated by the combined effect of correlations and of the excitation of the bound dipoles. In the in-phase spectra we identify longitudinal and transverse acoustic modes wholly maintained by correlations. Strong nonlinear generation of higher harmonics of the fundamental dipole oscillation frequency and the transfer of harmonics between different modes is observed.

  3. Electron impact excitation of SF6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trajmar, S.; Chutjian, A.

    1977-01-01

    A study of the electron impact energy-loss spectrum of SF6 under both optical (low scattering angle, high impact energy) and non-optical conditions (high scattering angle, low impact energy) has revealed a number of electronic excitation processes. With the help of theoretical calculations, several of these transitions have been assigned and approximate cross sections associated with four features have been determined. In addition, a strong resonance at 12 eV has been observed in both elastic and vibrationally inelastic (delta E = 0.092 eV) channels.

  4. Semiempirical Modeling of Ag Nanoclusters: New Parameters for Optical Property Studies Enable Determination of Double Excitation Contributions to Plasmonic Excitation.

    PubMed

    Gieseking, Rebecca L; Ratner, Mark A; Schatz, George C

    2016-07-01

    Quantum mechanical studies of Ag nanoclusters have shown that plasmonic behavior can be modeled in terms of excited states where collectivity among single excitations leads to strong absorption. However, new computational approaches are needed to provide understanding of plasmonic excitations beyond the single-excitation level. We show that semiempirical INDO/CI approaches with appropriately selected parameters reproduce the TD-DFT optical spectra of various closed-shell Ag clusters. The plasmon-like states with strong optical absorption comprise linear combinations of many singly excited configurations that contribute additively to the transition dipole moment, whereas all other excited states show significant cancellation among the contributions to the transition dipole moment. The computational efficiency of this approach allows us to investigate the role of double excitations at the INDO/SDCI level. The Ag cluster ground states are stabilized by slight mixing with doubly excited configurations, but the plasmonic states generally retain largely singly excited character. The consideration of double excitations in all cases improves the agreement of the INDO/CI absorption spectra with TD-DFT, suggesting that the SDCI calculation effectively captures some of the ground-state correlation implicit in DFT. These results provide the first evidence to support the commonly used assumption that single excitations are in many cases sufficient to describe the optical spectra of plasmonic excitations quantum mechanically. PMID:27259004

  5. Seeded excitation avalanches in off-resonantly driven Rydberg gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonelli, C.; Valado, M. M.; Masella, G.; Asteria, L.; Arimondo, E.; Ciampini, D.; Morsch, O.

    2016-08-01

    We report an experimental investigation of the facilitated excitation dynamics in off-resonantly driven Rydberg gases by separating the initial off-resonant excitation phase from the facilitation phase, in which successive facilitation events lead to excitation avalanches. We achieve this by creating a controlled number of initial seed excitations. Greater insight into the avalanche mechanism is obtained from an analysis of the full counting distributions. We also present simple mathematical models and numerical simulations of the excitation avalanches that agree well with our experimental results.

  6. Gluonic excitation of nonexotic hybrid charmonium from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Xiangqian; Liu Yan

    2006-08-01

    The ground and first excited states of the hybrid charmonium ccg, with nonexotic quantum numbers J{sup PC}=0{sup -+}, 1{sup --}, and 1{sup ++} are investigated using quenched lattice QCD. The excited states are completely ignored in the literature. However, we observe strong gluonic radial excitations in the first excited states; We find their masses are completely different from the first excited states of the corresponding conventional charmonium. Their relevance to the recent discovery of the Y(4260) state and future experimental search for other states are also discussed.

  7. The photodissociation and reaction dynamics of vibrationally excited molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Crim, F.F.

    1993-12-01

    This research determines the nature of highly vibrationally excited molecules, their unimolecular reactions, and their photodissociation dynamics. The goal is to characterize vibrationally excited molecules and to exploit that understanding to discover and control their chemical pathways. Most recently the author has used a combination of vibrational overtone excitation and laser induced fluorescence both to characterize vibrationally excited molecules and to study their photodissociation dynamics. The author has also begun laser induced grating spectroscopy experiments designed to obtain the electronic absorption spectra of highly vibrationally excited molecules.

  8. Acoustically excited heated jets. 3: Mean flow data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; Ahuja, K. K.; Brown, W. H.; Salikuddin, M.; Morris, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    This is Part 3 of a report on the excitability of heated jets under the influence of acoustic excitation. The effects of upstream internal acoustic excitation on jet mixing were described in Part 1. Part 2 described the effects of external excitation on flow mixing. Part 3 contains quantitative results from the measurements of mean Mach number and temperature and consists of radial profiles and centerline distributions measured at selected jet operating conditions for internally excited and unexcited jets. The mean flow data are presented in both graphical and tabulated forms. For the sake of completeness, this part contains temperature probe calibration curves also.

  9. Ocean tidal excitation of polar motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, B. V.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to ascertain the response of the rotational motion of the earth to forcing functions produced by the water mass redistribution due to the ocean tides. In particular, the components of displacement of the rotation axis at the surface of the Earth were obtained. The investigation also addressed the larger question concerning the possibility of excitation of the Chandler wobble of the earth. In general, the results show the existence of a polar wobble as a response to each of the components of the ocean tides. The magnitude of the polar displacement depends on two factors: the amplitude of the tidal component and its period. The maximum periodic contributions are: the Doodson's component number 055.565 with a period of 18.613 years and 50 cm of polar displacement, the annual component 056.544 with 37 cm of polar displacement and the semi-annual 057.555 with 32 cm. The tidal components with daily and semi-daily periods yield very small polar displacements of the order of 0.01 cm. The combined effect of all the periodic components can yield as much as 90 cm of pole displacements. The changes produced by the ocean tides in the products of inertia are periodic and regular, therefore, they cannot be the source of excitation of the Chandler wobble.

  10. Self-excited mono-ion oscillator.

    PubMed

    Dehmelt, H; Nagourney, W; Sandberg, J

    1986-08-01

    We propose self-excitation as a potentially more sensitive technique for studying a mono-ion oscillator of frequency v(z) approximately 0.1-100 MHz. This technique also makes only low demands on the harmonicity of the ion oscillation. It should therefore work with inexpensive, easily constructed rf traps. In our analysis, the bound ion between the trap electrodes is represented by an effective circuit resembling that of a piezoelectric quartz crystal. The feedback circuit developed, when operated below self-excitation threshold, may also make efficient electronic cooling of the ion possible, particularly in conjunction with a heterodyne feedback scheme. In the super-regenerative mode, the apparatus might function as a powerful atomic amplifier of the ion oscillation for an energy as low as a fraction of hv(z). These techniques may prove especially useful in conjunction with attempts to synthesize in an rf trap a loosely bound anti-hydrogen atom from a positron and antiproton. PMID:16593742

  11. Excitation in the ionized diffuse interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivan, J.-P.; Stasińska, G.; Lequeux, J.

    1986-04-01

    Large-scale spectra have been obtained in the diffuse, ionized background of the Sagittarius-Carina arm and in the large complex of loops and filaments located in Orion and Eridanus. The intensity ratios of the emission lines of O III forbidden line, H-beta, H-alpha, N II forbidden line and S II forbidden line have been derived from these spectra, and are analyzed using models of H II regions in ionization equilibrium at very low densities, down to 0.01/cu cm. The confrontation of the observed ratios with the predictions of the models, which have been calibrated against observations of classical H II regions, shows that the S II forbidden line (6717 + 6731)/H-alpha ratio is too large to arise in a gas submitted only to a stellar flux with which it comes into ionization equilibrium, whatever the dilution of the matter. Contribution of shock excitation seems a natural explanation, as shocks are likely to occur considering the chaotic morphology of the studied regions. Some alternative explanations are also suggested. However, this medium is principally ionized by radiation, and it is shown that the forbidden line O III/H-beta ratios are well accounted for by the known population of O stars within the expected uncertainties, while ionization by white dwarfs or by B stars suggested by previous authors are excluded. The mean effective temperature for ionizing stars (less than 35,000 K) is lower than that of stars exciting classical H II regions.

  12. Dual excitation acoustic paramagnetic logging tool

    DOEpatents

    Vail, III, William B.

    1989-01-01

    New methods and apparatus are disclosed which allow measurement of the presence of oil and water in gelogical formations using a new physical effect called the Acoustic Paramagnetic Logging Effect (APLE). The presence of petroleum in formation causes a slight increase in the earth's magnetic field in the vicinity of the reservoir. This is the phenomena of paramagnetism. Application of an acoustic source to a geological formation at the Larmor frequency of the nucleous present causes the paramagnetism of the formation to disappear. This results in a decrease in the earth's magnetic field in the vicinity of the oil bearing formation. Repetitively frequency sweeping the acoustic source through the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present (approx. 2 kHz) causes an amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field which is a consequence of the APLE. The amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field is measured with an induction coil gradiometer and provides a direct measure of the amount of oil and water in the excitation zone of the formation. The phase of the signal is used to infer the longitudinal relaxation times of the fluids present, which results in the ability in general to separate oil and water and to measure the viscosity of the oil present. Such measurements may be preformed in open boreholes and in cased well bores. The Dual Excitation Acoustic Paramagnetic Logging Tool employing two acoustic sources is also described.

  13. Turbine blade-tip clearance excitation forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Greitzer, E. M.

    1985-01-01

    The results of an effort to assess the existing knowledge and plan the required experimentation in the area of turbine blade tip excitation forces is summarized. The work was carried out in three phases. The first was a literature search and evaluation, which served to highlight the state of the art and to expose the need for an articulated theoretical experimental effort to provide not only design data, but also a rational framework for their extrapolation to new configurations and regimes. The second phase was a start in this direction, in which several of the explicit or implicit assumptions contained in the usual formulations of the Alford force effect were removed and a rigorous linearized flow analysis of the behavior of a nonsymmetric actuator disc was carried out. In the third phase a preliminary design of a turbine test facility that would be used to measure both the excitation forces themselves and the flow patterns responsible for them were conducted and do so over a realistic range of dimensionless parameters.

  14. Evanescent Excitation and Emission in Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Axelrod, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Evanescent light—light that does not propagate but instead decays in intensity over a subwavelength distance—appears in both excitation (as in total internal reflection) and emission (as in near-field imaging) forms in fluorescence microscopy. This review describes the physical connection between these two forms as a consequence of geometrical squeezing of wavefronts, and describes newly established or speculative applications and combinations of the two. In particular, each can be used in analogous ways to produce surface-selective images, to examine the thickness and refractive index of films (such as lipid multilayers or protein layers) on solid supports, and to measure the absolute distance of a fluorophore to a surface. In combination, the two forms can further increase selectivity and reduce background scattering in surface images. The polarization properties of each lead to more sensitive and accurate measures of fluorophore orientation and membrane micromorphology. The phase properties of the evanescent excitation lead to a method of creating a submicroscopic area of total internal reflection illumination or enhanced-resolution structured illumination. Analogously, the phase properties of evanescent emission lead to a method of producing a smaller point spread function, in a technique called virtual supercritical angle fluorescence. PMID:23561516

  15. VIBRATIONALLY EXCITED C{sub 6}H

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb, C. A.; McCarthy, M. C.; Thaddeus, P.

    2010-08-15

    Rotational spectra of the linear carbon chain radical C{sub 6}H in two low-lying excited vibrational states were observed both at millimeter wavelengths in a low-pressure glow discharge and at centimeter wavelengths in a supersonic molecular beam. Two series of harmonically related lines with rotational constants within 0.3% of the {sup 2{Pi}} ground state were assigned to the {sup 2{Sigma}} and {sup 2{Delta}} vibronic components of an excited bending vibrational level. Measurements of the intensities of the lines in the glow discharge indicate that the {sup 2{Sigma}} component lies very close to ground, but the {sup 2{Delta}} component is much higher in energy. The standard Hamiltonian for an isolated {sup 2{Delta}} state with five spectroscopic constants reproduces the observed rotational spectrum, but several high-order distortion terms in the spin-rotation interaction are needed to reproduce the spectrum of the {sup 2{Sigma}} component in C{sub 6}H and C{sub 6}D. The derived spectroscopic constants allow astronomers to calculate the rotational spectra of the {sup 2{Sigma}} and {sup 2{Delta}} states up to 260 GHz to within 0.1 km s{sup -1} or better in equivalent radial velocity.

  16. Parametric excitation of magnetization by electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Jin; Lee, Han Kyu; Verba, Roman; Katine, Jordan; Tiberkevich, Vasil; Slavin, Andrei; Barsukov, Igor; Krivorotov, Ilya

    Manipulation of magnetization by electric field is of primary importance for development of low-power spintronic devices. We present the first experimental demonstration of parametric generation of magnetic oscillations by electric field. We realize the parametric generation in CoFeB/MgO/SAF nanoscale magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). The magnetization of the free layer is perpendicular to the sample plane while the magnetizations of the synthetic antiferromagnet (SAF) lie in the plane. We apply microwave voltage to the MTJ at 2 f, where f is the ferromagnetic resonance frequency of the free layer. In this configuration, the oscillations can only be driven parametrically via voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy (VCMA) whereby electric field across the MgO barrier modulates the free layer anisotropy. The parametrically driven oscillations are detected via microwave voltage from the MTJ near f and show resonant character, observed only in a narrow range of drive frequencies near 2 f. The excitation also exhibits a well-pronounced threshold drive voltage of approximately 0.1 Volts. Our work demonstrates a low threshold for parametric excitation of magnetization by VCMA that holds promise for the development of energy-efficient nanoscale spin wave devices.

  17. Electron-impact excitation of neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballance, Connor; Griffin, Don

    2004-05-01

    A number of convergent close-coupling and R-matrix with pseudo-state (RMPS) calculations on H-like, He-like, Li-like, and Be-like ions have demonstrated that coupling to the target continuum can have large effects on the electron-impact excitation cross sections of neutral and low-charge species. However, no one has yet attempted such advanced calculations on a system as complex as neutral neon. We report on a series of RMPS calculations of electron-impact excitation of Ne using recently developed parallel Breit-Pauli (BP) R-matrix programs. Our largest calculation was a BP calculation with 235 spectroscopic and pseudo levels in the close-coupling expansion. Although the results of this calculation clearly reveal the importance of coupling to the target continuum in this atom, the pseudo-state expansion is not yet sufficiently complete to provide reliable cross sections for energies above the ionization limit. However, this is the largest BP calculation that can be performed with present computer resources. Thus, we have also carried out a series of RMPS calculations in LS coupling with different pseudo-state expansions. Comparisons of these results have allowed us to determine the approximate size of the pseudo-state expansion required to achieve convergence in future BP calculations for neon.

  18. Dual excitation acoustic paramagnetic logging tool

    DOEpatents

    Vail, W.B. III.

    1989-02-14

    New methods and apparatus are disclosed which allow measurement of the presence of oil and water in geological formations using a new physical effect called the Acoustic Paramagnetic Logging Effect (APLE). The presence of petroleum in formation causes a slight increase in the earth's magnetic field in the vicinity of the reservoir. This is the phenomena of paramagnetism. Application of an acoustic source to a geological formation at the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present causes the paramagnetism of the formation to disappear. This results in a decrease in the earth's magnetic field in the vicinity of the oil bearing formation. Repetitively frequency sweeping the acoustic source through the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present (approx. 2 kHz) causes an amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field which is a consequence of the APLE. The amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field is measured with an induction coil gradiometer and provides a direct measure of the amount of oil and water in the excitation zone of the formation. The phase of the signal is used to infer the longitudinal relaxation times of the fluids present, which results in the ability in general to separate oil and water and to measure the viscosity of the oil present. Such measurements may be performed in open boreholes and in cased well bores. The Dual Excitation Acoustic Paramagnetic Logging Tool employing two acoustic sources is also described. 6 figs.

  19. Fusion excitation functions involving transitional nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.; Jiang, C.L.; Esbensen, H.

    1995-08-01

    Measurements of fusion excitation functions involving transitional nuclei {sup 78}Kr and {sup 100}Mo showed a different behavior at low energies, if compared to measurements with {sup 86}Kr and {sup 92}Mo. This points to a possible influence of nuclear structure on the fusion process. One way to characterize the structure of vibrational nuclei is via their restoring force parameters C{sub 2} which can be calculated from the energy of the lowest 2{sup +} state and the corresponding B(E2) value. A survey of the even-even nuclei between A = 28-150 shows strong variations in C{sub 2} values spanning two orders of magnitude. The lowest values for C{sub 2} are observed for {sup 78}Kr, {sup 104}Ru and {sup 124}Xe followed by {sup 74,76}Ge, {sup 74,76}Se, {sup 100}Mo and {sup 110}Pd. In order to learn more about the influence of {open_quotes}softness{close_quotes} on the sub-barrier fusion enhancement, we measured cross sections for evaporation residue production for the systems {sup 78}Kr + {sup 104}Ru and {sup 78}Kr + {sup 76}Ge with the gas-filled magnet technique. For both systems, fusion excitation functions involving the closed neutron shell nucleus {sup 86}Kr were measured previously. The data are presently being analyzed.

  20. Vertical Distribution of Vibrationally Excited Hydroxyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grygalashvyly, Mykhaylo; Becker, Erich; Sonnemann, Gerd

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge about the vertical distribution of the vibrationally excited states of hydroxyl (OH*) is important for the interpretation of airglow measurements with respect to dynamical processes in the mesopause region. We derive an approximate analytical expression for the distribution of OH* that highlights the dependence on atomic oxygen and temperature. In addition, we use an advanced numerical model for the formation and relaxation of OH* and investigate the distributions of the different vibrationally exited states of OH*. For the production of OH*, the model includes the reaction of atomic hydrogen with ozone, as well as the reaction of atomic oxygen with hydroperoxy radicals. As loss processes we include 1) deactivation by atomic oxygen, molecular oxygen, and molecular nitrogen, 2) spontaneous emission, and 3) loss due to chemical reaction with atomic oxygen. All these processes take the dependence on the vibrational number into account. The quenching by molecular and atomic oxygen is parameterized by a multi-quantum relaxation scheme. This diagnostic model for OH* has been implemented as part of a chemistry-transport model that is driven by the dynamics simulated with the KMCM (Kühlungsborn Mechanistic general Circulation Model). Numerical results confirm that emission from excited states with higher vibrational number is weaker and emanates from higher altitudes. In addition we find that the OH*-peak altitudes depend significantly on season and latitude. This behavior is mainly controlled by the corresponding variations of atomic oxygen and temperature, as is also confirmed by the aforementioned approximate theory.

  1. Electromagnetic excitation of the Delta(1232) resonance

    SciTech Connect

    V. Pascalutsa; M. Vanderhaeghen; Shin Nan Yang

    2006-09-05

    We review the description of the lowest-energy nucleon excitation--the Delta(1232)-resonance. Much of the recent effort has been focused on the precision measurements of the nucleon to Delta transition by means of electromagnetic probes. We review the results of those measurements and confront them with the state-of-the-art calculations based on chiral effective-field theories (EFT), lattice QCD, and QCD-inspired models. Some of the theoretical approaches are reviewed in detail. In particular, we describe the chiral EFT of QCD in the energy domain of the Delta-resonance, and its applications to the electromagnetic nucleon-to-Delta transition (gamma N Delta). We also describe the recent dynamical and unitary-isobar models of pion electroproduction which are extensively used in the extraction of the gamma* N Delta form factors from experiment. Furthermore, we discuss the link of the gamma* N Delta form factors to generalized parton distributions (GPDs), as well as the predictions of perturbative QCD for these transition form factors. The present status of understanding the Delta-resonance properties and the nature of its excitation is summarized.

  2. Force Sensor Characterization Under Sinusoidal Excitations

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Nieves; de Vicente, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    The aim in the current work is the development of a method to characterize force sensors under sinusoidal excitations using a primary standard as the source of traceability. During this work the influence factors have been studied and a method to minimise their contributions, as well as the corrections to be performed under dynamic conditions have been established. These results will allow the realization of an adequate characterization of force sensors under sinusoidal excitations, which will be essential for its further proper use under dynamic conditions. The traceability of the sensor characterization is based in the direct definition of force as mass multiplied by acceleration. To do so, the sensor is loaded with different calibrated loads and is maintained under different sinusoidal accelerations by means of a vibration shaker system that is able to generate accelerations up to 100 m/s2 with frequencies from 5 Hz up to 2400 Hz. The acceleration is measured by means of a laser vibrometer with traceability to the units of time and length. A multiple channel data acquisition system is also required to simultaneously acquire the electrical output signals of the involved instrument in real time. PMID:25290287

  3. Dissociative excitation study of iron pentacarbonyl molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribar, Anita; Danko, Marián; Országh, Juraj; Ferreira da Silva, Filipe; Utke, Ivo; Matejčík, Štefan

    2015-04-01

    The processes of dissociative excitation (DE) and dissociative ionisation with excitation (DIE) of iron pentacarbonyl, Fe(CO)5, have been studied using a crossed electron-molecule beam experimental apparatus (Electron Induced Fluorescence Apparatus, EIFA). Using EIFA we were able to record the emission spectrum of the molecule in the UV-VIS range, as well as the photon efficiency curves initiated by electron impact. The emission spectrum of Fe(CO)5 initiated by impact of 50 eV electrons was recorded in the spectral range between 200 nm and 470 nm. It shows a high density of emission lines and bands (mainly iron lines and carbonyl bands). Additionally, we have measured photon efficiency curves (PECs) as a function of the electron impact energy for several lines and bands. On the basis of the PECs we have discussed the reaction mechanism and the energetics of the reactions associated with the DE and DIE processes. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Elementary Processes with Atoms and Molecules in Isolated and Aggregated States", edited by Friedrich Aumayr, Bratislav Marinkovic, Štefan Matejčík, John Tanis and Kurt H. Becker.

  4. Ultrafast excited-state dynamics of isocytosine.

    PubMed

    Szabla, Rafał; Góra, Robert W; Šponer, Jiří

    2016-07-27

    The alternative nucleobase isocytosine has long been considered as a plausible component of hypothetical primordial informational polymers. To examine this hypothesis we investigated the excited-state dynamics of the two most abundant forms of isocytosine in the gas phase (keto and enol). Our surface-hopping nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulations employing the algebraic diagrammatic construction to the second order [ADC(2)] method for the electronic structure calculations suggest that both tautomers undergo efficient radiationless deactivation to the electronic ground state with time constants which amount to τketo = 182 fs and τenol = 533 fs. The dominant photorelaxation pathways correspond to ring-puckering (ππ* surface) and C[double bond, length as m-dash]O stretching/N-H tilting (nπ* surface) for the enol and keto forms respectively. Based on these findings, we infer that isocytosine is a relatively photostable compound in the gas phase and in these terms resembles biologically relevant nucleobases. The estimated S1 [radiolysis arrow - arrow with voltage kink] T1 intersystem crossing rate constant of 8.02 × 10(10) s(-1) suggests that triplet states might also play an important role in the overall excited-state dynamics of the keto tautomer. The reliability of ADC(2)-based surface-hopping molecular dynamics simulations was tested against multireference quantum-chemical calculations and the potential limitations of the employed ADC(2) approach are briefly discussed. PMID:27346684

  5. New topological excitations in quantum Hall systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyanda-Geller, Yuli; Lin, Tsuging; Simion, George; Watson, John D.; Manfra, Michael J.; Csathy, Gabor; Rokhinson, Leonid

    2014-03-01

    We discover new topological excitations of two dimensional electrons in the quantum Hall regime. The strain dependence of resistivity observed experimentally is shown to change sign upon crossing filling-factor-specified boundaries of reentrant integer quantum Hall effect (RIQHE) states. This observation violates the known symmetry of electron bubbles thought to be responsible for the RIQHE. We demonstrate theoretically that electron bubbles become elongated in the vicinity of charge defects and form textures of finite size. Calculations confirm that textures lower the energy of excitations. In the two-electron bubble crystal these textures form two-dimensional hedgehogs around defects having one extra electron, and vortices around defects lacking one electron. Strain affects vortices and hedgehogs differently, explaining striking strain-dependent resistivity. The sharp transition from insulating RIQHE state to conducting state is caused by melting of Abrikosov crystal comprised of the defects. The proposed physical mechanism of conductivity due to topological defects is shown to lead to an unusually large magnitude of the strain effect on resistivity in the range of RIQHE filling factors, in agreement with experiment. Research was partially supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under Awards DE-SC0010544 (Y.L-G), DE-SC0008630 (L.P.R.), DE-SC0006671 (G.S. and M.M.).

  6. Low-lying excitations in 72Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, A. I.; Benzoni, G.; Watanabe, H.; Nishimura, S.; Browne, F.; Daido, R.; Doornenbal, P.; Fang, Y.; Lorusso, G.; Patel, Z.; Rice, S.; Sinclair, L.; Söderström, P.-A.; Sumikama, T.; Wu, J.; Xu, Z. Y.; Yagi, A.; Yokoyama, R.; Baba, H.; Avigo, R.; Bello Garrote, F. L.; Blasi, N.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Ceruti, S.; Crespi, F. C. L.; de Angelis, G.; Delattre, M.-C.; Dombradi, Zs.; Gottardo, A.; Isobe, T.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurz, N.; Kuti, I.; Matsui, K.; Melon, B.; Mengoni, D.; Miyazaki, T.; Modamio-Hoyborg, V.; Momiyama, S.; Napoli, D. R.; Niikura, M.; Orlandi, R.; Sakurai, H.; Sahin, E.; Sohler, D.; Shaffner, H.; Taniuchi, R.; Taprogge, J.; Vajta, Zs.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; Wieland, O.; Yalcinkaya, M.

    2016-03-01

    Low-lying excited states in 72Ni have been investigated in an in-flight fission experiment at the RIBF facility of the RIKEN Nishina Center. The combination of the state-of-the-art BigRIPS and EURICA setups has allowed for a very accurate study of the β decay from 72Co to 72Ni, and has provided first experimental information on the decay sequence 72Fe→72Co→72Ni and on the delayed neutron-emission branch 73Co→72Ni . Accordingly, we report nearly 60 previously unobserved γ transitions which deexcite 21 new levels in 72Ni. Evidence for the location of the so-sought-after (42+) ,(62+) , and (81+) seniority states is provided. As well, the existence of a low-spin β -decaying isomer in odd-odd neutron-rich Co isotopes is confirmed for mass A =72 . The new experimental information is compared to simple shell-model calculations including only neutron excitations across the f p g shells. It is shown that, in general, the calculations reproduce well the observed states.

  7. Improved Underwater Excitation-Emission Matrix Fluorometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Casey; daCunha, John; Rhoades, Bruce; Twardowski, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A compact, high-resolution, two-dimensional excitation-emission matrix fluorometer (EEMF) has been designed and built specifically for use in identifying and measuring the concentrations of organic compounds, including polluting hydrocarbons, in natural underwater settings. Heretofore, most EEMFs have been designed and built for installation in laboratories, where they are used to analyze the contents of samples collected in the field and brought to the laboratories. Because the present EEMF can be operated in the field, it is better suited to measurement of spatially and temporally varying concentrations of substances of interest. In excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorometry, fluorescence is excited by irradiating a sample at one or more wavelengths, and the fluorescent emission from the sample is measured at multiple wavelengths. When excitation is provided at only one wavelength, the technique is termed one-dimensional (1D) EEM fluorometry because the resulting matrix of fluorescence emission data (the EEM) contains only one row or column. When excitation is provided at multiple wavelengths, the technique is termed two-dimensional (2D) EEM fluorometry because the resulting EEM contains multiple rows and columns. EEM fluorometry - especially the 2D variety - is well established as a means of simultaneously detecting numerous dissolved and particulate compounds in water. Each compound or pool of compounds has a unique spectral fluorescence signature, and each EEM is rich in information content, in that it can contain multiple fluorescence signatures. By use of deconvolution and/or other mixture-analyses techniques, it is often possible to isolate the spectral signature of compounds of interest, even when their fluorescence spectra overlap. What distinguishes the present 2D EEMF over prior laboratory-type 2D EEMFs are several improvements in packaging (including a sealed housing) and other aspects of design that render it suitable for use in natural underwater

  8. Low-Pressure Microwave Excited Microplasmas as Sources of VUV Photons and Metastable Excited Atoms: Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushner, Mark; Cooley, James; Xue, Jun; Urdhal, Randall

    2011-10-01

    Low pressure plasmas sustained in rare gases and rare gas mixtures can be efficient sources of VUV light from resonant optical transitions. Many applications would benefit from having small, inexpensive sources of plasma produced VUV light. To address this need, microwave wave excited microplasma sources in rare gases operating at pressures of <10 Torr are being developed. The microplasmas are sustained in ceramic cavities having cross sectional dimensions of <=1 mm, excited by a split-ring resonator antenna operated at 2.45 GHz. Power deposition is a few W. Hybrid computer modeling of microplasmas sustained in Ar has been performed to develop scaling laws for increasing the efficiency of VUV light production. The model includes a Monte Carlo simulation for the electron energy distribution and for radiation transport. Results from those studies will be discussed for plasma densities, electron energy distributions, VUV light production and excited state densities as a function of power, pressure and aspect ratio of the microplasma cavities. Modeling results will be compared to laser absorption spectroscopy of Ar excited state densities. Work supported by Agilent Technologies.

  9. Broadband Transmission Loss Due to Reverberant Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barisciano, Lawrence P. Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The noise transmission characteristics of candidate curved aircraft sidewall panel constructions is examined analytically using finite element models of the selected panel geometries. The models are validated by experimental modal analyses and transmission loss testing. The structural and acoustic response of the models are then examined when subjected to random or reverberant excitation, the simulation of which is also discussed. For a candidate curved honeycomb panel, the effect of add-on trim panel treatments is examined. Specifically, two different mounting configurations are discussed and their effect on the transmission loss of the panel is presented. This study finds that the add-on acoustical treatments do improve on the primary structures transmission loss characteristics, however, much more research is necessary to draw any valid conclusions about the optimal configuration for the maximum noise transmission loss. This paper describes several directions for the extension of this work.

  10. Photonic simulation of topological excitations in metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wei; Sun, Yong; Chen, Hong; Shen, Shun-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Condensed matter systems with topological order and metamaterials with left-handed chirality have attracted recently extensive interests in the fields of physics and optics. So far the topological order and chirality of electromagnetic wave are two independent concepts, and there is no work to address their connection. Here we propose to establish the relation between the topological order in condensed matter systems and the chirality in metamaterials, by mapping explicitly Maxwell's equations to the Dirac equation in one dimension. We report an experimental implement of the band inversion in the Dirac equation, which accompanies change of chirality of electromagnetic wave in metamaterials, and the first microwave measurement of topological excitations and topological phases in one dimension. Our finding provides a proof-of-principle example that electromagnetic wave in the metamaterials can be used to simulate the topological order in condensed matter systems and quantum phenomena in relativistic quantum mechanics in a controlled laboratory environment. PMID:24452532

  11. Excited Baryons from the FLIC Fermion Action

    SciTech Connect

    Melnitchouk, Wally; Hedditch, J N; Leinweber, D B; Williams, A G; Zanoti, J; Zhang, J B

    2002-06-01

    Masses of positive and negative parity excited nucleons and hyperons are calculated in quenched lattice QCD using an order (a{sup 2}) improved gluon action and a fat-link clover fermion action in which only the irrelevant operators are constructed with fat links. The results are in agreement with earlier N* simulations with improved actions, and exhibit a clear mass splitting between the nucleon and its parity partner, as well as a small mass splitting between the low-lying J{sup P}=1/2{sup -}N* states. Study of different Lambda interpolating fields suggests a similar splitting between the lowest two 1/2{sup -}Lambda* states, although the empirical mass suppression of the Lambda*(1405) is not seen.

  12. Excited state baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Robert G. Edwards; Dudek, Jozef J.; Richards, David G.; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2011-10-31

    Here, we present a calculation of the Nucleon and Delta excited state spectrum on dynamical anisotropic clover lattices. A method for operator construction is introduced that allows for the reliable identification of the continuum spins of baryon states, overcoming the reduced symmetry of the cubic lattice. Using this method, we are able to determine a spectrum of single-particle states for spins up to and including $J = 7/2$, of both parities, the first time this has been achieved in a lattice calculation. We find a spectrum of states identifiable as admixtures of $SU(6) Ⓧ O(3)$ representations and a counting of levels that is consistent with the non-relativistic $qqq$ constituent quark model. This dense spectrum is incompatible with quark-diquark model solutions to the "missing resonance problem" and shows no signs of parity doubling of states.

  13. Fast excitation of EGAM by NBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, H. L.; Zhou, T.

    2010-03-01

    A new mechanism for the fast excitation of the energetic geodesic acoustic mode (EGAM) is proposed to explain the recent experiment in DIII-D (Nazikian et al 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 101 185001), where the mode turns on in less than a millisecond after the turn-on of the neutral beam injection. The existence of loss boundary in pitch angle when beam particles are injected counter to the plasma current is crucial to the formation of negative energy EGAM mode. The resonance of this negative energy wave with energetic particles, whose distribution decreases with energy, destabilizes the mode. We find that when there is a loss region, the onset time of instability can be significantly shorter than it would be if the injected particles had no loss region.

  14. Interchange mode excited by trapped energetic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Seiya

    2015-07-15

    The kinetic energy principle describing the interaction between ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes with trapped energetic ions is revised. A model is proposed on the basis of the reduced ideal MHD equations for background plasmas and the bounce-averaged drift-kinetic equation for trapped energetic ions. The model is applicable to large-aspect-ratio toroidal devices. Specifically, the effect of trapped energetic ions on the interchange mode in helical systems is analyzed. Results show that the interchange mode is excited by trapped energetic ions, even if the equilibrium states are stable to the ideal interchange mode. The energetic-ion-induced branch of the interchange mode might be associated with the fishbone mode in helical systems.

  15. Excited Biexcitons in Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, David

    Recently, experimental measurements and theoretical modeling have been in a disagreement concerning the binding energy of biexctions in transition metal dichalcogenides. While theory predicts a smaller binding energy (~20 meV) that is, as logically expected, lower than that of the trion, experiment finds values much larger (~60 meV), actually exceeding those for the trion. In this work, we show that there exists an excited state of the biexciton which yields binding energies that match well with experimental findings and thus gives a plausible explanation for the apparent discrepancy. Furthermore, it is shown that the electron-hole correlation functions of the ground state biexciton and trion are remarkably similar, possibly explaining why a distinct signature of ground state biexcitons would not have been noticed experimentally.

  16. Photoacoustic excitation profiles of gold nanoparticles☆

    PubMed Central

    Feis, Alessandro; Gellini, Cristina; Salvi, Pier Remigio; Becucci, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of the laser-induced photoacoustic signal amplitude has been measured for water dispersions of 10, 61, and 93 nm diameter gold nanospheres. The whole region of the localized surface plasmon resonance has been covered. This “photoacoustic excitation profile” can be overlayed with the extinction spectrum between 450 nm and 600 nm in the case of the smallest nanoparticles. At variance, the larger-sized nanoparticles display a progressive deviation from the extinction spectrum at longer wavelength, where the photoacoustic signal becomes relatively smaller. Considering that photoacoustics is intrinsically insensitive to light scattering, at least for optically thin samples, the results are in agreement with previous theoretical work predicting (i) an increasing contribution of scattering to extinction when the nanoparticle size increases and (ii) a larger scattering component at longer wavelengths. Therefore, the method has a general validity and can be applied to selectively determine light absorption by plasmonic systems. PMID:25302155

  17. New High-Pressure Excitations in Parahydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, A.F.; Hemley, R.J.; Mao, H.; Shu, J.

    1998-01-01

    Raman and infrared spectroscopy of para-H{sub 2} to pressures in excess of 200GPa and to 8K using new ultrapure synthetic diamond anvils reveals numerous new vibrational excitations in the three high-pressure phases. Highly resolved Raman-active librons indicate differences in orientational ordering between phasesII and III, including evidence for changes within phaseII. The librons in phaseIII are strongly pressure dependent and reflect a substantial increase in ordering with pressure. Multiple vibrons in all three phases (I, II, and III) are observed. The results place new bounds on predicted crystal structures and dynamics of the dense molecular solid. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. Coulomb excitation of {sup 189}Os

    SciTech Connect

    Seale, W.A.; Botelho, S.; Ribas, R.V.

    1993-10-01

    The transitional nucleus {sup 189}Os has been studied by Coulomb excitation. Measurements with a Ge(HP) detector were made at 0{degrees}, 55{degrees}, 90{degrees} with beams of {sup 28}Si at 80 and 88 Me {sup 35}Cl at 80 MeV and {sup 16}O at 58 MeV. A total of gamma-ray transitions leading to 23 levels we used in the least-squares code GOSIA to determined reduced matrix elements. A theoretic understanding of this nucleus has been attempt from the point of view of current nuclear mode as they apply to systematics of the 1/2 {sup -}[510] 3/2 -[512], 1/2 [503] levels in this ma region.

  19. Photoionization from excited states of helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, V. L.

    1973-01-01

    The cross sections for photoionization from the 2 1S, 2 3S, 2 1P and 2 3P excited states of helium are calculated for photoelectron energies below the n = 2 threshold of He(+) using Hylleraas bound state wave functions and 1s-2s-2p close coupling final state wave functions. The resonant structures associated with the lowest-lying 1S, 1P, 3P, and 1D autoionizing states of helium are found to be characterized by large values of the line profile parameter q. The cross sections and the photoelectron angular distribution asymmetry parameters for the P-states are calculated for various polarization states of the target atom and the incident photon. Experiments which would lead to the separate determinations of the S- and D- wave partial photoionization cross sections are discussed.

  20. Excitation of turbulence by density waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tichen, C. M.

    1985-01-01

    A nonlinear system describes the microdynamical state of turbulence that is excited by density waves. It consists of an equation of propagation and a master equation. A group-scaling generates the scaled equations of many interacting groups of distribution functions. The two leading groups govern the transport processes of evolution and eddy diffusivity. The remaining sub-groups represent the relaxation for the approach of diffusivity to equilibrium. In strong turbulence, the sub-groups disperse themselves and the ensemble acts like a medium that offers an effective damping to close the hierarchy. The kinetic equation of turbulence is derived. It calculates the eddy viscosity and identifies the effective damping of the assumed medium self-consistently. It formulates the coupling mechanism for the intensification of the turbulent energy at the expense of the wave energy, and the transfer mechanism for the cascade. The spectra of velocity and density fluctuations find the power law k sup-2 and k sup-4, respectively.