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Sample records for 2u-globulin hyaline droplet

  1. Rapid postexposure decay of. cap alpha. /sub 2u/-globulin and hyaline droplets in the kidneys of gasoline-treated male rats

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, B.D.; Olson, M.J.; Demyan, W.F.; Roy, A.K.

    1988-01-01

    Renal ..cap alpha../sub 2u/-globulin content increased to 210% of control within 18 h of a single oral dose of gasoline (2.0 ml/kg) in male rats; maximal levels (320% of control) were attained following gasoline administration for 3 d. Increases in renal ..cap alpha../sub 2u/-globulin caused by gasoline were accompanied by concurrent proliferation of hyaline droplets. However, within 3 d of terminating gasoline administration renal ..cap alpha../sub2u/-globulin content decreased to the same level as that in unexposed rats, although renal hyaline droplet number returned to pretreatment levels somewhat more slowly. The conjoint effect of postexposure recovery and estradiol (an inhibitor of hepatic ..cap alpha../sub 2u/-globulin synthesis) administration was also determined in male rats. On postexposure of 3, 6, and 9, estradiol treatment (1 mg/kg, sc, 4 d, starting on d 9 of gasoline treatment) decreased renal ..cap alpha../sub 2u/-globulin content to 75%, 59%, and 48%, respectively, of that in rats allowed to recover from gasoline with no hormone treatment. Hepatic ..cap alpha../sub 2u/-globulin content in estradiol-treated rats was decreased by 74%, 97%, and 96% at the same intervals. Estradiol treatment during recovery from gasoline also appeared to increase the removal of accumulated hyaline droplets from the renal cortex. Thus, accumulation of ..cap alpha../sub 2u/-globulin-containing hyaline droplets after subacute exposure of male rats to gasoline is rapidly reversible, dependent on continuous exposure to gasoline and maintenance of the normal rate of hepatic ..cap alpha../sub 2u/-globulin synthesis. These results emphasize the dynamic state of renal cortical hyaline droplets and suggest strongly that gasoline hydrocarbons cause hyaline droplet accumulation by prolonging the half-time degradation of ..cap alpha../sub 2u/-globulin.

  2. Biochemical basis for mouse resistance to hyaline droplet nephropathy: lack of relevance of the alpha 2u-globulin protein superfamily in this male rat-specific syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lehman-McKeeman, L D; Caudill, D

    1992-02-01

    It is well-established that binding of a chemical to alpha 2u-globulin is the rate-limiting step in the development of male rat-specific hyaline droplet nephropathy. Mice synthesize mouse urinary protein (MUP), a protein which is very similar to alpha 2u-globulin, but this protein does not render the mouse sensitive to a similar renal toxicity. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to determine the biochemical basis for mouse resistance to hyaline droplet nephropathy. Male Fischer 344 rats and B6C3F1 mice excreted 12.24 +/- 0.60 and 14.88 +/- 0.99 mg of alpha 2u-globulin and MUP daily, indicating that quantitative differences in protein excretion were not involved in the species specificity of the nephropathy. With d-limonene as a model hyaline droplet inducing agent, both rat and mouse liver microsomes oxidized the terpene to its 1,2-epoxide (the metabolite that binds reversibly to alpha 2u-globulin in vivo), demonstrating that metabolic differences do not determine the mouse resistance to this lesion. In spite of the formation of the epoxide intermediate, no binding of [14C]d-limonene equivalents to mouse kidney proteins was observed. In contrast, about 40% of the d-limonene equivalents in male rat kidney was reversibly bound to renal proteins. The renal reabsorption of alpha 2u-globulin and MUP was markedly different, as rats reabsorbed about 60% of the total filtered load of alpha 2u-globulin, but MUP was not reabsorbed by the mouse kidney. Given the absence of MUP in mouse kidney, in vitro equilibrium saturation binding studies were also conducted to determine whether MUP could bind the epoxide metabolite. alpha 2u-Globulin bound [14C]d-limonene-1,2-oxide with an apparent Kd of 4 x 10(-7) M. However, under identical experimental conditions, MUP failed to bind the epoxide. These data indicate that two major biochemical differences between alpha 2u-globulin and MUP contribute to mouse resistance to hyaline droplet nephropathy. Under both in vivo and in

  3. Hazard evaluation of chemicals that cause accumulation of alpha 2u-globulin, hyaline droplet nephropathy, and tubule neoplasia in the kidneys of male rats.

    PubMed Central

    Hard, G C; Rodgers, I S; Baetcke, K P; Richards, W L; McGaughy, R E; Valcovic, L R

    1993-01-01

    This review paper examines the relationship between chemicals inducing excessive accumulation of alpha 2u-globulin (alpha 2u-g) (CIGA) in hyaline droplets in male rat kidneys and the subsequent development of nephrotoxicity and renal tubule neoplasia in the male rat. This dose-responsive hyaline droplet accumulation distinguishes CIGA carcinogens from classical renal carcinogens. CIGA carcinogens also do not appear to react with DNA and are generally negative in short-term tests for genotoxicity, CIGA or their metabolites bind specifically, but reversibly, to male rat alpha 2u-g. The resulting complex appears to be more resistant to hydrolytic degradation in the proximal tubule than native, unbound alpha 2u-g. Single cell necrosis of the tubule epithelium, with associated granular cast formation and papillary mineralization, is followed by sustained regenerative tubule cell proliferation, foci of tubule hyperplasia in the convoluted proximal tubules, and renal tubule tumors. Although structurally similar proteins have been detected in other species, including humans, renal lesions characteristic of alpha 2u-g nephropathy have not been observed. Epidemiologic investigation has not specifically examined the CIGA hypothesis for humans. Based on cancer bioassays, hormone manipulation studies, investigations in an alpha 2u-g-deficient strain of rat, and other laboratory data, an increased proliferative response caused by chemically induced cytotoxicity appears to play a role in the development of renal tubule tumors in male rats. Thus, it is reasonable to suggest that the renal effects induced in male rats by chemicals causing alpha 2u-g accumulation are unlikely to occur in humans. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. FIGURE 11. FIGURE 12. FIGURE 13. PMID:7686485

  4. 2,2,4-Trimethylpentane-induced nephrotoxicity. II. The reversible binding of a TMP metabolite to a renal protein fraction containing alpha 2u-globulin.

    PubMed

    Lock, E A; Charbonneau, M; Strasser, J; Swenberg, J A; Bus, J S

    1987-11-01

    Trimethylpentane (TMP) produces nephrotoxicity in male but not in female rats. The toxicity is characterized by an increase in protein droplets in proximal convoluted tubular cells and an increase in the renal concentration of the male-rat-specific protein alpha 2u-globulin. Subcellular fractionation of the kidneys from male rats 24 hr after [3H]TMP administration showed that about 60% of the radiolabeled material was localized in the 116,000g supernatant. Column chromatography of this supernatant resolved the radioactivity into two components; one, which contained about 26% of the radiolabel, coeluted with alpha 2u-globulin and cross-reacted with an antibody specific for alpha 2u-globulin. The remaining component eluted in the low-molecular-weight range (less than 1000 Da) and was assumed to be TMP metabolites. Radiolabel from [3H]TMP in male rat urine also resolved into two components with about 0.1% of the radiolabel in urine coeluting with the alpha 2u-globulin-containing fraction. Radiolabel from TMP in male rat liver 116,000g supernatant and plasma and in female rat kidney 116,000g supernatant eluted as a single component in the low-molecular-weight range. Dialysis (1000-Da cutoff) of male kidney 116,000g supernatant led to a loss of the low-molecular-weight components, but nondialyzable radiolabel (about 20%) still coeluted with the alpha 2u-globulin after gel chromatography. Dialysis against 0.1% sodium dodecyl sulfate led to a loss of both the low- and high-molecular-weight radioactive material. These results suggested that the high-molecular-weight radioactive material was formed by the reversible binding of a radioactive component of TMP to a male-rat-specific protein. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of an ethyl acetate extract of the alpha 2u-globulin-containing fractions of TMP-treated male rat kidney 116,000g supernatant identified 2,4,4-trimethyl-2-pentanol as the only bound metabolite to alpha 2u-globulin. These studies provide the first

  5. Involvement of reversible binding to alpha 2u-globulin in 1,4-dichlorobenzene-induced nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Charbonneau, M; Strasser, J; Lock, E A; Turner, M J; Swenberg, J A

    1989-06-01

    Similarly to unleaded gasoline, 1,4-dichlorobenzene (1,4-DCB) administered for 2 years caused a dose-related increase in the incidence of renal tumors in male but not in female rats or in either sex of mice. Unleaded gasoline and 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (TMP), a component of unleaded gasoline, increased protein droplet formation and cell proliferation in male but not in female rat kidneys. These protein droplets contained, alpha 2u-globulin, a male rat-specific low-molecular-weight protein and 2,4,4-trimethyl-2-pentanol, a metabolite of TMP that was reversibly bound to this protein. Studies were undertaken to determine if 1,4-DCB produced similar effects; 1,2-DCB was used for comparison since it did not produce renal carcinogenesis in male rats. Gel filtration chromatography of a 116,000g supernatant prepared from kidneys of 1,4-[14C]DCB-treated rats showed that radiolabel coeluted with alpha 2u-globulin as one sharp peak as opposed to a multipeak pattern observed for 1,2-[14C]DCB; the maximal quantity of radiolabel for 1,4-DCB was twice that for 1,2-DCB. Equilibrium dialysis of kidney cytosol in the presence or absence of sodium dodecyl sulfate demonstrated that the radiolabel was reversibly bound to alpha 2u-globulin; the amount for 1,4-[14C]DCB-treated rats was almost twice as much as that for 1,2-[14C]DCB-treated rats. 1,2-DCB was also shown to be covalently bound to renal alpha 2u-globulin, and covalently bound to liver and plasma high-molecular-weight proteins. 1,4-DCB and, to a minor extent, 2,5-dichlorophenol, the major metabolite of 1,4-DCB, were reversibly bound to renal alpha 2u-globulin from 1,4-DCB-treated rats. 1,4-DCB increased protein droplet formation in male but not in female rat kidneys, whereas equimolar doses of 1,2-DCB showed no effect in either sex. Renal cell proliferation, measured by [3H]thymidine incorporation into renal DNA, was increased after 1,4-DCB but not after 1,2-DCB treatment. Nephrotoxicity and biochemical alterations induced by

  6. d-Limonene-induced male rat-specific nephrotoxicity: Evaluation of the association between d-limonene and alpha 2u-globulin

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman-McKeeman, L.D.; Rodriguez, P.A.; Takigiku, R.; Caudill, D.; Fey, M.L.

    1989-06-15

    d-Limonene is a naturally occurring monoterpene, which when dosed orally, causes a male rat-specific nephrotoxicity manifested acutely as the exacerbation of protein droplets in proximal tubule cells. Experiments were conducted to examine the retention of (/sup 14/C)d-limonene in male and female rat kidney, to determine whether d-limonene or one or more of its metabolites associates with the male rat-specific protein, alpha 2u-globulin, and if so, to identify the bound material. The results indicated that, 24 hr after oral administration of 3 mmol d-limonene/kg, the renal concentration of d-limonene equivalents was approximately 2.5 times higher in male rats than in female rats. Equilibrium dialysis in the presence or absence of sodium dodecyl sulfate indicated that approximately 40% of the d-limonene equivalents in male rat kidney associated with proteins in a reversible manner, whereas no significant association was observed between d-limonene equivalents and female rat kidney proteins. Association between d-limonene and male rat kidney proteins was characterized by high-performance gel filtration and reverse-phase chromatography. Gel filtration HPLC indicated that d-limonene in male rat kidney is associated with a protein fraction having a molecular weight of approximately 20,000. Separation of alpha 2u-globulin from other kidney proteins by reverse-phase HPLC indicated that d-limonene associated with a protein present only in male rat kidney which was definitively identified as alpha 2u-globulin by amino acid sequencing. The major metabolite associated with alpha 2u-globulin was d-limonene-1,2-oxide. Parent d-limonene was also identified as a minor component in the alpha 2u-globulin fraction.

  7. Comparative study regarding the association of alpha 2U globulin with the nephrotoxic mechanism of certain petroleum-based air force fuels. Final report, 1 July 1990-31 August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Eurell, T.E.

    1993-08-31

    Adult male rats have a strain, dose, and time-dependent renal proximal tubular degeneration induced by certain hydrocarbon compounds. We used rat strain variation (Fisher 344 and NCI Black Reiter) and different hydrocarbon compounds (JP-4, JP-8, decalin and trimethylpentane) to investigate the hydrocarbon-induced nephrotoxic response. Histochemical and morphometric evaluation of NCI-Black Reiter rats exposed to decalin and JP-8 indicated that this strain undergoes an intermediate form of the hydrocarbon-induced nephrotoxicity when compared to the albino Fisher 344 strain. The intermediate nephrotoxic response of the NCI-Black Reiter rat was characterized by approximately a two-fold increase in the number of acid phosphatase reactive lysosomes in renal tubular cells. The NBR rats did not demonstrate an increase in the size of the individual lysosomes, however, a characteristic lysosomal aggregation pattern occurred in renal tubular cells following hydrocarbon exposure. Light and electron microscopic immunohistochemistry revealed increased levels of A2U reactive sites in the renal tubular cell of F344 male rats exposed to decalin, trimethylpentane, JP-4 and JP-8. The nephrotoxic effect of decalin, trimethylpentane, JP-4 and JP-8 appeared to be equivalent as judged by renal tubular lysosomal alterations and increased A2U immunoreactive sites. Most lysosomal proteins in either control or treated animals were not reactive with specific antibodies against A2U. The relative number of A2U reactive sites per unit area did riot increase as lysosomes enlarged or became angular in response to hydrocarbon exposure. Alpha 2U globulin, Hyaline droplet nephropathy, Rats, Petroleum fuels, JP-4, JP-8, Cytoskeleton, Immunohistochemistry.

  8. Methylsulphone metabolites of m-dichlorobenzene as ligands for alpha 2u-globulin in rat kidney and urine.

    PubMed

    Larsen, G L; Bakke, J E; Huwe, J K

    1990-01-01

    1. Kidneys from rats given oral doses of either 3,5- or 2,4- dichlorophenyl[14C]methylsulphide contained the corresponding sulphones that were associated with a protein which has been isolated and characterized by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblot analysis to be alpha 2u-globulin. 2. The same methylsulphone-alpha 2u-globulin complex was isolated from the urine from rats doses with 3,5-dichlorophenyl[14C]methylsulphide (0.3-1.0% of dose, 8.5% of 14C in urine. 3. The stoichiometry of binding of the isolated methylsulphone-alpha 2u-globulin complex was shown to be 0.54-0.78 nmol/nmol protein. This binding was not covalent. PMID:1691566

  9. EFFECTS OF FOUR TRIHALOMETHANES ON DNA STRAND BREAKS, RENAL HYALINE DROPLET FORMATION AND SERUM TESTOSTERONE IN MALE F-344 RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    All four possible trihalomethanes (THMs) containing bromine and chlorine, as well as perchloroethylene (PCE), were evaluated for their ability to produce DNA strand breaks, a2u-globulin rich renal deposits, and testosterone changes in male F-344 rats. Rats received daily equimola...

  10. Effects of a major androgen-dependent urinary protein,. alpha. 2u-globulin on the pituitary-gonadal axis and hypothalamic monoamines in adult male mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, P.K.; Chandrashekar, V.; Steger, R. Bartke, A. )

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of alpha-2u-globulin, a sex-dependent male rat urinary protein on pituitary-gonadal functions and hypothalamic monamine contents in male mice. Adult male mice, maintained under standardized laboratory conditions were injected subcutaneously with alpha-2u-globulin or with vehicle daily for 14 days and killed 16 h after the last injection. Plasma levels of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), testosterone (T) and testicular levels of T were measured by radioimmunoassays. The concentrations of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) in medial basal hypothalamus (MBH) and anterior hypothalamus (AH) were measured by high performance liquid chromatography. Administration of alpha-2u-globulin led to a significant increase in plasma FSH and LH levels. In the MBH of alpha-2u-globulin treated mice, there were significant elevations of NE, DA and 5-HT contents. In the AH, both DA and 5-HT contents were decreased while NE content remained unaltered.

  11. The presence of alpha 2u-globulin is necessary for d-limonene promotion of male rat kidney tumors.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, D R; Swenberg, J A

    1991-07-01

    In a 2-year carcinogenesis bioassay, d-limonene (dL) induced kidney tumors in male F344 rats, but not in female F344 rats or either sex of mice, d-Limonene-1,2-oxide, a metabolite of dL, has been shown to bind reversibly the male rat-specific urinary protein, alpha2u-globulin (alpha 2u-G), lysosomal degradation than alpha 2u-G alone. This reduced degradation of alpha 2u-G-chemical complex leads to an accumulation of this protein in the proximal convoluted tubules of the male rat kidney and to the morphological changes characteristic for alpha 2u-globulin nephropathy. The only male rat strain known to be resistant to this renal disease is the alpha 2u-G deficient NCI-Black-Reiter (NBR) rat. The objectives of this study were to determine whether or not dL causes sustained increases in cell proliferation and has promoting activity for renal adenomas in male rats and if the male rat-specific urinary protein, alpha 2u-G, is required. In a 32-week initiation-promotion assay, male F344 and NBR rats were treated with either 0 or 500 ppm N-ethyl-N-hydroxyethylnitrosamine (EHEN) in the drinking water for 2 weeks. Experimental groups of 31 to 38 rats then received 0 or 150 mg d-limonene/kg/day in corn oil for 30 weeks by p.o. gavage 5 days/week. Cell proliferation in the proximal tubules was assessed via 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-filled osmotic mini-pumps and immunohistochemistry after 7 weeks (2 weeks EHEN + 5 weeks dL) and at the end of the study (2 weeks EHEN + 30 weeks dL). Preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions were quantified in perfusion-fixed kidneys. A 5-fold increase in the labeling index of P2-cells was found after 5 weeks and 30 weeks of promotion in all dL-treated F344 rats, whereas no difference between treatment groups was detected in NBR rats. No increase in tumors or preneoplastic lesions was detected in dL-treated NBR rats, whereas a 10-fold increase in renal adenomas and atypical hyperplasias was found in the EHEN-dL-treated F344 rats compared with F344 rats

  12. Characteristics of chemical binding to alpha 2u-globulin in vitro--evaluating structure-activity relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Borghoff, S.J.; Miller, A.B.; Bowen, J.P.; Swenberg, J.A. )

    1991-02-01

    alpha 2u-Globulin (alpha 2u) has been shown to accumulate in the kidneys of male rats treated with 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (TMP). 2,4,4-Trimethyl-2-pentanol (TMP-2-OH), a metabolite of TMP, is found reversibly bound to alpha 2u isolated from the kidneys of these treated rats. The objectives of the following study were to characterize the ability of (3H)TMP-2-OH to bind to alpha 2u in vitro and to determine whether other compounds that cause this protein to accumulate have the same binding characteristics. Although compounds that have been shown to cause the accumulation of alpha 2u in male rat kidneys compete in vitro with (3H)TMP-2-OH for binding to alpha 2u, they do so to varying degrees. The binding affinity (Kd) of the (3H)TMP-2-OH-alpha 2u complex was calculated to be on the order of 10(-7) M. The inhibition constant values (Ki) determined for d-limonene, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, and 2,5-dichlorophenol were all in the range 10(-4) M, whereas the Ki values for isophorone, 2,4,4- or 2,2,4-trimethyl-1-pentanol, and d-limonene oxide were determined to be in the range 10(-6) and 10(-7) M, respectively. TMP and 2,4,4- and 2,2,4-trimethylpentanoic acid did not compete for binding. This suggests that other factors, besides binding, are involved in the accumulation of alpha 2u. In this study the ability of a chemical to bind to alpha 2u was used as a measure of biological activity to assess structure-activity relationships among the chemicals tested and known to cause the accumulation of alpha 2u. The results so far suggest that binding is dependent on both hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonding.

  13. 14C-labeled pulegone and metabolites binding to alpha2u-globulin in kidneys of male F-344 rats.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Ling-Jen Chen; Lebetkin, Edward H; Lih, Fred B; Tomer, Kenneth B; Parkinson, Horace D; Borghoff, Susan J; Burka, Leo T

    2007-09-01

    Pulegone is a major constituent of pennyroyal oil and a minor component of peppermint oil. Pulegone is biotransformed to menthofuran and menthones (diastereomeric menthone and isomenthone) in pennyroyal and peppermint as well as in rodents. Pulegone and menthofuran are hepatotoxic to rodents, and menthones are less toxic. The metabolism and disposition of pulegone and menthofuran were previously studied in rodents, and higher concentrations of pulegone- and menthofuran-derived radioactivity were observed in male than female rat kidney. One explanation is the association of pulegone and metabolites with a male rat-specific protein, alpha2u-globulin. To test this hypothesis, male and female rats were dosed orally with 14C-labeled pulegone (80 mg/kg, 120 microCi/kg) or menthofuran (60 mg/kg, 120 microCi/kg) or menthones (80 mg/kg, 120 microCi/kg) in corn oil, and the kidney cytosol was prepared 24 h after dosing. An equilibrium dialysis experiment showed that in all three studies the radioactivity was associated with kidney cytosol proteins of male but not female rats. The chemicals present in the male rat kidney cytosol after dialysis were extracted with dichloromethane and characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS). All parent compounds were detected, and the metabolites characterized included piperitone from pulegone or menthones treatment, menthones and possibly 8-hydroxymenthones from pulegone treatment, and mintlactones (diastereomeric mintlactone and isomintlactone) and 7a-hydroxymintlactone from menthofuran treatment. Analysis of the male rat kidney cytosol by a gel filtration column demonstrated that the retention was due to reversible binding of these chemicals with the male rat-specific protein alpha2u-globulin. However, binding of pulegone and/or metabolites to alpha2u-globulin did not produce accumulation of this protein in the kidney. PMID:17687727

  14. Alpha 2u-globulin nephropathy: review of the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved and their implications for human risk assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Swenberg, J A

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews what is known about the induction of alpha 2u-globulin nephropathy and carcinogenesis. This unique male-rat-specific disease is associated with exposure to an ever-increasing number of chemicals. The processes leading to nephropathy and renal cancer are among the best-understood mechanisms for nongenotoxic chemicals and strongly support that it is a male-rat-specific process that is not relevant for human risk assessment. Nevertheless, the data available for individual chemicals vary greatly. This necessitates a case-by-case analysis of the available data when determining the relevance for humans of this chemically induced renal disease in male rats. PMID:7517351

  15. Renal hyalin

    PubMed Central

    Lendrum, A. C.; Slidders, W.; Fraser, D. S.

    1972-01-01

    This describes the sodium sulphate-Alcian Blue (SAB) method for staining amyloid in paraffin sections. Its value lies in the possibility of subsequent counterstaining and thus of revealing the structural relationships of amyloid. In the kidney the topical disposition of amyloid closely resembles the disposition of fibrin in the kidney of diabetics; this suggests that upset in vascular permeability plays a part in determining the site of the amyloid deposits. Furthermore, an aging process in amyloid can now be envisaged resembling the aging of extraluminal fibrin. Both materials proceed to a hyalin material that, staining like collagen, merits the name pseudo-collagen. This term we apply to a hyalin, staining like collagen, for which, we can postulate a specific precursor. Images PMID:4114696

  16. Comparative study regarding the association of alpha-2U globulin with the nephrotoxic mechanism of certain petroleum-based air force fuels. Final report 1, December 1987-30 November 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Eurell, T.E.

    1988-12-01

    Fischer 344 male rats have a dose- and time-dependent renal proximal tubular degeneration induced by certain hydrocarbon compounds. This degeneration my be associated with a low-molecular-weight urinary protein called alpha-2U globulin. The authors using a rat-strain variation of the alpha-2U globulin molecule and metabolic alteration of the urinary pH as methods to investigate the hydrocarbon-induced nephrotoxic response. Two significant advances were made in the first year of this project: (1) a histochemical procedure was developed to specifically evaluate changes in the renal epithelial lysosome, and (2) a rat-strain difference was detected in susceptibility to hydrocarbon-induced nephrotoxicity.

  17. Methyl isobutyl ketone exposure-related increases in specific measures of α2u-globulin (α2u) nephropathy in male rats along with in vitro evidence of reversible protein binding.

    PubMed

    Borghoff, S J; Poet, T S; Green, S; Davis, J; Hughes, B; Mensing, T; Sarang, S S; Lynch, A M; Hard, G C

    2015-07-01

    Chronic exposure to methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) resulted in an increase in the incidence of renal tubule adenomas and occurrence of renal tubule carcinomas in male, but not female Fischer 344 rats. Since a number of chemicals have been shown to cause male rat renal tumors through the α2u nephropathy-mediated mode of action, the objective of this study is to evaluate the ability of MIBK to induce measures of α2u nephropathy including renal cell proliferation in male and female F344 rats following exposure to the same inhalation concentrations used in the National Toxicology Program (NTP) cancer bioassay (0, 450, 900, or 1800ppm). Rats were exposed 6h/day for 1 or 4 weeks and kidneys excised approximately 18h post exposure to evaluate hyaline droplet accumulation (HDA), α2u staining of hyaline droplets, renal cell proliferation, and to quantitate renal α2u concentration. There was an exposure-related increase in all measures of α2u nephropathy in male, but not female rat kidneys. The hyaline droplets present in male rat kidney stained positively for α2u. The changes in HDA and α2u concentration were comparable to d-limonene, an acknowledged inducer of α2u nephropathy. In a separate in vitro study using a two-compartment vial equilibration model to assess the interaction between MIBK and α2u, the dissociation constant (Kd) was estimated to be 1.27×10(-5)M. This Kd is within the range of other chemicals known to bind to α2u and cause nephropathy. Together, the exposure-related increase in measures of α2u nephropathy, sustained increase in renal cell proliferation along with an indication of reversible binding of MIBK to α2u, support the inclusion of MIBK in the category of chemicals exerting renal effects through a protein droplet α2u nephropathy-mediated mode of action (MoA). PMID:25797582

  18. Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome: cutaneous manifestations*

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Stolf, Hamilton Ometto; Polizel, Juliana Ocanha; Munhoz, Tânia; Brandão, Marcela Calixto; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar

    2016-01-01

    Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome is the current name for clinical manifestations of diseases previously known as “infantile systemic hyalinosis” and “juvenile hyaline fibromatosis”. The authors report representative clinical cases of each one of the above subtypes with emphasis on cutaneous manifestations and difficulties for early diagnosis in this syndrome, essentially of multidisciplinary approach. PMID:27192526

  19. Fusarium and other opportunistic hyaline fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter focuses on those fungi that grow in tissue in the form of hyaline or lightly colored septate hyphae. These fungi include Fusarium and other hyaline fungi. Disease caused by hyaline fungi is referred to as hyalohyphomycosis. Hyaline fungi described in this chapter include the anamorphic,...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile hyaline fibromatosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... severe physical limitations, but most individuals have normal intelligence and live into adulthood. Related Information What does ... Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central GeneReview: Hyalinosis, Inherited Systemic OMIM: HYALINE FIBROMATOSIS SYNDROME ...

  1. Hyaline membrane disease, alkali, and intraventricular haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Wigglesworth, J S; Keith, I H; Girling, D J; Slade, S A

    1976-01-01

    The relation between intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) and hyaline membrane disease (HMD) was studied in singletons that came to necropsy at Hammersmith Hospital over the years 1966-73. The incidence of IVH in singleton live births was 3-22/1000 and of HMD 4-44/1000. Although the high figures were partily due to the large number of low birthweight infants born at this hospital, the incidence of IVH in babies weighing 1001-1500 g was three times as great as that reported in the 1658 British Perinatal Mortality Survey. Most IVH deaths were in babies with HMD, but the higher frequency of IVH was not associated with any prolongation of survival time of babies who died with HMD as compared with the 1958 survey. IVH was seen frequently at gestations of up to 36 weeks in babies with HMD but was rare above 30 weeks' gestation in babies without HMD. This indicated that factors associated with HMD must cause most cases of IVH seen at gestations above 30 weeks. Comparison of clinical details in infants with HMD who died with or without IVH (at gestations of 30-37 weeks) showed no significant differences between the groups other than a high incidence of fits and greater use of alkali therapy in the babies with IVH. During the 12 hours when most alkali therapy was given, babies dying with IVD received a mean total alkali dosage of 10-21 mmol/kg and those dying without IVH 6-34 mmol/kg (P less than 0-001).There was no difference in severity of hypoxia or of metabolic acidosis between the 2 groups. Babies who died with HMD and germinal layer haemorrhage (GLH) without IVH had received significantly more alkali than those who died with HMD alone, whereas survivors of severe respiratory distress syndrome had received lower alkali doses than other groups. It is suggested that the greatly increased death rate from IVH in babies with HMD indicates some alteration of management of HMD (since 1958) as a causative factor. Liberal use of hypertonic alkali solutions is the common factor

  2. Hyaline fibromatosis of Hoffa's fat pad in a patient with a mild type of hyaline fibromatosis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Van Raak, Sjoerd M; Meuffels, Duncan E; Van Leenders, Geert J L H; Oei, Edwin H G

    2014-04-01

    Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome (HFS) is a rare, homozygous, autosomal recessive disease, characterized by deposition of hyaline material in skin and other organs, resulting in esthetic problems, disability, and potential life-threatening complications. Most patients become clinically apparent in the first few years of life, and the disorder typically progresses with the appearance of new lesions. We describe a rare case of a 20-year-old patient with juvenile-onset mild HFS who presented with a history of progressive anterior knee pain. Detailed magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings with histopathological correlation are presented of hyaline fibromatosis of Hoffa's fat pad, including differential diagnosis. The diagnosis of HFS is generally made on basis of clinical and histopathological findings. Imaging findings, however, may contribute to the correct diagnosis in patients who present with a less typical clinical course of HFS. PMID:24132693

  3. Pulmonary epithelial permeability in hyaline-membrane disease

    SciTech Connect

    Jefferies, A.L.; Coates, G.; O'Brodovich, H.

    1984-10-25

    Neonatal hyaline-membrane disease is complicated by pulmonary edema, yet left atrial pressures are normal. Alveolar-capillary-membrane permeability may therefore be increased. To assess pulmonary epithelial permeability, we measured the pulmonary clearance and half-life of aerosolized /sup 99m/Tc-diethylenetriamine pentacetate (/sup 99m/Tc-DTPA) on 31 occasions in 15 intubated premature infants with hyaline-membrane disease. Three infants with respiratory failure due to other diseases were studied on four occasions. All studies of infants with hyaline-membrane disease that were performed in the first 72 hours of life demonstrated a biphasic clearance curve with a rapid-phase half-life of 1.6 +/- 0.6 minutes (mean +/- S.D.). As these infants recovered, the curve became monophasic with a half-life of 56.0 +/- 32.1 minutes. Two infants remained dependent on oxygen and ventilator support and had persistent biphasic curves with a rapid-phase half-life of 1.5 +/- 0.7 minutes. All infants without hyaline-membrane disease had monophasic curves with a half-life of 65.4 +/- 33.6 minutes. Using a similar technique, we observed that newborn lambs and piglets have a monophasic pulmonary clearance of /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA (114 +/- 59 minutes in lambs and 52.5 +/- 16.3 minutes in piglets). We conclude that the lungs of neonates with hyaline-membrane disease are abnormally permeable to small solutes and that this abnormality persists in infants with subsequent chronic lung disease.

  4. [Hyaline-vascular Multicentric Castleman's Disease in an immunocompetent patient].

    PubMed

    Zapata-Bonilla, Sergio Armando; López Vargas, Roberto; Scherling-Ocampo, Aldo Alfonso; Morales Leyte, Ana Lilia; García Ilizaliturri, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    A previously healthy, immunocompetent 67-year-old female presented with a one-month history of general symptoms, weight loss, night fevers, and bilateral lower extremity edema. On admission she had severe anemia, acute kidney injury, and multiple lymphadenopathies. An excisional biopsy of one of the axillary lymphadenopathies confirmed hyaline-vascular Castleman's disease. This rare disease is a polyclonal lymphoproliferative disorder that affects the normal lymph node architecture. According to its location it can be divided in unicentric (localized) or multicentric disease; it can be further divided according to histopathology in hyaline-vascular or plasmatic cells variety. Clinical presentation relates more to histopathological variety than to centricity. Human herpes virus 8 is ubiquitous in this disease and, along with interleukin 6, plays an important role in pathogenesis and symptoms presentation. Surgery is the go-to treatment of localized disease, while systemic chemotherapy is the option in multicentric disease. Communication between the clinical and anatomopathological teams is crucial; lag in diagnosis can lead to futile investigations in search of other diseases and delay in treatment. PMID:26526479

  5. Dancing Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cira, Nate; Prakash, Manu

    2013-11-01

    Inspired by the observation of intricate and beautifully dynamic patterns generated by food coloring on corona treated glass slides, we have investigated the behavior of propylene glycol and water droplets on clean glass surfaces. These droplets exhibit a range of interesting behaviors including long distance attraction or repulsion, and chasing/fleeing upon contact. We present explanations for each of these behaviors, and propose a detailed model for the long distance interactions based on vapor facilitated coupling. Finally we use our understanding to create several novel devices which: passively sort droplets by surface tension, spontaneously align droplets, drive droplets in circles, and cause droplets to bounce on a vertical surface. The simplicity of this system lends it particularly well to application as a toy model for physical systems with force fields and biological systems such as chemotaxis and motility.

  6. Swimming Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maass, Corinna C.; Krüger, Carsten; Herminghaus, Stephan; Bahr, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Swimming droplets are artificial microswimmers based on liquid droplets that show self-propelled motion when immersed in a second liquid. These systems are of tremendous interest as experimental models for the study of collective dynamics far from thermal equilibrium. For biological systems, such as bacterial colonies, plankton, or fish swarms, swimming droplets can provide a vital link between simulations and real life. We review the experimental systems and discuss the mechanisms of self-propulsion. Most systems are based on surfactant-stabilized droplets, the surfactant layer of which is modified in a way that leads to a steady Marangoni stress resulting in an autonomous motion of the droplet. The modification of the surfactant layer is caused either by the advection of a chemical reactant or by a solubilization process. Some types of swimming droplets possess a very simple design and long active periods, rendering them promising model systems for future studies of collective behavior.

  7. Prevalence and factors associated with scleral hyaline plaque: clinical study of older adults in southeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Soraya; Damasceno, Nadyr; Damasceno, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the prevalence of scleral hyaline plaque among older adults in the city of Niterói in southeastern Brazil. A second goal was to assess the correlation between scleral hyaline plaque and several age-related diseases, including eye diseases and systemic diseases. Methods The study sample comprised 667 participants who were followed for 15 months. The study had a prospective, longitudinal, observational design that established inclusion and exclusion criteria. The following variables were selected for correlation with scleral hyaline plaque: sex, age, age range, iris color, ethnicity, presence of cataract, moderate to high myopia, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetes mellitus, systemic arterial hypertension, degenerative arthritis, and osteoporosis. These correlations were assessed by means of the χ2 test and Student’s t-test. Multivariate analysis was performed to exclude factors that were potentially associated with aging exclusively but that did not have a direct relationship with hyaline plaque. Binary logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios, significance, and confidence intervals. Results Scleral hyaline plaques were found in 177 patients (17.54%). There was a statistically significant association between the presence of hyaline plaques and sex (female), age range (≥70 years old), ethnicity (Caucasian), cataract, moderate to high myopia, systemic arterial hypertension, degenerative arthritis, and osteoporosis (P<0.05). On multivariate binary logistic regression analysis, only female sex, age range (≥70 years), moderate to high myopia, and degenerative arthritis exhibited significant correlation. Conclusion The prevalence of scleral hyaline plaque in the present study was higher than in previous reports in the medical literature. Several age-related diseases exhibited a correlation with scleral hyaline plaque. The most significant factors associated with scleral hyaline plaque were advanced age, female sex

  8. Splashing Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randall L.; Kizito, John Patrick; Berger, Gordon M.; Iwan, J.; Alexander, D.; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2002-01-01

    Current data on droplet breakup is scarce for the sizes and velocities typical of practical applications such as in spray combustion processes and coating processes. While much more representative of practical applications, the small spatial scales and rapid time-scales prevent detailed measurement of the internal fluid dynamics and liquid property gradients produced by impinging upon surfaces. Realized through the extended spatial and temporal scales afforded by a microgravity environment, an improved understanding of drop breakup dynamics is sought to understand and ultimately control the impingement dynamics of droplets upon surfaces in practical situations. The primary objective of this research will be to mark the onset of different 'splashing modes' and to determine their temperature, pressure and angle dependence for impinging droplets representative of practical fluids. In addition, we are modeling the evolution of droplets that do not initially splash but rather undergo a 'fingering' evolution observed on the spreading fluid front and the transformation of these fingers into splashed products. An example of our experimental data is presented below. These images are of Isopar V impacting a mirror-polished surface. They were acquired using a high-speed camera at 1000 frames per second. They show the spreading of a single droplet after impact and ensuing finger instabilities. Normal gravity experimental data such as this will guide low gravity measurements in the 2.2 second drop tower and KC-135 aircraft as available. Presently we are in the process of comparing the experimental data of droplet shape evolution to numerical models, which can also capture the internal fluid dynamics and liquid property gradients such as produced by impingement upon a heated surface. To-date isothermal numerical data has been modeled using direct numerical simulations of representative splashing droplets. The data obtained so far indicates that the present model describes well

  9. Splashing Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanderWal, Randall L.; Kizito, John Patrick; Berger, Gordon M.; Iwan, J.; Alexander, D.; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2002-11-01

    Current data on droplet breakup is scarce for the sizes and velocities typical of practical applications such as in spray combustion processes and coating processes. While much more representative of practical applications, the small spatial scales and rapid time-scales prevent detailed measurement of the internal fluid dynamics and liquid property gradients produced by impinging upon surfaces. Realized through the extended spatial and temporal scales afforded by a microgravity environment, an improved understanding of drop breakup dynamics is sought to understand and ultimately control the impingement dynamics of droplets upon surfaces in practical situations. The primary objective of this research will be to mark the onset of different 'splashing modes' and to determine their temperature, pressure and angle dependence for impinging droplets representative of practical fluids. In addition, we are modeling the evolution of droplets that do not initially splash but rather undergo a 'fingering' evolution observed on the spreading fluid front and the transformation of these fingers into splashed products. An example of our experimental data is presented below. These images are of Isopar V impacting a mirror-polished surface. They were acquired using a high-speed camera at 1000 frames per second. They show the spreading of a single droplet after impact and ensuing finger instabilities. Normal gravity experimental data such as this will guide low gravity measurements in the 2.2 second drop tower and KC-135 aircraft as available. Presently we are in the process of comparing the experimental data of droplet shape evolution to numerical models, which can also capture the internal fluid dynamics and liquid property gradients such as produced by impingement upon a heated surface. To-date isothermal numerical data has been modeled using direct numerical simulations of representative splashing droplets. The data obtained so far indicates that the present model describes well

  10. Droplet Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marder, Michael Paolo

    When a mixture of two materials, such as aluminum and tin, or alcohol and water, is cooled below a certain temperature, the two components begin to separate. If one component is dilute in the other, it may separate out in the form of small spheres, and these will begin to enlarge, depleting the supersaturated material around them. If the dynamics is sufficiently slow, thermodynamics gives one considerable information about how the droplets grow. Two types of experiment have explored this behavior and given puzzling results. Nucleation experiments measure the rate at which droplets initially appear from a seemingly homogeneous mixture. Near the critical point in binary liquids, experiments conducted in the 1960's and early 1970's showed that nucleation was vastly slower than theory seemed to predict. The resolution of this problem arises by considering in detail the dynamics of growing droplets and comparing it with what experiments actually measure. Here will be presented a more detailed comparison of theory and experiment than has before been completed, obtaining satisfactory agreement with no free parameters needed. A second type of experiment measures droplet size distributions after long times. In the late stage, droplets compete with each other for material, a few growing at the expense of others. A theory first proposed by Lifshitz and Slyozov claims that this distribution, properly scaled, should be universal, and independent of properties of materials. Yet experimental measurements consistently find distributions that are more broad and squat than the theory would predict. Satisfactory agreement with experiment can be achieved by considering two points. First, one must study the complete time development of droplet size distributions, to understand when the asymptotic regime obtains. Second, droplet size distributions are spread by correlations between droplets. If one finds a small droplet, it is small because large droplets nearby are competing with it

  11. On the functional organisation of hyaline articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Pieper, K S; Fehrmann, P; Vergani, G; Herrmann, M

    1995-01-01

    Function of agonists and antagonists and the centering effect of the muscles on the connected joint result in constant changes of the site of load. Based on a model it is assumed that chondric cells organise in form of "functional units" within the single layers of the hyaline tectorial cartilage. In each case a small number of those units is subject to the rhythm of load and relief in a fixed period of time given. After 24-hour-culture of small pieces of cartilage in Ham's F-10 medium erected cilia are found on the predominantly ciliated chondrocytes with this indicating relief of pressure. In these cells massive glycogen synthesis and an active Golgi apparatus are present. In parallel, chondrones are found in which cellular contact functions via a cilium. Time-dependent glycogen occurs in these cells too. Cells having almost the same synthesis time course of the glycogen join up to form "functional units", which are particularly involved in the biomechanic cartilage behavior in the radiar cell zone. PMID:11322284

  12. Hyaline protoplasmic astrocytopathy in the setting of tuberous sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Prayson, Richard A

    2016-09-01

    Hyaline protoplasmic astrocytopathy is a rare disorder marked by an accumulation of protein material in the cytoplasm of astrocytic cells, mostly in the cortex. The finding has been described in Aicardi syndrome (agenesis of the corpus callosum, chorioretinal lacunae and infantile spasms) as well as in patients with pharmacoresistant epilepsy and in association with focal cortical dysplasia, polymicrogyria and nodular heterotopia. This report describes the first case of this entity described in a patient with tuberous sclerosis. The patient was a 3-year-old boy who presented at age 2months with medically intractable seizures. Has mother has a tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC 2) gene abnormality and a diagnosis of tuberous sclerosis. On imaging, he was noted to have multiple lesions in the left parietal and temporal lobes consistent with focal cortical dysplasia and a subependymal nodule. He additionally had two hypopigmented lesions on the skin. He underwent resection of the left parietal lobe 32months after seizure onset. Histopathologic examination showed eosinophilic cytoplasmic inclusions within astrocytes in the cortex and superficial white matter focally accompanied by a disordered cortical architecture with dysmorphic neurons and balloon cells, consistent with focal cortical dysplasia classified as type IIb according to International League Against Epilepsy classification criteria (ILAE type IIb). At the time of most recent follow-up, 93months postoperatively, he is still experiencing seizures with overall worthwhile improvement while on seizure medication. PMID:27174083

  13. Intraventricular haemorrhage in the preterm infant without hyaline membrane disease.

    PubMed Central

    Wigglesworth, J S; Davies, P A; Keith, I H; Slade, S A

    1977-01-01

    The clinicopathological associations of 33 singleton infants who died with intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) without hyaline membrane disease (HMD) ('IVH only') were compared with those of 39 infants who died with IVH+HMD over the same gestation range in order to determine what factors other than those related to HMD may contribute to the pathogenesis of IVH. The incidence of 'IVH only' was inversely related to gestational age in the Hammersmith birth population, whereas the incidence of IVH+HMD rose to a peak at 28-29 weeks' gestation. Infants with 'IVH only' lived longer on average than those with IVH+HMD despite a lower birthweight and shorter gestation. Infants who died in the first 12 hours from 'IVH only' had suffered severe birth asphyxia but in those who died later the main symptom was recurrent apnoea. Fewer infants with asphyxia but in those who died later the main symptom was.recurrent apnoea. Fewer infants with 'IVH only' were given alkali therapy or were connected to the ventilator as compared to those with IVH+HMD, but there were no differences in alkali therapy in those who lived for 12 hours or more. In the 'IVH only' group there was a high incidence of haemorrhage from other sites and of bacterial infections. It is suggested that, in the absence of HMD, extreme immaturity is the main factor determining the occurrence of IVH. Birth asphyxia, apnoeic attacks, haemorrhage, and infections may play subsidiary roles, possibly through development of metabolic acidosis. PMID:879829

  14. Analysis of the proteolytic degradation products of hyaline cartilage proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Liszt, F; Schnittker-Schulze, K; Stuhlsatz, H W; Greiling, H

    1990-01-01

    The proteolytic degradation products of nasal hyaline cartilage proteoglycans produced by polymorphonuclear leukocyte lysosomal enzymes were investigated. The protein content of the degradation products is 7.0-8.6% corresponding to a peptide chain of 24-28 amino acids and the relative molecular mass of the total fragment is M(r) = 37,600-39,200. On an average, each proteoglycan fragment contains two chondroitin-sulphate chains (M(r) = 22,000-22,400), every fourth fragment contains a keratan sulphate chain (M(r) = 7000-7200) and every seventh to eighth contains an O-glycosidic oligosaccharide. The results of the disaccharide analysis show that the galactosaminoglycan chains contain 76.2-83.6% chondroitin-4-sulphate, 12.9-19.4% chondroitin-6-sulphate, 3.5-3.8% chondroitin and no dermatan sulphate. Since composition and relative molecular mass of the chondroitin sulphate and keratan sulphate chains from the degradation products resemble those from native proteoglycans, it is suggested that the degradation of the proteoglycans occurs by proteinases that attack preferably the chondroitin sulphate region of the core protein. PMID:1726643

  15. Droplet microactuator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamula, Vamsee K. (Inventor); Srinivasan, Vijay (Inventor); Pollack, Michael G. (Inventor); Eckhardt, Allen E. (Inventor); Paik, Philip Y. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a droplet microactuator system. According to one embodiment, the droplet microactuator system includes: (a) a droplet microactuator configured to conduct droplet operations; (b) a magnetic field source arranged to immobilize magnetically responsive beads in a droplet during droplet operations; (c) a sensor configured in a sensing relationship with the droplet microactuator, such that the sensor is capable of sensing a signal from and/or a property of one or more droplets on the droplet microactuator; and (d) one or more processors electronically coupled to the droplet microactuator and programmed to control electrowetting-mediated droplet operations on the droplet actuator and process electronic signals from the sensor.

  16. Yeast Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Baochi; Upadhyaya, Arpita; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Brenner, Michael

    2002-11-01

    It is well known that the Young's law and surface tension govern the shape of liquid droplets on solid surfaces. Here we address through experiments and theory the shape of growing aggregates of yeast on agar substrates, and assess whether these ideas still hold. Experiments are carried out on Baker's yeast, with different levels of expressions of an adhesive protein governing cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesion. Changing either the agar concentration or the expression of this protein modifies the local contact angle of a yeast droplet. When the colony is small, the shape is a spherical cap with the contact angle obeying Young's law. However, above a critical volume this structure is unstable, and the droplet becomes nonspherical. We present a theoretical model where this instability is caused by bulk elastic effects. The model predicts that the transition depends on both volume and contact angle, in a manner quantitatively consistent with our experiments.

  17. An unusual degenerative disorder of neurons associated with a novel intranuclear hyaline inclusion (neuronal intranuclear hyaline inclusion disease). A clinicopathological study of a case.

    PubMed

    Sung, J H; Ramirez-Lassepas, M; Mastri, A R; Larkin, S M

    1980-03-01

    A 21-year-old woman with an unusual, progressive, degenerative neurological disorder is described. The disorder is characterized clinically by behavioral abnormality, peculiar involuntary movements, and ataxia starting in early childhood and subsequent development of dementia, choreoathetosis, rectal and bladder incontinence, bulbar and spinal muscular weakness, pes cavus, kyphoscoliosis, and generalized seizures. The clinical manifestations are correlated, with widespread pathological changes affecting almost all neuronal systems. The pathological changes are discussed in relation to the wide spectrum of "multisystem atrophies." Particular attention is directed to the ubiquitous occurrence of a novel intranuclear, eosinophilic, hyaline inclusion in almost all types of central, peripheral, and autonomic neurons. The ubiquitous neuronal involvement seems to explain the diffuse multiple system degeneration. The pathogenesis of the neuronal inclusions is unknown, but it is speculated that the disorder may represent a metabolic abnormality affecting the nuclear protein of neurons, rather than a viral infection. The pathological features, consisting of the neuronal intranuclear hyaline inclusions associated with multiple system atrophy, have not hitherto been described, and "neuronal intranuclear hyaline inclusion disease" is proposed as a name for the disorder. Rectal biopsy demonstrating the intranuclear hyaline inclusions in ganglion cells of the hyenteric plexuses may serve as a diagnostic procedure for the disorder. PMID:6154779

  18. Modular droplet actuator drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, Michael G. (Inventor); Paik, Philip (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A droplet actuator drive including a detection apparatus for sensing a property of a droplet on a droplet actuator; circuitry for controlling the detection apparatus electronically coupled to the detection apparatus; a droplet actuator cartridge connector arranged so that when a droplet actuator cartridge electronically is coupled thereto: the droplet actuator cartridge is aligned with the detection apparatus; and the detection apparatus can sense the property of the droplet on a droplet actuator; circuitry for controlling a droplet actuator coupled to the droplet actuator connector; and the droplet actuator circuitry may be coupled to a processor.

  19. Treatment of deep hyalin cartilage defects with autologous perichondrial grafts.

    PubMed

    Bruns, J; Steinhagen, J

    2003-07-01

    Perichondrial transplantation was performed in 29 patients suffering from a deep chondral lesion with different etiologies. Only those patients with a cartilage lesion in the knee joint were included. Patients were initially and postoperatively examined using the Lysholm- and HSS-Score. In most of the patients (20/29) trauma and the recurrence of osteochondrosis dissecans (6/29) were the cause of the cartilage lesion. Most often the medial femoral condyle (19/29) and, secondly, the lateral femoral condyle (5/29) were involved. In six patients additional therapeutic measures (ACL-plasty, n = 2; high tibial osteotomy because of varus mal-alignment, n = 4) had to be adopted. Follow-up examination was possible in 26/29 patients after a minimum postoperative period of 12 months. All patients exhibited a distinct and significant increase in both the Lysholm and the HSS-score. A follow-up after a minimum of 24 months was possible in 13/29 patients. Even these patients exhibited a distinct and significant improvement. Multiple follow-up examinations in 9/29 patients demonstrated maintenance of the first postoperative results obtained after one postoperative year for a maximum of 49 months in most of the patients. Only in one female patient, implantation of a semi-constrained total knee replacement was necessary because of osteoarthrosis resulting from crystal arthropathy (chondrocalcinosis). It was possible to obtain biopsies from three patients at the time osteosynthetic material was removed. In all cases hyaline-like cartilage was histologically observed. In the treatment of selected patients suffering from a circumscript cartilaginous lesion resulting from trauma or the recurrence of osteochondritis dissecans with a concomitant cartilage lesion but without major signs of osteoarthritis, perichondrial grafting can achieve acceptable clinical results, after a short follow-up period. In order to achieve satisfying results a good selection of patients and additional

  20. Hyalinizing Spitz nevus: spindle and epithelioid cell nevus with paucicellular collagenous stroma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Cohen, Philip R; Farhood, Anwar

    2004-01-01

    Hyalinizing spindle and epithelioid cell nevus (Spitz nevus) is an uncommon melanocytic lesion. The histologic features of this benign tumor can mimic those of certain benign (dermatofibroma and desmoplastic cellular blue nevus) and malignant (metastatic carcinoma and malignant melanoma) neoplasms. We report a woman with a hyalinizing Spitz nevus and review the clinical characteristics, histologic features, and differential diagnosis of this lesion. The lesion presented as an asymptomatic red firm nodule on her abdomen. Microscopic examination showed a symmetric lesion in the dermis. The neoplastic cells were large and epithelioid-shaped or plump and spindle-shaped. They were present as isolated individual cells, single cells in a linear pattern, small nests, and fascicles in a paucicellular hyalinized stroma. Neoplastic cells with prominent eosinophilic nucleoli were evenly exhibited from the superficial to deep lesion. Diffuse expression of S-100 protein and absence of staining with antibodies to cytokeratin and HMB-45 were observed. The features were diagnostic of a hyalinizing Spitz nevus. Hyalinizing Spitz nevus is a benign lesion whose histologic features may mimic dermatofibroma, desmoplastic cellular blue nevus, metastatic carcinoma, and malignant melanoma. Immunohistochemical studies are helpful to differentiate these lesions. PMID:14746435

  1. Droplet organelles?

    PubMed

    Courchaine, Edward M; Lu, Alice; Neugebauer, Karla M

    2016-08-01

    Cells contain numerous, molecularly distinct cellular compartments that are not enclosed by lipid bilayers. These compartments are implicated in a wide range of cellular activities, and they have been variously described as bodies, granules, or organelles. Recent evidence suggests that a liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) process may drive their formation, possibly justifying the unifying term "droplet organelle". A veritable deluge of recent publications points to the importance of low-complexity proteins and RNA in determining the physical properties of phase-separated structures. Many of the proteins linked to such structures are implicated in human diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We provide an overview of the organizational principles that characterize putative "droplet organelles" in healthy and diseased cells, connecting protein biochemistry with cell physiology. PMID:27357569

  2. Juvenile Hyaline Fibromatosis: Impact of Periodontal Care on Quality of Life and a Patient Perspective.

    PubMed

    Yonel, Zehra; Parma, Sabrina; Chapple, Iain L C

    2015-09-01

    Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis (JHF) is a rare autosomal recessive inherited condition presenting early in life and characterized by the accumulation of hyaline-like tissue in the skin as well as various organs. Gingival overgrowth is a significant oral manifestation. This paper highlights how early and essential periodontal intervention may be necessary to improve mastication and subsequent weight gain, and to eliminate pain and improve the patient's quality of life. Here we highlight the key features of this condition and demonstrate how appropriate surgical management can have a significant impact on a patient's wellbeing. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis has a significant impact on patient wellbeing and it is therefore important that clinicians are able to recognize the condition and ensure that patients receive appropriate care and management. PMID:26630863

  3. Oral pulse or hyaline ring granuloma: A case report and a brief review

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Swetha; Hallikeri, Kaveri; Anehosur, Ventakesh; Okade, Akshatha

    2015-01-01

    Pulse or hyaline ring granulomas are rare but are well-defined oral and extraoral lesions due to implantation of the cellulose moiety of plant foods in contrast starch components. A unique form as reactive gingival growth showing histologic features of oral pulse or hyaline ring granuloma (OPHRG) which had resulted from implantation of food particles of plant or vegetable origin into the periodontium has been illustrated. Such a presentation is attributable to compromised periodontal health and poor oral hygiene favoring the implantation of food particles has been described here along with a literature update on OPHRG. PMID:26229277

  4. Quantitative assessment of hyaline cartilage elasticity during optical clearing using optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chih-Hao; Singh, Manmohan; Li, Jiasong; Han, Zhaolong; Wu, Chen; Wang, Shang; Idugboe, Rita; Raghunathan, Raksha; Zakharov, Valery P.; Sobol, Emil N.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Twa, Michael; Larin, Kirill V.

    2015-03-01

    We report the first study on using optical coherence elastography (OCE) to quantitatively monitor the elasticity change of the hyaline cartilage during the optical clearing administrated by glucose solution. The measurement of the elasticity is verified using uniaxial compression test, demonstrating the feasibility of using OCE to quantify the Young's modulus of the cartilage tissue. As the results, we found that the stiffness of the hyaline cartilage increases during the optical clearing of the tissue. This study might be potentially useful for the early detection of osteoarthritis disease.

  5. Storage, ultrastructural targeting and function of toposomes and hyalin in sea urchin embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gratwohl, E K; Kellenberger, E; Lorand, L; Noll, H

    1991-02-01

    This study compares by immunogold labeling the ultrastructural localization of a hexameric 22S glycoprotein, called toposome, with that of hyalin in unfertilized eggs and cells of hatched sea urchin blastulae. Nearly all hyalin is present in the electron translucent compartment of the cortical granules and in the translucent non-cortical pigment granules. In the blastula both of these intracellular stores have vanished and hyalin now forms a broad band below the apical lamina. By contrast, in the egg toposomes are present on the surface, as well as stored in yolk granules and in the electron dense lamellar compartment of the cortical granules. In the hatched blastula, toposomes that have been modified by limited proteolysis in the yolk granules, are associated with the plasma membranes of all newly formed cells, while the toposomes originating from the cortical granules have been incorporated as unmodified 160 kDa polypeptides into an extracellular double layer enveloping the embryo on the outside of the hyaline layer. From evidence discussed in detail, we conclude that the extracellular toposomes rivet the apical lamina to the surface and underlying cytoskeleton of the microvilli, while the modified toposomes from the yolk granules are responsible for position specific intercellular adhesion as they are released to the surface of newly formed cells. We propose that all the material stored in yolk granules is utilized for the assembly of new membranes. PMID:1709570

  6. Feline ischemic myelopathy and encephalopathy secondary to hyaline arteriopathy in five cats.

    PubMed

    Rylander, Helena; Eminaga, Salih; Palus, Viktor; Steinberg, Howard; Caine, Abby; Summers, Brian A; Gehrke, Joshua; West, Chad; Fox, Philip R; Donovan, Taryn; Cherubini, Giunio Bruto

    2014-10-01

    Five cats presented with acute-onset neurological signs. Magnetic resonance imaging in four cats showed a T2-weighted hyperintense spinal cord lesion that was mildly contrast-enhancing in three cats. Owing to inflammatory cerebrospinal fluid changes three cats were treated with immunosuppression. One cat was treated with antibiotics. All cats improved initially, but were eventually euthanased owing to the recurrence of neurological signs. Histopathology in all cats showed hyaline degeneration of the ventral spinal artery, basilar artery or associated branches with aneurysmal dilation, thrombosis and ischemic degeneration and necrosis of the spinal cord and brain. Two cats also had similar vascular changes in meningeal vessels. Vascular hyaline degeneration resulting in vascular aneurysmal dilation and thrombosis should be a differential diagnosis in cats presenting with acute central nervous system signs. PMID:24518252

  7. Prevention of hyaline membrane disease in premature lambs by apneic oxygenation and extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal.

    PubMed

    Pesenti, A; Kolobow, T; Buckhold, D K; Pierce, J E; Huang, H; Chen, V

    1982-01-01

    Hyaline membrane disease is found only in lungs where pulmonary ventilation has been established, i.e. after birth. We delivered eleven fetal lambs of a gestational age of 128-130 days but instead kept their lungs in total apnea and inflated to constant pressure, while removing all metabolically produced carbon dioxide with an extracorporeal membrane lung. Oxygen was provided by the membrane lung, and by apneic oxygenation through the natural lungs. Hence, arterial blood gases remained always normal, without any pulmonary ventilation. After 6-66 h the lungs had sufficiently cleared to allow normal mechanical pulmonary ventilation in 10 our of 11 lambs so treated. In a control group treated with mechanical ventilation alone, five of seven lambs died within the first 24 h of severe hyaline membrane disease. PMID:6799556

  8. Effect of Alterations in Mechanical Ventilator Settings on Pulmonary Gas Exchange in Hyaline Membrane Disease

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, E. O. R.

    1971-01-01

    The effect of altering peak airway pressure, respiratory frequency, and inspiration: expiration ratio on arterial blood gas tensions, blood pressure, and calculated right-to-left shunt was investigated in 6 infants undergoing mechanical ventilation for hyaline membrane disease with a Bennet ventilator. The use of a very long inspiratory phase resulted in a large increase in Pao2 and fall in right-to-left shunt without affecting mean arterial blood pressure. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 4 PMID:5576023

  9. Pathological characterization of astrocytic hyaline inclusions in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, S.; Hayashi, H.; Nakashima, K.; Nanba, E.; Kato, M.; Hirano, A.; Nakano, I.; Asayama, K.; Ohama, E.

    1997-01-01

    To clarify the pathological characteristics of astrocytic hyaline inclusions (Ast-HIs) in patients with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS) with neuronal Lewy-body-like hyaline inclusions (LBHIs), eight autopsies on members of four different families, including two long-term surviving patients with clinical courses of over 10 years, were analyzed. Ast-HIs were found only in the two long-term surviving patients who belonged to different families and to different races. Ast-HIs were ultrastructurally composed of 15- to 25-nm granule-coated fibrils that had immunoreactivities to superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and ubiquitin. Approximately 50% of the Ast-HIs expressed alpha B-crystallin, metallothionein, glutamine synthetase, and tubulin (alpha and beta) at various intensities. Some Ast-HIs reacted with antibodies to tau protein, S-100 protein, and heat shock protein 27. The Ast-HIs were not stained for glial fibrillary acidic protein. Our results suggest a cooperative role of superoxide dismutase 1, ubiquitin, and cytoskeletal proteins in the formation of granule-coated fibrils (namely, Ast-HIs) and provide evidence that Ast-HIs are formed in certain long-surviving familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients with neuronal Lewy-body-like hyaline inclusions. Images Figure 2 p615-a Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9273821

  10. [Trabecular hyalinizing adenoma of the thyroid (HAT): A report of two cases].

    PubMed

    Román-González, Alejandro; Simón-Duque, Carlos; Camilo-Pérez, Juan; Vélez-Hoyo, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    The hyalinizing trabecular adenoma is a rare lesion of the thyroid. There is controversy in the literature about the correct name for this disease. Dr. Carney defended the benign nature of this condition and therefore continues calling it adenoma, the World Health Organization calls for the potential of tumor malignancy, and others qualify it as a variant of papillary carcinoma based on the presence of rearranged in transformation/papillary thyroid carcinoma (RET/PTC) rearrangements. In Latin America there are few reported cases. Two cases of hyalinizing trabecular adenoma are reported. The first is a 40-year-old woman with a thyroid nodule of 3x3 cm. The immunohistochemistry was positive for thyroglobulin and calcitonin and negative for cytokeratin 19 and chromogranin. The second case is a 36-year-old patient with a thyroid nodule of 4x4 cm with an immunohistochemical pattern identical to the first case. Trabecular hyalinizing adenoma is a benign disease, easily confused with papillary or medullary thyroid carcinoma. Awareness of this entity will allow a better classification and management of thyroid conditions. PMID:26927651

  11. A new droplet generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slack, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    A new droplet generator is described. A loud speaker driven extractor needle was immersed in a pendant drop. Pulsing the speaker extracted the needle forming a fluid ligament which will decay into a droplet. The droplets were sized by stroboscopic photographs. The droplet's size was changed by varying the amplitude of the speaker pulses and the extractor needle diameter. The mechanism of droplet formation is discussed and photographs of ligament decay are presented. The droplet generator worked well on both oil and water based pesticide formulations. Current applications and results are discussed.

  12. A new droplet generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slack, W. E.

    1982-03-01

    A new droplet generator is described. A loud speaker driven extractor needle was immersed in a pendant drop. Pulsing the speaker extracted the needle forming a fluid ligament which will decay into a droplet. The droplets were sized by stroboscopic photographs. The droplet's size was changed by varying the amplitude of the speaker pulses and the extractor needle diameter. The mechanism of droplet formation is discussed and photographs of ligament decay are presented. The droplet generator worked well on both oil and water based pesticide formulations. Current applications and results are discussed.

  13. Chemical structure-related mechanisms underlying in vivo genotoxicity induced by nitrofurantoin and its constituent moieties in gpt delta rats.

    PubMed

    Kijima, Aki; Ishii, Yuji; Takasu, Shinji; Matsushita, Kohei; Kuroda, Ken; Hibi, Daisuke; Suzuki, Yuta; Nohmi, Takehiko; Umemura, Takashi

    2015-05-01

    Nitrofurans are antimicrobial compounds containing a nitro group at the 5-position of the furan ring and an amine or hydrazide side chain derivative. One member of the nitrofurans, nitrofurantoin (NFT), is a renal carcinogen in male rats despite its still controversial genotoxicity. We investigated chemical structure-related modes of action of NFT, and reporter gene mutation assays for NFT and its constituent moieties were performed. NFT, 5-nitro-2-furaldehyde (NFA), or 1-aminohydantoin (AHD) was administered to male F344 gpt delta rats by gavage for 4 or 13 weeks at a carcinogenic or the maximum tolerated dose. NFT caused a significant increase in gpt mutant frequency (MF) at 13 weeks with G-base substitution mutations. An increase in gpt MF was also observed in the NFA-treated group at 13 weeks, but not in the AHD-treated group. 8-Hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels in the kidney DNA of NFT-treated rats were significantly increased after 4 weeks. NFT caused accumulation of hyaline droplets indicated by positive immunostaining and western blot analysis for α2u-globulin in the proximal tubules. An additional study, in which female gpt delta rats were given NFT at the same dose used for males, was performed to mitigate the effect of α2u-globulin. NFT exerted the same effects on female rat kidneys to the same extent as males in terms of gpt MF and 8-OHdG level. Thus, it is highly probable that the structure of the nitro furan plays a key role in NFT-induced genotoxicity and genotoxic mechanisms including oxidative DNA damage are involved in NFT-induced renal carcinogenesis. α2u-globulin-mediated nephropathy may be a prerequisite for NFT-induced renal carcinogenesis in male rats, and additionally NFT could be a latent carcinogen in female rats and other animal species. PMID:25772432

  14. Effects of three hydrocarbons on the histologic structure of male rat kidneys. Final report, 1 July 1993-30 June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Eurell, T.E.

    1994-08-31

    Using a lysosome specific, acid phosphatase stain developed by our research team, F344 and NBR male rats were found to respond to decalin, JP-4 and JP-8 exposure. Hydrocarbon-induced renal tubular lysosomal alterations were more closely related to the length of exposure rather than the strain of experimental animal. The NBR rats (extended exposure) had significantly enlarged lysosomes that would often be located in the basal aspect of the renal tubular epithelial cell in a manner similar to the characteristic F344 male rat response, whereas, the F344 rats (short exposure) showed groups of perinuclear lysosomal aggregates in a manner similar to the characteristic NBR male rat response. This effect could not be detected using, HE, LMBBF, and MH stains. This finding is important in regards to the controversy of alpha 2U-globulin's association with hyaline droplet nephropathy because: (1) the NBR rat demonstrates significant lysosomal alterations following extended hydrocarbon exposure in the presence of negligible concentrations of androgen-dependent alpha 2U-globulin and (2) the F344 rat demonstrates minimal lysosomal alteration following short hydrocarbon exposure in the presence of high concentrations of androgen-dependent alpha 2U-globulin. Immunohistochemical studies of renal tubular epithelial cells from NBR and F344 male rats exposed to decalin. JP-4 and JP-8 revealed that the microtubules of the cytoskeleton form a characteristic aggregate pattern in the apical portion of the cell in association with hydrocarbon-induced lysosomal alterations. The nephrotoxic effect of decalin, JP-4 and JP-8 appeared to be equivalent as judged by renal tubular lysosomal and cytoskeletal alterations.

  15. [The foreign particles injection induces stable hyaline cells differentiation in the hemolymph of the blowfly Calliphora vicina larvae].

    PubMed

    Kind, T V

    2008-01-01

    The stable hyaline cells (thrombocytoids precursors) are prevailing haemocytes type in young larvae of Calliphora vicina. Their concentration decreased significantly during the crop emptying and became completely absent in wandering larvae. However, the injection of foreign particles into the haemocoel induced evident increase in the number of stable hyaline cells by means of transformation from prohaemocytes within 24 h after the treatment. Maximum of hyaline cells concentration is achieved on the 2-3 day when the part of them starts to transform into prothrombocytoids. Injection of both abiotic (charcoal) and biotic (human erythrocytes) foreign particles exerts an identical effect. Puncture of the body wall, bacterial immunization and injection of saline did not induce hyaline cells appearance. In crop emptying larvae, the stable hyaline cells originate within the clusters of undifferentiated steam cells, i. e. prohaemocytes. After the completion of crop emptying in wandering and diapausing larvae, preliminary dedifferentiation of very young plasmatocytes may be also observed. It is suggested that specification of the stable hyaline cells is induced by thrombocytoids after engulfing of the injected foreign particles and forming of their agglutinates. PMID:18959187

  16. Mechanisms of droplet combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Law, C. K.

    1982-01-01

    The fundamental physico-chemical mechanisms governing droplet vaporization and combustion are discussed. Specific topics include governing equations and simplifications, the classical d(2)-Law solution and its subsequent modification, finite-rate kinetics and the flame structure, droplet dynamics, near- and super-critical combustion, combustion of multicomponent fuel blends/emulsions/suspensions, and droplet interaction. Potential research topics are suggested.

  17. Arabinogalactan protein-rich cell walls, paramural deposits and ergastic globules define the hyaline bodies of rhinanthoid Orobanchaceae haustoria

    PubMed Central

    Pielach, Anna; Leroux, Olivier; Domozych, David S.; Knox, J. Paul; Popper, Zoë A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Parasitic plants obtain nutrients from their hosts through organs called haustoria. The hyaline body is a specialized parenchymatous tissue occupying the central parts of haustoria in many Orobanchaceae species. The structure and functions of hyaline bodies are poorly understood despite their apparent necessity for the proper functioning of haustoria. Reported here is a cell wall-focused immunohistochemical study of the hyaline bodies of three species from the ecologically important clade of rhinanthoid Orobanchaceae. Methods Haustoria collected from laboratory-grown and field-collected plants of Rhinanthus minor, Odontites vernus and Melampyrum pratense attached to various hosts were immunolabelled for cell wall matrix glycans and glycoproteins using specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Key Results Hyaline body cell wall architecture differed from that of the surrounding parenchyma in all species investigated. Enrichment in arabinogalactan protein (AGP) epitopes labelled with mAbs LM2, JIM8, JIM13, JIM14 and CCRC-M7 was prominent and coincided with reduced labelling of de-esterified homogalacturonan with mAbs JIM5, LM18 and LM19. Furthermore, paramural bodies, intercellular deposits and globular ergastic bodies composed of pectins, xyloglucans, extensins and AGPs were common. In Rhinanthus they were particularly abundant in pairings with legume hosts. Hyaline body cells were not in direct contact with haustorial xylem, which was surrounded by a single layer of paratracheal parenchyma with thickened cell walls abutting the xylem. Conclusions The distinctive anatomy and cell wall architecture indicate hyaline body specialization. Altered proportions of AGPs and pectins may affect the mechanical properties of hyaline body cell walls. This and the association with a transfer-like type of paratracheal parenchyma suggest a role in nutrient translocation. Organelle-rich protoplasts and the presence of exceptionally profuse intra- and intercellular

  18. Patterning droplets with durotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Style, Robert W.; Che, Yonglu; Park, Su Ji; Weon, Byung Mook; Je, Jung Ho; Hyland, Callen; German, Guy K.; Power, Michael P.; Wilen, Larry A.; Wettlaufer, John S.; Dufresne, Eric R.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous cell types have shown a remarkable ability to detect and move along gradients in stiffness of an underlying substrate—a process known as durotaxis. The mechanisms underlying durotaxis are still unresolved, but generally believed to involve active sensing and locomotion. Here, we show that simple liquid droplets also undergo durotaxis. By modulating substrate stiffness, we obtain fine control of droplet position on soft, flat substrates. Unlike other control mechanisms, droplet durotaxis works without imposing chemical, thermal, electrical, or topographical gradients. We show that droplet durotaxis can be used to create large-scale droplet patterns and is potentially useful for many applications, such as microfluidics, thermal control, and microfabrication. PMID:23798415

  19. Distribution of cell wall components in Sphagnum hyaline cells and in liverwort and hornwort elaters.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Celeste; Pettolino, Filomena; Bacic, Antony; Drinnan, Andrew

    2004-10-01

    Spiral secondary walls are found in hyaline cells of Sphagnum, in the elaters of most liverworts, and in elaters of the hornwort Megaceros. Recent studies on these cells suggest that cytoskeletal and ultrastructural processes involved in cell differentiation and secondary wall formation are similar in bryophytes and vascular plant tracheary elements. To examine differences in wall structure, primary and secondary wall constituents of the hyaline cells of Sphagnum novo-zelandicum and elaters of the liverwort Radula buccinifera and the hornwort Megaceros gracilis were analyzed by immunohistochemical and chemical methods. Anti-arabinogalactan-protein antibodies, JIM8 and JIM13, labeled the central fibrillar secondary wall layer of Megaceros elaters and the walls of Sphagnum leaf cells, but did not label the walls of Radula elaters. The CCRC-M7 antibody, which detects an arabinosylated (1-->6)-linked beta-galactan epitope, exclusively labeled hyaline cells in Sphagnum leaves and the secondary walls of Radula elaters. Anti-pectin antibodies, LM5 and JIM5, labeled the primary wall in Megaceros elaters. LM5 also labeled the central layer of the secondary wall but only during formation. In Radula elaters, JIM5 and another anti-pectin antibody, JIM7, labeled the primary wall. The distribution of arabinogalactan-proteins and pectic polysaccharides restricted to specific wall types and stages of development provides evidence for the developmental and functional regulation of cell wall composition in bryophytes. Monosaccharide-linkage analysis of Sphagnum leaf cell walls suggests they contain polysaccharides similar to those of higher plants. The most abundant linkage was 4-Glc, typical of cellulose, but there was also evidence for xyloglucans, 4-linked mannans, 4-linked xylans and rhamnogalacturonan-type polysaccharides. PMID:15290291

  20. Developments in dynamic MR elastography for in vitro biomechanical assessment of hyaline cartilage under high-frequency cyclical shear.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Orlando; Amrami, Kimberly K; Manduca, Armando; Rossman, Phillip J; Ehman, Richard L

    2007-02-01

    The design, construction, and evaluation of a customized dynamic magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) technique for biomechanical assessment of hyaline cartilage in vitro are described. For quantification of the dynamic shear properties of hyaline cartilage by dynamic MRE, mechanical excitation and motion sensitization were performed at frequencies in the kilohertz range. A custom electromechanical actuator and a z-axis gradient coil were used to generate and image shear waves throughout cartilage at 1000-10,000 Hz. A radiofrequency (RF) coil was also constructed for high-resolution imaging. The technique was validated at 4000 and 6000 Hz by quantifying differences in shear stiffness between soft ( approximately 200 kPa) and stiff ( approximately 300 kPa) layers of 5-mm-thick bilayered phantoms. The technique was then used to quantify the dynamic shear properties of bovine and shark hyaline cartilage samples at frequencies up to 9000 Hz. The results demonstrate that one can obtain high-resolution shear stiffness measurements of hyaline cartilage and small, stiff, multilayered phantoms at high frequencies by generating robust mechanical excitations and using large magnetic field gradients. Dynamic MRE can potentially be used to directly quantify the dynamic shear properties of hyaline and articular cartilage, as well as other cartilaginous materials and engineered constructs. PMID:17260392

  1. Talocalcaneal Joint Middle Facet Coalition Resection With Interposition of a Juvenile Hyaline Cartilage Graft.

    PubMed

    Tower, Dyane E; Wood, Ryan W; Vaardahl, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Talocalcaneal joint middle facet coalition is the most common tarsal coalition, occurring in ≤2% of the population. Fewer than 50% of involved feet obtain lasting relief of symptoms after nonoperative treatment, and surgical intervention is commonly used to relieve symptoms, increase the range of motion, improve function, reconstruct concomitant pes planovalgus, and prevent future arthrosis from occurring at the surrounding joints. Several approaches to surgical intervention are available for patients with middle facet coalitions, ranging from resection to hindfoot arthrodesis. We present a series of 4 cases, in 3 adolescent patients, of talocalcaneal joint middle facet coalition resection with interposition of a particulate juvenile hyaline cartilaginous allograft (DeNovo(®) NT Natural Tissue Graft, Zimmer, Inc., Warsaw, IN). With a mean follow-up period of 42.8 ± 2.9 (range 41 to 47) months, the 3 adolescent patients in the present series were doing well with improved subtalar joint motion and decreased pain, and 1 foot showed no bony regrowth on a follow-up computed tomography scan. The use of a particulate juvenile hyaline cartilaginous allograft as interposition material after talocalcaneal middle facet coalition resection combined with adjunct procedures to address concomitant pes planovalgus resulted in good short-term outcomes in 4 feet in 3 adolescent patients. PMID:25922335

  2. How coalescing droplets jump.

    PubMed

    Enright, Ryan; Miljkovic, Nenad; Sprittles, James; Nolan, Kevin; Mitchell, Robert; Wang, Evelyn N

    2014-10-28

    Surface engineering at the nanoscale is a rapidly developing field that promises to impact a range of applications including energy production, water desalination, self-cleaning and anti-icing surfaces, thermal management of electronics, microfluidic platforms, and environmental pollution control. As the area advances, more detailed insights of dynamic wetting interactions on these surfaces are needed. In particular, the coalescence of two or more droplets on ultra-low adhesion surfaces leads to droplet jumping. Here we show, through detailed measurements of jumping droplets during water condensation coupled with numerical simulations of binary droplet coalescence, that this process is fundamentally inefficient with only a small fraction of the available excess surface energy (≲ 6%) convertible into translational kinetic energy. These findings clarify the role of internal fluid dynamics during the jumping droplet coalescence process and underpin the development of systems that can harness jumping droplets for a wide range of applications. PMID:25171210

  3. Droplet transport system and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neitzel, G. Paul (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Embodiments of droplet transport systems and methods are disclosed for levitating and transporting single or encapsulated droplets using thermocapillary convection. One method embodiment, among others comprises providing a droplet of a first liquid; and applying thermocapillary convection to the droplet to levitate and move the droplet.

  4. Water droplets also swim!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Linden, Marjolein; Izri, Ziane; Michelin, Sébastien; Dauchot, Olivier

    2015-03-01

    Recently there has been a surge of interest in producing artificial swimmers. One possible path is to produce self-propelling droplets in a liquid phase. The self-propulsion often relies on complex mechanisms at the droplet interface, involving chemical reactions and the adsorption-desorption kinetics of the surfactant. Here, we report the spontaneous swimming of droplets in a very simple system: water droplets immersed in an oil-surfactant medium. The swimmers consist of pure water, with no additional chemical species inside: water droplets also swim! The swimming is very robust: the droplets are able to transport cargo such as large colloids, salt crystals, and even cells. In this talk we discuss the origin of the spontaneous motion. Water from the droplet is solubilized by the reverse micellar solution, creating a concentration gradient of swollen reverse micelles around each droplet. By generalizing a recently proposed instability mechanism, we explain how spontaneous motion emerges in this system at sufficiently large Péclet number. Our water droplets in an oil-surfactant medium constitute the first experimental realization of spontaneous motion of isotropic particles driven by this instability mechanism.

  5. Photopolymerization Of Levitated Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan; Rhim, Won-Kyu; Hyson, Michael T.; Chang, Manchium

    1989-01-01

    Experimental containerless process combines two established techniques to make variety of polymeric microspheres. In single step, electrostatically-levitated monomer droplets polymerized by ultraviolet light. Faster than multiple-step emulsion polymerization process used to make microspheres. Droplets suspended in cylindrical quadrupole electrostatic levitator. Alternating electrostatic field produces dynamic potential along axis. Process enables tailoring of microspheres for medical, scientific, and industrial applications.

  6. Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggard, John B., Jr.; Nayagan, Vedha; Dryer, Frederick L.; Williams, Forman A.

    1998-01-01

    The first space-based experiments were performed on the combustion of free, individual liquid fuel droplets in oxidizing atmospheres. The fuel was heptane, with initial droplet diameters ranging about from 1 mm to 4 mm. The atmospheres were mixtures of helium and oxygen, at pressures of 1.00, 0.50 and 0.25 bar, with oxygen mole fractions between 20% and 40%, as well as normal Spacelab cabin air. The temperatures of the atmospheres and of the initial liquid fuel were nominally 300 K. A total of 44 droplets were burned successfully on the two flights, 8 on the shortened STS-83 mission and 36 on STS-94. The results spanned the full range of heptane droplet combustion behavior, from radiative flame extinction at larger droplet diameters in the more dilute atmospheres to diffusive extinction in the less dilute atmospheres, with the droplet disappearing prior to flame extinction at the highest oxygen concentrations. Quasisteady histories of droplet diameters were observed along with unsteady histories of flame diameters. New and detailed information was obtained on burning rates, flame characteristics and soot behavior. The results have motivated new computational and theoretical investigations of droplet combustion, improving knowledge of the chemical kinetics, fluid mechanics and heat and mass transfer processes involved in burning liquid fuels.

  7. Liquid droplet generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muntz, E. P.; Orme, Melissa; Farnham, Tony; Vandiep, G. Pham; Huerre, P.

    1989-01-01

    A pre-prototype segment of a droplet sheet generator for a liquid droplet radiator was designed, constructed and tested. The ability to achieve a uniform, non-diverging droplet sheet is limited by manufacturing tolerances on nozzle parallelism. For an array of 100, 100 micrometer diameters nozzles spaced 5 stream diameters apart, typical standard deviations in stream alignment were plus or minus 10 mrad. The drop to drop fractional speed variations of the drops in typical streams were similar and independent of position in the array. The absolute value of the speed dispersion depended on the amplitude of the disturbance applied to the stream. A second generation preliminary design of a 5200 stream segment of a droplet sheet generator was completed. The design is based on information developed during testing of the pre-prototype segment, along with the results of an acoustical analysis for the stagnation cavity pressure fluctuations used to break-up the streams into droplets.

  8. Universal fluid droplet ejector

    DOEpatents

    Lee, E.R.; Perl, M.L.

    1999-08-24

    A droplet generator comprises a fluid reservoir having a side wall made of glass or quartz, and an end cap made from a silicon plate. The end cap contains a micromachined aperture through which the fluid is ejected. The side wall is thermally fused to the end cap, and no adhesive is necessary. This means that the fluid only comes into contact with the side wall and the end cap, both of which are chemically inert. Amplitudes of drive pulses received by reservoir determine the horizontal displacements of droplets relative to the ejection aperture. The drive pulses are varied such that the dropper generates a two-dimensional array of vertically-falling droplets. Vertical and horizontal inter-droplet spacings may be varied in real time. Applications include droplet analysis experiments such as Millikan fractional charge searches and aerosol characterization, as well as material deposition applications. 8 figs.

  9. Vaporization of Deforming Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanxing; Chen, Xiaodong; Ma, Dongjun; Yang, Vigor

    2012-11-01

    Droplet deformation is one of the most important factors influencing the evaporation rate. In the present study, high-fidelity numerical simulations of single evaporating droplets with deformation are carried out over a wide range of the Reynolds and Weber numbers. The formulation is based on a complete set of conservation equations for both the liquid and surrounding gas phases. A modified volume-of-fluid (VOF) technique that takes into account heat and mass transfer is used to track the behavior of the liquid/gas interface. Special attention is given to the property conservation, which can be realized by using an iterative algorithm that enforces a divergence constraint in cells containing the interface. The effect of the ambient flow on droplet dynamics and evaporation are investigated systematically. Various underlying mechanisms dictating the droplet characteristics in different deformation regimes are identified. Correlations for the droplet evaporation rate are established in terms of the Reynolds and Weber numbers.

  10. Change in the optical properties of hyaline cartilage heated by the near-IR laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bagratashvili, Viktor N; Bagratashvili, N V; Omel'chenko, A I; Sviridov, A P; Sobol', E N; Tsypina, S I; Gapontsev, V P; Minaev, V P; Samartsev, I E; Makhmutova, G Sh

    2001-06-30

    The in vitro dynamics of the change in optical properties of hyaline cartilage heated by fibre lasers at wavelengths 0.97 and 1.56 {mu}m is studied. The laser-induced bleaching (at 1.56 {mu}m) and darkening (at 0.97 {mu}m) of the cartilage, caused by the heating and transport of water as well as by a change in the cartilage matrix, were observed and studied. These effects should be taken into account while estimating the depth of heating of the tissue. The investigated dynamics of light scattering in the cartilage allows one to choose the optimum radiation dose for laser plastic surgery of cartilage tissues. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  11. Cellular responses of embryonic hyaline cartilage to experimental wounding in vitro.

    PubMed

    Walker, E A; Verner, A; Flannery, C R; Archer, C W

    2000-01-01

    It is well established that the reparative potential of many tissues is greatest during embryonic development. Despite the extensive literature documenting repair in nonembryonic cartilage models, there is no comparable wealth of experience relating to embryonic cartilage repair. With the embryonic chick sternum as a model of hyaline cartilage, this paper accounts cellular responses and alterations in extracellular matrix composition in response to experimental wounding in vitro. Creation of an experimental lesion induced a rapid (<20 minutes) apoptotic response in chondrocytes adjacent to the lesion edge; the presence of perichondrium delayed this response. Alterations in the extracellular matrix included immediate mechanical damage to type-II collagen fibrils and an increase in the expression of chondroitin-4 sulphate next to the lesion. Creation of the lesion induced an increased proliferative response in chondrocytes behind the zone of apoptosis and the expression of alpha5 and alpha6 integrin subunits. PMID:10716275

  12. Hyaline Articular Matrix Formed by Dynamic Self-Regenerating Cartilage and Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Meppelink, Amanda M; Zhao, Xing; Griffin, Darvin J; Erali, Richard; Gill, Thomas J; Bonassar, Lawrence J; Redmond, Robert W; Randolph, Mark A

    2016-07-01

    Injuries to the articular cartilage surface are challenging to repair because cartilage possesses a limited capacity for self-repair. The outcomes of current clinical procedures aimed to address these injuries are inconsistent and unsatisfactory. We have developed a novel method for generating hyaline articular cartilage to improve the outcome of joint surface repair. A suspension of 10(7) swine chondrocytes was cultured under reciprocating motion for 14 days. The resulting dynamic self-regenerating cartilage (dSRC) was placed in a cartilage ring and capped with fibrin and collagen gel. A control group consisted of chondrocytes encapsulated in fibrin gel. Constructs were implanted subcutaneously in nude mice and harvested after 6 weeks. Gross, histological, immunohistochemical, biochemical, and biomechanical analyses were performed. In swine patellar groove, dSRC was implanted into osteochondral defects capped with collagen gel and compared to defects filled with osteochondral plugs, collagen gel, or left empty after 6 weeks. In mice, the fibrin- and collagen-capped dSRC constructs showed enhanced contiguous cartilage matrix formation over the control of cells encapsulated in fibrin gel. Biochemically, the fibrin and collagen gel dSRC groups were statistically improved in glycosaminoglycan and hydroxyproline content compared to the control. There was no statistical difference in the biomechanical data between the dSRC groups and the control. The swine model also showed contiguous cartilage matrix in the dSRC group but not in the collagen gel and empty defects. These data demonstrate the survivability and successful matrix formation of dSRC under the mechanical forces experienced by normal hyaline cartilage in the knee joint. The results from this study demonstrate that dSRC capped with hydrogels successfully engineers contiguous articular cartilage matrix in both nonload-bearing and load-bearing environments. PMID:27324118

  13. Autonomous droplet architectures.

    PubMed

    Jones, Gareth; King, Philip H; Morgan, Hywel; de Planque, Maurits R R; Zauner, Klaus-Peter

    2015-01-01

    The quintessential living element of all organisms is the cell-a fluid-filled compartment enclosed, but not isolated, by a layer of amphiphilic molecules that self-assemble at its boundary. Cells of different composition can aggregate and communicate through the exchange of molecules across their boundaries. The astounding success of this architecture is readily apparent throughout the biological world. Inspired by the versatility of nature's architecture, we investigate aggregates of membrane-enclosed droplets as a design concept for robotics. This will require droplets capable of sensing, information processing, and actuation. It will also require the integration of functionally specialized droplets into an interconnected functional unit. Based on results from the literature and from our own laboratory, we argue the viability of this approach. Sensing and information processing in droplets have been the subject of several recent studies, on which we draw. Integrating droplets into coherently acting units and the aspect of controlled actuation for locomotion have received less attention. This article describes experiments that address both of these challenges. Using lipid-coated droplets of Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction medium in oil, we show here that such droplets can be integrated and that chemically driven mechanical motion can be achieved. PMID:25622015

  14. Supercritical microgravity droplet vaporization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, J.; Curtis, E.; Farrell, P.

    1990-01-01

    Supercritical droplet vaporization is an important issue in many combustion systems, such as liquid fueled rockets and compression-ignition (diesel) engines. In order to study the details of droplet behavior at these conditions, an experiment was designed to provide a gas phase environment which is above the critical pressure and critical temperature of a single liquid droplet. In general, the droplet begins as a cold droplet in the hot, high pressure environment. In order to eliminate disruptions to the droplet by convective motion in the gas, forced and natural convection gas motion are required to be small. Implementation of this requirement for forced convection is straightforward, while reduction of natural convection is achieved by reduction in the g-level for the experiment. The resulting experiment consists of a rig which can stably position a droplet without restraint in a high-pressure, high temperature gas field in microgravity. The microgravity field is currently achieved by dropping the device in the NASA Lewis 2.2 second drop tower. The performance of the experimental device and results to date are presented.

  15. Reactive Leidenfrost droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raufaste, C.; Bouret, Y.; Celestini, F.

    2016-05-01

    We experimentally investigate the reactivity of Leidenfrost droplets with their supporting substrates. Several organic liquids are put into contact with a copper substrate heated above their Leidenfrost temperature. As the liquid evaporates, the gaseous flow cleans the superficial copper oxide formed at the substrate surface and the reaction maintains a native copper spot below the evaporating droplet. The copper spot can reach several times the droplet size for the most reactive organic compounds. This study shows an interesting coupling between the physics of the Leidenfrost effect and the mechanics of reactive flows. Different applications are proposed such as drop motion tracking and vapor flow monitoring.

  16. Active droplet generation in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Chong, Zhuang Zhi; Tan, Say Hwa; Gañán-Calvo, Alfonso M; Tor, Shu Beng; Loh, Ngiap Hiang; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-01-01

    The reliable generation of micron-sized droplets is an important process for various applications in droplet-based microfluidics. The generated droplets work as a self-contained reaction platform in droplet-based lab-on-a-chip systems. With the maturity of this platform technology, sophisticated and delicate control of the droplet generation process is needed to address increasingly complex applications. This review presents the state of the art of active droplet generation concepts, which are categorized according to the nature of the induced energy. At the liquid/liquid interface, an energy imbalance leads to instability and droplet breakup. PMID:26555381

  17. Bioprinting: Functional droplet networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durmus, Naside Gozde; Tasoglu, Savas; Demirci, Utkan

    2013-06-01

    Tissue-mimicking printed networks of droplets separated by lipid bilayers that can be functionalized with membrane proteins are able to spontaneously fold and transmit electrical currents along predefined paths.

  18. Universal fluid droplet ejector

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Eric R.; Perl, Martin L.

    1999-08-24

    A droplet generator comprises a fluid reservoir having a side wall made of glass or quartz, and an end cap made from a silicon plate. The end cap contains a micromachined aperture through which the fluid is ejected. The side wall is thermally fused to the end cap, and no adhesive is necessary. This means that the fluid only comes into contact with the side wall and the end cap, both of which are chemically inert. Amplitudes of drive pulses received by reservoir determine the horizontal displacements of droplets relative to the ejection aperture. The drive pulses are varied such that the dropper generates a two-dimensional array of vertically-falling droplets. Vertical and horizontal interdroplet spacings may be varied in real time. Applications include droplet analysis experiments such as Millikan fractional charge searches and aerosol characterization, as well as material deposition applications.

  19. Microscopic Rayleigh Droplet Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doak, R. B.

    2005-11-01

    A periodically triggered Rayleigh Droplet Beam (RDB) delivers a perfectly linear and periodic stream of identical, monoenergetic droplets that are phase-locked to the trigger signal. The droplet diameter and spacing are easily adjusted of choice of nozzle diameter and trigger frequency. Any liquid of low viscosity may be emloyed as the beam fluid. Although the field of nanofluidics is expanding rapidly, little effort has yet been devoted to ``external flows'' such as RDB's. At ASU we have generated RDB's of water and methanol down to 2 microns in droplet diameter. Nozzle clogging is the sole impediment to smaller droplets. Microscopic Rayleigh droplet beams offer tremendous potential for fundamental physical measurements, fluid dynamics research, and nanofabrication. This talk will describe the apparatus and techniques used at ASU to generate RDB's (surprisingly simple and inexpensive), discuss the triboelectric phenomena that play a role (surprisingly significant), present some initial experimental fluid dynamics measurements, and briefly survey RDB applications. Our particular interest in RDB's is as microscopic transport systems to deliver hydrated, undenatured proteins into vacuum for structure determination via serial diffraction of x-rays or electrons. This may offer the first general method for structure determination of non-crystallizable proteins.

  20. Functions of the Coacervate Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okihana, Hiroyuki; Ponnamperuma, Cyril

    1982-12-01

    Functions of coacervate droplets as protocells are studied by using synthetic polymers. The coacervate droplets were made from PVA-A and PVA-S. When glycine or diglycine were in the surrounding medium, the coacervate droplets concentrated them. The concentration of glycine in the coacervate droplets was higher than that of diglycine. When this mixture was irradiated by UV light, the coacervate droplets protected them from the photochemical decomposition.

  1. Fuel Droplet Burning During Droplet Combustion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Fuel ignites and burns in the Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE) on STS-94 on July 4 1997, MET:2/05:40 (approximate). The DCE was designed to investigate the fundamental combustion aspects of single, isolated droplets under different pressures and ambient oxygen concentrations for a range of droplet sizes varying between 2 and 5 mm. DCE used various fuels -- in drops ranging from 1 mm (0.04 inches) to 5 mm (0.2 inches) -- and mixtures of oxidizers and inert gases to learn more about the physics of combustion in the simplest burning configuration, a sphere. The experiment elapsed time is shown at the bottom of the composite image. The DCE principal investigator was Forman Williams, University of California, San Diego. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (1.4MB, 13-second MPEG, screen 320 x 240 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available)A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300168.html.

  2. Hyalinizing trabecular adenoma--a case report with FNAC histologic, MIB-1 proliferative index and immunohistochemical findings.

    PubMed

    Karak, A K; Sahoo, M; Bhatnagar, D

    1998-10-01

    Hyalinizing trabecular adenoma is a recently described benign thyroid tumor, almost exclusively occurring in females. The morphological features of this entity overlap with both papillary and medullary carcinoma to varying extent. This, in turn, creates a situation of serious diagnostic pitfall particularly for a false positive diagnosis of papillary carcinoma in fine needle aspiration (FNA) cytology. False consideration of medullary carcinoma is also possible by the unwary especially if staining for Congo red and/or immunostaining for calcitonin is not resorted to. At histologic level, the distinctive architectural pattern is however of great help and thus poses a much lesser danger of misdiagnosis. We relate here our experience in a recently encountered case of hyalinizing trabecular adenoma and describe detailed FNA cytologic and histologic findings along with immunohistochemical profile using a panel of eight monoclonal antibodies. The tumor proliferative potential has also been assessed using MIB-1 (Ki-67) immunostaining. The various pros and cons of diagnostic pitfalls are discussed. PMID:9866913

  3. High-frequency ventilation (HFV) in hyaline membrane disease--a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Pfenninger, J; Gerber, A C

    1987-01-01

    Eight premature babies affected by hyaline membrane disease and needing mechanical respiratory support were ventilated by means of a VDR 1 (Bird Space Technology) respirator at 10 Hz during a mean time of 51 h. Before HFV 7 infants had been on conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) and one on nasal CPAP. The values of mean airway pressure (MAP) and oxygenation index (PaO2/FIO2) on CMV and HFV were (mean and range): CMV: MAP 15 (4-29) mm Hg, ox. index 15.47 (5.07-23.19) kPa; HFV after 1 h: MAP 15 (10-19) mm Hg, ox. index 24.13 (9.07-46.12) kPa. Improved oxygenation allowed rapid reduction of FIO2 in the following hours. Only 3 infants were weaned directly from VDR 1, 5 were switched back to CMV mainly because of technical failures of the respirator. The change from HFV to CMV was associated with a fall of PaO2/FIO2 from 35.99 (15.86-74.52) to 22.39 (7.33-31.46) kPa. The mean time of artificial ventilation (CMV + HFV) was 121 h (range 46-166). Except for 1 pneumothorax no medical complications were seen during HFV, and all patients survived. Despite impressive improvements in oxygenation it is cautioned against the use of the VDR 1 because of the high incidence of technical problems. PMID:3558939

  4. Ultrastructural study of the hyaline layer of the starfish embryo, Pisaster ochraceus.

    PubMed

    Campbell, S S; Crawford, B J

    1991-09-01

    The hyaline layer (HL) is a multilayered extracellular matrix (ECM) that coats the external surfaces of sea urchin and starfish embryos. It is thought to protect and lubricate the embryo, stabilize the blastomeres during morphogenesis, and regulate nutrient intake. Ultrastructural studies of chemically fixed embryos have shown the HL to consist of two to four sublayers. However, since chemical fixatives may cause collapse and alter the positions and antigenicity of the extracellular components, fixation methods that exclude chemicals may reveal a picture of the HL closer to what is present in vivo. Freeze substitution, a fixation method whereby tissues are rapidly frozen and dehydrated at low temperatures, has proved useful for fixing material rich in ECM. In this study, embryos of the starfish Pisaster ochraceus were fixed for microscopy using freeze substitution and three chemical methods in order to determine, as accurately as possible, the structure of the HL. Embryos appear to be best preserved by freeze substitution and demonstrate a HL consisting of at least six distinct sublayers. Based on staining with anionic dyes, most sublayers appear to contain glycosaminoglycans. Freeze substituted embryos, which were also stained with monoclonal antibodies raised against their ECM, revealed that some molecules are common to all six sublayers, whereas other molecules may be restricted to specific sublayers. This suggests that each sublayer could have a different function. Additional evidence suggests that microvillus associated bodies, present in other marine invertebrate embryos, may anchor the asteroid HL to the cell surface microvilli. PMID:1721506

  5. Dysplastic follicular dendritic cells in hyaline-vascular Castleman disease: a rare occurrence creating diagnostic difficulty.

    PubMed

    Medina, Edward A; Fuehrer, Neil E; Miller, Frank R; Kinney, Marsha C; Higgins, Russell A

    2016-09-01

    Follicular dendritic cell (FDC) proliferations and dysplastic FDCs can be seen in Hyaline-vascular Castleman disease (HVCD). The association between HVCD and FDC sarcoma is well-documented; dysplastic FDCs may be precursors to FDC sarcoma. Herein, we describe a case of HVCD with strikingly large and dysplastic FDCs, which raised the differential of Hodgkin lymphoma and other neoplasms. Scattered dysplastic FDCs were predominantly in germinal centers and mantle zones, and rarely in interfollicular areas. Although occasional germinal centers contained increased FDCs, no mass forming proliferations were present to suggest FDC sarcoma. Immunostaining demonstrated that the atypical FDCs expressed CD21, clusterin and CXCL13, but not CD23, S100, pankeratin or CD30; they aberrantly expressed epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The present case demonstrates that dysplastic FDCs may be present as isolated cells that require immunophenotyping to distinguish them from malignant entities with similar morphologic features. A variety of FDC markers is required to confirm their origin as the expression of any single marker is not assured, as occurred in this case. Pathologists need be aware of FDC proliferations in HVCD because of their association with FDC sarcoma. Aberrant EGFR expression by dysplastic FDCs may indicate that they are pre-neoplastic and necessitate long-term patient follow-up. PMID:27593552

  6. Low temperature scanning electron microscopy of dog and guinea-pig hyaline articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, D L; O'Connor, P; Oates, K

    1981-01-01

    Fifty seven blocks of cartilage excised from the femoral condyles of 20 beagle dogs, and whole lower ends of 5 guinea-pig femora, were examined at -195 degrees (78 K), by scanning electron microscopy. The unfixed tissue, taken into slushy nitrogen at -210 degrees (63 K), was not exposed to atmospheric air after quenching and remained fully hydrated throughout long periods of observation. Images susceptible to analysis were obtained from washed and from unwashed cartilage surfaces. Preliminary coating with gold or with aluminium, known to be possible without exposing cold cartilage surfaces to changes in temperature likely to cause water loss by sublimation, was valuable in minimising charging and in facilitating the recording of electron images at higher magnifications. Although examination was possible without coating, the resultant images were of low resolution. Microscopy revealed a pattern of secondary surface irregularities of tertiary elevations closely resembling those seen by the conventional scanning electron microscopy of fixed, dehydrated hyaline cartilage. However, the pattern of tertiary surface structures was predominantly that of elevations, not of hollows. Quaternary surface ridges were common on the surfaces of excised dog cartilage blocks and were not seen on the surfaces of guinea-pig cartilage which remained on the femoral condyles. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 PMID:7024225

  7. Hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma with EWSR1-ATF1 fusion gene: report of three cases with molecular analyses.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Takafumi; Yamamoto, Hidetaka; Nishijima, Toshimitsu; Tamiya, Sadafumi; Shiratsuchi, Hideki; Nakashima, Torahiko; Komune, Shizuo; Oda, Yoshinao

    2015-01-01

    Hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma (HCCC) is a low-grade salivary gland carcinoma characterized by clear cells and hyalinized stroma. Recently, the EWSR1-ATF1 fusion gene was found in HCCCs. We herein describe three cases of HCCC identified in one male and two females, ranging in age from 27 to 67 years. The tumors were located in the root of tongue, nasopharynx, and soft palate. They were composed of nested or cord-like proliferations of epithelial cells with clear to pale eosinophilic cytoplasm, embedded in hyalinized and focally fibroedematous stroma. Tumor-associated lymphoid proliferation and pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia were also observed in each one case. MAML2 fusions specific to mucoepidermoid carcinoma were not detected in any of the three cases. We found EWSR1-ATF1 in two of three HCCCs using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with our original primer sets designed to detect the fusion gene transcripts in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. EWSR1 rearrangement was also confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on FFPE sections in two cases. There was a good concordance between the two methods (two positive cases and one negative case by both RT-PCR and FISH). Therefore, RT-PCR and FISH using FFPE tissue may be ancillary tools to confirm the diagnosis of HCCC. PMID:25359601

  8. Hydrodynamics of a quark droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjerrum-Bohr, Johan J.; Mishustin, Igor N.; Døssing, Thomas

    2012-05-01

    We present a simple model of a multi-quark droplet evolution based on the hydrodynamical description. This model includes collective expansion of the droplet, effects of the vacuum pressure and surface tension. The hadron emission from the droplet is described following Weisskopf's statistical model. We have considered evolution of baryon-free droplets which have different initial temperatures and expansion rates. As a typical trend we observe an oscillating behavior of the droplet radius superimposed with a gradual shrinkage due to the hadron emission. The characteristic life time of droplets with radii 1.5-2 fm are about 9-16 fm/c.

  9. Droplet lasing spectroscopy applied to droplet stream flames

    SciTech Connect

    Santangelo, P.J.; Kennedy, I.M.

    1999-04-01

    Droplet lasing spectroscopy (DLS) has been applied to the measurement of droplet size and vaporization rates in both reacting and non-reacting rectilinear droplet streams. A Berglund-Liu droplet generator was used to generate a stream of droplets, approximately 63 microns in diameter and 6.5 droplet diameters apart. Ethanol, methanol, and a pentane/ethanol mixture were doped with Rhodamine 6G. Lasing spectra were examined in the steady-state combustion regime. In the pentane/ethanol case the measurements were carried out in a sooting region of the flame. In some cases, vaporization rates were high enough to measure the rate from consecutive droplets, yielding a quasi-instantaneous measurement. In all cases, the D{sup 2} law of droplet vaporization was evident. In addition, photographs of the flames yielded measurements of flame height and thickness.

  10. Droplet Combustion Experiment movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE) was designed to investigate the fundamental combustion aspects of single, isolated droplets under different pressures and ambient oxygen concentrations for a range of droplet sizes varying between 2 and 5 mm. The DCE principal investigator was Forman Williams, University of California, San Diego. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 mission (STS-83, April 4-8 1997; the shortened mission was reflown as MSL-1R on STS-94). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (1.1 MB, 12-second MPEG, screen 320 x 240 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available)A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300164.html.

  11. Chip-based droplet sorting

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Lee, Abraham; Hatch, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    A non-contact system for sorting monodisperse water-in-oil emulsion droplets in a microfluidic device based on the droplet's contents and their interaction with an applied electromagnetic field or by identification and sorting.

  12. Composition of proteoglycan fragments from hyaline cartilage produced by granulocytes in a model of frustrated phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Liszt, F; Schnittker-Schulze, K; Stuhlsatz, H W; Greiling, H

    1991-02-01

    An in vitro model of frustrated phagocytosis was developed in which granulocytes interact with well-defined slices of hyaline cartilage. The composition of the purified proteoglycan fragments released from the cartilage slices by N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine-stimulated granulocytes was studied after 30, 60 and 90 min incubation time. It was shown that the proteoglycan fragments do not change their composition during incubation. The only change observed during incubation was an increase in the quantity of the fragments. The protein content of the proteoglycan fragments is 7.0-8.6%, corresponding to a peptide chain of 24-28 amino acids, and the relative molecular mass of the total fragment is Mr = 37,600-39,200. On average, each proteoglycan fragment contains two chondroitin sulphate chains (Mr = 22,000-22,400), every fourth fragment contains a keratan sulphate chain (Mr = 7000-7200) and every seventh to eighth contains an O-glycosidic oligosaccharide, whereas no N-glycosidic oligosaccharide could be detected. The results of the disaccharide analysis show that the galactosaminoglycan chains contain 76.2-83.6% chondroitin 4-sulphate, 12.9-19.4% chondroitin 6-sulphate, 3.5-3.8% chondroitin and no dermatan sulphate. Since composition and relative molecular mass of the chondroitin sulphate and keratan sulphate chains from the proteoglycan fragments resemble those of native proteoglycans, the conclusion may be drawn that the degeneration of the proteoglycans occurs by proteases that attack preferably the chondroitin sulphate-rich region of the core protein. This is the first inflammation model of joint destruction, which demonstrates the elution of soluble specific proteoglycan degradation products of defined size. PMID:1904780

  13. Lipid droplets go nuclear.

    PubMed

    Farese, Robert V; Walther, Tobias C

    2016-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are sometimes found in the nucleus of some cells. In this issue, Ohsaki et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201507122) show that the nuclear membrane, promyelocytic leukemia bodies, and the protein PML-II play a role in nuclear LD formation, suggesting functional relationships between these structures. PMID:26728852

  14. Sessile nanofluid droplet drying.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xin; Crivoi, Alexandru; Duan, Fei

    2015-03-01

    Nanofluid droplet evaporation has gained much audience nowadays due to its wide applications in painting, coating, surface patterning, particle deposition, etc. This paper reviews the drying progress and deposition formation from the evaporative sessile droplets with the suspended insoluble solutes, especially nanoparticles. The main content covers the evaporation fundamental, the particle self-assembly, and deposition patterns in sessile nanofluid droplet. Both experimental and theoretical studies are presented. The effects of the type, concentration and size of nanoparticles on the spreading and evaporative dynamics are elucidated at first, serving the basis for the understanding of particle motion and deposition process which are introduced afterward. Stressing on particle assembly and production of desirable residue patterns, we express abundant experimental interventions, various types of deposits, and the effects on nanoparticle deposition. The review ends with the introduction of theoretical investigations, including the Navier-Stokes equations in terms of solutions, the Diffusion Limited Aggregation approach, the Kinetic Monte Carlo method, and the Dynamical Density Functional Theory. Nanoparticles have shown great influences in spreading, evaporation rate, evaporation regime, fluid flow and pattern formation of sessile droplets. Under different experimental conditions, various deposition patterns can be formed. The existing theoretical approaches are able to predict fluid dynamics, particle motion and deposition patterns in the particular cases. On the basis of further understanding of the effects of fluid dynamics and particle motion, the desirable patterns can be obtained with appropriate experimental regulations. PMID:25578408

  15. Geoengineering with Charged Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokturk, H.

    2011-12-01

    Water molecules in a droplet are held together by intermolecular forces generated by hydrogen bonding which has a bonding energy of only about 0.2 eV. One can create a more rugged droplet by using an ion as a condensation nucleus. In that case, water molecules are held together by the interaction between the ion and the dipole moments of the water molecules surrounding the ion, in addition to any hydrogen bonding. In this research, properties of such charged droplets were investigated using first principle quantum mechanical calculations. A molecule which exhibits positive electron affinity is a good candidate to serve as the ionic condensation nucleus, because addition of an electron to such a molecule creates an energetically more stable state than the neutral molecule. A good example is the oxygen molecule (O2) where energy of O2 negative (O2-) ion is lower than that of the neutral O2 by about 0.5 eV. Examples of other molecules which have positive electron affinity include ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur oxides (SOx, x=1-3). Atomic models used in the calculations consisted of a negative ion of one of the molecules mentioned above surrounded by water molecules. Calculations were performed using the DFT method with B3LYP hybrid functional and Pople type basis sets with polarization and diffuse functions. Energy of interaction between O2- ion and the water molecule was found to be ~0.7 eV. This energy is an order of magnitude greater than the thermal energy of even the highest temperatures encountered in the atmosphere. Once created, charged rugged droplets can survive in hot and dry climates where they can be utilized to create humidity and precipitation. The ion which serves as the nucleus of the droplet can attract not only water molecules but also other dipolar gases in the atmosphere. Such dipolar gases include industrial pollutants, for example nitrogen dioxide (NO2) or sulfur dioxide (SO2). Energy of interaction between O2- ion and pollutant

  16. Microstructural and compositional features of the fibrous and hyaline cartilage on the medial tibial plateau imply a unique role for the hopping locomotion of kangaroo.

    PubMed

    He, Bo; Wu, Jian Ping; Xu, Jiake; Day, Robert E; Kirk, Thomas Brett

    2013-01-01

    Hopping provides efficient and energy saving locomotion for kangaroos, but it results in great forces in the knee joints. A previous study has suggested that a unique fibrous cartilage in the central region of the tibial cartilage could serve to decrease the peak stresses generated within kangaroo tibiofemoral joints. However, the influences of the microstructure, composition and mechanical properties of the central fibrous and peripheral hyaline cartilage on the function of the knee joints are still to be defined. The present study showed that the fibrous cartilage was thicker and had a lower chondrocyte density than the hyaline cartilage. Despite having a higher PG content in the middle and deep zones, the fibrous cartilage had an inferior compressive strength compared to the peripheral hyaline cartilage. The fibrous cartilage had a complex three dimensional collagen meshwork with collagen bundles parallel to the surface in the superficial zone, and with collagen bundles both parallel and perpendicular to the surface in the middle and deep zones. The collagen in the hyaline cartilage displayed a typical Benninghoff structure, with collagen fibres parallel to the surface in the superficial zone and collagen fibres perpendicular to the surface in the deep zone. Elastin fibres were found throughout the entire tissue depth of the fibrous cartilage and displayed a similar alignment to the adjacent collagen bundles. In comparison, the elastin fibres in the hyaline cartilage were confined within the superficial zone. This study examined for the first time the fibrillary structure, PG content and compressive properties of the central fibrous cartilage pad and peripheral hyaline cartilage within the kangaroo medial tibial plateau. It provided insights into the microstructure and composition of the fibrous and peripheral hyaline cartilage in relation to the unique mechanical properties of the tissues to provide for the normal activities of kangaroos. PMID:24058543

  17. Electric Field Mediated Droplet Centering

    SciTech Connect

    Bei, Z.-M.; Jones, T.B.; Tucker-Schwartz, A.; Harding, D.R.

    2010-03-12

    Double emulsion droplets subjected to a uniform ac electric field self-assemble into highly concentric structures via the dipole/dipole force if the outer droplet has a higher dielectric constant than the suspending liquid. The dielectric constant of the inner droplet has no influence. To minimize field-induced droplet distortion, the liquids must be density matched to ~0.1%. Centering of ~3 to 6 mm diameter droplets is achieved within ~60 s for field strengths of ~10^4 V_rms /m in liquids of viscosity ~10 cP. Effective centering depends strongly on frequency if the outer shell is conductive.

  18. Diffraction of walking droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Daniel M.; Pucci, Giuseppe; Bush, John W. M.

    2014-11-01

    We present results from our revisitation of the experiment of a walking droplet passing through a single slit, originally investigated by Couder & Fort (PRL, 2006). On each passage, the walker's trajectory is deviated as a result of the spatial confinement of its guiding wave. We explore the role of the droplet size and the bath's vibration amplitude on both the dynamics and statistics. We find the behavior to be remarkably sensitive to these control parameters. A complex physical picture emerges. The authors gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the NSF through Grant CMMI-1333242, DMH through the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program, and GP through the Programma Operativo Regionale (POR) Calabria - FSE 2007/2013.

  19. Impurity Extraction by Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, G.; Kincaid, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The goals are to model and to measure the phase equilibrium properties of a finely divided fluid containing a large number of chemically similar species. The objective is to develop an accurate, usable model for such phenomena as pollutant extraction of rain clouds, industrial separation in spray towers, and separation in emulsions. The project was designed as a hierarchy of complementary theoretical and experimental steps. A theory was developed to describe the segregation of complex impurities at the interface of a solvent. This phenomenon is important in phase behavior when a large fraction of molecules in a material are near an interface, the situation in a finely divided material. The theory will be modified to account for the effect of surface curvature on the surface tension. The study of mixtures differs from pure fluids not only because of the surface effects but also because composition differences between the droplet and the surrounding vapor can stabilize a droplet with respect to a bulk phase.

  20. Droplet monitoring probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baughman, J. R.; Thys, P. C.

    1973-01-01

    A droplet monitoring system is disclosed for analysis of mixed-phase fluid flow in development of gas turbines. The system uses a probe comprising two electrical wires spaced a known distance apart and connected at one end to means for establishing a dc potential between the wires. A drop in the fluid stream momentarily contacting both wires simultaneously causes and electrical signal which is amplified, detected and counted.

  1. Droplet Combustion Experiment Operates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Fuel ignites and burns in the Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE) on STS-94 on July 12, 1997, MET:11/07:00 (approximate). DCE used various fuels -- in drops ranging from 1 mm (0.04 inches) to 5 mm (0.2 inches) -- and mixtures of oxidizers and inert gases to learn more about the physics of combustion in the simplest burning configuration, a sphere. The DCE was designed to investigate the fundamental combustion aspects of single, isolated droplets under different pressures and ambient oxygen concentrations for a range of droplet sizes varying between 2 and 5 mm. The experiment elapsed time is shown at the bottom of the composite image. The DCE principal investigator was Forman Williams, University of California, San Diego. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (119KB JPEG, 658 x 982 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300171.html.

  2. High-Voltage Droplet Dispenser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus that is extremely effective in dispensing a wide range of droplets has been developed. This droplet dispenser is unique in that it utilizes a droplet bias voltage, as well as an ionization pulse, to release a droplet. Apparatuses that deploy individual droplets have been used in many applications, including, notably, study of combustion of liquid fuels. Experiments on isolated droplets are useful in that they enable the study of droplet phenomena under well-controlled and simplified conditions. In this apparatus, a syringe dispenses a known value of liquid, which emerges from, and hangs onto, the outer end of a flat-tipped, stainless steel needle. Somewhat below the needle tip and droplet is a ring electrode. A bias high voltage, followed by a high-voltage pulse, is applied so as to attract the droplet sufficiently to pull it off the needle. The voltages are such that the droplet and needle are negatively charged and the ring electrode is positively charged.

  3. [Molecular heterogeneity of proteoglycan aggregates of human hyalin cartilage in normal conditions and in systemic bone dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Feshchenko, S P; Krasnopol'skaia, K D; Rebrin, I A; Rudakov, S S

    1989-01-01

    Components of proteoglycan aggregates of human hyalin cartilage were studied under conditions of normal state and in some forms of osteochondrodysplasia. Extraction of uronic acids and protein from the tissue, amount of fractions and electrophoretic mobility of proteoglycan monomers, rations protein/glycosaminoglycans, keratan sulfate/chondroitin sulfate, a level and type of sulfatation as well as molecular mass of chondroitin sulfate, amino acid composition of rod protein, heterogeneity of binding proteins (concerning their isoelectric points and molecular masses) and immunoreactivity of protein moiety in proteoglycan aggregates were studied in rib cartilage, knee joint and ala ossis ilii. Structural parameters of proteoglycan aggregates proved to be dissimilar and depended on cartilage localization and age of the donors. Impairments in the rate of chondroitin sulfate sulfatation were detected in achondrogenesis of the II type and in diastrophic dysplasia; an extraction ability and amount of proteoglycan fractions, relative content of glycosaminoglycans and binding proteins were altered in some other forms of osteochondrodysplasias. Numerous biochemical markers of extracellular matrix deterioration were detected, which are typical for various morphofunctional alterations in hyalin cartilage--hyperproliferative reactions, tissue prematuration, persistence of the embryonal type of metabolism. PMID:2472707

  4. A preclinical evaluation of an autologous living hyaline-like cartilaginous graft for articular cartilage repair: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Peck, Yvonne; He, Pengfei; Chilla, Geetha Soujanya V. N.; Poh, Chueh Loo; Wang, Dong-An

    2015-01-01

    In this pilot study, an autologous synthetic scaffold-free construct with hyaline quality, termed living hyaline cartilaginous graft (LhCG), was applied for treating cartilage lesions. Implantation of autologous LhCG was done at load-bearing regions of the knees in skeletally mature mini-pigs for 6 months. Over the course of this study, significant radiographical improvement in LhCG treated sites was observed via magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, macroscopic repair was effected by LhCG at endpoint. Microscopic inspection revealed that LhCG engraftment restored cartilage thickness, promoted integration with surrounding native cartilage, produced abundant cartilage-specific matrix molecules, and re-established an intact superficial tangential zone. Importantly, the repair efficacy of LhCG was quantitatively shown to be comparable to native, unaffected cartilage in terms of biochemical composition and biomechanical properties. There were no complications related to the donor site of cartilage biopsy. Collectively, these results imply that LhCG engraftment may be a viable approach for articular cartilage repair. PMID:26549401

  5. Annulus Fibrosus Can Strip Hyaline Cartilage End Plate from Subchondral Bone: A Study of the Intervertebral Disk in Tension.

    PubMed

    Balkovec, Christian; Adams, Michael A; Dolan, Patricia; McGill, Stuart M

    2015-10-01

    Study Design Biomechanical study on cadaveric spines. Objective Spinal bending causes the annulus to pull vertically (axially) on the end plate, but failure mechanisms in response to this type of loading are poorly understood. Therefore, the objective of this study was to identify the weak point of the intervertebral disk in tension. Methods Cadaveric motion segments (aged 79 to 88 years) were dissected to create midsagittal blocks of tissue, with ∼10 mm of bone superior and inferior to the disk. From these blocks, 14 bone-disk-bone slices (average 4.8 mm thick) were cut in the frontal plane. Each slice was gripped by its bony ends and stretched to failure at 1 mm/s. Mode of failure was recorded using a digital camera. Results Of the 14 slices, 10 failed by the hyaline cartilage being peeled off the subchondral bone, with the failure starting opposite the lateral annulus and proceeding medially. Two slices failed by rupturing of the trabecular bone, and a further two failed in the annulus. Conclusions The hyaline cartilage-bone junction is the disk's weak link in tension. These findings provide a plausible mechanism for the appearance of bone and cartilage fragments in herniated material. Stripping cartilage from the bony end plate would result in the herniated mass containing relatively stiff cartilage that does not easily resorb. PMID:26430588

  6. Maze Solving by Chemotactic Droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Lagzi, Istvan; Soh, Siowling; Wesson, Paul J.; Browne, Kevin P.; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

    2010-01-11

    Droplets emitting surface-active chemicals exhibit chemotaxis toward low-pH regions. Such droplets are self-propelled and navigate through a complex maze to seek a source of acid placed at one of the maze’s exits. In doing so, the droplets find the shortest path through the maze. Chemotaxis and maze solving are due to an interplay between acid/base chemistry and surface tension effects.

  7. Uranium droplet core nuclear rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anghaie, Samim

    1991-01-01

    Uranium droplet nuclear rocket is conceptually designed to utilize the broad temperature range ofthe liquid phase of metallic uranium in droplet configuration which maximizes the energy transfer area per unit fuel volume. In a baseline system dissociated hydrogen at 100 bar is heated to 6000 K, providing 2000 second of Isp. Fission fragments and intense radian field enhance the dissociation of molecular hydrogen beyond the equilibrium thermodynamic level. Uranium droplets in the core are confined and separated by an axisymmetric vortex flow generated by high velocity tangential injection of hydrogen in the mid-core regions. Droplet uranium flow to the core is controlled and adjusted by a twin flow nozzle injection system.

  8. Asymmetric Wettability Directs Leidenfrost Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapov, Rebecca; Boreyko, Jonathan; Briggs, Dayrl; Srijanto, Bernadeta; Retterer, Scott; Collier, C. Patrick; Lavrik, Nickolay

    2014-03-01

    Exploration of Leidenfrost droplets on nano- and microstructured surfaces are of great importance for increasing control over heat transfer in high power density systems using boiling phenomena. They also provide an elegant way to direct droplet motion in a variety of emerging fluidic systems. Here, we report the fabrication and characterization of tilted nanopillar arrays (TNPAs) that exhibit directional Leidenfrost water droplets under dynamic conditions. The batch fabrication of the TNPAs was achieved by glancing-angle anisotropic reactive ion etching of a thermally dewet platinum mask. In contrast to previously implemented macro- and microscopic Leidenfrost ratchets, our TNPAs induce no preferential directional movement of Leidenfrost droplets under conditions approaching steady-state film boiling. This suggests that the observed droplet directionality is not a result of asymmetric vapor flow. Phase diagrams were constructed for the boiling behavior upon droplet impact onto TNPAs, straight nanopillar arrays, and smooth silicon surfaces. Asymmetric wettability and directional trajectory of droplets was exclusive to the TNPAs for impacts corresponding to the transition boiling regime, revealing this to be the mechanism for the droplet directionality. This work was conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, which is sponsored at Oak Ridge National Lab by the Division of Scientific User Facilities, US Dept. of Energy.

  9. Experiments examining drag in linear droplet packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Q. V.; Dunn-Rankin, D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of vertically traveling droplet packets, where the droplets in each packet are aligned linearly, one behind another. The paper describes in detail, an experimental apparatus that produces repeatable, linearly aligned, and isolated droplet packets containing 1 6 droplets per packet. The apparatus is suitable for examining aerodynamic interactions between droplets within each packet. This paper demonstrates the performance of the apparatus by examining the drag reduction and collision of droplets traveling in the wake of a lead droplet. Comparison of a calculated single droplet trajectory with the detailed droplet position versus time data for a droplet packet provides the average drag reduction experienced by the trailing droplets due to the aerodynamic wake of the lead droplet. For the conditions of our experiment (4 droplet packet, 145 μm methanol droplets, 10 m/s initial velocity, initial droplet spacing of 5.2 droplet diameters, Reynolds number approx. 80) the average drag on the first trailing droplet was found to be 75% of the drag on the lead droplet.

  10. Droplet Burns in the Fiber-Supported Droplet Combustion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    A fuel droplet burns in the Fiber-Supported Droplet Combustion (FSDC) Experiment on STS-94, July 4 1997, MET:02/19:20 (approximate). This experiment, performed in the Middeck Glovebox, allows us to study the burning of fuels such as n-heptane, n-decane, methanol, ethanol, methanol/water mixtures, and heptane/hexadecane mixtures in droplets as large as 6 mm (nearly 1/4 inch). In this sequence, you see the burn of a 5mm droplet of n-heptane, in a 30% O2/He environment at 1 atmosphere pressure. The droplet (looking bright pink because of reflected light) hangs suspended from the supporting fiber. FSDC-2 studied fundamental phenomena related to liquid fuel droplet combustion in air. Pure fuels and mixtures of fuels were burned as isolated single and dual droplets with and without forced air convection. The FSDC guest investigator was Forman Williams, University of California, San Diego. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (279KB JPEG, 1350 x 2026 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300175.html.

  11. Leidenfrost levitation: beyond droplets

    PubMed Central

    Hashmi, Ali; Xu, Yuhao; Coder, Benjamin; Osborne, Paul A.; Spafford, Jonathon; Michael, Grant E.; Yu, Gan; Xu, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Friction is a major inhibitor in almost every mechanical system. Enlightened by the Leidenfrost effect – a droplet can be levitated by its own vapor layer on a sufficiently hot surface – we demonstrate for the first time that a small cart can also be levitated by Leidenfrost vapor. The levitated cart can carry certain amount of load and move frictionlessly over the hot surface. The maximum load that the cart can carry is experimentally tested over a range of surface temperatures. We show that the levitated cart can be propelled not only by gravitational force over a slanted flat surface, but also self-propelled over a ratchet shaped horizontal surface. In the end, we experimentally tested water consumption rate for sustaining the levitated cart, and compared the results to theoretical calculations. If perfected, this frictionless Leidenfrost cart could be used in numerous engineering applications where relative motion exists between surfaces. PMID:23150770

  12. EWSR1 genetic rearrangements in salivary gland tumors: a specific and very common feature of hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shah, Akeesha A; LeGallo, Robin D; van Zante, Annemieke; Frierson, Henry F; Mills, Stacey E; Berean, Kenneth W; Mentrikoski, Mark J; Stelow, Edward B

    2013-04-01

    The Ewing sarcoma breakpoint region 1 (EWSR1) is translocated in many sarcomas. Recently, its rearrangement has been described in salivary gland hyalinizing clear cell carcinomas (HCCCs) and in a subset of soft tissue myoepitheliomas. This study examines the presence of the EWSR1 rearrangement in a variety of salivary gland lesions including classic myoepitheliomas and HCCCs. Using a tissue microarray and whole-mount sections, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed on a variety of salivary gland lesions including HCCCs. The EWSR1 rearrangement was detected in 87% of HCCCs (13 of 15); all other salivary gland lesions including classic myoepitheliomas had intact EWSR1. Patients with HCCCs with rearranged EWSR1 included 1 man, 10 women, and 2 of unknown sex. Ages ranged from 35 to 83 years; the tumor size ranged from 0.8 to 5.5 cm, and the involved locations included: palate (2), base of the tongue (2), mandible (2), submandibular gland (2), lip (1), floor of the mouth (1), sublingual gland (1), inner cheek (1), and nasopharynx (1). All HCCCs were composed of sheets and nests of monotonous cells with clear cytoplasm within a hyalinized stroma. All tested cases were immunoreactive with antibodies to p63 and were nonreactive with antibodies to more conventional myoepithelial antigens (e.g., smooth muscle actin and S100 protein). These findings show that the EWSR1 rearrangement is almost a defining feature of HCCCs and also confirm that classic salivary gland myoepitheliomas are distinct from these tumors and do not share a pathogenetic relationship with their soft tissue counterparts. PMID:23426124

  13. Mutations in Capillary Morphogenesis Gene-2 Result in the Allelic Disorders Juvenile Hyaline Fibromatosis and Infantile Systemic Hyalinosis

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, Oonagh; Difeo, Analisa; Ramirez, Maria C.; Tukel, Turgut; Narla, Goutham; Bonafe, Luisa; Kayserili, Hulya; Yuksel-Apak, Memnune; Paller, Amy S.; Norton, Karen; Teebi, Ahmad S.; Grum-Tokars, Valerie; Martin, Gail S.; Davis, George E.; Glucksman, Marc J.; Martignetti, John A.

    2003-01-01

    Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis (JHF) and infantile systemic hyalinosis (ISH) are autosomal recessive syndromes of unknown etiology characterized by multiple, recurring subcutaneous tumors, gingival hypertrophy, joint contractures, osteolysis, and osteoporosis. Both are believed to be allelic disorders; ISH is distinguished from JHF by its more severe phenotype, which includes hyaline deposits in multiple organs, recurrent infections, and death within the first 2 years of life. Using the previously reported chromosome 4q21 JHF disease locus as a guide for candidate-gene identification, we identified and characterized JHF and ISH disease-causing mutations in the capillary morphogenesis factor–2 gene (CMG2). Although CMG2 encodes a protein upregulated in endothelial cells during capillary formation and was recently shown to function as an anthrax-toxin receptor, its physiologic role is unclear. Two ISH family-specific truncating mutations, E220X and the 1-bp insertion P357insC that results in translation of an out-of-frame stop codon, were generated by site-directed mutagenesis and were shown to delete the CMG-2 transmembrane and/or cytosolic domains, respectively. An ISH compound mutation, I189T, is predicted to create a novel and destabilizing internal cavity within the protein. The JHF family-specific homoallelic missense mutation G105D destabilizes a von Willebrand factor A extracellular domain alpha-helix, whereas the other mutation, L329R, occurs within the transmembrane domain of the protein. Finally, and possibly providing insight into the pathophysiology of these diseases, analysis of fibroblasts derived from patients with JHF or ISH suggests that CMG2 mutations abrogate normal cell interactions with the extracellular matrix. PMID:12973667

  14. Lossless droplet transfer of droplet-based microfluidic analysis

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Ryan T; Tang, Keqi; Page, Jason S; Smith, Richard D

    2011-11-22

    A transfer structure for droplet-based microfluidic analysis is characterized by a first conduit containing a first stream having at least one immiscible droplet of aqueous material and a second conduit containing a second stream comprising an aqueous fluid. The interface between the first conduit and the second conduit can define a plurality of apertures, wherein the apertures are sized to prevent exchange of the first and second streams between conduits while allowing lossless transfer of droplets from the first conduit to the second conduit through contact between the first and second streams.

  15. Levitation of liquid sodium droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, S.S.; Cramb, A.W.; Hoburg, J.F.; Lally, B.

    1995-12-01

    Droplets of liquid sodium ranging from 1.2 to 2.1 g, immersed in mineral oil, were levitated in an electromagnetic field. The experimental setup was designed and constructed to levitate small metal droplets at audio frequencies. The levitated droplet was found to be very stable inside the inductor, and the equilibrium shape attained by the droplet in the electromagnetic field was measured during the experiment. A surface coupled mathematical model was used to calculate the self-consistent equilibrium droplet shape of liquid sodium under the influence of an electromagnetic field. The predicted shapes of the metal droplet and the position of the droplet inside the inductor compare well with the experimental data. The idea of casting metals and alloys without any physical contact has generated a lot of interest in the metals industry, especially in the production of metals/alloys that are highly reactive and have a very high melting point. Containerless casting can be achieved by levitating or pushing the liquid metal from the surface of the container.

  16. Droplets, Bubbles and Ultrasound Interactions.

    PubMed

    Shpak, Oleksandr; Verweij, Martin; de Jong, Nico; Versluis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of droplets and bubbles with ultrasound has been studied extensively in the last 25 years. Microbubbles are broadly used in diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, for instance, as ultrasound contrast agents. They have a similar size as red blood cells, and thus are able to circulate within blood vessels. Perfluorocarbon liquid droplets can be a potential new generation of microbubble agents as ultrasound can trigger their conversion into gas bubbles. Prior to activation, they are at least five times smaller in diameter than the resulting bubbles. Together with the violent nature of the phase-transition, the droplets can be used for local drug delivery, embolotherapy, HIFU enhancement and tumor imaging. Here we explain the basics of bubble dynamics, described by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation, bubble resonance frequency, damping and quality factor. We show the elegant calculation of the above characteristics for the case of small amplitude oscillations by linearizing the equations. The effect and importance of a bubble coating and effective surface tension are also discussed. We give the main characteristics of the power spectrum of bubble oscillations. Preceding bubble dynamics, ultrasound propagation is introduced. We explain the speed of sound, nonlinearity and attenuation terms. We examine bubble ultrasound scattering and how it depends on the wave-shape of the incident wave. Finally, we introduce droplet interaction with ultrasound. We elucidate the ultrasound-focusing concept within a droplets sphere, droplet shaking due to media compressibility and droplet phase-conversion dynamics. PMID:26486337

  17. Droplet resonator based optofluidic microlasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiraz, Alper; Jonáš, Alexandr; Aas, Mehdi; Karadag, Yasin; Brzobohatý, Oto; Ježek, Jan; Pilát, Zdeněk.; Zemánek, Pavel; Anand, Suman; McGloin, David

    2014-03-01

    We introduce tunable optofluidic microlasers based on active optical resonant cavities formed by optically stretched, dye-doped emulsion droplets confined in a dual-beam optical trap. To achieve tunable dye lasing, optically pumped droplets of oil dispersed in water are stretched by light in the dual-beam trap. Subsequently, resonant path lengths of whispering gallery modes (WGMs) propagating in the droplet are modified, leading to shifts in the microlaser emission wavelengths. We also report lasing in airborne, Rhodamine B-doped glycerolwater droplets which were localized using optical tweezers. While being trapped near the focal point of an infrared laser, the droplets were pumped with a Q-switched green laser. Furthermore, biological lasing in droplets supported by a superhydrophobic surface is demonstrated using a solution of Venus variant of the yellow fluorescent protein or E. Coli bacterial cells expressing stably the Venus protein. Our results may lead to new ways of probing airborne particles, exploiting the high sensitivity of stimulated emission to small perturbations in the droplet laser cavity and the gain medium.

  18. Thermocapillary Convection in Liquid Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this video is to understand the effects of surface tension on fluid convection. The fluid system chosen is the liquid sessile droplet to show the importance in single crystal growth, the spray drying and cooling of metal, and the advance droplet radiators of the space stations radiators. A cross sectional representation of a hemispherical liquid droplet under ideal conditions is used to show internal fluid motion. A direct simulation of buoyancy-dominant convection and surface tension-dominant convection is graphically displayed. The clear differences between two mechanisms of fluid transport, thermocapillary convection, and bouncy dominant convection is illustrated.

  19. Orbiting pairs of walking droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siefert, Emmanuel; Bush, John W. M.; Oza, Anand

    2015-11-01

    Droplets may self-propel on the surface of a vibrating fluid bath, pushed forward by their own Faraday pilot-wave field. We present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the interaction of pairs of such droplets. Particular attention is given to characterizing the system's dependence on the vibrational forcing of the bath and the impact parameter of the walking droplets. Observed criteria for the capture and stability of orbital pairs are rationalized by accompanying theoretical developments. Thanks to the NSF.

  20. Droplet spectral broadening in marine stratus

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, J.G.; Yum, Seong Soo

    1997-11-15

    Broadening of the cloud droplet (diameter < 50 {mu}m) spectrum with increased droplet size was found to depend on the vertical profiles of cloud water. Clouds with liquid water profiles resembling adiabatic conditions displayed constant spectral widths. Other clouds displayed broader droplet spectra and increasing broadness with mean droplet sizes. Less than adiabatic cloud liquid water profiles may be accounted for by conversion to drops (diameter > 50 {mu}m, i.e., drizzle). Broad droplet spectra were most closely associated with drizzle drops. Both the concentration, C and slope, k, of the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra were theoretically found to affect droplet spectral width. For individual cloud parcels a higher C and lower k each contributed to broader droplet spectra. When mixing among cloud parcels with different updrafts was considered, the predictions deviated especially at larger mean droplet diameters. Variations in updraft velocity result in differences in droplet concentrations and mean droplet sizes. The predictions for this internal mixing process showed greater droplet spectral widths for CCN spectra with higher k, especially at the larger mean droplet diameters. Instead of the individual parcel predictions of narrower droplet spectra at larger mean droplet sizes, internal mixing predicted increasing droplet spectral width with increasing mean droplet size. These predictions are consistent with the observations. First, when only cloud parcels with small mean droplet diameters (< 1 {mu}m) were considered, the polluted clouds that formed on CCN with higher C and lower k displayed broader droplet spectra than clean clouds. Cloud parcels with large mean droplet diameters (>12 {mu}m) and large {sigma} were observed only in clean conditions where k was high. Increasing droplet spectral width with mean droplet diameter (especially > 12 {mu}m) is typical of many observations here and elsewhere.

  1. Droplet combustion at reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryer, F. L.; Williams, F. A.

    1988-01-01

    The current work involves theoretical analyses of the effects identified, experiments in the NASA Lewis drop towers performed in the middeck areas of the Space Shuttle. In addition, there is laboratory work associated with the design of the flight apparatus. Calculations have shown that some of the test-matrix data can be obtained in drop towers, and some are achievable only in the space experiments. The apparatus consists of a droplet dispensing device (syringes), a droplet positioning device (opposing, retractable, hollow needles), a droplet ignition device (two matched pairs of retractable spark electrodes), gas and liquid handling systems, a data acquisition system (mainly giving motion-picture records of the combustion in two orthogonal views, one with backlighting for droplet resolution), and associated electronics.

  2. Droplets engulfing on a filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiang-Fa; Yu, Meng; Zhou, Zhengping; Bedarkar, Amol; Zhao, Youhao

    2014-03-01

    Two immiscible droplets wetting on a filament may assume engulfing, partial-engulfing, or non-engulfing morphology that depends on the wetting behavior and geometries of the resulting droplet-on-filament system. This paper studies the wetting behavior of two immiscible droplets contacting and sitting symmetrically on a straight filament. A set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) is formulated for determining the wetting morphology of the droplet-on-filament system. In the limiting case of engulfing or non-engulfing, the morphology of the droplet-on-filament system is determined in explicit form. In the case of partial-engulfing, surface finite element method is further employed for determining the wetting morphology, surface energy, and internal pressures of droplets of the system. Numerical scaling study is performed to explore their dependencies upon the wetting properties and geometries of the system. The study can be applicable for analysis and design of textiles with tailorable wetting properties and development of novel multifunctional fibrous materials for environmental protection such as oil-spill sorption, etc.

  3. On-demand droplet release for droplet-based microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Chun; Liu, YingShuai; Li, Chang Ming

    2010-03-01

    On-demand droplet release from microwell was successfully implemented and well combined with droplet trapping/fusion functions to make an ideal and integrated droplet based microfluidic system. PMID:20162230

  4. Uniform-droplet spray forming

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, C.A.; Sikka, V.K.; Chun, Jung-Hoon; Ando, T.

    1997-04-01

    The uniform-droplet process is a new method of liquid-metal atomization that results in single droplets that can be used to produce mono-size powders or sprayed-on to substrates to produce near-net shapes with tailored microstructure. The mono-sized powder-production capability of the uniform-droplet process also has the potential of permitting engineered powder blends to produce components of controlled porosity. Metal and alloy powders are commercially produced by at least three different methods: gas atomization, water atomization, and rotating disk. All three methods produce powders of a broad range in size with a very small yield of fine powders with single-sized droplets that can be used to produce mono-size powders or sprayed-on substrates to produce near-net shapes with tailored microstructures. The economical analysis has shown the process to have the potential of reducing capital cost by 50% and operating cost by 37.5% when applied to powder making. For the spray-forming process, a 25% savings is expected in both the capital and operating costs. The project is jointly carried out at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Tuffs University, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Preliminary interactions with both finished parts and powder producers have shown a strong interest in the uniform-droplet process. Systematic studies are being conducted to optimize the process parameters, understand the solidification of droplets and spray deposits, and develop a uniform-droplet-system (UDS) apparatus appropriate for processing engineering alloys.

  5. The absence of type II collagen and changes in proteoglycan structure of hyaline cartilage in a case of Langer-Saldino achondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Feshchenko, S P; Rebrin, I A; Sokolnik, V P; Sher, B M; Sokolov, B P; Kalinin, V N; Lazjuk, G I

    1989-04-01

    Structural analysis of hyaline cartilage extracellular matrix components from the ribs and knee joint of a stillborn female with type II achondrogenesis was carried out. The absence of type II collagen, a decrease in the amount of proteoglycans (PG), and structural changes in PG, namely, increased electrophoretic mobility of PG, lower relative content of chondroitin 4-sulfate (Ch4-S), lower molecular weight and decreased total chondroitin sulfate (ChS) sulfation, were detected. Increased amounts of type I and type III collagens, atypical for hyaline cartilage, were revealed. Among the link proteins (LPs), a large protein with a mol. wt. of 48 kDa was predominant. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of the pathogenesis of achondrogenesis ("chondrogenesis imperfecta") are discussed. The data obtained suggest that the primary defect in type II achondrogenesis involves ChS or type II collagen synthesis. PMID:2714779

  6. Dry Zones Around Frozen Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisbano, Caitlin; Nath, Saurabh; Boreyko, Jonathan; Nature-Inspired Fluids; Interfaces Team

    2015-11-01

    The saturation pressure of water vapor above supercooled water exceeds that above ice at the same temperature. A frozen droplet will therefore grow by harvesting water vapor from neighboring supercooled condensate, which has recently been demonstrated to be a primary mechanism of in-plane frost growth on hydrophobic surfaces. The underlying physics of this source-sink interaction is still poorly understood. In this work, a deposited water droplet is frozen on a dry hydrophobic surface initially held above the dew point. We demonstrate that when the surface is then cooled beneath the dew point, the frozen droplet harvests nearby water vapor in the air. This results in an annular dry zone that forms between the frozen droplet and the forming supercooled condensation. For a given ambient temperature and humidity, the length of the dry zone varied strongly with surface temperature and weakly with droplet volume. The dependence of the dry zone on surface temperature is due to the fact that the vapor pressure gradients between the ambient and the surface and between the liquid and frozen water are both functions of temperature.

  7. Comparison of Renal Amyloid and Hyaline Glomerulopathy in B6C3F1 Mice: An NTP Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Hoane, Jessica S; Johnson, Crystal L; Morrison, James P; Elmore, Susan A

    2016-07-01

    Due to potential misdiagnosis of hyaline glomerulopathy (HG) for amyloidosis, a retrospective study of B6C3F1 mice from the National Toxicology Program (NTP) archives was undertaken to determine whether HG had occurred in prior NTP studies and, if so, whether these 2 glomerular lesions could be routinely discriminated. Kidney slides from 7 amyloid-positive control mice, 2 HG-positive control mice, 3 normal or negative control mice, and 41 potential HG mice (with renal-only deposits previously diagnosed as amyloid) were evaluated using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), periodic acid Schiff (PAS), Congo red (CR), and Masson's trichrome (MT) stains. Utilizing these techniques, HG was reliably distinguished from amyloidosis. All 41 potential HG mice had glomerular deposits histochemically inconsistent with amyloid; the deposits were PAS positive and CR negative. Four of the 41 mice were selected for transmission electron microscopy of the glomerular deposits; ultrastructurally, the deposits in these animals were consistent with HG and not amyloid. Our findings indicate that HG is a spontaneous lesion in B6C3F1 mice of low occurrence, is commonly misdiagnosed as amyloidosis, and is more likely than amyloid to cause glomerular deposits in mice without evidence of deposits in other tissues. Also, HG can be distinguished from amyloid on H&E evaluation; however, the distinction is improved with use of PAS or CR staining and/or ultraviolet evaluation. PMID:27000376

  8. The distribution of different molecular species of collagen in fibrous, elastic and hyaline cartilages of the pig.

    PubMed

    Eyre, D R; Muir, H

    1975-12-01

    The distribution of type II collagen, considered to be characteristic of cartilaginous tissues, was determined in various specialized cartilages of the mature pig. The tissues examined were: (1) fibrocartilage of the semilunar meniscus of the knee; (2) elastic cartilage of the external ear; (3) hyaline cartilage of (a) the synovial joint (b) the thyroid plate of the larynx, and (c) the nasal septum. The predominant species of collagen in each tissue, whether type I or type II, was appraised semi-quantitatively by analysis of purified collagen solubilized by pepsin and of peptide fragments produced by cyanogen bromide. Cyanogen bromide-derived peptides were characterized by column chromatography on CM-cellulose and by electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gels. The proportion of each type of collagen was determined precisely by isolating the homologous small peptides alpha1(II)CB6 [nomenclature of Miller (1973) Clin. Orthop. 92, 260-280], by column chromatography on phosphocellulose and determining their relative proportions by amino acid analysis. Thus collagen of the fibrocartilage of the meniscus proved to be all type I; type II was not detected. In contrast, collagen of elastic cartilage of the outer ear, after rigorous exclusion of perichondrium, was type II. Similarly, type II was the only collagen detected in all the mature hyalline cartilages examined. PMID:766752

  9. Pleomorphic hyalinizing angiectatic tumor of soft parts: case report with unusual ganglion-like cells and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Changchien, Yi-Che; Bocskai, Pál; Kovács, Ilona; Hargitai, Zoltán; Kollár, Sándor; Török, Miklós

    2014-12-01

    Pleomorphic hyalinizing angiectatic tumor (PHAT) is a recently described, non-metastasizing tumor of uncertain lineage. This tumor distributes equally between the genders and has a predilection for the subcutaneous soft tissue, particularly in lower extremity, other locations are rare. Based on the recent literature, PHAT is suspected to encompass the morphological spectrum with other tumors such as myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma (MIFS) and hemosiderotic fibrolipomatous tumor (HFLT), although cytogenetic data remain inconsistent. We report a case of PHAT that arose in the upper arm with unusual morphology which showed ganglion-like cells similar to Reed-Sternberg-like cells found in MIFS. The tumor had strong immunohistochemical expression of CD34, CD99, and was negative for S-100. The ganglion-like cells were positive for both CD34 and CD68 but negative for CD30. The translocation between chromosome 1 and 10, a frequent finding of MIFS and HFLT, was not identified by FISH excluding the possibility of hybrid PHAT and MIFS. We conclude FISH can be a potential useful tool to separate PHAT with atypical morphology from hybrid tumor in doubted cases. Due to the rarity of PHAT and lack of consistent pathogenetic signatures, more cases and further studies will be needed to elucidate the pathogenesis and nature of this tumor. PMID:24857338

  10. Droplets merging through wireless ultrasonic actuation.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Praveen Priyaranjan; Kar, Durga Prasanna; Bhuyan, Satyanarayan

    2016-01-01

    A new technique of droplets merging through wireless ultrasonic actuation has been proposed and experimentally investigated in this work. The proposed method is based on the principle of resonant inductive coupling and piezoelectric resonance. When a mechanical vibration is excited in a piezoelectric plate, the ultrasonic vibration transmitted to the droplets placed on its surface and induces merging. It has been observed that the merging rate of water droplets depends on the operating frequency, mechanical vibration of piezoelectric plate, separation distance between the droplets, and volume of droplets. The investigated technique of droplets merging through piezoelectric actuation is quite useful for microfluidics, chemical and biomedical engineering applications. PMID:26299402

  11. Double-blind clinical trial of calf lung surfactant extract for the prevention of hyaline membrane disease in extremely premature infants.

    PubMed

    Kwong, M S; Egan, E A; Notter, R H; Shapiro, D L

    1985-10-01

    A prospective, double-blind, controlled trial was conducted to determine whether instillation of an exogenous surfactant into the lungs before the first breath could prevent hyaline membrane disease. The surfactant is calf lung lipid extracted from saline lung lavage. Entry was limited to infants who were 24 to 28 weeks' gestation, who were born at Children's Hospital of Buffalo, and whose mothers had not received betamethasone for more than 24 hours before birth. Treated infants received 3 mL (90 mg) of calf lung surfactant extract instilled into their trachea before the first breath; control infants received 3 mL of normal saline. A prospective scoring system and respiratory support variables were used to compare the groups. At 48 hours of age, only two of 14 calf lung surfactant extract-treated infants (14%) had hyaline membrane disease compared with seven of 13 control infants (54%) (P = .033). Inspired oxygen, mean airway pressure, ventilator rate and ventilator efficiency index were also lower in the treated group during the first 48 hours of life (P less than .01 to P less than .001). Calf lung surfactant extract instillation at birth appears to be an effective material and method of preventing hyaline membrane disease in extremely premature infants. PMID:3900906

  12. Droplet burning at zero G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, F. A.

    1978-01-01

    Questions of the importance and feasibility of performing experiments on droplet burning at zero gravity in Spacelab were studied. Information on the physics and chemistry of droplet combustion, with attention directed specifically to the chemical kinetics, heat and mass transfer, and fluid mechanics of the phenomena involved, are presented. The work was divided into three phases, the justification, the feasibility, and the conceptual development of a preliminary design. Results from the experiments performed revealed a few new facts concerning droplet burning, notably burning rates in excess of theoretical prediction and a phenomenon of flash extinction, both likely traceable to accumulation of carbon produced by gas-phase pyrolysis in the fuel-rich zone enclosed by the reaction surface. These experiments also showed that they were primarily due to timing difficulties.

  13. Vibration-Induced Droplet Atomization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. K.; James, A.; Vukasinovic, B.; Glezer, A.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal management is critical to a number of technologies used in a microgravity environment and in Earth-based systems. Examples include electronic cooling, power generation systems, metal forming and extrusion, and HVAC (heating, venting, and air conditioning) systems. One technique that can deliver the large heat fluxes required for many of these technologies is two-phase heat transfer. This type of heat transfer is seen in the boiling or evaporation of a liquid and in the condensation of a vapor. Such processes provide very large heat fluxes with small temperature differences. Our research program is directed toward the development of a new, two-phase heat transfer cell for use in a microgravity environment. In this paper, we consider the main technology used in this cell, a novel technique for the atomization of a liquid called vibration-induced droplet atomization. In this process, a small liquid droplet is placed on a thin metal diaphragm that is made to vibrate by an attached piezoelectric transducer. The vibration induces capillary waves on the free surface of the droplet that grow in amplitude and then begin to eject small secondary droplets from the wave crests. In some situations, this ejection process develops so rapidly that the entire droplet seems to burst into a small cloud of atomized droplets that move away from the diaphragm at speeds of up to 50 cm/s. By incorporating this process into a heat transfer cell, the active atomization and transport of the small liquid droplets could provide a large heat flux capability for the device. Experimental results are presented that document the behavior of the diaphragm and the droplet during the course of a typical bursting event. In addition, a simple mathematical model is presented that qualitatively reproduces all of the essential features we have seen in a burst event. From these two investigations, we have shown that delayed droplet bursting results when the system passes through a resonance

  14. The Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE) was designed to investigate the fundamental combustion aspects of single, isolated droplets under different pressures and ambient oxygen concentrations for a range of droplet sizes varying between 2 and 5 mm. The DCE principal investigator was Forman Williams, University of California, San Diego. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (167KB, 5-second MPEG, screen 160 x 120 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available)A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300166.html.

  15. Film boiling of mercury droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Schoessow, G. J.; Chmielewski, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Vaporization times of mercury droplets in Leidenfrost film boiling on a flat horizontal plate are measured in an air atmosphere. Extreme care was used to prevent large amplitude droplet vibrations and surface wetting; therefore, these data can be compared to film boiling theory. For these data, diffusion from the upper surface of the drop is a dominant mode of mass transfer from the drop. A closed-form analytical film boiling theory is developed to account for the diffusive evaporation. Reasonable agreement between data and theory is seen.

  16. Film boiling of mercury droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Schoessow, G. J.; Chmielewski, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Vaporization times of mercury droplets in Leidenfrost film boiling on a flat horizontal plate are measured in an air atmosphere. Extreme care was used to prevent large amplitude droplet vibrations and surface wetting; therefore, these data can be compared to film boiling theory. Diffusion from the upper surface of the drop appears as a dominant mode of mass transfer from the drop. A closed-form analytical film boiling theory is developed to account for the diffusive evaporation. Reasonable agreement between data and theory is seen.

  17. Dielectrowetting Driven Spreading of Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHale, G.; Brown, C. V.; Newton, M. I.; Wells, G. G.; Sampara, N.

    2011-10-01

    The wetting of solid surfaces can be modified by altering the surface free energy balance between the solid, liquid, and vapor phases. Here we show that liquid dielectrophoresis induced by nonuniform electric fields can be used to enhance and control the wetting of dielectric liquids. In the limit of thick droplets, we show theoretically that the cosine of the contact angle follows a simple voltage squared relationship analogous to that found for electrowetting on dielectric. Experimental observations confirm this predicted dielectrowetting behavior and show that the induced wetting is reversible. Our findings provide a noncontact electrical actuation process for meniscus and droplet control.

  18. Materials science: Droplets leap into action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, Doris; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2015-11-01

    What could cause a water droplet to start bouncing on a surface? It seems that a combination of evaporation and a highly water-repellent surface induces droplet bouncing when ambient pressure is reduced. See Letter p.82

  19. Droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling for simpler and faster PCR assay using wire-guided manipulations.

    PubMed

    You, David J; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2012-01-01

    A computer numerical control (CNC) apparatus was used to perform droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling on a single superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater. Droplets were manipulated using "wire-guided" method (a pipette tip was used in this study). This methodology can be easily adapted to existing commercial robotic pipetting system, while demonstrated added capabilities such as vibrational mixing, high-speed centrifuging of droplets, simple DNA extraction utilizing the hydrophobicity difference between the tip and the superhydrophobic surface, and rapid thermocycling with a moving droplet, all with wire-guided droplet manipulations on a superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater (i.e., not on a 96-well plate). Serial dilutions were demonstrated for diluting sample matrix. Centrifuging was demonstrated by rotating a 10 μL droplet at 2300 round per minute, concentrating E. coli by more than 3-fold within 3 min. DNA extraction was demonstrated from E. coli sample utilizing the disposable pipette tip to cleverly attract the extracted DNA from the droplet residing on a superhydrophobic surface, which took less than 10 min. Following extraction, the 1500 bp sequence of Peptidase D from E. coli was amplified using rapid droplet thermocycling, which took 10 min for 30 cycles. The total assay time was 23 min, including droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction and rapid droplet thermocycling. Evaporation from of 10 μL droplets was not significant during these procedures, since the longest time exposure to air and the vibrations was less than 5 min (during DNA extraction). The results of these sequentially executed processes were analyzed using gel electrophoresis. Thus, this work demonstrates the adaptability of the system to replace many common laboratory tasks on a single platform (through re-programmability), in rapid succession (using droplets), and with a high level of

  20. Droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling for simpler and faster PCR assay using wire-guided manipulations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A computer numerical control (CNC) apparatus was used to perform droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling on a single superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater. Droplets were manipulated using “wire-guided” method (a pipette tip was used in this study). This methodology can be easily adapted to existing commercial robotic pipetting system, while demonstrated added capabilities such as vibrational mixing, high-speed centrifuging of droplets, simple DNA extraction utilizing the hydrophobicity difference between the tip and the superhydrophobic surface, and rapid thermocycling with a moving droplet, all with wire-guided droplet manipulations on a superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater (i.e., not on a 96-well plate). Serial dilutions were demonstrated for diluting sample matrix. Centrifuging was demonstrated by rotating a 10 μL droplet at 2300 round per minute, concentrating E. coli by more than 3-fold within 3 min. DNA extraction was demonstrated from E. coli sample utilizing the disposable pipette tip to cleverly attract the extracted DNA from the droplet residing on a superhydrophobic surface, which took less than 10 min. Following extraction, the 1500 bp sequence of Peptidase D from E. coli was amplified using rapid droplet thermocycling, which took 10 min for 30 cycles. The total assay time was 23 min, including droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction and rapid droplet thermocycling. Evaporation from of 10 μL droplets was not significant during these procedures, since the longest time exposure to air and the vibrations was less than 5 min (during DNA extraction). The results of these sequentially executed processes were analyzed using gel electrophoresis. Thus, this work demonstrates the adaptability of the system to replace many common laboratory tasks on a single platform (through re-programmability), in rapid succession (using droplets), and with a high level of

  1. Sophisticated compound droplets on fiber networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyer, Floriane; Lismont, Marjorie; Dreesen, Laurent; Vandewalle, Nicolas

    2015-11-01

    Droplets on fibers are part of our everyday lives. Indeed, many phenomena involve drops and fibers such as the formation of dew droplets on a spiderweb, the trapping of water droplets on cactus spines or the dyeing of cotton or wool fibers. Therefore, this topic has been widely studied in the recent years and it appears that droplets on fibers can be the starting point for an open digital microfluidics. We study the behavior of soapy water droplets on a fiber array. When a droplet slides along a vertical fiber and encounters a horizontal fiber, it can either stick there or continue its way. In the latter case, the droplet releases a tiny residue. We study the volume of these residues depending on the geometry of the node. By using this technique, a large number of small droplets can be trapped at the nodes of a fiber array. These residues can be encapsulated and collected by an oil droplet in order to create a multicompound droplet. Moreover, by using optical fibers, we can provoke and detect the fluorescence of the inner droplets. Fibers provide therefore an original way to study compound droplets and multiple reactions. F. Weyer is financially supported by an FNRS grant. This work is also supported by the FRFC 2.4504.12.

  2. Water droplet impact on elastic superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Weisensee, Patricia B; Tian, Junjiao; Miljkovic, Nenad; King, William P

    2016-01-01

    Water droplet impact on surfaces is a ubiquitous phenomenon in nature and industry, where the time of contact between droplet and surface influences the transfer of mass, momentum and energy. To manipulate and reduce the contact time of impacting droplets, previous publications report tailoring of surface microstructures that influence the droplet - surface interface. Here we show that surface elasticity also affects droplet impact, where a droplet impacting an elastic superhydrophobic surface can lead to a two-fold reduction in contact time compared to equivalent rigid surfaces. Using high speed imaging, we investigated the impact dynamics on elastic nanostructured superhydrophobic substrates having membrane and cantilever designs with stiffness 0.5-7630 N/m. Upon impact, the droplet excites the substrate to oscillate, while during liquid retraction, the substrate imparts vertical momentum back to the droplet with a springboard effect, causing early droplet lift-off with reduced contact time. Through detailed experimental and theoretical analysis, we show that this novel springboarding phenomenon is achieved for a specific range of Weber numbers (We >40) and droplet Froude numbers during spreading (Fr >1). The observation of the substrate elasticity-mediated droplet springboard effect provides new insight into droplet impact physics. PMID:27461899

  3. Water droplet impact on elastic superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisensee, Patricia B.; Tian, Junjiao; Miljkovic, Nenad; King, William P.

    2016-07-01

    Water droplet impact on surfaces is a ubiquitous phenomenon in nature and industry, where the time of contact between droplet and surface influences the transfer of mass, momentum and energy. To manipulate and reduce the contact time of impacting droplets, previous publications report tailoring of surface microstructures that influence the droplet - surface interface. Here we show that surface elasticity also affects droplet impact, where a droplet impacting an elastic superhydrophobic surface can lead to a two-fold reduction in contact time compared to equivalent rigid surfaces. Using high speed imaging, we investigated the impact dynamics on elastic nanostructured superhydrophobic substrates having membrane and cantilever designs with stiffness 0.5–7630 N/m. Upon impact, the droplet excites the substrate to oscillate, while during liquid retraction, the substrate imparts vertical momentum back to the droplet with a springboard effect, causing early droplet lift-off with reduced contact time. Through detailed experimental and theoretical analysis, we show that this novel springboarding phenomenon is achieved for a specific range of Weber numbers (We >40) and droplet Froude numbers during spreading (Fr >1). The observation of the substrate elasticity-mediated droplet springboard effect provides new insight into droplet impact physics.

  4. Droplet Combustion and Soot Formation in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avedisian, C. Thomas

    1994-01-01

    One of the most complex processes involved in the combustion ot liquid fuels is the formation of soot. A well characterized flow field and simplified flame structure can improve considerably the understanding of soot formation processes. The simplest flame shape to analyze for a droplet is spherical with its associated one-dimensional flow field. It is a fundamental limit and the oldest and most often analyzed configuration of droplet combustion. Spherical symmetry in the droplet burning process will arise when there is no relative motion between the droplet and ambience or uneven heating around the droplet periphery, and buoyancy effects are negligible. The flame and droplet are then concentric with each other and there is no liquid circulation within the droplet. An understanding of the effect of soot on droplet combustion should therefore benefit from this simplified configuration. Soot formed during spherically symmetric droplet combustion, however, has only recently drawn attention and it appears to be one of the few aspects associated with droplet combustion which have not yet been thoroughly investigated. For this review, the broad subject of droplet combustion is narrowed considerably by restricting attention specifically to soot combined with spherically symmetric droplet burning processes that are promoted.

  5. Spin torque-generated magnetic droplet solitons.

    PubMed

    Mohseni, S M; Sani, S R; Persson, J; Nguyen, T N Anh; Chung, S; Pogoryelov, Ye; Muduli, P K; Iacocca, E; Eklund, A; Dumas, R K; Bonetti, S; Deac, A; Hoefer, M A; Akerman, J

    2013-03-15

    Dissipative solitons have been reported in a wide range of nonlinear systems, but the observation of their magnetic analog has been experimentally challenging. Using spin transfer torque underneath a nanocontact on a magnetic thin film with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA), we have observed the generation of dissipative magnetic droplet solitons and report on their rich dynamical properties. Micromagnetic simulations identify a wide range of automodulation frequencies, including droplet oscillatory motion, droplet "spinning," and droplet "breather" states. The droplet can be controlled by using both current and magnetic fields and is expected to have applications in spintronics, magnonics, and PMA-based domain-wall devices. PMID:23493707

  6. Simulation of Airborne Microbial Droplet Transport

    PubMed Central

    Lighthart, Bruce; Kim, Jinwon

    1989-01-01

    The framework for a simulation model which describes the dispersion of individual droplets of water containing viable microbes is presented. The model accounts for physical, chemical, biological, and measured meteorological parameters of each droplet at each of many short time steps. Repeating the modeling process for many droplets will simulate a cloud of droplets. The model is compared with the Tulelake, Calif., release in 1988 and found to show very similar patterns of deposition within 30 m (the maximum observation distance of the source. A hypothesis for the survival sequence in the microbe-containing droplets is discussed. PMID:16348015

  7. Formation and Levitation of Unconfined Droplet Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, S.; Ruff, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    Combustion experiments using arrays of droplets seek to provide a link between single droplet combustion phenomena and the behavior of complex spray combustion systems. Both single droplet and droplet array studies have been conducted in microgravity to better isolate the droplet interaction phenomena and eliminate or reduce the confounding effects of buoyancy-induced convection. In most experiments involving droplet arrays, the droplets are supported on fibers to keep them stationary and close together before the combustion event. The presence of the fiber, however, disturbs the combustion process by introducing a source of heat transfer and asymmetry into the configuration. As the number of drops in a droplet array increases, supporting the drops on fibers becomes less practical because of the cumulative effect of the fibers on the combustion process. The overall objective of this research is to study the combustion of well-characterized drop clusters in a microgravity environment. Direct experimental observations and measurements of the combustion of droplet clusters would fill a large gap in our current understanding of droplet and spray combustion and provide unique experimental data for the verification and improvement of spray combustion models. This paper describes current work on the design and performance of an apparatus to generate and stabilize droplet clusters using acoustic and electrostatic forces.

  8. Fiber-Supported Droplet Combustion. Experiment 32

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, Daniel L.; Haggard, John B., Jr.; Nayagam, Vedha; Dryer, Frederick L.; Williams, Forman A.; Shaw, Ben D.

    1998-01-01

    Individual droplets with diameters ranging from about 2 mm to 5 mm were burned under microgravity conditions in air at 1 bar with an ambient temperature of 300 K. Each droplet was tethered by a silicon carbide fiber of 80 mm or 150 mm diameter to keep it in view of video recording, and, in some tests, a forced air flow was applied in a direction parallel to the fiber axis. Methanol, two methanol-water mixtures, two methanol-dodecanol mixtures, and two heptane-hexadecane mixtures were the fuels. Droplet diameters were measured as functions of time and compared with existing theoretical predictions. The prediction that methanol droplets extinguish at diameters that increase with increasing initial droplet diameter is verified by these experiments. In addition, the quasi-steady burning rate constant of the heptane-hexadecane mixtures appears to decrease with increasing droplet diameter; obscuration consistent with very heavy sooting, but without the formation of soot shells, is observed for the largest of these droplets. Forced convective flow around methanol droplets was found to increase the burning rate and to produce a ratio of downstream-to-upstream flame radius that remained constant as the droplet size decreased, a trend in agreement with earlier results obtained at higher convective velocities for smaller droplets having larger flame standoff ratios. There are a number of implications of the experimental results regarding droplet-combustion theory.

  9. The epididymis, cytoplasmic droplets and male fertility

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Trevor G

    2011-01-01

    The potential of spermatozoa to become motile during post-testicular maturation, and the relationship between the cytoplasmic droplet and fertilizing capacity are reviewed. Post-testicular maturation of spermatozoa involves the autonomous induction of motility, which can occur in vivo in testes with occluded excurrent ducts and in vitro in testicular explants, and artefactual changes in morphology that appear to occur in the testis in vitro. Both modifications may reflect time-dependent oxidation of disulphide bonds of head and tail proteins. Regulatory volume decrease (RVD), which counters sperm swelling at ejaculation, is discussed in relation to loss of cytoplasmic droplets and consequences for fertility. It is postulated that: (i) fertile males possess spermatozoa with sufficient osmolytes to drive RVD at ejaculation, permitting the droplet to round up and pinch off without membrane rupture; and (ii) infertile males possess spermatozoa with insufficient osmolytes so that RVD is inadequate, the droplet swells and the resulting flagellar angulation prevents droplet loss. Droplet retention at ejaculation is a harbinger of infertility caused by failure of the spermatozoon to negotiate the uterotubal junction or mucous and reach the egg. In this hypothesis, the epididymis regulates fertility indirectly by the extent of osmolyte provision to spermatozoa, which influences RVD and therefore droplet loss. Man is an exception, because ejaculated human spermatozoa retain their droplets. This may reflect their short midpiece, approximating head length, permitting a swollen droplet to extend along the entire midpiece; this not only obviates droplet migration and flagellar angulation but also hampers droplet loss. PMID:21076437

  10. Electron Diffraction of Superfluid Helium Droplets

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We present experimental results of electron diffraction of superfluid helium droplets and droplets doped with phthalocyanine gallium chloride and discuss the possibility of performing the same experiment with a laser aligned sample. The diffraction profile of pure droplets demonstrates dependence on the nozzle temperature, that is, on the average size of the droplets. Larger clusters demonstrate faster decay with increasing momentum transfer, whereas smaller clusters converge to isolated gas phase molecules at source temperatures of 18 K and higher. Electron diffraction of doped droplets shows similar modified molecular scattering intensity as that of the corresponding gas phase molecules. On the basis of fittings of the scattering profile, the number of remaining helium atoms of the doped droplets is estimated to be on the order of hundreds. This result offers guidance in assessing the possibility of electron diffraction from laser aligned molecules doped in superfluid helium droplets. PMID:24920997

  11. Dancing droplets: Contact angle, drag, and confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benusiglio, Adrien; Cira, Nate; Prakash, Manu

    2015-11-01

    When deposited on a clean glass slide, a mixture of water and propylene glycol forms a droplet of given contact angle, when both pure liquids spread. (Cira, Benusiglio, Prakash: Nature, 2015). The droplet is stabilized by a gradient of surface tension due to evaporation that induces a Marangoni flow from the border to the apex of the droplets. The apparent contact angle of the droplets depends on both their composition and the external humidity as captured by simple models. These droplets present remarkable properties such as lack of a large pinning force. We discuss the drag on these droplets as a function of various parameters. We show theoretical and experimental results of how various confinement geometries change the vapor gradient and the dynamics of droplet attraction.

  12. Exciplex fluorescence thermometry of falling hexadecane droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Hanlon, T.R.; Melton, L.A. )

    1992-05-01

    Exciplex fluorescence thermometry has been used to measure the temperature of 283 micron hexadecane droplets falling through a quiescent, oxygen-free, approximately 500 C ambient. After a period of negligible change, the derived droplet temperatures exhibit a sharp rise of about 100 C followed by a gentle increase to approximately 200 C. The derived temperatures, although averaged over most of the volume of the droplet, still provide some evidence of internal processes in the droplet due to the partially selective optical sampling of the droplet volume, in which fluorescence from the region between 0.50 and 0.75 of the droplet is presumed to be approximately homogeneous, and the exciplex fluorescence thermometry measurements provide accurate, interpretable temperatures for the freely falling droplets.

  13. Enhanced Droplet Control by Transition Boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grounds, Alex; Still, Richard; Takashina, Kei

    2012-10-01

    A droplet of water on a heated surface can levitate over a film of gas produced by its own evaporation in the Leidenfrost effect. When the surface is prepared with ratchet-like saw-teeth topography, these droplets can self-propel and can even climb uphill. However, the extent to which the droplets can be controlled is limited by the physics of the Leidenfrost effect. Here, we show that transition boiling can be induced even at very high surface temperatures and provide additional control over the droplets. Ratchets with acute protrusions enable droplets to climb steeper inclines while ratchets with sub-structures enable their direction of motion to be controlled by varying the temperature of the surface. The droplets' departure from the Leidenfrost regime is assessed by analysing the sound produced by their boiling. We anticipate these techniques will enable the development of more sophisticated methods for controlling small droplets and heat transfer.

  14. Enhanced Droplet Control by Transition Boiling

    PubMed Central

    Grounds, Alex; Still, Richard; Takashina, Kei

    2012-01-01

    A droplet of water on a heated surface can levitate over a film of gas produced by its own evaporation in the Leidenfrost effect. When the surface is prepared with ratchet-like saw-teeth topography, these droplets can self-propel and can even climb uphill. However, the extent to which the droplets can be controlled is limited by the physics of the Leidenfrost effect. Here, we show that transition boiling can be induced even at very high surface temperatures and provide additional control over the droplets. Ratchets with acute protrusions enable droplets to climb steeper inclines while ratchets with sub-structures enable their direction of motion to be controlled by varying the temperature of the surface. The droplets' departure from the Leidenfrost regime is assessed by analysing the sound produced by their boiling. We anticipate these techniques will enable the development of more sophisticated methods for controlling small droplets and heat transfer. PMID:23056912

  15. Shape-Shifting Droplet Networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, T; Wan, Duanduan; Schwarz, J M; Bowick, M J

    2016-03-11

    We consider a three-dimensional network of aqueous droplets joined by single lipid bilayers to form a cohesive, tissuelike material. The droplets in these networks can be programed to have distinct osmolarities so that osmotic gradients generate internal stresses via local fluid flows to cause the network to change shape. We discover, using molecular dynamics simulations, a reversible folding-unfolding process by adding an osmotic interaction with the surrounding environment which necessarily evolves dynamically as the shape of the network changes. This discovery is the next important step towards osmotic robotics in this system. We also explore analytically and numerically how the networks become faceted via buckling and how quasi-one-dimensional networks become three dimensional. PMID:27015513

  16. Droplet actuator analyzer with cartridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Gregory F. (Inventor); Sturmer, Ryan A. (Inventor); Paik, Philip Y. (Inventor); Srinivasan, Vijay (Inventor); Pollack, Michael G. (Inventor); Pamula, Vamsee K. (Inventor); Brafford, Keith R. (Inventor); West, Richard M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A droplet actuator with cartridge is provided. According to one embodiment, a sample analyzer is provided and includes an analyzer unit comprising electronic or optical receiving means, a cartridge comprising self-contained droplet handling capabilities, and a wherein the cartridge is coupled to the analyzer unit by a means which aligns electronic and/or optical outputs from the cartridge with electronic or optical receiving means on the analyzer unit. According to another embodiment, a sample analyzer is provided and includes a sample analyzer comprising a cartridge coupled thereto and a means of electrical interface and/or optical interface between the cartridge and the analyzer, whereby electrical signals and/or optical signals may be transmitted from the cartridge to the analyzer.

  17. Shape-Shifting Droplet Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.; Wan, Duanduan; Schwarz, J. M.; Bowick, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    We consider a three-dimensional network of aqueous droplets joined by single lipid bilayers to form a cohesive, tissuelike material. The droplets in these networks can be programed to have distinct osmolarities so that osmotic gradients generate internal stresses via local fluid flows to cause the network to change shape. We discover, using molecular dynamics simulations, a reversible folding-unfolding process by adding an osmotic interaction with the surrounding environment which necessarily evolves dynamically as the shape of the network changes. This discovery is the next important step towards osmotic robotics in this system. We also explore analytically and numerically how the networks become faceted via buckling and how quasi-one-dimensional networks become three dimensional.

  18. Droplet Core Nuclear Rocket (DCNR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anghaie, Samim

    1991-01-01

    The most basic design feature of the droplet core nuclear reactor is to spray liquid uranium into the core in the form of droplets on the order of five to ten microns in size, to bring the reactor to critical conditions. The liquid uranium fuel ejector is driven by hydrogen, and more hydrogen is injected from the side of the reactor to about one and a half meters from the top. High temperature hydrogen is expanded through a nozzle to produce thrust. The hydrogen pressure in the system can be somewhere between 50 and 500 atmospheres; the higher pressure is more desirable. In the lower core region, hydrogen is tangentially injected to serve two purposes: (1) to provide a swirling flow to protect the wall from impingement of hot uranium droplets: (2) to generate a vortex flow that can be used for fuel separation. The reactor is designed to maximize the energy generation in the upper region of the core. The system can result in and Isp of 2000 per second, and a thrust-to-weight ratio of 1.6 for the shielded reactor. The nuclear engine system can reduce the Mars mission duration to less than 200 days. It can reduce the hydrogen consumption by a factor of 2 to 3, which reduces the hydrogen load by about 130 to 150 metric tons.

  19. Vortices catapult droplets in atomization

    SciTech Connect

    Jerome, J. John Soundar Zaleski, Stéphane; Hoepffner, Jérôme; Marty, Sylvain; Matas, Jean-Philippe

    2013-11-15

    A droplet ejection mechanism in planar two-phase mixing layers is examined. Any disturbance on the gas-liquid interface grows into a Kelvin-Helmholtz wave, and the wave crest forms a thin liquid film that flaps as the wave grows downstream. Increasing the gas speed, it is observed that the film breaks up into droplets which are eventually thrown into the gas stream at large angles. In a flow where most of the momentum is in the horizontal direction, it is surprising to observe these large ejection angles. Our experiments and simulations show that a recirculation region grows downstream of the wave and leads to vortex shedding similar to the wake of a backward-facing step. The ejection mechanism results from the interaction between the liquid film and the vortex shedding sequence: a recirculation zone appears in the wake of the wave and a liquid film emerges from the wave crest; the recirculation region detaches into a vortex and the gas flow over the wave momentarily reattaches due to the departure of the vortex; this reattached flow pushes the liquid film down; by now, a new recirculation vortex is being created in the wake of the wave—just where the liquid film is now located; the liquid film is blown up from below by the newly formed recirculation vortex in a manner similar to a bag-breakup event; the resulting droplets are catapulted by the recirculation vortex.

  20. Insight into instabilities in burning droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miglani, Ankur; Basu, Saptarshi; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2014-03-01

    The complex multiscale physics of nano-particle laden functional droplets in a reacting environment is of fundamental and applied significance for a wide variety of applications ranging from thermal sprays to pharmaceutics to modern day combustors using new brands of bio-fuels. Formation of homogenous nucleated bubbles at the superheat limit inside vaporizing droplets (with or without nanoparticles) represents an unstable system. Here we show that self-induced boiling in burning functional pendant droplets can produce severe volumetric shape oscillations. Internal pressure build-up due to ebullition activity ejects bubbles from the droplet domain causing undulations on the droplet surface and oscillations in bulk. Through experiments, we establish that the degree of droplet deformation depends on the frequency and intensity of these bubble expulsion events. In a distinct regime of single isolated bubble residing in the droplet, however, pre-ejection transient time is identified by Darrieus-Landau evaporative instability, where bubble-droplet system behaves as a synchronized driver-driven system with bulk bubble-shape oscillations being imposed on the droplet. The agglomeration of nanophase additives modulates the flow structures within the droplet and also influences the bubble inception and growth leading to different levels of instabilities.

  1. Bouncing of polymeric droplets on liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Gier, S; Dorbolo, S; Terwagne, D; Vandewalle, N; Wagner, C

    2012-12-01

    The effect of polymers on the bouncing behavior of droplets in a highly viscous, vertically shaken silicone oil bath was investigated in this study. Droplets of a sample liquid were carefully placed on a vibrating bath that was maintained well below the threshold of Faraday waves. The bouncing threshold of the plate acceleration depended on the acceleration frequency. For pure water droplets and droplets of aqueous polymer solutions, a minimum acceleration amplitude was observed in the acceleration threshold curves as a function of frequency. The bouncing acceleration amplitude for a droplet of a dilute aqueous polymer solution was higher than the acceleration amplitude for a pure water droplet. Measurements of the center of mass trajectory and the droplet deformations showed that the controlling parameter in the bouncing process was the oscillating elongational rate of the droplet. This parameter can be directly related to the elongational viscosity of the polymeric samples. The large elongational viscosity of the polymer solution droplets suppressed large droplet deformations, resulting in less chaotic bouncing. PMID:23368045

  2. [Micro-droplet characterization and its application for amino acid detection in droplet microfluidic system].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Huiling; Dong, Libing; Tu, Ran; Du, Wenbin; Ji, Shiru; Wang, Qinhong

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the droplet microfluidic system attracts interests due to its high throughput and low cost to detect and screen. The picoliter micro-droplets from droplet microfluidics are uniform with respect to the size and shape, and could be used as monodispensed micro-reactors for encapsulation and detection of single cell or its metabolites. Therefore, it is indispensable to characterize micro-droplet and its application from droplet microfluidic system. We first constructed the custom-designed droplet microfluidic system for generating micro-droplets, and then used the micro-droplets to encapsulate important amino acids such as glutamic acid, phenylalanine, tryptophan or tyrosine to test the droplets' properties, including the stability, diffusivity and bio-compatibility for investigating its application for amino acid detection and sorting. The custom-designed droplet microfluidic system could generate the uniformed micro-droplets with a controllable size between 20 to 50 microm. The micro-droplets could be stable for more than 20 h without cross-contamination or fusion each other. The throughput of detection and sorting of the system is about 600 micro-droplets per minute. This study provides a high-throughput platform for the analysis and screening of amino acid-producing microorganisms. PMID:24818488

  3. Oscillatory combustion of liquid monopropellant droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chanin, S. P.; Faeth, G. M.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was conducted on the open-loop combustion response of monopropellant droplets and sprays to imposed pressure oscillations. The theoretical model was solved as a perturbation analysis through first order, yielding linear response results. Unsteady gas phase effects were considered in some cases, but the bulk of the calculations assumed a quasi-steady gas phase. Calculations were conducted using properties corresponding to hydrazine decomposition. Zero-order results agreed with earlier measurements of hydrazine droplet burning in combustion gases. The droplet response was greatest (exceeding unity in some cases) for large droplets with liquid phase temperature gradients; at frequencies near the characteristic frequency of the liquid phase thermal wave. The response of a spray is less than that of its largest droplet, however, a relatively small percentage of large droplets provides a substantial response (exceeding unity in some cases).

  4. Supercritical droplet combustion and related transport phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Vigor; Hsieh, K. C.; Shuen, J. S.

    1993-01-01

    An overview of recent advances in theoretical analyses of supercritical droplet vaporization and combustion is conducted. Both hydrocarbon and cryogenic liquid droplets over a wide range of thermodynamic states are considered. Various important high-pressure effects on droplet behavior, such as thermodynamic non-ideality, transport anomaly, and property variation, are reviewed. Results indicate that the ambient gas pressure exerts significant control of droplet gasification and burning processes through its influence on fluid transport, gas-liquid interfacial thermodynamics, and chemical reactions. The droplet gasification rate increases progressively with pressure. However, the data for the overall burnout time exhibit a considerable change in the combustion mechanism at the criticl pressure, mainly as a result of reduced mass diffusivity and latent heat of vaporization with increased pressure. The influence of droplet size on the burning characteristics is also noted.

  5. A parameterization of cloud droplet nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, S.J. ); Chuang, C.; Penner, J.E. )

    1993-01-01

    Droplet nucleation is a fundamental cloud process. The number of aerosols activated to form cloud droplets influences not only the number of aerosols scavenged by clouds but also the size of the cloud droplets. Cloud droplet size influences the cloud albedo and the conversion of cloud water to precipitation. Global aerosol models are presently being developed with the intention of coupling with global atmospheric circulation models to evaluate the influence of aerosols and aerosol-cloud interactions on climate. If these and other coupled models are to address issues of aerosol-cloud interactions, the droplet nucleation process must be adequately represented. Here we introduce a droplet nucleation parametrization that offers certain advantages over the popular Twomey (1959) parameterization.

  6. How faceted liquid droplets grow tails.

    PubMed

    Guttman, Shani; Sapir, Zvi; Schultz, Moty; Butenko, Alexander V; Ocko, Benjamin M; Deutsch, Moshe; Sloutskin, Eli

    2016-01-19

    Liquid droplets, widely encountered in everyday life, have no flat facets. Here we show that water-dispersed oil droplets can be reversibly temperature-tuned to icosahedral and other faceted shapes, hitherto unreported for liquid droplets. These shape changes are shown to originate in the interplay between interfacial tension and the elasticity of the droplet's 2-nm-thick interfacial monolayer, which crystallizes at some T = Ts above the oil's melting point, with the droplet's bulk remaining liquid. Strikingly, at still-lower temperatures, this interfacial freezing (IF) effect also causes droplets to deform, split, and grow tails. Our findings provide deep insights into molecular-scale elasticity and allow formation of emulsions of tunable stability for directed self-assembly of complex-shaped particles and other future technologies. PMID:26733673

  7. Electropermanent magnet actuation for droplet ferromicrofluidics

    PubMed Central

    Padovani, José I.; Jeffrey, Stefanie S.; Howe, Roger T.

    2016-01-01

    Droplet actuation is an essential mechanism for droplet-based microfluidic systems. On-demand electromagnetic actuation is used in a ferrofluid-based microfluidic system for water droplet displacement. Electropermanent magnets (EPMs) are used to induce 50 mT magnetic fields in a ferrofluid filled microchannel with gradients up to 6.4 × 104 kA/m2. Short 50 µs current pulses activate the electropermanent magnets and generate negative magnetophoretic forces that range from 10 to 70 nN on 40 to 80 µm water-in-ferrofluid droplets. Maximum droplet displacement velocities of up to 300 µm/s are obtained under flow and no-flow conditions. Electropermanent magnet-activated droplet sorting under continuous flow is demonstrated using a split-junction microfluidic design. PMID:27583301

  8. Droplet Deformation Prediction with the Droplet Deormation and Break Up Model (DDB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario

    2012-01-01

    The Droplet Deformation and Breakup Model was used to predict deformation of droplets approaching the leading edge stagnation line of an airfoil. The quasi-steady model was solved for each position along the droplet path. A program was developed to solve the non-linear, second order, ordinary differential equation that governs the model. A fourth order Runge-Kutta method was used to solve the equation. Experimental slip velocities from droplet breakup studies were used as input to the model which required slip velocity along the particle path. The center of mass displacement predictions were compared to the experimental measurements from the droplet breakup studies for droplets with radii in the range of 200 to 700 mm approaching the airfoil at 50 and 90 m/sec. The model predictions were good for the displacement of the center of mass for small and medium sized droplets. For larger droplets the model predictions did not agree with the experimental results.

  9. Droplet Deformation Prediction With the Droplet Deformation and Breakup Model (DDB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario

    2012-01-01

    The Droplet Deformation and Breakup Model was used to predict deformation of droplets approaching the leading edge stagnation line of an airfoil. The quasi-steady model was solved for each position along the droplet path. A program was developed to solve the non-linear, second order, ordinary differential equation that governs the model. A fourth order Runge-Kutta method was used to solve the equation. Experimental slip velocities from droplet breakup studies were used as input to the model which required slip velocity along the particle path. The center of mass displacement predictions were compared to the experimental measurements from the droplet breakup studies for droplets with radii in the range of 200 to 700 mm approaching the airfoil at 50 and 90 m/sec. The model predictions were good for the displacement of the center of mass for small and medium sized droplets. For larger droplets the model predictions did not agree with the experimental results.

  10. Droplet Vaporization in a Supercritical Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, E. W.; Farrell, P. V.

    1987-01-01

    A model is presented which describes single liquid droplet vaporization at nearly critical liquid pressures and temperatures. A modified Redlich-Kwong equation of state is used to evaluate the fugacities and liquid and vapor mole fractions at the interface under the assumption of interface equilibrium. Results obtained for different droplet sizes and conditions indicate significant differences in behavior in comparison with low-pressure quasi-steady droplet vaporization.

  11. Impingement of Water Droplets on a Sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsch, Robert G.; Saper, Paul G.; Kadow, Charles F.

    1955-01-01

    Droplet trajectories about a sphere in ideal fluid flow were calculated. From the calculated droplet trajectories the droplet impingement characteristics of the sphere were determined. Impingement data and equations for determining the collection efficiency, the area, and the distribution of impingement are presented in terms of dimensionless parameters. The range of flight and atmospheric conditions covered in the calculations was extended considerably beyond the range covered by previously reported calculations for the sphere.

  12. Programmed Application of Transforming Growth Factor β3 and Rac1 Inhibitor NSC23766 Committed Hyaline Cartilage Differentiation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells for Osteochondral Defect Repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shouan; Chen, Pengfei; Wu, Yan; Xiong, Si; Sun, Heng; Xia, Qingqing; Shi, Libing

    2014-01-01

    Hyaline cartilage differentiation is always the challenge with application of stem cells for joint repair. Transforming growth factors (TGFs) and bone morphogenetic proteins can initiate cartilage differentiation but often lead to hypertrophy and calcification, related to abnormal Rac1 activity. In this study, we developed a strategy of programmed application of TGFβ3 and Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 to commit the hyaline cartilage differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) for joint cartilage repair. ADSCs were isolated and cultured in a micromass and pellet culture model to evaluate chondrogenic and hypertrophic differentiation. The function of Rac1 was investigated with constitutively active Rac1 mutant and dominant negative Rac1 mutant. The efficacy of ADSCs with programmed application of TGFβ3 and Rac1 inhibitor for cartilage repair was studied in a rat model of osteochondral defects. The results showed that TGFβ3 promoted ADSCs chondro-lineage differentiation and that NSC23766 prevented ADSC-derived chondrocytes from hypertrophy in vitro. The combination of ADSCs, TGFβ3, and NSC23766 promoted quality osteochondral defect repair in rats with much less chondrocytes hypertrophy and significantly higher International Cartilage Repair Society macroscopic and microscopic scores. The findings have illustrated that programmed application of TGFβ3 and Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 can commit ADSCs to chondro-lineage differentiation and improve the efficacy of ADSCs for cartilage defect repair. These findings suggest a promising stem cell-based strategy for articular cartilage repair. PMID:25154784

  13. Fiber Supported Droplet Combustion-2 (FSDC-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colantonio, Renato; Dietrich, Daniel; Haggard, John B., Jr.; Nayagan, Vedha; Dryer, Frederick L.; Shaw, Benjamin D.; Williams, Forman A.

    1998-01-01

    Experimental results for the burning characteristics of fiber supported, liquid droplets in ambient Shuttle cabin air (21% oxygen, 1 bar pressure) were obtained from the Glove Box Facility aboard the STS-94/MSL-1 mission using the Fiber Supported Droplet Combustion - 2 (FSDC-2) apparatus. The combustion of individual droplets of methanol/water mixtures, ethanol, ethanol/water azeotrope, n-heptane, n-decane, and n-heptane/n-hexadecane mixtures were studied in quiescent air. The effects of low velocity, laminar gas phase forced convection on the combustion of individual droplets of n-heptane and n-decane were investigated and interactions of two droplet-arrays of n-heptane and n-decane droplets were also studied with and without gas phase convective flow. Initial diameters ranging from about 2mm to over 6mm were burned on 80-100 micron silicon fibers. In addition to phenomenological observations, quantitative data were obtained in the form of backlit images of the burning droplets, overall flame images, and radiometric combustion emission measurements as a function of the burning time in each experiment. In all, 124 of the 129 attempted experiments (or about twice the number of experiments originally planned for the STS-94/MSL-1 mission) were conducted successfully. The experimental results contribute new observations on the combustion properties of pure alkanes, binary alkane mixtures, and simple alcohols for droplet sizes not studied previously, including measurements on individual droplets and two-droplet arrays, inclusive of the effects of forced gas phase convection. New phenomena characterized experimentally for the first time include radiative extinction of droplet burning for alkanes and the "twin effect" which occurs as a result of interactions during the combustion of two-droplet arrays. Numerical modeling of isolated droplet combustion phenomenon has been conducted for methanol/water mixtures, n-heptane, and n-heptane/n-hexadecane mixtures, and results

  14. Pyrolysis of Large Black Liquor Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartkus, Tadas P.; Dietrich, Daniel L.; T'ien, James S.; Wessel, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results of experiments involving the pyrolysis of large black liquor droplets in the NASA KC-135 reduced gravity aircraft. The reduced gravity environment facilitated the study of droplets up to 9 mm in diameter extending the results of previous studies to droplet sizes that are similar to those encountered in recovery boilers. Single black liquor droplets were rapidly inserted into a 923 K oven. The primary independent variables were the initial droplet diameter (0.5 mm to 9 mm), the black liquor solids content (66.12% - 72.9% by mass), and the ambient oxygen mole fraction (0.0 - 0.21). Video records of the experiments provided size and shape of the droplets as a function of time. The results show that the particle diameter at the end of the drying stage (D(sub DRY)) increases linearly with the initial particle diameter (D(sub O)). The results further show that the ratio of the maximum swollen diameter (D(sub MAX)) to D(sub O) decreases with increasing D(sub O) for droplets with D(sub O) less than 4 mm. This ratio was independent of D(sub O) for droplets with D(sub O) greater than 4 mm. The particle is most spherical at the end of drying, and least spherical at maximum swollen size, regardless of initial sphericity and droplet size.

  15. Strings of droplets propelled by coherent waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filoux, B.; Hubert, M.; Vandewalle, N.

    2015-10-01

    Bouncing walking droplets possess fascinating properties due to their peculiar wave-particle interaction leading to unexpected quantumlike behaviors. We propose a study consisting in droplets walking along annular cavities. We show that, in this geometry, they spontaneously form a string of synchronized bouncing droplets that share a common coherent wave propelling the group at a speed faster than single walkers. The formation of this coherent wave and the collective droplet behaviors are captured by a model. Those are at the opposite of the ones found in two-dimensional geometries. Our results shed light on walking dynamics.

  16. Interaction between electrically charged droplets in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenbourger, Martin; Caps, Herve; Hardouin, Jerome; Vitry, Youen; Boigelot, Bernard; Dorbolo, Stephane; Grasp Team; Beams Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The past ten years, electrically charged droplets have been studied tremendously for their applications in industry (electrospray, electrowetting,...). However, charged droplets are also present in nature. Indeed, it has been shown that the droplets falling from thunderclouds possess an excess of electric charges. Moreover, some research groups try to use the electrical interaction between drops in order to control the coalescence between cloud droplets and control rain generation. The common way to study this kind of system is to make hypothesis on the interaction between two charged drops. Then, these hypothesis are extended to a system of thousands of charged droplets. Thanks to microgravity conditions, we were able to study the interaction between two electrically charged droplets. In practice, the charged droplets were propelled one in front of the other at low speed (less than 1 m/s). The droplets trajectory is studied for various charges and volumes. The repulsion between two charged drops is correctly fitted by a simple Coulomb repulsion law. In the case of attractive interactions, we discuss the collisions observed as a function of the droplets speed, volume and electric charges. Thanks to FNRS for financial support.

  17. Pyrolysis of Large Black Liquor Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartkus, Tadas P.; T'ien, James S.; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Wessel, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results of experiments involving the pyrolysis of large black liquor droplets in the NASA KC-135 reduced gravity aircraft. The reduced gravity environment facilitated the study of droplets up to 9 mm in diameter extending the results of previous studies to droplet sizes that are similar to those encountered in recovery boilers. Single black liquor droplets were rapidly inserted into a 923 K oven. The primary independent variables were the initial droplet diameter (0.5 mm to 9 mm), the black liquor solids content (66.12% - 72.9% by mass), and the ambient oxygen mole fraction (0.0 - 0.21). Video records of the experiments provided size and shape of the droplets as a function of time. The results show that the particle diameter at the end of the drying stage (D(sub DRY) ) increases linearly with the initial particle diameter (D(sub O)). The results further show that the ratio of the maximum swollen diameter (D(sub MAX)) to D(sub O) decreases with increasing D(sub O) for droplets with D(sub O) less than 4 mm. This ratio was independent of D(sub O) for droplets with D(sub O) greater than 4 mm. The particle is most spherical at the end of drying, and least spherical at maximum swollen size, regardless of initial sphericity and droplet size.

  18. Janus droplet as a catalytic micromotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shklyaev, Sergey

    2015-06-01

    Self-propulsion of a Janus droplet in a solution of surfactant, which reacts on a half of a drop surface, is studied theoretically. The droplet acts as a catalytic motor creating a concentration gradient, which generates its surface-tension-driven motion; the self-propulsion speed is rather high, 60 μ \\text{m/s} and more. This catalytic motor has several advantages over other micromotors: simple manufacturing, easily attained neutral buoyancy. In contrast to a single-fluid droplet, which demonstrates a self-propulsion as a result of symmetry breaking instability, for the Janus one no stability threshold exists; hence, the droplet radius can be scaled down to micrometers.

  19. Droplet Charging Effects in the Space Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Joslyn, Thomas B.; Ketsdever, Andrew D.

    2011-05-20

    Several applications exist for transiting liquid droplets through the near-Earth space environment. Numerical results are presented for the charging of liquid droplets of trimethyl pentaphenyl siloxane (DC705) in three different plasma environments: ionosphere, auroral, and geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). Nominal and high geomagnetic activity cases are investigated. In general, high levels of droplet charging (>100 V) exist only in GEO during periods of high geomagnetic or solar activity. An experiment was conducted to assess the charging of silicon-oil droplets due to photoemission. The photoemission yield in the 120-200 nm wavelength range was found to be approximately 0.06.

  20. Rapid solidification of highly undercooled alloy droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, M. G.; Shiohara, Y.; Flemings, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental work is described on undercooling and structure of tin-lead droplets emulsified in oil. The droplets, predominantly in the size range of 10-20 microns, were cooled at rates ranging from about 0.04 K/sec to 1,000,000 K/sec. The higher cooling rates were obtained by a newly developed technique of quenching the emulsified droplets in a cold liquid. Measured undercoolings (at the lower cooling rates) ranged up to about 100 C. Structures obtained depended strongly on undercooling, cooling rate before nucleation, droplet size, alloy composition and the rate of heat extraction after nucleation.

  1. Droplet Vaporization In A Levitating Acoustic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, G. A.; Liu, S.; Ciobanescu, I.

    2003-01-01

    Combustion experiments using arrays of droplets seek to provide a link between single droplet combustion phenomena and the behavior of complex spray combustion systems. Both single droplet and droplet array studies have been conducted in microgravity to better isolate the droplet interaction phenomena and eliminate or reduce the effects of buoyancy-induced convection. In most experiments involving droplet arrays, the droplets are supported on fibers to keep them stationary and close together before the combustion event. The presence of the fiber, however, disturbs the combustion process by introducing a source of heat transfer and asymmetry into the configuration. As the number of drops in a droplet array increases, supporting the drops on fibers becomes less practical because of the cumulative effect of the fibers on the combustion process. To eliminate the effect of the fiber, several researchers have conducted microgravity experiments using unsupported droplets. Jackson and Avedisian investigated single, unsupported drops while Nomura et al. studied droplet clouds formed by a condensation technique. The overall objective of this research is to extend the study of unsupported drops by investigating the combustion of well-characterized drop clusters in a microgravity environment. Direct experimental observations and measurements of the combustion of droplet clusters would provide unique experimental data for the verification and improvement of spray combustion models. In this work, the formation of drop clusters is precisely controlled using an acoustic levitation system so that dilute, as well as dense clusters can be created and stabilized before combustion in microgravity is begun. While the low-gravity test facility is being completed, tests have been conducted in 1-g to characterize the effect of the acoustic field on the vaporization of single and multiple droplets. This is important because in the combustion experiment, the droplets will be formed and

  2. Salt stains from evaporating droplets.

    PubMed

    Shahidzadeh, Noushine; Schut, Marthe F L; Desarnaud, Julie; Prat, Marc; Bonn, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The study of the behavior of sessile droplets on solid substrates is not only associated with common everyday phenomena, such as the coffee stain effect, limescale deposits on our bathroom walls , but also very important in many applications such as purification of pharmaceuticals, de-icing of airplanes, inkjet printing and coating applications. In many of these processes, a phase change happens within the drop because of solvent evaporation, temperature changes or chemical reactions, which consequently lead to liquid to solid transitions in the droplets. Here we show that crystallization patterns of evaporating of water drops containing dissolved salts are different from the stains reported for evaporating colloidal suspensions. This happens because during the solvent evaporation, the salts crystallize and grow during the drying. Our results show that the patterns of the resulting salt crystal stains are mainly governed by wetting properties of the emerging crystal as well as the pathway of nucleation and growth, and are independent of the evaporation rate and thermal conductivity of the substrates. PMID:26012481

  3. Digital droplet PCR on disk.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Friedrich; Trotter, Martin; Geltman, Marcel; Schwemmer, Frank; Wadle, Simon; Domínguez-Garrido, Elena; López, María; Cervera-Acedo, Cristina; Santibáñez, Paula; von Stetten, Felix; Zengerle, Roland; Paust, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Existing systems for digital droplet PCR (ddPCR) either suffer from low integration or are difficult to introduce to mass fabrication. Here we present an integrated system that is compatible to mass fabrication and combines emulsification, PCR, and fluorescence readout in a single chamber within a disposable cartridge (disk). Droplets are generated by injecting the sample into fluorinated oil via centrifugal step emulsification. The resulting emulsion is aligned in the PCR and readout zone by capillary action. During thermocycling, gas bubbles generated by degassing are removed by capillary driven transport through tapered regions in the PCR chamber. Thereby, the positioning of the emulsion within the readout zone of the PCR chamber is ensured at any time and no bubbles are present during readout. Manual handling of the disk solely requires pipetting of oil and PCR mix into the inlet structures, placing the disk into the thermocycler and subsequently into a microarray scanner. The functionality of the ddPCR process chain is demonstrated by quantitative detection of the cystic fibrosis causing mutation p.Phe508del, which is of interest for non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). The mutation was detected in a concentration range spanning four orders of magnitude. We envision that this work will lay the base for the development of highly integrated sample-to-digital-answer PCR systems that can be employed in routine clinical diagnosis. PMID:26610263

  4. Friction-formed liquid droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockwood, A. J.; Anantheshwara, K.; Bobji, M. S.; Inkson, B. J.

    2011-03-01

    The formation of nanoscale liquid droplets by friction of a solid is observed in real-time. This is achieved using a newly developed in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) triboprobe capable of applying multiple reciprocating wear cycles to a nanoscale surface. Dynamical imaging of the nanoscale cyclic rubbing of a focused-ion-beam (FIB) processed Al alloy by diamond shows that the generation of nanoscale wear particles is followed by a phase separation to form liquid Ga nanodroplets and liquid bridges. The transformation of a two-body system to a four-body solid-liquid system within the reciprocating wear track significantly alters the local dynamical friction and wear processes. Moving liquid bridges are observed in situ to play a key role at the sliding nanocontact, interacting strongly with the highly mobile nanoparticle debris. In situ imaging demonstrates that both static and moving liquid droplets exhibit asymmetric menisci due to nanoscale surface roughness. Nanodroplet kinetics are furthermore dependent on local frictional temperature, with solid-like surface nanofilaments forming on cooling. TEM nanotribology opens up new avenues for the real-time quantification of cyclic friction, wear and dynamic solid-liquid nanomechanics, which will have widespread applications in many areas of nanoscience and nanotechnology.

  5. Slip of Spreading Viscoplastic Droplets.

    PubMed

    Jalaal, Maziyar; Balmforth, Neil J; Stoeber, Boris

    2015-11-10

    The spreading of axisymmetric viscoplastic droplets extruded slowly on glass surfaces is studied experimentally using shadowgraphy and swept-field confocal microscopy. The microscopy furnishes vertical profiles of the radial velocity using particle image velocimetry (PIV) with neutrally buoyant tracers seeded in the fluid. Experiments were conducted for two complex fluids: aqueous solutions of Carbopol and xanthan gum. On untreated glass surfaces, PIV demonstrates that both fluids experience a significant amount of effective slip. The experiments were repeated on glass that had been treated to feature positive surface charges, thereby promoting adhesion between the negatively charged polymeric constituents of the fluids and the glass surface. The Carbopol and xanthan gum droplets spread more slowly on the treated surface and to a smaller radial distance. PIV demonstrated that this reduced spreading was associated with a substantial reduction in slip. For Carbopol, the effective slip could be eliminated entirely to within the precision of the PIV measurements; the reduction in slip was less effective for xanthan gum, with a weak slip velocity remaining noticeable. PMID:26418827

  6. Droplet Microfluidics for Virus Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotem, Assaf; Cockrell, Shelley; Guo, Mira; Pipas, James; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    The ability to detect, isolate, and characterize an infectious agent is important for diagnosing and curing infectious diseases. Detecting new viral diseases is a challenge because the number of virus particles is often low and/or localized to a small subset of cells. Even if a new virus is detected, it is difficult to isolate it from clinical or environmental samples where multiple viruses are present each with very different properties. Isolation is crucial for whole genome sequencing because reconstructing a genome from fragments of many different genomes is practically impossible. We present a Droplet Microfluidics platform that can detect, isolate and sequence single viral genomes from complex samples containing mixtures of many viruses. We use metagenomic information about the sample of mixed viruses to select a short genomic sequence whose genome we are interested in characterizing. We then encapsulate single virions from the same sample in picoliter volume droplets and screen for successful PCR amplification of the sequence of interest. The selected drops are pooled and their contents sequenced to reconstruct the genome of interest. This method provides a general tool for detecting, isolating and sequencing genetic elements in clinical and environmental samples.

  7. Salt stains from evaporating droplets

    PubMed Central

    Shahidzadeh, Noushine; Schut, Marthe F. L.; Desarnaud, Julie; Prat, Marc; Bonn, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The study of the behavior of sessile droplets on solid substrates is not only associated with common everyday phenomena, such as the coffee stain effect, limescale deposits on our bathroom walls , but also very important in many applications such as purification of pharmaceuticals, de-icing of airplanes, inkjet printing and coating applications. In many of these processes, a phase change happens within the drop because of solvent evaporation, temperature changes or chemical reactions, which consequently lead to liquid to solid transitions in the droplets. Here we show that crystallization patterns of evaporating of water drops containing dissolved salts are different from the stains reported for evaporating colloidal suspensions. This happens because during the solvent evaporation, the salts crystallize and grow during the drying. Our results show that the patterns of the resulting salt crystal stains are mainly governed by wetting properties of the emerging crystal as well as the pathway of nucleation and growth, and are independent of the evaporation rate and thermal conductivity of the substrates. PMID:26012481

  8. Effect of droplet shape on ring stains from dried liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, Melvin; Brown, Katherine; Mathur, Harsh

    A landmark experimental paper on coffee stains by Deegan et al included a simple theoretical analysis of circular droplets. The analysis was based on a model informally called the Maxwell House equations. It describes the evolving height profile of the droplet, the evaporation of the solvent and the outflow of solute to the rim of the droplet. Since typical droplets are not circles, here we extend the analysis to more general shapes. We find that for thin droplets the height profile may be determined by solving Poisson's equation in a domain corresponding to the footprint of the droplet. Evaporation is treated in a simple approximation via an electrostatic analogy and is dominated by the sharp edges of the droplet. Assuming zero vorticity allows us to analyze the solvent flow in droplets of arbitrary shape. We compare circular droplets to other shapes including long linear droplets, ring shaped droplets and droplets with an elliptical footprint

  9. Bismuth nano-droplets for group-V based molecular-beam droplet epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Zeng, Z. Q.; Fan, D. S.; Hirono, Y.; Wu, J.; Morgan, T. A.; Hu, X.; Yu, S. Q.; Wang, Zh. M.; Salamo, G. J.

    2011-12-01

    Self-assembly of bismuth droplets at nanoscale on GaAs(100) surface using molecular beam epitaxy was demonstrated. Fine control of density and size was achieved by varying growth temperature and total bismuth deposition. Droplet density was tuned by roughly 3 orders of magnitude, and the density-temperature dependence was found to be consistent with classical nucleation theory. These results may extend the flexibility of droplet epitaxy by serving as templates for group V based droplet epitaxy, which is in contrast to conventional group III based droplet epitaxy and may encourage nanostructure formation of bismuth-containing materials.

  10. Dynamic Morphologies of Microscale Droplet Interface Bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Mruetusatorn, Prachya; Boreyko, Jonathan B; Sarles, Stephen A; Venkatesan, Guru; Hayes, Douglas G; Collier, Pat

    2014-01-01

    Droplet interface bilayers (DIBs) are a powerful platform for studying the dynamics of synthetic cellular membranes; however, very little has been done to exploit the unique dynamical features of DIBs. Here, we generate microscale droplet interface bilayers ( DIBs) by bringing together femtoliter-volume water droplets in a microfluidic oil channel, and characterize morphological changes of the DIBs as the droplets shrink due to evaporation. By varying the initial conditions of the system, we identify three distinct classes of dynamic morphology. (1) Buckling and Fission: When forming DIBs using the lipid-out method (lipids in oil phase), lipids in the shrinking monolayers continually pair together and slide into the bilayer to conserve their mass. As the bilayer continues to grow, it becomes confined, buckles, and eventually fissions one or more vesicles. (2) Uniform Shrinking: When using the lipid-in method (lipids in water phase) to form DIBs, lipids uniformly transfer from the monolayers and bilayer into vesicles contained inside the water droplets. (3) Stretching and Unzipping: Finally, when the droplets are pinned to the wall(s) of the microfluidic channel, the droplets become stretched during evaporation, culminating in the unzipping of the bilayer and droplet separation. These findings offer a better understanding of the dynamics of coupled lipid interfaces.

  11. Synchronous universal droplet logic and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsikis, Georgios; Cybulski, James S.; Prakash, Manu

    2015-07-01

    Droplets are versatile digital materials; they can be produced at high throughput, perform chemical reactions as miniature beakers and carry biological entities. Droplets have been manipulated with electric, optical, acoustic and magnetic forces, but all these methods use serial controls to address individual droplets. An alternative is algorithmic manipulation based on logic operations that automatically compute where droplets are stored or directed, thereby enabling parallel control. However, logic previously implemented in low-Reynolds-number droplet hydrodynamics is asynchronous and thus prone to errors that prevent scaling up the complexity of logic operations. Here we present a platform for error-free physical computation via synchronous universal logic. Our platform uses a rotating magnetic field that enables parallel manipulation of arbitrary numbers of ferrofluid droplets on permalloy tracks. Through the coupling of magnetic and hydrodynamic interaction forces between droplets, we developed AND, OR, XOR, NOT and NAND logic gates, fanouts, a full adder, a flip-flop and a finite-state machine. Our platform enables large-scale integration of droplet logic, analogous to the scaling seen in digital electronics, and opens new avenues in mesoscale material processing.

  12. On the lifetimes of evaporating droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Stephen; Stauber, Jutta; Duffy, Brian; Sefiane, Khellil

    2013-11-01

    The evaporation of a fluid droplet on a solid substrate is a practically important problem which has been the subject of considerable research in recent years, much of it motivated by a range of technological applications, such as the application of pesticides to plants, DNA microarray analysis, inkjet printing, micro-fabrication, and spray cooling. In particular, the lifetime of a fluid droplet is not only of fundamental scientific interest, but is also important in a number of technological applications, such as inkjet printing and spray cooling applications (in which shorter droplet lifetimes are often needed) and the application of pesticides to plants (in which longer droplet lifetimes are often needed). In this talk we will analyse the lifetimes of fluid droplets evaporating in a variety of modes and, in particular, show that the widely believed folklore that the lifetime of a droplet is always longer than that of an identical droplet evaporating in the constant radius (i.e. pinned contact line) mode and shorter than that of an identical droplet evaporating in the constant angle mode is not, in general, true.

  13. Binary droplet collision at high Weber number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Kuo-Long; Chou, Ping-Chung; Tseng, Yu-Jen

    2009-09-01

    By using the techniques developed for generating high-speed droplets, we have systematically investigated binary droplet collision when the Weber number (We) was increased from the range usually tested in previous studies on the order of 10 to a much larger value of about 5100 for water (a droplet at 23 m/s with a diameter of 0.7 mm). Various liquids were also used to explore the effects of viscosity and surface tension. Specifically, beyond the well-known regimes at moderate We’s, which exhibited coalescence, separation, and separation followed by satellite droplets, we found different behaviors showing a fingering lamella, separation after fingering, breakup of outer fingers, and prompt splattering into multiple secondary droplets as We was increased. The critical Weber numbers that mark the boundaries between these impact regimes are identified. The specific impact behaviors, such as fingering and prompt splattering or splashing, share essential similarity with those also observed in droplet-surface impacts, whereas substantial variations in the transition boundaries may result from the disparity of the boundary conditions at impacts. To compare the outcomes of both types of collisions, a simple model based on energy conservation was carried out to predict the maximum diameter of an expanding liquid disk for a binary droplet collision. The results oppose the dominance of viscous drag, as proposed by previous studies, as the main deceleration force to effect a Rayleigh-Taylor instability and ensuing periphery fingers, which may further lead to the formations of satellite droplets.

  14. Fine droplet generation using tunable electrohydrodynamic pulsation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xin; Ba, Zhengyu; Xiong, Zhenhua

    2015-07-01

    High-efficiency generation of fine droplets is significant for many microfluidic chips and sensor applications. To produce fine droplets, nozzles with small diameters are needed, which results in a high cost for nozzles and low efficiency of droplet generation. In this paper, a tunable electrohydrodynamic pulsation method which can generate fine droplets with high frequency and controllable size is presented using low conductivity liquids. The effects of flow rates and voltage parameters with respect to deposition frequency and droplet size are investigated. The influence of these parameters on Taylor cone formation time are also discussed and simple scaling laws are proposed to reveal and guide the droplet generation process. Experimental results show that single cycle deposition frequency decreases with increasing voltage frequency, but is only slightly influenced by the flow rates. The droplet size also decreases with voltage frequency, while large flow rates can make this decline gradual allowing better control. Moreover, the Taylor cone formation time may greatly affect the stability of the deposition frequency when the voltage frequency is larger than 30 Hz. Due to the short cycle time of high voltage frequencies, the hydrodynamic behavior in the emission process may be considerably affected by the increase of volume, which is also related to the flow rates. Tunable micropatterns consisting of fine droplets can be achieved by using this method in combination with motion stages.

  15. Double droplets simultaneous impact on liquid film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Y.; Chen, G.; Shen, S.; Zhang, J.

    2015-09-01

    The evolution of double droplets simultaneously impinging on flat liquid film are obtained with CLSVOF method(Combined Level Set and VOF). the impinging velocity, liquid film thickness, and the horizontal distance between the two droplets were investigated to analyze the factors that affect the evolution.

  16. Droplet turbulence interactions under subcritical and supercritical conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coy, E. B.; Greenfield, S. C.; Ondas, M. S.; Song, Y.-H.; Spegar, T. D.; Santavicca, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of this research is to experimentally characterize the behavior of droplets in vaporizing liquid sprays under conditions typical of those encountered in high pressure combustion systems such as liquid fueled rocket engines. Of particular interest are measurements of droplet drag, droplet heating, droplet vaporization, droplet distortion, and secondary droplet breakup, under both subcritical and supercritical conditions. The paper presents a brief description of the specific accomplishments which have been made over the past year.

  17. Fiber-Supported Droplet Combustion Experiment-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colantonio, Renato O.

    1998-01-01

    A major portion of the energy produced in the world today comes from the burning of liquid hydrocarbon fuels in the form of droplets. Understanding the fundamental physical processes involved in droplet combustion is not only important in energy production but also in propulsion, in the mitigation of combustion-generated pollution, and in the control of the fire hazards associated with handling liquid combustibles. Microgravity makes spherically symmetric combustion possible, allowing investigators to easily validate their droplet models without the complicating effects of gravity. The Fiber-Supported Droplet Combustion (FSDC-2) investigation was conducted in the Microgravity Glovebox facility of the shuttles' Spacelab during the reflight of the Microgravity Science Laboratory (MSL- 1R) on STS-94 in July 1997. FSDC-2 studied fundamental phenomena related to liquid fuel droplet combustion in air. Pure fuels and mixtures of fuels were burned as isolated single and duo droplets with and without forced air convection. FSDC-2 is sponsored by the NASA Lewis Research Center, whose researchers are working in cooperation with several investigators from industry and academia. The rate at which a droplet burns is important in many commercial applications. The classical theory of droplet burning assumes that, for an isolated, spherically symmetric, single-fuel droplet, the gas-phase combustion processes are much faster than the droplet surface regression rate and that the liquid phase is at a uniform temperature equal to the boiling point. Recent, more advanced models predict that both the liquid and gas phases are unsteady during a substantial portion of the droplet's burning history, thus affecting the instantaneous and average burning rates, and that flame radiation is a dominant mechanism that can extinguish flames in a microgravity environment. FSDC-2 has provided well-defined, symmetric droplet burning data including radiative emissions to validate these theoretical

  18. Spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in an osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle using a novel double-network hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Functional repair of articular osteochondral defects remains a major challenge not only in the field of knee surgery but also in tissue regeneration medicine. The purpose is to clarify whether the spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in a large osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle by means of implanting a novel double-network (DN) gel at the bottom of the defect. Methods Twenty-five mature rabbits were used in this study. In the bilateral knees of each animal, we created an osteochondral defect having a diameter of 2.4-mm in the medial condyle. Then, in 21 rabbits, we implanted a DN gel plug into a right knee defect so that a vacant space of 1.5-mm depth (in Group I), 2.5-mm depth (in Group II), or 3.5-mm depth (in Group III) was left. In the left knee, we did not apply any treatment to the defect to obtain the control data. All the rabbits were sacrificed at 4 weeks, and the gross and histological evaluations were performed. The remaining 4 rabbits underwent the same treatment as used in Group II, and real-time PCR analysis was performed at 4 weeks. Results The defect in Group II was filled with a sufficient volume of the hyaline cartilage tissue rich in proteoglycan and type-2 collagen. The Wayne's gross appearance and histology scores showed that Group II was significantly greater than Group I, III, and Control (p < 0.012). The relative expression level of type-2 collagen, aggrecan, and SOX9 mRNAs was significantly greater in Group II than in the control group (p < 0.023). Conclusions This study demonstrated that spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in vivo in an osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle by means of implanting the DN gel plug at the bottom of the defect so that an approximately 2-mm deep vacant space was intentionally left in the defect. This fact has prompted us to propose an innovative strategy without cell culture to repair osteochondral lesions in the femoral

  19. Soot agglomeration in isolated, free droplet combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, M. Y.; Dryer, F. L.; Green, G. J.; Sangiovanni, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    Under the conditions of an isolated, free droplet experiment, hollow, carbonaceous structures, called soot spheres, were observed to form during the atmospheric pressure, low Reynolds number combustion of 1-methylnaphthalene. These structures which are agglomerates composed of smaller spheroidal units result from both thermophoretic effects induced by the envelope flame surrounding each drop and aerodynamic effects caused by changes in the relative gas/drop velocities. A chemically reacting flow model was used to analyze the process of sootshell formation during microgravity droplet combustion. The time-dependent temperature and gas property field surrounding the droplet was determined, and the soot cloud location for microgravity combustion of n-heptane droplets was predicted. Experiments showed that the sooting propensity of n-alkane fuel droplets can be varied through diluent substitution, oxygen-index variations, and ambient pressure reductions.

  20. Kinetics of complex plasma with liquid droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, Shikha; Sodha, M. S.; Mishra, S. K.

    2013-12-15

    This paper provides a theoretical basis for the reduction of electron density by spray of water (or other liquids) in hot plasma. This phenomenon has been observed in a hypersonic flight experiment for relief of radio black out, caused by high ionization in the plasma sheath of a hypersonic vehicle, re-entering the atmosphere. The analysis incorporates a rather little known phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of ions from the surface and includes the charge balance on the droplets and number cum energy balance of electrons, ions, and neutral molecules; the energy balance of the evaporating droplets has also been taken into account. The analysis has been applied to a realistic situation and the transient variations of the charge and radius of water droplets, and other plasma parameters have been obtained and discussed. The analysis through made in the context of water droplets is applicable to all liquids.

  1. Kinetics of complex plasma with liquid droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Shikha; Mishra, S. K.; Sodha, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    This paper provides a theoretical basis for the reduction of electron density by spray of water (or other liquids) in hot plasma. This phenomenon has been observed in a hypersonic flight experiment for relief of radio black out, caused by high ionization in the plasma sheath of a hypersonic vehicle, re-entering the atmosphere. The analysis incorporates a rather little known phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of ions from the surface and includes the charge balance on the droplets and number cum energy balance of electrons, ions, and neutral molecules; the energy balance of the evaporating droplets has also been taken into account. The analysis has been applied to a realistic situation and the transient variations of the charge and radius of water droplets, and other plasma parameters have been obtained and discussed. The analysis through made in the context of water droplets is applicable to all liquids.

  2. Settling of fixed erythrocyte suspension droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omenyi, S. N.; Snyder, R. S.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that when particles behave collectively rather than individually, the fractionation of micron-size particles on the basis of size, density, and surface characteristics by centrifugation and electrophoresis is hindered. The formation and sedimentation of droplets containing particles represent an extreme example of collective behavior and pose a major problem for these separation methods when large quantities of particles need to be fractionated. Experiments are described that measure droplet sizes and settling rates for a variety of particles and droplets. Expressions relating the particle concentration in a drop to measurable quantities of the fluids and particles are developed. The number of particles in each droplet is then estimated, together with the effective droplet density. Red blood cells from different animals fixed in glutaraldehyde provide model particle groups.

  3. Removal of biofilms by impinging water droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cense, A. W.; van Dongen, M. E. H.; Gottenbos, B.; Nuijs, A. M.; Shulepov, S. Y.

    2006-12-01

    The process of impinging water droplets on Streptococcus mutans biofilms was studied experimentally and numerically. Droplets were experimentally produced by natural breakup of a cylindrical liquid jet. Droplet diameter and velocity were varied between 20 and 200 μm and between 20 and 100 m/s, respectively. The resulting erosion process of the biofilm was determined experimentally with high-speed recording techniques and a quantitative relationship between the removal rate, droplet size, and velocity was determined. The shear stress and the pressure on the surface during droplet impact were determined by numerical simulations, and a qualitative agreement between the experiment and the simulation was obtained. Furthermore, it was shown that the stresses on the surface are strongly reduced when a water film is present.

  4. The Lipid-Droplet Proteome Reveals that Droplets Are a Protein-Storage Depot

    SciTech Connect

    Cermelli, Silvia; Guo, Yi; Gross, Steven P.; Welte, Michael

    2006-09-19

    Lipid droplets are ubiquitous organelles that are among the basic building blocks of eukaryotic cells. Despite central roles for cholesterol homeostasis and lipid metabolism, their function and protein composition are poorly understood. Results: We purified lipid droplets from Drosophila embryos and analyzed the associated proteins by capillary LC-MS-MS. Important functional groups include enzymes involved in lipid metabolism, signaling molecules, and proteins related to membrane trafficking. Unexpectedly, histones H2A, H2Av, and H2B were present. Using biochemistry, genetics, real-time imaging, and cell biology, we confirm that roughly 50% of certain embryonic histones are physically attached to lipid droplets, a localization conserved in other fly species. Histone association with droplets starts during oogenesis and is prominent in early embryos, but it is undetectable in later stages or in cultured cells. Histones on droplets are not irreversibly trapped; quantitation of droplet histone levels and transplantation experiments suggest that histones are transferred from droplets to nuclei as development proceeds. When this maternal store of histones is unavailable because lipid droplets are mislocalized, zygotic histone production starts prematurely. Conclusions: Because we uncover a striking proteomic similarity of Drosophila droplets to mammalian lipid droplets, Drosophila likely provides a good model for understanding droplet function in general. Our analysis also reveals a new function for these organelles; the massive nature of histone association with droplets and its developmental time-course suggest that droplets sequester maternally provided proteins until they are needed. We propose that lipid droplets can serve as transient storage depots for proteins that lack appropriate binding partners in the cell. Such sequestration may provide a general cellular strategy for handling excess proteins.

  5. Droplet migration characteristics in confined oscillatory microflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhury, Kaustav; Mandal, Shubhadeep; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-02-01

    We analyze the migration characteristics of a droplet in an oscillatory flow field in a parallel plate microconfinement. Using phase field formalism, we capture the dynamical evolution of the droplet over a wide range of the frequency of the imposed oscillation in the flow field, drop size relative to the channel gap, and the capillary number. The latter two factors imply the contribution of droplet deformability, commonly considered in the study of droplet migration under steady shear flow conditions. We show that the imposed oscillation brings an additional time complexity in the droplet movement, realized through temporally varying drop shape, flow direction, and the inertial response of the droplet. As a consequence, we observe a spatially complicated pathway of the droplet along the transverse direction, in sharp contrast to the smooth migration under a similar yet steady shear flow condition. Intuitively, the longitudinal component of the droplet movement is in tandem with the flow continuity and evolves with time at the same frequency as that of the imposed oscillation, although with an amplitude decreasing with the frequency. The time complexity of the transverse component of the movement pattern, however, cannot be rationalized through such intuitive arguments. Towards bringing out the underlying physics, we further endeavor in a reciprocal identity based analysis. Following this approach, we unveil the time complexities of the droplet movement, which appear to be sufficient to rationalize the complex movement patterns observed through the comprehensive simulation studies. These results can be of profound importance in designing droplet based microfluidic systems in an oscillatory flow environment.

  6. Two Droplets on Wire Approaching Ignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Fiber-Supported Droplet Combustion (FSDC) uses two droplets positioned on the fiber wire, instead of the usual one. Two droplets more closely simulates the environment in engines, which ignite many fuel droplets at once. The behavior of the burning was also unexpected -- the droplets moved together after ignition, generating quite a bit of data for understanding the interaction of fuel droplets while they burn. This MPEG movie (1.3 MB) shows a time-lapse of this burn (3x speed). Because FSDC is backlit (the bright glow behind the drops), you carnot see the glow of the droplets while they burn -- instead, you see them shrink! The small blobs left on the wire after the burn are the beads used to center the fuel droplet on the wire. This image was taken on STS-94, July 12, 1997, MET:10/19:13 (approximate). FSDC-2 studied fundamental phenomena related to liquid fuel droplet combustion in air. Pure fuels and mixtures of fuels were burned as isolated single and dual droplets with and without forced air convection. The FSDC guest investigator was Forman Williams, University of California, San Diego. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations planned for the International Space Station. (1.3MB, 12-second MPEG, screen 320 x 240 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300178.html.

  7. Electrospray Droplet Impact/SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraoka, Kenzo

    A new type of cluster SIMS, named as electrospray droplet impact (EDI), has been developed in our laboratory. It was found that peptides deposited on the stainless steel substrate were ionized/desorbed without the accumulation of radiation products. The organic samples with film thickness thinner than 10 monolayers are desorbed/ionized with little damage underneath the surface. In general, rather strong negative ions as well as positive ions are generated. The mechanism for the ionization/desorption in EDI is much less complicated than those for MALDI and SIMS due to the fact that only very thin sample layers take part in the shock-wave excited selvedge and higher-order side reactions are largely suppressed.

  8. Dynamic wetting of viscoelastic droplets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuli; Minh, Do-Quang; Amberg, Gustav

    2015-10-01

    We conduct numerical experiments on spreading of viscoelastic droplets on a flat surface. Our work considers a Giesekus fluid characterized by a shear-thinning viscosity and an Oldroyd-B fluid, which is close to a Boger fluid with constant viscosity. Our results qualitatively agree with experimental observations in that both shear thinning and elasticity enhances contact line motion, and that the contact line motion of the Boger fluid obeys the Tanner-Voinov-Hoffman relation. Excluding inertia, the spreading speed shows strong dependence on rheological properties, such as the viscosity ratio between the solvent and the polymer suspension, and the polymeric relaxation time. We also discuss how elasticity can affect contact line motion. The molecular migration theory proposed in the literature is not able to explain the agreement between our simulations and experimental results. PMID:26565327

  9. Numerical simulations of pendant droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, Carlos; Kahouadji, Lyes; Matar, Omar; Chergui, Jalel; Juric, Damir; Shin, Seungwon

    2015-11-01

    We simulate the evolution of a three-dimensional pendant droplet through pinch-off using a new parallel two-phase flow solver called BLUE. The parallelization of the code is based on the technique of algebraic domain decomposition where the velocity field is solved by a parallel GMRes method for the viscous terms and the pressure by a parallel multigrid/GMRes method. Communication is handled by MPI message passing procedures. The method for the treatment of the fluid interfaces uses a hybrid Front Tracking/Level Set technique which defines the interface both by a discontinuous density field as well as by a local triangular Lagrangian mesh. This structure allows the interface to undergo large deformations including the rupture and coalescence of fluid interfaces. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  10. Freezing of stratospheric aerosol droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Beiping; Peter, Thomas; Crutzen, Paul

    Theoretical calculations are presented for homogeneous and heterogeneous freezing of sulfuric acid droplets under stratospheric conditions, based on classical nucleation theory. In contrast to previous results it is shown that a prominent candidate for freezing, sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT ≡ H2SO4·4H2O), does not freeze homogeneously. The theoretical results limit the homogeneous freezing rate at 200 K to much less than 1 cm-3s-1, a value that may be estimated from bulk phase laboratory experiments. This suggests that the experimental value is likely to be a measure of heterogeneous, not homogeneous nucleation. Thus, under statospheric conditions, freezing of SAT can only occur in the presence of suitable nuclei; however, even for heterogeneous nucleation experimental results impose strong constraints. Since a nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) embryo probably needs a solid body for nucleation, these results put an important constraint on the theory of NAT formation in polar stratospheric clouds.

  11. Risk assessment of d-limonene: an example of male rat-specific renal tumorigens.

    PubMed

    Hard, G C; Whysner, J

    1994-01-01

    The naturally occurring food constituent d-limonene has been found to cause tumors at high doses only in the kidney of the male rat in association with the development of hyaline droplet nephropathy. In contrast, neither kidney tumors nor the associated nephropathy have been found in female rats or mice at much higher doses. Adult male rats produce large quantities of a specific low-molecular-weight protein in the liver, which is known as alpha 2U-globulin (alpha 2U-g). With administration of sufficient doses of d-limonene to male rats, this protein has been found to accumulate excessively in the P2 segment cells of renal proximal tubules, resulting in hyaline droplet formation as a manifestation of protein overload. Hyaline droplet accumulation is the first stage in a unique sequence of nephropathic lesions (also known as alpha 2U-g nephropathy), including granular casts in the outer medulla and linear mineralization in the papilla. The mechanism underlying protein accumulation appears to be the reversible binding of chemical to alpha 2U-g with subsequent prolongation of its half-life in the tubule cell. In the case of d-limonene, the minor metabolite d-limonene-1,2-oxide has been shown to be the primary chemical species that binds reversibly to alpha 2U-g, impeding the normal process of lysosomal proteinase degradation of alpha 2U-g. The ensuing nephropathy is associated with a sustained increase in compensatory renal tubule cell proliferation, which provides the putative mechanistic link with renal tumor formation possibly through tumor promotion of spontaneously initiated cells or enhanced spontaneous mutagenesis. This proposed mechanism has been supported by additional information, including negative genotoxicity tests for d-limonene and its oxide metabolites, experimentally verified tumor promotion, and enhanced cell proliferation primarily in P2 segment tubule cells in male F344 rats, but no such effects in the alpha 2U-g-deficient NBR rat. The mechanism of

  12. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Change in the optical properties of hyaline cartilage heated by the near-IR laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagratashvili, Viktor N.; Bagratashvili, N. V.; Gapontsev, V. P.; Makhmutova, G. Sh; Minaev, V. P.; Omel'chenko, A. I.; Samartsev, I. E.; Sviridov, A. P.; Sobol', E. N.; Tsypina, S. I.

    2001-06-01

    The in vitro dynamics of the change in optical properties of hyaline cartilage heated by fibre lasers at wavelengths 0.97 and 1.56 μm is studied. The laser-induced bleaching (at 1.56 μm) and darkening (at 0.97 μm) of the cartilage, caused by the heating and transport of water as well as by a change in the cartilage matrix, were observed and studied. These effects should be taken into account while estimating the depth of heating of the tissue. The investigated dynamics of light scattering in the cartilage allows one to choose the optimum radiation dose for laser plastic surgery of cartilage tissues.

  13. Directional Movement of Droplets in Grooves: Suspended or Immersed?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei; Lan, Zhong; Peng, Benli; Wen, Rongfu; Chen, Yansong; Ma, Xuehu

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of droplets trapped in geometric structures is essential to droplet manipulation applications such as for droplet transport. Here we show that directional droplet movement can be realized by a V-shaped groove with the movement direction controlled by adjusting the surface wettability of the groove inner wall and the cross sectional angle of the groove. Experiments and analyses show that a droplet in a superhydrophobic groove translates from the immersed state to the suspended state as the cross sectional angle of the groove decreases and the suspended droplet departs from the groove bottom as the droplet volume increases. We also demonstrate that this simple grooved structure can be used to separate a water-oil mixture and generate droplets with the desired sizes. The structural effect actuated droplet movements provide a controllable droplet transport method which can be used in a wide range of droplet manipulation applications.

  14. Directional Movement of Droplets in Grooves: Suspended or Immersed?

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Lan, Zhong; Peng, Benli; Wen, Rongfu; Chen, Yansong; Ma, Xuehu

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of droplets trapped in geometric structures is essential to droplet manipulation applications such as for droplet transport. Here we show that directional droplet movement can be realized by a V-shaped groove with the movement direction controlled by adjusting the surface wettability of the groove inner wall and the cross sectional angle of the groove. Experiments and analyses show that a droplet in a superhydrophobic groove translates from the immersed state to the suspended state as the cross sectional angle of the groove decreases and the suspended droplet departs from the groove bottom as the droplet volume increases. We also demonstrate that this simple grooved structure can be used to separate a water-oil mixture and generate droplets with the desired sizes. The structural effect actuated droplet movements provide a controllable droplet transport method which can be used in a wide range of droplet manipulation applications. PMID:26743167

  15. Fluoropolymer surface coatings to control droplets in microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Riche, Carson T; Zhang, Chuchu; Gupta, Malancha; Malmstadt, Noah

    2014-06-01

    We have demonstrated the application of low surface energy fluoropolymer coatings onto poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic devices for droplet formation and extraction-induced merger of droplets. Initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) was used to pattern fluoropolymer coatings within microchannels based on geometrical constraints. In a two-phase flow system, the range of accessible flow rates for droplet formation was greatly enhanced in the coated devices. The ability to controllably apply the coating only at the inlet facilitated a method for merging droplets. An organic spacer droplet was extracted from between a pair of aqueous droplets. The size of the organic droplet and the flow rate controlled the time to merge the aqueous droplets; the process of merging was independent of the droplet sizes. Extraction-induced droplet merging is a robust method for manipulating droplets that could be applied in translating multi-step reactions to microfluidic platforms. PMID:24722827

  16. Small GTPase Rab40c associates with lipid droplets and modulates the biogenesis of lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ran; Wang, Weijie; Wang, Shicong; Wang, Zhen; Sun, Lixiang; He, Wei; Fan, Rong; Zhou, Yunhe; Xu, Xiaohui; Hong, Wanjin; Wang, Tuanlao

    2013-01-01

    The subcellular location and cell biological function of small GTPase Rab40c in mammalian cells have not been investigated in detail. In this study, we demonstrated that the exogenously expressed GFP-Rab40c associates with lipid droplets marked by neutral lipid specific dye Oil red or Nile red, but not with the Golgi or endosomal markers. Further examination demonstrated that Rab40c is also associated with ERGIC-53 containing structures, especially under the serum starvation condition. Rab40c is increasingly recruited to the surface of lipid droplets during lipid droplets formation and maturation in HepG2 cells. Rab40c knockdown moderately decreases the size of lipid droplets, suggesting that Rab40c is involved in the biogenesis of lipid droplets. Stimulation for adipocyte differentiation increases the expression of Rab40c in 3T3-L1 cells. Rab40c interacts with TIP47, and is appositionally associated with TIP47-labeled lipid droplets. In addition, over-expression of Rab40c causes the clustering of lipid droplets independent of its GTPase activity, but completely dependent of the intact SOCS box domain of Rab40c. In addition, Rab40c displayed self-interaction as well as interaction with TIP47 and the SOCS box is essential for its ability to induce clustering of lipid droplets. Our results suggest that Rab40c is a novel Rab protein associated with lipid droplets, and is likely involved in modulating the biogenesis of lipid droplets. PMID:23638186

  17. Self-propelled droplet behavior during condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Fuqiang; Wu, Xiaomin; Zhu, Bei; Zhang, Xuan

    2016-05-01

    Self-propelled droplet motion has applications in various engineering fields such as self-cleaning surfaces, heat transfer enhancement, and anti-icing methods. A superhydrophobic surface was fabricated using two simultaneous chemical reactions with droplet condensation experiments performed on the horizontal superhydrophobic surface to characterize the droplet behavior. The droplet behavior is classified into three types based on their motion features and leftover marks as immobile droplet coalescence, self-propelled droplet jumping, and self-propelled droplet sweeping. This study focuses on the droplet sweeping that occurs due to the ultra-small rolling angle of the superhydrophobic surface, where the resulting droplet sweeps along the surface, merging with all the droplets it meets and leaving a long, narrow, clear track with a large droplet at the end of the track. An easy method is developed to predict the droplet sweeping direction based on the relative positions of the droplets just before coalescence. The droplet sweeping always absorbs dozens of droplets and is not limited by the surface structures; thus, this sweeping has many useful applications. In addition, the relationships between the droplet behavior and the number of participating droplets are also analyzed statistically.

  18. Convective flows in evaporating sessile droplets.

    PubMed

    Barmi, Meysam R; Meinhart, Carl D

    2014-03-01

    The evaporation rate and internal convective flows of a sessile droplet with a pinned contact line were formulated and investigated numerically. We developed and analyzed a unified numerical model that includes the effects of temperature, droplet volume, and contact angle on evaporation rate and internal flows. The temperature gradient on the air/liquid interface causes an internal flow due to Marangoni stress, which provides good convective mixing within the droplet, depending upon Marangoni number. As the droplet volume decreases, the thermal gradient becomes smaller and the Marangoni flow becomes negligible. Simultaneously, as the droplet height decreases, evaporation-induced flow creates a large jet-like flow radially toward the contact line. For a droplet containing suspended particles, this jet-like convective flow carries particles toward the contact line and deposits them on the surface, forming the so-called "coffee ring stain". In addition, we reported a simple polynomial correlation for dimensionless evaporation time as a function of initial contact angle of the pinned sessile droplet which agrees well with the previous experimental and numerical results. PMID:24512008

  19. Spontaneous droplet trampolining on rigid superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schutzius, Thomas M; Jung, Stefan; Maitra, Tanmoy; Graeber, Gustav; Köhme, Moritz; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2015-11-01

    Spontaneous removal of condensed matter from surfaces is exploited in nature and in a broad range of technologies to achieve self-cleaning, anti-icing and condensation control. But despite much progress, our understanding of the phenomena leading to such behaviour remains incomplete, which makes it challenging to rationally design surfaces that benefit from its manifestation. Here we show that water droplets resting on superhydrophobic textured surfaces in a low-pressure environment can self-remove through sudden spontaneous levitation and subsequent trampoline-like bouncing behaviour, in which sequential collisions with the surface accelerate the droplets. These collisions have restitution coefficients (ratios of relative speeds after and before collision) greater than unity despite complete rigidity of the surface, and thus seemingly violate the second law of thermodynamics. However, these restitution coefficients result from an overpressure beneath the droplet produced by fast droplet vaporization while substrate adhesion and surface texture restrict vapour flow. We also show that the high vaporization rates experienced by the droplets and the associated cooling can result in freezing from a supercooled state that triggers a sudden increase in vaporization, which in turn boosts the levitation process. This effect can spontaneously remove surface icing by lifting away icy drops the moment they freeze. Although these observations are relevant only to systems in a low-pressure environment, they show how surface texturing can produce droplet-surface interactions that prohibit liquid and freezing water-droplet retention on surfaces. PMID:26536959

  20. Ferrofluid Droplet Formation by Vibratory Stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Paul; Hsu, Chang-Fang; Ashgriz, Nasser

    1996-11-01

    A new technique for the formation of ferrofluid droplets is developed. A vertically applied magnetic field is used to cause instabilities and then eventual droplet formation from a pool of ferrofluid. The magnetic field is created by a flat solenoid wrapped around a soft iron core. Instabilities are excited on the ferrofluid surface by applying a field strength below a critical strength for droplet formation. The ferrofluid is then subjected to vertical vibration. The surface vibration is achieved by mounting the ferrofluid container to a speaker. The frequency of this vibration is on the order of 10 Hz. This technique allows the variation of the droplet spacing, by changing the frequency of the pool oscillation, and the variation of the droplet size by changing the strength of the magnetic field. The main advantage of this technique over presently available droplet generators is that it does not require any orfices. The droplets can be formed directly from the surface of a pool of liquid. This eliminates the need for manufacturing minute orfices which may also be plugged easily.

  1. Self-arraying of charged levitating droplets.

    PubMed

    Kauffmann, Paul; Nussbaumer, Jérémie; Masse, Alain; Jeandey, Christian; Grateau, Henri; Pham, Pascale; Reyne, Gilbert; Haguet, Vincent

    2011-06-01

    Diamagnetic levitation of water droplets in air is a promising phenomenon to achieve contactless manipulation of chemical or biochemical samples. This noncontact handling technique prevents contaminations of samples as well as provides measurements of interaction forces between levitating reactors. Under a nonuniform magnetic field, diamagnetic bodies such as water droplets experience a repulsive force which may lead to diamagnetic levitation of a single or few micro-objects. The levitation of several repulsively charged picoliter droplets was successfully performed in a ~1 mm(2) adjustable flat magnetic well provided by a centimeter-sized cylindrical permanent magnet structure. Each droplet position results from the balance between the centripetal diamagnetic force and the repulsive Coulombian forces. Levitating water droplets self-organize into satellite patterns or thin clouds, according to their charge and size. Small triangular lattices of identical droplets reproduce magneto-Wigner crystals. Repulsive forces and inner charges can be measured in the piconewton and the femtocoulomb ranges, respectively. Evolution of interaction forces is accurately followed up over time during droplet evaporation. PMID:21500859

  2. Mechanical vibration of viscoelastic liquid droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, James; Harrold, Victoria

    2014-03-01

    The resonant vibrations of viscoelastic sessile droplets supported on different substrates were monitored using a simple laser light scattering technique. In these experiments, laser light was reflected from the surfaces of droplets of high Mw poly acrylamide-co-acrylic acid (PAA) dissolved in water. The scattered light was allowed to fall on the surface of a photodiode detector and a mechanical impulse was applied to the drops using a vibration motor mounted beneath the substrates. The mechanical impulse caused the droplets to vibrate and the scattered light moved across the surface of the photodiode. The resulting time dependent photodiode signal was then Fourier transformed to obtain the mechanical vibrational spectra of the droplets. The frequencies and widths of the resonant peaks were extracted for droplets containing different concentrations of PAA and with a range of sizes. This was repeated for PAA loaded water drops on surfaces which displayed different values of the three phase contact angle. The results were compared to a simple model of droplet vibration which considers the formation of standing wave states on the surface of a viscoelastic droplet. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Leverhulme trust under grant number RPG-2012-702.

  3. Spontaneous droplet trampolining on rigid superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutzius, Thomas M.; Jung, Stefan; Maitra, Tanmoy; Graeber, Gustav; Köhme, Moritz; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2015-11-01

    Spontaneous removal of condensed matter from surfaces is exploited in nature and in a broad range of technologies to achieve self-cleaning, anti-icing and condensation control. But despite much progress, our understanding of the phenomena leading to such behaviour remains incomplete, which makes it challenging to rationally design surfaces that benefit from its manifestation. Here we show that water droplets resting on superhydrophobic textured surfaces in a low-pressure environment can self-remove through sudden spontaneous levitation and subsequent trampoline-like bouncing behaviour, in which sequential collisions with the surface accelerate the droplets. These collisions have restitution coefficients (ratios of relative speeds after and before collision) greater than unity despite complete rigidity of the surface, and thus seemingly violate the second law of thermodynamics. However, these restitution coefficients result from an overpressure beneath the droplet produced by fast droplet vaporization while substrate adhesion and surface texture restrict vapour flow. We also show that the high vaporization rates experienced by the droplets and the associated cooling can result in freezing from a supercooled state that triggers a sudden increase in vaporization, which in turn boosts the levitation process. This effect can spontaneously remove surface icing by lifting away icy drops the moment they freeze. Although these observations are relevant only to systems in a low-pressure environment, they show how surface texturing can produce droplet-surface interactions that prohibit liquid and freezing water-droplet retention on surfaces.

  4. Mass Spectrometry of Acoustically Levitated Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Westphall, Michael S.; Jorabchi, Kaveh; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2008-01-01

    Containerless sample handling techniques such as acoustic levitation offer potential advantages for mass spectrometry, by eliminating surfaces where undesired adsorption/desorption processes can occur. In addition, they provide a unique opportunity to study fundamental aspects of the ionization process as well as phenomena occurring at the air–droplet interface. Realizing these advantages is contingent, however, upon being able to effectively interface levitated droplets with a mass spectrometer, a challenging task that is addressed in this report. We have employed a newly developed charge and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (CALDI) technique to obtain mass spectra from a 5-μL acoustically levitated droplet containing peptides and an ionic matrix. A four-ring electrostatic lens is used in conjunction with a corona needle to produce bursts of corona ions and to direct those ions toward the droplet, resulting in droplet charging. Analyte ions are produced from the droplet by a 337-nm laser pulse and detected by an atmospheric sampling mass spectrometer. The ion generation and extraction cycle is repeated at 20 Hz, the maximum operating frequency of the laser employed. It is shown in delayed ion extraction experiments that both positive and negative ions are produced, behavior similar to that observed for atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser absorption/ionization. No ion signal is observed in the absence of droplet charging. It is likely, although not yet proven, that the role of the droplet charging is to increase the strength of the electric field at the surface of the droplet, reducing chargere combination after ion desorption. PMID:18582090

  5. Mass spectrometry of acoustically levitated droplets.

    PubMed

    Westphall, Michael S; Jorabchi, Kaveh; Smith, Lloyd M

    2008-08-01

    Containerless sample handling techniques such as acoustic levitation offer potential advantages for mass spectrometry, by eliminating surfaces where undesired adsorption/desorption processes can occur. In addition, they provide a unique opportunity to study fundamental aspects of the ionization process as well as phenomena occurring at the air-droplet interface. Realizing these advantages is contingent, however, upon being able to effectively interface levitated droplets with a mass spectrometer, a challenging task that is addressed in this report. We have employed a newly developed charge and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (CALDI) technique to obtain mass spectra from a 5-microL acoustically levitated droplet containing peptides and an ionic matrix. A four-ring electrostatic lens is used in conjunction with a corona needle to produce bursts of corona ions and to direct those ions toward the droplet, resulting in droplet charging. Analyte ions are produced from the droplet by a 337-nm laser pulse and detected by an atmospheric sampling mass spectrometer. The ion generation and extraction cycle is repeated at 20 Hz, the maximum operating frequency of the laser employed. It is shown in delayed ion extraction experiments that both positive and negative ions are produced, behavior similar to that observed for atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser absorption/ionization. No ion signal is observed in the absence of droplet charging. It is likely, although not yet proven, that the role of the droplet charging is to increase the strength of the electric field at the surface of the droplet, reducing charge recombination after ion desorption. PMID:18582090

  6. Orbiting droplets on a vibrated bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampara, Naresh; Burger, Loic; Gilet, Tristan; Microfluidics, university of liege Team

    2015-11-01

    A millimeter-sized oil droplet can bounce on a vertically vibrated liquid bath for unlimited time. It may couple to the surface wave it emits; leading to horizontal self-propulsion called walking. When several walkers coexist close to one another, they either repel or attract each other, in response to the superposition of the waves they generate. Attraction leads to various bound states, including droplets that orbit around each other. We have experimentally investigated the variety of quantized orbital motions exhibited by two, three and more identical walkers, as a function of forcing acceleration. Each motion is quantified in terms of droplet and wave energy.

  7. Laser induced surface stress on water droplets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Neng; Lin, Zhifang; Ng, Jack

    2014-10-01

    Laser induced stress on spherical water droplets is studied. At mechanical equilibrium, the body stress vanishes therefore we consider only the surface stress. The surface stress on sub-wavelength droplets is slightly weaker along the light propagation direction. For larger droplets, due to their light focusing effect, the forward stress is significantly enhanced. For a particle roughly 3 micron in radius, when it is excited at whispering gallery mode with Q ∼ 10⁴ by a 1 Watt Gaussian beam, the stress can be enhanced by two orders of magnitude, and can be comparable with the Laplace pressure. PMID:25321955

  8. Undercooling and crystallization behaviour of antimony droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, J. A.; Perepezko, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    The droplet emulsion technique is presently used to examine the undercooling and crystallization behavior of pure antimony. Control of droplet size and applied cooling rate allowed maximum undercooling to be extended from 0.08 to 0.23 T(m). A droplet coating was produced by means of emulsification which appears to furnish a favorable crystallographic matching for effective nucleation catalysis of a metastable simple cubic structure. Thermal analysis shows the melting temperature of the single cubic phase to be about 625 C.

  9. Liquid Droplets on a Highly Deformable Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulman, Rafael D.; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2015-11-01

    We examine the deformation produced by microdroplets atop thin elastomeric and glassy free-standing films. Because of the Laplace pressure, the droplets deform the elastic membrane thereby forming a bulge. Thus, two angles define the droplet or membrane geometry: the angles the deformed bulge and the liquid surface make with the film. These angles are measured as a function of the film tension, and are in excellent agreement with a force balance at the contact line. Finally, we find that if the membrane has an anisotropic tension, the droplets are no longer spherical but become elongated along the direction of high tension.

  10. Fog, plant leaves and deposition of droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, W.; Ebner, M.; Traiser, C.; Roth-Nebelsick, A.

    2010-07-01

    For various plants and animals, the accumulation of fog or dew droplets constitutes an essential part of their water supply. Understanding how water droplets deposited by fog or dew events interact with plant or animal surfaces is essential for gaining insight into the functionality of these surfaces. Besides being interesting within the realm of biology, this knowledge is indispensable for technical applications. Frequently, it is advantageous to know (i) the growth rate of a droplet attached by surface tension to a surface which grows due to a given influx of fog particles, (ii) the maximum volume and (iii) the "lifespan" of a droplet before it detaches from the surface or starts to slide down along the plant surface, driven by gravity. Starting from principles of physics, we calculate quantitative expressions addressing questions (i) to (iii) for droplets which are attached to surfaces characterised by a high degree of symmetry, such as horizontally oriented or inclined planes, sections of spheres, cones and rotationally symmetric crevices. Furthermore, we treat the behaviour of droplets attached to a surface of non-constant contact angle. Although real surfaces never meet their geometric idealisations, results based on these often represent suitable and useful approximations to reality. Finally, we apply our results to Stipagrostis sabulicola, a dune grass of the Namib desert which satisfies its water demand solely by capturing fog and dew droplets. Pictures taken with a scanning electron microscope show that the stem of S. sabulicola is longitudinally built up by alternating elevated and countersunk strips. Filling gaps in the experimental observation with theoretical speculation, the following picture emerges: Assuming that the elevated strips exhibit a higher contact angle than the countersunk strips, water droplets being deposited on the elevated strips are drawn towards the latter. The lower contact angle which prevails there increases the droplets

  11. Diffusion and evaporation of a liquid droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, K. N.

    1980-06-01

    The process of evaporation and diffusion of a spherical liquid droplet in an atmosphere of noncondensable gas is studied theoretically. An equation for the shrinkage of the radius of the droplet is derived on the basis of continuity and momentum equations. Further, a conjugate problem consisting of the energy and mass balance for the gaseous environment is formulated. An approximation of thin thermal and diffusion boundary-layers is introduced to simplify the analysis. Results are presented for methanol-nitrogen, ammonia-nitrogen, and sodium-argon systems. It has been observed that the droplet of highly viscous fluid exhibits rapid contraction.

  12. Fog droplet distribution functions for lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Mallow, J.V.

    1982-04-15

    The interpretation of lidar data on fog has been limited by two obstacles: approximations in the form of the Mie scattering cross sections for water droplets, and droplet size distribution functions whose relationship to the experiment has not been clear. This paper develops a method for generating distribution functions from experimental data. These functions are then used with newly available Mie cross sections to obtain backscattering and extinction coefficients for singly scattered ruby laser pulses in fog. The results show what experimental lidar accuracies are needed to uniquely determine fog droplet size distribution.

  13. The effects of turbulence on droplet drag and secondary droplet breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Y.-H.; Coy, E.; Greenfield, S.; Ondas, M.; Prevish, T.; Spegar, T.; Santavicca, D.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this research is to obtain an improved understanding of the behavior of droplets in vaporizing sprays, particularly under conditions typical of those in high pressure rocket sprays. Experiments are conducted in a variety of high pressure, high temperature, optically-accessible flow systems, including one which is capable of operation at pressures up to 70 atm, temperatures up to 600 K, gas velocities up to 30 m/sec and turbulence intensities up to 40 percent. Single droplets, 50 to 500 micron in diameter, are produced by an aerodynamic droplet generator and transversely injected into the flow. Measurements are made of the droplet position, size, velocity and temperature and of the droplet's vapor wake from which droplet drag, dispersion, heating, vaporization and breakup are characterized.

  14. Evaporation of liquid droplets from a surface of anodized aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, G. V.; Feoktistov, D. V.; Orlova, E. G.

    2016-01-01

    The results of study of evaporation of water droplets and NaCl salt solution from a solid substrate made of anodized aluminum are presented in this paper. The experiment provides the parameters describing the droplet profile: contact spot diameter, contact angle, and droplet height. The specific rate of evaporation was calculated from the experimental data. The water droplets or brine droplets with concentration up to 9.1 % demonstrate evaporation with the pinning mode for the contact line. When the salt concentration in the brine is taken up to 16.7 %, the droplet spreading mode was observed. Two stages of droplet evaporation are distinguished as a function of phase transition rate.

  15. Quasistatic packings of droplets in flat microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadivar, Erfan

    2016-02-01

    As observed in recent experiments, monodisperse droplets self-assemble spontaneously in different ordered packings. In this work, we present a numerical study of the droplet packings in the flat rectangular microfluidic channels. Employing the boundary element method, we numerically solve the Stokes equation in two-dimension and investigate the appearance of droplet packing and transition between one and two-row packings of monodisperse emulsion droplets. By calculating packing force applied on the droplet interface, we investigate the effect of flow rate, droplet size, and surface tension on the packing configurations of droplets and transition between different topological packings.

  16. Droplet Breakup in Expansion-contraction Microchannels.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Pingan; Kong, Tiantian; Lei, Leyan; Tian, Xiaowei; Kang, Zhanxiao; Wang, Liqiu

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the influences of expansion-contraction microchannels on droplet breakup in capillary microfluidic devices. With variations in channel dimension, local shear stresses at the injection nozzle and focusing orifice vary, significantly impacting flow behavior including droplet breakup locations and breakup modes. We observe transition of droplet breakup location from focusing orifice to injection nozzle, and three distinct types of recently-reported tip-multi-breaking modes. By balancing local shear stresses and interfacial tension effects, we determine the critical condition for breakup location transition, and characterize the tip-multi-breaking mode quantitatively. In addition, we identify the mechanism responsible for the periodic oscillation of inner fluid tip in tip-multi-breaking mode. Our results offer fundamental understanding of two-phase flow behaviors in expansion-contraction microstructures, and would benefit droplet generation, manipulation and design of microfluidic devices. PMID:26899018

  17. Droplet evaporation in a nonpremixed counterflowing flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puri, Ishwar K.; Aggarwal, Suresh K.; Chen, Gang

    1991-01-01

    A numerical study is conducted that considers droplets in a conterflowing flame established by flowing two opposing streams of gaseous methane and air against each other. It is noted that this investigation is similar to the flowfield studied experimentally by Puri and Libby (1989), the results of which are used in combination with the results from this experiment in order to develop a further understanding of droplet motion in counterflowing streams. Based on calculations, it is concluded that, in a rapidly changing ambient medium, when the droplet residence time in the high-temperature region is small compared to the time spent in the entire couterflowing flowfield, the choice of gasification models is unimportant. Droplets at different locations in the flowfield, experiencing similar convective conditions, and having the same residence times in the high-temperature zone, are found to possess the same radius history.

  18. Droplet Breakup in Expansion-contraction Microchannels

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Pingan; Kong, Tiantian; Lei, Leyan; Tian, Xiaowei; Kang, Zhanxiao; Wang, Liqiu

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the influences of expansion-contraction microchannels on droplet breakup in capillary microfluidic devices. With variations in channel dimension, local shear stresses at the injection nozzle and focusing orifice vary, significantly impacting flow behavior including droplet breakup locations and breakup modes. We observe transition of droplet breakup location from focusing orifice to injection nozzle, and three distinct types of recently-reported tip-multi-breaking modes. By balancing local shear stresses and interfacial tension effects, we determine the critical condition for breakup location transition, and characterize the tip-multi-breaking mode quantitatively. In addition, we identify the mechanism responsible for the periodic oscillation of inner fluid tip in tip-multi-breaking mode. Our results offer fundamental understanding of two-phase flow behaviors in expansion-contraction microstructures, and would benefit droplet generation, manipulation and design of microfluidic devices. PMID:26899018

  19. Substrate Curvature Gradient Drives Rapid Droplet Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Cunjing; Chen, Chao; Chuang, Yin-Chuan; Tseng, Fan-Gang; Yin, Yajun; Grey, Francois; Zheng, Quanshui

    2014-07-01

    Making small liquid droplets move spontaneously on solid surfaces is a key challenge in lab-on-chip and heat exchanger technologies. Here, we report that a substrate curvature gradient can accelerate micro- and nanodroplets to high speeds on both hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates. Experiments for microscale water droplets on tapered surfaces show a maximum speed of 0.42 m/s, 2 orders of magnitude higher than with a wettability gradient. We show that the total free energy and driving force exerted on a droplet are determined by the substrate curvature and substrate curvature gradient, respectively. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we predict nanoscale droplets moving spontaneously at over 100 m/s on tapered surfaces.

  20. Substrate curvature gradient drives rapid droplet motion.

    PubMed

    Lv, Cunjing; Chen, Chao; Chuang, Yin-Chuan; Tseng, Fan-Gang; Yin, Yajun; Grey, Francois; Zheng, Quanshui

    2014-07-11

    Making small liquid droplets move spontaneously on solid surfaces is a key challenge in lab-on-chip and heat exchanger technologies. Here, we report that a substrate curvature gradient can accelerate micro- and nanodroplets to high speeds on both hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates. Experiments for microscale water droplets on tapered surfaces show a maximum speed of 0.42  m/s, 2 orders of magnitude higher than with a wettability gradient. We show that the total free energy and driving force exerted on a droplet are determined by the substrate curvature and substrate curvature gradient, respectively. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we predict nanoscale droplets moving spontaneously at over 100  m/s on tapered surfaces. PMID:25062213

  1. Droplet Breakup in Expansion-contraction Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Pingan; Kong, Tiantian; Lei, Leyan; Tian, Xiaowei; Kang, Zhanxiao; Wang, Liqiu

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the influences of expansion-contraction microchannels on droplet breakup in capillary microfluidic devices. With variations in channel dimension, local shear stresses at the injection nozzle and focusing orifice vary, significantly impacting flow behavior including droplet breakup locations and breakup modes. We observe transition of droplet breakup location from focusing orifice to injection nozzle, and three distinct types of recently-reported tip-multi-breaking modes. By balancing local shear stresses and interfacial tension effects, we determine the critical condition for breakup location transition, and characterize the tip-multi-breaking mode quantitatively. In addition, we identify the mechanism responsible for the periodic oscillation of inner fluid tip in tip-multi-breaking mode. Our results offer fundamental understanding of two-phase flow behaviors in expansion-contraction microstructures, and would benefit droplet generation, manipulation and design of microfluidic devices.

  2. Investigation of critical burning of fuel droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faeth, G. M.

    1979-01-01

    The general problem of spray combustion was investigated. The combustion of bipropellent droplets; combustion of hydrozine fuels; and combustion of sprays were studied. A model was developed to predict mean velocities and temperatures in a combusting gas jet.

  3. Transformation of oil droplets into giant vesicles.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Li; Kurihara, Kensuke

    2016-06-14

    We propose a protocell model in which compartments are constructed via a new process involving the formation of robust vesicles using an autocatalytic, self-reproducing oil droplet system as a 'scaffold'. PMID:27152371

  4. How faceted liquid droplets grow tails

    PubMed Central

    Guttman, Shani; Sapir, Zvi; Schultz, Moty; Butenko, Alexander V.; Ocko, Benjamin M.; Deutsch, Moshe; Sloutskin, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Liquid droplets, widely encountered in everyday life, have no flat facets. Here we show that water-dispersed oil droplets can be reversibly temperature-tuned to icosahedral and other faceted shapes, hitherto unreported for liquid droplets. These shape changes are shown to originate in the interplay between interfacial tension and the elasticity of the droplet’s 2-nm-thick interfacial monolayer, which crystallizes at some T = Ts above the oil’s melting point, with the droplet’s bulk remaining liquid. Strikingly, at still-lower temperatures, this interfacial freezing (IF) effect also causes droplets to deform, split, and grow tails. Our findings provide deep insights into molecular-scale elasticity and allow formation of emulsions of tunable stability for directed self-assembly of complex-shaped particles and other future technologies. PMID:26733673

  5. Nucleation pressure threshold in acoustic droplet vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Christopher J.; Doering, Charles R.; Kripfgans, Oliver D.

    2016-07-01

    We combine classical nucleation theory with superharmonic focusing to predict necessary pressures to induce nucleation in acoustic droplet vaporization. We show that linear acoustics is a valid approximation to leading order when particle displacements in the sound field are small relative to the radius of the droplet. This is done by perturbation analysis of an axisymmetric compressible inviscid flow about a droplet with small surface perturbations relative to the mean radius subjected to an incoming ultrasonic wave. The necessary nucleation pressure threshold inside the droplet is calculated to be -9.33 ± 0.30 MPa for typical experimental parameters by employing results from classical homogeneous nucleation theory. As a result, we are able to predict if a given incident pressure waveform will induce nucleation.

  6. Impact of droplet on superheated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohse, Detlef; Staat, Hendrik J. J.; Tran, Tuan; Prosperetti, Andrea; Sun, Chao

    2012-11-01

    At impact of a liquid droplet on a smooth surface heated way above the liquid's boiling point, the droplet spreads without any surface contact, floating on its own (Leidenfrost-type) vapor layer, and then bounces back. We show that the dimensionless maximum spreading factor Γ, defined by the ratio of the maximal spreading diameter and the droplet diameter, shows a universal scaling Γ ~ Weγ with the Weber number We - regardless of surface temperature and of liquid properties - which is much steeper than that for the impact on non-heated (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) surfaces, for which γ = 1 / 4 . Based on the idea that the vapor shooting out of the gap between the droplet and the superheated surface drags the liquid outwards, we derive scaling laws for the spreading factor Γ, the vapor layer thickness, and the vapor flow velocity.

  7. Numerical Simulations of Acoustically Driven, Burning Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H.-C.; Karagozian, A. R.; Smith, O. I.; Urban, Dave (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This computational study focuses on understanding and quantifying the effects of external acoustical perturbations on droplet combustion. A one-dimensional, axisymmetric representation of the essential diffusion and reaction processes occurring in the vicinity of the droplet stagnation point is used here in order to isolate the effects of the imposed acoustic disturbance. The simulation is performed using a third order accurate, essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) numerical scheme with a full methanol-air reaction mechanism. Consistent with recent microgravity and normal gravity combustion experiments, focus is placed on conditions where the droplet is situated at a velocity antinode in order for the droplet to experience the greatest effects of fluid mechanical straining of flame structures. The effects of imposed sound pressure level and frequency are explored here, and conditions leading to maximum burning rates are identified.

  8. Immersed Boundary Simulations of Active Fluid Droplets.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Carl A; Hawkins, Rhoda J

    2016-01-01

    We present numerical simulations of active fluid droplets immersed in an external fluid in 2-dimensions using an Immersed Boundary method to simulate the fluid droplet interface as a Lagrangian mesh. We present results from two example systems, firstly an active isotropic fluid boundary consisting of particles that can bind and unbind from the interface and generate surface tension gradients through active contractility. Secondly, a droplet filled with an active polar fluid with homeotropic anchoring at the droplet interface. These two systems demonstrate spontaneous symmetry breaking and steady state dynamics resembling cell motility and division and show complex feedback mechanisms with minimal degrees of freedom. The simulations outlined here will be useful for quantifying the wide range of dynamics observable in these active systems and modelling the effects of confinement in a consistent and adaptable way. PMID:27606609

  9. Dispensing nano-pico droplets of ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irajizad, Peyman; Farokhnia, Nazanin; Ghasemi, Hadi

    2015-11-01

    Dispensing miniature volumes of a ferrofluid is of fundamental and practical importance for diverse applications ranging from biomedical devices, optics, and self-assembly of materials. Current dispensing systems are based on microfluidics flow-focusing approaches or acoustic actuation requiring complicated structures. A simple method is presented to continuously dispense the miniature droplets from a ferrofluid reservoir. Once a jet of the ferrofluid is subjected to a constrained flux through a membrane and an inhomogeneous magnetic field, the jet experiences a curvature-driven instability and transforms to a droplet. Ferrofluid droplets in the range of 0.1-1000 nl are dispensed with tunable dispensing frequencies. A model is developed that predicts the dispensed volume of the ferrofluid droplets with an excellent agreement with the measurements.

  10. Droplet Microfluidics for Chip-Based Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Kaler, Karan V. I. S.; Prakash, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Droplet microfluidics (DMF) is a fluidic handling technology that enables precision control over dispensing and subsequent manipulation of droplets in the volume range of microliters to picoliters, on a micro-fabricated device. There are several different droplet actuation methods, all of which can generate external stimuli, to either actively or passively control the shape and positioning of fluidic droplets over patterned substrates. In this review article, we focus on the operation and utility of electro-actuation-based DMF devices, which utilize one or more micro-/nano-patterned substrates to facilitate electric field-based handling of chemical and/or biological samples. The underlying theory of DMF actuations, device fabrication methods and integration of optical and opto-electronic detectors is discussed in this review. Example applications of such electro-actuation-based DMF devices have also been included, illustrating the various actuation methods and their utility in conducting chip-based laboratory and clinical diagnostic assays. PMID:25490590

  11. Simple delay monitor for droplet sorters.

    PubMed

    De Grooth, B G; Doornbos, R M; Van Der Werf, K O; Greve, J

    1991-01-01

    We have constructed a simple device by which the optimal delay time between optical measurement of a cell and the application of the droplet charging pulse can be determined directly in a flow sorter. The device consists of a stainless steel chamber in which the sorted droplets are collected. In the collection chamber the collected droplets run through a capillary where a continuous fluorescence measurement is made. With a sample of fluorescent particles, the delay time is optimal when the measured fluorescence is maximal. The measuring volume is always filled with the last droplets sorted (about 3,000). With this device, the setting of the delay time can be done in a few seconds without the need for microscopical verification. The fluorescence in the collection chamber is excited and detected via optical fibers using about 10% of the light of the existing laser from the flow cytometer and an extra photomultiplier. PMID:1935461

  12. Impact of liquid droplets on granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delon, G.; Terwagne, D.; Dorbolo, S.; Vandewalle, N.; Caps, H.

    2011-10-01

    The crater formation due to the impact of a water droplet onto a granular bed has been experimentally investigated. Three parameters were tuned: the impact velocity, the size of the droplet, and the size of the grains. The aim is to determine the influence of the kinetic energy on the droplet pattern. The shape of the crater depends on the kinetic energy at the moment the droplet starts to impact the bed. The spreading and recession of the liquid during the impact were carefully analyzed from the dynamical point of view, using image analysis of high-speed video recordings. The different observed regimes are characterized by the balance between the impregnation time of the water by the granular bed by the water and the capillary time responsible for the recession of the drop.

  13. Effects of droplet interactions on droplet transport at intermediate Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuen, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    Effects of droplet interactions on drag, evaporation, and combustion of a planar droplet array, oriented perpendicular to the approaching flow, are studied numerically. The three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations, with variable thermophysical properties, are solved using finite-difference techniques. Parameters investigated include the droplet spacing, droplet Reynolds number, approaching stream oxygen concentration, and fuel type. Results are obtained for the Reynolds number range of 5 to 100, droplet spacing from 2 to 24 diameters, oxygen concentrations of 0.1 and 0.2, and methanol and n-butanol fuels. The calculations show that the gasification rates of interacting droplets decrease as the droplet spacings decrease. The reduction in gasification rates is significant only at small spacings and low Reynolds numbers. For the present array orientation, the effects of interactions on the gasification rates diminish rapidly for Reynolds numbers greater than 10 and spacings greater than 6 droplet diameters. The effects of adjacent droplets on drag are shown to be small.

  14. Effects of droplet interactions on droplet transport at intermediate Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuen, Jian-Shun

    1987-01-01

    Effects of droplet interactions on drag, evaporation, and combustion of a planar droplet array, oriented perpendicular to the approaching flow, are studied numerically. The three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations, with variable thermophysical properties, are solved using finite-difference techniques. Parameters investigated include the droplet spacing, droplet Reynolds number, approaching stream oxygen concentration, and fuel type. Results are obtained for the Reynolds number range of 5 to 100, droplet spacings from 2 to 24 diameters, oxygen concentrations of 0.1 and 0.2, and methanol and n-butanol fuels. The calculations show that the gasification rates of interacting droplets decrease as the droplet spacings decrease. The reduction in gasification rates is significant only at small spacings and low Reynolds numbers. For the present array orientation, the effects of interactions on the gasification rates diminish rapidly for Reynolds numbers greater than 10 and spacings greater than 6 droplet diameters. The effects of adjacent droplets on drag are shown to be small.

  15. Numerical simulation of droplet impact on interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahouadji, Lyes; Che, Zhizhao; Matar, Omar; Shin, Seungwon; Chergui, Jalel; Juric, Damir

    2015-11-01

    Simulations of three-dimensional droplet impact on interfaces are carried out using BLUE, a massively-parallel code based on a hybrid Front-Tracking/Level-Set algorithm for Lagrangian tracking of arbitrarily deformable phase interfaces. High resolution numerical results show fine details and features of droplet ejection, crown formation and rim instability observed under similar experimental conditions. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  16. Laser diagnostics for microgravity droplet studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Michael

    1993-01-01

    Rapid advances have recently been made in numerical simulation of droplet combustion under microgravity conditions, while experimental capabilities remain relatively primitive. Calculations can now provide detailed information on mass and energy transport, complex gas-phase chemistry, multi-component molecular diffusion, surface evaporation and heterogeneous reaction, which provides a clearer picture of both quasi-steady as well as dynamic behavior of droplet combustion. Experiments concerning these phenomena typically result in pictures of the burning droplets, and the data therefrom describe droplet surface regression along with flame and soot shell position. With much more precise, detailed, experimental diagnostics, significant gains could be made on the dynamics and flame structural changes which occur during droplet combustion. Since microgravity experiments become increasingly more expensive as they progress from drop towers and flights to spaceborne experiments, there is a great need to maximize the information content from these experiments. Sophisticated measurements using laser diagnostics on individual droplets and combustion phenomena are now possible. These include measuring flow patterns and temperature fields within droplets, vaporization rates and vaporization enhancement, radical species profiling in flames and gas-phase flow-tagging velocimetry. Although these measurements are sophisticated, they have undergone maturation to the degree where with some development, they are applicable to studies of microgravity droplet combustion. This program beginning in September of 1992, will include a series of measurements in the NASA Learjet, KC-135 and Drop Tower facilities for investigating the range of applicability of these diagnostics while generating and providing fundamental data to ongoing NASA research programs in this area. This program is being conducted in collaboration with other microgravity investigators and is aimed toward supplementing

  17. Fluid Flow in An Evaporating Droplet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, H.; Larson, R.

    1999-01-01

    Droplet evaporation is a common phenomenon in everyday life. For example, when a droplet of coffee or salt solution is dropped onto a surface and the droplet dries out, a ring of coffee or salt particles is left on the surface. This phenomenon exists not only in everyday life, but also in many practical industrial processes and scientific research and could also be used to assist in DNA sequence analysis, if the flow field in the droplet produced by the evaporation could be understood and predicted in detail. In order to measure the fluid flow in a droplet, small particles can be suspended into the fluid as tracers. From the ratio of gravitational force to Brownian force a(exp 4)(delta rho)(g)/k(sub B)T, we find that particle's tendency to settle is proportional to a(exp 4) (a is particle radius). So, to keep the particles from settling, the droplet size should be chosen to be in a range 0.1 -1.0 microns in experiments. For such small particles, the Brownian force will affect the motion of the particle preventing accurate measurement of the flow field. This problem could be overcome by using larger particles as tracers to measure fluid flow under microgravity since the gravitational acceleration g is then very small. For larger particles, Brownian force would hardly affect the motion of the particles. Therefore, accurate flow field could be determined from experiments in microgravity. In this paper, we will investigate the fluid flow in an evaporating droplet under normal gravity, and compare experiments to theories. Then, we will present our ideas about the experimental measurement of fluid flow in an evaporating droplet under microgravity.

  18. Lipid droplets, lipophagy, and beyond.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao-Wen

    2016-08-01

    Lipids are essential components for life. Their various structural and physical properties influence diverse cellular processes and, thereby, human health. Lipids are not genetically encoded but are synthesized and modified by complex metabolic pathways, supplying energy, membranes, signaling molecules, and hormones to affect growth, physiology, and response to environmental insults. Lipid homeostasis is crucial, such that excess fatty acids (FAs) can be harmful to cells. To prevent such lipotoxicity, cells convert excess FAs into neutral lipids for storage in organelles called lipid droplets (LDs). These organelles do not simply manage lipid storage and metabolism but also are involved in protein quality management, pathogenesis, immune responses, and, potentially, neurodegeneration. In recent years, a major trend in LD biology has centered around the physiology of lipid mobilization via lipophagy of fat stored within LDs. This review summarizes key findings in LD biology and lipophagy, offering novel insights into this rapidly growing field. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The cellular lipid landscape edited by Tim P. Levine and Anant K. Menon. PMID:26713677

  19. Acoustic Droplet Vaporization in Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, David; Fabiilli, Mario; Kripfgans, Oliver; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Bull, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    Gas embolotherapy is a proposed cancer therapy where gas bubbles acting as embolic agents are selectively generated near the tumor site to block blood supply, resulting to tumor necrosis. The gas bubbles are generated by using focused ultrasound to selective vaporize intravenously injected microdroplets. In this study, albumin encapsulated dodecafluorocarbon microdroplets were isolated in 25 to 100 micron diameter polydimethylsiloxane microchannels. The droplets were vaporized at 37 °C using a single pulse from a 7.5 MHz single element focused transducer with 8-32 cycles at 2.2 to 5.6 MPa peak negative pressure. The vaporization process was recorded using an ultra-high speed camera attached to an inverted microscope. A theoretical Rayleigh-Plesset like model was derived to describe the both the expansion of small spherical bubbles as well as cylindrical bubbles in a long microchannel. The gas phase was described as an ideal gas and the liquid DDFP and bulk fluid were viscous Newtonian fluids. Additionally, surface tension, viscous losses from the channel, and the phase change process were included in the model. The theoretical model matched very well to experiments with channel diameters or 50 micron or less. This work was supported by NIH Grant R01EB006476.

  20. A pipette dispenses a charged droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Dongwhi; Lee, Horim; Im, Do Jin; Kang, In Seok; Kang, Kwan Hyoung

    2012-11-01

    Micropipettes are widely used in many scientific and engineering fields. However, it is hardly known that a droplet dispensed from a plastic pipette tip has a considerable amount of charges (order of 10-10 C). Here we report that the charged droplet is dispensed from a commercial and disposable plastic pipette tip and this charge is originated from the natural electrification between a solution and the inner surface of the pipette tip. The charge amount is dependent on not only the physicochemical properties of a solution (e.g., pH and a concentration) but also dispensing environments (e.g., atmospheric humidity and type of commercial pipette tip). To investigate the effects of the charge on the droplet dispensing, we calculate the electrical force between the droplet and the pipette tip though numerical simulation. The micropipette users especially, who are dealing with discrete droplets in their experiments, should consider this charge effect in their dispensing of a droplet. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) Grant No. R0A-2007-000-20098-0 funded by the Korea government (MEST) and No. 20090083510 through Multiphenomena CFD Engineering Research Center.

  1. Gel-like double-emulsion droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzowski, Jan; Korczyk, Piotr; Garstecki, Piotr; Stone, Howard

    2015-11-01

    We experimentally study the problem of packing of micro-droplets inside a droplet of another immiscible liquid phase. We use microfluidics to encapsulate multiple monodisperse aqueous segments inside a drop of oil. For small numbers N (N<10) of the aqueous droplets and at their volume fraction in oil exceeding the close-packing threshold we observe multiple metastable structures with well-defined point-group symmetries. We attribute the observed metastability to the deformability of the droplets which leads to effective many-body interactions and energy barriers for rearrangement. By changing the composition of the oil phase we find that when the surface tensions of the droplets and of the encapsulating phase are comparable, the energy barriers are high enough to trap elongated structures or even linear chains, independently of N. However, when the surface tension of the encapsulating phase is much larger than that of the droplets, non-spherical morphologies are stable only at sufficiently high N. In such a case multiple internal interfaces can hold stresses and prevent relaxation of the global deformations which leads to a plastic, gel-like behavior. Our findings can serve as guidelines for synthesis of functional particles as well as for designing biomimetic materials, e.g. for tissue engineering. J.G. acknowledges financial support from Polish Ministry of Science provided within the framework Mobility Plus.

  2. Caustics and the growth of droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindarajan, Rama; Ravichandran, S.; Ray, Samriddhi; Deepu, P.

    Caustics are formed when inertial particles of very different velocities collide in a flow, and are a consequence of the dissipative nature of particle motion in a suspension. Using a model vortex-dominated flow with heavy droplets in a saturated environment, we suggest that sling caustics form only within a neighbourhood around a vortex, the square of whose radius is proportional to the product of circulation and particle inertia. Droplets starting close to this critical radius congregate very close together, resulting in large spikes in (Lagrangian) number density. Allowing for merger when droplets collide, we show that droplets starting out close to the critical radius display a much more rapid growth in size than those starting elsewhere, and a large fraction of the large droplets are those that originate within the caustics-forming region. We test these predictions in a two-dimensional simulation of turbulent flow. We hope that our study will be of interest in long-standing problems of physical interest such as the mechanism of broadening of droplet spectra in a turbulent flow. Support from the Ministry of Earth Sciences, Government of India for the project Coupled physical processes in the Bay of Bengal and monsoon air-sea interaction under OMM is gratefully acknowledged.

  3. Dictyostelium Lipid Droplets Host Novel Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiaoli; Barisch, Caroline; Paschke, Peggy; Herrfurth, Cornelia; Bertinetti, Oliver; Pawolleck, Nadine; Otto, Heike; Rühling, Harald; Feussner, Ivo; Herberg, Friedrich W.

    2013-01-01

    Across all kingdoms of life, cells store energy in a specialized organelle, the lipid droplet. In general, it consists of a hydrophobic core of triglycerides and steryl esters surrounded by only one leaflet derived from the endoplasmic reticulum membrane to which a specific set of proteins is bound. We have chosen the unicellular organism Dictyostelium discoideum to establish kinetics of lipid droplet formation and degradation and to further identify the lipid constituents and proteins of lipid droplets. Here, we show that the lipid composition is similar to what is found in mammalian lipid droplets. In addition, phospholipids preferentially consist of mainly saturated fatty acids, whereas neutral lipids are enriched in unsaturated fatty acids. Among the novel protein components are LdpA, a protein specific to Dictyostelium, and Net4, which has strong homologies to mammalian DUF829/Tmem53/NET4 that was previously only known as a constituent of the mammalian nuclear envelope. The proteins analyzed so far appear to move from the endoplasmic reticulum to the lipid droplets, supporting the concept that lipid droplets are formed on this membrane. PMID:24036346

  4. Dictyostelium lipid droplets host novel proteins.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaoli; Barisch, Caroline; Paschke, Peggy; Herrfurth, Cornelia; Bertinetti, Oliver; Pawolleck, Nadine; Otto, Heike; Rühling, Harald; Feussner, Ivo; Herberg, Friedrich W; Maniak, Markus

    2013-11-01

    Across all kingdoms of life, cells store energy in a specialized organelle, the lipid droplet. In general, it consists of a hydrophobic core of triglycerides and steryl esters surrounded by only one leaflet derived from the endoplasmic reticulum membrane to which a specific set of proteins is bound. We have chosen the unicellular organism Dictyostelium discoideum to establish kinetics of lipid droplet formation and degradation and to further identify the lipid constituents and proteins of lipid droplets. Here, we show that the lipid composition is similar to what is found in mammalian lipid droplets. In addition, phospholipids preferentially consist of mainly saturated fatty acids, whereas neutral lipids are enriched in unsaturated fatty acids. Among the novel protein components are LdpA, a protein specific to Dictyostelium, and Net4, which has strong homologies to mammalian DUF829/Tmem53/NET4 that was previously only known as a constituent of the mammalian nuclear envelope. The proteins analyzed so far appear to move from the endoplasmic reticulum to the lipid droplets, supporting the concept that lipid droplets are formed on this membrane. PMID:24036346

  5. Mechanical vibrations of pendant liquid droplets.

    PubMed

    Temperton, Robert H; Smith, Michael I; Sharp, James S

    2015-07-01

    A simple optical deflection technique was used to monitor the vibrations of microlitre pendant droplets of deuterium oxide, formamide, and 1,1,2,2-tetrabromoethane. Droplets of different volumes of each liquid were suspended from the end of a microlitre pipette and vibrated using a small puff of nitrogen gas. A laser was passed through the droplets and the scattered light was collected using a photodiode. Vibration of the droplets resulted in the motion of the scattered beam and time-dependent intensity variations were recorded using the photodiode. These time-dependent variations were Fourier transformed and the frequencies and widths of the mechanical droplet resonances were extracted. A simple model of vibrations in pendant/sessile drops was used to relate these parameters to the surface tension, density and viscosity of the liquid droplets. The surface tension values obtained from this method were found to be in good agreement with results obtained using the standard pendant drop technique. Damping of capillary waves on pendant drops was shown to be similar to that observed for deep liquid baths and the kinematic viscosities obtained were in agreement with literature values for all three liquids studied. PMID:26189195

  6. Ignition of Droplet Suspended on a Wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Fiber Supported Droplet Combustion Experiment completing a number of successful burns on STS-94, July 11, 1997, MET:9/17:40 (approximate). The photo shows a droplet of 95% heptane and 5% hexadecane, suspended and positioned by the fiber wire, just as it is being ignited by the glowing coil beneath. Study of the physical properties of burning fuel from this experiment is expected to contribute to more efficient use of fossil fuels and reduction of combustion by-products on Earth. The sequence is from a time-lapse movie (34 seconds condensed to 12 seconds), and clearly shows particles emanating from the droplet during the burn. The droplet shrank to nothing as it was consumed. FSDC-2 studied fundamental phenomena related to liquid fuel droplet combustion in air. Pure fuels and mixtures of fuels were burned as isolated single and dual droplets with and without forced air convection. The FSDC guest investigator was Forman Williams, University of California, San Diego. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (133KB JPEG, 656 x 741 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300181.html.

  7. Whole Teflon valves for handling droplets.

    PubMed

    Cybulski, Olgierd; Jakiela, Slawomir; Garstecki, Piotr

    2016-06-21

    We propose and test a new whole-Teflon gate valve for handling droplets. The valve allows droplet plugs to pass through without disturbing them. This is possible due to the geometric design, the choice of material and lack of any pulses of flow generated by closing or opening the valve. The duct through the valve resembles a simple segment of tubing, without constrictions, change in lumen or side pockets. There are no extra sealing materials with different wettability or chemical resistance. The only material exposed to liquids is FEP Teflon, which is resistant to aggressive chemicals and fully biocompatible. The valve can be integrated into microfluidic systems: we demonstrate a complex system for culturing bacteria in hundreds of microliter droplet chemostats. The valve effectively isolates modules of the system to increase precision of operations on droplets. We verified that the valve allowed millions of droplet plugs to safely pass through, without any cross-contamination with bacteria between the droplets. The valve can be used in automating complex microfluidic systems for experiments in biochemistry, biology and organic chemistry. PMID:27182628

  8. Studies of droplet burning and extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, F. A.

    1995-01-01

    A project on droplet combustion, pursued jointly with F. L. Dryer of Princeton University, has now been in progress for many years. The project involves experiments on the burning of single droplets in various atmospheres, mainly at normal atmospheric pressure and below, performed in drop towers and designed to be performed aboard space-based platforms such as the Space Shuttle or the Space Station and currently manifest for Spacelab in the MSL-1 flight of the Space Shuttle in April of 1997. It also involves numerical computations on droplet burning, performed mainly at Princeton, and asymptotic analyses of droplet burning, performed mainly at UCSD. The focus of the studies rests primarily on time-dependent droplet-burning characteristics and on extinction phenomena. The presentation to be given here concerns the recent research on application of asymptotic methods to investigation of the flame structure and extinction of alcohol droplets. These theoretical studies are relevant to the second of the proposed space-flight tests and are currently investigating the extent to which combustion of alcohols can be described by four-step reduced chemistry similar to that which has achieved a good degree of success for alkane flames. These studies have progressed to a point at which a number of definite conclusions can now be stated. These conclusions and the reasoning that led to them are outlined.

  9. Colloidal particles embedded in liquid crystal droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melchert, Drew; Sadati, Monirosadat; Zhou, Ye; de Pablo, Juan J.

    In this work, we encapsulate polystyrene and silica particles in nematic liquid crystal (LC) droplets dispersed in water using microfluidic glass capillary devices. While polystyrene particles induce planar anchoring on the surface, silica particles, treated with DMOAP, create homeotropic anchoring of the LC molecules at their surface. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) is added to the aqueous phase to stabilize LC droplets and promote a radial configuration with point defect in the center of LC droplet. Our experimental and computational studies show that, when trapped inside the LC droplets, particles with both anchoring types become mostly localized at the defect point (at the center) and interact with the radial configuration. Interestingly, a twisting structure is observed for polystyrene particle with strong planar anchoring. Although localization of the particles at the droplet center is the most stable state and with the lowest free energy, off-center positions also emerge, displacing the defect point from the center to near the surface of a radial droplet. - Corresponding author - Second affiliation: Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439, USA.

  10. Burning Heptane Droplets on STS-94

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Fuel ignites and burns in the Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE) on STS-94 on July 11, 1997. This round of experiments burned heptane droplets in 1/2 atmosphere pressure consisting of oxygen and helium. During this mission, scientists have seen for the first time droplets which stop burning due to heat loss by radiation. From these data, the investigators hope to understand the physical and chemical processes that take place in droplet combustion in different environments, including conditions under which the flames extinguish, the chemistry of the combustion reaction, and the production of pollutants such as nitrogen oxides and soot particles. The DCE was designed to investigate the fundamental combustion aspects of single, isolated droplets under different pressures and ambient oxygen concentrations for a range of droplet sizes varying between 2 and 5 mm. The DCE principal investigator was Forman Williams, University of California, San Diego. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station.(983KB, 9-second MPEG, screen 320 x 240 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300172.html.

  11. Droplet Suspended on a Wire Begins Ignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Fiber Supported Droplet Combustion Experiment completing a number of successful burns on STS-94, July 11, 1997, MET:9/17:40 (approximate). The photo shows a droplet of 95% heptane and 5% hexadecane, suspended and positioned by the fiber wire, just as it is being ignited by the glowing coil beneath. Study of the physical properties of burning fuel from this experiment is expected to contribute to more efficient use of fossil fuels and reduction of combustion by-products on Earth. The sequence is from a time-lapse movie (34 seconds condensed to 12 seconds), and clearly shows particles emanating from the droplet during the burn. The droplet shrank to nothing as it was consumed. FSDC-2 studied fundamental phenomena related to liquid fuel droplet combustion in air. Pure fuels and mixtures of fuels were burned as isolated single and dual droplets with and without forced air convection. The FSDC guest investigator was Forman Williams, University of California, San Diego. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (1.2 MB, 11-second MPEG, screen 320 x 240 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300180.html.

  12. Predicting Droplet Formation on Centrifugal Microfluidic Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, Jacob Alfred

    Centrifugal microfluidics is a widely known research tool for biological sample and water quality analysis. Currently, the standard equipment used for such diagnostic applications include slow, bulky machines controlled by multiple operators. These machines can be condensed into a smaller, faster benchtop sample-to-answer system. Sample processing is an important step taken to extract, isolate, and convert biological factors, such as nucleic acids or proteins, from a raw sample to an analyzable solution. Volume definition is one such step. The focus of this thesis is the development of a model predicting monodispersed droplet formation and the application of droplets as a technique for volume definition. First, a background of droplet microfluidic platforms is presented, along with current biological analysis technologies and the advantages of integrating such technologies onto microfluidic platforms. Second, background and theories of centrifugal microfluidics is given, followed by theories relevant to droplet emulsions. Third, fabrication techniques for centrifugal microfluidic designs are discussed. Finally, the development of a model for predicting droplet formation on the centrifugal microfluidic platform are presented for the rest of the thesis. Predicting droplet formation analytically based on the volumetric flow rates of the continuous and dispersed phases, the ratios of these two flow rates, and the interfacial tension between the continuous and dispersed phases presented many challenges, which will be discussed in this work. Experimental validation was completed using continuous phase solutions of different interfacial tensions. To conclude, prospective applications are discussed with expected challenges.

  13. Nanoliter droplet vitrification for oocyte cryopreservation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Khimji, Imran; Shao, Lei; Safaee, Hooman; Desai, Khanjan; Keles, Hasan Onur; Gurkan, Umut Atakan; Kayaalp, Emre; Nureddin, Aida; Anchan, Raymond M; Maas, Richard L; Demirci, Utkan

    2011-01-01

    Aim Oocyte cryopreservation remains largely experimental, with live birth rates of only 2–4% per thawed oocyte. In this study, we present a nanoliter droplet technology for oocyte vitrification. Materials & methods An ejector-based droplet vitrification system was designed to continuously cryopreserve oocytes in nanoliter droplets. Oocyte survival rates, morphologies and parthenogenetic development after each vitrification step were assessed in comparison with fresh oocytes. Results Oocytes were retrieved after cryoprotectant agent loading/unloading, and nanoliter droplet encapsulation showed comparable survival rates to fresh oocytes after 24 h in culture. Also, oocytes recovered after vitrification/thawing showed similar morphologies to those of fresh oocytes. Additionally, the rate of oocyte parthenogenetic activation after nanoliter droplet encapsulation was comparable with that observed for fresh oocytes. This nanoliter droplet technology enables the vitrification of oocytes at higher cooling and warming rates using lower cryoprotectant agent levels (i.e., 1.4 M ethylene glycol, 1.1 M dimethyl sulfoxide and 1 M sucrose), thus making it a potential technology to improve oocyte cryopreservation outcomes. PMID:22188180

  14. Floating Droplet Array: An Ultrahigh-Throughput Device for Droplet Trapping, Real-time Analysis and Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Labanieh, Louai; Nguyen, Thi N.; Zhao, Weian; Kang, Dong-Ku

    2016-01-01

    We describe the design, fabrication and use of a dual-layered microfluidic device for ultrahigh-throughput droplet trapping, analysis, and recovery using droplet buoyancy. To demonstrate the utility of this device for digital quantification of analytes, we quantify the number of droplets, which contain a β-galactosidase-conjugated bead among more than 100,000 immobilized droplets. In addition, we demonstrate that this device can be used for droplet clustering and real-time analysis by clustering several droplets together into microwells and monitoring diffusion of fluorescein, a product of the enzymatic reaction of β-galactosidase and its fluorogenic substrate FDG, between droplets. PMID:27134760

  15. Theory of droplet. Part 1: Renormalized laws of droplet vaporization in non-dilute sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, H. H.

    1989-01-01

    The vaporization of a droplet, interacting with its neighbors in a non-dilute spray environment is examined as well as a vaporization scaling law established on the basis of a recently developed theory of renormalized droplet. The interacting droplet consists of a centrally located droplet and its vapor bubble which is surrounded by a cloud of droplets. The distribution of the droplets and the size of the cloud are characterized by a pair-distribution function. The vaporization of a droplet is retarded by the collective thermal quenching, the vapor concentration accumulated in the outer sphere, and by the limited percolative passages for mass, momentum and energy fluxes. The retardation is scaled by the local collective interaction parameters (group combustion number of renormalized droplet, droplet spacing, renormalization number and local ambient conditions). The numerical results of a selected case study reveal that the vaporization correction factor falls from unity monotonically as the group combustion number increases, and saturation is likely to occur when the group combustion number reaches 35 to 40 with interdroplet spacing of 7.5 diameters and an environment temperature of 500 K. The scaling law suggests that dense sprays can be classified into: (1) a diffusively dense cloud characterized by uniform thermal quenching in the cloud; (2) a stratified dense cloud characterized by a radial stratification in temperature by the differential thermal quenching of the cloud; or (3) a sharply dense cloud marked by fine structure in the quasi-droplet cloud and the corresponding variation in the correction factor due to the variation in the topological structure of the cloud characterized by a pair-distribution function of quasi-droplets.

  16. Scavenging dissolved oxygen via acoustic droplet vaporization.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Kirthi; Holland, Christy K; Haworth, Kevin J

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) of perfluorocarbon emulsions has been explored for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Previous studies have demonstrated that vaporization of a liquid droplet results in a gas microbubble with a diameter 5-6 times larger than the initial droplet diameter. The expansion factor can increase to a factor of 10 in gassy fluids as a result of air diffusing from the surrounding fluid into the microbubble. This study investigates the potential of this process to serve as an ultrasound-mediated gas scavenging technology. Perfluoropentane droplets diluted in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) were insonified by a 2 MHz transducer at peak rarefactional pressures lower than and greater than the ADV pressure amplitude threshold in an in vitro flow phantom. The change in dissolved oxygen (DO) of the PBS before and after ADV was measured. A numerical model of gas scavenging, based on conservation of mass and equal partial pressures of gases at equilibrium, was developed. At insonation pressures exceeding the ADV threshold, the DO of air-saturated PBS decreased with increasing insonation pressures, dropping as low as 25% of air saturation within 20s. The decrease in DO of the PBS during ADV was dependent on the volumetric size distribution of the droplets and the fraction of droplets transitioned during ultrasound exposure. Numerically predicted changes in DO from the model agreed with the experimentally measured DO, indicating that concentration gradients can explain this phenomenon. Using computationally modified droplet size distributions that would be suitable for in vivo applications, the DO of the PBS was found to decrease with increasing concentrations. This study demonstrates that ADV can significantly decrease the DO in an aqueous fluid, which may have direct therapeutic applications and should be considered for ADV-based diagnostic or therapeutic applications. PMID:26964964

  17. Transient burning of a convective fuel droplet

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Guang; Sirignano, William A.

    2010-05-15

    The transient burning of an n-octane fuel droplet in a hot gas stream at 20 atmosphere pressure is numerically studied, with considerations of droplet regression, deceleration due to the drag of the droplet, internal circulation inside the droplet, variable properties, non-uniform surface temperature, and the effect of surface tension. An initial envelope flame is found to remain envelope in time, and an initial wake flame is always transitioned into an envelope flame at a later time, with the normalized transition delay controlled by the initial Reynolds number and the initial Damkohler number. The initial flame shape is primarily determined by the initial Damkohler number, which has a critical value of Da{sub 0}=1.02. The burning rates are modified by the transition, and are influenced by the intensity of forced convection which is determined by initial Reynolds number. The influence of surface tension is also studied as the surface temperature is non-uniform. Surface tension affects the liquid motion at the droplet surface significantly and affects the change of surface temperature and burning rate modestly. The influence of surface tension generally increases with increasing initial Reynolds number within the range without droplet breakup. We also studied cases with constant relative velocity between the air stream and the droplet. The results show that in these cases the initial envelope flame still remains envelope, but the evolution from an initial wake flame to an envelope flame is inhibited. Validation of our analysis is made by comparing with a published porous-sphere experiment Raghavan et al. (2005) which used methanol fuel. (author)

  18. Development of a droplet breakup model considering aerodynamic and droplet collision effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wert, K. L.; Jacobs, H. R.

    1993-01-01

    A model is currently under development to predict the occurrence and outcome of spray droplet breakup induced by aerodynamic forces and droplet collisions. It is speculated that these phenomena may be significant in determining the droplet size distribution in a spray subjected to acoustic velocity fluctuations. The goal is to integrate this breakup model into a larger spray model in order to examine the effects of combustion instabilities on liquid rocket motor fuel sprays. The model is composed of three fundamental components: a dynamic equation governing the deformation of the droplet, a criterion for breakage based on the amount of deformation energy stored in the droplet and an energy balance based equation to predict the Sauter mean diameter of the fragments resulting from breakup. Comparison with published data for aerodynamic breakup indicates good agreement in terms of predicting the occurrence of breakup. However, the model significantly over predicts the size of the resulting fragments. This portion of the model is still under development.

  19. Development of a droplet breakup model considering aerodynamic and droplet collision effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wert, K. L.; Jacobs, H. R.

    1993-11-01

    A model is currently under development to predict the occurrence and outcome of spray droplet breakup induced by aerodynamic forces and droplet collisions. It is speculated that these phenomena may be significant in determining the droplet size distribution in a spray subjected to acoustic velocity fluctuations. The goal is to integrate this breakup model into a larger spray model in order to examine the effects of combustion instabilities on liquid rocket motor fuel sprays. The model is composed of three fundamental components: a dynamic equation governing the deformation of the droplet, a criterion for breakage based on the amount of deformation energy stored in the droplet and an energy balance based equation to predict the Sauter mean diameter of the fragments resulting from breakup. Comparison with published data for aerodynamic breakup indicates good agreement in terms of predicting the occurrence of breakup. However, the model significantly over predicts the size of the resulting fragments. This portion of the model is still under development.

  20. Precise measurements of droplet-droplet contact forces in quasi-2D emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowensohn, Janna; Orellana, Carlos; Weeks, Eric

    2015-03-01

    We use microscopy to visualize a quasi-2D oil-in-water emulsion confined between two parallel slides. We then use the droplet shapes to infer the forces they exert on each other. To calibrate our force law, we set up an emulsion in a tilted sample chamber so that the droplets feel a known buoyant force. By correlating radius of the droplet and length of contacts with the buoyant forces, we validate our empirical force law. We improve upon prior work in our lab by using a high-resolution camera to image each droplet multiple times, thus providing sub-pixel resolution and reducing the noise. Our new technique identifies contact forces with only a 1% uncertainty, five times better than prior work. We demonstrate the utility of our technique by examining the normal modes of the droplet contact network in our samples.

  1. Vapor mediated droplet interactions - self-sensing droplet machines (Part 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cira, Nate; Benusiglio, Adrien; Prakash, Manu

    2014-11-01

    Reducing contact angle hysteresis is one strategy for making droplets mobile. Typically this involves carefully preparing a near-ideal surface. Here we show that a class of two-component droplets is self-motile on any high energy surface. Surprisingly, these binary droplets have characteristics of both completely and partially wetting fluids which precludes any hysteresis. This allows us to easily create mobile droplet systems with simple everyday materials like glass slides and sharpie. We build on the fundamental mechanisms and models we developed for this system and present multiple fluidic machines which take advantage of interactions between the droplets to autonomously execute complex tasks such as sorting and pattern formation. Time permitting we will run a live experiment to highlight the phenomena being discussed.

  2. Creeping motion of single droplet and mixing behaviour of coalescing droplets in a tube flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraoka, Masahiro; Ueno, Ichiro; Mizoguchi, Hiroshi; Toshihiko, Kamiyama; Wada, Takuma

    2012-07-01

    Creeping motion of single droplet and coalescence of droplets in a tube flow is expected to be useful for fluid handling technique, controlling chemical reaction and so on. In the case of motion of droplets with suspended particles, Drug delivery system can be cited as one of applications. The problem is also underlying basis on analyzing the flow of multiphase fluids through porous media. Such phenomena can be seen, for instance, in enhanced oil recovery, breaking of emulsions in porous coalescers and so on. Regarding examples of studies of creeping motion of droplets in a tube flow, Hetsroni G. et al[1] considered motion of droplets and bubbles with small d/D(d:undeformed diameter of droplet or bubble, D: tube diameter)theoretically. Higdon et al[2] obtained resistance functions for spherical particles, droplets and bubbles numerically. Olbricht at al.[3,4] investigated mainly coalescence time of coalescence phenomena of droplets. There exists little information, however, on mixing behaviour of coalescing droplets and effects of suspended particles in the droplets concerned on their coalescence. In this experiment, a glass tube of 2.0 mm in inner diameter, 7.0 mm in outer diameter, and 1500 mm in length is used as a test tube. Silicones oil of 50, 1000 and 6000cSt are employed as the test fluid for the droplet. Mixture fluid of glycerol and pure water is used for a surrounding fluid in the tube flow. The density of the droplets is matched to that of the surrounding fluid by adding carbon tetrachloride. An over flow tank is used to keep the flow in the tube steady at a designated averaged velocity V. The test tube is surrounded by a tank filled with a temperature-controlled water to keep the temperature of the system constant. Droplets are injected into the test tube using micro-syringes in front of inlet of the tube. Behaviours of droplets and suspended particles are monitored by a digital video camera and high speed cameras placed on a sliding stage. The motion

  3. Controlled multistep synthesis in a three-phase droplet reactor

    PubMed Central

    Nightingale, Adrian M.; Phillips, Thomas W.; Bannock, James H.; de Mello, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Channel-fouling is a pervasive problem in continuous flow chemistry, causing poor product control and reactor failure. Droplet chemistry, in which the reaction mixture flows as discrete droplets inside an immiscible carrier liquid, prevents fouling by isolating the reaction from the channel walls. Unfortunately, the difficulty of controllably adding new reagents to an existing droplet stream has largely restricted droplet chemistry to simple reactions in which all reagents are supplied at the time of droplet formation. Here we describe an effective method for repeatedly adding controlled quantities of reagents to droplets. The reagents are injected into a multiphase fluid stream, comprising the carrier liquid, droplets of the reaction mixture and an inert gas that maintains a uniform droplet spacing and suppresses new droplet formation. The method, which is suited to many multistep reactions, is applied to a five-stage quantum dot synthesis wherein particle growth is sustained by repeatedly adding fresh feedstock. PMID:24797034

  4. Bouncing of a Droplet on Superhydrophobic Surface in AC Electrowetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Kwan Hyoung; Lee, Seung Jun; Hong, Jiwoo

    2009-11-01

    Oscillation of a droplet is induced in ac electrowetting by time-dependent electrical wetting tension. A droplet placed on a superhydrophobic surface bounces up like a rubber ball when an ac signal is applied. The bouncing pattern is highly frequency dependent. We investigated how the shape deformation and bouncing of a droplet are affected by applied frequency. The droplet motion is analyzed with the spectral method. The droplet is modeled as a simple linear oscillator, and the mass and spring constants are determined based on analytical results. We found that bouncing occurs periodically at a resonance frequency of the droplet. The motion of a sessile droplet released from a fixed shape is analyzed based on the phase field method. The numerical results show qualitative agreement with the experimental results for a bouncing droplet. Details on the flow field inside a bouncing droplet will be discussed based on numerical results.

  5. Droplet confinement and leakage: Causes, underlying effects, and amelioration strategies

    PubMed Central

    Debon, Aaron P.; Wootton, Robert C. R.

    2015-01-01

    The applicability of droplet-based microfluidic systems to many research fields stems from the fact that droplets are generally considered individual and self-contained reaction vessels. This study demonstrates that, more often than not, the integrity of droplets is not complete, and depends on a range of factors including surfactant type and concentration, the micro-channel surface, droplet storage conditions, and the flow rates used to form and process droplets. Herein, a model microfluidic device is used for droplet generation and storage to allow the comparative study of forty-four different oil/surfactant conditions. Assessment of droplet stability under these conditions suggests a diversity of different droplet failure modes. These failure modes have been classified into families depending on the underlying effect, with both numerical and qualitative models being used to describe the causative effect and to provide practical solutions for droplet failure amelioration in microfluidic systems. PMID:26015831

  6. Interaction of droplets in recirculation regions within microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazi, Nastaran; Hosseini, Ashkan; Shojaei-Zadeh, Shahab

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the interaction of oil droplets in continuous water phase as they travel across the streamlines of a recirculation region using microfluidic devices. Oil droplets are first generated using hydrodynamic focusing and then enter a recirculation region. The droplets then keep recirculating until they are pushed out by the incoming ones. We show that the frequency of droplet generation, viscosity contrast (oil to water), and geometry determine which droplets to stay in the recirculation region and which one to leave. Using flow field simulations, we investigate the migration of droplets and their trajectories based on the geometry of the recirculation region, the bubble size, and fluid properties. Under favorable conditions, when droplets interact within the recirculation region for long enough time, the film thickness that separates the two interfaces reduces and droplets will coalesce. The proposed design thus provides a suitable platform to study droplet coalescence within microfluidic devices.

  7. Thermocapillary migration of an isolated droplet and interaction of two droplets in zero gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhendal, Yousuf; Turan, Ali; Kalendar, Abdulrahim

    2016-09-01

    Fluid transfer within a stagnant liquid presents a significant challenge in zero-gravity conditions due to the lack of buoyancy effects. This challenge can be overcome by the utilisation of the Marangoni effect, or more specifically thermocapillary migration. The thermocapillary migration of droplets is driven by temperature gradients within the multiphase system which bring about a surface tension gradient driving the flow from the cold to the hot region. The migration speed of the droplet is significantly impacted by the heat transfer both inside the droplet and in its surroundings. This paper presents the analysis of drop movement in a stagnant liquid using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The commercial software package Ansys-Fluent v.13 [1] is used to solve the governing continuum conservation equations for two-phase flow using the Volume of Fluid (VOF) method to track the liquid/liquid interface in 2D domain. This approach has been shown to be a valuable tool for studying the phenomena of liquid-liquid interaction. A strong agreement has been found with experimental observations conducted in microgravity. The inherent velocity of drops has been found to decrease with increasing Marangoni number. This finding is in line with the previous space experiments of Xie et al. (2005) [2] and in contrast to the numerical results of Ma (1999) [3] using the same liquid for the droplet and the host liquid. Data obtained in the present numerical study has been used to derive an expression predicting the scaled droplet velocity as a function of Marangoni number. A numerical study of the interaction of two spherical droplets undergoing thermocapillary migration in microgravity is also presented. The temperature thrust from the leading droplet towards the trailing droplet was found to disturb its migration velocity, but the trailing droplet was found to have no influence on the migration of the leading droplet.

  8. 3D Spray Droplet Distributions in Sneezes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Techet, Alexandra; Scharfman, Barry; Bourouiba, Lydia

    2015-11-01

    3D spray droplet clouds generated during human sneezing are investigated using the Synthetic Aperture Feature Extraction (SAFE) method, which relies on light field imaging (LFI) and synthetic aperture (SA) refocusing computational photographic techniques. An array of nine high-speed cameras are used to image sneeze droplets and tracked the droplets in 3D space and time (3D + T). An additional high-speed camera is utilized to track the motion of the head during sneezing. In the SAFE method, the raw images recorded by each camera in the array are preprocessed and binarized, simplifying post processing after image refocusing and enabling the extraction of feature sizes and positions in 3D + T. These binary images are refocused using either additive or multiplicative methods, combined with thresholding. Sneeze droplet centroids, radii, distributions and trajectories are determined and compared with existing data. The reconstructed 3D droplet centroids and radii enable a more complete understanding of the physical extent and fluid dynamics of sneeze ejecta. These measurements are important for understanding the infectious disease transmission potential of sneezes in various indoor environments.

  9. Minimising oil droplet size using ultrasonic emulsification.

    PubMed

    Leong, T S H; Wooster, T J; Kentish, S E; Ashokkumar, M

    2009-08-01

    The efficient production of nanoemulsions, with oil droplet sizes of less than 100nm would facilitate the inclusion of oil soluble bio-active agents into a range of water based foods. Small droplet sizes lead to transparent emulsions so that product appearance is not altered by the addition of an oil phase. In this paper, we demonstrate that it is possible to create remarkably small transparent O/W nanoemulsions with average diameters as low as 40nm from sunflower oil. This is achieved using ultrasound or high shear homogenization and a surfactant/co-surfactant/oil system that is well optimised. The minimum droplet size of 40nm, was only obtained when both droplet deformability (surfactant design) and the applied shear (equipment geometry) were optimal. The time required to achieve the minimum droplet size was also clearly affected by the equipment configuration. Results at atmospheric pressure fitted an expected exponential relationship with the total energy density. However, we found that this relationship changes when an overpressure of up to 400kPa is applied to the sonication vessel, leading to more efficient emulsion production. Oil stability is unaffected by the sonication process. PMID:19321375

  10. Simulating droplet motion on virtual leaf surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, Lisa C.; McCue, Scott W.; Moroney, Timothy J.; Forster, W. Alison; Kempthorne, Daryl M.; Belward, John A.; Turner, Ian W.

    2015-01-01

    A curvilinear thin film model is used to simulate the motion of droplets on a virtual leaf surface, with a view to better understand the retention of agricultural sprays on plants. The governing model, adapted from Roy et al. (2002 J. Fluid Mech. 454, 235–261 (doi:10.1017/S0022112001007133)) with the addition of a disjoining pressure term, describes the gravity- and curvature-driven flow of a small droplet on a complex substrate: a cotton leaf reconstructed from digitized scan data. Coalescence is the key mechanism behind spray coating of foliage, and our simulations demonstrate that various experimentally observed coalescence behaviours can be reproduced qualitatively. By varying the contact angle over the domain, we also demonstrate that the presence of a chemical defect can act as an obstacle to the droplet's path, causing break-up. In simulations on the virtual leaf, it is found that the movement of a typical spray size droplet is driven almost exclusively by substrate curvature gradients. It is not until droplet mass is sufficiently increased via coalescence that gravity becomes the dominating force. PMID:26064657

  11. Edge effects on water droplet condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royon, Laurent; Montgruel, Anne; Medici, Marie Gabrielle; Beysens, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    The effect of geometrical or thermal discontinuities on the growth of water droplets condensing on a cooled substrate is investigated. Edges, corners, cooled/non cooled boundaries can have a strong effect on the vapor concentration profile and mass diffusion around the drops. In comparison to growth in a pattern where droplets have to compete to catch vapor, which results in a linear water concentration profile directed perpendicular to the substrate, droplets near discontinuities can get more vapor (outer edges, corners), resulting in faster growth or less vapor (inner edges), giving lower growth. When the cooling heat flux limits growth instead of mass diffusion (substrate with low thermal conductivity, strong heat exchange with air), edges effects can be canceled. In certain cases, the growth enhancement can reach nearly 500% on edges or corners which, on an inclined substrate, make droplets near the edges detach sooner than in the middle of the substrate. This effect is frequently observed with dew condensing on windows or car windshields. Such droplets, acting as wipers, can thus appreciably increase dew collection on a substrate.

  12. Arrested coalescence of viscoelastic droplets: polydisperse doublets.

    PubMed

    Dahiya, Prerna; Caggioni, Marco; Spicer, Patrick T

    2016-07-28

    Arrested droplet coalescence produces stable anisotropic shapes and is a key mechanism for microstructure development in foods, petroleum and pharmaceutical formulations. Past work has examined the dynamic elastic arrest of coalescing monodisperse droplet doublets and developed a simple model of doublet strain as a function of physical variables. Although the work describes experimental data well, it is limited to describing same-size droplets. A new model incorporating a generalized description of doublet shape is developed to describe polydisperse doublet formation in more realistic emulsion systems. Polydisperse doublets are shown to arrest at lower strains than monodisperse doublets as a result of the smaller contribution of surface area in a given pair. Larger droplet size ratios have lower relative degrees of strain because coalescence is arrested at an earlier stage than in more monodisperse cases. Experimental observations of polydisperse doublet formation indicate that the model under-predicts arrest strains at low solid levels and small droplet sizes. The discrepancy is hypothesized to be the result of nonlinear elastic deformation at high strains.This article is part of the themed issue 'Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation'. PMID:27298435

  13. An evaporation model of colloidal suspension droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, Silvana; Li\\ Nán, Amable; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2009-11-01

    Colloidal suspensions of polymers in water or other solvents are widely used in the pharmaceutical industry to coat tablets with different agents. These allow controlling the rate at which the drug is delivered, taste or physical appearance. The coating is performed by simultaneously spraying and drying the tablets with the colloidal suspension at moderately high temperatures. The spreading of the coating on the pills surface depends on the droplet Webber and Reynolds numbers, angle of impact, but more importantly on the rheological properties of the drop. We present a model for the evaporation of a colloidal suspension droplet in a hot air environment with temperatures substantially lower than the boiling temperature of the carrier fluid. As the liquid vaporizes from the surface, a compacting front advances into the droplet faster than the liquid surface regresses, forming a shell of a porous medium where the particles reach their maximum packing density. While the surface regresses, the evaporation rate is determined by both the rate at which heat is transported to the droplet surface and the rate at which liquid vapor is diffused away from it. This regime continues until the compacting front reaches the center of the droplet, at which point the evaporation rate is drastically reduced.

  14. Droplet Number Concentration Value Added Product

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-08-06

    Cloud droplet number concentration is an important factor in understanding aerosol-cloud interactions. As aerosol concentration increases, it is expected that droplet number concentration (Nd) will increase and droplet size will decrease, for a given liquid water path. This will greatly affect cloud albedo as smaller droplets reflect more shortwave radiation; however, the magnitude and variability of these processes under different environmental conditions is still uncertain.McComiskey et al. (2009) have implemented a method, based onBoers andmore » Mitchell (1994), for calculating Nd from ground-based remote sensing measurements of optical depth and liquid water path. They show that the magnitude of the aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI) varies with a range of factors, including the relative value of the cloud liquid water path (LWP), the aerosol size distribution, and the cloud updraft velocity. Estimates of Nd under a range of cloud types and conditions and at a variety of sites are needed to further quantify the impacts of aerosol cloud interactions. In order to provide data sets for studying aerosol-cloud interactions, the McComiskey et al. (2009) method was implemented as the Droplet Number Concentration (NDROP) value-added product (VAP).« less

  15. Stimulated Raman diagnostics in diesel droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golombok, Michael

    1991-09-01

    Stimulated Raman spectroscopy (SRS) can simultaneously measure droplet sizes and the associated component concentrations in a fuel injection. As spray evaporation is crucial in determining the performance parameters of a diesel engine, such as cold start and particulate emission formation, the new application of the method for spatially and temporally resolved measurements is a useful new diagnostic, extending our understanding of spray processes. Droplet sizes can be obtained from single shot SRS spectra by measuring the separation between morphology-dependent resonances (MDR) that correspond to standing wave modes confined near the droplet circumference. Power spectrum analysis allows the measurement of more than one droplet from a spectrum using a pumped laser sheet in the fuel spray. The MDRs are responsible for the simultaneous stimulation of multiple Raman spectral lines over and above those seen in bulk liquids. The SRS method for concentration measurement is effectively self-calibrating in that the relative intensity of two adjacent lines is used to measure concentration. Any particular fuel has a unique ratio of SRS antisymmetric to symmetric C-H stretch intensity. If individual components in a fuel blend are characterized beforehand, one can monitor the evolution of the spray during injection by measuring signal intensity ratios which yield the volume fraction of the component of interest. The SRS technique is being used to examine a number of spray dynamics phenomena such as fuel atomization, droplet evolution and front-end volatility effects, which are of current interest in diesel development studies.

  16. Structural Transitions in Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Droplets.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ye; Bukusoglu, Emre; Martínez-González, José A; Rahimi, Mohammad; Roberts, Tyler F; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Xiaoguang; Abbott, Nicholas L; de Pablo, Juan J

    2016-07-26

    Confinement of cholesteric liquid crystals (ChLC) into droplets leads to a delicate interplay between elasticity, chirality, and surface energy. In this work, we rely on a combination of theory and experiments to understand the rich morphological behavior that arises from that balance. More specifically, a systematic study of micrometer-sized ChLC droplets is presented as a function of chirality and surface energy (or anchoring). With increasing chirality, a continuous transition is observed from a twisted bipolar structure to a radial spherical structure, all within a narrow range of chirality. During such a transition, a bent structure is predicted by simulations and confirmed by experimental observations. Simulations are also able to capture the dynamics of the quenching process observed in experiments. Consistent with published work, it is found that nanoparticles are attracted to defect regions on the surface of the droplets. For weak anchoring conditions at the nanoparticle surface, ChLC droplets adopt a morphology similar to that of the equilibrium helical phase observed for ChLCs in the bulk. As the anchoring strength increases, a planar bipolar structure arises, followed by a morphological transition to a bent structure. The influence of chirality and surface interactions are discussed in the context of the potential use of ChLC droplets as stimuli-responsive materials for reporting molecular adsorbates. PMID:27249186

  17. Bioeffects due to acoustic droplet vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Encapsulated micro- and nano-droplets can be vaporized via ultrasound, a process termed acoustic droplet vaporization. Our interest is primarily motivated by a developmental gas embolotherapy technique for cancer treatment. In this methodology, infarction of tumors is induced by selectively formed vascular gas bubbles that arise from the acoustic vaporization of vascular microdroplets. Additionally, the microdroplets may be used as vehicles for localized drug delivery, with or without flow occlusion. In this talk, we examine the dynamics of acoustic droplet vaporization through experiments and theoretical/computational fluid mechanics models, and investigate the bioeffects of acoustic droplet vaporization on endothelial cells and in vivo. Early timescale vaporization events, including phase change, are directly visualized using ultra-high speed imaging, and the influence of acoustic parameters on droplet/bubble dynamics is discussed. Acoustic and fluid mechanics parameters affecting the severity of endothelial cell bioeffects are explored. These findings suggest parameter spaces for which bioeffects may be reduced or enhanced, depending on the objective of the therapy. This work was supported by NIH grant R01EB006476.

  18. Bubbles and droplets in magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yecko, Philip

    2006-11-01

    In this work, the behavior of ferrofluid droplets and of bubbles rising in a ferrofluid is studied using direct numerical simulations based on a volume of fluid (VOF) method. A ferrofluid is a suspension of small (5--15 nm) magnetic particles in a carrier liquid which may be water or a hydrocarbon oil, stabilized against settling by Brownian motion and against agglomeration by coating each particle with a layer of surfactant. Although their main application is the fluid O-ring found in computer hard disk drives, ferrofluids have been more recently recognized for their use in micro- and nano-fluidic pumping, and applications to drug delivery are under investigation. Because ferrofluids are opaque, numerical simulations offer a unique opportunity to visualize flows that cannot be easily visualized experimentally, yet little effort has been directed to numerical simulations of realistic magnetic fluids. In this work, we develop and test a multiphase simulation code, based on Surfer, which can dynamically follow the behavior of small numbers of droplets, bubbles or layers of ferrofluid and ordinary viscous fluid for so-called linear magnetic material. In the rising bubble tests, we quantify the vertical elongation of the bubble and the resulting reduction in drag and rise time. In the falling droplet experiments, we demonstrate the effect of variable magnetic properties on the shape and trajectory of the droplet, including the instability threshold where droplet fission occurs.

  19. Simulation of sliding of liquid droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alen, Saif Khan; Farhat, Nazia; Rahman, Md. Ashiqur

    2016-07-01

    Numerical simulations of sliding behavior of liquid droplets on flat and periodic microgrooved surfaces with a range of groove geometry are conducted. A numerical model is developed which is capable of predicting the critical sliding angle of the drop by comparing the advancing and the receding angles obtained from numerical and experimental findings. The effect of microgroove topography, droplet size and inclination angle on the droplet sliding characteristics is analysed. Using an open-source platform (Surface Evolver), a 3D drop-shape model is developed to numerically determine the drop stability and contact angle hysteresis on tilted surfaces. In this numerical model, the three phase contact line of the drop is obtained by numerically calculating the vertex force and local contact angle at each vertex of the base contour. Several numerical models are developed based on various assumptions of base contour shape (circular or elliptical) and implementation of gravitational force to the droplet. Droplet shapes and critical sliding angles, obtained from these numerical models, are compared with those of experimental results and are found to be in very good agreement.

  20. Jumping-droplet electrostatic energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miljkovic, Nenad; Preston, Daniel J.; Enright, Ryan; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2014-07-01

    Micro- and nanoscale wetting phenomena have been an active area of research due to its potential for improving engineered system performance involving phase change. With the recent advancements in micro/nanofabrication techniques, structured surfaces can now be designed to allow condensing coalesced droplets to spontaneously jump off the surface due to the conversion of excess surface energy into kinetic energy. In addition to being removed at micrometric length scales (˜10 μm), jumping water droplets also attain a positive electrostatic charge (˜10-100 fC) from the hydrophobic coating/condensate interaction. In this work, we take advantage of this droplet charging to demonstrate jumping-droplet electrostatic energy harvesting. The charged droplets jump between superhydrophobic copper oxide and hydrophilic copper surfaces to create an electrostatic potential and generate power during formation of atmospheric dew. We demonstrated power densities of ˜15 pW/cm2, which, in the near term, can be improved to ˜1 μW/cm2. This work demonstrates a surface engineered platform that promises to be low cost and scalable for atmospheric energy harvesting and electric power generation.

  1. Modelling NOx emissions of single droplet combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moesl, Klaus G.; Schwing, Joachim E.; Sattelmayer, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    An approach for modelling and simulation of the generation of nitrogen oxide (NOx) in the gas phase surrounding single burning droplets is presented. Assuming spherical symmetry (no gravity, no forced convection), the governing equations are derived first. Then simplifications are introduced and it is proven that they are appropriate. The influences of the initial droplet diameter, the ambient conditions, and the droplet pre-vapourisation on NOx are investigated. The fuel of choice is n-decane (C10H22) as it resembles kerosene and diesel fuel best, and the complexity of the reaction mechanism is manageable. Combinations of C10H22 mechanisms and well-established NOx kinetics are evaluated in detail and validated for their applicability in the context of this work. The conducted simulations of droplet combustion in an atmosphere of hot exhaust gas show that NOx formation (by mass of fuel) increases linearly with the droplet diameter. There is a trade-off between available oxygen and ambient temperature. Increasing the equivalence ratio of the exhaust gas leads to higher NOx emissions in the very lean regime, but to lower emissions if the equivalence ratio exceeds 0.85. Pre-vapourisation of fuel at ambient conditions becomes beneficial with respect to NOx emissions only if the degree of vapourisation is above a minimum limit. If less fuel is vapourised before ignition, the NOx emissions remain almost unaffected.

  2. Non-equilibrium diffusion combustion of a fuel droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyurenkova, Veronika V.

    2012-06-01

    A mathematical model for the non-equilibrium combustion of droplets in rocket engines is developed. This model allows to determine the divergence of combustion rate for the equilibrium and non-equilibrium model. Criterion for droplet combustion deviation from equilibrium is introduced. It grows decreasing droplet radius, accommodation coefficient, temperature and decreases on decreasing diffusion coefficient. Also divergence from equilibrium increases on reduction of droplet radius. Droplet burning time essentially increases under non-equilibrium conditions. Comparison of theoretical and experimental data shows that to have adequate solution for small droplets it is necessary to use the non-equilibrium model.

  3. Numerical investigation of droplet motion in rotating viscous liquid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipov, V. A.; Tkachenko, A. S.; Usanina, A. S.

    2013-05-01

    The results of numerical investigation of the motion of a single droplet in a twisted flow of immiscible viscous liquid are presented. The motion trajectories of a droplet depending on its size, angular velocity of liquid rotation, and the physical parameters of the liquid and droplet have been determined. The values of the Reynolds, Bond, and Weber numbers along the droplet trajectory have been calculated. The effect of the Coriolis forces on the trajectory, velocity, and acceleration of the droplet in flow have been analyzed. The effect of the acceleration components of the droplet on the parameters of its motion is estimated. The numerical results are compared with experimental data.

  4. Early Stages of Hyaline Membrane Formation Detected in Alveolar Mouths in Diffuse Alveolar-Damage-Associated Diseases: A Detailed Immunohistochemical Study.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuki, Yuji; Fujita, Jiro; Yoshinouchi, Takeo; Enzan, Hideaki; Iguchi, Mitsuko; Lee, Gang-Hong; Furihata, Mutsuo

    2015-10-01

    To study the early stages of hyaline membrane (HM) formation, diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) was thoroughly investigated using immunohistochemical methods in 15 autopsy cases, which consisted of various types of interstitial pneumonias and pulmonary diseases derived from nonmalignant or malignant diseases. Alveolar mouths (AMs) that were presumed to be normal were ultrastructurally examined in detail, by using pulmonary tissues in the pneumothorax. It is interesting to note that during the initial stages of HM formation in AMs, fragmented eosinophilic masses were closely attached to AMs as irregular fragments or by a cap-like structure. The ultrastructure revealed some distance between the capillary spaces and surface epithelium of the AMs, indicating that the epithelial cells at the AMs might be often easily damaged even by minor stimuli; they can be considered as "locus minoris resistentiae." HMs were found to be formed initially at the site of AMs derived from fragmented eosinophilic masses in not only pulmonary but also extrapulmonary diseases, including both nonmalignant and malignant diseases. These irregular eosinophilic masses, representing the early shape of HMs, were immunohistochemically positive for the epithelial membrane antigens, namely, surfactant protein A and factor VIII antigen, and occasionally for KL-6 and cytokeratins. These results suggested that fragmented irregular masses represent the initial phase of HM formation. Five of 15 cases were focally negative for KL-6 at the initial irregular mass of HMs. Because KL-6 is one of the fundamental components of pulmonary surface elements, it needs to be studied further by detailed clinicopathological examination. PMID:26183849

  5. Droplet Spreading with Sol-Gel Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalaal, Maziyar; Stoeber, Boris; Balmforth, Neil J.

    2014-11-01

    The impact and spreading of liquid droplets on a smooth solid substrate is a classical subject with several industrial applications such as ink-jet printing, spray cooling, coating, and many others. For many of these deposition processes, controlling the final shape of the drop is critical. In the current research, a new technique for controlling the spreading of droplets impacting a substrate is presented. This technique exploits the rheology of a thermo-responsive polymer solution that undergoes a reversible sol/gel transition above a critical temperature. Experiments are conducted using a combination of shadowgraphy and micro-PIV to observe spreading drops. It is shown that the final diameter of a droplet can be controlled through the temperature of the substrate and the tunable sol/gel transition temperature of the fluid.A mathematical model is provided to further elucidate the flow dynamics.

  6. Edge effects on water droplet condensation.

    PubMed

    Medici, Marie-Gabrielle; Mongruel, Anne; Royon, Laurent; Beysens, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    In this study we investigate the effect of geometrical or thermal discontinuities on the growth of water droplets condensing on a cooled substrate. Edges, corners, and cooled and noncooled boundaries can have a strong effect on the vapor concentration profile and mass diffusion around the drops. In comparison to growth in a pattern where droplets have to compete to catch vapor, which results in a linear water concentration profile directed perpendicularly to the substrate, droplets near discontinuities can get more vapor (outer edges, corners), resulting in faster growth or less vapor (inner edges), giving lower growth. When the cooling heat flux limits growth instead of mass diffusion (substrate with low thermal conductivity, strong heat exchange with air), edge effects can be canceled. In certain cases, growth enhancement can reach nearly 500% on edges or corners. PMID:25615108

  7. Edge effects on water droplet condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medici, Marie-Gabrielle; Mongruel, Anne; Royon, Laurent; Beysens, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    In this study we investigate the effect of geometrical or thermal discontinuities on the growth of water droplets condensing on a cooled substrate. Edges, corners, and cooled and noncooled boundaries can have a strong effect on the vapor concentration profile and mass diffusion around the drops. In comparison to growth in a pattern where droplets have to compete to catch vapor, which results in a linear water concentration profile directed perpendicularly to the substrate, droplets near discontinuities can get more vapor (outer edges, corners), resulting in faster growth or less vapor (inner edges), giving lower growth. When the cooling heat flux limits growth instead of mass diffusion (substrate with low thermal conductivity, strong heat exchange with air), edge effects can be canceled. In certain cases, growth enhancement can reach nearly 500% on edges or corners.

  8. Versatile microfluidic droplets array for bioanalysis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shan-Wen; Xu, Bi-Yi; Ye, Wei-Ke; Xia, Xing-Hua; Chen, Hong-Yuan; Xu, Jing-Juan

    2015-01-14

    We propose a novel method to obtain versatile droplets arrays on a regional hydrophilic chip that is fabricated by PDMS soft lithography and regional plasma treatment. It enables rapid liquid dispensation and droplets array formation just making the chip surface in contact with solution. By combining this chip with a special Christmas Tree structure, the droplets array with concentrations in gradient is generated. It possesses the greatly improved performance of convenience and versatility in bioscreening and biosensing. For example, high throughput condition screening of toxic tests of CdSe quantum dots on HL-60 cells are conducted and cell death rates are successfully counted quickly and efficiently. Furthermore, a rapid biosensing approach for cancer biomarkers carcinoma embryonic antigen (CEA) is developed via magnetic beads (MBs)-based sandwich immunoassay methods. PMID:25525675

  9. [Evaporating Droplet and Imaging Slip Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. G.

    2002-01-01

    In this report, we summarize work on Evaporating Droplet and Imaging Slip Flows. The work was primarily performed by post-doc Hue Hu, and partially by grad students Lei Li and Danish Chopra. The work includes studies on droplet evaporation and its effects on temperature and velocity fields in an evaporating droplet, new 3-D microscopic particle image velocimetry and direct visualization on wall slip in a surfactant solution. With the exception of the slip measurements, these projects were those proposed in the grant application. Instead of slip flow, the original grant proposed imaging electro-osmotic flows. However, shortly after the grant was issued, the PI became aware of work on electro-osmotic flows by the group of Saville in Princeton that was similar to that proposed, and we therefore elected to carry out work on imaging slip flows rather than electro-osmotic flows.

  10. Supercritical droplet gasification experiments with forced convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron; Parigger, Chris; Jeng, San-Mou

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results of a comprehensive experimental program are presented which offer the first direct observations of suspended n-heptane droplet gasifications in pure nitrogen with forced convection without the interference to optical probing associated with a flame. Measurements show attainment of a wet-bulb temperature until reduced pressures exceed about 1.0 under supercritical gas temperatures. Thereafter, temperature measurements indicate fully transient heat-up through the critical temperature. The surface is found to regress in a continuous manner with the measured temperature approaching the critical value at the end of the droplet lifetime under supercritical conditions with very mild level of convection. At increased level of convection for the same ambient conditions, similar sized droplets will undergo significant deformation during the gasification process until partially convected away as a dense vapor cloud as the critical temperature is approached.

  11. Dielectrophoretic levitation of droplets and bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. B.

    1982-01-01

    Uncharged droplets and bubbles can be levitated dielectrophoretically in liquids using strong, nonuniform electric fields. The general equations of motion for a droplet or bubble in an axisymmetric, divergence-free electrostatic field allow determination of the conditions necessary and sufficient for stable levitation. The design of dielectrophoretic (DEP) levitation electrode structures is simplified by a Taylor-series expansion of cusped axisymmetric electrostatic fields. Extensive experimental measurements on bubbles in insulating liquids verify the simple dielectrophoretic model. Other have extended dielectrophoretic levitation to very small particles in aqueous media. Applications of DEP levitation to the study of gas bubbles, liquid droplets, and solid particles are discussed. Some of these applications are of special interest in the reduced gravitational field of a spacecraft.

  12. Droplet Growth Kinetics in Various Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raatikainen, T. E.; Lathem, T. L.; Moore, R.; Lin, J. J.; Cerully, K. M.; Padro, L.; Lance, S.; Cozic, J.; Anderson, B. E.; Nenes, A.

    2012-12-01

    The largest uncertainties in the effects of atmospherics aerosols on the global radiation budget are related to their indirect effects on cloud properties (IPCC, the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 2007). Cloud formation is a kinetic process where the resulting cloud properties depend on aerosol properties and meteorological parameters such as updraft velocity (e.g. McFiggans et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys., 6, 2593-2649, 2006). Droplet growth rates are limited by the water vapor diffusion, but additional kinetic limitations, e.g., due to organic surface films, slow solute dissociation or highly viscous or glassy aerosol states have been hypothesized. Significant additional kinetic limitations can lead to increased cloud droplet number concentration, thus the effect is similar to those of increased aerosol number concentration or changes in vertical velocity (e.g. Nenes et al., Geophys. Res. Lett., 29, 1848, 2002). There are a few studies where slow droplet growth has been observed (e.g. Ruehl et al., Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L15814, 2009), however, little is currently known about their global occurrence and magnitude. Cloud micro-physics models often describe kinetic limitations by an effective water vapor uptake coefficient or similar parameter. Typically, determining aerosol water vapor uptake coefficients requires experimental observations of droplet growth which are interpreted by a numerical droplet growth model where the uptake coefficient is an adjustable parameter (e.g. Kolb et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 10561-10605, 2010). Such methods have not been practical for high time-resolution or long term field measurements, until a model was recently developed for analyzing Droplet Measurement Technologies (DMT) cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) counter data (Raatikainen et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys., 12, 4227-4243, 2012). Model verification experiments showed that the calibration aerosol droplet size can be predicted accurately

  13. Droplet Combustion in a Slow Convective Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayagam, V.; Hicks, M. C.; Kaib, N.; Ackerman, M.; Haggard, J. B., Jr.; Williams, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the present flight experiment definition study is to investigate the effects of slow forced convective flows on the dynamics of isolated single droplet combustion and is designed to complement the quiescent, microgravity droplet combustion experiments (DCE-1 and DCE-2) of Williams and Dryer. The fuels selected for this study are the same as those of DCE, namely, a sooting alkane fuel (heptane) and a non-sooting alcohol (methanol), and imposed flow rates are chosen between 0 and 20 cm/s with varying ambient oxygen concentrations and pressures. Within this velocity range, both accelerating and decelerating flow effects will also be investigated. Two different approaches to generate the forced flow are currently under development in ground-based facilities; the first is a flow tunnel concept where the forced flow is imposed against a stationary droplet, and in the second a tethered droplet is translated at a specified velocity in a quiescent ambient medium. Depending upon the engineering feasibility a selection will be made between these two approaches so that the experiment can be accommodated in the Multiple Droplet Combustion Apparatus (MDCA) currently being designed for the International Space Station. Recently, we have finished designing and fabricating the experimental rigs using both the above mentioned concepts. The flow tunnel concept is implemented in a 2.2 second drop tower rig. Preliminary experiments have been carried out using heptane and methanol in air at atmospheric pressure. The translating droplet apparatus is scheduled to be tested in the 5 second drop facility in the near future. This report presents some of the experimental results obtained for heptane.

  14. Droplet distribution models for visibility calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardin, F.; Colomb, M.; Egal, F.; Morange, P.; Boreux, J.-J.

    2010-07-01

    More efficient predictions of fog occurrence and visibility are required in order to improve both safety and traffic management in critical adverse weather situations. Observation and simulation of the fog characteristics contribute to a better understanding of the phenomena and to adapt technical solutions against visibility reduction. The simulation of visibility reduction by fog condition using light scattering model depends on the size and concentration of droplets. Therefore it is necessary to include in the software some functions for the droplet distribution model rather than some data file of single measurement. The aim of the present work is to revisit some droplet distribution models of fog (Shettle and Fenn 1979) in order to actualise them by using recent experimental measures. Indeed the models mentioned above were established thanks to experimental data obtained with sensors of 70’s. Actual sensors are able to take into account droplets with radius 0.2 μm which was not the case with older sensors. A surface observation campaign was carried out at Palaiseau and Toulouse, France, between 2006 and 2008. These experiments allowed to collect microphysical data of fog and particularly droplet distributions of the fog, thanks to a "Palas" optical granulometer. Based on these data an analysis is carried out in order to provide a droplet distribution model. The first approach consists in testing the four Gamma laws proposed by Shettle and Fenn (1979). The adjustment of coefficients allows changing the characteristics from advection to radiation fog. These functions did not fit the new set of data collected with the Palas sensor. New algorithms based on Gamma and Lognormal laws are proposed and discussed in comparison to the previous models. For a road application, the coefficients of the proposed models are evaluated for different classes of visibility, ranged from 50 to 200 meters.

  15. Oil droplet collisions with marine snow: effect of manipulating droplet size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, R. A.; Variano, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    Solid particle aggregates in the ocean, such as marine snow, can scavenge oil droplets as they are transported in the ocean, resulting in the removal of oil from the water column. Often, chemical dispersant is applied to oil spills to manipulate the oil droplet size; we study how such manipulations affect the rate at which oil is removed from the water column by collision with marine snow. We model the collision process using the particle pair methodology. Three dominant collision mechanisms are considered for particle pairs in the ocean environment: turbulent shear, differential settling and Brownian motion. A comparison of the removal rate of oil from the water column for large and small droplets size is conducted at constant volume fraction. The results of the study show that, for a constant volume of oil, droplet size does alter the amount of oil removed from the water column during collisions with marine snow, and that a greater amount of oil is removed when the droplets are large. This finding holds regardless of which collision mechanism is considered. Of the three mechanisms, differential settling results in the largest constant-volume removal rate (since oil droplets rise while marine floc settle downward) while Brownian diffusion results in the lowest removal rate. These finding suggest that using chemical dispersant on deep-sea oil spills to reduce droplet size will reduce the total volume of oil that becomes attached to marine snow and reduce the amount removed from the water column by this mechanism.

  16. Dynamics of infectious disease transmission by inhalable respiratory droplets

    PubMed Central

    Stilianakis, Nikolaos I.; Drossinos, Yannis

    2010-01-01

    Transmission of respiratory infectious diseases in humans, for instance influenza, occurs by several modes. Respiratory droplets provide a vector of transmission of an infectious pathogen that may contribute to different transmission modes. An epidemiological model incorporating the dynamics of inhalable respiratory droplets is developed to assess their relevance in the infectious process. Inhalable respiratory droplets are divided into respirable droplets, with droplet diameter less than 10 µm, and inspirable droplets, with diameter in the range 10–100 µm: both droplet classes may be inhaled or settle. Droplet dynamics is determined by their physical properties (size), whereas population dynamics is determined by, among other parameters, the pathogen infectivity and the host contact rates. Three model influenza epidemic scenarios, mediated by different airborne or settled droplet classes, are analysed. The scenarios are distinguished by the characteristic times associated with breathing at contact and with hand-to-face contact. The scenarios suggest that airborne transmission, mediated by respirable droplets, provides the dominant transmission mode in middle and long-term epidemics, whereas inspirable droplets, be they airborne or settled, characterize short-term epidemics with high attack rates. The model neglects close-contact transmission by droplet sprays (direct projection onto facial mucous membranes), retaining close-contact transmission by inspirable droplets. PMID:20164087

  17. Droplet sizes, dynamics and deposition in vertical annular flow

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, J C.B.; Dukler, A E

    1985-10-01

    The role of droplets in vertical upwards annular flow is investigated, focusing on the droplet size distributions, dynamics, and deposition phenomena. An experimental program was performed based on a new laser optical technique developed in these laboratories and implemented here for annular flow. This permitted the simultaneous measurement of droplet size, axial and radial velocity. The dependence of droplet size distributions on flow conditions is analyzed. The Upper-Log Normal function proves to be a good model for the size distribution. The mechanism controlling the maximum stable drop size was found to result from the interaction of the pressure fluctuations of the turbulent flow of the gas core with the droplet. The average axial droplet velocity showed a weak dependence on gas rates. This can be explained once the droplet size distribution and droplet size-velocity relationship are analyzed simultaneously. The surprising result from the droplet conditional analysis is that larger droplet travel faster than smaller ones. This dependence cannot be explained if the drag curves used do not take into account the high levels of turbulence present in the gas core in annular flow. If these are considered, then interesting new situations of multiplicity and stability of droplet terminal velocities are encountered. Also, the observed size-velocity relationship can be explained. A droplet deposition is formulated based on the particle inertia control. This permitted the calculation of rates of drop deposition directly from the droplet size and velocities data.

  18. Dynamics of Fattening and Thinning 2D Sessile Droplets.

    PubMed

    Pradas, M; Savva, N; Benziger, J B; Kevrekidis, I G; Kalliadasis, S

    2016-05-17

    We investigate the dynamics of a droplet on a planar substrate as the droplet volume changes dynamically due to liquid being pumped in or out through a pore. We adopt a diffuse-interface formulation which is appropriately modified to account for a localized inflow-outflow boundary condition (the pore) at the bottom of the droplet, hence allowing to dynamically control its volume, as the droplet moves on a flat substrate with a periodic chemical pattern. We find that the droplet undergoes a stick-slip motion as the volume is increased (fattening droplet) which can be monitored by tracking the droplet contact points. If we then switch over to outflow conditions (thinning droplet), the droplet follows a different path (i.e., the distance of the droplet midpoint from the pore location evolves differently), giving rise to a hysteretic behavior. By means of geometrical arguments, we are able to theoretically construct the full bifurcation diagram of the droplet equilibria (positions and droplet shapes) as the droplet volume is changed, finding excellent agreement with time-dependent computations of our diffuse-interface model. PMID:27077328

  19. Rebound of continuous droplet streams from an immiscible liquid pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doak, William J.; Laiacona, Danielle M.; German, Guy K.; Chiarot, Paul R.

    2016-05-01

    We report on the rebound of high velocity continuous water droplet streams from the surface of an immiscible oil pool. The droplets have diameters and velocities of less than 90 μm and 15 m/s, respectively, and were created at frequencies up to 60 kHz. The impact and rebound of continuous droplet streams at this scale and velocity have been largely unexplored. This regime bridges the gap between single drop and jet impacts. The impinging droplets create a divot at the surface of the oil pool that had a common characteristic shape across a wide-range of droplet and oil properties. After impact, the reflected droplets maintain the same uniformity and periodicity of the incoming droplets but have significantly lower velocity and kinetic energy. This was solely attributed to the generation of a flow induced in the viscous oil pool by the impacting droplets. Unlike normally directed impact of millimeter-scale droplets with a solid surface, our results show that an air film does not appear to be maintained beneath the droplets during impact. This suggests direct contact between the droplets and the surface of the oil pool. A ballistic failure limit, correlated with the Weber number, was identified where the rebound was suppressed and the droplets were driven through the oil surface. A secondary failure mode was identified for aperiodic incoming streams. Startup effects and early time dynamics of the rebounding droplet stream were also investigated.

  20. Free running droplets on packed powder beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitby, Catherine P.; Bian, Xun; Sedev, Rossen

    2013-06-01

    We observed that water drops placed on horizontal beds of fine molybdenite particles move freely over the bed surface for about 1 second. The drops collect an irregular coating of unevenly distributed particles as they bounce and roll. We manipulated the distance that the drops travel, and hence the area of the droplet surface coated with particles, by varying the water surface tension and the kinetic energy of the initial droplet impact on the bed surface. Our results highlight the role of contact angle hysteresis in particle encapsulation of liquid drops.

  1. Electrostatic Effects on Droplet Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tryggvason, Gretar; Fernandez, Arturo; Esmaeeli, Asghar

    2002-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations are used to examine the effect of electric fields on the behavior of a suspensions of drops in channels. The effect of the electric field is modeled using the "leaky dielectric" model, coupled with the full Navier-Stokes equations. The governing equations are solved using a front-tracking/finite volume technique. The method has been validated by detailed comparison with previous results for the axisymmetric interactions of two drops in Stokes flow. An extensive set of two-dimensional simulations has allowed us to explore the effect of the conductivity and permittivity ratios in some detail. The interaction of two drops is controlled by two effects. The drops are driven together due to the charge distribution on the surface. Since the net charge of the drops is zero, the drops see each other as dipoles. This dielectrophoretic motion always leads to drops attraction. The second effect is fluid motion driven by tangential stresses at the fluid interface. The fluid motion depends on the relative magnitude of the permittivity and conductivity ratios. When the permittivity ratio is higher than the conductivity ratio, the tangential forces induce flow from the poles of the drops to the equator. If the center of two such drops lies on a line parallel to the electric field, the flow drains from the region between the drops and they attract each other. When the ratios are equal, no tangential motion is induced and the drops attract each other by dielectrophoretic motion. When an electric field is applied to many drops suspended in a channel flow, drops first attract each other pair-wise and some drops move to the wall. If the forces are strong (compared to the fluid shear) the drops can form columns or fibers, spanning the channel and blocking the two-dimensional flow. Electronic "fibration" of suspensions has been observed in a number of systems, including dispersion of milk droplets and red blood cells. If the attractive forces are weak

  2. Engineering optically triggered droplets for photoacoustic imaging and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dove, Jacob D.; Mountford, Paul A.; Murray, Todd W.; Borden, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Liquid perfluorocarbon (PFC) droplets incorporating optical absorbers can be vaporized through photothermal heating using a pulsed laser source. Here, we report on the effect of droplet core material on the optical fluence required to produce droplet vaporization. We fabricate gold nanoparticle templated microbubbles filled with various PFC gases (C3F8, C4F10, and C5F12) and apply pressure to condense them into droplets. The core material is found to have a strong effect on the threshold optical fluence, with lower boiling point droplets allowing for vaporization at lower laser fluence. The impact of droplet size on vaporization threshold is discussed, as well as a proposed mechanism for the relatively broad distribution of vaporization thresholds observed within a droplet population with the same core material. We propose that the control of optical vaporization threshold enabled by engineering the droplet core may find application in contrast enhanced photoacoustic imaging and therapy. PMID:25574448

  3. Hydrodynamic dispensing and electrical manipulation of attolitre droplets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanzhen; Zhu, Benliang; Liu, Yonghong; Wittstock, Gunther

    2016-01-01

    Dispensing and manipulation of small droplets is important in bioassays, chemical analysis and patterning of functional inks. So far, dispensing of small droplets has been achieved by squeezing the liquid out of a small orifice similar in size to the droplets. Here we report that instead of squeezing the liquid out, small droplets can also be dispensed advantageously from large orifices by draining the liquid out of a drop suspended from a nozzle. The droplet volume is adjustable from attolitre to microlitre. More importantly, the method can handle suspensions and liquids with viscosities as high as thousands mPa s markedly increasing the range of applicable liquids for controlled dispensing. Furthermore, the movement of the dispensed droplets is controllable by the direction and the strength of an electric field potentially allowing the use of the droplet for extracting analytes from small sample volume or placing a droplet onto a pre-patterned surface. PMID:27514279

  4. Hydrodynamic dispensing and electrical manipulation of attolitre droplets

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanzhen; Zhu, Benliang; Liu, Yonghong; Wittstock, Gunther

    2016-01-01

    Dispensing and manipulation of small droplets is important in bioassays, chemical analysis and patterning of functional inks. So far, dispensing of small droplets has been achieved by squeezing the liquid out of a small orifice similar in size to the droplets. Here we report that instead of squeezing the liquid out, small droplets can also be dispensed advantageously from large orifices by draining the liquid out of a drop suspended from a nozzle. The droplet volume is adjustable from attolitre to microlitre. More importantly, the method can handle suspensions and liquids with viscosities as high as thousands mPa s markedly increasing the range of applicable liquids for controlled dispensing. Furthermore, the movement of the dispensed droplets is controllable by the direction and the strength of an electric field potentially allowing the use of the droplet for extracting analytes from small sample volume or placing a droplet onto a pre-patterned surface. PMID:27514279

  5. Droplet motion driven by electro-elasto-capillary effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Jaymeen; Yang, Xin; Sun, Ying

    2013-11-01

    The motion of droplets on natural and synthetic fibers underlines many technological applications including flexible displays, insulation, and smart filters. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of the coupled electrical, elastic, and capillary forces on droplets in fiber networks. In the present study, the motion of a water droplet suspended between two electrically insulated fibers of different Young's modulus, lengths and diameters are examined under electric fields. The results on rigid fibers reveal a critical voltage, under which the droplet remain stationary. Above this critical voltage, droplet self-propulsion is observed as a result of the interplay of electro, elasto and capillary forces on the droplet. The effects of the inter-fiber distance and Young's modulus on droplet motion are also discussed. The controllable motion of droplets can be used to manipulate or transport liquid at small scales.

  6. One-to-one encapsulation based on alternating droplet generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirama, Hirotada; Torii, Toru

    2015-10-01

    This paper reports the preparation of encapsulated particles as models of cells using an alternating droplet generation encapsulation method in which the number of particles in a droplet is controlled by a microchannel to achieve one-to-one encapsulation. Using a microchannel in which wettability is treated locally, the fluorescent particles used as models of cells were successfully encapsulated in uniform water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) emulsion droplets. Furthermore, 20% of the particle-containing droplets contained one particle. Additionally, when a surfactant with the appropriate properties was used, the fluorescent particles within each inner aqueous droplet were enclosed in the merged droplet by spontaneous droplet coalescence. This one-to-one encapsulation method based on alternating droplet generation could be used for a variety of applications, such as high-throughput single-cell assays, gene transfection into cells or one-to-one cell fusion.

  7. Liquid crystal Janus emulsion droplets: preparation, tumbling, and swimming.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Joonwoo; Gross, Adam; Wei, Wei-Shao; Tu, Fuquan; Lee, Daeyeon; Collings, Peter J; Yodh, A G

    2015-09-14

    This study introduces liquid crystal (LC) Janus droplets. We describe a process for the preparation of these droplets, which consist of nematic LC and polymer compartments. The process employs solvent-induced phase separation in emulsion droplets generated by microfluidics. The droplet morphology was systematically investigated and demonstrated to be sensitive to the surfactant concentration in the background phase, the compartment volume ratio, and the possible coalescence of multiple Janus droplets. Interestingly, the combination of a polymer and an anisotropic LC introduces new functionalities into Janus droplets, and these properties lead to unusual dynamical behaviors. The different densities and solubilities of the two compartments produce gravity-induced alignment, tumbling, and directional self-propelled motion of Janus droplets. LC Janus droplets with remarkable optical properties and dynamical behaviors thus offer new avenues for applications of Janus colloids and active soft matter. PMID:26171829

  8. CHARGED DROPLET SCRUBBER FOR FINE PARTICLE CONTROL: PILOT DEMONSTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a successful Charged Droplet Scrubber (CDS) pilot demonstration of coke oven emissions control. It also describes the design, installation, and checkout of the demonstration system. The CDS uses electrically sprayed water droplets, accelerated through ...

  9. One-to-one encapsulation based on alternating droplet generation

    PubMed Central

    Hirama, Hirotada; Torii, Toru

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the preparation of encapsulated particles as models of cells using an alternating droplet generation encapsulation method in which the number of particles in a droplet is controlled by a microchannel to achieve one-to-one encapsulation. Using a microchannel in which wettability is treated locally, the fluorescent particles used as models of cells were successfully encapsulated in uniform water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) emulsion droplets. Furthermore, 20% of the particle-containing droplets contained one particle. Additionally, when a surfactant with the appropriate properties was used, the fluorescent particles within each inner aqueous droplet were enclosed in the merged droplet by spontaneous droplet coalescence. This one-to-one encapsulation method based on alternating droplet generation could be used for a variety of applications, such as high-throughput single-cell assays, gene transfection into cells or one-to-one cell fusion. PMID:26487193

  10. Characterisation of a laser droplet formation process by acoustic emission.

    PubMed

    Govekar, E; Klemencic, J; Kokalj, T; Jahrsdörfer, B; Muzic, P; Grabec, I

    2004-04-01

    The aim of this article is to describe an application of acoustic emission to characterise a process of laser droplet formation from a metal wire. Laser droplet formation is a crucial process in new laser droplet welding technology, where parts are joined by means of the heat content of a liquid metal droplet deposited onto the parts to be joined. A laser beam is used for heating and melting the wire tip, and for detaching the molten pendant droplet. Depending on the process parameters, three different outcomes of the process can be observed: (1) no droplet formed; (2) a droplet formed but not detached; (3) a droplet formed and detached from the wire. It is shown that AE can be used to monitor the process and to indicate the different process outcomes. PMID:15047268

  11. A novel coarsening mechanism of droplets in immiscible fluid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Ryotaro; Tanaka, Hajime

    2015-06-01

    In our daily lives, after shaking a salad dressing, we see the coarsening of oil droplets suspended in vinegar. Such a demixing process is observed everywhere in nature and also of technological importance. For a case of high droplet density, domain coarsening proceeds with inter-droplet collisions and the resulting coalescence. This phenomenon has been explained primarily by the so-called Brownian-coagulation mechanism: stochastic thermal forces exerted by molecules induce random motion of individual droplets, causing accidental collisions and subsequent interface-tension-driven coalescence. Contrary to this, here we demonstrate that the droplet motion is not random, but hydrodynamically driven by the composition Marangoni force due to an interfacial tension gradient produced in each droplet as a consequence of composition correlation among droplets. This alters our physical understanding of droplet coarsening in immiscible liquid mixtures on a fundamental level.

  12. Flow field induced particle accumulation inside droplets in rectangular channels.

    PubMed

    Hein, Michael; Moskopp, Michael; Seemann, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    Particle concentration is a basic operation needed to perform washing steps or to improve subsequent analysis in many (bio)-chemical assays. In this article we present field free, hydrodynamic accumulation of particles and cells in droplets flowing within rectangular micro-channels. Depending on droplet velocity, particles either accumulate at the rear of the droplet or are dispersed over the entire droplet cross-section. We show that the observed particle accumulation behavior can be understood by a coupling of particle sedimentation to the internal flow field of the droplet. The changing accumulation patterns are explained by a qualitative change of the internal flow field. The topological change of the internal flow field, however, is explained by the evolution of the droplet shape with increasing droplet velocity altering the friction with the channel walls. In addition, we demonstrate that accumulated particles can be concentrated, removing excess dispersed phase by splitting the droplet at a simple channel junction. PMID:26032835

  13. Photomicrographic Investigation of Spontaneous Freezing Temperatures of Supercooled Water Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsch, R. G.; Hacker, P. T.

    1950-01-01

    A photomicrographic technique for investigating eupercooled. water droplets has been devised and. used. to determine the spontaneous freezing temperatures of eupercooled. water droplets of the size ordinarily found. in the atmosphere. The freezing temperatures of 4527 droplets ranging from 8.75 to 1000 microns in diameter supported on a platinum surface and 571 droplets supported on copper were obtained. The average spontaneous freezing temperature decreased with decrease in the size of the droplets. The effect of size on the spontaneous freezing temperature was particularly marked below 60 microns. Frequency-distribution curves of the spontaneous freezing temperatures observed for droplets of a given size were obtained. Although no droplet froze at a temperature above 20 0 F, all droplets melted at 32 F. Results obtained with a copper support did not differ essentially from those obtained with a platinum surface.

  14. ROLE OF ROGUE DROPLET COMBUSTION IN HAZARDOUS WASTE INCINERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study to develop a predictive understanding of individual droplet trajectories in turbulent diffusion flames. In the incineration of liquid hazardous wastes, atomization quality may limit destruction efficiency. Large, nonmean droplets in a fuel spra...

  15. Steady-state droplet size in montmorillonite stabilised emulsions.

    PubMed

    Ganley, William J; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen S

    2016-08-14

    The formation of hexadecane-in-water emulsions stabilised by montmorillonite platelets was studied. In this system the platelets form a monolayer around the droplets and the droplet size decreases with increasing platelet volume fraction. However, the number of platelets present exceeds that required for monolayer coverage. The kinetics of emulsification were investigated and coalescence of droplets during turbulent mixing was found to continue even after the droplets had reached their ultimate size. Non-spherical droplets, resulting from arrested coalescence, were not observed suggesting that particles may be desorbing from the interface during the turbulent flow. A kinetic model based on a competition between droplet break-up and coalescence, mediated by particle adsorption and desorption, reproduces experimental trends in droplet diameter. The model can be used to predict the most efficient formulation to minimise droplet diameters for given materials and mixing conditions and sheds light on the processes occurring during emulsification in this system. PMID:27407026

  16. TRAJECTORY AND INCINERATION OF ROGUE DROPLETS IN A TURBULENT DIFFUSION FLAME

    EPA Science Inventory

    The trajectory and incineration efficiency of individual droplet streams of a fuel mixture injected into a swirling gas turbulent diffusion flame were measured as a function of droplet size, droplet velocity, interdroplet spacing, and droplet injection angle. Additional experimen...

  17. Contribution to the cloud droplet effective radius parameterization

    SciTech Connect

    Pontikis, C.; Hicks, E. )

    1992-11-01

    An analytic cloud droplet effective radius expression is derived and validated by using field experiment microphysical data. This expression shows that the effective radius depends simultaneously upon the cloud liquid water content, droplet concentration and droplet spectral dispersion. It further suggests that the variability in these parameters present at all scales, due to turbulent mixing and secondary droplet activation, could limit the accuracy of the effective radius parameterizations used in climate models. 12 refs.

  18. Electrocoalescence based serial dilution of microfluidic droplets

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Biddut; Vanapalli, Siva A.

    2014-01-01

    Dilution of microfluidic droplets where the concentration of a reagent is incrementally varied is a key operation in drop-based biological analysis. Here, we present an electrocoalescence based dilution scheme for droplets based on merging between moving and parked drops. We study the effects of fluidic and electrical parameters on the dilution process. Highly consistent coalescence and fine resolution in dilution factor are achieved with an AC signal as low as 10 V even though the electrodes are separated from the fluidic channel by insulator. We find that the amount of material exchange between the droplets per coalescence event is high for low capillary number. We also observe different types of coalescence depending on the flow and electrical parameters and discuss their influence on the rate of dilution. Overall, we find the key parameter governing the rate of dilution is the duration of coalescence between the moving and parked drop. The proposed design is simple incorporating the channel electrodes in the same layer as that of the fluidic channels. Our approach allows on-demand and controlled dilution of droplets and is simple enough to be useful for assays that require serial dilutions. The approach can also be useful for applications where there is a need to replace or wash fluid from stored drops. PMID:25379096

  19. The Physics of Foams, Droplets and Bubbles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarker, Dipak K.

    2013-01-01

    Foams or bubble dispersions are common to milkshakes, bread, champagne froth, shaving mousse, shampoo, crude oil extraction systems, upholstery packing and bubble wrap, whereas the term droplet is often synonymous with either a small drop of water or a drop of oil--a type of coarse dispersion. The latter are seen in butter and milk, household…

  20. CFD Simulations of Vibration Induced Droplet Ejection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Ashley; Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, Ari

    1998-11-01

    Vibration-induced droplet ejection is a process that occurs when a liquid droplet is placed on a vibrating membrane. Above a critical value of the excitation amplitude, Faraday waves form on the surface of the drop. As the amplitude is increased secondary drops are ejected from the wave crests. A Navier-Stokes solver designed to simulate the transient fluid mechanics of the process is presented. The solver is based on a MAC method on a staggered grid. A volume of fluid method is implemented to track the free surface. The volume fraction is advected via a second-order, unsplit method that minimizes numerical diffusion of the interface. Surface tension is incorporated as a continuum surface force. This work is intended to provide a comprehensive description of the fluid dynamics involved in vibration-induced droplet ejection, with the aim of understanding the mechanism behind the ejection process. The evolution of the interface through droplet ejection will be simulated. The dependence of the ejection process on the driving parameters will be evaluated and the resonance characteristics of the drop will be determined. The results of the computations will be compared with experimental results.

  1. Exotic states of bouncing and walking droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wind-Willassen, Øistein; Moláček, Jan; Harris, Daniel M.; Bush, John W. M.

    2013-08-01

    We present the results of an integrated experimental and theoretical investigation of droplets bouncing on a vibrating fluid bath. A comprehensive series of experiments provides the most detailed characterisation to date of the system's dependence on fluid properties, droplet size, and vibrational forcing. A number of new bouncing and walking states are reported, including complex periodic and aperiodic motions. Particular attention is given to the first characterisation of the different gaits arising within the walking regime. In addition to complex periodic walkers and limping droplets, we highlight a previously unreported mixed state, in which the droplet switches periodically between two distinct walking modes. Our experiments are complemented by a theoretical study based on our previous developments [J. Molacek and J. W. M. Bush, J. Fluid Mech. 727, 582-611 (2013);, 10.1017/jfm.2013.279 J. Molacek and J. W. M. Bush, J. Fluid Mech. 727, 612-647 (2013)], 10.1017/jfm.2013.280, which provide a basis for rationalising all observed bouncing and walking states.

  2. TRW CHARGED DROPLET SCRUBBER CORROSION STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of corrosion studies to provide definitive data concerning the corrosive nature of coke-oven waste-heat flue gas and its effects on wet electrostatic precipitators, and specifically on TRW's Charged Droplet Scrubber (CDS). The study characterized the chem...

  3. The effects of sooting in droplet combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kyeong-Ook; Jensen, Kirk; Choi, Mun Young

    1995-01-01

    The study of the burning of a single droplet is an ideal problem from which to gain fundamental understanding of diffusion flame characteristics. Droplet combustion is a complex physico-chemical process that involves a chemically-reacting two-phase flow with phase changes and yet simple experiments and analysis can be used to attain important insights into the burning rate, flame dynamics, kinetic extinction and disruption processes. It is a subject that has been actively studied for the past 40 years with most of the fundamental experiments being performed under reduced-gravity conditions for direct comparisons with theoretical/computational analyses that invoke spherical symmetry assumptions. In the earlier studies, the effects of sooting on the overall burning characteristics were not considered. However, recent microgravity investigations performed at the NASA-LeRC droptowers (Droplet Combustion Experiment) and others indicate that effects of soot and sootcloud formation may be significant during the lifetime of the droplet and therefore must be included in the analysis.

  4. Evaporation-Driven Bioassays in Suspended Droplets.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Perez, Ruth; Fan, Z Hugh; Garcia-Cordero, Jose L

    2016-07-19

    The microtiter plate has been an essential tool for diagnostics, high-throughput screening, and biological assays. We present an alternative platform to perform bioassays in a microplate format that exploits evaporation to drive assay reactions. Our method consists of droplets suspended on plastic pillars; reactions occur in these droplets instead of the wells. The pillars are fabricated by milling, and the rough surface created by this fabrication method pins the droplet to a constant contact line during the assay and also acts as a hydrophobic surface. Upon evaporation, natural convection arising from Marangoni currents mixes solutions in the droplet, which speeds up assay reactions, decreases assay times, and increases limits of detection. As a proof of concept we implemented two colorimetric assays to detect glucose and proteins in only 1.5 μL, without any external devices for mixing and with a digital microscope as a readout mechanism. Our platform is an ideal alternative to the microtiter plate, works with different volumes, is compatible with commercially available reagent dispensers and plate-readers, and could have broad applications in diagnostics and high-throughput screening. PMID:27331825

  5. Microfluidic droplet enrichment for targeted sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Eastburn, Dennis J.; Huang, Yong; Pellegrino, Maurizio; Sciambi, Adam; Ptáček, Louis J.; Abate, Adam R.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted sequence enrichment enables better identification of genetic variation by providing increased sequencing coverage for genomic regions of interest. Here, we report the development of a new target enrichment technology that is highly differentiated from other approaches currently in use. Our method, MESA (Microfluidic droplet Enrichment for Sequence Analysis), isolates genomic DNA fragments in microfluidic droplets and performs TaqMan PCR reactions to identify droplets containing a desired target sequence. The TaqMan positive droplets are subsequently recovered via dielectrophoretic sorting, and the TaqMan amplicons are removed enzymatically prior to sequencing. We demonstrated the utility of this approach by generating an average 31.6-fold sequence enrichment across 250 kb of targeted genomic DNA from five unique genomic loci. Significantly, this enrichment enabled a more comprehensive identification of genetic polymorphisms within the targeted loci. MESA requires low amounts of input DNA, minimal prior locus sequence information and enriches the target region without PCR bias or artifacts. These features make it well suited for the study of genetic variation in a number of research and diagnostic applications. PMID:25873629

  6. Density of states of helium droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Klavs; Johnson, Michael D.; Kresin, Vitaly V.

    2007-12-01

    Accurate analytical expressions for the state densities of liquid He4 droplets are derived, incorporating the ripplon and phonon degrees of freedom. The microcanonical temperature and the ripplon angular momentum level density are also evaluated. The approach is based on inversions and systematic expansions of canonical thermodynamic properties.

  7. Astronaut Peggy Whitson and Lemonade Droplet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In this video, astronaut Peggy Whitson is having fun with a blob of lemonade on the International Space Station (ISS). A Fluids physicist, however, sees much more than just a blob of lemonade floating around. Using sound waves and air flows, technology development to shape and position liquid droplets for containerless processing or fluid clean up is possible.

  8. Two Droplets Burning Side by Side

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Fiber-Supported Droplet Combustion (FSDC) experiment team got more than twice as many burns have been completed as were originally scheduled for STS-95. This image was taken July 12, 1997, MET:10/08:13 (approximate). As shown here, scientists were able to burn two droplets side by side, more closely mimicking behavior of burning fuel in an engine. This shows ignition of a single drop that subsequently burned while a fan blew through the chamber, giving the scientists data on burning with convection, but no buoyancy -- an important distinction when you're trying to solve a problem by breaking it into parts. FSDC-2 studied fundamental phenomena related to liquid fuel droplet combustion in air. Pure fuels and mixtures of fuels were burned as isolated single and dual droplets with and without forced air convection. The FSDC guest investigator was Forman Williams, University of California, San Diego. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (1.1 MB, 11-second MPEG, screen 320 x 240 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300176.html.

  9. Surface tension of evaporating nanofluid droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ruey-Hung; Phuoc, Tran X.; Martello, Donald

    2011-05-01

    Measurements of nanofluid surface tension were made using the pendant droplet method. Three different types of nanoparticles were used - laponite, silver and Fe2O3 - with de-ionized water (DW) as the base fluid. The reported results focus on the following categories; (1) because some nanoparticles require surfactants to form stable colloids, the individual effects of the surfactant and the particles were investigated; (2) due to evaporation of the pendant droplet, the particle concentration increases, affecting the apparent surface tension; (3) because of the evaporation process, a hysteresis was found where the evaporating droplet can only achieve lower values of surface tension than that of nanofluids at the same prepared concentrations: and (4) the Stefan equation relating the apparent surface tension and heat of evaporation was found to be inapplicable for nanofluids investigated. Comparisons with findings for sessile droplets are also discussed, pointing to additional effects of nanoparticles other than the non-equilibrium evaporation process.

  10. Many Roads Lead to the Lipid Droplet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this journal article, we review the recent work by Farese and colleagues (Functional genomic screen reveals genes involved in lipid-droplet formation and utilization. Guo Y, Walther TC, Rao M, Stuurman N, Goshima G, Terayama K, Wong JS, Vale RD, Walter P, Farese RV. Nature. 2008 May 29;453(7195):...

  11. Versatile on-demand droplet generation for controlled encapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Minsoung; Liu, Peng; Meagher, Robert J.; Light, Yooli K.; Singh, Anup K.

    2014-01-01

    We present a droplet-based microfluidic system for performing bioassays requiring controlled analyte encapsulation by employing highly flexible on-demand droplet generation. On-demand droplet generation and encapsulation are achieved pneumatically using a microdispensing pump connected to a constant pressure source. The system generates single droplets to the collection route only when the pump is actuated with a designated pressure level and produces two-phase parallel flow to the waste route during the stand-by state. We analyzed the effect of actuation pressure on the stability and size of droplets and optimized conditions for generation of stable droplets over a wide pressure range. By increasing the duration of pump actuation, we could either trigger a short train of identical size droplets or generate a single larger droplet. We also investigated the methodology to control droplet contents by fine-tuning flow rates or implementing a resistance bridge between the pump and main channels. We demonstrated the integrated chip for on-demand mixing between two aqueous phases in droplets and on-demand encapsulation of Escherichia coli cells. Our unique on-demand feature for selective encapsulation is particularly appropriate for bioassays with extremely dilute samples, such as pathogens in a clinical sample, since it can significantly reduce the number of empty droplets that impede droplet collection and subsequent data analysis. PMID:25379072

  12. INFLUENCE OF ROGUE DROPLET ATOMIZATION ON INCINERATION EFFECTIVENESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of measuring the trajectories and carbon destruction efficiency of fuel oil droplets in a 100 kW combustor, in an effort to better understand the influence of rogue droplet atomization on incineration effectiveness. The single monodisperse droplet streams ...

  13. Fluorescent photography of spray droplets using a laser light source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, J.; Hiroyasu, H.; Sowls, R.

    1969-01-01

    Monochromatic laser emission transformed by a fluorescent process into droplet emission over a wavelength band provides high light intensities for obtaining adequate time resolution to stop droplet motion in photographic spray studies. Experiments showed that the Q-switched laser-optical harmonic generator combination produced sharp, well-exposed droplet images.

  14. Droplet pairing and coalescence control for generation of combinatorial signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Um, Eujin; Rogers, Matthew; Stone, Howard

    2013-03-01

    A co-flowing aqueous phase with an immiscible oil phase in a microchannel generates uniformly spaced, monodisperse droplets, which retain their shape by not touching each other or by being stabilized with surfactants at the oil-water interface. However, droplet coalescence is required in many advanced applications, which can be achieved by a complex channel geometry or size differences in the droplets, and as well as by procedures to reduce the effect of a surfactant. These approaches, again, hinder the stability of droplets further downstream. We designed a microchannel which consistently inserts gas-bubble between droplets so that pairing and coalescence of droplets occurs even in the presence of surfactant, and yet prevents unwanted merging with other droplets. Aqueous droplets placed between the bubbles alter their relative speeds and spacing, and consequently we study the change in the number of droplet pairings in relation to the characteristics of the bubbles and the volume of aqueous droplets. By integrating this approach with droplets of different materials, we can program the output sequence of droplet compositions, and such complex combinatorial signals generated are aimed for concentration gradient generation and dynamic stimulation of biological cells with chemicals.

  15. Merging droplets in double nanocontact spin torque oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Dun; Liu, Yaowen; Zhou, Y.; Mohseni, S. M.; Chung, S.; Åkerman, J.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate how magnetic droplet soliton pairs, nucleated by two separated nanocontact (NC) spin torque oscillators, can merge into a single droplet soliton. A detailed description of the magnetization dynamics of this merger process is obtained by micromagnetic simulations: A droplet pair with a steady-state in-phase spin precession is generated through the spin-transfer torque effect underneath two separate NCs, followed by a gradual expansion of the droplets' volume and the out-phase of magnetization on the inner side of the two droplets, resulting in the droplets merging into a larger droplet. This merger occurs only when the NC separation is smaller than a critical value. A transient breathing mode is observed before the merged droplet stabilizes into a steady precession state. The precession frequency of the merged droplet is lower than that of the droplet pair, consistent with its larger size. Merged droplets can again break up into droplet pairs at high enough magnetic field with a strong hysteretic response.

  16. Response of two-phase droplets to intense electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James F.; Maloney, Daniel J.; Lawson, William F.; Casleton, Kent H.

    1993-01-01

    The behavior of two-phase droplets subjected to high intensity radiation pulses is studied. Droplets are highly absorbing solids in weakly absorbing liquid medium. The objective of the study was to define heating thresholds required for causing explosive boiling and secondary atomization of the fuel droplet. The results point to mechanisms for energy storage and transport in two-phase systems.

  17. Organic aerosol effects on fog droplet spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Yi; Russell, Lynn M.

    2004-05-01

    Organic aerosol alters cloud and fog properties through surface tension and solubility effects. This study characterizes the role of organic compounds in affecting fog droplet number concentration by initializing and comparing detailed particle microphysical simulations with two field campaigns in the Po Valley. The size distribution and chemical composition of aerosol were based on the measurements made in the Po Valley Fog Experiments in 1989 and 1998-1999. Two types of aerosol with different hygroscopicity were considered: the less hygroscopic particles, composed mainly of organic compounds, and the more hygroscopic particles, composed mainly of inorganic salts. The organic fraction of aerosol mass was explicitly modeled as a mixture of seven soluble compounds [, 2001] by employing a functional group-based thermodynamic model [, 2002]. Condensable gases in the vapor phase included nitric acid, sulfuric acid, and ammonia. The maximum supersaturation in the simulation is 0.030% and is comparable to the calculation by [1992] inferred from measured residual particle fractions. The minimum activation diameters of the less and more hygroscopic particles are 0.49 μm and 0.40 μm, respectively. The predicted residual particle fractions are in agreement with measurements. The organic components of aerosol account for 34% of the droplet residual particle mass and change the average droplet number concentration by -10-6%, depending on the lowering of droplet surface tension and the interactions among dissolving ions. The hygroscopic growth of particles due to the presence of water-soluble organic compounds enhances the condensation of nitric acid and ammonia due to the increased surface area, resulting in a 9% increase in the average droplet number concentration. Assuming ideal behavior of aqueous solutions of water-soluble organic compounds overestimates the hygroscopic growth of particles and increases droplet numbers by 6%. The results are sensitive to microphysical

  18. Fabrication of Janus droplets by evaporation driven liquid-liquid phase separation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingquan; Xu, Meng; Liu, Xiaojun; Zhao, Wenfeng; Zong, Chenghua; Yu, Yang; Wang, Qi; Gai, Hongwei

    2016-04-11

    We present a universal and scalable method to fabricate Janus droplets based on evaporation driven liquid-liquid phase separation. In this work, the morphologies and chemical properties of separate parts of the Janus droplets can be flexibly regulated, and more complex Janus droplets (such as core-shell Janus droplets, ternary Janus droplets, and multiple Janus droplets) can be constructed easily. PMID:26983706

  19. An interface tracking model for droplet electrocoalescence.

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Lindsay Crowl

    2013-09-01

    This report describes an Early Career Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to develop an interface tracking model for droplet electrocoalescence. Many fluid-based technologies rely on electrical fields to control the motion of droplets, e.g. microfluidic devices for high-speed droplet sorting, solution separation for chemical detectors, and purification of biodiesel fuel. Precise control over droplets is crucial to these applications. However, electric fields can induce complex and unpredictable fluid dynamics. Recent experiments (Ristenpart et al. 2009) have demonstrated that oppositely charged droplets bounce rather than coalesce in the presence of strong electric fields. A transient aqueous bridge forms between approaching drops prior to pinch-off. This observation applies to many types of fluids, but neither theory nor experiments have been able to offer a satisfactory explanation. Analytic hydrodynamic approximations for interfaces become invalid near coalescence, and therefore detailed numerical simulations are necessary. This is a computationally challenging problem that involves tracking a moving interface and solving complex multi-physics and multi-scale dynamics, which are beyond the capabilities of most state-of-the-art simulations. An interface-tracking model for electro-coalescence can provide a new perspective to a variety of applications in which interfacial physics are coupled with electrodynamics, including electro-osmosis, fabrication of microelectronics, fuel atomization, oil dehydration, nuclear waste reprocessing and solution separation for chemical detectors. We present a conformal decomposition finite element (CDFEM) interface-tracking method for the electrohydrodynamics of two-phase flow to demonstrate electro-coalescence. CDFEM is a sharp interface method that decomposes elements along fluid-fluid boundaries and uses a level set function to represent the interface.

  20. A DROPLET MODEL OF QUIESCENT PROMINENCE DOWNFLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Haerendel, G.; Berger, T.

    2011-04-20

    Observations of quiescent prominences with the Solar Optical Telescope on the Hinode satellite have revealed the ubiquitous existence of downflows forming coherent thin and highly structured vertically oriented threads with velocities between 10 and 20 km s{sup -1}. Their widths range between 300 and 500 km. They are often initiated at the top of the visible prominence, but sometimes also at intermediate level. We propose that the downflows are made of plasma packets that squeeze themselves through the dominantly horizontal field under the action of gravity. Their origin is assumed to be hot plasma supplied from either inside or the immediate vicinity of the prominence and condensing at its top. Under compression and further cooling, the matter overflows to the flanks of the prominence dragging its magnetic field with it. Under the increasing action of gravity, vertical structures are forming which eventually disconnect from the field of the inflow channel thus forming finite plasma packets. This process is reminiscent of water flowing over a mountain ridge and breaking up into a multitude of droplets. Like water droplets being subject to air drag, the falling plasma droplets experience a drag force by the horizontal prominence field and assume a steady vertical velocity. This happens via the excitation of Alfven waves. Lateral confinement by the prominence field determines their spatial extent. The small scales of the droplets and the directional balance of their internal tangled magnetic fields can explain the absence of appreciable vertical components in magnetic field measurements. On the basis of the observed width and vertical speed of the downflows and by adopting a prominence field of about 8 G, we derive central density and temperature of the droplets, which turn out to be quite consistent with known prominence characteristics. In the formulation of the drag force a dimensionless 'magnetic drag coefficient' has been introduced with a value well below unity.

  1. The differential distribution of acetylated and detyrosinated alpha-tubulin in the microtubular cytoskeleton and primary cilia of hyaline cartilage chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    POOLE, C. ANTHONY; ZHANG, ZI-JUN; ROSS, JACQUELINE M.

    2001-01-01

    The primary cilium is a ubiquitous cytoplasmic organelle of unknown function. Ultrastructural evidence of primary cilia in chondrocytes, and their colocalisation with the Golgi apparatus, has led to speculation that these structures are functionally linked. To investigate the relationship between these organelles, we examined the molecular anatomy of the microtubular cytoskeleton in the chondrocytes of chick embryo sterna. Thick cryosections were immunolabelled with antibodies directed against acetylated α-tubulin (C3B9), detyrosinated α-tubulin (ID5) and total α-tubulin (TAT), and imaged at high magnification using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed the ultrastructure of the chondrocyte primary cilium and its structural relationship to the Golgi apparatus. Detyrosinated and acetylated α-tubulins were concentrated in the centrioles, centrosome and microtubule organising centre adjacent to the nucleus, with total α-tubulin distributed throughout the cytoplasm. ID5 stained the primary cilium at an incidence of 1 per cell, its colocalisation with C3B9 identifying the primary cilium as one of the most stable features of the microtubular cytoskeleton. Primary cilia varied from 1 to 4 μm in length, and 3 patterns of projection into the extracellular matrix were identified; (1) full extension and matrix contact, with minor undulations along the length; (2) partial extension and matrix contact, with a range of bending deflections; (3) cilium reclined against the cell surface with minimal matrix contact. Ultrastructural studies identified direct connections between extracellular collagen fibres and the proteins which decorate ciliary microtubules, suggesting a matrix–cilium–Golgi continuum in hyaline chondrocytes. These results strengthen the hypothesis that the primary cilium acts as a ‘cellular cybernetic probe' capable of transducing environmental information from the extracellular matrix, communicating this

  2. Evaporation of ethanol/water droplets: examining the temporal evolution of droplet size, composition and temperature.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Rebecca J; Reid, Jonathan P

    2005-09-01

    The evolving size, composition, and temperature of evaporating ethanol/water aerosol droplets 25-57 microm in radius are probed by cavity enhanced Raman scattering (CERS) and laser induced fluorescence. This represents the first study in which the evolving composition of volatile droplets has been probed with spatial selectivity on the millisecond time scale, providing a new strategy for exploring mass and heat transfer in aerosols. The Raman scattering intensity is shown to depend exponentially on species concentration due to the stimulated nature of the CERS technique, providing a sensitive measure of the concentration of the volatile ethanol component. The accuracy with which we can determine droplet size, composition, and temperature is discussed. We demonstrate that the CERS measurements of evolving size and composition of droplets falling in a train can be used to characterize, and thus avoid, droplet coagulation. By varying the surrounding gas pressure (7-77 kPa), we investigate the dependence of the rate of evaporation on the rate of gas diffusion, and behavior consistent with gas diffusion-limited evaporation is observed. We suggest that such measurements can allow the determination of the vapor pressures of components within the droplet and can allow the determination of activity coefficients of volatile species. PMID:16834174

  3. Collision of oil droplets with marine aggregates: Effect of droplet size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Ruth A.; Variano, Evan A.

    2016-05-01

    Interactions between oil droplets and marine particle aggregates, such as marine snow, may affect the behavior of oil spills. Marine snow is known to scavenge fine particles from the water column, and has the potential to scavenge oil droplets in the same manner. To determine the degree to which such a process is important in the evolution of oil spills, we quantify the collision of oil droplets and marine aggregates using existing collision rate equations. Results show that interaction of drops and aggregates can substantially influence the drop size distribution, but like all such processes this result is sensitive to the local concentration of oil and aggregates. The analysis also shows that as the size distribution of oil droplets shifts toward larger droplets, a greater fraction of the total oil volume collides with marine aggregates. This result is robust to a variety of different assumptions in the collision model. Results also show that there is not always a dominant collision mechanism. For example, when droplets and aggregates are both close to 10 μm in radius, shear and differential settling contribute nearly equally to the collision rate. This overlap suggests that further research on the interaction of shear and differential settling could be useful.

  4. Aerodynamic device for generating mono-disperse fuel droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, G. J.; Walsh, D. E.; Takahashi, F.; Dryer, F. L.

    1989-04-01

    A device has been developed for generating well-defined, one-dimensional streams of small monosized droplets of a variety of fuels. The droplets produced are well separated, making this technique well suited to experimental combustion studies of unsupported, isolated droplets. This method has been used successfully to generate droplets of light and middistillate petroleum fuels, heavy oils, boron/JP-10 slurries, and coke/oil slurries, for a range of combustion studies. The principle of operation of the device is the aerodynamic stripping of incompletely formed droplets emerging from the tip of a capillary/fine wire which resides in the throat of a venturi or convergent nozzle.

  5. Effect of droplet-induced breakdown on CARS temperature measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Rankin, D. ); Switzer, G.L. ); Obringer, C.A.; Jackson, T. )

    1990-07-20

    This research examines the potential for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) to rovide reliable gas temperature measurements in the presence of liquid droplets. The droplets cause dielectric breakdown by focusing the CARS laser beams. This breakdown produces a plasma that can disrupt or obscure the CARS signal. Specifically, we examine the influence of laser induced breakdown on the CARS signal, and we determine the importance of droplet position relative to the CARS focal volume and droplet concentration on the reliability of CARS temperature measurements in droplet-laden flows. In addition, we propose a reliable data reduction procedure to minimize the disruptive influence of laser induced breakdown on CARS temperature.

  6. An Oil Droplet That Spontaneously Climbs up Stairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumino, Y.; Magome, N.; Yoshikawa, K.

    It has been reported that an oil droplet on a glass surface moves spontaneously in an oil-water system. This motion of an oil droplet can be understood as the spreading of a reactive droplet, which is induced by the interfacial tension gradient at the glass surface. In this paper, we focus on the spontaneous motion of an oil droplet climbing up stairs. We found that an oil droplet tends to move up the stairs rather than to step down. We describe some of the mechanisms of this unique behavior.

  7. Stability of a pendant droplet in gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, P.E.

    1998-07-01

    The authors develop a model of metal transfer in gas metal arc welding and compute the critical mass of a pendant droplet in order to ascertain the size and frequency of droplets detaching from the consumable metal electrode. These results are used to predict the mode of metal transfer for a range of voltage and current encompassing free flight transfer, and the transition between globular and spray transfer. This model includes an efficient method to compute the stability of a pendant droplet and the location of the liquid bridge connecting the primary droplet and the residual liquid remaining after detachment of the primary droplet.

  8. Velocity and rotation measurements in acoustically levitated droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Abhishek; Basu, Saptarshi; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2012-10-01

    The velocity scale inside an acoustically levitated droplet depends on the levitator and liquid properties. Using Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV), detailed velocity measurements have been made in a levitated droplet of different diameters and viscosity. The maximum velocity and rotation are normalized using frequency and amplitude of acoustic levitator, and droplet viscosity. The non-dimensional data are fitted for micrometer- and millimeter-sized droplets levitated in different levitators for different viscosity fluids. It is also shown that the rotational speed of nanosilica droplets at an advanced stage of vaporization compares well with that predicted by exponentially fitted parameters.

  9. Rapid and continuous magnetic separation in droplet microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Brouzes, Eric; Kruse, Travis; Kimmerling, Robert; Strey, Helmut H.

    2015-01-01

    We present a droplet microfluidic method to extract molecules of interest from a droplet in a rapid and continuous fashion. We accomplish this by first marginalizing functionalized super-paramagnetic beads within the droplet using a magnetic field, and then splitting the droplet into one droplet containing the majority of magnetic beads and one droplet containing the minority fraction. We quantitatively analysed the factors which affect the efficiency of marginalization and droplet splitting to optimize the enrichment of magnetic beads. We first characterized the interplay between the droplet velocity and the strength of the magnetic field and its effect on marginalization. We found that marginalization is optimal at the midline of the magnet and that marginalization is a good predictor of bead enrichment through splitting at low to moderate droplet velocities. Finally, we focused our efforts on manipulating the splitting profile to improve the enrichment provided by asymmetric splitting. We designed asymmetric splitting forks that employ capillary effects to preferentially extract the bead-rich regions of the droplets. Our strategy represents a framework to optimize magnetic bead enrichment methods tailored to the requirements of specific droplet-based applications. We anticipate that our separation technology is well suited for applications in single-cell genomics and proteomics. In particular, our method could be used to separate mRNA bound to poly-dT functionalized magnetic microparticles from single cell lysates to prepare single-cell cDNA libraries. PMID:25501881

  10. Interaction between microfluidic droplets in a Hele-Shaw cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarig, Itai; Starosvetsky, Yuli; Gat, Amir

    2015-11-01

    Various fluidic systems, such as chemical and biological lab-on-a-chip devices, involve motion of multiple droplets within an immersing fluid in narrow micro-channels. Modeling the dynamics of such systems requires calculation of the forces of interaction between the moving droplets. These forces are commonly approximated by superposition of dipoles solutions, which requires an assumption of sufficiently large distance between the droplets. In this work we obtain exact solutions for two droplets, and a droplet within a droplet, located within a moving immersing fluid and without limitation on the distance between the droplets. This is achieved by solution of the Laplace equation for the pressure in a bi-polar coordinate system, Fourier method and transformation and calculation of the force in a Cartesian coordinate system. Our results are validated with numerical computations, experimental data and with the existing dipole-based models. We utilize the results to calculate the dynamics of a droplet within a droplet, and of two close droplets, located within an immersing fluid with oscillating speed. The obtained results may be used to study the dynamics of dense droplet lattices, common to many current micro-fluidic systems.

  11. Multiphase Bioreaction Microsystem with Automated On-Chip Droplet Operation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Burns, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    A droplet-based bioreaction microsystem has been developed with automated droplet generation and confinement. On-chip electronic sensing is employed to track the position of the droplets by sensing the oil/aqueous interface in real time. The sensing signal is also used to control the pneumatic supply for moving as well as automatically generating four different nanoliter-sized droplets. The actual size of droplets is very close to the designed droplet size with a standard deviation less than 3% of the droplet size. The automated droplet generation can be completed in less than 2 sec, which is 5 times faster than using manual operation that takes at least 10 sec. Droplets can also be automatically confined in the reaction region with feedback pneumatic control and digital or analog sensing. As an example bioreaction, PCR has been successfully performed in the automated generated droplets. Although the amplification yield was slightly reduced with the droplet confinement, especially while using the analog sensing method, adding additional reagents effectively alleviated this inhibition. PMID:20445885

  12. Liquid droplet radiator program at the NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Presler, A. F.; Coles, C. E.; Diem-Kirsop, P. S.; White, K. A., III

    1985-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center and the Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory (AFRPL) are jointly engaged in a program for technical assessment of the Liquid Droplet Radiator (LDR) concept as an advanced high performance heat ejection component for future space missions. NASA Lewis has responsibility for the technology needed for the droplet generator, for working fluid qualification, and for investigating the physics of droplets in space; NASA Lewis is also conducting systems/mission analyses for potential LDR applications with candidate space power systems. For the droplet generator technology task, both micro-orifice fabrication techniques and droplet stream formation processes have been experimentally investigated. High quality micro-orifices (to 50 micron diameter) are routinely fabricated with automated equipment. Droplet formation studies have established operating boundaries for the generation of controlled and uniform droplet streams. A test rig is currently being installed for the experimental verification, under simulated space conditions, of droplet radiation heat transfer performance analyses and the determination of the effect radiative emissivity of multiple droplet streams. Initial testing has begun in the NASA Lewis Zero-Gravity Facility for investigating droplet stream behavior in microgravity conditions. This includes the effect of orifice wetting on jet dynamics and droplet formation. Results for both Brayton and Stirling power cycles have identified favorable mass and size comparisons of the LDR with conventional radiator concepts.

  13. Hydrodynamics of Leidenfrost droplets in one-component fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xinpeng; Qian, Tiezheng

    2013-04-01

    Using the dynamic van der Waals theory [Phys. Rev. E10.1103/PhysRevE.75.036304 75, 036304 (2007)], we numerically investigate the hydrodynamics of Leidenfrost droplets under gravity in two dimensions. Some recent theoretical predictions and experimental observations are confirmed in our simulations. A Leidenfrost droplet larger than a critical size is shown to be unstable and break up into smaller droplets due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the bottom surface of the droplet. Our simulations demonstrate that an evaporating Leidenfrost droplet changes continuously from a puddle to a circular droplet, with the droplet shape controlled by its size in comparison with a few characteristic length scales. The geometry of the vapor layer under the droplet is found to mainly depend on the droplet size and is nearly independent of the substrate temperature, as reported in a recent experimental study [Phys. Rev. Lett.10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.074301 109, 074301 (2012)]. Finally, our simulations demonstrate that a Leidenfrost droplet smaller than a characteristic size takes off from the hot substrate because the levitating force due to evaporation can no longer be balanced by the weight of the droplet, as observed in a recent experimental study [Phys. Rev. Lett.10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.034501 109, 034501 (2012)].

  14. Sorting and Manipulation of Magnetic Droplets in Continuous Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hetlani, Entesar; Hatt, Oliver J.; Vojtíšek, Martin; Tarn, Mark D.; Iles, Alexander; Pamme, Nicole

    2010-12-01

    We report the rapid on-chip generation and subsequent manipulation of magnetic droplets in continuous flow. Magnetic droplets were formed using aqueous-based ferrofluid as the dispersed phase and fluorocarbon oil as the continuous phase. Droplet manipulation was demonstrated with simple permanent magnets using two microfluidic platforms: (i) flow focusing droplet generation followed by their splitting into daughter droplets containing different amounts of magnetic nanoparticles, and (ii) droplet generation at a T-junction and their downstream deflection across a chamber for sorting based on the applied magnetic field and magnetite loading of the droplet. Both systems show great potential for performing a wide range of high throughput continuous flow processes including sample dilution, cell sorting and screening, and microparticle fabrication.

  15. Effective doping of low energy ions into superfluid helium droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Lei; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei

    2015-08-21

    We report a facile method of doping cations from an electrospray ionization (ESI) source into superfluid helium droplets. By decelerating and stopping the ion pulse of reserpine and substance P from an ESI source in the path of the droplet beam, about 10{sup 4} ion-doped droplets (one ion per droplet) can be recorded, corresponding to a pickup efficiency of nearly 1 out of 1000 ions. We attribute the success of this simple approach to the long residence time of the cations in the droplet beam. The resulting size of the doped droplets, on the order of 10{sup 5}/droplet, is measured using deflection and retardation methods. Our method does not require an ion trap in the doping region, which significantly simplifies the experimental setup and procedure for future spectroscopic and diffraction studies.

  16. Supersonic laser-induced jetting of aluminum micro-droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Zenou, M.; Sa'ar, A.; Kotler, Z.

    2015-05-04

    The droplet velocity and the incubation time of pure aluminum micro-droplets, printed using the method of sub-nanosecond laser induced forward transfer, have been measured indicating the formation of supersonic laser-induced jetting. The incubation time and the droplet velocity were extracted by measuring a transient electrical signal associated with droplet landing on the surface of the acceptor substrate. This technique has been exploited for studying small volume droplets, in the range of 10–100 femto-litters for which supersonic velocities were measured. The results suggest elastic propagation of the droplets across the donor-to-acceptor gap, a nonlinear deposition dynamics on the surface of the acceptor and overall efficient energy transfer from the laser beam to the droplets.

  17. Image processing system to analyze droplet distributions in sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertollini, Gary P.; Oberdier, Larry M.; Lee, Yong H.

    1987-01-01

    An image processing system was developed which automatically analyzes the size distributions in fuel spray video images. Images are generated by using pulsed laser light to freeze droplet motion in the spray sample volume under study. This coherent illumination source produces images which contain droplet diffraction patterns representing the droplets degree of focus. The analysis is performed by extracting feature data describing droplet diffraction patterns in the images. This allows the system to select droplets from image anomalies and measure only those droplets considered in focus. Unique features of the system are the totally automated analysis and droplet feature measurement from the grayscale image. The feature extraction and image restoration algorithms used in the system are described. Preliminary performance data is also given for two experiments. One experiment gives a comparison between a synthesized distribution measured manually and automatically. The second experiment compares a real spray distribution measured using current methods against the automatic system.

  18. Numerical simulation of natural convection in a sessile liquid droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartashevich, M. V.; Marchuk, I. V.; Kabov, O. A.

    2012-06-01

    Heat transfer in a sessile liquid droplet was studied with numerical methods. A computer code was developed for solving the problem of convection in an axisymmetric hemispherical droplet and in a spherical layer as well. The problem of establishing an equilibrium state in a droplet was solved using several variables: temperature, stream function, and vorticity. Simulation was performed for droplets of water, ethyl alcohol, and model liquids. Variable parameters: intensity of heat transfer from droplet surface, Rayleigh and Marangoni dimensionless criteria, and the characteristic temperature difference. It was revealed that the curve of convective flow intensity versus heat transfer intensity at droplet surface has a maximum. A dual-vortex structure was obtained in a stationary hemispherical profile of liquid droplet for the case of close values for thermocapillary and thermogravitational forces. Either thermocapillary or thermogravitational vortex might be dominating phenomena in the flow structure.

  19. Magnetohydrodynamic actuation of droplets for millimetric planar fluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, A.; McDermid, C. M.; Markley, L.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a magnetohydrodynamic method is proposed for the actuation of droplets in small-scale planar fluidic systems, providing an alternative to commonly used methods such as electrowetting-on-dielectric. Elementary droplet-based operations, including transport, merging, and mixing, are demonstrated. The forces acting on millimetric droplets are carefully investigated, with a primary focus on the magnetic actuation force and on the unbalanced capillary forces that arise due to hysteresis. A super-hydrophobic channel is 3D printed to guide the droplets, with thin wires installed as contact electrodes and permanent magnets providing a static magnetic field. It is shown that droplet motion is enhanced by increasing the droplet size and minimizing the electrode contact surface. The effects of channel geometry on threshold voltage and minimum moveable droplet volume are characterized. Finally, the presence of electrolysis is investigated and mitigating strategies are discussed.

  20. Nonaffine heterogeneities and droplet fluctuations in an equilibrium crystalline solid

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Tamoghna; Sengupta, Surajit; Rao, Madan

    2010-10-15

    We show, using molecular-dynamics simulations, that a two-dimensional Lennard-Jones solid exhibits droplet fluctuations characterized by nonaffine deviations from local crystallinity. The fraction of particles in these droplets increases as the mean density of the solid decreases and approaches {approx_equal}20% of the total number in the vicinity of the fluid-solid phase boundary. We monitor the geometry, local equation of state, density correlations, and Van Hove functions of these droplets. We provide evidence that these nonaffine heterogeneities should be interpreted as being droplet fluctuations from nearby metastable minima. The local excess pressure of the droplets plotted against the local number density shows a van der Waal loop with distinct branches corresponding to fluidlike compact and stringlike glassy droplets. The distinction between fluidlike and glassy droplets disappears above a well-defined temperature.

  1. Raman spectroscopy on deformed droplets: theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esen, Cemal; Weigel, Thomas; Sprynchak, Vitaliy; Schweiger, Gustav

    2004-11-01

    Raman scattering on deformed droplets was investigated theoretically and experimentally. The investigated droplets were levitated by an acoustic levitator or produced by a vibrating orifice aerosol generator. Our samples in acoustic levitation experiments were DEHS-droplets in the millimeter-size range and ethanol droplets in the size range of 50- 100 μm in the case of vibrating orifice generation. The C-H stretching region between 2800 and 3100cm-1 was investigated. We found that the Raman intensity measured by a scattering angle of 90∘ depends on the shape of the droplets. Raman scattering on spherical droplets was up to 50% smaller than scattering on spheroidal droplets with the same volume. The calculated results show also an enhancement of the Raman scattering for non-spherical particles and were in good agreement with the measurements.

  2. Effective doping of low energy ions into superfluid helium droplets

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Lei; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei

    2015-01-01

    We report a facile method of doping cations from an electrospray ionization (ESI) source into superfluid helium droplets. By decelerating and stopping the ion pulse of reserpine and substance P from an ESI source in the path of the droplet beam, about 104 ion-doped droplets (one ion per droplet) can be recorded, corresponding to a pickup efficiency of nearly 1 out of 1000 ions. We attribute the success of this simple approach to the long residence time of the cations in the droplet beam. The resulting size of the doped droplets, on the order of 105/droplet, is measured using deflection and retardation methods. Our method does not require an ion trap in the doping region, which significantly simplifies the experimental setup and procedure for future spectroscopic and diffraction studies. PMID:26298127

  3. Tactic, reactive, and functional droplets outside of equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Lach, Sławomir; Yoon, Seok Min; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2016-08-22

    Under non-equilibrium conditions, liquid droplets coupled to their environment by sustained flows of matter and/or energy can become "active" systems capable of various life-like functions. When "fueled" by even simple chemical reactions, such droplets can become tactic and can perform "intelligent" tasks such as maze solving. With more complex chemistries, droplets can support basic forms of metabolism, grow, self-replicate, and exhibit evolutionary changes akin to biological cells. There are also first exciting examples of active droplets connected into larger, tissue-like systems supporting droplet-to-droplet communication, and giving rise to collective material properties. As practical applications of droplets also begin to appear (e.g., in single-cell diagnostics, new methods of electricity generation, optofluidics, or sensors), it appears timely to review and systematize progress in this highly interdisciplinary area of chemical research, and also think about the avenues (and the roadblocks) for future work. PMID:27293207

  4. Supersonic laser-induced jetting of aluminum micro-droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenou, M.; Sa'ar, A.; Kotler, Z.

    2015-05-01

    The droplet velocity and the incubation time of pure aluminum micro-droplets, printed using the method of sub-nanosecond laser induced forward transfer, have been measured indicating the formation of supersonic laser-induced jetting. The incubation time and the droplet velocity were extracted by measuring a transient electrical signal associated with droplet landing on the surface of the acceptor substrate. This technique has been exploited for studying small volume droplets, in the range of 10-100 femto-litters for which supersonic velocities were measured. The results suggest elastic propagation of the droplets across the donor-to-acceptor gap, a nonlinear deposition dynamics on the surface of the acceptor and overall efficient energy transfer from the laser beam to the droplets.

  5. Hydrodynamic Stability of Multicomponent Droplet Gasification in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aharon, I.; Shaw, B. D.

    1995-01-01

    This investigation addresses the problem of hydrodynamic stability of a two-component droplet undergoing spherically-symmetrical gasification. The droplet components are assumed to have characteristic liquid species diffusion times that are large relative to characteristic droplet surface regression times. The problem is formulated as a linear stability analysis, with a goal of predicting when spherically-symmetric droplet gasification can be expected to be hydrodynamically unstable from surface-tension gradients acting along the surface of a droplet which result from perturbations. It is found that for the conditions assumed in this paper (quasisteady gas phase, no initial droplet temperature gradients, diffusion-dominated gasification), surface tension gradients do not play a role in the stability characteristics. In addition, all perturbations are predicted to decay such that droplets were hydrodynamically stable. Conditions are identified, however, that deserve more analysis as they may lead to hydrodynamic instabilities driven by capillary effects.

  6. Droplet Impact onto an Immiscible, Floating Oil Layer: Splash Behavior and Droplet Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, David; Li, Cheng; D'Albignac, Vincent; Morra, David; Katz, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    The high speed impact of a raindrop on a fluid surface at Wed = ρ u2d/ σ>2000 affects environmental processes like marine aerosol production. High speed imaging shows that a floating immiscible oil layer, such as a crude oil slick, modifies the splash behavior. Tests performed for a wide range of layer thicknesses (h), viscosities, and surface and interfacial tensions facilitate behavioral categorization in terms of Weh =ρh u2h/σh and ReFrh =ρd u3d/μhgh, where h and d subscripts refer to layer and droplet properties, respectively. Included are multi-layer/level crowns, and due to the high Oh = μ /(ρσ d)1/2 of oil, formation of an intact ejecta sheet within 50 μs after impact, which subsequently ruptures to form aerosolized oil droplets. High speed holographic microscopy provides the size and spatial distributions of airborne droplets, which are bimodal with peaks at 50 and 225 μm. Small droplets (50 μm) are ejected primarily at shallow angles and remain at low elevation by microligament breakup within the first 50 μs of impact. Larger droplets (225 μm) are ejected at a steeper angle and produced later by breakup of larger ligaments protruding vertically from the splash crown. Small droplet frequency at high elevation increases when crude oil is introduced, mostly as satellite droplets resulting from the large ligament breakup. Funding provided by the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative.

  7. Biotransformation and male rat-specific renal toxicity of diethyl ethyl- and dimethyl methylphosphonate.

    PubMed

    Blumbach, K; Pähler, A; Deger, H M; Dekant, W

    2000-01-01

    /kg had to be used. Control rats received corn oil only and positive controls received five doses of 500-mg/kg bw trimethylpentane (TMP). Relative kidney weights were increased in male rats dosed with DMMP, DEEP, and TMP. alpha(2u)-Globulin in kidney cytosol was separated and quantified by capillary electrophoresis and by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. In DMMP-, DEEP-, and TMP-treated rats, dose-dependent increases in the alpha(2u)-globulin content were observed by both methods in male, but not female rats. The increase of alpha(2u)-globulin accumulation was accompanied by the formation of protein droplets in the proximal tubules of male rats. These data demonstrate that the sex specific increase in kidney tumors by DMMP in male rats may be due to alpha(2u)-globulin accumulation and that similar toxic effects are to be expected from DEEP. PMID:10653517

  8. Swimming droplets driven by a surface wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebata, Hiroyuki; Sano, Masaki

    2015-02-01

    Self-propelling motion is ubiquitous for soft active objects such as crawling cells, active filaments, and liquid droplets moving on surfaces. Deformation and energy dissipation are required for self-propulsion of both living and non-living matter. From the perspective of physics, searching for universal laws of self-propelled motions in a dissipative environment is worthwhile, regardless of the objects' details. In this article, we propose a simple experimental system that demonstrates spontaneous migration of a droplet under uniform mechanical agitation. As we vary control parameters, spontaneous symmetry breaking occurs sequentially, and cascades of bifurcations of the motion arise. Equations describing deformable particles and hydrodynamic simulations successfully describe all of the observed motions. This system should enable us to improve our understanding of spontaneous motions of self-propelled objects.

  9. Swimming droplets driven by a surface wave

    PubMed Central

    Ebata, Hiroyuki; Sano, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Self-propelling motion is ubiquitous for soft active objects such as crawling cells, active filaments, and liquid droplets moving on surfaces. Deformation and energy dissipation are required for self-propulsion of both living and non-living matter. From the perspective of physics, searching for universal laws of self-propelled motions in a dissipative environment is worthwhile, regardless of the objects' details. In this article, we propose a simple experimental system that demonstrates spontaneous migration of a droplet under uniform mechanical agitation. As we vary control parameters, spontaneous symmetry breaking occurs sequentially, and cascades of bifurcations of the motion arise. Equations describing deformable particles and hydrodynamic simulations successfully describe all of the observed motions. This system should enable us to improve our understanding of spontaneous motions of self-propelled objects. PMID:25708871

  10. Swimming droplets driven by a surface wave.

    PubMed

    Ebata, Hiroyuki; Sano, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Self-propelling motion is ubiquitous for soft active objects such as crawling cells, active filaments, and liquid droplets moving on surfaces. Deformation and energy dissipation are required for self-propulsion of both living and non-living matter. From the perspective of physics, searching for universal laws of self-propelled motions in a dissipative environment is worthwhile, regardless of the objects' details. In this article, we propose a simple experimental system that demonstrates spontaneous migration of a droplet under uniform mechanical agitation. As we vary control parameters, spontaneous symmetry breaking occurs sequentially, and cascades of bifurcations of the motion arise. Equations describing deformable particles and hydrodynamic simulations successfully describe all of the observed motions. This system should enable us to improve our understanding of spontaneous motions of self-propelled objects. PMID:25708871

  11. Dancing droplets: Chemical space, substrates, and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cira, Nate; Benusiglio, Adrien; Prakash, Manu

    2015-11-01

    Previously we showed that droplets of propylene glycol and water display remarkable properties when placed on clean glass due to an interplay between surface tension and evaporation. (Cira, Benusiglio, Prakash: Nature, 2015). We showed that these mechanisms apply to a range of two-component mixtures of miscible liquids where one component has both higher surface tension and higher vapor pressure on a variety of high energy surfaces. We now show how this rule can be cheated using a simple trick. We go on to demonstrate applications for cleaning, and show how this system works on substrates prepared only with sunlight. We finish by demonstrating active control of droplets, allowing access to a host of new possibilities.

  12. Classification of precursors in nanoscale droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isele-Holder, Rolf E.; Ismail, Ahmed E.

    2016-04-01

    Molecular precursors, ultrathin films that precede spreading droplets, are still far from being understood, despite intensive study. The inherent microscopic length scales make small-scale experimental techniques and molecular simulation ideal methods to study this phenomenon. Previous work on molecular precursors using nanoscale droplets, however, consistently suffers from incorrect measurement of the dimensions of the precursor film. An alternative method to accurately characterize the precursor film is presented here. In contrast to previous measures, this method (i) allows for easy detection and characterization of precursors and (ii) yields wetting dynamics that agree with experimental observations. Finally, we briefly comment on previous studies whose conclusions may merit reconsideration in light of the present work.

  13. The crystallization of small particles and droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    A general expression is derived for the volume fraction of material crystallized as a function of time for the situation where boundary effects may be important, and it is applied to a sample consisting of a monodisperse array of small particles. It is assumed that crystallization occurs via homogeneous nucleation followed by crystal growth. The crystallization rate is shown to be controlled by a single dimensionless parameter, beta. Beta exp 1/4 is a dimensionless particle radius which tends to be small when the growth rate is large or when the nucleation rate is small. When beta is large, the general expression for the volume fraction transformed reduces to the standard expression valid for bulk samples. When beta is small, it reduces to the formula used to compute the volume fraction crystallized in droplet undercooling experiments. Hence, the present results are pertinent for the interpretation of some droplet undercooling experiments as well as isothermal DSC and DTA experiments.

  14. Acid droplet generation in SRM exhaust clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dingle, A. N.

    1983-01-01

    A free energy analysis is applied to the co-condensation/evaporation of H2O and HCl vapors on wettable particles in open air in order to model droplet nucleation in solid rocket motor (SRM) exhaust clouds. Formulations are defined for the free energy change, the drop radius, the saturation ratio, the total number of molecules, and the mean molecular radius in solution, as well as the molecular volume and the concentration range. The free energy release in the phase transition for the AL2O3 nuclei in the SRM exhaust is examined as a function of the HCl molefraction and nucleating particle radius, based on Titan III launch exhaust cloud conditions 90 sec after ignition. The most efficient droplet growth is determined to occur at an HCl molefraction of 0.082 and a particle radius of 0.0000013 cm, i.e. a molality of 5.355.

  15. Dilute nanoemulsions via separation of satellite droplets.

    PubMed

    Deen, Shad; Sajjadi, Shahriar

    2013-10-01

    A facile method is suggested for fabrication of dilute nanoemulsions. In a typical emulsification process, drops are usually accompanied by off-grade satellite droplets. The size of these satellite droplets ranges from hundreds of nanometers to above microns. Experiments were carried out to assess the possibility of separation of nanodrops from macroemulsions made via a conventional method in order to produce nanoemulsions. A low-power homogenizer was used to produce parent emulsions which were then injected from the bottom to a glass column containing water and allowed to cream. By monitoring drops remaining in the bottom of the column, it is clearly shown how progressively smaller they become with time yielding eventually dilute nanoemulsions. The average diameter of drops reduced to 100 nm when oil with high viscosity was used. The concentration of resulting nanoemulsions increased with increasing viscosity and ratio of the disperse phase of parent emulsions. PMID:23830283

  16. Vaporization of droplets in premixing chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yule, A. J.; Chigier, N. A.

    1980-01-01

    Detailed measurements were made of the structures of turbulent fuel sprays vaporizing in heated airstreams. The measurements show the size dependent vaporization and dispersion of the droplets and the important influence of the large eddies in the turbulence. The measurements form a data base for the development of models of fuel spray vaporization. Two laser techniques were specially developed for the investigation. A laser tomography technique converts line-of-sight light scattering measurements into time averaged 'point' measurements of droplet size distribution and volume concentration. A laser anemometer particle sizing technique was further developed to permit accurate measurements of individual particle sizes and velocities, with backscatter collection of light. The experiments are combined with heat transfer models to analyze the performance of miniature thermocouples in liquid sprays.

  17. Droplet formation for liquid monopropellant jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macken, Nelson A.

    1987-02-01

    The hydrodynamic development of droplets for conditions approximating those in the combustion chamber of regenerative liquid propellant guns has been investigated. The report contains a literature survey and discussion of various breakup mechanisms. Aerodynamic interaction is analyzed using classical stability theory and a formulation applied to anticipated working conditions. The model predicts mass removed and droplet size as a function of time. Results indicate that the jet does break up with almost all liquid atomized. Comparison to a simple burning rate model verifies that the hydrodynamic model is primarily responsible for liquid removal from the intact core. Results conflict with recent inverse gun code predictions which suggest significant liquid accumulation is occurring; i.e., the jet does not fully atomize and subsequently burn. A discussion of possible reasons for this discrepancy is included.

  18. Engineering particle morphology with microfluidic droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Zhanxiao; Kong, Tiantian; Lei, Leyan; Zhu, Pingan; Tian, Xiaowei; Wang, Liqiu

    2016-07-01

    The controlled generation of microparticles with non-spherical features is of increasing importance. Such particles are useful for fundamental studies in areas such as self-assembly, as well as biomedical applications from drug carriers to photonic devices. We propose a simple model that captures the dominating factors controlling the size and morphology of non-spherical particles from phase separated droplets. The validity of our model is verified by comparing the generated non-spherical microparticles by droplet microfluidics. This simple relationship between the dominating factors and the final morphologies enables the production of non-spherical particles with well-defined shapes and tightly-controlled dimensions for a variety of applications from drug delivery vehicles to structural materials.

  19. Helium anion formation inside helium droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbour Al Maalouf, Elias; Reitshammer, Julia; Ribar, Anita; Scheier, Paul; Denifl, Stephan

    2016-07-01

    The formation of He∗- is examined with improved electron energy resolution of about 100 meV utilizing a hemispherical electron monochromator. The work presented provides a precise determination of the three previously determined resonance peak positions that significantly contribute to the formation of He∗- inside helium nanodroplets in the energy range from 20 eV to 29.5 eV. In addition, a new feature is identified located at 27.69 ± 0.18 eV that we assign to the presence of O2 as a dopant inside the droplet. With increasing droplet size a small blue shift of the resonance positions is observed. Also for the relatively low electron currents used in the present study (i.e., 15-70 nA) a quadratic dependence of the He∗- ion yield on the electron current is observed.

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamics of rising droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Matthew; Francois, Marianne M.

    2012-09-05

    The main goal of this study is to perform simulations of droplet dynamics using Truchas, a LANL-developed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, and compare them to a computational study of Hysing et al.[IJNMF, 2009, 60:1259]. Understanding droplet dynamics is of fundamental importance in liquid-liquid extraction, a process used in the nuclear fuel cycle to separate various components. Simulations of a single droplet rising by buoyancy are conducted in two-dimensions. Multiple parametric studies are carried out to ensure the problem set-up is optimized. An Interface Smoothing Length (ISL) study and mesh resolution study are performed to verify convergence of the calculations. ISL is a parameter for the interface curvature calculation. Further, wall effects are investigated and checked against existing correlations. The ISL study found that the optimal ISL value is 2.5{Delta}x, with {Delta}x being the mesh cell spacing. The mesh resolution study found that the optimal mesh resolution is d/h=40, for d=drop diameter and h={Delta}x. In order for wall effects on terminal velocity to be insignificant, a conservative wall width of 9d or a nonconservative wall width of 7d can be used. The percentage difference between Hysing et al.[IJNMF, 2009, 60:1259] and Truchas for the velocity profiles vary from 7.9% to 9.9%. The computed droplet velocity and interface profiles are found in agreement with the study. The CFD calculations are performed on multiple cores, using LANL's Institutional High Performance Computing.

  1. Droplet formation and ejection from a micromachined ultrasonic droplet generator: Visualization and scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meacham, J. M.; Varady, M. J.; Degertekin, F. L.; Fedorov, A. G.

    2005-10-01

    Visualization and scaling of drop-on-demand and continuous-jet fluid atomization of water are presented to elucidate the fluid physics of the ejection process and characterize the modes of operation of a novel micromachined ultrasonic droplet generator. The device comprises a fluid reservoir that is formed between a bulk ceramic piezoelectric transducer and an array of liquid horn structures wet etched into (100) silicon. At resonance, the transducer generates a standing ultrasonic pressure wave within the cavity and the wave is focused at the tip of the nozzle by the horn structure. Device operation has been demonstrated by water droplet ejection from 5to10μm orifices at multiple resonant frequencies between 1 and 5MHz. The intimate interactions between focused ultrasonic pressure waves and capillary waves formed at the liquid-air interface located at the nozzle tip are found to govern the ejection dynamics, leading to different ejection modalities ranging from individual droplets to continuous jet. Specifically, we report the results of high-resolution stroboscopic optical imaging of the liquid-air interface evolution during acoustic pumping to elucidate the role of capillary waves in the droplet formation and ejection process. A basic understanding of the governing physics gained through careful visualization and scaling forms the basis for development of improved theoretical models for the droplet formation and ejection processes by accounting for key fluid mechanical features of the phenomena.

  2. Sharpening the surface of magnetic paranematic droplets.

    PubMed

    Tokarev, Alexander; Lee, Wah-Keat; Sevonkaev, Igor; Goia, Dan; Kornev, Konstantin G

    2014-03-28

    In a non-uniform magnetic field, the droplets of colloids of nickel nanorods and nanobeads aggregate to form a cusp at the droplet surface not deforming the entire droplet shape. When the field is removed, nanorods diffuse away and the cusp disappears. Spherical particles can form cusps in a similar way, but they stay aggregated after the release of the field; finally, the aggregates settle down to the bottom of the drop. The X-ray phase contrast imaging reveals that nanorods in the cusps stay parallel to each other without visible spatial order of their centers of mass. The formation of cusps can be explained with a model that includes magnetostatic and surface tension forces. The discovered possibility of controlled assembly and quenching of nanorod orientation under the cusped liquid surface offers vast opportunities for alignment of carbon nanotubes, nanowires and nanoscrolls, prior to spinning them into superstrong and multifunctional fibers. Magnetostatic and electrostatic analogies suggest that a similar ideal alignment can be achieved with the rod-like dipoles subject to a strong electric field. PMID:24800272

  3. High-pressure droplet combustion studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikami, Masato; Kono, M.; Sato, Junichi; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Williams, Forman A.

    1993-01-01

    This is a joint research program, pursued by investigators at the University of Tokyo, UCSD, and NASA Lewis Research Center. The focus is on high-pressure combustion of miscible binary fuel droplets. It involves construction of an experimental apparatus in Tokyo, mating of the apparatus to a NASA-Lewis 2.2-second drop-tower frame in San Diego, and performing experiments in the 2.2-second tower in Cleveland, with experimental results analyzed jointly by the Tokyo, UCSD, and NASA investigators. The project was initiated in December, 1990 and has now involved three periods of drop-tower testing by Mikami at Lewis. The research accomplished thus far concerns the combustion of individual fiber-supported droplets of mixtures of n-heptane and n-hexadecane, initially about 1 mm diameter, under free-fall microgravity conditions. Ambient pressures ranged up to 3.0 MPa, extending above the critical pressures of both pure fuels, in room-temperature nitrogen-oxygen atmospheres having oxygen mole fractions X of 0.12 and 0.13. The general objective is to study near-critical and super-critical combustion of these droplets and to see whether three-stage burning, observed at normal gravity, persists at high pressures in microgravity. Results of these investigations will be summarized here; a more complete account soon will be published.

  4. Droplet hydrodynamics during lysozyme protein crystallization.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, T; Asfer, M; Panigrahi, P K

    2012-11-01

    Various experimental studies in zero gravity have been reported in the literature for generation of superior quality crystals due to the importance of convective transport on protein crystal quality. However, limited experimental and numerical studies are available in the literature for a complete characterization of transport phenomena during the protein crystal growth process. The present investigation reports experimental results on convective motion inside the droplet during protein crystallization by the vapor diffusion method. Lysozyme crystals are grown using a sitting drop method and micro-particle image velocimetry is used for investigating the detailed hydrodynamics inside the droplet. Dynamic evolution of the flow field for the complete crystal growth process, i.e., during the prenucleation, nucleation, and postnucleation stage, is reported. Various flow transitions are observed during the complete cycle of the protein crystal growth process. Significant Marangoni convection is observed during the prenucleation period followed by buoyancy-driven convection during the postnucleation period. The Marangoni convection flow patterns observed during the prenucleation stage match those of evaporating droplets. The postnucleation convection patterns are similar to those of ethanol-water mixture evaporation with high ethanol concentration. PMID:23214788

  5. Gold metal liquid-like droplets.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Evgeny; Scanlon, Micheál D; Momotenko, Dmitry; Vrubel, Heron; Méndez, Manuel A; Brevet, Pierre-Francois; Girault, Hubert H

    2014-09-23

    Simple methods to self-assemble coatings and films encompassing nanoparticles are highly desirable in many practical scenarios, yet scarcely any examples of simple, robust approaches to coat macroscopic droplets with continuous, thick (multilayer), reflective and stable liquid nanoparticle films exist. Here, we introduce a facile and rapid one-step route to form films of reflective liquid-like gold that encase macroscopic droplets, and we denote these as gold metal liquid-like droplets (MeLLDs). The present approach takes advantage of the inherent self-assembly of gold nanoparticles at liquid-liquid interfaces and the increase in rates of nanoparticle aggregate trapping at the interface during emulsification. The ease of displacement of the stabilizing citrate ligands by appropriate redox active molecules that act as a lubricating molecular glue is key. Specifically, the heterogeneous interaction of citrate stabilized aqueous gold nanoparticles with the lipophilic electron donor tetrathiafulvalene under emulsified conditions produces gold MeLLDs. This methodology relies exclusively on electrochemical reactions, i.e., the oxidation of tetrathiafulvalene to its radical cation by the gold nanoparticle, and electrostatic interactions between the radical cation and nanoparticles. The gold MeLLDs are reversibly deformable upon compression and decompression and kinetically stable for extended periods of time in excess of a year. PMID:25184343

  6. Current status of droplet and liquid combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faeth, G. M.

    1977-01-01

    The present understanding of spray combustion in rocket engine, gas turbine, Diesel engine and industrial furnace applications is reviewed. In some cases, spray combustion can be modeled by ignoring the details of spray evaporation and treating the system as a gaseous diffusion flame; however, in many circumstances, this simplification is not adequate and turbulent two-phase flow must be considered. The behavior of individual droplets is a necessary component of two-phase models and recent work on transient droplet evaporation, ignition and combustion is considered, along with a discussion of important simplifying assumptions involved with modeling these processes. Methods of modeling spray evaporation and combustion processes are also discussed including: one-dimensional models for rocket engine and prevaporized combustion systems, lumped zone models (utilizing well-stirred reactor and plug flow regions) for gas turbine and furnace systems, locally homogeneous turbulent models, and two-phase models. The review highlights the need for improved injector characterization methods, more information of droplet transport characteristics in turbulent flow and continued development of more complete two-phase turbulent models

  7. Current status of droplet and liquid combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faeth, G. M.

    1977-01-01

    The present understanding of spray combustion in rocket engine, gas turbine, Diesel engine and industrial furnace applications is reviewed. In some cases, spray combustion can be modeled by ignoring the details of spray evaporation and treating the system in the same manner as a gaseous diffusion flame; however, in many circumstances, this type of simplification is not adequate and the turbulent two-phase flow must be considered. The behavior of individual droplets is a necessary component of two-phase models and recent work on transient droplet evaporation, ignition and combustion is considered, along with a discussion of important simplifying assumptions involved with modeling these processes. Methods of modeling spray evaporation and combustion processes are also discussed including: one-dimensional models for rocket engine and prevaporized combustion systems, lumped zone models (utilizing well-stirred reactor and plug flow regions) for gas turbine and furnace systems, locally homogeneous turbulent models, and two-phase models. The review highlights the need for improved injector characterization methods, more information of droplet transport characteristics in turbulent flow and continued development of more complete two-phase turbulent models.

  8. Droplet-Based Pyrosequencing Using Digital Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Boles, Deborah J.; Benton, Jonathan L.; Siew, Germaine J.; Levy, Miriam H.; Thwar, Prasanna K.; Sandahl, Melissa A.; Rouse, Jeremy L.; Perkins, Lisa C.; Sudarsan, Arjun P.; Jalili, Roxana; Pamula, Vamsee K.; Srinivasan, Vijay; Fair, Richard B.; Griffin, Peter B.; Eckhardt, Allen E.; Pollack, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility of implementing pyrosequencing chemistry within droplets using electrowetting-based digital microfluidics is reported. An array of electrodes patterned on a printed-circuit board was used to control the formation, transportation, merging, mixing, and splitting of submicroliter-sized droplets contained within an oil-filled chamber. A three-enzyme pyrosequencing protocol was implemented in which individual droplets contained enzymes, deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs), and DNA templates. The DNA templates were anchored to magnetic beads which enabled them to be thoroughly washed between nucleotide additions. Reagents and protocols were optimized to maximize signal over background, linearity of response, cycle efficiency, and wash efficiency. As an initial demonstration of feasibility, a portion of a 229 bp Candida parapsilosis template was sequenced using both a de novo protocol and a resequencing protocol. The resequencing protocol generated over 60 bp of sequence with 100% sequence accuracy based on raw pyrogram levels. Excellent linearity was observed for all of the homopolymers (two, three, or four nucleotides) contained in the C. parapsilosis sequence. With improvements in microfluidic design it is expected that longer reads, higher throughput, and improved process integration (i.e., “sample-to-sequence” capability) could eventually be achieved using this low-cost platform. PMID:21932784

  9. Rapid crystallization from acoustically levitated droplets.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hui-Ling; Yin, Da-Chuan; Guo, Yun-Zhu; Ma, Xiao-Liang; He, Jin; Guo, Wei-Hong; Xie, Xu-Zhuo; Zhou, Bo-Ru

    2012-04-01

    This paper reports on an ultrasonic levitation system developed for crystallization from solution in a containerless condition. The system has been proven to be able to levitate droplets stably and grow crystals rapidly and freely from a levitated droplet. Crystals of four samples, including NaCl, NH(4)Cl, lysozyme, and proteinase K, were obtained successfully utilizing the system. The studies showed that the crystals obtained from the acoustically levitated droplets all exhibited higher growth rates, larger sizes, better shapes, fewer crystals, as well as fewer twins and shards, compared with the control on a vessel wall. The results indicated that containerless ultrasonic levitation could play a key role in improving the crystallization of both inorganic salts and proteins. The ultrasonic levitation system could be used as a ground-based microgravity simulation platform, which could swiftly perform crystallization and screening of crystallization conditions for space crystallization and other ground-based containerless techniques. Moreover, the approach could also be conveniently applied to researching the dynamics and mechanism of crystallization. In addition, the device could be used for the preparation of high-purity materials, analysis of minute or poisonous samples, study of living cells, environmental monitoring, and so on. PMID:22501088

  10. A mechanistic view of drying suspension droplets.

    PubMed

    van der Kooij, Hanne M; van de Kerkhof, Gea T; Sprakel, Joris

    2016-03-21

    When a dispersion droplet dries, a rich variety of spatial and temporal heterogeneities emerge. Controlling these phenomena is essential for many applications yet requires a thorough understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Although the process of film formation from initially dispersed polymer particles is well documented and is known to involve three main stages - evaporation, particle deformation and coalescence - it is impossible to fully disentangle the effects of particle deformation and coalescence, as these stages are closely linked. We circumvent this problem by studying suspensions of colloidal rubber particles that are incapable of coalescing. Varying the crosslink density allows us to tune the particle deformability in a controlled manner. We develop a theoretical framework of the main regimes and stresses in drying droplets of these suspensions, and validate this framework experimentally. Specifically, we show that changing the particle modulus by less than an order of magnitude can completely alter the stress development and resulting instabilities. Scanning electron microscopy reveals that particle deformability is a key factor in stress mitigation. Our model is the suspension equivalent of the widely used Routh-Russel model for film formation in drying dispersions, with additional focus on lateral nonuniformities such as cracking and wrinkling inherent to the droplet geometry, thus adding a new dimension to the conventional view of particle deformation. PMID:26843025

  11. Frost halos from supercooled water droplets

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Stefan; Tiwari, Manish K.; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2012-01-01

    Water freezing on solid surfaces is ubiquitous in nature. Even though icing/frosting impairs the performance and safety in many processes, its mechanism remains inadequately understood. Changing atmospheric conditions, surface properties, the complexity of icing physics, and the unorthodox behavior of water are the primary factors that make icing and frost formation intriguing and difficult to predict. In addition to its unquestioned scientific and practical importance, unraveling the frosting mechanism under different conditions is a prerequisite to develop “icephobic” surfaces, which may avoid ice formation and contamination. In this work we demonstrate that evaporation from a freezing supercooled sessile droplet, which starts explosively due to the sudden latent heat released upon recalescent freezing, generates a condensation halo around the droplet, which crystallizes and drastically affects the surface behavior. The process involves simultaneous multiple phase transitions and may also spread icing by initiating sequential freezing of neighboring droplets in the form of a domino effect and frost propagation. Experiments under controlled humidity conditions using substrates differing up to three orders of magnitude in thermal conductivity establish that a delicate balance between heat diffusion and vapor transport determines the final expanse of the frozen condensate halo, which, in turn, controls frost formation and propagation. PMID:23012410

  12. Droplet Combustion Experiment on STS-94

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Fuel ignites and burns in the Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE) on STS-94 on July 12, 1997, MET:11/07:00 (approximate). DCE used various fuels -- in drops ranging from 1 mm (0.04 inches) to 5 mm (0.2 inches) -- and mixtures of oxidizers and inert gases to learn more about the physics of combustion in the simplest burning configuration, a sphere. The DCE was designed to investigate the fundamental combustion aspects of single, isolated droplets under different pressures and ambient oxygen concentrations for a range of droplet sizes varying between 2 and 5 mm. The experiment elapsed time is shown at the bottom of the composite image. The DCE principal investigator was Forman Williams, University of California, San Diego. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (1.3MB, 13-second MPEG, screen 320 x 240 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300170.html.

  13. Magnetic-field-induced liquid metal droplet manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daeyoung; Lee, Jeong-Bong

    2015-01-01

    We report magnetic-field-induced liquid metal droplet on-demand manipulation by coating a liquid metal with ferromagnetic materials. The gallium-based liquid metal alloy has a challenging drawback that it is instantly oxidized in ambient air, resulting in surface wetting on most surfaces. When the oxidized surface of the droplet is coated with ferromagnetic materials, it is non-wettable and can be controlled by applying an external magnetic field. We coated the surface of a liquid metal droplet with either an electroplated CoNiMnP layer or an iron (Fe) particle by simply rolling the liquid metal droplet on an Fe particle bed. For a paper towel, the minimum required magnetic flux density to initiate movement of the ~8 μL Fe-particle-coated liquid metal droplet was 50 gauss. Magnetic-field-induced liquid metal droplet manipulation was investigated under both horizontal and vertical magnetic fields. Compared to the CoNiMnP-electroplated liquid metal droplet, the Fe-particle-coated droplet could be well controlled because Fe particles were uniformly coated on the surface of the droplet. With a maximum applied magnetic flux density of ~1,600 gauss, the CoNiMnP layer on the liquid metal broke down, resulting in fragmentation of three smaller droplets, and the Fe particle was detached from the liquid metal surface and was re-coated after the magnetic field had been removed.

  14. Temperature distribution along the surface of evaporating droplets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Ma, Liran; Xu, Xuefeng; Luo, Jianbin; Guo, Dan

    2014-03-01

    The surface temperature can significantly affect the flow field of drying droplets. Most previous studies assumed a monotonic temperature variation along the droplet surface. However, the present analyses indicate that a nonmonotonic spatial distribution of the surface temperature should occur. Three different patterns of the surface temperature distribution may appear during the evaporation process of liquid droplets: (i) the surface temperature increases monotonically from the center to the edge of the droplet; (ii) the surface temperature exhibits a nonmonotonic spatial distribution along the droplet surface; (iii) the surface temperature decreases monotonically from the center to the edge of the droplet. These surface temperature distributions can be explained by combining the evaporative cooling at the droplet surface and the heat conduction across the substrate and the liquid. Furthermore, a "phase diagram" for the distribution of the surface temperature is introduced and the effect of the spatial temperature distribution along the droplet surface on the flow structure of the droplet is discussed. The results may provide a better understanding of the Marangoni effect of drying droplets and provide a potential way to control evaporation-driven deposition as well as the assembly of colloids and other materials. PMID:24730849

  15. Experimental investigation of interaction processes between droplets and hot walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karl, A.; Frohn, A.

    2000-04-01

    A detailed experimental investigation of interaction processes of small liquid droplets with hot walls well above the Leidenfrost temperature has been carried out. The experimental method which uses monodisperse droplet streams in combination with a standard video camera allows very detailed observations and measurements with very high time resolution. The main intent of this paper is to study the mechanical behavior of liquid droplets impacting on hot walls well above the Leidenfrost temperature. A better understanding of this process may lead to a better modeling of two-phase flows, especially for applications in fuel preparation processes, combustion processes, and spray cooling. The loss of momentum of the droplets, the droplet deformation, and the onset of droplet disintegration have been investigated. For all experimental results correlations have been developed, which can be used to improve the numerical modeling of two-phase flows. Using the correlation for the loss of momentum a theoretical approximation for the maximum droplet deformation has been deduced, which yields a very good agreement with our own measurements as well as with results reported in the literature. A minimum impinging angle for droplet disintegration has been discovered for small impinging angles. Below this impinging angle no droplet disintegration is observed. This phenomenon is directly related to the energy dissipation at the wall during the interaction process. With the presented work the understanding of basic interaction processes between droplets and hot walls may be improved.

  16. Surface features of the lipid droplet mediate perilipin 2 localization

    PubMed Central

    Sletten, Arthur; Seline, Alison; Rudd, Andrew; Logsdon, Michelle; Listenberger, Laura L.

    2014-01-01

    All eukaryotic organisms store excess lipid in intracellular lipid droplets. These dynamic structures are associated with and regulated by numerous proteins. Perilipin 2, an abundant protein on most lipid droplets, promotes neutral lipid accumulation in lipid droplets. However, the mechanism by which perilipin 2 binds to and remains anchored on the lipid droplet surface is unknown. Here we identify features of the lipid droplet surface that influence perilipin 2 localization. We show that perilipin 2 binding to the lipid droplet surface requires both hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Reagents that disrupt these interactions also decrease binding. Moreover, perilipin 2 binding does not depend on other lipid droplet-associated proteins but is influenced by the lipid composition of the surface. Perilipin 2 binds to synthetic vesicles composed of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, a phospholipid with unsaturated acyl chains. Decreasing the temperature of the binding reaction, or introducing phospholipids with saturated acyl chains, decreases binding. We therefore demonstrate a role for surface lipids and acyl chain packing in perilipin 2 binding to lipid droplets. The ability of the lipid droplet phospholipid composition to impact protein binding may link changes in nutrient availability to lipid droplet homeostasis. PMID:25172666

  17. Large Diameter, Radiative Extinction Experiments with Decane Droplets in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easton, John; Tien, James; Dietrich, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    The extinction of a diffusion flame is of fundamental interest in combustion science. Linan, Law, and Chung and Law analytically and experimentally determined an extinction boundary in terms of droplet diameter and pressure for a single droplet due to Damkohler, or blowoff, extinction. More recently, other researchers demonstrated extinction due to finite rate kinetics in reduced gravity for free droplets of heptane. Chao modeled the effect of radiative heat loss on a quasi-steady spherically symmetric single droplet burning in the absence of buoyancy. They determined that for increasing droplet diameter, a second limit can be reached such that combustion is no longer possible. This second, larger droplet diameter limit arises due to radiative heat loss, which increases with increasing droplet and flame diameter. This increase in radiative heat loss arises due to an increase in the surface area of the flame. Recently, Marchese modeled fuel droplets with detailed chemistry and radiative effects, and compared the results to other work. The modeling also showed the importance of radiative loss and radiative extinction Experiments examined the behavior of a large droplet of decane burning in reduced gravity onboard the NASA Lewis DC-9 aircraft, but did not show a radiative extinction boundary due to g-jitter (Variations in gravitational level and direction) effects. Dietrich conducted experiments in the reduced gravity environment of the Space Shuttle. This work showed that the extinction diameter of methanol droplets increased when the initial diameter of the droplets was large (in this case, approximately 5 mm). Theoretical results agreed with these experimental results only when the theory included radiative effects . Radiative extinction was experimentally verified by Nayagam in a later Shuttle mission. The following work focuses on the combustion and extinction of a single fuel droplet. The goal is to experimentally determine a large droplet diameter limit that

  18. Inertial migration of deformable droplets in a microchannel

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaodong; Xue, Chundong; Hu, Guoqing E-mail: sunjs@nanoctr.cn; Zhang, Li; Jiang, Xingyu; Sun, Jiashu E-mail: sunjs@nanoctr.cn

    2014-11-15

    The microfluidic inertial effect is an effective way of focusing and sorting droplets suspended in a carrier fluid in microchannels. To understand the flow dynamics of microscale droplet migration, we conduct numerical simulations on the droplet motion and deformation in a straight microchannel. The results are compared with preliminary experiments and theoretical analysis. In contrast to most existing literature, the present simulations are three-dimensional and full length in the streamwise direction and consider the confinement effects for a rectangular cross section. To thoroughly examine the effect of the velocity distribution, the release positions of single droplets are varied in a quarter of the channel cross section based on the geometrical symmetries. The migration dynamics and equilibrium positions of the droplets are obtained for different fluid velocities and droplet sizes. Droplets with diameters larger than half of the channel height migrate to the centerline in the height direction and two equilibrium positions are observed between the centerline and the wall in the width direction. In addition to the well-known Segré-Silberberg equilibrium positions, new equilibrium positions closer to the centerline are observed. This finding is validated by preliminary experiments that are designed to introduce droplets at different initial lateral positions. Small droplets also migrate to two equilibrium positions in the quarter of the channel cross section, but the coordinates in the width direction are between the centerline and the wall. The equilibrium positions move toward the centerlines with increasing Reynolds number due to increasing deformations of the droplets. The distributions of the lift forces, angular velocities, and the deformation parameters of droplets along the two confinement direction are investigated in detail. Comparisons are made with theoretical predictions to determine the fundamentals of droplet migration in microchannels. In

  19. Polarimetric Retrievals of Cloud Droplet Number Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, K.; Cairns, B.; Hair, J. W.; Hu, Y.; Hostetler, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) is one of the most significant microphysical properties of liquid clouds and is essential for the understanding of aerosol-cloud interaction. It impacts radiative forcing, cloud evolution, precipitation, global climate and, through observation, can be used to monitor the cloud albedo effect, or the first indirect effect. The IPCC's Fifth Assessment Report continues to consider aerosol-cloud interactions as one of the largest uncertainties in radiative forcing of climate. The SABOR experiment, which was a NASA-led ship and air campaign off the east coast of the United States during July and August of 2014, provided an opportunity for the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) to develop and cross-validate a new approach of sensing CDNC with the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL). The RSP is an airborne prototype of the Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor (APS) that was on-board the Glory satellite. It is a scanning sensor that provides high-precision measurements of polarized and full-intensity radiances at multiple angles over a wide spectral range. The distinctive feature of the polarimetric technique is that it does not make any assumption of the liquid water profile within the cloud. The approach involves (1) estimating the droplet size distribution from polarized reflectance observations in the rainbow, (2) using polarized reflectance to estimate above cloud water vapor and total reflectance to find how much near infra-red light is being absorbed in clouds, (3) finding cloud physical thickness from the absorption and cloud top pressure retrievals assuming a saturated mixing ratio for water vapor and (4) determining the cloud droplet number concentration from the physical thickness and droplet size distribution retrievals. An overview of the polarimetric technique will be presented along with the results of applying the new approach to SABOR campaign data. An analysis of the algorithm's performance when compared with the HSRL

  20. Research study of droplet sizing technology leading to the development of an advanced droplet sizing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, C. F.; Smart, A. E.; Espinosa, V. E.

    1985-01-01

    An instrument to measure the size and velocity of droplets was developed. The instrument uses one of two techniques, as appropriate. In the first technique two small laser beams of one color identify the center of a larger laser beam of a different color. This defines a region of almost uniform intensity where the light scattered by the individual droplets can be related to their size. The first technique uses the visibility of a Doppler burst and validates it against the peak intensity of the signal's pedestal. Results are presented for monodisperse, bimodal, trimodal, and polydisperse sprays produced by the Berglund-Liu droplet generator and a pressure nozzle. Size distributions of a given spray obtained using three different size ranges show excellent self-consistency in the overlapping region. Measurements of sprays of known characteristics exhibit errors in the order of 10%. The principles of operation and design criteria of the instrument are discussed in great detail.

  1. Experimental Study of Unsupported Nonane fuel Droplet Combustion in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, B. J.; Avedisian, C. T.; Hertzog, D. E.; Berkery, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    Soot formation in droplet flames is the basic component of the particulate emission process that occurs in spray combustion. The complexity of soot formation motivates a one-dimensional transport condition which has obvious advantages in modeling. Recent models of spherically symmetric droplet combustion have made this assumption when incorporating such aspects as detailed chemistry and radiation. Interestingly, spherical symmetry does not necessarily restrict the results because it has been observed that the properties of carbon formed in flames are not strongly affected by the nature of the fuel or flaming configuration. What is affected, however, are the forces acting on the soot aggregates and where they are trapped by a balance of drag and thermophoretic forces. The distribution of these forces depends on the transport conditions of the flame. Prior studies of spherical droplet flames have examined the droplet burning history of alkanes, alcohols and aromatics. Data are typically the evolution of droplet, flame, extinction, and soot shell diameters. These data are only now just beginning to find their way into comprehensive numerical models of droplet combustion to test proposed oxidation schemes for fuels such as methanol and heptane. In the present study, we report new measurements on the burning history of unsupported nonane droplets in a convection-free environment to promote spherical symmetry. The far-field gas is atmospheric pressure air at room temperature. The evolution of droplet diameter was measured using high speed cine photography of a spark-ignited, droplet within a confined volume in a drop tower. The initial droplet diameters varied between 0.5 mm and 0.6 mm. The challenge of unsupported droplets is to form, deploy and ignite them with minimal disturbance, and then to keep them in the camera field of view. Because of the difficulty of this undertaking, more sophisticated diagnostics for studying soot than photographic were not used. Supporting

  2. Laboratory studies of collection efficiency of sub-micrometer aerosol particles by cloud droplets on a single-droplet basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardon-Dryer, K.; Huang, Y.-W.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2015-08-01

    An experimental setup has been constructed to measure the collection efficiency (CE) of sub-micrometer aerosol particles by cloud droplets. Droplets of a dilute aqueous ammonium sulfate solution with an average radius of 21.6 μm fall freely into a chamber and collide with sub-micrometer polystyrene latex (PSL) sphere particles of known sizes and concentrations. Two relative humidity (RH) conditions, 15 ± 3 % and 88 ± 3 %, hereafter termed "low" and "high", respectively, were varied with different particles sizes and concentrations. After passing through the chamber, the droplets and aerosol particles were sent to the Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry (PALMS) instrument to determine chemical compositions on a single-droplet basis. "Coagulated droplets" (droplets that collected aerosols) had mass spectra that contained signatures from both an aerosol particle and a droplet residual. CE values range from 2.0 × 10-1 to 1.6 for the low-RH case and from 1.5 × 10-2 to 9.0 × 10-2 for the high-RH case. CE values were, within experimental uncertainty, independent of the aerosol concentrations. CE values in this study were found to be in agreement with previous experimental and theoretical studies. To our knowledge, this is the first collection experiment performed on a single-droplet basis with atmospherically relevant conditions such as droplet sizes, droplet charges and flow.

  3. Magnetophoretic control of water droplets in bulk ferrofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsikis, Georgios; Bréant, Alexandre; Prakash, Manu

    2015-11-01

    We present a microfluidic platform for 2-D manipulation of water droplets immersed in bulk oil-based ferrofluid. Although non-magnetic, the droplets are exclusively controlled by magnetic fields, without any pressure-driven flow. The diphasic fluid layer is trapped in a submillimeter Hele-Shaw chamber that includes permalloy tracks on its substrate. An in-plane rotating magnetic field magnetizes the permalloy tracks, thus producing local magnetic gradients, while an orthogonal magnetic field magnetizes the bulk ferrofluid. To minimize the magnetostatic energy of the system, droplets are attracted towards the locations of the tracks where ferrofluid is repelled. Using this technique, we demonstrate synchronous propagation of water droplets, analyze PIV data of the bulk ferrofluid flow and study the kinematics of propagation. In addition, we show droplet break-up, merging and derive relevant scaling laws. Finally, we discuss future applications owing to the biocompatibility of the droplets.

  4. Spontaneous electrical charging of droplets by conventional pipetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Dongwhi; Lee, Horim; Im, Do Jin; Kang, In Seok; Lim, Geunbae; Kim, Dong Sung; Kang, Kwan Hyoung

    2013-06-01

    We report that a droplet dispensed from a micropipette almost always has a considerable electrical charge of a magnitude dependent on the constituents of the droplet, on atmospheric humidity and on the coating material of pipette tip. We show that this natural electrification of a droplet originates from the charge separation between a droplet and pipette tip surface by contact with water due to the ionization of surface chemical groups. Charge on a droplet can make it difficult to detach the droplet from the pipette tip, can decrease its surface tension, can affect the chemical characteristics of solutions due to interactions with charged molecules, and can influence the combination and localization of charged bio-molecules; in all cases, the charge may affect results of experiments in which any of these factors is important. Thus, these findings reveal experimental parameters that should be controlled in experiments that use micropipettes.

  5. Investigation of critical burning of fuel droplets. [monopropellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faeth, G. M.; Chanin, S.

    1974-01-01

    The steady combustion characteristics of droplets were considered in combustion chamber environments at various pressures, flow conditions, and ambient oxidizer concentrations for a number of hydrocarbon fuels. Using data obtained earlier, predicted gasification rates were within + or - 30% of measurements when the correction for convection was based upon average properties between the liquid surface and the flame around the droplet. Analysis was also completed for the open loop response of monopropellant droplets, based upon earlier strand combustion results. At the limit of large droplets, where the effect of flame curvature is small, the results suggest sufficient response to provide a viable mechanism for combustion instability in the frequency and droplet size range appropriate to practical combustors. Calculations are still in progress for a broader range of droplet sizes, including conditions where active combustion effects are small.

  6. Measuring droplet size distributions from overlapping interferometric particle images.

    PubMed

    Bocanegra Evans, Humberto; Dam, Nico; van der Voort, Dennis; Bertens, Guus; van de Water, Willem

    2015-02-01

    Interferometric particle imaging provides a simple way to measure the probability density function (PDF) of droplet sizes from out-focus images. The optical setup is straightforward, but the interpretation of the data is a problem when particle images overlap. We propose a new way to analyze the images. The emphasis is not on a precise identification of droplets, but on obtaining a good estimate of the PDF of droplet sizes in the case of overlapping particle images. The algorithm is tested using synthetic and experimental data. We next use these methods to measure the PDF of droplet sizes produced by spinning disk aerosol generators. The mean primary droplet diameter agrees with predictions from the literature, but we find a broad distribution of satellite droplet sizes. PMID:25725854

  7. Vapor mediated droplet interactions - models and mechanisms (Part 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benusiglio, Adrien; Cira, Nate; Prakash, Manu

    2014-11-01

    When deposited on clean glass a two-component binary mixture of propylene glycol and water is energetically inclined to spread, as both pure liquids do. Instead the mixture forms droplets stabilized by evaporation induced surface tension gradients, giving them unique properties such as negligible hysteresis. When two of these special droplets are deposited several radii apart they attract each other. The vapor from one droplet destabilizes the other, resulting in an attraction force which brings both droplets together. We present a flux-based model for droplet stabilization and a model which connects the vapor profile to net force. These simple models capture the static and dynamic experimental trends, and our fundamental understanding of these droplets and their interactions allowed us to build autonomous fluidic machines.

  8. Detachment of Sessile Droplets in Immiscible Fluids Using Electrowetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jiwoo; Lee, Sang Joon

    2014-11-01

    The detachment (or removal) of droplets from a solid surface is an indispensable process in numerous practical applications. Here we firstly detach sessile droplets in immiscible fluids from a hydrophobic surface by electrowetting. The critical conditions for droplet detachment are determined by exploring the retracting dynamics for a wide range of driving voltages and physical properties of fluids. The relationships between physical parameters and dynamic characteristics of retracting and jumping droplets, such as contact time and jumping height, are also established. The threshold voltage for droplet detachment in oil with high viscosity is largely reduced by electrowetting actuations with a square pulse. Finally, by using DC and AC electrowetting actuations, we demonstrate the detachment of oil droplets with very low contact angle on a hydrophobic surface in water.

  9. A versatile technology for droplet-based microfluidics: thermomechanical actuation.

    PubMed

    Miralles, Vincent; Huerre, Axel; Williams, Hannah; Fournié, Bastien; Jullien, Marie-Caroline

    2015-05-01

    We report on a versatile technique for microfluidic droplet manipulation that proves effective at every step: from droplet generation to propulsion to sorting, rearrangement or break-up. Non-wetting droplets are thermomechanically actuated in a microfluidic chip using local heating resistors. Controlled temperature variation induces local dilation of the PDMS wall above the resistor, which drives the droplet away from the hot (i.e. constricted) region (B. Selva, I. Cantat and M.-C. Jullien, Phys. Fluids, 2011, 23, 052002). Adapted placing and actuation of such resistors thus allow us to push forward, stop, store and release, or even break up droplets, at the price of low electric power consumption (<150 mW). We believe this technically accessible method to provide a useful tool for droplet microfluidics. PMID:25849442

  10. Directional electrostatic accretion process employing acoustic droplet formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus for manufacturing a free standing solid metal part. In the present invention metal droplets are produced from a free surface pool of molten metal is when an acoustic wave impacts an acoustic lens that is contiguous with the free standing pool of molten metal. The metal droplets are then charged and deflected toward a target. The build up of the metal droplets combine to form the free standing solid metal part.

  11. Bi-Component Droplet Combustion in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Benjamin D.

    2004-01-01

    This research deals with reduced-gravity combustion of bi-component droplets initially in the mm size range or larger. The primary objectives of the research are to study the effects of droplet internal flows, thermal and solutal Marangoni stresses, and species volatility differences on liquid species transport and overall combustion phenomena (e.g., gas-phase unsteadiness, burning rates, sooting, radiation, and extinction). The research program utilizes a reduced gravity environment so that buoyancy effects are rendered negligible. Use of large droplets also facilitates visualization of droplet internal flows, which is important for this research. In the experiments, droplets composed of low- and high-volatility species are burned. The low-volatility components are initially present in small amounts. As combustion of a droplet proceeds, the liquid surface mass fraction of the low-volatility component will increase with time, resulting in a sudden and temporary decrease in droplet burning rates as the droplet rapidly heats to temperatures close to the boiling point of the low-volatility component. This decrease in burning rates causes a sudden and temporary contraction of the flame. The decrease in burning rates and the flame contraction can be observed experimentally. Measurements of burning rates as well as the onset time for flame contraction allow effective liquid-phase species diffusivities to be calculated, e.g., using asymptotic theory. It is planned that droplet internal flows will be visualized in flight and ground-based experiments. In this way, effective liquid species diffusivities can be related to droplet internal flow characteristics. This program is a continuation of extensive ground-based experimental and theoretical research on bi-component droplet combustion that has been ongoing for several years. The focal point of this program is a flight experiment (Bi-Component Droplet Combustion Experiment, BCDCE). This flight experiment is under

  12. Aerosol and cloud droplet number concentrations observed in marine stratocumulus

    SciTech Connect

    Vong, R.J.; Covert, D.S.

    1995-12-01

    The relationship between measurements of cloud droplet number concentration and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration, as inferred from aerosol size spectra, was investigated at a {open_quote}clean air{close_quote}, marine site (Cheeka Peak) located near the coast of the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State. Preliminary results demonstrated that cloud droplet number increased and droplet diameter decreased as aerosol number concentration (CCN) increased. These results support predictions of a climate cooling due to any future increases in marine aerosol concentrations.

  13. Aircraft Ice Accretion Due to Large-Droplet Icing Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Studies of aircraft icing due to clouds consisting of individual droplets 10 times larger than those normally found in icing conditions are being carried out by members of the NASA Lewis Research Center's Icing Technology Branch. When encountered by an aircraft in freezing conditions, clouds consisting of large water droplets have a significantly different effect than those with normal droplets. A large-water-droplet cloud has been suggested as the cause of a commuter airplane accident in the late fall of 1994. As a result, studies of what happens to aircraft flying in these rare, but potentially very hazardous, conditions have been reemphasized.

  14. The Burning of Large N-Heptane Droplets in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzello, Samuel L.; Choi, Mun Young; Kazakov, Andrei; Dryer, Frederick L.; Dobashi, Ritsu; Hirano, Toshisuke; Ferkul, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Experimental results are presented on the burning and sooting behavior of large n-heptane droplets in air at atmospheric pressure under microgravity conditions. The experiments were performed at the Japanese Microgravity Center (JAMIC) 10 sec dropshaft in Hokkaido, Japan. Soot volume fraction, burning rate, flame standoff and luminosity were measured for droplets of 2.6 mm and 2.9 mm in initial diameter. These are the largest droplets for which soot volume fraction measurements have ever been performed. Previous measurements of soot volume fractions for n-heptane droplets, confined to smaller droplet sizes of less than 1.8 mm, indicated that maximum soot volume fraction increased monotonically with initial droplet size. The new results demonstrate for the first time that sooting tendency is reduced for large droplets as it has been speculated previously but never confirmed experimentally. The lower soot volume fractions for the larger droplets were also accompanied by higher burning rates. The observed phenomenon is believed to be caused by the dimensional influence on radiative heat losses from the flame. Numerical calculations confirm that soot radiation affects the droplet burning behavior.

  15. On-chip droplet production regimes using surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Brenker, Jason C; Collins, David J; Van Phan, Hoang; Alan, Tuncay; Neild, Adrian

    2016-04-26

    Aqueous droplets suspended in an immiscible carrier fluid are a key tool in microfluidic chemical analysis platforms. The approaches for producing droplets in microfluidic devices can be divided into three general categories: batch emulsification, continuous production and tailored on-demand production. The major distinctions between each category are the rate of production and the degree of control over the droplet formation process in terms of the size and quantity. On-demand methods are highly desirable when, for example, small numbers or even single droplets of one sample type are required at a time. Here, we present a method for the on-demand production of femtolitre droplets, utilising a pressure source generated by high frequency surface acoustic waves (SAW). An increase in the continuous phase flow rate is enabled by a quasi-3D feature at the droplet production nozzle. A wide range of accessible flow rates permits the identification of different physical regimes in which droplets of different dimensions are produced. In the system investigated droplets measuring as little as 200 fl have been produced, ∼1/60th of the minimum volume previously reported. The experimental findings are supported by a numerical model which demonstrates the link between the number of droplets formed and the pulse length used. PMID:27045939

  16. Printing microstructures in a polymer matrix using a ferrofluid droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Fattah, Abdel Rahman; Ghosh, Suvojit; Puri, Ishwar K.

    2016-03-01

    We print complex curvilinear microstructures in an elastomer matrix using a ferrofluid droplet as the print head. A magnetic field moves the droplet along a prescribed path in liquid polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The droplet sheds magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) clusters in its wake, forming printed features. The PDMS is subsequently heated so that it crosslinks, which preserves the printed features in the elastomer matrix. The competition between magnetic and drag forces experienced by the ferrofluid droplet and its trailing MNPs highlight design criteria for successful printing, which are experimentally confirmed. The method promises new applications, such as flexible 3D circuitry.

  17. Sessile multidroplets and salt droplets under high tangential electric fields

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guoxin; He, Feng; Liu, Xiang; Si, Lina; Guo, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the interaction behaviors between sessile droplets under imposed high voltages is very important in many practical situations, e.g., microfluidic devices and the degradation/aging problems of outdoor high-power applications. In the present work, the droplet coalescence, the discharge activity and the surface thermal distribution response between sessile multidroplets and chloride salt droplets under high tangential electric fields have been investigated with infrared thermography, high-speed photography and pulse current measurement. Obvious polarity effects on the discharge path direction and the temperature change in the droplets in the initial stage after discharge initiation were observed due to the anodic dissolution of metal ions from the electrode. In the case of sessile aligned multidroplets, the discharge path direction could affect the location of initial droplet coalescence. The smaller unmerged droplet would be drained into the merged large droplet as a result from the pressure difference inside the droplets rather than the asymmetric temperature change due to discharge. The discharge inception voltages and the temperature variations for two salt droplets closely correlated with the ionization degree of the salt, as well as the interfacial electrochemical reactions near the electrodes. Mechanisms of these observed phenomena were discussed. PMID:27121926

  18. Efficient transport of droplet sandwiched between saw-tooth plates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liya; Wu, Hengan; Wang, Fengchao

    2016-01-15

    The transport of droplet sandwiched between smooth and saw-tooth plates was investigated using molecular dynamics method. The repeated opening and closing of the plates result in sequential stretching and squeezing of the droplet, which provide the driving force. The asymmetrical saw tooth obstructs the backward motion of the droplet, and gives rise to a net forward displacement of the droplet in every opening and closing cycle. This unidirectional motion facilitates the efficient droplet transport, which is referred to as the ratchet-like effect in this work. Our simulations also reveal that the influence of the surface wettability on the droplet transport is different for saw-tooth and smooth plates. Droplet transport efficiency exhibits monotonic decrease with the increase of the solid-liquid interactions for saw-tooth plates. While for smooth plates, unidirectional droplet movement was only observed for certain solid-liquid interactions. Taken together these simulation results and theoretical analysis, we demonstrate that hydrophobic saw-tooth plates can improve the transport efficiency significantly. These findings not only enhance our understanding of the droplet transport from atomistic scale, but also are beneficial to practical applications in designing of micro- and nano-fluidic systems. PMID:26473277

  19. Assembly of open clusters of colloidal dumbbells via droplet evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham Van, Hai; Fortini, Andrea; Schmidt, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the behavior of a mixture of asymmetric colloidal dumbbells and emulsion droplets by means of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The evaporation of the droplets and the competition between droplet-colloid attraction and colloid-colloid interactions lead to the formation of clusters built up of colloid aggregates with both closed and open structures. We find that stable packings and hence complex colloidal structures can be obtained by changing the relative size of the colloidal spheres and/or their interfacial tension with the droplets.

  20. ARFGAP1 Is Dynamically Associated with Lipid Droplets in Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Alamri, Hussam; Feng, Shi Bo; Kalantari, Fariba; Negi, Sarita; Wong, Amy H. Y.; Mazur, Alexander; Asp, Lennart; Fazel, Ali; Salman, Ayat; Lazaris, Anthoula; Metrakos, Peter; Bergeron, John J. M.; Nilsson, Tommy

    2014-01-01

    The ARF GTPase Activating Protein 1 (ARFGAP1) associates mainly with the cytosolic side of Golgi cisternal membranes where it participates in the formation of both COPI and clathrin-coated vesicles. In this study, we show that ARFGAP1 associates transiently with lipid droplets upon addition of oleate in cultured cells. Also, that addition of cyclic AMP shifts ARFGAP1 from lipid droplets to the Golgi apparatus and that overexpression and knockdown of ARFGAP1 affect lipid droplet formation. Examination of human liver tissue reveals that ARFGAP1 is found associated with lipid droplets at steady state in some but not all hepatocytes. PMID:25397679

  1. Cross-Interface Emulsification for Generating Size-Tunable Droplets.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng; Zheng, Xu; Tao, Yi; Du, Wenbin

    2016-03-15

    We report cross-interface emulsification (XiE), a simple method for the generation of monodisperse droplets of controllable volumes from picoliter to nanoliter. A device is set up in which a fused-silica capillary is vibrating across the surface of the continuous phase (mineral oil) in a reservoir, and the flow of the dispersed phase (aqueous solution) in the capillary is segmented into monodisperse droplets at the air/oil interface. We find that the volume of droplets is mainly dominated by the flow rate and vibrating frequency and not significantly influenced by other factors, such as the viscosity of the continuous phase and dispersed phase, the inner diameter of the capillary (20-100 μm), or the shape of the tip (tapered or flat). These features reflect high robustness, flexibility, and precision of XiE for on-demand volume control of droplets. The droplets automatically assemble into planar monolayer droplet arrays (PMDA) in flat-bottomed microwells of 96-well plates, offering excellent convenience for imaging of droplets. As a representative application, we carry out digital loop-mediated isothermal amplification using PMDAs with multivolume droplets for the absolute quantification of nucleic acids. Our results demonstrate that XiE is simple and controllable for the production of monodisperse size-tunable droplets, and it offers opportunities for common laboratories, even without microfabrication facilities, to perform digital quantification, single cell analysis, and other biochemical assays with high throughput. PMID:26849419

  2. Droplet Mobility Manipulation on Porous Media Using Backpressure.

    PubMed

    Vourdas, N; Pashos, G; Kokkoris, G; Boudouvis, A G; Stathopoulos, V N

    2016-05-31

    Wetting phenomena on hydrophobic surfaces are strongly related to the volume and pressure of gas pockets residing at the solid-liquid interface. In this study, we explore the underlying mechanisms of droplet actuation and mobility manipulation when backpressure is applied through a porous medium under a sessile pinned droplet. Reversible transitions between the initially sticky state and the slippery states are thus incited by modulating the backpressure. The sliding angles of deionized (DI) water and ethanol in DI water droplets of various volumes are presented to quantify the effect of the backpressure on the droplet mobility. For a 50 μL water droplet, the sliding angle decreases from 45 to 0° when the backpressure increases to ca. 0.60 bar. Significantly smaller backpressure levels are required for lower surface energy liquids. We shed light on the droplet actuation and movement mechanisms by means of simulations encompassing the momentum conservation and the continuity equations along with the Cahn-Hilliard phase-field equations in a 2D computational domain. The droplet actuation mechanism entails depinning of the receding contact line and movement by means of forward wave propagation reaching the front of the droplet. Eventually, the droplet skips forward. The contact line depinning is also corroborated by analytical calculations based on the governing vertical force balance, properly modified to incorporate the effect of the backpressure. PMID:27163363

  3. Onset of Area-Dependent Dissipation in Droplet Spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilton, Mark; Bäumchen, Oliver; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2015-07-01

    We probe the viscous relaxation of structured liquid droplets in the partial wetting regime using a diblock copolymer system. The relaxation time of the droplets is measured after a step change in temperature as a function of three tunable parameters: droplet size, equilibrium contact angle, and the viscosity of the fluid. Contrary to what is typically observed, the late-stage relaxation time does not scale with the radius of the droplet—rather, relaxation scales with the radius squared. Thus, the energy dissipation depends on the contact area of the droplet, rather than the contact line.

  4. Sessile multidroplets and salt droplets under high tangential electric fields.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guoxin; He, Feng; Liu, Xiang; Si, Lina; Guo, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the interaction behaviors between sessile droplets under imposed high voltages is very important in many practical situations, e.g., microfluidic devices and the degradation/aging problems of outdoor high-power applications. In the present work, the droplet coalescence, the discharge activity and the surface thermal distribution response between sessile multidroplets and chloride salt droplets under high tangential electric fields have been investigated with infrared thermography, high-speed photography and pulse current measurement. Obvious polarity effects on the discharge path direction and the temperature change in the droplets in the initial stage after discharge initiation were observed due to the anodic dissolution of metal ions from the electrode. In the case of sessile aligned multidroplets, the discharge path direction could affect the location of initial droplet coalescence. The smaller unmerged droplet would be drained into the merged large droplet as a result from the pressure difference inside the droplets rather than the asymmetric temperature change due to discharge. The discharge inception voltages and the temperature variations for two salt droplets closely correlated with the ionization degree of the salt, as well as the interfacial electrochemical reactions near the electrodes. Mechanisms of these observed phenomena were discussed. PMID:27121926

  5. Sessile multidroplets and salt droplets under high tangential electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Guoxin; He, Feng; Liu, Xiang; Si, Lina; Guo, Dan

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the interaction behaviors between sessile droplets under imposed high voltages is very important in many practical situations, e.g., microfluidic devices and the degradation/aging problems of outdoor high-power applications. In the present work, the droplet coalescence, the discharge activity and the surface thermal distribution response between sessile multidroplets and chloride salt droplets under high tangential electric fields have been investigated with infrared thermography, high-speed photography and pulse current measurement. Obvious polarity effects on the discharge path direction and the temperature change in the droplets in the initial stage after discharge initiation were observed due to the anodic dissolution of metal ions from the electrode. In the case of sessile aligned multidroplets, the discharge path direction could affect the location of initial droplet coalescence. The smaller unmerged droplet would be drained into the merged large droplet as a result from the pressure difference inside the droplets rather than the asymmetric temperature change due to discharge. The discharge inception voltages and the temperature variations for two salt droplets closely correlated with the ionization degree of the salt, as well as the interfacial electrochemical reactions near the electrodes. Mechanisms of these observed phenomena were discussed.

  6. Aerosol effect on the mobility of cloud droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koren, Ilan; Altaratz, Orit; Dagan, Guy

    2015-10-01

    Cloud droplet mobility is referred to here as a measure of the droplets’ ability to move with ambient air. We claim that an important part of the aerosol effect on convective clouds is driven by changes in droplet mobility. We show that the mass-weighted average droplet terminal velocity, defined here as the ‘effective terminal velocity’ (η) and its spread ({σ }η ) serve as direct measures of this effect. Moreover, we develop analytical estimations for η and {σ }η to show that changes in the relative dispersion of η ({\\varepsilon }η ={σ }η /η ) can serve as a sensitive predictor of the onset of droplet-collection processes.

  7. Droplet microfluidics for microbiology: techniques, applications and challenges.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Tomasz S; Scheler, Ott; Garstecki, Piotr

    2016-06-21

    Droplet microfluidics has rapidly emerged as one of the key technologies opening up new experimental possibilities in microbiology. The ability to generate, manipulate and monitor droplets carrying single cells or small populations of bacteria in a highly parallel and high throughput manner creates new approaches for solving problems in diagnostics and for research on bacterial evolution. This review presents applications of droplet microfluidics in various fields of microbiology: i) detection and identification of pathogens, ii) antibiotic susceptibility testing, iii) studies of microbial physiology and iv) biotechnological selection and improvement of strains. We also list the challenges in the dynamically developing field and new potential uses of droplets in microbiology. PMID:27212581

  8. Electric-Field-Assisted Droplet Dispensing on Immiscible Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhm, Taewoong; Hong, Jiwoo; Lee, Sang Joon; Kang, In Seok

    2014-11-01

    Dispensing tiny droplets is a basic and crucial process in numerous practical applications, such as printed electronics, DNA microarray, and digital microfluidics. The precise positioning with demanded size of droplets is the main issue of dispensing tiny droplets. Furthermore, capability of dispensing charged droplets on the immiscible fluids could bring out more utilities. In this work, we demonstrate the droplet dispensing on immiscible fluids by means of electrical charge concentration (ECC). This results from the fact that the droplet is generated by electric force caused by electric induction between the surface of droplet and the immiscible fluid. The temporal evolution of the droplet-dispensing process was observed consecutively with a high-speed camera. In addition, the relationship between the size of dispensed droplet and the parameters, such as physical properties of fluids and electrical field strength, is established. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning (Grant Number: 2013R1A1A2011956).

  9. Freezing of droplets colliding with a cold surface

    SciTech Connect

    Bhola, R.; Chandra, S.

    1995-12-31

    Impact of droplets of paraffin wax (melting point 70 C) on a polished aluminum surface was studied experimentally. Droplet impact was photographed, and the spread diameter and liquid-solid contact angle measured from photographs. Impact velocity was varied from 0.8 m/s to 2.6 m/s and surface temperature from 23 C to 73 C. For low impact velocities (< 2 m/s) splat edges solidified before droplet spread was complete, restricting movement of liquid. Photographs showed liquid recoiling in the droplet center during impact on a cold surface (23 C); the recoil reduced as the surface temperature approached the melting point of the droplet. When the impact velocity was increased, surface temperature had less effect on droplet spread, and recoil was not observed. A one-dimensional model of droplet solidification was used to derive a dimensionless parameter s*, which was a measure of the thickness of the solid layer formed at the cold surface. Solidification did not affect droplet spreading for s* < 8 {times} 10{sup {minus}3}. A simple energy conservation model was used to predict the maximum extent of liquid droplet spread when solidification was negligible. Predictions from the model were found to agree well with experimental measurements.This is applicable for spray forming of metals.

  10. Spreading dynamics of droplet on an inclined surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chaoqun; Yu, Cheng; Chen, Yongping

    2016-06-01

    A three-dimensional unsteady theoretical model of droplet spreading process on an inclined surface is developed and numerically analyzed to investigate the droplet spreading dynamics via the lattice Boltzmann simulation. The contact line motion and morphology evolution for the droplet spreading on an inclined surface, which are, respectively, represented by the advancing/receding spreading factor and droplet wetted length, are evaluated and analyzed. The effects of surface wettability and inclination on the droplet spreading behaviors are examined. The results indicate that, dominated by gravity and capillarity, the droplet experiences a complex asymmetric deformation and sliding motion after the droplet comes into contact with the inclined surfaces. The droplet firstly deforms near the solid surface and mainly exhibits a radial expansion flow in the start-up stage. An evident sliding-down motion along the inclination is observed in the middle stage. And the surface-tension-driven retraction occurs during the retract stage. Increases in inclination angle and equilibrium contact angle lead to a faster droplet motion and a smaller wetted area. In addition, increases in equilibrium contact angle lead to a shorter duration time of the middle stage and an earlier entry into the retract stage.

  11. Tuning of the droplet motion in interconnected microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Guoqing; Song, Kui; Zhang, Li

    2010-11-01

    The problem of controlling the droplet motions in multiphase flows on the microscale has gained increasing attention because the droplet-based microfluidic devices provide great potentials for chemical/biological applications such as drug discovery, chemical kinetics study, material synthesis, and DNA/cell assays. It is critical to understand the relevant physics on droplet hydrodynamics and thus control the generation, motion, splitting, and coalescence of droplets in complex microfluidic networks. The operation of those applications sometimes requires the arrival of droplets from different branch microchannels at a designated location within a transit time. We propose a simple design for interconnected microfluidic devices that implement the feedback mechanism to synchronize the droplet motion via a passive way. Numerical simulations using the Volume of Fluid (VOF) algorithm are conducted to investigate the time-dependent dynamics of droplets in both gas-liquid and liquid-liquid systems. An analytical mode based on the electronic-hydraulic analogy is also developed to describe the transit behavior of the droplet traffic. Both the numerical and theoretical results agree well with the corresponding experimental results. Furthermore, we optimize the microfluidic networks to control the motion of a series of droplets.

  12. Dynamic response of vaporizing droplet to pressure oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Lei; Shen, Chibing; Zhang, Xinqiao

    2016-06-01

    Combustion instability is a major challenge in the development of the liquid propellant engines, and droplet vaporization is viewed as a potential mechanism for driving instabilities. Based on the previous work, an unsteady droplet heating and vaporization model was developed. The model and numerical method are validated by experimental data available in literature, and then the oscillatory vaporization of n-Heptane droplet exposed to unsteady harmonic nitrogen atmosphere was numerically investigated over a wide range of amplitudes and frequencies. Also, temperature variations inside the droplet were demonstrated under oscillation environments. It was found that the thermal wave is attenuated with significantly reduced wave intensities as it penetrates deep into droplet from the ambient gas. Droplet surface temperature exhibits smaller fluctuation than that of the ambient gas, and it exhibits a time lag with regard to the pressure variation. Furthermore, the mechanism leading to phase lag of vaporization rate with respect to pressure oscillation was unraveled. Results show that this phase lag varies during the droplet lifetime and it is strongly influenced by oscillation frequency, indicating droplet vaporization is only capable of driving combustion instability in some certain frequency domains. Instead, the amplitude of the oscillation does not have very significant effects. It is noteworthy that thermal inertia of the droplet also plays a considerable role in determining the phase lag.

  13. Size-variable droplet actuation by interdigitated electrowetting electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianfeng; Yu, Yuhua; Li, Jia; Lai, Yongjun; Zhou, Jia

    2012-12-01

    We propose electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) electrodes to actuate size-variable droplets. By using interdigitated fingers and maximizing them in optimized construction, we can control droplets in different sizes with the same electrode array automatically. We both do the theory calculation and experiment verification to study the electrode with rectangular fingers. It is found that the electrode with triangle fingers can actuate droplets as small as 1/36 of that actuated by conventional square electrode array. It can actuate large droplets more efficiently than rectangular fingers. This work provides an approach to achieve multifunctional EWOD devices in the future.

  14. Droplet morphologies on particles with macroscopic surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Stepánek, Frantisek; Rajniak, Pavol

    2006-01-31

    The equilibrium configuration of liquid droplets on the surface of macroscopically rough solid particles was determined by numerical simulations using the volume-of-fluid (VOF) method. The fractional surface coverage of the particle as a function of the droplet size, equilibrium contact angle, and the particle surface roughness amplitude and correlation length has been systematically investigated. Droplet size and contact angle were found to generally have a stronger effect on surface coverage than particle surface roughness. Because of droplet coalescence, a relatively large variation in surface coverage was observed for any given total liquid volume, particularly for larger values of the equilibrium contact angle. PMID:16430249

  15. Quantum droplets of electrons and holes.

    PubMed

    Almand-Hunter, A E; Li, H; Cundiff, S T; Mootz, M; Kira, M; Koch, S W

    2014-02-27

    Interacting many-body systems are characterized by stable configurations of objects--ranging from elementary particles to cosmological formations--that also act as building blocks for more complicated structures. It is often possible to incorporate interactions in theoretical treatments of crystalline solids by introducing suitable quasiparticles that have an effective mass, spin or charge which in turn affects the material's conductivity, optical response or phase transitions. Additional quasiparticle interactions may also create strongly correlated configurations yielding new macroscopic phenomena, such as the emergence of a Mott insulator, superconductivity or the pseudogap phase of high-temperature superconductors. In semiconductors, a conduction-band electron attracts a valence-band hole (electronic vacancy) to create a bound pair, known as an exciton, which is yet another quasiparticle. Two excitons may also bind together to give molecules, often referred to as biexcitons, and even polyexcitons may exist. In indirect-gap semiconductors such as germanium or silicon, a thermodynamic phase transition may produce electron-hole droplets whose diameter can approach the micrometre range. In direct-gap semiconductors such as gallium arsenide, the exciton lifetime is too short for such a thermodynamic process. Instead, different quasiparticle configurations are stabilized dominantly by many-body interactions, not by thermalization. The resulting non-equilibrium quantum kinetics is so complicated that stable aggregates containing three or more Coulomb-correlated electron-hole pairs remain mostly unexplored. Here we study such complex aggregates and identify a new stable configuration of charged particles that we call a quantum droplet. This configuration exists in a plasma and exhibits quantization owing to its small size. It is charge neutral and contains a small number of particles with a pair-correlation function that is characteristic of a liquid. We present

  16. Nuclear lipid droplets: a novel nuclear domain.

    PubMed

    Layerenza, J P; González, P; García de Bravo, M M; Polo, M P; Sisti, M S; Ves-Losada, A

    2013-02-01

    We investigated nuclear neutral-lipid (NL) composition and organization, as NL may represent an alternative source for providing fatty acids and cholesterol (C) to membranes, signaling paths, and transcription factors in the nucleus. We show here that nuclear NL were organized into nonpolar domains in the form of nuclear-lipid droplets (nLD). By fluorescent confocal microscopy, representative nLD were observed in situ within the nuclei of rat hepatocytes in vivo and HepG2 cells, maintained under standard conditions in culture, and within nuclei isolated from rat liver. nLD were resistant to Triton X-100 and became stained with Sudan Red, OsO4, and BODIPY493/503. nLD and control cytosolic-lipid droplets (cLD) were isolated from rat-liver nuclei and from homogenates, respectively, by sucrose-gradient sedimentation. Lipids were extracted, separated by thin-layer chromatography, and quantified. nLD were composed of 37% lipids and 63% proteins. The nLD lipid composition was as follows: 19% triacylglycerols (TAG), 39% cholesteryl esters, 27% C, and 15% polar lipids; whereas the cLD composition contained different proportions of these same lipid classes, in particular 91% TAG. The TAG fatty acids from both lipid droplets were enriched in oleic, linoleic, and palmitic acids. The TAG from the nLD corresponded to a small pool, whereas the TAG from the cLD constituted the main cellular pool (at about 100% yield from the total homogenate). In conclusion, nLD are a domain within the nucleus where NL are stored and organized and may be involved in nuclear lipid homeostasis. PMID:23098923

  17. Laser diagnostics for microgravity droplet studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Michael

    1995-01-01

    An instrument has been designed, built, and tested for performing laser diagnostic measurements of droplet combustion in low-gravity-flight aircraft. Nonintrusive measurements are of particular importance for droplet combustion (the simplest example of non-premixed combustion) and transport in microgravity environments, where physical contact would introduce an unacceptable level of perturbations. The resolution of these diagnostics can also isolate transport to length scales much smaller than the droplet diameter. These techniques can be configured to instantaneously map an entire flow field in two and three dimensions, providing either qualitative or quantitative information on the distribution of a desired scalar or vector quantity. Detailing the gas-phase flow field and position of the flame front can be achieved using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of OH or another flame front marker. An alternative approach is to obtain LIF from a diagnostic seed included in the liquid phase fuel; it would be consumed at the flame front. The main advantage to this approach is that it is easier to choose the wavelength of the molecular absorption which coincides with convenient laser wavelengths rather than finding lasers which can be configured to access OH. Our present method uses a nitrogen-pumped dye laser tuned to a sodium absorption and addition of small concentrations of NaCl to the fuel. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is a laser-based technique which has recently had its practicality greatly enhanced by the development of high-resolution CCD cameras and the increase in speed and capacity of computer systems. With this technique, a seeded flow is illuminated with a double-pulsed laser sheet to generate a double exposure image on a film or CCD camera. Computer analysis of the image is used to determine the particle velocity vectors and, thus, the gas velocity within the plane of the laser sheet. Our current experiment uses PIV for measuring relative droplet

  18. Quark matter droplets in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heiselberg, H.; Pethick, C. J.; Staubo, E. F.

    1993-01-01

    We show that, for physically reasonable bulk and surface properties, the lowest energy state of dense matter consists of quark matter coexisting with nuclear matter in the presence of an essentially uniform background of electrons. We estimate the size and nature of spatial structure in this phase, and show that at the lowest densities the quark matter forms droplets embedded in nuclear matter, whereas at higher densities it can exhibit a variety of different topologies. A finite fraction of the interior of neutron stars could consist of matter in this new phase, which would provide new mechanisms for glitches and cooling.

  19. Theoretical and Experimental Investigations on Droplet Evaporation and Droplet Ignition at High Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ristau, R.; Nagel, U.; Iglseder, H.; Koenig, J.; Rath, H. J.; Normura, H.; Kono, M.; Tanabe, M.; Sato, J.

    1993-01-01

    The evaporation of fuel droplets under high ambient pressure and temperature in normal gravity and microgravity has been investigated experimentally. For subcritical ambient conditions, droplet evaporation after a heat-up period follows the d(exp 2)-law. For all data the evaporation constant increases as the ambient temperature increases. At identical ambient conditions the evaporation constant under microgravity is smaller compared to normal gravity. This effect can first be observed at 1 bar and increases with ambient pressure. Preliminary experiments on ignition delay for self-igniting fuel droplets have been performed. Above a 1 s delay time, at identical ambient conditions, significant differences in the results of the normal and microgravity data are observed. Self-ignition occurs within different temperature ranges due to the influence of gravity. The time dependent behavior of the droplet is examined theoretically. In the calculations two different approaches for the gas phase are applied. In the first approach the conditions at the interface are given using a quasi steady theory approximation. The second approach uses a set of time dependent governing equations for the gas phase which are then evaluated. In comparison, the second model shows a better agreement with the drop tower experiments. In both cases a time dependent gasification rate is observed.

  20. Influence of droplet size and velocity on droplet impact process on waxy leaf surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A custom-designed system consisting of two high-speed digital cameras, a uniform-size droplet generator, a constant-speed linear track unit, light sources and a 3-dimensional (3-D) image analytical program was used to investigate the impact processes. Leaves of Dracaena deremensis, Euphorbia pulche...

  1. Organic films on atmospheric aerosol particles, fog droplets, cloud droplets, raindrops, and snowflakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, P. S.; Graedel, T. E.; Weschler, C. J.

    1983-05-01

    If surface-active organic molecules are present as surface films, the transfer of gases into the atmospheric water system could be impeded, evaporation could be slowed, and the aqueous chemical reactions could be influenced. The results of new measurements of the surface tension of aqueous solutions of common atmospheric organic compounds (beta-pinene, n-hexanol, eugenol, and anethole) are reported, and it is shown that the compounds produce films with properties similar to those of the better known surfactants. It is concluded that organic films are probably common on atmospheric aerosol particles and that they may occur under certain circumstances on fog droplets, cloud droplets, and snowflakes. If they are present, they will increase the lifetimes of aerosol particles, fog droplets, and cloud droplets, both by inhibiting water vapor evaporation and by reducing the efficiency with which these atmospheric components are scavenged. It is thought likely that the transport of gaseous molecules into and out of the aqueous solution will be impeded by factors of several hundred or more when organic films are present.

  2. Breakup and vaporization of droplets under locally supersonic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, YoungJun; Hermanson, James C.

    2012-07-01

    The disruption and vaporization of simulated fuel droplets in an accelerating supersonic flow was examined experimentally in a draw-down supersonic wind tunnel. The droplets achieved supersonic velocities relative to the surrounding air to give relative Mach numbers of up to 1.8 and Weber numbers of up to 300. Mono-disperse, 100 μm-diameter fluid droplets were generated using a droplet-on-demand generator upstream of the tunnel entrance. Direct close-up single- and multiple-exposure imaging was used to examine the features of droplet breakup and to determine the droplet velocities. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging of the disrupting droplets was performed using acetone fluorescence to determine the dispersion of the expelled vapor. Three test liquids were employed: 2-propanol and tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether as non-volatile fluids and a 50/50 hexanol-pentane mixture (Hex-Pen 50/50). The vapor pressure of the Hex-Pen 50/50 was sufficiently high to cause the droplet fluid to potentially become superheated in the decreased static pressure of the supersonic stream. The dynamics for 2-propanol and Hex-Pen 50/50 droplets were similar up to the point of disruption, which occurred more rapidly for the more volatile Hex-Pen 50/50. A 1D dynamic droplet model was developed to provide a first estimate of the expected droplet acceleration and velocity. The actual droplet velocities were in reasonable agreement with the model up to the point at which significant droplet disruption and mass loss commenced. The droplet deformation and breakup patterns for these supersonic flow conditions can be classified into four different flow regions characterized by changes in the Weber number with downstream distance as the droplets accelerate, however, those flow regimes and Weber number ranges were different than those seen for droplets disrupting in shock tubes. The disruption patterns were seen to be generally similar for the different fluids, though droplet disruption

  3. Flocculation of deformable emulsion droplets. 1: Droplet shape and line tension effects

    SciTech Connect

    Denkov, N.D.; Petsev, D.N.; Danov, K.D.

    1995-12-01

    A simple theoretical model which allows the study of the configuration and the interaction energy of a doublet of flocculated Brownian droplets was recently proposed (Denkov et al., Phys, Rev. Lett. 71, 3226 (1993)). In this model the equilibrium film radius and thickness are determined by minimizing the total pair interaction energy which is presented as a sum of explicit expressions for the different contributions (van der Waals, electrostatic, steric, depletion, surface extension, etc.). In the present study this simplified model is numerically verified by comparison with the results stemming from the real shape of the interacting droplets. In order to determine the real configuration of two drops in contact the authors solve numerically the augmented Laplace equation of capillarity which accounts for the interaction between the droplets. Then the total interaction energy is alteratively calculated by integrating the energy density along the surfaces of the droplets. The numerical comparison shows that the equilibrium film radius and thickness, as well as the interaction energy calculated by means of the simplified model, are in very good agreement with the results from the more detailed (but more complex) approach. Numerical calculations of the equilibrium line tensions acting at the film periphery, a function of the droplet radius, are performed. The obtained results are relevant also to flocs containing more than two particles since the theory predicts pairwise additivity of the interaction energy in most cases. The results can be useful in gaining a deeper understanding of the processes of stabilization of flocculation in emulsions. Emulsions of great importance in many areas of human activity such as oil recovery.

  4. Surface Modification of Droplet Polymeric Microfluidic Devices for the Stable and Continuous Generation of Aqueous Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Balamurugan; Kim, Namwon; Lee, Wonbae; Spivak, David A.; Nikitopoulos, Dimitris E.; McCarley, Robin L.; Soper, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    Droplet microfluidics performed in poly(methylmethacrylate), PMMA, microfluidic devices resulted in significant wall wetting by water droplets formed in a liquid-liquid segmented flow when using a hydrophobic carrier fluid, such as perfluorotripropylamine (FC-3283). This wall wetting led to water droplets with non-uniform sizes that were often trapped on the wall surfaces leading to unstable and poorly controlled liquid-liquid segmented flow. To circumvent this problem, we developed a two-step procedure to hydrophobically modify the surfaces of PMMA and other thermoplastic materials commonly used for making microfluidic devices. The surface modification route involved the introduction of hydroxyl groups by oxygen plasma treatment of the polymer surface followed by a solution phase reaction with heptadecafluoro-1,1,2,2–tetrahydrodecyl trichlorosilane dissolved in the fluorocarbon solvent FC-3283. This procedure was found to be useful for the modification of PMMA and other thermoplastic surfaces, including polycyclic olefin copolymer (COC) and polycarbonate (PC). Angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that the fluorination of these polymers took place with high surface selectivity. This procedure was used to modify the surface of a PMMA droplet microfluidic device (DMFD) and was shown to be useful to reduce the wetting problem during the generation of aqueous droplets in a perfluorotripropylamine (FC-3283) carrier fluid and could generate stable segmented flows for hours of operation. In the case of the PMMA DMFD, oxygen plasma treatment was carried out after the PMMA cover plate was thermally fusion bonded to the PMMA microfluidic chip. Because the appended chemistry to the channel wall created a hydrophobic surface, it will accommodate the use of other carrier fluids that are hydrophobic as well, such as hexadecane or mineral oils. PMID:21608975

  5. The electroosmotic droplet switch: countering capillarity with electrokinetics.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Michael J; Ehrhard, Peter; Steen, Paul H

    2005-08-23

    Electroosmosis, originating in the double-layer of a small liquid-filled pore (size R) and driven by a voltage V, is shown to be effective in pumping against the capillary pressure of a larger liquid droplet (size B) provided the dimensionless parameter sigmaR(2)/epsilon|zeta|VB is small enough. Here sigma is surface tension of the droplet liquid/gas interface, epsilon is the liquid dielectric constant, and zeta is the zeta potential of the solid/liquid pair. As droplet size diminishes, the voltage required to pump electroosmotically scales as V approximately R(2)/B. Accordingly, the voltage needed to pump against smaller higher-pressure droplets can actually decrease provided the pump poresize scales down with droplet size appropriately. The technological implication of this favorable scaling is that electromechanical transducers made of moving droplets, so-called "droplet transducers," become feasible. To illustrate, we demonstrate a switch whose bistable energy landscape derives from the surface energy of a droplet-droplet system and whose triggering derives from the electroosmosis effect. The switch is an electromechanical transducer characterized by individual addressability, fast switching time with low voltage, and no moving solid parts. We report experimental results for millimeter-scale droplets to verify key predictions of a mathematical model of the switch. With millimeter-size water droplets and micrometer-size pores, 5 V can yield switching times of 1 s. Switching time scales as B(3)/VR(2). Two possible "grab-and-release" applications of arrays of switches are described. One mimics the controlled adhesion of an insect, the palm beetle; the other uses wettability to move a particle along a trajectory. PMID:16091462

  6. A numerical study of droplet trapping in microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, Mathias; Brun, P.-T.; Gallaire, François

    2014-03-01

    Microfluidic channels are powerful means of control of minute volumes such as droplets. These droplets are usually conveyed at will in an externally imposed flow which follows the geometry of the micro-channel. It has recently been pointed out by Dangla et al. ["Trapping microfluidic drops in wells of surface energy," Phys. Rev. Lett. 107(12), 124501 (2011)] that the motion of transported droplets may also be stopped in the flow, when they are anchored to grooves which are etched in the channels top wall. This feature of the channel geometry explores a direction that is usually uniform in microfluidics. Herein, this anchoring effect exploiting the three spatial directions is studied combining a depth averaged fluid description and a geometrical model that accounts for the shape of the droplet in the anchor. First, the presented method is shown to enable the capture and release droplets in numerical simulations. Second, this tool is used in a numerical investigation of the physical mechanisms at play in the capture of the droplet: a localized reduced Laplace pressure jump is found on its interface when the droplet penetrates the groove. This modified boundary condition helps the droplet cope with the linear pressure drop in the surrounding fluid. Held on the anchor the droplet deforms and stretches in the flow. The combination of these ingredients leads to recover the scaling law for the critical capillary number at which the droplets exit the anchors C a^{star} ∝ h2/R2 where h is the channel height and R the droplet undeformed radius.

  7. Shear driven droplet shedding and coalescence on a superhydrophobic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghtadernejad, S.; Tembely, M.; Jadidi, M.; Esmail, N.; Dolatabadi, A.

    2015-03-01

    The interest on shedding and coalescence of sessile droplets arises from the importance of these phenomena in various scientific problems and industrial applications such as ice formation on wind turbine blades, power lines, nacelles, and aircraft wings. It is shown recently that one of the ways to reduce the probability of ice accretion on industrial components is using superhydrophobic coatings due to their low adhesion to water droplets. In this study, a combined experimental and numerical approach is used to investigate droplet shedding and coalescence phenomena under the influence of air shear flow on a superhydrophobic surface. Droplets with a size of 2 mm are subjected to various air speeds ranging from 5 to 90 m/s. A numerical simulation based on the Volume of Fluid method coupled with the Large Eddy Simulation turbulent model is carried out in conjunction with the validating experiments to shed more light on the coalescence of droplets and detachment phenomena through a detailed analysis of the aerodynamics forces and velocity vectors on the droplet and the streamlines around it. The results indicate a contrast in the mechanism of two-droplet coalescence and subsequent detachment with those related to the case of a single droplet shedding. At lower speeds, the two droplets coalesce by attracting each other with successive rebounds of the merged droplet on the substrate, while at higher speeds, the detachment occurs almost instantly after coalescence, with a detachment time decreasing exponentially with the air speed. It is shown that coalescence phenomenon assists droplet detachment from the superhydrophobic substrate at lower air speeds.

  8. Droplet-Based Production of Liposomes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackley, Donald E.; Forster, Anita

    2009-01-01

    A process for making monodisperse liposomes having lipid bilayer membranes involves fewer, simpler process steps than do related prior methods. First, a microfluidic, cross junction droplet generator is used to produce vesicles comprising aqueous solution droplets contained in single layer lipid membranes. The vesicles are collected in a lipid-solvent mix that is at most partially soluble in water and is less dense than is water. A layer of water is dispensed on top of the solvent. By virtue of the difference in densities, the water sinks to the bottom and the solvent floats to the top. The vesicles, which have almost the same density as that of water, become exchanged into the water instead of floating to the top. As there are excess lipids in the solvent solution, in order for the vesicles to remain in the water, the addition of a second lipid layer to each vesicle is energetically favored. The resulting lipid bilayers present the hydrophilic ends of the lipid molecules to both the inner and outer membrane surfaces. If lipids of a second kind are dissolved in the solvent in sufficient excess before use, then asymmetric liposomes may be formed.

  9. Droplet Formation in Wire Array Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groot, J. S.; Rosenthal, S.; Cochrane, K.; Haill, T.; Mehlhorn, T.

    2003-10-01

    Wires in high power z-pinch wire array implosions are heated so rapidly that the liquid metal is heated beyond the normal boiling temperature and becomes metastable. The metastable liquid is heated to a point close to the spinodal, where explosive, homogeneous boiling rapidly ( ns) transforms the liquid to a mixed phase consisting of liquid fragments, droplets, and vapor. It is important to understand this process since the metastable liquid and the mixed state have an EOS and resistivity that can be quite different than equilibrium models. In addition, the liquid droplets can pass through the confining magnetic field so that mass is left behind the imploding plasma. We have modified the 3-D MHD code Alegra to incorporate of the nonequilibrium state. Initial 1-D Alegra calculations of the heating of a tungsten wire indicates that the explosive boiling occurs first near the outside of the plasma and then occurs successively into the center of the plasma. We are also using models to calculate the dynamics of the mixed state and to predict the fraction of the mass that is left behind. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy Under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. Aerosol droplets: Nucleation dynamics and photokinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signorell, Ruth

    This talk addresses two fundamental aerosol processes that play a pivotal role in atmospheric processes: The formation dynamics of aerosol particles from neutral gas phase precursors and photochemical reactions in small aerosol droplets induced by ultraviolet and visible light. Nucleation is the rate determining step of aerosol particle formation. The idea behind nucleation is that supersaturation of a gas leads to the formation of a critical cluster, which quickly grows into larger aerosol particles. We discuss an experiment for studying the size and chemical composition of critical clusters at the molecular level. Much of the chemistry happening in planetary atmospheres is driven by sunlight. Photochemical reactions in small aerosol particles play a peculiar role in this context. Sunlight is strongly focused inside these particles which leads to a natural increase in the rates of photochemical reactions in small particles compared with the bulk. This ubiquitous phenomenon has been recognised but so far escaped direct observation and quantification. The development of a new experimental setup has finally made it possible to directly observe this nanofocusing effect in droplet photokinetics. This work was supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF) and ETH Zurich.

  11. Blue-phase liquid crystal droplets

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-González, José A.; Zhou, Ye; Rahimi, Mohammad; Bukusoglu, Emre; Abbott, Nicholas L.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-01-01

    Blue phases of liquid crystals represent unique ordered states of matter in which arrays of defects are organized into striking patterns. Most studies of blue phases to date have focused on bulk properties. In this work, we present a systematic study of blue phases confined into spherical droplets. It is found that, in addition to the so-called blue phases I and II, several new morphologies arise under confinement, with a complexity that increases with the chirality of the medium and with a nature that can be altered by surface anchoring. Through a combination of simulations and experiments, it is also found that one can control the wavelength at which blue-phase droplets absorb light by manipulating either their size or the strength of the anchoring, thereby providing a liquid–state analog of nanoparticles, where dimensions are used to control absorbance or emission. The results presented in this work also suggest that there are conditions where confinement increases the range of stability of blue phases, thereby providing intriguing prospects for applications. PMID:26460039

  12. Sintering of viscous droplets under surface tension

    PubMed Central

    Vasseur, Jérémie; Llewellin, Edward W.; Schauroth, Jenny; Dobson, Katherine J.; Scheu, Bettina; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    We conduct experiments to investigate the sintering of high-viscosity liquid droplets. Free-standing cylinders of spherical glass beads are heated above their glass transition temperature, causing them to densify under surface tension. We determine the evolving volume of the bead pack at high spatial and temporal resolution. We use these data to test a range of existing models. We extend the models to account for the time-dependent droplet viscosity that results from non-isothermal conditions, and to account for non-zero final porosity. We also present a method to account for the initial distribution of radii of the pores interstitial to the liquid spheres, which allows the models to be used with no fitting parameters. We find a good agreement between the models and the data for times less than the capillary relaxation timescale. For longer times, we find an increasing discrepancy between the data and the model as the Darcy outgassing time-scale approaches the sintering timescale. We conclude that the decreasing permeability of the sintering system inhibits late-stage densification. Finally, we determine the residual, trapped gas volume fraction at equilibrium using X-ray computed tomography and compare this with theoretical values for the critical gas volume fraction in systems of overlapping spheres. PMID:27274687

  13. Accelerating Yeast Prion Biology using Droplet Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ung, Lloyd; Rotem, Assaf; Jarosz, Daniel; Datta, Manoshi; Lindquist, Susan; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    Prions are infectious proteins in a misfolded form, that can induce normal proteins to take the misfolded state. Yeast prions are relevant, as a model of human prion diseases, and interesting from an evolutionary standpoint. Prions may also be a form of epigenetic inheritance, which allow yeast to adapt to stressful conditions at rates exceeding those of random mutations and propagate that adaptation to their offspring. Encapsulation of yeast in droplet microfluidic devices enables high-throughput measurements with single cell resolution, which would not be feasible using bulk methods. Millions of populations of yeast can be screened to obtain reliable measurements of prion induction and loss rates. The population dynamics of clonal yeast, when a fraction of the cells are prion expressing, can be elucidated. Furthermore, the mechanism by which certain strains of bacteria induce yeast to express prions in the wild can be deduced. Integrating the disparate fields of prion biology and droplet microfluidics reveals a more complete picture of how prions may be more than just diseases and play a functional role in yeast.

  14. High precision droplet based new form manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves,S; Hadjiconstantinou, N; Miller, W O; Orme, M; Sahai, V; Shapiro, A B

    1999-09-16

    In collaboration with the University of California at Irvine (UCI), we are working on a new technology that relies on the precise deposition of nanoliter molten-metal droplets that are targeted onto a substrate by electrostatic charging and deflection. By this way, three-dimensional (3D) structural materials can be manufactured microlayer by microlayer. Because the volume of the droplets are small, they rapidly solidify on impact, bringing forth a material component with fine grain structures which lead to enhanced material properties (e.g., strength). UCI is responsible for an experimental investigation of the manufacturing feasibility of this process. LLNL has unique expertise in the computational modeling of 3D heat transfer and solid mechanics and has the large-scale computer resources necessary to model this large system. Process modeling will help move this technology from the bench-top to an industrial process. Applications at LLNL include rapid prototyping of metal parts and manufacturing new alloys by co-jetting different metals.

  15. Photoionization Dynamics in Pure Helium Droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Peterka, Darcy S.; Kim, Jeong Hyun; Wang, Chia C.; Poisson,Lionel; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2007-02-04

    The photoionization and photoelectron spectroscopy of pure He droplets are investigated at photon energies between 24.6 eV (the ionization energy of He) and 28 eV. Time-of-flight mass spectra and photoelectron images were obtained at a series of molecular beam source temperatures and pressures to assess the effect of droplet size on the photoionization dynamics. At source temperatures below 16 K, the photoelectron images are dominated by fast electrons produced via direct ionization of He atoms, with a small contribution from very slow electrons with kinetic energies below 1 meV arising from an indirect mechanism. The fast photoelectrons have as much as 0.5 eV more kinetic energy than those from atomic He at the same photon energy. This result is interpreted and simulated within the context of a 'dimer model', in which one assumes vertical ionization from two nearest neighbor He atoms to the attractive region of the He2+ potential energy curve. Possible mechanism for the slow electrons, which were also seen at energies below IE(He), are discussed, including vibrational autoionizaton of Rydberg states comprising an electron weakly bound to the surface of a large HeN+ core.

  16. Characterization of Acoustic Droplet Vaporization Using MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, David; Allen, Steven; Hernandez-Garcia, Luis; Bull, Joseph

    2013-11-01

    Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) is the selective vaporization of liquid droplets to form larger gas bubbles. The ADV process is currently being researched for biomedical applications such as gas embolotherapy, drug delivery, and phase-change contrast agents. In this study an albumin encapsulated dodecafluoropentane (DDFP, CAS: 678-26-2) microdroplet suspension was vaporized using a single element focused (f/2, D = 19 mm) 3.5 MHz transducer (Panametrics A321S, Olympus, Waltham, MA). The resulting DDFP bubble clouds were imaged using both bright field microscopy and MRI (Varian 7T, Agilent Technologies Inc., Santa Clara, CA). Field distortions due to DDFP bubble generation were characterized against the bright field images as a function of acoustic power and bubble cloud size. Experimentally a direct correlation between bubble cloud dimensions generated and field distortions seen in the MRI was observed. Additionally, MR velocimetry was used to measure the flow field resulting from ADV. The field distortions due to the bubbles were further characterized by modeling Maxwell's equations using COMSOL (COMSOL Inc., Burlington, MA). The ability to characterize ADV with alternative imaging modalities may prove useful in further development of ADV based biomedical therapies.

  17. Droplet evaporation on a soluble substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mailleur, Alexandra; Pirat, Christophe; Colombani, Jean; CNES Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Stains left by evaporated droplets are ubiquitous in everyday life as well as in industrial processes. Whatever the composition of the evaporating liquid (colloidal suspensions, biological fluids...), the stains are mostly constituted by a deposit at the periphery of the dried drop, similar to a coffee stain (Deegan, 1997). All these studies have been carried with non-reacting solids. In this presentation, we focus on the behavior of a pure-water droplet evaporating on a soluble substrate which is more complex, since three phenomena are strongly interacting: the dissolution of the substrate, the diffusion/convection of the dissolved species into the drop and the evaporation of the liquid. NaCl and KCl single crystals have been chosen for this experimental study as they are fast-dissolving solids. We have observed that the dissolution induces a pinning of the triple line from the beginning of the evaporation, leading to a decrease of the contact angle in time. At the end of the evaporation, a peripheral deposit is always formed, proof of an outward flow inside the drop (coffee-ring effect). The authors would like to thank the CNES for the financial support.

  18. Helium anion formation inside helium droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maalouf, Elias Jabbour Al; Reitshammer, Julia; Ribar, Anita; Scheier, Paul; Denifl, Stephan

    2016-07-01

    The formation of He∗- is examined with improved electron energy resolution of about 100 meV utilizing a hemispherical electron monochromator. The work presented provides a precise determination of the three previously determined resonance peak positions that significantly contribute to the formation of He∗- inside helium nanodroplets in the energy range from 20 eV to 29.5 eV. In addition, a new feature is identified located at 27.69 ± 0.18 eV that we assign to the presence of O2 as a dopant inside the droplet. With increasing droplet size a small blue shift of the resonance positions is observed. Also for the relatively low electron currents used in the present study (i.e., 15-70 nA) a quadratic dependence of the He∗- ion yield on the electron current is observed. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  19. Effects of turbulent mixing on droplets formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peerhossaini, Hassan; Lemenand, Thierry; Zellouf, Yacine; della Valle, Dominique

    2002-11-01

    The emulsification process in a vortex generating static mixer in turbulent flow is investigated.This type of mixer generates coherent large-scale structures, enhancing momentum transfer in the bulk flow and hence providing favourable conditions for phase dispersion.The mixer design is based on curved baffles fixed on the tube walls that generate large-scale longitudinal vortices.The study focuses on the granulometric characterization of oil emulsions in water obtained with the static mixer. The stability of the emulsion is obtained by encapsulating of oil drops, and droplets are sized using optical microscopy. The mean size, size distribution, and power consumption are compared with those in some existing devices. The size distribution was modelled according to the method proposed by Schwarz and Bazemer. In a log-linear coordinate system the data showed a linear relation between the cumulative volume (in droplet diameters and the inverse of the bounding diameter d, showing this model is verified here. From the energy consumptin point of view, it was shown that in some range of interfacial areas this mixer is 1000 times more energy efficient than other mixers.

  20. Interface Roughening Dynamics of Spreading Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taitelbaum, Haim; Be'Er, Avraham; Hecht, Inbal; Frydman, Aviad; Lereah, Yossi

    2006-03-01

    We review our recent experimental data of interface roughening dynamics of spreading mercury droplets on thin films (silver or gold), obtained using optical microscopy and other techniques (AFM, SEM). We discuss the various results obtained for the roughness and growth exponents associated with the interface dynamics, and their universality classes. We analyze the temporal width fluctuations, obtained for single interfaces, and show that these fluctuations contain information on the lateral correlation length of these interfaces. We show how to extract this length from experimental data, and demonstrate the validity of this method in a wide range of growing interfaces (droplet spreading experiments as well as water imbibition on paper). References: 1. A. Be'er, Y. Lereah and H. Taitelbaum, Physica A, 285, 156 (2000). 2. A. Be'er, Y. Lereah, I. Hecht and H. Taitelbaum, Physica A, 302, 297 (2001). 3. A. Be'er, Y. Lereah, A. Frydman and H. Taitelbaum, Physica A, 314, 325 (2002). 4. A. Be'er and Y. Lereah, J. of Microscopy, 208, 148 (2002). 5. I. Hecht and H. Taitelbaum, Phys. Rev. E, 70, 046307 (2004). 6. A. Be'er, I. Hecht and H. Taitelbaum, Phys. Rev. E, 72, 031606 (2005). 7. I. Hecht, A. Be'er and H. Taitelbaum, Fluctuation and Noise Letters, 5, L319 (2005).

  1. Supercooled Large Droplet Icing Flight Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Dean R.

    2000-01-01

    During the past three winters, the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field conducted icing research flights throughout the Great Lakes region to measure the characteristics of a severe icing condition having Supercooled Large Droplets (SLD). SLD was implicated in the 1994 crash of the ATR-72 commuter aircraft. This accident focused attention on the safety hazard associated with SLD, and it led the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to identify the need for a better understanding of the atmospheric characteristics of this icing condition. In response to this need, Glenn developed a cooperative icing flight research program with the FAA, the National Center for Atmospheric Research, and the Atmospheric Environment Service of Canada. The primary objectives were to (1) characterize the SLD icing condition in terms of important icing-related parameters (such as cloud droplet size, cloud water content, and temperature), (2) develop and refine SLD icing weather forecast products, and (3) document and measure the effects of SLD ice accretions on aircraft performance.

  2. Droplet formation and scaling in dense suspensions

    PubMed Central

    Miskin, Marc Z.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2012-01-01

    When a dense suspension is squeezed from a nozzle, droplet detachment can occur similar to that of pure liquids. While in pure liquids the process of droplet detachment is well characterized through self-similar profiles and known scaling laws, we show here the simple presence of particles causes suspensions to break up in a new fashion. Using high-speed imaging, we find that detachment of a suspension drop is described by a power law; specifically we find the neck minimum radius, rm, scales like near breakup at time τ = 0. We demonstrate data collapse in a variety of particle/liquid combinations, packing fractions, solvent viscosities, and initial conditions. We argue that this scaling is a consequence of particles deforming the neck surface, thereby creating a pressure that is balanced by inertia, and show how it emerges from topological constraints that relate particle configurations with macroscopic Gaussian curvature. This new type of scaling, uniquely enforced by geometry and regulated by the particles, displays memory of its initial conditions, fails to be self-similar, and has implications for the pressure given at generic suspension interfaces. PMID:22392979

  3. Investigation of critical burning of fuel droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, C. B.; Canada, G. S.; Faeth, G. M.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements were made on the burning of liquid hydrazine, MMH, and UDMH in a combustion gas environment. The experimental range of these tests involved gas temperatures of 1660-2530 K, oxygen concentrations of 0-42% by mass and droplet diameters (employing both droplets and porous spheres) of 0.11-1.91 cm. at atmospheric pressure. A simplified hybrid combustion theory was developed which was found to correlate the present results as well as the experimental measurements of other investigators. Measurements were also made of the monopropellant strand burning rates and liquid surface temperatures of a number of nitrate ester fuels and hydrazine at elevated pressures. The temperature measurements for the nitrate esters were found to be in good agreement with a theoretical model which allowed for gas solubility in the liquid phase at high pressures. Experimental results were also obtained on the burning rates and liquid surface temperatures of a number of paraffin and alcohol fuels burning in air pressures up to 72 atm. For these tests, the fuels were burned from porous spheres in a natural convection environment. Initial findings on a pressurized flat flame burner are also described as well as the design of an oscillatory combustion apparatus to test the response of burning liquid fuels.

  4. Temperature-induced coalescence of colliding binary droplets on superhydrophobic surface.

    PubMed

    Yi, Nan; Huang, Bin; Dong, Lining; Quan, Xiaojun; Hong, Fangjun; Tao, Peng; Song, Chengyi; Shang, Wen; Deng, Tao

    2014-01-01

    This report investigates the impact of droplet temperature on the head-on collision of binary droplets on a superhydrophobic surface. Understanding droplet collision is critical to many fundamental processes and industrial applications. There are many factors, including collision speed, collision angle, and droplet composition, that influence the outcome of the collision between binary droplets. This work provides the first experimental study of the influence of droplet temperature on the collision of binary droplets. As the droplet temperature increases, the possibility increases for the two droplets to coalesce after collision. The findings in this study can be extended to collision of droplets under other conditions where control of the droplet temperature is feasible. Such findings will also be beneficial to applications that involve droplet collision, such as in ink-jet printing, steam turbines, engine ignition, and spraying cooling. PMID:24603362

  5. Temperature-Induced Coalescence of Colliding Binary Droplets on Superhydrophobic Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Nan; Huang, Bin; Dong, Lining; Quan, Xiaojun; Hong, Fangjun; Tao, Peng; Song, Chengyi; Shang, Wen; Deng, Tao

    2014-03-01

    This report investigates the impact of droplet temperature on the head-on collision of binary droplets on a superhydrophobic surface. Understanding droplet collision is critical to many fundamental processes and industrial applications. There are many factors, including collision speed, collision angle, and droplet composition, that influence the outcome of the collision between binary droplets. This work provides the first experimental study of the influence of droplet temperature on the collision of binary droplets. As the droplet temperature increases, the possibility increases for the two droplets to coalesce after collision. The findings in this study can be extended to collision of droplets under other conditions where control of the droplet temperature is feasible. Such findings will also be beneficial to applications that involve droplet collision, such as in ink-jet printing, steam turbines, engine ignition, and spraying cooling.

  6. Temperature-Induced Coalescence of Colliding Binary Droplets on Superhydrophobic Surface

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Nan; Huang, Bin; Dong, Lining; Quan, Xiaojun; Hong, Fangjun; Tao, Peng; Song, Chengyi; Shang, Wen; Deng, Tao

    2014-01-01

    This report investigates the impact of droplet temperature on the head-on collision of binary droplets on a superhydrophobic surface. Understanding droplet collision is critical to many fundamental processes and industrial applications. There are many factors, including collision speed, collision angle, and droplet composition, that influence the outcome of the collision between binary droplets. This work provides the first experimental study of the influence of droplet temperature on the collision of binary droplets. As the droplet temperature increases, the possibility increases for the two droplets to coalesce after collision. The findings in this study can be extended to collision of droplets under other conditions where control of the droplet temperature is feasible. Such findings will also be beneficial to applications that involve droplet collision, such as in ink-jet printing, steam turbines, engine ignition, and spraying cooling. PMID:24603362

  7. Influence of droplet size, pH and ionic strength on endotoxin-triggered ordering transitions in liquid crystalline droplets

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Daniel S.; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2012-01-01

    We report an investigation of ordering transitions that are induced in water-dispersed, micrometer-sized droplets of a thermotropic liquid crystal (LC) by the bacterial lipopolysaccharide endotoxin. We reveal that the ordering transitions induced by endotoxin – from a bipolar state of the droplets to a radial state – are strongly dependent on the size of the LC droplets. Specifically, as the diameters of the LC droplets increase from 2 μm to above 10 μm (in phosphate buffered saline with an ionic strength of 90 mM and a pH of 7.2), we measured the percentage of droplets exhibiting a radial configuration in the presence of 100 pg/mL endotoxin to decrease from 98 ± 1 % to 3 ± 2 %. In addition, we measured a decrease in either the ionic strength or pH of the aqueous phase to reduce the percentage of droplets exhibiting a radial configuration in the presence of endotoxin. These results, when interpreted within the context of a simple thermodynamic model that incorporates the contributions of elasticity and surface anchoring to the free energies of the LC droplets, lead us to conclude that (i) the elastic constant K24 plays a central role in determining the size-dependent response of the LC droplets to endotoxin, and (ii) endotoxin-triggered ordering transitions occur only under solution conditions (pH, ionic strength) where the combined contributions of elasticity and surface anchoring to the free energies of the bipolar and radial configurations of the LC droplets are similar in magnitude. Our analysis also suggests that the presence of endotoxin perturbs the free energies of the LC droplets by ~10−17 J/droplet, which is comparable to the standard free energy of self-association of ~103 endotoxin molecules. These results, when combined with prior reports of localization of endotoxin at the center of LC droplets, are consistent with the hypothesis that self-assembly of endotoxin within micrometer-sized LC droplets provides the driving force for the ordering

  8. Water-in-Water Droplets by Passive Microfluidic Flow Focusing.

    PubMed

    Moon, Byeong-Ui; Abbasi, Niki; Jones, Steven G; Hwang, Dae Kun; Tsai, Scott S H

    2016-04-01

    We present a simple microfluidic system that generates water-in-water, aqueous two phase system (ATPS) droplets, by passive flow focusing. ATPS droplet formation is achieved by applying weak hydrostatic pressures, with liquid-filled pipette tips as fluid columns at the inlets, to introduce low speed flows to the flow focusing junction. To control the size of the droplets, we systematically vary the interfacial tension and viscosity of the ATPS fluids and adjust the fluid column height at the fluid inlets. The size of the droplets scales with a power law of the ratio of viscous stresses in the two ATPS phases. Overall, we find a drop size coefficient of variation (CV; i.e., polydispersity) of about 10%. We also find that when drops form very close to the flow focusing junction, the drops have a CV of less than 1%. Our droplet generation method is easily scalable: we demonstrate a parallel system that generates droplets simultaneously and improves the droplet production rate by up to one order of magnitude. Finally, we show the potential application of our system for encapsulating cells in water-in-water emulsions by encapsulating microparticles and cells. To the best of our knowledge, our microfluidic technique is the first that forms low interfacial tension ATPS droplets without applying external perturbations. We anticipate that this simple approach will find utility in drug and cell delivery applications because of the all-biocompatible nature of the water-in-water ATPS environment. PMID:26959358

  9. Droplet evaporation on heated hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dash, Susmita; Garimella, Suresh V

    2014-04-01

    The evaporation characteristics of sessile water droplets on smooth hydrophobic and structured superhydrophobic heated surfaces are experimentally investigated. Droplets placed on the hierarchical superhydrophobic surface subtend a very high contact angle (∼160°) and demonstrate low roll-off angle (∼1°), while the hydrophobic substrate supports corresponding values of 120° and ∼10°. The substrates are heated to different constant temperatures in the range of 40-60 °C, which causes the droplet to evaporate much faster than in the case of natural evaporation without heating. The geometric parameters of the droplet, such as contact angle, contact radius, and volume evolution over time, are experimentally tracked. The droplets are observed to evaporate primarily in a constant-contact-angle mode where the contact line slides along the surface. The measurements are compared with predictions from a model based on diffusion of vapor into the ambient that assumes isothermal conditions. This vapor-diffusion-only model captures the qualitative evaporation characteristics on both test substrates, but reasonable quantitative agreement is achieved only for the hydrophobic surface. The superhydrophobic surface demonstrates significant deviation between the measured evaporation rate and that obtained using the vapor-diffusion-only model, with the difference being amplified as the substrate temperature is increased. A simple model considering thermal diffusion through the droplet is used to highlight the important role of evaporative cooling at the droplet interface in determining the droplet evaporation characteristics on superhydrophobic surfaces. PMID:24827255

  10. Mixing Diagnostics in Confined, High-Speed Droplet Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Brian; Hidrovo, Carlos

    2012-11-01

    Fast mixing remains a major challenge in droplet-based microfluidics. The low Reynolds number operating regime of most mixing devices signifies orderly flows that are devoid of any inertial characteristics. To increase droplet mixing rates, a novel technique is under development that uses a high Reynolds number gaseous phase for droplet generation and transport and promotes mixing through binary droplet collisions at velocities near 1m/s. Limitations in existing mixing diagnostic methodologies has persuaded cultivation of a new technique for measuring droplet collision mixing in confined microchannels. The technique employs single fluorophore laser-induced fluorescence, custom image processing, and meaningful statistical analysis for monitoring and quantifying mixing in high-speed droplet collisions. Mixing progress is revealed through two statistics that separate the roles of convective rearrangement and molecular diffusion during the mixing process. The end result is a viewing window into the rich dynamics of droplet collisions with spatial and temporal resolutions of 1 μm and 25 μs, respectively. Experimental results obtained across a decade of Reynolds and Peclet numbers reveal a direct link between droplet mixing time and the collision convective timescale. This work provides valuable insight into the emerging field of two-phase gas-liquid microfluidics and opens the door to fundamental research possibilities not offered by traditional oil-based architectures.

  11. Dispersion and evaporation of droplets amended with adjuvants on soybeans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increased use of adjuvants to improve pesticide spray application efficiency is hindered by a lack of knowledge to enhance droplet adhesion. Dispersion and evaporation of single 300 µm droplets amended with four different spray adjuvants deposited at four different soybean plant locations were inves...

  12. Evaporation of Pesticide Droplets under Various Relative Humidity Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evaporation characteristics of five droplet sizes (246, 343, 575, 762 and 886 µm) under three relative humidity (RH) conditions (30%, 60% and 90%) were studied in a laboratory. Sequential images of evaporating droplets placed inside a small environmental-controlled chamber were obtained using a ster...

  13. Modeling a Bouncing Droplet with a Lubrication Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cessna, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    In our laboratory experiments, a shallow bath of silicone oil of a particular viscosity was placed on an electromagnetic shaker where it was driven by a constant frequency just below the threshold of Faraday instability. A small droplet was then manually created on the surface of the vibrating bath and the bouncing behavior of the droplet was observed and recorded with the aid of a high speed camera. Droplets of sufficient size do not coalesce with the bath due to a thin air film that forms between them. Coalescence is avoided when the time for the bath to accelerate the droplet back into ballistic motion is shorter than the time required for the thin air film to deplete. Computer software was utilized to process the images and plot the dynamics of the droplet. The experimental data revealed that the acceleration of the droplets measured below -1 g at the moment when a droplet was being launched back into flight by the oscillating bath. We investigate whether lubrication theory accounts for these measurements and model a bouncing droplet on a vibrating bath of the same viscosity with a lubrication force to reproduce our experimental data using Matlab.

  14. Stable magnetic droplet solitons in spin-transfer nanocontacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macià, Ferran; Backes, Dirk; Kent, Andrew D.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy have localized excitations that correspond to reversed, dynamically precessing magnetic moments, which are known as magnetic droplet solitons. Fundamentally, these excitations are associated with an attractive interaction between elementary spin-excitations and have been predicted to occur in perpendicularly magnetized materials in the absence of damping. Although damping suppresses these excitations, it can be compensated by spin-transfer torques when an electrical current flows in nanocontacts to ferromagnetic thin films. Theory predicts the appearance of magnetic droplet solitons in nanocontacts at a threshold current and, recently, experimental signatures of droplet nucleation have been reported. However, to date, these solitons have been observed to be nearly reversible excitations, with only partially reversed magnetization. Here, we show that magnetic droplet solitons exhibit a strong hysteretic response in field and current, proving the existence of bistable states: droplet and non-droplet states. In the droplet soliton state we find that the magnetization in the contact is almost fully reversed. These observations, in addition to their fundamental interest, are important to understanding and controlling droplet motion, nucleation and annihilation.

  15. Electrophoretic mobility of oil droplets in electrolyte and surfactant solutions.

    PubMed

    Wuzhang, Jiachen; Song, Yongxin; Sun, Runzhe; Pan, Xinxiang; Li, Dongqing

    2015-10-01

    Electrophoretic mobility of oil droplets of micron sizes in PBS and ionic surfactant solutions was measured in this paper. The experimental results show that, in addition to the applied electric field, the speed and the direction of electrophoretic motion of oil droplets depend on the surfactant concentration and on if the droplet is in negatively charged SDS solutions or in positively charged hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) solutions. The absolute value of the electrophoretic mobility increases with increased surfactant concentration before the surfactant concentration reaches to the CMC. It was also found that there are two vortices around the oil droplet under the applied electric field. The size of the vortices changes with the surfactant and with the electric field. The vortices around the droplet directly affect the drag of the flow field to the droplet motion and should be considered in the studies of electrophoretic mobility of oil droplets. The existence of the vortices will also influence the determination and the interpretation of the zeta potential of the oil droplets based on the measured mobility data. PMID:26140616

  16. Droplet Evaporator For High-Capacity Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valenzuela, Javier A.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed heat-exchange scheme boosts heat transfer per unit area. Key component is generator that fires uniform size droplets of subcooled liquid at hot plate. On impact, droplets spread out and evaporate almost instantly, removing heat from plate. In practice, many generator nozzles arrayed over evaporator plate.

  17. Equilibrium shapes of pendant monodisperse microbubbles suspension droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Juan Manuel; Campo-Cortes, Francisco

    2014-11-01

    The formation and stability of pendant droplets are a great value for both fundamental and engineering applications. In their pioneering work, Bashforth and Adams obtained the profile of a pendant pure liquid droplet by integrating the Young-Laplace equation. Since then, the stable and unstable conditions that govern the equilibrium of a pendant liquid droplet are well characterized. Here, we study the formation of droplets containing inside a suspension of monodisperse microbubbles. In this study, we present the different morphologies of these pendant multiphase droplets from the tip of a capillary tube of radius R for different average densities of the suspension droplet, defined as ρa =ρgαg +ρlαl where αg and αl are respectively the gas and liquid volume fractions. Experimental droplet profiles are compared with the theoretical predictions obtained by integrating the Young-Laplace equation. For low gas volume gas fraction (high liquid volume fraction), the suspension droplet shape (and consequently its maximum critical volume for stable equilibrium) is defined by the average Bond number, ρa gR2 / σ . However, for dense suspensions, αg > 0 . 7 , the presence of microbubbles greatly changes the mode of drop formation.

  18. Absorption of impinging water droplet in porous stones.

    PubMed

    Lee, J B; Radu, A I; Vontobel, P; Derome, D; Carmeliet, J

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation and numerical analysis of the absorption of water droplets impacting porous stones. The absorption process of an impinging droplet is here fully characterized from spreading to evaporation in terms of absorbed mass during droplet depletion and moisture content distribution in a time-resolved manner for three different natural stones. High-speed imaging and neutron radiography are used to quantify moisture absorption in porous stones of varying moisture properties from deposition until depletion. During impact and spreading, the droplet exhibits a dynamic non-wetting behavior. At maximum spreading, the droplet undergoes pinning, resulting into the contact radius remaining constant until droplet depletion. Absorption undergoes two phases: initially, absorption is hindered due a contact resistance attributed to entrapped air; afterwards, a more perfect capillary contact occurs and absorption goes on until depletion, concurrently with evaporation and further redistribution. A finite-element numerical model for isothermal unsaturated moisture transport in porous media captures the phases of mass absorption in good agreement with the experimental data. Droplet spreading and absorption are highly determined by the impact velocity of the droplet, while moisture content redistribution after depletion is much less dependent on impact conditions. PMID:26975034

  19. Adjuvant Effects on Evaporation Time and Wetted Area of Droplets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Appropriate adjuvant selection for pesticide applications is central to improve spray performances on waxy leaves and to reduce off-target losses. Evaporation and deposition patterns of 500 µm sessile droplets with five classes of adjuvants on five different waxy plants were investigated. Droplets g...

  20. Particle-Laden Leidenfrost Droplets: Final-Stage Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Zecong; Xu, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Little interest has been paid to the final stage of a Leidenfrost droplet until a recent study by Celestini et al [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 034501 (2012)] reporting an unexpected take-off phenomenon of micrometer sized pure liquid droplets (Rl < R droplets start to lose sphericity). In our study, we first report an unexpected observation on millimeter sized water Leidenfrost droplets (R >Ri), which behave quite differently from the previous study. While an originally micrometer sized Leidenfrost droplet takes off due to breakdown of lubrication regime, and hovers above its vapor layer until disappearing in the final stage of evaporation, an originally millimetric Leidenfrost drop is observed to hover and oscillate, taking off and falling back consecutively. We further report another interesting observation on water droplets containing micrometric glass beads. These droplets spontaneously organize and buckle together during evaporation. In addition to oscillation just like pure droplets, these particle-laden drops create an unexpected explosive shoot-up at the end of evaporation.