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Sample records for 2x2 km radar

  1. Photoelectron-induced waves: A likely source of 150 km radar echoes and enhanced electron modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheim, Meers M.; Dimant, Yakov S.

    2016-04-01

    VHF radars near the geomagnetic equator receive coherent reflections from plasma density irregularities between 130 and 160 km in altitude during the daytime. Though researchers first discovered these 150 km echoes over 50 years ago and use them to monitor vertical plasma drifts, the underlying mechanism that creates them remains a mystery. This paper uses large-scale kinetic simulations to show that photoelectrons can drive electron waves, which then enhance ion density irregularities that radars could observe as 150 km echoes. This model explains why 150 km echoes exist only during the day and why they appear at their lowest altitudes near noon. It predicts the spectral structure observed by Chau (2004) and suggests observations that can further evaluate this mechanism. It also shows the types and strength of electron modes that photoelectron-wave interactions generate in a magnetized plasma.

  2. Coherent scatter radar observations of 150-km echoes and vertical plasma drifts in the Brazilian sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, F. S.; de Paula, E. R.; Hysell, D. L.; Chau, J. L.

    2008-12-01

    Coherent scatter echoes coming from the valley region (~150 km altitude) in the equatorial ionosphere during daytime have been detected by the Jicamarca radar in Peru for several decades (Basley, 1945). More recently, it was found that the vertical Doppler shift of these echoes corresponds to the vertical velocity of the F-region background plasma (Kudeki and Fawcett, 1993; Woodman and Villanueva,1995, Chau and Woodman, 2004). Jicamarca now uses observations of 150-km echoes to provide estimates of the diurnal variation of the equatorial vertical plasma drifts in addition to traditional incoherent scatter radar drift measurements. These 150-km echoes have also been observed in other longitude sectors (e.g. Tsunoda and Ecklund,2004; Patra et al., 2008). Additionally, these echoes have also been detected in a semi-routine basis with a small, low-power radar in Sao Luis, Brazil. Initial results of our analysis suggest that vertical plasma drifts can be estimated from these observations. These measurements combined with simultaneous measurements made by the Jicamarca radar and the C/NOFS satellite can help us better understand the day-to-day variability and longitudinal variation of equatorial electric fields. In this talk we will present examples of 150-km echoes observations made with the Sao Luis radar. We will describe how vertical drifts can be estimated from the observations and how the vertical drifts over Sao Luis compare with the drifts measured simultaneously at Jicamarca. These new measurements can provide important new information about the low-latitude electrodynamics, and consequently to the C/NOFS mission.

  3. A 2 X 2 achievement goal framework.

    PubMed

    Elliot, A J; McGregor, H A

    2001-03-01

    A 2 x 2 achievement goal framework comprising mastery-approach, mastery-avoidance, performance-approach, and performance-avoidance goals was proposed and tested in 3 studies. Factor analytic results supported the independence of the 4 achievement goal constructs. The goals were examined with respect to several important antecedents (e.g., motive dispositions, implicit theories, socialization histories) and consequences (e.g., anticipatory test anxiety, exam performance, health center visits), with particular attention allocated to the new mastery-avoidance goal construct. The results revealed distinct empirical profiles for each of the achievement goals; the pattern for mastery-avoidance goals was, as anticipated, more negative than that for mastery-approach goals and more positive than that for performance-avoidance goals. Implications of the present work for future theoretical development in the achievement goal literature are discussed. PMID:11300582

  4. Improved estimates for neutral air temperatures at 90 km and 78°N using satellite and meteor radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyrland, M. E.; Hall, C. M.; Mulligan, F. J.; Tsutsumi, M.; Sigernes, F.

    2010-08-01

    A technique for using satellite-derived temperatures to calibrate initial estimates of 90 km temperatures measured by meteor wind radar is presented. Temperatures derived from the Nippon/Norway Svalbard Meteor Radar, situated on Svalbard at 78°N, 16°E, are calibrated using data from the Aura spacecraft's Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) experiment. The calibration was performed in a two-step process: after an initial calibration of first-guess temperatures, results were used to adjust the MLS values to reflect daily means rather than the 0200-1100 UT observation period of the satellite instrument; thereafter the calibration was repeated with the revised MLS temperatures. The resulting temperature time series represents a marked improvement on earlier results calibrated using hydroxyl emission and potassium/K-Lidar observations, as the uncertainty is reduced from 17 to 7 K. These latest results represent a new step toward reliable and continual monitoring of upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere temperature.

  5. Credit WCT. Original 2'" x 2%" color negative is housed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit WCT. Original 2-'" x 2-%" color negative is housed in the JPL Photography Laboratory, Pasadena, California. This view shows the propellant cutter as it was originally installed (JPL negative no. 381-2274A, 29 June 1962) - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Preparation Building, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  6. Credit WCT. Original 2'" x 2'" color negative is housed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit WCT. Original 2-'" x 2-'" color negative is housed in the JPL Photography Laboratory, Pasadena, California. View shows small autoclave demonstrated by JPL staff member Milton Clay (JPL negative no. JPL-10286AC, 27 January 1989). - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Liner Laboratory, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  7. Dynamics of the upper middle atmosphere (80-110 km) at Tromsoe, June-December 1987, using the Tromsoe/Saskatoon M.F. radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, A. H.; Meek, C. E.

    1989-01-01

    A real time winds (RTW) system from Saskatoon operated with the Tromsoe M.F. (partial reflection) radar on a continuous basis, June to December 1987. Profiles with 3 km resolution were obtained every 5 minutes with weak ionization, and few geomagnetic disturbances limited the observations normally to 80 to 110 km. However, daily mean winds, tidal characteristics (24, 12 h) such as amplitudes, phases and wavelengths, and gravity wave characteristics (intensities, mean directions) are available throughout this interval, which includes MAC-SINE and Epsilon. This is particularly valuable in defining the background state for some experiments, e.g., rockets, and for comparison with related parameters from the lidar and other radars (EISCAT, SOUSY-VHF). Comparisons with dynamical parameters from Saskatoon (52 N) are made: the zonal circulation was weaker at Tromsoe, tidal amplitudes smaller, and summer 12 h tidal wavelengths shorter (approx. 80 km vs approx. 100 km). The fall transition for this tide occurred in September, earlier than observed elsewhere. Initial comparisons with other experimental systems are also made.

  8. Signal transmission within the P2X2 trimeric receptor.

    PubMed

    Keceli, Batu; Kubo, Yoshihiro

    2014-06-01

    P2X2 receptor channel, a homotrimer activated by the binding of extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to three intersubunit ATP-binding sites (each located ∼50 Å from the ion permeation pore), also shows voltage-dependent activation upon hyperpolarization. Here, we used tandem trimeric constructs (TTCs) harboring critical mutations at the ATP-binding, linker, and pore regions to investigate how the ATP activation signal is transmitted within the trimer and how signals generated by ATP and hyperpolarization converge. Analysis of voltage- and [ATP]-dependent gating in these TTCs showed that: (a) Voltage- and [ATP]-dependent gating of P2X2 requires binding of at least two ATP molecules. (b) D315A mutation in the β-14 strand of the linker region connecting the ATP-binding domains to the pore-forming helices induces two different gating modes; this requires the presence of the D315A mutation in at least two subunits. (c) The T339S mutation in the pore domains of all three subunits abolishes the voltage dependence of P2X2 gating in saturating [ATP], making P2X2 equally active at all membrane potentials. Increasing the number of T339S mutations in the TTC results in gradual changes in the voltage dependence of gating from that of the wild-type channel, suggesting equal and independent contributions of the subunits at the pore level. (d) Voltage- and [ATP]-dependent gating in TTCs differs depending on the location of one D315A relative to one K308A that blocks the ATP binding and downstream signal transmission. (e) Voltage- and [ATP]-dependent gating does not depend on where one T339S is located relative to K308A (or D315A). Our results suggest that each intersubunit ATP-binding signal is directly transmitted on the same subunit to the level of D315 via the domain that contributes K308 to the β-14 strand. The signal subsequently spreads equally to all three subunits at the level of the pore, resulting in symmetric and independent contributions of the three

  9. Signal transmission within the P2X2 trimeric receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    P2X2 receptor channel, a homotrimer activated by the binding of extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to three intersubunit ATP-binding sites (each located ∼50 Å from the ion permeation pore), also shows voltage-dependent activation upon hyperpolarization. Here, we used tandem trimeric constructs (TTCs) harboring critical mutations at the ATP-binding, linker, and pore regions to investigate how the ATP activation signal is transmitted within the trimer and how signals generated by ATP and hyperpolarization converge. Analysis of voltage- and [ATP]-dependent gating in these TTCs showed that: (a) Voltage- and [ATP]-dependent gating of P2X2 requires binding of at least two ATP molecules. (b) D315A mutation in the β-14 strand of the linker region connecting the ATP-binding domains to the pore-forming helices induces two different gating modes; this requires the presence of the D315A mutation in at least two subunits. (c) The T339S mutation in the pore domains of all three subunits abolishes the voltage dependence of P2X2 gating in saturating [ATP], making P2X2 equally active at all membrane potentials. Increasing the number of T339S mutations in the TTC results in gradual changes in the voltage dependence of gating from that of the wild-type channel, suggesting equal and independent contributions of the subunits at the pore level. (d) Voltage- and [ATP]-dependent gating in TTCs differs depending on the location of one D315A relative to one K308A that blocks the ATP binding and downstream signal transmission. (e) Voltage- and [ATP]-dependent gating does not depend on where one T339S is located relative to K308A (or D315A). Our results suggest that each intersubunit ATP-binding signal is directly transmitted on the same subunit to the level of D315 via the domain that contributes K308 to the β-14 strand. The signal subsequently spreads equally to all three subunits at the level of the pore, resulting in symmetric and independent contributions of the three

  10. Impact Craters of Venus with D Greater Than 5 km Classified Based on Degree of Preservation of the Associated Radar-Dark Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basilevsky, A. T.; Head, J. W.; Setyaeva, I. V.

    2003-01-01

    This is a further continuation of work, which studied craters greater than or equal to 30 km in diameter. That work subdivided craters based on character of the associated radar dark deposits. It was suggested and then confirmed that the most pristine deposits of that sort are radar-dark parabolas. Non-parabolic radar-dark halos represent the next stage of the deposit evolution and then with time they disappear. So presence and character of crater-associated dark deposit can be used for estimates of the crater age and then for dating other features. Previous work classified craters into: 1) craters with dark parabola (DP), 2) with clear dark halo (CH), 3) with faint halo (FH) and 4) with no dark halo (NH). It was found that abundances of craters superposed on regional plains (whose mean age is close to the planet mean surface age T) and belonging to DP, CH, FH and NH classes were correspondingly 15, 30, 30 and 25%. From that it was concluded that DP craters are not older than 0.1-0.15T; CH craters formed during the time interval from approx. 0.5T until 0.1-0.15T ago, and the FH and NH craters formed prior to approx. 0.5T ago. It was shown that the DP, CH, FH and NH percentages show only slight apparent dependence on the crater geographic latitudes and no noticeable dependence on the crater size. The present study analyzes a much larger population (all D greater than or equal to 5 km craters) to investigate better the latitude effect and to study if within this larger crater population the size effect exists.

  11. Snow accumulation variability derived from radar and firn core data along a 600 km transect in Adelie Land, East Antarctic plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verfaillie, D.; Fily, M.; Le Meur, E.; Magand, O.; Jourdain, B.; Arnaud, L.; Favier, V.

    2012-11-01

    The mass balance of ice sheets is an intensively studied topic in the context of global change and sea-level rise. However - particularly in Antarctica - obtaining mass balance estimates remains difficult due to various logistical problems. In the framework of the TASTE-IDEA (Trans-Antarctic Scientific Traverses Expeditions - Ice Divide of East Antarctica) program, an International Polar Year project, continuous ground penetrating radar (GPR) measurements were carried out during a traverse in Adelie Land (East Antarctica) during the 2008-2009 austral summer between the Italian-French Dome C (DC) polar plateau site and French Dumont D'Urville (DdU) coastal station. The aim of this study was to process and interpret GPR data in terms of snow accumulation, to analyse its spatial and temporal variability and compare it with historical data and modelling. The focus was on the last 300 yr, from the pre-industrial period to recent times. Beta-radioactivity counting and gamma spectrometry were applied to cores at the LGGE laboratory, providing a depth-age calibration for radar measurements. Over the 600 km of usable GPR data, depth and snow accumulation were determined with the help of three distinct layers visible on the radargrams (≈ 1730, 1799 and 1941 AD). Preliminary results reveal a gradual increase in accumulation towards the coast (from ≈ 3 cm w.e. a-1 at Dome C to ≈ 17 cm w.e. a-1 at the end of the transect) and previously undocumented undulating structures between 300 and 600 km from DC. Results agree fairly well with data from previous studies and modelling. Drawing final conclusions on temporal variations is difficult because of the margin of error introduced by density estimation. This study should have various applications, including model validation.

  12. A comparison study of zonal drift velocities measurements as seen by MF spaced antenna and HF Doppler radar in the Indian dip equatorial mesospheric and lower thermospheric (80-100 km) region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramkumar, T. K.; Gurubaran, S.; Rajaram, R.; Tiwari, D.; Viswanathan, K. S.

    2010-02-01

    The simultaneous measurements of zonal drift velocities, observed in the heights of 84-98 km in the Indian geomagnetic dip equatorial region by an medium frequency (MF, 1.98 MHz) spaced antenna and a high-frequency (HF, 18 MHz) Doppler radars, are compared on selected few days in the solar maximum years of 1998, 1999, and 2000. The agreement between the two radar measurements is found to be good below about 88 km, where the neutral turbulence induced ionospheric irregularities are more predominant. Above 90 km, however, the agreement becomes poor and at the highest height of 98 km it becomes the least. At this height, more often the HF Doppler radar shows a westward drift of about 200 m/s whereas the MF spaced antenna radar values lie within ±10 m/s and sometimes attain maximum values of ±50 m/s. Detailed discussions are made on the possible sources of underestimation of the drift velocities measured by the MF radar and the nature of scattering irregularities that are produced because of large neutral turbulences and plasma instabilities. It is suggested that these neutral and plasma turbulences (particularly type II plasma irregularities) contribute in a different manner to different radar frequencies and techniques and hence very different drift velocities in the heights of 90-100 km particularly in the geomagnetic dip equatorial region. Discussions are also made on (1) the real atmospheric and ionospheric physical process prevailing in the 90-100 km region and (2) the technical aspects of the radars that limits them to measure only particular types of motion in this region.

  13. Single Channel Properties of P2X2 Purinoceptors

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shinghua; Sachs, Frederick

    1999-01-01

    The single channel properties of cloned P2X2 purinoceptors expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells and Xenopus oocytes were studied in outside-out patches. The mean single channel current–voltage relationship exhibited inward rectification in symmetric solutions with a chord conductance of ∼30 pS at −100 mV in 145 mM NaCl. The channel open state exhibited fast flickering with significant power beyond 10 kHz. Conformational changes, not ionic blockade, appeared responsible for the flickering. The equilibrium constant of Na+ binding in the pore was ∼150 mM at 0 mV and voltage dependent. The binding site appeared to be ∼0.2 of the electrical distance from the extracellular surface. The mean channel current and the excess noise had the selectivity: K+ > Rb+ > Cs+ > Na+ > Li+. ATP increased the probability of being open (Po) to a maximum of 0.6 with an EC50 of 11.2 μM and a Hill coefficient of 2.3. Lowering extracellular pH enhanced the apparent affinity of the channel for ATP with a pKa of ∼7.9, but did not cause a proton block of the open channel. High pH slowed the rise time to steps of ATP without affecting the fall time. The mean single channel amplitude was independent of pH, but the excess noise increased with decreasing pH. Kinetic analysis showed that ATP shortened the mean closed time but did not affect the mean open time. Maximum likelihood kinetic fitting of idealized single channel currents at different ATP concentrations produced a model with four sequential closed states (three binding steps) branching to two open states that converged on a final closed state. The ATP association rates increased with the sequential binding of ATP showing that the binding sites are not independent, but positively cooperative. Partially liganded channels do not appear to open. The predicted Po vs. ATP concentration closely matches the single channel current dose–response curve. PMID:10228183

  14. Dynamic aspects of functional regulation of the ATP receptor channel P2X2.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Yoshihiro; Fujiwara, Yuichiro; Keceli, Batu; Nakajo, Koichi

    2009-11-15

    The P2X(2) channel is a ligand-gated channel activated by ATP. Functional features that reflect the dynamic flexibility of the channel include time-dependent pore dilatation following ATP application and direct inhibitory interaction with activated nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on the membrane. We have been studying the mechanisms by which P2X(2) channel functionality is dynamically regulated. Using a Xenopus oocyte expression system, we observed that the pore properties, including ion selectivity and rectification, depend on the open channel density on the membrane. Pore dilatation was apparent when the open channel density was high and inward rectification was modest. We also observed that P2X(2) channels show voltage dependence, despite the absence of a canonical voltage sensor. At a semi-steady state after ATP application, P2X(2) channels were activated upon membrane hyperpolarization. This voltage-dependent activation was also [ATP] dependent. With increases in [ATP], the speed of hyperpolarization-induced activation was increased and the conductance-voltage relationship was shifted towards depolarized potentials. Based on analyses of experimental data and various simulations, we propose that these phenomena can be explained by assuming a fast ATP binding step and a rate-limiting voltage-dependent gating step. Complete elucidation of these regulatory mechanisms awaits dynamic imaging of functioning P2X(2) channels. PMID:19752115

  15. Local Surface Structures of C(2X2) SULFUR/NICKEL(011) and (2X2) SULFUR/GERMANIUM(111) Determined Using Arpefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, Steven Wayne

    Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) measurements were performed on the c(2 x 2) S/Ni(011) and (2 x 2) S/Ge(111) systems. The S/Ni(011) system was studied to assess the extent to which surface structural information can be obtained from ARPEFS and to provide a large data set for comparison to recently developed multiple -scattering calculations. The results of that study indicate that ARPEFS is not only capable of producing reliable information concerning the major features of the adsorption site--sulfur adsorbs in a rectangular hollow site 2.20 (ANGSTROM) above a second layer Ni atom--but can also detect relaxations induced by chemisorption. Thus, an expansion of the first Ni interplanar separation (11%) previously indicated by ion scattering experiments was confirmed, and a further reconstruction consisting of a buckled second Ni layer was suggested. The S/Ge(111) study extended the ARPEFS investigations to a previously unstudied system and also provides the first application of ARPEFS to a semiconductor substrate. The choice of (2 x 2) S/Ge(111) was partially motivated by the results of a SEXFAS measurement performed on the similar (2 x 2) Te/Ge(111) system. That study indicated that Te adsorbs on Ge(111) in a 3-fold surface site directly above a second layer Ge atom. The results of the ARPEFS investigation indicate that sulfur adsorbs on Ge(111) in a 2-fold bridge site, 1.03 (+OR-) 0.05 (ANGSTROM) above the first Ge layer. This is different from the site determined for Te/Ge(111), but agrees with the adsorption sites proposed for Te/Si(111) and Se/Si(111). The data also indicate a contraction (9%) in the first interplanar separation (the separation of the two components of the first bilayer), and an expansion of 7 (+OR-) 3% in the bond lengths between the Ge bilayers (2.60-2.65 (ANGSTROM) versus a bulk value of 2.45 (ANGSTROM)). This last result applies to the bonds which are most nearly below the 2-fold adsorption site.

  16. 60-GHz optical/wireless MIMO system integrated with optical subcarrier multiplexing and 2x2 wireless communication.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chi-Hsiang; Lin, Chun-Ting; Huang, Hou-Tzu; Zeng, Wei-Siang; Chiang, Shou-Chih; Chang, Hsi-Yu

    2015-05-01

    This paper proposes a 2x2 MIMO OFDM Radio-over-Fiber scheme based on optical subcarrier multiplexing and 60-GHz MIMO wireless transmission. We also schematically investigated the principle of optical subcarrier multiplexing, which is based on a dual-parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator (DP-MZM). In our simulation result, combining two MIMO OFDM signals to drive DP-MZM gives rise to the PAPR augmentation of less than 0.4 dB, which mitigates nonlinear distortion. Moreover, we applied a Levin-Campello bit-loading algorithm to compensate for the uneven frequency responses in the V-band. The resulting system achieves OFDM signal rates of 61.5-Gbits/s with BER of 10(-3) over 25-km SMF transmission followed by 3-m wireless transmission. PMID:25969299

  17. Understanding Student Goal Orientation Tendencies to Predict Student Performance: A 2x2 Achievement Goal Orientation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Mark Alan

    2013-01-01

    The study tested the 2X2 model of the Achievement Goal Orientation (AGO) theory in a military technical training environment while using the Air Force Officers Qualifying Test's academic aptitude score to control for the differences in the students' academic aptitude. The study method was quantitative and the design was correlational.…

  18. Cohen's Linearly Weighted Kappa Is a Weighted Average of 2 x 2 Kappas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warrens, Matthijs J.

    2011-01-01

    An agreement table with [n as an element of N is greater than or equal to] 3 ordered categories can be collapsed into n - 1 distinct 2 x 2 tables by combining adjacent categories. Vanbelle and Albert ("Stat. Methodol." 6:157-163, 2009c) showed that the components of Cohen's weighted kappa with linear weights can be obtained from these n - 1…

  19. The 2 x 2 Model of Perfectionism: A Comparison across Asian Canadians and European Canadians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franche, Veronique; Gaudreau, Patrick; Miranda, Dave

    2012-01-01

    The 2 x 2 model of perfectionism posits that the 4 within-person combinations of self-oriented and socially prescribed perfectionism (i.e., pure SOP, mixed perfectionism, pure SPP, and nonperfectionism) can be distinctively associated with psychological adjustment. This study examined whether the relationship between the 4 subtypes of…

  20. Window types: (from left to right) Pair of 2x2 multipaned ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Window types: (from left to right) Pair of 2x2 multipaned steel casements; triplet of 1x4 multipaned steel casements (center panel fixed); 1x3 multipaned steel casements. Building 20, facing southwest - Harbor Hills Housing Project, 26607 Western Avenue, Lomita, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. Extending the 2 x 2 Achievement Goal Framework: Development of a Measure of Scientific Achievement Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deemer, Eric D.; Carter, Alice P.; Lobrano, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    The current research sought to extend the 2 x 2 achievement goal framework by developing and testing the Achievement Goals for Research Scale (AGRS). Participants (N = 317) consisted of graduate students in the life, physical, and behavioral sciences. A principal components analysis (PCA) extracted five components accounting for 72.59% of the…

  2. Measuring Goal Orientation in a Work Domain: Construct Validity Evidence for the 2x2 Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baranik, Lisa E.; Barron, Kenneth E.; Finney, Sara J.

    2007-01-01

    The current research extended the three-factor (mastery, performance-approach, and performance-avoidance) measure of achievement goals in a work domain to the four-factor conceptualization (in a 2 x 2 framework) by adding items to represent mastery-avoidance goals. Confirmatory factor analysis was conducted on two independent samples to evaluate…

  3. Procrastination and the 2 x 2 Achievement Goal Framework in Malaysian Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganesan, Rajalakshmi; Mamat, Norul Hidayah Bt; Mellor, David; Rizzuto, Laura; Kolar, Christina

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated academic procrastination in the context of the 2 x 2 goal achievement theoretical framework within a population of 450 Malaysian undergraduate students, aged 18 to 25 years. Participants completed the Achievement Goal Questionnaire and the Tuckman Procrastination Test. Approach dimensions of both the mastery and…

  4. Structures and magnetism of two types of c(2x2)-Mn/Pd(001) surface alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuboi, N.; Okuyama, H.; Aruga, T.

    2005-05-15

    Mn/Pd(001) surface alloy was investigated by a tensor low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) analysis. After deposition of Mn on Pd(001) at room temperature, the surface was annealed at 570-620 K, which produced two types of c(2x2) surface alloys, according to the Mn coverage. At a low-Mn coverage, we obtained a Pd-capped c(2x2) surface, in which the first layer was composed of a (1x1)-Pd layer, and the second layer was a c(2x2)-MnPd mixed layer [{alpha}-c(2x2)]. The deposition of greater amounts of Mn followed by annealing resulted in another c(2x2) surface, in which Mn atoms existed in the substitutional sites of the first and third layers [{beta}-c(2x2)]. The first layer consisted of a c(2x2)-MnPd mixed layer, the second layer was a (1x1)-Pd layer, and the third layer was another c(2x2)-MnPd mixed layer. The structure of the {beta}-c(2x2) surface qualitatively agreed with the one previously investigated by LEED. These two types of surface alloys, {alpha}-c(2x2) and {beta}-c(2x2), may be considered as being precursors to the formation of the bulk MnPd{sub 3} alloy. We also investigated the magnetic properties of the {alpha}-c(2x2) and {beta}-c(2x2) surfaces by using surface magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE) and self-consistent, total-energy calculations. The MOKE measurements for both surface alloys show no hysterisis loop, even at 10 K. The total-energy calculation shows that Mn atoms have a local-spin moment of 3.9-4.1 {mu}{sub B} and that they are antiferromagnetically ordered in the ground state.

  5. Prediction of intrinsic motivation and sports performance using 2 x 2 achievement goal framework.

    PubMed

    Li, Chiung-Huang; Chi, Likang; Yeh, Suh-Ruu; Guo, Kwei-Bin; Ou, Cheng-Tsung; Kao, Chun-Chieh

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of 2 x 2 achievement goals on intrinsic motivation and performance in handball. Participants were 164 high school athletes. All completed the 2 x 2 Achievement Goals Questionnaire for Sport and the Intrinsic Motivation subscale of the Sport Motivation Scale; the coach for each team rated his athletes' overall sports performance. Using simultaneous-regression analyses, mastery-approach goals positively predicted both intrinsic motivation and performance in sports, whereas performance-avoidance goals negatively predicted sports performance. These results suggest that athletes who pursue task mastery and improvement of their competence perform well and enjoy their participation. In contrast, those who focus on avoiding normative incompetence perform poorly. PMID:21675576

  6. Entanglement monogamy inequality in a 2 x 2 x 4 system

    SciTech Connect

    Ren Xijun; Jiang Wei

    2010-02-15

    In this report, we show explicitly that the tangles of an arbitrary pure state in a 2 x 2 x 4 system satisfy the monogamy relation. This relation is also generalized to mixed states. As the tangle is always larger than the square of the concurrence, our result implies that the monogamy relation holds for concurrence too. It also supports the idea that the tangle could qualify as an elementary bipartite entanglement measure.

  7. ATP-activated P2X2 current in mouse spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Betsy; Miki, Kiyoshi; Clapham, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Sperm cells acquire hyperactivated motility as they ascend the female reproductive tract, which enables them to overcome barriers and penetrate the cumulus and zona pellucida surrounding the egg. This enhanced motility requires Ca2+ entry via cation channel of sperm (CatSper) Ca2+-selective ion channels in the sperm tail. Ca2+ entry via CatSper is enhanced by the membrane hyperpolarization mediated by Slo3, a K+ channel also present in the sperm tail. To date, no transmitter-mediated currents have been reported in sperm and no currents have been detected in the head or midpiece of mature spermatozoa. We screened a number of neurotransmitters and biomolecules to examine their ability to induce ion channel currents in the whole spermatozoa. Surprisingly, we find that none of the previously reported neurotransmitter receptors detected by antibodies alone are functional in mouse spermatozoa. Instead, we find that mouse spermatozoa have a cation-nonselective current in the midpiece of spermatozoa that is activated by external ATP, consistent with an ATP-mediated increase in intracellular Ca2+ as previously reported. The ATP-dependent current is not detected in mice lacking the P2X2 receptor gene (P2rx2−/−). Furthermore, the slowly desensitizing and strongly outwardly rectifying ATP-gated current has the biophysical and pharmacological properties that mimic heterologously expressed mouse P2X2. We conclude that the ATP-induced current on mouse spermatozoa is mediated by the P2X2 purinergic receptor/channel. Despite the loss of ATP-gated current, P2rx2−/− spermatozoa have normal progressive motility, hyperactivated motility, and acrosome reactions. However, fertility of P2rx2−/− males declines with frequent mating over days, suggesting that P2X2 receptor adds a selection advantage under these conditions. PMID:21831833

  8. Water adsorption on O(2x2)/Ru(0001) from STM experiments andfirst-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Cabrera-Sanfelix, P.; Sanchez-Portal, D.; Mugarza, A.; Shimizu,T.K.; Salmeron, M.; Arnau, A.

    2007-10-15

    We present a combined theoretical and experimental study of water adsorption on Ru(0001) pre-covered with 0.25 monolayers (ML) of oxygen forming a (2 x 2) structure. Several structures were analyzed by means of Density Functional Theory calculations for which STM simulations were performed and compared with experimental data. Up to 0.25 monolayers the molecules bind to the exposed Ru atoms of the 2 x 2 unit cell via the lone pair orbitals. The molecular plane is almost parallel to the surface with its H atoms pointing towards the chemisorbed O atoms of the 2 x 2 unit cell forming hydrogen bonds. The existence of these additional hydrogen bonds increases the adsorption energy of the water molecule to approximately 616 meV, which is {approx}220 meV more stable than on the clean Ru(0001) surface with a similar configuration. The binding energy shows only a weak dependence on water coverage, with a shallow minimum for a row structure at 0.125 ML. This is consistent with the STM experiments that show a tendency of the molecules to form linear rows at intermediate coverage. Our calculations also suggest the possible formation of water dimers near 0.25 ML.

  9. Magnetic ground state of UCu 2X 2 (X=Si, Ge) from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matar, Samir F.; Siruguri, Vasudeva; Eyert, Volker

    2006-10-01

    The electronic and magnetic structures of UCu 2X 2 germanide and silicide are revisited in view of existing controversy from experimental findings. From self-consistent calculations carried out within the local spin density functional theory using the augmented spherical wave method, the ground state is found to be ferromagnetic within simple and super cell setups. An analysis of the density of states and the chemical bonding shows the dominant role of Cu 2Ge 2-nearly planar like entities within the crystal lattice.

  10. New coplanar waveguide feed network for 2 x 2 linearly tapered slot antenna subarray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Perl, Thomas D.; Lee, Richard Q.

    1992-01-01

    A novel feed method is presently demonstrated for a 2 x 2 linearly tapered slot antenna (LTSA) on the basis of a coplanar-waveguide (CPW)-to-slotline transition and a coax-to-CPW in-phase, four-way power divider. The LTSA subarray exhibits excellent radiation patterns and return-loss characteristics at 18 GHz, and has symmetric beamwidth; its compactness renders it applicable as either a feed for a reflector antenna or as a building-block for large arrays.

  11. Operating manual holographic interferometry system for 2 x 2 foot transonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    A holographic interferometer system was installed in a 2X2 foot transonic wind tunnel. The system incorporates a modern, 10 pps, Nd:YAG pulsed laser which provides reliable operation and is easy to align. The spatial filtering requirements of the unstable resonator beam are described as well as the integration of the system into the existing Schieren system. A two plate holographic interferometer is used to reconstruct flow field data. For static wind tunnel models the single exposure holograms are recorded in the usual manner; however, for dynamic models such as oscillating airfoils, synchronous laser hologram recording is used.

  12. Measurements of flow quality in the Ames 2 x 2ft transonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, F. K.

    1981-01-01

    For decades, wind tunnel testing has been conducted in test section environments which have not been adequately documented. However, with the advent of the energy shortage, the need for improved fuel-efficient transports employing supercritical or LFC airfoils has increased the awareness of the possible influence of freestream turbulence on advanced experimental testing. This has already lead to detailed flow quality measurements in NASA transonic wind tunnels. The purpose of this paper is to present results of a study in the Ames 2 x 2 ft transonic wind tunnel.

  13. 2 x 2 TeV mu(superscript +) mu (superscript) collider

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N.V.; Noble, R.J.

    1996-10-01

    The scenarios for high-luminosity 2 x 2 TeV and 250 x 250 GeV {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} colliders are presented. Having a high physics potential, such a machine has specific physics and technical advantages and disadvantages when compared with an e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. Parameters for the candidate designs and the basic components - proton source, pion production and decay channel, cooling, acceleration and collider storage ring - are considered. Attention is paid to the areas mostly affecting the collider performance: targetry, energy spread, superconducting magnet survival, detector backgrounds, polarization, environmental issues. 13 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Lunar radar backscatter studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    The lunar surface material in the Plato area is characterized using Earth based visual, infrared, and radar signatures. Radar scattering in the lunar regolith with an existing optical scattering computer program is modeled. Mapping with 1 to 2 km resolution of the Moon using a 70 cm Arecibo radar is presented.

  15. Structure and Stability of Sb/Au(110)-c(2x2) Surface Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Lyman,P.; Shneerson, V.; Fung, R.; Parihar, S.; Johnson-Steigelman, H.; Lu, E.; Saldin, D.

    2006-01-01

    Adsorption of 0.5 monolayers (ML) of Sb on the Au(1 1 0) surface resulted in the formation of a c(2 x 2) surface reconstruction. Analysis of surface X-ray diffraction data by a direct method revealed the existence of an ordered substitutional surface alloy, with every other hollow site occupied by Au and Sb atoms. Quantitative conventional {chi}{sup 2} refinement showed a contraction of 0.12 {+-} 0.03 Angstroms in the spacing of the first Au layer to the second, an expansion of 0.13 {+-} 0.03 Angstroms in the second-to-third layer distance, and an inward Sb displacement (rumpling) of 0.21 {+-} 0.04 Angstroms. This surface phase proved to be extremely robust, with the long-range order of this arrangement remaining up to substrate temperatures of 900 K.

  16. Surface Morphology Changes During Pb Deposition on Cu(100): Evidence for Surface Alloyed Cu(100)-c(2x2) Pb

    SciTech Connect

    PLASS,RICHARD A.; KELLOGG,GARY LEE

    2000-07-13

    Using Low Energy Electron Microscopy (LEEM), the authors have followed Cu(100) surface morphology changes during Pb deposition at different temperatures. Surface steps advance and 2-D islands nucleate and grow as deposited Pb first alloys, and then dealloys, on a 125 C Cu(100)surface. From LEEM images, they determine how much Cu is being displaced at each stage and find that the amount of material added to the top layer for a complete Pb/Cu(100) c(4x4) reconstruction (a surface alloy) is consistent with the expected c(4x4) Cu content of 0.5 monolayer. However, as the surface changes to the Pb/Cu(100) c(2x2) overlayer, they find that the displaced material from surface dealloying, 0.22ML, is more than a factor of two lower than expected based on a pure Pb c(2x2) overlayer. Further, they find that in the 70 to 130 C range the amount of Cu remaining in c(2x2) increases with increasing substrate temperature during the deposition, showing that surface Cu is alloyed with Pb in the c(2x2) structure at these temperatures. When holding the sample at 125 C, the transformation from the c(2x2) structure to the higher coverage c(5{radical}2 x{radical}2)R45{degree} overlayer structure displaces more Cu, confirming the c(2x2) surface alloy model. They also find the c(2x2) surface has characteristically square 2-D islands with step edges parallel to the (100) type crystallographic directions, whereas the c(5{radical}2 x{radical}2)R45{degree} structure has line-like features which run parallel to the dislocation double rows of this surface's atomic structure and which expand into 2-D islands upon coarsening.

  17. TRMM radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okamoto, Kenichi

    1993-01-01

    The results of a conceptual design study and the performance of key components of the Bread Board Model (BBM) of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) radar are presented. The radar, which operates at 13.8 GHz and is designed to meet TRMM mission objectives, has a minimum measurable rain rate of 0.5 mm/h with a range resolution of 250 m, a horizontal resolution of about 4 km, and a swath width of 220 km. A 128-element active phased array system is adopted to achieve contiguous scanning within the swath. The basic characteristics of BBM were confirmed by experiments. The development of EM started with the cooperation of NASDA and CRL.

  18. Structure and stability of small Li2 +(X2Σ+ g )-Xen (n = 1-6) clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidi, Sameh; Ghanmi, Chedli; Berriche, Hamid

    2014-04-01

    We have studied the structure and stability of the Li2 +(X2Σ+ g )Xe n ( n = 1-6) clusters for special symmetry groups. The potential energy surfaces of these clusters, are described using an accurate ab initio approach based on non-empirical pseudopotential, parameterized l-dependent polarization potential and analytic potential forms for the Li+Xe and Xe-Xe interactions. The pseudopotential technique has reduced the number of active electrons of Li2 +(X2Σ+ g )-Xe n ( n = 1-6) clusters to only one electron, the Li valence electron. The core-core interactions for Li+Xe are included using accurate CCSD(T) potential fitted using the analytical form of Tang and Toennies. For the Xe-Xe potential interactions we have used the analytical form of Lennard Jones (LJ6 - 12). The potential energy surfaces of the Li2 +(X2Σ+ g )Xe n ( n = 1-6) clusters are performed for a fixed distance of the Li2 +(X2Σ+ g ) alkali dimer, its equilibrium distance. They are used to extract information on the stability of the Li2 +(X2Σ+ g Xe n ( n = 1-6) clusters. For each n, the stability of the different isomers is examined by comparing their potential energy surfaces. Moreover, we have determined the quantum energies ( D 0), the zero-point-energies (ZPE) and the ZPE%. To our best knowledge, there are neither experimental nor theoretical works realized for the Li2 +(X2Σ+ g Xe n ( n = 1-6) clusters, our results are presented for the first time.

  19. Regulation of the desensitization and ion selectivity of ATP-gated P2X2 channels by phosphoinositides.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yuichiro; Kubo, Yoshihiro

    2006-10-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIP(n)s) are known to regulate the activity of some ion channels. Here we determined that ATP-gated P2X(2) channels also are regulated by PIP(n)s, and investigated the structural background and the unique features of this regulation. We initially used two-electrode voltage clamp to analyse the electrophysiological properties of P2X(2) channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and observed that preincubation with wortmannin or LY294002, two PI3K inhibitors, accelerated channel desensitization. K365Q or K369Q mutation of the conserved, positively charged, amino acid residues in the proximal region of the cytoplasmic C-terminal domain also accelerated desensitization, whereas a K365R or K369R mutation did not. We observed that the permeability of the channel to N-methyl-d-glucamine (NMDG) transiently increased and then decreased after ATP application, and that the speed of the decrease was accelerated by K365Q or K369Q mutation or PI3K inhibition. Using GST-tagged recombinant proteins spanning the proximal C-terminal region, we then analysed their binding of the P2X(2) cytoplasmic domain to anionic lipids using PIP(n)s-coated nitrocellulose membranes. We found that the recombinant proteins that included the positively charged region bound to PIPs and PIP(2)s, and that this binding was eliminated by the K365Q and K369Q mutations. We also used a fluorescence assay to confirm that fusion proteins comprising the proximal C-terminal region of P2X(2) with EGFP expressed in COS-7 cells closely associated with the membrane. Taken together, these results show that membrane-bound PIP(n)s play a key role in maintaining channel activity and regulating pore dilation through electrostatic interaction with the proximal region of the P2X(2) cytoplasmic C-terminal domain. PMID:16857707

  20. Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar (MMCR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    KB Widener; K Johnson

    2005-01-30

    The millimeter cloud radar (MMCR) systems probe the extent and composition of clouds at millimeter wavelengths. The MMCR is a zenith-pointing radar that operates at a frequency of 35 GHz. The main purpose of this radar is to determine cloud boundaries (e.g., cloud bottoms and tops). This radar will also report radar reflectivity (dBZ) of the atmosphere up to 20 km. The radar possesses a doppler capability that will allow the measurement of cloud constituent vertical velocities.

  1. AF-353, a novel, potent and orally bioavailable P2X3/P2X2/3 receptor antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Gever, Joel R; Soto, Rothschild; Henningsen, Robert A; Martin, Renee S; Hackos, David H; Panicker, Sandip; Rubas, Werner; Oglesby, Ian B; Dillon, Michael P; Milla, Marcos E; Burnstock, Geoffrey; Ford, Anthony PDW

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Purinoceptors containing the P2X3 subunit (P2X3 homotrimeric and P2X2/3 heterotrimeric) are members of the P2X family of ion channels gated by ATP and may participate in primary afferent sensitization in a variety of pain-related diseases. The current work describes the in vitro pharmacological characteristics of AF-353, a novel, orally bioavailable, highly potent and selective P2X3/P2X2/3 receptor antagonist. Experimental approach: The antagonistic potencies (pIC50) of AF-353 for rat and human P2X3 and human P2X2/3 receptors were determined using methods of radioligand binding, intracellular calcium flux and whole cell voltage-clamp electrophysiology. Key results: The pIC50 estimates for these receptors ranged from 7.3 to 8.5, while concentrations 300-fold higher had little or no effect on other P2X channels or on an assortment of receptors, enzymes and transporter proteins. In contrast to A-317491 and TNP-ATP, competition binding and intracellular calcium flux experiments suggested that AF-353 inhibits activation by ATP in a non-competitive fashion. Favourable pharmacokinetic parameters were observed in rat, with good oral bioavailability (%F = 32.9), reasonable half-life (t1/2 = 1.63 h) and plasma-free fraction (98.2% protein bound). Conclusions and implications: The combination of a favourable pharmacokinetic profile with the antagonist potency and selectivity for P2X3 and P2X2/3 receptors suggests that AF-353 is an excellent in vivo tool compound for study of these channels in animal models and demonstrates the feasibility of identifying and optimizing molecules into potential clinical candidates, and, ultimately, into a novel class of therapeutics for the treatment of pain-related disorders. PMID:20590629

  2. Stabilization of the O p2x2 phase on Cu(001) sheltered by wrinkled BN over-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Sung; Ma, Chuanxu; Li, An-Ping; Yoon, Mina

    The 2 √3x √3R45°phase of oxygen (O) on the Cu(001) surface has been observed in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements. Although the p2x2 phase of O on the Cu(001) surface has been proposed theoretically to be the most stable in O-lean conditions, it has not been observed in experiments for a long time. Recently, the O p2x2 phase has been found in STM on the Cu(001) surface with an overlying BN monolayer. In this theoretical study, we investigate what the role of BN over-layer is to stabilize the O p2x2 phase on the Cu(001) surface. The BN over-layer is lattice-matched with the Cu(001) surface and the BN mono-layer sheet is periodically wrinkled along the BN arm-chair direction and along the [100] or [010] direction on the Cu(001) surface. The interlayer space between the Cu(001) surface and the bulge of the wrinkled BN sheet is found to play as a preferential shelter for O to be adsorbed, and the boundary of the BN inner wall along the [010] or [100] direction makes the p2x2 phase more favorable against the 45°-tilted 2 √3x √3R45°phase of O on the Cu(001) surface. This was supported by Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, which is a DOE Office of Science User Facility, and the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, maaged by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U. S. DOE.

  3. Modulation of P2X3 and P2X2/3 Receptors by Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Shcherbatko, Anatoly; Foletti, Davide; Poulsen, Kris; Strop, Pavel; Zhu, Guoyun; Hasa-Moreno, Adela; Melton Witt, Jody; Loo, Carole; Krimm, Stellanie; Pios, Ariel; Yu, Jessica; Brown, Colleen; Lee, John K; Stroud, Robert; Rajpal, Arvind; Shelton, David

    2016-06-01

    Purinergic homomeric P2X3 and heteromeric P2X2/3 receptors are ligand-gated cation channels activated by ATP. Both receptors are predominantly expressed in nociceptive sensory neurons, and an increase in extracellular ATP concentration under pathological conditions, such as tissue damage or visceral distension, induces channel opening, membrane depolarization, and initiation of pain signaling. Hence, these receptors are considered important therapeutic targets for pain management, and development of selective antagonists is currently progressing. To advance the search for novel analgesics, we have generated a panel of monoclonal antibodies directed against human P2X3 (hP2X3). We have found that these antibodies produce distinct functional effects, depending on the homomeric or heteromeric composition of the target, its kinetic state, and the duration of antibody exposure. The most potent antibody, 12D4, showed an estimated IC50 of 16 nm on hP2X3 after short term exposure (up to 18 min), binding to the inactivated state of the channel to inhibit activity. By contrast, with the same short term application, 12D4 potentiated the slow inactivating current mediated by the heteromeric hP2X2/3 channel. Extending the duration of exposure to ∼20 h resulted in a profound inhibition of both homomeric hP2X3 and heteromeric hP2X2/3 receptors, an effect mediated by efficient antibody-induced internalization of the channel from the plasma membrane. The therapeutic potential of mAb12D4 was assessed in the formalin, complete Freund's adjuvant, and visceral pain models. The efficacy of 12D4 in the visceral hypersensitivity model indicates that antibodies against P2X3 may have therapeutic potential in visceral pain indications. PMID:27129281

  4. P2X2 Receptor Terminal Field Demarcates a "Transition Zone" for Gustatory and Mechanosensory Processing in the Mouse Nucleus Tractus Solitarius.

    PubMed

    Breza, Joseph M; Travers, Susan P

    2016-07-01

    Peripheral gustatory neurons express P2X2 purinergic receptors and terminate in the rostral portion of the nucleus tractus solitarius (rNTS), but a relationship between the P2X2 terminal field and taste evoked activity has not been established. Additionally, a portion of somatosensory neurons from the trigeminal nerve, which are devoid of P2X2 expression, also terminate in the lateral rNTS. We hypothesized that P2X2 receptor expression on afferent nerve endings could be used as an anatomical tool for segregating gustatory from mechanosensory responsive regions in the mouse rNTS. C57BL/6 mice were used to record extracellular activity from neurons within the rNTS and the laterally adjacent reticular formation and trigeminal nucleus. Histological reconstruction of electrolytic lesions indicated that gustatory activity coincided with electrode tracks that traversed through P2X2 terminal fields. Gustatory recordings made more rostral in the rNTS had receptive fields located in the anterior oral cavity (AO), whereas gustatory recordings made more caudal in the rNTS had receptive fields located in the posterior oral cavity (PO). Mechanosensory neurons with AO receptive fields were recorded near the lateral border of the P2X2 terminal field and became numerous on electrode tracks made lateral to the P2X2 terminal field. In contrast, mechanosensory responses with PO receptive fields were recorded within the P2X2 terminal field along with gustatory activity and transitioned to mechanosensory only outside the P2X2 terminal field. Collectively, our results indicate that the lateral border of the P2X2 terminal field, demarcates a faithful "transition zone," where AO responses transition from gustatory to mechanosensory. PMID:27131102

  5. Identification and characterization of ATP-gated P2X2 receptor gene dominantly expressed in the Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) head kidney macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuo; Chen, Xiaoli; Hao, Gaixiang; Geng, Xuyun; Zhan, Wenbin; Sun, Jinsheng

    2016-07-01

    P2X2 receptor (P2X2R) belongs to the family of purinergic receptors that have been shown to play important roles in regulating host innate immune response. Although the immunologic significance of P2X2R has been studied in mammals, the presence and immune relevance of P2X2R in fish remains unclear. In this study we extended our previous observations by identifying and characterizing a P2X2R ortholog (termed PoP2X2R) from Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus). Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that PoP2X2R mRNA transcripts are widely distributed in all examined normal tissues and are dominantly expressed in hepatopancreas tissue. In addition, we for the first time showed that multiple P2XR subtypes, including P2X2R, P2X4R and P2X7R are co-expressed in the Japanese flounder head kidney macrophages (HKMs) and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs), indicating that they may assemble into hetero-receptor complex or interact in the form of homotrimers to trigger diverse purinergic signaling in the Japanese flounder immune cells. Compared with the known Japanese flounder P2X4 and P2X7 receptors, however, PoP2X2R is much more abundantly expressed in the Japanese flounder HKM cells, suggesting that PoP2X2R may play an important role in this type of immune cells. Glycosylation and immunohistochemistry analyses revealed that PoP2X2R is a glycoprotein expressed on the plasma membrane. Immune challenges experiments showed that PoP2X2R was significantly induced by LPS, poly(I:C) and zymosan stimulations in the HKM and PBL cells, and by Edwardsiella tarda infections in spleen and gill tissues as well. Taken together, we have identified and characterized a new P2X2R member that is involved in fish innate immune response. PMID:27103003

  6. Calcium permeability and block at homomeric and heteromeric P2X2 and P2X3 receptors, and P2X receptors in rat nodose neurones

    PubMed Central

    Virginio, Caterina; North, R A; Surprenant, Annmarie

    1998-01-01

    Whole-cell recordings were made from HEK 293 (human embryonic kidney) cells stably transfected with cDNAs encoding P2X2, P2X3 or both receptors (P2X2/3) and from cultured rat nodose neurones. Nodose neurones all showed immunoreactivity for both P2X2 and P2X3, but not P2X1, receptors. Reversal potentials were measured in extracellular sodium, N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMDG) and NMDG containing 5 mM Ca2+; the values were used to compute relative permeabilities (PNMDG/PNa and PCa/PNa). PNMDG/PNa was not different for P2X2, P2X2/3 and nodose neurones (0.03) but was significantly higher (0.07) for P2X3 receptors. PCa/PNa was not different among P2X3, P2X2/3 and nodose neurones (1.2-1.5) but was significantly higher (2.5) for P2X2 receptors. External Ca2+ inhibited purinoceptor currents with half-maximal concentrations of 5 mM at the P2X2 receptor, 89 mM at the P2X3 receptor and 15 mM at both the P2X2/3 heteromeric receptor and nodose neurones. In each case, the inhibition was voltage independent and was overcome by increasing concentrations of agonist. These results may indicate that Ca2+ permeability of the heteromeric (P2X2/3) channel is dominated by that of the P2X3 subunit, while Ca2+ block of the receptor involves both P2X2 and P2X3 subunits. The correspondence in properties between P2X2/3 receptors and nodose ganglion neurones further supports the conclusion that the native α,β-methylene ATP-sensitive receptor is a P2X2/3 heteromultimer. PMID:9625864

  7. Low-power, 2 x 2 silicon electro-optic switch with 110-nm bandwidth for broadband reconfigurable optical networks.

    PubMed

    Van Campenhout, Joris; Green, William M J; Assefa, Solomon; Vlasov, Yurii A

    2009-12-21

    We present an ultra-broadband Mach-Zehnder based optical switch in silicon, electrically driven through carrier injection. Crosstalk levels lower than -17 dB are obtained for both the 'on' and 'off' switching states over an optical bandwidth of 110 nm, owing to the implementation of broadband 50% couplers. Full 2 x 2 switching functionality is demonstrated, with low power consumption (approximately 3 mW) and a fast switching time (< 4 ns). The utilization of standard CMOS metallization results in a low drive voltage (approximately 1 V) and a record-low V(pi)L (approximately 0.06 V x mm). The wide optical bandwidth is maintained for temperature variations up to 30 K. PMID:20052114

  8. Strong anisotropy in the electromagnetic properties of Na2Ti2X2O (X = As, Sb) crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Y. G.; Wang, H. P.; Zhang, X.; Wang, W. D.; Huang, Y.; Wang, N. L.

    2013-10-01

    Na2Ti2X2O (X = As, Sb) crystals have been grown from the flux method. X-ray diffraction characterization revealed an anti-K2NiF4-type layered structure (tetragonal, space group I4/mmm) for both compounds. Magnetic susceptibility (χ(T)) and electrical resistivity (ρ(T)) measurements revealed major kinks at ˜115 K (Ts1) and ˜320 K (Ts2) for Na2Ti2Sb2O and Na2Ti2As2O, respectively, signifying possibly the opening of density wave gaps. Both Na2Ti2Sb2O and Na2Ti2As2O showed remarkably strong anisotropy in their electromagnetic transport properties, and values of γρ (ρc/ρab) even reached ˜140 and ˜430, respectively, being much larger than that of iron pnictide BaFe2As2 (γρ ˜ 2-5). The γρ of Na2Ti2Sb2O changed slightly with cooling, though a small drop at Ts1 occurred. In contrast, the γρ of Na2Ti2As2O changed strikingly by exhibiting not only a small change at Ts2 but also a sudden decrease of ˜50 K, reduced nearly 1/3. Specific heat measurement indicated that Na2Ti2Sb2O was only partially gapped with γ1 = 4.1 mJ mol-1 K-2, though a long-range order was established at Ts1, while Na2Ti2As2O was fully gapped. The remarkably strong electromagnetic anisotropy revealed in Na2Ti2X2O suggests the crucial role of the TiO2X4 layer for the transport properties of layered titanium oxypnictides.

  9. Double P2X2/P2X3 Purinergic Receptor Knockout Mice Do Not Taste NaCl or the Artificial Sweetener SC45647

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, Meghan C.; Eschle, Benjamin K.; Barrows, Jennell; Hallock, Robert M.; Finger, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    The P2X ionotropic purinergic receptors, P2X2 and P2X3, are essential for transmission of taste information from taste buds to the gustatory nerves. Mice lacking both P2X2 and P2X3 purinergic receptors (P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/−) exhibit no taste-evoked activity in the chorda tympani and glossopharyngeal nerves when stimulated with taste stimuli from any of the 5 classical taste quality groups (salt, sweet, sour, bitter, and umami) nor do the mice show taste preferences for sweet or umami, or avoidance of bitter substances (Finger et al. 2005. ATP signaling is crucial for communication from taste buds to gustatory nerves. Science. 310[5753]:1495–1499). Here, we compare the ability of P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice and P2X2/P2X3Dbl+/+ wild-type (WT) mice to detect NaCl in brief-access tests and conditioned aversion paradigms. Brief-access testing with NaCl revealed that whereas WT mice decrease licking at 300 mM and above, the P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice do not show any change in lick rates. In conditioned aversion tests, P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice did not develop a learned aversion to NaCl or the artificial sweetener SC45647, both of which are easily avoided by conditioned WT mice. The inability of P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice to show avoidance of these taste stimuli was not due to an inability to learn the task because both WT and P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice learned to avoid a combination of SC45647 and amyl acetate (an odor cue). These data suggest that P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice are unable to respond to NaCl or SC45647 as taste stimuli, mirroring the lack of gustatory nerve responses to these substances. PMID:19833661

  10. Equatorial MU Radar project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Mamoru; Hashiguchi, H.; Tsuda, Toshitaka; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto University (RISH) has been studying the atmosphere by using radars. The first big facility was the MU (Middle and Upper atmosphere) radar installed in Shiga, Japan in 1984. This is one of the most powerful and multi-functional radar, and is successful of revealing importance of atmospheric waves for the dynamical vertical coupling processes. The next big radar was the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR) installed at Kototabang, West Sumatra, Indonesia in 2001. The EAR was operated under close collaboration with LAPAN (Indonesia National Institute for Aeronautics and Space), and conducted the long-term continuous observations of the equatorial atmosphere/ionosphere for more than 10 years. The MU radar and the EAR are both utilized for inter-university and international collaborative research program for long time. National Institute for Polar Research (NIPR) joined EISCAT Scientific Association together with Nagoya University, and developed the PANSY radar at Syowa base in Antarctica as a joint project with University of Tokyo. These are the efforts of radar study of the atmosphere/ionosphere in the polar region. Now we can find that Japan holds a global network of big atmospheric/ionospheric radars. The EAR has the limitation of lower sensitivity compared with the other big radars shown above. RISH now proposes a plan of Equatorial MU Radar (EMU) that is to establish the MU-radar class radar next to the EAR. The EMU will have an active phased array antenna with the 163m diameter and 1055 cross-element Yagis. Total output power of the EMU will be more than 500kW. The EMU can detect turbulent echoes from the mesosphere (60-80km). In the ionosphere incoherent-scatter observations of plasma density, drift, and temperature would be possible. Multi-channel receivers will realize radar-imaging observations. The EMU is one of the key facilities in the project "Study of coupling processes in the solar-terrestrial system

  11. Infrared Absorption Study of Ca2- xNaxCuO2X2 (X=Cl, Br)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Takumi; Ogita, Norio; Kondo, Toshihisa; Zenitani, Yuji; Kawashima, Hirokazu; Suzuki, Teruhiko; Akimitsu, Jun; Udagawa, Masayuki

    2006-09-01

    IR-active phonon spectra of Ca2- xNaxCuO2X2 (X=Cl, Br) have been measured by a CsI powder method in the energy region between 250 and 4000 cm-1 at room temperature. Two absorption peaks with the Eu symmetry have been clearly observed for the undoped crystals of Ca2CuO2Cl2 and Ca2CuO2Br2. However, the observed two peaks disappear for the Na-doped superconducting samples. From the comparison of the highest-energy Eu phonon, which is the Cu-O stretching vibration, the interaction of the Cu-O bond along the CuO2 plane for the T-structure is stronger by 20 % than that of the T'-structure in the 2-1-4 family. To understand the effect of the apical ions, first-principles calculations of the Eu phonon energy for T- and T'-structure La2CuO4 is performed and the preliminary results agree with the experimental tendency.

  12. Photoelectron diffraction k-space volumes of the c(2x2) Mn/Ni(100) structure

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, S.; Denlinger, J.; Chen, X.

    1997-04-01

    Traditionally, x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) studies have either been done by scanning the diffraction angle for fixed kinetic energy (ADPD), or scanning the kinetic energy at fixed exit angle (EDPD). Both of these methods collect subsets of the full diffraction pattern, or volume, which is the intensity of photoemission as a function of momentum direction and magnitude. With the high density available at the Spectromicroscopy Facility (BL 7.0) {open_quotes}ultraESCA{close_quotes} station, the authors are able to completely characterize the photoelectron diffraction patterns of surface structures, up to several hundred electron volts kinetic energy. This large diffraction `volume` can then be analyzed in many ways. The k-space volume contains as a subset the energy dependent photoelectron diffraction spectra along all emission angles. It also contains individual, hemispherical, diffraction patterns at specific kinetic energies. Other `cuts` through the data set are also possible, revealing new ways of viewing photoelectron diffraction data, and potentially new information about the surface structure being studied. In this article the authors report a brief summary of a structural study being done on the c(2x2) Mn/Ni(100) surface alloy. This system is interesting for both structural and magnetic reasons. Magnetically, the Mn/Ni(100) surface alloy exhibits parallel coupling of the Mn and Ni moments, which is opposite to the reported coupling for the bulk, disordered, alloy. Structurally, the Mn atoms are believed to lie well above the surface plane.

  13. Analysis of Interferometric Radar Data in a Queensland, Australia Tropical Rain Forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensley, Scott; Rodriquez, Ernesto; Chapin, Elaine; Accad, Arnon

    1999-01-01

    The radar flies at 8000 m (24000 ft) above the ground and collects data in swath about 10 km wide. The radar simultaneously collects data from multiple frequencies and is capable of making interferometric radar measurements.

  14. Ectodomain movements of an ATP-gated ion channel (P2X2 receptor) probed by disulfide locking.

    PubMed

    Stelmashenko, Olga; Compan, Vincent; Browne, Liam E; North, R Alan

    2014-04-01

    The ectodomain of the P2X receptor is formed mainly from two- or three-stranded β-sheets provided symmetrically by each of the three subunits. These enclose a central cavity that is closed off furthest from the plasma membrane (the turret) and that joins with the transmembrane helices to form the ion permeation pathway. Comparison of closed and open crystal structures indicates that ATP binds in a pocket positioned between strands provided by different subunits and that this flexes the β-sheets of the lower body and enlarges the central cavity: this pulls apart the outer ends of the transmembrane helices and thereby opens an aperture, or gate, where they intersect within the membrane bilayer. In the present work, we examined this opening model by introducing pairs of cysteines into the rat P2X2 receptor that might form disulfide bonds within or between subunits. Receptors were expressed in human embryonic kidney cells, and disulfide formation was assessed by observing the effect of dithiothreitol on currents evoked by ATP. Substitutions in the turret (P90C, P89C/S97C), body wall (S65C/S190C, S65C/D315C) and the transmembrane domains (V48C/I328C, V51C/I328C, S54C/I328C) strongly inhibited ATP-evoked currents prior to reduction with dithiothreitol. Western blotting showed that these channels also formed predominately as dimers and/or trimers rather than monomers. The results strongly support the channel opening mechanism proposed on the basis of available crystal structures. PMID:24515105

  15. X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y sex chromosome systems in the Neotropical Gymnotiformes electric fish of the genus Brachyhypopomus.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Adauto Lima; Pieczarka, Julio Cesar; Nagamachi, Cleusa Yoshiko

    2015-05-01

    Several types of sex chromosome systems have been recorded among Gymnotiformes, including male and female heterogamety, simple and multiple sex chromosomes, and different mechanisms of origin and evolution. The X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y systems identified in three species of this order are considered homoplasic for the group. In the genus Brachyhypopomus, only B. gauderio presented this type of system. Herein we describe the karyotypes of Brachyhypopomus pinnicaudatus and B. n. sp. FLAV, which have an X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y sex chromosome system that evolved via fusion between an autosome and the Y chromosome. The morphology of the chromosomes and the meiotic pairing suggest that the sex chromosomes of B. gauderio and B. pinnicaudatus have a common origin, whereas in B . n. sp. FLAV the sex chromosome system evolved independently. However, we cannot discard the possibility of common origin followed by distinct processes of differentiation. The identification of two new karyotypes with an X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y sex chromosome system in Gymnotiformes makes it the most common among the karyotyped species of the group. Comparisons of these karyotypes and the evolutionary history of the taxa indicate independent origins for their sex chromosomes systems. The recurrent emergence of the X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y system may represent sex chromosomes turnover events in Gymnotiformes. PMID:26273225

  16. Characteristics of Sunset radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    Located in a narrow canyon 15 km west of Boulder, Colorado, the Sunset pulsed Doppler radar was the first radar designed and constructed specifically as a VHF ST radar. The antenna system is a phased array of coaxial-colinear dopoles with computer-controlled phase shifters for each line of dipoles. It operates at a frequency of 40.475 MHz and a wavelength of 7.41M. Peak transmitter power is 100 kW. Aperture efficiency is 0.58 and resistive loss is 0.30 for its 3600 sq m area. The practical steering rate is 1 record/minute/position to any arbitrary antenna beam position. The first clear-air turbulence echoes and wind velocity measurements were obtained in 1974. Significant accomplishments are listed.

  17. The MST Radar Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balsley, B. B.

    1985-01-01

    The past ten year have witnessed the development of a new radar technique to examine the structure and dynamics of the atmosphere between roughly 1 to 100 km on a continuous basis. The technique is known as the MST (for Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere) technique and is usable in all weather conditions, being unaffected by precipitation or cloud cover. MST radars make use of scattering from small scale structure in the atmospheric refractive index, with scales of the order of one-half the radar wavelength. Pertinent scale sizes for middle atmospheric studies typically range between a fraction of a meter and a few meters. The structure itself arises primarily from atmospheric turbulence. The technique is briefly described along with the meteorological parameters it measures.

  18. Planetary Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neish, Catherine D.; Carter, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the principles of planetary radar, and the primary scientific discoveries that have been made using this technique. The chapter starts by describing the different types of radar systems and how they are used to acquire images and accurate topography of planetary surfaces and probe their subsurface structure. It then explains how these products can be used to understand the properties of the target being investigated. Several examples of discoveries made with planetary radar are then summarized, covering solar system objects from Mercury to Saturn. Finally, opportunities for future discoveries in planetary radar are outlined and discussed.

  19. Radar Ionospheric Impact Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, G.; Decker, D.; Baker, C.

    2006-12-01

    New ionospheric modeling technology is being developed to improve correction of ionospheric impacts on the performance of ground-based space-surveillance radars (SSRs) in near-real-time. These radars, which detect and track space objects, can experience significant target location errors due to ionospheric delay and refraction of the radar signals. Since these radars must detect and track targets essentially to the radar horizon, it is necessary to accurately model the ionosphere as the radar would observe it, down to the local horizon. To correct for spatial and temporal changes in the ionosphere the model must be able to update in near-real-time using ionospheric sensor data. Since many radars are in isolated locations, or may have requirements to operate autonomously, an additional required capability is to provide accurate ionospheric mitigation by exploiting only sensor data from the radar site. However, the model must also be able to update using additional data from other types of sensors that may be available. The original radar ionospheric mitigation approach employed the Bent climatological model. This 35-year-old technology is still the means employed in the many DoD SSRs today. One more recent approach used capabilities from the PRISM model. PRISM technology has today been surpassed by `assimilative models' which employ better physics and Kalman filtering techniques. These models are not necessarily tailored for SSR application which needs to optimize modeling of very small regions using only data from a single sensor, or very few. The goal is to develop and validate the performance of innovative and efficient ionospheric modeling approaches that are optimized for the small regions applicable to ground-based radar coverage (radius of ~2000 km at ionospheric altitudes) and somewhat beyond. These approaches must adapt a continuous modeling scheme in near-real-time to be consistent with all observational data that may become available, and degrade

  20. Venus radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, R. M.; Green, R. R.; Rumsey, H. C.

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents a set of seven radar brightness images and the corresponding altitude contours of small portions (circular regions of 1500-km diameter) of the Venus surface located at the center of the disk taken in the winter of 1973-1974. The regions imaged are arranged in an equatorial belt on the one face of Venus which is always seen on the occasions of closest approach to earth. A real resolution for the images is, typically, 100 x 10 km, while altitude resolution is 500 m.

  1. Atmospheric radar sounding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, R. K.

    1972-01-01

    Monostatic and bistatic radar techniques for the measurement of the structure of volume targets in the troposphere and lower stratosphere are reviewed. The targets considered are thin turbulent layers in the lower stratosphere and rain in the troposphere. The measurements of scattering from thin turbulent layers show that layers are generally detected at or near the tropopause, and in 31 out of 34 sets of measurements, layers were detected above the tropopause in the lower 10 km of the stratosphere. The threshold for turbulent layer detection corresponds to an equivalent thickness product of ten to the minus 13th power times the cube root of m at a range of 100 km and for layers with less than 1000 m thickness. The measurement of scattering by rain shows that in the New England area both convective and widespread rain consists of a number of small cells. On average, the cells appear to have a half-intensity width of 3 to 4 km as measured with a radar system with a 1.8 km resolution cell size for cells at 100 km range.

  2. Vatalanib decrease the positive interaction of VEGF receptor-2 and P2X2/3 receptor in chronic constriction injury rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuangmei; Xu, Changshui; Li, Guilin; Liu, Han; Xie, Jinyan; Tu, Guihua; Peng, Haiying; Qiu, Shuyi; Liang, Shangdong

    2012-05-01

    Neuropathic pain can arise from a lesion affecting the peripheral nervous system. Selective P2X(3) and P2X(2/3) receptors' antagonists effectively reduce neuropathic pain. VEGF inhibitors are effective for pain relief. The present study investigated the effects of Vatalanib (VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) inhibitor) on the neuropathic pain to address the interaction of VEGFR-2 and P2X(2/3) receptor in dorsal root ganglia of chronic constriction injury (CCI) rats. Neuropathic pain symptoms following CCI are similar to most peripheral lesions as assessed by the Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham group, CCI group and CCI rats treated with Vatalanib group. Mechanical withdrawal threshold and thermal withdrawal latency were measured. Co-expression of VEGFR-2 and P2X(2) or P2X(3) in L4-6 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) was detected by double-label immunofluorescence. The modulation effect of VEGF on P2X(2/3) receptor agonist-activated currents in freshly isolated DRG neurons of rats both of sham and CCI rats was recorded by whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) and thermal withdrawal latency (TWL) in CCI group were lower than those in sham group (p<0.05). MWT and TWL in CCI rats treated with Vatalanib group were increased compared with those in CCI group (p<0.05). VEGFR-2 and P2X(2) or P2X(3) receptors were co-expressed in the cytoplasm and surface membranes of DRG. The co-expression of VEGFR-2 and P2X(2) or P2X(3) receptor in CCI group exhibited more intense staining than those in sham group and CCI rats treated with Vatalanib group, respectively. VEGF enhanced the amplitude of ATP and α,β-meATP -activated currents of both sham and CCI rats. Increment effects of VEGF on ATP and α,β-meATP -activated currents in CCI rats were higher than those in sham rats. Both ATP (100 μM) and α,β-meATP (10 μM)- activated currents enhanced by VEGF ( 1nM) were significantly blocked by Vatalanib (1

  3. Spaceborne radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. K.; Eckerman, J.; Meneghini, R.; Atlas, D.; Boerner, W. M.; Cherry, S.; Clark, J. F.; Doviak, R. J.; Goldhirsh, J.; Lhermitte, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    The spaceborne radar panel considered how radar could be used to measure precipitation from satellites. The emphasis was on how radar could be used with radiometry (at microwave, visible (VIS), and infrared (IR) wavelengths) to reduce the uncertainties of measuring precipitation with radiometry alone. In addition, the fundamental electromagnetic interactions involved in the measurements were discussed to determine the key work areas for research and development to produce effective instruments. Various approaches to implementing radar systems on satellites were considered for both shared and dedicated instruments. Finally, a research and development strategy was proposed for establishing the parametric relations and retrieval algorithms required for extracting precipitation information from the radar and associated radiometric data.

  4. Automotive radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohling, Hermann

    2004-07-01

    Radar networks for automtovie short-range applications (up to 30m) based on powerful but inexpensive 24GHz high range resolution pulse or FMCW radar systems have been developed at the Technical University of Hamburg-Harburg. The described system has been integrated in to an experimental vehicle and tested in real street environment. This paper considers the general network design, the individual pulse or FMCW radar sensors, the network signal processing scheme, the tracking procedure and possible automotive applications, respectively. Object position estimation is accomplished by the very precise range measurement of each individual sensor and additional trilateration procedures. The paper concludes with some results obtained in realistic traffic conditions with multiple target situations using 24 GHz radar network.

  5. Radar history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putley, Ernest

    2008-07-01

    The invention of radar, as mentioned in Chris Lavers' article on warship stealth technology (March pp21-25), continues to be a subject of discussion. Here in Malvern we have just unveiled a blue plaque to commemorate the physicist Albert Percival Rowe, who arrived in 1942 as the head of the Telecommunications Research Establishment (TRE), which was the Air Ministry research facility responsible for the first British radar systems.

  6. SMAP Radar Processing and Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, R.; Jaruwatanadilok, S.; Kwoun, O.; Chaubell, M.

    2013-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is part of the NASA space-based Earth observation program, and consists of an L-band radar and radiometer scheduled for launch into sun synchronous orbit in late 2014. A joint effort of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), the SMAP mission draws heavily on the design and risk reduction heritage of the Hydrosphere State (Hydros) mission [1], [2]. The SMAP science and applications objectives are to: 1) understand processes that link the terrestrial water, energy and carbon cycles, 2) estimate global water and energy fluxes at the land surface, 3) quantify net carbon flux in boreal landscapes, 4) enhance weather and climate forecast skill, and 5) develop improved flood prediction and drought monitoring capability. To meet these science objectives, SMAP ground processing will combine the attributes of the radar and radiometer observations (in terms of their spatial resolution and sensitivity to soil moisture, surface roughness, and vegetation) to estimate soil moisture with 4% volumetric accuracy at a resolution of 10 km, and freeze-thaw state at a resolution of 1-3 km. Model sensitivities translate the soil moisture accuracy to a radar backscatter accuracy of 1 dB (1 sigma) at 3 km resolution and a brightness temperature accuracy of 1.3 K at 40 km resolution. This paper will describe the level 1 radar processing and calibration challenges and the choices made so far for the algorithms and software implementation.

  7. Adsorption of water on O(2x2)/Ru(0001): thermal stability and inhibition of dissociation by H2O-O bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Mugarza, Aitor; Shimizu, Tomoko; Cabrera-Sanfelix, Pepa; Sanchez-Portal, Daniel; Arnau, Andres; Salmeron, Miquel

    2008-08-01

    The effect of preadsorbed oxygen on the subsequent adsorption and reactions of water on Ru(0001) has been studied using low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and DFT calculations. Experiments were carried out for O coverages close to 0.25 ML. It was found that no dissociation of water takes place up to the desorption temperature of {approx}180-230 K. DFT calculations show that intact water on O(2x2)/Ru(0001) is {approx} 0.49 eV more stable than the dissociation products, H and OH, at their preferred fcc and top adsorption sites.

  8. [Game behavior depending on "kind of information" and "degree of risk" in an alternating-sequential 2 x 2 game (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Hussy, W

    1979-01-01

    By an alternating-sequential 2 x 2-game behavior is analysed in dependence of eye contact, feedback about the score of the partner and the degree of risk. The dependent variables are 'need of information' and 'readiness for cooperation' score. The data of 48 university students are analysed by means of Analysis of Variance. They yield evidence for the hypotheses that 'need for information' and 'readiness for cooperation' is determined by all experimental variables, especially by 'eye contact'. The results are discussed in relation to models of thinking and problem solving. PMID:543799

  9. A 2x2 W-Band Reference Time-Shifted Phase-Locked Transmitter Array in 65nm CMOS Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Adrian; Virbila, Gabriel; Hsiao, Frank; Wu, Hao; Murphy, David; Mehdi, Imran; Siegel, P. H.; Chang, M-C. Frank

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a complete 2x2 phased array transmitter system operating at W-band (90-95 GHz) which employs a PLL reference time-shifting approach instead of using traditional mm-wave phase shifters. PLL reference shifting enables a phased array to be distributed over multiple chips without the need for coherent mm-wave signal distribution between chips. The proposed phased array transmitter system consumes 248 mW per array element when implemented in a 65 nm CMOS technology.

  10. A space-based microwave radar concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakraborty, D.

    1992-01-01

    A space-based microwave radar (SBR) concept is defined using a tether trans-receive antenna supported between two gravity gradient low earth-orbiting satellites. A cluster of four tether antennas each of 6 km maximum length and 1.5 km separation between tethers constitutes a radar. A system of eight to eleven such clusters constitutes the overall radar scheme which will cover approximately one third of the earth surface for detecting sea-based targets. Issues identified are the array structure, coherence of tethered arrays, grating lobe energy clamping, clutter effects, communications, system requirements and the overall radar system concept including stability considerations. This paper presents the base-line definition of an alternate space-based radar scheme.

  11. Debris Flux Comparisons From The Goldstone Radar, Haystack Radar, and Hax Radar Prior, During, and After the Last Solar Maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokely, C. L.; Stansbery, E. G.; Goldstein, R. M.

    2006-01-01

    The continual monitoring of low Earth orbit (LEO) debris environment using highly sensitive radars is essential for an accurate characterization of these dynamic populations. Debris populations are continually evolving since there are new debris sources, previously unrecognized debris sources, and debris loss mechanisms that are dependent on the dynamic space environment. Such radar data are used to supplement, update, and validate existing orbital debris models. NASA has been utilizing radar observations of the debris environment for over a decade from three complementary radars: the NASA JPL Goldstone radar, the MIT Lincoln Laboratory (MIT/LL) Long Range Imaging Radar (known as the Haystack radar), and the MIT/LL Haystack Auxiliary radar (HAX). All of these systems are highly sensitive radars that operate in a fixed staring mode to statistically sample orbital debris in the LEO environment. Each of these radars is ideally suited to measure debris within a specific size region. The Goldstone radar generally observes objects with sizes from 2 mm to 1 cm. The Haystack radar generally measures from 5 mm to several meters. The HAX radar generally measures from 2 cm to several meters. These overlapping size regions allow a continuous measurement of cumulative debris flux versus diameter from 2 mm to several meters for a given altitude window. This is demonstrated for all three radars by comparing the debris flux versus diameter over 200 km altitude windows for 3 nonconsecutive years from 1998 through 2003. These years correspond to periods before, during, and after the peak of the last solar cycle. Comparing the year to year flux from Haystack for each of these altitude regions indicate statistically significant changes in subsets of the debris populations. Potential causes of these changes are discussed. These analysis results include error bars that represent statistical sampling errors, and are detailed in this paper.

  12. Molecular Structure and Regulation of P2X Receptors With a Special Emphasis on the Role of P2X2 in the Auditory System.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Rahul; Chan, Brandon; Grati, M'hamed; Mittal, Jeenu; Patel, Kunal; Debs, Luca H; Patel, Amit P; Yan, Denise; Chapagain, Prem; Liu, Xue Zhong

    2016-08-01

    The P2X purinergic receptors are cation-selective channels gated by extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). These purinergic receptors are found in virtually all mammalian cell types and facilitate a number of important physiological processes. Within the past few years, the characterization of crystal structures of the zebrafish P2X4 receptor in its closed and open states has provided critical insights into the mechanisms of ligand binding and channel activation. Understanding of this gating mechanism has facilitated to design and interpret new modeling and structure-function experiments to better elucidate how different agonists and antagonists can affect the receptor with differing levels of potency. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the structure, activation, allosteric modulators, function, and location of the different P2X receptors. Moreover, an emphasis on the P2X2 receptors has been placed in respect to its role in the auditory system. In particular, the discovery of three missense mutations in P2X2 receptors could become important areas of study in the field of gene therapy to treat progressive and noise-induced hearing loss. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1656-1670, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26627116

  13. A 2x2 multi-chip reconfigurable MOEMS mask: a stepping stone to large format microshutter arrays for coded aperture applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNie, Mark E.; Brown, Alan G.; King, David O.; Smith, Gilbert W.; Gordon, Neil T.; Riches, Stephen; Rogers, Stanley

    2010-08-01

    Coded aperture imaging has been used for astronomical applications for several years. Typical implementations used a fixed mask pattern and are designed to operate in the X-Ray or gamma ray bands. Recently applications have emerged in the visible and infra red bands for low cost lens-less imaging systems and system studies have shown that considerable advantages in image resolution may accrue from the use of multiple different images of the same scene - requiring a reconfigurable mask. Previously reported work focused on realising a 2x2cm single chip mask in the mid-IR based on polysilicon micro-optoelectro- mechanical systems (MOEMS) technology and its integration with ASIC drive electronics using conventional wire bonding. It employs interference effects to modulate incident light - achieved by tuning a large array of asymmetric Fabry-Perot optical cavities via an applied voltage and uses a hysteretic row/column scheme for addressing. In this paper we report on the latest results in the mid-IR for the single chip reconfigurable MOEMS mask, trials in scaling up to a mask based on a 2x2 multi-chip array and report on progress towards realising a large format mask comprising 44 MOEMS chips. We also explore the potential of such large, transmissive IR spatial light modulator arrays for other applications and in the current and alternative architectures.

  14. Lunar radar mapping: Correlation between radar reflectivity and stratigraphy in north-western mare imbrium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaber, G.G.; Eggleton, R.E.; Thompson, T.W.

    1970-01-01

    DELAY-DOPPLER radar maps of the Moon obtained with the 430 MHz (70 cm wavelength) radar of the Arecibo Ionospheric Observatory in Puerto Rico (Thompson, unpublished) are at present being studied to correlate geological information with the radar reflexion characteristics of the lunar surface. Preliminary evaluation of the radar data for the Sinus Iridum quadrangle (32??-48?? N; 14??-38?? W) has revealed that the lowest values of radar reflectivity are closely correlated with the mare materials of lowest albedo mapped by Schaber1 as of most recent volcanic origin. These radar data were obtained with a surface resolution of 50 to 100 km2 on January 24 and April 17, 1967. A detailed account of the delay-doppler radar mapping technique can be found in unpublished reports by Thompson. ?? 1970 Nature Publishing Group.

  15. SMAP RADAR Calibration and Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, R. D.; Jaruwatanadilok, S.; Chaubel, M. J.; Spencer, M.; Chan, S. F.; Chen, C. W.; Fore, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission launched on Jan 31, 2015. The mission employs L-band radar and radiometer measurements to estimate soil moisture with 4% volumetric accuracy at a resolution of 10 km, and freeze-thaw state at a resolution of 1-3 km. Immediately following launch, there was a three month instrument checkout period, followed by six months of level 1 (L1) calibration and validation. In this presentation, we will discuss the calibration and validation activities and results for the L1 radar data. Early SMAP radar data were used to check commanded timing parameters, and to work out issues in the low- and high-resolution radar processors. From April 3-13 the radar collected receive only mode data to conduct a survey of RFI sources. Analysis of the RFI environment led to a preferred operating frequency. The RFI survey data were also used to validate noise subtraction and scaling operations in the radar processors. Normal radar operations resumed on April 13. All radar data were examined closely for image quality and calibration issues which led to improvements in the radar data products for the beta release at the end of July. Radar data were used to determine and correct for small biases in the reported spacecraft attitude. Geo-location was validated against coastline positions and the known positions of corner reflectors. Residual errors at the time of the beta release are about 350 m. Intra-swath biases in the high-resolution backscatter images are reduced to less than 0.3 dB for all polarizations. Radiometric cross-calibration with Aquarius was performed using areas of the Amazon rain forest. Cross-calibration was also examined using ocean data from the low-resolution processor and comparing with the Aquarius wind model function. Using all a-priori calibration constants provided good results with co-polarized measurements matching to better than 1 dB, and cross-polarized measurements matching to about 1 dB in the beta release. During the

  16. Characterizing Radar Raingauge Errors for NWP Assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dance, S.; Seed, A.

    2012-04-01

    The statistical characterisation of errors in quantitative precipitation estimates (QPE) is needed when generating QPE ensembles, combining multiple radars into a single mosaic, and when assimilating QPE into numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. The first step in the analysis was to characterise the errors at pixel resolution (1 km) as a function of radar specification, geographical location under the radar, and meteorology using data from 18 radars and 1500 rain gauges over a two-year period. The probability distribution of the radar - rain gauge residuals was evaluated and, as expected, the log-Normal distribution was found to fit the data better than the Normal distribution. Therefore the subsequent analysis was performed on the residuals expressed as decibels. The impact of beam width on the estimation errors was evaluated by comparing the errors from a one-degree S band radar (S1) with a two-degree S band radar (S2) for the same location (Brisbane) and time period. The standard deviation of the errors was found to increase by 0.2 dB per km for the S2 radar while the standard deviation for the S1 radar was constant out to the maximum range of 150 km. When data from all the S1 radars over the two years were pooled and compared with the S2 radars the standard deviation of the errors for the S1 radars increased by 0.1 dB per km compared with 0.25 dB per km for the S2 radars. The mean of the errors was found to vary significantly with range for all radars with underestimation at close range (< 30 km) and at far range (> 100 km). We think that this points to artefacts in the data due to clutter suppression at close range and over shooting the echo tops at the far range. The spatial distribution of the errors as a function of the altitude and roughness of the topography was investigated using the data from the S1 and S2 radars in Brisbane, but no relationship was found although there is clearly structure in the field. We also attempted to quantify the

  17. Radar images of asteroid 1627 Ivar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostro, S. J.; Werner, C. L.; Rosema, K. D.; Campbell, D. B.; Hine, A. A.; Shapiro, I. I.; Chandler, J. F.

    1990-01-01

    Radar echoes from the near-earth asteroid 1627 Ivar, whose orbit crosses the earth's, reveal it to be about twice as long as it is wide, with a maximum dimension no less than 7 km and probably within 20 percent of 12 km. The surface is fairly smooth at centimeter-to-meter scales but appears irregular and nonconvex at kilometer scales.

  18. Planetary radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    The radar astronomy activities supported by the Deep Space Network during June, July, and August 1980 are reported. The planetary bodies observed were Venus, Mercury, and the asteroid Toro. Data were obtained at both S and X band, and the observations were considered successful.

  19. SMAP RADAR Processing and Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, R. D.; Jaruwatanadilok, S.; Kwoun, O.; Chaubell, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission uses L-band radar and radiometer measurements to estimate soil moisture with 4% volumetric accuracy at a resolution of 10 km, and freeze-thaw state at a resolution of 1-3 km. Model sensitivities translate the soil moisture accuracy to a radar backscatter accuracy of 1 dB at 3 km resolution and a brightness temperature accuracy of 1.3 K at 40 km resolution. This presentation will describe the level 1 radar processing and calibration challenges and the choices made so far for the algorithms and software implementation. To obtain the desired high spatial resolution the level 1 radar ground processor employs synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging techniques. Part of the challenge of the SMAP data processing comes from doing SAR imaging on a conically scanned system with rapidly varying squint angles. The radar echo energy will be divided into range/Doppler bins using time domain processing algorithms that can easily follow the varying squint angle. For SMAP, projected range resolution is about 250 meters, while azimuth resolution varies from 400 meters to 1.2 km. Radiometric calibration of the SMAP radar means measuring, characterizing, and where necessary correcting the gain and noise contributions from every part of the system from the antenna radiation pattern all the way to the ground processing algorithms. The SMAP antenna pattern will be computed using an accurate antenna model, and then validated post-launch using homogeneous external targets such as the Amazon rain forest to look for uncorrected gain variation. Noise subtraction is applied after image processing using measurements from a noise only channel. Variations of the internal electronics are tracked by a loopback measurement which will capture most of the time and temperature variations of the transmit power and receiver gain. Long-term variations of system performance due to component aging will be tracked and corrected using stable external reference

  20. KM3NeT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, M.

    2015-07-01

    KM3NeT is a large research infrastructure, that will consist of a network of deep-sea neutrino telescopes in the Mediterranean Sea. The main objective of KM3NeT is the discovery and subsequent observation of high-energy neutrino sources in the Universe. A further physics perspective is the measurement of the mass hierarchy of neutrinos. A corresponding study, ORCA, is ongoing within KM3NeT. A cost effective technology for (very) large water Cherenkov detectors has been developed based on a new generation of low price 3-inch photo-multiplier tubes. Following the successful deployment and operation of two prototypes, the construction of the KM3NeT research infrastructure has started. The prospects of the different phases of the implementation of KM3NeT are summarised.

  1. KM3NeT

    SciTech Connect

    Jong, M. de; Collaboration: KM3NeT Collaboration

    2015-07-15

    KM3NeT is a large research infrastructure, that will consist of a network of deep-sea neutrino telescopes in the Mediterranean Sea. The main objective of KM3NeT is the discovery and subsequent observation of high-energy neutrino sources in the Universe. A further physics perspective is the measurement of the mass hierarchy of neutrinos. A corresponding study, ORCA, is ongoing within KM3NeT. A cost effective technology for (very) large water Cherenkov detectors has been developed based on a new generation of low price 3-inch photo-multiplier tubes. Following the successful deployment and operation of two prototypes, the construction of the KM3NeT research infrastructure has started. The prospects of the different phases of the implementation of KM3NeT are summarised.

  2. Reaction of O2(+)(X 2Pi sub g) with H2, D2, and HD - Guided ion beam studies, MO correlations, and statistical theory calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, M. E.; Dalleska, N. F.; Tjelta, B. L.; Fisher, E. R.; Armentrout, P. B.

    1993-01-01

    Guided ion-beam mass spectrometry is used to examined the reactions of vibrationally cold ground-state O2(+)(X 2Pi sub g) with H2, D2, and HD. The energy dependence of the absolute integral cross sections from thermal energy to over 4 eV are measured in the center-of-mass frame of reference. Results are also presented for internally excited O2(+) ions reacting with D2 and HD. The results are consistent with the dominant state being the a 4Pi sub u electronic state. The experimental excitation functions are analyzed in detail and interpreted by extending the molecular orbital correlation arguments of Mahan (1971) and by comparison with results of statistical phase space theory and with a theory that predicts a tight transition state.

  3. Results of the AFRSI rewaterproofing systems screening test in the NASA/Ames Research Center (ARC) 2 x 2-foot transonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marroquin, J.; Kingsland, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the NASA/Ames Research Center 2x2-foot Transonic Wind Tunnel to evaluate two AFRSI rewaterproofing systems and to investigate films as a means of reducing blanket joint distortion. The wind tunnel wall slot configuration influenced on the flow field over the test panel was investigated; primarily using oil flow data, and resulted in a closed slot configuration to provide a satisfactory screening environment flow field for the test. Sixteen AFRSI test panels, configured to represent the test system or film, were subjected to this screening environment (a flow field of separated and reattached flow at a freestream Mach numnber of 0.65 and q = 650 or 900 psf). Each condition was held until damage to the test article was observed or 55 minutes if no damage was incurred. All objectives related to AFRSI rewaterproofing and to the use of films to stiffen the blanket fibers were achieved.

  4. Chemical pressure effects on magnetism in the quantum spin liquid candidates Yb2X2O7 (X =Sn, Ti, Ge)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dun, Z. L.; Lee, M.; Choi, E. S.; Hallas, A. M.; Wiebe, C. R.; Gardner, J. S.; Arrighi, E.; Freitas, R. S.; Arevalo-Lopez, A. M.; Attfield, J. P.; Zhou, H. D.; Cheng, J. G.

    2014-02-01

    The linear and nonlinear ac susceptibility measurements of Yb-pyrochlores, Yb2X2O7 (X =Sn, Ti, and Ge), show transitions with a ferromagnetic nature at 0.13 and 0.25 K for Yb2Sn2O7 and Yb2Ti2O7, respectively, and an antiferromagnetic ordering at 0.62 K for Yb2Ge2O7. These systematical results (i) provided information about the nature of the unconventional magnetic ground state in Yb2Ti2O7; (ii) realized a distinct antiferromagnetic ordering state in Yb2Ge2O7; and (iii) demonstrated that the application of chemical pressure through the series of Yb-pyrochlores can efficiently perturb the fragile quantum spin fluctuations of the Yb3+ ions and lead to very different magnetic ground states.

  5. Rotational and hyperfine analysis of the E2Π1/2-X2Δ3/2 electronic transition of TaO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopher, Casey R.; Lee, Stephanie Y.; Gwandu, Francis B.; Matsumoto, Andrew J.; Knurr, Benjamin J.; Mahle, Thomas K.; Morrow, Zachary W.; Varberg, Thomas D.

    2014-07-01

    We have recorded the E2Π1/2-X2Δ3/2 (0, 0) and (1, 0) bands of TaO at sub-Doppler resolution by intermodulated fluorescence spectroscopy. The data were fitted using a Hamiltonian expressed in a Hund's case (c) basis set, leading to accurate values for the rotational, lambda-doubling and hyperfine constants of the upper state, which could be definitively assigned as 2Π1/2 for the first time. The E2Π1/2 state has an energy of T0 = 15876.5764(2) cm-1 and a vibrational interval of ΔG1/2 = 925.3164(3) cm-1.

  6. Synthesis, crystal structure, antioxidant activity, and DNA-binding studies of a novel Ni(II) [2x2] grid complex with a rigid bistridentate Schiff base ligand.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lei; Xu, Jun; Xu, Xi-Ming; Chen, Long-Hai; Jiang, Peng; Cheng, Fei-Xiang; Lu, Guang-Nong; Wang, Qin; Wu, Jin-Cai; Tang, Ning

    2010-08-01

    With a bistridentate Schiff-base ligand, N',N'(3)-bis[(1E)-1-(2-pyridinyl)ethylidene)] isophthalohydrazide (H(2)L), a [2x2]G grid complex, [Ni(4)(HL)(4)](ClO(4))(4).4H(2)O.0.5 CH(3)OH (1) has been synthesized and characterized spectroscopically and crystallographically. Spectrometric titrations, ethidium bromide displacement experiments, circular dichroism spectral analysis and viscosity measurements indicate that the compound 1 strongly binds with calf-thymus DNA, presumably via intercalation mechanism. Furthermore, the antioxidant activity (superoxide and hydroxyl radical) of the ligand and its nickel(II) complex is determined by using spectrophotometer methods in vitro. Complex 1 is found to possess potent antioxidant activity and be better than standard antioxidants like mannitol. PMID:20686262

  7. Towards Mapping the Ocean Surface Topography at 1 KM Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, L. L.; Rodriguez, E.

    2006-07-01

    We propose to apply the technique of synthetic aperture radar interferometry to the measurement of ocean surface topography at spatial resolu tion approaching 1 km . The measurement w ill have wide ranging applications in oceanography , hydrology , and marine geophysics. The oceanographic and related societal applications are briefly discussed in the paper. To meet the requirements for oceanographic application s, the in strument must be flown in an orbit w ith proper samp ling of ocean tides.

  8. Towards Mapping the Ocean Surface Topography at 1 km Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng; Rodriquez, Ernesto

    2006-01-01

    We propose to apply the technique of synthetic aperture radar interferometry to the measurement of ocean surface topography at spatial resolution approaching 1 km. The measurement will have wide ranging applications in oceanography, hydrology, and marine geophysics. The oceanographic and related societal applications are briefly discussed in the paper. To meet the requirements for oceanographic applications, the instrument must be flown in an orbit with proper sampling of ocean tides.

  9. Electronic structure and thermoelectric properties of (Mg2X)2 / (Mg2Y)2 (X, Y = Si, Ge, Sn) superlattices from first-principle calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, San-Dong

    2016-05-01

    To identify thermoelectric materials containing abundant, low-cost and non-toxic elements, we have studied the electronic structures and thermoelectric properties of (Mg2X)2/ (Mg2Y)2 (X, Y = Si, Ge, Sn) superlattices with state-of-the-art first-principles calculations using a modified Becke and Johnson (mBJ) exchange potential. Our results show that (Mg2Ge)2/ (Mg2Sn)2 and (Mg2Si)2/ (Mg2Sn)2 are semi-metals using mBJ plus spin-orbit coupling (mBJ + SOC), while (Mg2Si)2/ (Mg2Ge)2 is predicted to be a direct-gap semiconductor with a mBJ gap value of 0.46 eV and mBJ + SOC gap value of 0.44 eV. Thermoelectric properties are predicted by through solving the Boltzmann transport equations within the constant scattering time approximation. It is found that (Mg2Si)2/ (Mg2Ge)2 has a larger Seebeck coefficient and power factor than (Mg2Ge)2/ (Mg2Sn)2 and (Mg2Si)2/ (Mg2Sn)2 for both p-type and n-type doping. The detrimental influence of SOC on the power factor of p-type (Mg2X)2/ (Mg2Y)2 (X, Y = Si, Ge, Sn) is analyzed as a function of the carrier concentration, but there is a negligible SOC effect for n-type. These results can be explained by the influence of SOC on their valence and conduction bands near the Fermi level.

  10. Imaging Resolution of the 410-km and 660-km Discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, K.; Zhou, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Structure of seismic discontinuities at depths of about 410 km and 660 km provides important constraints on mantle convection as the associated phase transformations in the transition zone are sensitive to thermal perturbations. Teleseismic P-to-S receiver functions have been widely used to map the depths of the two discontinuities. In this study, we investigate the resolution of receiver functions in imaging topographic variations of the 410-km and 660-km discontinuities based on wave propagation simulations using the Spectral Element Method (SEM). We investigate finite-frequency effects of direct P waves as well as P-to-S converted waves by varying the length scale of discontinuity topography in the transition zone. We show that wavefront healing effects are significant in broadband receiver functions. For example, at a period of 10 to 20 seconds, the arrival anomaly in P-to-S converted waves is about 50% of what predicted by ray theory when the topography length scale is in the order of 400 km. The observed arrival anomaly further reduces to 10-20% when the topography length scale reduces to about 200 km. We calculate 2-D boundary sensitivity kernels for direct P waves as well as receiver functions based on surface wave mode summation and confirm that finite frequency-effects can be properly accounted for. Three-dimensional wavespeed structure beneath seismic stations can also introduce significant artifacts in transition zone discontinuity topography if time corrections are not applied, and, the effects are dependent on frequency.

  11. Solar Radar Astronomy with LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, P.

    2003-04-01

    A new approach to the study of the Sun's corona and its dynamical processes is possible with radar investigations in the frequency range of about 10-50 MHz. The range of electron densities of the solar corona is such that radio waves at these frequencies can provide diagnostic radar echoes of large scale phenomena such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We expect that the frequency shift imposed on the echo signal by an earthward-moving CME will provide a direct measurement of the velocity, thereby providing a good estimate of the arrival time at Earth. It is known that CMEs are responsible for the largest geomagnetic storms at Earth, which are capable of causing power grid blackouts, satellite electronic upsets, and degradation of radio communications circuits. Thus, having accurate forecasts of potential CME-initiated geomagnetic storms is of practical space weather interest. New high power transmitting arrays are becoming available, along with proposed modifications to existing research facilities, that will allow the use of radio waves to study the solar corona by the radar echo technique. Of particular interest for such solar radar investigations is the bistatic configuration with the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR). The LOFAR facility will have an effective receiving area of about 1 square km at solar radar frequencies. Such large effective area will provide the receiving antenna gain needed for detailed investigations of solar coronal dynamics. Conservative estimates of the signal-to-noise ratio for solar radar echoes as a function of the integration time required to achieve a specified detection level (e.g., ~ 5 dB) indicate that time resolutions of 10s of seconds can be achieved. Thus, we are able to resolve variations in the solar radar cross section on time scales which will provide new information on the plasma dynamical processes associated with the solar corona, such as CMEs. It is the combination of high transmitted power and large effective receiving

  12. Knob manager (KM) operators guide

    SciTech Connect

    1993-10-08

    KM, Knob Manager, is a tool which enables the user to use the SUNDIALS knob box to adjust the settings of the control system. The followings are some features of KM: dynamic knob assignments with the user friendly interface; user-defined gain for individual knob; graphical displays for operating range and status of each process variable is assigned; backup and restore one or multiple process variable; save current settings to a file and recall the settings from that file in future.

  13. Radar Detection of Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Isaac

    2012-03-01

    Progress in the study of high energy cosmic ray physics is limited by low flux. In order to collect substantial statistics above 10^19 eV, the two largest ground arrays currently in operation cover 800 km^2 (Telescope Array, Utah) and 3000 km^2 (Auger Observatory, Argentina). The logistics and cost of an order-of-magnitude increase in ground array aperture is prohibitive. In the literature, radar detection experiments have been proposed but substantial results have not been reported. We have deployed a low-power (1500 W) bistatic radar facility overlapping the Telescope Array (TA) in Delta, Utah. Data acquisition systems for the radar receivers were developed in parallel. This system has taught us a great deal, but our current focus is building and deploying a 40 kW transmitter and new high-gain transmitting antenna. Theoretical simulations of CR air shower scattering of radar show that coincidences with the ground array should be detected with this new system. An FCC license for the new transmitter/antenna has been obtained. Systems monitoring and data logging systems, as well as a new, intelligent self-triggered DAQ continue to be developed. We hope to deploy the self-triggered DAQ during the first few months of 2012 and complete the transmitte

  14. Voltage- and ATP-dependent structural rearrangements of the P2X2 receptor associated with the gating of the pore.

    PubMed

    Keceli, Batu; Kubo, Yoshihiro

    2014-11-01

    P2X2 is an extracellular ATP-gated cation channel which has a voltage-dependent gating property even though it lacks a canonical voltage sensor. It is a trimer in which each subunit has two transmembrane helices and a large extracellular domain. The three inter-subunit ATP binding sites are linked to the pore forming transmembrane (TM) domains by β-strands. We analysed structural rearrangements of the linker strands between the ATP binding site and TM domains upon ligand binding and voltage change, electrophysiologically in Xenopus oocytes, using mutants carrying engineered thiol-modifiable cysteine residues. (1) We demonstrated that the double mutant D315C&I67C (at β-14 and β-1, respectively) shows a 2- to 4-fold increase in current amplitude after treatment with a reducing reagent, dithiothreitol (DTT). Application of the thiol-reactive metal Cd(2+) induced current decline due to bond formation between D315C and I67C. This effect was not observed in wild type (WT) or in single point mutants. (2) Cd(2+)-induced current decline was analysed in hyperpolarized and depolarized conditions with different pulse protocols, and also in the presence and absence of ATP. (3) Current decline induced by Cd(2+) could be clearly observed in the presence of ATP, but was not clear in the absence of ATP, showing a state-dependent modification. (4) In the presence of ATP, Cd(2+) modification was significantly faster in hyperpolarized than in depolarized conditions, showing voltage-dependent structural rearrangements of the linker strands. (5) Experiments using tandem trimeric constructs (TTCs) with controlled number and position of mutations in the trimer showed that the bridging by Cd(2+) between 315 and 67 was not intra- but inter-subunit. (6) Finally, we performed similar analyses of a pore mutant T339S, which makes the channel activation voltage insensitive. Cd(2+) modification rates of T339S were similar in hyperpolarized and depolarized conditions. Taking these results

  15. Voltage- and ATP-dependent structural rearrangements of the P2X2 receptor associated with the gating of the pore

    PubMed Central

    Keceli, Batu; Kubo, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    P2X2 is an extracellular ATP-gated cation channel which has a voltage-dependent gating property even though it lacks a canonical voltage sensor. It is a trimer in which each subunit has two transmembrane helices and a large extracellular domain. The three inter-subunit ATP binding sites are linked to the pore forming transmembrane (TM) domains by β-strands. We analysed structural rearrangements of the linker strands between the ATP binding site and TM domains upon ligand binding and voltage change, electrophysiologically in Xenopus oocytes, using mutants carrying engineered thiol-modifiable cysteine residues. (1) We demonstrated that the double mutant D315C&I67C (at β-14 and β-1, respectively) shows a 2- to 4-fold increase in current amplitude after treatment with a reducing reagent, dithiothreitol (DTT). Application of the thiol-reactive metal Cd2+ induced current decline due to bond formation between D315C and I67C. This effect was not observed in wild type (WT) or in single point mutants. (2) Cd2+-induced current decline was analysed in hyperpolarized and depolarized conditions with different pulse protocols, and also in the presence and absence of ATP. (3) Current decline induced by Cd2+ could be clearly observed in the presence of ATP, but was not clear in the absence of ATP, showing a state-dependent modification. (4) In the presence of ATP, Cd2+ modification was significantly faster in hyperpolarized than in depolarized conditions, showing voltage-dependent structural rearrangements of the linker strands. (5) Experiments using tandem trimeric constructs (TTCs) with controlled number and position of mutations in the trimer showed that the bridging by Cd2+ between 315 and 67 was not intra- but inter-subunit. (6) Finally, we performed similar analyses of a pore mutant T339S, which makes the channel activation voltage insensitive. Cd2+ modification rates of T339S were similar in hyperpolarized and depolarized conditions. Taking these results together, we

  16. Radar Studies of Ionospheric Plasma Irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, P. B.

    2006-11-01

    High power high resolution VHF radars have proven to be powerful diagnostics to study ionospheric plasma irregularities, a space weather phenomenon of immense importance in view of its impact on space communication and navigation. The VHF radars at Jicamarca, Peru and Trivandrum, India have contributed greatly over the past four decades in arriving at the current understanding of the basic characteristics of the equatorial spread-F (ESF) and equatorial electrojet (EEJ) irregularities and the underlying plasma instability processes. Recent advances, involving high resolution radar observations of equatorial plasma irregularities, include the detection of supersonic plasma bubbles rising to heights beyond 1000 km, 150 km echoes and kilometric scale waves. The new and more recent developments in plasma irregularity studies came from the middle and upper atmosphere (MU) radar at Shigaraki, Japan and the mesosphere stratosphere troposphere (MST) radar at Gadanki, India. The new types of plasma irregularity structures observed by this mid- and low latitude VHF radars cover the well known quasi- periodic (QP) waves, tidal ion layers, kilometric scale waves and structures in the collision dominated lower E region. The paper presents an overview on the recent advances in the radar technique and the above mentioned new developments in observation and theory of the equatorial and low latitude ionospheric plasma irregularities.

  17. Ab initio surface reaction energetics of SiH4 and Si2H6 on Si(001)-(2 x 2).

    PubMed

    Smardon, R D; Srivastava, G P

    2005-11-01

    First-principles pseudopotential calculations, within a simple dynamically constrained scheme, have been performed to investigate the reaction of 0.25 ML coverage of SiH4 and Si2H6 with the Si(001)-(2 x 2) surface. The silane molecule (SiH4) is adsorbed on to the surface at a number of different sites (on dimer, interrow, or intrarow) with varying barrier heights. Two distinct structures, which are similar in energy, arise from the initial dissociative reaction SiH4-->SiH3(silyl) + H, where the dissociated species are adsorbed either on the same dimer components or on adjacent dimer components. Several further decays of silyl from SiH4 are presented in two separate regimes of high and low ambient hydrogen coverages. The decomposition of silyl can form two different bridging structures: an on top or an intrarow bridging structure in both of the two hydrogen coverage regimes. The disilane molecule (Si2H6) is also adsorbed upon this surface with varying energy barriers, resulting in a dissociation reaction where two SiH3 species are adsorbed on one dimer or in an adjacent dimer configuration. Plausible energy reaction paths for the above models are presented. The stability of the SiH2 species is also discussed. PMID:16375553

  18. Crystal Structure of Pseudorhombohedral InFe 1- xTi xO 3+ x/2 ( x=2/3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michiue, Yuichi; Onoda, Mitsuko; Watanabe, Akiteru; Watanabe, Mamoru; Brown, Francisco; Kimizuka, Noboru

    2002-02-01

    The structure of pseudorhombohedral-type InFe1-xTixO3-x/2 (x=2/3) was refined by Rietveld profile fitting. The crystal is a commensurate member of a series in a solution range on InFeO3-In2Ti2O7 including incommensurate structures. The structure with the unit cell of a=5.9188(1), b=10.1112(2), and c=6.3896(1) Å, β=108.018(2)°, and a space group P21/a is the alternate stacking of an edge-shared InO6 octahedral layer and an Fe/Ti-O plane along c*. Metal sites on the Fe/Ti-O plane are surrounded by four oxygen atoms on the Fe/Ti-O plane and two axial ones. Electric conductivities of the order 10-4 S/cm were observed for the samples at 1000 K, while the oxide ion transport number is almost zero as no electromotive force was detected by an oxygen concentration cell.

  19. Adsorption site and structure determination of c(2x2) N{sub 2}/Ni(100) using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Moler, E.J.; Kellar, S.A.; Huff, W.R.A.

    1997-04-01

    The authors have determined the atomic spatial structure of c(2x2) N2Ni(100) with Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) from the nitrogen 1s core level using monochromatized x-rays from beamline 6.1 at SSRL and beamline 9.3.2 at the ALS. The chemically shifted N 1s peak intensities were summed together to obtain ARPEFS curves for both nitrogen atoms in the molecule. They used a new, highly-optimized program based on the Rehr-Albers scattering matrix formalism to find the adsorption site and to quantitatively determine the bond-lengths. The nitrogen molecule stands upright at an atop site, with a N-Ni bond length of 2.25(1) {angstrom}, a N-N bond length of 1.10(7) {angstrom}, and a first layer Ni-Ni spacing of 1.76(4) {angstrom}. The shake-up peak shows an identical ARPEFS diffraction pattern, confirming its intrinsic nature and supporting a previous use of this feature to decompose the peak into contributions from the chemically inequivalent nitrogen atoms. Comparison to a previously published theoretical treatment of N-N-Ni and experimental structures of analogous adsorbate systems demonstrates the importance of adsorbate-adsorbate interactions in weakly chemisorbed systems.

  20. The nicotinic α6 subunit gene determines variability in chronic pain sensitivity via cross-inhibition of P2X2/3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Wieskopf, Jeffrey S; Mathur, Jayanti; Limapichat, Walrati; Post, Michael R; Al-Qazzaz, Mona; Sorge, Robert E; Martin, Loren J; Zaykin, Dmitri V; Smith, Shad B; Freitas, Kelen; Austin, Jean-Sebastien; Dai, Feng; Zhang, Jie; Marcovitz, Jaclyn; Tuttle, Alexander H; Slepian, Peter M; Clarke, Sarah; Drenan, Ryan M; Janes, Jeff; Al Sharari, Shakir; Segall, Samantha K; Aasvang, Eske K; Lai, Weike; Bittner, Reinhard; Richards, Christopher I; Slade, Gary D; Kehlet, Henrik; Walker, John; Maskos, Uwe; Changeux, Jean-Pierre; Devor, Marshall; Maixner, William; Diatchenko, Luda; Belfer, Inna; Dougherty, Dennis A; Su, Andrew I; Lummis, Sarah C R; Imad Damaj, M; Lester, Henry A; Patapoutian, Ardem; Mogil, Jeffrey S

    2015-05-13

    Chronic pain is a highly prevalent and poorly managed human health problem. We used microarray-based expression genomics in 25 inbred mouse strains to identify dorsal root ganglion (DRG)-expressed genetic contributors to mechanical allodynia, a prominent symptom of chronic pain. We identified expression levels of Chrna6, which encodes the α6 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), as highly associated with allodynia. We confirmed the importance of α6* (α6-containing) nAChRs by analyzing both gain- and loss-of-function mutants. We find that mechanical allodynia associated with neuropathic and inflammatory injuries is significantly altered in α6* mutants, and that α6* but not α4* nicotinic receptors are absolutely required for peripheral and/or spinal nicotine analgesia. Furthermore, we show that Chrna6's role in analgesia is at least partially due to direct interaction and cross-inhibition of α6* nAChRs with P2X2/3 receptors in DRG nociceptors. Finally, we establish the relevance of our results to humans by the observation of genetic association in patients suffering from chronic postsurgical and temporomandibular pain. PMID:25972004

  1. The Nicotinic α6 Subunit Gene Determines Variability in Chronic Pain Sensitivity via Cross-inhibition of P2X2/3 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wieskopf, Jeffrey S.; Mathur, Jayanti; Limapichat, Walrati; Post, Michael R.; Al-Qazzaz, Mona; Sorge, Robert E.; Martin, Loren J.; Zaykin, Dmitri V.; Smith, Shad B.; Freitas, Kelen; Austin, Jean-Sebastien; Dai, Feng; Zhang, Jie; Marcovitz, Jaclyn; Tuttle, Alexander H.; Slepian, Peter M.; Clarke, Sarah; Drenan, Ryan M.; Janes, Jeff; Sharari, Shakir Al; Segall, Samantha K.; Aasvang, Eske K.; Lai, Weike; Bittner, Reinhard; Richards, Christopher I.; Slade, Gary D.; Kehlet, Henrik; Walker, John; Maskos, Uwe; Changeux, Jean-Pierre; Devor, Marshall; Maixner, William; Diatchenko, Luda; Belfer, Inna; Dougherty, Dennis A.; Su, Andrew I.; Lummis, Sarah C.R.; Damaj, M. Imad; Lester, Henry A.; Patapoutian, Ardem; Mogil, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain is a highly prevalent and poorly managed human health problem. We used microarray-based expression genomics in 25 inbred mouse strains to identify dorsal root ganglion (DRG)-expressed genetic contributors to mechanical allodynia, a prominent symptom of chronic pain. We identified expression levels of Chrna6, which encodes the α6 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), as highly associated with allodynia. We confirmed the importance of α6* (i.e., α6-containing) nAChRs by analyzing both gain- and loss-of-function mutants. We find that mechanical allodynia associated with neuropathic and inflammatory injuries is significantly altered in α6* mutants, and that α6* but not α4* nicotinic receptors are absolutely required for peripheral and/or spinal nicotine analgesia. Furthermore, we show that Chrna6’s role in analgesia is at least partially due to direct interaction and cross-inhibition of α6* nAChRs with P2X2/3 receptors in DRG nociceptors. Finally, we establish relevance of our results to humans by the observation of genetic association in patients suffering from chronic postsurgical pain and temporomandibular pain. PMID:25972004

  2. Radar Rainfall Estimation with an X-Band Polarimetric Radar on Wheels: Early Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostou, E. N.; Krajewski, W. F.; Anagnostou, M. N.; Kruger, A.; Miriovsky, B.

    2002-05-01

    The main goal of the X-Band Polarimetric Radar on Wheels (XPOW) study is aimed at exploring the advantages of dual-polarized X-band radar systems in radar rainfall estimation. Secondary goals include characterizing the reflectivity variability captured by National Weather Service WSR-88Ds and comparing different types of disdrometers. This investigation was facilitated through field experiments during which high-resolution polarimetric radar data from the National Observatory of Athens (NOA) mobile dual-polarization X-band radar were collected over well-instrumented sites. The XPOW field experiment was conducted in Iowa City, Iowa during October and November 2001. For this experiment, five disdrometers, a vertically pointing Doppler radar, and several dual-gauge tipping bucket rain gauge platforms were deployed in an area about 1.0 km by 1.5 km. These instruments were used to both augment and validate the data collected by the polarimetric radar, which was located approximately 8 km away. In the same area we collected data from some 14 rain gauges located within a high density cluster at the Iowa City Municipal Airport. The five disdrometers included two-dimensional video disdrometer, two optical disdrometers, an impact disdrometer, and a bistatic radar based disdrometer. The area in which these instruments were deployed corresponds to the size of one pixel from the Davenport, IA WSR-88D, located 80 km east of Iowa City, allowing exploration of the variability of reflectivity at scales smaller than a typical radar pixel. We will be presenting quantitative comparisons of rain rates and precipitation microphysical variables retrieved from XPOW and measured by the high-density network of gages and disdrometers. Furthermore, XPOW attenuation correction results will be compared to the un-attenuated WSR-88D reflectivity measurements providing a framework for assessing the deployed algorithm's microphysical retrievals.

  3. The Goldstone Solar System Radar: 1988-2003 Earth-based Mars Radar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haldemann, A. F. C.; Jurgens, R. F.; Slade, M. A.; Larsen, K. W.

    2005-01-01

    The Goldstone Solar System Radar (GSSR) has successfully collected radar echo data from Mars over the past 30 years. The older data provided local elevation information for Mars, along with radar scattering information with global resolution. Since the upgrade to the 70-m DSN antenna at Goldstone completed in 1986, Mars data has been collected during all but the 1997 Mars opposition. Radar data, and non-imaging delay- Doppler data in particular, requires significant data processing to extract elevation, reflectivity and roughness of the reflecting surface. The spatial resolution of these experiments is typically some 10 km in longitude by some 150 km in latitude. The interpretation of these parameters while limited by the complexities of electromagnetic scattering, do provide information directly relevant to geophysical and geomorphic analyses of Mars.

  4. Radar and Lidar Radar DEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liskovich, Diana; Simard, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Using radar and lidar data, the aim is to improve 3D rendering of terrain, including digital elevation models (DEM) and estimates of vegetation height and biomass in a variety of forest types and terrains. The 3D mapping of vegetation structure and the analysis are useful to determine the role of forest in climate change (carbon cycle), in providing habitat and as a provider of socio-economic services. This in turn will lead to potential for development of more effective land-use management. The first part of the project was to characterize the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission DEM error with respect to ICESat/GLAS point estimates of elevation. We investigated potential trends with latitude, canopy height, signal to noise ratio (SNR), number of LiDAR waveform peaks, and maximum peak width. Scatter plots were produced for each variable and were fitted with 1st and 2nd degree polynomials. Higher order trends were visually inspected through filtering with a mean and median filter. We also assessed trends in the DEM error variance. Finally, a map showing how DEM error was geographically distributed globally was created.

  5. Probabilistic Quantitative Precipitation Estimates with Ground-based Radar Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirstetter, Pierre-Emmanuel; Gourley, Jonathan; Hong, Yang; Zhang, Jian; Moazamigoodarzi, Saber; Langston, Carrie; Arthur, Ami

    2015-04-01

    The uncertainty structure of radar quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) is largely unknown at fine spatiotemporal scales near the radar measurement scale (1-km/5-min). By using the WSR-88D radar network and rain gauge datasets across the conterminous US, an investigation of this subject has been carried out within the framework of the NOAA/NSSL ground radar-based Multi-Radar Multi-Sensor. Probability distributions of precipitation rates are computed instead of deterministic values using a model quantifying the relation between radar reflectivity and the corresponding "true" precipitation. The probabilistic model considers multiple sources of error in radar QPE as well as the impacts of correction algorithms on the radar signal. Ensembles of reflectivity-to-rain rate relationships accounting explicitly for rain typology were derived at a 5-min/1-km scale. This approach preserves the fine space/time sampling properties of the radar and conditions probabilistic QPE on the rain rate and precipitation type when computing probabilistic quantitative precipitation estimates (PQPE). The model components were estimated on the basis of a 1-year-long data sample. This PQPE model provides the basis for precipitation probability maps and the generation of radar precipitation ensembles. Maps of the precipitation exceedance probability for specific thresholds (e.g. precipitation return periods) are demonstrated. Precipitation probability maps are accumulated to the hourly time scale and compare positively to the deterministic QPE. This approach to PQPE can readily apply to other systems including space-based passive and active sensor algorithms.

  6. GIS based Spatial Precipitation Estimation using Next Generation Radar and Raingauge Data

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xuesong; Srinivasan, Ragahvan

    2010-01-01

    Precipitation is one important input variable for land surface hydrologic and ecological models. Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD) can provide precipitation products that cover most of the conterminous United States at high resolution (approximately 4km×4km).

  7. Mercury Radar Imaging At Arecibo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, J.

    The Arecibo telescope upgrade has enabled us to obtain radar images of Mercury of unprecedented quality. Here I report on results from Arecibo observations made dur- ing the period 1998-2001. The imaging was done using the delay-Doppler method in both its standard and long-code versions. The north polar "ice" features have been imaged at 1-km resolution. While these images strongly indicate radar backscatter- ing from volatile deposits in permanently shaded cold traps, the discovery of features in small craters and at relatively low (71-75) latitudes is difficult to reconcile with recent thermal modeling work. This suggests that our current understanding of the maintenance of water ice in the Mercurian environment is incomplete. Other (non- polar) regions have also been imaged, with the best results having come from long- code observations in the summer of 2001. These images are now indicating that all of the major radar features in the Mariner-unimaged hemisphere (including those earlier dubbed "A", "B", and "C") are associated with impact structures. Feature "A" shows a remarkable ejecta blanket and ray system as well as numerous secondary craters, all emanating from a central 85-km-diameter impact crater. Feature "B", earlier suggested as a possible volcano, now appears to be associated with an impact crater the same size as "A". Feature "C", though somewhat obscured by the Doppler equator, shows what appears to be a dense cluster of fresh craters, possibly an impactor swarm or secon- daries from a single (as yet unidentified) impact. A very large rayed impact feature has also been discovered to the south of "C". We have also obtained high-quality images over portions of the Mariner-imaged hemisphere. Here we find a strong correspon- dence between radar-bright craters and bright (and/or rayed) craters in the Mariner images. On the other hand, much of Caloris basin and its surrounding smooth plains appears radar-dark in depolarized radar images, suggesting

  8. Advanced Meteor radar at Tirupati: System details and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunkara, Eswaraiah; Gurubaran, Subramanian; Sundararaman, Sathishkumar; Venkat Ratnam, Madineni; Karanam, Kishore Kumar; Eethamakula, Kosalendra; Vijaya Bhaskara Rao, S.

    An advanced meteor radar viz., Enhanced Meteor Detection Radar (EMDR) operating at 35.25 MHz is installed at Sri Venkateswara University (SVU), Tirupati (13.63oN, 79.4oE), India, in the month of August 2013. Present communication describes the need for the meteor radar at present location, system description, its measurement techniques, its variables and comparison of measured mean winds with contemporary radars over the Indian region. The present radar site is selected to fill the blind region of Gadanki (13.5oN, 79.2oE) MST radar, which covers mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region (70-110 km). By modifying the receiving antenna structure and elements, this radar is capable of providing accurate wind information between 70 and 110 km unlike other similar radars. Height covering region is extended by increasing the meteor counting capacity by modifying the receiving antenna structure and elements and hence its wind estimation limits extended below and above of 80 and 100 km, respectively. In the present study, we also made comparison of horizontal winds in the MLT region with those measured by similar and different (MST and MF radars) techniques over the Indian region including the model (HWM 07) data sets. The comparison showed a very good agreement between the overlapping altitudes (82-98 km) of different radars. Zonal winds compared very well as that of meridional winds. The observed discrepancies and limitations in the wind measurement are discussed. This new radar is expected to play important role in understanding the vertical and lateral coupling by forming a unique local network.

  9. Radar Observations of Typhoon 9807

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, Noriyuki; Shibagaki, Yoshiaki; Fukao, Shoichiro

    In east Asia, tropical cyclones are called Typhoon. We conducted the Doppler radar observation during the passage of Typhoon 9807(Vicky) on Sep. 1998 with the middle and upper atmosphere (MU) radar located in the central region of the Japan Islands (at Shigaraki). The center of T9807 passed about 40 km northwest of the MU site. T9807 caused much damage by strong wind, and MU radar observation was also interrupted due to power cut by strong surface wind. A remarkable downdraft exceeding 6 m/s was found at the low level just before power cut, at which time also a rainband was observed by a meteorological radar operated by Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). Global objective analysis produced by JMA shows that cool-dried air advected in the tail of the Typhoon on the middle troposphere, we also confirmed this cool-dried air by means of a radiosonde launched at the MU observatory, and the rainband was located in front of this cool-dried air. In our presentation, we will show a case study observation for the Typhoon at mid- latitude in east Asia, and discuss the relations among the cool-dried air, the rainband, and the strong wind.

  10. Status of the Jicamarca radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, T.

    1984-01-01

    The capabilities of the large 50-MHz radar at Jicamarca for mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere MST observations were discussed in some detail. Hence this description will be quite brief and will concentrate on recent improvements in the facility. The radar is located about 20 km from Lima, Peru. It is well shielded by surrounding mountains, and most of the ground clutter is restricted to ranges of 15 km or less. The antenna consists of 18,432 half-wave dipoles (9216 crossed pairs) covering an area of 290 m by 290 m and divided up into 64 independent modules which can be individually phased and/or used as separate antennas in any way desired. The whole array can be steered about 3 degrees from the on-axis position (the limit is the beam width of the individual modules, which cannot be steered), and any polarization can be arranged. Even with this limited steerability it is straightforward to determine vector wind velocities by pointing segments of the antenna in different directions. The radar can also be used as in interferometer.

  11. The crystal chemistry of Ca(10-y)(SiO4)3(SO4)3Cl(2-x-2y)F(x) ellestadite.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yanan; Ritter, Clemens; White, Tim

    2011-12-19

    Fluor-chlorellestadite solid solutions Ca(10)(SiO(4))(3)(SO(4))(3)Cl(2-x)F(x), serving as prototype crystalline matrices for the fixation of hazardous fly ash, were synthesized and characterized by powder X-ray and neutron diffraction (PXRD and PND), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The lattice parameters of the ellestadites vary linearly with composition and show the expected shrinkage of unit cell volume as fluorine (IR = 1.33 Å) displaces chlorine (IR = 1.81 Å). FTIR spectra indicate little or no OH(-) in the solid solutions. All compositions conform to P6(3)/m symmetry where F(-) is located at the 2a (0, 0, (1)/(4)) position, while Cl(-) is displaced out of the 6h Ca(2) triangle plane and occupies 4e (0, 0, z) split positions with z ranging from 0.336(3) to 0.4315(3). Si/S randomly occupy the 6h tetrahedral site. Ellestadites rich in Cl (x ≤ 1.2) show an overall deficiency in halogens (<2 atom per formula unit), particularly Cl as a result of CaCl(2) volatilization, with charge balance achieved by the creation of Ca vacancies (Ca(2+) + 2Cl(-) →□(Ca) + 2□(Cl)) leading to the formula Ca(10-y)(SiO(4))(3)(SO(4))(3)Cl(2-x-2y)F(x). For F-rich compositions the vacancies are found at Ca(2), while for Cl-rich ellestadites, vacancies are at Ca(1). It is likely the loss of CaCl(2) which leads tunnel anion vacancies promotes intertunnel positional disorder, preventing the formation of a P2(1)/b monoclinic dimorph, analogous to that reported for Ca(10)(PO(4))(6)Cl(2). Trends in structure with composition were analyzed using crystal-chemical parameters, whose systematic variations served to validate the quality of the Rietveld refinements. PMID:22111559

  12. Observation of meteors by MST radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William; Kingsley, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    The observation of meteor trails by a vertical mesosphere - stratosphere - troposphere (MST) radar beam has the advantage of good height resolution and an approximate knowledge of the zenith angle since the trails are horizontal or near-horizontal. An extension of the ablation theory of meteors was developed for near horizontal trails which takes into account the curvature of the earth. Observations of the Geminid meteor shower by MST radar reveal the 'diffusion heights' to be in fair agreement with the true height, but with some discrepancies that can amount to 4 km. The true heights are almost entirely confined to the range 87-91 km, although the upper limit is attributed to the coherent integration time of the existing MST radar processing.

  13. The Urbana MST radar, capabilities and limitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royrvik, O.; Goss, L. D.

    1983-01-01

    The 41-MHz coherent-scatter radar located northeast of the University of Illinois at Urbana is being used for studies of the troposphere, stratosphere and mesosphere regions. The antenna consists of 1008 halfwave dipoles with a physical aperture of 11000 sq m. Transmitted peak power is about 750 kW. Clear-air returns may be received from 6 km to 90 km altitude. Autocorrelation functions of the scattered signal are calculated on-line. From the autocorrelation functions the scattered power, line-of-sight velocity and signal correlation time are calculated. Some aspects of the troposphere/stratosphere and the mesosphere observations are discussed. Capabilities and limitations of the Urbana MST radar are pointed out, and recent and planned improvements to the radar are described.

  14. Lunar craters with radar bright ejecta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, T. W.; Zisk, S. H.; Schultz, P. H.; Cutts, J. A.; Shorthill, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    The properties of the 3.8-cm radar-bright halos observed around certain lunar impact craters are compiled and compared with 70-cm radar, thermal infrared and photogeological data in order to address the nature of the halos. Diameters, positions, and radar and IR signal strengths are presented for 120 radar-bright ejecta regions of size greater than 20 km and twice the diameter of the crater. The 3.8-cm halos are noted to range in size up to 30 times that of the crater itself, although the strength of the signal from the crater and rim lies in a narrow range, while the IR halos are smaller in extent and variable in signal strength. The radar-bright ejecta are found to have a range of optical properties, and to be associated with fresh primary impact craters. Data are thus consistent with craters having radar-bright ejecta deposits having ages of less than 10 million to 1 billion years, with the radar and infrared signatures of the ejecta deposits produced by combinations of enhanced blockiness and roughness.

  15. High-Resolution Radar Imagery of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, John K.; Nolan, M. C.

    2009-09-01

    We present high-resolution radar images of Mars obtained during the 2005 and 2007 oppositions. The images were constructed from long-code delay-Doppler observations made with the Arecibo S-band (13-cm) radar. The average image resolution of 3 km represented a better than order-of-magnitude improvement over pre-upgrade Arecibo imagery of the planet. Images of depolarized reflectivity (an indicator primarily of wavelength-scale surface roughness) show the same bright volcanic flow features seen in earlier imagery, but with much finer detail. A new image of the Elysium region shows fine detail in the radar-bright channels of Athabasca Vallis, Marte Vallis, and Grjota Vallis. The new images of Tharsis and Olympus Mons also show a complex array of radar-bright and radar-dark features. Southern Amazonis exhibits some of the most complex and puzzling radar-bright structure on the planet. Another curiosity is the Chryse/Xanthe/Channels region, where we find some radar-bright features in or adjacent to fluvial chaos structures. Chryse/Xanthe is also the only region of Mars showing radar-bright craters (which are rare on Mars but common on the Moon and Mercury). We also obtained the first delay-Doppler image showing the enhanced backscatter from the residual south polar ice cap. In addition to the depolarized imagery, we were able to make the first delay-Doppler images of the circular polarization ratio (an important diagnostic for surface roughness texture). We find that vast areas of the radar-bright volcanic regions have polarization ratios close to unity. Such high ratios are rare for terrestrial lava flows and only seen for extremely blocky surfaces giving high levels of multiple scattering.

  16. A Digital Elevation Model of the Greenland Ice Sheet based on Envisat and CryoSat-2 Radar Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinsen, J. F.; Smith, B. E.; Sandberg Sørensen, L.; Khvorostovsky, K.; Forsberg, R.

    2014-12-01

    With the launch of the first radar altimeter by ESA in 1992, more than two decades of radar altimetry data are now available. Therefore, one goal of ESA's Ice Sheet Climate Change Initiative is the estimation of surface elevation changes of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) based on ERS-1, -2, Envisat, CryoSat-2, and, in the longer term, Sentinel-3 data. This will create a data record from 1992 until present date. In addition to elevation-change records, such data can be processed to produce digital elevation models, or DEMs, of the ice sheets. The DEMs can be used to correct radar altimetry data for slope-induced errors resulting from the large footprint (e.g. 2-10 km for Envisat vs. 60 m for ICESat laser altimetry) or to correct for the underlying surface topography when applying the repeat-track method. DEMs also provide key information in e.g. SAR remote sensing of ice velocities to remove the interferograms' topographic signal or in regional climate modeling. This work focuses on the development of a GrIS DEM from Envisat and CryoSat-2 altimetry, corrected with temporally and spatially coincident NASA ICESat, ATM, and LVIS laser data. The spatial resolution is 2 x 2 km and the reference year 2010. It is based on 2009 and 2010 data, the 2009 data adjusted to 2010 by accounting for the intermediate elevation changes. This increases the spatial data coverage and reduces data errors. The GIMP DEM has been corrected for negative elevations and errors in the north, and used to constrain the final DEM. The recently acquired observations and increased data coverage give a strong advantage to this DEM relative to previous models, based on lower-resolution, more temporally scattered data (e.g. a decade of observations or only ICESat data, limited to three annual 35-day acquisition periods). Furthermore, as surface changes occur continuously, an up-to-date DEM is necessary to correctly constrain the observations, thereby ensuring an accurate change detection or modeling

  17. The MST Radar Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roettger, J.

    1984-01-01

    The coherent radar technique is reviewed with special emphasis to mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radars operating in the VHF band. Some basic introduction to Doppler radar measurements and the radar equation is followed by an outline of the characteristics of atmospheric turbulence, viewed from the scattering and reflection processes of radar signals. Radar signal acquisition and preprocessing, namely coherent detection, digital sampling, pre-integration and coding, is briefly discussed. The data analysis is represented in terms of the correlation and spectrum analysis, yielding the essential parameters: power, signal-to-noise ratio, average and fluctuating velocity and persistency. The techniques to measure wind velocities, viz. the different modes of the Doppler method as well as the space antenna method are surveyed and the feasibilities of the MST radar interferometer technique are elucidated. A general view on the criteria to design phased array antennas is given. An outline of the hardware of a typical MST radar system is presented.

  18. Equatorial 150 km echoes and daytime F region vertical plasma drifts in the Brazilian longitude sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, F. S.; Shume, E. B.; de Paula, E. R.; Milla, M.

    2013-10-01

    Previous studies showed that conventional coherent backscatter radar measurements of the Doppler velocity of the so-called 150 km echoes can provide an alternative way of estimating ionospheric vertical plasma drifts during daytime hours (Kudeki and Fawcett, 1993; Chau and Woodman, 2004). Using observations made by a small, low-power 30 MHz coherent backscatter radar located in the equatorial site of São Luís (2.59° S, 44.21° W; -2.35° dip lat), we were able to detect and monitor the occurrence of 150 km echoes in the Brazilian sector. Using these measurements we estimated the local time variation of daytime vertical ionospheric drifts in the eastern American sector. Here, we present a few interesting cases of 150 km-echoes observations made by the São Luís radar and estimates of the diurnal variation of vertical drifts. These cases exemplify the variability of the vertical drifts in the Brazilian sector. Using same-day 150 km-echoes measurements made at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory in Peru, we also demonstrate the variability of the equatorial vertical drifts across the American sector. In addition to first estimates of the absolute vertical plasma drifts in the eastern American (Brazilian) sector, we also present observations of abnormal drifts detected by the São Luís radar associated with the 2009 major sudden stratospheric warming event.

  19. Doppler radar results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bracalente, Emedio M.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are covered in viewgraph form and include the following: (1) a summary of radar flight data collected; (2) a video of combined aft cockpit, nose camera, and radar hazard displays; (3) a comparison of airborne radar F-factor measurements with in situ and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) F-factors for some sample events; and (4) a summary of wind shear detection performance.

  20. Capabilities and limitations of the Jicamarca radar as an MST radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodman, R. F.; Farley, D. T.

    1983-01-01

    The Jicamarca radar (Long. 76.52W, Lat. 11.56S), located at 20 km from Lima at approximately 500 meters over sea level, is surrounded by mountains which provide a good shield from man-made interference. The radio horizon goes from a few hundred meters, across the dry valley where it is located, to 15 km, along the valley in the direction of the continental divide. This limits the clutter to 15 km, except for one high peak at 21 km. It is the most equatorial of all existing MST radars. Its proximity to the Andes, makes its location unique for the study of lee waves and orographic-induced turbulence. Vertical as well as horizontal projections of MST velocities are obtained by simultaneously pointing with different sections of the antenna into three or four different directions. The transmitters, receivers, and systems for data acquisition, processing, and control are included.

  1. Radar: Human Safety Net

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritz, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Radar is a technology that can be used to detect distant objects not visible to the human eye. A predecessor of radar, called the telemobiloscope, was first used to detect ships in the fog in 1904 off the German coast. Many scientists have worked on the development and refinement of radar (Hertz with electromagnetic waves; Popov with determining…

  2. The TRMM Precipitation Radar: Opportunities and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneghini, R.; Kozu, T.; Kawanishi, T.; Kuroiwa, H.; Okamoto, K.; Atlas, D.

    1999-01-01

    Although studies on the feasibility of spaceborne weather radar date back to the 1960's, it was only with the launch of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Satellite in November 1997 that the first weather radar was placed into low earth orbit. The long delay between the initial concept and implementation was caused not only by the demanding requirements of active sensors such as mass, power, and reliability, but because of scientific and technological challenges. For example, the demand for adequate spatial resolution arises from the need to resolve the horizontal structure of convective storm cells and to avoid surface contamination of the rain return at off-nadir angles. To achieve a horizontal resolution on the order of 4 km from low earth orbit with a modest antenna size of 2 m requires the use of a much higher frequency (Ku-band) than those typically used for ground-based weather radars (S- and C-band). Higher frequencies are subject to higher attenuation. As Hitschfeld and Bordan (1954) showed in their classic paper, attenuation correction with a single-wavelength radar is inherently unstable at high attenuations unless the drop size distribution and the radar constant are known precisely. Since these conditions are seldom met, much work over the last decade has been devoted to formulating and testing alternative methods of attenuation correction. The operational method used in the TRMM radar processing is discussed in section 3 of the paper.

  3. Applications of MST radars: Meteorological applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, M. F.

    1989-01-01

    Applications of mesosphere stratosphere troposphere radar to mesoscale meteorology are discussed. The applications include using the radar either as a research tool to improve our understanding of certain dynamical systems or as part of a network used to provide input data for weather forecasting. The workhorse of the operational observing network is the radiosonde balloon which provides measurements of pressure, temperature, humidity, and winds up to heights of 16 to 20 km. Horizontal and vertical measurement capabilities, reflectivity data, derivable quantities and parameters, and special operational requirements are surveyed.

  4. A radar image of Venus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, R. M.; Rumsey, H. C.

    1972-01-01

    Radar scans of Venus have yielded a brightness map of a large portion of the surface. The bright area in the south (alpha) and the twin such areas in the north (beta and delta) were first discovered by spectral analysis of radar echos. When range-gating is also applied, their shapes are revealed, and they are seen to be roundish and about 1000 km across. Although radar brightness can be the result of either intrinsic reflectivity or surface roughness, polarization studies show these features to be rough (to the scale of the wavelength, 12.5 cm). Dark, circular areas can also be seen, many with bright central spots. The dark areas are probably smooth. The blurring of the equatorial strip is an artifact of the range-Doppler geometry; all resolution disappears at the equator. Another artifact of the method is the 'ghost', in the south, of the images of beta and delta. Such ghosts appear only at the eastern and western extremes of the map.

  5. Cloud and Precipitation Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Martin; Höller, Hartmut; Schmidt, Kersten

    Precipitation or weather radar is an essential tool for research, diagnosis, and nowcasting of precipitation events like fronts or thunderstorms. Only with weather radar is it possible to gain insights into the three-dimensional structure of thunderstorms and to investigate processes like hail formation or tornado genesis. A number of different radar products are available to analyze the structure, dynamics and microphysics of precipitation systems. Cloud radars use short wavelengths to enable detection of small ice particles or cloud droplets. Their applications differ from weather radar as they are mostly orientated vertically, where different retrieval techniques can be applied.

  6. The Southern Argentine Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janches, Diego

    2014-11-01

    The Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER) is a new generation system deployed in Rio Grande, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina (53 S) in May 2008. SAAMER transmits 10 times more power than regular meteor radars, and uses a newly developed transmitting array, which focuses power upward instead of the traditional single-antenna-all-sky configuration. The system is configured such that the transmitter array can also be utilized as a receiver. The new design greatly increases the sensitivity of the radar enabling the detection of large number of particles at low zenith angles. The more concentrated transmitted power enables additional meteor studies besides those typical of these systems based on the detection of specular reflections, such as routine detections of head echoes and non-specular trails, previously only possible with High Power and Large Aperture radars. In August 2010, SAAMER was upgraded to a system capable to determine meteoroid orbital parameters. This was achieved by adding two remote receiving stations approximately 10 km away from the main site in near perpendicular directions. The upgrade significantly expands the science that is achieved with this new radar enabling us to study the orbital properties of the interplanetary dust environment. Because of the unique geographical location, SAAMER allows for additional inter-hemispheric comparison with measurements from Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar, which is geographically conjugate. Initial surveys show, for example, that SAAMER observes a very strong contribution of the South Toroidal Sporadic meteor source, of which limited observational data is available. In addition, SAAMER offers similar unique capabilities for meteor showers and streams studies given the range of ecliptic latitudes that the system enables detailed study of showers at high southern latitudes (e.g July Phoenicids or Puppids complex). Finally, SAAMER is ideal for the deployment of complementary instrumentation in both, permanent

  7. Radar ranging to Ganymede and Callisto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, J. K.; Ostro, S. J.; Chandler, J. F.; Hudson, R. S.

    1994-03-01

    Arecibo observations from 1992 February to March have yielded the first successful radar range measurements to the Galilean satellites. Round-up time delays were measured for Ganymede and Callisto with accuracies of 20 to 50 micrometer (3 to 7 km) and 90 micrometer (14 km), respectively. Both satellites showed round-trip delay residuals (relative to the E-3 ephemeris) of about a millisecond, most of which can be attributed to errors in the predicted along-track positions (orbital phases). Using a simple model that assumed that all of the ephemeris error was due to constant orbital phase and Jupiter range errors we estimate that Ganymede was leading its ephemeris by 122 +/- 4 km, Callisto was lagging its ephemeris by 307 +/- 14 km, and Jupiter was 11 +/- 4 km more distant than predicted by the PEP740 planetary ephemeris.

  8. Radar ranging to Ganymede and Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, J. K.; Ostro, S. J.; Chandler, J. F.; Hudson, R. S.

    1994-01-01

    Arecibo observations from 1992 February to March have yielded the first successful radar range measurements to the Galilean satellites. Round-up time delays were measured for Ganymede and Callisto with accuracies of 20 to 50 micrometer (3 to 7 km) and 90 micrometer (14 km), respectively. Both satellites showed round-trip delay residuals (relative to the E-3 ephemeris) of about a millisecond, most of which can be attributed to errors in the predicted along-track positions (orbital phases). Using a simple model that assumed that all of the ephemeris error was due to constant orbital phase and Jupiter range errors we estimate that Ganymede was leading its ephemeris by 122 +/- 4 km, Callisto was lagging its ephemeris by 307 +/- 14 km, and Jupiter was 11 +/- 4 km more distant than predicted by the PEP740 planetary ephemeris.

  9. Long range aircraft detection using high-frequency surface-wave radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong, Hank

    1994-12-01

    Experimental data from a high-frequency surface-wave radar (HFSWR) operating at 1.95 MHz at Cape Bonavista, Newfoundland are analyzed to assess the capability of the radar to detect aircraft over an ocean surface. The results of the analysis show that the HFSWR could easily detect and track a low-flying CP-140 Aurora aircraft at ranges between 11 and 56 km. The radar's coverage area coincides with a trans-Atlantic international flight route, and the radar was also able to detect and track some commercial aircraft in range as far as 280 km.

  10. 2. VIEW SOUTHWEST, prime search radar tower, height finder radar ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW SOUTHWEST, prime search radar tower, height finder radar towards, height finder radar towers, and radar tower (unknown function) - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  11. Alpine radar conversion for LAWR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savina, M.; Burlando, P.

    2012-04-01

    The Local Area Weather Radar (LAWR) is a ship-born weather radar system operating in X-band developed by the DHI Group to detect precipitation in urban areas. To date more than thirty units are installed in different settings around the world. A LAWR was also deployed in the Alps, at 3883 m a.s.l. on the Kl. Matterhorn (Valais, Switzerland). This was the highest LAWR of the world and it led to the development of an Alpine LAWR system that, besides featuring important technological improvements needed to withstand the severe Alpine conditions, required the development of a new Alpine Radar COnversion Model (ARCOM), which is the main focus of this contribution. The LAWR system is equipped with the original FURUNO fan-beam slotted antenna and the original logarithmic receiver, which limits the radar observations to the video signal (L) withour providing the reflectivity (Z). The beam is 0.95 deg wide and 20 deg high. It can detect precipitation to a max range of 60 km. In order to account for the limited availability of raw signal and information and the specific mountain set-up, the conversion model had to be developed differently from the state-of-the-art radar conversion technique used for this class of radars. In particular, the ARCOM is based on a model used to simulate a spatial dependent factor, hereafter called ACF, which is in turn function of parameters that take in account climatological conditions, also used in other conversion methods, but additionally accounting for local radar beam features and for orographic forcings such as the effective sampling power (sP), which is modelled by means of antenna pattern, geometric ground clutter and their interaction. The result is a conversion factor formulated to account for a range correction that is based on the increase of the sampling volume, partial beam blocking and local climatological conditions. The importance of the latter in this study is double with respect to the standard conversion technique for this

  12. Synthetic aperture radar interferometry of Okmok volcano, Alaska: radar observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhong; Mann, Dörte; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Meyer, David

    2000-01-01

    ERS-1/ERS-2 synthetic aperture radar interferometry was used to study the 1997 eruption of Okmok volcano in Alaska. First, we derived an accurate digital elevation model (DEM) using a tandem ERS-1/ERS-2 image pair and the preexisting DEM. Second, by studying changes in interferometric coherence we found that the newly erupted lava lost radar coherence for 5-17 months after the eruption. This suggests changes in the surface backscattering characteristics and was probably related to cooling and compaction processes. Third, the atmospheric delay anomalies in the deformation interferograms were quantitatively assessed. Atmospheric delay anomalies in some of the interferograms were significant and consistently smaller than one to two fringes in magnitude. For this reason, repeat observations are important to confidently interpret small geophysical signals related to volcanic activities. Finally, using two-pass differential interferometry, we analyzed the preemptive inflation, coeruptive deflation, and posteruptive inflation and confirmed the observations using independent image pairs. We observed more than 140 cm of subsidence associated with the 1997 eruption. This subsidence occurred between 16 months before the eruption and 5 months after the eruption, was preceded by ∼18 cm of uplift between 1992 and 1995 centered in the same location, and was followed by ∼10 cm of uplift between September 1997 and 1998. The best fitting model suggests the magma reservoir resided at 2.7 km depth beneath the center of the caldera, which was ∼5 km from the eruptive vent. We estimated the volume of the erupted material to be 0.055 km3 and the average thickness of the erupted lava to be ∼7.4 m. Copyright 2000 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Space Radar Image of Boston, Massachusetts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This radar image of the area surrounding Boston, Mass., shows how a spaceborne radar system distinguishes between densely populated urban areas and nearby areas that are relatively unsettled. The bright white area at the right center of the image is downtown Boston. The wide river below and to the left of the city is the Charles River in Boston's Back Bay neighborhood. The dark green patch to the right of the Back Bay is Boston Common. A bridge across the north end of Back Bay connects the cities of Boston and Cambridge. The light green areas that dominate most of the image are the suburban communities surrounding Boston. The many ponds that dot the region appear as dark irregular spots. Many densely populated urban areas show up as red in the image due to the alignment of streets and buildings to the incoming radar beam. North is toward the upper left. The image was acquired on October 9, 1994, by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) as it flew aboard the space shuttle Endeavour. This area is centered at 42.4 degrees north latitude, 71.2 degrees west longitude. The area shown is approximately 37 km by 18 km (23 miles by 11 miles). Colors are assigned to different radar frequencies and polarizations as follows: red is L-band horizontally transmitted, horizontally received; green is L-band horizontally transmitted, vertically received; blue is C-band horizontally transmitted, vertically received. SIR-C/X-SAR, a cooperative mission of the German, Italian and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program.

  14. Space Radar Image of Saline Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This is a three-dimensional perspective view of Saline Valley, about 30 km (19 miles) east of the town of Independence, California created by combining two spaceborne radar images using a technique known as interferometry. Visualizations like this one are helpful to scientists because they clarify the relationships of the different types of surfaces detected by the radar and the shapes of the topographic features such as mountains and valleys. The view is looking southwest across Saline Valley. The high peaks in the background are the Inyo Mountains, which rise more than 3,000 meters (10,000 feet) above the valley floor. The dark blue patch near the center of the image is an area of sand dunes. The brighter patches to the left of the dunes are the dry, salty lake beds of Saline Valley. The brown and orange areas are deposits of boulders, gravel and sand known as alluvial fans. The image was constructed by overlaying a color composite radar image on top of a digital elevation map. The radar image was taken by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-bandSynthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) on board the space shuttleEndeavour in October 1994. The digital elevation map was producedusing radar interferometry, a process in which radar data are acquired on different passes of the space shuttle. The two data passes are compared to obtain elevation information. The elevation data were derived from a 1,500-km-long (930-mile) digital topographic map processed at JPL. Radar image data are draped over the topography to provide the color with the following assignments: red is L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; green is C-band vertically transmitted, vetically received; and blue is the ratio of C-band vertically transmitted, vertically received to L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received. This image is centered near 36.8 degrees north latitude and 117.7 degrees west longitude. No vertical exaggeration factor has been applied to the data. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint

  15. Space Radar Image of Pishan, China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This radar image is centered near the small town of Pishan in northwest China, about 280 km (174 miles) southeast of the city of Kashgar along the ancient Silk Route in the Taklamakan desert of the Xinjiang Province. Geologists are using this radar image as a map to study past climate changes and tectonics of the area. The irregular lavender branching patterns in the center of the image are the remains of ancient alluvial fans, gravel deposits that have accumulated at the base of the mountains during times of wetter climate. The subtle striped pattern cutting across the ancient fans are caused by thrusting of the Kun Lun Mountains north. This motion is caused by the continuing plate-tectonic collision of India with Asia. Modern fans show up as large lavender triangles above the ancient fan deposits. Yellow areas on the modern fans are vegetated oases. The gridded pattern results from the alignment of poplar trees that have been planted as wind breaks. The reservoir at the top of the image is part of a sophisticated irrigation system that supplies water to the oases. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour in April 1994. This image is centered at 37.4 degrees north latitude, 78.3 degrees east longitude and shows an area approximately 50 km by 100 km (31 miles by 62 miles). The colors are assigned to different frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: Red is L-band horizontally transmitted, horizontally received; green is L-band horizontally transmitted, vertically received; and blue is C-band horizontally transmitted and vertically received. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian, and the United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth.

  16. Space Radar Image of Reunion Island

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This radar image shows the volcanic island of Reunion, about 700 km (434 miles) east of Madagascar in the southwest Indian Ocean. The southern half of the island is dominated by the active volcano, Piton de la Fournaise. This is one of the world's most active volcanoes, with more than 100 eruptions in the last 300 years. The most recent activity occurred in the vicinity of Dolomieu Crater, shown in the lower center of the image within a horseshoe-shaped collapse zone. Recent lava flows appear in shades of red, purple and orange. Light green areas are heavily vegetated forest, while much of the purple area near the coast is farmland. The radar illumination is from the left side of the image and dramatically emphasizes the precipitous cliffs at the edges of the central canyons of the island. These canyons are remnants from the collapse of formerly active parts of the volcanoes that built the island. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on October 5, 1994. The image is centered at 21.2 degrees south latitude, 55.6 degrees east longitude. The area shown is approximately 50 km by 80 km (31 miles by 50 miles). North is toward the upper right. Colors are assigned to different frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band horizontally transmitted, vertically received; green is L-band horizontally transmitted, vertically received; and blue is C-band horizontally transmitted, vertically received. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth.

  17. Eye-safe coherent laser radar system at 2.1 microns using Tm,Ho:YAG lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Sammy W.; Hale, Charley P.; Magee, James R.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Huffaker, A. V.

    1991-01-01

    An eye-safe pulsed coherent laser radar has been developed by using single-frequency Tm,Ho:YAG lasers and heterodyne detection. Returns from a mountainside located 145 km from the laser radar system and the measurement of wind velocity to ranges exceeding 20 km have been demonstrated with transmitted pulse energies of 22 mJ.

  18. Planetary radar studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, T. W.; Cutts, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    A catalog of lunar and radar anomalies was generated to provide a base for comparison with Venusian radar signatures. The relationships between lunar radar anomalies and regolith processes were investigated, and a consortium was formed to compare lunar and Venusian radar images of craters. Time was scheduled at the Arecibo Observatory to use the 430 MHz radar to obtain high resolution radar maps of six areas of the lunar suface. Data from 1978 observations of Mare Serenitas and Plato are being analyzed on a PDP 11/70 computer to construct the computer program library necessary for the eventual reduction of the May 1981 and subsequent data acquisitions. Papers accepted for publication are presented.

  19. Laser radar in robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Carmer, D.C.; Peterson, L.M.

    1996-02-01

    In this paper the authors describe the basic operating principles of laser radar sensors and the typical algorithms used to process laser radar imagery for robotic applications. The authors review 12 laser radar sensors to illustrate the variety of systems that have been applied to robotic applications wherein information extracted from the laser radar data is used to automatically control a mechanism or process. Next, they describe selected robotic applications in seven areas: autonomous vehicle navigation, walking machine foot placement, automated service vehicles, manufacturing and inspection, automotive, military, and agriculture. They conclude with a discussion of the status of laser radar technology and suggest trends seen in the application of laser radar sensors to robotics. Many new applications are expected as the maturity level progresses and system costs are reduced.

  20. W-band ARM Cloud Radar (WACR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Widener, KB; Johnson, K

    2005-01-05

    The W-band Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Cloud Radar (WACR) systems are zenith pointing Doppler radars that probe the extent and composition of clouds at 95.04 GHz. The main purpose of this radar is to determine cloud boundaries (e.g., cloud bottoms and tops). This radar reports estimates for the first three spectra moments for each range gate up to 15 km. The 0th moment is reflectivity, the 1st moment is radial velocity, and the 2nd moment is spectral width. Also available are the raw spectra files. Unlike the millimeter wavelength cloud radar (MMCR), the WACR does not use pulse coding and operates in only copolarization and cross-polarization modes.

  1. 3. VIEW NORTHWEST, height finder radar towers, and radar tower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW NORTHWEST, height finder radar towers, and radar tower (unknown function) - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  2. 30. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #318, showing radar control. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #318, showing radar control. Console and line printers - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  3. Probabilistic forecasts based on radar rainfall uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liguori, S.; Rico-Ramirez, M. A.

    2012-04-01

    gauges location, and then interpolated back onto the radar domain, in order to obtain probabilistic radar rainfall fields in real time. The deterministic nowcasting model integrated in the STEPS system [7-8] has been used for the purpose of propagating the uncertainty and assessing the benefit of implementing the radar ensemble generator for probabilistic rainfall forecasts and ultimately sewer flow predictions. For this purpose, events representative of different types of precipitation (i.e. stratiform/convective) and significant at the urban catchment scale (i.e. in terms of sewer overflow within the urban drainage system) have been selected. As high spatial/temporal resolution is required to the forecasts for their use in urban areas [9-11], the probabilistic nowcasts have been set up to be produced at 1 km resolution and 5 min intervals. The forecasting chain is completed by a hydrodynamic model of the urban drainage network. The aim of this work is to discuss the implementation of this probabilistic system, which takes into account the radar error to characterize the forecast uncertainty, with consequent potential benefits in the management of urban systems. It will also allow a comparison with previous findings related to the analysis of different approaches to uncertainty estimation and quantification in terms of rainfall [12] and flows at the urban scale [13]. Acknowledgements The authors would like to acknowledge the BADC, the UK Met Office and Dr. Alan Seed from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology for providing the radar data and the nowcasting model. The authors acknowledge the support from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) via grant EP/I012222/1.

  4. Differential absorption radar techniques: water vapor retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millán, Luis; Lebsock, Matthew; Livesey, Nathaniel; Tanelli, Simone

    2016-06-01

    Two radar pulses sent at different frequencies near the 183 GHz water vapor line can be used to determine total column water vapor and water vapor profiles (within clouds or precipitation) exploiting the differential absorption on and off the line. We assess these water vapor measurements by applying a radar instrument simulator to CloudSat pixels and then running end-to-end retrieval simulations. These end-to-end retrievals enable us to fully characterize not only the expected precision but also their potential biases, allowing us to select radar tones that maximize the water vapor signal minimizing potential errors due to spectral variations in the target extinction properties. A hypothetical CloudSat-like instrument with 500 m by ˜ 1 km vertical and horizontal resolution and a minimum detectable signal and radar precision of -30 and 0.16 dBZ, respectively, can estimate total column water vapor with an expected precision of around 0.03 cm, with potential biases smaller than 0.26 cm most of the time, even under rainy conditions. The expected precision for water vapor profiles was found to be around 89 % on average, with potential biases smaller than 77 % most of the time when the profile is being retrieved close to surface but smaller than 38 % above 3 km. By using either horizontal or vertical averaging, the precision will improve vastly, with the measurements still retaining a considerably high vertical and/or horizontal resolution.

  5. 70-cm radar observations of 433 Eros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, D. B.; Pettengill, G. H.; Shapiro, I. I.

    1976-01-01

    Radar observations of 433 Eros were made at the Arecibo Observatory using a wavelength of 70 cm during the close approach of Eros to earth in mid-January, 1975. A peak radar cross section of plus or minus 15 sq km was observed. The spectral broadening obtained was approximately 30 Hz, which is consistent with a value of 16 km for the maximum radius of the asteroid. The surface of Eros appears to be relatively rough at the scale of a wavelength as compared to the surfaces of the terrestrial planets and the moon. The composition of the surface is not well determined, except that it cannot be a highly conducting metal. A single measurement each of round-trip echo times delay and Doppler shift was made.

  6. 1999 IEEE radar conference

    SciTech Connect

    1999-07-01

    This conference addresses the stringent radar technology demands facing the next century: target detection, tracking and identification; changing target environment; increased clutter mitigation techniques; air traffic control; transportation; drug smuggling; remote sensing, and other consumer oriented applications. A timely discussion covers how to minimize costs for these emerging areas. Advanced radar technology theory and applications are also presented. Topics covered include: signal processing; space time adaptive processing/antennas; surveillance technology; radar systems; dual use; and phenomenology.

  7. Planetary radar astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostro, S. J.

    1983-03-01

    The present investigation is concerned with planetary radar research reported during the time from 1979 to 1982. A brief synopsis of radar definitions and technical terminology is also provided. In connection with the proximity of the moon to earth, lunar radar studies have been performed over a wider range of wavelengths than radar investigations of other planetary targets. The most recent study of lunar quasispecular scattering is due to Simpson and Tyler (1982). The latest efforts to interpret the lunar radar maps focus on maria-highlands regolith differences and models of crater ejecta evolution. The highly successful Pioneer Venus Radar Mapper experiment has provided a first look at Venus' global distributions of topography, lambda 17-cm radar reflectivity, and rms surface slopes. Attention is given to recent comparisons of Viking Orbiter images of Mars to groundbased radar altimetry of the planet, the icy Galilean satellites, radar observations of asteroids and comets, and lambda 4-cm and lambda 13-cm observations of Saturn's rings.

  8. A simulation study of the effects of land cover and crop type on sensing soil moisture with an orbital C-band radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, M. C.; Ulaby, F. T.; Moezzi, S.; Roth, E.

    1983-01-01

    Simulated C-band radar imagery for a 124-km by 108-km test site in eastern Kansas is used to classify soil moisture. Simulated radar resolutions are 100 m by 100 m, 1 km by 1 km, and 3 km by 3 km, and each is processed using more than 23 independent samples. Moisture classification errors are examined as a function of land-cover distribution, field-size distribution, and local topographic relief for the full test site and also for subregions of cropland, urban areas, woodland, and pasture/rangeland. Results show that a radar resolution of 100 m by 100 m yields the most robust classification accuracies.

  9. Advanced meteor wind observations using meteor and MST radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsumi, M.; Aso, T.; Hall, C.; Nakamura, T.; Sato, K.; Sato, T.

    A few topics from recent developments of radio meteor observation techniques are presented The Nippon Norway Tromsoe Meteor Radar NTMR has been in continuous operation since November 2003 in Tromsoe 69N One of the major advantages of the present meteor radar is its high echo rate 6000-20000 echoes a day despite the relatively small transmitting power 7 5kW peak From ambipolar diffusion coefficients we have successfully extracted atmospheric temperature fluctuations due to gravity waves assuming the Boussinesq approximation The time and height resolutions of horizontal winds and temperature fluctuations at the altitude of 90 km are 1 hour and 2km high enough for the study of gravity waves with a period longer than a few hours Horizontal propagation characteristics of gravity waves are further studied using a theoretical phase relation between the wind and temperature fluctuations MST radars in the VHF band have a great potential in meteor echo observations due to their high transmitting power The meteor measurement can be conducted throughout a day and complement the turbulent echo measurement in the mesosphere which is limited to daylight hours only The MU radar of Kyoto University is one of those radars and has been successfully applied to meteor studies by utilizing its very high versatility The MU radar was recently renewed Its signal processing unit is up-graded from a 4 analog receiver system to a 25 digital receiver system In the present study we try to improve the MU radar meteor measurement

  10. Towards a 1km resolution global flood risk model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Paul; Neal, Jeff; Sampson, Chris; Smith, Andy

    2014-05-01

    Recent advances in computationally efficient numerical algorithms and new High Performance Computing architectures now make high (1-2km) resolution global hydrodynamic models a realistic proposition. However in many areas of the world the data sets and tools necessary to undertake such modelling do not currently exist. In particular, five major problems need to be resolved: (1) the best globally available terrain data (SRTM) was generated from X-band interferometric radar data which does not penetrate vegetation canopies and which has significant problems in determining ground elevations in urban areas; (2) a global river bathymetry data set does not currently exist; (3) most river channels globally are less than the smallest currently resolvable grid scale (1km) and therefore require a sub-grid treatment; (4) a means to estimate the magnitude of the T year flood at any point along the global river network does not currently exist; and (5) a large proportion of flood losses are generated by off-floodplain surface water flows which are not well represented in current hydrodynamic modelling systems. In this paper we propose solutions to each of these five issues as part of a concerted effort to develop a 1km (or better) resolution global flood hazard model. We describe the new numerical algorithms, computer architectures and computational resources used, and demonstrate solutions to the five previously intractable problems identified above. We conduct a validation study of the modelling against satellite imagery of major flooding on the Mississippi-Missouri confluence plain in the central USA before outlining a proof-of-concept regional study for SE Asia as a step towards a global scale model. For SE Asia we simulate flood hazard for ten different flood return periods over the entire Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam, Malaysia and Laos region at 1km resolution and show that the modelling produces coherent, consistent and sensible simulations of extent and water depth.

  11. Unambiguous 3.5 cm radar images of Ganymede and Callisto from bistatic Goldstone/VLA radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harcke, L. J.; Butler, B. J.; Zebker, H. A.; Slade, M. A.; Jurgens, R. F.

    2001-11-01

    We present 3.5 cm wavelength radar reflectivity images of Ganymede and Callisto obtained by using the Goldstone radar and the VLA in a bistatic configuration. Although lower resolution than previous monostatic radar observations of these satellites (360 km vs. 75 km), the bistatic geometry and VLA image synthesis lead to albedo maps that are not subject to the usual range-Doppler folding and superposition of the northern and southern hemispheres. The data were acquired during the December 2000 Jovian opposition. As the array was maximally extended (A-configuration) for the observations, the best resolution possible with the Goldstone/VLA radar instrument was obtained. Observations at radio wavelengths are unique in their ability to probe beneath the surfaces of these bodies, possibly yielding information on structures that are not visible in optical images. Hence, we compare the new radar maps with Galileo orbiter images of the Jovian moons. We use the data acquired here to map the spatial variations in radar cross section across the disk of these moons and correlate them with optical albedo images, and investigate the spatial extent and absolute cross section of the coherent backscatter phenomena (Hapke, 1990) noted in 13 cm monostatic radar imaging with the Arecibo radar (Ostro et al., 1990; Harcke et al., 2001). Overlaying the radar images on the recent Galileo images will permit identification of particular radar surface features with optically-seen and studied features. The spatially resolved data permit tentative identification of the terrains which produce enhanced backscatter from the surfaces of these icy moons, and might eventually suggest candidate resurfacing processes. Harcke, L.J. (2001). 32nd LPSC, abstract 1369. Hapke, B. (1990). Icarus, 88, 407. Ostro, S.J. et al. (1992). JGR, 97, 18,227.

  12. Space Radar Image of Oil Slicks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a radar image of an offshore drilling field about 150 km (93 miles) west of Bombay, India, in the Arabian Sea. The dark streaks are extensive oil slicks surrounding many of the drilling platforms, which appear as bright white spots. Radar images are useful for detecting and measuring the extent of oil seepages on the ocean surface, from both natural and industrial sources. The long, thin streaks extending from many of the platforms are spreading across the sea surface, pushed by local winds. The larger dark patches are dispersed slicks that were likely discharged earlier than the longer streaks, when the winds were probably from a different direction. The dispersed oil will eventually spread out over the more dense water and become a layer which is a single molecule thick. Many forms of oil, both from biological and from petroleum sources, smooth out the ocean surface, causing the area to appear dark in radar images. There are also two forms of ocean waves shown in this image. The dominant group of large waves (upper center) are called internal waves. These waves are formed below the ocean surface at the boundary between layers of warm and cold water and they appear in the radar image because of the way they change the ocean surface. Ocean swells, which are waves generated by winds, are shown throughout the image but are most distinct in the blue area adjacent to the internal waves. Identification of waves provide oceanographers with information about the smaller scale dynamic processes of the ocean. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on October 9, 1994. The colors are assigned to different frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: Red is L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; green is the average of L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received and C-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; blue is C

  13. Radar illusion via metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei Xiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2011-02-01

    An optical illusion is an image of a real target perceived by the eye that is deceptive or misleading due to a physiological illusion or a specific visual trick. The recently developed metamaterials provide efficient approaches to generate a perfect optical illusion. However, all existing research on metamaterial illusions has been limited to theory and numerical simulations. Here, we propose the concept of a radar illusion, which can make the electromagnetic (EM) image of a target gathered by radar look like a different target, and we realize a radar illusion device experimentally to change the radar image of a metallic target into a dielectric target with predesigned size and material parameters. It is well known that the radar signatures of metallic and dielectric objects are significantly different. However, when a metallic target is enclosed by the proposed illusion device, its EM scattering characteristics will be identical to that of a predesigned dielectric object under the illumination of radar waves. Such an illusion device will confuse the radar, and hence the real EM properties of the metallic target cannot be perceived. We designed and fabricated the radar illusion device using artificial metamaterials in the microwave frequency, and good illusion performances are observed in the experimental results. PMID:21405918

  14. Determination of radar MTF

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D.

    1994-11-15

    The ultimate goal of the Current Meter Array (CMA) is to be able to compare the current patterns detected with the array with radar images of the water surface. The internal wave current patterns modulate the waves on the water surface giving a detectable modulation of the radar cross-section (RCS). The function relating the RCS modulations to the current patterns is the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). By comparing radar images directly with co-located CMA measurements the MTF can be determined. In this talk radar images and CMA measurements from a recent experiment at Loch Linnhe, Scotland, will be used to make the first direct determination of MTF for an X and S band radar at low grazing angles. The technical problems associated with comparing radar images to CMA data will be explained and the solution method discussed. The results suggest the both current and strain rate contribute equally to the radar modulation for X band. For S band, the strain rate contributes more than the current. The magnitude of the MTF and the RCS modulations are consistent with previous estimates when the wind is blowing perpendicular to the radar look direction.

  15. Java Radar Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaczek, Mariusz P.

    2005-01-01

    Java Radar Analysis Tool (JRAT) is a computer program for analyzing two-dimensional (2D) scatter plots derived from radar returns showing pieces of the disintegrating Space Shuttle Columbia. JRAT can also be applied to similar plots representing radar returns showing aviation accidents, and to scatter plots in general. The 2D scatter plots include overhead map views and side altitude views. The superposition of points in these views makes searching difficult. JRAT enables three-dimensional (3D) viewing: by use of a mouse and keyboard, the user can rotate to any desired viewing angle. The 3D view can include overlaid trajectories and search footprints to enhance situational awareness in searching for pieces. JRAT also enables playback: time-tagged radar-return data can be displayed in time order and an animated 3D model can be moved through the scene to show the locations of the Columbia (or other vehicle) at the times of the corresponding radar events. The combination of overlays and playback enables the user to correlate a radar return with a position of the vehicle to determine whether the return is valid. JRAT can optionally filter single radar returns, enabling the user to selectively hide or highlight a desired radar return.

  16. The PROUST radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertin, F.; Glass, M.; Ney, R.; Petitdidier, M.

    1986-01-01

    The Stratosphere-Troposphere (ST) radar called PROUST works at 935 MHz using the same klystron and antenna as the coherent-scatter radar. The use of this equipment for ST work has required some important modifications of the transmitting system and the development of receiving, data processing and acquisition (1984,1985) equipment. The modifications are discussed.

  17. Decoders for MST radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodman, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    Decoding techniques and equipment used by MST radars are described and some recommendations for new systems are presented. Decoding can be done either by software in special-purpose (array processors, etc.) or general-purpose computers or in specially designed digital decoders. Both software and hardware decoders are discussed and the special case of decoding for bistatic radars is examined.

  18. Optical and Radar Observations of the Midnight Temperature Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailes, L. W.; Meriwether, J. W.; Faivre, M.; Tepley, C.; Sulzer, M.; Aponte, N.; Garcia, R.; Chau, J.; Hysell, D.; Veliz, O.; Sherwood, P.; Biondi, M.

    2005-12-01

    An interesting phenomenon called the midnight temperature maximum (MTM) has been observed by Fabry-Perot measurements on numerous occasions over many years for low and equatorial latitudes. The MTM is seen near midnight and its amplitude is strongest during the equinox. We report on simultaneous optical and radar observations of the MTM that were obtained with Fabry-Perot and incoherent scatter radar measurements at Arecibo in Puerto Rico and at Arequipa-Lima in southern Peru. These results show that the heating represented by the MTM occur at altitudes above 270 km and is distributed evenly over the altitude range of 300 to 400 km.

  19. Aircraft and satellite measurement of ocean wave directional spectra using scanning-beam microwave radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, F. C.; Walton, W. T.; Baker, P. L.

    1985-01-01

    A microwave radar technique for remotely measuring the vector wave number spectrum of the ocean surface is described. The technique which employs short-pulse, noncoherent radars in a conical scan mode near vertical incidence, is shown to be suitable for both aircraft and satellite application, the technique was validated at 10 km aircraft altitude, where we have found excellent agreement between buoy and radar-inferred absolute wave height spectra.

  20. Aircraft and satellite measurement of ocean wave directional spectra using scanning-beam microwave radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, F. C.; Walton, W. T.; Baker, P. L.

    1982-01-01

    A microwave radar technique for remotely measuring the vector wave number spectrum of the ocean surface is described. The technique, which employs short-pulse, noncoherent radars in a conical scan mode near vertical incidence, is shown to be suitable for both aircraft and satellite application, the technique was validated at 10 km aircraft altitude, where we have found excellent agreement between buoy and radar-inferred absolute wave height spectra.

  1. Micropower impulse radar imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    From designs developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in radar and imaging technologies, there exists the potential for a variety of applications in both public and private sectors. Presently tests are being conducted for the detection of buried mines and the analysis of civil structures. These new systems use a patented ultra-wide band (impulse) radar technology known as Micropower Impulse Radar (GPR) imaging systems. LLNL has also developed signal processing software capable of producing 2-D and 3-D images of objects embedded in materials such as soil, wood and concrete. My assignment while at LLNL has focused on the testing of different radar configurations and applications, as well as assisting in the creation of computer algorithms which enable the radar to scan target areas of different geometeries.

  2. Spaceborne weather radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneghini, Robert; Kozu, Toshiaki

    1990-01-01

    The present work on the development status of spaceborne weather radar systems and services discusses radar instrument complementarities, the current forms of equations for the characterization of such aspects of weather radar performance as surface and mirror-image returns, polarimetry, and Doppler considerations, and such essential factors in spaceborne weather radar design as frequency selection, scanning modes, and the application of SAR to rain detection. Attention is then given to radar signal absorption by the various atmospheric gases, rain drop size distribution and wind velocity determinations, and the characteristics of clouds, as well as the range of available estimation methods for backscattering, single- and dual-wavelength attenuation, and polarimetric and climatological characteristics.

  3. Laser radar improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelalian, A. V.

    1981-11-01

    A short history of the uses of various laser radars is presented, and appropriate applications of laser and microwave radars are discussed. CO2 laser radar, operating at 10.6 microns, is considered for use in aircraft navigation systems, fire-control systems for armored vehicle and aircraft, missile guidance, severe storm research, line-of-sight command of missiles, wind turbine site surveys, clear-air turbulence monitors for aircraft, and satellite tracking. Microwave radar is all-weather, but is subject to multipath inaccuracies, countermeasures, and angular resolution limitations, so hybrid laser microwave systems look promising for microwave target acquisition and laser tracking. Advantages and disadvantages of the use of ruby, YAG, and CO2 lasers in varying atmospheric conditions are discussed. Development of a laser radar pod for obstacle detection, Doppler navigation, automatic terrain following, hover control, weapon delivery, and precision searching is noted.

  4. Intelligent radar data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzbaur, Ulrich D.

    The application of artificial intelligence principles to the processing of radar signals is considered theoretically. The main capabilities required are learning and adaptation in a changing environment, processing and modeling information (especially dynamics and uncertainty), and decision-making based on all available information (taking its reliability into account). For the application to combat-aircraft radar systems, the tasks include the combination of data from different types of sensors, reacting to electronic counter-countermeasures, evaluation of how much data should be acquired (energy and radiation management), control of the radar, tracking, and identification. Also discussed are related uses such as monitoring the avionics systems, supporting pilot decisions with respect to the radar system, and general applications in radar-system R&D.

  5. Triangulation using synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Sherman S. C.; Howington-Kraus, Annie E.

    1991-01-01

    For the extraction of topographic information about Venus from stereoradar images obtained from the Magellan Mission, a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) compilation system was developed on analytical stereoplotters. The system software was extensively tested by using stereoradar images from various spacecraft and airborne radar systems, including Seasat, SIR-B, ERIM XCL, and STAR-1. Stereomodeling from radar images was proven feasible, and development is on a correct approach. During testing, the software was enhanced and modified to obtain more flexibility and better precision. Triangulation software for establishing control points by using SAR images was also developed through a joint effort with the Defense Mapping Agency. The SAR triangulation system comprises four main programs, TRIDATA, MODDATA, TRISAR, and SHEAR. The first two programs are used to sort and update the data; the third program, the main one, performs iterative statistical adjustment; and the fourth program analyzes the results. Also, input are flight data and data from the Global Positioning System and Inertial System (navigation information). The SAR triangulation system was tested with six strips of STAR-1 radar images on a VAX-750 computer. Each strip contains images of 10 minutes flight time (equivalent to a ground distance of 73.5 km); the images cover a ground width of 22.5 km. All images were collected from the same side. With an input of 44 primary control points, 441 ground control points were produced. The adjustment process converged after eight iterations. With a 6-m/pixel resolution of the radar images, the triangulation adjustment has an average standard elevation error of 81 m. Development of Magellan radargrammetry will be continued to convert both SAR compilation and triangulation systems into digital form.

  6. Space Radar Image of North Ecuador

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A family of dormant volcanoes dominates the landscape in this radar image of the Andes Mountains in northern Ecuador. The city of Otavalo, shown in pink, and Lake Otavalo lie within the triangle formed by three volcanoes in the upper part of the image. These volcanoes are, clockwise from upper left, Mojanda, Imabura and Cusin. A lake partially fills the summit crater of Mojanda and a group of lava domes can be seen on the north flank. Geologists believe the most recent eruption of Mojanda was about 3,400 years ago. Much more recent activity has occurred at Cayambe, the large volcano at the bottom of the image. Massive mudflow deposits can be seen filling the valleys on the east (right) side of Cayambe. Cayambe last erupted about 600 years ago. Geologists are using radar to study volcanoes in the Andes to determine the history of eruptions and to identify potential threats the volcanoes pose to local communities. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on April 14, 1994. The image is centered at 0.1 degrees north latitude, 78.1 degrees west longitude. The area shown is approximately 50 km by 50 km (31 miles by 31 miles). North is toward the upper right. Colors are assigned to different frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band horizontally transmitted, vertically received; green is L-band horizontally transmitted, vertically received; and blue is C-band horizontally transmitted, horizontally received. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth.

  7. On the origin of 150-km echoes: Recent observational results and current understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Amit

    2012-07-01

    Discovered nearly 45 years ago, the so-called 150-km echoing phenomenon continues to be a puzzle. These are the coherent radar echoes coming from the height region of 140-180 km during daytime and are of special interest to the ionospheric scientists since they are very useful means for estimating the daytime electric fields, a crucial parameter for studying daytime electrodynamics and plasma physics, and can be observed by radar with moderate sensitivity. Although the 150-km echoes are being regularly used for studying low latitude electrodynamics, it is a bit awkward using them in the scientific work without knowing their origin. This paper is meant to present and discuss new results obtained from Gadanki (13.5o N, 79.2o E, mag. lat. 6.5o N), India to elucidate the underlying physical processes, not considered before. Two new findings, one obtained during the passage of a solar eclipse and another linked with the intermediate layer type descending properties of 150-km echoes, clearly indicate the role of electron density gradient in generating the irregularities responsible for the 150-km radar echoes, not envisioned before. Given the fact that Gadanki is located at magnetically low latitude, it is proposed that the descending echoing layers are produced by interchange instability on the gradient of daytime descending ion layer formed by meridional wind shear associated with tidal/gravity waves quite similar to that observed during nighttime. Comparative anatomy of daytime 150-km echoes and nighttime intermediate layer echoes will also be presented and discussed in an effort to have a deeper understanding on the underlying instability processes.

  8. 5. VIEW EAST, height finder radar towers, radar tower (unknown ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW EAST, height finder radar towers, radar tower (unknown function), prime search radar tower, operations building, and central heating plant - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  9. 4. VIEW NORTHEAST, radar tower (unknown function), prime search radar ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW NORTHEAST, radar tower (unknown function), prime search radar tower, emergency power building, and height finder radar tower - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  10. Tropospheric gravity waves observed by three closely-spaced ST radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, D. A.; Eriddle, A. C. AFGARELLO, R.ly stable thro; Eriddle, A. C. AFGARELLO, R.ly stable thro

    1985-01-01

    During a 6 week period in 1982, 3 ST (Stratosphere-Troposphere) radars measured horizontal and vertical wavelengths of small scale tropospheric gravity waves. These 50 MHz, vertically-directed radars were located in a trianglar network with approximately 5 km spacing on the southern coast of France at the mouth of the Rhone River during the ALPEX (Alpine Experiment) program.

  11. Experimental High Resolution (3 km) SMAP Soil Moisture Data Fields With Uncertainty Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, N. N.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission was launched on January 31st, 2015. The objective of the mission is global mapping of surface soil moisture and landscape freeze/thaw state. SMAP utilizes an L-band radar and radiometer sharing a rotating 6-meter mesh reflector antenna. The SMAP spacecraft is in a 685-km Sun-synchronous near-polar orbit, and viewing the surface at a constant 40-degree incidence angle with a 1000-km swath width. Merging of the high-resolution active (radar) and coarse-resolution but high-sensitivity passive (radiometer) L-band observations enable an unprecedented combination of accuracy, resolution, coverage and revisit-time for soil moisture and freeze/thaw state retrievals. However, on July 7th, 2015, the SMAP radar encountered an anomaly and is currently inoperable. Efforts are being made to revive the SMAP radar. Due to the present status of the SMAP observatory, nearly ~2.5 months (from the end of In-Orbit-Check April 13th, 2015 to July 7th, 2015) of the SMAP Active Passive product will be available to public through the NASA DAAC at National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC). The baseline L2_SM_AP product is retrieved soil moisture from the disaggregated/downscaled brightness temperature obtained by merging the coarse-resolution (~36 km) radiometer brightness temperature data and the high-resolution (~3 km) radar backscatter data. The baseline product is intermediate scale 9 km global soil moisture information. Experimentally, a much higher resolution global surface soil moisture data set is also produced at 3 km. This experimental product covering the 2.5 Spring/Summer months is the focus of this presentation. We specifically focus on the analysis of errors and reliability of this data set. The errors in disaggregated brightness temperatures and the retrived soil moisture estimates are discussed. In the presentation the accuracies of the SMAP L2-SM_AP soil moisture retrievals will be shown using summary comparisons with in

  12. High-Resolution Radar Imaging of Mercury's North Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, J. K.; Perillat, P. J.; Slade, M. A.

    2001-01-01

    The recently upgraded Arecibo S-band (λ12.6-cm) radar was used to make delay-Doppler images of Mercury's north polar region, where earlier observations had shown strong echoes from putative ice deposits in craters. The image resolution of 1.5-3 km is a substantial improvement over the 15-km resolution of the older Arecibo images (J. K. Harmon et al. 1994, Nature369, 213-215). The new observations confirm all the original polar features and reveal many additional features, including several at latitudes as low as 72-75°N and several from craters less than 10 km in diameter. All of the new features located on the Mariner-imaged side of the planet can be matched with known craters or other shaded areas. We find the north pole to be located 65 km from the original Mariner-based pole and 15 km from the new Mariner-based pole of M. S. Robinson et al. (1999, J. Geophys. Res.104, 30,847-30,852). The improved resolution reveals fine structure in the radar features and their respective host craters, including radar shadowing/highlighting by central peaks and rim walls, rim terracing, and preferential concentration of radar-bright deposits in shaded southern floor areas. The radar features' high brightness, circular polarization inversion (μ c=1.25), and confinement to regions permanently shaded from direct sunlight are all consistent with volume scattering from a cold-trapped volatile such as clean water ice. The sizes and locations of most of the features show good agreement with the thermal model of A. R. Vasavada, D. A. Paige, and S. E. Wood (1999, Icarus141, 179-193) for insulated (buried) water ice, although the problems of explaining radar features in small craters and the rapid burial required at lower latitudes suggest that other factors may be suppressing ice loss after emplacement.

  13. Planetary Radar Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostro, Steven J.

    1993-01-01

    Radar is a powerful technique that has furnished otherwise unavailable information about solar system bodies for three decades. The advantages of radar in planetary astronomy result from: (1) the observer's control of all the attributes of the coherent signal used to illuminate the target, especially the wave form's time/frequency modulation and polarization; (2) the ability of radar to resolve objects spatially via measurements of the distribution of echo power in time delay and Doppler frequency; (3) the pronounced degree to which delay-Doppler measurements constrain orbits and spin vectors; and (4) centimeter-to-meter wavelengths, which easily penetrate optically opaque planetary clouds and cometary comae, permit investigation of near-surface macrostructure and bulk density, and are sensitive to high concentrations of metal or, in certain situations, ice. Planetary radar astronomy has primarily involved observations with Earth-based radar telescopes, but also includes some experiments with a spaceborne transmitter or receiver. In addition to providing a wealth of information about the geological and dynamical properties of asteroids, comets, the inner planets, and natural satellites, radar experiments have established the scale of the solar system, have contributed significantly to the accuracy of planetary ephemerides, and have helped to constrain theories of gravitation. This review outlines radar astronomical techniques and describes principal observational results.

  14. Ground-penetrating radar methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ground-penetrating radar geophysical methods are finding greater and greater use in agriculture. With the ground-penetrating radar (GPR) method, an electromagnetic radio energy (radar) pulse is directed into the subsurface, followed by measurement of the elapsed time taken by the radar signal as it ...

  15. Radar remote sensing in biology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Richard K.; Simonett, David S.

    1967-01-01

    The present status of research on discrimination of natural and cultivated vegetation using radar imaging systems is sketched. The value of multiple polarization radar in improved discrimination of vegetation types over monoscopic radars is also documented. Possible future use of multi-frequency, multi-polarization radar systems for all weather agricultural survey is noted.

  16. Neutral Wind Observations below 200 km altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, S.; Abe, T.; Habu, H.; Kakinami, Y.; Larsen, M. F.; Pfaff, R. F., Jr.; Yamamoto, M.

    2015-12-01

    Neutral Wind Observations below 200 km altitudesS. Watanabe1, T. Abe2, H. Habu2, Y. Kakinami3, M. Larsen4, R. Pfaff5, M. Yamamoto6, M-Y. Yamamoto31Hokkaido University/Hokkaido Information University, 2JAXA/ISAS, 3Kochi University of Technology, 4Clemson University, 5NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, 6Kyoto University, Neutral wind in the thermosphere is one of the key parameters to understand the ionosphere-thermosphere coupling process. JAXA/ISAS successfully launched sounding rockets from Uchinoura Space Center (USC) on September 2, 2007, January 12, 2012, and July 20, 2013, and NASA launched sounding rockets from Kwajalein on May 7, 2013 and from Wallops on July 4, 2013. The rockets installed Lithium and/or TMA canisters as well as instruments for plasma and electric and magnetic fields. The atomic Lithium gases were released at altitudes between 150 km and 300 km in the evening on September 2, 2007, at altitude of ~100 km in the morning on January 12, 2012, at altitude of ~120km in the midnight on July 20, 2013, at altitude between 150 km and 300 km in the evening on May 7, 2013 and at altitude of ~150 km in the noon on July 4, 2013. The Lithium atoms were scattering sunlight by resonance scattering with wavelength of 670nm. However, the Lithium atoms scattered moon light on July 20, 2013. The moon light scattering is the first time to use for thermospheric wind measurement in the midnight. The Lithium clouds/trails and TMA trails showed clearly the neutral wind shears and atmospheric waves at ~150 km altitude in the lower thermosphere for all local time.

  17. Radar frequency radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malowicki, E.

    1981-11-01

    A method is presented for the determination of radar frequency radiation power densities that the PAVE PAWS radar system could produce in its air and ground environment. The effort was prompted by the concern of the people in the vicinity of OTIS AFB MA and BEALE AFB CA about the possible radar frequency radiation hazard of the PAVE PAWS radar. The method is based on the following main assumptions that: (a) the total field can be computed as the vector summation of the individual fields due to each antenna element; (b) the individual field can be calculated using distances for which the field point is in the far field of the antenna element. An RFR computer program was coded for the RADC HE 6180 digital computer and exercised to calculate the radiation levels in the air and ground space for the present baseline and the possible Six DB and 10 DB growth systems of the PAVE PAWS radar system at OTIS AFB MA. The average radiation levels due to the surveillance fence were computed for three regions: in the air space in front of the radar, at the radar hazard fence at OTIS AFB MA and at representative ground points in the OTIS AFB vicinity. It was concluded that the radar frequency radiation of PAVE PAWS does not present a hazard to personnel provided there is no entry to the air hazard zone or to the area within the hazard fence. The method developed offers a cost effective way to determine radiation levels from a phased array radar especially in the near field and transition regions.

  18. Radar applications overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenspan, Marshall

    1996-06-01

    During the fifty years since its initial development as a means of providing early warning of airborne attacks against allied countries during World War II, radar systems have developed to the point of being highly mobile and versatile systems capable of supporting a wide variety of remote sensing applications. Instead of being tied to stationary land-based sites, radar systems have found their way into highly mobile land vehicles as well as into aircraft, missiles, and ships of all sizes. Of all these applications, however, the most exciting revolution has occurred in the airborne platform arena where advanced technology radars can be found in all shapes and sizes...ranging from the large AWACS and Joint STARS long range surveillance and targeting systems to small millimeter wave multi-spectral sensors on smart weapons that can detect and identify their targets through the use of highly sophisticated digital signal processing hardware and software. This paper presents an overview of these radar applications with the emphasis on modern airborne sensors that span the RF spectrum. It will identify and describe the factors that influence the parameters of low frequency and ultra wide band radars designed to penetrate ground and dense foliage environments and locate within them buried mines, enemy armor, and other concealed or camouflaged weapons of war. It will similarly examine the factors that lead to the development of airborne radar systems that support long range extended endurance airborne surveillance platforms designed to detect and precision-located both small high speed airborne threats as well as highly mobile time critical moving and stationary surface vehicles. The mission needs and associated radar design impacts will be contrasted with those of radar systems designed for high maneuverability rapid acquisition tactical strike warfare platforms, and shorter range cued air-to-surface weapons with integral smart radar sensors.

  19. News from KM3NeT

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Ulrich F.; Collaboration: KM3NeT Collaboration

    2014-11-18

    KM3NeT is a future research infrastructure in the Mediterranean Sea, hosting a multi-cubic-kilometre neutrino telescope and nodes for Earth and Sea sciences. In this report we shortly summarise the genesis of the KM3NeT project and present key elements of its technical design. The physics objectives of the KM3NeT neutrino telescope and some selected sensitivity estimates are discussed. Finally, some first results from prototype operations and the next steps towards implementation – in particular the first construction phase in 2014/15 – are described.

  20. Polarimetric Doppler Weather Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bringi, V. N.; Chandrasekar, V.

    2001-10-01

    This work provides a detailed introduction to the principles of Doppler and polarimetric radar, focusing in particular on their use in the analysis of weather systems. The authors first discuss underlying topics such as electromagnetic scattering, polarization, and wave propagation. They then detail the engineering aspects of pulsed Doppler polarimetric radar, before examining key applications in meteorology and remote sensing. The book is aimed at graduate students of electrical engineering and atmospheric science as well as practitioners involved in the applications of polarimetric radar.

  1. EISCAT Svalbard radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtinen, Markku; Kangas, Jorma

    1992-02-01

    The main fields of interest of the Finnish scientists in EISCAT research are listed. Finnish interests in the Polar Cap Radar (PMR) and areas where the Finnish contribution could be important are addressed: radar techniques; sporadic E layers in the polar cap; atmospheric models; auroral studies in the polar cap; nonthermal plasmas in the F region; coordinated measurements with the Cluster satellites; studies of the ionospheric traveling; convection vortices; polar cap absorption; studies of lower atmosphere; educational program. A report on the design specification of an ionospheric and atmospheric radar facility based on the archipelago of Svalbard (Norway) is summarized.

  2. A microprogrammable radar controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Law, D. C.

    1986-01-01

    The Wave Propagation Lab. has completed the design and construction of a microprogrammable radar controller for atmospheric wind profiling. Unlike some radar controllers using state machines or hardwired logic for radar timing, this design is a high speed programmable sequencer with signal processing resources. A block diagram of the device is shown. The device is a single 8 1/2 inch by 10 1/2 inch printed circuit board and consists of three main subsections: (1) the host computer interface; (2) the microprogram sequencer; and (3) the signal processing circuitry. Each of these subsections are described in detail.

  3. Asteroid radar astrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostro, S. J.; Jurgens, R. F.; Rosema, K. D.; Winkler, R.; Yeomans, D. K.; Campbell, D. B.; Chandler, J. F.; Shapiro, I. I.; Hine, A. A.; Velez, R.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of time delay and Doppler frequency are reported for asteroid-radar echoes obtained at Arecibo and Goldstone during 1980-1990. Radar astrometry is presented for 23 near-earth asteroids and three mainbelt asteroids. These measurements, which are orthogonal to optical, angular-position measurements, and typically have a fractional precision between 10 to the -5th and 10 to the -8th, permit significant improvement in estimates of orbits and hence in the accuracy of prediction ephemerides. Estimates are also reported of radar cross-section and circular polarization ratio for all asteroids observed astrometrically during 1980-1990.

  4. SMAP RADAR Calibration and Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, R. D.; Jaruwatanadilok, S.; Chaubel, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is planned to launch on Jan 8, 2015. The mission employs L-band radar and radiometer measurements to estimate soil moisture with 4% volumetric accuracy at a resolution of 10 km, and freeze-thaw state at a resolution of 1-3 km. Immediately following launch, there will be a 3 month instrument checkout period, followed by 6 months of level 1 (L1) calibration and validation. In this presentation, we will discuss the plans and preparations for the calibration and validation of L1 radar data from SMAP. At the start of the L1 cal/val period, we will validate the operation of the instrument and of the ground processing using tools that look at readily identifiable surface features such as coast lines and corner reflectors. Geometric biases will be fit and removed. Radiometric cross-calibration with PALSAR and Aquarius will also be performed using target regions in the Amazon rain forest selected for their stability and uniformity. As the L1 cal/val period progresses, the performance of the automated short and long term calibration modules in ground processing will be tracked and verified using data from stable reference targets such as the wind corrected ocean and selected areas of rain forest that have shown good temporal stability. The performance of the radio frequency interference (RFI) removal algorithm will be validated by processing data with the algorithm turned on and off, and using different parameter settings. Additional information on the extent of RFI will be obtained from a special RFI survey conducted early in the L1 cal/val period. Radar transmissions are turned off during the RFI survey, and receive only data are collected over a variety of operating frequencies. The model based Faraday rotation corrections will also be checked during the L1 cal/val by comparing the model Faraday rotation with the measured Faraday rotation obtained by the SMAP Radiometer. This work is supported by the SMAP project at the Jet

  5. Agreement among 2 x 2 Agreement Indices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conger, Anthony J.; Ward, David G.

    1984-01-01

    Sixteen measures of reliability for two-category nominal scales are compared. Upon correcting for chance agreement, there are only five distinct indices: Fleiss's modification of A-sub-1, the phi coefficient, Cohen's kappa, and two intraclass coefficients. Recommendations for choosing an agreement index are made based on definitions, magnitude,…

  6. Status of KM3NeT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccobene, G.

    2016-07-01

    The recent observation of cosmic neutrinos by IceCube has pushed the quest towards the identification of cosmic sources of high-energy particles. The KM3NeT Collaboration is now ready to launch the massive construction of detection units to be installed in deep sea to build a km-cubic size neutrino telescope. The main elements of the detector, the status of the project and the expected perfomances are briefly reported.

  7. Mapping wintering waterfowl distributions using weather surveillance radar.

    PubMed

    Buler, Jeffrey J; Randall, Lori A; Fleskes, Joseph P; Barrow, Wylie C; Bogart, Tianna; Kluver, Daria

    2012-01-01

    The current network of weather surveillance radars within the United States readily detects flying birds and has proven to be a useful remote-sensing tool for ornithological study. Radar reflectivity measures serve as an index to bird density and have been used to quantitatively map landbird distributions during migratory stopover by sampling birds aloft at the onset of nocturnal migratory flights. Our objective was to further develop and validate a similar approach for mapping wintering waterfowl distributions using weather surveillance radar observations at the onset of evening flights. We evaluated data from the Sacramento, CA radar (KDAX) during winters 1998-1999 and 1999-2000. We determined an optimal sampling time by evaluating the accuracy and precision of radar observations at different times during the onset of evening flight relative to observed diurnal distributions of radio-marked birds on the ground. The mean time of evening flight initiation occurred 23 min after sunset with the strongest correlations between reflectivity and waterfowl density on the ground occurring almost immediately after flight initiation. Radar measures became more spatially homogeneous as evening flight progressed because birds dispersed from their departure locations. Radars effectively detected birds to a mean maximum range of 83 km during the first 20 min of evening flight. Using a sun elevation angle of -5° (28 min after sunset) as our optimal sampling time, we validated our approach using KDAX data and additional data from the Beale Air Force Base, CA (KBBX) radar during winter 1998-1999. Bias-adjusted radar reflectivity of waterfowl aloft was positively related to the observed diurnal density of radio-marked waterfowl locations on the ground. Thus, weather radars provide accurate measures of relative wintering waterfowl density that can be used to comprehensively map their distributions over large spatial extents. PMID:22911816

  8. Mapping wintering waterfowl distributions using weather surveillance radar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buler, Jeffrey J.; Randall, Lori A.; Fleskes, Joseph P.; Barrow, Wylie C.; Bogart, Tianna; Kluver, Daria

    2012-01-01

    The current network of weather surveillance radars within the United States readily detects flying birds and has proven to be a useful remote-sensing tool for ornithological study. Radar reflectivity measures serve as an index to bird density and have been used to quantitatively map landbird distributions during migratory stopover by sampling birds aloft at the onset of nocturnal migratory flights. Our objective was to further develop and validate a similar approach for mapping wintering waterfowl distributions using weather surveillance radar observations at the onset of evening flights. We evaluated data from the Sacramento, CA radar (KDAX) during winters 1998–1999 and 1999–2000. We determined an optimal sampling time by evaluating the accuracy and precision of radar observations at different times during the onset of evening flight relative to observed diurnal distributions of radio-marked birds on the ground. The mean time of evening flight initiation occurred 23 min after sunset with the strongest correlations between reflectivity and waterfowl density on the ground occurring almost immediately after flight initiation. Radar measures became more spatially homogeneous as evening flight progressed because birds dispersed from their departure locations. Radars effectively detected birds to a mean maximum range of 83 km during the first 20 min of evening flight. Using a sun elevation angle of -5° (28 min after sunset) as our optimal sampling time, we validated our approach using KDAX data and additional data from the Beale Air Force Base, CA (KBBX) radar during winter 1998–1999. Bias-adjusted radar reflectivity of waterfowl aloft was positively related to the observed diurnal density of radio-marked waterfowl locations on the ground. Thus, weather radars provide accurate measures of relative wintering waterfowl density that can be used to comprehensively map their distributions over large spatial extents.

  9. Airborne Radar Observations of Severe Hailstorms: Implications for Future Spaceborne Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Tian, Lin; Li, Lihua; McLinden, Matthew; Cervantes, Jaime I.

    2013-01-01

    A new dual-frequency (Ku and Ka band) nadir-pointing Doppler radar on the high-altitude NASA ER-2 aircraft, called the High-Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP), has collected data over severe thunderstorms in Oklahoma and Kansas during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E). The overarching motivation for this study is to understand the behavior of the dualwavelength airborne radar measurements in a global variety of thunderstorms and how these may relate to future spaceborne-radar measurements. HIWRAP is operated at frequencies that are similar to those of the precipitation radar on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (Ku band) and the upcoming Global Precipitation Measurement mission satellite's dual-frequency (Ku and Ka bands) precipitation radar. The aircraft measurements of strong hailstorms have been combined with ground-based polarimetric measurements to obtain a better understanding of the response of the Ku- and Ka-band radar to the vertical distribution of the hydrometeors, including hail. Data from two flight lines on 24 May 2011 are presented. Doppler velocities were approx. 39m/s2at 10.7-km altitude from the first flight line early on 24 May, and the lower value of approx. 25m/s on a second flight line later in the day. Vertical motions estimated using a fall speed estimate for large graupel and hail suggested that the first storm had an updraft that possibly exceeded 60m/s for the more intense part of the storm. This large updraft speed along with reports of 5-cm hail at the surface, reflectivities reaching 70 dBZ at S band in the storm cores, and hail signals from polarimetric data provide a highly challenging situation for spaceborne-radar measurements in intense convective systems. The Ku- and Ka-band reflectivities rarely exceed approx. 47 and approx. 37 dBZ, respectively, in these storms.

  10. Analysis of the Eglin Radar Debris Fence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Settecerri, Thomas J.; Skillicorn, Alan D.; Spikes, Paul C.

    2004-02-01

    The Eglin FPS-85 space surveillance radar is a bi-static phased array radar system located in Northern Florida. The FPS-85 recently re-established the capability to create a radar search fence to collect orbital debris data. The new debris fence extends from 155° to 205° in azimuth and is scanned at 35° elevation. In this configuration, it has a 0.99 probability of detection for all objects at 3000 km range or less that have a radar cross section greater than -35 dBsm. This paper will concentrate on the objects detected by the new debris fence. Debris populations that are shown will be characterized in terms of altitude, inclination, and estimated size. The results will be compared with data extracted from the United States Air Force Space Command (AFSPC) Space Surveillance Network (SSN) catalog. The initial assessment will consider the ability of the debris fence to retrack debris objects on subsequent orbits based on the size and orbital parameters of the debris.

  11. Impact Craters on Titan? Cassini RADAR View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Charles A.; Lopes, Rosaly; Stofan, Ellen R.; Paganelli, Flora; Elachi, Charles

    2005-01-01

    Titan is a planet-size (diameter of 5,150 km) satellite of Saturn that is currently being investigated by the Cassini spacecraft. Thus far only one flyby (Oct. 26, 2004; Ta) has occurred when radar images were obtained. In February, 2005, and approximately 20 more times in the next four years, additional radar swaths will be acquired. Each full swath images about 1% of Titan s surface at 13.78 GHz (Ku-band) with a maximum resolution of 400 m. The Ta radar pass [1] demonstrated that Titan has a solid surface with multiple types of landforms. However, there is no compelling detection of impact craters in this first radar swath. Dione, Tethys and other satellites of Saturn are intensely cratered, there is no way that Titan could have escaped a similar impact cratering past; thus there must be ongoing dynamic surface processes that erase impact craters (and other landforms) on Titan. The surface of Titan must be very young and the resurfacing rate must be significantly higher than the impact cratering rate.

  12. A simulation study of scene confusion factors in sensing soil moisture from orbital radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T. (Principal Investigator); Dobson, M. C.; Moezzi, S.; Roth, F. T.

    1983-01-01

    Simulated C-band radar imagery for a 124-km by 108-km test site in eastern Kansas is used to classify soil moisture. Simulated radar resolutions are 100 m by 100 m, 1 km by 1km, and 3 km by 3 km. Distributions of actual near-surface soil moisture are established daily for a 23-day accounting period using a water budget model. Within the 23-day period, three orbital radar overpasses are simulated roughly corresponding to generally moist, wet, and dry soil moisture conditions. The radar simulations are performed by a target/sensor interaction model dependent upon a terrain model, land-use classification, and near-surface soil moisture distribution. The accuracy of soil-moisture classification is evaluated for each single-date radar observation and also for multi-date detection of relative soil moisture change. In general, the results for single-date moisture detection show that 70% to 90% of cropland can be correctly classified to within +/- 20% of the true percent of field capacity. For a given radar resolution, the expected classification accuracy is shown to be dependent upon both the general soil moisture condition and also the geographical distribution of land-use and topographic relief. An analysis of cropland, urban, pasture/rangeland, and woodland subregions within the test site indicates that multi-temporal detection of relative soil moisture change is least sensitive to classification error resulting from scene complexity and topographic effects.

  13. Ultrawideband radar clutter measurements and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuley, Michael T.; Sheen, David M.; Collins, H. D.; Sager, Earl V.; Schultheis, A. C.

    1993-05-01

    This paper reports the results of ultrawideband radar clutter measurements made by Battelle- Pacific Northwest Laboratories and the System Planning Corporation near Sequim, WA. The measurement area is a mountainous coniferous forest with occasional roads and clear-cut areas. Local grazing angles range from near zero to approximately 40 degree(s). Very limited data are also presented from measurements made in a desert-type terrain near Richland, WA. Two ultrawideband radar systems were employed in the data collection. An impulse system providing an approximate one nanosecond monocycle pulse (bandwidth of 300 MHz - 1000 MHz) acquired data over a 0.7 km2 area (121,000 resolution cells). A step chirp radar with the same total bandwidth as the impulse system collected data over a 6.2 km2 area (780,000 resolution cells), including the area sampled by the impulse system. Wideband TEM horn antennas (log-periodic antennas for the step chirp system) deployed on a 19 m horizontally scanned aperture were used for transmission and reception, providing a 1.5 degree(s) azimuth resolution at 300 MHz for both systems.

  14. Radar for Monitoring Hurricanes from Geostationary Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Im, Eastwood; Durden, Stephen; Huang, John; Lou, Michael; Smith, Eric; Rahmat-Samii, Yahya

    2004-01-01

    A document describes a scanning Doppler radar system to be placed in a geostationary orbit for monitoring the three-dimensional structures of hurricanes, cyclones, and severe storms in general. The system would operate at a frequency of 35 GHz. It would include a large deployable spherical antenna reflector, instead of conventional paraboloidal reflectors, that would allow the reflector to remain stationary while moving the antenna feed(s), and thus, create a set of scanning antenna beams without degradation of performance. The radar would have separate transmitting and receiving antenna feeds moving in spiral scans over an angular excursion of 4 from the boresight axis to providing one radar image per hour of a circular surface area of 5,300-km diameter. The system would utilize a real-time pulse-compression technique to obtain 300-m vertical resolution without sacrificing detection sensitivity and without need for a high-peakpower transmitter. An onboard data-processing subsystem would generate three-dimensional rainfall reflectivity and Doppler observations with 13-km horizontal resolution and line-of-sight Doppler velocity at a precision of 0.3 m/s.

  15. RADAR performance experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leroux, C.; Bertin, F.; Mounir, H.

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical studies and experimental results obtained at Coulommiers airport showed the capability of Proust radar to detect wind shears, in clear air condition as well as in presence of clouds or rain. Several examples are presented: in a blocking highs situation an atmospheric wave system at the Brunt-Vaisala frequency can be clearly distinguished; in a situation of clouds without rain the limit between clear air and clouds can be easily seen; and a windshear associated with a gust front in rainy conditions is shown. A comparison of 30 cm clear air radar Proust and 5 cm weather Doppler radar Ronsard will allow to select the best candidate for wind shear detection, taking into account the low sensibility to ground clutter of Ronsard radar.

  16. Laser Radar Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Laser and radar instruments aboard NASA aircraft provide measurements of the snow and ice surface and down to the bedrock under the ice. Lasers, with a shorter wavelength, measure the surface eleva...

  17. Radar altimetry of South Tharsis, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, L. E.; Downs, G. S.; Saunders, R. S.; Schubert, G.

    1980-06-01

    The paper discusses Martian altitudes measured by radar during the oppositions of 1971 and 1973 using the 64-m antenna at Goldstone, Calif. The resultant topographic profiles substantiate a zonal classification of the volanic flows blanketing the south flanks of Arsia Mons, and they confirm the existence of a secondary, parasitic shield, attached from the SSW to the main Arsia shield. The secondary shield is about 400 km in diameter at its base and at least 4 km high at its center. The distribution and orientation of the lunar mare - like ridges in Sinai Planum appear to be independent of the regional gradients. Segments of the chaotic terrain at the eastern terminus of Valles Marineris are located down to 6 km below the level of the surrounding plains.

  18. Distributed array radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimiller, R. C.; Belyea, J. E.; Tomlinson, P. G.

    1983-11-01

    Distributed array radar (DAR) is a concept for efficiently accomplishing surveillance and tracking using coherently internetted mini-radars. They form a long baseline, very thinned array and are capable of very accurate location of targets. This paper describes the DAR concept. Factors involving two-way effective gain patterns for deterministic and random DAR arrays are analyzed and discussed. An analysis of factors affecting signal-to-noise ratio is presented and key technical and performance issues are briefly summarized.

  19. Downhole pulse radar

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Hsi-Tien

    1989-01-01

    A borehole logging tool generates a fast rise-time, short duration, high peak-power radar pulse having broad energy distribution between 30 MHz and 300 MHz through a directional transmitting and receiving antennas having barium titanate in the electromagnetically active region to reduce the wavelength to within an order of magnitude of the diameter of the antenna. Radar returns from geological discontinuities are sampled for transmission uphole.

  20. Downhole pulse radar

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Hsi-Tien

    1987-09-28

    A borehole logging tool generates a fast rise-time, short duration, high peak-power radar pulse having broad energy distribution between 30 MHz and 300 MHz through a directional transmitting and receiving antennas having barium titanate in the electromagnetically active region to reduce the wavelength to within an order of magnitude of the diameter of the antenna. Radar returns from geological discontinuities are sampled for transmission uphole. 7 figs.

  1. Rings of Earth detected by orbital debris radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, R.; Randolph, L.

    1990-01-01

    Small particles moving at an orbital velocity of 7.6 kilometers per second can present a considerable hazard to human activity in space. For astronauts outside of the protective shielding of their space vehicles, such particles can be lethal. The powerful radar at NASA's Goldstone Deep Communications Complex was used to monitor such orbital debris. This radar can detect metallic objects as small as 1.8 mm in diameter at 600 km altitude. The results of the preliminary survey show a flux (at 600 km altitude) of 6.4 objects per square kilometer per day of equivalent size of 1.8 mm or larger. Forty percent of the observed particles appear to be concentrated into two orbits. An orbital ring with the same inclination as the radar (35.1 degrees) is suggested. However, an orbital band with a much higher inclination (66 degrees) is also a possibility.

  2. Space Radar Image of Star City, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This radar image shows the Star City cosmonaut training center, east of Moscow, Russia. Four American astronauts are training here for future long-duration flights aboard the Russian Mir space station. These joint flights are giving NASA and the Russian Space Agency experience necessary for the construction of the international Alpha space station, beginning in late 1997. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR), on its 62nd orbit on October 3, 1994. This Star City image is centered at 55.55 degrees north latitude and 38.0 degrees east longitude. The area shown is approximately 32 kilometers by 49 kilometers (20 miles by 30 miles). North is to the top in this image. The radar illumination is from the top of the image. The image was produced using three channels of SIR-C radar data: red indicates L-band (23 cm wavelength, horizontally transmitted and received); green indicates L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue indicates C-band (6 cm wavelength, horizontally transmitted and vertically received). In general, dark pink areas are agricultural; pink and light blue areas are urban communities; black areas represent lakes and rivers; dark blue areas are cleared forest; and light green areas are forested. The prominent black runways just right of center are Shchelkovo Airfield, about 4 km long. The textured pale blue-green area east and southeast of Shchelkovo Airfield is forest. Just east of the runways is a thin railroad line running southeast; the Star City compound lies just east of the small bend in the rail line. Star City contains the living quarters and training facilities for Russian cosmonauts and their families. Moscow's inner loop road is visible at the lower left edge of the image. The Kremlin is just off the left edge, on the banks of the meandering Moskva River. The Klyazma River snakes to the southeast from the reservoir in the upper left (shown in bright red

  3. On wave radar measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewans, Kevin; Feld, Graham; Jonathan, Philip

    2014-09-01

    The SAAB REX WaveRadar sensor is widely used for platform-based wave measurement systems by the offshore oil and gas industry. It offers in situ surface elevation wave measurements at relatively low operational costs. Furthermore, there is adequate flexibility in sampling rates, allowing in principle sampling frequencies from 1 to 10 Hz, but with an angular microwave beam width of 10° and an implied ocean surface footprint in the order of metres, significant limitations on the spatial and temporal resolution might be expected. Indeed there are reports that the accuracy of the measurements from wave radars may not be as good as expected. We review the functionality of a WaveRadar using numerical simulations to better understand how WaveRadar estimates compare with known surface elevations. In addition, we review recent field measurements made with a WaveRadar set at the maximum sampling frequency, in the light of the expected functionality and the numerical simulations, and we include inter-comparisons between SAAB radars and buoy measurements for locations in the North Sea.

  4. Influences of the substituents on the M-M bonding in Cp4Al4 and Cp2M2X2 (M = B, Al, Ga; Cp = C5H5, X = halogen).

    PubMed

    Lu, Feifei; Li, Xiaoyan; Sun, Zheng; Zeng, Yanli; Meng, Lingpeng

    2015-08-21

    Although the geometries of CpAl4 (Cp* = C5Me5) and Cp4Al4 (Cp = C5H5) are similar, CpAl4 is more stable than Cp4Al4. CpAl2I2 is the first complex involving an Al(ii)-Al(ii) bond to be supported by Cp-type ligands. In this work, the stability of CpAl4 and Cp4Al4 (Cp = C5H5), the nature of M-M bonding in Cp2M2X2 (M = B, Al, and Ga), and the influences of the X atom on the M-M bonds have been analyzed and compared within the framework of the atoms in molecules (AIM) theory, electron localization function (ELF), energy decomposition analysis (EDA), and natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. The calculated results show that CpAl4 is more stable than Cp4Al4 because of HH interactions between the methyl groups on the same and different Cp rings and not because of the Al-Al bonds. In Cp2M2X2, the B-B bond is stronger than the Al-Al and Ga-Ga bonds. The B-B bond is most consistent with covalent bonding, whereas the Al-Al and Ga-Ga bonds are more consistent with metallic bonding. The strengths of the B-B bond increase in the sequence X = F, Cl, Br, and I, whereas the Al-Al and Ga-Ga bonds decrease in the sequence X = F, Cl, Br, and I. The different change tendencies arise from the different M-M bonds and the orbital interactions between atoms X and M. PMID:26171664

  5. Origins of the 520-km discontinuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinnik, Lev

    2016-04-01

    The 520-km discontinuity is often explained by the phase transition from wadsleyite to ringwoodite, although the theoretical impedance of this transition is so small that the related converted and reflected seismic phases could hardly be seen in the seismograms. At the same time there are numerous reports on observations of a large discontinuity at this depth, especially in the data on SS precursors and P-wave wide-angle reflections. Revenaugh and Jordan (1991) argued that this discontinuity is related to the garnet/post-garnet transformation. Gu et al. (1998) preferred very deep continental roots extending into the transition zone. Deuss and Woodhouse proposed splitting of the 520-km discontinuity into two discontinuities, whilst Bock (1994) denied evidence of the 520-km discontinuity in the SS precursors. Our approach to this problem is based on the analysis of S and P receiver functions. Most of our data are related to hot-spots in and around the Atlantic where the appropriate converted phases are often comparable in amplitude with P410s and S410p. Both S and P receiver functions provide strong evidence of a low S velocity in a depth range from 450 km to 510 km at some locations. The 520-km discontinuity appears to be the base of this low-velocity layer. Our observations of the low S velocity in the upper transition zone are very consistent with the indications of a drop in the solidus temperature of carbonated peridotite in the same pressure range (Keshav et al. 2011), and this phenomenon provides a viable alternative to the other explanations of the 520-km discontinuity.

  6. Analysis of the Gran Desierto, Pinacte Region, Sonora, Mexico, via shuttle imaging radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Christensen, P. R.; Mchone, J. F.; Asmerom, Y.; Zimbelman, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    The radar discriminability of geolian features and their geological setting as imaged by the SIR-A experiment is examined. The Gran Desierto and Pincate volcanio field of Sonora, Mexico was used to analyze the radar characteristics of the interplay of aeolian features and volcano terrain. The area in the Gran Desierto covers 4000 sq. km. and contains sand dunes of several forms. The Pincate volcanio field covers more than 2.000 sq. km. and consists primarily of basaltic lavas. Margins of the field, especially on the western and northern sides, include several maar and maar-like craters; thus obtaining information on their radar characteristics for comparison with impact craters.

  7. Simulation of Space-borne Radar Observation from High Resolution Cloud Model - for GPM Dual frequency Precipitation Radar -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Meneghini, R.; Jones, J.; Liao, L.

    2011-12-01

    A comprehensive space-borne radar simulator has been developed to support active microwave sensor satellite missions. The two major objectives of this study are: 1) to develop a radar simulator optimized for the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (KuPR and KaPR) on the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission satellite (GPM-DPR) and 2) to generate the synthetic test datasets for DPR algorithm development. This simulator consists of two modules: a DPR scanning configuration module and a forward module that generates atmospheric and surface radar observations. To generate realistic DPR test data, the scanning configuration module specifies the technical characteristics of DPR sensor and emulates the scanning geometry of the DPR with a inner swath of about 120 km, which contains matched-beam data from both frequencies, and an outer swath from 120 to 245 km over which only Ku-band data will be acquired. The second module is a forward model used to compute radar observables (reflectivity, attenuation and polarimetric variables) from input model variables including temperature, pressure and water content (rain water, cloud water, cloud ice, snow, graupel and water vapor) over the radar resolution volume. Presently, the input data to the simulator come from the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) and Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) models where a constant mass density is assumed for each species with a particle size distribution given by an exponential distribution with fixed intercept parameter (N0) and a slope parameter (Λ) determined from the equivalent water content. Although the model data do not presently contain mixed phase hydrometeors, the Yokoyama-Tanaka melting model is used along with the Bruggeman effective dielectric constant to replace rain and snow particles, where both are present, with mixed phase particles while preserving the snow/water fraction. For testing one of the DPR retrieval algorithms, the Surface Reference Technique (SRT), the simulator uses

  8. Statistics of 150-km echoes over Jicamarca based on low-power VHF observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, J. L.; Kudeki, E.

    2006-07-01

    In this work we summarize the statistics of the so-called 150-km echoes obtained with a low-power VHF radar operation at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory (11.97 S, 76.87 W, and 1.3 dip angle at 150-km altitude) in Peru. Our results are based on almost four years of observations between August 2001 and July 2005 (approximately 150 days per year). The majority of the observations have been conducted between 08:00 and 17:00 LT. We present the statistics of occurrence of the echoes for each of the four seasons as a function of time of day and altitude. The occurrence frequency of the echoes is ~75% around noon and start decreasing after 15:00 LT and disappear after 17:00 LT in all seasons. As shown in previous campaign observations, the 150-echoes appear at a higher altitude (>150 km) in narrow layers in the morning, reaching lower altitudes (~135 km) around noon, and disappear at higher altitudes (>150 km) after 17:00 LT. We show that although 150-km echoes are observed all year long, they exhibit a clear seasonal variability on altitudinal coverage and the percentage of occurrence around noon and early in the morning. We also show that there is a strong day-to-day variability, and no correlation with magnetic activity. Although our results do not solve the 150-km riddle, they should be taken into account when a reasonable theory is proposed.

  9. Radar image San Francisco Bay Area, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    preliminary nature of this image product. These artifacts will be removed after further data processing.

    This image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11,2000. SRTM uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the German and Italian Space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC.

    Size: 38 km (24 miles) by 71 km (44 miles) Location: 37.7 deg. North lat., 122.2 deg. West lon. Orientation: North to the upper right Original Data Resolution: 30 meters (99 feet) Date Acquired: February 16, 2000

  10. SMAP Radar Processing and Expected Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, R. D.; Jaruwatanadilok, S.

    2011-12-01

    This presentation will describe the processing algorithms being developed for the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) radar data and the expected characteristics of the measured backscattering cross sections. The SMAP radar combines some unique features such as a conically scanned antenna with SAR processing of the data. The rapidly varying squint angle gives the measurements variable resolution and noise characteristics and poses a challenge to the processor to maintain accuracy around the wide (1000 km) swath. Rapid variation of Doppler around the scan leads to a time domain azimuth correlation algorithm, and variation of the Doppler geometry will likely require varying the processing bandwidth to manage ambiguity contamination errors. The basic accuracy requirement is 1-dB (one-sigma) in the backscatter measurements at a resolution of 3 km. The main error contributions come from speckle noise, calibration uncertainty, and radio frequency interference (RFI). Speckle noise is determined by system design parameters and details of the processing algorithms. The calibration of the backscatter measurements will be based on pre-launch characterization of the radar components which allow corrections for short term (~1 month) variations in performance. Longer term variations and biases will be removed using measurements of stable reference targets such as parts of the Amazon rain forest, and possibly the oceans and ice sheets. RFI survey measurements will be included to measure the extent of RFI around the world. The SMAP radar is designed to be able to hop the operating frequency within the 80 MHz allocated band to avoid the worst RFI emitters. Data processing will detect and discard further RFI contaminated measurements. This work is supported by the SMAP project at JPL - CalTech. The SMAP mission has not been formally approved by NASA. The decision to proceed with the mission will not occur until the completion of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process

  11. Probabilistic precipitation rate estimates with ground-based radar networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirstetter, Pierre-Emmanuel; Gourley, Jonathan J.; Hong, Yang; Zhang, Jian; Moazamigoodarzi, Saber; Langston, Carrie; Arthur, Ami

    2015-03-01

    The uncertainty structure of radar quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) is largely unknown at fine spatiotemporal scales near the radar measurement scale. By using the WSR-88D radar network and gauge data sets across the conterminous US, an investigation of this subject has been carried out within the framework of the NOAA/NSSL ground radar-based Multi-Radar Multi-Sensor (MRMS) QPE system. A new method is proposed and called PRORATE for probabilistic QPE using radar observations of rate and typology estimates. Probability distributions of precipitation rates are computed instead of deterministic values using a model quantifying the relation between radar reflectivity and the corresponding "true" precipitation. The model acknowledges the uncertainty arising from many factors operative at the radar measurement scale and from the correction algorithm. Ensembles of reflectivity-to-precipitation rate relationships accounting explicitly for precipitation typology were derived at a 5 min/1 km scale. This approach conditions probabilistic quantitative precipitation estimates (PQPE) on the precipitation rate and type. The model components were estimated on the basis of a 1 year long data sample over the CONUS. This PQPE model provides the basis for precipitation probability maps and the generation of radar precipitation ensembles. Maps of the precipitation exceedance probability for specific thresholds (e.g., precipitation return periods) are computed. Precipitation probability maps are accumulated to the hourly time scale and compare favorably to the deterministic QPE. As an essential property of precipitation, the impact of the temporal correlation on the hourly accumulation is examined. This approach to PQPE can readily apply to other systems including space-based passive and active sensor algorithms.

  12. Neutral atmosphere temperature change at 90 km, 70° N, 19° E, 2003-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmen, S. E.; Hall, C. M.; Tsutsumi, M.

    2015-06-01

    Neutral temperatures for 90 km height above Tromsø, Norway, have been determined using ambipolar diffusion coefficients calculated from meteor echo fading times using the Nippon/Norway Tromsø Meteor Radar (NTMR). Daily temperature averages have been calculated from November 2003 to October 2014 and calibrated against temperature measurements from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on board Aura. The long-term trend of temperatures from the NTMR radar is investigated, and winter and summer seasons are looked at separately. Seasonal variation has been accounted for, as well as solar response, using the F10.7 cm flux as a proxy for solar activity. The long-term temperature trend from 2003 to 2014 is -3.6 K ± 1.1 K decade-1, with summer and winter trends -0.8 K ± 2.9 K decade-1 and -8.1 K ± 2.5 K decade-1, respectively. How well suited a meteor radar is for estimating neutral temperatures at 90 km using meteor trail echoes is discussed, and physical explanations behind a cooling trend are proposed.

  13. A barrier radar concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J.; Ball, C.; Weissman, I.

    A description is given of a low power, light-weight radar that can be quickly set up and operated on batteries for extended periods of time to detect airborne intruders. With low equipment and operating costs, it becomes practical to employ a multiplicity of such radars to provide an unbroken intrusion fence over the desired perimeter. Each radar establishes a single transmitted fan beam extending vertically from horizon to horizon. The beam is generated by a two-face array antenna built in an A-frame configuration and is shaped, through phasing of the array elements, to concentrate the transmitter power in a manner consistent with the expected operating altitude ceiling of the targets of interest. The angular width of this beam in the dimension transverse to the fan depends on the radar transmission frequency and the antenna aperture dimension, but is typically wide enough so that a target at the maximum altitude or range will require tens of seconds to pass through the beam. A large number of independent samples of radar data will thus be available to provide many opportunities for target detection.

  14. Report on the comparison of the scan strategies employed by the Patrick Air Force Base WSR-74C/McGill radar and the NWS Melbourne WSR-88D radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Gregory; Evans, Randolph; Manobianco, John; Schumann, Robin; Wheeler, Mark; Yersavich, Ann

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to determine whether the current standard WSR-88D radar (NEXRAD) scan strategies permit the use of the Melbourne WSR-88D to perform the essential functions now performed by the Patrick Air Force Base (PAFB) WSR-74C/McGill radar for evaluating shuttle weather flight rules (FR) and launch commit criteria (LCC). To meet this objective, the investigation compared the beam coverage patterns of the WSR-74C/McGill radar located at PAFB and the WSR-88D radar located at the Melbourne National Weather Service (NWS) Office over the area of concern for weather FR and LCC evaluations. The analysis focused on beam coverage within four vertical 74 km radius cylinders (1 to 4 km above ground level (AGL), 4 to 8 km AGL, 8 to 12 km AGL, and 1 to 12 km AGL) centered on Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Launch Complex 39A. The PAFB WSR-74C/McGill radar is approximately 17 km north-northeast of the Melbourne WSR-88D radar. The beam coverage of the WSR-88D using VCP 11 located at the Melbourne NWS Office is comparable (difference in percent of the atmosphere sampled between the two radars is 10 percent or less) within the area of concern to the beam coverage of the WSR-74C/McGill radar located at PAFB. Both radars provide good beam coverage over much of the atmospheric region of concern. In addition, both radars provide poor beam coverage (coverage less than 50 percent) over limited regions near the radars due to the radars' cone of silence and gaps in coverage within the higher elevation scans. Based on scan strategy alone, the WSR-88D radar could be used to perform the essential functions now performed by the PAFB WSR-74C/McGill radar for evaluating shuttle weather FR and LCC. Other radar characteristics may, however, affect the decision as to which radar to use in a given case.

  15. 33. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #320, perimeter acquisition radar ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #320, perimeter acquisition radar operations center (PAROC), contains the tactical command and control group equipment required to control the par site. Showing spacetrack monitor console - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  16. Measurement of momentum flux using two meteor radars in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Naoki; Shinbori, Atsuki; Riggin, Dennis M.; Tsuda, Toshitaka

    2016-03-01

    Two nearly identical meteor radars were operated at Koto Tabang (0.20° S, 100.32° E), West Sumatra, and Biak (1.17° S, 136.10° E), West Papua, in Indonesia, separated by approximately 4000 km in longitude on the Equator. The zonal and meridional momentum flux, u'w' and v'w', where u, v, and w are the eastward, northward, and vertical wind velocity components, respectively, were estimated at 86 to 94 km altitudes using the meteor radar data by applying a method proposed by Hocking (2005). The observed u'w' at the two sites agreed reasonably well at 86, 90, and 94 km during the observation periods when the data acquisition rate was sufficiently large enough. Variations in v'w' were consistent between 86, 90, and 94 km altitudes at both sites. The climatological variation in the monthly averaged u'w' and v'w' was investigated using the long-term radar data at Koto Tabang from November 2002 to November 2013. The seasonal variations in u'w' and v'w' showed a repeatable semiannual and annual cycles, respectively. u'w' showed eastward values in February-April and July-September and v'w' was northward in June to August at 90-94 km, both of which were generally anti-phase with the mean zonal and meridional winds, having the same periodicity. Our results suggest the usefulness of the Hocking method.

  17. Phase modulating the Urbana radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrington, L. J., Jr.; Bowhill, S. A.

    1983-01-01

    The design and operation of a switched phase modulation system for the Urbana Radar System are discussed. The system is implemented and demonstrated using a simple procedure. The radar system and circuits are described and analyzed.

  18. Mercury radar speckle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holin, Igor V.

    2010-06-01

    Current data reveal that Mercury is a dynamic system with a core which has not yet solidified completely and is at least partially decoupled from the mantle. Radar speckle displacement experiments have demonstrated that the accuracy in spin-dynamics determination for Earth-like planets can approach 10 -5. The extended analysis of space-time correlation properties of radar echoes shows that the behavior of speckles does not prevent estimation of Mercury's instantaneous spin-vector components to accuracy of a few parts in 10 7. This limit can be reached with more powerful radar facilities and leads to constraining the interior in more detail from effects of spin dynamics, e.g., from observation of the core-mantle interplay through high precision monitoring of the 88-day spin-variation of Mercury's crust.

  19. Radar Studies on Kamb Ice Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettersson, R.; Osterhouse, D. J.; Mulhausen, A.; Welch, B. C.; Strandli, C. W.; Jacobel, R. W.

    2006-12-01

    During the past two Antarctic field seasons we acquired approximately 1600 km of ground-based ice- penetrating radar data on the lower trunk of Kamb Ice Stream (KIS) as part of radar, GPS and modeling study with scientists at the University of California Santa Cruz examining the possibility of ice stream reactivation. We present here a summary of radar results from this work and preliminary interpretations. Our working hypothesis is that the reactivation of the stagnant KIS may be triggered by excess influx of basal water produced by increased basal strain heating when mass builds up in the upper reaches of the locked ice stream. Using radar data, we have quantified variations in the amplitude of radar reflections from the ice-bed interface to estimate different provenances of occurrence of basal water. The weakest-reflecting ice-bed interface is found at a "sticky spot" in the middle of the ice stream trunk where ice appears to have become grounded over a large bedrock bump. At the sticky spot, bore holes drilled by California Technical Institute in 2000 showed a dry bed. A more highly reflective bed is located to either side of the sticky spot in regions of faster flow of KIS including one location where bore holes showed water at the ice-bed interface. However, the brightest bed is located approximately 80~km upstream of the sticky spot, where ice velocities are still on the order of 120~m a-1. Here radar reflected power is up to 1.5 times higher than elsewhere in the trunk despite the ice being 40% deeper. From this pattern of bed reflectivity we hypothesize that conditions allowing for rapid flow still exist under most areas of KIS and that sticky spots, like the one studied here, have played a key role in the ice stream shut down. We have also produced a map of detailed bed topography and tracked internal reflection layers over the sticky spot. We are able to trace the evolution of folds in the radar internal stratigraphy in this region in both time and space

  20. Imaging radar observations of frozen Arctic lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.; Bryan, M. L.; Weeks, W. F.

    1976-01-01

    A synthetic aperture imaging L-band radar flown aboard the NASA CV-990 remotely sensed a number of ice-covered lakes about 48 km northwest of Bethel, Alaska. The image obtained is a high resolution, two-dimensional representation of the surface backscatter cross section, and large differences in backscatter returns are observed: homogeneous low returns, homogeneous high returns and/or low returns near lake borders, and high returns from central areas. It is suggested that a low return indicates that the lake is frozen completely to the bottom, while a high return indicates the presence of fresh water between the ice cover and the lake bed.

  1. The new Adelaide medium frequency Doppler radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, I. M.; Vandepeer, B. G. W.; Dillon, S.; Fuller, B.

    1993-08-01

    The Buckland Park Aerial Array (35 deg S, 138 deg E) is situated about 40 km north of Adelaide on a flat coastal plain. It was designed by Basil Briggs and Graham Elford, and constructed between 1965 and 1968. The first results were published in the late 1960's. Some aspects of the history of the array are described in Briggs (1993). A new MF Doppler Radar utilizing the array has been developed. This paper describes some of the technical details of this new facility.

  2. Radar data smoothing filter study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, J. V.

    1984-01-01

    The accuracy of the current Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) data smoothing techniques for a variety of radars and payloads is examined. Alternative data reduction techniques are given and recommendations are made for improving radar data processing at WFF. A data adaptive algorithm, based on Kalman filtering and smoothing techniques, is also developed for estimating payload trajectories above the atmosphere from noisy time varying radar data. This algorithm is tested and verified using radar tracking data from WFF.

  3. Threat radar system simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L.

    The capabilities, requirements, and goals of radar emitter simulators are discussed. Simulators are used to evaluate competing receiver designs, to quantify the performance envelope of a radar system, and to model the characteristics of a transmitted signal waveform. A database of candidate threat systems is developed and, in concert with intelligence data on a given weapons system, permits upgrading simulators to new projected threat capabilities. Four currently available simulation techniques are summarized, noting the usefulness of developing modular software for fast controlled-cost upgrades of simulation capabilities.

  4. Terminal Doppler weather radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelson, M.; Shrader, W. W.; Wieler, J. G.

    1990-02-01

    The terminal Doppler weather radar (TDWR) system, now under development, will provide automatic detection of microbursts and low-level wind shear. This paper discusses the TDWR performance parameters and describes its structural elements, including the antenna subsystem, the transmitter, the receiver/exciter, the digital signal processor, and the radar product generator/remote monitoring subsystem. Attention is also given to the processes of the base data formation, point target removal, signal-to-noise thresholding, and velocity de-aliasing and to the TDWR algorithms and displays. A schematic diagram of the TDWR system is presented.

  5. Radar Investigations of Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostro, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    Radar investigations of asteroids, including observations during 1984 to 1985 of at least 8 potential targets and continued analyses of radar data obtained during 1980 to 1984 for 30 other asteroids is proposed. The primary scientific objectives include estimation of echo strength, polarization, spectral shape, spectral bandwidth, and Doppler shift. These measurements yield estimates of target size, shape, and spin vector; place constraints on topography, morphology, density, and composition of the planetary surface; yield refined estimates of target orbital parameters; and reveals the presence of asteroidal satellites.

  6. Microwave radar oceanographic investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, F. C.

    1988-01-01

    The Radar Ocean Wave Spectrometer (ROWS) technique was developed and demonstrated for measuring ocean wave directional spectra from air and space platforms. The measurement technique was well demonstrated with data collected in a number of flight experiments involving wave spectral comparisons with wave buoys and the Surface Contour Radar (SCR). Recent missions include the SIR-B underflight experiment (1984), FASINEX (1986), and LEWEX (1987). ROWS related activity is presently concentrating on using the aircraft instrument for wave-processes investigations and obtaining the necessary support (consensus) for a satellite instrument development program. Prospective platforms include EOS and the Canadian RADARSAT.

  7. Spaceborne Imaging Radar Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.

    1983-01-01

    An overview of the present state of the art in the different scientific and technological fields related to spaceborne imaging radars was presented. The data acquired with the SEASAT SAR (1978) and Shuttle Imaging Radar, SIR-A (1981) clearly demonstrated the important emphasis in the 80's is going to be on in-depth research investigations conducted with the more flexible and sophisticated SIR series instruments and on long term monitoring of geophysical phenomena conducted from free-flying platforms such as ERS-1 and RADARSAT.

  8. Systems and Methods for Radar Data Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunch, Brian (Inventor); Szeto, Roland (Inventor); Miller, Brad (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A radar information processing system is operable to process high bandwidth radar information received from a radar system into low bandwidth radar information that may be communicated to a low bandwidth connection coupled to an electronic flight bag (EFB). An exemplary embodiment receives radar information from a radar system, the radar information communicated from the radar system at a first bandwidth; processes the received radar information into processed radar information, the processed radar information configured for communication over a connection operable at a second bandwidth, the second bandwidth lower than the first bandwidth; and communicates the radar information from a radar system, the radar information communicated from the radar system at a first bandwidth.

  9. SEASAT Synthetic Aperture Radar Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, F. M.

    1981-01-01

    The potential of radar imagery from space altitudes is discussed and the advantages of radar over passive sensor systems are outlined. Specific reference is made to the SEASAT synthetic aperture radar. Possible applications include oil spill monitoring, snow and ice reconnaissance, mineral exploration, and monitoring phenomena in the urban environment.

  10. Daytime zonal drifts in the ionospheric E and 150 km regions estimated using EAR observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peddapati, PavanChaitanya; Otsuka, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Mamoru; Yokoyama, Tatsuhiro; Patra, Amit

    2016-07-01

    The Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR), located at Kototabang (0.2o S, 100.32o E, mag. lat. 10.36o S), Indonesia, is capable of detecting both E region and 150 km echoes during daytime. We have conducted multi-beam observations using the EAR during daytime covering all seasons to study seasonal variations of these echoes and their dynamics. Given the facts that drifts at the 150 km region are governed primarily by electric field, drifts at the E region are governed by both electric field and neutral wind, simultaneous observations of drifts in both E and 150 km regions would help understand their variations. In this paper we present local time and seasonal variations of zonal drifts in the E and 150 km regions estimated using multi-beam observations. Zonal drifts (positive eastward) in the E and 150 km regions are found to be in the range of -10 to -60 m/s and -40 to 80 m/s, respectively. In the E region, zonal drifts show height reversal and temporal variations having tidal signature and noticeable seasonal variations. Zonal drifts in the 150 km region also show noticeable height and seasonal variations. These results are compared with model drifts and evaluated in terms of electric field and neutral wind.

  11. Nonlinear synthetic aperture radar imaging using a harmonic radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Kyle A.; Mazzaro, Gregory J.; Ranney, Kenneth I.; Nguyen, Lam H.; Martone, Anthony F.; Sherbondy, Kelly D.; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of linear and nonlinear targets. Data are collected using a linear/nonlinear step frequency radar. We show that it is indeed possible to produce SAR images using a nonlinear radar. Furthermore, it is shown that the nonlinear radar is able to reduce linear clutter by at least 80 dB compared to a linear radar. The nonlinear SAR images also show the system's ability to detect small electronic devices in the presence of large linear clutter. The system presented here has the ability to completely ignore a 20-inch trihedral corner reflector while detecting a RF mixer with a dipole antenna attached.

  12. Km3Net Italy - Seafloor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaleo, Riccardo

    2016-04-01

    The KM3NeT European project aims to construct a large volume underwater neutrino telescope in the depths of the Mediterranean Sea. INFN and KM3NeT collaboration, thanks to a dedicated funding of 21.000.000 € (PON 2007-2013), are committed to build and deploy the Phase 1 of the telescope, composed of a network of detection units: 8 towers, equipped with single photomultiplier optical modules, and 24 strings, equipped with multi-photomultipliers optical modules. All the towers and strings are connected to the main electro optical cable by means of a network of junction boxes and electro optical interlink cables. Each junction box is an active node able to provide all the necessary power to the detection units and to guarantee the data transmission between the detector and the on-shore control station. The KM3NeT Italia project foresees the realization and the installation of the first part of the deep sea network, composed of three junction boxes, one for the towers and two for the strings. In July 2015, two junction boxes have been deployed and connected to the new cable termination frame installed during the same sea campaign. The third and last one will be installed in November 2015. The status of the deep sea network is presented together with technical details of the project.

  13. Large Circular Basin - 1300-km diameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Close-up view of one-half of a 1300-km diameter circular basin the largest observed on Mercury. The other half is hidden beyond the terminator to the left. Hills and valleys extend in a radial fashion outward from the main ring. Interior of the large basin is completely flooded by plains materials; adjacent lowlands are also partially flooded and superimposed on the plains are bowl shaped craters. Wrinkle ridges are abundant on the plains materials. The area shown is 1008 miles (1600 km) from the top to the bottom of the picture. Sun's illumination is from the right. Blurred linear lines extending across the picture near bottom are missing data lines that have been filled in by the computer. Mariner 10 encountered Mercury on Friday, March 29th, 1974, passing the planet on the darkside 431 miles (690-km) from the surface.

    The Mariner 10 mission, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science, explored Venus in February 1974 on the way to three encounters with Mercury-in March and September 1974 and in March 1975. The spacecraft took more than 7,000 photos of Mercury, Venus, the Earth and the Moon.

    NOTE: This image was scanned from physical media.

  14. Venus Radar Mapper (VRM): Multimode radar system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, William T. K.; Edgerton, Alvin T.

    1986-01-01

    The surface of Venus has remained a relative mystery because of the very dense atmosphere that is opaque to visible radiation and, thus, normal photographic techniques used to explore the other terrestrial objects in the solar system are useless. The atmosphere is, however, almost transparent to radar waves and images of the surface have been produced via Earth-based and orbital radars. The technique of obtaining radar images of a surface is variously called side looking radar, imaging radar, or synthetic aperture radar (SAR). The radar requires a moving platform in which the antenna is side looking. High resolution is obtained in the cross-track or range direction by conventional radar pulse encoding. In the along-track or azimuth direction, the resolution would normally be the antenna beam width, but for the SAR case, a much longer antenna (or much sharper beam) is obtained by moving past a surface target as shown, and then combining the echoes from many pulses, by using the Doppler data, to obtain the images. The radar design of the Venus Radar Mapper (VRM) is discussed. It will acquire global radar imagery and altimetry data of the surface of Venus.

  15. Acid-sensing ion channel 3 or P2X2/3 is involved in the pain-like behavior under a high bone turnover state in ovariectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Kanaya, Kumiko; Iba, Kousuke; Abe, Yasuhisa; Dohke, Takayuki; Okazaki, Shunichiro; Matsumura, Tadaki; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2016-04-01

    We have recently demonstrated that pathological changes leading to increased bone resorption by osteoclast activation are related to the induction of pain-like behavior in ovariectomized (OVX) mice. In addition, bisphosphonate and the antagonist of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1), an acid-sensing nociceptor, improved the threshold value of pain-like behaviors accompanying an improvement in the acidic environment in the bone tissue based on osteoclast inactivation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of (i) an inhibitor of vacuolar H(+) -ATPase, known as an proton pump, (ii) an antagonist of acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) 3, as another acid-sensing nociceptor, and (iii) the P2X2/3 receptor, as an ATP-ligand nociceptor, on pain-like behavior in OVX mice. This inhibitor and antagonists were found to improve the threshold value of pain-like behavior in OVX mice. These results indicated that the skeletal pain accompanying osteoporosis is possibly associated with the acidic microenvironment and increased ATP level caused by osteoclast activation under a high bone turnover state. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:566-573, 2016. PMID:26340235

  16. New insights into the comprehension of the magnetic properties of dinuclear Mn(III) compounds with the general formula [{MnL(NN)}2(μ-O)(μ-n-RC6H4COO)2]X2.

    PubMed

    Escriche-Tur, Luis; Font-Bardia, Mercè; Albela, Belén; Corbella, Montserrat

    2016-07-19

    Five new dinuclear Mn(iii) compounds with benzoato derivative bridges [{Mn(bpy)L}2(μ-O)(μ-n-RC6H4COO)2]X2 (n-R = 3-MeO, 4-MeO and 4-tBu, X = NO3(-) and ClO4(-)) were synthesised and characterised. According to X-ray diffraction, the X anions tend to be coordinated to the Mn ions and may occupy the place of the monodentate ligand L. Two structural isomers that only differ in one of their monodentate ligands have been obtained with the 3-MeOC6H4COO(-) bridges. For all compounds, the Mn(iii) ions display elongated octahedra with a pronounced rhombic distortion. To quantify these distortions separately, the elongation and rhombicity parameters Δ and ρ have been defined. The magnetic study shows a good relationship between the distortion of the coordination polyhedra and the zero field splitting parameters (DMn and EMn). From the magnetic data of a powder sample, it is possible to determine the sign and magnitude of DMn for ferromagnetic systems or weak antiferromagnetic systems with DMn < 0. For this kind of dinuclear compound, the R group at the meta position, the rhombic distortion of the octahedra, and large torsion angles between the Jahn-Teller axes lead to ferromagnetic interactions. PMID:27295557

  17. A satellite-borne radar wind sensor (RAWS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Richard K.; Stuart, Michael; Xin, Weizhuang; Propp, Timothy

    1992-01-01

    The Laser Wind Sounder (LAWS) measures Doppler shifts from aerosols in the plan for the Earth Observation System (EOS). Gaps exist in LAWS coverage where heavy clouds are present. The radar wind sensor (RAWS) can be utilized to fill these gaps by measuring Doppler shifts from clouds and rain. It is shown that RAWS is a feasible instrument. The antenna required is large and the power is comparable with a spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR). Studies show that such an instrument could measure winds at about 1-km height intervals in denser clouds and rain.

  18. 2-D inner-shelf current observations from a single VHF WEllen RAdar (WERA) station

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voulgaris, G.; Kumar, N.; Gurgel, K.-W.; Warner, J.C.; List, J.H.

    2011-01-01

    The majority of High Frequency (HF) radars used worldwide operate at medium to high frequencies (8 to 30 MHz) providing spatial resolutions ranging from 3 to 1.5 km and ranges from 150 to 50 km. This paper presents results from the deployment of a single Very High Frequency (VHF, 48 MHz) WEllen RAdar (WERA) radar with spatial resolution of 150 m and range 10-15 km, used in the nearshore off Cape Hatteras, NC, USA. It consisted of a linear array of 12 antennas operating in beam forming mode. Radial velocities were estimated from radar backscatter for a variety of wind and nearshore wave conditions. A methodology similar to that used for converting acoustically derived beam velocities to an orthogonal system is presented for obtaining 2-D current fields from a single station. The accuracy of the VHF radar-derived radial velocities is examined using a new statistical technique that evaluates the system over the range of measured velocities. The VHF radar velocities showed a bias of 3 to 7 cm/s over the experimental period explainable by the differences in radar penetration and in-situ measurement height. The 2-D current field shows good agreement with the in-situ measurements. Deviations and inaccuracies are well explained by the geometric dilution analysis. ?? 2011 IEEE.

  19. Rain radar instrument definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Nicolas; Chenebault, J.; Suinot, Noel; Mancini, Paolo L.

    1996-12-01

    As a result of a pre-phase a study, founded by ESA, this paper presents the definition of a spaceborne Rain Radar, candidate instrument for earth explorer precipitation mission. Based upon the description of user requirements for such a dedicated mission, a mission analysis defines the most suitable space segment. At system level, a parametric analysis compares pros and cons of instrument concepts associated with rain rate retrieval algorithms in order to select the most performing one. Several trade-off analysis at subsystem level leads then to the definition of the proposed design. In particular, as pulse compression is implemented in order to increase the radar sensitivity, the selected method to achieve a pulse response with a side-lobe level below--60 dB is presented. Antenna is another critical rain radar subsystem and several designs are com pared: direct radiating array, single or dual reflector illuminated by single or dual feed arrays. At least, feasibility of centralized amplification using TWTA is compared with criticality of Tx/Rx modules for distributed amplification. Mass and power budgets of the designed instrument are summarized as well as standard deviations and bias of simulated rain rate retrieval profiles. The feasibility of a compliant rain radar instrument is therefore demonstrated.

  20. Passive bistatic radar analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hagan, Daniel W.; Kuschel, H.; Schiller, Joachim

    2009-06-01

    Passive Bistatic Radar (PBR) research is at its zenith with several notable PBR systems currently operational, or available for deployment. Such PBRs include the Manastash Ridge Radar (MRR) developed for and by academia; Silent Sentry developed as a commercial concern by Lockheed Martin; and Homeland Alerter (HA100) also a commercial system developed by Thales. However at present, despite the existence of numerous PBR prototypes, take up of commercial passive radar technology remains slow. This is due in part to technology immaturity, in part to politics, and particularly due to the fact that monostatic radars perform so well. If PBRs are to enjoy longevity as a viable technology then it is imperative that they address certain niche application areas, with the aforementioned MRR being one prime example of this. The focus of this paper will be an analysis of a PBR system that utilised FM radio signals of opportunity to detect aircraft targets with an RCS generally not lower than 20 m2. The paper will demonstrate the theoretical detection coverage of an FM based PBR operating in a severe interference environment.

  1. The Newcastle meteor radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keay, Colin

    1987-01-01

    A brief history and development of the Newcastle Meteor Radar system is given. Also described are its geographical coordinates and its method of operation. The initial objective when the project was commenced was to develop an entirely digital analyzer capable of recognizing meteor echo signals and recording as many of their parameters as possible. This objective was achieved.

  2. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, P. A.; Hensley, S.; Joughin, I. R.; Li, F.; Madsen, S. N.; Rodriguez, E.; Goldstein, R. M.

    1998-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar interferometry is an imaging technique for measuring the topography of a surface, its changes over time, and other changes in the detailed characteristics of the surface. This paper reviews the techniques of interferometry, systems and limitations, and applications in a rapidly growing area of science and engineering.

  3. Impulse radar studfinder

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-10-10

    An impulse radar studfinder propagates electromagnetic pulses and detects reflected pulses from a fixed range. Unmodulated pulses, about 200 ps wide, are emitted. A large number of reflected pulses are sampled and averaged. Background reflections are subtracted. Reflections from wall studs or other hidden objects are detected and displayed using light emitting diodes. 9 figs.

  4. Impulse radar studfinder

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    An impulse radar studfinder propagates electromagnetic pulses and detects reflected pulses from a fixed range. Unmodulated pulses, about 200 ps wide, are emitted. A large number of reflected pulses are sampled and averaged. Background reflections are subtracted. Reflections from wall studs or other hidden objects are detected and displayed using light emitting diodes.

  5. The RITMARE coastal radar network and applications to monitor marine transport infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrara, Paola; Corgnati, Lorenzo; Cosoli, Simone; Griffa, Annalisa; Kalampokis, Alkiviadis; Mantovani, Carlo; Oggioni, Alessandro; Pepe, Monica; Raffa, Francesco; Serafino, Francesco; Uttieri, Marco; Zambianchi, Enrico

    2014-05-01

    Coastal radars provide information on the environmental state of oceans, namely maps of surface currents at time intervals of the order of one hour with spatial coverage of the order of several km, depending on the transmission frequency. The observations are of crucial importance for monitoring ports and ship tracks close to the coast, providing support for safe navigation in densely operated areas and fast response in case of accidents at sea, such as oil spill or search and rescue. Besides these applications, coastal radar observations provide fundamental support in MPAs surveillance, connectivity and marine population circulation. In the framework of the Italian RITMARE flagship project coordinated by CNR (Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche), a coastal radar network has been designed and implemented with a number of innovative characteristics. The network includes both HF and X-band radars, allowing coverage of wide areas with different spatial and temporal resolutions. HF radars cover up to 80 km with a spatial resolution ranging between 1 and 5 km, while X-band radars provide 5 km coverage with a spatial resolution of 10 m. Joining these two capabilities, the RITMARE coastal radar network enables both a highly effective coverage of wide coastal areas and integrated monitoring of different phenomena, thus allowing the collection of current and wave parameters and detection of bathymetries of both open sea and coastal areas. A dedicated action to foster interoperability among data providers has been undertaken within RITMARE; an IT framework is under development to provide software tools for data collection and data sharing. It suggests standard, data format definitions, Quality Control strategies, data management and dissemination policies. In particular, the implementation of tools exploits both standards of OGC (Open Geospatial Consortium) and web services offered to manage, access and deliver geospatial data. Radar data produced in RITMARE by the coastal

  6. The Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER): Platform for comprehensive meteor radar observations and studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janches, D.; Hormaechea, J.; Pifko, S.; Hocking, W.; Fritts, D.; Brunini, C.; Close, S.; Michell, R.; Samara, M.

    2014-07-01

    The Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER) is a new generation system deployed in Rio Grande, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina (53^oS) in May 2008 (Janches et al., 2013,2014). SAAMER transmits 10 times more power than regular meteor radars, and uses a newly developed transmitting array, which focuses power upward instead of the traditional single-antenna-all-sky configuration. The system is configured such that the transmitter array can also be utilized as a receiver. The new design greatly increases the sensitivity of the radar enabling the detection of large numbers of particles at low zenith angles. The more concentrated transmitted power enables additional meteor studies besides those typical of these systems based on the detection of specular reflections, such as routine detections of head echoes and non-specular trails, previously only possible with High Power and Large Aperture radars (Janches et al., 2014). In August 2010, SAAMER was upgraded to a system capable to determine meteoroid orbital parameters. This was achieved by adding two remote receiving stations approximately 10 km away from the main site in near perpendicular directions (Pifko et al., 2014). The upgrade significantly expands the science that is achieved with this new radar enabling us to study the orbital properties of the interplanetary dust environment. Because of the unique geographical location, the SAAMER allows for additional inter-hemispheric comparison with measurements from Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar, which is geographically conjugate. Initial surveys show, for example, that SAAMER observes a very strong contribution of the South Toroidal Sporadic meteor source (Pifko et al., 2014), of which limited observational data is available. In addition, SAAMER offers similar unique capabilities for meteor showers and streams studies given the range of ecliptic latitudes that the system enables to survey (Janches et al., 2013). It can effectively observe radiants from the ecliptic south

  7. Space Radar Image of Sudan Collision Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a radar image of a region in northern Sudan called the Keraf Suture that reveals newly discovered geologic features buried beneath layers of sand. This discovery is being used to guide field studies of the region and has opened up new perspectives on old problems, such as what controls the course of the Nile, a question that has perplexed geologists for centuries. The Nile is the yellowish/green line that runs from the top to the bottom of the image. A small town, Abu Dis, can be seen as the bright, white area on the east (right) bank of the Nile (about a third of the way down from the top) at the mouth of a dry stream valley or 'wadi' that drains into the river. Wadis flowing into the Nile from both east and west stand out as dark, reddish branch-like drainage patterns. The bright pink area on the west (left) side of the Nile is a region where rocks are exposed, but the area east (right) of the Nile is obscured by layers of sand, a few inches to several feet thick. Virtually everything visible on the right side of this radar image is invisible when standing on the ground or when viewing photographs or satellite images such as the United States' Landsat or the French SPOT satellite. A sharp, straight fault cuts diagonally across the image, to the right of the Nile river. The area between the fault and the Nile is part of the collision zone where the ancient continents of East and West Gondwana crashed into each other to form the supercontinent Greater Gondwana more than 600 million years ago. On this image, the Nile approaches but never crosses the fault, indicating that this fault seems to be controlling the course of the Nile in this part of Sudan. The image is centered at 19.5 degrees north latitude, 33.35 degrees east longitude, and shows an area approximately 18 km by 20 km (10 miles by 12 miles). The colors in the image are assigned to different frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: Red is L-band, vertically transmitted and vertically

  8. Spatial Correlation of Rain Drop Size Distribution from Polarimetric Radar and 2D-Video Disdrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurai, Merhala; Bringi, Viswanathan; Gatlin, Patrick N.; Wingo, Matt; Petersen, Walter Arthur; Carey, Lawrence D.

    2011-01-01

    Spatial correlations of two of the main rain drop-size distribution (DSD) parameters - namely the median-volume diameter (Do) and the normalized intercept parameter (Nw) - as well as rainfall rate (R) are determined from polarimetric radar measurements, with added information from 2D video disdrometer (2DVD) data. Two cases have been considered, (i) a widespread, long-duration rain event in Huntsville, Alabama, and (ii) an event with localized intense rain-cells within a convection line which occurred during the MC3E campaign. For the first case, data from a C-band polarimetric radar (ARMOR) were utilized, with two 2DVDs acting as ground-truth , both being located at the same site 15 km from the radar. The radar was operated in a special near-dwelling mode over the 2DVDs. In the second case, data from an S-band polarimetric radar (NPOL) data were utilized, with at least five 2DVDs located between 20 and 30 km from the radar. In both rain event cases, comparisons of Do, log10(Nw) and R were made between radar derived estimates and 2DVD-based measurements, and were found to be in good agreement, and in both cases, the radar data were subsequently used to determine the spatial correlations For the first case, the spatial decorrelation distance was found to be smallest for R (4.5 km), and largest fo Do (8.2 km). For log10(Nw) it was 7.2 km (Fig. 1). For the second case, the corresponding decorrelation distances were somewhat smaller but had a directional dependence. In Fig. 2, we show an example of Do comparisons between NPOL based estimates and 1-minute DSD based estimates from one of the five 2DVDs.

  9. On the use of radar-based quantitative precipitation estimates for precipitation frequency analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldardiry, Hisham; Habib, Emad; Zhang, Yu

    2015-12-01

    The high spatio-temporal resolutions of radar-based multi-sensor Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPEs) makes them a potential complement to the gauge records for engineering design purposes, such as precipitation frequency analysis. The current study investigates three fundamental issues that arise when radar-based QPE products are used in frequency analysis: (a) Effect of sample size due to the typically short records of radar products; (b) Effect of uncertainties present in radar-rainfall estimation algorithms; and (c) Effect of the frequency estimation approach adopted. The study uses a 13-year dataset of hourly, 4 × 4 km2 radar-based over a domain that covers Louisiana, USA. Data-based investigations, as well as synthetic simulations, are performed to quantify the uncertainties associated with the radar-based derived frequencies, and to gain insight into the relative contributions of short record lengths and those from conditional biases in the radar product. Three regional estimation procedures were tested and the results indicate the sensitivity of the radar frequency estimates to the selection of the estimation approach and the impact on the uncertainties of the derived extreme quantiles. The simulation experiments revealed that the relatively short radar records explained the majority of the uncertainty associated with the radar-based quantiles; however, they did not account for any tangible contribution to the systematic underestimation observed between radar- and gauge-based frequency estimates. This underestimation was mostly attributable to the conditional bias inherent in the radar product. Addressing such key outstanding problems in radar-rainfall products is necessary before they can be fully and reliably used for frequency analysis applications.

  10. Space Radar Image of Missouri River - TOPSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    can be used to map the Earth's topography from satellites and from the space shuttle. The brightness of the image represents the radar backscatter at C-band, in the vertically transmitted and received polarization. The image is centered south of the town of Glasgow in central Missouri, at 39.1 degrees north latitude and 92.9 degrees west longitude. The area shown is about 5 km by 10 km (3.1 by 6.2 miles). Radar and topography data such as these are being used by scientists to more accurately assess the potential for future flooding in this region and how that might impact surrounding communities. Radar and interferometry processing for this image was performed at JPL; image generation was performed at Washington University, St. Louis.