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Sample records for 3-d fault geometry

  1. 3-D geometry and physical property of the Mega-Splay Fault in Nankai trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masui, R.; Tsuji, T.; Yamada, Y.; Environmental Resource; System Engineering laboratory

    2011-12-01

    The Nankai trough is a subduction zone, where the Philippine Sea plate is being subducted beneath southwest Japan at a rate of ~4-6.5 cm/y at an azimuth of ~300-315. A lot of operations have been done in Nankai, such as three-dimensional seismic reflection surveys and Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP), Ocean Drilling Program (ODP), Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP). They revealed that there is a large splay fault, referred to as 'Mega-Splay'. The Mega-Splay Fault has caused a series of catastrophic earthquakes and submarine landslides, which may have led to TSUNAMI. Since fault development history may have affected the geometry of the Mega-Splay Fault and physical property within the fault zone, they need to be examined in detail. In this research, we used 3-D pre-stack depth migration (PSDM), 3-D pre-stack time migration (PSTM) and P-wave velocity in C0004B well (Logging data), in order to interpret 3-D structure of Mega-Splay Fault. The analysis in this research is basically divided into two parts. One is structural interpretation of Splay Fault, based on the high amplitude reflection surface on seismic profiles. The other part is acoustic impedance inversion (AI inversion), in which we inverted seismic waveform into physical property (in this study, acoustic impedance), with the P-wave velocity data at C0004B near Mega-Splay Fault. The 3-D PSDM (or PSTM) clearly images details of Splay Fault, with good continuity of reflections along the fault. It is possible on each seismic profile to trace the high amplitude lines, where rock-properties significantly change. Since Mega-Splay Fault has 45-59m width along the wells, we interpreted the upper limit and the lower limit of the Mega-Splay Fault, based on the high amplitude surfaces along 3-D PSDM. Our interpretation shows that the width of Mega-Splay Fault has variation along the fault, and the plan geometry of the fault toe has a salient at the middle of the 3D box area, suggesting the fault could be divided into two segments: the eastern part and western part. In AI inversion, the 3-D PSTM and P-wave velocity at C0004B were used to build a physical property model around Mega-Splay Fault. AI Inversion is a methodology to invert seismic waveforms with physical property data, into acoustic impedance. Acoustic Impedance governs the ability of a rock to allow the passage of an acoustic wave. In this analysis, we used Hampson-Russell STRATA to perform post-stack seismic inversion. Our results show that there is a low acoustic impedance layer in the upper zone of Splay Fault. 3-D distribution of the low acoustic impedance layer in the fault zone has a variation in the width, similar to the 3-D interpretation of the geometry. This suggests that there are a relationship between structural geometry and physical property along the Mega-Splay Fault.

  2. Scaled sandbox models of growth-faulting processes: Mechanisms, evolution and 3-D geometry of listric normal growth faults

    SciTech Connect

    Vendeville, B.; Chermette, J.; Colletta, B.; Cobbold, P. )

    1988-08-01

    The northwest and southeast Mediterranean margins display spectacular gravity-related synsedimentary normal faults which affect Pliocene-Quaternary sediments above an evaporitic Messinian decollement layer. As in other growth-faulted terranes, Mediterranean growth faults are highly listric and sole out at depth within the basal salt layer. Faults tend to form in domains of seaward-verging fault planes which bound tilted blocks showing fan-shaped layering of Pliocene-Quaternary deposits. Several physical experiments have been designed to examine the structural evolution of growth-faulted terranes, the 3-D geometry of structures, and the interaction between faulting, sedimentation, and salt diapirism. Models have been scaled in terms of densities, viscosities, lengths, and gravitational forces with respect to natural data from the deep Rhone delta area. A basal layer of perfectly ductile silicone putty models the Messinian salt and deforms gravitationally by downslope spreading-gliding above a low-dipping planar base. Sand layers are deposited at regular time intervals on the top surface of the model and simulate sedimentation of an idealized brittle Pliocene-Quaternary sequence. Models emphasize that sedimentation rate strongly controls the shape, curvature, location, and evolution of normal growth faults. Experiments also suggest that listric growth-fault curvature is partly due to interaction between block rotation, sedimentation, and upward propagation of a fault plane during burial. Comparison of their results with seismic data from the deep Rhone delta and other growth-faulted regions can provide useful insights on growth-fault kinematics and 3-D geometry, which are critical in petroleum exploration.

  3. 3D Geometry of Active Shortening, Uplift and Subsidence West of the Alpine Fault (South Island, New Zealand)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisetti, F.; Sibson, R. H.; Hamling, I. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Alpine Fault is the principal component of the transform boundary between the Australian and Pacific plates across the South Island of New Zealand, linking the opposite dipping Hikurangi and Puysegur subduction zones. In the northern South Island, the transition from the subducted W-dipping Pacific slab of the Hikurangi margin to the intra-continental transform margin is defined by earthquake foci from 350 to 100 km deep. West of the Alpine Fault the Australian crust above the slab has been incorporated into the collisional plate boundary and uplifted in a compressional belt up to 100 km wide. Retro-deformation and back-stripping of 10 regional transects utilising surface geology, seismic reflection lines and exploration wells define the progressive deformation of the Australian crust since 35 Ma along the collisional margin. The reconstructed geometry of faulted basement blocks is tied to localisation and evolution of overlying sedimentary basins, coeval with displacement on the Alpine Fault. Amounts of shortening, uplift and subsidence and fault activity are heterogeneous in space and time across the margin, and are controlled by compressional reactivation of inherited high-angle, N-S Paleogene normal faults oblique to the margin. However, significant differences also occur along the strike of the collisional margin, with major contrasts in uplift and subsidence north and south of lat. 41°.7, i.e. the region overlying the southern termination of the Hikurangi slab. These differences are highlighted by present day hydrographic anomalies in the Buller region, and by the pattern of filtered topography at > 75 km wavelength. Our data show that the 3D geometry of the Australian plate cannot be entirely attributed to inherited crustal heterogeneity of a flexured "retro-foreland" domain in the footwall of the Alpine Fault, and suggest the need of deeper dynamic interaction between the Pacific and Australian lithosphere along the subduction-collision margin.

  4. Fault linkages and activities in a transition zone of compression to transpression in Hsinchu area, northwestern Taiwan based on 3-D structural geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.; Hu, J.; Huang, S.; Huang, C.

    2010-12-01

    The Taiwan orogenic belt is resulted from the convergence between Philippine Sea plate and Eurasian plate. Serious earthquakes occurred in west and northwest flanks of main mountain belt of the island in 1935 and 1999, caused more than 5000 deaths in total. In addition, Hsinchu Science and Industrial Park (HSIP) located in northwest Taiwan is one of the world's most important areas for semiconductor manufacturing. There are more than 400 technology companies in this park, and accounted for 10% of Taiwan's GDP. Consequently, active Hsincheng and Hsinchu faults in study area become the major threat of the industrial park, thus the understanding of complex subsurface seismogenic structures are crucial issue of earthquake hazard assessment and mitigation in Hsinchu area. Several geological cross sections have been constructed and discussed to suggest possible deep structures of these two major faults in previous study. However, how subsurface fault system and folding intersect still remains unclear and the evolution of fault and fold geometry in Hsinchu area is not fully understood. The main purpose of this study is to clarify the spatial linkage between the major thrust faults, folds, and adjacent transverse structures. In this study, we first construct the NW-SE trending cross-section which is sub-parallel to the regional shortening direction, and then balance this cross section to derive the structure evolution in Hsinchu area. We also incorporate several cross-sections and relocated seismicity to get detail 3D fault geometry for the numerical modeling in order to assess the interseismic strain accumulation and seismic potential based on geodetic measurements.

  5. Geometry and kinematics of the Arlar strike-slip fault, SW Qaidam basin, China: New insights from 3-D seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiang; Fu, Suotang; Wang, Haifeng; Yu, Xiangjiang; Cheng, Feng; Liu, Runchao; Du, Wei; Guo, Zhaojie

    2015-02-01

    The right-stepping en-échelon Kunbei fault system, consisting of the Hongliuquan, Arlar, XIII, and Kunbei faults, features importantly in the tectonic evolution of the southwest Qaidam basin. The 3D seismic cross-section interpretation and key horizon similarity attribute analysis show that the NWW-striking Arlar fault is composed of two steeply dipping faults (F1 and F2) in cross-sectional view, and branches eastward into two west-dipping faults (F5 and F6) in map view. The fact that the strata above T2 (the base of the early Miocene Xiayoushashan Formation) become dramatically thinner toward the high points of the Arlar fault suggests an early Miocene initiation (ca. 22.0 Ma) for this fault. As indicated by the windowed amplitude-related attribute maps, the Arlar fault and F5 (one branch of the Arlar fault) have cumulative sinistral offsets of ∼8.6-8.7 km and ∼5.2-5.4 km, respectively. These considerably greater strike-slip components, in conjunction with the respective maximum true dip-slip displacements of <2.2 km and <1.5 km, convincingly demonstrate that the Arlar fault and F5 are two predominantly left-lateral strike-slip faults. The other faults in the Kunbei fault system are similarly of strike-slip types. This means that the southern boundary of the Qaidam basin is not governed by south- or north-directed thrusting but rather strike-slip faulting, implying that the Qaidam basin is not a foreland basin of the Eastern Kunlun Range. Taking the Altyn Tagh fault into account, the Qaidam basin is essentially a strike-slip superimposed basin developing between two large left-lateral strike-slip faults.

  6. 3D geometry and kinematics of the Lassee flower structure: Implications for segmentation and seismotectonics of the Vienna Basin strike-slip fault, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beidinger, A.; Decker, K.

    2011-03-01

    The active Vienna Basin strike-slip fault consists of several segments, which differ both in their kinematic and seismotectonic properties. Mapping of industrial 2D seismic, geomorphological data and Quaternary basin analysis proves that active deformation uses Miocene faults. This is shown in detail for the negative flower structure of the Lassee Fault Segment, which developed during the Miocene and was reactivated in the Quaternary. The flower structure consists of Riedel-type splay faults, which merge in a major branch line at the top of the principle displacement zone (PDZ) in approximately 3.5-5.5 km depth. Mapping the PDZ of the Vienna Basin strike - slip fault in the continuations of the Lassee Segment reveals several fault segments which differ by the orientation of the PDZ. NE- and NNE-striking segments with releasing bend geometries are associated with Quaternary basins. These segments are delimited by fault-bends where the strike of the PDZ changes by angles of 20°-35°, and are connected by ENE-striking segments orientated parallel to the displacement vector. Among the releasing bends, the Lassee Segment is subject to increased extension due to the high angle (ca. 35°) between the general slip vector and the orientation of the segment. Resulting extension seems to be accommodated by both, the negative flower structure and normal faults, which branch off from the PDZ south of the Lassee releasing bend. The significant fault bends of 20°-35° delimiting the geometrical fault segments are regarded to act as impediments during dynamic rupture propagation. Hence, fault segment dimensions can be used for constraining the maximum fault surfaces, which can break during single earthquakes. The data on active kinematics and fault segmentation of the Vienna Basin strike-slip fault system therefore may serve as a basic input for future assessments of maximum credible earthquake estimates.

  7. Mapping 3D fault geometry in earthquakes using high-resolution topography: Examples from the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah (Mexico) and 2013 Balochistan (Pakistan) earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yu; Walker, Richard T.; Elliott, John R.; Parsons, Barry

    2016-04-01

    Fault dips are usually measured from outcrops in the field or inferred through geodetic or seismological modeling. Here we apply the classic structural geology approach of calculating dip from a fault's 3-D surface trace using recent, high-resolution topography. A test study applied to the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake shows very good agreement between our results and those previously determined from field measurements. To obtain a reliable estimate, a fault segment ≥120 m long with a topographic variation ≥15 m is suggested. We then applied this method to the 2013 Balochistan earthquake, getting dips similar to previous estimates. Our dip estimates show a switch from north to south dipping at the southern end of the main trace, which appears to be a response to local extension within a stepover. We suggest that this previously unidentified geometrical complexity may act as the endpoint of earthquake ruptures for the southern end of the Hoshab fault.

  8. New Efficient Dynamic 3-D Boundary Integral Equation Method and Application to Non-Planar Fault Geometry Dipping in Elastic Half Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, R.

    2014-12-01

    The boundary integral equation method formulated in the real space and time domain (BIEM-ST) has been used as a powerful tool to analyze the earthquake rupture dynamics on non-planar faults. Generally, BIEM is more accurate than volumetric methods such as the finite difference method and the finite difference method. With the recent development of the high performance computing environment, the earthquake rupture simulation studies have been conducted considering three dimensional realistic fault geometry models. However, the utility of BIEM-ST has been limited due to its heavy computational demanding increased depending on square of time steps (N2), which was needed to evaluate the historic integration. While BIEM can be efficient with the spectral domain formulation, the applications of such a method are limited to planar fault cases. In this study, we propose a new method to reduce the calculation time of BIEM-ST to linear of time step (N) without degrading the accuracy in the 3 dimensional modeling space. We extends the method proposed earlier for the case of the 2 dimensional framework, applying the asymptotic expressions of the elasto-dynamic Green's functions. This method uses the physical nature of the stress Green's function as dividing the causality cone according to the distances from the wave-fronts. The scalability of this method is shown on the parallel computing environment of the distributed memory. We demonstrate the applicability to analyses of subduction earthquake cases, suffering long time from the numerical limitations of previously available BIEMs. We analyze the dynamic rupture processes on dipping reverse faults embed in a three dimensional elastic half space.

  9. Recognizing Basement Fault Reactivation in 3D Seismic Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imber, J.; McCaffrey, K.; Holdsworth, R.; England, R.; Freeman, S.; Dore, T.; Geldjvik, G.

    2003-04-01

    3D seismic data are now widely used for hydrocarbon exploration and production, and because of its ability to image sub-surface structures, the technology represents one of the most important conceptual advances in the Earth Sciences in recent years. It provides an important tool capable of addressing fundamental questions concerning the way in which fault systems evolve in the continental crust, the effects of inherited crustal weakness on rifting style and the control of fault networks on reservoir properties. Preliminary analyses of published offshore seismic data demonstrate that there are quantifiable differences in the geometric evolution and growth of "thin-skinned" normal fault systems in which there is no direct basement involvement compared to those developed above little- and highly-reactivated basement structures. Reactivated fault systems are characterised by rapid strain localisation and fault lengths that are controlled by up-dip propagation of basement structures (Walsh et al. 2002). Thus, fault growth during reactivation is likely to be achieved by increasing cumulative displacement with negligible lateral propagation. Important questions remain, however, concerning the way in which faults grow and localise displacement during the earliest stages of reactivation. In particular, we have little detailed understanding of the extent to which basement fault geometry (e.g. polarity, segmentation) influences the pattern of faulting observed in the cover sequence, the kinematics of up-dip fault propagation and/or linkage, or the degree of displacement localisation at low bulk strains. Normal faults that developed in response to glacial retreat on the NE Atlantic Margin reactivate pre-existing Mesozoic, Caledonian and/or Precambrian structures and are characterised by low displacements (throws typically 100--101 m), thus representing the earliest stages in the development of a reactivated fault system. Spectacular images of postglacial and underlying Mesozoic normal fault systems are available from high-resolution (12.5 m bin spacing) 3-D seismic, providing a unique opportunity to study the kinematics of fault reactivation. In addition to improving our understanding of early stage fault growth during reactivation, our study will shed new light on the role of basement reactivation during the development of the NE Atlantic Margin.

  10. 3D geometry of growth strata in a fault-propagation fold: insights into space-time evolution of the Crevillente Fault (Abanilla-Alicante sector), Betic Cordillera, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Rojas, I.; Alfaro, P.; Estévez, A.

    2015-07-01

    This work presents a 3D geometric model of growth strata cropping out in a fault-propagation fold associated with the Crevillente Fault (Abanilla-Alicante sector) from the Bajo Segura Basin (eastern Betic Cordillera, southern Spain). The analysis of this 3D model enables us to unravel the along-strike and along-section variations of the growth strata, providing constraints to assess the fold development, and hence, the fault kinematic evolution in space and time. We postulate that the observed along-strike dip variations are related to lateral variation in fault displacement. Along-section variations of the progressive unconformity opening angles indicate greater fault slip in the upper Tortonian-Messinian time span; from the Messinian on, quantitative analysis of the unconformity indicate a constant or lower tectonic activity of the Crevillente Fault (Abanilla-Alicante sector); the minor abundance of striated pebbles in the Pliocene-Quaternary units could be interpreted as a decrease in the stress magnitude and consequently in the tectonic activity of the fault. At a regional scale, comparison of the growth successions cropping out in the northern and southern limits of the Bajo Segura Basin points to a southward migration of deformation in the basin. This means that the Bajo Segura Fault became active after the Crevillente Fault (Abanilla-Alicante sector), for which activity on the latter was probably decreasing according to our data. Consequently, we propose that the seismic hazard at the northern limit of the Bajo Segura Basin should be lower than at the southern limit.

  11. Imaging fault zones using 3D seismic image processing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacopini, David; Butler, Rob; Purves, Steve

    2013-04-01

    Significant advances in structural analysis of deep water structure, salt tectonic and extensional rift basin come from the descriptions of fault system geometries imaged in 3D seismic data. However, even where seismic data are excellent, in most cases the trajectory of thrust faults is highly conjectural and still significant uncertainty exists as to the patterns of deformation that develop between the main faults segments, and even of the fault architectures themselves. Moreover structural interpretations that conventionally define faults by breaks and apparent offsets of seismic reflectors are commonly conditioned by a narrow range of theoretical models of fault behavior. For example, almost all interpretations of thrust geometries on seismic data rely on theoretical "end-member" behaviors where concepts as strain localization or multilayer mechanics are simply avoided. Yet analogue outcrop studies confirm that such descriptions are commonly unsatisfactory and incomplete. In order to fill these gaps and improve the 3D visualization of deformation in the subsurface, seismic attribute methods are developed here in conjunction with conventional mapping of reflector amplitudes (Marfurt & Chopra, 2007)). These signal processing techniques recently developed and applied especially by the oil industry use variations in the amplitude and phase of the seismic wavelet. These seismic attributes improve the signal interpretation and are calculated and applied to the entire 3D seismic dataset. In this contribution we will show 3D seismic examples of fault structures from gravity-driven deep-water thrust structures and extensional basin systems to indicate how 3D seismic image processing methods can not only build better the geometrical interpretations of the faults but also begin to map both strain and damage through amplitude/phase properties of the seismic signal. This is done by quantifying and delineating the short-range anomalies on the intensity of reflector amplitudes and collecting these into "disturbance geobodies". These seismic image processing methods represents a first efficient step toward a construction of a robust technique to investigate sub-seismic strain, mapping noisy deformed zones and displacement within subsurface geology (Dutzer et al.,2011; Iacopini et al.,2012). In all these cases, accurate fault interpretation is critical in applied geology to building a robust and reliable reservoir model, and is essential for further study of fault seal behavior, and reservoir compartmentalization. They are also fundamental for understanding how deformation localizes within sedimentary basins, including the processes associated with active seismogenetic faults and mega-thrust systems in subduction zones. Dutzer, JF, Basford., H., Purves., S. 2009, Investigating fault sealing potential through fault relative seismic volume analysis. Petroleum Geology Conference series 2010, 7:509-515; doi:10.1144/0070509 Marfurt, K.J., Chopra, S., 2007, Seismic attributes for prospect identification and reservoir characterization. SEG Geophysical development Iacopini, D., Butler, RWH. & Purves, S. (2012). 'Seismic imaging of thrust faults and structural damage: a visualization workflow for deepwater thrust belts'. First Break, vol 5, no. 30, pp. 39-46.

  12. Discovering Structural Regularity in 3D Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Pauly, Mark; Mitra, Niloy J.; Wallner, Johannes; Pottmann, Helmut; Guibas, Leonidas J.

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a computational framework for discovering regular or repeated geometric structures in 3D shapes. We describe and classify possible regular structures and present an effective algorithm for detecting such repeated geometric patterns in point- or mesh-based models. Our method assumes no prior knowledge of the geometry or spatial location of the individual elements that define the pattern. Structure discovery is made possible by a careful analysis of pairwise similarity transformations that reveals prominent lattice structures in a suitable model of transformation space. We introduce an optimization method for detecting such uniform grids specifically designed to deal with outliers and missing elements. This yields a robust algorithm that successfully discovers complex regular structures amidst clutter, noise, and missing geometry. The accuracy of the extracted generating transformations is further improved using a novel simultaneous registration method in the spatial domain. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm on a variety of examples and show applications to compression, model repair, and geometry synthesis. PMID:21170292

  13. 3D geometry applied to atmospheric layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadjib Kouahla, Mohamed; Moreels, Guy; Faivre, Michael

    Epipolar geometry is an efficient method for generating 3D representations of objects. Here we present an original application of this method to the case of atmospheric layers. Two synchronized simultaneous images of the same scene are taken in two sites at a distance D. The 36*36 fields of view are oriented face to face along the same line of sight, but in opposite directions. The elevation angle of the optical axis above the horizon is 17. The observed objects are airglow emissions or cirrus clouds or aircraft trails. In the case of clouds, the shape of the objects is diffuse. To obtain a superposition of the common observed zone, it is necessary to calculate a normalized cross-correlation coefficient (NCC) to identify pairs of matching points in both images. The perspective effect in the rectangular images is inverted to produce a satellite-type view of the atmospheric layer as could be seen from an overlying satellite. We developed a triangulation algorithm to retrieve the 3D surface of the observed layer. The stereoscopic method was used to retrieve the wavy structure of the OH emissive layer at the altitude of 87 km. The distance between the observing sites was 600 km. Results obtained in Peru from the sites of Cerro Cosmos and Cerro Verde will be presented. We are currently extending the stereoscopic procedure to the study of troposphere cirruses, of natural origin or induced by aircraft engines. In this case, the distance between observation sites is D 60 km.

  14. Using Cabri3D Diagrams for Teaching Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Accascina, Giuseppe; Rogora, Enrico

    2006-01-01

    Cabri3D is a potentially very useful software for learning and teaching 3D geometry. The dynamic nature of the digital diagrams produced with it provides a useful aid for helping students to better develop concept images of geometric concepts. However, since any Cabri3D diagram represents three-dimensional objects on the two dimensional screen of…

  15. Unit cell geometry of 3-D braided structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du, Guang-Wu; Ko, Frank K.

    1993-01-01

    The traditional approach used in modeling of composites reinforced by three-dimensional (3-D) braids is to assume a simple unit cell geometry of a 3-D braided structure with known fiber volume fraction and orientation. In this article, we first examine 3-D braiding methods in the light of braid structures, followed by the development of geometric models for 3-D braids using a unit cell approach. The unit cell geometry of 3-D braids is identified and the relationship of structural parameters such as yarn orientation angle and fiber volume fraction with the key processing parameters established. The limiting geometry has been computed by establishing the point at which yarns jam against each other. Using this factor makes it possible to identify the complete range of allowable geometric arrangements for 3-D braided preforms. This identified unit cell geometry can be translated to mechanical models which relate the geometrical properties of fabric preforms to the mechanical responses of composite systems.

  16. A 3D Geometry Model Search Engine to Support Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tam, Gary K. L.; Lau, Rynson W. H.; Zhao, Jianmin

    2009-01-01

    Due to the popularity of 3D graphics in animation and games, usage of 3D geometry deformable models increases dramatically. Despite their growing importance, these models are difficult and time consuming to build. A distance learning system for the construction of these models could greatly facilitate students to learn and practice at different

  17. A 3D Geometry Model Search Engine to Support Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tam, Gary K. L.; Lau, Rynson W. H.; Zhao, Jianmin

    2009-01-01

    Due to the popularity of 3D graphics in animation and games, usage of 3D geometry deformable models increases dramatically. Despite their growing importance, these models are difficult and time consuming to build. A distance learning system for the construction of these models could greatly facilitate students to learn and practice at different…

  18. Using 3D Geometric Models to Teach Spatial Geometry Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertoline, Gary R.

    1991-01-01

    An explanation of 3-D Computer Aided Design (CAD) usage to teach spatial geometry concepts using nontraditional techniques is presented. The software packages CADKEY and AutoCAD are described as well as their usefulness in solving space geometry problems. (KR)

  19. Interactive Retro-Deformation of Terrain for Reconstructing 3D Fault Displacements.

    PubMed

    Westerteiger, R; Compton, T; Bernadin, T; Cowgill, E; Gwinner, K; Hamann, B; Gerndt, A; Hagen, H

    2012-12-01

    Planetary topography is the result of complex interactions between geological processes, of which faulting is a prominent component. Surface-rupturing earthquakes cut and move landforms which develop across active faults, producing characteristic surface displacements across the fault. Geometric models of faults and their associated surface displacements are commonly applied to reconstruct these offsets to enable interpretation of the observed topography. However, current 2D techniques are limited in their capability to convey both the three-dimensional kinematics of faulting and the incremental sequence of events required by a given reconstruction. Here we present a real-time system for interactive retro-deformation of faulted topography to enable reconstruction of fault displacement within a high-resolution (sub 1m/pixel) 3D terrain visualization. We employ geometry shaders on the GPU to intersect the surface mesh with fault-segments interactively specified by the user and transform the resulting surface blocks in realtime according to a kinematic model of fault motion. Our method facilitates a human-in-the-loop approach to reconstruction of fault displacements by providing instant visual feedback while exploring the parameter space. Thus, scientists can evaluate the validity of traditional point-to-point reconstructions by visually examining a smooth interpolation of the displacement in 3D. We show the efficacy of our approach by using it to reconstruct segments of the San Andreas fault, California as well as a graben structure in the Noctis Labyrinthus region on Mars. PMID:26357128

  20. Automatic visualization of 3D geometry contained in online databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; John, Nigel W.

    2003-04-01

    In this paper, the application of the Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML) for efficient database visualization is analyzed. With the help of JAVA programming, three examples of automatic visualization from a database containing 3-D Geometry are given. The first example is used to create basic geometries. The second example is used to create cylinders with a defined start point and end point. The third example is used to processs data from an old copper mine complex in Cheshire, United Kingdom. Interactive 3-D visualization of all geometric data in an online database is achieved with JSP technology.

  1. The SCEC 3D Community Fault Model (CFM-v5): An updated and expanded fault set of oblique crustal deformation and complex fault interaction for southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, C.; Plesch, A.; Sorlien, C. C.; Shaw, J. H.; Hauksson, E.

    2014-12-01

    Southern California represents an ideal natural laboratory to investigate oblique deformation in 3D owing to its comprehensive datasets, complex tectonic history, evolving components of oblique slip, and continued crustal rotations about horizontal and vertical axes. As the SCEC Community Fault Model (CFM) aims to accurately reflect this 3D deformation, we present the results of an extensive update to the model by using primarily detailed fault trace, seismic reflection, relocated hypocenter and focal mechanism nodal plane data to generate improved, more realistic digital 3D fault surfaces. The results document a wide variety of oblique strain accommodation, including various aspects of strain partitioning and fault-related folding, sets of both high-angle and low-angle faults that mutually interact, significant non-planar, multi-stranded faults with variable dip along strike and with depth, and active mid-crustal detachments. In places, closely-spaced fault strands or fault systems can remain surprisingly subparallel to seismogenic depths, while in other areas, major strike-slip to oblique-slip faults can merge, such as the S-dipping Arroyo Parida-Mission Ridge and Santa Ynez faults with the N-dipping North Channel-Pitas Point-Red Mountain fault system, or diverge with depth. Examples of the latter include the steep-to-west-dipping Laguna Salada-Indiviso faults with the steep-to-east-dipping Sierra Cucapah faults, and the steep southern San Andreas fault with the adjacent NE-dipping Mecca Hills-Hidden Springs fault system. In addition, overprinting by steep predominantly strike-slip faulting can segment which parts of intersecting inherited low-angle faults are reactivated, or result in mutual cross-cutting relationships. The updated CFM 3D fault surfaces thus help characterize a more complex pattern of fault interactions at depth between various fault sets and linked fault systems, and a more complex fault geometry than typically inferred or expected from projecting near-surface data down-dip, or modeled from surface strain and potential field data alone.

  2. Dynamic 3D simulations of earthquakes on en echelon faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, R.A.; Day, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    One of the mysteries of earthquake mechanics is why earthquakes stop. This process determines the difference between small and devastating ruptures. One possibility is that fault geometry controls earthquake size. We test this hypothesis using a numerical algorithm that simulates spontaneous rupture propagation in a three-dimensional medium and apply our knowledge to two California fault zones. We find that the size difference between the 1934 and 1966 Parkfield, California, earthquakes may be the product of a stepover at the southern end of the 1934 earthquake and show how the 1992 Landers, California, earthquake followed physically reasonable expectations when it jumped across en echelon faults to become a large event. If there are no linking structures, such as transfer faults, then strike-slip earthquakes are unlikely to propagate through stepovers >5 km wide. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Thermal 3D modeling system based on 3-view geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Sunjin; Kim, Joongrock; Lee, Sangyoun

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel thermal three-dimensional (3D) modeling system that includes 3D shape, visual, and thermal infrared information and solves a registration problem among these three types of information. The proposed system consists of a projector, a visual camera and, a thermal camera (PVT). To generate 3D shape information, we use a structured light technique, which consists of a visual camera and a projector. A thermal camera is added to the structured light system in order to provide thermal information. To solve the correspondence problem between the three sensors, we use three-view geometry. Finally, we obtain registered PVT data, which includes visual, thermal, and 3D shape information. Among various potential applications such as industrial measurements, biological experiments, military usage, and so on, we have adapted the proposed method to biometrics, particularly for face recognition. With the proposed method, we obtain multi-modal 3D face data that includes not only textural information but also data regarding head pose, 3D shape, and thermal information. Experimental results show that the performance of the proposed face recognition system is not limited by head pose variation which is a serious problem in face recognition.

  4. Novel 3D Compression Methods for Geometry, Connectivity and Texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddeq, M. M.; Rodrigues, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    A large number of applications in medical visualization, games, engineering design, entertainment, heritage, e-commerce and so on require the transmission of 3D models over the Internet or over local networks. 3D data compression is an important requirement for fast data storage, access and transmission within bandwidth limitations. The Wavefront OBJ (object) file format is commonly used to share models due to its clear simple design. Normally each OBJ file contains a large amount of data (e.g. vertices and triangulated faces, normals, texture coordinates and other parameters) describing the mesh surface. In this paper we introduce a new method to compress geometry, connectivity and texture coordinates by a novel Geometry Minimization Algorithm (GM-Algorithm) in connection with arithmetic coding. First, each vertex ( x, y, z) coordinates are encoded to a single value by the GM-Algorithm. Second, triangle faces are encoded by computing the differences between two adjacent vertex locations, which are compressed by arithmetic coding together with texture coordinates. We demonstrate the method on large data sets achieving compression ratios between 87 and 99 % without reduction in the number of reconstructed vertices and triangle faces. The decompression step is based on a Parallel Fast Matching Search Algorithm (Parallel-FMS) to recover the structure of the 3D mesh. A comparative analysis of compression ratios is provided with a number of commonly used 3D file formats such as VRML, OpenCTM and STL highlighting the performance and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  5. Simulation of human ischemic stroke in realistic 3D geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, Thierry; Duarte, Max; Descombes, Stéphane; Dronne, Marie-Aimée; Massot, Marc; Louvet, Violaine

    2013-06-01

    In silico research in medicine is thought to reduce the need for expensive clinical trials under the condition of reliable mathematical models and accurate and efficient numerical methods. In the present work, we tackle the numerical simulation of reaction-diffusion equations modeling human ischemic stroke. This problem induces peculiar difficulties like potentially large stiffness which stems from the broad spectrum of temporal scales in the nonlinear chemical source term as well as from the presence of steep spatial gradients in the reaction fronts, spatially very localized. Furthermore, simulations on realistic 3D geometries are mandatory in order to describe correctly this type of phenomenon. The main goal of this article is to obtain, for the first time, 3D simulations on realistic geometries and to show that the simulation results are consistent with those obtain in experimental studies or observed on MRI images in stroke patients. For this purpose, we introduce a new resolution strategy based mainly on time operator splitting that takes into account complex geometry coupled with a well-conceived parallelization strategy for shared memory architectures. We consider then a high order implicit time integration for the reaction and an explicit one for the diffusion term in order to build a time operator splitting scheme that exploits efficiently the special features of each problem. Thus, we aim at solving complete and realistic models including all time and space scales with conventional computing resources, that is on a reasonably powerful workstation. Consequently and as expected, 2D and also fully 3D numerical simulations of ischemic strokes for a realistic brain geometry, are conducted for the first time and shown to reproduce the dynamics observed on MRI images in stroke patients. Beyond this major step, in order to improve accuracy and computational efficiency of the simulations, we indicate how the present numerical strategy can be coupled with spatial adaptive multiresolution schemes. Preliminary results in the framework of simple geometries allow to assess the proposed strategy for further developments.

  6. Enhancing the symmetry and proportion of 3D face geometry.

    PubMed

    Liao, Qiqi; Jin, Xiaogang; Zeng, Wenting

    2012-10-01

    We present an engine for enhancing the geometry of a 3D face mesh model while making the enhanced version share close similarity with the original. After obtaining the feature points of a given scanned 3D face model, we first perform a local and global symmetrization on the key facial features. We then apply an overall proportion optimization to the frontal face based on Neoclassical Canons and golden ratios. A nonlinear least-squares solution is adopted to adjust the feature points so that the face profile complies with the aesthetic criteria, which are derived from the profile cosmetology. Through the above processes, we obtain the optimized feature points, which will lead to a more attractive face. According to the original feature points and the optimized ones, we perform Laplacian deformation to adjust the remaining points of the face in order to preserve the geometric details. The analysis of user study in this paper validates the effectiveness of our 3D face geometry enhancement engine. PMID:22291158

  7. 3D Fault Network of the Murchison Domain, Yilgarn Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdie, Ruth; Gessner, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    The architecture of Archean granite-greenstone terranes is often controlled by networks of 10 km to 100 km-scale shear zones that record displacement under amphibolite facies to greenschist facies metamorphic conditions. The geometry of such crustal scale 'fault networks' has been shown to be highly relevant to understand the tectonic and metamorphic history of granite-greenstone terranes, as well as the availability of structural controlled fluid pathways related to magmatic and hydrothermal mineralization. The Neoarchean Yilgarn Craton and the Proterozoic orogens around its margins constitute one of Earth's greatest mineral treasure troves, including iron, gold, copper and nickel mineral deposits. Whereas the Yilgarn Craton is one of the best studied Archean cratons, its enormous size and limited outcrop are detrimental to the better understanding of what controls the distribution of these vast resources and what geodynamic processes were involved the tectonic assembly of this part of the Australian continent. Here we present a network of the major faults of the NW Yilgarn Craton between the Yalgar Fault, Murchison's NW contact with the Narryer Terrane to the Ida Fault, its boundary with the Eastern Goldfields Superterrane. The model has been constructed from various geophysical and geological data, including potential field grids, Geological Survey of Western Australia map sheets, seismic reflection surveys and magnetotelluric traverses. The northern extremity of the modelled area is bounded by the Proterozoic cover and the southern limit has been arbitrarily chosen to include various greenstone belts. In the west, the major faults in the upper crust, such as the Carbar and Chundaloo Shear Zones, dip steeply towards the west and then flatten off at depth. They form complex branching fault systems that bound the greenstone belts in a series of stacked faults. East of the Ida, the far east of the model, the faults have been integrated with Geoscience Australia's pmd*CRC Eastern Goldfields model. In the central portion, the major faults such as the Youanmi and Wattle Creek, dip to the east and can be followed into the fabric of the Yarraquin Seismic Province. The Wattle Creek Shear Zone in particular can be traced on all three of the Youanmi seismic lines. The greenstones are cradled between these major faults and antithetic westward dipping subsidiary faults such as the Edale Shear Zone. While the Ida Fault cannot be located with great confidence, the slight drop in Moho depth toward the east and the overall change of seismic texture delineate the Youanmi-Eastern Goldfields boundary. The Lawler's Anticline, presumably located in the hanging wall of the Ida Fault, again changes the style of faulting with the Lawler's tonalite forming the core of a 10 km-scale antiform. The fault network presented here is a milestone to a craton-wide integrated structural model and will hopefully contribute to provide a better spatial context for geological, geochemical and geophysical data in our quest to understand the tectonics and mineral potential of the Yilgarn craton.

  8. A linguistic geometry for 3D strategic planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stilman, Boris

    1995-01-01

    This paper is a new step in the development and application of the Linguistic Geometry. This formal theory is intended to discover the inner properties of human expert heuristics, which have been successful in a certain class of complex control systems, and apply them to different systems. In this paper we investigate heuristics extracted in the form of hierarchical networks of planning paths of autonomous agents. Employing Linguistic Geometry tools the dynamic hierarchy of networks is represented as a hierarchy of formal attribute languages. The main ideas of this methodology are shown in this paper on the new pilot example of the solution of the extremely complex 3D optimization problem of strategic planning for the space combat of autonomous vehicles. This example demonstrates deep and highly selective search in comparison with conventional search algorithms.

  9. Multiwavelength depth encoding method for 3D range geometry compression.

    PubMed

    Bell, Tyler; Zhang, Song

    2015-12-20

    This paper presents a novel method for representing three-dimensional (3D) range data within regular two-dimensional (2D) images using multiwavelength encoding. These 2D images can then be further compressed using traditional lossless (e.g., PNG) or lossy (e.g., JPEG) image compression techniques. Current 3D range data compression methods require significant filtering to reduce lossy compression artifacts. The nature of the proposed encoding, however, offers a significant level of robustness to such artifacts brought about by high levels of JPEG compression. This enables extremely high compression ratios while maintaining a very low reconstruction error percentage with little to no filtering required to remove compression artifacts. For example, when encoding 3D geometry with the proposed method and storing the resulting 2D image with Matlab R2014a JPEG80 image compression, compression ratios of approximately 935:1 versus the OBJ format can be achieved at an error rate of approximately 0.027% without any filtering. PMID:26837036

  10. Statistical microstructure generation and 3D microstructure geometry extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sintay, Stephen D.

    3D microstructure modeling is a powerful way to study mesoscale mechanisms and phenamena and to explore the effect that the microstructure may (or may not) have on material performance. This work focuses on processes for generating statistically representative implicit microstructure models of polycrystalline materials, and extracting explicit geometries from implicit microstructure data. The generation methods are based on quantifying grain size and shape, grain orientation distribution, and grain misorientation distribution, which are obtained from orthogonal Electron BackScatter Diffraction (EBSD) scans of polycrystalline materials. This is followed by generation of a representative volume of synthetic material whose distributions match those of the observed microstructure. An example of statistical microstructure generation for aluminum alloy AA7075---T651 is given, where the distribution of the synthetic microstructure features are a close match to that of the EBSD observations. The synthetic aluminum alloy can then be used for physics---based modeling of microstructurally small fatigue cracks. Synthetic materials generation, as described above, defines the geometry of the polycrystalline microstructure implicitly and obtaining an explicit geometry is expedient for generating a volumetric mesh for future finite element analysis. A novel method is presented that uses the centers of mass of linear portions of the dual grid polygon to define the geometry of the triple line network. The location of the triple line network is constrained to be within the acceptable error bounds as defined by the implicit data. The triple line network is then used as a framework for triangulating the interfaces between each region. Using the dual grid method to define the triple line network essentially reduces the multi---region data into patches of binary data. The interfaces between two regions are modeled with triangulated meshes. Trimming, stitching, and deformation with a moving finite element method are steps used to create the surface meshes. The partial entity structure boundary representation is used as a framework for defining the interface geometry of the non---manifold, multiple---region microstructure data. The dual grid center of mass method provides a well defined set of rules such that the uncertainty of the inclination angle of a 2D geometric feature obtained from this method is explicitly defined. Further, the entire 3D multi---region geometric modeling strategy is tested for accuracy and fitness by using 3D Phantom geometries. Implicit data sets are generated from the explicit phantoms by sampling the phantoms through a range of resolutions, and these implicit data set are then reconstructed. The reconstructed models are tested for error against the phantoms to characterize the accuracy of the reconstruction techniques as a function of resolution. The error of the reconstructed geometries is reduced with increasing resolution. However, the mean width of the reconstructed regions are consistently lower than the phantoms. The geometry extraction methods are used on the digital microstrucres for AA7075-T651 and for data obtained from molecular dynamic simulations.

  11. 3D Velocity Structure of Chukou Fault Area, Taiwan from Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Chang, W.; Jian, W.

    2009-12-01

    In this study, we used the seismic data that recorded by the broadband stations which deployed around the Chukou fault area, Taiwan. We have chosen 1661 earthquake events with high quality records in this research. The waveform cross correlation technique is applied to calculate the 143086 pairs of waveform data. By combining with data from the seismic catalog, there are 342202 absolute travel-time pairs through the double difference tomography method to relocate the seismicity and invert the 3D velocity structures beneath the Chukou fault area. Due to Taiwan Island is located in an active boundary zone between the Eurasia continental and Philippine Sea plates, the violent collision between the two plates which causes a series of imbricate fold-thrust belts to form between the western foothills and the coastal plain. The Chukou fault is just the boundary between the fold-thrust belts and the coastal plain in the Chia-Nan area, Taiwan. The seismotectonic structure beneath this area is more complex. From many studies, velocity structure can be used as an indicator of the geometry of fault and the general aspect of tectonics. Therefore, the first goal of this research is to analyze the degree of correlation between the velocity structure and the characteristics of seismicity and the tectonic implications of the area. The second intention is to study the distribution of seismic events and its association with fault activities. Our results indicate that the variation of velocity structure beneath fault area is caused by local geological structures, complex fault crossing. We also find that most earthquakes occur in the area that has Vp/Vs gradient varying rapidly. Finally, both using catalog and cross-correlation data in the inversion procedure are not only exhibit better resolution, but also can obtain the detail 3D velocity structure beneath the fault zone.

  12. The Maradi fault zone: 3-D imagery of a classic wrench fault in Oman

    SciTech Connect

    Neuhaus, D. )

    1993-09-01

    The Maradi fault zone extends for almost 350 km in a north-northwest-south-southeast direction from the Oman Mountain foothills into the Arabian Sea, thereby dissecting two prolific hydrocarbon provinces, the Ghaba and Fahud salt basins. During its major Late Cretaceous period of movement, the Maradi fault zone acted as a left-lateral wrench fault. An early exploration campaign based on two-dimensional seismic targeted at fractured Cretaceous carbonates had mixed success and resulted in the discovery of one producing oil field. The structural complexity, rapidly varying carbonate facies, and uncertain fracture distribution prevented further drilling activity. In 1990 a three-dimensional (3-D) seismic survey covering some 500 km[sup 2] was acquired over the transpressional northern part of the Maradi fault zone. The good data quality and the focusing power of 3-D has enabled stunning insight into the complex structural style of a [open quotes]textbook[close quotes] wrench fault, even at deeper levels and below reverse faults hitherto unexplored. Subtle thickness changes within the carbonate reservoir and the unconformably overlying shale seal provided the tool for the identification of possible shoals and depocenters. Horizon attribute maps revealed in detail the various structural components of the wrench assemblage and highlighted areas of increased small-scale faulting/fracturing. The results of four recent exploration wells will be demonstrated and their impact on the interpretation discussed.

  13. Intensity of joints associated with an extensional fault zone: an estimation by poly3d .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minelli, G.

    2003-04-01

    The presence and frequency of joints in sedimentary rocks strongly affects the mechanical and fluid flow properties of the host layers. Joints intensity is evaluated by spacing, S, the distance between neighbouring fractures, or by density, D = 1/S. Joint spacing in layered rocks is often linearly related to layer thickness T, with typical values of 0.5 T < S < 2.0 T . On the other hand, some field cases display very tight joints with S << T and nonlinear relations between spacing and thickness , most of these cases are related to joint system “genetically” related to a nearby fault zone. The present study by using the code Poly3D (Rock Fracture Project at Stanford), numerically explores the effect of the stress distribution in the neighbour of an extensional fault zone with respect to the mapped intensity of joints both in the hanging wall and in the foot wall of it (WILLEMSE, E. J. M., 1997; MARTEL, S. J, AND BOGER, W. A,; 1998). Poly3D is a C language computer program that calculates the displacements, strains and stresses induced in an elastic whole or half-space by planar, polygonal-shaped elements of displacement discontinuity (WILLEMSE, E. J. M., POLLARD, D. D., 2000) Dislocations of varying shapes may be combined to yield complex three-dimensional surfaces well-suited for modeling fractures, faults, and cavities in the earth's crust. The algebraic expressions for the elastic fields around a polygonal element are derived by superposing the solution for an angular dislocation in an elastic half-space. The field data have been collected in a quarry located close to Noci town (Puglia) by using the scan line methodology. In this quarry a platform limestone with a regular bedding with very few shale or marly intercalations displaced by a normal fault are exposed. The comparison between the mapped joints intensity and the calculated stress around the fault displays a good agreement. Nevertheless the intrinsic limitations (isotropic medium and elastic behaviour) of this project encourages other application of Poly3d. References WILLEMSE, E. J. M., 1997, Segmented normal faults: Correspondence between three-dimensional mechanical models and field data: Journal of Geophysical Research, v. 102, p. 675-692. MARTEL, S. J, AND BOGER, W. A, 1998, Geometry and mechanics of secondary fracturing around small three-dimensional faults in granitic rock: Journal of Geophysical Research, v. 103, p. 21,299-21,314. WILLEMSE, E. J. M., POLLARD, D. D., 2000, Normal fault growth: evolution of tipline shapes and slip distribution: in Lehner, F.K. &Urai, J.L. (eds.), Aspects of Tectonic Faulting, Springer -Verlag , Berlin, p. 193-226.

  14. Kinematics of a growth fault/raft system on the West African margin using 3-D restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouby, Delphine; Raillard, Stéphane; Guillocheau, François; Bouroullec, Renaud; Nalpas, Thierry

    2002-04-01

    The ability to quantify the movement history associated with growth structures is crucial in the understanding of fundamental processes such as the growth of folds or faults in 3-D. In this paper, we present an application of an original approach to restore in 3-D a listric growth fault system resulting from gravity-induced extension located on the West African margin. Our goal is to establish the 3-D structural framework and kinematics of the study area. We construct a 3-D geometrical model of the fault system (from 3-D seismic data), then restore six stratigraphic surfaces and reconstruct the 3-D geometry of the system at six incremental steps of its history. The evolution of the growth fault/raft system corresponds to the progressive separation of two rafts by regional extension, resulting in the development of an intervening basin located between them that evolved in three main stages: (1) the rise of an evaporite wall, (2) the development of a symmetric basin as the elevation of the diapir is reduced and buried, and (3) the development of asymmetric basins related to two systems of listric faults (the main fault F1 and the graben located between the rollovers and the lower raft). Important features of the growth fault/raft system could only be observed in 3-D and with increments of deformation restored. The rollover anticline (associated with the listric fault F1) is composed of two sub-units separated by an E-W oriented transverse graben indicating that the displacement field was divergent in map view. The rollover units are located within the overlap area of two fault systems and displays a 'mock-turtle' anticline structure. The seaward translation of the lower raft is associated with two successive vertical axis rotations in the opposite sense (clockwise then counter-clockwise by about 10°). This results from the fact that the two main fault systems developed successively. Fault system F1 formed during the Upper Albian, and the graben during the Cenomanian. Using a new approach of 3-D restoration, this study suggests a consistent solution for: (1) the processes of deformation of a fault system, (2) the faulting kinematics, and (3) the incremental steps of deformation.

  15. 3D Dynamics of Oblique Rift Systems: Fault Evolution from Rift to Break-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, S.

    2014-12-01

    Rift evolution and passive margin formation has been thoroughly investigated using conceptual and numerical models in two dimensions. However, the 2D assumption that the extension direction is perpendicular to the rift trend is often invalid. In fact, the majority of rift systems that lead to continental break-up during the last 150 My involved moderate to high rift obliquity. Yet, the degree to which oblique lithospheric extension affects first-order rift and passive margin properties like surface stress pattern, fault azimuths, and basin geometry, is still not entirely clear. This contribution provides insight in crustal stress patterns and fault orientations by applying a 3D numerical rift model to oblique extensional settings. The presented forward experiments cover the whole spectrum of oblique extension (i.e. rift-orthogonal extension, low obliquity, high obliquity, strike-slip deformation) from initial deformation to breakup. They are conducted using an elasto-visco-plastic finite element model and involve crustal and mantle layers accounting for self-consistent necking of the lithosphere. Even though the model setup is very simple (horizontally layered, no inherited faults), its evolution exhibits a variety of fault orientations that are solely caused by the interaction of far-field stresses with rift-intrinsic buoyancy and strength. Depending on rift obliquity, these orientations involve rift-parallel, extension-orthogonal, and intermediate normal fault directions as well as strike-slip faults. Allowing new insights on fault patterns of the proximal and distal margins, the model shows that individual fault populations are activated in a characteristic multi-phase evolution driven by lateral density variations of the evolving rift system. Model results are in very good agreement with inferences from the well-studied Gulf of Aden and provide testable predictions for other rifts and passive margins worldwide.

  16. Indoor Modelling Benchmark for 3D Geometry Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, C.; Boehm, J.

    2014-06-01

    A combination of faster, cheaper and more accurate hardware, more sophisticated software, and greater industry acceptance have all laid the foundations for an increased desire for accurate 3D parametric models of buildings. Pointclouds are the data source of choice currently with static terrestrial laser scanning the predominant tool for large, dense volume measurement. The current importance of pointclouds as the primary source of real world representation is endorsed by CAD software vendor acquisitions of pointcloud engines in 2011. Both the capture and modelling of indoor environments require great effort in time by the operator (and therefore cost). Automation is seen as a way to aid this by reducing the workload of the user and some commercial packages have appeared that provide automation to some degree. In the data capture phase, advances in indoor mobile mapping systems are speeding up the process, albeit currently with a reduction in accuracy. As a result this paper presents freely accessible pointcloud datasets of two typical areas of a building each captured with two different capture methods and each with an accurate wholly manually created model. These datasets are provided as a benchmark for the research community to gauge the performance and improvements of various techniques for indoor geometry extraction. With this in mind, non-proprietary, interoperable formats are provided such as E57 for the scans and IFC for the reference model. The datasets can be found at: http://indoor-bench.github.io/indoor-bench.

  17. The COMET method in 3-D hexagonal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, K. J.; Rahnema, F.

    2012-07-01

    The hybrid stochastic-deterministic coarse mesh radiation transport (COMET) method developed at Georgia Tech now solves reactor core problems in 3-D hexagonal geometry. In this paper, the method is used to solve three preliminary test problems designed to challenge the method with steep flux gradients, high leakage, and strong asymmetry and heterogeneity in the core. The test problems are composed of blocks taken from a high temperature test reactor benchmark problem. As the method is still in development, these problems and their results are strictly preliminary. Results are compared to whole core Monte Carlo reference solutions in order to verify the method. Relative errors are on the order of 50 pcm in core eigenvalue, and mean relative error in pin fission density calculations is less than 1% in these difficult test cores. The method requires the one-time pre-computation of a response expansion coefficient library, which may be compiled in a comparable amount of time to a single whole core Monte Carlo calculation. After the library has been computed, COMET may solve any number of core configurations on the order of an hour, representing a significant gain in efficiency over other methods for whole core transport calculations. (authors)

  18. 3-D seismic response of buried pipelines laid through fault

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, J.W.

    1995-12-31

    An ideal model for the non-causative fault is put forward in which the fault is assumed to be composed by three horizontally adjacent soil media. Dynamic behaviors of pipelines laid through the fault is analyzed. Although simple, this model may qualitatively illustrate the accumulation of seismic waves in the fault, so illustrate the dynamic behaviors of the pipelines. The results show that, the fault is materially different from a two soil site even if the fault width is very narrow, and the dynamic behaviors of the pipelines laid through the fault are determined by the fault width, the stiffness ratio of the three soil media, and the type of the seismic waves.

  19. 3D Fault modeling of the active Chittagong-Myanmar fold belt, Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, D. E.; Hubbard, J.; Akhter, S. H.; Shamim, N.

    2013-12-01

    The Chittagong-Myanmar fold belt (CMFB), located in eastern Bangladesh, eastern India and western Myanmar, accommodates east-west shortening at the India-Burma plate boundary. Oblique subduction of the Indian Plate beneath the Burma Plate since the Eocene has led to the development of a large accretionary prism complex, creating a series of north-south trending folds. A continuous sediment record from ~55 Ma to the present has been deposited in the Bengal Basin by the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna rivers, providing an opportunity to learn about the history of tectonic deformation and activity in this fold-and-thrust belt. Surface mapping indicates that the fold-and-thrust belt is characterized by extensive N-S-trending anticlines and synclines in a belt ~150-200 km wide. Seismic reflection profiles from the Chittagong and Chittagong Hill Tracts, Bangladesh, indicate that the anticlines mapped at the surface narrow with depth and extend to ~3.0 seconds TWTT (two-way travel time), or ~6.0 km. The folds of Chittagong and Chittagong Hill Tracts are characterized by doubly plunging box-shaped en-echelon anticlines separated by wide synclines. The seismic data suggest that some of these anticlines are cored by thrust fault ramps that extend to a large-scale décollement that dips gently to the east. Other anticlines may be the result of detachment folding from the same décollement. The décollement likely deepens to the east and intersects with the northerly-trending, oblique-slip Kaladan fault. The CMFB region is bounded to the north by the north-dipping Dauki fault and the Shillong Plateau. The tectonic transition from a wide band of E-W shortening in the south to a narrow zone of N-S shortening along the Dauki fault is poorly understood. We integrate surface and subsurface datasets, including topography, geological maps, seismicity, and industry seismic reflection profiles, into a 3D modeling environment and construct initial 3D surfaces of the major faults in this region. These models will further our understanding of fault geometry and history of the CMFB, allowing us to investigate the region's potential for geologic hazards. At least twenty-five percent of the country of Bangladesh sits on top of this actively deforming region, which is home to more than 28 million people. The CMFB also extends offshore, meaning that a major thrusting event could induce a regional tsunami with little warning. Understanding the geometry of the region's underlying detachment as well as the location and ages of specific thrust faults is critical to assessing seismic hazards for this heavily populated area.

  20. Connecting multi-scale fault geometry with field observations: insights into fluid-fault rock relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherry, T. J.; Melosh, B. L.; Rowe, C. D.

    2012-12-01

    Fault geometry along with heterogenities in fluid pressure locally influences the mechanical behavior of faulting and the type of fault rock damage generated. The Naukluft Nappe Complex in central Namibia, southwest Africa features a well exposed basal foreland thrust fault emplaced during the 550 Ma Damara Orogen. Using differential GPS we walked and mapped the kilometer-scale dolomitic basal fault at two localities, the East and West side of the nappe complex. 3D fault geometry and orientation over each locality was interpolated using the high resolution GPS maps. The interpolated 3D geometry was then correlated with field observations of fault rock damage including cataclastic injection systems, brecciation, and alteration in the fault rock. 2D cross-sections were rendered using the interpolated 3D geometries. The eastern flank of the nappe complex locally exhibits ramp geometries and a prevalent granular fault rock known as "gritty dolomite". Cataclastic injection systems of gritty dolomite are observed injecting upsection off the basal thrust through opening mode fractures and are generally subvertical to the fault plane. The injectites are centimeter to meter scale, sometimes reach tens of meters in vertical extent, the width tapered towards the injection tip. Laminae interpreted as flow banding are oriented subparallel to the injectite walls and is also present in the basal thrust subparallel to the fault plane. Neocrystallized dolomite, quartz, and fracture filling calcite is observed within injectite systems suggesting the presence of super-saturated fluid. Bending strains create localized extension as the hanging wall enters the ramp, facilitating Mode I fractures and the formation of injectites which are observed at the base, within, and at the upper flat of the ramp structure, recording progressive hanging wall transport. Fault dip increases in the northern area of the eastern locality where a unit of shales directly overlies footwall limestone. The dolomitic fault rock, typically directly overlying the footwall is observed upsection. Injections propagate downsection off the dolomitic source bed and create a complex, discontinuous network of minor dikes and sills within the shale beds, likely exploiting bedding weaknesses. The basal thrust in the western side of the nappe complex is of consistent shallow dip with no evidence of ramp structures. The footwall is primarily shales with some discontinuous calc-mylonite and limestone lenses. At the basal thrust a yellow, altered dolomite grades upsection into massive grey dolomite. The hanging wall is composed of imbricate listric faults and folds of dolomite, quartzite, and shale layers. The alteration zone, along with the presence of footwall shales injecting upsection into the altered zone suggests a relative high fluid pressure in the footwall, consistent with the requirement for low angle overthrust sliding. We hypothesize that differing fault damage structures between the eastern and western localities on the basal thrust is the result of the relationship between local fault geometry and fluid pressure. Where the eastern basal thrust contained fluid within the granular fault rock, brecciation and injectites are common, and where the western locale had pore fluid within the footwall, an alteration zone is present along the fault with minor footwall injections.

  1. 3-D GPR data analysis for high-resolution imaging of shallow subsurface faults: the Mt Vettore case study (Central Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercoli, Maurizio; Pauselli, Cristina; Frigeri, Alessandro; Forte, Emanuele; Federico, Costanzo

    2014-07-01

    The activation of Late Quaternary faults in the Central Apennines (Italy) could generate earthquakes with magnitude of about 6.5, and the Monte Vettore fault system probably belongs to the same category of seismogenetic faults. Such structure has been defined `silent', because of its geological and geomorphological evidences of past activation, but the absence of historical records in the seismic catalogues to be associated with its activation. The `Piano di Castelluccio' intramountain basin, resulting from the Quaternary activity of normal faults, is characterized by a secondary fault strand highlighted by a NW-SE fault scarp: it has been already studied through palaeoseismological trenches, which highlighted evidences of Quaternary shallow faulting due to strong earthquakes, and through a 2-D ground penetrating radar (GPR) survey, showing the first geophysical signature of faulting for this site. Within the same place, a 3-D GPR volume over a 20 × 20 m area has been collected. The collection of radar echoes in three dimensions allows to map both the vertical and lateral continuity of shallow geometries of the fault zone (Fz), imaging features with high resolution, ranging from few metres to centimetres and therefore imaging also local variations at the microscale. Several geophysical markers of faulting, already highlighted on this site, have been taken as reference to plan the 3-D survey. In this paper, we provide the first 3-D subsurface imaging of an active shallow fault belonging to the Umbria-Marche Apennine highlighting the subsurface fault geometry and the stratigraphic sequence up to a depth of about 5 m. From our data, geophysical faulting signatures are clearly visible in three dimensions: diffraction hyperbolas, truncations of layers, local attenuated zones and varying dip of the layers have been detected within the Fz. The interpretation of the 3-D data set provided qualitative and quantitative geological information in addition to the fault location, like its geometry, boundaries and an estimation of the fault throw.

  2. A 3D modeling approach to complex faults with multi-source data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiang; Xu, Hua; Zou, Xukai; Lei, Hongzhuan

    2015-04-01

    Fault modeling is a very important step in making an accurate and reliable 3D geological model. Typical existing methods demand enough fault data to be able to construct complex fault models, however, it is well known that the available fault data are generally sparse and undersampled. In this paper, we propose a workflow of fault modeling, which can integrate multi-source data to construct fault models. For the faults that are not modeled with these data, especially small-scale or approximately parallel with the sections, we propose the fault deduction method to infer the hanging wall and footwall lines after displacement calculation. Moreover, using the fault cutting algorithm can supplement the available fault points on the location where faults cut each other. Increasing fault points in poor sample areas can not only efficiently construct fault models, but also reduce manual intervention. By using a fault-based interpolation and remeshing the horizons, an accurate 3D geological model can be constructed. The method can naturally simulate geological structures no matter whether the available geological data are sufficient or not. A concrete example of using the method in Tangshan, China, shows that the method can be applied to broad and complex geological areas.

  3. Types of Reasoning in 3D Geometry Thinking and Their Relation with Spatial Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittalis, Marios; Christou, Constantinos

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe and analyse the structure of 3D geometry thinking by identifying different types of reasoning and to examine their relation with spatial ability. To achieve this goal, two tests were administered to students in grades 5 to 9. The results of the study showed that 3D geometry thinking could be described by four…

  4. Interaction between the San Andreas and San Jacinto faults in southern California: A 3D numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q.; Liu, M.

    2005-12-01

    In southern California, most of the Pacific-North America plate motion is taken up by the subparallel San Andreas Fault (SAF) and San Jacinto Fault (SJF). Geological studies of slip history on these two faults show strong codependence. We have developed a 3D finite element model to simulate long term dynamic interaction between these two faults and its impact on active crustal deformation and seismicity in southern California. The model includes an elastoplastic upper crust and viscoelastic lower crust, with simplified fault geometry. The computational intensive multi-timescale fault interaction, including co-seismic plastic deformation and viscoelastic interseismic loading, is calculated with parallel computers. We found that the geometry of the SAF, especially its Big Bend in South California, would cause a stress and strain energy field favorable for initiation and growth of the SJF. Once the SJF has initiated, it causes decrease of fault slip rate on the southernmost SAF, consistent with observations. The SJF also cause a belt of concentrated strain energy that coincides spatially with the East California Shear Zone (ECSZ).

  5. New High-Resolution 3D Seismic Imagery of Deformation and Fault Architecture Along Newport-Inglewood/Rose Canyon Fault in the Inner California Borderlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, J. J.; Bormann, J. M.; Driscoll, N. W.; Kent, G.; Harding, A. J.; Wesnousky, S. G.

    2014-12-01

    The tectonic deformation and geomorphology of the Inner California Borderlands (ICB) records the transition from a convergent plate margin to a predominantly dextral strike-slip system. Geodetic measurements of plate boundary deformation onshore indicate that approximately 15%, or 6-8 mm/yr, of the total Pacific-North American relative plate motion is accommodated by faults offshore. The largest near-shore fault system, the Newport-Inglewood/Rose Canyon (NI/RC) fault complex, has a Holocene slip rate estimate of 1.5-2.0 mm/yr, according to onshore trenching, and current models suggest the potential to produce an Mw 7.0+ earthquake. The fault zone extends approximately 120 km, initiating from the south near downtown San Diego and striking northwards with a constraining bend north of Mt. Soledad in La Jolla and continuing northwestward along the continental shelf, eventually stepping onshore at Newport Beach, California. In late 2013, we completed the first high-resolution 3D seismic survey (3.125 m bins) of the NI/RC fault offshore of San Onofre as part of the Southern California Regional Fault Mapping project. We present new constraints on fault geometry and segmentation of the fault system that may play a role in limiting the extent of future earthquake ruptures. In addition, slip rate estimates using piercing points such as offset channels will be explored. These new observations will allow us to investigate recent deformation and strain transfer along the NI/RC fault system.

  6. Application of neural networks for identification of faults in a 3D seismic survey offshore Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastouri, Raja; Marchant, Robin; Marillier, François; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Bouaziz, Samir

    2013-04-01

    The Kerkennah High area (offshore Tunisia) is dominated by series of horst and grabens resulting from multiple tectonic events and multiphase stress (extension, compression, translation). In order to decipher this complex structural history from a 3D seismic survey, a neural network is applied to extract a fault-cube from the amplitude data (which does not image faults directly). The neural network transforms seismic attributes into a new 3D data cube in which faults are highlighted. This technique comprises the following steps. First, we compute several seismic attributes (dip-steering similarity, curvature, frequency, ridge and fault enhancement filters…) that enhance different aspects of the seismic data related to faulting. In a second step, a number of points in the seismic data are selected as representative of either faults or areas devoid of faults. These points are tested by the artificial neural network to determine the range in which the different attributes are representative of faults or not. Based on this learning phase, the neural network is then applied to the entire 3D seismic cube to produce a fault-cube that contains only faults which contrast and continuity have been enhance.

  7. Software-based geometry operations for 3D computer graphics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sima, Mihai; Iancu, Daniel; Glossner, John; Schulte, Michael; Mamidi, Suman

    2006-02-01

    In order to support a broad dynamic range and a high degree of precision, many of 3D renderings fundamental algorithms have been traditionally performed in floating-point. However, fixed-point data representation is preferable over floating-point representation in graphics applications on embedded devices where performance is of paramount importance, while the dynamic range and precision requirements are limited due to the small display sizes (current PDA's are 640 × 480 (VGA), while cell-phones are even smaller). In this paper we analyze the efficiency of a CORDIC-augmented Sandbridge processor when implementing a vertex processor in software using fixed-point arithmetic. A CORDIC-based solution for vertex processing exhibits a number of advantages over classical Multiply-and-Acumulate solutions. First, since a single primitive is used to describe the computation, the code can easily be vectorized and multithreaded, and thus fits the major Sandbridge architectural features. Second, since a CORDIC iteration consists of only a shift operation followed by an addition, the computation may be deeply pipelined. Initially, we outline the Sandbridge architecture extension which encompasses a CORDIC functional unit and the associated instructions. Then, we consider rigid-body rotation, lighting, exponentiation, vector normalization, and perspective division (which are some of the most important data-intensive 3D graphics kernels) and propose a scheme to implement them on the CORDIC-augmented Sandbridge processor. Preliminary results indicate that the performance improvement within the extended instruction set ranges from 3× to 10× (with the exception of rigid body rotation).

  8. The unusual 3D interplay of basement fault reactivation and fault-propagation-fold development: A case study of the Laramide-age Stillwell anticline, west Texas (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surpless, Ben; Hill, Nicola; Beasley, Cara

    2015-10-01

    Subsurface fault geometries have a systematic influence on folds formed above those faults. We use the extraordinarily well-exposed fold geometries of the Laramide-age Stillwell anticline in west Texas (USA) to develop a strain-predictive model of fault-propagation fold formation. The anticline is a 10-km long, NW-trending, NE-vergent, asymmetric fold system with an axis that displays a map-view left-stepping, en echelon pattern. We integrated field observations, geologic and structural data, cross-sections, and 2D kinematic modeling to establish an unusual 3D two-stage model of contractional fold formation, including: 1) reverse reactivation of a pre-existing, NW-striking, SW-dipping, left-stepping, en echelon normal fault system in Paleozoic basement rocks to generate monoclinal flexures in overlying layered Cretaceous carbonate rocks; and 2) the formation of a subsequent flat-ramp fault system that propagated horizontally along a mechanically-weak, clay-rich Cretaceous unit before ramping up at the hinge of the pre-existing monocline system. Strain is focused within the forelimb of the system, in front of the propagating fault tip, and is accommodated by a combination of interlayer slip, flat-ramp faulting, and fracturing proximal to planes of slip. This strain predictive model can be applied to similar, less-well-exposed contractional systems worldwide and provides a new, unusual example of Laramide-age contractional deformation.

  9. Full Wave Propagation Code in General 3D Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovich, Pavel; Cooper, W. Anthony; Villard, Laurent

    2003-10-01

    A full-wave propagation code (LEMan) has been developed and tested for 3D plasma configurations. The code solves the Maxwell operator for inhomogeneous plasma with a given external antenna. The plasma-wave interaction is modelled with full cold plasma dielectric tensor with finite electron mass. Special care is taken to avoid numerical pollution of the discretised spectrum: the wave equation is reformulated in terms of electromagnetic potentials. The discretisation is implemented with finite elements radially and Fourier decomposition in poloidal and toroidal angles. The LEMan code uses the equilibrium metric in Boozer magnetic coordinates produced with TERPSICHORE. The Fourier formulation of the problem gives a possibility to largely reduce matrix construction time by minimizing the number of numerical integrations of the equilibrium coefficients. Several mirror- and helix-like configurations have been analysed showing the expected structure of the spectrum in the Alfven frequency range with characteristic gaps and eigenmodes. In the case of both poloidal and toroidal mode coupling (2-period QAS stellarator) the spectrum is very complicated, but a comparison with the corresponding cylindrical branches still helps to distinguish the main modes and mode conversion surfaces.

  10. Using 3D Computer Graphics Multimedia to Motivate Preservice Teachers' Learning of Geometry and Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodson-Espy, Tracy; Lynch-Davis, Kathleen; Schram, Pamela; Quickenton, Art

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the genesis and purpose of our geometry methods course, focusing on a geometry-teaching technology we created using NVIDIA[R] Chameleon demonstration. This article presents examples from a sequence of lessons centered about a 3D computer graphics demonstration of the chameleon and its geometry. In addition, we present data…

  11. Verification of internal flow analyses in complex 3-D geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S. K.; Buggeln, R. C.

    1992-11-01

    Analysis of internal flow in advanced rocket propulsion systems is complicated by hardware geometry, high Reynolds numbers, rotation, high frequency phenomena, and near incompressibility. Typical of such a problem is the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) hot gas manifold (HGM). Previous analyses of flow in the SSME HGM have been compared to air flow data and found to be inaccurate with respect to system losses, outer wall static pressures, and transfer duct environments. Such discrepancies could arise from flow measurement methodology, low order algorithms, turbulence modeling, and/or inadequate grid resolution. The objective of this work is to compare internal flow computational analyses to LDV flow measurements for the MSFC HGM pilot model configuration using two grids of different node density in the near wall region. Grids were generated with the EAGLE grid generator and calculations were made with the SRA MINT code. The calculated results were compared with HGM experimental data obtained in the MSFC water flow facility.

  12. 3D seismic analysis of the structure and evolution of a salt-influenced normal fault zone: A test of competing fault growth models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Christopher A.-L.; Rotevatn, Atle

    2013-09-01

    In this paper we determine the structure and evolution of a normal fault system by applying qualitative and quantitative fault analysis techniques to a 3D seismic reflection dataset from the Suez Rift, Egypt. Our analysis indicates that the October Fault Zone is composed of two fault systems that are locally decoupled across a salt-bearing interval of Late Miocene (Messinian) age. The sub-salt system offsets pre-rift crystalline basement, and was active during the Late Oligocene-early Middle Miocene. It is composed of four, planar, NW-SE-striking segments that are hard- linked by N-S-striking segments, and up to 2 km of displacement occurs at top basement, suggesting that this fault system nucleated at or, more likely, below this structural level. The supra-salt system was active during the Pliocene-Holocene, and is composed of four, NW-SE-striking, listric fault segments, which are soft-linked by unbreached relay zones. Segments in the supra-salt fault system nucleated within Pliocene strata and have maximum throws of up to 482 m. Locally, the segments of the supra-salt fault system breach the Messinian salt to hard-link downwards with the underlying, sub-salt fault system, thus forming the upper part of a fault zone composed of: (i) a single, amalgamated fault system below the salt and (ii) a fault system composed of multiple soft-linked segments above the salt. Analysis of throw-distance (T-x) and throw-depth (T-z) plots for the supra-salt fault system, isopach maps of the associated growth strata and backstripping of intervening relay zones indicates that these faults rapidly established their lengths during the early stages of their slip history. The fault tips were then effectively ‘pinned’ and the faults accumulated displacement via predominantly downward propagation. We interpret that the October Fault Zone had the following evolutionary trend; (i) growth of the sub-salt fault system during the Oligocene-to-early Middle Miocene; (ii) cessation of activity on the sub-salt fault system during the Middle Miocene-to-?Early Pliocene; (iii) stretching of the sub- and supra-salt intervals during Pliocene regional extension, which resulted in mild reactivation of the sub-salt fault system and nucleation of the segmented supra-salt fault system, which at this time was geometrically decoupled from the sub-salt fault system; and (iv) Pliocene-to-Holocene growth of the supra-salt fault system by downwards vertical tip line propagation, which resulted in downward breaching of the salt and dip-linkage with the sub-salt fault system. The structure of the October Fault Zone and the rapid establishment of supra-salt fault lengths are compatible with the predictions of the coherent fault model, although we note that individual segments in the supra-salt array grew in accordance with the isolated fault model. Our study thereby indicates that both coherent and isolated fault models may be applicable to the growth of kilometre-scale, basin-bounding faults. Furthermore, we highlight the role that fault reactivation and dip-linkage in mechanically layered sequences can play in controlling the three-dimensional geometry of normal faults.

  13. Visual and haptic geometry of 3D shape discrimination.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Flip; O'Donnell, Emerson; Kernis, Noah

    2015-01-01

    There are countless candidate 'features' useful for the perceptual discrimination of three-dimensional shape. Human vision and touch use both modality-specific and cross-modal information to accomplish this task. For example, only vision can make diagnostic use of shading, color and optical texture while only touch can detect temperature, vibratory and other proprioceptive information such as joint angle. Some characteristics such as the physical texture of an object provide both visual appearance and tactile roughness information. When attempting to determine the 3D shape of an object its structural geometric information underlies most if not all of the useful features used by both vision and touch, individually or in concert. It is an open question as to what specific geometric information is essential or useful when performing discrimination tasks that involve vision, touch or their interaction. This research investigates the use of statistical differential geometric information while performing detection and discrimination tasks, both within and across perceptual modalities. We use eye- and hand-tracking to determine which parts of an object our subjects explore while making shape discrimination and differentiation decisions. We correlate these high-exploration regions with the objects' underlying differential geometric structure. We find that object regions with high curvature contrast are useful across both modalities as they define 'sharp' linear structures. Similarly, areas with high relative curvedness provide useful point landmarks. We further show that some geometric structures are more useful within a particular modality than another. As a result the worst-performing modality limits cross-modal use of this information but simultaneous presentation is facilitative. Finally, the statistical distribution of differential geometric structures serves to define diagnostic 'features' available to either touch or vision. The relative occurrence of features and their magnitude determine their usefulness within and across modalities. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326554

  14. Super Cooled Large Droplet Analysis of Several Geometries Using LEWICE3D Version 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidwell, Colin S.

    2011-01-01

    Super Cooled Large Droplet (SLD) collection efficiency calculations were performed for several geometries using the LEWICE3D Version 3 software. The computations were performed using the NASA Glenn Research Center SLD splashing model which has been incorporated into the LEWICE3D Version 3 software. Comparisons to experiment were made where available. The geometries included two straight wings, a swept 64A008 wing tip, two high lift geometries, and the generic commercial transport DLR-F4 wing body configuration. In general the LEWICE3D Version 3 computations compared well with the 2D LEWICE 3.2.2 results and with experimental data where available.

  15. Modeling the effects of 3-D slab geometry and oblique subduction on subduction zone thermal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, I.; Wang, K.; He, J.

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we revisit the effects of along-strike variation in slab geometry and oblique subduction on subduction zone thermal structures. Along-strike variations in slab dip cause changes in the descending rate of the slab and generate trench-parallel pressure gradients that drive trench-parallel mantle flow (e.g., Kneller and van Keken, 2007). Oblique subduction also drives trench-parallel mantle flow. In this study, we use a finite element code PGCtherm3D and examine a range of generic subduction geometries and parameters to investigate the effects of the above two factors. This exercise is part of foundational work towards developing detailed 3-D thermal models for NE Japan, Nankai, and Cascadia to better constrain their 3-D thermal structures and to understand the role of temperature in controlling metamorphic, seismogenic, and volcanic processes. The 3-D geometry of the subducting slabs in the forearc and arc regions are well delineated at these three subduction zones. Further, relatively large compilations of surface heat flow data at these subduction zones make them excellent candidates for this study. At NE Japan, a megathrust earthquake occurred on March 11, 2011; at Nankai and Cascadia, there has been a great effort to constrain the scale of the next subduction thrust earthquake for the purpose of disaster prevention. Temperature influences the slip behavior of subduction faults by (1) affecting the rheology of the interface material and (2) controlling dehydration reactions, which can lead to elevated pore fluid pressure. Beyond the depths of subduction thrust earthquakes, the thermal structure is affected strongly by the pattern of mantle wedge flow. This flow is driven by viscous coupling between the subducting slab and the overriding mantle, and it brings in hot flowing mantle into the wedge. The trench-ward (up-dip) extent of the slab-mantle coupling is thus a key factor that controls the thermal structure. Slab-mantle decoupling at shallow depths causes mantle stagnation and a cool condition, which allows serpentinization to occur, whereas coupling at greater depths drives hot flowing mantle, providing the thermal condition required for melt generation in the mantle wedge. The flowing mantle also causes rapid heating of the subducting slab and affects the occurrence of intraslab earthquakes. In the generic model calculations in the study, we also investigate the effect of local fluctuations in the depth of decoupling-coupling transition on the 3-D mantle wedge flow pattern and thermal structure. Kneller, E.A., and P.E. van Keken (2008), Effect of three-dimensional slab geometry on deformation in the mantle wedge: Implications for shear wave anisotropy, Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 9, Q01003, doi:10.1029/2007GC001677.

  16. Polyscale, polymodal fault geometries: evolution and predictive capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blenkinsop, T. G.; Carvell, J.; Clarke, G.; Tonelli, M.

    2012-12-01

    The Late Permian Rangal coal measures on the edge of the Nebo synclinorium in the Bowen basin, NE Queensland, Australia, are cut by normal faults. Mining operations allow 13 faults to be mapped in some detail to depths of 200m. These faults cut Tertiary intrusions and a reverse fault as well as the coal seams, and show no obvious signs of reactivation. The steeply dipping faults are clustered into groups of two to four, separated by hundreds of meters. The faults trend ENE and NE; both trends of faults dip in both directions, defining a quadrimodal geometry. The odd axis construction for these faults suggests that vertical shortening was accompanied by horizontal extension along both principal directions of 153° and 063°. The mapped extents of the faults are limited by erosion and the depth to which the faults have been drilled, but displacement profiles along the lengths of the faults show maxima within the fault planes. The displacement profiles suggest that the currently mapped faults have similar lengths to the total preserved lengths of the faults, and that they will continue into the unmined ground to a limited, but predictable extent. The fault planes have a complex geometry, with segments of individual faults showing a similar variability in orientation to the ensemble of fault planes: the fault planes themselves are polymodal. Displacement profiles show a good correlation with segment orientation. An odd axis construction based on fault segments, rather than individual faults, gives principal extension directions within 4° of the above results. The variable orientation of fault segments, the correlation of the displacement profiles with fault orientation, and the similarity between the segment and ensemble fault kinematics suggest that the faults have evolved by propagation and linking of smaller polymodal faults in the same bulk strain field.ross section of polymodal fault at Hail Creek coal mine

  17. 3D Dynamic Rupture Simulations Across Interacting Faults: the Mw7.0, 2010, Haiti Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douilly, R.; Aochi, H.; Calais, E.; Freed, A. M.; Aagaard, B.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanisms controlling rupture propagation between fault segments during an earthquake are key to the hazard posed by fault systems. Rupture initiation on a fault segment sometimes transfers to a larger fault, resulting in a significant event (e.g.i, 2002 M7.9Denali and 2010 M7.1 Darfield earthquakes). In other cases rupture is constrained to the initial segment and does not transfer to nearby faults, resulting in events of moderate magnitude. This is the case of the 1989 M6.9 Loma Prieta and 2010 M7.0 Haiti earthquakes which initiated on reverse faults abutting against a major strike-slip plate boundary fault but did not propagate onto it. Here we investigatethe rupture dynamics of the Haiti earthquake, seeking to understand why rupture propagated across two segments of the Léogâne fault but did not propagate to the adjacenent Enriquillo Plantain Garden Fault, the major 200 km long plate boundary fault cutting through southern Haiti. We use a Finite Element Model to simulate the nucleation and propagation of rupture on the Léogâne fault, varying friction and background stress to determine the parameter set that best explains the observed earthquake sequence. The best-fit simulation is in remarkable agreement with several finite fault inversions and predicts ground displacement in very good agreement with geodetic and geological observations. The two slip patches inferred from finite-fault inversions are explained by the successive rupture of two fault segments oriented favorably with respect to the rupture propagation, while the geometry of the Enriquillo fault did not allow shear stress to reach failure. Although our simulation results replicate well the ground deformation consistent with the geodetic surface observation but convolving the ground motion with the soil amplification from the microzonation study will correctly account for the heterogeneity of the PGA throughout the rupture area.

  18. 4d quantum geometry from 3d supersymmetric gauge theory and holomorphic block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Muxin

    2016-01-01

    A class of 3d N=2 supersymmetric gauge theories are constructed and shown to encode the simplicial geometries in 4-dimensions. The gauge theories are defined by applying the Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov construction [1] in 3d-3d correspondence to certain graph complement 3-manifolds. Given a gauge theory in this class, the massive supersymmetric vacua of the theory contain the classical geometries on a 4d simplicial complex. The corresponding 4d simplicial geometries are locally constant curvature (either dS or AdS), in the sense that they are made by gluing geometrical 4-simplices of the same constant curvature. When the simplicial complex is sufficiently refined, the simplicial geometries can approximate all possible smooth geometries on 4-manifold. At the quantum level, we propose that a class of holomorphic blocks defined in [2] from the 3d N=2 gauge theories are wave functions of quantum 4d simplicial geometries. In the semiclassical limit, the asymptotic behavior of holomorphic block reproduces the classical action of 4d Einstein-Hilbert gravity in the simplicial context.

  19. Strike-slip faulting in the West Siberian Platform: Insights from 3D seismic imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogonenkov, Georgiy N.; Timurziev, Akhmet I.

    2012-03-01

    The 3D seismic exploration, actively deployed in recent years on much of the West Siberian Platform - one of the world's largest oil and gas bearing basins - has brought out extensive development of a system of strike-slip faults within the basement. The fault system causes local structural and fluid flow anomalies within the Jurassic-Cretaceous sedimentary section, which is known to accommodate a multitude of large oil and gas deposits. This article will show the distribution geography and the scale of the basement strike-slip tectonics, and explain why this phenomenon, so clearly highlighted by 3D seismic, was not discovered earlier. The article will also consider how strike-slip faults are detected in the sedimentary cover and how they impact the characteristics of oil and gas fields located in their vicinity.

  20. A Nonfullerene Small Molecule Acceptor with 3D Interlocking Geometry Enabling Efficient Organic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaewon; Singh, Ranbir; Sin, Dong Hun; Kim, Heung Gyu; Song, Kyu Chan; Cho, Kilwon

    2016-01-01

    A new 3D nonfullerene small-molecule acceptor is reported. The 3D interlocking geometry of the small-molecule acceptor enables uniform molecular conformation and strong intermolecular connectivity, facilitating favorable nanoscale phase separation and electron charge transfer. By employing both a novel polymer donor and a nonfullerene small-molecule acceptor in the solution-processed organic solar cells, a high-power conversion efficiency of close to 6% is demonstrated. PMID:26539752

  1. Constraints on 3D fault and fracture distribution in layered volcanic- volcaniclastic sequences from terrestrial LIDAR datasets: Faroe Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raithatha, Bansri; McCaffrey, Kenneth; Walker, Richard; Brown, Richard; Pickering, Giles

    2013-04-01

    Hydrocarbon reservoirs commonly contain an array of fine-scale structures that control fluid flow in the subsurface, such as polyphase fracture networks and small-scale fault zones. These structures are unresolvable using seismic imaging and therefore outcrop-based studies have been used as analogues to characterize fault and fracture networks and assess their impact on fluid flow in the subsurface. To maximize recovery and enhance production, it is essential to understand the geometry, physical properties, and distribution of these structures in 3D. Here we present field data and terrestrial LIDAR-derived 3D, photo-realistic virtual outcrops of fault zones at a range of displacement scales (0.001- 4.5 m) within a volcaniclastic sand- and basaltic lava unit sequence in the Faroe Islands. Detailed field observations were used to constrain the virtual outcrop dataset, and a workflow has been developed to build a discrete fracture network (DFN) models in GOCAD from these datasets. Model construction involves three main stages: (1) Georeferencing and processing of LIDAR datasets; (2) Structural interpretation to discriminate between faults, fractures, veins, and joint planes using CAD software and RiSCAN Pro; and (3) Building a 3D DFN in GOCAD. To test the validity of this workflow, we focus here on a 4.5 m displacement strike-slip fault zone that displays a complex polymodal fracture network in the inter-layered basalt-volcaniclastic sequence, which is well-constrained by field study. The DFN models support our initial field-based hypothesis that fault zone geometry varies with increasing displacement through volcaniclastic units. Fracture concentration appears to be greatest in the upper lava unit, decreases into the volcaniclastic sediments, and decreases further into the lower lava unit. This distribution of fractures appears to be related to the width of the fault zone and the amount of fault damage on the outcrop. For instance, the fault zone is thicker in the upper lava unit and therefore fracture concentration is higher, while in the lower lava unit, the fault zone is narrower and thus fracture concentration is also low. Both field observations and the DFN model indicate that the faults and fractures are steeper in the basalts, and shallower in the volcaniclastic sequences, giving a 'stepped' geometry. To assess the nature of sub-seismic fracturing, fracture attributes (connectivity, spacing, length, and orientation) within the model were analysed quantitatively. Continuing work will integrate the detailed field analysis fully, including 1D and 2D fracture transects, structural logging and mapping as well as microstructural characterisation from collected field samples, to understand the complex nature of fracture networks in inter-layered basalt-volcaniclastic sequences. Fracture attributes, such as the shape, length, aspect ratio, curvature and aperture, will be quantified to provide key parameters for fluid flow simulation. Once these attributes have been assessed, experimental data (porosity and permeability) will be incorporated into the DFN model to constrain the fluid flow potential within these inter-layered volcanic sequences.

  2. Complex patterns of faulting revealed by 3D seismic data at the West Galicia rifted margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reston, Timothy; Cresswell, Derren; Sawyer, Dale; Ranero, Cesar; Shillington, Donna; Morgan, Julia; Lymer, Gael

    2015-04-01

    The west Galicia margin is characterised by crust thinning to less than 3 km, well-defined fault blocks, which overlie a bright reflection (the S reflector) generally interpreted as a tectonic Moho. The margin exhibits neither voluminous magmatism nor thick sediment piles to obscure the structures and the amount of extension. As such is represents an ideal location to study the process of continental breakup both through seismic imaging and potentially through drilling. Prestack depth migration of existing 2D profiles has strongly supported the interpretation of the S reflector as both a detachment and as the crust-mantle boundary; wide-angle seismic has also shown that the mantle beneath S is serpentinised. Despite the quality of the existing 2D seismic images, a number of competing models have been advanced to explain the formation of this margin, including sequential faulting, polyphase faulting, multiple detachments and the gravitational collapse of the margin over exhumed mantle. As these models, all developed for the Galicia margin, have been subsequently applied to other margins, distinguishing between them has implications not only for the structure of the Galicia margin but for the process of rifting through to breakup more generally. To address these issues in summer of 2013 we collected a 3D combined seismic reflection and wide-angle dataset over this margin. Here we present some of the results of ongoing processing of the 3D volume, focussing on the internal structure of some of the fault blocks that overlies the S detachment. 2D processing of the data shows a relatively simple series of tilted fault block, bound by west-dipping faults that detach downwards onto the bright S reflector. However, inspection of the 3D volume produced by 3D pre-stack time migration reveals that the fault blocks contain a complex set of sedimentary packages, with strata tilted to the east, west, north and south, each package bound by faults. Furthermore, the top of crustal basement appears in places to have acted as an extensional slip surface. We interpret the complex pattern of faulting and internal block deformation as the results of several phases of faulting, coupled with internal deformation and some late gravitational collapse, all components of some of the various models that have been applied to this margin.

  3. Displacement transfer from fault-bend to fault-propagation fold geometry: An example from the Himalayan thrust front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qayyum, Mazhar; Spratt, Deborah A.; Dixon, John M.; Lawrence, Robert D.

    2015-08-01

    The leading edge of the ENE-trending Himalayan thrust front in Pakistan exhibits along-strike changes in deformational style, ranging from fault-bend to fault-propagation folds. Although the structural geometry is very gently deformed throughout the Salt Range, it becomes progressively more complex to the east as the leading edge of the emergent Salt Range Thrust becomes blind. Surface geology, seismic reflection, petroleum well, and chronostratigraphic data are synthesized to produce a 3-D kinematic model that reconciles the contrasting structural geometries along this part of the Himalayan thrust front. We propose a model whereby displacement was transferred, across a newly-identified lateral ramp, from a fault-bend fold in the west to fault-propagation folds in the east and comparable shortening was synchronously accommodated by two fundamentally different mechanisms: translation vs. telescoping. However, substantially different shortening distribution patterns within these structurally contrasting segments require a tear fault, which later is reactivated as a thrust fault. The present geometry of this S-shaped displacement transfer zone is a combined result of the NW-SE compression of the lateral culmination wall and associated tear fault, and their subsequent modification due to mobilization of underlying ductile salt.

  4. Quaternary Deformation History of the Palos Verdes Fault in San Pedro Bay using 3D and 2D Seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigor, A.; Mellors, R. J.; Legg, M.; Francis, D.

    2002-12-01

    The Palos Verdes fault has one of the highest slip rates of the Los Angeles basin structures. Using a combination of exploration industry 3-D seismic data and 2-D high-resolution profiles through San Pedro Bay, we are preparing detailed maps of the shallow geometry and deformation history of the Palos Verdes fault. By mapping prominent shallow reflection horizons, that represent important late Pliocene and Quaternary sedimentary sequences, we can estimate the Quaternary deformation history of this important fault zone and identify whether significant changes in tectonic style or rates of deformation have occurred that may affect estimates of earthquake potential in the southern California region. We have identified about six major seismic stratigraphic sequences in the Wilmington Graben east of the Palos Verdes fault zone representing the time period from Repettian (Pliocene) to late Quaternary. Three of these are in the shallow section and clearly imaged by the high-resolution profiles. One of the more significant features we observe regarding these sequences is that the uplift of the Palos Verdes anticlinorium, represented by sedimentary growth wedges adjacent to the fault zone, appears to stop and start. These changes in vertical deformation character may represent important local changes in the tectonic style along the fault zone. For constraints on lateral deformation history, we are attempting to identify possible meanders or other irregularities in the Los Angeles - San Gabriel river system that generally flows straight along the northeast flank of the Palos Verdes anticlinorium before plunging down the slope in the San Gabriel submarine canyon. Channel thalwegs and margins offset by the Palos Verdes fault zone would provide requisite piercing points for measuring right-slip since channels filled. Major segment boundaries, such as the 3-km long north-trending releasing bend and Beta oil field complex restraining bend structure may provide other important cross-cutting features that represent piercing points.

  5. New Insights About Pre-Stress and Fault Interaction at Fault Step-Overs from 3D Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, K.; Oglesby, D. D.; Richards-Dinger, K. B.; Dieterich, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The stressing conditions on faults continuously evolve due to several factors, such as tectonic stressing, fault interactions, pore-fluid perturbations, and viscoelastic relaxation. Initial stressing conditions have a profound effect on the rupture process, including rupture propagation through stepover regions. Knowledge of rupture behavior near fault stepovers is critically important to properly quantify and mitigate seismic hazards. Previous studies have shown that stepovers along faults can influence both the earthquake magnitude and recurrence interval when rupture either jumps across or is arrested at a stepover. Landmark investigations of en echelon fault interaction with uniform initial stresses that promote super-shear rupture reported successful jumps occur at step-over widths ≤ 2.5 and 5 km for compressional and extensional stepovers, respectively (Harris and Day, 1993). We use the 3D quasi-dynamic, physics-based simulator RSQSim to investigate how stress evolution effects rupture propagation at fault stepovers over multiple earthquake cycles. Comparisons of single-event ruptures at fault stepovers between RSQSim and the dynamic finite element code FaultMod demonstrate nucleation locations on the receiver fault similar to those of Harris and Day (1993). These simulations use uniform initial stresses with rate- and state- and slip-weakening dependent friction for RSQSim and FaultMod, respectively. Here, we present results from multi-cycle event simulations on en echelon faults using evolved stress states that arise due to fault interaction and tectonic loading. Results indicate that successful rupture jumps only occur at stepover widths of 1-1.5 km for both fault step types. The spatial pattern of rupture re-nucleation locations is strongly influenced by the evolved stress state and is dissimilar to the pattern predicted by studies. Finally, initial rupture nucleation always occurs before the magnitude of the pre-stress reaches values high enough to cause super-shear rupture, due to the heterogeneity of stress and the rate- and state- frictional properties. These results suggest that mechanisms such as extreme weakening may play a larger role than initial stress on supershear ruptures, and that observations of rupture jumps > 1 km may be explained by fault connection at depth.

  6. Numerical model of formation of a 3-D strike-slip fault system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemenda, Alexandre I.; Cavalié, Olivier; Vergnolle, Mathilde; Bouissou, Stéphane; Delouis, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    The initiation and the initial evolution of a strike-slip fault are modeled within an elastoplasticity constitutive framework taking into account the evolution of the hardening modulus with inelastic straining. The initial and boundary conditions are similar to those of the Riedel shear experiment. The models first deform purely elastically. Then damage (inelastic deformation) starts at the model surface. The damage zone propagates both normal to the forming fault zone and downwards. Finally, it affects the whole layer thickness, forming flower-like structure in cross-section. At a certain stage, a dense set of parallel Riedel shears forms at shallow depth. A few of these propagate both laterally and vertically, while others die. The faults first propagate in-plane, but then rapidly change direction to make a larger angle with the shear axis. New fault segments form as well, resulting in complex 3-D fault zone architecture. Different fault segments accommodate strike-slip and normal displacements, which results in the formation of valleys and rotations along the fault system.

  7. Progressive geometry coding of 3D meshes using hierarchical vertex set split

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jingliang; Kuo, C.-C. Jay

    2005-08-01

    A progressive lossless 3D geometry encoder using a hierarchical vertex set split method is presented in this work. Compared with prior art, the proposed coder has significantly better rate-distortion (R-D) performance at low bit-rates and provides visually pleasant intermediate meshes at all bit-rates. Given a 3D mesh, all its 3D vertices form an initial vertex set, which is split into several child vertex sets using the well-known Generalized Lloyd Algorithm (GLA). Each newly generated vertex set that contains more than one vertex is iteratively split so as to form a hierarchical structure. During the process of hierarchical vertex set split, a representative is calculated for each newly generated vertex set. Then, the representatives of all existing vertex sets form an approximation to the original 3D geometry. For each vertex set split, the number of child vertex sets is arithmetic encoded, and the offsets of the child representatives from their parent representative are sorted, quantized and arithmetic encoded. If a finer resolution is required for a vertex set containing only one vertex, the rectangloid cell containing that vertex can be further subdivided and coded iteratively. Experimental results are provided to demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed geometry coder.

  8. Direct Detection of the Helical Magnetic Field Geometry from 3D Reconstruction of Prominence Knot Trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapiór, Maciej; Martínez-Gómez, David

    2016-02-01

    Based on the data collected by the Vacuum Tower Telescope located in the Teide Observatory in the Canary Islands, we analyzed the three-dimensional (3D) motion of so-called knots in a solar prominence of 2014 June 9. Trajectories of seven knots were reconstructed, giving information of the 3D geometry of the magnetic field. Helical motion was detected. From the equipartition principle, we estimated the lower limit of the magnetic field in the prominence to ≈1-3 G and from the Ampère’s law the lower limit of the electric current to ≈1.2 × 109 A.

  9. Experiments with Uas Imagery for Automatic Modeling of Power Line 3d Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jóźków, G.; Vander Jagt, B.; Toth, C.

    2015-08-01

    The ideal mapping technology for transmission line inspection is the airborne LiDAR executed from helicopter platforms. It allows for full 3D geometry extraction in highly automated manner. Large scale aerial images can be also used for this purpose, however, automation is possible only for finding transmission line positions (2D geometry), and the sag needs to be estimated manually. For longer lines, these techniques are less expensive than ground surveys, yet they are still expensive. UAS technology has the potential to reduce these costs, especially if using inexpensive platforms with consumer grade cameras. This study investigates the potential of using high resolution UAS imagery for automatic modeling of transmission line 3D geometry. The key point of this experiment was to employ dense matching algorithms to appropriately acquired UAS images to have points created also on wires. This allowed to model the 3D geometry of transmission lines similarly to LiDAR acquired point clouds. Results showed that the transmission line modeling is possible with a high internal accuracy for both, horizontal and vertical directions, even when wires were represented by a partial (sparse) point cloud.

  10. Rupture dynamics and ground motion from 3-D rough-fault simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zheqiang; Day, Steven M.

    2013-03-01

    perform three-dimensional (3-D) numerical calculations of dynamic rupture along non-planar faults to study the effects of fault roughness on rupture propagation and resultant ground motion. The fault roughness model follows a self-similar fractal distribution over length scales spanning three orders of magnitude, from ~102 to ~105 m. The fault is governed by a strongly rate-weakening friction, and the bulk material is subject to Drucker-Prager viscoplasticity. Fault roughness promotes the development of self-healing rupture pulses and a heterogeneous distribution of fault slip at the free surface and at depth. The inelastic deformation, generated by the large dynamic stress near rupture fronts, occurs in a narrow volume around the fault with heterogeneous thickness correlated to local roughness slopes. Inelastic deformation near the free surface, however, is induced by the stress waves originated from dynamic rupture at depth and spreads to large distances (>10 km) away from the fault. The present simulations model seismic wave excitation up to ~10 Hz with rupture lengths of ~100 km, permitting comparisons with empirical studies of ground-motion intensity measures of engineering interest. Characteristics of site-averaged synthetic response spectra, including the distance and period dependence of the median values, absolute level, and intra-event standard deviation, are comparable to appropriate empirical estimates throughout the period range 0.1-3.0 s. This class of model may provide a viable representation of the ground-motion excitation process over a wide frequency range in a large spatial domain, with potential applications to the numerical prediction of source- and path-specific effects on earthquake ground motion.

  11. Seismicity and fault geometry of the San Andreas fault around Parkfield, California and their implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woohan; Hong, Tae-Kyung; Lee, Junhyung; Taira, Taka'aki

    2016-05-01

    Fault geometry is a consequence of tectonic evolution, and it provides important information on potential seismic hazards. We investigated fault geometry and its properties in Parkfield, California on the basis of local seismicity and seismic velocity residuals refined by an adaptive-velocity hypocentral-parameter inversion method. The station correction terms from the hypocentral-parameter inversion present characteristic seismic velocity changes around the fault, suggesting low seismic velocities in the region east of the fault and high seismic velocities in the region to the west. Large seismic velocity anomalies are observed at shallow depths along the whole fault zone. At depths of 3-8 km, seismic velocity anomalies are small in the central fault zone, but are large in the northern and southern fault zones. At depths > 8 km, low seismic velocities are observed in the northern fault zone. High seismicity is observed in the Southwest Fracture Zone, which has developed beside the creeping segment of the San Andreas fault. The vertical distribution of seismicity suggests that the fault has spiral geometry, dipping NE in the northern region, nearly vertical in the central region, and SW in the southern region. The rapid twisting of the fault plane occurs in a short distance of approximately 50 km. The seismic velocity anomalies and fault geometry suggest location-dependent piecewise faulting, which may cause the periodic M6 events in the Parkfield region.

  12. Simulations of Coulomb systems with slab geometry using an efficient 3D Ewald summation method.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Alexandre P; Girotto, Matheus; Levin, Yan

    2016-04-14

    We present a new approach to efficiently simulate electrolytes confined between infinite charged walls using a 3d Ewald summation method. The optimal performance is achieved by separating the electrostatic potential produced by the charged walls from the electrostatic potential of electrolyte. The electric field produced by the 3d periodic images of the walls is constant inside the simulation cell, with the field produced by the transverse images of the charged plates canceling out. The non-neutral confined electrolyte in an external potential can be simulated using 3d Ewald summation with a suitable renormalization of the electrostatic energy, to remove a divergence, and a correction that accounts for the conditional convergence of the resulting lattice sum. The new algorithm is at least an order of magnitude more rapid than the usual simulation methods for the slab geometry and can be further sped up by adopting a particle-particle particle-mesh approach. PMID:27083704

  13. Simulations of Coulomb systems with slab geometry using an efficient 3D Ewald summation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Alexandre P.; Girotto, Matheus; Levin, Yan

    2016-04-01

    We present a new approach to efficiently simulate electrolytes confined between infinite charged walls using a 3d Ewald summation method. The optimal performance is achieved by separating the electrostatic potential produced by the charged walls from the electrostatic potential of electrolyte. The electric field produced by the 3d periodic images of the walls is constant inside the simulation cell, with the field produced by the transverse images of the charged plates canceling out. The non-neutral confined electrolyte in an external potential can be simulated using 3d Ewald summation with a suitable renormalization of the electrostatic energy, to remove a divergence, and a correction that accounts for the conditional convergence of the resulting lattice sum. The new algorithm is at least an order of magnitude more rapid than the usual simulation methods for the slab geometry and can be further sped up by adopting a particle-particle particle-mesh approach.

  14. Effect of geometry on drug release from 3D printed tablets.

    PubMed

    Goyanes, Alvaro; Robles Martinez, Pamela; Buanz, Asma; Basit, Abdul W; Gaisford, Simon

    2015-10-30

    The aim of this work was to explore the feasibility of combining hot melt extrusion (HME) with 3D printing (3DP) technology, with a view to producing different shaped tablets which would be otherwise difficult to produce using traditional methods. A filament extruder was used to obtain approx. 4% paracetamol loaded filaments of polyvinyl alcohol with characteristics suitable for use in fused-deposition modelling 3DP. Five different tablet geometries were successfully 3D-printed-cube, pyramid, cylinder, sphere and torus. The printing process did not affect the stability of the drug. Drug release from the tablets was not dependent on the surface area but instead on surface area to volume ratio, indicating the influence that geometrical shape has on drug release. An erosion-mediated process controlled drug release. This work has demonstrated the potential of 3DP to manufacture tablet shapes of different geometries, many of which would be challenging to manufacture by powder compaction. PMID:25934428

  15. 3D FEM Geometry and Material Flow Optimization of Porthole-Die Extrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ceretti, Elisabetta; Mazzoni, Luca; Giardini, Claudio

    2007-05-17

    The aim of this work is to design and to improve the geometry of a porthole-die for the production of aluminum components by means of 3D FEM simulations. In fact, the use of finite element models will allow to investigate the effects of the die geometry (webs, extrusion cavity) on the material flow and on the stresses acting on the die so to reduce the die wear and to improve the tool life. The software used to perform the simulations was a commercial FEM code, Deform 3D. The technological data introduced in the FE model have been furnished by METRA S.p.A. Company, partner in this research. The results obtained have been considered valid and helpful by the Company for building a new optimized extrusion porthole-die.

  16. 3D geometry and evolutionary sequence of fold-thrust systems in NW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hao-Yun; Yang, Kenn-Ming; Hsieh, Ching-Yun; Yang, Tzu-Ruei; Chuang, Hui-Ju; Chen, Yi-Ju

    2015-04-01

    During the arc-continental collision from the Pliocene to the Pleistocene, two sets of fold-and-thrust system developed in NW Taiwan, a series of NNE-SSW striking low-angle thrust faults and their related folds (set A) and the other series of NEE-SWW striking high-angle thrust faults and their related folds (set B). The latter one cuts the former one and extends forelandward. The geometry of intersection and development sequence of both sets of structures are still in debate. In this study, we utilized a grid of seismic profiles to constrain our interpretation on the subsurface structural geometry of the two structural sets, which then was tested by structural restoration. We also made some simulations on the formation of fault-related folds by trishear modeling. The influence of normal fault reactivation on and the transitional relationships among the structures were investigated to establish an evolutionary sequence for the fold-and thrust systems of NW Taiwan. The strike of set A is NNE-SSW in the northern part of the study area but becomes N-S to the south. The location of the strike change is cut by a NEE-SWW high-angle fault of set B. According to the seismic interpretation, shallower anticline is asymmetric whereas deeper anticline is symmetric. The low-angle thrust of set A extends to the south and transfers into high-angle where it is cut by the high-angle fault of set B. The trishear model suggests that the shallower anticline resulted from low-angle fault thrusting in early period, whereas the deeper one was caused by basal detachment faulting in the late stage. Seismic interpretation also reveals an asymmetric and gentle fold cut by a high-angle thrust fault of set B. The result of trishear modeling indicates that the anticline was formed by slip along a high angle thrust, which is a low-angle fault in the deep but turns into high angle along a pre-existing normal fault up to the surface. In summary, the development of the shallower anticline of set A is controlled by low-angle thrusting while the deeper one by basal detachment faulting. The anticlines of set B are not only controlled by the high-angle faulting but also influenced by the deeper low-angle thrusting. The depth of low-angle thrust fault of set B in the foreland is shallower than that of basal detachment fault of set A near the orogen. Such spatial variation in thrust shape suggests that set B was formed earlier than set A and, therefore, both sets of thrust and related structures can be viewed as an out-of-sequence development.

  17. Lorentz boosted frame simulation of Laser wakefield acceleration in quasi-3D geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Peicheng; Xu, Xinlu; Davidson, Asher; Tableman, Adam; Meyers, Michael; Dalichaouch, Thamine; Tsung, Frank; Decyk, Viktor; Fiuza, Frederico; Vieira, Jorge; Fonseca, Ricardo; Lu, Wei; Silva, Luis; Mori, Warren

    2015-11-01

    We present results on a systematic study of Particle-In-Cell simulation of Laser Wakefield Acceleration (LWFA) by combining the Lorentz boosted frame technique with the quasi-3D algorithm, in which fields are expanded into azimuthal harmonics and solved on an r - z PIC grid keeping only a few harmonics. The studies emphasize on LWFA in the nonlinear blowout regime, which is more challenging from a computational standpoint. We first discuss strategies for eliminating the numerical Cerenkov instability (NCI) that inevitably arises due to the presence of plasma drifting across the grid with relativistic speeds in quasi-3D geometry. These strategies work for FFT based Maxwell solvers. We have incorporated these mitigation strategies into our PIC code OSIRIS by adding a new hybrid Yee-FFT Maxwell solver. With these strategies, OSIRIS can now be used to combine the quasi-3D algorithm and Lorentz boosted frame technique, and carry out high fidelity LWFA boosted frame simulation with no evidence of the NCI in the quasi-3D geometry, leading to unprecedented speedups. Work supported by NSF and DOE.

  18. Preliminary simulation of a M6.5 earthquake on the Seattle Fault using 3D finite-difference modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephenson, William J.; Frankel, Arthur D.

    2000-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite-difference simulation of a moderate-sized (M 6.5) thrust-faulting earthquake on the Seattle fault demonstrates the effects of the Seattle Basin on strong ground motion in the Puget lowland. The model area includes the cities of Seattle, Bremerton and Bellevue. We use a recently developed detailed 3D-velocity model of the Seattle Basin in these simulations. The model extended to 20-km depth and assumed rupture on a finite fault with random slip distribution. Preliminary results from simulations of frequencies 0.5 Hz and lower suggest amplification can occur at the surface of the Seattle Basin by the trapping of energy in the Quaternary sediments. Surface waves generated within the basin appear to contribute to amplification throughout the modeled region. Several factors apparently contribute to large ground motions in downtown Seattle: (1) radiation pattern and directivity from the rupture; (2) amplification and energy trapping within the Quaternary sediments; and (3) basin geometry and variation in depth of both Quaternary and Tertiary sediments

  19. 3D Bioprinting of complex channels-Effects of material, orientation, geometry, and cell embedding.

    PubMed

    Wüst, Silke; Müller, Ralph; Hofmann, Sandra

    2015-08-01

    Creating filled or hollow channels within 3D tissues has become increasingly important in tissue engineering. Channels can serve as vasculature enhancing medium perfusion or as conduits for nerve regeneration. The 3D biofabrication seems to be a promising method to generate these structures within 3D constructs layer-by-layer. In this study, geometry and interface of bioprinted channels were investigated with micro-computed tomography and fluorescent imaging. In filament printing, size and shape of printed channels are influenced by their orientation, which was analyzed by printing horizontally and vertically aligned channels, and by the ink, which was evaluated by comparing channels printed with an alginate-gelatin hydrogel or with an emulsion. The influence of geometry and cell-embedding in the hydrogel on feature size and shape was investigated by printing more complex channels. The generation of hollow channels, induced through leaching of a support phase, was monitored over time. Horizontally aligned channels provided 16× smaller cross-sectional areas than channels in vertical orientation. The smallest feature size of hydrogel filaments was twice as large compared to emulsion filaments. Feature size and shape depended on the geometry but did not alter when living cells were embedded. With that knowledge, channels can be consciously tailored to the particular needs. PMID:25524726

  20. Objective and subjective quality assessment of geometry compression of reconstructed 3D humans in a 3D virtual room

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekuria, Rufael; Cesar, Pablo; Doumanis, Ioannis; Frisiello, Antonella

    2015-09-01

    Compression of 3D object based video is relevant for 3D Immersive applications. Nevertheless, the perceptual aspects of the degradation introduced by codecs for meshes and point clouds are not well understood. In this paper we evaluate the subjective and objective degradations introduced by such codecs in a state of art 3D immersive virtual room. In the 3D immersive virtual room, users are captured with multiple cameras, and their surfaces are reconstructed as photorealistic colored/textured 3D meshes or point clouds. To test the perceptual effect of compression and transmission, we render degraded versions with different frame rates in different contexts (near/far) in the scene. A quantitative subjective study with 16 users shows that negligible distortion of decoded surfaces compared to the original reconstructions can be achieved in the 3D virtual room. In addition, a qualitative task based analysis in a full prototype field trial shows increased presence, emotion, user and state recognition of the reconstructed 3D Human representation compared to animated computer avatars.

  1. Fault geometries and location in sedimentary cover during basement-controlled deformation: An experimental investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Vendeville, B. )

    1988-08-01

    Recent regional seismic and field investigations in the North Sea and the Gulf of Suez have shown that extension is partly controlled by reactivation of inherited basement structures and their upward propagation into the overlying sedimentary rocks. Basement control is expected to induce complex fault patterns into the sedimentary cover, especially if it includes weak stratigraphic horizons such as evaporites, marls, or shales. Relations between basement and cover fault geometries have been studied using scaled analog experiments and synthetic seismograms, which were compared with field and seismic data. Experiments were conducted for different dips of the basement fault and for a variety of rheological behaviors of the sedimentary sequence, ranging from purely ductile to entirely brittle. Ductile rocks were modeled using perfectly fluid silicon putty; dry sand simulated brittle layers. Experimental results show that both reverse and normal faults may occur, and that fault location, orientation, and development strongly depend on the rheology of the sedimentary cover. Basement-induced extension of a brittle cover induces transient high-angle reverse faults and late normal faults which both root into the basement fault at depth. Models with a ductile layer at the basement-cover interface show a permanent reverse fault above the basement fault, a basinward tilted block, and a rear graben structure located in the uplifted block. The geometry of transfer zones has also been investigated using 3-D models of interaction between tear faults and basement faults. Models show the development of arcuate structures and point out the influence of lateral boundary effects on the orientation of shallow normal and reverse faults.

  2. 3D Geometry and Motion Estimations of Maneuvering Targets for Interferometric ISAR With Sparse Aperture.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gang; Xing, Mengdao; Xia, Xiang-Gen; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Qianqian; Bao, Zheng

    2016-05-01

    In the current scenario of high-resolution inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging, the non-cooperative targets may have strong maneuverability, which tends to cause time-variant Doppler modulation and imaging plane in the echoed data. Furthermore, it is still a challenge to realize ISAR imaging of maneuvering targets from sparse aperture (SA) data. In this paper, we focus on the problem of 3D geometry and motion estimations of maneuvering targets for interferometric ISAR (InISAR) with SA. For a target of uniformly accelerated rotation, the rotational modulation in echo is formulated as chirp sensing code under a chirp-Fourier dictionary to represent the maneuverability. In particular, a joint multi-channel imaging approach is developed to incorporate the multi-channel data and treat the multi-channel ISAR image formation as a joint-sparsity constraint optimization. Then, a modified orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP) algorithm is employed to solve the optimization problem to produce high-resolution range-Doppler (RD) images and chirp parameter estimation. The 3D target geometry and the motion estimations are followed by using the acquired RD images and chirp parameters. Herein, a joint estimation approach of 3D geometry and rotation motion is presented to realize outlier removing and error reduction. In comparison with independent single-channel processing, the proposed joint multi-channel imaging approach performs better in 2D imaging, 3D imaging, and motion estimation. Finally, experiments using both simulated and measured data are performed to confirm the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. PMID:26930684

  3. Dynamic earthquake rupture simulations on nonplanar faults embedded in 3D geometrically complex, heterogeneous elastic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duru, Kenneth; Dunham, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic propagation of shear ruptures on a frictional interface in an elastic solid is a useful idealization of natural earthquakes. The conditions relating discontinuities in particle velocities across fault zones and tractions acting on the fault are often expressed as nonlinear friction laws. The corresponding initial boundary value problems are both numerically and computationally challenging. In addition, seismic waves generated by earthquake ruptures must be propagated for many wavelengths away from the fault. Therefore, reliable and efficient numerical simulations require both provably stable and high order accurate numerical methods. We present a high order accurate finite difference method for: a) enforcing nonlinear friction laws, in a consistent and provably stable manner, suitable for efficient explicit time integration; b) dynamic propagation of earthquake ruptures along nonplanar faults; and c) accurate propagation of seismic waves in heterogeneous media with free surface topography. We solve the first order form of the 3D elastic wave equation on a boundary-conforming curvilinear mesh, in terms of particle velocities and stresses that are collocated in space and time, using summation-by-parts (SBP) finite difference operators in space. Boundary and interface conditions are imposed weakly using penalties. By deriving semi-discrete energy estimates analogous to the continuous energy estimates we prove numerical stability. The finite difference stencils used in this paper are sixth order accurate in the interior and third order accurate close to the boundaries. However, the method is applicable to any spatial operator with a diagonal norm satisfying the SBP property. Time stepping is performed with a 4th order accurate explicit low storage Runge-Kutta scheme, thus yielding a globally fourth order accurate method in both space and time. We show numerical simulations on band limited self-similar fractal faults revealing the complexity of rupture dynamics on rough faults.

  4. Mapping 3-D functional capillary geometry in rat skeletal muscle in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Graham M; Milkovich, Stephanie; Goldman, Daniel; Ellis, Christopher G

    2012-02-01

    We have developed a novel mapping software package to reconstruct microvascular networks in three dimensions (3-D) from in vivo video images for use in blood flow and O2 transport modeling. An intravital optical imaging system was used to collect video sequences of blood flow in microvessels at different depths in the tissue. Functional images of vessels were produced from the video sequences and were processed using automated edge tracking software to yield location and geometry data for construction of the 3-D network. The same video sequences were analyzed for hemodynamic and O2 saturation data from individual capillaries in the network. Simple user-driven commands allowed the connection of vessel segments at bifurcations, and semiautomated registration enabled the tracking of vessels across multiple focal planes and fields of view. The reconstructed networks can be rotated and manipulated in 3-D to verify vessel connections and continuity. Hemodynamic and O2 saturation measurements made in vivo can be indexed to corresponding vessels and visualized using colorized maps of the vascular geometry. Vessels in each reconstruction are saved as text-based files that can be easily imported into flow or O2 transport models with complete geometry, hemodynamic, and O2 transport conditions. The results of digital morphometric analysis of seven microvascular networks showed mean capillary diameters and overall capillary density consistent with previous findings using histology and corrosion cast techniques. The described mapping software is a valuable tool for the quantification of in vivo microvascular geometry, hemodynamics, and oxygenation, thus providing rich data sets for experiment-based computational models. PMID:22140042

  5. The 3D geometry of regional-scale dolerite saucer complexes and their feeders in the Secunda Complex, Karoo Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coetzee, André; Kisters, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Dolerites in the Karoo Basin of South Africa commonly represent kilometre-scale, interconnected saucer-shaped structures that consist of inner sills, bounded by inclined sheets connected to stratigraphically higher outer sills. Based on information from over 3000 boreholes and mining operations extending over an area of ca. 500 km2 and covering a > 3 km vertical section from Karoo strata into underlying basement rocks, this paper presents the results of a 3D modelling exercise that describes the geometry and spatial relationships of a regional-scale saucer complex, locally referred to as the number 8 sill, from the Secunda (coal mine) Complex in the northern parts of the Karoo Basin. The composite number 8 sill complex consists of three main dolerite saucers (dolerites A to C). These dolerite saucers are hosted by the Karoo Supergroup and the connectivity and geometry of the saucers support a lateral, sill-feeding-sill relationship between dolerite saucers A, B and C. The saucers are underlain and fed by a shallowly-dipping sheet (dolerite D) in the basement rocks below the Karoo sequence. The 3D geometric strata model agrees well with experimental results of saucer formation from underlying feeders in sedimentary basins, but demonstrates a more intricate relationship where a single feeder can give rise to several split level saucers in one regionally extensive saucer complex. More localised dome- or ridge-shape protrusions are common in the flat lying sill parts of the regional-scale saucers. We suggest a mode of emplacement for these kilometre-scale dome- and ridge structures having formed as a result of lobate magma flow processes. Magma lobes, propagating in different directions ahead of the main magma sheet, undergo successive episodes of lobe arrest and inflation. The inflation of lobes initiates failure of the overlying strata and the formation of curved faults. Magma exploiting these faults transgresses the stratigraphy and coalesces to form a ring-like inclined sheet that subsequently feeds a central flat lying roof at a higher stratigraphic level. On a regional scale, the kilometre-size saucer geometries reflect the lateral migration and transport of mafic magmas close to or at the level of the Karoo Supergroup, fed by only isolated feeders in the basement. On a more local scale, the complex internal geometries within saucers mainly reflect the flow pattern of the magmas and wall-rock accommodation structures.

  6. IM3D: A parallel Monte Carlo code for efficient simulations of primary radiation displacements and damage in 3D geometry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong Gang; Yang, Yang; Short, Michael P.; Ding, Ze Jun; Zeng, Zhi; Li, Ju

    2015-01-01

    SRIM-like codes have limitations in describing general 3D geometries, for modeling radiation displacements and damage in nanostructured materials. A universal, computationally efficient and massively parallel 3D Monte Carlo code, IM3D, has been developed with excellent parallel scaling performance. IM3D is based on fast indexing of scattering integrals and the SRIM stopping power database, and allows the user a choice of Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG) or Finite Element Triangle Mesh (FETM) method for constructing 3D shapes and microstructures. For 2D films and multilayers, IM3D perfectly reproduces SRIM results, and can be ∼102 times faster in serial execution and > 104 times faster using parallel computation. For 3D problems, it provides a fast approach for analyzing the spatial distributions of primary displacements and defect generation under ion irradiation. Herein we also provide a detailed discussion of our open-source collision cascade physics engine, revealing the true meaning and limitations of the “Quick Kinchin-Pease” and “Full Cascades” options. The issues of femtosecond to picosecond timescales in defining displacement versus damage, the limitation of the displacements per atom (DPA) unit in quantifying radiation damage (such as inadequacy in quantifying degree of chemical mixing), are discussed. PMID:26658477

  7. IM3D: A parallel Monte Carlo code for efficient simulations of primary radiation displacements and damage in 3D geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong Gang; Yang, Yang; Short, Michael P.; Ding, Ze Jun; Zeng, Zhi; Li, Ju

    2015-12-01

    SRIM-like codes have limitations in describing general 3D geometries, for modeling radiation displacements and damage in nanostructured materials. A universal, computationally efficient and massively parallel 3D Monte Carlo code, IM3D, has been developed with excellent parallel scaling performance. IM3D is based on fast indexing of scattering integrals and the SRIM stopping power database, and allows the user a choice of Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG) or Finite Element Triangle Mesh (FETM) method for constructing 3D shapes and microstructures. For 2D films and multilayers, IM3D perfectly reproduces SRIM results, and can be ∼102 times faster in serial execution and > 104 times faster using parallel computation. For 3D problems, it provides a fast approach for analyzing the spatial distributions of primary displacements and defect generation under ion irradiation. Herein we also provide a detailed discussion of our open-source collision cascade physics engine, revealing the true meaning and limitations of the “Quick Kinchin-Pease” and “Full Cascades” options. The issues of femtosecond to picosecond timescales in defining displacement versus damage, the limitation of the displacements per atom (DPA) unit in quantifying radiation damage (such as inadequacy in quantifying degree of chemical mixing), are discussed.

  8. IM3D: A parallel Monte Carlo code for efficient simulations of primary radiation displacements and damage in 3D geometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong Gang; Yang, Yang; Short, Michael P; Ding, Ze Jun; Zeng, Zhi; Li, Ju

    2015-01-01

    SRIM-like codes have limitations in describing general 3D geometries, for modeling radiation displacements and damage in nanostructured materials. A universal, computationally efficient and massively parallel 3D Monte Carlo code, IM3D, has been developed with excellent parallel scaling performance. IM3D is based on fast indexing of scattering integrals and the SRIM stopping power database, and allows the user a choice of Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG) or Finite Element Triangle Mesh (FETM) method for constructing 3D shapes and microstructures. For 2D films and multilayers, IM3D perfectly reproduces SRIM results, and can be ∼10(2) times faster in serial execution and > 10(4) times faster using parallel computation. For 3D problems, it provides a fast approach for analyzing the spatial distributions of primary displacements and defect generation under ion irradiation. Herein we also provide a detailed discussion of our open-source collision cascade physics engine, revealing the true meaning and limitations of the "Quick Kinchin-Pease" and "Full Cascades" options. The issues of femtosecond to picosecond timescales in defining displacement versus damage, the limitation of the displacements per atom (DPA) unit in quantifying radiation damage (such as inadequacy in quantifying degree of chemical mixing), are discussed. PMID:26658477

  9. 3D Digital Surveying and Modelling of Cave Geometry: Application to Paleolithic Rock Art

    PubMed Central

    González-Aguilera, Diego; Muñoz-Nieto, Angel; Gómez-Lahoz, Javier; Herrero-Pascual, Jesus; Gutierrez-Alonso, Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    3D digital surveying and modelling of cave geometry represents a relevant approach for research, management and preservation of our cultural and geological legacy. In this paper, a multi-sensor approach based on a terrestrial laser scanner, a high-resolution digital camera and a total station is presented. Two emblematic caves of Paleolithic human occupation and situated in northern Spain, “Las Caldas” and “Peña de Candamo”, have been chosen to put in practise this approach. As a result, an integral and multi-scalable 3D model is generated which may allow other scientists, pre-historians, geologists…, to work on two different levels, integrating different Paleolithic Art datasets: (1) a basic level based on the accurate and metric support provided by the laser scanner; and (2) a advanced level using the range and image-based modelling. PMID:22399958

  10. 3D Digital Surveying and Modelling of Cave Geometry: Application to Paleolithic Rock Art.

    PubMed

    González-Aguilera, Diego; Muñoz-Nieto, Angel; Gómez-Lahoz, Javier; Herrero-Pascual, Jesus; Gutierrez-Alonso, Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    3D digital surveying and modelling of cave geometry represents a relevant approach for research, management and preservation of our cultural and geological legacy. In this paper, a multi-sensor approach based on a terrestrial laser scanner, a high-resolution digital camera and a total station is presented. Two emblematic caves of Paleolithic human occupation and situated in northern Spain, "Las Caldas" and "Peña de Candamo", have been chosen to put in practise this approach. As a result, an integral and multi-scalable 3D model is generated which may allow other scientists, pre-historians, geologists…, to work on two different levels, integrating different Paleolithic Art datasets: (1) a basic level based on the accurate and metric support provided by the laser scanner; and (2) a advanced level using the range and image-based modelling. PMID:22399958

  11. Real-time 3D target tracking and localization for arbitrary camera geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Ashutosh P.; Abousleman, Glen P.; Si, Jennie

    2007-04-01

    In this paper, we present a real-time 3-D tracking system which using two cameras with substantially arbitrary geometries. The primary goal of the proposed system is to capture incoming stereo vision feeds, examine and compare targets across the cameras, and using a derived camera calibration matrix, project them in real-world 3-D coordinates, in real time. The system is divided into two main components: Camera calibration, and tracking and cross-camera object matching. In the proposed system, algorithms such as 8-point feature matching form the basis for the camera calibration/pose estimation mechanism, while color histogram forms a robust feature for tracking across-camera The proposed system is robust and applicable to heterogeneous moving objects such as people, vehicles, and boats.

  12. Fault geometries in basement-induced wrench faulting under different initial stress states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naylor, M. A.; Mandl, G.; Supesteijn, C. H. K.

    Scaled sandbox experiments were used to generate models for relative ages, dip, strike and three-dimensional shape of faults in basement-controlled wrench faulting. The basic fault sequence runs from early en échelon Riedel shears and splay faults through 'lower-angle' shears to P shears. The Riedel shears are concave upwards and define a tulip structure in cross-section. In three dimensions, each Riedel shear has a helicoidal form. The sequence of faults and three-dimensional geometry are rationalized in terms of the prevailing stress field and Coulomb-Mohr theory of shear failure. The stress state in the sedimentary overburden before wrenching begins has a substantial influence on the fault geometries and on the final complexity of the fault zone. With the maximum compressive stress (∂ 1) initially parallel to the basement fault (transtension), Riedel shears are only slightly en échelon, sub-parallel to the basement fault, steeply dipping with a reduced helicoidal aspect. Conversely, with ∂ 1 initially perpendicular to the basement fault (transpression), Riedel shears are strongly oblique to the basement fault strike, have lower dips and an exaggerated helicoidal form; the final fault zone is both wide and complex. We find good agreement between the models and both mechanical theory and natural examples of wrench faulting.

  13. Reliable and Fault-Tolerant Software-Defined Network Operations Scheme for Remote 3D Printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongkyun; Gil, Joon-Min

    2015-03-01

    The recent wide expansion of applicable three-dimensional (3D) printing and software-defined networking (SDN) technologies has led to a great deal of attention being focused on efficient remote control of manufacturing processes. SDN is a renowned paradigm for network softwarization, which has helped facilitate remote manufacturing in association with high network performance, since SDN is designed to control network paths and traffic flows, guaranteeing improved quality of services by obtaining network requests from end-applications on demand through the separated SDN controller or control plane. However, current SDN approaches are generally focused on the controls and automation of the networks, which indicates that there is a lack of management plane development designed for a reliable and fault-tolerant SDN environment. Therefore, in addition to the inherent advantage of SDN, this paper proposes a new software-defined network operations center (SD-NOC) architecture to strengthen the reliability and fault-tolerance of SDN in terms of network operations and management in particular. The cooperation and orchestration between SDN and SD-NOC are also introduced for the SDN failover processes based on four principal SDN breakdown scenarios derived from the failures of the controller, SDN nodes, and connected links. The abovementioned SDN troubles significantly reduce the network reachability to remote devices (e.g., 3D printers, super high-definition cameras, etc.) and the reliability of relevant control processes. Our performance consideration and analysis results show that the proposed scheme can shrink operations and management overheads of SDN, which leads to the enhancement of responsiveness and reliability of SDN for remote 3D printing and control processes.

  14. Are climate signals observed in the 3-D ice surface geometry of mountain glaciers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, R.; Clark, C.

    2013-12-01

    Mountain glaciers are among the fastest responding components of the cryosphere to climatic perturbations and are thus an essential parameter in climate system monitoring. The intrinsic link between glacier mass balance and the organisation of ice flow vectors result in a situation where glacier surface profiles tend towards differing geometries in the accumulation and ablation area. These differing geometries can be readily explained, as a function of the mass balance budget, by principles of continuum mechanics and the need for glaciers to conserve mass. However, little work has been done to provide empirical evidence to link these distinct changes in ice surface geometry with observed glacier climate signals such as ELA and mass balance. With the use of remotely sensed optical imagery, global DEM datasets and geospatial methods, we present empirical observations that assess the extent to which ice surface morphology reflects the current state of mountain glaciers in a changing climate. Despite the complex relationship between mass balance, ice flow dynamics and climate, the findings suggest that observations of 3-D ice surface geometry may provide significant insights into how glaciers are responding to climate perturbations.

  15. The internal geometry of salt structures - A first look using 3D seismic data from the Zechstein of the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Gent, Heijn; Urai, Janos L.; de Keijzer, Martin

    2011-03-01

    We present a first look at the large-scale, complexly folded and faulted internal structure of Zechstein salt bodies in NW Europe using 3D reflection seismic reflection data from two surveys on the Groningen High and the Cleaver Bank High. We focus on a relatively brittle, folded and boudinaged, claystone-carbonate-anhydrite layer (the Z3 stringer) enclosed in ductile salt. A first classification of the structures is presented and compared with observations from salt mines and analogue and numerical models. Z3 stringers not only are reservoirs for hydrocarbons but can also present a serious drilling problem in some areas. Results of this study could provide the basis for better prediction of zones of drilling problems. More generally, the techniques presented here can be used to predict the internal structure of salt bodies, to estimate the geometry of economic deposits of all kinds and locate zones suitable for storage caverns. Structures observed include an extensive network of zones with increased thickness of the stringer. These we infer to have formed by early diagenesis, karstification, gravitational sliding and associated local sedimentation. Later, this template was deformed into large-scale folds and boudins during salt tectonics. Salt flow was rarely plane strain, producing complex fold and boudin geometries. Deformation was further complicated by the stronger zones of increased thickness, which led to strongly non-cylindrical structures. We present some indications that the thicker zones also influence the locations of later suprasalt structures, suggesting a feedback between the early internal evolution of this salt giant and later salt tectonics. This study opens the possibility to study the internal structure of the Zechstein and other salt giants in 3D using this technique, exposing a previously poorly known structure which is comparable in size and complexity to the internal parts of some orogens.

  16. Predicting band structure of 3D mechanical metamaterials with complex geometry via XFEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jifeng; Li, Ying; Liu, Wing Kam

    2015-04-01

    Band structure characterizes the most important property of mechanical metamaterials. However, predicting the band structure of 3D metamaterials with complex microstructures through direct numerical simulation (DNS) is computationally inefficient due to the complexity of meshing. To overcome this issue, an extended finite element method (XFEM)-based method is developed to predict 3D metamaterial band structures. Since the microstructure and material interface are implicitly resolved by the level-set function embedded in the XFEM formulation, a non-conforming (such as uniform) mesh is used in the proposed method to avoid the difficulties in meshing complex geometries. The accuracy and mesh convergence of the proposed method have been validated and verified by studying the band structure of a spherical particle embedded in a cube and comparing the results with DNS. The band structures of 3D metamaterials with different microstructures have been studied using the proposed method with the same finite element mesh, indicating the flexibility of this method. This XFEM-based method opens new opportunities in design and optimization of mechanical metamaterials with target functions, e.g. location and width of the band gap, by eliminating the iterative procedure of re-building and re-meshing microstructures that is required by classical DNS type of methods.

  17. 3D Simulation of Velocity Profile of Turbulent Flow in Open Channel with Complex Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamel, Benoumessad; Ilhem, Kriba; Ali, Fourar; Abdelbaki, Djebaili

    Simulation of open channel flow or river flow presents unique challenge to numerical simulators, which is widely used in the applications of computational fluid dynamics. The prediction is extremely difficult because the flow in open channel is usually transient and turbulent, the geometry is irregular and curved, and the free-surface elevation is varying with time. The results from a 3D non-linear k- ɛ turbulence model are presented to investigate the flow structure, the velocity distribution and mass transport process in a meandering compound open channel and a straight open channel. The 3D numerical model for calculating flow is set up in cylinder coordinates in order to calculate the complex boundary channel. The finite volume method is used to disperse the governing equations and the SIMPLE algorithm is applied to acquire the coupling of velocity and pressure. The non-linear k- ɛ turbulent model has good useful value because of taking into account the anisotropy and not increasing the computational time. The main contributions of this study are developing a numerical method that can be applied to predict the flow in river bends with various bend curvatures and different width-depth ratios. This study demonstrates that the 3D non-linear k- ɛ turbulence model can be used for analyzing flow structures, the velocity distribution and pollutant transport in the complex boundary open channel, this model is applicable for real river and wetland problem.

  18. SU-E-J-128: 3D Surface Reconstruction of a Patient Using Epipolar Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kotoku, J; Nakabayashi, S; Kumagai, S; Ishibashi, T; Kobayashi, T; Haga, A; Saotome, N; Arai, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To obtain a 3D surface data of a patient in a non-invasive way can substantially reduce the effort for the registration of patient in radiation therapy. To achieve this goal, we introduced the multiple view stereo technique, which is known to be used in a 'photo tourism' on the internet. Methods: 70 Images were taken with a digital single-lens reflex camera from different angles and positions. The camera positions and angles were inferred later in the reconstruction step. A sparse 3D reconstruction model was locating by SIFT features, which is robust for rotation and shift variance, in each image. We then found a set of correspondences between pairs of images by computing the fundamental matrix using the eight-point algorithm with RANSAC. After the pair matching, we optimized the parameter including camera positions to minimize the reprojection error by use of bundle adjustment technique (non-linear optimization). As a final step, we performed dense reconstruction and associate a color with each point using the library of PMVS. Results: Surface data were reconstructed well by visual inspection. The human skin is reconstructed well, althogh the reconstruction was time-consuming for direct use in daily clinical practice. Conclusion: 3D reconstruction using multi view stereo geometry is a promising tool for reducing the effort of patient setup. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI(25861128)

  19. Crustal 3-D geometry of the Kristineberg area (Sweden) with implications on VMS deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skyttä, P.; Bauer, T.; Hermansson, T.; Dehghannejad, M.; Juhlin, C.; García Juanatey, M.; Hübert, J.; Weihed, P.

    2013-10-01

    Structural analysis of the Palaeoproterozoic volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) hosting Kristineberg area, Sweden, constrained by existing magnetotelluric (MT) and seismic reflection data, reveals that the complex geometry characterized by non-cylindrical antiformal structures is due to transpression along the termination of a major high-strain zone. Similar orientations of the host rock deformation fabrics and the VMS ore lenses indicate that the present-day geometry of the complex VMS deposits in the Kristineberg area may be attributed to tectonic transposition. The tectonic transposition was dominantly controlled by reverse shearing and related upright to overturned folding, with increasing contribution of strike-slip shearing and sub-horizontal flow towards greater crustal depths. Furthermore, the northerly dip of the previously recognized subsurface crustal reflector within the Kristineberg area is attributed to formation of crustal compartments with opposite polarities within the scale of the whole Skellefte district. The resulting structural framework of the main geological units is visualized in a 3-D model which is available as a 3-D PDF document through the publication website.

  20. Development of an algorithm to measure defect geometry using a 3D laser scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilambi, S.; Tipton, S. M.

    2012-08-01

    Current fatigue life prediction models for coiled tubing (CT) require accurate measurements of the defect geometry. Three-dimensional (3D) laser imaging has shown promise toward becoming a nondestructive, non-contacting method of surface defect characterization. Laser imaging provides a detailed photographic image of a flaw, in addition to a detailed 3D surface map from which its critical dimensions can be measured. This paper describes algorithms to determine defect characteristics, specifically depth, width, length and projected cross-sectional area. Curve-fitting methods were compared and implicit algebraic fits have higher probability of convergence compared to explicit geometric fits. Among the algebraic fits, the Taubin circle fit has the least error. The algorithm was able to extract the dimensions of the flaw geometry from the scanned data of CT to within a tolerance of about 0.127 mm, close to the tolerance specified for the laser scanner itself, compared to measurements made using traveling microscopes. The algorithm computes the projected surface area of the flaw, which could previously only be estimated from the dimension measurements and the assumptions made about cutter shape. Although shadows compromised the accuracy of the shape characterization, especially for deep and narrow flaws, the results indicate that the algorithm with laser scanner can be used for non-destructive evaluation of CT in the oil field industry. Further work is needed to improve accuracy, to eliminate shadow effects and to reduce radial deviation.

  1. Image-based reconstruction of 3D myocardial infarct geometry for patient specific applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukwatta, Eranga; Rajchl, Martin; White, James; Pashakhanloo, Farhad; Herzka, Daniel A.; McVeigh, Elliot; Lardo, Albert C.; Trayanova, Natalia; Vadakkumpadan, Fijoy

    2015-03-01

    Accurate reconstruction of the three-dimensional (3D) geometry of a myocardial infarct from two-dimensional (2D) multi-slice image sequences has important applications in the clinical evaluation and treatment of patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy. However, this reconstruction is challenging because the resolution of common clinical scans used to acquire infarct structure, such as short-axis, late-gadolinium enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance (LGE-CMR) images, is low, especially in the out-of-plane direction. In this study, we propose a novel technique to reconstruct the 3D infarct geometry from low resolution clinical images. Our methodology is based on a function called logarithm of odds (LogOdds), which allows the broader class of linear combinations in the LogOdds vector space as opposed to being limited to only a convex combination in the binary label space. To assess the efficacy of the method, we used high-resolution LGE-CMR images of 36 human hearts in vivo, and 3 canine hearts ex vivo. The infarct was manually segmented in each slice of the acquired images, and the manually segmented data were downsampled to clinical resolution. The developed method was then applied to the downsampled image slices, and the resulting reconstructions were compared with the manually segmented data. Several existing reconstruction techniques were also implemented, and compared with the proposed method. The results show that the LogOdds method significantly outperforms all the other tested methods in terms of region overlap.

  2. Bispectrum feature extraction of gearbox faults based on nonnegative Tucker3 decomposition with 3D calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haijun; Xu, Feiyun; Zhao, Jun'ai; Jia, Minping; Hu, Jianzhong; Huang, Peng

    2013-11-01

    Nonnegative Tucker3 decomposition(NTD) has attracted lots of attentions for its good performance in 3D data array analysis. However, further research is still necessary to solve the problems of overfitting and slow convergence under the anharmonic vibration circumstance occurred in the field of mechanical fault diagnosis. To decompose a large-scale tensor and extract available bispectrum feature, a method of conjugating Choi-Williams kernel function with Gauss-Newton Cartesian product based on nonnegative Tucker3 decomposition(NTD_EDF) is investigated. The complexity of the proposed method is reduced from o( n N lg n) in 3D spaces to o( R 1 R 2 nlg n) in 1D vectors due to its low rank form of the Tucker-product convolution. Meanwhile, a simultaneously updating algorithm is given to overcome the overfitting, slow convergence and low efficiency existing in the conventional one-by-one updating algorithm. Furthermore, the technique of spectral phase analysis for quadratic coupling estimation is used to explain the feature spectrum extracted from the gearbox fault data by the proposed method in detail. The simulated and experimental results show that the sparser and more inerratic feature distribution of basis images can be obtained with core tensor by the NTD_EDF method compared with the one by the other methods in bispectrum feature extraction, and a legible fault expression can also be performed by power spectral density(PSD) function. Besides, the deviations of successive relative error(DSRE) of NTD_EDF achieves 81.66 dB against 15.17 dB by beta-divergences based on NTD(NTD_Beta) and the time-cost of NTD_EDF is only 129.3 s, which is far less than 1 747.9 s by hierarchical alternative least square based on NTD (NTD_HALS). The NTD_EDF method proposed not only avoids the data overfitting and improves the computation efficiency but also can be used to extract more inerratic and sparser bispectrum features of the gearbox fault.

  3. Fault core and slip zone geometry, wear and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shervais, K.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    The static strength and dynamic shear resistance of seismic faults depend on composition, shape, spatial variability, and distribution of asperities on fault surfaces. To characterize these qualities in a paleoseismic fault, we studied the Boyd Fault, a Laramide thrust exposed in crystalline rocks south of Palm Desert, CA. High-resolution digital elevation models of outcrops were rectified with fault strike and dip and used to map 62 m of exposed fault core in the field at three exposures over 175 m along fault strike. The fault core exhibits stratified layers of fault gouge of varying thicknesses with crosscutting relationships and discontinuous layers. One layer is interpreted as the most recent slip event because it crosscuts all the others and has injection veins branching into both the footwall and hanging wall. Microstructures and the presence of gouge injections indicate fluidization of the gouge throughout the fault slip zone during seismic slip. We compared the geometry of the most recent slip event to the fault core as a whole to constrain how the characteristics of the fault evolve with displacement. We found four "thresholds": a. the length scales at which the variance of 1. total fault core thickness and 2. the most recent gouge layer thickness do not fluctuate and remain stable, via experimental semivariograms; b. the length scale at which wear is scale dependent, via power spectral density (PSD) calculations from cross sections through the most recent layer and the fault core; and c. the scale at which fault wear transitions from inelastic to elastic, via the maximum length of hanging wall asperity clasts in the fault gouge. By comparing the most recent event with the core as a whole, these results indicate that faults smooth with displacement, but clast compositions provide evidence of preferential wear due to wall rock composition differences. In addition, slip zone thickness decreases and becomes less variable. We suggest the correlation length scale in the slip zone thickness defines the length scale of an asperity on the fault surface. Overall, our results indicate an evolution of the size and distribution of asperities, implying dynamic shear strength and the static strength of the fault also vary with increasing displacement.

  4. Amoeboid migration mode adaption in quasi-3D spatial density gradients of varying lattice geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelashvili, Mari; Emmert, Martin; Hodeck, Kai F.; Heinrich, Doris

    2014-07-01

    Cell migration processes are controlled by sensitive interaction with external cues such as topographic structures of the cell’s environment. Here, we present systematically controlled assays to investigate the specific effects of spatial density and local geometry of topographic structure on amoeboid migration of Dictyostelium discoideum cells. This is realized by well-controlled fabrication of quasi-3D pillar fields exhibiting a systematic variation of inter-pillar distance and pillar lattice geometry. By time-resolved local mean-squared displacement analysis of amoeboid migration, we can extract motility parameters in order to elucidate the details of amoeboid migration mechanisms and consolidate them in a two-state contact-controlled motility model, distinguishing directed and random phases. Specifically, we find that directed pillar-to-pillar runs are found preferably in high pillar density regions, and cells in directed motion states sense pillars as attractive topographic stimuli. In contrast, cell motion in random probing states is inhibited by high pillar density, where pillars act as obstacles for cell motion. In a gradient spatial density, these mechanisms lead to topographic guidance of cells, with a general trend towards a regime of inter-pillar spacing close to the cell diameter. In locally anisotropic pillar environments, cell migration is often found to be damped due to competing attraction by different pillars in close proximity and due to lack of other potential stimuli in the vicinity of the cell. Further, we demonstrate topographic cell guidance reflecting the lattice geometry of the quasi-3D environment by distinct preferences in migration direction. Our findings allow to specifically control amoeboid cell migration by purely topographic effects and thus, to induce active cell guidance. These tools hold prospects for medical applications like improved wound treatment, or invasion assays for immune cells.

  5. Modeling the 3D geometry of the cortical surface with genetic ancestry.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chun Chieh; Bartsch, Hauke; Schork, Andrew J; Chen, Chi-Hua; Wang, Yunpeng; Lo, Min-Tzu; Brown, Timothy T; Kuperman, Joshua M; Hagler, Donald J; Schork, Nicholas J; Jernigan, Terry L; Dale, Anders M

    2015-08-01

    Knowing how the human brain is shaped by migration and admixture is a critical step in studying human evolution [1, 2], as well as in preventing the bias of hidden population structure in brain research [3, 4]. Yet, the neuroanatomical differences engendered by population history are still poorly understood. Most of the inference relies on craniometric measurements, because morphology of the brain is presumed to be the neurocranium's main shaping force before bones are fused and ossified [5]. Although studies have shown that the shape variations of cranial bones are consistent with populationhistory [6-8], it is unknown how much human ancestry information is retained by the human cortical surface. In our group's previous study, we found that area measures of cortical surface and total brain volumes of individuals of European descent in the United States correlate significantly with their ancestral geographic locations in Europe [9]. Here, we demonstrate that the three-dimensional geometry of cortical surface is highly predictive of individuals' genetic ancestry in West Africa, Europe, East Asia, and America, even though their genetic background has been shaped by multiple waves of migratory and admixture events. The geometry of the cortical surface contains richer information about ancestry than the areal variability of the cortical surface, independent of total brain volumes. Besidesexplaining more ancestry variance than other brain imaging measurements, the 3D geometry of the cortical surface further characterizes distinct regional patterns in the folding and gyrification of the human brain associated with each ancestral lineage. PMID:26166778

  6. 3D Image Tour of the Hayward Fault in the East Bay, San Francisco Bay Region, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffer, P.

    2007-12-01

    A 3D image tour of the Hayward Fault begins at its northern land-based terminus at Point Pinole from where it continues northward under the waters of San Pablo Bay. From Point Pinole, the Hayward Fault extends southward for about 90 kilometers through the urbanized landscape of the East Bay region, passing through the cities of Richmond, Berkeley, Oakland, San Leandro, Hayward, Fremont, and other communities. At its southern end, the fault forms a series of oblique reverse faults, but at depth it connects with the Calaveras Fault as a through-going structure along the western foothills of the Diablo Range east of the greater San Jose area. This presentation focuses on access to the Hayward Fault in public places where features impacted by active fault creep can be viewed. Features include offset curbs, fractures in sidewalks, parking areas, buildings, and damage to other infrastructure in the active fault zone. Additional images highlight landscape features and historic landmarks along the fault, including those that were impacted by the 1868 Hayward earthquake, and those that were or were engineered both with and without consideration of the location of the fault. Earthquake data and geologic interpretations of the subsurface along the fault zone are also presented. This presentation, and an associated website, is for educational audiences with the intent of promoting public awareness and earthquake preparedness. This work is part of the ongoing outreach and public education efforts by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the 1868 Hayward Earthquake Alliance in anticipation of the 140th anniversary of the great earthquake. The use of 3D imagery enhances the educational value of the presentation and provides a unique perspective on the subject matter. Red-and-cyan 3D viewing glasses will be available at the presentation.

  7. PDE constrained optimization of electrical defibrillation in a 3D ventricular slice geometry.

    PubMed

    Chamakuri, Nagaiah; Kunisch, Karl; Plank, Gernot

    2016-04-01

    A computational study of an optimal control approach for cardiac defibrillation in a 3D geometry is presented. The cardiac bioelectric activity at the tissue and bath volumes is modeled by the bidomain model equations. The model includes intramural fiber rotation, axially symmetric around the fiber direction, and anisotropic conductivity coefficients, which are extracted from a histological image. The dynamics of the ionic currents are based on the regularized Mitchell-Schaeffer model. The controls enter in the form of electrodes, which are placed at the boundary of the bath volume with the goal of dampening undesired arrhythmias. The numerical optimization is based on Newton techniques. We demonstrated the parallel architecture environment for the computation of potentials on multidomains and for the higher order optimization techniques. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26249168

  8. Frame-by-frame 3D catheter tracking methods for an inverse geometry cardiac interventional system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speidel, Michael A.; Lowell, Augustus P.; Heanue, Joseph A.; Van Lysel, Michael S.

    2008-03-01

    The Scanning-Beam Digital X-ray (SBDX) system performs rapid scanning of a narrow x-ray beam using an electronically scanned focal spot and inverse beam geometry. SBDX's ability to perform real-time multi-plane tomosynthesis with high dose efficiency is well-suited to interventional procedures such as left atrial ablation, where precise knowledge of catheter positioning is desired and imaging times are long. We describe and evaluate techniques for frame-by-frame 3D localization of multiple catheter electrodes from the stacks of tomosynthetic images generated by SBDX. The localization algorithms operate on gradient-filtered versions of the tomosynthetic planes. Small high contrast objects are identified by thresholding the stack of images and applying connected component analysis. The 3D coordinate of each object is the center-of-mass of each connected component. Simulated scans of phantoms containing 1-mm platinum spheres were used to evaluate localization performance with the SBDX prototype (5.5 × 5.5 cm detector, 3° tomographic angle) and a with new SBDX detector under design (10-cm wide × 6 cm, 6° × 3°). Z-coordinate error with the SBDX prototype was -0.6 +/- 0.7 mm (mean+/-standard deviation) with 28 cm acrylic, 24.3 kWp source operation, and 12-mm plane spacing. Localization improved to -0.3 +/- 0.3 mm using the wider SBDX detector and a 3-mm plane spacing. The effects of tomographic angle, plane-to-plane spacing, and object velocity are evaluated, and a simulation demonstrating ablation catheter localization within a real anatomic background is presented. Results indicate that SBDX is capable of precise real-time 3D tracking of high contrast objects.

  9. 3D geometry and hydrodynamic modifications in fractured and porous rock samples through chemical alterations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noiriel, C. N.

    2011-12-01

    Fractured and porous rocks are the principal path for water flow and potential contamination. Modification of fracture topology and transmissivity by reactive fluids is an important and complex geological process. In carbonate rocks, fractures and porous media properties may change quickly and strongly due to natural processes (e.g. karstification, salt intrusion) or anthropogenic practice (e.g. CO2 geological sequestration). Recent application of X-ray micro-tomography to the Earth Sciences, which allows the visualization of 3D objects with a micrometre resolution, has considerably increased experimental capability by giving access to a 4D spatio-temporal vision (3D geometry + time) of the physical-chemical processes within the rocks. New information is now accessible, which provides a better understanding of the processes and allows the numerical models to be better constrained. I will present the application of X-ray micro-tomography to study changes of petrophysical properties (e.g. porosity, permeability, mineral surface area, etc.) of fractured and porous rocks in response to fluid-rock interactions (dissolution and precipitation). Experimental results will be discussed in regard to numerical modelling of flow and transport. Keywords: X-ray micro-tomography, fracture, porous media, dissolution, precipitation, carbon dioxide sequestration, limestone, reactive surface, geochemical modelling,

  10. 3D Modelling of Seismically Active Parts of Underground Faults via Seismic Data Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frantzeskakis, Theofanis; Konstantaras, Anthony

    2015-04-01

    During the last few years rapid steps have been taken towards drilling for oil in the western Mediterranean sea. Since most of the countries in the region benefit mainly from tourism and considering that the Mediterranean is a closed sea only replenishing its water once every ninety years careful measures are being taken to ensure safe drilling. In that concept this research work attempts to derive a three dimensional model of the seismically active parts of the underlying underground faults in areas of petroleum interest. For that purpose seismic spatio-temporal clustering has been applied to seismic data to identify potential distinct seismic regions in the area of interest. Results have been coalesced with two dimensional maps of underground faults from past surveys and seismic epicentres, having followed careful reallocation processing, have been used to provide information regarding the vertical extent of multiple underground faults in the region of interest. The end product is a three dimensional map of the possible underground location and extent of the seismically active parts of underground faults. Indexing terms: underground faults modelling, seismic data mining, 3D visualisation, active seismic source mapping, seismic hazard evaluation, dangerous phenomena modelling Acknowledgment This research work is supported by the ESPA Operational Programme, Education and Life Long Learning, Students Practical Placement Initiative. References [1] Alves, T.M., Kokinou, E. and Zodiatis, G.: 'A three-step model to assess shoreline and offshore susceptibility to oil spills: The South Aegean (Crete) as an analogue for confined marine basins', Marine Pollution Bulletin, In Press, 2014 [2] Ciappa, A., Costabile, S.: 'Oil spill hazard assessment using a reverse trajectory method for the Egadi marine protected area (Central Mediterranean Sea)', Marine Pollution Bulletin, vol. 84 (1-2), pp. 44-55, 2014 [3] Ganas, A., Karastathis, V., Moshou, A., Valkaniotis, S., Mouzakiotis, E. and Papathanassiou, G.: 'Aftershock relocation and frequency-size distribution, stress inversion and seismotectonic setting of the 7 August 2013 M=5.4 earthquake in Kallidromon Mountain, central Greece', Tectonophysics, vol. 617, pp. 101-113, 2014 [4] Maravelakis, E., Bilalis, N., Mantzorou, I., Konstantaras, A. and Antoniadis, A.: '3D modelling of the oldest olive tree of the world', International Journal Of Computational Engineering Research, vol. 2 (2), pp. 340-347, 2012 [5] Konstantaras, A., Katsifarakis, E, Maravelakis, E, Skounakis, E, Kokkinos, E. and Karapidakis, E.: 'Intelligent spatial-clustering of seismicity in the vicinity of the Hellenic seismic arc', Earth Science Research, vol. 1 (2), pp. 1- 10, 2012 [6] Georgoulas, G., Konstantaras, A., Katsifarakis, E., Stylios, C., Maravelakis, E and Vachtsevanos, G.: 'Seismic-mass" density-based algorithm for spatio-temporal clustering', Expert Systems with Applications, vol. 40 (10), pp. 4183-4189, 2013 [7] Konstantaras, A.: 'Classification of Distinct Seismic Regions and Regional Temporal Modelling of Seismicity in the Vicinity of the Hellenic Seismic Arc', Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote Sensing, IEEE Journal of', vol. 99, pp. 1-7, 2013

  11. The Derivation of Fault Volumetric Properties from 3D Trace Maps Using Outcrop Constrained Discrete Fracture Network Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgetts, David; Seers, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Fault systems are important structural elements within many petroleum reservoirs, acting as potential conduits, baffles or barriers to hydrocarbon migration. Large, seismic-scale faults often serve as reservoir bounding seals, forming structural traps which have proved to be prolific plays in many petroleum provinces. Though inconspicuous within most seismic datasets, smaller subsidiary faults, commonly within the damage zones of parent structures, may also play an important role. These smaller faults typically form narrow, tabular low permeability zones which serve to compartmentalize the reservoir, negatively impacting upon hydrocarbon recovery. Though considerable improvements have been made in the visualization field to reservoir-scale fault systems with the advent of 3D seismic surveys, the occlusion of smaller scale faults in such datasets is a source of significant uncertainty during prospect evaluation. The limited capacity of conventional subsurface datasets to probe the spatial distribution of these smaller scale faults has given rise to a large number of outcrop based studies, allowing their intensity, connectivity and size distributions to be explored in detail. Whilst these studies have yielded an improved theoretical understanding of the style and distribution of sub-seismic scale faults, the ability to transform observations from outcrop to quantities that are relatable to reservoir volumes remains elusive. These issues arise from the fact that outcrops essentially offer a pseudo-3D window into the rock volume, making the extrapolation of surficial fault properties such as areal density (fracture length per unit area: P21), to equivalent volumetric measures (i.e. fracture area per unit volume: P32) applicable to fracture modelling extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate an approach which harnesses advances in the extraction of 3D trace maps from surface reconstructions using calibrated image sequences, in combination with a novel semi-deterministic, outcrop constrained discrete fracture network modeling code to derive volumetric fault intensity measures (fault area per unit volume / fault volume per unit volume). Producing per-vertex measures of volumetric intensity; our method captures the spatial variability in 3D fault density across a surveyed outcrop, enabling first order controls to be probed. We demonstrate our approach on pervasively faulted exposures of a Permian aged reservoir analogue from the Vale of Eden Basin, UK.

  12. Estimating the detectability of faults in 3D-seismic data - A valuable input to Induced Seismic Hazard Assessment (ISHA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goertz, A.; Kraft, T.; Wiemer, S.; Spada, M.

    2012-12-01

    In the past several years, some geotechnical operations that inject fluid into the deep subsurface, such as oil and gas development, waste disposal, and geothermal energy development, have been found or suspected to cause small to moderate sized earthquakes. In several cases the largest events occurred on previously unmapped faults, within or in close vicinity to the operated reservoirs. The obvious conclusion drawn from this finding, also expressed in most recently published best practice guidelines and recommendations, is to avoid injecting into faults. Yet, how certain can we be that all faults relevant to induced seismic hazard have been identified, even around well studied sites? Here we present a probabilistic approach to assess the capability of detecting faults by means of 3D seismic imaging. First, we populate a model reservoir with seed faults of random orientation and slip direction. Drawing random samples from a Gutenberg-Richter distribution, each seed fault is assigned a magnitude and corresponding size using standard scaling relations based on a circular rupture model. We then compute the minimum resolution of a 3D seismic survey for given acquisition parameters and frequency bandwidth. Assuming a random distribution of medium properties and distribution of image frequencies, we obtain a probability that a fault of a given size is detected, or respectively overlooked, by the 3D seismic. Weighting the initial Gutenberg-Richter fault size distribution with the probability of imaging a fault, we obtain a modified fault size distribution in the imaged volume from which we can constrain the maximum magnitude to be considered in the seismic hazard assessment of the operation. We can further quantify the value of information associated with the seismic image by comparing the expected insured value loss between the image-weighted and the unweighted hazard estimates.

  13. Constraints on the geometry of the Suasselkä post-glacial fault, northern Finland, based on reflection seismic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdi, Amir; Heinonen, Suvi; Juhlin, Christopher; Karinen, Tuomo

    2015-05-01

    Unloading of the ice during the last glacial period in northern Fennoscandia is believed to have generated major faulting. These faults, often referred to as post-glacial faults, typically have clear surface exposures, but their geometry at depth is poorly known. In order to better understand the geometry at depth of the Suasselkä post-glacial fault in Finland, three high resolution 2D reflection seismic profiles over the fault were reprocessed. Their total profile length is about 60 km and they were acquired as part of a major effort in Finland to map the uppermost crust in mining areas. The reprocessing led to significantly improved images that could be used to map the fault at depth. Two approximately N-S striking profiles and one E-W striking profile were reprocessed. The different azimuths and the crooked nature of the profiles allowed the fault geometry to be relatively well constrained. Clear reflections from the fault, dipping towards the SE, can be traced from the shallow subsurface down to about 3 km. The strike and dip of two sets of dipping reflections in the stacked data along with geometrical constraints and cross-dip analysis give a consistent dip of about 35-45° towards the SE for the fault. The strike and dip vary from N55E with a dip of 35° in the east to a strike of N48E with a dip of 45° in the west. Existence of the two sets of reflections indicates that the fault surface is non-planar. Aside from allowing the geometry of the fault to be determined, the seismic data show a complex reflectivity pattern in the area and indications of both reverse and normal movement along fault planes with similar orientation to the Suasselkä post-glacial fault. These images can be used as a basis for better characterizing the 3D geology of the area.

  14. A novel culture system for modulating single cell geometry in 3D.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiaofei; Zhou, Mi; Gough, Julie; Glidle, Andrew; Yin, Huabing

    2015-09-01

    Dedifferentiation of chondrocytes during in vitro expansion remains an unsolved challenge for repairing serious articular cartilage defects. In this study, a novel culture system was developed to modulate single cell geometry in 3D and investigate its effects on the chondrocyte phenotype. The approach uses 2D micropatterns followed by in situ hydrogel formation to constrain single cell shape and spreading. This enables independent control of cell geometry and extracellular matrix. Using collagen I matrix, we demonstrated the formation of a biomimetic collagenous "basket" enveloping individual chondrocytes cells. By quantitatively monitoring the production by single cells of chondrogenic matrix (e.g. collagen II and aggrecan) during 21-day cultures, we found that if the cell's volume decreases, then so does its cell resistance to dedifferentiation (even if the cells remain spherical). Conversely, if the volume of spherical cells remains constant (after an initial decrease), then not only do the cells retain their differentiated status, but previously de-differentiated redifferentiate and regain a chondrocyte phenotype. The approach described here can be readily applied to pluripotent cells, offering a versatile platform in the search for niches toward either self-renewal or targeted differentiation. PMID:26086694

  15. Geometry of Thrust Faults Beneath Amenthes Rupes, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vidal, A.; Mueller, K. M.; Golombek, M. P.

    2005-01-01

    Amenthes Rupes is a 380 km-long lobate fault scarp located in the eastern hemisphere of Mars near the dichotomy boundary. The scarp is marked by about 1 km of vertical separation across a northeast dipping thrust fault (top to the SW) and offsets heavily-cratered terrain of Late Noachian age, the visible portion of which was in place by 3.92 Ga and the buried portion in place between 4.08 and 4.27 Ga. The timing of scarp formation is difficult to closely constrain. Previous geologic mapping shows that near the northern end of Amenthes Rupes, Hesperian age basalts terminate at the scarp, suggesting that fault slip predated the emplacement of these flows at 3.69 to 3.9 Ga. Maxwell and McGill also suggest the faulting ceased before the final emplacement of the Late Hesperian lavas on Isidis Planitia. The trend of the faults at Amenthes, like many thrust faults at the dichotomy boundary, parallels the boundary itself. Schultz and Watters used a dislocation modeling program to match surface topography and vertical offset of the scarp at Amenthes Rupes, varying the dip and depth of faulting, assuming a slip of 1.5 km on the fault. They modeled faulting below Amenthes Rupes as having a dip of between 25 and 30 degrees and a depth of 25 to 35 km, based on the best match to topography. Assuming a 25 degree dip and surface measurements of vertical offset of between 0.3 and 1.2 km, Watters later estimated the maximum displacement on the Amenthes Rupes fault to be 2.90 km. However, these studies did not determine the geometry of the thrust using quantitative constraints that included shortening estimates. Amenthes Rupes deforms large preexisting impact craters. We use these craters to constrain shortening across the scarp and combine this with vertical separation to infer fault geometry. Fault dip was also estimated using measurements of scarp morphology. Measurements were based on 460 m (1/128 per pixel) digital elevation data from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA), an instrument on the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) satellite.

  16. Pore Space Geometry and Seismic Anisotropy of Rocks: 3-D Experimental Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spacek, P.; Melichar, R.; Ulrich, S.

    2004-12-01

    Pressure-driven closing of the pores in the rock sample results in changes of its effective physical properties. We use 3-D ultrasonic pulse-transmission method to characterize the relationships between the spatial distribution of microcracks and elastic anisotropy of the rock. With the use of apparatus developed in Geophysical Institute, Prague, the P-wave velocities and amplitudes ({\\IT VP} and {\\IT AP}) are measured in 132 directions on spherical rock samples. The measurements are carried out at several steps of confining pressure within pressure-increasing and pressure-decreasing paths (0.1-400, 400-0.1 MPa). Then the directions of maximum and minimum velocities and amplitudes are found for which the measurements is repeated under continually changing pressure. As the measurements are repeated at the same position under various pressures, the data can be processed so that the change of the {\\IT VP} and {\\IT AP} between the individual pressure-steps and the hysteresis at particular pressure can be seen directly. The resulting differential diagrams show the magnitude of {\\IT VP} and {\\IT AP} changes in 3-D which are mainly due to the pressure-induced closing of microcracks, and respectively, the flexibility of the microcracks. Using the data measured at high confining pressure or those computed with averaging method we are able to distinguish the influence the deformation-induced lattice re-orientations from the pore-related properties. Numerous measurements carried out on various rock samples show that the anisotropic patterns of {\\IT VP} and {\\IT AP} changes due to the closing of oriented microcracks and other pores highly correlate with the macroscopic structural features of the rock (preferred grain-shape orientation, fracture cleavage, stretching lineation) and are sensitive to them. It is believed that in such cases where the structural features associated with porosity can not be observed directly, the above outlined method will be applicable as a tool for the examination of pore space geometry.

  17. Akaso Field, Nigeria: Use of integrated 3-D seismic, fault slicing, clay smearing, and RFT pressure data on fault trapping and dynamic leakage

    SciTech Connect

    Jev, B.I.; Watts, N.L.; Wilkie, J.T. ); Kaars-Sijpesteijn, C.H. ); Peters, M.P.A.M. )

    1993-08-01

    The Akaso field [STOIIP 78 [times] 10[sup 6] m[sup 3] (401 million STB)] of the eastern Niger Delta is separated from the large Cawthorne Channel field [STOIIP 208 [times]10[sup 6] m[sup 3] (1307 million STB)] normal fault. In 1989, three-dimensional (3-D) seismic data acquired and interpreted over the field revealed a subtle splinter or backsplit fault off this major antithetic fault west of the main Akaso field. Behind this backsplit fault the authors observed stacked amplitude anomalies. These anomalies extended to the structural spillpoint defined against the Akaso backsplit faults. Fault splicing and clay smear studies of the backsplit and main antithetic fault indicated strong seal potential with possible [open quotes]leak windows[close quotes] along the fault planes. In 1989, the sealing potentials of the western end of the Akaso boundary fault were fully confirmed by a deviated appraisal well, which found a STOIIP of 29 [times] 10[sup 6] (183 million STB) in a series of stacked footwall closures. The initial trapping potential of this major antithetic normal fault can be contrasted with its subsequent behavior during depletion by using RFT data acquired in a series of development wells drilled in 1990 in the main Akaso structure at the eastern end of the antithetic fault. Here, major stacked columns of oil and gas are trapped and sealed by the antithetic fault, but we identified and sealed by the antithetic fault, but the authors identified evidence of subsequent leakage due to production effects from the adjacent Cawthorne Channel field. Depletion of the unproduced Akaso G sands was found to be due to production from the juxtaposed E sands of the adjacent Cawthorne Channel field, thus we inferred dynamic fault leakage. The Akaso field represents a prime example of the trapping potential of a clay-smeared fault and its subsequent leakage during differential depletion. 18 refs., 11 figs.

  18. The contribution of 3D restoration for the reconstruction of pre-thrusting basin geometries in fold-and-thrust belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquè, R.; Tavarnelli, E.

    2012-04-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of complex geological settings and of original, pre-thrusting basin geometry is one of the challenges for modern structural geology. It has indeed a critical role in many industrial applications, such as in the hydrocarbon exploration. By using commercial specific softwares to produce balanced cross-sections and inferred 3D reconstructions (2DMove™, Gocad™), we modelled a portion of the Umbria-Marche fold-and-thrust belt, in the outer zones of the Northern Apennines of Italy, in order to infer the pre-thrusting geometry of the Mesozoic-Cenozoic extensional basins and to test the applicability of existing computer tools in areas that have experienced the effects of positive tectonic inversion. In the study area, the accurate reconstruction of the structural setting, cross-cut relationships and timing of the deformation, was inferred by using field data, map analysis and cross-section balancing techniques. The structural overprinting relationships among the investigated thrusts made it possible to infer a general piggy-back thrusting sequence, with new thrust faults to the East, developed in the footwall of formerly emplaced thrust sheets, in the West. This allowed to sequentially remove the effects of the deformation for progressively older structures, and to back-strip the thrust sheets in sequential evolutionary steps, in order to reconstruct a viable pre-thrusting template. Four balanced cross-sections have been drawn, providing the initial skeleton for 3D modelling, together with the map trace of the major tectonic features. The cross-sections and the geological map have been digitized and geo-referred in 2D-Move™. Starting from the inferred geometries, a coherent 3D model was built in Gocad™. The surfaces represent post-thrust normal faults, thrust planes, and pre-thrust normal faults, and five key stratigraphic surfaces, from bottom; the base and top of the Calcare Massiccio fm. (Lower Liassic), the base of the Maiolica fm. (Titonian), the base and the top of the Marne a Fucoidi fm. (Upper Albian-Lower Cenomanian). The main pre-thrusting normal faults have been projected using their map and cross-section traces, keeping into account the thickness variation of the selected stratigraphic reference; the complete detail of the condensed and complete stratigraphic sequence was considered in cross-section only. The combination of balanced cross-sections, 3D modelling and restoration techniques, sequentially applied to fold-and-thrust belts, provides effective tools to unravel the geometry of the pre-thrusting geometries and depict the architecture of the sedimentary basins. Even if the surface restoration techniques are strongly dependant on the reconstructed surface geometry (i.e. the mesh of the surface and the obtained cutoffs along a fault surface), the results are comparable to the calculations obtained from classical 2D balancing techniques. The results of this work seem to encourage for further applicability of similar methods to other areas of the Northern Apennines, and to geologically complex areas in general.

  19. General solution of 2D and 3D superconducting quasiclassical systems: coalescing vortices and nanoisland geometries

    PubMed Central

    Amundsen, Morten; Linder, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    An extension of quasiclassical Keldysh-Usadel theory to higher spatial dimensions than one is crucial in order to describe physical phenomena like charge/spin Hall effects and topological excitations like vortices and skyrmions, none of which are captured in one-dimensional models. We here present a numerical finite element method which solves the non-linearized 2D and 3D quasiclassical Usadel equation relevant for the diffusive regime. We show the application of this on three model systems with non-trivial geometries: (i) a bottlenecked Josephson junction with external flux, (ii) a nanodisk ferromagnet deposited on top of a superconductor and (iii) superconducting islands in contact with a ferromagnet. In case (i), we demonstrate that one may control externally not only the geometrical array in which superconducting vortices arrange themselves, but also to cause coalescence and tune the number of vortices. In case (iii), we show that the supercurrent path can be tailored by incorporating magnetic elements in planar Josephson junctions which also lead to a strong modulation of the density of states. The finite element method presented herein paves the way for gaining insight in physical phenomena which have remained largely unexplored due to the complexity of solving the full quasiclassical equations in higher dimensions. PMID:26961921

  20. General solution of 2D and 3D superconducting quasiclassical systems: coalescing vortices and nanoisland geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amundsen, Morten; Linder, Jacob

    2016-03-01

    An extension of quasiclassical Keldysh-Usadel theory to higher spatial dimensions than one is crucial in order to describe physical phenomena like charge/spin Hall effects and topological excitations like vortices and skyrmions, none of which are captured in one-dimensional models. We here present a numerical finite element method which solves the non-linearized 2D and 3D quasiclassical Usadel equation relevant for the diffusive regime. We show the application of this on three model systems with non-trivial geometries: (i) a bottlenecked Josephson junction with external flux, (ii) a nanodisk ferromagnet deposited on top of a superconductor and (iii) superconducting islands in contact with a ferromagnet. In case (i), we demonstrate that one may control externally not only the geometrical array in which superconducting vortices arrange themselves, but also to cause coalescence and tune the number of vortices. In case (iii), we show that the supercurrent path can be tailored by incorporating magnetic elements in planar Josephson junctions which also lead to a strong modulation of the density of states. The finite element method presented herein paves the way for gaining insight in physical phenomena which have remained largely unexplored due to the complexity of solving the full quasiclassical equations in higher dimensions.

  1. General solution of 2D and 3D superconducting quasiclassical systems: coalescing vortices and nanoisland geometries.

    PubMed

    Amundsen, Morten; Linder, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    An extension of quasiclassical Keldysh-Usadel theory to higher spatial dimensions than one is crucial in order to describe physical phenomena like charge/spin Hall effects and topological excitations like vortices and skyrmions, none of which are captured in one-dimensional models. We here present a numerical finite element method which solves the non-linearized 2D and 3D quasiclassical Usadel equation relevant for the diffusive regime. We show the application of this on three model systems with non-trivial geometries: (i) a bottlenecked Josephson junction with external flux, (ii) a nanodisk ferromagnet deposited on top of a superconductor and (iii) superconducting islands in contact with a ferromagnet. In case (i), we demonstrate that one may control externally not only the geometrical array in which superconducting vortices arrange themselves, but also to cause coalescence and tune the number of vortices. In case (iii), we show that the supercurrent path can be tailored by incorporating magnetic elements in planar Josephson junctions which also lead to a strong modulation of the density of states. The finite element method presented herein paves the way for gaining insight in physical phenomena which have remained largely unexplored due to the complexity of solving the full quasiclassical equations in higher dimensions. PMID:26961921

  2. 3D CFD modeling of subsonic and transonic flowing-gas DPALs with different pumping geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yacoby, Eyal; Sadot, Oren; Barmashenko, Boris D.; Rosenwaks, Salman

    2015-10-01

    Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (3D CFD) modeling of subsonic (Mach number M ~ 0.2) and transonic (M ~ 0.9) diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs), taking into account fluid dynamics and kinetic processes in the lasing medium is reported. The performance of these lasers is compared with that of supersonic (M ~ 2.7 for Cs and M ~ 2.4 for K) DPALs. The motivation for this study stems from the fact that subsonic and transonic DPALs require much simpler hardware than supersonic ones where supersonic nozzle, diffuser and high power mechanical pump (due to a drop in the gas total pressure in the nozzle) are required for continuous closed cycle operation. For Cs DPALs with 5 x 5 cm2 flow cross section pumped by large cross section (5 x 2 cm2) beam the maximum achievable power of supersonic devices is higher than that of the transonic and subsonic devices by only ~ 3% and ~ 10%, respectively. Thus in this case the supersonic operation mode has no substantial advantage over the transonic one. The main processes limiting the power of Cs supersonic DPALs are saturation of the D2 transition and large ~ 60% losses of alkali atoms due to ionization, whereas the influence of gas heating is negligible. For K transonic DPALs both the gas heating and ionization effects are shown to be unimportant. The maximum values of the power are higher than those in Cs transonic laser by ~ 11%. The power achieved in the supersonic and transonic K DPAL is higher than for the subsonic version, with the same resonator and K density at the inlet, by ~ 84% and ~ 27%, respectively, showing a considerable advantaged of the supersonic device over the transonic one. For pumping by rectangular beams of the same (5 x 2 cm2) cross section, comparison between end-pumping - where the laser beam and pump beam both propagate at along the same axis, and transverse-pumping - where they propagate perpendicularly to each other, shows that the output power and optical-to-optical efficiency are not affected by the pump geometry. However, the output laser beam in the case of end-pumped DPALs has a homogeneous spatial intensity distribution in the beam cross section, whereas for transverse-pumped DPALs the intensity varies significantly along the pumping axis (perpendicular to the resonator optical axis) and hence is strongly inhomogeneous in the laser beam cross section. Thus, higher brightness and better beam quality in the far field is achieved for the end-pumping geometry. Optimization of the resonator geometry for minimal gas temperature rise and minimal intra-resonator intensity (corresponds to a low ionization rate) is also reported.

  3. High-Performance and Omnidirectional Thin-Film Amorphous Silicon Solar Cell Modules Achieved by 3D Geometry Design.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dongliang; Yin, Min; Lu, Linfeng; Zhang, Hanzhong; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Zhu, Xufei; Che, Jianfei; Li, Dongdong

    2015-11-01

    High-performance thin-film hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells are achieved by combining macroscale 3D tubular substrates and nanoscaled 3D cone-like antireflective films. The tubular geometry delivers a series of advantages for large-scale deployment of photovoltaics, such as omnidirectional performance, easier encapsulation, decreased wind resistance, and easy integration with a second device inside the glass tube. PMID:26418573

  4. Mechanisms of clay smear formation in unconsolidated sediments - insights from 3-D observations of excavated normal faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettermann, Michael; Thronberens, Sebastian; Juarez, Oscar; Lajos Urai, Janos; Ziegler, Martin; Asmus, Sven; Kruger, Ulrich

    2016-05-01

    Clay smears in normal faults can form seals for hydrocarbons and groundwater, and their prediction in the subsurface is an important problem in applied and basic geoscience. However, neither their complex 3-D structure, nor their processes of formation or destruction are well understood, and outcrop studies to date are mainly 2-D. We present a 3-D study of an excavated normal fault with clay smear, together with both source layers, in unlithified sand and clay of the Hambach open-cast lignite mine in Germany. The faults formed at a depth of 150 m, and have shale gouge ratios between 0.1 and 0.3. The fault zones are layered, with sheared sand, sheared clay and tectonically mixed sand-clay gouge. The thickness of clay smears in two excavated fault zones of 1.8 and 3.8 m2 is approximately log-normal, with values between 5 mm and 5 cm, without holes. The 3-D thickness distribution is heterogeneous. We show that clay smears are strongly affected by R and R' shears, mostly at the footwall side. These shears can locally cross and offset clay smears, forming holes in the clay smear, while thinning of the clay smear by shearing in the fault core is less important. The thinnest parts of the clay smears are often located close to source layer cut-offs. Locally, the clay smear consists of overlapping patches of sheared clay, separated by sheared sand. More commonly, it is one amalgamated zone of sheared sand and clay. A microscopic study of fault-zone samples shows that grain-scale mixing can lead to thickening of the low permeability smears, which may lead to resealing of holes.

  5. 3D numerical simulations of negative hydrogen ion extraction using realistic plasma parameters, geometry of the extraction aperture and full 3D magnetic field map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochalskyy, S.; Wünderlich, D.; Ruf, B.; Franzen, P.; Fantz, U.; Minea, T.

    2014-02-01

    Decreasing the co-extracted electron current while simultaneously keeping negative ion (NI) current sufficiently high is a crucial issue on the development plasma source system for ITER Neutral Beam Injector. To support finding the best extraction conditions the 3D Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collision electrostatic code ONIX (Orsay Negative Ion eXtraction) has been developed. Close collaboration with experiments and other numerical models allows performing realistic simulations with relevant input parameters: plasma properties, geometry of the extraction aperture, full 3D magnetic field map, etc. For the first time ONIX has been benchmarked with commercial positive ions tracing code KOBRA3D. A very good agreement in terms of the meniscus position and depth has been found. Simulation of NI extraction with different e/NI ratio in bulk plasma shows high relevance of the direct negative ion extraction from the surface produced NI in order to obtain extracted NI current as in the experimental results from BATMAN testbed.

  6. 3D numerical simulations of negative hydrogen ion extraction using realistic plasma parameters, geometry of the extraction aperture and full 3D magnetic field map.

    PubMed

    Mochalskyy, S; Wünderlich, D; Ruf, B; Franzen, P; Fantz, U; Minea, T

    2014-02-01

    Decreasing the co-extracted electron current while simultaneously keeping negative ion (NI) current sufficiently high is a crucial issue on the development plasma source system for ITER Neutral Beam Injector. To support finding the best extraction conditions the 3D Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collision electrostatic code ONIX (Orsay Negative Ion eXtraction) has been developed. Close collaboration with experiments and other numerical models allows performing realistic simulations with relevant input parameters: plasma properties, geometry of the extraction aperture, full 3D magnetic field map, etc. For the first time ONIX has been benchmarked with commercial positive ions tracing code KOBRA3D. A very good agreement in terms of the meniscus position and depth has been found. Simulation of NI extraction with different e/NI ratio in bulk plasma shows high relevance of the direct negative ion extraction from the surface produced NI in order to obtain extracted NI current as in the experimental results from BATMAN testbed. PMID:24593578

  7. Tunneling Analyst: A 3D GIS extension for rock mass classification and fault zone analysis in tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yosoon; Yoon, Seo-Youn; Park, Hyeong-Dong

    2009-06-01

    In this study, an extension called Tunneling Analyst (TA) has been developed in ArcScene 3D GIS software, part of the ArcGIS software package. It dramatically extends the functionalities of ArcScene because it allows: (1) estimation of the 3D distribution of rock mass rating (RMR) values using borehole and geophysical exploration data, (2) the modeling of 3D discontinuity planes such as faults from field-based structural measurements, and (3) analysis of 3D intersections and 3D buffer zones between proposed tunnel alignments and some discontinuities. Because TA can handle and visualize both 2D and 3D geological data in a single GIS environment, the tedious tasks required for data conversion between various software packages can be reduced significantly. The application to the Daecheong tunneling project in Korea shows that TA could present a rational solution to evaluating the rock mass classes along a proposed tunnel alignment and can also provide specific 3D spatial query tools to support the tunnel design work. This paper describes the concept and details of the development and implementation of TA.

  8. Self-calibration of cone-beam CT geometry using 3D-2D image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouadah, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Gang, G. J.; Ehtiati, T.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    Robotic C-arms are capable of complex orbits that can increase field of view, reduce artifacts, improve image quality, and/or reduce dose; however, it can be challenging to obtain accurate, reproducible geometric calibration required for image reconstruction for such complex orbits. This work presents a method for geometric calibration for an arbitrary source-detector orbit by registering 2D projection data to a previously acquired 3D image. It also yields a method by which calibration of simple circular orbits can be improved. The registration uses a normalized gradient information similarity metric and the covariance matrix adaptation-evolution strategy optimizer for robustness against local minima and changes in image content. The resulting transformation provides a ‘self-calibration’ of system geometry. The algorithm was tested in phantom studies using both a cone-beam CT (CBCT) test-bench and a robotic C-arm (Artis Zeego, Siemens Healthcare) for circular and non-circular orbits. Self-calibration performance was evaluated in terms of the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the point spread function in CBCT reconstructions, the reprojection error (RPE) of steel ball bearings placed on each phantom, and the overall quality and presence of artifacts in CBCT images. In all cases, self-calibration improved the FWHM—e.g. on the CBCT bench, FWHM  =  0.86 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.65 mm for self-calibration (p  <  0.001). Similar improvements were measured in RPE—e.g. on the robotic C-arm, RPE  =  0.73 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.55 mm for self-calibration (p  <  0.001). Visible improvement was evident in CBCT reconstructions using self-calibration, particularly about high-contrast, high-frequency objects (e.g. temporal bone air cells and a surgical needle). The results indicate that self-calibration can improve even upon systems with presumably accurate geometric calibration and is applicable to situations where conventional calibration is not feasible, such as complex non-circular CBCT orbits and systems with irreproducible source-detector trajectory.

  9. Self-calibration of cone-beam CT geometry using 3D-2D image registration.

    PubMed

    Ouadah, S; Stayman, J W; Gang, G J; Ehtiati, T; Siewerdsen, J H

    2016-04-01

    Robotic C-arms are capable of complex orbits that can increase field of view, reduce artifacts, improve image quality, and/or reduce dose; however, it can be challenging to obtain accurate, reproducible geometric calibration required for image reconstruction for such complex orbits. This work presents a method for geometric calibration for an arbitrary source-detector orbit by registering 2D projection data to a previously acquired 3D image. It also yields a method by which calibration of simple circular orbits can be improved. The registration uses a normalized gradient information similarity metric and the covariance matrix adaptation-evolution strategy optimizer for robustness against local minima and changes in image content. The resulting transformation provides a 'self-calibration' of system geometry. The algorithm was tested in phantom studies using both a cone-beam CT (CBCT) test-bench and a robotic C-arm (Artis Zeego, Siemens Healthcare) for circular and non-circular orbits. Self-calibration performance was evaluated in terms of the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the point spread function in CBCT reconstructions, the reprojection error (RPE) of steel ball bearings placed on each phantom, and the overall quality and presence of artifacts in CBCT images. In all cases, self-calibration improved the FWHM-e.g. on the CBCT bench, FWHM  =  0.86 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.65 mm for self-calibration (p  <  0.001). Similar improvements were measured in RPE-e.g. on the robotic C-arm, RPE  =  0.73 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.55 mm for self-calibration (p  <  0.001). Visible improvement was evident in CBCT reconstructions using self-calibration, particularly about high-contrast, high-frequency objects (e.g. temporal bone air cells and a surgical needle). The results indicate that self-calibration can improve even upon systems with presumably accurate geometric calibration and is applicable to situations where conventional calibration is not feasible, such as complex non-circular CBCT orbits and systems with irreproducible source-detector trajectory. PMID:26961687

  10. Influence of 3D Teleseismic Body Waves in the Finite-Fault Source Inversion of Subduction Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sladen, A.; Monteiller, V.

    2014-12-01

    Most large earthquakes are generated in subduction zones. To study the complexity of these events, teleseismic body waves offer many advantages over other types of data: they allow to study both the temporal and spatial evolution of slip during the rupture, they don't depend on the presence of nearby land and they allow to study earthquakes regardless of their location. Since the development of teleseismic finite-fault inversion in the 1980th, teleseismic body waves have been simulated using 1D velocity models to take into account propagation effects at the source. Yet, subduction zones are known to be highly heterogeneous: they are characterized by curved and dipping structures, strong seismic velocity contrasts, strong variations of topography and height of the water column. The main reason for relying on a 1D approximation is the computational cost of 3D simulations. And while forward simulations of teleseismic waves in a 3D Earth are only starting to be tractable on modern computers at the frequency range of interest (0.1Hz or shorter), finite-fault source studies require a large number of these simulations. In this work, we present a new and efficient approach to compute 3D teleseismic body waves, in which the full 3D propagation is only computed in a regional domain using discontinuous Galerkin finite-element method, while the rest of the seismic wave field is propagated in a background axisymmetric Earth. The regional and global wave fields are matched using the so-called Total-Field/Scattered-Field technique. This new simulation approach allows us to study the waveform complexities resulting from 3D propagation and investigate how they could improve the resolution and reduce the non-uniqueness of finite-fault inversions.

  11. 3D range geometry video compression with the H.264 codec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpinsky, Nikolaus; Zhang, Song

    2013-05-01

    Advances in three-dimensional (3D) scanning have enabled the real-time capture of high-resolution 3D videos. With these advances brings the challenge of streaming and storing 3D videos in a manner that can be quickly and effectively used. This research addresses this challenge by generalizing the Holovideo technique to video codecs that use the YUV color space such as the H.264 codec. With the H.264 codec, we have achieved a compression ratio of over 6086:1 (Holovideo to OBJ) with a reasonably high quality; utilizing an NVIDIA GeForce 9400 m GPU, we have realized 17 frames per second encoding, and 28 frames per second decoding speed, making it a viable solution for real-time 3D video compression.

  12. Mantle wedge flow pattern and thermal structure in Northeast Japan: Effects of oblique subduction and 3-D slab geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Ikuko; He, Jiangheng; Hasegawa, Akira; Nakajima, Junichi

    2015-09-01

    We develop a 3-D thermal model for the Northeast Japan subduction margin, using a realistic slab geometry for the subducting Pacific plate, and investigate the effects of oblique subduction and 3-D slab geometry on the mantle wedge flow pattern and the thermal structure. In the Tohoku region, the mantle wedge flow pattern is nearly two-dimensional resulting in a thermal structure similar to those obtained by a 2-D model, owing to the simple slab geometry and subduction nearly perpendicular to the margin. However, in Hokkaido, oblique subduction leads to 3-D mantle wedge flow with northerly inflow and west-northwestward outflow and also results in lower temperatures in the shallow part of the mantle wedge than in Tohoku due to lower sinking rate of the slab. Between Hokkaido and Tohoku, the slab has a hinge-like shape due to a relatively sharp change in the dip direction. In this hinge zone, northerly mantle inflow from Hokkaido and westerly mantle inflow from Tohoku converge, discouraging inflow from northwest and resulting in a cooler mantle wedge. The model-predicted mantle wedge flow patterns are consistent with observed seismic anisotropy and may explain the orientations of volcanic cross-chains. The predicted 3-D thermal structure correlates well with the along-arc variations in the location of the frontal arc volcanoes and help to provide new insights into the surface heat flow pattern and the down-dip extent of interplate earthquakes.

  13. Development and application of a 3-D geometry/mass model for LDEF satellite ionizing radiation assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colborn, B. L.; Armstrong, T. W.

    1992-01-01

    A computer model of the three dimensional geometry and material distributions for the LDEF spacecraft, experiment trays, and, for selected trays, the components of experiments within a tray was developed for use in ionizing radiation assessments. The model is being applied to provide 3-D shielding distributions around radiation dosimeters to aid in data interpretation, particularly in assessing the directional properties of the radiation exposure. Also, the model has been interfaced with radiation transport codes for 3-D dosimetry response predictions and for calculations related to determining the accuracy of trapped proton and cosmic ray environment models. The methodology is described used in developing the 3-D LDEF model and the level of detail incorporated. Currently, the trays modeled in detail are F2, F8, and H12 and H3. Applications of the model which are discussed include the 3-D shielding distributions around various dosimeters, the influence of shielding on dosimetry responses, and comparisons of dose predictions based on the present 3-D model vs those from 1-D geometry model approximations used in initial estimates.

  14. Modeling the effect of preexisting joints on normal fault geometries using a brittle and cohesive material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettermann, M.; van Gent, H. W.; Urai, J. L.

    2012-04-01

    Brittle rocks, such as for example those hosting many carbonate or sandstone reservoirs, are often affected by different kinds of fractures that influence each other. Understanding the effects of these interactions on fault geometries and the formation of cavities and potential fluid pathways might be useful for reservoir quality prediction and production. Analogue modeling has proven to be a useful tool to study faulting processes, although usually the used materials do not provide cohesion and tensile strength, which are essential to create open fractures. Therefore, very fine-grained, cohesive, hemihydrate powder was used for our experiments. The mechanical properties of the material are scaling well for natural prototypes. Due to the fine grain size structures are preserved in in great detail. The used deformation box allows the formation of a half-graben and has initial dimensions of 30 cm width, 28 cm length and 20 cm height. The maximum dip-slip along the 60° dipping predefined basement fault is 4.5 cm and was fully used in all experiments. To setup open joints prior to faulting, sheets of paper placed vertically within the box to a depth of about 5 cm from top. The powder was then sieved into the box, embedding the paper almost entirely. Finally strings were used to remove the paper carefully, leaving open voids. Using this method allows the creation of cohesionless open joints while ensuring a minimum impact on the sensitive surrounding material. The presented series of experiments aims to investigate the effect of different angles between the strike of a rigid basement fault and a distinct joint set. All experiments were performed with a joint spacing of 2.5 cm and the fault-joint angles incrementally covered 0°, 4°, 8°, 12°, 16°, 20° and 25°. During the deformation time lapse photography from the top and side captured every structural change and provided data for post-processing analysis using particle imaging velocimetry (PIV). Additionally, stereo-photography at the final stage of deformation enabled the creation of 3D models to preserve basic geometric information. The models showed that at the surface the deformation localized always along preexisting joints, even when they strike at an angle to the basement-fault. In most cases faults intersect precisely at the maximum depth of the joints. With increasing fault-joint angle the deformation occurred distributed over several joints by forming stepovers with fractures oriented normal to the strike of the joints. No fractures were observed parallel to the basement fault. At low angles stepovers coincided with wedge-shaped structures between two joints that remain higher than the surrounding joint-fault intersection. The wide opening gap along the main fault allowed detailed observations of the fault planes at depth, which revealed (1) changing dips according to joint-fault angles, (2) slickenlines, (3) superimposed steepening fault-planes, causing sharp sawtooth-shaped structures. Comparison to a field analogue at Canyonlands National Park, Utah/USA showed similar structures and features such as vertical fault escarpments at the surface coinciding with joint-surfaces. In the field and in the models stepovers were observed as well as conjugate faulting and incremental fault-steepening.

  15. Poly 3D fault modeling scripts/data for permeability potential of Washington State geothermal prospects

    DOE Data Explorer

    Michael Swyer

    2015-02-05

    Matlab scripts/functions and data used to build Poly3D models and create permeability potential GIS layers for 1) Mount St Helen's, 2) Wind River Valley, and 3) Mount Baker geothermal prospect areas located in Washington state.

  16. A Study of Static Shift Removal Methods in a 3D Magnetotelluric Survey at Pisagua Fault, Chile.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bascur, J.; Comte, D.; Dias, D.; Siripunvaraporn, W.

    2014-12-01

    The static shift is one of the main problems that cause misleads in the magnetotellurics (MT) interpretation. This work presents a study comparing methods for removing the static shift effect from MT data acquired around the Pisagua Fault in Chile (2014). This evaluation considers the methods based on the joint inversion of the subsurface resistivity with the static shift effect and the calibration based on the TDEM data.First, it was developed a formulation in the data space, following the work of W. Siripunvaraporn (2005), that allows the joint inversion of the resistivity model and the static shift effect. That formulation makes it possible to use any linear representation for removing the static shift in the MT stations. This property permits compare the representation proposed by Sasaki (2004) and the static shift tensor, which use a 2x2 matrix to correct the effect. The last one is suggested to be a better model for 3D MT responses, because it can reproduce the distortion on the phase of MT data.Twenty one stations, measuring MT and TDEM methods, were acquired at the east side of the Pisagua town in the North of Chile (figure). In this place, there is an evident scarp on the topography that reveals the existence of an important fault (Pisagua Fault). Also, the Chilean desert at this location is characterized by the presence of shallow nitrate deposits (called "caliche"), whose have an elevated electrical resistance and can produce the static shift effect in the MT stations. For those reasons it was expected that the sector around the Pisagua Fault was an adequate place to evaluate static correction methods, because the data certainly would be distorted by the static shift and a successful correction method should reveal the fault observed at surface.The MT data acquired have mostly a 3D dimensionality (using A. Marti criteria, 2009) and show signs of being static shifted. A 3D inversion of this data, without considering the static shift, results in a poor misfit and the Pisagua fault does not appear in the model obtained. Calibrating the MT data with the TDEM soundings marginally improve the results. Only the joint inversion methods that include static shift effect could obtain models where the Pisagua fault is present and their responses have an adequate misfit with the data.

  17. Magnetic fabric and 3D geometry of the Hombreiro-Sta. Eulaliapluton: Implications for the Variscan structures of eastern Galicia, NW Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranguren, A.

    1997-05-01

    In this paper the internal structure and 3D geometry of the Hombreiro-Sta. Eulalia granitic pluton (Hercynian belt, NWSpain) are described. Characterization of the internal structure was performed from surface data, based on microstructural analysis and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility studies. The geometrical features of the pluton morphology at depth were derived from gravity data. The pluton is made up of paramagnetic granites and leucogranites (K values ranging between 1.1 and 13.3 × 10-5 SI), with well developed magnetic fabrics (anisotropy degree P‧ ≥ 1.05 for 78% of the sampling localities). The results obtained enable us to depict a flat-lying magnetic structure with associated N120°E-trending magnetic lineations. The gravity survey corroborates the subhorizontal laminar geometry of the pluton, which has an estimated thickness of 2 km and an almost planar floor. The 3D morphology is elongate at depth parallel to the linear internal fabric. This would imply that magma emplacement took place along this preferential direction. Whereas the deepest zones of the pluton trend WNW-ESE (elongate parallel to regional σ 1) it is almost rootless. We present data showing that the Hombreiro-Sta. Eulalia pluton emplacement was closely related (spatially and chronologically), along with other granitoid plutons from the Lugo Dome, with two major structures of eastern Galicia: the basal shear zone of the Mondoñedo nappe and the extensional Vivero fault.

  18. Accuracy Evaluation of 3D Geometry from Low-Attitude UAV collections A case at Zijin Mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q.; Wu, L.; Chen, S.; Shu, D.; Xu, Z.; Li, F.; Wang, R.

    2014-04-01

    This study investigates the usability of low-attitude unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) acquiring high resolution images for the geometry reconstruction of opencast mine. Image modelling techniques like Structure from Motion (SfM) and Patch-based Multiview Stereo (PMVS) algorithms are used to generate dense 3D point cloud from UAV collections. Then, precision of 3D point cloud will be first evaluated based on Real-time Kinematic (RTK) ground control points (GCPs) at point level. The experimental result shows that the mean square error of the UAV point cloud is 0.11 m. Digital surface model (DSM) of the study area is generated from UAV point cloud, and compared with that from the Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) data for further comparison at the surface level. Discrepancy map of 3D distances based on DSMs shows that most deviation is less than ±0.4 m and the relative error of the volume is 1.55 %.

  19. The differences in the development of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in 2D and 3D geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchugov, P. A.; Rozanov, V. B.; Zmitrenko, N. V.

    2014-06-01

    Results are presented from theoretical analysis and numerical simulations aimed to clarify specific features of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in 2D and 3D geometries. Two series of simulations, one with an isolated single-mode perturbation of the interface and the other with a random density perturbation, were performed. It is shown that the relative evolutions of integral characteristics for the first and the second series are different in 2D and 3D geometries. An attempt is made to interpret this result in the framework of the previously developed evolutionary approach based on the concept of the "critical age" of the perturbation (where, by the age is meant the product of the wavenumber and amplitude). The critical age corresponds to the destruction of the main mushroom-like structure formed during the development of Rayleigh-Taylor instability due to the onset of the secondary Kelvin-Helmholtz instability.

  20. Kumano Forearc Basin Uplift and Megasplay Fault Development: 3D Seismic Images of Nankai Margin off Kii Peninsula, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, S. P.; Bangs, N. L.; Moore, G. F.; Martin, K. M.; Sawyer, D. S.; Nakamura, Y.; Tobin, H. J.

    2008-12-01

    Off southern Honshu Island, Japan, a 12 by 56 km, 3D seismic reflection survey images parts of the region known as the Kumano area of the Nankai Trough. This region is where the Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment is taking place as part of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program and has thus far been the target of Expeditions 314, 315, and 316. A structural feature of the Kumano part of the margin is a high-seismic amplitude, regionally continuous splay fault system that acts as an out-of-sequence thrust and may be a pathway for updip seismic rupture propagation. Of seismic hazards interest, the shallower pathway for rupture propagation presented by the splay fault has been suggested to result in efficient delivery of high- angle slip close to the seafloor and thus the splay fault may be tsunamigenic. The Kumano forearc basin lies above the Kumano splay fault system and thus records its affect on margin development. Within the seaward portion of the Kumano Basin that is imaged by the 3D volume, we interpret 12 seismic sequences. In decreasing age, these sequences record a history of infilling and faulting as follows: 1) Sequences 12-9 were deposited in a shelf-edge depocenter that was deepest to the northeast due to a pre-existing structural high to the southwest. 2) From Sequence 8 time to Sequence 6 time, significant uplift occurred such that the primary depocenter shifted progressively landward. Northeast striking normal faults formed in the sediments above the uplifted southwestern structural high. 3) Since the deposition of Sequence 5, uplift has waned and the basin has attempted to re-equilibrate depositionally by filling in the lows and structurally through significant extension that continues today. The resulting normal faults are spaced <250 m apart, strike on average east-northeast, and are present up to ~20 km landward into the basin. The locus of uplift was limited to the outer basin, which was progressively thrust/displaced seaward relative to the inner basin as evidenced by the presence of graben structures at the landward limit of the tilted strata. The lateral extent of the tilted part of the Kumano basin overlies the previously reported high-amplitude part of the mega-splay reflection suggested to have originated from underthrusting of fluid rich sediments. We suggest that the uplift event recorded in the forearc basin corresponded to the formation of the mega-splay fault system and through integration of the sequence stratigraphy with drilling results we can place bounds on the timing of its formation.

  1. Shape analysis of hypertrophic and hypertensive heart disease using MRI-based 3D surface models of left ventricular geometry.

    PubMed

    Ardekani, Siamak; Jain, Saurabh; Sanzi, Alianna; Corona-Villalobos, Celia P; Abraham, Theodore P; Abraham, M Roselle; Zimmerman, Stefan L; Wu, Katherine C; Winslow, Raimond L; Miller, Michael I; Younes, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    The focus of this study was to develop advanced mathematical tools to construct high-resolution 3D models of left-ventricular (LV) geometry to evaluate focal geometric differences between patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and hypertensive heart disease (HHD) using cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) cross-sectional images. A limiting factor in 3D analysis of cardiac MR cross-sections is the low out-of-plane resolution of the acquired images. To overcome this problem, we have developed a mathematical framework to construct a population-based high-resolution 3D LV triangulated surface (template) in which an iterative matching algorithm maps a surface mesh of a normal heart to a set of cross-sectional contours that were extracted from short-axis cine cardiac MR images of patients who were diagnosed with either HCM or HHD. A statistical analysis was conducted on deformations that were estimated at each surface node to identify shape differences at end-diastole (ED), end-systole (ES), and motion-related shape variation from ED to ES. Some significant shape difference in radial thickness was detected at ES. Differences of LV 3D surface geometry were identified focally on the basal anterior septum wall. Further research is needed to relate these findings to the HCM morphological substrate and to design a classifier to discriminate among different etiologies of LV hypertrophy. PMID:26766206

  2. Effects of Training Method and Gender on Learning 2D/3D Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khairulanuar, Samsudin; Nazre, Abd Rashid; Jamilah, H.; Sairabanu, Omar Khan; Norasikin, Fabil

    2010-01-01

    This article reports the findings of an experimental study involving 36 primary school students (16 girls, 20 boys, Mean age = 9.5 years, age range: 8-10 years) in geometrical understanding of 2D and 3D objects. Students were assigned into two experimental groups and one control group based on a stratified random sampling procedure. The first…

  3. Strike-slip fault geometry in Turkey and its influence on earthquake activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barka, A. A.; Kadinsky-Cade, K.

    1988-01-01

    The geometry of Turkish strike-slip faults is reviewed, showing that fault geometry plays an important role in controlling the location of large earthquake rupture segments along the fault zones. It is found that large earthquake ruptures generally do not propagate past individual stepovers that are wider than 5 km or bends that have angles greater than about 30 degrees. It is suggested that certain geometric patterns are responsible for strain accumulation along portions of the fault zone. It is shown that fault geometry plays a role in the characteristics of earthquake behavior and that aftershocks and swarm activity are often associated with releasing areas.

  4. Direct Inversion of Postseismic Deformation for 3D Lithosphere Viscosity Structure and Fault Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hines, T.; Hetland, E. A.

    2014-12-01

    Geodetic measurements of postseismic deformation are rich signals with which the mechanical behavior of the lithosphere can be inferred, predominantly localized fault creep and distributed viscoelastic deformation. Numerous studies have used postseismic deformation to estimate the lithosphere's rheology but they are hindered by potentially computationally intensive forward problems with nonlinear relationships between surface deformation and the rheologic properties. As a result, most studies oversimplify the rheologic structure of the lithosphere and rely on forward estimation methods, such as grid or monte carlo searches. We present a novel method to simultaneously estimate patterns of fault slip and heterogeneous distribution of effective Maxwell viscoelasticity from postseismic deformation. Our method utilizes an approximation which linearizes the viscoelastic contribution to postseismic deformation with respect to the inverse relaxation time of discrete regions in the lithosphere, allowing the use of least squares techniques, akin to seismic tomographic methods. The validity of this approximation is inversely proportional to the time since the main rupture and holds for roughly as long as the lowest relaxation time in the lithosphere proximal to the coseismic rupture. Our estimation of both the slip history on a fault and the effective Maxwell relaxation times of the lithosphere takes a matter of minutes. We apply our method to postseismic deformation following the 2010 El Mayor earthquake, as well as the 1999 İzmit-Düzce earthquake sequence. We discuss the significance of both fault creep and three dimensional viscosity structure in describing postseismic deformation.

  5. The Akaso field, Nigeria: Use of integrated 3-D seismic/fault slicing/clay shearing on fault trapping and dynamic leakage

    SciTech Connect

    Jev, B.I.; Kaars-Sijpestein, C.H.; Wilkie, J.T. ); Peters, M.P.M.A. )

    1991-03-01

    The Akaso field on the Eastern Niger delta (STOIIP 401 MMstb) is separated from the large Cawthorne Channel field (STOIIP 1307 MMstb) by a major antithetic fault. In 1989 3-D seismic data revealed a subtle back-split off this antithetic to the west of the main Akaso field, behind which stacked amplitude anomalies occurred extending to the tip line of the back-split. Fault slicing and clay smear studies of the back-split and main antithetic indicated strong seal potential with occasional leak windows. These results were fully confirmed by a deviated appraisal well in late 1989 that found 183 MMstb STOIIP in a series of stacked footwall closures. The trapping potential of this fault can be contrasted with its behavior during depletion based upon RFT data acquired in a series of Akaso development wells in 1990. Depletion of the Akaso E and G sands was observed due to production from the juxtaposed C-D and E sands of Cawthorne Channel and subsequent fault breakdown. Dynamic pressure drops of 120 psi and 311 psi observed in the Akaso field therefore represent a prime example of the trapping potential of clay-smeared faults and their subsequent leakage during differential depletion.

  6. Geometry-based vs. intensity-based medical image registration: A comparative study on 3D CT data.

    PubMed

    Savva, Antonis D; Economopoulos, Theodore L; Matsopoulos, George K

    2016-02-01

    Spatial alignment of Computed Tomography (CT) data sets is often required in numerous medical applications and it is usually achieved by applying conventional exhaustive registration techniques, which are mainly based on the intensity of the subject data sets. Those techniques consider the full range of data points composing the data, thus negatively affecting the required processing time. Alternatively, alignment can be performed using the correspondence of extracted data points from both sets. Moreover, various geometrical characteristics of those data points can be used, instead of their chromatic properties, for uniquely characterizing each point, by forming a specific geometrical descriptor. This paper presents a comparative study reviewing variations of geometry-based, descriptor-oriented registration techniques, as well as conventional, exhaustive, intensity-based methods for aligning three-dimensional (3D) CT data pairs. In this context, three general image registration frameworks were examined: a geometry-based methodology featuring three distinct geometrical descriptors, an intensity-based methodology using three different similarity metrics, as well as the commonly used Iterative Closest Point algorithm. All techniques were applied on a total of thirty 3D CT data pairs with both known and unknown initial spatial differences. After an extensive qualitative and quantitative assessment, it was concluded that the proposed geometry-based registration framework performed similarly to the examined exhaustive registration techniques. In addition, geometry-based methods dramatically improved processing time over conventional exhaustive registration. PMID:26771247

  7. Grounding line migration as response to cycles of sliding pertubations and initial geometries in the MISMIP3D experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieschlag, Moritz; Kleiner, Thomas; Humbert, Angelika

    2014-05-01

    The benchmark experiment MISMIP3D (Pattyn et al., 2013) investigated the response of a artificial ice stream-ice shelf system to a sliding perturbation. We continued this experiment by applying cycles of pertubations at different time scales in order to see the long term response of the grounding line positions to changes in basal sliding. For this purpose we applied the finite-difference full-Stokes model TIM-FD3 on 2.5km and 1.25km using three different initial geometries. We found that our steady-state geometry shows a strong dependency of the grounding line position on the horizontal grid size and the chosen initial geometry. Not all experiments show a neutral equilibrium in subsequent basal sliding perturbation simulations.

  8. The Emergence of 3D Geometry from Children's (Teacher-Guided) Classification Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Wolff-Michael; Thom, Jennifer S.

    2009-01-01

    Geometry, classification, and the classification of geometrical objects are integral aspects of recent curriculum documents in mathematics education. Such curriculum documents, however, leave open how the "work" of classifying objects according to geometrical properties can be accomplished given that the knowledge of these properties is the…

  9. Modeling 3-D flow in the mantle wedge with complex slab geometries: Comparisons with seismic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kincaid, C. R.; MacDougall, J. G.; Druken, K. A.; Fischer, K. M.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding patterns in plate scale mantle flow in subduction zones is key to models of thermal structure, dehydration reactions, volatile distributions and magma generation and transport in convergent margins. Different patterns of flow in the mantle wedge can generate distinct signatures in seismological observables. Observed shear wave fast polarization directions in several subduction zones are inconsistent with predictions of simple 2-D wedge corner flow. Geochemical signatures in a number of subduction zones also indicate 3-D flow and entrainment patterns in the wedge. We report on a series of laboratory experiments on subduction driven flow to characterize spatial and temporal variability in 3-D patterns in flow and shear-induced finite strain. Cases focus on how rollback subduction, along-strike dip changes in subducting plates and evolving gaps or tears in subduction zones control temporal-spatial patterns in 3-D wedge flow. Models utilize a glucose working fluid with a temperature dependent viscosity to represent the upper 2000 km of the mantle. Subducting lithosphere is modeled with two rubber-reinforced continuous belts. Belts pass around trench and upper/lower mantle rollers. The deeper rollers can move laterally to allow for time varying dip angle. Each belt has independent speed control and dip adjustment, allowing for along-strike changes in convergence rate and the evolution of slab gaps. Rollback is modeled using a translation system to produce either uniform and asymmetric lateral trench motion. Neutral density finite strain markers are distributed throughout the fluid and used as proxies for tracking the evolution of anisotropy through space and time in the evolving flow fields. Particle image velocimetry methods are also used to track time varying 3-D velocity fields for directly calculating anisotropy patterns. Results show that complex plate motions (rollback, steepening) and morphologies (gaps) in convergent margins produce flows with marked differences from previous 2-D model simulations. Anisotropy alignments reveal complex spatial and temporal patterns near plate edges and near slab windows. In particular, results show that slab windows produce strong deviations in wedge flow and transport pathways for material entering the wedge in cases with and without trench rollback. Results also highlight the importance of initial strain marker orientations, particularly near slab edges and on the ocean-side of the slab in controlling the temporal evolution of alignment patterns in the wedge.

  10. High-precision differential earthquake location in 3-D models: evidence for a rheological barrier controlling the microseismicity at the Irpinia fault zone in southern Apennines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Landro, Grazia; Amoroso, Ortensia; Stabile, Tony Alfredo; Matrullo, Emanuela; Lomax, Antony; Zollo, Aldo

    2015-12-01

    A non-linear, global-search, probabilistic, double-difference earthquake location technique is illustrated. The main advantages of this method are the determination of comprehensive and complete solutions through the probability density function (PDF), the use of differential arrival times as data and the possibility to use a 3-D velocity model both for absolute and double-difference locations, all of which help to obtain accurate differential locations in structurally complex geological media. The joint use of this methodology and an accurate differential time data set allowed us to carry out a high-resolution, earthquake location analysis, which helps to characterize the active fault geometries in the studied region. We investigated the recent microseismicity occurring at the Campanian-Lucanian Apennines in the crustal volume embedding the fault system that generated the 1980 MS 6.9 earthquake in Irpinia. In order to obtain highly accurate seismicity locations, we applied the method to the P and S arrival time data set from 1312 events (ML < 3.1) that occurred from August 2005 to April 2011 and used the 3-D P- and S-wave velocity models optimized for the area under study. Both manually refined and cross-correlation refined absolute arrival times have been used. The refined seismicity locations show that the events occur in a volume delimited by the faults activated during the 1980 MS 6.9 Irpinia earthquake on subparallel, predominantly normal faults. We find an abrupt interruption of the seismicity across an SW-NE oriented structural discontinuity corresponding to a contact zone between different rheology rock formations (carbonate platform and basin residuals). This `barrier' appears to be located in the area bounded by the fault segments activated during the first (0 s) and the second (18 s) rupture episodes of the 1980s Irpinia earthquake. We hypothesize that this geometrical barrier could have played a key role during the 1980 Irpinia event, and possibly controlled the delayed times of activation of the two rupture segments.

  11. High precision Differential Earthquake Location in 3D models: Evidence for a rheological barrier controlling the microseismicity at the Irpinia fault zone in southern Apennines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Landro, Grazia; Amoroso, Ortensia; Alfredo Stabile, Tony; Matrullo, Emanuela; Lomax, Anthony; Zollo, Aldo

    2015-04-01

    A non-linear, global-search, probabilistic, double-difference earthquake location technique is illustrated. The main advantages of this method are the determination of comprehensive and complete solutions through the probability density function (PDF), the use of differential arrival-times as data, and the possibility to use a 3D velocity model both for absolute and relative locations, essential to obtain accurate differentials locations in structurally complex geological media. The joint use of this methodology and an accurate differential times data-set allowed us to carry out an high-resolution, earthquake location analysis, which helped to characterize the active fault geometries in the studied region. We investigated the recent micro-seismicity occurring at the Campanian-Lucanian Apennines, in the crustal volume embedding the fault system which generated the 1980, M 6.9 earthquake in Irpinia. In order to obtain highly accurate seismicity locations we applied the method to the P and S arrival time data set from 1312 events (M<3) that occurred from August 2005 to April 2011, and used the 3D P- and S-wave velocity models, optimized for the area under study. Both catalogue and cross-correlation first arrival-times have been used. The refined seismicity locations show that the events occur in a volume delimited by the faults activated during the 1980 Irpinia M 6.9 earthquake on sub-parallel, predominantly normal faults. Corresponding to a contact zone between different rheology rock formations (carbonate platform and basin residuals), we evidence an abrupt interruption of the seismicity across a SW-NE oriented structural discontinuity. This "barrier" appears to be located in the area bounded by the fault segments activated during the first (0 sec) and the second (20 sec) rupture episodes of the 80's Irpinia earthquake. We hypothesize that this geometrical barrier can have played a key role during the 1980 Irpinia event, and possibly controlled the delayed times of activation of the two rupture segments.

  12. Large scale 3D geometry of deformation structures in the Aar massif and overlying Helvetic nappes (Central Alps, Switzerland) - A combined remote sensing and field work approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumberger, R.; Wehrens, Ph.; Herwegh, M.

    2012-04-01

    Allowing deep insight into the formation history of a rock complex, shear zones, faults and joint systems represent important sources of geological information. The granitic rocks of the Haslital valley (Switzerland) show very good outcrop conditions to study these mechanical anisotropies. Furthermore, they permit a quantitative characterisation of the above-mentioned deformation structures on the large-scale, in terms of their 3D orientation, 3D spatial distribution, kinematics and evolution in 3D. A key problem while developing valid geological 3D models is the three-dimensional spatial distribution of geological structures, particularly with increasing distance from the surface. That is especially true in regions, where only little or even no "hard" underground data (e.g. bore holes, tunnel mappings and seismics) is available. In the study area, many subsurface data are available (e.g. cross sections, tunnel and pipeline mappings, bore holes etc.). Therefore, two methods dealing with the problems mentioned are developed: (1) A data acquisition, processing and visualisation method, (2) A methodology to improve the reliability of 3D models regarding the spatial trend of geological structures with increasing depth: 1) Using aerial photographs and a high-resolution digital elevation model, a GIS-based remote-sensing structural map of large-scale structural elements (shear zones, faults) of the study area was elaborated. Based on that lineament map, (i) a shear zone map was derived and (ii) a geostatistical analysis was applied to identify sub regions applicable for serving as field areas to test the methodology presented above. During fieldwork, the shear zone map was evaluated by verifying the occurrence and spatial distribution of the structures designated by remote sensing. Additionally, the geometry of the structures (e.g. 3D orientation, width, kinematics) was characterised and parameterised accordingly. These tasks were partially done using a GPS based Slate PC and the FieldMoveTM software, in order to ease the subsequent data processing. 2) Findings from the field work were visualised in 3D using the MoveTM software suite. Applying its specific tools and incorporating own field data, the structure's near-surface 3D settings was modelled. In a second step, the combined use of surface and subsurface data helped to predict their trend with increasing distance from the surface, bypassing a height difference of partially more than 2000m. Field work shows that the remote-sensing structural map fits very well with the field observations. Nevertheless, the shear zone map underwent an iterative refinement process, based on own observations in the field as well as on already existing maps. It now clearly describes the lithological subdivision of the study area. The incorporation of the data into the 3D modelling software points towards the fact, that own large-scale data fits very well with small-scale structures provided by recent studies in the same area. Yet, their exact interplay in terms of orientation, kinematics and evolution is not clear. Additional analysis is needed in order to gain more detailed insight into the deformation history of the rocks in the study area.

  13. Stratigraphic architecture and fault offsets of alluvial terraces at Te Marua, Wellington fault, New Zealand, revealed by pseudo-3D GPR investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauprêtre, S.; Manighetti, I.; Garambois, S.; Malavieille, J.; Dominguez, S.

    2013-08-01

    earthquake slips on faults are commonly determined by measuring morphological offsets at current ground surface. Because those offsets might not always be well preserved, we examine whether the first 10 m below ground surface contains relevant information to complement them. We focus on the Te Marua site, New Zealand, where 11 alluvial terraces have been dextrally offset by the Wellington fault. We investigated the site using pseudo-3D Ground Penetrating Radar and also produced a high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM) of the zone to constrain the surface slip record. The GPR data reveal additional information: (1) they image the 3D stratigraphic architecture of the seven youngest terraces and show that they are strath terraces carved into graywacke bedrock. Each strath surface is overlain by 3-5 m of horizontally bedded gravel sheets, including two pronounced and traceable reflectors; (2) thanks to the multilayer architecture, terrace risers and channels are imaged at three depths and their lateral offsets can be measured three to four times, constraining respective offsets and their uncertainties more reliably; and (3) the offsets are better preserved in the subsurface than at the ground surface, likely due to subsequent erosion-deposition on the latter. From surface and subsurface data, we infer that Te Marua has recorded six cumulative offsets of 2.9, 7.6, 18, 23.2, 26, and 31 m (± 1-2 m). Large earthquakes on southern Wellington fault might produce 3-5 m of slip, slightly less than previously proposed. Pseudo-3D GPR thus provides a novel paleoseismological tool to complement and refine surface investigations.

  14. The Monte Carlo SRNA-VOX code for 3D proton dose distribution in voxelized geometry using CT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilic, Radovan D.; Spasic-Jokic, Vesna; Belicev, Petar; Dragovic, Milos

    2005-03-01

    This paper describes the application of the SRNA Monte Carlo package for proton transport simulations in complex geometry and different material compositions. The SRNA package was developed for 3D dose distribution calculation in proton therapy and dosimetry and it was based on the theory of multiple scattering. The decay of proton induced compound nuclei was simulated by the Russian MSDM model and our own using ICRU 63 data. The developed package consists of two codes: the SRNA-2KG, which simulates proton transport in combinatorial geometry and the SRNA-VOX, which uses the voxelized geometry using the CT data and conversion of the Hounsfield's data to tissue elemental composition. Transition probabilities for both codes are prepared by the SRNADAT code. The simulation of the proton beam characterization by multi-layer Faraday cup, spatial distribution of positron emitters obtained by the SRNA-2KG code and intercomparison of computational codes in radiation dosimetry, indicate immediate application of the Monte Carlo techniques in clinical practice. In this paper, we briefly present the physical model implemented in the SRNA package, the ISTAR proton dose planning software, as well as the results of the numerical experiments with proton beams to obtain 3D dose distribution in the eye and breast tumour.

  15. Applying and validating the RANS-3D flow-solver for evaluating a subsonic serpentine diffuser geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, Michael J.; Won, Mark J.; Cosentino, Gary B.; Te, Alexander

    1993-01-01

    Subsonic inlet ducts for advanced, high-performance aircraft are evolving towards complex three-dimensional shapes for reasons of overall integration and weight. These factors lead to diffuser geometries that may sacrifice inlet performance, unless careful attention to design details and boundary layer management techniques are employed. The ability of viscous computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis of such geometries to aid the aircraft configurator in this complex design problem is herein examined. The RANS-3D Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solver is applied to model the complex flowfield occurring in a representative diffuser geometry and the solutions are compared to experimental results from a static test of the inlet duct. The computational results are shown to compare very favorably with experimental results over a range of mass flow rates, including those involving large amounts of separation in the diffuser. In addition, a novel grid topology is presented, and two turbulence models are evaluated in this study as part of the RANS-3D code.

  16. 3D field solver in toroidal geometry for the long wavelength E&M modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janhunen, Salomon; Wang, Bei; Hesthaven, Jan; Adams, Mark; Ku, Seung-Hoe; Chang, Choong-Seock

    2014-10-01

    Gyrokinetic simulations - such as those performed by the XGC code - provide a self-consistent framework to investigate a wide range of physics in strongly magnetized high temperature laboratory plasmas, global modes usually considered to be in the realm of MHD simulations. However, the present simulation models generally concentrate on short wavelength electro-magnetic modes mostly to convenience the field solver performance. To incorporate more global fluid-like modes, also non-zonal long wavelength physics needs to be retained. In this work we present development of a fully 3D mixed FEM/FDM electro-magnetic field solver for the gyrokinetic code XGC1. We present optimization for use on massively parallel computational platforms, investigation of numerical accuracy characteristics using the method of manufactured solutions and evaluate the regime of validity for the current physics model. Center for Edge Physics Simulation.

  17. 3D simulations of the early stages of AGN jets: geometry, thermodynamics and backflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cielo, S.; Antonuccio-Delogu, V.; Macciò, A. V.; Romeo, A. D.; Silk, J.

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the interplay between jets from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM) through full 3D, high-resolution, adaptive mesh refinement simulations performed with the FLASH code. We follow the jet-ISM system for several Myr in its transition from an early, compact source to an extended one including a large cocoon. During the jet evolution, we identify three major evolutionary stages and we find that, contrary to the prediction of popular theoretical models, none of the simulations shows a self-similar behaviour. We also follow the evolution of the energy budget, and find that the fraction of input power deposited into the ISM (the AGN coupling constant) is of the order of a few per cent during the first few Myr. This is in broad agreement with galaxy formation models employing AGN feedback. However, we find that in these early stages, this energy is deposited only in a small fraction (<1 per cent) of the total ISM volume. Finally, we demonstrate the relevance of backflows arising within the extended cocoon generated by a relativistic AGN jet within the ISM of its host galaxy, previously proposed as a mechanism for self-regulating the gas accretion on to the central object. These backflows tend later to be destabilized by the 3D dynamics, rather than by hydrodynamic (Kelvin-Helmholtz) instabilities. Yet, in the first few hundred thousand years, backflows may create a central accretion region of significant extent, and convey there as much as a few millions of solar masses.

  18. The Geometry of the Subducting Slabs Beneath the PRVI Microplate Based on 3D Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Keller, G. R.; Holland, A. A.; Keranen, K. M.; Li, H.

    2011-12-01

    The Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands (PRVI) microplate is located between two subduction zones, with the Puerto Rico trench to the north and the Muertos trough to the south. The Puerto Rico trench is caused by southward-directed subduction of the North American Plate, and the Muertos trough is the northern boundary of the Caribbean Plate. There is no active volcanism on Puerto Rico; however, earthquake depths and seismic tomography imply that the slab of Caribbean plate continues northward beneath Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico overlies these two slabs with extension to both the west (Mona Passage) and southeast (Anacapa Passage). The cause of the extension is unknown, but GPS measurements show that Puerto Rico is experiencing anti-clockwise rotation, and the extension associated with the Anacapa Passage may be produced by this rotation. To the west, it is debated whether the Mona Passage is a boundary between two micro-plates or simple a local rift basin. To address the sources of the extension and the cause of the rotation, we are investigating if the deep structures can be the dynamic source for the observed kinematic movements. We collected data on earthquakes occurring between 2009-2011 in the PRVI region and relocated them using the SEISAN code provided by the Institute of Solid Earth Physics, University of Bergen. The FMTOMO code from Australian National University was used for 3D tomography from P and S wave arrival times. By comparing the relocated epicenters and the 3D tomography results, the subducting slabs were identified. When integrated with the results of previous studies, the geometric model of the slabs is a critical key to understanding the evolution of the PRVI microplate in the past and the future.

  19. Geometry Optimization of 3D Micro Gas Thrust Bearing with Partial Parabolic Grooves Texturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongfang; Chao, Huanhuan; Zhang, Xingwang; Liu, Cheng

    In order to maximize the load-carrying capacity of micro gas thrust bearing with parabolic texture grooves for different convergence ratios, a multi-objective optimization approach, combining CFD code and particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm, was employed to implement geometry parametric optimization of textured gas thrust bearing based on Pareto dominance. The optimization results showed that the load-carrying capacity is greatly improved for the bearing with optimized parameters. Based on the optimization results, a set of formulas was proposed to guide the design of micro gas thrust bearing with partial parabolic grooves texturing.

  20. Validation of Direct Numerical Simulations in 3D pore geometries and Large-Eddy Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, Dmitri

    2013-04-01

    Numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes Equations became more popular in recent decades with increasingly accessible and powerful computational resources. Simulations in reconstructed or artificial pore geometries are often performed to gain insight into microscopic fluid flow structures or are used for upscaling quantities of interest, like hydraulic conductivity. A physically adequate representation of pore scale flow fields requires analysis of large domains in combination with turbulence models. We solve incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations in a cubic lattice and cubic close packing of spheres placed in a square duct with Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) and analyze the validity of the results. The influence of the number of spheres and mesh discretization is investigated for fluid flow up to Reynolds numbers of 5000 based on the spheres' diameter. The numerical simulations are performed with the OpenFOAM open-source CFD software. We statistically investigate spatial and temporal properties of the resulting fluid flow field and its kinetic energy spectra, and compare them to Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) performed for the same geometries. Differences between the DNS and LES are discussed together with upscaled hydraulic properties with respect to the number of spheres and the Reynolds number.

  1. Geometry of crustal faults: implications for seismicity distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaven, J. O.; Pollard, D. D.

    2009-12-01

    We investigate the importance of geometric complexity in fault systems using relocated seismicity from a catalog of events for the Joshua Tree - Landers earthquake sequence. The spatial density of seismicity is used to locate finite width fault zones and construct surfaces indicative of the centers of these fault zones. The method indentifies ten separate faults ranging in average strike from north-south to east-west that compare well with surface fault maps. These faults exhibit significant surface curvature with the Joshua Tree fault departing from a planar approximation by more than 2000m. The mechanical effects of the geometrically complex fault surfaces are illustrated using solutions to the quasi-static boundary value problem and investigating the resultant stresses and tractions induced by slip on the Joshua Tree fault before the rupture of the Landers earthquake. We find that the propensity for slip on the Landers faults increased in regions of initiation and largest slip during the subsequent event. The geometrically complex models predict greater propensity to slip along the northern faults involved in the Landers earthquake than the commonly used planar and vertical four-fault models. The stresses adjacent to the Joshua Tree fault are investigated by calculating the changes in Coulomb stresses on optimally oriented surfaces of weakness. We find that the geometrically complex model for Joshua Tree fault predicts the aftershocks immediately following the Joshua Tree earthquake quite well, and better than the planar fault model.

  2. Subsurface geometry and evolution of the Seattle fault zone and the Seattle Basin, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ten Brink, U.S.; Molzer, P.C.; Fisher, M.A.; Blakely, R.J.; Bucknam, R.C.; Parsons, T.; Crosson, R.S.; Creager, K.C.

    2002-01-01

    The Seattle fault, a large, seismically active, east-west-striking fault zone under Seattle, is the best-studied fault within the tectonically active Puget Lowland in western Washington, yet its subsurface geometry and evolution are not well constrained. We combine several analysis and modeling approaches to study the fault geometry and evolution, including depth-converted, deep-seismic-reflection images, P-wave-velocity field, gravity data, elastic modeling of shoreline uplift from a late Holocene earthquake, and kinematic fault restoration. We propose that the Seattle thrust or reverse fault is accompanied by a shallow, antithetic reverse fault that emerges south of the main fault. The wedge enclosed by the two faults is subject to an enhanced uplift, as indicated by the boxcar shape of the shoreline uplift from the last major earthquake on the fault zone. The Seattle Basin is interpreted as a flexural basin at the footwall of the Seattle fault zone. Basin stratigraphy and the regional tectonic history lead us to suggest that the Seattle fault zone initiated as a reverse fault during the middle Miocene, concurrently with changes in the regional stress field, to absorb some of the north-south shortening of the Cascadia forearc. Kingston Arch, 30 km north of the Seattle fault zone, is interpreted as a more recent disruption arising within the basin, probably due to the development of a blind reverse fault.

  3. Non-invasive 3D geometry extraction of a Sea lion foreflipper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Chen; Watson, Martha; Zhang, Pamela; Leftwich, Megan

    2015-11-01

    We are interested in underwater propulsion that leaves little traceable wake structure while producing high levels of thrust. A potential biological model is the California sea lion, a highly maneuverable aquatic mammal that produces thrust primarily with its foreflippers without a characteristic flapping frequency. The foreflippers are used for thrust, stability, and control during swimming motions. Recently, the flipper's kinematics during the thrust phase was extracted using 2D video tracking. This work extends the tracking ability to 3D using a non-invasive Direct Linear Transformation technique employed on non-research sea lions. marker-less flipper tracking is carried out manually for complete dorsal-ventral flipper motions. Two cameras are used (3840 × 2160 pixels resolution), calibrated in space using a calibration target inserted into the sea lion habitat, and synchronized in time using a simple light flash. The repeatability and objectivity of the tracked data is assessed by having two people tracking the same clap and comparing the results. The number of points required to track a flipper with sufficient detail is also discussed. Changes in the flipper pitch angle during the clap, an important feature for fluid dynamics modeling, will also be presented.

  4. Flow properties along field lines in a 3-D tilted-dipole geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzo, V. J.

    1995-01-01

    A 3-D MHD simulation of a global, tilted-dipole solar wind flow pattern is analyzed to determine flow properties along individual magnetic field lines. In the model, flow conditions near the Sun are chosen to provide a reasonable match to the interplanetary configuration prevailing during the recent south polar passage by Ulysses, i.e., a streamer belt inclined approximately 30 deg to the solar equator and speeds ranging from 325-800 km/s. Field lines all across the stream pattern are traced from 1 to 10 AU by following the motion of marker particles embedded in the flow. It is found that those field lines threading the core of the interaction region are subject to significant latitudinal and relative longitudinal displacement over this range of heliocentric distance. Thus, observations taken at a fixed latitude in the inner solar system sample, over the course of a solar rotation, field lines which connect to a range of latitudes in the outer heliosphere. Maps of the field line displacements are presented to help visualize these connections. In addition, it is found that depending upon the location relative to the CIR structure, the radial evolution of fluid elements frozen to different field lines can deviate considerably from that of the canonical solar wind. That is, for selected subsets of field lines, large speed changes (not just at shocks) can be experienced; the density variation can be far from 1/r(exp 2), and the magnetic field intensity need not decay monotonically with distance.

  5. TART97. A Coupled Neutron-Photon 3-D Combinatorial Geometry Monte Carlo Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D

    1997-11-22

    TART97 is a coupled neutron-photon, 3 dimensional, combinatorial geometry, time dependent Monte Carlo transport code. This code can run on any modern computer. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART97 is also incredibly fast: if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared to other similar codes. Use of the entire system can save you a great deal of time and energy. TART 97 is distributed on CD. This CD contains on-line documentation for all codes included in the system, the codes configured to run on a variety of computers, and many example problems that you can use to familiarize yourself with the system. TART97 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that users only use the most recent version of TART97 and ist data files.

  6. A Coupled Neutron-Photon 3-D Combinatorial Geometry Monte Carlo Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, Dermott E.

    1998-06-12

    TART97 is a coupled neutron-photon, 3 dimensional, combinatorial geometry, time dependent Monte Carlo transport code. This code can run on any modern computer. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART97 is also incredibly fast: if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared to other similar codes. Use of the entire system can save you a great deal of time and energy. TART 97 is distributed on CD. This CD contains on-line documentation for all codes included in the system, the codes configured to run on a variety of computers, and many example problems that you can use to familiarize yourself with the system. TART97 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that users only use the most recent version of TART97 and ist data files.

  7. Characterization of 3D filament dynamics in a MAST SOL flux tube geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walkden, N. R.; Dudson, B. D.; Fishpool, G.

    2013-10-01

    Non-linear simulations of filament propagation in a realistic MAST SOL flux tube geometry using the BOUT++ fluid modelling framework show an isolation of the dynamics of the filament in the divertor region from the midplane region due to three features of the magnetic geometry; the variation of magnetic curvature along the field line, the expansion of the flux tube and strong magnetic shear. Of the three effects, the latter two lead to a midplane ballooning feature of the filament, whilst the former leads to a ballooning around the X-points. In simulations containing all three effects the filament is observed to balloon at the midplane, suggesting that the role of curvature variation is sub-dominant to the flux expansion and magnetic shear. The magnitudes of these effects are all strongest near the X-point which leads to the formation of parallel density gradients. The filaments simulated, which represent filaments in MAST, are identified as resistive ballooning, meaning that their motion is inertially limited, not sheath limited. Parallel density gradients can drive the filament towards a Boltzmann response when the collisionalityof the plasma is low. The results here show that the formation of parallel density gradients is a natural and inevitable consequence of a realistic magnetic geometry and therefore the transition to the Boltzmann response is a consequence of the use of realistic magnetic geometry and does not require initializing specifically varying background profiles as in slab simulations. The filaments studied here are stable to the linear resistive drift-wave instability but are subject to the non-linear effects associated with the Boltzmann response, particularly Boltzmann spinning. The Boltzmann response causes the filament to spin on an axis. In later stages of its evolution a non-linear turbulent state develops where the vorticity evolves into a turbulent eddy field on the same length scale as the parallel current. The transition from interchange motion to the Boltzmann response occurs with increasing temperature through a decrease in collisionality. This is confirmed by measuring the correlation between density and potential perturbations within the filament, which is low in the antisymmetric state associated with the interchange mechanism, but high in the Boltzmann regime. In the Boltzmann regime net radial transport is drastically reduced whilst a small net toroidal transport is observed. This suggests that only a subset of filaments, those driven by the interchange mechanism at the separatrix, can propagate into the far SOL. Filaments in the Boltzmann regime will be confined to the near separatrix region and quickly disperse. It is plausible that filaments in both regimes can contribute to the SOL transport observed in experiment; the former by propagating the filament into the far SOL and the latter by dispersion of the density within the filament.

  8. TART97 a coupled neutron-photon 3-D, combinatorial geometry Monte Carlo transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D.E.

    1997-11-22

    TART97 is a coupled neutron-photon, 3 Dimensional, combinatorial geometry, time dependent Monte Carlo transport code. This code can on any modern computer. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART97 is also incredibly FAST; if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared to other similar codes. Use of the entire system can save you a great deal of time and energy. TART97 is distributed on CD. This CD contains on- line documentation for all codes included in the system, the codes configured to run on a variety of computers, and many example problems that you can use to familiarize yourself with the system. TART97 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that users only use the most recent version of TART97 and its data riles.

  9. High order spatial expansion for the method of characteristics applied to 3-D geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Naymeh, L.; Masiello, E.; Sanchez, R.

    2013-07-01

    The method of characteristics is an efficient and flexible technique to solve the neutron transport equation and has been extensively used in two-dimensional calculations because it permits to deal with complex geometries. However, because of a very fast increase in storage requirements and number of floating operations, its direct application to three-dimensional routine transport calculations it is not still possible. In this work we introduce and analyze several modifications aimed to reduce memory requirements and to diminish the computing burden. We explore high-order spatial approximation, the use of intermediary trajectory-dependent flux expansions and the possibility of dynamic trajectory reconstruction from local tracking for typed subdomains. (authors)

  10. Relation Between the 3D-Geometry of the Coronal Wave and Associated CME During the 26 April 2008 Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.; Gopalswamy, N.; Yashiro, S.

    2011-01-01

    We study the kinematical characteristics and 3D geometry of a large-scale coronal wave that occurred in association with the 26 April 2008 flare-CME event. The wave was observed with the EUVI instruments aboard both STEREO spacecraft (STEREO-A and STEREO-B) with a mean speed of approx 240 km/s. The wave is more pronounced in the eastern propagation direction, and is thus, better observable in STEREO-B images. From STEREO-B observations we derive two separate initiation centers for the wave, and their locations fit with the coronal dimming regions. Assuming a simple geometry of the wave we reconstruct its 3D nature from combined STEREO-A and STEREO-B observations. We find that the wave structure is asymmetric with an inclination toward East. The associated CME has a deprojected speed of approx 750 +/- 50 km/s, and it shows a non-radial outward motion toward the East with respect to the underlying source region location. Applying the forward fitting model developed by Thernisien, Howard, and Vourlidas we derive the CME flux rope position on the solar surface to be close to the dimming regions. We conclude that the expanding flanks of the CME most likely drive and shape the coronal wave.

  11. The Role of Faulting on the Growth of a Carbonate Platform: Evidence from 3D Seismic Analysis and Section Restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nur Fathiyah Jamaludin, Siti; Pubellier, Manuel; Prasad Ghosh, Deva; Menier, David; Pierson, Bernard

    2014-05-01

    Tectonics in addition to other environmental factors impacts the growth of carbonate platforms and plays an important role in shaping the internal architecture of the platforms. Detailed of faults and fractures development and healing in carbonate environment have not been explored sufficiently. Using 3D seismic and well data, we attempt to reconstruct the structural evolution of a Miocene carbonate platform in Central Luconia Province, offshore Malaysia. Luconia Province is located in the NW coast of Borneo and has become one of the largest carbonate factories in SE Asia. Seismic interpretations including seismic attribute analysis are applied to the carbonate platform to discern its sedimentology and structural details. Detailed seismic interpretations highlight the relationships of carbonate deposition with syn-depositional faulting. Branching conjugate faults are common in this carbonate platform and have become a template for reef growth, attesting lateral facies changes within the carbonate environments. Structural restoration was then appropriately performed on the interpreted seismic sections based on sequential restoration techniques, and provided images different from those of horizon flattening methods. This permits us to compensate faults' displacement, remove recent sediment layers and finally restore the older rock units prior to the fault motions. It allows prediction of platform evolution as a response to faulting before and after carbonate deposition and also enhances the pitfalls of interpretation. Once updated, the reconstructions allow unravelling of the un-seen geological features underneath the carbonate platform, such as paleo-structures and paleo-topography which in turn reflects the paleo-environment before deformations took place. Interestingly, sections balancing and restoration revealed the late-phase (Late Oligocene-Early Miocene) rifting of South China Sea, otherwise difficult to visualize on seismic sections. Later it is shown that this carbonate platform was possibly originated from two or more connected reef build-ups. The platform evolution in terms of tectonic influences on carbonate growth and development may serve as a case example for re-evaluation of pre-Late Miocene structures as a new potential target for hydrocarbon exploration in Central Luconia Province. Eventually, techniques used in this study might be of interest to oil and gas explorers in carbonate system.

  12. A 3D Computational fluid dynamics model validation for candidate molybdenum-99 target geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lin; Dale, Greg; Vorobieff, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Molybdenum-99 (99Mo) is the parent product of technetium-99m (99mTc), a radioisotope used in approximately 50,000 medical diagnostic tests per day in the U.S. The primary uses of this product include detection of heart disease, cancer, study of organ structure and function, and other applications. The US Department of Energy seeks new methods for generating 99Mo without the use of highly enriched uranium, to eliminate proliferation issues and provide a domestic supply of 99mTc for medical imaging. For this project, electron accelerating technology is used by sending an electron beam through a series of 100Mo targets. During this process a large amount of heat is created, which directly affects the operating temperature dictated by the tensile stress limit of the wall material. To maintain the required temperature range, helium gas is used as a cooling agent that flows through narrow channels between the target disks. In our numerical study, we investigate the cooling performance on a series of new geometry designs of the cooling channel. This research is supported by Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  13. Validation and Analysis of Forward Osmosis CFD Model in Complex 3D Geometries

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Mathias F.; Johnson, Carl J.; Tang, Chuyang; Jensen, Mogens H.; Yde, Lars; Hélix-Nielsen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    In forward osmosis (FO), an osmotic pressure gradient generated across a semi-permeable membrane is used to generate water transport from a dilute feed solution into a concentrated draw solution. This principle has shown great promise in the areas of water purification, wastewater treatment, seawater desalination and power generation. To ease optimization and increase understanding of membrane systems, it is desirable to have a comprehensive model that allows for easy investigation of all the major parameters in the separation process. Here we present experimental validation of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model developed to simulate FO experiments with asymmetric membranes. Simulations are compared with experimental results obtained from using two distinctly different complex three-dimensional membrane chambers. It is found that the CFD model accurately describes the solute separation process and water permeation through membranes under various flow conditions. It is furthermore demonstrated how the CFD model can be used to optimize membrane geometry in such as way as to promote the mass transfer. PMID:24958428

  14. Validation and Analysis of Forward Osmosis CFD Model in Complex 3D Geometries.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Mathias F; Johnson, Carl J; Tang, Chuyang; Jensen, Mogens H; Yde, Lars; Hélix-Nielsen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    In forward osmosis (FO), an osmotic pressure gradient generated across a semi-permeable membrane is used to generate water transport from a dilute feed solution into a concentrated draw solution. This principle has shown great promise in the areas of water purification, wastewater treatment, seawater desalination and power generation. To ease optimization and increase understanding of membrane systems, it is desirable to have a comprehensive model that allows for easy investigation of all the major parameters in the separation process. Here we present experimental validation of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model developed to simulate FO experiments with asymmetric membranes. Simulations are compared with experimental results obtained from using two distinctly different complex three-dimensional membrane chambers. It is found that the CFD model accurately describes the solute separation process and water permeation through membranes under various flow conditions. It is furthermore demonstrated how the CFD model can be used to optimize membrane geometry in such as way as to promote the mass transfer. PMID:24958428

  15. A Coupled Neutron-Photon 3-D Combinatorial Geometry Monte Carlo Transport Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-06-12

    TART97 is a coupled neutron-photon, 3 dimensional, combinatorial geometry, time dependent Monte Carlo transport code. This code can run on any modern computer. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART97 is also incredibly fast: if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared to other similar codes. Use of the entire system canmore » save you a great deal of time and energy. TART 97 is distributed on CD. This CD contains on-line documentation for all codes included in the system, the codes configured to run on a variety of computers, and many example problems that you can use to familiarize yourself with the system. TART97 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that users only use the most recent version of TART97 and ist data files.« less

  16. QUANTIFYING UNCERTAINTIES IN GROUND MOTION SIMULATIONS FOR SCENARIO EARTHQUAKES ON THE HAYWARD-RODGERS CREEK FAULT SYSTEM USING THE USGS 3D VELOCITY MODEL AND REALISTIC PSEUDODYNAMIC RUPTURE MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A; Xie, X

    2008-01-09

    This project seeks to compute ground motions for large (M>6.5) scenario earthquakes on the Hayward Fault using realistic pseudodynamic ruptures, the USGS three-dimensional (3D) velocity model and anelastic finite difference simulations on parallel computers. We will attempt to bound ground motions by performing simulations with suites of stochastic rupture models for a given scenario on a given fault segment. The outcome of this effort will provide the average, spread and range of ground motions that can be expected from likely large earthquake scenarios. The resulting ground motions will be based on first-principles calculations and include the effects of slip heterogeneity, fault geometry and directivity, however, they will be band-limited to relatively low-frequency (< 1 Hz).

  17. 3D Microstructural Investigation of Experimentally Deformed Smectite-rich San Andreas Fault Gouge from the Southern Deforming Zone (SAFOD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojatschke, J.; Scuderi, M.; Warr, L. N.; Saffer, D. M.; Marone, C.

    2014-12-01

    Smectite clays have been recognized to play an important role in fault zone strength and slip behavior. Due to their interaction with fluids, hydrological properties change and lead to a weakening of the fault. Some of the weakest clay gouge has been recovered from SAFOD core along the active Central Deforming Zone of the San Andreas Fault, with a coefficient of friction as low as µ=0.095. We conducted laboratory shearing experiments to investigate the microstructural fabric development and frictional behavior of powders and natural intact fault gouge to characterize differences in mechanical and hydrological properties caused by varying smectite clay fabrics. In this study we used almost pure clay powder from SAF gouge (<63 µm) and mixed it with varying amounts of quartz or SAF clasts (120-500 µm). We sheared gouge layers in a double-direct shear configuration housed in a pressure vessel, at an effective normal stress of σ'n = 5 MPa and under saturated conditions with a pore pressure of 2 MPa. We used a relatively low normal stress to allow recovery of material after the experiments for microstructural investigation. We sheared the layers at a constant velocity of 10 μm/s, followed by a series of slide-hold-slide tests to characterize frictional properties. After the experiments all samples were analyzed using a focused ion beam - scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM) in order to reconstruct the 3D microstructures associated with experimentally induced polished slip surfaces at the micro- to nanometer scale. Initial results document clear stages of clay fabric development related to the clay to clast ratio, which exhibit similarities with naturally developed fabrics. In smectite-dominated mixtures, principle slip surfaces develop parallel to each other, but these features are modified as the clast content increases. With higher clay content strain hardening becomes more prominent. Clay minerals and fabric developed during shear have a strong effect on gouge mechanical and hydrological properties, and therefore likely play a key role in controlling fault gouge slip behavior at seismogenic depth.

  18. GIS based 3D visualization of subsurface and surface lineaments / faults and their geological significance, northern tamil nadu, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravanavel, J.; Ramasamy, S. M.

    2014-11-01

    The study area falls in the southern part of the Indian Peninsular comprising hard crystalline rocks of Archaeozoic and Proterozoic Era. In the present study, the GIS based 3D visualizations of gravity, magnetic, resistivity and topographic datasets were made and therefrom the basement lineaments, shallow subsurface lineaments and surface lineaments/faults were interpreted. These lineaments were classified as category-1 i.e. exclusively surface lineaments, category-2 i.e. surface lineaments having connectivity with shallow subsurface lineaments and category-3 i.e. surface lineaments having connectivity with shallow subsurface lineaments and basement lineaments. These three classified lineaments were analyzed in conjunction with known mineral occurrences and historical seismicity of the study area in GIS environment. The study revealed that the category-3 NNE-SSW to NE-SW lineaments have greater control over the mineral occurrences and the N-S, NNE-SSW and NE-SW, faults/lineaments control the seismicities in the study area.

  19. 3D inclusion trail geometry determination within individual porphyroblasts using reflected light optical microscopy of oriented blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, Mark; Bowden, Douglas; Ord, Alison; Hobbs, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    It is vital to interpret porphyroblast microstructures accurately relative to both one another and to external matrix structures when using them to reconstruct the tectono-metamorphic evolution of orogenic terranes. Mis-interpretation may have profound implications for either the deformation component or the inferred metamorphic reactions resulting in erroneous Pressure-Temperature-time-Deformation (P-T-t-D) trajectories. A number of well-established approaches have been devised for measuring porphyroblast inclusion trails including pitch and strike measurement, 'FitPitch' best-fit plane assignment, and the radial asymmetry method. A long-standing limitation of these methods is that they generally permit only a single measurement to be extracted from each individual porphyroblast, and therefore provide mean 3D orientation data for an entire population. Alternatively, High-Resolution X-ray Computed Tomography (HRXCT) facilitates the imaging of 3D internal geometries within individuals. However, at present significant operating costs render it unviable for routine application to large numbers of samples required for extracting meaningful tectonic interpretations. Here, a new method is presented for the determination of 3D geometries within porphyroblasts using reflected light examination of polished schist material. Reflected light microscopy yields good quality representation of inclusion trails preserved within porphyroblasts. Sectioning oriented samples into small, oriented blocks allows multiple intersections through porphyroblasts (generally >5mm) to be measured via mechanical stage and amalgamated to reconstruct the plane in 3D. The method represents an accessible alternative to HRXCT, which is applicable to any porphyroblastic phase of adequate size to permit at least two intersections. The technique is demonstrated on garnets from the Mesoproterozoic Mount Barren Group, southern Albany-Fraser orogen of S. W. Australia. Porphyroblasts within a structural domain of the Kybalup Schist member of the Mount Barren Group preserve two generations of foliation that have been largely overprinted in the matrix during the effects of subsequent deformation. The earliest generation (S1) was associated with approximately East-West oriented horizontal bulk shortening.

  20. Multiphysics Simulations of the Complex 3D Geometry of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Fuel Elements Using COMSOL

    SciTech Connect

    Freels, James D; Jain, Prashant K

    2011-01-01

    A research and development project is ongoing to convert the currently operating High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from highly-enriched Uranium (HEU U3O8) fuel to low-enriched Uranium (LEU U-10Mo) fuel. Because LEU HFIR-specific testing and experiments will be limited, COMSOL is chosen to provide the needed multiphysics simulation capability to validate against the HEU design data and calculations, and predict the performance of the LEU fuel for design and safety analyses. The focus of this paper is on the unique issues associated with COMSOL modeling of the 3D geometry, meshing, and solution of the HFIR fuel plate and assembled fuel elements. Two parallel paths of 3D model development are underway. The first path follows the traditional route through examination of all flow and heat transfer details using the Low-Reynolds number k-e turbulence model provided by COMSOL v4.2. The second path simplifies the fluid channel modeling by taking advantage of the wealth of knowledge provided by decades of design and safety analyses, data from experiments and tests, and HFIR operation. By simplifying the fluid channel, a significant level of complexity and computer resource requirements are reduced, while also expanding the level and type of analysis that can be performed with COMSOL. Comparison and confirmation of validity of the first (detailed) and second (simplified) 3D modeling paths with each other, and with available data, will enable an expanded level of analysis. The detailed model will be used to analyze hot-spots and other micro fuel behavior events. The simplified model will be used to analyze events such as routine heat-up and expansion of the entire fuel element, and flow blockage. Preliminary, coarse-mesh model results of the detailed individual fuel plate are presented. Examples of the solution for an entire fuel element consisting of multiple individual fuel plates produced by the simplified model are also presented.

  1. Spontaneous wrinkling in azlactone-based functional polymer thin films in 2D and 3D geometries for guided nanopatterning

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, Nathan Muruganathan; Lokitz, Bradley S; Messman, Jamie M; Stafford, Christopher M; Kilbey, II, S Michael

    2013-01-01

    We report a simple, one step process for developing wrinkling patterns in azlactone-based polymer thin films and brushes in 2D and 3D surfaces. The polymer used in this work wrinkles spontaneously upon deposition and solidification on a substrate without applying any external strain to the substrate, with the mode of deposition defining the direction of the wrinkles. Wrinkle formation is shown to occur on a variety of substrates over large areas. We also find that a very thin brush-like layer of an azlactone-containing block copolymer also exhibits wrinkled topology. Given the spontaneity and versatility of wrinkle formation, we further demonstrate two proofs-of-concept, i) that these periodic wrinkled structures are not limited to planar surfaces, but are also developed in complex geometries including tubes, cones and other 3D structures; and ii) that this one-step wrinkling process can be used to guide the deposition of metal nanoparticles and quantum dots, creating a periodic, nanopatterned film.

  2. DIF3D nodal neutronics option for two- and three-dimensional diffusion theory calculations in hexagonal geometry. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, R.D.

    1983-03-01

    A nodal method is developed for the solution of the neutron-diffusion equation in two- and three-dimensional hexagonal geometries. The nodal scheme has been incorporated as an option in the finite-difference diffusion-theory code DIF3D, and is intended for use in the analysis of current LMFBR designs. The nodal equations are derived using higher-order polynomial approximations to the spatial dependence of the flux within the hexagonal-z node. The final equations, which are cast in the form of inhomogeneous response-matrix equations for each energy group, involved spatial moments of the node-interior flux distribution plus surface-averaged partial currents across the faces of the node. These equations are solved using a conventional fission-source iteration accelerated by coarse-mesh rebalance and asymptotic source extrapolation. This report describes the mathematical development and numerical solution of the nodal equations, as well as the use of the nodal option and details concerning its programming structure. This latter information is intended to supplement the information provided in the separate documentation of the DIF3D code.

  3. Three-dimensional geometry of axial magma chamber roof and faults at Lucky Strike volcano on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combier, Violaine; Seher, Tim; Singh, Satish C.; Crawford, Wayne C.; Cannat, Mathilde; Escartín, Javier; Dusunur, Doga

    2015-08-01

    We present results from three-dimensional (3-D) processing of seismic reflection data, acquired in June 2005 over the Lucky Strike volcano on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge as a part of the Seismic Study for Monitoring of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge survey. We use a 3-D tomographic velocity model derived from a coincident ocean bottom seismometer experiment to depth convert the poststack time-migrated seismic volume and provide 3-D geometry of the axial magma chamber roof, fault reflectors, and layer 2A gradient marker. We also generate a high-resolution bathymetric map using the seismic reflection data. The magma chamber roof is imaged at 3.4 ± 0.4 km depth beneath the volcano, and major faults are imaged with dips ranging between 33° and 50°. The magma chamber roof geometry is consistent with a focused melt supply at the segment center and steep across-axis thermal gradients as indicated by the proximity between the magma chamber and nearby faults. Fault scarps on the seafloor and fault dip at depth indicate that tectonic extension accounts for at least 10% of the total plate separation. Shallow dipping reflectors imaged in the upper crust beneath the volcano flanks are interpreted as buried lava flow surfaces.

  4. 3D fold and fault reconstruction with an uncertainty model: An example from an Alpine tunnel case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bistacchi, Andrea; Massironi, Matteo; Dal Piaz, Giorgio V.; Dal Piaz, Giovanni; Monopoli, Bruno; Schiavo, Alessio; Toffolon, Giovanni

    2008-04-01

    In order to improve the railway connection between Austria and Italy, a base tunnel, extending from Fortezza to Innsbruck (57 km), is under study. The design corridor crosscuts a large and strongly tectonized section of the Eastern Alpine chain, characterized by complex metamorphic and igneous lithology and polyphase structures developed under ductile to brittle deformation conditions. In order to model the sub-surface geology of the area, surface and sub-surface geological data have been integrated in a spatial database. 3D geological models of the Italian part of the corridor have been constructed on the basis of this data using two approaches. The first is a more traditional approach, involving the reconstruction of several parallel and intersecting cross-sections. It has been implemented using ArcGIS ® software with custom-developed scripts that enable one to automatically project structural data, collected at the surface and along boreholes, onto cross-sections. The projection direction can be controlled and is based on structural trends obtained from a detailed statistical analysis of orientation data. Other ArcGIS ® scripts enable linking of the network of crosscutting profiles and help to secure their consistency. The second approach involves the compilation of a true 3D geological model in gOcad ®. As far as time efficiency and visualization are concerned, the second approach is more powerful. The basic structural geology assumptions, however, are similar to those applied in the first approach. In addition to the 3D model, compilation scripts (ArcGIS ® and gOcad ®) have been developed, which allow estimation of the uncertainties in the depth extrapolation of structures observed at the surface or along boreholes. These scripts permit the assignment of each projected structural element (i.e., geological boundaries, faults and shear zones) to a parameter estimating reliability. Basic differences between "data-driven" interpolation and "knowledge-based" extrapolation of geological features at depth are also discussed and consequences for the uncertainty estimates of 3D geological models are evaluated.

  5. The role of the Denali fault, slab geometry, and rheology in the deformation of the overriding plate in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadamec, M.; Billen, M. I.; Roeske, S.

    2010-12-01

    Deformation of the North American plate in southern Alaska is characterized by uplift along the subducting plate boundary as well as a region of localized uplift in the Alaskan Range more than 500 km from the plate boundary. This interior plate deformation is spatially coincident with both the Denali Fault zone and the shallow slab in the subsurface. Whether the Denali Fault zone plays a role in localizing uplift in this region is debated and the affect of the change in slab dip on deformation of the overriding plate is also not well understood. We present 3D regional geodynamic models of the North American-Pacific plate boundary corner in southern Alaska that include the Denali fault zone modeled as a lithospheric-scale shear zone. The models include the subducting plate, overriding plate, and underlying mantle to 1500 km depth. The geometry of the subducting plate, defined from Wadati-Benioff zone seismicity and tomography, varies along the length of the Aleutian trench forming a flat slab beneath south central Alaska. The models are run with the finite-element code CitcomCU, modified to include a composite rheology (both Newtonian and non-Newtonian viscosity, as well as a depth-dependent yield stress). The models suggest the flat slab geometry beneath south central Alaska controls several first order deformation features in the overriding plate, including subsidence in the Cook Inlet Basin. To reproduce the localized uplift observed in the central Alaska Range, the models require a non-Newtonian rheology and a localized lithospheric weak zone representative of the Denali Fault, as well as the shallow slab geometry. Models with only a Newtonian viscosity do not reproduce the observed uplift, even when a localized lithospheric weak zone representative of the Denali Fault is included, indicating the importance of including the non-Newtonian mantle rheology for accurately modeling surface plate deformation.

  6. Comparative Simulations of 2D and 3D Mixed Convection Flow in a Faulted Basin: an Example from the Yarmouk Gorge, Israel and Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magri, F.; Inbar, N.; Raggad, M.; Möller, S.; Siebert, C.; Möller, P.; Kuehn, M.

    2014-12-01

    Lake Kinneret (Lake Tiberias or Sea of Galilee) is the most important freshwater reservoir in the Northern Jordan Valley. Simulations that couple fluid flow, heat and mass transport are built to understand the mechanisms responsible for the salinization of this important resource. Here the effects of permeability distribution on 2D and 3D convective patterns are compared. 2D simulations indicate that thermal brine in Haon and some springs in the Yamourk Gorge (YG) are the result of mixed convection, i.e. the interaction between the regional flow from the bordering heights and thermally-driven flow (Magri et al., 2014). Calibration of the calculated temperature profiles suggests that the faults in Haon and the YG provides paths for ascending hot waters, whereas the fault in the Golan recirculates water between 1 and 2 km depths. At higher depths, faults induce 2D layered convection in the surrounding units. The 2D assumption for a faulted basin can oversimplify the system, and the conclusions might not be fully correct. The 3D results also point to mixed convection as the main mechanism for the thermal anomalies. However, in 3D the convective structures are more complex allowing for longer flow paths and residence times. In the fault planes, hydrothermal convection develops in a finger regime enhancing inflow and outflow of heat in the system. Hot springs can form locally at the surface along the fault trace. By contrast, the layered cells extending from the faults into the surrounding sediments are preserved and are similar to those simulated in 2D. The results are consistent with the theory from Zhao et al. (2003), which predicts that 2D and 3D patterns have the same probability to develop given the permeability and temperature ranges encountered in geothermal fields. The 3D approach has to be preferred to the 2D in order to capture all patterns of convective flow, particularly in the case of planar high permeability regions such as faults. Magri, F., et al., 2014. Potential salinization mechanisms of drinking water due to large-scale flow of brines across faults in the Tiberias Basin. Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 16, Abstract No: EGU2014-8236-1, Wien, AustriaZhao, C., et al., 2003. Convective instability of 3-D fluid-saturated geological fault zones heated from below. Geophysical Journal International, 155, 213-220

  7. Control of faults on the 3D coupled fluid and heat transport in a geothermal site (Gross Schönebeck, NE-German Basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherubini, Y.; Cacace, M.; Scheck-Wenderoth, M.

    2011-12-01

    Studies that quantify the influence of faults on the fluid and heat transfer in 3D are still sparse. Faults have a significant impact on physical processes controlling heat transfer and fluid motion in the subsurface as they disturb the conformal succession of geological layers. Depending on their hydraulic properties, faults can act either as preferential pathways or as barriers to fluid flow (Barton et al. 1995). It is important to understand the role of faults and their impact on the thermal field for exploitation of geothermal energy. We improved an existing 3D structural model of the geothermal site "Gross Schönebeck" (Moeck et al. 2005) to carry out coupled fluid and heat transfer simulations. The coupled non-linear partial differential equations describing fluid flow and heat transport in a saturated porous medium are numerically solved by the finite element software FEFLOW° (Diersch, 2002). Simulation results are validated with borehole data. The geological model covers an area of 55 x 50 km. It integrates 18 sedimentary layers of Carboniferous to Quaternary age and reaches down to 5 km depth. An up to 1200 m thick Upper Permian (Zechstein) salt layer decouples two fault systems. We focus on the subsalt fault system which comprises the reservoir target zone and which includes major NW-SE and minor NE-SW trending faults cutting the lower part of the model. The major intersecting faults of the subsalt system are integrated as vertical discrete elements within the numerical model. By discrimination of critically stressed and extensional faults within the current stress field, the hydraulic conductivity of the faults is assessed (Moeck et al. 2009). The impact of the main fault characterising parameters, - the permeability and effective width of the fault-, are investigated by sensitivity analyses. We present outcomes from these simulations by comparing them with results from conductive and coupled fluid and heat transfer simulations obtained from models that do not integrate faults. The results pioneer in that they treat the fault-induced transport of fluid and heat in 3D. We find that faults can strongly alter the fluid regime as well as the temperature evolution in response to their contrasting hydraulic properties with respect to the surrounding matrix.

  8. 3-D Magnetic Field Geometry of the October 28, 2003 ICME: Comparison with SMEI White-Light Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, E. A.; Mulligan, T.; Jackson, B. V.; Tokumaru, M.

    2006-12-01

    Multiple reconstructions of the October 28-29, 2003 CME/ICME using white-light observations, ground-based cosmic-ray and in situ magnetic field flux rope modeling show two possible flux-rope configurations that pass Earth on opposite sides of the central symmetry axis of the disturbance. An analysis of flux rope model geometries initiated over a wide range in parameter space to test the uniqueness of the single spacecraft inversion reveals the fit is degenerate over a range of impact parameters such that two solutions are obtained. In one case (fit A) the disturbance passes Earth to the west of the rope center with the rope axis at a low inclination of 20 deg to the ecliptic, similar to the ground-based flux rope analysis by Kuwabara et al.~(2004). In the second case (fit B) the disturbance passes Earth to the east of the flux rope axis, with the rope axis more highly inclined at 42 deg from the ecliptic, consistent with the SMEI white-light analysis of Jackson et al.~(2006). The current densities in both solutions indicate a nearly force-free structure. Multipoint studies of ICMEs show the radius of curvature in the plane of the rope is between that of a dipole field line connected to the Sun and that of a circular field line connected to the Sun. Assuming a dipole field geometry for the large- scale axial field curvature of the rope results in a 3-D reconstruction for case B that is consistent with the loop structure and observed speed in the white-light LASCO images and SMEI density reconstruction, but not for case A. Multipoint measurements of large-scale solar wind transients is one of the key objectives of the Stereo mission, allowing more accurate 3-D reconstructions of in situ data for comparison with white-light observations. Until they become available, the large-scale axial field orientation and loop geometry of these rope reconstructions provides another tool to constrain magnetic flux rope fits of ICMEs using single spacecraft measurements.

  9. Density structure and geometry of the Costa Rican subduction zone from 3-D gravity modeling and local earthquake data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lücke, O. H.; Arroyo, I. G.

    2015-10-01

    The eastern part of the oceanic Cocos Plate presents a heterogeneous crustal structure due to diverse origins and ages as well as plate-hot spot interactions which originated the Cocos Ridge, a structure that converges with the Caribbean Plate in southeastern Costa Rica. The complex structure of the oceanic plate directly influences the dynamics and geometry of the subduction zone along the Middle American Trench. In this paper an integrated interpretation of the slab geometry in Costa Rica is presented based on 3-D density modeling of combined satellite and surface gravity data, constrained by available geophysical and geological data and seismological information obtained from local networks. The results show the continuation of steep subduction geometry from the Nicaraguan margin into northwestern Costa Rica, followed by a moderate dipping slab under the Central Cordillera toward the end of the Central American Volcanic Arc. Contrary to commonly assumed, to the southeast end of the volcanic arc, our preferred model shows a steep, coherent slab that extends up to the landward projection of the Panama Fracture Zone. Overall, a gradual change in the depth of the intraplate seismicity is observed, reaching 220 km in the northwestern part, and becoming progressively shallower toward the southeast, where it reaches a maximum depth of 75 km. The changes in the terminal depth of the observed seismicity correlate with the increased density in the modeled slab. The absence of intermediate depth (> 75 km) intraplate seismicity in the southeastern section and the higher densities for the subducted slab in this area, support a model in which dehydration reactions in the subducted slab cease at a shallower depth, originating an anhydrous and thus aseismic slab.

  10. Software development for a 3D gravity inversion and application to study of the Border Ranges Fault System, south-central Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, Rolando

    The Border Ranges Fault System (BRFS) bounds the Cook Inlet and Susitna Basins, and is an important petroleum province within south-central Alaska. A primary goal of our research is to test several plausible models of structure along the BRFS using a novel three-dimensional inversion technique utilizing gravity data, constrained with other geophysical, borehole and surface geological information. This research involves the development of 3D inversion modeling software using C++ Builder from Embarcadero's XE2 Suite. The novel inversion approach directly models known geology with a priori uncertainties assigned to the geologic model to allow researchers to compare alternative interpretations. This technique was developed to evaluate three-dimensional structure in regions of complex and poorly known geology. Our software computes the density solution of a geologic structure by utilizing its location within the gravity field as well as the gridded surface files of known topography and subsurface units. The total gravitational effect of each body is calculated with a series of semi-infinite vertical line elements which improves the computational efficiency of computing forward models of structures with extremely complex geometry. The inversion algorithm considers a priori geophysical constraints and uncertainties due to gravity measurements, surface file inconsistencies, and forward calculations in the model solution. In addition, a Kalman-based filtering estimator is used to minimize our observation and processing noise. The estimator allows the a posteriori covariance matrix to avoid its dependence on the non-singularity of the Jacobian (model) matrix.

  11. 3D geometrical inspection of complex geometry parts using a novel laser triangulation sensor and a robot.

    PubMed

    Brosed, Francisco Javier; Aguilar, Juan José; Guillomía, David; Santolaria, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses different non contact 3D measuring strategies and presents a model for measuring complex geometry parts, manipulated through a robot arm, using a novel vision system consisting of a laser triangulation sensor and a motorized linear stage. First, the geometric model incorporating an automatic simple module for long term stability improvement will be outlined in the article. The new method used in the automatic module allows the sensor set up, including the motorized linear stage, for the scanning avoiding external measurement devices. In the measurement model the robot is just a positioning of parts with high repeatability. Its position and orientation data are not used for the measurement and therefore it is not directly "coupled" as an active component in the model. The function of the robot is to present the various surfaces of the workpiece along the measurement range of the vision system, which is responsible for the measurement. Thus, the whole system is not affected by the robot own errors following a trajectory, except those due to the lack of static repeatability. For the indirect link between the vision system and the robot, the original model developed needs only one first piece measuring as a "zero" or master piece, known by its accurate measurement using, for example, a Coordinate Measurement Machine. The strategy proposed presents a different approach to traditional laser triangulation systems on board the robot in order to improve the measurement accuracy, and several important cues for self-recalibration are explored using only a master piece. Experimental results are also presented to demonstrate the technique and the final 3D measurement accuracy. PMID:22346569

  12. 3D Geometrical Inspection of Complex Geometry Parts Using a Novel Laser Triangulation Sensor and a Robot

    PubMed Central

    Brosed, Francisco Javier; Aguilar, Juan José; Guillomía, David; Santolaria, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses different non contact 3D measuring strategies and presents a model for measuring complex geometry parts, manipulated through a robot arm, using a novel vision system consisting of a laser triangulation sensor and a motorized linear stage. First, the geometric model incorporating an automatic simple module for long term stability improvement will be outlined in the article. The new method used in the automatic module allows the sensor set up, including the motorized linear stage, for the scanning avoiding external measurement devices. In the measurement model the robot is just a positioning of parts with high repeatability. Its position and orientation data are not used for the measurement and therefore it is not directly “coupled” as an active component in the model. The function of the robot is to present the various surfaces of the workpiece along the measurement range of the vision system, which is responsible for the measurement. Thus, the whole system is not affected by the robot own errors following a trajectory, except those due to the lack of static repeatability. For the indirect link between the vision system and the robot, the original model developed needs only one first piece measuring as a “zero” or master piece, known by its accurate measurement using, for example, a Coordinate Measurement Machine. The strategy proposed presents a different approach to traditional laser triangulation systems on board the robot in order to improve the measurement accuracy, and several important cues for self-recalibration are explored using only a master piece. Experimental results are also presented to demonstrate the technique and the final 3D measurement accuracy. PMID:22346569

  13. 3D coseismic deformation inversion of Wenchuan Ms8.0 earthquake with D-InSAR and the fault movement model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. L.; Wu, J. C.; Guo, L. Y.; Wang, X. Y.; Tan, H. B.; Shen, C. Y.

    2015-08-01

    Conventional D-InSAR (Differential SAR Interferometry) can only monitor 1-D surface deformation along LOS (line of sight) direction. In order to overcome this limitation and extract 3-D coseismic displacement, we combine the LOS displacement derived from D-InSAR technology, the OKADA elastic half space dislocation model theory, jointly the surface rupture distribution by field investigations and the fault model inverted by GPS, level data and gravity survey to retrieve the directions of surface co-seismic displacement, and then have got Wenchuan Ms8.0 Earthquake 3D displacement. Firstly, thirty six L-band PALSAR images of six adjacent ascending tracks are processed with D-InSAR technology to obtain the coseismic displacements along LOS direction. According to the OKADA model and the thrust fault movement model of the Long-Men-Shan Fault , we specify the three directions of surface coseismic displacements. And thus the 3D coseismic displacement field is then recovered by using LOS displacement and relevant geometric projection formulas, obviously including horizontal displacements field and vertical deformation contour maps. By comparing with the 3D displacement estimated from OKADA dislocation model and fault model, the displacement retrieved in this study can give more detail, and reflect seismic characteristics more truly.

  14. Preliminary 3D Depth Migration of a Network of 2D Seismic Lines for Fault Imaging at a Pyramid Lake, Nevada Geothermal Prospect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frary, R.; Louie, J. N.; Pullammanappallil, S.; Eisses, A.

    2011-12-01

    Many of the current geothermal power plants in western Nevada are found in extensional regimes that are associated with dilational faults and fault intersections. Most of these systems are blind and require advanced seismic imaging techniques to map target faults and reduce drilling risk. Surface features including fumaroles, hot springs, or hydrothermal deposits, like travertine and tufa, are indicators of a potential geothermal resource at depth, which still require advanced seismic imaging techniques for efficient development. One of the most notable locations of tufa deposits in western Nevada is in and around Pyramid Lake. With the abundant hydrothermal venting in the area, the tufa deposits indicate a prime locations for geothermal exploration. In 2010 and previous years, we collected about 38 km of vibroseis reflection data in a network of sixteen 2D lines of various orientations off the northwest side of Pyramid Lake. Most of these lines are within an area of only 10 square km. The 2010 survey used three heavy vibrators, and recorded 6-sec records of 8-sec, 10-100 Hz linear sweeps. Source and receiver spacing varied from 17-67 m, with up to 240 channels live for maximum offsets varying from 1000-5000 m, depending on line length. Preliminary 2D processing with first-arrival velocity optimization shows strong fault-plane reflections and several sets of stratigraphic terminations against faults. We interpret three sets of faults, which appear to intersect at about 1.25 km depth. Despite the three fault sets each appearing on several lines, only the lines trending perpendicular to fault strike show direct imaging of fault-plane reflections. We hypothesize that a 3D depth migration will reveal additional direct images of the faults. We are testing this hypothesis with a 3D Kirchhoff prestack migration of the data from this dense network of 2D lines. The 3D depth migration will take full account of lateral velocity changes. This migration should directly image additional steeply dipping fault planes at this prospect. The Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe will use this information to build 3D geologic and hydrologic models for geothermal power development.

  15. The foundation of 3D geometry model in omni-directional laser warning system based on diffuse reflection detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weian; Wang, Long; Dong, Qixin

    2011-06-01

    The omni-directional laser warning equipment based on infrared fish-eye lens and short-wave infrared FPA has been used to protect large-scale targets, which can detect the threat laser scattered by the attacked targets or the objects surrounding them, and image the laser spot on FPA, then fix the position of spot. The application offsets the disadvantage of direct interception warner which need disposed largely. Before study of imaging mechanism about the scattered laser spot, the definition of geometry relationship is needed firstly. In this paper we developed a 3D geometry model by analyzing the position relationships in typical battlefield environment among the enemy's threat laser source, the laser spot radiated on one flat surface and our omni-directional laser warning fish-eye lens. The model including R, α, β, d, θ, φ, ψ, δ etc. 8 parameters and 4 coordinate systems was suitable for any general situations. After achievement of the model foundation, we obtained analytic expression of the laser spot contour on flat surface, then attained analytic expression of spot contour on image surface by calculating the object space half-field angle and the azimuth angle relative to fish-eye lens of an arbitrary point at the spot edge on flat surface. The attainment of the expression makes possible that we can analyze the spot energy distributions on image surface and the imaging characteristic of the scattered laser spot via fish-eye lens, then can compute the transmission direction of the threat laser. The foundation of the model in this paper has an importantly basic and guiding meaning to the latter research on this aspect.

  16. The impact of fault zones on the 3D coupled fluid and heat transport for the area of Brandenburg (NE German Basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yvonne, Cherubini; Mauro, Cacace; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena

    2013-04-01

    Faults can provide permeable pathways for fluids at a variety of scales, from great depth in the crust to flow through fractured aquifers, geothermal fields, and hydrocarbon reservoirs (Barton et al. 1995). In terms of geothermal energy exploration, it is essential to understand the role of faults and their impact on the thermal field and fluid system. 3D numerical simulations provide a useful tool for investigating the active physical processes in the subsurface. To assess the influence of major fault zones on the thermal field and fluid system, 3D coupled fluid and heat transport simulations are carried out. The study is based on a recently published structural model of the Brandenburg area, which is located in the south-eastern part of the Northeast German Basin (NEGB) (Noack et al. 2010). Two major fault zones of the Elbe Fault System (Gardelegen and Lausitz Escarpments) vertically offset the pre-Permian basement against the Permian to Cenozoic basin fill at the southern margin by several km (Scheck et al. 2002). Within the numerical models, these two major fault zones are represented as equivalent porous media and vertical discrete elements. The coupled system of equations describing fluid flow and heat transport in saturated porous media are numerically solved by the Finite Element software FEFLOW® (Diersch, 2002). Different possible geological scenarios are modelled and compared to a simulation in which no faults are considered. In one scenario the fault zones are set as impermeable. In this case, the thermal field is similar to the no fault model. Fluid flow is redirected because the fault zones act as hydraulic barriers that prevent a lateral fluid advection into the fault zones. By contrast, modelled permeable fault zones induce a pronounced thermal signature with distinctly cooler temperatures than in the no fault model. Fluid motion within the fault is initially triggered by advection due to hydraulic head gradients, but may be even enhanced by buoyancy forces caused by density gradients mainly occurring due to differences in the temperature. References: Barton, C.A., Zoback, M.D., Moos, D., 1995. Fluid flow along potentially active faults in crystalline rock. Geology 23 (8), 683-686.

  17. Vectorization of a 2D-1D Iterative Algorithm for the 3D Neutron Transport Problem in Prismatic Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa, Salli; Févotte, François; Lathuilière, Bruno; Plagne, Laurent

    2014-06-01

    The past few years have been marked by a noticeable increase in the interest in 3D whole-core heterogeneous deterministic neutron transport solvers for reference calculations. Due to the extremely large problem sizes tackled by such solvers, they need to use adapted numerical methods and need to be efficiently implemented to take advantage of the full computing power of modern systems. As for numerical methods, one possible approach consists in iterating over resolutions of 2D and 1D MOC problems by taking advantage of prismatic geometries. The MICADO solver, developed at EDF R&D, is a parallel implementation of such a method in distributed and shared memory systems. However it is currently unable to use SIMD vectorization to leverage the full computing power of modern CPUs. In this paper, we describe our first effort to support vectorization in MICADO, typically targeting Intel© SSE CPUs. Both the 2D and 1D algorithms are vectorized, allowing for high expected speedups for the whole spatial solver. We present benchmark computations, which show nearly optimal speedups for our vectorized implementation on the TAKEDA case.

  18. Modelling of 3D fields due to ferritic inserts and test blanket modules in toroidal geometry at ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yueqiang; Äkäslompolo, Simppa; Cavinato, Mario; Koechl, Florian; Kurki-Suonio, Taina; Li, Li; Parail, Vassili; Saibene, Gabriella; Särkimäki, Konsta; Sipilä, Seppo; Varje, Jari

    2016-06-01

    Computations in toroidal geometry are systematically performed for the plasma response to 3D magnetic perturbations produced by ferritic inserts (FIs) and test blanket modules (TBMs) for four ITER plasma scenarios: the 15 MA baseline, the 12.5 MA hybrid, the 9 MA steady state, and the 7.5 MA half-field helium plasma. Due to the broad toroidal spectrum of the FI and TBM fields, the plasma response for all the n  =  1–6 field components are computed and compared. The plasma response is found to be weak for the high-n (n  >  4) components. The response is not globally sensitive to the toroidal plasma flow speed, as long as the latter is not reduced by an order of magnitude. This is essentially due to the strong screening effect occurring at a finite flow, as predicted for ITER plasmas. The ITER error field correction coils (EFCC) are used to compensate the n  =  1 field errors produced by FIs and TBMs for the baseline scenario for the purpose of avoiding mode locking. It is found that the middle row of the EFCC, with a suitable toroidal phase for the coil current, can provide the best correction of these field errors, according to various optimisation criteria. On the other hand, even without correction, it is predicted that these n  =  1 field errors will not cause substantial flow damping for the 15 MA baseline scenario.

  19. Stagnant lid convection in 3D-Cartesian geometry: Scaling laws and applications to icy moons and dwarf planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschamps, Frédéric; Lin, Ja-Ren

    2014-04-01

    We conducted numerical experiments of stagnant lid thermal convection in 3D-Cartesian geometry, and use these experiments to derive parameterizations for the average internal temperature, heat flux, and stagnant lid thickness. Our experiments suggest that the non-dimensional temperature jump across the bottom thermal boundary layer (TBL) is well described by (1 -θm) = 1.23 (ΔTv / ΔT) , where θm is the non-dimensional average temperature of the convective sublayer, and ΔTv / ΔT a viscous temperature scale defined as the inverse of the logarithmic temperature derivative of viscosity. Due to the presence of the stagnant lid at the top of the fluid, the frequency of the time-variations of the surface heat flux is much lower than those of the bottom heat flux. The Nusselt number, measuring the heat transfer, is well explain by Nu = 1.46 Ram0.270 (ΔTv / ΔT)1.21 , where Ram is the effective Rayleigh number. This result indicates that the heat flux through the outer ice shells of large icy moons and dwarf planets is larger than that predicted by scalings in 2D-Cartesian geometry by 20-40%. We then apply our parameterizations to the dynamics of the outer ice I shells of icy moons and dwarf planets. As pointed out in previous studies, our calculations indicate that the presence of volatile in the primordial ocean of these bodies strongly reduces the vigor of convection within their outer ice I shell, the heat transfer through these shells, and the tectonic activity at their surface. Furthermore, thicker ice I layers may be achieved in bodies having low (0.7 m/s2) gravity acceleration (e.g., Pluto), than in bodies having larger (1.3 m/s2 and more) gravity acceleration (e.g., Europa, Ganymede, and Titan). Decrease in the surface temperature increases the thickness of the stagnant lid, which may result in a stronger lithosphere, and thus in fewer tectonic activity. Our parameterizations may also be used as boundary conditions at zero curvature to build parameterizations in spherical geometry.

  20. High precision analysis of an embryonic extensional fault-related fold using 3D orthorectified virtual outcrops: The viewpoint importance in structural geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavani, Stefano; Corradetti, Amerigo; Billi, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Image-based 3D modeling has recently opened the way to the use of virtual outcrop models in geology. An intriguing application of this method involves the production of orthorectified images of outcrops using almost any user-defined point of view, so that photorealistic cross-sections suitable for numerous geological purposes and measurements can be easily generated. These purposes include the accurate quantitative analysis of fault-fold relationships starting from imperfectly oriented and partly inaccessible real outcrops. We applied the method of image-based 3D modeling and orthorectification to a case study from the northern Apennines, Italy, where an incipient extensional fault affecting well-layered limestones is exposed on a 10-m-high barely accessible cliff. Through a few simple steps, we constructed a high-quality image-based 3D model of the outcrop. In the model, we made a series of measurements including fault and bedding attitudes, which allowed us to derive the bedding-fault intersection direction. We then used this direction as viewpoint to obtain a distortion-free photorealistic cross-section, on which we measured bed dips and thicknesses as well as fault stratigraphic separations. These measurements allowed us to identify a slight difference (i.e. only 0.5°) between the hangingwall and footwall cutoff angles. We show that the hangingwall strain required to compensate the upward-decreasing displacement of the fault was accommodated by this 0.5° rotation (i.e. folding) and coeval 0.8% thickening of strata in the hangingwall relatively to footwall strata. This evidence is consistent with trishear fault-propagation folding. Our results emphasize the viewpoint importance in structural geology and therefore the potential of using orthorectified virtual outcrops.

  1. 3D features of delayed thermal convection in fault zones: consequences for deep fluid processes in the Tiberias Basin, Jordan Rift Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magri, Fabien; Möller, Sebastian; Inbar, Nimrod; Siebert, Christian; Möller, Peter; Rosenthal, Eliyahu; Kühn, Michael

    2015-04-01

    It has been shown that thermal convection in faults can also occur for subcritical Rayleigh conditions. This type of convection develops after a certain period and is referred to as "delayed convection" (Murphy, 1979). The delay in the onset is due to the heat exchange between the damage zone and the surrounding units that adds a thermal buffer along the fault walls. Few numerical studies investigated delayed thermal convection in fractured zones, despite it has the potential to transport energy and minerals over large spatial scales (Tournier, 2000). Here 3D numerical simulations of thermally driven flow in faults are presented in order to investigate the impact of delayed convection on deep fluid processes at basin-scale. The Tiberias Basin (TB), in the Jordan Rift Valley, serves as study area. The TB is characterized by upsurge of deep-seated hot waters along the faulted shores of Lake Tiberias and high temperature gradient that can locally reach 46 °C/km, as in the Lower Yarmouk Gorge (LYG). 3D simulations show that buoyant flow ascend in permeable faults which hydraulic conductivity is estimated to vary between 30 m/yr and 140 m/yr. Delayed convection starts respectively at 46 and 200 kyrs and generate temperature anomalies in agreement with observations. It turned out that delayed convective cells are transient. Cellular patterns that initially develop in permeable units surrounding the faults can trigger convection also within the fault plane. The combination of these two convective modes lead to helicoidal-like flow patterns. This complex flow can explain the location of springs along different fault traces of the TB. Besides being of importance for understanding the hydrogeological processes of the TB (Magri et al., 2015), the presented simulations provide a scenario illustrating fault-induced 3D cells that could develop in any geothermal system. References Magri, F., Inbar, N., Siebert, C., Rosenthal, E., Guttman, J., Möller, P., 2015. Transient simulations of large-scale hydrogeological processes causing temperature and salinity anomalies in the Tiberias Basin. Journal of Hydrology, 520(0), 342-355. Murphy, H.D., 1979. Convective instabilities in vertical fractures and faults. Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth, 84(B11), 6121-6130. Tournier, C., Genthon, P., Rabinowicz, M., 2000. The onset of natural convection in vertical fault planes: consequences for the thermal regime in crystalline basementsand for heat recovery experiments. Geophysical Journal International, 140(3), 500-508.

  2. Basement Structure Controls on the Evolution and Geometry of Rift Systems - Insights from Offshore S. Norway using 3D Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Thomas; Jackson, Christopher; Bell, Rebecca; Duffy, Oliver; Fossen, Haakon

    2015-04-01

    Rift basins form within lithosphere containing a range of heterogeneities, such as thin-skinned thrust belts and larger scale structures such as thick-skinned shear zones or crustal sutures. How the presence and reactivation of these structures during later rift events affect the geometry and evolution of rifts remains poorly understood as they are not typically well imaged on seismic data. The main reasons for this are that crystalline basement is often buried beneath thick sedimentary successions and contains small impedance contrasts. Furthermore, larger, crustal-scale, lineaments and sutures may not be imaged at all on seismic data due to their large scale and depth. In this study, we use borehole-constrained 2D and 3D seismic reflection data located around the Egersund and Farsund Basins, offshore south Norway. In both areas, crystalline basement is exceptionally well-imaged on typical 2D and 3D reflection data due to large impedance contrasts within a highly heterogeneous, shallow basement. This allows us to map a series of intrabasement reflections and overlying rift systems. Within the Egersund area, two main types of intrabasement structure are identified and mapped: i) thin (100 m), shallowly dipping (0-10°W) reflections showing a ramp-flat geometry; and ii) thick (1-1.5 km), low angle (c. 30°W) structures comprising of packages of reflections. These structures correlate along-strike northwards to Caledonian orogeny related structures mapped onshore Norway. The thin structures are interpreted as thin-skinned Caledonian thrusts, whereas the thicker structures represent thick-skinned Devonian shear zones formed through orogenic collapse of the Caledonides. Through seismic-stratigraphic analysis of the cover, we document multiple stages of extensional reactivation along these structures during Devonian, Permian-Triassic and Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous extension followed by reverse reactivation during Late Cretaceous compression. The Farsund Basin is situated above a deep crustal-scale lineament, the Tornquist zone. We also document multiple stages of reactivation and inversion within this basin, linked with motion along the underlying lineament. Reactivation of the Tornquist zone at depth leads to the formation of a deep, narrow basin at shallower levels. However, during reactivation, rift propagation may be inhibited by basement heterogeneities, such as pre-existing basement ridges. We find that the type of reactivated structure can exert a strong control on the geometry and evolution of the overlying rift. Low-angle, thin-skinned Caledonian thrusts have negligible effect on rift evolution as these are not readily reactivated. However, reactivation of thick-skinned structures does affect rift morphology. Direct reactivation of low angle Devonian shear zones forms a series of low angle rift-bounding faults, creating a wide, shallow basin. Conversely, reactivation of deep seated crustal lineaments causes the localisation of strain fields, creating deep, narrow basins. In both cases, the presence of these thick skinned structures acts as a template for the location of later rifts; their subsequent reactivation can then control the rift geometry.

  3. Fault strength in Marmara region inferred from the geometry of the principle stress axes and fault orientations: A case study for the Prince's Islands fault segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinar, Ali; Coskun, Zeynep; Mert, Aydin; Kalafat, Dogan

    2015-04-01

    The general consensus based on historical earthquake data point out that the last major moment release on the Prince's islands fault was in 1766 which in turn signals an increased seismic risk for Istanbul Metropolitan area considering the fact that most of the 20 mm/yr GPS derived slip rate for the region is accommodated mostly by that fault segment. The orientation of the Prince's islands fault segment overlaps with the NW-SE direction of the maximum principle stress axis derived from the focal mechanism solutions of the large and moderate sized earthquakes occurred in the Marmara region. As such, the NW-SE trending fault segment translates the motion between the two E-W trending branches of the North Anatolian fault zone; one extending from the Gulf of Izmit towards Çınarcık basin and the other extending between offshore Bakırköy and Silivri. The basic relation between the orientation of the maximum and minimum principal stress axes, the shear and normal stresses, and the orientation of a fault provides clue on the strength of a fault, i.e., its frictional coefficient. Here, the angle between the fault normal and maximum compressive stress axis is a key parameter where fault normal and fault parallel maximum compressive stress might be a necessary and sufficient condition for a creeping event. That relation also implies that when the trend of the sigma-1 axis is close to the strike of the fault the shear stress acting on the fault plane approaches zero. On the other hand, the ratio between the shear and normal stresses acting on a fault plane is proportional to the coefficient of frictional coefficient of the fault. Accordingly, the geometry between the Prince's islands fault segment and a maximum principal stress axis matches a weak fault model. In the frame of the presentation we analyze seismological data acquired in Marmara region and interpret the results in conjuction with the above mentioned weak fault model.

  4. Influence of cratonic lithosphere on slab geometry and mantle flow: insights from 3D time-dependent modelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taramón, Jorge M.; Rodríguez-González, Juan; Negredo, Ana M.

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies show a clear correlation between the occurrence of flat subduction and the proximity of areas of high elastic/thermal thickness in the overriding plate. A plausible explanation is that cold overriding plates lead to colder mantle wedge, increasing the hydrodynamic suction and decreasing the slab dip. In particular, recent numerical modeling has shown that the presence of cratonic lithosphere in the overriding plate has a significant effect on subducting slabs. In this study we quantify the influence of cratonic areas in the overriding plate on subduction dynamics. We present 3D thermo-mechanical and time-dependent numerical models of buoyancy-driven subduction processes. A non-Newtonian pseudo-plastic rheology is assumed. Different simulations have been performed to quantify the effect of different factors, such as the craton width, thermal thickness and distante to the trench. Modelling results indicate that presence of cratonic lithosphere in the overriding plate produces strong along-trench variations of the slab geometry. These variations are maintained and propagated at great depths as the slab sinks deeper into the mantle. Significant trench-parallel flow in the mantle wedge is generated by time-dependent changes in slab dip. For cases of reduced slab pull, the slab and the base of the craton become coupled, which causes a dramatic reduction of subduction velocity and the formation of a slab gap. The presence of cratons may have an important role on subduction episodicity and provide a new mechanism to explain slab gaps in areas where cratons have been located close to trenches, as is the case of South America and the Cenozoic subduction of North America. We further emphasize that the lithospheric structure of the overriding plate should be taken into account in analysis and modelling studies of subduction zones.

  5. 3-D velocity structure around tehri region of the garhwal lesser himalaya: constraints on geometry of the underthrusting indian plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaujia, Jyotima; Kumar, Ashwani; Gupta, S. C.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the upper crustal velocity structure beneath the Tehri region of the Garhwal Himalaya. The investigated region is situated within the 700-km-long central seismic gap of the Himalaya that has experienced three gap-filling earthquakes since 1991 including the recent 2015 Nepal earthquake (Mw 7.8). The local tomographic inversion is based on a dataset of 1365 events collected from January 2008 to December 2012 by a 12-station local network that covers an area of about 100 × 80 km around Tehri Dam. We perform a simultaneous inversion for P- and S-wave velocity anomalies. Tomograms are interpreted in the backdrop of the regional geological and tectonic framework of the region. The spatial distribution of relocated events from the 3- D velocity model has shed new light on the pattern of seismicity in the vicinity of the Main Central thrust (MCT), and has elucidated the structure of the underthrusting Indian plate. Our model exhibits a significant negative velocity anomaly up to ˜5 per cent beneath the central part of the Garhwal Inner Lesser Himalaya, and a P-wave low velocity anomaly near the Chamoli region. The seismicity zone around the Chamoli region may be attributed to the presence of fluid filled rocks. Furthermore, an area with˜3-4 per cent positive velocity anomaly is delineated to the northwest of the Uttarkashi thrust in the vicinity of the MCT. Significant findings of the study include: a flat-ramp-flat type sub-surface geometry of the underthrusting Indian plate below the Garhwal Himalaya, high velocity images representing the trend and configuration of Delhi-Haridwar-ridge below the Sub Himalaya and Lesser Himalaya, and a seismically active zone representing geometrical asperity on the basement thrust in the vicinity of the MCT.

  6. Structural geometry and gravity constraints on the Palos Verdes and Cabrillo faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cengelcik, Yeliz

    The thesis presents and evaluates five new gravity constrained structural cross-sections about the Palos Verdes and Cabrillo faults of southern California. They both have been active since the Miocene, however the Palos Verdes fault zone is considered to be a greater seismic hazard. Using geologic, gravity and seismic data we present new interpretations about the geometry of the Palos Verdes and Cabrillo faults. In the San Pedro and Los Angeles Harbor region approximately125 new gravity data were collected with a Worden gravimeter and new structural cross-sections were constructed by using data of our gravity surveying. The collected data displays a Simple Bouguer gravity anomaly high near the Cabrillo fault and northwards toward the Palos Verdes fault there is an approximately 30 mGal decrease. The Palos Verdes fault itself is characterized by an inflection in the gravity data and a relatively flat zone immediately to the north. This shelf in the gravity data is important because the highly productive Wilmington Oil Field is located in this area and it is likely a product of the particular geometry in the region. The Palos Verdes fault also forms the edge of the larger Los Angeles Basin. Our basic interpretation is that the Palos Verdes and Cabrillo faults are primarily strike slip faults. However, a horst-like block between the two faults has been uplifted and horizontally shortened. Our main interpretation is that Catalina Schist basement uplift and subsequent basin fill to the north is responsible for the large negative gravity anomalies associated with the Palos Verdes fault.

  7. Distribution and geometry of magma bodies within Hawaiian volcanic edifices inferred from 3-D seismic velocity and density models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Zelt, C. A.; Morgan, J. K.; Okubo, P. G.; Kauahikaua, J. P.

    2007-12-01

    Magmatic intrusions within active Hawaiian volcanoes, e.g., Kilauea and Mauna Loa, often result in measurable surface deformation. However, constraining the source of such deformation is often difficult, and dependent upon assumptions regarding source mechanism, geometry and depth. Estimates for these parameters can be improved by independent constraints on the distribution and geometry of magma bodies within the volcanic edifices. Here, we present seismic P-wave velocity and density models of the onshore and offshore regions around the Island of Hawaii, including parts of Hualalai, Mauna Kea, Mauna Loa, and Kilauea volcanoes, and Loihi seamount. The velocity and density models suggest that the distribution and geometry of magma bodies within the volcanic edifices, indicated by high-velocity and high-density anomalies, might be deeply related to the surface deformation. The velocity model was determined by tomographic inversion of ~200,000 first-arrival traveltime picks of earthquakes and airgun shots recorded by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO). The summits of Mauna Loa and Kilauea are underlain by localized high-velocity anomalies of 4.0-4.3 km/s just a few km below the surface, probably indicating shallow summit magma reservoirs responsible for localized inflation and deflation cycles. More extensive high-velocity anomalies of 6.5-7.0 km/s occur beneath the active rift zones of Kilauea, Mauna Loa, and Loihi, and are attributed to intrusive complexes comprising both dense dikes and olivine cumulates precipitated from long-lived deep magma chambers. These deeper bodies are responsible for the outward creep of the volcanic edifices, and probably also upper flank subsidence. Interestingly, the high-velocity bodies are not continuous, but commonly occur as discrete features, which may account for deformation partitioning along the volcano flanks. Kilauea's east rift zone (ERZ) shows two zones of high velocities, one near the summit and upper ERZ and one beneath the lower ERZ, with a region of low velocities beneath the central ERZ. Mauna Loa's lower southwest rift zone (SWRZ) is marked by a prominent high-velocity zone, lacking along the central and upper SWRZ. Mauna Loa's northeast rift zone shows high-velocity materials offset to the south of the current vent trend. High-velocity regions also occur without obvious surface expression, for example, beneath the south flanks of Hualalai, Mauna Kea, and Mauna Loa. These point to buried rift zones, unrelated to the current trends of surface vents on these volcanoes. The density structure of the island and its surroundings is obtained by converting the seismic velocity model to a density model using an empirical relationship. This relationship defines an initial/reference model for the 3-D inversion of onshore and offshore gravity data. The final inversion yields density anomalies that provide additional constraints on material properties. The largest positive density anomalies are observed beneath the summits and upper rift zones of Mauna Loa, Kilauea and Loihi, possibly due to the molten condition of the underlying magma cumulates. In contrast, the high-velocity features beneath the south flank of Mauna Loa yield densities consistent with their velocities, and are thus interpreted to reflect solidified magma cumulates and dike swarms along the old rift zone, resisting flank deformation.

  8. Control of fault geometry and permeability contrast on fault-related hydrothermal fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Christine; Rüpke, Lars; Hasenclever, Jörg; Grevemeyer, Ingo; Petersen, Sven

    2015-04-01

    High-temperature black smoker systems along slow-spreading ridges such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) are frequently related to tectonic fault zones and therefore are commonly found off axis. While preferential flow of hot fluids along highly permeable, fractured rocks seems intuitive, such efficient flow leads to the entrainment of cold ambient seawater resulting in a drastic decrease in vent temperatures. This temperature drop is difficult to reconcile with high-temperature black smoker activity observed at outcropping fault zones. In our recent study we aim to resolve this apparent contradiction by combining newly acquired seismological data (Grevemeyer et al., 2013) from the high-temperature, off-axis Logatchev 1 hydrothermal field (LHF1) along the MAR with 2D hydrothermal flow modeling. The seismic data shows intense off-axis seismicity with focal mechanisms suggesting a fault zone dipping from LHF1 toward the ridge axis. In order to explain fault-related high-temperature hydrothermal discharge as observed at LHF1, our simulations predict that fault zones need to be just permeable and wide enough to capture and redirect hydrothermal plumes rising from depth but, because they are not isolated conduits, must not be too wide or permeable in order to prevent cooling through mixing with ambient colder fluids. The two controlling parameters fault width and permeability contrast between fault and surrounding rock can be expressed as a single term, the relative transmissibility of the fault zone, which is defined by the product of the two. Low relative fault transmissibility leads to plumes that cross the fault and vent above the heat source rather than at the fault termination at the seafloor. High relative fault transmissibility leads to significantly lower vent exit temperatures than those observed at black smoker systems. Our findings further illustrate the intrinsic relationship between permeability, mass flux and upflow temperature: the higher the permeability, the higher the mass flux and the lower the vent temperature. The common occurrence of fault-linked high-temperature vent fields strongly points at a not-yet-quantified self-adjusting permeability that depends on pore space-clogging reactions between hydrothermal and ambient cold fluids. Furthermore, the temperature drop associated with any high permeability zone in heterogeneous crust may well explain the sparse high-temperature vent fields along the MAR and why the heterogeneous crust of the Atlantic, with its strong permeability contrasts, is predominantly cooled by lower-temperature fluid flow.

  9. 3D Dynamic Rupture Simulation Across a Complex Fault System: the Mw7.0, 2010, Haiti Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douilly, R.; Aochi, H.; Calais, E.; Freed, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Earthquakes ruptures sometimes take place on a secondary fault and surprisingly do not activate an adjacent major one. The 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake is a classic case where rupture occurred on a blind thrust while the adjacent San Andreas Fault was not triggered during the process. Similar to Loma Prieta, the Mw7.0, January 12 2010, Haiti earthquake also ruptured a secondary blind thrust, the Léogâne fault, adjacent to the main plate boundary, the Enriquillo Plantain Garden Fault, which did not rupture during this event. Aftershock relocalizations delineate the Léogâne rupture with two north dipping segments with slightly different dip, where the easternmost segment had mostly dip-slip motion and the westernmost one had mostly strike-slip motion. In addition, an offshore south dipping structure inferred from the aftershocks to the west of the rupture zone coincides with the offshore Trois Baies reverse fault, a region of increase in Coulomb stress increase. In this study, we investigate the rupture dynamics of the Haiti earthquake in a complex fault system of multiple segments identified by the aftershock relocations. We suppose a background stress regime that is consistent with the type of motion of each fault and with the regional tectonic regime. We initiate a nucleation on the east segment of the Léogâne fault by defining a circular region with a 2 km radius where shear stress is slightly greater than the yield stress. By varying friction on faults and background stress, we find a range of plausible scenarios. In the absence of near-field seismic records of the event, we score the different models against the static deformation field derived from GPS and InSAR at the surface. All the plausible simulations show that the rupture propagates from the eastern to the western segment along the Léogâne fault, but not on the Enriquillo fault nor on the Trois Baies fault. The best-fit simulation shows a significant increase of shear stresses on the Trois Baies fault, which might explain observed triggered aftershocks on this fault and small increase of shear stresses on the Enriquillo fault. We also find that a shift to north of about 3 km of the western segment of the Léogâne fault from recent studies provides a better fit to the coseismic InSAR and GPS displacements.

  10. The Development of WARP - A Framework for Continuous Energy Monte Carlo Neutron Transport in General 3D Geometries on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Ryan

    Graphics processing units, or GPUs, have gradually increased in computational power from the small, job-specific boards of the early 1990s to the programmable powerhouses of today. Compared to more common central processing units, or CPUs, GPUs have a higher aggregate memory bandwidth, much higher floating-point operations per second (FLOPS), and lower energy consumption per FLOP. Because one of the main obstacles in exascale computing is power consumption, many new supercomputing platforms are gaining much of their computational capacity by incorporating GPUs into their compute nodes. Since CPU-optimized parallel algorithms are not directly portable to GPU architectures (or at least not without losing substantial performance), transport codes need to be rewritten to execute efficiently on GPUs. Unless this is done, reactor simulations cannot take full advantage of these new supercomputers. WARP, which can stand for ``Weaving All the Random Particles,'' is a three-dimensional (3D) continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport code developed in this work as to efficiently implement a continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport algorithm on a GPU. WARP accelerates Monte Carlo simulations while preserving the benefits of using the Monte Carlo Method, namely, very few physical and geometrical simplifications. WARP is able to calculate multiplication factors, flux tallies, and fission source distributions for time-independent problems, and can run in both criticality or fixed source modes. WARP can transport neutrons in unrestricted arrangements of parallelepipeds, hexagonal prisms, cylinders, and spheres. WARP uses an event-based algorithm, but with some important differences. Moving data is expensive, so WARP uses a remapping vector of pointer/index pairs to direct GPU threads to the data they need to access. The remapping vector is sorted by reaction type after every transport iteration using a high-efficiency parallel radix sort, which serves to keep the reaction types as contiguous as possible and removes completed histories from the transport cycle. The sort reduces the amount of divergence in GPU ``thread blocks,'' keeps the SIMD units as full as possible, and eliminates using memory bandwidth to check if a neutron in the batch has been terminated or not. Using a remapping vector means the data access pattern is irregular, but this is mitigated by using large batch sizes where the GPU can effectively eliminate the high cost of irregular global memory access. WARP modifies the standard unionized energy grid implementation to reduce memory traffic. Instead of storing a matrix of pointers indexed by reaction type and energy, WARP stores three matrices. The first contains cross section values, the second contains pointers to angular distributions, and a third contains pointers to energy distributions. This linked list type of layout increases memory usage, but lowers the number of data loads that are needed to determine a reaction by eliminating a pointer load to find a cross section value. Optimized, high-performance GPU code libraries are also used by WARP wherever possible. The CUDA performance primitives (CUDPP) library is used to perform the parallel reductions, sorts and sums, the CURAND library is used to seed the linear congruential random number generators, and the OptiX ray tracing framework is used for geometry representation. OptiX is a highly-optimized library developed by NVIDIA that automatically builds hierarchical acceleration structures around user-input geometry so only surfaces along a ray line need to be queried in ray tracing. WARP also performs material and cell number queries with OptiX by using a point-in-polygon like algorithm. WARP has shown that GPUs are an effective platform for performing Monte Carlo neutron transport with continuous energy cross sections. Currently, WARP is the most detailed and feature-rich program in existence for performing continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport in general 3D geometries on GPUs, but compared to production codes like Serpent and MCNP, WARP has limited capabilities. Despite WARP's lack of features, its novel algorithm implementations show that high performance can be achieved on a GPU despite the inherently divergent program flow and sparse data access patterns. WARP is not ready for everyday nuclear reactor calculations, but is a good platform for further development of GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo neutron transport. In it's current state, it may be a useful tool for multiplication factor searches, i.e. determining reactivity coefficients by perturbing material densities or temperatures, since these types of calculations typically do not require many flux tallies. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  11. Fault geometries on Uranus' satellite Miranda: Implications for internal structure and heat flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beddingfield, C. B.; Burr, D. M.; Emery, J. P.

    2015-02-01

    Miranda, a ∼470-km-diameter uranian icy satellite, has a surface that exhibits evidence of a complex tectonic history. Tectonic structures are mostly localized in three regions termed coronae, but also form a rift system inferred to be global in extent. Ridges within the boundary of Arden Corona, and those that make up the 340° Chasma, part of the global rift system, have been interpreted as normal fault blocks. Using Voyager data, we test the hypothesis that these Arden Corona faults, as well as those at the northern edge of the 340° Chasma, are listric in geometry. For this testing, we use four geometric criteria for listric faults: (1) progressive down-dip decrease in fault scarp dip, (2) progressive down-dip increase in back-tilted face slope, (3) concavity of the exposed scarp surface, and (4) presence of a rollover structure. Results of this analysis support the hypothesis that the faults within the Arden Corona boundary are listric in geometry, but do not strongly support the hypothesis for the faults within the 340° Chasma. By analogy with terrestrial structures, the listric character of faults within the Arden Corona boundary suggests the presence of a subsurface detachment. This detachment likely occurred at Miranda's brittle-ductile transition zone at the time of faulting. Measurements of the Arden Corona fault system geometry are used to estimate depths to the proposed brittle-ductile transition zone at the time of faulting, resulting in values of 6.7-9.0 km. Those depths in turn are used to estimate a thermal gradient of 6-25 K km-1 and a surface heat flux of 31-112 mW m-2. The weaker evidence of a listric geometry for the faults of the 340° Chasma suggests that those faults did not interact with a brittle-ductile transition at the time of their formation. Our estimated thermal gradient of the Arden Corona region is consistent with a previous heating event on Miranda that was as significant as Europa's current resonance-induced tidal heating. This heating event may be associated with a hypothesized previous tidal resonance of Miranda with Umbriel and/or Ariel.

  12. Comparative geometry of the San Andreas Fault, California, and laboratory fault zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Diane E.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    Textural examination of fault gouge deformed in triaxial friction experiments has revealed differences in the orientations of secondary shear sets between the stably sliding and stick-slip samples. In order to determine whether such differences can be identified in natural faults, maps of recently active breaks along the San Andreas fault were examined to compare the types and orientations of secondary structures mapped in the creeping and locked sections. The fault zone was divided into 52 geometrically defined segments of uniform strike, which were then grouped into 7 sections: 4 straight and two curved sections, and Cholame Valley. Many of the gross geometric characteristics of the individual segments, such as length, width, and stepover size, reflect their position in either a straight or a curved section. In contrast, with respect to the orientations of the recent breaks within the segments, the single creeping section differs from all of the locked sections, both straight and curved. -from Authors

  13. The value of inclined coreholes for characterizing the geometry of 3-D fracture networks in bedrock aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munn, Jonathan; Parker, Beth

    2013-04-01

    In bedrock aquifers where matrix permeability is low, the nature and distribution of the fracture network has a strong impact on the transport and fate of contaminants. Accurate fracture characterization is therefore essential to fully understand the flow system and to predict contaminant migration. Powerful DFN models exist, yet the limitation is often on obtaining field data of sufficient quality to use as input parameters. One major contributing factor is the common practice of using only vertical coreholes to characterize bedrock aquifers. This can lead to datasets that are significantly biased toward fractures perpendicular to the corehole and are therefore not well suited for three-dimensional (3-D) fracture geometry characterization. This bias is particularly pronounced in flat-lying sedimentary strata where fracture networks are typically comprised of flat-lying bedding parallel fractures and vertical, or near vertical joints. An examination of such bias was conducted at a contaminated site in Guelph, Ontario, Canada, in a Silurian dolostone aquifer. Three inclined coreholes plunging 60 degrees with varying azimuths were drilled between 2010 and 2012 to supplement existing data from eleven vertical coreholes from previous investigations. Depth discrete datasets were collected in the coreholes including lithological and fracture logs from rock core, downhole geophysical surveys (e.g, acoustic televiewer, formation conductivity, temperature, natural gamma), and hydraulic testing including the first use of flexible liner profiling in inclined coreholes. These datasets were integrated to provide estimates of fracture frequency, orientation and aperture distributions and to estimate values of bulk effective fracture porosity. Orientation analysis revealed three dominant fracture sets on site that vary in intensity through mechanical layers. These sets consist of a horizontal, bedding-plane set with an average spacing of 0.3m, and two high-angle sets, NE-SW and WNW-ESE striking, with average spacings of 1.5m and 2.1m, respectively. When data from only the vertical coreholes are used for the analysis, only two fracture sets are identifiable: a bedding plane set and a high-angle E-W set, confirming the necessity of inclined coreholes for complete fracture orientation analysis. Hydraulic fracture apertures were estimated using the cubic law and range from 15 to 407 μm with a geometric mean of 125 μm. The fracture network properties will ultimately be used as input parameters for static and dynamic discrete fracture network models to assess current and future risks to nearby municipal supply wells. The study shows that inclined coreholes of varying orientation can help minimize sampling bias, and thereby provide a more representative sample of the fracture network.

  14. Thrust geometries in unconsolidated Quaternary sediments around the Eupchon fault, SE Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. Y.; Kim, Y.-S.; Kim, J. H.; Shin, H. C.

    2003-04-01

    It had been considered that Korean Peninsula is located in a relatively stable continental platform. Over ten Quaternary faults have recently been discovered, however, in the south-eastern part of the Korean Peninsula. The Eupchon Fault was discovered at the construction site of a primary school, close to a nuclear power plant. In order to understand the characteristics of the Eupchon fault, we carried out two trench surveys near the first finding site. The orientations of trench sites are 150o and 170o, the widths are 1.3 m and 1.5 m, and the maximum depths are 2.8 m and 5.5 m, respectively. The trenches are in Quaternary unconsolidated marine terrace sediments, which have horizontal bedding planes, are well sorted, and range from pebbles to muds The fault system includes one main reverse fault (N20o E/40o SE) with about 4m displacement and a series of branches. Structures in the fault system include synthetic and antithetic faults, hanging wall anticlines, drag folds, back thrusts, pop-up structures, flat-ramp geometries and duplexes, i.e. very similar to thrust systems in consolidated rocks. In the upper part of the fault system, several tip damage zone patterns are observed, indicating that the fault system terminates in the upper part of the section. Pebbles along the main fault plane show preferred orientation of long axes indicating the fault trace. The orientation of the slickenside striea is E-W, indicating the movement direction. The unconformity between the Quaternary deposits and the underlying Tertiary andesites and Cretaceous sedimentary rocks is displaced in a reverse sense. A normal displacement was reported lower in the section, indicating the fault had a normal displacement and was reverse reactivated during the Quaternary.

  15. Interaction of faults and perturbation of slip: influence of anisotropic stress states in the presence of fault friction and comparison between Wallace Bott and 3D Distinct Element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, C.

    2002-10-01

    Two decades after their birth, the validity of fault slip inversion methods is still strongly debated. These methods are based upon a very simplified mechanical background, the Wallace-Bott hypothesis. Following previous studies, the 3D Distinct Element Method (3DEC software) is used to explore the effect of varying stress anisotropy (i.e. the "shape" ratio) on slip perturbation along pairs of faults. Two end-member configurations are modelled in taking into account fault friction and internal deformation of faulted blocks. The first model deals with a relatively simple case where two nonintersecting conjugate normal faults are reactivated in an oblique normal stress regime. The second one simulates an extreme situation where two perpendicular intersecting faults are submitted to oblique extension. The average direction of fault slip predicted by 3DEC models is compared to the corresponding slip predicted by the simplified Wallace-Bott model. For the two simulated cases, it is shown that results from 3DEC and Wallace-Bott models are mutually consistent and argue for the validity of fault slip data inversion methods. Consistency remains even if slip is significantly deviated near the intersection line of faults. These deviations depend on the degree of anisotropy of applied stresses in presence of fault friction. Furthermore, modelling results suggest that, for intersecting faults with convergent slip directions, consideration of fault friction in the models leads to reduction of slip perturbation. In other words, modelling results lead to the nonintuitive conclusion that the validity of the simplified Wallace-Bott model is strengthened when 3DEC model's complexity (i.e. the number of parameters incorporated) increases.

  16. 3D modeling of architectural objects from video data obtained with the fixed focal length lens geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deliś, Paulina; Kędzierski, Michał; Fryśkowska, Anna; Wilińska, Michalina

    2013-12-01

    The article describes the process of creating 3D models of architectural objects on the basis of video images, which had been acquired by a Sony NEX-VG10E fixed focal length video camera. It was assumed, that based on video and Terrestrial Laser Scanning data it is possible to develop 3D models of architectural objects. The acquisition of video data was preceded by the calibration of video camera. The process of creating 3D models from video data involves the following steps: video frames selection for the orientation process, orientation of video frames using points with known coordinates from Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS), generating a TIN model using automatic matching methods. The above objects have been measured with an impulse laser scanner, Leica ScanStation 2. Created 3D models of architectural objects were compared with 3D models of the same objects for which the self-calibration bundle adjustment process was performed. In this order a PhotoModeler Software was used. In order to assess the accuracy of the developed 3D models of architectural objects, points with known coordinates from Terrestrial Laser Scanning were used. To assess the accuracy a shortest distance method was used. Analysis of the accuracy showed that 3D models generated from video images differ by about 0.06 ÷ 0.13 m compared to TLS data. Artykuł zawiera opis procesu opracowania modeli 3D obiektów architektonicznych na podstawie obrazów wideo pozyskanych kamerą wideo Sony NEX-VG10E ze stałoogniskowym obiektywem. Przyjęto założenie, że na podstawie danych wideo i danych z naziemnego skaningu laserowego (NSL) możliwe jest opracowanie modeli 3D obiektów architektonicznych. Pozyskanie danych wideo zostało poprzedzone kalibracją kamery wideo. Model matematyczny kamery był oparty na rzucie perspektywicznym. Proces opracowania modeli 3D na podstawie danych wideo składał się z następujących etapów: wybór klatek wideo do procesu orientacji, orientacja klatek wideo na podstawie współrzędnych odczytanych z chmury punktów NSL, wygenerowanie modelu 3D w strukturze TIN z wykorzystaniem metod automatycznej korelacji obrazów. Opracowane modele 3D zostały porównane z modelami 3D tych samych obiektów, dla których została przeprowadzona samokalibracja metodą wiązek. W celu oceny dokładności opracowanych modeli 3D obiektów architektonicznych wykorzystano punkty naziemnego skaningu laserowego. Do oceny dokładności wykorzystano metodę najkrótszej odległości. Analiza dokładności wykazała, że dokładność modeli 3D generowanych na podstawie danych wideo wynosi około 0.06 ÷ 0.13m względem danych NSL.

  17. Surface Geometry and Geomorphology of the Rodgers Creek Fault, San Francisco Bay Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecker, S.

    2007-12-01

    The Rodgers Creek fault, part of the right-lateral San Andreas fault system in the San Francisco Bay area, is geometrically segmented by bends on multiple scales. North of Sonoma Mountain, along the northern half of the fault, sections of the fault trace trend approximately parallel to the direction of relative plate motion (~N34°W) and display a right-stepping pattern across releasing double bends. Within the releasing bends, the fault trends >5° oblique to plate motion and shows geomorphic evidence of extension. The largest right bend, ~1 km at Santa Rosa, corresponds to the lowest elevations along the fault. To the south, the fault makes a broad restraining double bend around the southwest flank of Sonoma Mountain and trends up to ~13° compressively oblique to plate motion. Long-term uplift (Sonoma Mountain) east of the bend suggests a reduction in slip on the fault to the south. The restraining bend corresponds to the north end of a pronounced aseismic region along the fault that may represent a spatial change in the mode of strain accommodation. Aerial photo analysis (1:6 k) of well-preserved geomorphology at the south end of the Rodgers Creek fault, where the fault makes another left bend with respect to plate motion, reveals a section that is undergoing progressive inversion from localized transtension (at a right bend) to transpression. This inversion is manifest as a northwest- lengthening zone of uplift within the fault zone. The youngest push-ups appear to be overprinting a relict pull-apart and sag pond. This and possibly older sag deposits along the margin of the uplift may mark former positions of a releasing geometry in the fault trace, presently located directly north of the uplift front. Geometric and overprinting relations suggest that the main trace of the fault rotates and translates through the passing bends. This mode of fault-bend migration contrasts with a previously proposed model in which new transverse structures develop progressively in the direction of deformation (Wakabayashi and others, 2004).

  18. Near-Surface Seismic Images and Geometry of the San Andreas Fault, Santa Cruz Mountains, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldana, S. C.; Catchings, R. D.; Rymer, M. J.; Goldman, M. R.; Snelson, C. M.

    2005-12-01

    In July 2005, the US Geological Survey and the University of Nevada-Las Vegas acquired a 305-m-long, high-resolution, combined seismic reflection and refraction profile across the San Andreas fault within the Los Trancos Open Space Preserve in Palo Alto, California. The objective of the seismic investigation was to determine the geometry and seismic velocities of the San Andreas fault along a part of the surface rupture area of the 1906 M 7.9 San Francisco earthquake. Seismic sources (sledge hammer blows) and geophones (40-Hz single-element verticals) were co-located (1-m lateral offsets) and were spaced at 5-m increments along the profile. The data were recorded with two 60-channel seismographs without acquisition filters. From the resulting seismic data, we developed tomographic P-wave velocity models of the upper 80 m and stacked and migrated reflection images of the upper few hundred meters along the profile. Seismic P-wave velocities range from about 800 m/s to 4500 m/s in the upper 80 m. For rocks with velocities greater than 2500 m/s, the San Andreas fault is expressed as a well-defined low-velocity zone that is about 60 to 80 m wide. In stacked reflection images, the near-surface (upper 100 m) San Andreas fault zone includes multiple vertically offset reflectors with varying dips. On the basis of offset reflectors and lateral variations in the velocity structure, we suggest that the active fault zone is wider than previously indicated by some geologic maps. Surface ruptures from earthquakes prior to the 1906 rupture have likely involved some or all of the imaged near-surface splays. Other more populated areas along the San Andreas fault probably have similar near-surface geometries, and land-use planning in those areas should assume similar complex geometries for the San Andreas fault.

  19. How Students Solve Problems in Spatial Geometry while Using a Software Application for Visualizing 3D Geometric Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widder, Mirela; Gorsky, Paul

    2013-01-01

    In schools, learning spatial geometry is usually dependent upon a student's ability to visualize three dimensional geometric configurations from two dimensional drawings. Such a process, however, often creates visual obstacles which are unique to spatial geometry. Useful software programs which realistically depict three dimensional geometric…

  20. How Students Solve Problems in Spatial Geometry while Using a Software Application for Visualizing 3D Geometric Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widder, Mirela; Gorsky, Paul

    2013-01-01

    In schools, learning spatial geometry is usually dependent upon a student's ability to visualize three dimensional geometric configurations from two dimensional drawings. Such a process, however, often creates visual obstacles which are unique to spatial geometry. Useful software programs which realistically depict three dimensional geometric

  1. Thin-skinned shortening geometries of the South Fork fault: Bighorn basin, Park County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Clarey, T.L. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a new interpretation of the South Fork fault in light of thin-skinned thrust theory. Cross sections and seismic data are presented which indicate that the South Fork fault is an allochthonous salient which was emplaced in the Bighorn basin during the early to middle Eocene. All observed structural geometries can be interpreted as developing under a compressional regime, similar to the Wyoming-Utah-Idaho thrust belt. Faults either follow bedding-plane surfaces, cut up section in the direction of tectonic transport or form backthrusts. A single decollement within the Jurassic Gypsum Spring Formation appears to dominate. Tectonic transport was approximately southeast, parallel to tear faults in the allochthonous plate.

  2. The role of fault surface geometry in the evolution of the fault deformation zone: comparing modeling with field example from the Vignanotica normal fault (Gargano, Southern Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, Matteo; Cianfarra, Paola; Salvini, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    Faults have a (brittle) deformation zone that can be described as the presence of two distintive zones: an internal Fault core (FC) and an external Fault Damage Zone (FDZ). The FC is characterized by grinding processes that comminute the rock grains to a final grain-size distribution characterized by the prevalence of smaller grains over larger, represented by high fractal dimensions (up to 3.4). On the other hand, the FDZ is characterized by a network of fracture sets with characteristic attitudes (i.e. Riedel cleavages). This deformation pattern has important consequences on rock permeability. FC often represents hydraulic barriers, while FDZ, with its fracture connection, represents zones of higher permability. The observation of faults revealed that dimension and characteristics of FC and FDZ varies both in intensity and dimensions along them. One of the controlling factor in FC and FDZ development is the fault plane geometry. By changing its attitude, fault plane geometry locally alter the stress component produced by the fault kinematics and its combination with the bulk boundary conditions (regional stress field, fluid pressure, rocks rheology) is responsible for the development of zones of higher and lower fracture intensity with variable extension along the fault planes. Furthermore, the displacement along faults provides a cumulative deformation pattern that varies through time. The modeling of the fault evolution through time (4D modeling) is therefore required to fully describe the fracturing and therefore permeability. In this presentation we show a methodology developed to predict distribution of fracture intensity integrating seismic data and numerical modeling. Fault geometry is carefully reconstructed by interpolating stick lines from interpreted seismic sections converted to depth. The modeling is based on a mixed numerical/analytical method. Fault surface is discretized into cells with their geometric and rheological characteristics. For each cell, the acting stress and strength are computed by analytical laws (Coulomb failure). Total brittle deformation for each cell is then computed by cumulating the brittle failure values along the path of each cell belonging to one side onto the facing one. The brittle failure value is provided by the DF function, that is the difference between the computed shear and the strength of the cell at each step along its path by using the Frap in-house developed software. The width of the FC and the FDZ are computed as a function of the DF distribution and displacement around the fault. This methodology has been successfully applied to model the brittle deformation pattern of the Vignanotica normal fault (Gargano, Southern Italy) where fracture intensity is expressed by the dimensionless H/S ratio representing the ratio between the dimension and the spacing of homologous fracture sets (i.e., group of parallel fractures that can be ascribed to the same event/stage/stress field).

  3. Crustal structure and fault geometry of the 2010 Haiti earthquake from temporary seismometer deployments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Douilly, Roby; Haase, Jennifer S.; Ellsworth, William L.; Bouin, Marie‐Paule; Calais, Eric; Symithe, Steeve J.; Armbruster, John G.; Mercier de Lépinay, Bernard; Deschamps, Anne; Mildor, Saint‐Louis; Meremonte, Mark E.; Hough, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Haiti has been the locus of a number of large and damaging historical earthquakes. The recent 12 January 2010 Mw 7.0 earthquake affected cities that were largely unprepared, which resulted in tremendous losses. It was initially assumed that the earthquake ruptured the Enriquillo Plantain Garden fault (EPGF), a major active structure in southern Haiti, known from geodetic measurements and its geomorphic expression to be capable of producing M 7 or larger earthquakes. Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data, however, showed that the event ruptured a previously unmapped fault, the Léogâne fault, a north‐dipping oblique transpressional fault located immediately north of the EPGF. Following the earthquake, several groups installed temporary seismic stations to record aftershocks, including ocean‐bottom seismometers on either side of the EPGF. We use data from the complete set of stations deployed after the event, on land and offshore, to relocate all aftershocks from 10 February to 24 June 2010, determine a 1D regional crustal velocity model, and calculate focal mechanisms. The aftershock locations from the combined dataset clearly delineate the Léogâne fault, with a geometry close to that inferred from geodetic data. Its strike and dip closely agree with the global centroid moment tensor solution of the mainshock but with a steeper dip than inferred from previous finite fault inversions. The aftershocks also delineate a structure with shallower southward dip offshore and to the west of the rupture zone, which could indicate triggered seismicity on the offshore Trois Baies reverse fault. We use first‐motion focal mechanisms to clarify the relationship of the fault geometry to the triggered aftershocks.

  4. Development of kink bands in granodiorite: Effect of mechanical heterogeneities, fault geometry, and friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chheda, T. D.; Nevitt, J. M.; Pollard, D. D.

    2014-12-01

    The formation of monoclinal right-lateral kink bands in Lake Edison granodiorite (central Sierra Nevada, CA) is investigated through field observations and mechanics based numerical modeling. Vertical faults act as weak surfaces within the granodiorite, and vertical granodiorite slabs bounded by closely-spaced faults curve into a kink. Leucocratic dikes are observed in association with kinking. Measurements were made on maps of Hilgard, Waterfall, Trail Fork, Kip Camp (Pollard and Segall, 1983b) and Bear Creek kink bands (Martel, 1998). Outcrop scale geometric parameters such as fault length andspacing, kink angle, and dike width are used to construct a representative geometry to be used in a finite element model. Three orders of fault were classified, length = 1.8, 7.2 and 28.8 m, and spacing = 0.3, 1.2 and 3.6 m, respectively. The model faults are oriented at 25° to the direction of shortening (horizontal most compressive stress), consistent with measurements of wing crack orientations in the field area. The model also includes a vertical leucocratic dike, oriented perpendicular to the faults and with material properties consistent with aplite. Curvature of the deformed faults across the kink band was used to compare the effects of material properties, strain, and fault and dike geometry. Model results indicate that the presence of the dike, which provides a mechanical heterogeneity, is critical to kinking in these rocks. Keeping properties of the model granodiorite constant, curvature increased with decrease in yield strength and Young's modulus of the dike. Curvature increased significantly as yield strength decreased from 95 to 90 MPa, and below this threshold value, limb rotation for the kink band was restricted to the dike. Changing Poisson's ratio had no significant effect. The addition of small faults between bounding faults, decreasing fault spacing or increasing dike width increases the curvature. Increasing friction along the faults decreases slip, so the shortening is accommodated by more kinking. Analysis of these parameters also gives us an insight concerning the kilometer-scale kink band in the Mount Abbot Quadrangle, where the Rosy Finch Shear Zone may provide the mechanical heterogeneity that is necessary to cause kinking.

  5. A 3-D velocity model for earthquake location from combined geological and geophysical data: a case study from the TABOO near fault observatory (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latorre, Diana; Lupattelli, Andrea; Mirabella, Francesco; Trippetta, Fabio; Valoroso, Luisa; Lomax, Anthony; Di Stefano, Raffaele; Collettini, Cristiano; Chiaraluce, Lauro

    2014-05-01

    Accurate hypocenter location at the crustal scale strongly depends on our knowledge of the 3D velocity structure. The integration of geological and geophysical data, when available, should contribute to a reliable seismic velocity model in order to guarantee high quality earthquake locations as well as their consistency with the geological structure. Here we present a 3D, P- and S-wave velocity model of the Upper Tiber valley region (Northern Apennines) retrieved by combining an extremely robust dataset of surface and sub-surface geological data (seismic reflection profiles and boreholes), in situ and laboratory velocity measurements, and earthquake data. The study area is a portion of the Apennine belt undergoing active extension where a set of high-angle normal faults is detached on the Altotiberina low-angle normal fault (ATF). From 2010, this area hosts a scientific infrastructure (the Alto Tiberina Near Fault Observatory, TABOO; http://taboo.rm.ingv.it/), consisting of a dense array of multi-sensor stations, devoted to studying the earthquakes preparatory phase and the deformation processes along the ATF fault system. The proposed 3D velocity model is a layered model in which irregular shaped surfaces limit the boundaries between main lithological units. The model has been constructed by interpolating depth converted seismic horizons interpreted along 40 seismic reflection profiles (down to 4s two way travel times) that have been calibrated with 6 deep boreholes (down to 5 km depth) and constrained by detailed geological maps and structural surveys data. The layers of the model are characterized by similar rock types and seismic velocity properties. The P- and S-waves velocities for each layer have been derived from velocity measurements coming from both boreholes (sonic logs) and laboratory, where measurements have been performed on analogue natural samples increasing confining pressure in order to simulate crustal conditions. In order to test the 3D velocity model, we located a selected dataset of the 2010-2013 TABOO catalogue, which is composed of about 30,000 micro-earthquakes (see Valoroso et al., same session). Earthquake location was performed by applying the global-search earthquake location method NonLinLoc, which is able to manage strong velocity contrasts as that observed in the study area. The model volume is 65km x 55km x 20km and is parameterized by constant velocity, cubic cells of side 100 m. For comparison, we applied the same inversion code by using the best 1D model of the area obtained with earthquake data. The results show a significant quality improvement with the 3D model both in terms of location parameters and correlation between seismicity distribution and known geological structures.

  6. Specific features of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability growth with 2D and 3D initial perturbation geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igonin, V. V.; Krasovsky, G. B.; Kuratov, S. E.; Lebedev, A. I.; Lebedeva, M. O.; Meshkov, E. E.; Myshkina, I. Yu; Ol'khov, O. V.; Polovnikov, A. A.; Polovnikov, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    This paper addresses features of hydrodynamic instability growth on shock arrival at a free surface of condensed matter with deterministic initial perturbations. Richtmyer-Meshkov instability growth processes with initial two-dimensional (2D) and 3D perturbations are considered. Experimental diagnostics included pulsed radiography and a two-piston shock-tube technique. It is shown experimentally that the growth of perturbations strongly depends on material compression in the shock tube. In the hydrodynamic approximation, when the shock Mach number is M>1, the growth rate of initial 2D and 3D perturbations is the same. Under weak shock compression conditions (M~1), it may happen that initial 3D perturbations will not grow at all. Our results conflict with theoretical concepts of perturbation growth associated with Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, according to which the growth rate of initial 3D perturbations at the nonlinear stage should always be higher than the growth rate of 2D perturbations for the same a/? ratios. A computational physics model of the process of interest was developed based on LEGAK simulations.

  7. The role of salt layers in the hangingwall deformation of kinked-planar extensional faults: Insights from 3D analogue models and comparison with the Parentis Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, O.; Roca, E.; Vendeville, B. C.

    2014-12-01

    Using an analogue modelling approach, this work investigates the role played by salt in the hangingwall deformation of an extensional fault. Models' set-up included a wooden block simulating the footwall of different kinked-planar fault geometries flattening at depth. Above these faults, the hangingwall was modelled using only sand or sand overlain by pre- or syn-kinematic silicone putty. Regardless of the stage at which was deposited, the silicone appears as an efficient decoupling level that changes the deformation mode of the overlying sand layers. Above the silicone layers, the rollover panels only continue to develop up to the welding of the underlying silicone. Afterwards, they do not grow anymore and all shearing induced by the underlying fault bends is accommodated along the tilted silicone layer that acts as an extensional shear band. Further fault slip produces near-horizontal growth stratal geometries that can be easily misinterpreted as a syn-rift/post-rift boundary. In addition, the differential sedimentary loading of syn-kinematic layers triggers the upslope silicone flow from the hangingwall depocenters towards the rollover shoulders. This migration results in the formation of silicone welds at the rollover limbs and the growth of gentle silicone-cored anticlines above or near the rollover shoulder that are locally pierced by diapirs and walls. These experimental results fit with the Parentis Basin structure that, formed from the motion of lithosphere-scale kinked-planar extensional faults, includes salt inflated anticlines above their rollover shoulders and an intra-Albian unconformity interpreted now as syn-kinematic.

  8. Effect of faulting on fluid flow in porous sandstones: Geometry and spatial distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Antonellini, M.; Aydin, A.

    1995-05-01

    We present a methodology to describe fault geometry at different scales and to characterize the distribution of these scales on the flanks of a salt intrusion in the Colorado Plateau (Arches National Park, United States). This methodology is based on the recognition of the physical processes of faulting and on the quantitative characterization of the structural and petrophysical properties of faults in porous sandstones. The methods used include a variety of mapping techniques (photography, aerial photography, string mapping, theodolite surveys, etc.), as well as techniques for determining fluid flow properties. The resulting study is a prototype for understanding seismic and subseismic scales of heterogeneity related to faulting and fracturing in subsurface reservoirs. Slip planes, which are not interconnected, may have poor geometric sealing characteristics. In the hanging wall of a major normal fault, the quantitative spatial distribution of the faults can be correlated with bending of the strata, probably associated with the salt intrusion. The number of deformation bands, the most ubiquitous element, is proportional to the amount of slip on a single major fault. Deformation bands also have a very high density (>100 m{sup -1}) in stepovers between slip planes. In these areas we find the largest anomalies in permeability. In zones of high strata curvature, the average orders of magnitude with respect to the host rock; if complex fault zones are present, the average permeability can drop more than four orders of magnitude in the direction normal to the faults. Finally, by using outcrop and laboratory data that describe the effect of distinctive structural units on fluid flow, we quantify the three-dimensional distribution of permeability in a reservoir analog at any scale, and we show that such permeability distribution could be implemented in a geology-based reservoir simulator.

  9. Testing the influence of vertical, pre-existing joints on normal faulting using analogue and 3D discrete element models (DEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettermann, Michael; von Hagke, Christoph; Virgo, Simon; Urai, Janos L.

    2015-04-01

    Brittle rocks are often affected by different generations of fractures that influence each other. We study pre-existing vertical joints followed by a faulting event. Understanding the effect of these interactions on fracture/fault geometries as well as the development of dilatancy and the formation of cavities as potential fluid pathways is crucial for reservoir quality prediction and production. Our approach combines scaled analogue and numerical modeling. Using cohesive hemihydrate powder allows us to create open fractures prior to faulting. The physical models are reproduced using the ESyS-Particle discrete element Modeling Software (DEM), and different parameters are investigated. Analogue models were carried out in a manually driven deformation box (30x28x20 cm) with a 60° dipping pre-defined basement fault and 4.5 cm of displacement. To produce open joints prior to faulting, sheets of paper were mounted in the box to a depth of 5 cm at a spacing of 2.5 cm. Powder was then sieved into the box, embedding the paper almost entirely (column height of 19 cm), and the paper was removed. We tested the influence of different angles between the strike of the basement fault and the joint set (0°, 4°, 8°, 12°, 16°, 20°, and 25°). During deformation we captured structural information by time-lapse photography that allows particle imaging velocimetry analyses (PIV) to detect localized deformation at every increment of displacement. Post-mortem photogrammetry preserves the final 3-dimensional structure of the fault zone. We observe that no faults or fractures occur parallel to basement-fault strike. Secondary fractures are mostly oriented normal to primary joints. At the final stage of the experiments we analyzed semi-quantitatively the number of connected joints, number of secondary fractures, degree of segmentation (i.e. number of joints accommodating strain), damage zone width, and the map-view area fraction of open gaps. Whereas the area fraction does not change distinctly, the number of secondary fractures and connected joints increases strongly with increasing angles between basement fault and joint strike. Integrating these models with a 3-dimensional DEM code using the ESyS-Particle software allows for retrieving 4D information from the models, as well as for testing other parameters such as joint spacing or joint depth. Our DEM models are capable of robustly reproducing all characteristic features observed in the analogue models, and will provide a quantitative measure of the influence of joint-fault angle on permeability of cohesive rocks that have experienced more than one brittle deformation phase.

  10. Description of the Active Tectonic Deformation and Fault Friction in Iran Using Block and 3D Finite Element Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernant, P.; Chery, J.

    2004-12-01

    The intracontinental deformation involved in the eastern part of the Arabia/Eurasia collision zone (i.e., mainly Iran) is distributed among several orogens (Zagros, Caucasus, Alborz, Kopet-Dag) surrounding rigid blocks (South Caspian, Central Iran, Lut, Helmand). In this study we investigate the more appropiated desciption of the active tectonic deformation in Iran using different modeling approaches. To do so, we have developed models of the eastern part of the Arabia/Eurasia collision ranging from eastern Turkey (~43°E) to western Afghanistan (~63°E) and from the Arabian to the Eurasian plate. The available GPS velocity fields (Vernant et al., 2004) are used to constrain (block model) or set-up the boundary conditions (finite element modeling). Two different rheologies are used for the finite element modeling: (a) one visco-elastic layer, (b) two layers: the upper one corresponds to the crust and the lower one to the lithospheric mantle. The great strike-slip faults are treated as vertical material discontinuities of the mesh. Fault slip-rates ranging from 0.3 to 0.02 are controlled by a Coulomb-type friction. A third rheology is used corresponding to the block model: (c) elastic constitutive law with fault friction = 0. The rms of the residuals (observed - modeled velocity field) are compared for the different experiments. The statistics obtained are close for the three different rheologies implying that the GPS data are too sparse to definitely conclude about the best description of the active deformation in Iran. However, elasto-plastic or elastic rheologies with law fault frictions show a slightly better fit to the GPS data. This is confirmed by the comparison between the geological fault slip rates and the modeled ones, suggesting that the active tectonic deformation in Iran can be described using rigid blocks and very low fault slip rate (0.02 to 0.0). However, more GPS measurement need to be done to conclude if the deformation is only accommodated by rigid blocks and faults or if elasto-plastic deformation zones exist somewhere in this part of the Alpine-Himalayan mountain belt.

  11. Influence of pre-existing basement faults on the structural evolution of the Zagros Simply Folded belt: 3D numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruh, Jonas B.; Gerya, Taras

    2015-04-01

    The Simply Folded Belt of the Zagros orogen is characterized by elongated fold trains symptomatically defining the geomorphology along this mountain range. The Zagros orogen results from the collision of the Arabian and the Eurasian plates. The Simply Folded Belt is located southwest of the Zagros suture zone. An up to 2 km thick salt horizon below the sedimentary sequence enables mechanical and structural detachment from the underlying Arabian basement. Nevertheless, deformation within the basement influences the structural evolution of the Simply Folded Belt. It has been shown that thrusts in form of reactivated normal faults can trigger out-of-sequence deformation within the sedimentary stratigraphy. Furthermore, deeply rooted strike-slip faults, such as the Kazerun faults between the Fars zone in the southeast and the Dezful embayment and the Izeh zone, are largely dispersing into the overlying stratigraphy, strongly influencing the tectonic evolution and mechanical behaviour. The aim of this study is to reveal the influence of basement thrusts and strike-slip faults on the structural evolution of the Simply Folded Belt depending on the occurrence of intercrustal weak horizons (Hormuz salt) and the rheology and thermal structure of the basement. Therefore, we present high-resolution 3D thermo-mechnical models with pre-existing, inversively reactivated normal faults or strike-slip faults within the basement. Numerical models are based on finite difference, marker-in-cell technique with (power-law) visco-plastic rheology accounting for brittle deformation. Preliminary results show that deep tectonic structures present in the basement may have crucial effects on the morphology and evolution of a fold-and-thrust belt above a major detachment horizon.

  12. The 3D fault and vein architecture of strike-slip releasing- and restraining bends: Evidence from volcanic-centre-relatedmineral deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berger, B.R.

    2007-01-01

    High-temperature, volcanic-centre-related hydrothermal systems involve large fluid-flow volumes and are observed to have high discharge rates in the order of 100-400 kg/s. The flows and discharge occur predominantly on networks of critically stressed fractures. The coupling of hydrothermal fluid flow with deformation produces the volumes of veins found in epithermal mineral deposits. Owing to this coupling, veins provide information on the fault-fracture architecture in existence at the time of mineralization. They therefore provide information on the nature of deformation within fault zones, and the relations between different fault sets. The Virginia City and Goldfield mining districts, Nevada, were localized in zones of strike-slip transtension in an Early to Mid-Miocene volcanic belt along the western margin of North America. The Camp Douglas mining area occurs within the same belt, but is localized in a zone of strike-slip transpression. The vein systems in these districts record the spatial evolution of strike-slip extensional and contractional stepovers, as well as geometry of faulting in and adjacent to points along strike-slip faults where displacement has been interrupted and transferred into releasing and restraining stepovers. ?? The Geological Society of London 2007.

  13. Lithological 3D grid model of the Vuonos area built by using geostatistical simulation honoring the 3D fault model and structural trends of the Outokumpu association rocks in Eastern Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laine, Eevaliisa

    2015-04-01

    The Outokumpu mining district - a metallogenic province about 100 km long x 60 km wide - hosts a Palaeoproterozoic sulfide deposit characterized by an unusual lithological association. It is located in the North Karelia Schist Belt , which was thrust on the late Archaean gneissic-granitoid basement of the Karelian craton during the early stages of the Svecofennian Orogeny between 1.92 and 1.87 Ga (Koistinen 1981). Two major tectono-stratigraphic units can be distinguished, a lower, parautochthonous 'Lower Kaleva' unit and an upper, allochthonous 'upper Kaleva' unit or 'Outokumpu allochthon'. The latter consists of tightly-folded deep marine turbiditic mica schists and metagraywackes containing intercalations of black schist, and the Outo¬kumpu assemblage, which comprises ca. 1950 Ma old, serpentinized peridotites surrounded by carbonate-calc-silicate ('skarn')-quartz rocks. The ore body is enclosed in the Outokumpu assemblage, which is thought to be part of a disrupted and incomplete ophiolite complex (Vuollo & Piirainen 1989) that can be traced to the Kainuu schist belt further north where the well-preserved Jormua ophiolite is ex¬posed (Kontinen 1987, Peltonen & Kontinen 2004). Outokumpu can be divided into blocks divided by faults and shear zones (Saalmann and Laine, 2014). The aim of this study was to make a 3D lithological model of a small part of the Outokumpu association rocks in the Vuonos area honoring the 3D fault model built by Saalmann and Laine (2014). The Vuonos study area is also a part of the Outokumpu mining camp area (Aatos et al. 2013, 2014). Fault and shear structures was used in geostatistical gridding and simulation of the lithologies. Several possible realizations of the structural grids, conforming the main lithological trends were built. Accordingly, it was possible to build a 3D structural grid containing information of the distribution of the possible lithologies and an estimation the associated uncertainties. References: Aatos, S., Jokinen, J., Koistinen, E., Kontinen, A., Korhonen, J., Korpisalo, J., Kurimo, M.,Lahti, I., Laine, E., Levaniemi, H., Sorjonen-Ward, P. & Torppa, J. 2014. Developing deep exploration methods in the Outokumpu Mining Camp area. In: Lauri, L. S., Heilimo, E., Levaniemi, H., Tuusjarvi, M., Lahtinen, R. & Holtta, P. (eds) Current Research: 2nd GTK Mineral Potential Workshop, Kuopio, Finland, May 2014. Geological Survey of Finland,Report of Investigation 207. Koistinen, T. J., 1981. Structural evolution of an early Proterozoic strata-bound Cu-Co-Zn deposit, Outokumpu, Finland. Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh: Earth Sciences, 72, pp. 115-158. Kontinen,A., 1987.An early Proterozoic ophiolite -- the Jormuamafic-ultramafic complex, northern Finland. Precambrian Research 35, 313-341. Peltonen, P. & Kontinen, A. 2004. The Jormua Ophiolite: a mafic-ultramafic complex from an ancient ocean-continent transition zone. In: Precambrian ophiolites and related rocks. Developments in Precambrian geology 13. Amsterdam: Elsevier, 35-71. Saalmann, K.; Laine, E.L, 2014. Structure of the Outokumpu ore district and ophiolite-hosted Cu-Co-Zn-Ni-Ag-Au sulfide deposits revealed from 3D modeling and 2D high-resolution seismic reflection data. Ore Geology Reviews, Volume 62, October 2014, Pages 156-180. Vuollo, J., and Piirainen, T., 1989. Mineralogical evidence for an ophiolite from the Outokumpu serpentinites in North Karelia, Finland. Bulletin of the Geological Society of Finland 61, 95-112.

  14. Construction of high-resolution earthquake fault plane geometry at shallow depth: a detailed analysis from city planning benchmarks measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.; Chan, Y.; Hu, J.; Lee, J.

    2006-12-01

    In the past decade, improvements in geodesy allow geologists to measure the surface displacement of the hanging wall of a fault more precisely. The improved geodetic observations provide opportunities to better characterize the deformational behaviors of the hanging wall block due to earthquake fault slip. In the case of the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake, the hanging wall block of the earthquake fault showed complex deformation pattern at the kilometer scale. Because previous studies mainly characterize on the fault at the regional scale, it is of interest and also challenge to characterize the fault at a smaller scale with a higher resolution. In this study we reconstructed the geometry of a kilometer-scale patch of the fault plane using the displacement data collected from the densely distributed city planning benchmarks. The study area is approximately 4 km by 8 km in size, and contains as many as 924 benchmarks. Among the benchmarks, 62 have both horizontal and vertical displacement data, and the rest of the benchmarks have the horizontal displacement data. Based on the assumption of rigid block motion, we established the earthquake fault geometry using the 62 slip vectors. We then use fault parallel flow method to test the derived fault geometry model with satisfied results. The derived fault geometry model is rather consistent with the borehole data from the nearby 450 m well.

  15. 2D/3D multi-phase Fresnel volume rays and applications to simultaneously update both velocity model and reflector geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Chao-ying; Li, Xing-wang; Huang, Guo-jiao

    2015-04-01

    Theoretically, Fresnel volume ray theory is more suitable for handling real seismic propagation problems because the traveltime depends not only on the velocity distribution along a traditional geometric ray but also on the velocity distribution within a vicinal region (referred to as first Fresnel volume, abbreviated as FFV) which embraces the geometric ray. In this study, we used an exact solution to calculate multi-phase FFV rays for both 2-D and 3-D cases and introduced a normalized coefficient to account for different contributions inside the FFV ray on the traveltimes. Furthermore, we draw a new formula to calculate the partial traveltime derivatives with respective to the velocity variations and depth changes of the reflectors and finally present a simultaneous inversion method for updating both velocity field and reflector geometry by using these multi-phase FFV rays for both in 2-D and 3-D cases. Using synthetic data examples, we compare the reconstructions of the velocity field and the reflector geometry using the FFV ray tomographic methods and the traditional ray tomography approaches. The simulated inversion results for both 2-D and 3-D cases show that the FFV ray tomographic method is advantageous over the traditional ray tomography method, especially when the ray density is relatively low. The other advantage for the FFV ray tomography method is that it can capture the coarse velocity structure and reflector geometry by starting with a low-frequency data set and then map the fine velocity structure and the detailed reflector geometry by using a high-frequency data set.

  16. Reorienting in Virtual 3D Environments: Do Adult Humans Use Principal Axes, Medial Axes or Local Geometry?

    PubMed Central

    Ambosta, Althea H.; Reichert, James F.; Kelly, Debbie M.

    2013-01-01

    Studies have shown that animals, including humans, use the geometric properties of environments to orient. It has been proposed that orientation is accomplished primarily by encoding the principal axes (i.e., global geometry) of an environment. However, recent research has shown that animals use local information such as wall length and corner angles as well as local shape parameters (i.e., medial axes) to orient. The goal of the current study was to determine whether adult humans reorient according to global geometry based on principal axes or whether reliance is on local geometry such as wall length and sense information or medial axes. Using a virtual environment task, participants were trained to select a response box located at one of two geometrically identical corners within a featureless rectangular-shaped environment. Participants were subsequently tested in a transformed L-shaped environment that allowed for a dissociation of strategies based on principal axes, medial axes and local geometry. Results showed that participants relied primarily on a medial axes strategy to reorient in the L-shaped test environment. Importantly, the search behaviour of participants could not be explained by a principal axes-based strategy. PMID:24223869

  17. Development and application of a 3-D geometry/mass model for LDEF satellite ionizing radiation assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colborn, B. L.; Armstong, T. W.

    1993-01-01

    A three-dimensional geometry and mass model of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) spacecraft and experiment trays was developed for use in predictions and data interpretation related to ionizing radiation measurements. The modeling approach, level of detail incorporated, example models for specific experiments and radiation dosimeters, and example applications of the model are described.

  18. Reconstruction of 3D Slab Geometry from Seismicity Using Neighborhood Algebraic Surface Patch Generation and Moving Least Squares Blending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanco, M.; Billen, M. I.; Jadamec, M.

    2007-12-01

    The shape of slabs in the mantle combined with mechanical analysis (analytic or numerical modeling) can provide information on the state of stress in the slab (e.g., compressional versus tensional), the history of subduction (e.g., rate and direction), interaction of the slab with mantle structure (e.g., layers with different material properties) or with large-scale mantle deformation driven by heating from within. Because the primary source of information about slab location is seismicity, the shapes of slabs are often reconstructed from inhomogeneously distributed and noisy observations. Previous attempts to reconstruct three-dimensional slab shapes have relied on approximating the entire slab structure using the analytic solution for a thin elastic or viscous sheet, a surface with Gaussian curvature, or smooth splines. However, these approaches enforce a long wavelength smooth shape on the slab structure that can miss shorter length-scale features, or can introduce short wavelength undulations that are unrelated to the actual slab shape. As the slab structure is often used to create input for analytic or numerical models (e.g., thermal and mechanical structure for deformation models), errors in the slab structure can lead to errors in the predicted deformation. We present a new method for generating 3D slab morphology from seismicity that generates neighborhood surface patches from algebraic surfaces of specified degree (quadratic to quintic) and then blends adjacent patches using a moving least- squares algorithm to create a smooth, continuous surface. The new procedure provides options for pre- processing noisy data to remove outliers, to systematically combine different data sets with user defined weighting, and for defining the 3D edge of the slab surface. Generation of the 3D slab surface using algebraic surface patches and blending allows for smooth, continuous assignment of properties (e.g., temperature or viscosity) that are spatially-related to the location of the slab surface and its edges (e.g., by Euclidean distance) to a numerical model grid without aliasing.

  19. SDM - A geodetic inversion code incorporating with layered crust structure and curved fault geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rongjiang; Diao, Faqi; Hoechner, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Currently, inversion of geodetic data for earthquake fault ruptures is most based on a uniform half-space earth model because of its closed-form Green's functions. However, the layered structure of the crust can significantly affect the inversion results. The other effect, which is often neglected, is related to the curved fault geometry. Especially, fault planes of most mega thrust earthquakes vary their dip angle with depth from a few to several tens of degrees. Also the strike directions of many large earthquakes are variable. For simplicity, such curved fault geometry is usually approximated to several connected rectangular segments, leading to an artificial loss of the slip resolution and data fit. In this presentation, we introduce a free FORTRAN code incorporating with the layered crust structure and curved fault geometry in a user-friendly way. The name SDM stands for Steepest Descent Method, an iterative algorithm used for the constrained least-squares optimization. The new code can be used for joint inversion of different datasets, which may include systematic offsets, as most geodetic data are obtained from relative measurements. These offsets are treated as unknowns to be determined simultaneously with the slip unknowns. In addition, a-priori and physical constraints are considered. The a-priori constraint includes the upper limit of the slip amplitude and the variation range of the slip direction (rake angle) defined by the user. The physical constraint is needed to obtain a smooth slip model, which is realized through a smoothing term to be minimized with the misfit to data. In difference to most previous inversion codes, the smoothing can be optionally applied to slip or stress-drop. The code works with an input file, a well-documented example of which is provided with the source code. Application examples are demonstrated.

  20. R(2)OBBIE-3D, a Fast Robotic High-Resolution System for Quantitative Phenotyping of Surface Geometry and Colour-Texture.

    PubMed

    Martins, António F; Bessant, Michel; Manukyan, Liana; Milinkovitch, Michel C

    2015-01-01

    While recent imaging techniques provide insights into biological processes from the molecular to the cellular scale, phenotypes at larger scales remain poorly amenable to quantitative analyses. For example, investigations of the biophysical mechanisms generating skin morphological complexity and diversity would greatly benefit from 3D geometry and colour-texture reconstructions. Here, we report on R(2)OBBIE-3D, an integrated system that combines a robotic arm, a high-resolution digital colour camera, an illumination basket of high-intensity light-emitting diodes and state-of-the-art 3D-reconstruction approaches. We demonstrate that R(2)OBBIE generates accurate 3D models of biological objects between 1 and 100 cm, makes multiview photometric stereo scanning possible in practical processing times, and enables the capture of colour-texture and geometric resolutions better than 15 μm without the use of magnifying lenses. R(2)OBBIE has the potential to greatly improve quantitative analyses of phenotypes in addition to providing multiple new applications in, e.g., biomedical science. PMID:26039509

  1. R2OBBIE-3D, a Fast Robotic High-Resolution System for Quantitative Phenotyping of Surface Geometry and Colour-Texture

    PubMed Central

    Manukyan, Liana; Milinkovitch, Michel C.

    2015-01-01

    While recent imaging techniques provide insights into biological processes from the molecular to the cellular scale, phenotypes at larger scales remain poorly amenable to quantitative analyses. For example, investigations of the biophysical mechanisms generating skin morphological complexity and diversity would greatly benefit from 3D geometry and colour-texture reconstructions. Here, we report on R2OBBIE-3D, an integrated system that combines a robotic arm, a high-resolution digital colour camera, an illumination basket of high-intensity light-emitting diodes and state-of-the-art 3D-reconstruction approaches. We demonstrate that R2OBBIE generates accurate 3D models of biological objects between 1 and 100 cm, makes multiview photometric stereo scanning possible in practical processing times, and enables the capture of colour-texture and geometric resolutions better than 15 μm without the use of magnifying lenses. R2OBBIE has the potential to greatly improve quantitative analyses of phenotypes in addition to providing multiple new applications in, e.g., biomedical science. PMID:26039509

  2. FACET: a radiation view factor computer code for axisymmetric, 2D planar, and 3D geometries with shadowing

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.

    1983-08-01

    The computer code FACET calculates the radiation geometric view factor (alternatively called shape factor, angle factor, or configuration factor) between surfaces for axisymmetric, two-dimensional planar and three-dimensional geometries with interposed third surface obstructions. FACET was developed to calculate view factors for input to finite-element heat-transfer analysis codes. The first section of this report is a brief review of previous radiation-view-factor computer codes. The second section presents the defining integral equation for the geometric view factor between two surfaces and the assumptions made in its derivation. Also in this section are the numerical algorithms used to integrate this equation for the various geometries. The third section presents the algorithms used to detect self-shadowing and third-surface shadowing between the two surfaces for which a view factor is being calculated. The fourth section provides a user's input guide followed by several example problems.

  3. 3D Simultaneous Traveltime Inversion for Velocity Structure, Hypocenter Locations, and Reflector Geometry Using Multiple Classes of Arrivals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Chao-ying; Huang, Guo-jiao; Li, Xing-wang; Greenhalgh, Stewart

    2015-10-01

    Traditionally, traveltime tomography entails inversion of either the velocity field and the reflector geometry sequentially, or the velocity field and the hypocenter locations simultaneously or in a cascaded fashion, but seldom are all three types (velocities, geometry of reflectors, and source locations) updated simultaneously because of the compromise between the different classes of model variable and the lack of different seismic phases to constrain these variables. By using a state-of-the-art ray-tracing algorithm for the first and later arrivals combined with a popular linearized inversion solver, it is possible to simultaneously recover the three classes of model variables. In the work discussed in this paper we combined the multistage irregular shortest-path ray-tracing algorithm with a subspace inversion solver to achieve simultaneous inversion of multi-class variables, using arrival times for different phases to concurrently obtain the velocity field, the reflector shapes, and the hypocenter locations. Simulation and comparison tests for two sets of source-receiver arrangements (one the ideal case and the other an approximated real case) indicate that the combined triple-class inversion algorithm is capable of obtaining nearly the same results as the double-class affect inversion scheme (velocity and reflector geometry, or velocity and source locations) even if a lower ray density and irregular source-receiver geometry are used to simulate the real situation. In addition, the new simultaneous inversion method is not sensitive to a modest amount of picking error in the traveltime data and reasonable uncertainty in earthquake hypocenter locations, which shows it to be a feasible and promising approach in real applications.

  4. 3D Investigation of an Apparent Offset Channel: A Case Study From the San Andreas Fault in the Carrizo Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant Ludwig, L.; Akciz, S. O.; Zielke, O.; Arrowsmith, R.

    2011-12-01

    Airborne and terrestrial LiDAR topographic data can provide unprecedented spatial representations of faulting-related surface features and an opportunity to analyze and model their evolution. Analysis of high resolution topographic data from the southern San Andreas fault (B4-dataset) indicates that the average slip along the Carrizo section during the 1857 earthquake was ~5.5 m (Zielke et al., 2010). Here we present the results from >20 field-reviewed, shallow excavations surrounding a ~20 cm deep channel which has a sharp, 5 m long bend at the Bidart site along the SAF in the Carrizo Plain. Our observations show: 1) the sharp bend in the channel coincides with the trace of the 1857 fault rupture. 2) A mud flow deposit is the oldest unit to bury the surface deformed in 1857. The shallow channel is either younger than or likely contemporaneous with deposition of a pea gravel unit which sporadically overlays the post-1857 mud flow unit. 3) Pea gravel and mudflow deposits show no evidence of intense deformation compared to the underlying units which were interpreted to have deformed significantly (moletracks, fissures, apparent offsets, unit thickness changes, etc.) during 1857. 4) The sharp bend in the channel trace topography, clearly observed in field and LIDAR images, is younger than the 1857 offset and is now interpreted as a deflection. The pea gravel deposit may have been deflected around a ~5 m offset structure, but the relevant sedimentary relationships are ambiguous. 5) Subtle deformational features within the pea gravel are similar to the evidence previously documented at the Phelan Fan and LY4 paleoseismic sites (3 km and 35 km NW of Bidart), which may collectively suggest a post-1857 aftershock or moderate (pre 20th century) Cholame/Carrizo earthquake. New technologies and numerical methods provide novel opportunities for measuring and understanding processes that shape the surface of the earth. However, validation and 4-dimensional (depth and time) stratigraphic investigations are still warranted.

  5. Aspects of a Discontinuous Galerkin Approach for 3D Dynamic Rupture Modeling in the Case of a Complex Fault System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelties, C.; de la Puente, J.; Ampuero, J. P.; Brietzke, G. B.; Kaeser, M.

    2011-12-01

    We will present recent developments concerning the extensions of the arbitrary high-order derivative Discontinuous Galerkin (ADER-DG) method to solve three dimensional dynamic rupture problems on unstructured tetrahedral meshes. First of all, we verify our implementation by comparing results of the SCEC test case with other numerical methods such as Finite Difference and Spectral Boundary Integral. An important result of the benchmark is that the ADER-DG method avoids spurious high-frequency contributions in the slip rate spectra and therefore does not require artificial Kelvin-Voigt damping or a posteriori filtering of synthetic seismograms. Then, we present a detailed convergence study to ensure the systematic correctness. To demonstrate the capabilities of the high-order accurate ADER-DG scheme on unstructured meshes we use the 1992 Landers earthquake as an example. It represents a complex fault system including branching and six curved fault segments. Furthermore, topography is respected in the discretized model to capture the surface waves correctly. Strong mesh coarsening or refinement at areas of interest is applied to keep the computational costs feasible. Finally current problems and further developments will be discussed.

  6. Density structure and geometry of the Costa Rican subduction zone from 3-D gravity modeling and local earthquake data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lücke, O. H.; Arroyo, I. G.

    2015-07-01

    The eastern part of the oceanic Cocos Plate presents a heterogeneous crustal structure due to diverse origins and ages as well as plate-hot spot interactions which originated the Cocos Ridge, a structure that converges with the Caribbean Plate in southeastern Costa Rica. The complex structure of the oceanic plate directly influences the dynamics and geometry of the subduction zone along the Middle American Trench. In this paper an integrated interpretation of the slab geometry is presented based on three-dimensional density modeling of combined satellite and surface gravity data, constrained by available geophysical and geological data and seismological information obtained from local networks. The results show the continuation of steep subduction geometry from the Nicaraguan margin into Northwestern Costa Rica, followed by a moderate dipping slab under the Central Cordillera toward the end of the Central American Volcanic Arc. To the southeast end of the volcanic arc, our preferred model shows a steep, coherent slab that extends up to the landward projection of the Panama Fracture Zone. Overall, a gradual change in the depth of the intraplate seismicity is observed, reaching 220 km in the northwestern part, and becoming progressively shallower toward the southeast, where it reaches a terminal depth of 75 km. The changes in the terminal depth of the observed seismicity correlate with the increased density in the modeled slab. The absence of intermediate depth intraplate seismicity in the southeastern section and the higher densities for the subducted slab in this area, support a model in which dehydration reactions in the subducted slab cease at a shallower depth, originating an anhydrous and thus aseismic slab.

  7. RMT focal plane sensitivity to seismic network geometry and faulting style

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kendra L.; Hayes, Gavin P.; Herrmann, Robert B.; Benz, Harley M.; McNamara, Dan E.; Bergman, Eric

    2016-04-01

    Modern tectonic studies often use regional moment tensors (RMTs) to interpret the seismotectonic framework of an earthquake or earthquake sequence; however, despite extensive use, little existing work addresses RMT parameter uncertainty. Here, we quantify how network geometry and faulting style affect RMT sensitivity. We examine how data-model fits change with fault plane geometry (strike and dip) for varying station configurations. We calculate the relative data fit for incrementally varying geometries about a best-fit solution, applying our workflow to real and synthetic seismograms for both real and hypothetical station distributions and earthquakes. Initially, we conduct purely observational tests, computing RMTs from synthetic seismograms for hypothetical earthquakes and a series of well-behaved network geometries. We then incorporate real data and station distributions from the International Maule Aftershock Deployment (IMAD), which recorded aftershocks of the 2010 MW 8.8 Maule earthquake, and a set of regional stations capturing the ongoing earthquake sequence in Oklahoma and southern Kansas. We consider RMTs computed under three scenarios: (1) real seismic records selected for high data quality; (2) synthetic seismic records with noise computed for the observed source-station pairings; and (3) synthetic seismic records with noise computed for all possible station-source pairings. To assess RMT sensitivity for each test, we observe the "fit falloff", which portrays how relative fit changes when strike or dip varies incrementally; we then derive the ranges of acceptable strikes and dips by identifying the span of solutions with relative fits larger than 90% of the best-fit. For the azimuthally incomplete IMAD network, Scenario 3 best constrains fault geometry, with average ranges of 45° and 31° for strike and dip, respectively. In Oklahoma, Scenario 3 best constrains fault dip with an average range of 46°; however, strike is best constrained by Scenario 1, with a range of 26°. We draw two main conclusions from this study. (1) Station distribution impacts our ability to constrain RMTs using waveform time-series; however, in some tectonic settings, faulting style also plays a significant role; and (2) increasing station density and data quantity (both the number of stations and the number of individual channels) does not necessarily improve RMT constraint. These results may be useful when organizing future seismic deployments (e.g., by concentrating stations in alignment with anticipated nodal planes), and in computing RMTs, either by guiding a more rigorous data selection process for input data or informing variable weighting among the selected data (e.g., by eliminating the transverse component when strike-slip mechanisms are expected).

  8. DG-AMMOS: A New tool to generate 3D conformation of small molecules using Distance Geometry and Automated Molecular Mechanics Optimization for in silico Screening

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Discovery of new bioactive molecules that could enter drug discovery programs or that could serve as chemical probes is a very complex and costly endeavor. Structure-based and ligand-based in silico screening approaches are nowadays extensively used to complement experimental screening approaches in order to increase the effectiveness of the process and facilitating the screening of thousands or millions of small molecules against a biomolecular target. Both in silico screening methods require as input a suitable chemical compound collection and most often the 3D structure of the small molecules has to be generated since compounds are usually delivered in 1D SMILES, CANSMILES or in 2D SDF formats. Results Here, we describe the new open source program DG-AMMOS which allows the generation of the 3D conformation of small molecules using Distance Geometry and their energy minimization via Automated Molecular Mechanics Optimization. The program is validated on the Astex dataset, the ChemBridge Diversity database and on a number of small molecules with known crystal structures extracted from the Cambridge Structural Database. A comparison with the free program Balloon and the well-known commercial program Omega generating the 3D of small molecules is carried out. The results show that the new free program DG-AMMOS is a very efficient 3D structure generator engine. Conclusion DG-AMMOS provides fast, automated and reliable access to the generation of 3D conformation of small molecules and facilitates the preparation of a compound collection prior to high-throughput virtual screening computations. The validation of DG-AMMOS on several different datasets proves that generated structures are generally of equal quality or sometimes better than structures obtained by other tested methods. PMID:19912625

  9. The effects of mass redistribution due to erosion and sedimentation on the distribution of fault activity within extensional fault arrays: An investigation by using fully coupled 3D finite-element models with a landscape evolution tool.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniatis, Georgios; Turpeinen, Heidi; Hampel, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    Mass redistribution on the Earth's surface creates loads that may influence the rate of crustal deformation. Using three-dimensional finite-element models solved with the commercial finite-element software ABAQUS and implementing the landscape evolution with the CASQUS tool (Kurfeß and Heidbach 2009) we investigate how surface processes may affect the spatiotemporal distribution of fault slip within horst and graben structures in extensional tectonic settings. The finite-element models comprised of normal faults arranged in en echelon arrays that form graben or horst structures within a 200 km x 200-km-wide and 15-km-thick upper crust. Previous studies have shown that surface processes may affect fault slip rates on normal faults during extension phases and prolong fault activity after the onset of tectonic quiescence (Maniatis et al., 2009, Turpeinen et al., in press). In the present study we show that not only the parameters controlling the surface processes (e.g. diffusion constant) have an effect on the slip rate of individual faults but also the spatial distribution of erosion and deposition affects fault slip rates to different degrees depending on the fault's position within an array. By adding a subsequent phase of tectonic quiescence to the models, we investigate how ongoing erosion and sedimentation might prolong fault slip accumulation for up to millions of years after the cessation of extension across the fault arrays. Our models show that the amount and duration of additional fault slip are controlled by parameters such as the diffusion constant, fault length and fault dip. The results of the present study therefore imply that the feedbacks of erosion and deposition on tectonics should be additionally considered when evaluating the spatial distribution of fault activity within graben and horst systems. Furthermore, the potential of erosion and sedimentation to prolong fault activity in extensional settings should be taken into account when constraining the timing of the cessation of regional extension phases. References Kurfeß, D., Heidbach, O., 2009. CASQUS: a new simulation tool for coupled 3d finite element modeling of tectonic and surface processes based on ABAQUS™ and CASCADE. Comput. Geosci. 35, 1959-1967. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cageo.2008.10.019. Maniatis, G., Kurfeß, D., Hampel, A., Heidbach, O., 2009. Slip acceleration on normal faults due to erosion and sedimentation—results from a new three-dimensional numerical model coupling tectonics and landscape evolution. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 284, 570-582. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.epsl.2009.05.024. Turpeinen, H., Maniatis, G., Hampel, A., Slip on normal faults induced by surface processes after the cessation of regional extension—Insights from three-dimensional numerical modelling, Geomorphology (in press), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.geomorph.2013.12.008

  10. Drawing the geometry of 3d transition metal-boron pairs in silicon from electron emission channeling experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, D. J.; Wahl, U.; Correia, J. G.; Augustyns, V.; Lima, T. A. L.; Costa, A.; Bosne, E.; da Silva, M. R.; Araújo, J. P.; Pereira, L. M. C.

    2016-03-01

    Although the formation of transition metal-boron pairs is currently well established in silicon processing, the geometry of these complexes is still not completely understood. We investigated the lattice location of the transition metals manganese, iron, cobalt and nickel in n- and p+ -type silicon by means of electron emission channeling. For manganese, iron and cobalt, we observed an increase of sites near the ideal tetrahedral interstitial position by changing the doping from n- to p+ -type Si. Such increase was not observed for Ni. We ascribe this increase to the formation of pairs with boron, driven by Coulomb interactions, since the majority of iron, manganese and cobalt is positively charged in p+ -type silicon while Ni is neutral. We propose that breathing mode relaxation around the boron ion within the pair causes the observed displacement from the ideal tetrahedral interstitial site. We discuss the application of the emission channeling technique in this system and, in particular, how it provides insight on the geometry of such pairs.

  11. A split-step numerical method for the time-dependent Dirac equation in 3-D axisymmetric geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillion-Gourdeau, François; Lorin, Emmanuel; Bandrauk, André D.

    2014-09-01

    A numerical method is developed to solve the time-dependent Dirac equation in cylindrical coordinates for 3-D axisymmetric systems. The time evolution is treated by a splitting scheme in coordinate space using alternate direction iteration, while the wave function is discretized spatially on a uniform grid. The longitudinal coordinate evolution is performed exactly by the method of characteristics while the radial coordinates evolution uses Poisson's integral solution, which allows to implement the radial symmetry of the wave function. The latter is evaluated on a time staggered mesh by using Hermite polynomial interpolation and by performing the integration analytically. The cylindrical coordinate singularity problem at r=0 is circumvented by this method as the integral is well-defined at the origin. The resulting scheme is reminiscent of non-standard finite differences. In the last step of the splitting, the remaining equation has a solution in terms of a time-ordered exponential, which is approximated to a higher order than the time evolution scheme. We study the time evolution of Gaussian wave packets, and we evaluate the eigenstates of hydrogen-like systems by using a spectral method. We compare the numerical results to analytical solutions to validate the method. In addition, we present three-dimensional simulations of relativistic laser-matter interactions, using the Dirac equation.

  12. TU-F-BRF-04: Registration of 3D Transesophageal Echocardiography and X-Ray Fluoroscopy Using An Inverse Geometry X-Ray System

    SciTech Connect

    Speidel, M; Hatt, C; Tomkowiak, M; Raval, A; Funk, T

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a method for the fusion of 3D echocardiography and Scanning-Beam Digital X-ray (SBDX) fluoroscopy to assist with catheter device and soft tissue visualization during interventional procedures. Methods: SBDX is a technology for low-dose inverse geometry x-ray fluoroscopy that performs digital tomosynthesis at multiple planes in real time. In this study, transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) images were fused with SBDX images by estimating the 3D position and orientation (the “pose”) of the TEE probe within the x-ray coordinate system and then spatially transforming the TEE image data to match this pose. An initial pose estimate was obtained through tomosynthesis-based 3D localization of points along the probe perimeter. Position and angle estimates were then iteratively refined by comparing simulated projections of a 3D probe model against SBDX x-ray images. Algorithm performance was quantified by imaging a TEE probe in different known orientations and locations within the x-ray field (0-30 degree tilt angle, up to 50 mm translation). Fused 3D TEE/SBDX imaging was demonstrated by imaging a tissue-mimicking polyvinyl alcohol cylindrical cavity as a catheter was navigated along the cavity axis. Results: Detected changes in probe tilt angle agreed with the known changes to within 1.2 degrees. For a 50 mm translation along the source-detector axis, the detected translation was 50.3 mm. Errors for in-plane translations ranged from 0.1 to 0.9 mm. In a fused 3D TEE/SBDX display, the catheter device was well visualized and coincident with the device shadow in the TEE images. The TEE images portrayed phantom boundaries that were not evident under x-ray. Conclusion: Registration of soft tissue anatomy derived from TEE imaging and device imaging from SBDX x-ray fluoroscopy is feasible. The simultaneous 3D visualization of these two modalities may be useful in interventional procedures involving the navigation of devices to soft tissue anatomy.

  13. Users Manual for TART 2002: A Coupled Neutron-Photon 3-D, Combinatorial Geometry Time Dependent Monte Carlo Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D E

    2003-06-06

    TART 2002 is a coupled neutron-photon, 3 Dimensional, combinatorial geometry, time dependent Monte Carlo radiation transport code. This code can run on any modern computer. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART 2002 is also incredibly FAST; if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared to other similar codes. Use of the entire system can save you a great deal of time and energy. TART 2002 is distributed on CD. This CD contains on-line documentation for all codes included in the system, the codes configured to run on a variety of computers, and many example problems that you can use to familiarize yourself with the system. TART 2002 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that users only use the most recent version of TART 2002 and its data files.

  14. TART98 a coupled neutron-photon 3-D, combinatorial geometry time dependent Monte Carlo Transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D E

    1998-11-22

    TART98 is a coupled neutron-photon, 3 Dimensional, combinatorial geometry, time dependent Monte Carlo radiation transport code. This code can run on any modern computer. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART98 is also incredibly FAST; if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared to other similar codes. Use of the entire system can save you a great deal of time and energy. TART98 is distributed on CD. This CD contains on-line documentation for all codes included in the system, the codes configured to run on a variety of computers, and many example problems that you can use to familiarize yourself with the system. TART98 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that users only use the most recent version of TART98 and its data files.

  15. TART 2000: A Coupled Neutron-Photon, 3-D, Combinatorial Geometry, Time Dependent, Monte Carlo Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D.E

    2000-11-22

    TART2000 is a coupled neutron-photon, 3 Dimensional, combinatorial geometry, time dependent Monte Carlo radiation transport code. This code can run on any modern computer. It is a complete system to assist you with input Preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART2000 is also incredibly FAST; if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared to other similar codes. Use of the entire system can save you a great deal of time and energy. TART2000 is distributed on CD. This CD contains on-line documentation for all codes included in the system, the codes configured to run on a variety of computers, and many example problems that you can use to familiarize yourself with the system. TART2000 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that users only use the most recent version of TART2000 and its data files.

  16. Geodetic imaging of potential seismogenic asperities on the Xianshuihe-Anninghe-Zemuhe fault system, southwest China, with a new 3-D viscoelastic interseismic coupling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Guoyan; Xu, Xiwei; Chen, Guihua; Liu, Yajing; Fukahata, Yukitoshi; Wang, Hua; Yu, Guihua; Tan, Xibin; Xu, Caijun

    2015-03-01

    We use GPS and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) measurements to image the spatial variation of interseismic coupling on the Xianshuihe-Anninghe-Zemuhe (XAZ) fault system. A new 3-D viscoelastic interseismic deformation model is developed to infer the rotation and strain rates of blocks, postseismic viscoelastic relaxation, and interseismic slip deficit on the fault surface discretized with triangular dislocation patches. The inversions of synthetic data show that the optimal weight ratio and smoothing factor are both 1. The successive joint inversions of geodetic data with different viscosities reveal six potential fully coupled asperities on the XAZ fault system. Among them, the potential asperity between Shimian and Mianning, which does not exist in the case of 1019 Pa s, is confirmed by the published microearthquake depth profile. Besides, there is another potential partially coupled asperity between Daofu and Kangding with a length scale up to 140 km. All these asperity sizes are larger than the minimum resolvable wavelength. The minimum and maximum slip deficit rates near the Moxi town are 7.0 and 12.7 mm/yr, respectively. Different viscosities have little influence on the roughness of the slip deficit rate distribution and the fitting residuals, which probably suggests that our observations cannot provide a good constraint on the viscosity of the middle lower crust. The calculation of seismic moment accumulation on each segment indicates that the Songlinkou-Selaha (S4), Shimian-Mianning (S7), and Mianning-Xichang (S8) segments are very close to the rupture of characteristic earthquakes. However, the confidence level is confined by sparse near-fault observations.

  17. Application of an inverse method for calculating three-dimensional fault geometries and clip vectors, Nun River Field, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, H.G.; White, N.

    1996-03-01

    A general, automatic method for determining the three-dimensional geometry of a normal fault of any shape and size is applied to a three-dimensional seismic reflection data set from the Nun River field, Nigeria. In addition to calculating fault geometry, the method also automatically retrieves the extension direction without requiring any previous information about either the fault shape or the extension direction. Solutions are found by minimizing the misfit between sets of faults that are calculated from the observed geometries of two or more hanging-wall beds. In the example discussed here, the predicted fault surface is in excellent agreement with the shape of the seismically imaged fault. Although the calculated extension direction is oblique to the average strike of the fault, the value of this parameter is not well resolved. Our approach differs markedly from standard section-balancing models in two important ways. First, we do not assume that the extension direction is known, and second, the use of inverse theory ensures that formal confidence bounds can be determined for calculated fault geometries. This ability has important implications for a range of geological problems encountered at both exploration and production scales. In particular, once the three-dimensional displacement field has been constrained, the difficult but important problem of three-dimensional palinspastic restoration of hanging-wall structures becomes tractable.

  18. Pushing the Limits of Geological Mapping Outside the Earth: 3D Modeling of Strike-Slip and Extensional Fault Systems in Meridiani Planum Region, Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal Royo, O.

    2014-12-01

    GIS and geological modeling software have radically changed the means by which geological mapping is produced, published and visualized. This type of software environment normally requires a spatially aware reference system to position data and interpretation, often referred as georeferenced data (i.e. geographic data referenced on the Earth). However, for this study we coin the term areoreferenced data (i.e. Mars-referenced "geographic" data). Thanks to the wealth of areoreferenced data made available by the NASA and the HiRise at University of Arizona it is now possible to carry out 3D areographic and areologic (i.e. related to the topography and geology of Mars, respectively) reconstructions in great detail. The present work benefits from the availability of software and areographic data, and presents the results of an areologic map and 3D model of the fault systems in the Meridiani Planum of Mars. The work has been carried out in Move™ (developed by Midland Valley Exploration), a geological modeling toolkit that allows for easy data loading in a wide range of formats as well as straightforward 2D/3D model building tools of geological bodies. Initial data consisted of Digital Terrain Model and orthoimages (NASA/JPL/University of Arizona/USGS). From these we have interpreted several structural domains: right-lateral strike-slip systems with associated releasing bends, which gave room to an extensional event causing a horizontal-axis rotation of the bedding. Bedding ranges from subhorizontal in the southern domain where strike-slip prevails to nearly 40º in the central and northern domains, where a more complex interaction between strike-slip and extensional faults is described. The stratigraphic sequence is mainly composed by moderately rounded well laminated basaltic sandstones (Squyres et al., 2004) in which a high component of sulfurs (e.g. sulfate anhydrate, hexahydrite, epsomite, gypsum) and salts (e.g. halite) has been described (Squyres et al., 2004; Christensen et al., 2004). This presence of sulfurs and salts do not only evidence the presence of water in Mars in the past, but also makes us consider the presence of deeper layers that may constitute potential décollement levels on which the faults detach, as it has been described in extensional and compressional cordilleras elsewhere in the Earth.

  19. The 2009 L'Aquila seismic sequence (Central Italy): fault system geometry and kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valoroso, L.; Amato, A.; Cattaneo, M.; Cecere, G.; Chiarabba, C.; Chiaraluce, L.; de Gori, P.; Delladio, A.; de Luca, G.; di Bona, M.; di Stefano, R.; Govoni, A.; Lucente, F. P.; Margheriti, L.; Mazza, S.; Monachesi, G.; Moretti, M.; Olivieri, M.; Piana Agostinetti, N.; Selvaggi, G.; Improta, L.; Piccinini, D.; Mariscal, A.; Pequegnat, C.; Schlagenhauf, A.; Salaun, G.; Traversa, P.; Voisin, C.; Zuccarello, L.; Azzaro, R.

    2009-12-01

    On April 6 (01:32 UTC) 2009 a destructive MW 6.3 earthquake struck the Abruzzi region in Central Italy, causing nearly 300 deaths, 40.000 homeless, and strong damage to the cultural heritage of the L'Aquila city and its province. Two strong earthquakes hit the area in historical times (e.g. the 1461 and 1703 events), but the main fault that drives the extension in this portion of the Apennines was unknown. The ground surveys carried out after the earthquake find ambiguous evidence of surface faulting. We use aftershocks distribution to investigate the geometry of the activated fault system and to report on spatio-temporal seismicity pattern and kinematics of the whole seismic sequence. Seismic data were recorded at both permanent stations of the Centralized Italian National Seismic Network managed by the INGV and 45 temporary stations installed in the epicentral area. To manage such a large amount of earthquakes, we implemented a semi-automatic procedure able to identify local earthquakes and to provide consistently weighted P- and S-wave arrival times. We show that this procedure yields consistent earthquake detection and high-quality arrival times data for hundreds of events per day. The accurate location for thousands of aftershocks defines a complex, 40 km long, NW-trending normal fault system, with seismicity nucleating within the upper 12 km of the crust. We show the geometry of two major SW-dipping normal faults that form a right lateral en-echelon system. The main fault activated by the 6th of April earthquake is 20 km-long, NW-trending and about 50° SW-dipping and is located below the city of L'Aquila. To the north, we find a second fault, activated on the 9th of April by a MW 5.4 earthquake, that is about 12-km-long and shows a dip angle of about 40° with hypocenters mainly located in the 6 to 10 km depth range.

  20. A method to characterize the 3D geometry of complex landslides in clayey soils: the Valoria, Super-Sauze and La Valette case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daehne, A.; Travelletti, J.; Malet, J.-P.; Corsini, A.; Ronchetti, F.

    2009-04-01

    Bedrock geometry drastically influences the kinematic deformation pattern of slow-moving landslides exhibiting some flow characteristics. The development of extension and compression zones within the landslide body is largely controlled by the geometry (crests, bumps, hollows) and roughness of the topography covered by the moving mass. A challenge to progress in the forecast of such type of landslides is to precisely define 3D geometrical and geomechanical models. The objective of this work is to present a methodology for 3D geometrical modelling of the landslide structure, and to discuss the main possible errors in integrating multi-source and multi-resolution data in the modelling. The methodology is presented through the analysis of three landslides with similar geomorphological features (e.g. flow-like geomorphology) and development patterns (retrogression of the crown, roto-translational failures of the upper part, and translational movements in the lower part), and for which an extensive dataset of geophysical, geotechnical and geomorphological information is available. The three cases studies are the complex Valoria earth-slide-flow located in the Northern Apennines, the Super-Sauze and La Valette mudslides in the French South Alps. All three landslides are predominantly developed in a clay-shale soil formation. First, interpretation of the multi-data information, their resolution and accuracy is presented for the landslides. Second, a procedure to construct 3D geometrical models of the landslides is proposed (by using the Rockware's Rockworks geological modeller) and the influence of the interpolation algorithms is discussed. It is demonstrated that the model uncertainty is strongly depending on the density and distribution of the input data which vary for the three landslides. The quality of several geometrical models is then compared; a best-fit is achieved by using available geological and geomorphological site interpretation.

  1. Improving and validating 3D models for the leaf energy balance in canopy-scale problems with complex geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, B.; Stoll, R., II; Miller, N. E.; Pardyjak, E.; Mahaffee, W.

    2014-12-01

    Plants cover the majority of Earth's land surface, and thus play a critical role in the surface energy balance. Within individual plant communities, the leaf energy balance is a fundamental component of most biophysical processes. Absorbed radiation drives the energy balance and provides the means by which plants produce food. Available energy is partitioned into sensible and latent heat fluxes to determine surface temperature, which strongly influences rates of metabolic activity and growth. The energy balance of an individual leaf is coupled with other leaves in the community through longwave radiation emission and advection through the air. This complex coupling can make scaling models from leaves to whole-canopies difficult, specifically in canopies with complex, heterogeneous geometries. We present a new three-dimensional canopy model that simultaneously resolves sub-tree to whole-canopy scales. The model provides spatially explicit predictions of net radiation exchange, boundary-layer and stomatal conductances, evapotranspiration rates, and ultimately leaf surface temperature. The radiation model includes complex physics such as anisotropic emission and scattering. Radiation calculations are accelerated by leveraging graphics processing unit (GPU) technology, which allows canopy-scale problems to be performed on a standard desktop workstation. Since validating the three-dimensional distribution of leaf temperature can be extremely challenging, we used several independent measurement techniques to quantify errors in measured and modeled values. When compared with measured leaf temperatures, the model gave a mean error of about 2°C, which was close to the estimated measurement uncertainty.

  2. 3D model of fault and fissures structure of the Kovdor Baddeleyite-Apatite-Magnetite Deposit (NE of the Fennoscandian Shield)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhirov, Dmitry; Klimov, Sergey

    2015-04-01

    The Kovdor baddeleyite-apatite-magnetite deposit (KBAMD) is represented by a large vertical ore body and is located in the southwestern part of the Kovdor ultramafic-alkaline central-type intrusion. The intrusion represents a concentrically zoned complex of rocks with an oval shape in plan, and straight zoning, which complies with the injection and displacement of each of further magma phases from the center towards the periphery. The operation of the deposit in open pits started in 1962, and nowadays, it has produced over 500,000,000 tons of ore. This is one of the largest open pits in the Kola region, which is ca. 2 km long, 1.8 km wide, and over 400 m deep. Regular structural studies has been carried out since late 1970. A unique massif of spatial data has been accumulated so far to include over 25,000 measurements of fissures and faults from the surface, ca. 20,000 measurements of fissures in the oriented drill core (over 18 km) etc. Using this data base the 3D model of fault and fissures structure was designed. The analysis of one has resulted in the identification of a series of laws and features, which are necessary to be taken into account when designing a deep open pit and mining is carried out. These are mainly aspects concerning the origin, kinematics, mechanics and ratio of spatial extension of various fault systems, variation of their parameters at deep horizons, features of a modern stress field in the country rocks, etc. The 3D model has allowed to divide the whole fracture / fissure systems of the massif rocks into 2 large groups: prototectonic system of joints, including cracks of 'liquid magmatic (carbonatite stage) contraction genesis', and newly formed faults due to the superimposed tectonic stages. With regard to the deposit scale, these are characterized as intraformational and transformational, respectively. Each group shows a set (an assemblage) of fault systems with unique features and signs, as well as regular interconnections. The prototectonic assemblage of fissures includes the following main systems: 2-3 subsystems Rd of radial with angle of dip within 65-90° (median at 78°), two subsystems S of a circular subvertical (tangential, crossing Rd) with angle of dip within 60-90° (74°), and two diagonal-conic ones: a centriclinal C dipping towards the center of the intrusion at angles of 25-55° (43°), and a periclinal P dipping from the center of the intrusion at angles of 5-35° (18°). The system of subhorizontal joints L (angle of dip within 0-12°) at deep horizons is insignificantly manifested. All the prototectonic systems are regularly interrelated, and vary asymuthal features according to the law of axial symmetry (when moving around the vertical axis of symmetry passed through the geometric center of the carbonatite intrusion). The superimposed tectonics of post-ore stages forms a few large faults and systems of rupture discontinuities. A few (up to 3) variously oriented displacements are documented in the field on kinematic features (slide furrows, oriented cleavages). They were used for reconstruction of stresses and tectonic evolution. The superimposed tectonic faulting has heterogeneous (local) distribution in the rocks of the deposit, and slight predictability of main parameters. This study was supported by the Russian Scientific Fund (project nos. 14-17-00751).

  3. Size Dependent Fracture Energy; A Derivation from Hierarchical Fault Zone Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuki, K.

    2006-12-01

    The observations that the ratio of seismic radiation energy to seismic moment is nearly constant with about four orders deviations over the very wide range of seismic moment suggests that fracture energy G is nearly constant if stress drop also is constant. The values of fracture energy estimated from observations of earthquakes are the averaged one over the rupture surface concerned. However, fault zones are very heterogeneous and as well known, fault zones are composed of fault segments and fault jogs. Smaller segment-jog structures are nested in larger segment-jog structures, forming a hierarchical self-similar geometry (e.g. Otsuki and Dilov, 2005). We assume heare that a seismic rupture breaks a fault segment of a hierarchical rank in which segment-jog structures of lower ranks are nested, and that the fracture energy at jogs is much larger than the segments at a given hierarchical rank. Based on the geometrical relationships among the length, width and number of segments, and the length, width, thickness (step over distance) and number of jogs of a given hierarchical rank, we can formulate the fracture energy Gjog of a jog of a given hierarchical rank, as well as a mean fracture energy Gmean averaged over the rupture surface, as a function of these geometrical parameters and surface energy of rocks. A key point for estimation of G is the information on the microfracture distribution inside of jogs. I measured it for fault jogs formed during a rockburst in a South Africa gold mine (Gay and Ortlepp, 1979) and for small faults developed in the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone (Ahlgren, 2001; Katz et al., 2004). Microfractures of these fault jogs show a clear nature of fractal with fractal dimension D close to 1.56 (2-D measurements). It is likely to be a universal constant for shock wave fracturing under the constrained boundary conditions. As a result, we obtained some conclusions that both Gmean and Gjog are proportional to the rupture length to the power of D-1, and that Gjog of a lower hierarchical rank by one and two is nearly twice of Gmean and nearly equal to Gmean, respectively. Moreover, we can calculate Gmean appropriate for earthquake observations, if smallest size of microfracture is known.

  4. Imaging the Fault Geometry From the Multi-Channel Seismic Reflection Data in the Marmara Sea, Tekirdag Basin, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanbur, Z.; Alptekin, O.

    2002-05-01

    Determination of the fault geometry in the Marmara Sea has been a major problem for the researchers after the occurence of 17 August 1999 ?zmit (M=7.4) and 12 Novenber 1999 D\\x81zce (M=7.2) earthquakes. We used Pre-Stack Kirchhoff Depth Migration Technique to ivestigate the fault geometry in the Tekirda? Basin in western Marmara Sea by using the multi-channel seismic reflection data collected by Mineral Research Institute of Turkey ( MTA). Our results show that using the Kirchhoff technique the geometry of the fault plane can be imaged better comparing to the convensional technique. Our image of the Ganos fault indicates transpressive character in the west and transtensional character in the south margin of the Tekirda? basin. Imaging technique make the trust component visible in the migration section and show that the Ganos fault has multiple fault plane. These fault planes are imaged through the depth of 2750 m in the west of Tekirda? Basin. The major plane of Ganos fault dips 33 degrees toward south at 1750 m depth. The dip of the fault gradually decreases to 18 degrees till 2750 m. Another image cutting the basin in NS direction shows that the character of the Ganos fault is changed to transtensional and the whole section is like a flower structure. The fault plane dips 70 degrees toward north . The images obtained in this study not only confirm the preliminary results determined from conventional processing techniques but also provides significant additional information on the faults in the Marmara Sea.

  5. Geometry and controls on fracturing in a natural fault-bend fold: Rosario field, Maracaibo basin, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Apotria, T.G.; Wilkerson, M.S.; Knewtson, S.L.

    1996-08-01

    The Rosario oil field lies between the Perija Mountain front and Lake Maracaibo and produces from fractured Cretaceous carbonates and Tertiary clastics. We interpret the structure as a detached fault-bend fold which ramps through Cretaceous Cogollo and La Luna carbonates and flattens into an upper detachment at the base of the Upper Cretaceous Colon Shale. The structural relief formed primarily during the Mid Miocene and younger. Seismic and well control on the three-dimensional geometry illustrates the effects of (1) lithology and displacement variation on fold geometry, (2) an oblique footwall ramp on hangingwall faulting, and (3) fold curvature on fracturing and hydrocarbon production. Fold geometry at different structural levels is strongly controlled by lithology. Stiff Cogollo and La Luna carbonates exhibit kink-style folding above the upper fault-bend. The weak Colon Shale decouples the faulted carbonates from the concentrically folded Tertiary clastics. Regions of enhanced faulting and fracturing of Cretaceous carbonates are a function of structural position. We observe normal faults in the hangingwall where the strike of the footwall ramp changes from N20{degrees}E to N65{degrees}E. Fold curvature highlights fold hinges, yet distributed faulting is seismically imaged in the forelimb, suggesting that rocks fracture as they migrate through the ramp-upper flat fault-bend. Production rates are higher near the forelimb relative to the flat crestal region.

  6. The influence of normal fault geometry on porous sandstone deformation: Insights from mechanical models into conditions leading to Coulomb failure and shear-enhanced compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, K.; Reinen, L. A.

    2011-12-01

    Slip on non-planar faults produces stress perturbations in the surrounding host rock that can yield secondary faults at a scale too small to be resolved on seismic surveys. Porosity changes during failure may affect the ability of the rock to transmit fluids through dilatant cracking or, in porous rocks, shear-enhanced compaction (i.e., cataclastic flow). Modeling the mechanical behavior of the host rock in response to slip on non-planar faults can yield insights into the role of fault geometry on regions of enhanced or inhibited fluid flow. To evaluate the effect of normal fault geometry on deformation in porous sandstones, we model the system as a linear elastic, homogeneous, whole or half space using the boundary-element modeling program Poly3D. We consider conditions leading to secondary deformation using the maximum Coulomb shear stress (MCSS) as an index of brittle deformation and proximity to an elliptical yield envelope (Y), determined experimentally for porous sandstone (Baud et al., JGR, 2006), for cataclastic flow. We model rectangular faults consisting of two segments: an upper leg with a constant dip of 60° and a lower leg with dips ranging 15-85°. We explore far-field stress models of constant and gradient uniaxial strain. We investigate the potential damage in the host rock in two ways: [1] the size of the damage zone, and [2] regions of enhanced deformation indicated by elevated MCSS or Y. Preliminary results indicate that, along a vertical transect passing through the fault kink, [1] the size of the damage zone increases in the footwall with increasing lower leg dip and remains constant in the hanging wall. [2] In the footwall, the amount of deformation does not change as a function of lower leg dip in constant stress models; in gradient stress models, both MCSS and Y increase with dip. In the hanging wall, Y decreases with increasing lower leg dip for both constant and gradient stress models. In contrast, MCSS increases: as lower leg dip increases for constant stress models, and as the difference between lower leg dip and 60° increases for gradient stress models. These preliminary results indicate that the dip of the lower fault segment significantly affects the amount and style of deformation in the host rock.

  7. Experimental study on the 3D image reconstruction in a truncated Archimedean-like spiral geometry with a long-rectangular detector and its image characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Daeki; Cho, Heemoon; Cho, Hyosung; Choi, Sungil; Je, Uikyu; Park, Yeonok; Park, Chulkyu; Lim, Hyunwoo; Park, Soyoung; Woo, Taeho

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we performed a feasibility study on the three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction in a truncated Archimedean-like spiral geometry with a long-rectangular detector for application to high-accurate, cost-effective dental x-ray imaging. Here an x-ray tube and a detector rotate together around the rotational axis several times and, concurrently, the detector moves horizontally in the detector coordinate at a constant speed to cover the whole imaging volume during the projection data acquisition. We established a table-top setup which mainly consists of an x-ray tube (60 kVp, 5 mA), a narrow CMOS-type detector (198-μm pixel resolution, 184 (W)×1176 (H) pixel dimension), and a rotational stage for sample mounting and performed a systematic experiment to demonstrate the viability of the proposed approach to volumetric dental imaging. For the image reconstruction, we employed a compressed-sensing (CS)-based algorithm, rather than a common filtered-backprojection (FBP) one, for more accurate reconstruction. We successfully reconstructed 3D images of considerably high quality and investigated the image characteristics in terms of the image value profile, the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and the spatial resolution.

  8. Structure Segmentation and Transfer Faults in the Marcellus Shale, Clearfield County, Pennsylvania: Implications for Gas Recovery Efficiency and Risk Assessment Using 3D Seismic Attribute Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Emily D.

    The Marcellus Shale has become an important unconventional gas reservoir in the oil and gas industry. Fractures within this organic-rich black shale serve as an important component of porosity and permeability useful in enhancing production. Horizontal drilling is the primary approach for extracting hydrocarbons in the Marcellus Shale. Typically, wells are drilled perpendicular to natural fractures in an attempt to intersect fractures for effective hydraulic stimulation. If the fractures are contained within the shale, then hydraulic fracturing can enhance permeability by further breaking the already weakened rock. However, natural fractures can affect hydraulic stimulations by absorbing and/or redirecting the energy away from the wellbore, causing a decreased efficiency in gas recovery, as has been the case for the Clearfield County, Pennsylvania study area. Estimating appropriate distances away from faults and fractures, which may limit hydrocarbon recovery, is essential to reducing the risk of injection fluid migration along these faults. In an attempt to mitigate the negative influences of natural fractures on hydrocarbon extraction within the Marcellus Shale, fractures were analyzed through the aid of both traditional and advanced seismic attributes including variance, curvature, ant tracking, and waveform model regression. Through the integration of well log interpretations and seismic data, a detailed assessment of structural discontinuities that may decrease the recovery efficiency of hydrocarbons was conducted. High-quality 3D seismic data in Central Pennsylvania show regional folds and thrusts above the major detachment interval of the Salina Salt. In addition to the regional detachment folds and thrusts, cross-regional, northwest-trending lineaments were mapped. These lineaments may pose a threat to hydrocarbon productivity and recovery efficiency due to faults and fractures acting as paths of least resistance for induced hydraulic stimulation fluids. These lineaments may represent major transfer faults that serve as pathways for hydraulic fluid migration. Detection and evaluation of fracture orientation and intensity and emphasis on the relationship between fracture intensity and production potential is of high interest in the study area as it entails significant time and cost implications for both conventional and unconventional hydrocarbon exploration and production.

  9. Real-time inversions for finite fault slip models and rupture geometry based on high-rate GPS data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minson, Sarah E.; Murray, Jessica R.; Langbein, John O.; Gomberg, Joan S.

    2015-01-01

    We present an inversion strategy capable of using real-time high-rate GPS data to simultaneously solve for a distributed slip model and fault geometry in real time as a rupture unfolds. We employ Bayesian inference to find the optimal fault geometry and the distribution of possible slip models for that geometry using a simple analytical solution. By adopting an analytical Bayesian approach, we can solve this complex inversion problem (including calculating the uncertainties on our results) in real time. Furthermore, since the joint inversion for distributed slip and fault geometry can be computed in real time, the time required to obtain a source model of the earthquake does not depend on the computational cost. Instead, the time required is controlled by the duration of the rupture and the time required for information to propagate from the source to the receivers. We apply our modeling approach, called Bayesian Evidence-based Fault Orientation and Real-time Earthquake Slip, to the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake, 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake, and a simulated Hayward fault earthquake. In all three cases, the inversion recovers the magnitude, spatial distribution of slip, and fault geometry in real time. Since our inversion relies on static offsets estimated from real-time high-rate GPS data, we also present performance tests of various approaches to estimating quasi-static offsets in real time. We find that the raw high-rate time series are the best data to use for determining the moment magnitude of the event, but slightly smoothing the raw time series helps stabilize the inversion for fault geometry.

  10. Constraints on recent earthquake source parameters, fault geometry and aftershock characteristics in Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, D. E.; Benz, H.; Herrmann, R. B.; Bergman, E. A.; McMahon, N. D.; Aster, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    In late 2009, the seismicity of Oklahoma increased dramatically. The largest of these earthquakes was a series of three damaging events (Mw 4.8, 5.6, 4.8) that occurred over a span of four days in November 2011 near the town of Prague in central Oklahoma. Studies suggest that these earthquakes were induced by reactivation of the Wilzetta fault due to the disposal of waste water from hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") and other oil and gas activities. The Wilzetta fault is a northeast trending vertical strike-slip fault that is a well known structural trap for oil and gas. Since the November 2011 Prague sequence, thousands of small to moderate (M2-M4) earthquakes have occurred throughout central Oklahoma. The most active regions are located near the towns of Stillwater and Medford in north-central Oklahoma, and Guthrie, Langston and Jones near Oklahoma City. The USGS, in collaboration with the Oklahoma Geological Survey and the University of Oklahoma, has responded by deploying numerous temporary seismic stations in the region in order to record the vigorous aftershock sequences. In this study we use data from the temporary seismic stations to re-locate all Oklahoma earthquakes in the USGS National Earthquake Information Center catalog using a multiple-event approach known as hypo-centroidal decomposition that locates earthquakes with decreased uncertainty relative to one another. Modeling from this study allows us to constrain the detailed geometry of the reactivated faults, as well as source parameters (focal mechanisms, stress drop, rupture length) for the larger earthquakes. Preliminary results from the November 2011 Prague sequence suggest that subsurface rupture lengths of the largest earthquakes are anomalously long with very low stress drop. We also observe very high Q (~1000 at 1 Hz) that explains the large felt areas and we find relatively low b-value and a rapid decay of aftershocks.

  11. 3-D Model of Earthquake Sources in the Los Angeles Basin, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesch, A.; Shaw, J. H.

    2001-12-01

    We present a digital 3d model of the major, seismogenic fault system in the Los Angeles basin. The model is a prototype for a community-based fault characterization effort initiated by the Southern California Earthquake Center, Phase 2 (SCEC2). Faults were selected by consensus within the SCEC2 community based on geologic relevance, perceived hazard, and quality of descriptive data. Our first iteration model was populated with most of the important faults and with the deformed basement surface, which represents the main velocity interface in the basin. Constraints on fault geometries and positions include surface traces, surficial neotectonic data, seismic reflection profiles, wells, cross-sections, hypocentral locations, and focal mechanisms. Accurate geospatial registration proved essential. We use advanced geometric modeling software to integrate these various geophysical and geologic data in a 3d space, and to interpolate and extrapolate the fault surfaces. The model describes the geometry of imbricated blind-thrust faults that underlie the northern Los Angeles basin (Puente Hills, Las Cienegas, San Vicente, Elysian Park), as well as the basin bounding structures including the Santa Monica, Sierra Madre, and Cucamonga systems. In the case of the Santa Monica thrust, the 3d construction suggests the presence of a previously undocumented blind extension of this system to the northeast, below the Hollywood fault, and perhaps coinciding in parts with the North Salt Lake fault. The model also describes the 3D geometry of the major strike-slip systems in the basin, including the Newport-Inglewood and Whittier faults. The model provides a medium to investigate the spatial and temporal interactions of these fault systems based on their precise 3D geometries.

  12. Relationships between sliding behavior and internal geometry of laboratory fault zones and some creeping and locked strike-slip faults of California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Diane E.; Byerlee, J.

    1992-01-01

    Moore, D.E. and Byerlee, J., 1992. Relationships between sliding behavior and internal geometry of laboratory fault zones and some creeping and locked strike-slip faults of California. In: T. Mikumo, K. Aki, M. Ohnaka, L.J. Ruff and P.K.P. Spudich (Editors), Earthquake Source Physics and Earthquake Precursors. Tectonophysics, 211: 305-316. In order to relate fault geometries to sliding behavior, maps of recently active breaks within the Hayward fault of central California, which is characterized by fault creep, have been examined and compared to maps of the San Andreas fault. The patterns of recent breaks of the Hayward fault are consistent with those found within the creeping section of the San Andreas, and they appear to have plausible physical explanations in the findings of laboratory experiments. The distinguishing geometric features of the examined locked and creeping faults are: (1) P-type second-order traces predominate over R(Riedel)-type traces in creeping sections; and (2) R-type second-order traces make smaller angles to the local fault strike in creeping sections than they do in locked sections. Two different maps of the Hayward fault gave similar results, supporting the inference that the patterns identified are basic characteristics of the fault rather than artifacts of a particular mapping procedure. P shears predominate over R shears under laboratory conditions that allow dilation within the fault zone. In our own experiments, P-shear development was favored by the generation of excess pore-fluid pressures. We propose that creep in California faults also is the result of fluid overpressures that are maintained in a low-permeability gouge zone and that significantly lower effective stresses, thus helping to stabilize slip and producing high values of the ratio P/R. Small R-trace angles may also be an indicator of low effective stresses, but the evidence for this is not conclusive because other factors can also affect the size of the angles. ?? 1992.

  13. Delineation of faulting and basin geometry along a seismic reflection transect in urbanized San Bernardino Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephenson, W.J.; Odum, J.K.; Williams, R.A.; Anderson, M.L.

    2002-01-01

    Fourteen kilometers of continuous, shallow seismic reflection data acquired through the urbanized San Bernardino Valley, California, have revealed numerous faults between the San Jacinto and San Andreas faults as well as a complex pattern of downdropped and uplifted blocks. These data also indicate that the Loma Linda fault continues northeastward at least 4.5 km beyond its last mapped location on the southern edge of the valley and to within at least 2 km of downtown San Bernardino. Previously undetected faults within the valley northeast of the San Jacinto fault are also imaged, including the inferred western extension of the Banning fault and several unnamed faults. The Rialto-Colton fault is interpreted southwest of the San Jacinto fault. The seismic data image the top of the crystalline basement complex across 70% of the profile length and show that the basement has an overall dip of roughly 10?? southwest between Perris Hill and the San Jacinto fault. Gravity and aeromagnetic data corroborate the interpreted location of the San Jacinto fault and better constrain the basin depth along the seismic profile to be as deep as 1.7 km. These data also corroborate other fault locations and the general dip of the basement surface. At least 1.2 km of apparent vertical displacement on the basement is observed across the San Jacinto fault at the profile location. The basin geometry delineated by these data was used to generate modeled ground motions that show peak horizontal amplifications of 2-3.5 above bedrock response in the 0.05- to 1.0-Hz frequency band, which is consistent with recorded earthquake data in the valley.

  14. Elastic anisotropy of core samples from the Taiwan Chelungpu Fault Drilling Project (TCDP): direct 3-D measurements and weak anisotropy approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, Laurent; David, Christian; Špaček, Petr; Wong, Teng-Fong; Fortin, Jérôme; Song, Sheng Rong

    2012-01-01

    The study of seismic anisotropy has become a powerful tool to decipher rock physics attributes in reservoirs or in complex tectonic settings. We compare direct 3-D measurements of P-wave velocity in 132 different directions on spherical rock samples to the prediction of the approximate model proposed by Louis et al. based on a tensorial approach. The data set includes measurements on dry spheres under confining pressure ranging from 5 to 200 MPa for three sandstones retrieved at a depth of 850, 1365 and 1394 metres in TCDP hole A (Taiwan Chelungpu Fault Drilling Project). As long as the P-wave velocity anisotropy is weak, we show that the predictions of the approximate model are in good agreement with the measurements. As the tensorial method is designed to work with cylindrical samples cored in three orthogonal directions, a significant gain both in the number of measurements involved and in sample preparation is achieved compared to measurements on spheres. We analysed the pressure dependence of the velocity field and show that as the confining pressure is raised the velocity increases, the anisotropy decreases but remains significant even at high pressure, and the shape of the ellipsoid representing the velocity (or elastic) fabric evolves from elongated to planar. These observations can be accounted for by considering the existence of both isotropic and anisotropic crack distributions and their evolution with applied pressure.

  15. Geophysical Investigation of the Offshore Section of the Northern San Andreas Fault: Fault Zone Geometries, Shallow Deformation Patterns, and Holocene Sediment Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeson, J. W.; Goldfinger, C.; Johnson, S. Y.

    2014-12-01

    We mapped a ~120 km offshore section of the northern San Andreas Fault (NSAF) between Pt. Arena and Pt. Delgada using closely spaced seismic-reflection profiles, high-resolution multibeam bathymetry and marine magnetics data. This new dataset documents NSAF location and continuity, associated tectonic geomorphology, shallow stratigraphy and deformation. Variable deformation patterns in the generally narrow (~1-km-wide) fault zone are largely associated with fault trend and fault bends. We have described four regions (Pt. Arena, Basin, Shelter Cove, and Mendocino) along and adjacent to the NSAF based on fault trend, deformation styles, seismic stratigraphy, and seafloor bathymetry. The NSAF in the southern region (Pt. Arena) of the survey area is imaged as an arcuate fault trace that changes ~15° (327° to 342°) from south to north over a distance of about 50 km. The NSAF in the middle two regions (Basin and Shelter Cove) passes through two acute fault bends (~9° and ~8°), resulting in both an asymmetric "lazy z" sedimentary basin and an uplifted rocky shoal ("Tolo Bank"). The northwestern region of the survey area (Mendocino) lies west of the NSAF and Shelter Cove, and includes an east-trending fault zone related to the Mendocino transform fault that extends onshore near Punta Gorda. Using the densely spaced seismic-reflection profiles we have created an isopach map of Holocene sediment throughout the survey area. This isopach map has revealed thick sediment piles adjacent to coastal watersheds with high uplift rates. We infer from fault geometries, local bathymetry/topography and aero/marine magnetics that the NSAF zone transitions from a broadly distributed fault zone to a narrow fault zone over a short distance near Shelter Cove, Ca. At Shelter Cove the NSAF is characterized as a narrow, continuous fault. North of Shelter Cove the San Andreas likely terminates into a series of "horse tail" splay thrust faults known as the Kings Range Thrust. These observations allows for the NSAF near Shelter Cove, CA to accommodate significant slip, in agreement with paleoseismic studies and historical records.

  16. A free software for pore-scale modelling: solving Stokes equation for velocity fields and permeability values in 3D pore geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerke, Kirill; Vasilyev, Roman; Khirevich, Siarhei; Karsanina, Marina; Collins, Daniel; Korost, Dmitry; Mallants, Dirk

    2015-04-01

    In this contribution we introduce a novel free software which solves the Stokes equation to obtain velocity fields for low Reynolds-number flows within externally generated 3D pore geometries. Provided with velocity fields, one can calculate permeability for known pressure gradient boundary conditions via Darcy's equation. Finite-difference schemes of 2nd and 4th order of accuracy are used together with an artificial compressibility method to iteratively converge to a steady-state solution of Stokes' equation. This numerical approach is much faster and less computationally demanding than the majority of open-source or commercial softwares employing other algorithms (finite elements/volumes, lattice Boltzmann, etc.) The software consists of two parts: 1) a pre and post-processing graphical interface, and 2) a solver. The latter is efficiently parallelized to use any number of available cores (the speedup on 16 threads was up to 10-12 depending on hardware). Due to parallelization and memory optimization our software can be used to obtain solutions for 300x300x300 voxels geometries on modern desktop PCs. The software was successfully verified by testing it against lattice Boltzmann simulations and analytical solutions. To illustrate the software's applicability for numerous problems in Earth Sciences, a number of case studies have been developed: 1) identifying the representative elementary volume for permeability determination within a sandstone sample, 2) derivation of permeability/hydraulic conductivity values for rock and soil samples and comparing those with experimentally obtained values, 3) revealing the influence of the amount of fine-textured material such as clay on filtration properties of sandy soil. This work was partially supported by RSF grant 14-17-00658 (pore-scale modelling) and RFBR grants 13-04-00409-a and 13-05-01176-a.

  17. 3D Reconstruction of Chick Embryo Vascular Geometries Using Non-invasive High-Frequency Ultrasound for Computational Fluid Dynamics Studies.

    PubMed

    Tan, Germaine Xin Yi; Jamil, Muhammad; Tee, Nicole Gui Zhen; Zhong, Liang; Yap, Choon Hwai

    2015-11-01

    Recent animal studies have provided evidence that prenatal blood flow fluid mechanics may play a role in the pathogenesis of congenital cardiovascular malformations. To further these researches, it is important to have an imaging technique for small animal embryos with sufficient resolution to support computational fluid dynamics studies, and that is also non-invasive and non-destructive to allow for subject-specific, longitudinal studies. In the current study, we developed such a technique, based on ultrasound biomicroscopy scans on chick embryos. Our technique included a motion cancelation algorithm to negate embryonic body motion, a temporal averaging algorithm to differentiate blood spaces from tissue spaces, and 3D reconstruction of blood volumes in the embryo. The accuracy of the reconstructed models was validated with direct stereoscopic measurements. A computational fluid dynamics simulation was performed to model fluid flow in the generated construct of a Hamburger-Hamilton (HH) stage 27 embryo. Simulation results showed that there were divergent streamlines and a low shear region at the carotid duct, which may be linked to the carotid duct's eventual regression and disappearance by HH stage 34. We show that our technique has sufficient resolution to produce accurate geometries for computational fluid dynamics simulations to quantify embryonic cardiovascular fluid mechanics. PMID:26014359

  18. Temporal variation in the geometry of a strike slip fault zone: Examples from the Dead Sea Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marco, Shmuel

    2007-12-01

    The location of the active fault strands along the Dead Sea Transform fault zone (DST) changed through time. In the western margins of Dead Sea basin, the early activity began a few kilometers west of the preset shores and moved toward the center of the basin in four stages. Similar centerward migration of faulting is apparent in the Hula Valley north of the Sea of Galilee as well as in the Negev and the Sinai Peninsula. In the Arava Valley, seismic surveys reveal a series of buried inactive basins whereas the current active strand is on their eastern margins. In the central Arava the centerward migration of activity was followed by outward migration with Pleistocene faulting along NNE-trending faults nearly 50 km west of the center. Largely the faulting along the DST, which began in the early-middle Miocene over a wide zone of up to 50 km, became localized by the end of the Miocene. The subsidence of fault-controlled basins, which were active in the early stage, stopped at the end of the Miocene. Later during the Plio-Pleistocene new faults were formed in the Negev west of the main transform. They indicate that another cycle has begun with the widening of the fault zone. It is suggested that the localization of faulting goes on as long as there is no change in the stress field. The stresses change because the geometry of the plates must change as they move, and consequently the localization stage ends. The fault zone is rearranged, becomes wide, and a new localization stage begins as slip accumulates. It is hypothesized that alternating periods of widening and narrowing correlate to changes of the plate boundaries, manifest in different Euler poles.

  19. Rift Fault Geometry and Distribution in Layered Basaltic Rocks: A Comparison Between the Koa'e (Hawai'i) and Krafla (Iceland) Fault Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubeck, A.; Walker, R. J.; MacLeod, C. J.; Imber, J.

    2014-12-01

    Fault systems within incipient rifts that cut basaltic rocks comprise an array of fine-scale structures, including networks of fractures and small displacement (<15 m) faults that accommodate regional extension. These zones of damaged rock have mechanical and physical properties distinct from the surrounding intact host rock. As the rift system evolves this early-formed damage can be reactivated, and influence the distribution and growth of new fractures. Constraining the role of this inter-fault deformation in rift zone development is therefore important to characterizing the regional distribution of extensional strains, and the evolving physical and fluid flow properties of the host rock. Here we use high resolution field and remote mapping of the Koa'e insipient rift fault system on the south flank of Kilauea Volcano on Hawaii's Big Island, and the Krafla rift system, Iceland, to investigate the evolution of segmented rift fault systems in layered basalts, formed at low confining pressures. Extension in the Koa'e system is accommodated dominantly by interaction of zones of opening-mode fractures and areas of surface flexure rather than surface-breaching normal faults, which is attributed to gravitational collapse of Kilauea. Extension in the Krafla system is localised on segmented, large displacement (>20 m) normal faults, the development of which may have been controlled by dyke emplacement. Preliminary comparison between the Koa'e and Krafla systems suggests that strain rate and/or the effective stress path plays a primary role in controlling the geometry, characteristics, and distribution of major faults, and the scale and distribution of secondary (oblique) brittle structures within rift zones.

  20. Geometry of crustal faults: Identification from seismicity and implications for slip and stress transfer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaven, J. Ole; Pollard, David D.

    2013-09-01

    Geometric complexities of faults and fault systems are first-order effects that complicate the mechanics of faulting and physics of earthquakes. We investigate the importance of this complexity using relocated seismicity from a catalog of events for the Joshua Tree-Landers earthquake sequence and present a new method to locate faults or fault systems in clouds of seismicity. The abundance and ever improved accuracy of earthquake and microseismic location of such events permits a better understanding of the geometric intricacies of fault systems. The proposed method assumes that seismicity is most abundant in the central fault zone and the spatial density of seismicity is used to locate finite width fault zones and construct fault surfaces from the seismicity. The method is different from statistical fits (e.g., L1- and L2-norm fits) in that it does not suppose a decay of seismicity from the central fault zone and that it identifies the tiplines of faults from the fault zone seismicity directly. In the Joshua Tree-Landers earthquake catalog, the method identifies 10 separate fault segments ranging in average strike from north-south to east-west that compare well with surface trace fault maps. These faults exhibit significant nonplanarity with the Joshua Tree fault departing from a planar approximation by more than 2000 m. The mechanical effects of the geometrically complex fault surfaces are illustrated by inverting for coseismic slip using surface displacements and when compared to slip inversions on planar faults reveal a more complicated pattern of slip on the fault. The low RMS error in surface displacement, the good match to geodetic moment, and robust estimates of maximum slip compare well to the results for planar faults. The inverted slip distributions are used to solve the quasi-static fault stress transfer problem and estimate the tractions changes by slip on the Joshua Tree fault on the fault segments involved in the Landers earthquake. We find that the propensity for slip on the Landers faults increased in regions of initiation and largest slip during the subsequent event. The geometrically complex models predict greater likelihood for slip along the northern faults involved in the Landers earthquake than the commonly used planar and vertical four-fault models.

  1. Determination of the Coseismic Fault Slip Distribution on a Complex Fault Geometry, the Case of the Taitung Earthquake (2006), Mw 6.1, South-east of Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozziconacci, L.; Delouis, B.; Béthoux, N.; Huang, B.

    2010-12-01

    The orogen of Taiwan emerges east of the Pacific seaside of Mainland China. This ongoing mountain building is the result of the active collision between the Eurasian Plate to the West and the Philippine Sea Plate to the East. In the eastern part of the island, the plate boundary lays inside a narrow North-South valley, the Longitudinal Valley. In this convergent context happened on April, the 1st, 2006, the Taitung earthquake. This event of MW 6.1 is located in the southern-end of the Longitudinal Valley and displays a strike-slip focal mechanism with a more or less important reverse component with regard to data used in its determination (local or teleseismic data). In the epicentral area two major North-South fault systems take place on both sides of the Longitudinal Valley with the Peinanshan Massif between. To the East, the Longitudinal Valley Fault system (LVF hereafter) dips eastward. This main active structure makes up the effective plate boundary. To the West, the Central Range Fault system (CNF) is poorly active compared to the East one but some seismic cluster let supposed a westward dipping in good agreement with the North-South nodal plane geometry of the Taitung earthquake’ focal mechanism. In addition to those two main elements, secondary East-West and steep faults (EWF) are described in the Massif and also correspond to the East-West nodal plane of this earthquake. Consequently, two different causative structures can be associated to the main event of the Taitung (2006) crisis, the CNF as well as the EWF, and this ambiguity onto the generative structure geometry build up an important part of our study interest. To solve this problem we performed a joint inversion of the coseismic fault slip distribution from seismological (local strong motion and teleseismic time series) and geodetic (GPS) data. We selected the fault plane by comparing the adjustment between computed and observed data given by different fault geometries, the selected model corresponding to the best data fit. We determine that the fault geometry should be composed of a main listrique West dipping North-South plane and a secondary steep East-West plane, the second segment crossing the first one south to the epicenter. The listrique geometry of the main North-South plane, with decreasing dip as depth increase, is directly retrieved from seismological data that cannot be modellised together with a simple one dip plane. Concerning the East-West plane, it improves notably geodetic data especially stations located to the South-East which cannot be adjusted without. An interesting aspect of the rupture lies in the location of the slip that concentrates at the junction of the two planes, south to the epicenter. Since the CNF displays a geometry close to the North-South model we can consider it as the main generative structure of the earthquake. This event is thus the first manifestation of a large event (MW 6.1) ever instrumented for this fault system. Indeed, the crisis of April 2006 form an interesting proof of the CNF activity, a structure for which even the existence is still controversial in the southern-end part of the Valley.

  2. Adhesion and growth of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on precise-geometry 3D organic-inorganic composite scaffolds for bone repair.

    PubMed

    Chatzinikolaidou, Maria; Rekstyte, Sima; Danilevicius, Paulius; Pontikoglou, Charalampos; Papadaki, Helen; Farsari, Maria; Vamvakaki, Maria

    2015-03-01

    Engineering biomaterial scaffolds that promote attachment and growth of mesenchymal stem cells in three dimensions is a crucial parameter for successful bone tissue engineering. Towards this direction, a lot of research effort has focused recently into the development of three-dimensional porous scaffolds, aiming to elicit positive cellular behavior. However, the fabrication of three-dimensional tissue scaffolds with a precise geometry and complex micro- and nano-features, supporting cell in-growth remains a challenge. In this study we report on a positive cellular response of human bone marrow-derived (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) onto hybrid material scaffolds consisting of methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane, zirconium propoxide, and 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA). First, we use Direct fs Laser Writing, a 3D scaffolding technology to fabricate the complex structures. Subsequently, we investigate the morphology, viability and proliferation of BM-MSCs onto the hybrid scaffolds and examine the cellular response from different donors. Finally, we explore the effect of the materials' chemical composition on cell proliferation, employing three different material surfaces: (i) a hybrid consisting of methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane, zirconium propoxide and 50mol% DMAEMA, (ii) a hybrid material comprising methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane and zirconium propoxide, and (iii) a purely organic polyDMAEMA. Our results show a strong adhesion of BM-MSCs onto the hybrid material containing 50% DMAEMA from the first 2h after seeding, and up to several days, and a proliferation increase after 14 and 21days, similar to the polystyrene control, independent of cell donor. These findings support the potential use of our proposed cell-material combination in bone tissue engineering. PMID:25579927

  3. 3D Modeling By Consolidation Of Independent Geometries Extracted From Point Clouds - The Case Of The Modeling Of The Turckheim's Chapel (Alsace, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehl, M.; Fabre, Ph.; Schlussel, B.

    2014-06-01

    Turckheim is a small town located in Alsace, north-east of France. In the heart of the Alsatian vineyard, this city has many historical monuments including its old church. To understand the effectiveness of the project described in this paper, it is important to have a look at the history of this church. Indeed there are many historical events that explain its renovation and even its partial reconstruction. The first mention of a christian sanctuary in Turckheim dates back to 898. It will be replaced in the 12th century by a roman church (chapel), which subsists today as the bell tower. Touched by a lightning in 1661, the tower then was enhanced. In 1736, it was repaired following damage sustained in a tornado. In 1791, the town installs an organ to the church. Last milestone, the church is destroyed by fire in 1978. The organ, like the heart of the church will then have to be again restored (1983) with a simplified architecture. From this heavy and rich past, it unfortunately and as it is often the case, remains only very few documents and information available apart from facts stated in some sporadic writings. And with regard to the geometry, the positioning, the physical characteristics of the initial building, there are very little indication. Some assumptions of positions and right-of-way were well issued by different historians or archaeologists. The acquisition and 3D modeling project must therefore provide the current state of the edifice to serve as the basis of new investigations and for the generation of new hypotheses on the locations and historical shapes of this church and its original chapel (Fig. 1)

  4. The inverted Triassic rift of the Marrakech High Atlas: A reappraisal of basin geometries and faulting histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domènech, Mireia; Teixell, Antonio; Babault, Julien; Arboleya, Maria-Luisa

    2015-11-01

    The High Atlas of Morocco is an aborted rift developed during the Triassic-Jurassic and moderately inverted during the Cenozoic. The Marrakech High Atlas, with large exposures of basement and Triassic early syn-rift deposits, is ideal to investigate the geometries of the deepest parts of a rift, constituting a good analogue for pre-salt domains. It allows unraveling geometries and kinematics of the extensional and compressional structures and the influence that they exert over one another. A detailed structural study of the main Triassic basins and basin-margin faults of the Marrakech High Atlas shows that only a few rift faults were reactivated during the Cenozoic compressional stage in contrast to previous interpretations, and emphasizes that fault reactivation cannot be taken for granted in inverted rift systems. Preserved extensional features demonstrate a dominant dip-slip opening kinematics with strike-slip playing a minor role, at variance to models proposing a major strike-slip component along the main basin-bounding faults, including faults belonging to the Tizi n'Test fault zone. A new Middle Triassic paleogeographic reconstruction shows that the Marrakech High Atlas was a narrow and segmented orthogonal rift (sub-perpendicular to the main regional extension direction which was ~ NW-SE), in contrast to the central and eastern segments of the Atlas rift which developed obliquely. This difference in orientation is attributed to the indented Ouzellarh Precambrian salient, part of the West African Craton, which deflected the general rift trend in the area evidencing the major role of inherited lithospheric anisotropies in rift direction and evolution. As for the Cenozoic inversion, total orogenic shortening is moderate (~ 16%) and appears accommodated by basement-involved large-scale folding, and by newly formed shortcut and by-pass thrusting, with rare left-lateral strike-slip indicators. Triassic faults commonly acted as buttresses.

  5. Focal mechanisms of earthquake multiplets in the western part of the Corinth Rift (Greece): influence of the velocity model and constraints on the geometry of the active faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godano, Maxime; Deschamps, Anne; Lambotte, Sophie; Lyon-Caen, Hélène; Bernard, Pascal; Pacchiani, Francesco

    2014-06-01

    The composite fault plane solutions for 24 large multiplets recorded in the western part of the Corinth Rift between 2000 and 2007 are computed by jointly inverting P polarities and Sv/P, Sh/P, Sv/Sh amplitude ratios of the direct waves. The fault plane solutions are determined using 1-D and 3-D velocity models. Solutions computed with the 3-D velocity model are preferred to the ones computed with the 1-D model because overall, 3-D solutions have a better score function. They correspond essentially to E-NE/W-SW and W-NW/E-SE striking normal faults, which is consistent with the N-S extensional/vertical shortening tectonic regime of the area. For 15 multiplets, one of the nodal planes is similar to the plane delineated by the earthquakes. It is then possible to determine which nodal plane is the fault plane. The analysis of the fault plane solutions highlights a clear decrease of their dip with depth and towards the north. Several multiplets with steeply dipping fault planes (50°-60°) located at depths of 7-8 km are clearly located at the base of onshore and offshore faults that crop out close to the south border of the Corinth Gulf, indicating that these faults are steep down to 7-8 km depth. To the north, multiplets underline a low angle north-dipping structure (20°-30°) on which steep north-dipping faults could take root.

  6. 3d Modelling of Convective Flow In The Rhine Graben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bächler, D.; Kohl, T.; Rybach, L.

    Detailed investigations of the temperature distribution in the Rhine Graben indi- cate regular pattern of thermal anomalies following major north-south striking faults. These anomalies remain unexplained by conventional Rhine Graben studies based on 2D east-west striking sections. First analytical solutions for convective flow in vertical faults are applied for a clearly observable anomalous temperature pattern along ma- jor Rhine Graben faults. By these calculations the fault height, fault aperture, minimal fault permeability and time to convective onset is derived from the observed distances. Since analytical solutions are limited to simple model geometries further improvement was achieved by numerical model simulations, which allow to assume more com- plex initial and boundary conditions. Using the finite volume code TOUGH2 series of anomalies following the same fault were simulated by a 3D numerical model. Fo- cussing on the predominant north-south permeability structure the model consists of a vertical north-south striking fault and surrounding matrix. The fault geometries are based on the analytically predicted fault geometries (aperture=200m, height=3500m) and on the observed temperatures. Comparison of simulation results with observed temperatures shows that the fault is situated between 500 to 600m and 4200m. The fault permeability is taken as 5*10-13m2 and the fluid velocity in the fault is calcu- lated as 10-9 to 10-10 m/s. These results indicate the importance of our considerations since mass flux is much higher in the faults than across them. The minimal age of the anomaly is considered to be 77'000 years, since steady state is reached after this time span. The study proves that the observed temperature anomaly pattern along the gamma fault at Landau can be explained by north-south striking convection systems within fault zones. Similar situations have been found at Soultz. This may be a hint on a general feature of the major north-south striking faults in the Rhine Graben.

  7. Geometry of basement faults around the Soultz geothermal wells from reflected and converted seismic waves recorded during the 2007 multisource VSP survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubrano Lavadera, P.; Marthelot, J.; Zillmer, M.; Cornet, F. H.; Genter, A.

    2012-12-01

    Three wells (GPK 2 to 4) drilled at the Soultz geothermal site (France) penetrate the granitic basement of the Rhine graben between 1.5 and 5 km depth where the temperature at TD is 200°C. They are located at a distance of 5 km from the western southeast-dipping border fault of the graben in an area where the sedimentary cover is affected by a network of antithetic normal faults having local strikes in a fan of +/-30° relative to the North. The wells are deviated beneath 2.5 km with a maximum lateral offset of 0.6 km between wells. A VSP (Vertical Seismic Profiling) survey has been conducted in 2007 with 3 component geophones placed at 20 m interval between depths of 3 to 5 km in the GPK 3 and 4 wells and a vertical vibrator located at 26 surface positions spread at distances between 500m and 5km from the well head in different azimuths. After correlation with the 8 to 88 Hz vibrator sweep, the different seismic waves are separated according to their apparent velocities across the geophone lines for each shot position and each well. The downgoing waves include P and S wave trains having the slopes of the direct P and S waves in the granite. After f-k filtering of these large amplitude waves, coherent downgoing arrivals with apparent velocities larger than the direct P waves appear on vertical and horizontal geophone components. In contrast to VSP in stratified sediments, upgoing waves are absent or restricted to a small depth interval in the vicinity of P wave first arrivals. The traveltimes of direct P waves correspond to a model with P wave velocities increasing from 2 to 4.6 km/s in the 1.5 km thick sedimentary cover and 6 km/s in the granite. A previous 3D model of fracture zone indicators at different scales within the reservoir (cores, image and flow logs, induced microseismicity patterns) has led to the tentative identification of a major NNW trending 70° dipping basement fault intersecting the GPK3 well at 4775 m measured depth. 3D ray tracing of P waves reflected on this fault and recorded in the two wells provides traveltimes that fit the high apparent velocity downgoing waves for the shots located in positions allowing reflections. Depending on the incidence angles of the reflected waves at the geophones, these waves are observed in a complementary way on vertical or horizontal geophones. The geometry of the VSP survey allows illuminating vertically and horizontally the GPK3 fault in the depth range 3 to 4.7 km and in a 1000m lateral interval respectively. In contrast, the 2D surface seismic lines shot around the wells show no reliable reflections within the basement. In addition to the major fault, the Soultz VSP data include several evidences of basement faults where reflected waves and converted waves coincide at the well. VSP is one of the few geophysical techniques able to image fault zones within a deep seated granite.

  8. A Close View Into the 3D Geometry of Grain-to-Grain Contacts and Surface Roughness in Sandstones Using Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menendez, B.; David, C.; Louis, L.; Martinez Nistal, A.

    2003-12-01

    Due to its sharp resolution (< 1 micron) and its ability in building 3D reconstructions from images scanned at various depths, laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) is a powerful tool to render the three-dimensional geometry of microstructural features like pores, cracks and grains. This technique was used in particular to study the grain-to-grain contacts and grain surface topology at small scale in several sandstones. For that purpose, the rock samples to be studied were impregnated with a fluorescent dyed (Rhodamine B) resin in order to discriminate the void space from the grains. The next stage is then to make thin-sections with a thickness larger than usual (> 100 microns) that can be studied under LSCM. Three different sandstones have been studied: the Rothbach sandstone (Vosges mountains, Eastern France), the Bentheim sandstone (Germany) and the Darley Dale sandstone (UK). On each sample several three dimensional blocks have been investigated with size 228 by 152 microns and depths ranging from 35 to 100 microns. From each block, series of tens of parallel "virtual sections" have been recorded, separated by 1 or 2 microns in depth. We show on several examples the complex structure of grain-to-grain contacts which may be associated to the heterogeneity in cement distribution. In particular for the Rothbach sandstone, we found that the topology of the grain surfaces is dominated by the coating of clay particles which leads to a high surface roughness. Complementary SEM studies revealed that the clays are also present as cementing material between the grains. A thorough petrophysical study has shown that the anisotropy of P wave velocity in the Rothbach sandstone can be explained by an anisotropic distribution of cement: whereas this could not be confirmed from our LSCM and SEM analysis, we observed that the spatial distribution of contact lengths is anisotropic which explains qualitatively the spatial variability of P wave velocity. Finally we show examples of Hertzian cracks that initiated from the contact between grains in Darley Dale sandstone samples that experienced mechanical loading under triaxial conditions.

  9. Initiation of deformation of the Eastern California Shear Zone: Constraints from Garlock fault geometry and GPS observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gan, Weijun; Zhang, P.; Shen, Z.-K.; Prescott, W.H.; Svarc, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    We suggest a 2-stage deformation model for the Eastern California Shear Zone (ECSZ) to explain the geometry of the Garlock fault trace. We assume the Garlock fault was originally straight and then was gradually curved by right-lateral shear deformation across the ECSZ. In our 2-stage deformation model, the first stage involves uniform shear deformation across the eastern part of the shear zone, and the second stage involves uniform shear deformation across the entire shear zone. In addition to the current shape of the Garlock fault, our model incorporates constraints on contemporary deformation rates provided by GPS observations. We find that the best fitting age for initiation of shear in eastern part of the ECSZ is about 5.0 ?? 0.4 Ma, and that deformation of the western part started about 1.6 Myr later.

  10. Modelling of 3D fractured geological systems - technique and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacace, M.; Scheck-Wenderoth, M.; Cherubini, Y.; Kaiser, B. O.; Bloecher, G.

    2011-12-01

    All rocks in the earth's crust are fractured to some extent. Faults and fractures are important in different scientific and industry fields comprising engineering, geotechnical and hydrogeological applications. Many petroleum, gas and geothermal and water supply reservoirs form in faulted and fractured geological systems. Additionally, faults and fractures may control the transport of chemical contaminants into and through the subsurface. Depending on their origin and orientation with respect to the recent and palaeo stress field as well as on the overall kinematics of chemical processes occurring within them, faults and fractures can act either as hydraulic conductors providing preferential pathways for fluid to flow or as barriers preventing flow across them. The main challenge in modelling processes occurring in fractured rocks is related to the way of describing the heterogeneities of such geological systems. Flow paths are controlled by the geometry of faults and their open void space. To correctly simulate these processes an adequate 3D mesh is a basic requirement. Unfortunately, the representation of realistic 3D geological environments is limited by the complexity of embedded fracture networks often resulting in oversimplified models of the natural system. A technical description of an improved method to integrate generic dipping structures (representing faults and fractures) into a 3D porous medium is out forward. The automated mesh generation algorithm is composed of various existing routines from computational geometry (e.g. 2D-3D projection, interpolation, intersection, convex hull calculation) and meshing (e.g. triangulation in 2D and tetrahedralization in 3D). All routines have been combined in an automated software framework and the robustness of the approach has been tested and verified. These techniques and methods can be applied for fractured porous media including fault systems and therefore found wide applications in different geo-energy related topics including CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers, shale gas extraction and geothermal heat recovery. The main advantage is that dipping structures can be integrated into a 3D body representing the porous media and the interaction between the discrete flow paths through and across faults and fractures and within the rock matrix can be correctly simulated. In addition the complete workflow is captured by open-source software.

  11. dc3dm: Software to efficiently form and apply a 3D DDM operator for a nonuniformly discretized rectangular planar fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    My poster will describe dc3dm, a free open source software (FOSS) package that efficiently forms and applies the linear operator relating slip and traction components on a nonuniformly discretized rectangular planar fault in a homogeneous elastic (HE) half space. This linear operator implements what is called the displacement discontinuity method (DDM). The key properties of dc3dm are: 1. The mesh can be nonuniform. 2. Work and memory scale roughly linearly in the number of elements (rather than quadratically). 3. The order of accuracy of my method on a nonuniform mesh is the same as that of the standard method on a uniform mesh. Property 2 is achieved using my FOSS package hmmvp [AGU 2012]. A nonuniform mesh (property 1) is natural for some problems. For example, in a rate-state friction simulation, nucleation length, and so required element size, scales reciprocally with effective normal stress. Property 3 assures that if a nonuniform mesh is more efficient than a uniform mesh (in the sense of accuracy per element) at one level of mesh refinement, it will remain so at all further mesh refinements. I use the routine DC3D of Y. Okada, which calculates the stress tensor at a receiver resulting from a rectangular uniform dislocation source in an HE half space. On a uniform mesh, straightforward application of this Green's function (GF) yields a DDM I refer to as DDMu. On a nonuniform mesh, this same procedure leads to artifacts that degrade the order of accuracy of the DDM. I have developed a method I call IGA that implements the DDM using this GF for a nonuniformly discretized mesh having certain properties. Importantly, IGA's order of accuracy on a nonuniform mesh is the same as DDMu's on a uniform one. Boundary conditions can be periodic in the surface-parallel direction (in both directions if the GF is for a whole space), velocity on any side, and free surface. The mesh must have the following main property: each uniquely sized element must tile each element larger than itself. A mesh generated by a family of quadtrees has this property. Using multiple quadtrees that collectively cover the domain enables the elements to have a small aspect ratio. Mathematically, IGA works as follows. Let Mn be the nonuniform mesh. Define Mu to be the uniform mesh that is composed of the smallest element in Mn. Every element e in Mu has associated subelements in Mn that tile e. First, a linear operator Inu mapping data on Mn to Mu implements smooth (C^1) interpolation; I use cubic (Clough-Tocher) interpolation over a triangulation induced by Mn. Second, a linear operator Gu implements DDMu on Mu. Third, a linear operator Aun maps data on Mu to Mn. These three linear operators implement exact IGA (EIGA): Gn = Aun Gu Inu. Computationally, there are several more details. EIGA has the undesirable property that calculating one entry of Gn for receiver ri requires calculating multiple entries of Gu, no matter how far away from ri the smallest element is. Approximate IGA (AIGA) solves this problem by restricting EIGA to a neighborhood around each receiver. Associated with each neighborhood is a minimum element size s^i that indexes a family of operators Gu^i. The order of accuracy of AIGA is the same as that of EIGA and DDMu if each neighborhood is kept constant in spatial extent as the mesh is refined.

  12. Finite-element-method (FEM) model generation of time-resolved 3D echocardiographic geometry data for mitral-valve volumetry

    PubMed Central

    Verhey, Janko F; Nathan, Nadia S; Rienhoff, Otto; Kikinis, Ron; Rakebrandt, Fabian; D'Ambra, Michael N

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Mitral Valve (MV) 3D structural data can be easily obtained using standard transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) devices but quantitative pre- and intraoperative volume analysis of the MV is presently not feasible in the cardiac operation room (OR). Finite element method (FEM) modelling is necessary to carry out precise and individual volume analysis and in the future will form the basis for simulation of cardiac interventions. Method With the present retrospective pilot study we describe a method to transfer MV geometric data to 3D Slicer 2 software, an open-source medical visualization and analysis software package. A newly developed software program (ROIExtract) allowed selection of a region-of-interest (ROI) from the TEE data and data transformation for use in 3D Slicer. FEM models for quantitative volumetric studies were generated. Results ROI selection permitted the visualization and calculations required to create a sequence of volume rendered models of the MV allowing time-based visualization of regional deformation. Quantitation of tissue volume, especially important in myxomatous degeneration can be carried out. Rendered volumes are shown in 3D as well as in time-resolved 4D animations. Conclusion The visualization of the segmented MV may significantly enhance clinical interpretation. This method provides an infrastructure for the study of image guided assessment of clinical findings and surgical planning. For complete pre- and intraoperative 3D MV FEM analysis, three input elements are necessary: 1. time-gated, reality-based structural information, 2. continuous MV pressure and 3. instantaneous tissue elastance. The present process makes the first of these elements available. Volume defect analysis is essential to fully understand functional and geometrical dysfunction of but not limited to the valve. 3D Slicer was used for semi-automatic valve border detection and volume-rendering of clinical 3D echocardiographic data. FEM based models were also calculated. Method A Philips/HP Sonos 5500 ultrasound device stores volume data as time-resolved 4D volume data sets. Data sets for three subjects were used. Since 3D Slicer does not process time-resolved data sets, we employed a standard movie maker to animate the individual time-based models and visualizations. Calculation time and model size were minimized. Pressures were also easily available. We speculate that calculation of instantaneous elastance may be possible using instantaneous pressure values and tissue deformation data derived from the animated FEM. PMID:16512925

  13. Self-calibration of cone-beam CT geometry using 3D-2D image registration: development and application to tasked-based imaging with a robotic C-arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouadah, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Gang, G.; Uneri, A.; Ehtiati, T.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Robotic C-arm systems are capable of general noncircular orbits whose trajectories can be driven by the particular imaging task. However obtaining accurate calibrations for reconstruction in such geometries can be a challenging problem. This work proposes a method to perform a unique geometric calibration of an arbitrary C-arm orbit by registering 2D projections to a previously acquired 3D image to determine the transformation parameters representing the system geometry. Methods: Experiments involved a cone-beam CT (CBCT) bench system, a robotic C-arm, and three phantoms. A robust 3D-2D registration process was used to compute the 9 degree of freedom (DOF) transformation between each projection and an existing 3D image by maximizing normalized gradient information with a digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) of the 3D volume. The quality of the resulting "self-calibration" was evaluated in terms of the agreement with an established calibration method using a BB phantom as well as image quality in the resulting CBCT reconstruction. Results: The self-calibration yielded CBCT images without significant difference in spatial resolution from the standard ("true") calibration methods (p-value >0.05 for all three phantoms), and the differences between CBCT images reconstructed using the "self" and "true" calibration methods were on the order of 10-3 mm-1. Maximum error in magnification was 3.2%, and back-projection ray placement was within 0.5 mm. Conclusion: The proposed geometric "self" calibration provides a means for 3D imaging on general noncircular orbits in CBCT systems for which a geometric calibration is either not available or not reproducible. The method forms the basis of advanced "task-based" 3D imaging methods now in development for robotic C-arms.

  14. Re-evaluation of Fault Geometry and Slip Distribution of the 1944 Bolu-Gerede Earthquake Rupture, North Anatolian Fault System, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, H.; Awata, Y.; Emre, O.; Dogan, A.; Ozalp, S.; Tokay, F.; Yildirim, C.

    2002-12-01

    The successive earthquakes along the North Anatolian Fault System in 20th century provides us fundamental data on fault segmentation, characteristics faulting behavior, and dimensions and scaling laws of faulting. In this point of view, we re-evaluate geometry and slip-distribution of the Ms7.3 Bolu-Gerede earthquake rupture of 1944, which has not been studied since 1970. The 1944 rupture is traceable for about 185-km, from 30-km west of Bolu (40.6N, 31.4E) to 20-km west of Ilgaz (41.0N, 33.4E) almost continuously and straightly, trending N75E. Amount of slip along the rupture varies between 2 and 6 m right-laterally. In the middle-east section of the rupture, east of Gerede, the slip is as large as 4.5 to 6 m. Along the other sections, the amount of slip decreases to about 2-4 m. The rupture can be subdivided into 5 to 7 geometrical segments of 10 to 45-km-long, which are separated by small separation, bend, step, push-up and pull-apart structures. At 6-km east of Iametpasa (40.9N, 32.7E), a series of foundation of a stone-bridge, which is built approximately AD 680+190-90 (Ikeda, 1994), has been offset for about 20 m. The 3.5 to 4.0 m slip-per-event during the 1944 earthquakes suggests that the 20 m displacement has been accumulated by 5 to 6 faulting events with an average recurrence interval of about 200 to 350 years. Re-evaluated average slip of the 1944 rupture is about 3.5 m that is almost twice of the previously well-known amount. The straightness and continuance of the fault strands foresee that the 1944 earthquake had more simple rupture process and shorter source time than those of 1999 Izmit earthquake of Ms 7.4.

  15. How Long Is Long Enough? Estimation of Slip-Rate and Earthquake Recurrence Interval on a Simple Plate-Boundary Fault Using 3D Paleoseismic Trenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wechsler, N.; Rockwell, T. K.; Klinger, Y.; Agnon, A.; Marco, S.

    2012-12-01

    Models used to forecast future seismicity make fundamental assumptions about the behavior of faults and fault systems in the long term, but in many cases this long-term behavior is assumed using short-term and perhaps non-representative observations. The question arises - how long of a record is long enough to represent actual fault behavior, both in terms of recurrence of earthquakes and of moment release (aka slip-rate). We test earthquake recurrence and slip models via high-resolution three-dimensional trenching of the Beteiha (Bet-Zayda) site on the Dead Sea Transform (DST) in northern Israel. We extend the earthquake history of this simple plate boundary fault to establish slip rate for the past 3-4kyr, to determine the amount of slip per event and to study the fundamental behavior, thereby testing competing rupture models (characteristic, slip-patch, slip-loading, and Gutenberg Richter type distribution). To this end we opened more than 900m of trenches, mapped 8 buried channels and dated more than 80 radiocarbon samples. By mapping buried channels, offset by the DST on both sides of the fault, we obtained for each an estimate of displacement. Coupled with fault crossing trenches to determine event history, we construct earthquake and slip history for the fault for the past 2kyr. We observe evidence for a total of 9-10 surface-rupturing earthquakes with varying offset amounts. 6-7 events occurred in the 1st millennium, compared to just 2-3 in the 2nd millennium CE. From our observations it is clear that the fault is not behaving in a periodic fashion. A 4kyr old buried channel yields a slip rate of 3.5-4mm/yr, consistent with GPS rates for this segment. Yet in spite of the apparent agreement between GPS, Pleistocene to present slip rate, and the lifetime rate of the DST, the past 800-1000 year period appears deficit in strain release. Thus, in terms of moment release, most of the fault has remained locked and is accumulating elastic strain. In contrast, the preceding 1200 years or so experienced a spate of earthquake activity, with large events along the Jordan Valley segment alone in 31 BCE, 363, 749, and 1033 CE. Thus, the return period appears to vary by a factor of two to four during the historical period in the Jordan Valley as well as at our site. The Beteiha site seems to be affected by both its southern and northern neighboring segments, and there is tentative evidence that earthquakes nucleating in the Jordan Valley (e.g. 749 CE) can rupture through the Galilee step-over to the south of Beteiha, or trigger a smaller event on the Jordan Gorge segment, in which case the historical record will tend to amalgamate any evidence for it into one large event. We offer a model of earthquake slip for this segment, in which the overall slip rate remains constant, yet differing earthquake sizes can occur, depending on the segment from which they originated and the time since the last large event. The rate of earthquake production in this model does not produce a time predictable pattern over a period of 2kyr, and the slip rate varies between the 1st and 2nd millennia CE, as a result of the interplay between coalescing fault segments to the north.

  16. The 1967 Caracas Earthquake: Fault geometry, direction of rupture propagation and seismotectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SuáRez, Gerardo; NáBěLek, John

    1990-10-01

    The fault plane orientation of the July 30, 1967, Caracas earthquake (Mw = 6.6) has been a source of controversy for several years. This strike-slip event was originally thought to have occurred on an east-west oriented fault plane, reflecting the relative motion between the Caribbean and South American plates. More recently, however, the complex seismic radiation from this event was interpreted as being indicative of a north-south striking fault that ruptured along three en echelon segments. In this study we synthesize evidence based on the intensity and damage reports, the distribution of aftershocks, and the results of a joint formal inversion of the P and SH waves and show that these data clearly indicate that the rupture of the 1967 earthquake occurred on an east-west trending fault system. Using a master event technique, the largest aftershock, which occurred 40 min after the main event, is shown to lie 50 km east of the epicenter of the mainshock. The epicentral distances of small aftershocks registered in Caracas, based on the S-P arrival time differences and the polarizations of the P waves, are also consistent with these events occurring on an east-west oriented fault system north of Caracas. A joint inversion of the teleseismic P and SH waves, recorded on long-period seismographs of the World-Wide Standardized Seismographic Network, shows that in a time frame of 65 s, four distinct bursts of seismic moment release (subevents) occurred, with a total seismic moment of 8.6×1018 N m. The first three subevents triggered sequentially from west to east, in a direction that is almost identical to the east-west trending nodal planes of the source mechanisms. The average depth of these three subevents is 14 km. The fourth, and last identifiable, subevent of the sequence shows a reverse faulting mechanism with the nodal planes oriented roughly east-west. It occurred at a 21-km depth, about 50 km to the north of the fault zone defined by the strike-slip subevents. This fourth subevent appears to reflect compressional deformation of the southern Caribbean, possibly related to underthrusting along the proposed Curaçao trench. The complexity of the fault system causing the 1967 earthquake suggests that the relative motion along the Caribbean-South America plate boundary in central Venezuela is taken up over a broad, highly faulted, and highly stressed zone of deformation and not by a simple, major throughgoing fault.

  17. The first systematic analysis of 3D rapid prototyped poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds manufactured through BioCell printing: the effect of pore size and geometry on compressive mechanical behaviour and in vitro hMSC viability.

    PubMed

    Domingos, M; Intranuovo, F; Russo, T; De Santis, R; Gloria, A; Ambrosio, L; Ciurana, J; Bartolo, P

    2013-12-01

    Novel additive manufacturing processes are increasingly recognized as ideal techniques to produce 3D biodegradable structures with optimal pore size and spatial distribution, providing an adequate mechanical support for tissue regeneration while shaping in-growing tissues. With regard to the mechanical and biological performances of 3D scaffolds, pore size and geometry play a crucial role. In this study, a novel integrated automated system for the production and in vitro culture of 3D constructs, known as BioCell Printing, was used only to manufacture poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds for tissue engineering; the influence of pore size and shape on their mechanical and biological performances was investigated. Imposing a single lay-down pattern of 0°/90° and varying the filament distance, it was possible to produce scaffolds with square interconnected pores with channel sizes falling in the range of 245-433 µm, porosity 49-57% and a constant road width. Three different lay-down patterns were also adopted (0°/90°, 0°/60/120° and 0°/45°/90°/135°), thus resulting in scaffolds with quadrangular, triangular and complex internal geometries, respectively. Mechanical compression tests revealed a decrease of scaffold stiffness with the increasing porosity and number of deposition angles (from 0°/90° to 0°/45°/90°/135°). Results from biological analysis, carried out using human mesenchymal stem cells, suggest a strong influence of pore size and geometry on cell viability. On the other hand, after 21 days of in vitro static culture, it was not possible to detect any significant variation in terms of cell morphology promoted by scaffold topology. As a first systematic analysis, the obtained results clearly demonstrate the potential of the BioCell Printing process to produce 3D scaffolds with reproducible well organized architectures and tailored mechanical properties. PMID:24192056

  18. A 3-D Semi-analytic Viscoelastic Model of the San Andreas Fault System: A 1000-year Perspective of the Earthquake Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, B. R.; Sandwell, D. T.

    2004-12-01

    Combining historical earthquake data, coastal tide gauge measurements, and continuous vertical and horizontal geodetic velocities, we simulate one thousand years of the earthquake cycle for the entire San Andreas Fault System. We employ a model based on a new semi-analytic solution that provides the displacement and stress caused by time-dependent dislocations embedded in an elastic layer overlying a Maxwell viscoelastic half-space. The problem is solved analytically in both the vertical dimension and the time dimension, while the solution in the two horizontal dimensions is developed in the Fourier transform domain to exploit the computational advantages offered by the convolution theorem. Hundreds of dislocations imbedded in a 2048 x 2048 km sized grid are used to represent the San Andreas Fault System from the Gulf of California to the Mendocino Triple Junction. Major historical earthquakes (from 1812-present, Mw > 6.0) are used in conjunction with published recurrence intervals to produce the time-dependent velocity and stress tensor spanning the past 1000 years. The model simulates interseismic stress accumulation on the upper locked portion of subfaults and adjacent crust, repeated earthquakes on prescribed fault segments, and the viscoelastic response of the asthenosphere following major ruptures. Continuous geodetic observations (σ < 1.5 mm/yr) from the Scripps Orbit and Permanent Array Center (SOPAC) and USGS networks are used to constrain model parameters of elastic plate thickness (H), half-space viscosity ({η ), Poisson's ratio ({ν ), and apparent locking depth. We identify best fitting models with rms < 2.5 mm/yr for H > 60 km, {η = 1-5 x1019 Pa s, {ν = 0.35-0.45, and locking depths that are approximately 1/4 less deep than those required to fit an equivalent elastic half-space model. Using these model parameters, we calculate present-day Coulomb stress and observe large amounts of stress focused along the Carrizo and Mojave regions of the San Andreas, as expected from the absence of major earthquakes along these fault segments over the past 150 years. These results, along with corresponding time-dependent deformation results, have been assembled to form animations of the San Andreas Fault System that capture temporal variations in the plate-boundary velocity vector and stress tensor spanning the past 1000 years of the earthquake cycle.

  19. Interseismic stress build-up and stress rotations between low and high-angle normal faults in the Northern Apennines (Italy): Insight from 2D and 3D numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadacca, L.; Casarotti, E.; Chiaraluce, L.; Mirabella, F.

    2012-12-01

    The mechanical behavior of low-angle normal faults is a debated issue. We tackle this issue by considering the Altotiberina fault (ATF), a very low-angle normal fault dipping toward NE with an average dip of 15° and cutting the upper crust (from 0 to 15-18 km of depth) in the Northern Apennines of Italy. Here, geodetic and geological data suggest a velocity strengthening behavior, whereas historical earthquakes of medium magnitude can not exclude a velocity weakening behavior. In order to facilitate the understanding of this dilemma, we perform two-and three-dimensional mechanical models simulating the interseismic phase of the Altotiberina low-angle extensional fault system. The innovation of the proposed models is that a three-dimensional subsurface "topography" of the ATF is available on the basis on seismic reflection profiles. In this way also the along-strike stress field lateral variations due to the geometrical irregularities are considered. The faults are defined by a thick fault core characterized by a variation of the elastic parameters. Finally, the effects of a damage zone 1km thick, associated with the ATF, are also considered. The results of the 2D and 3D models can be summarized as follows: 1) the greatest build-up of the shear stress is localized mainly in the first kilometers of depth and at the ATF hangingwall; 2) a velocity strengthening behavior associated to the ATF could promote a local rotation of the principal stress axes; 3) this rotation is even more complex considering a thick damage zone around the ATF; 4) the rotation of the principal stress axes, also associated with along-strike geometrical irregularities, can generate anomalous accumulations of shear stress and therefore promote a velocity weakening behavior along certain patches of the fault. Those preliminary findings suggest that the Altotiberina low-angle extensional fault system is characterized by a gradual transition to prevalent velocity weakening behavior (above approximately 5 km), to changes to a mixed behavior (velocity weakening and velocity strengthening from 5 to 15 km of depth ), and finally to a prevalent velocity strengthening behavior.

  20. Virtual California: Earthquake Statistics, Surface Deformation Patterns, Surface Gravity Changes and InSAR Interferograms for Arbitrary Fault Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, K.; Sachs, M. K.; Heien, E. M.; Rundle, J. B.; Fernandez, J.; Turcotte, D.; Donnellan, A.

    2014-12-01

    With the ever increasing number of geodetic monitoring satellites, it is vital to have a variety of geophysical numerical simulators to produce sample/model datasets. Just as hurricane forecasts are derived from the consensus among multiple atmospheric models, earthquake forecasts cannot be derived from a single comprehensive model. Here we present the functionality of Virtual California, a numerical simulator that can generate sample surface deformations, surface gravity changes, and InSAR interferograms in addition to producing earthquake statistics and forecasts.Virtual California is a boundary element code designed to explore the seismicity of today's fault systems. For arbitrary input fault geometry, Virtual California can output simulated seismic histories of 50,000 years or more. Using co-seismic slips from the output data, we generate surface deformation maps, surface gravity change maps, and InSAR interferograms as viewed by an orbiting satellite. Furthermore, using the times between successive earthquakes we generate probability distributions and earthquake forecasts.Virtual California is now supported by the Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics. The source code is available for download and it comes with a users' manual. The manual includes instructions on how to generate fault models from scratch, how to deploy the simulator across a parallel computing environment, etc.http://geodynamics.org/cig/software/vc/

  1. 3-D Numerical Simulation and Analysis of Complex Fiber Geometry RaFC Materials with High Volume Fraction and High Aspect Ratio based on ABAQUS PYTHON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, BoCheng

    2011-12-01

    Organic and inorganic fiber reinforced composites with innumerable fiber orientation distributions and fiber geometries are abundantly available in several natural and synthetic structures. Inorganic glass fiber composites have been introduced to numerous applications due to their economical fabrication and tailored structural properties. Numerical characterization of such composite material systems is necessitated due to their intrinsic statistical nature, which renders extensive experimentation prohibitively time consuming and costly. To predict various mechanical behavior and characterizations of Uni-Directional Fiber Composites (UDFC) and Random Fiber Composites (RaFC), we numerically developed Representative Volume Elements (RVE) with high accuracy and efficiency and with complex fiber geometric representations encountered in uni-directional and random fiber networks. In this thesis, the numerical simulations of unidirectional RaFC fiber strand RVE models (VF>70%) are first presented by programming in ABAQUS PYTHON. Secondly, when the cross sectional aspect ratios (AR) of the second phase fiber inclusions are not necessarily one, various types of RVE models with different cross sectional shape fibers are simulated and discussed. A modified random sequential absorption algorithm is applied to enhance the volume fraction number (VF) of the RVE, which the mechanical properties represents the composite material. Thirdly, based on a Spatial Segment Shortest Distance (SSSD) algorithm, a 3-Dimentional RaFC material RVE model is simulated in ABAQUS PYTHON with randomly oriented and distributed straight fibers of high fiber aspect ratio (AR=100:1) and volume fraction (VF=31.8%). Fourthly, the piecewise multi-segments fiber geometry is obtained in MATLAB environment by a modified SSSD algorithm. Finally, numerical methods including the polynomial curve fitting and piecewise quadratic and cubic B-spline interpolation are applied to optimize the RaFC fiber geometries. Based on the multi-segments fiber geometries and aforementioned techniques, smooth curved fiber geometries depicted by cubic B-spline polynomial interpolation are obtained and different types of RaFC RVEs with high fiber filament aspect ratio (AR>3000:1) and high RVE volume fraction (VF>40.29%) are simulated by ABAQUS scripting language PYTHON programming.

  2. Inversion of the 3D exponential x-ray transform for a half equatorial band and other semi-circular geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noo, Frdric; Clackdoyle, Rolf; Wagner, Jean-Marc

    2002-08-01

    This work presents new mathematical results on the inversion of the exponential x-ray transform. It is shown that a reconstruction formula can be obtained for any dataset whose projection directions consist of a union of half great circles on the unit sphere. A basic example of such a dataset is the semi-equatorial band. The discussion in the paper is mostly focused on this example. The reconstruction formula takes the form of a Neumann (geometric) series and is both exact and stable. The exponential x-ray transform has been mainly studied in SPECT imaging. In this context, our results demonstrate mathematically that fully 3D image reconstruction in SPECT with non-zero attenuation does not always require symmetric datasets (opposing views).

  3. Characterizing the Geometry and History of Deformation of the Meeman-Shelby Fault near Memphis, TN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Y.; Magnani, M.; Guo, L.

    2011-12-01

    The New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ), located in the heart of the North American plate, is characterized by anomalously high seismicity but low surface deformation rates (0.2-1.4 mm/yr). One of the hypotheses proposed to reconcile this conflicting evidence is that fault activity and deformation may occur in different areas at different times. This hypothesis is in agreement with worldwide evidence that continental intraplate seismicity appears to be clustered, episodic and migrates throughout vast regions. One of the implications of this hypothesis is that the area of current seismicity might not represent the long-term seismogenic zone in Central U.S., and that faults, additional to the ones presently active, may have been seismogenic during the Quaternary. In order to image and characterize the network of faults buried beneath the Mississippi valley sediments, a series of high-resolution seismic surveys on or near Mississippi River have been carried out from 2008 to present. In the summer of 2008 one of these surveys, a high-resolution marine seismic reflection profile acquired along the Mississippi River, imaged a 45 km-long fault located about 10 km west of Memphis, Tennessee, at three different river crossings. The fault, named the Meeman-Shelby Fault (MSF), strikes N25E and offsets/folds the unconsolidated sediments from the top of the Paleozoic to the base of the Quaternary alluvium, suggesting recent tectonic activity. In the fall of 2010, in order to image the onshore continuation of the MSF, an additional 10 km-long high-resolution seismic reflection profile was acquired on land near West Memphis, Arkansas, across the segment of the fault between two river crossings. Here we present the newly acquired 2010 land seismic reflection profile and newly processed 2008 marine seismic reflection profiles crossing the MSF. The 2010 land survey acquired high quality data and imaged the MSF dipping WNW at a high angle, at the projected location, about 8 km west of downtown Memphis. Clear reflections at ~600 m and ~800 m corresponding to the top of the Cretaceous and the top of the Paleozoic sequences are visible throughout the profile. The seismic data clearly show that the fault displaces the top of the Paleozoic units for ~40 ms and the top of the Cretaceous sediments for ~30 ms, folding the top of the Paleocene, at a depth of ~380 ms. Similar conclusions can be drawn from the 2008 marine profiles. The consistent increase of offset with depth observed along the fault suggests a prolonged activity throughout the Tertiary and the Quaternary. In order to analyze in detail the displacement within the different units and to restore the deformation history of the MSF, we present a post-stack depth migrated version of the profiles. Depth migration was performed with a Kirchhoff algorithm, using a velocity field derived from iterative modification of an initial velocity model from nearby deep borehole sonic logs.

  4. Imaging the basin and fault geometry from the multichannel seismic reflection data in the Tekirdaǧ Basin, Marmara Sea, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanbur, Zakir; Alptekin, Ömer; Utkucu, Murat; Kanbur, Süveyla

    2007-05-01

    Determination of the fault geometry in the Marmara Sea has been a major problem for the researchers after the occurrence of the 1999 August 17 Golcuk (M = 7.4) earthquake. To shed a light to the problem we applied the pre-stack Kirchhoff depth migration technique to the multichannel seismic reflection data of three profiles to investigate the basin and fault geometry in the Tekirdaǧ Basin in the western Marmara Sea. The boundary of the basin and its sediments were revealed in N-S and NE-SW directions in depth sections. We identify major fault types involving these structures at different locations in Tekirdag Basin showing that the basin is developed under their movement. The North Anatolian Fault is imaged and interpreted as transtensional character at the centre of the Tekirdaǧ Basin that is symmetrically divided with a large distributed zone. The fault plane is imaged through the depth of 2 km dipping to the north with 90° in the upper 350 m and 82° in the lower part. The basin thickness reaches about 2.5 km at that point. Syn-transform sediments of the basin are disturbed by some normal faults dipping to the north. These faults are represented by notable displacements of the reflections which prompted us to consider them as a potential tsunami source if they move during a large earthquake along the major fault. Another major fault is identified at the westernmost of the basin. Because it shows the same character as Ganos fault, it might be submarine part of it. It has reverse component with the dip angle of 65° to the north and trending along the western flank of the basin. A reverse fault is identified appearing in low angle (~20°) surrounding the edge of the submarine slide at southwest of the basin. From its geometry it is interpreted as a local fault formed between two main faults. From the sketch of the basin and the fault geometry obtained from the images we suggest that the basin should be formed by a pull-apart system.

  5. New Constraints on the Geometry and Kinematics of Active Faults in the Hinterland of the Northwest Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morell, K. D.; Sandiford, M.; Rajendran, C. C. P.; Fink, D.; Kohn, B. P.

    2014-12-01

    The geometry and kinematics of the active, and potentially seismogenic, fault structures within the hinterland of the Himalaya have proven challenging to constrain in the past, primarily because active faults in this region tend to be buried beneath the subsurface and active seismicity often does not align with surficially mapped fault traces. Here we present a series of complementary datasets, including results from low temperature thermochronology, basin-wide erosion rates from 10Be concentrations, and topographic and longitudinal profile analyses, that place constraints on the spatial distribution of fault-related rock uplift and erosion across a ~400-km long region of the lower and high Himalaya of northwest India. Results from our analyses reveal that hillslope morphology and channel steepness are relatively invariant parallel to strike but vary significantly across strike, with the most prominent and abrupt variations occurring at the physiographic transition between the lower and high Himalaya (PT2), near the axial trace of the ramp-flat transition in the Main Himalayan Thrust (MHT). The cross-strike changes in geomorphology observed across the PT2 correlate with an order of magnitude northward increase in basin-wide erosion rates (~0.06-0.8 mm/a) and a corresponding decrease in apatite (~5-2 Ma) and zircon (U-Th)/He (~10-2 Ma) cooling ages. Combined with published geophysical and seismicity data, we interpret these results to reflect spatial variations in rock uplift and exhumation induced by a segment of the MHT ramp-flat system that is at least ~400 km long and ~125 km wide. The relatively young (U-Th)/He ages (<10 Ma) greater than 20 km south of the MHT ramp-flat transition preliminarily suggest that the kinematics of this system are best explained by a model which incorporates an accreting duplex on the MHT ramp but additional forthcoming analyses, including thermal modeling, will confirm if this hypothesis is robust.

  6. The geometry of the active strike-slip El Tigre Fault, Precordillera of San Juan, Central-Western Argentina: integrating resistivity surveys with structural and geomorphological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazzito, Sabrina Y.; Cortés, José M.; Rapalini, Augusto E.; Terrizzano, Carla M.

    2013-07-01

    The geometry and related geomorphological features of the right-lateral strike-slip El Tigre Fault, one of the main morphostructural discontinuities in the Central-Western Precordillera of Argentina, were investigated. Achievements of this survey include: recognition of structural and geometrical discontinuities along the fault trace, identification and classification of landforms associated with local transpressional and transtensional sectors, observation of significant changes in the fault strike and detection of right and left bends of different wavelength. In the Central Segment of the El Tigre Fault, 2D electrical resistivity tomography surveys were carried out across the fault zone. The resistivity imaging permitted to infer the orientation of the main fault surface, the presence of blind fault branches along the fault zone, tectonic tilting of the Quaternary sedimentary cover, subsurface structure of pressure ridges and depth to the water table. Based on this information, it is possible to characterize the El Tigre Fault also as an important hydro-geological barrier. Our survey shows that the main fault surface changes along different segments from a high-angle to a subvertical setting whilst the vertical-slip component is either reverse or normal, depending on the local transpressive or transtensive regime induced by major bends along the trace. These local variations are expressed as sections of a few kilometres in length with relatively homogeneous behaviour and frequently separated by oblique or transversal structures.

  7. 3D photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Jeffrey J. L.; Roumeliotis, Michael; Chaudhary, Govind; Stodilka, Robert Z.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2010-06-01

    Our group has concentrated on development of a 3D photoacoustic imaging system for biomedical imaging research. The technology employs a sparse parallel detection scheme and specialized reconstruction software to obtain 3D optical images using a single laser pulse. With the technology we have been able to capture 3D movies of translating point targets and rotating line targets. The current limitation of our 3D photoacoustic imaging approach is its inability ability to reconstruct complex objects in the field of view. This is primarily due to the relatively small number of projections used to reconstruct objects. However, in many photoacoustic imaging situations, only a few objects may be present in the field of view and these objects may have very high contrast compared to background. That is, the objects have sparse properties. Therefore, our work had two objectives: (i) to utilize mathematical tools to evaluate 3D photoacoustic imaging performance, and (ii) to test image reconstruction algorithms that prefer sparseness in the reconstructed images. Our approach was to utilize singular value decomposition techniques to study the imaging operator of the system and evaluate the complexity of objects that could potentially be reconstructed. We also compared the performance of two image reconstruction algorithms (algebraic reconstruction and l1-norm techniques) at reconstructing objects of increasing sparseness. We observed that for a 15-element detection scheme, the number of measureable singular vectors representative of the imaging operator was consistent with the demonstrated ability to reconstruct point and line targets in the field of view. We also observed that the l1-norm reconstruction technique, which is known to prefer sparseness in reconstructed images, was superior to the algebraic reconstruction technique. Based on these findings, we concluded (i) that singular value decomposition of the imaging operator provides valuable insight into the capabilities of a 3D photoacoustic imaging system, and (ii) that reconstruction algorithms which favor sparseness can significantly improve imaging performance. These methodologies should provide a means to optimize detector count and geometry for a multitude of 3D photoacoustic imaging applications.

  8. Exact geometry solid-shell element based on a sampling surfaces technique for 3D stress analysis of doubly-curved composite shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, G. M.; Mamontov, A. A.; Plotnikova, S. V.; Mamontov, S. A.

    2015-11-01

    A hybrid-mixed ANS four-node shell element by using the sampling surfaces (SaS) technique is developed. The SaS formulation is based on choosing inside the nth layer In not equally spaced SaS parallel to the middle surface of the shell in order to introduce the displacements of these surfaces as basic shell variables. Such choice of unknowns with the consequent use of Lagrange polynomials of degree In - 1 in the thickness direction for each layer permits the presentation of the layered shell formulation in a very compact form. The SaS are located inside each layer at Chebyshev polynomial nodes that allows one to minimize uniformly the error due to the Lagrange interpolation. To implement the efficient analytical integration throughout the element, the enhanced ANS method is employed. The proposed hybrid-mixed four-node shell element is based on the Hu-Washizu variational equation and exhibits a superior performance in the case of coarse meshes. It could be useful for the 3D stress analysis of thick and thin doubly-curved shells since the SaS formulation gives the possibility to obtain numerical solutions with a prescribed accuracy, which asymptotically approach the exact solutions of elasticity as the number of SaS tends to infinity.

  9. Fault geometry and slip distribution of the 1891 Nobi great earthquake (M = 8.0) with the oldest survey data sets in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, K.; Kimata, F.

    2010-12-01

    This study reexamines the ground deformation and fault slip model of the 1891 Nobi great earthquake (M = 8.0), central Japan. At the earthquake, three faults of Nukumi, Neodani and Umehara ruptured the ground surface with maximum of 8 m in the horizontal direction and 6 m in the vertical direction along the 80 km length [Koto, 1893; Matsuda, 1974]. Additionally, the Gifu-Ichinomiya line stretching toward south from Gifu is discussed as the buried fault of the Nobi earthquake, because of the vertical deformation and the high collapse rates along the line and wave propagation [Mikumo and Ando, 1976; Nakano et al., 2007]. We reevaluate two geodetic data sets of triangulation and leveling around the Umehara fault in 1885-1890 and 1894-1908 that were obtained from the Japanese Imperial Land Survey in the General Staff Office of the Imperial Army (the present Geospatial Information Authority of Japan); these data sets consist of displacements calculated from the net adjustment of triangulation and leveling surveys carried out before and after the Nobi earthquake. Co-seismic displacements are detected as southeastward displacements and uplifts are detected in the southwest block the Umehara fault. The maximum displacements and uplifts are up to 1.7 m and 0.74 m, respectively. We estimated the coseismic slip distribution of the faults by analyzing our data set. The geometry of the fault planes was adopted from the earthquake fault of this area. The remaining parameters are determined using a quasi-Newton nonlinear optimization algorithm. The best fit to the data is obtained from seven segments of the faults along the sections running Nukumi, Neodani and Umehara faults. The estimated uniform-slip elastic dislocation model consists of seven adjacent planes. The fault slips are up to 3.8 m. Because it can suitably explain the coseismic deformation due to seven earthquake source faults, the earthquake source fault is not admitted under the Gifu-Ichinomiya line.

  10. An application of enhanced 3D-CAD methods with integrated geometry creation algorithms for PVC-seams in automotive body in white design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frener, Gernot; Thum, Katharina; Hirz, Mario; Harrich, Alexander

    2012-06-01

    State of the art automotive development processes are based on virtual product models, which include a digital representation of complete vehicle geometry and structures. Increasing computation performance and continuously growing demands on virtual development processes lead to the application of precise product representation within common CAD software packages. A specific challenge represents the creation of PVC-seams, which are used for corrosion protection of sheet metal components in automotive body in white design. Besides the high requirements of accurate geometric modeling in digital representation, modern development processes call for an increasing level of design automation. To fit both, the present approach introduces a method for an automatic generation of PVC-seams using the functionalities of commercial CAD software. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Direct measurements of dust attenuation in z ∼ 1.5 star-forming galaxies from 3D-HST: Implications for dust geometry and star formation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Sedona H.; Kriek, Mariska; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Conroy, Charlie; Schreiber, Natascha M. Förster; Wuyts, Stijn; Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Lundgren, Britt; Momcheva, Ivelina; Nelson, Erica J.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Whitaker, Katherine E.

    2014-06-10

    The nature of dust in distant galaxies is not well understood, and until recently few direct dust measurements have been possible. We investigate dust in distant star-forming galaxies using near-infrared grism spectra of the 3D-HST survey combined with archival multi-wavelength photometry. These data allow us to make a direct comparison between dust around star-forming regions (A {sub V,} {sub H} {sub II}) and the integrated dust content (A {sub V,} {sub star}). We select a sample of 163 galaxies between 1.36 ≤ z ≤ 1.5 with Hα signal-to-noise ratio ≥5 and measure Balmer decrements from stacked spectra to calculate A {sub V,} {sub H} {sub II}. First, we stack spectra in bins of A {sub V,} {sub star}, and find that A {sub V,} {sub H} {sub II} = 1.86 A {sub V,} {sub star}, with a significance of σ = 1.7. Our result is consistent with the two-component dust model, in which galaxies contain both diffuse and stellar birth cloud dust. Next, we stack spectra in bins of specific star formation rate (log SSFR), star formation rate (log SFR), and stellar mass (log M {sub *}). We find that on average A {sub V,} {sub H} {sub II} increases with SFR and mass, but decreases with increasing SSFR. Interestingly, the data hint that the amount of extra attenuation decreases with increasing SSFR. This trend is expected from the two-component model, as the extra attenuation will increase once older stars outside the star-forming regions become more dominant in the galaxy spectrum. Finally, using Balmer decrements we derive dust-corrected Hα SFRs, and find that stellar population modeling produces incorrect SFRs if rapidly declining star formation histories are included in the explored parameter space.

  12. SU-E-T-342: Use of Patient Geometry Measurements to Predict Dosimetric Gain with VMAT Over 3D for Chestwall and Regional Nodal Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dumane, V; Knoll, M; Green, S; Bakst, R; Hunt, M; Steinberger, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To predict the dosimetric gain of VMAT over 3D for the treatment ofchestwall/IMN/supraclavicular nodes using geometric parameters acquired during simulation Methods: CT scans for 20 left and 20 right sided patients were retrospectively analyzed toobtain percent ipsilateral lung volume included in the PWT and supraclavicular fields, central lung depth (CLD), maximum lung depth (MLD), separation, chestwall concavity (defined here as the product of CLD and separation) and the maximum heart depth (MHD). VMAT, PWT and P/E plans were done for each case. The ipsilateral lung V20 Gy and mean, total lung V20 Gy and mean, heart V25 Gy and mean were noted for each plan. Correlation coefficients were obtained and linear regression models were built using data from the above training set of patients and then tested on 4 new patients. Results: The decrease in ipsilateral lung V20 Gy, total lung V20 Gy, ipsilateral lung mean and total lung mean with VMAT over PWT significantly (p<0.05) correlated with the percent volume of ipsilateral lung included in the PWT and supraclavicular fields with correlation coefficient values of r = 0.83, r = 0.77, r = 0.78 and r = 0.75 respectively. Significant correlations were also found between MHD and the decrease in heart V25 Gy and mean of r = 0.77 and r = 0.67 respectively. Dosimetric improvement with VMAT over P/E plans showed no correlation to any of the geometric parameters investigated in this study. The dosimetric gain predicted for the 4 test cases by the linear regression models given their respective percent ipsilateral lung volumes fell within the 95% confidence intervals around the best regression fit. Conclusion: The percent ipsilateral lung volume appears to be a strong predictor of the dosimetric gain on using VMAT over PWT apriori.

  13. Direct Measurement of Dust Attenuation in z approx. 1.5 Star-Forming Galaxies from 3D-HST: Implications for Dust Geometry and Star Formation Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Sedona H.; Kriek, Mariska; Brammer, Gabriel B; Conroy, Charlie; Schreiber, Natascha M. Foerster; Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Lundren, Britt; Momcheva, Ivelina; Nelson, Erica J.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Skelton, Rosalind E.; VanDokkum, Pieter G.; Tease, Katherine Whitaker; Wuyts, Stijn

    2013-01-01

    The nature of dust in distant galaxies is not well understood, and until recently few direct dust measurements have been possible. We investigate dust in distant star-forming galaxies using near-infrared grism spectra of the 3D-HST survey combined with archival multi-wavelength photometry. These data allow us to make a direct comparison between dust towards star-forming regions (measured using Balmer decrements) and the integrated dust properties (derived by comparing spectral energy distributions [SEDs] with stellar population and dust models) for a statistically significant sample of distant galaxies. We select a sample of 163 galaxies between 1.36< or = z< or = 1.5 with H(alpha) SNR > or = 5 and measure Balmer decrements from stacked spectra. First, we stack spectra in bins of integrated stellar dust attenuation, and find that there is extra dust extinction towards star-forming regions (AV,HII is 1.81 times the integrated AV, star), though slightly lower than found for low-redshift starburst galaxies. Next, we stack spectra in bins of specific star formation rate (log sSFR), star formation rate (log SFR), and stellar mass (logM*). We find that on average AV,HII increases with SFR and mass, but decreases with increasing sSFR. The amount of extra extinction also decreases with increasing sSFR and decreasing stellar mass. Our results are consistent with the two-phase dust model - in which galaxies contain both a diffuse and a stellar birth cloud dust component - as the extra extinction will increase once older stars outside the star-forming regions become more dominant. Finally, using our Balmer decrements we derive dust-corrected H(alpha) SFRs, and find evidence that SED fitting produces incorrect SFRs if very rapidly declining SFHs are included in the explored parameter space. Subject headings: dust, extinction- galaxies: evolution- galaxies: high-redshift

  14. Deep geometry and evolution of the northern part of Itoigwa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line active fault system, Central Japan, revealed by Seismic profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Iwasaki, T.; Matsuta, N.; Takeda, T.; Kawasaki, S.; Kozawa, T.; Elouai, D.; Hirata, N.; Kawanaka, T.

    2003-12-01

    The northern Fossa Magna (NFM) is a Miocene rift system produced in the final stages of the opening of the Sea of Japan. It divides the major structure of Japan into SW and NE portions. The Itoigawa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line (ISTL) bounds the western part of the northern Fossa Magna and forms an active fault system showing the one of the largest slip rates in the Japanese islands. Based on the paleo-seismological data, the ISTL active fault system was evaluated to have the highest seismic risk among active faults within inland Japan. A quantitative understanding of active tectonic processes, including crustal deformation and related destructive earthquakes, is important in reducing seismic hazards through precise estimation of strong ground motions. The structure of the crust, especially the deep geometry of active fault systems, is the most important piece information required to construct such a dynamic model. In this context, the seismic reflection profiling was performed across the northern part of the ISTL active fault system by three seismic lines. Obtained seismic sections are interpreted based on the pattern of reflectors, surface geology and velocity model by refraction analysis, using the balanced cross section technique. The 68-km-long Itoshizu 2002 seismic section across the northern middle part of the ISTL active fault system suggest that the Miocene NFM basin was formed by an east dipping normal fault with shallow flat (6 km), deeper ramp (6 15 km) and deeper flat at 15 km in depth. This unique geometry is interpreted that this low-angle normal fault was produced by Miocene high thermal regime, estimated from the thick volcanic rocks at the base of the basin fill. Namely, the normal fault reflects the brittle-ductile boundary in Miocene. Consequently, since the Pliocene, the basin fill was strongly folded by the reverse faulting along the pre-existing normal faults in the Pre-Neogene rocks. The reverse faults in the basin fill produced fault-related folds on their hanging wall. Westward migration of thrusting is recognized by shallow high-resolution seismic section and tectonic geomorphology. The ISTL active fault is an emergent thrust dipping 30 degrees to the east and no evidence is observed showing late Quaternary faulting along the fault, runs parallel to the ISTL and located east of it. Based on the balanced geologic cross-section, the total amount of Miocene extension is ca. 45 km and the total amount of shortening is ca. 25 km. If we assume that the shortening deformation has continued since 5 Ma at constant rate, the horizontal slip rate is calculated as 5 mm/y. The late Quaternary slip rate in the northern part of the ISTL active fault system based on very shallow seismic profiling and drilling shows similar value. The 7-km-long seismic section (Matsumoto 2002) across the middle part of ISTL active fault system also suggests that east-dipping fault geometry at gentle dip. To summarize deep geometry of the ISTL active fault system is strongly controlled by the Miocene extensional structure.

  15. Sensitivity of tsunami wave profiles and inundation simulations to earthquake slip and fault geometry for the 2011 Tohoku earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goda, Katsuichiro; Mai, Paul Martin; Yasuda, Tomohiro; Mori, Nobuhito

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we develop stochastic random-field slip models for the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and conduct a rigorous sensitivity analysis of tsunami hazards with respect to the uncertainty of earthquake slip and fault geometry. Synthetic earthquake slip distributions generated from the modified Mai-Beroza method captured key features of inversion-based source representations of the mega-thrust event, which were calibrated against rich geophysical observations of this event. Using original and synthesised earthquake source models (varied for strike, dip, and slip distributions), tsunami simulations were carried out and the resulting variability in tsunami hazard estimates was investigated. The results highlight significant sensitivity of the tsunami wave profiles and inundation heights to the coastal location and the slip characteristics, and indicate that earthquake slip characteristics are a major source of uncertainty in predicting tsunami risks due to future mega-thrust events.

  16. Oceanic transform earthquakes with unusual mechanisms or locations - Relation to fault geometry and state of stress in the adjacent lithosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, Cecily J.; Bergman, Eric A.; Solomon, Sean C.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented of a search for transform earthquakes departing from the pattern whereby they occur on the principal transform displacement zone (PTDZ) and have strike-slip mechanisms consistent with transform-parallel motion. The search was conducted on the basis of source mechanisms and locations taken from the Harvard centroid moment tensor catalog and the bulletin of the International Seismological Center. The source mechanisms and centroid depths of 10 such earthquakes on the St. Paul's, Marathon, Owen, Heezen, Tharp, Menard, and Rivera transforms are determined from inversions of long-period body waveforms. Much of the anomalous earthquake activity on oceanic transforms is associated with complexities in the geometry of the PTDZ or the presence of large structural features that may influence slip on the fault.

  17. Deep geometry structure feature of Haiyuan Fault on the northeastern margin of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau revealed by deep seismic reflection profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Gao, R.; Yin, A.; Kuang, Z.; Xiong, X.; Li, W.

    2012-12-01

    Because of incessant uplifting and pushing role of the active Qinghai-Tibet Plateau uplift and pushed role, Cenozoic tectonic deformation and seismic activity is intense, several large deep fault zones distribute in the northeastern margin of the Tibetan area. The Haiyuan fault is a left strike-slip fault zone with the strongest activities and the largest scale among the arc and active fault zones of the northeastern margin of Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, which is an important tectonic zone boundary faults and also an active faults controling earthquake activity. The CAGS carried out the research of the deep seismic reflection profiling with 300 km long across the northern margin of the West Qinling orogen,Linxia basin,the north Qilian and the southern margin of the Alxa block in 2009, supported by Crust Probe Project of China(Sinoprobe-02) and the Natural Science Foundation of China(No.40830316). The migration section were obtained. According to the section showing the different reflection characteristics, the deep geometry of the Haiyuan fault zone and the fine structure of the crust and upper mantle on both sides of fault. The results discolsed that the Haiyuan fault is not a simple steep or moderate, but its geometric shape changes with depth. The continuous reflection characteristics of the Moho under the Haiyuan fault show that Haiyuan fault is not an ultra-crust fault broke up the Moho directly. The research results provide seismological basis for studying the lithosphere deformation mechanism of the northeastern margin of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau.

  18. Estimate of the post-Last Glacial Maximum tectonic subsidence and attempt to elucidate the subsurface geometry of the active Shanchiao Fault in the Taipei metropolis, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Lee, J.; Chan, Y.; Lu, C.; Teng, L. S.

    2011-12-01

    The Taipei Metropolis, home to some 10 million people, is subject to seismic hazard originated from not only ground shaking in thick alluvial deposits due to distant faults or sources scattered throughout the Taiwan region, but also active faulting directly underneath. Northern Taiwan including the Taipei region is currently affected by post-orogenic (Plio-Pleistocene arc-continent collision) processes related to backarc extension of the Ryukyu subduction system. The Shanchiao Fault, an active normal fault outcropping along the western boundary of the Taipei Basin and dipping to the east, is investigated here for the areal extent and magnitude of its recent activity. Based on the growth faulting analysis in the Wuku profile in the central portion of the fault, one key horizon - the top of the Jingmei Conglomerate which was an alluvial fan formed rapidly when a major drainage reorganization occurred during the Last Glacial Maximum - serves to be the marker of tectonic subsidence since its inception around 23 ka. A determination and compilation of the depths of the Jingmei Conglomerate top horizon from nearly 500 borehole records within the Taipei Basin demonstrates that the hanging-wall deforms in a roll-over fashion and the offset is largest in the Wuku-Luzhou area in the central portion of the fault and decreases toward the southern tip of the fault. A geologic profile across the fault zone in the Luzhou area reveals the similar main-branch fault half-negative flower structural pattern observed in the Wuku profile, a phenomenon we interpreted to be originated from the geometry of the basin basement and the strong rheological contrast between unconsolidated basin sediments and basement rocks. We also attempt to resolve the poorly-known subsurface geometry of the Shanchiao Fault by simple elastic dislocation models. The surface deformation recorded by the above compilation is representative of the latest Quaternary period as it spans probably more than 10 earthquake cycles. Preliminary results suggest that the Shanchiao Fault possess a shallow listric geometry where the low-dipping part may be inherited from the negative tectonic inversion of former thrusts, while deeper rift-related normal faults might also be involved. Such constraints and knowledge are crucial in earthquake hazard evaluation and mitigation in the Taipei Metropolis, and in understanding the kinematics of transtensional tectonics in northern Taiwan.

  19. Neotectonic reactivation of shear zones and implications for faulting style and geometry in the continental margin of NE Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra, F. H. R.; Rossetti, D. F.; Oliveira, R. G.; Medeiros, W. E.; Neves, B. B. Brito; Balsamo, F.; Nogueira, F. C. C.; Dantas, E. L.; Andrades Filho, C.; Góes, A. M.

    2014-02-01

    The eastern continental margin of South America comprises a series of rift basins developed during the breakup of Pangea in the Jurassic-Cretaceous. We integrated high resolution aeromagnetic, structural and stratigraphic data in order to evaluate the role of reactivation of ductile, Neoproterozoic shear zones in the deposition and deformation of post-rift sedimentary deposits in one of these basins, the Paraíba Basin in northeastern Brazil. This basin corresponds to the last part of the South American continent to be separated from Africa during the Pangea breakup. Sediment deposition in this basin occurred in the Albian-Maastrichtian, Eocene-Miocene, and in the late Quaternary. However, our investigation concentrates on the Miocene-Quaternary, which we consider the neotectonic period because it encompasses the last stress field. This consisted of an E-W-oriented compression and a N-S-oriented extension. The basement of the basin forms a slightly seaward-tilted ramp capped by a late Cretaceous to Quaternary sedimentary cover ~ 100-400 m thick. Aeromagnetic lineaments mark the major steeply-dipping, ductile E-W- to NE-striking shear zones in this basement. The ductile shear zones mainly reactivated as strike-slip, normal and oblique-slip faults, resulting in a series of Miocene-Quaternary depocenters controlled by NE-, E-W-, and a few NW-striking faults. Faulting produced subsidence and uplift that are largely responsible for the present-day morphology of the valleys and tablelands in this margin. We conclude that Precambrian shear zone reactivation controlled geometry and orientation, as well as deformation of sedimentary deposits, until the Neogene-Quaternary.

  20. Three-dimensional Geometry of Buried Fold Scarps Associated With Ancient Earthquakes on the Puente Hills Blind Thrust Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, L. A.; Dolan, J. F.; Hoeft, J. S.; Shaw, J. H.; Hartleb, R. D.

    2003-12-01

    The Puente Hills thrust fault (PHT) is a large blind thrust fault that extends east-west beneath the heart of the metropolitan Los Angeles region (Shaw and Shearer, 1999; Shaw et al., 2003). Christofferson (2002; in prep.) and Dolan et al. (2003) identified four buried fold scarps associated with large (Mw greater than or equal to 7), ancient earthquakes on the PHT beneath the City of Bellflower, in northern Orange County. One of the major outstanding questions regarding this research concerns the subsurface, three-dimensional geometry of these buried scarps. Specifically, we want to determine the extent to which the subsurface geometry of these scarps is controlled by tectonic versus fluvial processes. In order to begin addressing these questions, we drilled a north-south transect of hollow-stem, continuously cored boreholes across the buried fold scarps. This new borehole transect, which comprises six, 20-m-deep boreholes, was drilled parallel to, and ˜ 100 m west of, the original Carfax Avenue transect of Christofferson (2002) and Dolan et al. (2003). The overall pattern of progressive southward thickening of sedimentary units observed in the Carfax borehole transect extends westward to the new transect. Moreover, several key sedimentary contacts that are traceable laterally between the two transects occur at approximately the same depths at all locations along both transects. This three-dimensional data set thus defines several buried fold scarps that extend east-west beneath the study site. These observations confirm that the buried scarps are primarily tectonic, rather than fluvial features.

  1. Exploring the 3D geometry of the diffusion kurtosis tensor--impact on the development of robust tractography procedures and novel biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Neto Henriques, Rafael; Correia, Marta Morgado; Nunes, Rita Gouveia; Ferreira, Hugo Alexandre

    2015-05-01

    Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) is a diffusion-weighted technique which overcomes limitations of the commonly used diffusion tensor imaging approach. This technique models non-Gaussian behaviour of water diffusion by the diffusion kurtosis tensor (KT), which can be used to provide indices of tissue heterogeneity and a better characterisation of the spatial architecture of tissue microstructure. In this study, the geometry of the KT is elucidated using synthetic data generated from multi-compartmental models, where diffusion heterogeneity between intra- and extra-cellular media is taken into account, as well as the sensitivity of the results to each model parameter and to synthetic noise. Furthermore, based on the assumption that the maxima of the KT are distributed perpendicularly to the direction of well-aligned fibres, a novel algorithm for estimating fibre direction directly from the KT is proposed and compared to the fibre directions extracted from DKI-based orientation distribution function (ODF) estimates previously proposed in the literature. Synthetic data results showed that, for fibres crossing at high intersection angles, direction estimates extracted directly from the KT have smaller errors than the DKI-based ODF estimation approaches (DKI-ODF). Nevertheless, the proposed method showed smaller angular resolution and lower stability to changes of the simulation parameters. On real data, tractography performed on these KT fibre estimates suggests a higher sensitivity than the DKI-based ODF in resolving lateral corpus callosum fibres reaching the pre-central cortex when diffusion acquisition is performed with five b-values. Using faster acquisition schemes, KT-based tractography did not show improved performance over the DKI-ODF procedures. Nevertheless, it is shown that direct KT fibre estimates are more adequate for computing a generalised version of radial kurtosis maps. PMID:25676915

  2. Fault growth and interactions in a multiphase rift fault network: Horda Platform, Norwegian North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, Oliver B.; Bell, Rebecca E.; Jackson, Christopher A.-L.; Gawthorpe, Rob L.; Whipp, Paul S.

    2015-11-01

    Physical models predict that multiphase rifts that experience a change in extension direction between stretching phases will typically develop non-colinear normal fault sets. Furthermore, multiphase rifts will display a greater frequency and range of styles of fault interactions than single-phase rifts. Although these physical models have yielded useful information on the evolution of fault networks in map view, the true 3D geometry of the faults and associated interactions are poorly understood. Here, we use an integrated 3D seismic reflection and borehole dataset to examine a range of fault interactions that occur in a natural multiphase fault network in the northern Horda Platform, northern North Sea. In particular we aim to: i) determine the range of styles of fault interaction that occur between non-colinear faults; ii) examine the typical geometries and throw patterns associated with each of these different styles; and iii) highlight the differences between single-phase and multiphase rift fault networks. Our study focuses on a ca. 350 km2 region around the >60 km long, N-S-striking Tusse Fault, a normal fault system that was active in the Permian-Triassic and again in the Late Jurassic-to-Early Cretaceous. The Tusse Fault is one of a series of large (>1500 m throw) N-S-striking faults forming part of the northern Horda Platform fault network, which includes numerous smaller (2-10 km long), lower throw (<100 m), predominantly NW-SE-striking faults that were only active during the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous. We examine how the 2nd-stage NW-SE-striking faults grew, interacted and linked with the N-S-striking Tusse Fault, documenting a range of interaction styles including mechanical and kinematic isolation, abutment, retardation and reactivated relays. Our results demonstrate that: i) isolated, and abutting interactions are the most common fault interaction styles in the northern Horda Platform; ii) pre-existing faults can act as sites of nucleation for 2nd-stage faults or may form mechanical barriers to propagation; iii) the throw distribution on reactivated 1st-stage faults will be modified in a predictable manner if they are intersected or influenced by 2nd-stage faults; iv) sites of fault linkage and relay-breaching associated with the first phase of extension can act as preferential nucleation sites for 2nd-stage faults; and v) the development of fault intersections is a dynamic process, involving the gradual transition from one style to another.

  3. Fault geometry and cumulative offsets in the central Coast Ranges, California: Evidence for northward increasing slip along the San Gregorio-San Simeon-Hosgri fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, V.E.; Jachens, R.C.; Graymer, R.W.; Colgan, J.P.; Wentworth, C.M.; Stanley, R.G.

    2012-01-01

    Estimates of the dip, depth extent, and amount of cumulative displacement along the major faults in the central California Coast Ranges are controversial. We use detailed aeromagnetic data to estimate these parameters for the San Gregorio–San Simeon–Hosgri and other faults. The recently acquired aeromagnetic data provide an areally consistent data set that crosses the onshore-offshore transition without disruption, which is particularly important for the mostly offshore San Gregorio–San Simeon–Hosgri fault. Our modeling, constrained by exposed geology and in some cases, drill-hole and seismic-reflection data, indicates that the San Gregorio–San Simeon–Hosgri and Reliz-Rinconada faults dip steeply throughout the seismogenic crust. Deviations from steep dips may result from local fault interactions, transfer of slip between faults, or overprinting by transpression since the late Miocene. Given that such faults are consistent with predominantly strike-slip displacement, we correlate geophysical anomalies offset by these faults to estimate cumulative displacements. We find a northward increase in right-lateral displacement along the San Gregorio–San Simeon–Hosgri fault that is mimicked by Quaternary slip rates. Although overall slip rates have decreased over the lifetime of the fault, the pattern of slip has not changed. Northward increase in right-lateral displacement is balanced in part by slip added by faults, such as the Reliz-Rinconada, Oceanic–West Huasna, and (speculatively) Santa Ynez River faults to the east.

  4. Future earthquake source faults on deep sea-floor around the Boso triple plate junction revealed by tectonic geomorphology using 3D images produced from 150 meter grid DEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, H.; Nakata, T.; Watanabe, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Izumi, N.; Nishizawa, A.; Horiuchi, D.; Kido, Y. N.

    2013-12-01

    Boso triple junction, which is the only example of a triple trench junction on earth, is located off the southeast of Boso peninsula, where the Izu-Bonin trench meets with the Japan trench and the Sagami trench. Boso submarine canyon, which is extended to Katsuuma basin about 7000m deep, forms an incised meander along the north side of Sagami trough. Taito spur separate Katsuuma basin from Bando abyssal basin about 9000m deep, where Japan trench meet with Isu-Bonin trench. In this paper, we present detailed stereo-paired topographic images produced from 0.002 degree (about 150m) DBEM (Digital Bathymetry Model), which processed from the depth sounding data obtained by Japan Coast Guard and JAMSTEC around Boso triple junction. It enables us to observe submarine geomorphology easily and precisely. We identified submarine active faults and other tectonic features related to subduction by using the similar standard for air-photo interpretation of inland active faults. We made more precise submarine active tectonic geomorphological map around Boso triple junction than that by previous workers. Numerous distinct faults on the so-called outer rise associated with subduction of Pacific plate are regarded as normal faulting as widely accepted. While the normal faults on the outer rise are parallel to the trench in the southern part of the Japan trench and the northern part of the Izu-Bonin trench, these normal faults around the east of the triple junction with NNW-SSE extend slightly oblique to the trench. The western margin of Bando abyssal basin is bounded by the thrust faults, which form east-facing 200-500m-high convex scarps associated with raised basin floor to the west of the scarp. These faults also deform Mogi submarine fan surface and uplift to the west along the extension of the scarp. The antecedent valley is extended for about 10km across Taito spur that is an active anticlinal ridge about 1000m high. Katsuura basin is surrounded by terraced former basin floor that is tilted to the west, indicating up-growing of Taito spur. Northeastern part of Izu bar on Philippine Sea plate is characterized by rather smooth extensive convex slope between 1500m-7500m for over 200km long along the trench. On the lower part of the slope below 6000m, several gullies such as Mikura canyon and Kita-Hachijo canyon dissecting the slope forms rapids, probably due to continuous up-warping by subsurface thrusting dipping to the west under the slope. It is noteworthy that we can identify prominent active tectonic features on even very deep sea-floor along the plate boundaries, by using 3D images produced from 150 meter grid DEM.

  5. Crustal Structure and Moho Geometry around the Alto Tiberina Fault (Northern Apennines) from Receiver Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licciardi, A.; Chiaraluce, L.; Piana Agostinetti, N.; Amato, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Alto Tiberina Fault (ATF) is an unique example of active low angle normal fault (dip ≈ 15°), detected in the Northern Apennines from the interpretation of passive and active seismic data. This NW-SE striking structure has been mapped for a about 50 km along dip and is thought to have accumulated a total of 2 km of displacement in the last 2 Ma. In the last years, a dense, high resolution seismic network has been deployed in the area surrounding the ATF, with the aim of better understanding the physical mechanisms of earthquakes nucleation of such geological feature and assessing the potentially associated seismic hazard. In this context, a good knowledge of the elastic properties of rocks at depth is the starting points for building accurate and consistent physical models of ATF's style of deformation. We carried out a teleseismic receiver functions (RF) study on the 42 broadband seismic stations, using about 800 events from teleseismic distances, recorded from January 2010 to December 2011. We selected an average of about 70 high S/N ratio RFs per station, achieving a good azimuthal coverage for most of the stations. We separated the isotropic and the anisotropic component of the RF data-set through the harmonic decomposition. For each station, we performed a Monte Carlo inversion (using a reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm) of the isotropic component of the RF data-set, obtaining 1-D Vs profiles from the surface to 60km depth. This kind of inversion does not suffer of the problems related to the choice of a particular starting model, and has the advantage of inferring the degree of complexity (i.e. the number of layers) of the resulting model, directly from the data themselves. Preliminary results show an increasing level of structural complexity moving from west to east across the target area. A clear and shallow (~25 km) Moho is observed from the velocity profiles in the westernmost part of the region. Along the easternmost part, crustal velocity structures in correspondence of the highest peaks of the mountain chain reflects the continental subduction of the Adriatic lower crust under the Northern Apennines. In the central part of the target area, the presence of multiple interfaces and a very-low Vs in the subcrustal mantle make the crust-mantle transition more difficult to recognize. The final results will help in constraining crustal structures and rocks properties in the ATF area, providing a new piece of information in the more general comprehension of the physical processes acting in this unique natural laboratory.

  6. Quantitative Process of CAOB Orogeny: Insights into the Geometry and Kinematic Evolution of the Central Segment of Wu'erhe-Xiazijie Fault at the Northwestern Margin of Junggar Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Dengfa; Wu, Xiaozhi; ma, Delong

    2014-05-01

    How do the Central Asia Orogenic Belts (CAOB) accrete or propagate since the Carboniferous Period is a key issue to understand its orogenic style and evolution processes. To make use of the new acquired seismic data, 2-D and 3-D, drilled cores and logging data, and surface geology at the Wu'erhe-Xiazijie thrust zone (WXTZ) at the northwestern margin of Junggar Basin, the paper studies the geometry and kinematics of the central segment of WXTZ. At the end of Carboniferous, it formed a fault-bend fold in the Carboniferous with the thrust fault (F1) soled into the intra-Carboniferous detachment zone and stepped-up to the surface and subjected to erosion, and thus with the very lowest Permian Jiamuhe Formation (P1j) unconformablly overlain it. The slip and horizontal shortening of F1 are 2.69km and 2.66km respectively. The second phase of thrusting was in the depositional stage of Early Permian Fengcheng Formation (P1f). By utilizing the old lower flat (F1) and a new upper detachment (F2) in the top Carboniferous it formed a tectonic wedge with a back-thrust fault developed in the overlying strata. The slip and horizontal shortening of the wedge are 9.93km and 9.43km respectively. Then it subsided and filled with thick-sediments till the earliest Triassic Period. The third phase of thrusting formed a meso-scale fault-bend fold in the Permian with the F2 as the lower detachment and the upper flat (F3) located at the base of Fengcheng Formation (P1f). The slip and horizontal shortening of the fault (F2 or F3) are the same as 4.48km. The fourth phase of thrusting took place at the latest Triassic, the fault (F4) cutoff F2 downwards and propagated upward into the upper Permian and formed a fault-propagation fold in the Triassic strata, with the fault-slip and horizontal shortening of 4.67km and 4.07km respectively. The fault-propagation fold is so-called Fengcheng anticline and a giant oil field nowadays. Besides thrusting of F4, the thrust faults, Wulanlinge( F5) and Da'erbut (F6) thrust also into the basin in a backward sequence at this time of period. Since Jurassic, it evolved into a quiescent period with the Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Paleogene strata upwardly onlapping the thrust zone. However, the Da'erbut Fault (F6) reactivated during the Late Neogene to the Quaternary. It showed a composite character of sinistral strike-slipping and reverse-faulting, which modified the structure of WXTZ. WXTZ shows episodic thrusting during Carboniferous to Triassic and exhibits a breaking-backward style with the fault-slip and horizontal shortening more than 21.74km and 20.64km respectively.

  7. Reservoir geology using 3D modelling tools

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrule, O.; Samson, P.; Segonds, D.

    1996-12-31

    The last decade has seen tremendous developments in the area of quantitative geological modelling. These developments have a significant impact on the current practice of constructing reservoir models. A structural model can first be constructed on the basis of depth-converted structural interpretations produced on a seismic interpretation workstation. Surfaces and faults can be represented as geological objects, and interactively modified. Once the tectonic framework has been obtained, intermediate stratigraphic surfaces can be constructed between the main structural surfaces. Within each layer, reservoir attributes can be represented using various techniques. Examples show how the distribution of different facies (i.e. from fine to coarse grain) can be represented, or how various depositional units (for instance channels, crevasses and lobes in a turbidite setting) can be modelled as geological {open_quotes}objects{close_quotes} with complex geometries. Elf Aquitaine, in close co-operation with the GOCAD project in Nancy (France) is investigating how geological models can be made more realistic by developing interactive functionalities. Examples show that, contrary to standard deterministic or geostatistical modelling techniques (which tend to be difficult to control) the use of new 3D tools allows the geologist to interactively modify geological surfaces (including faults) or volumetric properties. Thus, the sensitivity of various economic parameters (oil in place, connected volumes, reserves) to major geological uncertainties can be evaluated. It is argued that future breakthroughs in geological modelling techniques are likely to happen in the development of interactive approaches rather than in the research of new mathematical algorithms.

  8. Reservoir geology using 3D modelling tools

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrule, O. ); Samson, P. ); Segonds, D. )

    1996-01-01

    The last decade has seen tremendous developments in the area of quantitative geological modelling. These developments have a significant impact on the current practice of constructing reservoir models. A structural model can first be constructed on the basis of depth-converted structural interpretations produced on a seismic interpretation workstation. Surfaces and faults can be represented as geological objects, and interactively modified. Once the tectonic framework has been obtained, intermediate stratigraphic surfaces can be constructed between the main structural surfaces. Within each layer, reservoir attributes can be represented using various techniques. Examples show how the distribution of different facies (i.e. from fine to coarse grain) can be represented, or how various depositional units (for instance channels, crevasses and lobes in a turbidite setting) can be modelled as geological [open quotes]objects[close quotes] with complex geometries. Elf Aquitaine, in close co-operation with the GOCAD project in Nancy (France) is investigating how geological models can be made more realistic by developing interactive functionalities. Examples show that, contrary to standard deterministic or geostatistical modelling techniques (which tend to be difficult to control) the use of new 3D tools allows the geologist to interactively modify geological surfaces (including faults) or volumetric properties. Thus, the sensitivity of various economic parameters (oil in place, connected volumes, reserves) to major geological uncertainties can be evaluated. It is argued that future breakthroughs in geological modelling techniques are likely to happen in the development of interactive approaches rather than in the research of new mathematical algorithms.

  9. Morphotectonic, Quaternary and Structural Geology Analyses of the Shallow Geometry of the Mw 6.1, 2009 L'Aquila Earthquake Fault (central Italy): A Missed Opportunity for Surface Faulting Prevention.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucci, S.; Villani, F.; Civico, R.; Pantosti, D.; Smedile, A.; De Martini, P. M.; Di Naccio, D.; Gueli, A.

    2014-12-01

    The surface-rupturing 2009 L'Aquila earthquake evidenced the limited knowledge of active faults in the Middle Aterno Valley area. Gaps in detailed mapping of Quaternary deposits and tectonic landforms did not trigger researches on active faults, but after the tragic event. We present a morphotectonic study of geometry and evolution of the activated fault system (Paganica-San Demetrio, PSDFS). The LIDAR analysis and field survey yield to a new geological and structural map of the area with an unprecedented detail for the Quaternary deposits. It shows an alluvial depositional system prograding and migrating due to fault system evolution. The normal faults offset both the Quaternary deposits and the bedrock. The structural analysis allows us to recognize two fault systems: (A) NNE- and WNW-trending conjugate extensional system overprinting a strike-slip kinematics and (B) dip-slip NW-trending system. Crosscut relationship suggests that the activity of system B prevails, since Early Pleistocene, on system A, which earlier may have controlled a differently shaped basin. System B is the main responsible for the present-day compound outline of the Middle Aterno Valley, while system A major splays now act as segment boundaries. The long-term expression of B results in prominent fault scarps offsetting Quaternary deposits, dissecting erosional and depositional flat landforms. We retrieved detailed morphologic throws along fault scarps and we dated landforms by 14C, OSL (Optically Stimulated Luminescence), CRN (Cosmogenic Radionuclide) and tephra chronology. We show the persistent role of extensional faulting in dominating Quaternary landform evolution and we estimate slip-rate of the PSDFS at different time-scales. The results support repeated activity of PSDFS for ~20 km total length, thus implying M6.6 maximum expected earthquake. Such an approach should have been applied beforehand for the actual hazard estimation, to trigger, early enough, the adoption of precautionary measures against surface faulting events.

  10. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  11. Transfer zones in listric normal fault systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Shamik

    Listric normal faults are common in passive margin settings where sedimentary units are detached above weaker lithological units, such as evaporites or are driven by basal structural and stratigraphic discontinuities. The geometries and styles of faulting vary with the types of detachment and form landward and basinward dipping fault systems. Complex transfer zones therefore develop along the terminations of adjacent faults where deformation is accommodated by secondary faults, often below seismic resolution. The rollover geometry and secondary faults within the hanging wall of the major faults also vary with the styles of faulting and contribute to the complexity of the transfer zones. This study tries to understand the controlling factors for the formation of the different styles of listric normal faults and the different transfer zones formed within them, by using analog clay experimental models. Detailed analyses with respect to fault orientation, density and connectivity have been performed on the experiments in order to gather insights on the structural controls and the resulting geometries. A new high resolution 3D laser scanning technology has been introduced to scan the surfaces of the clay experiments for accurate measurements and 3D visualizations. Numerous examples from the Gulf of Mexico have been included to demonstrate and geometrically compare the observations in experiments and real structures. A salt cored convergent transfer zone from the South Timbalier Block 54, offshore Louisiana has been analyzed in detail to understand the evolutionary history of the region, which helps in deciphering the kinematic growth of similar structures in the Gulf of Mexico. The dissertation is divided into three chapters, written in a journal article format, that deal with three different aspects in understanding the listric normal fault systems and the transfer zones so formed. The first chapter involves clay experimental models to understand the fault patterns in divergent and convergent transfer zones. Flat base plate setups have been used to build different configurations that would lead to approaching, normal offset and overlapping faults geometries. The results have been analyzed with respect to fault orientation, density, connectivity and 3D geometry from photographs taken from the three free surfaces and laser scans of the top surface of the clay cake respectively. The second chapter looks into the 3D structural analysis of the South Timbalier Block 54, offshore Louisiana in the Gulf of Mexico with the help of a 3D seismic dataset and associated well tops and velocity data donated by ExxonMobil Corporation. This study involves seismic interpretation techniques, velocity modeling, cross section restoration of a series of seismic lines and 3D subsurface modeling using depth converted seismic horizons, well tops and balanced cross sections. The third chapter deals with the clay experiments of listric normal fault systems and tries to understand the controls on geometries of fault systems with and without a ductile substrate. Sloping flat base plate setups have been used and silicone fluid underlain below the clay cake has been considered as an analog for salt. The experimental configurations have been varied with respect to three factors viz. the direction of slope with respect to extension, the termination of silicone polymer with respect to the basal discontinuities and overlap of the base plates. The analyses for the experiments have again been performed from photographs and 3D laser scans of the clay surface.

  12. Integrated analysis of seismological, gravimetric and structural data for identification of active faults geometries in Abruzzo and Molise areas (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudiosi, Germana; Nappi, Rosa; Alessio, Giuliana; Porfido, Sabina; Cella, Federico; Fedi, Maurizio; Florio, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    This paper deals with an interdisciplinary research that has been carried out for more constraining the active faults and their geometry of Abruzzo - Molise areas (Central-Southern Apennines), two of the most active areas from a geodynamic point of view of the Italian Apennines, characterized by the occurrence of intense and widely spread seismic activity. An integrated analysis of structural, seismic and gravimetric (Gaudiosi et al., 2012) data of the area has been carried out through the Geographic Information System (GIS) which has provided the capability for storing and managing large amount of spatial data from different sources. In particular, the analysis has consisted of these main steps: (a) collection and acquisition of aerial photos, numeric cartography, Digital Terrain Model (DTM) data, geophysical data; (b) generation of the vector cartographic database and alpha-numerical data; c) image processing and features classification; d) cartographic restitution and multi-layers representation. In detail three thematic data sets have been generated "fault", "earthquake" and "gravimetric" data sets. The fault Dataset has been compiled by examining and merging the available structural maps, and many recent geological and geophysical papers of literature. The earthquake Dataset has been implemented collecting seismic data by the available historical and instrumental Catalogues and new precise earthquake locations for better constraining existence and activity of some outcropping and buried tectonic structures. Seismic data have been standardized in the same format into the GIS and merged in a final catalogue. For the gravimetric Dataset, the Multiscale Derivative Analysis (MDA) of the gravity field of the area has been performed, relying on the good resolution properties of the Enhanced Horizontal Derivative (EHD) (Fedi et al., 2005). MDA of gravity data has allowed localization of several trends identifying anomaly sources whose presence was not previously detected. The main results of our integrated analysis show a strong correlation among faults, hypocentral location of earthquakes and MDA lineaments from gravity data. Furthermore 2D seismic hypocentral locations together with high-resolution analysis of gravity anomalies have been correlated to estimate the fault systems parameters (strike, dip direction and dip angle) of some structures of the areas, through the application of the DEXP method (Fedi M. and M. Pilkington, 2012). References Fedi M., Cella F., Florio G., Rapolla A.; 2005: Multiscale Derivative Analysis of the gravity and magnetic fields of the Southern Apennines (Italy). In: Finetti I.R. (ed), CROP PROJECT: Deep Seismic Exploration of the Central Mediterranean and Italy, pp. 281-318. Fedi M., Pilkington M.; 2012: Understanding imaging methods for potential field data. Geophysics, 77: G13-G24. Gaudiosi G., Alessio G., Cella F., Fedi M., Florio G., Nappi, R.; 2012: Multiparametric data analysis for seismic sources identification in the Campanian area: merging of seismological, structural and gravimetric data. BGTA,. Vol. 53, n. 3, pp. 283-298.

  13. Toward DRM for 3D geometry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gschwandtner, Michael; Uhl, Andreas

    2008-02-01

    Computationally efficient encryption techniques for polygonal mesh data are proposed which exploit the prioritization of data in progressive meshes. Significant reduction of computational demand can be achieved as compared to full encryption, but it turns out that different techniques are required to support both privacy-focussed applications and try-and-buy scenarios.

  14. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  15. Geometry, slip distribution, and kinematics of surface rupture on the Sakarya fault segment during the 17 August 1999 İzmit, Turkey, earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langridge, R.M.; Stenner, H.D.; Fumal, T.E.; Christofferson, S.A.; Rockwell, T.K.; Hartleb, R.D.; Bachhuber, J.; Barka, A.A.

    2002-01-01

    The Mw 7.4 17 August 1999 İzmit earthquake ruptured five major fault segments of the dextral North Anatolian Fault Zone. The 26-km-long, N86°W-trending Sakarya fault segment (SFS) extends from the Sapanca releasing step-over in the west to near the town of Akyazi in the east. The SFS emerges from Lake Sapanca as two distinct fault traces that rejoin to traverse the Adapazari Plain to Akyazi. Offsets were measured across 88 cultural and natural features that cross the fault, such as roads, cornfield rows, rows of trees, walls, rails, field margins, ditches, vehicle ruts, a dike, and ground cracks. The maximum displacement observed for the İzmit earthquake (∼5.1 m) was encountered on this segment. Dextral displacement for the SFS rises from less than 1 m at Lake Sapanca to greater than 5 m near Arifiye, only 3 km away. Average slip decreases uniformly to the east from Arifiye until the fault steps left from Sagir to Kazanci to the N75°W, 6-km-long Akyazi strand, where slip drops to less than 1 m. The Akyazi strand passes eastward into the Akyazi Bend, which consists of a high-angle bend (18°-29°) between the Sakarya and Karadere fault segments, a 6-km gap in surface rupture, and high aftershock energy release. Complex structural geometries exist between the İzmit, Düzce, and 1967 Mudurnu fault segments that have arrested surface ruptures on timescales ranging from 30 sec to 88 days to 32 yr. The largest of these step-overs may have acted as a rupture segmentation boundary in previous earthquake cycles.

  16. Facies composition and scaling relationships of extensional faults in carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastesen, Eivind; Braathen, Alvar

    2010-05-01

    Fault seal evaluations in carbonates are challenged by limited input data. Our analysis of 100 extensional faults in shallow-buried layered carbonate rocks aims to improve forecasting of fault core characteristics in these rocks. We have analyzed the spatial distribution of fault core elements described using a Fault Facies classification scheme; a method specifically developed for 3D fault description and quantification, with application in reservoir modelling. In modelling, the fault envelope is populated with fault facies originating from the host rock, the properties of which (e.g. dimensions, geometry, internal structure, petrophysical properties, and spatial distribution of structural elements) are defined by outcrop data. Empirical data sets were collected from outcrops of extensional faults in fine grained, micro-porosity carbonates from western Sinai (Egypt), Central Spitsbergen (Arctic Norway), and Central Oman (Adam Foothills) which all have experienced maximum burial of 2-3 kilometres and exhibit displacements ranging from 4 centimetres to 400 meters. Key observations include fault core thickness, intrinsic composition and geometry. The studied fault cores display several distinct fault facies and facies associations. Based on geometry, fault cores can be categorised as distributed or localized. Each can be further sub-divided according to the presence of shale smear, carbonate fault rocks and cement/secondary calcite layers. Fault core thickness in carbonate rocks may be controlled by several mechanisms: (1) Mechanical breakdown: Irregularities such as breached relays and asperities are broken down by progressive faulting and fracturing to eventually form a thicker fault rock layer. (2) Layer shearing: Accumulations of shale smear along the fault core. (3) Diagenesis; pressure solution, karstification and precipitation of secondary calcite in the core. Observed fault core thicknesses scatter over three orders of magnitude, with a D/T range of 1:1 to 1:1000. In general the complete dataset shows a positive correlation between thickness (T) of fault cores and the displacement (D) on faults. For increasing displacement relationships, the D/T relationship is not constant. The D/T relationship is generally higher for small faults than for larger faults, which implies that comparisons between small and large fault with respect to this parameter should be handled with care. Fault envelope composition, as reflected by the relative proportions of different fault facies in the core, varies with displacement. In small scale faults (0-1 m displacement), secondary calcite layers and fault gouge dominate, whereas shale dominated fault rocks (shale smear) and carbonate dominated fault rocks (breccias) constitute minor components. Shale dominated fault rocks are restricted to shale-rich protoliths, and fault breccias to break-down of lenses formed near fault jogs. In medium scale faults (1-10m), fault rocks form the dominating facies, whereas the amount of secondary calcite layers decreases due to transformation into breccias. Further, in shale rich carbonates the fault cores consist of composite facies associations. In major faults (10-300 m displacement) fault rock layers and lenses dominate the fault cores. A common observation in large scale faults is a distinct layering of different fault rocks, shale smearing of major shale layers and massive secondary calcite layers along slip surfaces. Fault core heterogeneity in carbonates is ascribed to the distribution of fault facies, such as fault rocks, secondary calcite layers and shale smear. In a broader sense, facies distribution and thickness are controlled by displacement, protolith and tectonic environment. The heterogeneous properties and the varied distribution observed in this study may be valuable in forecasting fault seal characteristics of carbonate reservoirs.

  17. Intraoral 3D scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühmstedt, Peter; Bräuer-Burchardt, Christian; Munkelt, Christoph; Heinze, Matthias; Palme, Martin; Schmidt, Ingo; Hintersehr, Josef; Notni, Gunther

    2007-09-01

    Here a new set-up of a 3D-scanning system for CAD/CAM in dental industry is proposed. The system is designed for direct scanning of the dental preparations within the mouth. The measuring process is based on phase correlation technique in combination with fast fringe projection in a stereo arrangement. The novelty in the approach is characterized by the following features: A phase correlation between the phase values of the images of two cameras is used for the co-ordinate calculation. This works contrary to the usage of only phase values (phasogrammetry) or classical triangulation (phase values and camera image co-ordinate values) for the determination of the co-ordinates. The main advantage of the method is that the absolute value of the phase at each point does not directly determine the coordinate. Thus errors in the determination of the co-ordinates are prevented. Furthermore, using the epipolar geometry of the stereo-like arrangement the phase unwrapping problem of fringe analysis can be solved. The endoscope like measurement system contains one projection and two camera channels for illumination and observation of the object, respectively. The new system has a measurement field of nearly 25mm × 15mm. The user can measure two or three teeth at one time. So the system can by used for scanning of single tooth up to bridges preparations. In the paper the first realization of the intraoral scanner is described.

  18. Co-seismic fault geometry and slip distribution of the 26 December 2004, giant Sumatra-Andaman earthquake constrained by GPS, coral reef, and remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Yongge; Shen, Zheng-kang; Wang, Min; Zeng, Yuehua; Huang, Jichao; Li, Xiang; Cui, Huawei; Gao, Xiwei

    2015-06-01

    We analyze co-seismic displacement field of the 26 December 2004, giant Sumatra-Andaman earthquake derived from Global Position System observations, geological vertical measurement of coral head, and pivot line observed through remote sensing. Using the co-seismic displacement field and AK135 spherical layered Earth model, we invert co-seismic slip distribution along the seismic fault. We also search the best fault geometry model to fit the observed data. Assuming that the dip angle linearly increases in downward direction, the postfit residual variation of the inversed geometry model with dip angles linearly changing along fault strike are plotted. The geometry model with local minimum misfits is the one with dip angle linearly increasing along strike from 4.3o in top southernmost patch to 4.5o in top northernmost path and dip angle linearly increased. By using the fault shape and geodetic co-seismic data, we estimate the slip distribution on the curved fault. Our result shows that the earthquake ruptured ~200-km width down to a depth of about 60 km. 0.5-12.5 m of thrust slip is resolved with the largest slip centered around the central section of the rupture zone 7ºN-10ºN in latitude. The estimated seismic moment is 8.2 × 1022 N m, which is larger than estimation from the centroid moment magnitude (4.0 × 1022 N m), and smaller than estimation from normal-mode oscillation data modeling (1.0 × 1023 N m).

  19. Testing long-period ground-motion simulations of scenario earthquakes using the Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah mainshock: Evaluation of finite-fault rupture characterization and 3D seismic velocity models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graves, Robert W.; Aagaard, Brad T.

    2011-01-01

    Using a suite of five hypothetical finite-fault rupture models, we test the ability of long-period (T>2.0 s) ground-motion simulations of scenario earthquakes to produce waveforms throughout southern California consistent with those recorded during the 4 April 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake. The hypothetical ruptures are generated using the methodology proposed by Graves and Pitarka (2010) and require, as inputs, only a general description of the fault location and geometry, event magnitude, and hypocenter, as would be done for a scenario event. For each rupture model, two Southern California Earthquake Center three-dimensional community seismic velocity models (CVM-4m and CVM-H62) are used, resulting in a total of 10 ground-motion simulations, which we compare with recorded ground motions. While the details of the motions vary across the simulations, the median levels match the observed peak ground velocities reasonably well, with the standard deviation of the residuals generally within 50% of the median. Simulations with the CVM-4m model yield somewhat lower variance than those with the CVM-H62 model. Both models tend to overpredict motions in the San Diego region and underpredict motions in the Mojave desert. Within the greater Los Angeles basin, the CVM-4m model generally matches the level of observed motions, whereas the CVM-H62 model tends to overpredict the motions, particularly in the southern portion of the basin. The variance in the peak velocity residuals is lowest for a rupture that has significant shallow slip (<5 km depth), whereas the variance in the residuals is greatest for ruptures with large asperities below 10 km depth. Overall, these results are encouraging and provide confidence in the predictive capabilities of the simulation methodology, while also suggesting some regions in which the seismic velocity models may need improvement.

  20. Implications for Fault and Basin Geometry in the Central California Coast Ranges from Preliminary Gravity and Magnetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langenheim, V. E.; Jachens, R. C.; Graymer, R. W.; Wentworth, C. M.

    2008-12-01

    Preliminary aeromagnetic and newly processed gravity data help define block-bounding faults and deep sedimentary basins in the central California Coast Ranges, ranging from the Hosgri fault east to the San Andreas fault and from Monterey Bay south to Pt. Conception. Interpretation of these data results in an improved framework for seismic hazard and groundwater studies. Aeromagnetic data include a new survey with a flight-line spacing of 800 m at a nominal 300 m above ground and covering 15,000 km2. More than 11,500 gravity measurements, reprocessed with terrain corrections calculated from 30-m DEMs, form a roughly 2-km grid over most of the study area. Combined potential-field data and existing geologic mapping, delineate major fault-bounded blocks in the central California Coast Ranges. Main block-bounding faults from west to east include the San Gregorio- Hosgri, San Luis-Willmar-Santa Maria River-Little Pine, Oceanic-West Huasna, Nacimiento, Rinconada-South Cuyama, San Juan-Chimineas-Morales, and San Andreas faults. Most of these faults have evidence of Quaternary activity. Gravity gradients indicate that the reach of the San Andreas fault bounding the Gabilan Range and the northern extension of the Rinconada fault bounding the Santa Lucia Range dip steeply southwestward and have a reverse component of slip. Magnetic and microseismicity data suggest that the northern reach of the Hosgri fault dips eastward. The potential-field data also delineate several deep sedimentary basins, such as the 3-4 km deep Cuyama basin, the Santa Maria basin, and several basins along and possibly offset by the Rinconada fault. Gravity data show that the main west-northwest-striking faults bounding the Cuyama basin dip away from the basin, indicating compression adjacent to the big bend in the San Andreas fault. Prominent gravity and magnetic highs northeast of the San Andreas fault immediately east of Cuyama Valley suggest that there the San Andreas fault dips southwest. Such dip information is important for estimating shaking potential of scenario earthquakes and for calculating geodetic deformation whereas basin shapes and fault locations are critical components for groundwater flow modeling.

  1. Mini 3D for shallow gas reconnaissance

    SciTech Connect

    Vallieres, T. des; Enns, D.; Kuehn, H.; Parron, D.; Lafet, Y.; Van Hulle, D.

    1996-12-31

    The Mini 3D project was undertaken by TOTAL and ELF with the support of CEPM (Comite d`Etudes Petrolieres et Marines) to define an economical method of obtaining 3D seismic HR data for shallow gas assessment. An experimental 3D survey was carried out with classical site survey techniques in the North Sea. From these data 19 simulations, were produced to compare different acquisition geometries ranging from dual, 600 m long cables to a single receiver. Results show that short offset, low fold and very simple streamer positioning are sufficient to give a reliable 3D image of gas charged bodies. The 3D data allow a much more accurate risk delineation than 2D HR data. Moreover on financial grounds Mini-3D is comparable in cost to a classical HR 2D survey. In view of these results, such HR 3D should now be the standard for shallow gas surveying.

  2. 3-D seismology in the Arabian Gulf

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Husseini, M.; Chimblo, R.

    1995-08-01

    Since 1977 when Aramco and GSI (Geophysical Services International) pioneered the first 3-D seismic survey in the Arabian Gulf, under the guidance of Aramco`s Chief Geophysicist John Hoke, 3-D seismology has been effectively used to map many complex subsurface geological phenomena. By the mid-1990s extensive 3-D surveys were acquired in Abu Dhabi, Oman, Qatar and Saudi Arabia. Also in the mid-1990`s Bahrain, Kuwait and Dubai were preparing to record surveys over their fields. On the structural side 3-D has refined seismic maps, focused faults and fractures systems, as well as outlined the distribution of facies, porosity and fluid saturation. In field development, 3D has not only reduced drilling costs significantly, but has also improved the understanding of fluid behavior in the reservoir. In Oman, Petroleum Development Oman (PDO) has now acquired the first Gulf 4-D seismic survey (time-lapse 3D survey) over the Yibal Field. The 4-D survey will allow PDO to directly monitor water encroachment in the highly-faulted Cretaceous Shu`aiba reservoir. In exploration, 3-D seismology has resolved complex prospects with structural and stratigraphic complications and reduced the risk in the selection of drilling locations. The many case studies from Saudi Arabia, Oman, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates, which are reviewed in this paper, attest to the effectiveness of 3D seismology in exploration and producing, in clastics and carbonates reservoirs, and in the Mesozoic and Paleozoic.

  3. Normal Fault Basin Geometries From Gravity Analyses in the La Paz - Los Cabos Region, Baja California Sur, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, M. M.; Coyan, J. A.; Arrowsmith, J. R.; Umhoefer, P. J.; Martinez-Gutierrez, G.

    2008-12-01

    The southern cape region of the Baja California peninsula is ruptured by an array of roughly north-striking, left-stepping active normal faults, which accommodate regional transtension. Dominant faults within this system include the Carrizal, San Juan de los Planes (SJP) (and offshore Espiritu Santo fault), La Gata, and San Jose del Cabo (SJC) faults. We conducted gravity surveys across the basins bounded by these faults to gain insight into fault slip rates and basin evolution to better understand the role of upper-crustal processes during development of an obliquely rifted plate margin. The geodetic location of each gravity observation station was measured to cm-scale accuracy with real-time kinematic GPS and the relative gravity was measured with a LaCoste and Romberg Model G gravity meter to an accuracy of 0.01 mgal. Gravity data were modeled as a 2D two-layer model with a bedrock density of 2.67 g/cm3 and a basin fill density of 2.1 or 2.2 g/cm3. The hanging wall of the east-dipping Carrizal fault hosts the La Paz basin. In the subsurface, this basin is a half-graben that is manifest as two smaller basins (few hundred meters deep) separated by a bedrock high, which likely reflects the two main east-dipping splays (Carrizal and Centenario faults). The SJP basin is a graben bound by the SJP fault on the west and the La Gata fault on the east and has a modeled maximum depth of approximately 1.5 km. This basin is marked by a series of relict normal faults dipping toward the basin center. The maximum depth to bedrock is just northwest of center, asymmetric toward the SJP fault, indicating that slip may be greater along the SJP than along the La Gata fault. It might also mark the possible location of basin inception, indicating that as the basin evolved, faulting moved outward to the presently active SJP and La Gata Faults. The SJC basin has a maximum depth of approximately 2.5 km. The favored gravity model depicts the SJC basin as resulting from slip along a series of normal faults predominantly dipping toward the basin center (east). Bedrock topography within the basin could be attributed to paleotopography; however, with up to 1 km of relief, the interpreted faults seem more likely. The SJC basin has the greatest depth to bedrock, signifying that it accommodates a greater slip rate than the other faults within this system or that it accommodates equal slip but was the first to initiate. The adjacent topography is also the highest, indicating that the modern deformation has been stationary spatially for some time in contrast to the SJP fault, which has low footwall topography. It is likely that the SJP basin is a graben that serves to transfer strain between the larger Carrizal and Espiritu Santo faults and the SJC fault. An offshore CHIRP survey completed in late August, 2008 will provide further insight into the extent and interactions of faults within this system.

  4. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  5. Geometry and Pore Pressure Shape the Pattern of the Tectonic Tremors Activity on the Deep San Andreas Fault with Periodic, Period-Multiplying Recurrence Intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mele Veedu, D.; Barbot, S.

    2014-12-01

    A never before recorded pattern of periodic, chaotic, and doubled, earthquake recurrence intervals was detected in the sequence of deep tectonic tremors of the Parkfield segment of the San Andreas Fault (Shelly, 2010). These observations may be the most puzzling seismological observations of the last decade: The pattern was regularly oscillating with a period doubling of 3 and 6 days from mid-2003 until it was disrupted by the 2004 Mw 6.0 Parkfield earthquake. But by the end of 2007, the previous pattern resumed. Here, we assume that the complex dynamics of the tremors is caused by slip on a single asperity on the San Andreas Fault with homogeneous friction properties. We developed a three-dimensional model based on the rate-and-state friction law with a single patch and simulated fault slip during all stages of the earthquake cycle using the boundary integral method of Lapusta & Liu (2009). We find that homogeneous penny-shaped asperities cannot induce the observed period doubling, and that the geometry itself of the velocity-weakening asperity is critical in enabling the characteristic behavior of the Parkfield tremors. We also find that the system is sensitive to perturbations in pore pressure, such that the ones induced by the 2004 Parkfield earthquake are sufficient to dramatically alter the dynamics of the tremors for two years, as observed by Shelly (2010). An important finding is that tremor magnitude is amplified more by macroscopic slip duration on the source asperity than by slip amplitude, indicative of a time-dependent process for the breakage of micro-asperities that leads to seismic emissions. Our simulated event duration is in the range of 25 to 150 seconds, closely comparable to the event duration of a typical Parkfield tectonic tremor. Our simulations reproduce the unique observations of the Parkfield tremor activity. This study vividly illustrates the critical role of geometry in shaping the dynamics of fault slip evolution on a seismogenic fault.

  6. 3D geological modeling of the Trujillo block: Insights for crustal escape models of the Venezuelan Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhont, Damien; Monod, Bernard; Hervouët, Yves; Backé, Guillaume; Klarica, Stéphanie; Choy, José E.

    2012-11-01

    The Venezuelan Andes form a N50°E-trending mountain belt extending from the Colombian border in the SW to the Caribbean Sea in the NE. The belt began to rise since the Middle Miocene in response to the E-W collision between the Maracaibo block to the NW and the Guyana shield belonging to South America to the SE. This oblique collision led to strain partitioning with (1) shortening along opposite-vergent thrust fronts, (2) right-lateral slip along the Boconó fault crossing the belt more or less along-strike and (3) crustal escape of the Trujillo block moving towards the NE in between the Boconó fault and the N-S-striking left-lateral Valera fault. The geology of the Venezuelan Andes is well described at the surface, but its structure at depth remains hypothetic. We investigated the deep geometry of the Mérida Andes by a 3D model newly developed from geological and geophysical data. The 3D fault model is restricted to the crust and is mainly based on the surface data of outcropping fault traces. The final model reveals the orogenic float concept where the mountain belt is decoupled from its underlying lithosphere over a horizontal décollement located either at the upper/lower crust boundary. The reconstruction of the Boconó and Valera faults results in a 3D shape of the Trujillo block, which floats over a mid-crustal décollement horizon emerging at the Boconó-Valera triple junction. Motion of the Trujillo block is accompanied by a widespread extension towards the NE accommodated by normal faults with listric geometries such as for the Motatan, Momboy and Tuñame faults. Extension is explained by the gravitational spreading of the upper crust during the escape process.

  7. DIAN3D

    SciTech Connect

    Burge, S.W.; Oberjohn, W.J. )

    1993-09-30

    DIAN3D describes the momentum, energy and mass transfer occurring in duct injection and spray drying processes. DIAN3D calculates the effect of atomizer spacing and wall clearance on droplet evaporation and SO2 absorption. DIAN3D has the ability to model: Multi-dimensional (2D or 3d) gas flow, Cartesian or cylindrical polar coordinate systems, Laminar or turbulent flow, Droplet dynamics using a Lagrangian approach, Heat and mass transfer between the gas phase and slurry, Droplets or inert particles, SO2 removal.

  8. Geometry of the Nojima fault at Nojima-Hirabayashi, Japan - I. A simple damage structure inferred from borehole core permeability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockner, D.A.; Tanaka, H.; Ito, H.; Ikeda, R.; Omura, K.; Naka, H.

    2009-01-01

    The 1995 Kobe (Hyogo-ken Nanbu) earthquake, M = 7.2, ruptured the Nojima fault in southwest Japan. We have studied core samples taken from two scientific drillholes that crossed the fault zone SW of the epicentral region on Awaji Island. The shallower hole, drilled by the Geological Survey of Japan (GSJ), was started 75 m to the SE of the surface trace of the Nojima fault and crossed the fault at a depth of 624 m. A deeper hole, drilled by the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED) was started 302 m to the SE of the fault and crossed fault strands below a depth of 1140 m. We have measured strength and matrix permeability of core samples taken from these two drillholes. We find a strong correlation between permeability and proximity to the fault zone shear axes. The half-width of the high permeability zone (approximately 15 to 25 m) is in good agreement with the fault zone width inferred from trapped seismic wave analysis and other evidence. The fault zone core or shear axis contains clays with permeabilities of approximately 0.1 to 1 microdarcy at 50 MPa effective confining pressure (10 to 30 microdarcy at in situ pressures). Within a few meters of the fault zone core, the rock is highly fractured but has sustained little net shear. Matrix permeability of this zone is approximately 30 to 60 microdarcy at 50 MPa effective confining pressure (300 to 1000 microdarcy at in situ pressures). Outside this damage zone, matrix permeability drops below 0.01 microdarcy. The clay-rich core material has the lowest strength with a coefficient of friction of approximately 0.55. Shear strength increases with distance from the shear axis. These permeability and strength observations reveal a simple fault zone structure with a relatively weak fine-grained core surrounded by a damage zone of fractured rock. In this case, the damage zone will act as a high-permeability conduit for vertical and horizontal flow in the plane of the fault. The fine-grained core region, however, will impede fluid flow across the fault. ?? Birkh??user Verlag, Basel 2009.

  9. Constraining the slip distribution and fault geometry of the Mw 7.9, 3 November 2002, Denali fault earthquake with Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar and Global Positioning System data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Tim J.; Lu, Zhiming; Wicks, C.

    2004-01-01

    The Mw 7.9, Denali fault earthquake (DFE) is the largest continental strike-slip earthquake to occur since the development of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR). We use five interferograms, constructed using radar images from the Canadian Radarsat-1 satellite, to map the surface deformation at the western end of the fault rupture. Additional geodetic data are provided by displacements observed at 40 campaign and continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) sites. We use the data to determine the geometry of the Susitna Glacier fault, thrusting on which initiated the DFE, and to determine a slip model for the entire event that is consistent with both the InSAR and GPS data. We find there was an average of 7.3 ± 0.4 m slip on the Susitna Glacier fault, between 1 and 9.5 km depth on a 29 km long fault that dips north at 41 ± 0.7° and has a surface projection close to the mapped rupture. On the Denali fault, a simple model with large slip patches finds a maximum of 8.7 ± 0.7 m of slip between the surface and 14.3 ± 0.2 km depth. A more complex distributed slip model finds a peak of 12.5 ± 0.8 m in the upper 4 km, significantly higher than the observed surface slip. We estimate a geodetic moment of 670 ± 10 × 1018 N m (Mw 7.9), consistent with seismic estimates. Lack of preseismic data resulted in an absence of InSAR coverage for the eastern half of the DFE rupture. A dedicated geodetic InSAR mission could obviate coverage problems in the future.

  10. Low-angle extensional faulting, reactivated mylonites, and seismic reflection geometry of the Newark basin margin in eastern Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Ratcliffe, N.M.; Burton, W.C.; D'Angelo, R.M.; Costain, J.K.

    1986-09-01

    Low-angle 25/sup 0/ to 35/sup 0/ dips have been determined for the border fault of the Newark basin near Riegelsville, Pennsylvania, on the basis of a Vibroseis profile and two continuously cored drill holes across faults at the basin margin. A group of moderately strong planar reflections in a zone 0.5 km thick in gneiss and carbonate rocks of the footwall block coincides with the updip projection of imbricate fault slices and mylonites associated with the Musconetcong thrust system of Drake et al. (1967). Contrasts in acoustic impedance among mylonitic dolostone and mylonitic gneiss and their protoliths, determined from measurements on samples from a third cored hole, are sufficiently large to account for reflections seen in the footwall block. Analysis of drill core and surface outcrops supports the conclusion that low-angle extensional faulting in the early Mesozoic was localized by reactivation of Paleozoic imbricate thrust faults in the basement rocks. Extension in the northwest-southeast quadrant was approximately perpendicular to the strike of the ancient thrust faults in eastern Pennsylvania. The data presented here are the most explicit three-dimensional information obtained thus far in the eastern US in support of the concept of fault reactivation in controlling formation of early Mesozoic extensional basins.

  11. A 3-D Geodynamic Model of Strain Partitioning in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, J.; Liu, M.; Lin, F.

    2012-12-01

    In southern California, strain resulting from the relative motion between the Pacific and the North American plates is partitioned in a complex system of transcurrent, transcompressional, and transtensional faults. High-precision GPS measurements in this region have enabled kinematic modeling of the present-day strain partitioning between major faults in southern California. However, geodynamic models are needed to understand the cause of strain partitioning and to determine strain in regions where faults are blind or diffuse. We have developed a regional-scale geodynamic model of strain partitioning in southern California. This 3-D viscoelasto-plastic finite element model incorporates first-order fault geometry of the major active faults in the region. The model domain includes an elastoplastic upper crust on top of a viscoelastic lower lithospheric layer. Deformation is driven by the relative motion between the Pacific and the North American plates, imposed as a displacement boundary condition. Plastic deformation both within the fault zones and in the unfaulted surrounding crust is calculated. Our results show that the Big Bend of the San Andreas Fault, and other geometric complexity of faults in southern California, plays a major role in strain partitioning. The observed variations of strain portioning in southern California can be explained by the geometric configuration of fault systems relative to the relative plate motion, without appealing to basal traction of a flowing lower lithosphere. The model predicts concentrated plastic strain under the reverse fault systems in the Transverse Ranges and the young and diffuse faults in the Eastern California Shear Zone across the Mojave Desert, where a number damaging earthquakes occurred in the past decades.

  12. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  13. 3D whiteboard: collaborative sketching with 3D-tracked smart phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lue, James; Schulze, Jürgen P.

    2014-02-01

    We present the results of our investigation of the feasibility of a new approach for collaborative drawing in 3D, based on Android smart phones. Our approach utilizes a number of fiduciary markers, placed in the working area where they can be seen by the smart phones' cameras, in order to estimate the pose of each phone in the room. Our prototype allows two users to draw 3D objects with their smart phones by moving their phones around in 3D space. For example, 3D lines are drawn by recording the path of the phone as it is moved around in 3D space, drawing line segments on the screen along the way. Each user can see the virtual drawing space on their smart phones' displays, as if the display was a window into this space. Besides lines, our prototype application also supports 3D geometry creation, geometry transformation operations, and it shows the location of the other user's phone.

  14. A 3-D Model of Stacked Thrusts in the Sevier Thrust Belt, Eastern Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, R. W.; Clayton, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Using published and new geologic map data and two exploratory wells for control, we constructed a three-dimensional geological model of the Pine Creek area in the Big Hole Mountains of eastern Idaho, where stacked Sevier thrust sheets are exposed at the surface. In this area, Cretaceous crustal shortening displaced and folded strata from Cambrian to Cretaceous in age. Using geologic map data as a primary input to a 3-D model presents a number of challenges, especially representing fault geometries at depth and maintaining strata thicknesses. The highly variable attitudes measured at the surface are also difficult to represent in a subsurface model because they require extensive extrapolation to depth. To overcome these challenges we EarthVision software, which has tools for model construction with minimal data inputs and uses a minimum tension algorithm to create geologically realistic surfaces. We also constructed two primary cross-sections to constrain strata and fault geometries according to structural principles, and used these to guide construction of fault and horizon surfaces. We then designated horizons with the best control as reference horizons to constrain strata geometries, and built the remaining horizons using isochores to add or subtract from those surfaces. The model shows classic flat-ramp thrust geometries as seen farther southeast in the Wyoming section of the thrust belt. The model also shows uniform southwestward tilting of faults and strata in the north end above younger thrusts, but strong effects from a duplex on a younger thrust fault encountered in the southern well, which rotated the strata and older faults above it.

  15. Geometry of the Nojima fault at Nojima-Hirabayashi, Japan - II. Microstructures and their implications for permeability and strength

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Diane E.; Lockner, D.A.; Ito, H.; Ikeda, R.; Tanaka, H.; Omura, K.

    2009-01-01

    Samples of damage-zone granodiorite and fault core from two drillholes into the active, strike-slip Nojima fault zone display microstructures and alteration features that explain their measured present-day strengths and permeabilities and provide insight on the evolution of these properties in the fault zone. The least deformed damage-zone rocks contain two sets of nearly perpendicular (60-90?? angles), roughly vertical fractures that are concentrated in quartz-rich areas, with one set typically dominating over the other. With increasing intensity of deformation, which corresponds generally to increasing proximity to the core, zones of heavily fragmented rock, termed microbreccia zones, develop between prominent fractures of both sets. Granodiorite adjoining intersecting microbreccia zones in the active fault strands has been repeatedly fractured and locally brecciated, accompanied by the generation of millimeter-scale voids that are partly filled with secondary minerals. Minor shear bands overprint some of the heavily deformed areas, and small-scale shear zones form from the pairing of closely spaced shear bands. Strength and permeability measurements were made on core collected from the fault within a year after a major (Kobe) earthquake. Measured strengths of the samples decrease regularly with increasing fracturing and fragmentation, such that the gouge of the fault core and completely brecciated samples from the damage zone are the weakest. Permeability increases with increasing disruption, generally reaching a peak in heavily fractured but still more or less cohesive rock at the scale of the laboratory samples. Complete loss of cohesion, as in the gouge or the interiors of large microbreccia zones, is accompanied by a reduction of permeability by 1-2 orders of magnitude below the peak values. The core samples show abundant evidence of hydrothermal alteration and mineral precipitation. Permeability is thus expected to decrease and strength to increase somewhat in active fault strands between earthquakes, as mineral deposits progressively seal fractures and fill pore spaces. ?? Birkh??user Verlag, Basel 2009.

  16. Triangular framework mesh generation of 3D geological structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xianhai; Zhou, Kun; Li, Jigang; Yang, Qin

    2013-03-01

    The dynamic simulation of oil migration and accumulation is an important issue on the research of petroleum exploration, and it is a numerical simulation process with special requirement on the framework mesh of 3D geological models, which means that the mesh should have same geometry and topology relation near the intersected part of geological surfaces. In this paper, basing on the conforming Delaunay triangulation algorithm to construct mesh of individual geological stratum or fault, a novel link-Delaunay-triangulation method is presented to achieve the geometric and topological consistency in the intersected line between two surfaces, also with the analysis of termination of our algorithm. Finally, some examples of the geological framework mesh are provided and the experimental result proved that the algorithm's effectiveness in engineering practice.

  17. Fault Geometry and Active Stress from Earthquakes and Field Geology Data Analysis: The Colfiorito 1997 and L'Aquila 2009 Cases (Central Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrarini, F.; Lavecchia, G.; de Nardis, R.; Brozzetti, F.

    2015-05-01

    The fault segmentation pattern and the regional stress tensor acting since the Early Quaternary in the intra-Apennine area of central Italy was constrained by integrating two large geological and seismological fault-slip data sets collected for the areas struck by the two most energetic seismic sequences of the last 15 years (Colfiorito 1997, M w 6.0 and L'Aquila 2009, M w 6.1). The integrated analysis of the earthquake fault association and the reconstruction of the 3D shape of the seismogenic sources were exploited to identify homogeneous seismogenic volumes associated with subsets of geological and focal mechanism data. The independent analysis of geological and seismological data allowed us to observe and highlight similarities between the attitude of the long-term (e.g., Quaternary) and the instantaneous present-day (seismogenic) extensional deformations and to reveal their substantial coaxiality. Coherently, with the results from the kinematic analysis, the stress field inversion also noted a prevailing tensional seismotectonic regime associated with a subhorizontal, NE-SW, minimum stress axis. A minor, very local, and shallow (<5 km) strike-slip component of the stress field was observed in the Colfiorito sector, where an inherited N-S oriented right-lateral fault was reactivated with sinistral kinematics. Instead, an almost total absence of strike-slip solutions was observed in the L'Aquila area. These results do not agree with those indicating Quaternary regional strike-slip regimes or wide areas characterized by strike-slip deformation during the Colfiorito and L'Aquila seismic sequences.

  18. Regional seismic reflection line, southern Illinois Basin, provides new data on Cambrian rift geometry, Hicks Dome genesis, and the Fluorspar Area Fault Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, C.J.; Goldhaber, M.B.; Taylor, C.D. ); Heigold, P.C. )

    1992-01-01

    Detailed studies of the subsurface structure of the Cambrian Reelfoot rift (RFR) in the Midwestern US provide important insights into continental rifting processes and into the structural fabric of a zone of modern intracratonic seismicity (New Madrid zone). High-quality oil industry seismic reflection data show that in the area of transition between the RFR and the Rough Creek Graben (RCG) the geometry of the Cambrian rift system is that of a half-graben that thickens to the southeast. This contrasts with the northward-thickening half-graben observed to the east in the RCG and with the more symmetric graben to the south in the RFR. An 82.8-km segment of a northwest-southeast seismic reflection profile in southeastern Illinois and western Kentucky shows that near Hicks Dome, Illinois, Middle and Lower Cambrian syn-rift sedimentary rocks occupy about 0.35 s (two-way travel time) on the seismic reflection section (corresponding to a thickness of about 970 m). This stratigraphic interval occupies about 0.45 s (1,250 m) near the Ohio river and is thickest against the Tabb Fault System (TFS) in Kentucky, where it occupies 0.7 s (1,940 m). The seismic data show that in this part of the Cambrian rift the master fault was part of the TFS and that normal displacement on the TFS continued through middle Paleozoic time. The seismic data also provide new information on the late Paleozoic development of Hicks-Dome and the surrounding Fluorspar Area Fault Complex (FAFC) in southeastern Illinois and western Kentucky. A series of grabens and horsts in the FAFC document a late Paleozoic reactivation of the RFR. Comparison of the reflection data with surface mineralization patterns shows that in most cases mineralized graben-bounding faults clearly cut basement or are splays from faults that cut basement.

  19. Multichannel 3D profilometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chongxiang; Asundi, Anand K.; Fang, Zhong P.

    2001-10-01

    With the increasing demand for micro-products and bioengineering research, resolutions of profiles with micrometer or even nanometer scale are becoming commonplace. In addition development of large integrated manufacturing systems and the real time life science growth and adaptation need high-speed display and real-time inspection. Single point measurement is time consuming method with large area profile and micrometer resolution. Thus there is a need for a fast 3-D measurement system with high resolution. This paper presents a short overview among optical 3-D shape measurement techniques, and concentrates on the confocal method. Based on the properties analysis, a novel multi-channel 3-D topography measurement system was proposed. The feasibility and the construction of system were described A unique new structure of fiber coupled confocal system is put forth to solve present problems confronted in confocal system. This system can meet the current demand of high resolution and fast 3-D measurement.

  20. TRACE 3-D documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, K.R.

    1987-08-01

    TRACE 3-D is an interactive beam-dynamics program that calculates the envelopes of a bunched beam, including linear space-charge forces, through a user-defined transport system. TRACE 3-D provides an immediate graphics display of the envelopes and the phase-space ellipses and allows nine types of beam-matching options. This report describes the beam-dynamics calculations and gives detailed instruction for using the code. Several examples are described in detail.

  1. FEM-based linear inverse modeling using a 3D source array to image magma chambers with free geometry. Application to InSAR data from Rabaul Caldera (PNG).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronchin, Erika; Masterlark, Timothy; Dawson, John; Saunders, Steve; Martí Molist, Joan

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we present a method to fully integrate a family of finite element models (FEMs) into the regularized linear inversion of InSAR data collected at Rabaul caldera (PNG) between February 2007 and December 2010. During this period the caldera experienced a long-term steady subsidence that characterized surface movement both inside the caldera and outside, on its western side. The inversion is based on an array of FEM sources in the sense that the Green's function matrix is a library of forward numerical displacement solutions generated by the sources of an array common to all FEMs. Each entry of the library is the LOS surface displacement generated by injecting a unity mass of fluid, of known density and bulk modulus, into a different source cavity of the array for each FEM. By using FEMs, we are taking advantage of their capability of including topography and heterogeneous distribution of elastic material properties. All FEMs of the family share the same mesh in which only one source is activated at the time by removing the corresponding elements and applying the unity fluid flux. The domain therefore only needs to be discretized once. This precludes remeshing for each activated source, thus reducing computational requirements, often a downside of FEM-based inversions. Without imposing an a-priori source, the method allows us to identify, from a least-squares standpoint, a complex distribution of fluid flux (or change in pressure) with a 3D free geometry within the source array, as dictated by the data. The results of applying the proposed inversion to Rabaul InSAR data show a shallow magmatic system under the caldera made of two interconnected lobes located at the two opposite sides of the caldera. These lobes could be consistent with feeding reservoirs of the ongoing Tavuvur volcano eruption of andesitic products, on the eastern side, and of the past Vulcan volcano eruptions of more evolved materials, on the western side. The interconnection and spatial distribution of sources find correspondence in the petrography of the volcanic products described in literature and in the dynamics of the single and twin eruptions that characterize the caldera. As many other volcanoes, Rabaul caldera is an active and dangerous volcanic system whose dynamics still need to be understood to effectively predict the behavior of future eruptions. The good results obtained from the application of the method to Rabaul caldera show that the proposed linear inversion based on the FEM array of sources is suitable to generate models of magmatic systems. The method can image in space and time the complex free geometry of the source that generates the deformation, widening our understanding of deformational sources and their dynamics. This takes source modeling a step towards more realistic source models.

  2. Gravity and magnetic expression of the San Leandro gabbro with implications for the geometry and evolution of the Hayward Fault zone, northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ponce, D.A.; Hildenbrand, T.G.; Jachens, R.C.

    2003-01-01

    The Hayward Fault, one of the most hazardous faults in northern California, trends north-northwest and extends for about 90 km along the eastern San Francisco Bay region. At numerous locations along its length, distinct and elongate gravity and magnetic anomalies correlate with mapped mafic and ultramafic rocks. The most prominent of these anomalies reflects the 16-km-long San Leandro gabbroic block. Inversion of magnetic and gravity data constrained with physical property measurements is used to define the subsurface extent of the San Leandro gabbro body and to speculate on its origin and relationship to the Hayward Fault Zone. Modeling indicates that the San Leandro gabbro body is about 3 km wide, dips about 75??-80?? northeast, and extends to a depth of at least 6 km. One of the most striking results of the modeling, which was performed independently of seismicity data, is that accurately relocated seismicity is concentrated along the western edge or stratigraphically lower bounding surface of the San Leandro gabbro. The western boundary of the San Leandro gabbro block is the base of an incomplete ophiolite sequence and represented at one time, a low-angle roof thrust related to the tectonic wedging of the Franciscan Complex. After repeated episodes of extension and attenuation, the roof thrust of this tectonic wedge was rotated to near vertical, and in places, the strike-slip Hayward Fault probably reactivated or preferentially followed this pre-existing feature. Because earthquakes concentrate near the edge of the San Leandro gabbro but tend to avoid its interior, we qualitatively explore mechanical models to explain how this massive igneous block may influence the distribution of stress. The microseismicity cluster along the western flank of the San Leandro gabbro leads us to suggest that this stressed volume may be the site of future moderate to large earthquakes. Improved understanding of the three-dimensional geometry and physical properties along the Hayward Fault will provide additional constraints on seismic hazard probability, earthquake modeling, and fault interactions that are applicable to other major strike-slip faults around the world.

  3. An Improved Version of TOPAZ 3D

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnykh, Anatoly

    2003-07-29

    An improved version of the TOPAZ 3D gun code is presented as a powerful tool for beam optics simulation. In contrast to the previous version of TOPAZ 3D, the geometry of the device under test is introduced into TOPAZ 3D directly from a CAD program, such as Solid Edge or AutoCAD. In order to have this new feature, an interface was developed, using the GiD software package as a meshing code. The article describes this method with two models to illustrate the results.

  4. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  5. April 7, 2009, Mw 5.5 aftershock of the L'Aquila earthquake: seismogenic fault geometry and its implication for the central Apennines active extensional tectonics (Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adinolfi, Guido Maria; Lavecchia, Giusy; De Matteis, Raffaella; Nardis Rita, De; Francesco, Brozzetti; Federica, Ferrarini; Zollo, Aldo

    2015-04-01

    On April 6, 2009 (at 01:32 UTC) a Mw 6.3 earthquake hit the town of L'Aquila (central Italy) and surrounding villages causing fatalities and severe damage in the area. After few days, a nearly 40-km-long extensional fault system was activated generating both northward and southward seismicity migration along the NW-SE trending sector of central Apennines. During the intense aftershocks sequence, different sesmogenic sources with a distinct geometry, size and the degree of involvement were reactivated. Among the relevant aftershocks with Mw 5.0 to 5.5, the largest one occurred on April 7 (at 17:47 UTC), 9 km SE-ward of the mainshock involving a source seated at much greater depths (~14 km). Despite the enormous number of studies of the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake, mainly focused on the various geological and seismological aspects of the main Paganica source, the April 7 strongest aftershock (Mw 5.5) has not yet been deeply investigated. Consistent geometric and kinematic correlations between the geological and seismological data about this seismogenic source are missing. There are still open questions concerning its unresolved geometry and the unknown style of the central Apennines structure activated at greater depths during the 2009 L'Aquila seismic sequence. Furthermore, some authors (Lavecchia et al., 2012) have supposed that the April 7, 2009 aftershock (Mw 5.5) occurred onto an high dip segment (~50°) of an east-dipping extensional basal detachment with a potential surface expression outcropping in the area of the eastern Sabina-Simbruini Mts. In this work we propose a seismological analysis of the April 7, 2009 aftershock (Mw 5.5) rupture process. In order to define the unresolved source geometry, we computed the focal mechanism through the time domain, moment tensor full waveform inversion (Dreger and Helmberger, 1993). Also, we estimated the apparent source time functions (ASTFs) by deconvolution of the impulse response of the medium from the recorded data, using the empirical Green's function (EGF) method (Vallée, 2004). We finally inverted the ASTFs to obtain a kinematic rupture model by the isochrone back-projection technique (Festa and Zollo, 2006) constraining the rupture plane geometry. Afterward, we integrated our results with surface and sub-surface geological data in order to define the seismotectonic role of the April 7 aftershock (Mw 5.5) fault structure in the intra-Apennine Quaternary extensional system. As preliminary results, our analysis constrains an east dipping extensional basal detachment and extends the knowledge of the complex fault pattern activated during the 2009 L'Aquila sequence also at greater depths (> 10 km).

  6. Geometry of the Turkey-Arabia and Africa-Arabia plate boundaries in the latest Miocene to Mid-Pliocene: the role of the Malatya-Ovacık Fault Zone in eastern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westaway, R.; Demir, T.; Seyrek, A.

    2007-11-01

    We suggest a working hypothesis for the geometry of the strike-slip faults that formed the boundaries between the Turkish, African and Arabian plates in the latest Miocene to Mid-Pliocene (LMMP), between ~7-6 Ma and ~3.5 Ma. This geometry differed significantly from the modern geometry; the northern Dead Sea Fault Zone (DSFZ) was located east of its present line and the TR-AR boundary was formed by the Malatya-Ovacık Fault Zone (MOFZ), located well north of the modern East Anatolian Fault Zone (EAFZ). The MOFZ is potentially the most problematic aspect of such a scheme, given the dramatically different interpretations of it that have been proposed. However, the presently-available evidence, albeit limited, is consistent with our proposed interpretation. Significant differences between the proposed LMMP fault geometry and the modern geometry include, first, the transtensional geometry of the MOFZ, the modern EAFZ being typically a left-lateral transform fault zone but with localized transpression. Second, the MOFZ slip rate was much lower than the ~9-10 mm a-1 EAFZ slip rate; it is estimated as ~2-3 mm a-1, having produced no more than ~8 km of slip during its approximately three million year long activity. Third, unlike at present, there was no throughgoing linkage of left-lateral faulting between the LMMP DSFZ and the MOFZ; instead, the DSFZ terminated northward, and the MOFZ terminated southward, in a zone of localised crustal shortening adjoining the suture of the former Neotethys Ocean in the Kahramanmaraç-Pazarcık region of SE Turkey. The different motion of the Turkish plate relative to Arabia, and, thus, relative to Eurasia, means that senses and rates of crustal deformation can be expected to have been different during the LMMP phase from at present, throughout the eastern Mediterranean region.

  7. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-01

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions < ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge C T . We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N . We also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  8. Integrating 3D seismic curvature and curvature gradient attributes for fracture characterization: Methodologies and interpretational implications

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Dengliang

    2013-03-01

    In 3D seismic interpretation, curvature is a popular attribute that depicts the geometry of seismic reflectors and has been widely used to detect faults in the subsurface; however, it provides only part of the solutions to subsurface structure analysis. This study extends the curvature algorithm to a new curvature gradient algorithm, and integrates both algorithms for fracture detection using a 3D seismic test data set over Teapot Dome (Wyoming). In fractured reservoirs at Teapot Dome known to be formed by tectonic folding and faulting, curvature helps define the crestal portion of the reservoirs that is associated with strong seismic amplitude and high oil productivity. In contrast, curvature gradient helps better define the regional northwest-trending and the cross-regional northeast-trending lineaments that are associated with weak seismic amplitude and low oil productivity. In concert with previous reports from image logs, cores, and outcrops, the current study based on an integrated seismic curvature and curvature gradient analysis suggests that curvature might help define areas of enhanced potential to form tensile fractures, whereas curvature gradient might help define zones of enhanced potential to develop shear fractures. In certain fractured reservoirs such as at Teapot Dome where faulting and fault-related folding contribute dominantly to the formation and evolution of fractures, curvature and curvature gradient attributes can be potentially applied to differentiate fracture mode, to predict fracture intensity and orientation, to detect fracture volume and connectivity, and to model fracture networks.

  9. Kinematic interpretation of the 3D shapes of metamorphic core complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pourhiet, Laetitia; Huet, Benjamin; May, Dave A.; Labrousse, Loic; Jolivet, Laurent

    2012-09-01

    Metamorphic Core Complexes form dome shaped structures in which the ductile crust is exhumed beneath a detachment fault. The 3D dome geometry, inferred by mapping the schistosity in the exhumed crust, can be either elongated normal to the stretching direction or along it. In the first case, the domes are interpreted as having formed during extension. However, in the second case, they are interpreted either as strike-slip, transpressive or constrictive extensional structures, depending on the geodynamic context. Numerical models of metamorphic core complexes published to date are all two-dimensional and therefore, theoretically only apply to domes which are elongated normal to the stretching direction. Here, we explore by means of 3D thermomechanical modeling, the impact of 3D kinematic extensional boundary conditions on the shape of metamorphic core complexes. We examine the impact of a transtensional step over and of horsetail splay fault kinematics on the dynamics of exhumation, finite strain and P-T paths, and compare them to cylindrical 3D models. We show, for the first time, that domes formed in transtensional step over, or at the tip of propagating strike-slip faults, display a finite strain field which can be interpreted as characteristic of a transpressive domes, although no shortening was applied in the far-field. Applying our models to the Cyclades, we propose that the coeval formation of domes elongated normal and parallel to the stretching during the Miocene can be the result of horsetail splay fault kinematics, which could correspond to the formation of a tear in the Aegean slab.

  10. Magnetic Properties of 3D Printed Toroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollig, Lindsey; Otto, Austin; Hilpisch, Peter; Mowry, Greg; Nelson-Cheeseman, Brittany; Renewable Energy; Alternatives Lab (REAL) Team

    Transformers are ubiquitous in electronics today. Although toroidal geometries perform most efficiently, transformers are traditionally made with rectangular cross-sections due to the lower manufacturing costs. Additive manufacturing techniques (3D printing) can easily achieve toroidal geometries by building up a part through a series of 2D layers. To get strong magnetic properties in a 3D printed transformer, a composite filament is used containing Fe dispersed in a polymer matrix. How the resulting 3D printed toroid responds to a magnetic field depends on two structural factors of the printed 2D layers: fill factor (planar density) and fill pattern. In this work, we investigate how the fill factor and fill pattern affect the magnetic properties of 3D printed toroids. The magnetic properties of the printed toroids are measured by a custom circuit that produces a hysteresis loop for each toroid. Toroids with various fill factors and fill patterns are compared to determine how these two factors can affect the magnetic field the toroid can produce. These 3D printed toroids can be used for numerous applications in order to increase the efficiency of transformers by making it possible for manufacturers to make a toroidal geometry.

  11. 3D Magnetron simulation with CST STUDIO SUITE

    SciTech Connect

    Balk, Monika C.

    2011-07-01

    The modeling of magnetrons compared to other tubes is more difficult since it requires 3D modeling rather than a 2D investigation. This is not only due to the geometry which can include complicated details to be modeled in 3D but also due to the interaction process itself. The electric field, magnetic field and particle movement span a 3D space. In this paper 3D simulations of a strapped magnetron with CSTSTUDIO SUITE{sup TM} are presented. (author)

  12. 3-D Grab!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, M. G.; Schofield, I. S.

    2012-12-01

    Modern technologies in imaging greatly extend the potential to present visual information. With recently developed software tools, the perception of the third dimension can not only dramatically enhance presentation, but also allow spatial data to be better encoded. 3-D images can be taken for many subjects with only one camera, carefully moved to generate a stereo pair. Color anaglyph viewing now can be very effective using computer screens, and active filter technologies can enhance visual effects with ever-decreasing cost. We will present various novel results of 3-D imaging, including those from the auroral observations of the new twinned Athabasca University Geophysical Observatories.; Single camera stereo image for viewing with red/cyan glasses.

  13. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  14. 3D Printed Bionic Ears

    PubMed Central

    Mannoor, Manu S.; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A.; Soboyejo, Winston O.; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the precise anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  15. Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Maps for Seattle, Washington, Based on 3D Ground-Motion Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankel, A. D.; Stephenson, W. J.; Carver, D. L.; Williams, R. A.; Odum, J. K.; Rhea, S.

    2007-12-01

    We have produced probabilistic seismic hazard maps for Seattle using over 500 3D finite-difference simulations of ground motions from earthquakes in the Seattle fault zone, Cascadia subduction zone, South Whidbey Island fault, and background shallow and deep source areas. The maps depict 1 Hz response spectral accelerations with 2, 5, and 10% probabilities of being exceeded in 50 years. The simulations were used to generate site and source dependent amplification factors that are applied to rock-site attenuation relations. The maps incorporate essentially the same fault sources and earthquake recurrence times as the 2002 national seismic hazard maps. The simulations included basin surface waves and basin-edge focusing effects from a 3D model of the Seattle basin. The 3D velocity model was validated by modeling several earthquakes in the region, including the 2001 M6.8 Nisqually earthquake, that were recorded by our Seattle Urban Seismic Network and the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network. The simulations duplicate our observation that earthquakes from the south and southwest typically produce larger amplifications in the Seattle basin than earthquakes from other azimuths, relative to rock sites outside the basin. Finite-fault simulations were run for earthquakes along the Seattle fault zone, with magnitudes ranging from 6.6 to 7.2, so that the effects of rupture directivity were included. Nonlinear amplification factors for soft-soil sites of fill and alluvium were also applied in the maps. For the Cascadia subduction zone, 3D simulations with point sources at different locations along the zone were used to determine amplification factors across Seattle expected for great subduction-zone earthquakes. These new urban seismic hazard maps are based on determinations of hazard for 7236 sites with a spacing of 280 m. The maps show that the highest hazard locations for this frequency band (around 1 Hz) are soft-soil sites (fill and alluvium) within the Seattle basin and along the inferred trace of the frontal fault of the Seattle fault zone. Sites on more consolidated soils within the Seattle basin generally exhibit higher hazard than those on similar soils outside the basin, because of basin surface waves and focusing of S-waves by the geometry of the edges and bottom of the basin.

  16. Self-Discovery of Structural Geology Concepts using Interactive 3D Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billen, M. I.; Saunders, J.

    2010-12-01

    Mastering structural geology concepts that depend on understanding three-dimensional (3D) geometries and imagining relationships among unseen subsurface structures are fundamental skills for geologists. Traditionally these skills are developed first, through use of 2D drawings of 3D structures that can be difficult to decipher or 3D physical block models that show only a limited set of relationships on the surfaces of the blocks, followed by application and testing of concepts in field settings. We hypothesize that this learning process can be improved by providing repeated opportunities to evaluate and explore synthetic 3D structures using interactive 3D visualization software. We present laboratory modules designed for undergraduate structural geology curriculum using a self-discovery approach to teach concepts such as: the Rule of V’s, structure separation versus fault slip, and the more general dependence of structural exposure on surface topography. The laboratory modules are structured to allow students to discover and articulate each concept from observations of synthetic data both on traditional maps and using the volume visualization software 3DVisualizer. Modules lead students through exploration of data (e.g., a dipping layered structure exposed in ridge-valley topography or obliquely offset across a fault) by allowing them to interactively view (rotate, pan, zoom) the exposure of structures on topographic surfaces and to toggle on/off the full 3D structure as a transparent colored volume. This tool allows student to easily visually understand the relationships between, for example a dipping structure and its exposure on valley walls, as well as how the structure extends beneath the surface. Using this method gives students more opportunities to build a mental library of previously-seen relationships from which to draw-on when applying concepts in the field setting. These laboratory modules, the data and software are freely available from KeckCAVES.

  17. The Galicia 3D experiment: an Introduction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reston, Timothy; Martinez Loriente, Sara; Holroyd, Luke; Merry, Tobias; Sawyer, Dale; Morgan, Julia; Jordan, Brian; Tesi Sanjurjo, Mari; Alexanian, Ara; Shillington, Donna; Gibson, James; Minshull, Tim; Karplus, Marianne; Bayracki, Gaye; Davy, Richard; Klaeschen, Dirk; Papenberg, Cord; Ranero, Cesar; Perez-Gussinye, Marta; Martinez, Miguel

    2014-05-01

    In June and July 2013, scientists from 8 institutions took part in the Galicia 3D seismic experiment, the first ever crustal -scale academic 3D MCS survey over a rifted margin. The aim was to determine the 3D structure of a critical portion of the west Galicia rifted margin. At this margin, well-defined tilted fault blocks, bound by west-dipping faults and capped by synrift sediments are underlain by a bright reflection, undulating on time sections, termed the S reflector and thought to represent a major detachment fault of some kind. Moving west, the crust thins to zero thickness and mantle is unroofed, as evidence by the "Peridotite Ridge" first reported at this margin, but since observed at many other magma-poor margins. By imaging such a margin in detail, the experiment aimed to resolve the processes controlling crustal thinning and mantle unroofing at a type example magma poor margin. The experiment set out to collect several key datasets: a 3D seismic reflection volume measuring ~20x64km and extending down to ~14s TWT, a 3D ocean bottom seismometer dataset suitable for full wavefield inversion (the recording of the complete 3D seismic shots by 70 ocean bottom instruments), the "mirror imaging" of the crust using the same grid of OBS, a single 2D combined reflection/refraction profile extending to the west to determine the transition from unroofed mantle to true oceanic crust, and the seismic imaging of the water column, calibrated by regular deployment of XBTs to measure the temperature structure of the water column. We collected 1280 km2 of seismic reflection data, consisting of 136533 shots recorded on 1920 channels, producing 260 million seismic traces, each ~ 14s long. This adds up to ~ 8 terabytes of data, representing, we believe, the largest ever academic 3D MCS survey in terms of both the area covered and the volume of data. The OBS deployment was the largest ever within an academic 3D survey.

  18. Coulomb Stress Accumulation along the San Andreas Fault System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Bridget; Sandwell, David

    2003-01-01

    Stress accumulation rates along the primary segments of the San Andreas Fault system are computed using a three-dimensional (3-D) elastic half-space model with realistic fault geometry. The model is developed in the Fourier domain by solving for the response of an elastic half-space due to a point vector body force and analytically integrating the force from a locking depth to infinite depth. This approach is then applied to the San Andreas Fault system using published slip rates along 18 major fault strands of the fault zone. GPS-derived horizontal velocity measurements spanning the entire 1700 x 200 km region are then used to solve for apparent locking depth along each primary fault segment. This simple model fits remarkably well (2.43 mm/yr RMS misfit), although some discrepancies occur in the Eastern California Shear Zone. The model also predicts vertical uplift and subsidence rates that are in agreement with independent geologic and geodetic estimates. In addition, shear and normal stresses along the major fault strands are used to compute Coulomb stress accumulation rate. As a result, we find earthquake recurrence intervals along the San Andreas Fault system to be inversely proportional to Coulomb stress accumulation rate, in agreement with typical coseismic stress drops of 1 - 10 MPa. This 3-D deformation model can ultimately be extended to include both time-dependent forcing and viscoelastic response.

  19. Decoder for 3-D color codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Kung-Chuan; Brun, Todd

    Transversal circuits are important components of fault-tolerant quantum computation. Several classes of quantum error-correcting codes are known to have transversal implementations of any logical Clifford operation. However, to achieve universal quantum computation, it would be helpful to have high-performance error-correcting codes that have a transversal implementation of some logical non-Clifford operation. The 3-D color codes are a class of topological codes that permit transversal implementation of the logical π / 8 -gate. The decoding problem of a 3-D color code can be understood as a graph-matching problem on a three-dimensional lattice. Whether this class of codes will be useful in terms of performance is still an open question. We investigate the decoding problem of 3-D color codes and analyze the performance of some possible decoders.

  20. Regional and reservoir-scale analysis of fault systems and structural development of Pagerungan Gas Field, East Java Sea, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, R.K.; Medwedeff, D.A. )

    1996-01-01

    Pagerungan gas field lies on a complexly faulted and folded anticline just north of the major Sakala-Paliat Fault System (SPFS) offshore Bali. The Eocene clastic reservoir is affected by two generations of faults: Eocene normal and Neogene compressional faults. Fault geometry, timing and connectivity is determined by combining regional and field-scale methods. Restored regional structure maps and sections indicate the field is located on the L. Eocene, footwall-paleo-high of the south-dipping SPFS. Within the field, smaller normal faults nucleated sub-parallel to the SPFS with both synthetic and antithetic dips. Neogene to Present compression folded the strata creating closure in the field, reversed slip on selected preexisting normal faults, and nucleated new reverse fault sets. Some normal faults are completely inverted, others have net normal offset after some reverse slip, and still others are not reactivated. Reverse faults strike sub-parallel to earlier formed normal faults. The eastern and western parts of the field are distinguished by the style and magnitude of early compressional deformation. 3D seismic analysis indicates the geometry of reservoir faults is similar to the regional fault systems: sub-parallel segments share displacement at their terminations either by distributed deformation in the rock between adjacent terminations or through short cross-faults oriented at a high angle to the principal fault sets. Anomalous trends in the contours of throw projected onto fault surfaces predict the connectivity of complex fault patterns. Integration of regional and field-scale analysis provides the most accurate prediction of fault geometry and lays the foundation for field development.

  1. Regional and reservoir-scale analysis of fault systems and structural development of Pagerungan Gas Field, East Java Sea, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, R.K.; Medwedeff, D.A.

    1996-12-31

    Pagerungan gas field lies on a complexly faulted and folded anticline just north of the major Sakala-Paliat Fault System (SPFS) offshore Bali. The Eocene clastic reservoir is affected by two generations of faults: Eocene normal and Neogene compressional faults. Fault geometry, timing and connectivity is determined by combining regional and field-scale methods. Restored regional structure maps and sections indicate the field is located on the L. Eocene, footwall-paleo-high of the south-dipping SPFS. Within the field, smaller normal faults nucleated sub-parallel to the SPFS with both synthetic and antithetic dips. Neogene to Present compression folded the strata creating closure in the field, reversed slip on selected preexisting normal faults, and nucleated new reverse fault sets. Some normal faults are completely inverted, others have net normal offset after some reverse slip, and still others are not reactivated. Reverse faults strike sub-parallel to earlier formed normal faults. The eastern and western parts of the field are distinguished by the style and magnitude of early compressional deformation. 3D seismic analysis indicates the geometry of reservoir faults is similar to the regional fault systems: sub-parallel segments share displacement at their terminations either by distributed deformation in the rock between adjacent terminations or through short cross-faults oriented at a high angle to the principal fault sets. Anomalous trends in the contours of throw projected onto fault surfaces predict the connectivity of complex fault patterns. Integration of regional and field-scale analysis provides the most accurate prediction of fault geometry and lays the foundation for field development.

  2. iBem3D, a three-dimensional iterative boundary element method using angular dislocations for modeling geologic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maerten, F.; Maerten, L.; Pollard, D. D.

    2014-11-01

    Most analytical solutions to engineering or geological problems are limited to simple geometries. For example, analytical solutions have been found to solve for stresses around a circular hole in a plate. To solve more complex problems, mathematicians and engineers have developed powerful computer-aided numerical methods, which can be categorized into two main types: differential methods and integral methods. The finite element method (FEM) is a differential method that was developed in the 1950s and is one of the most commonly used numerical methods today. Since its development, other differential methods, including the boundary element method (BEM), have been developed to solve different types of problems. The purpose of this paper is to describe iBem3D, formally called Poly3D, a C++ and modular 3D boundary element computer program based on the theory of angular dislocations for modeling three-dimensional (3D) discontinuities in an elastic, heterogeneous, isotropic whole- or half-space. After 20 years and more than 150 scientific publications, we present in detail the formulation behind this method, its enhancements over the years as well as some important applications in several domains of the geosciences. The main advantage of using this formulation, for describing geological objects such as faults, resides in the possibility of modeling complex geometries without gaps and overlaps between adjacent triangular dislocation elements, which is a significant shortcoming for models using rectangular dislocation elements. Reliability, speed, simplicity, and accuracy are enhanced in the latest version of the computer code. Industrial applications include subseismic fault modeling, fractured reservoir modeling, interpretation and validation of fault connectivity and reservoir compartmentalization, depleted area and fault reactivation, and pressurized wellbore stability. Academic applications include earthquake and volcano monitoring, hazard mitigation, and slope stability modeling.

  3. 3-D Color Wheels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuBois, Ann

    2010-01-01

    The blending of information from an academic class with projects from art class can do nothing but strengthen the learning power of the student. Creating three-dimensional color wheels provides the perfect opportunity to combine basic geometry knowledge with color theory. In this article, the author describes how her seventh-grade painting…

  4. 3-D Color Wheels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuBois, Ann

    2010-01-01

    The blending of information from an academic class with projects from art class can do nothing but strengthen the learning power of the student. Creating three-dimensional color wheels provides the perfect opportunity to combine basic geometry knowledge with color theory. In this article, the author describes how her seventh-grade painting

  5. Joint earthquake source inversions using seismo-geodesy and 3-D Earth models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston, J. M.; Ferreira, A. M.; Funning, G.

    2013-12-01

    The strong spatial and high temporal resolution of geodetic and seismic data, respectively, make them complementary datasets for the robust characterisation of the earthquake source. We present here a joint inversion technique, which uses InSAR and teleseismic data, and for the first time takes 3-D Earth structure into account when modelling seismic surface and body waves. Unwrapped interferograms and long-period seismic data are jointly inverted for location, fault geometry and seismic moment, using a hybrid downhill Powell-Monte Carlo algorithm. While the InSAR data are modelled using rectangular dislocations in an elastic half-space, seismic data are modelled using the spectral element method for a 3-D Earth model. The effect of noise and lateral heterogeneity in the assumed Earth structure on the inversions is investigated by carrying out realistic synthetic tests for various earthquakes with different faulting mechanisms and magnitude (Mw 6.0-6.6). Synthetic tests highlight the improvement in the constraint of fault geometry and seismic moment when InSAR and seismic data are combined. Tests comparing the effect of using a 1-D or 3-D Earth model show that surface waves are more sensitive to 3-D Earth structure than body waves. Incorrect source parameters, particularly incorrect fault dip angles, can compensate for systematic errors in the assumed Earth structure, leading to an acceptable seismic data fit despite large discrepancies in source parameters. Three real earthquakes are also investigated: Eureka Valley, California (17th May 1993, Mw 6.0), Aiquile, Bolivia (22nd February 1998, Mw 6.6) and Zarand, Iran (22nd May 2005, Mw 6.5). These events are located in different tectonic environments and show large discrepancies between previous InSAR and seismically-determined source models. The 40-50 km discrepancies in location between previous geodetic and seismic estimates for the Eureka Valley and Aiquile earthquakes are resolved when using the geodetic location in the modelling of the seismic data. A 30° difference in strike is also resolved when taking 3-D Earth structure into account in the analysis of the Eureka Valley earthquake, and in all cases the seismic moment is more robustly constrained in the joint inversions than in the individual dataset inversions.

  6. Fault architecture, fault rocks and fault rock properties in carbonate rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Helene; Decker, Kurt

    2010-05-01

    Fault architecture, fault rocks and fault rock properties in carbonate rocks The current study addresses a comparative analysis of fault zones in limestone and dolomite rocks comparing the architecture of fault core and damage zones, fault rocks, and the hydrodynamic properties of faults exposed in the Upper Triassic Wetterstein Fm. of the Hochschwab Massif (Austria). All analysed faults are sinistral strike-slip faults, which formed at shallow crustal depth during the process of eastward lateral extrusion of the Eastern Alps in the Oligocene and Lower Miocene Fault zones in limestone tend to be relatively narrow zones with distinct fault core and damage zones. Fault cores, which include the principle slip surface of the fault, are characterized by cataclastic fault rock associated with slickensides separating strands of catalasite from surrounding host rock or occurring between different types of cataclasite. Cataclasites differ in terms of fragment size, matrix content and the angularity of fragments,. Cataclasite fabrics indicate progressive cataclasis and substantial displacement across the fault rock. Fault core heterogeneity tends to decrease within more evolved (higher displacement) faults. In all fault cores cataclasites are localized within strands, which connect to geometrically complex anastomosing volumes of fault rock. The 3D geometry of such fault cores is difficult to resolve on the outcrop scale. Beside cataclastic flow pressure solution, overprinting cataclastic fabrics, could be documented within fault zones. Damage zones in limestone fault zones are characterized by intensively fractured (jointed) host rock and dilatation breccias, indicating dilatation processes and peripheral wall rock weakening accompanying the growth of the fault zone. Dilatation breccias with high volumes of carbonate cement indicate these processes are related to high fluid pressure and the percolation of large volumes of fluid. Different parts of the damage zones were differentiated on the base of variable fracture densities. Fracture densities (P32 in m² joint surfaces per m³ rock) generally vary along all investigated faults. They are especially high in more evolved (higher displacement) fault zones where they are associated with large-scale Riedel sehars and in parts of the damage zones, that are next to the fault cores. The assessment of the abundance of small-scale fractures uses fracture facies as an empirical classification providing semi-quantitative estimates of fracture density and abundance. Different units were assigned to fracture facies 1 to 4, with fracture facies 4 indicating highest fracture density. Fault zones in dolomite tend to have several fault cores localized within wider zones of fractured wall rock (damage zones), even at low strain. Compared to fault zones with similar displacement in limestone, damage zones in dolomite tend to be wider and have higher fracture densities. Dilatation breccias are more abundant. A clear separation of fault core and damage zone is more difficult. Damage zones observed at the lateral (mode III) tips of the analysed strike-slip faults show that hydraulic fracturing and fluid flow through the propagating fault are of major importance for its evolution. A typical transition from the wall rock ahead of the propagating fault to the core of the slipped fault includes: densely jointed wall rock, wall rock with abundant cement-filled tension gashes, dilatation breccia and cataclasite reworking both dilatation breccia and wall rock. The detailed documentation of different fault zone units is supplemented by porosity measurements in order to assess the hydrogeological properties of the fault zones. High permeability units are first of all located in the damage zones, characterized by high fracture densities. Porosity measurements on fault rocks showed highest porosity (up to 6%) for fractured wall rocks (fracture facies 4) and dilatation breccias (porosity of undeformed wall rock: 1,5 % average, 2 % maximum). Thin sections prove that most of the porosity is carried by uncemented fractures. Fracture porosity therefore is the controlling factor of fault zone permeability. The different types of cataclasite in fault cores show low intra-granular porosities (average 2,5 %) and very low fracture density. They therefore are classified as low-permeability units.

  7. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.