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Sample records for 3-d position sensitive

  1. ASIC for High Rate 3D Position Sensitive Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, E.; De Geronimo, G.; Ackley, K.; Fried, J.; He, Z.; Herman, C.; Zhang, F.

    2010-06-16

    We report on the development of an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for 3D position sensitive detectors (3D PSD). The ASIC is designed to operate with pixelated wide bandgap sensors like Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT), Mercuric Iodide (Hgl2) and Thallium Bromide (TIBr). It measures the amplitudes and timings associated with an ionizing event on 128 anodes, the anode grid, and the cathode. Each channel provides low-noise charge amplification, high-order shaping with peaking time adjustable from 250 ns to 12 {micro}s, gain adjustable to 20 mV/fC or 120 mV/fC (for a dynamic range of 3.2 MeV and 530 keV in CZT), amplitude discrimination with 5-bit trimming, and positive and negative peak and timing detections. The readout can be full or sparse, based on a flag and single- or multi-cycle token passing. All channels, triggered channels only, or triggered with neighbors can be read out thus increasing the rate capability of the system to more than 10 kcps. The ASIC dissipates 330 mW which corresponds to about 2.5 mW per channel.

  2. READOUT ASIC FOR 3D POSITION-SENSITIVE DETECTORS.

    SciTech Connect

    DE GERONIMO,G.; VERNON, E.; ACKLEY, K.; DRAGONE, A.; FRIED, J.; OCONNOR, P.; HE, Z.; HERMAN, C.; ZHANG, F.

    2007-10-27

    We describe an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for 3D position-sensitive detectors. It was optimized for pixelated CZT sensors, and it measures, corresponding to an ionizing event, the energy and timing of signals from 121 anodes and one cathode. Each channel provides low-noise charge amplification, high-order shaping, along with peak- and timing-detection. The cathode's timing can be measured in three different ways: the first is based on multiple thresholds on the charge amplifier's voltage output; the second uses the threshold crossing of a fast-shaped signal; and the third measures the peak amplitude and timing from a bipolar shaper. With its power of 2 mW per channel the ASIC measures, on a CZT sensor Connected and biased, charges up to 100 fC with an electronic resolution better than 200 e{sup -} rms. Our preliminary spectral measurements applying a simple cathode/mode ratio correction demonstrated a single-pixel resolution of 4.8 keV (0.72 %) at 662 keV, with the electronics and leakage current contributing in total with 2.1 keV.

  3. Beam tests of a 3-D position sensitive scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Labanti, C.; Hall, C.J.; Agrinier, B.; Byard, K.; Dean, A.J.; Goldwurm, A.; Harding, J.S.

    1989-02-01

    An array of 30 position sensitive scintillator bars has been tested in a gamma-ray beam from I.N.S.T.N. Van de Graff facility at the Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires, Saclay, France. The gamma-ray energies ranged from 6 MeV to 17 MeV. The bars are similar to those proposed for use in the GRASP gamma-ray telescope satellite imaging plane. They are manufactured from CsI(T1) covered with a highly reflective diffusive wrapping, and are read out using large area PIN photodiodes. Each bar measures 15.0 cm by 1.3 cm by 1.3 cm. The beam test unit was comprised of 30 bars stacked in a 5 by 6 array. The photodiodes were optically coupled to the end face of each bar and were connected to a processing chain comprised of a low noise preamplifier, a high gain shaping amplifier, and a digitisation and data collection system. Several experiments were performed with the unit to assess the spectral response, position resolution, and background rejection capabilities of the complete detector. The test procedure is explained and some results are presented.

  4. Handy Compton camera using 3D position-sensitive scintillators coupled with large-area monolithic MPPC arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, J.; Kishimoto, A.; Nishiyama, T.; Fujita, T.; Takeuchi, K.; Kato, T.; Nakamori, T.; Ohsuka, S.; Nakamura, S.; Hirayanagi, M.; Adachi, S.; Uchiyama, T.; Yamamoto, K.

    2013-12-01

    The release of radioactive isotopes (mainly 137Cs, 134Cs and 131I) from the crippled Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant remains a serious problem in Japan. To help identify radiation hotspots and ensure effective decontamination operation, we are developing a novel Compton camera weighting only 1 kg and measuring just ∼10 cm2 in size. Despite its compactness, the camera realizes a wide 180° field of vision with a sensitivity about 50 times superior to other cameras being tested in Fukushima. We expect that a hotspot producing a 5 μSv/h dose at a distance of 3 m can be imaged every 10 s, with angular resolution better than 10° (FWHM). The 3D position-sensitive scintillators and thin monolithic MPPC arrays are the key technologies developed here. By measuring the pulse-height ratio of MPPC-arrays coupled at both ends of a Ce:GAGG scintillator block, the depth of interaction (DOI) is obtained for incident gamma rays as well as the usual 2D positions, with accuracy better than 2 mm. By using two identical 10 mm cubic Ce:GAGG scintillators as a scatterer and an absorber, we confirmed that the 3D configuration works well as a high-resolution gamma camera, and also works as spectrometer achieving typical energy resolution of 9.8% (FWHM) for 662 keV gamma rays. We present the current status of the prototype camera (weighting 1.5 kg and measuring 8.5×14×16 cm3 in size) being fabricated by Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. Although the camera still operates in non-DOI mode, angular resolution as high as 14° (FWHM) was achieved with an integration time of 30 s for the assumed hotspot described above.

  5. Development of Gamma-Ray Compton Imager Using Room-Temperature 3-D Position Sensitive Semiconductor Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong He; David Whe; Glenn Knoll

    2003-05-14

    During the three years of this project, two 3-dimensional position sensitive CdZnTe spectrometers were upgraded in collaboration with Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. A prototype Compton-scattering gamma-ray imager was assembled using the two upgraded CdZnTe detectors. The performance of both gamma-ray spectrometers were individually tested. The angular resolution and detection sensitivity of the imaging system were measured using both a point and a line-shaped 137 Cs radiation source. The measurement results are consistent with that obtained from Monte-Carlo simulations performed during the early phase of the project.

  6. Positional Awareness Map 3D (PAM3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Monica; Allen, Earl L.; Yount, John W.; Norcross, April Louise

    2012-01-01

    The Western Aeronautical Test Range of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Dryden Flight Research Center needed to address the aging software and hardware of its current situational awareness display application, the Global Real-Time Interactive Map (GRIM). GRIM was initially developed in the late 1980s and executes on older PC architectures using a Linux operating system that is no longer supported. Additionally, the software is difficult to maintain due to its complexity and loss of developer knowledge. It was decided that a replacement application must be developed or acquired in the near future. The replacement must provide the functionality of the original system, the ability to monitor test flight vehicles in real-time, and add improvements such as high resolution imagery and true 3-dimensional capability. This paper will discuss the process of determining the best approach to replace GRIM, and the functionality and capabilities of the first release of the Positional Awareness Map 3D.

  7. Performance and field tests of a handheld Compton camera using 3-D position-sensitive scintillators coupled to multi-pixel photon counter arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, A.; Kataoka, J.; Nishiyama, T.; Fujita, T.; Takeuchi, K.; Okochi, H.; Ogata, H.; Kuroshima, H.; Ohsuka, S.; Nakamura, S.; Hirayanagi, M.; Adachi, S.; Uchiyama, T.; Suzuki, H.

    2014-11-01

    After the nuclear disaster in Fukushima, radiation decontamination has become particularly urgent. To help identify radiation hotspots and ensure effective decontamination operation, we have developed a novel Compton camera based on Ce-doped Gd3Al2Ga3O12 scintillators and multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC) arrays. Even though its sensitivity is several times better than that of other cameras being tested in Fukushima, we introduce a depth-of-interaction (DOI) method to further improve the angular resolution. For gamma rays, the DOI information, in addition to 2-D position, is obtained by measuring the pulse-height ratio of the MPPC arrays coupled to ends of the scintillator. We present the detailed performance and results of various field tests conducted in Fukushima with the prototype 2-D and DOI Compton cameras. Moreover, we demonstrate stereo measurement of gamma rays that enables measurement of not only direction but also approximate distance to radioactive hotspots.

  8. An approach towards 3D sensitive AFM cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koops, Richard; Fokkema, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) tapping mode is a highly sensitive local probing technique that is very useful to study and measure surface properties down to the atomic scale. The tapping mode is mostly implemented using the resonance of the first bending mode of the cantilever and therefore provides sensitivity mainly along the direction of this oscillation. Driven by the semiconductor industry, there is an increasing need for accurate measurements of nanoscale structures for side wall characterization by AFM that requires additional sensitivity in the lateral direction. The conventional tapping mode has been augmented by various authors, for example by tilting the cantilever system (Cho et al 2011 Rev. Sci. Instrum. 82 023707) to access the sidewall or using a torsion mode (Dai et al 2011 Meas. Sci. Technol. 22 094009) of the cantilever to provide additional lateral sensitivity. These approaches however trade lateral sensitivity for vertical sensitivity or still lack sensitivity in the remaining lateral direction. We present an approach towards true 3D sensitivity for AFM cantilevers based on simultaneous excitation and optical detection of multiple cantilever resonance modes along three axes. Tuning the excitation of the cantilever to specific frequencies provides a mechanism to select only those cantilever modes that have the desired characteristics. Additionally, cantilever engineering has been used to design and create a substructure within the cantilever that has been optimized for specific resonance behavior around 4 MHz. In contrast to the conventional approach of using a piezo to actuate the cantilever modulation, we present results on photo-thermal excitation using an intensity modulated low-power laser source. By tightly focusing the excitation spot on the cantilever we were able to attain a deflection efficiency of 0.7 nm µW-1 for the first bending mode. The presented approach results in an efficient all optical excitation and deflection detection

  9. 3D plasmonic crystal metamaterials for ultra-sensitive biosensing.

    PubMed

    Aristov, Andrey I; Manousidaki, Maria; Danilov, Artem; Terzaki, Konstantina; Fotakis, Costas; Farsari, Maria; Kabashin, Andrei V

    2016-01-01

    We explore the excitation of plasmons in 3D plasmon crystal metamaterials and report the observation of a delocalized plasmon mode, which provides extremely high spectral sensitivity (>2600 nm per refractive index unit (RIU) change), outperforming all plasmonic counterparts excited in 2D nanoscale geometries, as well as a prominent phase-sensitive response (>3*10(4) deg. of phase per RIU). Combined with a large surface for bioimmobilization provided by the 3D matrix, the proposed sensor architecture promises a new important landmark in the advancement of plasmonic biosensing technology. PMID:27151104

  10. 3D plasmonic crystal metamaterials for ultra-sensitive biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristov, Andrey I.; Manousidaki, Maria; Danilov, Artem; Terzaki, Konstantina; Fotakis, Costas; Farsari, Maria; Kabashin, Andrei V.

    2016-05-01

    We explore the excitation of plasmons in 3D plasmon crystal metamaterials and report the observation of a delocalized plasmon mode, which provides extremely high spectral sensitivity (>2600 nm per refractive index unit (RIU) change), outperforming all plasmonic counterparts excited in 2D nanoscale geometries, as well as a prominent phase-sensitive response (>3*104 deg. of phase per RIU). Combined with a large surface for bioimmobilization provided by the 3D matrix, the proposed sensor architecture promises a new important landmark in the advancement of plasmonic biosensing technology.

  11. 3D plasmonic crystal metamaterials for ultra-sensitive biosensing

    PubMed Central

    Aristov, Andrey I.; Manousidaki, Maria; Danilov, Artem; Terzaki, Konstantina; Fotakis, Costas; Farsari, Maria; Kabashin, Andrei V.

    2016-01-01

    We explore the excitation of plasmons in 3D plasmon crystal metamaterials and report the observation of a delocalized plasmon mode, which provides extremely high spectral sensitivity (>2600 nm per refractive index unit (RIU) change), outperforming all plasmonic counterparts excited in 2D nanoscale geometries, as well as a prominent phase-sensitive response (>3*104 deg. of phase per RIU). Combined with a large surface for bioimmobilization provided by the 3D matrix, the proposed sensor architecture promises a new important landmark in the advancement of plasmonic biosensing technology. PMID:27151104

  12. Phase Sensitive Cueing for 3D Objects in Overhead Images

    SciTech Connect

    Paglieroni, D

    2005-02-04

    Locating specific 3D objects in overhead images is an important problem in many remote sensing applications. 3D objects may contain either one connected component or multiple disconnected components. Solutions must accommodate images acquired with diverse sensors at various times of the day, in various seasons of the year, or under various weather conditions. Moreover, the physical manifestation of a 3D object with fixed physical dimensions in an overhead image is highly dependent on object physical dimensions, object position/orientation, image spatial resolution, and imaging geometry (e.g., obliqueness). This paper describes a two-stage computer-assisted approach for locating 3D objects in overhead images. In the matching stage, the computer matches models of 3D objects to overhead images. The strongest degree of match over all object orientations is computed at each pixel. Unambiguous local maxima in the degree of match as a function of pixel location are then found. In the cueing stage, the computer sorts image thumbnails in descending order of figure-of-merit and presents them to human analysts for visual inspection and interpretation. The figure-of-merit associated with an image thumbnail is computed from the degrees of match to a 3D object model associated with unambiguous local maxima that lie within the thumbnail. This form of computer assistance is invaluable when most of the relevant thumbnails are highly ranked, and the amount of inspection time needed is much less for the highly ranked thumbnails than for images as a whole.

  13. 3D sensitivity of 6-electrode Focused Impedance Method (FIM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masum Iquebal, A. H.; Siddique-e Rabbani, K.

    2010-04-01

    The present work was taken up to have an understanding of the depth sensitivity of the 6 electrode FIM developed by our laboratory earlier, so that it may be applied judiciously for the measurement of organs in 3D, with electrodes on the skin surface. For a fixed electrode geometry sensitivity is expected to depend on the depth, size and conductivity of the target object. With current electrodes 18 cm apart and potential electrodes 5 cm apart, depth sensitivity of spherical conductors, insulators and of pieces of potato of different diameters were measured. The sensitivity dropped sharply with depth gradually leveling off to background, and objects could be sensed down to a depth of about twice their diameters. The sensitivity at a certain depth increases almost linearly with volume for objects with the same conductivity. Thus these results increase confidence in the use of FIM for studying organs at depths of the body.

  14. Inertial Pocket Navigation System: Unaided 3D Positioning

    PubMed Central

    Munoz Diaz, Estefania

    2015-01-01

    Inertial navigation systems use dead-reckoning to estimate the pedestrian's position. There are two types of pedestrian dead-reckoning, the strapdown algorithm and the step-and-heading approach. Unlike the strapdown algorithm, which consists of the double integration of the three orthogonal accelerometer readings, the step-and-heading approach lacks the vertical displacement estimation. We propose the first step-and-heading approach based on unaided inertial data solving 3D positioning. We present a step detector for steps up and down and a novel vertical displacement estimator. Our navigation system uses the sensor introduced in the front pocket of the trousers, a likely location of a smartphone. The proposed algorithms are based on the opening angle of the leg or pitch angle. We analyzed our step detector and compared it with the state-of-the-art, as well as our already proposed step length estimator. Lastly, we assessed our vertical displacement estimator in a real-world scenario. We found that our algorithms outperform the literature step and heading algorithms and solve 3D positioning using unaided inertial data. Additionally, we found that with the pitch angle, five activities are distinguishable: standing, sitting, walking, walking up stairs and walking down stairs. This information complements the pedestrian location and is of interest for applications, such as elderly care. PMID:25897501

  15. Inertial Pocket Navigation System: Unaided 3D Positioning.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Estefania Munoz

    2015-01-01

    Inertial navigation systems use dead-reckoning to estimate the pedestrian's position. There are two types of pedestrian dead-reckoning, the strapdown algorithm and the step-and-heading approach. Unlike the strapdown algorithm, which consists of the double integration of the three orthogonal accelerometer readings, the step-and-heading approach lacks the vertical displacement estimation. We propose the first step-and-heading approach based on unaided inertial data solving 3D positioning. We present a step detector for steps up and down and a novel vertical displacement estimator. Our navigation system uses the sensor introduced in the front pocket of the trousers, a likely location of a smartphone. The proposed algorithms are based on the opening angle of the leg or pitch angle. We analyzed our step detector and compared it with the state-of-the-art, as well as our already proposed step length estimator. Lastly, we assessed our vertical displacement estimator in a real-world scenario. We found that our algorithms outperform the literature step and heading algorithms and solve 3D positioning using unaided inertial data. Additionally, we found that with the pitch angle, five activities are distinguishable: standing, sitting, walking, walking up stairs and walking down stairs. This information complements the pedestrian location and is of interest for applications, such as elderly care. PMID:25897501

  16. Eigenvalue Contributon Estimator for Sensitivity Calculations with TSUNAMI-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Rearden, Bradley T; Williams, Mark L

    2007-01-01

    Since the release of the Tools for Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis Methodology Implementation (TSUNAMI) codes in SCALE [1], the use of sensitivity and uncertainty analysis techniques for criticality safety applications has greatly increased within the user community. In general, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is transitioning from a technique used only by specialists to a practical tool in routine use. With the desire to use the tool more routinely comes the need to improve the solution methodology to reduce the input and computational burden on the user. This paper reviews the current solution methodology of the Monte Carlo eigenvalue sensitivity analysis sequence TSUNAMI-3D, describes an alternative approach, and presents results from both methodologies.

  17. Output-sensitive 3D line integral convolution.

    PubMed

    Falk, Martin; Weiskopf, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    We propose an output-sensitive visualization method for 3D line integral convolution (LIC) whose rendering speed is largely independent of the data set size and mostly governed by the complexity of the output on the image plane. Our approach of view-dependent visualization tightly links the LIC generation with the volume rendering of the LIC result in order to avoid the computation of unnecessary LIC points: early-ray termination and empty-space leaping techniques are used to skip the computation of the LIC integral in a lazy-evaluation approach; both ray casting and texture slicing can be used as volume-rendering techniques. The input noise is modeled in object space to allow for temporal coherence under object and camera motion. Different noise models are discussed, covering dense representations based on filtered white noise all the way to sparse representations similar to oriented LIC. Aliasing artifacts are avoided by frequency control over the 3D noise and by employing a 3D variant of MIPmapping. A range of illumination models is applied to the LIC streamlines: different codimension-2 lighting models and a novel gradient-based illumination model that relies on precomputed gradients and does not require any direct calculation of gradients after the LIC integral is evaluated. We discuss the issue of proper sampling of the LIC and volume-rendering integrals by employing a frequency-space analysis of the noise model and the precomputed gradients. Finally, we demonstrate that our visualization approach lends itself to a fast graphics processing unit (GPU) implementation that supports both steady and unsteady flow. Therefore, this 3D LIC method allows users to interactively explore 3D flow by means of high-quality, view-dependent, and adaptive LIC volume visualization. Applications to flow visualization in combination with feature extraction and focus-and-context visualization are described, a comparison to previous methods is provided, and a detailed performance

  18. Phase Sensitive Cueing for 3D Objects in Overhead Images

    SciTech Connect

    Paglieroni, D W; Eppler, W G; Poland, D N

    2005-02-18

    A 3D solid model-aided object cueing method that matches phase angles of directional derivative vectors at image pixels to phase angles of vectors normal to projected model edges is described. It is intended for finding specific types of objects at arbitrary position and orientation in overhead images, independent of spatial resolution, obliqueness, acquisition conditions, and type of imaging sensor. It is shown that the phase similarity measure can be efficiently evaluated over all combinations of model position and orientation using the FFT. The highest degree of similarity over all model orientations is captured in a match surface of similarity values vs. model position. Unambiguous peaks in this surface are sorted in descending order of similarity value, and the small image thumbnails that contain them are presented to human analysts for inspection in sorted order.

  19. 3D positioning germanium detectors for gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coburn, Wayne; Amrose, Susan; Boggs, Steven E.; Lin, Robert P.; Amman, Mark S.; Burks, Morgan T.; Hull, Ethan L.; Luke, Paul N.; Madden, Norman W.

    2003-01-01

    We have developed germanium detector technologies for use in the Nuclear Compton Telescope (NCT) - a balloon-borne soft γ-ray (0.2-10 MeV) telescope to study astrophysical sources of nuclear line emission and polarization. The heart of NCT is an array of twelve large volume cross strip germanium detectors, designed to provide 3-D positions for each photon interaction with ~1mm resolution while maintaining the high spectral resolution of germanium. Here we discuss the detailed performance of our prototype 19x19 strip detector, including laboratory tests, calibrations, and numerical simulations. In addition to the x and y positions provided by the orthogonal strips, the interaction depth (z-position) in the detector is measured using the relative timing of the anode and cathode charge collection signals. We describe laboratory calibrations of the depth discrimination using collimated sources with different characteristic energies, and compare the measurements to detailed Monte Carlo simulations and charge collection routines tracing electron-hole pairs from the interaction site to the electrodes. We have also investigated the effects of charge sharing and loss between electrodes, and present these in comparison to charge collection simulations. Detailed analysis of strip-to-strip uniformity in both efficiency and spectral resolution are also presented.

  20. Melting of Temperature-Sensitive 3D Colloidal Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsayed, Ahmed; Han, Yilong; Yodh, Arjun

    2006-03-01

    We employ thermally responsive monodisperse microgel colloidal spheres to study the melting mechanisms of colloidal crystals [1]. The particle diameter decreases with increasing temperature and leads to volume fraction changes that drive phase-transitions. We will describe observations of a variety of phenomena. Premelting, the localized loss of crystalline order near defects (e.g. grain boundaries) at volume fractions above the bulk melting transition, is directly observed by video microscopy, and is characterized by monitoring the first peak position of the particle pair correlation function. We find the position of the first peak shifts toward smaller particle separations at the onset of premelting. After Delaunay triangulation, mean square rotational and translational fluctuations of bonds were measured close to and away from defects. The behavior of all such quantities exhibits increased disorder near the defects. By locally heating the material within a crystal domain, we also studied the superheating and melting of a perfect 3D crystal. Finally, the introduction of weak attractions between spheres reveals free-floating 3D crystal `blobs' which can be made to melt and recrystallize by tuning the temperature. [1] A. M. Alsayed, M. F. Islam, J. Zhang, P. J. Collings, A. G. Yodh, Science 309, 1207 (2005). This work was supported by grants from NSF (DMR-0505048 and MRSEC DMR05-20020) and NASA (NAG8-2172).

  1. Efficient sensitivity computations in 3D air quality models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kioutsioukis, Ioannis; Melas, Dimitrios; Zerefos, Christos; Ziomas, Ioannis

    2005-04-01

    The prediction of ground level ozone for air quality monitoring and assessment is simulated through an integrated system of gridded models (meteorological, photochemical), where the atmosphere is represented with a three-dimensional grid that may include thousands of grid cells. The continuity equation solved by the Photochemical Air Quality Model (PAQM) reproduces the atmospheric processes (dynamical, physical, chemical and radiative), such as moving and mixing air parcels from one grid cell to another, calculating chemical reactions, injecting new emissions. The whole modeling procedure includes several sources of uncertainty, especially in the large data sets that describe the status of the domain (boundary conditions, emissions, chemical reaction rates and several others). The robustness of the photochemical simulation is addressed in this work through the deterministic approach of sensitivity analysis. The automatic differentiation tool ADIFOR is applied on the 3D PAQM CAMx and augments its Fortran 77 code by introducing new lines of code that additionally calculate, in only one run, the gradient of the solution vector with respect to its input parameters. The applicability of the approach is evaluated through a sensitivity study of the modeled concentrations to perturbations at the boundary conditions and the emissions, for three essentially dissimilar European Metropolises of the Auto-Oil II programme (Athens, Milan, and London).

  2. Ideal Positions: 3D Sonography, Medical Visuality, Popular Culture.

    PubMed

    Seiber, Tim

    2016-03-01

    As digital technologies are integrated into medical environments, they continue to transform the experience of contemporary health care. Importantly, medicine is increasingly visual. In the history of sonography, visibility has played an important role in accessing fetal bodies for diagnostic and entertainment purposes. With the advent of three-dimensional (3D) rendering, sonography presents the fetus visually as already a child. The aesthetics of this process and the resulting imagery, made possible in digital networks, discloses important changes in the relationship between technology and biology, reproductive health and political debates, and biotechnology and culture. PMID:26164291

  3. Assessing 3D tunnel position in ACL reconstruction using a novel single image 3D-2D registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, X.; Yau, W. P.; Otake, Y.; Cheung, P. Y. S.; Hu, Y.; Taylor, R. H.

    2012-02-01

    The routinely used procedure for evaluating tunnel positions following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions based on standard X-ray images is known to pose difficulties in terms of obtaining accurate measures, especially in providing three-dimensional tunnel positions. This is largely due to the variability in individual knee joint pose relative to X-ray plates. Accurate results were reported using postoperative CT. However, its extensive usage in clinical routine is hampered by its major requirement of having CT scans of individual patients, which is not available for most ACL reconstructions. These difficulties are addressed through the proposed method, which aligns a knee model to X-ray images using our novel single-image 3D-2D registration method and then estimates the 3D tunnel position. In the proposed method, the alignment is achieved by using a novel contour-based 3D-2D registration method wherein image contours are treated as a set of oriented points. However, instead of using some form of orientation weighting function and multiplying it with a distance function, we formulate the 3D-2D registration as a probability density estimation using a mixture of von Mises-Fisher-Gaussian (vMFG) distributions and solve it through an expectation maximization (EM) algorithm. Compared with the ground-truth established from postoperative CT, our registration method in an experiment using a plastic phantom showed accurate results with errors of (-0.43°+/-1.19°, 0.45°+/-2.17°, 0.23°+/-1.05°) and (0.03+/-0.55, -0.03+/-0.54, -2.73+/-1.64) mm. As for the entry point of the ACL tunnel, one of the key measurements, it was obtained with high accuracy of 0.53+/-0.30 mm distance errors.

  4. 3D nanoporous optofluidic device for high sensitivity SERS detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H. Yazdi, Soroush; White, Ian M.

    2012-03-01

    We report the demonstration of an optofluidic surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) device that leverages nanoporous microfluidics to dramatically increase the SERS performance. A number of optofluidic approaches have been used to improve the detection limit of SERS in microfluidic channels, including active concentration of nanoparticles and/or analyte and passive concentration of nanoparticles. Previous reports have used a single nanofabricated fluidic channel to trap metal nanoparticles and adsorbed analytes. In this work, we utilize a significantly simpler fabrication approach by packing silica beads in a microfluidic channel to create a 3D nanofluidic concentration matrix. The device is fabricated using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) on glass using typical soft lithography methods. Due to the larger area of the nanoporous fluidic channel, this approach should be less prone to clogging than single nanofluidic inlets, and the loading time is decreased compared to previous reports. Using this microfluidic device, we achieved a detection limit of 4 femtomoles of Rhodamine 6G in 2 minutes. Compared to an open microfluidic channel, the 3D nanoporous concentration matrix increased the SERS signal by a factor of 250 due to the trapping of silver nanoclusters. Fiber optic cables are integrated into the PDMS to deliver excitation light directly to the detection volume and to collect Raman-scattered photons. As a result, the use of a laser diode and alignment-free integrated fiber optics implies the potential for the device to be used in portable and automated applications, such as the on-site detection of pesticides, water contaminants, and explosives.

  5. Compact camera for 3D position registration of cancer in radiation treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakayama, Toshitaka; Hiratsuka, Shun; Kamakura, Yoshihisa; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Yoshizawa, Toru

    2014-11-01

    Radiation treatments have been attracted many interests as one of revolutionary cancer therapies. Today, it is possible to treat cancers without any surgical operations. In the fields of the radiation treatments, it is important to regist the 3D position of the cancer inside the body precisely and instantaneously. To achieve 3D position registrations, we aim at developing a compact camera for 3D measurements. In this trial, we have developed a high-speed pattern projector based on the spatiotemporal conversion technique. In experiments, we show some experimental results for the 3D registrations.

  6. Doubly sensitivity-enhanced 3D TOCSY-HSQC.

    PubMed

    Wijmenga, S S; van Mierlo, C P; Steensma, E

    1996-10-01

    Recently, strategies for double sensitivity enhancement in heteronuclear three-dimensional NMR experiments were introduced (Krishnamurthy, V.V. (1995) J. Magn. Reson., B106, 170-177; Sattler et al. (1995) J. Biomol. NMR, 6, 11-22; Sattler et al. (1995) J. Magn. Reson., B108, 235-242). Since a sensitivity enhancement of a factor 2(1/2) can be achieved for each indirect dimension, nD spectra can theoretically be enhanced up to a factor of 2(((n-1)/2)). We propose and analyze a doubly enhanced three-dimensional TOCSY-HSQC sequence. The application of the doubly enhanced three-dimensional {(15)N, (1)H} TOCSY-HSQC sequence is shown for uniformly (13)C-/(15)N- and (15)N-labeled samples of the relatively large Azotobacter vinelandii flavodoxin II (179 amino acids). The main factors that contribute to the final signal-to-noise enhancement have been systematically investigated. The sensitivity enhancement obtained for the doubly enhanced TOCSY-HSQC pulse sequence as compared to the standard (unenhanced) version is close to the theoretically expected factor of two. PMID:20686884

  7. Continuous-energy eigenvalue sensitivity coefficient calculations in TSUNAMI-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Perfetti, C. M.; Rearden, B. T.

    2013-07-01

    Two methods for calculating eigenvalue sensitivity coefficients in continuous-energy Monte Carlo applications were implemented in the KENO code within the SCALE code package. The methods were used to calculate sensitivity coefficients for several test problems and produced sensitivity coefficients that agreed well with both reference sensitivities and multigroup TSUNAMI-3D sensitivity coefficients. The newly developed CLUTCH method was observed to produce sensitivity coefficients with high figures of merit and a low memory footprint, and both continuous-energy sensitivity methods met or exceeded the accuracy of the multigroup TSUNAMI-3D calculations. (authors)

  8. Position Sensitive Microcalorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadleir, J. E.; Hammock, C.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Stahle, C. K.; Bandler, S.; Saab, T.; Lindeman, M.; Porter, F. S.; Chervenak, J.; Brown, G.

    2004-01-01

    A Position Sensitive Transition-Edge Sensor (PoST) is a microcalorimeter device capable of one-dimensional imaging spectroscopy. The device consists of two Transition-Edge Sensors (TESs) connected to the ends of a long X-ray absorbing strip. The energy of a photon hitting the absorber and the position of the absorption event along the strip is measured from the response in the two sensors by analyzing the relative signal sizes, pulse rise times, and the sum of the pulses measured at each sensor, We report on the recent PoST effort at Goddard for applications to large field of view, high-energy- resolution, X-ray astrophysics.

  9. Improvement of integral 3D image quality by compensating for lens position errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okui, Makoto; Arai, Jun; Kobayashi, Masaki; Okano, Fumio

    2004-05-01

    Integral photography (IP) or integral imaging is a way to create natural-looking three-dimensional (3-D) images with full parallax. Integral three-dimensional television (integral 3-D TV) uses a method that electronically presents 3-D images in real time based on this IP method. The key component is a lens array comprising many micro-lenses for shooting and displaying. We have developed a prototype device with about 18,000 lenses using a super-high-definition camera with 2,000 scanning lines. Positional errors of these high-precision lenses as well as the camera's lenses will cause distortions in the elemental image, which directly affect the quality of the 3-D image and the viewing area. We have devised a way to compensate for such geometrical position errors and used it for the integral 3-D TV prototype, resulting in an improvement in both viewing zone and picture quality.

  10. 3D sensitive voxel detector of ionizing radiation based on Timepix device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukup, P.; Jakubek, J.; Vykydal, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Position sensitive detectors are evolving towards higher segmentation geometries from 0D (single pad) over 1D (strip) to 2D (pixel) detectors. Each step has brought up substantial expansion in the field of applications. The next logical step in this evolution is to design a 3D, i.e. voxel detector. The voxel detector can be constructed from 2D volume element detectors arranged in layers forming a 3D matrix of sensitive elements — voxels. Such detectors can effectively record tracks of energetic particles. By proper analysis of these tracks it is possible to determine the type, direction and energy of the primary particle. One of the prominent applications of such device is in the localization and identification of gamma and neutron sources in the environment. It can be also used for emission and transmission radiography in many fields where standard imagers are currently utilized. The qualitative properties of current imagers such as: spatial resolution, efficiency, directional sensitivity, energy sensitivity and selectivity (background suppression) can be improved. The first prototype of a voxel detector was built using a number of Timepix devices. Timepix is hybrid semiconductor detector consisting of a segmented semiconductor sensor bump-bonded to a readout chip. Each sensor contains 256x256 square pixels of 55 μm size. The voxel detector prototype was successfully tested to prove the concept functionality. The detector has a modular architecture with a daisy chain connection of the individual detector layers. This permits easy rearrangement due to its modularity, while keeping a single readout system for a variable number of detector layers. A limitation of this approach is the relatively large inter-layer distance (4 mm) compared to the pixel thickness (0.3 mm). Therefore the next step in the design is to decrease the space between the 2D detectors.

  11. 3D position determination in monolithic crystals coupled to SiPMs for PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etxebeste, Ane; Barrio, John; Muñoz, Enrique; Oliver, Josep F.; Solaz, Carles; Llosá, Gabriela

    2016-05-01

    The interest in using continuous monolithic crystals in positron emission tomography (PET) has grown in the last years. Coupled to silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), the detector can combine high sensitivity and high resolution, the two main factors to be maximized in a positron emission tomograph. In this work, the position determination capability of a detector comprised of a 12× 12× 10 mm3 LYSO crystal coupled to an 8× 8 -pixel array of SiPMs is evaluated. The 3D interaction position of γ-rays is estimated using an analytical model of the light distribution including reflections on the facets of the crystal. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to evaluate different crystal reflectors and geometries. The method has been characterized and applied to different cases. Intrinsic resolution obtained with the position estimation method used in this work, applied to experimental data, achieves sub-millimetre resolution values. Average resolution over the detector surface for 5 mm thick crystal is  ∼0.9 mm FWHM and  ∼1.2 mm FWHM for 10 mm thick crystal. Depth of interaction resolution is close to 2 mm FWHM in both cases, while the FWTM is  ∼5.3 mm for 5 mm thick crystal and  ∼9.6 mm for 10 mm thick crystal.

  12. 3D position determination in monolithic crystals coupled to SiPMs for PET.

    PubMed

    Etxebeste, Ane; Barrio, John; Muñoz, Enrique; Oliver, Josep F; Solaz, Carles; Llosá, Gabriela

    2016-05-21

    The interest in using continuous monolithic crystals in positron emission tomography (PET) has grown in the last years. Coupled to silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), the detector can combine high sensitivity and high resolution, the two main factors to be maximized in a positron emission tomograph. In this work, the position determination capability of a detector comprised of a [Formula: see text] mm(3) LYSO crystal coupled to an [Formula: see text]-pixel array of SiPMs is evaluated. The 3D interaction position of γ-rays is estimated using an analytical model of the light distribution including reflections on the facets of the crystal. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to evaluate different crystal reflectors and geometries. The method has been characterized and applied to different cases. Intrinsic resolution obtained with the position estimation method used in this work, applied to experimental data, achieves sub-millimetre resolution values. Average resolution over the detector surface for 5 mm thick crystal is  ∼0.9 mm FWHM and  ∼1.2 mm FWHM for 10 mm thick crystal. Depth of interaction resolution is close to 2 mm FWHM in both cases, while the FWTM is  ∼5.3 mm for 5 mm thick crystal and  ∼9.6 mm for 10 mm thick crystal. PMID:27119737

  13. Computationally efficient storage of 3D particle intensity and position data for use in 3D PIV and 3D PTV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, C.; Buchmann, N. A.; Soria, J.

    2013-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) volumetric velocity measurement techniques, such as tomographic or holographic particle image velocimetry (PIV), rely upon the computationally intensive formation, storage and localized interrogation of multiple 3D particle intensity fields. Calculation of a single velocity field typically requires the extraction of particle intensities into tens of thousands of 3D sub-volumes or discrete particle clusters, the processing of which can significantly affect the performance of 3D cross-correlation based PIV and 3D particle tracking velocimetry (PTV). In this paper, a series of popular and customized volumetric data formats are presented and investigated using synthetic particle volumes and experimental data arising from tomographic PIV measurements of a turbulent boundary layer. Results show that the use of a sub-grid ordered non-zero intensity format with a sub-grid size of 16 × 16 × 16 points provides the best performance for cross-correlation based PIV analysis, while a particle clustered non-zero intensity format provides the best format for PTV applications. In practical tomographic PIV measurements the sub-grid ordered non-zero intensity format offered a 29% improvement in reconstruction times, while providing a 93% reduction in volume data requirements and a 28% overall improvement in cross-correlation based velocity analysis and validation times.

  14. Sensitivity Analysis of the Scattering-Based SARBM3D Despeckling Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Di Simone, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery greatly suffers from multiplicative speckle noise, typical of coherent image acquisition sensors, such as SAR systems. Therefore, a proper and accurate despeckling preprocessing step is almost mandatory to aid the interpretation and processing of SAR data by human users and computer algorithms, respectively. Very recently, a scattering-oriented version of the popular SAR Block-Matching 3D (SARBM3D) despeckling filter, named Scattering-Based (SB)-SARBM3D, was proposed. The new filter is based on the a priori knowledge of the local topography of the scene. In this paper, an experimental sensitivity analysis of the above-mentioned despeckling algorithm is carried out, and the main results are shown and discussed. In particular, the role of both electromagnetic and geometrical parameters of the surface and the impact of its scattering behavior are investigated. Furthermore, a comprehensive sensitivity analysis of the SB-SARBM3D filter against the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) resolution and the SAR image-DEM coregistration step is also provided. The sensitivity analysis shows a significant robustness of the algorithm against most of the surface parameters, while the DEM resolution plays a key role in the despeckling process. Furthermore, the SB-SARBM3D algorithm outperforms the original SARBM3D in the presence of the most realistic scattering behaviors of the surface. An actual scenario is also presented to assess the DEM role in real-life conditions. PMID:27347971

  15. Sensitivity Analysis of the Scattering-Based SARBM3D Despeckling Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Di Simone, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery greatly suffers from multiplicative speckle noise, typical of coherent image acquisition sensors, such as SAR systems. Therefore, a proper and accurate despeckling preprocessing step is almost mandatory to aid the interpretation and processing of SAR data by human users and computer algorithms, respectively. Very recently, a scattering-oriented version of the popular SAR Block-Matching 3D (SARBM3D) despeckling filter, named Scattering-Based (SB)-SARBM3D, was proposed. The new filter is based on the a priori knowledge of the local topography of the scene. In this paper, an experimental sensitivity analysis of the above-mentioned despeckling algorithm is carried out, and the main results are shown and discussed. In particular, the role of both electromagnetic and geometrical parameters of the surface and the impact of its scattering behavior are investigated. Furthermore, a comprehensive sensitivity analysis of the SB-SARBM3D filter against the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) resolution and the SAR image-DEM coregistration step is also provided. The sensitivity analysis shows a significant robustness of the algorithm against most of the surface parameters, while the DEM resolution plays a key role in the despeckling process. Furthermore, the SB-SARBM3D algorithm outperforms the original SARBM3D in the presence of the most realistic scattering behaviors of the surface. An actual scenario is also presented to assess the DEM role in real-life conditions. PMID:27347971

  16. Bioimpedance monitoring of 3D cell culturing--complementary electrode configurations for enhanced spatial sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Canali, Chiara; Heiskanen, Arto; Muhammad, Haseena Bashir; Høyum, Per; Pettersen, Fred-Johan; Hemmingsen, Mette; Wolff, Anders; Dufva, Martin; Martinsen, Ørjan Grøttem; Emnéus, Jenny

    2015-01-15

    A bioimpedance platform is presented as a promising tool for non-invasive real-time monitoring of the entire process of three-dimensional (3D) cell culturing in a hydrogel scaffold. In this study, the dynamics involved in the whole process of 3D cell culturing, starting from polymerisation of a bare 3D gelatin scaffold, to human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) encapsulation and proliferation, was monitored over time. The platform consists of a large rectangular culture chamber with four embedded vertical gold plate electrodes that were exploited in two- and three terminal (2T and 3T) measurement configurations. By switching between the different combinations of electrode couples, it was possible to generate a multiplexing-like approach, which allowed for collecting spatially distributed information within the 3D space. Computational finite element (FE) analysis and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) characterisation were used to determine the configurations' sensitivity field localisation. The 2T setup gives insight into the interfacial phenomena at both electrode surfaces and covers the central part of the 3D cell culture volume, while the four 3T modes provide focus on the dynamics at the corners of the 3D culture chamber. By combining a number of electrode configurations, complementary spatially distributed information on a large 3D cell culture can be obtained with maximised sensitivity in the entire 3D space. The experimental results show that cell proliferation can be monitored within the tested biomimetic environment, paving the way to further developments in bioimpedance tracking of 3D cell cultures and tissue engineering. PMID:25058941

  17. Interfacing electrogenic cells with 3D nanoelectrodes: position, shape, and size matter.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Francesca; Dasgupta, Sabyasachi; Schnitker, Jan; Auth, Thorsten; Neumann, Elmar; Panaitov, Gregory; Gompper, Gerhard; Offenhäusser, Andreas

    2014-07-22

    An in-depth understanding of the interface between cells and nanostructures is one of the key challenges for coupling electrically excitable cells and electronic devices. Recently, various 3D nanostructures have been introduced to stimulate and record electrical signals emanating from inside of the cell. Even though such approaches are highly sensitive and scalable, it remains an open question how cells couple to 3D structures, in particular how the engulfment-like processes of nanostructures work. Here, we present a profound study of the cell interface with two widely used nanostructure types, cylindrical pillars with and without a cap. While basic functionality was shown for these approaches before, a systematic investigation linking experimental data with membrane properties was not presented so far. The combination of electron microscopy investigations with a theoretical membrane deformation model allows us to predict the optimal shape and dimensions of 3D nanostructures for cell-chip coupling. PMID:24963873

  18. 3D surface imaging of the human female torso in upright to supine positions.

    PubMed

    Reece, Gregory P; Merchant, Fatima; Andon, Johnny; Khatam, Hamed; Ravi-Chandar, K; Weston, June; Fingeret, Michelle C; Lane, Chris; Duncan, Kelly; Markey, Mia K

    2015-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) surface imaging of breasts is usually done with the patient in an upright position, which does not permit comparison of changes in breast morphology with changes in position of the torso. In theory, these limitations may be eliminated if the 3D camera system could remain fixed relative to the woman's torso as she is tilted from 0 to 90°. We mounted a 3dMDtorso imaging system onto a bariatric tilt table to image breasts at different tilt angles. The images were validated using a rigid plastic mannequin and the metrics compared to breast metrics obtained from five subjects with diverse morphology. The differences between distances between the same fiducial marks differed between the supine and upright positions by less than 1% for the mannequin, whereas the differences for distances between the same fiducial marks on the breasts of the five subjects differed significantly and could be correlated with body mass index and brassiere cup size for each position change. We show that a tilt table-3D imaging system can be used to determine quantitative changes in the morphology of ptotic breasts when the subject is tilted to various angles. PMID:25703742

  19. 3D Surface Imaging of the Human Female Torso in Upright to Supine Positions

    PubMed Central

    Reece, Gregory P.; Merchant, Fatima; Andon, Johnny; Khatam, Hamed; Ravi-Chandar, K.; Weston, June; Fingeret, Michelle C.; Lane, Chris; Duncan, Kelly; Markey, Mia K.

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) surface imaging of breasts is usually done with the patient in an upright position, which does not permit comparison of changes in breast morphology with changes in position of the torso. In theory, these limitations may be eliminated if the 3D camera system could remain fixed relative to the woman’s torso as she is tilted from 0 to 90 degrees. We mounted a 3dMDtorso imaging system onto a bariatric tilt table to image breasts at different tilt angles. The images were validated using a rigid plastic mannequin and the metrics compared to breast metrics obtained from 5 subjects with diverse morphology. The differences between distances between the same fiducial marks differed between the supine and upright positions by less than one percent for the mannequin, whereas the differences for distances between the same fiducial marks on the breasts of the 5 subjects differed significantly and could be correlated with body mass index and brassiere cup size for each position change. We show that a tilt table - 3D imaging system can be used to determine quantitative changes in the morphology of ptotic breasts when the subject is tilted to various angles. PMID:25703742

  20. 3D measurement of the position of gold particles via evanescent digital holographic particle tracking velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satake, Shin-ichi; Unno, Noriyuki; Nakata, Shuichiro; Taniguchi, Jun

    2016-08-01

    A new technique based on digital holography and evanescent waves was developed for 3D measurements of the position of gold nanoparticles in water. In this technique, an intensity profile is taken from a holographic image of a gold particle. To detect the position of the gold particle with high accuracy, its holographic image is recorded on a nanosized step made of MEXFLON, which has a refractive index close to that of water, and the position of the particle is reconstructed by means of digital holography. The height of the nanosized step was measured by using a profilometer and the digitally reconstructed height of the glass substrate had good agreement with the measured value. Furthermore, this method can be used to accurately track the 3D position of a gold particle in water.

  1. Sensitivity of an MT Array to 3D Structure Outside the Array Footprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booker, J. R.; Mackie, R. L.; Burd, A. I.; Pomposiello, M. C.; Favetto, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    Standard data collection strategy in magnetotellurics (MT) is to deploy a profile or array of sites that spans the target of interest. There is no expectation that structure can be imaged outside the area covered by sites. We have inverted two MT arrays for 3D structure under Argentina. The two arrays do not overlap, but serendipitously the 3D model for the northern array overlaps the position of a prominent 3D deep conductive structure seen in the inversion of the southern array. To our surprise this deep southern feature is also imaged by the northern array even though it is well outside the footprint of the northern array. It therefore appears that typical intuition about one's ability to image structure outside the span of the sites is not always true. We present model studies to demonstrate why this is so and under what conditions one can expect a 3D array to be capable of imaging structure outside the array.

  2. 3D positional tracking of ellipsoidal particles in a microtube flow using holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byeon, Hyeok Jun; Seo, Kyung Won; Lee, Sang Joon

    2014-11-01

    Understanding of micro-scale flow phenomena is getting large attention under advances in micro-scale measurement technologies. Especially, the dynamics of particles suspended in a fluid is essential in both scientific and industrial fields. Moreover, most particles handled in research and industrial fields have non-spherical shapes rather than a simple spherical shape. Under various flow conditions, these non-spherical particles exhibit unique dynamic behaviors. To analyze these dynamic behaviors in a fluid flow, 3D positional information of the particles should be measured accurately. In this study, digital holographic microscopy (DHM) is employed to measure the 3D positional information of non-spherical particles, which are fabricated by stretching spherical polystyrene particles. 3D motions of those particles are obtained by interpreting the holograms captured from particles. Ellipsoidal particles with known size and shape are observed to verify the performance of the DHM technique. In addition, 3D positions of particles in a microtube flow are traced. This DHM technique exhibits promising potential in the analysis of dynamic behaviors of non-spherical particles suspended in micro-scale fluid flows.

  3. 3D positioning scheme exploiting nano-scale IR-UWB orthogonal pulses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nammoon; Kim, Youngok

    2011-01-01

    In these days, the development of positioning technology for realizing ubiquitous environments has become one of the most important issues. The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a well-known positioning scheme, but it is not suitable for positioning in in-door/building environments because it is difficult to maintain line-of-sight condition between satellites and a GPS receiver. To such problem, various positioning methods such as RFID, WLAN, ZigBee, and Bluetooth have been developed for indoor positioning scheme. However, the majority of positioning schemes are focused on the two-dimension positioning even though three-dimension (3D) positioning information is more useful especially in indoor applications, such as smart space, U-health service, context aware service, etc. In this paper, a 3D positioning system based on mutually orthogonal nano-scale impulse radio ultra-wideband (IR-UWB) signals and cross array antenna is proposed. The proposed scheme uses nano-scale IR-UWB signals providing fine time resolution and high-resolution multiple signal specification algorithm for the time-of-arrival and the angle-of-arrival estimation. The performance is evaluated over various IEEE 802.15.4a channel models, and simulation results show the effectiveness of proposed scheme. PMID:21970578

  4. Multiview 3-D Echocardiography Fusion with Breath-Hold Position Tracking Using an Optical Tracking System.

    PubMed

    Punithakumar, Kumaradevan; Hareendranathan, Abhilash R; McNulty, Alexander; Biamonte, Marina; He, Allen; Noga, Michelle; Boulanger, Pierre; Becher, Harald

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in echocardiography allow real-time 3-D dynamic image acquisition of the heart. However, one of the major limitations of 3-D echocardiography is the limited field of view, which results in an acquisition insufficient to cover the whole geometry of the heart. This study proposes the novel approach of fusing multiple 3-D echocardiography images using an optical tracking system that incorporates breath-hold position tracking to infer that the heart remains at the same position during different acquisitions. In six healthy male volunteers, 18 pairs of apical/parasternal 3-D ultrasound data sets were acquired during a single breath-hold as well as in subsequent breath-holds. The proposed method yielded a field of view improvement of 35.4 ± 12.5%. To improve the quality of the fused image, a wavelet-based fusion algorithm was developed that computes pixelwise likelihood values for overlapping voxels from multiple image views. The proposed wavelet-based fusion approach yielded significant improvement in contrast (66.46 ± 21.68%), contrast-to-noise ratio (49.92 ± 28.71%), signal-to-noise ratio (57.59 ± 47.85%) and feature count (13.06 ± 7.44%) in comparison to individual views. PMID:27166019

  5. High sensitivity plasmonic biosensor based on nanoimprinted quasi 3D nanosquares for cell detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shuyan; Li, Hualin; Yang, Mengsu; Pang, Stella W.

    2016-07-01

    Quasi three-dimensional (3D) plasmonic nanostructures consisting of Au nanosquares on top of SU-8 nanopillars and Au nanoholes on the bottom were developed and fabricated using nanoimprint lithography with simultaneous thermal and UV exposure. These 3D plasmonic nanostructures were used to detect cell concentration of lung cancer A549 cells, retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, and breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Nanoimprint technology has the advantage of producing high uniformity plasmonic nanostructures for such biosensors. Multiple resonance modes were observed in these quasi 3D plasmonic nanostructures. The hybrid coupling of localized surface plasmon resonances and Fabry–Perot cavity modes in the quasi 3D nanostructures resulted in high sensitivity of 496 nm/refractive index unit. The plasmonic resonance peak wavelength and sensitivity could be tuned by varying the Au thickness. Resonance peak shifts for different cells at the same concentration were distinct due to their different cell area and confluency. The cell concentration detection limit covered a large range of 5 × 102 to 1 × 107 cells ml‑1 with these new plasmonic nanostructures. They also provide a large resonance peak shift of 51 nm for as little as 0.08 cells mm‑2 of RPE cells for high sensitivity cell detection.

  6. High sensitivity plasmonic biosensor based on nanoimprinted quasi 3D nanosquares for cell detection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shuyan; Li, Hualin; Yang, Mengsu; Pang, Stella W

    2016-07-22

    Quasi three-dimensional (3D) plasmonic nanostructures consisting of Au nanosquares on top of SU-8 nanopillars and Au nanoholes on the bottom were developed and fabricated using nanoimprint lithography with simultaneous thermal and UV exposure. These 3D plasmonic nanostructures were used to detect cell concentration of lung cancer A549 cells, retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, and breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Nanoimprint technology has the advantage of producing high uniformity plasmonic nanostructures for such biosensors. Multiple resonance modes were observed in these quasi 3D plasmonic nanostructures. The hybrid coupling of localized surface plasmon resonances and Fabry-Perot cavity modes in the quasi 3D nanostructures resulted in high sensitivity of 496 nm/refractive index unit. The plasmonic resonance peak wavelength and sensitivity could be tuned by varying the Au thickness. Resonance peak shifts for different cells at the same concentration were distinct due to their different cell area and confluency. The cell concentration detection limit covered a large range of 5 × 10(2) to 1 × 10(7) cells ml(-1) with these new plasmonic nanostructures. They also provide a large resonance peak shift of 51 nm for as little as 0.08 cells mm(-2) of RPE cells for high sensitivity cell detection. PMID:27275952

  7. Free-Breathing 3D Whole Heart Black Blood Imaging with Motion Sensitized Driven Equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Subashini; Hu, Peng; Kissinger, Kraig V.; Goddu, Beth; Goepfert, Lois; Schmidt, Ehud J.; Kozerke, Sebastian; Nezafat, Reza

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To assess the efficacy and robustness of motion sensitized driven equilibrium (MSDE) for blood suppression in volumetric 3D whole heart cardiac MR. Materials and Methods To investigate the efficacy of MSDE on blood suppression and myocardial SNR loss on different imaging sequences. 7 healthy adult subjects were imaged using 3D ECG-triggered MSDE-prep T1-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE), and spoiled gradient echo (GRE), after optimization of MSDE parameters in a pilot study of 5 subjects. Imaging artifacts, myocardial and blood SNR were assessed. Subsequently, the feasibility of isotropic spatial resolution MSDE-prep black-blood was assessed in 6 subjects. Finally, 15 patients with known or suspected cardiovascular disease were recruited to be imaged using conventional multi-slice 2D DIR TSE imaging sequence and 3D MSDE-prep spoiled GRE. Results The MSDE-prep yields significant blood suppression (75-92%), enabling a volumetric 3D black-blood assessment of the whole heart with significantly improved visualization of the chamber walls. The MSDE-prep also allowed successful acquisition of black-blood images with isotropic spatial resolution. In the patient study, 3D black-blood MSDE-prep and DIR resulted in similar blood suppression in LV and RV walls but the MSDE prep had superior myocardial signal and wall sharpness. Conclusion MSDE-prep allows volumetric black-blood imaging of the heart. PMID:22517477

  8. CONTINUOUS-ENERGY MONTE CARLO METHODS FOR CALCULATING GENERALIZED RESPONSE SENSITIVITIES USING TSUNAMI-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Perfetti, Christopher M; Rearden, Bradley T

    2014-01-01

    This work introduces a new approach for calculating sensitivity coefficients for generalized neutronic responses to nuclear data uncertainties using continuous-energy Monte Carlo methods. The approach presented in this paper, known as the GEAR-MC method, allows for the calculation of generalized sensitivity coefficients for multiple responses in a single Monte Carlo calculation with no nuclear data perturbations or knowledge of nuclear covariance data. The theory behind the GEAR-MC method is presented here, and proof of principle is demonstrated by using the GEAR-MC method to calculate sensitivity coefficients for responses in several 3D, continuous-energy Monte Carlo applications.

  9. 3D Image-Guided Automatic Pipette Positioning for Single Cell Experiments in vivo.

    PubMed

    Long, Brian; Li, Lu; Knoblich, Ulf; Zeng, Hongkui; Peng, Hanchuan

    2015-01-01

    We report a method to facilitate single cell, image-guided experiments including in vivo electrophysiology and electroporation. Our method combines 3D image data acquisition, visualization and on-line image analysis with precise control of physical probes such as electrophysiology microelectrodes in brain tissue in vivo. Adaptive pipette positioning provides a platform for future advances in automated, single cell in vivo experiments. PMID:26689553

  10. 3D Image-Guided Automatic Pipette Positioning for Single Cell Experiments in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Long, Brian; Li, Lu; Knoblich, Ulf; Zeng, Hongkui; Peng, Hanchuan

    2015-01-01

    We report a method to facilitate single cell, image-guided experiments including in vivo electrophysiology and electroporation. Our method combines 3D image data acquisition, visualization and on-line image analysis with precise control of physical probes such as electrophysiology microelectrodes in brain tissue in vivo. Adaptive pipette positioning provides a platform for future advances in automated, single cell in vivo experiments. PMID:26689553

  11. Dynamic WIFI-Based Indoor Positioning in 3D Virtual World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, S.; Sohn, G.; Wang, L.; Lee, W.

    2013-11-01

    A web-based system based on the 3DTown project was proposed using Google Earth plug-in that brings information from indoor positioning devices and real-time sensors into an integrated 3D indoor and outdoor virtual world to visualize the dynamics of urban life within the 3D context of a city. We addressed limitation of the 3DTown project with particular emphasis on video surveillance camera used for indoor tracking purposes. The proposed solution was to utilize wireless local area network (WLAN) WiFi as a replacement technology for localizing objects of interest due to the wide spread availability and large coverage area of WiFi in indoor building spaces. Indoor positioning was performed using WiFi without modifying existing building infrastructure or introducing additional access points (AP)s. A hybrid probabilistic approach was used for indoor positioning based on previously recorded WiFi fingerprint database in the Petrie Science and Engineering building at York University. In addition, we have developed a 3D building modeling module that allows for efficient reconstruction of outdoor building models to be integrated with indoor building models; a sensor module for receiving, distributing, and visualizing real-time sensor data; and a web-based visualization module for users to explore the dynamic urban life in a virtual world. In order to solve the problems in the implementation of the proposed system, we introduce approaches for integration of indoor building models with indoor positioning data, as well as real-time sensor information and visualization on the web-based system. In this paper we report the preliminary results of our prototype system, demonstrating the system's capability for implementing a dynamic 3D indoor and outdoor virtual world that is composed of discrete modules connected through pre-determined communication protocols.

  12. Performance and sensitivity evaluation of 3D spot detection methods in confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Štěpka, Karel; Matula, Pavel; Matula, Petr; Wörz, Stefan; Rohr, Karl; Kozubek, Michal

    2015-08-01

    Reliable 3D detection of diffraction-limited spots in fluorescence microscopy images is an important task in subcellular observation. Generally, fluorescence microscopy images are heavily degraded by noise and non-specifically stained background, making reliable detection a challenging task. In this work, we have studied the performance and parameter sensitivity of eight recent methods for 3D spot detection. The study is based on both 3D synthetic image data and 3D real confocal microscopy images. The synthetic images were generated using a simulator modeling the complete imaging setup, including the optical path as well as the image acquisition process. We studied the detection performance and parameter sensitivity under different noise levels and under the influence of uneven background signal. To evaluate the parameter sensitivity, we propose a novel measure based on the gradient magnitude of the F1 score. We measured the success rate of the individual methods for different types of the image data and found that the type of image degradation is an important factor. Using the F1 score and the newly proposed sensitivity measure, we found that the parameter sensitivity is not necessarily proportional to the success rate of a method. This also provided an explanation why the best performing method for synthetic data was outperformed by other methods when applied to the real microscopy images. On the basis of the results obtained, we conclude with the recommendation of the HDome method for data with relatively low variations in quality, or the Sorokin method for image sets in which the quality varies more. We also provide alternative recommendations for high-quality images, and for situations in which detailed parameter tuning might be deemed expensive. PMID:26033916

  13. Mechanical Performance and Parameter Sensitivity Analysis of 3D Braided Composites Joints

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yue; Nan, Bo; Chen, Liang

    2014-01-01

    3D braided composite joints are the important components in CFRP truss, which have significant influence on the reliability and lightweight of structures. To investigate the mechanical performance of 3D braided composite joints, a numerical method based on the microscopic mechanics is put forward, the modeling technologies, including the material constants selection, element type, grid size, and the boundary conditions, are discussed in detail. Secondly, a method for determination of ultimate bearing capacity is established, which can consider the strength failure. Finally, the effect of load parameters, geometric parameters, and process parameters on the ultimate bearing capacity of joints is analyzed by the global sensitivity analysis method. The results show that the main pipe diameter thickness ratio γ, the main pipe diameter D, and the braided angle α are sensitive to the ultimate bearing capacity N. PMID:25121121

  14. Mechanical performance and parameter sensitivity analysis of 3D braided composites joints.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Nan, Bo; Chen, Liang

    2014-01-01

    3D braided composite joints are the important components in CFRP truss, which have significant influence on the reliability and lightweight of structures. To investigate the mechanical performance of 3D braided composite joints, a numerical method based on the microscopic mechanics is put forward, the modeling technologies, including the material constants selection, element type, grid size, and the boundary conditions, are discussed in detail. Secondly, a method for determination of ultimate bearing capacity is established, which can consider the strength failure. Finally, the effect of load parameters, geometric parameters, and process parameters on the ultimate bearing capacity of joints is analyzed by the global sensitivity analysis method. The results show that the main pipe diameter thickness ratio γ, the main pipe diameter D, and the braided angle α are sensitive to the ultimate bearing capacity N. PMID:25121121

  15. Detection, 3-D positioning, and sizing of small pore defects using digital radiography and tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindgren, Erik

    2014-12-01

    This article presents an algorithm that handles the detection, positioning, and sizing of submillimeter-sized pores in welds using radiographic inspection and tracking. The possibility to detect, position, and size pores which have a low contrast-to-noise ratio increases the value of the nondestructive evaluation of welds by facilitating fatigue life predictions with lower uncertainty. In this article, a multiple hypothesis tracker with an extended Kalman filter is used to track an unknown number of pore indications in a sequence of radiographs as an object is rotated. Each pore is not required to be detected in all radiographs. In addition, in the tracking step, three-dimensional (3-D) positions of pore defects are calculated. To optimize, set up, and pre-evaluate the algorithm, the article explores a design of experimental approach in combination with synthetic radiographs of titanium laser welds containing pore defects. The pre-evaluation on synthetic radiographs at industrially reasonable contrast-to-noise ratios indicate less than 1% false detection rates at high detection rates and less than 0.1 mm of positioning errors for more than 90% of the pores. A comparison between experimental results of the presented algorithm and a computerized tomography reference measurement shows qualitatively good agreement in the 3-D positions of approximately 0.1-mm diameter pores in 5-mm-thick Ti-6242.

  16. Quantifying axis orientation in 3D using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Black, Adam J.; Wang, Hui; Akkin, Taner

    2016-03-01

    The optic axis of birefringent tissues indicates the direction of structural anisotropy. Polarization-sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography (PS-OCT) can provide reflectivity contrast as well as retardance and optic axis orientation contrasts that originate from tissue birefringence. We introduce imaging 3D tissue anisotropy by using a single-camera and polarization-maintaining fiber (PMF) based PS-OCT, which utilizes normal and angled illuminations. Because environmental factors such as the movement of PMF and temperature fluctuations induce arbitrary phase changes, the optic axis orientation measurement has a time-varying offset. In order to measure the absolute axis orientation, we add a calibration path which dynamically provides the arbitrary offset to be subtracted from the relative axis orientation values. The axis orientation on the normal plane is the 2D projection of the fiber direction in 3D space. We propose to characterize the axis orientation in different planes (xy, xy' and x'y planes) by using normal and angled illuminations. This allows calculation of the polar angle that completes the orientation information in 3D. Polarization-based optical systems relying on one illumination angle measure the "apparent birefringence" that light encounters rather than the "true birefringence". Birefringence as a measure of anisotropy is quantified with the orientation information in 3D. The method and validation with a biological tissue are presented. The study can facilitate imaging and mapping the structural connections in anisotropic tissues including the brain.

  17. 3-D periodic mesoporous nickel oxide for nonenzymatic uric acid sensors with improved sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Cao, Yang; Chen, Yong; Zhou, Yang; Huang, Qingyou

    2015-12-01

    3-D periodic mesoporous nickel oxide (NiO) particles with crystalline walls have been synthesized through the microwave-assisted hard template route toward the KIT-6 silica. It was investigated as a nonenzymatic amperometric sensor for the detection of uric acid. 3-D periodic nickel oxide matrix has been obtained by the hard template route from the KIT-6 silica template. The crystalline nickel oxide belonged to the Ia3d space group, and its structure was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption-desorption, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The analysis results showed that the microwave-assisted mesoporous NiO materials were more appropriate to be electrochemical sensors than the traditional mesoporous NiO. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) revealed that 3-D periodic NiO exhibited a direct electrocatalytic activity for the oxidation of uric acid in sodium hydroxide solution. The enzyme-less amperometric sensor used in the detection of uric acid with detection limit of 0.005 μM (S/N = 3) over wide linear detection ranges up to 0.374 mM and with a high sensitivity of 756.26 μA mM-1 cm-2, and a possible mechanism was also given in the paper.

  18. Simultaneous, accurate measurement of the 3D position and orientation of single molecules

    PubMed Central

    Backlund, Mikael P.; Lew, Matthew D.; Backer, Adam S.; Sahl, Steffen J.; Grover, Ginni; Agrawal, Anurag; Piestun, Rafael; Moerner, W. E.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, single molecule-based superresolution fluorescence microscopy has surpassed the diffraction limit to improve resolution to the order of 20 nm or better. These methods typically use image fitting that assumes an isotropic emission pattern from the single emitters as well as control of the emitter concentration. However, anisotropic single-molecule emission patterns arise from the transition dipole when it is rotationally immobile, depending highly on the molecule’s 3D orientation and z position. Failure to account for this fact can lead to significant lateral (x, y) mislocalizations (up to ∼50–200 nm). This systematic error can cause distortions in the reconstructed images, which can translate into degraded resolution. Using parameters uniquely inherent in the double-lobed nature of the Double-Helix Point Spread Function, we account for such mislocalizations and simultaneously measure 3D molecular orientation and 3D position. Mislocalizations during an axial scan of a single molecule manifest themselves as an apparent lateral shift in its position, which causes the standard deviation (SD) of its lateral position to appear larger than the SD expected from photon shot noise. By correcting each localization based on an estimated orientation, we are able to improve SDs in lateral localization from ∼2× worse than photon-limited precision (48 vs. 25 nm) to within 5 nm of photon-limited precision. Furthermore, by averaging many estimations of orientation over different depths, we are able to improve from a lateral SD of 116 (∼4× worse than the photon-limited precision; 28 nm) to 34 nm (within 6 nm of the photon limit). PMID:23129640

  19. Sensitivity Tuning through Additive Heterogeneous Plasmon Coupling between 3D Assembled Plasmonic Nanoparticle and Nanocup Arrays.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sujin; Zhou, Xiangfei; Liu, Gang Logan

    2016-07-01

    Plasmonic substrates have fixed sensitivity once the geometry of the structure is defined. In order to improve the sensitivity, significant research effort has been focused on designing new plasmonic structures, which involves high fabrication costs; however, a method is reported for improving sensitivity not by redesigning the structure but by simply assembling plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) near the evanescent field of the underlying 3D plasmonic nanostructure. Here, a nanoscale Lycurgus cup array (nanoLCA) is employed as a base colorimetric plasmonic substrate and an assembly template. Compared to the nanoLCA, the NP assembled nanoLCA (NP-nanoLCA) exhibits much higher sensitivity for both bulk refractive index sensing and biotin-streptavidin binding detection. The limit of detection of the NP-nanoLCA is at least ten times smaller when detecting biotin-streptavidin conjugation. The numerical calculations confirm the importance of the additive plasmon coupling between the NPs and the nanoLCA for a denser and stronger electric field in the same 3D volumetric space. Tunable sensitivity is accomplished by controlling the number of NPs in each nanocup, or the number density of the hot spots. This simple yet scalable and cost-effective method of using additive heterogeneous plasmon coupling effects will benefit various chemical, medical, and environmental plasmon-based sensors. PMID:27206214

  20. 3D positional control of magnetic levitation system using adaptive control: improvement of positioning control in horizontal plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, Toshimasa; Fujitani, Yasuhiro; Kato, Norihiko; Tsuda, Naoaki; Nomura, Yoshihiko; Matsui, Hirokazu

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to establish a technique that levitates and conveys a hand, a kind of micro-robot, by applying magnetic forces: the hand is assumed to have a function of holding and detaching the objects. The equipment to be used in our experiments consists of four pole-pieces of electromagnets, and is expected to work as a 4DOF drive unit within some restricted range of 3D space: the three DOF are corresponding to 3D positional control and the remaining one DOF, rotational oscillation damping control. Having used the same equipment, Khamesee et al. had manipulated the impressed voltages on the four electric magnetics by a PID controller by the use of the feedback signal of the hand's 3D position, the controlled variable. However, in this system, there were some problems remaining: in the horizontal direction, when translating the hand out of restricted region, positional control performance was suddenly degraded. The authors propose a method to apply an adaptive control to the horizontal directional control. It is expected that the technique to be presented in this paper contributes not only to the improvement of the response characteristic but also to widening the applicable range in the horizontal directional control.

  1. Robust 3D Position Estimation in Wide and Unconstrained Indoor Environments

    PubMed Central

    Mossel, Annette

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a system for 3D position estimation in wide, unconstrained indoor environments is presented that employs infrared optical outside-in tracking of rigid-body targets with a stereo camera rig. To overcome limitations of state-of-the-art optical tracking systems, a pipeline for robust target identification and 3D point reconstruction has been investigated that enables camera calibration and tracking in environments with poor illumination, static and moving ambient light sources, occlusions and harsh conditions, such as fog. For evaluation, the system has been successfully applied in three different wide and unconstrained indoor environments, (1) user tracking for virtual and augmented reality applications, (2) handheld target tracking for tunneling and (3) machine guidance for mining. The results of each use case are discussed to embed the presented approach into a larger technological and application context. The experimental results demonstrate the system’s capabilities to track targets up to 100 m. Comparing the proposed approach to prior art in optical tracking in terms of range coverage and accuracy, it significantly extends the available tracking range, while only requiring two cameras and providing a relative 3D point accuracy with sub-centimeter deviation up to 30 m and low-centimeter deviation up to 100 m. PMID:26694388

  2. 3D position estimation using an artificial neural network for a continuous scintillator PET detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Zhu, W.; Cheng, X.; Li, D.

    2013-03-01

    Continuous crystal based PET detectors have features of simple design, low cost, good energy resolution and high detection efficiency. Through single-end readout of scintillation light, direct three-dimensional (3D) position estimation could be another advantage that the continuous crystal detector would have. In this paper, we propose to use artificial neural networks to simultaneously estimate the plane coordinate and DOI coordinate of incident γ photons with detected scintillation light. Using our experimental setup with an ‘8 + 8’ simplified signal readout scheme, the training data of perpendicular irradiation on the front surface and one side surface are obtained, and the plane (x, y) networks and DOI networks are trained and evaluated. The test results show that the artificial neural network for DOI estimation is as effective as for plane estimation. The performance of both estimators is presented by resolution and bias. Without bias correction, the resolution of the plane estimator is on average better than 2 mm and that of the DOI estimator is about 2 mm over the whole area of the detector. With bias correction, the resolution at the edge area for plane estimation or at the end of the block away from the readout PMT for DOI estimation becomes worse, as we expect. The comprehensive performance of the 3D positioning by a neural network is accessed by the experimental test data of oblique irradiations. To show the combined effect of the 3D positioning over the whole area of the detector, the 2D flood images of oblique irradiation are presented with and without bias correction.

  3. Development of a Regional Velocity Model Using 3D Broadband Waveform Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panning, M. P.; Romanowicz, B. A.; Kim, A.

    2005-12-01

    We are developing a new approach which relies on a cascade of increasingly accurate theoretical approximations for computation of the seismic wavefield to develop a model of regional seismic velocity structure for eastern Eurasia using full seismic waveforms. The selected area is particularly suitable for the purpose of this experiment, as it is highly heterogeneous, presenting a challenge for standard modeling techniques, but it is well surrounded by earthquake sources and a significant number of high quality broadband digital stations exist, for which data are readily accessible through IRIS (Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology) and the FDSN (Federation of Digital Seismic Networks). The initial model is derived from a large database of teleseismic long period waveforms (surface waves and overtone wavepackets) using well-developed theoretical approximations, the Path Average Approximation (PAVA) and Nonlinear Asymptotic Coupling Theory (NACT). These approaches assume waveforms are only sensitive to the 1D (PAVA) and 2D (NACT) structure in the vertical plane between source and receiver, which is adequate for the development of a smooth initial 3D velocity model. We refine this model using a more accurate theoretical approach. We utilize an implementation of a 3D Born approximation, which takes into account the contribution to the waveform from single scattering throughout the model, giving full 3D waveform sensitivity kernels. We perform verification tests of this approach for synthetic models, and show that it can accurately represent the wavefield as predicted by numerical approaches in several situations where approximations such as PAVA and NACT are insufficient. The Born 3D waveform sensitivity kernels are used to perform a higher resolution inversion of regional waveforms for a smaller subregion between longitudes 90 and 150 degrees E, and latitudes 15 and 40 degrees N. To further increase the accuracy of this model, we intend to utilize a very

  4. Codeless GPS systems for positioning of offshore platforms and 3D seismic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDoran, P. F.; Miller, R. B.; Buennagel, L. A.; Fliegel, H. F.; Tanida, L.

    The Satellite Emission Range Inferred Earth Surveying (SERIES) method was originally intended for subdecimeter accuracy measurements of the crust of the earth in search of tell-tale patterns which could be exploited for research into earthquake prediction. The present paper is concerned with a specific application of the SERIES technology, taking into account high accuracy positioning related to exploration for oil and gas reserves in the offshore environment. One of the most advanced methods of exploration for hydrocarbon resources is known as 3D seismic surveying. Morgan (1983) has discussed this method, giving attention to the possible benefits of using the Global Positioning System (GPS). The present paper presents the SERIES-GPS method. It is shown that wide civil use of the Navstar is possible to levels of accuracy well beyond the Precise Positioning Service (PPS). Such a use is feasible without the DOD for Navstar codes and orbits.

  5. 3D segmentation of lung CT data with graph-cuts: analysis of parameter sensitivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Jung won; Dunlap, Neal; Wang, Brian; Amini, Amir

    2016-03-01

    Lung boundary image segmentation is important for many tasks including for example in development of radiation treatment plans for subjects with thoracic malignancies. In this paper, we describe a method and parameter settings for accurate 3D lung boundary segmentation based on graph-cuts from X-ray CT data1. Even though previously several researchers have used graph-cuts for image segmentation, to date, no systematic studies have been performed regarding the range of parameter that give accurate results. The energy function in the graph-cuts algorithm requires 3 suitable parameter settings: K, a large constant for assigning seed points, c, the similarity coefficient for n-links, and λ, the terminal coefficient for t-links. We analyzed the parameter sensitivity with four lung data sets from subjects with lung cancer using error metrics. Large values of K created artifacts on segmented images, and relatively much larger value of c than the value of λ influenced the balance between the boundary term and the data term in the energy function, leading to unacceptable segmentation results. For a range of parameter settings, we performed 3D image segmentation, and in each case compared the results with the expert-delineated lung boundaries. We used simple 6-neighborhood systems for n-link in 3D. The 3D image segmentation took 10 minutes for a 512x512x118 ~ 512x512x190 lung CT image volume. Our results indicate that the graph-cuts algorithm was more sensitive to the K and λ parameter settings than to the C parameter and furthermore that amongst the range of parameters tested, K=5 and λ=0.5 yielded good results.

  6. Increased sensitivity of 3D-Well enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for infectious disease detection using 3D-printing fabrication technology.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harpal; Shimojima, Masayuki; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Le Van, An; Sugamata, Masami; Yang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay or ELISA -based diagnostics are considered the gold standard in the demonstration of various immunological reaction including in the measurement of antibody response to infectious diseases and to support pathogen identification with application potential in infectious disease outbreaks and individual patients' treatment and clinical care. The rapid prototyping of ELISA-based diagnostics using available 3D printing technologies provides an opportunity for a further exploration of this platform into immunodetection systems. In this study, a '3D-Well' was designed and fabricated using available 3D printing platforms to have an increased surface area of more than 4 times for protein-surface adsorption compared to those of 96-well plates. The ease and rapidity in designing-product development-feedback cycle offered through 3D printing platforms provided an opportunity for its rapid assessment, in which a chemical etching process was used to make the surface hydrophilic followed by validation through the diagnostic performance of ELISA for infectious disease without modifying current laboratory practices for ELISA. The higher sensitivity of the 3D-Well (3-folds higher) compared to the 96-well ELISA provides a potential for the expansion of this technology towards miniaturization platforms to reduce time, volume of reagents and samples needed for laboratory or field diagnosis of infectious diseases including applications in other disciplines. PMID:26406036

  7. A Simple Interface for 3D Position Estimation of a Mobile Robot with Single Camera.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chun-Tang; Chung, Ming-Hsuan; Chiou, Juing-Shian; Wang, Chi-Jo

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of mobile robots controlled by a smart phone or tablet. This paper proposes a visual control interface for a mobile robot with a single camera to easily control the robot actions and estimate the 3D position of a target. In this proposal, the mobile robot employed an Arduino Yun as the core processor and was remote-controlled by a tablet with an Android operating system. In addition, the robot was fitted with a three-axis robotic arm for grasping. Both the real-time control signal and video transmission are transmitted via Wi-Fi. We show that with a properly calibrated camera and the proposed prototype procedures, the users can click on a desired position or object on the touchscreen and estimate its 3D coordinates in the real world by simple analytic geometry instead of a complicated algorithm. The results of the measurement verification demonstrates that this approach has great potential for mobile robots. PMID:27023556

  8. A Simple Interface for 3D Position Estimation of a Mobile Robot with Single Camera

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Chun-Tang; Chung, Ming-Hsuan; Chiou, Juing-Shian; Wang, Chi-Jo

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of mobile robots controlled by a smart phone or tablet. This paper proposes a visual control interface for a mobile robot with a single camera to easily control the robot actions and estimate the 3D position of a target. In this proposal, the mobile robot employed an Arduino Yun as the core processor and was remote-controlled by a tablet with an Android operating system. In addition, the robot was fitted with a three-axis robotic arm for grasping. Both the real-time control signal and video transmission are transmitted via Wi-Fi. We show that with a properly calibrated camera and the proposed prototype procedures, the users can click on a desired position or object on the touchscreen and estimate its 3D coordinates in the real world by simple analytic geometry instead of a complicated algorithm. The results of the measurement verification demonstrates that this approach has great potential for mobile robots. PMID:27023556

  9. Optically directed molecular transport and 3D isoelectric positioning of amphoteric biomolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Hafeman, Dean G.; Harkins, James B.; WitkowskiII, Charles E.; Lewis, Nathan S.; Brown, Gilbert M; Warmack, Robert J Bruce; Thundat, Thomas George

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate the formation of charged molecular packets and their transport within optically created electrical force-field traps in a pH-buffered electrolyte. We call this process photoelectrophoretic localization and transport (PELT). The electrolyte is in contact with a photoconductive semiconductor electrode and a counterelectrode that are connected through an external circuit. A light beam directed to coordinates on the photoconductive electrode surface produces a photocurrent within the circuit and electrolyte. Within the electrolyte, the photocurrent creates localized force-field traps centered at the illuminated coordinates. Charged molecules, including polypeptides and proteins, electrophoretically accumulate into the traps and subsequently can be transported in the electrolyte by moving the traps over the photoconductive electrode in response to movement of the light beam. The molecules in a single trap can be divided into aliquots, and the aliquots can be directed along multiple routes simultaneously by using multiple light beams. This photoelectrophoretic transport of charged molecules by PELT resembles the electrostatic transport of electrons within force-field wells of solid-state charge-coupled devices. The molecules, however, travel in a liquid electrolyte rather than a solid. Furthermore, we have used PELT to position amphoteric biomolecules in three dimensions. A 3D pH gradient was created in an electrolyte medium by controlling the illumination position on a photoconductive anode where protons were generated electrolytically. Photoelectrophoretic transport of amphoteric molecules through the pH gradient resulted in accumulation of the molecules at their apparent 3D isoelectric coordinates in the medium.

  10. A nanofiber based artificial electronic skin with high pressure sensitivity and 3D conformability.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Weibin; Liu, Qiongzhen; Wu, Yongzhi; Wang, Yuedan; Qing, Xing; Li, Mufang; Liu, Ke; Wang, Wenwen; Wang, Dong

    2016-06-16

    Pressure sensors with 3D conformability are highly desirable components for artificial electronic skin or e-textiles that can mimic natural skin, especially for application in real-time monitoring of human physiological signals. Here, a nanofiber based electronic skin with ultra-high pressure sensitivity and 3D conformability is designed and built by interlocking two elastic patterned nanofibrous membranes. The patterned membrane is facilely prepared by casting conductive nanofiber ink into a silicon mould to form an array of semi-spheroid-like protuberances. The protuberances composed of intertwined elastic POE nanofibers and PPy@PVA-co-PE nanofibers afford a tunable effective elastic modulus that is capable of capturing varied strains and stresses, thereby contributing to a high sensitivity for pressure sensing. This electronic skin-like sensor demonstrates an ultra-high sensitivity (1.24 kPa(-1)) below 150 Pa with a detection limit as low as about 1.3 Pa. The pixelated sensor array and a RGB-LED light are then assembled into a circuit and show a feasibility for visual detection of spatial pressure. Furthermore, a nanofiber based proof-of-concept wireless pressure sensor with a bluetooth module as a signal transmitter is proposed and has demonstrated great promise for wireless monitoring of human physiological signals, indicating a potential for large scale wearable electronic devices or e-skin. PMID:27250529

  11. Direct in vitro comparison of six 3D positive contrast methods for susceptibility marker imaging

    PubMed Central

    Vonken, Evert-jan P. A.; Schär, Michael; Yu, Jing; Bakker, Chris J. G.; Stuber, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To compare different techniques for positive contrast imaging of susceptibility markers with MRI for 3D visualization. As several different techniques have been reported, the choice of the suitable method depends on its properties with regard to the amount of positive contrast and the desired background suppression, as well as other imaging constraints needed for a specific application. Materials and methods Six different positive contrast techniques are investigated for their ability to image at 3T a single susceptibility marker in vitro. The white marker method (WM), susceptibility gradient mapping (SGM), inversion recovery with on-resonant water suppression (IRON), frequency selective excitation (FSX), fast low flip-angle positive contrast SSFP (FLAPS), and iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetry and least-squares estimation (IDEAL) were implemented and investigated. Results The different methods were compared with respect to the volume of positive contrast, the product of volume and signal intensity, imaging time, and the level of background suppression. Quantitative results are provided and strengths and weaknesses of the different approaches are discussed. Conclusion The appropriate choice of positive contrast imaging technique depends on the desired level of background suppression, acquisition speed, and robustness against artifacts, for which in vitro comparative data is now available. PMID:23281151

  12. Imaging knee position using MRI, RSA/CT and 3D digitisation.

    PubMed

    McPherson, A; Kärrholm, J; Pinskerova, V; Sosna, A; Martelli, S

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare 3 methods of imaging knee position. Three fresh cadaver knees were imaged at 6 flexion angles between 0 degrees and 120 degrees by MRI, a combination of RSA and CT and 3D digitisation (in two knees). Virtual models of all 42 positions were created using suitable computer software. Each virtual model was aligned to a newly defined anatomically based Cartesian coordinate system. The angular rotations around the 3 coordinate system axes were calculated directly from the aligned virtual models using rigid body kinematics and found to be equally accurate for the 3 methods. The 3 rotations in each knee could be depicted using anatomy-based diagrams for all 3 methods. We conclude that the 3 methods of data acquisition are equally and adequately accurate in vitro. MRI may be the most useful in vivo. PMID:15598452

  13. Real-time sensing of mouth 3-D position and orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdea, Grigore C.; Dunn, Stanley M.; Mallik, Matsumita; Jun, Heesung

    1990-07-01

    A key problem in using digital subtraction radiography in dentistry is the ability to reposition the X-ray source and patient so as to reproduce an identical imaging geometry. In this paper we describe an approach to solving this problem based on real time sensing of the 3-D position and orientation of the patient's mouth. The research described here is part of a program which has a long term goal to develop an automated digital subtraction radiography system. This will allow the patient and X-ray source to be accurately repositioned without the mechanical fixtures that are presently used to preserve the imaging geometry. If we can measure the position and orientation of the mouth, then the desired position of the source can be computed as the product of the transformation matrices describing the desired imaging geometry and the position vector of the targeted tooth. Position and orientation of the mouth is measured by a real time sensing device using low-frequency magnetic field technology. We first present the problem of repositioning the patient and source and then outline our analytic solution. Then we describe an experimental setup to measure the accuracy, reproducibility and resolution of the sensor and present results of preliminary experiments.

  14. Controlled Positioning of Cells in Biomaterials—Approaches Towards 3D Tissue Printing

    PubMed Central

    Wüst, Silke; Müller, Ralph; Hofmann, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Current tissue engineering techniques have various drawbacks: they often incorporate uncontrolled and imprecise scaffold geometries, whereas the current conventional cell seeding techniques result mostly in random cell placement rather than uniform cell distribution. For the successful reconstruction of deficient tissue, new material engineering approaches have to be considered to overcome current limitations. An emerging method to produce complex biological products including cells or extracellular matrices in a controlled manner is a process called bioprinting or biofabrication, which effectively uses principles of rapid prototyping combined with cell-loaded biomaterials, typically hydrogels. 3D tissue printing is an approach to manufacture functional tissue layer-by-layer that could be transplanted in vivo after production. This method is especially advantageous for stem cells since a controlled environment can be created to influence cell growth and differentiation. Using printed tissue for biotechnological and pharmacological needs like in vitro drug-testing may lead to a revolution in the pharmaceutical industry since animal models could be partially replaced by biofabricated tissues mimicking human physiology and pathology. This would not only be a major advancement concerning rising ethical issues but would also have a measureable impact on economical aspects in this industry of today, where animal studies are very labor-intensive and therefore costly. In this review, current controlled material and cell positioning techniques are introduced highlighting approaches towards 3D tissue printing. PMID:24956301

  15. 3D elemental sensitive imaging using transmission X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yijin; Meirer, Florian; Wang, Junyue; Requena, Guillermo; Williams, Phillip; Nelson, Johanna; Mehta, Apurva; Andrews, Joy C; Pianetta, Piero

    2012-09-01

    Determination of the heterogeneous distribution of metals in alloy/battery/catalyst and biological materials is critical to fully characterize and/or evaluate the functionality of the materials. Using synchrotron-based transmission x-ray microscopy (TXM), it is now feasible to perform nanoscale-resolution imaging over a wide X-ray energy range covering the absorption edges of many elements; combining elemental sensitive imaging with determination of sample morphology. We present an efficient and reliable methodology to perform 3D elemental sensitive imaging with excellent sample penetration (tens of microns) using hard X-ray TXM. A sample of an Al-Si piston alloy is used to demonstrate the capability of the proposed method. PMID:22349401

  16. 3D Ag/ZnO hybrids for sensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chenyue; Xu, Chunxiang; Lu, Junfeng; Li, Zhaohui; Tian, Zhengshan

    2016-03-01

    To combine the surface plasma resonance of metal and local field enhancement in metal/semiconductor interface, Ag nanoparticles (NPs) were assembled on a ZnO nanorod array which was grown by hydrothermally on carbon fibers. The construction of dimensional (3D) Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) substrate is used for the sensitive detection of organic pollutants with the advantages such as facile synthesis, short detection time and low cost. The hybrid substrate was manifested a high sensitivity to phenol red at a lower concentration of 1 × 10-9 M and a higher enhancement factor of 3.18 × 109. Moreover, the ZnO nanostructures decorated with Ag NPs were demonstrated self-cleaning function under UV irradiation via photocatalytic degradation of the analytic molecules. The fabrication process of the materials and sensors, optimization of the SERS behaviors for different sized Ag NPs, the mechanism of SERS and recovery were presented with a detailed discussion.

  17. Optically directed molecular transport and 3D isoelectric positioning of amphoteric biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Hafeman, Dean G.; Harkins, James B.; Witkowski, Charles E.; Lewis, Nathan S.; Warmack, Robert J.; Brown, Gilbert M.; Thundat, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate the formation of charged molecular packets and their transport within optically created electrical force-field traps in a pH-buffered electrolyte. We call this process photoelectrophoretic localization and transport (PELT). The electrolyte is in contact with a photoconductive semiconductor electrode and a counterelectrode that are connected through an external circuit. A light beam directed to coordinates on the photoconductive electrode surface produces a photocurrent within the circuit and electrolyte. Within the electrolyte, the photocurrent creates localized force-field traps centered at the illuminated coordinates. Charged molecules, including polypeptides and proteins, electrophoretically accumulate into the traps and subsequently can be transported in the electrolyte by moving the traps over the photoconductive electrode in response to movement of the light beam. The molecules in a single trap can be divided into aliquots, and the aliquots can be directed along multiple routes simultaneously by using multiple light beams. This photoelectrophoretic transport of charged molecules by PELT resembles the electrostatic transport of electrons within force-field wells of solid-state charge-coupled devices. The molecules, however, travel in a liquid electrolyte rather than a solid. Furthermore, we have used PELT to position amphoteric biomolecules in three dimensions. A 3D pH gradient was created in an electrolyte medium by controlling the illumination position on a photoconductive anode where protons were generated electrolytically. Photoelectrophoretic transport of amphoteric molecules through the pH gradient resulted in accumulation of the molecules at their apparent 3D isoelectric coordinates in the medium. PMID:16618926

  18. A nanofiber based artificial electronic skin with high pressure sensitivity and 3D conformability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Weibin; Liu, Qiongzhen; Wu, Yongzhi; Wang, Yuedan; Qing, Xing; Li, Mufang; Liu, Ke; Wang, Wenwen; Wang, Dong

    2016-06-01

    Pressure sensors with 3D conformability are highly desirable components for artificial electronic skin or e-textiles that can mimic natural skin, especially for application in real-time monitoring of human physiological signals. Here, a nanofiber based electronic skin with ultra-high pressure sensitivity and 3D conformability is designed and built by interlocking two elastic patterned nanofibrous membranes. The patterned membrane is facilely prepared by casting conductive nanofiber ink into a silicon mould to form an array of semi-spheroid-like protuberances. The protuberances composed of intertwined elastic POE nanofibers and PPy@PVA-co-PE nanofibers afford a tunable effective elastic modulus that is capable of capturing varied strains and stresses, thereby contributing to a high sensitivity for pressure sensing. This electronic skin-like sensor demonstrates an ultra-high sensitivity (1.24 kPa-1) below 150 Pa with a detection limit as low as about 1.3 Pa. The pixelated sensor array and a RGB-LED light are then assembled into a circuit and show a feasibility for visual detection of spatial pressure. Furthermore, a nanofiber based proof-of-concept wireless pressure sensor with a bluetooth module as a signal transmitter is proposed and has demonstrated great promise for wireless monitoring of human physiological signals, indicating a potential for large scale wearable electronic devices or e-skin.Pressure sensors with 3D conformability are highly desirable components for artificial electronic skin or e-textiles that can mimic natural skin, especially for application in real-time monitoring of human physiological signals. Here, a nanofiber based electronic skin with ultra-high pressure sensitivity and 3D conformability is designed and built by interlocking two elastic patterned nanofibrous membranes. The patterned membrane is facilely prepared by casting conductive nanofiber ink into a silicon mould to form an array of semi-spheroid-like protuberances. The

  19. Test Problems for Reactive Flow HE Model in the ALE3D Code and Limited Sensitivity Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gerassimenko, M.

    2000-03-01

    We document quick running test problems for a reactive flow model of HE initiation incorporated into ALE3D. A quarter percent change in projectile velocity changes the outcome from detonation to HE burn that dies down. We study the sensitivity of calculated HE behavior to several parameters of practical interest where modeling HE initiation with ALE3D.

  20. Development and evaluation of a 3D model observer with nonlinear spatiotemporal contrast sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avanaki, Ali R. N.; Espig, Kathryn S.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Marchessoux, Cedric; Bakic, Predrag R.; Kimpe, Tom R. L.

    2014-03-01

    We investigate improvements to our 3D model observer with the goal of better matching human observer performance as a function of viewing distance, effective contrast, maximum luminance, and browsing speed. Two nonlinear methods of applying the human contrast sensitivity function (CSF) to a 3D model observer are proposed, namely the Probability Map (PM) and Monte Carlo (MC) methods. In the PM method, the visibility probability for each frequency component of the image stack, p, is calculated taking into account Barten's spatiotemporal CSF, the component modulation, and the human psychometric function. The probability p is considered to be equal to the perceived amplitude of the frequency component and thus can be used by a traditional model observer (e.g., LG-msCHO) in the space-time domain. In the MC method, each component is randomly kept with probability p or discarded with 1-p. The amplitude of the retained components is normalized to unity. The methods were tested using DBT stacks of an anthropomorphic breast phantom processed in a comprehensive simulation pipeline. Our experiments indicate that both the PM and MC methods yield results that match human observer performance better than the linear filtering method as a function of viewing distance, effective contrast, maximum luminance, and browsing speed.

  1. Sensitivity of power and RMS delay spread predictions of a 3D indoor ray tracing model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhong-Yu; Guo, Li-Xin; Li, Chang-Long; Wang, Qiang; Zhao, Zhen-Wei

    2016-06-13

    This study investigates the sensitivity of a three-dimensional (3D) indoor ray tracing (RT) model for the use of the uniform theory of diffraction and geometrical optics in radio channel characterizations of indoor environments. Under complex indoor environments, RT-based predictions require detailed and accurate databases of indoor object layouts and the electrical characteristics of such environments. The aim of this study is to assist in selecting the appropriate level of accuracy required in indoor databases to achieve good trade-offs between database costs and prediction accuracy. This study focuses on the effects of errors in indoor environments on prediction results. In studying the effects of inaccuracies in geometry information (indoor object layout) on power coverage prediction, two types of artificial erroneous indoor maps are used. Moreover, a systematic analysis is performed by comparing the predictions with erroneous indoor maps and those with the original indoor map. Subsequently, the influence of random errors on RMS delay spread results is investigated. Given the effect of electrical parameters on the accuracy of the predicted results of the 3D RT model, the relative permittivity and conductivity of different fractions of an indoor environment are set with different values. Five types of computer simulations are considered, and for each type, the received power and RMS delay spread under the same circumstances are simulated with the RT model. PMID:27410335

  2. Fast 3D visualization of endogenous brain signals with high-sensitivity laser scanning photothermal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Jun; Iida, Tadatsune; Tanaka, Shinji; Hayashi-Takagi, Akiko; Kasai, Haruo; Okabe, Shigeo; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2016-05-01

    A fast, high-sensitivity photothermal microscope was developed by implementing a spatially segmented balanced detection scheme into a laser scanning microscope. We confirmed a 4.9 times improvement in signal-to-noise ratio in the spatially segmented balanced detection compared with that of conventional detection. The system demonstrated simultaneous bi-modal photothermal and confocal fluorescence imaging of transgenic mouse brain tissue with a pixel dwell time of 20 μs. The fluorescence image visualized neurons expressing yellow fluorescence proteins, while the photothermal signal detected endogenous chromophores in the mouse brain, allowing 3D visualization of the distribution of various features such as blood cells and fine structures probably due to lipids. This imaging modality was constructed using compact and cost-effective laser diodes, and will thus be widely useful in the life and medical sciences. PMID:27231615

  3. Correlated fluorescence and 3D electron microscopy with high sensitivity and spatial precision

    PubMed Central

    Kukulski, Wanda; Schorb, Martin; Welsch, Sonja; Picco, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Correlative electron and fluorescence microscopy has the potential to elucidate the ultrastructural details of dynamic and rare cellular events, but has been limited by low precision and sensitivity. Here we present a method for direct mapping of signals originating from ∼20 fluorescent protein molecules to 3D electron tomograms with a precision of less than 100 nm. We demonstrate that this method can be used to identify individual HIV particles bound to mammalian cell surfaces. We also apply the method to image microtubule end structures bound to mal3p in fission yeast, and demonstrate that growing microtubule plus-ends are flared in vivo. We localize Rvs167 to endocytic sites in budding yeast, and show that scission takes place halfway through a 10-s time period during which amphiphysins are bound to the vesicle neck. This new technique opens the door for direct correlation of fluorescence and electron microscopy to visualize cellular processes at the ultrastructural scale. PMID:21200030

  4. Fast 3D visualization of endogenous brain signals with high-sensitivity laser scanning photothermal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Jun; Iida, Tadatsune; Tanaka, Shinji; Hayashi-Takagi, Akiko; Kasai, Haruo; Okabe, Shigeo; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2016-01-01

    A fast, high-sensitivity photothermal microscope was developed by implementing a spatially segmented balanced detection scheme into a laser scanning microscope. We confirmed a 4.9 times improvement in signal-to-noise ratio in the spatially segmented balanced detection compared with that of conventional detection. The system demonstrated simultaneous bi-modal photothermal and confocal fluorescence imaging of transgenic mouse brain tissue with a pixel dwell time of 20 μs. The fluorescence image visualized neurons expressing yellow fluorescence proteins, while the photothermal signal detected endogenous chromophores in the mouse brain, allowing 3D visualization of the distribution of various features such as blood cells and fine structures probably due to lipids. This imaging modality was constructed using compact and cost-effective laser diodes, and will thus be widely useful in the life and medical sciences. PMID:27231615

  5. Enhanced photovoltaic performance of dye-sensitized solar cell using composite photoanode on 3D electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Chiew Keat; Huang, Hui; Tse, Man Siu; Tan, Ooi Kiang

    2013-12-01

    For dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC), an efficient transport of electron from the dye sensitizer through the mesoporous oxide layer and to be collected by electrode is crucial for high photovoltaic conversion efficiency. In this work, two novel approaches were developed in DSSC fabrication to improve the overall photovoltaic performance. The concurrent improvement in the charge transport property and light harvesting efficiency was achieved by incorporating N-doped TiO2 in the mesoporous TiO2 layer of the photoanode. These N-doped TiO2 (TiNxOy) was formed by using the single step thermal oxidation of Titanium Nitride (TiN) nanomaterials. At the same time, the 3D electrode with SnO2 nanorods grown on the FTO glass using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system was used to enhance the charge collection efficiency. By combining these two approaches simultaneously, the DSSC with composite TiNxOy-TiO2 photoanode on SnO2 nanorods 3D electrode was successfully fabricated and characterized. As compared to the standard DSSC, an overall increment of 28 % in the conversion efficiency was achieved. Higher incident photon-current conversion efficiency (IPCE) values were also obtained, specifically for the region 400 - 500 nm due to the cosensitization effect of N-doped TiO2. Efficient transfer of electron due to the decrease in charge transfer resistance at the mesoporous oxide/dye/electrolyte interface was observed from electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurement. With the use of SnO2 nanorods, the adhesion between the mesoporous TiO2/FTO was enhanced and the transit time of a photogenerated electron through the mesoporous layer before being collected at the FTO electrode was significantly reduced by 50 %.

  6. SU-E-T-511: Do Presage 3D Dosimeters Show Dose Fractionation Sensitivity?

    SciTech Connect

    Klawikowski, S; Alqathami, M; Ibbott, G; Adamovics, J; Benning, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine whether Presage 3D polymer dosimeter dose response is sensitive to dose delivery fractionation. Bang gels have demonstrated a dose fractionation related dependence in which a single 400 cGy irradiation would produce a different detector response than four 100 cGy irradiations even if delivered closely in time to one another. Such a fractional dependent response in Presage would be detrimental for measuring multi-beam irradiations. Methods: Two separate batches of Presage were poured into cuvettes, and a third batch was molded into cuvette shaped blocks. A total of 37 cuvettes/blocks were irradiated in a Cobalt-60 irradiator to 400 cGy within solid water phantoms in either one, eight, or sixteen fractions. Another group of 15 cuvettes were also kept unirradiated and used for background subtraction between the pre-scan and post-scan results. The times between fractional deliveries were held constant at 30 seconds and the Cobalt irradiator dose rate was 49 cGy/min. Each Presage batch has a separate dose sensitivity and therefore fractionation response comparisons were only performed within the same batch. The cuvettes were first pre-scanned the day prior to irradiation and post-scanned the day after irradiation. Other than approximately 3 hours warming time prior to each irradiation and optical density measurement the cuvettes were stored in a refrigerator. All cuvettes were stored in a lightless environment throughout manufacturing and testing. The cuvettes’ optical densities were optically measured at 632 nm with a spectrophotometer. Results: No noticeable dose fractionation dependence was detected for any of the three independent batches of Presage for either the eight or sixteen fraction irradiation schemes. Conclusion: These results indicate using Presage 3D dosimeters to measure multi-beam photon irradiations common in IMRT, Gamma Knife, and Cyberknife treatment delivery schemes. Presage dosimeters are made by and trademarked by Heuris

  7. Design of 3-D Nacelle near Flat-Plate Wing Using Multiblock Sensitivity Analysis (ADOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eleshaky, Mohamed E.; Baysal, Oktay

    1994-01-01

    One of the major design tasks involved in reducing aircraft drag is the integration of the engine nacelles and airframe. With this impetus, nacelle shapes with and without the presence of a flat-plate wing nearby were optimized. This also served as a demonstration of the 3-D version of the recently developed aerodynamic design optimization methodology using sensitivity analysis, ADOS. The required flow analyses were obtained by solving the three-dimensional, compressible, thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations using an implicit, upwind-biased, finite volume scheme. The sensitivity analyses were performed using the preconditioned version of the SADD scheme (sensitivity analysis on domain decomposition). In addition to demonstrating the present method's capability for automatic optimization, the results offered some insight into two important issues related to optimizing the shapes of multicomponent configurations in close proximity. First, inclusion of the mutual interference between the components resulted in a different shape as opposed to shaping an isolated component. Secondly, exclusion of the viscous effects compromised not only the flow physics but also the optimized shapes even for isolated components.

  8. 3D combinational curves for accuracy and performance analysis of positive biometrics identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yingzi; Chang, Chein-I.

    2008-06-01

    The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve has been widely used as an evaluation criterion to measure the accuracy of biometrics system. Unfortunately, such an ROC curve provides no indication of the optimum threshold and cost function. In this paper, two kinds of 3D combinational curves are proposed: the 3D combinational accuracy curve and the 3D combinational performance curve. The 3D combinational accuracy curve gives a balanced view of the relationships among FAR (false alarm rate), FRR (false rejection rate), threshold t, and Cost. Six 2D curves can be derived from the 3D combinational accuracy curve: the conventional 2D ROC curve, 2D curve of (FRR, t), 2D curve of (FAR, t), 2D curve of (FRR, Cost), 2D curve of (FAR, Cost), and 2D curve of ( t, Cost). The 3D combinational performance curve can be derived from the 3D combinational accuracy curve which can give a balanced view among Security, Convenience, threshold t, and Cost. The advantages of using the proposed 3D combinational curves are demonstrated by iris recognition systems where the experimental results show that the proposed 3D combinational curves can provide more comprehensive information of the system accuracy and performance.

  9. Improved MAGIC gel for higher sensitivity and elemental tissue equivalent 3D dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Xuping; Reese, Timothy G.; Crowley, Elizabeth M.; El Fakhri, Georges

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Polymer-based gel dosimeter (MAGIC type) is a preferable phantom material for PET range verification of proton beam therapy. However, improvement in elemental tissue equivalency (specifically O/C ratio) is very desirable to ensure realistic time-activity measurements. Methods: Glucose and urea was added to the original MAGIC formulation to adjust the O/C ratio. The dose responses of the new formulations were tested with MRI transverse relaxation rate (R2) measurements. Results: The new ingredients improved not only the elemental composition but also the sensitivity of the MAGIC gel. The O/C ratios of our new gels agree with that of soft tissue within 1%. The slopes of dose response curves were 1.6-2.7 times larger with glucose. The melting point also increased by 5 deg. C. Further addition of urea resulted in a similar slope but with an increased intercept and a decreased melting point. Conclusions: Our improved MAGIC gel formulations have higher sensitivity and better elemental tissue equivalency for 3D dosimetry applications involving nuclear reactions.

  10. Improved MAGIC gel for higher sensitivity and elemental tissue equivalent 3D dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xuping; Reese, Timothy G.; Crowley, Elizabeth M.; El Fakhri, Georges

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Polymer-based gel dosimeter (MAGIC type) is a preferable phantom material for PET range verification of proton beam therapy. However, improvement in elemental tissue equivalency (specifically O∕C ratio) is very desirable to ensure realistic time-activity measurements. Methods: Glucose and urea was added to the original MAGIC formulation to adjust the O∕C ratio. The dose responses of the new formulations were tested with MRI transverse relaxation rate (R2) measurements. Results: The new ingredients improved not only the elemental composition but also the sensitivity of the MAGIC gel. The O∕C ratios of our new gels agree with that of soft tissue within 1%. The slopes of dose response curves were 1.6–2.7 times larger with glucose. The melting point also increased by 5 °C. Further addition of urea resulted in a similar slope but with an increased intercept and a decreased melting point. Conclusions: Our improved MAGIC gel formulations have higher sensitivity and better elemental tissue equivalency for 3D dosimetry applications involving nuclear reactions. PMID:20175480

  11. Sensitivity of an asymmetric 3D diffuser to vortex-generator induced inlet condition perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundmann, S.; Sayles, E. L.; Elkins, Christopher J.; Eaton, J. K.

    2012-01-01

    Modifications of the turbulent separated flow in an asymmetric three-dimensional diffuser due to inlet condition perturbations were investigated using conventional static pressure measurements and velocity data acquired using magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV). Previous experiments and simulations revealed a strong sensitivity of the diffuser performance to weak secondary flows in the inlet. The present, more detailed experiments were conducted to obtain a better understanding of this sensitivity. Pressure data were acquired in an airflow apparatus at an inlet Reynolds number of 10,000. The diffuser pressure recovery was strongly affected by a pair of longitudinal vortices injected along one wall of the inlet channel using either dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators or conventional half-delta wing vortex generators. MRV measurements were obtained in a water flow apparatus at matched Reynolds number for two different cases with passive vortex generators. The first case had a pair of counter-rotating longitudinal vortices embedded in the boundary layer near the center of the expanding wall of the diffuser such that the flow on the outsides of the vortices was directed toward the wall. The MRV data showed that the three-dimensional separation bubble initially grew much slower causing a rapid early reduction in the core flow velocity and a consequent reduction of total pressure losses due to turbulent mixing. This produced a 13% increase in the overall pressure recovery. For the second case, the vortices rotated in the opposite sense, and the image vortices pushed them into the corners. This led to a very rapid initial growth of the separation bubble and formation of strong swirl at the diffuser exit. These changes resulted in a 17% reduction in the overall pressure recovery for this case. The results emphasize the extreme sensitivity of 3D separated flows to weak perturbations.

  12. High Sensitive Precise 3D Accelerometer for Solar System Exploration with Unmanned Spacecrafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savenko, Y. V.; Demyanenko, P. O.; Zinkovskiy, Y. F.

    Solutions of several space and geophysical tasks require creating high sensitive precise accelerometers with sensitivity in order of 10 -13 g. These several tasks are following: inertial navigation of the Earth and Space; gravimetry nearby the Earth and into Space; geology; geophysics; seismology etc. Accelerometers (gravimeters and gradientmeters) with required sensitivity are not available now. The best accelerometers in the world have sensitivity worth on 4-5 orders. It has been developed a new class of fiber-optical sensors (FOS) with light pulse modulation. These sensors have super high threshold sensitivity and wide (up to 10 orders) dynamic range, and can be used as a base for creating of measurement units of physical values as 3D superhigh sensitive precise accelerometers of linear accelerations that is suitable for highest requirements. The principle of operation of the FOS is organically combined with a digital signal processing. It allows decreasing hardware of the accelerometer due to using a usual air-borne or space-borne computer; correcting the influence of natural, design, technological drawbacks of FOS on measured results; neutralising the influence of extraordinary situations available during using of FOS; decreasing the influence of internal and external destabilising factors (as for FOS), such as oscillation of environment temperature, instability of pendulum cycle frequency of sensitive element of the accelerometer etc. We were conducted a quantitative estimation of precise opportunities of analogue FOS in structure of fiber optical measuring devices (FOMD) for elementary FOMD with analogue FOS built on modern element basis of fiber optics (FO), at following assumptions: absolute parameter stability of devices of FOS measuring path; single transmission band of registration path; maximum possible inserted in optical fiber (OF) a radiated power. Even at such idealized assumptions, a calculated value in limit reached minimum inaccuracy of

  13. Determination of 3D optic axis orientation in cartilage by polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugryumova, Nadya; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2007-02-01

    Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography has been used to solve fast-axis fibre orientation in three dimension space. Previously we have demonstrated that the apparent variations in polar angle orientation of collagen fibers along sagittal ridge of equine third metacarpophalangeal joint exist. A quantitative method based on multiple angles of illumination has been proposed to determine the polar angle of the collagen fibers. This method however ignored the full 3-D structure by assuming that the collagen fibers long-axis lay within the plane of incidence. A new quantitative method based on the theory of light propagation in uniaxial materials is described which avoids this assumption. To test this method we have performed control experiments on a sample of equine tendon (this tissue has well defined c-axis lying along the long-axis of the tendon). Several samples of tendon were cut to achieve a planar surface inclined at -20° to the long axis. Additional 30° rotation provided non-zero azimuthal angle. The surface was then imaged using incident beam angles -40°, -20°, 0, +20°, +40° in two orthogonal planes. Values for both the polar and azimuthal angles were then derived using a numerical optimisation procedure. Results agreed qualitatively with the nominal values but suggested that the accuracy was limited by our method of determining the apparent birefringence.

  14. Determination of 3D optic axis orientation in cartilage by polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugryumova, Nadya; Bonesi, Marco; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2008-02-01

    Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography has been used to solve fast-axis fibre orientation in three dimension space. Previously we have demonstrated that the apparent variations in polar angle orientation of collagen fibers along sagittal ridge of equine third metacarpophalangeal joint exist. A quantitative method based on multiple angles of illumination has been proposed to determine the polar angle of the collagen fibers. This method however ignored the full 3D structure by assuming that the collagen fibers long-axis lay within the plane of incidence. A new quantitative method based on the theory of light propagation in uniaxial materials is described which avoids this assumption. To test this method we have performed control experiments on a sample of equine tendon (this tissue has well defined c-axis lying along the long-axis of the tendon). Several samples of tendon were cut to achieve a planar surface inclined at -20° to the long axis. Additional 30° rotation provided non-zero azimuthal angle. The surface was then imaged using incident beam angles -40°, -20°, 0, +20°, +40° in two orthogonal planes. Values for both the polar and azimuthal angles were then derived using a numerical optimisation procedure. Results agreed qualitatively with the nominal values but suggested that the accuracy was limited by our method of determining the apparent birefringence.

  15. Phase-sensitive SQUIDs based on the 3D topological insulator HgTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, L.; Bocquillon, E.; Grimm, M.; Oostinga, J. B.; Ames, C.; Gould, C.; Brüne, C.; Buhmann, H.; Molenkamp, L. W.

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) topological insulators represent a new class of materials in which transport is governed by Dirac surface states while the bulk remains insulating. Due to helical spin polarization of the surface states, the coupling of a 3D topological insulator to a nearby superconductor is expected to generate unconventional proximity induced p-wave superconductivity. We report here on the development and measurements of superconducting quantum interference devices on the surface of strained HgTe, a 3D topological insulator, as a potential tool to investigate this effect.

  16. Enhanced Gas Sensitivity and Selectivity on Aperture-Controllable 3D Interconnected Macro-Mesoporous ZnO Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Huang, Huawen; Zhao, Heng; Yan, Xiaoting; Wu, Sijia; Li, Yu; Wu, Min; Chen, Lihua; Yang, Xiaoyu; Su, Bao-Lian

    2016-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) macro-mesoporous structures demonstrate effective performance for gas sensing. In this work, we have designed and successfully prepared aperture-controllable three-dimensional interconnected macro-mesoporous ZnO (3D-IMM-ZnO) nanostructures by template-based layer-by-layer filtration deposition. XRD, SEM, and TEM have been used to characterize the obtained hexagonal wurzite 3D-IMM-ZnO nanostructures. Owing to its special 3D interconnected hierarchically porous structure, the 3D-IMM-ZnO nanostructures exhibit excellent gas sensing performances toward acetone and methanol. The 3D-IMM-ZnO nanostructure with the largest macropore demonstrates the best gas sensitivity owing to its largest cavity providing enough space for gas diffusion. On the basis of the results and analyses, we propose that the synergistic effect of electron liberation and electron density of acetone and the special structure make the 3D-IMM-ZnO nanostructures demonstrate better gas sensing properties than many other porous ZnO nanostructures and preferred selectivity to acetone. PMID:26998736

  17. Wave Phase-Sensitive Transformation of 3d-Straining of Mechanical Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, I. N.; Speranskiy, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    It is the area of research of oscillatory processes in elastic mechanical systems. Technical result of innovation is creation of spectral set of multidimensional images which reflect time-correlated three-dimensional vector parameters of metrological, and\\or estimated, and\\or design parameters of oscillations in mechanical systems. Reconstructed images of different dimensionality integrated in various combinations depending on their objective function can be used as homeostatic profile or cybernetic image of oscillatory processes in mechanical systems for an objective estimation of current operational conditions in real time. The innovation can be widely used to enhance the efficiency of monitoring and research of oscillation processes in mechanical systems (objects) in construction, mechanical engineering, acoustics, etc. Concept method of vector vibrometry based on application of vector 3D phase- sensitive vibro-transducers permits unique evaluation of real stressed-strained states of power aggregates and loaded constructions and opens fundamental innovation opportunities: conduct of continuous (on-line regime) reliable monitoring of turboagregates of electrical machines, compressor installations, bases, supports, pipe-lines and other objects subjected to damaging effect of vibrations; control of operational safety of technical systems at all the stages of life cycle including design, test production, tuning, testing, operational use, repairs and resource enlargement; creation of vibro-diagnostic systems of authentic non-destructive control of anisotropic characteristics of materials resistance of power aggregates and loaded constructions under outer effects and operational flaws. The described technology is revolutionary, universal and common for all branches of engineering industry and construction building objects.

  18. Significant enhancement of power conversion efficiency for dye sensitized solar cell using 1D/3D network nanostructures as photoanodes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Baoyuan; Yu, Jichao; Hu, Yunxia; Xia, Chen; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Rong

    2015-01-01

    The single–crystalline TiO2 nanorod arrays with rutile phase have attracted much attention in the dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) applications because of their superior chemical stability, better electron transport properties, higher refractive index and low production cost. However, it suffers from a low surface area as compared with TiO2 nanoparticle films. In order to enlarge the surface area of TiO2 nanorod arrays, the 1D nanorods/3D nanotubes sample was synthesized using a facile two-step hydrothermal process involving hydrothermal growth 1D/3D nanorods and followed by post-etching treatment. In such bi-layer structure, the oriented TiO2 nanorods layer could provide direct pathway for fast electron transportation, and the 3D nanotubes layer offers a higher surface area for dye loading, therefore, the 1D nanorods/3D nanotubes photoanode exhibited faster electron transport and higher surface area than either 1D or 3D nanostructures alone, and an highest efficiency of 7.68% was achieved for the DSSCs based on 1D nanorods/3D nanotubes photoanode with further TiCl4 treatment. PMID:25800933

  19. Significant enhancement of power conversion efficiency for dye sensitized solar cell using 1D/3D network nanostructures as photoanodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Baoyuan; Yu, Jichao; Hu, Yunxia; Xia, Chen; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Rong

    2015-03-01

    The single-crystalline TiO2 nanorod arrays with rutile phase have attracted much attention in the dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) applications because of their superior chemical stability, better electron transport properties, higher refractive index and low production cost. However, it suffers from a low surface area as compared with TiO2 nanoparticle films. In order to enlarge the surface area of TiO2 nanorod arrays, the 1D nanorods/3D nanotubes sample was synthesized using a facile two-step hydrothermal process involving hydrothermal growth 1D/3D nanorods and followed by post-etching treatment. In such bi-layer structure, the oriented TiO2 nanorods layer could provide direct pathway for fast electron transportation, and the 3D nanotubes layer offers a higher surface area for dye loading, therefore, the 1D nanorods/3D nanotubes photoanode exhibited faster electron transport and higher surface area than either 1D or 3D nanostructures alone, and an highest efficiency of 7.68% was achieved for the DSSCs based on 1D nanorods/3D nanotubes photoanode with further TiCl4 treatment.

  20. Significant enhancement of power conversion efficiency for dye sensitized solar cell using 1D/3D network nanostructures as photoanodes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Baoyuan; Yu, Jichao; Hu, Yunxia; Xia, Chen; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Rong

    2015-01-01

    The single-crystalline TiO2 nanorod arrays with rutile phase have attracted much attention in the dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) applications because of their superior chemical stability, better electron transport properties, higher refractive index and low production cost. However, it suffers from a low surface area as compared with TiO2 nanoparticle films. In order to enlarge the surface area of TiO2 nanorod arrays, the 1D nanorods/3D nanotubes sample was synthesized using a facile two-step hydrothermal process involving hydrothermal growth 1D/3D nanorods and followed by post-etching treatment. In such bi-layer structure, the oriented TiO2 nanorods layer could provide direct pathway for fast electron transportation, and the 3D nanotubes layer offers a higher surface area for dye loading, therefore, the 1D nanorods/3D nanotubes photoanode exhibited faster electron transport and higher surface area than either 1D or 3D nanostructures alone, and an highest efficiency of 7.68% was achieved for the DSSCs based on 1D nanorods/3D nanotubes photoanode with further TiCl4 treatment. PMID:25800933

  1. CdS sensitized 3D hierarchical TiO2/ZnO heterostructure for efficient solar energy conversion.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhaoke; Xie, Wen; Lim, Zhi Shiuh; You, Lu; Wang, Junling

    2014-01-01

    For conventional dye or quantum dot sensitized solar cells, which are fabricated using mesoporous films, the inefficient electron transport due to defects such as grain boundaries and surface traps is a major drawback. To simultaneously increase the carrier transport efficiency as well as the surface area, optimal-assembling of hierarchical nanostructures is an attractive approach. Here, a three dimensional (3D) hierarchical heterostructure, consisting of CdS sensitized one dimensional (1D) ZnO nanorods deposited on two dimensional (2D) TiO2 (001) nanosheet, is prepared via a solution-process method. Such heterstructure exhibits significantly enhanced photoelectric and photocatalytic H2 evolution performance compared with CdS sensitized 1D ZnO nanorods/1D TiO2 nanorods photoanode, as a result of the more efficient light harvesting over the entire visible light spectrum and the effective electron transport through a highly connected 3D network. PMID:25030846

  2. CdS sensitized 3D hierarchical TiO2/ZnO heterostructure for efficient solar energy conversion

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhaoke; Xie, Wen; Lim, Zhi Shiuh; You, Lu; Wang, Junling

    2014-01-01

    For conventional dye or quantum dot sensitized solar cells, which are fabricated using mesoporous films, the inefficient electron transport due to defects such as grain boundaries and surface traps is a major drawback. To simultaneously increase the carrier transport efficiency as well as the surface area, optimal-assembling of hierarchical nanostructures is an attractive approach. Here, a three dimensional (3D) hierarchical heterostructure, consisting of CdS sensitized one dimensional (1D) ZnO nanorods deposited on two dimensional (2D) TiO2 (001) nanosheet, is prepared via a solution-process method. Such heterstructure exhibits significantly enhanced photoelectric and photocatalytic H2 evolution performance compared with CdS sensitized 1D ZnO nanorods/1D TiO2 nanorods photoanode, as a result of the more efficient light harvesting over the entire visible light spectrum and the effective electron transport through a highly connected 3D network. PMID:25030846

  3. Assessment of accuracy and precision of 3D reconstruction of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty in upright position using biplanar radiography.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Dimitriou, Dimitris; Hosseini, Ali; Liow, Ming Han Lincoln; Torriani, Martin; Li, Guoan; Kwon, Young-Min

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the precision and accuracy of 3D reconstruction of UKA component position, contact location and lower limb alignment in standing position using biplanar radiograph. Two human specimens with 4 medial UKAs were implanted with beads for radiostereometric analysis (RSA). The specimens were frozen in standing position and CT-scanned to obtain relative positions between the beads, bones and UKA components. The specimens were then imaged using biplanar radiograph (EOS). The positions of the femur, tibia, UKA components and UKA contact locations were obtained using RSA- and EOS-based techniques. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated for inter-observer reliability of the EOS technique. The average (standard deviation) of the differences between two techniques in translations and rotations were less than 0.18 (0.29) mm and 0.39° (0.66°) for UKA components. The root-mean-square-errors (RMSE) of contact location along the anterior/posterior and medial/lateral directions were 0.84mm and 0.30mm. The RMSEs of the knee rotations were less than 1.70°. The ICCs for the EOS-based segmental orientations between two raters were larger than 0.98. The results suggest the EOS-based 3D reconstruction technique can precisely determine component position, contact location and lower limb alignment for UKA patients in weight-bearing standing position. PMID:27117422

  4. 3D Joint Speaker Position and Orientation Tracking with Particle Filters

    PubMed Central

    Segura, Carlos; Hernando, Javier

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of three-dimensional speaker orientation estimation in a smart-room environment equipped with microphone arrays. A Bayesian approach is proposed to jointly track the location and orientation of an active speaker. The main motivation is that the knowledge of the speaker orientation may yield an increased localization performance and vice versa. Assuming that the sound produced by the speaker is originated from his mouth, the center of the head is deduced based on the estimated head orientation. Moreover, the elevation angle of the head of the speaker can be partly inferred from the fast vertical movements of the computed mouth location. In order to test the performance of the proposed algorithm, a new multimodal dataset has been recorded for this purpose, where the corresponding 3D orientation angles are acquired by an inertial measurement unit (IMU) provided by accelerometers, magnetometers and gyroscopes in the three-axes. The proposed joint algorithm outperforms a two-step approach in terms of localization and orientation angle precision assessing the superiority of the joint approach. PMID:24481230

  5. 3D joint speaker position and orientation tracking with particle filters.

    PubMed

    Segura, Carlos; Hernando, Javier

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of three-dimensional speaker orientation estimation in a smart-room environment equipped with microphone arrays. A Bayesian approach is proposed to jointly track the location and orientation of an active speaker. The main motivation is that the knowledge of the speaker orientation may yield an increased localization performance and vice versa. Assuming that the sound produced by the speaker is originated from his mouth, the center of the head is deduced based on the estimated head orientation. Moreover, the elevation angle of the head of the speaker can be partly inferred from the fast vertical movements of the computed mouth location. In order to test the performance of the proposed algorithm, a new multimodal dataset has been recorded for this purpose, where the corresponding 3D orientation angles are acquired by an inertial measurement unit (IMU) provided by accelerometers, magnetometers and gyroscopes in the three-axes. The proposed joint algorithm outperforms a two-step approach in terms of localization and orientation angle precision assessing the superiority of the joint approach. PMID:24481230

  6. Atomic identification of fluorescent Q-dots on tau-positive fibrils in 3D-reconstructed pick bodies.

    PubMed

    Uematsu, Miho; Adachi, Eijiro; Nakamura, Ayako; Tsuchiya, Kuniaki; Uchihara, Toshiki

    2012-04-01

    Pick body disease, characterized by the presence of Pick bodies, is distinguished from neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer disease on the basis of their smooth, spherical shape. Quantum dots (QDs) are nanometer-scale, water-soluble fluorophores that are detectable both as a fluorescent signal by light microscopy and as electron-dense particles under electron microscopy. In this study, tau-positive Pick bodies were immunofluorescently labeled with QD nanocrystals composed of cadmium selenide for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction and subsequently subjected to electron microscopic observation to identify QD immunolabeling on the same Pick body for comparison in detail. The identity of the QD nanocrystals, which label the tau-positive fibrils, was confirmed by the presence of both cadmium and selenium on these nanocrystals, demonstrated as parallel peaks corresponding to these atoms on energy-dispersive X-ray spot analysis under super-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. This confirmation of the specificity of the QD labeling through both its fluorescence and energy-dispersive X-ray spectra reinforces the reliability of the labeling. In addition, this exact comparison of the same structure by electron microscopy and 3D light microscopy demonstrates how its ultrastructural details are related to its surrounding structures on a 3D basis, providing further insights into how molecules woven into specific pathological ultrastructures are at work in situ. PMID:22322305

  7. Effects of electrode position on spatiotemporal auditory nerve fiber responses: a 3D computational model study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Soojin; Chwodhury, Tanmoy; Moon, Il Joon; Hong, Sung Hwa; Yang, Hyejin; Won, Jong Ho; Woo, Jihwan

    2015-01-01

    A cochlear implant (CI) is an auditory prosthesis that enables hearing by providing electrical stimuli through an electrode array. It has been previously established that the electrode position can influence CI performance. Thus, electrode position should be considered in order to achieve better CI results. This paper describes how the electrode position influences the auditory nerve fiber (ANF) response to either a single pulse or low- (250 pulses/s) and high-rate (5,000 pulses/s) pulse-trains using a computational model. The field potential in the cochlea was calculated using a three-dimensional finite-element model, and the ANF response was simulated using a biophysical ANF model. The effects were evaluated in terms of the dynamic range, stochasticity, and spike excitation pattern. The relative spread, threshold, jitter, and initiated node were analyzed for single-pulse response; and the dynamic range, threshold, initiated node, and interspike interval were analyzed for pulse-train stimuli responses. Electrode position was found to significantly affect the spatiotemporal pattern of the ANF response, and this effect was significantly dependent on the stimulus rate. We believe that these modeling results can provide guidance regarding perimodiolar and lateral insertion of CIs in clinical settings and help understand CI performance. PMID:25755675

  8. Effects of Electrode Position on Spatiotemporal Auditory Nerve Fiber Responses: A 3D Computational Model Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A cochlear implant (CI) is an auditory prosthesis that enables hearing by providing electrical stimuli through an electrode array. It has been previously established that the electrode position can influence CI performance. Thus, electrode position should be considered in order to achieve better CI results. This paper describes how the electrode position influences the auditory nerve fiber (ANF) response to either a single pulse or low- (250 pulses/s) and high-rate (5,000 pulses/s) pulse-trains using a computational model. The field potential in the cochlea was calculated using a three-dimensional finite-element model, and the ANF response was simulated using a biophysical ANF model. The effects were evaluated in terms of the dynamic range, stochasticity, and spike excitation pattern. The relative spread, threshold, jitter, and initiated node were analyzed for single-pulse response; and the dynamic range, threshold, initiated node, and interspike interval were analyzed for pulse-train stimuli responses. Electrode position was found to significantly affect the spatiotemporal pattern of the ANF response, and this effect was significantly dependent on the stimulus rate. We believe that these modeling results can provide guidance regarding perimodiolar and lateral insertion of CIs in clinical settings and help understand CI performance. PMID:25755675

  9. A 3D scaffold for ultra-sensitive reduced graphene oxide gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Yun, Yong Ju; Hong, Won G; Choi, Nak-Jin; Park, Hyung Ju; Moon, Seung Eon; Kim, Byung Hoon; Song, Ki-Bong; Jun, Yongseok; Lee, Hyung-Kun

    2014-06-21

    An ultra-sensitive gas sensor based on a reduced graphene oxide nanofiber mat was successfully fabricated using a combination of an electrospinning method and graphene oxide wrapping through an electrostatic self-assembly, followed by a low-temperature chemical reduction. The sensor showed excellent sensitivity to NO2 gas. PMID:24839129

  10. High sensitivity and high resolution element 3D analysis by a combined SIMS-SPM instrument.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Yves; Wirtz, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Using the recently developed SIMS-SPM prototype, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) data was combined with topographical data from the scanning probe microscopy (SPM) module for five test structures in order to obtain accurate chemical 3D maps: a polystyrene/polyvinylpyrrolidone (PS/PVP) polymer blend, a nickel-based super-alloy, a titanium carbonitride-based cermet, a reticle test structure and Mg(OH)2 nanoclusters incorporated inside a polymer matrix. The examples illustrate the potential of this combined approach to track and eliminate artefacts related to inhomogeneities of the sputter rates (caused by samples containing various materials, different phases or having a non-flat surface) and inhomogeneities of the secondary ion extraction efficiencies due to local field distortions (caused by topography with high aspect ratios). In this respect, this paper presents the measured relative sputter rates between PVP and PS as well as in between the different phases of the TiCN cermet. PMID:26171285

  11. Measurement and calibration of static distortion of position data from 3D trackers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Steve

    1992-01-01

    Three-dimensional trackers are becoming increasingly important as user inputs in interactive computer systems. These trackers output the three-dimensional position, and often the orientation, of a sensor in space. The three-dimensional tracking is often, however, highly distorted and inaccurate. The purpose of this paper is to discuss methods for the measurement and characterization of the static distortion of the position data. When the distortion is constant, various methods can be used to calibrate the data from the tracker to increase accuracy. Several preliminary methods are discussed in this paper, including polynomial and weighted lookup methods. The measurement and calibration methods are applied to the Polhemus electromagnetic tracking system, but are applicable to tracking systems based on other technologies.

  12. Lapse-time dependent coda-wave depth sensitivity to local velocity perturbations in 3-D heterogeneous elastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obermann, Anne; Planès, Thomas; Hadziioannou, Céline; Campillo, Michel

    2016-07-01

    In the context of seismic monitoring, recent studies made successful use of seismic coda waves to locate medium changes on the horizontal plane. Locating the depth of the changes, however, remains a challenge. In this paper, we use 3-D wavefield simulations to address two problems: firstly, we evaluate the contribution of surface and body wave sensitivity to a change at depth. We introduce a thin layer with a perturbed velocity at different depths and measure the apparent relative velocity changes due to this layer at different times in the coda and for different degrees of heterogeneity of the model. We show that the depth sensitivity can be modelled as a linear combination of body- and surface-wave sensitivity. The lapse-time dependent sensitivity ratio of body waves and surface waves can be used to build 3-D sensitivity kernels for imaging purposes. Secondly, we compare the lapse-time behavior in the presence of a perturbation in horizontal and vertical slabs to address, for instance, the origin of the velocity changes detected after large earthquakes.

  13. Full circle: 3D femoral mapping demonstrates age-related changes that influence femoral implant positioning.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Damien; Surup, Timm; Petersik, Andreas; Kelly, Michael

    2016-02-01

    The geometry of the femur is important in the final position of an intramedullary implant; we hypothesised that the femoral geometry changes with age and this may predispose the elderly to anterior mal-positioning of these implants. We used CT DICOM data of 919 intact left femora and specialist software that allowed us to defined landmarks for measurement reference - such as the linea aspera - on a template bone that could be mapped automatically to the entire database. We found that older (>80 years) cortical bone is up to 1.5 mm thinner anteriorly and 2 mm thinner posteriorly than younger (<40 years) bone but the rate of change of posterior to anterior cortex thickness is greater in the older bone. We also found the isthmus in the elderly to be more distal and less substantial than in the younger bone. This study has demonstrated femoral geometry changes with age that may explain our perception that the elderly are at increased risk for anterior mal-positioning of intramedullary implants. PMID:26686594

  14. A 3D scaffold for ultra-sensitive reduced graphene oxide gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Yong Ju; Hong, Won G.; Choi, Nak-Jin; Park, Hyung Ju; Moon, Seung Eon; Kim, Byung Hoon; Song, Ki-Bong; Jun, Yongseok; Lee, Hyung-Kun

    2014-05-01

    An ultra-sensitive gas sensor based on a reduced graphene oxide nanofiber mat was successfully fabricated using a combination of an electrospinning method and graphene oxide wrapping through an electrostatic self-assembly, followed by a low-temperature chemical reduction. The sensor showed excellent sensitivity to NO2 gas.An ultra-sensitive gas sensor based on a reduced graphene oxide nanofiber mat was successfully fabricated using a combination of an electrospinning method and graphene oxide wrapping through an electrostatic self-assembly, followed by a low-temperature chemical reduction. The sensor showed excellent sensitivity to NO2 gas. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00332b

  15. On 3-D modeling and automatic regridding in shape design sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Kyung K.; Yao, Tse-Min

    1987-01-01

    The material derivative idea of continuum mechanics and the adjoint variable method of design sensitivity analysis are used to obtain a computable expression for the effect of shape variations on measures of structural performance of three-dimensional elastic solids.

  16. Prediction of 3D internal organ position from skin surface motion: results from electromagnetic tracking studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Kenneth H.; Tang, Jonathan; Zhang, Hui J.; Varghese, Emmanuel; Cleary, Kevin R.

    2005-04-01

    An effective treatment method for organs that move with respiration (such as the lungs, pancreas, and liver) is a major goal of radiation medicine. In order to treat such tumors, we need (1) real-time knowledge of the current location of the tumor, and (2) the ability to adapt the radiation delivery system to follow this constantly changing location. In this study, we used electromagnetic tracking in a swine model to address the first challenge, and to determine if movement of a marker attached to the skin could accurately predict movement of an internal marker embedded in an organ. Under approved animal research protocols, an electromagnetically tracked needle was inserted into a swine liver and an electromagnetically tracked guidewire was taped to the abdominal skin of the animal. The Aurora (Northern Digital Inc., Waterloo, Canada) electromagnetic tracking system was then used to monitor the position of both of these sensors every 40 msec. Position readouts from the sensors were then tested to see if any of the movements showed correlation. The strongest correlations were observed between external anterior-posterior motion and internal inferior-superior motion, with many other axes exhibiting only weak correlation. We also used these data to build a predictive model of internal motion by taking segments from the data and using them to derive a general functional relationship between the internal needle and the external guidewire. For the axis with the strongest correlation, this model enabled us to predict internal organ motion to within 1 mm.

  17. A novel high-order, entropy stable, 3D AMR MHD solver with guaranteed positive pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derigs, Dominik; Winters, Andrew R.; Gassner, Gregor J.; Walch, Stefanie

    2016-07-01

    We describe a high-order numerical magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) solver built upon a novel non-linear entropy stable numerical flux function that supports eight travelling wave solutions. By construction the solver conserves mass, momentum, and energy and is entropy stable. The method is designed to treat the divergence-free constraint on the magnetic field in a similar fashion to a hyperbolic divergence cleaning technique. The solver described herein is especially well-suited for flows involving strong discontinuities. Furthermore, we present a new formulation to guarantee positivity of the pressure. We present the underlying theory and implementation of the new solver into the multi-physics, multi-scale adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) simulation code FLASH (http://flash.uchicago.edu)

  18. A novel high-order, entropy stable, 3D AMR MHD solver with guaranteed positive pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derigs, Dominik; Winters, Andrew R.; Gassner, Gregor J.; Walch, Stefanie

    2016-07-01

    We describe a high-order numerical magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) solver built upon a novel non-linear entropy stable numerical flux function that supports eight travelling wave solutions. By construction the solver conserves mass, momentum, and energy and is entropy stable. The method is designed to treat the divergence-free constraint on the magnetic field in a similar fashion to a hyperbolic divergence cleaning technique. The solver described herein is especially well-suited for flows involving strong discontinuities. Furthermore, we present a new formulation to guarantee positivity of the pressure. We present the underlying theory and implementation of the new solver into the multi-physics, multi-scale adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) simulation code FLASH (http://flash.uchicago.edu).

  19. High sensitivity and high resolution element 3D analysis by a combined SIMS–SPM instrument

    PubMed Central

    Wirtz, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Summary Using the recently developed SIMS–SPM prototype, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) data was combined with topographical data from the scanning probe microscopy (SPM) module for five test structures in order to obtain accurate chemical 3D maps: a polystyrene/polyvinylpyrrolidone (PS/PVP) polymer blend, a nickel-based super-alloy, a titanium carbonitride-based cermet, a reticle test structure and Mg(OH)2 nanoclusters incorporated inside a polymer matrix. The examples illustrate the potential of this combined approach to track and eliminate artefacts related to inhomogeneities of the sputter rates (caused by samples containing various materials, different phases or having a non-flat surface) and inhomogeneities of the secondary ion extraction efficiencies due to local field distortions (caused by topography with high aspect ratios). In this respect, this paper presents the measured relative sputter rates between PVP and PS as well as in between the different phases of the TiCN cermet. PMID:26171285

  20. Rapid Quantification of 3D Collagen Fiber Alignment and Fiber Intersection Correlations with High Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Meng; Bloom, Alexander B.; Zaman, Muhammad H.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic cancers aggressively reorganize collagen in their microenvironment. For example, radially orientated collagen fibers have been observed surrounding tumor cell clusters in vivo. The degree of fiber alignment, as a consequence of this remodeling, has often been difficult to quantify. In this paper, we present an easy to implement algorithm for accurate detection of collagen fiber orientation in a rapid pixel-wise manner. This algorithm quantifies the alignment of both computer generated and actual collagen fiber networks of varying degrees of alignment within 5°°. We also present an alternative easy method to calculate the alignment index directly from the standard deviation of fiber orientation. Using this quantitative method for determining collagen alignment, we demonstrate that the number of collagen fiber intersections has a negative correlation with the degree of fiber alignment. This decrease in intersections of aligned fibers could explain why cells move more rapidly along aligned fibers than unaligned fibers, as previously reported. Overall, our paper provides an easier, more quantitative and quicker way to quantify fiber orientation and alignment, and presents a platform in studying effects of matrix and cellular properties on fiber alignment in complex 3D environments. PMID:26158674

  1. Rapid Quantification of 3D Collagen Fiber Alignment and Fiber Intersection Correlations with High Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meng; Bloom, Alexander B; Zaman, Muhammad H

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic cancers aggressively reorganize collagen in their microenvironment. For example, radially orientated collagen fibers have been observed surrounding tumor cell clusters in vivo. The degree of fiber alignment, as a consequence of this remodeling, has often been difficult to quantify. In this paper, we present an easy to implement algorithm for accurate detection of collagen fiber orientation in a rapid pixel-wise manner. This algorithm quantifies the alignment of both computer generated and actual collagen fiber networks of varying degrees of alignment within 5°°. We also present an alternative easy method to calculate the alignment index directly from the standard deviation of fiber orientation. Using this quantitative method for determining collagen alignment, we demonstrate that the number of collagen fiber intersections has a negative correlation with the degree of fiber alignment. This decrease in intersections of aligned fibers could explain why cells move more rapidly along aligned fibers than unaligned fibers, as previously reported. Overall, our paper provides an easier, more quantitative and quicker way to quantify fiber orientation and alignment, and presents a platform in studying effects of matrix and cellular properties on fiber alignment in complex 3D environments. PMID:26158674

  2. Infarct quantification using 3D inversion recovery and 2D phase sensitive inversion recovery; validation in patients and ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular-MR (CMR) is the gold standard for quantifying myocardial infarction using late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) technique. Both 2D- and 3D-LGE-sequences are used in clinical practise and in clinical and experimental studies for infarct quantification. Therefore the aim of this study was to investigate if image acquisitions with 2D- and 3D-LGE show the same infarct size in patients and ex vivo. Methods Twenty-six patients with previous myocardial infarction who underwent a CMR scan were included. Images were acquired 10-20 minutes after an injection of 0.2 mmol/kg gadolinium-based contrast agent. Two LGE-sequences, 3D-inversion recovery (IR) and 2D-phase-sensitive (PS) IR, were used in all patients to quantify infarction size. Furthermore, six pigs with reperfused infarction in the left anterior descending artery (40 minutes occlusion and 4 hours of reperfusion) were scanned with 2D- and 3D-LGE ex vivo. A high resolution T1-sequence was used as reference for the infarct quantification ex vivo. Spearman’s rank-order correlation, Wilcoxon matched pairs test and bias according to Bland-Altman was used for comparison of infarct size with different LGE-sequences. Results There was no significant difference between the 2D- and 3D-LGE sequence in left ventricular mass (LVM) (2D: 115 ± 25 g; 3D: 117 ± 24 g: p = 0.35). Infarct size in vivo using 2D- and 3D-LGE showed high correlation and low bias for both LGE-sequences both in absolute volume of infarct (r = 0.97, bias 0.47 ± 2.1 ml) and infarct size as part of LVM (r = 0.94, bias 0.16 ± 2.0%). The 2D- and 3D-LGE-sequences ex vivo correlated well (r = 0.93, bias 0.67 ± 2.4%) for infarct size as part of the LVM. The IR LGE-sequences overestimated infarct size as part of the LVM ex vivo compared to the high resolution T1-sequence (bias 6.7 ± 3.0%, 7.3 ± 2.7% for 2D-PSIR and 3D-IR respectively, p < 0.05 for both). Conclusions Infarct quantification with

  3. Investigating the interaction between positions and signals of height-channel loudspeakers in reproducing immersive 3d sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karampourniotis, Antonios

    Since transmission capacities have significantly increased over the past few years, researchers are now able to transmit a larger amount of data, namely multichannel audio content, in the consumer applications. What has not been investigated in a systematic way yet is how to deliver the multichannel content. Specifically, researchers' attention is focused on the quest of a standardized immersive reproduction format that incorporates height loudspeakers coupled with the new high-resolution and three-dimensional (3D) media content for a comprehensive 3D experience. To better understand and utilize the immersive audio reproduction, this research focused on the (1) interaction between the positioning of height loudspeakers and the signals fed to the loudspeakers, (2) investigation of the perceptual characteristics associated with the height ambiences, and (3) the influence of inverse filtering on perceived sound quality for the realistic 3D sound reproduction. The experiment utilized the existence of two layers of loudspeakers: horizontal layer following the ITU-R BS.775 five-channel loudspeaker configuration and height layer locating a total of twelve loudspeakers at the azimuth of +/-30°, +/-50°, +/-70°, +/-90°, +/-110° and +/-130° and elevation of 30°. Eight configurations were formed, each of which selected four height-loudspeakers from twelve. In the subjective evaluation, listeners compared, ranked and described the eight randomly presented configurations of 4-channel height ambiences. The stimuli for the experiment were four nine-channel (5 channels for the horizontal and 4 for the height loudspeakers) multichannel music. Moreover, an approach of Finite Impulse Response (FIR) inverse filtering was attempted, in order to remove the particular room's acoustic influence. Another set of trained professionals was informally asked to use descriptors to characterize the newly presented multichannel music with height ambiences rendered with inverse filtering. The

  4. Control of Retinal Ganglion Cell Positioning and Neurite Growth: Combining 3D Printing with Radial Electrospun Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Kador, Karl E; Grogan, Shawn P; Dorthé, Erik W; Venugopalan, Praseeda; Malek, Monisha F; Goldberg, Jeffrey L; D'lima, Darryl D

    2016-02-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are responsible for the transfer of signals from the retina to the brain. As part of the central nervous system, RGCs are unable to regenerate following injury, and implanted cells have limited capacity to orient and integrate in vivo. During development, secreted guidance molecules along with signals from extracellular matrix and the vasculature guide cell positioning, for example, around the fovea, and axon outgrowth; however, these changes are temporally regulated and are not the same in the adult. Here, we combine electrospun cell transplantation scaffolds capable of RGC neurite guidance with thermal inkjet 3D cell printing techniques capable of precise positioning of RGCs on the scaffold surface. Optimal printing parameters are developed for viability, electrophysiological function and, neurite pathfinding. Different media, commonly used to promote RGC survival and growth, were tested under varying conditions. When printed in growth media containing both brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), RGCs maintained survival and normal electrophysiological function, and displayed radial axon outgrowth when printed onto electrospun scaffolds. These results demonstrate that 3D printing technology may be combined with complex electrospun surfaces in the design of future retinal models or therapies. PMID:26729061

  5. Writing Position Vectors in 3-d Space: A Student Difficulty With Spherical Unit Vectors in Intermediate E&M

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinrichs, Brant E.

    2010-10-01

    An intermediate E&M course (i.e. based on Griffiths [1]) involves the extensive integration of vector calculus concepts and notation with abstract physics concepts like field and potential. We hope that students take what they have learned in their math courses and apply it to help represent and make sense of the physics. To assess how well students are able to do this integration and application I have developed several simple concept tests on position and unit vectors in non-Cartesian coordinate systems as they are used in intermediate E&M. In this paper I describe one of these concept tests and present results that show both undergraduate physics majors and physics graduate students have difficulty using spherical unit vectors to write position vectors in 3-d space.

  6. 3-D description of fracture surfaces and stress-sensitivity analysis for naturally fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.Q.; Jioa, D.; Meng, Y.F.; Fan, Y.

    1997-08-01

    Three kinds of reservoir cores (limestone, sandstone, and shale with natural fractures) were used to study the effect of morphology of fracture surfaces on stress sensitivity. The cores, obtained from the reservoirs with depths of 2170 to 2300 m, have fractures which are mated on a large scale, but unmated on a fine scale. A specially designed photoelectric scanner with a computer was used to describe the topography of the fracture surfaces. Then, theoretical analysis of the fracture closure was carried out based on the fracture topography generated. The scanning results show that the asperity has almost normal distributions for all three types of samples. For the tested samples, the fracture closure predicted by the elastic-contact theory is different from the laboratory measurements because plastic deformation of the aspirates plays an important role under the testing range of normal stresses. In this work, the traditionally used elastic-contact theory has been modified to better predict the stress sensitivity of reservoir fractures. Analysis shows that the standard deviation of the probability density function of asperity distribution has a great effect on the fracture closure rate.

  7. Sensitivity of a 3D fully-gapped topological superconductor to non-magnetic impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Yukihiro; Nagai, Yuki; Machida, Masahiko

    2015-03-01

    Topological superconductors (TSC) are notable materials, owing to the mathematical curiosity and the application potential. The bulk TSC can emerge by copper intercalation into topological insulator Bi2Se3. In this paper, we theoretically study the non-magnetic impurity effects in the mean-field model of CuxBi2Se3, focusing on the odd-parity fully-gapped superconducting state. Calculating the density of states with a self-consistent T-matrix approach, we test the presence of mid-gap states, leading to pair-breaking effects. Remarkably, the sensitivity to non-magnetic impurities strongly depend on a normal-state dispersion character, i.e., either non-relativistic or relativistic dispersion relations. We show unification picture for understanding this intriguing result, deriving a low-energy effective superconducting theory.

  8. Determination of the positions and orientations of concentrated rod-like colloids from 3D microscopy data.

    PubMed

    Besseling, T H; Hermes, M; Kuijk, A; de Nijs, B; Deng, T-S; Dijkstra, M; Imhof, A; van Blaaderen, A

    2015-05-20

    Confocal microscopy in combination with real-space particle tracking has proven to be a powerful tool in scientific fields such as soft matter physics, materials science and cell biology. However, 3D tracking of anisotropic particles in concentrated phases remains not as optimized compared to algorithms for spherical particles. To address this problem, we developed a new particle-fitting algorithm that can extract the positions and orientations of fluorescent rod-like particles from three dimensional confocal microscopy data stacks. The algorithm is tailored to work even when the fluorescent signals of the particles overlap considerably and a threshold method and subsequent clusters analysis alone do not suffice. We demonstrate that our algorithm correctly identifies all five coordinates of uniaxial particles in both a concentrated disordered phase and a liquid-crystalline smectic-B phase. Apart from confocal microscopy images, we also demonstrate that the algorithm can be used to identify nanorods in 3D electron tomography reconstructions. Lastly, we determined the accuracy of the algorithm using both simulated and experimental confocal microscopy data-stacks of diffusing silica rods in a dilute suspension. This novel particle-fitting algorithm allows for the study of structure and dynamics in both dilute and dense liquid-crystalline phases (such as nematic, smectic and crystalline phases) as well as the study of the glass transition of rod-like particles in three dimensions on the single particle level. PMID:25922931

  9. Determination of the positions and orientations of concentrated rod-like colloids from 3D microscopy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besseling, T. H.; Hermes, M.; Kuijk, A.; de Nijs, B.; Deng, T.-S.; Dijkstra, M.; Imhof, A.; van Blaaderen, A.

    2015-05-01

    Confocal microscopy in combination with real-space particle tracking has proven to be a powerful tool in scientific fields such as soft matter physics, materials science and cell biology. However, 3D tracking of anisotropic particles in concentrated phases remains not as optimized compared to algorithms for spherical particles. To address this problem, we developed a new particle-fitting algorithm that can extract the positions and orientations of fluorescent rod-like particles from three dimensional confocal microscopy data stacks. The algorithm is tailored to work even when the fluorescent signals of the particles overlap considerably and a threshold method and subsequent clusters analysis alone do not suffice. We demonstrate that our algorithm correctly identifies all five coordinates of uniaxial particles in both a concentrated disordered phase and a liquid-crystalline smectic-B phase. Apart from confocal microscopy images, we also demonstrate that the algorithm can be used to identify nanorods in 3D electron tomography reconstructions. Lastly, we determined the accuracy of the algorithm using both simulated and experimental confocal microscopy data-stacks of diffusing silica rods in a dilute suspension. This novel particle-fitting algorithm allows for the study of structure and dynamics in both dilute and dense liquid-crystalline phases (such as nematic, smectic and crystalline phases) as well as the study of the glass transition of rod-like particles in three dimensions on the single particle level.

  10. Direct Growth of Graphene Films on 3D Grating Structural Quartz Substrates for High-Performance Pressure-Sensitive Sensors.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuefen; Sun, Tai; Yang, Jun; Yu, Leyong; Wei, Dacheng; Fang, Liang; Lu, Bin; Du, Chunlei; Wei, Dapeng

    2016-07-01

    Conformal graphene films have directly been synthesized on the surface of grating microstructured quartz substrates by a simple chemical vapor deposition process. The wonderful conformality and relatively high quality of the as-prepared graphene on the three-dimensional substrate have been verified by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectra. This conformal graphene film possesses excellent electrical and optical properties with a sheet resistance of <2000 Ω·sq(-1) and a transmittance of >80% (at 550 nm), which can be attached with a flat graphene film on a poly(dimethylsiloxane) substrate, and then could work as a pressure-sensitive sensor. This device possesses a high-pressure sensitivity of -6.524 kPa(-1) in a low-pressure range of 0-200 Pa. Meanwhile, this pressure-sensitive sensor exhibits super-reliability (≥5000 cycles) and an ultrafast response time (≤4 ms). Owing to these features, this pressure-sensitive sensor based on 3D conformal graphene is adequately introduced to test wind pressure, expressing higher accuracy and a lower background noise level than a market anemometer. PMID:27269362

  11. Global sensitivity analysis of a 3D street canyon model—Part II: Application and physical insight using sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, James; Ziehn, Tilo; Dixon, Nick S.; Tomlin, Alison S.

    In this work global sensitivity studies using Monte Carlo sampling and high dimensional model representations (HDMR) have been carried out on the k- ɛ closure computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model MISKAM, allowing detailed representation of the effects of changing input parameters on the model outputs. The scenario studied is that of a complex street canyon in the city of York, UK. The sensitivity of the turbulence and mean flow fields to the input parameters is detailed both at specific measurement points and in the associated canyon cross-section to aid comparison with field data. This analysis gives insight into how model parameters can influence the predicted outputs. It also shows the relative strength of each parameter in its influence. Four main input parameters are addressed. Three parameters are surface roughness lengths, determining the flow over a surface, and the fourth is the background wind direction. In order to determine the relative importance of each parameter, sensitivity indices are calculated for the canyon cross-section. The sensitivity of the flow structures in and above the canyon to each parameter is found to be very location dependant. In general, at a particular measurement point, it is the closest wall surface that is most influential on the model output. However, due to the complexity of the flow at different wind angles this is not always the case, for example when a re-circulating canyon flow pattern is present. The background wind direction is shown to be an important parameter as it determines the surface features encountered by the flow. The accuracy with which this is specified when modelling a full-scale situation is therefore an important consideration when considering model uncertainty. Overall, the uncertainty due to roughness lengths is small in comparison to the mean outputs, indicating that the model is well defined even with large ranges of input parameter uncertainty.

  12. Analysis of direct clinical consequences of MLC positional errors in volumetric-modulated arc therapy using 3D dosimetry system.

    PubMed

    Nithiyanantham, Karthikeyan; Mani, Ganesh K; Subramani, Vikraman; Mueller, Lutz; Palaniappan, Karrthick K; Kataria, Tejinder

    2015-01-01

    In advanced, intensity-modulated external radiotherapy facility, the multileaf collimator has a decisive role in the beam modulation by creating multiple segments or dynamically varying field shapes to deliver a uniform dose distribution to the target with maximum sparing of normal tissues. The position of each MLC leaf has become more critical for intensity-modulated delivery (step-and-shoot IMRT, dynamic IMRT, and VMAT) compared to 3D CRT, where it defines only field boundaries. We analyzed the impact of the MLC positional errors on the dose distribution for volumetric-modulated arc therapy, using a 3D dosimetry system. A total of 15 VMAT cases, five each for brain, head and neck, and prostate cases, were retrospectively selected for the study. All the plans were generated in Monaco 3.0.0v TPS (Elekta Corporation, Atlanta, GA) and delivered using Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. Systematic errors of +1, +0.5, +0.3, 0, -1, -0.5, -0.3 mm were introduced in the MLC bank of the linear accelerator and the impact on the dose distribution of VMAT delivery was measured using the COMPASS 3D dosim-etry system. All the plans were created using single modulated arcs and the dose calculation was performed using a Monte Carlo algorithm in a grid size of 3 mm. The clinical endpoints D95%, D50%, D2%, and Dmax,D20%, D50% were taken for the evaluation of the target and critical organs doses, respectively. A significant dosimetric effect was found for many cases even with 0.5 mm of MLC positional errors. The average change of dose D 95% to PTV for ± 1 mm, ± 0.5 mm, and ±0.3mm was 5.15%, 2.58%, and 0.96% for brain cases; 7.19%, 3.67%, and 1.56% for head and neck cases; and 8.39%, 4.5%, and 1.86% for prostate cases, respectively. The average deviation of dose Dmax was 5.4%, 2.8%, and 0.83% for brainstem in brain cases; 8.2%, 4.4%, and 1.9% for spinal cord in H&N; and 10.8%, 6.2%, and 2.1% for rectum in prostate cases, respectively. The average changes in dose followed a linear

  13. Plasmon-induced efficiency enhancement on dye-sensitized solar cell by a 3D TNW-AuNP layer.

    PubMed

    Yen, Yin-Cheng; Chen, Po-Hung; Chen, Jing-Zhi; Chen, Jau-An; Lin, Kuan-Jiuh

    2015-01-28

    A new 3D TNW-AuNP plasmonic electrode consists of antireflective (AR) TiO2 nanowires (TNWs) (∼600 nm thickness) serving as light-harvesting antennae coupling with Au nanoparticles (NPs). A huge red-shift of 55 nm is observed in surface plasmon spectra for the Au (11 nm) plasmonic electrode that has 11 nm size Au NPs, whereby (111) lattice planes have a specific bonding with the TiO2 (101) planes. Remarkable red-shift is mainly attributed to the localized electric field improvement resulting from the plasmonic coupling effect between the Au NPs and the Au-TiO2 hybrids. After TiCl4 treatment, this favorable Au (11 nm) nanostructure takes advantage of harvesting photons to increase the conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) from 6.25% to 9.73%. PMID:25548958

  14. Development of fast patient position verification software using 2D-3D image registration and its clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Mori, Shinichiro; Kumagai, Motoki; Miki, Kentaro; Fukuhara, Riki; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2015-09-01

    To improve treatment workflow, we developed a graphic processing unit (GPU)-based patient positional verification software application and integrated it into carbon-ion scanning beam treatment. Here, we evaluated the basic performance of the software. The algorithm provides 2D/3D registration matching using CT and orthogonal X-ray flat panel detector (FPD) images. The participants were 53 patients with tumors of the head and neck, prostate or lung receiving carbon-ion beam treatment. 2D/3D-ITchi-Gime (ITG) calculation accuracy was evaluated in terms of computation time and registration accuracy. Registration calculation was determined using the similarity measurement metrics gradient difference (GD), normalized mutual information (NMI), zero-mean normalized cross-correlation (ZNCC), and their combination. Registration accuracy was dependent on the particular metric used. Representative examples were determined to have target registration error (TRE) = 0.45 ± 0.23 mm and angular error (AE) = 0.35 ± 0.18° with ZNCC + GD for a head and neck tumor; TRE = 0.12 ± 0.07 mm and AE = 0.16 ± 0.07° with ZNCC for a pelvic tumor; and TRE = 1.19 ± 0.78 mm and AE = 0.83 ± 0.61° with ZNCC for lung tumor. Calculation time was less than 7.26 s.The new registration software has been successfully installed and implemented in our treatment process. We expect that it will improve both treatment workflow and treatment accuracy. PMID:26081313

  15. Development of fast patient position verification software using 2D-3D image registration and its clinical experience

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Shinichiro; Kumagai, Motoki; Miki, Kentaro; Fukuhara, Riki; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    To improve treatment workflow, we developed a graphic processing unit (GPU)-based patient positional verification software application and integrated it into carbon-ion scanning beam treatment. Here, we evaluated the basic performance of the software. The algorithm provides 2D/3D registration matching using CT and orthogonal X-ray flat panel detector (FPD) images. The participants were 53 patients with tumors of the head and neck, prostate or lung receiving carbon-ion beam treatment. 2D/3D-ITchi-Gime (ITG) calculation accuracy was evaluated in terms of computation time and registration accuracy. Registration calculation was determined using the similarity measurement metrics gradient difference (GD), normalized mutual information (NMI), zero-mean normalized cross-correlation (ZNCC), and their combination. Registration accuracy was dependent on the particular metric used. Representative examples were determined to have target registration error (TRE) = 0.45 ± 0.23 mm and angular error (AE) = 0.35 ± 0.18° with ZNCC + GD for a head and neck tumor; TRE = 0.12 ± 0.07 mm and AE = 0.16 ± 0.07° with ZNCC for a pelvic tumor; and TRE = 1.19 ± 0.78 mm and AE = 0.83 ± 0.61° with ZNCC for lung tumor. Calculation time was less than 7.26 s.The new registration software has been successfully installed and implemented in our treatment process. We expect that it will improve both treatment workflow and treatment accuracy. PMID:26081313

  16. A Unified Approach to Diffusion Direction Sensitive Slice Registration and 3-D DTI Reconstruction From Moving Fetal Brain Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Fogtmann, Mads; Seshamani, Sharmishtaa; Kroenke, Christopher; Cheng, Xi; Chapman, Teresa; Wilm, Jakob; Rousseau, François

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to 3-D diffusion tensor image (DTI) reconstruction from multi-slice diffusion weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions of the moving fetal brain. Motion scatters the slice measurements in the spatial and spherical diffusion domain with respect to the underlying anatomy. Previous image registration techniques have been described to estimate the between slice fetal head motion, allowing the reconstruction of 3-D a diffusion estimate on a regular grid using interpolation. We propose Approach to Unified Diffusion Sensitive Slice Alignment and Reconstruction (AUDiSSAR) that explicitly formulates a process for diffusion direction sensitive DW-slice-to-DTI-volume alignment. This also incorporates image resolution modeling to iteratively deconvolve the effects of the imaging point spread function using the multiple views provided by thick slices acquired in different anatomical planes. The algorithm is implemented using a multi-resolution iterative scheme and multiple real and synthetic data are used to evaluate the performance of the technique. An accuracy experiment using synthetically created motion data of an adult head and a experiment using synthetic motion added to sedated fetal monkey dataset show a significant improvement in motion-trajectory estimation compared to a state-of-the-art approaches. The performance of the method is then evaluated on challenging but clinically typical in utero fetal scans of four different human cases, showing improved rendition of cortical anatomy and extraction of white matter tracts. While the experimental work focuses on DTI reconstruction (second-order tensor model), the proposed reconstruction framework can employ any 5-D diffusion volume model that can be represented by the spatial parameterizations of an orientation distribution function. PMID:24108711

  17. Verification of proton range, position, and intensity in IMPT with a 3D liquid scintillator detector system

    PubMed Central

    Archambault, L.; Poenisch, F.; Sahoo, N.; Robertson, D.; Lee, A.; Gillin, M. T.; Mohan, R.; Beddar, S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) using spot scanned proton beams relies on the delivery of a large number of beamlets to shape the dose distribution in a highly conformal manner. The authors have developed a 3D system based on liquid scintillator to measure the spatial location, intensity, and depth of penetration (energy) of the proton beamlets in near real-time. Methods: The detector system consists of a 20 × 20 × 20 cc liquid scintillator (LS) material in a light tight enclosure connected to a CCD camera. This camera has a field of view of 25.7 by 19.3 cm and a pixel size of 0.4 mm. While the LS is irradiated, the camera continuously acquires images of the light distribution produced inside the LS. Irradiations were made with proton pencil beams produced with a spot-scanning nozzle. Pencil beams with nominal ranges in water between 9.5 and 17.6 cm were scanned to irradiate an area of 10 × 10 cm square on the surface of the LS phantom. Image frames were acquired at 50 ms per frame. Results: The signal to noise ratio of a typical Bragg peak was about 170. Proton range measured from the light distribution produced in the LS was accurate to within 0.3 mm on average. The largest deviation seen between the nominal and measured range was 0.6 mm. Lateral position of the measured pencil beam was accurate to within 0.4 mm on average. The largest deviation seen between the nominal and measured lateral position was 0.8 mm; however, the accuracy of this measurement could be improved by correcting light scattering artifacts. Intensity of single proton spots were measured with precision ranging from 3 % for the smallest spot intensity (0.005 MU) to 0.5 % for the largest spot (0.04 MU). Conclusions: Our LS detector system has been shown to be capable of fast, submillimeter spatial localization of proton spots delivered in a 3D volume. This system could be used for beam range, intensity and position verification in IMPT. PMID:22380355

  18. Verification of proton range, position, and intensity in IMPT with a 3D liquid scintillator detector system

    SciTech Connect

    Archambault, L.; Poenisch, F.; Sahoo, N.; Robertson, D.; Lee, A.; Gillin, M. T.; Mohan, R.; Beddar, S.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) using spot scanned proton beams relies on the delivery of a large number of beamlets to shape the dose distribution in a highly conformal manner. The authors have developed a 3D system based on liquid scintillator to measure the spatial location, intensity, and depth of penetration (energy) of the proton beamlets in near real-time. Methods: The detector system consists of a 20 x 20 x 20 cc liquid scintillator (LS) material in a light tight enclosure connected to a CCD camera. This camera has a field of view of 25.7 by 19.3 cm and a pixel size of 0.4 mm. While the LS is irradiated, the camera continuously acquires images of the light distribution produced inside the LS. Irradiations were made with proton pencil beams produced with a spot-scanning nozzle. Pencil beams with nominal ranges in water between 9.5 and 17.6 cm were scanned to irradiate an area of 10 x 10 cm square on the surface of the LS phantom. Image frames were acquired at 50 ms per frame. Results: The signal to noise ratio of a typical Bragg peak was about 170. Proton range measured from the light distribution produced in the LS was accurate to within 0.3 mm on average. The largest deviation seen between the nominal and measured range was 0.6 mm. Lateral position of the measured pencil beam was accurate to within 0.4 mm on average. The largest deviation seen between the nominal and measured lateral position was 0.8 mm; however, the accuracy of this measurement could be improved by correcting light scattering artifacts. Intensity of single proton spots were measured with precision ranging from 3 % for the smallest spot intensity (0.005 MU) to 0.5 % for the largest spot (0.04 MU). Conclusions: Our LS detector system has been shown to be capable of fast, submillimeter spatial localization of proton spots delivered in a 3D volume. This system could be used for beam range, intensity and position verification in IMPT.

  19. Triboelectric nanogenerator built on suspended 3D spiral structure as vibration and positioning sensor and wave energy harvester.

    PubMed

    Hu, Youfan; Yang, Jin; Jing, Qingshen; Niu, Simiao; Wu, Wenzhuo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2013-11-26

    An unstable mechanical structure that can self-balance when perturbed is a superior choice for vibration energy harvesting and vibration detection. In this work, a suspended 3D spiral structure is integrated with a triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) for energy harvesting and sensor applications. The newly designed vertical contact-separation mode TENG has a wide working bandwidth of 30 Hz in low-frequency range with a maximum output power density of 2.76 W/m(2) on a load of 6 MΩ. The position of an in-plane vibration source was identified by placing TENGs at multiple positions as multichannel, self-powered active sensors, and the location of the vibration source was determined with an error less than 6%. The magnitude of the vibration is also measured by the output voltage and current signal of the TENG. By integrating the TENG inside a buoy ball, wave energy harvesting at water surface has been demonstrated and used for lighting illumination light, which shows great potential applications in marine science and environmental/infrastructure monitoring. PMID:24168315

  20. a Uav Based 3-D Positioning Framework for Detecting Locations of Buried Persons in Collapsed Disaster Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, H.; Kim, C.; Lee, W.

    2016-06-01

    Regarding spatial location positioning, indoor location positioning theories based on wireless communication techniques such as Wi-Fi, beacon, UWB and Bluetooth has widely been developing across the world. These techniques are mainly focusing on spatial location detection of customers using fixed wireless APs and unique Tags in the indoor environment. Besides, since existing detection equipment and techniques using ultrasound or sound etc. to detect buried persons and identify survival status for them cause 2nd damages on the collapsed debris for rescuers. In addition, it might take time to check the buried persons. However, the collapsed disaster sites should consider both outdoor and indoor environments because empty spaces under collapsed debris exists. In order to detect buried persons from the empty spaces, we should collect wireless signals with Wi-Fi from their mobile phone. Basically, the Wi-Fi signal measure 2-D location. However, since the buried persons have Z value with burial depth, we also should collect barometer sensor data from their mobile phones in order to measure Z values according to weather conditions. Specially, for quick accessibility to the disaster area, a drone (UAV; Unmanned Arial Vehicle) system, which is equipped with a wireless detection module, was introduced. Using these framework, this study aims to provide the rescuers with effective rescue information by calculating 3-D location for buried persons based on the wireless and barometer sensor fusion.

  1. Position Sensitive Detection System for Charged Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Coello, E. A.; Favela, F.; Curiel, Q.; Chavez, E; Huerta, A.; Varela, A.; Shapira, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The position sensitive detection system presented in this work employs the Anger logic algorithm to determine the position of the light spark produced by the passage of charged particles on a 170 x 170 x 10 mm3 scintillator material (PILOT-U). The detection system consists of a matrix of nine photomultipliers, covering a fraction of the back area of the scintillators. Tests made with a non-collimated alpha particle source together with a Monte Carlo simulation that reproduces the data, suggest an intrinsic position resolution of up to 6 mm is achieved.

  2. Emulation workbench for position sensitive gaseous scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, L.; Margato, L. M. S.; Morozov, A.; Solovov, V.; Fraga, F. A. F.

    2015-12-01

    Position sensitive detectors based on gaseous scintillation proportional counters with Anger-type readout are being used in several research areas such as neutron detection, search for dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay. Design and optimization of such detectors are complex and time consuming tasks. Simulations, while being a powerful tool, strongly depend on the light transfer models and demand accurate knowledge of many parameters, which are often not available. Here we describe an alternative approach based on the experimental evaluation of a detector using an isotropic point-like light source with precisely controllable light emission properties, installed on a 3D positioning system. The results obtained with the developed setup at validation conditions, when the scattered light is strongly suppressed show good agreement with simulations.

  3. Highly-accelerated quantitative 2D and 3D localized spectroscopy with linear algebraic modeling (SLAM) and sensitivity encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Gabr, Refaat E.; Zhou, Jinyuan; Weiss, Robert G.; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2013-12-01

    Noninvasive magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) with chemical shift imaging (CSI) provides valuable metabolic information for research and clinical studies, but is often limited by long scan times. Recently, spectroscopy with linear algebraic modeling (SLAM) was shown to provide compartment-averaged spectra resolved in one spatial dimension with many-fold reductions in scan-time. This was achieved using a small subset of the CSI phase-encoding steps from central image k-space that maximized the signal-to-noise ratio. Here, SLAM is extended to two- and three-dimensions (2D, 3D). In addition, SLAM is combined with sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) parallel imaging techniques, enabling the replacement of even more CSI phase-encoding steps to further accelerate scan-speed. A modified SLAM reconstruction algorithm is introduced that significantly reduces the effects of signal nonuniformity within compartments. Finally, main-field inhomogeneity corrections are provided, analogous to CSI. These methods are all tested on brain proton MRS data from a total of 24 patients with brain tumors, and in a human cardiac phosphorus 3D SLAM study at 3T. Acceleration factors of up to 120-fold versus CSI are demonstrated, including speed-up factors of 5-fold relative to already-accelerated SENSE CSI. Brain metabolites are quantified in SLAM and SENSE SLAM spectra and found to be indistinguishable from CSI measures from the same compartments. The modified reconstruction algorithm demonstrated immunity to maladjusted segmentation and errors from signal heterogeneity in brain data. In conclusion, SLAM demonstrates the potential to supplant CSI in studies requiring compartment-average spectra or large volume coverage, by dramatically reducing scan-time while providing essentially the same quantitative results.

  4. Highly-accelerated quantitative 2D and 3D localized spectroscopy with linear algebraic modeling (SLAM) and sensitivity encoding

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Gabr, Refaat E.; Zhou, Jinyuan; Weiss, Robert G.; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Noninvasive magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) with chemical shift imaging (CSI) provides valuable metabolic information for research and clinical studies, but is often limited by long scan times. Recently, spectroscopy with linear algebraic modeling (SLAM) was shown to provide compartment-averaged spectra resolved in one spatial dimension with many-fold reductions in scan-time. This was achieved using a small subset of the CSI phase-encoding steps from central image k-space that maximized the signal-to-noise ratio. Here, SLAM is extended to two- and three-dimensions (2D, 3D). In addition, SLAM is combined with sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) parallel imaging techniques, enabling the replacement of even more CSI phase-encoding steps to further accelerate scan-speed. A modified SLAM reconstruction algorithm is introduced that significantly reduces the effects of signal nonuniformity within compartments. Finally, main-field inhomogeneity corrections are provided, analogous to CSI. These methods are all tested on brain proton MRS data from a total of 24 patients with brain tumors, and in a human cardiac phosphorus 3D SLAM study at 3T. Acceleration factors of up to 120-fold versus CSI are demonstrated, including speed-up factors of 5-fold relative to already-accelerated SENSE CSI. Brain metabolites are quantified in SLAM and SENSE SLAM spectra and found to be indistinguishable from CSI measures from the same compartments. The modified reconstruction algorithm demonstrated immunity to maladjusted segmentation and errors from signal heterogeneity in brain data. In conclusion, SLAM demonstrates the potential to supplant CSI in studies requiring compartment-average spectra or large volume coverage, by dramatically reducing scan-time while providing essentially the same quantitative results. PMID:24188921

  5. Large area position sensitive β-detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaintraub, S.; Hass, M.; Edri, H.; Morali, N.; Segal, T.

    2015-03-01

    A new conceptual design of a large area electron detector, which is position and energy sensitive, was developed. This detector is designed for beta decay energies up to 4 MeV, but in principle can be re-designed for higher energies. The detector incorporates one large plastic scintillator and, in general, a limited number of photomultipliers (7 presently). The current setup was designed and constructed after an extensive Geant4 simulation study. By comparison of a single hit light distribution between the various photomultipliers to a pre-measured accurate position-response map, the anticipated position resolution is around 5 mm. The first benchmark experiments have been conducted in order to calibrate and confirm the position resolution of the detector. The new method, results of the first test experiments and comparison to simulations are presented.

  6. Validity, Reliability, and Sensitivity of a 3D Vision Sensor-based Upper Extremity Reachable Workspace Evaluation in Neuromuscular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jay J.; Kurillo, Gregorij; Abresch, R. Ted; Nicorici, Alina; Bajcsy, Ruzena

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: One of the major challenges in the neuromuscular field has been lack of upper extremity outcome measures that can be useful for clinical therapeutic efficacy studies. Using vision-based sensor system and customized software, 3-dimensional (3D) upper extremity motion analysis can reconstruct a reachable workspace as a valid, reliable and sensitive outcome measure in various neuromuscular conditions where proximal upper extremity range of motion and function is impaired. Methods: Using a stereo-camera sensor system, 3D reachable workspace envelope surface area normalized to an individual’s arm length (relative surface area: RSA) to allow comparison between subjects was determined for 20 healthy controls and 9 individuals with varying degrees of upper extremity dysfunction due to neuromuscular conditions. All study subjects were classified based on Brooke upper extremity function scale. Right and left upper extremity reachable workspaces were determined based on three repeated measures. The RSAs for each frontal hemi-sphere quadrant and total reachable workspaces were determined with and without loading condition (500 gram wrist weight). Data were analyzed for assessment of the developed system and validity, reliability, and sensitivity to change of the reachable workspace outcome. Results: The mean total RSAs of the reachable workspace for the healthy controls and individuals with NMD were significantly different (0.586 ± 0.085 and 0.299 ± 0.198 respectively; p<0.001). All quadrant RSAs were reduced for individuals with NMDs compared to the healthy controls and these reductions correlated with reduced upper limb function as measured by Brooke grade. The upper quadrants of reachable workspace (above the shoulder level) demonstrated greatest reductions in RSA among subjects with progressive severity in upper extremity impairment. Evaluation of the developed outcomes system with the Bland-Altman method demonstrated narrow 95% limits of agreement (LOA

  7. Salt sensitivity of the morphometry of Artemia franciscana during development: a demonstration of 3D critical windows.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Casey A; Willis, Eric; Burggren, Warren W

    2016-02-01

    A 3D conceptual framework of 'critical windows' was used to examine whether the morphometry of Artemia franciscana is altered by salinity exposure during certain key periods of development. Artemia franciscana were hatched at 20 ppt (designated control salinity) and were then exposed to 10, 30, 40 or 50 ppt either chronically (days 1-15) or only on days 1-6, 7-9, 10-12 or 13-15. On day 15, maturity was assessed and morphometric characteristics, including mass, total body length, tail length and width, length of the third swimming appendage and eye diameter, were measured. Maturation and morphometry on day 15 were influenced by the exposure window and salinity dose. Artemia franciscana were generally larger following exposure to 10 and 40 ppt during days 1-6 and 7-9 when compared with days 10-12 and 13-15, in part due to a higher percentage of mature individuals. Exposure to different salinities on days 1-6 produced the greatest differences in morphometry, and thus this appears to be a period in development when A. franciscana is particularly sensitive to salinity. Viewing the developmental window as three-dimensional allowed more effective visualization of the complex interactions between exposure window, stressor dose and the magnitude of morphometric changes in A. franciscana. PMID:26685168

  8. Position-Sensitive Scanning Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Joseph P.; Chen, Yan; Müller, Joachim D.

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) uses a stationary laser beam to illuminate a small sample volume and analyze the temporal behavior of the fluorescence fluctuations within the stationary observation volume. In contrast, scanning FCS (SFCS) collects the fluorescence signal from a moving observation volume by scanning the laser beam. The fluctuations now contain both temporal and spatial information about the sample. To access the spatial information we synchronize scanning and data acquisition. Synchronization allows us to evaluate correlations for every position along the scanned trajectory. We use a circular scan trajectory in this study. Because the scan radius is constant, the phase angle is sufficient to characterize the position of the beam. We introduce position-sensitive SFCS (PSFCS), where correlations are calculated as a function of lag time and phase. We present the theory of PSFCS and derive expressions for diffusion, diffusion in the presence of flow, and for immobilization. To test PSFCS we compare experimental data with theory. We determine the direction and speed of a flowing dye solution and the position of an immobilized particle. To demonstrate the feasibility of the technique for applications in living cells we present data of enhanced green fluorescent protein measured in the nucleus of COS cells. PMID:15894645

  9. High speed curved position sensitive detector

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Robert W.; Wilson, Jack W.

    1989-01-01

    A high speed curved position sensitive porportional counter detector for use in x-ray diffraction, the detection of 5-20 keV photons and the like. The detector employs a planar anode assembly of a plurality of parallel metallic wires. This anode assembly is supported between two cathode planes, with at least one of these cathode planes having a serpentine resistive path in the form of a meander having legs generally perpendicular to the anode wires. This meander is produced by special microelectronic fabrication techniques whereby the meander "wire" fans outwardly at the cathode ends to produce the curved aspect of the detector, and the legs of the meander are small in cross-section and very closely spaced whereby a spatial resolution of about 50 .mu.m can be achieved. All of the other performance characteristics are about as good or better than conventional position sensitive proportional counter type detectors. Count rates of up to 40,000 counts per second with 0.5 .mu.s shaping time constants are achieved.

  10. Sensitivity Studies of 3D Reservoir Simulation at the I-Lan Geothermal Area in Taiwan Using TOUGH2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, C. W.; Song, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    A large scale geothermal project conducted by National Science Council is initiated recently in I-Lan south area, northeastern Taiwan. The goal of this national project is to generate at least 5 MW electricity from geothermal energy. To achieve this goal, an integrated team which consists of various specialties are held together to investigate I-Lan area comprehensively. For example, I-Lan geological data, petrophysical analysis, seismicity, temperature distribution, hydrology, geochemistry, heat source study etc. were performed to build a large scale 3D conceptual model of the geothermal potential sites. In addition, not only a well of 3000m deep but also several shallow wells are currently drilling to give us accurate information about the deep underground. According to the current conceptual model, the target area is bounded by two main faults, Jiaosi and Choshui faults. The geothermal gradient measured at one drilling well (1200m) is about 49.1˚C/km. The geothermal reservoir is expected to occur at a fractured geological formation, Siling sandstone layer. The preliminary results of this area from all the investigations are used as input parameters to create a realistic numerical reservoir model. This work is using numerical simulator TOUGH2/EOS1 to study the geothermal energy potential in I-Lan area. Once we can successfully predict the geothermal energy potential in this area and generate 5 MW electricity, we can apply the similar methodology to the other potential sites in Taiwan, and therefore increase the percentage of renewable energy in the generation of electricity. A large scale of three-dimensional subsurface geological model is built mainly based on the seismic exploration of the subsurface structure and well log data. The dimensions of the reservoir model in x, y, and z coordinates are 20x10x5 km, respectively. Once the conceptual model and the well locations are set up appropriately based on the field data, sensitivity studies on production and

  11. SU-E-T-152: Error Sensitivity and Superiority of a Protocol for 3D IMRT Quality Assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Gueorguiev, G; Cotter, C; Turcotte, J; Sharp, G; Crawford, B; Mah'D, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To test if the parameters included in our 3D QA protocol with current tolerance levels are able to detect certain errors and show the superiority of 3D QA method over single ion chamber measurements and 2D gamma test by detecting most of the introduced errors. The 3D QA protocol parameters are: TPS and measured average dose difference, 3D gamma test with 3mmDTA/3% test parameters, and structure volume for which the TPS predicted and measured absolute dose difference is greater than 6%. Methods: Two prostate and two thoracic step-and-shoot IMRT patients were investigated. The following errors were introduced to each original treatment plan: energy switched from 6MV to 10MV, linac jaws retracted to 15cmx15cm, 1,2,3 central MLC leaf pairs retracted behind the jaws, single central MLC leaf put in or out of the treatment field, Monitor Units (MU) increased and decreased by 1 and 3%, collimator off by 5 and 15 degrees, detector shifted by 5mm to the left and right, gantry treatment angle off by 5 and 15 degrees. QA was performed on each plan using single ion chamber, 2D ion chamber array for 2D gamma analysis and using IBA's COMPASS system for 3D QA. Results: Out of the three tested QA methods single ion chamber performs the worst not detecting subtle errors. 3D QA proves to be the superior out of the three methods detecting all of introduced errors, except 10MV and 1% MU change, and MLC rotated (those errors were not detected by any QA methods tested). Conclusion: As the way radiation is delivered evolves, so must the QA. We believe a diverse set of 3D statistical parameters applied both to OAR and target plan structures provides the highest level of QA.

  12. Two-dimensional position sensitive radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Mihalczo, John T.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear reaction detectors capable of position sensitivity with submillimeter resolution in two dimensions are each provided by placing arrays of scintillation or wave length shifting optical fibers formed of a plurality of such optical fibers in a side-by-side relationship in X and Y directions with a layer of nuclear reactive material operatively associated with surface regions of the optical fiber arrays. Each nuclear reaction occurring in the layer of nuclear reactive material produces energetic particles for simultaneously providing a light pulse in a single optical fiber in the X oriented array and in a single optical fiber in the Y oriented array. These pulses of light are transmitted to a signal producing circuit for providing signals indicative of the X-Y coordinates of each nuclear event.

  13. Two-dimensional position sensitive radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Mihalczo, J.T.

    1994-02-22

    Nuclear reaction detectors capable of position sensitivity with submillimeter resolution in two dimensions are each provided by placing arrays of scintillation or wavelength shifting optical fibers formed of a plurality of such optical fibers in a side-by-side relationship in X and Y directions with a layer of nuclear reactive material operatively associated with surface regions of the optical fiber arrays. Each nuclear reaction occurring in the layer of nuclear reactive material produces energetic particles for simultaneously providing a light pulse in a single optical fiber in the X oriented array and in a single optical fiber in the Y oriented array. These pulses of light are transmitted to a signal producing circuit for providing signals indicative of the X-Y coordinates of each nuclear event. 6 figures.

  14. Jigsaw phase III: a miniaturized airborne 3-D imaging laser radar with photon-counting sensitivity for foliage penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidyanathan, Mohan; Blask, Steven; Higgins, Thomas; Clifton, William; Davidsohn, Daniel; Carson, Ryan; Reynolds, Van; Pfannenstiel, Joanne; Cannata, Richard; Marino, Richard; Drover, John; Hatch, Robert; Schue, David; Freehart, Robert; Rowe, Greg; Mooney, James; Hart, Carl; Stanley, Byron; McLaughlin, Joseph; Lee, Eui-In; Berenholtz, Jack; Aull, Brian; Zayhowski, John; Vasile, Alex; Ramaswami, Prem; Ingersoll, Kevin; Amoruso, Thomas; Khan, Imran; Davis, William; Heinrichs, Richard

    2007-04-01

    Jigsaw three-dimensional (3D) imaging laser radar is a compact, light-weight system for imaging highly obscured targets through dense foliage semi-autonomously from an unmanned aircraft. The Jigsaw system uses a gimbaled sensor operating in a spot light mode to laser illuminate a cued target, and autonomously capture and produce the 3D image of hidden targets under trees at high 3D voxel resolution. With our MIT Lincoln Laboratory team members, the sensor system has been integrated into a geo-referenced 12-inch gimbal, and used in airborne data collections from a UH-1 manned helicopter, which served as a surrogate platform for the purpose of data collection and system validation. In this paper, we discuss the results from the ground integration and testing of the system, and the results from UH-1 flight data collections. We also discuss the performance results of the system obtained using ladar calibration targets.

  15. The Successful Complete Remission Induction by Sorafenib Monotherapy in a FLT3-D835Y-Positive Patient with Refractory Acute Monocytic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yanhua; Jin, Song; Xu, Ting; Zhou, Jin; Ma, Liang; Shen, Hongjie; Wu, Depei; Chen, Suning; Miao, Miao

    2016-06-01

    Sorafenib has been shown to be active in AML patients with FLT3-ITD. However, the effect of sorafenib in AML patients with FLT-TKD has never been well determined. Moreover, acquisition of secondary FLT3 TKD mutations, mainly at D835 (D835F/H/V/Y), are recognized as the major mechanisms of resistance of AML patients with FLT3-ITD to sorafenib. It has been reported that sorafenib induced death of cells that expressed the FLT3-ITD or FLT3-D835G but not cells that expressed the FLT3-D835Y point mutant or wild-type FLT3 in vitro. Here, we report the successful complete remission induction by sorafenib monotherapy in a FLT3-D835Y-positive patient with refractory AML-M5 followed by allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:27408351

  16. mr-PosEBR: a novel positive tone resist for high resolution electron beam lithography and 3D surface patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfirrmann, Stefan; Kirchner, Robert; Lohse, Olga; Guzenko, Vitaliy A.; Voigt, Anja; Harder, Irina; Kolander, Anett; Schift, Helmut; Grützner, Gabi

    2016-03-01

    In this contribution, we present the results of a systematic material variation for the development of a resist material for high resolution positive tone electron beam lithography (EBL). Several acrylic copolymer materials with different compositions, that is varying mass fractions of the comonomers and different molecular weights, were synthesized and - as resist solutions - evaluated in terms of EBL performance at acceleration voltages of 30 kV and 100 kV. The resist material exhibiting the best combination of the desired properties, named mr-PosEBR, is two times more sensitive than PMMA 495k and performs comparably to the known high resolution resist ZEP520A at 30 kV. For example, a grating pattern with 29 nm wide lines with a period of 100 nm could be lithographically generated in films of mr-PosEBR with an area dose of 100 μC/cm2. In terms of resolution, single lines of only 35 nm width could be fabricated via metal liftoff. Furthermore, the dry etch stability of mr-PosEBR in a CF4/SF6 process is similar to the one of ZEP520A. Consequently, via dry etching nano patterns in mr-PosEBR could be smoothly transferred into the underlying Si substrate with high fidelity. Moreover, mr-PosEBR was evaluated as electron beam grayscale patterning and reflow resist. It was shown that the resist exhibits a good grayscale and reflow performance very similar to PMMA 120k and ZEP520A. Via these well controllable processes the generation of a wide variety of features and applications is possible.

  17. Photoconversion of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells with a 3D-Structured Photoelectrode Consisting of Both TiO2 Nanofibers and Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Tae-Hwan; Kim, Wan-Tae; Choi, Won-Youl

    2016-03-01

    In dye-sensitized solar cells, a three-dimensional (3-D)-structured photoelectrode of TiO2 nanofibers and nanoparticles was successfully fabricated by electro-spinning and screen-printing processes. Structures with one-dimensional nanofibers can be expected to improve the charge transport in a photoelectrode. The microstructure and crystalline structure were observed by field-emission scanning electron microscopy and with an x-ray diffractometer, respectively. The particle size of the TiO2 particles and the diameters of the TiO2 nanofiber in the 3-D-structured photoelectrode were ~30 nm and ~500 nm, respectively. The total thickness of the TiO2 layer in the 3-D-structured photoelectrode, which is composed of a nanoparticle layer of ~12 μm and a nanofiber layer of ~8 μm, was ~20 μm. The crystalline, anatase phase was also determined. In these dye-sensitized solar cells with a 3-D-structured layer, a short-circuit current density of 12.36 mA/cm2, an open-circuit voltage of 0.74 V, a fill factor of 0.46, and an energy conversion efficiency of 4.18% were observed. These values are higher than those of dye-sensitized solar cells with a conventional TiO2 nanoparticle layer. The proposed 3-D-structured photoelectrode consisting of TiO2 nanofibers and nanoparticles can help improve the performance of commercial dye-sensitized solar cells.

  18. Photoconversion of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells with a 3D-Structured Photoelectrode Consisting of Both TiO2 Nanofibers and Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Tae-Hwan; Kim, Wan-Tae; Choi, Won-Youl

    2016-06-01

    In dye-sensitized solar cells, a three-dimensional (3-D)-structured photoelectrode of TiO2 nanofibers and nanoparticles was successfully fabricated by electro-spinning and screen-printing processes. Structures with one-dimensional nanofibers can be expected to improve the charge transport in a photoelectrode. The microstructure and crystalline structure were observed by field-emission scanning electron microscopy and with an x-ray diffractometer, respectively. The particle size of the TiO2 particles and the diameters of the TiO2 nanofiber in the 3-D-structured photoelectrode were ~30 nm and ~500 nm, respectively. The total thickness of the TiO2 layer in the 3-D-structured photoelectrode, which is composed of a nanoparticle layer of ~12 μm and a nanofiber layer of ~8 μm, was ~20 μm. The crystalline, anatase phase was also determined. In these dye-sensitized solar cells with a 3-D-structured layer, a short-circuit current density of 12.36 mA/cm2, an open-circuit voltage of 0.74 V, a fill factor of 0.46, and an energy conversion efficiency of 4.18% were observed. These values are higher than those of dye-sensitized solar cells with a conventional TiO2 nanoparticle layer. The proposed 3-D-structured photoelectrode consisting of TiO2 nanofibers and nanoparticles can help improve the performance of commercial dye-sensitized solar cells.

  19. Local and systemic activation of the whole complement cascade in human leukocytoclastic cutaneous vasculitis; C3d,g and terminal complement complex as sensitive markers.

    PubMed Central

    Dauchel, H; Joly, P; Delpech, A; Thomine, E; Sauger, F; Le Loet, X; Lauret, P; Tron, F; Fontaine, M; Ripoche, J

    1993-01-01

    We have studied complement activation both in plasma samples and in lesional skin from patients with leukocytoclastic cutaneous vasculitis (LCV). Enzyme immunoassay (EIA) quantification of the complement activation markers, C3d,g and the terminal complement complex (TCC) in plasma, showed that their levels were significantly increased in 66% and 55% of the patients, respectively (n = 29) compared with healthy controls, whereas the standard measurements of C3, factor B, C1q, C4 and C2 were generally within normal range. Elevations of C3d,g and TCC levels in plasma were significantly correlated. Importantly, a significant correlation was found between the severity of the vasculitis and both C3d,g and TCC plasma levels. Immunofluorescence studies of skin biopsy specimens demonstrated simultaneous presence of perivascular dermal deposits of C3d,g and TCC in lesional skin from 96% and 80% respectively of the patients (n = 25). There was a significant correlation between the intensity of the deposits of both markers. Clusterin, a TCC inhibitory protein, was always found at the same sites of perivascular TCC deposits. Immunofluorescence studies at the epidermal basement membrane zone (BMZ) revealed in each case deposits of C3d,g which were accompanied by TCC deposits in 52% of the biopsy specimens. These data demonstrate that there is a local and systemic activation of the whole complement cascade in human LCV. The presence of both C3d,g and clusterin-associated TCC perivascular deposits suggests an intervention of a regulatory mechanism of local complement activation in LCV. Finally, measurement of plasma C3d,g and TCC appears to be a sensitive indicator of systemic complement activation and disease severity in LCV. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8485913

  20. Comparison of anatomic coordinate systems with rigid multi-resolution 3D registration for the reproducible positioning of analysis volumes of interest in QCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisa, Fabian; Museyko, Oleg; Hess, Andreas; Kalender, Willi A.; Engelke, Klaus

    2010-03-01

    In this study we compared two approaches that have recently been used to minimize precision errors in 3D quantitative computed tomography (QCT) images of the hip and the spine in order to optimize the detection of longitudinal changes in bone mineral density (BMD). In 30 subjects we obtained baseline and 1 year follow-up 3D CT scans of the proximal femur and the spine. QCT analysis was applied to a variety of volumes of interest (VOIs) automatically positioned relative to anatomic coordinate systems (ACS). In the first approach (A1) baseline and follow-up scans were analyzed independently. In the second approach (A2) a 3D versor-based rigid intensity registration method was applied to match baseline and follow-up images, and the baseline ACS was mapped on the follow-up image using the registration transformation. Afterwards, the analysis VOIs were again independently calculated for baseline and follow-up images. There were no significant differences of percent BMD changes between baseline and follow-up images between A1 and A2 for any of the VOIs investigated. With advanced image processing methods a time-consuming 3D registration between baseline and follow-up images before the analysis does not improve analysis precision compared to the use of anatomical coordinate systems.

  1. Positional isomerism-driven two 3D pillar-layered metal-organic frameworks: Syntheses, topological structures and photoluminescence properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yayong; Zhao, Siwei; Ma, Haoran; Han, Yi; Liu, Kang; Wang, Lei

    2016-06-01

    Two novel three-dimensional (3D) pillar-layered metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), namely [Zn2(μ2-OH)(boaba)(1,4-bmimb)]n (1) and {[Zn5K2(μ2-H2O)2(boaba)4(1,2-bmimb)2(H2O)2]·H2O}n (2), were prepared by hydrothermal reactions (H3boaba=3,5-bis-oxyacetate-benzoic acid; 1,4-bmimb=1,4-bis((2-methyl-1H-imidazol-1-yl)methyl)benzene; 1,2-bmimb =1,2-bis((2-methyl-1H-imidazol-1-yl)methyl)benzene). Notably, 1 exhibits a (3,5)-connected binodal (63)(69·8)-gra net with binuclear [Zn2(μ2-OH)(COO)]2+ clusters, while 2 shows a novel (4,4,5,9)-connected 4-nodal net constructed from the unique Zn(II)-K(I) heterometal rod-like substructures. The results indicate that the disposition of the 2-methylimidazolyl groups of bis(imidazole) ligands have a significant effect on structural diversity. Moreover, the photoluminescence properties of 1 and 2 have been investigated.

  2. Imaging the position-dependent 3D force on microbeads subjected to acoustic radiation forces and streaming.

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, Andreas; Lakämper, Stefan; Baasch, Thierry; Schaap, Iwan A T; Dual, Jurg

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic particle manipulation in microfluidic channels is becoming a powerful tool in microfluidics to control micrometer sized objects in medical, chemical and biological applications. By creating a standing acoustic wave in the channel, the resulting pressure field can be employed to trap or sort particles. To design efficient and reproducible devices, it is important to characterize the pressure field throughout the volume of the microfluidic device. Here, we used an optically trapped particle as probe to measure the forces in all three dimensions. By moving the probe through the volume of the channel, we imaged spatial variations in the pressure field. In the direction of the standing wave this revealed a periodic energy landscape for 2 μm beads, resulting in an effective stiffness of 2.6 nN m(-1) for the acoustic trap. We found that multiple fabricated devices showed consistent pressure fields. Surprisingly, forces perpendicular to the direction of the standing wave reached values of up to 20% of the main-axis-values. To separate the direct acoustic force from secondary effects, we performed experiments with different bead sizes, which attributed some of the perpendicular forces to acoustic streaming. This method to image acoustically generated forces in 3D can be used to either minimize perpendicular forces or to employ them for specific applications in novel acoustofluidic designs. PMID:27302661

  3. Recapitulation of Tumor Heterogeneity and Molecular Signatures in a 3D Brain Cancer Model with Decreased Sensitivity to Histone Deacetylase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stuart J.; Wilson, Martin; Ward, Jennifer H.; Rahman, Cheryl V.; Peet, Andrew C.; Macarthur, Donald C.; Rose, Felicity R. A. J.; Grundy, Richard G.; Rahman, Ruman

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Physiologically relevant pre-clinical ex vivo models recapitulating CNS tumor micro-environmental complexity will aid development of biologically-targeted agents. We present comprehensive characterization of tumor aggregates generated using the 3D Rotary Cell Culture System (RCCS). Methods CNS cancer cell lines were grown in conventional 2D cultures and the RCCS and comparison with a cohort of 53 pediatric high grade gliomas conducted by genome wide gene expression and microRNA arrays, coupled with immunohistochemistry, ex vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy and drug sensitivity evaluation using the histone deacetylase inhibitor, Vorinostat. Results Macroscopic RCCS aggregates recapitulated the heterogeneous morphology of brain tumors with a distinct proliferating rim, necrotic core and oxygen tension gradient. Gene expression and microRNA analyses revealed significant differences with 3D expression intermediate to 2D cultures and primary brain tumors. Metabolic profiling revealed differential profiles, with an increase in tumor specific metabolites in 3D. To evaluate the potential of the RCCS as a drug testing tool, we determined the efficacy of Vorinostat against aggregates of U87 and KNS42 glioblastoma cells. Both lines demonstrated markedly reduced sensitivity when assaying in 3D culture conditions compared to classical 2D drug screen approaches. Conclusions Our comprehensive characterization demonstrates that 3D RCCS culture of high grade brain tumor cells has profound effects on the genetic, epigenetic and metabolic profiles of cultured cells, with these cells residing as an intermediate phenotype between that of 2D cultures and primary tumors. There is a discrepancy between 2D culture and tumor molecular profiles, and RCCS partially re-capitulates tissue specific features, allowing drug testing in a more relevant ex vivo system. PMID:23272238

  4. Axonemal Positioning and Orientation in 3-D Space for Primary Cilia: What is Known, What is Assumed, and What Needs Clarification

    PubMed Central

    Farnum, Cornelia E.; Wilsman, Norman J.

    2012-01-01

    Two positional characteristics of the ciliary axoneme – its location on the plasma membrane as it emerges from the cell, and its orientation in three-dimensional space – are known to be critical for optimal function of actively motile cilia (including nodal cilia), as well as for modified cilia associated with special senses. However, these positional characteristics have not been analyzed to any significant extent for primary cilia. This review briefly summarizes the history of knowledge of these two positional characteristics across a wide spectrum of cilia, emphasizing their importance for proper function. Then the review focuses what is known about these same positional characteristics for primary cilia in all major tissue types where they have been reported. The review emphasizes major areas that would be productive for future research for understanding how positioning and 3-D orientation of primary cilia may be related to their hypothesized signaling roles within different cellular populations. PMID:22012592

  5. Position tracking of moving liver lesion based on real-time registration between 2D ultrasound and 3D preoperative images

    SciTech Connect

    Weon, Chijun; Hyun Nam, Woo; Lee, Duhgoon; Ra, Jong Beom; Lee, Jae Young

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Registration between 2D ultrasound (US) and 3D preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) (or computed tomography, CT) images has been studied recently for US-guided intervention. However, the existing techniques have some limits, either in the registration speed or the performance. The purpose of this work is to develop a real-time and fully automatic registration system between two intermodal images of the liver, and subsequently an indirect lesion positioning/tracking algorithm based on the registration result, for image-guided interventions. Methods: The proposed position tracking system consists of three stages. In the preoperative stage, the authors acquire several 3D preoperative MR (or CT) images at different respiratory phases. Based on the transformations obtained from nonrigid registration of the acquired 3D images, they then generate a 4D preoperative image along the respiratory phase. In the intraoperative preparatory stage, they properly attach a 3D US transducer to the patient’s body and fix its pose using a holding mechanism. They then acquire a couple of respiratory-controlled 3D US images. Via the rigid registration of these US images to the 3D preoperative images in the 4D image, the pose information of the fixed-pose 3D US transducer is determined with respect to the preoperative image coordinates. As feature(s) to use for the rigid registration, they may choose either internal liver vessels or the inferior vena cava. Since the latter is especially useful in patients with a diffuse liver disease, the authors newly propose using it. In the intraoperative real-time stage, they acquire 2D US images in real-time from the fixed-pose transducer. For each US image, they select candidates for its corresponding 2D preoperative slice from the 4D preoperative MR (or CT) image, based on the predetermined pose information of the transducer. The correct corresponding image is then found among those candidates via real-time 2D registration based on a

  6. Evaluation of similarity measures for use in the intensity-based rigid 2D-3D registration for patient positioning in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jian; Kim, Minho; Peters, Jorg; Chung, Heeteak; Samant, Sanjiv S.

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: Rigid 2D-3D registration is an alternative to 3D-3D registration for cases where largely bony anatomy can be used for patient positioning in external beam radiation therapy. In this article, the authors evaluated seven similarity measures for use in the intensity-based rigid 2D-3D registration using a variation in Skerl's similarity measure evaluation protocol. Methods: The seven similarity measures are partitioned intensity uniformity, normalized mutual information (NMI), normalized cross correlation (NCC), entropy of the difference image, pattern intensity (PI), gradient correlation (GC), and gradient difference (GD). In contrast to traditional evaluation methods that rely on visual inspection or registration outcomes, the similarity measure evaluation protocol probes the transform parameter space and computes a number of similarity measure properties, which is objective and optimization method independent. The variation in protocol offers an improved property in the quantification of the capture range. The authors used this protocol to investigate the effects of the downsampling ratio, the region of interest, and the method of the digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) calculation [i.e., the incremental ray-tracing method implemented on a central processing unit (CPU) or the 3D texture rendering method implemented on a graphics processing unit (GPU)] on the performance of the similarity measures. The studies were carried out using both the kilovoltage (kV) and the megavoltage (MV) images of an anthropomorphic cranial phantom and the MV images of a head-and-neck cancer patient. Results: Both the phantom and the patient studies showed the 2D-3D registration using the GPU-based DRR calculation yielded better robustness, while providing similar accuracy compared to the CPU-based calculation. The phantom study using kV imaging suggested that NCC has the best accuracy and robustness, but its slow function value change near the global maximum requires a

  7. Sensitivity and specificity of 3-D texture analysis of lung parenchyma is better than 2-D for discrimination of lung pathology in stage 0 COPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ye; Sonka, Milan; McLennan, Geoffrey; Guo, Junfeng; Hoffman, Eric

    2005-04-01

    Lung parenchyma evaluation via multidetector-row CT (MDCT), has significantly altered clinical practice in the early detection of lung disease. Our goal is to enhance our texture-based tissue classification ability to differentiate early pathologic processes by extending our 2-D Adaptive Multiple Feature Method (AMFM) to 3-D AMFM. We performed MDCT on 34 human volunteers in five categories: emphysema in severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) as EC, emphysema in mild COPD (MC), normal appearing lung in COPD (NC), non-smokers with normal lung function (NN), smokers with normal function (NS). We volumetrically excluded the airway and vessel regions, calculated 24 volumetric texture features for each Volume of Interest (VOI); and used Bayesian rules for discrimination. Leave-one-out and half-half methods were used for testing. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were calculated. The accuracy of the leave-one-out method for the four-class classification in the form of 3-D/2-D is: EC: 84.9%/70.7%, MC: 89.8%/82.7%; NC: 87.5.0%/49.6%; NN: 100.0%/60.0%. The accuracy of the leave-one-out method for the two-class classification in the form of 3-D/2-D is: NN: 99.3%/71.6%; NS: 99.7%/74.5%. We conclude that 3-D AMFM analysis of the lung parenchyma improves discrimination compared to 2-D analysis of the same images.

  8. 3D computational mechanics elucidate the evolutionary implications of orbit position and size diversity of early amphibians.

    PubMed

    Marcé-Nogué, Jordi; Fortuny, Josep; De Esteban-Trivigno, Soledad; Sánchez, Montserrat; Gil, Lluís; Galobart, Àngel

    2015-01-01

    For the first time in vertebrate palaeontology, the potential of joining Finite Element Analysis (FEA) and Parametrical Analysis (PA) is used to shed new light on two different cranial parameters from the orbits to evaluate their biomechanical role and evolutionary patterns. The early tetrapod group of Stereospondyls, one of the largest groups of Temnospondyls is used as a case study because its orbits position and size vary hugely within the members of this group. An adult skull of Edingerella madagascariensis was analysed using two different cases of boundary and loading conditions in order to quantify stress and deformation response under a bilateral bite and during skull raising. Firstly, the variation of the original geometry of its orbits was introduced in the models producing new FEA results, allowing the exploration of the ecomorphology, feeding strategy and evolutionary patterns of these top predators. Secondly, the quantitative results were analysed in order to check if the orbit size and position were correlated with different stress patterns. These results revealed that in most of the cases the stress distribution is not affected by changes in the size and position of the orbit. This finding supports the high mechanical plasticity of this group during the Triassic period. The absence of mechanical constraints regarding the orbit probably promoted the ecomorphological diversity acknowledged for this group, as well as its ecological niche differentiation in the terrestrial Triassic ecosystems in clades as lydekkerinids, trematosaurs, capitosaurs or metoposaurs. PMID:26107295

  9. 3D Computational Mechanics Elucidate the Evolutionary Implications of Orbit Position and Size Diversity of Early Amphibians

    PubMed Central

    Marcé-Nogué, Jordi; Fortuny, Josep; De Esteban-Trivigno, Soledad; Sánchez, Montserrat; Gil, Lluís; Galobart, Àngel

    2015-01-01

    For the first time in vertebrate palaeontology, the potential of joining Finite Element Analysis (FEA) and Parametrical Analysis (PA) is used to shed new light on two different cranial parameters from the orbits to evaluate their biomechanical role and evolutionary patterns. The early tetrapod group of Stereospondyls, one of the largest groups of Temnospondyls is used as a case study because its orbits position and size vary hugely within the members of this group. An adult skull of Edingerella madagascariensis was analysed using two different cases of boundary and loading conditions in order to quantify stress and deformation response under a bilateral bite and during skull raising. Firstly, the variation of the original geometry of its orbits was introduced in the models producing new FEA results, allowing the exploration of the ecomorphology, feeding strategy and evolutionary patterns of these top predators. Secondly, the quantitative results were analysed in order to check if the orbit size and position were correlated with different stress patterns. These results revealed that in most of the cases the stress distribution is not affected by changes in the size and position of the orbit. This finding supports the high mechanical plasticity of this group during the Triassic period. The absence of mechanical constraints regarding the orbit probably promoted the ecomorphological diversity acknowledged for this group, as well as its ecological niche differentiation in the terrestrial Triassic ecosystems in clades as lydekkerinids, trematosaurs, capitosaurs or metoposaurs. PMID:26107295

  10. Potential of in vitro reconstituted 3D human airway epithelia (MucilAir™) to assess respiratory sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Song; Wiszniewski, Ludovic; Constant, Samuel; Roggen, Erwin

    2013-04-01

    Respiratory sensitizers are considered as substances of higher risk, at the same level as carcinogens, mutagens and toxic chemicals for reproduction. Presently, there is no validated assay for identifying the respiratory sensitizers. Based on a fully differentiated and functional in vitro cell model of the human airway epithelium, MucilAir™, we attempt to develop such assay. To this end, we invented a novel method, using Dextran as carrier, for applying the water insoluble chemicals to the apical surface of the airway epithelia. Using the Dextran carrier method, we successfully tested some reference chemical compounds known to cause respiratory sensitisation in human beings, including MDI, TMA and HCPt. Interestingly, these chemical sensitizers differentially up-regulated the releases of certain cytokines and chemokines involved in allergic responses. We believe that based on MucilAir™ an in vitro assay could be developed for identification and characterization of the respiratory sensitizers. PMID:23089132

  11. 32 CFR 154.13 - Sensitive positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Development or approval of war plans, plans or particulars of future major or special operations of war, or critical and extremely important items of war. (D) Investigative and certain investigative support duties...) Noncritical-sensitive. (A) Access to Secret or Confidential information. (B) Security police/provost...

  12. 32 CFR 154.13 - Sensitive positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Development or approval of war plans, plans or particulars of future major or special operations of war, or critical and extremely important items of war. (D) Investigative and certain investigative support duties...) Noncritical-sensitive. (A) Access to Secret or Confidential information. (B) Security police/provost...

  13. 32 CFR 154.13 - Sensitive positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Critical-sensitive. (A) Access to Top Secret information. (B) Development or approval of plans, policies... report required in subpart K. (e) Billet control system for Top Secret. (1) To standardize and control the issuance of Top Secret clearances within the Department of Defense, a specific designated...

  14. 32 CFR 154.13 - Sensitive positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Critical-sensitive. (A) Access to Top Secret information. (B) Development or approval of plans, policies... report required in subpart K. (e) Billet control system for Top Secret. (1) To standardize and control the issuance of Top Secret clearances within the Department of Defense, a specific designated...

  15. 32 CFR 154.13 - Sensitive positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Critical-sensitive. (A) Access to Top Secret information. (B) Development or approval of plans, policies... report required in subpart K. (e) Billet control system for Top Secret. (1) To standardize and control the issuance of Top Secret clearances within the Department of Defense, a specific designated...

  16. Development of an iterative reconstruction method to overcome 2D detector low resolution limitations in MLC leaf position error detection for 3D dose verification in IMRT.

    PubMed

    Visser, R; Godart, J; Wauben, D J L; Langendijk, J A; Van't Veld, A A; Korevaar, E W

    2016-05-21

    The objective of this study was to introduce a new iterative method to reconstruct multi leaf collimator (MLC) positions based on low resolution ionization detector array measurements and to evaluate its error detection performance. The iterative reconstruction method consists of a fluence model, a detector model and an optimizer. Expected detector response was calculated using a radiotherapy treatment plan in combination with the fluence model and detector model. MLC leaf positions were reconstructed by minimizing differences between expected and measured detector response. The iterative reconstruction method was evaluated for an Elekta SLi with 10.0 mm MLC leafs in combination with the COMPASS system and the MatriXX Evolution (IBA Dosimetry) detector with a spacing of 7.62 mm. The detector was positioned in such a way that each leaf pair of the MLC was aligned with one row of ionization chambers. Known leaf displacements were introduced in various field geometries ranging from  -10.0 mm to 10.0 mm. Error detection performance was tested for MLC leaf position dependency relative to the detector position, gantry angle dependency, monitor unit dependency, and for ten clinical intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment beams. For one clinical head and neck IMRT treatment beam, influence of the iterative reconstruction method on existing 3D dose reconstruction artifacts was evaluated. The described iterative reconstruction method was capable of individual MLC leaf position reconstruction with millimeter accuracy, independent of the relative detector position within the range of clinically applied MU's for IMRT. Dose reconstruction artifacts in a clinical IMRT treatment beam were considerably reduced as compared to the current dose verification procedure. The iterative reconstruction method allows high accuracy 3D dose verification by including actual MLC leaf positions reconstructed from low resolution 2D measurements. PMID:27100169

  17. Development of an iterative reconstruction method to overcome 2D detector low resolution limitations in MLC leaf position error detection for 3D dose verification in IMRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, R.; Godart, J.; Wauben, D. J. L.; Langendijk, J. A.; van’t Veld, A. A.; Korevaar, E. W.

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to introduce a new iterative method to reconstruct multi leaf collimator (MLC) positions based on low resolution ionization detector array measurements and to evaluate its error detection performance. The iterative reconstruction method consists of a fluence model, a detector model and an optimizer. Expected detector response was calculated using a radiotherapy treatment plan in combination with the fluence model and detector model. MLC leaf positions were reconstructed by minimizing differences between expected and measured detector response. The iterative reconstruction method was evaluated for an Elekta SLi with 10.0 mm MLC leafs in combination with the COMPASS system and the MatriXX Evolution (IBA Dosimetry) detector with a spacing of 7.62 mm. The detector was positioned in such a way that each leaf pair of the MLC was aligned with one row of ionization chambers. Known leaf displacements were introduced in various field geometries ranging from  ‑10.0 mm to 10.0 mm. Error detection performance was tested for MLC leaf position dependency relative to the detector position, gantry angle dependency, monitor unit dependency, and for ten clinical intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment beams. For one clinical head and neck IMRT treatment beam, influence of the iterative reconstruction method on existing 3D dose reconstruction artifacts was evaluated. The described iterative reconstruction method was capable of individual MLC leaf position reconstruction with millimeter accuracy, independent of the relative detector position within the range of clinically applied MU’s for IMRT. Dose reconstruction artifacts in a clinical IMRT treatment beam were considerably reduced as compared to the current dose verification procedure. The iterative reconstruction method allows high accuracy 3D dose verification by including actual MLC leaf positions reconstructed from low resolution 2D measurements.

  18. Effect of anchor positioning on binding and diffusion of elongated 3D DNA nanostructures on lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khmelinskaia, Alena; Franquelim, Henri G.; Petrov, Eugene P.; Schwille, Petra

    2016-05-01

    DNA origami is a state-of-the-art technology that enables the fabrication of nano-objects with defined shapes, to which functional moieties, such as lipophilic anchors, can be attached with a nanometre scale precision. Although binding of DNA origami to lipid membranes has been extensively demonstrated, the specific requirements necessary for membrane attachment are greatly overlooked. Here, we designed a set of amphipathic rectangular-shaped DNA origami structures with varying placement and number of chol-TEG anchors used for membrane attachment. Single- and multiple-cholesteryl-modified origami nanostructures were produced and studied in terms of their membrane localization, density and dynamics. We show that the positioning of at least two chol-TEG moieties near the corners is essential to ensure efficient membrane binding of large DNA nanostructures. Quantitative fluorescence correlation spectroscopy data further confirm that increasing the number of corner-positioned chol-TEG anchors lowers the dynamics of flat DNA origami structures on freestanding membranes. Taken together, our approach provides the first evidence of the importance of the location in addition to the number of hydrophobic moieties when rationally designing minimal DNA nanostructures with controlled membrane binding.

  19. Diffractive centrosymmetric 3D-transmission phase gratings positioned at the image plane of optical systems transform lightlike 4D-WORLD as tunable resonators into spectral metrics...

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauinger, Norbert

    1999-08-01

    Diffractive 3D phase gratings of spherical scatterers dense in hexagonal packing geometry represent adaptively tunable 4D-spatiotemporal filters with trichromatic resonance in visible spectrum. They are described in the (lambda) - chromatic and the reciprocal (nu) -aspects by reciprocal geometric translations of the lightlike Pythagoras theorem, and by the direction cosine for double cones. The most elementary resonance condition in the lightlike Pythagoras theorem is given by the transformation of the grating constants gx, gy, gz of the hexagonal 3D grating to (lambda) h1h2h3 equals (lambda) 111 with cos (alpha) equals 0.5. Through normalization of the chromaticity in the von Laue-interferences to (lambda) 111, the (nu) (lambda) equals (lambda) h1h2h3/(lambda) 111-factor of phase velocity becomes the crucial resonance factor, the 'regulating device' of the spatiotemporal interaction between 3D grating and light, space and time. In the reciprocal space equal/unequal weights and times in spectral metrics result at positions of interference maxima defined by hyperbolas and circles. A database becomes built up by optical interference for trichromatic image preprocessing, motion detection in vector space, multiple range data analysis, patchwide multiple correlations in the spatial frequency spectrum, etc.

  20. [A new 2D and 3D imaging approach to musculoskeletal physiology and pathology with low-dose radiation and the standing position: the EOS system].

    PubMed

    Dubousset, Jean; Charpak, Georges; Dorion, Irène; Skalli, Wafa; Lavaste, François; Deguise, Jacques; Kalifa, Gabriel; Ferey, Solène

    2005-02-01

    Close collaboration between multidisciplinary specialists (physicists, biomecanical engineers, medical radiologists and pediatric orthopedic surgeons) has led to the development of a new low-dose radiation device named EOS. EOS has three main advantages: The use of a gaseous X-ray detector, invented by Georges Charpak (Nobel Prizewinner 1992), the dose necessary to obtain a 2D image of the skeletal system has been reduced by 8 to 10 times, while that required to obtain a 3D reconstruction from CT slices has fallen by a factor of 800 to 1000. The accuracy of the 3D reconstruction obtained with EOS is as good as that obtained with CT. The patient is examined in the standing (or seated) position, and is scanned simultaneously from head to feet, both frontally and laterally. This is a major advantage over conventional CT which requires the patient to be placed horizontally. -The 3D reconstructions of each element of the osteo-articular system are as precise as those obtained by conventional CT. EOS is also rapid, taking only 15 to 30 minutes to image the entire spine. PMID:16114859

  1. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  2. Fabrication of high sensitivity 3D nanoSQUIDs based on a focused ion beam sculpting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Leo, Natascia; Fretto, Matteo; Lacquaniti, Vincenzo; Granata, Carmine; Vettoliere, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    In this paper a nanofabrication process, based on a focused ion beam (FIB) nanosculpting technique, for high sensitivity three-dimensional nanoscale superconducting quantum interference devices (nanoSQUIDs) is reported. The crucial steps of the fabrication process are described, as are some peculiar features of the superconductor–normal metal–insulator–superconductor (SNIS) Josephson junctions, which may useful for applications in cryocooler systems. This fabrication procedure is employed to fabricate sandwich nanojunctions and high sensitivity nanoSQUIDs. Specifically, the superconductive nanosensors have a rectangular loop of 1 × 0.2–0.4 μm2 interrupted by two square Nb/Al–AlO x /Nb SNIS Josephson junctions with side lengths of 0.3 μm. The characterization of a typical nanoSQUID has been carried out and a spectral density of magnetic flux noise as low as 0.8 μΦ0 Hz–1/2 has been measured.

  3. Stress field sensitivity analysis within Mesozoic successions in the Swiss Alpine foreland using 3-D-geomechanical-numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Karsten; Hergert, Tobias; Heidbach, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    The in situ stress conditions are of key importance for the evaluation of radioactive waste repositories. In stage two of the Swiss site selection program, the three siting areas of high-level radioactive waste are located in the Alpine foreland in northern Switzerland. The sedimentary succession overlays the basement, consisting of variscan crystalline rocks as well as partly preserved Permo-Carboniferous deposits in graben structures. The Mesozoic sequence represents nearly the complete era and is covered by Cenozoic Molasse deposits as well as Quaternary sediments, mainly in the valleys. The target horizon (designated host rock) is an >100 m thick argillaceous Jurassic deposit (Opalinus Clay). To enlighten the impact of site-specific features on the state of stress within the sedimentary succession, 3-D-geomechanical-numerical models with elasto-plastic rock properties are set up for three potential siting areas. The lateral extent of the models ranges between 12 and 20 km, the vertical extent is up to a depth of 2.5 or 5 km below sea level. The sedimentary sequence plus the basement are separated into 10 to 14 rock mechanical units. The Mesozoic succession is intersected by regional fault zones; two or three of them are present in each model. The numerical problem is solved with the finite element method with a resolution of 100-150 m laterally and 10-30 m vertically. An initial stress state is established for all models taking into account the depth-dependent overconsolidation ratio in Opalinus Clay in northern Switzerland. The influence of topography, rock properties, friction on the faults as well as the impact of tectonic shortening on the state of stress is investigated. The tectonic stress is implemented with lateral displacement boundary conditions, calibrated on stress data that are compiled in Northern Switzerland. The model results indicate that the stress perturbation by the topography is significant to depths greater than the relief contrast. The

  4. Creation of 3D digital anthropomorphic phantoms which model actual patient non-rigid body motion as determined from MRI and position tracking studies of volunteers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, C. M.; Konik, A.; Dasari, P. K. R.; Segars, P.; Zheng, S.; Johnson, K. L.; Dey, J.; King, M. A.

    2011-03-01

    Patient motion can cause artifacts, which can lead to difficulty in interpretation. The purpose of this study is to create 3D digital anthropomorphic phantoms which model the location of the structures of the chest and upper abdomen of human volunteers undergoing a series of clinically relevant motions. The 3D anatomy is modeled using the XCAT phantom and based on MRI studies. The NURBS surfaces of the XCAT are interactively adapted to fit the MRI studies. A detailed XCAT phantom is first developed from an EKG triggered Navigator acquisition composed of sagittal slices with a 3 x 3 x 3 mm voxel dimension. Rigid body motion states are then acquired at breath-hold as sagittal slices partially covering the thorax, centered on the heart, with 9 mm gaps between them. For non-rigid body motion requiring greater sampling, modified Navigator sequences covering the entire thorax with 3 mm gaps between slices are obtained. The structures of the initial XCAT are then adapted to fit these different motion states. Simultaneous to MRI imaging the positions of multiple reflective markers on stretchy bands about the volunteer's chest and abdomen are optically tracked in 3D via stereo imaging. These phantoms with combined position tracking will be used to investigate both imaging-data-driven and motion-tracking strategies to estimate and correct for patient motion. Our initial application will be to cardiacperfusion SPECT imaging where the XCAT phantoms will be used to create patient activity and attenuation distributions for each volunteer with corresponding motion tracking data from the markers on the body-surface. Monte Carlo methods will then be used to simulate SPECT acquisitions, which will be used to evaluate various motion estimation and correction strategies.

  5. Ag Nanoparticles Decorated Cactus-Like Ag Dendrites/Si Nanoneedles as Highly Efficient 3D Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Substrates toward Sensitive Sensing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian; Ma, Dayan; Chen, Feng; Bai, Min; Xu, Kewei; Zhao, Yongxi

    2015-10-20

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been considered as a promising sensing technique to detect low-level analytes. However, its practical application was hindered owing to the lack of uniform SERS substrates for ultrasensitive and reproducible assay. Herein, inspired by the natural cactus structure, we developed a cactus-like 3D nanostructure with uniform and high-density hotspots for highly efficient SERS sensing by both grafting the silicon nanoneedles onto Ag dendrites and subsequent decoration with Ag nanoparticles. The hierarchical scaffolds and high-density hotspots throughout the whole substrate result in great amplification of SERS signal. A high Raman enhancement factor of crystal violet up to 6.6 × 10(7) was achieved. Using malachite green (MG) as a model target, the fabricated SERS substrates exhibited good reproducibility (RSD ∼ 9.3%) and pushed the detection limit down to 10(-13) M with a wide linear range of 10(-12) M to 10(-7) M. Excellent selectivity was also demonstrated by facilely distinguishing MG from its derivative, some organics, and coexistent metal ions. Finally, the practicality and reliability of the 3D SERS substrates were confirmed by the quantitative analysis of spiked MG in environmental water with high recoveries (91.2% to 109.6%). By virtue of the excellent performance (good reproducibility, high sensitivity, and selectivity), the cactus-like 3D SERS substrate has great potential to become a versatile sensing platform in environmental monitoring, food safety, and medical diagnostics. PMID:26406111

  6. Strain-rate sensitivity of foam materials: A numerical study using 3D image-based finite element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yongle; Li, Q. M.; Withers, P. J.

    2015-09-01

    Realistic simulations are increasingly demanded to clarify the dynamic behaviour of foam materials, because, on one hand, the significant variability (e.g. 20% scatter band) of foam properties and the lack of reliable dynamic test methods for foams bring particular difficulty to accurately evaluate the strain-rate sensitivity in experiments; while on the other hand numerical models based on idealised cell structures (e.g. Kelvin and Voronoi) may not be sufficiently representative to capture the actual structural effect. To overcome these limitations, the strain-rate sensitivity of the compressive and tensile properties of closed-cell aluminium Alporas foam is investigated in this study by means of meso-scale realistic finite element (FE) simulations. The FE modelling method based on X-ray computed tomography (CT) image is introduced first, as well as its applications to foam materials. Then the compression and tension of Alporas foam at a wide variety of applied nominal strain-rates are simulated using FE model constructed from the actual cell geometry obtained from the CT image. The stain-rate sensitivity of compressive strength (collapse stress) and tensile strength (0.2% offset yield point) are evaluated when considering different cell-wall material properties. The numerical results show that the rate dependence of cell-wall material is the main cause of the strain-rate hardening of the compressive and tensile strengths at low and intermediate strain-rates. When the strain-rate is sufficiently high, shock compression is initiated, which significantly enhances the stress at the loading end and has complicated effect on the stress at the supporting end. The plastic tensile wave effect is evident at high strain-rates, but shock tension cannot develop in Alporas foam due to the softening associated with single fracture process zone occurring in tensile response. In all cases the micro inertia of individual cell walls subjected to localised deformation is found to

  7. Nanoelectronic three-dimensional (3D) nanotip sensing array for real-time, sensitive, label-free sequence specific detection of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Esfandyarpour, Rahim; Yang, Lu; Koochak, Zahra; Harris, James S; Davis, Ronald W

    2016-02-01

    The improvements in our ability to sequence and genotype DNA have opened up numerous avenues in the understanding of human biology and medicine with various applications, especially in medical diagnostics. But the realization of a label free, real time, high-throughput and low cost biosensing platforms to detect molecular interactions with a high level of sensitivity has been yet stunted due to two factors: one, slow binding kinetics caused by the lack of probe molecules on the sensors and two, limited mass transport due to the planar structure (two-dimensional) of the current biosensors. Here we present a novel three-dimensional (3D), highly sensitive, real-time, inexpensive and label-free nanotip array as a rapid and direct platform to sequence-specific DNA screening. Our nanotip sensors are designed to have a nano sized thin film as their sensing area (~ 20 nm), sandwiched between two sensing electrodes. The tip is then conjugated to a DNA oligonucleotide complementary to the sequence of interest, which is electrochemically detected in real-time via impedance changes upon the formation of a double-stranded helix at the sensor interface. This 3D configuration is specifically designed to improve the biomolecular hit rate and the detection speed. We demonstrate that our nanotip array effectively detects oligonucleotides in a sequence-specific and highly sensitive manner, yielding concentration-dependent impedance change measurements with a target concentration as low as 10 pM and discrimination against even a single mismatch. Notably, our nanotip sensors achieve this accurate, sensitive detection without relying on signal indicators or enhancing molecules like fluorophores. It can also easily be scaled for highly multiplxed detection with up to 5000 sensors/square centimeter, and integrated into microfluidic devices. The versatile, rapid, and sensitive performance of the nanotip array makes it an excellent candidate for point-of-care diagnostics, and high

  8. Nanoelectronic three-dimensional (3D) nanotip sensing array for real-time, sensitive, label-free sequence specific detection of nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lu; koochak, Zahra; Harris, James S.; Davis, Ronald W.

    2016-01-01

    The improvements in our ability to sequence and genotype DNA have opened up numerous avenues in the understanding of human biology and medicine with various applications, especially in medical diagnostics. But the realization of a label free, real time, high-throughput and low cost biosensing platforms to detect molecular interactions with a high level of sensitivity has been yet stunted due to two factors: one, slow binding kinetics caused by the lack of probe molecules on the sensors and two, limited mass transport due to the planar structure (two-dimensional) of the current biosensors. Here we present a novel three-dimensional (3D), highly sensitive, real-time, inexpensive and label-free nanotip array as a rapid and direct platform to sequence-specific DNA screening. Our nanotip sensors are designed to have a nano sized thin film as their sensing area (~ 20 nm), sandwiched between two sensing electrodes. The tip is then conjugated to a DNA oligonucleotide complementary to the sequence of interest, which is electrochemically detected in real-time via impedance changes upon the formation of a double-stranded helix at the sensor interface. This 3D configuration is specifically designed to improve the biomolecular hit rate and the detection speed. We demonstrate that our nanotip array effectively detects oligonucleotides in a sequence-specific and highly sensitive manner, yielding concentration-dependent impedance change measurements with a target concentration as low as 10 pM and discrimination against even a single mismatch. Notably, our nanotip sensors achieve this accurate, sensitive detection without relying on signal indicators or enhancing molecules like fluorophores. It can also easily be scaled for highly multiplxed detection with up to 5000 sensors/square centimeter, and integrated into microfluidic devices. The versatile, rapid, and sensitive performance of the nanotip array makes it an excellent candidate for point-of-care diagnostics, and high

  9. 43 CFR 422.11 - Position sensitivity and investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Position sensitivity and investigations. 422.11 Section 422.11 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF... Requirements § 422.11 Position sensitivity and investigations. Each law enforcement contract or...

  10. 43 CFR 422.11 - Position sensitivity and investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Position sensitivity and investigations. 422.11 Section 422.11 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF... Requirements § 422.11 Position sensitivity and investigations. Each law enforcement contract or...

  11. 43 CFR 422.11 - Position sensitivity and investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Position sensitivity and investigations. 422.11 Section 422.11 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF... Requirements § 422.11 Position sensitivity and investigations. Each law enforcement contract or...

  12. 43 CFR 422.11 - Position sensitivity and investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Position sensitivity and investigations. 422.11 Section 422.11 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF... Requirements § 422.11 Position sensitivity and investigations. Each law enforcement contract or...

  13. 43 CFR 422.11 - Position sensitivity and investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Position sensitivity and investigations. 422.11 Section 422.11 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF... Requirements § 422.11 Position sensitivity and investigations. Each law enforcement contract or...

  14. High-Throughput 3D Screening Reveals Differences in Drug Sensitivities between Culture Models of JIMT1 Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fey, Vidal; Mpindi, John-Patrick; Kleivi Sahlberg, Kristine; Kallioniemi, Olli; Perälä, Merja

    2013-01-01

    The traditional method for studying cancer in vitro is to grow immortalized cancer cells in two-dimensional monolayers on plastic. However, many cellular features are impaired in these artificial conditions, and large changes in gene expression compared to tumors have been reported. Three-dimensional cell culture models have become increasingly popular and are suggested to be better models than two-dimensional monolayers due to improved cell-to-cell contact and structures that resemble in vivo architecture. The aim of this study was to develop a simple high-throughput three-dimensional drug screening method and to compare drug responses in JIMT1 breast cancer cells when grown in two dimensions, in poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) induced anchorage-independent three-dimensional models, and in Matrigel three-dimensional cell culture models. We screened 102 compounds with multiple concentrations and biological replicates for their effects on cell proliferation. The cells were either treated immediately upon plating, or they were allowed to grow in three-dimensional cultures for 4 days before the drug treatment. Large variations in drug responses were observed between the models indicating that comparisons of culture model-influenced drug sensitivities cannot be made based on the effects of a single drug. However, we show with the 63 most prominent drugs that, in general, JIMT1 cells grown on Matrigel were significantly more sensitive to drugs than cells grown in two-dimensional cultures, while the responses of cells grown in poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) resembled those of the two-dimensional cultures. Furthermore, comparing the gene expression profiles of the cell culture models to xenograft tumors indicated that cells cultured in Matrigel and as xenografts most closely resembled each other. In this study, we also suggest that three-dimensional cultures can provide a platform for systematic experimentation of larger compound collections in a high-throughput mode

  15. Enhanced photovoltaic properties of Nb₂O₅-coated TiO₂ 3D ordered porous electrodes in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Na; Moon, Jun Hyuk

    2012-11-01

    This paper describes the use of Nb₂O₅-coated TiO₂ 3D ordered porous electrodes in dye-sensitized solar cells. We employed bilayer inverse opal structures as a backbone of 3D porous structures, and the number of Nb₂O₅ coatings was controlled, determining the concentration of Nb₂O₅ coating. XPS measurements confirmed the formation of Nb₂O₅. The uniformity of the Nb₂O₅ coating was characterized by elemental mapping using SEM and TEM measurements. Photovoltaic measurement on dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) that incorporated Nb₂O₅/TiO₂ inverse opal electrodes yielded a maximum efficiency of 7.23% for a 3.3 wt % Nb₂O₅ coating on a TiO₂ IO structure. The Nb₂O₅ significantly increased the short-circuit current density (J(SC)). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to measure the J(SC), revealing an enhanced electron injection upon deposition of the Nb₂O₅ coating. PMID:23153118

  16. High-resolution high-sensitivity elemental imaging by secondary ion mass spectrometry: from traditional 2D and 3D imaging to correlative microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirtz, T.; Philipp, P.; Audinot, J.-N.; Dowsett, D.; Eswara, S.

    2015-10-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) constitutes an extremely sensitive technique for imaging surfaces in 2D and 3D. Apart from its excellent sensitivity and high lateral resolution (50 nm on state-of-the-art SIMS instruments), advantages of SIMS include high dynamic range and the ability to differentiate between isotopes. This paper first reviews the underlying principles of SIMS as well as the performance and applications of 2D and 3D SIMS elemental imaging. The prospects for further improving the capabilities of SIMS imaging are discussed. The lateral resolution in SIMS imaging when using the microprobe mode is limited by (i) the ion probe size, which is dependent on the brightness of the primary ion source, the quality of the optics of the primary ion column and the electric fields in the near sample region used to extract secondary ions; (ii) the sensitivity of the analysis as a reasonable secondary ion signal, which must be detected from very tiny voxel sizes and thus from a very limited number of sputtered atoms; and (iii) the physical dimensions of the collision cascade determining the origin of the sputtered ions with respect to the impact site of the incident primary ion probe. One interesting prospect is the use of SIMS-based correlative microscopy. In this approach SIMS is combined with various high-resolution microscopy techniques, so that elemental/chemical information at the highest sensitivity can be obtained with SIMS, while excellent spatial resolution is provided by overlaying the SIMS images with high-resolution images obtained by these microscopy techniques. Examples of this approach are given by presenting in situ combinations of SIMS with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), helium ion microscopy (HIM) and scanning probe microscopy (SPM).

  17. High-resolution high-sensitivity elemental imaging by secondary ion mass spectrometry: from traditional 2D and 3D imaging to correlative microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wirtz, T; Philipp, P; Audinot, J-N; Dowsett, D; Eswara, S

    2015-10-30

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) constitutes an extremely sensitive technique for imaging surfaces in 2D and 3D. Apart from its excellent sensitivity and high lateral resolution (50 nm on state-of-the-art SIMS instruments), advantages of SIMS include high dynamic range and the ability to differentiate between isotopes. This paper first reviews the underlying principles of SIMS as well as the performance and applications of 2D and 3D SIMS elemental imaging. The prospects for further improving the capabilities of SIMS imaging are discussed. The lateral resolution in SIMS imaging when using the microprobe mode is limited by (i) the ion probe size, which is dependent on the brightness of the primary ion source, the quality of the optics of the primary ion column and the electric fields in the near sample region used to extract secondary ions; (ii) the sensitivity of the analysis as a reasonable secondary ion signal, which must be detected from very tiny voxel sizes and thus from a very limited number of sputtered atoms; and (iii) the physical dimensions of the collision cascade determining the origin of the sputtered ions with respect to the impact site of the incident primary ion probe. One interesting prospect is the use of SIMS-based correlative microscopy. In this approach SIMS is combined with various high-resolution microscopy techniques, so that elemental/chemical information at the highest sensitivity can be obtained with SIMS, while excellent spatial resolution is provided by overlaying the SIMS images with high-resolution images obtained by these microscopy techniques. Examples of this approach are given by presenting in situ combinations of SIMS with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), helium ion microscopy (HIM) and scanning probe microscopy (SPM). PMID:26436905

  18. Colonoscopy aided by magnetic 3D imaging: is the technique sufficiently sensitive to detect differences between men and women?

    PubMed

    Rowland, R S; Bell, G D; Dogramadzi, S; Allen, C

    1999-11-01

    Colonoscopy tends to be more difficult to perform in women. Women also experience more pain during flexible sigmoidoscopy, and the mean insertion distance of the instrument is less than in men. The 'Bladen system', first described in 1993, is a non-radiological method of continuously visualising the path of the endoscope using magnetic drive coils under the patient and a chain of sensors up the biopsy channel of the instrument. In 1998, results were published that used a novel computer graphics system (the 'RMR system'), in which a much more realistic endoscope could be produced using the stored positional data from the Bladen system. The RMR computer graphics system has been further refined to enable measurement of the anatomical lengths of different parts of the large intestine to an accuracy of greater than 5 mm. The system is used to analyse the results obtained in 232 patients undergoing a total colonoscopy. In women, the colonoscope tends to form loops in the sigmoid colon more readily than in men (p < 0.05). When the first 50 cm of the endoscope are inserted for the first time, the tip passes either up to or beyond the splenic flexure in 40/116, or 34.5%, of males, compared with 24/117, or 20.5%, of females (p = 0.0137). It is demonstrated that women have longer transverse colons than men, and the differences are especially apparent when a stiffening tube is used to splint the left side of the colon (p < 0.0001). The possible relevance of these observations to biomedical engineers and those manufacturing and assessing prototype endoscopes is discussed. PMID:10723871

  19. A multiplex readout method for position sensitive boron coated straw neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hao; Gong, Hui; Li, Jianmin; Wang, Yongqiang; Wang, Xuewu; Li, Yuanjing; Kang, Kejun

    2015-10-01

    A 1 m×1 m boron coated straw neutron detector is expected to be used to build the small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) instrument of the Compact Pulsed Hadron Source (CPHS) in Tsinghua University. A multiplex readout method based on summing circuits in columns and rows is studied for this large area position sensitive detector. In this method, the outputs of charge sensitive preamplifiers are combined by columns and rows at two ends of the detector, and then the shaped signals are sampled by flash ADCs. With the position reconstructed algorithm implemented in FPGA which analyzes the charge division and column and row number of signals, the 3-D position information of neutron events can be obtained. The position resolution and counting rate performance of this method are analyzed, and the comparison to the delay-line readout method is also given. With the multiplex readout method, the scale of readout electronics can be greatly reduced and a good position resolution can be reached. A readout electronics system for a detector module which consists 4 × 10 straw tubes is designed based on this method, and the test with neutron beam shows an average 3-D spatial resolution of 4 × 4 × 6.8mm3.

  20. Fabrication of 3D interconnected porous TiO2 nanotubes templated by poly(vinyl chloride-g-4-vinyl pyridine) for dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Joo Hwan; Koh, Jong Kwan; Seo, Jin Ah; Shin, Jong-Shik; Kim, Jong Hak

    2011-09-01

    Porous TiO2 nanotube arrays with three-dimensional (3D) interconnectivity were prepared using a sol-gel process assisted by poly(vinyl chloride-graft-4-vinyl pyridine), PVC-g-P4VP graft copolymer and a ZnO nanorod template. A 7 µm long ZnO nanorod array was grown from the fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glass via a liquid phase deposition method. The TiO2 sol-gel solution templated by the PVC-g-P4VP graft copolymer produced a random 3D interconnection between the adjacent ZnO nanorods during spin coating. Upon etching of ZnO, TiO2 nanotubes consisting of 10-15 nm nanoparticles were generated, as confirmed by wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS), energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy (EF-TEM) and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The ordered and interconnected nanotube architecture showed an enhanced light scattering effect and increased penetration of polymer electrolytes in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC). The energy conversion efficiency reached 1.82% for liquid electrolyte, and 1.46% for low molecular weight (Mw) and 0.74% for high Mw polymer electrolytes.

  1. CdSxSe1-x nanowhiskers sensitized Nitrogen-doped TiO2: 3D-branched photoelectrode and its photoelectrochemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Lang, Jihui; Su, Jun; Li, Xiuyan; Zhai, Hongju; Wang, Jingshu; Yang, Jinghai

    2016-05-01

    Light absorption, appropriate interfacial redox reaction, and photogenerated charge carriers separation are the three-key-aspect of efficient photoelectrochemical (PEC) devices. 3D-branched nanostructure photoelectrode was prepared by growing CdSxSe1-x nanowhiskers around the head of Nitrogen-doped TiO2 nanorods (NRs). PEC cells were assembled according to the aforesaid three-key-aspect. Synergistic effect of CdSxSe1-x sensitization and substituted N dopants was confirmed on the improved photocurrent properties of CdSxSe1-x/N-TiO2 photoelectrode. Meanwhile, the inferred type II band edge alignment in it facilitated the separation of photogenerated charge carriers. Moreover, 3D hierarchical nanostructure of CdSxSe1-x/N-TiO2 provided higher specific surface area and the result of more active sites for PEC reaction. Our work would be of some benefits to design and manufacture high performance photoelectrodes and assemble efficient PEC cells for solar energy conversion.

  2. Construction and commissioning of a position-sensitive ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwag, M. S.; Chae, K. Y.; Cha, S. M.; Kim, A.; Kim, M. J.; Lee, E. J.; Lee, J. H.

    2016-05-01

    A position-sensitive ionization chamber has been constructed and commissioned at the Physics Department of Sungkyunkwan University to extract position information on incident charged particles for future nuclear reaction measurements. By utilizing the newly-designed position-sensitive anodes and the previously-commissioned portable gas-filled ionization chamber by Chae et al., position information on incident particles could be obtained. The device was tested with an 241Am α-emitting source, and the standard deviation of the fitted Gaussian distribution was measured to be 1.76 mm when a collimator with a 2 mm hole was used.

  3. Structural modifications at the 6-position of thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidines and their effects on potency at FLT3 for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyuntae; Lee, Chulho; Yang, Jee Sun; Choi, Seonghwi; Park, Chun-Ho; Kang, Jong Soon; Oh, Soo Jin; Yun, Jieun; Kim, Myung-Hwa; Han, Gyoonhee

    2016-09-14

    Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) is a well-known and important target for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). A series of thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidine derivatives from a modification at the 6-position were synthesized to identify effective FLT3 inhibitors. Although compounds 1 and 2 emerged as promising FLT3 inhibitors among the synthesized compounds, both compounds exhibited poor metabolic stability in human and rat liver microsomes. Hence, further optimization was required for the discovery of FLT3 inhibitors, with a focus on improving metabolic stability. Compound 16d, which had structural modifications of the methyl group at the 5-position and the 4-(2-methylaminoethoxy) phenyl group at the 6-position, exhibited good inhibitory activity against FLT3 and showed effective antiproliferative activity against four leukemia cell lines, including MV4-11. Moreover, compound 16d displayed enhanced metabolic stability. The results of this study indicated that 16d could be a promising compound for further optimization and development as a potent FLT3 inhibitor. PMID:27187860

  4. The 3-D collagen structure of equine articular cartilage, characterized using variable-angle-of-incidence polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugryumova, Nadya; Gangnus, Sergei V.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2005-08-01

    Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography has been used to spatially map the birefringence of equine articular cartilage. Images obtained in the vicinity of visible osteoarthritic lesions display a characteristic disruption of the regular birefringence bands shown by normal cartilage. We also note that significant (e.g. ×2) variations in the apparent birefringence of samples taken from young (18 month) animals that otherwise appear visually homogeneous are found over spatial scales of a few millimeters. We suggest that whilst some of this variation may be due to changes in the intrinsic birefringence of the tissue, the 3-D orientation of the collagen fibers relative to the plane of the joint surface should also be taken into account. We propose a method based on multiple angles of illumination to determine the polar angle of the collagen fibers.

  5. PPO/PEO modified hollow fiber membranes improved sensitivity of 3D cultured hepatocytes to drug toxicity via suppressing drug adsorption on membranes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chong; Meng, Qin; He, Wenjuan; Wang, Qichen; Zhang, Guoliang

    2014-11-01

    The three dimensional (3D) cell culture in polymer-based micro system has become a useful tool for in vitro drug discovery. Among those polymers, polysulfone hollow fiber membrane (PSf HFM) is commonly used to create a microenvironment for cells. However, the target drug may adsorb on the polymeric surface, and this elicits negative impacts on cell exposure due to the reduced effective drug concentration in culture medium. In order to reduce the drug adsorption, PSf membrane were modified with hydrophilic Pluronic (PEO-b-PPO-b-PEO) copolymers, L121, P123 and F127 (PEO contents increase from 10%, 30% to 70%), by physical adsorption. As a result, the hydrophilicity of HFMs increased at an order of PSfF127>P123>L121 HFMs. The three modified membrane all showed significant resistance to adsorption of acid/neutral drugs. More importantly, the adsorption of base drugs were largely reduced to an average value of 11% on the L121 HFM. The improved resistance to drug adsorption could be attributed to the synergy of hydrophobic/neutrally charged PPO and hydrophilic PEO. The L121 HFM was further assessed by evaluating the drug hepatotoxicity in 3D culture of hepatocytes. The base drugs, clozapine and doxorubicin, showed more sensitive hepatotoxicity on hepatocytes in L121 HFM than in PSf HFM, while the acid drug, salicylic acid, showed the similar hepatotoxicity to hepatocytes in both HFMs. Our finding suggests that PSf HFM modified by PEO-b-PPO-b-PEO copolymers can efficiently resist the drug adsorption onto polymer membrane, and consequently improve the accuracy and sensitivity of in vitro hepatotoxic drug screening. PMID:25454662

  6. CdZnTe position-sensitive drift detectors with thicknesses up to 5 cm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Chen, E.; Cheng, S.; Cui, Y.; Gul, R.; Gallagher, R.; Dedic, V.; De Geronimo, G.; Ocampo Giraldo, L.; Fried, J.; Hossain, A.; MacKenzie, J. M.; Sellin, P.; Taherion, S.; Vernon, E.; Yang, G.; El-hanany, U.; James, R. B.

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the feasibility of long-drift-time CdZnTe (CZT) gamma-ray detectors, fabricated from CZT material produced by Redlen Technologies. CZT crystals with cross-section areas of 5 × 5 mm2 and 6 × 6 mm2 and thicknesses of 20-, 30-, 40-, and 50-mm were configured as 3D position-sensitive drift detectors and were read out using a front-end ASIC. By correcting the electron charge losses caused by defects in the crystals, we demonstrated high performance for relatively thick detectors fabricated from unselected CZT material.

  7. A position-sensitive alpha detector using a thin plastic scintillator combined with a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Iida, Takao

    1998-12-01

    A position-sensitive alpha detector was developed and tested. The alpha detector consists of a thin plastic scintillator, a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube, a position calculation circuit and a personal computer based data acquisition system. Because the thin plastic scintillator has high-detection efficiency for alpha particles while it has low-sensitivity for beta particles or gamma ray, the detector can selectively detect alpha particles with low background counts. The spatial resolution of the detector was approximately 3 mm FWHM. An autoradiographic images of plutonium distribution in the lung of an animal as well as an image of an uranium particle were successively obtained. Spatial and energy distribution of radon daughters could also be measured. We conclude that the developed position-sensitive alpha detector is useful for some applications such as plutonium detection or alpha autoradiography as well as distribution analysis of radon daughters.

  8. Position sensitivity of MAMA detectors. [Multi-Anode Microchannel Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, J. S.; Slater, D. S.; Timothy, J. G.; Jenkins, E. B.

    1988-01-01

    The results of laboratory and telescopic measurements of the position sensitivity of a visible MAMA detector utilizing a 'coarse-fine' array are presented. The photometric accuracy of this detector was determined under point source illumination. It was found that computed centroid positions are accurate across the entire array to within 0.04 pixels.

  9. Longitudinal, 3D Imaging of Collagen Remodeling in Murine Hypertrophic Scars In Vivo Using Polarization-Sensitive Optical Frequency Domain Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lo, William C Y; Villiger, Martin; Golberg, Alexander; Broelsch, G Felix; Khan, Saiqa; Lian, Christine G; Austen, William G; Yarmush, Martin; Bouma, Brett E

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars (HTS), frequently seen after traumatic injuries and surgery, remain a major clinical challenge because of the limited success of existing therapies. A significant obstacle to understanding HTS etiology is the lack of tools to monitor scar remodeling longitudinally and noninvasively. We present an in vivo, label-free technique using polarization-sensitive optical frequency domain imaging for the 3D, longitudinal assessment of collagen remodeling in murine HTS. In this study, HTS was induced with a mechanical tension device for 4-10 days on incisional wounds and imaged up to 1 month after device removal; an excisional HTS model was also imaged at 6 months after injury to investigate deeper and more mature scars. We showed that local retardation and degree of polarization provide a robust signature for HTS. Compared with normal skin with heterogeneous local retardation and low degree of polarization, HTS was characterized by an initially low local retardation, which increased as collagen fibers remodeled, and a persistently high degree of polarization. This study demonstrates that polarization-sensitive optical frequency domain imaging offers a powerful tool to gain significant biological insights into HTS remodeling by enabling longitudinal assessment of collagen in vivo, which is critical to elucidating HTS etiology and developing more effective HTS therapies. PMID:26763427

  10. Study of the counting efficiency of a WBC setup by using a computational 3D human body library in sitting position based on polygonal mesh surfaces.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, T C Ferreira; Bogaerts, R; Lebacq, A L; Mihailescu, C L; Vanhavere, F

    2014-04-01

    A realistic computational 3D human body library, called MaMP and FeMP (Male and Female Mesh Phantoms), based on polygonal mesh surface geometry, has been created to be used for numerical calibration of the whole body counter (WBC) system of the nuclear power plant (NPP) in Doel, Belgium. The main objective was to create flexible computational models varying in gender, body height, and mass for studying the morphology-induced variation of the detector counting efficiency (CE) and reducing the measurement uncertainties. First, the counting room and an HPGe detector were modeled using MCNPX (Monte Carlo radiation transport code). The validation of the model was carried out for different sample-detector geometries with point sources and a physical phantom. Second, CE values were calculated for a total of 36 different mesh phantoms in a seated position using the validated Monte Carlo model. This paper reports on the validation process of the in vivo whole body system and the CE calculated for different body heights and weights. The results reveal that the CE is strongly dependent on the individual body shape, size, and gender and may vary by a factor of 1.5 to 3 depending on the morphology aspects of the individual to be measured. PMID:24562069

  11. The development and test of a device for the reconstruction of 3-D position and orientation by means of a kinematic sensor assembly with rate gyroscopes and accelerometers.

    PubMed

    Giansanti, Daniele; Maccioni, Giovanni; Macellari, Velio

    2005-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a device for the Position and Orientation (P&O) reconstruction of human segmental locomotion tasks. It is based on three mono-axial accelerometers and three angular velocity sensors, geometrically arranged to form two orthogonal terns. The device was bench tested using step-by-step motor-based equipment. The characteristics of the six channels under bench test conditions were: crosstalk absent, non linearity < +/- 0.1% fs, hysteresis < 0.1% fs, accuracy 0.3% fs, overall resolution better than 0.04 deg/s, 2 x g x 10(-4). The device was validated with the stereophotogrammetric body motion analyzer during the execution of three different locomotion tasks: stand-to-sit, sit-to-stand, gait-initiation. Results obtained comparing the trajectories of the two methods showed that the errors were lower than 3 x 10(-2) m and 2 deg during a 4s of acquisition and lower than 6 x 10(-3) m and 0.2 deg during the effective duration of a locomotory task; showing that the wearable device hereby presented permits the 3-D reconstruction of the movement of the body segment to which it is affixed for time-limited clinical applications. PMID:16041990

  12. 3D Surgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intra-operative guidance. The system provides further intra-operative assistance with the help of a computer display showing jaw positions and 3D positioning guides updated in real-time during the surgical procedure. The CAS system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures prior to the surgery. CAS has the potential to make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases. Supported by NIDCR DE017727, and DE018962 PMID:20816308

  13. Comparison of 2D Radiographic Images and 3D Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Positioning Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Li Heng; Zhu, X. Ronald Zhang Lifei; Dong Lei; Tung, Sam; Ahamad, Anesa M.D.; Chao, K. S. Clifford; Morrison, William H.; Rosenthal, David I.; Schwartz, David L.; Mohan, Radhe; Garden, Adam S.

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the positioning accuracy using two-dimensional kilovoltage (2DkV) imaging and three-dimensional cone beam CT (CBCT) in patients with head and neck (H and N) cancer receiving radiation therapy. To assess the benefit of patient-specific headrest. Materials and Methods: All 21 patients studied were immobilized using thermoplastic masks with either a patient-specific vacuum bag (11 of 21, IMA) or standard clear plastic (10 of 21, IMB) headrests. Each patient was imaged with a pair of orthogonal 2DkV images in treatment position using onboard imaging before the CBCT procedure. The 2DkV and CBCT images were acquired weekly during the same session. The 2DkV images were reviewed by oncologists and also analyzed by a software tool based on mutual information (MI). Results: Ninety-eight pairs of assessable 2DkV-CBCT alignment sets were obtained. Systematic and random errors were <1.6 mm for both 2DkV and CBCT alignments. When we compared shifts determined by CBCT and 2DkV for the same patient setup, statistically significant correlations were observed in all three major directions. Among all CBCT couch shifts, 4.1% {>=} 0.5 cm and 18.7% {>=} 0.3 cm, whereas among all 2DkV (MI) shifts, 1.7% {>=} 0.5 cm and 11.2% {>=} 0.3 cm. Statistically significant difference was found on anteroposterior direction between IMA and IMB with the CBCT alignment only. Conclusions: The differences between 2D and 3D alignments were mainly caused by the relative flexibility of certain H and N structures and possibly by rotation. Better immobilization of the flexible neck is required to further reduce the setup errors for H and N patients receiving radiotherapy.

  14. Facile synthesis of high quality multi-walled carbon nanotubes on novel 3D KIT-6: application in high performance dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balamurugan, Jayaraman; Pandurangan, Arumugam; Kim, Nam Hoon; Lee, Joong Hee

    2014-12-01

    A novel hard templating strategy for the synthesis of high quality multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with a uniform diameter was developed. MWCNTs were successfully synthesized through chemical vapour deposition (CVD) using acetylene by employing 3D bicontinuous mesoporous silica (KIT-6) as a hard template and used as the counter electrode in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Here, we report that Ni-Cr-KIT-6 and Co-Cr-KIT-6 systems are the most suitable catalysts for the growth of MWCNTs. Raman spectroscopy and TEM analysis revealed that the synthesized MWCNTs were of high quality and well graphitized. Impressively, DSSCs with a MWCNT counter electrode demonstrated high power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of up to 10.53%, which was significantly higher than that of 9.87% obtained for a DSSC with a conventional Pt counter electrode. Moreover, MWCNTs had a charge transfer resistance (Rct) of only 0.74 Ω cm2 towards the I3-/I- electrolyte commonly applied in DSSCs, which is several orders of magnitude lower than that of a typical Pt electrode (2.78 Ω cm2). These results indicate that the synthesized MWCNT counter electrodes are versatile candidates that can increase the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of DSSCs.A novel hard templating strategy for the synthesis of high quality multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with a uniform diameter was developed. MWCNTs were successfully synthesized through chemical vapour deposition (CVD) using acetylene by employing 3D bicontinuous mesoporous silica (KIT-6) as a hard template and used as the counter electrode in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Here, we report that Ni-Cr-KIT-6 and Co-Cr-KIT-6 systems are the most suitable catalysts for the growth of MWCNTs. Raman spectroscopy and TEM analysis revealed that the synthesized MWCNTs were of high quality and well graphitized. Impressively, DSSCs with a MWCNT counter electrode demonstrated high power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of up to 10.53%, which was

  15. Self-Balancing Position-Sensitive Detector (SBPSD).

    PubMed

    Porrazzo, Ryan; Lydecker, Leigh; Gattu, Suhasini; Bakhru, Hassaram; Tokranova, Natalya; Castracane, James

    2015-01-01

    Optical position-sensitive detectors (PSDs) are a non-contact method of tracking the location of a light spot. Silicon-based versions of such sensors are fabricated with standard CMOS technology, are inexpensive and provide a real-time, analog signal output corresponding to the position of the light spot. An innovative type of optical position sensor was developed using two back-to-back connected photodiodes. These so called self-balancing position-sensitive detectors (SBPSDs) eliminate the need for external readout circuitry entirely. Fabricated prototype devices demonstrate linear, symmetric coordinate characteristics and a spatial resolution of 200 μm for a 74 mm device. PSDs are commercially available only up to a length of 37 mm. Prototype devices were fabricated with various lengths up to 100 mm and can be scaled down to any size below that. PMID:26205266

  16. Self-Balancing Position-Sensitive Detector (SBPSD)

    PubMed Central

    Porrazzo, Ryan; Lydecker, Leigh; Gattu, Suhasini; Bakhru, Hassaram; Tokranova, Natalya; Castracane, James

    2015-01-01

    Optical position-sensitive detectors (PSDs) are a non-contact method of tracking the location of a light spot. Silicon-based versions of such sensors are fabricated with standard CMOS technology, are inexpensive and provide a real-time, analog signal output corresponding to the position of the light spot. An innovative type of optical position sensor was developed using two back-to-back connected photodiodes. These so called self-balancing position-sensitive detectors (SBPSDs) eliminate the need for external readout circuitry entirely. Fabricated prototype devices demonstrate linear, symmetric coordinate characteristics and a spatial resolution of 200 μm for a 74 mm device. PSDs are commercially available only up to a length of 37 mm. Prototype devices were fabricated with various lengths up to 100 mm and can be scaled down to any size below that. PMID:26205266

  17. Dual Position Sensitive MWPC for tracking reaction products at VAMOS++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandebrouck, M.; Lemasson, A.; Rejmund, M.; Fremont, G.; Pancin, J.; Navin, A.; Michelagnoli, C.; Goupil, J.; Spitaels, C.; Jacquot, B.

    2016-03-01

    The characteristics and performance of a Dual Position Sensitive Multi-Wire Proportional Counter (DPS-MWPC) used to measure the scattering angle, the interaction position on the target and the velocity of reaction products detected in the VAMOS++ magnetic spectrometer, are reported. The detector consists of a pair of position sensitive low pressure MWPCs and provides both fast timing signals, along with the two-dimensional position coordinates required to define the trajectory of the reaction products. A time-of-flight resolution of 305(11) ps (FWHM) was measured. The measured resolutions (FWHM) were 2.5(3) mrad and 560(70) μm for the scattering angle and the interaction point at the target respectively. The subsequent improvement of the Doppler correction of the energy of the γ-rays, detected in the γ-ray tracking array AGATA in coincidence with isotopically identified ions in VAMOS++, is also discussed.

  18. Development of a novel position-sensitive microchannel plate detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, Blake; Siwal, Davinder; Desouza, Romualdo

    2015-10-01

    Position sensitive microchannel plate (MCP) detectors which measure the position of an incident electron, ion, or photon, are useful in imaging applications. Recently, a novel detector, which utilizes an induced approach to provide position sensitivity, has been developed. In the prototype detector, using only the zero-crossing point of the inherently bipolar signals, a position resolution of 466 μm (FWHM) has been achieved. Implementing a differential readout may improve on this resolution. To realize this differential approach, a better understanding of the dependence of the induced signal shape on the position of the electron cloud is required. To characterize the dependence of the induced signal shape on position a resistive anode (RA) has been incorporated into the detector. The RA will allow determination of the centroid of the electron cloud. Factors impacting the position resolution obtained with the RA will be discussed and the achieved position resolution of 157 μm (FWHM) will be presented. Supported by the US DOE NNSA under Award No. DE-NA0002012.

  19. Longitudinal, 3D Imaging of Collagen Remodeling in Murine Hypertrophic Scars In Vivo using Polarization-sensitive Optical Frequency Domain Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lo, William C. Y.; Villiger, Martin; Golberg, Alexander; Broelsch, G. Felix; Khan, Saiqa; Lian, Christine G.; Austen, William G.; Yarmush, Martin; Bouma, Brett E.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars (HTS), frequently seen after traumatic injuries and surgery, remain a major clinical challenge due to the limited success of existing therapies. A significant obstacle to understanding HTS etiology is the lack of tools to monitor scar remodeling longitudinally and non-invasively. We present an in vivo, label-free technique using polarization-sensitive optical frequency domain imaging (PS-OFDI) for the 3D, longitudinal assessment of collagen remodeling in murine HTS. In this study, HTS was induced with a mechanical tension device for 4 to 10 days on incisional wounds and imaged up to one month after device removal; an excisional HTS model was also imaged at 6 months after injury to investigate deeper and more mature scars. We showed that local retardation (LR) and degree of polarization (DOP) provide a robust signature for HTS. Compared to normal skin with heterogeneous LR and low DOP, HTS was characterized by an initially low LR, which increased as collagen fibers remodeled, and a persistently high DOP. This study demonstrates that PS-OFDI offers a powerful tool to gain significant biological insights into HTS remodeling by enabling longitudinal assessment of collagen in vivo, which is critical to elucidating HTS etiology and developing more effective HTS therapies. PMID:26763427

  20. Facile synthesis of high quality multi-walled carbon nanotubes on novel 3D KIT-6: application in high performance dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Balamurugan, Jayaraman; Pandurangan, Arumugam; Kim, Nam Hoon; Lee, Joong Hee

    2015-01-14

    A novel hard templating strategy for the synthesis of high quality multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with a uniform diameter was developed. MWCNTs were successfully synthesized through chemical vapour deposition (CVD) using acetylene by employing 3D bicontinuous mesoporous silica (KIT-6) as a hard template and used as the counter electrode in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Here, we report that Ni-Cr-KIT-6 and Co-Cr-KIT-6 systems are the most suitable catalysts for the growth of MWCNTs. Raman spectroscopy and TEM analysis revealed that the synthesized MWCNTs were of high quality and well graphitized. Impressively, DSSCs with a MWCNT counter electrode demonstrated high power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of up to 10.53%, which was significantly higher than that of 9.87% obtained for a DSSC with a conventional Pt counter electrode. Moreover, MWCNTs had a charge transfer resistance (Rct) of only 0.74 Ω cm(2) towards the I3(-)/I(-) electrolyte commonly applied in DSSCs, which is several orders of magnitude lower than that of a typical Pt electrode (2.78 Ω cm(2)). These results indicate that the synthesized MWCNT counter electrodes are versatile candidates that can increase the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of DSSCs. PMID:25429647

  1. Combining 3-D plasmonic gold nanorod arrays with colloidal nanoparticles as a versatile concept for reliable, sensitive, and selective molecular detection by SERS.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Mehmet; Senlik, Erhan; Biskin, Erhan; Yavuz, Mustafa Selman; Tamer, Ugur; Demirel, Gokhan

    2014-03-28

    The detection of molecules at an ultralow level by Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) has recently attracted enormous interest for various applications especially in biological, medical, and environmental fields. Despite the significant progress, SERS systems are still facing challenges for practical applications related to their sensitivity, reliability, and selectivity. To overcome these limitations, in this study, we have proposed a simple yet facile concept by combining 3-D anisotropic gold nanorod arrays with colloidal gold nanoparticles having different shapes for highly reliable, selective, and sensitive detection of some hazardous chemical and biological warfare agents in trace amounts through SERS. The gold nanorod arrays were created on the BK7 glass slides or silicon wafer surfaces via the oblique angle deposition (OAD) technique without using any template material or lithography technique and their surface densities were adjusted by manipulating the deposition angle (α). It is found that gold nanorod arrays fabricated at α = 10° exhibited the highest SERS enhancement in the absence of colloidal gold nanoparticles. Synergetic enhancement was obviously observed in SERS signals when combining gold nanorod arrays with colloidal gold nanoparticles having different shapes (i.e., spherical, rod, and cage). Due to their ability to produce localized surface plasmons (LSPs) in transverse and longitudinal directions, utilization of colloidal gold nanorods as a synergetic agent led to an increase in the enhancement factor by about tenfold compared to plain gold nanorod arrays. Moreover, we have tested our approach to detect some chemical and biological toxins namely dipicolinic acid (DIP), methyl parathion (MP), and diethyl phosphoramidate (DP). For all toxins, Raman spectra with high signal-to-noise ratios and reproducibility were successfully obtained over a broad concentration range (5 ppm-10 ppb). Our results suggest that the slightly tangled and

  2. Position sensitive radioactivity detection for gas and liquid chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Cochran, Joseph L.; McCarthy, John F.; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Phelps, Tommy J.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for the position sensitive detection of radioactivity in a fluid stream, particularly in the effluent fluid stream from a gas or liquid chromatographic instrument. The invention represents a significant advance in efficiency and cost reduction compared with current efforts.

  3. The pumping lid: investigating multi-material 3D printing for equipment-free, programmable generation of positive and negative pressures for microfluidic applications.

    PubMed

    Begolo, Stefano; Zhukov, Dmitriy V; Selck, David A; Li, Liang; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2014-12-21

    Equipment-free pumping is a challenging problem and an active area of research in microfluidics, with applications for both laboratory and limited-resource settings. This paper describes the pumping lid method, a strategy to achieve equipment-free pumping by controlled generation of pressure. Pressure was generated using portable, lightweight, and disposable parts that can be integrated with existing microfluidic devices to simplify workflow and eliminate the need for pumping equipment. The development of this method was enabled by multi-material 3D printing, which allows fast prototyping, including composite parts that combine materials with different mechanical properties (e.g. both rigid and elastic materials in the same part). The first type of pumping lid we describe was used to produce predictable positive or negative pressures via controlled compression or expansion of gases. A model was developed to describe the pressures and flow rates generated with this approach and it was validated experimentally. Pressures were pre-programmed by the geometry of the parts and could be tuned further even while the experiment was in progress. Using multiple lids or a composite lid with different inlets enabled several solutions to be pumped independently in a single device. The second type of pumping lid, which relied on vapor-liquid equilibrium to generate pressure, was designed, modeled, and experimentally characterized. The pumping lid method was validated by controlling flow in different types of microfluidic applications, including the production of droplets, control of laminar flow profiles, and loading of SlipChip devices. We believe that applying the pumping lid methodology to existing microfluidic devices will enhance their use as portable diagnostic tools in limited resource settings as well as accelerate adoption of microfluidics in laboratories. PMID:25231706

  4. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  5. Interdigited dual-cell position-sensitive device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shie, Jin-Shown

    1992-10-01

    A special one-dimensional position-sensitive device for detection of a light-spot location is designed and fabricated. The device is composed of a pair of photodiodes with complementarily interdigited comb configuration. The width of comb teeth is characterized by a designated distributive function, hence, the coordination information of a light spot falling upon the device can be determined by photo-induced currents of the two diodes. This device is useful as the position sensing element in camera-autofocus application.

  6. A position sensitive microchannel photomultiplier for ultraviolet space astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lampton, M.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Bixler, J.; Bowyer, S.

    1986-01-01

    The 25-mm microchannel-plate, position-sensitive UV astronomy photomultiplier tube presented is intended for the EOM-1 Spacelab Mission's FAUST payload and conducts wide-field imaging surveys in the VUV over the 1400-1800-A range. The sealed detector encompasses a CsI photocathode deposited on the inner surface of a MgF2 window, a stack of microchannel plates, and a wedge-and-strip two-dimensional position-sensing anode. Since the wedge-and-strip principle requires only three anode signals, flight electronics can be reduced to three charge amplifiers and three analog-to-digital converters.

  7. Integrated cooling channels in position-sensitive silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andricek, L.; Boronat, M.; Fuster, J.; Garcia, I.; Gomis, P.; Marinas, C.; Ninkovic, J.; Perelló, M.; Villarejo, M. A.; Vos, M.

    2016-06-01

    We present an approach to construct position-sensitive silicon detectors with an integrated cooling circuit. Tests on samples demonstrate that a very modest liquid flow very effectively cool the devices up to a power dissipation of over 10 W/cm2. The liquid flow is found to have a negligible impact on the mechanical stability. A finite-element simulation predicts the cooling performance to an accuracy of approximately 10%.

  8. Development of a fast position-sensitive laser beam detector

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, Isaac; Huang Rongxin; Henderson, Kevin; Florin, Ernst-Ludwig; Raizen, Mark G.

    2008-10-15

    We report the development of a fast position-sensitive laser beam detector. The detector uses a fiber-optic bundle that spatially splits the incident beam, followed by a fast balanced photodetector. The detector is applied to the study of Brownian motion of particles on fast time scales with 1 A spatial resolution. Future applications include the study of molecule motors, protein folding, as well as cellular processes.

  9. Spectroscopy of Actinide Nuclei - Perspectives with Position Sensitive HPGe Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, P.; Birkenbach, B.; Kotthaus, T.

    Recent advances in in-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy of actinide nuclei are based on highly efficient arrays of escape-suppressed spectrometers. The sensitivity of these detector arrays is greatly enhanced by the combination with powerful mass separators or particle detector systems. This technique is demonstrated by an experiment to investigate excited states in 234U after the one-neutron-transfer reaction 235U(d,t). In coincidence with the outgoing tritons, γ-rays were detected with the highly efficient MINIBALL spectrometer. In the near future an even enhanced sensitivity will be achieved by utilizing position sensitive HPGe detectors which will exploit the novel detection method of gamma-ray energy tracking in electrically segmented germanium detectors. An example for this novel approach is the investigation neutron-rich actinide Th and U nuclei after multi nucleon transfer reactions employing the AGATA demonstrator and PRISMA setup at LNL, Italy. A primary 136Xe beam hitting a 238U target was used to produce the nuclei of interest. Beam-like reaction products after neutron transfer were selected by the PRISMA spectrometer. Coincident γ-rays from excited states in beam and target like particles were measured with the position sensitive AGATA HPGe detectors. Improved Doppler correction and quality of the γ-spectra is based on the novel γ-ray tracking technique, which was successfully exploited in this region.

  10. 'Bonneville' in 3-D!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this 3-D navigation camera mosaic of the crater called 'Bonneville' after driving approximately 13 meters (42.7 feet) to get a better vantage point. Spirit's current position is close enough to the edge to see the interior of the crater, but high enough and far enough back to get a view of all of the walls. Because scientists and rover controllers are so pleased with this location, they will stay here for at least two more martian days, or sols, to take high resolution panoramic camera images of 'Bonneville' in its entirety. Just above the far crater rim, on the left side, is the rover's heatshield, which is visible as a tiny reflective speck.

  11. Two-dimensional position sensitive ionization chamber with GEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Noritaka; Noro, Tetsuo; Sakaguchi, Satoshi; Takao, Hideaki; Nishio, Yasutaka

    2014-09-01

    We have been developing a multi-anode ionization chamber for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at Kyushu University. Furthermore, we are planning to construct a neutron detector with high position resolution by combining the chamber with Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) and a neutron converter. One of purposes is the measurement of p-> , pn knockout reaction from unstable nuclei. The multi-anode ionization chamber is composed of subdivided multiple anodes, a cathode to produce an uniform electric field, and a Frisch grid. The chamber must have position sensitivity because obtaining a beam profile is required for AMS measurements, where counting loss should be avoided. Also in the case of the neutron detector, it is necessary to measure the position to deduce the scattering angles. We have recently established a two-dimensional position readout system by the following methods: the measurement of horizontal position is enabled by trimming some anodes into wedge-like shape, and vertical position can be determined by the ratio of induced charge on the grid to the total charge on anodes. In addition, improvement of S/N ratio is important for isotope separation and position resolution. We installed a rectangular-shaped GEM and tried improving S/N ratio by electron amplification.

  12. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  13. Doubly-excited {sup 1,3}D{sup e} resonance states of two-electron positive ions Li{sup +} and Be{sup 2+} in Debye plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, Sabyasachi; Wang, Yang; Jiang, Zishi; Li, Shuxia; Ratnavelu, K.

    2014-01-15

    We investigate the bound {sup 1,3}D states and the doubly-excited {sup 1,3}D{sup e} resonance states of two-electron positive ions Li{sup +} and Be{sup 2+} by employing correlated exponential wave functions. In the framework of the stabilization method, we are able to extract three series (2pnp, 2snd, 2pnf) of {sup 1}D{sup e} resonances and two series (2pnp, 2snd) of {sup 3}D{sup e} resonances below the N = 2 threshold. The {sup 1,3}D{sup e} resonance parameters (resonance energies and widths) for Li{sup +} and Be{sup 2+} along with the bound-excited 1s3d {sup 1,3}D state energies are reported for the first time as functions of the screening parameter. Accurate resonance energies and widths are also reported for Li{sup +} and Be{sup 2+} in vacuum. For free-atomic cases, comparisons are made with the reported results and few resonance states are reported for the first time.

  14. Application of the CAL 3-D CVS program to evaluate the equilibrium position of an Euler-jointed Alderson Part572

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaibani, S. J.

    1982-08-01

    The adaptation of the Cal 3-D crash victim simulation program in its version 20A form to a Vax 11/780 computer is described. The effectiveness of the modifications is demonstrated by using the program to seat a Euler-jointed Alderson Part 572 dummy with the equilibrium subroutine. The resulting segment linear acceleration values of .09 g or better indicate that the dummy can be considered to be in equilibrium.

  15. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  16. TU-F-12A-05: Sensitivity of Textural Features to 3D Vs. 4D FDG-PET/CT Imaging in NSCLC Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, F; Nyflot, M; Bowen, S; Kinahan, P; Sandison, G

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Neighborhood Gray-level difference matrices (NGLDM) based texture parameters extracted from conventional (3D) 18F-FDG PET scans in patients with NSCLC have been previously shown to associate with response to chemoradiation and poorer patient outcome. However, the change in these parameters when utilizing respiratory-correlated (4D) FDG-PET scans has not yet been characterized for NSCLC. The Objectives: of this study was to assess the extent to which NGLDM-based texture parameters on 4D PET images vary with reference to values derived from 3D scans in NSCLC. Methods: Eight patients with newly diagnosed NSCLC treated with concomitant chemoradiotherapy were included in this study. 4D PET scans were reconstructed with OSEM-IR in 5 respiratory phase-binned images and corresponding CT data of each phase were employed for attenuation correction. NGLDM-based texture features, consisting of coarseness, contrast, busyness, complexity and strength, were evaluated for gross tumor volumes defined on 3D/4D PET scans by radiation oncologists. Variation of the obtained texture parameters over the respiratory cycle were examined with respect to values extracted from 3D scans. Results: Differences between texture parameters derived from 4D scans at different respiratory phases and those extracted from 3D scans ranged from −30% to 13% for coarseness, −12% to 40% for contrast, −5% to 50% for busyness, −7% to 38% for complexity, and −43% to 20% for strength. Furthermore, no evident correlations were observed between respiratory phase and 4D scan texture parameters. Conclusion: Results of the current study showed that NGLDM-based texture parameters varied considerably based on choice of 3D PET and 4D PET reconstruction of NSCLC patient images, indicating that standardized image acquisition and analysis protocols need to be established for clinical studies, especially multicenter clinical trials, intending to validate prognostic values of texture features for NSCLC.

  17. Michrochannel plate for position sensitive alpha particle detection

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Hurley and James Tinsley

    2007-08-31

    This paper will describe the use of a microchannel plate (MCP) as the associated particle detector on a sealed tube neutron generator. The generator produces neutrons and associated alpha particles for use as a probe to locate and identify hidden explosives in associated particle imaging (API). The MCP measures the position in two dimensions and precise timing of the incident alpha particle, information which is then used to calculate the emission time and direction of the corresponding neutron. The MCP replaces the position-sensitive photomultipler tube (PSPMT) which, until recently, had been the only detector available for measuring position and timing for alpha particles in neutron generator applications. Where the PSPMT uses charge division for generating position information, a process that requires a first order correction to each pulse, the MCP uses delay-line timing, which requires no correction. The result is a device with an order of magnitude improvement in both position resolution and timing compared to the PSPMT. Hardware and software development and the measurements made to characterize the MCP for API applications are described.

  18. Canadian Penning Trap Mass Measurements using a Position Sensitive MCP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuta, Trenton; Aprahamian, Ani; Marley, Scott; Nystrom, Andrew; Clark, Jason; Perez Galvan, Adrian; Hirsh, Tsviki; Savard, Guy; Orford, Rodney; Morgan, Graeme

    2015-10-01

    The primary focus of the Canadian Penning Trap (CPT) located at Argonne National Lab is to determine the masses of various isotopes produced in the spontaneous fission of Californium. Currently, the CPT is operating in conjunction with CARIBU at the ATLAS facility in an attempt to measure neutron-rich nuclei produced by a 1.5 Curie source of Californium 252. The masses of nuclei produced in fission is accomplished by measuring the cyclotron frequency of the isotopes circling within the trap. This frequency is determined by a position sensitive MCP, which records the relative position of the isotope in the trap at different times. Using these position changes over time in connection with a center spot, angles between these positions are calculated and used to determine the frequency. Most of the work currently being conducted on the CPT is focused on the precision of these frequency measurements. The use of traps has revolutionized the measurements of nuclear masses to very high precision. The optimization methods employed here include focusing the beam in order to reduce the spread on the position of the isotope as well as the tuning of the MR-ToF, a mass separator that is intended on removing contaminants in the beam. This work was supported by the nuclear Grant PHY-1419765 for the University of Notre Dame.

  19. Position-Sensitive Nuclear Spectroscopy with Pixel Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Granja, Carlos; Vykydal, Zdenek; Jakubek, Jan; Pospisil, Stanislav

    2007-10-26

    State-of-the-art hybrid semiconductor pixel detectors such as Medipix2 are suitable for energy- and position-sensitive nuclear spectroscopy. In addition to excellent energy- and spatial-resolution, these devices can operate in spectroscopic, single-quantum counting and/or on-line tracking mode. A devoted compact USB-readout interface provides functionality and ease of operation. The compact and versatile Medipix2/USB radiation camera provides visualization, vacuum and room-temperature operation as a real-time portable active nuclear emulsion.

  20. Position-sensitive photodetector for rotation-angle transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurin, N. T.; Novikov, S. G.; Korneev, I. V.; Shtan'ko, A. A.; Rodionov, V. A.

    2011-03-01

    A new position-sensitive photodetector (PSPD) for photoelectric transducers of rotation angle is described, which is based on a three-layer ring sector structure. The output voltage of the PSPD is a linear function of the angle of rotation of a light-emitting diode relative to the PSPD contacts. The proposed device is highly reliable and ensures angle determination to within 7 min of arc. Rotation-angle transducers based on this PSPD are compatible with any measuring, matching, and processing equipment.

  1. A three dimensionally position sensitive large area detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochodzalla, J.; Butsch, R.; Heck, B.; Hlawatsch, G.; Miczaika, A.; Rabe, H. J.; Rosner, G.

    1985-01-01

    A large area detector consisting of a parallel plate avalanche counter (PPAC) and a trapezohedral ionization chamber (TIC) is described. Its active area is 184 cm 2. The time resolution of the PPAC is 175 ps. The energy resolution of the TIC is 0.4%, the energy loss resolution 2.8%, the nuclear charge resolution 2.3%. The TIC is position sensitive in three dimensions. The position x is measured via a saw-tooth anode with a resolution of 0.7 mm; the drift time coordinate shows a resolution of δy ≅ mm. The range z is determined by a new technique, a graded density Frisch grid. It enlarges the dynamic range of the charge measurement down to the Bragg maximum at E/ A ˜ 1 MeV. The resolution is δZ/ Z ≅ 3.5%

  2. Positional isomeric tunable two Co(II) 6-connected 3-D frameworks with pentanuclear to binuclear units: structures, ion-exchange and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Han, Min-Le; Duan, Ya-Ping; Li, Dong-Sheng; Wang, Hai-Bin; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Yao-Yu

    2014-11-01

    Two new Co(II) based metal-organic frameworks, namely {[Co5(μ3-OH)2(m-pda)3(bix)4]·2ClO4}n (1) and {[Co2(p-pda)2(bix)2(H2O)]·H2O}n (2), were prepared by hydrothermal reactions of Co(II) salt with two isomeric dicarboxyl tectons 1,3-phenylenediacetic acid (m-pda) and 1,4-phenylenediacetic acid (p-pda), along with 1,3-bis(imidazol-L-ylmethyl)benzene (bix). Both complexes 1 and 2 have been characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, single-crystal X-ray diffraction, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). 1 shows a 6-connected 3-D pcu cationic framework with pentanuclear [Co5(μ3-OH)2(COO)6(bix)2](2+) units, while 2 exhibits a 6-connected 3-D msw net based on [Co2(μ2-H2O)(COO)2](2+) clusters. The results indicate that the different dispositions of the carboxylic groups of dicarboxylates have an important effect on the overall coordination frameworks. Perchlorate anions in 1 can be partly exchanged by thiocyanate and azide anions, however they are unavailable to nitrate anions. Magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate that both 1 and 2 show weak antiferromagnetic interactions between the adjacent Co(II) ions. PMID:25190003

  3. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  4. Delay-Line Three-Dimensional Position Sensitive Radiation Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Manhee

    High-resistivity silicon(Si) in large volumes and with good charge carrier transport properties has been produced and achieved success as a radiation detector material over the past few years due to its relatively low cost as well as the availability of well-established processing technologies. One application of that technology is in the fabrication of various position-sensing topologies from which the incident radiation's direction can be determined. We have succeeded in developing the modeling tools for investigating different position-sensing schemes and used those tools to examine both amplitude-based and time-based methods, an assessment that indicates that fine position-sensing can be achieved with simpler readout designs than are conventionally deployed. This realization can make ubiquitous and inexpensive deployment of special nuclear materials (SNM) detecting technology becomes more feasible because if one can deploy position-sensitive semiconductor detectors with only one or two contacts per side. For this purpose, we have described the delay-line radiation detector and its optimized fabrication. The semiconductor physics were simulated, the results from which guided the fabrication of the guard ring structure and the detector electrode, both of which included metal-field-plates. The measured improvement in the leakage current was confirmed with the fabricated devices, and the structures successfully suppressed soft-breakdown. We also demonstrated that fabricating an asymmetric strip-line structure successfully minimizing the pulse shaping and increases the distance through which one can propagate the information of the deposited charge distribution. With fabricated delay-line detectors we can acquire alpha spectra (Am-241) and gamma spectra (Ba-133, Co-57 and Cd-109). The delay-line detectors can therefore be used to extract the charge information from both ion and gamma-ray interactions. Furthermore, standard charge-sensitive circuits yield high SNR

  5. Positron camera using position-sensitive detectors: PENN-PET

    SciTech Connect

    Muehllehner, G.; Karp, J.S.

    1986-01-01

    A single-slice positron camera has been developed with good spatial resolution and high count rate capability. The camera uses a hexagonal arrangement of six position-sensitive NaI(Tl) detectors. The count rate capability of NaI(Tl) was extended to 800k cps through the use of pulse shortening. In order to keep the detectors stationary, an iterative reconstruction algorithm was modified which ignores the missing data in the gaps between the six detectors and gives artifact-free images. The spatial resolution, as determined from the image of point sources in air, is 6.5 mm full width at half maximum. We have also imaged a brain phantom and dog hearts.

  6. Position Sensitive Detectors Mounted with Scintillators and Silicon Photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalhaes, Roberto P. M.; Bonifácio, Daniel A. B.; Moralles, Maurício

    2011-08-01

    This work presents the first results obtained in the "Assembly and characterization of position sensitive detectors composed of scintillators coupled to silicon photomultipliers" project. The development of new x and γ radiation detectors have found several technological applications, especially in medical physics, where γ detectors that can be used in high intensity magnetic field are of particular importance. The experimental setup consisted of coupling of two silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) to the small sides of a 3×3×100 mm3 scintillator and the coupling of one SiPM to one of the small sides of a 3×3×10 mm3 scintillator. We found that the detectors used in this study presented an energy resolution that is in agreement with those observed in scintillators of the same family coupled to conventional photomultipliers. Besides that, there is a strong correlation between the difference of the light intensity in both SiPMs of the long detector and the position of the γ source. The results confirm the great potential of application of such detectors.

  7. Radiologists' interpretive efficiency and variability in true- and false-positive detection when screen-reading with tomosynthesis (3D-mammography) relative to standard mammography in population screening.

    PubMed

    Svahn, Tony M; Macaskill, Petra; Houssami, Nehmat

    2015-12-01

    We examined interpretive efficiency and variability in true- and false-positive detection (TP, FP) for radiologists screen-reading with digital breast tomosynthesis as adjunct to full-field digital mammography (2D/3D) relative to 2D alone in population-based screening studies. A systematic literature search was performed to identify screening studies that provided radiologist-specific data for TP and FP detection. Radiologist interpretive efficiency (trade-off between TPs and FPs) was calculated using the FP:TP ratio which expresses the number of FP recalls for each screen-detected breast cancer. We modeled a pooled FP:TP ratio to assess variability in radiologists' interpretive efficiency at study-level using random effects logistic regression. FP:TP ratio improved (ratio decreased) for 2D/3D screen-reading (relative to 2D) for a majority of radiologists (18 of 22) across all studies. Variability in radiologists' FP:TP ratio was consistently lower in all studies for 2D/3D screen-reading, as suggested by lower variance in ratios. Study-level pooled FP:TP ratio for 2D- and 2D/3D-mammography respectively, were 5.96 (95%CI: 4.08 to 8.72) and 3.17 (95%CI: 2.25 to 4.47) for the STORM trial; 10.25 (95%CI: 6.42 to 16.35) and 7.07 (95%CI: 4.99 to 10.02) for the Oslo trial; and 20.84 (95%CI: 13.95 to 31.12) and 8.37 (95%CI: 5.87 to 11.93) for the Houston study. This transfers into study-level improved interpretative efficiencies of 48%, 30% and 55%, respectively, for 2D/3D screen-reading (relative to 2D). In summary, study-level FP:TP trade-off improved using 2D/3D-mammography for all studies, which was also seen for most individual radiologists. There was variability in the FP:TP trade-off between readers and studies for 2D-as well as for 2D/3D-interpretations but variability in radiologists' interpretive efficiency was relatively lower using 2D/3D-mammography. PMID:26433751

  8. TRACE 3-D documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, K.R.

    1987-08-01

    TRACE 3-D is an interactive beam-dynamics program that calculates the envelopes of a bunched beam, including linear space-charge forces, through a user-defined transport system. TRACE 3-D provides an immediate graphics display of the envelopes and the phase-space ellipses and allows nine types of beam-matching options. This report describes the beam-dynamics calculations and gives detailed instruction for using the code. Several examples are described in detail.

  9. Thermally-induced single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformations from a 2D two-fold interpenetrating square lattice layer to a 3D four-fold interpenetrating diamond framework and its application in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Fan, Rui Qing; Wang, Xin Ming; Wei, Li Guo; Song, Yang; Du, Xi; Xing, Kai; Wang, Ping; Yang, Yu Lin

    2016-07-28

    In this work, a rare 2D → 3D single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation (SCSC) is observed in metal-organic coordination complexes, which is triggered by thermal treatment. The 2D two-fold interpenetrating square lattice layer [Cd(IBA)2]n (1) is irreversibly converted into a 3D four-fold interpenetrating diamond framework {[Cd(IBA)2(H2O)]·2.5H2O}n (2) (HIBA = 4-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)benzoic acid). Consideration is given to these two complexes with different interpenetrating structures and dimensionality, and their influence on photovoltaic properties are studied. Encouraged by the UV-visible absorption and HOMO-LUMO energy states matched for sensitizing TiO2, the two complexes are employed in combination with N719 in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) to compensate absorption in the ultraviolet and blue-violet region, offset competitive visible light absorption of I3(-) and reducing charge the recombination of injected electrons. After co-sensitization with 1 and 2, the device co-sensitized by 1/N719 and 2/N719 to yield overall efficiencies of 7.82% and 8.39%, which are 19.94% and 28.68% higher than that of the device sensitized only by N719 (6.52%). Consequently, high dimensional interpenetrating complexes could serve as excellent co-sensitizers and have application in DSSCs. PMID:27356177

  10. Sensitivity and reproducibility of a new fast 3D segmentation technique for clinical MR-based brain volumetry in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lukas, Carsten; Hahn, Horst K; Bellenberg, Barbara; Rexilius, Jan; Schmid, Gebhard; Schimrigk, Sebastian K; Przuntek, Horst; Köster, Odo; Peitgen, Heinz-Otto

    2004-11-01

    Fast, reliable and easy-to-use methods to quantify brain atrophy are of increasing importance in clinical studies on neuro-degenerative diseases. Here, ILAB 4, a new volumetry software that uses a fast semi-automated 3D segmentation of thin-slice T1-weighted 3D MR images based on a modified watershed transform and an automatic histogram analysis was evaluated. It provides the cerebral volumes: whole brain, white matter, gray matter and intracranial cavity. Inter- and intra-rater reliability and scan-rescan reproducibility were excellent in measuring whole brain volumes (coefficients of variation below 0.5%) of volunteers and patients. However, gray and white matter volumes were more susceptible to image quality. High accuracy of the absolute volume results (+/-5 ml) were shown by phantom and preparation measurements. Analysis times were 6 min for processing of 128 slices. The proposed technique is reliable and highly suitable for quantitative studies of brain atrophy, e.g., in multiple sclerosis. PMID:15536555

  11. 3-D segmentation of human sternum in lung MDCT images.

    PubMed

    Pazokifard, Banafsheh; Sowmya, Arcot

    2013-01-01

    A fully automatic novel algorithm is presented for accurate 3-D segmentation of the human sternum in lung multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) images. The segmentation result is refined by employing active contours to remove calcified costal cartilage that is attached to the sternum. For each dataset, costal notches (sternocostal joints) are localized in 3-D by using a sternum mask and positions of the costal notches on it as reference. The proposed algorithm for sternum segmentation was tested on 16 complete lung MDCT datasets and comparison of the segmentation results to the reference delineation provided by a radiologist, shows high sensitivity (92.49%) and specificity (99.51%) and small mean distance (dmean=1.07 mm). Total average of the Euclidean distance error for costal notches positioning in 3-D is 4.2 mm. PMID:24110446

  12. Experimental validation of an extended Jones matrix calculus model to study the 3D structural orientation of the collagen fibers in articular cartilage using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kasaragod, Deepa K.; Lu, Zenghai; Jacobs, James; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    We report results to verify a theoretical framework to analyze the 3D depth-wise structural organization of collagen fibers in articular cartilage using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography. Apparent birefringence data obtained from multi-angle measurements using a time domain polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography system has been compared with simulated data based on the extended Jones matrix calculus. Experimental data has been shown to agree with the lamellar model previously proposed for the cartilage microstructure based on scanning electron microscopy data. This tool could have potential application in mapping the collagen structural orientation information of cartilage non-invasively during arthroscopy. PMID:22435087

  13. Assembly of 1D, 2D and 3D lanthanum(iii) coordination polymers with perchlorinated benzenedicarboxylates: positional isomeric effect, structural transformation and ring-opening polymerisation of glycolide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Chun; Dai, An-Qi; Huang, Kun-Lin; Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Cui, Ai-Jun; He, Ming-Yang; Chen, Qun

    2016-02-28

    Utilizing a series of positional isomers of tetrachlorinated benzenedicarboxylic acid ligands, seven La(iii)-based coordination polymers were solvothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Their structural dimensionalities varying from 1D double chains, to the 2D 3,4,5-connected network, to 3D 6-connected pcu topological nets are only governed by the positions of carboxyl groups on the tetrachlorinated benzene ring. A comprehensive analysis and comparison reveals that the size of the carbonyl solvent molecules (DMF, DEF, DMA, and NMP) can affect the coordination geometries around the La(iii) ions, the coordination modes of carboxylate groups, the packing arrangements, and the void volumes of the overall crystal lattices. One as-synthesized framework further shows an unprecedented structural transformation from a 3D 6-connected network to a 3D 4,5-connected net through the dissolution and reformation pathway in water, suggesting that these easily hydrolyzed lanthanide complexes may serve as precursors to produce new high-dimensional frameworks. The bulk solvent-free melt polymerisation of glycolide utilizing these La(iii) complexes as initiators has been reported herein for the first time. All complexes were found to promote the polymerization of glycolide over a temperature range of 200 to 220 °C, producing poly(glycolic acid) (PGA) with a molecular weight up to 93,280. Under the same experimental conditions, the different catalytic activities for these complexes may result from their structural discrepancy. PMID:26811117

  14. In vivo dosimetry for gynaecological brachytherapy using a novel position sensitive radiation detector: Feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Reniers, B.; Landry, G.; Eichner, R.; Hallil, A.; Verhaegen, F.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: In gynecological radiotherapy with high dose rate (HDR){sup 192}Ir brachytherapy, the treatment complexity has increased due to improved optimization techniques and dose constraints. As a consequence, it has become more important to verify the dose delivery to the target and also to the organs at risk (e.g., the bladder). In vivo dosimetry, where dosimeters are placed in or on the patient, is one way of verifying the dose but until recently this was hampered by motion of the radiation detectors with respect to the source. The authors present a novel dosimetry method using a position sensitive radiation detector. Methods: The prototype RADPOS system (Best Medical Canada) consists of a metal oxide field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeter coupled to a position-sensor, which deduces its 3D position in a magnetic field. To assess the feasibility of in vivo dosimetry based on the RADPOS system, different characteristics of the detector need to be investigated. Using a PMMA phantom, the positioning accuracy of the RADPOS system was quantified by comparing position readouts with the known position of the detector along the x and y-axes. RADPOS dose measurements were performed at various distances from a Nucletron{sup 192}Ir source in a PMMA phantom to evaluate the energy dependence of the MOSFET. A sensitivity analysis was performed by calculating the dose after varying (1) the position of the RADPOS detector to simulate organ motion and (2) the position of the first dwell position to simulate errors in delivery. The authors also performed an uncertainty analysis to determine the action level (AL) that should be used during in vivo dosimetry. Results: Positioning accuracy is found to be within 1 mm in the 1-10 cm range from the origin along the x-axis (away from the transmitter), meeting the requirements for in vivo dosimetry. Similar results are obtained for the other axes. The ALs are chosen to take into account the total uncertainty on the measurements. As a

  15. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-01

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions < ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge C T . We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N . We also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  16. 3D Position and Velocity Vector Computations of Objects Jettisoned from the International Space Station Using Close-Range Photogrammetry Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papanyan, Valeri; Oshle, Edward; Adamo, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Measurement of the jettisoned object departure trajectory and velocity vector in the International Space Station (ISS) reference frame is vitally important for prompt evaluation of the object s imminent orbit. We report on the first successful application of photogrammetric analysis of the ISS imagery for the prompt computation of the jettisoned object s position and velocity vectors. As post-EVA analyses examples, we present the Floating Potential Probe (FPP) and the Russian "Orlan" Space Suit jettisons, as well as the near-real-time (provided in several hours after the separation) computations of the Video Stanchion Support Assembly Flight Support Assembly (VSSA-FSA) and Early Ammonia Servicer (EAS) jettisons during the US astronauts space-walk. Standard close-range photogrammetry analysis was used during this EVA to analyze two on-board camera image sequences down-linked from the ISS. In this approach the ISS camera orientations were computed from known coordinates of several reference points on the ISS hardware. Then the position of the jettisoned object for each time-frame was computed from its image in each frame of the video-clips. In another, "quick-look" approach used in near-real time, orientation of the cameras was computed from their position (from the ISS CAD model) and operational data (pan and tilt) then location of the jettisoned object was calculated only for several frames of the two synchronized movies. Keywords: Photogrammetry, International Space Station, jettisons, image analysis.

  17. 78 FR 42982 - Submission for Review: Information Collection; Questionnaire for Non-Sensitive Positions (SF 85)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-18

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Information Collection; Questionnaire for Non-Sensitive Positions (SF 85...), Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Control No. 3206-NEW, for Questionnaire for Non-Sensitive Positions...@opm.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Questionnaire for Non-Sensitive Positions, SF 85, housed in...

  18. What Lies Ahead (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D cylindrical-perspective mosaic taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 82 shows the view south of the large crater dubbed 'Bonneville.' The rover will travel toward the Columbia Hills, seen here at the upper left. The rock dubbed 'Mazatzal' and the hole the rover drilled in to it can be seen at the lower left. The rover's position is referred to as 'Site 22, Position 32.' This image was geometrically corrected to make the horizon appear flat.

  19. 3-D structures of planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, W.

    2016-07-01

    Recent advances in the 3-D reconstruction of planetary nebulae are reviewed. We include not only results for 3-D reconstructions, but also the current techniques in terms of general methods and software. In order to obtain more accurate reconstructions, we suggest to extend the widely used assumption of homologous nebula expansion to map spectroscopically measured velocity to position along the line of sight.

  20. Forensic 3D Scene Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    LITTLE,CHARLES Q.; PETERS,RALPH R.; RIGDON,J. BRIAN; SMALL,DANIEL E.

    1999-10-12

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a feasible prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  1. Forensic 3D scene reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Charles Q.; Small, Daniel E.; Peters, Ralph R.; Rigdon, J. B.

    2000-05-01

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a fieldable prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  2. 3-D Technology Approaches for Biological Ecologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liyu; Austin, Robert; U. S-China Physical-Oncology Sciences Alliance (PS-OA) Team

    Constructing three dimensional (3-D) landscapes is an inevitable issue in deep study of biological ecologies, because in whatever scales in nature, all of the ecosystems are composed by complex 3-D environments and biological behaviors. Just imagine if a 3-D technology could help complex ecosystems be built easily and mimic in vivo microenvironment realistically with flexible environmental controls, it will be a fantastic and powerful thrust to assist researchers for explorations. For years, we have been utilizing and developing different technologies for constructing 3-D micro landscapes for biophysics studies in in vitro. Here, I will review our past efforts, including probing cancer cell invasiveness with 3-D silicon based Tepuis, constructing 3-D microenvironment for cell invasion and metastasis through polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) soft lithography, as well as explorations of optimized stenting positions for coronary bifurcation disease with 3-D wax printing and the latest home designed 3-D bio-printer. Although 3-D technologies is currently considered not mature enough for arbitrary 3-D micro-ecological models with easy design and fabrication, I hope through my talk, the audiences will be able to sense its significance and predictable breakthroughs in the near future. This work was supported by the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (Grant No. 2013CB837200), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11474345) and the Beijing Natural Science Foundation (Grant No. 7154221).

  3. Changes in gene expression, protein content and morphology of chondrocytes cultured on a 3D Random Positioning Machine and 2D rotating clinostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleshcheva, Ganna; Hauslage, Jens; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Infanger, Manfred; Bauer, Johann; Grimm, Daniela; Sahana, Jayashree

    Chondrocytes are the only cell type found in human cartilage consisting of proteoglycans and type II collagen. Several studies on chondrocytes cultured either in Space or on a ground-based facility for simulation of microgravity revealed that these cells are very resistant to adverse effects and stress induced by altered gravity. Tissue engineering of chondrocytes is a new strategy for cartilage regeneration. Using a three-dimensional Random Positioning Machine and a 2D rotating clinostat, devices designed to simulate microgravity on Earth, we investigated the early effects of microgravity exposure on human chondrocytes of six different donors after 30 min, 2 h, 4 h, 16 h, and 24 h and compared the results with the corresponding static controls cultured under normal gravity conditions. As little as 30 min of exposure resulted in increased expression of several genes responsible for cell motility, structure and integrity (beta-actin); control of cell growth, cell proliferation, cell differentiation and apoptosis; and cytoskeletal components such as microtubules (beta-tubulin) and intermediate filaments (vimentin). After 4 hours disruptions in the vimentin network were detected. These changes were less dramatic after 16 hours, when human chondrocytes appeared to reorganize their cytoskeleton. However, the gene expression and protein content of TGF-β1 was enhanced for 24 h. Based on the results achieved, we suggest that chondrocytes exposed to simulated microgravity seem to change their extracellular matrix production behavior while they rearrange their cytoskeletal proteins prior to forming three-dimensional aggregates.

  4. 3D microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Keigo

    2008-02-01

    In order to circumvent the fact that only one observer can view the image from a stereoscopic microscope, an attachment was devised for displaying the 3D microscopic image on a large LCD monitor for viewing by multiple observers in real time. The principle of operation, design, fabrication, and performance are presented, along with tolerance measurements relating to the properties of the cellophane half-wave plate used in the design.

  5. Drift Transport in Al2O3-Sheathed 3-D Transparent Conducting Oxide Photoanodes Observed in Liquid Electrolyte-Based Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Fa-Qian; Zhu, Kai; Li, Tao; Xu, Tao

    2014-04-25

    It has long been taken for granted that electron transport in liquid-electrolyte-based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) undergoes an ambipolar diffusive transport due to the strong coupling between electrons in the photoanode and the nearby mobile cations in liquid electrolyte, which, therefore, screens off any electric field in the photoanodes and consequently eliminates the possibility for drift transport. In this work, we demonstrate the existence of drift transport in liquid electrolyte-based DSSCs using a thin Al2O3-sheathed 3-dimentional (3-D) fluorinated tin oxide (FTO), as photoanodes. The electron diffusion rate in such 3-D TCO based DSSC exhibits a striking enhancement to the value of ~10–2 cm2/s, about 104 times faster than that of the TiO2 nanoparticle-based DSSCs. The electron diffusion coefficient is independent of the photoelectron density, while intensity modulated photocurrent spectroscopy (IMPS) suggests that the time constants of electron transport exhibit a linear dependence on the bias voltage, a strong indication of drift transport behavior in this 3-D FTO hollow nanobeads-based DSSC, despite the use of liquid I/I3 electrolyte.

  6. Variable angle-of-incidence polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography: its use to study the 3D collagen structure of equine articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugryumova, Nadya; Gangnus, Sergei V.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2006-02-01

    Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography has been used to spatially map the birefringence of equine articular cartilage. The polar orientation of the collagen fibers relative to the plane of the joint surface must be taken into account if a quantitative measurement of true birefringence is required. Using a series of images taken at different angles of illumination, we determine the fiber polar angle and true birefringence at one site on a sample of equine cartilage, on the assumption that the fibers lie within the plane of imaging. We propose a more general method based on the extended Jones matrix formalism to determine both the polar and azimuthal orientation of the collagen fibers as well as the true birefringence as functions of depth.

  7. Controlling sensitivity and stability of ferrous-xylenol orange-gelatin 3D gel dosimeters by doping with phenanthroline-type ligands and glyoxal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penev, Kalin I.; Mequanint, Kibret

    2013-03-01

    The ferrous-xylenol orange-gelatin (FXG) dosimeter is widely used for three-dimensional ionizing radiation field mapping through optical scanning. Upon irradiation, the ferrous iron (Fe2+) is oxidized to ferric iron (Fe3+), which forms an intensely coloured complex with xylenol orange (XO). XO also acts as a diffusion-limiting additive; however, its presence may cause rapid auto-oxidation of Fe2+ during storage and low stability of the dose response. In this work, phenanthroline-type ligands were added to FXG system in a bid to bind the ferrous iron in a stable complex and minimize the rate of the auto-oxidation, whereas glyoxal was used as a chemical cross-linker, aiming to minimize the ferric iron diffusion. It was found that addition of either 1,10-phenanthroline or 5-nitro-1,10-phenanthroline can improve the auto-oxidation behaviour of the gels. However, the initial background absorbance was slightly increased, and the sensitivity of the dosimeters was decreased. Doping with glyoxal led to a moderate decrease of the diffusion only in those gels that also contained a phenanthroline-type ligand, and did not affect the initial dose response. Glyoxal also afforded an extended period of stable background absorbance level after an initial period of bleaching of the gel. Following re-irradiation, most glyoxal-containing dosimeters showed an excellent linearity of the dose response, albeit at a decreased sensitivity. We recommend further testing of FXG dosimeters, doped with phenanthroline-type ligands and glyoxal as a means for controlling the dose response and improving the long-term storage properties of the gels and the potential for dose fractionation.

  8. Numerical 3D flow simulation of ultrasonic horns with attached cavitation structures and assessment of flow aggressiveness and cavitation erosion sensitive wall zones.

    PubMed

    Mottyll, Stephan; Skoda, Romuald

    2016-07-01

    As a contribution to a better understanding of cavitation erosion mechanisms, a compressible inviscid finite volume flow solver with barotropic homogeneous liquid-vapor mixture cavitation model is applied to ultrasonic horn set-ups with and without stationary specimen, that exhibit attached cavitation at the horn tip. Void collapses and shock waves, which are closely related to cavitation erosion, are resolved. The computational results are compared to hydrophone, shadowgraphy and erosion test data. At the horn tip, vapor volume and topology, subharmonic oscillation frequency as well as the amplitude of propagating pressure waves are in good agreement with experimental data. For the evaluation of flow aggressiveness and the assessment of erosion sensitive wall zones, statistical analyses of wall loads and of the multiplicity of distinct collapses in wall-adjacent flow regions are applied to the horn tip and the stationary specimen. An a posteriori projection of load collectives, i.e. cumulative collapse rate vs. collapse pressure, onto a reference grid eliminates the grid dependency effectively for attached cavitation at the horn tip, whereas a significant grid dependency remains at the stationary specimen. The load collectives show an exponential decrease towards higher collapse pressures. Erosion sensitive wall zones are well predicted for both, horn tip and stationary specimen, and load profiles are in good qualitative agreement with measured topography profiles of eroded duplex stainless steel samples after long-term runs. For the considered amplitude and gap width according to ASTM G32-10 standard, the analysis of load collectives reveals that the distinctive erosive ring shape at the horn tip can be attributed to frequent breakdown and re-development of a small portion of the tip-attached cavity. This partial breakdown of the attached cavity repeats at each driving cycle and is associated with relatively moderate collapse peak pressures, whereas the

  9. Interactive 3D Mars Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    The Interactive 3D Mars Visualization system provides high-performance, immersive visualization of satellite and surface vehicle imagery of Mars. The software can be used in mission operations to provide the most accurate position information for the Mars rovers to date. When integrated into the mission data pipeline, this system allows mission planners to view the location of the rover on Mars to 0.01-meter accuracy with respect to satellite imagery, with dynamic updates to incorporate the latest position information. Given this information so early in the planning process, rover drivers are able to plan more accurate drive activities for the rover than ever before, increasing the execution of science activities significantly. Scientifically, this 3D mapping information puts all of the science analyses to date into geologic context on a daily basis instead of weeks or months, as was the norm prior to this contribution. This allows the science planners to judge the efficacy of their previously executed science observations much more efficiently, and achieve greater science return as a result. The Interactive 3D Mars surface view is a Mars terrain browsing software interface that encompasses the entire region of exploration for a Mars surface exploration mission. The view is interactive, allowing the user to pan in any direction by clicking and dragging, or to zoom in or out by scrolling the mouse or touchpad. This set currently includes tools for selecting a point of interest, and a ruler tool for displaying the distance between and positions of two points of interest. The mapping information can be harvested and shared through ubiquitous online mapping tools like Google Mars, NASA WorldWind, and Worldwide Telescope.

  10. Electrochemical signal amplification for immunosensor based on 3D interdigitated array electrodes.

    PubMed

    Han, Donghoon; Kim, Yang-Rae; Kang, Chung Mu; Chung, Taek Dong

    2014-06-17

    We devised an electrochemical redox cycling based on three-dimensional interdigitated array (3D IDA) electrodes for signal amplification to enhance the sensitivity of chip-based immunosensors. The 3D IDA consists of two closely spaced parallel indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes that are positioned not only on the bottom but also the ceiling, facing each other along a microfluidic channel. We investigated the signal intensities from various geometric configurations: Open-2D IDA, Closed-2D IDA, and 3D IDA through electrochemical experiments and finite-element simulations. The 3D IDA among the four different systems exhibited the greatest signal amplification resulting from efficient redox cycling of electroactive species confined in the microchannel so that the faradaic current was augmented by a factor of ∼100. We exploited the enhanced sensitivity of the 3D IDA to build up a chronocoulometric immunosensing platform based on the sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) protocol. The mouse IgGs on the 3D IDA showed much lower detection limits than on the Closed-2D IDA. The detection limit for mouse IgG measured using the 3D IDA was ∼10 fg/mL, while it was ∼100 fg/mL for the Closed-2D IDA. Moreover, the proposed immunosensor system with the 3D IDA successfully worked for clinical analysis as shown by the sensitive detection of cardiac troponin I in human serum down to 100 fg/mL. PMID:24842332

  11. Multiviewer 3D monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrzewski, Andrew A.; Aye, Tin M.; Kim, Dai Hyun; Esterkin, Vladimir; Savant, Gajendra D.

    1998-09-01

    Physical Optics Corporation has developed an advanced 3-D virtual reality system for use with simulation tools for training technical and military personnel. This system avoids such drawbacks of other virtual reality (VR) systems as eye fatigue, headaches, and alignment for each viewer, all of which are due to the need to wear special VR goggles. The new system is based on direct viewing of an interactive environment. This innovative holographic multiplexed screen technology makes it unnecessary for the viewer to wear special goggles.

  12. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  13. Quantum dot-sensitized solar cells having 3D-TiO2 flower-like structures on the surface of titania nanorods with CuS counter electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buatong, Nattha; Tang, I.-Ming; Pon-On, Weeraphat

    2015-03-01

    The photovoltaic performance of a quantum dot (QD)-sensitized solar cell consisting of CdS/CdSe/ZnS QDs loaded onto the surface of the three-dimensional (3D) flower-like TiO2 structure grown on an array (1D) of TiO2 nanorods (FTiR) is studied. The flower-like structure on the rod-shaped titania was synthesized using a double-step hydrothermal process. The FTiR array exhibited a 3D/1D composite structure with a specific surface area of 81.87 m2/g. Using CuS as the counter electrode instead of Pt offers the best performance and leads to an increase in the conversion efficiency ( η). The efficiency of the CdS/CdSe/ZnS QD-loaded FTiR assembling CuS counter electrode cell improved from η = 2.715% ( Voc = 0.692 V, Jsc = 5.896 mA/cm2, FF = 0.665) to η = 0.703% ( Voc = 0.665 V, Jsc = 2.108 mA/cm2, FF = 0.501) for the QD-loaded FTiR assembling Pt counter electrode cell. These studies reveal a synergistically beneficial effect on the solar-to-current conversion of these QD-sensitized solar cells when a CuS counter electrode is used instead of the usual Pt counter electrode.

  14. Highly-Sensitive Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS)-based Chemical Sensor using 3D Graphene Foam Decorated with Silver Nanoparticles as SERS substrate

    PubMed Central

    Srichan, Chavis; Ekpanyapong, Mongkol; Horprathum, Mati; Eiamchai, Pitak; Nuntawong, Noppadon; Phokharatkul, Ditsayut; Danvirutai, Pobporn; Bohez, Erik; Wisitsoraat, Anurat; Tuantranont, Adisorn

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a novel platform for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS)-based chemical sensors utilizing three-dimensional microporous graphene foam (GF) decorated with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) is developed and applied for methylene blue (MB) detection. The results demonstrate that silver nanoparticles significantly enhance cascaded amplification of SERS effect on multilayer graphene foam (GF). The enhancement factor of AgNPs/GF sensor is found to be four orders of magnitude larger than that of AgNPs/Si substrate. In addition, the sensitivity of the sensor could be tuned by controlling the size of silver nanoparticles. The highest SERS enhancement factor of ∼5 × 104 is achieved at the optimal nanoparticle size of 50 nm. Moreover, the sensor is capable of detecting MB over broad concentration ranges from 1 nM to 100 μM. Therefore, AgNPs/GF is a highly promising SERS substrate for detection of chemical substances with ultra-low concentrations. PMID:27020705

  15. Highly-Sensitive Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS)-based Chemical Sensor using 3D Graphene Foam Decorated with Silver Nanoparticles as SERS substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srichan, Chavis; Ekpanyapong, Mongkol; Horprathum, Mati; Eiamchai, Pitak; Nuntawong, Noppadon; Phokharatkul, Ditsayut; Danvirutai, Pobporn; Bohez, Erik; Wisitsoraat, Anurat; Tuantranont, Adisorn

    2016-03-01

    In this work, a novel platform for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS)-based chemical sensors utilizing three-dimensional microporous graphene foam (GF) decorated with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) is developed and applied for methylene blue (MB) detection. The results demonstrate that silver nanoparticles significantly enhance cascaded amplification of SERS effect on multilayer graphene foam (GF). The enhancement factor of AgNPs/GF sensor is found to be four orders of magnitude larger than that of AgNPs/Si substrate. In addition, the sensitivity of the sensor could be tuned by controlling the size of silver nanoparticles. The highest SERS enhancement factor of ∼5 × 104 is achieved at the optimal nanoparticle size of 50 nm. Moreover, the sensor is capable of detecting MB over broad concentration ranges from 1 nM to 100 μM. Therefore, AgNPs/GF is a highly promising SERS substrate for detection of chemical substances with ultra-low concentrations.

  16. Mechanical characterisation of in vivo human skin using a 3D force-sensitive micro-robot and finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Cormac; Taberner, Andrew; Nielsen, Poul

    2011-02-01

    The complex mechanical properties of skin have been the subject of much study in recent years. Several experimental methods developed to measure the mechanical properties of skin in vivo, such as suction or torsion, are unable to measure skin's anisotropic characteristics. An experiment characterising the mechanical properties of in vivo human skin using a novel force-sensitive micro-robot is presented. The micro-robot applied in-plane deformations to the anterior forearm and the posterior upper arm. The behaviour of the skin in each area is highly nonlinear, anisotropic, and viscoelastic. The response of the upper arm skin is very dependent on the orientation of the arm. A finite element model consisting of an Ogden strain energy function and quasi-linear viscoelasticity was developed to simulate the experiments. An orthogonal initial stress field, representing the in vivo skin tension, was used as an additional model parameter. The model simulated the experiments accurately with an error-of-fit of 17.5% for the anterior lower forearm area, 6.5% for the anterior upper forearm and 9.3% for the posterior upper arm. The maximum in vivo tension in each area determined by the model was 6.2 Nm(-1) in the anterior lower forearm, 11.4 Nm(-1) in anterior upper forearm and 5.6 Nm(-1) in the posterior upper arm. The results also show that a finite element model with a neo-Hookean strain energy function cannot simulate the experiments with the same accuracy. PMID:20429025

  17. Cryogenic 3-D Detectors for Solar Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, R. A.; Martinez-Galarce, D.; Rausch, A.; Shing, L.; Deiker, S.; Boerner, P.; Metcalf, T.; Cabrera, B.; Leman, S. W.; Brink, P.; Irwin, K.; Alexander, D.

    2005-05-01

    Cryogenic microcalorimeters operating in the sub-Kelvin temperature range provide non-dispersive energy resolution at optical through gamma ray energies (e.g, E/Δ E ~ 1500 at 6 keV). Microcalorimeters also have high time resolution (msec or better), and can be made into imaging arrays through SQUID multiplexing of individual pixels or employing position sensitive detector structures. The application of such "3-D" detector technology to solar physics will lead to significant advances in our understanding of magnetic reconnection in the Sun, including X-ray jet phenomena, and active region heating and dynamics. An Explorer-class solar mission within the next 5-10 years, based upon these detectors, is rapidly becoming technically feasible. LMSAL currently has an internally funded laboratory research program to investigate TES (Transition Edge Sensor) microcalorimeters; we recently saw our first X-ray photons using TES detectors supplied by NIST. In addition, we have recently been funded by NASA to begin work with NIST on position-sensitive X-ray strip detectors for solar physics applications. Finally, we are collaborating with with Stanford and NIST on a solar sounding rocket. In this presentation, we will discuss the current status of these programs and their applicability to future Explorer missions and Roadmap missions such as RAM.

  18. Biocompatible 3D Matrix with Antimicrobial Properties.

    PubMed

    Ion, Alberto; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Rădulescu, Dragoș; Rădulescu, Marius; Iordache, Florin; Vasile, Bogdan Ștefan; Surdu, Adrian Vasile; Albu, Madalina Georgiana; Maniu, Horia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Holban, Alina Maria

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop, characterize and assess the biological activity of a new regenerative 3D matrix with antimicrobial properties, based on collagen (COLL), hydroxyapatite (HAp), β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and usnic acid (UA). The prepared 3D matrix was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Microscopy (FT-IRM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). In vitro qualitative and quantitative analyses performed on cultured diploid cells demonstrated that the 3D matrix is biocompatible, allowing the normal development and growth of MG-63 osteoblast-like cells and exhibited an antimicrobial effect, especially on the Staphylococcus aureus strain, explained by the particular higher inhibitory activity of usnic acid (UA) against Gram positive bacterial strains. Our data strongly recommend the obtained 3D matrix to be used as a successful alternative for the fabrication of three dimensional (3D) anti-infective regeneration matrix for bone tissue engineering. PMID:26805790

  19. The impact of including spatially longitudinal heterogeneities of vessel oxygen content and vascular fraction in 3D tumor oxygenation models on predicted radiation sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Lagerlöf, Jakob H.; Kindblom, Jon; Bernhardt, Peter

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Oxygen distribution models have been used to analyze the influences of oxygen tensions on tissue response after radiotherapy. These distributions are often generated assuming constant oxygen tension in the blood vessels. However, as red blood cells progress through the vessels, oxygen is continuously released into the plasma and the surrounding tissue, resulting in longitudinally varying oxygen levels in the blood vessels. In the present study, the authors investigated whether a tumor oxygenation model that incorporated longitudinally varying oxygen levels would provide different predictions of necrotic fractions and radiosensitivity compared to commonly used models with a constant oxygen pressure. Methods: Our models simulated oxygen diffusion based on a Green's function approach and oxygen consumption according to the Michaelis-Menten equation. The authors constructed tumor models with different vascular fractions (VFs), from which they generated depth oxygenation curves and a look-up table of oxygen pressure gradients. The authors evaluated models of spherical tumors of various sizes, from 1 to 10{sup 4} mg. The authors compared the results from a model with constant vessel oxygen (CVO) pressure to those from models with longitudinal variations in oxygen saturation and either a constant VF (CVF) or variable VF (VVF) within the tumor tissue. The authors monitored the necrotic fractions, defined as tumor regions with an oxygen pressure below 1 mmHg. Tumor radiation sensitivity was expressed as D{sub 99,} the homogeneous radiation dose required for a tumor control probability of 0.99. Results: In the CVO saturation model, no necrosis was observed, and decreasing the VF could only decrease the D{sub 99} by up to 10%. Furthermore, the D{sub 99} vs VF dependence was similar for different tumor masses. Compared to the CVO model, the extended CVF and VVF models provided clearly different results, including pronounced effects of VF and tumor size on the necrotic

  20. 3D polarimetric purity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, José J.; San José, Ignacio

    2010-11-01

    From our previous definition of the indices of polarimetric purity for 3D light beams [J.J. Gil, J.M. Correas, P.A. Melero and C. Ferreira, Monogr. Semin. Mat. G. de Galdeano 31, 161 (2004)], an analysis of their geometric and physical interpretation is presented. It is found that, in agreement with previous results, the first parameter is a measure of the degree of polarization, whereas the second parameter (called the degree of directionality) is a measure of the mean angular aperture of the direction of propagation of the corresponding light beam. This pair of invariant, non-dimensional, indices of polarimetric purity contains complete information about the polarimetric purity of a light beam. The overall degree of polarimetric purity is obtained as a weighted quadratic average of the degree of polarization and the degree of directionality.

  1. 3D field harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.

    1991-03-30

    We have developed an harmonic representation for the three dimensional field components within the windings of accelerator magnets. The form by which the field is presented is suitable for interfacing with other codes that make use of the 3D field components (particle tracking and stability). The field components can be calculated with high precision and reduced cup time at any location (r,{theta},z) inside the magnet bore. The same conductor geometry which is used to simulate line currents is also used in CAD with modifications more readily available. It is our hope that the format used here for magnetic fields can be used not only as a means of delivering fields but also as a way by which beam dynamics can suggest correction to the conductor geometry. 5 refs., 70 figs.

  2. Automatic needle segmentation in 3D ultrasound images using 3D Hough transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hua; Qiu, Wu; Ding, Mingyue; Zhang, Songgeng

    2007-12-01

    3D ultrasound (US) is a new technology that can be used for a variety of diagnostic applications, such as obstetrical, vascular, and urological imaging, and has been explored greatly potential in the applications of image-guided surgery and therapy. Uterine adenoma and uterine bleeding are the two most prevalent diseases in Chinese woman, and a minimally invasive ablation system using an RF button electrode which is needle-like is being used to destroy tumor cells or stop bleeding currently. Now a 3D US guidance system has been developed to avoid accidents or death of the patient by inaccurate localizations of the electrode and the tumor position during treatment. In this paper, we described two automated techniques, the 3D Hough Transform (3DHT) and the 3D Randomized Hough Transform (3DRHT), which is potentially fast, accurate, and robust to provide needle segmentation in 3D US image for use of 3D US imaging guidance. Based on the representation (Φ , θ , ρ , α ) of straight lines in 3D space, we used the 3DHT algorithm to segment needles successfully assumed that the approximate needle position and orientation are known in priori. The 3DRHT algorithm was developed to detect needles quickly without any information of the 3D US images. The needle segmentation techniques were evaluated using the 3D US images acquired by scanning water phantoms. The experiments demonstrated the feasibility of two 3D needle segmentation algorithms described in this paper.

  3. TH-E-BRE-01: A 3D Solver of Linear Boltzmann Transport Equation Based On a New Angular Discretization Method with Positivity for Photon Dose Calculation Benchmarked with Geant4

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, X; Gao, H

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The Linear Boltzmann Transport Equation (LBTE) solved through statistical Monte Carlo (MC) method provides the accurate dose calculation in radiotherapy. This work is to investigate the alternative way for accurately solving LBTE using deterministic numerical method due to its possible advantage in computational speed from MC. Methods: Instead of using traditional spherical harmonics to approximate angular scattering kernel, our deterministic numerical method directly computes angular scattering weights, based on a new angular discretization method that utilizes linear finite element method on the local triangulation of unit angular sphere. As a Result, our angular discretization method has the unique advantage in positivity, i.e., to maintain all scattering weights nonnegative all the time, which is physically correct. Moreover, our method is local in angular space, and therefore handles the anisotropic scattering well, such as the forward-peaking scattering. To be compatible with image-guided radiotherapy, the spatial variables are discretized on the structured grid with the standard diamond scheme. After discretization, the improved sourceiteration method is utilized for solving the linear system without saving the linear system to memory. The accuracy of our 3D solver is validated using analytic solutions and benchmarked with Geant4, a popular MC solver. Results: The differences between Geant4 solutions and our solutions were less than 1.5% for various testing cases that mimic the practical cases. More details are available in the supporting document. Conclusion: We have developed a 3D LBTE solver based on a new angular discretization method that guarantees the positivity of scattering weights for physical correctness, and it has been benchmarked with Geant4 for photon dose calculation.

  4. Three-dimensional, position-sensitive radiation detection

    DOEpatents

    He, Zhong; Zhang, Feng

    2010-04-06

    Disclosed herein is a method of determining a characteristic of radiation detected by a radiation detector via a multiple-pixel event having a plurality of radiation interactions. The method includes determining a cathode-to-anode signal ratio for a selected interaction of the plurality of radiation interactions based on electron drift time data for the selected interaction, and determining the radiation characteristic for the multiple-pixel event based on both the cathode-to-anode signal ratio and the electron drift time data. In some embodiments, the method further includes determining a correction factor for the radiation characteristic based on an interaction depth of the plurality of radiation interactions, a lateral distance between the selected interaction and a further interaction of the plurality of radiation interactions, and the lateral positioning of the plurality of radiation interactions.

  5. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  6. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  7. 3D bioprinting of tissues and organs.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sean V; Atala, Anthony

    2014-08-01

    Additive manufacturing, otherwise known as three-dimensional (3D) printing, is driving major innovations in many areas, such as engineering, manufacturing, art, education and medicine. Recent advances have enabled 3D printing of biocompatible materials, cells and supporting components into complex 3D functional living tissues. 3D bioprinting is being applied to regenerative medicine to address the need for tissues and organs suitable for transplantation. Compared with non-biological printing, 3D bioprinting involves additional complexities, such as the choice of materials, cell types, growth and differentiation factors, and technical challenges related to the sensitivities of living cells and the construction of tissues. Addressing these complexities requires the integration of technologies from the fields of engineering, biomaterials science, cell biology, physics and medicine. 3D bioprinting has already been used for the generation and transplantation of several tissues, including multilayered skin, bone, vascular grafts, tracheal splints, heart tissue and cartilaginous structures. Other applications include developing high-throughput 3D-bioprinted tissue models for research, drug discovery and toxicology. PMID:25093879

  8. Performance of a position-sensitive scintillation detector.

    PubMed

    Karp, J S; Muehllehner, G

    1985-07-01

    The spatial resolution of a NaI(T1), 25 mm thick bar detector designed for use in positron emission tomography has been studied. The position along the 500 mm long detector is determined from the centroid of the light distribution in the crystal as measured by a linear array of photomultiplier tubes. A Monte Carlo computer simulation was performed to investigate the factors limiting the spatial resolution. The program allowed us to study the effect of various phototube configurations and crystal surfaces. Since the resolution is affected by the width of the light distribution, we studied the effect of sharpening the distribution by modifying the front crystal surface with grooves cut perpendicular to the long axis of the crystal and by using non-linear preamplifiers. The simulation predicts a spatial resolution (FWHM) of 3 mm with this crystal. Experimental measurements of spatial resolution were performed concurrently with the simulations. In particular, a modified grooved crystal was measured to have 4.0 mm spatial resolution, an improvement over the original crystal without grooves. With delay line pulse shortening, which increases the count rate capability of the detector, the grooved crystal was measured to have 5.5 mm spatial resolution. PMID:3895256

  9. Fluid Substitution Modeling to Determine Sensitivity of 3D Vertical Seismic Profile Data to Injected CO­2­ at an active Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage Project, Farnsworth field, TX.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haar, K. K.; Balch, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration monitors a CO2 capture, utilization and storage project at Farnsworth field, TX. The reservoir interval is a Morrowan age fluvial sand deposited in an incised valley. The sands are between 10 to 25m thick and located about 2800m below the surface. Primary oil recovery began in 1958 and by the late 1960's secondary recovery through waterflooding was underway. In 2009, Chaparral Energy began tertiary recovery using 100% anthropogenic CO2 sourced from an ethanol and a fertilizer plant. This constitutes carbon sequestration and fulfills the DOE's initiative to determine the best approach to permanent carbon storage. One purpose of the study is to understand CO­2 migration from injection wells. CO2­ plume spatial distribution for this project is analyzed with the use of time-lapse 3D vertical seismic profiles centered on CO2 injection wells. They monitor raypaths traveling in a single direction compared to surface seismic surveys with raypaths traveling in both directions. 3D VSP surveys can image up to 1.5km away from the well of interest, exceeding regulatory requirements for maximum plume extent by a factor of two. To optimize the timing of repeat VSP acquisition, the sensitivity of the 3D VSP surveys to CO2 injection was analyzed to determine at what injection volumes a seismic response to the injected CO­2 will be observable. Static geologic models were generated for pre-CO2 and post-CO2 reservoir states through construction of fine scale seismic based geologic models, which were then history matched via flow simulations. These generated static states of the model, where CO2­ replaces oil and brine in pore spaces, allow for generation of impedance volumes which when convolved with a representative wavelet generate synthetic seismic volumes used in the sensitivity analysis. Funding for the project is provided by DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under Award No. DE-FC26-05NT42591.

  10. 3D EIT image reconstruction with GREIT.

    PubMed

    Grychtol, Bartłomiej; Müller, Beat; Adler, Andy

    2016-06-01

    Most applications of thoracic EIT use a single plane of electrodes on the chest from which a transverse image 'slice' is calculated. However, interpretation of EIT images is made difficult by the large region above and below the electrode plane to which EIT is sensitive. Volumetric EIT images using two (or more) electrode planes should help compensate, but are little used currently. The Graz consensus reconstruction algorithm for EIT (GREIT) has become popular in lung EIT. One shortcoming of the original formulation of GREIT is its restriction to reconstruction onto a 2D planar image. We present an extension of the GREIT algorithm to 3D and develop open-source tools to evaluate its performance as a function of the choice of stimulation and measurement pattern. Results show 3D GREIT using two electrode layers has significantly more uniform sensitivity profiles through the chest region. Overall, the advantages of 3D EIT are compelling. PMID:27203184

  11. Naphtho[2,3-c][1,2,5]thiadiazole and 2H-Naphtho[2,3-d][1,2,3]triazole-Containing D-A-π-A Conjugated Organic Dyes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Yen, Yung-Sheng; Ni, Jen-Shyang; Hung, Wei-I; Hsu, Chih-Yu; Chou, Hsien-Hsin; Lin, Jiann-T Suen

    2016-03-01

    Dipolar dyes comprising an arylamine as the electron donor, a cyanoacrylic acid as electron acceptor, and an electron deficient naphtho[2,3-c][1,2,5]thiadiazole (NTD) or naphtho[2,3-d][1,2,3]triazole (NTz) entity in the conjugated spacer, were developed and used as the sensitizers in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The introduction of the NTD unit into the molecular frame distinctly narrows the HOMO/LUMO gap with electronic absorption extending to >650 nm. However, significant charge trapping and dye aggregation were found in these dyes. Under standard global AM 1.5 G illumination, the best cell photovoltaic performance achieved 6.37 and 7.53% (∼94% relative to N719-based standard cell) without and with chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) coadsorbent, respectively. Without CDCA, the NTz dyes have higher power conversion efficiency (7.23%) than NTD dyes due to less charge trapping, dye aggregation, and better dark current suppression. PMID:26891701

  12. Increased gut hormones and insulin sensitivity index following a 3-d intervention with a barley kernel-based product: a randomised cross-over study in healthy middle-aged subjects.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Anne C; Johansson-Boll, Elin V; Björck, Inger M E

    2015-09-28

    Certain purified indigestible carbohydrates such as inulin have been shown to stimulate gut-derived hormones involved in glycaemic regulation and appetite regulation, and to counteract systemic inflammation through a gut microbiota-mediated mechanism. Less is known about the properties of indigestible carbohydrates intrinsic to food. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility to affect release of endogenous gut hormones and ameliorate appetite control and glycaemic control by ingestion of a whole-grain cereal food product rich in NSP and resistant starch in healthy humans. In all, twenty middle-aged subjects were provided with a barley kernel-based bread (BB) or a reference white wheat bread during 3 consecutive days, respectively, in a randomised cross-over design study. At a standardised breakfast the following day (day 4), blood was collected for the analysis of blood (b) glucose regulation, gastrointestinal hormones, markers of inflammation and markers of colonic fermentation; 3 d of intervention with BB increased gut hormones in plasma (p) the next morning at fasting (p-glucagon-like peptide-1; 56%) and postprandially (p-glucagon-like peptide-2; 13% and p-peptide YY; 18%). Breath H₂ excretion and fasting serum (s) SCFA concentrations were increased (363 and 18%, respectively), and b-glucose (22%) and s-insulin responses (17%) were decreased after BB intervention. Insulin sensitivity index (ISI(composite)) was also improved (25%) after BB. In conclusion, 3 d of intervention with BB increased systemic levels of gut hormones involved in appetite regulation, metabolic control and maintenance of gut barrier function, as well as improved markers of glucose homoeostasis in middle-aged subjects, altogether relevant for the prevention of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. PMID:26259632

  13. Vector quantization of 3-D point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Jae-Young; Kim, Chang-Su; Lee, Sang-Uk

    2005-10-01

    A geometry compression algorithm for 3-D QSplat data using vector quantization (VQ) is proposed in this work. The positions of child spheres are transformed to the local coordinate system, which is determined by the parent children relationship. The coordinate transform makes child positions more compactly distributed in 3-D space, facilitating effective quantization. Moreover, we develop a constrained encoding method for sphere radii, which guarantees hole-free surface rendering at the decoder side. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm provides a faithful rendering quality even at low bitrates.

  14. Exploring the 2- and 5-positions of the pyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidin-7-amino scaffold to target human A1 and A2A adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Squarcialupi, Lucia; Falsini, Matteo; Catarzi, Daniela; Varano, Flavia; Betti, Marco; Varani, Katia; Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Dal Ben, Diego; Lambertucci, Catia; Volpini, Rosaria; Colotta, Vittoria

    2016-06-15

    A new series of 7-aminopyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidine derivatives (1-31) were synthesized to evaluate some structural modifications at the 2- and 5-positions aimed at shifting affinity towards the human (h) A2A adenosine receptor (AR) or both hA2A and hA1 ARs. The most active compounds were those featured by a 2-furyl or 5-methylfuran-2-yl moiety at position 5, combined with a benzyl or a substituted-benzyl group at position 2. Several of these derivatives (22-31) displayed nanomolar affinity for the hA2A AR (Ki=3.62-57nM) and slightly lower for the hA1 ARs, thus showing different degrees (3-22 fold) of hA2A versus hA1 selectivity. In particular, the 2-(2-methoxybenzyl)-5-(5-methylfuran-2-yl) derivative 25 possessed the highest hA2A and hA1 AR affinities (Ki=3.62nM and 18nM, respectively) and behaved as potent antagonist at both these receptors (cAMP assays). Its 2-(2-hydroxybenzyl) analog 26 also showed a high affinity for the hA2A AR (Ki=5.26nM) and was 22-fold selective versus the hA1 subtype. Molecular docking investigations performed at the hA2A AR crystal structure and at a homology model of the hA1 AR allowed us to represent the hypothetical binding mode of our derivatives and to rationalize the observed SARs. PMID:27161878

  15. Novel 3D ultrasound image-based biomarkers based on a feature selection from a 2D standardized vessel wall thickness map: a tool for sensitive assessment of therapies for carotid atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Bernard; Li, Bing; Chow, Tommy W. S.

    2013-09-01

    With the advent of new therapies and management strategies for carotid atherosclerosis, there is a parallel need for measurement tools or biomarkers to evaluate the efficacy of these new strategies. 3D ultrasound has been shown to provide reproducible measurements of plaque area/volume and vessel wall volume. However, since carotid atherosclerosis is a focal disease that predominantly occurs at bifurcations, biomarkers based on local plaque change may be more sensitive than global volumetric measurements in demonstrating efficacy of new therapies. The ultimate goal of this paper is to develop a biomarker that is based on the local distribution of vessel-wall-plus-plaque thickness change (VWT-Change) that has occurred during the course of a clinical study. To allow comparison between different treatment groups, the VWT-Change distribution of each subject must first be mapped to a standardized domain. In this study, we developed a technique to map the 3D VWT-Change distribution to a 2D standardized template. We then applied a feature selection technique to identify regions on the 2D standardized map on which subjects in different treatment groups exhibit greater difference in VWT-Change. The proposed algorithm was applied to analyse the VWT-Change of 20 subjects in a placebo-controlled study of the effect of atorvastatin (Lipitor). The average VWT-Change for each subject was computed (i) over all points in the 2D map and (ii) over feature points only. For the average computed over all points, 97 subjects per group would be required to detect an effect size of 25% that of atorvastatin in a six-month study. The sample size is reduced to 25 subjects if the average were computed over feature points only. The introduction of this sensitive quantification technique for carotid atherosclerosis progression/regression would allow many proof-of-principle studies to be performed before a more costly and longer study involving a larger population is held to confirm the treatment

  16. 3D Spectroscopy in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mediavilla, Evencio; Arribas, Santiago; Roth, Martin; Cepa-Nogué, Jordi; Sánchez, Francisco

    2011-09-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Introductory review and technical approaches Martin M. Roth; 2. Observational procedures and data reduction James E. H. Turner; 3. 3D Spectroscopy instrumentation M. A. Bershady; 4. Analysis of 3D data Pierre Ferruit; 5. Science motivation for IFS and galactic studies F. Eisenhauer; 6. Extragalactic studies and future IFS science Luis Colina; 7. Tutorials: how to handle 3D spectroscopy data Sebastian F. Sánchez, Begona García-Lorenzo and Arlette Pécontal-Rousset.

  17. POSITION SENSITIVE GERMANIUM DETECTORS FOR GAMMA-RAY IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gamma-ray imaging with position-sensitive germanium detectors offers the advantages of excellent energy resolution, high detection efficiency, and potentially good sptial resolution. The development of the amorphous-semiconductor electrical contact technology for germanium detec...

  18. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  19. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  20. Theoretical Noise Analysis on a Position-sensitive Metallic Magnetic Calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    We report on the theoretical noise analysis for a position-sensitive Metallic Magnetic Calorimeter (MMC), consisting of MMC read-out at both ends of a large X-ray absorber. Such devices are under consideration as alternatives to other cryogenic technologies for future X-ray astronomy missions. We use a finite-element model (FEM) to numerically calculate the signal and noise response at the detector outputs and investigate the correlations between the noise measured at each MMC coupled by the absorber. We then calculate, using the optimal filter concept, the theoretical energy and position resolution across the detector and discuss the trade-offs involved in optimizing the detector design for energy resolution, position resolution and count rate. The results show, theoretically, the position-sensitive MMC concept offers impressive spectral and spatial resolving capabilities compared to pixel arrays and similar position-sensitive cryogenic technologies using Transition Edge Sensor (TES) read-out.

  1. Miniaturized 3D microscope imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Yung-Sung; Chang, Chir-Weei; Sung, Hsin-Yueh; Wang, Yen-Chang; Chang, Cheng-Yi

    2015-05-01

    We designed and assembled a portable 3-D miniature microscopic image system with the size of 35x35x105 mm3 . By integrating a microlens array (MLA) into the optical train of a handheld microscope, the biological specimen's image will be captured for ease of use in a single shot. With the light field raw data and program, the focal plane can be changed digitally and the 3-D image can be reconstructed after the image was taken. To localize an object in a 3-D volume, an automated data analysis algorithm to precisely distinguish profundity position is needed. The ability to create focal stacks from a single image allows moving or specimens to be recorded. Applying light field microscope algorithm to these focal stacks, a set of cross sections will be produced, which can be visualized using 3-D rendering. Furthermore, we have developed a series of design rules in order to enhance the pixel using efficiency and reduce the crosstalk between each microlens for obtain good image quality. In this paper, we demonstrate a handheld light field microscope (HLFM) to distinguish two different color fluorescence particles separated by a cover glass in a 600um range, show its focal stacks, and 3-D position.

  2. R3D-2-MSA: the RNA 3D structure-to-multiple sequence alignment server.

    PubMed

    Cannone, Jamie J; Sweeney, Blake A; Petrov, Anton I; Gutell, Robin R; Zirbel, Craig L; Leontis, Neocles

    2015-07-01

    The RNA 3D Structure-to-Multiple Sequence Alignment Server (R3D-2-MSA) is a new web service that seamlessly links RNA three-dimensional (3D) structures to high-quality RNA multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) from diverse biological sources. In this first release, R3D-2-MSA provides manual and programmatic access to curated, representative ribosomal RNA sequence alignments from bacterial, archaeal, eukaryal and organellar ribosomes, using nucleotide numbers from representative atomic-resolution 3D structures. A web-based front end is available for manual entry and an Application Program Interface for programmatic access. Users can specify up to five ranges of nucleotides and 50 nucleotide positions per range. The R3D-2-MSA server maps these ranges to the appropriate columns of the corresponding MSA and returns the contents of the columns, either for display in a web browser or in JSON format for subsequent programmatic use. The browser output page provides a 3D interactive display of the query, a full list of sequence variants with taxonomic information and a statistical summary of distinct sequence variants found. The output can be filtered and sorted in the browser. Previous user queries can be viewed at any time by resubmitting the output URL, which encodes the search and re-generates the results. The service is freely available with no login requirement at http://rna.bgsu.edu/r3d-2-msa. PMID:26048960

  3. R3D-2-MSA: the RNA 3D structure-to-multiple sequence alignment server

    PubMed Central

    Cannone, Jamie J.; Sweeney, Blake A.; Petrov, Anton I.; Gutell, Robin R.; Zirbel, Craig L.; Leontis, Neocles

    2015-01-01

    The RNA 3D Structure-to-Multiple Sequence Alignment Server (R3D-2-MSA) is a new web service that seamlessly links RNA three-dimensional (3D) structures to high-quality RNA multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) from diverse biological sources. In this first release, R3D-2-MSA provides manual and programmatic access to curated, representative ribosomal RNA sequence alignments from bacterial, archaeal, eukaryal and organellar ribosomes, using nucleotide numbers from representative atomic-resolution 3D structures. A web-based front end is available for manual entry and an Application Program Interface for programmatic access. Users can specify up to five ranges of nucleotides and 50 nucleotide positions per range. The R3D-2-MSA server maps these ranges to the appropriate columns of the corresponding MSA and returns the contents of the columns, either for display in a web browser or in JSON format for subsequent programmatic use. The browser output page provides a 3D interactive display of the query, a full list of sequence variants with taxonomic information and a statistical summary of distinct sequence variants found. The output can be filtered and sorted in the browser. Previous user queries can be viewed at any time by resubmitting the output URL, which encodes the search and re-generates the results. The service is freely available with no login requirement at http://rna.bgsu.edu/r3d-2-msa. PMID:26048960

  4. ATLAS3D Stellar Population Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntschner, Harald

    2015-04-01

    We present stellar population gradients of early-type galaxies from the ATLAS3D survey: a complete, volume-limited multi-wavelength survey of 260 early-type galaxies in the local 42 Mpc volume. Using emission-corrected spectra integrated within elliptical annuli we measure line-strength indices and apply single stellar population (SSP) models to derive SSP-equivalent values of stellar age, metallicity, and alpha enhancement as function of radius. For all galaxies we derive basic linear stellar population gradients versus radius logR/Re). These gradients are examined on their own and versus three mass-sensitive parameters: K-band luminosity MK, velocity dispersion within one effective radius log σe, and our dynamical mass MJAM. We find a correlation between positive age gradients (younger centre) and steeper negative metallicity gradients with a Spearman rank correlation coefficient of -0.46 and a significance of 7.65 × 10-15. Furthermore, we find a robustly estimated mean metallicity gradient of Δ[Z/H] = -0.37 +/- 0.01 for the sample with a significant trend for more massive galaxies to have shallower profiles. While there is no clear distinction between fast and slow rotators or signs of environmental influence, we do detect a significantly larger range of [Z/H]-gradients towards low mass galaxies.

  5. A Rotation Invariant in 3-D Reaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitra, Suvobrata; Turvey, M. T.

    2004-01-01

    In 3 experiments, the authors investigated changes in hand orientation during a 3-D reaching task that imposed specific position and orientation requirements on the hand's initial and final postures. Instantaneous hand orientation was described using 3-element rotation vectors representing current orientation as a rotation from a fixed reference…

  6. Automatic needle segmentation in 3D ultrasound images using 3D improved Hough transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hua; Qiu, Wu; Ding, Mingyue; Zhang, Songgen

    2008-03-01

    3D ultrasound (US) is a new technology that can be used for a variety of diagnostic applications, such as obstetrical, vascular, and urological imaging, and has been explored greatly potential in the applications of image-guided surgery and therapy. Uterine adenoma and uterine bleeding are the two most prevalent diseases in Chinese woman, and a minimally invasive ablation system using a needle-like RF button electrode is widely used to destroy tumor cells or stop bleeding. To avoid accidents or death of the patient by inaccurate localizations of the electrode and the tumor position during treatment, 3D US guidance system was developed. In this paper, a new automated technique, the 3D Improved Hough Transform (3DIHT) algorithm, which is potentially fast, accurate, and robust to provide needle segmentation in 3D US image for use of 3D US imaging guidance, was presented. Based on the coarse-fine search strategy and a four parameter representation of lines in 3D space, 3DIHT algorithm can segment needles quickly, accurately and robustly. The technique was evaluated using the 3D US images acquired by scanning a water phantom. The segmentation position deviation of the line was less than 2mm and angular deviation was much less than 2°. The average computational time measured on a Pentium IV 2.80GHz PC computer with a 381×381×250 image was less than 2s.

  7. Modular 3-D Transport model

    EPA Science Inventory

    MT3D was first developed by Chunmiao Zheng in 1990 at S.S. Papadopulos & Associates, Inc. with partial support from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). Starting in 1990, MT3D was released as a pubic domain code from the USEPA. Commercial versions with enhanced capab...

  8. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  9. LLNL-Earth3D

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  10. [3-D ultrasound in gastroenterology].

    PubMed

    Zoller, W G; Liess, H

    1994-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) sonography represents a development of noninvasive diagnostic imaging by real-time two-dimensional (2D) sonography. The use of transparent rotating scans, comparable to a block of glass, generates a 3D effect. The objective of the present study was to optimate 3D presentation of abdominal findings. Additional investigations were made with a new volumetric program to determine the volume of selected findings of the liver. The results were compared with the estimated volumes of 2D sonography and 2D computer tomography (CT). For the processing of 3D images, typical parameter constellations were found for the different findings, which facilitated processing of 3D images. In more than 75% of the cases examined we found an optimal 3D presentation of sonographic findings with respect to the evaluation criteria developed by us for the 3D imaging of processed data. Great differences were found for the estimated volumes of the findings of the liver concerning the three different techniques applied. 3D ultrasound represents a valuable method to judge morphological appearance in abdominal findings. The possibility of volumetric measurements enlarges its potential diagnostic significance. Further clinical investigations are necessary to find out if definite differentiation between benign and malign findings is possible. PMID:7919882

  11. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-30

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  12. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-02-26

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  13. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    structures, but their orientation and position with respect to the rest of the debris field had never been mapped before now.

    This new insight into the structure of Cas A gained from this 3-D visualization is important for astronomers who build models of supernova explosions. Now, they must consider that the outer layers of the star come off spherically, but the inner layers come out more disk-like with high-velocity jets in multiple directions.

  14. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-21

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K(+) channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44(+) EGFR(+) KV1.1(+) MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44(-) EGFR(-) KV1.1(+) 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third

  15. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  16. PLOT3D user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  17. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery. PMID:26657435

  18. A position sensitive time of flight detector for heavy ion ERD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschbaumer, S.; Bergmaier, A.; Dollinger, G.

    2016-03-01

    A new 2D position sensitive time of flight detector for heavy ion ERD has been developed. The detector features separate time and position measurement in a straight geometry. An electrostatic lens focuses the secondary electrons ejected from a carbon foil onto a channel plate stack maintaining the position information despite the electron momentum distribution. For position readout a 2D Backgammon anode is used. A position resolution of <0.6 mm (FWHM) and a time resolution of 96 ps (FWHM) is demonstrated.

  19. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  20. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  1. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  2. Bioprinting of 3D hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Stanton, M M; Samitier, J; Sánchez, S

    2015-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting has recently emerged as an extension of 3D material printing, by using biocompatible or cellular components to build structures in an additive, layer-by-layer methodology for encapsulation and culture of cells. These 3D systems allow for cell culture in a suspension for formation of highly organized tissue or controlled spatial orientation of cell environments. The in vitro 3D cellular environments simulate the complexity of an in vivo environment and natural extracellular matrices (ECM). This paper will focus on bioprinting utilizing hydrogels as 3D scaffolds. Hydrogels are advantageous for cell culture as they are highly permeable to cell culture media, nutrients, and waste products generated during metabolic cell processes. They have the ability to be fabricated in customized shapes with various material properties with dimensions at the micron scale. 3D hydrogels are a reliable method for biocompatible 3D printing and have applications in tissue engineering, drug screening, and organ on a chip models. PMID:26066320

  3. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  4. Arena3D: visualization of biological networks in 3D

    PubMed Central

    Pavlopoulos, Georgios A; O'Donoghue, Seán I; Satagopam, Venkata P; Soldatos, Theodoros G; Pafilis, Evangelos; Schneider, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    Background Complexity is a key problem when visualizing biological networks; as the number of entities increases, most graphical views become incomprehensible. Our goal is to enable many thousands of entities to be visualized meaningfully and with high performance. Results We present a new visualization tool, Arena3D, which introduces a new concept of staggered layers in 3D space. Related data – such as proteins, chemicals, or pathways – can be grouped onto separate layers and arranged via layout algorithms, such as Fruchterman-Reingold, distance geometry, and a novel hierarchical layout. Data on a layer can be clustered via k-means, affinity propagation, Markov clustering, neighbor joining, tree clustering, or UPGMA ('unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean'). A simple input format defines the name and URL for each node, and defines connections or similarity scores between pairs of nodes. The use of Arena3D is illustrated with datasets related to Huntington's disease. Conclusion Arena3D is a user friendly visualization tool that is able to visualize biological or any other network in 3D space. It is free for academic use and runs on any platform. It can be downloaded or lunched directly from . Java3D library and Java 1.5 need to be pre-installed for the software to run. PMID:19040715

  5. "Stereo Compton cameras" for the 3-D localization of radioisotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, K.; Kataoka, J.; Nishiyama, T.; Fujita, T.; Kishimoto, A.; Ohsuka, S.; Nakamura, S.; Adachi, S.; Hirayanagi, M.; Uchiyama, T.; Ishikawa, Y.; Kato, T.

    2014-11-01

    The Compton camera is a viable and convenient tool used to visualize the distribution of radioactive isotopes that emit gamma rays. After the nuclear disaster in Fukushima in 2011, there is a particularly urgent need to develop "gamma cameras", which can visualize the distribution of such radioisotopes. In response, we propose a portable Compton camera, which comprises 3-D position-sensitive GAGG scintillators coupled with thin monolithic MPPC arrays. The pulse-height ratio of two MPPC-arrays allocated at both ends of the scintillator block determines the depth of interaction (DOI), which dramatically improves the position resolution of the scintillation detectors. We report on the detailed optimization of the detector design, based on Geant4 simulation. The results indicate that detection efficiency reaches up to 0.54%, or more than 10 times that of other cameras being tested in Fukushima, along with a moderate angular resolution of 8.1° (FWHM). By applying the triangular surveying method, we also propose a new concept for the stereo measurement of gamma rays by using two Compton cameras, thus enabling the 3-D positional measurement of radioactive isotopes for the first time. From one point source simulation data, we ensured that the source position and the distance to the same could be determined typically to within 2 meters' accuracy and we also confirmed that more than two sources are clearly separated by the event selection from two point sources of simulation data.

  6. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    wavelengths. Since the amount of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through.

    The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave.

    This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron.

    High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these

  7. 3D Spray Droplet Distributions in Sneezes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Techet, Alexandra; Scharfman, Barry; Bourouiba, Lydia

    2015-11-01

    3D spray droplet clouds generated during human sneezing are investigated using the Synthetic Aperture Feature Extraction (SAFE) method, which relies on light field imaging (LFI) and synthetic aperture (SA) refocusing computational photographic techniques. An array of nine high-speed cameras are used to image sneeze droplets and tracked the droplets in 3D space and time (3D + T). An additional high-speed camera is utilized to track the motion of the head during sneezing. In the SAFE method, the raw images recorded by each camera in the array are preprocessed and binarized, simplifying post processing after image refocusing and enabling the extraction of feature sizes and positions in 3D + T. These binary images are refocused using either additive or multiplicative methods, combined with thresholding. Sneeze droplet centroids, radii, distributions and trajectories are determined and compared with existing data. The reconstructed 3D droplet centroids and radii enable a more complete understanding of the physical extent and fluid dynamics of sneeze ejecta. These measurements are important for understanding the infectious disease transmission potential of sneezes in various indoor environments.

  8. Fdf in US3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otis, Collin; Ferrero, Pietro; Candler, Graham; Givi, Peyman

    2013-11-01

    The scalar filtered mass density function (SFMDF) methodology is implemented into the computer code US3D. This is an unstructured Eulerian finite volume hydrodynamic solver and has proven very effective for simulation of compressible turbulent flows. The resulting SFMDF-US3D code is employed for large eddy simulation (LES) on unstructured meshes. Simulations are conducted of subsonic and supersonic flows under non-reacting and reacting conditions. The consistency and the accuracy of the simulated results are assessed along with appraisal of the overall performance of the methodology. The SFMDF-US3D is now capable of simulating high speed flows in complex configurations.

  9. Nondestructive quantitative 3D characterization of a car brake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jueptner, Werner P. O.; Osten, Wolfgang; Andrae, Peter; Nadeborn, Werner

    1996-07-01

    Holographic interferometry enables the accurate measurement of 3D displacement fields. However, the determination of 3D- displacement vectors of objects with complex surfaces requires to measure the 3D-object coordinates not only to consider local sensitivities but to distinguish between in- plane deformation, i.e. strains, and out-of-plane components, i.e. shears, too. To this purpose both the surface displacement and coordinates have to be combined and it is advantageous to make the data available for CAE- systems. The object surface has to be approximated analytically from the measured point cloud to generate a surface mesh. The displacement vectors can be assigned to the nodes of this surface mesh and the components of the deformation can be evaluated for an experimental stress analysis. They also can be compared to the results of FEM- calculations. The brake saddle of a car brake is such a complex formed object where the surface cannot be described by fundamental mathematical functions. The 3D-object coordinates were measured in a separate topometric set-up using a modified fringe projection technique to acquire absolute phase values. By means of a geometrical model the phase data were mapped onto coordinates precisely. The determination of 3D-displacement vectors required the measurement of several interference phase distributions for at least three independent sensitivity directions as well as the 3D-position of each measuring point. These geometric quantities had to be transformed into a reference coordinate system of the interferometric set-up in order to calculate the geometric matrix. The necessary transformation were realized by means of a detection of object features in both data sets and a subsequent determination of the external camera orientation. This paper presents a consistent solution for the measurement and combination of shape and displacement data including their transformation into simulation systems for the car brake. This is an example

  10. STAR3D: a stack-based RNA 3D structural alignment tool

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Ping; Zhang, Shaojie

    2015-01-01

    The various roles of versatile non-coding RNAs typically require the attainment of complex high-order structures. Therefore, comparing the 3D structures of RNA molecules can yield in-depth understanding of their functional conservation and evolutionary history. Recently, many powerful tools have been developed to align RNA 3D structures. Although some methods rely on both backbone conformations and base pairing interactions, none of them consider the entire hierarchical formation of the RNA secondary structure. One of the major issues is that directly applying the algorithms of matching 2D structures to the 3D coordinates is particularly time-consuming. In this article, we propose a novel RNA 3D structural alignment tool, STAR3D, to take into full account the 2D relations between stacks without the complicated comparison of secondary structures. First, the 3D conserved stacks in the inputs are identified and then combined into a tree-like consensus. Afterward, the loop regions are compared one-to-one in accordance with their relative positions in the consensus tree. The experimental results show that the prediction of STAR3D is more accurate for both non-homologous and homologous RNAs than other state-of-the-art tools with shorter running time. PMID:26184875

  11. STAR3D: a stack-based RNA 3D structural alignment tool.

    PubMed

    Ge, Ping; Zhang, Shaojie

    2015-11-16

    The various roles of versatile non-coding RNAs typically require the attainment of complex high-order structures. Therefore, comparing the 3D structures of RNA molecules can yield in-depth understanding of their functional conservation and evolutionary history. Recently, many powerful tools have been developed to align RNA 3D structures. Although some methods rely on both backbone conformations and base pairing interactions, none of them consider the entire hierarchical formation of the RNA secondary structure. One of the major issues is that directly applying the algorithms of matching 2D structures to the 3D coordinates is particularly time-consuming. In this article, we propose a novel RNA 3D structural alignment tool, STAR3D, to take into full account the 2D relations between stacks without the complicated comparison of secondary structures. First, the 3D conserved stacks in the inputs are identified and then combined into a tree-like consensus. Afterward, the loop regions are compared one-to-one in accordance with their relative positions in the consensus tree. The experimental results show that the prediction of STAR3D is more accurate for both non-homologous and homologous RNAs than other state-of-the-art tools with shorter running time. PMID:26184875

  12. Wavefront construction in 3-D

    SciTech Connect

    Chilcoat, S.R. Hildebrand, S.T.

    1995-12-31

    Travel time computation in inhomogeneous media is essential for pre-stack Kirchhoff imaging in areas such as the sub-salt province in the Gulf of Mexico. The 2D algorithm published by Vinje, et al, has been extended to 3D to compute wavefronts in complicated inhomogeneous media. The 3D wavefront construction algorithm provides many advantages over conventional ray tracing and other methods of computing travel times in 3D. The algorithm dynamically maintains a reasonably consistent ray density without making a priori guesses at the number of rays to shoot. The determination of caustics in 3D is a straight forward geometric procedure. The wavefront algorithm also enables the computation of multi-valued travel time surfaces.

  13. Heterodyne 3D ghost imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xu; Zhang, Yong; Yang, Chenghua; Xu, Lu; Wang, Qiang; Zhao, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    Conventional three dimensional (3D) ghost imaging measures range of target based on pulse fight time measurement method. Due to the limit of data acquisition system sampling rate, range resolution of the conventional 3D ghost imaging is usually low. In order to take off the effect of sampling rate to range resolution of 3D ghost imaging, a heterodyne 3D ghost imaging (HGI) system is presented in this study. The source of HGI is a continuous wave laser instead of pulse laser. Temporal correlation and spatial correlation of light are both utilized to obtain the range image of target. Through theory analysis and numerical simulations, it is demonstrated that HGI can obtain high range resolution image with low sampling rate.

  14. Combinatorial 3D Mechanical Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulais, Corentin; Teomy, Eial; de Reus, Koen; Shokef, Yair; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit 3D-folding motion. Our structures consist of cubic lattices of anisotropic unit cells that can be tiled in a complex combinatorial fashion. We design and 3d-print this complex ordered mechanism, in which we combine elastic hinges and defects to tailor the mechanics of the material. Finally, we use this large design space to encode smart functionalities such as surface patterning and multistability.

  15. A Beta-Particle Hodoscope Constructed Using Scintillating Optical Fibers and Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Orrell, John L.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Day, Anthony R.; Fast, Jim; Hossbach, Todd W.; Lidey, Lance S.; Ripplinger, Mike D.; Schrom, Brian T.

    2006-09-19

    A hodoscopic detector was constructed using a position-sensitive plastic scintillator active area to determine the location of beta-active micron-sized particulates on air filters. The ability to locate beta active particulates on airsample filters is a tool for environmental monitoring of anthropogenic production of radioactive material. A robust, field-deployable instrument can provide localization of radioactive particulate with position resolution of a few millimeters. The detector employs a novel configuration of scintillating plastic elements usually employed at much higher charged particle energies. A filter is placed on this element for assay. The detector is intended to be sensitive to activity greater than 1 Bq. The physical design, position reconstruction method, and expected detector sensitivity are reported.

  16. 3D hand tracking using Kalman filter in depth space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sangheon; Yu, Sunjin; Kim, Joongrock; Kim, Sungjin; Lee, Sangyoun

    2012-12-01

    Hand gestures are an important type of natural language used in many research areas such as human-computer interaction and computer vision. Hand gestures recognition requires the prior determination of the hand position through detection and tracking. One of the most efficient strategies for hand tracking is to use 2D visual information such as color and shape. However, visual-sensor-based hand tracking methods are very sensitive when tracking is performed under variable light conditions. Also, as hand movements are made in 3D space, the recognition performance of hand gestures using 2D information is inherently limited. In this article, we propose a novel real-time 3D hand tracking method in depth space using a 3D depth sensor and employing Kalman filter. We detect hand candidates using motion clusters and predefined wave motion, and track hand locations using Kalman filter. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, we compare the performance of the proposed method with the visual-based method. Experimental results show that the performance of the proposed method out performs visual-based method.

  17. 3-D target-based distributed smart camera network localization.

    PubMed

    Kassebaum, John; Bulusu, Nirupama; Feng, Wu-Chi

    2010-10-01

    For distributed smart camera networks to perform vision-based tasks such as subject recognition and tracking, every camera's position and orientation relative to a single 3-D coordinate frame must be accurately determined. In this paper, we present a new camera network localization solution that requires successively showing a 3-D feature point-rich target to all cameras, then using the known geometry of a 3-D target, cameras estimate and decompose projection matrices to compute their position and orientation relative to the coordinatization of the 3-D target's feature points. As each 3-D target position establishes a distinct coordinate frame, cameras that view more than one 3-D target position compute translations and rotations relating different positions' coordinate frames and share the transform data with neighbors to facilitate realignment of all cameras to a single coordinate frame. Compared to other localization solutions that use opportunistically found visual data, our solution is more suitable to battery-powered, processing-constrained camera networks because it requires communication only to determine simultaneous target viewings and for passing transform data. Additionally, our solution requires only pairwise view overlaps of sufficient size to see the 3-D target and detect its feature points, while also giving camera positions in meaningful units. We evaluate our algorithm in both real and simulated smart camera networks. In the real network, position error is less than 1 ('') when the 3-D target's feature points fill only 2.9% of the frame area. PMID:20679031

  18. Sex differences in risk sensitivity under positive and negative budgets and predictors of choice.

    PubMed

    Island, Heide K Deditius; Szalda-Petree, Allen D; Kucera, Stephanie C

    2007-10-01

    The authors investigated sex differences in human risk sensitivity by using a computerized choice task with an energy budget analogue. In addition, they explored possible personality predictors of variance sensitivity. The authors modified the traditional energy budget model from those used in risk-sensitive foraging research with nonhuman animals for appropriate use with a human population. Participants chose between 2 computer icons, 1 yielding a fixed-point reward and the other offering variable points. Men were risk prone in the negative budget and risk averse in the positive budget. Women were risk averse in the negative budget. Personality was not predictive of risk-sensitive bias. Interpreting the results using an evolutionary model, the authors found support for a biological and environmental construct of risk-sensitive behavior. PMID:18183739

  19. 3D electrical tomographic imaging using vertical arrays of electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, S. C.; Stanley, S. J.; Rhodes, D.; York, T. A.

    2006-11-01

    Linear arrays of electrodes in conjunction with electrical impedance tomography have been used to spatially interrogate industrial processes that have only limited access for sensor placement. This paper explores the compromises that are to be expected when using a small number of vertically positioned linear arrays to facilitate 3D imaging using electrical tomography. A configuration with three arrays is found to give reasonable results when compared with a 'conventional' arrangement of circumferential electrodes. A single array yields highly localized sensitivity that struggles to image the whole space. Strategies have been tested on a small-scale version of a sludge settling application that is of relevance to the industrial sponsor. A new electrode excitation strategy, referred to here as 'planar cross drive', is found to give superior results to an extended version of the adjacent electrodes technique due to the improved uniformity of the sensitivity across the domain. Recommendations are suggested for parameters to inform the scale-up to industrial vessels.

  20. Position-sensitive detection of slow neutrons: Survey of fundamental principles

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, R.K.

    1992-07-01

    This paper sets forth the fundamental principles governing the development of position-sensitive detection systems for slow neutrons. Since neutrons are only weakly interacting with most materials, it is not generally practical to detect slow neutrons directly. Therefore all practical slow neutron detection mechanisms depend on the use of nuclear reactions to ``convert`` the neutron to one or more charged particles, followed by the subsequent detection of the charged particles. The different conversion reactions which can be used are discussed, along with the relative merits of each. This is followed with a discussion of the various methods of charged particle detection, how these lend themselves to position-sensitive encoding, and the means of position encoding which can be applied to each case. Detector performance characteristics which may be of importance to the end user are discussed and related to these various detection and position-encoding mechanisms.

  1. Position-sensitive detection of slow neutrons: Survey of fundamental principles

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, R.K.

    1992-01-01

    This paper sets forth the fundamental principles governing the development of position-sensitive detection systems for slow neutrons. Since neutrons are only weakly interacting with most materials, it is not generally practical to detect slow neutrons directly. Therefore all practical slow neutron detection mechanisms depend on the use of nuclear reactions to convert'' the neutron to one or more charged particles, followed by the subsequent detection of the charged particles. The different conversion reactions which can be used are discussed, along with the relative merits of each. This is followed with a discussion of the various methods of charged particle detection, how these lend themselves to position-sensitive encoding, and the means of position encoding which can be applied to each case. Detector performance characteristics which may be of importance to the end user are discussed and related to these various detection and position-encoding mechanisms.

  2. Local Diagnosis of Reconnection in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scudder, J. D.; Karimabadi, H.; Daughton, W. S.; Roytershteyn, V.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate (I,II) an approach to find reconnection sites in 3D where there is no flux function for guidance, and where local observational signatures for the ``violation of frozen flux'' are under developed, if not non-existent. We use 2D and 3D PIC simulations of asymmetric guide field reconnection to test our observational hierarchy of single spacecraft kinetic diagnostics - all possible with present state of the art instrumentation. The proliferation of turbulent, electron inertial scale layers in the realistic 3D case demonstrates that electron demagnetization, while necessary, is not sufficient to identify reconnection sites. An excellent local, observable, single spacecraft proxy is demonstrated for the size of the theoretical frozen flux violation. Since even frozen flux violations need not imply reconnection is at hand, a new calibrated dimensionless method is used to determine the importance of such violations. This measure is available in 2D and 3D to help differentiate reconnection layers from weaker frozen flux violating layers. We discuss the possibility that this technique can be implemented on MMS. A technique to highlight flow geometries conducive to reconnection in 3D simulations is also suggested, that may also be implementable with the MMS flotilla. We use local analysis with multiple necessary, but theoretically independent electron kinetic conditions to help reduce the probability of misidentification of any given layer as a reconnection site. Since these local conditions are all necessary for the site, but none is known to be sufficient, the multiple tests help to greatly reduce false positive identifications. The selectivity of the results of this approach using PIC simulations of 3D asymmetric guide field reconnection will be shown using varying numbers of simultaneous conditions. Scudder, J.D., H. Karimabadi, W. Daughton and V. Roytershteyn I, II, submitted Phys. Plasma., 2014

  3. Fast vision-based catheter 3D reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Moradi Dalvand, Mohsen; Nahavandi, Saeid; Howe, Robert D

    2016-07-21

    Continuum robots offer better maneuverability and inherent compliance and are well-suited for surgical applications as catheters, where gentle interaction with the environment is desired. However, sensing their shape and tip position is a challenge as traditional sensors can not be employed in the way they are in rigid robotic manipulators. In this paper, a high speed vision-based shape sensing algorithm for real-time 3D reconstruction of continuum robots based on the views of two arbitrary positioned cameras is presented. The algorithm is based on the closed-form analytical solution of the reconstruction of quadratic curves in 3D space from two arbitrary perspective projections. High-speed image processing algorithms are developed for the segmentation and feature extraction from the images. The proposed algorithms are experimentally validated for accuracy by measuring the tip position, length and bending and orientation angles for known circular and elliptical catheter shaped tubes. Sensitivity analysis is also carried out to evaluate the robustness of the algorithm. Experimental results demonstrate good accuracy (maximum errors of  ±0.6 mm and  ±0.5 deg), performance (200 Hz), and robustness (maximum absolute error of 1.74 mm, 3.64 deg for the added noises) of the proposed high speed algorithms. PMID:27352011

  4. Fast vision-based catheter 3D reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi Dalvand, Mohsen; Nahavandi, Saeid; Howe, Robert D.

    2016-07-01

    Continuum robots offer better maneuverability and inherent compliance and are well-suited for surgical applications as catheters, where gentle interaction with the environment is desired. However, sensing their shape and tip position is a challenge as traditional sensors can not be employed in the way they are in rigid robotic manipulators. In this paper, a high speed vision-based shape sensing algorithm for real-time 3D reconstruction of continuum robots based on the views of two arbitrary positioned cameras is presented. The algorithm is based on the closed-form analytical solution of the reconstruction of quadratic curves in 3D space from two arbitrary perspective projections. High-speed image processing algorithms are developed for the segmentation and feature extraction from the images. The proposed algorithms are experimentally validated for accuracy by measuring the tip position, length and bending and orientation angles for known circular and elliptical catheter shaped tubes. Sensitivity analysis is also carried out to evaluate the robustness of the algorithm. Experimental results demonstrate good accuracy (maximum errors of  ±0.6 mm and  ±0.5 deg), performance (200 Hz), and robustness (maximum absolute error of 1.74 mm, 3.64 deg for the added noises) of the proposed high speed algorithms.

  5. Unconventional double bent-crystal diffractometer equipped by position-sensitive detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikula, Pavel; Lukas, Petr; Kulda, Jiri; Strunz, Pavel; Saroun, Jan; Wagner, Volker; Scherm, Reinhard; Alefeld, Berthold; Reinartz, Richard

    1992-11-01

    Using Bragg diffraction optics, an unconventional DBC diffractometer was tested for medium resolution small-angle neutron scattering experiments. The diffraction geometry of the analyzer enables to transform the angular beam distribution into the positional distribution and, consequently, to analyze it by means of a one-dimensional position sensitive detector. First experimental results obtained with a sample of PE+graphite proves a compatibility and a higher speed of data collection compared to a standard DBC diffractometer.

  6. From 3D view to 3D print

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dima, M.; Farisato, G.; Bergomi, M.; Viotto, V.; Magrin, D.; Greggio, D.; Farinato, J.; Marafatto, L.; Ragazzoni, R.; Piazza, D.

    2014-08-01

    In the last few years 3D printing is getting more and more popular and used in many fields going from manufacturing to industrial design, architecture, medical support and aerospace. 3D printing is an evolution of bi-dimensional printing, which allows to obtain a solid object from a 3D model, realized with a 3D modelling software. The final product is obtained using an additive process, in which successive layers of material are laid down one over the other. A 3D printer allows to realize, in a simple way, very complex shapes, which would be quite difficult to be produced with dedicated conventional facilities. Thanks to the fact that the 3D printing is obtained superposing one layer to the others, it doesn't need any particular work flow and it is sufficient to simply draw the model and send it to print. Many different kinds of 3D printers exist based on the technology and material used for layer deposition. A common material used by the toner is ABS plastics, which is a light and rigid thermoplastic polymer, whose peculiar mechanical properties make it diffusely used in several fields, like pipes production and cars interiors manufacturing. I used this technology to create a 1:1 scale model of the telescope which is the hardware core of the space small mission CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanets Satellite) by ESA, which aims to characterize EXOplanets via transits observations. The telescope has a Ritchey-Chrétien configuration with a 30cm aperture and the launch is foreseen in 2017. In this paper, I present the different phases for the realization of such a model, focusing onto pros and cons of this kind of technology. For example, because of the finite printable volume (10×10×12 inches in the x, y and z directions respectively), it has been necessary to split the largest parts of the instrument in smaller components to be then reassembled and post-processed. A further issue is the resolution of the printed material, which is expressed in terms of layers

  7. Implementation of Complex Signal Processing Algorithms for Position-Sensitive Microcalorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephen J.

    2008-01-01

    We have recently reported on a theoretical digital signal-processing algorithm for improved energy and position resolution in position-sensitive, transition-edge sensor (POST) X-ray detectors [Smith et al., Nucl, lnstr and Meth. A 556 (2006) 2371. PoST's consists of one or more transition-edge sensors (TES's) on a large continuous or pixellated X-ray absorber and are under development as an alternative to arrays of single pixel TES's. PoST's provide a means to increase the field-of-view for the fewest number of read-out channels. In this contribution we extend the theoretical correlated energy position optimal filter (CEPOF) algorithm (originally developed for 2-TES continuous absorber PoST's) to investigate the practical implementation on multi-pixel single TES PoST's or Hydras. We use numerically simulated data for a nine absorber device, which includes realistic detector noise, to demonstrate an iterative scheme that enables convergence on the correct photon absorption position and energy without any a priori assumptions. The position sensitivity of the CEPOF implemented on simulated data agrees very well with the theoretically predicted resolution. We discuss practical issues such as the impact of random arrival phase of the measured data on the performance of the CEPOF. The CEPOF algorithm demonstrates that full-width-at- half-maximum energy resolution of < 8 eV coupled with position-sensitivity down to a few 100 eV should be achievable for a fully optimized device.

  8. YouDash3D: exploring stereoscopic 3D gaming for 3D movie theaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Jonas; Seele, Sven; Masuch, Maic

    2012-03-01

    Along with the success of the digitally revived stereoscopic cinema, events beyond 3D movies become attractive for movie theater operators, i.e. interactive 3D games. In this paper, we present a case that explores possible challenges and solutions for interactive 3D games to be played by a movie theater audience. We analyze the setting and showcase current issues related to lighting and interaction. Our second focus is to provide gameplay mechanics that make special use of stereoscopy, especially depth-based game design. Based on these results, we present YouDash3D, a game prototype that explores public stereoscopic gameplay in a reduced kiosk setup. It features live 3D HD video stream of a professional stereo camera rig rendered in a real-time game scene. We use the effect to place the stereoscopic effigies of players into the digital game. The game showcases how stereoscopic vision can provide for a novel depth-based game mechanic. Projected trigger zones and distributed clusters of the audience video allow for easy adaptation to larger audiences and 3D movie theater gaming.

  9. Volumetric 3D display using a DLP projection engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jason

    2012-03-01

    In this article, we describe a volumetric 3D display system based on the high speed DLPTM (Digital Light Processing) projection engine. Existing two-dimensional (2D) flat screen displays often lead to ambiguity and confusion in high-dimensional data/graphics presentation due to lack of true depth cues. Even with the help of powerful 3D rendering software, three-dimensional (3D) objects displayed on a 2D flat screen may still fail to provide spatial relationship or depth information correctly and effectively. Essentially, 2D displays have to rely upon capability of human brain to piece together a 3D representation from 2D images. Despite the impressive mental capability of human visual system, its visual perception is not reliable if certain depth cues are missing. In contrast, volumetric 3D display technologies to be discussed in this article are capable of displaying 3D volumetric images in true 3D space. Each "voxel" on a 3D image (analogous to a pixel in 2D image) locates physically at the spatial position where it is supposed to be, and emits light from that position toward omni-directions to form a real 3D image in 3D space. Such a volumetric 3D display provides both physiological depth cues and psychological depth cues to human visual system to truthfully perceive 3D objects. It yields a realistic spatial representation of 3D objects and simplifies our understanding to the complexity of 3D objects and spatial relationship among them.

  10. Remote 3D Medical Consultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Greg; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Fuchs, Henry; Cairns, Bruce; Mayer-Patel, Ketan; Yang, Ruigang; State, Andrei; Towles, Herman; Ilie, Adrian; Krishnan, Srinivas; Söderholm, Hanna M.

    Two-dimensional (2D) video-based telemedical consultation has been explored widely in the past 15-20 years. Two issues that seem to arise in most relevant case studies are the difficulty associated with obtaining the desired 2D camera views, and poor depth perception. To address these problems we are exploring the use of a small array of cameras to synthesize a spatially continuous range of dynamic three-dimensional (3D) views of a remote environment and events. The 3D views can be sent across wired or wireless networks to remote viewers with fixed displays or mobile devices such as a personal digital assistant (PDA). The viewpoints could be specified manually or automatically via user head or PDA tracking, giving the remote viewer virtual head- or hand-slaved (PDA-based) remote cameras for mono or stereo viewing. We call this idea remote 3D medical consultation (3DMC). In this article we motivate and explain the vision for 3D medical consultation; we describe the relevant computer vision/graphics, display, and networking research; we present a proof-of-concept prototype system; and we present some early experimental results supporting the general hypothesis that 3D remote medical consultation could offer benefits over conventional 2D televideo.

  11. Speaking Volumes About 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, Genex submitted a proposal to Stennis Space Center for a volumetric 3-D display technique that would provide multiple users with a 360-degree perspective to simultaneously view and analyze 3-D data. The futuristic capabilities of the VolumeViewer(R) have offered tremendous benefits to commercial users in the fields of medicine and surgery, air traffic control, pilot training and education, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing, and military/battlefield management. The technology has also helped NASA to better analyze and assess the various data collected by its satellite and spacecraft sensors. Genex capitalized on its success with Stennis by introducing two separate products to the commercial market that incorporate key elements of the 3-D display technology designed under an SBIR contract. The company Rainbow 3D(R) imaging camera is a novel, three-dimensional surface profile measurement system that can obtain a full-frame 3-D image in less than 1 second. The third product is the 360-degree OmniEye(R) video system. Ideal for intrusion detection, surveillance, and situation management, this unique camera system offers a continuous, panoramic view of a scene in real time.

  12. Sensitivity to Social Contingency and Positive Emotion in 2-Month-Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soussignan, Robert; Nadel, Jacqueline; Canet, Pierre; Gerardin, Priscille

    2006-01-01

    This study was aimed at sorting out conflicting results in the literature concerning 2-month-olds' sensitivity to interpersonal contingency, and investigated the potential role of infants' positive emotion in contingency detection. Infants were randomly assigned to an experimental group (EG) that was presented an uninterrupted live-replay-live…

  13. 78 FR 59983 - Submission for Review: Information Collection 3206-NEW; Questionnaire for Non-Sensitive Positions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-30

    ...Federal Investigative Services (FIS), U. S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) offers the general public and other Federal agencies the opportunity to comment on an information collection request (ICR), Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Control No. 3206-NEW, for Questionnaire for Non-Sensitive Positions, Standard Form 85 (SF 85). As required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, (Pub.......

  14. Anisotropy effects on 3D waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stekl, I.; Warner, M.; Umpleby, A.

    2010-12-01

    In the recent years 3D waveform inversion has become achievable procedure for seismic data processing. A number of datasets has been inverted and presented (Warner el al 2008, Ben Hadj at all, Sirgue et all 2010) using isotropic 3D waveform inversion. However the question arises will the results be affected by isotropic assumption. Full-wavefield inversion techniques seek to match field data, wiggle-for-wiggle, to synthetic data generated by a high-resolution model of the sub-surface. In this endeavour, correctly matching the travel times of the principal arrivals is a necessary minimal requirement. In many, perhaps most, long-offset and wide-azimuth datasets, it is necessary to introduce some form of p-wave velocity anisotropy to match the travel times successfully. If this anisotropy is not also incorporated into the wavefield inversion, then results from the inversion will necessarily be compromised. We have incorporated anisotropy into our 3D wavefield tomography codes, characterised as spatially varying transverse isotropy with a tilted axis of symmetry - TTI anisotropy. This enhancement approximately doubles both the run time and the memory requirements of the code. We show that neglect of anisotropy can lead to significant artefacts in the recovered velocity models. We will present inversion results of inverting anisotropic 3D dataset by assuming isotropic earth and compare them with anisotropic inversion result. As a test case Marmousi model extended to 3D with no velocity variation in third direction and with added spatially varying anisotropy is used. Acquisition geometry is assumed as OBC with sources and receivers everywhere at the surface. We attempted inversion using both 2D and full 3D acquisition for this dataset. Results show that if no anisotropy is taken into account although image looks plausible most features are miss positioned in depth and space, even for relatively low anisotropy, which leads to incorrect result. This may lead to

  15. Centroid position measurements and subpixel sensitivity variations with the MAMA detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Slater, D. C.; Timothy, John G.; Jenkins, E. B.

    1989-01-01

    Initial measurements of the position sensitivity of a visible-light multianode microchannel array detector show that centroid calculations for image spots are accurate to better than 0.04 pixels even with sources that are essentially delta functions at the photocathode.Subpixel sensitivity variations of 10-15 percent are typically found for pixels in the array. Variations as large as 30 percent are possible in the worst conditions. These variations limit the photometric accuracy of the detector when very small scale features are observed. The photometric accuracy and the position sensitivity of the detector appear to be limited by cross-coupling effects within the anode array. Initial measurements with more recent designs of the detector show that most or all of this cross-coupling has been eliminated.

  16. 3D-Printed Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Au, Anthony K; Huynh, Wilson; Horowitz, Lisa F; Folch, Albert

    2016-03-14

    The advent of soft lithography allowed for an unprecedented expansion in the field of microfluidics. However, the vast majority of PDMS microfluidic devices are still made with extensive manual labor, are tethered to bulky control systems, and have cumbersome user interfaces, which all render commercialization difficult. On the other hand, 3D printing has begun to embrace the range of sizes and materials that appeal to the developers of microfluidic devices. Prior to fabrication, a design is digitally built as a detailed 3D CAD file. The design can be assembled in modules by remotely collaborating teams, and its mechanical and fluidic behavior can be simulated using finite-element modeling. As structures are created by adding materials without the need for etching or dissolution, processing is environmentally friendly and economically efficient. We predict that in the next few years, 3D printing will replace most PDMS and plastic molding techniques in academia. PMID:26854878

  17. What is 3D good for? A review of human performance on stereoscopic 3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntire, John P.; Havig, Paul R.; Geiselman, Eric E.

    2012-06-01

    This work reviews the human factors-related literature on the task performance implications of stereoscopic 3D displays, in order to point out the specific performance benefits (or lack thereof) one might reasonably expect to observe when utilizing these displays. What exactly is 3D good for? Relative to traditional 2D displays, stereoscopic displays have been shown to enhance performance on a variety of depth-related tasks. These tasks include judging absolute and relative distances, finding and identifying objects (by breaking camouflage and eliciting perceptual "pop-out"), performing spatial manipulations of objects (object positioning, orienting, and tracking), and navigating. More cognitively, stereoscopic displays can improve the spatial understanding of 3D scenes or objects, improve memory/recall of scenes or objects, and improve learning of spatial relationships and environments. However, for tasks that are relatively simple, that do not strictly require depth information for good performance, where other strong cues to depth can be utilized, or for depth tasks that lie outside the effective viewing volume of the display, the purported performance benefits of 3D may be small or altogether absent. Stereoscopic 3D displays come with a host of unique human factors problems including the simulator-sickness-type symptoms of eyestrain, headache, fatigue, disorientation, nausea, and malaise, which appear to effect large numbers of viewers (perhaps as many as 25% to 50% of the general population). Thus, 3D technology should be wielded delicately and applied carefully; and perhaps used only as is necessary to ensure good performance.

  18. Unlocking the scientific potential of complex 3D point cloud dataset : new classification and 3D comparison methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lague, D.; Brodu, N.; Leroux, J.

    2012-12-01

    Ground based lidar and photogrammetric techniques are increasingly used to track the evolution of natural surfaces in 3D at an unprecedented resolution and precision. The range of applications encompass many type of natural surfaces with different geometries and roughness characteristics (landslides, cliff erosion, river beds, bank erosion,....). Unravelling surface change in these contexts requires to compare large point clouds in 2D or 3D. The most commonly used method in geomorphology is based on a 2D difference of the gridded point clouds. Yet this is hardly adapted to many 3D natural environments such as rivers (with horizontal beds and vertical banks), while gridding complex rough surfaces is a complex task. On the other hand, tools allowing to perform 3D comparison are scarce and may require to mesh the point clouds which is difficult on rough natural surfaces. Moreover, existing 3D comparison tools do not provide an explicit calculation of confidence intervals that would factor in registration errors, roughness effects and instrument related position uncertainties. To unlock this problem, we developed the first algorithm combining a 3D measurement of surface change directly on point clouds with an estimate of spatially variable confidence intervals (called M3C2). The method has two steps : (1) surface normal estimation and orientation in 3D at a scale consistent with the local roughness ; (2) measurement of mean surface change along the normal direction with explicit calculation of a local confidence interval. Comparison with existing 3D methods based on a closest-point calculation demonstrates the higher precision of the M3C2 method when mm changes needs to be detected. The M3C2 method is also simple to use as it does not require surface meshing or gridding, and is not sensitive to missing data or change in point density. We also present a 3D classification tool (CANUPO) for vegetation removal based on a new geometrical measure: the multi

  19. Spacecraft 3D Augmented Reality Mobile App

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussey, Kevin J.; Doronila, Paul R.; Kumanchik, Brian E.; Chan, Evan G.; Ellison, Douglas J.; Boeck, Andrea; Moore, Justin M.

    2013-01-01

    The Spacecraft 3D application allows users to learn about and interact with iconic NASA missions in a new and immersive way using common mobile devices. Using Augmented Reality (AR) techniques to project 3D renditions of the mission spacecraft into real-world surroundings, users can interact with and learn about Curiosity, GRAIL, Cassini, and Voyager. Additional updates on future missions, animations, and information will be ongoing. Using a printed AR Target and camera on a mobile device, users can get up close with these robotic explorers, see how some move, and learn about these engineering feats, which are used to expand knowledge and understanding about space. The software receives input from the mobile device's camera to recognize the presence of an AR marker in the camera's field of view. It then displays a 3D rendition of the selected spacecraft in the user's physical surroundings, on the mobile device's screen, while it tracks the device's movement in relation to the physical position of the spacecraft's 3D image on the AR marker.

  20. 3D Computations and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; Faux, D; Goto, D; Nikkel, D

    2004-04-05

    This project consists of two activities. Task A, Simulations and Measurements, combines all the material model development and associated numerical work with the materials-oriented experimental activities. The goal of this effort is to provide an improved understanding of dynamic material properties and to provide accurate numerical representations of those properties for use in analysis codes. Task B, ALE3D Development, involves general development activities in the ALE3D code with the focus of improving simulation capabilities for problems of mutual interest to DoD and DOE. Emphasis is on problems involving multi-phase flow, blast loading of structures and system safety/vulnerability studies.

  1. 3D Computations and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; Faux, D; Goto, D; Nikkel, D

    2003-05-12

    This project is in its first full year after the combining of two previously funded projects: ''3D Code Development'' and ''Dynamic Material Properties''. The motivation behind this move was to emphasize and strengthen the ties between the experimental work and the computational model development in the materials area. The next year's activities will indicate the merging of the two efforts. The current activity is structured in two tasks. Task A, ''Simulations and Measurements'', combines all the material model development and associated numerical work with the materials-oriented experimental activities. Task B, ''ALE3D Development'', is a continuation of the non-materials related activities from the previous project.

  2. 3-D inversion of magnetotelluric Phase Tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patro, Prasanta; Uyeshima, Makoto

    2010-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) inversion of the magnetotelluric (MT) has become a routine practice among the MT community due to progress of algorithms for 3-D inverse problems (e.g. Mackie and Madden, 1993; Siripunvaraporn et al., 2005). While availability of such 3-D inversion codes have increased the resolving power of the MT data and improved the interpretation, on the other hand, still the galvanic effects poses difficulties in interpretation of resistivity structure obtained from the MT data. In order to tackle the galvanic distortion of MT data, Caldwell et al., (2004) introduced the concept of phase tensor. They demonstrated how the regional phase information can be retrieved from the observed impedance tensor without any assumptions for structural dimension, where both the near surface inhomogeneity and the regional conductivity structures can be 3-D. We made an attempt to modify a 3-D inversion code (Siripunvaraporn et al., 2005) to directly invert the phase tensor elements. We present here the main modification done in the sensitivity calculation and then show a few synthetic studies and its application to the real data. The synthetic model study suggests that the prior model (m_0) setting is important in retrieving the true model. This is because estimation of correct induction scale length lacks in the phase tensor inversion process. Comparison between results from conventional impedance inversion and new phase tensor inversion suggests that, in spite of presence of the galvanic distortion (due to near surface checkerboard anomalies in our case), the new inverion algorithm retrieves the regional conductivitity structure reliably. We applied the new inversion to the real data from the Indian sub continent and compared with the results from conventional impedance inversion.

  3. Characterization of multilayer reflectors and position sensitive detectors in the 45--300 A region

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, K.; Takahashi, S. ); Kitamoto, S.; Takahama, S.; Tamura, K. ); Hatsukade, I. ); Sakurai, M. ); Watanabe, M. ); Yamaguchi, A. ); Nagata, H.; Ohtani, M. )

    1992-01-01

    Multilayer reflectors and position sensitive detectors have been developed in constructing imaging optical systems in the 45--300 A region. Molybdenum-silicon (2{ital d}=140 A, {ital N}=20) and nickel--carbon (2{ital d}=100 A, {ital N}=20) multilayers were deposited on a spherical mirror (25 cm in diameter) for the normal incidence and on a segment of paraboloidal mirror (20 cm{times}10 cm) for 30{degree} grazing incidence. Their optical characteristics were evaluated by using characteristic x rays and monochromatized synchrotron radiation in the 45--300 A region. A position sensitive detector is made of a tandem microchannel plate (MCP) with a CsI photocathode and resistive plate, which is placed at the focal plane of each mirror. The detection efficiency and position resolution were measured by using characteristic x rays of C{ital K}{alpha} and monochromatized synchrotron radiation in the 45--200 A region.

  4. Performance of high-resolution position-sensitive detectors developed for storage-ring decay experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Suzaki, F.; Izumikawa, T.; Miyazawa, S.; Morimoto, K.; Suzuki, T.; Tokanai, F.; Furuki, H.; Ichihashi, N.; Ichikawa, C.; Kitagawa, A.; Kuboki, T.; Momota, S.; Nagae, D.; Nagashima, M.; Nakamura, Y.; Nishikiori, R.; Niwa, T.; Ohtsubo, T.; Ozawa, A.; Sato, K.; Sato, S.; Suzuki, S.

    2013-12-01

    As next generation spectroscopic tools, heavy-ion cooler storage rings will be a unique application of highly charged RI beam experiments. Decay spectroscopy of highly charged rare isotopes provides us important information relevant to the stellar conditions, such as for the s- and r-process nucleosynthesis. In-ring decay products of highly charged RI will be momentum-analyzed and reach a position-sensitive detector set-up located outside of the storage orbit. To realize such in-ring decay experiments, we have developed and tested two types of high-resolution position-sensitive detectors: silicon strips and scintillating fibers. The beam test experiments resulted in excellent position resolutions for both detectors, which will be available for future storage-ring experiments.

  5. Sensing and compressing 3-D models

    SciTech Connect

    Krumm, J.

    1998-02-01

    The goal of this research project was to create a passive and robust computer vision system for producing 3-D computer models of arbitrary scenes. Although the authors were unsuccessful in achieving the overall goal, several components of this research have shown significant potential. Of particular interest is the application of parametric eigenspace methods for planar pose measurement of partially occluded objects in gray-level images. The techniques presented provide a simple, accurate, and robust solution to the planar pose measurement problem. In addition, the representational efficiency of eigenspace methods used with gray-level features were successfully extended to binary features, which are less sensitive to illumination changes. The results of this research are presented in two papers that were written during the course of this project. The papers are included in sections 2 and 3. The first section of this report summarizes the 3-D modeling efforts.

  6. 3D Face Modeling Using the Multi-Deformable Method

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jinkyu; Yu, Sunjin; Kim, Joongrock; Lee, Sangyoun

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the problem of the accuracy performance of 3D face modeling techniques using corresponding features in multiple views, which is quite sensitive to feature extraction errors. To solve the problem, we adopt a statistical model-based 3D face modeling approach in a mirror system consisting of two mirrors and a camera. The overall procedure of our 3D facial modeling method has two primary steps: 3D facial shape estimation using a multiple 3D face deformable model and texture mapping using seamless cloning that is a type of gradient-domain blending. To evaluate our method's performance, we generate 3D faces of 30 individuals and then carry out two tests: accuracy test and robustness test. Our method shows not only highly accurate 3D face shape results when compared with the ground truth, but also robustness to feature extraction errors. Moreover, 3D face rendering results intuitively show that our method is more robust to feature extraction errors than other 3D face modeling methods. An additional contribution of our method is that a wide range of face textures can be acquired by the mirror system. By using this texture map, we generate realistic 3D face for individuals at the end of the paper. PMID:23201976

  7. SNL3dFace

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial featuresmore » of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.« less

  8. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manos, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the "TPT" theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity…

  9. SNL3dFace

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, Trina; Koch, Mark; Koudelka, Melissa; Peters, Ralph; Little, Charles; Boehnen, Chris; Peters, Tanya

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial features of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.

  10. 3D Printing: Exploring Capabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Kyle; Flowers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    As 3D printers become more affordable, schools are using them in increasing numbers. They fit well with the emphasis on product design in technology and engineering education, allowing students to create high-fidelity physical models to see and test different iterations in their product designs. They may also help students to "think in three…

  11. Development of position sensitive scintillation counter for balloon-borne hard x-ray telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Keisuke; Kunieda, Hideyo; Ogasaka, Yasushi; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Shibata, Ryo; Nakamura, Tomokazu; Ohnishi, Katsuhiko; Kanou, Yasufumi; Miyata, Emi; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2006-06-01

    We have been developing position sensitive scintillation counter as focal plane detector of hard X-ray telescope onboard a balloon borne experiment. This detector consists NaI(TI) scintillator and position sensitive photo-multiplier tube. Focal plane detector has to have high efficiency in hard X-ray region, enough position resolution and detection area. 3mm thickness of NaI(TI) scintillator can achieve almost 100% efficiency below 80 keV. We measured position resolved energy and position resolution in synchrotron radiation facility SPring-8 BL20B2. Position resolution of 2.4mm at 60keV is about half of plate scale of half power diameter of X-ray telescope. The detector has 6 cm diameter window and it corresponds to 25 arcmin field of view, and it is enough lager than the that of telescope, which is 12 arcmin in FWHM. Balloon borne experiment for observation of the background was performed on May 24, 2005 from Sanriku balloon center. We could obtain background data for 3 hours at altitude of 40 km.

  12. Position sensitivity in 3"×3" Spectroscopic LaBr3:Ce Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasi, N.; Giaz, A.; Boiano, C.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Million, B.; Riboldi, S.

    2015-06-01

    The position sensitivity of a thick, cylindrical and continuous 3" × 3" (7.62 cm × 7.62 cm) LaBr3:Ce crystal with diffusive surfaces was investigated. Nuclear physics basic research uses thick LaBr3:Ce crystals (> 3cm) to measure medium or high energy gamma rays (0.5 MeV < Eγ< 20 MeV). In the first measurement the PMT photocathode entrance window was covered by black absorber except for a small window 1 cm × 1cm wide. A complete scan of the detector over a 0.5 cm step grid was performed. The data show that even in a 3" thick LaBr3:Ce crystal with diffusive surfaces the position of the full energy peak centroid depends on the source position. The position of the full energy peak centroids are sufficient to identify the collimated gamma source position. The crystal was then coupled to four Position Sensitive Photomultipliers (PSPMT). We acquired the signals from the 256 segments of the four PSPMTs grouping them into 16 elements. An event by event analysis shows a positon resolution of the order of 2 cm.

  13. Development of a one-dimensional Position Sensitive Detector for tracking applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lydecker, Leigh Kent, IV

    Optical Position Sensitive Detectors (PSDs) are a non-contact method of tracking the location of a light spot. Silicon-based versions of such sensors are fabricated with standard CMOS processing, are inexpensive and provide a real-time, analog signal output corresponding to the position of the light spot. Because they are non-contact, they do not degrade over time from surface friction due to repetitive sliding motion associated with standard full contact sliding potentiometers. This results in long, reliable device lifetimes. In this work, an innovative PSD was developed to replace the linear hard contact potentiometer currently being used in a human-computer interface architecture. First, a basic lateral effect PSD was developed to provide real-time positioning of the mouthpiece used in the interface architecture which tracks along a single axis. During the course of this work, multiple device geometries were fabricated and analyzed resulting in a down selection of a final design. This final device design was then characterized in terms of resolution and responsivity and produced in larger quantities as initial prototypes for the test product integration. Finally, an electronic readout circuit was developed in order to interface the dual- line lateral effect PSD developed in this thesis with specifications required for product integration. To simplify position sensing, an innovative type of optical position sensor was developed using a linear photodiodes with back-to-back connections. This so- called Self-Balancing Position Sensitive Detector (SBPSD) requires significantly fewer processing steps than the basic lateral effect position sensitive detector discussed above and eliminates the need for external readout circuitry entirely. Prototype devices were fabricated in this work, and the performance characteristics of these devices were established paving the way for ultimate integration into the target product as well as additional applications.

  14. Position-sensitive detectors of the detector group at Jülich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, R.; Clemens, U.; Kemmerling, G.; Nöldgen, H.; Schelten, J.

    2009-06-01

    The detector group of the Central Institute of Electronics at the Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH was founded in 1968. First developments aimed at a detector system with a position-sensitive BF 3 proportional counter for small-angle neutron scattering, which was later used at a beamline of the research reactor FRJ2. At the end of the 1970s first measurements were carried out with photomultiplier (PM)-based detector systems linked with a LiI crystal from Harshaw. Based on this experience we started with the spectrum of position-sensitive neutron scintillation detectors, which have been developed and designed in our institute during the last three decades comprising several high-resolution linear and two-dimensional detectors. The general design of those detectors is based on a modified Anger principle using an array of PMs and a 1 mm 6Li glass scintillator. The sensitive detector area varies on the type of the PMs used and is related to the spatial resolution of the detector type. The neutron sensitivity at 1 Å is about 65% and the remaining gamma sensitivity is less than 10 -4 with a maximum count rate up to 500 kHz depending on the used detector system.

  15. 3D imaging reconstruction and impacted third molars: case reports

    PubMed Central

    Tuzi, Andrea; Di Bari, Roberto; Cicconetti, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Summary There is a debate in the literature about the need for Computed Tomagraphy (CT) before removing third molars, even if positive radiographic signs are present. In few cases, the third molar is so close to the inferior alveolar nerve that its extraction might expose patients to the risk of post-operative neuro-sensitive alterations of the skin and the mucosa of the homolateral lower lip and chin. Thus, the injury of the inferior alveolar nerve may represent a serious, though infrequent, neurologic complication in the surgery of the third molars rendering necessary a careful pre-operative evaluation of their anatomical relationship with the inferior alveolar nerve by means of radiographic imaging techniques. This contribution presents two case reports showing positive radiographic signs, which are the hallmarks of a possible close relationship between the inferior alveolar nerve and the third molars. We aim at better defining the relationship between third molars and the mandibular canal using Dental CT Scan, DICOM image acquisition and 3D reconstruction with a dedicated software. By our study we deduce that 3D images are not indispensable, but they can provide a very agreeable assistance in the most complicated cases. PMID:23386934

  16. Performance characteristics of a compact position-sensitive LSO detector module.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, J J; Seidel, J; Siegel, S; Gandler, W R; Green, M V

    1998-12-01

    We assembled a compact detector module comprised of an array of small, individual crystals of lutetium oxyorthosilicate:Ce (LSO) coupled directly to a miniature, metal-can, position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). We exposed this module to sources of 511-keV annihilation radiation and beams of 30- and 140-keV photons and measured spatial linearity; spatial variations in module gain, energy resolution, and event positioning; coincidence timing; the accuracy and sensitivity of identifying the crystal-of-first-interaction at 511 keV; and the effects of intercrystal scatter and LSO background radioactivity. The results suggest that this scintillator/phototube combination should be highly effective in the coincidence mode and can be used, with some limitations, to image relatively low-energy single photon emitters. Photons that are completely absorbed on their first interaction at 511 keV are positioned by the module at the center of a crystal. Intercrystal scatter events, even those that lead to total absorption of the incident photon, are placed by the module in a regular "connect-the-dot" pattern that joins crystal centers. As a result, the accuracy of event positioning can be made to exceed 90%, though at significantly reduced sensitivity, by retaining only events that occur within small regions-of-interest around each crystal center and rejecting events that occur outside these regions in the connect-the-dot pattern. PMID:10048853

  17. Position sensitive x-ray spectrophotometer using microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Mazin, Benjamin A.; Bumble, Bruce; Day, Peter K.; Eckart, Megan E.; Golwala, Sunil; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Harrison, Fiona A.

    2006-11-27

    The surface impedance of a superconductor changes when energy is absorbed and Cooper pairs are broken to produce single electron (quasiparticle) excitations. This change may be sensitively measured using a thin-film resonant circuit called a microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID). The practical application of MKIDs for photon detection requires a method of efficiently coupling the photon energy to the MKID. The authors present results on position sensitive x-ray detectors made by using two aluminum MKIDs on either side of a tantalum photon absorber strip. Diffusion constants, recombination times, and energy resolution are reported. MKIDs can easily be scaled into large arrays.

  18. Position sensitive x-ray spectrophotometer using microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazin, Benjamin A.; Bumble, Bruce; Day, Peter K.; Eckart, Megan E.; Golwala, Sunil; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Harrison, Fiona A.

    2006-11-01

    The surface impedance of a superconductor changes when energy is absorbed and Cooper pairs are broken to produce single electron (quasiparticle) excitations. This change may be sensitively measured using a thin-film resonant circuit called a microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID). The practical application of MKIDs for photon detection requires a method of efficiently coupling the photon energy to the MKID. The authors present results on position sensitive x-ray detectors made by using two aluminum MKIDs on either side of a tantalum photon absorber strip. Diffusion constants, recombination times, and energy resolution are reported. MKIDs can easily be scaled into large arrays.

  19. TACO3D. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1992-03-04

    TACO3D is a three-dimensional, finite-element program for heat transfer analysis. An extension of the two-dimensional TACO program, it can perform linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady-state problems. The program accepts time-dependent or temperature-dependent material properties, and materials may be isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additional specialized features treat enclosure radiation, bulk nodes, and master/slave internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance). Data input via a free-field format is provided. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A profile (bandwidth) minimization option is available. The code is limited to implicit time integration for transient solutions. TACO3D has no general mesh generation capability. Rows of evenly-spaced nodes and rows of sequential elements may be generated, but the program relies on separate mesh generators for complex zoning. TACO3D does not have the ability to calculate view factors internally. Graphical representation of data in the form of time history and spatial plots is provided through links to the POSTACO and GRAPE postprocessor codes.

  20. Pattern based 3D image Steganography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiyagarajan, P.; Natarajan, V.; Aghila, G.; Prasanna Venkatesan, V.; Anitha, R.

    2013-03-01

    This paper proposes a new high capacity Steganographic scheme using 3D geometric models. The novel algorithm re-triangulates a part of a triangle mesh and embeds the secret information into newly added position of triangle meshes. Up to nine bits of secret data can be embedded into vertices of a triangle without causing any changes in the visual quality and the geometric properties of the cover image. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is secure, with high capacity and low distortion rate. Our algorithm also resists against uniform affine transformations such as cropping, rotation and scaling. Also, the performance of the method is compared with other existing 3D Steganography algorithms. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. 3D scene reconstruction from multi-aperture images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Miao; Qin, Kaihuai

    2014-04-01

    With the development of virtual reality, there is a growing demand for 3D modeling of real scenes. This paper proposes a novel 3D scene reconstruction framework based on multi-aperture images. Our framework consists of four parts. Firstly, images with different apertures are captured via programmable aperture. Secondly, we use SIFT method for feature point matching. Then we exploit binocular stereo vision to calculate camera parameters and 3D positions of matching points, forming a sparse 3D scene model. Finally, we apply patch-based multi-view stereo to obtain a dense 3D scene model. Experimental results show that our method is practical and effective to reconstruct dense 3D scene.

  2. Breast mass detection using slice conspicuity in 3D reconstructed digital breast volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong Tae; Kim, Dae Hoe; Ro, Yong Man

    2014-09-01

    In digital breast tomosynthesis, the three dimensional (3D) reconstructed volumes only provide quasi-3D structure information with limited resolution along the depth direction due to insufficient sampling in depth direction and the limited angular range. The limitation could seriously hamper the conventional 3D image analysis techniques for detecting masses because the limited number of projection views causes blurring in the out-of-focus planes. In this paper, we propose a novel mass detection approach using slice conspicuity in the 3D reconstructed digital breast volumes to overcome the above limitation. First, to overcome the limited resolution along the depth direction, we detect regions of interest (ROIs) on each reconstructed slice and separately utilize the depth directional information to combine the ROIs effectively. Furthermore, we measure the blurriness of each slice for resolving the degradation of performance caused by the blur in the out-of-focus plane. Finally, mass features are extracted from the selected in focus slices and analyzed by a support vector machine classifier to reduce the false positives. Comparative experiments have been conducted on a clinical data set. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed approach outperforms the conventional 3D approach by achieving a high sensitivity with a small number of false positives.

  3. Measurement of spot dancing for focused beam in atmosphere using position sensitive photomultiplier tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoshan; Zhu, Wenyue; Rao, Ruizhong

    2005-05-01

    The spot dancing of the focused laser beam in the turbulent atmosphere was studied using a two dimensional position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The centroid position of the laser spot was evaluated by means of current-dividing center-of-gravity detection. The system has advantage over detector array system in spatial resolution and over the imaging system in dynamic range and sampling rate. Laser propagation experiments were carried out over 1000m path above the sea level and the fluctuations of laser intensity were measured simultaneously. The frequency spectra were calculated by fast Fourier tansform and the standard deviation of the spot dancing were analyzed.

  4. Development of position sensitive proportional counters for hot particle detection in laundry and portal monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Shonka, J.J.; Schwahn, S.O.; Bennett, T.E.; Misko, D.J.

    1992-09-01

    This report summarizes research which demonstrates the use of position sensitive proportional counters in contamination monitoring systems. Both laundry monitoring and portal monitoring systems were developed. The laundry monitor was deployed at a nuclear power plant where it was used to monitor clothing during an outage. Position sensitive proportional counter based contamination monitoring systems were shown to have significant advantages over systems using conventional proportional counters. These advantages include the ability to directly measure the area and quantity of contamination. This capability permits identification of hot particles. These systems are also capable of self calibration via internal check sources. Systems deployed with this technology should benefit from reduced complexity, cost and maintenance. The inherent reduction of background that occurs when the counter is electronically divided into numerous detectors permits operation in high background radiation fields and improves detection limits over conventional technology.

  5. New position sensitive photomultiplier tubes for high energy physics and nuclear medical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, S.; Matsushita, T.; Suzuki, T.; Kimura, S.; Kume, H.

    1988-02-01

    New position sensitive photomultiplier tubes with fine mesh structured dynodes and discrete anode array configurations have been developed. One kind of the position sensitive photomultiplier tubes is being used as a photodetector for High Enegy Physics applications in high magnetic field environments. A photomultiplier tube constructed with 88 Multi-Anodes has a spatial resolution of less than 2.6 mm in FWHM in a magnetic field with a density of 500-2000 Gauss. The resolution includes an anode width of 2.6 mm. Another type of Multi-Anode photomultiplier tube which has been developed is the detector with a high spatial resolution for such applications as the PET system and hodoscope in scintillation systems. The tube, by applying additional electro-focusing electrodes, has an intrinsic spatial resolution of 1.4 mm in FWHM without the magnetic field.

  6. Diagnostic value of 3D time-of-flight MRA in trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Xin, Zhen-Xue; Zhang, Yu-Qiang; Sun, Jie; Lu, Ji-Liang; Xie, Feng

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the diagnostic value of 3D time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (3D-TOF-MRA) in trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Relevant studies were identified by computerized database searches supplemented by manual search strategies. The studies were included in accordance with stringent inclusion and exclusion criteria. Following a multistep screening process, high quality studies related to the diagnostic value of 3D-TOF-MRA in TN were selected for meta-analysis. Statistical analyses were conducted using Statistical Analysis Software (version 8.2; SAS Institute, Cary, NC, USA) and Meta Disc (version 1.4; Unit of Clinical Biostatistics, Ramon y Cajal Hospital, Madrid, Spain). For the present meta-analysis, we initially retrieved 95 studies from database searches. A total of 13 studies were eventually enrolled containing a combined total of 1084 TN patients. The meta-analysis results demonstrated that the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnostic value of 3D-TOF-MRA in TN were 95% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.93-0.96) and 77% (95% CI 0.66-0.86), respectively. The pooled positive likelihood ratio and negative likelihood ratio were 2.72 (95% CI 1.81-4.09) and 0.08 (95% CI 0.06-0.12), respectively. The pooled diagnostic odds ratio of 3D-TOF-MRA in TN was 52.92 (95% CI 26.39-106.11), and the corresponding area under the curve in the summary receiver operating characteristic curve based on the 3D-TOF-MRA diagnostic image of observers was 0.9695 (standard error 0.0165). Our results suggest that 3D-TOF-MRA has excellent sensitivity and specificity as a diagnostic tool for TN, and that it can accurately identify neurovascular compression in TN patients. PMID:26077938

  7. Optoplasmonics: hybridization in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, L.; Gervinskas, G.; Žukauskas, A.; Malinauskas, M.; Brasselet, E.; Juodkazis, S.

    2013-12-01

    Femtosecond laser fabrication has been used to make hybrid refractive and di ractive micro-optical elements in photo-polymer SZ2080. For applications in micro- uidics, axicon lenses were fabricated (both single and arrays), for generation of light intensity patterns extending through the entire depth of a typically tens-of-micrometers deep channel. Further hybridisation of an axicon with a plasmonic slot is fabricated and demonstrated nu- merically. Spiralling chiral grooves were inscribed into a 100-nm-thick gold coating sputtered over polymerized micro-axicon lenses, using a focused ion beam. This demonstrates possibility of hybridisation between optical and plasmonic 3D micro-optical elements. Numerical modelling of optical performance by 3D-FDTD method is presented.

  8. 3-D Relativistic MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Frank, J.; Koide, S.; Sakai, J.-I.; Christodoulou, D. M.; Sol, H.; Mutel, R. L.

    1998-12-01

    We present 3-D numerical simulations of moderately hot, supersonic jets propagating initially along or obliquely to the field lines of a denser magnetized background medium with Lorentz factors of W = 4.56 and evolving in a four-dimensional spacetime. The new results are understood as follows: Relativistic simulations have consistently shown that these jets are effectively heavy and so they do not suffer substantial momentum losses and are not decelerated as efficiently as their nonrelativistic counterparts. In addition, the ambient magnetic field, however strong, can be pushed aside with relative ease by the beam, provided that the degrees of freedom associated with all three spatial dimensions are followed self-consistently in the simulations. This effect is analogous to pushing Japanese ``noren'' or vertical Venetian blinds out of the way while the slats are allowed to bend in 3-D space rather than as a 2-D slab structure.

  9. 360-degree 3D profilometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yuanhe; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Wenyi; Tan, Yushan

    1997-12-01

    A new method of 360 degree turning 3D shape measurement in which light sectioning and phase shifting techniques are both used is presented in this paper. A sine light field is applied in the projected light stripe, meanwhile phase shifting technique is used to calculate phases of the light slit. Thereafter wrapped phase distribution of the slit is formed and the unwrapping process is made by means of the height information based on the light sectioning method. Therefore phase measuring results with better precision can be obtained. At last the target 3D shape data can be produced according to geometric relationships between phases and the object heights. The principles of this method are discussed in detail and experimental results are shown in this paper.

  10. 3D Printable Graphene Composite.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-01-01

    In human being's history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today's personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite's linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C(-1) from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process. PMID:26153673

  11. 3D Printed Robotic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Schuler, Jason M.; Lippitt, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Dexterous robotic hands are changing the way robots and humans interact and use common tools. Unfortunately, the complexity of the joints and actuations drive up the manufacturing cost. Some cutting edge and commercially available rapid prototyping machines now have the ability to print multiple materials and even combine these materials in the same job. A 3D model of a robotic hand was designed using Creo Parametric 2.0. Combining "hard" and "soft" materials, the model was printed on the Object Connex350 3D printer with the purpose of resembling as much as possible the human appearance and mobility of a real hand while needing no assembly. After printing the prototype, strings where installed as actuators to test mobility. Based on printing materials, the manufacturing cost of the hand was $167, significantly lower than other robotic hands without the actuators since they have more complex assembly processes.

  12. 3D light scanning macrography.

    PubMed

    Huber, D; Keller, M; Robert, D

    2001-08-01

    The technique of 3D light scanning macrography permits the non-invasive surface scanning of small specimens at magnifications up to 200x. Obviating both the problem of limited depth of field inherent to conventional close-up macrophotography and the metallic coating required by scanning electron microscopy, 3D light scanning macrography provides three-dimensional digital images of intact specimens without the loss of colour, texture and transparency information. This newly developed technique offers a versatile, portable and cost-efficient method for the non-invasive digital and photographic documentation of small objects. Computer controlled device operation and digital image acquisition facilitate fast and accurate quantitative morphometric investigations, and the technique offers a broad field of research and educational applications in biological, medical and materials sciences. PMID:11489078

  13. 3D-graphite structure

    SciTech Connect

    Belenkov, E. A. Ali-Pasha, V. A.

    2011-01-15

    The structure of clusters of some new carbon 3D-graphite phases have been calculated using the molecular-mechanics methods. It is established that 3D-graphite polytypes {alpha}{sub 1,1}, {alpha}{sub 1,3}, {alpha}{sub 1,5}, {alpha}{sub 2,1}, {alpha}{sub 2,3}, {alpha}{sub 3,1}, {beta}{sub 1,2}, {beta}{sub 1,4}, {beta}{sub 1,6}, {beta}{sub 2,1}, and {beta}{sub 3,2} consist of sp{sup 2}-hybridized atoms, have hexagonal unit cells, and differ in regards to the structure of layers and order of their alternation. A possible way to experimentally synthesize new carbon phases is proposed: the polymerization and carbonization of hydrocarbon molecules.

  14. 3D Electromagnetic inversion using conjugate gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, G.A.; Alumbaugh, D.L.

    1997-06-01

    In large scale 3D EM inverse problems it may not be possible to directly invert a full least-squares system matrix involving model sensitivity elements. Thus iterative methods must be employed. For the inverse problem, we favor either a linear or non-linear (NL) CG scheme, depending on the application. In a NL CG scheme, the gradient of the objective function is required at each relaxation step along with a univariate line search needed to determine the optimum model update. Solution examples based on both approaches will be presented.

  15. High-sensitivity and high-dry-etching durability positive-type electron-beam resist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Akira; Yonezawa, Masaji; Sato, Mitsuyoshi; Fujimoto, Yoshiaki

    1991-08-01

    As feature sizes of semiconductors grow smaller, a resist having dry etching durability and high sensitivity is required for electron beam lithography. However, the positive type electron beam resist having both high sensitivity and high dry etching durability, which suits for practical use, has not been developed yet. In order to solve this problem, a homologous series of poly(alkyl 2-cyanoacrylate) has been investigated. As a result, the new positive type electron beam resist having high sensitivity, high dry etching durability, and high thermal resistance has been developed. This new type of resist consists of poly(cyclohexyl 2- cyanoacrylate), and these features of this resist are due to the cyano and the cyclohexyl groups. The dry etching durability of this resist is 2.19 times as high as that of poly(mthyl methacrylate) (PMMA). The sensitivity is 1.7 (mu) C/cm2 at accelerating voltage of 20 kV, which is about the same as that of poly(butene-1-sulfone) (PBS). Moreover, poly(cyclohexyl 2-cyanoacrylate) has the glass transition of 152 degree(s)C, and then it is thermally stable. Using this resist in photomask fabrication by dry etching, the chrome linewidth uniformity of 0.034 micrometers 3 (sigma) can be obtained.

  16. Data acquisition system for an advanced x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer using a segmented position-sensitive detector.

    PubMed

    Nam, U W; Lee, S G; Bak, J G; Moon, M K; Cheon, J K; Lee, C H

    2007-10-01

    A versatile time-to-digital converter based data acquisition system for a segmented position-sensitive detector has been developed. This data acquisition system was successfully demonstrated to a two-segment position-sensitive detector. The data acquisition system will be developed further to support multisegmented position-sensitive detector to improve the photon count rate capability of the advanced x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer system. PMID:17979416

  17. Development of Position-sensitive Transition-edge Sensor X-ray Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. J.; Bandler, S. R.; Brekosky, R. P.; Brown, A.-D.; Chervenak, J. A.; Eckard, M. E.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. s.; Sad (eor. K/ E/); Figueroa-Feliciano, E.

    2008-01-01

    We report on the development of position-sensitive transition-edge sensors (PoST's) for future x-ray astronomy missions such as the International X-ray Observatory (IXO), currently under study by NASA and ESA. PoST's consist of multiple absorbers each with a different thermal coupling to one or more transition-edge sensor (TES). This differential thermal coupling between absorbers and TES's results in different characteristic pulse shapes and allows position discrimination between the different pixels. The development of PoST's is motivated by a desire to achieve maximum focal-plane area with the least number of readout channels and as such. PoST's are ideally suited to provide a focal-plane extension to the Constellation-X microcalorimeter array. We report the first experimental results of our latest one and two channel PoST's, which utilize fast thermalizing electroplated Au/Bi absorbers coupled to low noise Mo/Au TES's - a technology already successfully implemented in our arrays of single pixel TES's. We demonstrate 6 eV energy resolution coupled with spatial sensitivity in the keV energy range. We also report on the development of signal processing algorithms to optimize energy and position sensitivity of our detectors.

  18. [Real time 3D echocardiography].

    PubMed

    Bauer, F; Shiota, T; Thomas, J D

    2001-07-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients. PMID:11494630

  19. [Real time 3D echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Shiota, T.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients.

  20. GPU-Accelerated Denoising in 3D (GD3D)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-10-01

    The raw computational power GPU Accelerators enables fast denoising of 3D MR images using bilateral filtering, anisotropic diffusion, and non-local means. This software addresses two facets of this promising application: what tuning is necessary to achieve optimal performance on a modern GPU? And what parameters yield the best denoising results in practice? To answer the first question, the software performs an autotuning step to empirically determine optimal memory blocking on the GPU. To answer themore » second, it performs a sweep of algorithm parameters to determine the combination that best reduces the mean squared error relative to a noiseless reference image.« less

  1. Magmatic Systems in 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Babcock, J. M.; Orcutt, J. A.; Bazin, S.; Singh, S.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Diebold, J.

    2002-12-01

    Multichannel seismic (MCS) images of crustal magma chambers are ideal targets for advanced visualization techniques. In the mid-ocean ridge environment, reflections originating at the melt-lens are well separated from other reflection boundaries, such as the seafloor, layer 2A and Moho, which enables the effective use of transparency filters. 3-D visualization of seismic reflectivity falls into two broad categories: volume and surface rendering. Volumetric-based visualization is an extremely powerful approach for the rapid exploration of very dense 3-D datasets. These 3-D datasets are divided into volume elements or voxels, which are individually color coded depending on the assigned datum value; the user can define an opacity filter to reject plotting certain voxels. This transparency allows the user to peer into the data volume, enabling an easy identification of patterns or relationships that might have geologic merit. Multiple image volumes can be co-registered to look at correlations between two different data types (e.g., amplitude variation with offsets studies), in a manner analogous to draping attributes onto a surface. In contrast, surface visualization of seismic reflectivity usually involves producing "fence" diagrams of 2-D seismic profiles that are complemented with seafloor topography, along with point class data, draped lines and vectors (e.g. fault scarps, earthquake locations and plate-motions). The overlying seafloor can be made partially transparent or see-through, enabling 3-D correlations between seafloor structure and seismic reflectivity. Exploration of 3-D datasets requires additional thought when constructing and manipulating these complex objects. As numbers of visual objects grow in a particular scene, there is a tendency to mask overlapping objects; this clutter can be managed through the effective use of total or partial transparency (i.e., alpha-channel). In this way, the co-variation between different datasets can be investigated

  2. Fast and precise 3D fluorophore localization by gradient fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hongqiang; Xu, Jianquan; Jin, Jingyi; Gao, Ying; Lan, Li; Liu, Yang

    2016-02-01

    Astigmatism imaging is widely used to encode the 3D position of fluorophore in single-particle tracking and super-resolution localization microscopy. Here, we present a fast and precise localization algorithm based on gradient fitting to decode the 3D subpixel position of the fluorophore. This algorithm determines the center of the emitter by finding the position with the best-fit gradient direction distribution to the measured point spread function (PSF), and can retrieve the 3D subpixel position of the emitter in a single iteration. Through numerical simulation and experiments with mammalian cells, we demonstrate that our algorithm yields comparable localization precision to the traditional iterative Gaussian function fitting (GF) based method, while exhibits over two orders-of-magnitude faster execution speed. Our algorithm is a promising online reconstruction method for 3D super-resolution microscopy.

  3. Accommodation response measurements for integral 3D image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiura, H.; Mishina, T.; Arai, J.; Iwadate, Y.

    2014-03-01

    We measured accommodation responses under integral photography (IP), binocular stereoscopic, and real object display conditions, and viewing conditions of binocular and monocular viewing conditions. The equipment we used was an optometric device and a 3D display. We developed the 3D display for IP and binocular stereoscopic images that comprises a high-resolution liquid crystal display (LCD) and a high-density lens array. The LCD has a resolution of 468 dpi and a diagonal size of 4.8 inches. The high-density lens array comprises 106 x 69 micro lenses that have a focal length of 3 mm and diameter of 1 mm. The lenses are arranged in a honeycomb pattern. The 3D display was positioned 60 cm from an observer under IP and binocular stereoscopic display conditions. The target was presented at eight depth positions relative to the 3D display: 15, 10, and 5 cm in front of the 3D display, on the 3D display panel, and 5, 10, 15 and 30 cm behind the 3D display under the IP and binocular stereoscopic display conditions. Under the real object display condition, the target was displayed on the 3D display panel, and the 3D display was placed at the eight positions. The results suggest that the IP image induced more natural accommodation responses compared to the binocular stereoscopic image. The accommodation responses of the IP image were weaker than those of a real object; however, they showed a similar tendency with those of the real object under the two viewing conditions. Therefore, IP can induce accommodation to the depth positions of 3D images.

  4. A 3-d modular gripper design tool

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.G.; Brost, R.C.

    1997-02-01

    Modular fixturing kits are sets of components used for flexible, rapid construction of fixtures. A modular vise is a parallel-jaw vise, each jaw of which is a modular fixture plate with a regular grid of precisely positioned holes. To fixture a part, one places pins in some of the holes so that when the vise is closed, the part is reliably located and completely constrained. The modular vise concept can be adapted easily to the design of modular parallel-jaw grippers for robots. By attaching a grid-plate to each jaw of a parallel-jaw gripper, one gains the ability to easily construct high-quality grasps for a wide variety of parts from a standard set of hardware. Wallack and Canny developed an algorithm for planning planar grasp configurations for the modular vise. In this paper, the authors expand this work to produce a 3-d fixture/gripper design tool. They describe several analyses they have added to the planar algorithm, including a 3-d grasp quality metric based on force information, 3-d geometric loading analysis, and inter-gripper interference analysis. Finally, the authors describe two applications of their code. One of these is an internal application at Sandia, while the other shows a potential use of the code for designing part of an agile assembly line.

  5. Development of arrays of position-sensitive microcalorimeters for Constellation-X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. J.; Bandler, S. R.; Brekosky, R. P.; Brown, A.-D.; Chervenak, J. A.; Eckart, M. E.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Iyomoto, N.; Kelley, R. L.; Kolbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.

    2008-01-01

    We are developing arrays of position-sensitive transition-edge sensor (POST) X-ray detectors for future astronomy missions such as NASA's Constellation-X. The POST consists of multiple absorbers thermally coupled to one or more transition-edge sensor (TES). Each absorber element has a different thermal coupling to the TES. This results in a distribution of different pulse shapes and enables position discrimination between the absorber elements. POST'S are motivated by the desire to achieve the largest possible focal plane area with the fewest number of readout channels and are ideally suited to increasing the Constellation-X focal plane area, without comprising on spatial sampling. Optimizing the performance of POST'S requires careful design of key parameters such as the thermal conductances between the absorbers, TES and the heat sink. as well as the absorber heat capacities. Using recently developed signal processing algorithms we have investigated the trade-off between position-sensitivity, energy resolution and pulse decay time. based on different device design parameters for PoST's. Our new generation of PoST's utilize technology successfully developed on high resolution (approximately 2.5eV) single pixels arrays of Mo/Au TESs. also under development for Constellation-X. This includes noise mitigation features on the TES and low resistivity electroplated absorbers. We report on the first experimental results from these new one and two-channel PoST"s, consisting of all Au and composite Au/Bi absorbers, which are designed to achieve an energy resolution of < 10 eV. coupled with count-rates of 100's per pixel per second and position sensitivity over the energy range 0.3-10 keV.

  6. Needle segmentation using 3D Hough transform in 3D TRUS guided prostate transperineal therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Wu; Yuchi Ming; Ding Mingyue; Tessier, David; Fenster, Aaron

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Prostate adenocarcinoma is the most common noncutaneous malignancy in American men with over 200 000 new cases diagnosed each year. Prostate interventional therapy, such as cryotherapy and brachytherapy, is an effective treatment for prostate cancer. Its success relies on the correct needle implant position. This paper proposes a robust and efficient needle segmentation method, which acts as an aid to localize the needle in three-dimensional (3D) transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate therapy. Methods: The procedure of locating the needle in a 3D TRUS image is a three-step process. First, the original 3D ultrasound image containing a needle is cropped; the cropped image is then converted to a binary format based on its histogram. Second, a 3D Hough transform based needle segmentation method is applied to the 3D binary image in order to locate the needle axis. The position of the needle endpoint is finally determined by an optimal threshold based analysis of the intensity probability distribution. The overall efficiency is improved through implementing a coarse-fine searching strategy. The proposed method was validated in tissue-mimicking agar phantoms, chicken breast phantoms, and 3D TRUS patient images from prostate brachytherapy and cryotherapy procedures by comparison to the manual segmentation. The robustness of the proposed approach was tested by means of varying parameters such as needle insertion angle, needle insertion length, binarization threshold level, and cropping size. Results: The validation results indicate that the proposed Hough transform based method is accurate and robust, with an achieved endpoint localization accuracy of 0.5 mm for agar phantom images, 0.7 mm for chicken breast phantom images, and 1 mm for in vivo patient cryotherapy and brachytherapy images. The mean execution time of needle segmentation algorithm was 2 s for a 3D TRUS image with size of 264 Multiplication-Sign 376 Multiplication-Sign 630 voxels. Conclusions

  7. The position effect of electron-deficient quinoxaline moiety in porphyrin based sensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Suhua; Lv, Kai; Sun, Hong; Zhou, Gang; Wang, Zhong-Sheng

    2015-04-01

    An electron-deficient group, 2,3-diphenylquinoxaline (DPQ), is incorporated as an auxiliary acceptor into the different positions of the porphyrin (Por) based donor-π bridge-acceptor (D-π-A) dye (FNE57) to construct D-A‧-Por-π-A (FNE58) and D-Por-A‧-π-A (FNE59) configurations. The incorporation of DPQ unit between the donor and porphyrin unit has negligible influence on the absorption property, whereas the DPQ unit located between the porphyrin unit and acceptor significantly increases the absorbance for the Soret band and the valley between the Soret and Q bands. Theoretical calculation reveals that incorporating the DPQ unit adjacent to the acceptor is more advantageous to delocalize the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital and enhance the electronic asymmetry, which facilitates the intramolecular charge transfer. The effect of DPQ unit and its linkage position on the performance of related quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) is systematically investigated. The quasi-solid-state DSSC with sensitizer FNE59 displays a power conversion efficiency of 6.02%, which is 23% and 51% higher than those for FNE57 and FNE58 based DSSCs. Our studies facilitate the understanding of the crucial importance of molecular engineering and pave a new path to design novel porphyrin based sensitizers for highly efficient DSSCs.

  8. A Clean Adirondack (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is a 3-D anaglyph showing a microscopic image taken of an area measuring 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across on the rock called Adirondack. The image was taken at Gusev Crater on the 33rd day of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's journey (Feb. 5, 2004), after the rover used its rock abrasion tool brush to clean the surface of the rock. Dust, which was pushed off to the side during cleaning, can still be seen to the left and in low areas of the rock.

  9. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manos, Harry

    2016-03-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the TPT theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity well tailored to specific class lessons. Most of the supplies are readily available in the home or at school: rubbing alcohol, a rag, two colors of spray paint, art brushes, and masking tape. The cost of these supplies, if you don't have them, is less than 20.

  10. Vacant Lander in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D image captured by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's rear hazard-identification camera shows the now-empty lander that carried the rover 283 million miles to Meridiani Planum, Mars. Engineers received confirmation that Opportunity's six wheels successfully rolled off the lander and onto martian soil at 3:01 a.m. PST, January 31, 2004, on the seventh martian day, or sol, of the mission. The rover is approximately 1 meter (3 feet) in front of the lander, facing north.

  11. Acoustic simulation in realistic 3D virtual scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozard, Patrick; Le Goff, Alain; Naz, Pierre; Cathala, Thierry; Latger, Jean

    2003-09-01

    The simulation workshop CHORALE developed in collaboration with OKTAL SE company for the French MoD is used by government services and industrial companies for weapon system validation and qualification trials in the infrared domain. The main operational reference for CHORALE is the assessment of the infrared guidance system of the Storm Shadow missile French version, called Scalp. The use of CHORALE workshop is now extended to the acoustic domain. The main objective is the simulation of the detection of moving vehicles in realistic 3D virtual scenes. This article briefly describes the acoustic model in CHORALE. The 3D scene is described by a set of polygons. Each polygon is characterized by its acoustic resistivity or its complex impedance. Sound sources are associated with moving vehicles and are characterized by their spectra and directivities. A microphone sensor is defined by its position, its frequency band and its sensitivity. The purpose of the acoustic simulation is to calculate the incoming acoustic pressure on microphone sensors. CHORALE is based on a generic ray tracing kernel. This kernel possesses original capabilities: computation time is nearly independent on the scene complexity, especially the number of polygons, databases are enhanced with precise physical data, special mechanisms of antialiasing have been developed that enable to manage very accurate details. The ray tracer takes into account the wave geometrical divergence and the atmospheric transmission. The sound wave refraction is simulated and rays cast in the 3D scene are curved according to air temperature gradient. Finally, sound diffraction by edges (hill, wall,...) is also taken into account.

  12. Density-tapered spiral arrays for ultrasound 3-D imaging.

    PubMed

    Ramalli, Alessandro; Boni, Enrico; Savoia, Alessandro Stuart; Tortoli, Piero

    2015-08-01

    The current high interest in 3-D ultrasound imaging is pushing the development of 2-D probes with a challenging number of active elements. The most popular approach to limit this number is the sparse array technique, which designs the array layout by means of complex optimization algorithms. These algorithms are typically constrained by a few steering conditions, and, as such, cannot guarantee uniform side-lobe performance at all angles. The performance may be improved by the ungridded extensions of the sparse array technique, but this result is achieved at the expense of a further complication of the optimization process. In this paper, a method to design the layout of large circular arrays with a limited number of elements according to Fermat's spiral seeds and spatial density modulation is proposed and shown to be suitable for application to 3-D ultrasound imaging. This deterministic, aperiodic, and balanced positioning procedure attempts to guarantee uniform performance over a wide range of steering angles. The capabilities of the method are demonstrated by simulating and comparing the performance of spiral and dense arrays. A good trade-off for small vessel imaging is found, e.g., in the 60λ spiral array with 1.0λ elements and Blackman density tapering window. Here, the grating lobe level is -16 dB, the lateral resolution is lower than 6λ the depth of field is 120λ and, the average contrast is 10.3 dB, while the sensitivity remains in a 5 dB range for a wide selection of steering angles. The simulation results may represent a reference guide to the design of spiral sparse array probes for different application fields. PMID:26285181

  13. FR3D: finding local and composite recurrent structural motifs in RNA 3D structures.

    PubMed

    Sarver, Michael; Zirbel, Craig L; Stombaugh, Jesse; Mokdad, Ali; Leontis, Neocles B

    2008-01-01

    New methods are described for finding recurrent three-dimensional (3D) motifs in RNA atomic-resolution structures. Recurrent RNA 3D motifs are sets of RNA nucleotides with similar spatial arrangements. They can be local or composite. Local motifs comprise nucleotides that occur in the same hairpin or internal loop. Composite motifs comprise nucleotides belonging to three or more different RNA strand segments or molecules. We use a base-centered approach to construct efficient, yet exhaustive search procedures using geometric, symbolic, or mixed representations of RNA structure that we implement in a suite of MATLAB programs, "Find RNA 3D" (FR3D). The first modules of FR3D preprocess structure files to classify base-pair and -stacking interactions. Each base is represented geometrically by the position of its glycosidic nitrogen in 3D space and by the rotation matrix that describes its orientation with respect to a common frame. Base-pairing and base-stacking interactions are calculated from the base geometries and are represented symbolically according to the Leontis/Westhof basepairing classification, extended to include base-stacking. These data are stored and used to organize motif searches. For geometric searches, the user supplies the 3D structure of a query motif which FR3D uses to find and score geometrically similar candidate motifs, without regard to the sequential position of their nucleotides in the RNA chain or the identity of their bases. To score and rank candidate motifs, FR3D calculates a geometric discrepancy by rigidly rotating candidates to align optimally with the query motif and then comparing the relative orientations of the corresponding bases in the query and candidate motifs. Given the growing size of the RNA structure database, it is impossible to explicitly compute the discrepancy for all conceivable candidate motifs, even for motifs with less than ten nucleotides. The screening algorithm that we describe finds all candidate motifs whose

  14. An improved method of energy calibration for position-sensitive silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ming-Dao; Huang, Tian-Heng; Liu, Zhong; Ding, Bing; Yang, Hua-Bin; Zhang, Zhi-Yuan; Wang, Jian-Guo; Ma, Long; Yu, Lin; Wang, Yong-Sheng; Gan, Zai-Guo; Xiao-Hong, Zhou

    2016-04-01

    Energy calibration of resistive charge division-based position-sensitive silicon detectors is achieved by parabolic fitting in the traditional method, where the systematic variations of vertex and curvature of the parabola with energy must be considered. In this paper we extend the traditional method in order to correct the fitting function, simplify the procedure of calibration and improve the experimental data quality. Instead of a parabolic function as used in the traditional method, a new function describing the relation of position and energy is introduced. The energy resolution of the 8.088 MeV α decay of 213Rn is determined to be about 87 keV (FWHM), which is better than the result of the traditional method, 104 keV (FWHM). The improved method can be applied to the energy calibration of resistive charge division-based position-sensitive silicon detectors with various performances. Supported by ‘100 Person Project’ of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (11405224 and 11435014)

  15. Development of a simple test device for spindle error measurement using a position sensitive detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chien-Hung; Jywe, Wen-Yuh; Lee, Hau-Wei

    2004-09-01

    A new spindle error measurement system has been developed in this paper. It employs a design development rotational fixture with a built-in laser diode and four batteries to replace a precision reference master ball or cylinder used in the traditional method. Two measuring devices with two position sensitive detectors (one is designed for the measurement of the compound X-axis and Y-axis errors and the other is designed with a lens for the measurement of the tilt angular errors) are fixed on the machine table to detect the laser point position from the laser diode in the rotational fixture. When the spindle rotates, the spindle error changes the direction of the laser beam. The laser beam is then divided into two separated beams by a beam splitter. The two separated beams are projected onto the two measuring devices and are detected by two position sensitive detectors, respectively. Thus, the compound motion errors and the tilt angular errors of the spindle can be obtained. Theoretical analysis and experimental tests are presented in this paper to separate the compound errors into two radial errors and tilt angular errors. This system is proposed as a new instrument and method for spindle metrology.

  16. Exploring the spatial resolution of position-sensitive microchannel plate detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, Blake; Siwal, Davinder; Desouza, Romualdo

    2016-03-01

    High amplification and excellent timing make microchannel plate (MCP) detectors excellent devices for detection of photons, electrons, and ions. In addition to providing sub-nanosecond time resolution MCP detectors can also provide spatial resolution, thus making them useful in imaging applications. Use of a resistive anode (RA) is a routinely used approach to make an MCP position-sensitive. The spatial resolution of the RA associated with detection of a single incident electron was determined. Factors impacting the spatial resolution obtained with the RA will be discussed and the achieved spatial resolution of 64 μm (FWHM) will be presented. Recently, a novel approach has been developed to provide position-sensitivity for an MCP detector. In this approach, namely the induced signal approach, the position of the incident particle is determined by sensing the electron cloud emanating from a MCP stack. By utilizing the zero-crossing point of the inherently bipolar signals, a spatial resolution of 466 μm (FWHM) has been achieved. Work to improve the spatial resolution of the induced signal approach further will be presented. Supported by the US DOE NNSA under Award No. DE-NA0002012.

  17. Biological Basis for Increased Sensitivity to Radiation Therapy in HPV-Positive Head and Neck Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Bol, V.; Grégoire, V.

    2014-01-01

    Although development of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) is commonly linked to the consumption of tobacco and alcohol, a link between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and a subgroup of head and neck cancers has been established. These HPV-positive tumors represent a distinct biological entity with overexpression of viral oncoproteins E6 and E7. It has been shown in several clinical studies that HPV-positive HNSCCs have a more favorable outcome and greater response to radiotherapy. The reason for improved prognosis of HPV-related HNSCC remains speculative, but it could be owned to multiple factors. One hypothesis is that HPV-positive cells are intrinsically more sensitive to standard therapies and thus respond better to treatment. Another possibility is that HPV-positive tumors uniquely express viral proteins that induce an immune response during therapy that helps clear tumors and prevents recurrence. Here, we will review current evidence for the biological basis of increased radiosensitivity in HPV-positive HNSCC. PMID:24804233

  18. Simultaneous full-field 3-D vibrometry of the human eardrum using spatial-bandwidth multiplexed holography

    PubMed Central

    Khaleghi, Morteza; Guignard, Jérémie; Furlong, Cosme; Rosowski, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Holographic interferometric methods typically require the use of three sensitivity vectors in order to obtain three-dimensional (3-D) information. Methods based on multiple directions of illumination have limited applications when studying biological tissues that have temporally varying responses such as the tympanic membrane (TM). Therefore, to measure 3-D displacements in such applications, the measurements along all the sensitivity vectors have to be done simultaneously. We propose a multiple-illumination directions approach to measure 3-D displacements from a single-shot hologram that contains displacement information from three sensitivity vectors. The hologram of an object of interest is simultaneously recorded with three incoherently superimposed pairs of reference and object beams. The incident off-axis angles of the reference beams are adjusted such that the frequency components of the multiplexed hologram are completely separate. Because of the differences in the directions and wavelengths of the reference beams, the positions of each reconstructed image corresponding to each sensitivity vector are different. We implemented a registration algorithm to accurately translate individual components of the hologram into a single global coordinate system to calculate 3-D displacements. The results include magnitudes and phases of 3-D sound-induced motions of a human cadaveric TM at several excitation frequencies showing modal and traveling wave motions on its surface. PMID:25984986

  19. 3D multifocus astigmatism and compressed sensing (3D MACS) based superresolution reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiaqing; Sun, Mingzhai; Gumpper, Kristyn; Chi, Yuejie; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-01-01

    Single molecule based superresolution techniques (STORM/PALM) achieve nanometer spatial resolution by integrating the temporal information of the switching dynamics of fluorophores (emitters). When emitter density is low for each frame, they are located to the nanometer resolution. However, when the emitter density rises, causing significant overlapping, it becomes increasingly difficult to accurately locate individual emitters. This is particularly apparent in three dimensional (3D) localization because of the large effective volume of the 3D point spread function (PSF). The inability to precisely locate the emitters at a high density causes poor temporal resolution of localization-based superresolution technique and significantly limits its application in 3D live cell imaging. To address this problem, we developed a 3D high-density superresolution imaging platform that allows us to precisely locate the positions of emitters, even when they are significantly overlapped in three dimensional space. Our platform involves a multi-focus system in combination with astigmatic optics and an ℓ1-Homotopy optimization procedure. To reduce the intrinsic bias introduced by the discrete formulation of compressed sensing, we introduced a debiasing step followed by a 3D weighted centroid procedure, which not only increases the localization accuracy, but also increases the computation speed of image reconstruction. We implemented our algorithms on a graphic processing unit (GPU), which speeds up processing 10 times compared with central processing unit (CPU) implementation. We tested our method with both simulated data and experimental data of fluorescently labeled microtubules and were able to reconstruct a 3D microtubule image with 1000 frames (512×512) acquired within 20 seconds. PMID:25798314

  20. 3D multifocus astigmatism and compressed sensing (3D MACS) based superresolution reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiaqing; Sun, Mingzhai; Gumpper, Kristyn; Chi, Yuejie; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-03-01

    Single molecule based superresolution techniques (STORM/PALM) achieve nanometer spatial resolution by integrating the temporal information of the switching dynamics of fluorophores (emitters). When emitter density is low for each frame, they are located to the nanometer resolution. However, when the emitter density rises, causing significant overlapping, it becomes increasingly difficult to accurately locate individual emitters. This is particularly apparent in three dimensional (3D) localization because of the large effective volume of the 3D point spread function (PSF). The inability to precisely locate the emitters at a high density causes poor temporal resolution of localization-based superresolution technique and significantly limits its application in 3D live cell imaging. To address this problem, we developed a 3D high-density superresolution imaging platform that allows us to precisely locate the positions of emitters, even when they are significantly overlapped in three dimensional space. Our platform involves a multi-focus system in combination with astigmatic optics and an ℓ 1-Homotopy optimization procedure. To reduce the intrinsic bias introduced by the discrete formulation of compressed sensing, we introduced a debiasing step followed by a 3D weighted centroid procedure, which not only increases the localization accuracy, but also increases the computation speed of image reconstruction. We implemented our algorithms on a graphic processing unit (GPU), which speeds up processing 10 times compared with central processing unit (CPU) implementation. We tested our method with both simulated data and experimental data of fluorescently labeled microtubules and were able to reconstruct a 3D microtubule image with 1000 frames (512×512) acquired within 20 seconds. PMID:25798314

  1. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-07-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C-1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process.

  2. 3D acoustic atmospheric tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kevin; Finn, Anthony

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a method for tomographically reconstructing spatially varying 3D atmospheric temperature profiles and wind velocity fields based. Measurements of the acoustic signature measured onboard a small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) are compared to ground-based observations of the same signals. The frequency-shifted signal variations are then used to estimate the acoustic propagation delay between the UAV and the ground microphones, which are also affected by atmospheric temperature and wind speed vectors along each sound ray path. The wind and temperature profiles are modelled as the weighted sum of Radial Basis Functions (RBFs), which also allow local meteorological measurements made at the UAV and ground receivers to supplement any acoustic observations. Tomography is used to provide a full 3D reconstruction/visualisation of the observed atmosphere. The technique offers observational mobility under direct user control and the capacity to monitor hazardous atmospheric environments, otherwise not justifiable on the basis of cost or risk. This paper summarises the tomographic technique and reports on the results of simulations and initial field trials. The technique has practical applications for atmospheric research, sound propagation studies, boundary layer meteorology, air pollution measurements, analysis of wind shear, and wind farm surveys.

  3. 3D Printed Bionic Ears

    PubMed Central

    Mannoor, Manu S.; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A.; Soboyejo, Winston O.; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the precise anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  4. 3-D Relativistic MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikaw, K.-I.; Frank, J.; Christodoulou, D. M.; Koide, S.; Sakai, J.-I.; Sol, H.; Mutel, R. L.

    1998-12-01

    We present 3-D numerical simulations of moderately hot, supersonic jets propagating initially along or obliquely to the field lines of a denser magnetized background medium with Lorentz factors of W=4.56 and evolving in a four-dimensional spacetime. The new results are understood as follows: Relativistic simulations have consistently shown that these jets are effectively heavy and so they do not suffer substantial momentum losses and are not decelerated as efficiently as their nonrelativistic counterparts. In addition, the ambient magnetic field, however strong, can be pushed aside with relative ease by the beam, provided that the degrees of freedom associated with all three spatial dimensions are followed self-consistently in the simulations. This effect is analogous to pushing Japanese ``noren'' or vertical Venetian blinds out of the way while the slats are allowed to bend in 3-D space rather than as a 2-D slab structure. We also simulate jets with the more realistic initial conditions for injecting jets for helical mangetic field, perturbed density, velocity, and internal energy, which are supposed to be caused in the process of jet generation. Three possible explanations for the observed variability are (i) tidal disruption of a star falling into the black hole, (ii) instabilities in the relativistic accretion disk, and (iii) jet-related PRocesses. New results will be reported at the meeting.

  5. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  6. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-01-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C−1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process. PMID:26153673

  7. 3D medical thermography device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Peyman

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a novel handheld 3D medical thermography system is introduced. The proposed system consists of a thermal-infrared camera, a color camera and a depth camera rigidly attached in close proximity and mounted on an ergonomic handle. As a practitioner holding the device smoothly moves it around the human body parts, the proposed system generates and builds up a precise 3D thermogram model by incorporating information from each new measurement in real-time. The data is acquired in motion, thus it provides multiple points of view. When processed, these multiple points of view are adaptively combined by taking into account the reliability of each individual measurement which can vary due to a variety of factors such as angle of incidence, distance between the device and the subject and environmental sensor data or other factors influencing a confidence of the thermal-infrared data when captured. Finally, several case studies are presented to support the usability and performance of the proposed system.

  8. 3D Ion Temperature Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Hiroshi; You, Setthivoine; Balandin, Alexander; Inomoto, Michiaki; Ono, Yasushi

    2009-11-01

    The TS-4 experiment at the University of Tokyo collides two spheromaks to form a single high-beta compact toroid. Magnetic reconnection during the merging process heats and accelerates the plasma in toroidal and poloidal directions. The reconnection region has a complex 3D topology determined by the pitch of the spheromak magnetic fields at the merging plane. A pair of multichord passive spectroscopic diagnostics have been established to measure the ion temperature and velocity in the reconnection volume. One setup measures spectral lines across a poloidal plane, retrieving velocity and temperature from Abel inversion. The other, novel setup records spectral lines across another section of the plasma and reconstructs velocity and temperature from 3D vector and 2D scalar tomography techniques. The magnetic field linking both measurement planes is determined from in situ magnetic probe arrays. The ion temperature is then estimated within the volume between the two measurement planes and at the reconnection region. The measurement is followed over several repeatable discharges to follow the heating and acceleration process during the merging reconnection.

  9. LOTT RANCH 3D PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Lawrence; Bruce Miller

    2004-09-01

    The Lott Ranch 3D seismic prospect located in Garza County, Texas is a project initiated in September of 1991 by the J.M. Huber Corp., a petroleum exploration and production company. By today's standards the 126 square mile project does not seem monumental, however at the time it was conceived it was the most intensive land 3D project ever attempted. Acquisition began in September of 1991 utilizing GEO-SEISMIC, INC., a seismic data contractor. The field parameters were selected by J.M. Huber, and were of a radical design. The recording instruments used were GeoCor IV amplifiers designed by Geosystems Inc., which record the data in signed bit format. It would not have been practical, if not impossible, to have processed the entire raw volume with the tools available at that time. The end result was a dataset that was thought to have little utility due to difficulties in processing the field data. In 1997, Yates Energy Corp. located in Roswell, New Mexico, formed a partnership to further develop the project. Through discussions and meetings with Pinnacle Seismic, it was determined that the original Lott Ranch 3D volume could be vastly improved upon reprocessing. Pinnacle Seismic had shown the viability of improving field-summed signed bit data on smaller 2D and 3D projects. Yates contracted Pinnacle Seismic Ltd. to perform the reprocessing. This project was initiated with high resolution being a priority. Much of the potential resolution was lost through the initial summing of the field data. Modern computers that are now being utilized have tremendous speed and storage capacities that were cost prohibitive when this data was initially processed. Software updates and capabilities offer a variety of quality control and statics resolution, which are pertinent to the Lott Ranch project. The reprocessing effort was very successful. The resulting processed data-set was then interpreted using modern PC-based interpretation and mapping software. Production data, log data

  10. Gamma ray measurement of earth formation properties using a position sensitive scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sonne, D.S.

    1986-10-21

    This patent describes a system for measuring properties of earth formations in the vicinity of a well borehole at different radial distances from the borehole, comprising: a fluid tight hollow body member sized and adapted for passage through a well borehole and housing therein; a source of gamma rays and means for directing gamma rays from the source outwardly from the body member into earth formations in the vicinity of the borehole; and a position sensitive scintillation detector for detecting gamma rays scattered back into the body member from the earth formation in the vicinity of the borehole and means for collimating the scattered gamma rays onto the detector.

  11. Conceptual design of elliptical cavities for intensity and position sensitive beam measurements in storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanjari, M. S.; Chen, X.; Hülsmann, P.; Litvinov, Yu A.; Nolden, F.; Piotrowski, J.; Steck, M.; Stöhlker, Th

    2015-11-01

    Position sensitive beam monitors are indispensable for the beam diagnostics in storage rings. Apart from their applications in the measurements of beam parameters, they can be used in non-destructive in-ring decay studies of radioactive ion beams as well as enhancing precision in the isochronous mass measurement technique. In this work, we introduce a novel approach based on cavities with elliptical cross-section, in order to compensate the limitations of known designs for the application in ion storage rings. The design is aimed primarily for future heavy ion storage rings of the FAIR project. The conceptual design is discussed together with simulation results.

  12. A fast position sensitive microstrip-gas-chamber detector at high count rate operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolbnya, I. P.; Alberda, H.; Hartjes, F. G.; Udo, F.; Bakker, R. E.; Konijnenburg, M.; Homan, E.; Cerjak, I.; Goedtkindt, P.; Bras, W.

    2002-11-01

    Testing of a newly developed position sensitive high count rate microstrip gas chamber (MSGC) detector at high count rate operation has been carried out at the Dutch-Belgian x-ray scattering beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (Grenoble, France) with a high intensity x-ray beam. The measurements show local count rate capabilities up to approx4.5 x105 counts/s/channel. Experimental data taken with this detector are also shown. These tests show that both time resolution down to 1.5 ms/frame and a reliable operation at high counting rates can be achieved.

  13. Identifying Moderators of the Link Between Parent and Child Anxiety Sensitivity: The Roles of Gender, Positive Parenting, and Corporal Punishment.

    PubMed

    Graham, Rebecca A; Weems, Carl F

    2015-07-01

    A substantial body of literature suggests that anxiety sensitivity is a risk factor for the development of anxiety problems and research has now begun to examine the links between parenting, parent anxiety sensitivity and their child's anxiety sensitivity. However, the extant literature has provided mixed findings as to whether parent anxiety sensitivity is associated with child anxiety sensitivity, with some evidence suggesting that other factors may influence the association. Theoretically, specific parenting behaviors may be important to the development of child anxiety sensitivity and also in understanding the association between parent and child anxiety sensitivity. In this study, 191 families (n = 255 children and adolescents aged 6-17 and their parents) completed measures of child anxiety sensitivity (CASI) and parenting (APQ-C), and parents completed measures of their own anxiety sensitivity (ASI) and their parenting (APQ-P). Corporal punishment was associated with child anxiety sensitivity and the child's report of their parent's positive parenting behaviors moderated the association between parent and child anxiety sensitivity. The child's gender was also found to moderate the association between parent and child anxiety sensitivity, such that there was a positive association between girls' and their parents anxiety sensitivity and a negative association in boys. The findings advance the understanding of child anxiety sensitivity by establishing a link with corporal punishment and by showing that the association between parent and child anxiety sensitivity may depend upon the parenting context and child's gender. PMID:25301177

  14. Identifying Moderators of the Link between Parent and Child Anxiety Sensitivity: The Roles of Gender, Positive Parenting, and Corporal Punishment

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Rebecca A.; Weems, Carl F.

    2014-01-01

    A substantial body of literature suggests that anxiety sensitivity is a risk factor for the development of anxiety problems and research has now begun to examine the links between parenting, parent anxiety sensitivity and their child’s anxiety sensitivity. However, the extant literature has provided mixed findings as to whether parent anxiety sensitivity is associated with child anxiety sensitivity, with some evidence suggesting that others factors may influence the association. Theoretically, specific parenting behaviors may be important to the development of child anxiety sensitivity and also in understanding the association between parent and child anxiety sensitivity. In this study, 191 families (n = 255 children and adolescents aged 6–17 and their parents) completed measures of child anxiety sensitivity (CASI) and parenting (APQ-C), and parents completed measures of their own anxiety sensitivity (ASI) and their parenting (APQ-P). Corporal punishment was associated with child anxiety sensitivity and the child’s report of their parent’s positive parenting behaviors moderated the association between parent and child anxiety sensitivity. The child’s gender was also found to moderate the association between parent and child anxiety sensitivity, such that there was a positive association between girls and parent anxiety sensitivity and a negative association in boys. The findings advance the understanding of child anxiety sensitivity by establishing a link with corporal punishment and by showing that the association between parent and child anxiety sensitivity may depend upon the parenting context and child’s gender. PMID:25301177

  15. Read-out of scintillating fibres using a weak cross-talk position-sensitive photomultiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agoritsas, V.; Akchurin, N.; Bing, O.; Bravar, A.; Drevenak, R.; Finger, Mic.; Finger, Mir.; Flaminio, V.; Digirolamo, B.; Gorin, A.; Kuroda, K.; Manuilov, I.; Okada, K.; Onel, Y.; Penzo, A.; Rappazzo, G. F.; Riazantsev, A.; Slunecka, M.; Takeutchi, F.; Yoshida, T.

    1998-02-01

    Fast and precise readout of scintillating fibres (SciFi) has a great potential for fast tracking and triggering at high-luminosity particle physics experiments. In the framework of the RD-17 experiment at CERN (FAROS) significant milestones in the development of SciFi detectors using position-sensitive photomultipliers have been achieved. Results obtained with a weak cross-talk multi-anode photomultiplier, Philips XP1724, and a parallel readout of the anodes are reported. With 0.5 mm diameter fibres a spatial resolution of about 125 μm and a detection efficiency in excess of 95% have been obtained. The time dispersion of signals from individual photomultiplier channels has been estimated to be about 1 ns. The possibility of digitising the track position in real time by a peak-sensing circuit is studied for the first time

  16. A diagnostic for micrometer sensitive positioning of solid targets in intense laser-matter interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Prashant Kumar; Kakolee, K. F.; Jeong, T. W.; Ter-Avetisyan, Sargis

    2016-09-01

    A target position monitoring diagnostic, relevant to intense laser-solid interaction, is presented. The alignment system, having a sensitivity of few micrometers, consist of an infinity corrected long working distance objective, a broadband illuminating source and a CCD camera. The imaging system, placed along the axis of incident laser pulse, serves the dual purpose of laser focus diagnosis and precise positioning of the target in three dimension axis. By employing this technique, solid targets with thickness varying from opaque micrometer thick foils to few nanometer thin transparent foils can be aligned precisely. The effectiveness of the entire alignment system is demonstrated in enhanced acceleration of ions in intense laser-matter interaction, with very high reproducibility.

  17. Time and position sensitive single photon detector for scintillator read-out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schössler, S.; Bromberger, B.; Brandis, M.; Schmidt, L. Ph H.; Tittelmeier, K.; Czasch, A.; Dangendorf, V.; Jagutzki, O.

    2012-02-01

    We have developed a photon counting detector system for combined neutron and γ radiography which can determine position, time and intensity of a secondary photon flash created by a high-energy particle or photon within a scintillator screen. The system is based on a micro-channel plate photomultiplier concept utilizing image charge coupling to a position- and time-sensitive read-out anode placed outside the vacuum tube in air, aided by a standard photomultiplier and very fast pulse-height analyzing electronics. Due to the low dead time of all system components it can cope with the high throughput demands of a proposed combined fast neutron and dual discrete energy γ radiography method (FNDDER). We show tests with different types of delay-line read-out anodes and present a novel pulse-height-to-time converter circuit with its potential to discriminate γ energies for the projected FNDDER devices for an automated cargo container inspection system (ACCIS).

  18. Antibiotic sensitivity pattern in blaNDM-1-positive and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Mulla, Summaiya; Charan, Jaykaran; Rajdev, Sangita

    2016-01-01

    Background: Some studies published in recent time revealed that many bacteria from Enterobacteriaceae group are multi-antibiotic-resistant because of the production enzymes carbapenemase particularly New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase encoded by gene called blaNDM-1. Looking at public health importance of this issue there is a need for studies at other centers to confirm or refute published findings. Objectives: This study was designed with the aim of exploring antibiotic resistance in Enterobacteriaceae group of bacteria and also to explore gene and enzyme responsible for it. Materials and Methods: Samples of Enterobacteriaceae were collected from wards and outpatient departments. Antibiotic sensitivity was checked by an automated system (VITEK 2 COMPACT). Carbapenemase production was assessed by Modified Hodge Test. Presence of blaNDM-1 was assessed by polymerase chain reaction. Statistics: Frequency and percentage were used to describe the data. Frequency of sensitivity was compared between carbapenemase producers and noncarbapenemase producers by Fisher's exact test. Results: Forty-seven percent bacteria were found to be producing carbapenemase enzyme. These bacteria were significantly less sensitive to cefoperazone, cefepime, and amikacin. Among carbapenemase-producing organisms, 3% and 6% were resistant to tigecycline and colistin, respectively. Forty percent bacteria were found to be having blaNDM-1 gene. There was a significant difference between blaNDM-1-positive and blaNDM-1-negative for sensitivity toward cefoperazone + sulbactam, imipenem, meropenem, amikacin, tobramycine, ciprofloxacin, and levofloxacin. Conclusion: Presence of carbapenemase enzyme and blaNDM-1 gene is associated with high level of resistance in Enterobacteriaceae group of bacteria and only few antibiotics have good sensitivity for these organisms. PMID:26958516

  19. Demonstration of a high sensitivity GNSS software receiver for indoor positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tao; Ma, Martin; Broumandan, Ali; Lachapelle, Gérard

    2013-03-01

    Advances in signal processing techniques contributed to the significant improvements of GNSS receiver performance in dense multipath environments and created the opportunities for a new category of high-sensitivity GNSS (HS-GNSS) receivers that can provide GNSS location services in indoor environments. The difficulties in improving the availability, reliability, and accuracy of these indoor capable GNSS receivers exceed those of the receivers designed for the most hostile urban canyon environments. The authors of this paper identified the vector tracking schemes, signal propagation statistics, and parallel processing techniques that are critical to a robust HS-GNSS receiver for indoor environments and successfully incorporated them into a fully functional high-sensitivity software receiver. A flexible vector-based receiver architecture is introduced to combine these key indoor signal processing technologies into GSNRx-hs™ - the high sensitivity software navigation receiver developed at the University of Calgary. The resulting receiver can perform multi-mode vector tracking in indoor environment at various levels of location and timing uncertainties. In addition to the obvious improvements in time-to-first-fix (TTFF) and signal sensitivity, the field test results in indoor environments surrounded by wood, glass, and concrete showed that the new techniques effectively improved the performance of indoor GNSS positioning. With fine GNSS timing, the proposed receiver can consistently deliver indoor navigation solution with the horizontal accuracy of 2-15 m depending on the satellite geometry and the indoor environments. If only the coarse GNSS timing is available, the horizontal accuracy of the indoor navigation solution from the proposed receiver is around 30 m depending on the coarse timing accuracy, the satellite geometry, and the indoor environments. From the preliminary field test results, it has been observed that the signal processing sensitivity is the

  20. 3D Printing of Graphene Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Feng; Medarametla, Sai Pradeep; Li, Hui; Zhou, Chi; Lin, Dong

    2016-04-01

    3D printing of a graphene aerogel with true 3D overhang structures is highlighted. The aerogel is fabricated by combining drop-on-demand 3D printing and freeze casting. The water-based GO ink is ejected and freeze-cast into designed 3D structures. The lightweight (<10 mg cm(-3) ) 3D printed graphene aerogel presents superelastic and high electrical conduction. PMID:26861680

  1. FR3D: finding local and composite recurrent structural motifs in RNA 3D structures

    PubMed Central

    Sarver, Michael; Stombaugh, Jesse; Mokdad, Ali; Leontis, Neocles B.

    2010-01-01

    New methods are described for finding recurrent three-dimensional (3D) motifs in RNA atomic-resolution structures. Recurrent RNA 3D motifs are sets of RNA nucleotides with similar spatial arrangements. They can be local or composite. Local motifs comprise nucleotides that occur in the same hairpin or internal loop. Composite motifs comprise nucleotides belonging to three or more different RNA strand segments or molecules. We use a base-centered approach to construct efficient, yet exhaustive search procedures using geometric, symbolic, or mixed representations of RNA structure that we implement in a suite of MATLAB programs, “Find RNA 3D” (FR3D). The first modules of FR3D preprocess structure files to classify base-pair and -stacking interactions. Each base is represented geometrically by the position of its glycosidic nitrogen in 3D space and by the rotation matrix that describes its orientation with respect to a common frame. Base-pairing and base-stacking interactions are calculated from the base geometries and are represented symbolically according to the Leontis/Westhof basepairing classification, extended to include base-stacking. These data are stored and used to organize motif searches. For geometric searches, the user supplies the 3D structure of a query motif which FR3D uses to find and score geometrically similar candidate motifs, without regard to the sequential position of their nucleotides in the RNA chain or the identity of their bases. To score and rank candidate motifs, FR3D calculates a geometric discrepancy by rigidly rotating candidates to align optimally with the query motif and then comparing the relative orientations of the corresponding bases in the query and candidate motifs. Given the growing size of the RNA structure database, it is impossible to explicitly compute the discrepancy for all conceivable candidate motifs, even for motifs with less than ten nucleotides. The screening algorithm that we describe finds all candidate motifs

  2. Sensitivity analysis of a cemented hip stem to implant position and cement mantle thickness.

    PubMed

    Shi, J; Browne, M; Strickland, M; Flivik, G; Taylor, M

    2014-11-01

    Patient-specific finite element models of the implanted proximal femur can be built from pre-operative computed tomography scans and post-operative X-rays. However, estimating three-dimensional positioning from two-dimensional radiographs introduces uncertainty in the implant position. Further, accurately measuring the thin cement mantle and the degree of cement-bone interdigitation from imaging data is challenging. To quantify the effect of these uncertainties in stem position and cement thickness, a sensitivity study was performed. A design-of-experiment study was implemented, simulating both gait and stair ascent. Cement mantle stresses and bone-implant interface strains were monitored. The results show that small variations in alignment affect the implant biomechanics, especially around the most proximal and most distal ends of the stem. The results suggest that implant position is more influential than cement thickness. Rotation around the medial-lateral axis is the dominant factor in the proximal zones and stem translations are the dominant factors around the distal tip. PMID:23405986

  3. A location system based on two-dimensional position sensitive detector used in interactive projection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Kai; Zhou, Qian; Chen, Liangjun; Sun, Peng; Xu, Honglei; Gao, Yuan; Ma, Jianshe; Li, Yi; Liu, Minxia

    2010-11-01

    The interactive projection systems have been widely used in people's life. Currently the major type is based on interactive whiteboard (IWB). In recent years, a new type based on CCD/CMOS sensor is greatly developed. Compared to IWB, CCD/CMOS implements non-contact sensing, which can use any surface as the projection screen. This makes them more flexible in many applications. However, the main defect is that the location accuracy and tracing speed are limited by the resolution and frame rate of the CCD/CMOS. In this paper, we introduced our recent progress on constructing a new type of non-contact interactive projection system by using a two-dimensional position sensitive detector (PSD). The PSD is an analog optoelectronic position sensor utilizing photodiode surface resistance, which provides continuous position measuring and features high position resolution (better than 1.5μm) and high speed response (less than 1μs). By using the PSD, both high positioning resolution and high tracing speed can be easily achieved. A specially designed pen equipped with infrared LEDs is used as a cooperative target. A high precision signal processing system is designed and optimized. The nonlinearity of the PSD as well as the aberration of the camera lens is carefully measured and calibrated. Several anti-interference methods and algorithms are studied. Experimental results show that the positioning error is about 2mm over a 1200mm×1000mm projection screen, and the sampling rate is at least 100Hz.

  4. 3D Inverse problem: Seawater intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steklova, K.; Haber, E.

    2013-12-01

    Modeling of seawater intrusions (SWI) is challenging as it involves solving the governing equations for variable density flow, multiple time scales and varying boundary conditions. Due to the nonlinearity of the equations and the large aquifer domains, 3D computations are a costly process, particularly when solving the inverse SWI problem. In addition the heads and concentration measurements are difficult to obtain due to mixing, saline wedge location is sensitive to aquifer topography, and there is general uncertainty in initial and boundary conditions and parameters. Some of these complications can be overcome by using indirect geophysical data next to standard groundwater measurements, however, the inverse problem is usually simplified, e.g. by zonation for the parameters based on geological information, steady state substitution of the unknown initial conditions, decoupling the equations or reducing the amount of unknown parameters by covariance analysis. In our work we present a discretization of the flow and solute mass balance equations for variable groundwater (GW) flow. A finite difference scheme is to solve pressure equation and a Semi - Lagrangian method for solute transport equation. In this way we are able to choose an arbitrarily large time step without losing stability up to an accuracy requirement coming from the coupled character of the variable density flow equations. We derive analytical sensitivities of the GW model for parameters related to the porous media properties and also the initial solute distribution. Analytically derived sensitivities reduce the computational cost of inverse problem, but also give insight for maximizing information in collected data. If the geophysical data are available it also enables simultaneous calibration in a coupled hydrogeophysical framework. The 3D inverse problem was tested on artificial time dependent data for pressure and solute content coming from a GW forward model and/or geophysical forward model. Two

  5. Hartree-Fock values of energies, interaction constants, and atomic properties for excited states with 3 d N4 s0 and 3 d n4 s2 configurations of the negative ions, neutral atoms, and first four positive ions of the transition elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, C. D.; Jastram, J. D.; Hitt, N. P.; Woffod, J.; Rice, K. C.

    2012-12-01

    Global climate-change models predict warmer stream temperatures, but there have been few studies that document such effects on stream communities. In Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, long-term temperature records indicate that stream temperatures show an increasing trend over the last 20 years and especially over the last 10 years. Stream temperatures have increased apparently due to atmospheric warming (i.e., stream temperatures are strongly correlated with regional air temperature patterns). Across 14 monitored stream sites, the median increase in maximum annual water temperature was 0.32oC per year for the 10-yr period between 2000 and 2009, and all 14 sites had positive trend slopes. Moreover, in contrast to water-chemistry trends, temperature trends showed no spatial structure and were consistent throughout the park. The observed warming is consistent with global warming projections, but other factors, including the North Atlantic Oscillation and forest defoliation due to gypsy moth (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae), also may have contributed to warming trends. We summarized benthic macroinvertebrate community composition and structure from samples collected at 24 stream sites over the last 20 years and evaluated temporal patterns in the context of observed temperature trends. We found that a substantial amount of temporal variation in both taxonomic composition and community structure could be explained by temperature trends, even after accounting for water-chemistry changes. We observed significant declines in community diversity as well as a decline in the abundance of several stonefly (Plecoptera) taxa, a cold-water-dependent taxonomic group. We hypothesize that temperature-induced changes in the diversity and composition of macroinvertebrate communities could cascade to other faunal groups and other parts of the watershed. For instance, reduced abundances of stoneflies, an important component of the shredder functional group, may lead to reduced export of

  6. ShowMe3D

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from themore » displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.« less

  7. ShowMe3D

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from the displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.

  8. 3D Elastic Wavefield Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasch, L.; Warner, M.; Stekl, I.; Umpleby, A.; Shah, N.

    2010-12-01

    Wavefield tomography, or waveform inversion, aims to extract the maximum information from seismic data by matching trace by trace the response of the solid earth to seismic waves using numerical modelling tools. Its first formulation dates from the early 80's, when Albert Tarantola developed a solid theoretical basis that is still used today with little change. Due to computational limitations, the application of the method to 3D problems has been unaffordable until a few years ago, and then only under the acoustic approximation. Although acoustic wavefield tomography is widely used, a complete solution of the seismic inversion problem requires that we account properly for the physics of wave propagation, and so must include elastic effects. We have developed a 3D tomographic wavefield inversion code that incorporates the full elastic wave equation. The bottle neck of the different implementations is the forward modelling algorithm that generates the synthetic data to be compared with the field seismograms as well as the backpropagation of the residuals needed to form the direction update of the model parameters. Furthermore, one or two extra modelling runs are needed in order to calculate the step-length. Our approach uses a FD scheme explicit time-stepping by finite differences that are 4th order in space and 2nd order in time, which is a 3D version of the one developed by Jean Virieux in 1986. We chose the time domain because an explicit time scheme is much less demanding in terms of memory than its frequency domain analogue, although the discussion of wich domain is more efficient still remains open. We calculate the parameter gradients for Vp and Vs by correlating the normal and shear stress wavefields respectively. A straightforward application would lead to the storage of the wavefield at all grid points at each time-step. We tackled this problem using two different approaches. The first one makes better use of resources for small models of dimension equal

  9. Detection of cerebral aneurysms in MRA, CTA and 3D-RA data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentschke, Clemens M.; Beuing, Oliver; Nickl, Rosa; Tönnies, Klaus D.

    2012-03-01

    We propose a system to automatically detect cerebral aneurysms in 3D X-ray rotational angiography images (3D-RA), magnetic resonance angiography images (MRA) and computed tomography angiography images (CTA). After image normalization, initial candidates are found by applying a blob-enhancing filter on the data sets. Clusters are computed by a modified k-means algorithm. A post-processing step reduces the false positive (FP) rate on the basis of computed features. This is implemented as a rule-based system that is adapted according to the modality. In MRA, clusters are excluded that are not neighbored to a vessel. As a final step, FP are further reduced by applying a threshold classification on a feature. Our method was tested on 93 angiographic data sets containing aneurysm and non-aneurysm cases. We achieved 95 % sensitivity with an average rate of 2.6 FP per data set (FP/DS) in case of 3D-RA, 89 % sensitivity at 6.6 FP/DS for MRA and 95 % sensitivity at 37.6 FP/DS with CTA, respectively. We showed that our post-processing approach eliminates FP in MRA with only a slight decrease of sensitivity. In contrast to other approaches, our algorithm does not require a vessel segmentation and does not require training of distributional properties.

  10. A Study of Position-Sensitive Solid-State Photomultiplier Signal Properties

    PubMed Central

    Schmall, Jeffrey P.; Du, Junwei; Judenhofer, Martin S.; Dokhale, Purushottam; Christian, James; McClish, Mickel; Shah, Kanai S.; Cherry, Simon R.

    2014-01-01

    We present an analysis of the signal properties of a position-sensitive solid-state photomultiplier (PS-SSPM) that has an integrated resistive network for position sensing. Attractive features of PS-SSPMs are their large area and ability to resolve small scintillator crystals. However, the large area leads to a high detector capacitance, and in order to achieve high spatial resolution a large network resistor value is required. These inevitably create a low-pass filter that drastically slows what would be a fast micro-cell discharge pulse. Significant changes in the signal shape of the PS-SSPM cathode output as a function of position are observed, which result in a position-dependent time delay when using traditional time pick-off methods such as leading edge discrimination and constant fraction discrimination. The timing resolution and time delay, as a function of position, were characterized for two different PS-SSPM designs, a continuous 10 mm × 10 mm PS-SSPM and a tiled 2 × 2 array of 5 mm × 5 mm PS-SSPMs. After time delay correction, the block timing resolution, measured with a 6 × 6 array of 1.3 × 1.3 × 20 mm3 LSO crystals, was 8.6 ns and 8.5 ns, with the 10 mm PS-SSPM and 5 mm PS-SSPM respectively. The effect of crystal size on timing resolution was also studied, and contrary to expectation, a small improvement was measured when reducing the crystal size from 1.3 mm to 0.5 mm. Digital timing methods were studied and showed great promise for allowing accurate timing by implementation of a leading edge time pick-off. Position-dependent changes in signal shape on the anode side also are present, which complicates peak height data acquisition methods used for positioning. We studied the effect of trigger position on signal amplitude, flood histogram quality, and depth-of-interaction resolution in a dual-ended readout detector configuration. We conclude that detector timing and positioning can be significantly improved by implementation of digital timing

  11. A Study of Position-Sensitive Solid-State Photomultiplier Signal Properties.

    PubMed

    Schmall, Jeffrey P; Du, Junwei; Judenhofer, Martin S; Dokhale, Purushottam; Christian, James; McClish, Mickel; Shah, Kanai S; Cherry, Simon R

    2014-06-12

    We present an analysis of the signal properties of a position-sensitive solid-state photomultiplier (PS-SSPM) that has an integrated resistive network for position sensing. Attractive features of PS-SSPMs are their large area and ability to resolve small scintillator crystals. However, the large area leads to a high detector capacitance, and in order to achieve high spatial resolution a large network resistor value is required. These inevitably create a low-pass filter that drastically slows what would be a fast micro-cell discharge pulse. Significant changes in the signal shape of the PS-SSPM cathode output as a function of position are observed, which result in a position-dependent time delay when using traditional time pick-off methods such as leading edge discrimination and constant fraction discrimination. The timing resolution and time delay, as a function of position, were characterized for two different PS-SSPM designs, a continuous 10 mm × 10 mm PS-SSPM and a tiled 2 × 2 array of 5 mm × 5 mm PS-SSPMs. After time delay correction, the block timing resolution, measured with a 6 × 6 array of 1.3 × 1.3 × 20 mm(3) LSO crystals, was 8.6 ns and 8.5 ns, with the 10 mm PS-SSPM and 5 mm PS-SSPM respectively. The effect of crystal size on timing resolution was also studied, and contrary to expectation, a small improvement was measured when reducing the crystal size from 1.3 mm to 0.5 mm. Digital timing methods were studied and showed great promise for allowing accurate timing by implementation of a leading edge time pick-off. Position-dependent changes in signal shape on the anode side also are present, which complicates peak height data acquisition methods used for positioning. We studied the effect of trigger position on signal amplitude, flood histogram quality, and depth-of-interaction resolution in a dual-ended readout detector configuration. We conclude that detector timing and positioning can be significantly improved by implementation of digital timing

  12. Characterization of contamination through the use of position sensitive detectors and digital image processing

    SciTech Connect

    Shonka, J.J.; DeBord, D.M.; Bennett, T.E.; Weismann, J.J.

    1996-06-01

    This report describes development of a significant new method for monitoring radioactive surface contamination. A floor monitor prototype has been designed which uses position sensitive proportional counter based radiation detectors. The system includes a novel operator interface consisting of an enhanced reality display providing the operator with 3 dimensional contours of contamination and background subtracted stereo clicks. The process software saves electronic files of survey data at very high rates along with time stamped video recording and provides completely documented surveys in a visualization oriented data management system. The data management system allows simple re-assembly of strips of data that are taken with a linear PSPC and allows visualization and treatment of the data using algorithms developed for processing images from earth resource satellites. This report includes a brief history of the development path for the floor monitor, a discussion of position sensitive proportional counter technology, and details concerning the process software, post processor and hardware. The last chapter discusses the field tests that were conducted at five sites and an application of the data management system for data not associated with detector systems.

  13. A position-sensitive twin ionization chamber for fission fragment and prompt neutron correlation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göök, A.; Geerts, W.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Vidali, M.; Zeynalov, Sh.

    2016-09-01

    A twin position-sensitive Frisch grid ionization chamber, intended as a fission fragment detector in experiments to study prompt fission neutron correlations with fission fragment properties, is presented. Fission fragment mass and energies are determined by means of the double kinetic energy technique, based on conservation of mass and linear momentum. The position sensitivity is achieved by replacing each anode plate in the standard twin ionization chamber by a wire plane and a strip anode, both readout by means of resistive charge division. This provides information about the fission axis orientation, which is necessary to reconstruct the neutron emission process in the fully accelerated fragment rest-frame. The energy resolution compared to the standard twin ionization chamber is found not to be affected by the modification. The angular resolution of the detector relative to an arbitrarily oriented axis is better than 7° FWHM. Results on prompt fission neutron angular distributions in 235U(n,f) obtained with the detector in combination with an array of neutron scintillation detectors is presented as a proof of principle.

  14. High spatial resolution two-dimensional position sensitive detector for the performance of coincidence experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ceolin, D.; Chaplier, G.; Lemonnier, M.; Garcia, G.A.; Miron, C.; Nahon, L.; Simon, M.; Leclercq, N.; Morin, P.

    2005-04-01

    A position sensitive detector (PSD) adapted to the technical and mechanical specifications of our angle and energy resolved electron-ion(s) coincidence experiments is described in this article. The device, whose principle is very similar to the one detailed by J. H. D. Eland [Meas. Sci. Technol. 5, 1501 (1994)], is composed by a set of microchannel plates and a delay line anode. The originality comes from the addition in front of the encoding surface of a ceramic disk covered by a resistive surface. The capacitive coupling between the anode and the resistive plane has the double advantage of eliminating the spatial modulations due to the lattice of the anode and also of sensitizing a greater number of electrodes, increasing thus considerably the accuracy of the position measurements. The tests carried out with a time to digital conversion module of 250 ps resolution showed that a spatial resolution better than 50 {mu}m and a dead time of 160 ns can be achieved. Typical images obtained with the help of the EPICEA and DELICIOUS coincidence setups are also shown.

  15. Position-sensitive radiation monitoring (surface contamination monitor). Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-06-01

    The Shonka Research Associates, Inc. Position-Sensitive Radiation Monitor both detects surface radiation and prepares electronic survey map/survey report of surveyed area automatically. The electronically recorded map can be downloaded to a personal computer for review and a map/report can be generated for inclusion in work packages. Switching from beta-gamma detection to alpha detection is relatively simple and entails moving a switch position to alpha and adjusting the voltage level to an alpha detection level. No field calibration is required when switching from beta-gamma to alpha detection. The system can be used for free-release surveys because it meets the federal detection level sensitivity limits requires for surface survey instrumentation. This technology is superior to traditionally-used floor contamination monitor (FCM) and hand-held survey instrumentation because it can precisely register locations of radioactivity and accurately correlate contamination levels to specific locations. Additionally, it can collect and store continuous radiological data in database format, which can be used to produce real-time imagery as well as automated graphics of survey data. Its flexible design can accommodate a variety of detectors. The cost of the innovative technology is 13% to 57% lower than traditional methods. This technology is suited for radiological surveys of flat surfaces at US Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) sites or similar public or commercial sites.

  16. Single-stage application of a novel decellularized dermis for treatment-resistant lower limb ulcers: positive outcomes assessed by SIAscopy, laser perfusion, and 3D imaging, with sequential timed histological analysis.

    PubMed

    Greaves, Nicholas S; Benatar, Brian; Baguneid, Mohamed; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2013-01-01

    We present results of an original clinical study investigating efficacy of a decellularized dermal skin substitute (DCD) as part of a one-stage therapeutic strategy for recalcitrant leg ulcers. Twenty patients with treatment-resistant ulcers underwent hydrosurgical debridement, after which DCD was applied and covered with negative pressure dressings for 1 week. Participants were reviewed on seven occasions over 6 months. 3D photography, full-field laser perfusion imaging, spectrophotometric intracutaneous analysis, and sequential biopsies were used to monitor healing. Mean ulcer duration and surface area prior to DCD placement were 4.76 years (range 0.25-40 years) and 13.11 cm(2) (range 1.06-40.75 cm(2)), respectively. Seventy percent of ulcers were venous. Surface area decreased in all patients after treatment (range 23-100%). Mean reduction was 87% after 6 months, and 60% of patients healed completely. Wound bed hemoglobin flux increased significantly 6 weeks after treatment (p = 0.005). Histological and immunohistochemical analysis confirmed progressive DCD integration with colonization by host fibroblasts, lymphocytes, and neutrophils, resulting in fibroplasia, reepithelialisation, and angiogenesis, with correlating raised CD31, collagen I, and collagen III levels. Subgroup analysis showed differing cellular behavior depending on wound duration, with delayed angiogenesis, reduced collagen deposition, and smaller reductions in surface area in ulcers present for over 1 year. The stain intensities of immunohistochemical markers including fibronectin, collagen, and CD31 differed depending on depth from the wound surface and presence of intact epithelium. DCD safely produced significant improvement in treatment-resistant leg ulcers. With no requirement for hospital admission, anesthetic, or autogenic skin grafting, this treatment could be administered in hospital and community settings. PMID:24134424

  17. Landmine detection by 3D GPR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Motoyuki; Yokota, Yuya; Takahashi, Kazunori; Grasmueck, Mark

    2012-06-01

    In order to demonstrate the possibility of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) for detection of small buried objects such as landmine and UXO, conducted demonstration tests by using the 3DGPR system, which is a GPR system combined with high accuracy positing system using a commercial laser positioning system (iGPS). iGPS can provide absolute and better than centimetre precise x,y,z coordinates to multiple mine sensors at the same time. The developed " 3DGPR" system is efficient and capable of high-resolution 3D shallow subsurface scanning of larger areas (25 m2 to thousands of square meters) with irregular topography . Field test by using a 500MHz GPR system equipped with 3DGPR system was conducted. PMN-2 and Type-72 mine models have been buried at the depth of 5-20cm in sand. We could demonstrate that the 3DGPR can visualize each of these buried land mines very clearly.

  18. Using a wireless motion controller for 3D medical image catheter interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitanovski, Dime; Hahn, Dieter; Daum, Volker; Hornegger, Joachim

    2009-02-01

    State-of-the-art morphological imaging techniques usually provide high resolution 3D images with a huge number of slices. In clinical practice, however, 2D slice-based examinations are still the method of choice even for these large amounts of data. Providing intuitive interaction methods for specific 3D medical visualization applications is therefore a critical feature for clinical imaging applications. For the domain of catheter navigation and surgery planning, it is crucial to assist the physician with appropriate visualization techniques, such as 3D segmentation maps, fly-through cameras or virtual interaction approaches. There has been an ongoing development and improvement for controllers that help to interact with 3D environments in the domain of computer games. These controllers are based on both motion and infrared sensors and are typically used to detect 3D position and orientation. We have investigated how a state-of-the-art wireless motion sensor controller (Wiimote), developed by Nintendo, can be used for catheter navigation and planning purposes. By default the Wiimote controller only measure rough acceleration over a range of +/- 3g with 10% sensitivity and orientation. Therefore, a pose estimation algorithm was developed for computing accurate position and orientation in 3D space regarding 4 Infrared LEDs. Current results show that for the translation it is possible to obtain a mean error of (0.38cm, 0.41cm, 4.94cm) and for the rotation (0.16, 0.28) respectively. Within this paper we introduce a clinical prototype that allows steering of a virtual fly-through camera attached to the catheter tip by the Wii controller on basis of a segmented vessel tree.

  19. Volumetric 3D Display System with Static Screen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Current display technology has relied on flat, 2D screens that cannot truly convey the third dimension of visual information: depth. In contrast to conventional visualization that is primarily based on 2D flat screens, the volumetric 3D display possesses a true 3D display volume, and places physically each 3D voxel in displayed 3D images at the true 3D (x,y,z) spatial position. Each voxel, analogous to a pixel in a 2D image, emits light from that position to form a real 3D image in the eyes of the viewers. Such true volumetric 3D display technology provides both physiological (accommodation, convergence, binocular disparity, and motion parallax) and psychological (image size, linear perspective, shading, brightness, etc.) depth cues to human visual systems to help in the perception of 3D objects. In a volumetric 3D display, viewers can watch the displayed 3D images from a completely 360 view without using any special eyewear. The volumetric 3D display techniques may lead to a quantum leap in information display technology and can dramatically change the ways humans interact with computers, which can lead to significant improvements in the efficiency of learning and knowledge management processes. Within a block of glass, a large amount of tiny dots of voxels are created by using a recently available machining technique called laser subsurface engraving (LSE). The LSE is able to produce tiny physical crack points (as small as 0.05 mm in diameter) at any (x,y,z) location within the cube of transparent material. The crack dots, when illuminated by a light source, scatter the light around and form visible voxels within the 3D volume. The locations of these tiny voxels are strategically determined such that each can be illuminated by a light ray from a high-resolution digital mirror device (DMD) light engine. The distribution of these voxels occupies the full display volume within the static 3D glass screen. This design eliminates any moving screen seen in previous

  20. Identifying novel sequence variants of RNA 3D motifs

    PubMed Central

    Zirbel, Craig L.; Roll, James; Sweeney, Blake A.; Petrov, Anton I.; Pirrung, Meg; Leontis, Neocles B.

    2015-01-01

    Predicting RNA 3D structure from sequence is a major challenge in biophysics. An important sub-goal is accurately identifying recurrent 3D motifs from RNA internal and hairpin loop sequences extracted from secondary structure (2D) diagrams. We have developed and validated new probabilistic models for 3D motif sequences based on hybrid Stochastic Context-Free Grammars and Markov Random Fields (SCFG/MRF). The SCFG/MRF models are constructed using atomic-resolution RNA 3D structures. To parameterize each model, we use all instances of each motif found in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas and annotations of pairwise nucleotide interactions generated by the FR3D software. Isostericity relations between non-Watson–Crick basepairs are used in scoring sequence variants. SCFG techniques model nested pairs and insertions, while MRF ideas handle crossing interactions and base triples. We use test sets of randomly-generated sequences to set acceptance and rejection thresholds for each motif group and thus control the false positive rate. Validation was carried out by comparing results for four motif groups to RMDetect. The software developed for sequence scoring (JAR3D) is structured to automatically incorporate new motifs as they accumulate in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas when new structures are solved and is available free for download. PMID:26130723

  1. Identifying novel sequence variants of RNA 3D motifs.

    PubMed

    Zirbel, Craig L; Roll, James; Sweeney, Blake A; Petrov, Anton I; Pirrung, Meg; Leontis, Neocles B

    2015-09-01

    Predicting RNA 3D structure from sequence is a major challenge in biophysics. An important sub-goal is accurately identifying recurrent 3D motifs from RNA internal and hairpin loop sequences extracted from secondary structure (2D) diagrams. We have developed and validated new probabilistic models for 3D motif sequences based on hybrid Stochastic Context-Free Grammars and Markov Random Fields (SCFG/MRF). The SCFG/MRF models are constructed using atomic-resolution RNA 3D structures. To parameterize each model, we use all instances of each motif found in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas and annotations of pairwise nucleotide interactions generated by the FR3D software. Isostericity relations between non-Watson-Crick basepairs are used in scoring sequence variants. SCFG techniques model nested pairs and insertions, while MRF ideas handle crossing interactions and base triples. We use test sets of randomly-generated sequences to set acceptance and rejection thresholds for each motif group and thus control the false positive rate. Validation was carried out by comparing results for four motif groups to RMDetect. The software developed for sequence scoring (JAR3D) is structured to automatically incorporate new motifs as they accumulate in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas when new structures are solved and is available free for download. PMID:26130723

  2. 3-D sonography for diagnosis of osteoarthrosis and disk degeneration of the temporomandibular joint, compared with MRI.

    PubMed

    Landes, Constantin A; Goral, Wojciech; Mack, Martin G; Sader, Robert

    2006-05-01

    This study determined the value of three-dimensional (3-D) sonography for the assessment of osteoarthrosis and disk degeneration of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Sixty-eight patients (136 TMJ) with clinical dysfunction were examined by 272 sonographic 3-D scans. An 8- to 12.5-MHz motor-angulated transducer positioned inferior-parallel to the zygomatic arch scanned the region-of-interest. 3-D condylar morphology was compared with subsequent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Fifty-three datasets were complete, i.e., 106 TMJ, 212 examinations. 3-D sonographic examination took 5 min and attained 70% sensitivity/76% specificity/75% accuracy; positive predictive value was 44%%; negative predictive value was 90%. Disk degeneration was diagnosed synonymously with 64%/73%/71%/42%/ 87%. 3-D sonography proved to be reliable for exclusion of osteoarthrosis as disk degeneration compared with MRI, whereas the presence of osteoarthrosis and disk dislocation cannot be reliably diagnosed. Prospective use will include routine screening, using more sophisticated equipment with higher frequency in real-time 3-D viewing. PMID:16677921

  3. A research of 3D gravity inversion based on the recovery of sparse underdetermined linear equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhaohai, M.

    2014-12-01

    Because of the properties of gravity data, it is made difficult to solve the problem of multiple solutions. There are two main types of 3D gravity inversion methods:One of two methods is based on the improvement of the instability of the sensitive matrix, solving the problem of multiple solutions and instability in 3D gravity inversion. Another is to join weight function into the 3D gravity inversion iteration. Through constant iteration, it can renewal density values and weight function to achieve the purpose to solve the multiple solutions and instability of the 3D gravity data inversion. Thanks to the sparse nature of the solutions of 3D gravity data inversions, we can transform it into a sparse equation. Then, through solving the sparse equations, we can get perfect 3D gravity inversion results. The main principle is based on zero norm of sparse matrix solution of the equation. Zero norm is mainly to solve the nonzero solution of the sparse matrix. However, the method of this article adopted is same as the principle of zero norm. But the method is the opposite of zero norm to obtain zero value solution. Through the form of a Gaussian fitting solution of the zero norm, we can find the solution by using regularization principle. Moreover, this method has been proved that it had a certain resistance to random noise in the mathematics, and it was more suitable than zero norm for the solution of the geophysical data. 3D gravity which is adopted in this article can well identify abnormal body density distribution characteristics, and it can also recognize the space position of abnormal distribution very well. We can take advantage of the density of the upper and lower limit penalty function to make each rectangular residual density within a reasonable range. Finally, this 3D gravity inversion is applied to a variety of combination model test, such as a single straight three-dimensional model, the adjacent straight three-dimensional model and Y three

  4. Evaluating scatterometry 3D capabilities for EUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Kritsun, Oleg; Dasari, Prasad; Volkman, Catherine; Wallow, Tom; Hu, Jiangtao

    2013-04-01

    Optical critical dimension (OCD) metrology using scatterometry has been demonstrated to be a viable solution for fast and non-destructive in-line process control and monitoring. As extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) is more widely adopted to fabricate smaller and smaller patterns for electronic devices, scatterometry faces new challenges due to several reasons. For 14nm node and beyond, the feature size is nearly an order of magnitude smaller than the shortest wavelength used in scatterometry. In addition, thinner resist layer is used in EUVL compared with conventional lithography, which leads to reduced measurement sensitivity. Despite these difficulties, tolerance has reduced for smaller feature size. In this work we evaluate 3D capability of scatterometry for EUV process using spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). Three types of structures, contact holes, tip-to-tip, and tip-to-edge, are studied to test CD and end-gap metrology capabilities. The wafer is processed with focus and exposure matrix. Good correlations to CD-SEM results are achieved and good dynamic precision is obtained for all the key parameters. In addition, the fit to process provides an independent method to evaluate data quality from different metrology tools such as OCD and CDSEM. We demonstrate 3D capabilities of scatterometry OCD metrology for EUVL using spectroscopic ellipsometry, which provides valuable in-line metrology for CD and end-gap control in electronic circuit fabrications.

  5. Estimated SLR station position and network frame sensitivity to time-varying gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelensky, Nikita P.; Lemoine, Frank G.; Chinn, Douglas S.; Melachroinos, Stavros; Beckley, Brian D.; Beall, Jennifer Wiser; Bordyugov, Oleg

    2014-06-01

    This paper evaluates the sensitivity of ITRF2008-based satellite laser ranging (SLR) station positions estimated weekly using LAGEOS-1/2 data from 1993 to 2012 to non-tidal time-varying gravity (TVG). Two primary methods for modeling TVG from degree-2 are employed. The operational approach applies an annual GRACE-derived field, and IERS recommended linear rates for five coefficients. The experimental approach uses low-order/degree coefficients estimated weekly from SLR and DORIS processing of up to 11 satellites (tvg4x4). This study shows that the LAGEOS-1/2 orbits and the weekly station solutions are sensitive to more detailed modeling of TVG than prescribed in the current IERS standards. Over 1993-2012 tvg4x4 improves SLR residuals by 18 % and shows 10 % RMS improvement in station stability. Tests suggest that the improved stability of the tvg4x4 POD solution frame may help clarify geophysical signals present in the estimated station position time series. The signals include linear and seasonal station motion, and motion of the TRF origin, particularly in Z. The effect on both POD and the station solutions becomes increasingly evident starting in 2006. Over 2008-2012, the tvg4x4 series improves SLR residuals by 29 %. Use of the GRGS RL02 series shows similar improvement in POD. Using tvg4x4, secular changes in the TRF origin Z component double over the last decade and although not conclusive, it is consistent with increased geocenter rate expected due to continental ice melt. The test results indicate that accurate modeling of TVG is necessary for improvement of station position estimation using SLR data.

  6. Stereoscopic 3D video games and their effects on engagement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogue, Andrew; Kapralos, Bill; Zerebecki, Chris; Tawadrous, Mina; Stanfield, Brodie; Hogue, Urszula

    2012-03-01

    With television manufacturers developing low-cost stereoscopic 3D displays, a large number of consumers will undoubtedly have access to 3D-capable televisions at home. The availability of 3D technology places the onus on content creators to develop interesting and engaging content. While the technology of stereoscopic displays and content generation are well understood, there are many questions yet to be answered surrounding its effects on the viewer. Effects of stereoscopic display on passive viewers for film are known, however video games are fundamentally different since the viewer/player is actively (rather than passively) engaged in the content. Questions of how stereoscopic viewing affects interaction mechanics have previously been studied in the context of player performance but very few have attempted to quantify the player experience to determine whether stereoscopic 3D has a positive or negative influence on their overall engagement. In this paper we present a preliminary study of the effects stereoscopic 3D have on player engagement in video games. Participants played a video game in two conditions, traditional 2D and stereoscopic 3D and their engagement was quantified using a previously validated self-reporting tool. The results suggest that S3D has a positive effect on immersion, presence, flow, and absorption.

  7. Development of an automultiscopic true 3D display (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtz, Russell M.; Pradhan, Ranjit D.; Aye, Tin M.; Yu, Kevin H.; Okorogu, Albert O.; Chua, Kang-Bin; Tun, Nay; Win, Tin; Schindler, Axel

    2005-05-01

    True 3D displays, whether generated by volume holography, merged stereopsis (requiring glasses), or autostereoscopic methods (stereopsis without the need for special glasses), are useful in a great number of applications, ranging from training through product visualization to computer gaming. Holography provides an excellent 3D image but cannot yet be produced in real time, merged stereopsis results in accommodation-convergence conflict (where distance cues generated by the 3D appearance of the image conflict with those obtained from the angular position of the eyes) and lacks parallax cues, and autostereoscopy produces a 3D image visible only from a small region of space. Physical Optics Corporation is developing the next step in real-time 3D displays, the automultiscopic system, which eliminates accommodation-convergence conflict, produces 3D imagery from any position around the display, and includes true image parallax. Theory of automultiscopic display systems is presented, together with results from our prototype display, which produces 3D video imagery with full parallax cues from any viewing direction.

  8. The impact of activating source dwell positions outside the CTV on the dose to treated normal tissue volumes in TRUS guided 3D conformal interstitial HDR brachytherapy of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thunberg, Per; Johansson, Bengt; Persliden, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Dose coverage is crucial for successful treatment in mono-brachytherapy. Since few and very high dose fractions are used, there is an important balance between dwell positioning outside the clinical target volume (CTV) and possible damage on adjacent normal tissue. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibility of having dwell positions close to the CTV surface, while maintaining an acceptable dose distribution, and to investigate the robustness in terms of known geometrical uncertainties of the implant. Material and methods This study included 37 patients who had received brachytherapy for prostate cancer as a monotherapy with the following schedules: 2 × 14 Gy or 3 × 11 Gy, each fraction separated by two weeks. The source dwell positions were activated 5 mm outside CTV. New optimizations were simulated for dwell positions at 3, 2, 1, and 0 mm. Inverse and graphical optimization were applied according to the relative dose constraints: V100 CTV ≥ 97%, Dmax, urethra ≤ 110%, and D10 rectal mucosa ≤ 65%. The V100, normal tissue outside CTV was used to evaluate dose variations caused by different dwell positions. Prostate geometries and dose distributions for the different dwell positions outside the CTV were used to investigate the impact on the CTV dose distribution due to geometrical uncertainties. Results Both V100, CTV, and V100, normal tissue decreased, 98.6% to 92.2%, and 17 cm3 to 9.0 cm3, for dwell activation from 5 mm to 0 mm. The evaluation of both simulated longitudinal geometrical uncertainties and different source dwell activations implied that V100, CTV ranged from 98.6% to 86.3%. Conclusions It is possible to reduce the V100, normal tissue by decreasing the source dwell positions outside the CTV from 5 to 3 mm, while maintaining dose constraints. In combination with the estimated geometrical uncertainties, however, the source dwell positions need to be 5 mm from the surface in order to maintain a robust implant. PMID:25337130

  9. Improvements in education in pathology: virtual 3D specimens.

    PubMed

    Kalinski, Thomas; Zwönitzer, Ralf; Jonczyk-Weber, Thomas; Hofmann, Harald; Bernarding, Johannes; Roessner, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Virtual three-dimensional (3D) specimens correspond to 3D visualizations of real pathological specimens on a computer display. We describe a simple method for the digitalization of such specimens from high-quality digital images. The images were taken during a whole rotation of a specimen, and merged together into a JPEG2000 multi-document file. The files were made available in the internet (http://patho.med.uni-magdeburg.de/research.shtml) and obtained very positive ratings by medical students. Virtual 3D specimens expand the application of digital techniques in pathology, and will contribute significantly to the successful introduction of knowledge databases and electronic learning platforms. PMID:19457621

  10. Lipid-conjugated telomerase template antagonists sensitize resistant HER2-positive breast cancer cells to trastuzumab.

    PubMed

    Goldblatt, Erin M; Erickson, Priscilla A; Gentry, Erin R; Gryaznov, Sergei M; Herbert, Brittney-Shea

    2009-11-01

    HER2 amplification in breast cancer is associated with a more aggressive disease, greater likelihood of recurrence, and decreased survival compared to women with HER2-negative breast cancer. Trastuzumab is a monoclonal antibody that inhibits HER2 activity, making this compound an important therapeutic option for patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. However, resistance to trastuzumab develops rapidly in a large number of breast cancer patients. The objective of this study was to determine whether GRN163L, a telomerase template antagonist currently in clinical trials for cancer treatment, can augment the effects of trastuzumab in breast cancer cells with HER2 amplification. GRN163L was effective in inhibiting telomerase activity and shortening telomeres in HER2-positive breast cancer cells. We show that GRN163L acts synergistically with trastuzumab in inhibiting HER2-positive breast cancer cell growth. More importantly, we show that GRN163L can restore the sensitivity of therapeutic-resistant breast cancer cells to trastuzumab. These findings implicate that telomerase template antagonists have potential use in the treatment of cancers that have developed resistance to traditional cancer therapy. PMID:18853252

  11. Evidence for the sensitivity of a Great Basin terminal lake to storm track position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatchett, B.; Boyle, D. P.; Garner, C.; Kaplan, M. L.; Bassett, S.

    2014-12-01

    Arid, closed basin watersheds can serve as indicators of regional climate change. In this work we test the hypothesis that surface elevations of Walker Lake, a Great Basin terminal lake, are sensitive to storm track positions. To do so, we use historical climate records, numerically dated paleolakeshore elevations, global reanalysis products and a semi-distributed water balance model. Precipitation and temperature values from calculated wet and dry periods between 1920-2011 were used as input to the model. Storm track climatologies were developed using reanalysis products. Our results demonstrate that a strong relationship exists between historic wet and dry periods and storm track positions. Under the assumption of a stationary climate using these historic wet and dry climates with the model, we simulated lake levels that are consistent with recorded high and lowstands occurring during Heinrich Stadial 1, the Younger Dryas, the Medieval Climate Anomaly and the Little Ice Age. These findings provide direct support for the storm track migration hypothesis. The nonlinear relationship between changes in precipitation and runoff appears to play a critical role in determining why terminal lakes are particularly responsive to changes in storm track positions.

  12. Polyanions decelerate the kinetics of positively charged gramicidin channels as shown by sensitized photoinactivation.

    PubMed Central

    Antonenko, Yuri N; Borisenko, Vitali; Melik-Nubarov, Nikolay S; Kotova, Elena A; Woolley, G Andrew

    2002-01-01

    The effects of different anionic polymers on the kinetic properties of ionic channels formed by neutral gramicidin A (gA) and its positively charged analogs gramicidin-tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (gram-TAEA) and gramicidin-ethylenediamine (gram-EDA) in a bilayer lipid membrane were studied using a method of sensitized photoinactivation. The addition of Konig's polyanion caused substantial deceleration of the photoinactivation kinetics of gram-TAEA channels, which expose three positive charges to the aqueous phase at both sides of the membrane. In contrast, channels formed of gram-EDA, which exposes one positive charge, and neutral gA channels were insensitive to Konig's polyanion. The effect strongly depended on the nature of the polyanion added, namely: DNA, RNA, polyacrylic acid, and polyglutamic acid were inactive, whereas modified polyacrylic acid induced deceleration of the channel kinetics at high concentrations. In addition, DNA was able to prevent the action of Konig's polyanion. In single-channel experiments, the addition of Konig's polyanion resulted in the appearance of long-lived gram-TAEA channels. The deceleration of the gram-TAEA channel kinetics was ascribed to electrostatic interaction of the polyanion with gram-TAEA that reduces the mobility of gram-TAEA monomers and dimers in the membrane via clustering of channels. PMID:11867447

  13. Development of Position-Sensitive Magnetic Calorimeter X-ray Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porst, Jan-Patrick; Bandler, Simon R.; Adams, Joseph S.; Hsieh, Wen-Ting; Rotzinger, Hannes; Seidel, George M.; Smith, Stephen J.; Stevenson, Thomas R.

    2009-12-01

    We are developing arrays of position-sensitive magnetic calorimeter (PoSM) X-ray detectors for future astronomy missions. The PoSM consists of multiple absorbers thermally coupled to one magnetic sensor. Each absorber element has a different thermal coupling to the sensor. This results in a distribution of different pulse shapes and enables position discrimination between the absorber elements. PoSMs are motivated by the desire to achieve the largest possible focal plane area with the fewest number of readout channels without compromising on spatial sampling. Optimizing the performance of PoSMs requires careful design of key parameters such as the thermal conductances between the absorbers, magnetic sensor and the heat sink, as well as the absorber heat capacities. We report on the first experimental results from four-absorber PoSMs, each absorber consisting of a two layer composite of bismuth and gold. The measured energy resolution (FWHM) was less than 5 eV for 6 keV X-rays into all four absorbers. Straightforward position discrimination by means of rise-time is also demonstrated.

  14. Development of Position-Sensitive Magnetic Calorimeter X-ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Porst, Jan-Patrick; Bandler, Simon R.; Adams, Joseph S.; Smith, Stephen J.; Hsieh, W.-T.; Stevenson, Thomas R.; Rotzinger, Hannes; Seidel, George M.

    2009-12-16

    We are developing arrays of position-sensitive magnetic calorimeter (PoSM) X-ray detectors for future astronomy missions. The PoSM consists of multiple absorbers thermally coupled to one magnetic sensor. Each absorber element has a different thermal coupling to the sensor. This results in a distribution of different pulse shapes and enables position discrimination between the absorber elements. PoSMs are motivated by the desire to achieve the largest possible focal plane area with the fewest number of readout channels without compromising on spatial sampling. Optimizing the performance of PoSMs requires careful design of key parameters such as the thermal conductances between the absorbers, magnetic sensor and the heat sink, as well as the absorber heat capacities. We report on the first experimental results from four-absorber PoSMs, each absorber consisting of a two layer composite of bismuth and gold. The measured energy resolution (FWHM) was less than 5 eV for 6 keV X-rays into all four absorbers. Straightforward position discrimination by means of rise-time is also demonstrated.

  15. Development of Position-Sensitive Magnetic Calorimeters for X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandler, SImon; Stevenson, Thomas; Hsieh, Wen-Ting

    2011-01-01

    Metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMC) are one of the most promising devices to provide very high energy resolution needed for future astronomical x-ray spectroscopy. MMC detectors can be built to large detector arrays having thousands of pixels. Position-sensitive magnetic (PoSM) microcalorimeters consist of multiple absorbers thermally coupled to one magnetic micro calorimeter. Each absorber element has a different thermal coupling to the MMC, resulting in a distribution of different pulse shapes and enabling position discrimination between the absorber elements. PoSMs therefore achieve the large focal plane area with fewer number of readout channels without compromising spatial sampling. Excellent performance of PoSMs was achieved by optimizing the designs of key parameters such as the thermal conductance among the absorbers, magnetic sensor, and heat sink, as well as the absorber heat capacities. Micro fab ri - cation techniques were developed to construct four-absorber PoSMs, in which each absorber consists of a two-layer composite of bismuth and gold. The energy resolution (FWHM full width at half maximum) was measured to be better than 5 eV at 6 keV x-rays for all four absorbers. Position determination was demonstrated with pulse-shape discrimination, as well as with pulse rise time. X-ray microcalorimeters are usually designed to thermalize as quickly as possible to avoid degradation in energy resolution from position dependence to the pulse shapes. Each pixel consists of an absorber and a temperature sensor, both decoupled from the cold bath through a weak thermal link. Each pixel requires a separate readout channel; for instance, with a SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device). For future astronomy missions where thousands to millions of resolution elements are required, having an individual SQUID readout channel for each pixel becomes difficult. One route to attaining these goals is a position-sensitive detector in which a large continuous or

  16. Glnemo2: Interactive Visualization 3D Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Jean-Charles

    2011-10-01

    Glnemo2 is an interactive 3D visualization program developed in C++ using the OpenGL library and Nokia QT 4.X API. It displays in 3D the particles positions of the different components of an nbody snapshot. It quickly gives a lot of information about the data (shape, density area, formation of structures such as spirals, bars, or peanuts). It allows for in/out zooms, rotations, changes of scale, translations, selection of different groups of particles and plots in different blending colors. It can color particles according to their density or temperature, play with the density threshold, trace orbits, display different time steps, take automatic screenshots to make movies, select particles using the mouse, and fly over a simulation using a given camera path. All these features are accessible from a very intuitive graphic user interface. Glnemo2 supports a wide range of input file formats (Nemo, Gadget 1 and 2, phiGrape, Ramses, list of files, realtime gyrfalcON simulation) which are automatically detected at loading time without user intervention. Glnemo2 uses a plugin mechanism to load the data, so that it is easy to add a new file reader. It's powered by a 3D engine which uses the latest OpenGL technology, such as shaders (glsl), vertex buffer object, frame buffer object, and takes in account the power of the graphic card used in order to accelerate the rendering. With a fast GPU, millions of particles can be rendered in real time. Glnemo2 runs on Linux, Windows (using minGW compiler), and MaxOSX, thanks to the QT4API.

  17. NIF Ignition Target 3D Point Design

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, O; Marinak, M; Milovich, J; Callahan, D

    2008-11-05

    We have developed an input file for running 3D NIF hohlraums that is optimized such that it can be run in 1-2 days on parallel computers. We have incorporated increasing levels of automation into the 3D input file: (1) Configuration controlled input files; (2) Common file for 2D and 3D, different types of capsules (symcap, etc.); and (3) Can obtain target dimensions, laser pulse, and diagnostics settings automatically from NIF Campaign Management Tool. Using 3D Hydra calculations to investigate different problems: (1) Intrinsic 3D asymmetry; (2) Tolerance to nonideal 3D effects (e.g. laser power balance, pointing errors); and (3) Synthetic diagnostics.

  18. 3D Kitaev spin liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanns, Maria

    The Kitaev honeycomb model has become one of the archetypal spin models exhibiting topological phases of matter, where the magnetic moments fractionalize into Majorana fermions interacting with a Z2 gauge field. In this talk, we discuss generalizations of this model to three-dimensional lattice structures. Our main focus is the metallic state that the emergent Majorana fermions form. In particular, we discuss the relation of the nature of this Majorana metal to the details of the underlying lattice structure. Besides (almost) conventional metals with a Majorana Fermi surface, one also finds various realizations of Dirac semi-metals, where the gapless modes form Fermi lines or even Weyl nodes. We introduce a general classification of these gapless quantum spin liquids using projective symmetry analysis. Furthermore, we briefly outline why these Majorana metals in 3D Kitaev systems provide an even richer variety of Dirac and Weyl phases than possible for electronic matter and comment on possible experimental signatures. Work done in collaboration with Kevin O'Brien and Simon Trebst.

  19. Yogi the rock - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Yogi, a rock taller than rover Sojourner, is the subject of this image, taken in stereo by the deployed Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. The soil in the foreground has been the location of multiple soil mechanics experiments performed by Sojourner's cleated wheels. Pathfinder scientists were able to control the force inflicted on the soil beneath the rover's wheels, giving them insight into the soil's mechanical properties. The soil mechanics experiments were conducted after this image was taken.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  20. 3D ultrafast laser scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahjoubfar, A.; Goda, K.; Wang, C.; Fard, A.; Adam, J.; Gossett, D. R.; Ayazi, A.; Sollier, E.; Malik, O.; Chen, E.; Liu, Y.; Brown, R.; Sarkhosh, N.; Di Carlo, D.; Jalali, B.

    2013-03-01

    Laser scanners are essential for scientific research, manufacturing, defense, and medical practice. Unfortunately, often times the speed of conventional laser scanners (e.g., galvanometric mirrors and acousto-optic deflectors) falls short for many applications, resulting in motion blur and failure to capture fast transient information. Here, we present a novel type of laser scanner that offers roughly three orders of magnitude higher scan rates than conventional methods. Our laser scanner, which we refer to as the hybrid dispersion laser scanner, performs inertia-free laser scanning by dispersing a train of broadband pulses both temporally and spatially. More specifically, each broadband pulse is temporally processed by time stretch dispersive Fourier transform and further dispersed into space by one or more diffractive elements such as prisms and gratings. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, we perform 1D line scans at a record high scan rate of 91 MHz and 2D raster scans and 3D volumetric scans at an unprecedented scan rate of 105 kHz. The method holds promise for a broad range of scientific, industrial, and biomedical applications. To show the utility of our method, we demonstrate imaging, nanometer-resolved surface vibrometry, and high-precision flow cytometry with real-time throughput that conventional laser scanners cannot offer due to their low scan rates.

  1. Crowdsourcing Based 3d Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyi, A.; Barsi, A.; Molnar, B.; Lovas, T.

    2016-06-01

    Web-based photo albums that support organizing and viewing the users' images are widely used. These services provide a convenient solution for storing, editing and sharing images. In many cases, the users attach geotags to the images in order to enable using them e.g. in location based applications on social networks. Our paper discusses a procedure that collects open access images from a site frequently visited by tourists. Geotagged pictures showing the image of a sight or tourist attraction are selected and processed in photogrammetric processing software that produces the 3D model of the captured object. For the particular investigation we selected three attractions in Budapest. To assess the geometrical accuracy, we used laser scanner and DSLR as well as smart phone photography to derive reference values to enable verifying the spatial model obtained from the web-album images. The investigation shows how detailed and accurate models could be derived applying photogrammetric processing software, simply by using images of the community, without visiting the site.

  2. Validation of 3D multimodality roadmapping in interventional neuroradiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruijters, Daniel; Homan, Robert; Mielekamp, Peter; van de Haar, Peter; Babic, Drazenko

    2011-08-01

    Three-dimensional multimodality roadmapping is entering clinical routine utilization for neuro-vascular treatment. Its purpose is to navigate intra-arterial and intra-venous endovascular devices through complex vascular anatomy by fusing pre-operative computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) with the live fluoroscopy image. The fused image presents the real-time position of the intra-vascular devices together with the patient's 3D vascular morphology and its soft-tissue context. This paper investigates the effectiveness, accuracy, robustness and computation times of the described methods in order to assess their suitability for the intended clinical purpose: accurate interventional navigation. The mutual information-based 3D-3D registration proved to be of sub-voxel accuracy and yielded an average registration error of 0.515 mm and the live machine-based 2D-3D registration delivered an average error of less than 0.2 mm. The capture range of the image-based 3D-3D registration was investigated to characterize its robustness, and yielded an extent of 35 mm and 25° for >80% of the datasets for registration of 3D rotational angiography (3DRA) with CT, and 15 mm and 20° for >80% of the datasets for registration of 3DRA with MR data. The image-based 3D-3D registration could be computed within 8 s, while applying the machine-based 2D-3D registration only took 1.5 µs, which makes them very suitable for interventional use.

  3. Validation of 3D multimodality roadmapping in interventional neuroradiology.

    PubMed

    Ruijters, Daniel; Homan, Robert; Mielekamp, Peter; van de Haar, Peter; Babic, Drazenko

    2011-08-21

    Three-dimensional multimodality roadmapping is entering clinical routine utilization for neuro-vascular treatment. Its purpose is to navigate intra-arterial and intra-venous endovascular devices through complex vascular anatomy by fusing pre-operative computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) with the live fluoroscopy image. The fused image presents the real-time position of the intra-vascular devices together with the patient's 3D vascular morphology and its soft-tissue context. This paper investigates the effectiveness, accuracy, robustness and computation times of the described methods in order to assess their suitability for the intended clinical purpose: accurate interventional navigation. The mutual information-based 3D-3D registration proved to be of sub-voxel accuracy and yielded an average registration error of 0.515 mm and the live machine-based 2D-3D registration delivered an average error of less than 0.2 mm. The capture range of the image-based 3D-3D registration was investigated to characterize its robustness, and yielded an extent of 35 mm and 25° for >80% of the datasets for registration of 3D rotational angiography (3DRA) with CT, and 15 mm and 20° for >80% of the datasets for registration of 3DRA with MR data. The image-based 3D-3D registration could be computed within 8 s, while applying the machine-based 2D-3D registration only took 1.5 µs, which makes them very suitable for interventional use. PMID:21799235

  4. Intensity-sensitive and position-resolving cavity for heavy-ion storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Sanjari, M. S.; Hülsmann, P.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Nolden, F.; Piotrowski, J.; Steck, M.; Stöhlker, Th.; Walker, P. M.

    2016-08-01

    A heavy-ion storage ring can be adapted for use as an isochronous mass spectrometer if the ion velocity matches the transition energy of the ring. Due to the variety of stored ion species, the isochronous condition cannot be fulfilled for all the ions. In order to eliminate the measurement uncertainty stemming from the velocity spread, an intensity-sensitive and position-resolving cavity is proposed. In this paper we first briefly discuss the correction method for the anisochronism effect in the measurement with the cavity. Then we introduce a novel design, which is operated in the monopole mode and offset from the central beam orbit to one side. The geometrical parameters were optimized by analytic and numerical means in accordance with the beam dynamics of the future collector ring at FAIR. Afterwards, the electromagnetic properties of scaled prototypes were measured on a test bench. The results were in good agreement with the predictions.

  5. Position-sensitive detection of ultracold neutrons with an imaging camera and its implications to spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wanchun; Broussard, L. J.; Hoffbauer, M. A.; Makela, M.; Morris, C. L.; Tang, Z.; Adamek, E. R.; Callahan, N. B.; Clayton, S. M.; Cude-Woods, C.; Currie, S.; Dees, E. B.; Ding, X.; Geltenbort, P.; Hickerson, K. P.; Holley, A. T.; Ito, T. M.; Leung, K. K.; Liu, C.-Y.; Morley, D. J.; Ortiz, Jose D.; Pattie, R. W.; Ramsey, J. C.; Saunders, A.; Seestrom, S. J.; Sharapov, E. I.; Sjue, S. K.; Wexler, J.; Womack, T. L.; Young, A. R.; Zeck, B. A.; Wang, Zhehui

    2016-09-01

    Position-sensitive detection of ultracold neutrons (UCNs) is demonstrated using an imaging charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. A spatial resolution less than 15 μm has been achieved, which is equivalent to a UCN energy resolution below 2 pico-electron-volts through the relation δE =m0 gδx. Here, the symbols δE, δx, m0 and g are the energy resolution, the spatial resolution, the neutron rest mass and the gravitational acceleration, respectively. A multilayer surface convertor described previously is used to capture UCNs and then emits visible light for CCD imaging. Particle identification and noise rejection are discussed through the use of light intensity profile analysis. This method allows different types of UCN spectroscopy and other applications.

  6. Micro Cantilever Movement Detection with an Amorphous Silicon Array of Position Sensitive Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Javier; Costa, Daniel; Pereira, Sonia; Fortunato, Elvira; Martins, Rodrigo; Wierzbicki, Rafal; Heerlein, Holger; Ferreira, Isabel

    2010-01-01

    The movement of a micro cantilever was detected via a self constructed portable data acquisition prototype system which integrates a linear array of 32 1D amorphous silicon position sensitive detectors (PSD). The system was mounted on a microscope using a metal structure platform and the movement of the 30 μm wide by 400 μm long cantilever was tracked by analyzing the signals acquired by the 32 sensor array electronic readout system and the relevant data algorithm. The obtained results show a linear behavior of the photocurrent relating X and Y movement, with a non-linearity of about 3%, a spatial resolution of less than 2 μm along the lateral dimension of the sensor as well as of less than 3 μm along the perpendicular dimension of the sensor, when detecting just the micro-cantilever, and a spatial resolution of less than 1 μm when detecting the holding structure. PMID:22163648

  7. Position-sensitive CdTe detector using improved crystal growth method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1988-09-01

    The feasibility of developing a position-sensitive CdTe detector array for astronomical observations in the hard X-ray, soft gamma ray region is demonstrated. In principle, it was possible to improve the resolution capability for imaging measurements in this region by orders of magnitude over what is now possible through the use of CdTe detector arrays. The objective was to show that CdTe crystals of the quality, size and uniformity required for this application can be obtained with a new high pressure growth technique. The approach was to fabricate, characterize and analyze a 100 element square array and several single-element detectors using crystals from the new growth process. Results show that detectors fabricated from transversely sliced, 7 cm diameter wafers of CdTe exhibit efficient counting capability and a high degree of uniformity over their entire areas. A 100 element square array of 1 sq mm detectors was fabricated and operated.

  8. Position-sensitive CdTe detector using improved crystal growth method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The feasibility of developing a position-sensitive CdTe detector array for astronomical observations in the hard X-ray, soft gamma ray region is demonstrated. In principle, it was possible to improve the resolution capability for imaging measurements in this region by orders of magnitude over what is now possible through the use of CdTe detector arrays. The objective was to show that CdTe crystals of the quality, size and uniformity required for this application can be obtained with a new high pressure growth technique. The approach was to fabricate, characterize and analyze a 100 element square array and several single-element detectors using crystals from the new growth process. Results show that detectors fabricated from transversely sliced, 7 cm diameter wafers of CdTe exhibit efficient counting capability and a high degree of uniformity over their entire areas. A 100 element square array of 1 sq mm detectors was fabricated and operated.

  9. Measuring relative-story displacement and local inclination angle using multiple position-sensitive detectors.

    PubMed

    Matsuya, Iwao; Katamura, Ryuta; Sato, Maya; Iba, Miroku; Kondo, Hideaki; Kanekawa, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Motoichi; Hatada, Tomohiko; Nitta, Yoshihiro; Tanii, Takashi; Shoji, Shuichi; Nishitani, Akira; Ohdomari, Iwao

    2010-01-01

    We propose a novel sensor system for monitoring the structural health of a building. The system optically measures the relative-story displacement during earthquakes for detecting any deformations of building elements. The sensor unit is composed of three position sensitive detectors (PSDs) and lenses capable of measuring the relative-story displacement precisely, even if the PSD unit was inclined in response to the seismic vibration. For verification, laboratory tests were carried out using an Xθ-stage and a shaking table. The static experiment verified that the sensor could measure the local inclination angle as well as the lateral displacement. The dynamic experiment revealed that the accuracy of the sensor was 150 μm in the relative-displacement measurement and 100 μrad in the inclination angle measurement. These results indicate that the proposed sensor system has sufficient accuracy for the measurement of relative-story displacement in response to the seismic vibration. PMID:22163434

  10. Positioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conone, Ruth M.

    The key to positioning is the creation of a clear benefit image in the consumer's mind. One positioning strategy is creating in the prospect's mind a position that takes into consideration the company's or agency's strengths and weaknesses as well as those of its competitors. Another strategy is to gain entry into a position ladder owned by…

  11. Cardiac Position Sensitivity Study in the Electrocardiographic Forward Problem Using Stochastic Collocation and Boundary Element Methods

    PubMed Central

    Swenson, Darrell J.; Geneser, Sarah E.; Stinstra, Jeroen G.; Kirby, Robert M.; MacLeod, Rob S.

    2012-01-01

    The electrocardiogram (ECG) is ubiquitously employed as a diagnostic and monitoring tool for patients experiencing cardiac distress and/or disease. It is widely known that changes in heart position resulting from, for example, posture of the patient (sitting, standing, lying) and respiration significantly affect the body-surface potentials; however, few studies have quantitatively and systematically evaluated the effects of heart displacement on the ECG. The goal of this study was to evaluate the impact of positional changes of the heart on the ECG in the specific clinical setting of myocardial ischemia. To carry out the necessary comprehensive sensitivity analysis, we applied a relatively novel and highly efficient statistical approach, the generalized polynomial chaos-stochastic collocation method, to a boundary element formulation of the electrocardiographic forward problem, and we drove these simulations with measured epicardial potentials from whole-heart experiments. Results of the analysis identified regions on the body-surface where the potentials were especially sensitive to realistic heart motion. The standard deviation (STD) of ST-segment voltage changes caused by the apex of a normal heart, swinging forward and backward or side-to-side was approximately 0.2 mV. Variations were even larger, 0.3 mV, for a heart exhibiting elevated ischemic potentials. These variations could be large enough to mask or to mimic signs of ischemia in the ECG. Our results suggest possible modifications to ECG protocols that could reduce the diagnostic error related to postural changes in patients possibly suffering from myocardial ischemia. PMID:21909818

  12. Fourier synthesis image reconstruction by use of one-dimensional position-sensitive detectors.

    PubMed

    Kotoku, Jun'ichi; Makishima, Kazuo; Okada, Yuu; Negoro, Hitoshi; Terada, Yukikatsu; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Oda, Minoru

    2003-07-10

    An improvement of Fourier synthesis optics for hard x-ray imaging is described, and the basic performance of the new optics is confirmed through numerical simulations. The original concept of the Fourier synthesis imager utilizes nonposition-sensitive hard x-ray detectors coupled to individual bigrid modulation collimators. The improved concept employs a one-dimensional position-sensitive detector (such as a CdTe strip detector) instead of the second grid layer of each bigrid modulation collimator. This improves the imaging performance in several respects over the original design. One performance improvement is a two-fold increase in the average transmission, from 1/4 to 1/2. The second merit is that both the sine and cosine components can be derived from a single grid-detector module, and hence the number of imaging modules can be halved. Furthermore, it provides information along the depth direction simultaneously. This in turn enables a three-dimensional imaging hard x-ray microscope for medical diagnostics, incorporating radioactive tracers. A conceptual design of such a microscope is presented, designed to provide a field of view of 4 mm and a spatial resolution of 400 microm. PMID:12856730

  13. Frontal but not parietal positivity during source recollection is sensitive to episodic content.

    PubMed

    Peters, Jan; Daum, Irene

    2009-05-01

    Remembering contextual aspects of an event (recollection) is an important function subserved by episodic memory. It has recently been shown that the electrophysiological correlates of recollection differ depending upon the type of information subjects retrieve from episodic memory. In the current study, we investigated whether electrophysiological correlates of memory are also affected by the type of source information retrieved from memory. Subjects studied words that were paired with a sound, a picture of a face or a picture of a scene. During test, they were required to judge whether a given probe word was new or old, and whether it had been paired with a sound, scene or face during study. The parietal old/new effect (400-700 ms post-stimulus), which has previously been associated with recollection, was larger for correct compared to incorrect source retrieval and of comparable magnitude for items from the different encoding conditions. A frontal positivity in the same time window, on the other hand, was sensitive to the type of information subjects retrieved from episodic memory, and showed a differential topography depending on memory content. Our findings confirm and extend previous observations by showing that, when recollection is assessed using an objective performance measure (i.e., source accuracy), frontal brain potentials are sensitive to episodic content. PMID:19429080

  14. Position sensitivity of graphene field effect transistors to X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Cazalas, Edward Moore, Michael E.; Jovanovic, Igor; Sarker, Biddut K.; Childres, Isaac; Chen, Yong P.

    2015-06-01

    Device architectures that incorporate graphene to realize detection of electromagnetic radiation typically utilize the direct absorbance of radiation by graphene. This limits their effective area to the size of the graphene and their applicability to lower-energy, less penetrating forms of radiation. In contrast, graphene-based transistor architectures that utilize the field effect as the detection mechanism can be sensitive to interactions of radiation not only with graphene but also with the surrounding substrate. Here, we report the study of the position sensitivity and response of a graphene-based field effect transistor (GFET) to penetrating, well-collimated radiation (micro-beam X-rays), producing ionization in the substrate primarily away from graph