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Sample records for 3-dimensional scaffold-embedded chondrocytes

  1. Evaluating Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes through a Novel 3-Dimensional In Vitro System for Cartilage Tissue Engineering and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hanwei; Davison, Noel; Moroni, Lorenzo; Feng, Felicia; Crist, Joshua; Salter, Erin; Bingham, Clifton O.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To characterize and evaluate osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes, in comparison to normal chondrocytes, through a novel 3-dimensional (3-D) culture system, poly(ethylene-glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA). The cytokine interleukin 1β (IL-1β) was also used to simulate an in vitro OA model. Methods: Normal and OA chondrocytes were cultured in monolayer and analyzed for changes in cartilage-specific gene expressions due to passage number. Then, cells were encapsulated in PEGDA to evaluate phenotype and matrix production capabilities through the in vitro culture system. Characterization was conducted with polymerase chain reaction (PCR), biochemical analyses, and histological staining. 3-D encapsulated chondrocytes (human and bovine) were also treated with IL-1β to characterize how the cytokine affects gene transcription and extracellular matrix (ECM) content. Results: In 2-dimensional monolayer, anabolic genes were down-regulated significantly in both normal and OA chondrocytes. In 3-D culture, OA chondrocytes demonstrated significantly higher expressions of catabolic genes when compared to normal cells. Differentiation medium resulted in significantly more matrix production than growth medium from OA chondrocytes, indicated through histological staining. In addition, normal chondrocytes responded more significantly to exogenous administration of IL-1β than OA chondrocytes. Temporary initial stimulation of IL-1β to OA chondrocytes resulted in comparable gene expressions to untreated cells after 3 weeks of in vitro culture. Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate the use of OA chondrocytes in tissue engineering and their significance for potential future cartilage regeneration research through their matrix production capabilities and the use of a hydrogel culture system. PMID:26069626

  2. Fabrication and evaluation of a sustained-release chitosan-based scaffold embedded with PLGA microspheres.

    PubMed

    Song, Kedong; Liu, Yingchao; Macedo, Hugo M; Jiang, Lili; Li, Chao; Mei, Guanyu; Liu, Tianqing

    2013-04-01

    Nutrient depletion within three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds is one of the major hurdles in the use of this technology to grow cells for applications in tissue engineering. In order to help in addressing it, we herein propose to use the controlled release of encapsulated nutrients within polymer microspheres into chitosan-based 3D scaffolds, wherein the microspheres are embedded. This method has allowed maintaining a stable concentration of nutrients within the scaffolds over the long term. The polymer microspheres were prepared using multiple emulsions (w/o/w), in which bovine serum albumin (BSA) and poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) were regarded as the protein pattern and the exoperidium material, respectively. These were then mixed with a chitosan solution in order to form the scaffolds by cryo-desiccation. The release of BSA, entrapped within the embedded microspheres, was monitored with time using a BCA kit. The morphology and structure of the PLGA microspheres containing BSA before and after embedding within the scaffold were observed under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). These had a round shape with diameters in the range of 27-55 μm, whereas the chitosan-based scaffolds had a uniform porous structure with the microspheres uniformly dispersed within their 3D structure and without any morphological change. In addition, the porosity, water absorption and degradation rate at 37 °C in an aqueous environment of 1% chitosan-based scaffolds were (92.99±2.51) %, (89.66±0.66) % and (73.77±3.21) %, respectively. The studies of BSA release from the embedded microspheres have shown a sustained and cumulative tendency with little initial burst, with (20.24±0.83) % of the initial amount released after 168 h (an average rate of 0.12%/h). The protein concentration within the chitosan-based scaffolds after 168 h was found to be (11.44±1.81)×10(-2) mg/mL. This novel chitosan-based scaffold embedded with PLGA microspheres has proven to be a promising technique

  3. Chondrocyte Moves: clever strategies?

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Teresa I.

    2007-01-01

    Goals To review the literature on chondrocyte movements and to develop plausible hypothesis for further work. Design Chondrocyte movements are herein defined as translocations of the cell body. To set the stage for a discussion of chondrocyte moves, a brief overview of cell migration in other cell types is presented, including a discussion of the challenges that cells find when moving within tissues. Reports of isolated chondrocyte migration in vitro (isolated cell systems) and ex vivo (cartilage organ cultures) are then summarized, followed by a discussion of recent studies that infer chondrocyte movements in vivo. Results Investigators from different laboratories have observed chondrocyte motility in vitro. I became interested in the question of whether articular chondrocytes retained their phenotype during their migratory excursions. We devised a simple method to separate migratory and stationary chondrocytes and then showed that migratory chondrocytes synthesized collagen II but not I—consistent with a differentiated phenotype. Our time-lapse video microscopy studies showed that the cells displayed appropriate movement kinetics, albeit with low speed and directionality. Similarly, others have presented data consistent with slow movement of chondrocytes out of cartilage explants. It is important to decipher whether these in vitro movements reflect physiological states and if so, which events are simulated. Examples of in vivo studies that have inferred chondrocyte movements include those describing rotational or gliding movements of chondrocytes in the proliferative zone of the growth plate and its importance in the growth process; and the notion that chondrocytes move from the cartilage endplates to the nucleus pulposus in the spine of rabbits and rats during development. Such studies are consistent with the hypothesis that chondrocytes exhibit highly controlled and specialized movements during tissue growth and remodeling in vivo. On the other hand, the

  4. The Emerging Chondrocyte Channelome

    PubMed Central

    Barrett-Jolley, Richard; Lewis, Rebecca; Fallman, Rebecca; Mobasheri, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Chondrocytes are the resident cells of articular cartilage and are responsible for synthesizing a range of collagenous and non-collagenous extracellular matrix macromolecules. Whilst chondrocytes exist at low densities in the tissue (1–10% of the total tissue volume in mature cartilage) they are extremely active cells and are capable of responding to a range of mechanical and biochemical stimuli. These responses are necessary for the maintenance of viable cartilage and may be compromised in inflammatory diseases such as arthritis. Although chondrocytes are non-excitable cells their plasma membrane contains a rich complement of ion channels. This diverse channelome appears to be as complex as one might expect to find in excitable cells although, in the case of chondrocytes, their functions are far less well understood. The ion channels so far identified in chondrocytes include potassium channels (KATP, BK, Kv, and SK), sodium channels (epithelial sodium channels, voltage activated sodium channels), transient receptor potential calcium or non-selective cation channels and chloride channels. In this review we describe this emerging channelome and discuss the possible functions of a range of chondrocyte ion channels. PMID:21423376

  5. Chondrocyte channel transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Rebecca; May, Hannah; Mobasheri, Ali; Barrett-Jolley, Richard

    2013-01-01

    To date, a range of ion channels have been identified in chondrocytes using a number of different techniques, predominantly electrophysiological and/or biomolecular; each of these has its advantages and disadvantages. Here we aim to compare and contrast the data available from biophysical and microarray experiments. This letter analyses recent transcriptomics datasets from chondrocytes, accessible from the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI). We discuss whether such bioinformatic analysis of microarray datasets can potentially accelerate identification and discovery of ion channels in chondrocytes. The ion channels which appear most frequently across these microarray datasets are discussed, along with their possible functions. We discuss whether functional or protein data exist which support the microarray data. A microarray experiment comparing gene expression in osteoarthritis and healthy cartilage is also discussed and we verify the differential expression of 2 of these genes, namely the genes encoding large calcium-activated potassium (BK) and aquaporin channels. PMID:23995703

  6. The Interplay between Chondrocyte Redifferentiation Pellet Size and Oxygen Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Babur, Betul Kul; Ghanavi, Parisa; Levett, Peter; Lott, William B.; Klein, Travis; Cooper-White, Justin J.; Crawford, Ross; Doran, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Chondrocytes dedifferentiate during ex vivo expansion on 2-dimensional surfaces. Aggregation of the expanded cells into 3-dimensional pellets, in the presence of induction factors, facilitates their redifferentiation and restoration of the chondrogenic phenotype. Typically 1×105–5×105 chondrocytes are aggregated, resulting in “macro” pellets having diameters ranging from 1–2 mm. These macropellets are commonly used to study redifferentiation, and recently macropellets of autologous chondrocytes have been implanted directly into articular cartilage defects to facilitate their repair. However, diffusion of metabolites over the 1–2 mm pellet length-scales is inefficient, resulting in radial tissue heterogeneity. Herein we demonstrate that the aggregation of 2×105 human chondrocytes into micropellets of 166 cells each, rather than into larger single macropellets, enhances chondrogenic redifferentiation. In this study, we describe the development of a cost effective fabrication strategy to manufacture a microwell surface for the large-scale production of micropellets. The thousands of micropellets were manufactured using the microwell platform, which is an array of 360×360 µm microwells cast into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), that has been surface modified with an electrostatic multilayer of hyaluronic acid and chitosan to enhance micropellet formation. Such surface modification was essential to prevent chondrocyte spreading on the PDMS. Sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) production and collagen II gene expression in chondrocyte micropellets increased significantly relative to macropellet controls, and redifferentiation was enhanced in both macro and micropellets with the provision of a hypoxic atmosphere (2% O2). Once micropellet formation had been optimized, we demonstrated that micropellets could be assembled into larger cartilage tissues. Our results indicate that micropellet amalgamation efficiency is inversely related to the time cultured as discreet

  7. Autologous chondrocytes. Autologous chondrocyte implantation: more data needed.

    PubMed

    2011-05-01

    There is no standard surgical treatment for young adults with persistent, incapacitating symptoms of knee cartilage damage. ChondroCelect is the first cell therapy product to be authorised in the European Union. It contains a dense suspension of chondrocytes cultured from a biopsy of the patient's knee cartilage for 4 weeks before being reimplanted. Clinical evaluation of Chondro-Celect only includes one trial, versus subchondral microfracture, in 118 patients. After 3 years of follow-up, there was no difference in the symptom score between the groups. Histological outcome was better after autologous chondrocyte implantation, but methodological problems make it difficult to interpret the observed difference. Long-term functional outcomes remain to be determined. More joint complications occurred after autologous chondrocyte implantation than after subchondral bone microfracture: more frequently symptomatic cartilage hypertrophy (27% versus 13%, possibly related to the implantation technique), joint swelling (22% versus 6.6%), joint effusion (24% versus 9.8%), and joint crepitations (18% versus 6.6%). Autologous chondrocyte implantation was sometimes associated with flu-like syndrome (in 7.8% of patients), which did not occur with the microfracture technique. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is more complex than microfracture. During routine use, there is a risk that one patient will inadvertently receive chondrocytes collected from another patient, leading to a risk of rejection. In practice, this autologous chondrocyte product should only be used by highly specialised teams, and its assessment must continue. PMID:21648176

  8. Chondroregulatory action of prolactin on proliferation and differentiation of mouse chondrogenic ATDC5 cells in 3-dimensional micromass cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Seriwatanachai, Dutmanee; Krishnamra, Nateetip; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mouse chondrogenic ATDC5 cells expressed PRL receptor mRNAs and proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low PRL concentration (10 ng/mL) increased chondrocyte viability and differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher PRL concentrations ( Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 100 ng/mL) decreased viability and increased apoptosis. -- Abstract: A recent investigation in lactating rats has provided evidence that the lactogenic hormone prolactin (PRL) increases endochondral bone growth and bone elongation, presumably by accelerating apoptosis of hypertrophic chondrocytes in the growth plate and/or subsequent chondrogenic matrix mineralization. Herein, we demonstrated the direct chondroregulatory action of PRL on proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of chondrocytes in 3-dimensional micromass culture of mouse chondrogenic ATDC5 cell line. The results showed that ATDC5 cells expressed PRL receptor (PRLR) transcripts, and responded typically to PRL by downregulating PRLR expression. Exposure to a low PRL concentration of 10 ng/mL, comparable to the normal levels in male and non-pregnant female rats, increased chondrocyte viability, differentiation, proteoglycan accumulation, and mRNA expression of several chondrogenic differentiation markers, such as Sox9, ALP and Hspg2. In contrast, high PRL concentrations of Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 100 ng/mL, comparable to the levels in pregnancy or lactation, decreased chondrocyte viability by inducing apoptosis, with no effect on chondrogenic marker expression. It could be concluded that chondrocytes directly but differentially responded to non-pregnant and pregnant/lactating levels of PRL, thus suggesting the stimulatory effect of PRL on chondrogenesis in young growing individuals, and supporting the hypothesis of hypertrophic chondrocyte apoptosis in the growth plate of lactating rats.

  9. Teleportation of a 3-dimensional GHZ State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hai-Jing; Wang, Huai-Sheng; Li, Peng-Fei; Song, He-Shan

    2012-05-01

    The process of teleportation of a completely unknown 3-dimensional GHZ state is considered. Three maximally entangled 3-dimensional Bell states function as quantum channel in the scheme. This teleportation scheme can be directly generalized to teleport an unknown d-dimensional GHZ state.

  10. 3-Dimensional Topographic Models for the Classroom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, J. W.; Roark, J. H.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Stockman, S.; Frey, H. V.

    2003-01-01

    We have recently undertaken a program to develop educational tools using 3-dimensional solid models of digital elevation data acquired by the Mars Orbital Laser Altimeter (MOLA) for Mars as well as a variety of sources for elevation data of the Earth. This work is made possible by the use of rapid prototyping technology to construct solid 3-Dimensional models of science data. We recently acquired rapid prototyping machine that builds 3-dimensional models in extruded plastic. While the machine was acquired to assist in the design and development of scientific instruments and hardware, it is also fully capable of producing models of spacecraft remote sensing data. We have demonstrated this by using Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) topographic data and Earth based topographic data to produce extruded plastic topographic models which are visually appealing and instantly engage those who handle them.

  11. 3-dimensional imaging at nanometer resolutions

    DOEpatents

    Werner, James H.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Shreve, Andrew P.

    2010-03-09

    An apparatus and method for enabling precise, 3-dimensional, photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM) using selective, two-photon activation of fluorophores in a single z-slice of a sample in cooperation with time-gated imaging for reducing the background radiation from other image planes to levels suitable for single-molecule detection and spatial location, are described.

  12. Simvastatin inhibits CD44 fragmentation in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Terabe, Kenya; Takahashi, Nobunori; Takemoto, Toki; Knudson, Warren; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kojima, Toshihisa

    2016-08-15

    In human osteoarthritic chondrocytes, the hyaluronan receptor CD44 undergoes proteolytic cleavage at the cell surface. CD44 cleavage is thought to require transit of CD44 into cholesterol-rich lipid rafts. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether statins exert a protective effect on articular chondrocytes due to diminution of cholesterol. Three model systems of chondrocytes were examined including human HCS-2/8 chondrosarcoma cells, human osteoarthritic chondrocytes and normal bovine articular chondrocytes. Treatment with IL-1β + Oncostatin M resulted in a substantial increase in CD44 fragmentation in each of the three chondrocyte models. Pre-incubation with simvastatin prior to treatment with IL-1β + Oncostatin M decreased the level of CD44 fragmentation, decreased the proportion of CD44 that transits into the lipid raft fractions, decreased ADAM10 activity and diminished the interaction between CD44 and ADAM10. In HCS-2/8 cells and bovine articular chondrocytes, fragmentation of CD44 was blocked by the knockdown of ADAM10. Inhibition of CD44 fragmentation by simvastatin also resulted in improved retention of pericellular matrix. Addition of cholesterol and farnesyl-pyrophosphate reversed the protective effects of simvastatin. Thus, the addition of simvastatin exerts positive effects on chondrocytes including reduced CD44 fragmentation and enhanced the retention of pericellular matrix. PMID:27242325

  13. Articular chondrocyte metabolism and osteoarthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Leipold, H.R.

    1989-01-01

    The three main objectives of this study were: (1) to determine if depletion of proteoglycans from the cartilage matrix that occurs during osteoarthritis causes a measurable increase of cartilage proteoglycan components in the synovial fluid and sera, (2) to observe what effect intracellular cAMP has on the expression of matrix components by chondrocytes, and (3) to determine if freshly isolated chondrocytes contain detectable levels of mRNA for fibronectin. Canine serum keratan sulfate and hyaluronate were measured to determine if there was an elevation of these serum glycosaminoglycans in a canine model of osteoarthritis. A single intra-articular injection of chymopapain into a shoulder joint increased serum keratan sulfate 10 fold and hyaluronate less than 2 fold in 24 hours. Keratan sulfate concentrations in synovial fluids of dogs about one year old were unrelated to the presence of spontaneous cartilage degeneration in the joints. High keratan sulfate in synovial fluids correlated with higher keratan sulfate in serum. The mean keratan sulfate concentration in sera of older dogs with osteoarthritis was 37% higher than disease-free controls, but the difference between the groups was not statistically significant. Treatment of chondrocytes with 0.5 millimolar (mM) dibutyryl cAMP (DBcAMP) caused the cells to adopt a more rounded morphology. There was no difference between the amount of proteins synthesized by cultures treated with DBcAMP and controls. The amount of fibronectin (FN) in the media of DBcAMP treated cultures detected by an ELISA was specifically reduced, and the amount of {sup 35}S-FN purified by gelatin affinity chromatography decreased. Moreover, the percentage of FN containing the extra domain. A sequence was reduced. Concomitant with the decrease in FN there was an increase in the concentration of keratan sulfate.

  14. Morphological, genetic and phenotypic comparison between human articular chondrocytes and cultured chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Mata-Miranda, Mónica Maribel; Martinez-Martinez, Claudia María; Noriega-Gonzalez, Jesús Emmanuel; Paredes-Gonzalez, Luis Enrique; Vázquez-Zapién, Gustavo Jesús

    2016-08-01

    Articular cartilage is an avascular and aneural tissue with limited capacity for regeneration. On large articular lesions, it is recommended to use regenerative medicine strategies, like autologous chondrocyte implantation. There is a concern about morphological changes that chondrocytes suffer once they have been isolated and cultured. Due to the fact that there is little evidence that compares articular cartilage chondrocytes with cultured chondrocytes, in this research we proposed to obtain chondrocytes from human articular cartilage, compare them with themselves once they have been cultured and characterize them through genetic, phenotypic and morphological analysis. Knee articular cartilage samples of 10 mm were obtained, and each sample was divided into two fragments; a portion was used to determine gene expression, and from the other portion, chondrocytes were obtained by enzymatic disaggregation, in order to be cultured and expanded in vitro. Subsequently, morphological, genetic and phenotypic characteristics were compared between in situ (articular cartilage) and cultured chondrocytes. Obtained cultured chondrocytes were rounded in shape, possessing a large nucleus with condensed chromatin and a clear cytoplasm; histological appearance was quite similar to typical chondrocyte. The expression levels of COL2A1 and COL10A1 genes were higher in cultured chondrocytes than in situ chondrocytes; moreover, the expression of COL1A1 was almost undetectable on cultured chondrocytes; likewise, COL2 and SOX9 proteins were detected by immunofluorescence. We concluded that chondrocytes derived from adult human cartilage cultured for 21 days do not tend to dedifferentiate, maintaining their capacity to produce matrix and also retaining their synthesis capacity and morphology. PMID:27094849

  15. Biochemical Applications Of 3-Dimensional Fluorescence Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiner, Marc J.; Wolfbeis, Otto S.

    1988-06-01

    We investigated the 3-dimensional fluorescence of complex mixtures of bioloquids such as human serum, serum ultrafiltrate, human urine, and human plasma low density lipoproteins. The total fluorescence of human serum can be divided into a few peaks. When comparing fluorescence topograms of sera, from normal and cancerous subjects, we found significant differences in tryptophan fluorescence. Although the total fluorescence of human urine can be resolved into 3-5 distinct peaks, some of them. do not result from single fluorescent urinary metabolites, but rather from. several species having similar spectral properties. Human plasma, low density lipoproteins possess a native fluorescence that changes when submitted to in-vitro autoxidation. The 3-dimensional fluorescence demonstrated the presence of 7 fluorophores in the lipid domain, and 6 fluorophores in the protein. dovain- The above results demonstrated that 3-dimensional fluorescence can resolve the spectral properties of complex ,lxtures much better than other methods. Moreover, other parameters than excitation and emission wavelength and intensity (for instance fluorescence lifetime, polarization, or quenchability) may be exploited to give a multidl,ensio,a1 matrix, that is unique for each sample. Consequently, 3-dimensio:Hhal fluorescence as such, or in combination with separation techniques is therefore considered to have the potential of becoming a useful new H.ethod in clinical chemistry and analytical biochemistry.

  16. Chopping off the chondrocyte proteome

    PubMed Central

    Dvir-Ginzberg, Mona; Reich, Eli

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The progressive nature of osteoarthritis is manifested by the dynamic increase of degenerated articular cartilage, which is one of the major characteristics of this debilitating disease. As articular chondrocytes become exposed to inflammatory stress they enter a pro-catabolic state, which leads to the secretion and activation of a plethora of proteases. In aim to detect the disease before massive areas of cartilage are destroyed, various protein and non-protein biomarkers have been examined in bodily fluids and correlated with disease severity. This review will discuss the widely research extracellular degraded products as well as products generated by affected cellular pathways upon increased protease activity. While extracellular components could be more abundant, cleaved cellular proteins are less abundant and are suggested to possess a significant effect on cell metabolism and cartilage secretome. Subtle changes in cell secretome could potentially act as indicators of the chondrocyte metabolic and biological state. Therefore, it is envisioned that combined biomarkers composed of both cell and extracellular-degraded secretome could provide a valuable platform for testing drug efficacy to halt disease progression at its early stages. PMID:25179281

  17. Chondrocyte Apoptosis in the Pathogenesis of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hyun Sook; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a highly-regulated, active process of cell death involved in development, homeostasis and aging. Dysregulation of apoptosis leads to pathological states, such as cancer, developmental anomalies and degenerative diseases. Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common chronic joint disease in the elderly population, is characterized by progressive destruction of articular cartilage, resulting in significant disability. Because articular cartilage depends solely on its resident cells, the chondrocytes, for the maintenance of extracellular matrix, the compromising of chondrocyte function and survival would lead to the failure of the articular cartilage. The role of subchondral bone in the maintenance of proper cartilage matrix has been suggested as well, and it has been proposed that both articular cartilage and subchondral bone interact with each other in the maintenance of articular integrity and physiology. Some investigators include both articular cartilage and subchondral bone as targets for repairing joint degeneration. In late-stage OA, the cartilage becomes hypocellular, often accompanied by lacunar emptying, which has been considered as evidence that chondrocyte death is a central feature in OA progression. Apoptosis clearly occurs in osteoarthritic cartilage; however, the relative contribution of chondrocyte apoptosis in the pathogenesis of OA is difficult to evaluate, and contradictory reports exist on the rate of apoptotic chondrocytes in osteoarthritic cartilage. It is not clear whether chondrocyte apoptosis is the inducer of cartilage degeneration or a byproduct of cartilage destruction. Chondrocyte death and matrix loss may form a vicious cycle, with the progression of one aggravating the other, and the literature reveals that there is a definite correlation between the degree of cartilage damage and chondrocyte apoptosis. Because current treatments for OA act only on symptoms and do not prevent or cure OA, chondrocyte apoptosis would be a valid

  18. Chondrocyte Apoptosis in the Pathogenesis of Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyun Sook; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a highly-regulated, active process of cell death involved in development, homeostasis and aging. Dysregulation of apoptosis leads to pathological states, such as cancer, developmental anomalies and degenerative diseases. Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common chronic joint disease in the elderly population, is characterized by progressive destruction of articular cartilage, resulting in significant disability. Because articular cartilage depends solely on its resident cells, the chondrocytes, for the maintenance of extracellular matrix, the compromising of chondrocyte function and survival would lead to the failure of the articular cartilage. The role of subchondral bone in the maintenance of proper cartilage matrix has been suggested as well, and it has been proposed that both articular cartilage and subchondral bone interact with each other in the maintenance of articular integrity and physiology. Some investigators include both articular cartilage and subchondral bone as targets for repairing joint degeneration. In late-stage OA, the cartilage becomes hypocellular, often accompanied by lacunar emptying, which has been considered as evidence that chondrocyte death is a central feature in OA progression. Apoptosis clearly occurs in osteoarthritic cartilage; however, the relative contribution of chondrocyte apoptosis in the pathogenesis of OA is difficult to evaluate, and contradictory reports exist on the rate of apoptotic chondrocytes in osteoarthritic cartilage. It is not clear whether chondrocyte apoptosis is the inducer of cartilage degeneration or a byproduct of cartilage destruction. Chondrocyte death and matrix loss may form a vicious cycle, with the progression of one aggravating the other, and the literature reveals that there is a definite correlation between the degree of cartilage damage and chondrocyte apoptosis. Because current treatments for OA act only on symptoms and do not prevent or cure OA, chondrocyte apoptosis would be a valid

  19. Hydroelectric structures studies using 3-dimensional methods

    SciTech Connect

    Harrell, T.R.; Jones, G.V.; Toner, C.K. )

    1989-01-01

    Deterioration and degradation of aged, hydroelectric project structures can significantly affect the operation and safety of a project. In many cases, hydroelectric headworks (in particular) have complicated geometrical configurations, loading patterns and hence, stress conditions. An accurate study of such structures can be performed using 3-dimensional computer models. 3-D computer models can be used for both stability evaluation and for finite element stress analysis. Computer aided engineering processes facilitate the use of 3-D methods in both pre-processing and post-processing of data. Two actual project examples are used to emphasize the authors' points.

  20. ROCK inhibitor prevents the dedifferentiation of human articular chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Emi; Furumatsu, Takayuki; Kanazawa, Tomoko; Tamura, Masanori; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor stimulates chondrogenic gene expression of articular chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor prevents the dedifferentiation of monolayer-cultured chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor enhances the redifferentiation of cultured chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor is useful for preparation of un-dedifferentiated chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor may be a useful reagent for chondrocyte-based regeneration therapy. -- Abstract: Chondrocytes lose their chondrocytic phenotypes in vitro. The Rho family GTPase ROCK, involved in organizing the actin cytoskeleton, modulates the differentiation status of chondrocytic cells. However, the optimum method to prepare a large number of un-dedifferentiated chondrocytes is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of ROCK inhibitor (ROCKi) on the chondrogenic property of monolayer-cultured articular chondrocytes. Human articular chondrocytes were subcultured in the presence or absence of ROCKi (Y-27632). The expression of chondrocytic marker genes such as SOX9 and COL2A1 was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Cellular morphology and viability were evaluated. Chondrogenic redifferentiation potential was examined by a pellet culture procedure. The expression level of SOX9 and COL2A1 was higher in ROCKi-treated chondrocytes than in untreated cells. Chondrocyte morphology varied from a spreading form to a round shape in a ROCKi-dependent manner. In addition, ROCKi treatment stimulated the proliferation of chondrocytes. The deposition of safranin O-stained proteoglycans and type II collagen was highly detected in chondrogenic pellets derived from ROCKi-pretreated chondrocytes. Our results suggest that ROCKi prevents the dedifferentiation of monolayer-cultured chondrocytes, and may be a useful reagent to maintain chondrocytic phenotypes in vitro for chondrocyte

  1. Native Chondrocyte Viability during Cartilage Lesion Progression

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Kumkum; McRury, Ian D.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Morgan, Roy E.; Augé, Wayne K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Early surgical intervention for articular cartilage disease is desirable before full-thickness lesions develop. As early intervention treatments are designed, native chondrocyte viability at the treatment site before intervention becomes an important parameter to consider. The purpose of this study is to evaluate native chondrocyte viability in a series of specimens demonstrating the progression of articular cartilage lesions to determine if the chondrocyte viability profile changes during the evolution of articular cartilage disease to the level of surface fibrillation. Design: Osteochondral specimens demonstrating various degrees of articular cartilage damage were obtained from patients undergoing knee total joint replacement. Three groups were created within a patient harvest based on visual and tactile cues commonly encountered during surgical intervention: group 1, visually and tactilely intact surfaces; group 2, visually intact, tactilely soft surfaces; and group 3, surface fibrillation. Confocal laser microscopy was performed following live/dead cell viability staining. Results: Groups 1 to 3 demonstrated viable chondrocytes in all specimens, even within the fibrillated portions of articular cartilage, with little to no evidence of dead chondrocytes. Chondrocyte viability profile in articular cartilage does not appear to change as disease lesion progresses from normal to surface fibrillation. Conclusions: Fibrillated partial-thickness articular cartilage lesions are a good therapeutic target for early intervention. These lesions retain a high profile of viable chondrocytes and are readily diagnosed by visual and tactile cues during surgery. Early intervention should be based on matrix failure rather than on more aggressive procedures that further corrupt the matrix and contribute to chondrocyte necrosis of contiguous untargeted cartilage. PMID:26069561

  2. Biochemical and proteomic characterization of alkaptonuric chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Braconi, Daniela; Bernardini, Giulia; Bianchini, Claretta; Laschi, Marcella; Millucci, Lia; Amato, Loredana; Tinti, Laura; Serchi, Tommaso; Chellini, Federico; Spreafico, Adriano; Santucci, Annalisa

    2012-09-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare genetic disease associated with the accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA) and its oxidized/polymerized products which leads to the deposition of melanin-like pigments (ochronosis) in connective tissues. Although numerous case reports have described ochronosis in joints, little is known on the molecular mechanisms leading to such a phenomenon. For this reason, we characterized biochemically chondrocytes isolated from the ochronotic cartilage of AKU patients. Based on the macroscopic appearance of the ochronotic cartilage, two sub-populations were identified: cells coming from the black portion of the cartilage were referred to as "black" AKU chondrocytes, while those coming from the white portion were referred to as "white" AKU chondrocytes. Notably, both AKU chondrocytic types were characterized by increased apoptosis, NO release, and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Transmission electron microscopy also revealed that intracellular ochronotic pigment deposition was common to both "white" and "black" AKU cells. We then undertook a proteomic and redox-proteomic analysis of AKU chondrocytes which revealed profound alterations in the levels of proteins involved in cell defence, protein folding, and cell organization. An increased post-translational oxidation of proteins, which also involved high molecular weight protein aggregates, was found to be particularly relevant in "black" AKU chondrocytes. PMID:22213341

  3. Biochemical and Proteomic Characterization of Alkaptonuric Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Braconi, Daniela; Bernardini, Giulia; Bianchini, Claretta; Laschi, Marcella; Millucci, Lia; Amato, Loredana; Tinti, Laura; Serchi, Tommaso; Chellini, Federico; Spreafico, Adriano; Santucci, Annalisa

    2012-01-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare genetic disease associated with the accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA) and its oxidized/polymerized products which leads to the deposition of melanin-like pigments (ochronosis) in connective tissues. Although numerous case reports have described ochronosis in joints, little is known on the molecular mechanisms leading to such a phenomenon. For this reason, we characterized biochemically chondrocytes isolated from the ochronotic cartilage of AKU patients. Based on the macroscopic appearance of the ochronotic cartilage, two sub-populations were identified: cells coming from the black portion of the cartilage were referred to as “black” AKU chondrocytes, while those coming from the white portion were referred to as “white” AKU chondrocytes. Notably, both AKU chondrocytic types were characterized by increased apoptosis, NO release, and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Transmission electron microscopy also revealed that intracellular ochronotic pigment deposition was common to both “white” and “black” AKU cells. We then undertook a proteomic and redox-proteomic analysis of AKU chondrocytes which revealed profound alterations in the levels of proteins involved in cell defence, protein folding, and cell organization. An increased post-translational oxidation of proteins, which also involved high molecular weight protein aggregates, was found to be particularly relevant in “black” AKU chondrocytes. J. Cell. Physiol. 227: 3333–3343, 2012. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22213341

  4. 3-dimensional bioprinting for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Gu, Bon Kang; Choi, Dong Jin; Park, Sang Jun; Kim, Min Sup; Kang, Chang Mo; Kim, Chun-Ho

    2016-01-01

    The 3-dimensional (3D) printing technologies, referred to as additive manufacturing (AM) or rapid prototyping (RP), have acquired reputation over the past few years for art, architectural modeling, lightweight machines, and tissue engineering applications. Among these applications, tissue engineering field using 3D printing has attracted the attention from many researchers. 3D bioprinting has an advantage in the manufacture of a scaffold for tissue engineering applications, because of rapid-fabrication, high-precision, and customized-production, etc. In this review, we will introduce the principles and the current state of the 3D bioprinting methods. Focusing on some of studies that are being current application for biomedical and tissue engineering fields using printed 3D scaffolds. PMID:27114828

  5. Sodium nitroprusside induces apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Qian; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Chen, Tong-Sheng

    2013-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by a slowly progressing degradation of the matrix and destruction of articular cartilage. Apoptosis of chondrocyte is accounted for the mechanism of OA. Nitric oxide (NO), as a stimulus, has been shown to induce chondrocyte apoptosis by activating the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), increasing the expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and the level of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), inhibiting the proteoglycan synthesis and type II collagen expression. In this study, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was administered to be the NO donor to explore the mechanism of NO-induced apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes obtained from six weeks old New Zealand rabbits. CCK-8 assay revealed the inhibitory effect of SNP on cell viability. We used flow cytometry (FCM) to assess the form of cell death by Annexin-V/propidium iodide (PI) double staining, and evaluate the change of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). We found that the SNP induced chondrocyte apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner and an observable reduction of ΔΨm. In conclusion, our findings indicate that SNP induces apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes via a mitochondria-mediated pathway.

  6. Oxygen tension affects lubricin expression in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hatta, Taku; Kishimoto, Koshi N; Okuno, Hiroshi; Itoi, Eiji

    2014-10-01

    We assessed the effects of oxygen tension on lubricin expression in bovine chondrocytes and cartilage explants and a role for hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF)-1α in regulating lubricin expression was investigated using a murine chondroprogenitor cell line, ATDC5, and bovine chondrocytes isolated from superficial and middle/deep zones of femoral cartilage. ATDC5 cells and bovine chondrocytes were cultured in micromass under different oxygen tensions (21%, 5%, and 1%). ATDC5 cells and middle/deep zone chondrocytes that initially had low lubricin expression levels were also cultured with or without transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR was used to determine lubricin and chondrogenic marker gene mRNA levels and immunohistochemistry was used to assess lubricin protein expression. Explant cartilage plugs cultured under different oxygen tensions were also subjected to immunohistological analysis for lubricin. HIF-1α gene silencing was achieved by electroporatic transfer into ATDC5 cells. A low oxygen tension reduced lubricin gene expression levels in bovine superficial chondrocytes, TGF-β1-treated middle/deep zone chondrocytes, and TGF-β1-treated ATDC5 cells. Lubricin expression in explant cartilage was also suppressed under hypoxia. HIF-1α gene silencing in ATDC5 cells attenuated the lubricin expression response to the oxygen tension. These results corroborate with previous studies that the oxygen tension regulates lubricin gene expression and suggest that HIF-1α plays an important role in this regulation. The normal distribution of lubricin in articular cartilage may be due to the hypoxic oxygen environment of cartilage as it is an avascular tissue. An oxygen tension gradient may be a key factor for engineering cartilage tissue with a layered morphology. PMID:24712343

  7. Cardiothoracic Applications of 3-dimensional Printing.

    PubMed

    Giannopoulos, Andreas A; Steigner, Michael L; George, Elizabeth; Barile, Maria; Hunsaker, Andetta R; Rybicki, Frank J; Mitsouras, Dimitris

    2016-09-01

    Medical 3-dimensional (3D) printing is emerging as a clinically relevant imaging tool in directing preoperative and intraoperative planning in many surgical specialties and will therefore likely lead to interdisciplinary collaboration between engineers, radiologists, and surgeons. Data from standard imaging modalities such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, echocardiography, and rotational angiography can be used to fabricate life-sized models of human anatomy and pathology, as well as patient-specific implants and surgical guides. Cardiovascular 3D-printed models can improve diagnosis and allow for advanced preoperative planning. The majority of applications reported involve congenital heart diseases and valvular and great vessels pathologies. Printed models are suitable for planning both surgical and minimally invasive procedures. Added value has been reported toward improving outcomes, minimizing perioperative risk, and developing new procedures such as transcatheter mitral valve replacements. Similarly, thoracic surgeons are using 3D printing to assess invasion of vital structures by tumors and to assist in diagnosis and treatment of upper and lower airway diseases. Anatomic models enable surgeons to assimilate information more quickly than image review, choose the optimal surgical approach, and achieve surgery in a shorter time. Patient-specific 3D-printed implants are beginning to appear and may have significant impact on cosmetic and life-saving procedures in the future. In summary, cardiothoracic 3D printing is rapidly evolving and may be a potential game-changer for surgeons. The imager who is equipped with the tools to apply this new imaging science to cardiothoracic care is thus ideally positioned to innovate in this new emerging imaging modality. PMID:27149367

  8. Incorporating 3-dimensional models in online articles

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia H. S.; Ruellasa, Antonio C. O.; Jomier, Julien; Nguyen, Tung; Pieper, Steve; Budin, Francois; Styner, Martin; Paniagua, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aims of this article were to introduce the capability to view and interact with 3-dimensional (3D) surface models in online publications, and to describe how to prepare surface models for such online 3D visualizations. Methods Three-dimensional image analysis methods include image acquisition, construction of surface models, registration in a common coordinate system, visualization of overlays, and quantification of changes. Cone-beam computed tomography scans were acquired as volumetric images that can be visualized as 3D projected images or used to construct polygonal meshes or surfaces of specific anatomic structures of interest. The anatomic structures of interest in the scans can be labeled with color (3D volumetric label maps), and then the scans are registered in a common coordinate system using a target region as the reference. The registered 3D volumetric label maps can be saved in .obj, .ply, .stl, or .vtk file formats and used for overlays, quantification of differences in each of the 3 planes of space, or color-coded graphic displays of 3D surface distances. Results All registered 3D surface models in this study were saved in .vtk file format and loaded in the Elsevier 3D viewer. In this study, we describe possible ways to visualize the surface models constructed from cone-beam computed tomography images using 2D and 3D figures. The 3D surface models are available in the article’s online version for viewing and downloading using the reader’s software of choice. These 3D graphic displays are represented in the print version as 2D snapshots. Overlays and color-coded distance maps can be displayed using the reader’s software of choice, allowing graphic assessment of the location and direction of changes or morphologic differences relative to the structure of reference. The interpretation of 3D overlays and quantitative color-coded maps requires basic knowledge of 3D image analysis. Conclusions When submitting manuscripts, authors can

  9. Effects of vimentin disruption on the mechanoresponses of articular chondrocyte.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Yin, Li; Song, Xiongbo; Yang, Hao; Ren, Xiang; Gong, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Fuyou; Yang, Liu

    2016-01-01

    Human articular cartilage is subjected to repetitive mechanical loading during life time. As the only cellular component of articular cartilage, chondrocytes play a key role in the mechanotransduction within this tissue. The mechanoresponses of chondrocytes are largely determined by the cytoskeleton. Vimentin intermediate filaments, one of the major cytoskeletal components, have been shown to regulate chondrocyte phenotype. However, the contribution of vimentin in chondrocyte mechanoresponses remains less studied. In this study, we seeded goat articular chondrocytes on a soft polyacrylamide gel, and disrupted the vimentin cytoskeleton using acrylamide. Then we applied a transient stretch or compression to the cells, and measured the changes of cellular stiffness and traction forces using Optical Magnetic Twisting Cytometry and Traction Force Microscopy, respectively. In addition, to study the effects of vimentin disruption on the intracellular force generation, we treated the cells with a variety of reagents that are known to increase or decrease cytoskeletal tension. We found that, after a compression, the contractile moment and cellular stiffness were not affected in untreated chondrocytes, but were decreased in vimentin-disrupted chondrocytes; after a stretch, vimentin-disrupted chondrocytes showed a lower level of fluidization-resolidification response compared to untreated cells. Moreover, vimentin-disrupted chondrocytes didn't show much difference to control cells in responding to reagents that target actin and ROCK pathway, but showed a weaker response to histamine and isoproterenol. These findings confirmed chondrocyte vimentin as a major contributor in withstanding compressive loading, and its minor role in regulating cytoskeletal tension. PMID:26616052

  10. Bovine achondrogenesis: evidence for defective chondrocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Horton, W A; Jayo, M J; Leipold, H W; Machado, M A; Campbell, D; Ahmed, S

    1987-01-01

    A survey study of growth cartilage abnormalities in bovine bone dysplasias revealed that a disorder in Holstein cattle called bulldog calf closely resembles human achondrogenesis Type II. Substantial amounts of Type I collagen and other non Type II collagens were detected in the bulldog cartilage which was comprised primarily of extensive vascular canals and cells having the characteristics of hypertrophic and degenerative chondrocytes normally found in the growth plate. It is proposed that chondrocytes throughout the bulldog growth cartilage prematurely differentiate into hypertrophic cells that degenerate and predispose the cartilage to vascular invasion and the formation of cartilage canals. The presence of these canals probably accounts for most of the observed collagen abnormalities. PMID:3606909

  11. [Growth behavior of chondrocytes on various biomaterials].

    PubMed

    Rudert, M; Hirschmann, F; Wirth, C J

    1999-01-01

    Chondrocytes can be cultured on different three-dimensional culture systems suitable for transplantation to enhance the repair of localized cartilage defects. Articular cartilage chondrocytes from adult rabbit knees and from bovine calf metacarpophalangeal joints were isolated by enzymatic digestion and cultured in a monolayer system to amplify cell count. After amplification the cells were seeded on different biocompatible materials. We investigated two types of bioresorbable polymer fleece matrices (a composite fleece of polydioxanon and polyglactin and a resorbable poly-L-lactic acid fleece) and lyophilized dura as a biological carrier. On all three types of transport media the phenotypic and morphological appearance of cultured chondrocytes could be observed. The production of glycosaminoglycans was revealed by Alcian blue staining and immunohistochemical detection of Chondroitin-4 and 6-sulfate in the created constructs. The material properties of the carriers allow for transplantation of the artificial cartilage-like products into full thickness articular cartilage defects and could therefore improve the minor intrinsic healing capacity of cartilage tissue. Bioartificial cartilage may become a future perspective in the treatment options of orthopaedic and plastic surgery. PMID:10081046

  12. Genome-wide mapping of DNA hydroxymethylation in osteoarthritic chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Sarah E. B.; Li, Ye Henry; Wong, Wing H.; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine genome-wide 5hmC distribution in osteoarthritic (OA) and normal chondrocytes to investigate the effect on OA-specific gene expression. Methods Cartilage was obtained from OA patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty or control patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Genome-wide sequencing of 5hmC-enriched DNA (5hmC-seq) was performed for a small cohort of normal and OA chondrocytes to identify differentially hydroxymethylated regions (DhMRs) in OA chondrocytes. 5hmC-seq data was intersected with global OA gene expression data to define subsets of genes and pathways potentially affected by increased 5hmC levels in OA chondrocytes. Results 70591 DhMRs were identified in OA chondrocytes compared to normal chondrocytes, 44288 (63%) of which were increased in OA chondrocytes. The majority of DhMRs (66%) were gained in gene bodies. Increased DhMRs were observed in ~50% of genes previously implicated in OA pathology including MMP3, LRP5, GDF5 and COL11A1. Furthermore, analyses of gene expression data revealed gene body gain of 5hmC appears to be preferentially associated with activated but not repressed genes in OA chondrocytes. Conclusion This study provides the first genome-wide profiling of 5hmC distribution in OA chondrocytes. We had previously reported a global increase in 5hmC levels in OA chondrocytes. Gain of 5hmC in the gene body is found to be characteristic of activated genes in OA chondrocytes, highlighting the influence of 5hmC as an epigenetic mark in OA. In addition, this study identifies multiple OA-associated genes that are potentially regulated either singularly by gain of DNA hydroxymethylation or in combination with loss of DNA methylation. PMID:25940674

  13. Chondrocyte-specific ablation of Osterix leads to impaired endochondral ossification

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Jung-Hoon; Park, Seung-Yoon; Crombrugghe, Benoit de; Kim, Jung-Eun

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conditional ablation of Osterix (Osx) in chondrocytes leads to skeletal defects. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Osx regulates chondrocyte differentiation and bone growth in growth plate chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Osx has an autonomous function in chondrocytes during endochondral ossification. -- Abstract: Osterix (Osx) is an essential transcription factor required for osteoblast differentiation during both intramembranous and endochondral ossification. Endochondral ossification, a process in which bone formation initiates from a cartilage intermediate, is crucial for skeletal development and growth. Osx is expressed in differentiating chondrocytes as well as osteoblasts during mouse development, but its role in chondrocytes has not been well studied. Here, the in vivo function of Osx in chondrocytes was examined in a chondrocyte-specific Osx conditional knockout model using Col2a1-Cre. Chondrocyte-specific Osx deficiency resulted in a weak and bent skeleton which was evident in newborn by radiographic analysis and skeletal preparation. To further understand the skeletal deformity of the chondrocyte-specific Osx conditional knockout, histological analysis was performed on developing long bones during embryogenesis. Hypertrophic chondrocytes were expanded, the formation of bone trabeculae and marrow cavities was remarkably delayed, and subsequent skeletal growth was reduced. The expression of several chondrocyte differentiation markers was reduced, indicating the impairment of chondrocyte differentiation and endochondral ossification in the chondrocyte-specific Osx conditional knockout. Taken together, Osx regulates chondrocyte differentiation and bone growth in growth plate chondrocytes, suggesting an autonomous function of Osx in chondrocytes during endochondral ossification.

  14. Applications of Chondrocyte-Based Cartilage Engineering: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Eo, Seong-Hui; Abbas, Qamar; Ahmed, Madiha

    2016-01-01

    Chondrocytes are the exclusive cells residing in cartilage and maintain the functionality of cartilage tissue. Series of biocomponents such as different growth factors, cytokines, and transcriptional factors regulate the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiation to chondrocytes. The number of chondrocytes and dedifferentiation are the key limitations in subsequent clinical application of the chondrocytes. Different culture methods are being developed to overcome such issues. Using tissue engineering and cell based approaches, chondrocytes offer prominent therapeutic option specifically in orthopedics for cartilage repair and to treat ailments such as tracheal defects, facial reconstruction, and urinary incontinence. Matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation/implantation is an improved version of traditional autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) method. An increasing number of studies show the clinical significance of this technique for the chondral lesions treatment. Literature survey was carried out to address clinical and functional findings by using various ACT procedures. The current study was conducted to study the pharmacological significance and biomedical application of chondrocytes. Furthermore, it is inferred from the present study that long term follow-up studies are required to evaluate the potential of these methods and specific positive outcomes.

  15. Proliferation and differentiation potential of chondrocytes from osteoarthritic patients

    PubMed Central

    Tallheden, Tommi; Bengtsson, Catherine; Brantsing, Camilla; Sjögren-Jansson, Eva; Carlsson, Lars; Peterson, Lars; Brittberg, Mats; Lindahl, Anders

    2005-01-01

    Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) has been shown, in long-term follow-up studies, to be a promising treatment for the repair of isolated cartilage lesions. The method is based on an implantation of in vitro expanded chondrocytes originating from a small cartilage biopsy harvested from a non-weight-bearing area within the joint. In patients with osteoarthritis (OA), there is a need for the resurfacing of large areas, which could potentially be made by using a scaffold in combination with culture-expanded cells. As a first step towards a cell-based therapy for OA, we therefore investigated the expansion and redifferentiation potential in vitro of chondrocytes isolated from patients undergoing total knee replacement. The results demonstrate that OA chondrocytes have a good proliferation potential and are able to redifferentiate in a three-dimensional pellet model. During the redifferentiation, the OA cells expressed increasing amounts of DNA and proteoglycans, and at day 14 the cells from all donors contained type II collagen-rich matrix. The accumulation of proteoglycans was in comparable amounts to those from ACT donors, whereas total collagen was significantly lower in all of the redifferentiated OA chondrocytes. When the OA chondrocytes were loaded into a scaffold based on hyaluronic acid, they bound to the scaffold and produced cartilage-specific matrix proteins. Thus, autologous chondrocytes are a potential source for the biological treatment of OA patients but the limited collagen synthesis of the OA chondrocytes needs to be further explained. PMID:15899043

  16. Monolayer expansion induces an oxidative metabolism and ROS in chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Heywood, H.K. Lee, D.A.

    2008-08-22

    This study tests the hypothesis that articular chondrocytes shift from a characteristically glycolytic to an oxidative energy metabolism during population expansion in monolayer. Bovine articular chondrocytes were cultured in monolayer under standard incubator conditions for up to 14 days. Cellular proliferation, oxygen consumption, lactate production, protein content, ROS generation and mitochondrial morphology were examined. Lactate release increased {approx}5-fold within 1 week, but this was limited to {approx}2-fold increase when normalized to cellular protein content. By contrast, per cell oxidative phosphorylation increased 98-fold in 1 week. The increase in oxidative phosphorylation was evident within 24 h, preceding cell proliferation and was associated with augmented reactive oxygen species generation. The autologous chondrocyte implantation procedure requires 14-21 days for population expansion. The alterations in metabolic phenotype we report within 7 days in vitro are thus pertinent to autologous chondrocyte implantation with significant implications for the chondrocyte functionality.

  17. Biomarkers of Chondrocyte Apoptosis and Autophagy in Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Castrogiovanni, Paola; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Weinberg, Annelie Martina; Al-Wasiyah, Mohammad K.; Alqahtani, Mohammed H.; Mobasheri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Cell death with morphological and molecular features of apoptosis has been detected in osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage, which suggests a key role for chondrocyte death/survival in the pathogenesis of OA. Identification of biomarkers of chondrocyte apoptosis may facilitate the development of novel therapies that may eliminate the cause or, at least, slow down the degenerative processes in OA. The aim of this review was to explore the molecular markers and signals that induce chondrocyte apoptosis in OA. A literature search was conducted in PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar using the keywords chondrocyte death, apoptosis, osteoarthritis, autophagy and biomarker. Several molecules considered to be markers of chondrocyte apoptosis will be discussed in this brief review. Molecular markers and signalling pathways associated with chondroycte apoptosis may turn out to be therapeutic targets in OA and approaches aimed at neutralizing apoptosis-inducing molecules may at least delay the progression of cartilage degeneration in OA. PMID:26334269

  18. 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine acts as a modulator of chondrocyte hypertrophy and maturation in chick caudal region chondrocytes in culture.

    PubMed

    Haq, Samina Hyder

    2016-06-01

    This study was carried out to explore the effect of DNA hypomethylation on chondrocytes phenotype, in particular the effect on chondrocyte hypertrophy, maturation, and apoptosis. Chondrocytes derived from caudal region of day 17 embryonic chick sterna were pretreated with hypomethylating drug 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine for 48 hours and then maintained in the normal culture medium for up to 14 days. Histological studies showed distinct morphological changes occurred in the pretreated cultures when compared to the control cultures. The pretreated chondrocytes after 7 days in culture became bigger in size and acquired more flattened fibroblastic phenotype as well as a loss of cartilage specific extracellular matrix. Scanning electron microscopy at day 7 showed chondrocytes to have increased in cell volume and at day 14 in culture the extracellular matrix of the pretreated cultures showed regular fibrillar structure heavily embedded with matrix vesicles, which is the characteristic feature of chondrocyte hypertrophy. Transmission electron microscopic studies indicated the terminal fate of the hypertrophic cells in culture. The pretreated chondrocytes grown for 14 days in culture showed two types of cells: dark cells which had condense chromatin in dark patches and dark cytoplasm. The other light chondrocytes appeared to be heavily loaded with endoplasmic reticulum indicative of very active protein and secretory activity; their cytoplasm had large vacuoles and disintegrating cytoplasm. The biosynthetic profile showed that the pretreated cultures were actively synthesizing and secreting type X collagen and alkaline phosphatase as a major biosynthetic product. PMID:27382512

  19. 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine acts as a modulator of chondrocyte hypertrophy and maturation in chick caudal region chondrocytes in culture

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to explore the effect of DNA hypomethylation on chondrocytes phenotype, in particular the effect on chondrocyte hypertrophy, maturation, and apoptosis. Chondrocytes derived from caudal region of day 17 embryonic chick sterna were pretreated with hypomethylating drug 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine for 48 hours and then maintained in the normal culture medium for up to 14 days. Histological studies showed distinct morphological changes occurred in the pretreated cultures when compared to the control cultures. The pretreated chondrocytes after 7 days in culture became bigger in size and acquired more flattened fibroblastic phenotype as well as a loss of cartilage specific extracellular matrix. Scanning electron microscopy at day 7 showed chondrocytes to have increased in cell volume and at day 14 in culture the extracellular matrix of the pretreated cultures showed regular fibrillar structure heavily embedded with matrix vesicles, which is the characteristic feature of chondrocyte hypertrophy. Transmission electron microscopic studies indicated the terminal fate of the hypertrophic cells in culture. The pretreated chondrocytes grown for 14 days in culture showed two types of cells: dark cells which had condense chromatin in dark patches and dark cytoplasm. The other light chondrocytes appeared to be heavily loaded with endoplasmic reticulum indicative of very active protein and secretory activity; their cytoplasm had large vacuoles and disintegrating cytoplasm. The biosynthetic profile showed that the pretreated cultures were actively synthesizing and secreting type X collagen and alkaline phosphatase as a major biosynthetic product. PMID:27382512

  20. Joint aging and chondrocyte cell death

    PubMed Central

    Grogan, Shawn P; D’Lima, Darryl D

    2010-01-01

    Articular cartilage extracellular matrix and cell function change with age and are considered to be the most important factors in the development and progression of osteoarthritis. The multifaceted nature of joint disease indicates that the contribution of cell death can be an important factor at early and late stages of osteoarthritis. Therefore, the pharmacologic inhibition of cell death is likely to be clinically valuable at any stage of the disease. In this article, we will discuss the close association between diverse changes in cartilage aging, how altered conditions influence chondrocyte death, and the implications of preventing cell loss to retard osteoarthritis progression and preserve tissue homeostasis. PMID:20671988

  1. From 2-dimensional cephalograms to 3-dimensional computed tomography scans.

    PubMed

    Halazonetis, Demetrios J

    2005-05-01

    Computed tomography is entering the orthodontic specialty as a mainstream diagnostic modality. Radiation exposure and cost have decreased significantly, and the diagnostic value is very high compared with traditional radiographic options. However, 3-dimensional data present new challenges and need a different approach from traditional viewing of static images to make the most of the available possibilities. Advances in computer hardware and software now enable interactive display of the data on personal computers, with the ability to selectively view soft or hard tissues from any angle. Transfer functions are used to apply transparency and color. Cephalometric measurements can be taken by digitizing points in 3-dimensional coordinates. Application of 3-dimensional data is expected to increase significantly soon and might eventually replace many conventional orthodontic records that are in use today. PMID:15877045

  2. Effect of hyaluronic acid on chondrocyte apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Barreto, Ronald Bispo; Sadigursky, David; de Rezende, Marcia Uchoa; Hernandez, Arnaldo José

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the percentage of apoptotic cells in a contusion model of osteoarthritis (OA) and to assess whether intra-articular injection of high doses of hyaluronic acid (HA) immediately after trauma reduces chondrocyte apoptosis. METHODS: Forty knees from adult rabbits were impacted thrice with a 1 kg block released through a 1 meter tall cylinder (29.4 Joules). Subsequently, 2 mL of HA was injected in one knee and 2 mL saline in the contra-lateral knee. Medication were administered twice a week for 30 days, when animals were sacrificed. Specimens were prepared for optical microscopy exam and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase end labeling assay (TUNEL). RESULTS: The apoptosis rate in the contusion model was 68.01% (± 19.73%), a higher rate than previously described. HA significantly reduced the rate of apoptosis to 53.52% (± 18.09) (p <0.001). CONCLUSION: Intra-articular HA administration started immediately after trauma reduces impact-induced chondrocyte apoptosis rates in rabbits. Level of Evidence I, Experimental Study. PMID:27069407

  3. Fibroblast growth factor is an inhibitor of chondrocyte terminal differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Y.; Iwamoto, M. )

    1990-04-05

    The effects of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on terminal differentiation of chondrocytes and cartilage-matrix calcification were investigated. Rabbit growth-plate chondrocytes maintained as a pelleted mass in a centrifuge tube produced an abundant proteoglycan matrix during the matrix-maturation stage, yielding a cartilage-like tissue. Thereafter, they terminally differentiated to hypertrophic chondrocytes which produced high levels of alkaline phosphatase. These cells induced extensive calcification of the matrix in the absence of additional phosphate. Addition of bFGF to the chondrocyte cultures abolished the increases in alkaline phosphatase activity, {sup 45}Ca deposition, and the calcium content. These effects were dose-dependent, reversible, and observed in the presence of cytosine arabinoside, an inhibitor of DNA synthesis. The inhibitory effects could be observed only when chondrocytes were exposed to bFGF in a transition period between the matrix-maturation and hypertrophic stages. As chondrocytes differentiated to hypertrophic cells, bFGF became less effective in inhibiting the expression of the mineralization-related phenotypes. The present study also shows that although the rate of ({sup 35}S)sulfate incorporation into large, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan in the cell-matrix fraction is very high during the matrix-maturation stage, it abruptly decreases by 90% after terminal differentiation. Furthermore, the terminal differentiation-associated decrease in proteoglycan synthesis was delayed by bFGF. These results provide evidence that bFGF inhibits terminal differentiation of chondrocytes and calcification.

  4. Expression of Angiotensin II Receptor-1 in Human Articular Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Yuki; Matsuo, Kosuke; Murata, Minako; Yudoh, Kazuo; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Beppu, Moroe; Inaba, Yutaka; Saito, Tomoyuki; Kato, Tomohiro; Masuko, Kayo

    2012-01-01

    Background. Besides its involvement in the cardiovascular system, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone (RAS) system has also been suggested to play an important role in inflammation. To explore the role of this system in cartilage damage in arthritis, we investigated the expression of angiotensin II receptors in chondrocytes. Methods. Articular cartilage was obtained from patients with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and traumatic fractures who were undergoing arthroplasty. Chondrocytes were isolated and cultured in vitro with or without interleukin (IL-1). The expression of angiotensin II receptor types 1 (AT1R) and 2 (AT2R) mRNA by the chondrocytes was analyzed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). AT1R expression in cartilage tissue was analyzed using immunohistochemistry. The effect of IL-1 on AT1R/AT2R expression in the chondrocytes was analyzed by quantitative PCR and flow cytometry. Results. Chondrocytes from all patient types expressed AT1R/AT2R mRNA, though considerable variation was found between samples. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed AT1R expression at the protein level. Stimulation with IL-1 enhanced the expression of AT1R/AT2R mRNA in OA and RA chondrocytes. Conclusions. Human articular chondrocytes, at least partially, express angiotensin II receptors, and IL-1 stimulation induced AT1R/AT2R mRNA expression significantly. PMID:23346400

  5. Synthesis of classical pathway complement components by chondrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, K; North, J; Saunders, D; Schwaeble, W; Jeziorska, M; Woolley, D E; Whaley, K

    1996-01-01

    Using immunohistochemical studies, C1q, C1s, C4 and C2 were detected in chondrocytes in normal human articular cartilage and macroscopically normal articular cartilage from the inferior surfaces of hip joints of patients with osteoarthritis. Using reverse-transcribed polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), mRNA for C1q, C1s, C4 and C2 was also detected in RNA extracted from articular cartilage. C1r, C3, C1-inhibitor, C4-binding protein and factor I were not detected by either technique. Articular chondrocytes cultured in vitro synthesized C1r, C1s, C4, C2, C3 and C1-inhibitor but not C1q, C4-binding protein or factor I, as assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Northern blot analysis. Thus cultured articular chondrocytes have a complement profile that is similar to that of cultured human fibroblasts rather than that of articular chondrocytes in vivo. Complement synthesis in cultured chondrocytes was modulated by the cytokines interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), showing that cytokines can probably regulate complement synthesis in intact cartilage. The possible roles of local synthesis of complement components by chondrocytes in matrix turnover and the regulation chondrocyte function are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:8881771

  6. Differential Cross Section Kinematics for 3-dimensional Transport Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Dick, Frank

    2008-01-01

    In support of the development of 3-dimensional transport codes, this paper derives the relevant relativistic particle kinematic theory. Formulas are given for invariant, spectral and angular distributions in both the lab (spacecraft) and center of momentum frames, for collisions involving 2, 3 and n - body final states.

  7. Controlled teleportation of a 3-dimensional bipartite quantum state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hai-Jing; Chen, Zhong-Hua; Song, He-Shan

    2008-07-01

    A controlled teleportation scheme of an unknown 3-dimensional (3D) two-particle quantum state is proposed, where a 3D Bell state and 3D GHZ state function as the quantum channel. This teleportation scheme can be directly generalized to teleport an unknown d-dimensional bipartite quantum state.

  8. Runx1 Activities in Superficial Zone Chondrocytes, Osteoarthritic Chondrocyte Clones and Response to Mechanical Loading

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Kimberly T.; Walcott, Marie E.; Gaur, Tripti; O’Connell, Shannon L.; Basil, Kirti; Tadiri, Christina P.; Mason-Savas, April; Silva, Jason A.; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S; Ayers, David C.; Lian, Jane B.; Fanning, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Runx1, the hematopoietic lineage determining transcription factor, is present in perichondrium and chondrocytes. Here we addressed Runx1 functions, by examining expression in cartilage during mouse and human osteoarthritis (OA) progression and in response to mechanical loading. Methods Spared and diseased compartments in knees of OA patients and in mice with surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus were examined for changes in expression of Runx1 mRNA (Q-PCR) and protein (immunoblot, immunohistochemistry). Runx1 levels were quantified in response to static mechanical compression of bovine articular cartilage. Runx1 function was assessed by cell proliferation (Ki67, PCNA) and cell type phenotypic markers. Results Runx1 is enriched in superficial zone (SZ) chondrocytes of normal bovine, mouse, and human tissues. Increasing loading conditions in bovine cartilage revealed a positive correlation with a significant elevation of Runx1. Runx1 becomes highly expressed at the periphery of mouse OA lesions and in human OA chondrocyte ‘clones’ where Runx1 co-localizes with Vcam1, the mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) marker and lubricin (Prg4), a cartilage chondroprotective protein. These OA induced cells represent a proliferative cell population, Runx1 depletion in MPCs decreases cell growth, supporting Runx1 contribution to cell expansion. Conclusion The highest Runx1 levels in SZC of normal cartilage suggest a function that supports the unique phenotype of articular chondrocytes, reflected by upregulation under conditions of compression. We propose Runx1 co-expression with Vcam1 and lubricin in murine cell clusters and human ‘clones’ of OA cartilage, participate in a cooperative mechanism for a compensatory anabolic function. PMID:25078095

  9. A Qualitative Model of the Differentiation Network in Chondrocyte Maturation: A Holistic View of Chondrocyte Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Kerkhofs, Johan; Leijten, Jeroen; Bolander, Johanna; Luyten, Frank P; Post, Janine N; Geris, Liesbet

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation of chondrocytes towards hypertrophy is a natural process whose control is essential in endochondral bone formation. It is additionally thought to play a role in several pathophysiological processes, with osteoarthritis being a prominent example. We perform a dynamic analysis of a qualitative mathematical model of the regulatory network that directs this phenotypic switch to investigate the influence of the individual factors holistically. To estimate the stability of a SOX9 positive state (associated with resting/proliferation chondrocytes) versus a RUNX2 positive one (associated with hypertrophy) we employ two measures. The robustness of the state in canalisation (size of the attractor basin) is assessed by a Monte Carlo analysis and the sensitivity to perturbations is assessed by a perturbational analysis of the attractor. Through qualitative predictions, these measures allow for an in silico screening of the effect of the modelled factors on chondrocyte maintenance and hypertrophy. We show how discrepancies between experimental data and the model's results can be resolved by evaluating the dynamic plausibility of alternative network topologies. The findings are further supported by a literature study of proposed therapeutic targets in the case of osteoarthritis. PMID:27579819

  10. Catabolic effects of muramyl dipeptide on rabbit chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ikebe, T.; Iribe, H.; Hirata, M.; Yanaga, F.; Koga, T. )

    1990-12-01

    Muramyl dipeptide, an essential structure for the diverse biologic activities of bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan, inhibited the synthesis of glycosaminoglycan/proteoglycan in cultured rabbit costal chondrocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Muramyl dipeptide, as well as lipopolysaccharide and interleukin-1 alpha, also enhanced the release of 35S-sulfate-prelabeled glycosaminoglycan/proteoglycan from the cell layer, which seems to reflect, at least partially, the increasing degradation of glycosaminoglycan/proteoglycan. Five synthetic analogs of muramyl dipeptide known to be adjuvant active or adjuvant inactive were tested for their potential to inhibit synthesis of glycosaminoglycan/proteoglycan and to enhance the release of glycosaminoglycan/proteoglycan in chondrocytes. The structural dependence of these synthetic analogs on chondrocytes was found to parallel that of immunoadjuvant activity. These results suggest that muramyl dipeptide is a potent mediator of catabolism in chondrocytes.

  11. The effect of piroxicam on the metabolism of isolated human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bulstra, S K; Kuijer, R; Buurman, W A; Terwindt-Rouwenhorst, E; Guelen, P J; van der Linden, A J

    1992-04-01

    The effect of piroxicam on the metabolism of healthy and osteoarthrotic (OA) chondrocytes was studied in vitro. The chondrocytes were obtained from five healthy, five moderately OA, and four severely OA hips or knees. The chondrocytes were cultured in a high-density, short-term in vitro model. In this culture, the healthy chondrocytes as well as the OA chondrocytes retain their metabolic properties. Piroxicam was used in concentrations ranging from 0 to 10 micrograms/ml, which is comparable to the concentrations reached in vivo after oral administration. In cultures of healthy chondrocytes, piroxicam inhibited proliferation and synthesis of proteoglycans. The metabolism of moderately damaged chondrocytes was not influenced by piroxicam. In severely damaged chondrocytes, the proliferation was significantly inhibited by piroxicam. In order to avoid the possible negative side effects of piroxicam on the metabolism of healthy and severely OA chondrocytes, piroxicam treatment of an OA joint with synovitis should be restricted to the period of the effusion. PMID:1555353

  12. Membrane channel gene expression in human costal and articular chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Asmar, A.; Barrett-Jolley, R.; Werner, A.; Kelly, R.; Stacey, M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chondrocytes are the uniquely resident cells found in all types of cartilage and key to their function is the ability to respond to mechanical loads with changes of metabolic activity. This mechanotransduction property is, in part, mediated through the activity of a range of expressed transmembrane channels; ion channels, gap junction proteins, and porins. Appropriate expression of ion channels has been shown essential for production of extracellular matrix and differential expression of transmembrane channels is correlated to musculoskeletal diseases such as osteoarthritis and Albers-Schönberg. In this study we analyzed the consistency of gene expression between channelomes of chondrocytes from human articular and costal (teenage and fetal origin) cartilages. Notably, we found 14 ion channel genes commonly expressed between articular and both types of costal cartilage chondrocytes. There were several other ion channel genes expressed only in articular (6 genes) or costal chondrocytes (5 genes). Significant differences in expression of BEST1 and KCNJ2 (Kir2.1) were observed between fetal and teenage costal cartilage. Interestingly, the large Ca2+ activated potassium channel (BKα, or KCNMA1) was very highly expressed in all chondrocytes examined. Expression of the gap junction genes for Panx1, GJA1 (Cx43) and GJC1 (Cx45) was also observed in chondrocytes from all cartilage samples. Together, this data highlights similarities between chondrocyte membrane channel gene expressions in cells derived from different anatomical sites, and may imply that common electrophysiological signaling pathways underlie cellular control. The high expression of a range of mechanically and metabolically sensitive membrane channels suggest that chondrocyte mechanotransduction may be more complex than previously thought. PMID:27116676

  13. Extensively Expanded Auricular Chondrocytes Form Neocartilage In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Alan; Pomerantseva, Irina; Cronce, Michael J.; Kimura, Anya M.; Neville, Craig M.; Randolph, Mark A.; Sundback, Cathryn A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Our goal was to engineer cartilage in vivo using auricular chondrocytes that underwent clinically relevant expansion and using methodologies that could be easily translated into health care practice. Design Sheep and human chondrocytes were isolated from auricular cartilage biopsies and expanded in vitro. To reverse dedifferentiation, expanded cells were either mixed with cryopreserved P0 chondrocytes at the time of seeding onto porous collagen scaffolds or proliferated with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). After 2-week in vitro incubation, seeded scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously in nude mice for 6 weeks. The neocartilage quality was evaluated histologically; DNA and glycosaminoglycans were quantified. Cell proliferation rates and collagen gene expression profiles were assessed. Results Clinically sufficient over 500-fold chondrocyte expansion was achieved at passage 3 (P3); cell dedifferentiation was confirmed by the simultaneous COL1A1/3A1 gene upregulation and COL2A1 downregulation. The chondrogenic phenotype of sheep but not human P3 cells was rescued by addition of cryopreserved P0 chondrocytes. With bFGF supplementation, chondrocytes achieved clinically sufficient expansion at P2; COL2A1 expression was not rescued but COL1A1/3A1genes were downregulated. Although bFGF failed to rescue COL2A1 expression during chondrocyte expansion in vitro, elastic neocartilage with obvious collagen II expression was observed on porous collagen scaffolds after implantation in mice for 6 weeks. Conclusions Both animal and human auricular chondrocytes expanded with low-concentration bFGF supplementation formed high-quality elastic neocartilage on porous collagen scaffolds in vivo. PMID:26069703

  14. Multimodality 3-Dimensional Image Integration for Congenital Cardiac Catheterization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac catheterization procedures for patients with congenital and structural heart disease are becoming more complex. New imaging strategies involving integration of 3-dimensional images from rotational angiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computerized tomography (CT), and transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) are employed to facilitate these procedures. We discuss the current use of these new 3D imaging technologies and their advantages and challenges when used to guide complex diagnostic and interventional catheterization procedures in patients with congenital heart disease. PMID:25114757

  15. Sphingosine-1-phosphate stimulates rat primary chondrocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Mi-Kyoung; Lee, Ha Young; Kwak, Jong-Young; Park, Joo-In; Yun, Jeanho; Bae, Yoe-Sik . E-mail: yoesik@donga.ac.kr

    2006-06-23

    Rat primary chondrocytes express the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor, S1P{sub 2}, S1P{sub 3}, S1P{sub 4}, but not S1P{sub 1}. When chondrocytes were stimulated with S1P or phytosphingosine-1-phosphate (PhS1P, an S1P{sub 1}- and S1P{sub 4}-selective agonist), phospholipase C-mediated cytosolic calcium increase was dramatically induced. S1P and PhS1P also stimulated two kinds of mitogen-activated protein kinases, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 kinase in chondrocytes. In terms of the two phospholipids-mediated functional modulation of chondrocytes, S1P and PhS1P stimulated cellular proliferation. The two phospholipids-induced chondrocyte proliferations were almost completely blocked by PD98059 but not by SB203580, suggesting that ERK but not p38 kinase is essentially required for the proliferation. Pertussis toxin almost completely inhibited the two phospholipids-induced cellular proliferation and ERK activation, indicating the crucial role of G{sub i} protein. This study demonstrates the physiological role of two important phospholipids (S1P and PhS1P) on the modulation of rat primary chondrocyte proliferation, and the crucial role played by ERK in the process.

  16. Equine articular chondrocytes on MACT scaffolds for cartilage defect treatment.

    PubMed

    Nürnberger, S; Meyer, C; Ponomarev, I; Barnewitz, D; Resinger, C; Klepal, W; Albrecht, C; Marlovits, S

    2013-10-01

    Treatment of cartilage defects poses challenging problems in human and veterinary medicine, especially in horses. This study examines the suitability of applying scaffold materials similar to those used for human cartilage regeneration on equine chondrocytes. Chondrocytes gained from biopsies of the talocrural joint of three horses were propagated in 2D culture and grown on two different scaffold materials, hyaluronan (HYAFF®) and collagen (BioGide®), and evaluated by light and electron microscopy. The equine chondrocytes developed well in both types of materials. They were vital and physiologically highly active. On the surface of the scaffolds, they formed cell multilayers. Inside the hyaluronan web, the chondrocytes were regularly distributed and spanned the large scaffold fibre distances by producing their own matrix sheath. Half-circle-like depressions occasionally found in the cell membrane were probably related to movement on the flexible matrix sheath. Inside the dense collagen scaffold, only single cells were found. They passed through the scaffold strands by cell shape adaptation. This study showed that the examined scaffold materials can be used for equine chondrocyte cultivation. Chondrocytes tend to form multilayers on the surface of both, very dense and very porous scaffolds, and have strategies to span between and move in large gaps. PMID:23323689

  17. Antioxidant effect of bisphosphonates and simvastatin on chondrocyte lipid peroxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Dombrecht, E.J.; De Tollenaere, C.B.; Aerts, K.; Cos, P.; Schuerwegh, A.J.; Bridts, C.H.; Van Offel, J.F.; Ebo, D.G.; Stevens, W.J. . E-mail: immuno@ua.ac.be; De Clerck, L.S.

    2006-09-22

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of bisphosphonates (BPs) and simvastatin on chondrocyte lipid peroxidation. For this purpose, a flow cytometrical method using C11-BODIPY{sup 581/591} was developed to detect hydroperoxide-induced lipid peroxidation in chondrocytes. Tertiary butylhydroperoxide (t-BHP) induced a time and concentration dependent increase in chondrocyte lipid peroxidation. Addition of a Fe{sup 2+}/EDTA complex to t-BHP or hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) clearly enhanced lipid peroxidation. The lipophilic simvastatin demonstrated a small inhibition in the chondrocyte lipid peroxidation. None of three tested BPs (clodronate, pamidronate, and risedronate) had an effect on chondrocyte lipid peroxidation induced by t-BHP. However, when Fe{sup 2+}/EDTA complex was added to t-BHP or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, BPs inhibited the lipid peroxidation process varying from 25% to 58%. This study demonstrates that BPs have antioxidant properties as iron chelators, thereby inhibiting the chondrocyte lipid peroxidation. These findings add evidence to the therapeutic potential of bisphosphonates and statins in rheumatoid arthritis.

  18. CCN1 Regulates Chondrocyte Maturation and Cartilage Development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongchun; Sheu, Tzong-jen; Hoak, Donna; Shen, Jie; Hilton, Matthew J; Zuscik, Michael J; Jonason, Jennifer H; O’Keefe, Regis J

    2016-01-01

    WNT/β-CATENIN signaling is involved in multiple aspects of skeletal development, including chondrocyte differentiation and maturation. Although the functions of β-CATENIN in chondrocytes have been extensively investigated through gain-of-function and loss-of-function mouse models, the precise downstream effectors through which β-CATENIN regulates these processes are not well defined. Here, we report that the matricellular protein, CCN1, is induced by WNT/β-CATENIN signaling in chondrocytes. Specifically, we found that β-CATENIN signaling promotes CCN1 expression in isolated primary sternal chondrocytes and both embryonic and postnatal cartilage. Additionally, we show that, in vitro, CCN1 overexpression promotes chondrocyte maturation, whereas inhibition of endogenous CCN1 function inhibits maturation. To explore the role of CCN1 on cartilage development and homeostasis in vivo, we generated a novel transgenic mouse model for conditional Ccn1 overexpression and show that cartilage-specific CCN1 overexpression leads to chondrodysplasia during development and cartilage degeneration in adult mice. Finally, we demonstrate that CCN1 expression increases in mouse knee joint tissues after meniscal/ligamentous injury (MLI) and in human cartilage after meniscal tear. Collectively, our data suggest that CCN1 is an important regulator of chondrocyte maturation during cartilage development and homeostasis. PMID:26363286

  19. CCN1 Regulates Chondrocyte Maturation and Cartilage Development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongchun; Sheu, Tzong-Jen; Hoak, Donna; Shen, Jie; Hilton, Matthew J; Zuscik, Michael J; Jonason, Jennifer H; O'Keefe, Regis J

    2016-03-01

    WNT/β-CATENIN signaling is involved in multiple aspects of skeletal development, including chondrocyte differentiation and maturation. Although the functions of β-CATENIN in chondrocytes have been extensively investigated through gain-of-function and loss-of-function mouse models, the precise downstream effectors through which β-CATENIN regulates these processes are not well defined. Here, we report that the matricellular protein, CCN1, is induced by WNT/β-CATENIN signaling in chondrocytes. Specifically, we found that β-CATENIN signaling promotes CCN1 expression in isolated primary sternal chondrocytes and both embryonic and postnatal cartilage. Additionally, we show that, in vitro, CCN1 overexpression promotes chondrocyte maturation, whereas inhibition of endogenous CCN1 function inhibits maturation. To explore the role of CCN1 on cartilage development and homeostasis in vivo, we generated a novel transgenic mouse model for conditional Ccn1 overexpression and show that cartilage-specific CCN1 overexpression leads to chondrodysplasia during development and cartilage degeneration in adult mice. Finally, we demonstrate that CCN1 expression increases in mouse knee joint tissues after meniscal/ligamentous injury (MLI) and in human cartilage after meniscal tear. Collectively, our data suggest that CCN1 is an important regulator of chondrocyte maturation during cartilage development and homeostasis. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26363286

  20. Monosodium Urate Crystal-Induced Chondrocyte Death via Autophagic Process

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hyun Sook; Yang, Chung Mi; Park, Su Jin; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2015-01-01

    Monosodium urate (MSU) crystals, which are highly precipitated in the joint cartilage, increase the production of cartilage-degrading enzymes and pro-inflammatory mediators in cartilage, thereby leading to gouty inflammation and joint damage. In this study, we investigated the effect of MSU crystals on the viability of human articular chondrocytes and the mechanism of MSU crystal-induced chondrocyte death. MSU crystals significantly decreased the viability of primary chondrocytes in a time- and dose-dependent manner. DNA fragmentation was observed in a culture medium of MSU crystal-treated chondrocytes, but not in cell lysates. MSU crystals did not activate caspase-3, a marker of apoptosis, compared with actinomycin D and TNF-α-treated cells. MSU crystals did not directly affect the expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers at the mRNA and protein levels. However, MSU crystals significantly increased the LC3-II level in a time-dependent manner, indicating autophagy activation. Moreover, MSU crystal-induced autophagy and subsequent chondrocyte death were significantly inhibited by 3-methyladenine, a blocker of autophagosomes formation. MSU crystals activated autophagy via inhibition of phosporylation of the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. These results demonstrate that MSU crystals may cause the death of chondrocytes through the activation of the autophagic process rather than apoptosis or ER stress. PMID:26670233

  1. The properties of bioengineered chondrocyte sheets for cartilage regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mitani, Genya; Sato, Masato; Lee, Jeong IK; Kaneshiro, Nagatoshi; Ishihara, Miya; Ota, Naoshi; Kokubo, Mami; Sakai, Hideaki; Kikuchi, Tetsutaro; Mochida, Joji

    2009-01-01

    Background Although the clinical results of autologous chondrocyte implantation for articular cartilage defects have recently improved as a result of advanced techniques based on tissue engineering procedures, problems with cell handling and scaffold imperfections remain to be solved. A new cell-sheet technique has been developed, and is potentially able to overcome these obstacles. Chondrocyte sheets applicable to cartilage regeneration can be prepared with this cell-sheet technique using temperature-responsive culture dishes. However, for clinical application, it is necessary to evaluate the characteristics of the cells in these sheets and to identify their similarities to naive cartilage. Results The expression of SOX 9, collagen type 2, 27, integrin α10, and fibronectin genes in triple-layered chondrocyte sheets was significantly increased in comparison to those in conventional monolayer culture and in a single chondrocyte sheet, implying a nature similar to ordinary cartilage. In addition, immunohistochemistry demonstrated that collagen type II, fibronectin, and integrin α10 were present in the triple-layered chondrocyte sheets. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that these chondrocyte sheets with a consistent cartilaginous phenotype and adhesive properties may lead to a new strategy for cartilage regeneration. PMID:19267909

  2. Epigenetic regulation in chondrocyte phenotype maintenance for cell-based cartilage repair

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Li; Liang, Yujie; Ma, Bin; Zhu, Weimin; Wang, Daping

    2015-01-01

    Loss of hyaline chondrocyte phenotype during the monolayer culture in vitro is a major obstacle for cell-based articular cartilage repair. Increasing evidence implicates an important role of the epigenetic regulation in maintaining the chondrocyte phenotype. DNA methylation, histone modifications and microRNAs have all been shown to contribute to chondrocyte dedifferentiation and hypertrophy. Moreover, the interplay among epigenetic regulators forms a complicated epigenetic network in regulating chondrocyte dedifferentiation. This review provides a detailed overview of the epigenetic regulation in maintaining the chondrocyte phenotype for chondrocyte-based cartilage repair. PMID:26807163

  3. Adventitial Cells and Perictyes Support Chondrogenesis Through Different Mechanisms in 3-Dimensional Cultures With or Without Nanoscaffolds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu; Ba, Kai; Wu, Ling; Lee, Siyong; Peault, Bruno; Petrigliano, Frank A; McAllister, David R; Adams, John S; Evseenko, Denis; Lin, Yunfeng

    2015-10-01

    In previous studies, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) derived from bone marrow and fat tissues were shown to increase proliferation and matrix production of chondrocytes (CH) in co-culture. The aim of this study was to investigate the roles of pericytes (CD31(neg)CD45(neg)CD146+CD34(neg)) and adventitial cells (CD31(neg)CD45(neg)CD146(neg)CD34+) sub-populations of MSCs in supporting proliferation and matrix deposition of CH. The MSCs were derived from synovial membrane and attaching fat tissue. Then, the pericytes and adventitial cells were sorted from total MSCs and co-cultured with articular CH respectively. In pellet co-culture model, the pericytes showed more prominent effects on glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) production and Collagen II synthesis than the adventitial cells which had stronger effects on promoting CH proliferation. In addition, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed to examine the expression of a group of secreted growth factors and co-culture performed on electrospun scaffolds based on Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate) (P3HB4HB), to verify the trophic effects of different MSC sub-populations in 3-Dimensional (3D) environment. In conclusion, it was found that the pericytes and adventitial cells support CH in different ways; the adventitial cells more supporting the proliferation of CH, while pericytes are better in stimulating GAGs and collagen production of CH. PMID:26502642

  4. Choosing the right chondrocyte cell line: Focus on nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Anna; Conde, Javier; Scotece, Morena; Abella, Vanessa; López, Verónica; Pino, Jesús; Gómez, Rodolfo; Gómez-Reino, Juan Jesús; Gualillo, Oreste

    2015-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been considered a catabolic factor that contributes to OA pathology by inducing chondrocytes apoptosis, matrix metalloproteinases synthesis, and pro-inflammatory cytokines expression. Thus, the research on NO regulation in chondrocytes represents a relevant field which needs to be explored in depth. However, to date, only the murine ATDC-5 cell line and primary chondrocytes are well-established cells to study NO production in cartilage tissues. The goal of this study is to determine whether two commonly used human chondrocytic cell lines: SW-1353 and T/C-28a2 cell lines are good models to examine lipopolysaccharide and/or pro-inflammatory cytokine-driven NO release and iNOS expression. To this aim, we carefully examined NO production and iNOS protein expression in human T/C-28a2 and SW-1353 chondrocytes stimulated with LPS and interleukin (IL)-1 alone or in combination. We also use ATDC-5 cells as a positive control for NO production. NO accumulation has been determined by colorimetric Griess reaction, whereas NOS type II expression was determined by Western Blot analysis. Our results clearly demonstrated that neither human T/C-28a2 nor SW-1353 chondrocytes showed a detectable increase in NO production or iNOS expression after bacterial endotoxin or cytokines challenge with IL-1. Our study demonstrated that T/C-28a2 and SW-1353 human cell lines are not suitable for studying NO release and iNOS expression confirming that ATDC5 and human primary cultured chondrocytes are the best in vitro cell system to study the actions derived from this mediator. PMID:26016689

  5. The 3-dimensional cellular automata for HIV infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Youbin; Ren, Bin; Yang, Wencao; Shuai, Jianwei

    2014-04-01

    The HIV infection dynamics is discussed in detail with a 3-dimensional cellular automata model in this paper. The model can reproduce the three-phase development, i.e., the acute period, the asymptotic period and the AIDS period, observed in the HIV-infected patients in a clinic. We show that the 3D HIV model performs a better robustness on the model parameters than the 2D cellular automata. Furthermore, we reveal that the occurrence of a perpetual source to successively generate infectious waves to spread to the whole system drives the model from the asymptotic state to the AIDS state.

  6. Modeling chondrocyte patterns by elliptical cluster processes.

    PubMed

    Meinhardt, Martin; Lück, Sebastian; Martin, Pascal; Felka, Tino; Aicher, Wilhelm; Rolauffs, Bernd; Schmidt, Volker

    2012-02-01

    Superficial zone chondrocytes (CHs) of human joints are spatially organized in distinct horizontal patterns. Among other factors, the type of spatial CH organization within a given articular surface depends on whether the cartilage has been derived from an intact joint or the joint is affected by osteoarthritis (OA). Furthermore, specific variations of the type of spatial organization are associated with particular states of OA. This association may prove relevant for early disease recognition based on a quantitative structural characterization of CH patterns. Therefore, we present a point process model describing the distinct morphology of CH patterns within the articular surface of intact human cartilage. This reference model for intact CH organization can be seen as a first step towards a model-based statistical diagnostic tool. Model parameters are fitted to fluorescence microscopy data by a novel statistical methodology utilizing tools from cluster and principal component analysis. This way, the complex morphology of surface CH patters is represented by a relatively small number of model parameters. We validate the point process model by comparing biologically relevant structural characteristics between the fitted model and data derived from photomicrographs of the human articular surface using techniques from spatial statistics. PMID:22155191

  7. The influence of scaffold material on chondrocytes in inflammatory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Heenam; Sun, Lin; Cairns, Dana M.; Rainbow, Roshni S.; Preda, Rucsanda Carmen; Kaplan, David L.; Zeng, Li

    2013-01-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering aims to repair damaged cartilage tissue in arthritic joints. As arthritic joints have significantly higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (such as IL-1β and TNFα that cause cartilage destruction, it is critical to engineer stable cartilage in an inflammatory environment. Biomaterial scaffolds constitute an important component of the microenvironment for chondrocytes in engineered cartilage. However, it remains unclear how scaffold material influences the response of chondrocytes seeded in these scaffolds under inflammatory stimuli. Here, we compared the response of articular chondrocytes seeded within three different polymeric scaffolding materials (silk, collagen and polylactic acid (PLA)) to IL-1β and TNFα. These scaffolds have different physical characteristics and yielded significant differences in the expression of genes associated with cartilage matrix production and degradation, cell adhesion and cell death. Silk and collagen scaffolds released pro-inflammatory cytokines faster and had higher uptake water abilities than PLA scaffolds. Correspondingly, chondrocytes cultured in silk and collagen scaffolds maintained higher levels of cartilage matrix than those in PLA, suggesting that these biophysical properties of scaffolds may regulate gene expression and response to inflammatory stimuli in chondrocytes. Based on this study, we concluded that selecting the proper scaffolding material will aid in the engineering of more stable cartilage tissues for cartilage repair; and that silk and collagen are the more optimal scaffolds in supporting the stability of 3D cartilage under inflammatory conditions. PMID:23333441

  8. Repair Mechanism of Osteochondral Defect Promoted by Bioengineered Chondrocyte Sheet

    PubMed Central

    Kamei, Naosuke; Adachi, Nobuo; Hamanishi, Michio; Kamei, Goki; Mahmoud, Elhussein Elbadry; Nakano, Tomohiro; Iwata, Takanori; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2015-01-01

    Cell sheet engineering has developed as a remarkable method for cell transplantation. In the field of cartilage regeneration, several studies previously reported that cartilage defects could be regenerated by transplantation of a chondrocyte sheet using cell sheet engineering. However, it remains unclear how such a thin cell sheet could repair a deep cartilage defect. We, therefore, focused on the mechanism of cartilage repair using cell sheet engineering in this study. Chondrocyte sheets and synovial cell sheets were fabricated using cell sheet engineering, and these allogenic cell sheets were transplanted to cover an osteochondral defect in a rat model. Macroscopic and histological evaluation was performed at 4 and 12 weeks after transplantation. Analysis of the gene expression of each cell sheet and of the regenerated tissue at 1 week after transplantation was performed. In addition, green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic rats were used as donors (transplanted chondrocyte sheets) or recipients (osteochondral defect models) to identify the cell origin of regenerated cartilage. Cartilage repair was significantly better in the group implanted with a chondrocyte sheet than in that with a synovial cell sheet. The results of gene expression analysis suggest that the possible factor contributing to cartilage repair might be TGFβ1. Cell tracking experiments using GFP transgenic rats showed that the regenerated cartilage was largely composed of cells derived from the transplanted chondrocyte sheets. PMID:25396711

  9. Focal Adhesion Assembly Induces Phenotypic Changes and Dedifferentiation in Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyunjun; Lee, Mi Nam; Choung, Jin Seung; Kim, Sanghee; Choi, Byung Hyune; Noh, Minsoo; Shin, Jennifer H

    2016-08-01

    The expansion of autologous chondrocytes in vitro is used to generate sufficient populations for cell-based therapies. However, during monolayer culture, chondrocytes lose inherent characteristics and shift to fibroblast-like cells as passage number increase. Here, we investigated passage-dependent changes in cellular physiology, including cellular morphology, motility, and gene and protein expression, as well as the role of focal adhesion and cytoskeletal regulation in the dedifferentiation process. We found that the gene and protein expression levels of both the focal adhesion complex and small Rho GTPases are upregulated with increasing passage number and are closely linked to chondrocyte dedifferentiation. The inhibition of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) but not small Rho GTPases induced the loss of fibroblastic traits and the recovery of collagen type II, aggrecan, and SOX9 expression levels in dedifferentiated chondrocytes. Based on these findings, we propose a strategy to suppress chondrogenic dedifferentiation by inhibiting the identified FAK or Src pathways while maintaining the expansion capability of chondrocytes in a 2D environment. These results highlight a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of skeletal diseases and the generation of cartilage in tissue-engineering approaches. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1822-1831, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26661891

  10. Studies of the humoral factors produced by layered chondrocyte sheets.

    PubMed

    Hamahashi, K; Sato, M; Yamato, M; Kokubo, M; Mitani, G; Ito, S; Nagai, T; Ebihara, G; Kutsuna, T; Okano, T; Mochida, J

    2015-01-01

    The authors aimed to repair and regenerate articular cartilage with layered chondrocyte sheets, produced using temperature-responsive culture dishes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the humoral factors produced by layered chondrocyte sheets. Articular chondrocytes and synovial cells were harvested during total knee arthroplasty. After co-culture, the samples were divided into three groups: a monolayer, 7 day culture sheet group (group M); a triple-layered, 7 day culture sheet group (group L); and a monolayer culture group with a cell count identical to that of group L (group C). The secretion of collagen type 1 (COL1), collagen type 2 (COL2), matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP13), transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ), melanoma inhibitory activity (MIA) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Layered chondrocyte sheets produced the most humoral factors. PGE2 expression declined over time in group C but was significantly higher in groups M and L. TGFβ expression was low in group C but was significantly higher in groups M and L (p<0.05). Our results suggest that the humoral factors produced by layered chondrocyte sheets may contribute to cartilaginous tissue repair and regeneration. PMID:23165985

  11. Autophagy modulates articular cartilage vesicle formation in primary articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Ann K; Gohr, Claudia M; Mitton-Fitzgerald, Elizabeth; Grewal, Rupinder; Ninomiya, James; Coyne, Carolyn B; Jackson, William T

    2015-05-22

    Chondrocyte-derived extracellular organelles known as articular cartilage vesicles (ACVs) participate in non-classical protein secretion, intercellular communication, and pathologic calcification. Factors affecting ACV formation and release remain poorly characterized; although in some cell types, the generation of extracellular vesicles is associated with up-regulation of autophagy. We sought to determine the role of autophagy in ACV production by primary articular chondrocytes. Using an innovative dynamic model with a light scatter nanoparticle counting apparatus, we determined the effects of autophagy modulators on ACV number and content in conditioned medium from normal adult porcine and human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Healthy articular chondrocytes release ACVs into conditioned medium and show significant levels of ongoing autophagy. Rapamycin, which promotes autophagy, increased ACV numbers in a dose- and time-dependent manner associated with increased levels of autophagy markers and autophagosome formation. These effects were suppressed by pharmacologic autophagy inhibitors and short interfering RNA for ATG5. Caspase-3 inhibition and a Rho/ROCK inhibitor prevented rapamycin-induced increases in ACV number. Osteoarthritic chondrocytes, which are deficient in autophagy, did not increase ACV number in response to rapamycin. SMER28, which induces autophagy via an mTOR-independent mechanism, also increased ACV number. ACVs induced under all conditions had similar ecto-enzyme specific activities and types of RNA, and all ACVs contained LC3, an autophagosome-resident protein. These findings identify autophagy as a critical participant in ACV formation, and augment our understanding of ACVs in cartilage disease and repair. PMID:25869133

  12. Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Production by Immortalized Human Chondrocyte Lines

    PubMed Central

    Malemud, Charles J.; Meszaros, Evan C.; Wylie, Meredith A.; Dahoud, Wissam; Skomorovska-Prokvolit, Yelenna; Mesiano, Sam

    2016-01-01

    We reported at the Keynote Forum of Immunology Summit-2015 that recombinant human (rh) TNF-α or rhIL-6 stimulated production of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in the T/C28a2 and C-28/I2 human immortalized chondrocyte cell lines. Furthermore, we reported that tocilizumab (TCZ), a fully humanized monoclonal antibody which neutralizes IL-6-mediated signaling, inhibited the rhIL-6-mediated increase in the production of MMP-9. IL-6 is also a known activator of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway. In that regard, we evaluated the effect of rhIL-6 on total and phosphorylated Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription by these chondrocyte lines which showed that whereas STAT3 was constitutively phosphorylated in T/C28a2 chondrocytes, rhIL-6 activated STAT3 in C-28/I2 chondrocytes. The finding that rhIL-6 increased the production of MMP-9 by human immortalized chondrocyte cell lines may have important implications with respect to the destruction of articular cartilage in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. Thus, the markedly elevated level of IL-6 in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis sera and synovial fluid would be expected to generate significant MMP-9 to cause the degradation of articular cartilage extracellular matrix proteins. The finding that TCZ suppressed rhIL-6-mediated MMP-9 production suggests that TCZ, currently employed in the medical therapy of rheumatoid arthritis, could be considered as a drug for osteoarthritis.

  13. In vitro phenotypic modulation of chondrocytes from knees of patients with osteochondritis dissecans: implications for chondrocyte implantation procedures.

    PubMed

    Aurich, M; Hofmann, G O; Mückley, T; Mollenhauer, J; Rolauffs, B

    2012-01-01

    We attempted to characterise the biological quality and regenerative potential of chondrocytes in osteochondritis dissecans (OCD). Dissected fragments from ten patients with OCD of the knee (mean age 27.8 years (16 to 49)) were harvested at arthroscopy. A sample of cartilage from the intercondylar notch was taken from the same joint and from the notch of ten patients with a traumatic cartilage defect (mean age 31.6 years (19 to 52)). Chondrocytes were extracted and subsequently cultured. Collagen types 1, 2, and 10 mRNA were quantified by polymerase chain reaction. Compared with the notch chondrocytes, cells from the dissecate expressed similar levels of collagen types 1 and 2 mRNA. The level of collagen type 10 message was 50 times lower after cell culture, indicating a loss of hypertrophic cells or genes. The high viability, retained capacity to differentiate and metabolic activity of the extracted cells suggests preservation of the intrinsic repair capability of these dissecates. Molecular analysis indicated a phenotypic modulation of the expanded dissecate chondrocytes towards a normal phenotype. Our findings suggest that cartilage taken from the dissecate can be reasonably used as a cell source for chondrocyte implantation procedures. PMID:22219249

  14. Effects of radiation therapy on chondrocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Margulies, B S; Horton, J A; Wang, Y; Damron, T A; Allen, M J

    2006-05-01

    The negative irradiation complications of growth loss leading to limb length asymmetry and pathological fracture incurred following radiation therapy in pediatric patients has led to a renewed interest in understanding the specific effects of irradiation on the growth plate and the surrounding bone. In the present report, we examined the radiation therapy effects on primary rat growth cartilage chondrocytes in order to determine the chondrocyte radiosensitivity relative to other bone cell constituents and tumor cells, the postirradiation temporal progression of radiation-induced alterations in chondrocyte function, and the time course for the functional restoration of chondrocyte pathways that drive the eventual recovery in growth function. We employed an in vitro primary rat costochondral growth cartilage cell culture model system to evaluate the radiation therapy effects on proliferative chondrocytes using serial radiation doses (0-20 Gy) that are well within the clinically relevant range. Following irradiation, all of the following occurred in a dose-dependent manner: proliferation decreased, cytotoxicity increased, several markers of apoptosis increased, markers of radiation-induced cellular differentiation increased, and cell synthetic activity was disturbed. Alterations in proliferation, cell death, and induction of apoptosis are likely due to a transient radiation-induced derangement of the parathyroid hormone-related protein-Indian hedgehog proliferation-maturation pathway. Alterations in cellular differentiation and cell synthetic activity are novel observations for chondrocytes. Further, these results correspond very well to our previous work in an in vivo Sprague-Dawley rat model, making this model particularly relevant to researching the radiation therapy effects on longitudinal growth. PMID:16691495

  15. Regulation of osteogenic proteins by chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chubinskaya, Susan; Kuettner, Klaus E

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize the current scientific knowledge of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) in adult articular cartilage. We specifically focus on adult cartilage, since one of the major potential applications of the members of the BMP family may be a repair of adult tissue after trauma and/or disease. After reviewing cartilage physiology and BMPs, we analyze the data on the role of recombinant BMPs as anabolic agents in tissue formation and restoration in different in vitro and in vivo models following with the endogenous expression of BMPs and factors that regulate their expression. We also discuss recent transgenic modifications of BMP genes and subsequent effect on cartilage matrix synthesis. We found that the most studied BMPs in adult articular cartilage are BMP-7 and BMP-2 as well as transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). There are a number of contradicting reports for some of these growth factors, since different models, animals, doses, time points, culture conditions and devices were used. However, regardless of the experimental conditions, only BMP-7 or osteogenic protein-1 (OP-1) exhibits the most convincing effects. It is the only BMP studied thus far in adult cartilage that demonstrates strong anabolic activity in vitro and in vivo with and without serum. OP-1 stimulates the synthesis of the majority of cartilage extracellular matrix proteins in adult articular chondrocytes derived from different species and of different age. OP-1 counteracts the degenerative effect of numerous catabolic mediators; it is also expressed in adult human, bovine, rabbit and goat articular cartilage. This review reveals the importance of the exploration of the BMPs in the cartilage field and highlights their significance for clinical applications in the treatment of cartilage-related diseases. PMID:12798347

  16. Chondrocytes transdifferentiate into osteoblasts in endochondral bone during development, postnatal growth and fracture healing in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; von der Mark, Klaus; Henry, Stephen; Norton, William; Adams, Henry; de Crombrugghe, Benoit

    2014-12-01

    One of the crucial steps in endochondral bone formation is the replacement of a cartilage matrix produced by chondrocytes with bone trabeculae made by osteoblasts. However, the precise sources of osteoblasts responsible for trabecular bone formation have not been fully defined. To investigate whether cells derived from hypertrophic chondrocytes contribute to the osteoblast pool in trabecular bones, we genetically labeled either hypertrophic chondrocytes by Col10a1-Cre or chondrocytes by tamoxifen-induced Agc1-CreERT2 using EGFP, LacZ or Tomato expression. Both Cre drivers were specifically active in chondrocytic cells and not in perichondrium, in periosteum or in any of the osteoblast lineage cells. These in vivo experiments allowed us to follow the fate of cells labeled in Col10a1-Cre or Agc1-CreERT2 -expressing chondrocytes. After the labeling of chondrocytes, both during prenatal development and after birth, abundant labeled non-chondrocytic cells were present in the primary spongiosa. These cells were distributed throughout trabeculae surfaces and later were present in the endosteum, and embedded within the bone matrix. Co-expression studies using osteoblast markers indicated that a proportion of the non-chondrocytic cells derived from chondrocytes labeled by Col10a1-Cre or by Agc1-CreERT2 were functional osteoblasts. Hence, our results show that both chondrocytes prior to initial ossification and growth plate chondrocytes before or after birth have the capacity to undergo transdifferentiation to become osteoblasts. The osteoblasts derived from Col10a1-expressing hypertrophic chondrocytes represent about sixty percent of all mature osteoblasts in endochondral bones of one month old mice. A similar process of chondrocyte to osteoblast transdifferentiation was involved during bone fracture healing in adult mice. Thus, in addition to cells in the periosteum chondrocytes represent a major source of osteoblasts contributing to endochondral bone formation in vivo

  17. Chondrocytes Transdifferentiate into Osteoblasts in Endochondral Bone during Development, Postnatal Growth and Fracture Healing in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin; von der Mark, Klaus; Henry, Stephen; Norton, William; Adams, Henry; de Crombrugghe, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    One of the crucial steps in endochondral bone formation is the replacement of a cartilage matrix produced by chondrocytes with bone trabeculae made by osteoblasts. However, the precise sources of osteoblasts responsible for trabecular bone formation have not been fully defined. To investigate whether cells derived from hypertrophic chondrocytes contribute to the osteoblast pool in trabecular bones, we genetically labeled either hypertrophic chondrocytes by Col10a1-Cre or chondrocytes by tamoxifen-induced Agc1-CreERT2 using EGFP, LacZ or Tomato expression. Both Cre drivers were specifically active in chondrocytic cells and not in perichondrium, in periosteum or in any of the osteoblast lineage cells. These in vivo experiments allowed us to follow the fate of cells labeled in Col10a1-Cre or Agc1-CreERT2 -expressing chondrocytes. After the labeling of chondrocytes, both during prenatal development and after birth, abundant labeled non-chondrocytic cells were present in the primary spongiosa. These cells were distributed throughout trabeculae surfaces and later were present in the endosteum, and embedded within the bone matrix. Co-expression studies using osteoblast markers indicated that a proportion of the non-chondrocytic cells derived from chondrocytes labeled by Col10a1-Cre or by Agc1-CreERT2 were functional osteoblasts. Hence, our results show that both chondrocytes prior to initial ossification and growth plate chondrocytes before or after birth have the capacity to undergo transdifferentiation to become osteoblasts. The osteoblasts derived from Col10a1-expressing hypertrophic chondrocytes represent about sixty percent of all mature osteoblasts in endochondral bones of one month old mice. A similar process of chondrocyte to osteoblast transdifferentiation was involved during bone fracture healing in adult mice. Thus, in addition to cells in the periosteum chondrocytes represent a major source of osteoblasts contributing to endochondral bone formation in vivo

  18. 3-Dimensional Imaging Modalities for Phenotyping Genetically Engineered Mice

    PubMed Central

    Powell, K. A.; Wilson, D.

    2013-01-01

    A variety of 3-dimensional (3D) digital imaging modalities are available for whole-body assessment of genetically engineered mice: magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM), X-ray microcomputed tomography (microCT), optical projection tomography (OPT), episcopic and cryoimaging, and ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM). Embryo and adult mouse phenotyping can be accomplished at microscopy or near microscopy spatial resolutions using these modalities. MRM and microCT are particularly well-suited for evaluating structural information at the organ level, whereas episcopic and OPT imaging provide structural and functional information from molecular fluorescence imaging at the cellular level. UBM can be used to monitor embryonic development longitudinally in utero. Specimens are not significantly altered during preparation, and structures can be viewed in their native orientations. Technologies for rapid automated data acquisition and high-throughput phenotyping have been developed and continually improve as this exciting field evolves. PMID:22146851

  19. Protalign: a 3-dimensional protein alignment assessment tool.

    PubMed

    Meads, D; Hansen, M D; Pang, A

    1999-01-01

    Protein fold recognition (sometimes called threading) is the prediction of a protein's 3-dimensional shape based on its similarity to a protein of known structure. Fold predictions are low resolution; that is, no effort is made to rotate the protein's component amino acid side chains into their correct spatial orientations. The goal is simply to recognize the protein family member that most closely resembles the target sequence of unknown structure and to create a sensible alignment of the target to the known structure (i.e., a structure-sequence alignment). To facilitate this type of structure prediction, we have designed a low resolution molecular graphics tool. ProtAlign introduces the ability to interact with and edit alignments directly in the 3-dimensional structure as well as in the usual 2-dimensional layout. It also contains several functions and features to help the user assess areas within the alignment. ProtAlign implements an open pipe architecture to allow other programs to access its molecular graphics capabilities. In addition, it is capable of "driving" other programs. Because amino acid side chain orientation is not relevant in fold recognition, we represent amino acid residues as abstract shapes or glyphs much like Lego (tm) blocks and we borrow techniques from comparative flow visualization using streamlines to provide clean depictions of the entire protein model. By creating a low resolution representation of protein structure, we are able to at least double the amount of information on the screen. At the same time, we create a view that is not as busy as the corresponding representations using traditional high resolution visualization methods which show detailed atomic structure. This eliminates distracting and possibly misleading visual clutter resulting from the mapping of protein alignment information onto a high resolution display of the known structure. This molecular graphics program is implemented in Open GL to facilitate porting to

  20. The effect of resveratrol on normal and osteoarthritic chondrocyte metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H. J.; Braun, H. J.; Dragoo, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Resveratrol is a polyphenolic compound commonly found in the skins of red grapes. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is a human gene that is activated by resveratrol and has been shown to promote longevity and boost mitochondrial metabolism. We examined the effect of resveratrol on normal and osteoarthritic (OA) human chondrocytes. Methods Normal and OA chondrocytes were incubated with various concentrations of resveratrol (1 µM, 10 µM, 25 µM and 50 µM) and cultured for 24, 48 or 72 hours or for six weeks. Cell proliferation, gene expression, and senescence were evaluated. Results SIRT1 was significantly upregulated in normal chondrocytes with resveratrol concentrations of 25 µM and 50 µM on both two- (2D) (both p = 0.001) and three-dimensional (3D) cultures (p = 0.008 and 0.001, respectively). It was significantly upregulated in OA chondrocytes treated with 10 µM, 25 µM and 50 µM resveratrol on 2D cultures (p = 0.036, 0.002 and 0.001, respectively) and at 50 µM concentration on 3D cultures (p = 0.001). At 72 hours, the expression of collagen (COL)-10, aggrecan (AGG), and runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) was significantly greater in both 25 µM (p = 0.011, 0.006 and 0.015, respectively) and 50 µM (p = 0.019, 0.004 and 0.002, respectively) resveratrol-treated normal chondrocyte cultures. In OA chondrocytes, expression of COL10 and RUNX2 was significantly greater in 25 µM (p = 0.004 and 0.024) and 50 µM (p = 0.004 and 0.019) cultures at 72 hours on 3D cultures. Conclusions At concentrations of 25 µM and/or 50 µM, resveratrol treatment significantly upregulates SIRT1 gene expression in normal and osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Resveratrol induces chondrocytes into a hypertrophic state through upregulation of COL1, COL10, and RUNX2. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:51–9. PMID:24615710

  1. Runx2 inhibits chondrocyte proliferation and hypertrophy through its expression in the perichondrium

    PubMed Central

    Hinoi, Eiichi; Bialek, Peter; Chen, You-Tzung; Rached, Marie-Therese; Groner, Yoram; Behringer, Richard R.; Ornitz, David M.; Karsenty, Gerard

    2006-01-01

    The perichondrium, a structure made of undifferentiated mesenchymal cells surrounding growth plate cartilage, regulates chondrocyte maturation through poorly understood mechanisms. Analyses of loss- and gain-of-function models show that Twist-1, whose expression in cartilage is restricted to perichondrium, favors chondrocyte maturation in a Runx2-dependent manner. Runx2, in turn, enhances perichondrial expression of Fgf18, a regulator of chondrocyte maturation. Accordingly, compound heterozygous embryos for Runx2 and Fgf18 deletion display the same chondrocyte maturation phenotype as Fgf18-null embryos. This study identifies a transcriptional basis for the inhibition of chondrocyte maturation by perichondrium and reveals that Runx2 fulfills antagonistic functions during chondrogenesis. PMID:17050674

  2. In vitro chondrocyte behavior on porous biodegradable poly(e-caprolactone)/polyglycolic acid scaffolds for articular chondrocyte adhesion and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Jonnalagadda, John B; Rivero, Iris V; Dertien, Janet S

    2015-01-01

    In this study, poly(e-caprolactone)/polyglycolic acid (PCL/PGA) scaffolds for repairing articular cartilage were fabricated via solid-state cryomilling along with compression molding and porogen leaching. Four distinct scaffolds were fabricated using this approach by four independent cryomilling times. These scaffolds were assessed for their suitability to promote articular cartilage regeneration with in vitro chondrocyte cell culture studies. The scaffolds were characterized for pore size, porosity, swelling ratio, compressive, and thermal properties. Cryomilling time proved to significantly affect the physical, mechanical, and morphological properties of the scaffolds. In vitro bovine chondrocyte culture was performed dynamically for 1, 7, 14, 28, and 35 days. Chondrocyte viability and adhesion were tested using MTT assay and scanning electron microscopy micrographs. Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and DNA assays were performed to investigate the extracellular matrix (ECM) formation and cell proliferation, respectively. PCL/PGA scaffolds demonstrated high porosity for all scaffold types. Morphological analysis and poly(ethylene oxide) continuity demonstrated the existence of a co-continuous network of interconnected pores with pore sizes appropriate for tissue engineering and chondrocyte ingrowth. While mean pore size decreased, water uptake and compressive properties increased with increasing cryomilling times. Compressive modulus of 12, 30, and 60 min scaffolds matched the compressive modulus of human articular cartilage. Viable cells increased besides increase in cell proliferation and ECM formation with progress in culture period. Chondrocytes exhibited spherical morphology on all scaffold types. The pore size of the scaffold affected chondrocyte adhesion, proliferation, and GAG secretion. The results indicated that the 12 min scaffolds delivered promising results for applications in articular cartilage repair. PMID:25671317

  3. Repopulation of laser-perforated chondroepiphyseal matrix with xenogeneic chondrocytes: An experimental model

    SciTech Connect

    Caruso, E.M.; Lewandrowski, K.U.; Ohlendorf, C.; Tomford, W.W.; Zaleske, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    Growth of chondrocytes into a xenogeneic chondroepiphyseal matrix was investigated in an in vitro experimental model by combining viable calf chondrocytes with chick epiphyseal matrix devoid of viable chondrocytes. The chondrocytes were harvested from the wrist joints of newborn calves and cultured for 2 days. The epiphyses were harvested from the distal femurs and the proximal tibias of fetal chicks after development was arrested at 17 days by freezing. The epiphyseal specimens were prepared in four ways. These included femoral and tibial epiphyses without holes and femoral and tibial epiphyses with holes made by a laser. These epiphyseal specimens were co-cultured with calf chondrocytes for various periods. After digestion of the epiphyseal matrix, viable chondrocytes were counted in suspension. Chondrocyte division in the matrix was assessed by [{sup 3}H]thymidine incorporation. The growth of calf chondrocytes into the xenogeneic chick matrix was evaluated by fluorescence microscopy on fresh thick epiphyseal sections. The percentage of viable chondrocytes in the xenogeneic epiphyseal matrix increased with culture time to a maximum at day 21. The addition of laser-drilled holes was found to extend a plateau of chondrocyte viability until day 29. A decrease in cell viability was detected at later observation points. This study demonstrates that xenogeneic matrix may serve as a morphogenetic scaffold for chondrocytic growth. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Comparative study of the chondrogenic potential of human bone marrow stromal cells, neonatal chondrocytes and adult chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Sushmita; Kirkham, Jennifer; Wood, David; Curran, Stephen; Yang, Xuebin

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} This study has characterised three different cell types under conditions similar to those used for autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) for applications in cartilage repair/regeneration. {yields} Compared for the first time the chondrogenic potential of neonatal chondrocytes with human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs) and adult chondrocytes. {yields} Demonstrated that adult chondrocytes hold greatest potential for use in ACI based on their higher proliferation rates, lower alkaline phosphatise activity and enhanced expression of chondrogenic genes. {yields} Demonstrated the need for chondroinduction as a necessary pre-requisite to efficient chondrogenesis in vitro and, by extrapolation, for cell based therapy (e.g. ACI or cartilage tissue engineering). -- Abstract: Cartilage tissue engineering is still a major clinical challenge with optimisation of a suitable source of cells for cartilage repair/regeneration not yet fully addressed. The aims of this study were to compare and contrast the differences in chondrogenic behaviour between human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs), human neonatal and adult chondrocytes to further our understanding of chondroinduction relative to cell maturity and to identify factors that promote chondrogenesis and maintain functional homoeostasis. Cells were cultured in monolayer in either chondrogenic or basal medium, recapitulating procedures used in existing clinical procedures for cell-based therapies. Cell doubling time, morphology and alkaline phosphatase specific activity (ALPSA) were determined at different time points. Expression of chondrogenic markers (SOX9, ACAN and COL2A1) was compared via real time polymerase chain reaction. Amongst the three cell types studied, HBMSCs had the highest ALPSA in basal culture and lowest ALPSA in chondrogenic media. Neonatal chondrocytes were the most proliferative and adult chondrocytes had the lowest ALPSA in basal media. Gene expression analysis revealed

  5. Clinical Outcomes of Characterized Chondrocyte Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Huylebroek, José; Van Der Bauwhede, Jan; Saris, Daniël; Veeckman, Geert; Bobic, Vladimir; Victor, Jan; Almqvist, Karl Fredrik; Verdonk, Peter; Fortems, Yves; Van Lommel, Nel; Haazen, Ludo

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical outcome of patients treated with autologous chondrocyte implantation using ChondroCelect in daily practice. Methods: The study is a cross-sectional analysis of an open-label, noninterventional cohort. The setting was a compassionate use program, involving 43 orthopaedic centers in 7 European countries. The participants were patients treated with ChondroCelect between October 13, 2004 and July 2, 2008. The measurements used were Clinical Global Impression–Improvement and –Efficacy and solicited adverse event reports. Results: Safety data were collected from 334 patients (90.3%), and effectiveness data were from 282 (76.2%) of the 370 patients treated. Mean age at baseline was 33.6 years (range, 12-57 years), 57% were male, and mean body mass index was 25 kg/m2. Mean follow-up was 2.2 years (range, 0.4-4.1 years). A femoral condyle lesion was reported in 66% (288/379) and a patellar lesion in 19% (84/379). Mean lesion size was 3.5 cm2; a collagen membrane was used in 92.4% (328/355). A therapeutic effect was reported in 89% (234/264) of patients overall and in 87% (40/46) of patellar lesion patients. Rates of much or very much improved patients were similar in patients with short- (<18 months: 71% [115/163]) and long-term follow-up (>18 months: 68% [70/103]) (P = 0.68) and were independent of lesion size (>4 cm2: 75.5% [37/49]; ≤4 cm2: 67.7% [111/164]) (P = 0.38). Adverse events were similar to those reported in the randomized trial with the same product, with more arthrofibrosis, more reduced joint mobility, and more crepitations reported in patellar lesions. Overall, less cartilage hypertrophy was noted, probably due to the use of a biological membrane cover. Conclusions: Implantation of ChondroCelect appeared to result in a positive benefit/risk ratio when used in an unselected heterogenous population, irrespective of the follow-up period, lesion size, and type of lesion treated. PMID:26069630

  6. Interaction of electromagnetic fields with chondrocytes in gel culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Buschmann, Michael D.; Gluzband, Yehezkiel A.

    1992-01-01

    The specific objectives of this research period were: (1) to quantify the effect of applied electric fields on chondrocyte metabolism, using a range of stimulation frequencies and amplitudes; (2) to compare the chondrocyte biosynthetic response to applied fields at early times in agarose gel culture before an extracellular matrix has accumulated and at later times after significant deposition of matrix around and between the cells; and (3) to begin to interpret the biosynthetic response to applied fields in terms of models of physical mechanisms. The results of these studies suggest that electric fields applied to chondrocytes in agarose can modulate the synthesis of proteoglycans and protein constituents. Biosynthesis may be inhibited or stimulated depending on the amplitude of the applied current density. In addition, the presence of extracellular matrix may enhance the ability of normal chondrocytes and cells in intact cartilage to respond to electric fields, although the presence of matrix was not required for the stimulatory response to be observed with Swarm rat chondrosarcoma cells.

  7. Effect of thiram on avian growth plate chondrocytes in culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thiram (tetramethyl thiuram disulfide) is a general use pesticide. It causes tibial dyschondroplasia, a cartilage defect in poultry leading to growth plate deformation and lameness. The mechanism of its action on chondrocytes is not understood. Since proteins play significant role in development an...

  8. Telomere erosion and senescence in human articular cartilage chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Martin, J A; Buckwalter, J A

    2001-04-01

    Aging and the degeneration of articular cartilage in osteoarthritis are distinct processes, but a strong association exists between age and the incidence and prevalence of osteoarthritis. We hypothesized that this association is due to in vivo replicative senescence, which causes age-related declines in the ability of chondrocytes to maintain articular cartilage. For this hypothesis to be tested, senescence-associated markers were measured in human articular chondrocytes from donors ranging in age from 1 to 87 years. These measures included in situ staining for senescence-associated beta-galactosidase activity, (3)H-thymidine incorporation assays for mitotic activity, and Southern blots for telomere length determinations. We found that senescence-associated beta-galactosidase activity increased with age, whereas both mitotic activity and mean telomere length declined. These findings indicate that chondrocyte replicative senescence occurs in vivo and support the hypothesis that the association between osteoarthritis and aging is due in part to replicative senescence. The data also imply that transplantation procedures performed to restore damaged articular surfaces could be limited by the inability of older chondrocytes to form new cartilage after transplantation. PMID:11283188

  9. [Molecular mechanisms of cartilage formation and chondrocyte maturation].

    PubMed

    Tamamura, Yoshihiro; Iwamoto, Masahiro

    2004-07-01

    Cartilage plays multiple roles in vertebrate animals. In an embryonic stage and early postnatal life, cartilage is important not only as a structural support of early embryo but also as a template of endochondral bone. In a later postnatal life, cartilage provides smooth joint movement and tissue elasticity. A number of critical signaling molecules that regulate cartilage formation and chondrocytes maturation in endochondral bone formation have been identified to date. The interplay of those important molecules is also actively studied. However, several fundamental questions still remain unsolved. What signal initiates mesenchymal cell condensation? Does condensation enough to make cells competent for BMP-induced chondrogenesis? Is there chondrocyte stem cell in cartilage? Likewise, it is not known which factor triggers chondrocytes maturation. In this review article, we summarized the action of several key factors including BMP, hedgehog, PTHrP, and Wnt in condensation, chondrogenenic differentiation and maturation of chondrocytes. Towards further understanding of above fundamental questions, this review article also tried to propose future direction of cartilage biology research. PMID:15577071

  10. Influence of cell printing on biological characters of chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Miao; Gao, Xiaoyan; Hou, Yikang; Shen, Congcong; Xu, Yourong; Zhu, Ming; Wang, Hengjian; Xu, Haisong; Chai, Gang; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To establish a two-dimensional biological printing technique of chondrocytes and compare the difference of related biological characters between printed chondrocytes and unprinted cells so as to control the cell transfer process and keep cell viability after printing. Methods: Primary chondrocytes were obtained from human mature and fetal cartilage tissues and then were regularly sub-cultured to harvest cells at passage 2 (P2), which were adjusted to the single cell suspension at a density of 1×106/mL. The experiment was divided into 2 groups: experimental group P2 chondrocytes were transferred by rapid prototype biological printer (driving voltage value 50 V, interval in x-axis 300 μm, interval in y-axis 1500 μm). Afterwards Live/Dead viability Kit and flow cytometry were respectively adopted to detect cell viability; CCK-8 Kit was adopted to detect cell proliferation viability; immunocytochemistry, immunofluorescence and RT-PCR was employed to identify related markers of chondrocytes; control group steps were the same as the printing group except that cell suspension received no printing. Results: Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry analyses showed that there was no significant difference between experimental group and control group in terms of cell viability. After 7-day in vitro culture, control group exhibited higher O.D values than experimental group from 2nd day to 7th day but there was no distinct difference between these two groups (P>0.05). Inverted microscope observation demonstrated that the morphology of these two groups had no significant difference either. Similarly, Immunocytochemistry, immunofluorescence and RT-PCR assays also showed that there was no significant difference in the protein and gene expression of type II collagen and aggrecan between these two groups (P>0.05). Conclusion Cell printing has no distinctly negative effect on cell vitality, proliferation and phenotype of chondrocytes. Biological printing technique may

  11. Chromosome Conformation of Human Fibroblasts Grown in 3-Dimensional Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haiming; Comment, Nicholas; Chen, Jie; Ronquist, Scott; Hero, Alfred; Ried, Thomas; Rajapakse, Indika

    2015-01-01

    In the study of interphase chromosome organization, genome-wide chromosome conformation capture (Hi-C) maps are often generated using 2-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures. These 2D cells have morphological deviations from cells that exist in 3-dimensional (3D) tissues in vivo, and may not maintain the same chromosome conformation. We used Hi-C maps to test the extent of differences in chromosome conformation between human fibroblasts grown in 2D cultures and those grown in 3D spheroids. Significant differences in chromosome conformation were found between 2D cells and those grown in spheroids. Intra-chromosomal interactions were generally increased in spheroid cells, with a few exceptions, while inter-chromosomal interactions were generally decreased. Overall, chromosomes located closer to the nuclear periphery had increased intra-chromosomal contacts in spheroid cells, while those located more centrally had decreased interactions. This study highlights the necessity to conduct studies on the topography of the interphase nucleus under conditions that mimic an in vivo environment. PMID:25738643

  12. Thermal crosstalk in 3-dimensional RRAM crossbar array

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Pengxiao; Lu, Nianduan; Li, Ling; Li, Yingtao; Wang, Hong; Lv, Hangbing; Liu, Qi; Long, Shibing; Liu, Su; Liu, Ming

    2015-01-01

    High density 3-dimensional (3D) crossbar resistive random access memory (RRAM) is one of the major focus of the new age technologies. To compete with the ultra-high density NAND and NOR memories, understanding of reliability mechanisms and scaling potential of 3D RRAM crossbar array is needed. Thermal crosstalk is one of the most critical effects that should be considered in 3D crossbar array application. The Joule heat generated inside the RRAM device will determine the switching behavior itself, and for dense memory arrays, the temperature surrounding may lead to a consequent resistance degradation of neighboring devices. In this work, thermal crosstalk effect and scaling potential under thermal effect in 3D RRAM crossbar array are systematically investigated. It is revealed that the reset process is dominated by transient thermal effect in 3D RRAM array. More importantly, thermal crosstalk phenomena could deteriorate device retention performance and even lead to data storage state failure from LRS (low resistance state) to HRS (high resistance state) of the disturbed RRAM cell. In addition, the resistance state degradation will be more serious with continuously scaling down the feature size. Possible methods for alleviating thermal crosstalk effect while further advancing the scaling potential are also provided and verified by numerical simulation. PMID:26310537

  13. Thermal crosstalk in 3-dimensional RRAM crossbar array.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pengxiao; Lu, Nianduan; Li, Ling; Li, Yingtao; Wang, Hong; Lv, Hangbing; Liu, Qi; Long, Shibing; Liu, Su; Liu, Ming

    2015-01-01

    High density 3-dimensional (3D) crossbar resistive random access memory (RRAM) is one of the major focus of the new age technologies. To compete with the ultra-high density NAND and NOR memories, understanding of reliability mechanisms and scaling potential of 3D RRAM crossbar array is needed. Thermal crosstalk is one of the most critical effects that should be considered in 3D crossbar array application. The Joule heat generated inside the RRAM device will determine the switching behavior itself, and for dense memory arrays, the temperature surrounding may lead to a consequent resistance degradation of neighboring devices. In this work, thermal crosstalk effect and scaling potential under thermal effect in 3D RRAM crossbar array are systematically investigated. It is revealed that the reset process is dominated by transient thermal effect in 3D RRAM array. More importantly, thermal crosstalk phenomena could deteriorate device retention performance and even lead to data storage state failure from LRS (low resistance state) to HRS (high resistance state) of the disturbed RRAM cell. In addition, the resistance state degradation will be more serious with continuously scaling down the feature size. Possible methods for alleviating thermal crosstalk effect while further advancing the scaling potential are also provided and verified by numerical simulation. PMID:26310537

  14. Neutral amino acid transport in bovine articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Barker, G A; Wilkins, R J; Golding, S; Ellory, J C

    1999-02-01

    1. The sodium-dependent amino acid transport systems responsible for proline, glycine and glutamine transport, together with the sodium-independent systems for leucine and tryptophan, have been investigated in isolated bovine chondrocytes by inhibition studies and ion replacement. Each system was characterized kinetically. 2. Transport via system A was identified using the system-specific analogue alpha-methylaminoisobutyric acid (MeAIB) as an inhibitor of proline, glycine and glutamine transport. 3. Uptake of proline, glycine and glutamine via system ASC was identified by inhibition with alanine or serine. 4. System Gly was identified by the inhibition of glycine transport with excess sarcosine (a substrate for system Gly) whilst systems A and ASC were inhibited. This system, having a very limited substrate specificity and tissue distribution, was also shown to be Na+ and Cl- dependent. Evidence for expression of the system Gly component GLYT-1 was obtained using the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). 5. System N, also of narrow substrate specificity and tissue distribution, was shown to be present in chondrocytes. Na+-dependent glutamine uptake was inhibited by high concentrations of histidine (a substrate of system N) in the presence of excess MeAIB and serine. 6. System L was identified using the system specific analogue 2-aminobicyclo(2,2, 1)heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH) and D-leucine as inhibitors of leucine and tryptophan transport. 7. The presence of system T was tested by using leucine, tryptophan and tyrosine inhibition. It was concluded that this system was absent in the chondrocyte. 8. Kinetic analysis showed the Na+-independent chondrocyte L system to have apparent affinities for leucine and tryptophan of 125 +/- 27 and 36 +/- 11 microM, respectively. 9. Transport of the essential amino acids leucine and tryptophan into bovine chondrocytes occurs only by the Na+-independent system L, but with a higher affinity than the

  15. Efficient, Low-Cost Nucleofection of Passaged Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Parreno, Justin; Delve, Elizabeth; Andrejevic, Katarina; Paez-Parent, Sabrina; Wu, Po-Han; Kandel, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Nucleofection of chondrocytes has been shown to be an adequate method of transfection. Using Amaxa's nucleofection system, transfection efficiencies up to 89% were achievable for vector (pmaxGFP) and 98% for siRNA (siGLO) into passaged chondrocytes. However, such methods rely on costly commercial kits with proprietary reagents limiting its use in basic science labs and in clinical translation. Bovine-passaged chondrocytes were plated in serum reduced media conditionsand then nucleofected using various in laboratory-produced buffers. Cell attachment, confluency, viability, and transfection efficiency was assessed following nucleofection. For each parameter the buffers were scored and a final rank for each buffer was determined. Buffer denoted as 1M resulted in no significant difference for cell attachment, confluency, and viability as compared to non-nucleofected controls. Nucleofection in 1M buffer, in the absence of DNA vectors, resulted in increased col2, ki67, ccnd1 mRNA levels, and decreased col1 mRNA levels at 4 days of culture. Flow cytometry revealed that the transfection efficiency of 1M buffer was comparable to that obtained using the Amaxa commercial kit. siRNA designed against lamin A/C resulted in an average reduction of lamin A and C proteins to 19% and 8% of control levels, respectively. This study identifies a cost-effective, efficient method of nonviral nucleofection of bovine-passaged chondrocytes using known buffer formulations. Human-passaged chondrocytes could also be successfully nucleofected in 1M buffer. Thus this method should facilitate cost-efficient gene targeting of cells used for articular cartilage repair in a research setting. PMID:26958320

  16. Inverse correlation between tyrosine phosphorylation and collagenase production in chondrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, T F; Mills, G; Pritzker, K P; Kandel, R A

    1990-01-01

    Collagenase production by chondrocytes appears to play a major role in the development of osteoarthritis. Although the mechanisms regulating collagenase production by chondrocytes are not known, incubation of bovine chondrocytes in serum markedly decreases collagenase production. Since serum has been demonstrated to increase levels of phosphotyrosine (P-Tyr) in several cell types, we determined the effect of altering intracellular levels of P-Tyr on collagenase production. Both orthovanadate, a potent inhibitor of tyrosine phosphatases, and serum caused a marked increase in tyrosine phosphorylation. The increase in P-Tyr was associated with a decrease in the production of collagenase, suggesting that two processes may be linked. Orthovanadate caused an increase in P-Tyr in the absence of serum, suggesting that P-Tyr levels in resting chondrocytes are regulated through activity of both tyrosine kinases and phosphatases. Orthovanadate and serum induced a synergistic increase in P-Tyr levels, suggesting that serum functions through increasing kinase activity rather than decreasing phosphatase activity. In the absence of serum, concentrations of orthovanadate which maximally inhibited collagenase production primarily increased phosphorylation of a 36 kDa protein, suggesting that the phosphorylation of this protein may play a major role in regulating collagenase production. Orthovanadate had limited effects on chondrocyte proteoglycan synthesis, morphology or viability in the presence or absence of serum, suggesting that the decrease in collagenase production was not due to non-specific inhibition of protein synthesis or cellular toxicity. Inhibition of tyrosine phosphatases by orthovanadate or activation of tyrosine kinases by addition of serum correlated with the inhibition of collagenase production. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:1697163

  17. Microfluidics-based optimization of neuroleukin-mediated regulation of articular chondrocyte proliferation

    PubMed Central

    TIAN, KANG; ZHONG, WEILIANG; ZHANG, YINGQIU; YIN, BAOSHENG; ZHANG, WEIGUO; LIU, HAN

    2016-01-01

    Due to the low proliferative and migratory capacities of chondrocytes, cartilage repair remains a challenging clinical problem. Current therapeutic strategies for cartilage repair result in unsatisfactory outcomes. Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is a cell based therapy that relies on the in vitro expansion of healthy chondrocytes from the patient, during which proliferation-promoting factors are frequently used. Neuroleukin (NLK) is a multifunctional protein that possesses growth factor functions, and its expression has been associated with cartilage development and bone regeneration, however its direct role in chondrocyte proliferation remains to be fully elucidated. In the current study, the role of NLK in chondrocyte proliferation in vitro in addition to its potential to act as an exogenous factor during ACI was investigated. Furthermore, the concentration of NLK for in vitro chondrocyte culture was optimized using a microfluidic device. An NLK concentration of 12.85 ng/ml was observed to provide optimal conditions for the promotion of chondrocyte proliferation. Additionally, NLK stimulation resulted in an increase in type II collagen synthesis by chondrocytes, which is a cartilaginous secretion marker and associated with the phenotype of chondrocytes. Together these data suggest that NLK is able to promote cell proliferation and type II collagen synthesis during in vitro chondrocyte propagation, and thus may serve as an exogenous factor for ACI. PMID:26573126

  18. Conditional expression of constitutively active estrogen receptor {alpha} in chondrocytes impairs longitudinal bone growth in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Tsukui, Tohru; Imazawa, Yukiko; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Inoue, Satoshi

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conditional transgenic mice expressing constitutively active estrogen receptor {alpha} (caER{alpha}) in chondrocytes were developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of caER{alpha} in chondrocytes impaired longitudinal bone growth in mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer caER{alpha} affects chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This mouse model is useful for understanding the physiological role of ER{alpha}in vivo. -- Abstract: Estrogen plays important roles in the regulation of chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation, which are essential steps for longitudinal bone growth; however, the mechanisms of estrogen action on chondrocytes have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we generated conditional transgenic mice, designated as caER{alpha}{sup ColII}, expressing constitutively active mutant estrogen receptor (ER) {alpha} in chondrocytes, using the chondrocyte-specific type II collagen promoter-driven Cre transgenic mice. caER{alpha}{sup ColII} mice showed retardation in longitudinal growth, with short bone lengths. BrdU labeling showed reduced proliferation of hypertrophic chondrocytes in the proliferating layer of the growth plate of tibia in caER{alpha}{sup ColII} mice. In situ hybridization analysis of type X collagen revealed that the maturation of hypertrophic chondrocytes was impaired in caER{alpha}{sup ColII} mice. These results suggest that ER{alpha} is a critical regulator of chondrocyte proliferation and maturation during skeletal development, mediating longitudinal bone growth in vivo.

  19. Induced superficial chondrocyte death reduces catabolic cartilage damage in murine posttraumatic osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minjie; Mani, Sriniwasan B; He, Yao; Hall, Amber M; Xu, Lin; Li, Yefu; Zurakowski, David; Jay, Gregory D; Warman, Matthew L

    2016-08-01

    Joints that have degenerated as a result of aging or injury contain dead chondrocytes and damaged cartilage. Some studies have suggested that chondrocyte death precedes cartilage damage, but how the loss of chondrocytes affects cartilage integrity is not clear. In this study, we examined whether chondrocyte death undermines cartilage integrity in aging and injury using a rapid 3D confocal cartilage imaging technique coupled with standard histology. We induced autonomous expression of diphtheria toxin to kill articular surface chondrocytes in mice and determined that chondrocyte death did not lead to cartilage damage. Moreover, cartilage damage after surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus of the knee was increased in mice with intact chondrocytes compared with animals whose chondrocytes had been killed, suggesting that chondrocyte death does not drive cartilage damage in response to injury. These data imply that chondrocyte catabolism, not death, contributes to articular cartilage damage following injury. Therefore, therapies targeted at reducing the catabolic phenotype may protect against degenerative joint disease. PMID:27427985

  20. Video Based Sensor for Tracking 3-Dimensional Targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, R. T.; Book, Michael L.; Bryan, Thomas C.

    2000-01-01

    Video-Based Sensor for Tracking 3-Dimensional Targets The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASAs) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been developing and testing video-based sensors for automated spacecraft guidance for several years, and the next generation of video sensor will have tracking rates up to 100 Hz and will be able to track multiple reflectors and targets. The Video Guidance Sensor (VGS) developed over the past several years has performed well in testing and met the objective of being used as the terminal guidance sensor for an automated rendezvous and capture system. The first VGS was successfully tested in closed-loop 3-degree-of-freedom (3- DOF) tests in 1989 and then in 6-DOF open-loop tests in 1992 and closed-loop tests in 1993-4. Development and testing continued, and in 1995 approval was given to test the VGS in an experiment on the Space Shuttle. The VGS flew in 1997 and in 1998, performing well for both flights. During the development and testing before, during, and after the flight experiments, numerous areas for improvement were found. The VGS was developed with a sensor head and an electronics box, connected by cables. The VGS was used in conjunction with a target that had wavelength-filtered retro-reflectors in a specific pattern, The sensor head contained the laser diodes, video camera, and heaters and coolers. The electronics box contained a frame grabber, image processor, the electronics to control the components in the sensor head, the communications electronics, and the power supply. The system works by sequentially firing two different wavelengths of laser diodes at the target and processing the two images. Since the target only reflects one wavelength, it shows up well in one image and not at all in the other. Because the target's dimensions are known, the relative positions and attitudes of the target and the sensor can be computed from the spots reflected from the target. The system was designed to work from I

  1. The 3-dimensional construction of the Rae craton, central Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, David B.; Craven, James A.; Pilkington, Mark; Hillier, Michael J.

    2015-10-01

    Reconstruction of the 3-dimensional tectonic assembly of early continents, first as Archean cratons and then Proterozoic shields, remains poorly understood. In this paper, all readily available geophysical and geochemical data are assembled in a 3-D model with the most accurate bedrock geology in order to understand better the geometry of major structures within the Rae craton of central Canada. Analysis of geophysical observations of gravity and seismic wave speed variations revealed several lithospheric-scale discontinuities in physical properties. Where these discontinuities project upward to correlate with mapped upper crustal geological structures, the discontinuities can be interpreted as shear zones. Radiometric dating of xenoliths provides estimates of rock types and ages at depth beneath sparse kimberlite occurrences. These ages can also be correlated to surface rocks. The 3.6-2.6 Ga Rae craton comprises at least three smaller continental terranes, which "cratonized" during a granitic bloom. Cratonization probably represents final differentiation of early crust into a relatively homogeneous, uniformly thin (35-42 km), tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite crust with pyroxenite layers near the Moho. The peak thermotectonic event at 1.86-1.7 Ga was associated with the Hudsonian orogeny that assembled several cratons and lesser continental blocks into the Canadian Shield using a number of southeast-dipping megathrusts. This orogeny metasomatized, mineralized, and recrystallized mantle and lower crustal rocks, apparently making them more conductive by introducing or concentrating sulfides or graphite. Little evidence exists of thin slabs similar to modern oceanic lithosphere in this Precambrian construction history whereas underthrusting and wedging of continental lithosphere is inferred from multiple dipping discontinuities.

  2. A 3-Dimensional Anatomic Study of the Distal Biceps Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Christine; Li, Zhi; Pennings, Amanda; Agur, Anne; Elmaraghy, Amr

    2015-01-01

    Background Complete rupture of the distal biceps tendon from its osseous attachment is most often treated with operative intervention. Knowledge of the overall tendon morphology as well as the orientation of the collagenous fibers throughout the musculotendinous junction are key to intraoperative decision making and surgical technique in both the acute and chronic setting. Unfortunately, there is little information available in the literature. Purpose To comprehensively describe the morphology of the distal biceps tendon. Study Design Descriptive laboratory study. Methods The distal biceps terminal musculature, musculotendinous junction, and tendon were digitized in 10 cadaveric specimens and data reconstructed using 3-dimensional modeling. Results The average length, width, and thickness of the external distal biceps tendon were found to be 63.0, 6.0, and 3.0 mm, respectively. A unique expansion of the tendon fibers within the distal muscle was characterized, creating a thick collagenous network along the central component between the long and short heads. Conclusion This study documents the morphologic parameters of the native distal biceps tendon. Reconstruction may be necessary, especially in chronic distal biceps tendon ruptures, if the remaining tendon morphology is significantly compromised compared with the native distal biceps tendon. Knowledge of normal anatomical distal biceps tendon parameters may also guide the selection of a substitute graft with similar morphological characteristics. Clinical Relevance A thorough description of distal biceps tendon morphology is important to guide intraoperative decision making between primary repair and reconstruction and to better select the most appropriate graft. The detailed description of the tendinous expansion into the muscle may provide insight into better graft-weaving and suture-grasping techniques to maximize proximal graft incorporation. PMID:26665092

  3. Development and Validation of a 3-Dimensional CFB Furnace Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vepsäläinen, Arl; Myöhänen, Karl; Hyppäneni, Timo; Leino, Timo; Tourunen, Antti

    At Foster Wheeler, a three-dimensional CFB furnace model is essential part of knowledge development of CFB furnace process regarding solid mixing, combustion, emission formation and heat transfer. Results of laboratory and pilot scale phenomenon research are utilized in development of sub-models. Analyses of field-test results in industrial-scale CFB boilers including furnace profile measurements are simultaneously carried out with development of 3-dimensional process modeling, which provides a chain of knowledge that is utilized as feedback for phenomenon research. Knowledge gathered by model validation studies and up-to-date parameter databases are utilized in performance prediction and design development of CFB boiler furnaces. This paper reports recent development steps related to modeling of combustion and formation of char and volatiles of various fuel types in CFB conditions. Also a new model for predicting the formation of nitrogen oxides is presented. Validation of mixing and combustion parameters for solids and gases are based on test balances at several large-scale CFB boilers combusting coal, peat and bio-fuels. Field-tests including lateral and vertical furnace profile measurements and characterization of solid materials provides a window for characterization of fuel specific mixing and combustion behavior in CFB furnace at different loads and operation conditions. Measured horizontal gas profiles are projection of balance between fuel mixing and reactions at lower part of furnace and are used together with both lateral temperature profiles at bed and upper parts of furnace for determination of solid mixing and combustion model parameters. Modeling of char and volatile based formation of NO profiles is followed by analysis of oxidizing and reducing regions formed due lower furnace design and mixing characteristics of fuel and combustion airs effecting to formation ofNO furnace profile by reduction and volatile-nitrogen reactions. This paper presents

  4. R-spondin 2 facilitates differentiation of proliferating chondrocytes into hypertrophic chondrocytes by enhancing Wnt/β-catenin signaling in endochondral ossification.

    PubMed

    Takegami, Yasuhiko; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ito, Mikako; Masuda, Akio; Nakashima, Hiroaki; Ishiguro, Naoki; Ohno, Kinji

    2016-04-22

    Endochondral ossification is a crucial process for longitudinal growth of bones. Differentiating chondrocytes in growth cartilage form four sequential zones of proliferation, alignment into column, hypertrophy, and substitution of chondrocytes with osteoblasts. Wnt/β-catenin signaling is essential for differentiation of proliferating chondrocytes into hypertrophic chondrocytes in growth cartilage. R-spondin 2 (Rspo2), a member of R-spondin family, is an agonist for Wnt signaling, but its role in chondrocyte differentiation remains unknown. Here we report that growth cartilage of Rspo2-knockout mice shows a decreased amount of β-catenin and increased amounts collagen type II (CII) and Sox9 in the abnormally extended proliferating zone. In contrast, expression of collagen type X (CX) in the hypertrophic zone remains unchanged. Differentiating chondrogenic ATDC5 cells, mimicking proliferating chondrocytes, upregulate Rspo2 and its putative receptor, Lgr5, in parallel. Addition of recombinant human Rspo2 to differentiating ATDC5 cells decreases expressions of Col2a1, Sox9, and Acan, as well as production of proteoglycans. In contrast, lentivirus-mediated knockdown of Rspo2 has the opposite effect. The effect of Rspo2 on chondrogenic differentiation is mediated by Wnt/β-catenin signaling, and not by Wnt/PCP or Wnt/Ca(2+) signaling. We propose that Rspo2 activates Wnt/β-catenin signaling to reduce Col2a1 and Sox9 and to facilitate differentiation of proliferating chondrocytes into hypertrophic chondrocytes in growth cartilage. PMID:27012200

  5. Yap1 Regulates Multiple Steps of Chondrocyte Differentiation during Skeletal Development and Bone Repair.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yujie; Wu, Ailing; Li, Pikshan; Li, Gang; Qin, Ling; Song, Hai; Mak, Kinglun Kingston

    2016-03-01

    Hippo signaling controls organ size and tissue regeneration in many organs, but its roles in chondrocyte differentiation and bone repair remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that Yap1, an effector of Hippo pathway inhibits skeletal development, postnatal growth, and bone repair. We show that Yap1 regulates chondrocyte differentiation at multiple steps in which it promotes early chondrocyte proliferation but inhibits subsequent chondrocyte maturation both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, we find that Yap1 requires Teads binding for direct regulation of Sox6 expression to promote chondrocyte proliferation. In contrast, Yap1 inhibits chondrocyte maturation by suppression of Col10a1 expression through interaction with Runx2. In addition, Yap1 also governs the initiation of fracture repair by inhibition of cartilaginous callus tissue formation. Taken together, our work provides insights into the mechanism by which Yap1 regulates endochondral ossification, which may help the development of therapeutic treatment for bone regeneration. PMID:26923596

  6. Lectin binding patterns reflect the phenotypic status of in vitro chondrocyte models.

    PubMed

    Toegel, S; Plattner, V E; Wu, S Q; Goldring, M B; Chiari, C; Kolb, A; Unger, F M; Nehrer, S; Gabor, F; Viernstein, H; Wirth, M

    2009-01-01

    In vitro studies using chondrocyte cell cultures have increased our understanding of cartilage physiology and the altered chondrocytic cell phenotype in joint diseases. Beside the use of primary cells isolated from cartilage specimens of donors, immortalized chondrocyte cell lines such as C-28/I2 and T/C-28a2 have facilitated reproducible and standardized experiments. Although carbohydrate structures appear of significance for cartilage function, the contribution of the chondrocyte glycocalyx to matrix assembly and alterations of the chondrocyte phenotype is poorly understood. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the glycoprofile of primary human chondrocytes as well as of C-28/I2 and T/C-28a2 cells in culture. First, the chondrocytic phenotype of primary and immortalized cells was assessed using real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, immunofluorescence, and glycosaminoglycans staining. Then, a panel of lectins was selected to probe for a range of oligosaccharide sequences determining specific products of the O-glycosylation and N-glycosylation pathways. We found that differences in the molecular phenotype between primary chondrocytes and the immortalized chondrocyte cell models C-28/I2 and T/C-28a2 are reflected in the glycoprofile of the cells. In this regard, the glycocalyx of immortalized chondrocytes was characterized by reduced levels of high-mannose type and sialic acid-capped N-glycans as well as increased fucosylated O-glycosylation products. In summary, the present report emphasizes the glycophenotype as an integral part of the chondrocyte phenotype and points at a significant role of the glycophenotype in chondrocyte differentiation. PMID:19263178

  7. Regulators of chondrocyte differentiation in tibial dyschondroplasia: an in vivo and in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Farquharson, C; Berry, J L; Mawer, E B; Seawright, E; Whitehead, C C

    1995-09-01

    Tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) is a disorder of endochondral bone growth and results in the retention of a mass of unmineralized, avascular cartilage extending into the metaphysis. We have studied various parameters of chondrocyte differentiation, both in isolated chick chondrocytes and growth plate sections, in an attempt to determine whether the inhibition in chondrocyte differentiation seen in TD is a consequence of an inherent incapability of chondrocytes to differentiate terminally and mineralize. Results from in vitro experiments indicated that both normal and lesion chondrocytes synthesized a matrix that stained with antibodies to types II and X collagen and displayed foci of mineralization. Alkaline phosphatase activity in lesion chondrocytes was significantly increased in comparison to that in normal hypertrophic chondrocytes. In addition, normal and lesion chondrocytes in culture synthesized transforming growth factor-beta and 24,25(OH)2D3 but not 1,25(OH)2D3. There was no significant difference in the production rate of these growth regulators between normal and lesion chondrocytes. In contrast, in growth plate sections, alkaline phosphatase activity was markedly reduced in the lesion chondrocytes and sites of mineralization were not evident. Type II collagen was located throughout the growth plate and lesion, but type X collagen was not present within the lesion except at sites of vascularization. These results indicate that, in culture, lesion chondrocytes have the ability to differentiate terminally and mineralize, and suggest that the primary abnormality in TD is related to a developmental fault which is only operative in vivo. This may include a defect in cartilage vascularization and/or impairment of chondrocyte differentiation by mechanisms that have not yet been elucidated but may involve the abnormal production of regulatory factors. PMID:8541142

  8. A 3-dimensional Analysis of the Cassiopeia A Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isensee, Karl

    We present a multi-wavelength study of the nearby supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A). Easily resolvable supernova remnants such as Cas A provide a unique opportunity to test supernova explosion models. Additionally, we can observe key processes in the interstellar medium as the ejecta from the initial explosion encounter Cas A's powerful shocks. In order to accomplish these science goals, we used the Spitzer Space Telescope's Infrared Spectrograph to create a high resolution spectral map of select regions of Cas A, allowing us to make a Doppler reconstruction of its 3-dimensional structure structure. In the center of the remnant, we find relatively pristine ejecta that have not yet reached Cas A's reverse shock or interacted with the circumstellar environment. We observe O, Si, and S emission. These ejecta can form both sheet-like structures as well as filaments. Si and O, which come from different nucleosynthetic layers of the star, are observed to be coincident in some regions, and separated by >500 km s -1 in others. Observed ejecta traveling toward us are, on average, ˜800 km s -1 slower than the material traveling away from us. We compare our observations to recent supernova explosion models and find that no single model can simultaneously reproduce all the observed features. However, models of different supernova explosions can collectively produce the observed geometries and structures of the emission interior to Cas A's reverse shock. We use the results from the models to address the conditions during the supernova explosion, concentrating on asymmetries in the shock structure. We also predict that the back surface of Cassiopeia A will begin brightening in ∼30 years, and the front surface in ˜100 years. We then used similar observations from 3 regions on Cas A's reverse shock in order to create more 3-dimensional maps. In these regions, we observe supernova ejecta both immediately before and during the shock-ejecta interaction. We determine that the

  9. A practical way to prepare primer human chondrocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Isyar, Mehmet; Yilmaz, Ibrahim; Yasar Sirin, Duygu; Yalcin, Sercan; Guler, Olcay; Mahirogullari, Mahir

    2016-09-01

    Biological cartilage repair is one of the most important targets for orthopedic surgeons currently. For this purpose, it is mandatory to know how to prepare a chondrocyte culture. In this study, our purpose was to introduce a method enabling orthopedic surgeons to practice their knowledge and skills on molecular experimental setup at cellular level, based on our experiences from previous pilot studies. Thus, we believe it will encourage orthopedic surgeons. PMID:27408489

  10. MicroRNA-33 suppresses CCL2 expression in chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Meng; Xie, Qingyun; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Fan; Cheng, Yue; Guo, Dongyang; Wang, Ying; Mo, Liweng; Wang, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    CCL2-mediated macrophage infiltration in articular tissues plays a pivotal role in the development of the osteoarthritis (OA). miRNAs regulate the onset and progression of diseases via controlling the expression of a series of genes. How the CCL2 gene was regulated by miRNAs was still not fully elucidated. In the present study, we demonstrated that the binding sites of miR-33 in the 3′UTR of CCL2 gene were conserved in human, mouse and rat species. By performing gain- or loss-of-function studies, we verified that miR-33 suppressed CCL2 expression in the mRNA and protein levels. We also found that miR-33 suppressed the CCL2 levels in the supernatant of cultured primary mouse chondrocytes. With reporter gene assay, we demonstrated that miR-33 targeted at AAUGCA in the 3′UTR of CCL2 gene. In transwell migration assays, we demonstrated that the conditional medium (CM) from miR-33 deficient chondrocytes potentiated the monocyte chemotaxis in a CCL2 dependent manner. Finally, we demonstrated that the level of miR-33 was decreased, whereas the CCL2 level was increased in the articular cartilage from the OA patients compared with the control group. In summary, we identified miR-33 as a novel suppressor of CCL2 in chondrocytes. The miR-33/CCL2 axis in chondrocytes regulates monocyte chemotaxis, providing a potential mechanism of macrophage infiltration in OA. PMID:27129293

  11. Hydrogen peroxide induces apoptosis via a mitochondrial pathway in chondrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Cai-ping; Liang, Qian; Wang, Xiao-ping; Chen, Tong-sheng

    2012-03-01

    The degenerative joint disease such as osteoarthritis (OA) is closely associated with the death of chondrocytes in apoptosis fashion. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), higher expression following acute damage in OA patients, has been shown to be up-regulated during apoptosis in a bulk of experimental models. This study was aimed to explore the mechanism of H2O2-induced rabbit chondrocytes apoptosis. Articular cartilage was biopsied from the joints of 6 weeks old New Zealand rabbits. Cell Counting Kit (CCK-8) assay was used to assess the inhibitory effect of H2O2 on cell viability. H2O2 treatment induced a remarkable reduction of cell viability. We used flow cytometry to assess the form of cell death with Annexin-V/PI double staining, and found that H2O2 treatment induced apoptosis in a dose-and time-dependent manner. Exposure of chondrocytes to 1.5 mM of H2O2 for 2 h induced a burst apoptosis that can be alleviated by N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) pretreatment, an anti-oxidant amino-acid derivative. Loss of mitochondria membrane potential (▵Ψm) was evaluated using confocal microscopy imaging and flow cytometry (FCM). H2O2 treatment induced a marked reduction of ▵Ψm, and the abrupt disappearance of ▵Ψm occurred within 5 minutes. These results indicate that H2O2 induces a rapid apoptosis via a mitochondrial pathway in rabbit chondrocytes.

  12. Incomplete defect filling after third generation autologous chondrocyte implantation

    PubMed Central

    Pietschmann, Matthias F.; Ficklscherer, Andreas; Gülecyüz, Mehmet F.; Hammerschmid, Florian; Müller, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Third generation autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is a suitable method for the treatment of cartilage defects in the knee joint. However, knowledge about the development of graft thickness and the clinical relevance of incomplete defect filling in the postoperative course is low. This prospective study analyses the graft integration into the surrounding cartilage, with special consideration of the graft thickness. Material and methods A total of 71 consecutive patients with 79 cartilage defects were treated with third generation autologous chondrocyte implantation (NOVOCART 3D) in the knee. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed at 0.25, 0.5, 1 and 2 years. Graft thickness was measured compared to the surrounding healthy cartilage. The International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scoring system and the visual analogue scale (VAS) were used for clinical evaluation. Cartilage defect filling was classified as the percentage of the surrounding cartilage. Results The average graft thickness showed a significant increase between 3 and 6 months after autologous chondrocyte implantation. Incomplete defect filling occurred in 44 (55.7%) cases. Of these, 33 cases showed incomplete defect filling grade I (> 75%), 10 cases were grade II (> 50%) and one case grade III (> 25%). Incomplete defect filling grade IV (< 25%) was not observed. Incomplete defect filling occurred significantly more often in women (p = 0.021), without worse clinical results. Conclusions Graft thickness after third generation autologous chondrocyte implantation shows increasing graft thickness over the period of 2 years postoperatively. A high rate of incomplete defect filling in the surrounding cartilage was observed, without worse clinical results. PMID:27478460

  13. Bioreactor-Induced Chondrocyte Maturation Is Dependent on Cell Passage and Onset of Loading

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning; Grad, Sibylle; Stoddart, Martin J.; Niemeyer, Philipp; Südkamp, Norbert P.; Pestka, Jan; Alini, Mauro; Chen, Jiying

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of shifting in vitro culture conditions regarding cellular passage and onset of loading within matrix-associated bovine articular chondrocytes cultured under free-swelling and/or dynamical loading conditions on general chondrocyte maturation. Methods: Primary or passage 3 bovine chondrocytes were seeded in fibrin-polyurethane scaffolds. Constructs were cultured either free-swelling for 2 or 4 weeks, under direct mechanical loading for 2 or 4 weeks, or free swelling for 2 weeks followed by 2 weeks of loading. Samples were collected for glycosaminoglycan (GAG) quantification, mRNA expression of chondrogenic genes, immunohistochemistry, and histology. Results: Mechanical loading generally stimulated GAG synthesis, up-regulated chondrogenic genes, and improved the accumulation of matrix in cell-laden constructs when compared with free-swelling controls. Primary chondrocytes underwent more effective cartilage maturation when compared with passaged chondrocytes. Constructs of primary chondrocytes that were initially free-swelling followed by 2 weeks of mechanical load (delayed) had overall highest GAG with strongest responsiveness to load regarding matrix synthesis. Constructs that experienced the delayed loading regime also demonstrated most favorable chondrogenic gene expression profiles in both primary and third passage cells. Furthermore, most intense matrix staining and immunostaining of collagen type II and aggrecan were visualized in these constructs. Conclusions: Primary chondrocytes were more effective than passage 3 chondrocytes when chondrogenesis was concerned. The most efficient chondrogenesis resulted from primary articular chondrocytes, which were initially free-swelling followed by a standardized loading protocol. PMID:26069659

  14. Optimal 3-D culture of primary articular chondrocytes for use in the Rotating Wall Vessel Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Mellor, Liliana F.; Baker, Travis L.; Brown, Raquel J.; Catlin, Lindsey W.; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Reliable culturing methods for primary articular chondrocytes are essential to study the effects of loading and unloading on joint tissue at the cellular level. Due to the limited proliferation capacity of primary chondrocytes and their tendency to dedifferentiate in conventional culture conditions, long-term culturing conditions of primary chondrocytes can be challenging. The goal of this study was to develop a suspension culturing technique that not only would retain the cellular morphology but also maintain gene expression characteristics of primary articular chondrocytes. METHODS Three-dimensional culturing methods were compared and optimized for primary articular chondrocytes in the rotating wall vessel bioreactor, which changes the mechanical culture conditions to provide a form of suspension culture optimized for low shear and turbulence. We performed gene expression analysis and morphological characterization of cells cultured in alginate beads, Cytopore-2 microcarriers, primary monolayer culture, and passaged monolayer cultures using reverse transcription-PCR and laser scanning confocal microscopy. RESULTS Primary chondrocytes grown on Cytopore-2 microcarriers maintained the phenotypical morphology and gene expression pattern observed in primary bovine articular chondrocytes, and retained these characteristics for up to 9 days. DISCUSSION Our results provide a novel and alternative culturing technique for primary chondrocytes suitable for studies that require suspension such as those using the rotating wall vessel bioreactor. In addition, we provide an alternative culturing technique for primary chondrocytes that can impact future mechanistic studies of osteoarthritis progression, treatments for cartilage damage and repair, and cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:25199120

  15. In situ chondrocyte deformation with physiological compression of the feline patellofemoral joint.

    PubMed

    Clark, A L; Barclay, L D; Matyas, J R; Herzog, W

    2003-04-01

    The mechanical environment is an important factor affecting the maintenance and adaptation of articular cartilage, and thus the function of the joint and the progression of joint degeneration. Recent evidence suggests that cartilage deformation caused by mechanical loading is directly associated with deformation and volume changes of chondrocytes. Furthermore, in vitro experiments have shown that these changes in the mechanical states of chondrocytes correlate with a change in the biosynthetic activity of cartilage cells. The purpose of this study was to apply our knowledge of contact forces within the feline patellofemoral joint to quantify chondrocyte deformation in situ under loads of physiological magnitude. A uniform, static load of physiological magnitude was applied to healthy articular cartilage still fully intact and attached to its native bone. The compressed cartilage was then chemically fixed to enable the evaluation of cartilage strain, chondrocyte deformation and chondrocyte volumetric fraction. Patella and femoral groove articular cartilages differ in thickness, chondrocyte aspect ratio, and chondrocyte volumetric fraction in both magnitude and depth distribution. Furthermore, when subjected to the same compressive loads, changes to all of these parameters differ in magnitude and depth distribution between patellar and femoral groove articular cartilage. This evidence suggests that significant chondrocyte deformation likely occurs during in vivo joint loading, and may influence chondrocyte biosynthetic activity. Furthermore, we hypothesise that the contrasts between patella and femoral groove cartilages may explain, in part, the site-specific progression of osteoarthritis in the patellofemoral joint of the feline anterior cruciate ligament transected knee. PMID:12600346

  16. A pathway to bone: signaling molecules and transcription factors involved in chondrocyte development and maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kozhemyakina, Elena; Lassar, Andrew B.; Zelzer, Elazar

    2015-01-01

    Decades of work have identified the signaling pathways that regulate the differentiation of chondrocytes during bone formation, from their initial induction from mesenchymal progenitor cells to their terminal maturation into hypertrophic chondrocytes. Here, we review how multiple signaling molecules, mechanical signals and morphological cell features are integrated to activate a set of key transcription factors that determine and regulate the genetic program that induces chondrogenesis and chondrocyte differentiation. Moreover, we describe recent findings regarding the roles of several signaling pathways in modulating the proliferation and maturation of chondrocytes in the growth plate, which is the ‘engine’ of bone elongation. PMID:25715393

  17. Bushen Zhuangjin decoction inhibits TM-induced chondrocyte apoptosis mediated by endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    LIN, PINGDONG; WENG, XIAPING; LIU, FAYUAN; MA, YUHUAN; CHEN, HOUHUANG; SHAO, XIANG; ZHENG, WENWEI; LIU, XIANXIANG; YE, HONGZHI; LI, XIHAI

    2015-01-01

    Chondrocyte apoptosis triggered by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress plays a vital role in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). Bushen Zhuangjin decoction (BZD) has been widely used in the treatment of OA. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the inhibitory effects of BZD on chondrocyte apoptosis remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of BZD on ER stress-induced chondrocyte apoptosis using a chondrocyte in vitro model of OA. Chondrocytes obtained from the articular cartilage of the knee joints of Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were detected by immunohistochemical staining for type II collagen. The ER stress-mediated apoptosis of tunicamycin (TM)-stimulated chondrocytes was detected using 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA). We found that 4-PBA inhibited TM-induced chondrocyte apoptosis, which confirmed the successful induction of chondrocyte apoptosis. BZD enhanced the viability of the TM-stimulated chondrocytes in a dose- and time-dependent manner, as shown by MTT assay. The apoptotic rate and the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) of the TM-stimulated chondrocytes treated with BZD was markedly decreased compared with those of chondrocytes not treated with BZD, as shown by 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining, Annexin V-FITC binding assay and JC-1 assay. To further elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the inhibitory effects of BZD on TM-induced chondrocyte apoptosis mediated by ER stress, the mRNA and protein expression levels of binding immunoglobulin protein (Bip), X-box binding protein 1 (Xbp1), activating transcription factor 4 (Atf4), C/EBP-homologous protein (Chop), caspase-9, caspase-3, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) were measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analysis. In the TM-stimulated chondrocytes treated with BZD, the mRNA and protein expression levels of Bip, Atf4, Chop, caspase-9, caspase-3

  18. Notch signaling indirectly promotes chondrocyte hypertrophy via regulation of BMP signaling and cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Xifu; Wang, Jinwu; Luo, Zhengliang; Wang, Yongjun; Morandi, Massimo M.; Marymont, John V.; Hilton, Matthew J.; Dong, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    Cell cycle regulation is critical for chondrocyte differentiation and hypertrophy. Recently we identified the Notch signaling pathway as an important regulator of chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation during mouse cartilage development. To investigate the underlying mechanisms, we assessed the role for Notch signaling regulation of the cell cycle during chondrocyte differentiation. Real-time RT-PCR data showed that over-expression of the Notch Intracellular Domain (NICD) significantly induced the expression of p57, a cell cycle inhibitor, in chondrocytes. Flow cytometric analyses further confirmed that over-expression of NICD in chondrocytes enhances the G0/G1 cell cycle transition and cell cycle arrest. In contrast, treatment of chondrocytes with the Notch inhibitor, DAPT, decreased both endogenous and BMP2-induced SMAD 1/5/8 phosphorylation and knockdown of SMAD 1/5/8 impaired NICD-induced chondrocyte differentiation and p57 expression. Co-immunoprecipitation using p-SMAD 1/5/8 and NICD antibodies further showed a strong interaction of these proteins during chondrocyte maturation. Finally, RT-PCR and Western blot results revealed a significant reduction in the expression of the SMAD-related phosphatase, PPM1A, following NICD over-expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Notch signaling induces cell cycle arrest and thereby initiates chondrocyte hypertrophy via BMP/SMAD-mediated up-regulation of p57. PMID:27146698

  19. Cellular response of chondrocytes to magnesium alloys for orthopedic applications.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yi; Xu, Qingli; Zhang, Jian; Niu, Jialing; Yuan, Guangyin; Jiang, Yao; He, Yaohua; Wang, Xinling

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, the effects of Mg-Nd-Zn-Zr (JDBM), brushite (CaHPO4·2H2O)-coated JDBM (C-JDBM), AZ31, WE43, pure magnesium (Mg) and Ti alloy (TC4) on rabbit chondrocytes were investigated in vitro. Adhesion experiments revealed the satisfactory morphology of chondrocytes on the surface of all samples. An indirect cytotoxicity test using MTT assay revealed that C‑JDBM and TC4 exhibited results similar to those of the negative control, better than those obtained with JDBM, AZ31, WE43 and pure Mg (p<0.05). There were no statistically significant differences observed between the JDBM, AZ31, WE43 and pure Mg group (p>0.05). The results of indirect cell cytotoxicity and proliferation assays, as well as those of apoptosis assay, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) quantification, assessment of collagen Ⅱ (Col Ⅱ) levels and RT-qPCR revealed a similar a trend as was observed with MTT assay. These findings suggested that the JDBM alloy was highly biocompatible with chondrocytes in vitro, yielding results similar to those of AZ31, WE43 and pure Mg. Furthermore, CaHPO4·2H2O coating significantly improved the biocompatibility of this alloy. PMID:25975216

  20. The effects of simulated microgravity on cultured chicken embryonic chondrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Li, X. B.; Yang, S. Z.; Li, S. G.; Jiang, P. D.; Lin, Z. H.

    2003-10-01

    Using the cultured chicken embryonic chondrocytes as a model, the effects of simulated microgravity on the microtubular system of the cellular skeleton, extracellular matrix, alkaline phosphatase activity, intracellular free calcium concentration and mitochondrial ATP synthase activity with its oligomycin inhibition rate were studied with a clinostat. The microtubular content was measured by a flow cytometer. The decrease of microtubular content showed the impairment of the cellular skeleton system. Observation on the extracellualr matrix by the scanning electron microscopy showed that it decreased significantly after rotating, and the fibers in the extracellular matrix were more tiny and disorderly than that of the control group. It can be concluded that the simulated microgravity can affect the secreting and assembly of the extracellular matrix. In contrast to the control, there was a time course decrease in alkaline phosphatase activity of chondrocytes, a marker of matrix mineralization. Meanwhile a significant drop in the intracellular calcium concentration happened at the beginning of rotation. These results indicate that simulated microgravity can suppress matrix calcification of cultured chondrocytes, and intracellular free calcium may be involved in the regulation of matrix calcification as the second signal transmitter. No significant changes happened in the mitochondrial ATP synthase activity and its oligomycin inhibition rate. Perhaps the energy metabolism wasn't affected by the simulated microgravity. The possible mechanisms about them were discussed.

  1. Human Articular Chondrocytes Express Multiple Gap Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mayan, Maria D.; Carpintero-Fernandez, Paula; Gago-Fuentes, Raquel; Martinez-de-Ilarduya, Oskar; Wang, Hong-Zhang; Valiunas, Virginijus; Brink, Peter; Blanco, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease and involves progressive degeneration of articular cartilage. The aim of this study was to investigate if chondrocytes from human articular cartilage express gap junction proteins called connexins (Cxs). We show that human chondrocytes in tissue express Cx43, Cx45, Cx32, and Cx46. We also find that primary chondrocytes from adults retain the capacity to form functional voltage-dependent gap junctions. Immunohistochemistry experiments in cartilage from OA patients revealed significantly elevated levels of Cx43 and Cx45 in the superficial zone and down through the next approximately 1000 μm of tissue. These zones corresponded with regions damaged in OA that also had high levels of proliferative cell nuclear antigen. An increased number of Cxs may help explain the increased proliferation of cells in clusters that finally lead to tissue homeostasis loss. Conversely, high levels of Cxs in OA cartilage reflect the increased number of adjacent cells in clusters that are able to interact directly by gap junctions as compared with hemichannels on single cells in normal cartilage. Our data provide strong evidence that OA patients have a loss of the usual ordered distribution of Cxs in the damaged zones and that the reductions in Cx43 levels are accompanied by the loss of correct Cx localization in the nondamaged areas. PMID:23416160

  2. Hydrostatic pressure influences HIF-2 alpha expression in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiroaki; Arai, Yuji; Kishida, Tsunao; Terauchi, Ryu; Honjo, Kuniaki; Nakagawa, Shuji; Tsuchida, Shinji; Matsuki, Tomohiro; Ueshima, Keiichirou; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α is considered to play a major role in the progression of osteoarthritis. Recently, it was reported that pressure amplitude influences HIF-2α expression in murine endothelial cells. We examined whether hydrostatic pressure is involved in expression of HIF-2α in articular chondrocytes. Chondrocytes were cultured and stimulated by inflammation or hydrostatic pressure of 0, 5, 10, or 50 MPa. After stimulation, heat shock protein (HSP) 70, HIF-2α, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, MMP-3, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene expression were evaluated. The levels of all gene expression were increased by inflammatory stress. When chondrocytes were exposed to a hydrostatic pressure of 5 MPa, HIF-2α, MMP-13, and MMP-3 gene expression increased significantly although those of HSP70 and NF-κB were not significantly different from the control group. In contrast, HIF-2α gene expression did not increase under a hydrostatic pressure of 50 MPa although HSP70 and NF-κB expression increased significantly compared to control. We considered that hydrostatic pressure of 5 MPa could regulate HIF-2α independent of NF-κB, because the level of HIF-2α gene expression increased significantly without upregulation of NF-κB expression at 5 MPa. Hydrostatic pressure may influence cartilage degeneration, inducing MMP-13 and MMP-3 expression through HIF-2α. PMID:25569085

  3. Adaptive cellular response to osmotic stress in pig articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Borghetti, P; Della Salda, L; De Angelis, E; Maltarello, M C; Petronini, P G; Cabassi, E; Marcato, P S; Maraldi, N M; Borghetti, A F

    1995-04-01

    The authors studied the effects of a wide range of medium osmolarities (from 0.28 osM (physiological osmolarity of plasma and synovial fluid) to 0.58 osM) by altering Na+ concentration in high density cultures of pig articular chondrocytes in order to analyze the behaviour of some functional and structural parameters during cell adaptation to these imposed changes in the ionic environment. Biochemical and morphological results indicated that, even if isolated from the tissue matrix and cultured in vitro, chondrocytes maintained active osmoregulation systems which are present in living conditions. They showed a similar biochemical and morphological behavior when cultured at 0.28 osM and 0.38 osM but they were able, with regard to protein synthesis, aminoacid transport and proliferation rates, to respond quickly and to adapt to 0.48 osM medium as well. On the contrary, the treatment at the highest osmolarity (0.58 osM) early altered these biochemical parameters and was detrimental or even gave rise to lethal damage during long-term treatment. Furthermore, while chondrocytes cultured in 0.28-0.38 osM medium maintained phenotypic characteristics in culture, the higher osmolarities (0.48-0.58 osM) caused morphological changes in cell populations resulting in loss of phenotypic cell stability as demonstrated by their taking on a fibroblast-like shape as well as a lack of ability to assembly matrix proteoglycans. PMID:7778094

  4. Thermally reversible colloidal gels for three-dimensional chondrocyte culture

    PubMed Central

    Lapworth, James W.; Hatton, Paul V.; Goodchild, Rebecca L.; Rimmer, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Healthy cells are required in large numbers to form a tissue-engineered construct and primary cells must therefore be increased in number in a process termed ‘expansion’. There are significant problems with existing procedures, including cell injury and an associated loss of phenotype, but three-dimensional culture has been reported to offer a solution. Reversible gels, which allow for the recovery of cells after expansion would therefore have great value in the expansion of chondrocytes for tissue engineering applications, but they have received relatively little attention to date. In this study, we examined the synthesis and use of thermoresponsive polymers that form reversible three-dimensional gels for chondrocyte cell culture. A series of polymers comprising N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) and styrene was synthesized before studying their thermoresponsive solution behaviour and gelation. A poly(NIPAM-co-styrene-graft-N-vinylpyrrolidone) variant was also synthesized in order to provide increased water content. Both random- and graft-copolymers formed particulate gels above the lower critical solution temperature and, on cooling, re-dissolved to allow enzyme-free cell recovery. Chondrocytes remained viable in all of these materials for 24 days, increased in number and produced collagen type II and glycosaminoglycans. PMID:21775322

  5. Cellular response of chondrocytes to magnesium alloys for orthopedic applications

    PubMed Central

    LIAO, YI; XU, QINGLI; ZHANG, JIAN; NIU, JIALING; YUAN, GUANGYIN; JIANG, YAO; HE, YAOHUA; WANG, XINLING

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the effects of Mg-Nd-Zn-Zr (JDBM), brushite (CaHPO4·2H2O)-coated JDBM (C-JDBM), AZ31, WE43, pure magnesium (Mg) and Ti alloy (TC4) on rabbit chondrocytes were investigated in vitro. Adhesion experiments revealed the satisfactory morphology of chondrocytes on the surface of all samples. An indirect cytotoxicity test using MTT assay revealed that C-JDBM and TC4 exhibited results similar to those of the negative control, better than those obtained with JDBM, AZ31, WE43 and pure Mg (p<0.05). There were no statistically significant differences observed between the JDBM, AZ31, WE43 and pure Mg group (p>0.05). The results of indirect cell cytotoxicity and proliferation assays, as well as those of apoptosis assay, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) quantification, assessment of collagen II (Col II) levels and RT-qPCR revealed a similar a trend as was observed with MTT assay. These findings suggested that the JDBM alloy was highly biocompatible with chondrocytes in vitro, yielding results similar to those of AZ31, WE43 and pure Mg. Furthermore, CaHPO4·2H2O coating significantly improved the biocompatibility of this alloy. PMID:25975216

  6. Doublecortin May Play a Role in Defining Chondrocyte Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Dongxia; Zhang, Qing-Song; Zabaleta, Jovanny; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; Reiser, Brendan; Bunnell, Bruce A.; Braun, Stephen E.; O’Brien, Michael J.; Savoie, Felix H.; You, Zongbing

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic development of articular cartilage has not been well understood and the role of doublecortin (DCX) in determination of chondrocyte phenotype is unknown. Here, we use a DCX promoter-driven eGFP reporter mouse model to study the dynamic gene expression profiles in mouse embryonic handplates at E12.5 to E13.5 when the condensed mesenchymal cells differentiate into either endochondral chondrocytes or joint interzone cells. Illumina microarray analysis identified a variety of genes that were expressed differentially in the different regions of mouse handplate. The unique expression patterns of many genes were revealed. Cytl1 and 3110032G18RIK were highly expressed in the proximal region of E12.5 handplate and the carpal region of E13.5 handplate, whereas Olfr538, Kctd15, and Cited1 were highly expressed in the distal region of E12.5 and the metacarpal region of E13.5 handplates. There was an increasing gradient of Hrc expression in the proximal to distal direction in E13.5 handplate. Furthermore, when human DCX protein was expressed in human adipose stem cells, collagen II was decreased while aggrecan, matrilin 2, and GDF5 were increased during the 14-day pellet culture. These findings suggest that DCX may play a role in defining chondrocyte phenotype. PMID:24758934

  7. Hydrostatic Pressure Influences HIF-2 Alpha Expression in Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Hiroaki; Arai, Yuji; Kishida, Tsunao; Terauchi, Ryu; Honjo, Kuniaki; Nakagawa, Shuji; Tsuchida, Shinji; Matsuki, Tomohiro; Ueshima, Keiichirou; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α is considered to play a major role in the progression of osteoarthritis. Recently, it was reported that pressure amplitude influences HIF-2α expression in murine endothelial cells. We examined whether hydrostatic pressure is involved in expression of HIF-2α in articular chondrocytes. Chondrocytes were cultured and stimulated by inflammation or hydrostatic pressure of 0, 5, 10, or 50 MPa. After stimulation, heat shock protein (HSP) 70, HIF-2α, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, MMP-3, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene expression were evaluated. The levels of all gene expression were increased by inflammatory stress. When chondrocytes were exposed to a hydrostatic pressure of 5 MPa, HIF-2α, MMP-13, and MMP-3 gene expression increased significantly although those of HSP70 and NF-κB were not significantly different from the control group. In contrast, HIF-2α gene expression did not increase under a hydrostatic pressure of 50 MPa although HSP70 and NF-κB expression increased significantly compared to control. We considered that hydrostatic pressure of 5 MPa could regulate HIF-2α independent of NF-κB, because the level of HIF-2α gene expression increased significantly without upregulation of NF-κB expression at 5 MPa. Hydrostatic pressure may influence cartilage degeneration, inducing MMP-13 and MMP-3 expression through HIF-2α. PMID:25569085

  8. Matrix molecule influence on chondrocyte phenotype and proteoglycan 4 expression by alginate-embedded zonal chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Coates, Emily E; Riggin, Corinne N; Fisher, John P

    2012-12-01

    Articular cartilage resists load and provides frictionless movement at joint surfaces. The tissue is organized into the superficial, middle, deep, and calcified zones throughout its depth, each which serve distinct functions. Proteoglycan 4 (PRG4), found in the superficial zone, is a critical component of the joint's lubricating mechanisms. Maintenance of both the chondrocyte and zonal chondrocyte phenotype remain challenges for in vitro culture and tissue engineering. Here we investigate the expression of PRG4 mRNA and protein by primary bovine superficial zone chondrocytes, middle/deep zone chondrocytes, and mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated in alginate hydrogels with hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) additives. Chondrogenic phenotype and differentiation markers are evaluated by mRNA expression, histochemical, and immunohistochemical staining. Results show middle/deep cells express no measurable PRG4 mRNA by day 7. In contrast, superficial zone cells express elevated PRG4 mRNA throughout culture time. This expression can be significantly enhanced up to 15-fold by addition of both HA and CS to scaffolds. Conversely, PRG4 mRNA expression is downregulated (up to 5-fold) by CS and HA in differentiating MSCs, possibly due to build up of entrapped protein. HA and CS demonstrate favorable effects on chondrogenesis by upregulating transcription factor Sox9 mRNA (up to 4.6-fold) and downregulating type I collagen mRNA (up to 18-fold). Results highlight the important relationship between matrix components and expression of critical lubricating proteins in an engineered cartilage scaffold. PMID:22674584

  9. Method and apparatus for imaging through 3-dimensional tracking of protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, James M. (Inventor); Macri, John R. (Inventor); McConnell, Mark L. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for creating density images of an object through the 3-dimensional tracking of protons that have passed through the object are provided. More specifically, the 3-dimensional tracking of the protons is accomplished by gathering and analyzing images of the ionization tracks of the protons in a closely packed stack of scintillating fibers.

  10. Intercellular Ca2+ waves in mechanically stimulated articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, P; Calabrese, A; Capozzi, I; Grandolfo, M; Tonon, R; Vittur, F

    2000-01-01

    Articular cartilage is a tissue designed to withstand compression during joint movement and, in vivo, is subjected to a wide range of mechanical loading forces. Mechanosensitivity has been demonstrated to influence chondrocyte metabolism and cartilage homeostasis, but the mechanisms underlying mechanotransduction in these cells are poorly understood. In many cell types mechanical stimulation induces increases of the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration that propagates from cell to cell as an intercellular Ca2+ wave. Cell-to-cell communication through gap junctions underlies tissue co-ordination of metabolism and sensitivity to extracellular stimuli: gap junctional permeability to intracellular second messengers allows signal transduction pathways to be shared among several cells, ultimately resulting in co-ordinated tissue responses. Mechanically-induced Ca2+ signalling was investigated with digital fluorescence video imaging in primary cultures of rabbit articular chondrocytes. Mechanical stimulation of a single cell, obtained by briefly distorting the plasmamembrane with a micropipette, induced a wave of increased Ca2+ that was communicated to surrounding cells. Intercellular Ca2+ spreading was inhibited by 18 alpha-glycyrrhetinic acid, suggesting the involvement of gap junctions in signal propagation. The functional expression of gap junctions was assessed, in confluent chondrocyte cultures, by the intercellular transfer of Lucifer yellow dye in microinjection experiments while the expression of connexin 43 could be detected in Western blots. A series of pharmacological tools known to interfere with the cell calcium handling capacity were employed to investigate the mechanism of mechanically-induced Ca2+ signalling. In the absence of extracellular Ca2+ mechanical stimulation induced communicated Ca2+ waves similar to controls. Mechanical stress induced Ca2+ influx both in the stimulated chondrocyte but not in the adjacent cells, as assessed by the Mn2+ quenching

  11. Modulation of Hyaluronan Synthesis by the Interaction between Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Antonioli, Eliane; Piccinato, Carla A.; Nader, Helena B.; Cohen, Moisés; Goldberg, Anna Carla; Ferretti, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) are considered a good source for cellular therapy in cartilage repair. But, their potential to repair the extracellular matrix, in an osteoarthritic environment, is still controversial. In osteoarthritis (OA), anti-inflammatory action and extracellular matrix production are important steps for cartilage healing. This study examined the interaction of BM-MSC and OA-chondrocyte on the production of hyaluronan and inflammatory cytokines in a Transwell system. We compared cocultured BM-MSCs and OA-chondrocytes with the individually cultured controls (monocultures). There was a decrease in BM-MSCs cell count in coculture with OA-chondrocytes when compared to BM-MSCs alone. In monoculture, BM-MSCs produced higher amounts of hyaluronan than OA-chondrocytes and coculture of BM-MSCs with OA-chondrocytes increased hyaluronan production per cell. Hyaluronan synthase-1 mRNA expression was upregulated in BM-MSCs after coculture with OA-chondrocytes, whereas hyaluronidase-1 was downregulated. After coculture, lower IL-6 levels were detected in BM-MSCs compared with OA-chondrocytes. These results indicate that, in response to coculture with OA-chondrocytes, BM-MSCs change their behavior by increasing production of hyaluronan and decreasing inflammatory cytokines. Our results indicate that BM-MSCs per se could be a potential tool for OA regenerative therapy, exerting short-term effects on the local microenvironment even when cell:cell contact is not occurring. PMID:26273306

  12. Xanthan gum protects rabbit articular chondrocytes against sodium nitroprusside-induced apoptosis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qixin; Mei, Xifan; Han, Guanying; Ling, Peixue; Guo, Bin; Guo, Yuewei; Shao, Huarong; Wang, Guan; Cui, Zan; Bai, Yuxin; Xu, Fang

    2015-10-20

    We have previously reported that intra-articular injection of xanthan gum (XG) could significantly ameliorate the degree of joint cartilage degradation and pain in experimental osteoarthritis (OA) model in vivo. In this present study, we evaluated the protective effect of XG against Sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced rabbit articular chondrocytes apoptosis in vitro. Rabbit articular chondrocytes were incubated with various concentrations of XG for 24h prior to 0.5mmol/L SNP co-treatment for 24h. The proliferation of chondrocytes was analyzed using MTT assay. The chondrocytes early apoptosis rates were evaluated using Annexin V-FITC/PI flow cytometry. The morphology of apoptosis chondrocytes were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The loss/disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential was detected using rhodamin 123 by confocal microscope. The concentration of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in cell culture supernatants was evaluated using ELISA assay. The results showed that XG could significantly reverse SNP-reduced cell proliferation and inhibited cell early apoptosis rate in a dose-dependent manner. XG alleviated loss/disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and decreased the PGE2 level of chondrocytes cell culture supernatants in SNP-induced chondrocytes. These results of the present research strongly suggest that XG can protect rabbit articular chondrocytes against SNP-induced apoptosis in vitro. PMID:26256195

  13. Annexin V/beta5 integrin interactions regulate apoptosis of growth plate chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Kirsch, Thorsten

    2006-10-13

    Apoptosis of terminally differentiated chondrocytes allows the replacement of growth plate cartilage by bone. Despite its importance, little is known about the regulation of chondrocyte apoptosis. We show that overexpression of annexin V, which binds to the cytoplasmic domain of beta5 integrin and protein kinase C alpha (PKCalpha), stimulates apoptotic events in hypertrophic growth plate chondrocytes. To determine whether the balance between the interactions of annexin V/beta5 integrin and annexin V/active PKCalpha play a role in the regulation of terminally differentiated growth plate chondrocyte apoptosis, a peptide mimic of annexin V (Penetratin (Pen)-VVISYSMPD) that binds to beta5 integrin but not to PKCalpha was used. This peptide stimulated apoptotic events in growth plate chondrocytes. Suppression of annexin V expression using small interfering ribonucleic acid decreased caspase-3 activity and increased cell viability in Pen-VVISYSMPD-treated growth plate chondrocytes. An activator of PKC resulted in a further decrease of cell viability and further increase of caspase-3 activity in Pen-VVISYSMPD-treated growth plate chondrocytes, whereas inhibitors of PKCalpha led to an increase of cell viability and decrease of caspase-3 activity of Pen-VVISYSMPD-treated cells. These findings suggest that binding of annexin V to active PKCalpha stimulates apoptotic events in growth plate chondrocytes and that binding of annexin Vto beta5 integrin controls these interactions and ultimately apoptosis. PMID:16914549

  14. RECK Is Up-Regulated and Involved in Chondrocyte Cloning in Human Osteoarthritic Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Tokuhiro; Okada, Aiko; Yatabe, Taku; Okubo, Masashi; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Noda, Makoto; Okada, Yasunori

    2010-01-01

    Reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs (RECK) is a membrane-anchored matrix metalloproteinase regulator, but its functions in cartilage are not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to examine the expression and functions of RECK in human osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage. Quantitative RT-PCR indicated that the expression level of RECK is significantly higher in OA cartilage than in normal cartilage. By immunohistochemical analysis, RECK was localized to chondrocytes in OA cartilage, and the immunoreactivity directly correlated with the Mankin score and degree of chondrocyte cloning and proliferation. In cultured OA chondrocytes, RECK was expressed on the cell surface by glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchoring. The expression was stimulated by insulin-like growth factor-1 and suppressed by interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α. Down-regulation of RECK by small interfering RNA showed reduced spreading and smaller focal adhesions in the chondrocytes. Chondrocyte migration in a monolayer wounding assay was increased by down-regulation of RECK and inhibited by RECK overexpression in an matrix metalloproteinase activity-dependent manner. On the other hand, chondrocyte proliferation was suppressed by RECK silencing, and this was associated with reduced phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase, whereas the proliferation was enhanced by RECK overexpression. These data are the first to demonstrate that RECK is up-regulated in human OA cartilage and suggest that RECK plays a role in chondrocyte cloning probably through suppression and promotion of chondrocyte migration and proliferation, respectively. PMID:20395433

  15. Modelling and Simulating the Adhesion and Detachment of Chondrocytes in Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jian; Pan, Tsorng-Whay; Rosenstrauch, Doreen

    Chondrocytes are typically studied in the environment where they normally reside such as the joints in hips, intervertebral disks or the ear. For example, in [SKE+99], the effect of seeding duration on the strength of chondrocyte adhesion to articulate cartilage has been studied in shear flow chamber since such adhesion may play an important role in the repair of articular defects by maintaining cells in positions where their biosynthetic products can contribute to the repair process. However, in this investigation, we focus mainly on the use of auricular chondrocytes in cardiovascular implants. They are abundant, easily and efficiently harvested by a minimally invasive technique. Auricular chondrocytes have ability to produce collagen type-II and other important extracellular matrix constituents; this allows them to adhere strongly to the artificial surfaces. They can be genetically engineered to act like endothelial cells so that the biocompatibility of cardiovascular prothesis can be improved. Actually in [SBBR+02], genetically engineered auricular chondrocytes can be used to line blood-contacting luminal surfaces of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) and a chondrocyte-lined LVAD has been planted into the tissue-donor calf and the results in vivo have proved the feasibility of using autologous auricular chondrocytes to improve the biocompatibility of the blood-biomaterial interface in LVADs and cardiovascular prothesis. Therefore, cultured chondrocytes may offer a more efficient and less invasive means of covering artificial surface with a viable and adherent cell layer.

  16. Chondrocyte number and proteoglycan synthesis in the aging and osteoarthritic human articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Bobacz, K; Erlacher, L; Smolen, J; Soleiman, A; Graninger, W

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To correlate the number of chondrocytes in healthy and osteoarthritic human articular cartilage with age, and to evaluate the influence of donor age on total proteoglycan synthesis. Methods: Chondrocytes were isolated from human articular cartilage derived from hip joints with and without osteoarthritic lesions. The cell number was normalised to cartilage sample wet weight. In addition, the influence of age on chondrocyte numbers was assessed histomorphometrically. Chondrocytes were grown as monolayer cultures for seven days in a chemically defined serum-free basal medium. Total proteoglycan synthesis was measured by [35S]sulphate incorporation into newly synthesised macromolecules. Results: Chondrocyte numbers in healthy cartilage decreased significantly with advancing age (r = –0.69, p<0.0001). In contrast to healthy specimens, chondrocyte numbers were decreased in osteoarthritic cartilage irrespective of and unrelated to age, and differed markedly, by an average of 38%, from the cell numbers found in healthy individuals (p<0.0001). Regarding synthesis of matrix macromolecules, no dependence on patients' age, either in healthy or in osteoarthritic specimens, could be observed. Conclusions: Under the experimental conditions employed, chondrocytes from healthy and osteoarthritic joints synthesised comparable amounts of cartilage macromolecules, independent of age or underlying osteoarthritic disease. Thus the decrease in chondrocyte number in aging and osteoarthritic joints could be a crucial factor in limiting tissue replenishment. PMID:15547085

  17. Notch signaling controls chondrocyte hypertrophy via indirect regulation of Sox9

    PubMed Central

    Kohn, Anat; Rutkowski, Timothy P; Liu, Zhaoyang; Mirando, Anthony J; Zuscik, Michael J; O’Keefe, Regis J; Hilton, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    RBPjk-dependent Notch signaling regulates both the onset of chondrocyte hypertrophy and the progression to terminal chondrocyte maturation during endochondral ossification. It has been suggested that Notch signaling can regulate Sox9 transcription, although how this occurs at the molecular level in chondrocytes and whether this transcriptional regulation mediates Notch control of chondrocyte hypertrophy and cartilage development is unknown or controversial. Here we have provided conclusive genetic evidence linking RBPjk-dependent Notch signaling to the regulation of Sox9 expression and chondrocyte hypertrophy by examining tissue-specific Rbpjk mutant (Prx1Cre;Rbpjkf/f), Rbpjk mutant/Sox9 haploinsufficient (Prx1Cre;Rbpjkf/f;Sox9f/+), and control embryos for alterations in SOX9 expression and chondrocyte hypertrophy during cartilage development. These studies demonstrate that Notch signaling regulates the onset of chondrocyte maturation in a SOX9-dependent manner, while Notch-mediated regulation of terminal chondrocyte maturation likely functions independently of SOX9. Furthermore, our in vitro molecular analyses of the Sox9 promoter and Notch-mediated regulation of Sox9 gene expression in chondrogenic cells identified the ability of Notch to induce Sox9 expression directly in the acute setting, but suppresses Sox9 transcription with prolonged Notch signaling that requires protein synthesis of secondary effectors. PMID:26558140

  18. AP-1 family members act with Sox9 to promote chondrocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    He, Xinjun; Ohba, Shinsuke; Hojo, Hironori; McMahon, Andrew P

    2016-08-15

    An analysis of Sox9 binding profiles in developing chondrocytes identified marked enrichment of an AP-1-like motif. Here, we have explored the functional interplay between Sox9 and AP-1 in mammalian chondrocyte development. Among AP-1 family members, Jun and Fosl2 were highly expressed within prehypertrophic and early hypertrophic chondrocytes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) showed a striking overlap in Jun- and Sox9-bound regions throughout the chondrocyte genome, reflecting direct binding of each factor to the same enhancers and a potential for protein-protein interactions within AP-1- and Sox9-containing complexes. In vitro reporter analysis indicated that direct co-binding of Sox9 and AP-1 at target motifs promoted gene activity. By contrast, where only one factor can engage its DNA target, the presence of the other factor suppresses target activation consistent with protein-protein interactions attenuating transcription. Analysis of prehypertrophic chondrocyte removal of Sox9 confirmed the requirement of Sox9 for hypertrophic chondrocyte development, and in vitro and ex vivo analyses showed that AP-1 promotes chondrocyte hypertrophy. Sox9 and Jun co-bound and co-activated a Col10a1 enhancer in Sox9 and AP-1 motif-dependent manners consistent with their combined action promoting hypertrophic gene expression. Together, the data support a model in which AP-1 family members contribute to Sox9 action in the transition of chondrocytes to the hypertrophic program. PMID:27471255

  19. Effects of telomerase and viral oncogene expression on the in vitro growth of human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Martin, James A; Mitchell, Calista J; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J; Buckwalter, Joseph A

    2002-02-01

    Senescent chondrocytes accumulate with aging in articular cartilage, a process that interferes with cartilage homeostasis and increases the risk of cartilage degeneration. We showed previously that chondrocyte telomere length declines with donor age, which suggests that the aging process is telomere dependent. From these results we hypothesized that telomerase should delay the onset of senescence in cultured chondrocytes. Population doubling limits (PDL) were determined for chondrocytes expressing telomerase. We found that telomerase alone did not extend PDL beyond controls that senesced after 25 population doublings. The human papillomavirus 16 oncogenes E6 and E7 were transduced into the same cell population to investigate this telomere-independent form of senescence further. Chondrocytes expressing E6 and E7 grew longer than the telomerase cDNA (hTERT) cells but still senesced at 55 population doublings. In contrast, chondrocytes expressing telomerase with E6 and E7 grew vigorously past 100 population doublings. We conclude that although telomerase is necessary for the indefinite extension of chondrocyte life span, telomere-independent senescence limits PDL in vitro and may play a role in the age-related accumulation of senescent chondrocytes in vivo. PMID:11818423

  20. ADAM17 Controls Endochondral Ossification by Regulating Terminal Differentiation of Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Katherine C.; Hill, Daniel; Otero, Miguel; Plumb, Darren A.; Froemel, Dara; Dragomir, Cecilia L.; Maretzky, Thorsten; Boskey, Adele; Crawford, Howard C.; Selleri, Licia; Goldring, Mary B.

    2013-01-01

    Endochondral ossification is a highly regulated process that relies on properly orchestrated cell-cell interactions in the developing growth plate. This study is focused on understanding the role of a crucial regulator of cell-cell interactions, the membrane-anchored metalloproteinase ADAM17, in endochondral ossification. ADAM17 releases growth factors, cytokines, and other membrane proteins from cells and is essential for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling and for processing tumor necrosis factor alpha. Here, we report that mice lacking ADAM17 in chondrocytes (A17ΔCh) have a significantly expanded zone of hypertrophic chondrocytes in the growth plate and retarded growth of long bones. This abnormality is caused by an accumulation of the most terminally differentiated type of chondrocytes that produces a calcified matrix. Inactivation of ADAM17 in osteoclasts or endothelial cells does not affect the zone of hypertrophic chondrocytes, suggesting that the main role of ADAM17 in the growth plate is in chondrocytes. This notion is further supported by in vitro experiments showing enhanced hypertrophic differentiation of primary chondrocytes lacking Adam17. The enlarged zone of hypertrophic chondrocytes in A17ΔCh mice resembles that described in mice with mutant EGFR signaling or lack of its ligand transforming growth factor α (TGFα), suggesting that ADAM17 regulates terminal differentiation of chondrocytes during endochondral ossification by activating the TGFα/EGFR signaling axis. PMID:23732913

  1. Hyaluronan production and chondrogenic properties of primary human chondrocyte on gelatin based hematostatic spongostan scaffold

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Autologous chondrocyte transplantation is a promising technique for treatment of cartilage defects. Three dimensional chondrocyte cultures on a scaffold are widely used to retain the chondrogenic phenotype. Using a biodegradable gelatin scaffold is one option for the cell delivery system, but molecular and histological studies of the method have not yet been done. Methods We evaluated the chondrogenic property of the primary human chondrocyte on a gelatin scaffold as compared to a collagen scaffold over a period of 21 days. We examined the production of glycosaminoglycan by quantitative and histological analysis. Gene expression of cartilage-associated molecules was assessed by quantitative RT-PCR. Results The gelatin scaffold showed the ability to promote chondrocyte expansion, chondrogenic phenotype retention at molecular and mRNA levels. Conclusions This scaffold is thus suitable for use as an in vitro model for chondrocyte 3D culture. PMID:23253362

  2. Identification and cloning of a novel phosphatase expressed at high levels in differentiating growth plate chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Houston, B; Seawright, E; Jefferies, D; Hoogland, E; Lester, D; Whitehead, C; Farquharson, C

    1999-01-11

    Growth plate chondrocytes progress through a proliferative phase before acquiring a terminally-differentiated phenotype. In this study we used Percoll density gradients to separate chick growth plate chondrocytes into populations of different maturational phenotype. By applying agarose gel differential display to these populations we cloned a cDNA encoding a novel 268 amino acid protein (3X11A). 3X11A contains two peptide motifs that are conserved in a recently identified superfamily of phosphotransferases. It is likely that 3X11A is a phosphatase, but its substrate specificity remains uncertain. 3X11A expression is upregulated 5-fold during chondrocyte terminal differentiation and its expression is approximately 100-fold higher in hypertrophic chondrocytes than in non-chondrogenic tissues. This suggests that 3X11A participates in a biochemical pathway that is particularly active in differentiating chondrocytes. PMID:9990301

  3. Linking cell shape, elasticity and fate: in vitro re-differentiation of chondrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiaofei; Chim, Yahua; Yin, Huabing

    2014-02-01

    Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) has become a promising method for repairing large articular defects. However, dedifferentiation of chondrocytes during cell expansion remains a major limitation for ACT procedures. In this study, we explore the potential of confining cell shape for re-differentiation of dedifferentiated bovine chondrocytes. A novel culture system, combining 2D micropatterning with 3D matrix formation, was developed to control and maintain individual chondrocyte's shape. Both collagen II synthesis and the mechanical properties of cells were monitored during re-differentiation. We show that a spherical morphology without cell spreading plays a limited role in induction of re-differentiation. Instead, isolated, dedifferentiated chondrocytes partially regain chondrogenic properties if they have an appropriate cell shape and limited spreading.

  4. Chemokine expression is upregulated in chondrocytes in diabetic fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Alblowi, Jazia; Tian, Chen; Siqueira, Michelle F; Kayal, Rayyan A; McKenzie, Erin; Behl, Yugal; Gerstenfeld, Louis; Einhorn, Thomas A; Graves, Dana T

    2013-03-01

    Chemokines are thought to play an important role in several aspects of bone metabolism including the recruitment of leukocytes and the formation of osteoclasts. We investigated the impact of diabetes on chemokine expression in normal and diabetic fracture healing. Fracture of the femur was performed in streptozotocin-induced diabetic and matched normoglycemic control mice. Microarray analysis was carried out and chemokine mRNA levels in vivo were assessed. CCL4 were examined in fracture calluses by immunohistochemistry and the role of TNF in diabetes-enhanced expression was investigated by treatment of animals with the TNF-specific inhibitor, pegsunercept. In vitro studies were conducted with ATDC5 chondrocytes. Diabetes significantly upregulated mRNA levels of several chemokines in vivo including CCL4, CCL8, CCL6, CCL11, CCL20, CCL24, CXCL2, CXCL5 and chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4. Chondrocytes were identified as a significant source of CCL4 and its expression in diabetic fractures was dependent on TNF (P<0.05). TNF-α significantly increased mRNA levels of several chemokines in vitro which were knocked down with FOXO1 siRNA (P<0.05). CCL4 expression at the mRNA and proteins levels was induced by FOXO1 over-expression and reduced by FOXO1 knockdown. The current studies point to the importance of TNF-α as a mechanism for diabetes enhanced chemokine expression by chondrocytes, which may contribute to the accelerated loss of cartilage observed in diabetic fracture healing. Moreover, in vitro results point to FOXO1 as a potentially important transcription factor in mediating this effect. PMID:23262028

  5. IFT88 influences chondrocyte actin organization and biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z.; Wann, A.K.T.; Thompson, C.L.; Hassen, A.; Wang, W.; Knight, M.M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objectives Primary cilia are microtubule based organelles which control a variety of signalling pathways important in cartilage development, health and disease. This study examines the role of the intraflagellar transport (IFT) protein, IFT88, in regulating fundamental actin organisation and mechanics in articular chondrocytes. Methods The study used an established chondrocyte cell line with and without hypomorphic mutation of IFT88 (IFT88orpk). Confocal microscopy was used to quantify F-actin and myosin IIB organisation. Viscoelastic cell and actin cortex mechanics were determined using micropipette aspiration with actin dynamics visualised in live cells transfected with LifeACT-GFP. Results IFT88orpk cells exhibited a significant increase in acto-myosin stress fibre organisation relative to wild-type (WT) cells in monolayer and an altered response to cytochalasin D. Rounded IFT88orpk cells cultured in suspension exhibited reduced cortical actin expression with reduced cellular equilibrium modulus. Micropipette aspiration resulted in reduced membrane bleb formation in IFT88orpk cells. Following membrane blebbing, IFT88orpk cells exhibited slower reformation of the actin cortex. IFT88orpk cells showed increased actin deformability and reduced cortical tension confirming that IFT regulates actin cortex mechanics. The reduced cortical tension is also consistent with the reduced bleb formation. Conclusions This study demonstrates for the first time that the ciliary protein IFT88 regulates fundamental actin organisation and the stiffness of the actin cortex leading to alterations in cell deformation, mechanical properties and blebbing in an IFT88 chondrocyte cell line. This adds to the growing understanding of the role of primary cilia and IFT in regulating cartilage biology. PMID:26493329

  6. Modulation of Apoptosis and Differentiation by the Treatment of Sulfasalazine in Rabbit Articular Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Kil; Kang, Jin Seok

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to examine the cellular regulatory mechanisms of sulfasalazine (SSZ) in rabbit articular chondrocytes treated with sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Cell phenotype was determined, and the MTT assay, Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining of type II collagen was performed in control, SNP-treated and SNP plus SSZ (50~200 μg/mL) rabbit articular chondrocytes. Cellular proliferation was decreased significantly in the SNP-treated group compared with that in the control (p < 0.01). SSZ treatment clearly increased the SNP-reduced proliferation levels in a concentration-dependent manner (p < 0.01). SNP treatment induced significant dedifferentiation and inflammation compared with control chondrocytes (p < 0.01). Type II collagen expression levels increased in a concentration-dependent manner in response to SSZ treatment but were unaltered in SNP-treated chondrocytes (p < 0.05 and < 0.01, respectively). Cylooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression increased in a concentration-dependent manner in response to SSZ treatment but was unaltered in SNP-treated chondrocytes (p < 0.05). Immunofluorescence staining showed that SSZ treatment increased type II collagen expression compared with that in SNP-treated chondrocytes. Furthermore, phosphorylated extracellular regulated kinase (pERK) expression levels were decreased significantly in the SNP-treated group compared with those in control chondrocytes (p < 0.01). Expression levels of pERK increased in a concentration-dependent manner by SSZ but were unaltered in SNP-treated chondrocytes. pp38 kinase expression levels increased in a concentration-dependent manner by SSZ but were unaltered in control chondrocytes (p < 0.01). In summary, SSZ significantly inhibited nitric oxide-induced cell death and dedifferentiation, and regulated extracellular regulated kinases 1 and 2 and p38 kinase in rabbit articular chondrocytes. PMID:27123162

  7. Leptin Receptor Metabolism Disorder in Primary Chondrocytes from Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Girls

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yun-Jia; Yu, Hong-Gui; Zhou, Zhen-Hai; Guo, Qiang; Wang, Long-Jie; Zhang, Hong-Qi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the underlying mechanisms of low metabolic activity of primary chondrocytes obtained from girls with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS); AIS is a spine-deforming disease that often occurs in girls. AIS is associated with a lower bone mass than that of healthy individuals and osteopenia. Leptin was shown to play an important role in bone growth. It can also regulate the function of chondrocytes. Changes in leptin and Ob-R levels in AIS patients have been reported in several studies. The underlying mechanisms between the dysfunction of peripheral leptin signaling and abnormal chondrocytes remain unclear; The following parameters were evaluated in AIS patients and the control groups: total serum leptin levels; Ob-R expression in the plasma membrane of primary chondrocytes; JAK2 and STAT3 phosphorylation status. Then, we inhibited the lysosome and proteasome and knocked down clathrin heavy chain (CHC) expression in primary chondrocytes isolated from girls with AIS and evaluated Ob-R expression. We investigated the effects of leptin combined with a lysosome inhibitor or CHC knockdown in primary chondrocytes obtained from AIS patients; Compared with the controls, AIS patients showed similar total serum leptin levels, reduced JAK2 and STAT3 phosphorylation, and decreased cartilage matrix synthesis in the facet joint. Lower metabolic activity and lower membrane expression of Ob-R were observed in primary chondrocytes from the AIS group than in the controls. Lysosome inhibition increased the total Ob-R content but had no effect on the membrane expression of Ob-R or leptin’s effects on AIS primary chondrocytes. CHC knockdown upregulated the membrane Ob-R levels and enhanced leptin’s effects on AIS primary chondrocytes; The underlying mechanism of chondrocytes that are hyposensitive to leptin in some girls with AIS is low plasma membrane Ob-R expression that results from an imbalance between the rate of receptor endocytosis and the insertion of newly

  8. Modulation of Apoptosis and Differentiation by the Treatment of Sulfasalazine in Rabbit Articular Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won Kil; Kang, Jin Seok

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the cellular regulatory mechanisms of sulfasalazine (SSZ) in rabbit articular chondrocytes treated with sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Cell phenotype was determined, and the MTT assay, Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining of type II collagen was performed in control, SNP-treated and SNP plus SSZ (50~200 μg/mL) rabbit articular chondrocytes. Cellular proliferation was decreased significantly in the SNP-treated group compared with that in the control (p < 0.01). SSZ treatment clearly increased the SNP-reduced proliferation levels in a concentration-dependent manner (p < 0.01). SNP treatment induced significant dedifferentiation and inflammation compared with control chondrocytes (p < 0.01). Type II collagen expression levels increased in a concentration-dependent manner in response to SSZ treatment but were unaltered in SNP-treated chondrocytes (p < 0.05 and < 0.01, respectively). Cylooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression increased in a concentration-dependent manner in response to SSZ treatment but was unaltered in SNP-treated chondrocytes (p < 0.05). Immunofluorescence staining showed that SSZ treatment increased type II collagen expression compared with that in SNP-treated chondrocytes. Furthermore, phosphorylated extracellular regulated kinase (pERK) expression levels were decreased significantly in the SNP-treated group compared with those in control chondrocytes (p < 0.01). Expression levels of pERK increased in a concentration-dependent manner by SSZ but were unaltered in SNP-treated chondrocytes. pp38 kinase expression levels increased in a concentration-dependent manner by SSZ but were unaltered in control chondrocytes (p < 0.01). In summary, SSZ significantly inhibited nitric oxide-induced cell death and dedifferentiation, and regulated extracellular regulated kinases 1 and 2 and p38 kinase in rabbit articular chondrocytes. PMID:27123162

  9. Cyclic Equibiaxial Tensile Strain Alters Gene Expression of Chondrocytes via Histone Deacetylase 4 Shuttling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chongwei; Wei, Xiaochun; Lv, Zhi; Sun, Xiaojuan; Wang, Shaowei; Zhang, Yang; Jiao, Qiang; Wang, Xiaohu; Li, Yongping; Wei, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This paper aims to investigate whether equibiaxial tensile strain alters chondrocyte gene expression via controlling subcellular localization of histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4). Materials and Methods Murine chondrocytes transfected with GFP-HDAC4 were subjected to 3 h cyclic equibiaxial tensile strain (CTS, 6% strain at 0.25 Hz) by a Flexcell® FX-5000™ Tension System. Fluorescence microscope and western blot were used to observe subcellular location of HDAC4. The gene expression was analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. The concentration of Glycosaminoglycans in culture medium was quantified by bimethylmethylene blue dye; Collagen II protein was evaluated by western blot. Cells phenotype was identified by immunohistochemistry. Cell viability was evaluated by live-dead cell detect kit. Okadaic acid, an inhibitor of HDAC4 nuclear relocation, was used to further validate whether HDAC4 nuclear relocation plays a role in gene expression in response to tension stimulation. Results 87.5% of HDAC4 was located in the cytoplasm in chondrocytes under no loading condition, but it was relocated to the nucleus after CTS. RT-PCR analysis showed that levels of mRNA for aggrecan, collagen II, LK1 and SOX9 were all increased in chondrocytes subjected to CTS as compared to no loading control chondrocytes; in contrast, the levels of type X collagen, MMP-13, IHH and Runx2 gene expression were decreased in the chondrocytes subjected to CTS as compared to control chondrocytes. Meanwhile, CTS contributed to elevation of glycosaminoglycans and collagen II protein, but did not change collagen I production. When Okadaic acid blocked HDAC4 relocation from the cytoplasm to nucleus, the changes of the chondrocytes induced by CTS were abrogated. There was no chondrocyte dead detected in this study in response to CTS. Conclusions CTS is able to induce HDAC4 relocation from cytoplasm to nucleus. Thus, CTS alters chondrocytes gene expression in association with the relocation of HDAC4 induced

  10. Comparative potential of juvenile and adult human articular chondrocytes for cartilage tissue formation in three-dimensional biomimetic hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Smeriglio, Piera; Lai, Janice H; Dhulipala, Lakshmi; Behn, Anthony W; Goodman, Stuart B; Smith, Robert L; Maloney, William J; Yang, Fan; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of human articular cartilage is inherently limited and extensive efforts have focused on engineering the cartilage tissue. Various cellular sources have been studied for cartilage tissue engineering including adult chondrocytes, and embryonic or adult stem cells. Juvenile chondrocytes (from donors below 13 years of age) have recently been reported to be a promising cell source for cartilage regeneration. Previous studies have compared the potential of adult and juvenile chondrocytes or adult and osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes. To comprehensively characterize the comparative potential of young, old, and diseased chondrocytes, here we examined cartilage formation by juvenile, adult, and OA chondrocytes in three-dimensional (3D) biomimetic hydrogels composed of poly(ethylene glycol) and chondroitin sulfate. All three human articular chondrocytes were encapsulated in the 3D biomimetic hydrogels and cultured for 3 or 6 weeks to allow maturation and extracellular matrix formation. Outcomes were analyzed using quantitative gene expression, immunofluorescence staining, biochemical assays, and mechanical testing. After 3 and 6 weeks, juvenile chondrocytes showed a greater upregulation of chondrogenic gene expression than adult chondrocytes, while OA chondrocytes showed a downregulation. Aggrecan and type II collagen deposition and glycosaminoglycan accumulation were high for juvenile and adult chondrocytes but not for OA chondrocytes. Similar trend was observed in the compressive moduli of the cartilage constructs generated by the three different chondrocytes. In conclusion, the juvenile, adult and OA chondrocytes showed differential responses in the 3D biomimetic hydrogels. The 3D culture model described here may also provide a useful tool to further study the molecular differences among chondrocytes from different stages, which can help elucidate the mechanisms for age-related decline in the intrinsic capacity for cartilage repair. PMID:25054343

  11. FGFR1 signaling in hypertrophic chondrocytes is attenuated by the Ras-GAP neurofibromin during endochondral bone formation

    PubMed Central

    Karolak, Matthew R.; Yang, Xiangli; Elefteriou, Florent

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) signaling disrupts chondrocyte proliferation and growth plate size and architecture, leading to various chondrodysplasias or bone overgrowth. These observations suggest that the duration, intensity and cellular context of FGFR signaling during growth plate chondrocyte maturation require tight, regulated control for proper bone elongation. However, the machinery fine-tuning FGFR signaling in chondrocytes is incompletely defined. We report here that neurofibromin, a Ras-GAP encoded by Nf1, has an overlapping expression pattern with FGFR1 and FGFR3 in prehypertrophic chondrocytes, and with FGFR1 in hypertrophic chondrocytes during endochondral ossification. Based on previous evidence that neurofibromin inhibits Ras-ERK signaling in chondrocytes and phenotypic analogies between mice with constitutive FGFR1 activation and Nf1 deficiency in Col2a1-positive chondrocytes, we asked whether neurofibromin is required to control FGFR1-Ras-ERK signaling in maturing chondrocytes in vivo. Genetic Nf1 ablation in Fgfr1-deficient chondrocytes reactivated Ras-ERK1/2 signaling in hypertrophic chondrocytes and reversed the expansion of the hypertrophic zone observed in mice lacking Fgfr1 in Col2a1-positive chondrocytes. Histomorphometric and gene expression analyses suggested that neurofibromin, by inhibiting Rankl expression, attenuates pro-osteoclastogenic FGFR1 signaling in hypertrophic chondrocytes. We also provide evidence suggesting that neurofibromin in prehypertrophic chondrocytes, downstream of FGFRs and via an indirect mechanism, is required for normal extension and organization of proliferative columns. Collectively, this study indicates that FGFR signaling provides an important input into the Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK1/2 signaling axis in chondrocytes, and that this input is differentially regulated during chondrocyte maturation by a complex intracellular machinery, of which neurofibromin is a critical component. PMID:25616962

  12. FGFR1 signaling in hypertrophic chondrocytes is attenuated by the Ras-GAP neurofibromin during endochondral bone formation.

    PubMed

    Karolak, Matthew R; Yang, Xiangli; Elefteriou, Florent

    2015-05-01

    Aberrant fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) signaling disrupts chondrocyte proliferation and growth plate size and architecture, leading to various chondrodysplasias or bone overgrowth. These observations suggest that the duration, intensity and cellular context of FGFR signaling during growth plate chondrocyte maturation require tight, regulated control for proper bone elongation. However, the machinery fine-tuning FGFR signaling in chondrocytes is incompletely defined. We report here that neurofibromin, a Ras-GAP encoded by Nf1, has an overlapping expression pattern with FGFR1 and FGFR3 in prehypertrophic chondrocytes, and with FGFR1 in hypertrophic chondrocytes during endochondral ossification. Based on previous evidence that neurofibromin inhibits Ras-ERK signaling in chondrocytes and phenotypic analogies between mice with constitutive FGFR1 activation and Nf1 deficiency in Col2a1-positive chondrocytes, we asked whether neurofibromin is required to control FGFR1-Ras-ERK signaling in maturing chondrocytes in vivo. Genetic Nf1 ablation in Fgfr1-deficient chondrocytes reactivated Ras-ERK1/2 signaling in hypertrophic chondrocytes and reversed the expansion of the hypertrophic zone observed in mice lacking Fgfr1 in Col2a1-positive chondrocytes. Histomorphometric and gene expression analyses suggested that neurofibromin, by inhibiting Rankl expression, attenuates pro-osteoclastogenic FGFR1 signaling in hypertrophic chondrocytes. We also provide evidence suggesting that neurofibromin in prehypertrophic chondrocytes, downstream of FGFRs and via an indirect mechanism, is required for normal extension and organization of proliferative columns. Collectively, this study indicates that FGFR signaling provides an important input into the Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK1/2 signaling axis in chondrocytes, and that this input is differentially regulated during chondrocyte maturation by a complex intracellular machinery, of which neurofibromin is a critical component. PMID:25616962

  13. Lentiviral shRNA knockdown of ADAMTS-5 and -9 restores matrix deposition in 3D chondrocyte culture

    PubMed Central

    Coughlan, Teresa C; Crawford, Aileen; Goldring, Mary B; Hatton, Paul V; Barker, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    Aggrecan is one of the two major constituents of articular cartilage, and during diseases such as osteoarthritis (OA) it is subject to degradation by proteolytic enzymes. The primary proteases responsible for aggrecan cleavage are the aggrecanases, identified as members of the ADAMTS family of proteases, which are upregulated in response to inflammatory stimuli. It is uncertain which of the 6 aggrecanases (ADAMTS-1, -4, -5, -8, -9 and -15) are primarily responsible for the degradation of aggrecan in human cartilage. Here we show that 4 of the 6 aggrecanases are expressed in immortalized chondrocyte cell-lines and can be up-regulated in response to inflammatory cytokines. Using RNA interference, we demonstrate robust knockdown of ADAMTS-5 and -9 expression in these cells, and by culturing them on 3 dimensional scaffolds, show that reduction in expression of ADAMTS-5 enzyme results in an increase in matrix deposition. These data suggest that the quality of tissue-engineered cartilage matrix might be improved by targeted depletion of aggrecanase expression. Moreover, this work also provides further evidence that ADAMTS-5 may be a therapeutic target in the treatment of arthritic disease. PMID:20568084

  14. Loss of the mammalian DREAM complex deregulates chondrocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Forristal, Chantal; Henley, Shauna A; MacDonald, James I; Bush, Jason R; Ort, Carley; Passos, Daniel T; Talluri, Srikanth; Ishak, Charles A; Thwaites, Michael J; Norley, Chris J; Litovchick, Larisa; DeCaprio, James A; DiMattia, Gabriel; Holdsworth, David W; Beier, Frank; Dick, Frederick A

    2014-06-01

    Mammalian DREAM is a conserved protein complex that functions in cellular quiescence. DREAM contains an E2F, a retinoblastoma (RB)-family protein, and the MuvB core (LIN9, LIN37, LIN52, LIN54, and RBBP4). In mammals, MuvB can alternatively bind to BMYB to form a complex that promotes mitotic gene expression. Because BMYB-MuvB is essential for proliferation, loss-of-function approaches to study MuvB have generated limited insight into DREAM function. Here, we report a gene-targeted mouse model that is uniquely deficient for DREAM complex assembly. We have targeted p107 (Rbl1) to prevent MuvB binding and combined it with deficiency for p130 (Rbl2). Our data demonstrate that cells from these mice preferentially assemble BMYB-MuvB complexes and fail to repress transcription. DREAM-deficient mice show defects in endochondral bone formation and die shortly after birth. Micro-computed tomography and histology demonstrate that in the absence of DREAM, chondrocytes fail to arrest proliferation. Since DREAM requires DYRK1A (dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated protein kinase 1A) phosphorylation of LIN52 for assembly, we utilized an embryonic bone culture system and pharmacologic inhibition of (DYRK) kinase to demonstrate a similar defect in endochondral bone growth. This reveals that assembly of mammalian DREAM is required to induce cell cycle exit in chondrocytes. PMID:24710275

  15. Loss of the Mammalian DREAM Complex Deregulates Chondrocyte Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Forristal, Chantal; Henley, Shauna A.; MacDonald, James I.; Bush, Jason R.; Ort, Carley; Passos, Daniel T.; Talluri, Srikanth; Ishak, Charles A.; Thwaites, Michael J.; Norley, Chris J.; Litovchick, Larisa; DeCaprio, James A.; DiMattia, Gabriel; Holdsworth, David W.; Beier, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian DREAM is a conserved protein complex that functions in cellular quiescence. DREAM contains an E2F, a retinoblastoma (RB)-family protein, and the MuvB core (LIN9, LIN37, LIN52, LIN54, and RBBP4). In mammals, MuvB can alternatively bind to BMYB to form a complex that promotes mitotic gene expression. Because BMYB-MuvB is essential for proliferation, loss-of-function approaches to study MuvB have generated limited insight into DREAM function. Here, we report a gene-targeted mouse model that is uniquely deficient for DREAM complex assembly. We have targeted p107 (Rbl1) to prevent MuvB binding and combined it with deficiency for p130 (Rbl2). Our data demonstrate that cells from these mice preferentially assemble BMYB-MuvB complexes and fail to repress transcription. DREAM-deficient mice show defects in endochondral bone formation and die shortly after birth. Micro-computed tomography and histology demonstrate that in the absence of DREAM, chondrocytes fail to arrest proliferation. Since DREAM requires DYRK1A (dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated protein kinase 1A) phosphorylation of LIN52 for assembly, we utilized an embryonic bone culture system and pharmacologic inhibition of (DYRK) kinase to demonstrate a similar defect in endochondral bone growth. This reveals that assembly of mammalian DREAM is required to induce cell cycle exit in chondrocytes. PMID:24710275

  16. AUTOLOGOUS CHONDROCYTE TRANSPLANTATION-SERIES OF 3 CASES

    PubMed Central

    Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Barreto, Ronald Bispo; Pécora, José Ricardo; Rezende, Múrcia Uchõa de; Filho, Tarcisio E.P Barros; Lombello, Christiane Bertachini

    2015-01-01

    Hyaline cartilage covers joint surfaces and plays an important role in reducing friction and mechanical loading on synovial joints such as the knee. This tissue is not supplied with blood vessels, nerves or lymphatic circulation, which may be one of the reasons why joint cartilage has such poor capacity for healing. Chondral lesions that reach the subchondral bone (osteochondral lesions) do not heal and may progress to arthrosis with the passage of time. In young patients, treatment of chondral defects of the knee is still a challenge, especially in lesions larger than 4 cm. One option for treating these patients is autologous chondrocyte transplantation/implantation. Because this treatment does not violate the subchondral bone and repairs the defect with tissue similar to hyaline cartilage, it has the theoretical advantage of being more biological, and mechanically superior, compared with other techniques. In this paper, we describe our experience with autologous chondrocyte transplantation/implantation at the Institute of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Hospital das Clínicas, University of Sâo Paulo, through a report on three cases. PMID:27022579

  17. MR imaging of osteochondral grafts and autologous chondrocyte implantation

    PubMed Central

    Millington, S. A.; Szomolanyi, P.; Marlovits, S.

    2006-01-01

    Surgical articular cartilage repair therapies for cartilage defects such as osteochondral autograft transfer, autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) or matrix associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) are becoming more common. MRI has become the method of choice for non-invasive follow-up of patients after cartilage repair surgery. It should be performed with cartilage sensitive sequences, including fat-suppressed proton density-weighted T2 fast spin-echo (PD/T2-FSE) and three-dimensional gradient-echo (3D GRE) sequences, which provide good signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios. A thorough magnetic resonance (MR)-based assessment of cartilage repair tissue includes evaluations of defect filling, the surface and structure of repair tissue, the signal intensity of repair tissue and the subchondral bone status. Furthermore, in osteochondral autografts surface congruity, osseous incorporation and the donor site should be assessed. High spatial resolution is mandatory and can be achieved either by using a surface coil with a 1.5-T scanner or with a knee coil at 3 T; it is particularly important for assessing graft morphology and integration. Moreover, MR imaging facilitates assessment of complications including periosteal hypertrophy, delamination, adhesions, surface incongruence and reactive changes such as effusions and synovitis. Ongoing developments include isotropic 3D sequences, for improved morphological analysis, and in vivo biochemical imaging such as dGEMRIC, T2 mapping and diffusion-weighted imaging, which make functional analysis of cartilage possible. PMID:16802126

  18. Chondrocyte differentiation for auricular cartilage reconstruction using a chitosan based hydrogel.

    PubMed

    García-López, J; Garciadiego-Cázares, D; Melgarejo-Ramírez, Y; Sánchez-Sánchez, R; Solís-Arrieta, L; García-Carvajal, Z; Sánchez-Betancourt, J I; Ibarra, C; Luna-Bárcenas, G; Velasquillo, C

    2015-12-01

    Tissue engineering with the use of biodegradable and biocompatible scaffolds is an interesting option for ear repair. Chitosan-Polyvinyl alcohol-Epichlorohydrine hydrogel (CS-PVA-ECH) is biocompatible and displays appropriate mechanical properties to be used as a scaffold. The present work, studies the potential of CS-PVA-ECH scaffolds seeded with chondrocytes to develop elastic cartilage engineered-neotissues. Chondrocytes isolated from rabbit and swine elastic cartilage were independently cultured onto CS-PVA-ECH scaffolds for 20 days to form the appropriate constructs. Then, in vitro cell viability and morphology were evaluated by calcein AM and EthD-1 assays and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) respectively, and the constructs were implanted in nu/nu mice for four months, in order to evaluate the neotissue formation. Histological analysis of the formed neotissues was performed by Safranin O, Toluidine blue (GAG's), Verhoeff-Van Gieson (elastic fibers), Masson's trichrome (collagen) and Von Kossa (Calcium salts) stains and SEM. Results indicate appropriate cell viability, seeded with rabbit or swine chondrocyte constructs; nevertheless, upon implantation the constructs developed neotissues with different characteristics depending on the animal species from which the seeded chondrocytes came from. Neotissues developed from swine chondrocytes were similar to auricular cartilage, while neotissues from rabbit chondrocytes were similar to hyaline cartilage and eventually they differentiate to bone. This result suggests that neotissue characteristics may be influenced by the animal species source of the chondrocytes isolated. PMID:26119536

  19. Effect of Laminin-A4 inhibition on cluster formation of human osteoarthritic chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Moazedi-Fuerst, Florentine C; Gruber, Gerald; Stradner, Martin H; Guidolin, Diego; Jones, Jonathan C; Bodo, Koppany; Wagner, Karin; Peischler, Daniela; Krischan, Verena; Weber, Jennifer; Sadoghi, Patrick; Glehr, Mathias; Leithner, Andreas; Graninger, Winfried B

    2016-03-01

    Formation of chondrocyte clusters is not only a morphological sign of osteoarthritis but it is also observed in cell culture. Active locomotion of chondrocytes is controlled by integrins in vitro. Integrins bind to Laminin-A4 (LAMA4), a protein that is highly expressed in vivo in clusters of hypertrophic chondrocytes. We tested if LAMA4 is relevant for cluster formation. Human chondrocytes were cultured in a 2D matrigel model and treated with different concentrations of a monoclonal inhibitory anti-LAMA4-antibody. Migration and cluster formation was analysed using live cell imaging technique. Full genome gene expression analysis was performed to assess the effect of LAMA4 inhibition. The data set were screened for genes relevant to cell motility. F-actin staining was performed to document cytoskeletal changes. Anti-LAMA4 treatment significantly reduced the rate of cluster formation in human chondrocytes. Cells changed their surface morphology and exhibited fewer protrusions. Expression of genes associated with cellular motility and migration was affected by anti-LAMA4 treatment. LAMA4-integrin signalling affects chondrocyte morphology and gene expression in vitro, thereby contributing to cluster formation in human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:419-426, 2016. PMID:26295200

  20. Characterization of Chondrocyte Scaffold Carriers for Cell-based Gene Therapy in Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Shui, Wei; Yin, Liangjun; Luo, Jeffrey; Li, Ruidong; Zhang, Wenwen; Zhang, Jiye; Huang, Wei; Hu, Ning; Liang, Xi; Deng, Zhong-Liang; Hu, Zhenming; Shi, Lewis; Luu, Hue H.; Haydon, Rex C.; He, Tong-Chuan; Ho, Sherwin

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage lesions in the knee are common injuries. Chondrocyte transplant represents a promising therapeutic modality for articular cartilage injuries. Here, we characterize the viability and transgene expression of articular chondrocytes cultured in 3-D scaffolds provided by four types of carriers. Articular chondrocytes are isolated from rabbit knees and cultured in four types of scaffolds: type I collagen sponge, fibrin glue, hyaluronan, and Open-cell PolyLactic Acid (OPLA). The cultured cells are transduced with adenovirus expressing green fluorescence protein (AdGFP) and luciferase (AdGL3-Luc). The viability and gene expression in the chondrocytes are determined with fluorescence microscopy and luciferase assay. Cartilage matrix production is assessed by Alcian blue staining. Rabbit articular chondrocytes are effectively infected by AdGFP and exhibited sustained GFP expression. All tested scaffolds support the survival and gene expression of the infected chondrocytes. However, the highest transgene expression is observed in the OPLA carrier. At four weeks, Alcian blue-positive matrix materials are readily detected in OPLA cultures. Thus, our results indicate that, while all tested carriers can support the survival of chondrocytes, OPLA supports the highest transgene expression and is the most conductive scaffold for matrix production, suggesting that OPLA may be a suitable scaffold for cell-based gene therapy of articular cartilage repairs. PMID:23629940

  1. IL-36α: a novel cytokine involved in the catabolic and inflammatory response in chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Javier; Scotece, Morena; Abella, Vanessa; Lois, Ana; López, Verónica; García-Caballero, Tomás; Pino, Jesús; Gómez-Reino, Juan Jesús; Gómez, Rodolfo; Lago, Francisca; Gualillo, Oreste

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies confer to IL-36α pro-inflammatory properties. However, little is known about the expression and function of IL-36α in cartilage. This study sought to analyze the expression of IL-36α in healthy and OA cartilage. Next, we determined the effects of recombinant IL-36α on catabolism and inflammation in chondrocytes. For completeness, part of the signaling pathway elicited by IL-36α was also explored. IL-36α expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and RT-qPCR. Expression of MMP-13, NOS2 and COX-2 was also determined in OA articular chondrocytes treated with recombinant IL-36α. IκB-α and P-p38 was explored by western blot. We observed a low constitutive expression of IL-36α in healthy human chondrocytes. However, OA chondrocytes likely expressed more IL-36α than healthy chondrocytes. In addition, immune cells infiltrated into the joint and PBMCs express higher levels of IL-36α in comparison to chondrocytes. OA chondrocytes, treated with IL-36α, showed significant increase in the expression of MMP-13, NOS2 and COX-2. Finally, IL-36α stimulated cells showed NFκB and p38 MAPK activated pathways. IL-36α acts as a pro-inflammatory cytokine at cartilage level, by increasing the expression of markers of inflammation and cartilage catabolism. Like other members of IL-1 family, IL-36α acts through the activation of NFκB and p38 MAPK pathway. PMID:26560022

  2. Crucial Role of Elovl6 in Chondrocyte Growth and Differentiation during Growth Plate Development in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Manami; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Ishii, Kiyoaki; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Takayanagi, Misa; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    ELOVL family member 6, elongation of very long chain fatty acids (Elovl6) is a microsomal enzyme, which regulates the elongation of C12-16 saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids. Elovl6 has been shown to be associated with various pathophysiologies including insulin resistance, atherosclerosis, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. To investigate a potential role of Elovl6 during bone development, we here examined a skeletal phenotype of Elovl6 knockout (Elovl6-/-) mice. The Elovl6-/- skeleton was smaller than that of controls, but exhibited no obvious patterning defects. Histological analysis revealed a reduced length of proliferating and an elongated length of hypertrophic chondrocyte layer, and decreased trabecular bone in Elovl6-/- mice compared with controls. These results were presumably due to a modest decrease in chondrocyte proliferation and accelerated differentiation of cells of the chondrocyte lineage. Consistent with the increased length of the hypertrophic chondrocyte layer in Elovl6-/- mice, Collagen10α1 was identified as one of the most affected genes by ablation of Elovl6 in chondrocytes. Furthermore, this elevated expression of Collagen10α1 of Elovl6-null chondrocytes was likely associated with increased levels of Foxa2/a3 and Mef2c mRNA expression. Relative increases in protein levels of nuclear Foxa2 and cytoplasmic histone deacethylase 4/5/7 were also observed in Elovl6 knockdown cells of the chondrocyte lineage. Collectively, our data suggest that Elovl6 plays a critical role for proper development of embryonic growth plate. PMID:27467521

  3. Engineered cartilage using primary chondrocytes cultured in a porous cartilage-derived matrix

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Nai-Chen; Estes, Bradley T; Young, Tai-Horng; Guilak, Farshid

    2011-01-01

    Aim To investigate the cell growth, matrix accumulation and mechanical properties of neocartilage formed by human or porcine articular chondrocytes on a porous, porcine cartilage-derived matrix (CDM) for use in cartilage tissue engineering. Materials & methods We examined the physical properties, cell infiltration and matrix accumulation in different formulations of CDM and selected a CDM made of homogenized cartilage slurry as an appropriate scaffold for long-term culture of human and porcine articular chondrocytes. Results The CDM scaffold supported growth and proliferation of both human and porcine chondrocytes. Histology and immunohistochemistry showed abundant cartilage-specific macromolecule deposition at day 28. Human chondrocytes migrated throughout the CDM, showing a relatively homogeneous distribution of new tissue accumulation, whereas porcine chondrocytes tended to form a proteoglycan-rich layer primarily on the surfaces of the scaffold. Human chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds had a significantly lower aggregate modulus and hydraulic permeability at day 28. Conclusions These data show that a scaffold derived from native porcine articular cartilage can support neocartilage formation in the absence of exogenous growth factors. The overall characteristics and properties of the constructs depend on factors such as the concentration of CDM used, the porosity of the scaffold, and the species of chondrocytes. PMID:21175289

  4. Effect of epigallocatechin-3-gallate on proliferation and phenotype maintenance in rabbit articular chondrocytes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, HAOJIA; LIU, QIN; LIU, LEI; WU, HUAYU; ZHENG, LI

    2015-01-01

    In autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) to restore defective cartilage, limited cell numbers and dedifferentiation of chondrocytes are the major difficulties. An alternative is the use of growth factors, but their high cost and potential for tumorigenesis are major obstacles. To ensure successful ACI therapy, it is important to find an effective substitute pro-chondrogenic agent. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), one of the green tea catechins, has been widely investigated in studies of interleukin-1β-induced chondrocytes. In the present study, the effects of EGCG on rabbit articular chondrocytes were investigated through the examination of cell proliferation, morphology, glycosaminoglycan synthesis and cartilage-specific gene expression. The results showed that EGCG could effectively promote chondrocyte growth and enhance the secretion and synthesis of the cartilage extracellular matrix by upregulating expression levels of aggrecan, collagen II and Sox9 genes. Expression of the collagen I gene was downregulated, which showed that EGCG effectively inhibited the dedifferentiation of chondrocytes. Hypertrophy, which may lead to chondrocyte ossification, was also undetectable in the EGCG groups. In conclusion, the recommended dose of EGCG was found to be in the range of 5 to 20 μM, with the most marked response observed with 10 μM. The present study may provide a basis for the development of a novel agent as a substitute for growth factors in the treatment of articular cartilage defects. PMID:25452805

  5. Cartilage engineering using chondrocyte cell sheets and its application in reconstruction of microtia

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Libin; Ding, Ruiying; Li, Baowei; Han, Haolun; Wang, Hongnan; Wang, Gang; Xu, Bingxin; Zhai, Suoqiang; Wu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The imperfections of scaffold materials have hindered the clinical application of cartilage tissue engineering. The recently developed cell-sheet technique is adopted to engineer tissues without scaffold materials, thus is considered being potentially able to overcome the problems concerning the scaffold imperfections. This study constructed monolayer and bilayer chondrocyte cell sheets and harvested the sheets with cell scraper instead of temperature-responsive culture dishes. The properties of the cultured chondrocyte cell sheets and the feasibility of cartilage engineering using the chondrocyte cell sheets was further investigated via in vitro and in vivo study. Primary extracellular matrix (ECM) formation and type II collagen expression was detected in the cell sheets during in vitro culture. After implanted into nude mice for 8 weeks, mature cartilage discs were harvested. The morphology of newly formed cartilage was similar in the constructs originated from monolayer and bilayer chondrocyte cell sheet. The chondrocytes were located within evenly distributed ovoid lacunae. Robust ECM formation and intense expression of type II collagen was observed surrounding the evenly distributed chondrocytes in the neocartilages. Biochemical analysis showed that the DNA contents of the neocartilages were higher than native human costal cartilage; while the contents of the main component of ECM, glycosaminoglycan and hydroxyproline, were similar to native human costal cartilage. In conclusion, the chondrocyte cell sheet constructed using the simple and low-cost technique is basically the same with the cell sheet cultured and harvested in temperature-responsive culture dishes, and can be used for cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:25755694

  6. Cartilage engineering using chondrocyte cell sheets and its application in reconstruction of microtia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Libin; Ding, Ruiying; Li, Baowei; Han, Haolun; Wang, Hongnan; Wang, Gang; Xu, Bingxin; Zhai, Suoqiang; Wu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The imperfections of scaffold materials have hindered the clinical application of cartilage tissue engineering. The recently developed cell-sheet technique is adopted to engineer tissues without scaffold materials, thus is considered being potentially able to overcome the problems concerning the scaffold imperfections. This study constructed monolayer and bilayer chondrocyte cell sheets and harvested the sheets with cell scraper instead of temperature-responsive culture dishes. The properties of the cultured chondrocyte cell sheets and the feasibility of cartilage engineering using the chondrocyte cell sheets was further investigated via in vitro and in vivo study. Primary extracellular matrix (ECM) formation and type II collagen expression was detected in the cell sheets during in vitro culture. After implanted into nude mice for 8 weeks, mature cartilage discs were harvested. The morphology of newly formed cartilage was similar in the constructs originated from monolayer and bilayer chondrocyte cell sheet. The chondrocytes were located within evenly distributed ovoid lacunae. Robust ECM formation and intense expression of type II collagen was observed surrounding the evenly distributed chondrocytes in the neocartilages. Biochemical analysis showed that the DNA contents of the neocartilages were higher than native human costal cartilage; while the contents of the main component of ECM, glycosaminoglycan and hydroxyproline, were similar to native human costal cartilage. In conclusion, the chondrocyte cell sheet constructed using the simple and low-cost technique is basically the same with the cell sheet cultured and harvested in temperature-responsive culture dishes, and can be used for cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:25755694

  7. Antiangiogenic treatment delays chondrocyte maturation and bone formation during limb skeletogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Melinda; Gentili, Chiara; Koyama, Eiki; Zasloff, Michael; Pacifici, Maurizio

    2002-01-01

    Hypertrophic chondrocytes have important roles in promoting invasion of cartilage by blood vessels and its replacement with bone. However, it is unclear whether blood vessels exert reciprocal positive influences on chondrocyte maturation and function. Therefore, we implanted beads containing the antiangiogenic molecule squalamine around humeral anlagen in chick embryo wing buds and monitored the effects over time. Fluorescence microscopy showed that the drug diffused from the beads and accumulated in humeral perichondrial tissues, indicating that these tissues were the predominant targets of drug action. Diaphyseal chondrocyte maturation was indeed delayed in squalamine-treated humeri, as indicated by reduced cell hypertrophy and expression of type X collagen, transferrin, and Indian hedgehog (Ihh). Although reduced in amount, Ihh maintained a striking distribution in treated and control humeri, being associated with diaphyseal chondrocytes as well as inner perichondrial layer. These decreases were accompanied by lack of cartilage invasion and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive (TRAP+) cells and a significant longitudinal growth retardation. Recovery occurred at later developmental times, when in fact expression in treated humeri of markers such as matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) appeared to exceed that in controls. Treating primary cultures of hypertrophic chondrocytes and osteoblasts with squalamine revealed no obvious changes in cell phenotype. These data provide evidence that perichondrial tissues and blood vessels in particular influence chondrocyte maturation in a positive manner and may cooperate with hypertrophic chondrocytes in dictating the normal pace and location of the transition from cartilage to bone. PMID:11771670

  8. Prolonged Application of High Fluid Shear to Chondrocytes Recapitulates Gene Expression Profiles Associated with Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fei; Wang, Pu; Lee, Norman H.; Goldring, Mary B.; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2010-01-01

    Background Excessive mechanical loading of articular cartilage producing hydrostatic stress, tensile strain and fluid flow leads to irreversible cartilage erosion and osteoarthritic (OA) disease. Since application of high fluid shear to chondrocytes recapitulates some of the earmarks of OA, we aimed to screen the gene expression profiles of shear-activated chondrocytes and assess potential similarities with OA chondrocytes. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a cDNA microarray technology, we screened the differentially-regulated genes in human T/C-28a2 chondrocytes subjected to high fluid shear (20 dyn/cm2) for 48 h and 72 h relative to static controls. Confirmation of the expression patterns of select genes was obtained by qRT-PCR. Using significance analysis of microarrays with a 5% false discovery rate, 71 and 60 non-redundant transcripts were identified to be ≥2-fold up-regulated and ≤0.6-fold down-regulated, respectively, in sheared chondrocytes. Published data sets indicate that 42 of these genes, which are related to extracellular matrix/degradation, cell proliferation/differentiation, inflammation and cell survival/death, are differentially-regulated in OA chondrocytes. In view of the pivotal role of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the pathogenesis and/or progression of OA in vivo and regulation of shear-induced inflammation and apoptosis in vitro, we identified a collection of genes that are either up- or down-regulated by shear-induced COX-2. COX-2 and L-prostaglandin D synthase (L-PGDS) induce reactive oxygen species production, and negatively regulate genes of the histone and cell cycle families, which may play a critical role in chondrocyte death. Conclusions/Significance Prolonged application of high fluid shear stress to chondrocytes recapitulates gene expression profiles associated with osteoarthritis. Our data suggest a potential link between exposure of chondrocytes/cartilage to abnormal mechanical loading and the pathogenesis/progression of OA

  9. Effects of intermittent versus continuous parathyroid hormone administration on condylar chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qi; Wan, Qilong; Yang, Rongtao; Zhou, Haihua; Li, Zubing

    2012-07-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different PTH administration exerts different effects on condylar chondrocyte. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Intermittent PTH administration suppresses condylar chondrocyte proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Continuous PTH administration maintains condylar chondrocyte proliferating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Intermittent PTH administration enhances condylar chondrocyte differentiation. -- Abstract: Endochondral ossification is a complex process involving chondrogenesis and osteogenesis regulated by many hormones and growth factors. Parathyroid hormone (PTH), one of the key hormones regulating bone metabolism, promotes osteoblast differentiation and osteogenesis by intermittent administration, whereas continuous PTH administration inhibits bone formation. However, the effects of PTH on chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation are still unclear. In this study, intermittent PTH administration presented enhanced effects on condylar chondrocyte differentiation and bone formation, as demonstrated by increased mineral nodule formation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, up-regulated runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), ALP, collagen type X (COL10a1), collagen type I (COL1a1), osteocalcin (OCN), bone sialoprotein (BSP), bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and osterix (OSX) mRNA and/or protein expression. On the contrary, continuous PTH administration promoted condylar chondrocyte proliferation and suppressed its differentiation, as demonstrated by up-regulated collagen type II (COL2a1) mRNA expression, reduced mineral nodule formation and down-regulated expression of the mRNAs and/or proteins mentioned above. Our data suggest that PTH can regulate condylar chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation, depending on the type of PTH administration. These results provide new insight into the effects of PTH on condylar chondrocytes and new evidence for using local PTH administration to cure mandibular

  10. Viability and Regeneration of Chondrocytes after Laser Cartilage Reshaping Using 1,460 nm Diode Laser

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Ji-Hun; Kim, Ji-Sun; Lee, Jae-Wook; Chung, Phil-Sang

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Cartilage reshaping by laser irradiation is used to correct septal and auricular cartilage deformities. Chondrocyte viability following laser irradiation and reshaping has been well established. However, the regeneration process of chondrocyte after laser irradiation has not been revealed yet. The aims of this study were to determine the mechanism of cartilaginous thermal injury and the regenerative process of damaged cartilage following laser irradiation. Methods Laser irradiation was performed on human septal cartilage and rabbit auricular cartilage using a 1,460-nm diode laser. We observed change in the shape of cartilage and evaluated the extent of cartilage injury using live/dead cell assay via confocal microscopy. Hoechst and propidium iodide (PI) staining was used to evaluate the mechanism of chondrocyte injury after laser irradiation. To evaluate the regeneration of cartilage, laser irradiated cartilages were reimplanted into a subperichondrial pocket and were harvested at 1, 2, and 4 weeks after reimplantation for viability assessment and histologic examination. Results Laser irradiation using a 1,460-nm diode laser produced a marked shape change in both human septal and rabbit auricular cartilages. Thermal damage on cartilage was correlated with the exposure time and the laser power. Hoechst and PI staining showed that chondrocyte death by laser irradiation was due to mainly necrosis, rather than apoptosis. In lower power treatment group (0.3 W and 0.5 W), all the chondrocytes regenerated within 4 weeks, however, in 1 W treatment group, chondrocytes could not regenerate until 4 weeks. Conclusion Reshaping of cartilage using 1,460 nm diode laser was attained concurrently with the thermal injury to the chondrocytes. The extent of thermal damage on chondrocytes was dependent on the exposure time and the laser power and the damaged chondrocytes irradiated with lower level of laser power could be regenerated after reimplantation into

  11. A poroviscohyperelastic model for numerical analysis of mechanical behavior of single chondrocyte.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trung Dung; Oloyede, Adekunle; Gu, Yuantong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to use a poroviscohyperelastic (PVHE) model, which is developed based on the porohyperelastic (PHE) model to explore the mechanical deformation properties of single chondrocytes. Both creep and relaxation responses are investigated by using finite element analysis models of micropipette aspiration and atomic force microscopy experiments, respectively. The newly developed PVHE model is compared thoroughly with the standard neo-Hookean solid and PHE models. It has been found that the PVHE can accurately capture both creep and stress relaxation behaviors of chondrocytes better than other two models. Hence, the PVHE is a promising model to investigate mechanical properties of single chondrocytes. PMID:25588670

  12. Nuclear deformation and expression change of cartilaginous genes during in vitro expansion of chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshiba, Takashi; Yamada, Tomoe; Lu, Hongxu; Kawazoe, Naoki; Tateishi, Tetsuya; Chen, Guoping

    2008-10-03

    Cartilaginous gene expression decreased when chondrocytes were expanded on cell-culture plates. Understanding the dedifferentiation mechanism may provide valuable insight into cartilage tissue engineering. Here, we demonstrated the relationship between the nuclear shape and gene expression during in vitro expansion culture of chondrocytes. Specifically, the projected nuclear area increased and cartilaginous gene expressions decreased during in vitro expansion culture. When the nuclear deformation was recovered by cytochalasin D treatment, aggrecan expression was up-regulated and type I collagen (Col1a2) expression was down-regulated. These results suggest that nuclear deformation may be one of the mechanisms for chondrocyte dedifferentiation during in vitro expansion culture.

  13. Chondrocyte Senescence and Telomere Regulation: Implications in Cartilage Aging and Cancer (A Brief Review)

    PubMed Central

    Mollano, Anthony V; Martin, James A; Buckwalter, Joseph A

    2002-01-01

    Recent studies on osteoarthritis and the cartilage aging in our laboratory demonstrate that chronologic age correlates with molecular changes in human chondrocytes that affect cell cycle control and replicative life span. These findings indicate that age-related changes in chondrocytes may explain the heightened risk for development of primary osteoarthritis (OA) with increasing age. Concomitant studies of human chondrosarcoma suggest that these aging mechanisms may also play a role in preventing the malignant transformation of chondrocytes. The convergence at the molecular level of these seemingly dissimilar biologic processes provides an excellent opportunity to deepen our understanding of the fundamental processes underlying cartilage neoplasia, cartilage aging, and osteoarthritis. PMID:12180600

  14. Microtubules are potential regulators of growth-plate chondrocyte differentiation and hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Farquharson, C; Lester, D; Seawright, E; Jefferies, D; Houston, B

    1999-10-01

    Terminal differentiation of growth-plate chondrocytes is accompanied by the acquisition of a spherical morphology and a large increase in cell volume. These changes are likely to be associated with rearrangement of the cytoskeleton, but little information on this aspect of chondrocyte hypertrophy is available. We report a role for microtubules in the control of chondrocyte maturation and hypertrophy. Chick growth-plate chondrocytes were fractionated into five maturationally distinct populations by Percoll density gradient centrifugation, and agarose gel differential display analysis was performed. We identified a 1200 bp cDNA fragment derived from a transcript that was most highly expressed in the hypertrophic chondrocytes. After cloning and sequencing, FASTA and BLAST analysis revealed 100% identity to chick beta7-tubulin. Differential expression was confirmed in a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay using specific primers for a 343 bp fragment from the 3' untranslated region of beta7-tubulin. Beta7-tubulin was upregulated three-fold in fully hypertrophic chondrocytes compared with the other four fractions, which all had similar levels of expression. Immunocytochemical localization of beta-tubulin in chick growth-plate sections demonstrated little staining in the chondrocytes of the proliferating zone, but intense cytoplasmic staining was present in the large hypertrophic chondrocytes. In cell culture studies, the addition of colchicine (10(-6) mol/L) resulted in a higher rate of [3H]-thymidine uptake (36.0%; p < 0.001), but lower amounts of alkaline phosphatase activity (69.1%; p < 0.001), collagen (49.1%; p < 0.01), and glycosaminoglycan (43.3%; p < 0.01) accumulation within the cell-matrix layer. Further evidence for the involvement of microtubules in chondrocyte differentiation and hypertrophy was obtained by morphological assessment of colchicine-treated growth-plate explant cultures. A partial failure of chondrocyte hypertrophy was

  15. Application of 3-dimensional printing in hand surgery for production of a novel bone reduction clamp.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Sam M; Butz, Daniel R; Vevang, Curt B; Makhlouf, Mansour V

    2014-09-01

    Three-dimensional printing is being rapidly incorporated in the medical field to produce external prosthetics for improved cosmesis and fabricated molds to aid in presurgical planning. Biomedically engineered products from 3-dimensional printers are also utilized as implantable devices for knee arthroplasty, airway orthoses, and other surgical procedures. Although at first expensive and conceptually difficult to construct, 3-dimensional printing is now becoming more affordable and widely accessible. In hand surgery, like many other specialties, new or customized instruments would be desirable; however, the overall production cost restricts their development. We are presenting our step-by-step experience in creating a bone reduction clamp for finger fractures using 3-dimensional printing technology. Using free, downloadable software, a 3-dimensional model of a bone reduction clamp for hand fractures was created based on the senior author's (M.V.M.) specific design, previous experience, and preferences for fracture fixation. Once deemed satisfactory, the computer files were sent to a 3-dimensional printing company for the production of the prototypes. Multiple plastic prototypes were made and adjusted, affording a fast, low-cost working model of the proposed clamp. Once a workable design was obtained, a printing company produced the surgical clamp prototype directly from the 3-dimensional model represented in the computer files. This prototype was used in the operating room, meeting the expectations of the surgeon. Three-dimensional printing is affordable and offers the benefits of reducing production time and nurturing innovations in hand surgery. This article presents a step-by-step description of our design process using online software programs and 3-dimensional printing services. As medical technology advances, it is important that hand surgeons remain aware of available resources, are knowledgeable about how the process works, and are able to take advantage of

  16. Streptococcus pyogenes degrades extracellular matrix in chondrocytes via MMP-13

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurai, Atsuo; Okahashi, Nobuo; Maruyama, Fumito; Ooshima, Takashi; Hamada, Shigeyuki; Nakagawa, Ichiro

    2008-08-29

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) causes a wide range of human diseases, including bacterial arthritis. The pathogenesis of arthritis is characterized by synovial proliferation and the destruction of cartilage and subchondral bone in joints. We report here that GAS strain JRS4 invaded a chondrogenic cell line ATDC5 and induced the degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM), whereas an isogenic mutant of JRS4 lacking a fibronectin-binding protein, SAM1, failed to invade the chondrocytes or degrade the ECM. Reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot analysis revealed that the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 was strongly elevated during the infection with GAS. A reporter assay revealed that the activation of the AP-1 transcription factor and the phosphorylation of c-Jun terminal kinase participated in MMP-13 expression. These results suggest that MMP-13 plays an important role in the destruction of infected joints during the development of septic arthritis.

  17. Exploration of mechanisms underlying the strain-rate-dependent mechanical property of single chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Trung Dung; Gu, YuanTong

    2014-05-05

    Based on the characterization by Atomic Force Microscopy, we report that the mechanical property of single chondrocytes has dependency on the strain-rates. By comparing the mechanical deformation responses and the Young's moduli of living and fixed chondrocytes at four different strain-rates, we explore the deformation mechanisms underlying this dependency property. We found that the strain-rate-dependent mechanical property of living cells is governed by both of the cellular cytoskeleton and the intracellular fluid when the fixed chondrocytes are mainly governed by their intracellular fluid, which is called the consolidation-dependent deformation behavior. Finally, we report that the porohyperelastic constitutive material model which can capture the consolidation-dependent behavior of both living and fixed chondrocytes is a potential candidature to study living cell biomechanics.

  18. Effect of Heterotheca inuloides essential oil on rat cytoskeleton articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Flores-San Martin, Denise; Perea-Flores, María de Jesús; Morales-López, Javier; Centeno-Alvarez, Mónica María; Pérez-Ishiwara, Guillermo; Pérez-Hernández, Nury; Pérez-Hernández, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is characterised by progressive loss of articular cartilage through the increase of catabolic metalloproteinases, and chondrocyte cytoskeleton disruption has also been reported. In this regard, we studied the effect of Heterotheca inuloides essential oil (HIEO) on the distribution and immunolocalisation of actin, vimentin and tubulin of chondrocytes from cultured rat articular cartilage explants in the presence of the cytoskeleton disassembly agent acrylamide. After 48 h, chondrocytes treated with acrylamide showed changes in actin immunolocalisation and shrinkage, loss of tubulin compartmentalisation and vimentin collapse and redistribution. However, the immunostaining pattern of these three proteins in acrylamide- and HIEO-treated chondrocytes simultaneously retained their typical characteristics. These results suggest that HIEO promotes protein cytoskeleton reorganisation without providing a preventive effect of acrylamide-associated disassembly. However, it is also possible that HIEO prevents vimentin disorganisation by chemical interaction with acrylamide. PMID:24088175

  19. Mechanical overloading causes mitochondrial superoxide and SOD2 imbalance in chondrocytes resulting in cartilage degeneration.

    PubMed

    Koike, Masato; Nojiri, Hidetoshi; Ozawa, Yusuke; Watanabe, Kenji; Muramatsu, Yuta; Kaneko, Haruka; Morikawa, Daichi; Kobayashi, Keiji; Saita, Yoshitomo; Sasho, Takahisa; Shirasawa, Takuji; Yokote, Koutaro; Kaneko, Kazuo; Shimizu, Takahiko

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical stress and aging are major risk factors of cartilage degeneration. Human studies have previously reported that oxidative damage increased, while SOD2 protein was reciprocally downregulated in osteoarthritic degenerated cartilage. However, it remains unclear whether mitochondrial superoxide imbalance in chondrocytes causes cartilage degeneration. We herein demonstrate that mechanical loading promoted mitochondrial superoxide generation and selective Sod2 downregulation in chondrocytes in vivo and that mitochondrial superoxide inducer also downregulated Sod2 expression in chondrocytes in vitro. A genetically manipulated model revealed that Sod2 deficiency in chondrocytes also resulted in mitochondrial superoxide overproduction and dysfunction, thus leading to cartilage degeneration. Intra-articular injection of a permeable antioxidant effectively suppressed the mechanical loading-induced mitochondrial superoxide generation and cartilage degeneration in mice. Our findings demonstrate that mitochondrial superoxide plays a pivotal role in the development and progression of osteoarthritis, and the mitochondrial superoxide balance may therefore be a promising target for the treatment of cartilage degeneration. PMID:26108578

  20. Derivation of chondrocyte and osteoblast reporter mouse embryonic stem cell lines.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yu; Maye, Peter

    2015-01-01

    With the establishment of methods that provide evidence for the generation of chondrocyte and osteoblast cell types from ESCs, there is a need for reagents that will enable their further characterization. Here we report on the derivation of chondrocyte and osteoblast reporter ESCs from previously generated and characterized transgenic mouse lines, Collagen type 2 alpha 1(Col2a1)-ECFP, Bone Sialoprotein (BSP)-Topaz, and BSP-Topaz/Dentin Matrix Protein 1 (DMP1)-Cherry dual reporter mice. Col2a1-ECFP is highly expressed in chondrocytes, while BSP-Topaz and DMP1-Cherry are highly expressed in osteoblasts and osteocytes, respectively. These new skeletal reporter mouse ESC lines will serve as valuable reagents to investigate the functionality of ESC derived chondrocyte and osteoblast cell types. PMID:25809957

  1. Derivation of Chondrocyte and Osteoblast Reporter Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yu; Maye, Peter

    2015-01-01

    With the establishment of methods that provide evidence for the generation of chondrocyte and osteoblast cell types from ESCs, there is a need for reagents that will enable their further characterization. Here we report on the derivation of chondrocyte and osteoblast reporter ESCs from previously generated and characterized transgenic mouse lines, Collagen type 2 alpha 1(Col2a1)-ECFP, Bone Sialoprotein (BSP)-Topaz, and BSP-Topaz/Dentin Matrix Protein 1 (DMP1)-Cherry dual reporter mice. Col2a1-ECFP is highly expressed in chondrocytes, while BSP-Topaz and DMP1-Cherry are highly expressed in osteoblasts and osteocytes, respectively. These new skeletal reporter mouse ESC lines will serve as valuable reagents to investigate the functionality of ESC derived chondrocyte and osteoblast cell types. PMID:25809957

  2. Mechanical overloading causes mitochondrial superoxide and SOD2 imbalance in chondrocytes resulting in cartilage degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Koike, Masato; Nojiri, Hidetoshi; Ozawa, Yusuke; Watanabe, Kenji; Muramatsu, Yuta; Kaneko, Haruka; Morikawa, Daichi; Kobayashi, Keiji; Saita, Yoshitomo; Sasho, Takahisa; Shirasawa, Takuji; Yokote, Koutaro; Kaneko, Kazuo; Shimizu, Takahiko

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical stress and aging are major risk factors of cartilage degeneration. Human studies have previously reported that oxidative damage increased, while SOD2 protein was reciprocally downregulated in osteoarthritic degenerated cartilage. However, it remains unclear whether mitochondrial superoxide imbalance in chondrocytes causes cartilage degeneration. We herein demonstrate that mechanical loading promoted mitochondrial superoxide generation and selective Sod2 downregulation in chondrocytes in vivo and that mitochondrial superoxide inducer also downregulated Sod2 expression in chondrocytes in vitro. A genetically manipulated model revealed that Sod2 deficiency in chondrocytes also resulted in mitochondrial superoxide overproduction and dysfunction, thus leading to cartilage degeneration. Intra-articular injection of a permeable antioxidant effectively suppressed the mechanical loading-induced mitochondrial superoxide generation and cartilage degeneration in mice. Our findings demonstrate that mitochondrial superoxide plays a pivotal role in the development and progression of osteoarthritis, and the mitochondrial superoxide balance may therefore be a promising target for the treatment of cartilage degeneration. PMID:26108578

  3. Identification and characterization of the novel Col10a1 regulatory mechanism during chondrocyte hypertrophic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gu, J; Lu, Y; Li, F; Qiao, L; Wang, Q; Li, N; Borgia, J A; Deng, Y; Lei, G; Zheng, Q

    2014-01-01

    The majority of human skeleton develops through the endochondral pathway, in which cartilage-forming chondrocytes proliferate and enlarge into hypertrophic chondrocytes that eventually undergo apoptosis and are replaced by bone. Although at a terminal differentiation stage, hypertrophic chondrocytes have been implicated as the principal engine of bone growth. Abnormal chondrocyte hypertrophy has been seen in many skeletal dysplasia and osteoarthritis. Meanwhile, as a specific marker of hypertrophic chondrocytes, the type X collagen gene (COL10A1) is also critical for endochondral bone formation, as mutation and altered COL10A1 expression are often accompanied by abnormal chondrocyte hypertrophy in many skeletal diseases. However, how the type X collagen gene is regulated during chondrocyte hypertrophy has not been fully elucidated. We have recently demonstrated that Runx2 interaction with a 150-bp mouse Col10a1 cis-enhancer is required but not sufficient for its hypertrophic chondrocyte-specific reporter expression in transgenic mice, suggesting requirement of additional Col10a1 regulators. In this study, we report in silico sequence analysis of this 150-bp enhancer and identification of its multiple binding factors, including AP1, MEF2, NFAT, Runx1 and TBX5. Using this enhancer as bait, we performed yeast one-hybrid assay and identified multiple candidate Col10a1-interacting genes, including cyclooxygenase 1 (Cox-1) and Cox-2. We have also performed mass spectrometry analysis and detected EF1-alpha, Fus, GdF7 and Runx3 as components of the specific complex formed by the cis-enhancer and nuclear extracts from hypertrophic MCT (mouse chondrocytes immortalized with large T antigen) cells that express Col10a1 abundantly. Notably, some of the candidate genes are differentially expressed in hypertrophic MCT cells and have been associated with chondrocyte hypertrophy and Runx2, an indispensible Col10a1 regulator. Intriguingly, we detected high-level Cox-2 expression in

  4. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 effects on proliferation and telomerase activity in sheep growth plate chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) inhibits growth-plate chondrocyte proliferation and limits bone elongation. Gain-of-function FGFR3 mutations cause dwarfism, reduced telomerase activity and shorter telomeres in growth plate chondroyctes suggesting that FGFR3 reduces proliferative capacity, inhibits telomerase, and enhances senescence. Thyroid hormone (T3) plays a role in cellular maturation of growth plate chondrocytes and a known target of T3 is FGFR3. The present study addressed whether reduced FGFR3 expression enhanced telomerase activity, mRNA expression of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and RNA component of telomerase (TR), and chondrocyte proliferation, and whether the stimulation of FGFR3 by T3 evoked the opposite response. Results Sheep growth-plate proliferative zone chondrocytes were cultured and transfected with siRNA to reduce FGFR3 expression; FGFR3 siRNA reduced chondrocyte FGFR3 mRNA and protein resulting in greater proliferation and increased TERT mRNA expression and telomerase activity (p < 0.05). Chondrocytes treated with T3 significantly enhanced FGFR3 mRNA and protein expression and reduced telomerase activity (p < 0.05); TERT and TR were not significantly reduced. The action of T3 at the growth plate may be partially mediated through the FGFR3 pathway. Conclusions The results suggest that FGFR3 inhibits chondrocyte proliferation by down-regulating TERT expression and reducing telomerase activity indicating an important role for telomerase in sustaining chondrocyte proliferative capacity during bone elongation. PMID:23216972

  5. Lidocaine induces ROCK-dependent membrane blebbing and subsequent cell death in rabbit articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Tsutomu; Toyoda, Futoshi; Imai, Shinji; Tanigawa, Hitoshi; Kumagai, Kousuke; Matsuura, Hiroshi; Matsusue, Yoshitaka

    2016-05-01

    Local anesthetics are administered intraarticularly for pain control in orthopedic clinics and surgeries. Although previous studies have shown that local anesthetics can be toxic to chondrocytes, the underlying cellular mechanisms remain unclear. The present study investigates acute cellular responses associated with lidocaine-induced toxicity to articular chondrocytes. Rabbit articular chondrocytes were exposed to lidocaine and their morphological changes were monitored with live cell microscopy. The viability of chondrocytes was evaluated using a fluorescence based LIVE/DEAD assay. Acute treatment of chondrocytes with lidocaine (3-30 mM) induced spherical protrusions on the cell surface (so called "membrane blebbing") in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The concentration-response relationship for the lidocaine effect was shifted leftward by elevating extracellular pH, as expected for the non-ionized lidocaine being involved in the bleb formation. ROCK (Rho-kinase) inhibitors Y-27632 and fasudil completely prevented the lidocaine-induced membrane blebbing, suggesting that ROCK activation is required for bleb formation. Caspase-3 levels were unchanged by 10 mM lidocaine (p = 0.325) and a caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk did not affect the lidocaine-induced blebbing (p = 0.964). GTP-RhoA levels were significantly increased (p < 0.001), but Rho inhibitor-1 failed to suppress the membrane blebbing (p = 0.875). Lidocaine (30 mM) reduced the cell viability of isolated chondrocytes (p < 0.001) and in situ chondrocytes (p < 0.001). The chondrotoxicity was attenuated by pretreatment of cells with ROCK inhibitors or a myosin-II inhibitor blebbistatin (p < 0.001). These findings suggest that lidocaine induces ROCK-dependent membrane blebbing and thereby produces a cytotoxic effect on chondrocytes. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:754-762, 2016. PMID:26519731

  6. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes recognize and lyse chondrocytes under inflammatory, but not non-inflammatory conditions.

    PubMed

    Cohen, E Suzanne; Bodmer, Helen C

    2003-05-01

    The human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I allele HLA-B27 is strongly associated with seronegative spondyloarthropathies including ankylosing spondylitis and reactive arthritis. Although of unknown aetiology, one hypothesis suggests that a cytotoxic T cell (CTL) response against a self-antigen at sites of inflammation, such as entheses or joints may be involved. The chondrocyte is one of the major specialized cell types found both in articular cartilage and cartilaginous entheses and therefore is a possible source of such an antigen. CTL recognition of these cells is a potential mechanism for inflammation and cartilage damage, both through direct lysis of chondrocytes and the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). We test the feasibility of this hypothesis by examining the ability of chondrocytes to present antigen to CTL in vitro. Chondrocytes isolated from the ribcages of mice did not constitutively express detectable levels of MHC class I by fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis. In addition, they were resistant to lysis by alloreactive and influenza A virus nucleoprotein (NP)-specific CTL. However, treatment of chondrocytes with IFN-gamma up-regulated MHC class I expression and rendered the cells susceptible to lysis by CTL. Similarly, IFN-gamma-treated chondrocytes infected with influenza A virus were recognized by NP-specific CTL, though with variable efficiency. Thus, we suggest that under certain circumstances CTL-mediated lysis of chondrocytes is potentially a potent mechanism for cartilage damage in vivo, but that low levels of MHC class I on healthy chondrocytes protects from immune recognition in health. PMID:12709012

  7. Cryopreservation Effect on Proliferative and Chondrogenic Potential of Human Chondrocytes Isolated from Superficial and Deep Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Muiños-López, Emma; Rendal-Vázquez, Mª Esther; Hermida-Gómez, Tamara; Fuentes-Boquete, Isaac; Díaz-Prado, Silvia; Blanco, Francisco J

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the proliferative and chondrogenic potential of fresh and frozen chondrocytes isolated from superficial and deep articular cartilage biopsies. Materials and Methodology: The study included 12 samples of fresh and frozen healthy human knee articular cartilage. Cell proliferation was tested at 3, 6 and 9 days. Studies of mRNA quantification, protein expression and immunofluorescence for proliferation and chondrogenic markers were performed. Results: Stimulation of fresh and frozen chondrocytes from both superficial and deep cartilage with fetal bovine serum produced an increase in the proliferative capacity compared to the non-stimulated control group. In the stimulated fresh cells group, the proliferative capacity of cells from the deep biopsy was greater than that from cells from the superficial biopsy (0.046 vs 0.028, respectively, p<0.05). There was also a significant difference between the proliferative capacity of superficial zone fresh (0.028) and frozen (0.051) chondrocytes (p<0.05). CCND1 mRNA and protein expression levels, and immunopositivity for Ki67 revealed a higher proliferative capacity for fresh articular chondrocytes from deep cartilage. Regarding the chondrogenic potential, stimulated fresh cells showed higher SOX9 and Col II expression in chondrocytes from deep than from superficial zone (p<0.05, T student test). Conclusions: The highest rate of cell proliferation and chondrogenic potential of fresh chondrocytes was found in cells obtained from deep cartilage biopsies, whereas there were no statistically significant differences in proliferative and chondrogenic capacity between biopsy origins with frozen chondrocytes. These results indicate that both origin and cryopreservation affect the proliferative and chondrogenic potential of chondrocytes. PMID:22523526

  8. Akt-1 mediates survival of chondrocytes from endoplasmic reticulum-induced stress.

    PubMed

    Price, Jeremy; Zaidi, Asifa K; Bohensky, Jolene; Srinivas, Vickram; Shapiro, Irving M; Ali, Hydar

    2010-03-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is an evolutionary conserved adaptive mechanism that permits cells to react and adjust to conditions of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. In addition to UPR, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways protect a variety of cells from ER stress. The goal of the present study was to assess the susceptibility of chondrocytes to ER stress and to determine the signaling pathways involved in their survival. We found that low concentration of thapsigargin (10 nM) reduced the viability of a chondrocyte cell line (N1511 cells) and that these cells were approximately 100 fold more susceptible to thapsigargin-induced stress than fibroblasts. Interestingly, in thapsigargin and tunicamycin-stressed chondrocytes induction of the proapoptotic transcription factor CHOP preceded that of the anti-apoptotic BiP by 12 h. Although both of these agents caused sustained Akt and ERK phosphorylation; inhibition of Akt phosphorylation sensitized chondrocytes to ER stress, while blocking ERK signaling by U0126 had no effect. We found that Akt-1, but not Akt-2 or Akt-3, is predominantly expressed in N1511 chondrocytes. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Akt-1 sensitized chondrocytes to ER stress, which was associated with increased capsase-3 activity and decreased Bcl(XL) expression. These data suggest that under condition of ER stress, multiple signaling processes regulate chondrocyte's survival-death decisions. Thus, rapid upregulation of CHOP likely contributes to chondrocyte death, while Akt-1-mediated inactivation of caspase 3 and induction of BclXL promotes survival. PMID:20020442

  9. Stimulation by concanavalin A of cartilage-matrix proteoglycan synthesis in chondrocyte cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, W.Q.; Nakashima, K.; Iwamoto, M.; Kato, Y. )

    1990-06-15

    The effect of concanavalin A on proteoglycan synthesis by rabbit costal and articular chondrocytes was examined. Chondrocytes were seeded at low density and grown to confluency in medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum, and then the serum concentration was reduced to 0.3%. At the low serum concentration, chondrocytes adopted a fibroblastic morphology. Addition of concanavalin A to the culture medium induced a morphologic alteration of the fibroblastic cells to spherical chondrocytes and increased by 3- to 4-fold incorporation of (35S)sulfate and (3H)glucosamine into large chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan that was characteristically found in cartilage. The stimulation of incorporation of labeled precursors reflected real increases in proteoglycan synthesis, as chemical analyses showed a 4-fold increase in the accumulation of macromolecules containing hexuronic acid in concanavalin A-maintained cultures. Furthermore, the effect of concanavalin A on (35S)sulfate incorporation into proteoglycans was greater than that of various growth factors or hormones. However, concanavalin A had smaller effects on (35S)sulfate incorporation into small proteoglycans and (3H)glucosamine incorporation into hyaluronic acid and chondroitinase AC-resistant glycosaminoglycans. Since other lectins tested, such as wheat germ agglutinin, lentil lectin, and phytohemagglutinin, had little effect on (35S)sulfate incorporation into proteoglycans, the concanavalin A action on chondrocytes seems specific. Although concanavalin A decreased (3H)thymidine incorporation in chondrocytes, the stimulation of proteoglycan synthesis could be observed in chondrocytes exposed to the inhibitor of DNA synthesis, cytosine arabinoside. These results indicate that concanavalin A is a potent modulator of proteoglycan synthesis by chondrocytes.

  10. Expression of mutant cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in human chondrocytes induces the pseudoachondroplasia phenotype.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Thomas M; Alcorn, Joseph L; Haynes, Richard; Hecht, Jacqueline T

    2006-04-01

    Over 70 mutations in the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), a large extracellular pentameric glycoprotein synthesized by chondrocytes, have been identified as causing two skeletal dysplasias: multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED/EDM1), and a dwarfing condition, pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH). These mutations induce misfolding of intracellular COMP, resulting in retention of the protein in the rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER) of chondrocytes. This accumulation of COMP in the rER creates the phenotypic enlarged rER cisternae in the cells, which is believed to compromise chondrocyte function and eventually cause cell death. To study the molecular mechanisms involved with the disease, we sought to develop an in vitro model that recapitulates the PSACH phenotype. Normal human chondrocytes were transfected with wildtype (wt-) COMP or with mutant COMP (D469del; mt-) recombinant adenoviruses and grown in a nonattachment redifferentiating culture system that provides an environment allowing formation of a differentiated chondrocyte nodule. Visualization of normal cells expressing COMP suggested the hallmarks of the PSACH phenotype. Mutant COMP expressed in normal cells was retained in enlarged rER cisternae, which also retained IX collagen (COL9) and matrilin-3 (MATN3). Although these proteins were secreted normally into the ECM of the wt-COMP nodules, reduced secretion of these proteins was observed in nodules composed of cells transfected with mt-COMP. The findings complement those found in chondrocytes from PSACH patient growth plates. This new model system allows for production of PSACH chondrocyte pathology in normal costochondral chondrocytes and can be used for future mechanistic and potential gene therapy studies. PMID:16514635

  11. Inhibition of β-Catenin Signaling in Articular Chondrocytes Results in Articular Cartilage Destruction

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Mei; Chen, Mo; Zuscik, Michael; Wu, Qiuqian; Wang, Yong-Jun; Rosier, Randy N.; O’Keefe, Regis J.; Chen, Di

    2009-01-01

    Objective Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disease whose molecular mechanism is currently unknown. Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been demonstrated to play a critical role in the development and function of articular chondrocytes. To determine the role of β-catenin signaling in articular chondrocyte function, we generated Col2a1-ICAT–transgenic mice to inhibit β-catenin signaling in chondrocytes. Methods The expression of the ICAT transgene was determined by immunostaining and Western blot analysis. Histologic analyses were performed to determine changes in articular cartilage structure and morphology. Cell apoptosis was determined by TUNEL staining and the immunostaining of cleaved caspase 3 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) proteins. Expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and Bax proteins and caspase 9 and caspase 3/7 activities were examined in primary sternal chondrocytes isolated from 3-day-old neonatal Col2a1-ICAT–transgenic mice and their wild-type littermates and in primary chicken and porcine articular chondrocytes. Results Expression of the ICAT transgene was detected in articular chondrocytes of the transgenic mice. Associated with this, age-dependent articular cartilage destruction was observed in Col2a1-ICAT– transgenic mice. A significant increase in cell apoptosis in articular chondrocytes was identified by TUNEL staining and the immunostaining of cleaved caspase 3 and PARP proteins in these transgenic mice. Consistent with this, Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL expression were decreased and caspase 9 and caspase 3/7 activity were increased, suggesting that increased cell apoptosis may contribute significantly to the articular cartilage destruction observed in Col2a1-ICAT–transgenic mice. Conclusion Inhibition of β-catenin signaling in articular chondrocytes causes increased cell apoptosis and articular cartilage destruction in Col2a1-ICAT–transgenic mice. PMID:18576323

  12. Construction of 3-Dimensional Printed Ultrasound Phantoms With Wall-less Vessels.

    PubMed

    Nikitichev, Daniil I; Barburas, Anamaria; McPherson, Kirstie; Mari, Jean-Martial; West, Simeon J; Desjardins, Adrien E

    2016-06-01

    Ultrasound phantoms are invaluable as training tools for vascular access procedures. We developed ultrasound phantoms with wall-less vessels using 3-dimensional printed chambers. Agar was used as a soft tissue-mimicking material, and the wall-less vessels were created with rods that were retracted after the agar was set. The chambers had integrated luer connectors to allow for fluid injections with clinical syringes. Several variations on this design are presented, which include branched and stenotic vessels. The results show that 3-dimensional printing can be well suited to the construction of wall-less ultrasound phantoms, with designs that can be readily customized and shared electronically. PMID:27162278

  13. 3-Dimensional Terraced NAND (3D TNAND) Flash Memory-Stacked Version of Folded NAND Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoon; Cho, Seongjae; Lee, Gil Sung; Park, Il Han; Lee, Jong Duk; Shin, Hyungcheol; Park, Byung-Gook

    We propose a 3-dimensional terraced NAND flash memory. It has a vertical channel so it is possible to make a long enough channel in 1F2 size. And it has 3-dimensional structure whose channel is connected vertically along with two stairs. So we can obtain high density as in the stacked array structure, without silicon stacking process. We can make NAND flash memory with 3F2 cell size. Using SILVACO ATLAS simulation, we study terraced NAND flash memory characteristics such as program, erase, and read. Also, its fabrication method is proposed.

  14. Magnetic topologies of coronal mass ejection events: Effects of 3-dimensional reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Gosling, J.T.

    1995-09-01

    New magnetic loops formed in the corona following coronal mass ejection, CME, liftoffs provide strong evidence that magnetic reconnection commonly occurs within the magnetic ``legs`` of the departing CMEs. Such reconnection is inherently 3-dimensional and naturally produces CMEs having magnetic flux rope topologies. Sustained reconnection behind CMEs can produce a mixture of open and disconnected field lines threading the CMES. In contrast to the results of 2-dimensional reconnection. the disconnected field lines are attached to the outer heliosphere at both ends. A variety of solar and solar wind observations are consistent with the concept of sustained 3-dimensional reconnection within the magnetic legs of CMEs close to the Sun.

  15. Dosimetric Comparison Between 3-Dimensional Conformal and Robotic SBRT Treatment Plans for Accelerated Partial Breast Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Goggin, L M; Descovich, M; McGuinness, C; Shiao, S; Pouliot, J; Park, C

    2016-06-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation is an attractive alternative to conventional whole breast radiotherapy for selected patients. Recently, CyberKnife has emerged as a possible alternative to conventional techniques for accelerated partial breast irradiation. In this retrospective study, we present a dosimetric comparison between 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans and CyberKnife plans using circular (Iris) and multi-leaf collimators. Nine patients who had undergone breast-conserving surgery followed by whole breast radiation were included in this retrospective study. The CyberKnife planning target volume (PTV) was defined as the lumpectomy cavity + 10 mm + 2 mm with prescription dose of 30 Gy in 5 fractions. Two sets of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans were created, one used the same definitions as described for CyberKnife and the second used the RTOG-0413 definition of the PTV: lumpectomy cavity + 15 mm + 10 mm with prescription dose of 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions. Using both PTV definitions allowed us to compare the dose delivery capabilities of each technology and to evaluate the advantage of CyberKnife tracking. For the dosimetric comparison using the same PTV margins, CyberKnife and 3-dimensional plans resulted in similar tumor coverage and dose to critical structures, with the exception of the lung V5%, which was significantly smaller for 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, 6.2% when compared to 39.4% for CyberKnife-Iris and 17.9% for CyberKnife-multi-leaf collimator. When the inability of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to track motion is considered, the result increased to 25.6%. Both CyberKnife-Iris and CyberKnife-multi-leaf collimator plans demonstrated significantly lower average ipsilateral breast V50% (25.5% and 24.2%, respectively) than 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (56.2%). The CyberKnife plans were more conformal but less homogeneous than the 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans. Approximately 50% shorter

  16. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs protect against chondrocyte apoptotic death.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, P; Rachita, C; Aisen, P S; Pasinetti, G M

    2001-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the degradation of cartilage in osteoarthritis is characterized by chondrocyte apoptosis, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved or potential protective measures. In the present study, we used an immortalized chondrocyte cell line to explore the mechanisms of apoptotic chondrocyte cell death. We found that staurosporine-mediated chondrocyte death depended on the concentration and time of incubation, and coincided with increased Bax:Bcl-X mRNA expression, cytochrome C release, and activation of caspase-3. Pre-treatment of the cultures with nimesulide, a preferential cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor, or with ibuprofen, a non-selective COX-1/COX-2 inhibitor, protected the chondrocytes against the staurosporine-mediated nuclear damage and cell death in a concentration-dependent manner (10(-12) to 10(-6) M). Cell protection coincided with inhibition of the staurosporine-mediated induction of caspase-3 activation. Notably, the selective COX-2 inhibitor NS-398 (10(-6) M, 24 hr pre-treatment) did not protect the cells against staurosporine-mediated apoptotic death. The data suggest that nimesulide and ibuprofen, in addition to their anti-inflammatory and analgesic benefits, may also have a protective effect in osteoarthritis through the inhibition of apoptosis in chondrocytes. PMID:11296547

  17. Stimulation of chondrocyte proliferation following photothermal, thermal, and mechanical injury in ex-vivo cartilage grafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandoh, Nidhi S.; Truong, Mai T.; Diaz-Valdes, Sergio H.; Gardiner, David M.; Wong, Brian J.

    2002-06-01

    Laser irradiation may stimulate chondrocytes proliferation in the peripheral region surrounding a photothermally-heated area in rabbit nasal septal cartilage. In this study, ex- vivo rabbit nasal septal cartilages maintained in culture were irradiated with an Nd:YAG laser ((lambda) equals1.32 micrometers , 4-16 sec, 10-45 W/cm2) to examine the relationship between the diameter of replicating cells and irradiation time. Also, this study investigated whether proliferation occurs following heating (by immersion in hot saline baths, with a heated metal rod, and a soldering iron) and mechanical modification (crushing with a metal stamp and scoring with a scalpel). Replicating chondrocytes were identified using a Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) double antibody detection system in whole mount tissue. Light microscopy was used to confirm the presence of BrdU stained chondrocytes. The mechanical and thermal stressors used failed to produce a proliferative response in chondrocytes as previously seen with laser irradiation. We suspect that chondrocyte proliferation may be induced as a response to alteration in matrix structure produced by photothermal, thermal, or mechanical modification of the matrix. Heat generated by a laser to stimulate chondrocyte proliferation may lead to new treatment options for degenerative articular diseases and disorders. Laser technology can be adapted for use with minimally invasive surgical instrumentation to deliver light into otherwise inaccessible regions of the body.

  18. Chondrocyte Culture in Three Dimensional Alginate Sulfate Hydrogels Promotes Proliferation While Maintaining Expression of Chondrogenic Markers

    PubMed Central

    Mhanna, Rami; Kashyap, Aditya; Palazzolo, Gemma; Vallmajo-Martin, Queralt; Becher, Jana; Möller, Stephanie; Schnabelrauch, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The loss of expression of chondrogenic markers during monolayer expansion remains a stumbling block for cell-based treatment of cartilage lesions. Here, we introduce sulfated alginate hydrogels as a cartilage biomimetic biomaterial that induces cell proliferation while maintaining the chondrogenic phenotype of encapsulated chondrocytes. Hydroxyl groups of alginate were converted to sulfates by incubation with sulfur trioxide–pyridine complex (SO3/pyridine), yielding a sulfated material cross-linkable with calcium chloride. Passage 3 bovine chondrocytes were encapsulated in alginate and alginate sulfate hydrogels for up to 35 days. Cell proliferation was five-fold higher in alginate sulfate compared with alginate (p=0.038). Blocking beta1 integrins in chondrocytes within alginate sulfate hydrogels significantly inhibited proliferation (p=0.002). Sulfated alginate increased the RhoA activity of chondrocytes compared with unmodified alginate, an increase that was blocked by β1 blocking antibodies (p=0.017). Expression and synthesis of type II collagen, type I collagen, and proteoglycan was not significantly affected by the encapsulation material evidenced by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry. Alginate sulfate constructs showed an opaque appearance in culture, whereas the unmodified alginate samples remained translucent. In conclusion, alginate sulfate provides a three dimensional microenvironment that promotes both chondrocyte proliferation and maintenance of the chondrogenic phenotype and represents an important advance for chondrocyte-based cartilage repair therapies providing a material in which cell expansion can be done in situ. PMID:24320935

  19. Characterization of pediatric microtia cartilage: a reservoir of chondrocytes for auricular reconstruction using tissue engineering strategies.

    PubMed

    Melgarejo-Ramírez, Y; Sánchez-Sánchez, R; García-López, J; Brena-Molina, A M; Gutiérrez-Gómez, C; Ibarra, C; Velasquillo, C

    2016-09-01

    The external ear is composed of elastic cartilage. Microtia is a congenital malformation of the external ear that involves a small reduction in size or a complete absence. The aim of tissue engineering is to regenerate tissues and organs clinically implantable based on the utilization of cells and biomaterials. Remnants from microtia represent a source of cells for auricular reconstruction using tissue engineering. To examine the macromolecular architecture of microtia cartilage and behavior of chondrocytes, in order to enrich the knowledge of this type of cartilage as a cell reservoir. Auricular cartilage remnants were obtained from pediatric patients with microtia undergoing reconstructive procedures. Extracellular matrix composition was characterized using immunofluorescence and histological staining methods. Chondrocytes were isolated and expanded in vitro using a mechanical-enzymatic protocol. Chondrocyte phenotype was analyzed using qualitative PCR. Microtia cartilage preserves structural organization similar to healthy elastic cartilage. Extracellular matrix is composed of typical cartilage proteins such as type II collagen, elastin and proteoglycans. Chondrocytes displayed morphological features similar to chondrocytes derived from healthy cartilage, expressing SOX9, COL2 and ELN, thus preserving chondral phenotype. Cell viability was 94.6 % during in vitro expansion. Elastic cartilage from microtia has similar characteristics, both architectural and biochemical to healthy cartilage. We confirmed the suitability of microtia remnant as a reservoir of chondrocytes with potential to be expanded in vitro, maintaining phenotypical features and viability. Microtia remnants are an accessible source of autologous cells for auricular reconstruction using tissue engineering strategies. PMID:27566509

  20. Chondrocytes-Specific Expression of Osteoprotegerin Modulates Osteoclast Formation in Metaphyseal Bone.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baoli; Jin, Hongting; Shu, Bing; Mira, Ranim R; Chen, Di

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells/osteoblasts were originally thought to be the major player in regulating osteoclast differentiation through expressing RANKL/OPG cytokines. Recent studies have established that chondrocytes also express RANKL/OPG and support osteoclast formation. Till now, the in vivo function of chondrocyte-produced OPG in osteoclast formation and postnatal bone growth has not been directly investigated. In this study, chondrocyte-specific Opg transgenic mice were generated by using type II collagen promoter. The Col2-Opg transgenic mice showed delayed formation of secondary ossification center and localized increase of bone mass in proximal metaphysis of tibiae. TRAP staining showed that osteoclast numbers were reduced in both secondary ossification center and proximal metaphysis. This finding was further confirmed by in vitro chondrocyte/spleen cell co-culture assay. In contrast, the mineral apposition rates were not changed in Col2-Opg transgenic mice. TUNEL staining revealed more apoptotic hypertrophic chondrocytes in the growth plate of Col2-Opg mice. Flow cytometry analysis showed fewer RANK-expressing cells in the marrow of Col2a1-Opg mice, suggesting the role of OPG in blocking the differentiation of early mesenchymal progenitors into RANK-expressing pre-osteoclasts. Our results demonstrated that OPG expression in chondrocyte increases bone mass in the proximal metaphysis of tibiae through negative regulation of osteoclast formation. PMID:26329493

  1. Chondrocytes-Specific Expression of Osteoprotegerin Modulates Osteoclast Formation in Metaphyseal Bone

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baoli; Jin, Hongting; Shu, Bing; Mira, Ranim R.; Chen, Di

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells/osteoblasts were originally thought to be the major player in regulating osteoclast differentiation through expressing RANKL/OPG cytokines. Recent studies have established that chondrocytes also express RANKL/OPG and support osteoclast formation. Till now, the in vivo function of chondrocyte-produced OPG in osteoclast formation and postnatal bone growth has not been directly investigated. In this study, chondrocyte-specific Opg transgenic mice were generated by using type II collagen promoter. The Col2-Opg transgenic mice showed delayed formation of secondary ossification center and localized increase of bone mass in proximal metaphysis of tibiae. TRAP staining showed that osteoclast numbers were reduced in both secondary ossification center and proximal metaphysis. This finding was further confirmed by in vitro chondrocyte/spleen cell co-culture assay. In contrast, the mineral apposition rates were not changed in Col2-Opg transgenic mice. TUNEL staining revealed more apoptotic hypertrophic chondrocytes in the growth plate of Col2-Opg mice. Flow cytometry analysis showed fewer RANK-expressing cells in the marrow of Col2a1-Opg mice, suggesting the role of OPG in blocking the differentiation of early mesenchymal progenitors into RANK-expressing pre-osteoclasts. Our results demonstrated that OPG expression in chondrocyte increases bone mass in the proximal metaphysis of tibiae through negative regulation of osteoclast formation. PMID:26329493

  2. Chitosan Enriched Three-Dimensional Matrix Reduces Inflammatory and Catabolic Mediators Production by Human Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Oprenyeszk, Frederic; Sanchez, Christelle; Dubuc, Jean-Emile; Maquet, Véronique; Henrist, Catherine; Compère, Philippe; Henrotin, Yves

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the metabolism of human osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes encapsulated in a spherical matrix enriched of chitosan. Human OA chondrocytes were encapsulated and cultured for 28 days either in chitosan-alginate beads or in alginate beads. The beads were formed by slowly passing dropwise either the chitosan 0.6%–alginate 1.2% or the alginate 1.2% solution through a syringe into a 102 mM CaCl2 solution. Beads were analyzed histologically after 28 days. Interleukin (IL)-6 and -8, prostaglandin (PG) E2, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), hyaluronan and aggrecan were quantified directly in the culture supernatant by specific ELISA and nitric oxide (NO) by using a colorimetric method based on the Griess reaction. Hematoxylin and eosin staining showed that chitosan was homogeneously distributed through the matrix and was in direct contact with chondrocytes. The production of IL-6, IL-8 and MMP-3 by chondrocytes significantly decreased in chitosan-alginate beads compared to alginate beads. PGE2 and NO decreased also significantly but only during the first three days of culture. Hyaluronan and aggrecan production tended to increase in chitosan-alginate beads after 28 days of culture. Chitosan-alginate beads reduced the production of inflammatory and catabolic mediators by OA chondrocytes and tended to stimulate the synthesis of cartilage matrix components. These particular effects indicate that chitosan-alginate beads are an interesting scaffold for chondrocytes encapsulation before transplantation to repair cartilage defects. PMID:26020773

  3. Enhanced chondrocyte culture and growth on biologically inspired nanofibrous cell culture dishes

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Garima; Webster, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Chondral and osteochondral defects affect a large number of people in which treatment options are currently limited. Due to its ability to mimic the natural nanofibrous structure of cartilage, this current in vitro study aimed at introducing a new scaffold, called XanoMatrix™, for cartilage regeneration. In addition, this same scaffold is introduced here as a new substrate onto which to study chondrocyte functions. Current studies on chondrocyte functions are limited due to nonbiologically inspired cell culture substrates. With its polyethylene terephthalate and cellulose acetate composition, good mechanical properties and nanofibrous structure resembling an extracellular matrix, XanoMatrix offers an ideal surface for chondrocyte growth and proliferation. This current study demonstrated that the XanoMatrix scaffolds promote chondrocyte growth and proliferation as compared with the Corning and Falcon surfaces normally used for chondrocyte cell culture. The XanoMatrix scaffolds also have greater hydrophobicity, three-dimensional surface area, and greater tensile strength, making them ideal candidates for alternative treatment options for chondral and osteochondral defects as well as cell culture substrates to study chondrocyte functions. PMID:26917958

  4. Finite difference time domain model of ultrasound propagation in agarose scaffold containing collagen or chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Inkinen, Satu I; Liukkonen, Jukka; Malo, Markus K H; Virén, Tuomas; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha

    2016-07-01

    Measurement of ultrasound backscattering is a promising diagnostic technique for arthroscopic evaluation of articular cartilage. However, contribution of collagen and chondrocytes on ultrasound backscattering and speed of sound in cartilage is not fully understood and is experimentally difficult to study. Agarose hydrogels have been used in tissue engineering applications of cartilage. Therefore, the aim of this study was to simulate the propagation of high frequency ultrasound (40 MHz) in agarose scaffolds with varying concentrations of chondrocytes (1 to 32 × 10(6) cells/ml) and collagen (1.56-200 mg/ml) using transversely isotropic two-dimensional finite difference time domain method (FDTD). Backscatter and speed of sound were evaluated from the simulated pulse-echo and through transmission measurements, respectively. Ultrasound backscatter increased with increasing collagen and chondrocyte concentrations. Furthermore, speed of sound increased with increasing collagen concentration. However, this was not observed with increasing chondrocyte concentrations. The present study suggests that the FDTD method may have some applicability in simulations of ultrasound scattering and propagation in constructs containing collagen and chondrocytes. Findings of this study indicate the significant role of collagen and chondrocytes as ultrasound scatterers and can aid in development of modeling approaches for understanding how cartilage architecture affects to the propagation of high frequency ultrasound. PMID:27475127

  5. Protocatechuic acid benefits proliferation and phenotypic maintenance of rabbit articular chondrocytes: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    LUO, LIKE; WEI, QINGJUN; LIU, LEI; LIN, XIAO; LIN, CUIWU; ZHENG, LI; ZHAO, JINMIN

    2015-01-01

    Numerous antioxidants exhibit antiarthritic effects due to their inhibitory effect on inflammatory factors. Certain antioxidants, such as protocatechuic acid (PCA) and its analogs, have been reported to be effective in the treatment of arthritis. However, the effect of PCA on chondro-protection may be alleviated due to the induction of apoptosis, as has been demonstrated in stomatocytes. To clearly determine the effect of PCA on the biological and cellular metabolism of rabbit articular chondrocytes in vitro, examinations of cytotoxicity, proliferation and morphology were performed, in addition to analyses of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis and the expression of cartilage-specific genes. The results revealed that PCA effectively promoted chondrocyte growth, the synthesis of the extracellular matrix and the mRNA expression of aggrecan, collagen II and Sox9, while downregulating the expression of the collagen I gene, a marker of chondrocyte dedifferentiation. In addition, hypertrophy, which may result in chondrocyte ossification, was not detected in the groups. Among the doses (range, 0.05–0.3 mmol/l) of PCA that promoted the proliferation of chondrocytes, a concentration of 0.125 mmol/l produced the optimum performance. The results indicated that PCA, particularly at a dose of 0.125 mmol/l, accelerated the proliferation of rabbit articular chondrocytes in vitro and maintained their phenotype. This study may provide a basis for further research concerning the treatment of cartilage defects. PMID:26136906

  6. Effects of introducing cultured human chondrocytes into a human articular cartilage explant model.

    PubMed

    Secretan, Charles; Bagnall, Keith M; Jomha, Nadr M

    2010-02-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) heals poorly and effective host-tissue integration after reconstruction is a concern. We have investigated the ability of implanted chondrocytes to attach at the site of injury and to be incorporated into the decellularized host matrix adjacent to a defect in an in vitro human explant model. Human osteochondral dowels received a standardized injury, were seeded with passage 3 chondrocytes labelled with PKH 26 and compared with two control groups. All dowels were cultured in vitro, harvested at 0, 7, 14 and 28 days and assessed for chondrocyte adherence and migration into the region of decellularized tissue adjacent to the defects. Additional evaluation included cell viability, general morphology and collagen II production. Seeded chondrocytes adhered to the standardized defect and areas of lamina splendens disruption but did not migrate into the adjacent acellular region. A difference was noted in viable-cell density between the experimental group and one control group. A thin lattice-like network of matrix surrounded the seeded chondrocytes and collagen II was present. The results indicate that cultured human chondrocytes do indeed adhere to regions of AC matrix injury but do not migrate into the host tissue, despite the presence of viable cells. This human explant model is thus an effective tool for studying the interaction of implanted cells and host tissue. PMID:20012649

  7. Mutant activated FGFR3 impairs endochondral bone growth by preventing SOX9 downregulation in differentiating chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zi-Qiang; Ota, Sara; Deng, Chuxia; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Hurlin, Peter J

    2015-03-15

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) plays a critical role in the control of endochondral ossification, and bone growth and mutations that cause hyperactivation of FGFR3 are responsible for a collection of developmental disorders that feature poor endochondral bone growth. FGFR3 is expressed in proliferating chondrocytes of the cartilaginous growth plate but also in chondrocytes that have exited the cell cycle and entered the prehypertrophic phase of chondrocyte differentiation. Achondroplasia disorders feature defects in chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation, and the defects in differentiation have generally been considered to be a secondary manifestation of altered proliferation. By initiating a mutant activated knockin allele of FGFR3 (FGFR3K650E) that causes Thanatophoric Dysplasia Type II (TDII) specifically in prehypertrophic chondrocytes, we show that mutant FGFR3 induces a differentiation block at this stage independent of any changes in proliferation. The differentiation block coincided with persistent expression of SOX9, the master regulator of chondrogenesis, and reducing SOX9 dosage allowed chondrocyte differentiation to proceed and significantly improved endochondral bone growth in TDII. These findings suggest that a proliferation-independent and SOX9-dependent differentiation block is a key driving mechanism responsible for poor endochondral bone growth in achondroplasia disorders caused by mutations in FGFR3. PMID:25432534

  8. STAT1 and STAT3 do not participate in FGF-mediated growth arrest in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Krejci, Pavel; Salazar, Lisa; Goodridge, Helen S; Kashiwada, Tamara A; Schibler, Matthew J; Jelinkova, Petra; Thompson, Leslie Michels; Wilcox, William R

    2008-02-01

    Activating mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) cause several human skeletal dysplasias as a result of attenuation of cartilage growth. It is believed that FGFR3 inhibits chondrocyte proliferation via activation of signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) proteins, although the exact mechanism of both STAT activation and STAT-mediated inhibition of chondrocyte growth is unclear. We show that FGFR3 interacts with STAT1 in cells and is capable of activating phosphorylation of STAT1 in a kinase assay, thus potentially serving as a STAT1 kinase in chondrocytes. However, as demonstrated by western blotting with phosphorylation-specific antibodies, imaging of STAT nuclear translocation, STAT transcription factor assays and STAT luciferase reporter assays, FGF does not activate STAT1 or STAT3 in RCS chondrocytes, which nevertheless respond to a FGF stimulus with potent growth arrest. Moreover, addition of active STAT1 and STAT3 to the FGF signal, by means of cytokine treatment, SRC-mediated STAT activation or expression of constitutively active STAT mutants does not sensitize RCS chondrocytes to FGF-mediated growth arrest. Since FGF-mediated growth arrest is rescued by siRNA-mediated downregulation of the MAP kinase ERK1/2 but not STAT1 or STAT3, our data support a model whereby the ERK arm but not STAT arm of FGF signaling in chondrocytes accounts for the growth arrest phenotype. PMID:18198189

  9. Millimeter Wave Treatment Inhibits Apoptosis of Chondrocytes via Regulation Dynamic Equilibrium of Intracellular Free Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jinxia; Wu, Guangwen; Li, Xihai; Li, Zuanfang; Zheng, Chunsong; Liu, Xianxiang; Ye, Hongzhi

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of TNF-α-induced apoptosis of chondrocyte and the role of Ca2+ mediating the effects of MW on TNF-α-induced apoptosis of chondrocytes remained unclear. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism underlying inhibiting TNF-α-induced chondrocytes apoptosis of MW. MTT assay, DAPI, and flow cytometry demonstrated that MW significantly increased cell activity and inhibited chromatin condensation accompanying the loss of plasma membrane asymmetry and the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential. Our results also indicated that MW reduced the elevation of [Ca2+]i in chondrocytes by LSCM. Moreover, MW suppressed the protein levels of calpain, Bax, cytochrome c, and caspase-3, while the expressions of Bcl-2, collagen II, and aggrecan were increased. Our evidences indicated that MW treatment inhibited the apoptosis of chondrocytes through depression of [Ca2+]i. It also inhibited calpain activation, which mediated Bax cleavage and cytochrome c release and initiated the apoptotic execution phase. In addition, MW treatment increased the expression of collagen II and aggrecan of chondrocytes. PMID:25705239

  10. Passaged Adult Chondrocytes Can Form Engineered Cartilage with Functional Mechanical Properties: A Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kenneth W.; Lima, Eric G.; Bian, Liming; O'Conor, Christopher J.; Jayabalan, Prakash S.; Stoker, Aaron M.; Kuroki, Keiichi; Cook, Cristi R.; Ateshian, Gerard A.; Cook, James L.

    2010-01-01

    It was hypothesized that previously optimized serum-free culture conditions for juvenile bovine chondrocytes could be adapted to generate engineered cartilage with physiologic mechanical properties in a preclinical, adult canine model. Primary or passaged (using growth factors) adult chondrocytes from three adult dogs were encapsulated in agarose, and cultured in serum-free media with transforming growth factor-β3. After 28 days in culture, engineered cartilage formed by primary chondrocytes exhibited only small increases in glycosaminoglycan content. However, all passaged chondrocytes on day 28 elaborated a cartilage matrix with compressive properties and glycosaminoglycan content in the range of native adult canine cartilage values. A preliminary biocompatibility study utilizing chondral and osteochondral constructs showed no gross or histological signs of rejection, with all implanted constructs showing excellent integration with surrounding cartilage and subchondral bone. This study demonstrates that adult canine chondrocytes can form a mechanically functional, biocompatible engineered cartilage tissue under optimized culture conditions. The encouraging findings of this work highlight the potential for tissue engineering strategies using adult chondrocytes in the clinical treatment of cartilage defects. PMID:19845465

  11. Carnosol Inhibits Pro-Inflammatory and Catabolic Mediators of Cartilage Breakdown in Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes and Mediates Cross-Talk between Subchondral Bone Osteoblasts and Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Christelle; Horcajada, Marie-Noëlle; Membrez Scalfo, Fanny; Ameye, Laurent; Offord, Elizabeth; Henrotin, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of carnosol, a rosemary polyphenol, on pro-inflammatory and catabolic mediators of cartilage breakdown in chondrocytes and via bone-cartilage crosstalk. Materials and Methods Osteoarthritic (OA) human chondrocytes were cultured in alginate beads for 4 days in presence or absence of carnosol (6 nM to 9 μM). The production of aggrecan, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1, interleukin (IL)-6 and nitric oxide (NO) and the expression of type II collagen and ADAMTS-4 and -5 were analyzed. Human osteoblasts from sclerotic (SC) or non-sclerotic (NSC) subchondral bone were cultured for 3 days in presence or absence of carnosol before co-culture with chondrocytes. Chondrocyte gene expression was analyzed after 4 days of co-culture. Results In chondrocytes, type II collagen expression was significantly enhanced in the presence of 3 μM carnosol (p = 0.008). MMP-3, IL-6, NO production and ADAMTS-4 expression were down-regulated in a concentration-dependent manner by carnosol (p<0.01). TIMP-1 production was slightly increased at 3 μM (p = 0.02) and ADAMTS-5 expression was decreased from 0.2 to 9 μM carnosol (p<0.05). IL-6 and PGE2 production was reduced in the presence of carnosol in both SC and NSC osteoblasts while alkaline phosphatase activity was not changed. In co-culture experiments preincubation of NSC and SC osteoblasts wih carnosol resulted in similar effects to incubation with anti-IL-6 antibody, namely a significant increase in aggrecan and decrease in MMP-3, ADAMTS-4 and -5 gene expression by chondrocytes. Conclusions Carnosol showed potent inhibition of pro-inflammatory and catabolic mediators of cartilage breakdown in chondrocytes. Inhibition of matrix degradation and enhancement of formation was observed in chondrocytes cocultured with subchondral osteoblasts preincubated with carnosol indicating a cross-talk between these two cellular compartments, potentially

  12. Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Affects Chondrocyte Extracellular Matrix Production via an Integrin-Mediated p38 MAPK Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Xia, Peng; Ren, Shasha; Lin, Qiang; Cheng, Kai; Shen, Shihao; Gao, Mingxia; Li, Xueping

    2015-06-01

    Although low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) regulates p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and promotes cartilage repair in osteoarthritis, the role of integrin-mediated p38 MAPK in the effect of LIPUS on extracellular matrix (ECM) production of normal and OA chondrocytes remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate whether LIPUS affects ECM production in normal and OA rabbit chondrocytes through an integrin-p38 signaling pathway. A rabbit model of OA was established by anterior cruciate ligament transection, and chondrocytes were isolated from normal or OA cartilage and cultured in vitro. Chondrocytes were treated with LIPUS and then pre-incubated with the integrin inhibitor GRGDSP or the p38 inhibitor SB203580. Expression of type II collagen, MMP-13, integrin β1, p38 and phosphorylated p38 was assessed by Western blot analysis. We found that type II collagen and integrin β1 were upregulated (p < 0.05), whereas MMP-13 was downregulated (p < 0.05) in normal and OA chondrocytes. Furthermore, phosphorylated p38 was upregulated (p < 0.05) in normal chondrocytes, but downregulated (p < 0.05) in OA chondrocytes after LIPUS stimulation. Pre-incubation of chondrocytes with the integrin inhibitor disrupted the effects of LIPUS on normal and OA chondrocytes. Pre-incubation of chrondocytes with the p38 inhibitor reduced the effects of LIPUS on normal chondrocytes, but had no impact on OA chondrocytes. Our findings suggest that the integrin-p38 MAPK signaling pathway plays an important role in LIPUS-mediated ECM production in chondrocytes. PMID:25736607

  13. Differences in cartilage-forming capacity of expanded human chondrocytes from ear and nose and their gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Hellingman, Catharine A; Verwiel, Eugène T P; Slagt, Inez; Koevoet, Wendy; Poublon, René M L; Nolst-Trenité, Gilbert J; Baatenburg de Jong, Robert J; Jahr, Holger; van Osch, Gerjo J V M

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of culture-expanded human auricular and nasoseptal chondrocytes as cell source for regeneration of stable cartilage and to analyze the differences in gene expression profile of expanded chondrocytes from these specific locations. Auricular chondrocytes in monolayer proliferated less and more slowly (two passages took 26.7 ± 2.1 days and were reached in 4.37 ± 0.30 population doublings) than nasoseptal chondrocytes (19.3 ± 2.5 days; 5.45 ± 0.20 population doublings). However, auricular chondrocytes produced larger pellets with more cartilage-like matrix than nasoseptal chondrocytes (2.2 ± 0.71 vs. 1.7 ± 0.13 mm in diameter after 35 days of culture). Although the matrix formed by auricular and nasoseptal chondrocytes contained collagen X, it did not mineralize in an in vitro model or after in vivo subcutaneous implantation. A DNA microarray study on expanded auricular and nasoseptal chondrocytes from the same donors revealed 1,090 differentially expressed genes. No difference was observed in the expression of known markers of chondrogenic capacity (e.g., collagen II, FGFR3, BMP2, and ALK1). The most striking differences were that the auricular chondrocytes had a higher expression of anabolic growth factors BMP5 and IGF1, while matrix-degrading enzymes MMP13 and ADAMTS5 were higher expressed in nasoseptal chondrocytes. This might offer a possible explanation for the observed higher matrix production by auricular chondrocytes. Moreover, chondrocytes isolated from auricular or nasoseptal cartilage had specific gene expression profiles even after expansion. These differently expressed genes were not restricted to known characterization of donor site subtype (e.g., elastic), but were also related to developmental processes. PMID:21054934

  14. 3-dimensional root phenotyping with a novel imaging and software platform

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel imaging and software platform was developed for the high-throughput phenotyping of 3-dimensional root traits during seedling development. To demonstrate the platform’s capacity, plants of two rice (Oryza sativa) genotypes, Azucena and IR64, were grown in a transparent gellan gum system and ...

  15. 3-DIMENSIONAL MEASURED AND SIMULATED FLOW FOR SCOUR NEAR SPUR DIKES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To improve understanding of the flow and scour processes associated with spur dikes more fully, 3-dimensional flow velocities were measured using an acoustic Doppler velocimeter at a closely spaced grid over a fixed flat bed with a submerged spur dike. Some 2592 three-dimensional velocities around a...

  16. 3-dimensional orthodontics visualization system with dental study models and orthopantomograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hua; Ong, S. H.; Foong, K. W. C.; Dhar, T.

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a system that provides 3-dimensional visualization of orthodontic treatments. Dental plaster models and corresponding orthopantomogram (dental panoramic tomogram) are first digitized and fed into the system. A semi-auto segmentation technique is applied to the plaster models to detect the dental arches, tooth interstices and gum margins, which are used to extract individual crown models. 3-dimensional representation of roots, generated by deforming generic tooth models with orthopantomogram using radial basis functions, is attached to corresponding crowns to enable visualization of complete teeth. An optional algorithm to close the gaps between deformed roots and actual crowns by using multi-quadratic radial basis functions is also presented, which is capable of generating smooth mesh representation of complete 3-dimensional teeth. User interface is carefully designed to achieve a flexible system with as much user friendliness as possible. Manual calibration and correction is possible throughout the data processing steps to compensate occasional misbehaviors of automatic procedures. By allowing the users to move and re-arrange individual teeth (with their roots) on a full dentition, this orthodontic visualization system provides an easy and accurate way of simulation and planning of orthodontic treatment. Its capability of presenting 3-dimensional root information with only study models and orthopantomogram is especially useful for patients who do not undergo CT scanning, which is not a routine procedure in most orthodontic cases.

  17. Characterization of Students' Reasoning and Proof Abilities in 3-Dimensional Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutierrez, Angel; Pegg, John; Lawrie, Christine

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we report on a research aimed to identify and characterize secondary school students' reasoning and proof abilities when working with 3-dimensional geometric solids. We analyze students' answers to two problems asking them to prove certain properties of prisms. As results of this analysis, we get, on the one side, a characterization…

  18. 3-Dimensional and Interactive Istanbul University Virtual Laboratory Based on Active Learning Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ince, Elif; Kirbaslar, Fatma Gulay; Yolcu, Ergun; Aslan, Ayse Esra; Kayacan, Zeynep Cigdem; Alkan Olsson, Johanna; Akbasli, Ayse Ceylan; Aytekin, Mesut; Bauer, Thomas; Charalambis, Dimitris; Gunes, Zeliha Ozsoy; Kandemir, Ceyhan; Sari, Umit; Turkoglu, Suleyman; Yaman, Yavuz; Yolcu, Ozgu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a 3-dimensional interactive multi-user and multi-admin IUVIRLAB featuring active learning methods and techniques for university students and to introduce the Virtual Laboratory of Istanbul University and to show effects of IUVIRLAB on students' attitudes on communication skills and IUVIRLAB. Although…

  19. Compression regulates gene expression of chondrocytes through HDAC4 nuclear relocation via PP2A-dependent HDAC4 dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chongwei; Wei, Xiaochun; Wang, Shaowei; Jiao, Qiang; Zhang, Yang; Du, Guoqing; Wang, Xiaohu; Wei, Fangyuan; Zhang, Jianzhong; Wei, Lei

    2016-07-01

    Biomechanics plays a critical role in the modulation of chondrocyte function. The mechanisms by which mechanical loading is transduced into intracellular signals that regulate chondrocyte gene expression remain largely unknown. Histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) is specifically expressed in chondrocytes. Mice lacking HDAC4 display chondrocyte hypertrophy, ectopic and premature ossification, and die early during the perinatal period. HDAC4 has a remarkable ability to translocate between the cell's cytoplasm and nucleus. It has been established that subcellular relocation of HDAC4 plays a critical role in chondrocyte differentiation and proliferation. However, it remains unclear whether subcellular relocation of HDAC4 in chondrocytes can be induced by mechanical loading. In this study, we first report that compressive loading induces HDAC4 relocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus of chondrocytes via stimulation of Ser/Thr-phosphoprotein phosphatases 2A (PP2A) activity, which results in dephosphorylation of HDAC4. Dephosphorylated HDAC4 relocates to the nucleus to achieve transcriptional repression of Runx2 and regulates chondrocyte gene expression in response to compression. Our results elucidate the mechanism by which mechanical compression regulates chondrocyte gene expression through HDAC4 relocation from the cell's cytoplasm to the nucleus via PP2A-dependent HDAC4 dephosphorylation. PMID:27106144

  20. Biological and Chemical Removal of Primary Cilia Affects Mechanical Activation of Chondrogenesis Markers in Chondroprogenitors and Hypertrophic Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Deren, Matthew E.; Yang, Xu; Guan, Yingjie; Chen, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Chondroprogenitors and hypertrophic chondrocytes, which are the first and last stages of the chondrocyte differentiation process, respectively, are sensitive to mechanical signals. We hypothesize that the mechanical sensitivity of these cells depends on the cell surface primary cilia. To test this hypothesis, we removed the primary cilia by biological means with transfection with intraflagellar transport protein 88 (IFT88) siRNA or by chemical means with chloral hydrate treatment. Transfection of IFT88 siRNA significantly reduced the percentage of ciliated cells in both chondroprogenitor ATDC5 cells as well as primary hypertrophic chondrocytes. Cyclic loading (1 Hz, 10% matrix deformation) of ATDC5 cells in three-dimensional (3D) culture stimulates the mRNA levels of chondrogenesis marker Type II collagen (Col II), hypertrophic chondrocyte marker Type X collagen (Col X), and a molecular regulator of chondrogenesis and chondrocyte hypertrophy bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2). The reduction of ciliated chondroprogenitors abolishes mechanical stimulation of Col II, Col X, and BMP-2. In contrast, cyclic loading stimulates Col X mRNA levels in hypertrophic chondrocytes, but not those of Col II and BMP-2. Both biological and chemical reduction of ciliated hypertrophic chondrocytes reduced but failed to abolish mechanical stimulation of Col X mRNA levels. Thus, primary cilia play a major role in mechanical stimulation of chondrogenesis and chondrocyte hypertrophy in chondroprogenitor cells and at least a partial role in hypertrophic chondrocytes. PMID:26861287

  1. Fibroblast growth factor 18 increases the trophic effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on chondrocytes isolated from late stage osteoarthritic patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Wang, Yan; Li, Mingchao; Li, Jiaping; Wu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Coculture of mesenchymal stem cells with chondrocytes increases production of cartilaginous matrix. Chondrocytes isolated from late stage osteoarthritic patients usually lost their phenotype of producing cartilaginous matrix. Fibroblast growth factor 18 is believed to redifferentiate OA chondrocyte into functionally active chondrocytes. The aim of this study is to investigate the supportive effects of MSCs on OA chondrocytes and test if FGF18 could enhance the responsiveness of OA chondrocytes to the support of MSCs in a coculture system. Both pellet and transwell co-cultures were used. GAG quantification, hydroxyproline assay, and qPCR were performed. An ectopic models of cartilage formation was also applied. Our data indicated that, in pellets coculture of MSCs and OA chondrocytes, matrix production was increased in the presence of FGF18, comparing to the monoculture of chondrocytes. Results from transwell coculture study showed that expression of matrix producing genes in OA chondrocytes increased when cocultured with MSCs with FGF18 in culture medium, while hypertrophic genes were not changed by coculture. Finally, coimplantation of MSCs with OA chondrocytes produces more matrix than chondrocytes only. In conclusion, FGF18 can restore the responsiveness of OA chondrocytes to the trophic effects of MSCs. Coimplantation of MSCs and OA chondrocytes treated with FGF18 may be a good alternative cell source for regenerating cartilage tissue that is degraded during OA pathological changes. PMID:25544847

  2. Dominant roles of Fenton reaction in sodium nitroprusside-induced chondrocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Quan, Ying-Yao; Qin, Gui-Qi; Huang, Hao; Liu, Yu-Hong; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Chen, Tong-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Sodium nitroprusside (SNP) has been widely used as an exogenous nitric oxide (NO) donor to explore the molecular mechanism of NO-mediated chondrocyte apoptosis during the latest two decades. We have recently found that NO-independent ROS play a key role in SNP-induced apoptosis in rabbit chondrocytes. This study aims to investigate what kind of ROS and how the reliable ROS mediators mediate the SNP-induced apoptosis. Data shows that SNP and NO-exhausted SNP (SNPex) induced ROS production or cytotoxicity to identically degree. SNP induced a marked increase in iron ions, superoxide anion (O2(•-)), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) level. H2O2 scavenger (CAT) and (•)OH scavenger (DMSO) significantly inhibited SNP-induced chondrocyte apoptosis. Iron ions chelator (DFO) entirely prevented SNP-induced chondrocyte apoptosis. In contrast, O2(•-) scavenger (SOD) and glutathione depletion agent (BSO) promoted SNP-induced cytotoxicity. K3[Fe(CN)6] exhibited no cytotoxicity, and H2O2 alone up to 250µM or iron ions alone up to 90µM is non-cytotoxic to chondrocytes. Combination of 25µM FeSO4 and 100µM H2O2 in the presence of BSO induced chondrocyte death similar to SNP treatment. Fetal bovine serum (FBS) enhanced iron ions release from SNP and the cytotoxicity of SNP. Our data shows that the extracellular Fenton reaction between iron ions released from SNP and H2O2 induced by SNP plays a key role in SNP-induced chondrocyte apoptosis. Overall, our results indicate that the potential of SNP to increase iron ions and ROS should be especially considered for some biological functions and, possibly, also for clinical applications of this drug. PMID:26923801

  3. Gold Nanoparticles of Diameter 13 nm Induce Apoptosis in Rabbit Articular Chondrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hao; Quan, Ying-yao; Wang, Xiao-ping; Chen, Tong-sheng

    2016-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been widely used in biomedical science including antiarthritic agents, drug loading, and photothermal therapy. In this report, we studied the effects of AuNPs with diameters of 3, 13, and 45 nm, respectively, on rabbit articular chondrocytes. AuNPs were capped with citrate and their diameter and zeta potential were measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Cell viability was evaluated by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay after the rabbit articular chondrocytes were pre-incubated with 3, 13, and 45 nm AuNPs, respectively, for 24 h. Flow cytometry (FCM) analysis with annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) double staining and fluorescence imaging with Hoechst 33258 staining were used to determine the fashion of AuNPs-induced chondrocyte death. Further, 13 nm AuNPs (2 nM) significantly induced chondrocyte death accompanying apoptotic characteristics including mitochondrial damage, externalization of phosphatidylserine and nuclear concentration. However, 3 nm AuNPs (2 nM) and 45 nm (0.02 nM) AuNPs did not induce cytotoxicity in chondrocytes. Although 13 nm AuNPs (2 nM) increased the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, pretreatment with Nacetyl cysteine (NAC), a ROS scavenger, did not prevent the cytotoxicity induced by 13 nm AuNPs, indicating that 13 nm AuNPs (2 nM) induced ROS-independent apoptosis in chondrocytes. These results demonstrate the size-dependent cytotoxicity of AuNPs in chondrocytes, which must be seriously considered when using AuNPs for treatment of osteoarthritis (OA).

  4. Curcumin synergizes with resveratrol to stimulate the MAPK signaling pathway in human articular chondrocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shakibaei, Mehdi; Mobasheri, Ali; Buhrmann, Constanze

    2011-05-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway is stimulated in differentiated chondrocytes and is an important signaling cascade for chondrocyte differentiation and survival. Pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin 1β (IL-1β) play important roles in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In this study, we investigated whether curcumin and resveratrol can synergistically inhibit the catabolic effects of IL-1β, specifically the inhibition of the MAPK and subsequent apoptosis in human articular chondrocytes. Chondrocytes were either left untreated or treated with 10 ng/ml IL-1β or 1 μM U0126, a specific inhibitor of MAPK pathway alone for the indicated time periods or pre-treated with 10 μM curcumin, 10 μM resveratrol or 10 μM resveratrol and 10 μM curcumin for 4 h followed by co-treatment with 10 ng/ml IL-1β or 1 μM U0126 and 10 μM resveratrol, 10 μM curcumin or 10 μM resveratrol and 10 μM curcumin for the indicated time periods. Cultures were evaluated by immunoblotting and transmission electron microscopy. Incubation of chondrocytes with IL-1β resulted in induction of apoptosis, downregulation of β1-integrins and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2). Interestingly, U0126 induced apoptosis and blocked the above-mentioned proteins in a similar way to IL-1β. Furthermore, curcumin and resveratrol inhibited IL-1β- or U0126-induced apoptosis and downregulation of β1-integrins and Erk1/2 in human articular chondrocytes. These results suggest that combining these two natural compounds activates MEK/Erk signaling, a pathway that is involved in the maintenance of chondrocyte differentiation and survival. PMID:21484156

  5. Deformation Thresholds for Chondrocyte Death and the Protective Effect of the Pericellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Stefan A.H.; van Turnhout, Mark C.; Oomens, Cees W.J.; Erdemir, Ahmet; Ito, Keita

    2014-01-01

    In cartilage tissue engineering studies, the stimulatory effect of mechanical perturbation declines after the first 2 weeks of culture. Similarly, it is known that chondrocyte–agarose constructs should not be loaded within the first days after seeding, to prevent considerable cell death, suggesting a mechanical threshold. This study aims to establish a relationship between chondrocyte deformation and death, and to evaluate the protective effect of the pericellular matrix (PCM) that is formed in 3D cultures. Chondrocyte viability was monitored every hour for 24 h after applying a strain range of 0% to 25% to agarose constructs containing chondrocytes, cultured for 1, 3, 5, 7, or 10 days. At these culture time points, the PCM thickness and chondrocyte deformation were assessed by means of histology and assayed for biochemical contents. Inverse finite element (FE) simulations were used to evaluate the change of mechanical properties of the chondrocyte and PCM over the 10-day culture duration. Chondrocyte death was demonstrated to be dependent on both the magnitude and duration of straining. The highest cell death was observed at day 1 (43%), reducing over culture duration (15% at day 3 and 2.5% at day 10). Cell deformation at 25% compression decreased significantly over culture duration (aspect ratio of 2.24±0.67 at day 1 and 1.45±0.24 at day 3) and with increased matrix production. Inverse FE simulations showed an increasing PCM Young's modulus of 45 kPa at day 3 to 162 kPa at day 10. The current results provide evidence for a mechanical threshold for chondrocyte death and for the protective effect of the PCM. As such, these insights may help in establishing mechanical loading protocols for cartilage tissue engineering studies. PMID:24438476

  6. Effect of localization, length and orientation of chondrocytic primary cilium on murine growth plate organization.

    PubMed

    Ascenzi, Maria-Grazia; Blanco, Christian; Drayer, Ian; Kim, Hannah; Wilson, Ryan; Retting, Kelsey N; Lyons, Karen M; Mohler, George

    2011-09-21

    The research investigates the role of the immotile chondrocytic primary cilium in the growth plate. This study was motivated by (i) the recent evidence of the mechano-sensorial function of the primary cilium in kidney tubule epithelial cells and (ii) the distinct three-dimensional orientation patterns that the chondrocytic primary cilium forms in articular cartilage in the presence or the absence of loading. For our investigation, we used the Smad1/5(CKO) mutant mouse, whose disorganized growth plate is due to the conditional deletion of Smad 1 and 5 proteins that also affect the so-called Indian Hedgehog pathway, whose physical and functional topography has been shown to be partially controlled by the primary cilium. Fluorescence and confocal microscopy on stained sections visualized ciliated chondrocytes. Morphometric data regarding position, orientation and eccentricity of chondrocytes, and ciliary localization on cell membrane, length and orientation, were collected and reconstructed from images. We established that both localization and orientation of the cilium are definite, and differently so, in the Smad1/5(CKO) and control mice. The orientation of the primary cilium, relative to the major axis of the chondrocyte, clusters at 80° with respect to the anterior-posterior direction for the Smad1/5(CKO) mice, showing loss of the additional clustering present in the control mice at 10°. We therefore hypothesized that the clustering at 10° contains information of columnar organization. To test our hypothesis, we prepared a mathematical model of relative positioning of the proliferative chondrocytic population based on ciliary orientation. Our model belongs to the category of "interactive particle system models for self-organization with birth". The model qualitatively reproduced the experimentally observed chondrocytic arrangements in growth plate of each of the Smad1/5(CKO) and control mice. Our mathematically predicted cell division process will need to be

  7. Effect of localization, length and orientation of chondrocytic primary cilium on murine growth plate organization

    PubMed Central

    Ascenzi, Maria-Grazia; Blanco, Christian; Drayer, Ian; Kim, Hannah; Wilson, Ryan; Retting, Kelsey N.; Lyons, Karen M.; Mohler, George

    2011-01-01

    The research investigates the role of the immotile chondrocytic primary cilium in the growth plate. This study was motivated by (i) the recent evidence of the mechano-sensorial function of the primary cilium in kidney tubule epithelial cells; and (ii) the distinct three-dimensional orientation patterns that the chondrocytic primary cilium forms in articular cartilage in the presence or the absence of loading. For our investigation, we used the Smad1/5CKO mutant mouse, whose disorganized growth plate is due to the conditional deletion of Smad 1 and 5 proteins that also affect the so-called Indian Hedgehog pathway, whose physical and functional topography has been shown to be partially controlled by the primary cilium. Fluorescence and confocal microscopy on stained sections visualized ciliated chondrocytes. Morphometric data regarding position, orientation and eccentricity of chondrocytes, and ciliary localization on cell membrane, length and orientation, were collected and reconstructed from images. We established that both localization and orientation of the cilium are definite, and differently so, in the Smad1/5CKO and control mice. The orientation of the primary cilium, relative to the major axis of the chondrocyte, clusters at 80° with respect to the anterior-posterior direction for the Smad1/5CKO mice, showing loss of the additional clustering present in the control mice at 10°. We therefore hypothesized that the clustering at 10° contains information of columnar organization. To test our hypothesis, we prepared a mathematical model of relative positioning of the proliferative chondrocytic population based on ciliary orientation. Our model belongs to the category of “interactive particle system models for self-organization with birth”. The model qualitatively reproduced the experimentally observed chondrocytic arrangements in growth plate of each of the Smad1/5CKO and control mice. Our mathematically predicted cell division process will need to be

  8. TGF-β2 is involved in the preservation of the chondrocyte phenotype under hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Das, R; Timur, U T; Edip, S; Haak, E; Wruck, C; Weinans, H; Jahr, H

    2015-03-01

    Culturing chondrocytes under oxygen tension closely resembling their in vivo environment has been shown to have positive effects on matrix synthesis. In redifferentiation of expanded chondrocytes, hypoxia increased collagen type II expression. However, the mechanism by which hypoxia enhances redifferentiation is still unknown. We employed novel bioreactor technology to investigate the role of TGF-β, a growth factor heavily implicated in matrix production, in chondrocytes under hypoxia. Dedifferentiated chondrocytes in alginate were cultured for 48h under hypoxic (1% pO2) or normoxic (20%) conditions, using specialized bioreactor technology. Hypoxia induced gene expression (GDF1-, PHD3, HAS2, VEGF, COX2), chondrocyte markers (SOX9, COL2, COL1, AGC1 and MMP13), as well as components of the TGF-β signaling pathway (TGF-β isoforms, receptors, and downstream effectors) were analyzed by qPCR after 48h. In addition, protein expression of COL2 and TGF-β2 were evaluated. To further elucidate the involvement of the TGF-β2, we used siRNA and ALK5 inhibition. Hypoxic culture showed robust upregulation of hypoxic markers as well as upregulation of SOX9 and COL2 expression. Of all TGF-β isoforms, only TGF-β2 was upregulated under hypoxia on both gene and protein level. In addition, both type I receptors (ALK1 and ALK5) were upregulated under hypoxia, but type II and III receptors were not. TGF-β2 downregulation via siRNA abrogated the hypoxia-induced COL2 expression, as did ALK5 inhibition, giving a strong indication that this pathway is involved in chondrocyte redifferentiation under low oxygen tension. Hypoxic culture is a common approach for cartilage tissue engineering, but its underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here, we show that increased TGF-β2 signaling through ALK5 plays a role in hypoxia-induced redifferentiation of chondrocytes. PMID:25621374

  9. Dual pathways to endochondral osteoblasts: a novel chondrocyte-derived osteoprogenitor cell identified in hypertrophic cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung; Gebhardt, Matthias; Golovchenko, Svitlana; Perez-Branguli, Francesc; Hattori, Takako; Hartmann, Christine; Zhou, Xin; deCrombrugghe, Benoit; Stock, Michael; Schneider, Holm; von der Mark, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    According to the general understanding, the chondrocyte lineage terminates with the elimination of late hypertrophic cells by apoptosis in the growth plate. However, recent cell tracking studies have shown that murine hypertrophic chondrocytes can survive beyond “terminal” differentiation and give rise to a progeny of osteoblasts participating in endochondral bone formation. The question how chondrocytes convert into osteoblasts, however, remained open. Following the cell fate of hypertrophic chondrocytes by genetic lineage tracing using BACCol10;Cre induced YFP-reporter gene expression we show that a progeny of Col10Cre-reporter labelled osteoprogenitor cells and osteoblasts appears in the primary spongiosa and participates – depending on the developmental stage – substantially in trabecular, endosteal, and cortical bone formation. YFP+ trabecular and endosteal cells isolated by FACS expressed Col1a1, osteocalcin and runx2, thus confirming their osteogenic phenotype. In searching for transitory cells between hypertrophic chondrocytes and trabecular osteoblasts we identified by confocal microscopy a novel, small YFP+Osx+ cell type with mitotic activity in the lower hypertrophic zone at the chondro-osseous junction. When isolated from growth plates by fractional enzymatic digestion, these cells termed CDOP (chondrocyte-derived osteoprogenitor) cells expressed bone typical genes and differentiated into osteoblasts in vitro. We propose the Col10Cre-labeled CDOP cells mark the initiation point of a second pathway giving rise to endochondral osteoblasts, alternative to perichondrium derived osteoprogenitor cells. These findings add to current concepts of chondrocyte-osteocyte lineages and give new insight into the complex cartilage-bone transition process in the growth plate. PMID:25882555

  10. Effects of PTHrP on chondrocytes of sika deer antler.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bin; Wang, Shou-Tang; Duan, Cui-Cui; Li, Dang-Dang; Tian, Xue-Chao; Wang, Qu-Yuan; Yue, Zhan-Peng

    2013-11-01

    Parathyroid-hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) is an important regulator of chondrocyte differentiation in growth plates but little is known about its role in deer antler cartilage. The aim of the present study was to use the deer antler as a model to determine the possible role of PTHrP in regulating chondrocyte differentiation of deer antler. PTHrP and its receptor PTH1R mRNA were highly expressed in the perichondrium and cartilage of sika deer antler, as shown by in situ hybridization. Chondrocytes of deer antler were identified by toluidine blue staining of glycosaminoglycan and immunocytochemical staining of type II collagen (Col II). Treatment with PTHrP (1-34) reduced the expression of prehypertrophic chondrocyte marker Col IX and hypertrophic chondrocyte marker Col X. In order to confirm the mechanism of action of PTHrP, we initially examined the expression of cyclin D1, Bcl-2 and runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) in sika deer antler by in situ hybridization and found that cyclin D1, Runx2 and Bcl-2 mRNA were also expressed in antler chondrocytes. Exogenous PTHrP induced the expression of cyclin D1 and Bcl-2 mRNA by various signalling pathways, whereas it inhibited Runx2 expression through PKA, p38MAPK, MEK and PI3K signalling pathways. Thus, PTHrP might promote the proliferation of antler chondrocytes and prevent their differentiation; it might furthermore influence the growth and development of sika deer antler. PMID:23824099

  11. Gold Nanoparticles of Diameter 13 nm Induce Apoptosis in Rabbit Articular Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hao; Quan, Ying-Yao; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Chen, Tong-Sheng

    2016-12-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been widely used in biomedical science including antiarthritic agents, drug loading, and photothermal therapy. In this report, we studied the effects of AuNPs with diameters of 3, 13, and 45 nm, respectively, on rabbit articular chondrocytes. AuNPs were capped with citrate and their diameter and zeta potential were measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Cell viability was evaluated by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay after the rabbit articular chondrocytes were pre-incubated with 3, 13, and 45 nm AuNPs, respectively, for 24 h. Flow cytometry (FCM) analysis with annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) double staining and fluorescence imaging with Hoechst 33258 staining were used to determine the fashion of AuNPs-induced chondrocyte death. Further, 13 nm AuNPs (2 nM) significantly induced chondrocyte death accompanying apoptotic characteristics including mitochondrial damage, externalization of phosphatidylserine and nuclear concentration. However, 3 nm AuNPs (2 nM) and 45 nm (0.02 nM) AuNPs did not induce cytotoxicity in chondrocytes. Although 13 nm AuNPs (2 nM) increased the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, pretreatment with Nacetyl cysteine (NAC), a ROS scavenger, did not prevent the cytotoxicity induced by 13 nm AuNPs, indicating that 13 nm AuNPs (2 nM) induced ROS-independent apoptosis in chondrocytes. These results demonstrate the size-dependent cytotoxicity of AuNPs in chondrocytes, which must be seriously considered when using AuNPs for treatment of osteoarthritis (OA). PMID:27178054

  12. Functional Characterization of TRPV4 As an Osmotically Sensitive Ion Channel in Articular Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Mimi N.; Leddy, Holly A.; Votta, Bartholomew J.; Kumar, Sanjay; Levy, Dana S.; Lipshutz, David B.; Lee, Sukhee; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Guilak, Farshid

    2010-01-01

    Objective Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) is a Ca2+ permeable channel that can be gated by tonicity (osmolarity) and mechanical stimuli. Chondrocytes, the cells in cartilage, respond to their osmotic and mechanical environments; however, the molecular basis of this signal transduction is not fully understood. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the presence and functionality of TRPV4 in chondrocytes. Methods TRPV4 protein expression was measured by immunolabeling and Western blotting. In response to TRPV4 agonist/antagonists, osmotic stress, and interleukin-1 (IL-1), changes in Ca2+ signaling, cell volume, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production were measured in porcine chondrocytes using fluorescence microscopy, light microscopy, or immunoassay, respectively. Results TRPV4 was expressed abundantly at the RNA and protein level. Exposure to 4αPDD, a TRPV4 activator, caused Ca2+ signaling in chondrocytes, which was blocked by the selective TRPV4 antagonist, GSK205. Blocking TRPV4 diminished the chondrocytes' response to hypo-osmotic stress, reducing the fraction of Ca2+ responsive cells, regulatory volume decrease (RVD), and PGE2 production. Ca2+ signaling was inhibited by removal of extracellular Ca2+ or depletion of intracellular stores. Specific activation of TRPV4 restored defective RVD caused by IL-1. Chemical disruption of the primary cilium eliminated Ca2+ signaling in response to either 4αPDD or hypo-osmotic stress. Conclusion TRPV4 is present in articular chondrocytes, and chondrocyte response to hypo-osmotic stress is mediated by this channel, which involves both an extracellular Ca2+ and intracellular Ca2+ release. TRPV4 may also be involved in modulating the production or influence of pro-inflammatory molecules in response to osmotic stress. PMID:19790068

  13. Investigation of the Effects of Extracellular Osmotic Pressure on Morphology and Mechanical Properties of Individual Chondrocyte.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trung Dung; Oloyede, Adekunle; Singh, Sanjleena; Gu, YuanTong

    2016-06-01

    It has been demonstrated that most cells of the body respond to osmotic pressure in a systematic manner. The disruption of the collagen network in the early stages of osteoarthritis causes an increase in water content of cartilage which leads to a reduction of pericellular osmolality in chondrocytes distributed within the extracellular environment. It is therefore arguable that an insight into the mechanical properties of chondrocytes under varying osmotic pressure would provide a better understanding of chondrocyte mechanotransduction and potentially contribute to knowledge on cartilage degeneration. In this present study, the chondrocyte cells were exposed to solutions with different osmolality. Changes in their dimensions and mechanical properties were measured over time. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to apply load at various strain-rates and the force-time curves were logged. The thin-layer elastic model was used to extract the elastic stiffness of chondrocytes at different strain-rates and at different solution osmolality. In addition, the porohyperelastic (PHE) model was used to investigate the strain-rate-dependent responses under the loading and osmotic pressure conditions. The results revealed that the hypo-osmotic external environment increased chondrocyte dimensions and reduced Young's modulus of the cells at all strain-rates tested. In contrast, the hyper-osmotic external environment reduced dimensions and increased Young's modulus. Moreover, using the PHE model coupled with inverse FEA simulation, we established that the hydraulic permeability of chondrocytes increased with decreasing extracellular osmolality which is consistent with previous work in the literature. This could be due to a higher intracellular fluid volume fraction with lower osmolality. PMID:26831866

  14. Fibroblast Growth Factor–2 Promotes Catabolism Via FGFR1–Ras–Raf–MEK1/2–ERK1/2 Axis That Coordinates With the PKCδ Pathway in Human Articular Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Dongyao; Chen, Di; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) has been found to play an anti-anabolic and/or a catabolic role in adult human articular cartilage via regulation of multiple signaling pathways. Upon FGF-2 stimulation, a molecular crosstalk between the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) and protein kinase C δ (PKCδ) pathways are initiated, where PKCδ positively regulates downstream MAPK signaling. In this study, we explored the relationship between fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1), Ras, and PKCδ in FGF-2 signaling in human articular chondrocytes. Pathway-specific inhibition using both chemical inhibitors and siRNA targeting FGFR1 demonstrated that, upon FGF-2 stimulation, FGFR1 controlled both Ras and PKCδ activation, which converged on the Raf-MEK1/2-ERK1/2 axis. No crosstalk was observed between Ras and PKCδ. Quantitative PCR analyses revealed that both Ras and PKCδ contributed to FGF-2-mediated upregulation of MMP-13, ADAMTS5, and repression of aggrecan gene. Correspondingly, FGF-2-mediated proteoglycan loss was effectively reversed by individual pathway-specific inhibitor of Ras, PKCδ, and ERK1/2 in both 3-dimensional alginate bead culture and cartilage organ culture systems. Our findings suggest that FGFR1 interacts with FGF-2 and then activates Ras and PKCδ, which concertedly drive MAPK signaling to mediate biological effects of FGF-2. Such an integration of dual inputs constitutes a novel mechanism of FGF-2 signaling cascade in human articular chondrocytes. PMID:22488450

  15. Continuous infusion of angiotensin II modulates hypertrophic differentiation and apoptosis of chondrocytes in cartilage formation in a fracture model mouse.

    PubMed

    Kawahata, Hirohisa; Sotobayashi, Daisuke; Aoki, Motokuni; Shimizu, Hideo; Nakagami, Hironori; Ogihara, Toshio; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2015-06-01

    Although components of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) are reported to be expressed in cultured chondrocytes and cartilage, little is known about the precise function of Angiotensin II (Ang II) in chondrocytes. In this study, we employed a rib fracture model mouse to investigate the effect of Ang II on chondrocytes. Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R) was expressed in chondrocytes in the growth plate of mouse tibia. Continuous infusion of Ang II to rib-fractured mice resulted in a significant increase in the volume of cartilage, suggesting Ang II-induced hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes. It was also confirmed by a significant increase in the mRNA expression of Sox9 and runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), which are genes related to chondrocyte differentiation, and type X collagen, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 and Indian hedgehog (Ihh), which are hypertrophic chondrocyte-specific molecular markers. Chondrocyte hypertrophy with upregulation of these genes was attenuated by administration of olmesartan, an AT1R blocker, but not by hydralazine. Moreover, Ang II infusion significantly suppressed apoptosis of chondrocytes, accompanied by significant induction of mRNA expression of bcl-2 and bcl-xL. Olmesartan, but not hydralazine, significantly attenuated the reduction of apoptotic cells and the increase in anti-apoptotic genes induced by Ang II infusion. Overall, the present study demonstrated that Ang II promoted hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes and reduced apoptosis of hypertrophic chondrocytes independently of high blood pressure. The present data indicate the role of Ang II in cartilage, and might provide a new concept for treatment of cartilage diseases. PMID:25693858

  16. Human fetal and adult chondrocytes. Effect of insulinlike growth factors I and II, insulin, and growth hormone on clonal growth.

    PubMed Central

    Vetter, U; Zapf, J; Heit, W; Helbing, G; Heinze, E; Froesch, E R; Teller, W M

    1986-01-01

    Clonal proliferation of freshly isolated human fetal chondrocytes and adult chondrocytes in response to human insulinlike growth factors I and II (IGF I, IGF II), human biosynthetic insulin, and human growth hormone (GH) was assessed. IGF I (25 ng/ml) stimulated clonal growth of fetal chondrocytes (54 +/- 12 colonies/1,000 inserted cells, mean +/- 1 SD), but IGF II (25 ng/ml) was significantly more effective (106 +/- 12 colonies/1,000 inserted cells, P less than 0.05, unstimulated control: 14 +/- 4 colonies/1,000 inserted cells). In contrast, IGF I (25 ng/ml) was more effective in adult chondrocytes (42 +/- 6 colonies/1,000 inserted cells) than IGF II (25 ng/ml) (21 +/- 6 colonies/1,000 inserted cells; P less than 0.05, unstimulated control: 6 +/- 3 colonies/1,000 inserted cells). GH and human biosynthetic insulin did not affect clonal growth of fetal or adult chondrocytes. The clonal growth pattern of IGF-stimulated fetal and adult chondrocytes was not significantly changed when chondrocytes were first grown in monolayer culture, harvested, and then inserted in the clonal culture system. However, the adult chondrocytes showed a time-dependent decrease of stimulation of clonal growth by IGF I and II. This was not true for fetal chondrocytes. The results are compatible with the concept that IGF II is a more potent stimulant of clonal growth of chondrocytes during fetal life, whereas IGF I is more effective in stimulating clonal growth of chondrocytes during postnatal life. Images PMID:3519682

  17. Detecting new microRNAs in human osteoarthritic chondrocytes identifies miR-3085 as a human, chondrocyte-selective, microRNA

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, N.; Swingler, T.E.; Le, L.T.T.; Barter, M.J.; Wheeler, G.; Pais, H.; Donell, S.T.; Young, D.A.; Dalmay, T.; Clark, I.M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective To use deep sequencing to identify novel microRNAs (miRNAs) in human osteoarthritic cartilage which have a functional role in chondrocyte phenotype or function. Design A small RNA library was prepared from human osteoarthritic primary chondrocytes using in-house adaptors and analysed by Illumina sequencing. Novel candidate miRNAs were validated by northern blot and qRT-PCR. Expression was measured in cartilage models. Targets of novel candidates were identified by microarray and computational analysis, validated using 3′-UTR-luciferase reporter plasmids. Protein levels were assessed by western blot and functional analysis by cell adhesion. Results We identified 990 known miRNAs and 1621 potential novel miRNAs in human osteoarthritic chondrocytes, 60 of the latter were expressed in all samples assayed. MicroRNA-140-3p was the most highly expressed microRNA in osteoarthritic cartilage. Sixteen novel candidate miRNAs were analysed further, of which six remained after northern blot analysis. Three novel miRNAs were regulated across models of chondrogenesis, chondrocyte differentiation or cartilage injury. One sequence (novel #11), annotated in rodents as microRNA-3085-3p, was preferentially expressed in cartilage, dependent on chondrocyte differentiation and, in man, is located in an intron of the cartilage-expressed gene CRTAC-1. This microRNA was shown to target the ITGA5 gene directly (which encodes integrin alpha5) and inhibited adhesion to fibronectin (dependent on alpha5beta1 integrin). Conclusion Deep sequencing has uncovered many potential microRNA candidates expressed in human cartilage. At least three of these show potential functional interest in cartilage homeostasis and osteoarthritis (OA). Particularly, novel #11 (microRNA-3085-3p) which has been identified for the first time in man. PMID:26497608

  18. The life cycle of chondrocytes in the developing skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Shum, Lillian; Nuckolls, Glen

    2002-01-01

    Cartilage serves multiple functions in the developing embryo and in postnatal life. Genetic mutations affecting cartilage development are relatively common and lead to skeletal malformations, dysfunction or increased susceptibility to disease or injury. Characterization of these mutations and investigation of the molecular pathways in which these genes function have contributed to an understanding of the mechanisms regulating skeletal patterning, chondrogenesis, endochondral ossification and joint formation. Extracellular growth and differentiation factors including bone morphogenetic proteins, fibroblast growth factors, parathyroid hormone-related peptide, extracellular matrix components, and members of the hedgehog and Wnt families provide important signals for the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Transduction of these signals within the developing mesenchymal cells and chondrocytes results in changes in gene expression mediated by transcription factors including Smads, Msx2, Sox9, signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT), and core-binding factor alpha 1. Further investigation of the interactions of these signaling pathways will contribute to an understanding of cartilage growth and development, and will allow for the development of strategies for the early detection, prevention and treatment of diseases and disorders affecting the skeleton. PMID:11879545

  19. Growth factor effects on costal chondrocytes for tissue engineering fibrocartilage.

    PubMed

    Johns, D E; Athanasiou, K A

    2008-09-01

    Tissue-engineered fibrocartilage could become a feasible option for replacing tissues such as the knee meniscus or temporomandibular joint disc. This study employed five growth factors (insulin-like growth factor-I, transforming growth factor-beta1, epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor-BB, and basic fibroblast growth factor) in a scaffoldless approach with costal chondrocytes, attempting to improve biochemical and mechanical properties of engineered constructs. Samples were quantitatively assessed for total collagen, glycosaminoglycans, collagen type I, collagen type II, cells, compressive properties, and tensile properties at two time points. Most treated constructs had lower biomechanical and biochemical properties than the controls with no growth factors, suggesting a detrimental effect, but the treatment with insulin-like growth factor-I tended to improve the constructs. Additionally, the 6-week time point was consistently better than that at 3 weeks, with total collagen, glycosaminoglycans, and aggregate modulus doubling during this time. Further optimization of the time in culture and exogenous stimuli will be important in making a more functional replacement tissue. PMID:18597118

  20. Biocompatibility of polysebacic anhydride microparticles with chondrocytes in engineered cartilage.

    PubMed

    Ponnurangam, Sathish; O'Connell, Grace D; Hung, Clark T; Somasundaran, Ponisseril

    2015-12-01

    One of main challenges in developing clinically relevant engineered cartilage is overcoming limited nutrient diffusion due to progressive elaboration of extracellular matrix at the periphery of the construct. Macro-channels have been used to decrease the nutrient path-length; however, the channels become occluded with matrix within weeks in culture, reducing nutrient diffusion. Alternatively, microparticles can be imbedded throughout the scaffold to provide localized nutrient delivery. In this study, we evaluated biocompatibility of polysebacic anhydride (PSA) polymers and the effectiveness of PSA-based microparticles for short-term delivery of nutrients in engineered cartilage. PSA-based microparticles were biocompatible with juvenile bovine chondrocytes for concentrations up to 2mg/mL; however, cytotoxicity was observed at 20mg/mL. Cytotoxicity at high concentrations is likely due to intracellular accumulation of PSA degradation products and resulting lipotoxicity. Cytotoxicity of PSA was partially reversed in the presence of bovine serum albumin. In conclusion, the findings from this study demonstrate concentration-dependent biocompatibility of PSA-based microparticles and potential application as a nutrient delivery vehicle that can be imbedded in scaffolds for tissue engineering. PMID:26398146

  1. Obesity affects the chondrocyte responsiveness to leptin in patients with osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Increasing evidence support the regulatory role of leptin in osteoarthritis (OA). As high circulating concentrations of leptin disrupt the physiological function of the adipokine in obese individuals, the current study has been undertaken to determine whether the elevated levels of leptin found in the joint from obese OA patients also induce changes in the chondrocyte response to leptin. Methods Chondrocytes isolated from OA patients with various body mass index (BMI) were treated with 20, 100 or 500 ng/ml of leptin. The expression of cartilage-specific components (aggrecan, type 2 collagen), as well as regulatory (IGF-1, TGFβ, MMP-13, TIMP 2) or inflammatory (COX-2, iNOS, IL-1) factors was investigated by real-time PCR to evaluate chondrocyte responsiveness to leptin. Furthermore, the effect of body mass index (BMI) on leptin signalling pathways was analyzed with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for STATs activation. Results Leptin at 20 ng/ml was unable to modulate gene expression in chondrocytes, except for MMP-13 in obese OA patients. Higher leptin levels induced the expression of IGF-1, type 2 collagen, TIMP-2 and MMP-13. However, the activity of the adipokine was shown to be critically dependent on both the concentration and the BMI of the patients with a negative association between the activation of regulated genes and BMI for 100 ng/ml of adipokine, but a positive association between chondrocyte responsiveness and BMI for the highest leptin dose. In addition, the gene encoding MMP-13 was identified as a target of leptin for chondrocytes originated from obese patients while mRNA level of TIMP-2 was increased in leptin-treated chondrocytes collected from normal or overweight patients. The adipokine at 500 ng/ml triggered signal transduction through a STAT-dependent pathway while 100 ng/ml of leptin failed to activate STAT 3 but induced STAT 1α phosphorylation in chondrocytes obtained from obese patients. Conclusions The current study

  2. Extracellular Matrix Domain Formation as an Indicator of Chondrocyte Dedifferentiation and Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ling; Gonzalez, Stephanie; Shah, Saumya; Kyupelyan, Levon; Petrigliano, Frank A.; McAllister, David R.; Adams, John S; Karperien, Marcel; Tuan, Tai-Lan; Benya, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage injury represents one of the most significant clinical conditions. Implantation of expanded autologous chondrocytes from noninjured compartments of the joint is a typical strategy for repairing cartilage. However, two-dimensional culture causes dedifferentiation of chondrocytes, making them functionally inferior for cartilage repair. We hypothesized that functional exclusion of dedifferentiated chondrocytes can be achieved by the selective mapping of collagen molecules deposited by chondrogenic cells in a three-dimensional environment. Freshly isolated and in vitro expanded human fetal or adult articular chondrocytes were cultured in a thermoreversible hydrogel at density of 1×107 cells/mL for 24 h. Chondrocytes were released from the gel, stained with antibodies against collagen type 2 (COL II) or COL I or COL X and sorted by fluorescence activated cell sorting. Imaging flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) assays were performed to evaluate the differences between COL II domain forming and COL II domain-negative cells. Freshly dissected periarticular chondrocytes robustly formed domains that consisted of the extracellular matrix surrounding cells in the hydrogel as a capsule clearly detectable by imaging flow cytometry (ImageStream) and confocal microscopy. These domains were almost exclusively formed by COL II. In contrast to that, a significant percentage of freshly isolated growth plate pre-hypertrophic and hyperdrophic chondrocytes deposited matrix domains positive for COL II, COL I, and COL X. The proportion of the cells producing COL II domains decreased with the increased passage of in vitro expanded periarticular fetal or adult articular chondrocytes. Sorted COL II domain forming cells deposited much higher levels of COL II and GAGs in pellet assays than COL II domain-negative cells. COL II domain forming cells expressed chondrogenic genes at higher levels than negative cells

  3. mTORC1 regulates PTHrP to coordinate chondrocyte growth, proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bo; Zhang, Zhongmin; Jin, Dadi; Cai, Chen; Jia, Chunhong; Liu, Wen; Wang, Ting; Li, Shengfa; Zhang, Haiyan; Huang, Bin; Lai, Pinglin; Wang, Hua; Liu, Anling; Zeng, Chun; Cai, Daozhang; Jiang, Yu; Bai, Xiaochun

    2016-01-01

    Precise coordination of cell growth, proliferation and differentiation is essential for the development of multicellular organisms. Here, we report that although the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activity is required for chondrocyte growth and proliferation, its inactivation is essential for chondrocyte differentiation. Hyperactivation of mTORC1 via TSC1 gene deletion in chondrocytes causes uncoupling of the normal proliferation and differentiation programme within the growth plate, resulting in uncontrolled cell proliferation, and blockage of differentiation and chondrodysplasia in mice. Rapamycin promotes chondrocyte differentiation and restores these defects in mutant mice. Mechanistically, mTORC1 downstream kinase S6K1 interacts with and phosphorylates Gli2, and releases Gli2 from SuFu binding, resulting in nuclear translocation of Gli2 and transcription of parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP), a key regulator of bone development. Our findings demonstrate that dynamically controlled mTORC1 activity is crucial to coordinate chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation partially through regulating Gli2/PTHrP during endochondral bone development. PMID:27039827

  4. Time-varying magnetic fields: effects of orientation on chondrocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Elliott, J P; Smith, R L; Block, C A

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of orientation of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) on cellular proliferation and extracellular matrix synthesis. Bovine articular chondrocytes were cultured in PEMFs (repetitive pulse at 72 Hz) generated using Helmholtz coils oriented either parallel (horizontal) or perpendicular (vertical) to the plane of cell adhesion. Dissipation of signal energy in the form of heat increased the temperature of the PEMF coils by 2 degrees C and the tissue culture medium by 1 degree C. Therefore, control coils, which emitted no PEMFs, were heated to the temperature of PEMF coils by circulating water. Chondrocytes were cultured in 16-mm-well culture plates, and the data for individual wells were pooled as triplicates. Although not observed by microscopic examination of individual wells, positionally dependent electric field effects may be minimized by this approach. PEMFs generated by coils oriented vertically significantly decreased chondrocyte proliferation. The effect was dependent on the concentration of serum in the culture media. At 3% serum concentration, the total cell number attained after 10 days of culture was reduced by 50% in stimulated cultures when compared with controls. At 5% serum concentration, there was no effect. PEMFs applied by coils oriented horizontally did not alter proliferation of articular chondrocytes. PEMFs had no effect on synthesis of extracellular matrix by chondrocytes plated at high density, irrespective of orientation. PMID:3343631

  5. mTORC1 regulates PTHrP to coordinate chondrocyte growth, proliferation and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Bo; Zhang, Zhongmin; Jin, Dadi; Cai, Chen; Jia, Chunhong; Liu, Wen; Wang, Ting; Li, Shengfa; Zhang, Haiyan; Huang, Bin; Lai, Pinglin; Wang, Hua; Liu, Anling; Zeng, Chun; Cai, Daozhang; Jiang, Yu; Bai, Xiaochun

    2016-01-01

    Precise coordination of cell growth, proliferation and differentiation is essential for the development of multicellular organisms. Here, we report that although the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activity is required for chondrocyte growth and proliferation, its inactivation is essential for chondrocyte differentiation. Hyperactivation of mTORC1 via TSC1 gene deletion in chondrocytes causes uncoupling of the normal proliferation and differentiation programme within the growth plate, resulting in uncontrolled cell proliferation, and blockage of differentiation and chondrodysplasia in mice. Rapamycin promotes chondrocyte differentiation and restores these defects in mutant mice. Mechanistically, mTORC1 downstream kinase S6K1 interacts with and phosphorylates Gli2, and releases Gli2 from SuFu binding, resulting in nuclear translocation of Gli2 and transcription of parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP), a key regulator of bone development. Our findings demonstrate that dynamically controlled mTORC1 activity is crucial to coordinate chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation partially through regulating Gli2/PTHrP during endochondral bone development. PMID:27039827

  6. Chondrocytes, Mesenchymal Stem Cells, and Their Combination in Articular Cartilage Regenerative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Nazempour, A; Van Wie, B J

    2016-05-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) is a highly organized connective tissue lining, covering the ends of bones within articulating joints. Its highly ordered structure is essential for stable motion and provides a frictionless surface easing load transfer. AC is vulnerable to lesions and, because it is aneural and avascular, it has limited self-repair potential which often leads to osteoarthritis. To date, no fully successful treatment for osteoarthritis has been reported. Thus, the development of innovative therapeutic approaches is desperately needed. Autologous chondrocyte implantation, the only cell-based surgical intervention approved in the United States for treating cartilage defects, has limitations because of de-differentiation of articular chondrocytes (AChs) upon in vitro expansion. De-differentiation can be abated if initial populations of AChs are co-cultured with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which not only undergo chondrogenesis themselves but also support chondrocyte vitality. In this review we summarize studies utilizing AChs, non-AChs, and MSCs and compare associated outcomes. Moreover, a comprehensive set of recent human studies using chondrocytes to direct MSC differentiation, MSCs to support chondrocyte re-differentiation and proliferation in co-culture environments, and exploratory animal intra- and inter-species studies are systematically reviewed and discussed in an innovative manner allowing side-by-side comparisons of protocols and outcomes. Finally, a comprehensive set of recommendations are made for future studies. PMID:26987846

  7. Cartilage repair in transplanted scaffold-free chondrocyte sheets using a minipig model.

    PubMed

    Ebihara, Goro; Sato, Masato; Yamato, Masayuki; Mitani, Genya; Kutsuna, Toshiharu; Nagai, Toshihiro; Ito, Satoshi; Ukai, Taku; Kobayashi, Miyuki; Kokubo, Mami; Okano, Teruo; Mochida, Joji

    2012-05-01

    Lacking a blood supply and having a low cellular density, articular cartilage has a minimal ability for self-repair. Therefore, wide-ranging cartilage damage rarely resolves spontaneously. Cartilage damage is typically treated by chondrocyte transplantation, mosaicplasty or microfracture. Recent advances in tissue engineering have prompted research on techniques to repair articular cartilage damage using a variety of transplanted cells. We studied the repair and regeneration of cartilage damage using layered chondrocyte sheets prepared on a temperature-responsive culture dish. We previously reported achieving robust tissue repair when covering only the surface layer with layered chondrocyte sheets when researching partial-thickness defects in the articular cartilage of domestic rabbits. The present study was an experiment on the repair and regeneration of articular cartilage in a minipig model of full-thickness defects. Good safranin-O staining and integration with surrounding tissues was achieved in animals transplanted with layered chondrocyte sheets. However, tissue having poor safranin-O staining-not noted in the domestic rabbit experiments-was identified in some of the animals, and the subchondral bone was poorly repaired in these. Thus, although layered chondrocyte sheets facilitate articular cartilage repair, further investigations into appropriate animal models and culture and transplant conditions are required. PMID:22369960

  8. Treatment of osteoarthritis using a helper-dependent adenoviral vector retargeted to chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Merry ZC; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Cela, Racel; Clarke, Chris; Lundgren-Akerlund, Evy; Barry, Michael A; Lee, Brendan HL

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a joint disease characterized by degeneration of the articular cartilage, subchondral bone remodeling, and secondary inflammation. It is among the top three causes of chronic disability, and currently there are no treatment options to prevent disease progression. The localized nature of OA makes it an ideal candidate for gene and cell therapy. However, gene and cell therapy of OA is impeded by inefficient gene transduction of chondrocytes. In this study, we developed a broadly applicable system that retargets cell surface receptors by conjugating antibodies to the capsid of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDVs). Specifically, we applied this system to retarget chondrocytes by conjugating an HDV to an α-10 integrin monoclonal antibody (a10mab). We show that a10mab-conjugated HDV (a10mabHDV)-infected chondrocytes efficiently in vitro and in vivo while detargeting other cell types. The therapeutic index of an intra-articular injection of 10mabHDV-expressing proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) into a murine model of post-traumatic OA was 10-fold higher than with standard HDV. Moreover, we show that PRG4 overexpression from articular, superficial zone chondrocytes is effective for chondroprotection in postinjury OA and that α-10 integrin is an effective protein for chondrocyte targeting. PMID:27626040

  9. Coptisine Prevented IL-β-Induced Expression of Inflammatory Mediators in Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kai; Hu, Li; Liao, Wenjun; Yin, Defeng; Rui, Feng

    2016-08-01

    Interleukin 1β (IL-1β) is a pleiotropic pro-inflammatory cytokine that plays a critical role in the development of osteoarthritis (OA). Coptisine is an isoquinoline alkaloid extracted from Coptidis rhizome and has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory activity. However, the anti-inflammatory effects of coptisine on interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β)-stimulated chondrocytes have not been reported. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of coptisine on IL-1β-induced inflammation in human articular chondrocytes. Our results showed that coptisine greatly inhibited the production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), as well as suppressed the expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in human OA chondrocytes induced by IL-1β. It also inhibited the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) and MMP-13 in IL-1β-stimulated human OA chondrocytes. Furthermore, coptisine significantly inhibited the IL-1β-induced NF-kB activation in human OA chondrocytes. Taken together, these data suggest that coptisine inhibits the IL-1β-induced inflammatory response by suppressing the NF-kB signaling pathway. Thus, coptisine may be a potential agent in the treatment of OA. PMID:27294276

  10. Elevation of IGFBP2 contributes to mycotoxin T-2-induced chondrocyte injury and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Yan; Chang, Yanhai; Duan, Dapeng; Sun, Zhengming; Guo, Xiong

    2016-09-01

    Kashin-Beck disease (KBD) is an endemic degenerative osteoarthropathy. The mycotoxin of T-2 toxin is extensively accepted as a major etiological contributor to KBD. However, its function and mechanism in KBD remains unclearly elucidated. Here, T-2 toxin treatment induced chondrocyte injury in a time- and dose-dependent manner by repressing cell viability and promoting cell necrosis and apoptosis. Importantly, T-2 suppressed the transcription of type II collagen and aggrecan, as well as the release of sulphated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG). Furthermore, exposure to T-2 enhanced the transcription of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), including MMP-1, -2, -3 and -9. In contrast to control groups, higher expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 (IGFBP2) was observed in chondrocytes from KBD patients. Interestingly, T-2 toxin caused a dramatical elevation of IGFBP2 expression in chondrocytes. Mechanism analysis corroborated that cessation of IGFBP2 expression alleviated T-2-induced damage to chondrocytes. Simultaneously, transfection with IGFBP2 siRNA also attenuated matrix synthesis and catabolism-related gene expressions of MMPs. Together, this study validated that T-2 toxin exposure might promote the progression of KBD by inducing chondrocyte injury, suppressing matrix synthesis and accelerating cellular catabolism through IGFBP2. Therefore, this research will elucidate a new insight about how T-2 toxin participate in the pathogenesis of KBD. PMID:27416762

  11. Single cell confocal Raman spectroscopy of human osteoarthritic chondrocytes: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh; Singh, Gajendra P; Grønhaug, Kirsten M; Afseth, Nils K; de Lange Davies, Catharina; Drogset, Jon O; Lilledahl, Magnus B

    2015-01-01

    A great deal of effort has been focused on exploring the underlying molecular mechanism of osteoarthritis (OA) especially at the cellular level. We report a confocal Raman spectroscopic investigation on human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. The objective of this investigation is to identify molecular features and the stage of OA based on the spectral signatures corresponding to bio-molecular changes at the cellular level in chondrocytes. In this study, we isolated chondrocytes from human osteoarthritic cartilage and acquired Raman spectra from single cells. Major spectral differences between the cells obtained from different International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) grades of osteoarthritic cartilage were identified. During progression of OA, a decrease in protein content and an increase in cell death were observed from the vibrational spectra. Principal component analysis and subsequent cross-validation was able to associate osteoarthritic chondrocytes to ICRS Grade I, II and III with specificity 100.0%, 98.1%, and 90.7% respectively, while, sensitivity was 98.6%, 82.8%, and 97.5% respectively. The overall predictive efficiency was 92.2%. Our pilot study encourages further use of Raman spectroscopy as a noninvasive and label free technique for revealing molecular features associated with osteoarthritic chondrocytes. PMID:25918938

  12. Treatment of osteoarthritis using a helper-dependent adenoviral vector retargeted to chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Merry Zc; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Cela, Racel; Clarke, Chris; Lundgren-Akerlund, Evy; Barry, Michael A; Lee, Brendan Hl

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a joint disease characterized by degeneration of the articular cartilage, subchondral bone remodeling, and secondary inflammation. It is among the top three causes of chronic disability, and currently there are no treatment options to prevent disease progression. The localized nature of OA makes it an ideal candidate for gene and cell therapy. However, gene and cell therapy of OA is impeded by inefficient gene transduction of chondrocytes. In this study, we developed a broadly applicable system that retargets cell surface receptors by conjugating antibodies to the capsid of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDVs). Specifically, we applied this system to retarget chondrocytes by conjugating an HDV to an α-10 integrin monoclonal antibody (a10mab). We show that a10mab-conjugated HDV (a10mabHDV)-infected chondrocytes efficiently in vitro and in vivo while detargeting other cell types. The therapeutic index of an intra-articular injection of 10mabHDV-expressing proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) into a murine model of post-traumatic OA was 10-fold higher than with standard HDV. Moreover, we show that PRG4 overexpression from articular, superficial zone chondrocytes is effective for chondroprotection in postinjury OA and that α-10 integrin is an effective protein for chondrocyte targeting. PMID:27626040

  13. Effect of transforming growth factor-β3 on mono and multilayer chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sefat, Farshid; Youseffi, Mansour; Khaghani, Seyed Ali; Soon, Chin Fhung; Javid, Farideh

    2016-07-01

    Articular cartilage is an avascular and flexible connective tissue found in joints. It produces a cushioning effect at the joints and provides low friction to protect the ends of the bones from wear and tear/damage. It has poor repair capacity and any injury can result pain and loss of mobility. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), a cytokine superfamily, regulates cell function, including differentiation and proliferation. Although the function of the TGF-βs in various cell types has been investigated, their function in cartilage repair is as yet not fully understood. The effect of TGF-β3 in biological regulation of primary chondrocyte was investigated in this work. TGF-β3 provided fibroblastic morphology to chondrocytes and therefore overall reduction in cell proliferation was observed. The length of the cells supplemented with TGF-β3 were larger than the cells without TGF-β3 treatment. This was caused by the fibroblast like cells (dedifferentiated chondrocytes) which occupied larger areas compared to cells without TGF-β3 addition. The healing process of the model wound closure assay of chondrocyte multilayer was slowed down by TGF-β3, and this cytokine negatively affected the strength of chondrocyte adhesion to the cell culture surface. PMID:27108397

  14. Del1 Knockout Mice Developed More Severe Osteoarthritis Associated with Increased Susceptibility of Chondrocytes to Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Tran, Misha C.; Bhatia, Namrata J.; Hsing, Alexander W.; Chen, Carol; LaRussa, Marie F.; Fattakhov, Ernst; Rashidi, Vania; Jang, Kyu Yun; Choo, Kevin J.; Nie, Xingju; Mathy, Jonathan A.; Longaker, Michael T.; Dauskardt, Reinhold H.; Helms, Jill A.; Yang, George P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective We identified significant expression of the matricellular protein, DEL1, in hypertrophic and mature cartilage during development. We hypothesized that this tissue-specific expression indicated a biological role for DEL1 in cartilage biology. Methods Del1 KO and WT mice had cartilage thickness evaluated by histomorphometry. Additional mice underwent medial meniscectomy to induce osteoarthritis, and were assayed at 1 week for apoptosis by TUNEL staining and at 8 weeks for histology and OA scoring. In vitro proliferation and apoptosis assays were performed on primary chondrocytes. Results Deletion of the Del1 gene led to decreased amounts of cartilage in the ears and knee joints in mice with otherwise normal skeletal morphology. Destabilization of the knee led to more severe OA compared to controls. In vitro, DEL1 blocked apoptosis in chondrocytes. Conclusion Osteoarthritis is among the most prevalent diseases worldwide and increasing in incidence as our population ages. Initiation begins with an injury resulting in the release of inflammatory mediators. Excessive production of inflammatory mediators results in apoptosis of chondrocytes. Because of the limited ability of chondrocytes to regenerate, articular cartilage deteriorates leading to the clinical symptoms including severe pain and decreased mobility. No treatments effectively block the progression of OA. We propose that direct modulation of chondrocyte apoptosis is a key variable in the etiology of OA, and therapies aimed at preventing this important step represent a new class of regenerative medicine targets. PMID:27505251

  15. Prostaglandin F2α receptor (FP) signaling regulates Bmp signaling and promotes chondrocyte differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joohwee; Shim, Minsub

    2015-01-01

    Prostaglandins are a group of lipid signaling molecules involved in various physiological processes. In addition, prostaglandins have been implicated in the development and progression of diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and arthritis. Prostaglandins exert their effects through the activation of specific G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In this report, we examined the role of prostaglandin F2α receptor (FP) signaling as a regulator of chondrocyte differentiation. We found that FP expression was dramatically induced during the differentiation of chondrocytes and was up-regulated in cartilages. Forced expression of FP in ATDC5 chondrogenic cell line resulted in the increased expression of differentiation-related genes and increased synthesis of the extracellular matrix (ECM) regardless of the presence of insulin. Similarly, PGF2α treatment induced the expression of chondrogenic marker genes. In contrast, knockdown of endogenous FP expression suppressed the expression of chondrocyte marker genes and ECM synthesis. Organ culture of cartilage rudiments revealed that PGF2α induces chondrocyte hypertrophy. Additionally, FP overexpression increased the levels of Bmp-6, phospho-Smad1/5, and Bmpr1a, while knockdown of FP reduced expression of those genes. These results demonstrate that up-regulation of FP expression plays an important role in chondrocyte differentiation and modulates Bmp signaling. PMID:25499765

  16. Time-varying magnetic fields: effects of orientation on chondrocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, J.P.; Smith, R.L.; Block, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of orientation of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) on cellular proliferation and extracellular matrix synthesis. Bovine articular chondrocytes were cultured in PEMFs (repetitive pulse at 72 Hz) generated using Helmholtz coils oriented either parallel (horizontal) or perpendicular (vertical) to the plane of cell adhesion. Dissipation of signal energy in the form of heat increased the temperature of the PEMF coils by 2 degrees C and the tissue culture medium by 1 degree C. Therefore, control coils, which emitted no PEMFs, were heated to the temperature of PEMF coils by circulating water. Chondrocytes were cultured in 16-mm-well culture plates, and the data for individual wells were pooled as triplicates. Although not observed by microscopic examination of individual wells, positionally dependent electric field effects may be minimized by this approach. PEMFs generated by coils oriented vertically significantly decreased chondrocyte proliferation. The effect was dependent on the concentration of serum in the culture media. At 3% serum concentration, the total cell number attained after 10 days of culture was reduced by 50% in stimulated cultures when compared with controls. At 5% serum concentration, there was no effect. PEMFs applied by coils oriented horizontally did not alter proliferation of articular chondrocytes. PEMFs had no effect on synthesis of extracellular matrix by chondrocytes plated at high density, irrespective of orientation.

  17. Porcine Intervertebral Disc Repair Using Allogeneic Juvenile Articular Chondrocytes or Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Frank L.; Metz, Lionel; Adkisson, Huston Davis; Liu, Jane; Carruthers-Liebenberg, Ellen; Milliman, Curt; Maloney, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Tissue engineering strategies for intervertebral disc repair have focused on the use of autologous disc-derived chondrocytes. Difficulties with graft procurement, harvest site morbidity, and functionality, however, may limit the utility of this cell source. We used an in vivo porcine model to investigate allogeneic non-disc-derived chondrocytes and allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for disc repair. After denucleation, lumbar discs were injected with either fibrin carrier alone, allogeneic juvenile chondrocytes (JCs), or allogeneic MSCs. Discs were harvested at 3, 6, and 12 months, and cell viability and functionality were assessed qualitatively and quantitatively. JC-treated discs demonstrated abundant cartilage formation at 3 months, and to a lesser extent at 6 and 12 months. For the carrier and MSC-treated groups, however, there was little evidence of proteoglycan matrix or residual notochordal/chondrocyte cells, but rather a type I/II collagen-enriched scar tissue. By contrast, JCs produced a type II collagen-rich matrix that was largely absent of type I collagen. Viable JCs were observed at all time points, whereas no evidence of viable MSCs was found. These data support the premise that committed chondrocytes are more appropriate for use in disc repair, as they are uniquely suited for survival in the ischemic disc microenvironment. PMID:21910592

  18. Chondrocyte survival in articular cartilage: the influence of subchondral bone in a bovine model.

    PubMed

    Amin, A K; Huntley, J S; Simpson, A H R W; Hall, A C

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether subchondral bone influences in situ chondrocyte survival. Bovine explants were cultured in serum-free media over seven days with subchondral bone excised from articular cartilage (group A), subchondral bone left attached to articular cartilage (group B), and subchondral bone excised but co-cultured with articular cartilage (group C). Using confocal laser scanning microscopy, fluorescent probes and biochemical assays, in situ chondrocyte viability and relevant biophysical parameters (cartilage thickness, cell density, culture medium composition) were quantified over time (2.5 hours vs seven days). There was a significant increase in chondrocyte death over seven days, primarily within the superficial zone, for group A, but not for groups B or C (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference in cartilage thickness or cell density between groups A, B and C (p > 0.05). Increases in the protein content of the culture media for groups B and C, but not for group A, suggested that the release of soluble factors from subchondral bone may have influenced chondrocyte survival. In conclusion, subchondral bone significantly influenced chondrocyte survival in articular cartilage during explant culture. The extrapolation of bone-cartilage interactions in vitro to the clinical situation must be made with caution, but the findings from these experiments suggest that future investigation into in vivo mechanisms of articular cartilage survival and degradation must consider the interactions of cartilage with subchondral bone. PMID:19407309

  19. Normal proliferation and differentiation of Hoxc-8 transgenic chondrocytes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Cormier, Stephania A; Mello, Maria Alice; Kappen, Claudia

    2003-01-01

    Background Hox genes encode transcription factors that are involved in pattern formation in the skeleton, and recent evidence suggests that they also play a role in the regulation of endochondral ossification. To analyze the role of Hoxc-8 in this process in more detail, we applied in vitro culture systems, using high density cultures of primary chondrocytes from neonatal mouse ribs. Results Cultured cells were characterized on the basis of morphology (light microscopy) and production of cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (sulfated proteoglycans and type II Collagen). Hypertrophy was demonstrated by increase in cell size, alkaline phosphatase activity and type X Collagen immunohistochemistry. Proliferation was assessed by BrdU uptake and flow cytometry. Unexpectedly, chondrocytes from Hoxc-8 transgenic mice, which exhibit delayed cartilage maturation in vivo [1], were able to proliferate and differentiate normally in our culture systems. This was the case even though freshly isolated Hoxc-8 transgenic chondrocytes exhibited significant molecular differences as measured by real-time quantitative PCR. Conclusions The results demonstrate that primary rib chondrocytes behave similar to published reports for chondrocytes from other sources, validating in vitro approaches for studies of Hox genes in the regulation of endochondral ossification. Our analysis of cartilage-producing cells from Hoxc-8 transgenic mice provides evidence that the cellular phenotype induced by Hoxc-8 overexpression in vivo is reversible in vitro. PMID:12713673

  20. Lubricin is expressed in chondrocytes derived from osteoarthritic cartilage encapsulated in poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Musumeci, G.; Loreto, C.; Carnazza, M.L.; Coppolino, F.; Cardile, V.; Leonardi, R.

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by degenerative changes within joints that involved quantitative and/or qualitative alterations of cartilage and synovial fluid lubricin, a mucinous glycoprotein secreted by synovial fibroblasts and chondrocytes. Modern therapeutic methods, including tissue-engineering techniques, have been used to treat mechanical damage of the articular cartilage but to date there is no specific and effective treatment. This study aimed at investigating lubricin immunohistochemical expression in cartilage explant from normal and OA patients and in cartilage constructions formed by Poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) based hydrogels (PEG-DA) encapsulated OA chondrocytes. The expression levels of lubricin were studied by immunohistochemistry: i) in tissue explanted from OA and normal human cartilage; ii) in chondrocytes encapsulated in hydrogel PEGDA from OA and normal human cartilage. Moreover, immunocytochemical and western blot analysis were performed in monolayer cells from OA and normal cartilage. The results showed an increased expression of lubricin in explanted tissue and in monolayer cells from normal cartilage, and a decreased expression of lubricin in OA cartilage. The chondrocytes from OA cartilage after 5 weeks of culture in hydrogels (PEGDA) showed an increased expression of lubricin compared with the control cartilage. The present study demonstrated that OA chondrocytes encapsulated in PEGDA, grown in the scaffold and were able to restore lubricin biosynthesis. Thus our results suggest the possibility of applying autologous cell transplantation in conjunction with scaffold materials for repairing cartilage lesions in patients with OA to reduce at least the progression of the disease. PMID:22073377

  1. Candidate mediators of chondrocyte mechanotransduction via targeted and untargeted metabolomic measurements

    PubMed Central

    Jutila, Aaron A.; Zignego, Donald L.; Hwang, Bradley K.; Hilmer, Jonathan K.; Hamerly, Timothy; Minor, Cody A.; Walk, Seth T.; June, Ronald K.

    2014-01-01

    Chondrocyte mechanotransduction is the process by which cartilage cells transduce mechanical loads into biochemical and biological signals. Previous studies have identified several pathways by which chondrocytes transduce mechanical loads, yet a general understanding of which signals are activated and in what order remains elusive. This study was performed to identify candidate mediators of chondrocyte mechanotransduction using SW1353 chondrocytes embedded in physiologically stiff agarose. Dynamic compression was applied to cell-seeded constructs for 0–30 minutes, followed immediately by whole-cell metabolite extraction. Metabolites were detected via LC-MS, and compounds of interest were identified via database searches. We found several metabolites which were statistically different between the experimental groups, and we report the detection of 5 molecules which are not found in metabolite databases of known compounds indicating potential novel molecules. Targeted studies to quantify the response of central energy metabolites to compression found a transient increase in the ratio of NADP+ to NADPH and a continual decrease in the ratio of GDP to GTP, suggesting a flux of energy into the TCA cycle. These data are consistent with the remodeling of cytoskeletal components by mechanically induced signaling, and add substantial new data to a complex picture of how chondrocytes transduce mechanical loads. PMID:24440608

  2. Creating 3-dimensional Models of the Photosphere using the SIR Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thonhofer, S.; Utz, D.; Jurčák, J.; Pauritsch, J.; Hanslmeier, A.; Lemmerer, B.

    A high-resolution 3-dimensional model of the photospheric magnetic field is essential for the investigation of magnetic features such as sunspots, pores or smaller elements like single flux tubes seen as magnetic bright points. The SIR code is an advanced inversion code that retrieves physical quantities, e.g. magnetic field, from Stokes profiles. Based on this code, we developed a program for automated inversion of Hinode SOT/SP data and for storing these results in 3-dimensional data cubes in the form of fits files. We obtained models of the temperature, magnetic field strength, magnetic field angles and LOS-velocity in a region of the quiet sun. We will give a first discussion of those parameters in regards of small scale magnetic fields and what we can obtain and learn in the future.

  3. Conditioned Media From Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells Accelerates Healing in 3-Dimensional Skin Cultures.

    PubMed

    Collawn, Sherry S; Mobley, James A; Banerjee, N Sanjib; Chow, Louise T

    2016-04-01

    Wound healing involves a number of factors that results in the production of a "closed" wound. Studies have shown, in animal models, acceleration of wound healing with the addition of adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSC). The cause for the positive effect which these cells have on wound healing has not been elucidated. We have previously shown that addition of ADSC to the dermal equivalent in 3-dimensional skin cultures accelerates reepithelialization. We now demonstrate that conditioned media (CM) from cultured ADSC produced a similar rate of healing. This result suggests that a feedback from the 3-dimensional epithelial cultures to ADSC was not necessary to effect the accelerated reepithelialization. Mass spectrometry of CM from ADSC and primary human fibroblasts revealed differences in secretomes, some of which might have roles in the accelerating wound healing. Thus, the use of CM has provided some preliminary information on a possible mode of action. PMID:26954733

  4. Towards non-AdS holography in 3-dimensional higher spin gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gary, Michael; Grumiller, Daniel; Rashkov, Radoslav

    2012-03-01

    We take the first steps towards non-AdS holography in higher spin gravity. Namely, we propose a variational principle for generic 3-dimensional higher spin gravity that accommodates asymptotic backgrounds beyond AdS, like asymptotically Schrödinger, Lifshitz or warped AdS spacetimes. As examples we study in some detail the four sl(2) embeddings of spin-4 gravity and provide associated geometries, including an asymptotic Lifshitz black hole.

  5. Energy Sources of the Dominant Frequency Dependent 3-dimensional Atmospheric Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, S.

    1985-01-01

    The energy sources and sinks associated with the zonally asymmetric winter mean flow are investigated as part of an on-going study of atmospheric variability. Distinctly different horizontal structures for the long, intermediate and short time scale atmospheric variations were noted. In previous observations, the 3-dimensional structure of the fluctuations is investigated and the relative roles of barotropic and baroclinic terms are assessed.

  6. Protein kinase B and extracellular signal-regulated kinase contribute to the chondroprotective effect of morroniside on osteoarthritis chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Liang; Zeng, Guoqing; Liu, Zejun; Zhang, Bing; Cui, Xu; Zhao, Honghai; Zheng, Xinpeng; Song, Gang; Kang, Jian; Xia, Chun

    2015-01-01

    Despite extensive studies on the multifaceted roles of morroniside, the main active constituent of iridoid glycoside from Corni Fructus, the effect of morroniside on osteoarthritis (OA) chondrocytes remains poorly understood. Here, we investigated the influence of morroniside on cultured human OA chondrocytes and a rat experimental model of OA. The results showed that morroniside enhanced the cell viability and the levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression (PCNA), type II collagen and aggrecan in human OA chondrocytes, indicating that morroniside promoted chondrocyte survival and matrix synthesis. Furthermore, different doses of morroniside activated protein kinase B (AKT) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in human OA chondrocytes, and in turn, triggered AKT/S6 and ERK/P70S6K/S6 pathway, respectively. The PI3K/AKT inhibitor LY294002 or the MEK/ERK inhibitor U0126 attenuated the effect of morroniside on human OA chondrocytes, indicating that the activation of AKT and ERK contributed to the regulation of morroniside in human OA chondrocytes. In addition, the intra-articular injection of morroniside elevated the level of proteoglycans in cartilage matrix and the thickness of articular cartilage in a rat experimental model of OA, with the increase of AKT and ERK activation. As a consequence, morroniside has chondroprotective effect on OA chondrocytes, and may have the therapeutic potential for OA treatment. PMID:25754021

  7. Protein kinase B and extracellular signal-regulated kinase contribute to the chondroprotective effect of morroniside on osteoarthritis chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Liang; Zeng, Guoqing; Liu, Zejun; Zhang, Bing; Cui, Xu; Zhao, Honghai; Zheng, Xinpeng; Song, Gang; Kang, Jian; Xia, Chun

    2015-08-01

    Despite extensive studies on the multifaceted roles of morroniside, the main active constituent of iridoid glycoside from Corni Fructus, the effect of morroniside on osteoarthritis (OA) chondrocytes remains poorly understood. Here, we investigated the influence of morroniside on cultured human OA chondrocytes and a rat experimental model of OA. The results showed that morroniside enhanced the cell viability and the levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression (PCNA), type II collagen and aggrecan in human OA chondrocytes, indicating that morroniside promoted chondrocyte survival and matrix synthesis. Furthermore, different doses of morroniside activated protein kinase B (AKT) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in human OA chondrocytes, and in turn, triggered AKT/S6 and ERK/P70S6K/S6 pathway, respectively. The PI3K/AKT inhibitor LY294002 or the MEK/ERK inhibitor U0126 attenuated the effect of morroniside on human OA chondrocytes, indicating that the activation of AKT and ERK contributed to the regulation of morroniside in human OA chondrocytes. In addition, the intra-articular injection of morroniside elevated the level of proteoglycans in cartilage matrix and the thickness of articular cartilage in a rat experimental model of OA, with the increase of AKT and ERK activation. As a consequence, morroniside has chondroprotective effect on OA chondrocytes, and may have the therapeutic potential for OA treatment. PMID:25754021

  8. Characterization of chondrocyte sheets prepared using a co-culture method with temperature-responsive culture inserts.

    PubMed

    Kokubo, Mami; Sato, Masato; Yamato, Masayuki; Mitani, Genya; Kutsuna, Toshiharu; Ebihara, Goro; Okano, Teruo; Mochida, Joji

    2016-06-01

    Conventional culture methods using temperature-responsive culture dishes require 4-5 weeks to prepare layered chondrocyte sheets that can be used in articular cartilage repair and regeneration. This study investigated whether the use of synovial tissue obtained from the same joint as the chondrocyte nutritive supply source could more quickly facilitate the preparation of chondrocyte sheets. After culturing derived synoviocytes and chondrocytes together (i.e. combined culture or co-culture) on temperature-responsive inserts, chondrocyte growth was assessed and a molecular analysis of the chondrocyte sheets was performed. Transplantable tissue could be obtained more quickly using this method (average 10.5 days). Real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunostaining of the three-layer chondrocyte sheets confirmed the significant expression of genes critical to cartilage maintenance, including type II collagen (COL2), aggrecan-1 and tissue metallopeptidase inhibitor 1. However, the expression of COL1, matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3), MMP13 and A-disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs 5 was suppressed. The adhesive factor fibronectin-1 (FN1) was observed in all sheet layers, whereas in sheets generated using conventional preparation methods positive FN1 immunostaining was observed only on the surface of the sheets. The results indicate that synoviocyte co-cultures provide an optimal environment for the preparation of chondrocyte sheets for tissue transplantation and are particularly beneficial for shortening the required culture period. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23868865

  9. Hyaluronic acid regulates a key redox control factor Nrf2 via phosphorylation of Akt in bovine articular chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Onodera, Yuta; Teramura, Takeshi; Takehara, Toshiyuki; Fukuda, Kanji

    2015-01-01

    One important pharmacological function of hyaluronic acid (HA) in chondrocytes is reduction of cellular superoxide generation and accumulation. Here we demonstrated a relationship between HA supplementation and accumulation of Nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which is a master transcription factor in cellular redox reactions, in cultured chondrocytes derived from bovine joint cartilage. In HA-treated chondrocytes, expression of Nrf2 and its downstream genes was upregulated. In HA-treated chondrocytes, Akt was phosphorylated, and inhibition of Akt activity or suppression of HA receptors CD44 and/or RHAMM with siRNAs prevented HA-mediated Nrf2 accumulation. Furthermore, Nrf2 siRNA inhibited the HA effect on antioxidant enzymes. These results show that HA might contribute to ROS reduction through Nrf2 regulation by activating Akt. Our study suggests a new mechanism for extracellular matrix (ECM)-mediated redox systems in chondrocytes. PMID:26106522

  10. Repair of experimentally produced defects in rabbit articular cartilage by autologous chondrocyte transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Grande, D.A.; Pitman, M.I.; Peterson, L.; Menche, D.; Klein, M.

    1989-01-01

    Using the knee joints of New Zealand White rabbits, a baseline study was made to determine the intrinsic capability of cartilage for healing defects that do not fracture the subchondral plate. A second experiment examined the effect of autologous chondrocytes grown in vitro on the healing rate of these defects. To determine whether any of the reconstituted cartilage resulted from the chondrocyte graft, a third experiment was conducted involving grafts with chondrocytes that had been labeled prior to grafting with a nuclear tracer. Results were evaluated using both qualitative and quantitative light microscopy. Macroscopic results from grafted specimens displayed a marked decrease in synovitis and other degenerative changes. In defects that had received transplants, a significant amount of cartilage was reconstituted (82%) compared to ungrafted controls (18%). Autoradiography on reconstituted cartilage showed that there were labeled cells incorporated into the repair matrix.

  11. Pterosin B prevents chondrocyte hypertrophy and osteoarthritis in mice by inhibiting Sik3

    PubMed Central

    Yahara, Yasuhito; Takemori, Hiroshi; Okada, Minoru; Kosai, Azuma; Yamashita, Akihiro; Kobayashi, Tomohito; Fujita, Kaori; Itoh, Yumi; Nakamura, Masahiro; Fuchino, Hiroyuki; Kawahara, Nobuo; Fukui, Naoshi; Watanabe, Akira; Kimura, Tomoatsu; Tsumaki, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a common debilitating joint disorder. Risk factors for osteoarthritis include age, which is associated with thinning of articular cartilage. Here we generate chondrocyte-specific salt-inducible kinase 3 (Sik3) conditional knockout mice that are resistant to osteoarthritis with thickened articular cartilage owing to a larger chondrocyte population. We also identify an edible Pteridium aquilinum compound, pterosin B, as a Sik3 pathway inhibitor. We show that either Sik3 deletion or intraarticular injection of mice with pterosin B inhibits chondrocyte hypertrophy and protects cartilage from osteoarthritis. Collectively, our results suggest Sik3 regulates the homeostasis of articular cartilage and is a target for the treatment of osteoarthritis, with pterosin B as a candidate therapeutic. PMID:27009967

  12. Observation and quantification of chondrocyte aggregation behavior on fibroin surfaces using Voronoi partition.

    PubMed

    Otaka, Akihisa; Kachi, Naoyoshi D; Hatano, Naoya; Kuwana, Yoshihiko; Tamada, Yasushi; Tomita, Naohide

    2013-05-01

    Cell migration is one of the fundamental processes in histogenesis, and it is necessary to investigate such multicellular behavior quantitatively in cell regeneration studies. In this study, Voronoi diagram analysis was first confirmed in simulation testing, and then used to evaluate the multicellular behavior of chondrocytes on three different substrates: (1) wild-type fibroin (FIB); (2) L-RGDSx2 transgenic fibroin; (3) and collagen. The indices for the round factor average, round factor homogeneity, and area disorder (AD), calculated from Voronoi diagram analysis, were used to characterize the difference in spatiotemporal changes for the different chondrocyte populations, and a regression analysis of the AD index was used to measure the speed of cell aggregation. The results suggested that the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-serine sequence affects aggregate formation of chondrocytes cultured on FIB. The Voronoi diagram analysis represents one of the promising quantitative analyses for cell regeneration studies. PMID:23083372

  13. Effect of Longan polysaccharides on proliferation and phenotype maintenance in rabbit articular chondrocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shuyu; Zhou, Bo; Liu, Qin; Wu, Huayu; Zheng, Li

    2016-04-01

    For autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) to restore cartilage defect, limited cell numbers and dedifferentiation of chondrocytes are the major difficulties. An alternative is the use of growth factors, but the high cost and potential tumorigenesis are the major obstacles. To ensure successful ACI therapy, it is of significance to find effective substituted pro-chondrogenic agent. Polysaccharides from plant extract have low toxicity and few undesirable side effects, which were reported to facilitate cartilage regeneration. In this study, we investigated the effect of Longan polysaccharides (LP) on rabbit articular chondrocytes through examination of the cell proliferation, morphology, viability, glycosaminoglycan synthesis and cartilage-specific gene expression. Results showed that close to the positive group which used the growth factor of TGF-β, LP could effectively promote chondrocytes growth and enhance secretion and synthesis of cartilage extracellular matrix by up-regulating expression levels of aggrecan, collagen II and sox9 compared to the negative control. Expression of collagen I gene was effectively down-regulated, demonstrating the inhibition of chondrocytes dedifferentiation by LP. Hypertrophy that might lead to chondrocyte ossification was also undetectable in LP groups. Range of 4.69-18.76 µg/ml was recommended dose of LP, among which the most profound response was observed with 9.38 μg/ml. All the evidences revealed that LP may replace the growth factors to be applied in ACI therapy. This study might provide a basis for development of a novel agent in the treatment of articular cartilage defect. PMID:26231088

  14. Ski Inhibits TGF-β/phospho-Smad3 Signaling and Accelerates Hypertrophic Differentiation in Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung-Ok; Sampson, Erik R.; Maynard, Robert D; O'Keefe, Regis J.; Chen, Di; Drissi, Hicham; Rosier, Randy N.; Hilton, Matthew J.; Zuscik, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Since TGF-β/Smad signaling inhibits chondrocyte maturation, endogenous negative regulators of TGF-β signaling are likely also important regulators of the chondrocyte differentiation process. One such negative regulator, Ski, is an oncoprotein that is known to inhibit TGF-β/Smad3 signaling via its interaction with phospho-Smad3 and recruitment of histone deacetylases (HDACs) to the DNA binding complex. Based on this, we hypothesized that Ski inhibits TGF-β signaling and accelerates maturation in chondrocytes via recruitment of HDACs to transcriptional complexes containing Smads. We tested this hypothesis in chick upper sternal chondrocytes (USCs), where gain and loss of Ski expression experiments were performed. Over-expression of Ski not only reversed the inhibitory effect of TGF-β on the expression of hypertrophic marker genes such as type × collagen (colX) and osteocalcin, it induced these genes basally as well. Conversely, knockdown of Ski by RNA interference led to a reduction of colX and osteocalcin expression under basal conditions. Furthermore, Ski blocked TGF-β induction of cyclinD1 and caused a basal up-regulation of Runx2, consistent with the observed acceleration of hypertrophy. Regarding mechanism, not only does Ski associate with phospho-Smad2 and 3, but its association with phospho-Smad3 is required for recruitment of HDAC4 and 5. Implicating this recruitment of HDACs in the phenotypic effects of Ski in chondrocytes, the HDAC inhibitor SAHA reversed the up-regulation of colX and osteocalcin in Ski over-expressing cells. These results suggest that inhibition of TGF-β signaling by Ski, which involves its association with phospho-Smad3 and recruitment of HDAC4 and 5, leads to accelerated chondrocyte differentiation. PMID:22461172

  15. Chondroprotective Effect of Kartogenin on CD44-Mediated Functions in Articular Cartilage and Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Yohei; Ishizuka, Shinya; Knudson, Cheryl B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: A recent report identified the small molecule kartogenin as a chondrogenic and chondroprotective agent. Since changes in hyaluronan metabolism occur during cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritis, we began studies to determine whether there was a connection between extracellular hyaluronan, CD44–hyaluronan interactions and the effects of kartogenin on articular chondrocytes. Methods: Chondrocytes cultured in monolayers, bioengineered neocartilages, or cartilage explants were treated with kartogenin with or without stimulation by IL-1β. Accumulation of matrix was visualized by a particle exclusion assay or by safranin O staining and release of sulfated glycosaminoglycans was determined. Production of aggrecanases and aggrecan G1-ITEGE neoepitope, fragmentation of CD44 and the SMAD1/5/8 signaling pathway were evaluated by western blotting. Results: Kartogenin treatment enhanced chondrocyte pericellular matrix assembly and retention in the presence of IL-1β. The chondroprotective effects of kartogenin on IL-1β-induced release of sulfated glycosaminoglycans from articular cartilage explants, reduction in safranin O staining of neocartilage discs as well as a reduction in aggrecan G1-ITEGE neoepitope in chondrocyte and explant cartilage cultures were observed. Kartogenin partially blocked the IL-1β-induced increased expression of ADAMTS-5. Additionally, kartogenin-treated articular chondrocytes exhibited a decrease in CD44 proteolytic fragmentation. However, kartogenin treatment did not enhance proteoglycan in control, non-IL-1β-treated cultures. Similarly, kartogenin enhanced the SMAD1 phosphorylation but only following pretreatment with IL-1β. Conclusion: These studies provide novel information on the chondroprotective function of kartogenin in adult articular cartilage. The effects of kartogenin are significant after activation of chondrocytic chondrolysis, which may occur following disruption of homeostasis maintained by hyaluronan–CD44

  16. Regulation of human mesenchymal stem cells differentiation into chondrocytes in extracellular matrix-based hydrogel scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Du, Mingchun; Liang, Hui; Mou, Chenchen; Li, Xiaoran; Sun, Jie; Zhuang, Yan; Xiao, Zhifeng; Chen, Bing; Dai, Jianwu

    2014-02-01

    To induce human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to differentiate into chondrocytes in three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments, we developed porous hydrogel scaffolds using the cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) components of chondroitin sulfate (CS) and collagen (COL). The turbidity and viscosity experiments indicated hydrogel could form through pH-triggered co-precipitation when pH=2-3. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) confirmed the hydrogel scaffolds could controllably release growth factors as envisaged. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) was released to stimulate hMSCs differentiation into chondrocytes; and then collagen binding domain-basic fibroblast growth factor (CBD-bFGF) was released to improve the differentiation and preserve the chondrocyte phenotype. In in vitro cell culture experiments, the differentiation processes were compared in different microenvironments: 2D culture in culture plate as control, 3D culture in the fabricated scaffolds without growth factors (CC), the samples with CBD-bFGF (CC-C), the samples with TGF-β (CC-T), the samples with CBD-bFGF/TGF-β (CC-CT). Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed the hMSC marker genes of CD44 and CD105 decreased; at the same time the chondrocyte marker genes of collagen type II and aggrecan increased, especially in the CC-CT sample. Immunostaining results further confirmed the hMSC marker protein of CD 44 disappeared and the chondrocyte marker protein of collagen type II emerged over time in the CC-CT sample. These results imply the ECM-based hydrogel scaffolds with growth factors can supply suitable 3D cell niches for hMSCs differentiation into chondrocytes and the differentiation process can be regulated by the controllably released growth factors. PMID:24231133

  17. Evaluation of thermoreversible polymers containing fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF-9) for chondrocyte culture

    SciTech Connect

    Au, Angela; Ha, Jinny; Polotsky, Anna; Krzyminski, Karol J.; Gutowska, Anna; Hungerford, Davis S.; Frondoza, Carmelita G.

    2004-05-01

    We have evaluated a biomaterial to serve as a scaffold for the propagation and amplification of chondrocytes that promotes the original cellular phenotype of these cells. The goal of the present study was to investigate the use of thermally reversible polymer gels poly(NiPAAm-co-AAc), as a biocompatible supporting scaffold for the propagation of chondrocytic cells. The polymer gels at temperatures above its lower critical solution temperature (LCST) while liquefying at temperatures below its LCST of 34.5 C. Hence, the polymer, in its gelled form, has the ability to hold cells in situ, forming a matrix similar to the natural cellular environment or the extracellular matrix that comprises cartilage. We tested the hypothesis that the polymer gel promotes cell viability and function. Human osteoblast-like cells, nasal chondrocytes, and articular chondrocytes (1x105/150 ?l) were re-suspended in enriched DMEM media and were plated onto control (without gel) and gel containing 24-well plates. The plates were re-incubated at 37 C, 5% CO2 for the time-point of interest. Additional media was added to the plates and exchanged as needed. Following cell culture, cells were retrieved, enumerated, and cell viability was determined. Other aliquots of the cells were stained for morphological analysis while expression of chondrocyte markers including collagen type II and aggrecan were determined using Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). The polymer gel was not cytotoxic as the cell number retrieved from three-dimensional culture gel was found to be one to two times higher than that retrieved from monolayer culture. Chondrocytes propagated in the thermo-reversible polymers expressed enhanced or maintained expression of collagen type II and aggrecan. Collagen type I expression was decreased or unaltered. The N-isopropylacrylamide and acrylic acid copolymer gel has potential use as a cell culture substrate and as a cell delivery vehicle.

  18. Mechanotransduction in primary human osteoarthritic chondrocytes is mediated by metabolism of energy, lipids, and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Zignego, Donald L; Hilmer, Jonathan K; June, Ronald K

    2015-12-16

    Chondrocytes are the sole cell type found in articular cartilage and are repeatedly subjected to mechanical loading in vivo. We hypothesized that physiological dynamic compression results in changes in energy metabolism to produce proteins for maintenance of the pericellular and extracellular matrices. The objective of this study was to develop an in-depth understanding for the short term (<30min) chondrocyte response to sub-injurious, physiological compression by analyzing metabolomic profiles for human chondrocytes harvested from femoral heads of osteoarthritic donors. Cell-seeded agarose constructs were randomly assigned to experimental groups, and dynamic compression was applied for 0, 15, or 30min. Following dynamic compression, metabolites were extracted and detected by HPLC-MS. Untargeted analyzes examined changes in global metabolomics profiles and targeted analysis examined the expression of specific metabolites related to central energy metabolism. We identified hundreds of metabolites that were regulated by applied compression, and we report the detection of 16 molecules not found in existing metabolite databases. We observed patient-specific mechanotransduction with aging dependence. Targeted studies found a transient increase in the ratio of NADP+ to NADPH and an initial decrease in the ratio of GDP to GTP, suggesting a flux of energy into the TCA cycle. By characterizing metabolomics profiles of primary chondrocytes in response to applied dynamic compression, this study provides insight into how OA chondrocytes respond to mechanical load. These results are consistent with increases in glycolytic energy utilization by mechanically induced signaling, and add substantial new data to a complex picture of how chondrocytes transduce mechanical loads. PMID:26573901

  19. The application of POSS nanostructures in cartilage tissue engineering: the chondrocyte response to nanoscale geometry.

    PubMed

    Oseni, Adelola O; Butler, Peter E; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2015-11-01

    Despite extensive research into cartilage tissue engineering (CTE), there is still no scaffold ideal for clinical applications. Various synthetic and natural polymers have been investigated in vitro and in vivo, but none have reached widespread clinical use. The authors investigate the potential of POSS-PCU, a synthetic nanocomposite polymer, for use in CTE. POSS-PCU is modified with silsesquioxane nanostructures that improve its biological and physical properties. The ability of POSS-PCU to support the growth of ovine nasoseptal chondrocytes was evaluated against a polymer widely used in CTE, polycaprolactone (PCL). Scaffolds with varied concentrations of the POSS molecule were also synthesized to investigate their effect on chondrocyte growth. Chondrocytes were seeded onto scaffold disks (PCU negative control; POSS-PCU 2%, 4%, 6%, 8%; PCL). Cytocompatibilty was evaluated using cell viability, total DNA, collagen and GAG assays. Chondrocytes cultured on POSS-PCU (2% POSS) scaffolds had significantly higher viability than PCL scaffolds (p < 0.001). Total DNA, collagen and sGAG protein were also greater on POSS-PCU scaffolds compared with PCL (p > 0.05). POSS-PCU (6% and 8% POSS) had improved viability and proliferation over an 18 day culture period compared with 2% and 4% POSS-PCU (p < 0.0001). Increasing the percentage of POSS in the scaffolds increased the size of the pores found in the scaffolds (p < 0.05). POSS-PCU has excellent potential for use in CTE. It supports the growth of chondrocytes in vitro and the POSS modification significantly enhances the growth and proliferation of nasoseptal chondrocytes compared with traditional scaffolds such as PCL. PMID:23576328

  20. Initiation of Chondrocyte Self-Assembly Requires an Intact Cytoskeletal Network.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jennifer K; Hu, Jerry C Y; Yamada, Soichiro; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2016-02-01

    Self-assembly and self-organization have recently emerged as robust scaffold-free tissue engineering methodologies that can be used to generate various tissues, including cartilage, vessel, and liver. Self-assembly, in particular, is a scaffold-free platform for tissue engineering that does not require the input of exogenous energy to the system. Although self-assembly can generate functional tissues, most notably neocartilage, the mechanisms of self-assembly remain unclear. To study the self-assembling process, we used articular chondrocytes as a model to identify parameters that can affect this process. Specifically, the roles of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion molecules, surface-bound collagen, and the actin cytoskeletal network were investigated. Using time-lapse imaging, we analyzed the early stages of chondrocyte self-assembly. Within hours, chondrocytes rapidly coalesced into cell clusters before compacting to form tight cellular structures. Chondrocyte self-assembly was found to depend primarily on integrin function and secondarily on cadherin function. In addition, actin or myosin II inhibitors prevented chondrocyte self-assembly, suggesting that cell adhesion alone is not sufficient, but rather the active contractile actin cytoskeleton is essential for proper chondrocyte self-assembly and the formation of neocartilage. Better understanding of the self-assembly mechanisms allows for the rational modulation of this process toward generating neocartilages with improved properties. These findings are germane to understanding self-assembly, an emerging platform for tissue engineering of a plethora of tissues, especially as these neotissues are poised for translation. PMID:26729374

  1. Chondrocytes Utilize a Cholesterol-Dependent Lipid Translocator To Externalize Phosphatidylserine†

    PubMed Central

    Damek-Poprawa, Monika; Golub, Ellis; Otis, Linda; Harrison, Gerald; Phillips, Christine; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    During endochondral ossification, growth plate chondrocytes release plasma membrane (PM) derived matrix vesicles (MV), which are the site of initial hydroxyapatite crystal formation. MV constituents which facilitate the mineralization process include the integral membrane ectoenzymes alkaline phosphatase (ALPase) and nucleotide pyrophosphatase phosphodiesterase (NPP1/PC-1), along with a phosphatidylserine- (PS-) rich membrane surface that binds annexins and calcium, resulting in enhanced calcium entry into MV. In this study, we determined that chick growth plate MV were highly enriched in membrane raft microdomains containing high levels of cholesterol, glycophosphatidylinositol- (GPI-) anchored ALPase, and phosphatidylserine (PS) localized to the external leaflet of the bilayer. To determine how such membrane microdomains arise during chondrocyte maturation, we explored the role of PM cholesterol-dependent lipid assemblies in regulating the activities of lipid translocators involved in the externalization of PS. We first isolated and determined the composition of detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) from chondrocyte PM. DRMs isolated from chondrocyte PM were enhanced in ganglioside 1 (GM1) and cholesterol as well as GPI-anchored ALPase. Furthermore, these membrane domains were enriched in PS (localized to the external leaflet of the bilayer) and had significantly higher ALPase activity than non-cholesterol-enriched domains. To understand the role of cholesterol-dependent lipid assemblies in the externalization of PS, we measured the activities of two lipid transporters involved in PS externalization, aminophospholipid translocase (APLT) and phospholipid scramblase (PLSCR1), during maturation of a murine chondrocytic cell line, N1511. In this report, we provide the first evidence that maturing chondrocytes express PLSCR1 and have scramblase activity. We propose that redistribution of PS is dependent on an increase in phospholipid scramblase activity and a decrease

  2. Adult equine bone marrow stromal cells produce a cartilage-like ECM mechanically superior to animal-matched adult chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Kopesky, P W; Lee, H-Y; Vanderploeg, E J; Kisiday, J D; Frisbie, D D; Plaas, A H K; Ortiz, C; Grodzinsky, A J

    2010-06-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the age-dependent mechanical phenotype of bone marrow stromal cell- (BMSC-) and chondrocyte-produced cartilage-like neo-tissue and to elucidate the matrix-associated mechanisms which generate this phenotype. Cells from both immature (2-4 month-old foals) and skeletally-mature (2-5 year-old adults) mixed-breed horses were isolated from animal-matched bone marrow and cartilage tissue, encapsulated in self-assembling-peptide hydrogels, and cultured with and without TGF-beta1 supplementation. BMSCs and chondrocytes from both donor ages were encapsulated with high viability. BMSCs from both ages produced neo-tissue with higher mechanical stiffness than that produced by either young or adult chondrocytes. Young, but not adult, chondrocytes proliferated in response to TGF-beta1 while BMSCs from both age groups proliferated with TGF-beta1. Young chondrocytes stimulated by TGF-beta1 accumulated ECM with 10-fold higher sulfated-glycosaminoglycan content than adult chondrocytes and 2-3-fold higher than BMSCs of either age. The opposite trend was observed for hydroxyproline content, with BMSCs accumulating 2-3-fold more than chondrocytes, independent of age. Size-exclusion chromatography of extracted proteoglycans showed that an aggrecan-like peak was the predominant sulfated proteoglycan for all cell types. Direct measurement of aggrecan core protein length and chondroitin sulfate chain length by single molecule atomic force microscopy imaging revealed that, independent of age, BMSCs produced longer core protein and longer chondroitin sulfate chains, and fewer short core protein molecules than chondrocytes, suggesting that the BMSC-produced aggrecan has a phenotype more characteristic of young tissue than chondrocyte-produced aggrecan. Aggrecan ultrastructure, ECM composition, and cellular proliferation combine to suggest a mechanism by which BMSCs produce a superior cartilage-like neo-tissue than either young or adult chondrocytes. PMID:20153827

  3. The Knee Joint Loose Body as a Source of Viable Autologous Human Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Melrose, J.

    2016-01-01

    Loose bodies are fragments of cartilage or bone present in the synovial fluid. In the present study we assessed if loose bodies could be used as a source of autologous human chondrocytes for experimental purposes. Histochemical examination of loose bodies and differential enzymatic digestions were undertaken, the isolated cells were cultured in alginate bead microspheres and immunolocalisations were undertaken for chondrogenic markers such as aggrecan, and type II collagen. Isolated loose body cells had high viability (≥90% viable), expressed chondrogenic markers (aggrecan, type II collagen) but no type I collagen. Loose bodies may be a useful source of autologous chondrocytes of high viability. PMID:27349321

  4. Wnt induction of chondrocyte hypertrophy through the Runx2 transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yu-Feng; Soung, Do Y; Schwarz, Edward M; O'Keefe, Regis J; Drissi, Hicham

    2006-07-01

    We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying canonical Wnt-mediated regulation of chondrocyte hypertrophy using chick upper sternal chondrocytes. Replication competent avian sarcoma (RCAS) viral over-expression of Wnt8c and Wnt9a, upregulated type X collagen (col10a1) and Runx2 mRNA expression thereby inducing chondrocyte hypertrophy. Wnt8c and Wnt9a strongly inhibited mRNA levels of Sox9 and type II collagen (col2a1). Wnt8c further enhanced canonical bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP-2)-induced expression of Runx2 and col10a1 while Wnt8c and Wnt9a inhibited TGF-beta-induced expression of Sox9 and col2a1. Over-expression of beta-catenin mimics the effect of Wnt8c and Wnt9a by upregulating Runx2, col10a1, and alkaline phosphatase (AP) mRNA levels while it inhibits col2a1 transcription. Western blot analysis shows that Wnt8c and beta-catenin also induces Runx2 protein levels in chondrocytes. Thus, our results indicate that activation of the canonical beta-catenin Wnt signaling pathway induces chondrocyte hypertrophy and maturation. We further investigated the effects of beta-catenin-TCF/Lef on Runx2 promoter. Co-transfection of lymphoid enhancer factor (Lef1) and beta-catenin in chicken upper sternal chondrocytes together with deletion constructs of the Runx2 promoter shows that the proximal region spanning the first 128 base pairs of this promoter is responsible for the Wnt-mediated induction of Runx2. Mutation of the TCF/Lef binding site in the -128 fragment of the Runx2 promoter resulted in loss of its responsiveness to beta-catenin. Additionally, gel-shift assay analyses determined the DNA/protein interaction of the TCF/Lef binding sites on the Runx2 promoter. Finally, our site-directed mutagenesis data demonstrated that the Runx2 site on type X collagen promoter is required for canonical Wnt induction of col10a1. Altogether we demonstrate that Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is regulated by TGF-beta and BMP-2 in chick upper sternal chondrocytes, and mediates

  5. Microcontact printing of BMP-2 and its effect on human chondrocytes behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Chang-Jiang; Nie, Yu-Dong

    2010-01-01

    The present study is to investigate human chondrocytes behavior on microcontact printed bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) lines on polystyrene (PS) surface. It was found that the cells aligned with BMP lines and expressed type II and VI collagen. The chondrocytes in vitro cultured on BMP lines were elongated, which resulted in altered cell morphology. Taking all these results into consideration, BMP-2 lines enhance cell adhesion, restrict spreading, and increase type II and VI collagen expression. The results represented in this study may be an approach to the problem of engineering reparative cartilage in vitro.

  6. Patterned 3-dimensional metal grid electrodes as alternative electron collectors in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Chua, Julianto; Mathews, Nripan; Jennings, James R; Yang, Guangwu; Wang, Qing; Mhaisalkar, Subodh G

    2011-11-21

    We describe the application of 3-dimensional metal grid electrodes (3D-MGEs) as electron collectors in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) as a replacement for fluorinated tin oxide (FTO) electrodes. Requirements, structure, advantages, and limitations of the metal grid electrodes are discussed. Solar conversion efficiencies of 6.2% have been achieved in 3D-MGE based solar cells, comparable to that fabricated on FTO (7.1%). The charge transport properties and collection efficiencies in these novel solar cells have been studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. PMID:21989708

  7. Incorporating a 3-dimensional printer into the management of early-stage cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Baek, Min-Hyun; Kim, Dae-Yeon; Kim, Namkug; Rhim, Chae Chun; Kim, Jong-Hyeok; Nam, Joo-Hyun

    2016-08-01

    We used a 3-dimensional (3D) printer to create anatomical replicas of real lesions and tested its application in cervical cancer. Our study patient decided to undergo radical hysterectomy after seeing her 3D model which was then used to plan and simulate this surgery. Using 3D printers to create patient-specific 3D tumor models may aid cervical cancer patients make treatment decisions. This technology will lead to better surgical and oncological outcomes for cervical cancer patients. J. Surg. Oncol. 2016;114:150-152. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27222318

  8. MT3D: a 3 dimensional magnetotelluric modeling program (user's guide and documentation for Rev. 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Nutter, C.; Wannamaker, P.E.

    1980-11-01

    MT3D.REV1 is a non-interactive computer program written in FORTRAN to do 3-dimensional magnetotelluric modeling. A 3-D volume integral equation has been adapted to simulate the MT response of a 3D body in the earth. An integro-difference scheme has been incorporated to increase the accuracy. This is a user's guide for MT3D.REV1 on the University of Utah Research Institute's (UURI) PRIME 400 computer operating under PRIMOS IV, Rev. 17.

  9. International "Intercomparison of 3-Dimensional (3D) Radiation Codes" (13RC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, Robert F.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    An international "Intercomparison of 3-dimensional (3D) Radiation Codes" 13RC) has been initiated. It is endorsed by the GEWEX Radiation Panel, and funded jointly by the United States Department of Energy ARM program, and by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Radiation Sciences program. It is a 3-phase effort that has as its goals to: (1) understand the errors and limits of 3D methods; (2) provide 'baseline' cases for future 3D code development; (3) promote sharing of 3D tools; (4) derive guidelines for 3D tool selection; and (5) improve atmospheric science education in 3D radiation.

  10. High-speed 3-dimensional imaging in robot-assisted thoracic surgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Naohiro; Akata, Soichi; Hagiwara, Masaru; Yoshida, Koichi; Kato, Yasufumi; Kakihana, Masatoshi; Ohira, Tatsuo; Kawate, Norihiko; Ikeda, Norihiko

    2014-06-01

    We used a high-speed 3-dimensional (3D) image analysis system (SYNAPSE VINCENT, Fujifilm Corp, Tokyo, Japan) to determine the best positioning of robotic arms and instruments preoperatively. The da Vinci S (Intuitive Surgical Inc, Sunnyvale, CA) was easily set up accurately and rapidly for this operation. Preoperative simulation and intraoperative navigation using the SYNAPSE VINCENT for robot-assisted thoracic operations enabled efficient planning of the operation settings. The SYNAPSE VINCENT can detect the tumor location and depict surrounding tissues quickly, accurately, and safely. This system is also excellent for navigational and educational use. PMID:24882302

  11. Design of 3-dimensional complex airplane configurations with specified pressure distribution via optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubrynski, Krzysztof

    1991-01-01

    A subcritical panel method applied to flow analysis and aerodynamic design of complex aircraft configurations is presented. The analysis method is based on linearized, compressible, subsonic flow equations and indirect Dirichlet boundary conditions. Quadratic dipol and linear source distribution on flat panels are applied. In the case of aerodynamic design, the geometry which minimizes differences between design and actual pressure distribution is found iteratively, using numerical optimization technique. Geometry modifications are modeled by surface transpiration concept. Constraints in respect to resulting geometry can be specified. A number of complex 3-dimensional design examples are presented. The software is adopted to personal computers, and as result an unexpected low cost of computations is obtained.

  12. A 3-dimensional finite-difference method for calculating the dynamic coefficients of seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietzen, F. J.; Nordmann, R.

    1989-01-01

    A method to calculate the dynamic coefficients of seals with arbitrary geometry is presented. The Navier-Stokes equations are used in conjunction with the k-e turbulence model to describe the turbulent flow. These equations are solved by a full 3-dimensional finite-difference procedure instead of the normally used perturbation analysis. The time dependence of the equations is introduced by working with a coordinate system rotating with the precession frequency of the shaft. The results of this theory are compared with coefficients calculated by a perturbation analysis and with experimental results.

  13. Growth Factor Priming Differentially Modulates Components of the Extracellular Matrix Proteome in Chondrocytes and Synovium-Derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jennifer C.; Colligan, Ryan M.; Bulinski, J. Chloë; Cook, James L.; Ateshian, Gerard A.; Brown, Lewis M.; Hung, Clark T.

    2014-01-01

    To make progress in cartilage repair it is essential to optimize protocols for two-dimensional cell expansion. Chondrocytes and SDSCs are promising cell sources for cartilage repair. We previously observed that priming with a specific growth factor cocktail (1 ng/mL transforming growth factor-β1, 5 ng/mL basic fibroblast growth factor, and 10 ng/mL platelet-derived growth factor-BB) in two-dimensional culture, led to significant improvement in mechanical and biochemical properties of synovium-derived stem cell (SDSC)-seeded constructs. The current study assessed the effect of growth factor priming on the proteome of canine chondrocytes and SDSCs. In particular, growth factor priming modulated the proteins associated with the extracellular matrix in two-dimensional cultures of chondrocytes and SDSCs, inducing a partial dedifferentiation of chondrocytes (most proteins associated with cartilage were down-regulated in primed chondrocytes) and a partial differentiation of SDSCs (some collagen-related proteins were up-regulated in primed SDSCs). However, when chondrocytes and SDSCs were grown in pellet culture, growth factor-primed cells maintained their chondrogenic potential with respect to glycosaminoglycan and collagen production. In conclusion, the strength of the label-free proteomics technique is that it allows for the determination of changes in components of the extracellular matrix proteome in chondrocytes and SDSCs in response to growth factor priming, which could help in future tissue engineering strategies. PMID:24516581

  14. Electrospun gelatin/polycaprolactone nanofibrous membranes combined with a coculture of bone marrow stromal cells and chondrocytes for cartilage engineering

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaomin; Feng, Bei; Huang, Chuanpei; Wang, Hao; Ge, Yang; Hu, Renjie; Yin, Meng; Xu, Zhiwei; Wang, Wei; Fu, Wei; Zheng, Jinghao

    2015-01-01

    Electrospinning has recently received considerable attention, showing notable potential as a novel method of scaffold fabrication for cartilage engineering. The aim of this study was to use a coculture strategy of chondrocytes combined with electrospun gelatin/polycaprolactone (GT/PCL) membranes, instead of pure chondrocytes, to evaluate the formation of cartilaginous tissue. We prepared the GT/PCL membranes, seeded bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC)/chondrocyte cocultures (75% BMSCs and 25% chondrocytes) in a sandwich model in vitro, and then implanted the constructs subcutaneously into nude mice for 12 weeks. Gross observation, histological and immunohistological evaluation, glycosaminoglycan analyses, Young’s modulus measurement, and immunofluorescence staining were performed postimplantation. We found that the coculture group formed mature cartilage-like tissue, with no statistically significant difference from the chondrocyte group, and labeled BMSCs could differentiate into chondrocyte-like cells under the chondrogenic niche of chondrocytes. This entire strategy indicates that GT/PCL membranes are also a suitable scaffold for stem cell-based cartilage engineering and may provide a potentially clinically feasible approach for cartilage repairs. PMID:25834428

  15. Electrospun gelatin/polycaprolactone nanofibrous membranes combined with a coculture of bone marrow stromal cells and chondrocytes for cartilage engineering.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaomin; Feng, Bei; Huang, Chuanpei; Wang, Hao; Ge, Yang; Hu, Renjie; Yin, Meng; Xu, Zhiwei; Wang, Wei; Fu, Wei; Zheng, Jinghao

    2015-01-01

    Electrospinning has recently received considerable attention, showing notable potential as a novel method of scaffold fabrication for cartilage engineering. The aim of this study was to use a coculture strategy of chondrocytes combined with electrospun gelatin/polycaprolactone (GT/PCL) membranes, instead of pure chondrocytes, to evaluate the formation of cartilaginous tissue. We prepared the GT/PCL membranes, seeded bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC)/chondrocyte cocultures (75% BMSCs and 25% chondrocytes) in a sandwich model in vitro, and then implanted the constructs subcutaneously into nude mice for 12 weeks. Gross observation, histological and immunohistological evaluation, glycosaminoglycan analyses, Young's modulus measurement, and immunofluorescence staining were performed postimplantation. We found that the coculture group formed mature cartilage-like tissue, with no statistically significant difference from the chondrocyte group, and labeled BMSCs could differentiate into chondrocyte-like cells under the chondrogenic niche of chondrocytes. This entire strategy indicates that GT/PCL membranes are also a suitable scaffold for stem cell-based cartilage engineering and may provide a potentially clinically feasible approach for cartilage repairs. PMID:25834428

  16. Effect of the polyamine analogue N1,N11-diethylnorspermine on cell survival and susceptibility to apoptosis of human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Stanic, Ivana; Cetrullo, Silvia; Facchini, Annalisa; Stefanelli, Claudio; Borzì, Rosa Maria; Tantini, Benedetta; Guarnieri, Carlo; Caldarera, Claudio Marcello; Flamigni, Flavio

    2008-07-01

    Chondrocyte survival is closely linked to cartilage integrity, and forms of chondrocyte apoptotic death can contribute to cartilage degeneration in articular diseases. Since growing evidence also implicates polyamines in the control of cell death, we have been investigating the role of polyamine metabolism in chondrocyte survival and apoptosis. Treatment of human C-28/I2 chondrocytes with N(1),N(11)-diethylnorspermine (DENSPM), a polyamine analogue with clinical relevance as an experimental anticancer agent, inhibited polyamine biosynthesis and induced polyamine catabolism, thus rapidly depleting all main polyamines. DENSPM did not increase significantly caspase activity, but provoked a late cell death associated to DNA fragmentation. A short treatment with DENSPM did not reduce cell viability when given alone, but enhanced caspase-3 and -9 activation in chondrocytes exposed to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) and cycloheximide (CHX). A longer treatment with DENSPM however reduced caspase response to TNF plus CHX. Depletion of all polyamines obtained by specific inhibitors of polyamine biosynthesis did not cause cell death and contrasted apoptosis by decreasing caspase activities. In conclusion, following DENSPM treatment, C-28/I2 chondrocytes are initially sensitized to caspase 9-dependent apoptosis in the presence of TNF and CHX and may eventually undergo a late and mainly caspase-independent cell death in the absence of other stimuli. Moreover, these results indicate that a reduction of polyamine levels not only leads to inhibition of cell proliferation, but also of caspase-mediated pathways of chondrocyte apoptosis. PMID:18231987

  17. Chondrocytes expressing intracellular collagen type II enter the cell cycle and co-express collagen type I in monolayer culture.

    PubMed

    Tekari, Adel; Luginbuehl, Reto; Hofstetter, Willy; Egli, Rainer J

    2014-11-01

    For autologous chondrocyte transplantation, articular chondrocytes are harvested from cartilage tissue and expanded in vitro in monolayer culture. We aimed to characterize with a cellular resolution the synthesis of collagen type II (COL2) and collagen type I (COL1) during expansion in order to further understand why these cells lose the potential to form cartilage tissue when re-introduced into a microenvironment that supports chondrogenesis. During expansion for six passages, levels of transcripts encoding COL2 decreased to <0.1%, whereas transcript levels encoding COL1 increased 370-fold as compared to primary chondrocytes. Flow cytometry for intracellular proteins revealed that chondrocytes acquired a COL2/COL1-double positive phenotype during expansion, and the COL2 positive cells were able to enter the cell cycle. While the fraction of COL2 positive cells decreased from 70% to <2% in primary chondrocytes to passage six cells, the fraction of COL1 positive cells increased from <1% to >95%. In parallel to the decrease of the fraction of COL2 positive cells, the cells' potential to form cartilage-like tissue in pellet cultures steadily decreased. Intracellular staining for COL2 enables for characterization of chondrocyte lineage cells in more detail with a cellular resolution, and it may allow predicting the effectiveness of expanded chondrocytes to form cartilage-like tissue. PMID:25043137

  18. Sequential differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in an agarose scaffold promotes a physis-like zonal alignment of chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Jacqueline Frida; See, Kwee Hua; Hua, See Kwee; Yang, Zheng; Zheng, Yang; Hui, James Hoi Po; Po, James Hui Hoi; Lee, Eng Hin; Hin, Lee Eng

    2012-11-01

    Chondrocytes of the epiphyseal growth plate (physis) differentiate and mature in defined linear zones. The current study examines the differentiation of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) into zonal physeal cartilage. hBMSCs were embedded in an agarose scaffold with only the surface of the scaffold in direct contact with the culture medium. The cells were differentiated using a two-step system involving the sequential addition of TGFβ followed by BMP2. The resultant samples displayed a heterogenic population of physis-like collagen type 2 positive cells including proliferating chondrocytes and mature chondrocytes showing hypertrophy, expression of early bone markers and matrix mineralization. Histological analysis revealed a physis-like linear zonal alignment of chondrocytes in varying stages of differentiation. The less mature chondrocytes were seen at the base of the construct while hypertrophic chondrocytes and matrix mineralization was observed closer to the surface of the construct. The described differentiation protocol using hBMSCs in an agarose scaffold can be used to study the factors and conditions that influence the differentiation, proliferation, maturation, and zonal alignment of physeal chondrocytes. PMID:22517299

  19. MiR-34a promotes Fas-mediated cartilage endplate chondrocyte apoptosis by targeting Bcl-2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huajiang; Wang, Jianxi; Hu, Bo; Wu, Xiaodong; Chen, Yu; Li, Renhu; Yuan, Wen

    2015-08-01

    Apoptosis of cartilage endplate (CEP) chondrocytes is associated with the pathogenesis of intervertebral disk degeneration (IDD). Recent studies have shown that miR-34a is crucially involved in chondrocyte apoptosis during osteoarthritic cartilage. Here, we investigated the involvement of miR-34a in CEP chondrocyte apoptosis in IDD. In human degenerated CEP chondrocytes, miRNA (miR)-34a was markedly elevated in association with increased apoptosis. Bioinformatics target prediction identified Bcl-2 as a putative target of miR-34a. Furthermore, miR-34a inhibited Bcl-2 expression by directly targeting their 3'-untranslated regions, and this inhibition was abolished by mutation of the miR-34a binding sites. In vitro, knockdown of miR-34a in human endplate chondrocytes resulted in overexpression of Bcl-2, whereas upregulation of miR-34a led to repression of Bcl-2. Fas-mediated apoptosis was decreased when antagonizing miR-34a with locked nucleotide analog-miR-34a in human endplate chondrocytes. Taken together, our results demonstrate that upregulated miR-34a potentiates Fas-mediated endplate chondrocyte apoptosis, which is associated with IDD. PMID:25910896

  20. Wnt/β-catenin signaling of cartilage canal and osteochondral junction chondrocytes and full thickness cartilage in early equine osteochondrosis.

    PubMed

    Kinsley, Marc A; Semevolos, Stacy A; Duesterdieck-Zellmer, Katja F

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to elucidate gene and protein expression of Wnt signaling molecules in chondrocytes of foals having early osteochondrosis (OC) versus normal controls. The hypothesis was that increased expression of components of Wnt signaling pathway in osteochondral junction (OCJ) and cartilage canal (CC) chondrocytes would be found in early OC when compared to controls. Paraffin-embedded osteochondral samples (7 OC, 8 normal) and cDNA from whole cartilage (7 OC, 10 normal) and chondrocytes surrounding cartilage canals and osteochondral junctions captured with laser capture microdissection (4 OC, 6 normal) were obtained from femoropatellar joints of 17 immature horses. Equine-specific Wnt signaling molecule mRNA expression levels were evaluated by two-step real-time qPCR. Spatial tissue protein expression of β-catenin, Wnt-11, Wnt-4, and Dkk-1 was determined by immunohistochemistry. There was significantly decreased Wnt-11 and increased β-catenin, Wnt-5b, Dkk-1, Lrp6, Wif-1, Axin1, and SC-PEP gene expression in early OC cartilage canal chondrocytes compared to controls. There was also significantly increased β-catenin gene expression in early OC osteochondral junction chondrocytes compared to controls. Based on this study, abundant gene expression differences in OC chondrocytes surrounding cartilage canals suggest pathways associated with catabolism and inhibition of chondrocyte maturation are targeted in early OC pathogenesis. PMID:25676127

  1. Latexin is involved in bone morphogenetic protein-2-induced chondrocyte differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kadouchi, Ichiro; Sakamoto, Kei; Tangjiao, Liu; Murakami, Takashi; Kobayashi, Eiji; Hoshino, Yuichi; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2009-01-16

    Latexin is the only known carboxypeptidase A inhibitor in mammals. We previously demonstrated that BMP-2 significantly induced latexin expression in Runx2-deficient mesenchymal cells (RD-C6 cells), during chondrocyte and osteoblast differentiation. In this study, we investigated latexin expression in the skeleton and its role in chondrocyte differentiation. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that proliferating and prehypertrophic chondrocytes expressed latexin during skeletogenesis and bone fracture repair. In the early phase of bone fracture, latexin mRNA expression was dramatically upregulated. BMP-2 upregulated the expression of the mRNAs of latexin, Col2a1, and the gene encoding aggrecan (Agc1) in a micromass culture of C3H10T1/2 cells. Overexpression of latexin additively stimulated the BMP-2-induced expression of the mRNAs of Col2a, Agc1, and Col10a1. BMP-2 treatment upregulated Sox9 expression, and Sox9 stimulated the promoter activity of latexin. These results indicate that latexin is involved in BMP-2-induced chondrocyte differentiation and plays an important role in skeletogenesis and skeletal regeneration.

  2. Smpd3 Expression in both Chondrocytes and Osteoblasts Is Required for Normal Endochondral Bone Development.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingjing; Manickam, Garthiga; Ray, Seemun; Oh, Chun-do; Yasuda, Hideyo; Moffatt, Pierre; Murshed, Monzur

    2016-09-01

    Sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 3 (SMPD3), a lipid-metabolizing enzyme present in bone and cartilage, has been identified to be a key regulator of skeletal development. A homozygous loss-of-function mutation called fragilitas ossium (fro) in the Smpd3 gene causes poor bone and cartilage mineralization resulting in severe congenital skeletal deformities. Here we show that Smpd3 expression in ATDC5 chondrogenic cells is downregulated by parathyroid hormone-related peptide through transcription factor SOX9. Furthermore, we show that transgenic expression of Smpd3 in the chondrocytes of fro/fro mice corrects the cartilage but not the bone abnormalities. Additionally, we report the generation of Smpd3(flox/flox) mice for the tissue-specific inactivation of Smpd3 using the Cre-loxP system. We found that the skeletal phenotype in Smpd3(flox/flox); Osx-Cre mice, in which the Smpd3 gene is ablated in both late-stage chondrocytes and osteoblasts, closely mimics the skeletal phenotype in fro/fro mice. On the other hand, Smpd3(flox/flox); Col2a1-Cre mice, in which the Smpd3 gene is knocked out in chondrocytes only, recapitulate the fro/fro mouse cartilage phenotype. This work demonstrates that Smpd3 expression in both chondrocytes and osteoblasts is required for normal endochondral bone development. PMID:27325675

  3. Acquiring Chondrocyte Phenotype from Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells under Inflammatory Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Masahiro; Yamaoka, Kunihiro; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2014-01-01

    An inflammatory milieu breaks down the cartilage matrix and induces chondrocyte apoptosis, resulting in cartilage destruction in patients with cartilage degenerative diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis. Because of the limited regenerative ability of chondrocytes, defects in cartilage are irreversible and difficult to repair. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are expected to be a new tool for cartilage repair because they are present in the cartilage and are able to differentiate into multiple lineages of cells, including chondrocytes. Although clinical trials using MSCs for patients with cartilage defects have already begun, its efficacy and repair mechanisms remain unknown. A PubMed search conducted in October 2014 using the following medical subject headings (MeSH) terms: mesenchymal stromal cells, chondrogenesis, and cytokines resulted in 204 articles. The titles and abstracts were screened and nine articles relevant to “inflammatory” cytokines and “human” MSCs were identified. Herein, we review the cell biology and mechanisms of chondrocyte phenotype acquisition from human MSCs in an inflammatory milieu and discuss the clinical potential of MSCs for cartilage repair. PMID:25407530

  4. Role of lubricin and boundary lubrication in the prevention of chondrocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Waller, Kimberly A; Zhang, Ling X; Elsaid, Khaled A; Fleming, Braden C; Warman, Matthew L; Jay, Gregory D

    2013-04-01

    Osteoarthritis is a complex disease involving the mechanical breakdown of articular cartilage in the presence of altered joint mechanics and chondrocyte death, but the connection between these factors is not well established. Lubricin, a mucinous glycoprotein encoded by the PRG4 gene, provides boundary lubrication in articular joints. Joint friction is elevated and accompanied by accelerated cartilage damage in humans and mice that have genetic deficiency of lubricin. Here, we investigated the relationship between coefficient of friction and chondrocyte death using ex vivo and in vitro measurements of friction and apoptosis. We observed increases in whole-joint friction and cellular apoptosis in lubricin knockout mice compared with wild-type mice. When we used an in vitro bovine explant cartilage-on-cartilage bearing system, we observed a direct correlation between coefficient of friction and chondrocyte apoptosis in the superficial layers of cartilage. In the bovine explant system, the addition of lubricin as a test lubricant significantly lowered the static coefficient of friction and number of apoptotic chondrocytes. These results demonstrate a direct connection between lubricin, boundary lubrication, and cell survival and suggest that supplementation of synovial fluid with lubricin may be an effective treatment to prevent cartilage deterioration in patients with genetic or acquired deficiency of lubricin. PMID:23530215

  5. Processed xenogenic cartilage as innovative biomatrix for cartilage tissue engineering: effects on chondrocyte differentiation and function.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Silke; Elsaesser, Alexander F; Koerber, Ludwig; Goldberg-Bockhorn, Eva; Seitz, Andreas M; Bermueller, Christian; Dürselen, Lutz; Ignatius, Anita; Breiter, Roman; Rotter, Nicole

    2015-12-01

    One key point in the development of new bioimplant matrices for the reconstruction and replacement of cartilage defects is to provide an adequate microenvironment to ensure chondrocyte migration and de novo synthesis of cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM). A recently developed decellularization and sterilization process maintains the three-dimensional (3D) collagen structure of native septal cartilage while increasing matrix porosity, which is considered to be crucial for cartilage tissue engineering. Human primary nasal septal chondrocytes were amplified in monolayer culture and 3D-cultured on processed porcine nasal septal cartilage scaffolds. The influence of chondrogenic growth factors on neosynthesis of ECM proteins was examined at the protein and gene expression levels. Seeding experiments demonstrated that processed xenogenic cartilage matrices provide excellent environmental properties for human nasal septal chondrocytes with respect to cell adhesion, migration into the matrix and neosynthesis of cartilage-specific ECM proteins, such as collagen type II and aggrecan. Matrix biomechanical stability indicated that the constructs retrieve full stability and function during 3D culture for up to 42 days, proportional to collagen type II and GAG production. Thus, processed xenogenic cartilage offers a suitable environment for human nasal chondrocytes and has promising potential for cartilage tissue engineering in the head and neck region. PMID:23193064

  6. FGF signaling in the osteoprogenitor lineage non-autonomously regulates postnatal chondrocyte proliferation and skeletal growth.

    PubMed

    Karuppaiah, Kannan; Yu, Kai; Lim, Joohyun; Chen, Jianquan; Smith, Craig; Long, Fanxin; Ornitz, David M

    2016-05-15

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling is important for skeletal development; however, cell-specific functions, redundancy and feedback mechanisms regulating bone growth are poorly understood. FGF receptors 1 and 2 (Fgfr1 and Fgfr2) are both expressed in the osteoprogenitor lineage. Double conditional knockout mice, in which both receptors were inactivated using an osteoprogenitor-specific Cre driver, appeared normal at birth; however, these mice showed severe postnatal growth defects that include an ∼50% reduction in body weight and bone mass, and impaired longitudinal bone growth. Histological analysis showed reduced cortical and trabecular bone, suggesting cell-autonomous functions of FGF signaling during postnatal bone formation. Surprisingly, the double conditional knockout mice also showed growth plate defects and an arrest in chondrocyte proliferation. We provide genetic evidence of a non-cell-autonomous feedback pathway regulating Fgf9, Fgf18 and Pthlh expression, which led to increased expression and signaling of Fgfr3 in growth plate chondrocytes and suppression of chondrocyte proliferation. These observations show that FGF signaling in the osteoprogenitor lineage is obligately coupled to chondrocyte proliferation and the regulation of longitudinal bone growth. PMID:27052727

  7. 3D Hydrogel Scaffolds for Articular Chondrocyte Culture and Cartilage Generation.

    PubMed

    Smeriglio, Piera; Lai, Janice H; Yang, Fan; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Human articular cartilage is highly susceptible to damage and has limited self-repair and regeneration potential. Cell-based strategies to engineer cartilage tissue offer a promising solution to repair articular cartilage. To select the optimal cell source for tissue repair, it is important to develop an appropriate culture platform to systematically examine the biological and biomechanical differences in the tissue-engineered cartilage by different cell sources. Here we applied a three-dimensional (3D) biomimetic hydrogel culture platform to systematically examine cartilage regeneration potential of juvenile, adult, and osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes. The 3D biomimetic hydrogel consisted of synthetic component poly(ethylene glycol) and bioactive component chondroitin sulfate, which provides a physiologically relevant microenvironment for in vitro culture of chondrocytes. In addition, the scaffold may be potentially used for cell delivery for cartilage repair in vivo. Cartilage tissue engineered in the scaffold can be evaluated using quantitative gene expression, immunofluorescence staining, biochemical assays, and mechanical testing. Utilizing these outcomes, we were able to characterize the differential regenerative potential of chondrocytes of varying age, both at the gene expression level and in the biochemical and biomechanical properties of the engineered cartilage tissue. The 3D culture model could be applied to investigate the molecular and functional differences among chondrocytes and progenitor cells from different stages of normal or aberrant development. PMID:26484414

  8. Diosgenin inhibits IL-1β-induced expression of inflammatory mediators in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Leisheng; Ma, Tian; Zheng, Yanpin; Lv, Shiqiao; Li, Yu; Liu, Shaoxian

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that the inflammatory cytokines play important roles in osteoarthritis (OA). Diosgenin is a steroidal saponin found in several plants including Solanum and Dioscorea species and possesses diverse biological activities including anti-inflammatory properties. However, the role of diosgenin in inflammatory responses in OA chondrocytes is still unclear. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory properties of diosgenin in human OA chondrocytes. We found that diosgenin inhibited the production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) induced by interleukin-1-beta (IL-1β). Diosgenin significantly inhibited the IL-1β-stimulated expression of metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), MMP-13, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in human OA chondrocytes. In addition, diosgenin suppressed the degradation of IκB-α in IL-1β-induced human OA chondrocytes. Taken together, this study showed that diosgenin can effectively inhibit the IL-1β-induced expression of inflammatory mediators, suggesting that diosgenin may be a potential agent in the treatment of OA. PMID:26191174

  9. Diosgenin inhibits IL-1β-induced expression of inflammatory mediators in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Leisheng; Ma, Tian; Zheng, Yanpin; Lv, Shiqiao; Li, Yu; Liu, Shaoxian

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that the inflammatory cytokines play important roles in osteoarthritis (OA). Diosgenin is a steroidal saponin found in several plants including Solanum and Dioscorea species and possesses diverse biological activities including anti-inflammatory properties. However, the role of diosgenin in inflammatory responses in OA chondrocytes is still unclear. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory properties of diosgenin in human OA chondrocytes. We found that diosgenin inhibited the production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) induced by interleukin-1-beta (IL-1β). Diosgenin significantly inhibited the IL-1β-stimulated expression of metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), MMP-13, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in human OA chondrocytes. In addition, diosgenin suppressed the degradation of IκB-α in IL-1β-induced human OA chondrocytes. Taken together, this study showed that diosgenin can effectively inhibit the IL-1β-induced expression of inflammatory mediators, suggesting that diosgenin may be a potential agent in the treatment of OA. PMID:26191174

  10. Effects of allicin on the proliferation and cell cycle of chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Shi, Hong-Yan; Hua, Yong-Xin; Gao, Chen; Xia, Qing; Yang, Guang; Li, Bin

    2015-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the effect of allicin on the proliferation and the cell cycle distribution of the chondrocytes. MTT assay and flow cytometry were used for the evaluation of the effect of allicin on cell proliferative and the cell cycle distribution, respectively of the chondrocytes. The reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analysis were respectively used for the analysis of mRNA and protein expression levels of cyclin D1, CDK4 and CDK6. The results revealed that exposure of the chondrocytes to allicin at a concentration of 40 µM significantly promoted the cell viability. Treatment of the cells with 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 μg/mL of allicin enhanced the cell viability by 2.5.47 ± 0.86, 5.43 ± 0.66, 10.74 ± 1.48, 35.89 ± 3.78, and 32.21 ± 2.92%, respectively after 36 h compared to control cells. Allicin exposure caused a marked decrease in the percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase with a subsequent increase in the S phase population. Furthermore, allicin treatment enhanced the expression of cyclin D1, CDK4 and CDK6. Therefore, allicin treatment enhances the proliferation of chondrocytes by promoting the transition from G1 to S phase of the cell cycle through increase in the expression of cyclin D1, CDK4 and CDK6 levels. PMID:26722440

  11. 3D Hydrogel Scaffolds for Articular Chondrocyte Culture and Cartilage Generation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Human articular cartilage is highly susceptible to damage and has limited self-repair and regeneration potential. Cell-based strategies to engineer cartilage tissue offer a promising solution to repair articular cartilage. To select the optimal cell source for tissue repair, it is important to develop an appropriate culture platform to systematically examine the biological and biomechanical differences in the tissue-engineered cartilage by different cell sources. Here we applied a three-dimensional (3D) biomimetic hydrogel culture platform to systematically examine cartilage regeneration potential of juvenile, adult, and osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes. The 3D biomimetic hydrogel consisted of synthetic component poly(ethylene glycol) and bioactive component chondroitin sulfate, which provides a physiologically relevant microenvironment for in vitro culture of chondrocytes. In addition, the scaffold may be potentially used for cell delivery for cartilage repair in vivo. Cartilage tissue engineered in the scaffold can be evaluated using quantitative gene expression, immunofluorescence staining, biochemical assays, and mechanical testing. Utilizing these outcomes, we were able to characterize the differential regenerative potential of chondrocytes of varying age, both at the gene expression level and in the biochemical and biomechanical properties of the engineered cartilage tissue. The 3D culture model could be applied to investigate the molecular and functional differences among chondrocytes and progenitor cells from different stages of normal or aberrant development. PMID:26484414

  12. Distinct horizontal patterns in the spatial organization of superficial zone chondrocytes of human joints

    PubMed Central

    Rolauffs, Bernd; Williams, James M.; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Kuettner, Klaus E.; Cole, Ada A.

    2008-01-01

    A better understanding of the unique cellular and functional properties of the superficial zone of articular cartilage may aid current strategies in tissue engineering which attempts a layered design for the repair of cartilage lesions to avert or postpone the onset of osteoarthritis. However, data pertaining to the cellular organization of non-degenerated superficial zone of articular cartilage is not available for most human joints. The present study analyzed the arrangement of chondrocytes of non-degenerated human joints (shoulder, elbow, knee, and ankle) by using fluorescence microscopy of the superficial zone in a top-down view. The resulting horizontal chondrocyte arrangements were tested for randomness, homogeneity or a significant grouping via point pattern analysis and were correlated with the joint type in which they occurred. The present study demonstrated that human superficial chondrocytes occurred in four distinct patterns of strings, clusters, pairs or single chondrocytes. Those patterns represented a significant grouping (p<0.0001) with horizontal alignment. Each articular joint surface was dominated by only one of these four patterns (p<0.001). Specific patterns correlated with specific diarthrodial joint types (p<0.001). Further studies need to establish whether these organizational patterns are a consequence of their surrounding environment or whether they are linked to a functional purpose. PMID:18325787

  13. Distinct horizontal patterns in the spatial organization of superficial zone chondrocytes of human joints.

    PubMed

    Rolauffs, Bernd; Williams, James M; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Kuettner, Klaus E; Cole, Ada A

    2008-05-01

    A better understanding of the unique cellular and functional properties of the superficial zone of articular cartilage may aid current strategies in tissue engineering which attempts a layered design for the repair of cartilage lesions to avert or postpone the onset of osteoarthritis. However, data pertaining to the cellular organization of non-degenerated superficial zone of articular cartilage is not available for most human joints. The present study analyzed the arrangement of chondrocytes of non-degenerated human joints (shoulder, elbow, knee, and ankle) by using fluorescence microscopy of the superficial zone in a top-down view. The resulting horizontal chondrocyte arrangements were tested for randomness, homogeneity or a significant grouping via point pattern analysis and were correlated with the joint type in which they occurred. The present study demonstrated that human superficial chondrocytes occurred in four distinct patterns of strings, clusters, pairs or single chondrocytes. Those patterns represented a significant grouping (p < 0.0001) with horizontal alignment. Each articular joint surface was dominated by only one of these four patterns (p < 0.001). Specific patterns correlated with specific diarthrodial joint types (p < 0.001). Further studies need to establish whether these organizational patterns are a consequence of their surrounding environment or whether they are linked to a functional purpose. PMID:18325787

  14. Effects of allicin on the proliferation and cell cycle of chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Shi, Hong-Yan; Hua, Yong-Xin; Gao, Chen; Xia, Qing; Yang, Guang; Li, Bin

    2015-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the effect of allicin on the proliferation and the cell cycle distribution of the chondrocytes. MTT assay and flow cytometry were used for the evaluation of the effect of allicin on cell proliferative and the cell cycle distribution, respectively of the chondrocytes. The reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analysis were respectively used for the analysis of mRNA and protein expression levels of cyclin D1, CDK4 and CDK6. The results revealed that exposure of the chondrocytes to allicin at a concentration of 40 µM significantly promoted the cell viability. Treatment of the cells with 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 μg/mL of allicin enhanced the cell viability by 2.5.47 ± 0.86, 5.43 ± 0.66, 10.74 ± 1.48, 35.89 ± 3.78, and 32.21 ± 2.92%, respectively after 36 h compared to control cells. Allicin exposure caused a marked decrease in the percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase with a subsequent increase in the S phase population. Furthermore, allicin treatment enhanced the expression of cyclin D1, CDK4 and CDK6. Therefore, allicin treatment enhances the proliferation of chondrocytes by promoting the transition from G1 to S phase of the cell cycle through increase in the expression of cyclin D1, CDK4 and CDK6 levels. PMID:26722440

  15. Differential Activation and Inhibition of RhoA by Fluid Flow Induced Shear Stress in Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Qiaoqiao; Kim, Seung joon; Yokota, Hiroki; Na, Sungsoo

    2013-01-01

    Physical force environment is a major factor that influences cellular homeostasis and remodeling. It is not well understood, however, as a potential role of force intensities in the induction of cellular mechanotransduction. Using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based approach, we asked whether activities of GTPase RhoA in chondrocytes are dependent on intensities of flow induced shear stress. We hypothesized that RhoA activities can be either elevated or reduced by selecting different levels of shear stress intensities. The result indicate that C28/I2 chondrocytes have increased RhoA activities in response to high shear stress (10 or 20 dyn/cm2), whereas a decrease in activity was seen with an intermediate shear stress of 5 dyn/cm2. No changes were seen under low shear stress (2 dyn/cm2). The observed 2-level switch of RhoA activities is closely linked to the shear stress-induced alterations in actin cytoskeleton and traction forces. In the presence of constitutively active RhoA (RhoA-V14), intermediate shear stress suppressed RhoA activities, while high shear stress failed to activate them. In chondrocytes, expression of various metalloproteinases is, in part, regulated by shear and normal stresses through a network of GTPases. Collectively, the data suggest that intensities of shear stress are critical in differential activation and inhibition of RhoA activities in chondrocytes. PMID:23408748

  16. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 impacts chondrocyte hypertrophic differentiation during endochondral ossification.

    PubMed

    Welting, T J M; Caron, M M J; Emans, P J; Janssen, M P F; Sanen, K; Coolsen, M M E; Voss, L; Surtel, D A M; Cremers, A; Voncken, J W; van Rhijn, L W

    2011-01-01

    Skeletogenesis and bone fracture healing involve endochondral ossification, a process during which cartilaginous primordia are gradually replaced by bone tissue. In line with a role for cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the endochondral ossification process, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were reported to negatively affect bone fracture healing due to impaired osteogenesis. However, a role for COX-2 activity in the chondrogenic phase of endochondral ossification has not been addressed before. We show that COX-2 activity fulfils an important regulatory function in chondrocyte hypertrophic differentiation. Our data reveal essential cross-talk between COX-2 and bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2) during chondrocyte hypertrophic differentiation. BMP-2 mediated chondrocyte hypertrophy is associated with increased COX-2 expression and pharmacological inhibition of COX-2 activity by NSAIDs (e.g., Celecoxib) decreases hypertrophic differentiation in various chondrogenic models in vitro and in vivo, while leaving early chondrogenic development unaltered. Our findings demonstrate that COX-2 activity is a novel factor partaking in chondrocyte hypertrophy in the context of endochondral ossification and these observations provide a novel etiological perspective on the adverse effects of NSAIDs on bone fracture healing and have important implications for the use of NSAIDs during endochondral skeletal development. PMID:22183916

  17. INHIBITION OF CELL-MATRIX ADHESIONS PREVENTS CARTILAGE CHONDROCYTE DEATH FOLLOWING IMPACT INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Kee W.; Buckwalter, Joseph A.; Martin, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Focal adhesions are transmembrane protein complexes that attach chondrocytes to the pericellular cartilage matrix and in turn, are linked to intracellular organelles via cytoskeleton. We previously found that excessive compression of articular cartilage leads to cytoskeleton-dependent chondrocyte death. Here we tested the hypothesis that this process also requires integrin activation and signaling via focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Src family kinase (SFK). Osteochondral explants were treated with FAK and SFK inhibitors (FAKi, SFKi respectively) for 2 hours and then subjected to a death-inducing impact load. Chondrocyte viability was assessed by confocal microscopy immediately and at 24 hours post-impact. With no treatment immediate post-impact viability was 59%. Treatment with 10μM SFKi, 10μM or 100μM FAKi improved viability to 80%, 77%, and 82% respectively (p<0.05). After 24 hours viability declined to 34% in controls, 48% with 10μM SFKi, 45% with 10μM FAKi, and 56% with 100μM FAKi (p<0.01) treatment. These results confirmed that most of the acute chondrocyte mortality was FAK- and SFK-dependent, which implicates integrin-cytoskeleton interactions in the death signaling pathway. Together with previous findings, these data support the hypothesis that the excessive tissue strains accompanying impact loading induce death via a pathway initiated by strain on cell adhesion receptors. PMID:24249698

  18. NF-{kappa}B regulates Lef1 gene expression in chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Kangsun; Choi, Yoo Duk; Nam, Jong Hee; Park, Zeeyoung; Im, Sin-Hyeog . E-mail: imsh@gist.ac.kr

    2007-06-08

    The relation of Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling to osteoarthritis progression has been revealed with little information on the underlying molecular mechanism. In this study we found overexpression of Lef1 in cartilage tissue of osteoarthritic patients and elucidated molecular mechanism of NF-{kappa}B-mediated Lef1 gene regulation in chondrocytes. Treatment of IL-1{beta} augmented Lef1 upregulation and nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B in chondrocytes. Under IL-1{beta} signaling, treatment of NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation inhibitor SN-50 reduced Lef1 expression. A conserved NF-{kappa}B-binding site between mouse and human was selected through bioinformatic analysis and mapped at the 14 kb upstream of Lef1 transcription initiation site. NF-{kappa}B binding to the site was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Lef1 expression was synergistically upregulated by interactions of NF-{kappa}B with Lef1/{beta}-catenin in chondrocytes. Our results suggest a pivotal role of NF-{kappa}B in Lef1 expression in arthritic chondrocytes or cartilage degeneration.

  19. Role of Chondrocytes in Cartilage Formation, Progression of Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Akkiraju, Hemanth; Nohe, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) covers the diarthrodial joints and is responsible for the mechanical distribution of loads across the joints. The majority of its structure and function is controlled by chondrocytes that regulate Extracellular Matrix (ECM) turnover and maintain tissue homeostasis. Imbalance in their function leads to degenerative diseases like Osteoarthritis (OA). OA is characterized by cartilage degradation, osteophyte formation and stiffening of joints. Cartilage degeneration is a consequence of chondrocyte hypertrophy along with the expression of proteolytic enzymes. Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs) and A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase with Thrombospondin Motifs (ADAMTS) are an example of these enzymes that degrade the ECM. Signaling cascades involved in limb patterning and cartilage repair play a role in OA progression. However, the regulation of these remains to be elucidated. Further the role of stem cells and mature chondrocytes in OA progression is unclear. The progress in cell based therapies that utilize Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) infusion for cartilage repair may lead to new therapeutics in the long term. However, many questions are unanswered such as the efficacy of MSCs usage in therapy. This review focuses on the role of chondrocytes in cartilage formation and the progression of OA. Moreover, it summarizes possible alternative therapeutic approaches using MSC infusion for cartilage restoration. PMID:27347486

  20. The Morphology and Functions of Articular Chondrocytes on a Honeycomb-Patterned Surface

    PubMed Central

    Eniwumide, Joshua O.; Tanaka, Masaru; Nagai, Nobuhiro; Morita, Yuka; de Bruijn, Joost; Yamamoto, Sadaaki; Onodera, Shin; Kondo, Eiji; Yasuda, Kazunori; Shimomura, Masatsugu

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the potential of a novel micropatterned substrate for neocartilage formation. Articular chondrocytes were cultured on poly(ɛ-caprolactone) materials whose surfaces were either flat or honeycomb-patterned. The latter was prepared using a novel self-organization technique, while the former, was prepared by spin-coating. The chondrocytes attached and proliferated on both surfaces. On the honeycomb films, chondrocytes were found at the top surface and encased within the 10 μm pores. Meanwhile, chondrocytes on the spin-coated surface flattened out. Accumulation of DNA and keratin sulphate was comparatively higher on the honeycomb films within the first 7 days. At their respective peaks, DNA concentration increased on the honeycomb and flat surfaces by approximately 210% and 400% of their day 1 values, respectively. However, cultures on the flat surface took longer to peak. Extracellular Matrix (ECM) concentrations peaked at 900% and 320% increases for the honeycomb and flat cultures. Type II collagen was upregulated on the honeycomb and flat surfaces by as much as 28% and 25% of their day 1 values, while aggrecan was downregulated with time, by 3.4% and 7.4%. These initial results demonstrate the potential usefulness of honeycomb-based scaffolds during early cultures neocartilage and soft tissue engineering. PMID:24804237

  1. A novel form of chondrocyte stress is triggered by a COMP mutation causing pseudoachondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Suleman, Farhana; Gualeni, Benedetta; Gregson, Hannah J; Leighton, Matthew P; Piróg, Katarzyna A; Edwards, Sarah; Holden, Paul; Boot-Handford, Raymond P; Briggs, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    Pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) results from mutations in cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) and the p.D469del mutation within the type III repeats of COMP accounts for approximately 30% of PSACH. To determine disease mechanisms of PSACH in vivo, we introduced the Comp D469del mutation into the mouse genome. Mutant animals were normal at birth but grew slower than their wild-type littermates and developed short-limb dwarfism. In the growth plates of mutant mice chondrocyte columns were reduced in number and poorly organized, while mutant COMP was retained within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of cells. Chondrocyte proliferation was reduced and apoptosis was both increased and spatially dysregulated. Previous studies on COMP mutations have shown mutant COMP is co-localized with chaperone proteins, and we have reported an unfolded protein response (UPR) in mouse models of PSACH-MED (multiple epiphyseal dysplasia) harboring mutations in Comp (T585M) and Matn3, Comp etc (V194D). However, we found no evidence of UPR in this mouse model of PSACH. In contrast, microarray analysis identified expression changes in groups of genes implicated in oxidative stress, cell cycle regulation, and apoptosis, which is consistent with the chondrocyte pathology. Overall, these data suggest that a novel form of chondrocyte stress triggered by the expression of mutant COMP is central to the pathogenesis of PSACH. PMID:22006726

  2. Chondrocyte spheroids on microfabricated PEG hydrogel surface and their noninvasive functional monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Hidenori; Nagamura, Masako; Kaneko, Akie; Kutsuzawa, Koichi; Sakata, Toshiya; Miyahara, Yuji

    2012-12-01

    A two-dimensional microarray of 10 000 (100 × 100) chondrocyte spheroids was constructed with a 100 μm spacing on a micropatterned gold electrode that was coated with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels. The PEGylated surface as a cytophobic region was regulated by controlling the gel structure through photolithography. In this way, a PEG hydrogel was modulated enough to inhibit outgrowth of chondrocytes from a cell adhering region in the horizontal direction, which is critical for inducing formation of three-dimensional chondrocyte aggregations (spheroids) within 24 h. We further report noninvasive monitoring of the cellular functional change at the cell membrane using a chondrocyte-based field effect transistor. This measurement is based on detection of extracellular potential change induced as a result of the interaction between extracellular matrix protein secreted from spheroid and substrate at the cell membrane. The interface potential change at the cell membrane/gate interface can be monitored during the differentiation of spheroids without any labeling materials. Our measurements of the time evolution of the interface potential provide important information for understanding the uptake kinetics for cellular differentiation.

  3. Oxidative Stress Promotes Peroxiredoxin Hyperoxidation and Attenuates Pro-survival Signaling in Aging Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Collins, John A; Wood, Scott T; Nelson, Kimberly J; Rowe, Meredith A; Carlson, Cathy S; Chubinskaya, Susan; Poole, Leslie B; Furdui, Cristina M; Loeser, Richard F

    2016-03-25

    Oxidative stress-mediated post-translational modifications of redox-sensitive proteins are postulated as a key mechanism underlying age-related cellular dysfunction and disease progression. Peroxiredoxins (PRX) are critical intracellular antioxidants that also regulate redox signaling events. Age-related osteoarthritis is a common form of arthritis that has been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of aging and oxidative stress on chondrocyte intracellular signaling, with a specific focus on oxidation of cytosolic PRX2 and mitochondrial PRX3. Menadione was used as a model to induce cellular oxidative stress. Compared with chondrocytes isolated from young adult humans, chondrocytes from older adults exhibited higher levels of PRX1-3 hyperoxidation basally and under conditions of oxidative stress. Peroxiredoxin hyperoxidation was associated with inhibition of pro-survival Akt signaling and stimulation of pro-death p38 signaling. These changes were prevented in cultured human chondrocytes by adenoviral expression of catalase targeted to the mitochondria (MCAT) and in cartilage explants from MCAT transgenic mice. Peroxiredoxin hyperoxidation was observedin situin human cartilage sections from older adults and in osteoarthritic cartilage. MCAT transgenic mice exhibited less age-related osteoarthritis. These findings demonstrate that age-related oxidative stress can disrupt normal physiological signaling and contribute to osteoarthritis and suggest peroxiredoxin hyperoxidation as a potential mechanism. PMID:26797130

  4. Chondrocyte BMP2 signaling plays an essential role in bone fracture healing

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Meng; Jin, Hongting; Wang, Baoli; Yukata, Kiminori; Sheu, Tzong-jen; Ke, Qiao Han; Tong, Peijian; Im, Hee-Jeong; Xiao, Guozhi; Chen, Di

    2012-01-01

    The specific role of endogenous Bmp2 gene in chondrocytes and in osteoblasts in fracture healing was investigated by generation and analysis of chondrocyte- and osteoblast-specific Bmp2 conditional knockout (cKO) mice. The unilateral open transverse tibial fractures were created in these Bmp2 cKO mice. Bone fracture callus samples were collected and analyzed by X-ray, micro-CT, histology analyses, biomechanical testing and gene expression assays. The results demonstrated that the lack of Bmp2 expression in chondrocytes leads to a prolonged cartilage callus formation and a delayed osteogenesis initiation and progression into mineralization phase with lower biomechanical properties. In contrast, when the Bmp2 gene was deleted in osteoblasts, the mice showed no significant difference in the fracture healing process compared to control mice. These findings suggest that endogenous BMP2 expression in chondrocytes may play an essential role in cartilage callus maturation at an early stage of fracture healing. Our studies may provide important information for clinical application of BMP2. PMID:23107765

  5. Evaluation of a mPEG-polyester-based hydrogel as cell carrier for chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Peng, Sydney; Yang, Shu-Rui; Ko, Chao-Yin; Peng, Yu-Shiang; Chu, I-Ming

    2013-11-01

    Temperature-sensitive hydrogels are attractive alternatives to porous cell-seeded scaffolds and is minimally invasive through simple injection and in situ gelling. In this study, we compared the performance of two types of temperature-sensitive hydrogels on chondrocytes encapsulation for the use of tissue engineering of cartilage. The two hydrogels are composed of methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)- poly(lactic-co-valerolactone) (mPEG-PVLA), and methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic- co-glycolide) (mPEG-PLGA). Osmolarity and pH were optimized through the manipulation of polymer concentration and dispersion medium. Chondrocytes proliferation in mPEG-PVLA hydrogels was observed as well as accumulation of GAGs and collagen. On the other hand, chondrocytes encapsulated in mPEG-PLGA hydrogels showed low viability and chondrogenesis. Also, mPEG-PVLA hydrogel, which is more hydrophobic, retained physical integrity after 14 days while mPEG-PLGA hydrogel underwent full degradation due to faster hydrolysis rate and more pronounced acidic self-catalyzed degradation. The mPEG-PVLA hydrogel can be furthered tuned by manipulation of molecular weights to obtain hydrogels with different swelling and degradation characteristics, which may be useful as producing a selection of hydrogels compatible with different cell types. Taken together, these results demonstrate that mPEG-PVLA hydrogels are promising to serve as three-dimensional cell carriers for chondrocytes and potentially applicable in cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:24039062

  6. Tissue responses against tissue-engineered cartilage consisting of chondrocytes encapsulated within non-absorbable hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Sanshiro; Fujihara, Yuko; Sakamoto, Tomoaki; Asawa, Yukiyo; Komura, Makoto; Nagata, Satoru; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Hoshi, Kazuto

    2013-01-01

    To disclose the influence of foreign body responses raised against a non-absorbable hydrogel consisting of tissue-engineered cartilage, we embedded human/canine chondrocytes within agarose and transplanted them into subcutaneous pockets in nude mice and donor beagles. One month after transplantation, cartilage formation was observed in the experiments using human chondrocytes in nude mice. No significant invasion of blood cells was noted in the areas where the cartilage was newly formed. Around the tissue-engineered cartilage, agarose fragments, a dense fibrous connective tissue and many macrophages were observed. On the other hand, no cartilage tissue was detected in the autologous transplantation of canine chondrocytes. Few surviving chondrocytes were observed in the agarose and no accumulation of blood cells was observed in the inner parts of the transplants. Localizations of IgG and complements were noted in areas of agarose, and also in the devitalized cells embedded within the agarose. Even if we had inhibited the proximity of the blood cells to the transplanted cells, the survival of the cells could not be secured. We suggest that these cytotoxic mechanisms seem to be associated not only with macrophages but also with soluble factors, including antibodies and complements. PMID:21916014

  7. The Properties of Chondrocyte Membrane Reservoirs and Their Role in Impact-Induced Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Moo, Eng Kuan; Amrein, Matthias; Epstein, Marcelo; Duvall, Mike; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Herzog, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Impact loading of articular cartilage causes extensive chondrocyte death. Cell membranes have a limited elastic range of 3–4% strain but are protected from direct stretch during physiological loading by their membrane reservoir, an intricate pattern of membrane folds. Using a finite-element model, we suggested previously that access to the membrane reservoir is strain-rate-dependent and that during impact loading, the accessible membrane reservoir is drastically decreased, so that strains applied to chondrocytes are directly transferred to cell membranes, which fail when strains exceed 3–4%. However, experimental support for this proposal is lacking. The purpose of this study was to measure the accessible membrane reservoir size for different membrane strain rates using membrane tethering techniques with atomic force microscopy. We conducted atomic force spectroscopy on isolated chondrocytes (n = 87). A micron-sized cantilever was used to extract membrane tethers from cell surfaces at constant pulling rates. Membrane tethers could be identified as force plateaus in the resulting force-displacement curves. Six pulling rates were tested (1, 5, 10, 20, 40, and 80 μm/s). The size of the membrane reservoir, represented by the membrane tether surface areas, decreased exponentially with increasing pulling rates. The current results support our theoretical findings that chondrocytes exposed to impact loading die because of membrane ruptures caused by high tensile membrane strain rates. PMID:24094400

  8. Changes in Morphology, Gene Expression and Protein Content in Chondrocytes Cultured on a Random Positioning Machine

    PubMed Central

    Aleshcheva, Ganna; Sahana, Jayashree; Ma, Xiao; Hauslage, Jens; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Egli, Marcel; Infanger, Manfred; Bauer, Johann; Grimm, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering of chondrocytes on a Random Positioning Machine (RPM) is a new strategy for cartilage regeneration. Using a three-dimensional RPM, a device designed to simulate microgravity on Earth, we investigated the early effects of RPM exposure on human chondrocytes of six different donors after 30 min, 2 h, 4 h, 16 h, and 24 h and compared the results with the corresponding static controls cultured under normal gravity conditions. As little as 30 min of RPM exposure resulted in increased expression of several genes responsible for cell motility, structure and integrity (beta-actin); control of cell growth, cell proliferation, cell differentiation and apoptosis (TGF-β1, osteopontin); and cytoskeletal components such as microtubules (beta-tubulin) and intermediate filaments (vimentin). After 4 hours of RPM exposure disruptions in the vimentin network were detected. These changes were less dramatic after 16 hours on the RPM, when human chondrocytes appeared to reorganize their cytoskeleton. However, the gene expression and protein content of TGF-β1 was enhanced during RPM culture for 24 h. Taking these results together, we suggest that chondrocytes exposed to the RPM seem to change their extracellular matrix production behaviour while they rearrange their cytoskeletal proteins prior to forming three-dimensional aggregates. PMID:24244418

  9. Andrographolide Enhances Proliferation and Prevents Dedifferentiation of Rabbit Articular Chondrocytes: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Li-ke; Wei, Qing-jun; Liu, Lei; Zheng, Li; Zhao, Jin-min

    2015-01-01

    As the main active constituent of Andrographis paniculata that was applied in treatment of many diseases including inflammation in ancient China, andrographolide (ANDRO) was found to facilitate reduction of edema and analgesia in arthritis. This suggested that ANDRO may be promising anti-inflammatory agent to relieve destruction and degeneration of cartilage after inflammation. In this study, the effect of ANDRO on rabbit articular chondrocytes in vitro was investigated. Results showed that not more than 8 μM ANDRO did no harm to chondrocytes (P < 0.05). DNA content and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) /DNA were, respectively, improved in ANDRO groups comparing to the control (P < 0.05). ANDRO could promote expression of aggrecan, collagen II, and Sox9 genes while downregulating expression of collagen I gene (P < 0.05). Furthermore, hypertrophy that may result in chondrocyte ossification could not be detected in all groups (P > 0.05). The viability assay, hematoxylin-eosin, safranin O, and immunohistochemical staining also showed better performances in ANDRO groups. As to the doses, 3 μM ANDRO showed the best performance. The results indicate that ANDRO can accelerate proliferation of rabbit articular chondrocytes in vitro and meanwhile maintain the phenotype, which may provide valuable references for further exploration on arthritis. PMID:25802548

  10. Acetylation reduces SOX9 nuclear entry and ACAN gene transactivation in human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bar Oz, Michal; Kumar, Ashok; Elayyan, Jinan; Reich, Eli; Binyamin, Milana; Kandel, Leonid; Liebergall, Meir; Steinmeyer, Juergen; Lefebvre, Veronique; Dvir-Ginzberg, Mona

    2016-06-01

    Changes in the content of aggrecan, an essential proteoglycan of articular cartilage, have been implicated in the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis (OA), a prevalent age-related, degenerative joint disease. Here, we examined the effect of SOX9 acetylation on ACAN transactivation in the context of osteoarthritis. Primary chondrocytes freshly isolated from degenerated OA cartilage displayed lower levels of ACAN mRNA and higher levels of acetylated SOX9 compared with cells from intact regions of OA cartilage. Degenerated OA cartilage presented chondrocyte clusters bearing diffused immunostaining for SOX9 compared with intact cartilage regions. Primary human chondrocytes freshly isolated from OA knee joints were cultured in monolayer or in three-dimensional alginate microbeads (3D). SOX9 was hypo-acetylated in 3D cultures and displayed enhanced binding to a -10 kb ACAN enhancer, a result consistent with higher ACAN mRNA levels than in monolayer cultures. It also co-immunoprecipitated with SIRT1, a major deacetylase responsible for SOX9 deacetylation. Finally, immunofluorescence assays revealed increased nuclear localization of SOX9 in primary chondrocytes treated with the NAD SIRT1 cofactor, than in cells treated with a SIRT1 inhibitor. Inhibition of importin β by importazole maintained SOX9 in the cytoplasm, even in the presence of NAD. Based on these data, we conclude that deacetylation promotes SOX9 nuclear translocation and hence its ability to activate ACAN. PMID:26910618

  11. Interleukin-1 beta induces synthesis and secretion of interleukin-6 in human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bender, S; Haubeck, H D; Van de Leur, E; Dufhues, G; Schiel, X; Lauwerijns, J; Greiling, H; Heinrich, P C

    1990-04-24

    Increased concentrations of interleukin-6 (IL-6) have been found in the synovial fluid of patients with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and crystal-related joint diseases. It is therefore of great interest to identify the cells responsible for the production of IL-6, and to investigate whether IL-6 plays a role in the pathogenesis of degenerative or inflammatory joint diseases. Here we show that human interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) induces IL-6 synthesis and secretion in differentiated human chondrocytes. In organ cultures resembling closely the in vivo system 10(6) chondrocytes incubated with 100 units of interleukin-1 beta per ml of medium led to the release of 6 X 10(3) units of IL-6 within 24 h. Chondrocytes cultured in agarose or as monolayers similarly incubated with IL-1 beta produced even higher amounts of IL-6: 70 X 10(3) units per 10(6) cells within 24 h. The induction of IL-6 synthesis by IL-1 beta was also shown at the mRNA level. IL-6 secreted by stimulated chondrocytes showed heterogeneity upon Western blot analysis. PMID:2335234

  12. Polyethylene-Glycol-Modified Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Intra-Articular Delivery to Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sacchetti, Cristiano; Liu-Bryan, Ru; Magrini, Andrea; Rosato, Nicola; Bottini, Nunzio; Bottini, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common and debilitating degenerative disease of articular joints for which no disease-modifying medical therapy is currently available. Inefficient delivery of pharmacologic agents into cartilage-resident chondrocytes after systemic administration has been a limitation to the development of anti-OA medications. Direct intra-articular injection enables delivery of high concentrations of agents in close proximity to chondrocytes; however, the efficacy of this approach is limited by the fast clearance of small molecules and biomacromolecules after injection into the synovial cavity. Coupling of pharmacologic agents with drug delivery systems able to enhance their residence time and cartilage penetration can enhance the effectiveness of intra-articularly injected anti-OA medications. Herein we describe an efficient intra-articular delivery nanosystem based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains (PEG-SWCNTs). We show that PEG-SWCNTs are capable to persist in the joint cavity for a prolonged time, enter the cartilage matrix, and deliver gene inhibitors into chondrocytes of both healthy and OA mice. PEG-SWCNT nanoparticles did not elicit systemic or local side effects. Our data suggest that PEG-SWCNTs represent a biocompatible and effective nanocarrier for intra-articular delivery of agents to chondrocytes. PMID:25415768

  13. Effects of electromagnetic field frequencies on chondrocytes in 3D cell-printed composite constructs.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hee-Gyeong; Kang, Kyung Shin; Hong, Jung Min; Jang, Jinah; Park, Moon Nyeo; Jeong, Young Hun; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-07-01

    In cartilage tissue engineering, electromagnetic field (EMF) therapy has been reported to have a modest effect on promoting cartilage regeneration. However, these studies were conducted using different frequencies of EMF to stimulate chondrocytes. Thus, it is necessary to investigate the effect of EMF frequency on cartilage formation. In addition to the stimulation, a scaffold is required to satisfy the characteristics of cartilage such as its hydrated and dense extracellular matrix, and a mechanical resilience to applied loads. Therefore, we 3D-printed a composite construct composed of a polymeric framework and a chondrocyte-laden hydrogel. Here, we observed frequency-dependent positive and negative effects on chondrogenesis using a 3D cell-printed cartilage tissue. We found that a frequency of 45 Hz promoted gene expression and secretion of extracellular matrix molecules of chondrocytes. In contrast, a frequency of 7.5 Hz suppressed chondrogenic differentiation in vitro. Additionally, the EMF-treated composite constructs prior to implantation showed consistent results with those of in vitro, suggesting that in vitro pre-treatment with different EMF frequencies provides different capabilities for the enhancement of cartilage formation in vivo. This correlation between EMF frequency and 3D-printed chondrocytes suggests the necessity for optimization of EMF parameters when this physical stimulus is applied to engineered cartilage. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1797-1804, 2016. PMID:26991030

  14. MicroRNA-411 inhibited matrix metalloproteinase 13 expression in human chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guodong; Zhang, Yuanmin; Zhao, Xiaowei; Meng, Chunyang; Ma, Longfei; Kong, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint degenerative disease affecting the joint structure, leading to loss of joint function and tissue destruction. Recent studies have demonstrated that miRNAs are involved in many pathological conditions, including OA. The study was to investigate the role of miR-411 in the pathogenesis of OA. The expression of miR-411 was downregulated in OA cartilage compared with in normal cartilage. Conversely, the expression of MMP-13 was upregulated in OA cartilage compared with in normal cartilage. IL-1β treatment repressed miR-411 expression in chondrocytes. Moreover, we identified MMP-13 as a direct target gene of miR-411 in chondrocytes and overexpression of miR-411 inhibited the MMP-13 expression. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-411 increased the expression of type II collagen and type IV collagen expression in chondrocytes. MiR-411 is a crucial regulator of MMP-13 in chondrocytes and may response to the development of OA. PMID:26692943

  15. Hypertrophic chondrocytes can become osteoblasts and osteocytes in endochondral bone formation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liu; Tsang, Kwok Yeung; Tang, Hoi Ching; Chan, Danny; Cheah, Kathryn S. E.

    2014-01-01

    According to current dogma, chondrocytes and osteoblasts are considered independent lineages derived from a common osteochondroprogenitor. In endochondral bone formation, chondrocytes undergo a series of differentiation steps to form the growth plate, and it generally is accepted that death is the ultimate fate of terminally differentiated hypertrophic chondrocytes (HCs). Osteoblasts, accompanying vascular invasion, lay down endochondral bone to replace cartilage. However, whether an HC can become an osteoblast and contribute to the full osteogenic lineage has been the subject of a century-long debate. Here we use a cell-specific tamoxifen-inducible genetic recombination approach to track the fate of murine HCs and show that they can survive the cartilage-to-bone transition and become osteogenic cells in fetal and postnatal endochondral bones and persist into adulthood. This discovery of a chondrocyte-to-osteoblast lineage continuum revises concepts of the ontogeny of osteoblasts, with implications for the control of bone homeostasis and the interpretation of the underlying pathological bases of bone disorders. PMID:25092332

  16. Long Intergenic Noncoding RNAs Mediate the Human Chondrocyte Inflammatory Response and Are Differentially Expressed in Osteoarthritis Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Mark J.; Philp, Ashleigh M.; Heward, James A.; Roux, Benoit T.; Walsh, David A.; Davis, Edward T.; Lindsay, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), including long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs), antisense RNAs, and pseudogenes, associated with the inflammatory response in human primary osteoarthritis (OA) chondrocytes and to explore their expression and function in OA. Methods OA cartilage was obtained from patients with hip or knee OA following joint replacement surgery. Non‐OA cartilage was obtained from postmortem donors and patients with fracture of the neck of the femur. Primary OA chondrocytes were isolated by collagenase digestion. LncRNA expression analysis was performed by RNA sequencing (RNAseq) and quantitative reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction. Modulation of lncRNA chondrocyte expression was achieved using LNA longRNA GapmeRs (Exiqon). Cytokine production was measured with Luminex. Results RNAseq identified 983 lncRNAs in primary human hip OA chondrocytes, 183 of which had not previously been identified. Following interleukin‐1β (IL‐1β) stimulation, we identified 125 lincRNAs that were differentially expressed. The lincRNA p50‐associated cyclooxygenase 2–extragenic RNA (PACER) and 2 novel chondrocyte inflammation–associated lincRNAs (CILinc01 and CILinc02) were differentially expressed in both knee and hip OA cartilage compared to non‐OA cartilage. In primary OA chondrocytes, these lincRNAs were rapidly and transiently induced in response to multiple proinflammatory cytokines. Knockdown of CILinc01 and CILinc02 expression in human chondrocytes significantly enhanced the IL‐1–stimulated secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Conclusion The inflammatory response in human OA chondrocytes is associated with widespread changes in the profile of lncRNAs, including PACER, CILinc01, and CILinc02. Differential expression of CILinc01 and CIinc02 in hip and knee OA cartilage, and their role in modulating cytokine production during the chondrocyte inflammatory response, suggest that they may play an important role

  17. Increased adipogenesis in cultured embryonic chondrocytes and in adult bone marrow of dominant negative Erg transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Flajollet, Sébastien; Tian, Tian V; Huot, Ludovic; Tomavo, Nathalie; Flourens, Anne; Holder-Espinasse, Muriel; Le Jeune, Marion; Dumont, Patrick; Hot, David; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric; Duterque-Coquillaud, Martine

    2012-01-01

    In monolayer culture, primary articular chondrocytes have an intrinsic tendency to lose their phenotype during expansion. The molecular events underlying this chondrocyte dedifferentiation are still largely unknown. Several transcription factors are important for chondrocyte differentiation. The Ets transcription factor family may be involved in skeletal development. One family member, the Erg gene, is mainly expressed during cartilage formation. To further investigate the potential role of Erg in the maintenance of the chondrocyte phenotype, we isolated and cultured chondrocytes from the rib cartilage of embryos of transgenic mice that express a dominant negative form of Erg (DN-Erg) during cartilage formation. DN-Erg expression in chondrocytes cultured for up to 20 days did not affect the early dedifferentiation usually observed in cultured chondrocytes. However, lipid droplets accumulated in DN-Erg chondrocytes, suggesting adipocyte emergence. Transcriptomic analysis using a DNA microarray, validated by quantitative RT-PCR, revealed strong differential gene expression, with a decrease in chondrogenesis-related markers and an increase in adipogenesis-related gene expression in cultured DN-Erg chondrocytes. These results indicate that Erg is involved in either maintaining the chondrogenic phenotype in vitro or in cell fate orientation. Along with the in vitro studies, we compared adipocyte presence in wild-type and transgenic mice skeletons. Histological investigations revealed an increase in the number of adipocytes in the bone marrow of adult DN-Erg mice even though no adipocytes were detected in embryonic cartilage or bone. These findings suggest that the Ets transcription factor family may contribute to the homeostatic balance in skeleton cell plasticity. PMID:23155398

  18. Ascorbic acid-induced chondrocyte terminal differentiation: the role of the extracellular matrix and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D.

    PubMed

    Farquharson, C; Berry, J L; Mawer, E B; Seawright, E; Whitehead, C C

    1998-06-01

    Chondrocyte terminal differentiation is associated with cellular hypertrophy increased activity of plasma membrane alkaline phosphatase and the synthesis of collagen type X. The hypertrophic phenotype of cultured chondrocytes can be stimulated by ascorbic acid but the underlying mechanisms for this phenotypic change are unclear. As ascorbic acid is central to many hydroxylation reactions, the possibility was examined that its pro-differentiating effects are mediated by its effects on collagen and vitamin D metabolite formation. In vitro studies indicated that ascorbic acid-induced chondrocyte alkaline phosphatase activity was inhibited by the addition of both collagen and proteoglycan synthesis inhibitors. The addition of arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD)-containing peptides also resulted in lower alkaline phosphatase activity. Chicks supplemented with dietary ascorbic acid had higher concentrations of both collagen and proteoglycans within their growth plates but the chondrocyte maturation rate was unaltered. No evidence was obtained to suggest that ascorbic acid-induced collagen production was mediated by lipid peroxidation. In addition, supplementation with dietary ascorbic acid resulted in higher serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 concentrations and increased chondrocyte vitamin D receptor number. Ascorbic acid-treated chondrocytes maintained in vitro also had increased vitamin D receptor numbers but chondrocyte receptor affinity for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 was unaltered. These results indicate that ascorbic acid promotes both chondrocyte matrix production and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 synthesis, accompanied by upregulation of the vitamin D receptor. Thus, ascorbic acid may be causing amplification of the vitamin D receptor-dependent genomic response to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, resulting in promotion of terminal differentiation. Strong evidence is provided to support the hypothesis that ascorbic acid-induced chondrocyte terminal differentiation is mediated by

  19. Culture surfaces coated with various implant materials affect chondrocyte growth and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hambleton, J; Schwartz, Z; Khare, A; Windeler, S W; Luna, M; Brooks, B P; Dean, D D; Boyan, B D

    1994-07-01

    The effect on chondrocyte metabolism of culture surfaces sputter-coated with various materials used for orthopaedic implants was studied and correlated with the stage of cartilage cell maturation. Confluent, fourth-passage chondrocytes from the costochondral resting zone and growth zone of rats were cultured for 6 or 9 days on 24-well plates sputter-coated with ultrathin films of titanium, titanium dioxide, aluminum oxide, zirconium oxide, and calcium phosphate (1.67:1). Corona-discharged tissue culture plastic served as the control. The effect of surface material was examined with regard to cell morphology; cell proliferation (cell number) and DNA synthesis ([3H]thymidine incorporation); RNA synthesis ([3H]uridine incorporation); collagenase-digestible protein, noncollagenase-digestible protein, and percentage of collagen production; and alkaline phosphatase-specific activity, both in the cell layer and in trypsinized chondrocytes. Cell morphology was dependent on surface material; only cells cultured on titanium had an appearance similar to that of cells cultured on plastic. While titanium or titanium dioxide surfaces had no effect on cell number or [3H]thymidine incorporation, aluminum oxide, calcium phosphate, and zirconium oxide surfaces inhibited both parameters. Cells cultured on aluminum oxide, calcium phosphate, zirconium oxide, and titanium dioxide exhibited decreased collagenase-digestible protein, noncollagenase-digestible protein, and percentage of collagen production, but [3H]uridine incorporation was decreased only in those chondrocytes cultured on aluminum oxide, calcium phosphate, or zirconium oxide. Chondrocytes cultured on titanium had greater alkaline phosphatase-specific activity than did cells cultured on plastic, but the incorporation of [3H]uridine and production of collagenase-digestible protein, noncollagenase-digestible protein, and percentage of collagen was comparable. The response of chondrocytes from the growth zone and resting zone

  20. Changes in the Chondrocyte and Extracellular Matrix Proteome during Post-natal Mouse Cartilage Development*

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Richard; Norris, Emma L.; Brachvogel, Bent; Angelucci, Constanza; Zivkovic, Snezana; Gordon, Lavinia; Bernardo, Bianca C.; Stermann, Jacek; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi; Gorman, Jeffrey J.; Bateman, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal growth by endochondral ossification involves tightly coordinated chondrocyte differentiation that creates reserve, proliferating, prehypertrophic, and hypertrophic cartilage zones in the growth plate. Many human skeletal disorders result from mutations in cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) components that compromise both ECM architecture and chondrocyte function. Understanding normal cartilage development, composition, and structure is therefore vital to unravel these disease mechanisms. To study this intricate process in vivo by proteomics, we analyzed mouse femoral head cartilage at developmental stages enriched in either immature chondrocytes or maturing/hypertrophic chondrocytes (post-natal days 3 and 21, respectively). Using LTQ-Orbitrap tandem mass spectrometry, we identified 703 cartilage proteins. Differentially abundant proteins (q < 0.01) included prototypic markers for both early and late chondrocyte differentiation (epiphycan and collagen X, respectively) and novel ECM and cell adhesion proteins with no previously described roles in cartilage development (tenascin X, vitrin, Urb, emilin-1, and the sushi repeat-containing proteins SRPX and SRPX2). Meta-analysis of cartilage development in vivo and an in vitro chondrocyte culture model (Wilson, R., Diseberg, A. F., Gordon, L., Zivkovic, S., Tatarczuch, L., Mackie, E. J., Gorman, J. J., and Bateman, J. F. (2010) Comprehensive profiling of cartilage extracellular matrix formation and maturation using sequential extraction and label-free quantitative proteomics. Mol. Cell. Proteomics 9, 1296–1313) identified components involved in both systems, such as Urb, and components with specific roles in vivo, including vitrin and CILP-2 (cartilage intermediate layer protein-2). Immunolocalization of Urb, vitrin, and CILP-2 indicated specific roles at different maturation stages. In addition to ECM-related changes, we provide the first biochemical evidence of changing endoplasmic reticulum function during

  1. Interaction of strain and interleukin-1 in articular cartilage: effects, on proteoglycan synthesis in chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gassner, Robert J.; Buckley, Michael J.; Studer, Rebecca K.; Evans, Chris H.; Agarwal, Sudha

    2016-01-01

    In temporomandibular joint disorders, the release of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 (IL-1) initiates an inflammatory process disrupting cartilage homeostasis, ultimately leading to cartilage destruction. Additionally, mechanical stimuli affect articular chondrocyte metabolism. While articular chondrocytes generate nitric oxide (NO) in the presence of IL-1 proteoglycan synthesis is consecutively suppressed. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of proinflammatory cytokines and mechanical strain in the form of cyclic tensile stretch on proteoglycan synthesis in chondrocytes, as compared to the NO competitive inhibitor L-N-monomethyl arginine (LMA), and to assess whether this effect is secondarily related to the activity of growth factors such as transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β). Lapine articular chondrocytes were exposed to one of four different treatment regimens: no cyclic tensile stretch, IL-1, cyclic tensile stretch, or IL-1 plus cyclic tensile stretch. NO production was determined as medium nitrite accumulation. TGF-β-bioactivity in chondrocyte conditioned medium was measured with the mink-lung epithelial cell bioassay. Proteoglycan synthesis was measured as the incorporation of 35-[S]-sodium sulfate into macromolecules separated from unincorporated label by gel filtration on PD-10 columns. In resting chondrocyte cultures, only baseline levels of NO were measured and the application of stretch for 24 h did not affect NO production. Addition of IL-1 provoked a large increase in NO synthesis which was abrogated in the presence of LMA. Application of stretch decreased the IL-1 induced NO synthesis, but did not modify the effect of LMA (being a competitive inhibitor of the inducible NO synthase) inhibiting IL-1 induced NO production. Glucosaminoglycan production was noted as proteoglycan synthesis showing almost no effect of cyclic stretch alone in comparison to the control condition, which correlates with the missing NO

  2. Adaptation of chondrocytes to low oxygen tension: relationship between hypoxia and cellular metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rajpurohit, R; Koch, C J; Tao, Z; Teixeira, C M; Shapiro, I M

    1996-08-01

    In endochondral bone, the growth cartilage is the site of rapid growth. Since the vascular supply to the cartilage is limited, it is widely assumed that cells of the cartilage are hypoxic and that limitations in the oxygen supply regulate the energetic state of the maturing cells. In this report, we evaluate the effects of oxygen tension on chondrocyte energy metabolism, thiol status, and expression of transcription elements, HIF and AP-1. Imposition of an hypoxic environment on cultured chondrocytes caused a proportional increase in glucose utilization and elevated levels of lactate synthesis. Although we observed a statistical increase in the activities of phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase after exposure to lowered oxygen concentrations, the effect was small. The cultured cells exhibited a decreased utilization of glutamine, possibly due to down regulation of mitochondrial function and inhibition of oxidative deamination. With respect to total energy generation, we noted that these cells are quite capable of maintaining the energy charge of the cell at low oxygen tensions. Indeed, no changes in the absolute quantity of adenine nucleotides or the energy charge ratio was observed. Hypoxia caused a decrease in the glutathione content of cultured chondrocytes and a concomitant rise in cell and medium cysteine levels. It is likely that the fall in cell glutathione level is due to decreased synthesis of the tripeptide under reduced oxygen stress and the limited supply of glutamate. The observed rise in cellular and medium cysteine levels probably reflects an increase in the rate of degradation of glutathione and a decrease in synthesis of the peptide. To explore how cells transduce these metabolic effects, gel retardation assays were used to study chondrocyte HIF and AP-1 binding activities. Chondrocyte nuclear preparations bound an HIF-oligonucleotide; however, at low oxygen tensions, no increase in HIF binding was

  3. 3-Dimensional quantitative detection of nanoparticle content in biological tissue samples after local cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahn, Helene; Alexiou, Christoph; Trahms, Lutz; Odenbach, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    X-ray computed tomography is nowadays used for a wide range of applications in medicine, science and technology. X-ray microcomputed tomography (XµCT) follows the same principles used for conventional medical CT scanners, but improves the spatial resolution to a few micrometers. We present an example of an application of X-ray microtomography, a study of 3-dimensional biodistribution, as along with the quantification of nanoparticle content in tumoral tissue after minimally invasive cancer therapy. One of these minimal invasive cancer treatments is magnetic drug targeting, where the magnetic nanoparticles are used as controllable drug carriers. The quantification is based on a calibration of the XµCT-equipment. The developed calibration procedure of the X-ray-µCT-equipment is based on a phantom system which allows the discrimination between the various gray values of the data set. These phantoms consist of a biological tissue substitute and magnetic nanoparticles. The phantoms have been studied with XµCT and have been examined magnetically. The obtained gray values and nanoparticle concentration lead to a calibration curve. This curve can be applied to tomographic data sets. Accordingly, this calibration enables a voxel-wise assignment of gray values in the digital tomographic data set to nanoparticle content. Thus, the calibration procedure enables a 3-dimensional study of nanoparticle distribution as well as concentration.

  4. A New 3-Dimensional Dynamic Quantitative Analysis System of Facial Motion: An Establishment and Reliability Test

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Guodong; Zhao, Yang; Tian, Xu; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to establish a 3-dimensional dynamic quantitative facial motion analysis system, and then determine its accuracy and test-retest reliability. The system could automatically reconstruct the motion of the observational points. Standardized T-shaped rod and L-shaped rods were used to evaluate the static and dynamic accuracy of the system. Nineteen healthy volunteers were recruited to test the reliability of the system. The average static distance error measurement was 0.19 mm, and the average angular error was 0.29°. The measuring results decreased with the increase of distance between the cameras and objects, 80 cm of which was considered to be optimal. It took only 58 seconds to perform the full facial measurement process. The average intra-class correlation coefficient for distance measurement and angular measurement was 0.973 and 0.794 respectively. The results demonstrated that we successfully established a practical 3-dimensional dynamic quantitative analysis system that is accurate and reliable enough to meet both clinical and research needs. PMID:25390881

  5. A customizable 3-dimensional digital atlas of the canary brain in multiple modalities.

    PubMed

    Vellema, Michiel; Verschueren, Jacob; Van Meir, Vincent; Van der Linden, Annemie

    2011-07-15

    Songbirds are well known for their ability to learn their vocalizations by imitating conspecific adults. This uncommon skill has led to many studies examining the behavioral and neurobiological processes involved in vocal learning. Canaries display a variable, seasonally dependent, vocal behavior throughout their lives. This trait makes this bird species particularly valuable to study the functional relationship between the continued plasticity in the singing behavior and alterations in the anatomy and physiology of the brain. In order to optimally interpret these types of studies, a detailed understanding of the brain anatomy is essential. Because traditional 2-dimensional brain atlases are limited in the information they can provide about the anatomy of the brain, here we present a 3-dimensional MRI-based atlas of the canary brain. Using multiple imaging protocols we were able to maximize the number of detectable brain regions, including most of the areas involved in song perception, learning, and production. The brain atlas can readily be used to determine the stereotactic location of delineated brain areas at any desirable head angle. Alternatively the brain data can be used to determine the ideal orientation of the brain for stereotactic injections, electrophysiological recordings, and brain sectioning. The 3-dimensional canary brain atlas presented here is freely available and is easily adaptable to support many types of neurobiological studies, including anatomical, electrophysiological, histological, explant, and tracer studies. PMID:21565273

  6. Realization of integral 3-dimensional image using fabricated tunable liquid lens array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Muyoung; Kim, Junoh; Kim, Cheol Joong; Lee, Jin Su; Won, Yong Hyub

    2015-03-01

    Electrowetting has been widely studied for various optical applications such as optical switch, sensor, prism, and display. In this study, vari-focal liquid lens array is developed using electrowetting principle to construct integral 3-dimensional imaging. The electrowetting principle that changes the surface tension by applying voltage has several advantages to realize active optical device such as fast response time, low electrical consumption, and no mechanical moving parts. Two immiscible liquids that are water and oil are used for forming lens. By applying a voltage to the water, the focal length of the lens could be tuned as changing contact angle of water. The fabricated electrowetting vari-focal liquid lens array has 1mm diameter spherical lens shape that has 1.6mm distance between each lens. The number of lenses on the panel is 23x23 and the focal length of the lens array is simultaneously tuned from -125 to 110 diopters depending on the applied voltage. The fabricated lens array is implemented to integral 3-dimensional imaging. A 3D object is reconstructed by fabricated liquid lens array with 23x23 elemental images that are generated by 3D max tools. When liquid lens array is tuned as convex state. From vari-focal liquid lens array implemented integral imaging system, we expect that depth enhanced integral imaging can be realized in the near future.

  7. Morphological Control of Cells on 3-Dimensional Multi-Layer Nanotopographic Structures.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Heon-Ho; Noh, Young-Mu; Song, Hwan-Moon; Lee, Sang-Ho; Park, Jin-Sung; Lee, Chang-Soo

    2015-05-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) environment is known to play an important role in the process of various cell regulatory mechanisms. We have investigated the ability of 3-dimensional ECM geometries to induce morphological changes in cells. Bi-layer polymeric structures with submicron scale stripe patterns were fabricated using a two-step nano-imprinting technique, and the orientation angle (θ(α)) of the upper layer was controlled by changing its alignment with respect to the orientation of the bottom layer. When cells were grown on the mono-layer stripe structure with a single orientation, they elongated along the direction of the stripe pattern. On bi-layer polymer structures, the cell morphologies gradually changed and became rounded, with an increase of θα up to 90 degrees, but the polarities of these cells were still aligned along the orientation of the upper layer. As a result, we show that the polarity and the roundness of cells can be independently regulated by adjusting the orientation of 3-dimensional hierarchical ECM topography. PMID:26505024

  8. Particle trajectory computation on a 3-dimensional engine inlet. Final Report Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    A 3-dimensional particle trajectory computer code was developed to compute the distribution of water droplet impingement efficiency on a 3-dimensional engine inlet. The computed results provide the essential droplet impingement data required for the engine inlet anti-icing system design and analysis. The droplet trajectories are obtained by solving the trajectory equation using the fourth order Runge-Kutta and Adams predictor-corrector schemes. A compressible 3-D full potential flow code is employed to obtain a cylindrical grid definition of the flowfield on and about the engine inlet. The inlet surface is defined mathematically through a system of bi-cubic parametric patches in order to compute the droplet impingement points accurately. Analysis results of the 3-D trajectory code obtained for an axisymmetric droplet impingement problem are in good agreement with NACA experimental data. Experimental data are not yet available for the engine inlet impingement problem analyzed. Applicability of the method to solid particle impingement problems, such as engine sand ingestion, is also demonstrated.

  9. Cyclooxygenases and prostaglandin E2 receptors in growth plate chondrocytes in vitro and in situ--prostaglandin E2 dependent proliferation of growth plate chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Brochhausen, Christoph; Neuland, Pia; Kirkpatrick, C James; Nüsing, Rolf M; Klaus, Günter

    2006-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) plays an important role in bone development and metabolism. To interfere therapeutically in the PGE2 pathway, however, knowledge about the involved enzymes (cyclooxygenases) and receptors (PGE2 receptors) is essential. We therefore examined the production of PGE2 in cultured growth plate chondrocytes in vitro and the effects of exogenously added PGE2 on cell proliferation. Furthermore, we analysed the expression and spatial distribution of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 and PGE2 receptor types EP1, EP2, EP3 and EP4 in the growth plate in situ and in vitro. PGE2 synthesis was determined by mass spectrometry, cell proliferation by DNA [3H]-thymidine incorporation, mRNA expression of cyclooxygenases and EP receptors by RT-PCR on cultured cells and in homogenized growth plates. To determine cellular expression, frozen sections of rat tibial growth plate and primary chondrocyte cultures were stained using immunohistochemistry with polyclonal antibodies directed towards COX-1, COX-2, EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4. Cultured growth plate chondrocytes transiently secreted PGE2 into the culture medium. Although both enzymes were expressed in chondrocytes in vitro and in vivo, it appears that mainly COX-2 contributed to PGE2-dependent proliferation. Exogenously added PGE2 stimulated DNA synthesis in a dose-dependent fashion and gave a bell-shaped curve with a maximum at 10-8 M. The EP1/EP3 specific agonist sulprostone and the EP1-selective agonist ONO-D1-004 increased DNA synthesis. The effect of PGE2 was suppressed by ONO-8711. The expression of EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4 receptors in situ and in vitro was observed; EP2 was homogenously expressed in all zones of the growth plate in situ, whereas EP1 expression was inhomogenous, with spared cells in the reserve zone. In cultured cells these four receptors were expressed in a subset of cells only. The most intense staining for the EP1 receptor was found in polygonal cells surrounded by matrix. Expression of

  10. Lithium Chloride Dependent Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 Inactivation Links Oxidative DNA Damage, Hypertrophy and Senescence in Human Articular Chondrocytes and Reproduces Chondrocyte Phenotype of Obese Osteoarthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Platano, Daniela; Cattini, Luca; Trisolino, Giovanni; Mariani, Erminia; Borzì, Rosa Maria

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Recent evidence suggests that GSK3 activity is chondroprotective in osteoarthritis (OA), but at the same time, its inactivation has been proposed as an anti-inflammatory therapeutic option. Here we evaluated the extent of GSK3β inactivation in vivo in OA knee cartilage and the molecular events downstream GSK3β inactivation in vitro to assess their contribution to cell senescence and hypertrophy. Methods In vivo level of phosphorylated GSK3β was analyzed in cartilage and oxidative damage was assessed by 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine staining. The in vitro effects of GSK3β inactivation (using either LiCl or SB216763) were evaluated on proliferating primary human chondrocytes by combined confocal microscopy analysis of Mitotracker staining and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production (2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate staining). Downstream effects on DNA damage and senescence were investigated by western blot (γH2AX, GADD45β and p21), flow cytometric analysis of cell cycle and light scattering properties, quantitative assessment of senescence associated β galactosidase activity, and PAS staining. Results In vivo chondrocytes from obese OA patients showed higher levels of phosphorylated GSK3β, oxidative damage and expression of GADD45β and p21, in comparison with chondrocytes of nonobese OA patients. LiCl mediated GSK3β inactivation in vitro resulted in increased mitochondrial ROS production, responsible for reduced cell proliferation, S phase transient arrest, and increase in cell senescence, size and granularity. Collectively, western blot data supported the occurrence of a DNA damage response leading to cellular senescence with increase in γH2AX, GADD45β and p21. Moreover, LiCl boosted 8-oxo-dG staining, expression of IKKα and MMP-10. Conclusions In articular chondrocytes, GSK3β activity is required for the maintenance of proliferative potential and phenotype. Conversely, GSK3β inactivation, although preserving chondrocyte survival, results in

  11. Crosstalk between adipose-derived stem cells and chondrocytes: when growth factors matter.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Juan; Guo, Bin; Xie, Jing; Deng, Shuwen; Fu, Na; Lin, Shiyu; Li, Guo; Lin, Yunfeng; Cai, Xiaoxiao

    2016-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) and mesenchymal stem cells are promising for tissue repair because of their multilineage differentiation capacity. Our previous data confirmed that the implantation of mixed ASCs and chondrocytes into cartilage defects induced desirable in vivo healing outcomes. However, the paracrine action of ASCs on chondrocytes needs to be further elucidated. In this study, we established a co-culture system to achieve cell-to-cell and cell-to-tissue crosstalk and explored the soluble growth factors in both ASCs and chondrocytes supplemented with 1% fetal bovine serum to mimic the physiological microenvironment. In ASCs, we screened for growth factors by semi-quantitative PCR and quantitative real-time PCR and found that the expression of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2), vascular endothelial growth factor B (VEGFB), hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), and transforming growth factor-β1 significantly increased after co-culture in comparison with mono-culture. In chondrocytes, VEGFA was significantly enhanced after co-culture. Unexpectedly, the expression of collagen II and aggrecan was significantly down-regulated in the co-culture group compared with the mono-culture group. Meanwhile, among all the growth factors screened, we found that the BMP family members BMP-2, BMP-4, and BMP-5 were down-regulated and that VEGFB, HIF-1α, FGF-2, and PDGF were significantly decreased after co-culture. These results suggest that crosstalk between ASCs and chondrocytes is a pathway through the regulated growth factors that might have potential in cartilage repair and regeneration and could be useful for tissue engineering. PMID:26848404

  12. Biotechnological Chondroitin a Novel Glycosamminoglycan With Remarkable Biological Function on Human Primary Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Stellavato, Antonietta; Tirino, Virginia; de Novellis, Francesca; Della Vecchia, Antonella; Cinquegrani, Fabio; De Rosa, Mario; Papaccio, Gianpaolo; Schiraldi, Chiara

    2016-09-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering, with in vitro expansion of autologus chondrocytes, is a promising technique for tissue regeneration and is a new potential strategy to prevent and/or treat cartilage damage (e.g., osteoarthritis). The aim of this study was (i) to investigate and compare the effects of new biotechnological chondroitin (BC) and a commercial extractive chondroitin sulfate (CS) on human chondrocytes in vitro culture; (ii) to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of the innovative BC compared to extractive CS. A chondrogenic cell population was isolated from human nasoseptal cartilage and in vitro cultures were studied through time-lapse video microscopy (TLVM), immunohistochemical staining and cytometry. In order to investigate the effect of BC and CS on phenotype maintainance, chondrogenic gene expression of aggrecan (AGN), of the transcriptor factor SOX9, of the types I and II collagen (COL1A1 and COL1A2), were quantified through transcriptional and protein evaluation at increasing cultivation time and passages. In addition to resemble the osteoarthritis-like in vitro model, chondrocytes were treated with IL-1β and the anti-inflammatory activity of BC and CS was assessed using cytokines quantification by multiplex array. BC significantly enhances cell proliferation also preserving chondrocyte phenotype increasing type II collagen expression up to 10 days of treatment and reduces inflammatory response in IL-1β treated chondrocytes respect to CS treated cells. Our results, taken together, suggest that this new BC is of foremost importance in translational medicine because it can be applied in novel scaffolds and pharmaceutical preparations aiming at cartilage pathology treatments such as the osteoarthritis. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2158-2169, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27018169

  13. Epiphyseal chondrocyte secondary ossification centers require thyroid hormone activation of Indian hedgehog and osterix signaling.

    PubMed

    Xing, Weirong; Cheng, Shaohong; Wergedal, Jon; Mohan, Subburaman

    2014-10-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) are known to regulate endochondral ossification during skeletal development via acting directly in chondrocytes and osteoblasts. In this study, we focused on TH effects on the secondary ossification center (SOC) because the time of appearance of SOCs in several species coincides with the time when peak levels of TH are attained. Accordingly, micro-computed tomography (µCT) evaluation of femurs and tibias at day 21 in TH-deficient and control mice revealed that endochondral ossification of SOCs is severely compromised owing to TH deficiency and that TH treatment for 10 days completely rescued this phenotype. Staining of cartilage and bone in the epiphysis revealed that whereas all of the cartilage is converted into bone in the prepubertal control mice, this conversion failed to occur in the TH-deficient mice. Immunohistochemistry studies revealed that TH treatment of thyroid stimulating hormone receptor mutant (Tshr(-/-) ) mice induced expression of Indian hedgehog (Ihh) and Osx in type 2 collagen (Col2)-expressing chondrocytes in the SOC at day 7, which subsequently differentiate into type 10 collagen (Col10)/osteocalcin-expressing chondro/osteoblasts at day 10. Consistent with these data, treatment of tibia cultures from 3-day-old mice with 10 ng/mL TH increased expression of Osx, Col10, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and osteocalcin in the epiphysis by sixfold to 60-fold. Furthermore, knockdown of the TH-induced increase in Osx expression using lentiviral small hairpin RNA (shRNA) significantly blocked TH-induced ALP and osteocalcin expression in chondrocytes. Treatment of chondrogenic cells with an Ihh inhibitor abolished chondro/osteoblast differentiation and SOC formation. Our findings indicate that TH regulates the SOC initiation and progression via differentiating chondrocytes into bone matrix-producing osteoblasts by stimulating Ihh and Osx expression in chondrocytes. PMID:24753031

  14. Epiphyseal chondrocyte secondary ossification centers require thyroid hormone activation of Indian hedgehog and osterix signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Weirong; Cheng, Shaohong; Wergedal, Jon; Mohan, Subburaman

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are known to regulate endochondral ossification during skeletal development via acting directly in chondrocytes and osteoblasts. In this study, we focused on TH effects on the secondary ossification center (SOC), since the time of appearance of SOCs in several species coincides with the time when peak levels of TH are attained. Accordingly, μCT evaluation of femurs and tibias at day 21 in TH-deficient and control mice revealed that endochondral ossification of SOCs is severely compromised due to TH deficiency and that TH treatment for 10 days completely rescued this phenotype. Staining of cartilage and bone in the epiphysis revealed that while all of the cartilage is converted into bone in the prepubertal control mice, this conversion failed to occur in the TH-deficient mice. Immunohistochemistry studies revealed that TH treatment of Tshr−/− mice induced expression of Ihh and Osx in Col2 expressing chondrocytes in the SOC at day 7 which subsequently differentiate into Col10/osteocalcin expressing chondro-osteoblasts at day 10. Consistent with these data, treatment of tibia cultures from 3-day old mice with10 ng/ml TH increased expression of Osx, Col10, ALP and osteocalcin in the epiphysis by 6–60 fold. Furthermore, knockdown of the TH-induced increase in Osx expression using lentiviral shRNA significantly blocked TH-induced ALP and osteocalcin expression in chondrocytes. Treatment of chondrogenic cells with an Ihh inhibitor abolished chondro-osteoblast differentiation and SOC formation. Our findings indicate that TH regulates the SOC initiation and progression via differentiating chondrocytes into bone matrix producing osteoblasts by stimulating Ihh and Osx expression in chondrocytes. PMID:24753031

  15. Follistatin in chondrocytes: the link between TRPV4 channelopathies and skeletal malformations

    PubMed Central

    Leddy, Holly A.; McNulty, Amy L.; Lee, Suk Hee; Rothfusz, Nicole E.; Gloss, Bernd; Kirby, Margaret L.; Hutson, Mary R.; Cohn, Daniel H.; Guilak, Farshid; Liedtke, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Point mutations in the calcium-permeable TRPV4 ion channel have been identified as the cause of autosomal-dominant human motor neuropathies, arthropathies, and skeletal malformations of varying severity. The objective of this study was to determine the mechanism by which TRPV4 channelopathy mutations cause skeletal dysplasia. The human TRPV4V620I channelopathy mutation was transfected into primary porcine chondrocytes and caused significant (2.6-fold) up-regulation of follistatin (FST) expression levels. Pore altering mutations that prevent calcium influx through the channel prevented significant FST up-regulation (1.1-fold). We generated a mouse model of theTRPV4V620I mutation, and found significant skeletal deformities (e.g., shortening of tibiae and digits, similar to the human disease brachyolmia) and increases in Fst/TRPV4 mRNA levels (2.8-fold). FST was significantly up-regulated in primary chondrocytes transfected with 3 different dysplasia-causing TRPV4 mutations (2- to 2.3-fold), but was not affected by an arthropathy mutation (1.1-fold). Furthermore, FST-loaded microbeads decreased bone ossification in developing chick femora (6%) and tibiae (11%). FST gene and protein levels were also increased 4-fold in human chondrocytes from an individual natively expressing the TRPV4T89I mutation. Taken together, these data strongly support that up-regulation of FST in chondrocytes by skeletal dysplasia-inducing TRPV4 mutations contributes to disease pathogenesis.—Leddy, H. A., McNulty, A. L., Lee, S. H., Rothfusz, N. E., Gloss, B., Kirby, M. L., Hutson, M. R., Cohn, D. H., Guilak, F., Liedtke, W. Follistatin in chondrocytes: the link between TRPV4 channelopathies and skeletal malformations. PMID:24577120

  16. Temporal changes in charge content of cultured chondrocytes from bovine cartilaginous tissues.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, M P; Sinnaya, P; Derry, K; Murphy, W H; Preston, B N

    1997-03-01

    The effective charge content of the pericellular matrix of chondrocytes has been determined while the matrix is being synthesized by cells grown in culture for several weeks. The data were compared with estimates determined by chemical analysis. When measurements were performed after digestion of the matrix with papain, there was close agreement between results obtained from both techniques for proteoglycans synthesized by chondrocytes from nasal septum (a non-articular cartilage). By contrast, no such agreement was observed for proteoglycans synthesized by chondrocytes from articular cartilage, even after solubilization of the matrix with papain. While the charge calculated from chemical analysis showed a constant increase with time in culture, that measured by colloid titration showed a cyclical pattern, with maximal values occurring on days 7 and 24 of culture and a minimal value on day 14. This inability to detect all negative groups present in the matrix synthesized by articular chondrocytes would suggest the involvement of these groups in electrostatic interactions. Partial characterization of proteins synthesized by the pericellular matrix indicates that the decrease in charge content observed on day 14 could not be attributed to proteins of a particular molecular mass but possibly to an increase in the total amount of protein present. It is concluded that the marked difference in the availability of negative groups between chondrocytes cultured from articular and non-articular cartilages may reflect differences in the interaction of these negative groups with matrix components; these differences would lead to the distinct structural organization of these two cartilaginous tissues which possess different mechanical functions. PMID:9106160

  17. Sodium Thiosulfate Prevents Chondrocyte Mineralization and Reduces the Severity of Murine Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nasi, Sonia; Ea, Hang-Korng; Lioté, Frédéric; So, Alexander; Busso, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Calcium-containing crystals participate in the pathogenesis of OA. Sodium thiosulfate (STS) has been shown to be an effective treatment in calcification disorders such as calciphylaxis and vascular calcification. This study investigated the effects and mechanisms of action of STS in a murine model of OA and in chondrocyte calcification. Methods Hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals-stimulated murine chondrocytes and macrophages were treated with STS. Mineralization and cellular production of IL-6, MCP-1 and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assayed. STS's effects on genes involved in calcification, inflammation and cartilage matrix degradation were studied by RT-PCR. STS was administered in the menisectomy model of murine OA, and the effect on periarticular calcific deposits and cartilage degeneration was investigated by micro-CT-scan and histology. Results In vitro, STS prevented in a dose-dependent manner calcium crystal deposition in chondrocytes and inhibited Annexin V gene expression. In addition, there was a reduction in crystal-induced IL-6 and MCP-1 production. STS also had an antioxidant effect, diminished HA-induced ROS generation and abrogated HA-induced catabolic responses in chondrocytes. In vivo, administration of STS reduced the histological severity of OA, by limiting the size of new periarticular calcific deposits and reducing the severity of cartilage damage. Conclusions STS reduces the severity of periarticular calcification and cartilage damage in an animal model of OA via its effects on chondrocyte mineralization and its attenuation of crystal-induced inflammation as well as catabolic enzymes and ROS generation. Our study suggests that STS may be a disease-modifying drug in crystal-associated OA. PMID:27391970

  18. Resveratrol Protects Chondrocytes from Apoptosis via Altering the Ultrastructural and Biomechanical Properties: An AFM Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tongsheng; Wang, Xiaoping

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), a degenerative joint disease with high prevalence among older people, occurs from molecular or nanometer level and extends gradually to higher degrees of the ultrastructure of cartilage, finally resulting in irreversible structural and functional damages. This report aims to use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the protective effects of resveratrol (RV), a drug with good anti-inflammatory properties, on cellular morphology, membrane architecture, cytoskeleton, cell surface adhesion and stiffness at nanometer level in sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced apoptotic chondrocytes, a typical cellular OA model. CCK-8 assay showed that 100 μM RV significantly prevented SNP-induced cytotoxicity. AFM imaging and quantitative analysis showed that SNP potently induced chondrocytes changes including shrunk, round, lamellipodia contraction and decrease in adherent junctions among cells, as well as the destruction of biomechanics: 90% decrease in elasticity and 30% decrease in adhesion. In addition, confocal imaging analysis showed that SNP induced aggregation of the cytoskeleton and decrease in the expression of cytoskeletal proteins. More importantly, these SNP-induced damages to chondrocytes could be potently prevented by RV pretreatment. Interestingly, the biomechanical changes occurred before morphological changes could be clearly observed during SNP-induced apoptosis, indicating that the biomechanics of cellular membrane may be a more robust indicator of cell function. Collectively, our data demonstrate that RV prevents SNP-induced apoptosis of chondrocytes by regulating actin organization, and that AFM-based technology can be developed into a powerful and sensitive method to study the interaction mechanisms between chondrocytes and drugs. PMID:24632762

  19. Crosstalk between adipose-derived stem cells and chondrocytes: when growth factors matter

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Juan; Guo, Bin; Xie, Jing; Deng, Shuwen; Fu, Na; Lin, Shiyu; Li, Guo; Lin, Yunfeng; Cai, Xiaoxiao

    2016-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) and mesenchymal stem cells are promising for tissue repair because of their multilineage differentiation capacity. Our previous data confirmed that the implantation of mixed ASCs and chondrocytes into cartilage defects induced desirable in vivo healing outcomes. However, the paracrine action of ASCs on chondrocytes needs to be further elucidated. In this study, we established a co-culture system to achieve cell-to-cell and cell-to-tissue crosstalk and explored the soluble growth factors in both ASCs and chondrocytes supplemented with 1% fetal bovine serum to mimic the physiological microenvironment. In ASCs, we screened for growth factors by semi-quantitative PCR and quantitative real-time PCR and found that the expression of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2), vascular endothelial growth factor B (VEGFB), hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), and transforming growth factor-β1 significantly increased after co-culture in comparison with mono-culture. In chondrocytes, VEGFA was significantly enhanced after co-culture. Unexpectedly, the expression of collagen II and aggrecan was significantly down-regulated in the co-culture group compared with the mono-culture group. Meanwhile, among all the growth factors screened, we found that the BMP family members BMP-2, BMP-4, and BMP-5 were down-regulated and that VEGFB, HIF-1α, FGF-2, and PDGF were significantly decreased after co-culture. These results suggest that crosstalk between ASCs and chondrocytes is a pathway through the regulated growth factors that might have potential in cartilage repair and regeneration and could be useful for tissue engineering. PMID:26848404

  20. Implantation of rAAV5-IGF-I transduced autologous chondrocytes improves cartilage repair in full-thickness defects in the equine model.

    PubMed

    Ortved, Kyla F; Begum, Laila; Mohammed, Hussni O; Nixon, Alan J

    2015-02-01

    Cartilage injury often precipitates osteoarthritis which has driven research to bolster repair in cartilage impact damage. Autologous chondrocytes transduced with rAAV5-IGF-I were evaluated in chondral defects in a well-established large animal model. Cartilage was harvested from the talus of 24 horses; chondrocytes were isolated and stored frozen. Twenty million cells were cultured and transduced with 10(5) AAV vg/cell prior to implantation. Chondrocytes from eight horses were transduced with rAAV5-IGF-I, chondrocytes from eight horses with rAAV5-GFP, and chondrocytes from eight horses were not transduced. A 15 mm full-thickness chondral defect was created arthroscopically in the lateral trochlear ridge of the femur in both femoropatellar joints. Treated defects were filled with naive or gene-enhanced chondrocytes, in fibrin vehicle. Control defects in the opposite limb received fibrin alone. rAAV5-IGF-I transduced chondrocytes resulted in significantly better healing at 8 week arthroscopy and 8 month necropsy examination when compared to controls. At 8 months, defects implanted with cells expressing IGF-I had better histological scores compared to control defects and defects repaired with naive chondrocytes. This included increased chondrocyte predominance and collagen type II, both features of hyaline-like repair tissue. The equine model closely approximates human cartilage healing, indicating AAV-mediated genetic modification of chondrocytes may be clinically beneficial to humans. PMID:25311491

  1. Biomechanical study of the edge outgrowth phenomenon of encapsulated chondrocytic isogenous groups in the surface layer of hydrogel scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ng, Soon Seng; Su, Kai; Li, Chuan; Chan-Park, Mary B; Wang, Dong-An; Chan, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    In cartilage tissue engineering, hydrogel is widely used as the scaffold for hosting and culturing chondrocyte suspension during neo-tissue formation. In order to develop cultured chondrocytes into a functional cartilage equivalent, the hydrogel must provide an ideal microenvironment for the rapidly proliferating chondrocytes. At the same time, the essential functions of chondrocytes, such as the secretion of type II collagen and glycosaminoglycans, must be maintained. In these studies, we quantitatively characterize the mechanobiology underlying a newly discovered "edge flourish" phenomenon of cultured chondrocytes within a three-dimensional agarose hydrogel, which may ultimately nurture scaffold-free cartilaginous tissue regeneration. First, real-time microscopy was used to track the spatiotemporal distributions of chondrocytes at different focal planes. The chondrocytes were observed to exhibit abundant neo-tissue outgrowth and significant cartilaginous phenotype at the edge of the hydrogel compared to those inside the hydrogel bulk. Secondly, the hydrogel surface stresses induced by the encapsulated chondrocytes were characterized quantitatively in real time using the finite-element method. Finally, the real-time three-dimensional matrix deformations of agarose hydrogel under the influence of chondrocytes were measured using a multiple-particle tracking assay. Our results indicate that the mechanism of the "edge flourish" phenomenon is induced by the oriented outgrowth of chondrocytic isogenous groups located at the edge of hydrogel. These isogenous groups exhibit directed outgrowth towards the surface of the hydrogel and eventually generate substantial surface tension on the interface of hydrogel and medium. Ultimately, the encapsulated chondrocytes closest to the hydrogel/medium interface will spontaneously sprout out of the hydrogel and form a layer of rich proliferative and chondrocytic extracellular matrix secreting chondrocytes at the surface of the

  2. 3-dimensional interactive space (3DIS); A new dimension in asset protection

    SciTech Connect

    Veitch, S. ); Veitch, J. ); West, S.J. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the 3DIS security system which uses standard CCTV cameras to create 3-Dimensional detection zones around valuable assets within protected areas. An intrusion into a zone changes light values and triggers an alarm that is annunciated, while images from multiple cameras are recorded. 3DIS lowers nuisance alarm rates and provides superior automated surveillance capability. Performance is improved over 2-D systems because activity around, above or below the zone does to cause an alarm. Invisible 3-D zones protect assets as small as a pin or as large as a 747 jetliner. Detection zones are created by excising subspaces from the overlapping fields of view of two or more video cameras. Hundred of zones may co-exist, operating simultaneously. Intrusion into any 3-D zone will cause a coincidental change in light values, triggering an alarm specific to that space.

  3. Theory of relativistic Brownian motion: the (1+3) -dimensional case.

    PubMed

    Dunkel, Jörn; Hänggi, Peter

    2005-09-01

    A theory for (1+3) -dimensional relativistic Brownian motion under the influence of external force fields is put forward. Starting out from a set of relativistically covariant, but multiplicative Langevin equations we describe the relativistic stochastic dynamics of a forced Brownian particle. The corresponding Fokker-Planck equations are studied in the laboratory frame coordinates. In particular, the stochastic integration prescription--i.e., the discretization rule dilemma--is elucidated (prepoint discretization rule versus midpoint discretization rule versus postpoint discretization rule). Remarkably, within our relativistic scheme we find that the postpoint rule (or the transport form) yields the only Fokker-Planck dynamics from which the relativistic Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics is recovered as the stationary solution. The relativistic velocity effects become distinctly more pronounced by going from one to three spatial dimensions. Moreover, we present numerical results for the asymptotic mean-square displacement of a free relativistic Brownian particle moving in 1+3 dimensions. PMID:16241514

  4. Tracking Error analysis of Concentrator Photovoltaic Module Using Total 3-Dimensional Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Yasuyuki; Nishioka, Kensuke

    2011-12-01

    A 3-dimensional (3D) operating simulator for concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) module using triple-junction solar cell was developed. By connecting 3D equivalent circuit simulation for triple-junction solar cell and ray-trace simulation for optics model, the operating characteristics of CPV module were calculated. A typical flat Fresnel lens and homogenizer were adapted to the optics model. The influence of tracking error on the performance of CPV module was calculated. There was the correlation between the optical efficiency and Isc. However, Pm was not correlated with these values, and was strongly dependent on FF. We can use this total simulator for the evaluation and optimization from the light incidence to operating characteristic of CPV modules.

  5. A 3-Dimensional Cockpit Display with Traffic and Terrain Information for the Small Aircraft Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    UijtdeHaag, Maarten; Thomas, Robert; Rankin, James R.

    2004-01-01

    The report discusses the architecture and the flight test results of a 3-Dimensional Cockpit Display of Traffic and terrain Information (3D-CDTI). The presented 3D-CDTI is a perspective display format that combines existing Synthetic Vision System (SVS) research and Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) technology to improve the pilot's situational awareness. The goal of the 3D-CDTI is to contribute to the development of new display concepts for NASA's Small Aircraft Transportation System research program. Papers were presented at the PLANS 2002 meeting and the ION-GPS 2002 meeting. The contents of this report are derived from the results discussed in those papers.

  6. Investigation of Asymmetries in Inductively Coupled Plasma Etching Reactors Using a 3-Dimensional Hybrid Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushner, Mark J.; Grapperhaus, Michael J.

    1996-10-01

    Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) reactors have the potential for scaling to large area substrates while maintaining azimuthal symmetry or side-to-side uniformity across the wafer. Asymmetric etch properties in these devices have been attributed to transmission line properties of the coil, internal structures (such as wafer clamps) and non-uniform gas injection or pumping. To investigate the origins of asymmetric etch properties, a 3-dimensional hybrid model has been developed. The hybrid model contains electromagnetic, electric circuit, electron energy equation, and fluid modules. Continuity and momentum equations are solved in the fluid module along with Poisson's equation. We will discuss results for ion and radical flux uniformity to the substrate while varying the transmission line characteristics of the coil, symmetry of gas inlets/pumping, and internal structures. Comparisons will be made to expermental measurements of etch rates. ^*Work supported by SRC, NSF, ARPA/AFOSR and LAM Research.

  7. PROMALS3D: multiple protein sequence alignment enhanced with evolutionary and 3-dimensional structural information

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick V.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) is an essential tool with many applications in bioinformatics and computational biology. Accurate MSA construction for divergent proteins remains a difficult computational task. The constantly increasing protein sequences and structures in public databases could be used to improve alignment quality. PROMALS3D is a tool for protein MSA construction enhanced with additional evolutionary and structural information from database searches. PROMALS3D automatically identifies homologs from sequence and structure databases for input proteins, derives structure-based constraints from alignments of 3-dimensional structures, and combines them with sequence-based constraints of profile-profile alignments in a consistency-based framework to construct high-quality multiple sequence alignments. PROMALS3D output is a consensus alignment enriched with sequence and structural information about input proteins and their homologs. PROMALS3D web server and package are available at http://prodata.swmed.edu/PROMALS3D. PMID:24170408

  8. Using 3-dimensional printing to create presurgical models for endodontic surgery.

    PubMed

    Bahcall, James K

    2014-09-01

    Advances in endodontic surgery--from both a technological and procedural perspective-have been significant over the last 18 years. Although these technologies and procedural enhancements have significantly improved endodontic surgical treatment outcomes, there is still an ongoing challenge of overcoming the limitations of interpreting preoperative 2-dimensional (2-D) radiographic representation of a 3-dimensional (3-D) in vivo surgical field. Cone-beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) has helped to address this issue by providing a 3-D enhancement of the 2-D radiograph. The next logical step to further improve a presurgical case 3-D assessment is to create a surgical model from the CBCT scan. The purpose of this article is to introduce 3-D printing of CBCT scans for creating presurgical models for endodontic surgery. PMID:25197746

  9. The program FANS-3D (finite analytic numerical simulation 3-dimensional) and its applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bravo, Ramiro H.; Chen, Ching-Jen

    1992-01-01

    In this study, the program named FANS-3D (Finite Analytic Numerical Simulation-3 Dimensional) is presented. FANS-3D was designed to solve problems of incompressible fluid flow and combined modes of heat transfer. It solves problems with conduction and convection modes of heat transfer in laminar flow, with provisions for radiation and turbulent flows. It can solve singular or conjugate modes of heat transfer. It also solves problems in natural convection, using the Boussinesq approximation. FANS-3D was designed to solve heat transfer problems inside one, two and three dimensional geometries that can be represented by orthogonal planes in a Cartesian coordinate system. It can solve internal and external flows using appropriate boundary conditions such as symmetric, periodic and user specified.

  10. Evaluation of the 3-Dimensional, Weight-bearing Orientation of the Normal Adult Knee

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Denis; Shah, Ritesh R.; Nunley, Ryan M.; Barrack, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use 3-dimensional, weight-bearing images corrected for rotation to establish normative data of limb alignment and joint line orientation in asymptomatic, adult knees. One hundred adults (200 lower extremities) were recruited to receive weight-bearing, simultaneous biplanar imaging of both lower extremities. Multiple radiographic parameters were measured from 3D images, corrected for limb rotation. 70.0% of knees were in neutral, 19.5% in varus, and 10.5% in valgus overall alignment. Only 31 % of knees possessed both a neutral mechanical axis and the absence of joint line obliquity. There was substantial agreement between the 2D and 3D images for overall mechanical alignment (κ=0.77), but only a moderate agreement for joint line obliquity (κ=0.58). A substantial portion of asymptomatic adults possess either a varus or valgus mechanical alignment and joint line obliquity, PMID:24315446

  11. Carbohydrate Cluster Microarrays Fabricated on 3-Dimensional Dendrimeric Platforms for Functional Glycomics Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xichun; Turchi, Craig; Wang, Denong

    2009-01-01

    We reported here a novel, ready-to-use bioarray platform and methodology for construction of sensitive carbohydrate cluster microarrays. This technology utilizes a 3-dimensional (3-D) poly(amidoamine) starburst dendrimer monolayer assembled on glass surface, which is functionalized with terminal aminooxy and hydrazide groups for site-specific coupling of carbohydrates. A wide range of saccharides, including monosaccharides, oligosaccharides and polysaccharides of diverse structures, are applicable for the 3-D bioarray platform without prior chemical derivatization. The process of carbohydrate coupling is effectively accelerated by microwave radiation energy. The carbohydrate concentration required for microarray fabrication is substantially reduced using this technology. Importantly, this bioarray platform presents sugar chains in defined orientation and cluster configurations. It is, thus, uniquely useful for exploration of the structural and conformational diversities of glyco-epitope and their functional properties. PMID:19791771

  12. DIEP Flap Breast Reconstruction Using 3-dimensional Surface Imaging and a Printed Mold.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Koichi; Yano, Kenji; Hata, Yuki; Nishibayashi, Akimitsu; Hosokawa, Ko

    2015-03-01

    Recent advances in 3-dimensional (3D) surface imaging technologies allow for digital quantification of complex breast tissue. We performed 11 unilateral breast reconstructions with deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flaps (5 immediate, 6 delayed) using 3D surface imaging for easier surgery planning and 3D-printed molds for shaping the breast neoparenchyma. A single- or double-pedicle flap was preoperatively planned according to the estimated tissue volume required and estimated total flap volume. The DIEP flap was then intraoperatively shaped with a 3D-printed mold that was based on a horizontally inverted shape of the contralateral breast. Cosmetic outcomes were assessed as satisfactory, as confirmed by the postoperative 3D measurements of bilateral breasts. We believe that DIEP flap reconstruction assisted with 3D surface imaging and a 3D-printed mold is a simple and quick method for rebuilding a symmetric breast. PMID:25878927

  13. DIEP Flap Breast Reconstruction Using 3-dimensional Surface Imaging and a Printed Mold

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Kenji; Hata, Yuki; Nishibayashi, Akimitsu; Hosokawa, Ko

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Recent advances in 3-dimensional (3D) surface imaging technologies allow for digital quantification of complex breast tissue. We performed 11 unilateral breast reconstructions with deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flaps (5 immediate, 6 delayed) using 3D surface imaging for easier surgery planning and 3D-printed molds for shaping the breast neoparenchyma. A single- or double-pedicle flap was preoperatively planned according to the estimated tissue volume required and estimated total flap volume. The DIEP flap was then intraoperatively shaped with a 3D-printed mold that was based on a horizontally inverted shape of the contralateral breast. Cosmetic outcomes were assessed as satisfactory, as confirmed by the postoperative 3D measurements of bilateral breasts. We believe that DIEP flap reconstruction assisted with 3D surface imaging and a 3D-printed mold is a simple and quick method for rebuilding a symmetric breast. PMID:25878927

  14. Simple computer program to model 3-dimensional underground heat flow with realistic boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, P. D.

    A FORTRAN computer program called GROCS (GRound Coupled Systems) has been developed to study 3-dimensional underground heat flow. Features include the use of up to 30 finite elements or blocks of Earth which interact via finite difference heat flow equations and a subprogram which sets realistic time and depth dependent boundary conditions. No explicit consideration of mositure movement or freezing is given. GROCS has been used to model the thermal behavior of buried solar heat storage tanks (with and without insulation) and serpentine pipe fields for solar heat pump space conditioning systems. The program is available independently or in a form compatible with specially written TRNSYS component TYPE subroutines. The approach taken in the design of GROCS, the mathematics contained and the program architecture, are described. Then, the operation of the stand-alone version is explained. Finally, the validity of GROCS is discussed.

  15. S2PLOT: a Straightforward Library for Advanced 3-dimensional Scientific Visualisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, D. G.; Fluke, C. J.

    2008-08-01

    S2PLOT is a user-oriented programming library for generating and exploring 3-dimensional (3-d) scientific plots and diagrams. It provides a lightweight interface---inspired by the simple yet widely-used PGPLOT---to produce hardware-accelerated visualisations of point, line, image and volumetric data. S2PLOT provides C and FORTRAN interfaces, and supports monoscopic, stereoscopic and curved (eg. dome) display devices. PGPLOT-savvy astronomers can usually write their first S2PLOT program in less than ten minutes. In this paper, we introduce the latest S2PLOT version and highlight major new additions to the library, including volume rendering and isosurfacing of astronomical data. We describe a simple extension that enables the embedding of large-area FITS images directly into S2PLOT programs using standard World Coordinate Systems, and we introduce the Python interface to S2PLOT.

  16. Use of 3-Dimensional Printing for Preoperative Planning in the Treatment of Recurrent Anterior Shoulder Instability

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Ujash; Theodoropoulos, John; Abouali, Jihad

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent anterior shoulder instability often results from large bony Bankart or Hill-Sachs lesions. Preoperative imaging is essential in guiding our surgical management of patients with these conditions. However, we are often limited to making an attempt to interpret a 3-dimensional (3D) structure using conventional 2-dimensional imaging. In cases in which complex anatomy or bony defects are encountered, this type of imaging is often inadequate. We used 3D printing to produce a solid 3D model of a glenohumeral joint from a young patient with recurrent anterior shoulder instability and complex Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions. The 3D model from our patient was used in the preoperative planning stages of an arthroscopic Bankart repair and remplissage to determine the depth of the Hill-Sachs lesion and the degree of abduction and external rotation at which the Hill-Sachs lesion engaged. PMID:26759768

  17. Effective implantation of autologous chondrocytes in a patient suffering from a painful and invalidating rizoarthrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Sgherzi, Stefano; Sillani, Alessandro; Magris, Cecilia

    2009-01-01

    A 45-year-old patient, caucasian, affected by severe, painful and invalidating rizoarthrosis has been treated by implanting autologous chondrocytes, normally used for degenerative joint diseases of the knee and ankle. PMID:19918494

  18. Effective implantation of autologous chondrocytes in a patient suffering from a painful and invalidating rizoarthrosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Carelli, Francesco; Sgherzi, Stefano; Sillani, Alessandro; Magris, Cecilia

    2009-01-01

    A 45-year-old patient, caucasian, affected by severe, painful and invalidating rizoarthrosis has been treated by implanting autologous chondrocytes, normally used for degenerative joint diseases of the knee and ankle. PMID:19918494

  19. Characterization of a type II collagen gene (COL2A1) mutation identified in cultured chondrocytes from human hypochondrogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Horton, W A; Machado, M A; Ellard, J; Campbell, D; Bartley, J; Ramirez, F; Vitale, E; Lee, B

    1992-01-01

    A subtle mutation in the type II collagen gene COL2A1 was detected in a case of human hypochondrogenesis by using a chondrocyte culture system and PCR-cDNA scanning analysis. Chondrocytes obtained from cartilage biopsies were dedifferentiated and expanded in monolayer culture and then redifferentiated by culture over agarose. Single-strand conformation polymorphism and direct sequencing analysis identified a G----A transition, resulting in a glycine substitution at amino acid 574 of the pro alpha 1(II) collagen triple-helical domain. Morphologic assessment of cartilage-like structures produced in culture and electrophoretic analysis of collagens synthesized by the cultured chondrocytes suggested that the glycine substitution interferes with conversion of type II procollagen to collagen, impairs intracellular transport and secretion of the molecule, and disrupts collagen fibril assembly. This experimental approach has broad implications for the investigation of human chondrodysplasias as well as human chondrocyte biology. Images PMID:1374906

  20. Photobiostimulation on chondrocytes proliferation in different concentration of fetal bovine serum under low-level laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Liqin; Wang, Yuhua; Qiu, Caimin; Chen, Jianlin; Yang, Hongqin; Zhang, Yanding; Xie, Shusen

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) on the chondrocytes proliferation cultured in different concentration of fetal bovine serum (FBS) using 658 nm, 785 nm and 830 nm diode lasers. The role of energy density (10-70 mJ·cm-2) on chondrocytes proliferation following irradiation with 658 nm laser for 2 days was firstly investigated to find out the best laser energy density. Then the effect of LLLI on the proliferation of chondrocytes cultured with fetal bovine serum at 0%, 2%, 5% and 10% was also evaluated. The results showed that there was no or little photobiostimulation on the proliferation of chondrocytes cultured with 0% FBS and 10% FBS; the cell proliferation at 2% and 5% FBS was significantly modulated by LLLI.

  1. Generation and 3-Dimensional Quantitation of Arterial Lesions in Mice Using Optical Projection Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kirkby, Nicholas S.; Low, Lucinda; Wu, Junxi; Miller, Eileen; Seckl, Jonathan R.; Walker, Brian R.; Webb, David J.; Hadoke, Patrick W. F.

    2015-01-01

    The generation and analysis of vascular lesions in appropriate animal models is a cornerstone of research into cardiovascular disease, generating important information on the pathogenesis of lesion formation and the action of novel therapies. Use of atherosclerosis-prone mice, surgical methods of lesion induction, and dietary modification has dramatically improved understanding of the mechanisms that contribute to disease development and the potential of new treatments. Classically, analysis of lesions is performed ex vivo using 2-dimensional histological techniques. This article describes application of optical projection tomography (OPT) to 3-dimensional quantitation of arterial lesions. As this technique is non-destructive, it can be used as an adjunct to standard histological and immunohistochemical analyses. Neointimal lesions were induced by wire-insertion or ligation of the mouse femoral artery whilst atherosclerotic lesions were generated by administration of an atherogenic diet to apoE-deficient mice. Lesions were examined using OPT imaging of autofluorescent emission followed by complementary histological and immunohistochemical analysis. OPT clearly distinguished lesions from the underlying vascular wall. Lesion size was calculated in 2-dimensional sections using planimetry, enabling calculation of lesion volume and maximal cross-sectional area. Data generated using OPT were consistent with measurements obtained using histology, confirming the accuracy of the technique and its potential as a complement (rather than alternative) to traditional methods of analysis. This work demonstrates the potential of OPT for imaging atherosclerotic and neointimal lesions. It provides a rapid, much needed ex vivo technique for the routine 3-dimensional quantification of vascular remodelling. PMID:26067588

  2. Efficacy of 3-Dimensional plates over Champys miniplates in mandibular anterior fractures

    PubMed Central

    Barde, Dhananjay H; Mudhol, Anupama; Ali, Fareedi Mukram; Madan, R S; Kar, Sanjay; Ustaad, Farheen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mandibular fractures are treated surgically by either rigid or semi-rigid fixation, two techniques that reflect almost opposite concept of craniomaxillofacial osteosynthesis. The shortcomings of these fixations led to the development of 3 dimensional (3D) miniplates. This study was designed with the aim of evaluating the efficiency of 3D miniplate over Champys miniplate in anterior mandibular fractures. Materials & Methods: This study was done in 40 patients with anterior mandibular fractures. Group I consisting of 20 patients in whom 3D plates were used for fixation while in Group II consisting of other 20 patients, 4 holes straight plates were used. The efficacy of 3D miniplate over Champy’s miniplate was evaluated in terms of operating time, average pain, post operative infection, occlusion, wound dehiscence, post operative mobility and neurological deficit. Results: The mean operation time for Group II was more compared to Group I (statistically significant).There was significantly greater pain on day of surgery and at 2nd week for Group II patients but there was no significant difference between the two groups at 4th week. The post operative infection, occlusal disturbance, wound dehiscence, post operative mobility at facture site, neurological deficit was statistically insignificant (chi square test). Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that fixation of anterior mandibular fractures with 3D plates provides three dimensional stability and carries low morbidity and infection rates. The only probable limitation of these 3D plates may be excessive implant material, but they seem to be easy alternative to champys miniplate. How to cite the article: Barde DH, Mudhol A, Ali FM, Madan RS, Kar S, Ustaad F. Efficacy of 3-Dimensional plates over Champys miniplates in mandibular anterior fractures. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(1):20-6. PMID:24653598

  3. The Effectiveness of an Interactive 3-Dimensional Computer Graphics Model for Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Konishi, Takeshi; Tamura, Yoko; Moriguchi, Hiroki

    2012-01-01

    Background Medical students often have difficulty achieving a conceptual understanding of 3-dimensional (3D) anatomy, such as bone alignment, muscles, and complex movements, from 2-dimensional (2D) images. To this end, animated and interactive 3-dimensional computer graphics (3DCG) can provide better visual information to users. In medical fields, research on the advantages of 3DCG in medical education is relatively new. Objective To determine the educational effectiveness of interactive 3DCG. Methods We divided 100 participants (27 men, mean (SD) age 17.9 (0.6) years, and 73 women, mean (SD) age 18.1 (1.1) years) from the Health Sciences University of Mongolia (HSUM) into 3DCG (n = 50) and textbook-only (control) (n = 50) groups. The control group used a textbook and 2D images, while the 3DCG group was trained to use the interactive 3DCG shoulder model in addition to a textbook. We conducted a questionnaire survey via an encrypted satellite network between HSUM and Tokushima University. The questionnaire was scored on a 5-point Likert scale from strongly disagree (score 1) to strongly agree (score 5). Results Interactive 3DCG was effective in undergraduate medical education. Specifically, there was a significant difference in mean (SD) scores between the 3DCG and control groups in their response to questionnaire items regarding content (4.26 (0.69) vs 3.85 (0.68), P = .001) and teaching methods (4.33 (0.65) vs 3.74 (0.79), P < .001), but no significant difference in the Web category. Participants also provided meaningful comments on the advantages of interactive 3DCG. Conclusions Interactive 3DCG materials have positive effects on medical education when properly integrated into conventional education. In particular, our results suggest that interactive 3DCG is more efficient than textbooks alone in medical education and can motivate students to understand complex anatomical structures. PMID:23611759

  4. Selection of massive bone allografts using shape-matching 3-dimensional registration

    PubMed Central

    Docquier, Pierre-Louis; Cartiaux, Olivier; Cornu, Olivier; Delloye, Christian; Banse, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Massive bone allografts are used when surgery causes large segmental defects. Shape-matching is the primary criterion for selection of an allograft. The current selection method, based on 2-dimensional template comparison, is inefficient for 3-dimensional complex bones. We have analyzed a 3-dimensional (3-D) registration method to match the anatomy of the allograft with that of the recipient. Methods 3-D CT-based registration was performed to match the shapes of both bones. We used the registration to align the allograft volume onto the recipient's bone. Hemipelvic allograft selection was tested in 10 virtual recipients with a panel of 10 potential allografts, including one from the recipient himself (trap graft). 4 observers were asked to visually inspect the superposition of allograft over the recipient, to classify the allografts into 4 categories according to the matching of anatomic zones, and to select the 3 best matching allografts. The results obtained using the registration method were compared with those from a previous study on the template method. Results Using the registration method, the observers systematically detected the trap graft. Selections of the 3 best matching allografts performed using registration and template methods were different. Selection of the 3 best matching allografts was improved by the registration method. Finally, reproducibility of the selection was improved when using the registration method. Interpretation 3-D CT registration provides more useful information than the template method but the final decision lies with the surgeon, who should select the optimal allograft according to his or her own preferences and the needs of the recipient. PMID:20175643

  5. 3 Dimensional Diagnosis Unravelling Prognosis of Multiple Impacted Teeth – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, Adusumilli; Reddy, Naveen Admala; Rohra, Mayur G

    2013-01-01

    Impaction of teeth results from the interplay between nature and nurture. Radiographs play an important role in assessment of both the location and the typing of impacted teeth. In general, periapical, occlusal, and/or panoramic radiographs are sufficient for providing the information required by the clinician. Recent advances in diagnostic imaging enables to visualize , diagnose and prognose the treatment outcome of the impacted teeth. This case report discusses the value of cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) for evaluation of the critical parameters like bone thickness , tooth position and tooth morphology of multiple impacted teeth by 3 dimensional radiography – CBCT. In this report, we present a case of 27-year-old male patient with multiple missing teeth. Radiographs revealed multiple impacted permanent teeth, though medical and family history along with physical examination was not suggestive of any syndromes. Intraoral periapical radiograph, Orthopantomograph, Occlusal radiograph, Cone beam computed tomography were taken for the same patient to determine the exact position of multiple impacted teeth and prognose the treatment plan with the associated factors to impacted teeth. Cone beam computed tomography is an accurate modality to localize and determine the prognosing factors associated with multiple impacted teeth. Three-dimensional volumetric imaging might provide information for improved diagnosis and treatment plans, and ultimately result in more successful treatment outcomes and better care for patients. How to cite this article: Gopinath A, Reddy NA, Rohra MG. 3 Dimensional Diagnosis Unravelling Prognosis of Multiple Impacted Teeth – A Case Report. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(4):78-83. PMID:24155625

  6. 3-Dimensional Geologic Modeling Applied to the Structural Characterization of Geothermal Systems: Astor Pass, Nevada, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Siler, Drew L; Faulds, James E; Mayhew, Brett

    2013-04-16

    Geothermal systems in the Great Basin, USA, are controlled by a variety of fault intersection and fault interaction areas. Understanding the specific geometry of the structures most conducive to broad-scale geothermal circulation is crucial to both the mitigation of the costs of geothermal exploration (especially drilling) and to the identification of geothermal systems that have no surface expression (blind systems). 3-dimensional geologic modeling is a tool that can elucidate the specific stratigraphic intervals and structural geometries that host geothermal reservoirs. Astor Pass, NV USA lies just beyond the northern extent of the dextral Pyramid Lake fault zone near the boundary between two distinct structural domains, the Walker Lane and the Basin and Range, and exhibits characteristics of each setting. Both northwest-striking, left-stepping dextral faults of the Walker Lane and kinematically linked northerly striking normal faults associated with the Basin and Range are present. Previous studies at Astor Pass identified a blind geothermal system controlled by the intersection of west-northwest and north-northwest striking dextral-normal faults. Wells drilled into the southwestern quadrant of the fault intersection yielded 94°C fluids, with geothermometers suggesting a maximum reservoir temperature of 130°C. A 3-dimensional model was constructed based on detailed geologic maps and cross-sections, 2-dimensional seismic data, and petrologic analysis of the cuttings from three wells in order to further constrain the structural setting. The model reveals the specific geometry of the fault interaction area at a level of detail beyond what geologic maps and cross-sections can provide.

  7. Looping Mediated Interaction between the Promoter and 3′ UTR Regulates Type II Collagen Expression in Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jash, Arijita; Yun, Kangsun; Sahoo, Anupama; So, Jae-Seon; Im, Sin-Hyeog

    2012-01-01

    Type II collagen is the major component of articular cartilage and is mainly synthesized by chondrocytes. Repeated sub-culturing of primary chondrocytes leads to reduction of type II collagen gene (Col2a1) expression, which mimics the process of chondrocyte dedifferentiation. Although the functional importance of Col2a1 expression has been extensively investigated, mechanism of transcriptional regulation during chondrocyte dedifferentiation is still unclear. In this study, we have investigated the crosstalk between cis-acting DNA element and transcription factor on Col2a1 expression in primary chondrocytes. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the potential regulatory regions in the Col2a1 genomic locus. Among them, promoter and 3′ untranslated region (UTR) showed highly accessible chromatin architecture with enriched recruitment of active chromatin markers in primary chondrocytes. 3′ UTR has a potent enhancer function which recruits Lef1 (Lymphoid enhancer binding factor 1) transcription factor, leading to juxtaposition of the 3′ UTR with the promoter through gene looping resulting in up-regulation of Col2a1 gene transcription. Knock-down of endogenous Lef1 level significantly reduced the gene looping and subsequently down-regulated Col2a1 expression. However, these regulatory loci become inaccessible due to condensed chromatin architecture as chondrocytes dedifferentiate which was accompanied by a reduction of gene looping and down-regulation of Col2a1 expression. Our results indicate that Lef1 mediated looping between promoter and 3′ UTR under the permissive chromatin architecture upregulates Col2a1 expression in primary chondrocytes. PMID:22815835

  8. Early induction of a prechondrogenic population allows efficient generation of stable chondrocytes from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jieun; Taylor, Sarah E. B.; Smeriglio, Piera; Lai, Janice; Maloney, William J.; Yang, Fan; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of human cartilage is inherently inefficient; an abundant autologous source, such as human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), is therefore attractive for engineering cartilage. We report a growth factor-based protocol for differentiating hiPSCs into articular-like chondrocytes (hiChondrocytes) within 2 weeks, with an overall efficiency >90%. The hiChondrocytes are stable and comparable to adult articular chondrocytes in global gene expression, extracellular matrix production, and ability to generate cartilage tissue in vitro and in immune-deficient mice. Molecular characterization identified an early SRY (sex-determining region Y) box (Sox)9low cluster of differentiation (CD)44lowCD140low prechondrogenic population during hiPSC differentiation. In addition, 2 distinct Sox9-regulated gene networks were identified in the Sox9low and Sox9high populations providing novel molecular insights into chondrogenic fate commitment and differentiation. Our findings present a favorable method for generating hiPSC-derived articular-like chondrocytes. The hiChondrocytes are an attractive cell source for cartilage engineering because of their abundance, autologous nature, and potential to generate articular-like cartilage rather than fibrocartilage. In addition, hiChondrocytes can be excellent tools for modeling human musculoskeletal diseases in a dish and for rapid drug screening.—Lee, J., Taylor, S. E. B., Smeriglio, P., Lai, J., Maloney, W. J., Yang, F., Bhutani, N. Early induction of a prechondrogenic population allows efficient generation of stable chondrocytes from human induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:25911615

  9. Proliferative re-modeling of the spatial organization of human superficial chondrocytes distant to focal early osteoarthritis (OA)

    PubMed Central

    Rolauffs, Bernd; Williams, James M.; Aurich, Matthias; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Kuettner, Klaus E.; Cole, Ada A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Human superficial chondrocytes show distinct spatial organizations whereas they commonly aggregate near osteoarthritic (OA) fissures. It is not known whether remodeling or destruction of the spatial chondrocyte organization may occur distant to focal (early) OA lesions. Methods The intact cartilages (condyles, patellofemoral groove, proximal tibia) distant to focal OA lesions of human grade 2 joints were compared to location-matched non-degenerative (grade 0–1) cartilages. Chondrocyte nuclei were stained with propidium iodide and recorded by fluorescence-microscopy in a top-down view. Chondrocyte arrangements were tested for randomness or significant grouping via point pattern analyses (Clark and Evans Aggregation Index), and were correlated with OA grade and surface cell densities. Results In grade 2 cartilages, superficial chondrocytes were situated in horizontal patterns such as strings, cluster, pairs and singles comparable to non-degenerative cartilage. In the intact cartilages of grade 2 joints, the spatial organization included a novel pattern, consisting of chondrocytes that were aligned in two parallel lines building double strings. These double strings correlated with an increased number of chondrocytes per group (p<0.05), increased corresponding superficial zone cell density (p<0.001), and were observed in all grade 2 condyles (p<0.001), some grade 2 tibiae (p<0.05) but never in grade 0–1 cartilage (p<0.001). Conclusion The present study is the first to identify a distinct spatial re-organization of human superficial chondrocytes in response to distant early OA lesions and suggests that proliferation had occurred distant to focal early OA. This spatial re-organization may serve to recruit metabolically active units as attempt to repair focal damage. PMID:20112377

  10. Expression and Function of K(ATP) Channels in Normal and Osteoarthritic Human Chondrocytes: Possible Role in Glucose Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Rufino, Ana T; Rosa, Susana C; Judas, Fernando; Mobasheri, Ali; Lopes, M Celeste; Mendes, Alexandrina F

    2013-01-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium [K(ATP)] channels sense intracellular ATP/ADP levels, being essential components of a glucose-sensing apparatus in various cells that couples glucose metabolism, intracellular ATP/ADP levels and membrane potential. These channels are present in human chondrocytes, but their subunit composition and functions are unknown. This study aimed at elucidating the subunit composition of K(ATP) channels expressed in human chondrocytes and determining whether they play a role in regulating the abundance of major glucose transporters, GLUT-1 and GLUT-3, and glucose transport capacity. The results obtained show that human chondrocytes express the pore forming subunits, Kir6.1 and Kir6.2, at the mRNA and protein levels and the regulatory sulfonylurea receptor (SUR) subunits, SUR2A and SUR2B, but not SUR1. The expression of these subunits was no affected by culture under hyperglycemia-like conditions. Functional impairment of the channel activity, using a SUR blocker (glibenclamide 10 or 20 nM), reduced the protein levels of GLUT-1 and GLUT-3 by approximately 30% in normal chondrocytes, while in cells from cartilage with increasing osteoarthritic (OA) grade no changes were observed. Glucose transport capacity, however, was not affected in normal or OA chondrocytes. These results show that K(ATP) channel activity regulates the abundance of GLUT-1 and GLUT-3, although other mechanisms are involved in regulating the overall glucose transport capacity of human chondrocytes. Therefore, K(ATP) channels are potential components of a broad glucose sensing apparatus that modulates glucose transporters and allows human chondrocytes to adjust to varying extracellular glucose concentrations. This function of K(ATP) channels seems to be impaired in OA chondrocytes. J. Cell. Biochem. 114: 1879–1889, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23494827

  11. Stimulation of regulatory volume decrease (RVD) by isolated bovine articular chondrocytes following F-actin disruption using latrunculin B.

    PubMed

    Kerrigan, Mark J P; Hall, Andrew C

    2005-01-01

    Articular chondrocytes are exposed to significant changes in extracellular osmolarity during normal joint activity, which can lead to changes in cell volume and metabolism of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Chondrocytes can respond to cell swelling/shrinking by volume regulatory pathways, but the signalling pathways are poorly understood although a role for the cytoskeleton is frequently implicated. Here, we have investigated the effects of disruption of the chondrocyte F-actin cytoskeleton on the recovery of cell volume by RVD. The cytoskeleton was perturbed using the relatively specific agent latrunculin B (5 microM; 30 min) and loss of F-actin integrity quantified using fluorescent phalloidin-labelling and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Imaging of isolated chondrocytes labelled with Fura-2 to measure the fluorescence associated with cell volume changes, showed that the extent of hypo-osmotic swelling was unaffected by latrunculin B treatment. Two categories of the chondrocyte RVD response were observed: 'fast' RVD where at 3 min post-osmotic challenge there was a recovery in cell fluorescence of >or=80%, whereas other cells exhibited 'slow' RVD. Latrunculin B increased the proportion of chondrocytes demonstrating 'fast' RVD by approximately 10 fold and reduced those cells showing 'slow' RVD. An inhibitor of chondrocyte RVD (REV 5901) had no significant effect on the integrity of the cytoskeleton showing that the RVD response could be inhibited independent of the state of the F-actin cytoskeleton. These results suggest that the intact cortical F-actin cytoskeleton has a restraining effect on the RVD response of isolated bovine articular chondrocytes. PMID:16227656

  12. Increased Chondrocyte Apoptosis Is Associated with Progression of Osteoarthritis in Spontaneous Guinea Pig Models of the Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zamli, Zaitunnatakhin; Adams, Michael A.; Tarlton, John F.; Sharif, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease characterised by degradation of articular cartilage and bone remodelling. For almost a decade chondrocyte apoptosis has been investigated as a possible mechanism of cartilage damage in OA, but its precise role in initiation and/or progression of OA remains to the determined. The aim of this study is to determine the role of chondrocyte apoptosis in spontaneous animal models of OA. Right tibias from six male Dunkin Hartley (DH) and Bristol Strain 2 (BS2) guinea pigs were collected at 10, 16, 24 and 30 weeks of age. Fresh-frozen sections of tibial epiphysis were microscopically scored for OA, and immunostained with caspase-3 and TUNEL for apoptotic chondrocytes. The DH strain had more pronounced cartilage damage than BS2, especially at 30 weeks. At this time point, the apoptotic chondrocytes were largely confined to the deep zone of articular cartilage (AC) with a greater percentage in the medial side of DH than BS2 (DH: 5.7%, 95% CI: 4.2–7.2), BS2: 4.8%, 95% CI: 3.8–5.8), p > 0.05). DH had a significant progression of chondrocyte death between 24 to 30 weeks during which time significant changes were observed in AC fibrillation, proteoglycan depletion and overall microscopic OA score. A strong correlation (p ≤ 0.01) was found between chondrocyte apoptosis and AC fibrillation (r = 0.3), cellularity (r = 0.4) and overall microscopic OA scores (r = 0.4). Overall, the rate of progression in OA and apoptosis over the study period was greater in the DH (versus BS2) and the medial AC (versus lateral). Chondrocyte apoptosis was higher at the later stage of OA development when the cartilage matrix was hypocellular and highly fibrillated, suggesting that chondrocyte apoptosis is a late event in OA. PMID:23994836

  13. Celecoxib can suppress expression of genes associated with PGE2 pathway in chondrocytes under inflammatory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Tian-Wen; Wu, Zhi-Hong; Weng, Xi-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of a selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor (celecoxib) on the expression of arachidonate-associated inflammatory genes in cultured human normal chondrocytes. Normal chondrocytes were obtained from the cartilage of three different amputated patients without osteoarthritis (OA). Affymetrix Human microarray was used to assess the alterations in gene expression in three groups of cells: untreated cells (negative control group), cells treated with interleukin-1β (IL-1β) (positive control group), and cells treated with IL-1β and celecoxib. The patterns of up-regulation and down-regulation of gene expression were further validated by real-time PCR. A total of 1091 up-regulated genes and 1252 down-regulated genes were identified in the positive control group compared with the negative control group. Among them, PTGS2, ADAMTS5, PTGER2, mPTGES and PTGER4 are known to be involved in chondrocyte inflammation, while VEGFA, BCL2, TRAF1, CYR61, BMP6, DAPK1, DUSP7, IL1RN, MMP13 and TNFSF10 were reported being associated with cytokine and chemokine signaling. 189 up-regulated genes and 177 down-regulated genes were identified in the positive control group compared with intervention group. PTGS1, PTGS2, ADAMTS5, PTGER2, mPTGES and PTGER4 were among the genes down-regulated upon the treatment with celecoxib. Our results demonstrated that the OA chondrocytes are the site of active eicosanoid production. IL-1β can activate inflammation in chondrocytes and trigger the production of various proteins involved in cyclooxygenase pathway. The expression of genes corresponding to these proteins can be down-regulated by celecoxib. The findings indicate that the therapy with prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)-blocking agents may decrease the PGE2 production not only by direct inhibition of COX-2 activity, but also by down-regulating the expression of genes encoding for COX-2, microsomal prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 1 (mPGES-1) and prostaglandin

  14. Heme oxygenase-1 regulates matrix metalloproteinase MMP-1 secretion and chondrocyte cell death via Nox4 NADPH oxidase activity in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Rousset, Francis; Nguyen, Minh Vu Chuong; Grange, Laurent; Morel, Françoise; Lardy, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) activates the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and secretion of MMPs as well as chondrocyte apoptosis. Those events lead to matrix breakdown and are key features of osteoarthritis (OA). We confirmed that in human C-20/A4 chondrocytes the NADPH oxidase Nox4 is the main source of ROS upon IL-1β stimulation. Since heme molecules are essential for the NADPH oxidase maturation and activity, we therefore investigated the consequences of the modulation of Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the limiting enzyme in heme catabolism, on the IL-1β signaling pathway and more specifically on Nox4 activity. Induction of HO-1 expression decreased dramatically Nox4 activity in C-20/A4 and HEK293 T-REx™ Nox4 cell lines. Unexpectedly, this decrease was not accompanied by any change in the expression, the subcellular localization or the maturation of Nox4. In fact, the inhibition of the heme synthesis by succinylacetone rather than heme catabolism by HO-1, led to a confinement of the Nox4/p22(phox) heterodimer in the endoplasmic reticulum with an absence of redox differential spectrum highlighting an incomplete maturation. Therefore, the downregulation of Nox4 activity by HO-1 induction appeared to be mediated by carbon monoxide (CO) generated from the heme degradation process. Interestingly, either HO-1 or CO caused a significant decrease in the expression of MMP-1 and DNA fragmentation of chondrocytes stimulated by IL-1β. These results all together suggest that a modulation of Nox4 activity via heme oxygenase-1 may represent a promising therapeutic tool in osteoarthritis. PMID:23840483

  15. Heme Oxygenase-1 Regulates Matrix Metalloproteinase MMP-1 Secretion and Chondrocyte Cell Death via Nox4 NADPH Oxidase Activity in Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rousset, Francis; Nguyen, Minh Vu Chuong; Grange, Laurent; Morel, Françoise; Lardy, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) activates the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and secretion of MMPs as well as chondrocyte apoptosis. Those events lead to matrix breakdown and are key features of osteoarthritis (OA). We confirmed that in human C-20/A4 chondrocytes the NADPH oxidase Nox4 is the main source of ROS upon IL-1β stimulation. Since heme molecules are essential for the NADPH oxidase maturation and activity, we therefore investigated the consequences of the modulation of Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the limiting enzyme in heme catabolism, on the IL-1β signaling pathway and more specifically on Nox4 activity. Induction of HO-1 expression decreased dramatically Nox4 activity in C-20/A4 and HEK293 T-REx™ Nox4 cell lines. Unexpectedly, this decrease was not accompanied by any change in the expression, the subcellular localization or the maturation of Nox4. In fact, the inhibition of the heme synthesis by succinylacetone rather than heme catabolism by HO-1, led to a confinement of the Nox4/p22phox heterodimer in the endoplasmic reticulum with an absence of redox differential spectrum highlighting an incomplete maturation. Therefore, the downregulation of Nox4 activity by HO-1 induction appeared to be mediated by carbon monoxide (CO) generated from the heme degradation process. Interestingly, either HO-1 or CO caused a significant decrease in the expression of MMP-1 and DNA fragmentation of chondrocytes stimulated by IL-1β. These results all together suggest that a modulation of Nox4 activity via heme oxygenase-1 may represent a promising therapeutic tool in osteoarthritis. PMID:23840483

  16. The synovial microenvironment of osteoarthritic joints alters RNA-seq expression profiles of human primary articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lewallen, Eric A; Bonin, Carolina A; Li, Xin; Smith, Jay; Karperien, Marcel; Larson, A Noelle; Lewallen, David G; Cool, Simon M; Westendorf, Jennifer J; Krych, Aaron J; Leontovich, Alexey A; Im, Hee-Jeong; van Wijnen, Andre J

    2016-10-15

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a disabling degenerative joint disease that prompts pain and has limited treatment options. To permit early diagnosis and treatment of OA, a high resolution mechanistic understanding of human chondrocytes in normal and diseased states is necessary. In this study, we assessed the biological effects of OA-related changes in the synovial microenvironment on chondrocytes embedded within anatomically intact cartilage from joints with different pathological grades by next generation RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq). We determined the transcriptome of primary articular chondrocytes derived from anatomically unaffected knees and ankles, as well as from joints affected by OA. The GALAXY bioinformatics platform was used to facilitate biological interpretations. Comparisons of patient samples by k-means, hierarchical clustering and principal component analyses together reveal that primary chondrocytes exhibit OA grade-related differences in gene expression, including genes involved in cell-adhesion, ECM production and immune response. We conclude that diseased synovial microenvironments in joints with different histopathological OA grades directly alter gene expression in chondrocytes. One ramification of this finding is that anatomically intact cartilage from OA joints is not an ideal source of healthy chondrocytes, nor should these specimens be used to generate a normal baseline for the molecular characterization of diseased joints. PMID:27378743

  17. The Effect of Chondroitin Sulphate and Hyaluronic Acid on Chondrocytes Cultured within a Fibrin-Alginate Hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Little, Christopher J; Kulyk, William M; Chen, Xiongbiao

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a painful degenerative joint disease that could be better managed if tissue engineers can develop methods to create long-term engineered articular cartilage tissue substitutes. Many of the tissue engineered cartilage constructs currently available lack the chemical stimuli and cell-friendly environment that promote the matrix accumulation and cell proliferation needed for use in joint cartilage repair. The goal of this research was to test the efficacy of using a fibrin-alginate hydrogel containing hyaluronic acid (HA) and/or chondroitin sulphate (CS) supplements for chondrocyte culture. Neonatal porcine chondrocytes cultured in fibrin-alginate hydrogels retained their phenotype better than chondrocytes cultured in monolayer, as evidenced by analysis of their relative expression of type II versus type I collagen mRNA transcripts. HA or CS supplementation of the hydrogels increased matrix glycosaminoglycan (GAG) production during the first week of culture. However, the effects of these supplements on matrix accumulation were not additive and were no longer observed after two weeks of culture. Supplementation of the hydrogels with CS or a combination of both CS and HA increased the chondrocyte cell population after two weeks of culture. Statistical analysis indicated that the HA and CS treatment effects on chondrocyte numbers may be additive. This research suggests that supplementation with CS and/or HA has positive effects on cartilage matrix production and chondrocyte proliferation in three-dimensional (3D) fibrin-alginate hydrogels. PMID:25238548

  18. Paracrine effects of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells in inflammatory stress-induced senescence features of osteoarthritic chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Platas, Julia; Guillén, Maria Isabel; Pérez Del Caz, Maria Dolores; Gomar, Francisco; Castejón, Miguel Angel; Mirabet, Vicente; Alcaraz, Maria José

    2016-08-01

    Aging and exposure to stress would determine the chondrocyte phenotype in osteoarthritis (OA). In particular, chronic inflammation may contribute to stress-induced senescence of chondrocytes and cartilage degeneration during OA progression. Recent studies have shown that adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells exert paracrine effects protecting against degenerative changes in chondrocytes. We have investigated whether the conditioned medium (CM) from adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells may regulate senescence features induced by inflammatory stress in OA chondrocytes. Our results indicate that CM down-regulated senescence markers induced by interleukin-1β including senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, accumulation of γH2AX foci and morphological changes with enhanced formation of actin stress fibers. Treatment of chondrocytes with CM also decreased the production of oxidative stress, the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, and the expression of caveolin-1 and p21. The effects of CM were related to the reduction in p53 acetylation which would be dependent on the enhancement of Sirtuin 1 expression. Therefore, CM may exert protective effects in degenerative joint conditions by countering the premature senescence of OA chondrocytes induced by inflammatory stress. PMID:27490266

  19. Activin A/BMP2 chimera AB235 drives efficient redifferentiation of long term cultured autologous chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, G; López-Ruiz, E; Kwiatkowski, W; Montañez, E; Arrebola, F; Carrillo, E; Gray, P C; Izpisua Belmonte, J C; Choe, S; Perán, M; Marchal, J A

    2015-01-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) depends on the quality and quantity of implanted cells and is hindered by the fact that chondrocytes cultured for long periods of time undergo dedifferentiation. Here we have developed a reproducible and efficient chondrogenic protocol to redifferentiate chondrocytes isolated from osteoarthritis (OA) patients. We used morphological, histological and immunological analysis together with a RT-PCR detection of collagen I and collagen II gene expression to show that chondrocytes isolated from articular cartilage biopsies of patients and subjected to long-term culture undergo dedifferentiation and that these cells can be redifferentiated following treatment with the chimeric Activin A/BMP2 ligand AB235. Examination of AB235-treated cell pellets in both in vitro and in vivo experiments revealed that redifferentiated chondrocytes synthesized a cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM), primarily consisting of vertically-orientated collagen fibres and cartilage-specific proteoglycans. AB235-treated cell pellets also integrated into the surrounding subcutaneous tissue following transplantation in mice as demonstrated by their dramatic increase in size while non-treated control pellets disintegrated upon transplantation. Thus, our findings describe an effective protocol for the promotion of redifferentiation of autologous chondrocytes obtained from OA patients and the formation of a cartilage-like ECM that can integrate into the surrounding tissue in vivo. PMID:26563344

  20. Activin A/BMP2 chimera AB235 drives efficient redifferentiation of long term cultured autologous chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, G.; López-Ruiz, E.; Kwiatkowski, W.; Montañez, E.; Arrebola, F.; Carrillo, E.; Gray, P. C.; Belmonte, J. C. Izpisua; Choe, S.; Perán, M.; Marchal, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) depends on the quality and quantity of implanted cells and is hindered by the fact that chondrocytes cultured for long periods of time undergo dedifferentiation. Here we have developed a reproducible and efficient chondrogenic protocol to redifferentiate chondrocytes isolated from osteoarthritis (OA) patients. We used morphological, histological and immunological analysis together with a RT-PCR detection of collagen I and collagen II gene expression to show that chondrocytes isolated from articular cartilage biopsies of patients and subjected to long-term culture undergo dedifferentiation and that these cells can be redifferentiated following treatment with the chimeric Activin A/BMP2 ligand AB235. Examination of AB235-treated cell pellets in both in vitro and in vivo experiments revealed that redifferentiated chondrocytes synthesized a cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM), primarily consisting of vertically-orientated collagen fibres and cartilage-specific proteoglycans. AB235-treated cell pellets also integrated into the surrounding subcutaneous tissue following transplantation in mice as demonstrated by their dramatic increase in size while non-treated control pellets disintegrated upon transplantation. Thus, our findings describe an effective protocol for the promotion of redifferentiation of autologous chondrocytes obtained from OA patients and the formation of a cartilage-like ECM that can integrate into the surrounding tissue in vivo. PMID:26563344

  1. Regulation of chondrocyte terminal differentiation in the postembryonic growth plate: the role of the PTHrP-Indian hedgehog axis.

    PubMed

    Farquharson, C; Jefferies, D; Seawright, E; Houston, B

    2001-09-01

    Chondrocyte differentiation during embryonic bone growth is controlled by interactions between PTHrP and Indian hedgehog. We have now determined that the major components of this signaling pathway are present in the postembryonic growth plate. PTHrP was immunolocalized throughout the growth plate, and semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis of maturationally distinct chondrocyte fractions indicated that PTHrP, Indian hedgehog, and the PTH/PTHrP receptor were expressed at similar levels throughout the growth plate. However, patched, the hedgehog receptor, was more highly expressed in proliferating chondrocytes. Although all fractionated cells responded to PTHrP in culture by increasing thymidine incorporation and cAMP production and decreasing alkaline phosphatase activity, the magnitude of response was greatest in the proliferative chondrocytes. Bone morphogenetic proteins are considered likely intermediates in PTHrP signaling. Expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 and 4--7 was detected within the growth plate, and PTHrP inhibited the expression of bone morphogenetic protein-4 and 6. Although organ culture studies indicated a possible paracrine role for epiphyseal chondrocyte-derived PTHrP in regulating growth plate chondrocyte differentiation, the presence within the postembryonic growth plate of functional components of the PTHrP-Indian hedgehog pathway suggests that local mechanisms intrinsic to the growth plate exist to control the rate of endochondral ossification. PMID:11517192

  2. Effect of the tripeptide glycyl-L-histidyl-L-lysine on the proliferation and synthetic activity of chick embryo chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Pesáková, V; Novotná, J; Adam, M

    1995-08-01

    Under certain conditions chondrocytes form lattices with cartilage collagens, which may serve as cartilage implants. It is necessary to find the optimal conditions for culturing chondrocytes. Three different supports are compared: (a) plastic; (b) cartilage collagens; and (c) insoluble skin collagen solubilized under denaturing conditions (ISC-40). The effect of culture medium supplementation with the tripeptide (Gly-His-Lys)2.Cu.2H2O.2NaCl (GHK) on chondrocyte proliferation and synthetic activity is studied, with particular attention paid to collagen types I, II and III. The collagen supports stimulated chondrocyte proliferation, but on the ISC-40 support they started to dedifferentiate rather early. In the primary culture, chondrocytes on all three supports synthesized mainly collagen type II, and only small amounts of types I and III. In the first passage the synthesis of these two collagen types increased, relative to collagen type II, at least on the cartilage collagen support. Supplementation of culture medium with GHK stimulated chondrocyte proliferation in the primary structure mostly on the ISC-40 support. On the other two types of supports the stimulatory effect of GHK was expressed mostly in the first passages. The collagen synthetic rate was increased by GHK on both of the collagen supports; on the cartilage collagen support collagen type II was synthesized predominantly and on the ISC-40 support types I and III were mostly formed. It is suggested that supplementation of culture medium with GHK may be useful in the preparation of cartilage implants. PMID:8562779

  3. Activation of α2A-adrenergic signal transduction in chondrocytes promotes degenerative remodelling of temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Kai; Zeng, Guang; Niu, Li-Na; Yang, Hong-Xu; Ren, Gao-Tong; Xu, Xin-Yue; Li, Fei-Fei; Tay, Franklin R; Wang, Mei-Qing

    2016-01-01

    This study tested whether activation of adrenoreceptors in chondrocytes has roles in degenerative remodelling of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and to determine associated mechanisms. Unilateral anterior crossbite (UAC) was established to induce TMJ degeneration in rats. Saline vehicle, α2- and β-adrenoreceptor antagonists or agonists were injected locally into the TMJ area of UAC rats. Cartilage degeneration, subchondral bone microarchitecture and the expression of adrenoreceptors, aggrecans, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and RANKL by chondrocytes were evaluated. Chondrocytes were stimulated by norepinephrine to investigate signal transduction of adrenoreceptors. Increased α2A-adrenoreceptor expression was observed in condylar cartilage of UAC rats, together with cartilage degeneration and subchondral bone loss. Norepinephrine depresses aggrecans expression but stimulates MMP-3, MMP-13 and RANKL production by chondrocytes through ERK1/2 and PKA pathway; these effects were abolished by an α2A-adrenoreceptor antagonist. Furthermore, inhibition of α2A-adrenoreceptor attenuated degenerative remodelling in the condylar cartilage and subchondral bone, as revealed by increased cartilage thickness, proteoglycans and aggrecan expression, and decreased MMP-3, MMP-13 and RANKL expressions in cartilage, increased BMD, BV/TV, and decreased Tb.Sp in subchondral bone. Conversely, activation of α2A-adrenoreceptor intensified aforementioned degenerative changes in UAC rats. It is concluded that activation of α2A-adrenergic signal in chondrocytes promotes TMJ degenerative remodelling by chondrocyte-mediated pro-catabolic activities. PMID:27452863

  4. Activation of α2A-adrenergic signal transduction in chondrocytes promotes degenerative remodelling of temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Kai; Zeng, Guang; Niu, Li-Na; Yang, Hong-xu; Ren, Gao-tong; Xu, Xin-yue; Li, Fei-fei; Tay, Franklin R.; Wang, Mei-qing

    2016-01-01

    This study tested whether activation of adrenoreceptors in chondrocytes has roles in degenerative remodelling of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and to determine associated mechanisms. Unilateral anterior crossbite (UAC) was established to induce TMJ degeneration in rats. Saline vehicle, α2- and β-adrenoreceptor antagonists or agonists were injected locally into the TMJ area of UAC rats. Cartilage degeneration, subchondral bone microarchitecture and the expression of adrenoreceptors, aggrecans, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and RANKL by chondrocytes were evaluated. Chondrocytes were stimulated by norepinephrine to investigate signal transduction of adrenoreceptors. Increased α2A-adrenoreceptor expression was observed in condylar cartilage of UAC rats, together with cartilage degeneration and subchondral bone loss. Norepinephrine depresses aggrecans expression but stimulates MMP-3, MMP-13 and RANKL production by chondrocytes through ERK1/2 and PKA pathway; these effects were abolished by an α2A-adrenoreceptor antagonist. Furthermore, inhibition of α2A-adrenoreceptor attenuated degenerative remodelling in the condylar cartilage and subchondral bone, as revealed by increased cartilage thickness, proteoglycans and aggrecan expression, and decreased MMP-3, MMP-13 and RANKL expressions in cartilage, increased BMD, BV/TV, and decreased Tb.Sp in subchondral bone. Conversely, activation of α2A-adrenoreceptor intensified aforementioned degenerative changes in UAC rats. It is concluded that activation of α2A-adrenergic signal in chondrocytes promotes TMJ degenerative remodelling by chondrocyte-mediated pro-catabolic activities. PMID:27452863

  5. Flavonoid Compound Icariin Activates Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α in Chondrocytes and Promotes Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    He, Qiling; Wang, Jianqi; Shiu, Hoi Ting; Shu, Yinglan; Tsang, Wing Pui; Liang, Shuang; Zhao, Kai; Wan, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage has poor capability for repair following trauma or degenerative pathology due to avascular property, low cell density and migratory ability. Discovery of novel therapeutic approaches for articular cartilage repair remains a significant clinical need. Hypoxia is a hallmark for cartilage development and pathology. Hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α) has been identified as a key mediator for chondrocytes to response to fluctuations of oxygen availability during cartilage development or repair. This suggests that HIF-1α may serve as a target for modulating chondrocyte functions. In this study, using phenotypic cellular screen assays, we identify that Icariin, an active flavonoid component from Herba Epimedii, activates HIF-1α expression in chondrocytes. We performed systemic in vitro and in vivo analysis to determine the roles of Icariin in regulation of chondrogenesis. Our results show that Icariin significantly increases hypoxia responsive element luciferase reporter activity, which is accompanied by increased accumulation and nuclear translocation of HIF-1α in murine chondrocytes. The phenotype is associated with inhibiting PHD activity through interaction between Icariin and iron ions. The upregulation of HIF-1α mRNA levels in chondrocytes persists during chondrogenic differentiation for 7 and 14 days. Icariin (10−6 M) increases the proliferation of chondrocytes or chondroprogenitors examined by MTT, BrdU incorporation or colony formation assays. Icariin enhances chondrogenic marker expression in a micromass culture including Sox9, collagen type 2 (Col2α1) and aggrecan as determined by real-time PCR and promotes extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis indicated by Alcian blue staining. ELISA assays show dramatically increased production of aggrecan and hydroxyproline in Icariin-treated cultures at day 14 of chondrogenic differentiation as compared with the controls. Meanwhile, the expression of chondrocyte catabolic marker genes

  6. The effect of fumonisin B1 on isolated chondrocytes and on bone formation.

    PubMed

    Wu, W; Li, G; Liu, T; Vesonder, R R

    1995-09-01

    Toxic effects of fumonisin B1 (FB1) were observed with cultured chondrocytes isolated from epiphyseal growth plates and with growing broiler chicks. Viability of chondrocytes was reduced after 48 h exposure to FB1, and half lethal concentration of FB1 was estimated to be greater than 250 microM. Increase in cell size was inhibited by as low as 25 microM FB1. Dietary inclusion of fumonisins (55 and 110 ppm) caused a reduction in body weight, increase in liver weight, and decrease in feed efficiency (P < .05). However, diarrhea and bone malformation were not observed. It is concluded that fumonisin by itself is not sufficient to cause skeletal problems in poultry. PMID:7501587

  7. Chondrocyte Generation of Cartilage-Like Tissue Following Photoencapsulation in Methacrylated Polysaccharide Solution Blends.

    PubMed

    Hayami, James W S; Waldman, Stephen D; Amsden, Brian G

    2016-07-01

    Chondrocyte-seeded, photo-cross-linked hydrogels prepared from solutions containing 50% mass fractions of methacrylated glycol chitosan or methacrylated hyaluronic acid (MHA) with methacrylated chondroitin sulfate (MCS) are cultured in vitro under static conditions over 35 d to assess their suitability for load-bearing soft tissue repair. The photo-cross-linked hydrogels have initial equilibrium moduli between 100 and 300 kPa, but only the MHAMCS hydrogels retain an approximately constant modulus (264 ± 5 kPa) throughout the culture period. Visually, the seeded chondrocytes in the MHAMCS hydrogels are well distributed with an apparent constant viability in culture. Multicellular aggregates are surrounded by cartilaginous matrix, which contain aggrecan and collagen II. Thus, co-cross-linked MCS and MHA hydrogels may be suited for use in an articular cartilage or nucleus pulposus repair applications. PMID:27061241

  8. Fabrication of photo-crosslinked chitosan- gelatin scaffold in sodium alginate hydrogel for chondrocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peng; Deng, Cuijun; Xu, Hongzhen; Tang, Xing; He, Hailong; Lin, Chao; Su, Jiansheng

    2014-01-01

    Photo-crosslinked chitosan-gelatin scaffolds were fabricated and applied for chondrocyte culture in vitro. Photocurable methacryloyl chitosan was synthesized and characterized by FTIR and 1H NMR, respectively. Microstructure and mechanical properties of the chitosan-gelatin scaffold treated with or without EDC as crosslinking agent were analyzed by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), compression and viscoelastic measurement. It is demonstrated that EDC-treated chitosan-gelatin scaffold possesses better porous structure and improved mechanical properties. Photo-crosslinked chitosan-gelatin scaffold could be further integrated in sodium alginate hydrogel using calcium chloride to support proliferation of chondrocytes for over 21 days and maintain spherical phenotype, as evaluated by AlamarBlue assay and SEM, respectively, implying that the chitosan-gelatin-hydrogel system exhibits great cyto-biocompatibility. Results of this study show that photo-crosslinked chitosan-gelatin scaffold in sodium alginate hydrogel is suited as a scaffold candidate for cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:24211948

  9. Flavonoid Compound Icariin Activates Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α in Chondrocytes and Promotes Articular Cartilage Repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengzhen; Zhang, Fengjie; He, Qiling; Wang, Jianqi; Shiu, Hoi Ting; Shu, Yinglan; Tsang, Wing Pui; Liang, Shuang; Zhao, Kai; Wan, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage has poor capability for repair following trauma or degenerative pathology due to avascular property, low cell density and migratory ability. Discovery of novel therapeutic approaches for articular cartilage repair remains a significant clinical need. Hypoxia is a hallmark for cartilage development and pathology. Hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α) has been identified as a key mediator for chondrocytes to response to fluctuations of oxygen availability during cartilage development or repair. This suggests that HIF-1α may serve as a target for modulating chondrocyte functions. In this study, using phenotypic cellular screen assays, we identify that Icariin, an active flavonoid component from Herba Epimedii, activates HIF-1α expression in chondrocytes. We performed systemic in vitro and in vivo analysis to determine the roles of Icariin in regulation of chondrogenesis. Our results show that Icariin significantly increases hypoxia responsive element luciferase reporter activity, which is accompanied by increased accumulation and nuclear translocation of HIF-1α in murine chondrocytes. The phenotype is associated with inhibiting PHD activity through interaction between Icariin and iron ions. The upregulation of HIF-1α mRNA levels in chondrocytes persists during chondrogenic differentiation for 7 and 14 days. Icariin (10-6 M) increases the proliferation of chondrocytes or chondroprogenitors examined by MTT, BrdU incorporation or colony formation assays. Icariin enhances chondrogenic marker expression in a micromass culture including Sox9, collagen type 2 (Col2α1) and aggrecan as determined by real-time PCR and promotes extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis indicated by Alcian blue staining. ELISA assays show dramatically increased production of aggrecan and hydroxyproline in Icariin-treated cultures at day 14 of chondrogenic differentiation as compared with the controls. Meanwhile, the expression of chondrocyte catabolic marker genes

  10. Stem cells catalyze cartilage formation by neonatal articular chondrocytes in 3D biomimetic hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Janice H.; Kajiyama, Glen; Smith, Robert Lane; Maloney, William; Yang, Fan

    2013-12-01

    Cartilage loss is a leading cause of disability among adults and effective therapy remains elusive. Neonatal chondrocytes (NChons) are an attractive allogeneic cell source for cartilage repair, but their clinical translation has been hindered by scarce donor availability. Here we examine the potential for catalyzing cartilage tissue formation using a minimal number of NChons by co-culturing them with adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in 3D hydrogels. Using three different co-culture models, we demonstrated that the effects of co-culture on cartilage tissue formation are dependent on the intercellular distance and cell distribution in 3D. Unexpectedly, increasing ADSC ratio in mixed co-culture led to increased synergy between NChons and ADSCs, and resulted in the formation of large neocartilage nodules. This work raises the potential of utilizing stem cells to catalyze tissue formation by neonatal chondrocytes via paracrine signaling, and highlights the importance of controlling cell distribution in 3D matrices to achieve optimal synergy.

  11. The ECM-Cell Interaction of Cartilage Extracellular Matrix on Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuyun; Huang, Jingxiang; Guo, Weimin; Chen, Jifeng; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Bin; Peng, Jiang; Wang, Aiyuan; Wang, Yu; Xu, Wenjing; Lu, Shibi; Yuan, Mei; Guo, Quanyi

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) is composed primarily of the network type II collagen (COLII) and an interlocking mesh of fibrous proteins and proteoglycans (PGs), hyaluronic acid (HA), and chondroitin sulfate (CS). Articular cartilage ECM plays a crucial role in regulating chondrocyte metabolism and functions, such as organized cytoskeleton through integrin-mediated signaling via cell-matrix interaction. Cell signaling through integrins regulates several chondrocyte functions, including differentiation, metabolism, matrix remodeling, responses to mechanical stimulation, and cell survival. The major signaling pathways that regulate chondrogenesis have been identified as wnt signal, nitric oxide (NO) signal, protein kinase C (PKC), and retinoic acid (RA) signal. Integrins are a large family of molecules that are central regulators in multicellular biology. They orchestrate cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesive interactions from embryonic development to mature tissue function. In this review, we emphasize the signaling molecule effect and the biomechanics effect of cartilage ECM on chondrogenesis. PMID:24959581

  12. The Role of PPARγ in Advanced Glycation End Products-Induced Inflammatory Response in Human Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu-qing; Chen, Cheng; Cai, Wei; Zeng, Yue-lin

    2015-01-01

    Objective Advances made in the past ten years highlight the notion that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors gamma (PPARγ) has protective properties in the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis (OA). The aim of this study was to define the roles of PPARγ in AGEs-induced inflammatory response in human chondrocytes. Methods Primary human chondrocytes were stimulated with AGEs in the presence or absence of neutralizing antibody against RAGE (anti-RAGE), MAPK specific inhibitors and PPARγ agonist pioglitazone. The expression of IL-1, MMP-13, TNF-α, PPARγ, nuclear NF-κB p65 and cytosol IκBα was determined by western blotting and real-time PCR. Results AGEs could enhance the expression of IL-1, TNF-α, and MMP-13, but the level of PPARγ was decreased in a time- and dose-dependent manner, which was inhibited by anti-RAGE, SB203580 (P38 MAPK specific inhibitor) and SP600125 (a selective inhibitor of JNK). PPARγ agonist pioglitazone could inhibit the effects of AGEs-induced inflammatory response and PPARγ down-regulation. In human chondrocytes, AGEs could induce cytosol IκBα degradation and increase the level of nuclear NF-κB p65, which was inhibited by PPARγ agonist pioglitazone. Conclusions In primary human chondrocytes, AGEs could down-regulate PPARγ expression and increase the inflammatory mediators, which could be reversed by PPARγ agonist pioglitazone. Activation of RAGE by AGEs triggers a cascade of downstream signaling, including MAPK JNK/ p38, PPARγ and NF-κB. Taken together, PPARγ could be a potential target for pharmacologic intervention in the treatment of OA. PMID:26024533

  13. Biomechanical signals exert sustained attenuation of proinflammatory gene induction in articular chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Madhavan, S.; Anghelina, M.; Rath-Deschner, B.; Wypasek, E.; John, A.; Deschner, J.; Piesco, N.; Agarwal, S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Physical therapies are commonly used for limiting joint inflammation. To gain insight into their mechanisms of actions for optimal usage, we examined persistence of mechanical signals generated by cyclic tensile strain (CTS) in chondrocytes, in vitro. We hypothesized that mechanical signals induce anti-inflammatory and anabolic responses that are sustained over extended periods. Methods Articular chondrocytes obtained from rats were subjected to CTS for various time intervals followed by a period of rest, in the presence of interleukin-1β (IL-1β). The induction for cyclooxygenase (COX-2), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, MMP-13 and aggrecan was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence. Results Exposure of chondrocytes to constant CTS (3% CTS at 0.25 Hz) for 4e24 h blocked more than 90% (P < 0.05) of the IL-1β-induced transcriptional activation of proinflammatory genes, like iNOS, COX-2, MMP-9 and MMP-13, and abrogated inhibition of aggrecan synthesis. CTS exposure for 4, 8, 12, 16, or 20 h followed by a rest for 20, 16, 12, 8 or 4 h, respectively, revealed that 8 h of CTS optimally blocked (P < 0.05) IL-1β-induced proinflammatory gene induction for ensuing 16 h. However, CTS for 8 h was not sufficient to inhibit iNOS expression for ensuing 28 or 40 h. Conclusions Data suggest that constant application of CTS blocks IL-1β-induced proinflammatory genes at transcriptional level. The signals generated by CTS are sustained after its removal, and their persistence depends upon the length of CTS exposure. Furthermore, the sustained effects of mechanical signals are also reflected in their ability to induce aggrecan synthesis. These findings, once extrapolated to human chondrocytes, may provide insight in obtaining optimal sustained effects of physical therapies in the management of arthritic joints. PMID:16731008

  14. In vitro evidence for effects of magnesium supplementation on quinolone-treated horse and dog chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Egerbacher, M; Wolfesberger, B; Gabler, C

    2001-03-01

    Quinolones and magnesium deficiency cause similar lesions in joint cartilage of young animals. Chondrocytes cultivated in the presence of quinolones and in Mg-free medium show severe alterations in cytoskeleton and decreased ability to adhere to the culture dish. We investigated whether Mg2+ supplementation can prevent quinolone-mediated effects on chondrocytes in vitro. Chondrocytes cultivated in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium/HAM's F-12 medium were treated with ciprofloxacin (80 and 160 microg/ml) and enrofloxacin (100 and 150 microg/ml). Mg2+ was added at a concentration of 0.0612 mg/ml (MgCl) and 0.0488 mg/ml (MgSO4) or a triple dose. In addition, cells were cultivated in Mg-free medium and accordingly treated with Mg2+ supplementation. After 5 days in culture, the number of adherent cells per milliliter was determined. The number of chondrocytes in quinolone-treated groups decreased to 12-36% that of the control group within the culture period. With Mg2+ supplementation, the number of attached cells increased to 40-70% that of control cells. The threefold dose of Mg2+ led to better results than did the single dose. Cell proliferation tested by immunohistochemical staining with Ki67 (clone MIB5) decreased from 70% in control groups to 55%, 48%, and 30% in enrofloxacin-treated groups in a concentration dependent manner (50, 100, and 150 microg/ml). Addition of Mg2+ did not increase the rate of cell proliferation. These results suggest that a great part of quinolone-induced damage is due to magnesium complex formation, as Mg2+ supplementation is able to reduce the effects in vitro. However, quinolone effects on cell proliferation seem to be an independent process that is not influenced by magnesium supplementation. PMID:11280370

  15. Inhibition of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 enhances endochondral bone formation by increasing chondrocyte survival.

    PubMed

    Eaton, G J; Zhang, Q-S; Diallo, C; Matsuzawa, A; Ichijo, H; Steinbeck, M J; Freeman, T A

    2014-01-01

    Endochondral ossification is the result of chondrocyte differentiation, hypertrophy, death and replacement by bone. The careful timing and progression of this process is important for normal skeletal bone growth and development, as well as fracture repair. Apoptosis Signal-Regulating Kinase 1 (ASK1) is a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), which is activated by reactive oxygen species and other cellular stress events. Activation of ASK1 initiates a signaling cascade known to regulate diverse cellular events including cytokine and growth factor signaling, cell cycle regulation, cellular differentiation, hypertrophy, survival and apoptosis. ASK1 is highly expressed in hypertrophic chondrocytes, but the role of ASK1 in skeletal tissues has not been investigated. Herein, we report that ASK1 knockout (KO) mice display alterations in normal growth plate morphology, which include a shorter proliferative zone and a lengthened hypertrophic zone. These changes in growth plate dynamics result in accelerated long bone mineralization and an increased formation of trabecular bone, which can be attributed to an increased resistance of terminally differentiated chondrocytes to undergo cell death. Interestingly, under normal cell culture conditions, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from ASK1 KO mice show no differences in either MAPK signaling or osteogenic or chondrogenic differentiation when compared with wild-type (WT) MEFs. However, when cultured with stress activators, H2O2 or staurosporine, the KO cells show enhanced survival, an associated decrease in the activation of proteins involved in death signaling pathways and a reduction in markers of terminal differentiation. Furthermore, in both WT mice treated with the ASK1 inhibitor, NQDI-1, and ASK1 KO mice endochondral bone formation was increased in an ectopic ossification model. These findings highlight a previously unrealized role for ASK1 in regulating endochondral bone formation. Inhibition of ASK1 has

  16. Optimization of chondrocyte isolation and phenotype characterization for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lau, Ting Ting; Peck, Yvonne; Huang, Weiliang; Wang, Dong-An

    2015-02-01

    Current protocols for chondrocyte isolation are inconsistent, resulting in suboptimal cell yield and compromised cell quality. Thus, there is a need for an improved isolation protocol that is able to give a maximum yield with optimal cell viability while preserving the chondrocyte phenotype. In light of this, we developed an improved isolation protocol based on enzymatic digestion using 0.1% (w/v) collagenase II. Different from existing methods of digesting minced cartilage for a prolonged period (usually 14-16 h), we performed two additional digestions, with a 5- and 3-h interval in between. The results showed that this multiple digestion method was able to yield a total number of cells that are more than a fivefold increase as compared to any of the common isolation protocols. More importantly, a high percentage of the isolated cells remained viable. Furthermore, an evaluation of the effect of additional digestions on chondrocyte phenotype indicated that cells harvested from the second and third digestion showed a comparable or higher proliferative capacity than the first digestion and all the cells expressed chondrocyte-specific markers tested, with cells from the third digestion showing exceptionally high gene expression levels for collagen type II (Col II), aggrecan, and COMP. Additionally, their ability to produce collagen type II as well as their morphology were not affected by the two additional digestions. Taken together, the results suggested that the use of this isolation protocol resulted in a higher cell yield and the quality of the isolated cells was maintained. Hence, we recommend this isolation protocol to be employed for more efficient cell harvesting especially from limited biopsied cartilage tissue samples. PMID:24918498

  17. Low dose short duration pulsed electromagnetic field effects on cultured human chondrocytes: An experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Anbarasan, Selvam; Baraneedharan, Ulaganathan; Paul, Solomon FD; Kaur, Harpreet; Rangaswami, Subramoniam; Bhaskar, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) is used to treat bone and joint disorders for over 30 years. Recent studies demonstrate a significant effect of PEMF on bone and cartilage proliferation, differentiation, synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) and production of growth factors. The aim of this study is to assess if PEMF of low frequency, ultralow field strength and short time exposure have beneficial effects on in-vitro cultured human chondrocytes. Materials and Methods: Primary human chondrocytes cultures were established using articular cartilage obtained from knee joint during joint replacement surgery. Post characterization, the cells were exposed to PEMF at frequencies ranging from 0.1 to 10 Hz and field intensities ranging from 0.65 to 1.95 μT for 60 min/day for 3 consecutive days to analyze the viability, ECM component synthesis, proliferation and morphology related changes post exposure. Association between exposure doses and cellular effects were analyzed with paired't’ test. Results: In-vitro PEMF exposure of 0.1 Hz frequency, 1.95 μT and duration of 60 min/day for 3 consecutive days produced the most favorable response on chondrocytes viability (P < 0.001), ECM component production (P < 0.001) and multiplication. Exposure of identical chondrocyte cultures to PEMFs of 0.65 μT field intensity at 1 Hz frequency resulted in less significant response. Exposure to 1.3 μT PEMFs at 10 Hz frequency does not show any significant effects in different analytical parameters. Conclusions: Short duration PEMF exposure may represent a new therapy for patients with Osteoarthritis (OA). PMID:26955182

  18. Carnosol and Related Substances Modulate Chemokine and Cytokine Production in Macrophages and Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Schwager, Joseph; Richard, Nathalie; Fowler, Ann; Seifert, Nicole; Raederstorff, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Phenolic diterpenes present in Rosmarinus officinalis and Salvia officinalis have anti-inflammatory and chemoprotective effects. We investigated the in vitro effects of carnosol (CL), carnosic acid (CA), carnosic acid-12-methylether (CAME), 20-deoxocarnosol and abieta-8,11,13-triene-11,12,20-triol (ABTT) in murine macrophages (RAW264.7 cells) and human chondrocytes. The substances concentration-dependently reduced nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) production in LPS-stimulated macrophages (i.e., acute inflammation). They significantly blunted gene expression levels of iNOS, cytokines/interleukins (IL-1α, IL-6) and chemokines including CCL5/RANTES, CXCL10/IP-10. The substances modulated the expression of catabolic and anabolic genes in chondrosarcoma cell line SW1353 and in primary human chondrocytes that were stimulated by IL-1β (i.e., chronic inflammation In SW1353, catabolic genes like MMP-13 and ADAMTS-4 that contribute to cartilage erosion were down-regulated, while expression of anabolic genes including Col2A1 and aggrecan were shifted towards pre-pathophysiological homeostasis. CL had the strongest overall effect on inflammatory mediators, as well as on macrophage and chondrocyte gene expression. Conversely, CAME mainly affected catabolic gene expression, whereas ABTT had a more selectively altered interleukin and chemokine gene exprssion. CL inhibited the IL-1β induced nuclear translocation of NF-κBp65, suggesting that it primarily regulated via the NF-κB signalling pathway. Collectively, CL had the strongest effects on inflammatory mediators and chondrocyte gene expression. The data show that the phenolic diterpenes altered activity pattern of genes that regulate acute and chronic inflammatory processes. Since the substances affected catabolic and anabolic gene expression in cartilage cells in vitro, they may beneficially act on the aetiology of osteoarthritis. PMID:27070563

  19. The Circadian Clock in Murine Chondrocytes Regulates Genes Controlling Key Aspects of Cartilage Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Gossan, Nicole; Zeef, Leo; Hensman, James; Hughes, Alun; Bateman, John F; Rowley, Lynn; Little, Christopher B; Piggins, Hugh D; Rattray, Magnus; Boot-Handford, Raymond P; Meng, Qing-Jun

    2013-01-01

    ObjectiveTo characterize the circadian clock in murine cartilage tissue and identify tissue-specific clock target genes, and to investigate whether the circadian clock changes during aging or during cartilage degeneration using an experimental mouse model of osteoarthritis (OA). MethodsCartilage explants were obtained from aged and young adult mice after transduction with the circadian clock fusion protein reporter PER2::luc, and real-time bioluminescence recordings were used to characterize the properties of the clock. Time-series microarrays were performed on mouse cartilage tissue to identify genes expressed in a circadian manner. Rhythmic genes were confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction using mouse tissue, primary chondrocytes, and a human chondrocyte cell line. Experimental OA was induced in mice by destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM), and articular cartilage samples were microdissected and subjected to microarray analysis. ResultsMouse cartilage tissue and a human chondrocyte cell line were found to contain intrinsic molecular circadian clocks. The cartilage clock could be reset by temperature signals, while the circadian period was temperature compensated. PER2::luc bioluminescence demonstrated that circadian oscillations were significantly lower in amplitude in cartilage from aged mice. Time-series microarray analyses of the mouse tissue identified the first circadian transcriptome in cartilage, revealing that 615 genes (∼3.9% of the expressed genes) displayed a circadian pattern of expression. This included genes involved in cartilage homeostasis and survival, as well as genes with potential importance in the pathogenesis of OA. Several clock genes were disrupted in the early stages of cartilage degeneration in the DMM mouse model of OA. ConclusionThese results reveal an autonomous circadian clock in chondrocytes that can be implicated in key aspects of cartilage biology and pathology. Consequently

  20. Chondrocyte-Specific Pathology During Skeletal Growth and Therapeutics in a Murine Model of Pseudoachondroplasia

    PubMed Central

    Posey, Karen L; Coustry, Francoise; Veerisetty, Alka C; Liu, Peiman; Alcorn, Joseph L; Hecht, Jacqueline T

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) cause pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH), a severe dwarfing condition. Pain, a significant complication, has generally been attributed to joint abnormalities and erosion and early onset osteoarthritis. Previously, we found that the Inflammatory-related transcripts were elevated In growth plate and articular cartilages, Indicating that Inflammation plays an important role in the chondrocyte disease pathology and may contribute to the overall pain sequelae. Here, we describe the effects of D469-delCOMP expression on the skeleton and growth plate chondrocytes with the aim to define a treatment window and thereby reduce pain. Consistent with the human PSACH phenotype, skeletal development of D469del-COMP mice was normal and similar to controls at birth. By postnatal day 7 (P7), the D469del-COMP skeleton, limbs, skull and snout were reduced and this reduction was progressive during postnatal growth, resulting in a short-limbed dwarfed mouse. Modulation of prenatal and postnatal expression of D469del-COMP showed minimal retention/cell death at P7 with some retention/cell death by P14, suggesting that earlier treatment intervention at the time of PSACH diagnosis may produce optimal results. Important and novel findings were an increase In Inflammatory proteins generally starting at P21 and that exercise exacerbates Inflammation. These observations suggest that pain in PSACH may be related to an intrinsic inflammatory process that can be treated symptomatically and is not related to early joint erosion. We also show that genetic ablation of CHOP dampens the inflammatory response. observed in mice expressing D469del-COMP. Toward identifying potential treatments, drugs known to decrease cellular stress (lithlum, phenyl butyric add, and valproate) were assessed. Interestingly, all diminished the chondrocyte pathology but had untoward outcomes on mouse growth, development, and longevity. Collectively, these

  1. Piperine inhibits IL-β induced expression of inflammatory mediators in human osteoarthritis chondrocyte.

    PubMed

    Ying, Xiaozhou; Chen, Xiaowei; Cheng, Shaowen; Shen, Yue; Peng, Lei; Xu, Hua Zi

    2013-10-01

    Black pepper (Piper nigrum) is a common remedy in Traditional Chinese Medicine and possesses diverse biological activities including anti-inflammatory properties. Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease with an inflammatory component that drives the degradation of cartilage extracellular matrix. The present study aimed to assess the effects of piperine, the active phenolic component in black pepper extract, on human OA chondrocytes. In this study, human OA chondrocytes were pretreated with piperine at 10, 50 or 100μg/ml and subsequently stimulated with IL-1β (5ng/ml) for 24h. Production of PGE2 and NO was evaluated by the Griess reaction and an ELISA. Gene expression of MMP-3, MMP-13, iNOS and COX-2 was measured by real-time PCR. MMP-3 and MMP-13 proteins in culture medium were determined using cytokine-specific ELISA. Western immunoblotting was used to analyze the iNOS and COX-2 protein production in the culture medium. The regulation of NF-kB activity and the degradation of IkB were explored using luciferase and Western immunoblotting, respectively. We found that piperine inhibited the production of PGE2 and NO induced by IL-1β. Piperine significantly decreased the IL-1β-stimulated gene expression and production of MMP-3, MMP-13, iNOS and COX-2 in human OA chondrocytes. Piperine inhibited the IL-1β-mediated activation of NF-κB by suppressing the degradation of its inhibitory protein IκBα in the cytoplasm. The present report is first to demonstrate the anti-inflammatory activity of piperine in human OA chondrocytes. Piperine can effectively abrogate the IL-1β-induced over-expression of inflammatory mediators; suggesting that piperine may be a potential agent in the treatment of OA. PMID:23838114

  2. Deletion of IFT80 Impairs Epiphyseal and Articular Cartilage Formation Due to Disruption of Chondrocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xue; Yang, Shuying

    2015-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport proteins (IFT) play important roles in cilia formation and organ development. Partial loss of IFT80 function leads Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (JATD) or short-rib polydactyly (SRP) syndrome type III, displaying narrow thoracic cavity and multiple cartilage anomalies. However, it is unknown how IFT80 regulates cartilage formation. To define the role and mechanism of IFT80 in chondrocyte function and cartilage formation, we generated a Col2α1; IFT80f/f mouse model by crossing IFT80f/f mice with inducible Col2α1-CreER mice, and deleted IFT80 in chondrocyte lineage by injection of tamoxifen into the mice in embryonic or postnatal stage. Loss of IFT80 in the embryonic stage resulted in short limbs at birth. Histological studies showed that IFT80-deficient mice have shortened cartilage with marked changes in cellular morphology and organization in the resting, proliferative, pre-hypertrophic, and hypertrophic zones. Moreover, deletion of IFT80 in the postnatal stage led to mouse stunted growth with shortened growth plate but thickened articular cartilage. Defects of ciliogenesis were found in the cartilage of IFT80-deficient mice and primary IFT80-deficient chondrocytes. Further study showed that chondrogenic differentiation was significantly inhibited in IFT80-deficient mice due to reduced hedgehog (Hh) signaling and increased Wnt signaling activities. These findings demonstrate that loss of IFT80 blocks chondrocyte differentiation by disruption of ciliogenesis and alteration of Hh and Wnt signaling transduction, which in turn alters epiphyseal and articular cartilage formation. PMID:26098911

  3. Dexamethasone-induced expression of the glucocorticoid response gene lipocalin 2 in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Owen, H C; Roberts, S J; Ahmed, S F; Farquharson, C

    2008-06-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are commonly used anti-inflammatory drugs, but long-term use can result in marked growth retardation in children due to their actions on growth plate chondrocytes. To gain an insight into the mechanisms involved in GC-induced growth retardation, we performed Affymetrix microarray analysis of the murine chondrogenic cell line ATDC5, incubated with 10(-6) M dexamethasone (Dex) for 24 h. Downregulated genes included secreted frizzled-related protein and IGF-I, and upregulated genes included serum/GC-regulated kinase, connective-tissue growth factor, and lipocalin 2. Lipocalin 2 expression increased 40-fold after 24-h Dex treatment. Expression increased further after 48-h (75-fold) and 96-h (84-fold) Dex treatment, and this response was Dex concentration dependent. Lipocalin 2 was immunolocalized to both proliferating and hypertrophic growth plate zones, and its expression was increased by Dex in primary chondrocytes at 6 h (3-fold, P < 0.05). The lipocalin 2 response was blocked by the GC-receptor antagonist RU-486 and was increased further by the protein synthesis blocker cycloheximide. Proliferation in lipocalin 2-overexpressing cells was less than in control cells (49%, P < 0.05), and overexpression caused an increase in collagen type X expression (4-fold, P < 0.05). The effects of lipocalin 2 overexpression on chondrocyte proliferation (64%, P < 0.05) and collagen type X expression (8-fold, P < 0.05) were further exacerbated with the addition of 10(-6) M Dex. This synergistic effect may be explained by a further increase in lipocalin 2 expression with Dex treatment of transfected cells (45%, P < 0.05). These results suggest that lipocalin 2 may mediate Dex effects on chondrocytes and provides a potential novel mechanism for GC-induced growth retardation. PMID:18381927

  4. Evaluation of chondrocyte survival in situ using WST-1 and membrane integrity stains.

    PubMed

    Jomha, Nadr M; Elliott, Janet A W; Law, Garson K; McGann, Locksley E

    2007-01-01

    Evaluating chondrocytes in situ to document the effectiveness of cartilage preservation techniques has proven exceedingly difficult. This study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of WST-1 on porcine chondrocytes in situ after cooling to -10 degrees C (without ice formation) compared to membrane integrity stains (MIS). Osteochondral dowels (10 mm in diameter) were harvested from sexually mature pigs within 24 h of sacrifice and randomized into three groups: (1) untreated control, (2) one day storage at -10 degrees C (in cryoprotectant solution to prevent ice formation), and (3) seven day storage at -10 degrees C (in cryoprotectant solution). Fluorescent MISs (Syto 13 and ethidium bromide) were used on 70 microm slices. Representative images were digitized and green and red pixel numbers determined the percent recovery of intact cells. Mitochondrial activity (WST-1) was determined using 20 slices of 70 microm thickness per sample to obtain reliable readings using a spectrophotometer at 450 nm. All samples underwent repeated measures of membrane integrity and metabolic activity obtained after 0, 3, 24, 48, 72, and 144 h incubation in growth media. WST-1 consistently overestimated cell recovery with results greater than fresh controls. After hypothermic storage for 7 days, the WST-1 measurement demonstrated decreased mitochondrial activity that recovered by 48 h. MIS was most accurate when "absolute" cell recovery was compared to original controls, taking into account cell density. In conclusion, WST-1 can track metabolic activity of chondrocytes in situ over time but "absolute" cell recovery determined by MISs after 48 h incubation may be the most accurate determination of the number of live chondrocytes in situ. PMID:17094019

  5. Deletion of IFT80 Impairs Epiphyseal and Articular Cartilage Formation Due to Disruption of Chondrocyte Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xue; Yang, Shuying

    2015-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport proteins (IFT) play important roles in cilia formation and organ development. Partial loss of IFT80 function leads Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (JATD) or short-rib polydactyly (SRP) syndrome type III, displaying narrow thoracic cavity and multiple cartilage anomalies. However, it is unknown how IFT80 regulates cartilage formation. To define the role and mechanism of IFT80 in chondrocyte function and cartilage formation, we generated a Col2α1; IFT80f/f mouse model by crossing IFT80f/f mice with inducible Col2α1-CreER mice, and deleted IFT80 in chondrocyte lineage by injection of tamoxifen into the mice in embryonic or postnatal stage. Loss of IFT80 in the embryonic stage resulted in short limbs at birth. Histological studies showed that IFT80-deficient mice have shortened cartilage with marked changes in cellular morphology and organization in the resting, proliferative, pre-hypertrophic, and hypertrophic zones. Moreover, deletion of IFT80 in the postnatal stage led to mouse stunted growth with shortened growth plate but thickened articular cartilage. Defects of ciliogenesis were found in the cartilage of IFT80-deficient mice and primary IFT80-deficient chondrocytes. Further study showed that chondrogenic differentiation was significantly inhibited in IFT80-deficient mice due to reduced hedgehog (Hh) signaling and increased Wnt signaling activities. These findings demonstrate that loss of IFT80 blocks chondrocyte differentiation by disruption of ciliogenesis and alteration of Hh and Wnt signaling transduction, which in turn alters epiphyseal and articular cartilage formation. PMID:26098911

  6. Effect of a novel synthesized sulfonamido-based gallate-SZNTC on chondrocytes metabolism in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qin; Li, Mu-Yan; Lin, Xiao; Lin, Cui-Wu; Liu, Bu-Ming; Zheng, Li; Zhao, Jin-Min

    2014-09-25

    The ideal therapeutic agent for treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) should have not only potent anti-inflammatory effect but also favorable biological properties to restore cartilage function. Gallic acid (GA) and its derivatives are anti-inflammatory agents reported to have an effect on OA (Singh et al., 2003) [1]. However, GA has much weaker antioxidant effects and inferior bioactivity compared with its derivatives. We modified GA with the introduction of sulfonamide to synthesize a novel sulfonamido-based gallate named sodium salt of 3,4,5-trihydroxy-N-[4-(thiazol-2-ylsulfamoyl)-phenyl]-benzamide (SZNTC) and analyzed its chondro-protective and pharmacological effects. Comparison of SZNTC with GA and sulfathiazole sodium (ST-Na) was also performed. Results showed that SZNTC could effectively inhibit the Interleukin-1 (IL-1)-mediated induction of metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and MMP-3 and could induce the expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), which demonstrated ability to reduce the progression of OA. SZNTC can also exert chondro-protective effects by promoting cell proliferation and maintaining the phenotype of articular chondrocytes, as evidenced by improved cell growth, enhanced synthesis of cartilage specific markers such as aggrecan, collagen II and Sox9. Expression of the collagen I gene was effectively down-regulated, revealing the inhibition of chondrocytes dedifferentiation by SZNTC. Hypertrophy that may lead to chondrocyte ossification was also undetectable in SZNTC groups. The recommended dose of SZNTC ranges from 3.91μg/ml to 15.64μg/ml, among which the most profound response was observed with 7.82μg/ml. In contrast, its source products of GA and ST-Na have a weak effect in the bioactivity of chondrocytes, which indicated the significance of this modification. This study revealed SZNTC as a promising novel agent in the treatment of chondral and osteochondral lesions. PMID:25130855

  7. Vav1 Regulates Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation Decision Between Adipocyte and Chondrocyte via Sirt1.

    PubMed

    Qu, Peng; Wang, Lizhen; Min, Yongfen; McKennett, Lois; Keller, Jonathan R; Lin, P Charles

    2016-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stromal cells residing in the bone marrow. MSCs have the potential to differentiate to adipocytes, chondrocytes, and other types of cells. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism that controls MSC cell fate decisions for differentiation. We found that Vav1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rho GTPase, was highly expressed in MSCs. Interestingly, loss of Vav1 in MSCs led to spontaneous adipogenic but impaired chondrogenic differentiation, and accordingly Vav1 null mice displayed an increase in fat content and a decrease in cartilage. Conversely, ectopic expression of Vav1 in MSCs reversed this phenotype, and led to enhanced MSC differentiation into chondrocyte but retarded adipogenesis. Mechanistically, loss of Vav1 reduced the level of Sirt1, which was responsible for an increase of acetylated PPARγ. As acetylation activates PPARγ, it increased C/EBPα expression and promoted adipogenesis. On the other hand, loss of Vav1 resulted in an increase of acetylated Sox9, a target of Sirt1. As acetylation represses Sox9 activity, it led to a dramatic reduction of collagen 2α1, a key regulator in chondrocyte differentiation. Finally, we found that Vav1 regulates Sirt1 in MSCs through Creb. Together this study reveals a novel function of Vav1 in regulating MSC cell fate decisions for differentiation through Sirt1. Sirt1 deacetylates PPARγ and Sox9, two key mediators that control adipocyte and chondrocyte differentiation. The acetylation status of PPARγ and Sox9 has opposite effects on its activity, thereby controlling cell fate decision. Stem Cells 2016;34:1934-1946. PMID:26990002

  8. D469del-COMP retention in chondrocytes stimulates caspase-independent necroptosis.

    PubMed

    Coustry, Françoise; Posey, Karen L; Liu, Peiman; Alcorn, Joseph L; Hecht, Jacqueline T

    2012-02-01

    Mutations in the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein gene (COMP) cause pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH). This dysplasia results from the intracellular retention of mutant COMP protein and premature death of growth-plate chondrocytes. Toward better understanding of these underlying mechanisms, we examined D469del-COMP activation of the unfolded protein response and cell death pathways in rat chondrosarcoma cells. Using an inducible expression system, we examined the effects of D469del-COMP retention after 4 days of mRNA expression and then 5 days without inducing agent. Retention of D469del-COMP stimulated Chop (Ddit3) and Gadd34 (Ppp1r15a) and triggered reactivation of protein translation that exacerbated intracellular retention. High levels of Nox4 and endoplasmic reticulum receptor stress-inducible Ero1β generated reactive oxygen species, causing oxidative stress. Increased expression of Gadd genes and presence of γH2AX indicated that DNA damage was occurring. The presence of cleaved apoptosis inducing factor (tAIF) and the absence of activated caspases indicated that retention of D469del-COMP triggers cell death in chondrocytes by necroptosis, a caspase-independent programmed necrosis. Loss of growth-plate chondrocytes by necroptosis was also found in our pseudoachondroplasia mouse model. These results suggest a model in which D469del-COMP expression induces persistent endoplasmic reticulum stress, oxidative stress, and DNA damage, thus priming chondrocytes for necroptosis. We define for the first time the precise mechanisms underlying D469del-COMP pathology in pseudoachondroplasia and suggest that oxidative stress and AIF may be promising therapeutic targets. PMID:22154936

  9. Femtosecond laser microstructuring and bioactive nanocoating of titanium surfaces in relation to chondrocyte growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilgner, Justus; Biedron, Slavomir; Fadeeva, Elena; Chichkov, Boris; Klee, Doris; Loos, Anneke; Sowa-Söhle, Eveline; Westhofen, Martin

    2010-02-01

    Introduction: Titanium implants can be regarded as the current gold standard for restoration of sound transmission in the middle ear following destruction of the ossicular chain by chronic inflammation. Many efforts have been made to improve prosthesis design, while less attention had been given to the role of the interface. We present a study on chemical nanocoating on microstructured titanium contact surface with bioactive protein. Materials and Methods: Titanium samples of 5mm diameter and 0,25mm thickness were structured by means of a Ti:Sapphire femtosecond laser operating at 970nm with parallel lines of 5μm depth, 5μm width and 10μm inter-groove distance. In addition, various nanolayers were applied to titanium samples by aminosilanization, to which Star-Polyethylene glycole (Star-PEG) molecules plus biomarkers (e.g. RGD peptide sequence) were linked. Results: Chondrocytes could be cultured on microstructured surfaces without reduced rate of vital / dead cells compared to native surfaces. Chondrocytes also showed contact guidance by growing along ridges particularly on 5μm lines. On nanocoated titanium samples, first results showed a strong effect of Star-PEG suppressing unspecific protein absorption, while RGD peptide sequence did not promote chondrocyte cell growth. Discussion: According to these results, the idea of promoting cell growth on titanium prosthesis contact surfaces compared to non-contact surfaces (e.g. prosthesis shaft) by nanocoating is practicable. However, relative selectivity induced by microstructures for growth of chondrocytes compared to fibrocytes is subject to further evaluation.

  10. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid suppresses endoplasmic reticulum stress in the chondrocytes of patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Cao, Yongping; Yang, Xin; Shan, Pengcheng; Liu, Heng

    2015-10-01

    The main pathogenic events in osteoarthritis (OA) include loss and abnormal remodeling of cartilage extracellular matrix. The present study aimed to evaluate the protective effect of tauroursodeoxycholic acid on chondrocyte apoptosis induced by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Articular cartilage tissues were collected from 18 patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty and were analyzed histologically. Subsequently, chondrocyte apoptosis was assessed by TUNEL. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis were employed to evaluate gene and protein expression, respectively, of ER stress markers, including glucose‑regulated protein 78 (GRP78), growth arrest and DNA‑damage‑inducible gene 153 (GADD153) and caspase‑12 along with type II collagen. Chondrocytes obtained from osteoarthritis patients at different stages were cultured in three conditions including: No treatment (CON group), tunicamycin treatment to induce ER stress (ERS group) and tauroursodeoxycholic acid treatment after 4 h of tunicamycin (TDA group); and cell proliferation, apoptosis, function and ER stress level were assessed. Degradation of cartilage resulted in histological damage with more apoptotic cartilage cells observed. Of note, GRP78, GADD153 and caspase‑12 mRNA and protein expression increased gradually from grade I to III cartilage tissue, while type II collagen expression decreased. Tunicamycin induced ER stress, as shown by a high expression of ER stress markers, reduced cell proliferation, increased apoptosis and decreased synthesis of type II collagen. Notably, tauroursodeoxycholic acid treatment resulted in the improvement of tunicamycin‑induced ER stress. These results indicated that ER stress is highly involved in the tunicamycin‑induced apoptosis in chondrocytes, which can be prevented by tauroursodeoxycholic acid. PMID:26238983

  11. The Investigation of Accuracy of 3 Dimensional Models Generated From Point Clouds with Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumus, Kutalmis; Erkaya, Halil

    2013-04-01

    In Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) applications, it is necessary to take into consideration the conditions that affect the scanning process, especially the general characteristics of the laser scanner, geometric properties of the scanned object (shape, size, etc.), and its spatial location in the environment. Three dimensional models obtained with TLS, allow determining the geometric features and relevant magnitudes of the scanned object in an indirect way. In order to compare the spatial location and geometric accuracy of the 3-dimensional model created by Terrestrial laser scanning, it is necessary to use measurement tools that give more precise results than TLS. Geometric comparisons are performed by analyzing the differences between the distances, the angles between surfaces and the measured values taken from cross-sections between the data from the 3-dimensional model created with TLS and the values measured by other measurement devices The performance of the scanners, the size and shape of the scanned objects are tested using reference objects the sizes of which are determined with high precision. In this study, the important points to consider when choosing reference objects were highlighted. The steps up to processing the point clouds collected by scanning, regularizing these points and modeling in 3 dimensions was presented visually. In order to test the geometric correctness of the models obtained by Terrestrial laser scanners, sample objects with simple geometric shapes such as cubes, rectangular prisms and cylinders that are made of concrete were used as reference models. Three dimensional models were generated by scanning these reference models with Trimble Mensi GS 100. The dimension of the 3D model that is created from point clouds was compared with the precisely measured dimensions of the reference objects. For this purpose, horizontal and vertical cross-sections were taken from the reference objects and generated 3D models and the proximity of

  12. Role of miR-146a in human chondrocyte apoptosis in response to mechanical pressure injury in vitro

    PubMed Central

    JIN, LEI; ZHAO, JIAN; JING, WENSEN; YAN, SHIJU; WANG, XIN; XIAO, CHUN; MA, BAOAN

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNA (miR)-146a is known to be overexpressed in osteoarthritis (OA). However, the role of miR-146a in OA has not yet been fully elucidated. In the present study, we applied mechanical pressure of 10 MPa to human chondrocytes for 60 min in order to investigate the expression of miR-146a and apoptosis following the mechanical pressure injury. Normal human chondrocytes were transfected with an miR-146a mimic or an inhibitor to regulate miR-146a expression. Potential target genes of miR-146a were predicted using bioinformatics. Moreover, luciferase reporter assay confirmed that Smad4 was a direct target of miR-146a. The expression levels of miR-146a, Smad4 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were quantified by quantitative reverse transcription PCR and/or western blot analysis. The effects of miR-146a on apoptosis were detected by Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)/propidium iodide (PI) flow cytometry. The results indicated that mechanical pressure affected chondrocyte viability and induced the early apoptosis of chondrocytes. Mechanical pressure injury increased the expression levels of miR-146a and VEGF and decreased the levels of Smad4 in the chondrocytes. In the human chondrocytes, the upregulation of miR-146a induced apoptosis, upregulated VEGF expression and downregulated Smad4 expression. In addition, the knockdown of miR-146a reduced cell apoptosis, upregulated Smad4 expression and downregulated VEGF expression. Smad4 was identified as a direct target of miR-146a by harboring a miR-146a binding sequence in the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) of its mRNA. Furthermore, the upregulation of VEGF induced by miR-146a was mediated by Smad4 in the chondrocytes subjected to mechanical pressure injury. These results demonstrated that miR-146a was overexpressed in our chondrocyte model of experimentally induced human mechanical injury, accompanied by the upregulation of VEGF and the downregulation of Smad4 in vitro. Moreover, our data suggest

  13. Role of miR-146a in human chondrocyte apoptosis in response to mechanical pressure injury in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lei; Zhao, Jian; Jing, Wensen; Yan, Shiju; Wang, Xin; Xiao, Chun; Ma, Baoan

    2014-08-01

    MicroRNA (miR)-146a is known to be overexpressed in osteoarthritis (OA). However, the role of miR-146a in OA has not yet been fully elucidated. In the present study, we applied mechanical pressure of 10 MPa to human chondrocytes for 60 min in order to investigate the expression of miR-146a and apoptosis following the mechanical pressure injury. Normal human chondrocytes were transfected with an miR-146a mimic or an inhibitor to regulate miR-146a expression. Potential target genes of miR-146a were predicted using bioinformatics. Moreover, luciferase reporter assay confirmed that Smad4 was a direct target of miR-146a. The expression levels of miR-146a, Smad4 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were quantified by quantitative reverse transcription PCR and/or western blot analysis. The effects of miR-146a on apoptosis were detected by Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)/propidium iodide (PI) flow cytometry. The results indicated that mechanical pressure affected chondrocyte viability and induced the early apoptosis of chondrocytes. Mechanical pressure injury increased the expression levels of miR-146a and VEGF and decreased the levels of Smad4 in the chondrocytes. In the human chondrocytes, the upregulation of miR-146a induced apoptosis, upregulated VEGF expression and downregulated Smad4 expression. In addition, the knockdown of miR-146a reduced cell apoptosis, upregulated Smad4 expression and downregulated VEGF expression. Smad4 was identified as a direct target of miR-146a by harboring a miR‑146a binding sequence in the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of its mRNA. Furthermore, the upregulation of VEGF induced by miR‑146a was mediated by Smad4 in the chondrocytes subjected to mechanical pressure injury. These results demonstrated that miR-146a was overexpressed in our chondrocyte model of experimentally induced human mechanical injury, accompanied by the upregulation of VEGF and the downregulation of Smad4 in vitro. Moreover, our data suggest

  14. Successful Parenchyma-Sparing Anatomical Surgery by 3-Dimensional Reconstruction of Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma Combined with Anatomic Variation.

    PubMed

    Ni, Qihong; Wang, Haolu; Liang, Xiaowen; Zhang, Yunhe; Chen, Wei; Wang, Jian

    2016-06-01

    The combination of hilar cholangiocarcinoma and anatomic variation constitutes a rare and complicated condition. Precise understanding of 3-dimensional position of tumor in the intrahepatic structure in such cases is important for operation planning and navigation. We report a case of a 61-year woman presenting with hilar cholangiocarcinoma. Anatomic variation and tumor location were well depicted on preoperative multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) combined with 3-dimensional reconstruction as the right posterior segmental duct drained to left hepatic duct. The common hepatic duct, biliary confluence, right anterior segmental duct, and right anterior branch of portal vein were involved by the tumor (Bismuth IIIa). After carefully operation planning, we successfully performed a radical parenchyma-sparing anatomical surgery of hilar cholangiocarcinoma: Liver segmentectomy (segments 5 and 8) and caudate lobectomy. MDCTcombined with 3-dimensional reconstruction is a reliable non-invasive modality for preoperative evaluation of hilar cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:27376205

  15. Triptolide suppresses proinflammatory cytokine-induced matrix metalloproteinase and aggrecanase-1 gene expression in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Liacini, Abdelhamid; Sylvester, Judith; Zafarullah, Muhammad

    2005-02-01

    A hallmark of rheumatoid- and osteoarthritis (OA) is proinflammatory cytokine-induced degeneration of cartilage collagen and aggrecan by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and aggrecanases (ADAMTS). Effects of the Chinese herb, Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F (TWHF), on cartilage and its anti-arthritic mechanisms are poorly understood. This study investigated the impact of a purified derivative of TWHF, PG490 (triptolide), on cytokine-stimulated expression of the major cartilage damaging proteases, MMP-3, MMP-13, and ADAMTS4. PG490 inhibited cytokine-induced MMP-3, MMP-13 gene expression in primary human OA chondrocytes, bovine chondrocytes, SW1353 cells, and human synovial fibroblasts. Triptolide was effective at low doses and blocked the induction of MMP-13 by IL-1 in human and bovine cartilage explants. TWHF extract and PG490 also suppressed IL-1-, IL-17-, and TNF-alpha-induced expression of ADAMTS-4 in bovine chondrocytes. Thus, PG490 could protect cartilage from MMP- and aggrecanase-driven breakdown. The immunosuppressive, cartilage protective, and anti-inflammatory properties could make PG490 potentially a new therapeutic agent for arthritis. PMID:15629465

  16. The effects of high magnitude cyclic tensile load on cartilage matrix metabolism in cultured chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Honda, K; Ohno, S; Tanimoto, K; Ijuin, C; Tanaka, N; Doi, T; Kato, Y; Tanne, K

    2000-09-01

    Excessive mechanical load is thought to be responsible for the onset of osteoarthrosis (OA), but the mechanisms of cartilage destruction caused by mechanical loads remain unknown. In this study we applied a high magnitude cyclic tensile load to cultured chondrocytes using a Flexercell strain unit, which produces a change in cell morphology from a polygonal to spindle-like shape, and examined the protein level of cartilage matrixes and the gene expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs) and proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1beta and TNF-alpha. Toluidine blue staining, type II collagen immunostaining, and an assay of the incorporation of [35S]sulfate into proteoglycans revealed a decrease in the level of cartilage-specific matrixes in chondrocyte cultures subjected to high magnitude cyclic tensile load. PCR-Southern blot analysis showed that the high magnitude cyclic tensile load increased the mRNA level of MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-9, IL-1beta, TNF-alpha and TIMP-1 in the cultured chondrocytes, while the mRNA level of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 was unchanged. Moreover, the induction of MMP-1, MMP-3 and MMP-9 mRNA expression was observed in the presence of cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis. These findings suggest that excessive mechanical load directly changes the metabolism of cartilage by reducing the matrix components and causing a quantitative imbalance between MMPs and TIMPs. PMID:11043401

  17. Taraxasterol inhibits IL-1β-induced inflammatory response in human osteoarthritic chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Piao, Taikui; Ma, Zhiqiang; Li, Xin; Liu, Jianyu

    2015-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), a chronic degenerative joint disease, is a leading cause of disability among elderly patients. Taraxasterol, a pentacyclic-triterpene isolated from Taraxacum officinale, has been shown to have anti-inflammatory effects. However, the protective effect of taraxasterol on OA remains unclear. In order to provide a scientific basis for the applicability of taraxasterol in OA, the anti-inflammatory effects of taraxasterol on IL-1β-stimulated osteoarthritic chondrocytes were investigated. Chondrocytes were pretreated with taraxasterol 1h before IL-1β treatment. The productions of MMP-1, MMP3, MMP13, PGE2 and NO were measured by ELISA and Griess reaction. The expression of COX-2, iNOS, and NF-κB was detected by western blot analysis. Our results demonstrated that taraxasterol dose-dependently suppressed MMP-1, MMP3, MMP13, PGE2 and NO production induced by IL-1β. The expression of COX-2 and iNOS was also inhibited by taraxasterol. Western blot analysis showed that taraxasterol suppressed IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, we found that taraxasterol protected human chondrocytes by inhibiting MMPs, NO and PGE2 production. Taraxasterol may be a useful agent for prevention and treatment of OA. PMID:25797286

  18. Rutin protects rat articular chondrocytes against oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide through SIRT1 activation.

    PubMed

    Na, Ji-Young; Song, Kibbeum; Kim, Sokho; Kwon, Jungkee

    2016-05-13

    The progressive degeneration and ossification of articular chondrocytes are main symptoms in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). Several flavonoids may provide an adjunctive alternative for the management of moderate OA in humans. Rutin, a natural flavone derivative (quercetin-3-rhamnosylglucoside), is well known for its potent anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties against oxidative stress. However, the protective function of rutin related to OA, which is characterized by deterioration of articular cartilage, remains unclear. The present study investigated the protective effects of rutin, an activator of silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1), involved in the inhibition of NF-κB/MAPK signaling pathway in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress in rat chondrocytes. SIRT1 activation by rutin attenuated levels of inflammatory cytokines and NF-κB/MAPK signaling, whereas the inhibition of SIRT1 by sirtinol counteracted the beneficial effects of rutin in H2O2-treated chondrocytes. The findings of these studies suggested the potential involvement of SIRT1 in the pathogenesis of OA, and indicated that rutin is a possible therapeutic option for OA. PMID:27086847

  19. MicroRNA-381 Regulates Chondrocyte Hypertrophy by Inhibiting Histone Deacetylase 4 Expression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weishen; Sheng, Puyi; Huang, Zhiyu; Meng, Fangang; Kang, Yan; Huang, Guangxin; Zhang, Zhiqi; Liao, Weiming; Zhang, Ziji

    2016-01-01

    Chondrocyte hypertrophy, regulated by Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13), is a crucial step in cartilage degeneration and osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenesis. We previously demonstrated that microRNA-381 (miR-381) promotes MMP13 expression during chondrogenesis and contributes to cartilage degeneration; however, the mechanism underlying this process remained unclear. In this study, we observed divergent expression of miR-381 and histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4), an enzyme that directly inhibits RUNX2 and MMP13 expression, during late-stage chondrogenesis of ATDC5 cells, as well as in prehypertrophic and hypertrophic chondrocytes during long bone development in E16.5 mouse embryos. We therefore investigated whether this miRNA regulates HDAC4 expression during chondrogenesis. Notably, overexpression of miR-381 inhibited HDAC4 expression but promoted RUNX2 expression. Moreover, transfection of SW1353 cells with an miR-381 mimic suppressed the activity of a reporter construct containing the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of HDAC4. Conversely, treatment with a miR-381 inhibitor yielded increased HDAC4 expression and decreased RUNX2 expression. Lastly, knockdown of HDAC4 expression resulted in increased RUNX2 and MMP13 expression in SW1353 cells. Collectively, our results indicate that miR-381 epigenetically regulates MMP13 and RUNX2 expression via targeting of HDAC4, thereby suggesting the possibilities of inhibiting miR-381 to control chondrocyte hypertrophy and cartilage degeneration. PMID:27563877

  20. HES factors regulate specific aspects of chondrogenesis and chondrocyte hypertrophy during cartilage development.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Timothy P; Kohn, Anat; Sharma, Deepika; Ren, Yinshi; Mirando, Anthony J; Hilton, Matthew J

    2016-06-01

    RBPjκ-dependent Notch signaling regulates multiple processes during cartilage development, including chondrogenesis, chondrocyte hypertrophy and cartilage matrix catabolism. Select members of the HES- and HEY-families of transcription factors are recognized Notch signaling targets that mediate specific aspects of Notch function during development. However, whether particular HES and HEY factors play any role(s) in the processes during cartilage development is unknown. Here, for the first time, we have developed unique in vivo genetic models and in vitro approaches demonstrating that the RBPjκ-dependent Notch targets HES1 and HES5 suppress chondrogenesis and promote the onset of chondrocyte hypertrophy. HES1 and HES5 might have some overlapping function in these processes, although only HES5 directly regulates Sox9 transcription to coordinate cartilage development. HEY1 and HEYL play no discernable role in regulating chondrogenesis or chondrocyte hypertrophy, whereas none of the HES or HEY factors appear to mediate Notch regulation of cartilage matrix catabolism. This work identifies important candidates that might function as downstream mediators of Notch signaling both during normal skeletal development and in Notch-related skeletal disorders. PMID:27160681

  1. Effect of Fiber Diameter on the Spreading, Proliferation and Differentiation of Chondrocytes on Electrospun Chitosan Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Noriega, Sandra E.; Hasanova, Gulnara I.; Schneider, Min Jeong; Larsen, Gustavo F.; Subramanian, Anuradha

    2012-01-01

    Tissue-engineered neocartilage with appropriate biomechanical properties holds promise not only for graft applications but also as a model system for controlled studies of chondrogenesis. Our objective in the present research study is to better understand the impact of fiber diameter on the cellular activity of chondrocytes cultured on nanofibrous matrices. By using the electrospinning process, fibrous scaffolds with fiber diameters ranging from 300 nm to 1 μm were prepared and the physicomechanical properties of the scaffolds were characterized. Bovine articular chondrocytes were then seeded and maintained on the scaffolds for 7 and 14 days in culture. An upregulation in the gene expression of collagen II was noted with decreasing fiber diameters. For cells that were cultured on scaffolds with a mean fiber diameter of 300 nm, a 2-fold higher ratio of collagen II/collagen I was noted when compared to cells cultured on sponge-like scaffolds prepared by freeze drying and lyophilization. Integrin (α5, αv, β1) gene expression was also observed to be influenced by matrix morphology. Our combined results suggest that matrix geometry can regulate and promote the retention of the chondrocyte genotype. PMID:21540560

  2. Tormentic Acid Inhibits IL-1β-Induced Inflammatory Response in Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Yawei; Wang, Yumin; Zhao, Meng; Jia, Haobo; Li, Bing; Xing, Dan

    2016-06-01

    The pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) plays critical roles in pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). Tormentic acid (TA), a triterpene isolated from Rosa rugosa, has anti-inflammatory activity. However, the anti-inflammatory effect of TA on OA is still unclear. So, in the present study, we examined the effect of TA on IL-1β-induced inflammatory response in primary human OA chondrocytes. Our results demonstrated that TA significantly decreased the IL-1β-stimulated expression of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) and MMP-13. It also inhibited the IL-1β-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), as well as the production of NO and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in human OA chondrocytes. Furthermore, TA greatly inhibited the IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation. In conclusion, this study is the first to demonstrate the anti-inflammatory activity of TA in human OA chondrocytes. TA significantly inhibits the IL-1β-induced inflammatory response by suppressing the NF-κB signaling pathway. Thus, TA may be a potential agent in the treatment of OA. PMID:27102898

  3. Effect of Carnosine in Experimental Arthritis and on Primary Culture Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ponist, S.; Drafi, F.; Kuncirova, V.; Mihalova, D.; Rackova, L.; Danisovic, L.; Ondrejickova, O.; Tumova, I.; Trunova, O.; Fedorova, T.; Bauerova, K.

    2016-01-01

    Carnosine's (CARN) anti-inflammatory potential in autoimmune diseases has been but scarcely investigated as yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of CARN in rat adjuvant arthritis, in the model of carrageenan induced hind paw edema (CARA), and also in primary culture of chondrocytes under H2O2 injury. The experiments were done on healthy animals, arthritic animals, and arthritic animals with oral administration of CARN in a daily dose of 150 mg/kg b.w. during 28 days as well as animals with CARA treated by a single administration of CARN in the same dose. CARN beneficially affected hind paw volume and changes in body weight on day 14 and reduced hind paw swelling in CARA. Markers of oxidative stress in plasma and brain (malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal, protein carbonyls, and lag time of lipid peroxidation) and also activity of gamma-glutamyltransferase were significantly corrected by CARN. CARN also reduced IL-1alpha in plasma. Suppression of intracellular oxidant levels was also observed in chondrocytes pretreated with CARN. Our results obtained on two animal models showed that CARN has systemic anti-inflammatory activity and protected rat brain and chondrocytes from oxidative stress. This finding suggests that CARN might be beneficial for treatment of arthritic diseases. PMID:26885252

  4. Production of three-dimensional tissue-engineered cartilage through mutual fusion of chondrocyte pellets.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, K; Fujihara, Y; Mori, Y; Asawa, Y; Kanazawa, S; Nishizawa, S; Misawa, M; Numano, T; Inoue, H; Sakamoto, T; Watanabe, M; Komura, M; Takato, T

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the mutual fusion of chondrocyte pellets was promoted in order to produce large-sized tissue-engineered cartilage with a three-dimensional (3D) shape. Five pellets of human auricular chondrocytes were first prepared, which were then incubated in an agarose mold. After 3 weeks of culture in matrix production-promoting medium under 5.78g/cm(2) compression, the tissue-engineered cartilage showed a sufficient mechanical strength. To confirm the usefulness of these methods, a transplantation experiment was performed using beagles. Tissue-engineered cartilage prepared with 50 pellets of beagle chondrocytes was transplanted subcutaneously into the cell-donor dog for 2 months. The tissue-engineered cartilage of the beagles maintained a rod-like shape, even after harvest. Histology showed fair cartilage regeneration. Furthermore, 20 pellets were made and placed on a beta-tricalcium phosphate prism, and this was then incubated within the agarose mold for 3 weeks. The construct was transplanted into a bone/cartilage defect in the cell-donor beagle. After 2 months, bone and cartilage regeneration was identified on micro-computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. This approach involving the fusion of small pellets into a large structure enabled the production of 3D tissue-engineered cartilage that was close to physiological cartilage tissue in property, without conventional polyper scaffolds. PMID:27173826

  5. Stochastic resonance is a method to improve the biosynthetic response of chondrocytes to mechanical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Weber, Joanna F; Waldman, Stephen D

    2016-02-01

    Cellular mechanosensitivity is an important factor during the mechanical stimulation of tissue engineered cartilage. While the application of mechanical stimuli improves tissue growth and properties, chondrocytes also rapidly desensitize under prolonged loading thereby limiting its effectiveness. One potential method to mitigate load-induced desensitization is by superimposing noise on the loading waveforms ("stochastic resonance"). Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of stochastic resonance on chondrocyte matrix metabolism. Chondrocyte-seeded agarose gels were subjected to dynamic compressive loading, with or without, superimposed vibrations of different amplitudes and frequency bandwidths. Changes in matrix biosynthesis were determined by radioisotope incorporation and subsequent effects on intracellular calcium signaling were evaluated by confocal microscopy. Although dependent on the duration of loading, superimposed vibrations improved cellular sensitivity to mechanical loading by further increasing matrix synthesis between 20-60%. Stochastic resonance also appeared to limit load-induced desensitization by maintaining sensitivity under desensitized loading conditions. While superimposed vibrations had little effect on the magnitude of intracellular calcium signaling, recovery of mechanosensitivity after stimulation was achieved at a faster rate suggesting that less time may be required between successive loading applications. Thus, stochastic resonance appears to be a valuable tool during the mechanical stimulation of cartilage constructs, even when suboptimal stimulation conditions are used. PMID:26234431

  6. Effect of Carnosine in Experimental Arthritis and on Primary Culture Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ponist, S; Drafi, F; Kuncirova, V; Mihalova, D; Rackova, L; Danisovic, L; Ondrejickova, O; Tumova, I; Trunova, O; Fedorova, T; Bauerova, K

    2016-01-01

    Carnosine's (CARN) anti-inflammatory potential in autoimmune diseases has been but scarcely investigated as yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of CARN in rat adjuvant arthritis, in the model of carrageenan induced hind paw edema (CARA), and also in primary culture of chondrocytes under H2O2 injury. The experiments were done on healthy animals, arthritic animals, and arthritic animals with oral administration of CARN in a daily dose of 150 mg/kg b.w. during 28 days as well as animals with CARA treated by a single administration of CARN in the same dose. CARN beneficially affected hind paw volume and changes in body weight on day 14 and reduced hind paw swelling in CARA. Markers of oxidative stress in plasma and brain (malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal, protein carbonyls, and lag time of lipid peroxidation) and also activity of gamma-glutamyltransferase were significantly corrected by CARN. CARN also reduced IL-1alpha in plasma. Suppression of intracellular oxidant levels was also observed in chondrocytes pretreated with CARN. Our results obtained on two animal models showed that CARN has systemic anti-inflammatory activity and protected rat brain and chondrocytes from oxidative stress. This finding suggests that CARN might be beneficial for treatment of arthritic diseases. PMID:26885252

  7. Bioimaging: An Useful Tool to Monitor Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells into Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Suchorska, Wiktoria M; Lach, Michał S; Richter, Magdalena; Kaczmarczyk, Jacek; Trzeciak, Tomasz

    2016-05-01

    To improve the recovery of damaged cartilage tissue, pluripotent stem cell-based therapies are being intensively explored. A number of techniques exist that enable monitoring of stem cell differentiation, including immunofluorescence staining. This simple and fast method enables changes to be observed during the differentiation process. Here, two protocols for the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into chondrocytes were used (monolayer cell culture and embryoid body formation). Cells were labeled for markers expressed during the differentiation process at different time points (pluripotent: NANOG, SOX2, OCT3/4, E-cadherin; prochondrogenic: SOX6, SOX9, Collagen type II; extracellular matrix components: chondroitin sulfate, heparan sulfate; beta-catenin, CXCR4, and Brachyury). Comparison of the signal intensity of differentiated cells to control cell populations (articular cartilage chondrocytes and human embryonic stem cells) showed decreased signal intensities of pluripotent markers, E-cadherin and beta-catenin. Increased signal intensities of prochondrogenic markers and extracellular matrix components were observed. The changes during chondrogenic differentiation monitored by evaluation of pluripotent and chondrogenic markers signal intensity were described. The changes were similar to several studies over chondrogenesis. These results were confirmed by semi-quantitative analysis of IF signals. In this research we indicate a bioimaging as a useful tool to monitor and semi-quantify the IF pictures during the differentiation of hES into chondrocyte-like. PMID:26354117

  8. Comparison of proteomic datasets from hypertrophic chondrocytes in response to ER stress.

    PubMed

    Kudelko, Mateusz; Sharma, Rakesh; Cheah, Kathryn S E; Chan, Danny