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Sample records for 3-ketoacyl-coa reductase activities

  1. Ferrisiderophore reductase activity in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed Central

    Lodge, J S; Gaines, C G; Arceneaux, J E; Byers, B R

    1982-01-01

    Reduction of the iron in ferriagrobactin by the cytoplasmic fraction of Agrobacterium tumefaciens strictly required NaDH as the reductant. Addition of flavin mononucleotide and anaerobic conditions were necessary for the reaction; when added with flavin mononucleotide, magnesium was stimulatory. This ferrisiderophore reductase activity may be a part of the iron assimilation process in A. tumefaciens. PMID:7056702

  2. Evaluation of nitrate reductase activity in Rhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Streeter, J.G.; DeVine, P.J.

    1983-08-01

    Nitrate reductase activity was evaluated by four approaches, using four strains of Rhizobium japonicum and 11 chlorate-resistant mutants of the four strains. It was concluded that in vitro assays with bacteria or bacteroids provide the most simple and reliable assessment of the presence or absence of nitrate reductase. Nitrite reductase activity with methyl viologen and dithionite was found, but the enzyme activity does not confound the assay of nitrate reductase. 18 references

  3. Nitrite Reductase Activity in Engineered Azurin Variants.

    PubMed

    Berry, Steven M; Strange, Jacob N; Bladholm, Erika L; Khatiwada, Balabhadra; Hedstrom, Christine G; Sauer, Alexandra M

    2016-05-01

    Nitrite reductase (NiR) activity was examined in a series of dicopper P.a. azurin variants in which a surface binding copper site was added through site-directed mutagenesis. Four variants were synthesized with copper binding motifs inspired by the catalytic type 2 copper binding sites found in the native noncoupled dinuclear copper enzymes nitrite reductase and peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase. The four azurin variants, denoted Az-NiR, Az-NiR3His, Az-PHM, and Az-PHM3His, maintained the azurin electron transfer copper center, with the second designed copper site located over 13 Å away and consisting of mutations Asn10His,Gln14Asp,Asn16His-azurin, Asn10His,Gln14His,Asn16His-azurin, Gln8Met,Gln14His,Asn16His-azurin, and Gln8His,Gln14His,Asn16His-azurin, respectively. UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, EPR spectroscopy, and electrochemistry of the sites demonstrate copper binding as well as interaction with small exogenous ligands. The nitrite reduction activity of the variants was determined, including the catalytic Michaelis-Menten parameters. The variants showed activity (0.34-0.59 min(-1)) that was slower than that of native NiRs but comparable to that of other model systems. There were small variations in activity of the four variants that correlated with the number of histidines in the added copper site. Catalysis was found to be reversible, with nitrite produced from NO. Reactions starting with reduced azurin variants demonstrated that electrons from both copper centers were used to reduce nitrite, although steady-state catalysis required the T2 copper center and did not require the T1 center. Finally, experiments separating rates of enzyme reduction from rates of reoxidation by nitrite demonstrated that the reaction with nitrite was rate limiting during catalysis. PMID:27055058

  4. Aldose reductase mediates retinal microglia activation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kun-Che; Shieh, Biehuoy; Petrash, J Mark

    2016-04-29

    Retinal microglia (RMG) are one of the major immune cells in charge of surveillance of inflammatory responses in the eye. In the absence of an inflammatory stimulus, RMG reside predominately in the ganglion layer and inner or outer plexiform layers. However, under stress RMG become activated and migrate into the inner nuclear layer (INL) or outer nuclear layer (ONL). Activated RMG in cell culture secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines in a manner sensitive to downregulation by aldose reductase inhibitors. In this study, we utilized CX3CR1(GFP) mice carrying AR mutant alleles to evaluate the role of AR on RMG activation and migration in vivo. When tested on an AR(WT) background, IP injection of LPS induced RMG activation and migration into the INL and ONL. However, this phenomenon was largely prevented by AR inhibitors or in AR null mice, or was exacerbated in transgenic mice that over-express AR. LPS-induced increases in ocular levels of TNF-α and CX3CL-1 in WT mice were substantially lower in AR null mice or were reduced by AR inhibitor treatment. These studies demonstrate that AR expression in RMG may contribute to the proinflammatory phenotypes common to various eye diseases such as uveitis and diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27033597

  5. Low apparent aldose reductase activity produced by monosaccharide autoxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, S P; Crabbe, M J

    1985-01-01

    Low apparent aldose reductase activity, as measured by NADPH oxidation, can be produced by the spontaneous autoxidation of monosaccharides. NADPH is oxidized to metabolically active NADP+ in a solution of autoxidizing DL-glyceraldehyde at rates of up to 15 X 10(-4) A340/min. The close parallelism between the effects of buffer salt type and concentration, monosaccharide structure and temperature activation on autoxidation and NADPH oxidation imply that autoxidation is a prerequisite for the NADPH oxidation, probably via the hydroperoxy radical. Nucleotide-binding proteins enhanced NADPH oxidation induced by DL-glyceraldehyde, up to 10.6-fold with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Glutathione reductase-catalysed NADPH oxidation in the presence of autoxidizing monosaccharide showed many characteristics of the aldose reductase reaction. Aldose reductase inhibitors acted as antioxidants in inhibiting this NADPH oxidation. These results indicate that low apparent aldose reductase activities may be due to artifacts of monosaccharide autoxidation, and could provide an explanation for the non-linear steady-state kinetics observed with DL-glyceraldehyde and aldose reductase. PMID:2985042

  6. Equine 5α-reductase activity and expression in epididymis.

    PubMed

    Corbin, C J; Legacki, E L; Ball, B A; Scoggin, K E; Stanley, S D; Conley, A J

    2016-10-01

    The 5α-reductase enzymes play an important role during male sexual differentiation, and in pregnant females, especially equine species where maintenance relies on 5α-reduced progesterone, 5α-dihydroprogesterone (DHP). Epididymis expresses 5α-reductases but was not studied elaborately in horses. Epididymis from younger and older postpubertal stallions was divided into caput, corpus and cauda and examined for 5α-reductase activity and expression of type 1 and 2 isoforms by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Metabolism of progesterone and testosterone to DHP and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), respectively, by epididymal microsomal protein was examined by thin-layer chromatography and verified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Relative inhibitory potencies of finasteride and dutasteride toward equine 5α-reductase activity were investigated. Pregnenolone was investigated as an additional potential substrate for 5α-reductase, suggested previously from in vivo studies in mares but never directly examined. No regional gradient of 5α-reductase expression was observed by either enzyme activity or transcript analysis. Results of PCR experiments suggested that type 1 isoform predominates in equine epididymis. Primers for the type 2 isoform were unable to amplify product from any samples examined. Progesterone and testosterone were readily reduced to DHP and DHT, and activity was effectively inhibited by both inhibitors. Using epididymis as an enzyme source, no experimental evidence was obtained supporting the notion that pregnenolone could be directly metabolized by equine 5α-reductases as has been suggested by previous investigators speculating on alternative metabolic pathways leading to DHP synthesis in placenta during equine pregnancies. PMID:27466384

  7. A high-throughput assay format for determination of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase enzyme activities

    SciTech Connect

    McNally, N.; Liu, Xiang Yang; Choudary, P.V.

    1997-01-01

    The authors describe a microplate-based high-throughput procedure for rapid assay of the enzyme activities of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase, using extremely small volumes of reagents. The new procedure offers the advantages of rapidity, small sample size-nanoliter volumes, low cost, and a dramatic increase in the throughput sample number that can be analyzed simultaneously. Additional advantages can be accessed by using microplate reader application software packages that permit assigning a group type to the wells, recording of the data on exportable data files and exercising the option of using the kinetic or endpoint reading modes. The assay can also be used independently for detecting nitrite residues/contamination in environmental/food samples. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  8. 5. cap alpha. -reductase activity in rat adipose tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Zyirek, M.; Flood, C.; Longcope, C.

    1987-11-01

    We measured the 5 ..cap alpha..-reductase activity in isolated cell preparations of rat adipose tissue using the formation of (/sup 3/H) dihydrotestosterone from (/sup 3/H) testosterone as an endpoint. Stromal cells were prepared from the epididymal fat pad, perinephric fat, and subcutaneous fat of male rats and from perinephric fat of female rats. Adipocytes were prepared from the epididymal fat pad and perinephric fat of male rats. Stromal cells from the epididymal fat pad and perinephric fat contained greater 5..cap alpha..-reductase activity than did the adipocytes from these depots. Stromal cells from the epididymal fat pad contained greater activity than those from perinephric and subcutaneous depots. Perinephric stromal cells from female rats were slightly more active than those from male rats. Estradiol (10/sup -8/ M), when added to the medium, caused a 90% decrease in 5..cap alpha..-reductase activity. Aromatase activity was minimal, several orders of magnitude less than 5..cap alpha..-reductase activity in each tissue studied.

  9. Activated and unactivated forms of human erythrocyte aldose reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, S K; Hair, G A; Das, B

    1985-01-01

    Aldose reductase (alditol:NADP+ 1-oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.21) has been partially purified from human erythrocytes by DEAE-cellulose (DE-52) column chromatography. This enzyme is activated severalfold upon incubation with 10 microM each glucose 6-phosphate, NADPH, and glucose. The activation of the enzyme was confirmed by following the oxidation of NADPH as well as the formation of sorbitol with glucose as substrate. The activated form of aldose reductase exhibited monophasic kinetics with both glyceraldehyde and glucose (Km of glucose = 0.68 mM and Km of glyceraldehyde = 0.096 mM), whereas the native (unactivated) enzyme exhibited biphasic kinetics (Km of glucose = 9.0 and 0.9 mM and Km of glyceraldehyde = 1.1 and 0.14 mM). The unactivated enzyme was strongly inhibited by aldose reductase inhibitors such as sorbinil, alrestatin, and quercetrin, and by phosphorylated intermediates such as ADP, glycerate 3-phosphate, glycerate 1,3-bisphosphate, and glycerate 2,3-trisphosphate. The activated form of the enzyme was less susceptible to inhibition by aldose reductase inhibitors and phosphorylated intermediates. PMID:3933003

  10. Measurement of nitrous oxide reductase activity in aquatic sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, L.G.; Oremland, R.S.; Paulsen, S.

    1986-01-01

    Denitrification in aquatic sediments was measured by an N/sub 2/O reductase assay. Sediments consumed small added quantities of N/sub 2/O over short periods (a few hours). In experiments with sediment slurries, N/sub 2/O reductase activity was inhibited by 0/sub 2/, C/sub 2/H/sub 2/, heat treatment, and by high levels of nitrate (1 mM) or sulfide (10 mM). However, ambient levels of nitrate (<100 ..mu..M) did not influence activity, and moderate levels (about 150 ..mu..M) induced only a short lag before reductase activity began. Moderate levels of sulfide (<1 mM) had no effect on N/sub 2/O reductase activity. Nitrous oxide reductase displayed Michaelis-Menten kinetics in sediments from freshwater, estuarine, and alkaline-saline environments. An in situ assay was devised in which a solution of N/sub 2/O was injected into sealed glass cores containing intact sediment. Two estimates of net rates of denitrification in San Francisco Bay under approximated in situ conditions were 0.009 and 0.041 mmol of N/sub 2/O per m/sup 2/ per h. Addition of chlorate to inhibit denitrification in these intact-core experiments (to estimate gross rates of N/sub 2/O consumption) resulted in approximately a 14% upward revision of estimates of net rates. These results were comparable to an in situ estimate of 0.022 mmol of N/sub 2/O per m/sup 2/ per h made with the acetylene block assay.

  11. Perchlorate Reductase Is Distinguished by Active Site Aromatic Gate Residues.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Maglaqui, Adrian P; Gau-Pan, Phonchien S; Redford, Steven A; Wong, Alan; Tainer, John A; Coates, John D

    2016-04-22

    Perchlorate is an important ion on both Earth and Mars. Perchlorate reductase (PcrAB), a specialized member of the dimethylsulfoxide reductase superfamily, catalyzes the first step of microbial perchlorate respiration, but little is known about the biochemistry, specificity, structure, and mechanism of PcrAB. Here we characterize the biophysics and phylogeny of this enzyme and report the 1.86-Å resolution PcrAB complex crystal structure. Biochemical analysis revealed a relatively high perchlorate affinity (Km = 6 μm) and a characteristic substrate inhibition compared with the highly similar respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI, which has a relatively much lower affinity for perchlorate (Km = 1.1 mm) and no substrate inhibition. Structural analysis of oxidized and reduced PcrAB with and without the substrate analog SeO3 (2-) bound to the active site identified key residues in the positively charged and funnel-shaped substrate access tunnel that gated substrate entrance and product release while trapping transiently produced chlorate. The structures suggest gating was associated with shifts of a Phe residue between open and closed conformations plus an Asp residue carboxylate shift between monodentate and bidentate coordination to the active site molybdenum atom. Taken together, structural and mutational analyses of gate residues suggest key roles of these gate residues for substrate entrance and product release. Our combined results provide the first detailed structural insight into the mechanism of biological perchlorate reduction, a critical component of the chlorine redox cycle on Earth. PMID:26940877

  12. Aldose reductase inhibitory activity of compounds from Zea mays L.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hyeon; Kim, Jin Kyu; Kang, Young-Hee; Lee, Jae-Yong; Kang, Il Jun; Lim, Soon Sung

    2013-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AR) inhibitors have a considerable therapeutic potential against diabetes complications and do not increase the risk of hypoglycemia. Through bioassay-guided fractionation of an EtOH extract of the kernel from purple corn (Zea mays L.), 7 nonanthocyanin phenolic compounds (compound 1-7) and 5 anthocyanins (compound 8-12) were isolated. These compounds were investigated by rat lens aldose reductase (RLAR) inhibitory assays. Kinetic analyses of recombinant human aldose reductase (rhAR) were performed, and intracellular galactitol levels were measured. Hirsutrin, one of 12 isolated compounds, showed the most potent RLAR inhibitory activity (IC(50), 4.78 μ M). In the kinetic analyses using Lineweaver-Burk plots of 1/velocity and 1/substrate concentration, hirsutrin showed competitive inhibition against rhAR. Furthermore, hirsutrin inhibited galactitol formation in rat lens and erythrocytes sample incubated with a high concentration of galactose; this finding indicates that hirsutrin may effectively prevent osmotic stress in hyperglycemia. Therefore, hirsutrin derived from Zea mays L. may be a potential therapeutic agent against diabetes complications. PMID:23586057

  13. Terpenoids from Diplophyllum taxifolium with quinone reductase-inducing activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Jiao-Zhen; Zhou, Jin-Chuan; Shen, Tao; Lou, Hong-Xiang

    2016-03-01

    Two new ent-prenylaromadendrane-type diterpenoids, diplotaxifols A (1) and B (2), a new ent-eudesmol, ent-eudesma-4(15),11(13)-dien-6α,12-diol (3), eight new eudesmanolides enantiomers (4-11) of the corresponding compounds from higher plants along with four known ent-eudesmanolides (12-15) were isolated from the 95% EtOH extract of Chinese liverwort Diplophyllum taxifolium. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of MS, NMR and IR spectral data, and confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The quinone reductase-inducing activity of the compounds was evaluated. PMID:26656409

  14. Optimisation of nitrate reductase enzyme activity to synthesise silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Khodashenas, Bahareh; Ghorbani, Hamid Reza

    2016-06-01

    Today, the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) is very common since it has many applications in different areas. The synthesis of these nanoparticles is done by means of physical, chemical, or biological methods. However, due to its inexpensive and environmentally friendly features, the biological method is more preferable. In the present study, using nitrate reductase enzyme available in the Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacterium, the biosynthesis of Ag NPs was investigated. In addition, the activity of the nitrate reductase enzyme was optimised by changing its cultural conditions, and the effects of silver nitrate (AgNO(3)) concentration and enzyme amount on nanoparticles synthesis were studied. Finally, the produced nanoparticles were studied using ultraviolet -visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometer, dynamic light scattering technique, and transmission electron microscopy. UV-Visible spectrophotometric study showed the characteristic peak for Ag NPs at wavelength 405-420 nm for 1 mM metal precursor solution (AgNO(3)) with 1, 5, 10, and 20 cc supernatant and 435 nm for 0.01M AgNO(3) with 20 cc supernatant. In this study, it was found that there is a direct relationship between the AgNO(3) concentration and the size of produced Ag NPs. PMID:27256897

  15. Determination of the specific activities of methionine sulfoxide reductase A and B by capillary electrophoresis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A capillary electrophoresis (CE) method for the determination of methionine sulfoxide reductase A and methionine sulfoxide reductase B activities in mouse liver is described. The method is based on detection of the 4-(dimethylamino)azobenzene-4’-sulfonyl derivative of L-methionine (dabsyl Met), the ...

  16. Evaluation of 5α-reductase inhibitory activity of certain herbs useful as antiandrogens.

    PubMed

    Nahata, A; Dixit, V K

    2014-08-01

    This study demonstrates 5α-reductase inhibitory activity of certain herbs useful in the management of androgenic disorders. Ganoderma lucidum (Curtis) P. Karst (GL), Urtica dioica Linn. (UD), Caesalpinia bonducella Fleming. (CB), Tribulus terrestris Linn. (TT), Pedalium murex Linn. (PM), Sphaeranthus indicus Linn. (SI), Cuscuta reflexa Roxb. (CR), Citrullus colocynthis Schrad. (CC), Benincasa hispida Cogn. (BH), Phyllanthus niruri Linn. (PN) and Echinops echinatus Linn. (EE) were included in the study. Petroleum ether, ethanol and aqueous extracts of these herbs were tested for their 5α-reductase inhibitory activity against the standard 5α-reductase inhibitor, finasteride. A biochemical method to determine the activity of 5α-reductase was used to evaluate the inhibition of different extracts to the enzyme. The optical density (OD) value of each sample was measured continuously with ultraviolet spectrophotometer for the reason that the substrate NADPH has a specific absorbance at 340 nm. As the enzyme 5α-reductase uses NADPH as a substrate, so in the presence of 5α-reductase inhibitor, the NADPH concentration will increase with the function of time. This method thus implicates the activity of 5α-reductase. The method proved to be extremely useful to screen the herbs for their 5α-reductase inhibitory potential. GL, UD, BH, SI and CR came out to be promising candidates for further exploring their antiandrogenic properties. PMID:23710567

  17. Reductive activation of E. coli respiratory nitrate reductase.

    PubMed

    Ceccaldi, Pierre; Rendon, Julia; Léger, Christophe; Toci, René; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Magalon, Axel; Grimaldi, Stéphane; Fourmond, Vincent

    2015-10-01

    Over the past decades, a number of authors have reported the presence of inactive species in as-prepared samples of members of the Mo/W-bisPGD enzyme family. This greatly complicated the spectroscopic studies of these enzymes, since it is impossible to discriminate between active and inactive species on the basis of the spectroscopic signatures alone. Escherichia coli nitrate reductase A (NarGHI) is a member of the Mo/W-bisPGD family that allows anaerobic respiration using nitrate as terminal electron acceptor. Here, using protein film voltammetry on NarGH films, we show that the enzyme is purified in a functionally heterogeneous form that contains between 20 and 40% of inactive species that activate the first time they are reduced. This activation proceeds in two steps: a non-redox reversible reaction followed by an irreversible reduction. By carefully correlating electrochemical and EPR spectroscopic data, we show that neither the two major Mo(V) signals nor those of the two FeS clusters that are the closest to the Mo center are associated with the two inactive species. We also conclusively exclude the possibility that the major "low-pH" and "high-pH" Mo(V) EPR signatures correspond to species in acid-base equilibrium. PMID:26073890

  18. Diversity in Overall Activity Regulation of Ribonucleotide Reductase*

    PubMed Central

    Jonna, Venkateswara Rao; Crona, Mikael; Rofougaran, Reza; Lundin, Daniel; Johansson, Samuel; Brännström, Kristoffer; Sjöberg, Britt-Marie; Hofer, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) catalyzes the reduction of ribonucleotides to the corresponding deoxyribonucleotides, which are used as building blocks for DNA replication and repair. This process is tightly regulated via two allosteric sites, the specificity site (s-site) and the overall activity site (a-site). The a-site resides in an N-terminal ATP cone domain that binds dATP or ATP and functions as an on/off switch, whereas the composite s-site binds ATP, dATP, dTTP, or dGTP and determines which substrate to reduce. There are three classes of RNRs, and class I RNRs consist of different combinations of α and β subunits. In eukaryotic and Escherichia coli class I RNRs, dATP inhibits enzyme activity through the formation of inactive α6 and α4β4 complexes, respectively. Here we show that the Pseudomonas aeruginosa class I RNR has a duplicated ATP cone domain and represents a third mechanism of overall activity regulation. Each α polypeptide binds three dATP molecules, and the N-terminal ATP cone is critical for binding two of the dATPs because a truncated protein lacking this cone could only bind dATP to its s-site. ATP activates the enzyme solely by preventing dATP from binding. The dATP-induced inactive form is an α4 complex, which can interact with β2 to form a non-productive α4β2 complex. Other allosteric effectors induce a mixture of α2 and α4 forms, with the former being able to interact with β2 to form active α2β2 complexes. The unique features of the P. aeruginosa RNR are interesting both from evolutionary and drug discovery perspectives. PMID:25971975

  19. Chromate reductase activity in Streptomyces sp. MC1.

    PubMed

    Polti, Marta A; Amoroso, María J; Abate, Carlos M

    2010-02-01

    Biological transformation of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by enzymatic reduction may provide a less costly and more environmentally friendly approach to remediation. In a previous report a Cr(VI) resistant actinomycete strain, Streptomyces sp. MC1, was able to reduce Cr(VI) present in a synthetic medium, soil extract and soil samples. This is the first time optimal conditions such as pH, temperature, growth phase and electron donor have been elucidated in vitro for Cr(VI) reduction by a streptomycete. Chromate reductase of Streptomyces sp. MC1 is a constitutive enzyme which was mainly associated with biomass and required NAD(P)H as an electron donor. It was active over a broad temperature (19-39 degrees C) and pH (5-8) range, and optimum conditions were 30 degrees C and pH 7. The enzyme was present in supernatant, pellet and cell free extract. Bioremediation with the enzyme was observed in non-compatible cell reproduction systems, conditions frequently found in contaminated environments. PMID:20339215

  20. 5α-reductase inhibitors, antiviral and anti-tumor activities of some steroidal cyanopyridinone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Al-Mohizea, Abdullah M; Al-Omar, Mohamed A; Abdalla, Mohamed M; Amr, Abdel-Galil E

    2012-01-01

    We herein report the 5α-reductase inhibitors, antiviral and anti-tumor activities of some synthesized heterocyclic cyanopyridone and cyanothiopyridone derivatives fused with steroidal structure. Initially the acute toxicity of the compounds was assayed via the determination of their LD(50). All the compounds, except 3b, were interestingly less toxic than the reference drug (Prednisolone(®)). Seventeen heterocyclic derivatives containing a cyanopyridone or cyanothiopyridone rings fused to a steroidal moiety were synthesized and screened for their 5α-reductase inhibitors, antiviral and anti-tumor activities comparable to that of Anastrozole, Bicalutamide, Efavirenz, Capravirine, Ribavirin, Oseltamivir and Amantadine as the reference drugs. Some of the compounds exhibited better 5α-reductase inhibitors, antiviral and anti-tumor activities than the reference drugs. The detailed 5α-reductase inhibitors, antiviral and anti-tumor activities of the synthesized compounds were reported. PMID:22057085

  1. Peach MYB7 activates transcription of the proanthocyanidin pathway gene encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase, but not anthocyanidin reductase

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hui; Lin-Wang, Kui; Liao, Liao; Gu, Chao; Lu, Ziqi; Allan, Andrew C.; Han, Yuepeng

    2015-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs) are a group of natural phenolic compounds that have a great effect on both flavor and nutritious value of fruit. It has been shown that PA synthesis is regulated by R2R3-MYB transcription factors (TFs) via activation of PA-specific pathway genes encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase and anthocyanidin reductase. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a MYB gene designated PpMYB7 in peach. The peach PpMYB7 represents a new group of R2R3-MYB genes regulating PA synthesis in plants. It is able to activate transcription of PpLAR1 but not PpANR, and has a broader selection of potential bHLH partners compared with PpMYBPA1. Transcription of PpMYB7 can be activated by the peach basic leucine-zipper 5 TF (PpbZIP5) via response to ABA. Our study suggests a transcriptional network regulating PA synthesis in peach, with the results aiding the understanding of the functional divergence between R2R3-MYB TFs in plants. PMID:26579158

  2. Identification of promiscuous ene-reductase activity by mining structural databases using active site constellations

    PubMed Central

    Steinkellner, Georg; Gruber, Christian C.; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Binter, Alexandra; Steiner, Kerstin; Winkler, Christoph; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Schwamberger, Orsolya; Oberer, Monika; Schwab, Helmut; Faber, Kurt; Macheroux, Peter; Gruber, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The exploitation of catalytic promiscuity and the application of de novo design have recently opened the access to novel, non-natural enzymatic activities. Here we describe a structural bioinformatic method for predicting catalytic activities of enzymes based on three-dimensional constellations of functional groups in active sites (‘catalophores’). As a proof-of-concept we identify two enzymes with predicted promiscuous ene-reductase activity (reduction of activated C–C double bonds) and compare them with known ene-reductases, that is, members of the Old Yellow Enzyme family. Despite completely different amino acid sequences, overall structures and protein folds, high-resolution crystal structures reveal equivalent binding modes of typical Old Yellow Enzyme substrates and ligands. Biochemical and biocatalytic data show that the two enzymes indeed possess ene-reductase activity and reveal an inverted stereopreference compared with Old Yellow Enzymes for some substrates. This method could thus be a tool for the identification of viable starting points for the development and engineering of novel biocatalysts. PMID:24954722

  3. Increased 5. cap alpha. -reductase activity in idiopathic hirsutism

    SciTech Connect

    Serafini, P.; Lobo, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    In vitro, genital skin 5..cap alpha..-reductase activity (5..cap alpha..-RA) was measured in ten hirsute women with normal androgen levels (idiopathic hirsutism (IH)) and in ten hirsute women with elevated androgen levels (polycystic ovary syndrome (PCO)) in order to determine the influence of secreted androgens on 5..cap alpha..-RA. In vitro 5..cap alpha..-RA was assessed by incubations of skin with /sup 14/C-testosterone (T) for 2 hours, after which steroids were separated and the radioactivity of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and 5..cap alpha..-androstane 3..cap alpha..-17..beta..-estradiol (3..cap alpha..-diol) in specific eluates were determined. All androgens were normal in IH with the exception of higher levels of 3..cap alpha..-diol glucuronide which were similar to the levels of PCO. The conversion ratio (CR) of T to DHT in IH and PCO were similar, yet significantly greater than the CR of control subjects. The CR of T to 3..cap alpha..-diol in IH and PCO were similar, yet higher than in control subjects. Serum androgens showed no correlation with 5..cap alpha..-RA, while the CR of T to DHT showed a significant positive correlation with the Ferriman and Gallwey score. The increased 5..cap alpha..-RA in IH appears to be independent of serum androgen levels and is, therefore, an inherent abnormality. The term idiopathic is a misnomer, because hirsutism in these patients may be explained on the basis of increased skin 5..cap alpha..-RA.

  4. Endothelial human dihydrofolate reductase low activity limits vascular tetrahydrobiopterin recycling

    PubMed Central

    Whitsett, Jennifer; Filho, Artur Rangel; Sethumadhavan, Savitha; Celinska, Joanna; Widlansky, Michael; Vásquez-Vivar, Jeannette

    2013-01-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is required for NO synthesis and inhibition of superoxide release from eNOS. Clinical trials using BH4 to treat endothelial dysfunction have produced mixed results. Poor outcomes may be explained by the rapid systemic and cellular oxidation of BH4. One of the oxidation products of BH4, 7,8-dihydrobiopterin (7,8-BH2), is recycled back to BH4 by dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). This enzyme is ubiquitously distributed and shows a wide range of activity depending on species-specific factors and cell type. Information about the kinetics and efficiency of BH4 recycling in human endothelial cells receiving BH4 treatment is lacking. To characterize this reaction, we applied a novel multi-electrode coulometric HPLC method that enabled the direct quantification of 7,8-BH2 and BH4 which is not possible with fluorescent-based methodologies. We found that basal untreated BH4 and 7,8-BH2 concentrations in human ECs is lower than bovine and murine endothelioma cells. Treatment of human ECs with BH4 transiently increased intracellular BH4 while accumulating the more stable 7,8-BH2. This was different from bovine or murine ECs that resulted in preferential BH4 increase. Using BH4 diastereomers, 6S-BH4 and 6R-BH4, the narrow contribution of enzymatic DHFR recycling to total intracellular BH4 was demonstrated. Reduction of 7,8-BH2 to BH4 occurs at very slow rates in cells and needs supra-physiological levels of 7,8-BH2, indicating this reaction is kinetically limited. Activity assays verified that hDHFR has very low affinity for 7,8-BH2 (DHF7,8-BH2) and folic acid inhibits 7,8-BH2 recycling. We conclude that low activity of endothelial DHFR is an important factor limiting the benefits of BH4 therapies which may be further aggravated by folate supplements. PMID:23707606

  5. Regulation of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase Activity in Human Fibroblasts by Lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Michael S.; Dana, Suzanna E.; Goldstein, Joseph L.

    1973-01-01

    The activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (EC 1.1.1.34), the rate-limiting enzyme of hepatic cholesterol biosynthesis, is suppressed in human fibroblasts cultured in the presence of serum. This enzyme activity increases by more than 10-fold after the removal of serum from the medium. The rise in enzyme activity requires de novo protein synthesis and is not accompanied by changes in the activities of several other cellular enzymes. The factor responsible for the suppression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase activity in cultured fibroblasts is present in the sera of at least four mammalian species, and in human serum it is found in the low-density lipoproteins. Human high-density lipoproteins, very low-density lipoproteins from chicken egg yolk, and the fraction of human serum containing no lipoproteins do not suppress the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase. PMID:4352976

  6. Testosterone selectively affects aromatase and 5α-reductase activities in the green anole lizard brain

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Rachel E.; Wade, Juli

    2011-01-01

    Testosterone (T) and its metabolites are important in the regulation of reproductive behavior in males of a variety of vertebrate species. Aromatase converts T to estradiol and 5α-reductase converts T to 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Male green anole reproduction depends on androgens, yet 5α-reductase in the brain is not sexually dimorphic and does not vary with season. In contrast, aromatase activity in the male brain is increased during the breeding compared to non-breeding season, and males have higher levels than females during the breeding season. Aromatase is important for female, but not male, sexual behaviors. The present experiment was conducted to determine whether 5α-reductase and aromatase are regulated by T. Enzyme activity was quantified in whole brain homogenates in both the breeding and non-breeding seasons in males and females that had been treated with either a T or blank implant. In males only, T increased 5α-reductase activity regardless of season and up-regulated aromatase during the breeding season specifically. Thus, regulation of both enzymes occurs in males, whereas females do not show parallel sensitivity to T. When considered with previous results, the data suggest that aromatase might influence a male function associated with the breeding season other than sexual behavior. 5α-Reductase can be mediated by T availability, but this regulation may not serve a sex- or season-specific purpose. PMID:19917285

  7. The functional nitrite reductase activity of the heme-globins

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Hemoglobin and myoglobin are among the most extensively studied proteins, and nitrite is one of the most studied small molecules. Recently, multiple physiologic studies have surprisingly revealed that nitrite represents a biologic reservoir of NO that can regulate hypoxic vasodilation, cellular respiration, and signaling. These studies suggest a vital role for deoxyhemoglobin- and deoxymyoglobin-dependent nitrite reduction. Biophysical and chemical analysis of the nitrite-deoxyhemoglobin reaction has revealed unexpected chemistries between nitrite and deoxyhemoglobin that may contribute to and facilitate hypoxic NO generation and signaling. The first is that hemoglobin is an allosterically regulated nitrite reductase, such that oxygen binding increases the rate of nitrite conversion to NO, a process termed R-state catalysis. The second chemical property is oxidative denitrosylation, a process by which the NO formed in the deoxyhemoglobin-nitrite reaction that binds to other deoxyhemes can be released due to heme oxidation, releasing free NO. Third, the reaction undergoes a nitrite reductase/anhydrase redox cycle that catalyzes the anaerobic conversion of 2 molecules of nitrite into dinitrogen trioxide (N2O3), an uncharged molecule that may be exported from the erythrocyte. We will review these reactions in the biologic framework of hypoxic signaling in blood and the heart. PMID:18596228

  8. MEK2 regulates ribonucleotide reductase activity through functional interaction with ribonucleotide reductase small subunit p53R2.

    PubMed

    Piao, Chunmei; Youn, Cha-Kyung; Jin, Min; Yoon, Sang Pil; Chang, In-Youb; Lee, Jung Hee; You, Ho Jin

    2012-09-01

    The p53R2 protein, a newly identified member of the ribonucleotide reductase family that provides nucleotides for DNA damage repair, is directly regulated by p53. We show that p53R2 is also regulated by a MEK2 (ERK kinase 2/MAP kinase kinase 2)-dependent pathway. Increased MEK1/2 phosphorylation by serum stimulation coincided with an increase in the RNR activity in U2OS and H1299 cells. The inhibition of MEK2 activity, either by treatment with a MEK inhibitor or by transfection with MEK2 siRNA, dramatically decreased the serum-stimulated RNR activity. Moreover, p53R2 siRNA, but not R2 siRNA, significantly inhibits serum-stimulated RNR activity, indicating that p53R2 is specifically regulated by a MEK2-dependent pathway. Co-immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that the MEK2 segment comprising amino acids 65-171 is critical for p53R2-MEK2 interaction, and the binding domain of MEK2 is required for MEK2-mediated increased RNR activity. Phosphorylation of MEK1/2 was greatly augmented by ionizing radiation, and RNR activity was concurrently increased. Ionizing radiation-induced RNR activity was markedly attenuated by transfection of MEK2 or p53R2 siRNA, but not R2 siRNA. These data show that MEK2 is an endogenous regulator of p53R2 and suggest that MEK2 may associate with p53R2 and upregulate its activity. PMID:22895183

  9. The dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase of Aeromonas caviae ST exhibits NADH-dependent tellurite reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Castro, Miguel E; Molina, Roberto; Díaz, Waldo; Pichuantes, Sergio E; Vásquez, Claudio C

    2008-10-10

    Potassium tellurite (K(2)TeO(3)) is extremely toxic for most forms of life and only a limited number of organisms are naturally resistant to the toxic effects of this compound. Crude extracts prepared from the environmental isolate Aeromonas caviae ST catalize the in vitro reduction of TeO32- in a NADH-dependent reaction. Upon fractionation by ionic exchange column chromatography three major polypeptides identified as the E1, E2, and E3 components of the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex were identified in fractions exhibiting tellurite-reducing activity. Tellurite reductase and pyruvate dehydrogenase activities co-eluted from a Sephadex gel filtration column. To determine which component(s) of the PDH complex has tellurite reductase activity, the A. caviae ST structural genes encoding for E1 (aceE), E2 (aceF), and E3 (lpdA) were independently cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and their gene products purified. Results indicated that tellurite reductase activity lies almost exclusively in the E3 component, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase. The E3 component of the PDH complex from E. coli, Zymomonas mobilis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus also showed NADH-dependent tellurite reductase in vitro suggesting that this enzymatic activity is widely distributed among microorganisms. PMID:18675788

  10. Importance of P450 reductase activity in determining sensitivity of breast tumour cells to the bioreductive drug, tirapazamine (SR 4233).

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, A. V.; Barham, H. M.; Chinje, E. C.; Adams, G. E.; Harris, A. L.; Stratford, I. J.

    1995-01-01

    P450 reductase (NADPH:cytochrome P450 reductase, EC 1.6.2.4) is known to be important in the reductive activation of the benzotriazene-di-N-oxide tirapazamine (SR 4233). Using a panel of six human breast adenocarcinoma cell lines we have examined the relationship between P450 reductase activity and sensitivity to tirapazamine. The toxicity of tirapazamine was found to correlate strongly with P450 reductase activity following an acute (3 h) exposure under hypoxic conditions, the drug being most toxic in the cell lines with the highest P450 reductase activity. A similar correlation was also observed following a chronic (96 h) exposure to the drug in air but not following acute (3 h) exposure in air. We have also determined the ability of lysates prepared from the cell lines to metabolise tirapazamine to its two-electron reduced product, SR 4317, under hypoxic conditions using NADPH as an electron donor. The rate of SR 4317 formation was found to correlate both with P450 reductase activity and with sensitivity to tirapazamine, the highest rates of SR 4317 formation being associated with the highest levels of P450 reductase activity and the greatest sensitivity to the drug. These findings indicate a major role for P450 reductase in determining the hypoxic toxicity of tirapazamine in breast tumour cell lines. Images Figure 4 PMID:7577460

  11. Ferric reductase activity and PsFRO1 sequence variation in pisum sps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physiological studies in pea (Pisum sativum) suggest that the reduction of iron (Fe) is the rate-limiting physiological process in Fe acquisition by dicotyledonous plants. Previous molecular work suggests that ferric reductase activity is regulated at both the transcriptional and post-translational ...

  12. Glyphosate Effect on Shikimate, Nitrate Reductase Activity, Yield, and Seed Composition in Corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 2-yr field study investigated the effects of glyphosate drift rate on plant injury, shikimate accumulation, nitrate reductase activity, leaf nitrogen, yield, and seed composition in non-glyphosate-resistant (non-GR) corn (Zea mays L.) and the effects of glyphosate at label rates on nitrate reducta...

  13. Differential antioxidant and quinone reductase inducing activity of American, Asian, and Siberian ginseng

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The antioxidant and quinone reductase (QR) inducing activities of American, Asian, and Siberian ginseng have been reported using various plant materials, solvents, and assays. To directly establish their comparative bioactivity, the effects of extracts obtained from acidified methanol (MeOH), a gas...

  14. EFFECT OF LINDANE ON INTESTINAL NITROREDUCTASE, AZO REDUCTASE, B-GLUCURONIDASE, DECHLORINASE AND DEHYDROCHLORINASE ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of daily p.o. injections of 20 mg/kg lindane on nitroreductase, azo reductase, B-glucuronidase, dechlorinase and dehydrochlorinase enzyme activity in the rat intestinal tract vas investigated after 2 weeks and 5 weeks of treatment. Antibiotics were administered to half...

  15. Overexpression of Nitrate Reductase in Tobacco Delays Drought-Induced Decreases in Nitrate Reductase Activity and mRNA1

    PubMed Central

    Ferrario-Méry, Sylvie; Valadier, Marie-Hélène; Foyer, Christine H.

    1998-01-01

    Transformed (cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter [35S]) tobacco (Nicotiana plumbaginifolia L.) plants constitutively expressing nitrate reductase (NR) and untransformed controls were subjected to drought for 5 d. Drought-induced changes in biomass accumulation and photosynthesis were comparable in both lines of plants. After 4 d of water deprivation, a large increase in the ratio of shoot dry weight to fresh weight was observed, together with a decrease in the rate of photosynthetic CO2 assimilation. Foliar sucrose increased in both lines during water stress, but hexoses increased only in leaves from untransformed controls. Foliar NO3− decreased rapidly in both lines and was halved within 2 d of the onset of water deprivation. Total foliar amino acids decreased in leaves of both lines following water deprivation. After 4 d of water deprivation no NR activity could be detected in leaves of untransformed plants, whereas about 50% of the original activity remained in the leaves of the 35S-NR transformants. NR mRNA was much more stable than NR activity. NR mRNA abundance increased in the leaves of the 35S-NR plants and remained constant in controls for the first 3 d of drought. On the 4th d, however, NR mRNA suddenly decreased in both lines. Rehydration at d 3 caused rapid recovery (within 24 h) of 35S-NR transcripts, but no recovery was observed in the controls. The phosphorylation state of the protein was unchanged by long-term drought. There was a strong correlation between maximal extractable NR activity and ambient photosynthesis in both lines. We conclude that drought first causes increased NR protein turnover and then accelerates NR mRNA turnover. Constitutive NR expression temporarily delayed drought-induced losses in NR activity. 35S-NR expression may therefore allow more rapid recovery of N assimilation following short-term water deficit. PMID:9576799

  16. Isolation, modification, and aldose reductase inhibitory activity of rosmarinic acid derivatives from the roots of Salvia grandifolia.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jie; Tang, Yanbo; Liu, Quan; Guo, Nan; Zhang, Jian; Xiao, Zhiyan; Chen, Ruoyun; Shen, Zhufang

    2016-07-01

    To find aldose reductase inhibitors, two previously unreported compounds, grandifolias H and I, and five known compounds, including rosmarinic acid and rosmarinic acid derivatives, were isolated from the roots of Salvia grandifolia. A series of rosmarinic acid derivatives was obtained from rosmarinic acid using simple synthetic methods. The aldose reductase inhibitory activity of the isolated and synthesized compounds was assessed. Seven of the tested compounds showed moderate aldose reductase inhibition (IC50=0.06-0.30μM). The structure-activity relationship of aldose reductase inhibitory activity of rosmarinic acid derivatives was discussed for the first time. This study provided useful information that will facilitate the development of aldose reductase inhibitors. PMID:27233987

  17. Biochemical and antitumor activity of trimidox, a new inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed

    Szekeres, T; Gharehbaghi, K; Fritzer, M; Woody, M; Srivastava, A; van't Riet, B; Jayaram, H N; Elford, H L

    1994-01-01

    Trimidox (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzamidoxime), a newly synthesized analog of didox (N,3,4-trihydroxybenzamide) reduced the activity of ribonucleotide reductase (EC 1.17.4.1) in extracts of L1210 cells by 50% (50% growth-inhibitory concentration, IC50) at 5 microM, whereas hydroxyurea, the only ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor in clinical use, exhibited an IC50 of 500 microM. Ribonucleotide reductase activity was also measured in situ by incubating L1210 cells for 24 h with trimidox at 7.5 microM, a concentration that inhibits cell proliferation by 50% (IC50) or at 100 microM for 2 h; these concentrations resulted in a decrease in enzyme activity to 22% and 50% of the control value, respectively. Trimidox and hydroxyurea were cytotoxic to L1210 cells with IC50 values of 7.5 and 50 microM, respectively. Versus ribonucleotide reductase, trimidox and hydroxyurea yielded IC50 values of 12 and 87 microM, respectively. A dose-dependent increase in life span was observed in mice bearing intraperitoneally transplanted L1210 tumors. Trimidox treatment (200 mg/kg; q1dx9) significantly increased the life span of mice bearing L1210 leukemia (by 82% in male mice and 112% in female mice). The anti-tumor activity appeared more pronounced in female mice than in male mice. Viewed in concert, these findings suggest that trimidox is a new and potent inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase and that it is a promising candidate for the chemotherapy of cancer in humans. PMID:8174204

  18. Regulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase activity in mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Angelin, B

    1988-01-01

    The lipoprotein-mediated regulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-(HMG-) CoA reductase in cultured mouse peritoneal macrophages has been investigated. In contrast to what has been reported for other cells, HMG-CoA reductase activity is not suppressed by normal serum or by normal low density lipoproteins (LDL) from humans or dogs. Suppression of reductase activity occurred when cells were cultured in the presence of beta-migrating very low density lipoproteins (beta-VLDL) or LDL from hypercholesterolaemic dogs, or LDL modified by acetoacetylation. Human beta-VLDL from an atypical type III hyperlipoproteinaemic patient was also effective, as was apolipoprotein (apo) E-containing high density lipoproteins (HDL) from cholesterol-fed dogs (apo-E HDLc). The results indicate that cholesterol biosynthesis in mouse peritoneal macrophages is regulated by lipoprotein cholesterol entering via receptor-mediated endocytosis. Normal LDL were not effective because of the poor binding and uptake of these lipoproteins by the apo-B, E (LDL) receptor. Only beta-VLDL, apo-E HDLc, and hypercholesterolaemic LDL were avidly taken up by this receptor and were able to suppress HMG-CoA reductase. Acetoacetylated LDL were internalized via the acetyl-LDL (scavenger) receptor. Thus, mouse macrophages differ from human fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells in their physiological regulation of cholesterogenesis. PMID:3202831

  19. Posttranslational regulation of nitrogenase in Rhodospirillum rubrum strains overexpressing the regulatory enzymes dinitrogenase reductase ADP-ribosyltransferase and dinitrogenase reductase activating glycohydrolase.

    PubMed Central

    Grunwald, S K; Lies, D P; Roberts, G P; Ludden, P W

    1995-01-01

    Rhodospirillum rubrum strains that overexpress the enzymes involved in posttranslational nitrogenase regulation, dinitrogenase reductase ADP-ribosyltransferase (DRAT) and dinitrogenase reductase activating glycohydrolase (DRAG), were constructed, and the effect of this overexpression on in vivo DRAT and DRAG regulation was investigated. Broad-host-range plasmid constructs containing a fusion of the R. rubrum nifH promoter and translation initiation sequences to the second codon of draT, the first gene of the dra operon, were constructed. Overexpression plasmid constructs which overexpressed (i) only functional DRAT, (ii) only functional DRAG and presumably the putative downstream open reading frame (ORF)-encoded protein, or (iii) all three proteins were generated and introduced into wild-type R. rubrum. Overexpression of DRAT still allowed proper regulation of nitrogenase activity, with ADP-ribosylation of dinitrogenase reductase by DRAT occurring only upon dark or ammonium stimuli, suggesting that DRAT is still regulated upon overexpression. However, overexpression of DRAG and the downstream ORF altered nitrogenase regulation such that dinitrogenase reductase did not accumulate in the ADP-ribosylated form under inactivation conditions, suggesting that DRAG was constitutively active and that therefore DRAG regulation is altered upon overexpression. Proper DRAG regulation was observed in a strain overexpressing DRAT, DRAG, and the downstream ORF, suggesting that a proper balance of DRAT and DRAG levels is required for proper DRAG regulation. PMID:7836296

  20. Compensatory periplasmic nitrate reductase activity supports anaerobic growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 in the absence of membrane nitrate reductase.

    PubMed

    Van Alst, Nadine E; Sherrill, Lani A; Iglewski, Barbara H; Haidaris, Constantine G

    2009-10-01

    Nitrate serves as a terminal electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Reduction of nitrate to nitrite generates a transmembrane proton motive force allowing ATP synthesis and anaerobic growth. The inner membrane-bound nitrate reductase NarGHI is encoded within the narK1K2GHJI operon, and the periplasmic nitrate reductase NapAB is encoded within the napEFDABC operon. The roles of the 2 dissimilatory nitrate reductases in anaerobic growth, and the regulation of their expressions, were examined by use of a set of deletion mutants in P. aeruginosa PAO1. NarGHI mutants were unable to grow anaerobically, but plate cultures remained viable up to 120 h. In contrast, the nitrate sensor-response regulator mutant DeltanarXL displayed growth arrest initially, but resumed growth after 72 h and reached the early stationary phase in liquid culture after 120 h. Genetic, transcriptional, and biochemical studies demonstrated that anaerobic growth recovery by the NarXL mutant was the result of NapAB periplasmic nitrate reductase expression. A novel transcriptional start site for napEFDABC expression was identified in the NarXL mutant grown anaerobically. Furthermore, mutagenesis of a consensus NarL-binding site monomer upstream of the novel transcriptional start site restored anaerobic growth recovery in the NarXL mutant. The data suggest that during anaerobic growth of wild-type P. aeruginosa PAO1, the nitrate response regulator NarL directly represses expression of periplasmic nitrate reductase, while inducing maximal expression of membrane nitrate reductase. PMID:19935885

  1. MYC Phosphorylation, Activation, and Tumorigenic Potential in Hepatocellular Carcinoma are Regulated by HMG-CoA Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhongwei; Fan-Minogue, Hua; Bellovin, David I.; Yevtodiyenko, Aleksey; Arzeno, Julia; Yang, Qiwei; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Felsher, Dean W.

    2011-01-01

    MYC is a potential target for many cancers but is not amenable to existing pharmacological approaches. Inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase by statins has shown potential efficacy against a number of cancers. Here, we demonstrate that inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase by atorvastatin blocks both MYC phosphorylation and activation, suppressing tumor initiation and growth in vivo in a transgenic model of MYC-induced HCC as well as in human HCC-derived cell lines. To confirm specificity, we show that the anti-tumor effects of atorvastatin are blocked by co-treatment with the HMG-CoA reductase product, Mevalonate. Moreover, by using a novel molecular imaging sensor, we confirm that inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase blocks MYC phosphorylation in vivo. Importantly, the introduction of phosphorylation mutants of MYC at Ser62 or Thr58 into tumors blocks their sensitivity to inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase. Finally, we demonstrate that inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase suppresses MYC phosphorylation through Rac GTPase. Therefore, HMG-CoA reductase is a critical regulator of MYC phosphorylation, activation, and tumorigenic properties. The inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase may be a useful target for the treatment of MYC-associated HCC as well as other tumors. PMID:21262914

  2. Immobilization of mercuric reductase from a pseudomonas putida strain on different activated carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Anspach, F.B.; Hueckel, M.; Brunke, M.

    1994-02-01

    Mercuric reductase was isolated from Pseudomonas putida KT2442::mer-73 and immobilized on chromatographic carriers activated by various methods. The immobilization methods for covalent coupling were compared with regard to preservation of enzymatic activity and coupling yields. Highest yields were obtained with carriers bearing the most reactive functional groups. Best results were achieved with tresyl chloride-activated carriers. The optimum binding conditions were found at pH 8. Application of the immobilized mercuric reductase for continuous treatment of Hg(II)-containing water was examined in a fixed bed reactor. Space-time yields up to 510 nmol/min{center_dot}mL were attained. The kinetics of immobilized enzyme systems were not diffusion-controlled. 22 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Ferric reductase activity in Azotobacter vinelandii and its inhibition by Zn2+.

    PubMed

    Huyer, M; Page, W J

    1989-07-01

    Ferric reductase activity was examined in Azotobacter vinelandii and was found to be located in the cytoplasm. The specific activities of soluble cell extracts were not affected by the iron concentration of the growth medium; however, activity was inhibited by the presence of Zn2+ during cell growth and also by the addition of Zn2+ to the enzyme assays. Intracellular Fe2+ levels were lower and siderophore production was increased in Zn2+-grown cells. The ferric reductase was active under aerobic conditions, had an optimal pH of approximately 7.5, and required flavin mononucleotide and Mg2+ for maximum activity. The enzyme utilized NADH to reduce iron supplied as a variety of iron chelates, including the ferrisiderophores of A. vinelandii. The enzyme was purified by conventional protein purification techniques, and the final preparation consisted of two major proteins with molecular weights of 44,600 and 69,000. The apparent Km values of the ferric reductase for Fe3+ (supplied as ferric citrate) and NADH were 10 and 15.8 microM, respectively, and the data for the enzyme reaction were consistent with Ping Pong Bi Bi kinetics. The approximate Ki values resulting from inhibition of the enzyme by Zn2+, which was a hyperbolic (partial) mixed-type inhibitor, were 25 microM with respect to iron and 1.7 microM with respect to NADH. These results suggested that ferric reductase activity may have a regulatory role in the processes of iron assimilation in A. vinelandii. PMID:2525550

  4. Regulating the nitrite reductase activity of myoglobin by redesigning the heme active center.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei-Bin; Yuan, Hong; Gao, Shu-Qin; You, Yong; Nie, Chang-Ming; Wen, Ge-Bo; Lin, Ying-Wu; Tan, Xiangshi

    2016-07-01

    Heme proteins perform diverse functions in living systems, of which nitrite reductase (NIR) activity receives much attention recently. In this study, to better understand the structural elements responsible for the NIR activity, we used myoglobin (Mb) as a model heme protein and redesigned the heme active center, by introducing one or two distal histidines, and by creating a channel to the heme center with removal of the native distal His64 gate (His to Ala mutation). UV-Vis kinetic studies, combined with EPR studies, showed that a single distal histidine with a suitable position to the heme iron, i.e., His43, is crucial for nitrite (NO2(-)) to nitric oxide (NO) reduction. Moreover, creation of a water channel to the heme center significantly enhanced the NIR activity compared to the corresponding mutant without the channel. In addition, X-ray crystallographic studies of F43H/H64A Mb and its complexes with NO2(-) or NO revealed a unique hydrogen-bonding network in the heme active center, as well as unique substrate and product binding models, providing valuable structural information for the enhanced NIR activity. These findings enriched our understanding of the structure and NIR activity relationship of heme proteins. The approach of creating a channel in this study is also useful for rational design of other functional heme proteins. PMID:27108710

  5. The Desulfuromonas acetoxidans Triheme Cytochrome c7 Produced in Desulfovibrio desulfuricans Retains Its Metal Reductase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Aubert, Corinne; Lojou, Elisabeth; Bianco, Pierre; Rousset, Marc; Durand, Marie-Claire; Bruschi, Mireille; Dolla, Alain

    1998-01-01

    Multiheme cytochrome c proteins that belong to class III have been recently shown to exhibit a metal reductase activity, which could be of great environmental interest, especially in metal bioremediation. To get a better understanding of these activities, the gene encoding cytochrome c7 from the sulfur-reducing bacterium Desulfuromonas acetoxidans was cloned from genomic DNA by PCR and expressed in Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G201. The expression system was based on the cyc transcription unit from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and led to the synthesis of holocytochrome c7 when transferred by electrotransformation into the sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G201. The produced cytochrome was indistinguishable from the protein purified from Desulfuromonas acetoxidans cells with respect to several biochemical and biophysical criteria and exhibited the same metal reductase activities as determined from electrochemical experiments. This suggests that the molecule was correctly folded in the host organism. Desulfovibrio desulfuricans produces functional multiheme c-type cytochromes from bacteria belonging to a different genus and may be considered a suitable host for the heterologous biogenesis of multiheme c-type cytochromes for either structural or engineering studies. This report, which presents the first example of the transformation of a Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strain by electrotransformation, describes work that is the first necessary step of a protein engineering program that aims to specify the structural features that are responsible for the metal reductase activities of multiheme cytochrome c7. PMID:9546165

  6. Mineral supplementation increases erythrose reductase activity in erythritol biosynthesis from glycerol by Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewska, Ludwika; Rymowicz, Waldemar; Rywińska, Anita

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of divalent copper, iron, manganese, and zinc ions on the production of erythritol from glycerol by Yarrowia lipolytica and their effect on the activity of erythrose reductase. No inhibitory effect of the examined minerals on yeast growth was observed in the study. Supplementation with MnSO4 · 7H2O (25 mg l(-1)) increased erythritol production by Y. lipolytica by 14.5%. In the bioreactor culture with manganese ion addition, 47.1 g l(-1) of erythritol was produced from 100.0 g l(-1) of glycerol, which corresponded to volumetric productivity of 0.87 g l(-1) h(-1). The addition of Mn(2+) enhanced the intracellular activity of erythrose reductase up to 24.9 U g(-1) of dry weight of biomass (DW), hence, about 1.3 times more than in the control. PMID:24488778

  7. 5-alpha reductase inhibitors in patients on active surveillance: do the benefits outweigh the risk?

    PubMed

    Al Edwan, Ghazi; Fleshner, Neil

    2013-06-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is a slow, progressive disease. Prostate specific antigen testing, screening, and aggressive case identification has made PCa the most frequently diagnosed cancer. Concerns regarding overdiagnosis and overtreatment flourish on a large scale. In order to avoid overtreatment for those in whom therapeutic intervention is not required, active surveillance for eligible patients with the use of 5-alpha reductase can be considered a safe and a promising approach to delay the progression of the disease with minimal side effects. PMID:23579402

  8. Molecular cloning, expression and catalytic activity of a human AKR7 member of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily: evidence that the major 2-carboxybenzaldehyde reductase from human liver is a homologue of rat aflatoxin B1-aldehyde reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Ireland, L S; Harrison, D J; Neal, G E; Hayes, J D

    1998-01-01

    The masking of charged amino or carboxy groups by N-phthalidylation and O-phthalidylation has been used to improve the absorption of many drugs, including ampicillin and 5-fluorouracil. Following absorption of such prodrugs, the phthalidyl group is hydrolysed to release 2-carboxybenzaldehyde (2-CBA) and the pharmaceutically active compound; in humans, 2-CBA is further metabolized to 2-hydroxymethylbenzoic acid by reduction of the aldehyde group. In the present work, the enzyme responsible for the reduction of 2-CBA in humans is identified as a homologue of rat aflatoxin B1-aldehyde reductase (rAFAR). This novel human aldo-keto reductase (AKR) has been cloned from a liver cDNA library, and together with the rat protein, establishes the AKR7 family of the AKR superfamily. Unlike its rat homologue, human AFAR (hAFAR) appears to be constitutively expressed in human liver, and is widely expressed in extrahepatic tissues. The deduced human and rat protein sequences share 78% identity and 87% similarity. Although the two AKR7 proteins are predicted to possess distinct secondary structural features which distinguish them from the prototypic AKR1 family of AKRs, the catalytic- and NADPH-binding residues appear to be conserved in both families. Certain of the predicted structural features of the AKR7 family members are shared with the AKR6 beta-subunits of voltage-gated K+-channels. In addition to reducing the dialdehydic form of aflatoxin B1-8,9-dihydrodiol, hAFAR shows high affinity for the gamma-aminobutyric acid metabolite succinic semialdehyde (SSA) which is structurally related to 2-CBA, suggesting that hAFAR could function as both a SSA reductase and a 2-CBA reductase in vivo. This hypothesis is supported in part by the finding that the major peak of 2-CBA reductase activity in human liver co-purifies with hAFAR protein. PMID:9576847

  9. Studies on the nitrate reductase activities of the fruit and the source leaf in pepper

    SciTech Connect

    Achhireddy, N.R.; Beevers, L.; Fletcher, J.S.

    1983-12-01

    Nitrate reductase (NR) activity (NO/sub 2//sup -/ produced in the dark and under anaerobic conditions) of 30-day-old fruit of Capsicum annuum L. was 2.2% that in tissues of a single leaf adjacent to each fruit (33 vs. 1500 nmoles/hr-g fresh weight). The optimal NR activity in one source leaf could only account for about 17% of the fruit's total nitrogen accumulation, while the fruit's own NR activity was almost negligible. Covered and uncovered fruits did not differ significantly in NR activities. 19 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  10. Distinguishing two groups of flavin reductases by analyzing the protonation state of an active site carboxylic acid.

    PubMed

    Dumit, Verónica I; Cortez, Néstor; Matthias Ullmann, G

    2011-07-01

    Flavin-containing reductases are involved in a wide variety of physiological reactions such as photosynthesis, nitric oxide synthesis, and detoxification of foreign compounds, including therapeutic drugs. Ferredoxin-NADP(H)-reductase (FNR) is the prototypical enzyme of this family. The fold of this protein is highly conserved and occurs as one domain of several multidomain enzymes such as the members of the diflavin reductase family. The enzymes of this family have emerged as fusion of a FNR and a flavodoxin. Although the active sites of these enzymes are very similar, different enzymes function in opposite directions, that is, some reduce oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP(+)) and some oxidize reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH). In this work, we analyze the protonation behavior of titratable residues of these enzymes through electrostatic calculations. We find that a highly conserved carboxylic acid in the active site shows a different titration behavior in different flavin reductases. This residue is deprotonated in flavin reductases present in plastids, but protonated in bacterial counterparts and in diflavin reductases. The protonation state of the carboxylic acid may also influence substrate binding. The physiological substrate for plastidic enzymes is NADP(+), but it is NADPH for the other mentioned reductases. In this article, we discuss the relevance of the environment of this residue for its protonation and its importance in catalysis. Our results allow to reinterpret and explain experimental data. PMID:21538544

  11. Major peptides from amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus) protein inhibit HMG-CoA reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Soares, Rosana Aparecida Manólio; Mendonça, Simone; de Castro, Luíla Ívini Andrade; Menezes, Amanda Caroline Cardoso Corrêa Carlos; Arêas, José Alfredo Gomes

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the major peptides generated by the in vitro hydrolysis of Amaranthus cruentus protein and to verify the effect of these peptides on the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase), a key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis. A protein isolate was prepared, and an enzymatic hydrolysis that simulated the in vivo digestion of the protein was performed. After hydrolysis, the peptide mixture was filtered through a 3 kDa membrane. The peptide profile of this mixture was determined by reversed phase high performance chromatography (RP-HPLC), and the peptide identification was performed by LC-ESI MS/MS. Three major peptides under 3 kDa were detected, corresponding to more than 90% of the peptides of similar size produced by enzymatic hydrolysis. The sequences identified were GGV, IVG or LVG and VGVI or VGVL. These peptides had not yet been described for amaranth protein nor are they present in known sequences of amaranth grain protein, except LVG, which can be found in amaranth α‑amylase. Their ability to inhibit the activity of HMG-CoA reductase was determined, and we found that the sequences GGV, IVG, and VGVL, significantly inhibited this enzyme, suggesting a possible hypocholesterolemic effect. PMID:25690031

  12. Major Peptides from Amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus) Protein Inhibit HMG-CoA Reductase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Rosana Aparecida Manólio; Mendonça, Simone; de Castro, Luíla Ívini Andrade; Menezes, Amanda Caroline Cardoso Corrêa Carlos; Arêas, José Alfredo Gomes

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the major peptides generated by the in vitro hydrolysis of Amaranthus cruentus protein and to verify the effect of these peptides on the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase), a key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis. A protein isolate was prepared, and an enzymatic hydrolysis that simulated the in vivo digestion of the protein was performed. After hydrolysis, the peptide mixture was filtered through a 3 kDa membrane. The peptide profile of this mixture was determined by reversed phase high performance chromatography (RP-HPLC), and the peptide identification was performed by LC-ESI MS/MS. Three major peptides under 3 kDa were detected, corresponding to more than 90% of the peptides of similar size produced by enzymatic hydrolysis. The sequences identified were GGV, IVG or LVG and VGVI or VGVL. These peptides had not yet been described for amaranth protein nor are they present in known sequences of amaranth grain protein, except LVG, which can be found in amaranth α‑amylase. Their ability to inhibit the activity of HMG-CoA reductase was determined, and we found that the sequences GGV, IVG, and VGVL, significantly inhibited this enzyme, suggesting a possible hypocholesterolemic effect. PMID:25690031

  13. Novel prenylated bichalcone and chalcone from Humulus lupulus and their quinone reductase induction activities.

    PubMed

    Yu, Liyan; Zhang, Fuxian; Hu, Zhijuan; Ding, Hui; Tang, Huifang; Ma, Zhongjun; Zhao, Xiaofeng

    2014-03-01

    A new prenylated chalcone xanthohumol M (1), a novel prenylated bichalcone humulusol (2) and six known chalcones (3-8) were found from Humulus lupulus. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic methods. All the chalcones' electrophilic abilities were assessed by GSH (glutathione) rapid screening, and their QR (quinone reductase) induction activities were evaluated using hepa 1c1c7 cells. The results of electrophilic assay and QR induction activity assay were quite well. New compounds 1 and 2, along with some known prenylated chalcones, displayed certain QR induction activity. PMID:24397993

  14. A genetic screen reveals a periplasmic copper chaperone required for nitrite reductase activity in pathogenic Neisseria.

    PubMed

    Jen, Freda E-C; Djoko, Karrera Y; Bent, Stephen J; Day, Christopher J; McEwan, Alastair G; Jennings, Michael P

    2015-09-01

    Under conditions of low oxygen availability, Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are able to respire via a partial denitrification pathway in which nitrite is converted to nitrous oxide. In this process, nitrite reductase (AniA), a copper (Cu)-containing protein converts nitrite to NO, and this product is converted to nitrous oxide by nitric oxide reductase (NorB). NorB also confers protection against toxic NO, and so we devised a conditional lethal screen, using a norB mutant, to identify mutants that were resistant to nitrite-dependent killing. After random-deletion mutagenesis of N. meningitidis, this genetic screen identified a gene encoding a Cu chaperone that is essential for AniA function, AccA. Purified AccA binds one Cu (I) ion and also possesses a second binding site for Cu (II). This novel periplasmic Cu chaperone (AccA) appears to be essential for provision of Cu ions to AniA of pathogenic Neisseria to generate an active nitrite reductase. Apart from the Neisseria genus, AccA is distributed across a wide range of environmental Proteobacteria species. PMID:26031293

  15. Aldose Reductase Inhibitory Activity of Compounds from  Zea mays L.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Hyeon; Kim, Jin Kyu; Kang, Young-Hee; Lee, Jae-Yong; Kang, Il Jun; Lim, Soon Sung

    2013-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AR) inhibitors have a considerable therapeutic potential against diabetes complications and do not increase the risk of hypoglycemia. Through bioassay-guided fractionation of an EtOH extract of the kernel from purple corn (Zea mays L.), 7 nonanthocyanin phenolic compounds (compound 1–7) and 5 anthocyanins (compound 8–12) were isolated. These compounds were investigated by rat lens aldose reductase (RLAR) inhibitory assays. Kinetic analyses of recombinant human aldose reductase (rhAR) were performed, and intracellular galactitol levels were measured. Hirsutrin, one of 12 isolated compounds, showed the most potent RLAR inhibitory activity (IC50, 4.78 μM). In the kinetic analyses using Lineweaver-Burk plots of 1/velocity and 1/substrate concentration, hirsutrin showed competitive inhibition against rhAR. Furthermore, hirsutrin inhibited galactitol formation in rat lens and erythrocytes sample incubated with a high concentration of galactose; this finding indicates that hirsutrin may effectively prevent osmotic stress in hyperglycemia. Therefore, hirsutrin derived from Zea mays L. may be a potential therapeutic agent against diabetes complications. PMID:23586057

  16. Azo-reductase activated budesodine prodrugs for colon targeting.

    PubMed

    Marquez Ruiz, Juan F; Kedziora, Kinga; O'Reilly, Mary; Maguire, Jacqueline; Keogh, Brian; Windle, Henry; Kelleher, Dermot P; Gilmer, John F

    2012-12-15

    Budesodine is a synthetic glurocorticoid that undergoes substantial first pass metabolism, limiting systemic exposure. Its use in treatment of inflammatory bowel disease would benefit from a targeting strategy that could lead to a local topical effect, improving safety and increasing anti-inflammatory efficacy. A two-step prodrug strategy involving azoreduction/cyclization that we developed previously for prednisolone is here applied with some variations to budesonide. The budesodine prodrugs were tested using an in vitro azoreductase assay simulating human colonic microflora. The kinetics of amino steroid ester cyclization and its pH dependence was also evaluated. The stability of the prodrugs systems in simulated human duodenal and gastric fluid was evaluated to determine the likelihood of intact intestinal transit. The propionic acid derived prodrug 3 undergoes rapid activation by Clostridium perfingens and its putative reduction product cyclizes with acceptable rapidity when synthesized independently. These properties of 3 suggest that it has potential in management of ulcerative colitis. PMID:23122819

  17. Differential cytochrome content and reductase activity in Geospirillum barnesii strain SeS3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stolz, J.F.; Gugliuzza, T.; Switzer, Blum J.; Oremland, R.; Martinez, Murillo F.

    1997-01-01

    The protein composition, cytochrome content, and reductase activity in the dissimilatory selenate-reducing bacterium Geospirillum barnesii strain SeS3, grown with thiosulfate, nitrate, selenate, or fumarate as the terminal electron acceptor, was investigated. Comparison of seven high-molecular-mass membrane proteins (105.3, 90.3, 82.6, 70.2, 67.4, 61.1, and 57.3 kDa) by SDS-PAGE showed that their detection was dependent on the terminal electron acceptor used. Membrane fractions from cells grown on thiosulfate contained a 70.2-kDa c-type cytochrome with absorbance maxima at 552, 522, and 421 nm. A 61.1-kDa c-type cytochrome with absorption maxima at 552, 523, and 423 nm was seen in membrane fractions from cells grown on nitrate. No c-type cytochromes were detected in membrane fractions of either selenate- or fumarate-grown cells. Difference spectra, however, revealed the presence of a cytochrome b554 (absorption maxima at 554, 523, and 422 nm) in membrane fractions from selenate-grown cells and a cytochrome b556 (absorption maxima at 556, 520, and 416 nm) in membrane fractions from fumarate-grown cells. Analysis of reductase activity in the different membrane fractions showed variability in substrate specificity. However, enzyme activity was greatest for the substrate on which the cells had been grown (e.g., membranes from nitrate-grown cells exhibited the greatest activity with nitrate). These results show that protein composition, cytochrome content, and reductase activity are dependent on the terminal electron acceptor used for growth.

  18. Key Residues Regulating the Reductase Activity of the Human Mitochondrial Apoptosis Inducing Factor.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Raquel; Ferreira, Patricia; Marcuello, Carlos; Usón, Alejandro; Miramar, M Dolores; Peleato, M Luisa; Lostao, Anabel; Susin, Santos A; Medina, Milagros

    2015-08-25

    The human Apoptosis Inducing Factor (hAIF) is a bifunctional NAD(P)H-dependent flavoreductase involved in both mitochondrial energy metabolism and caspase-independent cell death. Even though several studies indicate that both functions are redox controlled by NADH binding, the exact role of hAIF as a reductase in healthy mitochondria remains unknown. Upon reduction by NADH, hAIF dimerizes and produces very stable flavin/nicotinamide charge transfer complexes (CTC), by stacking of the oxidized nicotinamide moiety of the NAD(+) coenzyme against the re-face of the reduced flavin ring of its FAD cofactor. Such complexes are critical to restrict the hAIF efficiency as a reductase. The molecular basis of the hAIF reductase activity is here investigated by analyzing the role played by residues contributing to the interaction of the FAD isoalloxazine ring and of the nicotinamide moiety of NADH at the active site. Mutations at K177 and E314 produced drastic effects on the hAIF ability to retain the FAD cofactor, indicating that these residues are important to set up the holo-enzyme active site conformation. Characterization of P173G hAIF indicates that the stacking of P173 against the isoalloxazine ring is relevant to determine the flavin environment and to modulate the enzyme affinity for NADH. Finally, the properties of the F310G and H454S hAIF mutants indicate that these two positions contribute to form a compact active site essential for NADH binding, CTC stabilization, and NAD(+) affinity for the reduced state of hAIF. These features are key determinants of the particular behavior of hAIF as a NADH-dependent oxidoreductase. PMID:26237213

  19. Osmolarity and glucose differentially regulate aldose reductase activity in cultured mouse podocytes.

    PubMed

    Lewko, Barbara; Latawiec, Elżbieta; Maryn, Anna; Barczyńska, Anna; Pikuła, Michał; Zieliński, Maciej; Rybczyńska, Apolonia

    2011-01-01

    Podocyte injury is associated with progression of many renal diseases, including diabetic nephropathy. In this study we examined whether aldose reductase (AR), the enzyme implicated in diabetic complications in different tissues, is modulated by high glucose and osmolarity in podocyte cells. AR mRNA, protein expression, and activity were measured in mouse podocytes cultured in both normal and high glucose and osmolarity for 6 hours to 5 days. Hyperosmolarity acutely stimulated AR expression and activity, with subsequent increase of AR expression but decrease of activity. High glucose also elevated AR protein level; however, this was not accompanied by respective enzyme activation. Furthermore, high glucose appeared to counteract the osmolarity-dependent activation of AR. In conclusion, in podocytes AR is modulated by high glucose and increased osmolarity in a different manner. Posttranslational events may affect AR activity independent of enzyme protein amount. Activation of AR in podocytes may be implicated in diabetic podocytopathy. PMID:22253613

  20. Quinone Reductase 2 Is a Catechol Quinone Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yue; Buryanovskyy, Leonid; Zhang, Zhongtao

    2008-09-05

    The functions of quinone reductase 2 have eluded researchers for decades even though a genetic polymorphism is associated with various neurological disorders. Employing enzymatic studies using adrenochrome as a substrate, we show that quinone reductase 2 is specific for the reduction of adrenochrome, whereas quinone reductase 1 shows no activity. We also solved the crystal structure of quinone reductase 2 in complexes with dopamine and adrenochrome, two compounds that are structurally related to catecholamine quinones. Detailed structural analyses delineate the mechanism of quinone reductase 2 specificity toward catechol quinones in comparison with quinone reductase 1; a side-chain rotational difference between quinone reductase 1 and quinone reductase 2 of a single residue, phenylalanine 106, determines the specificity of enzymatic activities. These results infer functional differences between two homologous enzymes and indicate that quinone reductase 2 could play important roles in the regulation of catecholamine oxidation processes that may be involved in the etiology of Parkinson disease.

  1. Conversion of NfsA, the Major Escherichia coli Nitroreductase, to a Flavin Reductase with an Activity Similar to That of Frp, a Flavin Reductase in Vibrio harveyi, by a Single Amino Acid Substitution

    PubMed Central

    Zenno, Shuhei; Kobori, Toshiro; Tanokura, Masaru; Saigo, Kaoru

    1998-01-01

    NfsA is the major oxygen-insensitive nitroreductase of Escherichia coli, similar in amino acid sequence to Frp, a flavin reductase of Vibrio harveyi. Here, we show that a single amino acid substitution at position 99, which may destroy three hydrogen bonds in the putative active center, transforms NfsA from a nitroreductase into a flavin reductase that is as active as the authentic Frp and a tartrazine reductase that is 30-fold more active than wild-type NfsA. PMID:9440535

  2. Adventitious Arsenate Reductase Activity of the Catalytic Domain of the Human Cdc25B and Cdc25C Phosphatases†

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Hiranmoy; Sheng, Ju; Ajees, A. Abdul; Mukhopadhyay, Rita; Rosen, Barry P.

    2013-01-01

    A number of eukaryotic enzymes that function as arsenate reductases are homologues of the catalytic domain of the human Cdc25 phosphatase. For example, the Leishmania major enzyme LmACR2 is both a phosphatase and an arsenate reductase, and its structure bears similarity to the structure of the catalytic domain of human Cdc25 phosphatase. These reductases contain an active site C-X5-R signature motif, where C is the catalytic cysteine, the five X residues form a phosphate binding loop, and R is a highly conserved arginine, which is also present in human Cdc25 phosphatases. We therefore investigated the possibility that the three human Cdc25 isoforms might have adventitious arsenate reductase activity. The sequences for the catalytic domains of Cdc25A, -B, and -C were cloned individually into a prokaryotic expression vector, and their gene products were purified from a bacterial host using nickel affinity chromatography. While each of the three Cdc25 catalytic domains exhibited phosphatase activity, arsenate reductase activity was observed only with Cdc25B and -C. These two enzymes reduced inorganic arsenate but not methylated pentavalent arsenicals. Alteration of either the cysteine and arginine residues of the Cys-X5-Arg motif led to the loss of both reductase and phosphatase activities. Our observations suggest that Cdc25B and -C may adventitiously reduce arsenate to the more toxic arsenite and may also provide a framework for identifying other human protein tyrosine phosphatases containing the active site Cys-X5-Arg loop that might moonlight as arsenate reductases. PMID:20025242

  3. Glyphosate effect on shikimate, nitrate reductase activity, yield, and seed composition in corn.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Krishna N; Bellaloui, Nacer; Zablotowicz, Robert M

    2010-03-24

    When glyphosate is applied to glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops, drift to nonglyphosate-resistant (non-GR) crops may cause significant injury and reduce yields. Tools are needed to quantify injury and predict crop losses. In this study, glyphosate drift was simulated by direct application at 12.5% of the recommended label rate to non-GR corn (Zea mays L.) at 3 or 6 weeks after planting (WAP) during two field seasons in the Mississippi delta region of the southeastern USA. Visual plant injury, shikimate accumulation, nitrate reductase activity, leaf nitrogen, yield, and seed composition were evaluated. Effects were also evaluated in GR corn and GR corn with stacked glufosinate-resistant gene at the recommended label rate at 3 and 6 WAP. Glyphosate at 105 g ae/ha was applied once at 3 or 6 weeks after planting to non-GR corn. Glyphosate at 840 (lower label limit) or 1260 (upper label limit) g ae/ha was applied twice at 3 and 6 WAP to transgenic corn. Glyphosate caused injury (45-55%) and increased shikimate levels (24-86%) in non-GR compared to nontreated corn. In non-GR corn, glyphosate drift did not affect starch content but increased seed protein 8-21% while reducing leaf nitrogen reductase activity 46-64%, leaf nitrogen 7-16%, grain yield 49-54%, and seed oil 18-23%. In GR and GR stacked with glufosinate-resistant corn, glyphosate applied at label rates did not affect corn yield, leaf and seed nitrogen, or seed composition (protein, oil, and starch content). Yet, nitrate reductase activity was reduced 5-19% with glyphosate at 840 + 840 g/ha rate and 8-42% with glyphosate at 1260 + 1260 g/ha rate in both GR and GR stacked corn. These results demonstrate the potential for severe yield loss in non-GR corn exposed to glyphosate drift. PMID:20180575

  4. Nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, glutamine synthetase, and glutamate synthase expression and activity in response to different nitrogen sources in nitrogen-starved wheat seedlings.

    PubMed

    Balotf, Sadegh; Kavoosi, Gholamreza; Kholdebarin, Bahman

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the expression and activity of nitrate reductase (NR, EC 1.7.1.1), nitrite reductase (NiR, EC 1.7.2.2), glutamine synthetase (GS, EC 6.3.1.2), and glutamate synthase (GOGAT, EC 1.4.7.1) in response to potassium nitrate, ammonium chloride, and ammonium nitrate in nitrogen-starved wheat seedlings. Plants were grown in standard nutrient solution for 17 days and then subjected to nitrogen starvation for 7 days. The starved plants were supplied with potassium nitrate ammonium nitrate and ammonium chloride (50 mM) for 4 days and the leaves were harvested. The relative expression of NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT as well as the enzyme activities were investigated. Nitrogen starvation caused a significant decrease both in transcript levels and in NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT activities. Potassium nitrate and ammonium nitrate treatments restored NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT expressions and activities. Ammonium chloride increased only the expressions and activities of GS and GOGAT in a dose-dependent manner. The results of our study highlight the differential effects between the type and the amount of nitrogen salts on NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT activities in wheat seedlings while potassium nitrate being more effective. PMID:25676153

  5. Human castration resistant prostate cancer rather prefer to decreased 5α-reductase activity

    PubMed Central

    Kosaka, Takeo; Miyajima, Akira; Nagata, Hirohiko; Maeda, Takahiro; Kikuchi, Eiji; Oya, Mototsugu

    2013-01-01

    Physiologically relevant steroid 5α-reductase (SRD5A) activity that is essential for dihydrotestosterone (DHT) biosynthesis in human castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) has not been fully characterized yet. In this study to ascertain the potential SRD5A activity, we cultured two human CRPC cell lines, C4-2 and C4-2AT6, with the steroid precursor: 13C-[2,3,4]-androstenedione (13C-Adione), and analyzed the sequential biosynthesis of 13C-[2,3,4]-testosterone (13C-T) and 13C-[2,3,4]-DHT (13C-DHT) by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). The 13C-DHT/13C-T concentration ratio detected by LC/MS/MS in C4-2AT6 cells appeared to reflect the SRD5A activity. The ratio in C4-2AT6 was significantly lower than that in C4-2. An increased concentration of DHT did not have a positive effect on cell proliferation, rather it exhibited inhibitory effects. 5α-reductase inhibitors did not have any inhibitory effect at clinically achievable concentrations. These results indicate that CRPC cells may have an unknown regulation system to protect themselves from an androgenic suppressive effect mediated by SRD5A activity. PMID:23429215

  6. The inhibitory activity of aldose reductase in vitro by constituents of Garcinia mangostana Linn.

    PubMed

    Fatmawati, Sri; Ersam, Taslim; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2015-01-15

    We investigated aldose reductase inhibition of Garcinia mangostana Linn. from Indonesia. Dichloromethane extract of the root bark of this tree was found to demonstrate an IC50 value of 11.98 µg/ml for human aldose reductase in vitro. From the dichloromethane fraction, prenylated xanthones were isolated as potent human aldose reductase inhibitors. We discovered 3-isomangostin to be most potent against aldose reductase, with an IC50 of 3.48 µM. PMID:25636870

  7. Physicochemical nature of interfaces controlling ferredoxin NADP(+) reductase activity through its interprotein interactions with ferredoxin.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Misaki; Kim, Ju Yaen; Kume, Satoshi; Sakakibara, Yukiko; Sugiki, Toshihiko; Kojima, Chojiro; Kurisu, Genji; Ikegami, Takahisa; Hase, Toshiharu; Kimata-Ariga, Yoko; Lee, Young-Ho

    2015-10-01

    Although acidic residues of ferredoxin (Fd) are known to be essential for activities of various Fd-dependent enzymes, including ferredoxin NADP(+) reductase (FNR) and sulfite reductase (SiR), through electrostatic interactions with basic residues of partner enzymes, non-electrostatic contributions such as hydrophobic forces remain largely unknown. We herein demonstrated that intermolecular hydrophobic and charge-charge interactions between Fd and enzymes were both critical for enzymatic activity. Systematic site-directed mutagenesis, which altered physicochemical properties of residues on the interfaces of Fd for FNR /SiR, revealed various changes in activities of both enzymes. The replacement of serine 43 of Fd to a hydrophobic residue (S43W) and charged residue (S43D) increased and decreased FNR activity, respectively, while S43W showed significantly lower SiR activity without affecting SiR activity by S43D, suggesting that hydrophobic and electrostatic interprotein forces affected FNR activity. Enzyme kinetics revealed that changes in FNR activity by mutating Fd correlated with Km, but not with kcat or activation energy, indicating that interprotein interactions determined FNR activity. Calorimetry-based binding thermodynamics between Fd and FNR showed different binding modes of FNR to wild-type, S43W, or S43D, which were controlled by enthalpy and entropy, as shown by the driving force plot. Residue-based NMR spectroscopy of (15)N FNR with Fds also revealed distinct binding modes of each complex based on different directions of NMR peak shifts with similar overall chemical shift differences. We proposed that subtle adjustments in both hydrophobic and electrostatic forces were critical for enzymatic activity, and these results may be applicable to protein-based electron transfer systems. PMID:26087388

  8. Ultrafast ligand binding dynamics in the active site of native bacterial nitric oxide reductase.

    PubMed

    Kapetanaki, Sofia M; Field, Sarah J; Hughes, Ross J L; Watmough, Nicholas J; Liebl, Ursula; Vos, Marten H

    2008-01-01

    The active site of nitric oxide reductase from Paracoccus denitrificans contains heme and non-heme iron and is evolutionarily related to heme-copper oxidases. The CO and NO dynamics in the active site were investigated using ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy. We find that, upon photodissociation from the active site heme, 20% of the CO rebinds in 170 ps, suggesting that not all the CO transiently binds to the non-heme iron. The remaining 80% does not rebind within 4 ns and likely migrates out of the active site without transient binding to the non-heme iron. Rebinding of NO to ferrous heme takes place in approximately 13 ps. Our results reveal that heme-ligand recombination in this enzyme is considerably faster than in heme-copper oxidases and are consistent with a more confined configuration of the active site. PMID:18420024

  9. Arabidopsis nitrate reductase activity is stimulated by the E3 SUMO ligase AtSIZ1

    PubMed Central

    Park, Bong Soo; Song, Jong Tae; Seo, Hak Soo

    2011-01-01

    Small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) is a small polypeptide that modulates protein activity and regulates hormone signalling, abiotic and biotic responses in plants. Here we show that AtSIZ regulates nitrogen assimilation in Arabidopsis through its E3 SUMO ligase function. Dwarf plants of siz1-2 flower early, show abnormal seed development and have high salicylic acid content and enhanced resistance to bacterial pathogens. These mutant phenotypes are reverted to wild-type phenotypes by exogenous ammonium but not by nitrate, phosphate or potassium. Decreased nitrate reductase activity in siz1-2 plants resulted in low nitrogen concentrations, low nitric oxide production and high nitrate content in comparison with wild-type plants. The nitrate reductases, NIA1 and NIA2, are sumoylated by AtSIZ1, which dramatically increases their activity. Both sumoylated and non-sumoylated NIA1 and NIA2 can form dimers. Our results indicate that AtSIZ1 positively controls nitrogen assimilation by promoting sumoylation of NRs in Arabidopsis. PMID:21772271

  10. Inducible chromate reductase exhibiting extracellular activity in Bacillus methylotrophicus for chromium bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Sandana Mala, John Geraldine; Sujatha, Dhanasingh; Rose, Chellan

    2015-01-01

    Chromium toxicity is one of the major causes of environmental pollution due to its heavy discharge in industrial wastewaters. Chromate reduction is a viable method to detoxify hexavalent chromium to nontoxic trivalent species mediated by enzymes and metabolites. A new Bacillus methylotrophicus strain was isolated from tannery sludge and was an efficient candidate for chromate reduction. An initial chromate reductase activity of 212.84 U/mg protein was obtained at 48 h in a low-cost defined medium formulation with 0.25 mM chromate. The extracellular enzyme was inducible at 12h substrate addition with 312.99 U/mg at 48 h. Reduced glutathione was required for enhanced specific activity of 356.48 U/mg. Enzyme activity was optimum at pH 7.0 and at 30 °C, and was stable in the presence of EDTA, DTT and metal ions. The enzyme exhibited a Vmax of 59.89 μM/min/mg protein and a Km of 86.5 μM, suggesting feasibility of the reaction with K₂Cr₂O₇ as substrate. Application of the crude reductase in tannery effluent resulted in 91.3% chromate reduction at 48 h. An enzyme-mediated chromate reduction process has therefore been developed for bioremediation of toxic chromium sp. in industrial effluents. PMID:24985094

  11. Arabidopsis nitrate reductase activity is stimulated by the E3 SUMO ligase AtSIZ1.

    PubMed

    Park, Bong Soo; Song, Jong Tae; Seo, Hak Soo

    2011-01-01

    Small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) is a small polypeptide that modulates protein activity and regulates hormone signalling, abiotic and biotic responses in plants. Here we show that AtSIZ regulates nitrogen assimilation in Arabidopsis through its E3 SUMO ligase function. Dwarf plants of siz1-2 flower early, show abnormal seed development and have high salicylic acid content and enhanced resistance to bacterial pathogens. These mutant phenotypes are reverted to wild-type phenotypes by exogenous ammonium but not by nitrate, phosphate or potassium. Decreased nitrate reductase activity in siz1-2 plants resulted in low nitrogen concentrations, low nitric oxide production and high nitrate content in comparison with wild-type plants. The nitrate reductases, NIA1 and NIA2, are sumoylated by AtSIZ1, which dramatically increases their activity. Both sumoylated and non-sumoylated NIA1 and NIA2 can form dimers. Our results indicate that AtSIZ1 positively controls nitrogen assimilation by promoting sumoylation of NRs in Arabidopsis. PMID:21772271

  12. Response to Arsenate Treatment in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and the Role of Its Arsenate Reductase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Matia-González, Ana M.; Sotelo, Jael; Zarco-Fernández, Sonia; Muñoz-Olivas, Riansares; Cámara, Carmen; Rodríguez-Gabriel, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic toxicity has been studied for a long time due to its effects in humans. Although epidemiological studies have demonstrated multiple effects in human physiology, there are many open questions about the cellular targets and the mechanisms of response to arsenic. Using the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as model system, we have been able to demonstrate a strong activation of the MAPK Spc1/Sty1 in response to arsenate. This activation is dependent on Wis1 activation and Pyp2 phosphatase inactivation. Using arsenic speciation analysis we have also demonstrated the previously unknown capacity of S. pombe cells to reduce As (V) to As (III). Genetic analysis of several fission yeast mutants point towards the cell cycle phosphatase Cdc25 as a possible candidate to carry out this arsenate reductase activity. We propose that arsenate reduction and intracellular accumulation of arsenite are the key mechanisms of arsenate tolerance in fission yeast. PMID:22912829

  13. Modulation of HMG-CoA reductase activity by pantetheine/pantethine.

    PubMed

    Cighetti, G; Del Puppo, M; Paroni, R; Galli Kienle, M

    1988-11-25

    The ability of pantetheine/pantethine to modulate the activity of HMG-CoA reductase (EC 1.1.1.34) was determined in vitro with rat liver microsomes. The decay of the activity was obtained with pantethine in the 10(-5)-10(-4) M range, whereas stimulation by pantetheine occurred at 10(-3)-10(-2) M, as previously reported for GSSG and GSH, respectively. Inhibition of HMG-CoA by pantethine in isolated liver cells was also investigated by measuring the enzyme activity in microsomes isolated from hepatocytes incubated without or with 1 mM pantethine under conditions previously shown by us to induce inhibition of cholesterol synthesis from acetate. The enzyme amount was not modified by pantethine, but in cells treated with the disulphide, the relative amounts of the thiolic active forms of the enzyme, both phosphorylated and dephosphorylated, were decreased to about half compared to controls. PMID:3196742

  14. Enhanced Xylitol Production by Mutant Kluyveromyces marxianus 36907-FMEL1 Due to Improved Xylose Reductase Activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Seong; Park, Jae-Bum; Jang, Seung-Won; Ha, Suk-Jin

    2015-08-01

    A directed evolution and random mutagenesis were carried out with thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus ATCC 36907 for efficient xylitol production. The final selected strain, K. marxianus 36907-FMEL1, exhibited 120 and 39 % improvements of xylitol concentration and xylitol yield, respectively, as compared to the parental strain, K. marxianus ATCC 36907. According to enzymatic assays for xylose reductase (XR) activities, XR activity from K. marxianus 36907-FMEL1 was around twofold higher than that from the parental strain. Interestingly, the ratios of NADH-linked and NADPH-linked XR activities were highly changed from 1.92 to 1.30 when K. marxianus ATCC 36907 and K. marxianus 36907-FMEL1 were compared. As results of KmXYL1 genes sequencing, it was found that cysteine was substituted to tyrosine at position 36 after strain development which might cause enhanced XR activity from K. marxianus 36907-FMEL1. PMID:26043853

  15. Synthesis of benzothiadiazine derivatives exhibiting dual activity as aldose reductase inhibitors and antioxidant agents.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shaojuan; Hao, Xin; Zhang, Shuzhen; Qin, Xiangyu; Chen, Xin; Zhu, Changjin

    2016-06-15

    Several multifunctional benzothiadiazine derivatives were synthesized and examined for their inhibition to the enzyme aldose reductase and in vitro antioxidant activity to identify novel drugs for diabetes and its complications. Most of them exhibited good inhibitory activity. Importantly, a number of compounds demonstrated strong antioxidant activity and one compound in particular was extremely active in the DPPH radical scavenging and MDA inhibition analysis. The DPPH radical scavenging rate with this compound was 98.0%, 92.3% and 42.1% at concentrations of 100μM, 10μM, and 1μM, respectively, and the initial reaction rate was faster than Trolox at a concentration of 10μM. PMID:27156769

  16. Methionine sulfoxide reductase: chemistry, substrate binding, recycling process and oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Boschi-Muller, Sandrine; Branlant, Guy

    2014-12-01

    Three classes of methionine sulfoxide reductases are known: MsrA and MsrB which are implicated stereo-selectively in the repair of protein oxidized on their methionine residues; and fRMsr, discovered more recently, which binds and reduces selectively free L-Met-R-O. It is now well established that the chemical mechanism of the reductase step passes through formation of a sulfenic acid intermediate. The oxidized catalytic cysteine can then be recycled by either Trx when a recycling cysteine is operative or a reductant like glutathione in the absence of recycling cysteine which is the case for 30% of the MsrBs. Recently, it was shown that a subclass of MsrAs with two recycling cysteines displays an oxidase activity. This reverse activity needs the accumulation of the sulfenic acid intermediate. The present review focuses on recent insights into the catalytic mechanism of action of the Msrs based on kinetic studies, theoretical chemistry investigations and new structural data. Major attention is placed on how the sulfenic acid intermediate can be formed and the oxidized catalytic cysteine returns back to its reduced form. PMID:25108804

  17. Determination of the specific activities of methionine sulfoxide reductase A and B by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Uthus, Eric O

    2010-06-01

    A capillary electrophoresis (CE) method for the determination of methionine sulfoxide reductase A and methionine sulfoxide reductase B activities in mouse liver is described. The method is based on detection of the 4-(dimethylamino)azobenzene-4'-sulfonyl derivative of l-methionine (dabsyl Met), the product of the enzymatic reactions when either dabsyl l-methionine S-sulfoxide or dabsyl l-methionine R-sulfoxide is used as a substrate. The method provides baseline resolution of the substrates and, therefore, can be used to easily determine the purity of the substrates. The method is rapid ( approximately 20min sample to sample), requires no column regeneration, and uses very small amounts of buffers. Separation was performed by using a 75-mum internal diameter polyimide-coated fused silica capillary (no inside coating) with 60cm total length (50cm to the detector window). Samples were separated at 22.5kV, and the separation buffer was 25mM KH(2)PO(4) (pH 8.0) containing 0.9ml of N-lauroylsarcosine (sodium salt, 30% [w/v] solution) per 100ml of buffer. Prior to use, the capillary was conditioned with the same buffer that also contained 25mM sodium dodecyl sulfate. The CE method is compared with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) as determined by comparing results from measurements of hepatic enzyme activities in mice fed either deficient or adequate selenium. PMID:20167203

  18. Consequence of absence of nitrate reductase activity on photosynthesis in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia plants

    SciTech Connect

    Saux, C.; Lemoine, Y.; Marion-Poll, A.; Valadier, M.H.; Deng, M.; Morot-Gaudry, J.F.

    1987-05-01

    Chlorate-resistant Nicotiana plumbaginifolia (cv Viviani) mutants were found to be deficient in the nitrate reductase apoprotein (NR/sup -/ nia). Because they could not grow with nitrate as sole nitrogen source, they were cultivated as graftings on wild-type Nicotiana tabacum plants. The grafts of mutant plants were chlorotic compared to the grafts of wild type. Mutant leaves did not accumulate nitrogen but contained less malate and more glutamine than wild leaves. They exhibited a slight increase of the proportion of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein complexes and a lowering of the efficiency of energy transfer between these complexes and the active centers. After a 3 second /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ pulse, the total /sup 14/C incorporation of the mutant leaves was approximately 20/sup 5/ of that of the control. The /sup 14/C was essentially recovered in ribulose bisphosphate in these plants. It was consistent with a decline of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity observed in the mutant. After a 3 second /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ pulse followed by a 60 second chase with normal CO/sub 2/, /sup 14/C was mainly accumulated in starch which was labeled more in the mutant than in the wild type. These results confirm the observation that in the nitrate reductase deficient leaves, chloroplasts were loaded with large starch inclusions preceding disorganization of the photosynthetic apparatus.

  19. Identification of a Noroxomaritidine Reductase with Amaryllidaceae Alkaloid Biosynthesis Related Activities.

    PubMed

    Kilgore, Matthew B; Holland, Cynthia K; Jez, Joseph M; Kutchan, Toni M

    2016-08-01

    Amaryllidaceae alkaloids are a large group of plant natural products with over 300 documented structures and diverse biological activities. Several groups of Amaryllidaceae alkaloids including the hemanthamine- and crinine-type alkaloids show promise as anticancer agents. Two reduction reactions are required for the production of these compounds: the reduction of norcraugsodine to norbelladine and the reduction of noroxomaritidine to normaritidine, with the enantiomer of noroxomaritidine dictating whether the derivatives will be the crinine-type or hemanthamine-type. It is also possible for the carbon-carbon double bond of noroxomaritidine to be reduced, forming the precursor for maritinamine or elwesine depending on the enantiomer reduced to an oxomaritinamine product. In this study, a short chain alcohol dehydrogenase/reductase that co-expresses with the previously discovered norbelladine 4'-O-methyltransferase from Narcissus sp. and Galanthus spp. was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli Biochemical analyses and x-ray crystallography indicates that this protein functions as a noroxomaritidine reductase that forms oxomaritinamine from noroxomaritidine through a carbon-carbon double bond reduction. The enzyme also reduces norcraugsodine to norbelladine with a 400-fold lower specific activity. These studies identify a missing step in the biosynthesis of this pharmacologically important class of plant natural products. PMID:27252378

  20. Enhanced nitrite reductase activity associated with the haptoglobin complexed hemoglobin dimer: Functional and antioxidative implications

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Camille J.; Dantsker, David; Alayash, Abdu I.; Friedman, Joel M.

    2012-01-01

    The presence of acellular hemoglobin (Hb) within the circulation is generally viewed as a pathological state that can result in toxic consequences. Haptoglobin (Hp), a globular protein found in the plasma, binds with high avidity the αβ dimers derived from the dissociation of Hb tetramer and thus helps clear free Hb. More recently there have been compelling indications that the redox properties of the Hp bound dimer (Hb–Hp) may play a more active role in controlling toxicity by limiting the potential tissue damage caused by propagation of the free-radicals generated within the heme containing globin chains. The present study further examines the potential protective effect of Hp through its impact on the production of nitric oxide (NO) from nitrite through nitrite reductase activity of the Hp bound αβ Hb dimer. The presented results show that the Hb dimer in the Hb–Hp complex has oxygen binding, CO recombination and spectroscopic properties consistent with an Hb species having properties similar to but not exactly the same as the R quaternary state of the Hb tetramer. Consistent with these observations is the finding that the initial nitrite reductase rate for Hb–Hp is approximately ten times that of HbA under the same conditions. These results in conjunction with the earlier redox properties of the Hb–Hp are discussed in terms of limiting the pathophysiological consequences of acellular Hb in the circulation. PMID:22521791

  1. Membrane composition influences the activity of in vitro refolded human vitamin K epoxide reductase.

    PubMed

    Jaenecke, Frank; Friedrich-Epler, Beatrice; Parthier, Christoph; Stubbs, Milton T

    2015-10-27

    Human vitamin K epoxide reductase (hVKOR) is an integral membrane protein responsible for the maintenance of reduced vitamin K pools, a prerequisite for the action of γ-glutamyl carboxylase and hence for hemostasis. Here we describe the recombinant expression of hVKOR as an insoluble fusion protein in Escherichia coli, followed by purification and chemical cleavage under denaturing conditions. In vitro renaturation and reconstitution of purified solubilized hVKOR in phospholipids could be established to yield active protein. Crucially, the renatured enzyme is inhibited by the powerful coumarin anticoagulant warfarin, and we demonstrate that enzyme activity depends on lipid composition. The completely synthetic system for protein production allows a rational investigation of the multiple variables in membrane protein folding and paves the way for the provision of pure, active membrane protein for structural studies. PMID:26435421

  2. Oxidase, superoxide dismutase, and hydrogen peroxide reductase activities of methanobactin from types I and II methanotrophs.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong W; Semrau, Jeremy D; Antholine, William E; Hartsel, Scott C; Anderson, Ryan C; Carey, Jeffrey N; Dreis, Ashley M; Kenseth, Erik M; Renstrom, Joel M; Scardino, Lori L; Van Gorden, Garrett S; Volkert, Anna A; Wingad, Aaron D; Yanzer, Paul J; McEllistrem, Marcus T; de la Mora, Arlene M; DiSpirito, Alan A

    2008-08-01

    Methanobactin (mb) is a copper-binding chromopeptide that appears to be involved in oxidation of methane by the membrane-associated or particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO). To examine this potential physiological role, the redox and catalytic properties of mb from three different methanotrophs were examined in the absence and presence of O(2). Metal free mb from the type II methanotroph Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, but not from the type I methanotrophs Methylococcus capsulatus Bath or Methylomicrobium album BG8, were reduced by a variety of reductants, including NADH and duroquinol, and catalyzed the reduction of O(2) to O(2)(-). Copper-containing mb (Cu-mb) from all three methanotrophs showed several interesting properties, including reductase dependent oxidase activity, dismutation of O(2)(-) to H(2)O(2), and the reductant dependent reduction of H(2)O(2) to H(2)O. The superoxide dismutase-like and hydrogen peroxide reductase activities of Cu-mb were 4 and 1 order(s) of magnitude higher, respectively, than the observed oxidase activity. The results demonstrate that Cu-mb from all three methanotrophs are redox-active molecules and oxygen radical scavengers, with the capacity to detoxify both superoxide and hydrogen peroxide without the formation of the hydroxyl radicals associated with Fenton reactions. As previously observed with Cu-mb from Ms. trichosporium OB3b, Cu-mb from both type I methanotrophs stimulated pMMO activity. However, in contrast to previous studies using mb from Ms. trichosporium OB3b, pMMO activity was not inhibited by mb from the two type I methanotrophs at low copper to mb ratios. PMID:18372044

  3. Metal complexes with 2-acetylpyridine-N(4)-orthochlorophenylthiosemicarbazone: cytotoxicity and effect on the enzymatic activity of thioredoxin reductase and glutathione reductase.

    PubMed

    Parrilha, Gabrieli L; Ferraz, Karina S O; Lessa, Josane A; de Oliveira, Kely Navakoski; Rodrigues, Bernardo L; Ramos, Jonas P; Souza-Fagundes, Elaine M; Ott, Ingo; Beraldo, Heloisa

    2014-09-12

    Metal complexes with 2-acetylpyridine-N(4)-orthochlorophenylthiosemicarbazone (H2Ac4oClPh) were assayed for their cytotoxicity against MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma and HT-29 colon carcinoma cells. The thiosemicarbazone and most of the complexes were highly cytotoxic. H2Ac4oClPh and its gallium(III) and tin(IV) complexes did not show any inhibitory activity against thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and glutathione reductase (GR). The palladium(II), platinum(II) and bismuth(III) complexes inhibited TrxR at micromolar concentrations but not GR. The antimony(III) and gold(III) complexes strongly inhibited TrxR at submicromolar doses with GR inhibition at higher concentrations. The selectivity of these complexes for TrxR suggests metal binding to a selenol residue in the active site of the enzyme. TrxR inhibition is likely a contributing factor to the mode of action of the gold and antimony derivatives. PMID:25058344

  4. Determination of oenothein B as the active 5-alpha-reductase-inhibiting principle of the folk medicine Epilobium parviflorum.

    PubMed

    Lesuisse, D; Berjonneau, J; Ciot, C; Devaux, P; Doucet, B; Gourvest, J F; Khemis, B; Lang, C; Legrand, R; Lowinski, M; Maquin, P; Parent, A; Schoot, B; Teutsch, G

    1996-05-01

    Several extracts from Epilobium parviflorum, a plant used in Central Europe for the treatment of prostate disorders, were evaluated in a biochemical assay with 5-alpha-reductase. The aqueous extract displaying inhibition of the enzyme was analyzed, the fraction responsible for this activity was purified, and the active compound identified as a macrocyclic tannin, oenothein B (1). PMID:8778238

  5. Xanthones with quinone reductase-inducing activity from the fruits of Garcinia mangostana (Mangosteen).

    PubMed

    Chin, Young-Won; Jung, Hyun-Ah; Chai, Heebyung; Keller, William J; Kinghorn, A Douglas

    2008-02-01

    Bioactivity-guided fractionation of a dichloromethane-soluble extract of Garcinia mangostana fruits has led to the isolation and identification of five compounds, including two xanthones, 1,2-dihydro-1,8,10-trihydroxy-2-(2-hydroxypropan-2-yl)-9-(3-methylbut-2-enyl)furo[3,2-a]xanthen-11-one (1) and 6-deoxy-7-demethylmangostanin (2), along with three known compounds, 1,3,7-trihydroxy-2,8-di-(3-methylbut-2-enyl)xanthone (3), mangostanin (4), and alpha-mangostin (5). The structures of compounds 1 and 2 were determined from analysis of their spectroscopic data. All isolated compounds in the present study together with eleven other compounds previously isolated from the pericarp of mangosteen, were tested in an in vitro quinone reductase-induction assay using murine hepatoma cells (Hepa 1c1c7) and an in vitro hydroxyl radical antioxidant assay. Of these, compounds 1-4 induced quinone reductase (concentration to double enzyme induction, 0.68-2.2microg/mL) in Hepa 1c1c7 cells and gamma-mangostin (6) exhibited hydroxyl radical-scavenging activity (IC50, 0.20microg/mL). PMID:17991497

  6. Esculetin, a Coumarin Derivative, Inhibits Aldose Reductase Activity in vitro and Cataractogenesis in Galactose-Fed Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chan-Sik; Kim, Junghyun; Lee, Yun Mi; Sohn, Eunjin; Kim, Jin Sook

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring coumarin compounds have received substantial attention due to their pharmaceutical effects. Esculetin is a coumarin derivative and a polyphenol compound that is used in a variety of therapeutic and pharmacological strategies. However, its effect on aldose reductase activity remains poorly understood. In this study, the potential beneficial effects of esculetin on lenticular aldose reductase were investigated in galactose-fed (GAL) rats, an animal model of sugar cataracts. Cataracts were induced in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats via a 50% galactose diet for 2 weeks, and groups of GAL rats were orally treated with esculetin (10 or 50 mg/kg body weight). In vehicle-treated GAL rats, lens opacification was observed, and swelling and membrane rupture of the lens fiber cells were increased. Additionally, aldose reductase was highly expressed in the lens epithelium and superficial cortical fibers during cataract development in the GAL rats. Esculetin reduced rat lens aldose reductase (RLAR) activity in vitro, and esculetin treatment significantly inhibited lens opacity, as well as morphological alterations, such as swelling, vacuolation and liquefaction of lens fibers, via the inhibition of aldose reductase in the GAL rats. These results indicate that esculetin is a useful treatment for galactose-induced cataracts. PMID:26902086

  7. Esculetin, a Coumarin Derivative, Inhibits Aldose Reductase Activity in vitro and Cataractogenesis in Galactose-Fed Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chan-Sik; Kim, Junghyun; Lee, Yun Mi; Sohn, Eunjin; Kim, Jin Sook

    2016-03-01

    Naturally occurring coumarin compounds have received substantial attention due to their pharmaceutical effects. Esculetin is a coumarin derivative and a polyphenol compound that is used in a variety of therapeutic and pharmacological strategies. However, its effect on aldose reductase activity remains poorly understood. In this study, the potential beneficialeffects of esculetin on lenticular aldose reductase were investigated in galactose-fed (GAL) rats, an animal model of sugar cataracts. Cataracts were induced in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats via a 50% galactose diet for 2 weeks, and groups of GAL rats were orally treated with esculetin (10 or 50 mg/kg body weight). In vehicle-treated GAL rats, lens opacificationwas observed, and swelling and membrane rupture of the lens fibercells were increased. Additionally, aldose reductase was highly expressed in the lens epithelium and superficialcortical fibersduring cataract development in the GAL rats. Esculetin reduced rat lens aldose reductase (RLAR) activity in vitro, and esculetin treatment significanty inhibited lens opacity, as well as morphological alterations, such as swelling, vacuolation and liquefaction of lens fibers,via the inhibition of aldose reductase in the GAL rats. These results indicate that esculetin is a useful treatment for galactose-induced cataracts. PMID:26902086

  8. Thioredoxin reductase.

    PubMed

    Mustacich, D; Powis, G

    2000-02-15

    The mammalian thioredoxin reductases (TrxRs) are a family of selenium-containing pyridine nucleotide-disulphide oxidoreductases with mechanistic and sequence identity, including a conserved -Cys-Val-Asn-Val-Gly-Cys- redox catalytic site, to glutathione reductases. TrxRs catalyse the NADPH-dependent reduction of the redox protein thioredoxin (Trx), as well as of other endogenous and exogenous compounds. The broad substrate specificity of mammalian TrxRs is due to a second redox-active site, a C-terminal -Cys-SeCys- (where SeCys is selenocysteine), that is not found in glutathione reductase or Escherichia coli TrxR. There are currently two confirmed forms of mammalian TrxRs, TrxR1 and TrxR2, and it is possible that other forms will be identified. The availability of Se is a key factor determining TrxR activity both in cell culture and in vivo, and the mechanism(s) for the incorporation of Se into TrxRs, as well as the regulation of TrxR activity, have only recently begun to be investigated. The importance of Trx to many aspects of cell function make it likely that TrxRs also play a role in protection against oxidant injury, cell growth and transformation, and the recycling of ascorbate from its oxidized form. Since TrxRs are able to reduce a number of substrates other than Trx, it is likely that additional biological effects will be discovered for TrxR. Furthermore, inhibiting TrxR with drugs may lead to new treatments for human diseases such as cancer, AIDS and autoimmune diseases. PMID:10657232

  9. Hexavalent Chromate Reductase Activity in Cell Free Extracts of Penicillium sp.

    PubMed Central

    Arévalo-Rangel, Damaris L.; Cárdenas-González, Juan F.; Martínez-Juárez, Víctor M.; Acosta-Rodríguez, Ismael

    2013-01-01

    A chromium-resistant fungus isolated from contaminated air with industrial vapors can be used for reducing toxic Cr(VI) to Cr(III). This study analyzes in vitro reduction of hexavalent chromium using cell free extract(s) of the fungus that was characterized based on optimal temperature, pH, use of electron donors, metal ions and initial Cr(VI) concentration in the reaction mixture. This showed the highest activity at 37°C and pH 7.0; there is an increase in Cr(VI) reductase activity with addition of NADH as an electron donor, and it was highly inhibited by Hg2+, Ca2+ and Mg2+, and azide, EDTA, and KCN. PMID:24027493

  10. Structural Mechanism of Allosteric Activity Regulation in a Ribonucleotide Reductase with Double ATP Cones.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Renzo; Jonna, Venkateswara Rao; Kumar, Rohit; Nayeri, Niloofar; Lundin, Daniel; Sjöberg, Britt-Marie; Hofer, Anders; Logan, Derek T

    2016-06-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) reduce ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides. Their overall activity is stimulated by ATP and downregulated by dATP via a genetically mobile ATP cone domain mediating the formation of oligomeric complexes with varying quaternary structures. The crystal structure and solution X-ray scattering data of a novel dATP-induced homotetramer of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa class I RNR reveal the structural bases for its unique properties, namely one ATP cone that binds two dATP molecules and a second one that is non-functional, binding no nucleotides. Mutations in the observed tetramer interface ablate oligomerization and dATP-induced inhibition but not the ability to bind dATP. Sequence analysis shows that the novel type of ATP cone may be widespread in RNRs. The present study supports a scenario in which diverse mechanisms for allosteric activity regulation are gained and lost through acquisition and evolutionary erosion of different types of ATP cone. PMID:27133024

  11. Isolation, characterization, and biological activity of ferredoxin-NAD+ reductase from the methane oxidizer Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y P; Yoch, D C

    1989-01-01

    A ferredoxin-NAD+ oxidoreductase (EC 1.18.1.3) has been isolated from extracts of the obligate methanotroph Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. This enzyme was shown to couple electron flow from formate dehydrogenase (NAD+ requiring) to ferredoxin. Ferredoxin-NAD+ reductase was purified to homogeneity by conventional chromatography techniques and was shown to be a flavoprotein with a molecular weight of 36,000 +/- 1,000. This ferredoxin reductase was specific for NADH (Km, 125 microM) and coupled electron flow to the native ferredoxin and to ferredoxins from spinach, Clostridium pasteurianum, and Rhodospirillum rubrum (ferredoxin II). M. trichosporium ferredoxin saturated the ferredoxin-NAD+ reductase at a concentration 2 orders of magnitude lower (3 nM) than did spinach ferredoxin (0.4 microM). Ferredoxin-NAD+ reductase also had transhydrogenase activity which transferred electrons and protons from NADH to thionicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (Km, 9 microM) and from NADPH to 3-acetylpyridine adenine dinucleotide (Km, 16 microM). Reconstitution of a soluble electron transport pathway that coupled formate oxidation to ferredoxin reduction required formate dehydrogenase, NAD+, and ferredoxin-NAD+ reductase. Images PMID:2768195

  12. Regulation of assimilatory nitrate reductase activity in soil by microbial assimilation of ammonium.

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, G W; Bremner, J M

    1992-01-01

    It is well established that assimilatory nitrate reductase (ANR) activity in soil is inhibited by ammonium (NH4+). To elucidate the mechanism of this inhibition, we studied the effect of L-methionine sulfoximine (MSX), an inhibitor of NH4+ assimilation by microorganisms, on assimilatory reduction of nitrate (NO3-) in aerated soil slurries treated with NH4+. We found that NH4+ strongly inhibited ANR activity in these slurries and that MSX eliminated this inhibition. We also found that MSX induced dissimilatory reduction of NO3- to NH4+ in soil and that the NH4+ thus formed had no effect on the rate of NO-3 reduction. We concluded from these observations that the inhibition of ANR activity by NH4+ is due not to NH4+ per se but to products formed by microbial assimilation of NH4+. This conclusion was supported by a study of the effects of early products of NH4+ assimilation (L amino acids) on ANR activity in soil, because this study showed that the biologically active, L isomers of glutamine and asparagine strongly inhibited ANR activity, whereas the D isomers of these amino acids had little effect on ANR activity. Evidence that ANR activity is regulated by the glutamine formed by NH4+ assimilation was provided by studies showing that inhibitors of glutamine metabolism (azaserine, albizziin, and aminooxyacetate) inhibited ANR activity in soil treated with NO3- but did not do so in the presence of MSX. PMID:11607250

  13. Evolutionary origins of retinoid active short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases of SDR16C family.

    PubMed

    Belyaeva, Olga V; Chang, Chenbei; Berlett, Michael C; Kedishvili, Natalia Y

    2015-06-01

    Vertebrate enzymes that belong to the 16C family of short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR16C) were shown to play an essential role in the control of retinoic acid (RA) levels during development. To trace the evolution of enzymatic function of SDR16C family, and to examine the origins of the pathway for RA biosynthesis from vitamin A, we identified putative SDR16C enzymes through the extensive search of available genome sequencing data in a subset of species representing major metazoan phyla. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that enzymes from protostome, non-chordate deuterostome and invertebrate chordate species are found in three clades of SDR16C family containing retinoid active enzymes, which are retinol dehydrogenase 10 (RDH10), retinol dehydrogenases E2 (RDHE2) and RDHE2-similar, and dehydrogenase reductase (SDR family) member 3 (DHRS3). For the initial functional analysis, we cloned RDH10- and RDHE2-related enzymes from the early developmental stages of a non-chordate deuterostome, green sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus, and an invertebrate chordate, sea squirt Ciona intestinalis. In situ hybridization revealed that these proteins are expressed in a pattern relevant to development, while assays performed on proteins expressed in mammalian cell culture showed that they possess retinol-oxidizing activity as their vertebrate homologs. The existence of invertebrate homologs of DHRS3 was inferred from the analysis of phylogeny and cofactor-binding residues characteristic of preference for NADP(H). The presence of invertebrate homologs in the DHRS3 group of SDR16C is interesting in light of the complex mutually activating interaction, which we have recently described for human RDH10 and DHRS3 enzymes. Further functional analysis of these homologs will establish whether this interaction evolved to control retinoid homeostasis only in vertebrates, or is also conserved in pre-vertebrates. PMID:25451586

  14. Effect of Pharmaceutical Potential Endocrine Disruptor Compounds on Protein Disulfide Isomerase Reductase Activity Using Di-Eosin-Oxidized-Glutathion

    PubMed Central

    Klett, Danièle; Cahoreau, Claire; Villeret, Mélanie; Combarnous, Yves

    2010-01-01

    Background Protein Disulfide Isomerase (PDI) in the endoplasmic reticulum of all cells catalyzes the rearrangement of disulfide bridges during folding of membrane and secreted proteins. As PDI is also known to bind various molecules including hormones such as estradiol and thyroxin, we considered the hypothesis that adverse effects of endocrine-disrupter compounds (EDC) could be mediated through their interaction with PDI leading to defects in membrane or secreted proteins. Methodology/Principal Findings Taking advantage of the recent description of the fluorescence self quenched substrate di-eosin-oxidized-glutathion (DiE-GSSG), we determined kinetically the effects of various potential pharmaceutical EDCs on the in-vitro reductase activity of bovine liver PDI by measuring the fluorescence of the reaction product (E-GSH). Our data show that estrogens (ethynylestradiol and bisphenol-A) as well as indomethacin exert an inhibition whereas medroxyprogesteroneacetate and nortestosterone exert a potentiation of bovine PDI reductase activity. Conclusions The present data indicate that the tested EDCs could not only affect endocrine target cells through nuclear receptors as previously shown, but could also affect these and all other cells by positively or negatively affecting PDI activity. The substrate DiE-GSSG has been demonstrated to be a convenient substrate to measure PDI reductase activity in the presence of various potential EDCs. It will certainely be usefull for the screening of potential effect of all kinds of chemicals on PDI reductase activity. PMID:20209080

  15. From Alcohol Dehydrogenase to a “One-way” Carbonyl Reductase by Active-site Redesign

    PubMed Central

    Klimacek, Mario; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    Directional preference in catalysis is often used to distinguish alcohol dehydrogenases from carbonyl reductases. However, the mechanistic basis underpinning this discrimination is weak. In mannitol 2-dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas fluorescens, stabilization of (partial) negative charge on the substrate oxyanion by the side chains of Asn-191 and Asn-300 is a key feature of catalysis in the direction of alcohol oxidation. We have disrupted this ability through individual and combined substitutions of the two asparagines by aspartic acid. Kinetic data and their thermodynamic analysis show that the internal equilibrium of enzyme-NADH-fructose and enzyme-NAD+-mannitol (Kint) was altered dramatically (104- to 105-fold) from being balanced in the wild-type enzyme (Kint ≈ 3) to favoring enzyme-NAD+-mannitol in the single site mutants, N191D and N300D. The change in Kint reflects a selective slowing down of the mannitol oxidation rate, resulting because Asn → Asp replacement (i) disfavors partial abstraction of alcohol proton by Lys-295 in a step preceding catalytic hydride transfer, and (ii) causes stabilization of a nonproductive enzyme-NAD+-mannitol complex. N191D and N300D appear to lose fructose binding affinity due to deprotonation of the respective Asp above apparent pK values of 5.3 ± 0.1 and 6.3 ± 0.2, respectively. The mutant incorporating both Asn→Asp substitutions behaved as a slow “fructose reductase” at pH 5.2, lacking measurable activity for mannitol oxidation in the pH range 6.8–10. A mechanism is suggested in which polarization of the substrate carbonyl by a doubly protonated diad of Asp and Lys-295 facilitates NADH-dependent reduction of fructose by N191D and N300D under optimum pH conditions. Creation of an effectively “one-way” reductase by active-site redesign of a parent dehydrogenase has not been previously reported and holds promise in the development of carbonyl reductases for application in organic synthesis. PMID:20639204

  16. Methionine sulfoxide reductase regulates brain catechol-O-methyl transferase activity.

    PubMed

    Moskovitz, Jackob; Walss-Bass, Consuelo; Cruz, Dianne A; Thompson, Peter M; Bortolato, Marco

    2014-10-01

    Catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) plays a key role in the degradation of brain dopamine (DA). Specifically, low COMT activity results in higher DA levels in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), thereby reducing the vulnerability for attentional and cognitive deficits in both psychotic and healthy individuals. COMT activity is markedly reduced by a non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) that generates a valine-to-methionine substitution on the residue 108/158, by means of as-yet incompletely understood post-translational mechanisms. One post-translational modification is methionine sulfoxide, which can be reduced by the methionine sulfoxide reductase (Msr) A and B enzymes. We used recombinant COMT proteins (Val/Met108) and mice (wild-type (WT) and MsrA knockout) to determine the effect of methionine oxidation on COMT activity and COMT interaction with Msr, through a combination of enzymatic activity and Western blot assays. Recombinant COMT activity is positively regulated by MsrA, especially under oxidative conditions, whereas brains of MsrA knockout mice exhibited lower COMT activity (as compared with their WT counterparts). These results suggest that COMT activity may be reduced by methionine oxidation, and point to Msr as a key molecular determinant for the modulation of COMT activity in the brain. The role of Msr in modulating cognitive functions in healthy individuals and schizophrenia patients is yet to be determined. PMID:24735585

  17. Utilization of iron-catecholamine complexes involving ferric reductase activity in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Coulanges, V; Andre, P; Ziegler, O; Buchheit, L; Vidon, D J

    1997-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous potentially pathogenic organism requiring iron for growth and virulence. Although it does not produce siderophores, L. monocytogenes is able to obtain iron by using either exogenous siderophores produced by various microorganisms or natural catechol compounds widespread in the environment. In the presence of tropolone, an iron-chelating agent, growth of L. monocytogenes is completely inhibited. However, the growth inhibition can be relieved by the addition of dopamine or norepinephrine under their different isomeric forms, while the catecholamine derivatives 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenylglycol and normetanephrine did not relieve the inhibitory effect of tropolone. Preincubation of L. monocytogenes with chlorpromazine and yohimbine did not antagonize the growth-promoting effect of catecholamines in iron-complexed medium. In addition, norepinephrine stimulated the growth-promoting effect induced by human transferrin in iron-limited medium. Furthermore, dopamine and norepinephrine allowed 55Fe uptake by iron-deprived bacterial cells. The uptake of iron was energy dependent, as indicated by inhibition of 55Fe uptake at 0 degrees C as well as by preincubating the bacteria with KCN. Inhibition of 55Fe uptake by L. monocytogenes was also observed in the presence of Pt(II). Moreover, when assessed by a whole-cell ferric reductase assay, reductase activity of L. monocytogenes was inhibited by Pt(II). These data demonstrate that dopamine and norepinephrine can function as siderophore-like compounds in L. monocytogenes owing to their ortho-diphenol function and that catecholamine-mediated iron acquisition does not involve specific catecholamine receptors but acts through a cell-bound ferrireductase activity. PMID:9199450

  18. Growth, photosynthesis, nitrogen partitioning and responses to CO2 enrichment in barley mutants lacking NADH-dependent nitrate reductase activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined plant growth, photosynthesis and leaf constituents of both the wild type (WT) and two mutant lines of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Steptoe) with defects in NADH-dependent nitrate reductase (NADH-NAR) activity. The first mutant, nar1, had a lesion within the NAR structural gene and the...

  19. The Thiol Reductase Activity of YUCCA6 Mediates Delayed Leaf Senescence by Regulating Genes Involved in Auxin Redistribution.

    PubMed

    Cha, Joon-Yung; Kim, Mi R; Jung, In J; Kang, Sun B; Park, Hee J; Kim, Min G; Yun, Dae-Jin; Kim, Woe-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Auxin, a phytohormone that affects almost every aspect of plant growth and development, is biosynthesized from tryptophan via the tryptamine, indole-3-acetamide, indole-3-pyruvic acid, and indole-3-acetaldoxime pathways. YUCCAs (YUCs), flavin monooxygenase enzymes, catalyze the conversion of indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPA) to the auxin (indole acetic acid). Arabidopsis thaliana YUC6 also exhibits thiol-reductase and chaperone activity in vitro; these activities require the highly conserved Cys-85 and are essential for scavenging of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the drought tolerance response. Here, we examined whether the YUC6 thiol reductase activity also participates in the delay in senescence observed in YUC6-overexpressing (YUC6-OX) plants. YUC6 overexpression delays leaf senescence in natural and dark-induced senescence conditions by reducing the expression of SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED GENE 12 (SAG12). ROS accumulation normally occurs during senescence, but was not observed in the leaves of YUC6-OX plants; however, ROS accumulation was observed in YUC6-OX(C85S) plants, which overexpress a mutant YUC6 that lacks thiol reductase activity. We also found that YUC6-OX plants, but not YUC6-OX(C85S) plants, show upregulation of three genes encoding NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductases (NTRA, NTRB, and NTRC), and GAMMA-GLUTAMYLCYSTEINE SYNTHETASE 1 (GSH1), encoding an enzyme involved in redox signaling. We further determined that excess ROS accumulation caused by methyl viologen treatment or decreased glutathione levels caused by buthionine sulfoximine treatment can decrease the levels of auxin efflux proteins such as PIN2-4. The expression of PINs is also reduced in YUC6-OX plants. These findings suggest that the thiol reductase activity of YUC6 may play an essential role in delaying senescence via the activation of genes involved in redox signaling and auxin availability. PMID:27242830

  20. The Thiol Reductase Activity of YUCCA6 Mediates Delayed Leaf Senescence by Regulating Genes Involved in Auxin Redistribution

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Joon-Yung; Kim, Mi R.; Jung, In J.; Kang, Sun B.; Park, Hee J.; Kim, Min G.; Yun, Dae-Jin; Kim, Woe-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Auxin, a phytohormone that affects almost every aspect of plant growth and development, is biosynthesized from tryptophan via the tryptamine, indole-3-acetamide, indole-3-pyruvic acid, and indole-3-acetaldoxime pathways. YUCCAs (YUCs), flavin monooxygenase enzymes, catalyze the conversion of indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPA) to the auxin (indole acetic acid). Arabidopsis thaliana YUC6 also exhibits thiol-reductase and chaperone activity in vitro; these activities require the highly conserved Cys-85 and are essential for scavenging of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the drought tolerance response. Here, we examined whether the YUC6 thiol reductase activity also participates in the delay in senescence observed in YUC6-overexpressing (YUC6-OX) plants. YUC6 overexpression delays leaf senescence in natural and dark-induced senescence conditions by reducing the expression of SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED GENE 12 (SAG12). ROS accumulation normally occurs during senescence, but was not observed in the leaves of YUC6-OX plants; however, ROS accumulation was observed in YUC6-OXC85S plants, which overexpress a mutant YUC6 that lacks thiol reductase activity. We also found that YUC6-OX plants, but not YUC6-OXC85S plants, show upregulation of three genes encoding NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductases (NTRA, NTRB, and NTRC), and GAMMA-GLUTAMYLCYSTEINE SYNTHETASE 1 (GSH1), encoding an enzyme involved in redox signaling. We further determined that excess ROS accumulation caused by methyl viologen treatment or decreased glutathione levels caused by buthionine sulfoximine treatment can decrease the levels of auxin efflux proteins such as PIN2-4. The expression of PINs is also reduced in YUC6-OX plants. These findings suggest that the thiol reductase activity of YUC6 may play an essential role in delaying senescence via the activation of genes involved in redox signaling and auxin availability. PMID:27242830

  1. Activities of nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase in rice seedlings during cyanide metabolism.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-Zhang; Zhang, Fu-Zhong

    2012-07-30

    A study was conducted to investigate activities of nitrate reductase (NR) and glutamine synthetase (GS) in plants during cyanide metabolism. Young rice seedlings (Oryza sativa L. cv. XZX 45) were grown in the nutrient solutions containing KNO(3) or NH(4)Cl and treated with free cyanide (KCN). Cyanide in solutions and in plant materials was analyzed to estimate the phyto-assimilation potential. Activities of NR and GS in different parts of rice seedlings were assayed in vivo. Seedlings grown on NH(4)(+) showed significantly higher relative growth rate than those on NO(3)(-) (p<0.05) in the presence of exogenous cyanide. The metabolic rates of cyanide by seedlings were all positively correlated to the concentrations supplied. A negligible difference was observed between the two treatments with nitrate and ammonium (p>0.05). Enzymatic assays showed that cyanide (≥0.97mg CN L(-1)) impaired NR activity significantly in both roots and shoots (p<0.05). The effect of cyanide on GS activity in roots was more evident at 1.93mg CN L(-1), suggesting that NR activity was more susceptible to change from cyanide application than GS activity. The results observed here suggest that the exogenous cyanide, which to a certain level has a beneficial role in plant nutrition. PMID:22633925

  2. Human biliverdin reductase, a previously unknown activator of protein kinase C betaII.

    PubMed

    Maines, Mahin D; Miralem, Tihomir; Lerner-Marmarosh, Nicole; Shen, Jenny; Gibbs, Peter E M

    2007-03-16

    Human biliverdin reductase (hBVR), a dual specificity kinase (Ser/Thr/Tyr) is, as protein kinase C (PKC) betaII, activated by insulin and free radicals (Miralem, T., Hu, Z., Torno, M. D., Lelli, K. M., and Maines, M. D. (2005) J. Biol. Chem. 280, 17084-17092; Lerner-Marmarosh, N., Shen, J., Torno, M. D., Kravets, A., Hu, Z., and Maines, M. D. (2005) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 102, 7109-7114). Here, by using 293A cells co-transfected with pcDNA3-hBVR and PKC betaII plasmids, we report the co-immunoprecipitation of the proteins and co-purification in the glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown assay. hBVR and PKC betaII, but not the reductase and PKC zeta, transphosphorylated in assay systems supportive of activity of only one of the kinases. PKC betaII K371R mutant protein ("kinase-dead") was also a substrate for hBVR. The reductase increased the Vmax but not the apparent Km values of PKC betaII for myelin basic protein; activation was independent of phospholipids and extended to the phosphorylation of S2, a PKC-specific substrate. The increase in substrate phosphorylation was blocked by specific inhibitors of conventional PKCs and attenuated by sihBVR. The effect of the latter could be rescued by subsequent overexpression of hBVR. To a large extent, the activation was a function of the hBVR N-terminal chain of valines and intact ATP-binding site and the cysteine-rich C-terminal segment. The cobalt protoporphyrin-activated hBVR phosphorylated a threonine in a peptide corresponding to the Thr500 in the human PKC betaII activation loop. Neither serine nor threonine residues in peptides corresponding to other phosphorylation sites of the PKC betaII nor PKC zeta activation loop-derived peptides were substrates. The phosphorylation of Thr500 was confirmed by immunoblotting of hBVR.PKC betaII immunocomplex. The potential biological relevance of the hBVR activation of PKC betaII was suggested by the finding that in cells transfected with the PKC betaII, h

  3. An ene reductase from Clavispora lusitaniae for asymmetric reduction of activated alkenes.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yan; Yu, Hui-Lei; Lin, Guo-Qiang; Xu, Jian-He

    2014-03-01

    A putative ene reductase gene from Clavispora lusitaniae was heterologously overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the encoded protein (ClER) was purified and characterized for its biocatalytic properties. This NADPH-dependent flavoprotein was identified with reduction activities toward a diverse range of activated alkenes including conjugated enones, enals, maleimide derivative and α,β-unsaturated carboxylic esters. The purified ClER exhibited a relatively high activity of 7.3 U mg(prot)⁻¹ for ketoisophorone while a remarkable catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)=810 s⁻¹ mM⁻¹) was obtained for 2-methyl-cinnamaldehyde due to the high affinity. A series of prochiral activated alkenes were stereoselectively reduced by ClER furnishing the corresponding saturated products in up to 99% ee. The practical applicability of ClER was further evaluated for the production of (R)-levodione, a valuable chiral compound, from ketoisophorone. Using the crude enzyme of ClER and glucose dehydrogenase (GDH), 500 mM of ketoisophorone was efficiently converted to (R)-levodione with excellent stereoselectivity (98% ee) within 1h. All these positive features demonstrate a high synthetic potential of ClER in the asymmetric reduction of activated alkenes. PMID:24564901

  4. Periplasmic nitrate reductase and formate dehydrogenase: similar molecular architectures with very different enzymatic activities.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Nuno M F S A; Gonzalez, Pablo J; Fernandes, Pedro A; Moura, José J G; Ramos, Maria João

    2015-11-17

    It is remarkable how nature has been able to construct enzymes that, despite sharing many similarities, have simple but key differences that tune them for completely different functions in living cells. Periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) and formate dehydrogenase (Fdh) from the DMSOr family are representative examples of this. Both enzymes share almost identical three-dimensional protein foldings and active sites, in terms of coordination number, geometry and nature of the ligands. The substrates of both enzymes (nitrate and formate) are polyatomic anions that also share similar charge and stereochemistry. In terms of the catalytic mechanism, both enzymes have a common activation mechanism (the sulfur-shift mechanism) that ensures a constant coordination number around the metal ion during the catalytic cycle. In spite of these similarities, they catalyze very different reactions: Nap abstracts an oxygen atom from nitrate releasing nitrite, whereas FdH catalyzes a hydrogen atom transfer from formate and releases carbon dioxide. In this Account, a critical analysis of structure, function, and catalytic mechanism of the molybdenum enzymes periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) and formate dehydrogenase (Fdh) is presented. We conclude that the main structural driving force that dictates the type of reaction, catalyzed by each enzyme, is a key difference on one active site residue that is located in the top region of the active sites of both enzymes. In both enzymes, the active site is centered on the metal ion of the cofactor (Mo in Nap and Mo or W in Fdh) that is coordinated by four sulfur atoms from two pyranopterin guanosine dinucleotide (PGD) molecules and by a sulfido. However, while in Nap there is a Cys directly coordinated to the Mo ion, in FdH there is a SeCys instead. In Fdh there is also an important His that interacts very closely with the SeCys, whereas in Nap the same position is occupied by a Met. The role of Cys in Nap and SeCys in FdH is similar in both

  5. Induction of quinone reductase activity by stilbene analogs in mouse Hepa 1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Heo, Y H; Kim, S; Park, J E; Jeong, L S; Lee, S K

    2001-12-01

    Based on the potential cancer chemopreventive activity of resveratrol, a trihydroxystilbene with the induction of quinone reductase activity, this study was designed to determine if stilbene-related compounds were inducers of phase II detoxifying metabolic enzyme quinone reductase (QR) in the mouse hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cells. Among the thirteen compounds tested, several compounds including 3,4,5,3',5'-pentamethoxy-trans-stilbene were found to potentially induce QR activity in this cell line. In addition, substitution with 3-thiofurane ring instead of phenyl ring in the stilbene skeleton also exhibited potential induction of QR activity. This result will give primary information to design the potential inducers of QR activity in the stilbene analogs. PMID:11794542

  6. Inhibitory effects of Zingiber officinale Roscoe derived components on aldose reductase activity in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kato, Atsushi; Higuchi, Yasuko; Goto, Hirozo; Kizu, Haruhisa; Okamoto, Tadashi; Asano, Naoki; Hollinshead, Jackie; Nash, Robert J; Adachi, Isao

    2006-09-01

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) continues to be used as an important cooking spice and herbal medicine around the world. Scientific research has gradually verified the antidiabetic effects of ginger. Especially gingerols, which are the major components of ginger, are known to improve diabetes including the effect of enhancement against insulin-sensitivity. Aldose reductase inhibitors have considerable potential for the treatment of diabetes, without increased risk of hypoglycemia. The assay for aldose reductase inhibitors in ginger led to the isolation of five active compounds including 2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)ethanol (2) and 2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)ethanoic acid (3). Compounds 2 and 3 were good inhibitors of recombinant human aldose reductase, with IC50 values of 19.2 +/- 1.9 and 18.5 +/- 1.1 microM, respectively. Furthermore, these compounds significantly suppressed not only sorbitol accumulation in human erythrocytes but also lens galactitol accumulation in 30% of galactose-fed cataract rat model. A structure-activity relationship study revealed that the applicable side alkyl chain length and the presence of a C3 OCH3 group in the aromatic ring are essential features for enzyme recognition and binding. These results suggested that it would contribute to the protection against or improvement of diabetic complications for a dietary supplement of ginger or its extract containing aldose reductase inhibitors. PMID:16939321

  7. Activity landscape analysis of novel 5[Formula: see text]-reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Naveja, J Jesús; Cortés-Benítez, Francisco; Bratoeff, Eugene; Medina-Franco, José L

    2016-08-01

    Inhibitors of the enzyme 5[Formula: see text]-reductase (5aR) are promising therapeutic agents for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer. The lack of structural data of the enzyme 5aR prompts the application of ligand-based approaches to systematically explore the activity landscape of 5aR inhibitors. As part of an effort to develop inhibitors of this enzyme for the treatment of BPH, herein we discuss a chemoinformatic-based analysis of the activity landscape of a novel set of 53 novel pregnane and androstene compounds. It was found that, in general, for each pair of compounds in the set, as the structure similarity of the compounds increases the corresponding potency difference decreases. These results are in agreement with an overall smooth activity landscape. However, two potent activity cliff generators were identified pointing to specific small structural changes that have a large impact on the inhibition of 5aR. PMID:26829939

  8. Annual pattern of nitrate reductase activity in needles of high-elevation red spruce trees

    SciTech Connect

    Tjoelker, M.G.; Norby, R.J. ); DiCosty, R.J. ); Weerasuriya, Y. )

    1989-04-01

    To assess the ability of foliar nitrate reductase (NR) as a biochemical marker for the impact of nitrogen oxide pollutants on high-elevation forests, we measured needle NR activity in red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) saplings at two stands in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (1,935 m, 1,720 m). Seven times between September 1987 and 1988, branches were cut from selected saplings, and NR activity was assayed on current-year needles, using an in vivo method. NR activity increased to maximum values of 60 nmol g{sup {minus}1} h{sup {minus}1} in late summer of both years and then declined by 85 percent in October 1987 and 65 percent in September 1988. Although NR activity was 30 percent great in red spruce at the high site relative to the low site in September and October 1987, NR activity dropped to 10 nmol g{sup {minus}1} h{sup {minus}1} at both sites in November 1987. No difference between the sites were evident in 1988. The seasonal pattern of needle NR activity at these sites may be due to ontogenetic changes in needle N metabolism and/or extrinsic variation in temperature or nitrogen oxide deposition. Characterization of nitrogen oxide pollutant levels and exposure episodes at high-elevation sites may aid in assessing seasonal and site variation in NR activity and the likelihood of needle NR induction by uptake of nitrogen oxides. These measurements of NR activity indicate that red spruce are capable of reducing nitrate in foliage under field conditions and that the nitrate assimilation capacity varies seasonally.

  9. Differential thioredoxin reductase activity from human normal hepatic and hepatoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Jung, Haeng-Im; Lim, Hye-Won; Kim, Byung-Chul; Park, Eun-Hee; Lim, Chang-Jin

    2004-04-30

    Thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), a component of the thioredoxin system, including thioredoxin (Trx) and NADPH, catalyzes the transfer of electrons from NADPH to Trx, acts as a reductant of disulfide-containing proteins and participates in the defense system against oxidative stresses. In this study, the regulation pattern of TrxR in the presence of various stressful reagents was compared between Chang (human normal hepatic cell) and HepG2 (human hepatoma cell) cell lines. Aluminum chloride (0.5 mM) and zinc chloride (0.5 mM) enhanced the TrxR activity in the Chang cell line to a higher degree than in the HepG2 cell line, but cupric chloride (0.2 mM) and cadmium chloride (0.1 mM) enhanced the TrxR activity in the HepG2 cell line to a greater degree. The TrxR activities in both Chang and HepG2 cell lines were similarly induced by treatment with sodium selenite (0.02 mM) and menadione (0.5 and 1.0 mM). Lipopolysaccharide (2 micro g/m1) increased the TrxR activity upto 4.02- and 2.2-fold in the Chang and HepG2 cell lines, respectively, in time-dependent manners. Hydrogen peroxide (5 mM) markedly enhanced the TrxR activity in the HepG2 cell line, but not in the Chang cell line. NO-generating sodium nitroprusside (3.0 and 6.0 mM) induced TrxR activities in both human liver cell lines. The TrxR activity was also induced in human liver cells under limited growth conditions by serum deprivation. These results imply that the TrxR activities in normal hepatic and hepatoma cell lines are subject to different regulatory responses to various stresses. PMID:15118998

  10. Bioactive fraction of Saraca indica prevents diabetes induced cataractogenesis: An aldose reductase inhibitory activity

    PubMed Central

    Somani, Gauresh; Sathaye, Sadhana

    2015-01-01

    Background: The present study was designed to investigate the effect of Saraca indica (SI) flowers extract and different bioactive fraction on in vitro aldose reductase (AR) inhibitory activity, high glucose-induced cataract in goat lens and in vivo streptozotocin (STZ; 45 mg/kg, i.p) induced cataract in rats. Methods: Extract of flowers of SI tested for inhibition against rat lens AR. Furthermore, bioactive fraction was investigated against high glucose-induced opacification of the lens in vitro lens culture and STZ induced diabetic cataract in rats. Identification of the bioactive component was attempted through high-performance thin-layer chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Results: Ethyl acetate fraction of S. indica (EASI) produced maximum inhibition that may be due to high phenolic content. Goat lenses in media containing glucose developed a distinctly opaque ring in 72 h and treatment with EASI fraction lowered lens opacity in 72 h. Prolonged treatment with EASI to STZ-induced diabetic rats inhibited the AR activity and delayed cataract progression in a dose dependent manner. Conclusion: Ethyl acetate fraction of S. indica fraction has potential to inhibit rat lens AR enzyme and prevent cataractogenesis not only in goat lens model (in vitro), but also in STZ induced diabetic rats (in vivo). This study is suggestive of the anticataract activity of EASI fraction that could be attributed to the phytoconstituents present in the same. PMID:25709218

  11. Free energy simulations of active-site mutants of dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed

    Doron, Dvir; Stojković, Vanja; Gakhar, Lokesh; Vardi-Kilshtain, Alexandra; Kohen, Amnon; Major, Dan Thomas

    2015-01-22

    This study employs hybrid quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations to investigate the effect of mutations of the active-site residue I14 of E. coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) on the hydride transfer. Recent kinetic measurements of the I14X mutants (X = V, A, and G) indicated slower hydride transfer rates and increasingly temperature-dependent kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) with systematic reduction of the I14 side chain. The QM/MM simulations show that when the original isoleucine residue is substituted in silico by valine, alanine, or glycine (I14V, I14A, and I14G DHFR, respectively), the free energy barrier height of the hydride transfer reaction increases relative to the wild-type enzyme. These trends are in line with the single-turnover rate measurements reported for these systems. In addition, extended dynamics simulations of the reactive Michaelis complex reveal enhanced flexibility in the mutants, and in particular for the I14G mutant, including considerable fluctuations of the donor-acceptor distance (DAD) and the active-site hydrogen bonding network compared with those detected in the native enzyme. These observations suggest that the perturbations induced by the mutations partly impair the active-site environment in the reactant state. On the other hand, the average DADs at the transition state of all DHFR variants are similar. Crystal structures of I14 mutants (V, A, and G) confirmed the trend of increased flexibility of the M20 and other loops. PMID:25382260

  12. Toward aldehyde and alkane production by removing aldehyde reductase activity in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Gabriel M.; Atsumi, Shota

    2015-01-01

    Advances in synthetic biology and metabolic engineering have enabled the construction of novel biological routes to valuable chemicals using suitable microbial hosts. Aldehydes serve as chemical feedstocks in the synthesis of rubbers, plastics, and other larger molecules. Microbial production of alkanes is dependent on the formation of a fatty aldehyde intermediate which is converted to an alkane by an aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (ADO). However, microbial hosts such as Escherichia coli are plagued by many highly active endogenous aldehyde reductases (ALRs) that convert aldehydes to alcohols, which greatly complicates strain engineering for aldehyde and alkane production. It has been shown that the endogenous ALR activity outcompetes the ADO enzyme for fatty aldehyde substrate. The large degree of ALR redundancy coupled with an incomplete database of ALRs represents a significant obstacle in engineering E. coli for either aldehyde or alkane production. In this study, we identified 44 ALR candidates encoded in the E. coli genome using bioinformatics tools, and undertook a comprehensive screening by measuring the ability of these enzymes to produce isobutanol. From the pool of 44 candidates, we found five new ALRs using this screening method (YahK, DkgA, GldA, YbbO, and YghA). Combined deletions of all 13 known ALRs resulted in a 90–99% reduction in endogenous ALR activity for a wide range of aldehyde substrates (C2–C12). Elucidation of the ALRs found in E. coli could guide one in reducing competing alcohol formation during alkane or aldehyde production. PMID:25108218

  13. Nitrite-Reductase and Peroxynitrite Isomerization Activities of Methanosarcina acetivorans Protoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Ascenzi, Paolo; Leboffe, Loris; Pesce, Alessandra; Ciaccio, Chiara; Sbardella, Diego; Bolognesi, Martino; Coletta, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Within the globin superfamily, protoglobins (Pgb) belong phylogenetically to the same cluster of two-domain globin-coupled sensors and single-domain sensor globins. Multiple functional roles have been postulated for Methanosarcina acetivorans Pgb (Ma-Pgb), since the detoxification of reactive nitrogen and oxygen species might co-exist with enzymatic activity(ies) to facilitate the conversion of CO to methane. Here, the nitrite-reductase and peroxynitrite isomerization activities of the CysE20Ser mutant of Ma-Pgb (Ma-Pgb*) are reported and analyzed in parallel with those of related heme-proteins. Kinetics of nitrite-reductase activity of ferrous Ma-Pgb* (Ma-Pgb*-Fe(II)) is biphasic and values of the second-order rate constant for the reduction of NO2– to NO and the concomitant formation of nitrosylated Ma-Pgb*-Fe(II) (Ma-Pgb*-Fe(II)-NO) are kapp1 = 9.6±0.2 M–1 s–1 and kapp2 = 1.2±0.1 M–1 s–1 (at pH 7.4 and 20°C). The kapp1 and kapp2 values increase by about one order of magnitude for each pH unit decrease, between pH 8.3 and 6.2, indicating that the reaction requires one proton. On the other hand, kinetics of peroxynitrite isomerization catalyzed by ferric Ma-Pgb* (Ma-Pgb*-Fe(III)) is monophasic and values of the second order rate constant for peroxynitrite isomerization by Ma-Pgb*-Fe(III) and of the first order rate constant for the spontaneous conversion of peroxynitrite to nitrate are happ = 3.8×104 M–1 s–1 and h0 = 2.8×10–1 s–1 (at pH 7.4 and 20°C). The pH-dependence of hon and h0 values reflects the acid-base equilibrium of peroxynitrite (pKa = 6.7 and 6.9, respectively; at 20°C), indicating that HOONO is the species that reacts preferentially with the heme-Fe(III) atom. These results highlight the potential role of Pgbs in the biosynthesis and scavenging of reactive nitrogen and oxygen species. PMID:24827820

  14. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory activity and phytocomponent investigation of Basella alba leaf extract as a treatment for hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, Gunasekaran; Salvamani, Shamala; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima; Shaharuddin, Noor Azmi; Pattiram, Parveen Devi; Shukor, Mohd Yunus

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase is the key enzyme of the mevalonate pathway that produces cholesterol. Inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase reduces cholesterol biosynthesis in the liver. Synthetic drugs, statins, are commonly used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Due to the side effects of statins, natural HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors of plant origin are needed. In this study, 25 medicinal plant methanol extracts were screened for anti-HMG-CoA reductase activity. Basella alba leaf extract showed the highest inhibitory effect at about 74%. Thus, B. alba was examined in order to investigate its phytochemical components. Gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry and reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed the presence of phenol 2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl), 1-heptatriacotanol, oleic acid, eicosyl ester, naringin, apigenin, luteolin, ascorbic acid, and α-tocopherol, which have been reported to possess antihypercholesterolemic effects. Further investigation of in vivo models should be performed in order to confirm its potential as an alternative treatment for hypercholesterolemia and related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25609924

  15. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory activity and phytocomponent investigation of Basella alba leaf extract as a treatment for hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Baskaran, Gunasekaran; Salvamani, Shamala; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima; Shaharuddin, Noor Azmi; Pattiram, Parveen Devi; Shukor, Mohd Yunus

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase is the key enzyme of the mevalonate pathway that produces cholesterol. Inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase reduces cholesterol biosynthesis in the liver. Synthetic drugs, statins, are commonly used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Due to the side effects of statins, natural HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors of plant origin are needed. In this study, 25 medicinal plant methanol extracts were screened for anti-HMG-CoA reductase activity. Basella alba leaf extract showed the highest inhibitory effect at about 74%. Thus, B. alba was examined in order to investigate its phytochemical components. Gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry and reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed the presence of phenol 2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl), 1-heptatriacotanol, oleic acid, eicosyl ester, naringin, apigenin, luteolin, ascorbic acid, and α-tocopherol, which have been reported to possess antihypercholesterolemic effects. Further investigation of in vivo models should be performed in order to confirm its potential as an alternative treatment for hypercholesterolemia and related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25609924

  16. Potentiation of the reductase activity of protein disulphide isomerase (PDI) by 19-nortestosterone, bacitracin, fluoxetine, and ammonium sulphate.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Maya Haj; Alvarez, Eva; Cahoreau, Claire; Klett, Danièle; Lecompte, François; Combarnous, Yves

    2011-10-01

    Protein disulphide isomerase (PDI) in the endoplasmic reticulum catalyzes the rearrangement of disulphide bridges during folding of secreted proteins. It binds various molecules that inhibit its activity. But here, we looked for molecules that would potentiate its activity. PDI reductase activity was measured in vitro using di-eosin-oxidized glutathione as substrate. Its classical inhibitor bacitracin was found to exert a biphasic effect: stimulatory at low concentrations (∼10(-6) M) and inhibitory only at higher concentrations (∼10(-4)-10(-3) M). The weak oestrogenic molecule bisphenol A was found to exert a weak inhibitory effect on PDI reductase activity relative to the strong oestrogens, ethynylestradiol, and diethylstilbestrol. Like 19-nortestosterone, fluoxetine was found to exert a potentiating effect on PDI reductase activity and their potentiating effects could be reversed by increasing concentrations of oestrogens. In conclusion, this paper provides the first identification of potentiators of PDI activity that are potential pharmaceuticals against pathologies affecting protein folding such as Alzheimer's disease. PMID:21250820

  17. The nitrite reductase activity of horse heart carboxymethylated-cytochrome c is modulated by cardiolipin.

    PubMed

    Ascenzi, Paolo; Sbardella, Diego; Sinibaldi, Federica; Santucci, Roberto; Coletta, Massimo

    2016-06-01

    Horse heart carboxymethylated cytc (CM-cytc) displays myoglobin-like properties. Here, the effect of cardiolipin (CL) liposomes on the nitrite reductase activity of ferrous CM-cytc [CM-cytc-Fe(II)], in the presence of sodium dithionite, is reported between pH 5.5 and 7.6, at 20.0 °C. Cytc-Fe(II) displays a very low value of the apparent second-order rate constant for the NO2 (-)-mediated conversion of cytc-Fe(II) to cytc-Fe(II)-NO [k on = (7.3 ± 0.7) × 10(-2) M(-1) s(-1); at pH 7.4], whereas the value of k on for NO2 (-) reduction by CM-cytc-Fe(II) is 1.1 ± 0.2 M(-1) s(-1) (at pH 7.4). CL facilitates the NO2 (-)-mediated nitrosylation of CM-cytc-Fe(II) in a dose-dependent manner, the value of k on for the NO2 (-)-mediated conversion of CL-CM-cytc-Fe(II) to CL-CM-cytc-Fe(II)-NO (5.6 ± 0.6 M(-1) s(-1); at pH 7.4) being slightly higher than that for the NO2 (-)-mediated conversion of CL-cytc-Fe(II) to CL-cytc-Fe(II)-NO (2.6 ± 0.3 M(-1) s(-1); at pH 7.4). The apparent affinity of CL for CM-cytc-Fe(II) is essentially pH independent, the average value of B being (1.3 ± 0.3) × 10(-6) M. In the absence and presence of CL liposomes, the nitrite reductase activity of CM-cytc-Fe(II) increases linearly on lowering pH and the values of the slope of the linear fittings of Log k on versus pH are -1.05 ± 0.07 and -1.03 ± 0.03, respectively, reflecting the involvement of one proton for the formation of the transient ferric form, NO, and OH(-). These results indicate that Met80 carboxymethylation and CL binding cooperate in the stabilization of the highly reactive heme-Fe atom of CL-CM-cytc. PMID:27010463

  18. Targeted Mutations of Bacillus anthracis Dihydrofolate Reductase Condense Complex Structure-Activity Relationships

    SciTech Connect

    J Beierlein; N Karri; A Anderson

    2011-12-31

    Several antifolates, including trimethoprim (TMP) and a series of propargyl-linked analogues, bind dihydrofolate reductase from Bacillus anthracis (BaDHFR) with lower affinity than is typical in other bacterial species. To guide lead optimization for BaDHFR, we explored a new approach to determine structure-activity relationships whereby the enzyme is altered and the analogues remain constant, essentially reversing the standard experimental design. Active site mutants of the enzyme, Ba(F96I)DHFR and Ba(Y102F)DHFR, were created and evaluated with enzyme inhibition assays and crystal structures. The affinities of the antifolates increase up to 60-fold with the Y102F mutant, suggesting that interactions with Tyr 102 are critical for affinity. Crystal structures of the enzymes bound to TMP and propargyl-linked inhibitors reveal the basis of TMP resistance and illuminate the influence of Tyr 102 on the lipophilic linker between the pyrimidine and aryl rings. Two new inhibitors test and validate these conclusions and show the value of the technique for providing new directions during lead optimization.

  19. Role of active site loop in coenzyme binding and flavin reduction in cytochrome P450 reductase.

    PubMed

    Mothersole, Robert G; Meints, Carla E; Louder, Alex; Wolthers, Kirsten R

    2016-09-15

    Cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) contains a loop within the active site (comprising Asp(634), Ala(635), Arg(636) and Asn(637); human CPR numbering) that relocates upon NADPH binding. Repositioning of the loop triggers the reorientation of an FAD-shielding tryptophan (Trp(679)) to a partially stacked conformer, reducing the energy barrier for displacement of the residue by the NADPH nicotinamide ring: an essential step for hydride transfer. We used site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic analysis to investigate if the amino acid composition of the loop influences the catalytic properties of CPR. The D634A and D634N variants elicited a modest increase in coenzyme binding affinity coupled with a 36- and 10-fold reduction in cytochrome c(3+) turnover and a 17- and 3-fold decrease in the pre-steady state rate of flavin reduction. These results, in combination with a reduction in the kinetic isotope effect for hydride transfer, suggest that diminished activity is due to destabilization of the partially stacked conformer of Trp(677) and slower release of NADP(+). In contrast, R636A, R636S and an A635G/R636S double mutant led to a modest increase in cytochrome c(3+) reduction, which is linked to weaker coenzyme binding and faster interflavin electron transfer. A potential mechanism by which Arg(636) influences catalysis is discussed. PMID:27461959

  20. Role of nitrite in the induction of nitrate reductase activity in barley leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Aslam, M.; Huffaker, R.C.

    1986-04-01

    High levels of nitrate reductase activity (NRA) were induced in detached leaves of 8-day-old barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seedlings when supplied with NO/sub 2//sup -/ in the induction solutions. At similar N flux, the level of the enzyme activity induced by NO/sub 2//sup -/ was about one-half of that induced by NO/sub 3//sup -/. Significant levels of NO/sub 3//sup -/ accumulated in NO/sub 2//sup -/-fed leaves. Traces of NO/sub 3//sup -/ (0.6%) were detected in solutions of reagent grade KNO/sub 2/. However, the amount of NO/sub 3//sup -/ absorbed from the NO/sub 2//sup -/ solutions was only one-tenth of that accumulated in the leaves during the induction period, showing the actual conversion of NO/sub 2//sup -/ to NO/sub 3//sup -/ within the leaf. When the NO/sub 3//sup -/ concentrations in the NO/sub 2//sup -/-fed leaves were plotted against NRA, a highly positive correlation was obtained. The results suggest that NO/sub 2//sup -/ induces NRA indirectly after being oxidized to NO/sub 3//sup -/ within the leaf.

  1. Glutathione-dependent extracellular ferric reductase activities in dimorphic zoopathogenic fungi

    PubMed Central

    Zarnowski, Robert; Woods, Jon P.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, extracellular glutathione-dependent ferric reductase (GSH-FeR) activities in different dimorphic zoopathogenic fungal species were characterized. Supernatants from Blastomyces dermatitidis, Histoplasma capsulatum, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Sporothrix schenckii strains grown in their yeast form were able to reduce iron enzymically with glutathione as a cofactor. Some variations in the level of reduction were noted amongst the strains. This activity was stable in acidic, neutral and slightly alkaline environments and was inhibited when trivalent aluminium and gallium ions were present. Using zymography, single bands of GSH-FeRs with apparent molecular masses varying from 430 to 460 kDa were identified in all strains. The same molecular mass range was determined by size exclusion chromatography. These data demonstrate that dimorphic zoopathogenic fungi produce and secrete a family of similar GSH-FeRs that may be involved in the acquisition and utilization of iron. Siderophore production by these and other fungi has sometimes been considered to provide a full explanation of iron acquisition in these organisms. Our work reveals an additional common mechanism that may be biologically and pathogenically important. Furthermore, while some characteristics of these enzymes such as extracellular location, cofactor utilization and large size are not individually unique, when considered together and shared across a range of fungi, they represent an important novel physiological feature. PMID:16000713

  2. Glucose and collagen regulate human platelet activity through aldose reductase induction of thromboxane

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wai Ho; Stitham, Jeremiah; Gleim, Scott; Di Febbo, Concetta; Porreca, Ettore; Fava, Cristiano; Tacconelli, Stefania; Capone, Marta; Evangelista, Virgilio; Levantesi, Giacomo; Wen, Li; Martin, Kathleen; Minuz, Pietro; Rade, Jeffrey; Patrignani, Paola; Hwa, John

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with platelet hyperactivity, which leads to increased morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease. This is coupled with enhanced levels of thromboxane (TX), an eicosanoid that facilitates platelet aggregation. Although intensely studied, the mechanism underlying the relationship among hyperglycemia, TX generation, and platelet hyperactivity remains unclear. We sought to identify key signaling components that connect high levels of glucose to TX generation and to examine their clinical relevance. In human platelets, aldose reductase synergistically modulated platelet response to both hyperglycemia and collagen exposure through a pathway involving ROS/PLCγ2/PKC/p38α MAPK. In clinical patients with platelet activation (deep vein thrombosis; saphenous vein graft occlusion after coronary bypass surgery), and particularly those with diabetes, urinary levels of a major enzymatic metabolite of TX (11-dehydro-TXB2 [TX-M]) were substantially increased. Elevated TX-M persisted in diabetic patients taking low-dose aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid, ASA), suggesting that such patients may have underlying endothelial damage, collagen exposure, and thrombovascular disease. Thus, our study has identified multiple potential signaling targets for designing combination chemotherapies that could inhibit the synergistic activation of platelets by hyperglycemia and collagen exposure. PMID:22005299

  3. Glucose and collagen regulate human platelet activity through aldose reductase induction of thromboxane.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wai Ho; Stitham, Jeremiah; Gleim, Scott; Di Febbo, Concetta; Porreca, Ettore; Fava, Cristiano; Tacconelli, Stefania; Capone, Marta; Evangelista, Virgilio; Levantesi, Giacomo; Wen, Li; Martin, Kathleen; Minuz, Pietro; Rade, Jeffrey; Patrignani, Paola; Hwa, John

    2011-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with platelet hyperactivity, which leads to increased morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease. This is coupled with enhanced levels of thromboxane (TX), an eicosanoid that facilitates platelet aggregation. Although intensely studied, the mechanism underlying the relationship among hyperglycemia, TX generation, and platelet hyperactivity remains unclear. We sought to identify key signaling components that connect high levels of glucose to TX generation and to examine their clinical relevance. In human platelets, aldose reductase synergistically modulated platelet response to both hyperglycemia and collagen exposure through a pathway involving ROS/PLCγ2/PKC/p38α MAPK. In clinical patients with platelet activation (deep vein thrombosis; saphenous vein graft occlusion after coronary bypass surgery), and particularly those with diabetes, urinary levels of a major enzymatic metabolite of TX (11-dehydro-TXB2 [TX-M]) were substantially increased. Elevated TX-M persisted in diabetic patients taking low-dose aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid, ASA), suggesting that such patients may have underlying endothelial damage, collagen exposure, and thrombovascular disease. Thus, our study has identified multiple potential signaling targets for designing combination chemotherapies that could inhibit the synergistic activation of platelets by hyperglycemia and collagen exposure. PMID:22005299

  4. CIPK23 is involved in iron acquisition of Arabidopsis by affecting ferric chelate reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qiuying; Zhang, Xinxin; Yang, An; Wang, Tianzuo; Zhang, Wen-Hao

    2016-05-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the major limiting factors affecting quality and production of crops in calcareous soils. Numerous signaling molecules and transcription factors have been demonstrated to play a regulatory role in adaptation of plants to iron deficiency. However, the mechanisms underlying the iron deficiency-induced physiological processes remain to be fully dissected. Here, we demonstrated that the protein kinase CIPK23 was involved in iron acquisition. Lesion of CIPK23 rendered Arabidopsis mutants hypersensitive to iron deficiency, as evidenced by stronger chlorosis in young leaves and lower iron concentration than wild-type plants under iron-deficient conditions by down-regulating ferric chelate reductase activity. We found that iron deficiency evoked an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration and the elevated Ca(2+) would bind to CBL1/CBL9, leading to activation of CIPK23. These novel findings highlight the involvement of calcium-dependent CBL-CIPK23 complexes in the regulation of iron acquisition. Moreover, mutation of CIPK23 led to changes in contents of mineral elements, suggesting that CBL-CIPK23 complexes could be as "nutritional sensors" to sense and regulate the mineral homeostasis in Arabisopsis. PMID:26993237

  5. Activity improvement of a Kluyveromyces lactis aldo-keto reductase KlAKR via rational design.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xi; Wang, Ya-Jun; Shen, Wei; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2016-04-20

    Optically pure t-butyl 6-cyano-(3R, 5R)-dihydroxyhexanoate ((R)-1b) is the key chiral precursor for atorvastatin calcium, the most widely used cholesterol-lowering drug. Wild-type aldo-keto reductase KlAKR from Kluyveromyces lactis has ideal diastereoselectivity toward t-butyl 6-cyano-(5R)-hydroxy-3-oxohexanoate (1a, dep>99.5%) but poor activity. A rational engineering was used to improve the KlAKR activity. Based on homology modeling and molecular docking, two amino acid residues (295 and 296) were selected as mutation sites, and two rounds of site-saturation mutagenesis were performed. Among the mutants, KlAKR-Y295W/W296L exhibited the highest catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) toward 1a up to 12.37s(-1)mM(-1), which was 11.25-fold higher than that of wild-type KlAKR. Moreover, the majority of mutations have no negative impact on stereoselectivity. Using KlAKR-Y295W/W296L coupled with Exiguobacterium sibiricum glucose dehydrogenase (EsGDH) for cofactor regeneration, (R)-1b was accumulated up to 162.7mM with dep value above 99.5%. KlAKR-Y295W/W296L represents a robust tool for (R)-1b synthesis. PMID:26959479

  6. Latent nitrate reductase activity is associated with the plasma membrane of corn roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, M. R.; Grimes, H. D.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    Latent nitrate reductase activity (NRA) was detected in corn (Zea mays L., Golden Jubilee) root microsome fractions. Microsome-associated NRA was stimulated up to 20-fold by Triton X-100 (octylphenoxy polyethoxyethanol) whereas soluble NRA was only increased up to 1.2-fold. Microsome-associated NRA represented up to 19% of the total root NRA. Analysis of microsomal fractions by aqueous two-phase partitioning showed that the membrane-associated NRA was localized in the second upper phase (U2). Analysis with marker enzymes indicated that the U2 fraction was plasma membrane (PM). The PM-associated NRA was not removed by washing vesicles with up to 1.0 M NACl but was solubilized from the PM with 0.05% Triton X-100. In contrast, vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity was not solubilized from the PM by treatment with 0.1% Triton X-100. The results show that a protein capable of reducing nitrate is embedded in the hydrophobic region of the PM of corn roots.

  7. S-Nitrosation of Conserved Cysteines Modulates Activity and Stability of S-Nitrosoglutathione Reductase (GSNOR).

    PubMed

    Guerra, Damian; Ballard, Keith; Truebridge, Ian; Vierling, Elizabeth

    2016-05-01

    The free radical nitric oxide (NO(•)) regulates diverse physiological processes from vasodilation in humans to gas exchange in plants. S-Nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) is considered a principal nitroso reservoir due to its chemical stability. GSNO accumulation is attenuated by GSNO reductase (GSNOR), a cysteine-rich cytosolic enzyme. Regulation of protein nitrosation is not well understood since NO(•)-dependent events proceed without discernible changes in GSNOR expression. Because GSNORs contain evolutionarily conserved cysteines that could serve as nitrosation sites, we examined the effects of treating plant (Arabidopsis thaliana), mammalian (human), and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) GSNORs with nitrosating agents in vitro. Enzyme activity was sensitive to nitroso donors, whereas the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT) restored activity, suggesting that catalytic impairment was due to S-nitrosation. Protein nitrosation was confirmed by mass spectrometry, by which mono-, di-, and trinitrosation were observed, and these signals were sensitive to DTT. GSNOR mutants in specific non-zinc-coordinating cysteines were less sensitive to catalytic inhibition by nitroso donors and exhibited reduced nitrosation signals by mass spectrometry. Nitrosation also coincided with decreased tryptophan fluorescence, increased thermal aggregation propensity, and increased polydispersity-properties reflected by differential solvent accessibility of amino acids important for dimerization and the shape of the substrate and coenzyme binding pockets as assessed by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. Collectively, these data suggest a mechanism for NO(•) signal transduction in which GSNOR nitrosation and inhibition transiently permit GSNO accumulation. PMID:27064847

  8. A Continuous Spectrophotometric Assay for APS Reductase Activity with Sulfite-Selective Probes

    PubMed Central

    Paritala, Hanumantharao; Carroll, Kate S.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate (APS) reductase (EC number 1.8.4.10), (APR) catalyzes the first committed step in sulfate reduction for the biosynthesis of essential reduced sulfur-containing biomolecules, such as cysteine, and is essential for survival in the latent phase of TB infection. Despite the importance of APR to Mtb, and other bacterial pathogens, current assay methods depend on use of [35S]-labeled APS or shunt AMP to a coupled-enzyme system. Both methods are cumbersome and require the use of expensive reagents. Here we report the development of a continuous spectrophotometric method for measuring APR activity by using novel sulfite-selective colorimetric or “off-on” fluorescent levulinate-based probes. The APR activity can thus be followed by monitoring the increase in absorbance or fluorescence of the resulting phenolate product. Using this assay, we determined Michelis-Menten kinetic constants (Km, kcat, kcat/Km) and apparent inhibition constant (Ki) for adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP), which compared favorably to values obtained in the gold-standard radioactive assay. The newly developed assay is robust and easy to perform with a simple spectrophotometer. PMID:23711725

  9. S-nitrosation of conserved cysteines modulates activity and stability of S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR)

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Damian; Ballard, Keith; Truebridge, Ian; Vierling, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The free radical nitric oxide (NO•) regulates diverse physiological processes from vasodilation in humans to gas exchange in plants. S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) is considered a principal nitroso reservoir due to its chemical stability. GSNO accumulation is attenuated by GSNO reductase (GSNOR), a cysteine-rich cytosolic enzyme. Regulation of protein nitrosation is not well understood since NO•-dependent events proceed without discernible changes in GSNOR expression. Because GSNORs contain evolutionarily-conserved cysteines that could serve as nitrosation sites, we examined the effects of treating plant (Arabidopsis thaliana), mammalian (human), and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) GSNORs with nitrosating agents in vitro. Enzyme activity was sensitive to nitroso donors, while the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT) restored activity, suggesting catalytic impairment was due to S-nitrosation. Protein nitrosation was confirmed by mass spectrometry, by which mono-, di-, and tri-nitrosation were observed, and these signals were sensitive to DTT. GSNOR mutants in specific non-zinc coordinating cysteines were less sensitive to catalytic inhibition by nitroso donors and exhibited reduced nitrosation signals by mass spectrometry. Nitrosation also coincided with decreased tryptophan fluorescence, increased thermal aggregation propensity, and increased polydispersity—properties reflected by differential solvent accessibility of amino acids important for dimerization and the shape of the substrate and coenzyme binding pockets as assessed by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. Collectively, these data suggest a mechanism for NO• signal transduction in which GSNOR nitrosation and inhibition transiently permit GSNO accumulation. PMID:27064847

  10. Activity of glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and lipid peroxidation in erythrocytes in workers exposed to lead.

    PubMed

    Kasperczyk, Slawomir; Kasperczyk, Aleksandra; Ostalowska, Alina; Dziwisz, Maria; Birkner, Ewa

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), and malondialdehyde (MDA) in erythrocytes in healthy male employees of zinc and lead steelworks who were occupationally exposed to lead over a long period of time (about 15 yr). Workers were divided into two subgroups: the first included employees with low exposure to lead (LL) (n=75) with blood lead level PbB=25-40 microg/dL and the second with high exposure to lead (HL) (n=62) with PbB over 40 microg/dL. Administration workers (n=35) with normal levels of PbB and zinc protoporphyrin in blood (ZPP) in blood were the control group. The activity of GPx significantly increased in LL when compared to the control group (p<0.001) and decreased when compared to the HL group (p=0.036). There were no significant changes in activity of GR in the study population. MDA erythrocyte concentration significantly increased in the HL group compared to the control (p=0.014) and to the LL group (p=0.024). For the people with low exposure to lead (PbB=25-40 microg/dL), the increase of activity of GPx by about 79% in erythrocytes prevented lipid peroxidation and it appears to be the adaptive mechanism against the toxic effect of lead. People with high exposure to lead (with PbB over 40 microg/dL) have shown an increase in MDA concentration in erythrocytes by about 91%, which seems to have resulted from reduced activity of GPx and the lack of increase in activity of GR in blood red cells. PMID:15621928

  11. Effects of Elevated Cytosolic Glutathione Reductase Activity on the Cellular Glutathione Pool and Photosynthesis in Leaves under Normal and Stress Conditions.

    PubMed

    Foyer, C; Lelandais, M; Galap, C; Kunert, K J

    1991-11-01

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum var Samsun) was transformed using the bacterial gor gene coding for the enzyme glutathione reductase. Transgenic plants were selected by their kanamycin resistence and expression of the bacterial gor gene. After separation by isoelectric focusing techniques, leaf extracts from transgenic plants having both native and bacterial glutathione reductase activity gave, in addition to the six bands of the native enzyme, two further closely running isoenzymes. These additional bands originating from the expression of the bacterial gor gene were nonchloroplastic. Leaves from transgenic plants had two- to 10-fold higher glutathione reductase activity than non-transgenic controls. The amount of extractable glutathione reductase activity obtained in transgenic plants was dependent on leaf age and the conditions to which leaves were exposed. Both light and exposure to methylviologen increased leaf glutathione reductase activity. Elevated levels of cytosolic glutathione reductase activity in transgenic plants had no effect on the amount or reduction state of the reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione pool under optimal conditions or oxidative conditions induced by methylviologen. The glutathione pool was unaltered despite the oxidation-dependent loss of CO(2) assimilation and oxidation of enzymes involved in photosynthesis. However, the reduction state of the ascorbate pool was greater in transgenic plants relative to nontransgenic controls following illumination of methylviologen-treated leaf discs. Therefore, we conclude that in the natural state glutathione reductase is present in tobacco at levels above those required for maximal operation of the ascorbate-glutathione pathway. PMID:16668524

  12. Molecular characterization of thioredoxin-1 and thioredoxin reductase activity in mud crab Scylla paramamosain.

    PubMed

    Hu, J H; Zhang, F Y; Jiang, K J; Fang, Y B; Wang, J; Zhao, M; Qiao, Z G; Ma, L B

    2014-01-01

    The thioredoxin (Trx) system consists of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), Trx, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH). TrxR is an NADPH-dependent oxidoreductase. Trx is a ubiquitous small protein with a redox-active disulfide bridge that plays important regulatory roles in some vital metabolic reactions. In this study, a cDNA sequence (SpTrx1) showing high identity to the first Trx gene was isolated from a hepatopancreas cDNA library of the mud crab Scylla paramamosain. The full-length cDNA of SpTrx1 consisted of 672 bp and contained a complete open reading frame of 318 bp encoding a polypeptide of 105 amino acids. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that SpTrx1 expression was ubiquitous in various organs of S. paramamosain, including the gill, muscle, heart, hemolymph, testis, and hepatopancreas. SpTrx1 expression was upregulated significantly after Vibrio parahaemolyticus challenge: it obviously rose at 48 h and reached the highest level at 72 h. Furthermore, TrxR activity was detected in the gill, heart, muscle, hemolymph, and hepatopancreas. The relative TrxR activity in different tissues after V. parahaemolyticus injection had the same tendency in each tissue (P < 0.01) as SpTrx1 expression. The TrxR activity increased 2 h after injection, peaked at 8 h, slowly decreased from 12 to 24 h, and returned to normal levels at 48 h. The consistency of the expression between the Trx transcript and TrxR activity demonstrated that Trx was closely related to TrxR in the Trx system in S. paramamosain, suggesting that it may participate in the immune system of mud crabs. PMID:25501236

  13. Human Aldo-Keto Reductases and the Metabolic Activation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) are promiscuous NAD(P)(H) dependent oxidoreductases implicated in the metabolic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). These enzymes catalyze the oxidation of non-K-region trans-dihydrodiols to the corresponding o-quinones with the concomitant production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The PAH o-quinones are Michael acceptors and can form adducts but are also redox-active and enter into futile redox cycles to amplify ROS formation. Evidence exists to support this metabolic pathway in humans. The human recombinant AKR1A1 and AKR1C1–AKR1C4 enzymes all catalyze the oxidation of PAH trans-dihydrodiols to PAH o-quinones. Many human AKRs also catalyze the NADPH-dependent reduction of the o-quinone products to air-sensitive catechols, exacerbating ROS formation. Moreover, this pathway of PAH activation occurs in a panel of human lung cell lines, resulting in the production of ROS and oxidative DNA damage in the form of 8-oxo-2′-deoxyguanosine. Using stable-isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, this pathway of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) metabolism was found to contribute equally with the diol-epoxide pathway to the activation of this human carcinogen in human lung cells. Evaluation of the mutagenicity of anti-B[a]P-diol epoxide with B[a]P-7,8-dione on p53 showed that the o-quinone produced by AKRs was the more potent mutagen, provided that it was permitted to redox cycle, and that the mutations observed were G to T transversions, reminiscent of those observed in human lung cancer. It is concluded that there is sufficient evidence to support the role of human AKRs in the metabolic activation of PAH in human lung cell lines and that they may contribute to the causation of human lung cancer. PMID:25279998

  14. In vitro activity of almond skin polyphenols for scavenging free radicals and inducing quinone reductase.

    PubMed

    Chen, C-Y Oliver; Blumberg, Jeffrey B

    2008-06-25

    Observational studies and clinical trials suggest nut intake, including almonds, is associated with an enhancement in antioxidant defense and a reduction in the risk of cancer and cardiovascular disease. Almond skins are rich in polyphenols (ASP) that may contribute to these putative benefits. To assess their potential mechanisms of action, we tested the in vitro effect of ASP extracted with methanol (M) or a gastrointestinal juice mimic (GI) alone or in combination with vitamins C (VC) or E (VE) (1-10 micromol/L) on scavenging free radicals and inducing quinone reductase (QR). Flavonoid profiles from ASP-M and -GI extracts were different from one another. ASP-GI was more potent in scavenging HOCl and ONOO (-) radicals than ASP-M. In contrast, ASP-M increased and ASP-GI decreased QR activity in Hepa1c1c7 cells. Adding VC or VE to ASP produced a combination- and dose-dependent action on radical scavenging and QR induction. In comparison to their independent actions, ASP-M plus VC were less potent in scavenging DPPH, HOCl, ONOO (-), and O 2 (-) (*). However, the interaction between ASP-GI plus VC promoted their radical scavenging activity. Combining ASP-M plus VC resulted in a synergistic interaction, inducing QR activity, but ASP-GI plus VC had an antagonistic effect. On the basis of their total phenolic content, the measures of total antioxidant activity of ASP-M and -GI were comparable. Thus, in vitro, ASP act as antioxidants and induce QR activity, but these actions are dependent upon their dose, method of extraction, and interaction with antioxidant vitamins. PMID:18512942

  15. Human aldo-keto reductases and the metabolic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Penning, Trevor M

    2014-11-17

    Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) are promiscuous NAD(P)(H) dependent oxidoreductases implicated in the metabolic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). These enzymes catalyze the oxidation of non-K-region trans-dihydrodiols to the corresponding o-quinones with the concomitant production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The PAH o-quinones are Michael acceptors and can form adducts but are also redox-active and enter into futile redox cycles to amplify ROS formation. Evidence exists to support this metabolic pathway in humans. The human recombinant AKR1A1 and AKR1C1-AKR1C4 enzymes all catalyze the oxidation of PAH trans-dihydrodiols to PAH o-quinones. Many human AKRs also catalyze the NADPH-dependent reduction of the o-quinone products to air-sensitive catechols, exacerbating ROS formation. Moreover, this pathway of PAH activation occurs in a panel of human lung cell lines, resulting in the production of ROS and oxidative DNA damage in the form of 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine. Using stable-isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, this pathway of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) metabolism was found to contribute equally with the diol-epoxide pathway to the activation of this human carcinogen in human lung cells. Evaluation of the mutagenicity of anti-B[a]P-diol epoxide with B[a]P-7,8-dione on p53 showed that the o-quinone produced by AKRs was the more potent mutagen, provided that it was permitted to redox cycle, and that the mutations observed were G to T transversions, reminiscent of those observed in human lung cancer. It is concluded that there is sufficient evidence to support the role of human AKRs in the metabolic activation of PAH in human lung cell lines and that they may contribute to the causation of human lung cancer. PMID:25279998

  16. Evidence for Increased 5α-Reductase Activity During Early Childhood in Daughters of Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Torchen, Laura C.; Idkowiak, Jan; Fogel, Naomi R.; O'Neil, Donna M.; Shackleton, Cedric H. L.; Arlt, Wiebke

    2016-01-01

    Context: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heritable, complex genetic disease. Animal models suggest that androgen exposure at critical developmental stages contributes to disease pathogenesis. We hypothesized that genetic variation resulting in increased androgen production produces the phenotypic features of PCOS by programming during critical developmental periods. Although we have not found evidence for increased in utero androgen levels in cord blood in the daughters of women with PCOS (PCOS-d), target tissue androgen production may be amplified by increased 5α-reductase activity analogous to findings in adult affected women. It is possible to noninvasively test this hypothesis by examining urinary steroid metabolites. Objective: We performed this study to investigate whether PCOS-d have altered androgen metabolism during early childhood. Design, Setting, and Participants: Twenty-one PCOS-d, 1–3 years old, and 36 control girls of comparable age were studied at an academic medical center. Main Outcome Measures: Urinary steroid metabolites were measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Twenty-four hour steroid excretion rates and precursor to product ratios suggestive of 5α-reductase and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities were calculated. Results: Age did not differ but weight for length Z-scores were higher in PCOS-d compared to control girls (P = .02). PCOS-d had increased 5α-tetrahydrocortisol:tetrahydrocortisol ratios (P = .04), suggesting increased global 5α-reductase activity. There was no evidence for differences in 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity. Steroid metabolite excretion was not correlated with weight. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that differences in androgen metabolism are present in early childhood in PCOS-d. Increased 5α-reductase activity could contribute to the development of PCOS by amplifying target tissue androgen action. PMID:26990942

  17. [Effect of anticancer agents on rat prostate. Evaluation of organ weight, histological finding and 5 alpha-reductase activities].

    PubMed

    Takeda, M; Hosaka, M; Kitajima, N; Noguchi, K; Fujii, H; Oshima, H; Harada, M

    1985-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of anticancer chemotherapeutic antigens on rat prostate, ten kinds of anticancer agents corresponding to the dose generally used for humans were intraperitoneally injected to 63-day-old Wistar rats. The anticancer agents were administered as follows: Cyclophosphamide (CPM) was used at the dose of 8 mg/kg for 7 days. Methotrexate (MTX), actinomycin-D (ACD) and cis-platinum (CDDP), 163 micrograms/kg, 8 micrograms/kg and 833 micrograms/kg for 5 days, respectively. Nitrogen mustard (NM), bleomycin (BLM), peplomycin (PLM), adriamycin (ADM), vincristine (VCR), and vinblastine (VBL), 500 micrograms/kg, 250 micrograms/kg, 170 micrograms/kg, 2.5 mg/kg, 33 micrograms/kg and 83 micrograms/kg, twice in a week, respectively. The rats were killed on the fifth day after completion of the schedule. Then, the weight of the body, the prostate, the epididymis and the adrenal gland were measured. In addition, 5 alpha-reductase activities and histological findings in the prostate were examined. For determination of 5 alpha-reductase activities, cell-free homogenate obtained from the rat ventral prostate was incubated with C14-testosterone at 37 degrees C for 30 minutes in an atmosphere of 95% of O2 and 5% of CO2. Subsequently, the metabolites from testosterone were separated and purified with thin layer chromatography using the solvent system with benzene acetone, 4:1 (v/v). 5 alpha-Reductase activity was determined with the sum of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and androstanediol converted from testosterone and indicated as pmol product/mg protein. The 5 alpha-reductase activity was employed as a biological marker for the degree of androgenic dependency in the prostate. The results were summarized as follows. CDDP significantly reduced the weight of the body (p less than 0.001, n = 7), but not the activity of 5 alpha-reductase. NM and VBL had a specific action to reduce the weight of the prostate (p less than 0.01, n = 8) without causing loss of body weight. NM and

  18. Induction of Xylose Reductase and Xylitol Dehydrogenase Activities in Pachysolen tannophilus and Pichia stipitis on Mixed Sugars

    PubMed Central

    Bicho, Paul A.; Runnals, P. Lynn; Cunningham, J. Douglas; Lee, Hung

    1988-01-01

    The induction of xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase activities on mixed sugars was investigated in the yeasts Pachysolen tannophilus and Pichia stipitis. Enzyme activities induced on d-xylose served as the controls. In both yeasts, d-glucose, d-mannose, and 2-deoxyglucose inhibited enzyme induction by d-xylose to various degrees. Cellobiose, l-arabinose, and d-galactose were not inhibitory. In liquid batch culture, P. tannophilus utilized d-glucose and d-mannose rapidly and preferentially over d-xylose, while d-galactose consumption was poor and lagged behind that of the pentose sugar. In P. stipitis, all three hexoses were used preferentially over d-xylose. The results showed that the repressibility of xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase may limit the potential of yeast fermentation of pentose sugars in hydrolysates of lignocellulosic substrates. PMID:16347538

  19. Tobacco Nectarin III is a bifunctional enzyme with monodehydroascorbate reductase and carbonic anhydrase activities.

    PubMed

    Carter, Clay J; Thornburg, Robert W

    2004-02-01

    Tobacco plants secrete a limited array of proteins (nectarins) into their floral nectar. N-terminal sequencing of the Nectarin II ( NEC2; 35kD) and the Nectarin III ( NEC3; 40kD) proteins revealed that they both share identity with dioscorin, the major soluble protein of yam tubers. These sequences also revealed that NEC2 is a breakdown product of NEC3. Using these N-terminal peptide sequences, degenerate oligonucleotides were designed that permitted the isolation of a partial NEC3 cDNA. This cDNA was then used to probe a nectary specific cDNA library and a full-length NEC3 cDNA clone was isolated. Complete sequence analysis confirmed the identity of NEC3 as a dioscorin-like protein. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric fingerprinting of tryptic peptides derived from the purified NEC3 confirmed that this protein was encoded by the isolated cDNA. NEC3 was shown to possess both carbonic anhydrase and monodehydroascorbate reductase activities. RT-PCR based expression analyses demonstrated that NEC3 transcript is expressed throughout nectary development as well as in other floral organs. A proposed function in the maintenance of pH and oxidative balance in nectar is discussed. PMID:15284496

  20. Structure of recombinant Leishmania donovani pteridine reductase reveals a disordered active site

    PubMed Central

    Barrack, Keri L.; Tulloch, Lindsay B.; Burke, Lynsey-Ann; Fyfe, Paul K.; Hunter, William N.

    2011-01-01

    Pteridine reductase (PTR1) is a potential target for drug development against parasitic Trypanosoma and Leishmania species, protozoa that are responsible for a range of serious diseases found in tropical and subtropical parts of the world. As part of a structure-based approach to inhibitor development, specifically targeting Leishmania species, well ordered crystals of L. donovani PTR1 were sought to support the characterization of complexes formed with inhibitors. An efficient system for recombinant protein production was prepared and the enzyme was purified and crystallized in an orthorhombic form with ammonium sulfate as the precipitant. Diffraction data were measured to 2.5 Å resolution and the structure was solved by molecular replacement. However, a sulfate occupies a phosphate-binding site used by NADPH and occludes cofactor binding. The nicotinamide moiety is a critical component of the active site and without it this part of the structure is disordered. The crystal form obtained under these conditions is therefore unsuitable for the characterization of inhibitor complexes. PMID:21206018

  1. A role for 5alpha-reductase activity in the development of male homosexuality?

    PubMed

    Alias, A G

    2004-12-01

    Higher body hair with lower mesmorphism ratings were observed in Caucasian homosexual men compared with the general male population, reflecting elevated 5alpha-reductase (5alphaR) activity, and higher dihydrotestosterone-to-testosterone (DHT-to-T) ratio, in sharp contrast to 46,XY 5alphaR 2 deficiency subjects, who are often born with ambiguous, or female genitalia, but tend to grow up to be muscular, heterosexual men with very little body hair, or beard. One study also showed them scoring around dull normal IQs. A greater prevalence of liberal body hair growth in men with higher IQs and/or educational levels was also observed in several samples. The exceptions to this statistical trend are too unsettling, however. Nevertheless, the results of a number of published studies, including one showing higher DHT-to-T ratio in homosexual men, done with different objectives over a span of 80 years, together strongly support these findings. Furthermore, in an animal model, "cognitive-enhancing effects" of "5alpha-reduced androgen [metabolites]" were recently demonstrated. PMID:15677419

  2. Effects of Nitrite, Chlorate, and Chlorite on Nitrate Uptake and Nitrate Reductase Activity 1

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqi, M. Yaeesh; King, Bryan J.; Glass, Anthony D. M.

    1992-01-01

    Effects of NO2−, ClO3−, and ClO2− on the induction of nitrate transport and nitrate reductase activity (NRA) as well as their effects on NO3− influx into roots of intact barley (Hordeum vulgare cv Klondike) seedlings were investigated. A 24-h pretreatment with 0.1 mol m−3 NO2− fully induced NO3− transport but failed to induce NRA. Similar pretreatments with ClO3− and ClO2− induced neither NO3− transport nor NRA. Net ClO3− uptake was induced by NO3− but not by ClO3− itself, indicating that NO3− and ClO3− transport occur via the NO3− carrier. At the uptake step, NO2− and ClO2− strongly inhibited NO3− influx; the former exhibited classical competitive kinetics, whereas the latter exhibited complex mixed-type kinetics. ClO3− proved to be a weak inhibitor of NO3− influx (Ki = 16 mol m−3) in a noncompetitive manner. The implications of these findings are discussed in the context of the suitability of these NO3− analogs as screening agents for the isolation of mutants defective in NO3− transport. PMID:16653041

  3. Non-native ligands define the active site of Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R. Br dehydroascorbate reductase.

    PubMed

    Krishna Das, Bhaba; Kumar, Amit; Maindola, Priyank; Mahanty, Srikrishna; Jain, S K; Reddy, Mallireddy K; Arockiasamy, Arulandu

    2016-05-13

    Dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), a member of the glutathione-S-transferase (GST) family, reduces dehydroascorbate (DHA) to ascorbate (AsA; Vitamin-C) in a glutathione (GSH)-dependent manner and in doing so, replenishes the critical AsA pool of the cell. To understand the enzyme mechanism in detail, we determined the crystal structure of a plant DHAR from Pennisetum glaucum (PgDHAR) using Iodide-Single Anomalous Dispersion (SAD) and Molecular replacement methods, in two different space groups. Here, we show PgDHAR in complex with two non-native ligands, viz. an acetate bound at the G-site, which resembles the γ-carboxyl moiety of GSH, and a glycerol at the H-site, which shares the backbone of AsA. We also show that, in the absence of bound native substrates, these non-native ligands help define the critical 'hook points' in the DHAR enzyme active site. Further, our data suggest that these non-native ligands can act as the logical bootstrapping points for iterative design of inhibitors/analogs for DHARs. PMID:27067046

  4. Residues in the Distal Heme Pocket of Arabidopsis Non-Symbiotic Hemoglobins: Implication for Nitrite Reductase Activity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nitin; Astegno, Alessandra; Chen, Jian; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Dominici, Paola

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that plant hemoglobins (Hbs) are involved in nitric oxide (NO) metabolism via NO dioxygenase and/or nitrite reductase activity. The ferrous-deoxy Arabidopsis Hb1 and Hb2 (AHb1 and AHb2) have been shown to reduce nitrite to NO under hypoxia. Here, to test the hypothesis that a six- to five-coordinate heme iron transition might mediate the control of the nitrite reduction rate, we examined distal pocket mutants of AHb1 and AHb2 for nitrite reductase activity, NO production and spectroscopic features. Absorption spectra of AHbs distal histidine mutants showed that AHb1 mutant (H69L) is a stable pentacoordinate high-spin species in both ferrous and ferric states, whereas heme iron in AHb2 mutant (H66L) is hexacoordinated low-spin with Lys69 as the sixth ligand. The bimolecular rate constants for nitrite reduction to NO were 13.3 ± 0.40, 7.3 ± 0.5, 10.6 ± 0.8 and 171.90 ± 9.00 M(-1)·s(-1) for AHb1, AHb2, AHb1 H69L and AHb2 H66L, respectively, at pH 7.4 and 25 °C. Consistent with the reductase activity, the amount of NO detected by chemiluminescence was significantly higher in the AHb2 H66L mutant. Our data indicate that nitrite reductase activity is determined not only by heme coordination, but also by a unique distal heme pocket in each AHb. PMID:27136534

  5. Residues in the Distal Heme Pocket of Arabidopsis Non-Symbiotic Hemoglobins: Implication for Nitrite Reductase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nitin; Astegno, Alessandra; Chen, Jian; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Dominici, Paola

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that plant hemoglobins (Hbs) are involved in nitric oxide (NO) metabolism via NO dioxygenase and/or nitrite reductase activity. The ferrous-deoxy Arabidopsis Hb1 and Hb2 (AHb1 and AHb2) have been shown to reduce nitrite to NO under hypoxia. Here, to test the hypothesis that a six- to five-coordinate heme iron transition might mediate the control of the nitrite reduction rate, we examined distal pocket mutants of AHb1 and AHb2 for nitrite reductase activity, NO production and spectroscopic features. Absorption spectra of AHbs distal histidine mutants showed that AHb1 mutant (H69L) is a stable pentacoordinate high-spin species in both ferrous and ferric states, whereas heme iron in AHb2 mutant (H66L) is hexacoordinated low-spin with Lys69 as the sixth ligand. The bimolecular rate constants for nitrite reduction to NO were 13.3 ± 0.40, 7.3 ± 0.5, 10.6 ± 0.8 and 171.90 ± 9.00 M−1·s−1 for AHb1, AHb2, AHb1 H69L and AHb2 H66L, respectively, at pH 7.4 and 25 °C. Consistent with the reductase activity, the amount of NO detected by chemiluminescence was significantly higher in the AHb2 H66L mutant. Our data indicate that nitrite reductase activity is determined not only by heme coordination, but also by a unique distal heme pocket in each AHb. PMID:27136534

  6. A Cu4S Model for the Nitrous Oxide Reductase Active Sites Supported Only by Nitrogen Ligands†

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Brittany J.; Antholine, William E.; Lindeman, Sergey V.; Mankad, Neal P.

    2016-01-01

    To model the (His)7Cu4Sn (n = 1 or 2) active sites of nitrous oxide reductase, the first Cu4(μ4-S) cluster supported only by nitrogen donors has been prepared using amidinate supporting ligands. Structural, magnetic, spectroscopic, and computational characterization is reported. Electrochemical data indicates that the 2-hole model complex can be reduced reversibly to the 1-hole state and irreversibly to the fully reduced state. PMID:26111160

  7. A Cu4S model for the nitrous oxide reductase active sites supported only by nitrogen ligands.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brittany J; Antholine, William E; Lindeman, Sergey V; Mankad, Neal P

    2015-07-28

    To model the (His)7Cu4Sn (n = 1 or 2) active sites of nitrous oxide reductase, the first Cu4(μ4-S) cluster supported only by nitrogen donors has been prepared using amidinate supporting ligands. Structural, magnetic, spectroscopic, and computational characterization is reported. Electrochemical data indicates that the 2-hole model complex can be reduced reversibly to the 1-hole state and irreversibly to the fully reduced state. PMID:26111160

  8. Kinetics of Hydrogen Atom Abstraction from Substrate by an Active Site Thiyl Radical in Ribonucleotide Reductase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) catalyze the conversion of nucleotides to deoxynucleotides in all organisms. Active E. coli class Ia RNR is an α2β2 complex that undergoes reversible, long-range proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) over a pathway of redox active amino acids (β-Y122 → [β-W48] → β-Y356 → α-Y731 → α-Y730 → α-C439) that spans ∼35 Å. To unmask PCET kinetics from rate-limiting conformational changes, we prepared a photochemical RNR containing a [ReI] photooxidant site-specifically incorporated at position 355 ([Re]-β2), adjacent to PCET pathway residue Y356 in β. [Re]-β2 was further modified by replacing Y356 with 2,3,5-trifluorotyrosine to enable photochemical generation and spectroscopic observation of chemically competent tyrosyl radical(s). Using transient absorption spectroscopy, we compare the kinetics of Y· decay in the presence of substrate and wt-α2, Y731F-α2 ,or C439S-α2, as well as with 3′-[2H]-substrate and wt-α2. We find that only in the presence of wt-α2 and the unlabeled substrate do we observe an enhanced rate of radical decay indicative of forward radical propagation. This observation reveals that cleavage of the 3′-C–H bond of substrate by the transiently formed C439· thiyl radical is rate-limiting in forward PCET through α and has allowed calculation of a lower bound for the rate constant associated with this step of (1.4 ± 0.4) × 104 s–1. Prompting radical propagation with light has enabled observation of PCET events heretofore inaccessible, revealing active site chemistry at the heart of RNR catalysis. PMID:25353063

  9. Probing the Electrostatics of Active Site Microenvironments along the Catalytic Cycle for Escherichia coli Dihydrofolate Reductase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Electrostatic interactions play an important role in enzyme catalysis by guiding ligand binding and facilitating chemical reactions. These electrostatic interactions are modulated by conformational changes occurring over the catalytic cycle. Herein, the changes in active site electrostatic microenvironments are examined for all enzyme complexes along the catalytic cycle of Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (ecDHFR) by incorporation of thiocyanate probes at two site-specific locations in the active site. The electrostatics and degree of hydration of the microenvironments surrounding the probes are investigated with spectroscopic techniques and mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations. Changes in the electrostatic microenvironments along the catalytic environment lead to different nitrile (CN) vibrational stretching frequencies and 13C NMR chemical shifts. These environmental changes arise from protein conformational rearrangements during catalysis. The QM/MM calculations reproduce the experimentally measured vibrational frequency shifts of the thiocyanate probes across the catalyzed hydride transfer step, which spans the closed and occluded conformations of the enzyme. Analysis of the molecular dynamics trajectories provides insight into the conformational changes occurring between these two states and the resulting changes in classical electrostatics and specific hydrogen-bonding interactions. The electric fields along the CN axes of the probes are decomposed into contributions from specific residues, ligands, and solvent molecules that make up the microenvironments around the probes. Moreover, calculation of the electric field along the hydride donor–acceptor axis, along with decomposition of this field into specific contributions, indicates that the cofactor and substrate, as well as the enzyme, impose a substantial electric field that facilitates hydride transfer. Overall, experimental and theoretical data provide evidence for

  10. Introducing a 2-His-1-Glu Nonheme Iron Center into Myoglobin Confers Nitric Oxide Reductase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Y Lin; N Yeung; Y Gao; K Miner; L Lei; H Robinson; Y Lu

    2011-12-31

    A conserved 2-His-1-Glu metal center, as found in natural nonheme iron-containing enzymes, was engineered into sperm whale myoglobin by replacing Leu29 and Phe43 with Glu and His, respectively (swMb L29E, F43H, H64, called Fe{sub B}Mb(-His)). A high resolution (1.65 {angstrom}) crystal structure of Cu(II)-CN{sup -}-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) was determined, demonstrating that the unique 2-His-1-Glu metal center was successfully created within swMb. The Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) can bind Cu, Fe, or Zn ions, with both Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) and Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) exhibiting nitric oxide reductase (NOR) activities. Cu dependent NOR activity was significantly higher than that of Fe in the same metal binding site. EPR studies showed that the reduction of NO to N{sub 2}O catalyzed by these two enzymes resulted in different intermediates; a five-coordinate heme-NO species was observed for Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) due to the cleavage of the proximal heme Fe-His bond, while Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) remained six-coordinate. Therefore, both the metal ligand, Glu29, and the metal itself, Cu or Fe, play crucial roles in NOR activity. This study presents a novel protein model of NOR and provides insights into a newly discovered member of the NOR family, gNOR.

  11. Introducing a 2-His-1-Glu Nonheme Iron Center into Myoglobin Confers Nitric Oxide Reductase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.W.; Robinson, H.; Yeung, N.; Gao, Y.-G.; Miner, K. D.; Lei, L.; Lu, Y.

    2010-07-28

    A conserved 2-His-1-Glu metal center, as found in natural nonheme iron-containing enzymes, was engineered into sperm whale myoglobin by replacing Leu29 and Phe43 with Glu and His, respectively (swMb L29E, F43H, H64, called Fe{sub B}Mb(-His)). A high resolution (1.65 {angstrom}) crystal structure of Cu(II)-CN?-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) was determined, demonstrating that the unique 2-His-1-Glu metal center was successfully created within swMb. The Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) can bind Cu, Fe, or Zn ions, with both Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) and Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) exhibiting nitric oxide reductase (NOR) activities. Cu dependent NOR activity was significantly higher than that of Fe in the same metal binding site. EPR studies showed that the reduction of NO to N{sub 2}O catalyzed by these two enzymes resulted in different intermediates; a five-coordinate heme-NO species was observed for Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) due to the cleavage of the proximal heme Fe-His bond, while Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) remained six-coordinate. Therefore, both the metal ligand, Glu29, and the metal itself, Cu or Fe, play crucial roles in NOR activity. This study presents a novel protein model of NOR and provides insights into a newly discovered member of the NOR family, gNOR.

  12. Exogenous Methyl Jasmonate Treatment Increases Glucosinolate Biosynthesis and Quinone Reductase Activity in Kale Leaf Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Kang-Mo; Jeffery, Elizabeth H.; Juvik, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Methyl jasmonate (MeJA) spray treatments were applied to the kale varieties ‘Dwarf Blue Curled Vates’ and ‘Red Winter’ in replicated field plantings in 2010 and 2011 to investigate alteration of glucosinolate (GS) composition in harvested leaf tissue. Aqueous solutions of 250 µM MeJA were sprayed to saturation on aerial plant tissues four days prior to harvest at commercial maturity. The MeJA treatment significantly increased gluconasturtiin (56%), glucobrassicin (98%), and neoglucobrassicin (150%) concentrations in the apical leaf tissue of these genotypes over two seasons. Induction of quinone reductase (QR) activity, a biomarker for anti-carcinogenesis, was significantly increased by the extracts from the leaf tissue of these two cultivars. Extracts of apical leaf tissues had greater MeJA mediated increases in phenolics, glucosinolate concentrations, GS hydrolysis products, and QR activity than extracts from basal leaf tissue samples. The concentration of the hydrolysis product of glucoraphanin, sulforphane was significantly increased in apical leaf tissue of the cultivar ‘Red Winter’ in both 2010 and 2011. There was interaction between exogenous MeJA treatment and environmental conditions to induce endogenous JA. Correlation analysis revealed that indole-3-carbanol (I3C) generated from the hydrolysis of glucobrassicin significantly correlated with QR activity (r = 0.800, P<0.001). Concentrations required to double the specific QR activity (CD values) of I3C was calculated at 230 µM, which is considerably weaker at induction than other isothiocyanates like sulforphane. To confirm relationships between GS hydrolysis products and QR activity, a range of concentrations of MeJA sprays were applied to kale leaf tissues of both cultivars in 2011. Correlation analysis of these results indicated that sulforaphane, NI3C, neoascorbigen, I3C, and diindolylmethane were all significantly correlated with QR activity. Thus, increased QR activity may be due to

  13. Dual binding of 14-3-3 protein regulates Arabidopsis nitrate reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Chi, Jen-Chih; Roeper, Juliane; Schwarz, Guenter; Fischer-Schrader, Katrin

    2015-03-01

    14-3-3 proteins represent a family of ubiquitous eukaryotic proteins involved in numerous signal transduction processes and metabolic pathways. One important 14-3-3 target in higher plants is nitrate reductase (NR), whose activity is regulated by different physiological conditions. Intra-molecular electron transfer in NR is inhibited following 14-3-3 binding to a conserved phospho-serine motif located in hinge 1, a surface exposed loop between the catalytic molybdenum and central heme domain. Here we describe a novel 14-3-3 binding site within the NR N-terminus, an acidic motif conserved in NRs of higher plants, which significantly contributes to 14-3-3-mediated inhibition of NR. Deletion or mutation of the N-terminal acidic motif resulted in a significant loss of 14-3-3 mediated inhibition of Ser534 phosphorylated NR-Mo-heme (residues 1-625), a previously established model of NR regulation. Co-sedimentation and crosslinking studies with NR peptides comprising each of the two binding motifs demonstrated direct binding of either peptide to 14-3-3. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy disclosed high-affinity binding of 14-3-3ω to the well-known phospho-hinge site and low-affinity binding to the N-terminal acidic motif. A binding groove-deficient 14-3-3ω variant retained interaction to the acidic motif, but lost binding to the phospho-hinge motif. To our knowledge, NR is the first enzyme that harbors two independent 14-3-3 binding sites with different affinities, which both need to be occupied by 14-3-3ω to confer full inhibition of NR activity under physiological conditions. PMID:25578809

  14. Melatonin Reduces Cataract Formation and Aldose Reductase Activity in Lenses of Streptozotocin-induced Diabetic Rat

    PubMed Central

    Khorsand, Marjan; Akmali, Masoumeh; Sharzad, Sahab; Beheshtitabar, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Background: The relationship between the high activity of aldose reductase (AR) and diabetic cataract formation has been previously investigated. The purpose of the present study was to determine the preventing effect of melatonin on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic cataract in rats. Methods: 34 adult healthy male Sprague-Dawely rats were divided into four groups. Diabetic control and diabetic+melatonin received a single dose of STZ (50 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), whereas the normal control and normal+melatonin received vehicle. The melatonin groups were gavaged with melatonin (5 mg/kg) daily for a period of 8 weeks, whereas the rats in the normal control and diabetic control groups received only the vehicle. The rats’ eyes were examined every week and cataract formation scores (0-4) were determined by slit-lamp microscope. At the end of the eighth week, the rats were sacrificed and markers of the polyol pathway and antioxidative (Glutathione, GSH) in their lens were determined. The levels of blood glucose, HbA1c and plasma malondialdhyde (MDA), as a marker of lipid peroxidation, were also measured. Results: Melatonin prevented STZ-induced hyperglycemia by decreased blood glucose and HbA1c levels. Slit lamp examination indicated that melatonin delayed cataract progression in diabetic rats. The results revealed that melatonin feeding increased the GSH levels, decreased the activities of AR and sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) and sorbitol formation in catractous lenses as well as plasma MDA content. Conclusion: In summary, for the first time we demonstrated that melatonin delayed the formation and progression of cataract in diabetic rat lenses. PMID:27365552

  15. Dissection of malonyl-coenzyme A reductase of Chloroflexus aurantiacus results in enzyme activity improvement.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changshui; Wang, Qi; Xian, Mo; Ding, Yamei; Zhao, Guang

    2013-01-01

    The formation of fusion protein in biosynthetic pathways usually improves metabolic efficiency either channeling intermediates and/or colocalizing enzymes. In the metabolic engineering of biochemical pathways, generating unnatural protein fusions between sequential biosynthetic enzymes is a useful method to increase system efficiency and product yield. Here, we reported a special case. The malonyl-CoA reductase (MCR) of Chloroflexus aurantiacus catalyzes the conversion of malonyl-CoA to 3-hydroxypropionate (3HP), and is a key enzyme in microbial production of 3HP, an important platform chemical. Functional domain analysis revealed that the N-terminal region of MCR (MCR-N; amino acids 1-549) and the C-terminal region of MCR (MCR-C; amino acids 550-1219) were functionally distinct. The malonyl-CoA was reduced into free intermediate malonate semialdehyde with NADPH by MCR-C fragment, and further reduced to 3HP by MCR-N fragment. In this process, the initial reduction of malonyl-CoA was rate limiting. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that the TGXXXG(A)X(1-2)G and YXXXK motifs were important for enzyme activities of both MCR-N and MCR-C fragments. Moreover, the enzyme activity increased when MCR was separated into two individual fragments. Kinetic analysis showed that MCR-C fragment had higher affinity for malonyl-CoA and 4-time higher K cat/K m value than MCR. Dissecting MCR into MCR-N and MCR-C fragments also had a positive effect on the 3HP production in a recombinant Escherichia coli strain. Our study showed the feasibility of protein dissection as a new strategy in biosynthetic systems. PMID:24073271

  16. Mercury Resistance and Mercuric Reductase Activities and Expression among Chemotrophic Thermophilic Aquificae

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Zachary; Zhu, Chengsheng

    2012-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) resistance (mer) by the reduction of mercuric to elemental Hg is broadly distributed among the Bacteria and Archaea and plays an important role in Hg detoxification and biogeochemical cycling. MerA is the protein subunit of the homodimeric mercuric reductase (MR) enzyme, the central function of the mer system. MerA sequences in the phylum Aquificae form the deepest-branching lineage in Bayesian phylogenetic reconstructions of all known MerA homologs. We therefore hypothesized that the merA homologs in two thermophilic Aquificae, Hydrogenobaculum sp. strain Y04AAS1 (AAS1) and Hydrogenivirga sp. strain 128-5-R1-1 (R1-1), specified Hg resistance. Results supported this hypothesis, because strains AAS1 and R1-1 (i) were resistant to >10 μM Hg(II), (ii) transformed Hg(II) to Hg(0) during cellular growth, and (iii) possessed Hg-dependent NAD(P)H oxidation activities in crude cell extracts that were optimal at temperatures corresponding with the strains' optimal growth temperatures, 55°C for AAS1 and 70°C for R1-1. While these characteristics all conformed with the mer system paradigm, expression of the Aquificae mer operons was not induced by exposure to Hg(II) as indicated by unity ratios of merA transcripts, normalized to gyrA transcripts for hydrogen-grown AAS1 cultures, and by similar MR specific activities in thiosulfate-grown cultures with and without Hg(II). The Hg(II)-independent expression of mer in the deepest-branching lineage of MerA from bacteria whose natural habitats are Hg-rich geothermal environments suggests that regulated expression of mer was a later innovation likely in environments where microorganisms were intermittently exposed to toxic concentrations of Hg. PMID:22773655

  17. Interaction of Product Analogues With the Active Site of Rhodobacter Sphaeroides Dimethyl Sulfoxide Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    George, G.N.; Nelson, K.J.; Harris, H.H.; Doonan, C.J.; Rajagopalan, K.V.; /Saskatchewan U. /Duke U. /Sydney U.

    2007-07-09

    We report a structural characterization using X-ray absorption spectroscopy of Rhodobacter sphaeroides dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) reductase reduced with trimethylarsine, and show that this is structurally analogous to the physiologically relevant dimethylsulfide-reduced DMSO reductase. Our data unambiguously indicate that these species should be regarded as formal MoIV species, and indicate a classical coordination complex of trimethylarsine oxide, with no special structural distortions. The similarity of the trimethylarsine and dimethylsulfide complexes suggests in turn that the dimethylsulfide reduced enzyme possesses a classical coordination of DMSO with no special elongation of the S-O bond, as previously suggested.

  18. Imaging the activity of nitrate reductase by means of a scanning electrochemical microscope.

    PubMed

    Zaumseil, J; Wittstock, G; Bahrs, S; Steinrücke, P

    2000-06-01

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) was used to characterize immobilized nitrate reductase (NaR) from Pseudonomonas stutzeri (E.C. 1.7.99.4). Nitrate reductase with membrane fragment was embedded in a polyurethane hydrogel in a capillary and solubilized NaR without membrane fragment was covalently coupled to a diaminoethyl-cellulose-carbamitate film on glass. After systematic studies of possible mediators, SECM feedback imaging of both forms of immobilized NaR was accomplished with methylviologen as redox mediator. PMID:11225859

  19. Interaction of Product Analogs with the Active Site of Rhodobacter sphaeroides Dimethylsulfoxide Reductase

    PubMed Central

    George, Graham N.; Nelson, Kimberly Johnson; Harris, Hugh H.; Doonan, Christian J.; Rajagopalan, K.V.

    2007-01-01

    We report a structural characterization using X-ray absorption spectroscopy of Rhodobacter sphaeroides dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) reductase reduced with trimethylarsine, and show that this is structurally analogous to the physiologically relevant dimethylsulfide-reduced DMSO reductase. Our data unambiguously indicate that these species should be regarded as formal MoIV species, and indicate a classical coordination complex of trimethylarsine oxide, with no special structural distortions. The similarity of the trimethylarsine and dimethylsulfide complexes suggests in turn that the dimethylsulfide reduced enzyme possesses a classical coordination of DMSO with no special elongation of the S—O bond, as previously suggested. PMID:17361996

  20. Biosynthesis of catalytically active rat testosterone 5. alpha. -reductase in microinjected Xenopus oocytes: Evidence for tissue-specific differences in translatable mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Farkash, Y.; Soreq, H.; Orly, J. )

    1988-08-01

    The enzyme 4-ene-3-ketosteroid-5{alpha}-oxidoreductase plays a key role in androgen-dependent target tissues, where it catalyzes the conversion of testosterone to the biologically active dihydrotestosterone. The regulation of 5{alpha}-reductase expression has not been studied at the molecular level as the enzyme is a membrane protein that is labile in cell-free homogenates. The authors developed a sensitive bioassay of the enzyme activity expressed in Xenopus oocytes microinjected with rat liver and prostate mRNA. After microinjection, incubation of intact oocytes in the presence of ({sup 3}H)testosterone revealed the in ovo appearance of active 5{alpha}-reductase. Polyandenylylated RNA was fractionated by sucrose gradient centrifugation, and the enzymatic activity was shown to be encoded by a 1,600- to 2,000-base-pair fraction of hepatic poly(A){sup +} RNA. 5{alpha}-Reductase mRNA was most efficiently translated when up to 80 ng of RNA was injected per oocyte. In the injected oocytes, 5{alpha}-reductase mRNA was found to be a short-lived molecule whereas its in ovo translatable 5{alpha}-reductase protein exhibited stable enzymatic activity for over 40 hr. Moreover, the levels of translatable tissue-specific 5{alpha}-reductase mRNAs as monitored in the Xenopus oocytes correlated with the variable 5{alpha}-reductase activities in female rat liver, male rat liver, and prostate homogenates. Altogether, these results provide supporting evidence in favor of the transcriptional control of 5{alpha}-reductase expression in rat tissues.

  1. Polymorphism in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, and apolipoprotein E in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Al-Muhanna, Fahad; Al-Mueilo, Samir; Al-Ali, Amein; Larbi, Emmanuel; Rubaish, Abdullah; Abdulmohsen, Mohammed Fakhry; Al-Zahrani, Alhussain; Al-Ateeq, Suad

    2008-11-01

    The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphism, apolipoprotein E (apo epsilon4) gene polymorphism and polymorphism of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) have been shown to be associated with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). To determine the prevalence of these mutations in Saudi patients with ESRD on hemodialysis, we studied the allelic frequency and genotype distribution in patients receiving hemodialysis and in a control group, all residing in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia. The genotypes were determined using allele specific hybridization procedures and were confirmed by restriction fragment length polymorphism. The T allele frequency and homozygous genotype of MTHFR in ESRD patients were 14% and 2.4%, respectively compared to 13.4% and 0%, respectively in the control group. The allele frequency and homozygous genotype of 4G/4G PAI-1 gene polymorphism were 46.4% and 4.8% respectively in ESRD patients compared to 57.1% and 32% respectively in the control group. The apo s4 allele frequency and homozygous genotype distribution in hemodialysis patients were 7% and 2.4%, respectively compared to 13% and 2% in the control group. Although allele frequency of C677T of MTHFR was statistically similar in the hemodialysis patients and in the control group, the homozygotes T allele genotype was over represented in the hemodialysis group compared to normal. The prevalence of PAI-1 4G/4G polymorphism in ESRD patients was lower when compared to the control group. The prevalence of apo s4 allele did not differ significantly between the two groups. The present results demonstrate that all three studied polymorphic mutations are present in our population and that they may contribute to the etiology of the disease in our area. PMID:18974580

  2. Simultaneous binding of coenzyme and two ligand molecules into the active site of fungal trihydroxynaphthalene reductase.

    PubMed

    Stojan, Jure; Brunskole, Mojca; Rizner, Tea Lanisnik

    2009-03-16

    We present here a kinetic characterization of the oxidation of the artificial substrate 2,3-dihydro-2,5-dihydroxy-4H-benzopyran-4-one in the presence of NADP(+) by trihydroxynaphthalene reductase from the filamentous fungus Curvularia lunata. Although the experimental data were gathered by conventional equipment and were only available for the reaction in one direction, the analysis confirms the bi-bi reaction mechanism and yields estimates of kinetic parameters of the intermediates. It is based on an independent estimation of coenzyme binding constants and on a sequential analysis of three portions of the progress curves, from the beginning of the reaction until equilibrium is reached. First, the plateaus are used to determine the overall equilibrium constant of the non-catalyzed reaction. Then, the dissociation constants of the oxidized and reduced cofactor are estimated by titration. Subsequently, the initial parts of the progress curves are analyzed using the rate equation that is derived under combined assumptions of equilibrium and steady state. The macroscopic relations obtained are then fixed in the final progress curve analysis where the information for only two remaining rate constants is extracted from their curved portions by fitting numerically solved model-specific differential equations to the data. At pH 8, the overall equilibrium largely favours the oxidized substrate and reduced cofactor, and the activity of the holoenzyme is inhibited by high substrate concentrations. Substrate inhibition can be discriminated from true cooperativity through the effects of apigenin, a flavonoid inhibitor that is structurally similar, but larger, than the substrate used in the study. PMID:19071099

  3. Iridoid Synthase Activity Is Common among the Plant Progesterone 5β-Reductase Family.

    PubMed

    Munkert, Jennifer; Pollier, Jacob; Miettinen, Karel; Van Moerkercke, Alex; Payne, Richard; Müller-Uri, Frieder; Burlat, Vincent; O'Connor, Sarah E; Memelink, Johan; Kreis, Wolfgang; Goossens, Alain

    2014-09-19

    Catharanthus roseus, the Madagascar periwinkle, synthesizes bioactive monoterpenoid indole alkaloids, among which the anti-cancer drugs vinblastine and vincristine. The monoterpenoid branch of the alkaloid pathway leads to the secoiridoid secologanin and involves the enzyme iridoid synthase (IS), a member of the progesterone 5β-reductase (P5βR) family. IS reduces 8-oxogeranial to iridodial. Through transcriptome mining, we show that IS belongs to a family of six C. roseus P5βR genes. Characterisation of recombinant CrP5βR proteins demonstrates that all but CrP5βR3 can reduce progesterone, and thus can be classified as P5βRs. Three of them, namely CrP5βR1, CrP5βR2 and CrP5βR4, could also reduce 8-oxogeranial, pointing to a possible redundancy with IS (corresponding to CrP5βR5) in secoiridoid synthesis. In depth functional analysis by subcellular protein localisation, gene expression analysis, in situ hybridisation and virus-induced gene silencing, indicates that besides IS, CrP5βR4 may also participate in secoiridoid biosynthesis. Finally, we cloned a set of P5βR genes from angiosperm plant species not known to produce iridoids and demonstrate that the corresponding recombinant proteins are also capable of using 8-oxogeranial as a substrate. This suggests that 'IS activity' is intrinsic to angiosperm P5βR proteins and has evolved early during evolution. PMID:25239067

  4. Iridoid synthase activity is common among the plant progesterone 5β-reductase family.

    PubMed

    Munkert, Jennifer; Pollier, Jacob; Miettinen, Karel; Van Moerkercke, Alex; Payne, Richard; Müller-Uri, Frieder; Burlat, Vincent; O'Connor, Sarah E; Memelink, Johan; Kreis, Wolfgang; Goossens, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus, the Madagascar periwinkle, synthesizes bioactive monoterpenoid indole alkaloids, including the anti-cancer drugs vinblastine and vincristine. The monoterpenoid branch of the alkaloid pathway leads to the secoiridoid secologanin and involves the enzyme iridoid synthase (IS), a member of the progesterone 5β-reductase (P5βR) family. IS reduces 8-oxogeranial to iridodial. Through transcriptome mining, we show that IS belongs to a family of six C. roseus P5βR genes. Characterization of recombinant CrP5βR proteins demonstrates that all but CrP5βR3 can reduce progesterone and thus can be classified as P5βRs. Three of them, namely CrP5βR1, CrP5βR2, and CrP5βR4, can also reduce 8-oxogeranial, pointing to a possible redundancy with IS (corresponding to CrP5βR5) in secoiridoid synthesis. In-depth functional analysis by subcellular protein localization, gene expression analysis, in situ hybridization, and virus-induced gene silencing indicate that besides IS, CrP5βR4 may also participate in secoiridoid biosynthesis. We cloned a set of P5βR genes from angiosperm plant species not known to produce iridoids and demonstrate that the corresponding recombinant proteins are also capable of using 8-oxogeranial as a substrate. This suggests that IS activity is intrinsic to angiosperm P5βR proteins and has evolved early during evolution. PMID:25578278

  5. Pivotal role of dihydrofolate reductase knockdown in the anticancer activity of 2-hydroxyoleic acid

    PubMed Central

    Lladó, Victoria; Terés, Silvia; Higuera, Mónica; Álvarez, Rafael; Noguera-Salva, Maria Antònia; Halver, John E.; Escribá, Pablo V.; Busquets, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    α-Hydroxy-9-cis-octadecenoic acid, a synthetic fatty acid that modifies the composition and structure of lipid membranes. 2-Hydroxyoleic acid (HOA) generated interest due to its potent, yet nontoxic, anticancer activity. It induces cell cycle arrest in human lung cancer (A549) cells and apoptosis in human leukemia (Jurkat) cells. These two pathways may explain how HOA induces regression of a variety of cancers. We showed that HOA repressed the expression of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), the enzyme responsible for tetrahydrofolate (THF) synthesis. Folinic acid, which readily produces THF without the participation of DHFR, reverses the antitumor effects of HOA in A549 and Jurkat cells, as well as the inhibitory influence on cyclin D and cdk2 in A549 cells, and on DNA and PARP degradation in Jurkat cells. This effect was very specific, because either elaidic acid (an analog of HOA) or other lipids, failed to alter A549 or Jurkat cell growth. THF is a cofactor necessary for DNA synthesis. Thus, impairment of DNA synthesis appears to be a common mechanism involved in the different responses elicited by cancer cells following treatment with HOA, namely cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. Compared with other antifolates, such as methotrexate, HOA did not directly inhibit DHFR but rather, it repressed its expression, a mode of action that offers certain therapeutic advantages. These results not only demonstrate the effect of a fatty acid on the expression of DHFR, but also emphasize the potential of HOA to be used as a wide-spectrum drug against cancer. PMID:19666584

  6. Effect of changing the nanoscale environment on activity and stability of nitrate reductase.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Veena; Hooda, Vinita

    2016-07-01

    Nitrate reductase (NR) is employed for fabrication of nitrate sensing devices in which the enzyme in immobilized form is used to catalyze the conversion of nitrate to nitrite in the presence of a suitable cofactor. So far, instability of immobilized NR due to the use of inappropriate immobilization matrices has limited the practical applications of these devices. Present study is an attempt to improve the kinetic properties and stability of NR using nanoscale iron oxide (nFe3O4) and zinc oxide (nZnO) particles. The desired nanoparticles were synthesized, surface functionalized, characterized and affixed onto the epoxy resin to yield two nanocomposite supports (epoxy/nFe3O4 and epoxy/nZnO) for immobilizing NR. Epoxy/nFe3O4 and epoxy/nZnO support could load as much as 35.8±0.01 and 33.20±0.01μg/cm(2) of NR with retention of about 93.72±0.50 and 84.81±0.80% of its initial activity respectively. Changes in surface morphology and chemical bonding structure of both the nanocomposite supports after addition of NR were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Optimum working conditions of pH, temperature and substrate concentration were ascertained for free as well as immobilized NR preparations. Further, storage stability at 4°C and thermal stability between 25-50°C were determined for all the NR preparations. Analytical applications of immobilized NR for determination of soil and water nitrates along with reusability data has been included to make sure the usefulness of the procedure. PMID:27233127

  7. Biliverdin reductase, a novel regulator for induction of activating transcription factor-2 and heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Kravets, Anatoliy; Hu, Zhenbo; Miralem, Tihomir; Torno, Michael D; Maines, Mahin D

    2004-05-01

    Biliverdin IXalpha reductase (BVR) catalyzes reduction of the HO activity product, biliverdin, to bilirubin. hBVR is a serine/threonine kinase that contains a bZip domain. Presently, regulation of gene expression by hBVR was examined. 293A cells were infected with adenovirus-doxycycline (Ad-Dox)-inducible hBVR cDNA. High level expression of hBVR was determined at mRNA, protein, and activity levels 8 h after induction. Cell signal transduction microarray analysis of cells infected with expression or with the control Ad-inverted (INV)-hBVR vector identified ATF-2 among several up-regulated genes. ATF-2 is a bZip transcription factor for activation of cAMP response element (CRE) and a dimeric partner to c-jun in MAPK pathway that regulates the stress protein, HO-1, expression. Northern and Western blot analyses showed increases of approximately 10-fold in ATF-2 mRNA and protein at 16 and 24 h after Dox addition. Ad-INV-hBVR did not effect ATF-2 expression. In hBVR-infected cells, levels of HO-1 mRNA and protein were increased. In vitro translated hBVR and nuclear extract containing hBVR in gel mobility-shift assay bound to AP-1 sites in the ATF-2 promoter region and to an oligonucleotide containing the CRE site. Both bindings could be competed out by excess unlabeled probe; in the presence of hBVR antibody, they displayed shifted bands. Co-transfection of hBVR with ATF-2 or c-jun promoters caused a severalfold increase in luciferase activity. hBVR modulation of ATF-2 and HO-1 expression suggests it has a potential role in regulation of AP-1 and cAMP-regulated genes and a role in cell signaling. We propose that increased expression of the protein can be used to alter the gene expression profile in the cell. PMID:14988408

  8. Magnesium Deficiency and High Light Intensity Enhance Activities of Superoxide Dismutase, Ascorbate Peroxidase, and Glutathione Reductase in Bean Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Cakmak, Ismail; Marschner, Horst

    1992-01-01

    The influence of varied Mg supply (10-1000 micromolar) and light intensity (100-580 microeinsteins per square meter per second) on the concentrations of ascorbate (AsA) and nonprotein SH-compounds and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD; EC 1.15.11) and the H2O2 scavenging enzymes, AsA peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7), dehydroascorbate reductase (EC 1.8.5.1), and glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2) were studied in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) leaves over a 13-day period. The concentrations of AsA and SH-compounds and the activities of SOD and H2O2 scavenging enzymes increased with light intensity, in particular in Mg-deficient leaves. Over the 12-day period of growth for a given light intensity, the concentrations of AsA and SH-compounds and the activities of these enzymes remained more or less constant in Mg-sufficient leaves. In contrast, in Mg-deficient leaves, a progressive increase was recorded, particularly in concentrations of AsA and activities of AsA peroxidase and glutathione reductase, whereas the activities of guaiacol peroxidase and catalase were only slightly enhanced. Partial shading of Mg-deficient leaf blades for 4 days prevented chlorosis, and the activities of the O2.− and H2O2 scavenging enzymes remained at a low level. The results demonstrate the role of both light intensity and Mg nutritional status on the regulation of O2.− and H2O2 scavenging enzymes in chloroplasts. PMID:16668779

  9. Human biliverdin reductase: a member of the insulin receptor substrate family with serine/threonine/tyrosine kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Lerner-Marmarosh, Nicole; Shen, Jenny; Torno, Michael D; Kravets, Anatoliy; Hu, Zhenbo; Maines, Mahin D

    2005-05-17

    We describe here the tyrosine kinase activity of human biliverdin reductase (BVR) and its potential role in the insulin-signaling pathway. BVR is both a substrate for insulin receptor (IR) tyrosine kinase (IRK) activity and a kinase for serine phosphorylation of IR substrate 1 (IRS-1). Our previous studies have revealed serine/threonine kinase activity of BVR. Y198, in the YMKM motif found in the C-terminal domain of BVR, is shown to be a substrate for insulin-activated IRK. This motif in IRS proteins provides a docking site for proteins that contain a Src homology 2 domain. Additionally, Y228 in the YLSF sequence and Y291 are IRK substrates; the former sequence provides optimum recognition motif in the tyrosine phosphatase, SHP-1, and for SHC (Src homology 2 domain containing transfroming protein 1). BVR autophosphorylates N-terminal tyrosines Y72 and Y83. Serine residues in IRS-1 are targets for BVR phosphorylation, and point mutation of serine residues in the kinase domain of the reductase inhibits phosphotransferase activity. Because tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1 activates the insulin signaling pathway and serine phosphorylation of IRS-1 blocks insulin action, our findings that insulin increases BVR tyrosine phosphorylation and that there is an increase in glucose uptake in response to insulin when expression of BVR is "knocked down" by small interfering RNA suggest a potential role for BVR in the insulin signaling pathway. PMID:15870194

  10. Diurnal variation in the fraction of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase in the active form in the mammary gland of the lactating rat.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R A; Middleton, B; West, D W

    1986-01-01

    'Expressed' and 'total' activities of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase) were measured in freeze-clamped samples of mammary glands from lactating rats at intervals throughout the 24 h light/dark cycle. 'Expressed' activities were measured in microsomal fractions isolated and assayed in the presence of 100 mM-KF. 'Total' activities were determined in microsomal preparations from the same homogenates but washed free of KF and incubated with exogenously added sheep liver phosphoprotein phosphatase before assay. Both 'expressed' and 'total' activities of HMG-CoA reductase underwent a diurnal cycle, which had a major peak 6 h into the light phase and a nadir 15 h later, i.e. 9 h into the dark period. Both activities showed a secondary peak of activity (around 68% of the maximum activity) at the time of changeover from dark to light, with a trough in the value of the 'expressed' activity that was close to the nadir value. 'Expressed' activity was lower than 'total' at all time points, indicating the presence of enzyme molecules inactivated by covalent phosphorylation. Nevertheless the 'expressed'/'total' activity ratio was comparatively constant and varied only between 43% and 75%. Immunotitration of enzyme activity, with antiserum raised in sheep against purified rat liver HMG-CoA reductase, confirmed the presence of both active and inactive forms of the enzyme and indicated that at the peak and nadir the variation in 'expressed' HMG-CoA reductase activity resulted from changes in the total number of enzyme molecules rather than from covalent modification. The sample obtained after 3 h of the light phase exhibited an anomalously low 'total' HMG-CoA reductase activity, which could be increased when Cl- replaced F- in the homogenization medium. The result suggests that at that time the activity of the enzyme could be regulated by mechanisms other than covalent phosphorylation or degradation. PMID:3814075

  11. Identification of one-electron reductases that activate both the hypoxia prodrug SN30000 and diagnostic probe EF5.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingli; Guise, Chris P; Dachs, Gabi U; Phung, Yen; Hsu, Annie Huai-Ling; Lambie, Neil K; Patterson, Adam V; Wilson, William R

    2014-10-15

    SN30000 is a second-generation benzotriazine-N-oxide hypoxia-activated prodrug scheduled for clinical trial. Previously we showed that covalent binding of the hypoxia probe EF5 predicts metabolic activation of SN30000 in a panel of cancer cell lines under anoxia, suggesting that they are activated by the same reductases. However the identity of these reductases is unknown. Here, we test whether forced expression of nine oxidoreductases with known or suspected roles in bioreductive prodrug metabolism (AKR1C3, CYB5R3, FDXR, MTRR, NDOR1, NOS2A, NQO1, NQO2 and POR) enhances oxic or anoxic reduction of SN30000 and EF5 by HCT116 cells. Covalent binding of (14)C-EF5 and reduction of SN30000 to its 1-oxide and nor-oxide metabolites was highly selective for anoxia in all lines, with significantly elevated anoxic metabolism of both compounds in lines over-expressing POR, MTRR, NOS2A or NDOR1. There was a strong correlation between EF5 binding and SN30000 metabolism under anoxia across the cell lines (R(2)=0.84, p=0.0001). Antiproliferative potency of SN30000 under anoxia was increased most strongly by overexpression of MTRR and POR. Transcript abundance in human tumours, evaluated using public domain mRNA expression data, was highest for MTRR, followed by POR, NOS2A and NDOR1, with little variation between tumour types. Immunostaining of tissue microarrays demonstrated variable MTRR protein expression across 517 human cancers with most displaying low expression. In conclusion, we have identified four diflavin reductases (POR, MTRR, NOS2A and NDOR1) capable of reducing both SN30000 and EF5, further supporting use of 2-nitroimidazole probes to predict the ability of hypoxic cells to activate SN30000. PMID:25130546

  12. The changes of nitrate reductase activity in soils under Robinia pseudoacacia shelterbelt and in adjoining cultivated field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojciech Szajdak, Lech; Gaca, Wioletta

    2010-05-01

    The investigations were carried out in Dezydery Chlapowski Agroecological Landscape Park in Turew (40 km South-West of Poznań, West Polish Lowlands, 16° 45 E and 52° 01 N). Intensively agriculture is observed in this region. Characteristic features of this landscape are shelterbelts created in the XIX century by the general Dezydery Chlapowski. Soil samples were taken from Robinia pseudoacacia shelterbelt and from adjoining cultivated field. This is 200 - years old shelterbelt consists mainly of Robinia pseudacacia and small admixture of Quercus robur and Quercus petraea. It is 2 kilometers length and 36 meters width. Shelterbelts and adjoining cultivated fields were introduced on Hapludalfs soils (according to FAO classification). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of moisture and nitrogen concentrations on the changes of nitrate reductase activity in soil under shelterbelt and in adjoining cultivated field. The experiments were carried out in two different moisture content. The first was field-moist and the second was 15% moisture content. In this study three different contents of nitrogen in the form of urea (organic form of nitrogen) were investigated: field concentration, after addition of 0.25% and 0.5% of nitrogen. Activity of nitrate reductase changes in different interval of time were measured. Rate constant of reactions was calculated for the changes of nitrate reductase activity. Our results have shown that this process runs according to the equation rate of first-order kinetic reaction model. The first-order reaction rate constants increases with the changes of moisture content from field-moist to 15% in soil under shelterbelt. In soil under adjoining cultivated field raise of the moisture content from field-moist to 15% causes an increase of the first-order reaction rate constants higher than in soil under shelterbelt. The processes of the changes of nitrate reductase activity 15% moisture content of the soil under shelterbelt and in

  13. Antihyperlipidemic Activity of Aloe succotrina in Rats: Possibly Mediated by Inhibition of HMG-CoA Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Lamba, Deepak; Kumar, Ramesh; Nath, Pashupati; Gauttam, Satyaprakash

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate antihyperlipidemic activity of dried pulp of Aloe succotrina leaves in Wistar albino rats. Hyperlipidemia was induced in rats by feeding them high fat diet (HFD) or D-fructose (25% w/v) for 4 successive weeks. From 15th to 28th day, dried pulp (100 and 200 mg/kg, p.o) and atorvastatin (10 mg/kg, p.o.) per se were administered 2 h prior to feeding rats with HFD or fructose. Aloe succotrina did not significantly decrease the body weight of rats. The dried pulp and atorvastatin per se significantly decreased relative liver weight but did not significantly affect relative heart weight. HFD or fructose significantly increased serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL-c, and VLDL, and decreased HDL-c; significantly increased liver MDA and decreased GSH levels. The dried pulp (200 mg/kg p.o.) significantly reversed high fat diet-induced and fructose-induced hyperlipidemia and atherogenic index. Aloe succotrina significantly decreased HMG Co-A reductase activity. Antihyperlipidemic effect of the dried pulp was comparable to atorvastatin. Thus, Aloe succotrina produced significant antihyperlipidemic activity in both HFD and fructose-induced hyperlipidemic rats, possibly through normalization of serum lipid profile, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory activity, and amelioration of oxidative stress in liver. PMID:24693447

  14. Inhibitory Activities of Phenolic Compounds Isolated from Adina rubella Leaves Against 5α-Reductase Associated with Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Heo, Jun Hyeok; Hwang, Yoon Jeong; Le, Thi Tam; Lee, Min Won

    2016-01-01

    Adina rubella Hance (AR), a plant native to Korea, has been used as traditional medicine for dysentery, eczema, intoxication, and external hemorrhages. Previous phytochemical studies of AR have reported several components, including terpenoids, phenolics, and alkaloids. The current study evaluated the anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities and 5α-reductase inhibition of isolated compounds of AR leaves to find a potential therapeutic agent for benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). Repeated chromatographic isolation of an 80% acetone extract of AR leaves yielded seven phenolic compounds: caffeic acid (1), chlorogenic acid (2), methyl chlorogenate (3), quercetin-3-rutinoside (4), kaempferol-3-O-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→6)-β-d-glucopyranoside (5), hyperoside (6), and grandifloroside (7). Compound 7 is a novel compound in AR. Caffeoyl derivatives 1-3 and 7 showed good anti-oxidative activities. In particular, caffeic acid (1) and grandifloroside (7) showed potent anti-inflammatory activities, and 7 also exhibited potent inhibitory activity against TNF-α and 5α-reductase. Our results show that the extract and grandifloroside (7) from leaves of AR might be developed as a source of potent anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory agents and therapeutic agent for BPH. PMID:27399661

  15. Effects of SRT and DO on N2O reductase activity in an anoxic-oxic activated sludge system.

    PubMed

    Noda, N; Kaneko, N; Mikami, M; Kimochi, Y; Tsuneda, S; Hirata, A; Mizuochi, M; Inamori, Y

    2003-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is emitted from wastewater treatment processes, and is known to be a green house gas contributing to global warming. It is thus important to develop technology that can suppress N2O emission. The effects of sludge retention time (SRT) and dissolved oxygen (DO) on N2O emission in an anoxic-oxic activated sludge system were estimated. Moreover, the microbial community structure in the sludge, which plays an important role in N2O suppression, was clarified based on nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ) gene analysis by molecular biological techniques. The results showed that under low SRT conditions, nitrification efficiency was reduced and the N2O emission rate in the oxic reactors was increased. It was also observed that N2O emission was enhanced under low DO conditions, where the available oxygen is insufficient for nitrification. Moreover, molecular analysis revealed that the clones identified in this study were closely related to Ralstonia eutropha and Paracoccus denitrificans. The fact that the identified sequences are not closely related to known culturable denitrifier nosZ sequences indicates a substantial in situ diversity of denitrifiers contributing to N2O suppression, which are not reflected in the cultivatable fraction of the population. The further application of these new molecular techniques should serve to enhance our knowledge of the microbial community of denitrifying bacteria contributing to N2O suppression in wastewater treatment systems. PMID:14753557

  16. Mercuric reductase activity and evidence of broad-spectrum mercury resistance among clinical isolates of rapidly growing mycobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Steingrube, V.A.; Wallace, R.J. Jr.; Steele, L.C.; Pang, Y.J. )

    1991-05-01

    Resistance to mercury was evaluated in 356 rapidly growing mycobacteria belonging to eight taxonomic groups. Resistance to inorganic Hg2+ ranged from 0% among the unnamed third biovariant complex of Mycobacterium fortuitum to 83% among M. chelonae-like organisms. With cell extracts and 203Hg(NO3)2 as the substrate, mercuric reductase (HgRe) activity was demonstrable in six of eight taxonomic groups. HgRe activity was inducible and required NADPH or NADH and a thiol donor for optimai activity. Species with HgRe activity were also resistant to organomercurial compounds, including phenylmercuric acetate. Attempts at intraspecies and intragenus transfer of HgRe activity by conjugation or transformation were unsuccessful. Mercury resistance is common in rapidly growing mycobacteria and appears to function via the same inducible enzyme systems already defined in other bacterial species. This system offers potential as a strain marker for epidemiologic investigations and for studying genetic systems in rapidly growing mycobacteria.

  17. Dihydropteridine reductase activity in dried blood spots: effects of aging and senile dementia of the Alzheimer type.

    PubMed Central

    Jeeps, C M; Silcox, A; Lloyd, B; Clayton, B E

    1986-01-01

    Dihydropteridine reductase (EC 1.6.99.7) (DHPR) activity was measured in blood spots from 50 neonates, 52 healthy adults aged 30-62 years, and 21 elderly controls aged 67-97 years, as well as 32 demented patients of whom 25 had senile dementia of the Alzheimer type. Enzyme activity was stable for seven days at 4 degrees C and for at least 14 days at -20 degrees C. No important difference was found between the DHPR activity of venous and capillary blood. DHPR activity was considerably lower in the healthy adult group compared with neonates and the elderly group, and there was no sex difference at any age. The erythrocyte DHPR activity of patients with senile dementia of the Alzheimer type was similar to that of elderly controls. This result differs from that previously reported for leucocytes. PMID:3950042

  18. Light effects and diel variations of nitrate reductase activity in phytoplankton from the northwest Africa upwelling region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Rosa; Packard, Theodore T.; Blasco, Dolors

    1987-06-01

    Light kinetics and diel cycles of nitrate reductase (NR) activity were studied in the upwelling ecosystem off northwest Africa. The activity of the enzyme showed a strong response to light at low intensities but became saturated at light intensities above 15-30% of the incident light intensity. At higher irradiances, NR activity showed photoinhibition. At sea surface irradiances an average inhibition of 32% in the NR activity was observed. Diel cycles of NR activity exhibited the following characteristics: a low pre-dawn value (0.03-0.009 μmol NO 3-N (μg Chl α) -1), a rapid increase with the onset of daylight, a maximum before noon (tripling the dark value), a secondary maximum in the early afternoon, and an afternoon-evening decrease that coincided with the decrease in sunlight. To simulate these characteristics a continuous polynomial function of light and time was developed.

  19. Human brain aldehyde reductases: relationship to succinic semialdehyde reductase and aldose reductase.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, P L; Wermuth, B; von Wartburg, J P

    1980-08-01

    Human brain contains multiple forms of aldehyde-reducing enzymes. One major form (AR3), as previously shown, has properties that indicate its identity with NADPH-dependent aldehyde reductase isolated from brain and other organs of various species; i.e., low molecular weight, use of NADPH as the preferred cofactor, and sensitivity to inhibition by barbiturates. A second form of aldehyde reductase ("SSA reductase") specifically reduces succinic semialdehyde (SSA) to produce gamma-hydroxybutyrate. This enzyme form has a higher molecular weight than AR3, and uses NADH as well as NADPH as cofactor. SSA reductase was not inhibited by pyrazole, oxalate, or barbiturates, and the only effective inhibitor found was the flavonoid quercetine. Although AR3 can also reduce SSA, the relative specificity of SSA reductase may enhance its in vivo role. A third form of human brain aldehyde reductase, AR2, appears to be comparable to aldose reductases characterized in several species, on the basis of its activity pattern with various sugar aldehydes and its response to characteristic inhibitors and activators, as well as kinetic parameters. This enzyme is also the most active in reducing the aldehyde derivatives of biogenic amines. These studies suggest that the various forms of human brain aldehyde reductases may have specific physiological functions. PMID:6778961

  20. [Illumination's effect on the growth and nitrate reductase activity of typical red-tide algae in the East China Sea].

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-mei; Shi, Xiao-yong; Ding, Yan-yan; Tang, Hong-jie

    2013-09-01

    Two typical red-tide algae, Skeletonema costatum and Prorocentrum donghaiense were selected as studied objects. The nitrate reductase activity (NRA) and the growth of the two algae under different illuminations through incubation experiment were studied. The illumination condition was consistent with in situ. Results showed that P. donghaiense and S. costatum could grow normally in the solar radiation ranged from 30-60 W x m(-2), and the growth curve was "S" type. However, when solar radiation was below 9 W x m(-2), the two alga could hardly grow. In the range of 0-60 W x m(-2), three parameters (NRAmax, micro(max), Bf) increased with the increasing of light intensity, indicating that the light intensity can influence the grow of alga indirectly through influencing the nitrate reductase activity. The micro(max) and NRAmax in unite volume of Skeletonema costatum were higher than those of Prorocentrum donghaiense, indicating that Skeletonema costatum can better utilize the nitrate than Prorocentrum donghaiense. PMID:24288981

  1. Probing the Active Site of Candida Glabrata Dihydrofolate Reductase with High Resolution Crystal Structures and the Synthesis of New Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; Bolstad, D; Smith, A; Priestley, N; Wright, D; Anderson, A

    2009-01-01

    Candida glabrata, a fungal strain resistant to many commonly administered antifungal agents, has become an emerging threat to human health. In previous work, we validated that the essential enzyme, dihydrofolate reductase, is a drug target in C. glabrata. Using a crystal structure of dihydrofolate reductase from C. glabrata bound to an initial lead compound, we designed a class of biphenyl antifolates that potently and selectively inhibit both the enzyme and the growth of the fungal culture. In this work, we explore the structure-activity relationships of this class of antifolates with four new high resolution crystal structures of enzyme:inhibitor complexes and the synthesis of four new inhibitors. The designed inhibitors are intended to probe key hydrophobic pockets visible in the crystal structure. The crystal structures and an evaluation of the new compounds reveal that methyl groups at the meta and para positions of the distal phenyl ring achieve the greatest number of interactions with the pathogenic enzyme and the greatest degree of selectivity over the human enzyme. Additionally, antifungal activity can be tuned with substitution patterns at the propargyl and para-phenyl positions.

  2. Compensating for the absence of selenocysteine in high-molecular weight thioredoxin reductases: the electrophilic activation hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Lothrop, Adam P; Snider, Gregg W; Flemer, Stevenson; Ruggles, Erik L; Davidson, Ronald S; Lamb, Audrey L; Hondal, Robert J

    2014-02-01

    Mammalian thioredoxin reductase (TR) is a pyridine disulfide oxidoreductase that uses the rare amino acid selenocysteine (Sec) in place of the more commonly used amino acid cysteine (Cys). Selenium is a Janus-faced element because it is both highly nucleophilic and highly electrophilic. Cys orthologs of Sec-containing enzymes may compensate for the absence of a Sec residue by making the active site Cys residue more (i) nucleophilic, (ii) electrophilic, or (iii) reactive by increasing both S-nucleophilicity and S-electrophilicity. It has already been shown that the Cys ortholog TR from Drosophila melanogaster (DmTR) has increased S-nucleophilicity [Gromer, S., Johansson, L., Bauer, H., Arscott, L. D., Rauch, S., Ballou, D. P., Williams, C. H., Jr., Schrimer, R. H., and Arnér, E. S (2003) Active sites of thioredoxin reductases: Why selenoproteins? Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 100, 12618-12623]. Here we present evidence that DmTR also enhances the electrophilicity of Cys490 through the use of an "electrophilic activation" mechanism. This mechanism is proposed to work by polarizing the disulfide bond that occurs between Cys489 and Cys490 in the C-terminal redox center by the placement of a positive charge near Cys489. This polarization renders the sulfur atom of Cys490 electron deficient and enhances the rate of thiol/disulfide exchange that occurs between the N- and C-terminal redox centers. Our hypothesis was developed by using a strategy of homocysteine (hCys) for Cys substitution in the Cys-Cys redox dyad of DmTR to differentiate the function of each Cys residue. The results show that hCys could substitute for Cys490 with little loss of thioredoxin reductase activity, but that substitution of hCys for Cys489 resulted in a 238-fold reduction in activity. We hypothesize that replacement of Cys489 with hCys destroys an interaction between the sulfur atom of Cys489 and His464 crucial for the proposed electrophilic activation mechanism. This electrophilic activation

  3. Compensating for the Absence of Selenocysteine in High-Molecular Weight Thioredoxin Reductases: The Electrophilic Activation Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian thioredoxin reductase (TR) is a pyridine disulfide oxidoreductase that uses the rare amino acid selenocysteine (Sec) in place of the more commonly used amino acid cysteine (Cys). Selenium is a Janus-faced element because it is both highly nucleophilic and highly electrophilic. Cys orthologs of Sec-containing enzymes may compensate for the absence of a Sec residue by making the active site Cys residue more (i) nucleophilic, (ii) electrophilic, or (iii) reactive by increasing both S-nucleophilicity and S-electrophilicity. It has already been shown that the Cys ortholog TR from Drosophila melanogaster (DmTR) has increased S-nucleophilicity [Gromer, S., Johansson, L., Bauer, H., Arscott, L. D., Rauch, S., Ballou, D. P., Williams, C. H., Jr., Schrimer, R. H., and Arnér, E. S (2003) Active sites of thioredoxin reductases: Why selenoproteins? Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 100, 12618–12623]. Here we present evidence that DmTR also enhances the electrophilicity of Cys490 through the use of an “electrophilic activation” mechanism. This mechanism is proposed to work by polarizing the disulfide bond that occurs between Cys489 and Cys490 in the C-terminal redox center by the placement of a positive charge near Cys489. This polarization renders the sulfur atom of Cys490 electron deficient and enhances the rate of thiol/disulfide exchange that occurs between the N- and C-terminal redox centers. Our hypothesis was developed by using a strategy of homocysteine (hCys) for Cys substitution in the Cys-Cys redox dyad of DmTR to differentiate the function of each Cys residue. The results show that hCys could substitute for Cys490 with little loss of thioredoxin reductase activity, but that substitution of hCys for Cys489 resulted in a 238-fold reduction in activity. We hypothesize that replacement of Cys489 with hCys destroys an interaction between the sulfur atom of Cys489 and His464 crucial for the proposed electrophilic activation mechanism. This electrophilic

  4. Asymmetric Reduction of Activated Alkenes by Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate Reductase: Specificity and Control of Stereochemical Outcome by Reaction Optimisation

    PubMed Central

    Fryszkowska, Anna; Toogood, Helen; Sakuma, Michiyo; Gardiner, John M.; Stephens, Gill M.; Scrutton, Nigel S.

    2009-01-01

    We show that pentaerythritol tetranitrate reductase (PETNR), a member of the ‘ene’ reductase old yellow enzyme family, catalyses the asymmetric reduction of a variety of industrially relevant activated α,β-unsaturated alkenes including enones, enals, maleimides and nitroalkenes. We have rationalised the broad substrate specificity and stereochemical outcome of these reductions by reference to molecular models of enzyme-substrate complexes based on the crystal complex of the PETNR with 2-cyclohexenone 4a. The optical purity of products is variable (49–99% ee), depending on the substrate type and nature of substituents. Generally, high enantioselectivity was observed for reaction products with stereogenic centres at Cβ (>99% ee). However, for the substrates existing in two isomeric forms (e.g., citral 11a or nitroalkenes 18–19a), an enantiodivergent course of the reduction of E/Z-forms may lead to lower enantiopurities of the products. We also demonstrate that the poor optical purity obtained for products with stereogenic centres at Cα is due to non-enzymatic racemisation. In reactions with ketoisophorone 3a we show that product racemisation is prevented through reaction optimisation, specifically by shortening reaction time and through control of solution pH. We suggest this as a general strategy for improved recovery of optically pure products with other biocatalytic conversions where there is potential for product racemisation. PMID:20396613

  5. Anti-HMG-CoA Reductase, Antioxidant, and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Amaranthus viridis Leaf Extract as a Potential Treatment for Hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Salvamani, Shamala; Gunasekaran, Baskaran; Shukor, Mohd Yunus; Shaharuddin, Noor Azmi; Sabullah, Mohd Khalizan; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are believed to contribute to the pathology of several chronic diseases including hypercholesterolemia (elevated levels of cholesterol in blood) and atherosclerosis. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors of plant origin are needed as synthetic drugs, such as statins, which are known to cause adverse effects on the liver and muscles. Amaranthus viridis (A. viridis) has been used from ancient times for its supposedly medically beneficial properties. In the current study, different parts of A. viridis (leaf, stem, and seed) were evaluated for potential anti-HMG-CoA reductase, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities. The putative HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory activity of A. viridis extracts at different concentrations was determined spectrophotometrically by NADPH oxidation, using HMG-CoA as substrate. A. viridis leaf extract revealed the highest HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory effect at about 71%, with noncompetitive inhibition in Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis. The leaf extract showed good inhibition of hydroperoxides, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), nitric oxide (NO), and ferric ion radicals in various concentrations. A. viridis leaf extract was proven to be an effective inhibitor of hyaluronidase, lipoxygenase, and xanthine oxidase enzymes. The experimental data suggest that A. viridis leaf extract is a source of potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent and may modulate cholesterol metabolism by inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase. PMID:27051453

  6. Anti-HMG-CoA Reductase, Antioxidant, and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Amaranthus viridis Leaf Extract as a Potential Treatment for Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Salvamani, Shamala; Gunasekaran, Baskaran; Shukor, Mohd Yunus; Shaharuddin, Noor Azmi; Sabullah, Mohd Khalizan

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are believed to contribute to the pathology of several chronic diseases including hypercholesterolemia (elevated levels of cholesterol in blood) and atherosclerosis. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors of plant origin are needed as synthetic drugs, such as statins, which are known to cause adverse effects on the liver and muscles. Amaranthus viridis (A. viridis) has been used from ancient times for its supposedly medically beneficial properties. In the current study, different parts of A. viridis (leaf, stem, and seed) were evaluated for potential anti-HMG-CoA reductase, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities. The putative HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory activity of A. viridis extracts at different concentrations was determined spectrophotometrically by NADPH oxidation, using HMG-CoA as substrate. A. viridis leaf extract revealed the highest HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory effect at about 71%, with noncompetitive inhibition in Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis. The leaf extract showed good inhibition of hydroperoxides, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), nitric oxide (NO), and ferric ion radicals in various concentrations. A. viridis leaf extract was proven to be an effective inhibitor of hyaluronidase, lipoxygenase, and xanthine oxidase enzymes. The experimental data suggest that A. viridis leaf extract is a source of potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent and may modulate cholesterol metabolism by inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase. PMID:27051453

  7. Purification and characterization of 3-hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase of Schistosoma mansoni: regulation of parasite enzyme activity differs from mammalian host.

    PubMed

    Chen, G Z; Foster, L; Bennett, J L

    1991-07-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase plays a critical role in regulating the production of cholesterol, dolichols, and ubiquinones in mammals. The inhibition of this enzyme in Schistosoma mansoni is accompanied by a cessation of egg production by the female parasite and a reduced ability of the parasite to properly glycoslyate their proteins. Furthermore, we recently demonstrated that mevinolin, if given continuously over a period of 10-14 days, is a potent antischistosomal drug. In this paper, we describe the properties of purified HMG-CoA reductase from S. mansoni. Using affinity chromatography, we were able to obtain a 417-fold purification of the enzyme which had Km values similar to the rat enzyme for HMG-CoA and NADPH. The Ki value for mevinolin, a potent and selective inhibitor of the rat reductase (Ki = 0.6 nM), was significantly higher (Ki = 46 nM) for the schistosome enzyme. SDS-PAGE and HPLC of the purified enzyme resulted in the appearance of a single protein, which had a molecular weight (66,000) in the range reported for the rat enzyme. Parasite reductase activity, unlike that of its host, did not display a circadian rhythm. Furthermore, agents which elevate (cholestyramine) or decrease (cholesterol) mammalian reductase activity had no effect on the parasite enzyme. Our results suggest that the mechanism which regulates production of the parasite's enzyme may differ from its mammalian host. PMID:1905241

  8. Regulation of nap Gene Expression and Periplasmic Nitrate Reductase Activity in the Phototrophic Bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides DSM158

    PubMed Central

    Gavira, Mónica; Roldán, M. Dolores; Castillo, Francisco; Moreno-Vivián, Conrado

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial periplasmic nitrate reductases (Nap) can play different physiological roles and are expressed under different conditions depending on the organism. Rhodobacter sphaeroides DSM158 has a Nap system, encoded by the napKEFDABC gene cluster, but nitrite formed is not further reduced because this strain lacks nitrite reductase. Nap activity increases in the presence of nitrate and oxygen but is unaffected by ammonium. Reverse transcription-PCR and Northern blots demonstrated that the napKEFDABC genes constitute an operon transcribed as a single 5.5-kb product. Northern blots and nap-lacZ fusions revealed that nap expression is threefold higher under aerobic conditions but is regulated by neither nitrate nor ammonium, although it is weakly induced by nitrite. On the other hand, nitrate but not nitrite causes a rapid enzyme activation, explaining the higher Nap activity found in nitrate-grown cells. Translational nap′-′lacZ fusions reveal that the napK and napD genes are not efficiently translated, probably due to mRNA secondary structures occluding the translation initiation sites of these genes. Neither butyrate nor caproate increases nap expression, although cells growing phototrophically on these reduced substrates show a very high Nap activity in vivo (nitrite accumulation is sevenfold higher than in medium with malate). Phototrophic growth on butyrate or caproate medium is severely reduced in the NapA− mutants. Taken together, these results indicate that nitrate reduction in R. sphaeroides is mainly regulated at the level of enzyme activity by both nitrate and electron supply and confirm that the Nap system is involved in redox balancing using nitrate as an ancillary oxidant to dissipate excess reductant. PMID:11872721

  9. De novo designed metallopeptides with type 2 copper centers: modulation of reduction potentials and nitrite reductase activities

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fangting; Penner-Hahn, James E.; Pecoraro, Vincent L.

    2014-01-01

    Enzymatic reactions involving redox processes are highly sensitive to the local electrostatic environment. Despite considerable effort, the complex interactions between different influential factors in native proteins impede progress towards complete understanding of the structure-function relationship. Of particular interest is the type 2 copper center Cu(His)3, which may act as an electron transfer center in peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM) or a catalytic center in copper nitrite reductase (CuNiR). A de novo design strategy is used to probe the effect of modifying charged amino acid residues around, but not directly bound to, a Cu(His)3 center embedded in three-stranded coiled coils (TRI-H)3 [TRI-H = Ac-G WKALEEK LKALEEK LKALEEK HKALEEK G-NH2]. Specifically, the peptide TRI-EH [TRI-EH = TRI-HK22E] alters an important lysine to glutamate just above the copper binding center. With a series of TRI-EH peptides mutated below the metal center, we use a variety of spectroscopies (EPR, UV-Vis, XAS) to show a direct impact on the protonation equilibria, copper binding affinities, reduction potentials and nitrite reductase activities of these copper-peptide complexes. The potentials at a specific pH vary by 100 mV and nitrite reductase activity ranges over a factor of four in rates. We also observe that affinities, potentials and catalytic activities are strongly influenced by pH conditions (pH 5.8 ~ 7.4). In general, Cu(II) affinities for the peptides are diminished at low pH values. The interplay between these factors can lead to a 200 mV shift in reduction potentials across these peptides, which is determined by the pH-dependent affinities of copper in both oxidation states. This study illustrates the strength of de novo protein design in elucidating the influence of ionizable residues on a particular redox system, an important step towards understanding the factors that govern the properties of this metalloenzyme with a goal of eventually improving

  10. Tetrathionate reductase of Salmonella thyphimurium: a molybdenum containing enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Hinojosa-Leon, M.; Dubourdieu, M.; Sanchez-Crispin, J.A.; Chippaux, M.

    1986-04-29

    Use of radioactive molybdenum demonstrates that the tetrathionate reductase of Salmonella typhimurium is a molydenum containing enzyme. It is proposed that this enzyme shares with other molybdo-proteins, such as nitrate reductase, a common molybdenum containing cofactor the defect of which leads to the loss of the tetrathionate reductase and nitrate reductase activities.

  11. Metabolism of hydroxypyruvate in a mutant of barley lacking NADH-dependent hydroxypyruvate reductase, an important photorespiratory enzyme activity

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, A.J.S.; Blackwell, R.D.; Lea, P.J. )

    1989-09-01

    A mutant of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), LaPr 88/29, deficient in NADH-dependent hydroxypyruvate reductase (HPR) activity has been isolated. The activities of both NADH (5%) and NADPH-dependent (19%) HPR were severely reduced in this mutant compared to the wild type. Although lacking an enzyme in the main carbon pathway of photorespiration, this mutant was capable of CO{sub 2} fixation rates equivalent to 75% of that of the wild type, in normal atmospheres and 50% O{sub 2}. There also appeared to be little disruption to the photorespiratory metabolism as ammonia release, CO{sub 2} efflux and {sup 14}CO{sub 2} release from L-(U-{sup 14}C)serine feeding were similar in both mutant and wild-type leaves. When leaves of LaPr 88/29 were fed either ({sup 14}C)serine or {sup 14}CO{sub 2}, the accumulation of radioactivity was in serine and not in hydroxypyruvate, although the mutant was still able to metabolize over 25% of the supplied ({sup 14}C)serine into sucrose. After 3 hours in air the soluble amino acid pool was almost totally dominated by serine and glycine. LaPr 88/29 has also been used to show that NADH-glyoxylate reductase and NADH-HPR are probably not catalyzed by the same enzyme in barley and that over 80% of the NADPH-dependent HPR activity is due to the NADH-dependent enzyme. We also suggest that the alternative NADPH activity can metabolize a proportion, but not all, of the hydroxypyruvate produced during photorespiration and may thus form a useful backup to the NADH-dependent enzyme under conditions of maximal photorespiration.

  12. Relationship of changing delta 4-steroid 5 alpha-reductase activity to (125I)iododeoxyuridine uptake during regeneration of involuted rat prostates

    SciTech Connect

    Kitahara, S.; Higashi, Y.; Takeuchi, S.; Oshima, H. )

    1989-04-01

    To elucidate the phenotypic expression of proliferating prostatic cells, rats were castrated, and the regenerating process of involuted ventral prostates during testosterone propionate (TP) administration was investigated by examining morphology, (5-{sup 125}I)iododeoxyuridine ({sup 125}I-UdR) uptake, DNA content, weight, acid phosphatase, and delta 4-steroid 5 alpha-reductase (5 alpha-reductase) activities. Morphologically, TP treatment initially increased the number of epithelial cells lining glandular lobules and subsequently restored the shape of epithelial cells. {sup 125}I-UdR uptake peaked on Day 3 of TP treatment and stayed at higher levels than for uncastrated controls until Day 14 of treatment. Prostatic weight, protein content, acid phosphatase, and DNA content returned to uncastrated control levels by Day 14 of TP treatment. TP administration markedly stimulated prostatic 5 alpha-reductase activity, which peaked on the Day 5 of treatment and decreased to uncastrated control levels by Day 14 of treatment. It is concluded that TP administration to castrated rats initially induced active mitotic division of the remaining stem cells, followed by formation of differentiated functional epithelial cells. Prostatic 5 alpha-reductase was highly active at the initial phase of active mitotic cell division. The major portion of the increased enzyme activity can be regarded as a phenotypic expression of stem or transient cells of prostatic epithelium.

  13. FAD binding, cobinamide binding and active site communication in the corrin reductase (CobR)

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Andrew D.; Taylor, Samantha L.; Scott, Alan; Rowe, Michelle L.; Johnson, Christopher M.; Rigby, Stephen E. J.; Geeves, Michael A.; Pickersgill, Richard W.; Howard, Mark J.; Warren, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    Adenosylcobalamin, the coenzyme form of vitamin B12, is one Nature's most complex coenzyme whose de novo biogenesis proceeds along either an anaerobic or aerobic metabolic pathway. The aerobic synthesis involves reduction of the centrally chelated cobalt metal ion of the corrin ring from Co(II) to Co(I) before adenosylation can take place. A corrin reductase (CobR) enzyme has been identified as the likely agent to catalyse this reduction of the metal ion. Herein, we reveal how Brucella melitensis CobR binds its coenzyme FAD (flavin dinucleotide) and we also show that the enzyme can bind a corrin substrate consistent with its role in reduction of the cobalt of the corrin ring. Stopped-flow kinetics and EPR reveal a mechanistic asymmetry in CobR dimer that provides a potential link between the two electron reduction by NADH to the single electron reduction of Co(II) to Co(I). PMID:24909839

  14. Implications and problems in analysing cytotoxic activity of hydroxyurea in combination with a potential inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed

    Nocentini, G; Barzi, A; Franchetti, P

    1990-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of hydroxyurea in combination with 2.2'-bipyridyl-6-carbothioamide (a potential inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase) on P388 murine leukemia is reported. Synergistic activity was studied using various interpretations of the isobologram method and the combination index method. We evaluated the pros and cons of these methods and their overall usefulness. In our opinion, to obtain all possible information from a compound association, it is important to choose a formally correct method that (a) can quantitatively evaluate synergism or antagonism, (b) may offer the possibility of averaging final results, (c) needs a minimal amount of experimental data, and (d) is rapid. Moreover, we emphasize both the utility of testing at least three molar ratios of compound association and the importance of carefully choosing the fractional inhibition used in calculating the combination effect. Such evaluation of drug combinations gives information essential to the preparation of new anticancer drug regimens and to the early assessment of biochemical interactions. PMID:2208576

  15. Induction of quinone reductase activity by psoralidin isolated from Psoralea corylifolia in mouse hepa 1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Jin; Nam, Kung-Woo; Mar, Woongchon

    2009-07-01

    Quinone reductase (QR) is a protective phase II enzyme against mutagens and carcinogens which is inducible by a number of chemical compounds in plants. This study was carried out to investigate effects of the fractions from the seeds of Psoralea corylifolia on the induction of QR with Hepa 1c1c7 murine hepatoma cell line. The ethyl acetate-soluble fraction of the methanolic extract from the seeds was found to induce QR and the concentration of 1.5 fold QR induction (1.5 FIC) was 1.2 mug/mL. We obtained as an active compound, psoralidin, isolated from the ethyl acetate-soluble fraction after further sequential fractionation with column chromatography and 1.5 FIC of psoralidin was 0.5 mug/mL. The seeds of Psoralea corylifolia and psoralidin might be a candidate for developing QR inducers. PMID:19641888

  16. Asymmetric mutations in the tetrameric R67 dihydrofolate reductase reveal high tolerance to active-site substitutions

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Maximilian C C J C; Morley, Krista L; Volpato, Jordan P; Schmitzer, Andreea R; Pelletier, Joelle N

    2015-01-01

    Type II R67 dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) is a bacterial plasmid-encoded enzyme that is intrinsically resistant to the widely-administered antibiotic trimethoprim. R67 DHFR is genetically and structurally unrelated to E. coli chromosomal DHFR and has an unusual architecture, in that four identical protomers form a single symmetrical active site tunnel that allows only one substrate binding/catalytic event at any given time. As a result, substitution of an active-site residue has as many as four distinct consequences on catalysis, constituting an atypical model of enzyme evolution. Although we previously demonstrated that no single residue of the native active site is indispensable for function, library selection here revealed a strong bias toward maintenance of two native protomers per mutated tetramer. A variety of such “half-native” tetramers were shown to procure native-like catalytic activity, with similar KM values but kcat values 5- to 33-fold lower, illustrating a high tolerance for active-site substitutions. The selected variants showed a reduced thermal stability (Tm ∼12°C lower), which appears to result from looser association of the protomers, but generally showed a marked increase in resilience to heat denaturation, recovering activity to a significantly greater extent than the variant with no active-site substitutions. Our results suggest that the presence of two native protomers in the R67 DHFR tetramer is sufficient to provide native-like catalytic rate and thus ensure cellular proliferation. PMID:25401264

  17. Osmotic Stress, not Aldose Reductase Activity, Directly induces Growth Factors and MAPK Signaling changes during Sugar Cataract Formation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Xing, Kuiyi; Randazzo, James; Blessing, Karen; Lou, Marjorie F.; Kador, Peter F.

    2012-01-01

    In sugar cataract formation in rats, aldose reductase (AR) actitvity is not only linked to lenticular sorbitol (diabetic) or galactitol (galactosemic) formation but also to signal transduction changes, cytotoxic signals and activation of apoptosis. Using both in vitro and in vivo techniques, the interrelationship between AR activity, polyol (sorbitol and galactitol) formation, osmotic stress, growth factor induction, and cell signaling changes have been investigated. For in vitro studies, lenses from Sprague Dawley rats were cultured for up to 48 hrs in TC-199-bicarbonate media containing either 30 mM fructose (control), or 30 mM glucose or galctose with/without the aldose reductase inhibitors AL1576 or tolrestat, the sorbitol dehydrogenase inhibitor (SDI) CP-470,711, or 15 mM mannitol (osmotic-compensated media). For in vivo studies, lenses were obtained from streptozotocin-induced diabetic Sprague Dawley rats fed diet with/without the ARIs AL1576 or tolrestat for 10 weeks. As expected, lenses cultured in high glucose / galactose media or from untreated diabetic rats all showed a decrease in the GSH pool that was lessened by ARI treatment. Lenses either from diabetic rats or from glucose/galactose culture conditions showed increased expression of basic-FGF, TGF-β, and increased signaling through P-Akt, P-ERK1/2 and P-SAPK/JNK which were also normalized by ARIs to the expression levels observed in non-diabetic controls. Culturing rat lenses in osomotically compensated media containing 30 mM glucose or galactose did not lead to increased growth factor expression or altered signaling. These studies indicate that it is the biophysical response of the lens to osmotic stress that results in an increased intralenticular production of basic-FGF and TGF-β and the altered cytotoxic signaling that is observed during sugar cataract formation. PMID:22710095

  18. Adaptation of cytochrome-b5 reductase activity and methaemoglobinaemia in areas with a high nitrate concentration in drinking-water.

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, S. K.; Gupta, R. C.; Seth, A. K.; Gupta, A. B.; Bassin, J. K.; Gupta, A.

    1999-01-01

    An epidemiological investigation was undertaken in India to assess the prevalence of methaemoglobinaemia in areas with high nitrate concentration in drinking-water and the possible association with an adaptation of cytochrome-b5 reductase. Five areas were selected, with average nitrate ion concentrations in drinking-water of 26, 45, 95, 222 and 459 mg/l. These areas were visited and house schedules were prepared in accordance with a statistically designed protocol. A sample of 10% of the total population was selected in each of the areas, matched for age and weight, giving a total of 178 persons in five age groups. For each subject, a detailed history was documented, a medical examination was conducted and blood samples were taken to determine methaemoglobin level and cytochrome-b5 reductase activity. Collected data were subjected to statistical analysis to test for a possible relationship between nitrate concentration, cytochrome-b5 reductase activity and methaemoglobinaemia. High nitrate concentrations caused methaemoglobinaemia in infants and adults. The reserve of cytochrome-b5 reductase activity (i.e. the enzyme activity not currently being used, but which is available when needed; for example, under conditions of increased nitrate ingestion) and its adaptation with increasing water nitrate concentration to reduce methaemoglobin were more pronounced in children and adolescents. PMID:10534899

  19. Nitrate and periplasmic nitrate reductases

    PubMed Central

    Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney; Stolz, John F.; Basu, Partha

    2014-01-01

    The nitrate anion is a simple, abundant and relatively stable species, yet plays a significant role in global cycling of nitrogen, global climate change, and human health. Although it has been known for quite some time that nitrate is an important species environmentally, recent studies have identified potential medical applications. In this respect the nitrate anion remains an enigmatic species that promises to offer exciting science in years to come. Many bacteria readily reduce nitrate to nitrite via nitrate reductases. Classified into three distinct types – periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), respiratory nitrate reductase (Nar) and assimilatory nitrate reductase (Nas), they are defined by their cellular location, operon organization and active site structure. Of these, Nap proteins are the focus of this review. Despite similarities in the catalytic and spectroscopic properties Nap from different Proteobacteria are phylogenetically distinct. This review has two major sections: in the first section, nitrate in the nitrogen cycle and human health, taxonomy of nitrate reductases, assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reduction, cellular locations of nitrate reductases, structural and redox chemistry are discussed. The second section focuses on the features of periplasmic nitrate reductase where the catalytic subunit of the Nap and its kinetic properties, auxiliary Nap proteins, operon structure and phylogenetic relationships are discussed. PMID:24141308

  20. YNL134C from Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a novel protein with aldehyde reductase activity for detoxification of furfural derived from lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xianxian; Tang, Juan; Wang, Xu; Yang, Ruoheng; Zhang, Xiaoping; Gu, Yunfu; Li, Xi; Ma, Menggen

    2015-05-01

    Furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) are the two main aldehyde compounds derived from pentoses and hexoses, respectively, during lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment. These two compounds inhibit microbial growth and interfere with subsequent alcohol fermentation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has the in situ ability to detoxify furfural and HMF to the less toxic 2-furanmethanol (FM) and furan-2,5-dimethanol (FDM), respectively. Herein, we report that an uncharacterized gene, YNL134C, was highly up-regulated under furfural or HMF stress and Yap1p and Msn2/4p transcription factors likely controlled its up-regulated expression. Enzyme activity assays showed that YNL134C is an NADH-dependent aldehyde reductase, which plays a role in detoxification of furfural to FM. However, no NADH- or NADPH-dependent enzyme activity was observed for detoxification of HMF to FDM. This enzyme did not catalyse the reverse reaction of FM to furfural or FDM to HMF. Further studies showed that YNL134C is a broad-substrate aldehyde reductase, which can reduce multiple aldehydes to their corresponding alcohols. Although YNL134C is grouped into the quinone oxidoreductase family, no quinone reductase activity was observed using 1,2-naphthoquinone or 9,10-phenanthrenequinone as a substrate, and phylogenetic analysis indicates that it is genetically distant to quinone reductases. Proteins similar to YNL134C in sequence from S. cerevisiae and other microorganisms were phylogenetically analysed. PMID:25656244

  1. Characterizing and predicting carboxylic acid reductase activity for diversifying bioaldehyde production.

    PubMed

    Moura, Matthew; Pertusi, Dante; Lenzini, Stephen; Bhan, Namita; Broadbelt, Linda J; Tyo, Keith E J

    2016-05-01

    Chemicals with aldehyde moieties are useful in the synthesis of polymerization reagents, pharmaceuticals, pesticides, flavors, and fragrances because of their high reactivity. However, chemical synthesis of aldehydes from carboxylic acids has unfavorable thermodynamics and limited specificity. Enzymatically catalyzed reductive bioaldehyde synthesis is an attractive route that overcomes unfavorable thermodynamics by ATP hydrolysis in ambient, aqueous conditions. Carboxylic acid reductases (Cars) are particularly attractive, as only one enzyme is required. We sought to increase the knowledge base of permitted substrates for four Cars. Additionally, the Lys2 enzyme family was found to be mechanistically the same as Cars and two isozymes were also tested. Our results show that Cars prefer molecules where the carboxylic acid is the only polar/charged group. Using this data and other published data, we develop a support vector classifier (SVC) for predicting Car reactivity and make predictions on all carboxylic acid metabolites in iAF1260 and Model SEED. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 944-952. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26479709

  2. Profiles of Glucosinolates, Their Hydrolysis Products, and Quinone Reductase Inducing Activity from 39 Arugula (Eruca sativa Mill.) Accessions.

    PubMed

    Ku, Kang-Mo; Kim, Moo Jung; Jeffery, Elizabeth H; Kang, Young-Hwa; Juvik, John A

    2016-08-31

    Glucosinolates, their hydrolysis product concentrations, and the quinone reductase (QR) inducing activity of extracts of leaf tissue were assayed from 39 arugula (Eruca sativa Mill.) accessions. Arugula accessions from Mediterranean countries (n = 16; Egypt, Greece, Italy, Libya, Spain, and Turkey) and Northern Europe (n = 2; Poland and United Kingdom) were higher in glucosinolates and their hydrolysis products, especially glucoraphanin and sulforaphane, compared to those from Asia (n = 13; China, India, and Pakistan) and Middle East Asia (n = 8; Afghanistan, Iran, and Israel). The QR inducing activity was also the highest in Mediterranean and Northern European arugula accessions, possibly due to a significant positive correlation between sulforaphane and QR inducing activity (r = 0.54). No nitrile hydrolysis products were found, suggesting very low or no epithiospecifier protein activity from these arugula accessions. Broad sense heritability (H(2)) was estimated to be 0.91-0.98 for glucoinolates, 0.55-0.83 for their hydrolysis products, and 0.90 for QR inducing activity. PMID:27523193

  3. Differential activation of potato 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase genes by wounding and pathogen challenge.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Z; Park, H; Lacy, G H; Cramer, C L

    1991-01-01

    Potato genes encoding 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) were expressed in response to pathogen, elicitor, and wounding. HMGR catalyzes the rate-limiting step in isoprenoid biosynthesis leading to accumulation of phytoalexins and steroid glycoalkaloids. Wounding caused increases in HMGR mRNA levels. A rapid and transient peak occurred 30 minutes after wounding, followed by a slower peak at 14 hours; both were correlated with increased enzyme activity. Induction of HMGR mRNA by the soft rot pathogen Erwinia carotovora subsp carotovora or arachidonic acid began 8 hours after challenge and continued through 22 hours. Potato HMGR is encoded by a gene family. An HMGR gene-specific probe was used to demonstrate that one isogene of the HMGR family is pathogen activated and is distinct from isogene(s) that are wound activated. This provides evidence that defense-related increases in HMGR activity are due to mRNA level increases and that HMGR isogenes are activated differentially by wounding or pathogen challenge. PMID:1840919

  4. HMG-CoA reductase regulates CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration via geranylgeranylation and RhoA activation

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Haidari, Amr A.; Syk, Ingvar; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Simvastatin blocked CCL17-induced and CCR4-dependent RhoA activation in HT29 cells. • CCL17/CCR4-mediated migration of colon cancer cells was antagonised by simvastatin. • Cell migration recovered by adding Mevalonate and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. • Targeting HMG-CoA reductase might be useful to inhibit colon cancer metastasis. - Abstract: Background: Simvastatin is widely used to lower cholesterol levels in patients with cardiovascular diseases, although accumulating evidence suggests that statins, such as simvastatin, also exert numerous anti-tumoral effects. Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of simvastatin on colon cancer cell migration. Methods: Migration assays were performed to evaluate CCL17-induced colon cancer cell (HT-29) chemotaxis. In vitro tumor growth and apoptosis were assessed using a proliferation assay and annexin V assay, respectively. Active RhoA protein levels in CCL17-stimulated colon cancer cells were quantified using a G-LISA assay. Results: We found that simvastatin dose-dependently decreased CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration. Simvastatin had no effect on colon cancer cell proliferation or apoptosis. Inhibition of beta chemokine receptor 4, CCR4, reduced CCL17-evoked activation of RhoA in colon cancer cells. Moreover, administration of mevalonate reversed the inhibitory effect of simvastatin on CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration. Interestingly, co-incubation with geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) antagonized the inhibitory impact of simvastatin on colon cancer cell migration triggered by CCL17. Moreover, we observed that simvastatin decreased CCL17-induced activation of RhoA in colon cancer cells. Administration of mevalonate and GGPP reversed the inhibitory effect of simvastatin on CCL17-provoked RhoA activation in colon cancer cells. Conclusions: Taken together, our findings show for the first time that HMG-CoA reductase regulates CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration via

  5. Expression of catalytically active barley glutamyl tRNAGlu reductase in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with glutathione S-transferase.

    PubMed

    Vothknecht, U C; Kannangara, C G; von Wettstein, D

    1996-08-20

    delta-Aminolevulinate in plants, algae, cyanobacteria, and several other bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis is synthesized from glutamate by means of a tRNA(Glu) mediated pathway. The enzyme glutamyl tRNA(Glu) reductase catalyzes the second step in this pathway, the reduction of tRNA bound glutamate to give glutamate 1-semialdehyde. The hemA gene from barley encoding the glutamyl tRNA(Glu) reductase was expressed in E. coli cells joined at its amino terminal end to Schistosoma japonicum glutathione S-transferase (GST). GST-glutamyl tRNA(Glu) reductase fusion protein and the reductase released from it by thrombin digestion catalyzed the reduction of glutamyl tRNA(Glu) to glutamate 1-semialdehyde. The specific activity of the fusion protein was 120 pmol.micrograms-1.min-1. The fusion protein used tRNA(Glu) from barley chloroplasts preferentially to E. coli tRNA(Glu) and its activity was inhibited by hemin. It migrated as an 82-kDa polypeptide with SDS/PAGE and eluted with an apparent molecular mass of 450 kDa from Superose 12. After removal of the GST by thrombin, the protein migrated as an approximately equal to 60-kDa polypeptide with SDS/PAGE, whereas gel filtration on Superose 12 yielded an apparent molecule mass of 250 kDa. Isolated fusion protein contained heme, which could be reduced by NADPH and oxidized by air. PMID:8799193

  6. Characterization of the novel protein kinase activity present in the R1 subunit of herpes simplex virus ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, J; Conner, J; Clements, J B

    1995-01-01

    We have compared the protein kinase activities of the R1 subunits from herpes simplex virus types 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2) ribonucleotide reductase following expression in Escherichia coli. Autophosphorylation activity was observed when kinase assays were performed with immunoprecipitated R1 or proteins purified to homogeneity, and the activity was stimulated by the basic protein protamine. Transphosphorylation of histones or calmodulin by purified or immunoprecipitated HSV-1 and HSV-2 R1 was not observed, and our results suggest that the activities of these two proteins are similar. We further characterized the protein kinase activity of HSV-1 R1 by producing insertion and deletion mutants constructed with a plasmid expressing R1 amino acids 1 to 449. C-terminal deletion analysis identified the catalytic core of the enzyme as comprising residues 1 to 292, and this polypeptide will be useful for structural determinations by X-ray crystallography. Insertion of a 4-amino-acid sequence at sites within the protein kinase domain identified regions essential for activity; insertions at residues 22 and 112 completely inactivated activity, and an insertion at residue 136 reduced activity sixfold. Similar insertions at residues 257, 262, 292, and 343 had no effect on activity. The ATP analog 5'-fluorosulfonylbenzoyladenosine, which covalently modifies conventional eukaryotic kinases at an essential lysine residue within the active site, did label HSV R1, but this labelling occurred outside the N-terminal domain. These data indicate that the HSV R1 kinase is novel and distinct from other eukaryotic protein kinases. PMID:7609068

  7. Cytochrome cb-type nitric oxide reductase with cytochrome c oxidase activity from Paracoccus denitrificans ATCC 35512.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, T; Fukumori, Y

    1996-04-01

    A highly active nitric oxide reductase was purified from Paracoccus denitrificans ATCC 35512, formerly named Thiosphaera pantotropha, which was anaerobically cultivated in the presence of nitrate. The enzyme was composed of two subunits with molecular masses of 34 and 15 kDa and contained two hemes b and one heme c per molecule. Copper was not found in the enzyme. The spectral properties suggested that one of the two hemes b and heme c were in six-coordinated low-spin states and another heme b was in a five-coordinated high-spin state and reacted with carbon monoxide. The enzyme showed high cytochrome c-nitric oxide oxidoreductase activity and formed nitrous oxide from nitric oxide with the expected stoichiometry when P. denitrificans ATCC 35512 ferrocytochrome c-550 was used as the electron donor. The V max and Km values for nitric oxide were 84 micromol of nitric oxide per min/mg of protein and 0.25 microM, respectively. Furthermore, the enzyme showed ferrocytochrome c-550-O2 oxidoreductase activity with a V max of 8.4 micromol of O2 per min/mg of protein and a Km value of 0.9 mM. Both activities were 50% inhibited by about 0.3 mM KCN. PMID:8606159

  8. In Silico Screening, Structure-Activity Relationship, and Biologic Evaluation of Selective Pteridine Reductase Inhibitors Targeting Visceral Leishmaniasis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Jaspreet; Kumar, Pranav; Tyagi, Sargam; Pathak, Richa; Batra, Sanjay; Singh, Prashant; Singh, Neeloo

    2011-01-01

    In this study we utilized the concept of rational drug design to identify novel compounds with optimal selectivity, efficacy and safety, which would bind to the target enzyme pteridine reductase 1 (PTR1) in Leishmania parasites. Twelve compounds afforded from Baylis-Hillman chemistry were docked by using the QUANTUM program into the active site of Leishmania donovani PTR1 homology model. The biological activity for these compounds was estimated in green fluorescent protein-transfected L. donovani promastigotes, and the most potential analogue was further investigated in intracellular amastigotes. Structure-activity relationship based on homology model drawn on our recombinant enzyme was substantiated by recombinant enzyme inhibition assay and growth of the cell culture. Flow cytometry results indicated that 7-(4-chlorobenzyl)-3-methyl-4-(4-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-3,4,6,7,8,9-hexahydro-pyrimido[1,2-a]pyrimidin-2-one (compound 7) was 10 times more active on L. donovani amastigotes (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] = 3 μM) than on promastigotes (IC50 = 29 μM). Compound 7 exhibited a Ki value of 0.72 μM in a recombinant enzyme inhibition assay. We discovered that novel pyrimido[1,2-a]pyrimidin-2-one systems generated from the allyl amines afforded from the Baylis-Hillman acetates could have potential as a valuable pharmacological tool against the neglected disease visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:21115787

  9. Ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase: a catalytically active dithiol group links photoreduced ferredoxin to thioredoxin functional in photosynthetic enzyme regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Droux, M.; Miginiac-Maslow, M.; Jacquot, J.P.; Gadal, P.; Crawford, N.A.; Kosower, N.S.; Buchanan, B.B.

    1987-07-01

    The mechanism by which the ferredoxin-thioredoxin system activates the target enzyme, NADP-malate dehydrogenase, was investigated by analyzing the sulfhydryl status of individual protein components with (/sup 14/C)iodoacetate and monobromobimane. The data indicate that ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase (FTR)--an iron-sulfur enzyme present in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms--is the first member of a thiol chain that links light to enzyme regulation. FTR possesses a catalytically active dithiol group localized on the 13 kDa (similar) subunit, that occurs in all species investigated and accepts reducing equivalents from photoreduced ferredoxin and transfers them stoichiometrically to the disulfide form of thioredoxin m. The reduced thioredoxin m, in turn, reduces NADP-malate dehydrogenase, thereby converting it from an inactive (S-S) to an active (SH) form. The means by which FTR is able to combine electrons (from photoreduced ferredoxin) with protons (from the medium) to reduce its active disulfide group remains to be determined.

  10. New evidence of similarity between human and plant steroid metabolism: 5alpha-reductase activity in Solanum malacoxylon.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Fabiana; Danza, Giovanna; Guarna, Antonio; Cini, Nicoletta; Racchi, Milvia Luisa; Serio, Mario

    2003-01-01

    The physiological role of steroid hormones in humans is well known, and the metabolic pathway and mechanisms of action are almost completely elucidated. The role of plant steroid hormones, brassinosteroids, is less known, but an increasing amount of data on brassinosteroid biosynthesis is showing unexpected similarities between human and plant steroid metabolic pathways. Here we focus our attention on the enzyme 5alpha-reductase (5alphaR) for which a plant ortholog of the mammalian system, DET2, was recently described in Arabidopsis thaliana. We demonstrate that campestenone, the natural substrate of DET2, is reduced to 5alpha-campestanone by both human 5alphaR isozymes but with different affinities. Solanum malacoxylon, which is a calcinogenic plant very active in the biosynthesis of vitamin D-like molecules and sterols, was used to study 5alphaR activity. Leaves and calli were chosen as examples of differentiated and undifferentiated tissues, respectively. Two separate 5alphaR activities were found in calli and leaves of Solanum using campestenone as substrate. The use of progesterone allowed the detection of both activities in calli. Support for the existence of two 5alphaR isozymes in S. malacoxylon was provided by the differential actions of inhibitors of the human 5alphaR in calli and leaves. The evidence for the presence of two isozymes in different plant tissues extends the analogies between plant and mammalian steroid metabolic pathways. PMID:12488348

  11. Cytochrome cb-type nitric oxide reductase with cytochrome c oxidase activity from Paracoccus denitrificans ATCC 35512.

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, T; Fukumori, Y

    1996-01-01

    A highly active nitric oxide reductase was purified from Paracoccus denitrificans ATCC 35512, formerly named Thiosphaera pantotropha, which was anaerobically cultivated in the presence of nitrate. The enzyme was composed of two subunits with molecular masses of 34 and 15 kDa and contained two hemes b and one heme c per molecule. Copper was not found in the enzyme. The spectral properties suggested that one of the two hemes b and heme c were in six-coordinated low-spin states and another heme b was in a five-coordinated high-spin state and reacted with carbon monoxide. The enzyme showed high cytochrome c-nitric oxide oxidoreductase activity and formed nitrous oxide from nitric oxide with the expected stoichiometry when P. denitrificans ATCC 35512 ferrocytochrome c-550 was used as the electron donor. The V max and Km values for nitric oxide were 84 micromol of nitric oxide per min/mg of protein and 0.25 microM, respectively. Furthermore, the enzyme showed ferrocytochrome c-550-O2 oxidoreductase activity with a V max of 8.4 micromol of O2 per min/mg of protein and a Km value of 0.9 mM. Both activities were 50% inhibited by about 0.3 mM KCN. PMID:8606159

  12. E2F1 promote the aggressiveness of human colorectal cancer by activating the ribonucleotide reductase small subunit M2

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Zejun; Gong, Chaoju; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Xiaomin; Mei, Lingming; Song, Mintao; Qiu, Lanlan; Luo, Shuchai; Zhu, Zhihua; Zhang, Ronghui; Gu, Hongqian; Chen, Xiang

    2015-08-21

    As the ribonucleotide reductase small subunit, the high expression of ribonucleotide reductase small subunit M2 (RRM2) induces cancer and contributes to tumor growth and invasion. In several colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines, we found that the expression levels of RRM2 were closely related to the transcription factor E2F1. Mechanistic studies were conducted to determine the molecular basis. Ectopic overexpression of E2F1 promoted RRM2 transactivation while knockdown of E2F1 reduced the levels of RRM2 mRNA and protein. To further investigate the roles of RRM2 which was activated by E2F1 in CRC, CCK-8 assay and EdU incorporation assay were performed. Overexpression of E2F1 promoted cell proliferation in CRC cells, which was blocked by RRM2 knockdown attenuation. In the migration and invasion tests, overexpression of E2F1 enhanced the migration and invasion of CRC cells which was abrogated by silencing RRM2. Besides, overexpression of RRM2 reversed the effects of E2F1 knockdown partially in CRC cells. Examination of clinical CRC specimens demonstrated that both RRM2 and E2F1 were elevated in most cancer tissues compared to the paired normal tissues. Further analysis showed that the protein expression levels of E2F1 and RRM2 were parallel with each other and positively correlated with lymph node metastasis (LNM), TNM stage and distant metastasis. Consistently, the patients with low E2F1 and RRM2 levels have a better prognosis than those with high levels. Therefore, we suggest that E2F1 can promote CRC proliferation, migration, invasion and metastasis by regulating RRM2 transactivation. Understanding the role of E2F1 in activating RRM2 transcription will help to explain the relationship between E2F1 and RRM2 in CRC and provide a novel predictive marker for diagnosis and prognosis of the disease. - Highlights: • E2F1 promotes RRM2 transactivation in CRC cells. • E2F1 promotes the proliferation of CRC cells by activating RRM2. • E2F1 promotes the migration and

  13. Synthesis, in vitro antitumor activity, dihydrofolate reductase inhibition, DNA intercalation and structure-activity relationship studies of 1,3,5-triazine analogues.

    PubMed

    Singla, Prinka; Luxami, Vijay; Paul, Kamaldeep

    2016-01-15

    A series of triazine-benzimidazoles with 4-fluoroaniline substitution has been designed and synthesized. These compounds were further substituted with different primary and secondary amines. The structures of newly synthesized compounds were confirmed by (1)H, (13)C NMR, mass spectrometry and, in case of compound 18, by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The newly synthesized compounds were evaluated against 60 human tumor cell lines at one dose and five dose concentration levels. Compounds 7, 8 and 22 have been found to be the most active antitumor agents with GI50 values of 1.77, 1.94 and 2.87μM, respectively. The synthesized compounds were then evaluated for their inhibitory activity to mammalian dihydrofolate reductase. Compound 22 was depicted as the most active compound for the inhibition of dihydrofolate reductase with IC50 value of 2.0nM. DNA binding studies were also revealed strong interacting properties of triazine derivatives towards calf thymus-DNA. PMID:26670841

  14. Spectrophotometric method for the assay of steroid 5α-reductase activity of rat liver and prostate microsomes.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Atsushi; Yoshimura, Teruki; Wada, Keiji; Watabe, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Yuki; Ito, Etsuro; Miura, Toshiaki

    2013-01-01

    A simple spectrophotometric method for the assay of steroid 5α-reductase (5α-SR) was developed in which 5α-dihydrotestosterone (5α-DHT) and 5α-androstane-3α,17β-diol (5α-diol), metabolites formed in the NADPH-dependent reduction of testosterone with enzyme sources of 5α-SR, were measured by enzymatic cycling using 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in the presence of excess thionicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (thio-NAD) and NADH. It was found that 5α-SR activity was proportional to the accumulated thio-NADH having an absorption maximum at 400 nm. Because of the high cycling rate (> 600 cycle per min) and no interference from testosterone, enzymatic cycling can determine the sum of 5α-DHT and 5α-diol at the picomole level without separation from excess testosterone. The present method was readily applicable to the assay of 5α-SR activity of rat liver and prostate microsomes as well as to the assay of inhibitory activity of finasteride, a synthetic inhibitor of 5α-SR. PMID:23574674

  15. Thyroid-stimulating hormone decreases HMG-CoA reductase phosphorylation via AMP-activated protein kinase in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiujuan; Song, Yongfeng; Feng, Mei; Zhou, Xinli; Lu, Yingli; Gao, Ling; Yu, Chunxiao; Jiang, Xiuyun; Zhao, Jiajun

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol homeostasis is strictly regulated through the modulation of HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR), the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol synthesis. Phosphorylation of HMGCR inactivates it and dephosphorylation activates it. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is the major kinase phosphorylating the enzyme. Our previous study found that thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) increased the hepatocytic HMGCR expression, but it was still unclear whether TSH affected hepatic HMGCR phosphorylation associated with AMPK. We used bovine TSH (bTSH) to treat the primary mouse hepatocytes and HepG2 cells with or without constitutively active (CA)-AMPK plasmid or protein kinase A inhibitor (H89), and set up the TSH receptor (Tshr)-KO mouse models. The p-HMGCR, p-AMPK, and related molecular expression were tested. The ratios of p-HMGCR/HMGCR and p-AMPK/AMPK decreased in the hepatocytes in a dose-dependent manner following bTSH stimulation. The changes above were inversed when the cells were treated with CA-AMPK plasmid or H89. In Tshr-KO mice, the ratios of liver p-HMGCR/HMGCR and p-AMPK/AMPK were increased relative to the littermate wild-type mice. Consistently, the phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, a downstream target molecule of AMPK, increased. All results suggested that TSH could regulate the phosphorylation of HMGCR via AMPK, which established a potential mechanism for hypercholesterolemia involved in a direct action of the TSH in the liver. PMID:25713102

  16. Influence of seasonal variation and methyl jasmonate mediated induction of glucosinolate biosynthesis on quinone reductase activity in broccoli florets.

    PubMed

    Ku, Kang Mo; Jeffery, Elizabeth H; Juvik, John A

    2013-10-01

    Methyl jasmonate spray treatments (250 μM) were utilized to alter glucosinolate composition in the florets of the commercial broccoli F1 hybrids 'Pirate', 'Expo', 'Green Magic', 'Imperial', and 'Gypsy' grown in replicated field plantings in 2009 and 2010. MeJA treatment significantly increased glucoraphanin (11%), gluconasturtiin (59%), and neoglucobrassicin (248%) concentrations and their hydrolysis products including sulforaphane (152%), phenethyl isothiocyanate (318%), N-methoxyindole-3-carbinol (313%), and neoascorbigen (232%) extracted from florets of these genotypes over two seasons. Increased quinone reductase (QR) activity was significantly correlated with increased levels of sulforaphane, N-methoxyindole-3-carbinol, and neoascorbigen. Partitioning experiment-wide trait variances indicated that the variability in concentrations of sulforaphane (29%), neoascorbigen (48%), and QR activity (72%) was influenced by year-associated weather variables, whereas variation in neoglucobrassicin (63%) and N-methoxyindole-3-carbinol (46%) concentrations was primarily attributed to methyl jasmonate treatment. These results suggest that methyl jasmonate treatment can enhance QR inducing activity by increased hydrolysis of glucoraphanin into sulforaphane and the hydrolysis products of neoglucobrassicin. PMID:24032372

  17. Slow-Onset Inhibition of the FabI Enoyl Reductase from Francisella tularensis: Residence Time and in Vivo Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, H.; England, K; Ende, C; Truglio, J; Luckner, S; Reddy, B; Marlenee, N; Knudson, S; Knudson, D; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent and contagious Gram-negative intracellular bacterium that causes the disease tularemia in mammals. The high infectivity and the ability of the bacterium to survive for weeks in a cool, moist environment have raised the possibility that this organism could be exploited deliberately as a potential biological weapon. Fatty acid biosynthesis (FAS-II) is essential for bacterial viability and has been validated as a target for the discovery of novel antibacterials. The FAS-II enoyl reductase ftuFabI has been cloned and expressed, and a series of diphenyl ethers have been identified that are subnanomolar inhibitors of the enzyme with MIC90 values as low as 0.00018 ?g mL-1. The existence of a linear correlation between the Ki and MIC values strongly suggests that the antibacterial activity of the diphenyl ethers results from direct inhibition of ftuFabI within the cell. The compounds are slow-onset inhibitors of ftuFabI, and the residence time of the inhibitors on the enzyme correlates with their in vivo activity in a mouse model of tularemia infection. Significantly, the rate of breakdown of the enzyme-inhibitor complex is a better predictor of in vivo activity than the overall thermodynamic stability of the complex, a concept that has important implications for the discovery of novel chemotherapeutics that normally rely on equilibrium measurements of potency.

  18. Thioredoxin reductase activity may be more important than GSH level in protecting human lens epithelial cells against UVA light.

    PubMed

    Padgaonkar, Vanita A; Leverenz, Victor R; Bhat, Aparna V; Pelliccia, Sara E; Giblin, Frank J

    2015-01-01

    This study compares the abilities of the glutathione (GSH) and thioredoxin (Trx) antioxidant systems in defending cultured human lens epithelial cells (LECs) against UVA light. Levels of GSH were depleted with either L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO) or 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB). CDNB treatment also inhibited the activity of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR). Two levels of O2 , 3% and 20%, were employed during a 1 h exposure of the cells to 25 J cm(-2) of UVA radiation (338-400 nm wavelength, peak at 365 nm). Inhibition of TrxR activity by CDNB, combined with exposure to UVA light, produced a substantial loss of LECs and cell damage, with the effects being considerably more severe at 20% O2 compared to 3%. In contrast, depletion of GSH by BSO, combined with exposure to UVA light, produced only a slight cell loss, with no apparent morphological effects. Catalase was highly sensitive to UVA-induced inactivation, but was not essential for protection. Although UVA light presented a challenge for the lens epithelium, it was well tolerated under normal conditions. The results demonstrate an important role for TrxR activity in defending the lens epithelium against UVA light, possibly related to the ability of the Trx system to assist DNA synthesis following UVA-induced cell damage. PMID:25495870

  19. Thioredoxin Reductase Activity may be More Important than GSH Level in Protecting Human Lens Epithelial Cells Against UVA Light

    PubMed Central

    Padgaonkar, Vanita A.; Leverenz, Victor R.; Bhat, Aparna V.; Pelliccia, Sara E.; Giblin, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    This study compares the abilities of the glutathione (GSH) and thioredoxin (Trx) antioxidant systems in defending cultured human lens epithelial cells (LECs) against UVA light. Levels of GSH were depleted with either L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO) or 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB). CDNB treatment also inhibited the activity of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR). Two levels of O2, 3% and 20%, were employed during a 1 hr exposure of the cells to 25 J/cm2 of UVA radiation (338-400nm wavelength, peak at 365nm). Inhibition of TrxR activity by CDNB, combined with exposure to UVA light, produced a substantial loss of LECs and cell damage, with the effects being considerably more severe at 20% O2 compared to 3%. In contrast, depletion of GSH by BSO, combined with exposure to UVA light, produced only a slight cell loss, with no apparent morphological effects. Catalase was highly sensitive to UVA-induced inactivation, but was not essential for protection. Although UVA light presented a challenge for the lens epithelium, it was well-tolerated under normal conditions. The results demonstrate an important role for TrxR activity in defending the lens epithelium against UVA light, possibly related to the ability of the Trx system to assist DNA synthesis following UVA-induced cell damage. PMID:25495870

  20. Rational design of broad spectrum antibacterial activity based on a clinically relevant enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Schiebel, Johannes; Chang, Andrew; Shah, Sonam; Lu, Yang; Liu, Li; Pan, Pan; Hirschbeck, Maria W; Tareilus, Mona; Eltschkner, Sandra; Yu, Weixuan; Cummings, Jason E; Knudson, Susan E; Bommineni, Gopal R; Walker, Stephen G; Slayden, Richard A; Sotriffer, Christoph A; Tonge, Peter J; Kisker, Caroline

    2014-06-01

    Determining the molecular basis for target selectivity is of particular importance in drug discovery. The ideal antibiotic should be active against a broad spectrum of pathogenic organisms with a minimal effect on human targets. CG400549, a Staphylococcus-specific 2-pyridone compound that inhibits the enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI), has recently been shown to possess human efficacy for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections, which constitute a serious threat to human health. In this study, we solved the structures of three different FabI homologues in complex with several pyridone inhibitors, including CG400549. Based on these structures, we rationalize the 65-fold reduced affinity of CG400549 toward Escherichia coli versus S. aureus FabI and implement concepts to improve the spectrum of antibacterial activity. The identification of different conformational states along the reaction coordinate of the enzymatic hydride transfer provides an elegant visual depiction of the relationship between catalysis and inhibition, which facilitates rational inhibitor design. Ultimately, we developed the novel 4-pyridone-based FabI inhibitor PT166 that retained favorable pharmacokinetics and efficacy in a mouse model of S. aureus infection with extended activity against Gram-negative and mycobacterial organisms. PMID:24739388

  1. Simple and rapid method for detection of nitrate reductase activity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium canettii grown in the Bactec MGIT960 system.

    PubMed

    Goh, Khye Seng; Rastogi, Nalin

    2010-05-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis reduces nitrate very strongly as compared to Mycobacterium bovis and M. bovis BCG. Nitrate reductase, in conjunction with niacin accumulation, constitutes one of the major biochemical tests used in clinical microbiology laboratories to differentiate M. tuberculosis from other members of the M. tuberculosis complex, as well as nontuberculous Mycobacteria. Determination of nitrate reductase activity is currently performed using cultures grown on solid media with a slow detection time and the need for large quantities of bacilli, as otherwise the test is not reliable. Hereby, we propose a nitrate reduction test coupled to Bactec MGIT960 system as a simple, rapid and economic method with a total gain of time of about 3 to 4weeks over the conventional solid medium. In our study, almost all the M. tuberculosis and Mycobacterium canettii strains gave a strongly positive nitrate reductase result within 1day of positive detection by the MGIT960 system. In contrast, M. bovis, M. bovis BCG and M. africanum strains remained negative even after 14days of incubation. The possibility to detect nitrate reductase within 1 to 3days of a positive culture using MGIT960 opens new perspectives with the possibility of confirming M. tuberculosis - starting directly from pathological specimens. PMID:20298726

  2. Radiation inactivation analysis of assimilatory NADH:nitrate reductase. Apparent functional sizes of partial activities associated with intact and proteolytically modified enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Solomonson, L.P.; McCreery, M.J.; Kay, C.J.; Barber, M.J.

    1987-06-25

    Recently we demonstrated that target sizes for the partial activities of nitrate reductase were considerably smaller than the 100-kDa subunit which corresponded to the target size of the full (physiologic) activity NADH:nitrate reductase. These results suggested that the partial activities resided on functionally independent domains and that radiation inactivation may be due to localized rather than extensive damage to protein structure. The present study extends these observations and addresses several associated questions. Monophasic plots were observed over a wide range of radiation doses, suggesting a single activity component in each case. No apparent differences were observed over a 10-fold range of concentration for each substrate, suggesting that the observed slopes were not due to marked changes in Km values. Apparent target sizes estimated for partial activities associated with native enzyme and with limited proteolysis products of native enzyme suggested that the functional size obtained by radiation inactivation analysis is independent of the size of the polypeptide chain. The presence of free radical scavengers during irradiation reduced the apparent target size of both the physiologic and partial activities by an amount ranging from 24 to 43%, suggesting that a free radical mechanism is at least partially responsible for the inactivation. Immunoblot analysis of nitrate reductase irradiated in the presence of free radical scavengers revealed formation of distinct bands at 90, 75, and 40 kDa with increasing doses of irradiation rather than complete destruction of the polypeptide chain.

  3. Kinetic evidence that methionine sulfoxide reductase A can reveal its oxidase activity in the presence of thioredoxin.

    PubMed

    Kriznik, Alexandre; Boschi-Muller, Sandrine; Branlant, Guy

    2014-04-15

    The mouse methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA) belongs to the subclass of MsrAs with one catalytic and two recycling Cys corresponding to Cys51, Cys198 and Cys206 in Escherichia coli MsrA, respectively. It was previously shown that in the absence of thioredoxin, the mouse and the E. coli MsrAs, which reduce two mol of methionine-O substrate per mol of enzyme, displays an in vitro S-stereospecific methionine oxidase activity. In the present study carried out with E. coli MsrA, kinetic evidence are presented which show that formation of the second mol of Ac-L-Met-NHMe is rate-limiting in the absence of thioredoxin. In the presence of thioredoxin, the overall rate-limiting step is associated with the thioredoxin-recycling process. Kinetic arguments are presented which support the accumulation of the E. coli MsrA under Cys51 sulfenic acid state in the presence of Trx. Thus, the methionine oxidase activity could be operative in vivo without the action of a regulatory protein in order to block the action of Trx as previously proposed. PMID:24632144

  4. Involvement of tristetraprolin in transcriptional activation of hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase by insulin

    SciTech Connect

    Ness, Gene C.; Edelman, Jeffrey L.; Brooks, Patricia A.

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer siRNAs to tristetraprolin blocks transcription of HMGR in vivo in rat liver. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer siRNAs to tristetraprolin inhibits insulin activation of HMGR transcription. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insulin acts to rapidly increase tristetraprolin in liver nuclear extracts. -- Abstract: Several AU-rich RNA binding element (ARE) proteins were investigated for their possible effects on transcription of hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) in normal rats. Using in vivo electroporation, four different siRNAs to each ARE protein were introduced together with HMGR promoter (-325 to +20) luciferase construct and compared to saline controls. All four siRNAs to tristetraprolin (TTP) completely eliminated transcription from the HMGR promoter construct. Since insulin acts to rapidly increase hepatic HMGR transcription, the effect of TTP siRNA on induction by insulin was tested. The 3-fold stimulation by insulin was eliminated by this treatment. In comparison, siRNA to AU RNA binding protein/enoyl coenzyme A hydratase (AUH) had no effect. These findings indicate a role for TTP in the insulin-mediated activation of hepatic HMGR transcription.

  5. A novel thiol-reductase activity of Arabidopsis YUC6 confers drought tolerance independently of auxin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Joon-Yung; Kim, Woe-Yeon; Kang, Sun Bin; Kim, Jeong Im; Baek, Dongwon; Jung, In Jung; Kim, Mi Ri; Li, Ning; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Asami, Tadao; Sabir, Jamal S. M.; Park, Hyeong Cheol; Lee, Sang Yeol; Bohnert, Hans J.; Bressan, Ray A.; Pardo, Jose M.; Yun, Dae-Jin

    2015-01-01

    YUCCA (YUC) proteins constitute a family of flavin monooxygenases (FMOs), with an important role in auxin (IAA) biosynthesis. Here we report that Arabidopsis plants overexpressing YUC6 display enhanced IAA-related phenotypes and exhibit improved drought stress tolerance, low rate of water loss and controlled ROS accumulation under drought and oxidative stresses. Co-overexpression of an IAA-conjugating enzyme reduces IAA levels but drought stress tolerance is unaffected, indicating that the stress-related phenotype is not based on IAA overproduction. YUC6 contains a previously unrecognized FAD- and NADPH-dependent thiol-reductase activity (TR) that overlaps with the FMO domain involved in IAA biosynthesis. Mutation of a conserved cysteine residue (Cys-85) preserves FMO but suppresses TR activity and stress tolerance, whereas mutating the FAD- and NADPH-binding sites, that are common to TR and FMO domains, abolishes all outputs. We provide a paradigm for a single protein playing a dual role, regulating plant development and conveying stress defence responses. PMID:26314500

  6. A novel thiol-reductase activity of Arabidopsis YUC6 confers drought tolerance independently of auxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Cha, Joon-Yung; Kim, Woe-Yeon; Kang, Sun Bin; Kim, Jeong Im; Baek, Dongwon; Jung, In Jung; Kim, Mi Ri; Li, Ning; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Asami, Tadao; Sabir, Jamal S M; Park, Hyeong Cheol; Lee, Sang Yeol; Bohnert, Hans J; Bressan, Ray A; Pardo, Jose M; Yun, Dae-Jin

    2015-01-01

    YUCCA (YUC) proteins constitute a family of flavin monooxygenases (FMOs), with an important role in auxin (IAA) biosynthesis. Here we report that Arabidopsis plants overexpressing YUC6 display enhanced IAA-related phenotypes and exhibit improved drought stress tolerance, low rate of water loss and controlled ROS accumulation under drought and oxidative stresses. Co-overexpression of an IAA-conjugating enzyme reduces IAA levels but drought stress tolerance is unaffected, indicating that the stress-related phenotype is not based on IAA overproduction. YUC6 contains a previously unrecognized FAD- and NADPH-dependent thiol-reductase activity (TR) that overlaps with the FMO domain involved in IAA biosynthesis. Mutation of a conserved cysteine residue (Cys-85) preserves FMO but suppresses TR activity and stress tolerance, whereas mutating the FAD- and NADPH-binding sites, that are common to TR and FMO domains, abolishes all outputs. We provide a paradigm for a single protein playing a dual role, regulating plant development and conveying stress defence responses. PMID:26314500

  7. Solvent as a probe of active site motion and chemistry during the hydrogen tunnelling reaction in morphinone reductase.

    PubMed

    Hay, Sam; Pudney, Christopher R; Sutcliffe, Michael J; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2008-09-15

    The reductive half-reaction of morphinone reductase involves a hydride transfer from enzyme-bound beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) to a flavin mononucleotide (FMN). We have previously demonstrated that this step proceeds via a quantum mechanical tunnelling mechanism. Herein, we probe the effect of the solvent on the active site chemistry. The pK(a) of the reduced FMN N1 is 7.4+/-0.7, based on the pH-dependence of the FMN midpoint potential. We rule out that protonation of the reduced FMN N1 is coupled to the preceding H-transfer as both the rate and temperature-dependence of the reaction are insensitive to changes in solution pH above and below this pK(a). Further, the solvent kinetic isotope effect is approximately 1.0 and both the 1 degrees and 2 degrees KIEs are insensitive to solution pH. The effect of the solvent's dielectric constant is investigated and the rate of H-transfer is found to be unaffected by changes in the dielectric constant between approximately 60 and 80. We suggest that, while there is crystallographic evidence for some water in the active site, the putative promoting motion involved in the H-tunnelling reaction is insensitive to such changes. PMID:18668493

  8. A continuous spectrophotometric assay for NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase activity using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl.

    PubMed

    Yim, Sung-Kun; Yun, Su-Jung; Yun, Chul-Ho

    2004-09-30

    NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) transfers electrons from NADPH to cytochrome P450, and catalyzes the one-electron reduction of many drugs and foreign compounds. Various forms of spectrophotometric titration have been performed to investigate the electron-accepting properties of CPR, particularly, to examine its ability to reduce cytochrome c and ferricyanide. In this study, the reduction of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) by CPR was assessed as a means of monitoring CPR activity. The principle advantage of DPPH is that its reduction can be assayed directly in the reaction medium by a continuous spectrophotometry. Thus, electrons released from NADPH by CPR were transferred to DPPH, and DPPH reduction was then followed spectrophotometrically by measuring A(520) reduction. Optimal assay concentrations of DPPH, CPR, potassium phosphate buffer, and NADPH were first established. DPPH reduction activity was found to depend upon the strength of the buffer used, which was optimal at 100 mM potassium phosphate and pH 7.6. The extinction coefficient of DPPH was 4.09mM(-1) cm(-1). DPPH reduction followed classical Michaelis-Menten kinetics (K(m) = 28 microM, k(cat) = 1690 min(-1)). This method uses readily available materials, and has the additional advantages of being rapid and inexpensive. PMID:15479629

  9. Dissimilatory arsenate reductase activity and arsenate-respiring bacteria in bovine rumen fluid, hamster feces, and the termite hindgut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herbel, M.J.; Switzer, Blum J.; Hoeft, S.E.; Cohen, S.M.; Arnold, L.L.; Lisak, J.; Stolz, J.F.; Oremland, R.S.

    2002-01-01

    Bovine rumen fluid and slurried hamster feces completely reduced millimolar levels of arsenate to arsenite upon incubation under anoxic conditions. This activity was strongly inhibited by autoclaving or aerobic conditions, and partially inhibited by tungstate or chloramphenicol. The rate of arsenate reduction was faster in feces from a population of arsenate-watered (100 ppm) hamsters compared to a control group watered without arsenate. Using radioisotope methods, arsenate reductase activity in hamster feces was also detected at very low concentrations of added arsenate (???10 ??M). Bacterial cultures were isolated from these materials, as well as from the termite hindgut, that grew using H2 as their electron donor, acetate as their carbon source, and arsenate as their respiratory electron acceptor. The three cultures aligned phylogenetically either with well-established enteric bacteria, or with an organism associated with feedlot fecal wastes. Because arsenite is transported across the gut epithelium more readily than arsenate, microbial dissimilatory reduction of arsenate in the gut may promote the body's absorption of arsenic and hence potentiate its toxicity. ?? 2002 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Plant Thioredoxin CDSP32 Regenerates 1-Cys Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase B Activity through the Direct Reduction of Sulfenic Acid*

    PubMed Central

    Tarrago, Lionel; Laugier, Edith; Zaffagnini, Mirko; Marchand, Christophe H.; Le Maréchal, Pierre; Lemaire, Stéphane D.; Rey, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    Thioredoxins (Trxs) are ubiquitous enzymes catalyzing the reduction of disulfide bonds, thanks to a CXXC active site. Among their substrates, 2-Cys methionine sulfoxide reductases B (2-Cys MSRBs) reduce the R diastereoisomer of methionine sulfoxide (MetSO) and possess two redox-active Cys as follows: a catalytic Cys reducing MetSO and a resolving one, involved in disulfide bridge formation. The other MSRB type, 1-Cys MSRBs, possesses only the catalytic Cys, and their regeneration mechanisms by Trxs remain unclear. The plant plastidial Trx CDSP32 is able to provide 1-Cys MSRB with electrons. CDSP32 includes two Trx modules with one potential active site 219CGPC222 and three extra Cys. Here, we investigated the redox properties of recombinant Arabidopsis CDSP32 and delineated the biochemical mechanisms of MSRB regeneration by CDSP32. Free thiol titration and 4-acetamido-4′-maleimidyldistilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid alkylation assays indicated that the Trx possesses only two redox-active Cys, very likely the Cys219 and Cys222. Protein electrophoresis analyses coupled to mass spectrometry revealed that CDSP32 forms a heterodimeric complex with MSRB1 via reduction of the sulfenic acid formed on MSRB1 catalytic Cys after MetSO reduction. MSR activity assays using variable CDSP32 amounts revealed that MSRB1 reduction proceeds with a 1:1 stoichiometry, and redox titrations indicated that CDSP32 and MSRB1 possess midpoints potentials of −337 and −328 mV at pH 7.9, respectively, indicating that regeneration of MSRB1 activity by the Trx through sulfenic acid reduction is thermodynamically feasible in physiological conditions. PMID:20236937

  11. Control of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Activity in Cultured Human Fibroblasts by Very Low Density Lipoproteins of Subjects with Hypertriglyceridemia

    PubMed Central

    Gianturco, Sandra H.; Gotto, Antonio M.; Jackson, Richard L.; Patsch, Josef R.; Sybers, Harley D.; Taunton, O. David; Yeshurun, Daniel L.; Smith, Louis C.

    1978-01-01

    Very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) and low density lipoproteins (LDL) from human normolipemic plasma, and the VLDL, the intermediate density lipoprotein (IDL), and LDL from patients with Type III hyperlipoproteinemic plasma were tested for their abilities to suppress the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase in cultured human fibroblasts from normal subjects and a Type III patient. Regulation of cholesterol synthesis in the fibroblasts of a patient with Type III hyperlipoproteinemia appears to be normal. VLDL from normal subjects, isolated by angle head ultracentrifugation (d < 1.006) or by gel filtration on BioGel A-5m, were about 5 times less effective than LDL in suppressing HMG-CoA reductase activity, based on protein content, in agreement with previous reports with normal fibroblasts. Zonal centrifugation of normal VLDL isolated by both methods showed that the VLDL contained IDL. Normal VLDL from the angle head rotor, refractionated by the zonal method, had little, if any, ability to suppress the HMG-CoA reductase activity in either normal or Type III fibroblasts. VLDL, IDL, and LDL fractionated by zonal ultracentrifugation from Type III plasma gave half-maximum inhibition at 0.2-0.5 μg of protein/ml, indistinguishable from the suppression caused by normal LDL. Type III VLDL did not suppress HMG-CoA reductase in mutant LDL receptor-negative fibroblasts. Zonally isolated VLDL obtained from one Type IV and one Type V patient gave half-maximal suppression at 5 and 0.5 μg of protein/ml, respectively. Molecular diameters and apoprotein compositions of the zonally isolated normal and Type III VLDL were similar; the major difference in composition was that Type III VLDL contained more cholesteryl esters and less triglyceride than did normal VLDL. The compositions and diameters of the Type IV and Type V VLDL were similar to normal VLDL. These findings show that the basic defect in Type III hyperlipoproteinemia is qualitatively

  12. The Chinese Hamster Dihydrofolate Reductase Replication Origin Beta Is Active at Multiple Ectopic Chromosomal Locations and Requires Specific DNA Sequence Elements for Activity

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Amy L.; Fanning, Ellen

    2001-01-01

    To identify cis-acting genetic elements essential for mammalian chromosomal DNA replication, a 5.8-kb fragment from the Chinese hamster dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) locus containing the origin beta (ori-β) initiation region was stably transfected into random ectopic chromosomal locations in a hamster cell line lacking the endogenous DHFR locus. Initiation at ectopic ori-β in uncloned pools of transfected cells was measured using a competitive PCR-based nascent strand abundance assay and shown to mimic that at the endogenous ori-β region in Chinese hamster ovary K1 cells. Initiation activity of three ectopic ori-β deletion mutants was reduced, while the activity of another deletion mutant was enhanced. The results suggest that a 5.8-kb fragment of the DHFR ori-β region is sufficient to direct initiation and that specific DNA sequences in the ori-β region are required for efficient initiation activity. PMID:11158297

  13. Post-translational control of nitrate reductase activity responding to light and photosynthesis evolved already in the early vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Nemie-Feyissa, Dugassa; Królicka, Adriana; Førland, Nina; Hansen, Margarita; Heidari, Behzad; Lillo, Cathrine

    2013-05-01

    Regulation of nitrate reductase (NR) by reversible phosphorylation at a conserved motif is well established in higher plants, and enables regulation of NR in response to rapid fluctuations in light intensity. This regulation is not conserved in algae NR, and we wished to test the evolutionary origin of the regulatory mechanism by physiological examination of ancient land plants. Especially a member of the lycophytes is of interest since their NR is candidate for regulation by reversible phosphorylation based on sequence analysis. We compared Selaginella kraussiana, a member of the lycophytes and earliest vascular plants, with the angiosperm Arabidopsis thaliana, and also tested the moss Physcomitrella patens. Interestingly, optimization of assay conditions revealed that S. kraussiana NR used NADH as an electron donor like A. thaliana, whereas P. patens NR activity depended on NADPH. Examination of light/darkness effects showed that S. kraussiana NR was rapidly regulated similar to A. thaliana NR when a differential (Mg(2+) contra EDTA) assay was used to reveal activity state of NR. This implies that already existing NR enzyme was post-translationally activated by light in both species. Light had a positive effect also on de novo synthesis of NR in S. kraussiana, which could be shown after the plants had been exposed to a prolonged dark period (7 days). Daily variations in NR activity were mainly caused by post-translational modifications. As for angiosperms, the post-translational light activation of NR in S. kraussiana was inhibited by 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1*1-dimethylurea (DCMU), an inhibitor of photosynthesis and stomata opening. Evolutionary, a post-translational control mechanism for NR have occurred before or in parallel with development of vascular tissue in land plants, and appears to be part of a complex mechanisms for coordination of CO2 and nitrogen metabolism in these plants. PMID:23395536

  14. Elevated CO2 levels affect the activity of nitrate reductase and carbonic anhydrase in the calcifying rhodophyte Corallina officinalis

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Laurie C.

    2013-01-01

    The concentration of CO2 in global surface ocean waters is increasing due to rising atmospheric CO2 emissions, resulting in lower pH and a lower saturation state of carbonate ions. Such changes in seawater chemistry are expected to impact calcification in calcifying marine organisms. However, other physiological processes related to calcification might also be affected, including enzyme activity. In a mesocosm experiment, macroalgal communities were exposed to three CO2 concentrations (380, 665, and 1486 µatm) to determine how the activity of two enzymes related to inorganic carbon uptake and nutrient assimilation in Corallina officinalis, an abundant calcifying rhodophyte, will be affected by elevated CO2 concentrations. The activity of external carbonic anhydrase, an important enzyme functioning in macroalgal carbon-concentrating mechanisms, was inversely related to CO2 concentration after long-term exposure (12 weeks). Nitrate reductase, the enzyme responsible for reduction of nitrate to nitrite, was stimulated by CO2 and was highest in algae grown at 665 µatm CO2. Nitrate and phosphate uptake rates were inversely related to CO2, while ammonium uptake was unaffected, and the percentage of inorganic carbon in the algal skeleton decreased with increasing CO2. The results indicate that the processes of inorganic carbon and nutrient uptake and assimilation are affected by elevated CO2 due to changes in enzyme activity, which change the energy balance and physiological status of C. officinalis, therefore affecting its competitive interactions with other macroalgae. The ecological implications of the physiological changes in C. officinalis in response to elevated CO2 are discussed. PMID:23314813

  15. Designing a functional type 2 copper center that has nitrite reductase activity within α-helical coiled coils

    PubMed Central

    Tegoni, Matteo; Yu, Fangting; Bersellini, Manuela; Penner-Hahn, James E.; Pecoraro, Vincent L.

    2012-01-01

    One of the ultimate objectives of de novo protein design is to realize systems capable of catalyzing redox reactions on substrates. This goal is challenging as redox-active proteins require design considerations for both the reduced and oxidized states of the protein. In this paper, we describe the spectroscopic characterization and catalytic activity of a de novo designed metallopeptide Cu(I/II)(TRIL23H)3+/2+, where Cu(I/II) is embeded in α-helical coiled coils, as a model for the CuT2 center of copper nitrite reductase. In Cu(I/II)(TRIL23H)3+/2+, Cu(I) is coordinated to three histidines, as indicated by X-ray absorption data, and Cu(II) to three histidines and one or two water molecules. Both ions are bound in the interior of the three-stranded coiled coils with affinities that range from nano- to micromolar [Cu(II)], and picomolar [Cu(I)]. The Cu(His)3 active site is characterized in both oxidation states, revealing similarities to the CuT2 site in the natural enzyme. The species Cu(II)(TRIL23H)32+ in aqueous solution can be reduced to Cu(I)(TRIL23H)3+ using ascorbate, and reoxidized by nitrite with production of nitric oxide. At pH 5.8, with an excess of both the reductant (ascorbate) and the substrate (nitrite), the copper peptide Cu(II)(TRIL23H)32+ acts as a catalyst for the reduction of nitrite with at least five turnovers and no loss of catalytic efficiency after 3.7 h. The catalytic activity, which is first order in the concentration of the peptide, also shows a pH dependence that is described and discussed. PMID:23236170

  16. Designing a functional type 2 copper center that has nitrite reductase activity within α-helical coiled coils.

    PubMed

    Tegoni, Matteo; Yu, Fangting; Bersellini, Manuela; Penner-Hahn, James E; Pecoraro, Vincent L

    2012-12-26

    One of the ultimate objectives of de novo protein design is to realize systems capable of catalyzing redox reactions on substrates. This goal is challenging as redox-active proteins require design considerations for both the reduced and oxidized states of the protein. In this paper, we describe the spectroscopic characterization and catalytic activity of a de novo designed metallopeptide Cu(I/II)(TRIL23H)(3)(+/2+), where Cu(I/II) is embeded in α-helical coiled coils, as a model for the Cu(T2) center of copper nitrite reductase. In Cu(I/II)(TRIL23H)(3)(+/2+), Cu(I) is coordinated to three histidines, as indicated by X-ray absorption data, and Cu(II) to three histidines and one or two water molecules. Both ions are bound in the interior of the three-stranded coiled coils with affinities that range from nano- to micromolar [Cu(II)], and picomolar [Cu(I)]. The Cu(His)(3) active site is characterized in both oxidation states, revealing similarities to the Cu(T2) site in the natural enzyme. The species Cu(II)(TRIL23H)(3)(2+) in aqueous solution can be reduced to Cu(I)(TRIL23H)(3)(+) using ascorbate, and reoxidized by nitrite with production of nitric oxide. At pH 5.8, with an excess of both the reductant (ascorbate) and the substrate (nitrite), the copper peptide Cu(II)(TRIL23H)(3)(2+) acts as a catalyst for the reduction of nitrite with at least five turnovers and no loss of catalytic efficiency after 3.7 h. The catalytic activity, which is first order in the concentration of the peptide, also shows a pH dependence that is described and discussed. PMID:23236170

  17. Inhibitors of 7-Dehydrocholesterol Reductase: Screening of a Collection of Pharmacologically Active Compounds in Neuro2a Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Young H; Korade, Zeljka; Tallman, Keri A; Liu, Wei; Weaver, C David; Mirnics, Karoly; Porter, Ned A

    2016-05-16

    A small library of pharmacologically active compounds (the NIH Clinical Collection) was assayed in Neuro2a cells to determine their effect on the last step in the biosynthesis of cholesterol, the transformation of 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC) to cholesterol promoted by 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase, DHCR7. Of some 727 compounds in the NIH Clinical Collection, over 30 compounds significantly increased 7-DHC in Neuro2a cells when assayed at 1 μM. Active compounds that increased 7-DHC with a Z-score of +3 or greater generally gave rise to modest decreases in desmosterol and increases in lanosterol levels. Among the most active compounds identified in the library were the antipsychotic, antidepressant, and anxiolytic compounds that included perospirone, nefazodone, haloperidol, aripiprazole, trazodone, and buspirone. Fluoxetine and risperidone were also active at 1 μM, and another 10 compounds in this class of pharmaceuticals were identified in the screen at concentrations of 10 μM. Increased levels of 7-DHC are associated with Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS), a human condition that results from a mutation in the gene that encodes DHCR7. The SLOS phenotype includes neurological deficits and congenital malformations, and it is linked to a higher incidence of autism spectrum disorder. The significance of the current study is that it identifies common pharmacological compounds that may induce a biochemical presentation similar to SLOS. Little is known about the side effects of elevated 7-DHC postdevelopmentally, and the elevated 7-DHC that results from exposure to these compounds may also be a confounder in the diagnosis of SLOS. PMID:27097157

  18. In vivo protection of activated Tyr22-dihydrofolate reductase gene-modified canine T lymphocytes from methotrexate

    PubMed Central

    Gori, Jennifer L.; Beard, Brian C.; Williams, Nathaniel P.; Ironside, Christina; Swanson, Debra; McIvor, R. Scott; Kiem, HP

    2013-01-01

    Background Nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation can cure malignant and nonmalignant diseases affecting the hematopoietic system, such as severe combined immunodeficiencies, aplastic anemia and hemoglobinopathies. Although nonmyeloablative is favored over myeloablative transplantation for many patients, graft rejection remains problematic. One strategy to decrease rejection is to protect donor activated T cells in the graft from methotrexate (MTX) by genetically modifying the cells to express MTX-resistant dihydrofolate reductase (Tyr22-DHFR), leaving the immunosuppressive effects of MTX to act solely on activated host T lymphocytes, shifting the balance to favor allogeneic engraftment. Methods To evaluate MTX resistance of Tyr22-DHFR+ T lymphocytes in vivo, we transplanted dogs with autologous CD34+ cells modified with YFP and DHFR-GFP lentivirus vectors. Dogs were then treated with a standard MTX regimen (days 1, 3, 6, and 11) following immune activation with a foreign antigen as a surrogate assay to mimic early transplantation. Results DHFR-GFP+ gene marking was maintained in CD3+CD25+ and CD4+ T lymphocytes after MTX treatment while the level of T lymphocytes that expressed only a fluorescent reporter (YFP+) decreased. These data show that Tyr22-DHFR expression protects T lymphocytes from MTX toxicity in dogs, highlighting a clinically relevant application for preserving donor T lymphocytes during post transplantation immunosuppression. Conclusions These findings have implications for clinical translation of MTX-resistant T cells to facilitate engraftment of allogeneic cells following nonmyeloablative conditioning and minimize the risk of rejection. In summary, Tyr22-DHFR expression in T lymphocytes provides chemoprotection from MTX-mediated elimination in the context of immune activation in vivo. PMID:23666780

  19. Mithramycin inhibits SP1 binding and selectively inhibits transcriptional activity of the dihydrofolate reductase gene in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Blume, S W; Snyder, R C; Ray, R; Thomas, S; Koller, C A; Miller, D M

    1991-01-01

    The promoter of the human dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene contains two consensus binding sites for the DNA binding protein Sp1. DNAse protection and gel mobility shift assays demonstrate binding of recombinant Sp1 to both decanucleotide Sp1 binding sequences which are located 49 and 14 base pairs upstream of the transcription start site. The more distal of the two binding sites exhibits a somewhat higher affinity for Sp1. The G-C specific DNA binding drug, mithramycin, binds to both consensus sequences and prevents subsequent Sp1 binding. Promoter-dependent in vitro transcription of a DHFR template is selectively inhibited by mithramycin when compared to the human H2b histone gene. A similar effect is also noted in vivo. Mithramycin treatment of MCF-7 human breast carcinoma cells containing an amplified DHFR gene induces selective inhibition of DHFR transcription initiation, resulting in a decline in DHFR mRNA level and enzyme activity. This selective inhibition of DHFR expression suggests that it is possible to modulate the overexpression of the DHFR gene in methotrexate resistant cells. Images PMID:1834700

  20. IN VITRO INHIBITION OF GLUTATHIONE REDUCTASE BY ARSENOTRI-GLUTATHIONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenotriglutathione, a product of the reduction of arsenate and the complexation of arsenite by glutathione, is a mixed type inhibitor of the reduction of glutathione disulfide by purified yeast glutathione reductase or the glutathione reductase activity in rabbit erythrocyte ly...

  1. Inhibition of Rat 5α-Reductase Activity and Testosterone-Induced Sebum Synthesis in Hamster Sebocytes by an Extract of Quercus acutissima Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Koseki, Junichi; Matsumoto, Takashi; Matsubara, Yosuke; Tsuchiya, Kazuaki; Mizuhara, Yasuharu; Sekiguchi, Kyoji; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Junko; Kaneko, Atsushi; Hattori, Tomohisa; Maemura, Kazuya; Kase, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Bokusoku (BK) is an extract from the Quercus cortex used in folk medicine for treatment of skin disorders and convergence, and is present in jumihaidokuto, a traditional Japanese medicine that is prescribed for purulent skin diseases like acne vulgaris. The excess of sebum production induced by androgen is involved in the development of acne. Our aim is to examine whether BK and its constituents inhibit testosterone metabolism and testosterone-induced sebum synthesis. Methods. Measurements of 5α-reductase activity and lipogenesis were performed using rat liver microsomes and hamster sebocytes, respectively. Results. BK dose-dependently reduced the conversion of testosterone to a more active androgen, dihydrotestosterone in a 5α-reductase enzymatic reaction. Twenty polyphenols in BK categorized as gallotannin, ellagitannin, and flavonoid were identified by LC-MS/MS. Nine polyphenols with gallate group, tetragalloyl glucose, pentagalloyl glucose, eugeniin, 1-desgalloyl eugeniin, casuarinin, castalagin, stenophyllanin C, (−)-epicatechin gallate, and (−)-epigallocatechin gallate, inhibited testosterone metabolism. In particular, pentagalloyl glucose showed the strongest activity. BK and pentagalloyl glucose suppressed testosterone-induced lipogenesis, whereas they weakly inhibited the lipogenic action of insulin. Conclusions. BK inhibited androgen-related pathogenesis of acne, testosterone conversion, and sebum synthesis, partially through 5α-reductase inhibition, and has potential to be a useful agent in the therapeutic strategy of acne. PMID:25709710

  2. Community structures and activity of denitrifying microbes in a forested catchment in central Japan: survey using nitrite reductase genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohte, N.; Aoki, M.; Katsuyama, C.; Suwa, Y.; Tange, T.

    2012-12-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms of denitrification processes in the forested catchment, microbial ecological approaches have been applied in an experimental watershed that has previously investigated its hydrological processes. The study catchment is located in the Chiba prefecture in central Japan under the temperate Asian monsoon climate. Potential activities of denitrification of soil samples were measured by incubation experiments under anoxic condition associated with Na15NO3 addition. Existence and variety of microbes having nitrite reductase genes were investigated by PCR amplification, cloning and sequencings of nirK and nirS fragments after DNA extraction. Contrary to our early expectation that the potential denitrification activity was higher at deeper soil horizon with consistent groundwater residence than that in the surface soil, denitrification potential was higher in shallower soil horizons than deeper soils. This suggested that the deficiency of NO3- as a respiratory substrate for denitrifier occurred in deeper soils especially in the summer. However, high denitrification activity and presence of microbes having nirK and nirS in surface soils usually under aerobic condition was explainable by the fact that the majority of denitrifying bacteria have been recognized as a facultative anaerobic bacterium. This also suggests the possibility of that denitrification occurs even in the surface soils if the wet condition is provided by rainwater during and after a storm event. Community structures of microbes having nirK were different between near surface and deeper soil horizons, and ones having nirS was different between saturated zone (under groundwater table) and unsaturated soil horizons. These imply that microbial communities with nisK are sensitive to the concentration of soil organic matters and ones with nirS is sensitive to soil moisture contents.

  3. Detoxification of superoxide without production of H2O2: Antioxidant activity of superoxide reductase complexed with ferrocyanide

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Heredia, Fernando P.; Houée-Levin, Chantal; Berthomieu, Catherine; Touati, Danièle; Tremey, Emilie; Favaudon, Vincent; Adam, Virgile; Nivière, Vincent

    2006-01-01

    The superoxide radical O2·̅ is a toxic by-product of oxygen metabolism. Two O2·̅ detoxifying enzymes have been described so far, superoxide dismutase and superoxide reductase (SOR), both forming H2O2 as a reaction product. Recently, the SOR active site, a ferrous iron in a [Fe2+ (N-His)4 (S-Cys)] pentacoordination, was shown to have the ability to form a complex with the organometallic compound ferrocyanide. Here, we have investigated in detail the reactivity of the SOR–ferrocyanide complex with O2·̅ by pulse and γ-ray radiolysis, infrared, and UV-visible spectroscopies. The complex reacts very efficiently with O2·̅. However, the presence of the ferrocyanide adduct markedly modifies the reaction mechanism of SOR, with the formation of transient intermediates different from those observed for SOR alone. A one-electron redox chemistry appears to be carried out by the ferrocyanide moiety of the complex, whereas the SOR iron site remains in the reduced state. Surprisingly, the toxic H2O2 species is no longer the reaction product. Accordingly, in vivoexperiments showed that formation of the SOR–ferrocyanide complex increased the antioxidant capabilities of SOR expressed in an Escherichia coli sodA sodB recA mutant strain. Altogether, these data describe an unprecedented O2·̅ detoxification activity, catalyzed by the SOR–ferrocyanide complex, which does not conduct to the production of the toxic H2O2 species. PMID:17001016

  4. Dissecting the Structural Elements for the Activation of β-Ketoacyl-(Acyl Carrier Protein) Reductase from Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jing; Zheng, Heping; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Zimmerman, Matthew D.; Shumilin, Igor A.; Osinski, Tomasz; Demas, Matt; Grimshaw, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT β-Ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) reductase (FabG) catalyzes the key reductive reaction in the elongation cycle of fatty acid synthesis (FAS), which is a vital metabolic pathway in bacteria and a promising target for new antibiotic development. The activation of the enzyme is usually linked to the formation of a catalytic triad and cofactor binding, and crystal structures of FabG from different organisms have been captured in either the active or inactive conformation. However, the structural elements which enable activation of FabG require further exploration. Here we report the findings of structural, enzymatic, and binding studies of the FabG protein found in the causative agent of cholera, Vibrio cholerae (vcFabG). vcFabG exists predominantly as a dimer in solution and is able to self-associate to form tetramers, which is the state seen in the crystal structure. The formation of the tetramer may be promoted by the presence of the cofactor NADP(H). The transition between the dimeric and tetrameric states of vcFabG is related to changes in the conformations of the α4/α5 helices on the dimer-dimer interface. Two glycine residues adjacent to the dimer interface (G92 and G141) are identified to be the hinge for the conformational changes, while the catalytic tyrosine (Y155) and a glutamine residue that forms hydrogen bonds to both loop β4-α4 and loop β5-α5 (Q152) stabilize the active conformation. The functions of the aforementioned residues were confirmed by binding and enzymatic assays for the corresponding mutants. IMPORTANCE This paper describes the results of structural, enzymatic, and binding studies of FabG from Vibrio cholerae (vcFabG). In this work, we dissected the structural elements responsible for the activation of vcFabG. The structural information provided here is essential for the development of antibiotics specifically targeting bacterial FabG, especially for the multidrug-resistant strains of V. cholerae. PMID:26553852

  5. A new CuZ active form in the catalytic reduction of N(2)O by nitrous oxide reductase from Pseudomonas nautica.

    PubMed

    Dell'Acqua, Simone; Pauleta, Sofia R; Paes de Sousa, Patrícia M; Monzani, Enrico; Casella, Luigi; Moura, José J G; Moura, Isabel

    2010-08-01

    The final step of bacterial denitrification, the two-electron reduction of N(2)O to N(2), is catalyzed by a multi-copper enzyme named nitrous oxide reductase. The catalytic centre of this enzyme is a tetranuclear copper site called CuZ, unique in biological systems. The in vitro reconstruction of the activity requires a slow activation in the presence of the artificial electron donor, reduced methyl viologen, necessary to reduce CuZ from the resting non-active state (1Cu(II)/3Cu(I)) to the fully reduced state (4Cu(I)), in contrast to the turnover cycle, which is very fast. In the present work, the direct reaction of the activated form of Pseudomonas nautica nitrous oxide reductase with stoichiometric amounts of N(2)O allowed the identification of a new reactive intermediate of the catalytic centre, CuZ degrees , in the turnover cycle, characterized by an intense absorption band at 680 nm. Moreover, the first mediated electrochemical study of Ps. nautica nitrous oxide reductase with its physiological electron donor, cytochrome c-552, was performed. The intermolecular electron transfer was analysed by cyclic voltammetry, under catalytic conditions, and a second-order rate constant of (5.5 +/- 0.9) x 10(5) M(-1 )s(-1) was determined. Both the reaction of stoichiometric amounts of substrate and the electrochemical studies show that the active CuZ degrees species, generated in the absence of reductants, can rearrange to the resting non-active CuZ state. In this light, new aspects of the catalytic and activation/inactivation mechanism of the enzyme are discussed. PMID:20422435

  6. Evaluation of chromate reductase activity in the cell-free culture filtrate of Arthrobacter sp. SUK 1201 isolated from chromite mine overburden.

    PubMed

    Dey, Satarupa; Paul, A K

    2016-08-01

    Arthrobacter sp. SUK 1201, a chromate resistant and reducing bacterium isolated from chromite mine overburden of Sukinda valley, Odisha, India has been evaluated for its hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] reduction potential using cell-free culture filtrate as extracellular chromate reductase enzyme. Production of the enzyme was enhanced in presence of Cr(VI) and its reducing efficiency was increased with increasing concentration of Cr(VI). The Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) and the maximum specific velocity (Vmax) of the extracellular Cr(VI) reductase were calculated to be 54.03 μM Cr(VI) and 5.803 U mg(-1) of protein respectively showing high affinity towards Cr(VI). The reducing activity of the enzyme was maximum at pH 6.5-7.5 and at a temperature of 35 °C and was dependent on NADH. The enzyme was tolerant to different metals such as Mn(II), Mg(II) and Fe(III) and was able to reduce Cr(VI) present in chromite mine seepage. These findings suggest that the extracellular chromate reductase of Arthrobacter sp. SUK 1201 has a great promise for use in Cr(VI) detoxification under different environmental conditions, particularly in the mining waste water treatment systems. PMID:27176938

  7. Details in the catalytic mechanism of mammalian thioredoxin reductase 1 revealed using point mutations and juglone-coupled enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianqiang; Cheng, Qing; Arnér, Elias S J

    2016-05-01

    The mammalian selenoprotein thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1) is a key enzyme in redox regulation, antioxidant defense, and cellular growth. TrxR1 can catalyze efficient reduction of juglone (5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone; walnut toxin) in a reaction which, in contrast to reduction of most other substrates of TrxR1, is not dependent upon an intact selenocysteine (Sec, U) residue of the enzyme. Using a number of TrxR1 mutant variants, we here found that a sole Cys residue at the C-terminal tail of TrxR1 is required for high-efficiency juglone-coupled NADPH oxidase activity of Sec-deficient enzyme, occurring with mixed one- and two-electron reactions producing superoxide. The activity also utilizes the FAD and the N-terminal redox active disulfide/dithiol motif of TrxR1. If a sole Cys residue at the C-terminal tail of TrxR1, in the absence of Sec, was moved further towards the C-terminal end of the protein compared to its natural position at residue 497, juglone reduction was, surprisingly, further increased. Ala substitutions of Trp407, Asn418 and Asn419 in a previously described "guiding bar", thought to mediate interactions of the C-terminal tail of TrxR1 with the FAD/dithiol site at the N-terminal domain of the other subunit in the dimeric enzyme, lowered turnover with juglone about 4.5-fold. Four residues of Sec-deficient TrxR1 were found to be easily arylated by juglone, including the Cys residue at position 497. Based upon our observations we suggest a model for involvement of the juglone-arylated C-terminal motif of TrxR1 to explain its high activity with juglone. This study thus provides novel insights into the catalytic mechanisms of TrxR1. One-electron juglone reduction by TrxR1 producing superoxide should furthermore contribute to the well-known prooxidant cytotoxicity of juglone. PMID:26898501

  8. The activation of electrophile, nucleophile and leaving group during the reaction catalysed by pI258 arsenate reductase.

    PubMed

    Roos, Goedele; Loverix, Stefan; Brosens, Elke; Van Belle, Karolien; Wyns, Lode; Geerlings, Paul; Messens, Joris

    2006-06-01

    The reduction of arsenate to arsenite by pI258 arsenate reductase (ArsC) combines a nucleophilic displacement reaction with a unique intramolecular disulfide cascade. Within this reaction mechanism, the oxidative equivalents are translocated from the active site to the surface of ArsC. The first reaction step in the reduction of arsenate by pI258 ArsC consists of a nucleophilic displacement reaction carried out by Cys10 on dianionic arsenate. The second step involves the nucleophilic attack of Cys82 on the Cys10-arseno intermediate formed during the first reaction step. The onset of the second step is studied here by using quantum chemical calculations in a density functional theory context. The optimised geometry of the Cys10-arseno adduct in the ArsC catalytic site (sequence motif: Cys10-Thr11-Gly12-Asn13-Ser14-Cys15-Arg16-Ser17) forms the starting point for all subsequent calculations. Thermodynamic data and a hard and soft acids and bases (HSAB) reactivity analysis show a preferential nucleophilic attack on a monoanionic Cys10-arseno adduct, which is stabilised by Ser17. The P-loop active site of pI258 ArsC activates first a hydroxy group and subsequently arsenite as the leaving group, as is clear from an increase in the calculated nucleofugality of these groups upon going from the gas phase to the solvent phase to the enzymatic environment. Furthermore, the enzymatic environment stabilises the thiolate form of the nucleophile Cys82 by 3.3 pH units through the presence of the eight-residue alpha helix flanked by Cys82 and Cys89 (redox helix) and through a hydrogen bond with Thr11. The importance of Thr11 in the pKa regulation of Cys82 was confirmed by the observed decrease in the kcat value of the Thr11Ala mutant as compared to that of wild-type ArsC. During the final reaction step, Cys89 is activated as a nucleophile by structural alterations of the redox helix that functions as a pKa control switch for Cys89; this final step is necessary to expose a Cys82-Cys

  9. Inhibition of NADH-ubiquinone reductase activity by N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and correlation of this inhibition with the occurrence of energy-coupling site 1 in various organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, T.

    1987-05-19

    The NADH-ubiquinone reductase activity of the respiratory chains of several organisms was inhibited by the carboxyl-modifying reagent N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD). This inhibition correlated with the presence of an energy-transducing site in this segment of the respiratory chain. Where the NADH-quinone reductase segment involved an energy-coupling site (e.g., in bovine heart and rat liver mitochondria, and in Paracoccus denitrificans, Escherichia coli, and Thermus thermophilus HB-8 membranes), DCCD acted as an inhibitor of ubiquinone reduction by NADH. By contrast, where energy-coupling site 1 was absent (e.g., in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria and BacilLus subtilis membranes), there was no inhibition of NADH-ubiquinone reductase activity by DCCD. In the bovine and P. denitrificans systems, DCCD inhibition was pseudo first order with respect to incubation time, and reaction order with respect to inhibitor concentration was close to unity, indicating that inhibition resulted from the binding of one inhibitor molecule per active unit of NADH-ubiquinone reductase. In the bovine NADH-ubiquinone reductase complex (complex I), (/sup 14/C)DCCD was preferentially incorporated into two subunits of molecular weight 49,000 and 29,000. The time course of labeling of the 29,000 molecular weight subunit with (/sup 14/C)DCCD paralleled the time course of inhibition of NADH-ubiquinone reductase activity.

  10. Determination of the active form of the tetranuclear copper sulfur cluster in nitrous oxide reductase.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Esther M; Dell'Acqua, Simone; Ramos, Susana; Pauleta, Sofia R; Moura, Isabel; Solomon, Edward I

    2014-01-15

    N2OR has been found to have two structural forms of its tetranuclear copper active site, the 4CuS Cu(Z)* form and the 4Cu2S Cu(Z) form. EPR, resonance Raman, and MCD spectroscopies have been used to determine the redox states of these sites under different reductant conditions, showing that the Cu(Z)* site accesses the 1-hole and fully reduced redox states, while the Cu(Z) site accesses the 2-hole and 1-hole redox states. Single-turnover reactions of N2OR for Cu(Z) and Cu(Z)* poised in these redox states and steady-state turnover assays with different proportions of Cu(Z) and Cu(Z)* show that only fully reduced Cu(Z)* is catalytically competent in rapid turnover with N2O. PMID:24364717

  11. Mercury (II) removal by resistant bacterial isolates and mercuric (II) reductase activity in a new strain of Pseudomonas sp. B50A.

    PubMed

    Giovanella, Patricia; Cabral, Lucélia; Bento, Fátima Menezes; Gianello, Clesio; Camargo, Flávio Anastácio Oliveira

    2016-01-25

    This study aimed to isolate mercury resistant bacteria, determine the minimum inhibitory concentration for Hg, estimate mercury removal by selected isolates, explore the mer genes, and detect and characterize the activity of the enzyme mercuric (II) reductase produced by a new strain of Pseudomonas sp. B50A. The Hg removal capacity of the isolates was determined by incubating the isolates in Luria Bertani broth and the remaining mercury quantified by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. A PCR reaction was carried out to detect the merA gene and the mercury (II) reductase activity was determined in a spectrophotometer at 340 nm. Eight Gram-negative bacterial isolates were resistant to high mercury concentrations and capable of removing mercury, and of these, five were positive for the gene merA. The isolate Pseudomonas sp. B50A removed 86% of the mercury present in the culture medium and was chosen for further analysis of its enzyme activity. Mercuric (II) reductase activity was detected in the crude extract of this strain. This enzyme showed optimal activity at pH 8 and at temperatures between 37 °C and 45 °C. The ions NH4(+), Ba(2+), Sn(2+), Ni(2+) and Cd(2+) neither inhibited nor stimulated the enzyme activity but it decreased in the presence of the ions Ca(2+), Cu(+) and K(+). The isolate and the enzyme detected were effective in reducing Hg(II) to Hg(0), showing the potential to develop bioremediation technologies and processes to clean-up the environment and waste contaminated with mercury. PMID:26051077

  12. Synthesis and activity of novel 16-dehydropregnenolone acetate derivatives as inhibitors of type 1 5α-reductase and on cancer cell line SK-LU-1.

    PubMed

    Silva-Ortiz, Aylin Viviana; Bratoeff, Eugene; Ramírez-Apan, Teresa; Heuze, Yvonne; Sánchez, Araceli; Soriano, Juan; Cabeza, Marisa

    2015-12-15

    Testosterone (T) plays a crucial role in prostate growth. In androgen-dependent tissues T is reduced to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) because of the presence of the 5α-reductase enzyme. This androgen is more active than T, since it has a higher affinity for the androgen receptor (AR). When this mechanism is altered, androgen-dependent diseases, including prostate cancer, could result. The aim of this study was to synthesize several 16-dehydropregnenolone acetate derivatives containing a triazole ring at C-21 and a linear or alicyclic ester moiety at C-3 of the steroidal skeleton. These steroids were designed as potential inhibitors of the activity of both types (1 and 2) of 5α-reductase. The cytotoxic activity of these compounds was also evaluated on a panel of PC-3, MCF7, and SK-LU-1 human cancer cell lines. The results from this study showed that with the exception of steroids 20-oxo-21-(1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-yl)pregna-5,16-dien-3β-yl-propionate and 20-oxo-21-(1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-yl)pregna-5,16-dien-3β-yl-pentanoate, the compounds exhibit a lower inhibitory activity for both isoenzymes of 5α-reductase than finasteride. Furthermore the 3β-hydroxy-21-(1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-yl)pregna-5,16-dien-20-one and 20-oxo-21-(1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-yl)pregna-5,16-dien-3β-yl-acetate derivatives display 80% cytotoxic activity on the SK-LU-1 cell line. These results also indicated that the triazole derivatives, which have a hydroxyl or acetoxy group at C-3, could have an anticancer effect, whereas the derivatives with a alicyclic ester group at C-3 do not show biological activity. PMID:26631442

  13. Zeatin reductase in Phaseolus embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.C.; Mok, David, W.S.; Mok, M.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Zeatin was converted to O-xylosylzeatin in embryos of Phaseolus vulgaris . O-xylosyldihydrozeatin was also identified as a zeatin metabolite. Incubation of embryo extracts with {sup 14}C-zeatin and {sup 14}C-O-xylosylzeatin revealed that reduction preceeds the O-xylosylation of zeatin. An enzyme responsible for reducing the N{sup 6}-side chain was isolated and partially purified using ammonium sulfate fractionation and affinity, gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography. The NADPH dependent reductase was zeatin specific and did not recognize cis-zeatin, ribosylzeatin, i{sup 6}Ade or i{sup 6}Ado. Two forms of the reductase could be separated by either gel filtration or anion exchange HPLC. The HMW isozyme (Mr. 55,000) eluted from the anion exchange column later than the LMW isozyme (Mr. 25,000). Interspecific differences in zeatin reductase activity were also detected.

  14. Regulative roles of glutathione reductase and four glutaredoxins in glutathione redox, antioxidant activity, and iron homeostasis of Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Long-Bin; Tang, Li; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2016-07-01

    Multiple glutaredoxins (Grx) and glutathione reductase (Glr) are vital for the thiol-disulfide redox system in budding yeast but generally unexplored in filamentous fungi. Here we characterized the Beauveria bassiana redox system comprising dithiol Grx1, monothiol Grx2-4, Grx-like Grx5, and Glr orthologue. Each grx or glr deletion was compensated by increased transcripts of some other grx genes in normal cultures. Particularly, grx3 compensated the absence of grx1, grx2, grx5, or glr under oxidative stress while its absence was compensated only by undeletable grx4 under normal conditions but by most of other undeleted grx and glr genes in response to menadione. Consequently, the redox state was disturbed in Δglr more than in Δgrx3 but not in Δgrx1/2/5. Superoxide dismutases were more active in normal Δgrx1-3 cultures but less in Δgrx5 or Δglr response to menadione. Total catalase activity increased differentially in all the mutant cultures stressed with or without H2O2 while total peroxidase activity decreased more in the normal or H2O2-stressed culture of Δglr than of Δgrx3. Among the mutants, Δgrx3 showed slightly increased sensitivity to menadione or H2O2; Δglr exhibited greater sensitivity to thiol-oxidizing diamide than thiol-reducing 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as well as increased sensitivity to the two oxidants. Intriguingly, all the mutants grew slower in a Fe(3+)-inclusive medium perhaps due to elevated transcripts of two Fe(3+) transporter genes. More or fewer phenotypes linked with biocontrol potential were altered in four deletion mutants excluding Δgrx5. All the changes were restored by targeted gene complementation. Overall, Grx3 played more critical role than other Grx homologues in the Glr-dependent redox system of the fungal entomopathogen. PMID:26969041

  15. The effect of salts on the activity and stability of Escherichia coli and Haloferax volcanii dihydrofolate reductases.

    PubMed

    Wright, Donna B; Banks, Douglas D; Lohman, Jeremy R; Hilsenbeck, Jacqueline L; Gloss, Lisa M

    2002-10-18

    The extremely halophilic Archae require near-saturating concentrations of salt in the external environment and in their cytoplasm, potassium being the predominant intracellular cation. The proteins of these organisms have evolved to function in concentrations of salt that inactivate or precipitate homologous proteins from non-halophilic species. It has been proposed that haloadaptation is primarily due to clustering of acidic residues on the surface of the protein, and that these clusters bind networks of hydrated ions. The dihydrofolate reductases from Escherichia coli (ecDHFR) and two DHFR isozymes from Haloferax volcanii (hvDHFR1 and hvDHFR2) have been used as a model system to compare the effect of salts on a mesophilic and halophilic enzyme. The KCl-dependence of the activity and substrate affinity was investigated. ecDHFR is largely inactivated above 1M KCl, with no major effect on substrate affinity. hvDHFR1 and hvDHFR2 unfold at KCl concentrations below approximately 0.5M. Above approximately 1M, the KCl dependence of the hvDHFR activities can be attributed to the effect of salt on substrate affinity. The abilities of NaCl, KCl, and CsCl to enhance the stability to urea denaturation were determined, and similar efficacies of stabilization were observed for all three DHFR variants. The DeltaG degrees (H(2)O) values increased linearly with increasing KCl and CsCl concentrations. The increase of DeltaG degrees (H(2)O) as a function of the smallest cation, NaCl, is slightly curved, suggesting a minor stabilization from cation binding or screening of electrostatic repulsion. At their respective physiological ionic strengths, the DHFR variants exhibit similar stabilities. Salts stabilize ecDHFR and the hvDHFRs by a common mechanism, not a halophile-specific mechanism, such as the binding of hydrated salt networks. The primary mode of salt stabilization of the mesophilic and halophilic DHFRs appears to be through preferential hydration and the Hofmeister effect of

  16. Unraveling the Redox Properties of the Global Regulator FurA from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120: Disulfide Reductase Activity Based on Its CXXC Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Botello-Morte, Laura; Bes, M. Teresa; Heras, Begoña; Fernández-Otal, Ángela; Peleato, M. Luisa

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Cyanobacterial FurA works as a global regulator linking iron homeostasis to photosynthetic metabolism and the responses to different environmental stresses. Additionally, FurA modulates several genes involved in redox homeostasis and fulfills the characteristics of a heme-sensor protein whose interaction with this cofactor negatively affects its DNA binding ability. FurA from Anabaena PCC 7120 contains five cysteine residues, four of them arranged in two redox CXXC motifs. Aims: Our goals were to analyze in depth the putative contribution of these CXXC motifs in the redox properties of FurA and to identify potential interacting partners of this regulator. Results: Insulin reduction assays unravel that FurA exhibits disulfide reductase activity. Simultaneous presence of both CXXC signatures greatly enhances the reduction rate, although the redox motif containing Cys101 and Cys104 seems a major contributor to this activity. Disulfide reductase activity was not detected in other ferric uptake regulator (Fur) proteins isolated from heterotrophic bacteria. In vivo, FurA presents different redox states involving intramolecular disulfide bonds when is partially oxidized. Redox potential values for CXXC motifs, −235 and −238 mV, are consistent with those reported for other proteins displaying disulfide reductase activity. Pull-down and two-hybrid assays unveil potential FurA interacting partners, namely phosphoribulokinase Alr4123, the hypothetical amidase-containing domain All1140 and the DNA-binding protein HU. Innovation: A novel biochemical activity of cyanobacterial FurA based on its cysteine arrangements and the identification of novel interacting partners are reported. Conclusion: The present study discloses a putative connection of FurA with the cyanobacterial redox-signaling pathway. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1396–1406. PMID:24093463

  17. Effect of warfarin on plasma and liver vitamin K levels and vitamin K epoxide reductase activity in relation to plasma clotting factor levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Y; Yamano, M; Yasunaga, K; Shike, T; Uchida, K

    1990-01-15

    Changes in plasma and liver vitamin K1 and vitamin K1 epoxide levels, liver microsomal vitamin K epoxide reductase activity, and plasma clotting factor II and VII levels were determined in rats after a single injection of warfarin (2.5 mg/kg, s.c.). The plasma and liver vitamin K1 levels gradually decreased after warfarin injection, attaining the lowest values at 2-3 hrs and remaining low for 48 hrs. They then returned to the control levels at 72 hrs. The changes in vitamin K1 epoxide levels were opposite, with an increase being seen soon after the warfarin injection, the highest values at 3 hrs and a gradual decrease to the initial levels occurring subsequently. The combined levels of vitamin K1 plus vitamin K1 epoxide, however, remained almost constant in both plasma and liver after the warfarin injection. The liver vitamin K epoxide reductase activity decreased to its lowest level soon after the injection and then gradually increased after 12 hrs, but the activity at 72 hrs was only about 30% of the initial activity. The plasma clotting factor levels gradually decreased after the injection, bottomed at 24 hrs and then began to increase, recovering almost to the initial levels at 72 hrs. A positive correlation was found between plasma and liver levels for both vitamin K1 and vitamin K1 epoxide, and the slope of the vitamin K1 epoxide curve was steeper than that for vitamin K1 in the warfarin-treated rats. A similar positive correlation was found for both vitamin K1 and vitamin K1 epoxide after vitamin K1 injection in normal untreated rats, but the slope of the vitamin K1 epoxide curve was much shallower. These results suggest that warfarin inhibits vitamin K epoxide reductase and decreases blood clotting factor synthesis, thus increasing plasma and liver vitamin K1 epoxide levels. A vitamin K epoxide reductase activity one third of that in normal rats is sufficient to maintain normal reduction of vitamin K1 epoxide and synthesis of blood clotting factors. PMID

  18. A maize gene encoding an NADPH binding enzyme highly homologous to isoflavone reductases is activated in response to sulfur starvation.

    PubMed Central

    Petrucco, S; Bolchi, A; Foroni, C; Percudani, R; Rossi, G L; Ottonello, S

    1996-01-01

    we isolated a novel gene that is selectively induced both in roots and shoots in response to sulfur starvation. This gene encodes a cytosolic, monomeric protein of 33 kD that selectively binds NADPH. The predicted polypeptide is highly homologous ( > 70%) to leguminous isoflavone reductases (IFRs), but the maize protein (IRL for isoflavone reductase-like) belongs to a novel family of proteins present in a variety of plants. Anti-IRL antibodies specifically recognize IFR polypeptides, yet the maize protein is unable to use various isoflavonoids as substrates. IRL expression is correlated closely to glutathione availability: it is persistently induced in seedlings whose glutathione content is about fourfold lower than controls, and it is down-regulated rapidly when control levels of glutathione are restored. This glutathione-dependent regulation indicates that maize IRL may play a crucial role in the establishment of a thiol-independent response to oxidative stress under glutathione shortage conditions. PMID:8597660

  19. Resolution of two native monomeric 90 kDa nitrate reductase active proteins from Shewanella gelidimarina and the sequence of two napA genes

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, Philippa J.L.; McKinzie, Audra A.; Codd, Rachel; School of Medical Sciences and Bosch Institute, University of Sydney, NSW 2006

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Two monomeric 90 kDa nitrate reductase active proteins from Shewanella gelidimarina. {yields} Sequence of napA from napEDABC-type operon and napA from NapDAGHB-type operon. {yields} Isolation of NAP as NapA or NapAB correlated with NapA P47E amino acid substitution. -- Abstract: The reduction of nitrate to nitrite in the bacterial periplasm occurs in the 90 kDa NapA subunit of the periplasmic nitrate reductase (NAP) system. Most Shewanella genomes contain two nap operons: napEDABC and napDAGHB, which is an unusual feature of this genus. Two native, monomeric, 90 kDa nitrate reductase active proteins were resolved by hydrophobic interaction chromatography from aerobic cultures of Shewanella gelidimarina replete with reduced nitrogen compounds. The 90 kDa protein obtained in higher yield was characterized as NapA by electronic absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies and was identified by LC/MS/MS and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS as NapA from the napEDABC-type operon. The other 90 kDa protein, which was unstable and produced in low yields, was posited as NapA from the napDAGHB-type operon. Two napA genes have been sequenced from the napEDABC-type and napDAGHB-type operons of S. gelidimarina. Native NAP from S. putrefaciens was resolved as one NapA monomer and one NapAB heterodimer. Two amino acid substitutions in NapA correlated with the isolation of NAP as a NapA monomer or a NapAB heterodimer. The resolution of native, redox-active NapA isoforms in Shewanella provides new insight into the respiratory versatility of this genus, which has implications in bioremediation and the assembly of microbial fuel cells.

  20. Camphene, a Plant-Derived Monoterpene, Reduces Plasma Cholesterol and Triglycerides in Hyperlipidemic Rats Independently of HMG-CoA Reductase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Vallianou, Ioanna; Peroulis, Nikolaos; Pantazis, Panayotis; Hadzopoulou-Cladaras, Margarita

    2011-01-01

    Background Central to the pathology of coronary heart disease is the accumulation of lipids, cholesterol and triglycerides, within the intima of arterial blood vessels. The search for drugs to treat dislipidemia, remains a major pharmaceutical focus. In this study, we evaluated the hypolipidemic properties of the essential oil from Chios mastic gum (MGO). Methodology/Principal Findings The hypolipidemic effect of MGO was investigated in naïve as well as in rats susceptible to detergent-induced hyperlipidemia. Serum cholesterol and triglycerides were determined using commercial kits. HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A) reductase activity was measured in HepG2 cell extracts using a radioactive assay; cellular cholesterol and cholesterol esters were assessed using gas chromatography. MGO administration into naïve rats resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in the constitutive synthesis of serum cholesterol and triglycerides. In hyperlipidemic rats, MGO treatment had also a strong hypolipidemic effect. By testing various components of MGO, we show for the first time that the hypolipidemic action is associated with camphene. Administration of camphene at a dose of 30 µg/gr of body weight in hyperlipidemic rats resulted in a 54.5% reduction of total cholesterol (p<0.001), 54% of Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol (p<0.001) and 34.5% of triglycerides (p<0.001). Treatment of HepG2 cells with camphene led to a decrease in cellular cholesterol content to the same extend as mevinolin, a known HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor. The hypolipidemic action of camphene is independent of HMG-CoA reductase activity, suggesting that its hypocholesterolemic and hypotriglyceridemic effects are associated with a mechanism of action different than that of statins. Conclusions Given the critical role that the control of hyperlipidemia plays in cardiovascular disease, the results of our study provide insights into the use of camphene as an alternative lipid lowering agent

  1. Oral Nitrate Reductase Activity Is Not Associated with Development of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) and Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH): A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Barzin, Gilda; Merat, Shahin; Nokhbeh-Zaeem, Habibeh; Saniee, Parastoo; Pedramnia, Shahrzad; Mostashfi Habibabadi, Ali; Nasseri-Moghaddam, Siavosh

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND NAFLD/NASH is a manifestation of metabolic syndrome and is associated with obesity/overweight. Not all obese/overweight individuals develop NASH. Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is considered a gastrointestinal manifestation of the metabolic syndrome and is associated with obesity/overweight. Again not all obese/overweight individuals develop GERD. Recent data show association of dietary nitrate content and oral nitrate reductase activity (NRA) with GERD. Nitrates need to be converted to nitrite (done in human beings by nitrate reductase of oral bacteria exclusively) to be active in metabolic pathways. OBJECTIVE To assess the relation between NASH/NAFLD and oral NRA. METHODS Oral NRA was measured in individuals with NASH (compatible abdominal ultrasound and two elevated ALT/AST levels over six months) and was compared with that of those without NASH. Oral NRA was measured according to a previously reported protocol. RESULTS Eleven NASH patients and twelve controls were enrolled. Mean oral NRA activity were 2.82 vs. 3.51 μg nitrite-N formed per person per minute for cases and controls respectively (p=0.46). CONCLUSION According to our data, oral nitrite production is not different between individual swith and without NASH. PMID:24829701

  2. Familial Hypercholesterolemia: Identification of a Defect in the Regulation of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase Activity Associated with Overproduction of Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Joseph L.; Brown, Michael S.

    1973-01-01

    The homozygous form of the autosomal dominant disorder, familial hypercholesterolemia, is characterized by the presence in children of profound hypercholesterolemia, cutaneous planar xanthomas, and rapidly progressive coronary vascular disease that usually results in death before age 30 years. Cultured skin fibroblasts from three unrelated subjects with this disorder showed 40- to 60-fold higher activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (EC 1.1.1.34), the rate-controlling enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis, when compared with fibroblasts of seven control subjects. Enhanced enzyme activity resulted from a complete absence of normal feedback suppression by low-density lipoproteins, which led to a marked overproduction of cholesterol by the mutant cells. The demonstration of apparently identical kinetic properties of the reductase activity of control and mutant cells, coupled with the evidence that this enzyme is normally regulated not by allosteric effectors but by alterations in enzyme synthesis and degradation, suggests that the primary genetic abnormality does not involve the structural gene for the enzyme itself, but a hitherto unidentified gene whose product is necessary for mediation of feedback control by lipoproteins. The fibroblasts of two obligate heterozygotes, the parents of one of the homozygotes, showed a pattern of enzyme regulation intermediate between that of controls and homozygotes. PMID:4355366

  3. An autophosphorylating but not transphosphorylating activity is associated with the unique N terminus of the herpes simplex virus type 1 ribonucleotide reductase large subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Conner, J; Cooper, J; Furlong, J; Clements, J B

    1992-01-01

    We report on a protein kinase function encoded by the unique N terminus of the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) ribonucleotide reductase large subunit (R1). R1 expressed in Escherichia coli exhibited autophosphorylation activity in a reaction which depended on the presence of the unique N terminus. When the N terminus was separately expressed in E. coli and partially purified, a similar autophosphorylation reaction was observed. Importantly, transphosphorylation of histones and of proteins in HSV-1-infected cell extracts was also observed with purified R1 and with truncated R1 mutants in which most of the N terminus was deleted. Ion-exchange chromatography was used to separate the autophosphorylating activity of the N terminus from the transphosphorylating activity of an E. coli contaminant protein kinase. We propose a putative function for this activity of the HSV-1 R1 N terminus during the immediate-early phase of virus replication. Images PMID:1331536

  4. A series of pyrido[2,3-b]pyrazin-3(4H)-one derivatives as aldose reductase inhibitors with antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhongfei; Hao, Xin; Ma, Bing; Zhu, Changjin

    2016-10-01

    A series of pyrido[2,3-b]pyrazin-3(4H)-one based derivatives were designed as inhibitors of aldose reductase (ALR2), the enzyme which plays a key role in the development of diabetes complications as well as in the oxidative stress processes associated with diabetes and other pathologies. Most of the derivatives, having a substituted C2 aromatic group and a N4 acetic acid group on the core structure, were found to be potent and selective aldose reductase inhibitors with submicromolar IC50 values, and 9c was the most active with IC50 value 0.009 μM. Particularly, a number of the designed compounds bearing phenolic hydroxyl substituted C2-styryl side chain showed excellent not only in ALR2 inhibition but also in antioxidant, and among these 11i was proved to be the top one with an antioxidant ability even comparable to that of the well-known antioxidant Trolox. Structure-activity relationship and molecular docking studies highlighted the importance of phenolic hydroxyl substituents and vinyl spacer in C2 side chain of the scaffold for the construction of efficient and multifunctional ALR2 inhibitors. PMID:27267001

  5. An optimized semi-automatic rate method for serum glutathione reductase activity and its application to patients with malignant disease.

    PubMed Central

    Delides, A; Spooner, R J; Goldberg, D M; Neal, F E

    1976-01-01

    An improved and optimized method for serum glutathione reductase is described. The reference range for normal subjects is 47-79 IU/1. The method is more sensitive than conventional enzyme tests in the detection of malignant disease. It was not raised more frequently in patients with clinical evidence of metastases than in those clinically free of such metastases, and it did not seem to correlate with prognosis among those patients who failed to survive six months from the time the analysis was first conducted. PMID:2624

  6. Production of a highly active, soluble form of the cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR A) from Candida tropicalis

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark

    2006-08-01

    The present invention provides soluble cytochrome p450 reductase (CPR) proteins from Candida sp. having an altered N-terminal region which results in reduced hydrophobicity of the N-terminal region. Also provided are host cells comprising the subject soluble CPR proteins. In addition, the present invention provides nucleotide and corresponding amino acid sequences for soluble CPR proteins and vectors comprising the nucleotide sequences. Methods for producing a soluble CPR, for increasing production of a dicarboxylic acid, and for detecting a cytochrome P450 are also provided.

  7. Structural and Biochemical Characterizations of Methanoredoxin from Methanosarcina acetivorans, a Glutaredoxin-Like Enzyme with Coenzyme M-Dependent Protein Disulfide Reductase Activity.

    PubMed

    Yenugudhati, Deepa; Prakash, Divya; Kumar, Adepu K; Kumar, R Siva Sai; Yennawar, Neela H; Yennawar, Hemant P; Ferry, James G

    2016-01-19

    Glutaredoxins (GRXs) are thiol-disulfide oxidoreductases abundant in prokaryotes, although little is understood of these enzymes from the domain Archaea. The numerous characterized GRXs from the domain Bacteria utilize a diversity of low-molecular-weight thiols in addition to glutathione as reductants. We report here the biochemical and structural properties of a GRX-like protein named methanoredoxin (MRX) from Methanosarcina acetivorans of the domain Archaea. MRX utilizes coenzyme M (CoMSH) as reductant for insulin disulfide reductase activity, which adds to the diversity of thiol protectants in prokaryotes. Cell-free extracts of M. acetivorans displayed CoMS-SCoM reductase activity that complements the CoMSH-dependent activity of MRX. The crystal structure exhibits a classic thioredoxin-glutaredoxin fold comprising three α-helices surrounding four antiparallel β-sheets. A pocket on the surface contains a CVWC motif, identifying the active site with architecture similar to GRXs. Although it is a monomer in solution, the crystal lattice has four monomers in a dimer of dimers arrangement. A cadmium ion is found within the active site of each monomer. Two such ions stabilize the N-terminal tails and dimer interfaces. Our modeling studies indicate that CoMSH and glutathione (GSH) bind to the active site of MRX similar to the binding of GSH in GRXs, although there are differences in the amino acid composition of the binding motifs. The results, combined with our bioinformatic analyses, show that MRX represents a class of GRX-like enzymes present in a diversity of methane-producing Archaea. PMID:26684934

  8. Purification and characterization of a highly active chromate reductase from endophytic Bacillus sp. DGV19 of Albizzia lebbeck (L.) Benth. actively involved in phytoremediation of tannery effluent-contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Manikandan, Muthu; Gopal, Judy; Kumaran, Rangarajulu Senthil; Kannan, Vijayaraghavan; Chun, Sechul

    2016-01-01

    Phytoremediation using timber-yielding tree species is considered to be the most efficient method for chromium/tannery effluent-contaminated sites. In this study, we have chosen Albizzia lebbeck, a chromium hyperaccumulator plant, and studied one of its chromium detoxification processes operated by its endophytic bacterial assemblage. Out of the four different groups of endophytic bacteria comprising Pseudomonas, Rhizobium, Bacillus, and Salinicoccus identified from A. lebbeck employed in phytoremediation of tannery effluent-contaminated soil, Bacillus predominated with three species, which exhibited not only remarkable chromium accumulation ability but also high chromium reductase activity. A chromate reductase was purified to homogeneity from the most efficient chromium accumulator, Bacillus sp. DGV 019, and the purified 34.2-kD enzyme was observed to be stable at temperatures from 20°C to 60°C. The enzyme was active over a wide range of pH values (4.0-9.0). Furthermore, the enzyme activity was enhanced with the electron donors NADH, followed by NADPH, not affected by glutathione and ascorbic acid. Cu(2+) enhanced the activity of the purified enzyme but was inhibited by Zn(2+) and etheylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). In conclusion, due to its versatile adaptability the chromate reductase can be used for chromium remediation. PMID:26444299

  9. Functional studies of aldo-keto reductases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Qing; Griest, Terry A.; Harter, Theresa M.; Petrash, J. Mark

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY We utilized the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model to systematically explore physiological roles for yeast and mammalian aldo-keto reductases. Six open reading frames encoding putative aldo-keto reductases were identified when the yeast genome was queried against the sequence for human aldose reductase, the prototypical mammalian aldo-keto reductase. Recombinant proteins produced from five of these yeast open reading frames demonstrated NADPH-dependent reductase activity with a variety of aldehyde and ketone substrates. A triple aldo-keto reductase null mutant strain demonstrated a glucose-dependent heat shock phenotype which could be rescued by ectopic expression of human aldose reductase. Catalytically-inactive mutants of human or yeast aldo-keto reductases failed to effect a rescue of the heat shock phenotype, suggesting that the phenotype results from either an accumulation of one or more unmetabolized aldo-keto reductase substrates or a synthetic deficiency of aldo-keto reductase products generated in response to heat shock stress. These results suggest that multiple aldo-keto reductases fulfill functionally redundant roles in the stress response in yeast. PMID:17140678

  10. A dissimilatory nitrite reductase in Paracoccus halodenitrificans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, M. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1984-01-01

    Paracoccus halodenitrificans produced a membrane-associated nitrite reductase. Spectrophotometric analysis showed it to be associated with a cd-cytochrome and located on the inner side of the cytoplasmic membrane. When supplied with nitrite, membrane preparations produced nitrous oxide and nitric oxide in different ratios depending on the electron donor employed. The nitrite reductase was maximally active at relatively low concentrations of sodium chloride and remained attached to the membranes at 100 mM sodium chloride.

  11. Astaxanthin can alter CYP1A-dependent activities via two different mechanisms: induction of protein expression and inhibition of NADPH P450 reductase dependent electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Marumi; Darwish, Wageh S; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Miki, Wataru; Ishizuka, Mayumi

    2011-06-01

    Astaxanthin (Ax), a xanthophyll carotenoid, is reported to induce cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A-dependent activity. CYP1A is one of the most important enzymes participating in phase I metabolism for chemicals, and it can activate various mutagens. To investigate the effect of Ax on the metabolic activation of a typical promutagen, benzo[a]pyrene by CYP1A, we orally administrated Ax-containing oil (100 mg Ax/kg body weight/day for 3 days) to male Wistar rats. In the treated rat liver, expression of CYP1A1 mRNA, protein, and its activity were significantly increased (5.5-, 8.5-, and 2.5-fold, respectively). In contrast, the activities of phase II enzymes (glutathione S-transferase and glucuronosyl-transferase) were not modulated by Ax-containing oil. As a consequence, the mutagenicity of benzo[a]pyrene was more enhanced in Ax-treated rats, compared with controls in the Ames assay. On the other hand, NADPH P450 reductase activity was decreased in liver microsomes from the treated group. This result suggests the possibility that Ax inhibits the electron supply necessary for CYP catalytic activities and decreases CYP1A activity indirectly. In conclusion, Ax-containing oil intake can alter CYP1A-dependent activities through two different mechanisms: (1) induction of CYP1A1 mRNA, protein expression, and activity; and (2) inhibition of the electron supply for the enzyme. PMID:21414371

  12. Process-driven bacterial community dynamics are key to cured meat colour formation by coagulase-negative staphylococci via nitrate reductase or nitric oxide synthase activities.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Mainar, María; Leroy, Frédéric

    2015-11-01

    The cured colour of European raw fermented meats is usually achieved by nitrate-into-nitrite reduction by coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS), subsequently generating nitric oxide to form the relatively stable nitrosomyoglobin pigment. The present study aimed at comparing this classical curing procedure, based on nitrate reductase activity, with a potential alternative colour formation mechanism, based on nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, under different acidification profiles. To this end, meat models with and without added nitrate were fermented with cultures of an acidifying strain (Lactobacillus sakei CTC 494) and either a nitrate-reducing Staphylococcus carnosus strain or a rare NOS-positive CNS strain (Staphylococcus haemolyticus G110), or by relying on the background microbiota. Satisfactory colour was obtained in the models prepared with added nitrate and S. carnosus. In the presence of nitrate but absence of added CNS, however, cured colour was only obtained when L. sakei CTC 494 was also omitted. This was ascribed to the pH dependency of the emerging CNS background microbiota, selecting for nitrate-reducing Staphylococcus equorum strains at mild acidification conditions but for Staphylococcus saprophyticus strains with poor colour formation capability when the pH decrease was more rapid. This reliance of colour formation on the composition of the background microbiota was further explored by a side experiment, demonstrating the heterogeneity in nitrate reduction of a set of 88 CNS strains from different species. Finally, in all batches prepared with S. haemolyticus G110, colour generation failed as the strain was systematically outcompeted by the background microbiota, even when imposing milder acidification profiles. Thus, when aiming at colour formation through CNS metabolism, technological processing can severely interfere with the composition and functionality of the meat-associated CNS communities, for both nitrate reductase and NOS activities

  13. Elevated CO2-induced production of nitric oxide (NO) by NO synthase differentially affects nitrate reductase activity in Arabidopsis plants under different nitrate supplies.

    PubMed

    Du, Shaoting; Zhang, Ranran; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Huijun; Yan, Minggang; Chen, Ni; Xie, Huaqiang; Ke, Shouwei

    2016-02-01

    CO2 elevation often alters the plant's nitrate reductase (NR) activity, the first enzyme acting in the nitrate assimilation pathway. However, the mechanism underlying this process remains unknown. The association between elevated CO2-induced alterations of NR activity and nitric oxide (NO) was examined in Col-0 Arabidopsis fed with 0.2-10 mM nitrate, using NO donors, NO scavenger, and NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor. The noa1 mutant, in which most NOS activity was lost, and the NR activity-null mutant nia1 nia2 were also used to examine the above association. In response to CO2 elevation, NR activity increased in low-nitrate Col-0 plants but was inhibited in high-nitrate Col-0 plants. NO scavenger and NOS inhibitor could eliminate these two responses, whereas the application of NO donors mimicked these distinct responses in ambient CO2-grown Col-0 plants. Furthermore, in both low- and high-nitrate conditions, elevated CO2 increased NOS activity and NO levels in Col-0 and nia1 nia2 plants but had little effect on NO level and NR activity in noa1 plants. Considering all of these findings, this study concluded that, in response to CO2 elevation, either the NR activity induction in low-nitrate plants or the NR activity inhibition in high-nitrate plants is regulated by NOS-generated NO. PMID:26608644

  14. Drought-Induced Effects on Nitrate Reductase Activity and mRNA and on the Coordination of Nitrogen and Carbon Metabolism in Maize Leaves1

    PubMed Central

    Foyer, Christine H.; Valadier, Marie-Hélène; Migge, Andrea; Becker, Thomas W.

    1998-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) plants were grown to the nine-leaf stage. Despite a saturating N supply, the youngest mature leaves (seventh position on the stem) contained little NO3− reserve. Droughted plants (deprived of nutrient solution) showed changes in foliar enzyme activities, mRNA accumulation, photosynthesis, and carbohydrate and amino acid contents. Total leaf water potential and CO2 assimilation rates, measured 3 h into the photoperiod, decreased 3 d after the onset of drought. Starch, glucose, fructose, and amino acids, but not sucrose (Suc), accumulated in the leaves of droughted plants. Maximal extractable phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activities increased slightly during water deficit, whereas the sensitivity of this enzyme to the inhibitor malate decreased. Maximal extractable Suc phosphate synthase activities decreased as a result of water stress, and there was an increase in the sensitivity to the inhibitor orthophosphate. A correlation between maximal extractable foliar nitrate reductase (NR) activity and the rate of CO2 assimilation was observed. The NR activation state and maximal extractable NR activity declined rapidly in response to drought. Photosynthesis and NR activity recovered rapidly when nutrient solution was restored at this point. The decrease in maximal extractable NR activity was accompanied by a decrease in NR transcripts, whereas Suc phosphate synthase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase mRNAs were much less affected. The coordination of N and C metabolism is retained during drought conditions via modulation of the activities of Suc phosphate synthase and NR commensurate with the prevailing rate of photosynthesis. PMID:9576798

  15. Overexpression of a GmCnx1 gene enhanced activity of nitrate reductase and aldehyde oxidase, and boosted mosaic virus resistance in soybean.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zheng; He, Hongli; Ma, Luping; Yu, Xiaoqian; Mi, Qian; Pang, Jingsong; Tang, Guixiang; Liu, Bao

    2015-01-01

    Molybdenum cofactor (Moco) is required for the activities of Moco-dependant enzymes. Cofactor for nitrate reductase and xanthine dehydrogenase (Cnx1) is known to be involved in the biosynthesis of Moco in plants. In this work, a soybean (Glycine max L.) Cnx1 gene (GmCnx1) was transferred into soybean using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation method. Twenty seven positive transgenic soybean plants were identified by coating leaves with phosphinothricin, bar protein quick dip stick and PCR analysis. Moreover, Southern blot analysis was carried out to confirm the insertion of GmCnx1 gene. Furthermore, expression of GmCnx1 gene in leaf and root of all transgenic lines increased 1.04-2.12 and 1.55-3.89 folds, respectively, as compared to wild type with GmCnx1 gene and in line 10 , 22 showing the highest expression. The activities of Moco-related enzymes viz nitrate reductase (NR) and aldehydeoxidase (AO) of T1 generation plants revealed that the best line among the GmCnx1 transgenic plants accumulated 4.25 μg g(-1) h(-1) and 30 pmol L(-1), respectively (approximately 2.6-fold and 3.9-fold higher than non-transgenic control plants).In addition, overexpression ofGmCnx1boosted the resistance to various strains of soybean mosaic virus (SMV). DAS-ELISA analysis further revealed that infection rate of GmCnx1 transgenic plants were generally lower than those of non-transgenic plants among two different virus strains tested. Taken together, this study showed that overexpression of a GmCnx1 gene enhanced NR and AO activities and SMV resistance, suggesting its important role in soybean genetic improvement. PMID:25886067

  16. Multiple aldehyde reductases of human brain.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, P L; Wermuth, B; von Wartburg, J P

    1980-01-01

    Human brain contains four forms of aldehyde reducing enzymes. One major activity, designated AR3, has properties indicating its identity with the NADPH-dependent aldehyde reductase, EC 1.1.1.2. The other major form of human brain enzyme, AR1, which is also NADPH-dependent, reduces both aldehyde and ketone-containing substrates, including vitamin K3 (menadione) and daunorubicin, a cancer chemotherapeutic agent. This enzyme is very sensitive to inhibition by the flavonoids quercitrin and quercetine, and may be analogous to a daunorubicin reductase previously described in liver of other species. One minor form of human brain aldehyde reductase, AR2, demonstrates substrate specificity and inhibitor sensitivity which suggest its similarity to aldose reductases found in lens and other tissues of many species. This enzyme, which can also use NADH as cofactor to some extent, is the most active in reducing the aldehyde derivatives of the biogenic amines. The fourth human brain enzyme ("SSA reductase") differs from the other forms in its ability to use NADH as well as or better than NADPH as cofactor, and in its molecular weight, which is nearly twice that of the other forms. It is quite specific for succinic semialdehyde (SSA) as substrate, and was found to be significantly inhibited only by quercetine and quercitrin. AR3 can also reduce SSA, and both enzymes may contribute to the production of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid in vivo. These results indicate that the human brain aldehyde reductases can play relatively specific physiologic roles. PMID:7424738

  17. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase in rainbow trout: effects of fasting and statin drugs on activities and mRNA transcripts.

    PubMed

    Estey, Chelsie; Chen, Xi; Moon, Thomas W

    2008-04-01

    Human pharmaceuticals including statin drugs are found in effluents post-waste water treatment plant. In order to establish whether statin drugs could affect an aquatic species, we initially characterized in the rainbow trout the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase or HMGCoAR which is the mammalian target of statin drugs. Two HMGCoAR transcripts (-1 and -2) were isolated to trout tissues and given their prevalence in liver and brain, these two tissues were used in activity assays. HMGCoAR activities were 87.2 and 66.0 pmol/min/mg protein for liver microsomes and whole brain homogenates. Liver activities were affected by conditions promoting phosphorylation but not by a 14 day fast; brain activities were differentially altered by fasting and re-feeding. Even though activities were altered by fasting, HMGCoAR-1 (but not -2) mRNA was reduced by fasting in both the liver and hypothalamus/pituitary. Both statin drugs (cerivastatin and atorvastatin) significantly decreased HMGCoAR activities in vitro and cerivastatin when injected significantly decreased hepatic but not brain activities; some changes in mRNA levels were noted. These studies demonstrate that at the concentrations of statins used in this study, effects on HMGCoAR activities and transcripts occur. Such changes could affect cholesterol content and may alter cholesterol dynamics in this species. PMID:18280795

  18. Properties of nitrogen fertilization are decisive in determining the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on the activity of nitrate reductase in plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ranran; Du, Shaoting

    2016-04-01

    The concentration of atmospheric CO2 is predicted to double by the end of this century. The response of higher plants to an increase in atmospheric CO2 often includes a change in nitrate reductase (NR) activity. In a recent study, we showed that, under elevated CO2 levels, NR induction in low-nitrate plants and NR inhibition in high-nitrate plants are regulated by nitric oxide (NO) generated via nitric oxide synthases. This finding provides an explanation for the diverse responses of plants to elevated CO2 levels, and suggests that the use of nitrogen fertilizers on soil will have a major influence on the nitrogen assimilation capacity of plants in response to CO2 elevation. PMID:27043473

  19. Effect of Shoot Removal and Malate on the Activity of Nitrate Reductase Assayed in Vivo in Barley Roots (Hordeum vulgare cv. Midas)

    PubMed Central

    Deane-Drummond, Celia E.; Clarkson, David T.; Johnson, Christopher B.

    1979-01-01

    There is a diurnal variation of nitrate reductase activity (NRA) measured in vivo in barley roots (Hordeum vulgare cv. Midas). In intact plants receiving a 16-hour photoperiod, NRA increases when the light is switched on, reaches a maximum value after 7 to 8 hours, and thereafter declines. Shoot removal (detopping) at the start of the photoperiod prevents the rise in NRA; detopping after 5 hours light leads to a rapid fall in NRA. The inclusion of 10 millimolar malate in the external medium causes a rise in NRA in plants detopped at the beginning of the photoperiod and thus seems to substitute partially for the illuminated shoot. Oxalate, fumarate, and tartrate did not have this effect. Preincubation of the roots of intact plants with 10 millimolar malate for 3 hours, prior to detopping, causes an increase in the flux of amino acids into the xylem sap of detopped roots. PMID:16661028

  20. Drug design by machine learning: the use of inductive logic programming to model the structure-activity relationships of trimethoprim analogues binding to dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed

    King, R D; Muggleton, S; Lewis, R A; Sternberg, M J

    1992-12-01

    The machine learning program GOLEM from the field of inductive logic programming was applied to the drug design problem of modeling structure-activity relationships. The training data for the program were 44 trimethoprim analogues and their observed inhibition of Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase. A further 11 compounds were used as unseen test data. GOLEM obtained rules that were statistically more accurate on the training data and also better on the test data than a Hansch linear regression model. Importantly machine learning yields understandable rules that characterized the chemistry of favored inhibitors in terms of polarity, flexibility, and hydrogen-bonding character. These rules agree with the stereochemistry of the interaction observed crystallographically. PMID:1454814

  1. EM23, a natural sesquiterpene lactone, targets thioredoxin reductase to activate JNK and cell death pathways in human cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Bo; Wang, Guo-Cai; Ma, Dong-Lei; Wong, Nai Sum; Xiao, Hao; Liu, Qiu-Ying; Zhou, Guang-Xiong; Li, Yao-Lan; Li, Man-Mei; Wang, Yi-Fei; Liu, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Sesquiterpene lactones (SLs) are the active constituents of a variety of medicinal plants and found to have potential anticancer activities. However, the intracellular molecular targets of SLs and the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been well elucidated. In this study, we observed that EM23, a natural SL, exhibited anti-cancer activity in human cervical cancer cell lines by inducing apoptosis as indicated by caspase 3 activation, XIAP downregulation and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mechanistic studies indicated that EM23-induced apoptosis was mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the knockdown of thioredoxin (Trx) or thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) resulted in a reduction in apoptosis. EM23 attenuated TrxR activity by alkylation of C-terminal redox-active site Sec498 of TrxR and inhibited the expression levels of Trx/TrxR to facilitate ROS accumulation. Furthermore, inhibition of Trx/TrxR system resulted in the dissociation of ASK1 from Trx and the downstream activation of JNK. Pretreatment with ASK1/JNK inhibitors partially rescued cells from EM23-induced apoptosis. Additionally, EM23 inhibited Akt/mTOR pathway and induced autophagy, which was observed to be proapoptotic and mediated by ROS. Together, these results reveal a potential molecular mechanism for the apoptotic induction observed with SL compound EM23, and emphasize its putative role as a therapeutic agent for human cervical cancer. PMID:26758418

  2. EM23, a natural sesquiterpene lactone, targets thioredoxin reductase to activate JNK and cell death pathways in human cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shao, Fang-Yuan; Wang, Sheng; Li, Hong-Yu; Chen, Wen-Bo; Wang, Guo-Cai; Ma, Dong-Lei; Wong, Nai Sum; Xiao, Hao; Liu, Qiu-Ying; Zhou, Guang-Xiong; Li, Yao-Lan; Li, Man-Mei; Wang, Yi-Fei; Liu, Zhong

    2016-02-01

    Sesquiterpene lactones (SLs) are the active constituents of a variety of medicinal plants and found to have potential anticancer activities. However, the intracellular molecular targets of SLs and the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been well elucidated. In this study, we observed that EM23, a natural SL, exhibited anti-cancer activity in human cervical cancer cell lines by inducing apoptosis as indicated by caspase 3 activation, XIAP downregulation and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mechanistic studies indicated that EM23-induced apoptosis was mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the knockdown of thioredoxin (Trx) or thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) resulted in a reduction in apoptosis. EM23 attenuated TrxR activity by alkylation of C-terminal redox-active site Sec498 of TrxR and inhibited the expression levels of Trx/TrxR to facilitate ROS accumulation. Furthermore, inhibition of Trx/TrxR system resulted in the dissociation of ASK1 from Trx and the downstream activation of JNK. Pretreatment with ASK1/JNK inhibitors partially rescued cells from EM23-induced apoptosis. Additionally, EM23 inhibited Akt/mTOR pathway and induced autophagy, which was observed to be proapoptotic and mediated by ROS. Together, these results reveal a potential molecular mechanism for the apoptotic induction observed with SL compound EM23, and emphasize its putative role as a therapeutic agent for human cervical cancer. PMID:26758418

  3. Assembly, structure, and reactivity of Cu₄S and Cu₃S models for the nitrous oxide reductase active site, Cu(Z)*.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brittany J; Lindeman, Sergey V; Mankad, Neal P

    2014-10-01

    Bridging diphosphine ligands were used to facilitate the assembly of copper clusters with single sulfur atom bridges that model the structure of the Cu(Z)* active site of nitrous oxide reductase. Using bis(diphenylphosphino)amine (dppa), a [Cu(I)4(μ4-S)] cluster with N-H hydrogen bond donors in the secondary coordination sphere was assembled. Solvent and anion guests were found docking to the N-H sites in the solid state and in the solution phase, highlighting a kinetically viable pathway for substrate introduction to the inorganic core. Using bis(dicyclohexylphosphino)methane (dcpm), a [Cu(I)3(μ3-S)] cluster was assembled preferentially. Both complexes exhibited reversible oxidation events in their cyclic voltammograms, making them functionally relevant to the Cu(Z)* active site that is capable of catalyzing a multielectron redox transformation, unlike the previously known [Cu(I)4(μ4-S)] complex from Yam and co-workers supported by bis(diphenylphosphino)methane (dppm). The dppa-supported [Cu(I)4(μ4-S)] cluster reacted with N3(-), a linear triatomic substrate isoelectronic to N2O, in preference to NO2(-), a bent triatomic. This [Cu(I)4(μ4-S)] cluster also bound I(-), a known inhibitor of Cu(Z)*. Consistent with previous observations for nitrous oxide reductase, the tetracopper model complex bound the I(-) inhibitor much more strongly and rapidly than the substrate isoelectronic to N2O, producing unreactive μ3-iodide clusters including a [Cu3(μ3-S)(μ3-I)] complex related to the [Cu4(μ4-S)(μ2-I)] form of the inhibited enzyme. PMID:25211396

  4. Role of the Dinitrogenase Reductase Arginine 101 Residue in Dinitrogenase Reductase ADP-Ribosyltransferase Binding, NAD Binding, and Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan; Ludden, Paul W.

    2001-01-01

    Dinitrogenase reductase is posttranslationally regulated by dinitrogenase reductase ADP-ribosyltransferase (DRAT) via ADP-ribosylation of the arginine 101 residue in some bacteria. Rhodospirillum rubrum strains in which the arginine 101 of dinitrogenase reductase was replaced by tyrosine, phenylalanine, or leucine were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis of the nifH gene. The strain containing the R101F form of dinitrogenase reductase retains 91%, the strain containing the R101Y form retains 72%, and the strain containing the R101L form retains only 28% of in vivo nitrogenase activity of the strain containing the dinitrogenase reductase with arginine at position 101. In vivo acetylene reduction assays, immunoblotting with anti-dinitrogenase reductase antibody, and [adenylate-32P]NAD labeling experiments showed that no switch-off of nitrogenase activity occurred in any of the three mutants and no ADP-ribosylation of altered dinitrogenase reductases occurred either in vivo or in vitro. Altered dinitrogenase reductases from strains UR629 (R101Y) and UR630 (R101F) were purified to homogeneity. The R101F and R101Y forms of dinitrogenase reductase were able to form a complex with DRAT that could be chemically cross-linked by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide. The R101F form of dinitrogenase reductase and DRAT together were not able to cleave NAD. This suggests that arginine 101 is not critical for the binding of DRAT to dinitrogenase reductase but that the availability of arginine 101 is important for NAD cleavage. Both DRAT and dinitrogenase reductase can be labeled by [carbonyl-14C]NAD individually upon UV irradiation, but most 14C label is incorporated into DRAT when both proteins are present. The ability of R101F dinitrogenase reductase to be labeled by [carbonyl-14C]NAD suggested that Arg 101 is not absolutely required for NAD binding. PMID:11114923

  5. The regulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase activity, cholesterol esterification and the expression of low-density lipoprotein receptors in cultured monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Knight, B L; Patel, D D; Soutar, A K

    1983-01-01

    Human blood monocytes cultured in medium containing 20% whole serum showed the greatest activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase and [14C]acetate incorporation into non-saponifiable lipids around the 7th day after seeding, the period of greatest growth. Although there was enough low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in the medium to saturate the LDL receptors that were expressed by normal cells at that time, HMG-CoA reductase activity and acetate incorporation were as high in normal cells as in cells from familial-hypercholesterolaemic (FH) patients. Both the addition of extra LDL, which interacted with the cells by non-saturable processes, and receptor-mediated uptake of acetylated LDL significantly reduced reductase activity and increased incorporation of [14C]oleate into cholesteryl esters in normal cells and cells from FH patients ('FH cells'), and reduced the expression of LDL receptors in normal cells. Pre-incubation for 20h in lipoprotein-deficient medium apparently increased the number of LDL receptors expressed by normal cells but reduced the activity of HMG-CoA reductase in both normal and FH cells. During subsequent incubations the same rate of degradation of acetylated LDL and of non-saturable degradation of LDL by FH cells was associated with the same reduction in HMG-CoA reductase activity, although LDL produced a much smaller stimulation of oleate incorporation into cholesteryl esters. In normal cells pre-incubated without lipoproteins, receptor-mediated uptake of LDL could abolish reductase activity and the expression of LDL receptors. The results suggested that in these cells, receptor-mediated uptake of LDL might have a greater effect on reductase activity and LDL receptors than the equivalent uptake of acetylated LDL. It is proposed that endogenous synthesis is an important source of cholesterol for growth of normal cells, and that the site at which cholesterol is deposited in the cells may determine the nature and extent of the

  6. Effect of inhibition of sterol delta 14-reductase on accumulation of meiosis-activating sterol and meiotic resumption in cumulus-enclosed mouse oocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Leonardsen, L; Strömstedt, M; Jacobsen, D; Kristensen, K S; Baltsen, M; Andersen, C Y; Byskov, A G

    2000-01-01

    Two sterols of the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway induce resumption of meiosis in mouse oocytes in vitro. The sterols, termed meiosis-activating sterols (MAS), have been isolated from human follicular fluid (FF-MAS, 4,4-dimethyl-5 alpha-cholest-8,14,24-triene-3 beta-ol) and from bull testicular tissue (T-MAS, 4,4-dimethyl-5 alpha-cholest-8,24-diene-3 beta-ol). FF-MAS is the first intermediate in the cholesterol biosynthesis from lanosterol and is converted to T-MAS by sterol delta 14-reductase. An inhibitor of delta 7-reductase and delta 14 reductase, AY9944-A-7, causes cells with a constitutive cholesterol biosynthesis to accumulate FF-MAS and possibly other intermediates between lanosterol and cholesterol. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether AY9944-A-7 added to cultures of cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC) from mice resulted in accumulation of MAS and meiotic maturation. AY9944-A-7 stimulated dose dependently (5-25 mumol l-1) COC to resume meiosis when cultured for 22 h in alpha minimal essential medium (alpha-MEM) containing 4 mmol hypoxanthine l-1, a natural inhibitor of meiotic maturation. In contrast, naked oocytes were not induced to resume meiosis by AY9944-A-7. When cumulus cells were separated from their oocytes and co-cultured, AY9944-A-7 did not affect resumption of meiosis, indicating that intact oocyte-cumulus cell connections are important for AY9944-A-7 to exert its effect on meiosis. Cultures of COC with 10 mumol AY9944-A-7 l-1 in the presence of [3H]mevalonic acid, a natural precursor for steroid synthesis, resulted in accumulation of labelled FF-MAS, which had an 11-fold greater amount of radioactivity incorporated per COC compared with the control culture without AY9944-A-7. In contrast, incorporation of radioactivity into the cholesterol fraction was reduced 30-fold in extracts from the same oocytes. The present findings demonstrate for the first time that COC can synthesize cholesterol from mevalonate and accumulate FF-MAS in

  7. Relation between coumarate decarboxylase and vinylphenol reductase activity with regard to the production of volatile phenols by native Dekkera bruxellensis strains under 'wine-like' conditions.

    PubMed

    Sturm, M E; Assof, M; Fanzone, M; Martinez, C; Ganga, M A; Jofré, V; Ramirez, M L; Combina, M

    2015-08-01

    Dekkera/Brettanomyces bruxellensis is considered a major cause of wine spoilage, and 4-ethylphenol and 4-ethylguaiacol are the most abundant off-aromas produced by this species. They are produced by decarboxylation of the corresponding hydroxycinnamic acids (HCAs), followed by a reduction of the intermediate 4-vinylphenols. The aim of the present study was to examine coumarate decarboxylase (CD) and vinylphenol reductase (VR) enzyme activities in 5 native D. bruxellensis strains and determine their relation with the production of ethylphenols under 'wine-like' conditions. In addition, biomass, cell culturability, carbon source utilization and organic acids were monitored during 60 days. All strains assayed turned out to have both enzyme activities. No significant differences were found in CD activity, whilst VR activity was variable among the strains. Growth of D. bruxellensis under 'wine-like' conditions showed two growth phases. Sugars were completely consumed during the first growth phase. Transformation of HCAs into ethylphenols also occurred during active growth of the yeast. No statistical differences were observed in volatile phenol levels produced by the strains growing under 'wine-like' conditions, independently of the enzyme activity previously recorded. Furthermore, our results demonstrate a relationship between the physiological state of D. bruxellensis and its ability to produce ethylphenols. Inhibition of growth of D. bruxellensis in wine seems to be the most efficient way to avoid ethylphenol production and the consequent loss of wine quality. PMID:25955288

  8. Quantum mechanical calculation of electric fields and vibrational Stark shifts at active site of human aldose reductase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianwei; Zhang, John Z H; He, Xiao

    2015-11-14

    Recent advance in biophysics has made it possible to directly measure site-specific electric field at internal sites of proteins using molecular probes with C = O or C≡N groups in the context of vibrational Stark effect. These measurements directly probe changes of electric field at specific protein sites due to, e.g., mutation and are very useful in protein design. Computational simulation of the Stark effect based on force fields such as AMBER and OPLS, while providing good insight, shows large errors in comparison to experimental measurement due to inherent difficulties associated with point charge based representation of force fields. In this study, quantum mechanical calculation of protein's internal electrostatic properties and vibrational Stark shifts was carried out by using electrostatically embedded generalized molecular fractionation with conjugate caps method. Quantum calculated change of mutation-induced electric field and vibrational Stark shift is reported at the internal probing site of enzyme human aldose reductase. The quantum result is in much better agreement with experimental data than those predicted by force fields, underscoring the deficiency of traditional point charge models describing intra-protein electrostatic properties. PMID:26567650

  9. Quantum mechanical calculation of electric fields and vibrational Stark shifts at active site of human aldose reductase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianwei; Zhang, John Z. H.; He, Xiao

    2015-11-01

    Recent advance in biophysics has made it possible to directly measure site-specific electric field at internal sites of proteins using molecular probes with C = O or C≡N groups in the context of vibrational Stark effect. These measurements directly probe changes of electric field at specific protein sites due to, e.g., mutation and are very useful in protein design. Computational simulation of the Stark effect based on force fields such as AMBER and OPLS, while providing good insight, shows large errors in comparison to experimental measurement due to inherent difficulties associated with point charge based representation of force fields. In this study, quantum mechanical calculation of protein's internal electrostatic properties and vibrational Stark shifts was carried out by using electrostatically embedded generalized molecular fractionation with conjugate caps method. Quantum calculated change of mutation-induced electric field and vibrational Stark shift is reported at the internal probing site of enzyme human aldose reductase. The quantum result is in much better agreement with experimental data than those predicted by force fields, underscoring the deficiency of traditional point charge models describing intra-protein electrostatic properties.

  10. RNA-dependent inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase is a major pathway for 5-azacytidine activity in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Aimiuwu, Josephine; Wang, Hongyan; Chen, Ping; Xie, Zhiliang; Wang, Jiang; Liu, Shujun; Klisovic, Rebecca; Mims, Alice; Blum, William; Marcucci, Guido

    2012-01-01

    5-Azacytidine (5-azaC) is an azanucleoside approved for myelodysplastic syndrome. Approximately 80%-90% of 5-azaC is believed to be incorporated into RNA, which disrupts nucleic acid and protein metabolism leading to apoptosis. A smaller fraction (10%-20%) of 5-azaC inhibits DNA methylation and synthesis through conversion to decitabine triphosphate and subsequent DNA incorporation. However, its precise mechanism of action remains unclear. Ribonucleotide reductase (RR) is a highly regulated enzyme comprising 2 subunits, RRM1 and RRM2, that provides the deoxyribonucleotides required for DNA synthesis/repair. In the present study, we found for the first time that 5-azaC is a potent inhibitor of RRM2 in leukemia cell lines, in a mouse model, and in BM mononuclear cells from acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. 5-azaC–induced RRM2 gene expression inhibition involves its direct RNA incorporation and an attenuated RRM2 mRNA stability. Therefore, 5-azaC causes a major perturbation of deoxyribonucleotide pools. We also demonstrate herein that the initial RR-mediated 5-azaC conversion to decitabine is terminated through its own inhibition. In conclusion, we identify RRM2 as a novel molecular target of 5-azaC in AML. Our findings provide a basis for its more widespread clinical use either alone or in combination. PMID:22517893

  11. Quantum mechanical calculation of electric fields and vibrational Stark shifts at active site of human aldose reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xianwei; Zhang, John Z. H.; He, Xiao

    2015-11-14

    Recent advance in biophysics has made it possible to directly measure site-specific electric field at internal sites of proteins using molecular probes with C = O or C≡N groups in the context of vibrational Stark effect. These measurements directly probe changes of electric field at specific protein sites due to, e.g., mutation and are very useful in protein design. Computational simulation of the Stark effect based on force fields such as AMBER and OPLS, while providing good insight, shows large errors in comparison to experimental measurement due to inherent difficulties associated with point charge based representation of force fields. In this study, quantum mechanical calculation of protein’s internal electrostatic properties and vibrational Stark shifts was carried out by using electrostatically embedded generalized molecular fractionation with conjugate caps method. Quantum calculated change of mutation-induced electric field and vibrational Stark shift is reported at the internal probing site of enzyme human aldose reductase. The quantum result is in much better agreement with experimental data than those predicted by force fields, underscoring the deficiency of traditional point charge models describing intra-protein electrostatic properties.

  12. Novel 5alpha-reductase inhibitors: synthesis, structure-activity studies, and pharmacokinetic profile of phenoxybenzoylphenyl acetic acids.

    PubMed

    Salem, Ola I A; Frotscher, Martin; Scherer, Christiane; Neugebauer, Alexander; Biemel, Klaus; Streiber, Martina; Maas, Ruth; Hartmann, Rolf W

    2006-01-26

    Novel substituted benzoyl benzoic acids and phenylacetic acids 1-14 have been synthesized and evaluated for inhibition of rat and human steroid 5alpha-reductase isozymes 1 and 2. The compounds turned out to be potent and selective human type 2 enzyme inhibitors, exhibiting IC(50) values in the nanomolar range. The phenylacetic acid derivatives were more potent than the analogous benzoic acids. Bromination in the 4-position of the phenoxy moiety led to the strongest inhibitor in this class (12; IC(50) = 5 nM), which was equipotent to finasteride. Since oral absorption is essential for a potential drug, 12 was further examined. In the parallel artificial membrane permeation assay (PAMPA) it turned out to be a good permeator, whereas it was a medium permeator in Caco2 cells. After oral administration (40 mg/kg) to rats a high bioavailability and a biological half-life of 5.5 h were observed, making it a promising candidate for clinical evaluation. PMID:16420060

  13. Rat peptide methionine sulphoxide reductase: cloning of the cDNA, and down-regulation of gene expression and enzyme activity during aging.

    PubMed Central

    Petropoulos, I; Mary, J; Perichon, M; Friguet, B

    2001-01-01

    Peptide methionine sulphoxide reductase (PMSR, EC 1.8.4.6), the msrA or pmsR gene product, is a ubiquitous enzyme catalysing the reduction of methionine sulphoxide to methionine in proteins. Decreased expression and/or activity of the PMSR with age could explain, at least in part, the accumulation of oxidized protein observed upon aging. To test this hypothesis, the rat pmsR cDNA was cloned and sequenced. The recombinant protein was expressed, its catalytic activity checked with a synthetic substrate and polyclonal antibodies were raised against recombinant PMSR. The expression of the pmsR gene and protein as well as its catalytic activity were then analysed as a function of age in the rat brain and in two organs that express the most PMSR, liver and kidney. It appears that pmsR gene expression decreases with age in liver and kidney as early as 18 months, whereas protein level and protein activity are reduced in the three organs at the very end of the life of the rat (26 months). These results suggest that the down-regulation of PMSR can contribute to the accumulation of oxidized protein that has been associated with the aging process. PMID:11311146

  14. Avicequinone C isolated from Avicennia marina exhibits 5α-reductase-type 1 inhibitory activity using an androgenic alopecia relevant cell-based assay system.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ruchy; Monthakantirat, Orawan; Tengamnuay, Parkpoom; De-Eknamkul, Wanchai

    2014-01-01

    Avicennia marina (AM) exhibits various biological activities and has been traditionally used in Egypt to cure skin diseases. In this study, the methanolic heartwood extract of AM was evaluated for inhibitory activity against 5α-reductase (5α-R) [E.C.1.3.99.5], the enzyme responsible for the over-production of 5α-dihydrotestosterone (5α-DHT) causing androgenic alopecia (AGA). An AGA-relevant cell-based assay was developed using human hair dermal papilla cells (HHDPCs), the main regulator of hair growth and the only cells within the hair follicle that are the direct site of 5α-DHT action, combined with a non-radioactive thin layer chromatography (TLC) detection technique. The results revealed that AM is a potent 5α-R type 1 (5α-R1) inhibitor, reducing the 5α-DHT production by 52% at the final concentration of 10 µg/mL. Activity-guided fractionation has led to the identification of avicequinone C, a furanonaphthaquinone, as a 5α-R1 inhibitor with an IC50 of 9.94 ± 0.33 µg/mL or 38.8 ± 1.29 µM. This paper is the first to report anti-androgenic activity through 5α-R1 inhibition of AM and avicequinone C. PMID:24858268

  15. Exploring the Mechanisms of the Reductase Activity of Neuroglobin by Site-Directed Mutagenesis of the Heme Distal Pocket

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb) is a six-coordinate globin that can catalyze the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide. Although this reaction is common to heme proteins, the molecular interactions in the heme pocket that regulate this reaction are largely unknown. We have shown that the H64L Ngb mutation increases the rate of nitrite reduction by 2000-fold compared to that of wild-type Ngb [Tiso, M., et al. (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 18277–18289]. Here we explore the effect of distal heme pocket mutations on nitrite reduction. For this purpose, we have generated mutations of Ngb residues Phe28(B10), His64(E7), and Val68(E11). Our results indicate a dichotomy in the reactivity of deoxy five- and six-coordinate globins toward nitrite. In hemoglobin and myoglobin, there is a correlation between faster rates and more negative potentials. However, in Ngb, reaction rates are apparently related to the distal pocket volume, and redox potential shows a poor relationship with the rate constants. This suggests a relationship between the nitrite reduction rate and heme accessibility in Ngb, particularly marked for His64(E7) mutants. In five-coordinate globins, His(E7) facilitates nitrite reduction, likely through proton donation. Conversely, in Ngb, the reduction mechanism does not rely on the delivery of a proton from the histidine side chain, as His64 mutants show the fastest reduction rates. In fact, the rate observed for H64A Ngb (1120 M–1 s–1) is to the best of our knowledge the fastest reported for a heme nitrite reductase. These differences may be related to a differential stabilization of the iron–nitrite complexes in five- and six-coordinate globins. PMID:25554946

  16. Solvent environments significantly affect the enzymatic function of Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase: comparison of wild-type protein and active-site mutant D27E.

    PubMed

    Ohmae, Eiji; Miyashita, Yurina; Tate, Shin-Ichi; Gekko, Kunihiko; Kitazawa, Soichiro; Kitahara, Ryo; Kuwajima, Kunihiro

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the contribution of solvent environments to the enzymatic function of Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), the salt-, pH-, and pressure-dependence of the enzymatic function of the wild-type protein were compared with those of the active-site mutant D27E in relation to their structure and stability. The salt concentration-dependence of enzymatic activity indicated that inorganic cations bound to and inhibited the activity of wild-type DHFR at neutral pH. The BaCl2 concentration-dependence of the (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra of the wild-type DHFR-folate binary complex showed that the cation-binding site was located adjacent to the Met20 loop. The insensitivity of the D27E mutant to univalent cations, the decreased optimal pH for its enzymatic activity, and the increased Km and Kd values for its substrate dihydrofolate suggested that the substrate-binding cleft of the mutant was slightly opened to expose the active-site side chain to the solvent. The marginally increased fluorescence intensity and decreased volume change due to unfolding of the mutant also supported this structural change or the modified cavity and hydration. Surprisingly, the enzymatic activity of the mutant increased with pressurization up to 250MPa together with negative activation volumes of -4.0 or -4.8mL/mol, depending on the solvent system, while that of the wild-type was decreased and had positive activation volumes of 6.1 or 7.7mL/mol. These results clearly indicate that the insertion of a single methylene at the active site could substantially change the enzymatic reaction mechanism of DHFR, and solvent environments play important roles in the function of this enzyme. PMID:24140567

  17. Human biliverdin reductase is a leucine zipper-like DNA-binding protein and functions in transcriptional activation of heme oxygenase-1 by oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Salim, Mohammad; Maines, Mahin D

    2002-03-15

    Human biliverdin reductase (hBVR) is a serine/threonine kinase that catalyzes reduction of the heme oxygenase (HO) activity product, biliverdin, to bilirubin. A domain of biliverdin reductase (BVR) has primary structural features that resemble leucine zipper proteins. A heptad repeat of five leucines (L(1)--L(5)), a basic domain, and a conserved alanine characterize the domain. In hBVR, a lysine replaces L(3). The secondary structure model of hBVR predicts an alpha-helix-turn-beta-sheet for this domain. hBVR translated by the rabbit reticulocyte lysate system appears on a nondenaturing gel as a single band with molecular mass of approximately 69 kDa. The protein on a denaturing gel separates into two anti-hBVR immunoreactive proteins of approximately 39.9 + 34.6 kDa. The dimeric form, but not purified hBVR, binds to a 100-mer DNA fragment corresponding to the mouse HO-1 (hsp32) promoter region encompassing two activator protein (AP-1) sites. The specificity of DNA binding is suggested by the following: (a) hBVR does not bind to the same DNA fragment with one or zero AP-1 sites; (b) a 56-bp random DNA with one AP-1 site does not form a complex with hBVR; (c) in vitro translated HO-1 does not interact with the 100-mer DNA fragment with two AP-1 sites; (d) mutation of Lys(143), Leu(150), or Leu(157) blocks both the formation of the approximately 69-kDa specimens and hBVR DNA complex formation; and (e) purified preparations of hBVR or hHO-1 do not bind to DNA with two AP-1 sites. The potential significance of the AP-1 binding is suggested by the finding that the response of HO-1, in COS cells stably transfected with antisense hBVR, with 66% reduced BVR activity, to superoxide anion (O(2)()) formed by menadione is attenuated, whereas induction by heme is not affected. We propose a role for BVR in the signaling cascade for AP-1 complex activation necessary for HO-1 oxidative stress response. PMID:11773068

  18. The biological activity of 3alpha-hydroxysteroid oxido-reductase in the spinal cord regulates thermal and mechanical pain thresholds after sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Laurence; Venard, Christine; Schaeffer, Véronique; Patte-Mensah, Christine; Mensah-Nyagan, Ayikoe G

    2008-04-01

    Identification of cellular targets pertinent for the development of effective therapies against pathological pain constitutes a difficult challenge. We combined several approaches to show that 3alpha-hydroxysteroid oxido-reductase (3alpha-HSOR), abundantly expressed in the spinal cord (SC), is a key target, the modulation of which markedly affects nociception. 3alpha-HSOR catalyzes the biosynthesis and oxidation of 3alpha,5alpha-reduced neurosteroids as allopregnanolone (3alpha,5alpha-THP), which stimulates GABA(A) receptors. Intrathecal injection of Provera (pharmacological inhibitor of 3alpha-HSOR activity) in naive rat SC decreased thermal and mechanical nociceptive thresholds assessed with behavioral methods. In contrast, pain thresholds were dose-dependently increased by 3alpha,5alpha-THP. In animals subjected to sciatic nerve injury-evoked neuropathic pain, molecular and biochemical experiments revealed an up-regulation of 3alpha-HSOR reductive activity in the SC. Enhancement of 3alpha,5alpha-THP concentration in the SC induced analgesia in neuropathic rats while Provera exacerbated their pathological state. Possibilities are opened for chronic pain control with drugs modulating 3alpha-HSOR activity in nerve cells. PMID:18291663

  19. Microbicidal activity of neutrophils is inhibited by isolates from recurrent vaginal candidiasis (RVVC) caused by Candida albicans through fungal thioredoxin reductase.

    PubMed

    Ratti, Bianca Altrão; Godoy, Janine Silva Ribeiro; de Souza Bonfim Mendonça, Patrícia; Bidóia, Danielle Lazarin; Nakamura, Tânia Ueda; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Lopes Consolaro, Marcia Edilaine; Estivalet Svidzinski, Terezinha Inez; de Oliveira Silva, Sueli

    2015-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is characterized by an infection of the vulva and vagina, mainly caused by Candida albicans, a commensal microorganism that inhabits the vaginal, digestive, and respiratory mucosae. Vulvovaginal candidiasis affects approximately 75% of women, and 5% develop the recurrent form (RVVC). The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether neutrophils microbicidal response is triggered when activated with RVVC isolates caused by C. albicans. Our results showed that RVVC isolates induced neutrophil migration but significantly decrease the microbicidal activity of neutrophils, compared with VVC and ASS isolates. The microbicidal activity of neutrophils is highly dependent on the production of reactive oxygen species/reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS). However, this isolate induced detoxification of ROS/RNS produced by neutrophils, reflected by the high level of thiol groups and by the oxygen consumption. Therefore, RVVC isolates induced biochemical changes in the inflammatory response triggered by neutrophils, and these effects were mainly related to the detoxification of ROS/RNS through the thioredoxin reductase (TR), a key antioxidant enzyme in fungi. This might be one of the resistance mechanisms triggered by RVVC caused by C. albicans. PMID:25497972

  20. Novel Substrate Specificity and Temperature-Sensitive Activity of Mycosphaerella graminicola CYP51 Supported by the Native NADPH Cytochrome P450 Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Price, Claire L.; Warrilow, Andrew G. S.; Parker, Josie E.; Mullins, Jonathan G. L.; Nes, W. David

    2015-01-01

    Mycosphaerella graminicola (Zymoseptoria tritici) is an ascomycete filamentous fungus that causes Septoria leaf blotch in wheat crops. In Europe the most widely used fungicides for this major disease are demethylation inhibitors (DMIs). Their target is the essential sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51), which requires cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) as its redox partner for functional activity. The M. graminicola CPR (MgCPR) is able to catalyze the sterol 14α-demethylation of eburicol and lanosterol when partnered with Candida albicans CYP51 (CaCYP51) and that of eburicol only with M. graminicola CYP51 (MgCYP51). The availability of the functional in vivo redox partner enabled the in vitro catalytic activity of MgCYP51 to be demonstrated for the first time. MgCYP51 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) studies with epoxiconazole, tebuconazole, triadimenol, and prothioconazole-desthio confirmed that MgCYP51 bound these azole inhibitors tightly. The characterization of the MgCPR/MgCYP51 redox pairing has produced a functional method to evaluate the effects of agricultural azole fungicides, has demonstrated eburicol specificity in the activity observed, and supports the conclusion that prothioconazole is a profungicide. PMID:25746994

  1. Excretion of tectoridin metabolites in rat urine and bile orally administrated at different dosages and their inhibitory activity against aldose reductase.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jialin; Wu, Zhizhen; Gao, Jie; Wen, Hao; Wang, Tao; Yuan, Dan

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the urinary and biliary excretion of tectoridin, a major active isoflavonoid found in the flowers of Pueraria thomsonii Benth. and the rhizomes of Belamcanda chinensis (L.) DC. Using UHPLC/Q-TOFMS, seven glucuronides and/or sulfated metabolites and four Phase I metabolites were simultaneously quantified in rat urine after oral administration of tectoridin at 100 and 200 mg/kg. Over a 72-h period, 14.2% and 14.7% of the tectoridin were excreted as eleven metabolites in urine, among which, two major metabolites tectorigenin-7-O-β-D-glucuronide (Te-7G) and tectorigenin accounted for 5.5-5.5% and 4.3-4.4%. Furthermore, the cumulative excretion of four glucuronides and sulfated metabolites in bile accounted for 7.3% and 3.9% of the dose within 60 h, among which, Te-7G and tectorigenin-7-O-glucuronide-4'-O-sulfate (Te-7G-4'S) accounted for 2.3-3.0% and 1.4-3.9%, respectively. The results indicate that the urine was the primary elimination route, and glucuronidation after deglycosylation at C-7 position was the major metabolic pathway of tectoridin in vivo. Moreover, the inhibitory activities of tectoridin and its five metabolites on rat lens aldose reductase were confirmed (IC₅₀: 1.4-15.5 μM), whereas irisolidone-7-O-glucuronide (Ir-7G) and irisolidone showed little activity. PMID:25256063

  2. The relationship between inhibition of vitamin K1 2,3-epoxide reductase and reduction of clotting factor activity with warfarin.

    PubMed Central

    Choonara, I A; Malia, R G; Haynes, B P; Hay, C R; Cholerton, S; Breckenridge, A M; Preston, F E; Park, B K

    1988-01-01

    1 The effect of low dose steady state warfarin (0.2 mg and 1 mg daily) on clotting factor activity and vitamin K1 metabolism was studied in seven healthy volunteers. 2 Steady state plasma warfarin concentrations were 41-99 ng ml-1 for the 0.2 mg dose and 157-292 ng ml-1 for the 1 mg dose. 3 There was a significant prolongation of the mean prothrombin time (0.9 s) after 1 mg warfarin daily, but no significant change in prothrombin time after 0.2 mg warfarin daily. There was no significant change in individual clotting factor activity (II, VII, IX or X) with either dose of warfarin. 4 Following the administration of a pharmacological dose of vitamin K1 (10 mg), all seven volunteers had detectable levels of vitamin K1 2,3-epoxide with both doses of warfarin (Cpmax 31-409 ng ml-1). 5 Both the Cpmax and the AUC for vitamin K1 2,3-epoxide were significantly greater on 1 mg of warfarin daily than 0.2 mg daily (P less than 0.01). 6 The apparent dissociation between inhibition of vitamin K1 2,3-epoxide reductase and reduction of clotting factor activity, produced by warfarin, may reflect the insensitivity of functional clotting factor assays to a small reduction in clotting factor concentration. PMID:3370190

  3. Effects of Red, Far Red, and Blue Light on Enhancement of Nitrate Reductase Activity and on Nitrate Uptake in Etiolated Rice Seedlings 1

    PubMed Central

    Sasakawa, Hideo; Yamamoto, Yukio

    1979-01-01

    The effects of red (R), far red (FR), or blue light (B) on the enhancement of nitrate reductase (NR) activity and on nitrate uptake in etiolated rice seedlings were examined. On 5-minute illumination followed by 12-hour dark, R caused marked increase of NR activity, but FR and B caused only slight increase. Illumination with 560 ergs per square centimeter per second of R for 5 minutes caused maximal increase. The effect of R was almost completely counteracted by subsequent illumination with 2,000 ergs per square centimeter per second of FR for 10 minutes, indicating that NR induction was mediated by phytochrome. Exogenous supply of inducer nitrate was not required during the 5-minute illumination and the R-FR cycles, if the seedlings were transferred to nitrate solution at the beginning of the dark incubation. NR activity in the shoots was found high when shoots were illuminated but was low when only roots were illuminated. On continuous illumination for 12 hours, B had more effect on NR increase than R. Nitrate uptake during 6-hour dark was not increased by exposure to R, FR, or B for 5 minutes at the beginning. On continuous illumination for 6 hours, R slightly increased nitrate uptake, whereas FR and B had no effect. PMID:16660864

  4. Novel Substrate Specificity and Temperature-Sensitive Activity of Mycosphaerella graminicola CYP51 Supported by the Native NADPH Cytochrome P450 Reductase.

    PubMed

    Price, Claire L; Warrilow, Andrew G S; Parker, Josie E; Mullins, Jonathan G L; Nes, W David; Kelly, Diane E; Kelly, Steven L

    2015-05-15

    Mycosphaerella graminicola (Zymoseptoria tritici) is an ascomycete filamentous fungus that causes Septoria leaf blotch in wheat crops. In Europe the most widely used fungicides for this major disease are demethylation inhibitors (DMIs). Their target is the essential sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51), which requires cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) as its redox partner for functional activity. The M. graminicola CPR (MgCPR) is able to catalyze the sterol 14α-demethylation of eburicol and lanosterol when partnered with Candida albicans CYP51 (CaCYP51) and that of eburicol only with M. graminicola CYP51 (MgCYP51). The availability of the functional in vivo redox partner enabled the in vitro catalytic activity of MgCYP51 to be demonstrated for the first time. MgCYP51 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) studies with epoxiconazole, tebuconazole, triadimenol, and prothioconazole-desthio confirmed that MgCYP51 bound these azole inhibitors tightly. The characterization of the MgCPR/MgCYP51 redox pairing has produced a functional method to evaluate the effects of agricultural azole fungicides, has demonstrated eburicol specificity in the activity observed, and supports the conclusion that prothioconazole is a profungicide. PMID:25746994

  5. The Prostaglandin F Synthase Activity of the Human Aldose Reductase AKR1B1 Brings New Lenses to Look at Pathologic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bresson, Eva; Lacroix-Pépin, Nicolas; Boucher-Kovalik, Sofia; Chapdelaine, Pierre; Fortier, Michel A.

    2012-01-01

    Prostaglandins are important regulators of female reproductive functions to which aldose reductases exhibiting hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity also contribute. Our work on the regulation of reproductive function by prostaglandins (PGs), lead us to the discovery that AKR1B5 and later AKR1B1were highly efficient and physiologically relevant PGF synthases. PGE2 and PGF2α are the main prostanoids produced in the human endometrium and proper balance in their relative production is important for normal menstruation and optimal fertility. Recent evidence suggests that PGE2/EP2 and PGF2α/FP may constitute a functional dyad with physiological relevance comparable to the prostacyclin-thromboxane dyad in the vascular system. We have recently reported that AKR1B1 was expressed and modulated in association with PGF2α production in response to IL-1β in the human endometrium. In the present study, we show that the human AKR1B1 (gene ID: 231) also known as ALDR1 or ALR2 is a functional PGF2α synthase in different models of living cells and tissues. Using human endometrial cells, prostate, and vascular smooth muscle cells, cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells we demonstrate that IL-1β is able to up regulate COX-2 and AKR1B1 proteins as well as PGF2α production under normal glucose concentrations. We show that the promoter activity of AKR1B1 gene is increased by IL-1β particularly around the multiple stress response region containing two putative antioxidant response elements adjacent to TonE and AP1. We also show that AKR1B1 is able to regulate PGE2 production through PGF2α acting on its FP receptor and that aldose reductase inhibitors like alrestatin, Statil (ponalrestat), and EBPC exhibit distinct and characteristic inhibition of PGF2α production in different cell models. The PGF synthase activity of AKR1B1 represents a new and important target to regulate ischemic and inflammatory responses associated with several human pathologies. PMID:22654757

  6. Pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and thioredoxin reductase are involved in 5-nitroimidazole activation while flavin metabolism is linked to 5-nitroimidazole resistance in Giardia lamblia

    PubMed Central

    Leitsch, David; Burgess, Anita G.; Dunn, Linda A.; Krauer, Kenia G.; Tan, Kevin; Duchêne, Michael; Upcroft, Peter; Eckmann, Lars; Upcroft, Jacqueline A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The mechanism of action of, and resistance to, metronidazole in the anaerobic (or micro-aerotolerant) protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia has long been associated with the reduction of ferredoxin (Fd) by the enzyme pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) and the subsequent activation of metronidazole by Fd to toxic radical species. Resistance to metronidazole has been associated with down-regulation of PFOR and Fd. The aim of this study was to determine whether the PFOR/Fd couple is the only pathway involved in metronidazole activation in Giardia. Methods PFOR and Fd activities were measured in extracts of highly metronidazole-resistant (MTRr) lines and activities of recombinant G. lamblia thioredoxin reductase (GlTrxR) and NADPH oxidase were assessed for their involvement in metronidazole activation and resistance. Results We demonstrated that several lines of highly MTRr G. lamblia have fully functional PFOR and Fd indicating that PFOR/Fd-independent mechanisms are involved in metronidazole activation and resistance in these cells. Flavin-dependent GlTrxR, like TrxR of other anaerobic protozoa, reduces 5-nitroimidazole compounds including metronidazole, although expression of TrxR is not decreased in MTRr Giardia. However, reduction of flavins is suppressed in highly MTRr cells, as evidenced by as much as an 80% decrease in NADPH oxidase flavin mononucleotide reduction activity. This suppression is consistent with generalized impaired flavin metabolism in highly MTRr Trichomonas vaginalis. Conclusions These data add to the mounting evidence against the dogma that PFOR/Fd is the only couple with a low enough redox potential to reduce metronidazole in anaerobes and point to the multi-factorial nature of metronidazole resistance. PMID:21602576

  7. Nitric oxide is required for the auxin-induced activation of NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase and protein denitrosylation during root growth responses in arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Correa-Aragunde, Natalia; Cejudo, Francisco J.; Lamattina, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Auxin is the main phytohormone controlling root development in plants. This study uses pharmacological and genetic approaches to examine the role of auxin and nitric oxide (NO) in the activation of NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase (NTR), and the effect that this activity has on root growth responses in Arabidopsis thaliana. Methods Arabidopsis seedlings were treated with auxin with or without the NTR inhibitors auranofin (ANF) and 1-chloro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene (DNCB). NTR activity, lateral root (LR) formation and S-nitrosothiol content were measured in roots. Protein S-nitrosylation was analysed by the biotin switch method in wild-type arabidopsis and in the double mutant ntra ntrb. Key Results The auxin-mediated induction of NTR activity is inhibited by the NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (CPTIO), suggesting that NO is downstream of auxin in this regulatory pathway. The NTR inhibitors ANF and DNCB prevent auxin-mediated activation of NTR and LR formation. Moreover, ANF and DNCB also inhibit auxin-induced DR5 : : GUS and BA3 : : GUS gene expression, suggesting that the auxin signalling pathway is compromised without full NTR activity. Treatment of roots with ANF and DNCB increases total nitrosothiols (SNO) content and protein S-nitrosylation, suggesting a role of the NTR-thioredoxin (Trx)-redox system in protein denitrosylation. In agreement with these results, the level of S-nitrosylated proteins is increased in the arabidopsis double mutant ntra ntrb as compared with the wild-type. Conclusions The results support for the idea that NTR is involved in protein denitrosylation during auxin-mediated root development. The fact that a high NO concentration induces NTR activity suggests that a feedback mechanism to control massive and unregulated protein S-nitrosylation could be operating in plant cells. PMID:26229066

  8. Flavonoids from the buds of Rosa damascena inhibit the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme a reductase and angiotensin I-converting enzyme.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Dae-Young; Lee, Hyungjae; Kim, Dae-Ok; Baek, Nam-In; Kim, Young-Eon; Kim, Hae-Yeong

    2010-01-27

    Rosa damascena has been manufactured as various food products, including tea, in Korea. A new flavonoid glycoside, kaempferol-3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl(1-->4)-beta-D-xylopyranoside, named roxyloside A was isolated from the buds of this plant, along with four known compounds, isoquercitrin, afzelin, cyanidin-3-O-beta-glucoside, and quercetin gentiobioside. The chemical structures of these compounds were determined by spectroscopic analyses, including FAB-MS, UV, IR, (1)H and (13)C NMR, DEPT, and 2D NMR (COSY, HSQC, and HMBC). All the isolated compounds except cyanidin-3-O-beta-glucoside exhibited high levels of inhibitory activity against 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase with IC(50) values ranging from 47.1 to 80.6 microM. Cyanidin-3-O-beta-glucoside significantly suppressed angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) activity, with an IC(50) value of 138.8 microM, while the other four compounds were ineffective. These results indicate that R. damascena and its flavonoids may be effective to improve the cardiovascular system. PMID:20038104

  9. Water-Soluble Compounds from Lentinula edodes Influencing the HMG-CoA Reductase Activity and the Expression of Genes Involved in the Cholesterol Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gil-Ramírez, Alicia; Caz, Víctor; Smiderle, Fhernanda R; Martin-Hernandez, Roberto; Largo, Carlota; Tabernero, María; Marín, Francisco R; Iacomini, Marcello; Reglero, Guillermo; Soler-Rivas, Cristina

    2016-03-01

    A water extract from Lentinula edodes (LWE) showed HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory activity but contained no statins. NMR indicated the presence of water-soluble α- and β-glucans and fucomannogalactans. Fractions containing derivatives of these polysaccharides with molecular weight down to approximately 1 kDa still retained their inhibitory activity. Once digested LWE was applied to Caco2 in transport experiments, no significant effect was noticed on the modulation of cholesterol-related gene expression. But, when the lower compartment of the Caco2 monolayer was applied to HepG2, some genes were modulated (after 24 h). LWE was also administrated to normo- and hypercholesterolemic mice, and no significant lowering of serum cholesterol levels was observed; but reduction of triglycerides in liver was observed. However, LWE supplementation modulated the transcriptional profile of some genes involved in the cholesterol metabolism similarly to simvastatin, suggesting that it could hold potential as a hypolipidemic/hypocholesterolemic extract, although further dose-dependent studies should be carried out. PMID:26877235

  10. Enhancement of the Chaperone Activity of Alkyl Hydroperoxide Reductase C from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Resulting from a Point-Specific Mutation Confers Heat Tolerance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Taek; Lee, Seung Sik; Mondal, Suvendu; Tripathi, Bhumi Nath; Kim, Siu; Lee, Keun Woo; Hong, Sung Hyun; Bai, Hyoung-Woo; Cho, Jae-Young; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2016-08-31

    Alkyl hydroperoxide reductase subunit C from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (PaAhpC) is a member of the 2-Cys peroxiredoxin family. Here, we examined the peroxidase and molecular chaperone functions of PaAhpC using a site-directed mutagenesis approach by substitution of Ser and Thr residues with Cys at positions 78 and 105 located between two catalytic cysteines. Substitution of Ser with Cys at position 78 enhanced the chaperone activity of the mutant (S78C-PaAhpC) by approximately 9-fold compared with that of the wild-type protein (WT-PaAhpC). This increased activity may have been associated with the proportionate increase in the high-molecular-weight (HMW) fraction and enhanced hydrophobicity of S78C-PaAhpC. Homology modeling revealed that mutation of Ser(78) to Cys(78) resulted in a more compact decameric structure than that observed in WT-PaAhpC and decreased the atomic distance between the two neighboring sulfur atoms of Cys(78) in the dimer-dimer interface of S78C-PaAhpC, which could be responsible for the enhanced hydrophobic interaction at the dimer-dimer interface. Furthermore, complementation assays showed that S78C-PaAhpC exhibited greatly improved the heat tolerance, resulting in enhanced survival under thermal stress. Thus, addition of Cys at position 78 in PaAhpC modulated the functional shifting of this protein from a peroxidase to a chaperone. PMID:27457208

  11. Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships and docking studies of some structurally diverse flavonoids and design of new aldose reductase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chandra De, Utpal; Debnath, Tanusree; Sen, Debanjan; Debnath, Sudhan

    2015-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AR) plays an important role in the development of several long-term diabetic complications. Inhibition of AR activities is a strategy for controlling complications arising from chronic diabetes. Several AR inhibitors have been reported in the literature. Flavonoid type compounds are shown to have significant AR inhibition. The objective of this study was to perform a computational work to get an idea about structural insight of flavonoid type compounds for developing as well as for searching new flavonoid based AR inhibitors. The data-set comprising 68 flavones along with their pIC50 values ranging from 0.44 to 4.59 have been collected from literature. Structure of all the flavonoids were drawn in Chembiodraw Ultra 11.0, converted into corresponding three-dimensional structure, saved as mole file and then imported to maestro project table. Imported ligands were prepared using LigPrep option of maestro 9.6 version. Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships and docking studies were performed with appropriate options of maestro 9.6 version installed in HP Z820 workstation with CentOS 6.3 (Linux). A model with partial least squares factor 5, standard deviation 0.2482, R2 = 0.9502 and variance ratio of regression 122 has been found as the best statistical model. PMID:25709964

  12. Expression of a constitutively active nitrate reductase variant in tobacco reduces tobacco-specific nitrosamine accumulation in cured leaves and cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianli; Zhang, Leichen; Lewis, Ramsey S; Bovet, Lucien; Goepfert, Simon; Jack, Anne M; Crutchfield, James D; Ji, Huihua; Dewey, Ralph E

    2016-07-01

    Burley tobaccos (Nicotiana tabacum) display a nitrogen-use-deficiency phenotype that is associated with the accumulation of high levels of nitrate within the leaf, a trait correlated with production of a class of compounds referred to as tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs). Two TSNA species, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) and N-nitrosonornicotine (NNN), have been shown to be strong carcinogens in numerous animal studies. We investigated the potential of molecular genetic strategies to lower nitrate levels in burley tobaccos by overexpressing genes encoding key enzymes of the nitrogen-assimilation pathway. Of the various constructs tested, only the expression of a constitutively active nitrate reductase (NR) dramatically decreased free nitrate levels in the leaves. Field-grown tobacco plants expressing this NR variant exhibited greatly reduced levels of TSNAs in both cured leaves and mainstream smoke of cigarettes made from these materials. Decreasing leaf nitrate levels via expression of a constitutively active NR enzyme represents an exceptionally promising means for reducing the production of NNN and NNK, two of the most well-documented animal carcinogens found in tobacco products. PMID:26800860

  13. Enhancement of the Chaperone Activity of Alkyl Hydroperoxide Reductase C from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Resulting from a Point-Specific Mutation Confers Heat Tolerance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Taek; Lee, Seung Sik; Mondal, Suvendu; Tripathi, Bhumi Nath; Kim, Siu; Lee, Keun Woo; Hong, Sung Hyun; Bai, Hyoung-Woo; Cho, Jae-Young; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2016-01-01

    Alkyl hydroperoxide reductase subunit C from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (PaAhpC) is a member of the 2-Cys peroxiredoxin family. Here, we examined the peroxidase and molecular chaperone functions of PaAhpC using a site-directed mutagenesis approach by substitution of Ser and Thr residues with Cys at positions 78 and 105 located between two catalytic cysteines. Substitution of Ser with Cys at position 78 enhanced the chaperone activity of the mutant (S78C-PaAhpC) by approximately 9-fold compared with that of the wild-type protein (WT-PaAhpC). This increased activity may have been associated with the proportionate increase in the high-molecular-weight (HMW) fraction and enhanced hydrophobicity of S78C-PaAhpC. Homology modeling revealed that mutation of Ser78 to Cys78 resulted in a more compact decameric structure than that observed in WT-PaAhpC and decreased the atomic distance between the two neighboring sulfur atoms of Cys78 in the dimer-dimer interface of S78C-PaAhpC, which could be responsible for the enhanced hydrophobic interaction at the dimer-dimer interface. Furthermore, complementation assays showed that S78C-PaAhpC exhibited greatly improved the heat tolerance, resulting in enhanced survival under thermal stress. Thus, addition of Cys at position 78 in PaAhpC modulated the functional shifting of this protein from a peroxidase to a chaperone. PMID:27457208

  14. VKORC1L1, an Enzyme Rescuing the Vitamin K 2,3-Epoxide Reductase Activity in Some Extrahepatic Tissues during Anticoagulation Therapy*

    PubMed Central

    Hammed, Abdessalem; Matagrin, Benjamin; Spohn, Gabriele; Prouillac, Caroline; Benoit, Etienne; Lattard, Virginie

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin K is involved in the γ-carboxylation of the vitamin K-dependent proteins, and vitamin K epoxide is a by-product of this reaction. Due to the limited intake of vitamin K, its regeneration is necessary and involves vitamin K 2,3-epoxide reductase (VKOR) activity. This activity is known to be supported by VKORC1 protein, but recently a second gene, VKORC1L1, appears to be able to support this activity when the encoded protein is expressed in HEK293T cells. Nevertheless, this protein was described as being responsible for driving the vitamin K-mediated antioxidation pathways. In this paper we precisely analyzed the catalytic properties of VKORC1L1 when expressed in Pichia pastoris and more particularly its susceptibility to vitamin K antagonists. Vitamin K antagonists are also inhibitors of VKORC1L1, but this enzyme appears to be 50-fold more resistant to vitamin K antagonists than VKORC1. The expression of Vkorc1l1 mRNA was observed in all tissues assayed, i.e. in C57BL/6 wild type and VKORC1-deficient mouse liver, lung, and testis and rat liver, lung, brain, kidney, testis, and osteoblastic cells. The characterization of VKOR activity in extrahepatic tissues demonstrated that a part of the VKOR activity, more or less important according to the tissue, may be supported by VKORC1L1 enzyme especially in testis, lung, and osteoblasts. Therefore, the involvement of VKORC1L1 in VKOR activity partly explains the low susceptibility of some extrahepatic tissues to vitamin K antagonists and the lack of effects of vitamin K antagonists on the functionality of the vitamin K-dependent protein produced by extrahepatic tissues such as matrix Gla protein or osteocalcin. PMID:23928358

  15. Conformational coupling between the active site and residues within the KC-channel of the Vibrio cholerae cbb3-type (C-family) oxygen reductase

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Young O.; Mahinthichaichan, Paween; Lee, Hyun Ju; Ouyang, Hanlin; Kaluka, Daniel; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Arjona, Davinia; Rousseau, Denis L.; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Ädelroth, Pia; Gennis, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    The respiratory chains of nearly all aerobic organisms are terminated by proton-pumping heme-copper oxygen reductases (HCOs). Previous studies have established that C-family HCOs contain a single channel for uptake from the bacterial cytoplasm of all chemical and pumped protons, and that the entrance of the KC-channel is a conserved glutamate in subunit III. However, the majority of the KC-channel is within subunit I, and the pathway from this conserved glutamate to subunit I is not evident. In the present study, molecular dynamics simulations were used to characterize a chain of water molecules leading from the cytoplasmic solution, passing the conserved glutamate in subunit III and extending into subunit I. Formation of the water chain, which controls the delivery of protons to the KC-channel, was found to depend on the conformation of Y241Vc, located in subunit I at the interface with subunit III. Mutations of Y241Vc (to A/F/H/S) in the Vibrio cholerae cbb3 eliminate catalytic activity, but also cause perturbations that propagate over a 28-Å distance to the active site heme b3. The data suggest a linkage between residues lining the KC-channel and the active site of the enzyme, possibly mediated by transmembrane helix α7, which contains both Y241Vc and the active site cross-linked Y255Vc, as well as two CuB histidine ligands. Other mutations of residues within or near helix α7 also perturb the active site, indicating that this helix is involved in modulation of the active site of the enzyme. PMID:25288772

  16. Structure-based approach to pharmacophore identification, in silico screening, and three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship studies for inhibitors of Trypanosoma cruzi dihydrofolate reductase function

    SciTech Connect

    Schormann, N.; Senkovich, O.; Walker, K.; Wright, D.L.; Anderson, A.C.; Rosowsky, A.; Ananthan, S.; Shinkre, B.; Velu, S.; Chattopadhyay, D.

    2009-07-10

    We have employed a structure-based three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) approach to predict the biochemical activity for inhibitors of T. cruzi dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS). Crystal structures of complexes of the enzyme with eight different inhibitors of the DHFR activity together with the structure in the substrate-free state (DHFR domain) were used to validate and refine docking poses of ligands that constitute likely active conformations. Structural information from these complexes formed the basis for the structure-based alignment used as input for the QSAR study. Contrary to indirect ligand-based approaches the strategy described here employs a direct receptor-based approach. The goal is to generate a library of selective lead inhibitors for further development as antiparasitic agents. 3D-QSAR models were obtained for T. cruzi DHFR-TS (30 inhibitors in learning set) and human DHFR (36 inhibitors in learning set) that show a very good agreement between experimental and predicted enzyme inhibition data. For crossvalidation of the QSAR model(s), we have used the 10% leave-one-out method. The derived 3D-QSAR models were tested against a few selected compounds (a small test set of six inhibitors for each enzyme) with known activity, which were not part of the learning set, and the quality of prediction of the initial 3D-QSAR models demonstrated that such studies are feasible. Further refinement of the models through integration of additional activity data and optimization of reliable docking poses is expected to lead to an improved predictive ability.

  17. The Crystal Structure of Thermotoga maritima Class III Ribonucleotide Reductase Lacks a Radical Cysteine Pre-Positioned in the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Aurelius, Oskar; Johansson, Renzo; Bågenholm, Viktoria; Lundin, Daniel; Tholander, Fredrik; Balhuizen, Alexander; Beck, Tobias; Sahlin, Margareta; Sjöberg, Britt-Marie; Mulliez, Etienne; Logan, Derek T.

    2015-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) catalyze the reduction of ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides, the building blocks for DNA synthesis, and are found in all but a few organisms. RNRs use radical chemistry to catalyze the reduction reaction. Despite RNR having evolved several mechanisms for generation of different kinds of essential radicals across a large evolutionary time frame, this initial radical is normally always channelled to a strictly conserved cysteine residue directly adjacent to the substrate for initiation of substrate reduction, and this cysteine has been found in the structures of all RNRs solved to date. We present the crystal structure of an anaerobic RNR from the extreme thermophile Thermotoga maritima (tmNrdD), alone and in several complexes, including with the allosteric effector dATP and its cognate substrate CTP. In the crystal structure of the enzyme as purified, tmNrdD lacks a cysteine for radical transfer to the substrate pre-positioned in the active site. Nevertheless activity assays using anaerobic cell extracts from T. maritima demonstrate that the class III RNR is enzymatically active. Other genetic and microbiological evidence is summarized indicating that the enzyme is important for T. maritima. Mutation of either of two cysteine residues in a disordered loop far from the active site results in inactive enzyme. We discuss the possible mechanisms for radical initiation of substrate reduction given the collected evidence from the crystal structure, our activity assays and other published work. Taken together, the results suggest either that initiation of substrate reduction may involve unprecedented conformational changes in the enzyme to bring one of these cysteine residues to the expected position, or that alternative routes for initiation of the RNR reduction reaction may exist. Finally, we present a phylogenetic analysis showing that the structure of tmNrdD is representative of a new RNR subclass IIIh, present in all Thermotoga

  18. Comparative Studies on the Induction and Inactivation of Nitrate Reductase in Corn Roots and Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Aslam, Muhammad; Oaks, Ann

    1976-01-01

    A comparison of induction and inactivation of nitrate reductase and two of its component activities, namely FMNH2-nitrate reductase and NO3−-induced NADH-cytochrome c reductase, was made in roots and leaves of corn (Zea mays L. var. W64A × 182E). The three activities were induced in parallel in both tissues when NO3− was supplied. WO4= suppressed the induction of NADH- and FMNH2-nitrate reductase activities in root tips and leaves. The NO3−-induced NADH-cytochrome c reductase activity showed a normal increase in roots treated with WO4=. In leaves, on the other hand, there was a marked superinduction of the NO3−-induced NADH-cytochrome c reductase in the presence of WO4=. The half-life values of NADH-nitrate reductase and FMNH2-nitrate reductase measured by removing NO3− and adding WO4= to the medium, were 4 hours in root tips and 6 hours in excised leaves. Addition of NO3− in the induction medium together with WO4= gave partial protection of NADH-nitrate reductase and FMNH2-nitrate reductase activities in both root tips and leaves with a t0.5 of 6 and 8 hours, respectively. NO3− also reduced the loss of nitrate reductase activity from mature root sections. In the presence of cycloheximide, both NADH-nitrate reductase and NO3−-induced NADH-cytochrome c reductase activities were lost at similar rates in root tips. NO3− protected the loss of NO3−-induced NADH-cytochrome c reductase to the same extent as that of NADH-nitrate reductase. PMID:16659529

  19. Respiratory arsenate reductase as a bidirectional enzyme

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richey, C.; Chovanec, P.; Hoeft, S.E.; Oremland, R.S.; Basu, P.; Stolz, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is capable of anaerobic chemolithoautotrophic growth by coupling the oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) to the reduction of nitrate and carbon dioxide. Analysis of its complete genome indicates that it lacks a conventional arsenite oxidase (Aox), but instead possesses two operons that each encode a putative respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr). Here we show that one homolog is expressed under chemolithoautotrophic conditions and exhibits both arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. We also demonstrate that Arr from two arsenate respiring bacteria, Alkaliphilus oremlandii and Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, is also biochemically reversible. Thus Arr can function as a reductase or oxidase. Its physiological role in a specific organism, however, may depend on the electron potentials of the molybdenum center and [Fe–S] clusters, additional subunits, or constitution of the electron transfer chain. This versatility further underscores the ubiquity and antiquity of microbial arsenic metabolism.

  20. Respiratory arsenate reductase as a bidirectional enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Richey, Christine; Chovanec, Peter; Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 ; Hoeft, Shelley E.; Oremland, Ronald S.; Basu, Partha; Stolz, John F.

    2009-05-01

    The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is capable of anaerobic chemolithoautotrophic growth by coupling the oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) to the reduction of nitrate and carbon dioxide. Analysis of its complete genome indicates that it lacks a conventional arsenite oxidase (Aox), but instead possesses two operons that each encode a putative respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr). Here we show that one homolog is expressed under chemolithoautotrophic conditions and exhibits both arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. We also demonstrate that Arr from two arsenate respiring bacteria, Alkaliphilus oremlandii and Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, is also biochemically reversible. Thus Arr can function as a reductase or oxidase. Its physiological role in a specific organism, however, may depend on the electron potentials of the molybdenum center and [Fe-S] clusters, additional subunits, or constitution of the electron transfer chain. This versatility further underscores the ubiquity and antiquity of microbial arsenic metabolism.

  1. Phylogenomics of Mycobacterium Nitrate Reductase Operon.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qinqin; Abdalla, Abualgasim Elgaili; Xie, Jianping

    2015-07-01

    NarGHJI operon encodes a nitrate reductase that can reduce nitrate to nitrite. This process enhances bacterial survival by nitrate respiration under anaerobic conditions. NarGHJI operon exists in many bacteria, especially saprophytic bacteria living in soil which play a key role in the nitrogen cycle. Most actinomycetes, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, possess NarGHJI operons. M. tuberculosis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that expands in macrophages and has the ability to persist in a non-replicative form in granuloma lifelong. Nitrogen and nitrogen compounds play crucial roles in the struggle between M. tuberculosis and host. M. tuberculosis can use nitrate as a final electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions to enhance its survival. In this article, we reviewed the mechanisms regulating nitrate reductase expression and affecting its activity. Potential genes involved in regulating the nitrate reductase expression in M. tuberculosis were identified. The conserved NarG might be an alternative mycobacterium taxonomic marker. PMID:25980349

  2. The Conserved Lys-95 Charged Residue Cluster Is Critical for the Homodimerization and Enzyme Activity of Human Ribonucleotide Reductase Small Subunit M2*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xinhuan; Xu, Zhijian; Zhang, Lingna; Liu, Hongchuan; Liu, Xia; Lou, Meng; Zhu, Lijun; Huang, Bingding; Yang, Cai-Guang; Zhu, Weiliang; Shao, Jimin

    2014-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RR) catalyzes the reduction of ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides for DNA synthesis. Human RR small subunit M2 exists in a homodimer form. However, the importance of the dimer form to the enzyme and the related mechanism remain unclear. In this study, we tried to identify the interfacial residues that may mediate the assembly of M2 homodimer by computational alanine scanning based on the x-ray crystal structure. Co-immunoprecipitation, size exclusion chromatography, and RR activity assays showed that the K95E mutation in M2 resulted in dimer disassembly and enzyme activity inhibition. In comparison, the charge-exchanging double mutation of K95E and E98K recovered the dimerization and activity. Structural comparisons suggested that a conserved cluster of charged residues, including Lys-95, Glu-98, Glu-105, and Glu-174, at the interface may function as an ionic lock for M2 homodimer. Although the measurements of the radical and iron contents showed that the monomer (the K95E mutant) was capable of generating the diiron and tyrosyl radical cofactor, co-immunoprecipitation and competitive enzyme inhibition assays indicated that the disassembly of M2 dimer reduced its interaction with the large subunit M1. In addition, the immunofluorescent and fusion protein-fluorescent imaging analyses showed that the dissociation of M2 dimer altered its subcellular localization. Finally, the transfection of the wild-type M2 but not the K95E mutant rescued the G1/S phase cell cycle arrest and cell growth inhibition caused by the siRNA knockdown of M2. Thus, the conserved Lys-95 charged residue cluster is critical for human RR M2 homodimerization, which is indispensable to constitute an active holoenzyme and function in cells. PMID:24253041

  3. Generation of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate from acetate in higher plants: Detection of acetoacetyl CoA reductase- and PHB synthase- activities in rice.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Hirohisa; Shiraki, Mari; Inoue, Eri; Saito, Terumi

    2016-08-20

    It has been reported that Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) is generated from acetate in the rice root. However, no information is available about the biosynthetic pathway of PHB from acetate in plant cells. In the bacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16 (R. eutropha), PHB is synthesized from acetyl CoA by the consecutive reaction of three enzymes: β-ketothiolase (EC: 2.3.1.9), acetoacetyl CoA reductase (EC: 1.1.1.36) and PHB synthase (EC: 2.3.1.-). Thus, in this study, we examined whether the above three enzymatic activities were also detected in rice seedlings. The results clearly showed that the activities of the above three enzymes were all detected in rice. In particular, the PHB synthase activity was detected specifically in the sonicated particulate fractions (2000g 10min precipitate (ppt) and the 8000g 30min ppt) of rice roots and leaves. In addition to these enzyme activities, several new experimental results were obtained on PHB synthesis in higher plants: (a) (14)C-PHB generated from 2-(14)C-acetate was mainly localized in the 2000g 10min ppt and the 8000g 30min ppt of rice root. (b) Addition of acetate (0.1-10mM) to culture medium of rice seedlings did not increase the content of PHB in the rice root or leaf. (c) In addition to C3 plants, PHB was generated from acetate in a C4 plant (corn) and in a CAM plant (Bryophyllum pinnatum). d) Washing with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) strongly suggested that the PHB synthesized from acetate was of plant origin and was not bacterial contamination. PMID:27372278

  4. The Solution Structure of Bacillus anthracis Dihydrofolate Reductase Yields Insight into the Analysis of Structure–Activity Relationships for Novel Inhibitors†,‡

    PubMed Central

    Beierlein, Jennifer M.; Deshmukh, Lalit; Frey, Kathleen M.; Vinogradova, Olga; Anderson, Amy C.

    2010-01-01

    There is a significant need for new therapeutics to treat infections caused by the biodefense agent Bacillus anthracis. In pursuit of drug discovery against this organism, we have developed novel propargyl-linked inhibitors that target the essential enzyme dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) from B. anthracis. Previously, we reported an initial series of these inhibitors and a high-resolution crystal structure of the ternary complex of the enzyme bound to its cofactor and one of the most potent inhibitors, UCP120B [Beierlein, J., Frey, K., Bolstad, D., Pelphrey, P., Joska, T., Smith, A., Priestley, N., Wright, D., and Anderson, A. (2008) J. Med. Chem. 51, 7532–7540]. Herein, we describe a three-dimensional solution structure of the ternary complex as determined by NMR. A comparison of this solution structure to the crystal structure reveals a general conservation of the DHFR fold and cofactor interactions as well as differences in the location of an active site helix and specific ligand interactions. In addition to data for the fully assigned ternary complex, data for the binary (enzyme–cofactor) complex were collected, providing chemical shift comparisons and revealing perturbations in residues that accommodate ligand binding. Dynamics of the protein, measured using 15N T1 and T2 relaxation times and {1H}–15N heteronuclear NOEs, reveal residue flexibility at the active site that explains enzyme inhibition and structure–activity relationships for two different series of these propargyl-linked inhibitors. The information obtained from the solution structure regarding active site flexibility will be especially valuable in the design of inhibitors with increased potency. PMID:19323450

  5. Fluoxetine elevates allopregnanolone in female rat brain but inhibits a steroid microsomal dehydrogenase rather than activating an aldo-keto reductase

    PubMed Central

    Fry, J P; Li, K Y; Devall, A J; Cockcroft, S; Honour, J W; Lovick, T A

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, elevates brain concentrations of the neuroactive progesterone metabolite allopregnanolone, an effect suggested to underlie its use in the treatment of premenstrual dysphoria. One report showed fluoxetine to activate the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) component of 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3α-HSD), which catalyses production of allopregnanolone from 5α-dihydroprogesterone. However, this action was not observed by others. The present study sought to clarify the site of action for fluoxetine in elevating brain allopregnanolone. Experimental Approach Adult male rats and female rats in dioestrus were treated with fluoxetine and their brains assayed for allopregnanolone and its precursors, progesterone and 5α-dihydroprogesterone. Subcellular fractions of rat brain were also used to investigate the actions of fluoxetine on 3α-HSD activity in both the reductive direction, producing allopregnanolone from 5α-dihydroprogesterone, and the reverse oxidative direction. Fluoxetine was also tested on these recombinant enzyme activities expressed in HEK cells. Key Results Short-term treatment with fluoxetine increased brain allopregnanolone concentrations in female, but not male, rats. Enzyme assays on native rat brain fractions and on activities expressed in HEK cells showed fluoxetine did not affect the AKR producing allopregnanolone from 5α-dihydroprogesterone but did inhibit the microsomal dehydrogenase oxidizing allopregnanolone to 5α-dihydroprogesterone. Conclusions and Implications Fluoxetine elevated allopregnanolone in female rat brain by inhibiting its oxidation to 5α-dihydroprogesterone by a microsomal dehydrogenase. This is a novel site of action for fluoxetine, with implications for the development of new agents and/or dosing regimens to raise brain allopregnanolone. PMID:25161074

  6. Computer modeling studies of the structural role of NADPH binding to active site mutants of human dihydrofolate reductase in complex with piritrexim.

    PubMed

    Nowak, W; Cody, V; Wojtczak, A

    2001-01-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR, EC 1.5.1.3) is one of the enzymes active in the folate cycle which plays an important role in DNA synthesis. Inhibition of DHFR is a key element in the treatment of many diseases, including cancer and AIDS related infections. A search for new selective inhibitors is motivated by the resistance to common drugs observed in the course of treatment. In this paper, results of a detailed computer analysis of human DHFR interactions with the lipophilic inhibitor piritrexim (PTX) are presented. It was found that the NADPH cofactor contributes 30% of the total PTX-enzyme interaction energy. Substitution of the highly conserved Glu30 with alanine does not lead to the release of the inhibitor from the hDHFR pocket. The important L22F point mutation does affect PTX orientation but does not changethe binding energy. Simulations of the dynamics of binary hDHFR-PTX complexes were performed with the use of Extensible Systematic Force Field (ESFF) and the results indicate structural changes in the enzyme induced by NADPH binding. PMID:11996001

  7. Effects of elevated CO2 on the photosynthesis and nitrate reductase activity of Pyropia haitanensis (Bangiales, Rhodophyta) grown at different nutrient levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunxiang; Zou, Dinghui

    2015-03-01

    Pyropia haitanensis, a commercially important species, was cultured at two CO2 concentrations (390×10-6 and 700×10-6 (parts per million)) and at low and high nutrient levels, to explore the effect of elevated CO2 on the species under nutrient enrichment. Results show that in CO2-enriched thalli, relative growth rate (RGR) was enhanced under nutrient enrichment. Elevated CO2 decreased phycobiliprotein (PB) contents, but increased the contents of soluble carbohydrates. Nutrient enrichment increased the contents of chlorophyll a (Chl a) and PB, while soluble carbohydrate content decreased. CO2 enrichment enhanced the relative maximum electronic transport rate and light saturation point. In nutrient-enriched thalli the activity of nitrate reductase (NRA) increased under elevated CO2. An instantaneous pH change in seawater (from 8.1 to 9.6) resulted in reduction of NRA, and the thalli grown under both elevated CO2 and nutrient enrichment exhibited less pronounced reduction than in algae grown at the ambient CO2. The thermal optima of NRA under elevated CO2 and/or nutrient enrichment shifted to a lower temperature (10-15°C) compared to that in ambient conditions (20°C). We propose that accelerated photosynthesis could result in growth increment. N assimilation remained high in acidified seawater and reflected increased temperature sensitivity in response to elevated CO2 and eutrophication.

  8. In vivo identification of promoter elements and transcription factors mediating activation of hepatic HMG-CoA reductase by T{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, Lindsey R.; Niesen, Melissa I.; Jaroszeski, Mark; Ness, Gene C.

    2009-07-31

    The promoter elements and transcription factors necessary for triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}) induction of hepatic HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR) were investigated by transfecting rat livers with wild type and mutant HMGR promoter-luciferase constructs using in vivo electroporation. Mutations in the sterol response element (SRE), nuclear factor-y (NF-Y) site, and the newly identified upstream transcription factor-2 (USF-2) site essentially abolished the T{sub 3} response. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis demonstrated that T{sub 3} treatment caused a 4-fold increase in in vivo binding of USF-2 to the HMGR promoter. Co-transfection of the wild type HMGR promoter with siRNAs to USF-2, SREBP-2, or NF-Y nearly abolished the T{sub 3} induction, as measured by promoter activity. These data provide in vivo evidence for functional roles for USF-2, SREBP-2, and NF-Y in mediating the T{sub 3}-induction of hepatic HMGR transcription.

  9. Methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) gene abundance correlates with activity measurements of methanogenic H2/CO2-enriched anaerobic biomass

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Rachel; Schauer-Gimenez, Anne; Bhattad, Ujwal; Kearney, Colleen; Struble, Craig A; Zitomer, Daniel; Maki, James S

    2014-01-01

    Biologically produced methane (CH4) from anaerobic digesters is a renewable alternative to fossil fuels, but digester failure can be a serious problem. Monitoring the microbial community within the digester could provide valuable information about process stability because this technology is dependent upon the metabolic processes of microorganisms. A healthy methanogenic community is critical for digester function and CH4 production. Methanogens can be surveyed and monitored using genes and transcripts of mcrA, which encodes the α subunit of methyl coenzyme M reductase – the enzyme that catalyses the final step in methanogenesis. Using clone libraries and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we compared the diversity and abundance of mcrA genes and transcripts in four different methanogenic hydrogen/CO2 enrichment cultures to function, as measured by specific methanogenic activity (SMA) assays using H2/CO2. The mcrA gene copy number significantly correlated with CH4 production rates using H2/CO2, while correlations between mcrA transcript number and SMA were not significant. The DNA and cDNA clone libraries from all enrichments were distinctive but community diversity also did not correlate with SMA. Although hydrogenotrophic methanogens dominated these enrichments, the results indicate that this methodology should be applicable to monitoring other methanogenic communities in anaerobic digesters. Ultimately, this could lead to the engineering of digester microbial communities to produce more CH4 for use as renewable fuel. PMID:24320083

  10. Functional analysis of ars gene cluster of Pannonibacter indicus strain HT23(T) (DSM 23407(T)) and identification of a proline residue essential for arsenate reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Saumya; Das, Subrata K

    2016-04-01

    Arsenic is a naturally occurring ubiquitous highly toxic metalloid. In this study, we have identified ars gene cluster in Pannonibacter indicus strain HT23(T) (DSM 23407(T)), responsible for reduction of toxic pentavalent arsenate. The ars gene cluster is comprised of four non-overlapping open reading frames (ORFs) encoding a transcriptional regulator (ArsR), a low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatases (LMW-PTPase) with hypothetical function, an arsenite efflux pump (Acr3), and an arsenate reductase (ArsC). Heterologous expression of arsenic inducible ars gene cluster conferred arsenic resistance to Escherichia coli ∆ars mutant strain AW3110. The recombinant ArsC was purified and assayed. Site-directed mutagenesis was employed to ascertain the role of specific amino acids in ArsC catalysis. Pro94X (X = Ala, Arg, Cys, and His) amino acid substitutions led to enzyme inactivation. Circular dichroism spectra analysis suggested Pro94 as an essential amino acid for enzyme catalytic activity as it is indispensable for optimum protein folding in P. indicus Grx-coupled ArsC. PMID:26915994

  11. Inhibitory effect on in vitro LDL oxidation and HMG Co-A reductase activity of the liquid-liquid partitioned fractions of Hericium erinaceus (Bull.) Persoon (lion's mane mushroom).

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mohammad Azizur; Abdullah, Noorlidah; Aminudin, Norhaniza

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) has been strongly suggested as the key factor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Mushrooms have been implicated in having preventive effects against chronic diseases due especially to their antioxidant properties. In this study, in vitro inhibitory effect of Hericium erinaceus on LDL oxidation and the activity of the cholesterol biosynthetic key enzyme, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG Co-A) reductase, was evaluated using five liquid-liquid solvent fractions consisting of methanol : dichloromethane (M : DCM), hexane (HEX), dichloromethane (DCM), ethyl acetate (EA), and aqueous residue (AQ). The hexane fraction showed the highest inhibition of oxidation of human LDL as reflected by the increased lag time (100 mins) for the formation of conjugated diene (CD) at 1 µg/mL and decreased production (68.28%, IC50 0.73 mg/mL) of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) at 1 mg/mL. It also mostly inhibited (59.91%) the activity of the HMG Co-A reductase at 10 mg/mL. The GC-MS profiling of the hexane fraction identified the presence of myconutrients: inter alia, ergosterol and linoleic acid. Thus, hexane fraction of Hericium erinaceus was found to be the most potent in vitro inhibitor of both LDL oxidation and HMG Co-A reductase activity having therapeutic potential for the prevention of oxidative stress-mediated vascular diseases. PMID:24959591

  12. Inhibitory Effect on In Vitro LDL Oxidation and HMG Co-A Reductase Activity of the Liquid-Liquid Partitioned Fractions of Hericium erinaceus (Bull.) Persoon (Lion's Mane Mushroom)

    PubMed Central

    Aminudin, Norhaniza

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) has been strongly suggested as the key factor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Mushrooms have been implicated in having preventive effects against chronic diseases due especially to their antioxidant properties. In this study, in vitro inhibitory effect of Hericium erinaceus on LDL oxidation and the activity of the cholesterol biosynthetic key enzyme, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG Co-A) reductase, was evaluated using five liquid-liquid solvent fractions consisting of methanol : dichloromethane (M : DCM), hexane (HEX), dichloromethane (DCM), ethyl acetate (EA), and aqueous residue (AQ). The hexane fraction showed the highest inhibition of oxidation of human LDL as reflected by the increased lag time (100 mins) for the formation of conjugated diene (CD) at 1 µg/mL and decreased production (68.28%, IC50 0.73 mg/mL) of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) at 1 mg/mL. It also mostly inhibited (59.91%) the activity of the HMG Co-A reductase at 10 mg/mL. The GC-MS profiling of the hexane fraction identified the presence of myconutrients: inter alia, ergosterol and linoleic acid. Thus, hexane fraction of Hericium erinaceus was found to be the most potent in vitro inhibitor of both LDL oxidation and HMG Co-A reductase activity having therapeutic potential for the prevention of oxidative stress-mediated vascular diseases. PMID:24959591

  13. Divergence in cholesterol biosynthetic rates and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase activity as a consequence of granulocyte versus monocyte-macrophage differentiation in HL-60 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Yachnin, S; Toub, D B; Mannickarottu, V

    1984-01-01

    Addition of dimethyl sulfoxide or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) to HL-60 cell cultures induces granulocytic or monocyte-macrophage differentiation, respectively, in HL-60 cells. Dimethyl sulfoxide-induced granulocyte differentiation in HL-60 cells is associated with a decrease in cellular 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl (HMG)-CoA reductase activity and with a decrease in the incorporation of [14C]acetate and mevalonate into products of the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway. PMA-induced monocyte-macrophage differentiation in HL-60 cells is associated with a rapid and profound fall in cell proliferation but nonetheless is accompanied by a dose-dependent increase in cellular HMG-CoA reductase activity and [14C]acetate incorporation into the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway. In addition, PMA induces an increase in [14C]mevalonate incorporation into cholesterol and its precursors, suggesting that post-HMG-CoA reductase events in cholesterol biosynthesis are also enhanced. Mature peripheral blood human monocytes possess an active cholesterol biosynthetic pathway, whereas mature human granulocytes are almost entirely lacking in the ability to synthesize post-squalene products. Our results with HL-60 cells indicate that this divergence in sterol-synthesizing ability between two cell lineages, which normally also derive from a common stem cell, can be observed as an early event in the differentiation process. PMID:6583685

  14. Purification of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase enzymes from the gill tissue of Lake Van fish and analyzing the effects of some chalcone derivatives on enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Kuzu, Muslum; Aslan, Abdulselam; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Comakli, Veysel; Demirdag, Ramazan; Uzun, Naim

    2016-04-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and glutathione reductase (GR) are metabolically quite important enzymes. Within this study, these two enzymes were purified for the first time from the gills of Lake Van fish. In the purifying process, ammonium sulfate precipitation and 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity column chromatography techniques for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, temperature degradation and 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity column chromatography for glutathione reductase enzyme were used. The control of the enzyme purity and determination of molecular weight were done with sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. K M and V max values were determined with Lineweaver-Burk plot. Besides, the effects of some chalcone derivatives on the purified enzymes were analyzed. For the ones showing inhibition effect, % activity-[I] figures were drawn and IC50 values were determined. K i value was calculated by using Cheng-Prusoff equation. PMID:26676512

  15. AFN-1252 is a potent inhibitor of enoyl-ACP reductase from Burkholderia pseudomallei—Crystal structure, mode of action, and biological activity

    PubMed Central

    Narasimha Rao, Krishnamurthy; Lakshminarasimhan, Anirudha; Joseph, Sarah; Lekshmi, Swathi U; Lau, Ming-Seong; Takhi, Mohammed; Sreenivas, Kandepu; Nathan, Sheila; Yusof, Rohana; Abd Rahman, Noorsaadah; Ramachandra, Murali; Antony, Thomas; Subramanya, Hosahalli

    2015-01-01

    Melioidosis is a tropical bacterial infection caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei (B. pseudomallei; Bpm), a Gram-negative bacterium. Current therapeutic options are largely limited to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and β-lactam drugs, and the treatment duration is about 4 months. Moreover, resistance has been reported to these drugs. Hence, there is a pressing need to develop new antibiotics for Melioidosis. Inhibition of enoyl-ACP reducatase (FabI), a key enzyme in the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway has shown significant promise for antibacterial drug development. FabI has been identified as the major enoyl-ACP reductase present in B. pseudomallei. In this study, we evaluated AFN-1252, a Staphylococcus aureus FabI inhibitor currently in clinical development, for its potential to bind to BpmFabI enzyme and inhibit B. pseudomallei bacterial growth. AFN-1252 stabilized BpmFabI and inhibited the enzyme activity with an IC50 of 9.6 nM. It showed good antibacterial activity against B. pseudomallei R15 strain, isolated from a melioidosis patient (MIC of 2.35 mg/L). X-ray structure of BpmFabI with AFN-1252 was determined at a resolution of 2.3 Å. Complex of BpmFabI with AFN-1252 formed a symmetrical tetrameric structure with one molecule of AFN-1252 bound to each monomeric subunit. The kinetic and thermal melting studies supported the finding that AFN-1252 can bind to BpmFabI independent of cofactor. The structural and mechanistic insights from these studies might help the rational design and development of new FabI inhibitors. PMID:25644789

  16. AFN-1252 is a potent inhibitor of enoyl-ACP reductase from Burkholderia pseudomallei--Crystal structure, mode of action, and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Rao, Krishnamurthy Narasimha; Lakshminarasimhan, Anirudha; Joseph, Sarah; Lekshmi, Swathi U; Lau, Ming-Seong; Takhi, Mohammed; Sreenivas, Kandepu; Nathan, Sheila; Yusof, Rohana; Abd Rahman, Noorsaadah; Ramachandra, Murali; Antony, Thomas; Subramanya, Hosahalli

    2015-05-01

    Melioidosis is a tropical bacterial infection caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei (B. pseudomallei; Bpm), a Gram-negative bacterium. Current therapeutic options are largely limited to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and β-lactam drugs, and the treatment duration is about 4 months. Moreover, resistance has been reported to these drugs. Hence, there is a pressing need to develop new antibiotics for Melioidosis. Inhibition of enoyl-ACP reducatase (FabI), a key enzyme in the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway has shown significant promise for antibacterial drug development. FabI has been identified as the major enoyl-ACP reductase present in B. pseudomallei. In this study, we evaluated AFN-1252, a Staphylococcus aureus FabI inhibitor currently in clinical development, for its potential to bind to BpmFabI enzyme and inhibit B. pseudomallei bacterial growth. AFN-1252 stabilized BpmFabI and inhibited the enzyme activity with an IC50 of 9.6 nM. It showed good antibacterial activity against B. pseudomallei R15 strain, isolated from a melioidosis patient (MIC of 2.35 mg/L). X-ray structure of BpmFabI with AFN-1252 was determined at a resolution of 2.3 Å. Complex of BpmFabI with AFN-1252 formed a symmetrical tetrameric structure with one molecule of AFN-1252 bound to each monomeric subunit. The kinetic and thermal melting studies supported the finding that AFN-1252 can bind to BpmFabI independent of cofactor. The structural and mechanistic insights from these studies might help the rational design and development of new FabI inhibitors. PMID:25644789

  17. Nitrite Reductase and Nitric-oxide Synthase Activity of the Mitochondrial Molybdopterin Enzymes mARC1 and mARC2*

    PubMed Central

    Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney E.; Tejero, Jesús; Sun, Bin; Gauthier, Marc C.; Thomas, John; Ragireddy, Venkata; Merchant, Bonnie A.; Wang, Jun; Azarov, Ivan; Basu, Partha; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial amidoxime reducing component (mARC) proteins are molybdopterin-containing enzymes of unclear physiological function. Both human isoforms mARC-1 and mARC-2 are able to catalyze the reduction of nitrite when they are in the reduced form. Moreover, our results indicate that mARC can generate nitric oxide (NO) from nitrite when forming an electron transfer chain with NADH, cytochrome b5, and NADH-dependent cytochrome b5 reductase. The rate of NO formation increases almost 3-fold when pH was lowered from 7.5 to 6.5. To determine if nitrite reduction is catalyzed by molybdenum in the active site of mARC-1, we mutated the putative active site cysteine residue (Cys-273), known to coordinate molybdenum binding. NO formation was abolished by the C273A mutation in mARC-1. Supplementation of transformed Escherichia coli with tungsten facilitated the replacement of molybdenum in recombinant mARC-1 and abolished NO formation. Therefore, we conclude that human mARC-1 and mARC-2 are capable of catalyzing reduction of nitrite to NO through reaction with its molybdenum cofactor. Finally, expression of mARC-1 in HEK cells using a lentivirus vector was used to confirm cellular nitrite reduction to NO. A comparison of NO formation profiles between mARC and xanthine oxidase reveals similar Kcat and Vmax values but more sustained NO formation from mARC, possibly because it is not vulnerable to autoinhibition via molybdenum desulfuration. The reduction of nitrite by mARC in the mitochondria may represent a new signaling pathway for NADH-dependent hypoxic NO production. PMID:24500710

  18. Density Functional Theory Analysis of Structure, Energetics, and Spectroscopy for the Mn-Fe Active Site of Chlamydia trachomatis Ribonucleotide Reductase in Four Oxidation States

    PubMed Central

    Han, Wen-Ge; Giammona, Debra Ann; Bashford, Donald; Noodleman, Louis

    2010-01-01

    Models for the Mn-Fe active site structure of ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) from pathogenic bacteria Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) in different oxidation states have been studied in this paper, using broken-symmetry density functional theory (DFT) incorporated with the conductor like screening (COSMO) solvation model and also with the finite-difference Poisson-Boltzmann self-consistent reaction field (PB-SCRF) calculations. The detailed structures for the reduced Mn(II)-Fe(II), the met Mn(III)-Fe(III), the oxidized Mn(IV)-Fe(III) and the superoxidized Mn(IV)-Fe(IV) states are predicted. The calculated properties, including geometries, 57Fe Mössbauer isomer shifts and quadrupole splittings, and 57Fe and 55Mn ENDOR hyperfine coupling constants, are compared with the available experimental data. The Mössbauer and energetic calculations show that the (μ-oxo, μ-hydroxo) models better represent the structure of the Mn(IV)-Fe(III) state than the di-μ-oxo models. The predicted Mn(IV)-Fe(III) distances (2.95 and 2.98 Å) in the (μ-oxo, μ-hydroxo) models are in agreement with the EXAFS experimental value of 2.92 Å (Younker, et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2008, 130, 15022-15027). The effect of the protein and solvent environment on the assignment of the Mn metal position is examined by comparing the relative energies of alternative mono-Mn(II) active site structures. It is proposed that if the Mn(II)-Fe(II) protein is prepared with prior addition of Mn(II) or with Mn(II) richer than Fe(II), Mn is likely positioned at metal site 2, which is further from Phe127. PMID:20604534

  19. The expression and activity of thioredoxin reductase 1 splice variants v1 and v2 regulate the expression of genes associated with differentiation and adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Nalvarte, Ivan; Damdimopoulos, Anastasios E.; Rüegg, Joëlle; Spyrou, Giannis

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian redox-active selenoprotein thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) is a main player in redox homoeostasis. It transfers electrons from NADPH to a large variety of substrates, particularly to those containing redox-active cysteines. Previously, we reported that the classical form of cytosolic TrxR1 (TXNRD1_v1), when overexpressed in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK-293), prompted the cells to undergo differentiation [Nalvarte et al. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 54510–54517]. In the present study, we show that several genes associated with differentiation and adhesion are differentially expressed in HEK-293 cells stably overexpressing TXNRD1_v1 compared with cells expressing its splice variant TXNRD1_v2. Overexpression of these two splice forms resulted in distinctive effects on various aspects of cellular functions including gene regulation patterns, alteration of growth rate, migration and morphology and susceptibility to selenium-induced toxicity. Furthermore, differentiation of the neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y induced by all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) increased both TXNRD1_v1 and TXNRD1_v2 expressions along with several of the identified genes associated with differentiation and adhesion. Selenium supplementation in the SH-SY5Y cells also induced a differentiated morphology and changed expression of the adhesion protein fibronectin 1 and the differentiation marker cadherin 11, as well as different temporal expression of the studied TXNRD1 variants. These data suggest that both TXNRD1_v1 and TXNRD1_v2 have distinct roles in differentiation, possibly by altering the expression of the genes associated with differentiation, and further emphasize the importance in distinguishing each unique action of different TrxR1 splice forms, especially when studying the gene silencing or knockout of TrxR1. PMID:26464515

  20. The expression and activity of thioredoxin reductase 1 splice variants v1 and v2 regulate the expression of genes associated with differentiation and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Nalvarte, Ivan; Damdimopoulos, Anastasios E; Rüegg, Joëlle; Spyrou, Giannis

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian redox-active selenoprotein thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) is a main player in redox homoeostasis. It transfers electrons from NADPH to a large variety of substrates, particularly to those containing redox-active cysteines. Previously, we reported that the classical form of cytosolic TrxR1 (TXNRD1_v1), when overexpressed in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK-293), prompted the cells to undergo differentiation [Nalvarte et al. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279: , 54510-54517]. In the present study, we show that several genes associated with differentiation and adhesion are differentially expressed in HEK-293 cells stably overexpressing TXNRD1_v1 compared with cells expressing its splice variant TXNRD1_v2. Overexpression of these two splice forms resulted in distinctive effects on various aspects of cellular functions including gene regulation patterns, alteration of growth rate, migration and morphology and susceptibility to selenium-induced toxicity. Furthermore, differentiation of the neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y induced by all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) increased both TXNRD1_v1 and TXNRD1_v2 expressions along with several of the identified genes associated with differentiation and adhesion. Selenium supplementation in the SH-SY5Y cells also induced a differentiated morphology and changed expression of the adhesion protein fibronectin 1 and the differentiation marker cadherin 11, as well as different temporal expression of the studied TXNRD1 variants. These data suggest that both TXNRD1_v1 and TXNRD1_v2 have distinct roles in differentiation, possibly by altering the expression of the genes associated with differentiation, and further emphasize the importance in distinguishing each unique action of different TrxR1 splice forms, especially when studying the gene silencing or knockout of TrxR1. PMID:26464515

  1. Low resolution solution structure of an enzymatic active AhpC10:AhpF2 ensemble of the Escherichia coli Alkyl hydroperoxide Reductase.

    PubMed

    Kamariah, Neelagandan; Nartey, Wilson; Eisenhaber, Birgit; Eisenhaber, Frank; Grüber, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    The ability of bacteria to combat oxidative stress is imperative for their survival. The Alkyl hydroperoxide Reductase (AhpR) system, composed of the AhpC and AhpF proteins, is one of the dominant antioxidant defense systems required for scavenging hydrogen peroxide and organic peroxide. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the mechanism of the AhpR ensemble formation. In previous studies, we were able to elucidate conformational flexibility of Escherichia coli AhpF during the catalytic cycle and its binding site, the N-terminal domain (NTD), to AhpC. We proposed the novel binding and release mechanism of EcAhpC-AhpF, which is mediated by the well defined redox-state linked conformational changes associated with the C-terminal tail and active site regions of EcAhpC. Here, we have proceeded further to elucidate the solution structure of E. coli AhpC and the stable ensemble formation with EcAhpF using size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. The EcAhpC-AhpF complex structure with a stoichiometry of AhpC10:AhpF2 reveals that dimeric EcAhpF in its extended conformation enables the NTD disulphide centers to come in close proximity to the redox-active disulphide centers of EcAhpC, and provides an efficient electron transfer. Furthermore, the significance of the C-terminal tail of EcAhpC in ensemble formation is elucidated. SAXS data-based modeling revealed the flexible C-terminal tail of EcAhpC in solution, and its exposed nature, making it possible to contact the NTD of EcAhpF for stable complex formation. PMID:26584540

  2. Dihydropteridine reductase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, S G; Shaw, D C; Armarego, W L

    1988-01-01

    A dihydropteridine reductase from Escherichia coli was purified to apparent homogeneity. It is a dimeric enzyme with identical subunits (Mr 27000) and a free N-terminal group. It can use NADH (Vmax./Km 3.36 s-1) and NADPH (Vmax./Km 1.07 s-1) when 6-methyldihydro-(6H)-pterin is the second substrate, as well as quinonoid dihydro-(6H)-biopterin (Vmax./Km 0.69 s-1), dihydro-(6H)-neopterin (Vmax./Km 0.58 s-1), dihydro-(6H)-monapterin 0.66 s-1), 6-methyldihydro-(6H)-pterin and cis-6,7-dimethyldihydro-(6H)-pterin (Vmax./Km 0.66 s-1) when NADH is the second substrate. The pure reductase has a yellow colour and contains bound FAD. The enzyme also has pterin-independent NADH and NADPH oxidoreductase activities when potassium ferricyanide is the electron acceptor. Images Fig. 2. PMID:3060113

  3. Isolation of a Bisulfite Reductase Activity from Desulfotomaculum nigrificans and Its Identification as the Carbon Monoxide-Binding Pigment P582

    PubMed Central

    Akagi, J. M.; Adams, Verna

    1973-01-01

    Crude preparations of Desulfotomaculum nigrificans were found to reduce bisulfite to trithionate, thiosulfate, and sulfide. The bisulfite reductase of this organism was partially purified and observed to reduce bisulfite to trithionate as the major product and with thiosulfate and sulfide as minor products. The enzyme exhibited spectral properties identical to the carbon monoxide-reacting pigment (P582) isolated from this organism. It is concluded that the bisulfite reductase of D. nigrificans is P582 and that this organism utilizes a pathway which involves trithionate during the reduction of bisulfite to sulfide. PMID:4745421

  4. Hug1 is an intrinsically disordered protein that inhibits ribonucleotide reductase activity by directly binding Rnr2 subunit.

    PubMed

    Meurisse, Julie; Bacquin, Agathe; Richet, Nicolas; Charbonnier, Jean-Baptiste; Ochsenbein, Françoise; Peyroche, Anne

    2014-12-01

    Rad53 is a conserved protein kinase with a central role in DNA damage response and nucleotide metabolism. We observed that the expression of a dominant-lethal form of RAD53 leads to significant expression changes for at least 16 genes, including the RNR3 and the HUG1 genes, both of which are involved in the control of nucleotide metabolism. We established by multiple biophysical and biochemical approaches that Hug1 is an intrinsically disordered protein that directly binds to the small RNR subunit Rnr2. We characterized the surface of interaction involved in Hug1 binding to Rnr2, and we thus defined a new binding region to Rnr2. Moreover, we show that Hug1 is deleterious to cell growth in the context of reduced RNR activity. This inhibitory effect of Hug1 on RNR activity depends on the binding of Hug1 to Rnr2. We propose a model in which Hug1 modulates Rnr2-Rnr1 association by binding Rnr2. We show that Hug1 accumulates under various physiological conditions of high RNR induction. Hence, both the regulation and the mode of action of Hug1 are different from those of the small protein inhibitors Dif1 and Sml1, and Hug1 can be considered as a regulator for fine-tuning of RNR activity. PMID:25378334

  5. Genetic variation in aldo-keto reductase 1D1 (AKR1D1) affects the expression and activity of multiple cytochrome P450s.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Amarjit S; Thirumaran, Ranjit K; Yasuda, Kazuto; Yang, Xia; Fan, Yiping; Strom, Stephen C; Schuetz, Erin G

    2013-08-01

    Human liver gene regulatory (Bayesian) network analysis was previously used to identify a cytochrome P450 (P450) gene subnetwork with Aldo-keto reductase 1D1 (AKR1D1) as a key regulatory driver of this subnetwork. This study assessed the biologic importance of AKR1D1 [a key enzyme in the synthesis of bile acids, ligand activators of farnesoid X receptor (FXR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), known transcriptional regulators of P450s] to hepatic P450 expression. Overexpression of AKR1D1 in primary human hepatocytes led to increased expression of CYP3A4, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP2B6. Conversely, AKR1D1 knockdown decreased expression of these P450s. We resequenced AKR1D1 from 98 donor livers and identified a 3'-untranslated region (UTR) (rs1872930) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) significantly associated with higher AKR1D1 mRNA expression. AKR1D1 3'-UTR-luciferase reporter studies showed that the variant allele resulted in higher luciferase activity, suggesting that the SNP increases AKR1D1 mRNA stability and/or translation efficiency. Consistent with AKR1D1's putative role as a driver of the P450 subnetwork, the AKR1D1 3'-UTR SNP was significantly associated with increased hepatic mRNA expression of multiple P450s (CYP3A4, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP2B6) and CYP3A4, CYP2C8, CYP2C19, and CYP2B6 activities. After adjusting for multiple testing, the association remained significant for AKR1D1, CYP2C9, and CYP2C8 mRNA expression and CYP2C8 activity. These results provide new insights into the variation in expression and activity of P450s that can account for interindividual differences in drug metabolism/efficacy and adverse drug events. In conclusion, we provide the first experimental evidence supporting a role for AKR1D1 as a key genetic regulator of the P450 network. PMID:23704699

  6. Solubilization and Resolution of the Membrane-Bound Nitrite Reductase from Paracoccus Halodenitrificans into Nitrite and Nitric Oxide Reductases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Michael A.; Cronin, Sonja E.; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1984-01-01

    Membranes prepared from Paracoccus halodenitrificans reduced nitrite or nitric oxide to nitrous oxide. Extraction of these membranes with the detergent CHAPSO [3-(3-Chlolamidoporopyldimethylammonio)-1-(2- hydroxy-1-propanesulfonate)], followed by ammonium sulfate fractionation of the solubilized proteins, resulted in the separation of nitrite and nitric oxide reductase activities. The fraction containing nitrite reductase activity spectrally resembled a cd-type cytochrome. Several cytochromes were detected in the nitric oxide reductase fraction. Which, if any, of these cytochromes is associated with the reduction of nitric oxide is not clear at this time.

  7. Evidence That the [beta] Subunit of Chlamydia trachomatis Ribonucleotide Reductase Is Active with the Manganese Ion of Its Manganese(IV)/Iron(III) Cofactor in Site 1

    SciTech Connect

    Dassama, Laura M.K.; Boal, Amie K.; Krebs, Carsten; Rosenzweig, Amy C.; Bollinger, Jr., J. Martin

    2014-10-02

    The reaction of a class I ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) begins when a cofactor in the {beta} subunit oxidizes a cysteine residue {approx}35 {angstrom} away in the {alpha} subunit, generating a thiyl radical. In the class Ic enzyme from Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct), the cysteine oxidant is the Mn{sup IV} ion of a Mn{sup IV}/Fe{sup III} cluster, which assembles in a reaction between O{sub 2} and the Mn{sup II}/Fe{sup II} complex of {beta}. The heterodinuclear nature of the cofactor raises the question of which site, 1 or 2, contains the Mn{sup IV} ion. Because site 1 is closer to the conserved location of the cysteine-oxidizing tyrosyl radical of class Ia and Ib RNRs, we suggested that the Mn{sup IV} ion most likely resides in this site (i.e., {sup 1}Mn{sup IV}/{sup 2}Fe{sup III}), but a subsequent computational study favored its occupation of site 2 ({sup 1}Fe{sup III}/{sup 2}Mn{sup IV}). In this work, we have sought to resolve the location of the Mn{sup IV} ion in Ct RNR-{beta} by correlating X-ray crystallographic anomalous scattering intensities with catalytic activity for samples of the protein reconstituted in vitro by two different procedures. In samples containing primarily Mn{sup IV}/Fe{sup III} clusters, Mn preferentially occupies site 1, but some anomalous scattering from site 2 is observed, implying that both {sup 1}Mn{sup II}/{sup 2}Fe{sup II} and {sup 1}Fe{sup II}/{sup 2}Mn{sup II} complexes are competent to react with O{sub 2} to produce the corresponding oxidized states. However, with diminished Mn{sup II} loading in the reconstitution, there is no evidence for Mn occupancy of site 2, and the greater activity of these 'low-Mn' samples on a per-Mn basis implies that the {sup 1}Mn{sup IV}/{sup 2}Fe{sup III}-{beta} is at least the more active of the two oxidized forms and may be the only active form.

  8. Adaptations of Photosynthetic Electron Transport, Carbon Assimilation, and Carbon Partitioning in Transgenic Nicotiana plumbaginifolia Plants to Changes in Nitrate Reductase Activity.

    PubMed Central

    Foyer, C. H.; Lescure, J. C.; Lefebvre, C.; Morot-Gaudry, J. F.; Vincentz, M.; Vaucheret, H.

    1994-01-01

    Transgenic Nicotiana plumbaginifolia plants that express either a 5-fold increase or a 20-fold decrease in nitrate reductase (NR) activity were used to study the relationships between carbon and nitrogen metabolism in leaves. Under saturating irradiance the maximum rate of photosynthesis, per unit surface area, was decreased in the low NR expressors but was relatively unchanged in the high NR expressors compared with the wild-type controls. However, when photosynthesis was expressed on a chlorophyll (Chl) basis the low NR plants had comparable or even higher values than the wild-type plants. Surprisingly, the high NR expressors showed very similar rates of photosynthesis and respiration to the wild-type plants and contained identical amounts of leaf Chl, carbohydrate, and protein. These plants were provided with a saturating supply of nitrate plus a basal level of ammonium during all phases of growth. Under these conditions overexpression of NR had little impact on leaf metabolism and did not stimulate growth or biomass production. Large differences in photochemical quenching and nonphotochemical quenching components of Chl a fluorescence, as well as the ratio of variable to maximum fluorescence, (FV/FM), were apparent in the low NR expressors in comparison with the wild-type controls. Light intensity-dependent increases in nonphotochemical quenching and decreases in FV/FM were greatest in the low NR expressors, whereas photochemical quenching decreased uniformly with increasing irradiance in all plant types. Nonphotochemical quenching was increased at all except the lowest irradiances in the low NR expressors, allowing photosystem II to remain oxidized on its acceptor side. The relative contributions of photochemical and nonphotochemical quenching of Chl a fluorescence with changing irradiance were virtually identical in the high NR expressors and the wild-type controls. Zeaxanthin was present in all leaves at high irradiances; however, at high irradiance leaves

  9. Elevated chloroplastic glutathione reductase activities decrease chilling-induced photoinhibition by increasing rates of photochemistry, but not thermal energy dissipation, in transgenic cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract. The effect of the overproduction of glutathione reductase (GR+) in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. cv. Coker 312) chloroplasts on the response of photosynthetic parameters to chilling in the light was examined. After 180 min at 10ºC and 500 mol photons m-2 s-1 in the chamber of an oxygen el...

  10. [Opportunities and risks of 5α reductase inhibitors in the medical management of Active surveillance for localized prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Linares Espinos, Estefania; Carballido Rodriguez, Joaquin

    2014-06-01

    Active surveillance (AS) as a therapeutic option is already integrated as a primary treatment strategy in low risk localized prostate cancer (PCa). There is a recent interest for the search of therapeutic interventions that result in a delay in the progression of such indolent cancers. The evaluation of the possible implication of 5 ARI drugs in the reduction of the risk of progression of PCa was enacted by the results of the clinical trials PCPT (Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial) and REDUCE (Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events study). The results of the REDEEM clinical trial (Reduction by Dutasteride of clinical progression events in expectant management trial) revealed a delay in PCa progression favoring Dutasteride in comparison with placebo, being advanced age and PSA Density independent predictive factors for pathologic progression. Evidences regarding the influence of 5 ARIs in the evolution of AS patients come from few studies with limited follow up. Thus, the conclusions probably are far from being consiidered as definitive. PMID:24914845

  11. At5g50600 encodes a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase reductase superfamily with 11beta- and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities associated with Arabidopsis thaliana seed oil bodies.

    PubMed

    d'Andréa, S; Canonge, M; Beopoulos, A; Jolivet, P; Hartmann, M A; Miquel, M; Lepiniec, L; Chardot, T

    2007-02-01

    In a previous work, we presented evidence for the presence of a protein encoded by At5g50600 in oil bodies (OBs) from Arabidopsis thaliana [P. Jolivet, E. Roux, S. D'Andrea, M. Davanture, L. Negroni, M. Zivy, T. Chardot, Protein composition of oil bodies in Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype WS, Plant Physiol. Biochem. 42 (2004) 501-509]. Using specific antibodies and proteomic techniques, we presently confirm the existence of this protein, which is a member of the short-chain steroid dehydrogenase reductase superfamily. We have measured its activity toward various steroids (cholesterol, dehydroepiandrosterone, cortisol, corticosterone, estradiol, estrone) and NAD(P)(H), either within purified OBs or as a purified bacterially expressed chimera. Both enzymatic systems (OBs purified from A. thaliana seeds as well as the chimeric enzyme) exhibited hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) activity toward estradiol (17beta-hydroxysteroid) with NAD+ or NADP+, NADP+ being the preferred cofactor. Low levels of activity were observed with cortisol or corticosterone (11beta-hydroxysteroids), but neither cholesterol nor DHEA (3beta-hydroxysteroids) were substrates, whatever the cofactor used. Similar activity profiles were found for both enzyme sources. Purified OBs were found to be also able to catalyze estrone reduction (17beta-ketosteroid reductase activity) with NADPH. The enzyme occurring in A. thaliana OBs can be classified as a NADP+-dependent 11beta-,17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/17beta-ketosteroid reductase. This enzyme probably corresponds to AtHSD1, which is encoded by At5g50600. However, its physiological role and substrates still remain to be determined. PMID:17074428

  12. An electrogenic nitric oxide reductase.

    PubMed

    Al-Attar, Sinan; de Vries, Simon

    2015-07-22

    Nitric oxide reductases (Nors) are members of the heme-copper oxidase superfamily that reduce nitric oxide (NO) to nitrous oxide (N₂O). In contrast to the proton-pumping cytochrome oxidases, Nors studied so far have neither been implicated in proton pumping nor have they been experimentally established as electrogenic. The copper-A-dependent Nor from Bacillus azotoformans uses cytochrome c₅₅₁ as electron donor but lacks menaquinol activity, in contrast to our earlier report (Suharti et al., 2001). Employing reduced phenazine ethosulfate (PESH) as electron donor, the main NO reduction pathway catalyzed by Cu(A)Nor reconstituted in liposomes involves transmembrane cycling of the PES radical. We show that Cu(A)Nor reconstituted in liposomes generates a proton electrochemical gradient across the membrane similar in magnitude to cytochrome aa₃, highlighting that bacilli using Cu(A)Nor can exploit NO reduction for increased cellular ATP production compared to organisms using cNor. PMID:26149211

  13. Chaperone properties of Escherichia coli thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Renée; Malki, Abderrahim; Holmgren, Arne; Richarme, Gilbert

    2003-01-01

    Thioredoxin, thioredoxin reductase and NADPH form the thioredoxin system and are the major cellular protein disulphide reductase. We report here that Escherichia coli thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase interact with unfolded and denatured proteins, in a manner similar to that of molecular chaperones that are involved in protein folding and protein renaturation after stress. Thioredoxin and/or thioredoxin reductase promote the functional folding of citrate synthase and alpha-glucosidase after urea denaturation. They also promote the functional folding of the bacterial galactose receptor, a protein without any cysteines. Furthermore, redox cycling of thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase in the presence of NADPH and cystine stimulates the renaturation of the galactose receptor, suggesting that the thioredoxin system functions like a redox-powered chaperone machine. Thioredoxin reductase prevents the aggregation of citrate synthase under heat-shock conditions. It forms complexes that are more stable than those formed by thioredoxin with several unfolded proteins such as reduced carboxymethyl alpha-lactalbumin and unfolded bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor. These results suggest that the thioredoxin system, in addition to its protein disulphide isomerase activity possesses chaperone-like properties, and that its thioredoxin reductase component plays a major role in this function. PMID:12549977

  14. Comparative anatomy of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Jez, J M; Bennett, M J; Schlegel, B P; Lewis, M; Penning, T M

    1997-01-01

    The aldo-keto reductases metabolize a wide range of substrates and are potential drug targets. This protein superfamily includes aldose reductases, aldehyde reductases, hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases and dihydrodiol dehydrogenases. By combining multiple sequence alignments with known three-dimensional structures and the results of site-directed mutagenesis studies, we have developed a structure/function analysis of this superfamily. Our studies suggest that the (alpha/beta)8-barrel fold provides a common scaffold for an NAD(P)(H)-dependent catalytic activity, with substrate specificity determined by variation of loops on the C-terminal side of the barrel. All the aldo-keto reductases are dependent on nicotinamide cofactors for catalysis and retain a similar cofactor binding site, even among proteins with less than 30% amino acid sequence identity. Likewise, the aldo-keto reductase active site is highly conserved. However, our alignments indicate that variation ofa single residue in the active site may alter the reaction mechanism from carbonyl oxidoreduction to carbon-carbon double-bond reduction, as in the 3-oxo-5beta-steroid 4-dehydrogenases (Delta4-3-ketosteroid 5beta-reductases) of the superfamily. Comparison of the proposed substrate binding pocket suggests residues 54 and 118, near the active site, as possible discriminators between sugar and steroid substrates. In addition, sequence alignment and subsequent homology modelling of mouse liver 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and rat ovary 20alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase indicate that three loops on the C-terminal side of the barrel play potential roles in determining the positional and stereo-specificity of the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases. Finally, we propose that the aldo-keto reductase superfamily may represent an example of divergent evolution from an ancestral multifunctional oxidoreductase and an example of convergent evolution to the same active-site constellation as the short

  15. Reaction mechanism and regulation of mammalian thioredoxin/glutathione reductase.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qi-An; Su, Dan; Novoselov, Sergey V; Carlson, Bradley A; Hatfield, Dolph L; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2005-11-01

    Thioredoxin/glutathione reductase (TGR) is a recently discovered member of the selenoprotein thioredoxin reductase family in mammals. In contrast to two other mammalian thioredoxin reductases, it contains an N-terminal glutaredoxin domain and exhibits a wide spectrum of enzyme activities. To elucidate the reaction mechanism and regulation of TGR, we prepared a recombinant mouse TGR in the selenoprotein form as well as various mutants and individual domains of this enzyme. Using these proteins, we showed that the glutaredoxin and thioredoxin reductase domains of TGR could independently catalyze reactions normally associated with each domain. The glutaredoxin domain is a monothiol glutaredoxin containing a CxxS motif at the active site, which could receive electrons from either the thioredoxin reductase domain of TGR or thioredoxin reductase 1. We also found that the C-terminal penultimate selenocysteine was required for transfer of reducing equivalents from the thiol/disulfide active site of TGR to the glutaredoxin domain. Thus, the physiologically relevant NADPH-dependent activities of TGR were dependent on this residue. In addition, we examined the effects of selenium levels in the diet and perturbations in selenocysteine tRNA function on TGR biosynthesis and found that expression of this protein was regulated by both selenium and tRNA status in liver, but was more resistant to this regulation in testes. PMID:16262253

  16. Marked differences in drug-induced methemoglobinemia in sheep are not due to RBC glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, reduced glutathione, or methemoglobin reductase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, D.G.; Guertler, A.T.; Lagutchik, M.S.; Woodard, C.L.; Leonard, D.A.

    1993-05-13

    Benzocaine is a commonly used topical anesthetic that is structurally similar to current candidates for cyanide prophylaxis. Benzocaine induces profound methemoglobinemia in some sheep but not others. After topical benzocaine administration certain sheep respond to form MHb (elevated MHb 16-50% after a 56-280 mg dose, a 2-10 second spray with benzocine), while other phenotypically similar sheep fail to significantly form MHb (less than a 2% increase from baseline). Deficiencies in Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD), reduced glutathione (GSH), and MHb reductase increase the susceptibility to methemoglobinemia in man and animals. Sheep are used as a model for G-6-PD deficiency in man, and differences in this enzyme level could cause the variable response seen in these sheep. Similarly, differences in GSH and MHb reductase could be responsible for the observed differences in MHb formation.

  17. Human type 3 5α-reductase is expressed in peripheral tissues at higher levels than types 1 and 2 and its activity is potently inhibited by finasteride and dutasteride.

    PubMed

    Yamana, Kazutoshi; Labrie, Fernand; Luu-The, Van

    2010-08-01

    5α-Reductases are crucial enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of dihydrotestosterone, the most potent natural androgen. To date, three types of 5α-reductases, chronologically named types 1, 2 and 3 5α-reductases (SRD5a-1, 2 and 3) have been described. In the present paper, we characterized the activity and compared the mRNA expression levels of SRD5a-3 with those of SRD5a-1 and 2 in various human tissues, and determined its sensitivity to finasteride and dutasteride. We have established HEK-293 cell line that stably expressed SRD5a-3 for studying its activity and the inhibitory effect of finasteride, using [14C]labeled steroids. mRNA expression levels were quantified using real-time PCR in many male and female human tissues including the prostate, adipose tissue, mammary gland, as well as breast and prostate cancer cell lines. Incubation of HEK-SRD5a-3 cells with [14C]4-androstenedione and [14C]testosterone allowed us to show that SRD5a-3 can catalyze very efficiently both substrates 4-androstenedione and testosterone into 5α-androstanedione and dihydrotestosterone, respectively. We observed that the affinity of the enzyme for 4-androstenedione is higher than for testosterone. The activity of SRD5a-3 and SRD5a-2 are similarly sensitive to finasteride, whereas dutasteride is a much more potent inhibitor of SRD5a-3 than SRD5a-2. Tissue distribution analysis shows that SRD5a-3 mRNA expression levels are higher than those of SRD5a-1 and SRD5a-2 in 20 analyzed tissues. In particular, it is highly expressed in the skin, brain, mammary gland and breast cancer cell lines, thus suggesting that SRD5a-3 could play an important role in the production of androgens in these and other peripheral tissues. PMID:25961201

  18. A Model for the Active-Site Formation Process in DMSO Reductase Family Molybdenum Enzymes Involving Oxido-Alcoholato and Oxido-Thiolato Molybdenum(VI) Core Structures.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Hideki; Sato, Masanori; Asano, Kaori; Suzuki, Takeyuki; Mieda, Kaoru; Ogura, Takashi; Matsumoto, Takashi; Giles, Logan J; Pokhrel, Amrit; Kirk, Martin L; Itoh, Shinobu

    2016-02-15

    New bis(ene-1,2-dithiolato)-oxido-alcoholato molybdenum(VI) and -oxido-thiolato molybdenum(VI) anionic complexes, denoted as [Mo(VI)O(ER)L2](-) (E = O, S; L = dimethoxycarboxylate-1,2-ethylenedithiolate), were obtained from the reaction of the corresponding dioxido-molybdenum(VI) precursor complex with either an alcohol or a thiol in the presence of an organic acid (e.g., 10-camphorsulfonic acid) at low temperature. The [Mo(VI)O(ER)L2](-) complexes were isolated and characterized, and the structure of [Mo(VI)O(OEt)L2](-) was determined by X-ray crystallography. The Mo(VI) center in [Mo(VI)O(OEt)L2](-) exhibits a distorted octahedral geometry with the two ene-1,2-dithiolate ligands being symmetry inequivalent. The computed structure of [Mo(VI)O(SR)L2](-) is essentially identical to that of [Mo(VI)O(OR)L2](-). The electronic structures of the resulting molybdenum(VI) complexes were evaluated using electronic absorption spectroscopy and bonding calculations. The nature of the distorted O(h) geometry in these [Mo(VI)O(EEt)L2](-) complexes results in a lowest unoccupied molecular orbital wave function that possesses strong π* interactions between the Mo(d(xy)) orbital and the cis S(p(z)) orbital localized on one sulfur donor from a single ene-1,2-dithiolate ligand. The presence of a covalent Mo-S(dithiolene) bonding interaction in these monooxido Mo(VI) compounds contributes to their low-energy ligand-to-metal charge transfer transitions. A second important d-p π bonding interaction derives from the ∼180° O(oxo)-Mo-E-C dihedral angle involving the alcoholate and thiolate donors, and this contributes to ancillary ligand contributions to the electronic structure of these species. The formation of [Mo(VI)O(OEt)L2](-) and [Mo(VI)O(SEt)L2](-) from the dioxidomolybdenum(VI) precursor may be regarded as a model for the active-site formation process that occurs in the dimethyl sulfoxide reductase family of pyranopterin molybdenum enzymes. PMID:26816115

  19. Expression of bacterial mercuric ion reductase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Rensing, C; Kües, U; Stahl, U; Nies, D H; Friedrich, B

    1992-01-01

    The gene merA coding for bacterial mercuric ion reductase was cloned under the control of the yeast promoter for alcohol dehydrogenase I in the yeast-Escherichia coli shuttle plasmid pADH040-2 and transformed into Saccharomyces cerevisiae AH22. The resulting transformant harbored stable copies of the merA-containing hybrid plasmid, displayed a fivefold increase in the MIC of mercuric chloride, and synthesized mercuric ion reductase activity. Images PMID:1735719

  20. Characterization of erythrose reductases from filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Birgit; Mach, Robert L; Mach-Aigner, Astrid R

    2013-01-01

    Proteins with putative erythrose reductase activity have been identified in the filamentous fungi Trichoderma reesei, Aspergillus niger, and Fusarium graminearum by in silico analysis. The proteins found in T. reesei and A. niger had earlier been characterized as glycerol dehydrogenase and aldehyde reductase, respectively. Corresponding genes from all three fungi were cloned, heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified. Subsequently, they were used to establish optimal enzyme assay conditions. All three enzymes strictly require NADPH as cofactor, whereas with NADH no activity could be observed. The enzymatic characterization of the three enzymes using ten substrates revealed high substrate specificity and activity with D-erythrose and D-threose. The enzymes from T. reesei and A. niger herein showed comparable activities, whereas the one from F. graminearum reached only about a tenth of it for all tested substrates. In order to proof in vivo the proposed enzyme function, we overexpressed the erythrose reductase-encoding gene in T. reesei. An increased production of erythritol by the recombinant strain compared to the parental strain could be detected. PMID:23924507

  1. Structure of the Molybdenum Site of EEcherichia Coli Trimethylamine N-Oxide Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L.; Nelson, K.Johnson; Rajagopalan, K.V.; George, G.N.

    2009-05-28

    We report a structural characterization of the molybdenum site of recombinant Escherichia coli trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) reductase using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The enzyme active site shows considerable similarity to that of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) reductase, in that, like DMSO reductase, the TMAO reductase active site can exist in multiple forms. Examination of the published crystal structure of TMAO oxidase from Shewanella massilia indicates that the postulated Mo coordination structure is chemically impossible. The presence of multiple active site structures provides a potential explanation for the anomalous features reported from the crystal structure.

  2. Regulation of the Neurospora crassa assimilatory nitrate reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Ketchum, P A; Zeeb, D D; Owens, M S

    1977-01-01

    Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-nitrate reductase from Neurospora crassa was purified and found to be stimulated by certain amino acids, citrate, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Stimulation by citrate and the amino acids was dependent upon the prior removal of EDTA from the enzyme preparations, since low quantities of EDTA resulted in maximal stimulation. Removal of EDTA from enzyme preparations by dialysis against Chelex-containing buffer resulted in a loss of nitrate reductase activity. Addition of alanine, arginine, glycine, glutamine, glutamate, histidine, tryptophan, and citrate restored and stimulated nitrate reductase activity from 29- to 46-fold. The amino acids tested altered the Km of NADPH-nitrate reductase for NADPH but did not significantly change that for nitrate. The Km of nitrate reductase for NADPH increased with increasing concentrations of histidine but decreased with increasing concentrations of glutamine. Amino acid modulation of NADPH-nitrate reductase activity is discussed in relation to the conservation of energy (NADPH) by Neurospora when nitrate is the nitrogen source. PMID:19423

  3. Aqueous extracts of selenium-fertilized broccoli increase selenoprotein activity and inhibit DNA single-strand breaks, but decrease the activity of quinone reductase in Hepa 1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Keck, Anna-Sigrid; Finley, John W

    2006-05-01

    Depending on growth conditions, broccoli may be enriched in the isothiocyanate sulforaphane and/or the mineral selenium (Se); both compounds may play an important role in the reduction of intracellular oxidative stress and chronic disease prevention. Sulforaphane up-regulates transcription of Phase II detoxification proteins (e.g. quinone reductase [QR]), whereas Se is needed for the production of thioredoxin reductase (TR) and glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx1), both of which exhibit antioxidant activity. The objective of the present study was to determine whether the fertilization of broccoli with Se increases the antioxidant ability of broccoli. Hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA single-strand breaks (measured by single cell electrophoresis, Comet assay) and activity of antioxidant enzymes (GPx, TR and QR) were measured in mouse hepatoma cells (Hepa 1c1c7 cells) treated with purified sulforaphane, sodium selenite or extracts of selenized broccoli. When supplied separately as chemically pure substances, sodium selenite was more effective than sulforaphane for reduction of single-strand breaks. Se-fertilized broccoli extracts were the most effective for reduction of DNA single-strand breaks, and extracts that contained 0.71 microM Se and 0.08 microM sulforaphane inhibited 94% of DNA single-strand breaks. A significant positive association (r = 0.81, p = 0.009) between GPx1 activity and inhibition of DNA single-strand breaks as well as a 24h lag time between addition of Se, sulforaphane or broccoli extract and inhibition of single-strand breaks suggests that some of the antioxidant protection is mediated through selenoproteins. Conversely, fertilization of broccoli with Se decreased the ability of broccoli extract to induce QR activity. These results demonstrate that Se and sulforaphane, alone or as a component of broccoli, may help decrease oxidative stress. They further suggest that Se is the most important for decreasing oxidative stress, but maximizing the Se content

  4. Aldose and aldehyde reductases : structure-function studies on the coenzyme and inhibitor-binding sites.

    SciTech Connect

    El-Kabbani, O.; Old, S. E.; Ginell, S. L.; Carper, D. A.; Biosciences Division; Monash Univ.; NIH

    1999-09-03

    PURPOSE: To identify the structural features responsible for the differences in coenzyme and inhibitor specificities of aldose and aldehyde reductases. METHODS: The crystal structure of porcine aldehyde reductase in complex with NADPH and the aldose reductase inhibitor sorbinil was determined. The contribution of each amino acid lining the coenzyme-binding site to the binding of NADPH was calculated using the Discover package. In human aldose reductase, the role of the non-conserved Pro 216 (Ser in aldehyde reductase) in the binding of coenzyme was examined by site-directed mutagenesis. RESULTS: Sorbinil binds to the active site of aldehyde reductase and is hydrogen-bonded to Trp 22, Tyr 50, His 113, and the non-conserved Arg 312. Unlike tolrestat, the binding of sorbinil does not induce a change in the side chain conformation of Arg 312. Mutation of Pro 216 to Ser in aldose reductase makes the binding of coenzyme more similar to that of aldehyde reductase. CONCLUSIONS: The participation of non-conserved active site residues in the binding of inhibitors and the differences in the structural changes required for the binding to occur are responsible for the differences in the potency of inhibition of aldose and aldehyde reductases. We report that the non-conserved Pro 216 in aldose reductase contributes to the tight binding of NADPH.

  5. Structure and function of NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase and nitric oxide synthase reductase domain

    SciTech Connect

    Iyanagi, Takashi . E-mail: iyanagi@spring8.or.jp

    2005-12-09

    NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) reductase domains are members of the FAD-FMN family of proteins. The FAD accepts two reducing equivalents from NADPH (dehydrogenase flavin) and FMN acts as a one-electron carrier (flavodoxin-type flavin) for the transfer from NADPH to the heme protein, in which the FMNH {sup {center_dot}}/FMNH{sub 2} couple donates electrons to cytochrome P450 at constant oxidation-reduction potential. Although the interflavin electron transfer between FAD and FMN is not strictly regulated in CPR, electron transfer is activated in neuronal NOS reductase domain upon binding calmodulin (CaM), in which the CaM-bound activated form can function by a similar mechanism to that of CPR. The oxygenated form and spin state of substrate-bound cytochrome P450 in perfused rat liver are also discussed in terms of stepwise one-electron transfer from CPR. This review provides a historical perspective of the microsomal mixed-function oxidases including CPR and P450. In addition, a new model for the redox-linked conformational changes during the catalytic cycle for both CPR and NOS reductase domain is also discussed.

  6. 17 beta-(N-tert-butylcarbamoyl)-4-aza-5 alpha-androstan-1-en-3-one is an active site-directed slow time-dependent inhibitor of human steroid 5 alpha-reductase 1.

    PubMed

    Tian, G; Stuart, J D; Moss, M L; Domanico, P L; Bramson, H N; Patel, I R; Kadwell, S H; Overton, L K; Kost, T A; Mook, R A

    1994-03-01

    17 beta-(N-tert-butylcarbamoyl)-4-aza-5 alpha-androstan-1-en-3-one (finasteride), which has been approved for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia, is shown here to be a slow time-dependent inhibitor of human steroid 5 alpha-reductase isozyme 1. This inhibition is characterized by an initial, fast step where the inhibitor binds to the enzyme followed by a slow step that leads to a final enzyme-inhibitor complex (EI*). No recovery of activity from this EI* complex was observed after dialysis for 3 days. The formation of EI* is diminished in the presence of a competitive, reversible inhibitor, indicating that the inhibition is active site-directed. At 37 degrees C and pH 7.0, the rate constant for the second, slow inhibition step, k3, is (1.40 +/- 0.04) x 10(-3) s-1 and the pseudo-bimolecular rate constant, k3/Ki, is (4.0 +/- 0.3) x 10(3) M-1 s-1. This latter rate constant is less than the value of 2.7 x 10(5) M-1 s-1 determined for the inhibition of 5 alpha-reductase 2 by finasteride [Faller, B., Farley, D., & Nick, H. (1993) Biochemistry 32, 5705-5710].(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8117686

  7. Differential Light Induction of Nitrate Reductases in Greening and Photobleached Soybean Seedlings 1

    PubMed Central

    Kakefuda, Genichi; Duke, Stanley H.; Duke, Stephen O.

    1983-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) seeds were imbibed and germinated with or without NO3−, tungstate, and norflurazon (San 9789). Norflurazon is a herbicide which causes photobleaching of chlorophyll by inhibiting carotenoid synthesis and which impairs normal chloroplast development. After 3 days in the dark, seedlings were placed in white light to induce extractable nitrate reductase activity. The induction of maximal nitrate reductase activity in greening cotyledons did not require NO3− and was not inhibited by tungstate. Induction of nitrate reductase activity in norflurazon-treated cotyledons had an absolute requirement for NO3− and was completely inhibited by tungstate. Nitrate was not detected in seeds or seedlings which had not been treated with NO3−. The optimum pH for cotyledon nitrate reductase activity from norflurazon-treated seedlings was at pH 7.5, and near that for root nitrate reductase activity, whereas the optimum pH for nitrate reductase activity from greening cotyledons was pH 6.5. Induction of root nitrate reductase activity was also inhibited by tungstate and was dependent on the presence of NO3−, further indicating that the isoform of nitrate reductase induced in norflurazon-treated cotyledons is the same or similar to that found in roots. Nitrate reductases with and without a NO3− requirement for light induction appear to be present in developing leaves. In vivo kinetics (light induction and dark decay rates) and in vitro kinetics (Arrhenius energies of activation and NADH:NADPH specificities) of nitrate reductases with and without a NO3− requirement for induction were quite different. Km values for NO3− were identical for both nitrate reductases. PMID:16663185

  8. Purification and characterization of assimilatory nitrite reductase from Candida utilis.

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, S; Shaila, M S; Rao, G R

    1996-01-01

    Nitrate assimilation in many plants, algae, yeasts and bacteria is mediated by two enzymes, nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.2) and nitrite reductase (EC 1.7.7.1). They catalyse the stepwise reduction of nitrate to nitrite and nitrite to ammonia respectively. The nitrite reductase from an industrially important yeast, Candida utilis, has been purified to homogeneity. Purified nitrite reductase is a heterodimer and the molecular masses of the two subunits are 58 and 66 kDa. The native enzyme exhibits a molecular mass of 126 kDa as analysed by gel filtration. The identify of the two subunits of nitrite reductase was confirmed by immunoblotting using antibody for Cucurbita pepo leaf nitrite reductase. The presence of two different sized transcripts coding for the two subunits was confirmed by (a) in vitro translation of mRNA from nitrate-induced C. utilis followed by immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translated products with heterologous nitrite reductase antibody and (b) Northern-blot analysis. The 66 kDa subunit is acidic in nature which is probably due to its phosphorylated status. The enzyme is stable over a range of temperatures. Both subunits can catalyse nitrite reduction, and the reconstituted enzyme, at a higher protein concentration, shows an activity similar to that of the purified enzyme. Each of these subunits has been shown to contain a few unique peptides in addition to a large number of common peptides. Reduced Methyl Viologen has been found to be as effective an electron donor as NADPH in the catalytic process, a phenomenon not commonly seen for nitrite reductases from other systems. PMID:8694757

  9. Purification and Characterization of Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase, 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase, and Glutathione Reductase from Rat Heart and Inhibition Effects of Furosemide, Digoxin, and Dopamine on the Enzymes Activities.

    PubMed

    Adem, Sevki; Ciftci, Mehmet

    2016-06-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate characterization and purification of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, and glutathione reductase from rat heart and the inhibitory effect of three drugs. The purification of the enzymes was performed using 2',5'-ADP sepharose 4B affinity material. The subunit and the natural molecular weights were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration. Biochemical characteristics such as the optimum temperature, pH, stable pH, and salt concentration were examined for each enzyme. Types of product inhibition and Ki values with Km and Vmax values of the substrates and coenzymes were determined. According to the obtained Ki and IC50 values, furosemide, digoxin, and dopamine showed inhibitory effect on the enzyme activities at low millimolar concentrations in vitro conditions. Dopamine inhibited the activity of these enzymes as competitive, whereas furosemide and digoxin inhibited the activity of the enzyme as noncompetitive. PMID:26820767

  10. An overview on 5alpha-reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Thareja, Suresh; Verma, Abhilasha; Bhardwaj, Tilak Raj; Kumar, Manoj

    2010-02-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the noncancerous proliferation of the prostate gland associated with benign prostatic obstruction and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) such as frequency, hesitancy, urgency, etc. Its prevalence increases with age affecting around 70% by the age of 70 years. High activity of 5alpha-reductase enzyme in humans results in excessive dihydrotestosterone levels in peripheral tissues and hence suppression of androgen action by 5alpha-reductase inhibitors is a logical treatment for BPH as they inhibit the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone. Finasteride (13) was the first steroidal 5alpha-reductase inhibitor approved by U.S. Food and Drug Administration (USFDA). In human it decreases the prostatic DHT level by 70-90% and reduces the prostatic size. Dutasteride (27) another related analogue has been approved in 2002. Unlike Finasteride, Dutasteride is a competitive inhibitor of both 5alpha-reductase type I and type II isozymes, reduced DHT levels >90% following 1 year of oral administration. A number of classes of non-steroidal inhibitors of 5alpha-reductase have also been synthesized generally by removing one or more rings from the azasteroidal structure or by an early non-steroidal lead (ONO-3805) (261). In this review all categories of inhibitors of 5alpha-reductase have been covered. PMID:19879888

  11. Substrate-dependent modulation of the enzymatic catalytic activity: reduction of nitrate, chlorate and perchlorate by respiratory nitrate reductase from Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus 617.

    PubMed

    Marangon, Jacopo; Paes de Sousa, Patrícia M; Moura, Isabel; Brondino, Carlos D; Moura, José J G; González, Pablo J

    2012-07-01

    The respiratory nitrate reductase complex (NarGHI) from Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus 617 (Mh, formerly Pseudomonas nautica 617) catalyzes the reduction of nitrate to nitrite. This reaction is the first step of the denitrification pathway and is coupled to the quinone pool oxidation and proton translocation to the periplasm, which generates the proton motive force needed for ATP synthesis. The Mh NarGH water-soluble heterodimer has been purified and the kinetic and redox properties have been studied through in-solution enzyme kinetics, protein film voltammetry and spectropotentiometric redox titration. The kinetic parameters of Mh NarGH toward substrates and inhibitors are consistent with those reported for other respiratory nitrate reductases. Protein film voltammetry showed that at least two catalytically distinct forms of the enzyme, which depend on the applied potential, are responsible for substrate reduction. These two forms are affected differentially by the oxidizing substrate, as well as by pH and inhibitors. A new model for the potential dependence of the catalytic efficiency of Nars is proposed. PMID:22561116

  12. Redox activation of Fe(III)-thiosemicarbazones and Fe(III)-bleomycin by thioredoxin reductase: specificity of enzymatic redox centers and analysis of reactive species formation by ESR spin trapping

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Judith M.; Cheng, Qing; Antholine, William E.; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Filipovska, Aleksandra; Arnér, ArnerElias S.J.; Myers, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Thiosemicarbazones such as triapine (Tp) and Dp44mT are tridentate iron (Fe) chelators that have well-documented anti-neoplastic activity. While Fe-thiosemicarbazones can undergo redox-cycling to generate reactive species that may have important roles in their cytotoxicity, there is only limited insight into specific cellular agents that can rapidly reduce Fe(III)-thiosemicarbazones and thereby promote their redox activity. Here we report that thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR1) and glutathione reductase (GR) have this activity, and that there is considerable specificity to the interactions between specific redox centers in these enzymes and different Fe(III) complexes. Site-directed variants of TrxR1 demonstrate that the selenocysteine (Sec) of the enzyme is not required, whereas the C59 residue and the flavin have important roles. While TrxR1 and GR have analogous C59/flavin motifs, TrxR is considerably faster than GR. For both enzymes, Fe(III)(Tp)2 is reduced faster than Fe(III)(Dp44mT)2. This reduction promotes redox cycling and the generation of hydroxyl radical (HO•) in a peroxide-dependent manner, even with low μM levels of Fe(Tp)2. TrxR also reduces Fe(III)-bleomycin and this activity is Sec-dependent. TrxR cannot reduce Fe(III)-EDTA at significant rates. Our findings are the first to demonstrate pro-oxidant reductive activation of Fe(III)-based antitumor thiosemicarbazones by interactions with specific enzyme species. The marked elevation of TrxR in many tumors could contribute to the selective tumor toxicity of these drugs by enhancing the redox activation of Fe(III)-thiosemicarbazones and the generation of reactive oxygen species such as HO• PMID:23485585

  13. A flavone from Manilkara indica as a specific inhibitor against aldose reductase in vitro.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Ryosuke; Ishizu, Takashi; Yagi, Akira

    2003-09-01

    Isoaffinetin (5,7,3',4',5'-pentahydroxyflavone-6-C-glucoside) was isolated from Manilkara indica as a potent inhibitor of lens aldose reductase by bioassay-directed fractionation. This C-glucosyl flavone showed specific inhibition against aldose reductases (rat lens, porcine lens and recombinant human) with no inhibition against aldehyde reductase and NADH oxidase. Kinetic analysis showed that isoaffinetin exhibited uncompetitive inhibition against both dl-glyceraldehyde and NADPH. A structure-activity relationship study revealed that the increasing number of hydroxy groups in the B-ring contributes to the increase in aldose reductase inhibition by C-glucosyl flavones. PMID:14598214

  14. cDNA cloning, expression and activity of a second human aflatoxin B1-metabolizing member of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily, AKR7A3.

    PubMed

    Knight, L P; Primiano, T; Groopman, J D; Kensler, T W; Sutter, T R

    1999-07-01

    The aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) aldehyde metabolite of AFB1 may contribute to the cytotoxicity of this hepatocarcinogen via protein adduction. Aflatoxin B1 aldehyde reductases, specifically the NADPH-dependent aldo-keto reductases of rat (AKR7A1) and human (AKR7A2), are known to metabolize the AFB1 dihydrodiol by forming AFB1 dialcohol. Using a rat AKR7A1 cDNA, we isolated and characterized a distinct aldo-keto reductase (AKR7A3) from an adult human liver cDNA library. The deduced amino acid sequence of AKR7A3 shares 80 and 88% identity with rat AKR7A1 and human AKR7A2, respectively. Recombinant rat AKR7A1 and human AKR7A3 were expressed and purified from Escherichia coli as hexa-histidine tagged fusion proteins. These proteins catalyzed the reduction of several model carbonyl-containing substrates. The NADPH-dependent formation of AFB1 dialcohol by recombinant human AKR7A3 was confirmed by liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Rabbit polyclonal antibodies produced using recombinant rat AKR7A1 protein were shown to detect nanogram amounts of rat and human AKR7A protein. The amount of AKR7A-related protein in hepatic cytosols of 1, 2-dithiole-3-thione-treated rats was 18-fold greater than in cytosols from untreated animals. These antibodies detected AKR7A-related protein in normal human liver samples ranging from 0.3 to 0.8 microg/mg cytosolic protein. Northern blot analysis showed varying levels of expression of AKR7A RNA in human liver and in several extrahepatic tissues, with relatively high levels in the stomach, pancreas, kidney and liver. Based on the kinetic parameters determined using recombinant human AKR7A3 and AFB1 dihydrodiol at pH 7.4, the catalytic efficiency of this reaction (k2/K, per M/s) equals or exceeds those reported for other enzymes, for example cytochrome P450s and glutathione S-transferases, known to metabolize AFB1 in vivo. These findings indicate that, depending on the extent of AFB1 dihydrodiol formation, AKR

  15. Biliverdin reductase: a target for cancer therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Peter E. M.; Miralem, Tihomir; Maines, Mahin D.

    2015-01-01

    Biliverdin reductase (BVR) is a multifunctional protein that is the primary source of the potent antioxidant, bilirubin. BVR regulates activities/functions in the insulin/IGF-1/IRK/PI3K/MAPK pathways. Activation of certain kinases in these pathways is/are hallmark(s) of cancerous cells. The protein is a scaffold/bridge and intracellular transporter of kinases that regulate growth and proliferation of cells, including PKCs, ERK and Akt, and their targets including NF-κB, Elk1, HO-1, and iNOS. The scaffold and transport functions enable activated BVR to relocate from the cytosol to the nucleus or to the plasma membrane, depending on the activating stimulus. This enables the reductase to function in diverse signaling pathways. And, its expression at the transcript and protein levels are increased in human tumors and the infiltrating T-cells, monocytes and circulating lymphocytes, as well as the circulating and infiltrating macrophages. These functions suggest that the cytoprotective role of BVR may be permissive for cancer/tumor growth. In this review, we summarize the recent developments that define the pro-growth activities of BVR, particularly with respect to its input into the MAPK signaling pathway and present evidence that BVR-based peptides inhibit activation of protein kinases, including MEK, PKCδ, and ERK as well as downstream targets including Elk1 and iNOS, and thus offers a credible novel approach to reduce cancer cell proliferation. PMID:26089799

  16. Application of photocatalytic cadmium sulfide nanoparticles to detection of enzymatic activities of glucose oxidase and glutathione reductase using oxidation of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine.

    PubMed

    Grinyte, Ruta; Garai-Ibabe, Gaizka; Saa, Laura; Pavlov, Valeri

    2015-06-30

    It was found out that semiconductor CdS nanoparticles (NPs) are able to catalyze photooxidation of the well known chromogenic enzymatic substrate 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) by oxygen. The photocatalytical oxidation of TMB does not require hydrogen peroxide and its rate is directly proportional to the quantity of CdS NPs produced in situ through the interaction of Cd(2+) and S(2-) ions in an aqueous medium. This phenomenon was applied to development of colorimetric sensitive assays for glucose oxidase and glutathione reductase based on enzymatic generation of CdS NPs acting as light-powered catalysts. Sensitivity of the developed chromogenic assays was of the same order of magnitude or even better than that of relevant fluorogenic assays. The present approach opens the possibility for the design of simple and sensitive colorimetric assays for a number of enzymes using inexpensive and available TMB as a universal chromogenic compound. PMID:26041529

  17. Interplay between DtxR and nitric oxide reductase activities: a functional genomics approach indicating involvement of homologous protein domains in bacterial pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shwetank; Bansal, Saurabh; Deb, Jahar K; Kundu, Bishwajit

    2007-01-01

    Summary Corynebacterium diphtheriae pathogenesis depends on the production of toxin (Dtx), which in turn depends on a micromolar concentration of nitric oxide (NO)-mediated deactivation of DtxR (an iron-dependent regulator). Inside a host, the pathogen often encounters excess of NO that acts as an oxidative toxicant. Therefore a critical level of NO needs to be maintained by the pathogen. This necessitates reduction of excess NO by the presence of a reductase, namely nitric oxide reductase (NOR). Similar to the expression of toxin, the expression of NOR is possibly regulated by another regulator NorR, as has been found in other gram positive and gram-negative bacteria. Therefore, a correlation between concentration of NO on the deactivation of DtxR and transactivation of NorR becomes apparent. However, unlike many other pathogens the presence of NOR and NorR in C. diphtheriae has not been established. We applied a combination of bioinformatics and comparative genomics approach on C. diphtheriae genome using Escherichia coli as a model organism to find some structural and functional homologoues for the two genes in question. The various domain characteristics for the two proteins (NOR and NorR) have been taken into account in this analysis. Through extensive genome and proteome search we have been able to identify key regulatory genes, which are possibly involved in coordination and control of NO stress in C. diphtheriae. Our finding will progress the understanding of the complete regulatory mechanism for evasion and maintenance of pathogenesis by this and other pathogenic organisms. PMID:17877539

  18. Isolated menthone reductase and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney B; Davis, Edward M; Ringer, Kerry L

    2013-04-23

    The present invention provides isolated menthone reductase proteins, isolated nucleic acid molecules encoding menthone reductase proteins, methods for expressing and isolating menthone reductase proteins, and transgenic plants expressing elevated levels of menthone reductase protein.

  19. Purification and partial characterization of an aldo-keto reductase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, A; van Zyl, C; van Tonder, A; Prior, B A

    1995-01-01

    A cytosolic aldo-keto reductase was purified from Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 26602 to homogeneity by affinity chromatography, chromatofocusing, and hydroxylapatite chromatography. The relative molecular weights of the aldo-keto reductase as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and size exclusion chromatography were 36,800 and 35,000, respectively, indicating that the enzyme is monomeric. Amino acid composition and N-terminal sequence analysis revealed that the enzyme is closely related to the aldose reductases of xylose-fermenting yeasts and mammalian tissues. The enzyme was apparently immunologically unrelated to the aldose reductases of other xylose-fermenting yeasts. The aldo-keto reductase is NADPH specific and catalyzes the reduction of a variety of aldehydes. The best substrate for the enzyme is the aromatic aldehyde p-nitrobenzaldehyde (Km = 46 microM; kcat/Km = 52,100 s-1 M-1), whereas among the aldoses, DL-glyceraldehyde was the preferred substrate (Km = 1.44 mM; kcat/Km = 1,790 s-1 M-1). The enzyme failed to catalyze the reduction of menadione and p-benzoquinone, substrates for carbonyl reductase. The enzyme was inhibited only slightly by 2 mM sodium valproate and was activated by pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. The optimum pH of the enzyme is 5. These data indicate that the S. cerevisiae aldo-keto reductase is a monomeric NADPH-specific reductase with strong similarities to the aldose reductases. PMID:7747971

  20. Evidence for an Inactivating System of Nitrate Reductase in Hordeum vulgare L. during Darkness That Requires Protein Synthesis 1

    PubMed Central

    Travis, R. L.; Jordan, W. R.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1969-01-01

    The disappearance of nitrate reductase activity in leaves of Hordeum vulgare L. during darkness was inhibited by cycloheximide, actinomycin D, and low temperature. Thus, protein synthesis was probably required for the disappearance of nitrate reductase in the dark. Since chloramphenicol did not affect the rate of loss of activity, the degradation or inactivation apparently required protein synthesis by the cytoplasmic ribosomal system. Consistent with this observation, nitrate reductase is also reportedly located in the cytoplasm. Thus, the amount of nitrate reductase activity present in leaves of barley may be controlled by a balance between activating and inactivating systems. PMID:16657182

  1. Genetics Home Reference: 5-alpha reductase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... gene provides instructions for making an enzyme called steroid 5-alpha reductase 2. This enzyme is involved ... external genitalia. Mutations in the SRD5A2 gene prevent steroid 5-alpha reductase 2 from effectively converting testosterone ...

  2. Synthesis and in vitro activity of some epimeric 20 alpha-hydroxy, 20-oxime and aziridine pregnene derivatives as inhibitors of human 17 alpha-hydroxylase/C17,20-lyase and 5 alpha-reductase.

    PubMed

    Ling, Y Z; Li, J S; Kato, K; Liu, Y; Wang, X; Klus, G T; Marat, K; Nnane, I P; Brodie, A M

    1998-10-01

    Some epimeric 20-hydroxy, 20-oxime, 16 alpha, 17 alpha-, 17,20- and 20,21-aziridine derivatives of progesterone were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of human 17 alpha-hydroxylase/C17,20-lyase (P450(17) alpha) and 5 alpha-reductase (5 alpha-R). The reduction of 16-dehydropregenolone acetate (3a) was reinvestigated. NaBH4 in the presence of CeCl3 gave better stereo-selectivity for 20 beta-ol [20 alpha/20 beta-OH (4 alpha/4 beta) = 1/2.7] than LTBAH or the Meerwein-Pondroff method reported; reduction with Zn in HOAc formed exclusively 20 alpha-ol (4 alpha b). The 20 alpha- and 20 beta-hydroxy-4,16-pregnadien-3-one (9 alpha) and (9 beta) were synthesized from the alcohols 4 alpha b and 4 beta b. Several 20-oxime pregnadienes and 16 alpha, 17 alpha-, 17,20- and 20,21-aziridinyl-5-pregnene derivatives were also synthesized. LiAlH4 reduction of the 16-en-20-oxime (12b) yielded 20 (R)-(13a) and 20(S)-17 alpha,20-aziridine (13b) and 20(R)-17 beta,20-aziridine (14a). Several compounds inhibited the human P450(17) alpha with greater potency than ketoconzole. The 5 alpha-R enzyme assay showed that while (9 alpha) did not have any activity, (9 beta) and (3b) were potent 5 alpha-reductase (IC50 = 21 and 31 nM) inhibitors with activities similar to finasteride. The 20-oximes (17a) and (17b) were potent dual inhibitors for both 5 alpha-R (IC50 = 63 and 115 nM, compared to 33 nM for finasteride) and P450(17) alpha (IC50 = 43 and 25 nM, compared to 78 nM for ketoconazole). PMID:9839000

  3. Reduction of tetrathionate by mammalian thioredoxin reductase

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Vivek; Kudva, Avinash K.; Prabhu, K. Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Tetrathionate, a polythionate oxidation product of microbial hydrogen sulfide and reactive oxygen species from immune cells in the gut, serves as a terminal electron acceptor to confer growth advantage for Salmonella and other enterobacteria. Here we show that the rat liver selenoen-zyme thioredoxin reductase (Txnrd1; TR1) efficiently reduces tetrathionate in vitro. Furthermore, lysates of selenium-supplemented murine macrophages also displayed activity towards tetrathionate, while cells lacking TR1 were unable to reduce tetrathionate. These studies suggest that upregulation of TR1 expression, via selenium supplementation, may modulate the gut microbiome, particularly during inflammation, by regulating the levels of tetrathionate. PMID:26252619

  4. Flavodiiron Oxygen Reductase from Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Vera L.; Vicente, João B.; Pinto, Liliana; Romão, Célia V.; Frazão, Carlos; Sarti, Paolo; Giuffrè, Alessandro; Teixeira, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Flavodiiron proteins (FDPs) are a family of enzymes endowed with bona fide oxygen- and/or nitric-oxide reductase activity, although their substrate specificity determinants remain elusive. After a comprehensive comparison of available three-dimensional structures, particularly of FDPs with a clear preference toward either O2 or NO, two main differences were identified near the diiron active site, which led to the construction of site-directed mutants of Tyr271 and Lys53 in the oxygen reducing Entamoeba histolytica EhFdp1. The biochemical and biophysical properties of these mutants were studied by UV-visible and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies coupled to potentiometry. Their reactivity with O2 and NO was analyzed by stopped-flow absorption spectroscopy and amperometric methods. These mutations, whereas keeping the overall properties of the redox cofactors, resulted in increased NO reductase activity and faster inactivation of the enzyme in the reaction with O2, pointing to a role of the mutated residues in substrate selectivity. PMID:25151360

  5. Synthesis and biological activities of tricyclic conformationally restricted tetrahydropyrido annulated furo[2,3-d]pyrimidines as inhibitors of dihydrofolate reductases.

    PubMed

    Gangjee, A; Elzein, E; Queener, S F; McGuire, J J

    1998-04-23

    The synthesis of seven 2,4-diamino-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-7-substituted pyrido[4',3':4,5]furo[2,3-d]pyrimidines 1-6 are reported as nonclassical antifolate inhibitors of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and compound 7 as a classical antifolate inhibitor of tumor cells in culture. The compounds were designed as conformationally restricted analogues of trimetrexate. The synthesis was accomplished from the cyclocondensation of 3-bromo-4-piperidone with 2, 4-diamino-6-hydroxypyrimidine to afford regiospecifically 2, 4-diamino-5,6,7,8-tetrahydropyrido[4',3':4,5]furo[2, 3-d]pyrimidine-7-hydrobromide (16). This in turn was alkylated with the appropriate benzyl halide to afford the target compounds 1-6. The classical antifolate 7 utilized 4-(chloromethyl)benzoyl-l-glutamic acid diethyl ester (17) instead of the benzyl halide for alkylation, followed by saponification to afford 7. Compounds 1-6 showed moderate inhibitory potency against DHFR from Pneumocystis carinii, Toxoplasma gondii, Mycobacterium avium, and rat liver. The classical analogue 7 was 88-fold more potent against M. avium DHFR than against rat liver DHFR. The classical analogue was also inhibitory against the growth of tumor cells, CCRF-CEM, and FaDu, in culture. PMID:9554874

  6. Discovery of anti-cancer activity for benzo[1,2,4]triazin-7-ones: Very strong correlation to pleurotin and thioredoxin reductase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Martin; Coyle, Robert; Kavanagh, Paul; Berezin, Andrey A; Lo Re, Daniele; Zissimou, Georgia A; Koutentis, Panayiotis A; Carty, Michael P; Aldabbagh, Fawaz

    2016-08-15

    The thioredoxin (Trx)-thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) system plays a key role in maintaining the cellular redox balance with Trx being over-expressed in a number of cancers. Inhibition of TrxR is an important strategy for anti-cancer drug discovery. The natural product pleurotin is a well-known irreversible inhibitor of TrxR. The cytotoxicity data for benzo[1,2,4]triazin-7-ones showed very strong correlation (Pearson correlation coefficients ∼0.8) to pleurotin using National Cancer Institute COMPARE analysis. A new 3-CF3 substituted benzo[1,2,4]triazin-7-one gave submicromolar inhibition of TrxR, although the parent compound 1,3-diphenylbenzo[1,2,4]triazin-7-one was more cytotoxic against cancer cell lines. Benzo[1,2,4]triazin-7-ones exhibited different types of reversible inhibition of TrxR, and cyclic voltammetry showed characteristic quasi-reversible redox processes. Cell viability studies indicated strong dependence of cytotoxicity on substitution at the 6-position of the 1,3-diphenylbenzo[1,2,4]triazin-7-one ring. PMID:27290691

  7. Mutation for Nonsyndromic Mental Retardation in the trans-2-Enoyl-CoA Reductase TER Gene Involved in Fatty Acid Elongation Impairs the Enzyme Activity and Stability, Leading to Change in Sphingolipid Profile*

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Kensuke; Ohno, Yusuke; Sassa, Takayuki; Taguchi, Ryo; Çalışkan, Minal; Ober, Carole; Kihara, Akio

    2013-01-01

    Very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs, chain length >C20) exist in tissues throughout the body and are synthesized by repetition of the fatty acid (FA) elongation cycle composed of four successive enzymatic reactions. In mammals, the TER gene is the only gene encoding trans-2-enoyl-CoA reductase, which catalyzes the fourth reaction in the FA elongation cycle. The TER P182L mutation is the pathogenic mutation for nonsyndromic mental retardation. This mutation substitutes a leucine for a proline residue at amino acid 182 in the TER enzyme. Currently, the mechanism by which the TER P182L mutation causes nonsyndromic mental retardation is unknown. To understand the effect of this mutation on the TER enzyme and VLCFA synthesis, we have biochemically characterized the TER P182L mutant enzyme using yeast and mammalian cells transfected with the TER P182L mutant gene and analyzed the FA elongation cycle in the B-lymphoblastoid cell line with the homozygous TER P182L mutation (TERP182L/P182L B-lymphoblastoid cell line). We have found that TER P182L mutant enzyme exhibits reduced trans-2-enoyl-CoA reductase activity and protein stability, thereby impairing VLCFA synthesis and, in turn, altering the sphingolipid profile (i.e. decreased level of C24 sphingomyelin and C24 ceramide) in the TERP182L/P182L B-lymphoblastoid cell line. We have also found that in addition to the TER enzyme-catalyzed fourth reaction, the third reaction in the FA elongation cycle is affected by the TER P182L mutation. These findings provide new insight into the biochemical defects associated with this genetic mutation. PMID:24220030

  8. New steroidal 17β-carboxy derivatives present anti-5α-reductase activity and anti-proliferative effects in a human androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Cristina; Varela, Carla; Correia-da-Silva, Georgina; Tavares da Silva, Elisiário; Carvalho, Rui A; Costa, Saul C P; Cunha, Sara C; Fernandes, José O; Teixeira, Natércia; Roleira, Fernanda M F

    2013-11-01

    The androgens testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), besides playing an important role in prostate development and growth, are also responsible for the development and progression of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer. Therefore, the actions of these hormones can be antagonized by preventing the irreversible conversion of T into DHT by inhibiting 5α-reductase (5α-R). This has been a useful therapeutic approach for the referred diseases and can be achieved by using 5α-reductase inhibitors (RIs). Steroidal RIs, finasteride and dutasteride, are used in clinic for BPH treatment and were also proposed for chemoprevention of prostate cancer. Nevertheless, due to the increase in bone and muscle loss, impotency and occurrence of high-grade prostate tumours, it is important to seek for other potent and specific molecules with lower side effects. In the present work, we designed and synthesized steroids with the 3-keto-Δ(4) moiety in the A-ring, as in the 5α-R substrate T, and with carboxamide, carboxyester or carboxylic acid functions at the C-17β position. The inhibitory 5α-R activity, in human prostate microsomes, as well as the anti-proliferative effects of the most potent compounds, in a human androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell line (LNCaP cells), were investigated. Our results showed that steroids 3, 4 and 5 are good RIs, which suggest that C-17β lipophylic amides favour 5α-R inhibition. Moreover, these steroids induce a decrease in cell viability of stimulated LNCaP cells, in a 5α-R dependent-manner, similarly to finasteride. PMID:23933094

  9. Immunochemical characterization of NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase from Jerusalem artichoke and other higher plants.

    PubMed Central

    Benveniste, I; Lesot, A; Hasenfratz, M P; Durst, F

    1989-01-01

    Polyclonal antibodies were prepared against NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase purified from Jerusalem artichoke. These antibodies inhibited efficiently the NADPH-cytochrome c reductase activity of the purified enzyme, as well as of Jerusalem artichoke microsomes. Likewise, microsomal NADPH-dependent cytochrome P-450 mono-oxygenases (cinnamate and laurate hydroxylases) were efficiently inhibited. The antibodies were only slightly inhibitory toward microsomal NADH-cytochrome c reductase activity, but lowered NADH-dependent cytochrome P-450 mono-oxygenase activities. The Jerusalem artichoke NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase is characterized by its high Mr (82,000) as compared with the enzyme from animals (76,000-78,000). Western blot analysis revealed cross-reactivity of the Jerusalem artichoke reductase antibodies with microsomes from plants belonging to different families (monocotyledons and dicotyledons). All of the proteins recognized by the antibodies had an Mr of approx. 82,000. No cross-reaction was observed with microsomes from rat liver or Locusta migratoria midgut. The cross-reactivity generally paralleled well the inhibition of reductase activity: the enzyme from most higher plants tested was inhibited by the antibodies; whereas Gingko biloba, Euglena gracilis, yeast, rat liver and insect midgut activities were insensitive to the antibodies. These results point to structural differences, particularly at the active site, between the reductases from higher plants and the enzymes from phylogenetically distant plants and from animals. Images Fig. 5. PMID:2499315

  10. The SUD1 Gene Encodes a Putative E3 Ubiquitin Ligase and Is a Positive Regulator of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase Activity in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Doblas, Verónica G.; Amorim-Silva, Vítor; Posé, David; Rosado, Abel; Esteban, Alicia; Arró, Montserrat; Azevedo, Herlander; Bombarely, Aureliano; Borsani, Omar; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Ferrer, Albert; Tavares, Rui M.; Botella, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) enzyme catalyzes the major rate-limiting step of the mevalonic acid (MVA) pathway from which sterols and other isoprenoids are synthesized. In contrast with our extensive knowledge of the regulation of HMGR in yeast and animals, little is known about this process in plants. To identify regulatory components of the MVA pathway in plants, we performed a genetic screen for second-site suppressor mutations of the Arabidopsis thaliana highly drought-sensitive drought hypersensitive2 (dry2) mutant that shows decreased squalene epoxidase activity. We show that mutations in SUPPRESSOR OF DRY2 DEFECTS1 (SUD1) gene recover most developmental defects in dry2 through changes in HMGR activity. SUD1 encodes a putative E3 ubiquitin ligase that shows sequence and structural similarity to yeast Degradation of α factor (Doα10) and human TEB4, components of the endoplasmic reticulum–associated degradation C (ERAD-C) pathway. While in yeast and animals, the alternative ERAD-L/ERAD-M pathway regulates HMGR activity by controlling protein stability, SUD1 regulates HMGR activity without apparent changes in protein content. These results highlight similarities, as well as important mechanistic differences, among the components involved in HMGR regulation in plants, yeast, and animals. PMID:23404890

  11. Design and synthesis of phosphonoacetic acid (PPA) ester and amide bioisosters of ribofuranosylnucleoside diphosphates as potential ribonucleotide reductase inhibitors and evaluation of their enzyme inhibitory, cytostatic and antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Manfredini, Stefano; Solaroli, Nicola; Angusti, Angela; Nalin, Federico; Durini, Elisa; Vertuani, Silvia; Pricl, Sabrina; Ferrone, Marco; Spadari, Silvio; Focher, Federico; Verri, Annalisa; De Clercq, Erik; Balzarini, Jan

    2003-07-01

    Continuing our investigations on inhibitors of ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), the crucial enzyme that catalyses the reduction of ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides, we have now prepared and evaluated 5'-phosphonoacetic acid, amide and ester analogues of adenosine, uridine and cytidine with the aim to verify both substrate specificity and contribution to biological activity of diphosphate mimic moieties. A molecular modelling study has been conducted on the RNR R1 subunit, in order to verify the possible interaction of the proposed bioisosteric moieties. The study compounds were finally tested on the recombinant murine RNR showing a degree of inhibition that ranged from 350 microM for the UDP analogue 5'-deoxy-5'-N-(phosphon-acetyl)uridine sodium salt (amide) to 600 microM for the CDP analogue 5'-O-[(diethyl-phosphon)acetyl]cytidine (ester). None of the tested compounds displayed noteworthy cytostatic activity at 100-500 microM concentrations, whereas ADP analogue 5'-N-[(diethyl-phosphon) acetyl]adenosine (amide) and 5'-deoxy-5'-N-(phosphon-acetyl)adenosine sodium salt (amide) showed a moderate inhibitory activity (EC50: 48 microM) against HSV-2 and a modest inhibitory activity (EC50: 110 microM) against HIV-1, respectively. PMID:14582847

  12. Reduction of aliphatic nitroesters and N-nitramines by Enterobacter cloacae PB2 pentaerythritol tetranitrate reductase: quantitative structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Nivinskas, Henrikas; Sarlauskas, Jonas; Anusevicius, Zilvinas; Toogood, Helen S; Scrutton, Nigel S; Cenas, Narimantas

    2008-12-01

    Enterobacter cloacae PB2 NADPH:pentaerythritol tetranitrate reductase (PETNR) performs the biodegradation of explosive organic nitrate esters via their reductive denitration. In order to understand the enzyme substrate specificity, we have examined the reactions of PETNR with organic nitrates (n = 15) and their nitrogen analogues, N-nitramines (n = 4). The reactions of these compounds with PETNR were accompanied by the release of 1-2 mol of nitrite per mole of compound, but were not accompanied by their redox cycling and superoxide formation. The reduction rate constants (k(cat)/K(m)) of inositol hexanitrate, diglycerol tetranitrate, erythritol tetranitrate, mannitol hexanitrate and xylitol pentanitrate were similar to those of the established PETNR substrates, PETN and glycerol trinitrate, whereas the reactivities of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine were three orders of magnitude lower. The log k(cat)/K(m) value of the compounds increased with a decrease in the enthalpy of formation of the hydride adducts [DeltaH(f)(R-O-N(OH)O(-)) or DeltaH(f)(R(1),R(2) > N-N(OH)O(-))], and with an increase in their lipophilicity (octanol/water partition coefficient, log P(ow)), and did not depend on their van der Waals' volumes. Hydrophobic organic nitroesters and hydrophilic N-nitramines compete for the same binding site in the reduced enzyme form. The role of the hydrophobic interaction of PETNR with glycerol trinitrate was supported by the positive dependence of glycerol trinitrate reactivity on the solution ionic strength. The discrimination of nitroesters and N-nitramines according to their log P(ow) values seems to be a specific feature of the Old Yellow Enzyme family of flavoenzymes. PMID:19016851

  13. The binding sites on human heme oxygenase-1 for cytochrome p450 reductase and biliverdin reductase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinling; de Montellano, Paul R Ortiz

    2003-05-30

    Human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) catalyzes the NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase-dependent oxidation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron. The biliverdin is subsequently reduced to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. Earlier kinetic studies suggested that biliverdin reductase facilitates the release of biliverdin from hHO-1 (Liu, Y., and Ortiz de Montellano, P. R. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 5297-5307). We have investigated the binding of P450 reductase and biliverdin reductase to truncated, soluble hHO-1 by fluorescence resonance energy transfer and site-specific mutagenesis. P450 reductase and biliverdin reductase bind to truncated hHO-1 with Kd = 0.4 +/- 0.1 and 0.2 +/- 0.1 microm, respectively. FRET experiments indicate that biliverdin reductase and P450 reductase compete for binding to truncated hHO-1. Mutation of surface ionic residues shows that hHO-1 residues Lys18, Lys22, Lys179, Arg183, Arg198, Glu19, Glu127, and Glu190 contribute to the binding of cytochrome P450 reductase. The mutagenesis results and a computational analysis of the protein surfaces partially define the binding site for P450 reductase. An overlapping binding site including Lys18, Lys22, Lys179, Arg183, and Arg185 is similarly defined for biliverdin reductase. These results confirm the binding of biliverdin reductase to hHO-1 and define binding sites of the two reductases. PMID:12626517

  14. Pinpointing a Mechanistic Switch Between Ketoreduction and "Ene" Reduction in Short-Chain Dehydrogenases/Reductases.

    PubMed

    Lygidakis, Antonios; Karuppiah, Vijaykumar; Hoeven, Robin; Ní Cheallaigh, Aisling; Leys, David; Gardiner, John M; Toogood, Helen S; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2016-08-01

    Three enzymes of the Mentha essential oil biosynthetic pathway are highly homologous, namely the ketoreductases (-)-menthone:(-)-menthol reductase and (-)-menthone:(+)-neomenthol reductase, and the "ene" reductase isopiperitenone reductase. We identified a rare catalytic residue substitution in the last two, and performed comparative crystal structure analyses and residue-swapping mutagenesis to investigate whether this determines the reaction outcome. The result was a complete loss of native activity and a switch between ene reduction and ketoreduction. This suggests the importance of a catalytic glutamate vs. tyrosine residue in determining the outcome of the reduction of α,β-unsaturated alkenes, due to the substrate occupying different binding conformations, and possibly also to the relative acidities of the two residues. This simple switch in mechanism by a single amino acid substitution could potentially generate a large number of de novo ene reductases. PMID:27411040

  15. Natural variation in arsenate tolerance identifies an arsenate reductase in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Bermejo, Eduardo; Castrillo, Gabriel; del Llano, Bárbara; Navarro, Cristina; Zarco-Fernández, Sonia; Martinez-Herrera, Dannys Jorge; Leo-del Puerto, Yolanda; Muñoz, Riansares; Cámara, Carmen; Paz-Ares, Javier; Alonso-Blanco, Carlos; Leyva, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The enormous amount of environmental arsenic was a major factor in determining the biochemistry of incipient life forms early in the Earth's history. The most abundant chemical form in the reducing atmosphere was arsenite, which forced organisms to evolve strategies to manage this chemical species. Following the great oxygenation event, arsenite oxidized to arsenate and the action of arsenate reductases became a central survival requirement. The identity of a biologically relevant arsenate reductase in plants nonetheless continues to be debated. Here we identify a quantitative trait locus that encodes a novel arsenate reductase critical for arsenic tolerance in plants. Functional analyses indicate that several non-additive polymorphisms affect protein structure and account for the natural variation in arsenate reductase activity in Arabidopsis thaliana accessions. This study shows that arsenate reductases are an essential component for natural plant variation in As(V) tolerance. PMID:25099865

  16. Inhibition of rat steroid 5 alpha-reductase (isozyme 1) by suramin.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M F; Bhattacharyya, A K; Collins, D C

    1995-07-01

    In this study, we show the inhibition of rat steroid 5 alpha-reductase (isozyme 1) by suramin. The enzyme activity decreased in a dose-dependent manner as suramin concentrations increased with the calculated drug dose required for 50% inhibition (at 5 microM testosterone and 200 microM NADPH) being 13 microM. Suramin showed non-competitive inhibition of 5 alpha-reductase with respect to testosterone (KT1 = 2.4 microM) and competitive inhibition with respect to NADPH (KiNADPH = 220 nM). Furthermore, suramin and NADP+, but not NAD+, protected 5 alpha-reductase from labeling by 2-azido-NADP+, a photoactive probe which has recently been used to identify the NADPH binding domain of 5 alpha-reductase. These results suggest that suramin inhibits rat steroid 5 alpha-reductase (isozyme 1) at the level of NADPH binding to the enzyme. PMID:7482629

  17. The cystathionine-β-synthase domains on the guanosine 5''-monophosphate reductase and inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase enzymes from Leishmania regulate enzymatic activity in response to guanylate and adenylate nucleotide levels.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sabrina; Boitz, Jan; Chidambaram, Ehzilan Subramanian; Chatterjee, Abhishek; Ait-Tihyaty, Maria; Ullman, Buddy; Jardim, Armando

    2016-06-01

    The Leishmania guanosine 5'-monophosphate reductase (GMPR) and inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) are purine metabolic enzymes that function maintaining the cellular adenylate and guanylate nucleotide. Interestingly, both enzymes contain a cystathionine-β-synthase domain (CBS). To investigate this metabolic regulation, the Leishmania GMPR was cloned and shown to be sufficient to complement the guaC (GMPR), but not the guaB (IMPDH), mutation in Escherichia coli. Kinetic studies confirmed that the Leishmania GMPR catalyzed a strict NADPH-dependent reductive deamination of GMP to produce IMP. Addition of GTP or high levels of GMP induced a marked increase in activity without altering the Km values for the substrates. In contrast, the binding of ATP decreased the GMPR activity and increased the GMP Km value 10-fold. These kinetic changes were correlated with changes in the GMPR quaternary structure, induced by the binding of GMP, GTP, or ATP to the GMPR CBS domain. The capacity of these CBS domains to mediate the catalytic activity of the IMPDH and GMPR provides a regulatory mechanism for balancing the intracellular adenylate and guanylate pools. PMID:26853689

  18. Thioredoxin-thioredoxin reductase system of Streptomyces clavuligerus: sequences, expression, and organization of the genes.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, G; Yanko, M; Mislovati, M; Argaman, A; Schreiber, R; Av-Gay, Y; Aharonowitz, Y

    1993-01-01

    The genes that encode thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase of Streptomyces clavuligerus were cloned, and their DNA sequences were determined. Previously, we showed that S. clavuligerus possesses a disulfide reductase with broad substrate specificity that biochemically resembles the thioredoxin oxidoreductase system and may play a role in the biosynthesis of beta-lactam antibiotics. It consists consists of two components, a 70-kDa NADPH-dependent flavoprotein disulfide reductase with two identical subunits and a 12-kDa heat-stable protein general disulfide reductant. In this study, we found, by comparative analysis of their predicted amino acid sequences, that the 35-kDa protein is in fact thioredoxin reductase; it shares 48.7% amino acid sequence identity with Escherichia coli thioredoxin reductase, the 12-kDa protein is thioredoxin, and it shares 28 to 56% amino acid sequence identity with other thioredoxins. The streptomycete thioredoxin reductase has the identical cysteine redox-active region--Cys-Ala-Thr-Cys--and essentially the same flavin adenine dinucleotide- and NADPH dinucleotide-binding sites as E. coli thioredoxin reductase and is partially able to accept E. coli thioredoxin as a substrate. The streptomycete thioredoxin has the same cysteine redox-active segment--Trp-Cys-Gly-Pro-Cys--that is present in virtually all eucaryotic and procaryotic thioredoxins. However, in vivo it is unable to donate electrons to E. coli methionine sulfoxide reductase and does not serve as a substrate in vitro for E. coli thioredoxin reductase. The S. clavuligerus thioredoxin (trxA) and thioredoxin reductase (trxB) genes are organized in a cluster. They are transcribed in the same direction and separated by 33 nucleotides. In contrast, the trxA and trxB genes of E. coli, the only other organism in which both genes have been characterized, are physically widely separated. Images PMID:8349555

  19. Overexpression of Aldose Reductase Render Mouse Hepatocytes More Sensitive to Acetaminophen Induced Oxidative Stress and Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Munzir M E; Al-Obosi, J A S; Osman, H M; Shayoub, M E

    2016-04-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) a commonly used drug for decrease the fever and pain but is capable to induced hepatotoxicity at over dose. This study was carried out to investigate the effect of APAP on the expression of anti-apoptotic and antioxidative defense genes, and whether aldose reductase over-expressing plasmid capable to protect against APAP-induced oxidative stress and cell death. APAP treatment induced oxidative stress and hepatotoxicity, and significantly increased aldose reductase mRNA and protein expression in mouse hepatocyte (AML-12). Unexpectedly, AML-12 cells over-expressing aldose reductase augmented APAP-induced reduction in cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, glutathione (GSH) depletion and glutathione S-transferase A2 expression. Moreover, over-expression of aldose reductase potentiated APAP induced reduction on proliferating cell nuclear antigen, B cell lymphoma-extra large (bcl-xL), catalase, glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx-1) and abolished APAP-induced B-cell lymphoma 2 (bcl-2) inductions. Further, over-expression of aldose reductase significantly abolished AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity in APAP-treated cells and induced p53 expression. This results demonstrate that APAP induced toxicity in AML-12, increased aldose reductase expression, and over-expression of aldose reductase render this cell more susceptible to APAP induced oxidative stress and cell death, this probably due to inhibition AMPK or bcl-2 activity, or may due to competition between aldose reductase and glutathione reductase for NADPH. PMID:27069324

  20. Ascorbate free radical reductase mRNA levels are induced by wounding.

    PubMed Central

    Grantz, A A; Brummell, D A; Bennett, A B

    1995-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding ascorbate free radical (AFR) reductase (EC 1.6.5.4) was isolated from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) and its mRNA levels were analyzed. The cDNA encoded a deduced protein of 433 amino acids and possessed amino acid domains characteristic of flavin adenine dinucleotide- and NAD(P)H-binding proteins but did not possess typical eukaryotic targeting sequences, suggesting that it encodes a cytosolic form of AFR reductase. Low-stringency genomic DNA gel blot analysis indicated that a single nuclear gene encoded this enzyme. Total ascorbate contents were greatest in leaves, with decreasing amounts in stems and roots and relatively constant levels in all stages of fruit. AFR reductase activity was inversely correlated with total ascorbate content, whereas the relative abundance of AFR reductase mRNA was directly correlated with enzyme activity in tissues examined. AFR reductase mRNA abundance increased dramatically in response to wounding, a treatment that is known to also induce ascorbate-dependent prolyl hydroxylation required for the accumulation of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins. In addition, AFR reductase may contribute to maintaining levels of ascorbic acid for protection against wound-induced free radical-mediated damage. Collectively, the results suggest that AFR reductase activity is regulated at the level of mRNA abundance by low ascorbate contents or by factors that promote ascorbate utilization. PMID:7784511

  1. Thioredoxin and NADP-thioredoxin reductase from cultured carrot cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. C.; Cao, R. Q.; Kung, J. E.; Buchanan, B. B.

    1987-01-01

    Dark-grown carrot (Daucus carota L.) tissue cultures were found to contain both protein components of the NADP/thioredoxin system--NADP-thioredoxin reductase and the thioredoxin characteristic of heterotrophic systems, thioredoxin h. Thioredoxin h was purified to apparent homogeneity and, like typical bacterial counterparts, was a 12-kdalton (kDa) acidic protein capable of activating chloroplast NADP-malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.82) more effectively than fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11). NADP-thioredoxin reductase (EC 1.6.4.5) was partially purified and found to be an arsenite-sensitive enzyme composed of two 34-kDa subunits. Carrot NADP-thioredoxin reductase resembled more closely its counterpart from bacteria rather than animal cells in acceptor (thioredoxin) specificity. Upon greening of the cells, the content of NADP-thioredoxin-reductase activity, and, to a lesser extent, thioredoxin h decreased. The results confirm the presence of a heterotrophic-type thioredoxin system in plant cells and raise the question of its physiological function.

  2. Fatty acyl-CoA reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, Steven E.; Somerville, Chris R.

    1998-12-01

    The present invention relates to bacterial enzymes, in particular to an acyl-CoA reductase and a gene encoding an acyl-CoA reductase, the amino acid and nucleic acid sequences corresponding to the reductase polypeptide and gene, respectively, and to methods of obtaining such enzymes, amino acid sequences and nucleic acid sequences. The invention also relates to the use of such sequences to provide transgenic host cells capable of producing fatty alcohols and fatty aldehydes.

  3. NADPH:cytochrome c (P450) reductase activates tirapazamine (SR4233) to restore hypoxic and oxic cytotoxicity in an aerobic resistant derivative of the A549 lung cancer cell line

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, M P; Patterson, A V; Chinje, E C; Harris, A L; Stratford, I J

    2000-01-01

    Tirapazamine (TPZ, SR4233, WIN 59075) is a bioreductive drug that is activated in regions of low oxygen tension to a cytotoxic radical intermediate. This labile metabolite shows high selective toxicity towards hypoxic cells, such as those found in solid tumours. Under aerobic conditions, redox cycling occurs with subsequent generation of superoxide radicals, which are also cytotoxic. NADPH:cytochrome c (P450) reductase (P450R) is a one-electron reducing enzyme that efficiently activates TPZ. Recently a derivative of the A549 non-small cell lung cancer cell line (A549c50) was generated that showed substantially reduced P450R activity compared to its parental line (Elwell et al (1997) Biochem Pharmacol54: 249–257). Here, it is demonstrated that the A549c50 cells are markedly more resistant to TPZ under both aerobic and hypoxic conditions. In addition, these cells have a dramatically impaired ability to metabolize TPZ to its two-electron reduction product, SR4317, under hypoxic conditions when compared to wild-type cells. P450R activity in the A549c50 cells was reintroduced to similar levels as that seen in the parental A549 cells by transfection of the full-length cDNA for human P450R. These P450R over-expressing cells exhibit restored sensitivity to TPZ under both aerobic and hypoxic conditions, comparable to that found in the original parental A549 cells. Further, the ability of the transfected cells to metabolize TPZ to SR4317 under hypoxic conditions is also shown to be restored. This provides further evidence that P450R can play an important role in the activation, metabolism and toxicity of this lead bioreductive drug. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10682679

  4. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase as a cytosolic arsenate reductase.

    PubMed

    Gregus, Zoltán; Németi, Balázs

    2002-11-01

    The findings of the accompanying paper (Németi and Gregus, Toxicol: Sci. 70, 4-12) indicate that the arsenate (AsV) reductase activity of rat liver cytosol is due to an SH enzyme that uses phosphate (or its analogue, arsenate, AsV) and a purine nucleoside (guanosine or inosine) as substrates. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) is such an enzyme. It catalyzes the phosphorolytic cleavage of 6-oxopurine nucleosides according to the following scheme: guanosine (or inosine) + phosphate <--> guanine (or hypoxanthine) + ribose-1-phosphate. Therefore, we have tested the hypothesis that PNP is responsible for the thiol- and purine nucleoside-dependent reduction of AsV to AsIII by rat liver cytosol. AsIII formed from AsV was quantified by HPLC-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry analysis of the deproteinized incubates. The following findings support the conclusion that PNP reduces AsV to AsIII, using AsV instead of phosphate in the reaction above: (1) Specific PNP inhibitors (CI-1000, BCX-1777) at a concentration of 1 microM completely inhibited cytosolic AsV reductase activity. (2) During anion-exchange chromatography of cytosolic proteins, PNP activity perfectly coeluted with the AsV reductase activity, suggesting that both activities belong to the same protein. (3) PNP purified from calf spleen catalyzed reduction of AsV to AsIII in the presence of dithiothreitol (DTT) and a 6-oxopurine nucleoside (guanosine or inosine). (4) AsV reductase activity of purified PNP, like the cytosolic AsV reductase activity, was inhibited by phosphate (a substrate of PNP alternative to AsV), guanine and hypoxanthine (products of PNP favoring the reverse reaction), mercurial thiol reagents (nonspecific inhibitors of PNP), as well as CI-1000 and BCX-1777 (specific PNP inhibitors). Thus, PNP appears to be responsible for the AsV reductase activity of rat liver cytosol in the presence of DTT. Further research should clarify the mechanism and the in vivo significance of PNP

  5. Purification, properties, and sequence of glycerol trinitrate reductase from Agrobacterium radiobacter.

    PubMed Central

    Snape, J R; Walkley, N A; Morby, A P; Nicklin, S; White, G F

    1997-01-01

    Glycerol trinitrate (GTN) reductase, which enables Agrobacterium radiobacter to utilize GTN and related explosives as sources of nitrogen for growth, was purified and characterized, and its gene was cloned and sequenced. The enzyme was a 39-kDa monomeric protein which catalyzed the NADH-dependent reductive scission of GTN (Km = 23 microM) to glycerol dinitrates (mainly the 1,3-isomer) with a pH optimum of 6.5, a temperature optimum of 35 degrees C, and no dependence on metal ions for activity. It was also active on pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), on isosorbide dinitrate, and, very weakly, on ethyleneglycol dinitrate, but it was inactive on isopropyl nitrate, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, ammonium ions, nitrate, or nitrite. The amino acid sequence deduced from the DNA sequence was homologous (42 to 51% identity and 61 to 69% similarity) to those of PETN reductase from Enterobacter cloacae, N-ethylmaleimide reductase from Escherichia coli, morphinone reductase from Pseudomonas putida, and old yellow enzyme from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, placing the GTN reductase in the alpha/beta barrel flavoprotein group of proteins. GTN reductase and PETN reductase were very similar in many respects except in their distinct preferences for NADH and NADPH cofactors, respectively. PMID:9401040

  6. Intracellular Metabolism of α,β-Unsaturated Carbonyl Compounds, Acrolein, Crotonaldehyde and Methyl Vinyl Ketone, Active Toxicants in Cigarette Smoke: Participation of Glutathione Conjugation Ability and Aldehyde-Ketone Sensitive Reductase Activity.

    PubMed

    Horiyama, Shizuyo; Hatai, Mayuko; Takahashi, Yuta; Date, Sachiko; Masujima, Tsutomu; Honda, Chie; Ichikawa, Atsushi; Yoshikawa, Noriko; Nakamura, Kazuki; Kunitomo, Masaru; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    The major toxicants in cigarette smoke, α,β-unsaturated aldehydes, such as acrolein (ACR) and crotonaldehyde (CA), and α,β-unsaturated ketone, methyl vinyl ketone (MVK), are known to form Michael-type adducts with glutathione (GSH) and consequently cause intracellular GSH depletion, which is involved in cigarette smoke-induced cytotoxicity. We have previously clarified that exposure to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) of a mouse melanoma cell culture medium causes rapid reduction of intracellular GSH levels, and that the GSH-MVK adduct can be detected by LC/MS analysis while the GSH-CA adduct is hardly detected. In the present study, to clarify why the GSH-CA adduct is difficult to detect in the cell medium, we conducted detailed investigation of the structures of the reaction products of ACR, CA, MVK and CSE in the GSH solution or the cell culture medium. The mass spectra indicated that in the presence of the cells, the GSH-CA and GSH-ACR adducts were almost not detected while their corresponding alcohols were detected. On the other hand, both the GSH-MVK adducts and their reduced products were detected. In the absence of the cells, the reaction of GSH with all α,β-unsaturated carbonyls produced only their corresponding adducts. These results show that the GSH adducts of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes, CA and ACR, are quickly reduced by certain intracellular carbonyl reductase(s) and excreted from the cells, unlike the GSH adduct of α,β-unsaturated ketone, MVK. Such a difference in reactivity to the carbonyl reductase might be related to differences in the cytotoxicity of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes and ketones. PMID:27250793

  7. Development of Potent and Selective Inhibitors of Aldo-Keto Reductase 1C3 (type 5 17β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase) Based on N-Phenyl-Aminobenzoates and Their Structure Activity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Adeniji, Adegoke O.; Twenter, Barry M.; Byrns, Michael C.; Jin, Yi; Chen, Mo; Winkler, Jeffrey D.; Penning, Trevor M.

    2012-01-01

    Aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3; type 5 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase) is overexpressed in castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and is implicated in the intratumoral biosynthesis of testosterone and 5α-dihydrotestosterone. Selective AKR1C3 inhibitors are required since compounds should not inhibit the highly related AKR1C1 and AKR1C2 isoforms which are involved in the inactivation of 5α-dihydrotestosterone. NSAIDs, N-phenylanthranilates in particular are potent but non-selective AKR1C3 inhibitors. Using flufenamic acid, 2-{[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]amino}benzoic acid as lead compound, five classes of structural analogs were synthesized and evaluated for AKR1C3 inhibitory potency and selectivity. Structure activity relationship (SAR) studies revealed that a meta-carboxylic acid group relative to the amine conferred pronounced AKR1C3 selectivity without loss of potency, while electron withdrawing groups on the phenylamino B-ring were optimal for AKR1C3 inhibition. Lead compounds did not inhibit COX-1 or COX-2 but blocked the AKR1C3 mediated production of testosterone in LNCaP-AKR1C3 cells. These compounds offer promising leads towards new therapeutics for CRPC. PMID:22263837

  8. The arsenic hyperaccumulating Pteris vittata expresses two arsenate reductases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesaro, Patrizia; Cattaneo, Chiara; Bona, Elisa; Berta, Graziella; Cavaletto, Maria

    2015-09-01

    Enzymatic reduction of arsenate to arsenite is the first known step in arsenate metabolism in all organisms. Although the presence of one mRNA arsenate reductase (PvACR2) has been characterized in gametophytes of P. vittata, no arsenate reductase protein has been directly observed in this arsenic hyperaccumulating fern, yet. In order to assess the possible presence of arsenate reductase in P. vittata, two recombinant proteins, ACR2-His6 and Trx-His6-S-Pv2.5-8 were prepared in Escherichia coli, purified and used to produce polyclonal antibodies. The presence of these two enzymes was evaluated by qRT-PCR, immunoblotting and direct MS analysis. Enzymatic activity was detected in crude extracts. For the first time we detected and identified two arsenate reductase proteins (PvACR2 and Pv2.5-8) in sporophytes and gametophytes of P. vittata. Despite an increase of the mRNA levels for both proteins in roots, no difference was observed at the protein level after arsenic treatment. Overall, our data demonstrate the constitutive protein expression of PvACR2 and Pv2.5-8 in P. vittata tissues and propose their specific role in the complex metabolic network of arsenic reduction.

  9. The arsenic hyperaccumulating Pteris vittata expresses two arsenate reductases

    PubMed Central

    Cesaro, Patrizia; Cattaneo, Chiara; Bona, Elisa; Berta, Graziella; Cavaletto, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic reduction of arsenate to arsenite is the first known step in arsenate metabolism in all organisms. Although the presence of one mRNA arsenate reductase (PvACR2) has been characterized in gametophytes of P. vittata, no arsenate reductase protein has been directly observed in this arsenic hyperaccumulating fern, yet. In order to assess the possible presence of arsenate reductase in P. vittata, two recombinant proteins, ACR2-His6 and Trx-His6-S-Pv2.5–8 were prepared in Escherichia coli, purified and used to produce polyclonal antibodies. The presence of these two enzymes was evaluated by qRT-PCR, immunoblotting and direct MS analysis. Enzymatic activity was detected in crude extracts. For the first time we detected and identified two arsenate reductase proteins (PvACR2 and Pv2.5–8) in sporophytes and gametophytes of P. vittata. Despite an increase of the mRNA levels for both proteins in roots, no difference was observed at the protein level after arsenic treatment. Overall, our data demonstrate the constitutive protein expression of PvACR2 and Pv2.5–8 in P. vittata tissues and propose their specific role in the complex metabolic network of arsenic reduction. PMID:26412036

  10. Characterization of mitochondrial thioredoxin reductase from C. elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Lacey, Brian M.; Hondal, Robert J. . E-mail: Robert.Hondal@uvm.edu

    2006-08-04

    Thioredoxin reductase catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of the catalytic disulfide bond of thioredoxin. In mammals and other higher eukaryotes, thioredoxin reductases contain the rare amino acid selenocysteine at the active site. The mitochondrial enzyme from Caenorhabditis elegans, however, contains a cysteine residue in place of selenocysteine. The mitochondrial C. elegans thioredoxin reductase was cloned from an expressed sequence tag and then produced in Escherichia coli as an intein-fusion protein. The purified recombinant enzyme has a k {sub cat} of 610 min{sup -1} and a K {sub m} of 610 {mu}M using E. coli thioredoxin as substrate. The reported k {sub cat} is 25% of the k {sub cat} of the mammalian enzyme and is 43-fold higher than a cysteine mutant of mammalian thioredoxin reductase. The enzyme would reduce selenocysteine, but not hydrogen peroxide or insulin. The flanking glycine residues of the GCCG motif were mutated to serine. The mutants improved substrate binding, but decreased the catalytic rate.

  11. Steroidal pyrazolines evaluated as aromatase and quinone reductase-2 inhibitors for chemoprevention of cancer.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Mohamed M; Al-Omar, Mohamed A; Bhat, Mashooq A; Amr, Abdel-Galil E; Al-Mohizea, Abdullah M

    2012-05-01

    The aromatase and quinone reductase-2 inhibition of synthesized heterocyclic pyrazole derivatives fused with steroidal structure for chemoprevention of cancer is reported herein. All compounds were interestingly less toxic than the reference drug (Cyproterone(®)). The aromatase inhibitory activities of these compounds were much more potent than the lead compound resveratrol, which has an IC(50) of 80 μM. In addition, all the compounds displayed potent quinone reductase-2 inhibition. Initially the acute toxicity of the compounds was assayed via the determination of their LD(50). The aromatase and quinone reductase-2 inhibitors resulting from this study have potential value in the treatment and prevention of cancer. PMID:22361454

  12. Virtual screening of plant derived compounds for aldose reductase inhibition using molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Muppalaneni, Naresh Babu; Rao, Allam Appa

    2012-01-01

    The role of the aldose reductase in type 2 diabetes is widely described. Therefore, it is of interest to identify plant derived compounds to inhibit its activity. We studied the protein-ligand interaction of 267 compounds from different parts of seven plants (Allium sativum, Coriandrum sativum, Dacus carota, Murrayyakoneigii, Eucalyptus, Calendula officinalis and Lycopersicon esculentum) with aldose reductase as the target protein. Molecular docking and re-scoring of top ten compounds (using GOLD, AutoDock Vina, eHiTS, PatchDock and MEDock) followed by rank-sum technique identified compound allium38 with high binding affinity for aldose reductase. PMID:23275691

  13. Ribonucleotide reductase metallocofactor: assembly, maintenance and inhibition

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, Caiguo; LIU, Guoqi; HUANG, Mingxia

    2014-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) supplies cellular deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates (dNTP) pools by converting ribonucleotides to the corresponding deoxy forms using radical-based chemistry. Eukaryotic RNR comprises α and β subunits: α contains the catalytic and allosteric sites; β houses a diferric-tyrosyl radical cofactor (FeIII2-Y•) that is required to initiates nucleotide reduction in α. Cells have evolved multi-layered mechanisms to regulate RNR level and activity in order to maintain the adequate sizes and ratios of their dNTP pools to ensure high-fidelity DNA replication and repair. The central role of RNR in nucleotide metabolism also makes it a proven target of chemotherapeutics. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding the function and regulation of eukaryotic RNRs, with a focus on studies revealing the cellular machineries involved in RNR metallocofactor biosynthesis and its implication in RNR-targeting therapeutics. PMID:24899886

  14. "Subversive" substrates for the enzyme trypanothione disulfide reductase: alternative approach to chemotherapy of Chagas disease.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, G B; Ulrich, P; Fairlamb, A H; Rosenberg, I; Pereira, M; Sela, M; Cerami, A

    1988-01-01

    The trypanosomatid flavoprotein disulfide reductase, trypanothione reductase, is shown to catalyze one-electron reduction of suitably substituted naphthoquinone and nitrofuran derivatives. A number of such compounds have been chemically synthesized, and a structure-activity relationship has been established; the enzyme is most active with compounds that contain basic functional groups in side-chain residues. The reduced products are readily reoxidized by molecular oxygen and thus undergo classical enzyme-catalyzed redox cycling. In addition to their ability to act as substrates for trypanothione reductase, the compounds are also shown to effectively inhibit enzymatic reduction of the enzyme's physiological substrate, trypanothione disulfide. Under aerobic conditions, trypanothione reductase is not inactivated by these redox-cycling substrates, whereas under anaerobic conditions the nitrofuran compounds cause irreversible inactivation of the enzyme. When tested for biological activity against Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes, many of the test compounds were trypanocidal, and this activity correlated with their relative ability to act as substrates for trypanothione reductase. The activity of the enzyme with these redox-cycling derivatives constitutes a subversion of its normal antioxidant role within the cell. For this reason these compounds may be termed "subversive" substrates for trypanothione reductase. PMID:3135548

  15. Synergistic fungicidal activity of Cu(2+) and allicin, an allyl sulfur compound from garlic, and its relation to the role of alkyl hydroperoxide reductase 1 as a cell surface defense in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ogita, Akira; Hirooka, Kiyoo; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Tsutsui, Nobuo; Fujita, Ken-Ichi; Taniguchi, Makoto; Tanaka, Toshio

    2005-11-15

    Cu(2+) showed a dose-dependent fungicidal activity against Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, and its lethal effect was extremely enhanced in the presence of allicin, an allyl sulfur compound from garlic. The fungicidal activity of Cu(2+) was unaffected or rather attenuated by other sulfur-containing compounds such as N-acetyl-cysteine, l-cysteine or dithiothreitol. Ca(2+) could absolutely protect against the lethal effect of Cu(2+) itself, but showed no protection against the fungicidal activity of Cu(2+) newly generated in combination with allicin. Cu(2+) accelerated an endogenous generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in S. cerevisiae cells at a lethal concentration, but such intracellular oxidative stress induction was not observed during cell death progression upon treatment with Cu(2+) and allicin. A surfactant, sodium N-lauroyl sarcosinate (SLS), enhanced the solubilization of a few proteins including alkyl hydroperoxide reductase 1 (AHP1) in intact cells, accounting for the absence of this protein in the extract from allicin-treated cells. Allicin-treated cells were rendered extremely sensitive to the subsequent Cu(2+) treatment as in the case of SLS-treated cells. Allicin-treated cells and SLS-treated cells similarly showed an increased sensitivity to exogenously added tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BOOH), an organic peroxide that is detoxified by the action of AHP1. Our study suggests that allicin influences the mode of cell surface localization or the related function of AHP1 as a defense against phospholipid peroxidation by the external action of Cu(2+). PMID:16102883

  16. Steroid 5β-Reductase from Leaves of Vitis vinifera: Molecular Cloning, Expression, and Modeling.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Mona; Munkert, Jennifer; Campa, Manuela; Malnoy, Mickael; Martens, Stefan; Müller-Uri, Frieder

    2015-11-25

    A steroid 5β-reductase gene corresponding to the hypothetical protein LOC100247199 from leaves of Vitis vinifera (var. 'Chardonnay') was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein showed 5β-reductase activity when progesterone was used as a substrate. The reaction was stereoselective, producing only 5β-products such as 5β-pregnane-3,20-dione. Other small substrates (terpenoids and enones) were also accepted as substrates, indicating the highly promiscuous character of the enzyme class. Our results show that the steroid 5β-reductase gene, encoding an orthologous enzyme described as a key enzyme in cardenolide biosynthesis, is also expressed in leaves of the cardenolide-free plant V. vinifera. We emphasize the fact that, on some occasions, different reductases (e.g., progesterone 5β-reductase and monoterpenoid reductase) can also use molecules that are similar to the final products as a substrate. Therefore, in planta, the different reductases may contribute to the immense number of diverse small natural products finally leading to the flavor of wine. PMID:26537436

  17. Converting the NiFeS Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase to a Hydrogenase and a Hydroxylamine Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Jongyun; Wolfe, Marcus T.; Staples, Christopher R.; Ludden, Paul W.

    2002-01-01

    Substitution of one amino acid for another at the active site of an enzyme usually diminishes or eliminates the activity of the enzyme. In some cases, however, the specificity of the enzyme is changed. In this study, we report that the changing of a metal ligand at the active site of the NiFeS-containing carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH) converts the enzyme to a hydrogenase or a hydroxylamine reductase. CODH with alanine substituted for Cys531 exhibits substantial uptake hydrogenase activity, and this activity is enhanced by treatment with CO. CODH with valine substituted for His265 exhibits hydroxylamine reductase activity. Both Cys531 and His265 are ligands to the active-site cluster of CODH. Further, CODH with Fe substituted for Ni at the active site acquires hydroxylamine reductase activity. PMID:12374822

  18. Nickel site of methane catalysis in the methyl reductase enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Shelnutt, J.A.; Shiemke, A.K.; Scott, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Methyl reductase is the enzyme of methanogenic bacteria that catalyzed the two-electron reduction of the methyl group of 2-(methylthio)ethanesulfonic acid (methyl-S-CoM) to methane and HS-CoM. The methyl group of methyl-S-CoM ultimately comes from the six-electron reduction of CO/sub 2/ by hydrogen, which also provides the reducing equivalents needed by methyl reductase. The nature of the catalytic site of methyl reductase is of current interest from the point of view of developing biomimetic C/sub 1/, chemistries directed toward methane synthesis and activation. In particular, Sandia is using molecular graphics and energy optimization techniques to design macromolecular catalysts that mimic the structure of sites of proteins that carry out C/sub 1/ chemistry. The goal is to produce catalysts whose function is the oxidation of low molecular weight hydrocarbon gases to generate liquid fuels or, alternatively, the reduction of abundant inorganic resources such as CO/sub 2/ to generate gaseous fuels. Unfortunately, the catalytic sites of many of the enzymes of interest, e.g., methyl reductase and methane monooxygenase, have not been characterized by X-ray crystallography and other structural techniques. With the goal of learning more about the structure of one of these naturally occurring sites of C/sub 1/ chemistry, we have obtained the first resonance Raman spectra of the nickel-macrocycle, called F/sub 430/, at the site of catalysis in methyl reductase. To help us structurally interpret the Raman spectra of the enzyme we have also obtained Raman spectra of solutions of the major forms of F/sub 430/ (salt-extracted and cytosol-free) at room temperature and at 77/degree/K and also, under similar solution conditions, spectra of a nickel-corphinoid derivative that is related to F/sub 430/.

  19. Biological activity of phenolic compounds. Hepatic cytochrome P-450, cytochrome b/sub 5/ and NADPH cytochrome c reductase in chicks and rats fed phenolic monomers, polymers, and glycosides

    SciTech Connect

    Klasing, S.A.; Mora, M.I.; Wilson, W.C.; Fahey, G.C. Jr.; Garst, J.E.

    1985-09-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine effects of a phenolic polymer (Kraft wood lignin, Indulin), phenolic glycosides (cane molasses and wood molasses), and phenolic monomers (vanillin, vanillic acid, ferulic acid, and p-coumaric acid) on liver cytochromes P-450, cytochrome b/sub 5/, and NADPH cytochrome c reductase in chicks and rats. Chicks fed 6.0% lignin had a higher cytochromes P-450 content than did chicks fed 0% fiber, 6.0% wood cellulose, or 6.0% arenaceous flour. Chicks fed 12.0% wood molasses had a higher cytochromes P-450 level than did chicks fed 0% fiber or 6.0% wood molasses. Cane molasses incorporated at both 6.0 and 12.0% of the diet induced cytochromes P-450 content over those of control-fed birds. Chicks fed 6.0% lignin, with or without antibiotic, had a higher cytochromes P-450 level than did chicks fed control diets, with or without antibiotic. Additionally, chicks fed 6.0% lignin had lower intestinal diaminopimelic acid (DAP) levels than did chicks fed 0% fiber. Rats fed 0% fiber, 6.0% wood cellulose, 6.0% arenaceous flour, or 6.0% lignin exhibited no difference in cytochrome level or activity among treatments. Chicks fed 0.5% vanillin, 0.5% vanillic acid, 0.5% ferulic acid, or 0.5% p-coumaric acid had comparable cytochromes level and activity compared with chicks fed no phenolics. Chicks fed 0.5% p-coumaric acid had lower rates of gain than did chicks fed control or other phenolic-containing diets. Rats fed these phenolics had similar cytochromes P-450 content among treatments.

  20. Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Reductase in Chlorella autotrophica and Chlorella saccharophila in Relation to Osmoregulation 1

    PubMed Central

    Laliberté, Gilles; Hellebust, Johan A.

    1989-01-01

    Pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) reductase (EC 1.5.1.2), which catalyzes the reduction of P5C to proline, was partially purified from two Chlorella species; Chlorella autotrophica, a euryhaline marine alga that responds to increases in salinity by accumulating proline and ions, and Chlorella saccharophila, which does not accumulate proline for osmoregulation. From the elution profile of this enzyme from an anion exchange column in Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.6), containing sorbitol and glycine betaine, it was shown that P5C reductase from C. autotrophica was a neutral protein whereas the enzyme from C. saccharophila was negatively charged. The kinetic mechanisms of the reductase was characteristic of a ping-pong mechanism with double competitive substrate inhibition. Both enzymes showed high specificity for NADH as cofactor. The affinities of the reductases for their substrates did not change when the cells were grown at different salinities. In both algae, the apparent Km values of the reductase for P5C and NADH were 0.17 and 0.10 millimolar, respectively. A fourfold increase in maximal velocity of the reductase was observed when C. autotrophica was transferred from 50 to 150% artificial sea water. Even though the reductase was inhibited by NaCl, KCl, and proline, it still showed appreciable activity in the presence of these compounds at molar concentrations. A possible role for the regulation of proline synthesis at the step catalyzed by P5C reductase is discussed in relation to the specificity of P5C reductase for NADH and its responses to salt treatments. PMID:16667157

  1. The cytochrome bd respiratory oxygen reductases

    PubMed Central

    Borisov, Vitaliy B.; Gennis, Robert B.; Hemp, James; Verkhovsky, Michael I.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Cytochrome bd is a respiratory quinol:O2 oxidoreductase found in many prokaryotes, including a number of pathogens. The main bioenergetic function of the enzyme is the production of a proton motive force by the vectorial charge transfer of protons. The sequences of cytochromes bd are not homologous to those of the other respiratory oxygen reductases, i.e., the heme-copper oxygen reductases or alternative oxidases (AOX). Generally, cytochromes bd are noteworthy for their high affinity for O2 and resistance to inhibition by cyanide. In E. coli, for example, cytochrome bd (specifically, cytochrome bd-I) is expressed under O2-limited conditions. Among the members of the bd-family are the so-called cyanide-insensitive quinol oxidases (CIO) which often have a low content of the eponymous heme d but, instead, have heme b in place of heme d in at least a majority of the enzyme population. However, at this point, no sequence motif has been identified to distinguish cytochrome bd (with a stoichiometric complement of heme d) from an enzyme designated as CIO. Members of the bd-family can be subdivided into those which contain either a long or a short hydrophilic connection between transmembrane helices 6 and 7 in subunit I, designated as the Q-loop. However, it is not clear whether there is a functional consequence of this difference. This review summarizes current knowledge on the physiological functions, genetics, structural and catalytic properties of cytochromes bd. Included in this review are descriptions of the intermediates of the catalytic cycle, the proposed site for the reduction of O2, evidence for a proton channel connecting this active site to the bacterial cytoplasm, and the molecular mechanism by which a membrane potential is generated. PMID:21756872

  2. Dietary Selenium (Se) and Copper (Cu) Affect the Activity and Expression of the Hepatic Selenoprotein Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase B (MrsB) in Rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As reported by Jenkinson et al. (J Nutr 1982) and Prohaska et al. (J Nutr Biochem 1992) Cu deficiency (CuD) decreases the activity and mRNA expression of the selenoprotein GPx. Because both Se and Cu are important in oxidative defense, we wanted to determine the effect of a combined deficiency on th...

  3. Aldo-keto reductase 1B10 promotes development of cisplatin resistance in gastrointestinal cancer cells through down-regulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Ayaka; Kezuka, Chihiro; Okumura, Naoko; Iguchi, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Ikuo; Soda, Midori; Endo, Satoshi; El-Kabbani, Ossama; Hara, Akira; Ikari, Akira

    2016-08-25

    Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum, CDDP) is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic drugs that are used for treatment of patients with gastrointestinal cancer cells, but its continuous administration often evokes the development of chemoresistance. In this study, we investigated alterations in antioxidant molecules and functions using a newly established CDDP-resistant variant of gastric cancer MKN45 cells, and found that aldo-keto reductase 1B10 (AKR1B10) is significantly up-regulated with acquisition of the CDDP resistance. In the nonresistant MKN45 cells, the sensitivity to cytotoxic effect of CDDP was decreased and increased by overexpression and silencing of AKR1B10, respectively. In addition, the AKR1B10 overexpression markedly suppressed accumulation and cytotoxicity of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal that is produced during lipid peroxidation by CDDP treatment, suggesting that the enzyme acts as a crucial factor for facilitation of the CDDP resistance through inhibiting induction of oxidative stress by the drug. Transient exposure to CDDP and induction of the CDDP resistance decreased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) in MKN45 and colon cancer LoVo cells. Additionally, overexpression of PPARγ in the cells elevated the sensitivity to the CDDP toxicity, which was further augmented by concomitant treatment with a PPARγ ligand rosiglitazone. Intriguingly, overexpression of AKR1B10 in the cells resulted in a decrease in PPARγ expression, which was recovered by addition of an AKR1B10 inhibitor oleanolic acid, inferring that PPARγ is a downstream target of AKR1B10-dependent mechanism underlying the CDDP resistance. Combined treatment with the AKR1B10 inhibitor and PPARγ ligand elevated the CDDP sensitivity, which was almost the same level as that in the parental cells. These results suggest that combined treatment with the AKR1B10 inhibitor and PPARγ ligand is an effective adjuvant therapy for overcoming CDDP resistance of

  4. A Glycine soja methionine sulfoxide reductase B5a interacts with the Ca(2+) /CAM-binding kinase GsCBRLK and activates ROS signaling under carbonate alkaline stress.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoli; Sun, Mingzhe; Jia, Bowei; Qin, Zhiwei; Yang, Kejun; Chen, Chao; Yu, Qingyue; Zhu, Yanming

    2016-06-01

    Although research has extensively illustrated the molecular basis of plant responses to salt and high-pH stresses, knowledge on carbonate alkaline stress is poor and the specific responsive mechanism remains elusive. We have previously characterized a Glycine soja Ca(2+) /CAM-dependent kinase GsCBRLK that could increase salt tolerance. Here, we characterize a methionine sulfoxide reductase (MSR) B protein GsMSRB5a as a GsCBRLK interactor by using Y2H and BiFc assays. Further analyses showed that the N-terminal variable domain of GsCBRLK contributed to the GsMSRB5a interaction. Y2H assays also revealed the interaction specificity of GsCBRLK with the wild soybean MSRB subfamily proteins, and determined that the BoxI/BoxII-containing regions within GsMSRBs were responsible for their interaction. Furthermore, we also illustrated that the N-terminal basic regions in GsMSRBs functioned as transit peptides, which targeted themselves into chloroplasts and thereby prevented their interaction with GsCBRLK. Nevertheless, deletion of these regions allowed them to localize on the plasma membrane (PM) and interact with GsCBRLK. In addition, we also showed that GsMSRB5a and GsCBRLK displayed overlapping tissue expression specificity and coincident expression patterns under carbonate alkaline stress. Phenotypic experiments demonstrated that GsMSRB5a and GsCBRLK overexpression in Arabidopsis enhanced carbonate alkaline stress tolerance. Further investigations elucidated that GsMSRB5a and GsCBRLK inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation by modifying the expression of ROS signaling, biosynthesis and scavenging genes. Summarily, our results demonstrated that GsCBRLK and GsMSRB5a interacted with each other, and activated ROS signaling under carbonate alkaline stress. PMID:27121031

  5. Aldo-Keto Reductases 1B in Adrenal Cortex Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Pastel, Emilie; Pointud, Jean-Christophe; Martinez, Antoine; Lefrançois-Martinez, A. Marie

    2016-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AKR1B) proteins are monomeric enzymes, belonging to the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. They perform oxidoreduction of carbonyl groups from a wide variety of substrates, such as aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes or ketones. Due to the involvement of human aldose reductases in pathologies, such as diabetic complications and cancer, AKR1B subgroup enzymatic properties have been extensively characterized. However, the issue of AKR1B function in non-pathologic conditions remains poorly resolved. Adrenal activities generated large amount of harmful aldehydes from lipid peroxidation and steroidogenesis, including 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and isocaproaldehyde (4-methylpentanal), which can both be reduced by AKR1B proteins. More recently, some AKR1B isoforms have been shown to be endowed with prostaglandin F synthase (PGFS) activity, suggesting that, in addition to possible scavenger function, they could instigate paracrine signals. Interestingly, the adrenal gland is one of the major sites for human and murine AKR1B expression, suggesting that their detoxifying/signaling activity could be specifically required for the correct handling of adrenal function. Moreover, chronic effects of ACTH result in a coordinated regulation of genes encoding the steroidogenic enzymes and some AKR1B isoforms. This review presents the molecular mechanisms accounting for the adrenal-specific expression of some AKR1B genes. Using data from recent mouse genetic models, we will try to connect their enzymatic properties and regulation with adrenal functions. PMID:27499746

  6. Amplification and loss of dihydrofolate reductase genes in a Chinese hamster ovary cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, R.J.; Schimke, R.T.

    1981-12-01

    During stepwise increases in the methotrexate concentration in culture medium, the authors selected Chinese hamster ovary cells that contained elevated dihydrofolate reductase levels which were proportional to the number of dihydrofolate reductase gene copies (i.e., gene amplification). The authors studied the dihydrofolate reductase levels in individual cells that underwent the initial steps of methotrexate resistance by using the fluorescence-activated cell sorter technique. Such cells constituted a heterogeneous population with differing dihydrofolate reductase levels, and they characteristically lost the elevated enzyme levels when they were grown in the absence of methotrexate. The progeny of individual cells with high enzyme levels behaved differently and could lose all or variable numbers of the amplified genes.

  7. The Reductase Activity of the Arabidopsis Caleosin RESPONSIVE TO DESSICATION20 Mediates Gibberellin-Dependent Flowering Time, Abscisic Acid Sensitivity, and Tolerance to Oxidative Stress1[W

    PubMed Central

    Blée, Elizabeth; Boachon, Benoît; Burcklen, Michel; Le Guédard, Marina; Hanano, Abdulsamie; Heintz, Dimitri; Ehlting, Jürgen; Herrfurth, Cornelia; Feussner, Ivo; Bessoule, Jean-Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Contrasting with the wealth of information available on the multiple roles of jasmonates in plant development and defense, knowledge about the functions and the biosynthesis of hydroxylated oxylipins remains scarce. By expressing the caleosin RESPONSIVE TO DESSICATION20 (RD20) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we show that the recombinant protein possesses an unusual peroxygenase activity with restricted specificity toward hydroperoxides of unsaturated fatty acid. Accordingly, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants overexpressing RD20 accumulate the product 13-hydroxy-9,11,15-octadecatrienoic acid, a linolenate-derived hydroxide. These plants exhibit elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) associated with early gibberellin-dependent flowering and abscisic acid hypersensitivity at seed germination. These phenotypes are dependent on the presence of active RD20, since they are abolished in the rd20 null mutant and in lines overexpressing RD20, in which peroxygenase was inactivated by a point mutation of a catalytic histidine residue. RD20 also confers tolerance against stress induced by Paraquat, Rose Bengal, heavy metal, and the synthetic auxins 1-naphthaleneacetic acid and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. Under oxidative stress, 13-hydroxy-9,11,15-octadecatrienoic acid still accumulates in RD20-overexpressing lines, but this lipid oxidation is associated with reduced ROS levels, minor cell death, and delayed floral transition. A model is discussed where the interplay between fatty acid hydroxides generated by RD20 and ROS is counteracted by ethylene during development in unstressed environments. PMID:25056921

  8. The reductase activity of the Arabidopsis caleosin RESPONSIVE TO DESSICATION20 mediates gibberellin-dependent flowering time, abscisic acid sensitivity, and tolerance to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Blée, Elizabeth; Boachon, Benoît; Burcklen, Michel; Le Guédard, Marina; Hanano, Abdulsamie; Heintz, Dimitri; Ehlting, Jürgen; Herrfurth, Cornelia; Feussner, Ivo; Bessoule, Jean-Jacques

    2014-09-01

    Contrasting with the wealth of information available on the multiple roles of jasmonates in plant development and defense, knowledge about the functions and the biosynthesis of hydroxylated oxylipins remains scarce. By expressing the caleosin RESPONSIVE TO DESSICATION20 (RD20) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we show that the recombinant protein possesses an unusual peroxygenase activity with restricted specificity toward hydroperoxides of unsaturated fatty acid. Accordingly, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants overexpressing RD20 accumulate the product 13-hydroxy-9,11,15-octadecatrienoic acid, a linolenate-derived hydroxide. These plants exhibit elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) associated with early gibberellin-dependent flowering and abscisic acid hypersensitivity at seed germination. These phenotypes are dependent on the presence of active RD20, since they are abolished in the rd20 null mutant and in lines overexpressing RD20, in which peroxygenase was inactivated by a point mutation of a catalytic histidine residue. RD20 also confers tolerance against stress induced by Paraquat, Rose Bengal, heavy metal, and the synthetic auxins 1-naphthaleneacetic acid and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. Under oxidative stress, 13-hydroxy-9,11,15-octadecatrienoic acid still accumulates in RD20-overexpressing lines, but this lipid oxidation is associated with reduced ROS levels, minor cell death, and delayed floral transition. A model is discussed where the interplay between fatty acid hydroxides generated by RD20 and ROS is counteracted by ethylene during development in unstressed environments. PMID:25056921

  9. Structural Basis for Substrate Specificity in Human Monomeric Carbonyl Reductases

    PubMed Central

    El-Hawari, Yasser; Dunford, James E.; Kochan, Grazyna; Wsol, Vladimir; Martin, Hans-Joerg; Maser, Edmund; Oppermann, Udo

    2009-01-01

    Carbonyl reduction constitutes a phase I reaction for many xenobiotics and is carried out in mammals mainly by members of two protein families, namely aldo-keto reductases and short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases. In addition to their capacity to reduce xenobiotics, several of the enzymes act on endogenous compounds such as steroids or eicosanoids. One of the major carbonyl reducing enzymes found in humans is carbonyl reductase 1 (CBR1) with a very broad substrate spectrum. A paralog, carbonyl reductase 3 (CBR3) has about 70% sequence identity and has not been sufficiently characterized to date. Screening of a focused xenobiotic compound library revealed that CBR3 has narrower substrate specificity and acts on several orthoquinones, as well as isatin or the anticancer drug oracin. To further investigate structure-activity relationships between these enzymes we crystallized CBR3, performed substrate docking, site-directed mutagenesis and compared its kinetic features to CBR1. Despite high sequence similarities, the active sites differ in shape and surface properties. The data reveal that the differences in substrate specificity are largely due to a short segment of a substrate binding loop comprising critical residues Trp229/Pro230, Ala235/Asp236 as well as part of the active site formed by Met141/Gln142 in CBR1 and CBR3, respectively. The data suggest a minor role in xenobiotic metabolism for CBR3. Enhanced version This article can also be viewed as an enhanced version in which the text of the article is integrated with interactive 3D representations and animated transitions. Please note that a web plugin is required to access this enhanced functionality. Instructions for the installation and use of the web plugin are available in Text S1. PMID:19841672

  10. Iron(II)/reductant(DH2)-induced activation of dioxygen for the hydroxylation and ketonization of hydrocarbons; mimics for the cytochrome P-450 hydroxylase/reductase system.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, D T; Liu, X; Redman, C; Chong, B

    1994-12-01

    Several metal complexes [(FeII(DPAH)2 (DPAH2 = 2,6-dicarboxyl pyridine), FeII(PA)2 (PAH = picolinic acid), FeII(bpy)2(2+), FeII(OPPh3)4(2+), (Cl8TPP)FeIIIX (X = Cl, OH, SCH2Ph) [Cl8TPP = tetrakis (2,6-dichlorophenyl)porphyrin], (TPP) FeIIICl (TPP = tetraphenylporphyrin), and CuI(tpy)2+ (typ = 2,2'-6,2"-terpyridine)] in combination with one of several reductants [DH2; PhNHNHPh (mimic of dihydroflavin), PhNHNH2, ascorbic acid (H2asc), and PhCH2SH (model ligand for cysteine residue)] catalytically activate O2 (1 atm) for the hydroxylation of saturated hydrocarbons (e.g. c-C6H12-->c-C6H11OH). This chemistry closely parallels that of cytochrome P-450 proteins, and both appear to involve a Fenton-like reactive intermediate), [LxFeOOH(DH)]. With cyclohexane as the substrate the dominant product is its ketone (as well as significant amounts of its hydroperoxide). 1,4-Cyclohexadiene (with two double-allylic carbon centers) undergoes dehydrogenation to give benzene, but also yields substantial amounts of phenol via ketonization of an allylic carbon. The 1:1 FeII(bpy)2(2+)/(PhNHNH2 or H2asc), FeII(PA)2/H2asc, and (Cl8TPP)FeIIICl/PhNHNH2 combinations initiate the autoxidation of 1,4-cyclohexadiene with turnover numbers (moles of product per mole of reductant) from 71 to 26, respectively (alpha-tocophenol reduces the turnover numbers by 20-80%). With respect to aerobic biology, the present results indicate that dysfunctional transition metals (degradation products of metalloproteins) in combination with biological reductants activate O2 for reaction with organic substrates. The level of activation is similar to that for Fenton reagents and cytochrome P-450 hydroxylases. Hence, dysfunctional transition metals, reductants, and O2 are a hazardous combination within a biological matrix. PMID:7788301

  11. Photoaffinity labelling of nuclear steroid 5 alpha-reductase of rat ventral prostate.

    PubMed

    Enderle-Schmitt, U; Seitz, J; Aumüller, G

    1989-09-01

    In order to get more information on the molecular structure of the rat prostatic 5 alpha-reductase (3-oxo-5 alpha-steroid: NADP+ 4-ene-oxidoreductase, EC 1.3:1.22) a systematic photoaffinity labelling study has been performed. To irreversibly freeze the status quo of interaction, either testosterone, the physiological ligand, or diazo-MAPD (21-diazo-4-methyl-4-aza-5 alpha-pregnane-3,20-dione), a specific 5 alpha-reductase inhibitor, was irradiated with isolated nuclei or with purified nuclear membranes or with solubilized nuclear membrane proteins and checked for optimal labelling conditions. The principal substances covalently labelled were phospholipids and at a minor ratio proteins. Analysis by SDS-PAGE and autoradiofluorography revealed two labelled polypeptides with molecular weights of 20 kDa and 26 kDa. The following evidence indicates that these polypeptides might be derived from the enzyme 5 alpha-reductase: both proteins are labelled only when specific ligands for 5 alpha-reductase are used; binding can be reduced by the addition of an excess of unlabelled ligand; enzyme activity is irreversibly suppressed when irradiated in the presence of these ligands; only subcellular fractions containing 5 alpha-reductase reveal the labelled proteins; in all 5 alpha-reductase containing preparations with increasing specific activity, independent of the polypeptide pattern, the same proteins are labelled. PMID:2779229

  12. Human carbonyl reductase (CBR) localized to band 21q22. 1 by high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization displays gene dosage effects in trisomy 21 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lemieux, N. ); Malfoy, B. ); Forrest, G.L. )

    1993-01-01

    Human carbonyl reductase (CBR) belongs to a group of NADPH-dependent enzymes called aldo-keto reductases. The enzyme can function as an aldo-keto reductase or as a quinone reductase with potential for modulating quinone-mediated oxygen free radicals. The CBR gene was mapped by high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization to band 21q22.12, very close to the SOD1 locus at position 2lq22.11. CBR displayed gene dosage effects in trisomy 21 human lymphoblasts at the DNA and mRNA levels. Lymphoblasts with increasing chromosome 21 ploidy also showed increased aldo-keto reductase activity and increased quinone reductase activity. Both aldo-keto reductase activity and quinone reductase activity have been shown to be associated with carbonyl reductase. The location of CBR near SOD1 and the increased enzyme activity and potential for free radical modulation in trisomy 21 cells implicate CBR as a candidate for contributing to the pathology of certain diseases such as Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease. 28 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. Isolation of Assimilatory- and Dissimilatory-Type Sulfite Reductases from Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Po; LeGall, Jean; Peck, Harry D.

    1973-01-01

    Bisulfite reductase (desulfoviridin) and an assimilatory sulfite reductase have been purified from extracts of Desulfovibrio vulgaris. The bisulfite reductase has absorption maxima at 628, 580, 408, 390, and 279 nm, and a molecular weight of 226,000 by sedimentation equilibrium, and was judged to be free of other proteins by disk electrophoresis and ultracentrifugation. On gels, purified bisulfite reductase exhibited two green bands which coincided with activity and protein. The enzyme appears to be a tetramer but was shown to have two different types of subunits having molecular weights of 42,000 and 50,000. The chromophore did not form an alkaline ferrohemochromogen, was not reduced with dithionite or borohydride, and did not form a spectrally visible complex with CO. The assimilatory sulfite reductase has absorption maxima at 590, 545, 405 and 275 nm and a molecular weight of 26,800, and appears to consist of a single polypeptide chain as it is not dissociated into subunits by sodium dodecyl sulfate. By disk electrophoresis, purified sulfite reductase exhibited a single greenish-brown band which coincided with activity and protein. The sole product of the reduction was sulfide, and the chromophore was reduced by borohydride in the presence of sulfite. Carbon monoxide reacted with the reduced chromophore but it did not form a typical pyridine ferrohemochromogen. Thiosulfate, trithionate, and tetrathionate were not reduced by either enzyme preparation. In the presence of 8 M urea, the spectrum of bisulfite reductase resembles that of the sulfite reductase, thus suggesting a chemical relationship between the two chromophores. Images PMID:4725615

  14. Pinpointing a Mechanistic Switch Between Ketoreduction and “Ene” Reduction in Short‐Chain Dehydrogenases/Reductases

    PubMed Central

    Lygidakis, Antonios; Karuppiah, Vijaykumar; Hoeven, Robin; Ní Cheallaigh, Aisling; Leys, David; Gardiner, John M.; Toogood, Helen S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Three enzymes of the Mentha essential oil biosynthetic pathway are highly homologous, namely the ketoreductases (−)‐menthone:(−)‐menthol reductase and (−)‐menthone:(+)‐neomenthol reductase, and the “ene” reductase isopiperitenone reductase. We identified a rare catalytic residue substitution in the last two, and performed comparative crystal structure analyses and residue‐swapping mutagenesis to investigate whether this determines the reaction outcome. The result was a complete loss of native activity and a switch between ene reduction and ketoreduction. This suggests the importance of a catalytic glutamate vs. tyrosine residue in determining the outcome of the reduction of α,β‐unsaturated alkenes, due to the substrate occupying different binding conformations, and possibly also to the relative acidities of the two residues. This simple switch in mechanism by a single amino acid substitution could potentially generate a large number of de novo ene reductases. PMID:27587903

  15. Pinpointing a Mechanistic Switch Between Ketoreduction and “Ene” Reduction in Short‐Chain Dehydrogenases/Reductases

    PubMed Central

    Lygidakis, Antonios; Karuppiah, Vijaykumar; Hoeven, Robin; Ní Cheallaigh, Aisling; Leys, David; Gardiner, John M.; Toogood, Helen S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Three enzymes of the Mentha essential oil biosynthetic pathway are highly homologous, namely the ketoreductases (−)‐menthone:(−)‐menthol reductase and (−)‐menthone:(+)‐neomenthol reductase, and the “ene” reductase isopiperitenone reductase. We identified a rare catalytic residue substitution in the last two, and performed comparative crystal structure analyses and residue‐swapping mutagenesis to investigate whether this determines the reaction outcome. The result was a complete loss of native activity and a switch between ene reduction and ketoreduction. This suggests the importance of a catalytic glutamate vs. tyrosine residue in determining the outcome of the reduction of α,β‐unsaturated alkenes, due to the substrate occupying different binding conformations, and possibly also to the relative acidities of the two residues. This simple switch in mechanism by a single amino acid substitution could potentially generate a large number of de novo ene reductases. PMID:27411040

  16. Genetics Home Reference: sepiapterin reductase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... reductase enzyme. This enzyme is involved in the production of a molecule called tetrahydrobiopterin (also known as ... is responsible for the last step in the production of tetrahydrobiopterin. Tetrahydrobiopterin helps process several building blocks ...

  17. The isolation of a hexaheme cytochrome from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans and its identification as a new type of nitrite reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, M.-C.; Peck, H.D., Jr.

    1981-12-01

    Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (ATCC 27774), a strictly anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria, is able to perform anaerobic nitrate respiration in which nitrate is first reduced to nitrite by the action of nitrate reductase, and nitrite reductase then catalyzes the six-electron reduction of nitrite to ammonia. The nitrite reductase was found to be a membrane-bound enzyme and has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity. The purified enzyme has a minimal M/sub r/=66,000 as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis and contains 6 c-type heme groups/molecule. Pure nitrite reductase exhibits a typical c-type cytochrome absorption spectrum with reduced..cap alpha..-band at 552.5 nm. NADH and NADPH do not function as direct electron donors for the nitrite reductase. Desulfovibrio vulgaris hydrogenase,however, is able to transfer electrons from H/sub 2/ to the nitrite reductase using FAD as the electron transfer mediator. The dithionite-reduced nitrite reductase was demonstrated to be auto-oxidizable even in the presence of potassium cyanide. On addition of nitrite, the dithionite-reduced enzyme is re-oxidized immediately. Hydroxylamine, however, can only partially reoxidize the reduced enzyme. Ascorbate reduces the enzyme to a limited extent and the partially reduced enzyme is neither auto-oxidizable by nitrite or hydroxylamine. Purified nitrite reductase has a pH optimum in the range of 8.0-9.5 and optimal activity at 57/sup o/C. Purified nitrite reductase also has hydroxylamine reductase activity, and the K/sub m/ for nitrite was determined to be 1.14 mM.

  18. Synthesis and degradation of nitrate reductase during the cell cycle of Chlorella sorokiniana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velasco, P. J.; Tischner, R.; Huffaker, R. C.; Whitaker, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Studies on the diurnal variations of nitrate reductase (NR) activity during the life cycle of synchronized Chlorella sorokiniana cells grown with a 7:5 light-dark cycle showed that the NADH:NR activity, as well as the NR partial activities NADH:cytochrome c reductase and reduced methyl viologen:NR, closely paralleled the appearance and disappearance of NR protein as shown by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis and immunoblots. Results of pulse-labeling experiments with [35S]methionine further confirmed that diurnal variations of the enzyme activities can be entirely accounted for by the concomitant synthesis and degradation of the NR protein.

  19. The role of glutathione reductase and related enzymes on cellular redox homoeostasis network.

    PubMed

    Couto, Narciso; Wood, Jennifer; Barber, Jill

    2016-06-01

    In this review article we examine the role of glutathione reductase in the regulation, modulation and maintenance of cellular redox homoeostasis. Glutathione reductase is responsible for maintaining the supply of reduced glutathione; one of the most abundant reducing thiols in the majority of cells. In its reduced form, glutathione plays key roles in the cellular control of reactive oxygen species. Reactive oxygen species act as intracellular and extracellular signalling molecules and complex cross talk between levels of reactive oxygen species, levels of oxidised and reduced glutathione and other thiols, and antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione reductase determine the most suitable conditions for redox control within a cell or for activation of programmed cell death. Additionally, we discuss the translation and expression of glutathione reductase in a number of organisms including yeast and humans. In yeast and human cells, a single gene expresses more than one form of glutathione reductase, destined for residence in the cytoplasm or for translocation to different organelles; in plants, however, two genes encoding this protein have been described. In general, insects and kinetoplastids (a group of protozoa, including Plasmodia and Trypanosoma) do not express glutathione reductase or glutathione biosynthetic enzymes. Instead, they express either the thioredoxin system or the trypanothione system. The thioredoxin system is also present in organisms that have the glutathione system and there may be overlapping functions with cross-talk between the two systems. Finally we evaluate therapeutic targets to overcome oxidative stress associated cellular disorders. PMID:26923386

  20. Characterization of anaerobic sulfite reduction by Salmonella typhimurium and purification of the anaerobically induced sulfite reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Hallenbeck, P.C. ); Clark, M.A.; Barrett, E.L. )

    1989-06-01

    Mutants of Salmonella typhimurium that lack the biosynthetic sulfite reductase (cysI and cysJ mutants) retain the ability to reduce sulfite for growth under anaerobic conditions. Here we report studies of sulfite reduction by a cysI mutant of S. typhimurium and purification of the associated anaerobic sulfite reductase. Sulfite reduction for anaerobic growth did not require a reducing atmosphere but was prevented by an argon atmosphere contaminated with air (<0.33%). It was also prevented by the presence of 0.1 mM nitrate. Anaerobic growth in liquid minimal medium, but not on agar, was found to require additions of trace amounts (10{sup {minus}7} M) of cysteine. Spontaneous mutants that grew under the argon contaminated with air also lost the requirement for 10{sup {minus}7}M cysteine for anaerobic growth in liquid. A role for sulfite reduction in anaerobic energy generation was contraindicated by the findings that sulfite reduction did not improve cell yields, and anaerobic sulfite reductase activity was greatest during the stationary phase of growth. Sulfite reductase was purified from the cytoplasmic fraction of the anaerobically grown cysI mutant and was purified 190-fold. The most effective donor in crude extracts was NADH. NADHP and methyl viologen were, respectively, 40 and 30% as effective as NADH. Oxygen reversibly inhibited the enzyme. The anaerobic sulfite reductase showed some resemblance to the biosynthetic sulfite reductase, but apparently it has a unique, as yet unidentified function.

  1. In vitro expression of rat lens aldose reductase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Old, S E; Sato, S; Kador, P F; Carper, D A

    1990-01-01

    Aldose reductase (alditol:NADP+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.21), an enzyme that converts glucose to sorbitol, the first step of the polyol pathway, has been implicated in secondary complications of diabetes, such as cataracts, retinopathy, neuropathy, and nephropathy. Aldose reductase inhibitors have been observed to prevent or delay the onset of these complications; however, more potent and specific inhibitors are needed. Development of new inhibitors necessitates a better understanding of the molecular structure of this protein. To elucidate the structure-function relationships of aldose reductase and to develop methods of regulating this enzyme, large and homogeneous quantities of rat lens aldose reductase have been expressed in bacterial cells. A construction of the complete coding sequence and 3' untranslated region for rat lens aldose reductase was assembled in the expression vector pKK233-2 (Pharmacia). This construction expresses an active enzyme that has been purified and demonstrates kinetic, immunological, and inhibitory properties similar to rat lens aldose reductase. Images PMID:2114645

  2. Two fatty acyl reductases involved in moth pheromone biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Antony, Binu; Ding, Bao-Jian; Moto, Ken'Ichi; Aldosari, Saleh A; Aldawood, Abdulrahman S

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acyl reductases (FARs) constitute an evolutionarily conserved gene family found in all kingdoms of life. Members of the FAR gene family play diverse roles, including seed oil synthesis, insect pheromone biosynthesis, and mammalian wax biosynthesis. In insects, FAR genes dedicated to sex pheromone biosynthesis (pheromone-gland-specific fatty acyl reductase, pgFAR) form a unique clade that exhibits substantial modifications in gene structure and possesses unique specificity and selectivity for fatty acyl substrates. Highly selective and semi-selective 'single pgFARs' produce single and multicomponent pheromone signals in bombycid, pyralid, yponomeutid and noctuid moths. An intriguing question is how a 'single reductase' can direct the synthesis of several fatty alcohols of various chain lengths and isomeric forms. Here, we report two active pgFARs in the pheromone gland of Spodoptera, namely a semi-selective, C14:acyl-specific pgFAR and a highly selective, C16:acyl-specific pgFAR, and demonstrate that these pgFARs play a pivotal role in the formation of species-specific signals, a finding that is strongly supported by functional gene expression data. The study envisages a new area of research for disclosing evolutionary changes associated with C14- and C16-specific FARs in moth pheromone biosynthesis. PMID:27427355

  3. Molecular cloning and transcription expression of 3-dehydroecdysone 3α-reductase (3de 3α-reductase) in the different tissues and the developing stage from the silkworm, Bombyx mori L.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua-jun; Xin, Hu-hu; Lu, Yan; Cai, Zi-zheng; Wang, Mei-xian; Chen, Rui-Ting; Liang, Shuang; Singh, Chabungbam Orville; Kim, Jong-nam; Miao, Yun-gen

    2013-10-01

    Molting in insects is regulated by molting hormones (ecdysteroids), which are also crucial to insect growth, development, and reproduction etc. The decreased ecdysteroid in titre results from enhanced ecdysteroid inactivation reactions including the formation of 3-epiecdyson under ecdysone oxidase and 3-dehydroecdysone 3α-reductase (3DE 3α-reductase). In this paper, we cloned and characterized 3-dehydroecdysone 3α-reductase (3DE 3α-reductase) in different tissues and developing stage of the silkworm, Bombyx mori L. The B. mori 3DE 3α-reductase cDNA contains an ORF 783 bp and the deduced protein sequence containing 260 amino acid residues. Analysis showed the deduced 3DE 3α-reductase belongs to SDR family, which has the NAD(P)-binding domain. Using the Escherichia coli, a high level expression of a fusion polypeptide band of approx. 33 kDa was observed. High transcription of 3DE 3α-reductase was mainly presented in the midgut and hemolymph in the third day of fifth instar larvae in silkworm. The expression of 3DE 3α-reductase at different stages of larval showed that the activity in the early instar was high, and then reduced in late instar. This is parallel to the changes of molting hormone titer in larval. 3DE 3α-reductase is key enzyme in inactivation path of ecdysteroid. The data elucidate the regulation of 3DE 3α-reductase in ecdyteroid titer of its targeting organs and the relationship between the enzyme and metamorphosis. PMID:24038161

  4. Thioredoxin Reductase and its Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Saccoccia, Fulvio; Angelucci, Francesco; Boumis, Giovanna; Carotti, Daniela; Desiato, Gianni; Miele, Adriana E; Bellelli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Thioredoxin plays a crucial role in a wide number of physiological processes, which span from reduction of nucleotides to deoxyriboucleotides to the detoxification from xenobiotics, oxidants and radicals. The redox function of Thioredoxin is critically dependent on the enzyme Thioredoxin NADPH Reductase (TrxR). In view of its indirect involvement in the above mentioned physio/pathological processes, inhibition of TrxR is an important clinical goal. As a general rule, the affinities and mechanisms of binding of TrxR inhibitors to the target enzyme are known with scarce precision and conflicting results abound in the literature. A relevant analysis of published results as well as the experimental procedures is therefore needed, also in view of the critical interest of TrxR inhibitors. We review the inhibitors of TrxR and related flavoreductases and the classical treatment of reversible, competitive, non competitive and uncompetitive inhibition with respect to TrxR, and in some cases we are able to reconcile contradictory results generated by oversimplified data analysis. PMID:24875642

  5. Characterization of thyroidal glutathione reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Raasch, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Glutathione levels were determined in bovine and rat thyroid tissue by enzymatic conjugation with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene using glutathione S-transferase. Bovine thyroid tissue contained 1.31 {+-} 0.04 mM reduced glutathione (GSH) and 0.14 {+-} 0.02 mM oxidized glutathione (GSSG). In the rat, the concentration of GSH was 2.50 {+-} 0.05 mM while GSSG was 0.21 {+-} 0.03 mM. Glutathione reductase (GR) was purified from bovine thyroid to electrophoretic homogeneity by ion exchange, affinity and molecular exclusion chromatography. A molecular weight range of 102-109 kDa and subunit size of 55 kDa were determined for GR. Thyroidal GR was shown to be a favoprotein with one FAD per subunit. The Michaelis constants of bovine thyroidal GR were determined to be 21.8 {mu}M for NADPH and 58.8 {mu}M for GSSG. The effect of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroxine (T{sub 4}) on in vivo levels of GR and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase were determined in rat thyroid homogenates. Both enzymes were stimulated by TSH treatment and markedly reduced following T{sub 4} treatment. Lysosomal hydrolysis of ({sup 125}I)-labeled and unlabeled thyroglobulin was examined using size exclusion HPLC.

  6. Nitroimidazole Action in Entamoeba histolytica: A Central Role for Thioredoxin Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Leitsch, David; Kolarich, Daniel; Wilson, Iain B. H; Altmann, Friedrich; Duchêne, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Metronidazole, a 5-nitroimidazole drug, has been the gold standard for several decades in the treatment of infections with microaerophilic protist parasites, including Entamoeba histolytica. For activation, the drug must be chemically reduced, but little is known about the targets of the active metabolites. Applying two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, we searched for protein targets in E. histolytica. Of all proteins visualized, only five were found to form adducts with metronidazole metabolites: thioredoxin, thioredoxin reductase, superoxide dismutase, purine nucleoside phosphorylase, and a previously unknown protein. Recombinant thioredoxin reductase carrying the modification displayed reduced enzymatic activity. In treated cells, essential non-protein thiols such as free cysteine were also affected by covalent adduct formation, their levels being drastically reduced. Accordingly, addition of cysteine allowed E. histolytica to survive in the presence of otherwise lethal metronidazole concentrations and reduced protein adduct formation. Finally, we discovered that thioredoxin reductase reduces metronidazole and other nitro compounds, suggesting a new model of metronidazole activation in E. histolytica with a central role for thioredoxin reductase. By reducing metronidazole, the enzyme renders itself and associated thiol-containing proteins vulnerable to adduct formation. Because thioredoxin reductase is a ubiquitous enzyme, similar processes could occur in other eukaryotic or prokaryotic organisms. PMID:17676992

  7. An ethoxyquin-inducible aldehyde reductase from rat liver that metabolizes aflatoxin B1 defines a subfamily of aldo-keto reductases.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, E M; Judah, D J; Neal, G E; Hayes, J D

    1993-01-01

    Protection of liver against the toxic and carcinogenic effects of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) can be achieved through the induction of detoxification enzymes by chemoprotectors such as the phenolic antioxidant ethoxyquin. We have cloned and sequenced a cDNA encoding an aldehyde reductase (AFB1-AR), which is expressed in rat liver in response to dietary ethoxyquin. Expression of the cDNA in Escherichia coli and purification of the recombinant enzyme reveals that the protein exhibits aldehyde reductase activity and is capable of converting the protein-binding dialdehyde form of AFB1-dihydrodiol to the nonbinding dialcohol metabolite. We show that the mRNA encoding this enzyme is markedly elevated in the liver of rats fed an ethoxyquin-containing diet, correlating with acquisition of resistance to AFB1. AFB1-AR represents the only carcinogen-metabolizing aldehyde reductase identified to date that is induced by a chemoprotector. Alignment of the amino acid sequence of AFB1-AR with other known and putative aldehyde reductases shows that it defines a subfamily within the aldo-keto reductase superfamily. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8234296

  8. Deletion of the varicella-zoster virus large subunit of ribonucleotide reductase impairs growth of virus in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Heineman, T C; Cohen, J I

    1994-01-01

    Cells infected with varicella-zoster virus (VZV) express a viral ribonucleotide reductase which is distinct from that present in uninfected cells. VZV open reading frames 18 and 19 (ORF18 and ORF19) are homologous to the herpes simplex virus type 1 genes encoding the small and large subunits of ribonucleotide reductase, respectively. We generated recombinant VZV by transfecting cultured cells with four overlapping cosmid DNAs. To construct a virus lacking ribonucleotide reductase, we deleted 97% of VZV ORF19 from one of the cosmids. Transfection of this cosmid with the other parental cosmids yielded a VZV mutant with a 2.3-kbp deletion confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Virus-specific ribonucleotide reductase activity was not detected in cells infected with VZV lacking ORF19. Infection of melanoma cells with ORF19-deleted VZV resulted in plaques smaller than those produced by infection with the parental VZV. The mutant virus also exhibited a growth rate slightly slower than that of the parental virus. Chemical inhibition of the VZV ribonucleotide reductase has been shown to potentiate the anti-VZV activity of acyclovir. Similarly, the concentration of acyclovir required to inhibit plaque formation by 50% was threefold lower for the VZV ribonucleotide reductase deletion mutants than for parental virus. We conclude that the VZV ribonucleotide reductase large subunit is not essential for virus infection in vitro; however, deletion of the gene impairs the growth of VZV in cell culture and renders the virus more susceptible to inhibition by acyclovir. Images PMID:8151792

  9. Putative Role of the Aldo-Keto Reductase from Trypanosoma cruzi in Benznidazole Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Garavaglia, Patricia Andrea; Laverrière, Marc; Cannata, Joaquín J B; García, Gabriela Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Benznidazole (Bz), the drug used for treatment of Chagas' disease (caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi), is activated by a parasitic NADH-dependent type I nitroreductase (NTR I). However, several studies have shown that other enzymes are involved. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the aldo-keto reductase from T. cruzi (TcAKR), a NADPH-dependent oxido-reductase previously described by our group, uses Bz as the substrate. We demonstrated that both recombinant and native TcAKR enzymes reduce Bz by using NADPH, but not NADH, as a cofactor. TcAKR-overexpressing epimastigotes showed higher NADPH-dependent Bz reductase activity and a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) value for Bz 1.8-fold higher than that of the controls, suggesting that TcAKR is involved in Bz detoxification instead of activation. To understand the role of TcAKR in Bz metabolism, we studied TcAKR expression and NADPH/NADH-dependent Bz reductase activities in two T. cruzi strains with differential susceptibility to Bz: CL Brener and Nicaragua. Taking into account the results obtained with TcAKR-overexpressing epimastigotes, we expected the more resistant strain, Nicaragua, to have higher TcAKR levels than CL Brener. However, the results were the opposite. CL Brener showed 2-fold higher TcAKR expression and 5.7-fold higher NADPH-Bz reduction than the Nicaragua strain. In addition, NADH-dependent Bz reductase activity, characteristic of NTR I, was also higher in CL Brener than in Nicaragua. We conclude that although TcAKR uses Bz as the substrate, TcAKR activity is not a determinant of Bz resistance in wild-type strains and may be overcome by other enzymes involved in Bz activation, such as NADPH- and NADH-dependent reductases. PMID:26856844

  10. Biochemical Characterization of Inducible 'Reductase' Component of Benzoate Dioxygenase and Phthalate Isomer Dioxygenases from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PP4.

    PubMed

    Karandikar, Rohini; Badri, Abinaya; Phale, Prashant S

    2015-09-01

    The first step involved in the degradation of phthalate isomers (phthalate, isophthalate and terephthalate) is the double hydroxylation by respective aromatic-ring hydroxylating dioxygenases. These are two component enzymes consisting of 'oxygenase' and 'reductase' components. Soil isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PP4 degrades phthalate isomers via protocatechuate and benzoate via catechol 'ortho' ring cleavage pathway. Metabolic studies suggest that strain PP4 has carbon source-specific inducible phthalate isomer dioxygenase and benzoate dioxygenase. Thus, it was of interest to study the properties of reductase components of these enzymes. Reductase activity from phthalate isomer-grown cells was 3-5-folds higher than benzoate grown cells. In-gel activity staining profile showed a reductase activity band of R f 0.56 for phthalate isomer-grown cells as compared to R f 0.73 from benzoate-grown cells. Partially purified reductase components from phthalate isomer grown cells showed K m in the range of 30-40 μM and V max = 34-48 μmol min(-1) mg(-1). However, reductase from benzoate grown cells showed K m = 49 μM and V max = 10 μmol min(-1) mg(-1). Strikingly similar molecular and kinetic properties of reductase component from phthalate isomer-grown cells suggest that probably the same reductase component is employed in three phthalate isomer dioxygenases. However, reductase component is different, with respect to kinetic properties and zymogram analysis, from benzoate-grown cells when compared to that from phthalate isomer grown cells of PP4. PMID:26201480

  11. Relationship between nitrate reductase and nitrate uptake in phytoplankton in the Peru upwelling region

    SciTech Connect

    Blasco, D.; MacIsaac, J.J.; Packard, T.T.; Dugdale, R.C.

    1984-03-01

    Nitrate reductase (NR) activity and /sup 15/NO/sub 3//sup -/ uptake in phytoplankton were compared under different environmental conditions on two cruises in the upwelling region off Peru. The NR activity and NO/sub 3//sup -/ uptake rates responded differently to light and nutrients and the differences led to variations in the uptake: reductase ratio. Analysis of these variations suggests that the re-equilibration time of the two processes in response to environmental perturbation is an important source of variability. The nitrate uptake system responds faster than the nitrate reductase system. Considering these differences in response time the basic differences in the two processes, and the differences in their measurement, the authors conclude that the Nr activity measures the current nitrate-reducing potential, which reflects NO/sub 3//sup -/ assimilation before the sampling time, while /sup 15/NO/sub 3//sup -/ uptake measures NO/sub 3//sup -/ assimilation in the 6-h period following sampling.

  12. Inactivation kinetics of dihydrofolate reductase from Chinese hamster during urea denaturation.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, J W; Wang, Z X; Zhou, J M

    1997-01-01

    The kinetic theory of substrate reaction during modification of enzyme activity has been applied to the study of inactivation kinetics of Chinese hamster dihydrofolate reductase by urea [Tsou (1988) Adv. Enzymol. Relat. Areas Mol. Biol. 61, 381-436]. On the basis of the kinetic equation of substrate reaction in the presence of urea, all microscopic kinetic constants for the free enzyme and enzyme-substrate binary and ternary complexes have been determined. The results of the present study indicate that the denaturation of dihydrofolate reductase by urea follows single-phase kinetics, and changes in enzyme activity and tertiary structure proceed simultaneously in the unfolding process. Both substrates, NADPH and 7,8-dihydrofolate, protect dihydrofolate reductase against inactivation, and enzyme-substrate complexes lose their activity less rapidly than the free enzyme. PMID:9182696

  13. The archaeon Methanosarcina acetivorans contains a protein disulfide reductase with an iron-sulfur cluster.

    PubMed

    Lessner, Daniel J; Ferry, James G

    2007-10-01

    Methanosarcina acetivorans, a strictly anaerobic methane-producing species belonging to the domain Archaea, contains a gene cluster annotated with homologs encoding oxidative stress proteins. One of the genes (MA3736) is annotated as a gene encoding an uncharacterized carboxymuconolactone decarboxylase, an enzyme required for aerobic growth with aromatic compounds by species in the domain Bacteria. Methane-producing species are not known to utilize aromatic compounds, suggesting that MA3736 is incorrectly annotated. The product of MA3736, overproduced in Escherichia coli, had protein disulfide reductase activity dependent on a C(67)XXC(70) motif not found in carboxymuconolactone decarboxylase. We propose that MA3736 be renamed mdrA (methanosarcina disulfide reductase). Further, unlike carboxymuconolactone decarboxylase, MdrA contained an Fe-S cluster. Binding of the Fe-S cluster was dependent on essential cysteines C(67) and C(70), while cysteines C(39) and C(107) were not required. Loss of the Fe-S cluster resulted in conversion of MdrA from an inactive hexamer to a trimer with protein disulfide reductase activity. The data suggest that MdrA is the prototype of a previously unrecognized protein disulfide reductase family which contains an intermolecular Fe-S cluster that controls oligomerization as a mechanism to regulate protein disulfide reductase activity. PMID:17675382

  14. Properties of seleno-methionine substituted assimilatory nitrate reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Solomonson, L.P.; Barber, M.J. )

    1991-03-11

    Assimilatory NADH:nitrate reductase contains FAD, heme and Mo-pterin arranged in an NADH{yields}FAD{yields}heme{yields}Mo-Pterin{yields}NO{sub 3} electron transfer sequence. A functional Mo-pterin center is essential for all nitrate-reducing activities. To assess the possible functional role of Met, a Se-Met substituted NR was obtained by addition of Se-Met to ammonia-grown Chlorella cells prior to induction of NR activity. Increase in NADH:dehydrogenase partial activities and nitrate reductase protein proceeded normally following induction but little or no nitrate-reducing activity was expressed. This effect was observed with as little as 10{sup {minus}5} Se-Met and was prevented by a 10-fold excess of Met. A less pronounced effect was observed with 10{sup {minus}4}M Se-Cys. The purified Se-Met substituted enzyme exhibited the same apparent physical size, spectral properties and NADH dehydrogenase activities as control NR but was devoid of nitrate-reducing activities. These results suggest that one or more Met residues are essential for the catalytic function of the molybdo-pterin center of assimilatory NR.

  15. Structural and mechanistic insights on nitrate reductases.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Catarina; Romão, Maria João

    2015-12-01

    Nitrate reductases (NR) belong to the DMSO reductase family of Mo-containing enzymes and perform key roles in the metabolism of the nitrogen cycle, reducing nitrate to nitrite. Due to variable cell location, structure and function, they have been divided into periplasmic (Nap), cytoplasmic, and membrane-bound (Nar) nitrate reductases. The first crystal structure obtained for a NR was that of the monomeric NapA from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans in 1999. Since then several new crystal structures were solved providing novel insights that led to the revision of the commonly accepted reaction mechanism for periplasmic nitrate reductases. The two crystal structures available for the NarGHI protein are from the same organism (Escherichia coli) and the combination with electrochemical and spectroscopic studies also lead to the proposal of a reaction mechanism for this group of enzymes. Here we present an overview on the current advances in structural and functional aspects of bacterial nitrate reductases, focusing on the mechanistic implications drawn from the crystallographic data. PMID:26362109

  16. Enzymatic removal of diacetyl from beer. II. Further studies on the use of diacetyl reductase.

    PubMed

    Tolls, T N; Shovers, J; Sandine, W E; Elliker, P R

    1970-04-01

    Diacetyl removal from beer was studied with whole cells and crude enzyme extracts of yeasts and bacteria. Cells of Streptococcus diacetilactis 18-16 destroyed diacetyl in solutions at a rate almost equal to that achieved by the addition of whole yeast cells. Yeast cells impregnated in a diatomaceous earth filter bed removed all diacetyl from solutions percolated through the bed. Undialyzed crude enzyme extracts from yeast cells removed diacetyl very slowly from beer at its normal pH (4.1); at a pH of 5.0 or higher, rapid diacetyl removal was achieved. Dialyzed crude enzyme extracts from yeast cells were found to destroy diacetyl in a manner quite similar to that of diacetyl reductase from Aerobacter aerogenes, and both the bacterial and the yeast extracts were stimulated significantly by the addition of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). Diacetyl reductase activity of four strains of A. aerogenes was compared; three of the strains produced enzyme with approximately twice the specific activity of the other strain (8724). Gel electrophoresis results indicated that at least three different NADH-oxidizing enzymes were present in crude extracts of diacetyl reductase. Sephadex-gel chromotography separated NADH oxidase from diacetyl reductase. It was also noted that ethyl alcohol concentrations approximately equivalent to those found in beer were quite inhibitory to diacetyl reductase. PMID:4315861

  17. Purification and thermal dependence of glutathione reductase from two forage legume species.

    PubMed

    Kidambi, S P; Mahan, J R; Matches, A G

    1990-02-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia Scop.) are forage legumes that differ in their responses to high and low temperature stresses. Thermal limitations on the function of glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2) could adversely affect the ability of the plant to cope with adverse temperatures. Our objectives were to (a) purify glutathione reductase from ;Cimarron' alfalfa and ;PI 212241' sainfoin and (b) investigate the intraspecies variation in the thermal dependency of glutathione reductase from each of three cultivars of alfalfa and two cultivars and an introduction of sainfoin. Glutathione reductase was purified 1222-and 1948-fold to a specific activity of 281 and 273 units per milligram of protein, from one species each of alfalfa and sainfoin, respectively. The relative molecular mass of the protein was approximately 140 kilodaltons with subunits of 57 and 37 kilodaltons under denaturing conditions. The activation energies were approximately 50 kilojoules per mole for both species. Over a 5 to 45 degrees C temperature gradient, large variation among species and genotypes within species was found for: (a) the minimum apparent Michaelis constant (0.6-2.1 micromoles of NADPH), (b) the temperature at which the minimum apparent Michaelis constant was observed (10-25 degrees C), and (c) the thermal kinetic windows (6-19 degrees C width). Future studies will focus on relating the thermal dependence of the Michaelis constant of the glutathione reductases and plant growth rates and forage quality of these species throughout the growing season. PMID:16667283

  18. Inhibition of NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase by the model sulfur mustard vesicant 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide is associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Gray, Joshua P; Mishin, Vladimir; Heck, Diane E; Laskin, Debra L; Laskin, Jeffrey D

    2010-09-01

    Inhalation of vesicants including sulfur mustard can cause significant damage to the upper airways. This is the result of vesicant-induced modifications of proteins important in maintaining the integrity of the lung. Cytochrome P450s are the major enzymes in the lung mediating detoxification of sulfur mustard and its metabolites. NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase is a flavin-containing electron donor for cytochrome P450. The present studies demonstrate that the sulfur mustard analog, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), is a potent inhibitor of human recombinant cytochrome P450 reductase, as well as native cytochrome P450 reductase from liver microsomes of saline and beta-naphthoflavone-treated rats, and cytochrome P450 reductase from type II lung epithelial cells. Using rat liver microsomes from beta-naphthoflavone-treated rats, CEES was found to inhibit CYP 1A1 activity. This inhibition was overcome by microsomal cytochrome P450 reductase from saline-treated rats, which lack CYP 1A1 activity, demonstrating that the CEES inhibitory activity was selective for cytochrome P450 reductase. Cytochrome P450 reductase also generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) via oxidation of NADPH. In contrast to its inhibitory effects on the reduction of cytochrome c and CYP1A1 activity, CEES was found to stimulate ROS formation. Taken together, these data demonstrate that sulfur mustard vesicants target cytochrome P450 reductase and that this effect may be an important mechanism mediating oxidative stress and lung injury. PMID:20561902

  19. Inhibition of NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase by the model sulfur mustard vesicant 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide is associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Joshua P.; Mishin, Vladimir; Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2010-09-01

    Inhalation of vesicants including sulfur mustard can cause significant damage to the upper airways. This is the result of vesicant-induced modifications of proteins important in maintaining the integrity of the lung. Cytochrome P450s are the major enzymes in the lung mediating detoxification of sulfur mustard and its metabolites. NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase is a flavin-containing electron donor for cytochrome P450. The present studies demonstrate that the sulfur mustard analog, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), is a potent inhibitor of human recombinant cytochrome P450 reductase, as well as native cytochrome P450 reductase from liver microsomes of saline and {beta}-naphthoflavone-treated rats, and cytochrome P450 reductase from type II lung epithelial cells. Using rat liver microsomes from {beta}-naphthoflavone-treated rats, CEES was found to inhibit CYP 1A1 activity. This inhibition was overcome by microsomal cytochrome P450 reductase from saline-treated rats, which lack CYP 1A1 activity, demonstrating that the CEES inhibitory activity was selective for cytochrome P450 reductase. Cytochrome P450 reductase also generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) via oxidation of NADPH. In contrast to its inhibitory effects on the reduction of cytochrome c and CYP1A1 activity, CEES was found to stimulate ROS formation. Taken together, these data demonstrate that sulfur mustard vesicants target cytochrome P450 reductase and that this effect may be an important mechanism mediating oxidative stress and lung injury.

  20. DNA damage induction of ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Elledge, S J; Davis, R W

    1989-01-01

    RNR2 encodes the small subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, the enzyme that catalyzes the first step in the pathway for the production of deoxyribonucleotides needed for DNA synthesis. RNR2 is a member of a group of genes whose activities are cell cycle regulated and that are transcriptionally induced in response to the stress of DNA damage. An RNR2-lacZ fusion was used to further characterize the regulation of RNR2 and the pathway responsible for its response to DNA damage. beta-Galactosidase activity in yeast strains containing the RNR2-lacZ fusion was inducible in response to DNA-damaging agents (UV light, 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide [4-NQO], and methyl methanesulfonate [MMS]) and agents that block DNA replication (hydroxyurea [HU] and methotrexate) but not heat shock. When MATa cells were arrested in G1 by alpha-factor, RNR2 mRNA was still inducible by DNA damage, indicating that the observed induction can occur outside of S phase. In addition, RNR2 induction was not blocked by the presence of cycloheximide and is therefore likely to be independent of protein synthesis. A mutation, rnr2-314, was found to confer hypersensitivity to HU and increased sensitivity to MMS. In rnr2-314 mutant strains, the DNA damage stress response was found to be partially constitutive as well as hypersensitive to induction by HU but not MMS. The induction properties of RNR2 were examined in a rad4-2 mutant background; in this genetic background, RNR2 was hypersensitive to induction by 4-NQO but not MMS. Induction of the RNR2-lacZ fusion in a RAD(+) strain in response to 4-NQO was not enhanced by the presence of an equal number of rad4-2 cells that lacked the fusion, implying that the DNA damage stress response in cell autonomous. Images PMID:2513480

  1. The effect of copper and gallium compounds on ribonucleotide reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, J.

    1992-01-01

    The mode of action of copper complexes (CuL and CuKTS) and gallium compounds (gallium nitrate and citrate) in cytotoxicity was studied. The effects of these agents on the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase was investigated by monitoring the tyrosyl free radical present in the active site of the enzyme through electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Ribonucleotide reductase, a key enzyme in cellular proliferation, consists of two subunits. M1, a dimer of molecular weight 170,000 contains the substrate and effector binding sites. M2, a dimer of molecular weight 88,000, contains non-heme iron and tyrosyl free radical essential for the activity of the enzyme. In studies using copper complexes, the cellular oxidative chemistry was examined by ESR studies on adduct formation with membranes, and oxidation of thiols. Membrane thiols were oxidized through the reduction of the ESR signal of the thiol adduct and the analysis of sulfhydryl content. Using the radiolabel [sup 59]Fe, the inhibitory action of copper thiosemicarbazones on cellular iron uptake was shown. The inhibitory action of CuL on ribonucleotide reductase was shown by the quenching of the tyrosyl free radical on the M2 subunit. The hypothesis that gallium directly interacts with the M2 subunit of the enzyme and displaces the iron from it was proven. The tyrosyl free radical signal from cell lysates was inhibited by the direct addition of gallium compounds. Gallium content in the cells was measured by a fluorimetric method, to ensure the presence of sufficient amounts of gallium to compete with the iron in the M2 subunit. The enzyme activity, measured by the conversion of [sup 14]C-CDP to the labeled deoxy CDP, was inhibited by the addition of gallium nitrate in a cell free assay system. The immunoprecipitation studies of the [sup 59]Fe labeled M2 protein using the monoclonal antibody directed against this subunit suggested that gallium releases iron from the M2 subunit.

  2. Pharmacokinetic parameters and mechanisms of inhibition of rat type 1 and 2 steroid 5alpha-reductases: determinants for different in vivo activities of GI198745 and finasteride in the rat.

    PubMed

    Stuart, J D; Lee, F W; Simpson Noel, D; Kadwell, S H; Overton, L K; Hoffman, C R; Kost, T A; Tippin, T K; Yeager, R L; Batchelor, K W; Bramson, H N

    2001-10-01

    The interaction of baculovirus expressed rat steroid 5alpha-reductase types 1 and 2 (r5AR1 and r5AR2) with 17beta-N-(2,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)carbamoyl-4-aza-5alpha-androst-1-en-3-one (GI198745) was investigated at pH 7 and 37 degrees. This 5alpha-reductase inhibitor was found previously to be a time-dependent inhibitor of the two human 5alpha-reductase isozymes. In contrast, we demonstrate in the present study that although GI198745 is a potent time-dependent inhibitor of r5AR2, it is a classical rapid-equilibrium inhibitor of r5AR1. This type of behavior with human and rat 5alpha-reductases has been shown for the inhibitor 17beta-(N-tert-butylcarbamoyl)-4-aza-5alpha-androst-1-en-3-one (finasteride), a current therapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia. Inhibition of r5AR1 by GI198745 was competitive with testosterone and followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a K(i) value of 0.3 +/- 0.02 nM. Data for the inhibition of r5AR2 by GI198745 were consistent with a two-step mechanism, where K(i) is the dissociation constant for an initial enzyme-inhibitor complex and k(3) is the rate constant for the second slow step. The pseudo-bimolecular rate constant (k(3)/K(i)) for the association of GI198745 with r5AR2 was (2.0 +/- 0.4) x 10(7) M(-1) sec(-1). The high affinity of this inhibitor for r5AR2 was further demonstrated by the inability of the enzyme-inhibitor complex to dissociate after approximately 7 days of dialysis at 4 degrees. Both GI198745 and finasteride appear to inactivate r5AR2 by apparent irreversible modification, but are classical, reversible inhibitors of r5AR1. Therefore, we hypothesize that because of its pharmacokinetic parameters and increased potency against r5AR1, GI198745 is more effective than finasteride in preventing the growth of the rat prostate. PMID:11543729

  3. Tungstate, a Molybdate Analog Inactivating Nitrate Reductase, Deregulates the Expression of the Nitrate Reductase Structural Gene

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Mingde; Moureaux, Thérèse; Caboche, Michel

    1989-01-01

    Nitrate reductase (NR, EC 1.6.6.1) from higher plants is a homodimeric enzyme carrying a molybdenum cofactor at the catalytic site. Tungsten can be substituted for molybdenum in the cofactor structure, resulting in an inactive enzyme. When nitratefed Nicotiana tabacum plants were grown on a nutrient solution in which tungstate was substituted for molybdate, NR activity in the leaves decreased to a very low level within 24 hours while NR protein accumulated progressively to a level severalfold higher than the control after 6 days. NR mRNA level in molybdate-grown plants exhibited a considerable day-night fluctuation. However, when plants were treated with tungstate, NR mRNA level remained very high. NR activity and protein increased over a 24-hour period when nitrate was added back to N-starved molybdate-grown plants. NR mRNA level increased markedly during the first 2 hours and then decreased. In the presence of tungstate, however, the induction of NR activity by nitrate was totally abolished while high levels of NR protein and mRNA were both induced, and the high level of NR mRNA was maintained over a 10-hour period. These results sug