Science.gov

Sample records for 3001-b 3004-b t-30

  1. Project management plan for inactive tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, 3013, and T-30 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    *This document identifies the roles and responsibilities of the project team members and identifies the project scope, schedule, and cost reporting activities for a maintenance activity to remove and dispose of three inactive liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW) system tanks and to isolate and fill one LLLW tank with grout. Tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, and T-30 are located in concrete vaults and tank 3013 is buried directly in the soil. The maintenance project consists of cutting the existing pipes attached to the tanks; capping the piping to be left in place; removing the tanks and filling the vaults with grout for tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, and T-30; and filling tank 3013 with grout. Because the LLLW line serving tank 3001-B will be needed for discharging the 3001 canal demineralizer back flush and regeneration waste to tank WC-19, tank 3001-B will be replaced with a section of piping.

  2. Maintenance Action Work Plan for Waste Area Grouping 1 inactive tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, T-30, and 3013 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This Maintenance Action Work Plan has been prepared to document the activities and procedures for the remediation of four inactive, low-level radioactive tanks at Waste Area Grouping 1, from the Category D list of tanks in the Federal Facility Agreement for the Oak Ridge Reservation (EPA et al. 1994). The four tanks to remediated are tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, T-30, and 3013. Three of the tanks (3001-B, 3004-B, and T-30) will be physically removed from the ground. Because of logistical issues associted with excavation and site access, the fourth tank (3013) will be grouted in place and permanently closed.

  3. STS-32 crewmembers pose with LDEF model at T-30 press conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-32 crewmembers pose with a model of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) at T-30 preflight press conference in the JSC Auditorium and Public Affairs Facility Bldg 2. From right to left are Mission Specialist (MS) G. David Low, MS Marsha S. Ivins, MS Bonnie J. Dunbar, Pilot James D. Wetherbee, and Commander Daniel C. Brandenstein standing behind a LDEF scale model and in front of a mural of a space shuttle launch.

  4. Laboratory and field evaluation of spinosad formulation Natular T30 against immature Culex mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Su, Tianyun; Cheng, Min-Lee; Thieme, Jennifer

    2014-07-01

    Spinosad consisting of spinosyn A and D is derived from a naturally occurring, soil-dwelling bacterium, Saccharopolyspora spinosa. Spinosyns are neurotoxins that activate postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine and gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors and cause rapid excitation of the insect nervous system and ultimately exhaustion and death of the targets. During the past 30 yr, numerous spinosad-based formulations have been developed and applied to control various arthropod pests of agricultural importance. Natular T-30 is a new slow-release formulation containing 8.33% spinosad for use in mosquito larval control programs. High-level larvicidal activity, as indicated by low LC50 and LC90 levels, was demonstrated against Culex quinquefasciatus Say in the laboratory. Larvicidal efficacy was evaluated in semifield microcosms, field mesocosms, and underground storm drains. Fair performance against larval populations of Culex spp. and other mosquito species was achieved, although low efficacy during the initial few days posttreatment was encountered. This slow-release formulation will play an important role in controlling mosquitoes in persistent breeding sources. PMID:25118417

  5. Absorption spectral band width of charge transfer transition of E(T)(30) dye in homogeneous and heterogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Das, Parimal Kumar; Pramanik, Ramkrishna; Bagchi, Sanjib

    2003-06-01

    Solvation characteristics in homogeneous and heterogeneous media have been probed by monitoring the band width of ICT band of 2,6-di-phenyl-4(2,4,6-triphenyl-1-pyridino) phenolate, the indicator solute for E(T)(30) scale, in pure, mixed binary solvents and aqueous micellar solution. Non-ideal solvation behaviour is observed in all the binary solvent mixtures. Index of preferential solvation has been calculated as a function of solvent composition. Study in micellar media indicates that the dye is located at the micelle-water interface. The effects of variation of micelle concentration, temperature and electrolyte concentration have also been studies. PMID:12736053

  6. Test wells T23, T29, and T30, White Sands Missile Range and Fort Bliss Military Reservation, Dona Ana County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Myers, R.G.; Pinckley, K.M.

    1984-01-01

    Three test wells, T23, T29, and T30, were drilled in south-central New Mexico as part of a joint military training program sponsored by the U.S. Army in November 1982. Test well T23 was drilled as an exploratory and monitoring well in the proposed Soledad well field at the Fort Bliss Military Reservation. Test wells T29 and T30 were drilled at White Sands Missile Range. Test well T29 was drilled as an observation well in the vicinity of the outfall channel from the sewage treatment plant. Test well T30 was drilled as an observation well for a landfill south of the well site. Information obtained from these wells includes lithologic logs for all wells and borehole-geophysical logs from the cased wells for test wells T29 and T30. (USGS)

  7. Measurement of the MACS of {sup 159}Tb(n, γ) at kT=30 keV by Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Praena, J.; Mastinu, P.F.; Pignatari, M.; Quesada, J.M.; Capote, R.; Morilla, Y.

    2014-06-15

    The measurement of the Maxwellian-Averaged Cross-Section (MACS) of the {sup 159}Tb(n, γ) reaction at kT=30 keV by the activation technique is presented. An innovative method for the generation of Maxwellian neutron spectra at kT=30 keV is used. An experimental value of 2166±181 mb agrees well with the MACS value derived from the ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluation, but is higher than KADoNiS recommended value of 1580±150 mb. Astrophysical implications are studied.

  8. Small-Scale Trials Suggest Increasing Applications of Natular™ XRT and Natular™ T30 Larvicide Tablets May Not Improve Mosquito Reduction in Some Catch Basins.

    PubMed

    Harbison, Justin E; Henry, Marlon; Corcoran, Peter C; Zazra, Dave; Xamplas, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Stormwater catch basins are commonly treated with larvicides by mosquito control agencies to reduce local populations of mosquito species capable of transmitting West Nile virus. Recent evidence suggests that extended-release larvicides formulated to last up to 180 days in catch basins may not be effective in some basins due to chronic flushing, rapid dissolution, or burying of treatment in sump debris. To investigate if increasing the number of applications could improve effectiveness, a small study was performed over 13 weeks in 2015 to evaluate two extended-release larvicides (Natular™ XRT 180-day tablets and Natular™ T30 30-day tablets) and a larvicide oil (CocoBear™). Over the course of 13 weeks, three groups of eight basins were monitored for mosquitoes, each group receiving Natular™ XRT, Natular™ T30, or CocoBear™ larvicides. All basins received a single application at the beginning of the study period. Once mosquitoes in a basin surpassed the treatment threshold during weekly monitoring, an additional application of the associated larvicide was given to that basin. The number of applications during the study period ranged from 1 to 10 for CocoBear™ basins, 1 to 7 for T30 basins, and 2 to 8 for XRT basins. Overall, the average number of applications and the cost of larvicide per basin were 4.4 applications at $0.66 per Coco-Bear™ basin, 4.4 applications at $6.26 per T30 basin, and 4 applications at $16.56 per XRT basin. Basins treated with XRT and T30 needed reapplications more often than expected, yet were no more effective than CocoBear™, suggesting that increasing the frequency of application of these larvicide formulations may not provide increased mosquito reduction in some basins. PMID:26792998

  9. Small-Scale Trials Suggest Increasing Applications of Natular™ XRT and Natular™ T30 Larvicide Tablets May Not Improve Mosquito Reduction in Some Catch Basins

    PubMed Central

    Harbison, Justin E.; Henry, Marlon; Corcoran, Peter C.; Zazra, Dave; Xamplas, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Stormwater catch basins are commonly treated with larvicides by mosquito control agencies to reduce local populations of mosquito species capable of transmitting West Nile virus. Recent evidence suggests that extended-release larvicides formulated to last up to 180 days in catch basins may not be effective in some basins due to chronic flushing, rapid dissolution, or burying of treatment in sump debris. To investigate if increasing the number of applications could improve effectiveness, a small study was performed over 13 weeks in 2015 to evaluate two extended-release larvicides (Natular™ XRT 180-day tablets and Natular™ T30 30-day tablets) and a larvicide oil (CocoBear™). Over the course of 13 weeks, three groups of eight basins were monitored for mosquitoes, each group receiving Natular™ XRT, Natular™ T30, or CocoBear™ larvicides. All basins received a single application at the beginning of the study period. Once mosquitoes in a basin surpassed the treatment threshold during weekly monitoring, an additional application of the associated larvicide was given to that basin. The number of applications during the study period ranged from 1 to 10 for CocoBear™ basins, 1 to 7 for T30 basins, and 2 to 8 for XRT basins. Overall, the average number of applications and the cost of larvicide per basin were 4.4 applications at $0.66 per Coco-Bear™ basin, 4.4 applications at $6.26 per T30 basin, and 4 applications at $16.56 per XRT basin. Basins treated with XRT and T30 needed reapplications more often than expected, yet were no more effective than CocoBear™, suggesting that increasing the frequency of application of these larvicide formulations may not provide increased mosquito reduction in some basins. PMID:26792998

  10. Super-hot (T > 30 MK) thermal plasma in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, Amir

    2010-05-01

    The Sun offers a convenient nearby laboratory to study the physical processes of particle acceleration and impulsive energy release in magnetized plasmas that occur throughout the universe, from planetary magnetospheres to black hole accretion disks. Solar flares are the most powerful explosions in the solar system, releasing up to 1032-1033 ergs over only 100-1,000 seconds. These events can accelerate electrons up to hundreds of MeV and can heat plasma to tens of MK, exceeding ∼40 MK in the most intense flares. The accelerated electrons and the hot plasma each contain tens of percent of the total flare energy, indicating an intimate link between particle acceleration, plasma heating, and flare energy release. X-ray emission is the most direct signature of these processes; accelerated electrons emit hard X-ray bremsstrahlung as they collide with the ambient atmosphere, while hot plasma emits soft X-rays from both bremsstrahlung and excitation lines of highly-ionized atoms. The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observes this emission from ∼3 keV to ∼17 MeV with unprecedented spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution, providing the most precise measurements of the X-ray flare spectrum and enabling the most accurate characterization of the X-ray-emitting hot and accelerated electron populations. RHESSI observations show that "super-hot" temperatures exceeding ∼30 MK are common in large flares but are achieved almost exclusively by X-class events and appear to be strictly associated with coronal magnetic field strengths exceeding ∼170 Gauss; these results suggest a direct link between the magnetic field and heating of super-hot plasma, and that super-hot flares may require a minimum threshold of field strength and overall flare intensity. Imaging and spectroscopic observations of the 2002 July 23 X4.8 event show that the superhot plasma is both spectrally and spatially distinct from the usual ∼10-20 MK plasma observed in nearly all flares, and is located above rather than at the top of the loop containing the cooler plasma. It exists with high density even during the pre-impulsive phase, which is dominated by coronal non-thermal emission with negligible footpoints, suggesting that particle acceleration and plasma heating are intrinsically related but that, rather than the traditional picture of chromospheric evaporation, the origins of super-hot plasma may be the compression and subsequent thermalization of ambient material accelerated in the reconnection region above the flare loop, a physically-plausible process not detectable with current instruments but potentially observable with future telescopes. Explaining the origins of super-hot plasma would thus ultimately help to understand the mechanisms of particle acceleration and impulsive energy release in solar flares.

  11. SU-E-T-30: Absorbed Doses Determined by Texture Analysis of Gafchromic EBT3 Films Using Scanning Electron Microscopy: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S; Kim, H; Ye, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The texture analysis method is useful to estimate structural features of images as color, size, and shape. The study aims to determine a dose-response curve by texture analysis of Gafchromic EBT3 film images using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Methods: The uncoated Gafchromic EBT3 films were prepared to directly scan over the active surface layer of EBT3 film using SEM. The EBT3 films were exposed at a dose range of 0 to 10 Gy using a 6 MV photon beam. The exposed film samples were SEM-scanned at 100X, 1000X, and 3000X magnifications. The four texture features (Homogeneity, Correlation, Contrast, and Energy) were calculated based on the gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) derived from the SEM images at each dose. To validate a correlation between delivered doses and texture features, an R-squared value in linear regression was tested. Results: The results showed that the Correlation index was more suitable as dose indices than the other three texture features due to higher linearity and sensitivity of the dose response curves. Further the Correlation index of 3000X magnified SEM images with 9 pixel offsets had an R-squared value of 0.964. The differences between the delivered doses and the doses measured by this method were 0.9, 1.2, 0.2, and 0.2 Gy at 5, 10, 15, and 20 Gy, respectively. Conclusion: It seems to be feasible to convert micro-scale structural features of {sub χ}t{sub χχχ}he EBT3 films to absorbed doses using the texture analysis method.

  12. 78 FR 52097 - Revision to the Manual of Regulations and Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-22

    ... Manual of Regulations and Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency Management, 77 FR 75567, 75567-68 (Dec... U.S.C. 901 et seq., Executive Order 12046 (March 27, 1978), 43 FR 13349, 3 CFR 1978 Comp. at 158... (March 27, 1978), 43 FR 13349, 3 CFR 1978 Comp., p. 158. 0 2. Section 300.1(b) is revised to read...

  13. 76 FR 18652 - Revision to the Manual of Regulations and Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... Federal Radio Frequency Management, 75 FR 54790, 54791 (Sept. 9, 2010) (revising the Manual through May... 47 U.S.C. 901 et seq., Executive Order 12046 (March 27, 1978), 43 FR 13349, 3 CFR 1978 Comp. at 158... Order 12046 (March 27, 1978), 43 FR 13349, 3 CFR 1978 Comp., p. 158. 0 2. Section 300.1 (b) is...

  14. 77 FR 75567 - Revision to the Manual of Regulations and Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-21

    ... Radio Frequency Management, 76 FR 56984, 56984-85 (Sept. 15, 2011) (revising the Manual through May 2011... 47 U.S.C. 901 et seq., Executive Order 12046 (March 27, 1978), 43 FR 13349, 3 CFR 1978 Comp. at 158... (March 27, 1978), 43 FR 13349, 3 CFR 1978 Comp., p. 158. 0 2. Section 300.1 (b) is revised to read...

  15. 76 FR 56984 - Revision to the Manual of Regulations and Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-15

    ... Radio Frequency Management, 76 FR 18652, 18652-53 (April 5, 2011) (revising the Manual through September... 47 U.S.C. 901 et seq., Executive Order 12046 (March 27, 1978), 43 FR 13349, 3 CFR 1978 Comp. at 158... Order 12046 (March 27, 1978), 43 FR 13349, 3 CFR 1978 Comp., p. 158. 0 2. Section 300.1(b) is revised...

  16. 75 FR 54790 - Revision to the Manual of Regulations and Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-09

    ... Radio Frequency Management, 75 FR 6818 (Feb. 11, 2010) (revising the Manual through September 2009... 47 U.S.C. 901 et seq., Executive Order 12046 (March 27, 1978), 43 FR 13349, 3 CFR 1978 Comp. at 158... 27, 1978), 43 FR 13349, 3 CFR 1978 Comp., p. 158. 0 2. Section 300.1 (b) is revised to read...

  17. 30 CFR 935.15 - Approval of Ohio regulatory program amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...), -07; 13-4-03 through -05. January 6, 1983 May 24, 1983 ORC as amended by SB 240 and 323. June 10, 1983...-03, -04. July 18, 1983 October 13, 1983 ORC 1513:01(G)(2), (U); -13(A)(1), (C)(1), (3). January 30...-04(B)(5), (G)(15); and Division Advisory Memo No. 31. July 23, 1984 November 1, 1984 ORC contained...

  18. Molecular diversity of Citrus tristeza virus in California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is a serious citrus pathogen worldwide. Recent genetic studies have identified five standard CTV genotypic groups: T30, VT, T36, T3, and B165/T68. Field surveys performed in California in 2008-2010 identified primarily MCA13-negative CTV isolates with T30-like genotype. C...

  19. On the nature of charge carrier scattering in Ag{sub 2}Se at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Jafarov, M. B.

    2010-10-15

    The electric and thermoelectric properties of silver selenide in the temperature range of 4.2-300 K have been studied. The data obtained are interpreted within the theory of one-type carriers and Kane dispersion relation, with allowance for the character of electron-electron interaction. It is established that, for the concentrations n {<=} 7.8 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}, charge carriers are scattered by impurity ions at T {<=} 30 K and by acoustic and optical phonons and point defects at T {>=} 30 K. Electron-electron interactions are found to be elastic at T < 30 K.

  20. Home Ventilator Guide

    MedlinePlus

    ... alarms, inadequate pressures for some people, higher electricity operating costs, and discomfort from EPAP. Many of the ... H Oxygen = O Monnal T30 Air Liquide Medical Systems, Inc. www. airliquidemedicalsystems. com v CPAP, S, ST, T, ...

  1. Effect of hand-arm exercise on venous blood constituents during leg exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, N.; Silver, J. E.; Greenawalt, S.; Kravik, S. E.; Geelen, G.

    1985-01-01

    Contributions by ancillary hand and arm actions to the changes in blood constituents effected by leg exercises on cycle ergometer were assessed. Static or dynamic hand-arm exercises were added to the leg exercise (50 percent VO2 peak)-only control regimens for the subjects (19-27 yr old men) in the two experimental groups. Antecubital venous blood was analyzed at times 0, 15, and 30 min (T0, T15, and T30) for serum Na(+), K(+), osmolality, albumin, total CA(2+), and glucose; blood hemoglobin, hematocrit, and lactic acid; and change in plasma volume. Only glucose and lactate values were affected by additional arm exercise. Glucose decreased 4 percent at T15 and T30 after static exercise, and by 2 percent at T15 (with no change at T30) after dynamic arm exercise. Conversely, lactic acid increased by 20 percent at T30 after static exercise, and by 14 percent by T15 and 6 percent at T30 after dynamic arm exercise. It is concluded that additional arm movements, performed usually when gripping the handle-bar on the cycle ergometer, could introduce significant errors in measured venous concentrations of glucose and lactate in the leg-exercised subjects.

  2. Effects of subthalamic nucleus stimulation on motor cortex plasticity in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Jin; Udupa, Kaviraja; Ni, Zhen; Moro, Elena; Gunraj, Carolyn; Mazzella, Filomena; Lozano, Andres M.; Hodaie, Mojgan; Lang, Anthony E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We hypothesized that subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) will improve long-term potentiation (LTP)-like plasticity in motor cortex in Parkinson disease (PD). Methods: We studied 8 patients with PD treated with STN-DBS and 9 age-matched healthy controls. Patients with PD were studied in 4 sessions in medication (Med) OFF/stimulator (Stim) OFF, Med-OFF/Stim-ON, Med-ON/Stim-OFF, and Med-ON/Stim-ON states in random order. Motor evoked potential amplitude and cortical silent period duration were measured at baseline before paired associated stimulation (PAS) and at 3 different time intervals (T0, T30, T60) up to 60 minutes after PAS in the abductor pollicis brevis and abductor digiti minimi muscles. Results: Motor evoked potential size significantly increased after PAS in controls (+67.7% of baseline at T30) and in patients in the Med-ON/Stim-ON condition (+55.8% of baseline at T30), but not in patients in the Med-OFF/Stim-OFF (−0.4% of baseline at T30), Med-OFF/Stim-ON (+10.3% of baseline at T30), and Med-ON/Stim-OFF conditions (+17.3% of baseline at T30). Cortical silent period duration increased after PAS in controls but not in patients in all test conditions. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that STN-DBS together with dopaminergic medications restore LTP-like plasticity in motor cortex in PD. Restoration of cortical plasticity may be one of the mechanisms of how STN-DBS produces clinical benefit. PMID:26156511

  3. The prevalence of the citrus tristeza virus trifoliate resistant breaking genotype among Puerto Rican isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates have been grouped previously into five genotypes: T3, T30, T36, VT, B165 based on symptoms, host range and genomic sequence data. A sixth genotype has recently been identified with the novel property of replicating in trifoliate orange trees, a non host for the o...

  4. 12 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Method to Derive Pricing Multipliers and Uniform Amount

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... weighted average CAMELS component rating referred to in 12 CFR 327.9(d)(2)(i): Equation 7 PiT = + 30.211... Uniform Amount A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 327 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY ASSESSMENTS In General Pt. 327, Subpt. A, App....

  5. 12 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Method to Derive Pricing Multipliers and Uniform Amount

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... weighted average CAMELS component rating referred to in 12 CFR 327.9(d)(2)(i): Equation 7 PiT = + 30.211... Uniform Amount A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 327 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY ASSESSMENTS In General Pt. 327, Subpt. A, App....

  6. 12 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Method to Derive Pricing Multipliers and Uniform Amount

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... weighted average CAMELS component rating referred to in 12 CFR 327.9(d)(2)(i): Equation 7 PiT = + 30.211... Uniform Amount A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 327 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY ASSESSMENTS In General Pt. 327, Subpt. A, App....

  7. 27 CFR 9.74 - Columbia Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... 29 N. and T 30 N. at Ninemile Flat; (26) Then east following the township line between T. 29 N. and T... southeast in a straight line for approximately 4.7 miles to the source of Rocky Ford Creek near a fish hatchery; (32) Then south following Rocky Ford Creek and Moses Lake to U.S. Interstate 90 southwest of...

  8. 27 CFR 9.74 - Columbia Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... 29 N. and T 30 N. at Ninemile Flat; (26) Then east following the township line between T. 29 N. and T... southeast in a straight line for approximately 4.7 miles to the source of Rocky Ford Creek near a fish hatchery; (32) Then south following Rocky Ford Creek and Moses Lake to U.S. Interstate 90 southwest of...

  9. 27 CFR 9.74 - Columbia Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... 29 N. and T 30 N. at Ninemile Flat; (26) Then east following the township line between T. 29 N. and T... southeast in a straight line for approximately 4.7 miles to the source of Rocky Ford Creek near a fish hatchery; (32) Then south following Rocky Ford Creek and Moses Lake to U.S. Interstate 90 southwest of...

  10. 27 CFR 9.74 - Columbia Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... 29 N. and T 30 N. at Ninemile Flat; (26) Then east following the township line between T. 29 N. and T... southeast in a straight line for approximately 4.7 miles to the source of Rocky Ford Creek near a fish hatchery; (32) Then south following Rocky Ford Creek and Moses Lake to U.S. Interstate 90 southwest of...

  11. 27 CFR 9.74 - Columbia Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... 29 N. and T 30 N. at Ninemile Flat; (26) Then east following the township line between T. 29 N. and T... southeast in a straight line for approximately 4.7 miles to the source of Rocky Ford Creek near a fish hatchery; (32) Then south following Rocky Ford Creek and Moses Lake to U.S. Interstate 90 southwest of...

  12. Recombination defines two gene modules and provides for increased genetic diversity in a narrow host range plant virus.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates T36, T68-1 and NS25 showed phylogenetic incongruities between sequences involved in viral RNA replication and those involved in movement and other viral functions. This incongruity was not found in the sequences of isolates T3, T30, T385, VT and T318A. Distance...

  13. A novel thermoalkaliphilic xylanase from Gordonia sp. is salt, solvent and surfactant tolerant.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Radhika; Monika; Subudhi, Enketeswara

    2014-12-01

    Two aerobic bacterial consortia namely Con T and Con R were developed by enrichment technique from termite gut and cow dung respectively, using xylan as a sole carbon source. Molecular characterization of Con R based on 16S rRNA sequence analysis showed the presence of Pannonibacter sp. R-3 and Pseudoxanthomas sp. R-5. On the other hand, Con T showed the presence of Pseudoxanthomas sp. T-5, Cellulosimicrobium sp. T-21, and Gordonia sp. T-30. Being the maximum xylanase producer among the five isolates and being a novel xylanase producing bacterial genus, Gordonia sp. T-30 was selected. Xylanase produced by Gordonia sp. T-30 showed optimum activity at 60 °C and pH 9. Xylanase was 95% stable for 120 min at pH 9.0 and 98% stable at 60 °C for 90 min. Xylanase activity was stimulated in the presence of organic solvents such as petroleum ether, acetone, diethyl ether, n-hexane, and benzene. Detergent like cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and presence of NaCl also accelerated the xylanase function. Comparative evaluation was studied between sterilized and non-sterilized solid fermentation to produce xylanase by Gordonia sp. T-30 using various agricultural residues as growth substrate in cost effective manner. Industrially important features endowed by this xylanase make it a very promising candidate for food, feed, and fuel industry. PMID:24912946

  14. Genetic differentiation and biology of Citrus tristeza virus populations spreading in eradicative and non-eradicative areas of California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies showed Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates collected from the 1970’s in California were closely related to the mild T30 isolate; only a few severe strains such as SY568 (Riverside) and Dekopon (Orange Cove) were found and subsequently eradicated. CTV is now spreading rapidly in so...

  15. Nucleotide heterogeneity at the genomic 5’- and 3’-termini of California (CA) isolates of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nucleotide (nt) sequences in the genomic ends of sense (+)-RNA viruses serve essential biological functions and are important considerations in the construction of infectious clones. Two isolates of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) from California (CA) having a T30- and a T36-genotype were inoculated in ...

  16. Dramatic Change in Citrus tristeza virus populations in the Dominican Republic

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is the most destructive viral pathogen of citrus and has been an important concern for the citrus industry in the Dominican Republic. Earlier studies documented widespread distribution of mild isolates of the T30 genotype, which caused no disease in the infected trees, an...

  17. Complete Nucleotide Sequence of a New Genotype of Citrus Tristeza Virus from an Isolate Having a Mixed Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An isolate of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) that causes severe stem pitting in grapefruits (# 3800) was used for sequencing. Analysis of the isolate revealed the presence of at least three different populations, one belonging to T30 genotype and the other two belonging to new genotypes, designated T2K...

  18. Coal combustion waste management at landfills and surface impoundments 1994-2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Elcock, D.; Ranek, N. L.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-09-08

    On May 22, 2000, as required by Congress in its 1980 Amendments to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a Regulatory Determination on Wastes from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels. On the basis of information contained in its 1999 Report to Congress: Wastes from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels, the EPA concluded that coal combustion wastes (CCWs), also known as coal combustion by-products (CCBs), did not warrant regulation under Subtitle C of RCRA, and it retained the existing hazardous waste exemption for these materials under RCRA Section 3001(b)(3)(C). However, the EPA also determined that national regulations under Subtitle D of RCRA were warranted for CCWs that are disposed of in landfills or surface impoundments. The EPA made this determination in part on the basis of its findings that 'present disposal practices are such that, in 1995, these wastes were being managed in 40 percent to 70 percent of landfills and surface impoundments without reasonable controls in place, particularly in the area of groundwater monitoring; and while there have been substantive improvements in state regulatory programs, we have also identified gaps in State oversight' (EPA 2000). The 1999 Report to Congress (RTC), however, may not have reflected the changes in CCW disposal practices that occurred since the cutoff date (1995) of its database and subsequent developments. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the EPA discussed this issue and decided to conduct a joint DOE/EPA study to collect new information on the recent CCW management practices by the power industry. It was agreed that such information would provide a perspective on the chronological adoption of control measures in CCW units based on State regulations. A team of experts from the EPA, industry, and DOE (with support from Argonne National Laboratory) was established to develop a mutually acceptable approach for collecting and analyzing data on CCW

  19. Depressive Symptoms and Associated Psychosocial Factors among Adolescent Survivors 30 Months after 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake: A Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xuliang; Yu, Nancy X.; Zhou, Ya; Geng, Fulei; Fan, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study longitudinally investigated the changes of depressive symptoms among adolescent survivors over 2 years and a half after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake in China, as well as the predictive effects of demographic characteristics, earthquake exposure, negative life events, social support, and dispositional resilience on the risk of depressive symptoms at two time points after the earthquake. Methods: Participants were 1573 adolescent survivors (720 males and 853 females, mean age at initial survey = 15.00 ± 1.26 years), whose depressive symptoms were assessed at 6 months (T6m) and 30 months (T30m) post-earthquake. Data on demographics, earthquake exposure, and dispositional resilience were collected at T6m. Negative life events and social support were measured at T6m and 24 months (T24m) post-earthquake. Results: The prevalence rates of probable depression, 27.5 at T6m and 27.2% at T30m, maintained relatively stable over time. Female gender was related with higher risk of depressive symptoms at both T6m and T30m, while being only child could only predict higher risk of depressive symptoms at T30m. Negative life events and social support at T6m, as well as earthquake exposure, were concurrently associated with increased risk of depressive symptoms at T6m, but not associated with the risk of depressive symptoms at T30m, while negative life events and social support at T24m could predict depressive symptoms at T30m, all of which suggested that these variables may have strong but short-term effect on adolescents’ depressive symptoms post-earthquake. Besides, dispositional resilience was evidenced as a relatively stable negative predictor for depressive symptoms. Conclusions: These findings could inform mental health professionals regarding how to screen adolescent survivors at high risk for depression, so as to provide them with timely and appropriate mental health services based on the identified risk and protective factors for depressive symptoms

  20. Lacimonas salitolerans gen. nov., sp. nov., isolated from surface water of a saline lake.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zhi-Ping; Liu, Ying; Wang, Fang; Zhou, Yu-Guang; Liu, Hong-Can; Liu, Zhi-Pei

    2015-12-01

    A Gram-stain-negative bacterium, strain TS-T30T, was isolated from a saline lake (Lake Tuosu) in Qaidam basin, Qinghai province, China, and its taxonomic position was determined by using a polyphasic approach. Cells were non-spore-forming rods, non-motile, 0.8-1.4 μm wide and 1.9-4.0 μm long. Strain TS-T30T was strictly heterotrophic and aerobic. Catalase- and oxidase-positive. Growth was observed in the presence of 0.5-11.0 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 3.0 %), and at 10-35 °C (optimum 25 °C) and pH 6.5-10.0 (optimum pH 8.5). Strain TS-T30T contained C18 : 1ω7c as the only predominant fatty acid. The major respiratory quinone was Q-10. The DNA G+C content was 62 mol% (Tm). Phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain TS-T30T formed a distinct lineage that was independent of other most closely related genera: Lutimaribacter (95.2-95.9 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities), Poseidonocella (95.4 %), Ruegeria (92.8-94.9 %), Marivita (93.6-94.9 %), Seohaeicola (94.7 %), Sediminimonas (94.7 %), Shimia (93.9-94.7 %), Oceanicola (92.6-94.5 %) and Roseicyclus (94.5 %). The major polar lipids were phosphatidylglycerol, one unidentified phospholipid and an unknown aminolipid; phosphatidylcholine was not detected. These data demonstrated that strain TS-T30T represents a novel species of a new genus in the family Rhodobacteraceae, for which the name Lacimonas salitolerans gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the type species is TS-T30T ( = CGMCC 1.12477T = NBRC 110969T). PMID:26373783

  1. Measurement of the shape of the boson-transverse momentum distribution in pp --> Z/gamma* --> e+e- + X events produced at square root s = 1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, P; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chan, K; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, J; Guo, F; Gutierrez, P; Gutierrez, G; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J R; Kalk, J M; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lellouch, J; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Li, L; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, J; Meyer, A; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Y Garzón, G J Otero; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; da Silva, W L Prado; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schliephake, T; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, J; Snow, G R; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Strauss, E; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, S; Uvarov, L; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weber, G; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2008-03-14

    We present a measurement of the shape of the Z/gamma* boson transverse momentum (q(T)) distribution in pp --> Z/gamma* --> e(+)e(-) + X events at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV using 0.98 fb(-1) of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data are found to be consistent with the resummation prediction at low q(T), but above the perturbative QCD calculation in the region of q(T)>30 GeV/c. Using events with q(T)<30 GeV/c, we extract the value of g(2), one of the nonperturbative parameters for the resummation calculation. Data at large boson rapidity y are compared with the prediction of resummation and with alternative models that employ a resummed form factor with modifications in the small Bjorken x region of the proton wave function. PMID:18352175

  2. The effect of calcium-naloxone treatment on blood calcium, beta-endorphin, and acetylcholine in milk fever.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, A; Minoia, G; Ceci, E; Manca, R; Mutinati, M; Spedicato, M; Sciorsci, R L

    2008-09-01

    Milk fever is a postpartum syndrome of cows characterized by acute hypocalcemia, which reduces the release of acetylcholine (ACH), inducing flaccid paralysis and recumbency. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of calcium (Ca2+) combined with naloxone (Nx, an opioid antagonist; Ca2+-Nx) on plasma concentrations of ACH, beta-endorphin (betaE), and Ca2+ just before treatment (T0) and at 15, 30, and 90 min after treatment (T15, T30, and T90, respectively). Thirty cows were divided into 3 groups of 10 cows each. In group A1, cows affected by milk fever were treated (i.v.) with a combination of 0.2 mL/kg of body weight (BW) of Ca2+ borogluconate (20%) and 0.01 mg/kg of BW of Nx hydrochloride dihydrate. In group A2, cows affected by milk fever were treated (i.v.) with 2 mL/kg of BW of Ca2+ borogluconate (20%). In group C, healthy cows were treated (i.v.) with a combination of 0.2 mL/kg of BW of Ca2+ borogluconate (20%) and 0.01 mg/kg of BW of Nx hydrochloride dihydrate. Cows underwent treatments within 24 h of calving. Blood samples were collected at T0 and at T15, T30, and T90 for quantitative determination of ACH, betaE, and Ca2+. The cows in groups A1 and A2 recovered within a mean of 20 +/- 10 min, although 4 cows in group A2 underwent a relapse. Blood Ca2+ concentrations in group C increased slightly at T30 and at T90 (T30: 8.8 +/- 0.6 mg/dL; T90: 8.7 +/- 0.6 mg/dL) after treatment, whereas the response in groups affected by milk fever was similar, even though Ca2+ concentrations showed a sharp increase (A1: 8.9 +/- 0.8 mg/dL; A2: 6.0 +/- 0.7 mg/dL), particularly at T15 in group A1. Concentrations of betaE showed a similar pattern in groups A1 and C, with an increase at T15 (A1: 8.2 +/- 1.0 ng/mL; C: 2.7 +/- 0.4 ng/mL) and a subsequent decrease until T90 (A1: 1.4 +/- 0.3 ng/mL; C: 1.4 +/- 0.4 ng/mL), whereas betaE remained constant throughout in group A2. Concentrations of ACH in group A1 decreased significantly between T0 and T15, T30, and T90 (T0: 7.2 +/- 1.1 nmol

  3. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Hhh... - Exempted Aquifers in New Mexico

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...—Formation SE/NE 5 T30NR16W 1650′FNL 330′FEL 134 NW/NW 30 T31NR16W 660′FNL 703′FWL 8 SE/SW 28 T31NR16W 790′FSL 2150′FWL 167 NW/SE 33 T31NR16W 1710′FSL 2310′FEL 199 SE/NW 35 T31NR16W 2105′FNL 2105′FWL 196 NW/NW 4 T30NR16W 455′FNL 4435′FEL 219 NW/SW 33 T31NR16W 1980′FSL 386′FWL 65 NW/SE 27 T31NR16W...

  4. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Hhh... - Exempted Aquifers in New Mexico

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...—Formation SE/NE 5 T30NR16W 1650′FNL 330′FEL 134 NW/NW 30 T31NR16W 660′FNL 703′FWL 8 SE/SW 28 T31NR16W 790′FSL 2150′FWL 167 NW/SE 33 T31NR16W 1710′FSL 2310′FEL 199 SE/NW 35 T31NR16W 2105′FNL 2105′FWL 196 NW/NW 4 T30NR16W 455′FNL 4435′FEL 219 NW/SW 33 T31NR16W 1980′FSL 386′FWL 65 NW/SE 27 T31NR16W...

  5. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Hhh... - Exempted Aquifers in New Mexico

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...—Formation SE/NE 5 T30NR16W 1650′FNL 330′FEL 134 NW/NW 30 T31NR16W 660′FNL 703′FWL 8 SE/SW 28 T31NR16W 790′FSL 2150′FWL 167 NW/SE 33 T31NR16W 1710′FSL 2310′FEL 199 SE/NW 35 T31NR16W 2105′FNL 2105′FWL 196 NW/NW 4 T30NR16W 455′FNL 4435′FEL 219 NW/SW 33 T31NR16W 1980′FSL 386′FWL 65 NW/SE 27 T31NR16W...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Hhh... - Exempted Aquifers in New Mexico

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...—Formation SE/NE 5 T30NR16W 1650′FNL 330′FEL 134 NW/NW 30 T31NR16W 660′FNL 703′FWL 8 SE/SW 28 T31NR16W 790′FSL 2150′FWL 167 NW/SE 33 T31NR16W 1710′FSL 2310′FEL 199 SE/NW 35 T31NR16W 2105′FNL 2105′FWL 196 NW/NW 4 T30NR16W 455′FNL 4435′FEL 219 NW/SW 33 T31NR16W 1980′FSL 386′FWL 65 NW/SE 27 T31NR16W...

  7. Coefficient of thermal expansion of Fluorinert FC-86

    SciTech Connect

    Pane, A.J.

    1982-05-01

    The cubical coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) pf Fluorinert Fluid, FC-86 was measured before and after degassing. The CTE for the FC-86 before degassing is: ..beta.. = 9.282 x 10/sup -6/T + 1.6115 x 10/sup -3/ with T = -30 to + 75/sup 0/C. The CTE for the FC-86 (degassed) is: ..beta.. = 6.133 x 10/sup -6/T + 1.7643 x 10/sup -3/ with T = -30 to + 75/sup 0/C. Measurements were also made of the pressures required to prevent cavitation in the degassed FC-86 and in FC-86 containing 2.4 volume percent of air. At 71.0/sup 0/C the cavitational pressure of degassed FC-86 is 1285 torr and at 73.8/sup 0/C the cavitational pressure of the FC-86 containing 2.4 volume percent of air is 1229 torr.

  8. Spark alloying of an AL9 alloy by hard alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuptsov, S. G.; Fominykh, M. V.; Mukhinov, D. V.; Magomedova, R. S.; Nikonenko, E. A.

    2015-08-01

    The phase compositions of spark coatings of Kh12M steel with a VT1-0 (titanium) alloy and T15K6 and T30K4 hard alloys are studied. It is shown that the TiC titanium carbide forms in all cases and tungsten carbide decomposes with the formation of tungsten in a coating. These processes are intensified by increasing time, capacitance, and frequency. The surface hardness, the sample weight, and the white layer thickness increase monotonically.

  9. Analysis of High Resolution Spectra of Eris: Possible Evidence for Cold Phase CH4 Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, J.; Mastrapa, R. M.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Alvarez-Candal, A.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.

    2011-10-01

    We examined the spectrum of Eris by isolating the 1.67 and 1.72 μm CH4 bands and comparing these to Hapke models. These bands are chosen because (i) CH4(II) is more distinguished from CH4(I) at these wavelengths and (ii) the SNR of the observationswere higher than the bands longward of 1.8 μm. At the time of writing this abstract, the analysis was performed using optical constants for pure CH4 because of the lack of optical constants for CH4 diluted in N2 between 15 and 30 K.We assume the spectrum of Eris is a spectral blend of both CH4 phases. To model the spectrum, we used the CH4 optical constants from (11). CH4(II) ice is represented by their 20 K measurements, while optical constants for the CH4(I) ice is estimated from a linear interpolation between measurements at T > 30 K, or a second order extrapolation of the data at T > 30 to estimate the optical constants at 20.4 < T < 30 K. Each component is allowed to shift in wavelength.

  10. Genetic Marker Analysis of a Global Collection of Isolates of Citrus tristeza virus: Characterization and Distribution of CTV Genotypes and Association with Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Hilf, Mark E; Mavrodieva, Vessela A; Garnsey, Stephen M

    2005-08-01

    ABSTRACT Genetic markers amplified from three noncontiguous regions by sequence specific primers designed from the partial or complete genome sequences of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates T3, T30, T36, and VT were used to assess genetic relatedness of 372 isolates in an international collection. Eighty-five isolates were judged similar to the T3 isolate, 81 to T30, 11 to T36, and 89 to VT. Fifty-one isolates were mixed infections by two or more identifiable viral genotypes, and 55 isolates could not be assigned unequivocally to a group defined by marker patterns. Maximum parsimony analysis of aligned marker sequences supported the grouping of isolates on the basis of marker patterns only. Specific disease symptoms induced in select citrus host plants were shared across molecular groups, although symptoms were least severe among isolates grouped by markers with the T30 isolate and were most severe among isolates grouped by markers with the T3 isolate. Isolates assigned the same genotype showed variable symptoms and symptom severity. A classification strategy for CTV isolates is proposed that combines genetic marker patterns and nucleotide sequence data. PMID:18944413

  11. The application of a crosslinked pectin-based wafer matrix for gradual buccal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Rubina P; Pillay, Viness; Choonara, Yahya E; Du Toit, Lisa C; Ndesendo, Valence M K; Kumar, Pradeep; Khan, Riaz A

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop crosslinked wafer matrices and establish the influence of the crosslinker type and processing sequence on achieving gradual buccal drug delivery. Three sets of drug-loaded crosslinked pectin wafers were produced employing the model water-soluble antihistamine, diphenhydramine and were compared with noncrosslinked wafers. The formulations were crosslinked with CaCl(2), BaCl(2), or ZnSO(4) pre- or postlyophilization (sets 1 and 2) as well as pre- and postlyophilization (set 3), respectively. The surface morphology, porositometry, molecular vibrational transitions, textural attributes, thermal and in vitro drug release were characterized and supported by in silico molecular mechanics simulations. Results revealed that crosslinked wafers produced smaller pore sizes (107.63 Å) compared with noncrosslinked matrices (180.53 Å) due to molecular crosslinks formed between pectin chains. Drug release performance was dependent on the wafer crosslinking production sequence. Noncrosslinked wafers displayed burst-release with 82% drug released at t(30min) compared with first-order kinetic profiles obtained for prelyophilized crosslinked matrices (50% released at t(30min) followed by steady release). Wafers crosslinked postlyophilization displayed superior control of drug release (40% at t(30min)). Molecular mechanics simulations corroborated with the experimental data and established that Ba(++), having the largest atomic radii (1.35 Å) formed a number of ionic bridges producing wafers of higher porosity (0.048 cm(2)/g) and had more influence on drug release. PMID:22323418

  12. Effect of seminal plasma vesicular structures in canine frozen-thawed semen.

    PubMed

    Goericke-Pesch, S; Hauck, S; Failing, K; Wehrend, A

    2015-12-01

    Membrane vesicles (MVs) in the ejaculate have been identified in various species and are considered to affect membrane fluidity due to their characteristic molecular composition. Addition of MV to human frozen semen has been shown to improve post-thaw motility. Similarly, a beneficial effect has been suggested for frozen equine semen. As post-thaw canine semen quality varies widely between dogs, the aim of our study was to test for the effect of addition of canine MV on post-thaw semen quality in dogs. Semen samples from 10 male dogs were purified from MV and prepared for freezing. In experiment 1, three groups were compared: sperm frozen (1) with MV (S1); (2) without MV, but MV added immediately after thawing (S2); and (3) without MV (C). Semen analysis included computer-assisted sperm analysis of motility parameters immediately after thawing (t0), after 10 (t10) and 30 minutes (t30), % living sperm, % membrane intact, % morphologically normal sperm (all t0 and t30). Computer-assisted sperm analysis motility distance and velocity parameters (all P < 0.05) and % living sperm (P < 0.001) were significantly affected by treatment with a temporary increase of distance and velocity parameters at t0 to t10, but a significant decrease of the aforementioned parameters at t30 in samples with MV. In experiment 2, different MV protein concentrations added after thawing were compared: 0.05 mg, 0.1 mg, and 0.2 mg/mL. Computer-assisted sperm motility analysis was performed at t0, t10, and t30. No differences between MV concentrations were identified, only a significant interaction between effect of treatment and time for progressive motility (P < 0.01). Our study identified a short-term beneficial effect of canine MV on post-thaw distance and velocity parameters, whereas at t30 progressive motility, motility parameters and % living sperm were reduced in samples with MV compared to C. The results point to species-specific differences regarding the MV effect on frozen

  13. Narrowing the critical regions for mouse t complex transmission ratio distortion factors by use of deletions.

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, M F; Schimenti, J C; Evans, E P

    2000-01-01

    Previously a deletion in mouse chromosome 17, T(22H), was shown to behave like a t allele of the t complex distorter gene Tcd1, and this was attributed to deletion of this locus. Seven further deletions are studied here, with the aim of narrowing the critical region in which Tcd1 must lie. One deletion, T(30H), together with three others, T(31H), T(33H), and T(36H), which extended more proximally, caused male sterility when heterozygous with a complete t haplotype and also enhanced transmission ratio of the partial t haplotype t(6), and this was attributed to deletion of the Tcd1 locus. The deletions T(29H), T(32H), and T(34H) that extended less proximally than T(30H) permitted male fertility when opposite a complete t haplotype. These results enabled narrowing of the critical interval for Tcd1 to between the markers D17Mit164 and D17Leh48. In addition, T(29H) and T(32H) enhanced the transmission ratio of t(6), but significantly less so than T(30H). T(34H) had no effect on transmission ratio. These results could be explained by a new distorter located between the breakpoints of T(29H) and T(34H) (between T and D17Leh66E). It is suggested that the original distorter Tcd1 in fact consists of two loci: Tcd1a, lying between D17Mit164 and D17Leh48, and Tcd1b, lying between T and D17Leh66E. PMID:10835400

  14. Investigating the use of in situ liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy to explore DNA-mediated gold nanoparticle growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguy, Amanda

    Engineering nanoparticles with desired shape-dependent properties is the key to many applications in nanotechnology. Although many synthetic procedures exist to produce anisotropic gold nanoparticles, the dynamics of growth are typically unknown or hypothetical. In the case of seed-mediated growth in the presence of DNA into anisotropic nanoparticles, it is not known exactly how DNA directs growth into specific morphologies. A series of preliminary experiments were carried out to contribute to the investigation of the possible mechanism of DNA-mediated growth of gold nanoprisms into gold nanostars using liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Imaging in the liquid phase was achieved through the use of a liquid cell platform and liquid cell holder that allow the sample to be contained within a “chip sandwich” between two electron transparent windows. Ex situ growth experiments were performed using Au-T30 NPrisms (30-base thymine oligonucleotide-coated gold nanoprisms) that are expected to grow into gold nanostars. Growth to form these nanostars were imaged using TEM (transmission electron microscopy) and liquid cell STEM (scanning transmission electron microscopy). An attempt to perform in situ growth experiments with the same Au-T30 nanoprisms revealed challenges in obtaining desired morphology results due to the environmental differences within the liquid cell compared to the ex situ environment. Different parameters in the experimental method were explored including fluid line set up, simultaneous and alternating reagent addition, and the effect of different liquid cell volumes to ensure adequate flow of reagents into the liquid cell. Lastly, the binding affinities were compared for T30 and A30 DNA incubated with gold nanoparticles using zeta potential measurements, absorption spectroscopy, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). It was previously reported thymine bases have a lower binding affinity to gold surfaces than

  15. Improving spatial updating accuracy in absence of external feedback.

    PubMed

    Mackrous, I; Simoneau, M

    2015-08-01

    Updating the position of an earth-fixed target during whole-body rotation seems to rely on cognitive processes such as the utilization of external feedback. According to perceptual learning models, improvement in performance can also occur without external feedback. The aim of this study was to assess spatial updating improvement in the absence and in the presence of external feedback. While being rotated counterclockwise (CCW), participants had to predict when their body midline had crossed the position of a memorized target. Four experimental conditions were tested: (1) Pre-test: the target was presented 30° in the CCW direction from participant's midline. (2) Practice: the target was located 45° in the CCW direction from participant's midline. One group received external feedback about their spatial accuracy (Mackrous and Simoneau, 2014) while the other group did not. (3) Transfer T(30)CCW: the target was presented 30° in the CCW direction to evaluate whether improvement in performance, during practice, generalized to other target eccentricity. (4) Transfer T(30)CW: the target was presented 30° in the clockwise (CW) direction and participants were rotated CW. This transfer condition evaluated whether improvement in performance generalized to the untrained rotation direction. With practice, performance improved in the absence of external feedback (p=0.004). Nonetheless, larger improvement occurred when external feedback was provided (ps=0.002). During T(30)CCW, performance remained better for the feedback than the no-feedback group (p=0.005). However, no group difference was observed for the untrained direction (p=0.22). We demonstrated that spatial updating improved without external feedback but less than when external feedback was given. These observations are explained by a mixture of calibration processes and supervised vestibular learning. PMID:25987200

  16. The mechanism of post-rift fault activities in Baiyun sag, Pearl River Mouth basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhen; Xu, Ziying; Sun, Longtao; Pang, Xiong; Yan, Chengzhi; Li, Yuanping; Zhao, Zhongxian; Wang, Zhangwen; Zhang, Cuimei

    2014-08-01

    Post-rift fault activities were often observed in deepwater basins, which have great contributions to oil and gas migration and accumulation. The main causes for post-rift fault activities include tectonic events, mud or salt diapirs, and gravitational collapse. In the South China Sea continental margin, post-rift fault activities are widely distributed, especially in Baiyun sag, one of the largest deepwater sag with its main body located beneath present continental slope. During the post-rift stage, large population of faults kept active for a long time from 32 Ma (T70) till 5.5 Ma (T10). Seismic interpretation, fault analysis and analogue modeling experiments indicate that the post-rift fault activities in Baiyun sag between 32 Ma (T70) and 13.8 Ma (T30) was mainly controlled by gravity pointing to the Main Baiyun sag, which caused the faults extensive on the side facing Main Baiyun sag and the back side compressive. Around 32 Ma (T70), the breakup of the continental margin and the spreading of the South China Sea shed a combined effect of weak compression toward Baiyun sag. The gravity during post-rift stage might be caused by discrepant subsidence and sedimentation between strongly thinned sag center and wing areas. This is supported by positive relationship between sedimentation rate and fault growth index. After 13.8 Ma (T30), fault activity shows negative relationship with sedimentation rate. Compressive uplift and erosion in seismic profiles as well as negative tectonic subsiding rates suggest that the fault activity from 13.8 Ma (T30) to 5.5 Ma (T10) might be controlled by the subductive compression from the Philippine plate in the east.

  17. On the possible role played by tunnel recombination in the loss processes of excess current carriers in cadmium telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, G. F.; Marinin, A. A.; Gapanovich, M. V.; Rabenok, E. V.

    2010-05-01

    The microwave photoconductivity method was used to study the kinetics of the decay of current carriers generated by nitrogen laser pulses in n- and p-type cadmium telluride. The dependences of the shape and amplitude of photoresponse decays on temperature and light intensity were studied. Photoresponse decays contained "fast" (at t < 30 ns) and "slow" (at t > 50 ns) components. At long times, the dependence of photoresponse on the logarithm of time was linear. The shape of slow component decays was almost independent of temperature. The slow component of photoresponse decay could correspond to the loss process of entrapped charges in tunnel recombination.

  18. CPm gene diversity in field isolates of Citrus tristeza virus from Colombia.

    PubMed

    Oliveros-Garay, Oscar Arturo; Martinez-Salazar, Natalhie; Torres-Ruiz, Yanneth; Acosta, Orlando

    2009-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence diversity of the CPm gene from 28 field isolates of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) was assessed by SSCP and sequence analyses. These isolates showed two major shared haplotypes, which differed in distribution: A1 was the major haplotype in 23 isolates from different geographic regions, whereas R1 was found in isolates from a discrete region. Phylogenetic reconstruction clustered A1 within an independent group, while R1 was grouped with mild isolates T30 from Florida and T385 from Spain. Some isolates contained several minor haplotypes, which were very similar to, and associated with, the major haplotype. PMID:19882104

  19. Long Rest Interval Promotes Durable Testosterone Responses in High-Intensity Bench Press.

    PubMed

    Scudese, Estevão; Simão, Roberto; Senna, Gilmar; Vingren, Jakob L; Willardson, Jeffrey M; Baffi, Matheus; Miranda, Humberto

    2016-05-01

    Scudese, E, Simão, R, Senna, G, Vingren, JL, Willardson, JM, Baffi, M, and Miranda, H. Long rest interval promotes durable testosterone responses in high-intensity bench press. J Strength Cond Res 30(5): 1275-1286, 2016-The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of rest period duration (1 vs. 3 minute between sets) on acute hormone responses to a high-intensity and equal volume bench press workout. Ten resistance-trained men (25.2 ± 5.6 years; 78.2 ± 5.7 kg; 176.7 ± 5.4 cm; bench press relative strength: 1.3 ± 0.1 kg per kilogram of body mass) performed 2 bench press workouts separated by 1 week. Each workout consisted of 5 sets of 3 repetitions performed at 85% of 1 repetition maximum, with either 1- or 3-minute rest between sets. Circulating concentrations of total testosterone (TT), free testosterone (FT), cortisol (C), testosterone/cortisol ratio (TT/C), and growth hormone (GH) were measured at preworkout (PRE), and immediately (T0), 15 minutes (T15), and 30 minutes (T30) postworkout. Rating of perceived exertion was recorded before and after each set. For TT, both rest lengths enhanced all postexercise verifications (T0, T15, and T30) compared with PRE, with 1 minute showing decreases on T15 and T30 compared with T0. For FT, both 1- and 3-minute rest protocols triggered augmentations on distinct postexercise moments (T0 and T15 for 1 minute; T15 and T30 for 3-minute) compared with PRE. The C values did not change throughout any postexercise verification for either rests. The TT/C ratio was significantly elevated for both rests in all postexercise moments compared with PRE. Finally, GH values did not change for both rest lengths. In conclusion, although both short and long rest periods enhanced acute testosterone values, the longer rest promoted a long-lasting elevation for both TT and FT. PMID:26466135

  20. Anomalous Schottky specific heat and structural distortion in ferromagnetic PrAl2.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Arjun K; Paudyal, D; Mudryk, Y; Gschneidner, K A; Pecharsky, V K

    2013-05-01

    Unique from other rare earth dialuminides, PrAl(2) undergoes a cubic to tetragonal distortion below T = 30 K in a zero magnetic field, but the system recovers its cubic symmetry upon the application of an external magnetic field of 10 kOe via a lifting of the 4f crystal field splitting. The nuclear Schottky specific heat in PrAl(2) is anomalously high compared to that of pure Pr metal. First principles calculations reveal that the 4f crystal field splitting in the tetragonally distorted phase of PrAl(2) underpins the observed unusual low temperature phenomena. PMID:23683228

  1. Longitudinal double-spin asymmetry for inclusive jet production in p(pol) + p(pol) collisions at {radical}{ovr s} = 200 GeV.

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H. M.; Underwood, D. G.; STAR Collaboration; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Illinois; Panjab Univ.; Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre; Kent State Univ.; Particle Physic Lab.

    2008-01-01

    We report a new STAR measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry A{sub LL} for inclusive jet production at midrapidity in polarized p+p collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical} = 200 GeV. The data, which cover jet transverse momenta 5 < p{sub T} < 30 GeV/c, are substantially more precise than previous measurements. They provide significant new constraints on the gluon spin contribution to the nucleon spin through the comparison to predictions derived from one global fit to polarized deep-inelastic scattering measurements.

  2. Deep sequencing and analysis of small RNAs in sweet orange grafted on sour orange infected with two citrus tristeza virus isolates prevalent in Sicily.

    PubMed

    Licciardello, Grazia; Scuderi, Giuseppe; Ferraro, Rosario; Giampetruzzi, Annalisa; Russo, Marcella; Lombardo, Alessandro; Raspagliesi, Domenico; Bar-Joseph, Moshe; Catara, Antonino

    2015-10-01

    Two representative isolates of a citrus tristeza virus population in Sicily, SG29 (aggressive) and Bau282 (mild), were sequenced via viral small RNAs (vsRNA) produced in budlings of sweet orange grafted on sour orange. Phylogenetic relationships with Mediterranean and exotic isolates revealed that SG29 clustered within the "VT-Asian" subtype, whereas Bau282 belonged to the cluster T30. The study confirms that molecular data need to be integrated with bio-indexing in order to obtain adequate information for risk assessment. PMID:26175068

  3. The complete mitochondrial DNA of the silky shark (Carcharhinus falciformis).

    PubMed

    Galván-Tirado, Carolina; Hinojosa-Alvarez, Silvia; Diaz-Jaimes, Pindaro; Marcet-Houben, Marina; García-De-León, Francisco J

    2016-01-01

    The silky shark mitogenome (GeneBank accession number KF801102) has a total length of 17,774 bp, the base composition of the genomes was as follows: A (31.36%), T (30.18%), C (25.27%) and G (13.17%), which demonstrated an A + T-rich feature (61.64%), similar to other elasmobranch mitogenomes. The mitochondrial genome contained 13 protein-coding genes and 23 tRNA genes. The tRNA genes ranged from 70 to 72 bp. The gene order was the same as in other vertebrates and teleosts. PMID:24450712

  4. Quantification of wave reflection in the human aorta from pressure alone: a proof of principle.

    PubMed

    Westerhof, Berend E; Guelen, Ilja; Westerhof, Nico; Karemaker, John M; Avolio, Alberto

    2006-10-01

    Wave reflections affect the proximal aortic pressure and flow waves and play a role in systolic hypertension. A measure of wave reflection, receiving much attention, is the augmentation index (AI), the ratio of the secondary rise in pressure and pulse pressure. AI can be limiting, because it depends not only on the magnitude of wave reflection but also on wave shapes and timing of incident and reflected waves. More accurate measures are obtainable after separation of pressure in its forward (P(f)) and reflected (P(b)) components. However, this calculation requires measurement of aortic flow. We explore the possibility of replacing the unknown flow by a triangular wave, with duration equal to ejection time, and peak flow at the inflection point of pressure (F(tIP)) and, for a second analysis, at 30% of ejection time (F(t30)). Wave form analysis gave forward and backward pressure waves. Reflection magnitude (RM) and reflection index (RI) were defined as RM=P(b)/P(f) and RI=P(b)/(P(f)+P(b)), respectively. Healthy subjects, including interventions such as exercise and Valsalva maneuvers, and patients with ischemic heart disease and failure were analyzed. RMs and RIs using F(tIP) and F(t30) were compared with those using measured flow (F(m)). Pressure and flow were recorded with high fidelity pressure and velocity sensors. Relations are: RM(tIP)=0.82RM(mf)+0.06 (R(2)=0.79; n=24), RM(t30)=0.79RM(mf)+0.08 (R(2)=0.85; n=29) and RI(tIP)=0.89RI(mf)+0.02 (R(2)=0.81; n=24), RI(t30)=0.83RI(mf)+0.05 (R(2)=0.88; n=29). We suggest that wave reflection can be derived from uncalibrated aortic pressure alone, even when no clear inflection point is distinguishable and AI cannot be obtained. Epidemiological studies should establish its clinical value. PMID:16940207

  5. Dynamic behavior of correlated nanodomains in K1 - xLixTaO3, x=0.011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleemann, W.; Klössner, A.

    1996-08-01

    Temporal relaxation of the field-induced remanent polarization has been measured on K0.989Li0.011TaO3 at temperatures between 19.1 and 50.2 K. It is described in terms of Chamberlin's theory of dynamically correlated domains. Activated dynamics with correlation coefficients C > 0 outside the freezing region, T > 34 K and T < 30 K, is traced back to activated cluster and domain wall dynamics, respectively. Non-activated dynamics within 30 < T < 34 K hints at late-stage wall relaxation of percolating polar clusters in the vicinity of the glass transition, Tg approx 34 K.

  6. Longitudinal double-spin asymmetry for inclusive jet production in vec p + vec p collisions at sqrt s = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Coll

    2007-10-07

    We report a new STAR measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry A{sub LL} for inclusive jet production at mid-rapidity in polarized p + p collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 200 GeV. The data, which cover jet transverse momenta 5 < p{sub T} < 30 GeV/c, are substantially more precise than previous measurements. They provide significant new constraints on the gluon spin contribution to the nucleon spin through the comparison to predictions derived from one global fit of polarized deep-inelastic scattering measurements.

  7. Longitudinal double-spin asymmetry for inclusive jet production in p[over -->] + p[over -->] collisions at sqrt[s]=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Baumgart, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Betts, R R; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Blyth, S-L; Bombara, M; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Callner, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Cervantes, M C; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, J Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chung, S U; Clarke, R F; Codrington, M J M; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; Dephillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Elhalhuli, E; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Feng, A; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Ganti, M S; Garcia-Solis, E; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gorbunov, Y N; Gos, H; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Grube, B; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, A; Gupta, N; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Hollis, R S; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Iordanova, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kettler, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klein, S R; Knospe, A G; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kowalik, K L; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kurnadi, P; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lapointe, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lehocka, S; Levine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, A; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nepali, C; Netrakanti, P K; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Pruthi, N K; Putschke, J; Qattan, I A; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Relyea, D; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Staszak, D; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Suarez, M C; Subba, N L; Sumbera, M; Sun, X M; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Tram, V N; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Vander Molen, A M; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Wada, M; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, J; Wu, Y; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yue, Q; Yurevich, V I; Zawisza, M; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zhou, J; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

    2008-06-13

    We report a new STAR measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry A(LL) for inclusive jet production at midrapidity in polarized p + p collisions at a center-of-mass energy of sqrt[s]=200 GeV. The data, which cover jet transverse momenta 5T)<30 GeV/c, are substantially more precise than previous measurements. They provide significant new constraints on the gluon spin contribution to the nucleon spin through the comparison to predictions derived from one global fit to polarized deep-inelastic scattering measurements. PMID:18643488

  8. Anomalous Schottky Specific Heat and Structural Distortion in Ferromagnetic PrAl2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Arjun K.; Paudyal, D.; Mudryk, Y.; Gschneidner, K. A., Jr.; Pecharsky, V. K.

    2013-05-01

    Unique from other rare earth dialuminides, PrAl2 undergoes a cubic to tetragonal distortion below T=30K in a zero magnetic field, but the system recovers its cubic symmetry upon the application of an external magnetic field of 10 kOe via a lifting of the 4f crystal field splitting. The nuclear Schottky specific heat in PrAl2 is anomalously high compared to that of pure Pr metal. First principles calculations reveal that the 4f crystal field splitting in the tetragonally distorted phase of PrAl2 underpins the observed unusual low temperature phenomena.

  9. Erratum to: Measurement of jet multiplicity distributions in $$\\mathrm {t}\\overline{\\mathrm {t}}$$ production in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = 7\\,\\text {TeV} $$

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2015-05-19

    Table 4 was incorrectly captioned in the originally published version. The correct caption is ‘Normalised differential tt- production cross section as a function of the number of additional jets with pT > 30 GeV in the lepton+jets channel. Furthermore, the statistical, systematic, and total uncertainties are also shown. Finally, the main experimental and model systematic uncertainties are displayed: JES and the combination of renormalisation and factorisation scales, jet-parton matching threshold, and hadronisation (in the table “Q2/Match./Had.”)’.

  10. 25. 'HANGAR SHEDS TRUSSES DETAILS; ARCHITECTURAL PLANS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. 'HANGAR SHEDS - TRUSSES - DETAILS; ARCHITECTURAL PLANS - PLANT AREA; MODIFICATION CENTER NO. 1, DAGGETT, CALIFORNIA.' Sections and details of trusses, ironwork, and joints, as modified to show ridge joint detail. As built. This blueline also shows the fire suppression system, added in orange pencil for 'Project 13: Bldgs. T-30, T-50, T-70, T-90' at a later, unspecified date. Contract no. W509 Eng. 2743; File no. 555/84, revision B, dated August 24, 1942. No sheet number. - Barstow-Daggett Airport, Hangar Shed No. 4, 39500 National Trails Highway, Daggett, San Bernardino County, CA

  11. Huge Seebeck coefficients in nonaqueous electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetti, M.; Nakamae, S.; Roger, M.; Guenoun, P.

    2011-03-01

    The Seebeck coefficients of the nonaqueous electrolytes tetrabutylammonium nitrate, tetraoctylphosphonium bromide, and tetradodecylammonium nitrate in 1-octanol, 1-dodecanol, and ethylene-glycol are measured in a temperature range from T = 30 °C to T = 45 °C. The Seebeck coefficient is generally of the order of a few hundreds of microvolts per Kelvin for aqueous solution of inorganic ions. Here we report huge values of 7 mV/K at 0.1 M concentration for tetrabutylammonium nitrate in 1-dodecanol. These striking results open the question of unexpectedly large kosmotrope or "structure making" effects of tetraalkylammonium ions on the structure of alcohols.

  12. STS-39 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, SPAS II IBSS computer animation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-39 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Shuttle Pallet Satellite (SPAS) II Infrared Background Signature Survey (IBSS) and Chemical Release Observation (CRO) experiment illustrated with computer graphics. Views include SPAS II (in foreground) deployed by OV-103 (27771), orbital maneuvering system (OMS) primary reaction control system (PRCS) plume firings after SPAS II deployment (27772), Chemical Release Observation (CRO) experiment in orbit (27773), and CRO deployed from OV-103 payload bay (27774). View (27772) used in the STS-39 Press Information (PUB 3546-V Rev 4-91) p27, April 1991 and for T-30 flight directors' briefing.

  13. On the molecular structure and UV/vis spectroscopic properties of the solvatochromic and thermochromic pyridinium-N-phenolate betaine dye B30.

    PubMed

    Catalán, Javier; Garcia de Paz, Jose Luis; Reichardt, Christian

    2010-06-01

    Quantum chemical calculations as well as vis absorption and fluorescence measurements of the pyridinium-N-phenolate betaine dye B30, dissolved in 1-chlorobutane at temperatures between 343 and 77 K, shed more light on the solvatochromism, thermosolvatochromism, and photophysical behavior of this probe dye, formerly used to establish an empirical scale of solvent polarity, called E(T)(30) or E(T)(N) scale. A new calculated gas-phase E(T)(30) value is reported. Complementary to recent work of Kharlanov and Rettig (J. Phys. Chem. A 2009, 113, 10693-10703), it is shown that fluorescence of B30 in 1-chlorobutane solution is observable already at temperatures just below the solvent's melting point and not only at 77 K. Analogous to increasing solvent polarity, decreasing solvent temperature leads to a large hypsochromic shift of the vis absorption band of B30, dissolved in 1-chlorobutane (Deltalambda = -245 nm from 797 nm at 343 K to 552 nm at 77 K). This thermosolvatochromism can be easily seen: the solution color changes from greenish yellow (343 K) to magenta-violet (77 K). PMID:20446695

  14. Solving the stellar 62Ni problem with AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillmann, I.; Faestermann, T.; Korschinek, G.; Lachner, J.; Maiti, M.; Poutivtsev, M.; Rugel, G.; Walter, S.; Käppeler, F.; Erhard, M.; Junghans, A. R.; Nair, C.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.

    2010-04-01

    An accurate knowledge of the neutron capture cross sections of 62,63Ni is crucial since both isotopes take key positions which affect the whole reaction flow in the weak s process up to A≈90. No experimental value for the 63Ni(n,γ) cross section exists so far, and until recently the experimental values for 62Ni(n,γ) at stellar temperatures (kT=30keV) ranged between 12 and 37 mb. This latter discrepancy could now be solved by two activations with following AMS using the GAMS setup at the Munich tandem accelerator which are also in perfect agreement with a recent time-of-flight measurement. The resulting (preliminary) Maxwellian cross section at kT = 30 keV was determined to be <σ>=23.4±4.6mb. Additionally, we have measured the 64Ni(γ,n)63Ni cross section close to threshold. Photoactivations at 13.5 MeV, 11.4 MeV and 10.3 MeV were carried out with the ELBE accelerator at Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf. A first AMS measurement of the sample activated at 13.5 MeV revealed a cross section smaller by more than a factor of 2 compared to NON-SMOKER predictions.

  15. Measurement of prompt ψ(2S) to J/ψ yield ratios in Pb-Pb and p-p collisions at sqrt[sNN]=2.76  TeV.

    PubMed

    Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Fabjan, C; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hartl, C; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kiesenhofer, W; Knünz, V; Krammer, M; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Rabady, D; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Treberer-Treberspurg, W; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Alderweireldt, S; Bansal, M; Bansal, S; Cornelis, T; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Knutsson, A; Luyckx, S; Ochesanu, S; Roland, B; Rougny, R; Van De Klundert, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Daci, N; Heracleous, N; Keaveney, J; Lowette, S; Maes, M; Olbrechts, A; Python, Q; Strom, D; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Caillol, C; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dobur, D; Favart, L; Gay, A P R; Grebenyuk, A; Léonard, A; Mohammadi, A; Perniè, L; Reis, T; Seva, T; Thomas, L; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wang, J; Adler, V; Beernaert, K; Benucci, L; Cimmino, A; Costantini, S; Crucy, S; Dildick, S; Fagot, A; Garcia, G; Mccartin, J; Ocampo Rios, A A; Ryckbosch, D; Salva Diblen, S; Sigamani, M; Strobbe, N; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Beluffi, C; Bruno, G; Castello, R; Caudron, A; Ceard, L; Da Silveira, G G; Delaere, C; du Pree, T; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Hollar, J; Jez, P; Komm, M; Lemaitre, V; Nuttens, C; Pagano, D; Perrini, L; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Popov, A; Quertenmont, L; Selvaggi, M; Vidal Marono, M; Vizan Garcia, J M; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Hammad, G H; Aldá Júnior, W L; Alves, G A; Brito, L; Correa Martins Junior, M; Dos Reis Martins, T; Mora Herrera, C; Pol, M E; Carvalho, W; Chinellato, J; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Malbouisson, H; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santaolalla, J; Santoro, A; Sznajder, A; Tonelli Manganote, E J; Vilela Pereira, A; Bernardes, C A; Dogra, S; Tomei, T R Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E M; Mercadante, P G; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Aleksandrov, A; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Marinov, A; Piperov, S; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Tcholakov, V; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Glushkov, I; Hadjiiska, R; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Du, R; Jiang, C H; Liang, S; Plestina, R; Tao, J; Wang, X; Wang, Z; Asawatangtrakuldee, C; Ban, Y; Guo, Y; Li, Q; Li, W; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Wang, D; Zhang, L; Zou, W; Avila, C; Chaparro Sierra, L F; Florez, C; Gomez, J P; Gomez Moreno, B; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Kadija, K; Luetic, J; Mekterovic, D; Sudic, L; Attikis, A; Mavromanolakis, G; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Bodlak, M; Finger, M; Finger, M; Assran, Y; Ellithi Kamel, A; Mahmoud, M A; Radi, A; Kadastik, M; Murumaa, M; Raidal, M; Tiko, A; Eerola, P; Fedi, G; Voutilainen, M; Härkönen, J; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Peltola, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Wendland, L; Tuuva, T; Besancon, M; Couderc, F; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Favaro, C; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Titov, M; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dahms, T; Dalchenko, M; Dobrzynski, L; Filipovic, N; Florent, A; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Mastrolorenzo, L; Miné, P; Mironov, C; Naranjo, I N; Nguyen, M; Ochando, C; Paganini, P; Regnard, S; Salerno, R; Sauvan, J B; Sirois, Y; Veelken, C; Yilmaz, Y; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Aubin, A; Bloch, D; Brom, J-M; Chabert, E C; Collard, C; Conte, E; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Goetzmann, C; Le Bihan, A-C; Van Hove, P; Gadrat, S; Beauceron, S; Beaupere, N; Boudoul, G; Bouvier, E; Brochet, S; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Chasserat, J; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Fan, J; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Gouzevitch, M; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Ruiz Alvarez, J D; Sabes, D; Sgandurra, L; Sordini, V; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Viret, S; Xiao, H; Tsamalaidze, Z; Autermann, C; Beranek, S; Bontenackels, M; Edelhoff, M; Feld, L; Hindrichs, O; Klein, K; Ostapchuk, A; Perieanu, A; Raupach, F; Sammet, J; Schael, S; Weber, H; Wittmer, B; Zhukov, V; Ata, M; Dietz-Laursonn, E; Duchardt, D; Erdmann, M; Fischer, R; Güth, A; Hebbeker, T; Heidemann, C; Hoepfner, K; Klingebiel, D; Knutzen, S; Kreuzer, P; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Millet, P; Olschewski, M; Padeken, K; Papacz, P; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A

    2014-12-31

    The ratio between the prompt ψ(2S) and J/ψ yields, reconstructed via their decays into μ+ μ-, is measured in Pb-Pb and p-p collisions at sqrt[sNN]=2.76  TeV. The analysis is based on Pb-Pb and p-p data samples collected by CMS at the Large Hadron Collider, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 150  μb(-1) and 5.4  pb(-1), respectively. The double ratio of measured yields (Nψ(2S)/N(J/ψ))(Pb-Pb)/(Nψ(2S)/N(J/ψ))(p-p) is computed in three Pb-Pb collision centrality bins and two kinematic ranges: one at midrapidity, |y|<1.6, covering the transverse momentum range 6.5T<30  GeV/c, and the other at forward rapidity, 1.6<|y|<2.4, extending to lower pT values, 3T<30  GeV/c. The centrality-integrated double ratio changes from 0.45±0.13(stat)±0.07(syst) in the first range to 1.67±0.34(stat)±0.27(syst) in the second. This difference is most pronounced in the most central collisions. PMID:25615312

  16. Acoustical study on the impact of sound absorptions, distances of workstations, and height of partitions in open plan offices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utami, Sentagi Sesotya; Al Rochmadi, Nurwachid; Sarwono, R. Sugeng Joko

    2015-09-01

    Low partitions are commonly found in open-plan offices as the boundaries of workstation islands or groups of workstations. This room layout often cause excessive speech intelligibility, which creates work distraction and reduce the quality of speech privacy. Sound absorption, distance between workstations, and height of partitions are factors that were investigated on their impact to the room acoustics condition, referred to ISO 3382-3:2012. Observed room acoustics conditions were speech intelligibility, speech privacy, and distraction to concentrate in work using parameters of T30, C50, and RASTI. Parameters of T30, C50, and RASTI were used to evaluate the speech intelligibility. The level of speech privacy was indicated by parameter of privacy distance (rP). Distraction to concentrate in work was indicated by distraction distance (rD). The results from 2 experimental setups show that sound absorption, distance between workstations, and partitions influenced the level of speech intelligibility, speech privacy, and distraction to concentration at work. The value of C50 decline, by 76.9% and 77.4%, each for scenario A and B. RASTI decline, by 18.7% and 14.8%. Difference in percentage of speech privacy, by 6% and 11%. Difference in percentage of distraction to concentration at work, by 79% and 70%.

  17. Shape transformation of bimetallic Au–Pd core–shell nanocubes to multilayered Au–Pd–Au core–shell hexagonal platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattarai, Nabraj; Prozorov, Tanya

    2015-11-05

    Transformation of metallic or bimetallic (BM) nanoparticles (NPs) from one shape to another desired shape is of importance to nanoscience and nanotechnology, where new morphologies of NPs lead to enhancement of their exploitable properties. In this report, we present the shape transformation of Au octahedral NPs to Au–Pd core–shell nanocubes, followed by their transformation to nanostars and finally to multilayered Au–Pd–Au core–shell hexagonal platelets in the presence of T30 DNA. The weaker binding affinity of T30 DNA directs the growth to favor the formation of lower energy {111} facets, changing the morphology from nanocubes to nanostar. The nanostars, exhibiting unusual intermediate morphologies, are comprised two sets of shell layers and have Au core, Pd intermediate shell, and Au outer shell. Similarly, the hexagonal platelets, which also have Au core and inner Pd shell, are encased in an external gold shell. As a result, the formation of multilayered Au–Pd–Au core–shell hexagonal platelets from Au–Pd core–shell nanocubes via the multilayered nanostars is monitored using scanning/transmission electron microscopy analysis.

  18. Shape transformation of bimetallic Au–Pd core–shell nanocubes to multilayered Au–Pd–Au core–shell hexagonal platelets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bhattarai, Nabraj; Prozorov, Tanya

    2015-11-05

    Transformation of metallic or bimetallic (BM) nanoparticles (NPs) from one shape to another desired shape is of importance to nanoscience and nanotechnology, where new morphologies of NPs lead to enhancement of their exploitable properties. In this report, we present the shape transformation of Au octahedral NPs to Au–Pd core–shell nanocubes, followed by their transformation to nanostars and finally to multilayered Au–Pd–Au core–shell hexagonal platelets in the presence of T30 DNA. The weaker binding affinity of T30 DNA directs the growth to favor the formation of lower energy {111} facets, changing the morphology from nanocubes to nanostar. The nanostars, exhibiting unusualmore » intermediate morphologies, are comprised two sets of shell layers and have Au core, Pd intermediate shell, and Au outer shell. Similarly, the hexagonal platelets, which also have Au core and inner Pd shell, are encased in an external gold shell. As a result, the formation of multilayered Au–Pd–Au core–shell hexagonal platelets from Au–Pd core–shell nanocubes via the multilayered nanostars is monitored using scanning/transmission electron microscopy analysis.« less

  19. Selective differences in macrophage populations and monokine production in resolving pulmonary granuloma and fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, I.

    1991-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) and their production of interleukin-1-like activity (IL-1) and macrophage-derived growth factor for fibroblasts (MDGF) were examined during chronic inflammatory reactions leading to either granuloma formation or fibrosis. Groups of five rats each received, respectively, a single transtracheal injection of xonotlite, attapulgite, short chrysotile 4T30, UICC chrysotile B asbestos, or saline. One month later, such treatments induced either no change (xonotlite), granuloma formation (attapulgite and short chrysotile 4T30), or fibrosis (UICC chrysotile B). By 8 months, however, the granulomatous reactions had resolved or greatly diminished, whereas the fibrosis persisted irreversibly. Parallel examination of cell populations obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage revealed that multinucleated giant macrophages (MGC) were present in lavage fluids of animals with resolving granulomatous reactions but absent in those obtained from animals with lung fibrosis. Evaluation of monokine production by inflammatory macrophages also revealed significant differences. Enhanced production of IL-1-like activity was seen in both types of lung injury, although especially during the early stage (1 month) and decreased thereafter (8 months). By contrast, augmentation of MDGF production was observed in animals with lung fibrosis only and persisted up to 9 months. Taken together, these data indicate that production of selected cytokines, as well as AM differentiation along a given pathway, may modulate the outcome of a chronic inflammatory response. PMID:1992772

  20. 13C urea breath test for Helicobacter pylori: Evaluation of 10-minute breath collection

    PubMed Central

    Mauro, Marina; Radovic, Vladimir; Wolfe, Melanie; Kamath, Markad; Bercik, Premsyl; Armstrong, David

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether a shortened 13C urea breath test (13C UBT) (breath collection time of 10 min) is as reliable as the standard assay (30 min). METHODS: Two hundred ninety-seven patients (mean ± SD: 53±16 years, 57% female) completed a 13C UBT. Breath samples were obtained at baseline and at 5 min intervals up to 30 min. Sixty-seven patients also underwent endoscopic biopsy. Cluster analysis was performed on the 13C UBT data to determine the optimal cut-off point at each time interval. Sensitivity and specificity of the 13C UBT at all intervals compared with histology and culture and against the standard 30 min interval were determined. RESULTS: The calculated optimal cut-off points for each time interval (T), expressed as delta over baseline (δ‰), were 3.29 δ‰ at T5, 3.15 δ‰ at T10, 3.42 δ‰ at T15, 3.17 δ‰ at T20, 2.99 δ‰ at T25 and 2.82 δ ‰ at T30. Except at T5, the risk of false-positive and false-negative test results at each time interval was lower than 2.3% using these cut-off points. When replacing the cut-off points with 3.0 δ‰, the risk of error was still lower than 2.3%. The test at T10 showed 98.6% sensitivity and 98.6% specificity compared with T30. T10 and T30 showed 100% sensitivity and 96% specificity compared with histology and culture. CONCLUSIONS: The 13C UBT is an accurate, noninvasive test, even when the breath sample interval is reduced to 10 min. The present study confirms the validity of a cut-off point of 3.0 δ‰ for the 10 min and 30 min 13C UBT. PMID:17171196

  1. Studies of single walled carbon nanotubes for biomedical, mechanical and electrical applications using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiji, Roya Roientan

    The promise of carbon nanotubes to provide high-strength composites implies that carbon nanotubes might find widespread use throughout the world, implying that humans everywhere will be exposed to carbon nanotube-containing materials. In order to study what effects if any carbon nanotubes might have on the function of living cells, we have studied the association of single stranded DNA (ssDNA) with single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as a first step toward understanding the interaction of SWCNTs with living matter. Studies have been performed on both as-received and chemically oxidized SWCNTs to better understand the preferential association of ssDNA with SWCNTs. Samples of T30 ssDNA:SWCNT were examined under ambient conditions using non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)) techniques. AFM images of well-dispersed, as-received SWCNTs revealed isolated features on the SWCNT that are 1.4 to 2.8 nm higher than the bare SWCNT itself. X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed these features to be T30 ssDNA in nature. Chemically oxidizing SWCNTs before dispersion by sonication is found to be an effective way to increase the number of T30 ssDNA features. A series of experiments showed that free radical scavengers such as ascorbic acid and trolox can effectively prevent the conjugation of ssDNA to SWCNTs, suggesting a significant role of free radicals in this association. Also hybridization of the complimentary ssDNA sequences showed the covalent nature of this association. These results are important to understanding the precise mechanism of ssDNA:SWCNT association and provide valuable information for future use in electronics, biosensors and as a possible drug carrier into individual cells. If SWCNTs are used in biosensor or circuit design applications then it is important to note how much energy can be stored in a SWCNT based on its shape and configuration before a permanent damage is introduced to it. Therefore a study has been done on bending SWCNTs into

  2. Methane production from the red seaweed gracilaria tikvahiae

    SciTech Connect

    Hanisak, M.D.

    1981-01-01

    Stable continuous anaerobic digestion of the title seaweed was maintained in large (120 L) digesters for more than 20 months, with an average gas (60% CH4) production of 0.4 L/g volatile solids. The average bioconversion efficiency was approximately 48%. When the retention time, t, was increased (i.e., loading rate decreased) from 10 to 60 days the total production of biogas and CH4 (as well as the percent CH4 and the reduction of total volatile solids) increased to maximum at t = 30 days and decreased at t = 60 days. Biogas and CH4 production on the basis of volatile solids added increased to less than or equal to 60 days, as did the percent volatile solids reduction. The pH in the digesters increased with increasing t.

  3. Interaction of near-IR laser radiation with plasma of a continuous optical discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimakov, V. P.; Kuznetsov, V. A.; Solovyov, N. G.; Shemyakin, A. N.; Shilov, A. O.; Yakimov, M. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of 1.07-μm laser radiation with plasma of a continuous optical discharge (COD) in xenon and argon at a pressure of p = 3-25 bar and temperature of T = 15 kK has been studied. The threshold power required to sustain COD is found to decrease with increasing gas pressure to P t < 30 W in xenon at p > 20 bar and to P t < 350 W in argon at p > 15 bar. This effect is explained by an increase in the coefficient of laser radiation absorption to 20-25 cm-1 in Xe and 1-2 cm-1 in Ar due to electronic transitions between the broadened excited atomic levels. The COD characteristics also depend on the laser beam refraction in plasma. This effect can be partially compensated by a tighter focusing of the laser beam. COD is applied as a broadband light source with a high spectral brightness.

  4. A measurement of the ratio of the production cross sections for W and Z bosons in association with jets with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aad, G.

    2014-12-02

    In this study, the ratio of the production cross sections for W and Z bosons in association with jets has been measured in proton–proton collisions at √s = 7TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. The measurement is based on the entire 2011 dataset, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6fb–1. Inclusive and differential cross-section ratios for massive vector bosons decaying to electrons and muons are measured in association with jets with transverse momentum pT > 30GeV and jet rapidity |y| < 4.4. The measurements are compared to next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations and to predictions from differentmore » Monte Carlo generators implementing leading-order matrix elements supplemented by parton showers.« less

  5. Ferromagnetic correlations in Yb2Ti2O7 as revealed by small angle neutron scattering techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhariwalla, Connor; Ma, Qianli; Debeer-Schmitt, Lisa; Dabkowska, Hanna; Gaulin, Bruce

    We report low temperature SANS measurements on frustrated Seff=1/2 XY pyrochlore magnet Yb2Ti2O7. The ground state of this material has been proposed as a realization of a quantum spin ice; however, the low temperature phase behaviour has been complicated by sample dependencies believed to be related to weak ``stuffing''. Our SANS study focuses on the low Q structure of elastic ``rods'' of magnetic scattering which extend from Q=0 along the 111 direction. Using a single crystal sample, we characterize the low Q (<0.2Å-1) temperature dependence of this structured diffuse scattering intensity to T=30mK, passing through the enigmatic heat capacity anomaly near Tc=200mK. The temperature dependence of this diffuse scattering near Q=0 is largely consistent with that measured previously near 111.

  6. Observations of Magnetars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, C.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetars (Soft Gamma Repeaters and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars) are a subclass of neutron stars characterized by their recurrent X-ray bursts. While in an active (bursting) state, they are emitting hundreds of predominantly soft (kT=30 keV), short (0.1 - 100ms long) events. Active states last anywhere between days and years. Their quiescent source X-ray light curves exhibit pulsations in the narrow range of 5-1 1 s; estimates of these rotational period rate changes (spin-down) indicate that their magnetic fields are extremely high, of the order of 10(exp 14)-10(exp 15) G. Such high B-field objects, dubbed "magnetars", had been predicted to exist in 1992, but the first concrete observational evidence were obtained in 1998 for two of these sources. I will discuss here the history of magnetars, and their spectral, timing and flux characteristics both in the persistent and their burst emission.

  7. Observations of Soft Gamma Repeaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2004-01-01

    Magnetars (Soft Gamma Repeaters and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars) are a subclass of neutron stars characterized by their recurrent X-ray bursts. While in an active (bursting) state (lasting anywhere between days and years), they are emit&ng hundreds of predominantly soft (kT=30 kev), short (0.1-100 ms long) events. Their quiescent source x-ray light ewes exhibit puhlions rotational period rate changes (spin-down) indicate that their magnetic fields are extremely high, of the order of 10^14- 10^l5 G. Such high B-field objects, dubbed "magnetars", had been predicted to exist in 1992, but the first concrete observational evidence were obtained in 1998 for two of these sources. I will discuss here the history of Soft Gamma Repeaters, and their spectral, timing and flux characteristics both in the persistent and their burst emission.

  8. Eliashberg analysis of optical spectra reveals a strong coupling of charge carriers to spin fluctuations in doped iron-pnictide BaFe2As2 superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, D.; Barišić, N.; Dressel, M.; Cao, G. H.; Xu, Z.-A.; Schachinger, E.; Carbotte, J. P.

    2010-10-01

    The temperature and frequency dependences of the optical conductivity of Co-doped BaFe2As2 are analyzed and the electron-boson spectral density α2F(ω) are extracted using Eliashberg’s formalism. For the normal state at T=30K there is a relatively sharp and large peak around 10 meV and a secondary smaller and broader peak centered around 50 meV with the spectrum extending to high energies beyond the maximum phonon energy. The electron-boson mass enhancement parameter is 4.4, a value more consistent with spin-fluctuation scattering rather than with phonons. In addition the spectrum is found to evolve with temperature toward a less structured background at higher energies as in the spin susceptibility.

  9. Neutrino dynamics below the electroweak crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiglieri, J.; Laine, M.

    2016-07-01

    We estimate the thermal masses and damping rates of active (m < eV) and sterile (M ~ GeV) neutrinos with thermal momenta k~ 3T at temperatures below the electroweak crossover (5 GeV < T < 160 GeV) . These quantities fix the equilibration or ``washout'' rates of Standard Model lepton number densities. Sterile neutrinos interact via direct scatterings mediated by Yukawa couplings, and via their overlap with active neutrinos. Including all leading-order reactions we find that the washout rate generally exceeds the Hubble rate for 5 GeV < T < 30 GeV . Therefore it is challenging to generate a large lepton asymmetry facilitating dark matter computations operating at T < 5 GeV, whereas the generation of a baryon asymmetry at T > 130 GeV remains an option. Our differential rates are tabulated in a form suitable for studies of specific scenarios with given neutrino Yukawa matrices.

  10. Crystal field and magnetization of canted antiferromagnet CoCO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshcheryakov, V. F.

    2007-11-01

    The magnetization of the canted antiferromagnet CoCO3 ( T N = 18.1 K) is calculated in the Weiss molecular field approximation taking into account the microscopic state of the Co2+ ion in the entire range of temperatures and magnetic fields. The values of T N, magnetic susceptibility in the basal plane, and ferromagnetic moment were used as parameters. It is shown that the anisotropy of the g factor and of the exchange interaction at low temperatures ( T < 30 K) including the magnetic ordering temperature is correctly described in the Abragam-Pryce approximation. At high temperatures, the g factor increases and becomes isotropic, but it cannot be described using the Abragam-Pryce approximation. The reasons for g factor variation and the magnitude of the magnetic moment are discussed.

  11. Effect of microwave irradiation on the photoluminescence of bound excitons in CdTe:Cl single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Korbutyak, D. V.; Lotsko, A. P.; Vakhnyak, N. D.; Demchuna, L. A.; Konakova, R. V. Milenin, V. V.; Red'ko, R. A.

    2011-09-15

    The effect of microwave radiation on the transformation of impurity-based structural complexes in Cd{sub Te}:Cl single crystals is studied using low-temperature photoluminescence measurements. It is shown that microwave radiation activates Cl{sub Te} centers, resulting in an increase in the intensity of photoluminescence line of excitons bound at the corresponding Cl{sub Te} donor centers. A nonmonotonic dependence of the integrated photoluminescence intensity on the duration of microwave irradiation is observed. At the initial stage of microwave irradiation (t = 30 s), an increase in the integrated excitonic photoluminescence intensity is observed; as the duration of microwave irradiation is increased, the photoluminescence intensity decreases. The experimentally observed variations in the photoluminescence intensity are athermal in nature. The hypothetical mechanism of transformation of impurity-based structural complexes is described.

  12. Recovery of Pyruvic Acid using Tri-n-butylamine Dissolved in Non-Toxic Diluent (Rice Bran Oil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Dharm; Keshav, Amit

    2016-04-01

    An attempt has been made to investigate the effectiveness of the vegetable oil based biocompatible solvent for the separation of pyruvic acid from fermentation broth, by using rice bran oil as natural, non-toxic diluent. Reactive extraction of pyruvic acid (0.1-0.5 k mol/m3) from aqueous solutions has been studied using tri-n-butylamine (TBA; 10-70 %) as an extractant dissolved in non toxic rice bran oil at T = 30 ± 1 °C. Results were presented in terms of distribution coefficient (Kd), extraction efficiency (E %), loading ratio (Z), and complexation constant (\\varphi_{α β }). Extraction equilibrium was interpreted using mass action modeling approach. Based on the extent of loading (Z < 0.5) only (1:1), pyruvic acid: TBA complex was proposed. Equilibrium complexation constant was evaluated to 1.22 m3/k mol. Results obtained are useful in understanding the extraction mechanism.

  13. SESAME 7363: A new Li(6)D equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, Daniel Glen; Kress, Joel David; Crockett, Scott; Collins, Lee A.; Greeff, Carl William

    2015-09-21

    A new Equation of State (EOS) for Lithium 6 Deuteride (6LiD) was created, sesame 7363. This EOS was released to the user community under “eos-developmental” as sesame 97363. The construction of this new EOS is a modification of a previously released EOS, sesame 73601. Sesame 7360 is too stiff (5-10% excess pressure) at high compressions and high temperatures (ρ = 4-110g/cm3, T = 30-10,000 eV) compared to orbital-free density-functional theory. Sesame 7363 is softer and gives a better representation of the physics over this range without compromising the agreement with the experimental and simulation data that sesame 7360 was based on.

  14. Substituent and Solvent Effects on Excited State Charge Transfer Behavior of Highly Fluorescent Dyes Containing Thiophenylimidazole-Based Aldehydes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santos, Javier; Bu, Xiu R.; Mintz, Eric A.

    2001-01-01

    The excited state charge transfer for a series of highly fluorescent dyes containing thiophenylimidazole moiety was investigated. These systems follow the Twisted Intramolecular Charge Transfer (TICT) model. Dual fluorescence was observed for each substituted dye. X-ray structures analysis reveals a twisted ground state geometry for the donor substituted aryl on the 4 and 5 position at the imidazole ring. The excited state charge transfer was modeled by a linear solvation energy relationship using Taft's pi and Dimroth's E(sub T)(30) as solvent parameters. There is linear relation between the energy of the fluorescence transition and solvent polarity. The degree of stabilization of the excited state charge transfer was found to be consistent with the intramolecular molecular charge transfer. Excited dipole moment was studied by utilizing the solvatochromic shift method.

  15. Damping of charge-density waves in NbSe 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, J.; Chen, J.

    1993-05-01

    We have performed DC conductivity measurements in high electric field, and "Narrow-band noise" measurements up to 400 MHz, for temperatures in the range 15-55K, and in magnetic field 0-7 T. From the saturating value of dE/dv obtained in high electric field we have deduced the total damping parameter τ -1 which decreases with decreasing temperature. We analyse our data with the Wonneberger's theory for the ac response of the collective mode, which predicts in the low frequency range, τ1 = τ0-1(1+ α)+ βϱqp, where τ 0-1 is the bare phason damping coefficient and ϱ qp the quasiparticle resistivity. From our measurements we deduce the thermal variation of τ 0-1 which seems to verify for T < 30 K the theoretical prediction of Takada, Wong and Holstein in the low temperature limit, τ 0-1 ≌ A 1T 5.

  16. MOCVD of YBa 2Cu 3O 7-x thin films using a Ba fluorocarbon-based precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröhlich, K.; Šouc, J.; Chromik, S.; Machajdik, D.; Kliment, V.

    1992-11-01

    We have prepared superconducting YBa 2Cu 3O 7- x films by MOCVD using fluorocarbon based Ba(hfa) 2 precursor. The films were deposited at 500°C and annealed in low pressure ( pO2=10 -2Pa) dry oxygen atmosphere as well as in argon/oxygen mixture in the presence of water vapour. The samples on a MgO single crystal substrate had Tc( R=0)=79 K and Jc=10 4 A/cm 2 at T=30 K in zero magnetic field while the film on SrTiO 3, annealed under the same conditions had Tc( R=0)=86 K and Jc reached a value of 10 5 A/cm 2 at T=78 K.

  17. The mitochondrial genome of the hammerhead Sphyrna zygaena.

    PubMed

    Bolaño-Martínez, Nataly; Bayona-Vasquez, Natalia; Uribe-Alcocer, Manuel; Díaz-Jaimes, Píndaro

    2016-05-01

    The hammerhead shark (Sphyrna zygaena) is listed as a "Vulnerable" species for the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Here we report the complete sequence for the mitochondrial genome of the hammerhead shark of a specimen collected from the eastern Pacific Ocean. The genome structure is quite similar to other reported mtDNA shark species. It has a total length of 16,731 base pairs (bp); the base composition was A (31.54%), T (30.23%) C (25.03%) and G: 13.20, contains 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes; 21 tRNA genes. In addition, most of the starting (ATG) and ending codons (TAA) for the mtDNA gene regions were registered. PMID:25395081

  18. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Macaca mulatta brevicaudus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangjian; Tan, Xinxin; Shi, Fanglei; Liu, Zhijin

    2016-09-01

    The complete mitochondrial sequence of the Macaca mulatta brevicaudus has been determined by mapping the raw data to previously published mitochondrial assemblies of the corresponding species. The total sequence length is 16,561 bp, consisting of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, two ribosomal RNA genes, and one D-loop control region. The base composition of the mtDNA genome is 31.77% A, 25.14% T, 30.33% C, and 12.76% G, with an AT content of 56.90%. The arrangement of genes in M. m. brevicaudus is identical to that of M. mulatta. All genes are encoded on the heavy strand with the exception of ND6 and eight tRNA genes. The mitochondrial genome of M. m. brevicaudus presented here will contribute to a better understanding of the population genetics, help to protect its genetic diversity and resolve phylogenetic relationships within the family. PMID:25962482

  19. The Met Office NWP-based Nowcasting Demonstration Project for the summer 2012 floods and London Olympics 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, Susan P.; Li, Zhihong; Simonin, David; Tubbs, Robert; Kelly, Graeme; Caron, Jean-Francois

    2013-04-01

    The Met Office developed a high resolution (1.5km) NWP system covering southern England and Wales for nowcasting (NDP) for the London Olympics 2012 using the Unified Model and hourly cycling 4D-Var data assimilation. The system produces 6 hour forecasts every hour. This has been running near-real-time since March 2012 on the IBM Power 6 and moved to the new IBM Power 7 in September 2012. The system uses latent heat nudging of radar derived rain rates provided every 15mins, direct assimilation in VAR of an hourly 3D cloud cover analysis and high time frequency subhourly radar Doppler winds (6 per hour), wind profiler and MSG SEVIRI upper tropospheric water vapour channels every 15mins as well as hourly surface synoptic reports and AMDAR reports. Eumetsat Satellite winds (AMVs) are used but they are very coarse horizontally and temporally eg at T-30mins only. The domain includes 8 of the UK network radars of which 5 were providing Doppler radial winds by the time of the Olympics and 4 wind. Boundary condition updates were provided every 30mins from 1.5km resolution 6hourly forecasts from a 3hourly cycling 3-km 3D-VAR for the UK region, UKV model. The NDP uses a 4D-Var data assimilation system with 1/2 UM resolution (i.e. 3km), hourly assimilation windows with 10 minute LS states, and 100 second timestep. The PF model and its adjoint have dimensions of 180 x 144 x 70. Observations are extracted in the observation time window T-30 mins to T+30 mins. The 1.5km UM (360 x 288 x 70) uses 50 sec time-stepping on 6 nodes in 12 x16 decomposition. 4D-Var increments are added to UM at the initial forecast time T-30 mins (at first UM time step). A 45 minute data cutoff was used and forecasts were available within 1 hour of nominal analysis time ie taking 15mins for observation processing, data assimilation and forecast. Summer 2012 was an excellent time to assess the skill of the system for flash flood prediction due to the extreme weather over the UK during that period

  20. Design and optimization of hydrogen cooled pulsed storage inductors for electromagnetic launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Eyssa, Y.M.; Abdelsalam, M.K.; Boom, R.W.; Huang, X. . Applied Superconductivity Center); McIntosh, G.E. ); Waynert, J. )

    1989-01-01

    Cryoresistive magnetic energy storage systems that can deliver Meg-Amp Kilo-Volt levels of pulsed power for a short time (200-1000 s) have important potential applications in space-based strategic defense systems. Hydrogen cooled aluminum cryoresistive coils operating at frequencies > 1 H/sub z/ are efficient and light weight (/sub {Delta}/E/M = 20-50 J/g). In this paper the authors report on: analysis of eddy current losses; the use of aluminum inductors at 15 {Kappa} < T < 30 {Kappa} in fields B < 10 T; inductor cooling; optimization of energy stored per unit mass; and conceptual designs of 300 MJ hydrogen cooled cryoresistive toroids and solenoids.

  1. Measurement of tritium in natural water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meifen

    1985-06-01

    A detergent-scintillation liquid mixture applied to measure low specific activity of tritium in natural water was studied. The DYS-1 low level liquid scintillation counter designed and manufactured by our institute was employed. In comparing the Triton X-100 scintillation liquid mixture with the dioxane-based-scintillation liquid, a better formula for Triton X-100 scintillation liquid mixture was determined, the mixture possesses the quality of high water content; high efficiency and low back-ground in measuring tritium in water. Chemiluminescence of the Triton X-100 scintillation liquid mixture can be totally de-excited in short time. It can be employed at ambient temperature 11 28°C. For 20ml sample in quartz vials, counting efficiency is 15% with a background 2.17 cpm, Y=31 TU (t=30 min).

  2. Dirac and Pauli form factors based on consideration of the gluon effect in light-cone wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojaei, Mohammad Reza; Nikkhoo, Negin Sattary

    2015-11-01

    We discuss Dirac and Pauli form factors based on a generalized parton distribution framework in the range of high momentum transfers of t < 30 GeV2 and calculate the electromagnetic form factors, GE and GM, for the proton. In previous work, Gaussian parameterization has been used in wave functions for calculating electromagnetic form factors at intermediate-high momentum transfers of 1 GeV2 < t < 10 GeV2; in this paper, by considering an improved Gaussian ansatz, we not only calculate the electromagnetic form factors at moderately high momentum transfers t but also can calculate these quantities at high momentum transfers, achieving reasonable agreement with experimental data and other previous work.

  3. The complete mitochondrial genome of Eleotris oxycephala (Perciformes: Eleotridae).

    PubMed

    Meng, Yongyong; Ma, Hongyu; Ma, Chunyan; Wei, Hongqing; Liu, Yuexing; Zhang, Fengying; Wang, Wei; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Mengdi; Chen, Fenfang; Ma, Lingbo

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, we obtained the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Eleotris oxycephala, which was 16 527 bp in length. This genome consisted of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, two ribosomal RNA genes and a putative control region. Of the 37 genes, 28 were encoded by heavy strand, while nine were encoded by light strand. The overall base composition of this mitogenome was 28.21% for A, 16.81% for G, 24.75% for T, 30.23% for C, respectively, with a slight higher A + T content (52.96%). The phylogenetic analysis based on 13 concatenated protein-coding genes suggested that E. oxycephala as a sister species to Eleotris acanthopoma was clustered in family Eleotridae. This complete mitochondrial genome sequence of E. oxycephala should be helpful for the studies on population genetic structure, molecular evolution and phylogeny of E. oxycephala and related species. PMID:27158874

  4. Anisotropic Nuclear Inelastic Scattering of an Iron(II) Molecular Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, H.; Benda, R.; Herta, C.; Schünemann, V.; Chumakov, A. I.; Duelund, L.; Winkler, H.; Toftlund, H.; Trautwein, A. X.

    2001-02-01

    Nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS) spectra were recorded for a monocrystal of the spin-crossover complex [Fe\\(tptMetame\\)] \\(ClO 4\\)2 \\(tptMetame = 1,1,1-tris\\{[N-\\(2-pyridylmethyl\\)-N-methylamino]-methyl\\}ethane\\) at T = 30 K (low-spin state) and at room temperature (high-spin state) for different crystal orientations. The high energy resolution (0.65 meV) allowed us to resolve individual molecular vibrations which were unambiguously identified by density functional calculations. From the NIS spectra for the first time the angular-resolved iron-partial density of phonon states (PDOS) was extracted. The PDOS corroborates a vibrational entropy difference as driving force of the spin transition.

  5. Hemoglobin, Growth, and Attention of Infants in Southern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Aubuchon-Endsley, Nicki L.; Grant, Stephanie L.; Berhanu, Getenesh; Thomas, David G.; Schrader, Sarah E.; Eldridge, Devon; Kennedy, Tay; Hambidge, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Researchers tested male and female infants from rural Ethiopia to investigate relations among hemoglobin, anthropometry, and attention. They utilized a longitudinal design to examine differences in attention performance from 6 (M = 24.9 weeks, n = 89) to 9 months of age (M = 40.6 weeks, n = 85), differences hypothesized to be related to changes in iron status and growth delays. Stunting (length-for-age z-scores < −2.0) and attention performance [t(30) = −2.42, p = .022] worsened over time. Growth and hemoglobin predicted attention at 9 months [R2 = .15, p < .05], but not at 6. The use of the attention task at 9 months was supported. The study contributes to the knowledge base of hemoglobin, growth, and attention. PMID:21545582

  6. Neutron capture cross sections of /sup 178/,/sup 179/,/sup 180/Hf and the origin of nature's rarest stable isotope /sup 180/Ta

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, H.; Macklin, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    The neutron capture cross sections of /sup 178/,/sup 179/,/sup 180/Hf were measured in the energy range 2.6 keV to 2 MeV. The average capture cross sections were derived and fitted in terms of strength functions. Resonance parameters for the observed resonances below 10 keV were determined by shape analysis. Maxwellian-averaged capture cross sections were computed for thermal energies with kT between 5 and 100 keV. The cross sections for kT = 30 keV were used to determine the population probability of the 8- isomeric level in /sup 180/Hf by neutron capture as (1.24 +- 0.06)% and the r-process abundance of /sup 180/Hf as 0.0290 (Si = 10/sup 6/). These quantities served to analyze s- and r-process nucleosynthesis of /sup 180/Ta, nature's rarest stable isotope.

  7. Bose-Einstein Condensation of Magnons in Cs{sub 2}CuCl{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Radu, T.; Wilhelm, H.; Luehmann, T.; Steglich, F.; Yushankhai, V.; Kovrizhin, D.; Coldea, R.; Tylczynski, Z.

    2005-09-16

    We report on results of specific heat measurements on single crystals of the frustrated quasi-2D spin-1/2 antiferromagnet Cs{sub 2}CuCl{sub 4} (T{sub N}=0.595 K) in external magnetic fields B<12 T and for temperatures T>30 mK. Decreasing B from high fields leads to the closure of the field-induced gap in the magnon spectrum at a critical field B{sub c}{approx_equal}8.51 T and a magnetic phase transition is clearly seen below B{sub c}. In the vicinity of B{sub c}, the phase transition boundary is well described by the power law T{sub c}(B){proportional_to}(B{sub c}-B){sup 1/{phi}}, with the measured critical exponent {phi}{approx_equal}1.5. These findings are interpreted as a Bose-Einstein condensation of magnons.

  8. Complete mitochondrial genome of striped gourami, Trichogaster fasciata (Perciformes: Osphronemidae).

    PubMed

    Chen, Xialian; Luo, Lin; He, Huan; Tian, Yinshuai; Bai, Jie

    2016-09-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Trichogaster fasciata is determined in this study. It is 16,635 bp in size and consists of 2 rRNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes and 1 non-coding control region (D-loop). The overall base composition of the heavy strand of the T. fasciata mitochondrial genome is A: 29.18%, T: 30.22%, C: 25.14%, and G: 15.46%. A 78 bp AT tandem repeats was identified in the control region. This present study will be helpful to bring out the fact of genetic divergence among the genus Trichogaster. PMID:25765086

  9. In Situ Radiometric and Exposure Age Dating of the Martian Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, K. A.; Malespin, C.; Mahaffy, P.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Vasconcelos, P. M.; Milliken, R. E.; Malin, M.; Edgett, K. S.; Pavlov, A. A.; Hurowitz, J. A.; Grant, J. A.; Miller, H. B.; Arvidson, R.; Beegle, L.; Calef, F.; Conrad, P. G.; Dietrich, W. E.; Eigenbrode, J.; Gellert, R.; Gupta, S.; Hamilton, V.; Hassler, D. M.; Lewis, K. W.; McLennan, S. M.; Ming, D. M.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Steele, A.; Stolper, E. M.; Sumner, D. Y.; Vaniman, D.; Vasavada, A.; Williford, K.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2014-01-01

    We determined radiogenic and cosmogenic noble gases in a mudstone on the floor of Gale Crater. A K-Ar age of 4.21 +/- 0.35 billion years represents a mixture of detrital and authigenic components and confirms the expected antiquity of rocks comprising the crater rim. Cosmic-ray-produced 3He, 21Ne, and 36Ar yield concordant surface exposure ages of 78 T 30 million years. Surface exposure occurred mainly in the present geomorphic setting rather than during primary erosion and transport. Our observations are consistent with mudstone deposition shortly after the Gale impact or possibly in a later event of rapid erosion and deposition. The mudstone remained buried until recent exposure by wind-driven scarp retreat. Sedimentary rocks exposed by this mechanism may thus offer the best potential for organic biomarker preservation against destruction by cosmic radiation.

  10. Theory of radiative electron attachment to molecules: Benchmark study of CN-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douguet, Nicolas; Fonseca dos Santos, Samantha; Raoult, Maurice; Dulieu, Olivier; Orel, Ann E.; Kokoouline, Viatcheslav

    2013-11-01

    We have developed an approach based on first principles to study the process of radiative electron attachment (REA) to linear molecules of astrophysical interest in collisions between the molecules and electrons at energies below 1 eV. The approach is based on accurate ab initio calculations of electronic bound and continuum states of the negative ion. The electronic continuum states are obtained with the complex-Kohn variational method. The benchmark calculation for the REA to the simplest negative ion CN-, which was recently observed in the interstellar medium, has produced a relatively low rate coefficient α(T)=7.3×10-16 cm3/s at T=30 K. Moreover, our results are shown to agree well with microscopic reversibility applied on a recent photodetachment experiment on CN-. Finally, the study confirms a previous assessment that the CN- ion is unlikely be formed by REA in the interstellar medium.

  11. Adsorption and photocatalytic degradation of dyes on polyacrylamide/calcium alginate/TiO2 composite film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shuxin; Zhao, Kongyin; Zhang, Xinxin; Fu, Yifan; Li, Zhihui; Xu, Sai; Wei, Junfu

    2015-03-01

    A casting solution was prepared by dispersing titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles in the sodium alginate and acrylamide aqueous solution. The casting solution was spread on a glass plate by a glass rod enlaced with brass wires to control the thickness of the sticky solution. Then polyacrylamide/calcium alginate/TiO2 (PAM/CA/T) composite film was obtained after UV irradiation and cross-linking by CaCl2. The PAM/CA/T film was characterized by scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope. The PAM/CA/T film had good strength and toughness. And they did not rupture after swelling in 5 wt.% NaCl solution and still had good mechanical properties. The adsorption properties of the PAM/CA/T film were investigated by using different dyes as the adsorbates. The photocatalytic degradation properties of these dyes on the PAM/CA/T films were also researched. The results indicated that there was no difference in the adsorption efficiency of PAM/CA film and PAM/CA/T-30 film. The adsorption rates of all the dyes were fast. The pre-adsorption of dyes had little effect on the catalytic degradation of dyes on PAM/CA/T film. The PAM/CA/T hydrogel film provided a suitable carrier for TiO2 in the photocatalytic degradation of dyes and the degradation efficiency of PAM/CA/T-30 film for methyl orange reached 80.76%. The PAM/CA/T film had good reusability and could degrade dyes in NaCl solution.

  12. Dietary composition and its associations with insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in youth.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Mélanie; Benedetti, Andrea; Gray-Donald, Katherine

    2014-02-01

    The objectives of the present study were to examine the associations between macronutrient intake and insulin sensitivity (IS) and insulin secretion (ISct), taking into consideration moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), fitness and sedentary behaviour. Caucasian youth (n 630) aged 8-10 years at recruitment, with at least one obese biological parent, were studied (QUebec Adipose and Lifestyle InvesTigation in Youth cohort). IS was measured using the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) of insulin resistance and Matsuda IS index. ISct was measured using HOMA2%-β, the ratio of the AUC of insulin:glucose over the first 30 min (AUC I/G(t= 30 min)) of the oral glucose tolerance test and AUC I/G(t= 120 min) over 2 h. Fitness was measured using VO₂(peak), percentage of fat mass by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and 7 d MVPA using accelerometry; screen time (ST) by average daily hours of self-reported television, video game or computer use. Dietary composition was measured using three non-consecutive dietary recalls. Non-parametric smoothing splines were used to model non-linear associations; all models were adjusted for age, sex, season, pubertal stage, MVPA, fitness, ST and adiposity. The percentage of total daily energy from dietary protein, fat, saturated fat and carbohydrate and the consumption of dietary vitamin D, sugar-sweetened beverages, fibre and portions of fruits and vegetables were taken into consideration. No dietary component was associated with any measure of IS after adjusting for MVPA, fitness, ST and adiposity. For every 1% increase in daily protein intake (%), AUC I/G(t= 30 min) decreased by 1·1% (P= 0·033). Otherwise, dietary composition was not associated with ISct. While long-term excess of energy intake has been shown to lead to overweight and obesity, dietary macronutrient composition is not independently correlated with IS or ISct in youth. PMID:24047611

  13. A new method to assess skin treatments for lowering the impedance and noise of individual gelled Ag-AgCl electrodes.

    PubMed

    Piervirgili, G; Petracca, F; Merletti, R

    2014-10-01

    A model-based new procedure for measuring the single electrode-gel-skin impedance (ZEGS) is presented. The method is suitable for monitoring the contact impedance of the electrodes of a large array with limited modifications of the hardware and without removing or disconnecting the array from the amplifier. The procedure is based on multiple measurements between electrode pairs and is particularly suitable for electrode arrays. It has been applied to study the effectiveness of three skin treatments, with respect to no treatment, for reducing the electrode-gel-skin impedance (ZEGS) and noise: (i) rubbing with alcohol; (ii) rubbing with abrasive conductive paste; (iii) stripping with adhesive tape. The complex impedances ZEGS of the individual electrodes were measured by applying this procedure to disposable commercial Ag-AgCl gelled electrode arrays (4  ×  1) with a 5 mm(2) contact area. The impedance unbalance ΔZ = ZEGS1 - ZEGS2 and the RMS noise (VRMS) were measured between pairs of electrodes. The tissue impedance ZT was also obtained, as a collateral result. Measurements were repeated at t0 = 0 min and at t30 = 30 min from the electrode application. Mixed linear models and linear regression analysis applied to ZEGS, ΔZ and noise VRMS for the skin treatment factor demonstrated (a) that skin rubbing with abrasive conductive paste is more effective in lowering ZEGS, ΔZ and VRMS (p < 0.01) than the other treatments or no treatment, and (b) a statistically significant decrement (p < 0.01), between t0 and t30, of magnitude and phase of ZEGS.Rubbing with abrasive conductive paste significantly decreased the noise VRMS with respect to other treatments or no treatment. PMID:25243492

  14. Background Noise Characteristics in the Western Part of Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grecu, B.; Neagoe, C.; Tataru, D.; Stuart, G.

    2012-04-01

    The seismological database of the western part of Romania increased significantly during the last years, when 33 broadband seismic stations provided by SEIS-UK (10 CMG 40 T's - 30 s, 9 CMG 3T's - 120 s, 14 CMG 6T's - 30 s) were deployed in the western part of the country in July 2009 to operate autonomously for two years. These stations were installed within a joint project (South Carpathian Project - SCP) between University of Leeds, UK and National Institute for Earth Physics (NIEP), Romania that aimed at determining the lithospheric structure and geodynamical evolution of the South Carpathian Orogen. The characteristics of the background seismic noise recorded at the SCP broadband seismic network have been studied in order to identify the variations in background seismic noise as a function of time of day, season, and particular conditions at the stations. Power spectral densities (PSDs) and their corresponding probability density functions (PDFs) are used to characterize the background seismic noise. At high frequencies (> 1 Hz), seismic noise seems to have cultural origin, since notable variations between daytime and nighttime noise levels are observed at most of the stations. The seasonal variations are seen in the microseisms band. The noise levels increase during the winter and autumn months and decrease in summer and spring seasons, while the double-frequency peak shifts from lower periods in summer to longer periods in winter. The analysis of the probability density functions for stations located in different geologic conditions points out that the noise level is higher for stations sited on softer formations than those sited on hard rocks. Finally, the polarization analysis indicates that the main sources of secondary microseisms are found in the Mediterranean Sea and Atlantic Ocean.

  15. The Preventive Role of Low-Dose Intravenous Ketamine on Postoperative Shivering in Children: A Placebo Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sanie, Mohammad Sadegh; Kalani, Navid; Ghobadifar, Mohamed Amin; Zabetian, Hassan; Hosseini, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative shivering is a major problem in children undergoing general anesthesia. Objectives The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of low-dose intravenous ketamine for prevention of shivering after induction of general anesthesia in children who had undergone tonsillectomy. Patients and Methods This was a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial including 80 children, of American society of anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status I or II, scheduled for tonsillectomy under general anesthesia who were randomly assigned to an intravenous ketamine (0.5 mg/kg, n = 40; group K) group or matched dose placebo (n = 40; group N) group. Surgical and demographic data, unexpected side effects, and the occurrence of shivering for each child were assessed by a blinded observer at the following time points: T0, in the recovery room; T10, at 10 minutes; T20, at 20 minutes; T30, and at 30 minutes. Results With regards to the demographic and surgical data, no significant differences between the two study groups were observed (P ≥ 0.05). Shivering intensity in children who had received ketamine was significantly lower than children who had not received ketamine, at T0, T10, T20, and T30 after arrival (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in hallucination, nausea, vomiting, hemodynamic dysfunction, blurred vision, and seizure in the K group compared with the N group (P ≥ 0.05). Conclusions Administration of intravenous ketamine at a dosage of 0.5 mg/kg immediately after anesthesia induction had a preventive effect on shivering intensity without hemodynamic alterations in children undergoing general anesthesia for tonsillectomy.

  16. Baseline plasma corticosterone, haematological and biochemical results in nesting and rehabilitating loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta)

    PubMed Central

    Flower, Jennifer E.; Norton, Terry M.; Andrews, Kimberly M.; Nelson, Steven E.; Parker, Clare E.; Romero, L. Michael; Mitchell, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation of hormonal responses to stress in reptiles relies on acquisition of baseline corticosterone concentrations; however, the stress associated with the restraint needed to collect the blood samples can affect the results. The purpose of this study was to determine a time limit for the collection of blood samples to evaluate baseline corticosterone, haematological and biochemical results in nesting (n = 11) and rehabilitating (n = 16) loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta). Blood samples were collected from the dorsal cervical sinus of each turtle immediately after touching the animal (t0; 0–3 min) and 3 (t3; 3–6 min), 6 (t6; 6–9 min; nesting turtles only), 10 (t10; 10–13 min) and 30 min (t30; rehabilitating turtles only) after the initial hands-on time. Consistent between the rehabilitating and nesting turtles, there was a subtle yet significant increase in white blood cell counts over time. Despite the fact that white blood cell counts increased during the sampling period, there was no direct correlation between white blood cell count and corticosterone in the sampled turtles. In the nesting turtles, significant elevations in corticosterone were noted between t0 and t3 (P = 0.014) and between t0 and t6 (P = 0.022). Values at t10 were not significantly different from those at t0 (P = 0.102); however, there was a trend for the corticosterone values to continue to increase. These results suggest that sampling of nesting loggerhead sea turtles within 3 min of handling will provide baseline corticosterone concentrations in their natural environment. Significant elevations in corticosterone were also noted in the rehabilitating loggerhead sea turtles between t0 and t10 (P = 0.02) and between t0 and t30 of sampling (P = 0.0001). These results suggest that sampling of loggerhead sea turtles within 6 min of handling should provide baseline corticosterone concentrations in a rehabilitation setting. The delay in

  17. N2O emission from urine in the soil in the beef production in Southeast Brazil: soil moisture content and temperature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simões Barneze, Arlete; Mancebo Mazzetto, Andre; Fernandes Zani, Caio; Siqueira Neto, Marcos; Clemente Cerri, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    Pasture expansion in Brazil has shown an increase in 4.5% per year, and a total cattle herd of about 200 millions in 2010. Associated to animal husbandry there are emissions of N2O (nitrous oxide) and other gases to the atmosphere. The liquid manure contributes to emitte 5% of the total N2O emissions. The urea content of cattle urine will readily hydrolyze to form ammonium after deposition to the soil. Nitrous oxide may then be emitted through the microbiological processes of nitrification and denitrification. Important factors can influence on these processes and consequently in nitrous oxide emissions, as soil water content and temperature (Bolan et al., 2004; Luo et al., 2008). The main goal of this research was to determine the soil water content and temperature influence on N2O emissions from urine depositions on the soil. In order to achieve the objective, soil incubation experiment was conducted in laboratory conditions at three levels of water-filled pore space (40%, 60% and 80% WFPS) and two temperatures (25ºC and 35ºC) with and without urine, with five replicates each. The soil used in this study was collected from the 0-10 cm layer of a grassland field in Southeast of Brazil and classified as Nitisols. For each measurement, the Kilner jar was hermetically sealed by replacing the lid and a first gas sample was immediately taken (time-zero, t0 sample) using a syringe and stored in a pre-evacuated gas vial. After 30 minutes the headspace of each jar was sampled again (time-thirty, t_30 sample). The lids were then removed and kept off until the next sampling day. Nitrous oxide concentrations in the sampled air were measured using a SRI Gas Chromatograph (Model 8610C). Gas fluxes were calculated by fitting linear regressions through the data collected at t0 and t_30 and were corrected for temperature and amount of soil incubated. Gas measurements were carried out up to 55 days. To determine the statistical significance, Tukey tests were carried out at 0

  18. Somatic growth effects of intramuscular injection of growth hormone in androgen-treated juvenile Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus (Perciformes: Cichlidae).

    PubMed

    Liñán-Cabello, Marco A; Robles-Basto, Cindy M; Mena-herrera, Alfredo

    2013-03-01

    Little is known about the effects of the interaction of growth hormone (GH) with 17 alpha-methyltestosterone (17-MT) during fish growth. We evaluated this in the present study to assess the effect on fish growth. Fish in two batches of juvenile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) (approximately 5.0cm in length) were randomly assigned in triplicate to three treatments and a control group, distributed among 12 fiberglass tanks of 1 000L capacity (50 fish per tank) in an experiment covering a period of six weeks. The experimental groups were: a) fish treated with 17-MT and GH in mineral oil (RGH); b) fish treated with 17-MT and mineral oil without the addition of GH (R); c) fish treated with GH in mineral oil but not 17-MT (NGH); and d) fish of the control group, which were treated with mineral oil but not 17-MT or GH (N). The GH was injected into the fish at a rate of 0.625mg/g body weight. Morphometric data were recorded at the beginning of the experiment (T0) and at 15, 30 and 45 days (T15, T30 and T45), and various indicators of growth were assessed: condition factor (K); survival percentage (S), feed conversion rate (FCR), percentage weight gain (WG) and (v) daily weight gain. The optimum dietary level was calculated assuming 5% food conversion to total weight in each group. During the experiment, the fish were provided with a commercial food containing 45% protein. The data showed that GH injection resulted in a greater weight gain in fish treated with 17-MT (the RGH treatment group), being particularly significant increase in weight during T15 and T30 (p<0.05). High values of K were found in the R and RGH treatments during the initial days of the experiment, which may have been a consequence of the better nutritional status affecting both weight gain and growth in body length, as a result of the additive effects of 17-MT and GH. The fish in groups not treated with 17-MT and treated with 17-MT and added GH showed greater increases in WG per day, higher K values and

  19. Computer simulations of the solvatochromism of betaine-30

    SciTech Connect

    Mente, S.R.; Maroncelli, M.

    1999-09-09

    Monte Carlo simulations of the pyridinium N-phenolate dye betaine-30 in 12 solvents (20 solvent representations) were performed in order to explore the molecular basis of the E{sub T}(30) scale of solvent polarity. Ab initio (HF/6-31G{sup *}) and semiempirical (AM1 and INDO/S) electronic structure calculations were used to determine the geometry and charge distribution of betaine-30 in its S{sub 0} and S{sub 1} states. The solvent effect on the betaine absorption spectrum was assumed to derive from electrostatic interactions between the effective charge distributions of solvent molecules and the charge shift brought about by the S{sub 0} {r_arrow} S{sub 1} transition. Two models for this charge shift, one obtained from INDO/S calculations and the other an idealized two-site model, were used for the spectral calculations. Good agreement between simulated and observed {Delta}E{sub T} shifts (E{sub T}(30) values measured relative to the nonpolar standard tetramethylsilane) was found for both charge-shift models. In water and other hydroxylic solvents, the O atom of the betaine solute was observed to form moderately strong hydrogen bonds to between one and two solvent molecules. The contribution of these specifically coordinated molecules to the {Delta}E{sub T} shift was found to be large, (30--60%) and comparable to experimental estimates. Additional simulations of acetonitrile and methanol in equilibrium with the S{sub 1} state of betaine-30 were used to determine reorganization energies in these solvents and to decide the extent to which the solvent response to the S{sub 0} {leftrightarrow} S{sub 1} transition conforms to linear response predictions. In both solvents, the spectral distributions observed in the S{sub 0} state simulations were {approximately} 15% narrower than those in the S{sub 1} simulations, indicating only a relatively small departure from linear behavior. Reorganization energies were also estimated for a number of other solvents and compared to

  20. The aluminum phosphate zone in the Peace River area, land-pebble phosphate field, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cathcart, James B.

    1953-01-01

    The Peace River area, comprising T. 30 and 31 S., R. 24 and 25 E., contains a thicker and more persistent aluminum phosphate zone, and one that is higher in P2O5 and uranium content than is known elsewhere in the land-pebble phosphate district. This report has been prepared to bring together all of the information on the aluminum phosphate zone in the area where the first plant to treat this material will probably be located. The area may be divided into three physiographic units, (1) the ridge, (2) the flatwoods, and (3) the valley. Maps showing distribution and grade of the aluminum phosphate zone indicate that the zone is thin or absent in the ridge unit, thickest and most persistent, and of the best grade in P2O5 and uranium in the flatwoods unit, and absent or very low in grade in the valley unit. Maps of thickness and of chemical composition show that even in favorable areas there are places where the aluminum phosphate zone is missing or of questionable economic importance. The distribution maps also show that areas of high P2O5 and high uranium content coincide closely. Areas containing thick aluminum phosphate material usually have high uranium and P2O5 contents. It is estimated that an average of 13,000 tons per day of aluminum phosphate material might be mined from this area. This figure is based on the probable amount of time, per year, that mining would be in favorable ground. When all mines in the area are in favorable ground, the tonnage per day might be about 23,000 tons. Tonnages of aluminum phosphate material have been computed for about 36 percent of the area of T. 30 S., R. 25 E., and for 18 percent of the area of T. 31 S., R. 25 E. The total inferred tonnage is about 150,000,000 short tons, with an average grade of 0.012 percent U3O8.

  1. Water Formation and Oxygen Chemistry on Dust Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidali, Gianfranco; He, Jiao

    Water plays an important role in space. As ice on cold dust grains, it provides the medium for a rich chemistry; in the gas-phase, it gives information on the particular environment it is in. It is understood that the formation of water occurs both in the gas-phase and on grains. While the importance of water formation on dust grain surfaces has been recognized for a long time (1) , it is only recently that laboratory investigations have been undertaken to characterize the network of reactions (2) . Closely connected to this work on water formation, is the study of oxygen chemistry on dust grains. Of particular importance is the characterization of the energetics of adsorption, diffusion and desorption of oxygen-containing molecules. I will present data from recent experiments on the interaction of oxygen and hydroxyls with silicate surfaces and on the formation of water on warm (T>30K) amorphous silicates. Such results provide new values to parameters used in simulation codes of the chemical evolution of interstellar space environments. 1. A.G.G.M Tielens & W. Hagen, Astron. & Astrophys. 114, 245 (1982). 2. G. Vidali, J. Low Temp. Phys. 170,1 (2013). This work is supported by the NSF, Astronomy & Astrophysics Division (Grants No. 0908108 and 1311958), and NASA (Grant No. NNX12AF38G). We thank Dr. J.Brucato of the Astrophysical Observatory of Arcetri for providing the samples used in these experiments.

  2. Pressure and temperature dependence of growth and morphology of Escherichia coli: experiments and stochastic model.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pradeep; Libchaber, Albert

    2013-08-01

    We have investigated the growth of Escherichia coli, a mesophilic bacterium, as a function of pressure (P) and temperature (T). Escherichia coli can grow and divide in a wide range of pressure (1-400 atm) and temperature (23-40°C). For T > 30°C, the doubling time of E. coli increases exponentially with pressure and exhibits a departure from exponential behavior at pressures between 250 and 400 atm for all the temperatures studied in our experiments. The sharp change in doubling time is followed by a sharp change in phenotypic transition of E. coli at high pressures where bacterial cells switch to an elongating cell type. We propose a model that this phenotypic change in bacteria at high pressures is an irreversible stochastic process, whereas the switching probability to elongating cell type increases with increasing pressure. The model fits well the experimental data. We discuss our experimental results in the light of structural and thus functional changes in proteins and membranes. PMID:23931326

  3. Microwave properties of a Y 0.7Ca 0.3Ba 2Cu 3O 7- δ microstrip ring resonator with various hole concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, L. S.; Juang, J. Y.; Wu, K. H.; Uen, T. M.; Lin, J. Y.; Gou, Y. S.

    2004-10-01

    Superconducting ring resonator with a Y 0.7Ca 0.3Ba 2Cu 3O 7- δ ground plane was fabricated by using Y 0.7Ca 0.3Ba 2Cu 3O 7- δ thin film deposited on both sides of a LaAlO 3 (LAO) substrate. The resonator exhibits a high quality factor Q > 10 4 at T < 30 K, and from empirical relation, Tc/ Tc,max = 1 - 82.6( p - 0.16) 2, we obtained the hole concentration p. By controlling the oxygen contents of the ring resonator, the hole concentration p was controlled from 0.218 to 0.088, determined by the empirical relation, in the same film. The temperature dependence of the resonance frequency, f( T), was then systematically studied. By using Chang’s inductive formula and taking a functional form ( λ(5 K)/ λ( T)) 2 = 1 - ( T/ Tc) 2 at T < 0.6 Tc, the London penetration depths λ(5 K) for various oxygen contents at 5 K were obtained, respectively. Finally, it allows us to test the Uemura relation 1/ λ2(5 K) ∝ Tc from the over- to the underdoped regime in the same sample.

  4. In vivo Raman spectroscopy of biochemical changes in human skin by cosmetic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosato, Maira Gaspar; dos Santos, Edson Pereira; Alves, Rani de Souza; Raniero, Leandro; Menezes, Priscila Fernanda C.; Kruger, Odivânia; Praes, Carlos Eduardo O.; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2010-02-01

    The skin aging process is mainly accelerated by external agents such as sunlight, air humidity and surfactants action. Changes in protein structures and hydration during the aging process are responsible for skin morphological variations. In this work the human skin was investigated by in vivo Raman spectroscopy before and after the topical applications of a cosmetic on 17 healthy volunteers (age 60 to 75). In vivo Raman spectra of the skin were obtained with a Spectrometer SpectraPro- 2500i (Pi-Acton), CCD detector and a 785 nm laser excitation source, collected at the beginning of experiment without cream (T0), after 30 (T30) and 60 (T60) days using the product. The primary changes occurred in the following spectral regions: 935 cm-1 (νCC), 1060 cm-1 (lipids), 1174 to 1201 cm-1 (tryptofan, phenylalanine and tyrosine), 1302 cm-1 (phospholipids), 1520 to 1580 cm-1 (C=C) and 1650 cm-1 (amide I). These findings indicate that skin positive effects were enhanced by a continuous cream application.

  5. The Structural Properties of Vapor Deposited Water Ice and Astrophysical Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, P.; Blake, D. F.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Films of vapor deposited water ice at low temperature (T<30 K) show a number of interesting structural changes during a gradual warmup. We would like to talk about the structure of the low temperature high density amorphous form of water ice, the process of crystallization, and some recent work on the morphological changes of water ice films at high temperature. The studies of the high density amorphous form are from in-situ electron microscopy as well as numerical simulations of molecular dynamics and have lead to new insights into the physical distinction between this high density amorphous form and the low density amorphous form. For the process of crystallization, we propose a model that describes the crystallization of water ice from the amorphous phase to cubic ice in terms of the nucleation of small domains in the ice. This model agrees well with the behavior of water ice in our electron microscopy studies and finds that pure water above the glass transition is a strong liquid. In more recent work, we have concentrated on temperatures above the crystallization temperature and we find interesting morphological changes related to the decrease in viscosity of the amorphous component in the cubic crystalline regime. Given enough time, we would like to put these results in an astrophysical context and discuss some observed features of the frost on interstellar grains and the bulk ice in comets.

  6. 193 nm photodissociation of larger multiply-charged biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Ziqiang; Kelleher, Neil L.; O'Connor, Peter B.; Aaserud, David J.; Little, Daniel P.; McLafferty, Fred W.

    1996-12-01

    In contrast to most ion dissociation methods, 193 nm ultraviolet photodissociation of electrosprayed melittin (2.8 kDa) and ubiquitin (8.6 kDa) molecular ions yields new c and z ions (backbone amine bond dissociation) that provide additional sequence information. Dissociation by collisions or infrared photons produce b and y ions; for cleavages between the same amino acids the c ion represents the addition of NH2 to the b ion, and z the loss of NH2 from the y ion, so that these ions can be differentiated by this ± 16.02 Da difference. However, 193 nm photodissociation of 12-29 kDa ions as yet does not give collectable product ions, and that of the very stable y182+ ion from ubiquitin only effects a side chain loss. 193 nm irradiation of negative ions of all-T 30-mer DNA appears to eject electrons; apparently this is the first observation of electron photodetachment from multiply-charged negative ions.

  7. Nuclear Spin Symmetry Conservation and Relaxation in Water (1H216O) Studied by Cavity Ring-Down (CRD) Spectroscopy of Supersonic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manca Tanner, Carine; Quack, Martin; Schmidiger, David

    2013-10-01

    We report high resolution near-infrared laser spectra of water seeded in a supersonic jet expansion of argon probed by cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) in the R branch of the 2-3 band (above 7500 cm-1) at several effective temperatures T < 30 K. Our goal is to study nuclear spin symmetry conservation and relaxation. For low mole fractions of water in the gas mixture, we obtained the lowest rotational temperatures and observed nuclear spin symmetry conservation, in agreement with theoretical expectation for inelastic collisions of isolated H2O molecules with Ar and similar to a previous series of experiments with other small molecules in supersonic jet expansions. However, for the highest mole fractions of water, which we used (xH2O < 1.6%), we obtained slightly higher rotational temperatures and observed nuclear spin symmetry relaxation, which cannot be explained by the intramolecular quantum relaxation mechanism in the monomer H2O. The nuclear spin symmetry relaxation observed is, indeed, seen to be related to the formation of water clusters at the early stage of the supersonic jet expansion. Under these conditions, two mechanisms can contribute to nuclear spin symmetry relaxation. The results are discussed in relation to claims of the stability of nuclear spin isomers of H2O in the condensed phase and briefly also to astrophysical spectroscopy.

  8. Threshold selection for classification of MR brain images by clustering method

    SciTech Connect

    Moldovanu, Simona; Obreja, Cristian; Moraru, Luminita

    2015-12-07

    Given a grey-intensity image, our method detects the optimal threshold for a suitable binarization of MR brain images. In MR brain image processing, the grey levels of pixels belonging to the object are not substantially different from the grey levels belonging to the background. Threshold optimization is an effective tool to separate objects from the background and further, in classification applications. This paper gives a detailed investigation on the selection of thresholds. Our method does not use the well-known method for binarization. Instead, we perform a simple threshold optimization which, in turn, will allow the best classification of the analyzed images into healthy and multiple sclerosis disease. The dissimilarity (or the distance between classes) has been established using the clustering method based on dendrograms. We tested our method using two classes of images: the first consists of 20 T2-weighted and 20 proton density PD-weighted scans from two healthy subjects and from two patients with multiple sclerosis. For each image and for each threshold, the number of the white pixels (or the area of white objects in binary image) has been determined. These pixel numbers represent the objects in clustering operation. The following optimum threshold values are obtained, T = 80 for PD images and T = 30 for T2w images. Each mentioned threshold separate clearly the clusters that belonging of the studied groups, healthy patient and multiple sclerosis disease.

  9. Determination of the stellar (n,γ) cross section of Ca40 with accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillmann, I.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Heil, M.; Käppeler, F.; Wallner, A.; Forstner, O.; Golser, R.; Kutschera, W.; Priller, A.; Steier, P.; Mengoni, A.; Gallino, R.; Paul, M.; Vockenhuber, C.

    2009-06-01

    The stellar (n,γ) cross section of Ca40 at kT=25 keV has been measured with a combination of the activation technique and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). This combination is required when direct off-line counting of the produced activity is compromised by the long half-life and/or missing γ-ray transitions. The neutron activations were performed at the Karlsruhe Van de Graaff accelerator using the quasistellar neutron spectrum of kT=25 keV produced by the Li7(p,n)Be7 reaction. The subsequent AMS measurements were carried out at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA) with a 3 MV tandem accelerator. The doubly magic Ca40 is a bottle-neck isotope in incomplete silicon burning, and its neutron capture cross section determines the amount of leakage, thus impacting on the eventual production of iron group elements. Because of its high abundance, Ca40 can also play a secondary role as “neutron poison” for the s-process. Previous determinations of this value at stellar energies were based on time-of-flight measurements. Our method uses an independent approach, and yields for the Maxwellian-averaged cross section at kT=30 keV a value of <σ>30keV=5.73±0.34 mb.

  10. Threshold selection for classification of MR brain images by clustering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldovanu, Simona; Obreja, Cristian; Moraru, Luminita

    2015-12-01

    Given a grey-intensity image, our method detects the optimal threshold for a suitable binarization of MR brain images. In MR brain image processing, the grey levels of pixels belonging to the object are not substantially different from the grey levels belonging to the background. Threshold optimization is an effective tool to separate objects from the background and further, in classification applications. This paper gives a detailed investigation on the selection of thresholds. Our method does not use the well-known method for binarization. Instead, we perform a simple threshold optimization which, in turn, will allow the best classification of the analyzed images into healthy and multiple sclerosis disease. The dissimilarity (or the distance between classes) has been established using the clustering method based on dendrograms. We tested our method using two classes of images: the first consists of 20 T2-weighted and 20 proton density PD-weighted scans from two healthy subjects and from two patients with multiple sclerosis. For each image and for each threshold, the number of the white pixels (or the area of white objects in binary image) has been determined. These pixel numbers represent the objects in clustering operation. The following optimum threshold values are obtained, T = 80 for PD images and T = 30 for T2w images. Each mentioned threshold separate clearly the clusters that belonging of the studied groups, healthy patient and multiple sclerosis disease.

  11. Binding of environmental carcinogens to asbestos and mineral fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, G; Pagé, M; Dumas, L

    1984-01-01

    A rapid method has been developed for measuring the binding capacity of asbestos and other mineral fibres for environmental carcinogens. Benzo(alpha)pyrene (B(alpha)P), nitrosonornicotine (NNN), and N-acetyl-2-aminofluorene (NAAF) were assayed in the presence of Canadian grade 4T30 chrysotile, chrysotile A, amosite, crocidolite, glass microfibres, glasswool, attapulgite, and titanium dioxide. Chrysotile binds significantly more carcinogens than the other mineral fibres. This binding assay is reproducible with coefficients of variation of less than 8% and 6% respectively for inter and intra assay. The influence of pH was also studied, and there is good correlation between the carcinogen binding and the charge of the tested mineral fibres. The in vitro cytotoxicity on macrophage like cell line P388D1 and the haemolytic activity of various mineral fibres were also measured; a good correlation was found between the binding capacity and the cytotoxicity of tested mineral fibres on P388D1 cells. These results give some explanations for the reported synergism between exposure to asbestos and the smoking habits of workers. PMID:6331497

  12. The energy input mechanism into the lower transition regions between stellar chromospheres and coronae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1988-01-01

    The ratio of the emission line fluxes for the C II and C IV lines in the lower transition regions (T = 30,000 to 100,000 K) between stellar chromospheres and transition layers is shown to depend mainly on the temperature gradient in the line emitting regions which can therefore be determined from this line ratio. From the observed constant (within the limits of observational error) ratio of the emission line fluxes of the C II (1335 A) and C IV (1550 A) lines it is concluded that the temperature gradients in the lower transition layers are similar for the large majority of stars independently of T sub eff, L, and degree of activity. This means that the temperature dependence of the damping length for the mechanical flux must be the same for all these stars. Since for different kinds of mechanical fluxes the dependence of the damping length on gas pressure and temperature is quite different, it is concluded that the same heating mechanism must be responsible for the heating of all the lower transition layers of these stars, regardless of their chromospheric activity. Only the amount of mechanical flux changes. The T Tauri stars are exceptions: their emission lines are probably mainly due to circumstellar material.

  13. Measurement of differential J /ψ production cross sections and forward-backward ratios in p + Pb collisions with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abouzeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao de Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. 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R.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thong, W. M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tran, H. L.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van den Wollenberg, W.; van der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Leeuw, R.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virzi, J.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.; Atlas Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    Measurements of differential cross sections for J /ψ production in p +Pb collisions at √{sN N}=5.02 TeV at the CERN Large Hadron Collider with the ATLAS detector are presented. The data set used corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 28.1 nb-1. The J /ψ mesons are reconstructed in the dimuon decay channel over the transverse momentum range 8 T<30 GeV and over the center-of-mass rapidity range -2.87

  14. Responsiveness of the QUALID to Improved Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Patients with Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Benhabib, Hadas; Lanctôt, Krista L.; Eryavec, Goran M.; Li, Abby; Herrmann, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Background This study aimed to determine whether the Quality of Life in Late-Stage Dementia (QUALID) scale is responsive to changes in behaviour due to therapeutic intervention. Method 31 long-term care residents with moderate to severe AD and agitation/aggression entered a three-month, open-label trial of memantine 10 mg BID. The relationships between the QUALID and BPSD, global improvement, and cognition at baseline and endpoint, as well as the changes in these scales as a result of treatment, were examined. Results Despite a significant improvement in agitation and aggression (NPI agitation, F3,90 = 3.721, p =.014; CMAI total, F3,90 = 6.301, p =.001) and overall behaviour (NPI total, F3,90 = 4.035, p =.010), there was no significant change in QUALID score (t30 = −0.278, p =.783). The QUALID was correlated with NPI at baseline (τ = 0.270, p =.037) and endpoint (τ = 0.404, p =.002), but change scores were not correlated (τ = 0.107, p =.412). Conclusion While the QUALID correlates with behavioural measures at single time points, it does not appear to correlate with changes longitudinally associated with treatment. PMID:24278094

  15. Influence of isoflurane on the diastolic pressure-flow relationship and critical occlusion pressure during arterial CABG surgery: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Hinz, José; Hanekop, Gerd G.; Weyland, Andreas; Popov, Aron F.; Schmitto, Jan D.; Bauer, Martin; Kazmaier, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The effects of isoflurane on the determinants of blood flow during Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG) surgery are not completely understood. This study characterized the influence of isoflurane on the diastolic Pressure-Flow (P-F) relationship and Critical Occlusion Pressure (COP) during CABG surgery. Twenty patients undergoing CABG surgery were studied. Patients were assigned to an isoflurane or control group. Hemodynamic and flow measurements during CABG surgery were performed twice (15 minutes after the discontinuation of extracorporeal circulation (T15) and again 15 minutes later (T30)). The zero flow pressure intercept (a measure of COP) was extrapolated from a linear regression analysis of the instantaneous diastolic P-F relationship. In the isoflurane group, the application of isoflurane significantly increased the slope of the diastolic P-F relationship by 215% indicating a mean reduction of Coronary Vascular Resistance (CVR) by 46%. Simultaneously, the Mean Diastolic Aortic Pressure (MDAP) decreased by 19% mainly due to a decrease in the systemic vascular resistance index by 21%. The COP, cardiac index, heart rate, Left Ventricular End-Diastolic Pressure (LVEDP) and Coronary Sinus Pressure (CSP) did not change significantly. In the control group, the parameters remained unchanged. In both groups, COP significantly exceeded the CSP and LVEDP at both time points. We conclude that short-term application of isoflurane at a sedative concentration markedly increases the slope of the instantaneous diastolic P-F relationship during CABG surgery implying a distinct decrease with CVR in patients undergoing CABG surgery. PMID:26966644

  16. Antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity of endophytes from Scapania verrucosa Heeg.

    PubMed

    Wu, J-G; Peng, W; Zeng, P-Y; Wu, Y-B; Yi, J; Wu, J-Z

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the antibacterial activity and cytotoxicity of endophytes isolated from Scapania verrucosa Heeg., which belongs to the liverwort class. A total of 49 endophytic fungi were isolated from S. verrucosa and classified into seven genera and one family in our previous study. In this study, the cytotoxic activity of the endophytes was assessed using the brine shrimp lethality bioassay, seven of which showed potent toxicity against the brine shrimp with 50% lethal concentration values less than 20 µg/mL. T-30 was the most toxic, with a 50% lethal concentration value of 7.15 µg/mL. Moreover, T-27 exhibited the strongest antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, with minimal inhibitory concentrations below 0.25 and 4 mg/mL, which can inhibit the growth of two standard strains - ATCC 25923 (methicillin-sensitive S. aureus) and ATCC 43300 (methicillin-resistant S. aureus) - in a time-dependent manner, respectively. These results suggest that endophytes in S. verrucosa are the sources for the production of natural bioactive products and thus warrant further investigation. PMID:23613238

  17. Stellar (n,{gamma}) cross sections of p-process isotopes. II. {sup 168}Yb, {sup 180}W, {sup 184}Os, {sup 190}Pt, and {sup 196}Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Marganiec, J.; Dillmann, I.; Pardo, C. Domingo; Kaeppeler, F.; Walter, S.

    2010-09-15

    The neutron-capture cross sections of {sup 168}Yb, {sup 180}W, {sup 184}Os, {sup 190}Pt, and {sup 196}Hg have been measured by means of the activation technique. The samples were irradiated in a quasistellar neutron spectrum of kT=25 keV, which was produced at the Karlsruhe 3.7-MV Van de Graaff accelerator via the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction. Systematic uncertainties were investigated in repeated activations with different samples and by variation of the experimental parameters, that is, irradiation times, neutron fluxes, and {gamma}-ray counting conditions. The measured data were converted into Maxwellian-averaged cross sections at kT=30 keV, yielding 1214{+-}61, 624{+-}54, 590{+-}43, 511{+-}46, and 201{+-}11 mb for {sup 168}Yb, {sup 180}W, {sup 184}Os, {sup 190}Pt, and {sup 196}Hg, respectively. The present results either represent first experimental data ({sup 168}Yb, {sup 184}Os, and {sup 196}Hg) or could be determined with significantly reduced uncertainties ({sup 180}W and {sup 190}Pt). These measurements are part of a systematic study of stellar (n,{gamma}) cross sections of the stable p isotopes.

  18. Anaerobic degradation of alcohol ethoxylates and polyethylene glycols in marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Traverso-Soto, Juan M; Rojas-Ojeda, Patricia; Sanz, José Luis; González-Mazo, Eduardo; Lara-Martín, Pablo A

    2016-02-15

    This research is focused on alcohol polyethoxylates (AEOs), nonionic surfactants used in a wide variety of products such as household cleaners and detergents. Our main objective in this work was to study the anaerobic degradation of these compounds and their main aerobic degradation products and precursors (polyethylene glycols, PEGs, which are also used for many other applications) in marine sediments, providing the first data available on this topic. First, we observed that average AEO sediment-water partition coefficients (Kd) increased towards those homologs having longer alkyl chains (from 257 L/kg for C12 to 5772 L/kg for C18),which were less susceptible to undergo biodegradation. Overall, AEO and PEG removal percentages reached up to 99.7 and 93%, respectively, after 169 days of incubation using anaerobic conditions in sediments ([O2] = 0 ppm, Eh = -170 to -380 mV and T = 30 °C). Average half-life was estimated to be in a range from 10 to 15 days for AEO homologs (C12AEO8-C18AEO8), and 18 days for PEGEO8.Methanogenic activity proved to be intense during the experiment, confirming the occurrence of anaerobic conditions. This is the first study showing that AEOs and PEGs can be degraded in absence of oxygen in marine sediments, so this new information should be taken into account for future environmental risk assessments on these chemicals. PMID:26657255

  19. Measurement of the Bbar0-B0 and Bbars0- Bs0 production asymmetries in pp collisions at √{ s} = 7 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cojocariu, L.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H.-M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R. F.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gavrilov, G.; Geraci, A.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani', S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Moggi, N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perez Trigo, E.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Bbar0-B0 and Bbars0- Bs0 production asymmetries, AP (B0) and AP (Bs0), are measured by means of a time-dependent analysis of B0 → J / ψK*0, B0 →D-π+ and Bs0 → Ds- π+ decays, using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb-1, collected by LHCb in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. The measurements are performed as a function of transverse momentum and pseudorapidity of the B0 and Bs0 mesons within the LHCb acceptance. The production asymmetries, integrated over pT and η in the range 4 T < 30 GeV / c and 2.5 < η < 4.5, are determined to be AP (B0) = (- 0.35 ± 0.76 ± 0.28)% and AP (Bs0) = (1.09 ± 2.61 ± 0.66)%, where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second systematic.

  20. Cold Agglutinin Disease; A Laboratory Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Nikousefat, Zahra; Javdani, Moosa; Hashemnia, Mohammad; Haratyan, Abbas; Jalili, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Autoimmune haemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a complex process characterized by an immune reaction against red blood cell self-antigens. The analysis of specimens, drawn from patients with cold auto-immune hemolytic anemia is a difficult problem for automated hematology analyzer. This paper was written to alert technologists and pathologists to the presence of cold agglutinins and its effect on laboratory tests. Case Presentation: A 72-year-old female presented to the Shafa laboratory for hematology profile evaluation. CBC indices showed invalid findings with the Sysmex automated hematology analyzer. Checking the laboratory process showed precipitation residue sticking to the sides of the tube. After warming the tubes, results become valid and the problem attributed to cold agglutinin disease. In this situation, aggregation of RBCs, which occurs at t < 30°C, causes invalid findings meanwhile working with automated hematology analyzer. Conclusions: Knowledge of this phenomenon can help prevent wasting too much time and make an early and accurate diagnosis. PMID:26566452

  1. J-integral of circumferential crack in large diameter pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei; Chao, Yuh J.; Sutton, M. A.; Lam, P. S.; Mertz, G. E.

    Large diameter thin-walled pipes are encountered in a low pressure nuclear power piping system. Fracture parameters such as K and J, associated with postulated cracks, are needed to assess the safety of the structure, for example, prediction of the onset of tile crack growth and the stability of the crack. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has completed a comprehensive study of cracks in pipes and handbook-type data is available. However, for some large diameter, thin-walled pipes the needed information is not included in the handbook. This paper reports our study of circumferential cracks in large diameter, thin-walled pipes (R/t=30 to 40) under remote bending or tension loads. Elastic-Plastic analyses using the finite element method were performed to determine the elastic and fully plastic J values for various pipe/crack geometries. A non-linear Ramberg-Osgood material model is used with strain hardening exponents (n) that range from 3 to 10. A number of circumferential, through thickness cracks were studied with half crack angles ranging from 0.063(pi) to 0.5(pi). Results are tabulated for use with the EPRI estimation scheme.

  2. A reliable monitoring of the biocompatibility of an effluent along an oxidative pre-treatment by sequential bioassays and chemical analyses.

    PubMed

    Amat, A M; Arques, A; García-Ripoll, A; Santos-Juanes, L; Vicente, R; Oller, I; Maldonado, M I; Malato, S

    2009-02-01

    A new approach to assess biocompatibility of an effluent, based on combination of different bioassays and chemical analyses, has been tested using a mixture of four commercial pesticides treated by a solar photo-Fenton as target effluent. A very fast elimination of the pesticides occurred (all of them were below detection limit at t30W=36 min), but mineralisation was a more time-consuming process, due to the formation of organic intermediates and to the presence of solvents, as shown by GC-MS analysis. Measurements based on activated sludge indicated that detoxification was coincident with the removal of the active ingredients, while more sensitive Vibrio fischeri bacterium showed significant toxicity until the end of the experiment, although the effluent might be compatible with biological processes. Biodegradability of the solutions was enhanced by the photochemical process, to reach BOD5/COD ratios above 0.8. Longer time bioassays, such as the Zahn-Wellens' test, support the applicability of coupling photochemical with activated sludge-based biological processes to deal with these effluents. PMID:19070346

  3. The effects of motor rehabilitation training on clinical symptoms and serum BDNF levels in Parkinson's disease subjects.

    PubMed

    Angelucci, Francesco; Piermaria, Jacopo; Gelfo, Francesca; Shofany, Jacob; Tramontano, Marco; Fiore, Marco; Caltagirone, Carlo; Peppe, Antonella

    2016-04-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that motor rehabilitation may delay Parkinson's disease (PD) progression. Moreover, parallel treatments in animals up-regulate brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Thus, we investigated the effect of a motor rehabilitation protocol on PD symptoms and BDNF serum levels. Motor rehabilitation training consisted of a cycle of 20 days/month of physiotherapy divided in 3 daily sessions. Clinical data were collected at the beginning, at the end, and at 90 days follow-up. BDNF serum levels were detected by ELISA at 0, 7, 14, 21, 30, and 90 days. The follow-up period had a duration of 60 days (T30-T90). The results showed that at the end of the treatment (day 30), an improvement in extrapyramidal signs (UPDRS III; UPDRS III - Gait and Balance items), motor (6 Minute Walking Test), and daily living activities (UPDRS II; PDQ-39) was observed. BDNF levels were increased at day 7 as compared with baseline. After that, no changes in BDNF were observed during the treatment and in the successive follow-up. This study demonstrates that motor rehabilitation training is able to ameliorate PD symptoms and to increase temporarily BDNF serum levels. The latter effect may potentially contribute to the therapeutic action. PMID:26863448

  4. Low-energy spin fluctuations in the metallic spinel compound LiV2O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yushankhai, V. Yu.; Thalmeier, P.; Takimoto, T.

    2009-08-01

    In the family of transition metal oxides the spinel compound LiV2O4 is a rare metallic system showing heavy fermion behavior. In particular, an anomalously large specific heat coefficient γ = C/T and strongly enhanced magnetic susceptibility χs were detected in the low temperature limit, T<30 K. Recently we have proposed a model which allowed us to relate such an anomalous behavior of LiV2O4 to the proximity of the underlying 3d-electron system to a magnetic instability at T→0. The emergence of a rather peculiar paramagnetic ground state with largely degenerate lowenergy "critical" antiferromagnetic fluctuations in LiV2O4 is the combined effect of strong electron correlations and the geometrical frustration of V-ion pyrochlore lattice forming the metallic system in this compound. A self-consistent renormalization theory was developed to describe effects of strong coupling between spin fluctuation modes and their evolution with varying temperature and external pressure. The theory was shown to provide a firm basis for understanding many peculiar properties of spin dynamics obtained in the inelastic neutron scattering and NMR measurements on LiV2O4.

  5. Magnetars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2005-01-01

    "Magnetars (Soft Gamma Repeaters and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars) are a subclass of neutron stars characterized by their recurrent X-ray bursts. While in an active (bursting) state, they are emitting hundreds of predominantly soft (kT=30 keV), short (0.1-100 ms long) events. Active states last anywhere between days and years. Their quiescent source X-ray light curves exhibit pulsations in the narrow range of 5-11 s; estimates of these rotational period rate changes (spin-down) indicate that their magnetic fields are extremely high, of the order of 10^14-10^15 G. Such high B-field objects, dubbed "magnetars", had been predicted to exist in 1992, but the first concrete observational evidence was obtained in 1998 for two of these sources. I will discuss here the recent spectacular results from SGR 1806-20, as well as the history of magnetars, and their spectral, timing and flux characteristics both in the persistent and their burst emission."

  6. Thickness of the particle swarm in cosmic ray air showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsley, J.

    1985-01-01

    The average dispersion in arrival time of air shower particles detected with a scintillator at an impact parameter r is described with accuracy 5-10% by the empirical formula sigma = Sigma sub to (1+r/r sub t) sup b, where Sigma sub to = 2.6 ns, r sub t = 30m and b = (1.94 + or - .08) (0.39 + or - .06) sec Theta, for r 2 km, 10 to the 8th power E 10 to the 11th power GeV, and Theta 60 deg. (E is the primary energy and theta is the zenith angle). The amount of fluctuation in sigma sub t due to fluctuations in the level of origin and shower development is less than 20%. These results provide a basis for estimating the impact parameters of very larger showers with data from very small detector arrays (mini-arrays). The energy of such showers can then be estimated from the local particle density. The formula also provides a basis for estimating the angular resolution of air shower array-telescopes.

  7. Thomson scattering measurements in the RFX reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Bassan, M.; Bilato, R.; Giudicotti, L.; Pasqualotto, R.; Sardella, A.

    1997-01-01

    The first systematic measurements of the electron temperature (T{sub e}) spatial profile have been obtained in the reversed field pinch experiment RFX with a single pulse Thomson scattering (TS) diagnostic. Scattered light from a ruby laser pulse (E{le}15 J, {Delta}t=30 ns) is collected through three objectives from 10 positions along a diameter in the plasma equatorial plane, with a spatial resolution of 2.5 cm. Plasma discharges with current in the range 700{endash}900 kA have been investigated finding evidence of a quite flat T{sub e} profile. Data dispersion significantly greater than experimental uncertainties provides an indication of remarkable plasma fluctuations. Results are in good agreement with T{sub e} measurements from other single chord spectroscopic diagnostics (SiLi detector and SXR double filter), showing a reliable operation down to an electron density n{sub e}=3{times}10{sup 19} m{sup {minus}3}. Integration of this apparatus with a ND:YLF laser system for multipulse Thomson scattering measurements, sharing the same input optics, is under way. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Expression and purification of the modification-dependent restriction enzyme BisI and its homologous enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shuang-yong; Klein, Pernelle; Degtyarev, Sergey Kh.; Roberts, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    The methylation-dependent restriction endonuclease (REase) BisI (Gm5C ↓ NGC) is found in Bacillus subtilis T30. We expressed and purified the BisI endonuclease and 34 BisI homologs identified in bacterial genomes. 23 of these BisI homologs are active based on digestion of m5C-modified substrates. Two major specificities were found among these BisI family enzymes: Group I enzymes cut GCNGC containing two to four m5C in the two strands, or hemi-methylated sites containing two m5C in one strand; Group II enzymes only cut GCNGC sites containing three to four m5C, while one enzyme requires all four cytosines to be modified for cleavage. Another homolog, Esp638I cleaves GCS ↓ SGC (relaxed specificity RCN ↓ NGY, containing at least four m5C). Two BisI homologs show degenerate specificity cleaving unmodified DNA. Many homologs are small proteins ranging from 150 to 190 amino acid (aa) residues, but some homologs associated with mobile genetic elements are larger and contain an extra C-terminal domain. More than 156 BisI homologs are found in >60 bacterial genera, indicating that these enzymes are widespread in bacteria. They may play an important biological function in restricting pre-modified phage DNA. PMID:27353146

  9. Lipase-catalyzed synthesis of xylitol monoesters: solvent engineering approach.

    PubMed

    Castillo, E; Pezzotti, F; Navarro, A; López-Munguía, A

    2003-05-01

    A solvent engineering strategy was applied to the lipase-catalyzed synthesis of xylitol-oleic acid monoesters. The different esterification degrees for this polyhydroxylated molecule were examined in different organic solvent mixtures. In this context, conditions for high selectivity towards monooleoyl xylitol synthesis were enhanced from 6 mol% in pure n-hexane to 73 mol% in 2-methyl-2-propanol/dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) 80:20 (v/v). On the contrary, the highest production of di- and trioleoyl xylitol, corresponding to 94 mol%, was achieved in n-hexane. Changes in polarity of the reaction medium and in the molecular interactions between solvents and reactants were correlated with the activity coefficients of products. Based on experimental results and calculated thermodynamic activities, the effect of different binary mixtures of solvents on the selective production of xylitol esters is reported. From this analysis, it is concluded that in the more polar conditions (100% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO)), the synthesis of xylitol monoesters is favored. However, these conditions are unfavorable in terms of enzyme stability. As an alternative, binary mixtures of solvents were proposed. Each mixture of solvents was characterized in terms of the quantitative polarity parameter E(T)(30) and related with the activity coefficients of xylitol esters. To our knowledge, the characterization of solvent mixtures in terms of this polarity parameter and its relationship with the selectivity of the process has not been previously reported. PMID:12730008

  10. Stellar (n ,γ ) cross sections of neutron-rich nuclei: Completing the isotope chains of Yb, Os, Pt, and Hg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marganiec, J.; Dillmann, I.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Käppeler, F.

    2014-12-01

    The (n ,γ ) cross sections of the most neutron-rich stable isotopes of Yb, Os, Pt, and Hg have been determined in a series of activation measurements at the Karlsruhe 3.7 MV Van de Graaff accelerator, using the quasistellar neutron spectrum for k T =25 keV that can be produced with the 7Li(p ,n ) 7Be reaction. In this way, Maxwellian averaged cross sections could be directly obtained with only minor corrections. After irradiation the induced activities were counted with a HPGe detector via the strongest γ -ray lines. The stellar neutron capture cross sections of Yb,176174, Os,192190, Pt,198196, and Hg,204202, extrapolated to k T =30 keV, were found to be 157 ±6 mb, 114 ±8 mb, 278 ±11 mb, 160 ±7 mb, 171 ±19 mb, 94 ±4 mb, 62 ±2 mb, and 32 ±15 mb, respectively. In the case of 196Pt the partial cross section to the isomeric state at 399.5 keV could be determined as well. With these results the cross section data for long isotopic chains could be completed for a discussion of the predictive power of statistical model calculations towards the neutron-rich and proton-rich sides of the stability valley.

  11. Studies on the expression and processing of human proinsulin derivatives encoded by different DNA constructs.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Farheen; Gardner, Qurra-tul Ann Afza; Zain, Hina; Nadeem, Muhammad Shahid; Ali, Muhammad; Rashid, Naeem; Akhtar, Muhammad

    2013-10-01

    A synthetic gene encoding human proinsulin, containing Escherichia coli preferred codons, with an additional N-terminal methionine, was used for the expression, of M-proinsulin and construction of nine derivatives. No improvement in expression was noted, relative to that of M-proinsulin, when the 5'- of the gene was appended to codons for seven amino acids of a well expressed E. coli protein (threonine dehydrogenase), or the constructs contained multiple copies of the proinsulin gene. That in the latter constructs only the gene adjacent to the prometer sequence is expressed, was shown by a construct containing a proinsulin gene followed by that for interferon α-2b. With the latter construct, the proinsulin was, predominantly, expressed. The availability of data on the constructs prompted, subjecting these to analysis by two models designed to predict the expression of proteins from the sequences, of putative mRNA, around the start of translation but no significant relationship was noted. In all cases the proteins were expressed as inclusion bodies, which were refolded to give products of desired masses and successfully converted into insulin derivatives. Of all the constructs containing a trypsin sensitive site before phenylalanine (F), the N-terminal sequence, MKR↓F, was most efficiently processed, by a cocktail of trypsin and buffalo carboxypeptidase B, to give insulin with the removal of the N-terminus linker as well as the C-peptide in a single step, without cleaving the trypsin sensitive K(29)T(30) peptide bond. PMID:23872484

  12. Bidirectional frequency-dependent effect of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field on E. coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Varsik; Baghdasaryan, Naira; Ayrapetyan, Sinerik

    2013-09-01

    In the present work, the frequency-dependent effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF EMF) on Escherichia coli K-12 growth have been studied. The frequency-dependent effects of ELF EMF have shown that it can either stimulate or inhibit the growth of microbes. However, the mechanism by which the ELF EMF affects the bacterial cells is not clear yet. It was suggested that the aqua medium can serve as a target through which the biological effect of ELF EMF on microbes may be realized. To check this hypothesis, the frequency-dependent effects (2, 4, 6, 8, 10 Hz, B = 0.4 mT, 30 min) of ELF EMF on the bacterial growth were studied in both cases where the microbes were in the culture media during the exposure and where culture media was preliminarily exposed to the ELF EMF before the addition of bacteria. For investigating the cell proliferation, the radioactive [(3)H]-thymidine assay was carried out. It has been shown that EMF at 4 Hz exposure has pronounced stimulation while at 8 Hz it has inhibited cell proliferation. PMID:23046211

  13. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Xizang Plateau frog, Nanorana parkeri (Anura: Dicroglossidae).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lichun; Ruan, Qiping; Chen, Wei

    2016-09-01

    The Xizang Plateau frog (Nanorana parkeri) belongs to the family Dicroglossidae, which distributes in southern and eastern Xizang, southern-most Qinghai in China, high elevations of north-central Nepal, Himalayan Bhutan, northeastern Kashmir and India. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of N. parkeri was sequenced. The mitogenome was 17,837 bp in length, consisting of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, two ribosomal RNA genes, and a non-coding control region (CR). As in other vertebrates, most mitochondrial genes are encoded on the heavy strand, except for ND6 and eight tRNA genes, which are encoded on the light strand. The overall base composition of the N. parkeri is A: 27.7 % A, T: 30.1 % T, C: 26.6% and G: 15.6%. The alignment of the Nanorana species CRs exhibited high genetic variability and rich A + T content. In comparison with the mtDNA sequences typical of vertebrates, a tandem duplication of the tRNA(Met) gene and a rearrangement of the tRNA(Thr), tRNA(Pro) and tRNA(Leu) (CUN) genes were found. The complete mitogenome of N. parkeri can provided an important data for the studies on phylogenetic relationship and population genetics to further explore the taxonomic status of this species. PMID:25758045

  14. Impact dynamics of porcine drip bloodstains on fabrics.

    PubMed

    Williams, Elisabeth M P; Dodds, Margaret; Taylor, Michael C; Li, Jingyao; Michielsen, Stephen

    2016-05-01

    As a passive blood drop impacts a hard surface, it is observed to collapse and spread laterally, then retract and settle. During the spreading phase, the edge of the drop may rise forming a crown extending into spines and breaking up into secondary drops. When a similar drop falls onto a textile surface these same processes may occur, but the process of blood wicking into the fabric complicates stain formation. These processes are described within for passive drip stains collected under controlled conditions using anticoagulated porcine blood. Three stages of this impact process were identified and could be separated into distinct time zones: (1) spreading (time t≤2.5ms) and (2) retraction (2.5≤t≤12ms) on the surface with potential splashing at the periphery, and (3) wicking (30ms ≤t≤30min) of the blood into the fabric. Although wetting and wicking may also occur for t<30ms, the vast majority of wetting and wicking occur after this time and thus the short-time wicking can be ignored. In addition, the number of satellite stains correlates with the surface roughness with the number of satellites for jersey knit>plain-woven>cardboard. Conversely, the size of the satellite stains correlates with the amount of wicking in the fabric with the satellite stain size for plain-woven>jersey knit>cardboard. PMID:26970869

  15. Resonance neutron capture by Ne-(20, 22) in stellar environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winters, R. R.; Macklin, R. L.

    1988-06-01

    The neutron capture cross sections were measured over the neutron energy range 2.5-200 keV of Ne-(20, 22) at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator using enriched samples at high pressures. The cross sections, averaged using a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution weighting function for a range of temperatures thought to be appropriate for the sites of s-process stellar nucleosynthesis, are small. For example, the Maxwellian-averaged Ne-22(n, gamma) cross section for kT = 30 keV derived from the present work is smaller than 0.27 mbarn. This result increases the calculated net neutron production from Ne-22 by reducing the importance of Ne-22(n, gamma) as a neutron poison in s-process calculations. The number of neutrons per Fe-56 seed available for s-process stellar nucleosynthesis appears sufficient to account for the observed abundances of the s-elements for A in the range of 60-90.

  16. Multi-modality molecular imaging: pre-clinical laboratory configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yanjun; Wellen, Jeremy W.; Sarkar, Susanta K.

    2006-02-01

    In recent years, the prevalence of in vivo molecular imaging applications has rapidly increased. Here we report on the construction of a multi-modality imaging facility in a pharmaceutical setting that is expected to further advance existing capabilities for in vivo imaging of drug distribution and the interaction with their target. The imaging instrumentation in our facility includes a microPET scanner, a four wavelength time-domain optical imaging scanner, a 9.4T/30cm MRI scanner and a SPECT/X-ray CT scanner. An electronics shop and a computer room dedicated to image analysis are additional features of the facility. The layout of the facility was designed with a central animal preparation room surrounded by separate laboratory rooms for each of the major imaging modalities to accommodate the work-flow of simultaneous in vivo imaging experiments. This report will focus on the design of and anticipated applications for our microPET and optical imaging laboratory spaces. Additionally, we will discuss efforts to maximize the daily throughput of animal scans through development of efficient experimental work-flows and the use of multiple animals in a single scanning session.

  17. Diffractive photoproduction of /J/ψ mesons with large momentum transfer at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H1 Collaboration; Aktas, A.; Andreev, V.; Anthonis, T.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Bähr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J. C.; Böhme, J.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Bröker, H.-B.; Brown, D. P.; Bruncko, D.; Büsser, F. W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Chekelian, V.; Clarke, D.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J. G.; Coppens, Y. R.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cox, B. E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Dau, W. D.; Daum, K.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; de Roeck, A.; de Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J. D.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y. H.; Flucke, G.; Flügge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formánek, J.; Franke, G.; Frising, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, J.; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, S.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Grab, C.; Grabski, V.; Grässler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Henshaw, O.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Hladký, J.; Höting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Ibbotson, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, D. P.; Jones, M. A. S.; Jung, H.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Katzy, J.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S. D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Koutouev, R.; Koutov, A.; Kroseberg, J.; Krüger, K.; Kueckens, J.; Kuhr, T.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leißner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lueders, H.; Lüders, S.; Lüke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.-U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S. J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michine, S.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mohrdieck, S.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Phillips, J. P.; Pitzl, D.; Pöschl, R.; Povh, B.; Raicevic, N.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauvan, E.; Schätzel, S.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schröder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlák, K.; Sefkow, F.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truöl, P.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J. E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Uraev, A.; Urban, M.; Usik, A.; Valkár, S.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vassiliev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vichnevski, A.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Wallny, R.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.-G.; Wissing, Ch.; Woehrling, E.-E.; Wünsch, E.; Wyatt, A. C.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; Zur Nedden, M.

    2003-08-01

    The diffractive photoproduction of /J/ψ mesons is measured with the H1 detector at the /ep collider HERA using an integrated luminosity of 78 pb-1. The differential cross section /dσ(γp-->J/ψY)/dt is studied in the range 2<t<30 GeV2, where /t is the square of the four-momentum transferred at the proton vertex. The cross section is also presented as a function of the photon-proton centre-of-mass energy Wγp in three /t intervals, spanning the range 50

  18. Diffractive photoproduction of J/ ψ mesons with large momentum transfer at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktas, A.; Andreev, V.; Anthonis, T.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Bähr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J. C.; Böhme, J.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Bröker, H.-B.; Brown, D. P.; Bruncko, D.; Büsser, F. W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Chekelian, V.; Clarke, D.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J. G.; Coppens, Y. R.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cox, B. E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Dau, W. D.; Daum, K.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J. D.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y. H.; Flucke, G.; Flügge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formánek, J.; Franke, G.; Frising, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, J.; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, S.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Grab, C.; Grabski, V.; Grässler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Henshaw, O.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Hladký, J.; Höting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Ibbotson, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, D. P.; Jones, M. A. S.; Jung, H.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Katzy, J.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S. D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Koutouev, R.; Koutov, A.; Kroseberg, J.; Krüger, K.; Kueckens, J.; Kuhr, T.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leißner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lueders, H.; Lüders, S.; Lüke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.-U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S. J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michine, S.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mohrdieck, S.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Phillips, J. P.; Pitzl, D.; Pöschl, R.; Povh, B.; Raicevic, N.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauvan, E.; Schätzel, S.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schröder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlák, K.; Sefkow, F.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truöl, P.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J. E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Uraev, A.; Urban, M.; Usik, A.; Valkár, S.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vassiliev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vichnevski, A.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Wallny, R.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.-G.; Wissing, Ch.; Woehrling, E.-E.; Wünsch, E.; Wyatt, A. C.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; zur Nedden, M.; H1 Collaboration

    2003-08-01

    The diffractive photoproduction of J/ψ mesons is measured with the H1 detector at the ep collider HERA using an integrated luminosity of 78 pb-1. The differential cross section dσ(γp→J/ψY)/dt is studied in the range 2<|t|<30 GeV2, where t is the square of the four-momentum transferred at the proton vertex. The cross section is also presented as a function of the photon-proton centre-of-mass energy Wγp in three t intervals, spanning the range 50

  19. Postseismic deformation due to subcrustal viscoelastic relaxation following dip-slip earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1982-01-01

    The deformation of the Earth following a dip-slip earthquake is calculated using a three layer rheological model and finite element techniques. The three layers are an elastic upper lithosphere, a standard linear solid lower lithosphere, and a Maxwell viscoelastic asthenosphere-a model previously analyzed in the strike-clip case (Cohen, 1981, 1982). Attention is focused on the magnitude of the postseismic subsidence and the width of the subsidence zone that can develop due to the viscoelastic response to coseismic reverse slip. Detailed analysis for a fault extending from the surface to 15 km with a 45 deg dip reveals that postseismic subsidence is sensitive to the depth to the asthenosphere but is only weakly dependent on lower lithosphere depth. The greatest subsidence occurs when the elastic lithosphere is about 30 km thick and the asthenosphere lies just below this layer (asthenosphere depth = 2 times the fault depth). The extremum in the subsidence pattern occurs at about 5 km from the surface trace of the fault and lies over the slip plane. In a typical case after a time t = 30 tau (tau = Maxwell time) following the earthquake the subsidence at this point is 60% of the coseismic uplift. Unlike the horizontal deformation following a strike slip earthquake, significant vertical deformation due to asthenosphere flow persists for many times tau and the magnitude of the vertical deformation is not necessarily enhanced by having a partially relaxing lower lithosphere.

  20. Excessive self-focused attention and defensiveness among psychiatric patients: a vicious cycle?

    PubMed

    Höping, Winfried; de Jong-Meyer, Renate; Abrams, Dominic

    2006-04-01

    The contribution of defensive coping to the phenomenon of excessive self-focused attention was studied in 20 depressed or anxious psychiatric outpatients comprising the negative affect group, 20 patients with psychotic disorders, and a control group of 21 patients of an orthopaedic clinic. Self-focused attention was assessed using the Self-reflectiveness and Internal State Awareness subfactors of the Private Self-consciousness Scale. In accordance with other research on self-focused attention, the negative affect group obtained higher scores on the Self-reflectiveness scale than the control group (t39=2.40, p<.03). To examine the relationship between self-focus and defensiveness, Weinberger, Schwartz, and Davidson's approach was employed, using median splits of short forms of the Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale and the Marlowe-Crowne scale to differentiate among four groups of subjects. The highest self-reflectiveness was found for those participants who were high in both defensiveness and anxiety. This group scored higher than the nondefensive high anxious group (t30= -2.31, p<.03). The heightened self-focused attention might result from automatically instigated states of self-focused attention and paradoxical effects of defensive efforts to avoid self-focus. PMID:16796082

  1. Pressure and Temperature Dependence of Growth and Morphology of Escherichia coli: Experiments and Stochastic Model

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pradeep; Libchaber, Albert

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the growth of Escherichia coli, a mesophilic bacterium, as a function of pressure (P) and temperature (T). Escherichia coli can grow and divide in a wide range of pressure (1–400 atm) and temperature (23–40°C). For T > 30°C, the doubling time of E. coli increases exponentially with pressure and exhibits a departure from exponential behavior at pressures between 250 and 400 atm for all the temperatures studied in our experiments. The sharp change in doubling time is followed by a sharp change in phenotypic transition of E. coli at high pressures where bacterial cells switch to an elongating cell type. We propose a model that this phenotypic change in bacteria at high pressures is an irreversible stochastic process, whereas the switching probability to elongating cell type increases with increasing pressure. The model fits well the experimental data. We discuss our experimental results in the light of structural and thus functional changes in proteins and membranes. PMID:23931326

  2. Cueing and pop-out.

    PubMed

    Ziebell, O; Nothdurft, H C

    1999-06-01

    We describe experiments on the dynamics of pop-out from orientation. Target lines at an oblique orientation and orthogonal background elements were presented with various onset delays, and subjects' performance in target detection was measured. Detection rates increased for short delays compared to synchronous stimulus presentation, with a maximum at delta t = 30-60 ms. Control experiments showed that this effect did not reveal specific interactions between target and background lines; a similar effect was obtained when targets were cued with non-oriented stimuli presented shortly before stimulus onset. Specific and non-specific cues improved the target detection rate even when four cues, at different potential target positions were shown simultaneously. Non-localized cues, however, and cues at positions irrelevant for the task did not improve performance. While the effect might partially resemble the temporal modulation transfer function of the visual system, we did not find evidence for other dynamic processes in the tested time intervals (10-300 ms), in particular not for synchronization effects as assumed to provide perceptual linking of background elements. PMID:10343794

  3. Measurement of differential J/ψ production cross sections and forward-backward ratios in p + Pb collisions with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.

    2015-09-01

    Measurements of differential cross sections for J/ψ production in p+Pb collisions at √sNN=5.02TeV at the CERN Large Hadron Collider with the ATLAS detector are presented. The data set used corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 28.1 nb-1. The J/ψ mesons are reconstructed in the dimuon decay channel over the transverse momentum range 8T<30GeV and over the center-of-mass rapidity range -2.87

  4. Orientation of Tie-Lines in the Phase Diagram of DOPC:DPPC:Cholesterol Model Biomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Uppamoochikkal, Pradeep; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Nagle, John F.

    2010-01-01

    We report the direction of tie-lines of coexisting phases in a ternary diagram of DOPC:DPPC:Cholesterol lipid bilayers, which has been a system of interest in the discussion of biological rafts. For coexisting Ld and Lo phases we find that the orientation angle α of the tie-lines increases as the cholesterol concentration increases and it also increases as temperature increases from T=15 °C to T=30 °C. Results at lower cholesterol concentrations support the existence of a different 2-phase coexistence region of Ld and So phases and the existence of a 3-phase region separating the two 2-phase regions. Our method uses the X-ray lamellar D-spacings observed in oriented bilayers as a function of varying hydration. Although this method does not obtain the ends of the tie-lines, it gives precise values (±1°) of their angles α in the ternary phase diagram. PMID:20968281

  5. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Pterophyllum scalare (Cichliformes: Cichlidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-Peng; Min, Qiao; Si, Gui-Cai

    2016-07-01

    Pterophyllum scalare belongs in the family Cichlidae of Cichliformes. This species and its congeners are characterized by a compressed and disc-shaped body with dorsal and anal spiny rays increasing in length from anterior to posterior part of the fin. In this study, we determine and describe the complete mitogenome sequence of Pterophyllum scalare for the first time, which is 16,494 bp in length, and contains 37 genes, including 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNAs, 22 tRNAs, 1 origin of replication on the light-strand (OL) and a putative control region. The overall base composition is 27.5% A, 26.8% T, 30.1% C and 15.6% G, with a slight AT bias (54.3%). All protein-coding genes share the start codon ATG, except for COI that begins with GTG. These results are expected to provide useful molecular data for phylogenetic studies of Cichlidae and Cichliformes. Maximum Likelihood (ML) tree and Bayesian analyses based on partitioned nucleotide sequences of 12 mitochondrial protein-coding genes were constructed and both yielded trees with identical topologies. PMID:26017040

  6. EPR STUDIES OF THERMALLY STERILIZED VASELINUM ALBUM.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Paweł; Pilawa, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used for examination of free radicals in thermally treated vaselinum album (VA). Thermal treatment in hot air as sterilization process was tested. Conditions of thermal sterilization were chosen according to the pharmaceutical norms. Vaselinum album was heated at the following conditions (T--temperature, t--time): T = 160°C and t = 120 min, T = 170°C and t = 60 min and T = 180°C and t = 30 min. The aim of this work was to determine concentration and free radical properties of thermally sterilized VA. EPR analysis for VA was done 15 min after sterilization. EPR measurements were done at room temperature. EPR spectra were recorded in the range of microwave power of 2.2-70 mW. g-Factor, amplitudes (A) and line width (ΔBpp) of the spectra were determined. The shape of the EPR spectra was analyzed. Free radical concentration (N) in the heated samples was determined. EPR spectra were not obtained for the non heated VA. EPR spectra were detected for all thermally sterilized samples. The spectra revealed complex character, their asymmetry depends on microwave power. The lowest free radicals concentration was found for the VA sterilized at 180°C during 30 min. EPR spectroscopy is proposed as the method useful for optimization of sterilization process of drugs. PMID:26647625

  7. Constraining the physical properties of Titan's empty lake basins using nadir and off-nadir Cassini RADAR backscatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelides, R. J.; Hayes, A. G.; Mastrogiuseppe, M.; Zebker, H. A.; Farr, T. G.; Malaska, M. J.; Poggiali, V.; Mullen, J. P.

    2016-05-01

    We use repeat synthetic aperture radar (SAR) observations and complementary altimetry passes acquired by the Cassini spacecraft to study the scattering properties of Titan's empty lake basins. The best-fit coefficients from fitting SAR data to a quasi-specular plus diffuse backscatter model suggest that the bright basin floors have a higher dielectric constant, but similar facet-scale rms surface facet slopes, to surrounding terrain. Waveform analysis of altimetry returns reveals that nadir backscatter returns from basin floors are greater than nadir backscatter returns from basin surroundings and have narrower pulse widths. This suggests that floor deposits are structurally distinct from their surroundings, consistent with the interpretation that some of these basins may be filled with evaporitic and/or sedimentary deposits. Basin floor deposits also express a larger diffuse component to their backscatter, which is likely due to variations in subsurface structure or an increase in roughness at the wavelength scale (Hayes, A.G. et al. [2008]. Geophys. Res. Lett. 35, 9). We generate a high-resolution altimetry radargram of the T30 altimetry pass over an empty lake basin, with which we place geometric constraints on the basin's slopes, rim heights, and depth. Finally, the importance of these backscatter observations and geometric measurements for basin formation mechanisms is briefly discussed.

  8. Titan's surface at 2.2-cm wavelength imaged by the Cassini RADAR radiometer: Calibration and first results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Janssen, M.A.; Lorenz, R.D.; West, R.; Paganelli, F.; Lopes, R.M.; Kirk, R.L.; Elachi, C.; Wall, S.D.; Johnson, W.T.K.; Anderson, Y.; Boehmer, R.A.; Callahan, P.; Gim, Y.; Hamilton, G.A.; Kelleher, K.D.; Roth, L.; Stiles, B.; Le, Gall A.

    2009-01-01

    The first comprehensive calibration and mapping of the thermal microwave emission from Titan's surface is reported based on radiometric data obtained at 2.2-cm wavelength by the passive radiometer included in the Cassini Radar instrument. The data reported were accumulated from 69 separate observational segments in Titan passes from Ta (October 2004) through T30 (May 2007) and include emission from 94% of Titan's surface. They are diverse in the key observing parameters of emission angle, polarization, and spatial resolution, and their reduction into calibrated global mosaic maps involved several steps. Analysis of the polarimetry obtained at low to moderate resolution (50+ km) enabled integration of the radiometry into a single mosaic of the equivalent brightness temperature at normal incidence with a relative precision of about 1 K. The Huygens probe measurement of Titan's surface temperature and radiometry obtained on Titan's dune fields allowed us to infer an absolute calibration estimated to be accurate to a level approaching 1 K. The results provide evidence for a surface that is complex and varied on large scales. The radiometry primarily constrains physical properties of the surface, where we see strong evidence for subsurface (volume) scattering as a dominant mechanism that determines the emissivity, with the possibility of a fluffy or graded-density surface layer in many regions. The results are consistent with, but not necessarily definitive of a surface composition resulting from the slow deposition and processing of organic compounds from the atmosphere. ?? 2008 Elsevier Inc.

  9. Complete mitochondrial genome of Zebra tilapia, Tilapia buttikoferi.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xi-Dong; Liu, Chao; Wang, Xue-Jie; Liu, Yi; Hu, Yin-Chang; Luo, Jian-Ren

    2016-01-01

    We determined the complete mitochondrial genome of Tilapia buttikoferi, which was 16,577 bp in length with an A + T content of 53.0%, containing 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNAs, 22 tRNAs and a complete control region. The gene arrangement was similar to that of typical fishes. The total base composition of the mitogenome was 25.6% T, 30.8% C, 27.4% A and 16.2% G. Of the 13 protein-coding genes, 12 genes start with an ATG codon, except for COX1 with GTG. Seven (ND1, ND2, COX1, ATPase8, ATPase6, ND4L and ND6) used TAA or AGA as the termination codon, whereas six (COX2, COX3, ND3, ND4, ND5 and cyt b) had incomplete stop codon T. Its control region was atypical in being short at 861 bp, and contained TACAT motif and one microsatellite-like region (TA)7. This mitogenome sequence data may be useful for phylogenetic and systematic analyses within the family Cichlaidae. PMID:24438265

  10. RSM based optimized enzyme-assisted extraction of antioxidant phenolics from underutilized watermelon (Citrullus lanatus Thunb.) rind.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Muhammad; Sultana, Bushra; Bhatti, Haq Nawaz; Asghar, Muhammad

    2015-08-01

    Enzyme assisted solvent extraction (EASE) of phenolic compounds from watermelon (C. lanatus) rind (WMR) was optimized using Response Surface Methodology (RSM) with Rotatable Central Composite Design (RCCD). Four variables each at five levels i.e. enzyme concentration (EC) 0.5-6.5 %, pH 6-9, temperature (T) 25-75 °C and treatment time (t) 30-90 min, were augmented to get optimal yield of polyphenols with maximum retained antioxidant potential. The polyphenol extracts obtained under optimum conditions were evaluated for their in-vitro antioxidant activities and characterized for individual phenolic profile by RP-HPLC-DAD. The results obtained indicated that optimized EASE enhanced the liberation of antioxidant phenolics up to 3 folds on fresh weight basis (FW) as compared to conventional solvent extraction (CSE), with substantial level of total phenolics (173.70 mg GAE/g FW), TEAC 279.96 mg TE/g FW and DPPH radical scavenging ability (IC50) 112.27 mg/mL. Chlorogenic acid (115.60-1611.04), Vanillic acid (26.13-2317.01) and Sinapic acid (113.01-241.12 μg/g) were major phenolic acid found in EASEx of WMR. Overall, it was concluded that EASE might be efficient and green technique to revalorize under-utilized WMR into potent antioxidant phenolic for their further application in food and nutraceutical industries. PMID:26243925

  11. Enhanced malignant transformation is accompanied by increased survival recovery after ionizing radiation in Chinese hamster embryo fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Boothman, D.A.

    1994-04-01

    Transformed Chinese hamster embryo fibroblasts (CHEF), which gradually increase in tumor-forming ability in nude mice, were isolated from normal diploid CHEF/18 cells. Transformed CHEF cells (i.e., T30-4 > 21-2M3 > 21-2 > normal CHEF/18) showed gradual increases in potentially lethal damage (PLD) survival recovery. {beta}-Lapachone and camptothecin, modulators of topoisomerase I (Topo I) activity, not only prevented survival recovery in normal as well as in tumor cells, but enhanced unscheduled DNA synthesis. These seemingly conflicting results are due to the fact that Topo I activity can be modulated by inhibitors to convert single-stranded DNA lesions into double-stranded breaks. Increases in unscheduled DNA synthesis may result from a continual supply of free ends, on which DNA repair processes may act. Altering Topo I activity with modulators appears to increase X-ray lethality via a DNA lesion modification suicide pathway. Cells down-regulate Topo I immediately after ionizing radiation to prevent Topo I-mediated lesion modification and to enhance survival recovery. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. The Falcon I Launch Vehicle - Steps to and Results from the First Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenigsmann, H.; Shotwell, G. E.

    Falcon 1 was launched on March 25, 2006 from Omelek, a small island which is part of the Kwajalein Atoll of the Marshall Islands. Though the vehicle lifted off with a first stage engine fire, for the first 30 seconds the vehicle performed nominally. At T=+30 seconds, the main engine shut down. The vehicle landed 150 m downrange from the launch pad. Three days prior to the launch, a system test was conducted which included a static firing of the first stage engine to verify vehicle and pad operation, vehicle fueling and de-tanking, as well as exercising the interfaces to the Range, such as telemetry links, video and flight safety. This test was successful with no anomalies. The customer for this flight was the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the USAF under the joint USAF and DARPA Falcon Program. The objectives of the flight were to demonstrate responsive operations including rapid payload integration and collect data on the both the vehicle and the operations.

  13. Analysis of bolus formation in micropipette ejection systems.

    PubMed

    Mirbod, Parisa; Meng, Diwen

    2015-06-01

    The ejection of drugs from micropipettes is practiced frequently in biomedical research and clinical studies however, little is known about the dynamics of this process. The fundamentals of disperse fluid injection via a capillary into an ambient immiscible fluid have been investigated extensively. Here, we experimentally investigate the bolus formation in micropipette ejection systems, where the injection and ambient fluid are the same. We experimentally measure the temporal evolution of the bolus formation in the same fluid. There are three different bolus formation mechanisms that arise from different Re t regimes: a) a nearly spherical bolus, b) a pear-like bolus, and c) a large distortion or axial jet. We examine the scaled dimensions of the bolus, R b/D t, L b/D t, H/D t, and α, as a function of the dimensionless parameters such as tip Reynolds number, Re t, dimensionless value of g/(D t (.) V t), the dimensionless time, tV t/D t, and the distance between the edge of the micropipette and the free surface, D/D t. The bolus radius for 0.2 < Re t < 30 grows according to t (1/2) in the entire time range, which allows us to estimate the time for complete bolus formation. PMID:26100535

  14. Perifollicular fibrosis: pathogenetic role in androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hyeon Gyeong; Kim, Jin Sook; Lee, Se Rah; Pyo, Hyun Keol; Moon, Hyung In; Lee, Jong Hee; Kwon, Oh Sang; Chung, Jin Ho; Kim, Kyu Han; Eun, Hee Chul; Cho, Kwang Hyun

    2006-06-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is a dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-mediated process, characterized by continuous miniaturization of androgen reactive hair follicles and accompanied by perifollicular fibrosis of follicular units in histological examination. Testosterone (T: 10(-9)-10(-7) M) treatment increased the expression of type I procollagen at mRNA and protein level. Pretreatment of finasteride (10(-8) M) inhibited the T-induced type I procollagen expression at mRNA (40.2%) and protein levels (24.9%). T treatment increased the expression of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta1) at protein levels by 81.9% in the human scalp dermal fibroblasts (DFs). Pretreatment of finasteride decreased the expression of TGF-beta1 protein induced by an average of T (30.4%). The type I procollagen expression after pretreatment of neutralizing TGF-beta1 antibody (10 microg/ml) was inhibited by an average of 54.3%. Our findings suggest that T-induced TGF-beta1 and type I procollagen expression may contribute to the development of perifollicular fibrosis in the AGA, and the inhibitory effects on T-induced procollagen and TGF-beta1 expression may explain another possible mechanism how finasteride works in AGA. PMID:16755026

  15. On-line characterization using ultrasound of pectin hydrolysis catalyzed by the enzyme pectinmethylesterase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio, C.; Resa, P.; Sierra, C.; Elvira, L.

    2012-12-01

    The major problem in the fruit juice industry is associated with juice quality deterioration due to the cloud loss of juice concentrates by the enzymatic reaction of pectinmethylesterase enzyme (PME, EC 3.1.1.11). During pectin hydrolysis, pectin and water are transformed into polygalacturonic acid (pectate) and methanol by the action of PME. In this work, a low-intensity ultrasonic technique is used to monitor this enzymatic reaction, with PME both from orange peel and from Aspergillus niger. Changes in sound velocity during pectin hydrolysis (1% concentration of pectin, T = 30°C and pH = 4.5 and 7) with 0.25 ml of enzyme solution (PME) have been measured using a through-transmission technique. Sound velocity decreases as pectin is transformed into pectate and methanol and at the end of the process, the change in sound velocity reaches 0.3 m/s with PME from orange peel and 0.33 m/s with PME from Aspergillus niger.

  16. Anthropometric Characteristics and Sex Influence Magnitude of Skin Cooling following Exposure to Whole Body Cryotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, L. E.; Cuttell, S.; Nunley, P.; Meyler, J.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored whether anthropometric measures influence magnitude of skin cooling following exposure to whole body cryotherapy (WBC). Height, weight, body fat percentage, and lean mass were measured in 18 male and 14 female participants. Body surface area, body surface area to mass ratio, body mass index, fat-free mass index, and fat mass index were calculated. Thermal images were captured before and after WBC (−60°C for 30 seconds, −110°C for 2 minutes). Skin temperature was measured at the chest, arm, thigh, and calf. Mean skin temperature before and after WBC and change in mean skin temperature (ΔTsk) were calculated. ΔTsk was significantly greater in females (12.07 ± 1.55°C) than males (10.12 ± 1.86°C; t(30) = −3.09, P = .004). A significant relationship was observed between body fat percentage and ΔTsk in the combined dataset (P = .002, r = .516) and between fat-free mass index and ΔTsk in males (P = .005, r = .622). No other significant associations were found. Skin response of individuals to WBC appears to depend upon anthropometric variables and sex, with individuals with a higher adiposity cooling more than thinner individuals. Effects of sex and anthompometrics should be considered when designing WBC research or treatment protocols. PMID:25061612

  17. Induction Cell Design Tradeoffs and Examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reginato, Louis L.; Briggs*, Richard J.

    A brief history of induction accelerator development was covered in Chap. 2 10.1007/978-3-642-13917-8_2". The induction accelerators constructed since the early 1960s can be categorized as short-pulse if the pulse duration is less than 100 ns and long-pulse if it is longer. The distinction between short-pulse and long-pulse is arbitrary; it mainly reflects the type of magnetic material that was typically used in the cell. Examples of short-pulse induction accelerators are the electron ring accelerator (ERA, Δ t=30 ns) [1], the advanced test accelerator (ATA, Δ t=70 ns) [2] and the experimental test accelerator (ETA-II, Δ t=70 ns) [3]. Examples of long-pulse accelerators are the Astron (Δ t=400 ns) [4, 5] and the second axis of the dual axis radiographic hydro test accelerator (DARHT-II, Δ t=2{,}000 ns) [6]. In this chapter the cell design of several of these accelerators will be described in detail. We will discuss how the physics, economics, and space requirements often lead to a non-optimum design from the accelerator systems vantage point. Although modulators are covered in Chap. 4 10.1007/978-3-642-13917-8_4, some specific designs will be discussed on how the constant voltage (flat-top) was achieved in concert with the cell design and compensation network .

  18. Induction Cell Design Tradeoffs and Examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reginato, Louis L.; Briggs*, Richard J.

    A brief history of induction accelerator development was covered in Chap. 2. The induction accelerators constructed since the early 1960s can be categorized as short-pulse if the pulse duration is less than 100 ns and long-pulse if it is longer. The distinction between short-pulse and long-pulse is arbitrary; it mainly reflects the type of magnetic material that was typically used in the cell. Examples of short-pulse induction accelerators are the electron ring accelerator (ERA, Δ t=30 ns) [1], the advanced test accelerator (ATA, Δ t=70 ns) [2] and the experimental test accelerator (ETA-II, Δ t=70 ns) [3]. Examples of long-pulse accelerators are the Astron (Δ t=400 ns) [4, 5] and the second axis of the dual axis radiographic hydro test accelerator (DARHT-II, Δ t=2{,}000 ns) [6]. In this chapter the cell design of several of these accelerators will be described in detail. We will discuss how the physics, economics, and space requirements often lead to a non-optimum design from the accelerator systems vantage point. Although modulators are covered in Chap. 4 , some specific designs will be discussed on how the constant voltage (flat-top) was achieved in concert with the cell design and compensation network .

  19. Postseismic deformation due to subcrustal viscoelastic relaxation following dip-slip earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    The deformation of the earth following a dip-slip earthquake is calculated using a three layer rheological model and finite element techniques. The three layers are an elastic upper lithosphere, a standard linear solid lower lithosphere, and a Maxwell viscoelastic asthenosphere - a model previously analyzed in the strike-clip case (Cohen, 1981, 1982). Attention is focused on the magnitude of the postseismic subsidence and the width of the subsidence zone that can develop due to the viscoelastic response to coseismic reverse slip. Detailed analysis for a fault extending from the surface to 15 km with a 45 deg dip reveals that postseismic subsidence is sensitive to the depth to the asthenosphere but is only weakly dependent on lower lithosphere depth. The greatest subsidence occurs when the elastic lithosphere is about 30 km thick and the asthenosphere lies just below this layer (asthenosphere depth = 2 times the fault depth). The extremum in the subsidence pattern occurs at about 5 km from the surface trace of the fault and lies over the slip plane. In a typical case after a time t = 30 tau (tau = Maxwell time) following the earthquake, the subsidence at this point is 60 percent of the coseismic uplift. Unlike the horizontal deformation following a strike slip earthquake, significant vertical deformation due to asthenosphere flow persists for many times tau and the magnitude of the vertical deformation is not necessarily enhanced by having a partially relaxing lower lithosphere. Previously announced in STAR as N83-13683

  20. On the nature of photo charge carriers in ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrenko, V. F.; Khusnatdinov, N. N.

    1994-06-01

    A method of photoelectromotive force (PEMF) was developed to find the charge sign, mobility, and lifetime of photo charge carriers in ice generated by photons with energy hν≳6.5 eV. It was determined that the most mobile photo charge carriers are negative ones, with mobility μ increasing from 2×10-3 cm2/V s at T=-10 °C to 4×10-2 cm2/V s at T=-30 °C, and with their lifetime decreasing from 30 to 10 s in the same temperature range. Activation energies of the mobility and the lifetime are Eμ=-0.77 eV and Eτ=0.32 eV, respectively. In addition to the negative photo charge carriers positive ones arise with mobility μ=2.3×10-4 cm2/V s and lifetime τ=26 min at T=-15 °C. We suggest that the negative photo charge carriers in ice are mobile complexes of an electron, vacancy and D-defect (e-+V+D). To take into account a specific mechanism of charge transport in ice, configurational vector Ω, and the generation of complexes (e-+V+D), a reaction of ``autoionization'' was modified for ice, 2H2O+hν→H3O++OH•int(e-+V+D).

  1. Characterization of the mitogenome of Uropsilus gracilis and species delimitation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Quanfen; Tu, Feiyun; Liu, Yang; Liu, Shaoying

    2016-05-01

    The species diversity within the genus Uropsilus were underestimated: 10 species among the genus Uropsilus have been proposed. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of U. gracilis, with the topotype, was determined. It is 16,536 bp in length, comprising of 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and 1 control region. The composition and arrangement of its genes are similar to most other mammals. The total base composition of the mitogenome is A, 33.4%; T, 30.3%; C, 22.7% and G, 13.6%, with a rich content of A+T pattern. We performed the similarity comparison based on 13 PCGs of three species of Asiatic shrew-like mole, U. gracilis, U. sp. 1 and U. soricipes. Pairwise sequence alignment showed that similarity data of U. gracilis versus U. sorcipes are significantly higher than those of U. gracilis versus U. sp.1. This pointed toward a cryptic species (U. sp.1) from Jiajin Mountains rather than U. gracilis. PMID:25329296

  2. The complete mitochondrial genome of Eurasian water shrew (Neomys fodiens).

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhitao; Zhao, Wenge; Liu, Peng; Li, Shulan; Xu, Chunzhu

    2016-07-01

    The complete mitogenome sequence of Eurasian water shrew (Neomys fodiens) was determined using long PCR. The genome was 17,260 bp in length and contained 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and 1 control region. The overall base composition of the heavy strand is A (33.0%), C (23.2%), T (30.9%) and G (12.9%). The base compositions present clearly the A-T skew, which is most obviously in the control region and protein-coding genes. The extended termination-associated sequence domain, the central conserved domain and the conserved sequence block domain are defined in the mitochondrial genome control region of Eurasian water shrew. Mitochondrial genomes analyses based on MP, ML, NJ and Bayesian analyses yielded identical phylogenetic trees. Neomys elegans, Soriculus fumidus, and N. fodiens formed a monophyletic group with the high bootstrap value (100%) in all examinations. This clade with the Anourosorex squamipes as the sister taxon to Sorex. PMID:26006281

  3. Extremely large electronic anisotropy caused by electronic phase separation in Ca3(Ru0.97Ti0.03)2O7 single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jing; Wu, Xiaoshan; Mao, Zhiqiang

    2015-03-01

    Bilayered ruthenate Ca3 Ru2O7 exhibits rich electronic and magnetic properties. It orders at 56K, with FM bilayers antiferromagnetically coupled along c-axis (AFM-a). The AFM transition is closely followed by a first-order metal-insulator (MI) transition at 48K where spin directions switch to the b-axis (AFM-b). While this MI transition is accompanied by the opening of anisotropic charge gap; small Fermi pockets survive from the MI transition, thus resulting in quasi-2D metallic transport behavior for T<30K. We previously showed such a quasi-2D metal with the AFM-b order composed of FM bilayers can be tuned to a Mott-insulating state with a nearest-neighbor AFM order via Ti doping. Ca3(Ru0 . 97 Ti0 . 03) 2O7 is close to the critical composition for the AFM-b-to-G-AFM phase transition. Our recent studies show the sample with this composition is characterized by an electronic phase separation between the insulating G-AFM phase (major) and the localized AFM-b phase (minor). The minor AFM-b phase forms a conducting path through electronic percolation within the ab-plane, but not along the c-axis, thus resulting in extremely large electronic anisotropy with ρab /ρc ~109 , which may be the largest among bulk materials.

  4. Measurement of prompt ψ(2S) to J/ψ yield ratios in Pb-Pb and p-p collisions at sNN=2.76TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; et al

    2014-12-31

    The ratio between the prompt ψ(2S) and J/ψ yields, reconstructed via their decays into μ⁺μ⁻, is measured in Pb-Pb and p-p collisions at √sNN = 2.76  TeV. The analysis is based on Pb-Pb and p-p data samples collected by CMS at the Large Hadron Collider, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 150  μb⁻¹ and 5.4  pb⁻¹, respectively. The double ratio of measured yields (Nψ(2S)/NJ/ψ)Pb−Pb/(Nψ(2S)/NJ/ψ)p−p is computed in three Pb-Pb collision centrality bins and two kinematic ranges: one at midrapidity, |y| < 1.6, covering the transverse momentum range 6.5 < pT < 30  GeV/c, and the other at forward rapidity, 1.6<|y|<2.4, extending to lower pT values,more » 3« less

  5. Multi-mode Fabry-Pérot Interferences in SiO2-supported Single Layer Graphene, in Large Aspect Ratio 2-terminal Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Joseph; Carabello, Steven; Ramos, Roberto

    2015-03-01

    The Fabry-Pérot (F-P) interference of charge carriers in graphene occur in 2-dimensional cavities defined between pn interfaces. Typically, pn interfaces form by local doping of metallic contacts, and serve as partially reflecting mirrors for ballistic charge carriers. Here, we report on observed F-P resonances in very large aspect ratio devices. For all devices studied, the inter-lead distance is L ~ 0 . 2 μm, and the graphene channel widths range from W ~ 5 to 17 μm, resulting in aspect ratios up to W / L ~ 74 . In maps of conductance versus source-drain and gate voltages, we observe long-range tapestry patterns, extending over the gate voltage range from Vg = - 60 V to 20 V. These features onset at a temperature of T ~ 20 K. Upon lowering the temperature, an additional mode appears around T ~ 3 K, and remains fairly unchanged down to T ~ 30 mK. From the lowest energy features, we estimate the phase coherence length to be on the order of 1 to 2 μm. Using FFT, we have identified two modes: the fundamental longitudinal, and one of the transverse modes, which we propose is a result of smaller cavities formed by the disorder-induced charge puddles. We gratefully acknowledge Prof. Fred Wellstood, University of Maryland, for access to fabrication facilities.

  6. Thomson scattering diagnostic for the TdeV tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Côté, A.; Michaud, D.; Richard, N.; Neufeld, R.; Legros, C.

    1995-01-01

    The Thomson scattering diagnostic system on the TdeV tokamak (R/a=87/27 cm, BT=1.5 T, Ip<300 kA) routinely monitors electron temperature (Te) and density (ne). The scattered light from a vertically oriented Nd:YAG laser beam (E=0.8 J, f=50 Hz, Δt=30 ns) is analyzed by six polychromators looking at different vertical positions. Each polychromator splits the light into three spectral bands by means of bandpass interference filters. Avalanche photodiode detectors are used to measure the scattered radiation. These detectors also measure the plasma radiation (including bremsstrahlung) between laser pulses. Two polychromators are optimized for edge temperature measurements (50

  7. Partial molecular volumes of lipids and cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Alexander I.; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Nagle, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Volumetric measurements are reported for fully hydrated lipid/cholesterol bilayer mixtures using the neutral flotation method. Apparent specific volume data were obtained with the lipids DOPC, POPC and DMPC at T = 30 °C, DPPC at 50 °C, and brain sphingomyelin (BSM) at 45 and 24 °C for mole fractions of cholesterol x from 0 to 0.5. Unlike previous cholesterol mixture studies, we converted our raw data to partial molecular volume VL of the lipid and VC of the cholesterol. The partial molecular volumes were constant for POPC and DOPC as x was varied, but had sharp breaks for the other lipids at values of xC near 0.25 ± 0.05. Results for x < xC clearly exhibit the condensation effect of cholesterol on DPPC, DMPC and BSM when measured at temperatures above their main transition temperatures TM. The break points at xC are compared to phase diagrams in the literature. For x > xC the values of the partial molecular volumes of cholesterol clustered near 630 ± 10 Å3 in all the lipids when measured for T > TM; we suggest that this is the most appropriate measure of the bare volume of cholesterol in lipid bilayers. PMID:16737691

  8. Evaluation of enhanced coagulation pretreatment to improve ozone oxidation efficiency in wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wert, Eric C; Gonzales, Sarah; Dong, Mei Mei; Rosario-Ortiz, Fernando L

    2011-10-15

    Enhanced coagulation (EC) using ferric chloride was evaluated as a pretreatment process to improve the efficiency of ozone (O3) for the oxidation of trace organic contaminants in wastewater. At the applied dosages (10-30 mg/L as Fe), EC pretreatment removed between 10 and 47% of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from the three wastewaters studied. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) showed that EC preferentially removed higher apparent molecular weight (AMW) compounds. Subsequent O3 testing was performed using an O3:DOC ratio of 1. Results showed that O3 exposures were similar even though the required doses were reduced by 10-47% by the EC pretreatment process. Hydroxyl radical (HO·) exposure, measured by parachlorobenzoic acid (pCBA), showed 10% reduction when using a FeCl3 dose of 30 mg/L, likely due to the lower O3 dose and decreased production of HO· during the initial phase of O3 decomposition (t<30 s). The oxidation of 13 trace organic contaminants (including atenolol, carbamazepine, DEET, diclofenac, dilantin, gemfibrozil, ibuprofen, meprobamate, naproxen, primidone, sulfamethoxazole, triclosan, and trimethoprim) was evaluated after EC and O3 treatment. EC was ineffective at removing any of the contaminants, while O3 oxidation reduced the concentration of compounds according to their reaction rate constants with O3 and HO·. PMID:21855954

  9. Informatics in radiology: integration of the medical imaging resource center into a teaching hospital network to allow single sign-on access.

    PubMed

    Prevedello, Luciano M; Andriole, Katherine P; Khorasani, Ryan Roobian Ramin

    2009-01-01

    The RSNA Medical Imaging Resource Center (MIRC) software is an open-source program that allows users to identify, index, and retrieve images, teaching files, and other radiologic data that share a common underlying structure. The software is being continually improved as new challenges and different needs become apparent. Although version T30 is easily installed on a stand-alone computer, its implementation at healthcare enterprises with complex network architecture may be challenging with respect to security because users cannot log on by using a standard enterprise-wide authentication protocol. Instead, authentication takes place through the local MIRC database, creating security concerns and potential organizational problems. In this setting, the Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) can be used to provide a single sign-on environment and increase authentication security. A commercial directory service using LDAP has been successfully integrated with MIRC in a large multifacility enterprise to provide single sign-on capability compatible with the institutional networking policies for password security. PMID:19605651

  10. Symmetry-breaking Ta4+ centers in KTaO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laguta, V. V.; Zaritskii, M. I.; Glinchuk, M. D.; Bykov, I. P.; Rosa, J.; Jastrabík, L.

    1998-07-01

    A study of photoinduced Ta4+ centers in nominally pure KTaO3 single crystals has been carried out by electron-spin resonance. Two of these centers (Ta4+-VO and Ta4+-VO-Me4+) are connected with vacancies of oxygen (VO); a third center is associated with an OH- molecular ion (Ta4+-OH-). This assignment is made on the basis of concentration measurements of the corresponding centers after annealing in argon, oxygen, hydrogen, and H2O vapor atmospheres. It has been shown that the Ta4+ centers are shallow donors; at T>=30 K they are ionized and transformed into ordinary VO and OH- which are assumed to be the main lattice defects before illumination. Their energy levels are determined by the temperature dependence of the relaxation rate of the light-induced nonequilibrium localized electron population. The energy levels of Ta4+-VO and Ta4+-VO-Me4+ centers are situated at 26 and 8 meV below the bottom of the conduction band, respectively. The symmetry of the centers is inverse broken in the sense that the photoelectron is localized near one of two equivalent Ta5+ ions next to an oxygen vacancy or OH-. The role of VO defects and OH- molecules in the nucleation of local polar clusters in nominally pure KTaO3 crystals at low temperatures is discussed.

  11. Four point bending setup for characterization of semiconductor piezoresistance.

    PubMed

    Richter, J; Arnoldus, M B; Hansen, O; Thomsen, E V

    2008-04-01

    We present a four point bending setup suitable for high precision characterization of piezoresistance in semiconductors. The compact setup has a total size of 635 cm(3). Thermal stability is ensured by an aluminum housing wherein the actual four point bending fixture is located. The four point bending fixture is manufactured in polyetheretherketon and a dedicated silicon chip with embedded piezoresistors fits in the fixture. The fixture is actuated by a microstepper actuator and a high sensitivity force sensor measures the applied force on the fixture and chip. The setup includes heaters embedded in the housing and controlled by a thermocouple feedback loop to ensure characterization at different temperature settings. We present three-dimensional finite element modeling simulations of the fixture and discuss the possible contributions to the uncertainty of the piezoresistance characterization. As a proof of concept, we show measurements of the piezocoefficient pi(44) in p-type silicon at three different doping concentrations in the temperature range from T=30 degrees C to T=80 degrees C. The extracted piezocoefficients are determined with an uncertainty of 1.8%. PMID:18447540

  12. Stellar neutron capture cross sections of 41K and 45Sc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heil, M.; Plag, R.; Uberseder, E.; Bisterzo, S.; Käppeler, F.; Mengoni, A.; Pignatari, M.

    2016-05-01

    The neutron capture cross sections of light nuclei (A <56 ) are important for s -process scenarios since they act as neutron poisons. We report on measurements of the neutron capture cross sections of 41K and 45Sc, which were performed at the Karlsruhe 3.7 MV Van de Graaff accelerator via the activation method in a quasistellar neutron spectrum corresponding to a thermal energy of k T =25 keV. Systematic effects were controlled by repeated irradiations, resulting in overall uncertainties of less than 3%. The measured spectrum-averaged data have been used to normalize the energy-dependent (n ,γ ) cross sections from the main data libraries JEFF-3.2, JENDL-4.0, and ENDF/B-VII.1, and a set of Maxwellian averaged cross sections was calculated for improving the s -process nucleosynthesis yields in AGB stars and in massive stars. At k T =30 keV, the new Maxwellian averaged cross sections of 41K and 45Sc are 19.2 ±0.6 mb and 61.3 ±1.8 mb, respectively. Both values are 20% lower than previously recommended. The effect of neutron poisons is discussed for nuclei with A <56 in general and for the investigated isotopes in particular.

  13. Suppression of non-prompt J/ ψ, prompt J/ ψ, and Upsilon (1S) in PbPb collisions at √ {{{s_{{NN}}}}} = 2.76 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hoch, M.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Krammer, M.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Teischinger, F.; Wagner, P.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, S.; Benucci, L.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Maes, T.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Charaf, O.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hammad, G. H.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wickens, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Vanelderen, L.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, J.; Ceard, L.; De Favereau De Jeneret, J.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Grégoire, G.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Alves, G. A.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Júnior, W. L. Aldá; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Figueiredo, D. Matos; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Da Silva, W. L. Prado; Santoro, A.; Silva do Amaral, S. M.; Sznajder, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Darmenov, N.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Karadzhinova, A.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Ban, Y.; Guo, S.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, S.; Zhu, B.; Zou, W.; Cabrera, A.; Moreno, B. Gomez; Rios, A. A. Ocampo; Oliveros, A. F. Osorio; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Dzelalija, M.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Kamel, A. Ellithi; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Hektor, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Azzolini, V.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Czellar, S.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Karjalainen, A.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Sillou, D.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Marionneau, M.; Millischer, L.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Elgammal, S.; de Cassagnac, R. Granier; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Thiebaux, C.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Greder, S.; Juillot, P.; Karim, M.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Baty, C.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bedjidian, M.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Boumediene, D.; Brun, H.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Falkiewicz, A.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Le Grand, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tosi, S.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Lomidze, D.; Anagnostou, G.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.; Merz, J.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Sprenger, D.; Weber, H.; Weber, M.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Erdmann, M.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hoepfner, K.; Klimkovich, T.; Klingebiel, D.; Kreuzer, P.; Lanske, D.; Lingemann, J.; Magass, C.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Papacz, P.; Pieta, H.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Steggemann, J.; Teyssier, D.; Bontenackels, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Davids, M.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Ahmad, W. Haj; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Linn, A.; Nowack, A.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Rennefeld, J.; Sauerland, P.; Stahl, A.; Tornier, D.; Zoeller, M. H.; Martin, M. Aldaya; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bergholz, M.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Cakir, A.; Campbell, A.; Castro, E.; Dammann, D.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Flossdorf, A.; Flucke, G.; Geiser, A.; Hauk, J.; Jung, H.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, H.; Knutsson, A.; Krämer, M.; Krücker, D.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lange, W.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Marienfeld, M.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Olzem, J.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Raspereza, A.; Rosin, M.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Sen, N.; Spiridonov, A.; Stein, M.; Tomaszewska, J.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Autermann, C.; Blobel, V.; Bobrovskyi, S.; Draeger, J.; Enderle, H.; Gebbert, U.; Görner, M.; Hermanns, T.; Kaschube, K.; Kaussen, G.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Lange, J.; Mura, B.; Nowak, F.; Pietsch, N.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schröder, M.; Schum, T.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Thomsen, J.; Barth, C.; Berger, J.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Dierlamm, A.; Dirkes, G.; Feindt, M.; Gruschke, J.; Guthoff, M.; Hackstein, C.; Hartmann, F.; Heinrich, M.; Held, H.; Hoffmann, K. H.; Honc, S.; Katkov, I.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Kuhr, T.; Martschei, D.; Mueller, S.; Müller, Th.; Niegel, M.; Oberst, O.; Oehler, A.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Ratnikova, N.; Renz, M.; Röcker, S.; Saout, C.; Scheurer, A.; Schieferdecker, P.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schmanau, M.; Schott, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Troendle, D.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Weiler, T.; Zeise, M.; Ziebarth, E. B.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Kesisoglou, S.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Manolakos, I.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Mavrommatis, C.; Ntomari, E.; Petrakou, E.; Gouskos, L.; Mertzimekis, T. J.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Stiliaris, E.; Evangelou, I.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Patras, V.; Triantis, F. A.; Aranyi, A.; Bencze, G.; Boldizsar, L.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Kapusi, A.; Krajczar, K.; Sikler, F.; Veres, G. I.; Vesztergombi, G.; Beni, N.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Veszpremi, V.; Karancsi, J.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Dhingra, N.; Gupta, R.; Jindal, M.; Kaur, M.; Kohli, J. M.; Mehta, M. Z.; Nishu, N.; Saini, L. K.; Sharma, A.; Singh, A. P.; Singh, J.; Singh, S. P.; Ahuja, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, S.; Jain, S.; Khurana, R.; Sarkar, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Dutta, D.; Kailas, S.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Aziz, T.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Maity, M.; Majumder, D.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Saha, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Banerjee, S.; Dugad, S.; Mondal, N. K.; Arfaei, H.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Hashemi, M.; Hesari, H.; Jafari, A.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi, A.; Najafabadi, M. Mohammadi; Mehdiabadi, S. Paktinat; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Barbone, L.; Calabria, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Lusito, L.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Manna, N.; Marangelli, B.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pacifico, N.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Romano, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tupputi, S.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Meneghelli, M.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Odorici, F.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Frosali, S.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Colafranceschi, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Fabbricatore, P.; Musenich, R.; Benaglia, A.; De Guio, F.; Di Matteo, L.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Malvezzi, S.; Martelli, A.; Massironi, A.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Sala, S.; de Fatis, T. Tabarelli; Buontempo, S.; Montoya, C. A. Carrillo; Cavallo, N.; De Cosa, A.; Dogangun, O.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bellan, P.; Biasotto, M.; Bisello, D.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gozzelino, A.; Gulmini, M.; Lacaprara, S.; Lazzizzera, I.; Margoni, M.; Maron, G.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Nespolo, M.; Perrozzi, L.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Triossi, A.; Vanini, S.; Zotto, P.; Baesso, P.; Berzano, U.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Torre, P.; Vitulo, P.; Viviani, C.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Caponeri, B.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Lucaroni, A.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Nappi, A.; Romeo, F.; Santocchia, A.; Taroni, S.; Valdata, M.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Kraan, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Palmonari, F.; Rizzi, A.; Segneri, G.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Franci, D.; Grassi, M.; Longo, E.; Meridiani, P.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Organtini, G.; Pandolfi, F.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Sigamani, M.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Biino, C.; Botta, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Castello, R.; Costa, M.; Demaria, N.; Graziano, A.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Pereira, A. Vilela; Belforte, S.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; Marone, M.; Montanino, D.; Penzo, A.; Heo, S. G.; Nam, S. K.; Chang, S.; Chung, J.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, J. E.; Kong, D. J.; Park, H.; Ro, S. R.; Son, D. C.; Son, T.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Zero J.; Song, S.; Jo, H. Y.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Lee, K. S.; Moon, D. H.; Park, S. K.; Seo, E.; Sim, K. S.; Choi, M.; Kang, S.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Park, C.; Park, I. C.; Park, S.; Ryu, G.; Cho, Y.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, M. S.; Lee, B.; Lee, J.; Lee, S.; Seo, H.; Yu, I.; Bilinskas, M. J.; Grigelionis, I.; Janulis, M.; Martisiute, D.; Petrov, P.; Polujanskas, M.; Sabonis, T.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; La Cruz, I. Heredia-de; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Magaña Villalba, R.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Villasenor-Cendejas, L. M.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Casimiao Linares, E.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Reyes-Santos, M. A.; Krofcheck, D.; Tam, J.; Bell, A. J.; Butler, P. H.; Doesburg, R.; Reucroft, S.; Silverwood, H.; Ahmad, M.; Asghar, M. I.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khalid, S.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Qazi, S.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Brona, G.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Bialkowska, H.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Gokieli, R.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Wrochna, G.; Zalewski, P.; Almeida, N.; Bargassa, P.; David, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Musella, P.; Nayak, A.; Pela, J.; Ribeiro, P. Q.; Seixas, J.; Varela, J.; Afanasiev, S.; Belotelov, I.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Kozlov, G.; Lanev, A.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Smirnov, V.; Volodko, A.; Zarubin, A.; Evstyukhin, S.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, An.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Matveev, V.; Pashenkov, A.; Toropin, A.; Troitsky, S.; Epshteyn, V.; Erofeeva, M.; Gavrilov, V.; Kossov, M.; Krokhotin, A.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Kodolova, O.; Korotkikh, V.; Lokhtin, I.; Markina, A.; Obraztsov, S.; Perfilov, M.; Petrushanko, S.; Sarycheva, L.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Vardanyan, I.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Grishin, V.; Kachanov, V.; Konstantinov, D.; Korablev, A.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Djordjevic, M.; Ekmedzic, M.; Krpic, D.; Milosevic, J.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Arce, P.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Diez Pardos, C.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Ferrando, A.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Lopez, S. Goy; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Merino, G.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Santaolalla, J.; Soares, M. S.; Willmott, C.; Albajar, C.; Codispoti, G.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Chuang, S. H.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Felcini, M.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez Sanchez, J.; Jorda, C.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Virto, A. Lopez; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Sobron Sanudo, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Bernet, C.; Bialas, W.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Breuker, H.; Bunkowski, K.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Christiansen, T.; Perez, J. A. Coarasa; Curé, B.; D'Enterria, D.; De Roeck, A.; Di Guida, S.; Dobson, M.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Frisch, B.; Funk, W.; Gaddi, A.; Georgiou, G.; Gerwig, H.; Giffels, M.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Giunta, M.; Glege, F.; Garrido, R. Gomez-Reino; Gouzevitch, M.; Govoni, P.; Gowdy, S.; Guida, R.; Guiducci, L.; Gundacker, S.; Hansen, M.; Hartl, C.; Harvey, J.; Hegeman, J.; Hegner, B.; Hoffmann, H. F.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kaadze, K.; Karavakis, E.; Lecoq, P.; Lenzi, P.; Lourenço, C.; Mäki, T.; Malberti, M.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Masetti, L.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moser, R.; Mozer, M. U.; Mulders, M.; Nesvold, E.; Nguyen, M.; Orimoto, T.; Orsini, L.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Perez, E.; Petrilli, A.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Polese, G.; Quertenmont, L.; Racz, A.; Reece, W.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Rolandi, G.; Rommerskirchen, T.; Rovelli, C.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Santanastasio, F.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Segoni, I.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Spiropulu, M.; Stoye, M.; Tsirou, A.; Vichoudis, P.; Wöhri, H. K.; Worm, S. D.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Gabathuler, K.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; König, S.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Meier, F.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Sibille, J.; Bäni, L.; Bortignon, P.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Chen, Z.; Cittolin, S.; Deisher, A.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Eugster, J.; Freudenreich, K.; Grab, C.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Marchica, C.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Milenovic, P.; Mohr, N.; Moortgat, F.; Nägeli, C.; Nef, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pape, L.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Ronga, F. J.; Rossini, M.; Sala, L.; Sanchez, A. K.; Sawley, M.-C.; Starodumov, A.; Stieger, B.; Takahashi, M.; Tauscher, L.; Thea, A.; Theofilatos, K.; Treille, D.; Urscheler, C.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Wehrli, L.; Weng, J.; Aguilo, E.; Amsler, C.; Chiochia, V.; De Visscher, S.; Favaro, C.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Millan Mejias, B.; Otiougova, P.; Robmann, P.; Schmidt, A.; Snoek, H.; Verzetti, M.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, K. H.; Kuo, C. M.; Li, S. W.; Lin, W.; Liu, Z. K.; Lu, Y. J.; Mekterovic, D.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Bartalini, P.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Kao, K. Y.; Lei, Y. J.; Lu, R.-S.; Shiu, J. G.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wan, X.; Wang, M.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Karapinar, G.; Topaksu, A. Kayis; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sogut, K.; Cerci, D. Sunar; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Uzun, D.; Vergili, L. N.; Vergili, M.; Akin, I. V.; Aliev, T.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Deniz, M.; Gamsizkan, H.; Guler, A. M.; Ocalan, K.; Ozpineci, A.; Serin, M.; Sever, R.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Yildirim, E.; Zeyrek, M.; Deliomeroglu, M.; Gülmez, E.; Isildak, B.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Özbek, M.; Ozkorucuklu, S.; Sonmez, N.; Levchuk, L.; Bostock, F.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Frazier, R.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Kreczko, L.; Metson, S.; Newbold, D. M.; Nirunpong, K.; Poll, A.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Williams, T.; Basso, L.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Camanzi, B.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Jackson, J.; Kennedy, B. W.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; RadburnSmith, B. C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Tomalin, I. R.; Womersley, W. J.; Bainbridge, R.; Ball, G.; Beuselinck, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Cutajar, M.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Bryer, A. Guneratne; Hall, G.; Hatherell, Z.; Hays, J.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Marrouche, J.; Mathias, B.; Nandi, R.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Papageorgiou, A.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Pioppi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rompotis, N.; Rose, A.; Ryan, M. J.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Sparrow, A.; Tapper, A.; Tourneur, S.; Acosta, M. Vazquez; Virdee, T.; Wakefield, S.; Wardle, N.; Wardrope, D.; Whyntie, T.; Barrett, M.; Chadwick, M.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leslie, D.; Martin, W.; Reid, I. D.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Henderson, C.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Jarrin, E. Carrera; Fantasia, C.; Heister, A.; John, J. St.; Lawson, P.; Lazic, D.; Rohlf, J.; Sperka, D.; Sulak, L.; Bhattacharya, S.; Cutts, D.; Ferapontov, A.; Heintz, U.; Jabeen, S.; Kukartsev, G.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Nguyen, D.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Tsang, K. V.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; De La Barca Sanchez, M. Calderon; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. 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B.; Evans, D.; Golf, F.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Mangano, B.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Petrucciani, G.; Pi, H.; Pieri, M.; Ranieri, R.; Sani, M.; Sfiligoi, I.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yoo, J.; Barge, D.; Bellan, R.; Campagnari, C.; D'Alfonso, M.; Danielson, T.; Flowers, K.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Kalavase, P.; Koay, S. A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krutelyov, V.; Lowette, S.; Mccoll, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Pavlunin, V.; Rebassoo, F.; Ribnik, J.; Richman, J.; Rossin, R.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; Vlimant, J. R.; West, C.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Di Marco, E.; Duarte, J.; Gataullin, M.; Ma, Y.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Rogan, C.; Timciuc, V.; Traczyk, P.; Veverka, J.; Wilkinson, R.; Yang, Y.; Zhu, R. Y.; Akgun, B.; Carroll, R.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Jang, D. W.; Jun, S. Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Dinardo, M. E.; Drell, B. R.; Edelmaier, C. J.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Heyburn, B.; Lopez, E. Luiggi; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Zang, S. L.; Agostino, L.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Eggert, N.; Gibbons, L. K.; Heltsley, B.; Hopkins, W.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Kreis, B.; Kaufman, G. Nicolas; Patterson, J. R.; Puigh, D.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Shi, X.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Vaughan, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Biselli, A.; Cirino, G.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Atac, M.; Bakken, J. A.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bloch, I.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Chetluru, V.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Cooper, W.; Eartly, D. P.; Elvira, V. D.; Esen, S.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Gottschalk, E.; Green, D.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jensen, H.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kousouris, K.; Kunori, S.; Kwan, S.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Miao, T.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Pivarski, J.; Pordes, R.; Prokofyev, O.; Schwarz, T.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Tan, P.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, W.; Yang, F.; Yumiceva, F.; Yun, J. C.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Chen, M.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Dobur, D.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Fu, Y.; Furic, I. K.; Gartner, J.; Goldberg, S.; Hugon, J.; Kim, B.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Park, M.; Remington, R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Schmitt, M.; Scurlock, B.; Sellers, P.; Skhirtladze, N.; Snowball, M.; Wang, D.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Gaultney, V.; Lebolo, L. M.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Chen, J.; Diamond, B.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Jenkins, M.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Sekmen, S.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Baarmand, M. M.; Dorney, B.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Vodopiyanov, I.; Adams, M. R.; Anghel, I. M.; Apanasevich, L.; Bai, Y.; Bazterra, V. E.; Betts, R. R.; Callner, J.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dragoiu, C.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Kunde, G. J.; Lacroix, F.; Malek, M.; O'Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Silvestre, C.; Strom, D.; Varelas, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Duru, F.; Griffiths, S.; Lae, C. K.; McCliment, E.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Newsom, C. R.; Norbeck, E.; Olson, J.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Sen, S.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Bonato, A.; Eskew, C.; Fehling, D.; Giurgiu, G.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Hu, G.; Maksimovic, P.; Rappoccio, S.; Swartz, M.; Tran, N. V.; Whitbeck, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Grachov, O.; Kenny, R. P.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Tinti, G.; Wood, J. S.; Zhukova, V.; Barfuss, A. F.; Bolton, T.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Shrestha, S.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Boutemeur, M.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kirn, M.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Peterman, A.; Rossato, K.; Rumerio, P.; Skuja, A.; Temple, J.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Twedt, E.; Alver, B.; Bauer, G.; Bendavid, J.; Busza, W.; Butz, E.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Dutta, V.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Hahn, K. A.; Harris, P.; Kim, Y.; Klute, M.; Lee, Y.-J.; Li, W.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Nahn, S.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rudolph, M.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Sung, K.; Velicanu, D.; Wenger, E. A.; Wolf, R.; Wyslouch, B.; Xie, S.; Yang, M.; Yilmaz, Y.; Yoon, A. S.; Zanetti, M.; Cooper, S. I.; Cushman, P.; Dahmes, B.; De Benedetti, A.; Franzoni, G.; Gude, A.; Haupt, J.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rekovic, V.; Rusack, R.; Sasseville, M.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Perera, L.; Rahmat, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Butt, J.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Eads, M.; Jindal, P.; Keller, J.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malbouisson, H.; Malik, S.; Snow, G. R.; Baur, U.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Jain, S.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Smith, K.; Wan, Z.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Ofierzynski, R. A.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Antonelli, L.; Berry, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kolb, J.; Kolberg, T.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Morse, D. M.; Pearson, T.; Ruchti, R.; Slaunwhite, J.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Ziegler, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Hill, C.; Killewald, P.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Rodenburg, M.; Vuosalo, C.; Williams, G.; Adam, N.; Berry, E.; Elmer, P.; Gerbaudo, D.; Halyo, V.; Hebda, P.; Hunt, A.; Laird, E.; Pegna, D. Lopes; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Raval, A.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Acosta, J. G.; Huang, X. T.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Oliveros, S.; Vargas, J. E. Ramirez; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Alagoz, E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bolla, G.; Borrello, L.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Everett, A.; Gutay, L.; Hu, Z.; Jones, M.; Koybasi, O.; Kress, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Leonardo, N.; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Vidal Marono, M.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Guragain, S.; Parashar, N.; Adair, A.; Boulahouache, C.; Cuplov, V.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Chung, Y. S.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Flacher, H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Gotra, Y.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Miner, D. C.; Petrillo, G.; Sakumoto, W.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Malik, S.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Atramentov, O.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hits, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Richards, A.; Rose, K.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Cerizza, G.; Hollingsworth, M.; Spanier, S.; Yang, Z. C.; York, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Safonov, A.; Sengupta, S.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Toback, D.; Akchurin, N.; Bardak, C.; Damgov, J.; Dudero, P. R.; Jeong, C.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Mane, P.; Roh, Y.; Sill, A.; Volobouev, I.; Wigmans, R.; Yazgan, E.; Appelt, E.; Brownson, E.; Engh, D.; Florez, C.; Gabella, W.; Gurrola, A.; Issah, M.; Johns, W.; Johnston, C.; Kurt, P.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Balazs, M.; Boutle, S.; Conetti, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goadhouse, S.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Yohay, R.; Gollapinni, S.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Don, C. Kottachchi Kankanamge; Lamichhane, P.; Mattson, M.; Milstène, C.; Sakharov, A.; Anderson, M.; Bachtis, M.; Belknap, D.; Bellinger, J. N.; Bernardini, J.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Efron, J.; Friis, E.; Gray, L.; Grogg, K. S.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Leonard, J.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Pierro, G. A.; Ross, I.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Swanson, J.; Weinberg, M.

    2012-05-01

    Yields of prompt and non-prompt J/ ψ, as well as Upsilon (1S) mesons, are measured by the CMS experiment via their μ + μ - decays in PbPb and pp collisions at √{{{s_{{NN}}}}} = 2.76 TeV for quarkonium rapidity | y| < 2.4. Differential cross sections and nuclear modification factors are reported as functions of y and transverse momentum p T, as well as collision centrality. For prompt J/ ψ with relatively high p T (6.5 < p T < 30 GeV/ c), a strong, centrality-dependent suppression is observed in PbPb collisions, compared to the yield in pp collisions scaled by the number of inelastic nucleon-nucleon collisions. In the same kinematic range, a suppression of non-prompt J/ ψ, which is sensitive to the in-medium b-quark energy loss, is measured for the first time. Also the low- p T Upsilon (1S) mesons are suppressed in PbPb collisions.

  14. Microstructure of polyelectrolyte nanoaggregates studied by fluorescence probe method.

    PubMed

    Vasilescu, Marilena; Angelescu, Daniel G; Bandula, Rodica; Staikos, Georgios

    2011-11-01

    The microstructure of water soluble nanoaggregates based on polyelectrolyte complex formed by the cationic comb-type copolymer poly(acrylamide -co-[3- (methacryloyl-amino)propyl] trimethylammonium chloride)-graft- polyacrylamide [P(AM-co-MAPTAC)-g-PAM] and the anionic linear polyelectrolyte sodium polyacrylate (NaPA) was investigated using the fluorescence probe technique. The fluorescence probe were 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS), pyrene (Py) and 1,10-bis(1-pyrene) decane (PD). The fluorescence properties in polyelectrolyte complex solutions, which are sensitive to either micropolarity (ANS, Py) or microviscosity (PD), were related to the quantities obtained in different pure or mixed solvents. Micropolarities were quantified utilizing the polarity common index (Reichardt) E(T)(30). ANS and Py showed a variation of the micropolarity with the charge ratio of the two polymers, with the lowest polarity reached at the complex neutralization. The PD probe, by its excimer-to-monomer fluorescence intensities ratio, enabled us to evidence the effect of the composition and the comb-type copolymer grafting density on the microviscosity of the interpolyelectrolytes aggregates. It has been found that the microviscosity increased with the density of the grafting PAM chains. PMID:21688051

  15. EVIDENCE FOR MULTIPLE PATHWAYS TO DEUTERIUM ENHANCEMENTS IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Oeberg, Karin I.; Qi, Chunhua; Wilner, David J.; Hogerheijde, Michiel R.

    2012-04-20

    The distributions of deuterated molecules in protoplanetary disks are expected to depend on the molecular formation pathways. We use observations of spatially resolved DCN emission from the disk around TW Hya, acquired during ALMA science verification with a {approx}3'' synthesized beam, together with comparable DCO{sup +} observations from the Submillimeter Array, to investigate differences in the radial distributions of these species and hence differences in their formation chemistry. In contrast to DCO{sup +}, which shows an increasing column density with radius, DCN is better fit by a model that is centrally peaked. We infer that DCN forms at a smaller radii and thus at higher temperatures than DCO{sup +}. This is consistent with chemical network model predictions of DCO{sup +} formation from H{sub 2}D{sup +} at T < 30 K and DCN formation from additional pathways involving CH{sub 2}D{sup +} at higher temperatures. We estimate a DCN/HCN abundance ratio of {approx}0.017, similar to the DCO{sup +}/HCO{sup +} abundance ratio. Deuterium fractionation appears to be efficient at a range of temperatures in this protoplanetary disk. These results suggest caution in interpreting the range of deuterium fractions observed in solar system bodies, as multiple formation pathways should be taken into account.

  16. Magnetic field effect on growth, arsenic uptake, and total amylolytic activity on mesquite (Prosopis juliflora x P. velutina) seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Tavizón, Edith; Mokgalaka-Matlala, Ntebogeng S.; Elizalde Galindo, José T.; Castillo-Michelle, Hiram; Peralta-Videa, Jose R.; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L.

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic field is closely related to the cell metabolism of plants [N. A. Belyavskaya, Adv. Space Res. 34, 1566 (2004)]. In order to see the effect of magnetic field on the plant growth, arsenic uptake, and total amylolytic activity of mesquite (Prosopis juliflora x P. velutina) seeds, ten sets of 80 seeds were selected to be oriented with the long axis parallel or randomly oriented to an external magnetic field. The external magnetic field magnitude was 1 T, and the exposition time t = 30 min. Then, the seeds were stored for three days in a plastic bag and then sown on paper towels in a modified Hoagland's nutrient solution. After three days of germination in the dark and three days in light, seedlings were grown hydroponically in modified Hoagland's nutrient solution (high PO42-) containing 0, 10, or 20 ppm of arsenic as As (III) and (V). The results show that the germination ratios, growth, elongation, arsenic uptake, and total amylolytic activity of the long axis oriented mesquite seeds were much higher than those of the randomly oriented seeds. Also, these two sets of seeds showed higher properties than the ones that were not exposed to external magnetic field.

  17. A Very High Momentum Particle Identification Detector for the ALICE experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mayani, Daniel

    2011-04-26

    The main purpose of the ALICE experiment at CERN is to identify and study the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) in heavy ion collisions at the LHC. Among others, hadrochemistry allows for a detailed insight into the characteristics of the high temperature and density system created in these events. It is therefore important to be able to identify charged particles on a track by track basis. Moreover, results from high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions obtained by other experiments (e.g. at RHIC) indicate that it is imperative to extend the detection capability of ALICE to higher momenta. To meet these challenges, we propose the construction of the Very High Momentum Particle Identification Detector (VHMPID), which aims to identify charged pions, kaons, protons and antiprotons in the momentum range of 10 GeV/cT}<30 GeV/c. In this contribution we will review the relevant physics arguments in proton-proton and heavy ion collisions as well as the detector proposal based on a RICH (Ring Imaging Cherenkov) detector with a C{sub 4}F{sub 10} radiator and a MWPC based CsI photon counter. In addition, we will present the advances in the development of an alternative multi-THGEM based CsI photon detector.

  18. Spin-induced symmetry breaking in orbitally ordered NiCr2O4 and CuCr2O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchomel, Matthew R.; Shoemaker, Daniel P.; Ribaud, Lynn; Kemei, Moureen C.; Seshadri, Ram

    2012-08-01

    At room temperature, the normal oxide spinels NiCr2O4 and CuCr2O4 are tetragonally distorted and crystallize in the I41/amd space group due to cooperative Jahn-Teller ordering driven by the orbital degeneracy of tetrahedral Ni2+ (t24) and Cu2+ (t25). Upon cooling, these compounds undergo magnetic ordering transitions; interactions are somewhat frustrated for NiCr2O4 but not for CuCr2O4. We employ variable-temperature high-resolution synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction to establish that at the magnetic ordering temperatures there are further structural changes, which result in both compounds distorting to an orthorhombic structure consistent with the Fddd space group. NiCr2O4 exhibits additional distortion, likely within the same space group, at a yet-lower transition temperature of T=30 K. The tetragonal to orthorhombic structural transition in these compounds appears to primarily involve changes in NiO4 and CuO4 tetrahedra.

  19. Open and closed heavy-flavour suppression in heavy-ion collisions with CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Mihee; Cms Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is fully equipped to measure quarkonia in the dimuon decay channel in the high multiplicity environment of nucleus-nucleus collisions. Quarkonia are especially relevant for studying the quark-gluon plasma since they are produced at early times and propagate through the medium, mapping its evolution. CMS has measured the nuclear modification factors of non-prompt J/ψ (from b-hadron decays), prompt J/ψ, inclusive ψ(2S), and the first three Upsilon states in PbPb collisions at = 2.76 TeV. A suppression of non-prompt J/ψ, which is sensitive to the in-medium b-quark energy loss, has been measured at relatively high pT (6.5 < pT < 30 GeV/c) in PbPb collisions, compared to the yield in pp collisions scaled by the number of inelastic nucleon-nucleon collisions. For prompt J/ψ in the same kinematic range, a strong, centrality-dependent suppression is observed. Such strong suppression at high pT has previously not been observed at RHIC. At mid-rapidity and high pT, ψ(2S) show an even stronger suppression than J/ψ. Furthermore, CMS has measured the suppression of the three Upsilon states, separately, down to pT =0 GeV/c. A clear ordering of the suppression with binding energy is observed, as expected from sequential melting of quarkonium states.

  20. Increase in prostate stem cell antigen expression in prostatic hyperplasia induced by testosterone and 17β-estradiol in C57BL mice.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Nariaki; Kanno, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Estradiol (E2) is known to act synergistically with testosterone (T) for the development of prostatic hyperplasia in rats and dogs, but murine prostate is less responsive to hormonal stimulation. However, a recent study revealed that the combined administration of E2 and T induced prostatic hyperplasia with bladder outlet obstruction in C57BL mice. To understand the mechanisms underlying the hormonal induction of prostatic hyperplasia, the expression of growth factors and their receptors, androgen receptor, estrogen receptor (ER), and prostatic secretory proteins was investigated. Ten-week-old male C57BL mice were treated with T (30mg) or T+E2 (0.5mg) for 10 weeks, and prostatic lobes were dissected and subjected to quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblotting analysis. T administration appeared to induce glandular prostatic growth, while with T+E2 administration this growth was greater and accompanied by extreme bladder enlargement. The expression of prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) mRNA and protein was increased in prostate tissue in the T group. The combined administration of E2 with T prominently enhanced PSCA expression, along with increased insulin growth factor 1 mRNA levels and decreased estrogen receptor β mRNA expression. The synergistic effect of E2 on the expression of PSCA suggests that this protein may play an important role in the hormone-induced development of prostatic hyperplasia. PMID:26815912

  1. Do tunneling states and boson peak persist or disappear in extremely stabilized glasses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, M. A.; Pérez-Castañeda, T.; Jiménez-Riobóo, R. J.; Rodríguez-Tinoco, C.; Rodríguez-Viejo, J.

    2015-06-01

    We review and concurrently discuss two recent works conducted by us, which apparently give opposite results. Specifically, we have investigated how extreme thermal histories in glasses can affect their universal properties at low temperatures, by studying: (i) amber, the fossilized natural resin, which is a glass which has experienced a hyperaging process for about one hundred million years; and (ii) ultrastable thin-film glasses of indomethacin. Specific heat Cp measurements in the temperature range 0.07 K < T < 30 K showed that the amount of two-level systems, assessed from the linear term at the lowest temperatures, was exactly the same for the pristine hyperaged amber glass as for the subsequently rejuvenated samples, whereas just a modest increase of the boson-peak height (in Cp/T3) with increasing rejuvenation was observed, related to a corresponding increase of the Debye coefficient. On the other hand, we have observed an unexpected suppression of the two-level systems in the ultrastable glass of indomethacin, whereas conventionally prepared thin films of the same material exhibit the usual linear term in the specific heat below 1 K ascribed to these universal two-level systems in glasses. By comparing both highly-stable kinds of glass, we conclude that the disappearance of the tunneling two-level systems in ultrastable thin films of indomethacin may be due to the quasi-2D and anisotropic behavior of this glass, what could support the idea of a phonon-mediated interaction between two-level systems.

  2. Thomson scattering as a method for laser plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Alayi, Y.

    1983-12-01

    The Thomson scattering has been used to determine the density and temperature of an inhomogeneous nonstationary plasma. A common method to calibrate the Thomson scattering device consists in replacing the plasma by a gas and measuring the Rayleigh scattering cross section. The angular distribution of the scattered light in Argon is measured, the incident light is a ruby laser with ..delta..t = 30ns and lambda = 6943nm and vertically polarized. We have found that angular distribution is strongly favored in the forward direction (30/sup 0/, 45/sup 0/, 60/sup 0/) and defavored for backward direction (90/sup 0/, 120/sup 0/, 135/sup 0/, 150/sup 0/) in agreement with the results of George, et al, but in disagreement with the Rayleigh theory which assumes a uniform distribution. Our results may be related to the form of the scattered light spectrum which undergoes a dramatic change through the kinetic-hydrodynamic transition. The general form of the spectrum is determined by the parameter y = 1/Kl (where K = 4..pi.. sin (theta/2)/lambda, theta is the scattering angle and l is the free path path), which increases in the direction of the hydrodynamic regime (small angles). By analogy, the Thomson scattering presents the same aspects with ..cap alpha.. = 1/Klambda /SUB D/ (where lambda /SUB D/ is the Debye length). The deviation from the uniform distribution provides the possibility to determine the plasma turbulence spectrum from the scattered light.

  3. Preparation of gluten free bread enriched with green mussel (Perna canaliculus) protein hydrolysates and characterization of peptides responsible for mussel flavour.

    PubMed

    Vijaykrishnaraj, M; Roopa, B S; Prabhasankar, P

    2016-11-15

    Green mussel protein hydrolysates (GMPH) utilization for the enrichment of gluten-free bread followed by characterization of flavour peptides using chromatography and electronic nose techniques have been done. The degree of hydrolysis was carried out in each protease digest, and the higher degree of hydrolysis was observed in pepsin digestion. Gluten-free (GF) bread was formulated by using buckwheat flour (BWF), rice flour (RF) and chickpea flour (CPF) (70:20:10) and GMPH were added in the range of 0-20% in the GF bread for enrichment with GMPH. Radar plot of the electronic nose analysis showed that the sensors P30/2, T30/1 and T70/2 had a higher response to the GF bread and GMPH. Consequently, the peptide sequence was obtained manually by ESI-MS spectra of GMPH (KGYSSYICDK) and F-II (SSYCIVKICDK). Flavour quality was 97% discriminately comparable to the GMPH and F-II fractions. Mussel flavoured GF bread can be included in the celiac diet. PMID:27283688

  4. Caregiver Stigma and Burden in Memory Disorders: An Evaluation of the Effects of Caregiver Type and Gender

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Phoebe V.; Wishart, Heather A.; Randolph, Jennifer S.; Santulli, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    Despite considerable gains in public awareness of dementia, dementia patients and their caregivers continue to be stigmatized. Previous work has explored stigma and burden among adult children of persons with dementia in Israel, but no similar data exist for spousal caregivers or caregivers in general in the United States. This study examines the differences in stigma and burden experienced by spousal and adult child caregivers and male and female caregivers of persons with dementia. Eighty-two caregivers were given the Zarit Burden Inventory Short Form (ZBI) and the Caregiver Section of the Family Stigma in Alzheimer's Disease Scale (FS-ADS-C). Scores on the FS-ADS-C and ZBI were positively correlated (rs = .51, p < .001). Female caregivers reported experiencing more stigma on the FS-ADS-C (t(80) = −4.37, p < .001) and more burden on the ZBI (t(80) = −2.68, p = .009) compared to male caregivers, and adult child caregivers reported experiencing more stigma on the FS-ADS-C (t(30.8) = −2.22, p = .034) and more burden on the ZBI (t(80) = −2.65, p = .010) than spousal caregivers. These results reinforce the importance of support for caregivers, particularly adult child and female caregivers who may experience higher levels of stigma and burden. PMID:26941795

  5. Two-Component Self-Diffusion in Solutions: Trehalose and Sucrose in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feick, E. J.; von Meerwall, E. D.; Ekdawi, N.; de Pablo, J.

    2001-03-01

    Trehalose is now recognized as a superior substitute for sucrose in solution as a cryoprotectant, for preserving organs destined for transplantation. To explore some aspects of this superiority, we have used the proton NMR pulsed-gradient spin-echo method at T = 30, 50, and 85 deg. C to study the self-diffusion of solvent and solute in aqueous solutions of these molecules as function of their concentration, c. We find that both solute molecules diffuse substantially more slowly than water at the same c and T; that addition of water accelerates solute diffusion more rapidly than that of water; and that while at a given c and T water diffusion is insensitive to solute identity, trehalose diffusion is somewhat slower than sucrose diffusion, an effect which reaches a factor near two at the highest c. The results of our extensive MC and MD molecular simulations of diffusion in sucrose solutions agree quantitatively with our experimental findings at corresponding c. Free-volume theory is also employed to explore the cooperative interactions between solvent and solutes, and to guide the interpretation of both experiment and simulation.

  6. Diffusion of Trehalose and Sucrose in Aqueous Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feick, E.; von Meerwall, E.; Ekdawi, N.; de Pablo, J.

    2000-10-01

    Trehalose is emerging as superior substitute for sucrose in solution as a cryoprotectant, e. g., to preserve organs destined for transplantation. We have used the proton NMR pulsed-gradient spin-echo method between T = 30 and 85 deg. C to study the self-diffusion of solvent and solute in aqueous solutions of these molecules as function of their concentration, c. We find that both solute molecules diffuse substantially more slowly than water at corresponding c and T; that addition of water accelerates solute diffusion more rapidly than that of water; and that while at a given c and T water diffusion is insensitive to solute identity, trehalose diffusion is slower than sucrose diffusion. The latter effect increases with c, approaching a factor of two at the highest c. In these respects our results correspond closely to those of our extensive numerical simulations of these systems. Free-volume theory is employed to explore the cooperative kinetic interactions between solvent and solutes, and to account tentatively for part of the superiority of trehalose to sucrose as preservation agent. Differences in crystallization behavior also seem to be involved.

  7. Development of lead salt semiconductor lasers for the 9-17 micron spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linden, K. J.; Butler, J. F.; Nill, K. W.; Reeder, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Improved diode lasers of Pb sub 1-x Sn sub x Se operating in the 9-17 micrometers spectral region were developed. The performance characteristics of the best lasers exceeded the contract goals of 500 microW/mode at T 30K in the 9-12 micrometers region and 200 microW/mode at T 18K in the 16-17 micrometers region. Increased reliability and device yields resulted from processing improvements which evolved from a series of diagnostic studies. By means of Auger electron spectroscopy, laser shelf storage degradation was shown to be characterized by the presence of In metal on the semiconductor crystal surfaces. Studies of various metal barrier layers between the crystals and the In metal led to the development of an improved metallurgical contacting technology which has resulted in devices with performance stability values exceeding the contract goal of a one year shelf life. Lasers cycled over 500 times between 300K and 77K were also shown to be stable. Studies on improved methods of fabricating striped geometry lasers indicated that good spectral mode characteristics resulted from lasers which stripe widths of 12 and 25 micrometers.

  8. Caffeine Ingestion Increases Estimated Glycolytic Metabolism during Taekwondo Combat Simulation but Does Not Improve Performance or Parasympathetic Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of caffeine ingestion on performance and estimated energy system contribution during simulated taekwondo combat and on post-exercise parasympathetic reactivation. Methods Ten taekwondo athletes completed two experimental sessions separated by at least 48 hours. Athletes consumed a capsule containing either caffeine (5 mg∙kg-1) or placebo (cellulose) one hour before the combat simulation (3 rounds of 2 min separated by 1 min passive recovery), in a double-blind, randomized, repeated-measures crossover design. All simulated combat was filmed to quantify the time spent fighting in each round. Lactate concentration and rating of perceived exertion were measured before and after each round, while heart rate (HR) and the estimated contribution of the oxidative (WAER), ATP-PCr (WPCR), and glycolytic (W[La-]) systems were calculated during the combat simulation. Furthermore, parasympathetic reactivation after the combat simulation was evaluated through 1) taking absolute difference between the final HR observed at the end of third round and the HR recorded 60-s after (HRR60s), 2) taking the time constant of HR decay obtained by fitting the 6-min post-exercise HRR into a first-order exponential decay curve (HRRτ), or by 3) analyzing the first 30-s via logarithmic regression analysis (T30). Results Caffeine ingestion increased estimated glycolytic energy contribution in relation to placebo (12.5 ± 1.7 kJ and 8.9 ± 1.2 kJ, P = 0.04). However, caffeine did not improve performance as measured by attack number (CAF: 26. 7 ± 1.9; PLA: 27.3 ± 2.1, P = 0.48) or attack time (CAF: 33.8 ± 1.9 s; PLA: 36.6 ± 4.5 s, P = 0.58). Similarly, RPE (CAF: 11.7 ± 0.4 a.u.; PLA: 11.5 ± 0.3 a.u., P = 0.62), HR (CAF: 170 ± 3.5 bpm; PLA: 174.2 bpm, P = 0.12), oxidative (CAF: 109.3 ± 4.5 kJ; PLA: 107.9 kJ, P = 0.61) and ATP-PCr energy contributions (CAF: 45.3 ± 3.4 kJ; PLA: 46.8 ± 3.6 kJ, P = 0.72) during the combat simulation

  9. Evaluation of sexual dimorphism by discriminant function analysis of toe length (1T–5T) of adult Igbo populace in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Alabi, Stephen A.; Didia, Blessing C.; Oladipo, Gabriel Sunday; Aigbogun, Eric O.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sex determination is an important and one of the foremost criteria in establishing the identity of an individual, and this is achieved by investigating various anatomical structures to establish sex discriminatory features. The present study conducted baseline data for the toe with a view of finding discriminatory sex characteristics. Materials and Methods: A total of 420 subjects were studied by direct linear measurements of the toe length (big toe [1T] to the fifth toes [5T]) of both feet using a digital Vernier caliper with accuracy of 0.01 mm. Statistical Package for Social Sciences  (IBM, version 23, Armonk, New York, USA), Levene's ANOVA outcome informed the use of t-tests to compare mean differences. Discriminant function analysis (DFA) was used to evaluate the possibility of sex categorization. The significance level was set at 95%. Results: The mean ± standard deviation values of the right (R) toes for the males were 49.63 ± 4.43 mm (1T), 36.92 ± 5.14 mm (2T), 30.35 ± 4.95 mm (3T), 25.55 ± 3.97 mm (4T) and 22.21 ± 2.94 mm (5T), whereas the female values were 45.73 ± 4.07 mm (1T), 33.31 ± 4.66 mm (2T), 26.63 ± 4.02 mm (3T), 22.89 ± 3.43 mm (4T), and 19.77 ± 2.70 mm (5T). The left male values were 49.16 ± 4.32 mm (1T), 36.82 ± 5.16 mm (2T), 30.88 ± 4.91 mm (3T), 26.13 ± 3.99 mm (4T), and 22.46 ± 3.24 mm (5T), whereas the female values were 45.33 ± 4.05 mm (1T), 33.05 ± 4.70 mm (2T), 27.27 ± 4.29 mm (3T), 23.10 ± 3.36 mm (4T), 19.81 ± 2.59 mm (5T). From the results, males displayed significantly higher mean values than females in all measured parameters (t = 2.405, P = 0.018) with no asymmetry (P > 0.05); although T3 and T4 were larger on the left foot. The DFA model when tested with the present data derived a significant F likelihood ratio test (P < 0.001), a Wilks’ lambda predictability value of 0.759 having a model accuracy of 69.5% with a better prediction for female (70%) than males (69%). Conclusion: The use of toe

  10. Optimized performance for neutron interrogation to detect SNM

    SciTech Connect

    Slaughter, D R; Asztalos, S J; Biltoft, P J; Church, J A; Descalle, M; Hall, J M; Luu, T C; Manatt, D R; Mauger, G J; Norman, E B; Petersen, D C; Pruet, J A; Prussin, S G

    2007-02-14

    A program of simulations and validating experiments was utilized to evaluate a concept for neutron interrogation of commercial cargo containers that would reliably detect special nuclear material (SNM). The goals were to develop an interrogation system capable of detecting a 5 kg solid sphere of high-enriched uranium (HEU) even when deeply embedded in commercial cargo. Performance goals included a minimum detection probability, P{sub d} {ge} 95%, a maximum occurrence of false positive indications, P{sub fA} {le} 0.001, and maximum scan duration of t {le} 1 min. The conditions necessary to meet these goals were demonstrated in experimental measurements even when the SNM is deeply buried in any commercial cargo, and are projected to be met successfully in the most challenging cases of steel or hydrocarbons at areal density {rho}L {le} 150 g/cm{sup 2}. Optimal performance was obtained with a collimated ({Delta}{Theta} = {+-} 15{sup o}) neutron beam at energy E{sub n} = 7 MeV produced by the D(d,n) reaction with the deuteron energy E{sub d} = 4 MeV. Two fission product signatures are utilized to uniquely identify SNM, including delayed neutrons detected in a large array of polyethylene moderated 3He proportional counters and high energy {beta}-delayed fission product {gamma}-radiation detected in a large array of 61 x 61 x 25 cm{sup 3} plastic scintillators. The latter detectors are nearly blind to normal terrestrial background radiation by setting an energy threshold on the detection at E{sub min} {ge} 3 MeV. Detection goals were attained with a low beam current (I{sub d} = 15-65 {micro}A) source up to {rho}L = 75 g/cm{sup 2} utilizing long irradiations, T = 30 sec, and long counting times, t = 30-100 sec. Projecting to a higher beam current, I{sub d} {ge} 600 {micro}A and larger detector array the detection and false alarm goals would be attained even with intervening cargo overburden as large as {rho}L {le} 150 g/cm{sup 2}. The latter cargo thickness corresponds to

  11. Greater Monoamine Oxidase A Binding in Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Brittany A.; Kish, Stephen J.; Xu, Xin; Boileau, Isabelle; Rusjan, Pablo M.; Wilson, Alan A.; DiGiacomo, Dan; Houle, Sylvain; Meyer, Jeffrey H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Alcohol dependence (AD) is a multiorgan disease in which excessive oxidative stress and apoptosis are implicated. Monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) is an important enzyme on the outer mitochondrial membrane that participates in the cellular response to oxidative stress and mitochondrial toxicity. It is unknown whether MAO-A levels are abnormal in AD. We hypothesized that MAO-A VT, an index of MAO-A level, is elevated in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) during AD, because markers of greater oxidative stress and apoptosis are reported in the brain in AD and a microarray analysis reported greater MAO-A messenger RNA in the PFC of rodents exposed to alcohol vapor. Methods Sixteen participants with alcohol dependence and 16 healthy control subjects underwent [11C]-harmine positron emission tomography. All were nonsmoking, medication- and drug-free, and had no other past or present psychiatric or medical illnesses. Results MAO-A VT was significantly greater in the PFC (37%, independent samples t test, t30 = 3.93, p < .001), and all brain regions analyzed (mean 32%, multivariate analysis of variance, F7,24 = 3.67, p = .008). Greater duration of heavy drinking correlated positively with greater MAO-A VT in the PFC (r = .67, p = .005) and all brain regions analyzed (r = .73 to .57, p = .001–.02). Conclusions This finding represents a new pathological marker present in AD that is therapeutically targetable through direct inhibition or by novel treatments toward oxidative/pro-apoptotic processes implicated by MAO-A overexpression. PMID:24269057

  12. Structural basis for the ligand-binding specificity of fatty acid-binding proteins (pFABP4 and pFABP5) in gentoo penguin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang Woo; Kim, Jung Eun; Do, Hackwon; Kim, Ryeo-Ok; Lee, Sung Gu; Park, Hyun Ho; Chang, Jeong Ho; Yim, Joung Han; Park, Hyun; Kim, Il-Chan; Lee, Jun Hyuck

    2015-09-11

    Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are involved in transporting hydrophobic fatty acids between various aqueous compartments of the cell by directly binding ligands inside their β-barrel cavities. Here, we report the crystal structures of ligand-unbound pFABP4, linoleate-bound pFABP4, and palmitate-bound pFABP5, obtained from gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua), at a resolution of 2.1 Å, 2.2 Å, and 2.3 Å, respectively. The pFABP4 and pFABP5 proteins have a canonical β-barrel structure with two short α-helices that form a cap region and fatty acid ligand binding sites in the hydrophobic cavity within the β-barrel structure. Linoleate-bound pFABP4 and palmitate-bound pFABP5 possess different ligand-binding modes and a unique ligand-binding pocket due to several sequence dissimilarities (A76/L78, T30/M32, underlining indicates pFABP4 residues) between the two proteins. Structural comparison revealed significantly different conformational changes in the β3-β4 loop region (residues 57-62) as well as the flipped Phe60 residue of pFABP5 than that in pFABP4 (the corresponding residue is Phe58). A ligand-binding study using fluorophore displacement assays shows that pFABP4 has a relatively strong affinity for linoleate as compared to pFABP5. In contrast, pFABP5 exhibits higher affinity for palmitate than that for pFABP4. In conclusion, our high-resolution structures and ligand-binding studies provide useful insights into the ligand-binding preferences of pFABPs based on key protein-ligand interactions. PMID:26206084

  13. Evaluating the Performance of Short-Term Heat Storage in Alluvial Aquifer with 4D Electrical Resistivity Tomography and Hydrological Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermans, T.; Robert, T.; Paulus, C.; Bolly, P. Y.; Koo Seen Lin, E.; Nguyen, F.

    2015-12-01

    In the context of energy demand side management (DSM), energy storage solutions are needed to store energy during high production periods and recover energy during high demand periods. Among currently studied solutions, storing energy in the subsurface through heat pumps and/or exchangers (thermal energy storage) is relatively simple with low investment costs. However, the design and functioning of such systems have strong interconnections with the geology of the site which may be complex and heterogeneous, making predictions difficult. In this context, local temperature measurements are necessary but not sufficient to model heat flow and transport in the subsurface. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) provides spatially distributed information on the temperature distribution in the subsurface. In this study, we monitored, with 4D ERT combined with multiple hydrological measurements in available wells, a short-term heat storage experiment in a confined alluvial aquifer. We injected heated water (ΔT=30K) during 6 hours with a rate of 3 m³/h. We stored this heat during 3 days, and then we pumped it back to estimate the energy balance. We collected ERT data sets using 9 parallel profiles of 21 electrodes and cross-lines measurements. Inversion results clearly show the ability of ERT to delimit the thermal plume growth during injection, the diffusion and decrease of temperature during storage, and the decrease in size after pumping. Quantitative interpretation of ERT in terms of temperature estimates is difficult at this stage due to strong spatial variations of the total dissolved solid content in the aquifer, due to historical chloride contamination of the site. However, we demonstrated that short-term heat storage in alluvial aquifer is efficient and that ERT combined with hydrological measurements is a valuable tool to image and estimate the temperature distribution in the subsurface. Moreover, energy balance shows that up to 75% of the energy can be easily

  14. IGR J18293-1213 is an eclipsing Cataclysmic Variable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavel, M.; Tomsick, J. A.; Bodaghee, A.; Chiu, J.-L.; Fornasini, F. M.; Hong, J.; Krivonos, R.; Ponti, G.; Rahoui, F.; Stern, D.

    2016-06-01

    Studying the population of faint hard X-ray sources along the plane of the Galaxy is challenging because of high-extinction and crowding, which make the identification of individual sources more difficult. IGR J18293-1213 is part of the population of persistent sources which have been discovered by the INTEGRAL satellite. We report on NuSTAR and Swift/XRT observations of this source, performed on 2015 September 11. We detected three eclipsing intervals in the NuSTAR light curve, allowing us to constrain the duration of these eclipses, Δ t= 30.8^{+6.3}_{-0.0} min, and the orbital period of the system, T = 6.92 ± 0.01 hr. Even though we only report an upper limit on the amplitude of a putative spin modulation, the orbital period and the hard thermal Bremsstrahlung spectrum of IGR J18293-1213 provide strong evidence that this source is a magnetic Cataclysmic Variable (CV). Our NuSTAR and Swift/XRT joint spectral analysis places strong constraints on the white dwarf mass M_wd = 0.78^{+0.10}_{-0.09} M⊙. Assuming that the mass to radius ratio of the companion star M⋆/R⋆ = 1 (solar units) and using T, Δt and Mwd, we derived the mass of the companion star M⋆ = 0.82 ± 0.01 M⊙, the orbital separation of the binary system a = 2.14 ± 0.04 R⊙, and its orbital inclination compared to the line of sight i=(72.2^{+2.4}_{-0.0})± 1.0°.

  15. Validation and Characterization of a Novel Peptide That Binds Monomeric and Aggregated β-Amyloid and Inhibits the Formation of Neurotoxic Oligomers.

    PubMed

    Barr, Renae K; Verdile, Giuseppe; Wijaya, Linda K; Morici, Michael; Taddei, Kevin; Gupta, Veer B; Pedrini, Steve; Jin, Liang; Nicolazzo, Joseph A; Knock, Erin; Fraser, Paul E; Martins, Ralph N

    2016-01-01

    Although the formation of β-amyloid (Aβ) deposits in the brain is a hallmark of Alzheimer disease (AD), the soluble oligomers rather than the mature amyloid fibrils most likely contribute to Aβ toxicity and neurodegeneration. Thus, the discovery of agents targeting soluble Aβ oligomers is highly desirable for early diagnosis prior to the manifestation of a clinical AD phenotype and also more effective therapies. We have previously reported that a novel 15-amino acid peptide (15-mer), isolated via phage display screening, targeted Aβ and attenuated its neurotoxicity (Taddei, K., Laws, S. M., Verdile, G., Munns, S., D'Costa, K., Harvey, A. R., Martins, I. J., Hill, F., Levy, E., Shaw, J. E., and Martins, R. N. (2010) Neurobiol. Aging 31, 203-214). The aim of the current study was to generate and biochemically characterize analogues of this peptide with improved stability and therapeutic potential. We demonstrated that a stable analogue of the 15-amino acid peptide (15M S.A.) retained the activity and potency of the parent peptide and demonstrated improved proteolytic resistance in vitro (stable to t = 300 min, c.f. t = 30 min for the parent peptide). This candidate reduced the formation of soluble Aβ42 oligomers, with the concurrent generation of non-toxic, insoluble aggregates measuring up to 25-30 nm diameter as determined by atomic force microscopy. The 15M S.A. candidate directly interacted with oligomeric Aβ42, as shown by coimmunoprecipitation and surface plasmon resonance/Biacore analysis, with an affinity in the low micromolar range. Furthermore, this peptide bound fibrillar Aβ42 and also stained plaques ex vivo in brain tissue from AD model mice. Given its multifaceted ability to target monomeric and aggregated Aβ42 species, this candidate holds promise for novel preclinical AD imaging and therapeutic strategies. PMID:26538562

  16. High-resolution Submillimeter and Near-infrared Studies of the Transition Disk around Sz 91

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukagoshi, Takashi; Momose, Munetake; Hashimoto, Jun; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Andrews, Sean; Saito, Masao; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Wilner, David; Kawabe, Ryohei; Abe, Lyu; Akiyama, Eiji; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Carson, Joseph; Currie, Thayne; Egner, Sebastian E.; Goto, Miwa; Grady, Carol; Guyon, Olivier; Hayano, Yutaka; Hayashi, Masahiko; Hayashi, Saeko; Henning, Thomas; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Ishii, Miki; Iye, Masanori; Janson, Markus; Kandori, Ryo; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Kwon, Jungmi; McElwain, Mike; Matsuo, Taro; Mayama, Satoshi; Miyama, Shoken; Morino, Jun-ichi; Moro-Martín, Amaya; Nishimura, Tetsuro; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Serabyn, Eugene; Suenaga, Takuya; Suto, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Ryuji; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Takami, Hideki; Takami, Michihiro; Takato, Naruhisa; Terada, Hiroshi; Thalmann, Christian; Tomono, Daigo; Turner, Edwin L.; Usuda, Tomonori; Watanabe, Makoto; Wisniewski, John P.; Yamada, Toru; Tamura, Motohide

    2014-03-01

    To reveal the structures of a transition disk around a young stellar object in Lupus, Sz 91 , we have performed aperture synthesis 345 GHz continuum and CO(3-2) observations with the Submillimeter Array (~1''-3'' resolution) and high-resolution imaging of polarized intensity at the Ks -band using the HiCIAO instrument on the Subaru Telescope (0.''25 resolution). Our observations successfully resolved the inner and outer radii of the dust disk to be 65 and 170 AU, respectively, which indicates that Sz 91 is a transition disk source with one of the largest known inner holes. The model fitting analysis of the spectral energy distribution reveals an H2 mass of 2.4 × 10-3 M ⊙ in the cold (T < 30 K) outer part at 65 AU 3 × 10-9 M ⊙) of hot (T ~ 180 K) dust possibly remains inside the inner hole of the disk. The structure of the hot component could be interpreted as either an unresolved self-luminous companion body (not directly detected in our observations) or a narrow ring inside the inner hole. Significant CO(3-2) emission with a velocity gradient along the major axis of the dust disk is concentrated on the Sz 91 position, suggesting a rotating gas disk with a radius of 420 AU. The Sz 91 disk is possibly a rare disk in an evolutionary stage immediately after the formation of protoplanets because of the large inner hole and the lower disk mass than other transition disks studied thus far.

  17. High-resolution submillimeter and near-infrared studies of the transition disk around Sz 91

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukagoshi, Takashi; Momose, Munetake; Hashimoto, Jun; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Saito, Masao; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Kawabe, Ryohei; Akiyama, Eiji; Andrews, Sean; Wilner, David; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Abe, Lyu; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Carson, Joseph; Currie, Thayne; Egner, Sebastian E.; Guyon, Olivier; Goto, Miwa; Grady, Carol; and others

    2014-03-10

    To reveal the structures of a transition disk around a young stellar object in Lupus, Sz 91 , we have performed aperture synthesis 345 GHz continuum and CO(3-2) observations with the Submillimeter Array (∼1''-3'' resolution) and high-resolution imaging of polarized intensity at the K{sub s} -band using the HiCIAO instrument on the Subaru Telescope (0.''25 resolution). Our observations successfully resolved the inner and outer radii of the dust disk to be 65 and 170 AU, respectively, which indicates that Sz 91 is a transition disk source with one of the largest known inner holes. The model fitting analysis of the spectral energy distribution reveals an H{sub 2} mass of 2.4 × 10{sup –3} M {sub ☉} in the cold (T < 30 K) outer part at 65 AU 3 × 10{sup –9} M {sub ☉}) of hot (T ∼ 180 K) dust possibly remains inside the inner hole of the disk. The structure of the hot component could be interpreted as either an unresolved self-luminous companion body (not directly detected in our observations) or a narrow ring inside the inner hole. Significant CO(3-2) emission with a velocity gradient along the major axis of the dust disk is concentrated on the Sz 91 position, suggesting a rotating gas disk with a radius of 420 AU. The Sz 91 disk is possibly a rare disk in an evolutionary stage immediately after the formation of protoplanets because of the large inner hole and the lower disk mass than other transition disks studied thus far.

  18. Structural and magnetic characterization of the new GdMn1-xFexO3 perovskite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona Vasquez, J. A.; Landínez Téllez, D. A.; Collazos, C. A.; Roa Rojas, J.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we presents the synthesis process of the GdMn1-xFexO3 perovskite material by conventional solid state reaction method. Crystalline phase evolution during the synthesis was studied by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) in powder of the materials, observing that the chemical reaction of the precursor oxides was significant above 1000°C. Rietveld refinement of DRX patterns shows a perovskite structure with octahedral distortions (space group Pbnm, # 62) for studied values of x (0, 0.1 and 0.2). The degree of substitution generates an increasing tendency on lattice parameters a and c, while for b is decreasing just as for the volume of the unit cell. The effect of the change in the lattice parameters directly affects the octahedral distortions, ie, with increasing degree of substitution (increased parameter c) octahedra tend to arrange one above the other aligned with the c axis. Magnetization measurements as a function of temperature were performed above room temperature between 300K and 860K with an applied field of 20Oe and below room temperature in Field Cooling (FC) and Zero Field Cooling modes (ZFC) between 4.2K and 300K with an applied field of 200Oe. Magnetic behavior above room temperature is paramagnetic for used values of x, on the other hand at low temperatures (T<30K) magnetic phase transitions associated to the apparition of an antiferromagnetic phase are observed. In addition for x=0.1 the derivative of magnetization shows a peak around 31K, associated to the ferrimagnetic transition for this material. Curie-Weiss fit reveals the antiferromagnetic (ferrimagnetic) behavior of the materials, also shows that the configurations with x=0 and x=0.2 have an effective magnetic moment very similar to the reported value of undoped material, while for x=0.1 a higher value is observed confirming the ferrimagnetic behavior of this configuration.

  19. Reengineered glucose oxidase for amperometric glucose determination in diabetes analytics.

    PubMed

    Arango Gutierrez, Erik; Mundhada, Hemanshu; Meier, Thomas; Duefel, Hartmut; Bocola, Marco; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2013-12-15

    Glucose oxidase is an oxidoreductase exhibiting a high β-D-glucose specificity and high stability which renders glucose oxidase well-suited for applications in diabetes care. Nevertheless, GOx activity is highly oxygen dependent which can lead to inaccuracies in amperometric β-D-glucose determinations. Therefore a directed evolution campaign with two rounds of random mutagenesis (SeSaM followed by epPCR), site saturation mutagenesis studies on individual positions, and one simultaneous site saturation library (OmniChange; 4 positions) was performed. A diabetes care well suited mediator (quinone diimine) was selected and the GOx variant (T30V I94V) served as starting point. For directed GOx evolution a microtiter plate detection system based on the quinone diimine mediator was developed and the well-known ABTS-assay was applied in microtiter plate format to validate oxygen independency of improved GOx variants. Two iterative rounds of random diversity generation and screening yielded to two subsets of amino acid positions which mainly improved activity (A173, A332) and oxygen independency (F414, V560). Simultaneous site saturation of all four positions with a reduced subset of amino acids using the OmniChange method yielded finally variant V7 with a 37-fold decreased oxygen dependency (mediator activity: 7.4 U/mg WT, 47.5 U/mg V7; oxygen activity: 172.3 U/mg WT, 30.1 U/mg V7). V7 is still highly β-D-glucose specific, highly active with the quinone diimine mediator and thermal resistance is retained (prerequisite for GOx coating of diabetes test stripes). The latter properties and V7's oxygen insensitivity make V7 a very promising candidate to replace standard GOx in diabetes care applications. PMID:23835222

  20. Alpha-synuclein and familial variants affect the chain order and the thermotropic phase behavior of anionic lipid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Pantusa, Manuela; Vad, Brian; Lillelund, Ove; Kjær, Lars; Otzen, Daniel; Bartucci, Rosa

    2016-09-01

    Alpha-synuclein (aSN) is a presynaptic protein with a pathological role in Parkinson's disease (PD). The mutants A30P, E46K and A53T are involved in PD early-onset forms. aSN is natively unfolded but can self-assemble to oligomers and fibrils and binds anionic membranes in a helical conformation. We study the influence of wild-type (wt) aSN and familial variants on the chain order and thermotropic phase behavior of anionic dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) bilayers by using electron spin resonance and calorimetry, respectively. The alpha-helical conformation of the proteins in the membrane-bound state is assessed by circular dichroism thermal scans. wt and mutated aSN upon binding to fluid DMPG vesicles progressively increase chain order. Lipid:protein molar binding stoichiometries correspond to 50 for A30P, 35-36 for aSN and A53T, 30 for E46K. The temperature range over which the variants assume the α-helical fold correlates directly with the density of proteins on vesicle surfaces. All variants preserve the characteristic chain flexibility gradient and impart motional restriction in the lipid chain. This is evident at the first CH2 segments and is markedly reduced at the chain termini, disappearing completely for A30P. The proteins slightly reduce DMPG main transition temperature, revealing preferential affinity for the fluid phase, and broaden the transition, promoting gel-fluid phase coexistence. The overall results are consistent with protein surface association in which the degree of binding correlates with the degree of folding and perturbation of the membrane bilayer. However, the degree of binding of monomer to membrane does not correlate directly with aSN toxicity in vivo. PMID:27177693

  1. Anti-inflammatory effects of locally applied enzyme-loaded ultradeformable vesicles on an acute cutaneous model.

    PubMed

    Simões, Sandra; Marques, Cláudia; Cruz, Maria Eugénia; Martins, Maria Bárbara Figueira

    2009-11-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) are active scavengers of reactive oxygen species and were incorporated into ultradeformable vesicles with the aim of increasing enzyme bioavailability (skin delivery). These special very adaptable vesicles have been formulated and optimized for enzyme transport in order to penetrate into or across the intact skin barrier. Anti-inflammatory activity of SOD-loaded, CAT-loaded and of SOD- and CAT-loaded ultradeformable vesicles applied epicutaneously was measured using different protein doses on the skin, on an arachidonic acid-induced mouse ear oedema. The biological anti-oedema activity is a measurement of drug-targeting potentiation in the organ. Delivery by means of deformable vesicles was compared to conventional vesicles or the absence of an enzyme carrier mediated transport. This was done at various times following prophylactic application of the test formulations. Positive reference groups were treated epicutaneously with several low molecular weight non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The latter included indomethacin (3 mg kg(-1)), etofenamate (30 mg kg(-1)) and piroxicam (1 mg kg(-1)) and reduced the oedema by 94 +/- 4%, 81 +/- 4% and 42 +/- 5%, respectively, if measured 30 min after ear treatment with a NSAID. Of the enzyme-loaded carriers tested, only the enzyme-loaded ultradeformable vesicles reduced the swelling of ears significantly: SOD (90 microg kg(-1)), CAT (250 microg kg(-1)) and SOD (90 microg kg(-1)) plus CAT (250 microg kg(-1)) reduced the oedema by 70 +/- 12%, 65 +/- 10% and 61 +/- 19%, respectively, at t = 30 min. Aqueous enzyme solutions and empty carriers had no such effect. The combination of two enzymes resulted in no increased therapeutic effect, but the results are inconclusive since only two dose combinations were tested. The results presented in this study suggest that antioxidant enzymes delivered by means of ultradeformable lipid vesicles can serve as a novel region

  2. Prevention of sevoflurane related emergence agitation in children undergoing adenotonsillectomy: A comparison of dexmedetomidine and propofol

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Monaz Abdulrahman; Abdellatif, Ashraf Abualhasan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Emergence agitation (EA) in children is increased after sevoflurane anesthesia. Propofol and dexmedetomidine have been used for prophylactic treatment with controversial results. The aim of the present study was to compare the effect of a single dose of propofol or dexmedetomidine prior to termination of sevoflurane-based anesthesia on the incidence and severity of EA in children. Methods: One hundred and twenty children, American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II, 2-6 years old undergoing adenotonsillectomy under sevoflurane based anesthesia were enrolled in the study. Children were randomly allocated to one of the three equal groups: (Group C) received 10 ml saline 0.9%, (Group P) received propofol 1 mg/kg or (group D) received dexmedetomidine 0.3 ug/kg-1. The study drugs were administered 5 min before the end of surgery. In post anesthesia care unit (PACU), the incidence of EA was assessed with Aonos four point scale and the severity of EA was assessed with pediatric anesthesia emergence delirium scale upon admission (T0), after 5 min (T5), 15 min (T15) and 30 min (T30). Extubation time, emergence time, duration of PACU stay and pain were assessed. Results: The incidence and severity of EA were lower in group P and group D compared to group C at T0, T5 and T15. The incidence and severity of EA in group P were significantly higher than group D at the same times. The incidence and severity of EA decreased significantly over time in all groups. The modified Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Pain Scale was significantly lower in group D compared to group C and group P. Conclusions: Dexmedetomidine 0.3 ug/kg1 was more effective than propofol 1 mg/kg in decreasing the incidence and severity of EA, when administered 5 min before the end of surgery in children undergoing adenotonsillectomy under sevoflurane anesthesia. PMID:24015133

  3. Disribution and interplay of geologic processes on Titan from Cassini radar data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopes, R.M.C.; Stofan, E.R.; Peckyno, R.; Radebaugh, J.; Mitchell, K.L.; Mitri, G.; Wood, C.A.; Kirk, R.L.; Wall, S.D.; Lunine, J.I.; Hayes, A.; Lorenz, R.; Farr, Tom; Wye, L.; Craig, J.; Ollerenshaw, R.J.; Janssen, M.; LeGall, A.; Paganelli, F.; West, R.; Stiles, B.; Callahan, P.; Anderson, Y.; Valora, P.; Soderblom, L.

    2010-01-01

    The Cassini Titan Radar Mapper is providing an unprecedented view of Titan's surface geology. Here we use Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image swaths (Ta-T30) obtained from October 2004 to December 2007 to infer the geologic processes that have shaped Titan's surface. These SAR swaths cover about 20% of the surface, at a spatial resolution ranging from ~350 m to ~2 km. The SAR data are distributed over a wide latitudinal and longitudinal range, enabling some conclusions to be drawn about the global distribution of processes. They reveal a geologically complex surface that has been modified by all the major geologic processes seen on Earth - volcanism, tectonism, impact cratering, and erosion and deposition by fluvial and aeolian activity. In this paper, we map geomorphological units from SAR data and analyze their areal distribution and relative ages of modification in order to infer the geologic evolution of Titan's surface. We find that dunes and hummocky and mountainous terrains are more widespread than lakes, putative cryovolcanic features, mottled plains, and craters and crateriform structures that may be due to impact. Undifferentiated plains are the largest areal unit; their origin is uncertain. In terms of latitudinal distribution, dunes and hummocky and mountainous terrains are located mostly at low latitudes (less than 30 degrees), with no dunes being present above 60 degrees. Channels formed by fluvial activity are present at all latitudes, but lakes are at high latitudes only. Crateriform structures that may have been formed by impact appear to be uniformly distributed with latitude, but the well-preserved impact craters are all located at low latitudes, possibly indicating that more resurfacing has occurred at higher latitudes. Cryovolcanic features are not ubiquitous, and are mostly located between 30 degrees and 60 degrees north. We examine temporal relationships between units wherever possible, and conclude that aeolian and fluvial

  4. Experimental Study of the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability of Incompressible Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niederhaus, Charles; Jacobs, Jeffrey W.

    2002-01-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of a low Atwood number, miscible, two-liquid system is investigated experimentally. The initially stratified fluids are contained within a rectangular tank mounted to a sled that rides on a vertical set of rails. The instability is generated by dropping the sled onto a coil spring, producing a nearly impulsive upward acceleration. The subsequent freefall that occurs as the container travels upward and then downward on the rails allows the instability to evolve in the absence of gravity. The interface separating the two liquids initially has a well-defined, sinusoidal perturbation that quickly inverts and then grows in amplitude after undergoing the impulsive acceleration. Disturbance amplitudes are measured and compared to theoretical predictions. Linear stability theory gives excellent agreement with the measured initial growth rate, a(sub 0), for single-mode perturbations with the predicted amplitudes differing by less than 10% from experimental measurements up to a nondimensional time ka(sub 0)t = 0.7, where k is the wavenumber. Linear stability theory also provides excellent agreement for the individual mode amplitudes of multi-mode initial perturbations up until the interface becomes multi-valued. Comparison with previously published weakly nonlinear single-mode models shows good agreement up to ka(sub 0)t = 3, while published nonlinear single-mode models provide good agreement up to ka(sub 0)t = 30. The effects of Reynolds number on the vortex core evolution and overall growth rate of the interface are also investigated. Measurements of the overall amplitude are found to be unaffected by the Reynolds number for the range of values studied here. However, experiments carried out at lower values of Reynolds numbers were found to have decreased vortex core rotation rates. In addition, an instability in the vortex cores is observed.

  5. Comparing low-dose intravenous ketamine-midazolam with intravenous morphine with respect to pain control in patients with closed limb fracture

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Omid; Isfahani, Mehdi Nasr; Feizi, Awat

    2014-01-01

    Background: We assessed the effects of low-dose IV ketamine-midazolam versus morphine on pain control in patients with closed limb fracture(s); and also compared the incidence of adverse events (cardio-pulmonary) between two groups. Materials and Methods: This prospective, single-blind, non-inferiority trial randomized consecutive emergency department (ED) patients aged 18-60 years to two groups: Receiving 300-500 mcg/kg ketamine plus 0.03 mg/kg midazolam, or 0.05-0.1 mg/kg morphine. Visual analogue score (VAS) and adverse events were verified during an interval of 30 minutes. Results: Two hundred and thirty — six patients were selected, among whom 207 were males (87.3%). The average age was 29 ± 2, (range, 18-60 years). The VAS score at T30 (i.e., 30 minutes after initial analgesic dose) was significantly decreased compared with VAS score at T0, in both groups. No statistically significant difference, however, was observed between the two groups (–6.1 ± 1.1 versus –6.2 ± 1.0; P = 0.16). With regard to systolic blood pressure and respiratory rate, however, a meaningful difference was noted between the two groups (1.5 ± 6.4 versus –2.1 ± 6.6; P = 0.000 for SBP, and –0.2 ± 1.1 versus –1.1 ± 6.1; P = 0.048 for RR). Conclusion: Low-dose intravenous ketamine plus midazolam has the same analgesic effects as morphine on pain control in trauma patients with closed limb fracture(s), in addition to less respiratory adverse events. PMID:25197290

  6. Titan dune heights retrieval by using Cassini Radar Altimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastrogiuseppe, M.; Poggiali, V.; Seu, R.; Martufi, R.; Notarnicola, C.

    2014-02-01

    The Cassini Radar is a Ku band multimode instrument capable of providing topographic and mapping information. During several of the 93 Titan fly-bys performed by Cassini, the radar collected a large amount of data observing many dune fields in multiple modes such as SAR, Altimeter, Scatterometer and Radiometer. Understanding dune characteristics, such as shape and height, will reveal important clues on Titan's climatic and geological history providing a better understanding of aeolian processes on Earth. Dunes are believed to be sculpted by the action of the wind, weak at the surface but still able to activate the process of sand-sized particle transport. This work aims to estimate dunes height by modeling the shape of the real Cassini Radar Altimeter echoes. Joint processing of SAR/Altimeter data has been adopted to localize the altimeter footprints overlapping dune fields excluding non-dune features. The height of the dunes was estimated by applying Maximum Likelihood Estimation along with a non-coherent electromagnetic (EM) echo model, thus comparing the real averaged waveform with the theoretical curves. Such analysis has been performed over the Fensal dune field observed during the T30 flyby (May 2007). As a result we found that the estimated dunes' peak to trough heights difference was in the order of 60-120 m. Estimation accuracy and robustness of the MLE for different complex scenarios was assessed via radar simulations and Monte-Carlo approach. We simulated dunes-interdunes different composition and roughness for a large set of values verifying that, in the range of possible Titan environment conditions, these two surface parameters have weak effects on our estimates of standard dune heights deviation. Results presented here are the first part of a study that will cover all Titan's sand seas.

  7. Enhancing the orthorhombicity and antiferromagnetic-insulating state in epitaxial La0.67Ca0.33MnO3/NdGaO3(001) films by inserting a SmFeO3 buffer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xuelian; Gao, Guanyin; Chen, Pingfan; Xu, Haoran; Zhi, Bowen; Jin, Feng; Chen, Feng; Wu, Wenbin

    2014-11-01

    Structural and magnetotransport properties of epitaxial La0.67Ca0.33MnO3(30 nm)/NdGaO3(001) [LCMO/NGO(001)] films are tuned by inserting an insulating SmFeO3 (SFO) buffer layer at various thicknesses (t). All the layers and the NGO substrates have the same Pbnm symmetry with the octahedra tilting about the b-axis, but different orthorhombicity (d). We found that as t increases, the fully strained (≤15 nm) or partially relaxed (30-60 nm) SFO layers can produce different d in the upper LCMO films. Correspondingly, the induced antiferromagnetic-insulating (AFI) state in LCMO is greatly enhanced with TAFI shifted from ˜250 K for t ≤ 15 nm to ˜263 K for t = 30-60 nm. We also show that the strain relaxation for t ≥ 30 nm is remarkably anisotropic, with a stable lattice constant a as that of the NGO substrates but increasing b of both SFO and LCMO layers. This indicates the octahedral coupling across the interfaces, leaving the strain along the a-axis accommodated by the octahedral tilts, while along the b-axis most probably by the octahedral deformations. The AFI state in the LCMO layer could be ascribed to the enhanced orthorhombicity with cooperatively increased Jahn-Teller-like distortions and tilting of the MnO6 octahedra. The results strongly suggest that the interfacial octahedral coupling plays a crucial role in epitaxial growth and in tuning functionalities of the perovskite oxide films.

  8. IGR J18293-1213 is an eclipsing cataclysmic variable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavel, M.; Tomsick, J. A.; Bodaghee, A.; Chiu, J.-L.; Fornasini, F. M.; Hong, J.; Krivonos, R.; Ponti, G.; Rahoui, F.; Stern, D.

    2016-09-01

    Studying the population of faint hard X-ray sources along the plane of the Galaxy is challenging because of high extinction and crowding, which make the identification of individual sources more difficult. IGR J18293-1213 is part of the population of persistent sources which have been discovered by the INTEGRAL satellite. We report on NuSTAR and Swift/XRT observations of this source, performed on 2015 September 11. We detected three eclipsing intervals in the NuSTAR light curve, allowing us to constrain the duration of these eclipses, Δ t= 30.8^{+6.3}_{-0.0} min, and the orbital period of the system, T = 6.92 ± 0.01 h. Even though we only report an upper limit on the amplitude of a putative spin modulation, the orbital period and the hard thermal bremsstrahlung spectrum of IGR J18293-1213 provide strong evidence that this source is a magnetic cataclysmic variable. Our NuSTAR and Swift/XRT joint spectral analysis places strong constraints on the white dwarf mass M_wd = 0.78^{+0.10}_{-0.09} M⊙. Assuming that the mass to radius ratio of the companion star M⋆/R⋆ = 1 (solar units) and using T, Δt, and Mwd, we derived the mass of the companion star M⋆ = 0.82 ± 0.01 M⊙, the orbital separation of the binary system a = 2.14 ± 0.04 R⊙, and its orbital inclination compared to the line of sight i=(72.2°^{+2.4}_{-0.0})± 1.0°.

  9. Coordination chemistry of two heavy metals: I, Ligand preferences in lead(II) complexation, toward the development of therapeutic agents for lead poisoning: II, Plutonium solubility and speciation relevant to the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Neu, M.P.

    1993-11-01

    The coordination chemistry and solution behavior of the toxic ions lead(II) and plutonium(IV, V, VI) have been investigated. The ligand pK{sub a}s and ligand-lead(II) stability constants of one hydroxamic acid and four thiohydroaxamic acids were determined. Solution thermodynamic results indicate that thiohydroxamic acids are more acidic and slightly better lead chelators than hydroxamates, e.g., N-methylthioaceto-hydroxamic acid, pK{sub a} = 5.94, log{beta}{sub 120} = 10.92; acetohydroxamic acid, pK{sub a} = 9.34, log{beta}{sub l20} = 9.52. The syntheses of lead complexes of two bulky hydroxamate ligands are presented. The X-ray crystal structures show the lead hydroxamates are di-bridged dimers with irregular five-coordinate geometry about the metal atom and a stereochemically active lone pair of electrons. Molecular orbital calculations of a lead hydroxamate and a highly symmetric pseudo octahedral lead complex were performed. The thermodynamic stability of plutonium(IV) complexes of the siderophore, desferrioxamine B (DFO), and two octadentate derivatives of DFO were investigated using competition spectrophotometric titrations. The stability constant measured for the plutonium(IV) complex of DFO-methylterephthalamide is log{beta}{sub 110} = 41.7. The solubility limited speciation of {sup 242}Pu as a function of time in near neutral carbonate solution was measured. Individual solutions of plutonium in a single oxidation state were added to individual solutions at pH = 6.0, T = 30.0, 1.93 mM dissolved carbonate, and sampled over intervals up to 150 days. Plutonium solubility was measured, and speciation was investigated using laser photoacoustic spectroscopy and chemical methods.

  10. Spot activity on HD 89546 (FG UMa) from long-term photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdarcan, O.; Evren, S.; Henry, G. W.

    2012-02-01

    We present the analysis of 20 years of time-series BV photometry of the SB1 RS CVn binary HD 89546. The system's yearly mean V brightness, the B-V color index, the photometric period, and the light curve amplitude all show clear cyclic variability with an ≈9-year time scale. We also find some evidence for brightness variability on a time scale longer than the 20-year time span of our observations, perhaps indicating a longer cycle analogous to the solar Gleissberg cycle. We estimate the unspotted V magnitude of HD 89546 to be 7.154m, which is ≈0.2m brighter than the observed maximum brightness. Spot modelling of the system shows that spot temperature variations affect the observed B-V color as well as the V brightness. Two active longitudes are observed, centered around 180° and 360° longitude on the G9 III primary, each covering a longitude range of 120°. Furthermore, two inactive longitude zones are seen spanning only 60° between the two active longitudes. The longitudinal distribution of the spots exhibits no strong cyclic variability but does show rapid jumps of 120° that look like the flip-flop phenomenon. We estimate the differential rotation coefficient of the star as k=0.086 by considering the range of observed photometric period variations and assumed latitudinal spot variations over 45°. Based on data obtained with the Tennessee State University T3 0.4 m APT at Fairborn Observatory, operated by Tennessee State University, and T30 0.3 m telescope of the Ege University Observatory in Izmir.

  11. Quantification of rapid environmental redox processes with quick-scanning x-ray absorption spectroscopy (Q-XAS).

    PubMed

    Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Landrot, Gautier; Fischel, Jason S; Sparks, Donald L

    2009-09-22

    Quantification of the initial rates of environmental reactions at the mineral/water interface is a fundamental prerequisite to determining reaction mechanisms and contaminant transport modeling and predicting environmental risk. Until recently, experimental techniques with adequate time resolution and elemental sensitivity to measure initial rates of the wide variety of environmental reactions were quite limited. Techniques such as electron paramagnetic resonance and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies suffer from limited elemental specificity and poor sensitivity to inorganic elements, respectively. Ex situ analysis of batch and stirred-flow systems provides high elemental sensitivity; however, their time resolution is inadequate to characterize rapid environmental reactions. Here we apply quick-scanning x-ray absorption spectroscopy (Q-XAS), at sub-second time-scales, to measure the initial oxidation rate of As(III) to As(V) by hydrous manganese(IV) oxide. Using Q-XAS, As(III) and As(V) concentrations were determined every 0.98 s in batch reactions. The initial apparent As(III) depletion rate constants (t < 30 s) measured with Q-XAS are nearly twice as large as rate constants measured with traditional analytical techniques. Our results demonstrate the importance of developing analytical techniques capable of analyzing environmental reactions on the same time scale as they occur. Given the high sensitivity, elemental specificity, and time resolution of Q-XAS, it has many potential applications. They could include measuring not only redox reactions but also dissolution/precipitation reactions, such as the formation and/or reductive dissolution of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, solid-phase transformations (i.e., formation of layered-double hydroxide minerals), or almost any other reaction occurring in aqueous media that can be measured using x-ray absorption spectroscopy. PMID:19805269

  12. Physico-chemical and microbiological characteristics of water for fish production using small ponds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntengwe, Felix W.; Edema, Mojisola O.

    The physical-chemical and biological characteristics of water in fish ponds were investigated with a view to optimise the conditions for fish productivity using small ponds. Five fish ponds were used in the study. The water samples were collected in each pond at a depth of 10-15 cm from the surface over a period of six months and analysed for pH, temperature, DO, alkalinity. The fish activity and growth rates were also assessed. The results showed that the ponds were slightly acidic to neutral (pH 6.69-7.66). The mean lowest and highest values of DO were 9.05 and 9.93 mg/L while the values for alkalinity were 67.86 and 90.57 mg/L respectively. The bacterial counts were in the order of 10 6 and the populations comprised Pseudomonas, Enterobacter, Salmonella, Staphylococcus, Bacillus, Azotobacter, Arthrobacter species and Escherichia coli. It was also observed that the fish activity increased as the temperature of the water varied from April to September as given by the activity ranges of 55-95, 40-80, 55-80, 70-95 and 55-95/m 2 for ponds P1, P2, P3, P4 and P5, respectively. The lowest values were in the months of April, May and June and highest values were in the months of July, August and September. The optimum conditions for increased fish productivity were found to be the warm temperatures (20 < t < 30 °C), adequate DO level (>4 mg/L) and appropriate pH (6 < pH < 9) and alkalinity (Alk) (80 < Alk < 200 mg/L). The correlations between characteristics were significant at 0.01 and 0.05 levels (2 tailed). Therefore, the fish productivity can be enhanced if the conditions in the ponds were maintained at optimum levels.

  13. In vivo protection against soman toxicity by known inhibitors of acetylcholine synthesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sterling, G H; Doukas, P H; Sheldon, R J; O'Neill, J J

    1988-02-01

    Soman inhibits the enzyme acetylcholinesterase, essentially irreversibly, producing an accumulation of acetylcholine (ACh) which is responsible for many of its toxic effects. Current approaches to treatment include: (1) atropine, a muscarinic receptor blocker; (2) pyridine-2-aldoxime methylchloride (2-PAM), an enzyme reactivator; and (3) carbamate protection of the enzyme. However, no fully satisfactory regimen has been found, primarily because of the rapid aging process. In this study, compounds known to inhibit ACh synthesis in vitro were evaluated in combination with atropine and 2-PAM so as to assess their potential utility in protection against soman toxicity in rats. Acetylsecohemicholinium (100 micrograms/kg, i.c.v.t., 30 min prior to soman), an inhibitor of high affinity choline uptake (HAChU) and cholineacetyltransferase (ChAT) activity in vitro, enhanced the protective effects of atropine and 2-PAM, reducing the mortality within the first 2 hr following soman. N-Hydroxyethylnaphthylvinylpyridine (NHENVP), a quaternary ChAT inhibitor (1.7 mumol/kg, i.m.), significantly reduced the overall percent mortality due to soman from 80% to 20%. The compound was most effective when administered 2-3 min prior to soman and was effective only by the intramuscular route. N-Allyl-3-quinuclidinol, a potent HAChU inhibitor (1 mumol/kg, i.m.) was the most effective quinuclidine analog evaluated, also reducing the percent mortality for a 24-hr period. Unlike NHENVP, it was most effective when given 30-60 min prior to soman. It is suggested from the data that compounds that disrupt presynaptic ACh synthesis in vitro may prove effective in treating organophosphate poisoning. The results demonstrate interesting differences among the compounds studied and provide insight for the design of protectants against soman toxicity. These findings further underscore the need to examine the structure activity and pharmacokinetic properties of these compounds, i.e. comparison of routes of

  14. Host-seeking activity and avian host preferences of mosquitoes associated with West Nile virus transmission in the northeastern U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suom, Channsotha; Ginsberg, Howard S.; Bernick, Andrew; Klein, Coby; Buckley, P.A.; Salvatore, Christa; LeBrun, Roger A.

    2010-01-01

    Mosquito host-seeking activity was studied using a custom-designed trap to explore: (1) at which time interval of the night adult mosquito abatement would be most effective, and (2) if there exists an avian-specific host-seeking preference. Overnight trials using traps baited with dry ice showed that Aedes taeniorhynchus (Wiedemann) was most active at dusk and was then captured throughout the night. In contrast, Culex spp. (Cx. pipiens (Linnaeus) and Cx. restuans (Theobald) delayed most activity until about two h after dusk and were then captured through the night. This pattern suggests that management activities directed at adult Culex spp. would be most effective if initiated well after sunset. Mosquito capture rates in traps baited with birds in net bags were significantly greater than those with empty net bags, indicating that mosquitoes were attracted to the birds and not incidentally being sucked in by the custom trap's strong fan motor (Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test, n = 24, t = 30, p 2 = 0.21, p = 0.02). Trials with paired traps that contained different native bird species showed that Gray Catbirds, Dumatella carolinensis, attracted more mosquitoes than the heavier Northern Cardinals, Cardinalis cardinalis (paired samples t-test, t = 2.58, df = 7, p = 0.04). However, attractiveness did not differ substantially among bird species, and Gray Catbirds did not attract more mosquitoes than all other birds combined as a group. American Robins, Turdus migratorius (n = 4) were comparable in attractiveness to other bird species, but not enough American Robins were captured for a comprehensive study of mosquito avian preference.

  15. TERRESTRIAL PLANET FORMATION DURING THE MIGRATION AND RESONANCE CROSSINGS OF THE GIANT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Lykawka, Patryk Sofia; Ito, Takashi

    2013-08-10

    The newly formed giant planets may have migrated and crossed a number of mutual mean motion resonances (MMRs) when smaller objects (embryos) were accreting to form the terrestrial planets in the planetesimal disk. We investigated the effects of the planetesimal-driven migration of Jupiter and Saturn, and the influence of their mutual 1:2 MMR crossing on terrestrial planet formation for the first time, by performing N-body simulations. These simulations considered distinct timescales of MMR crossing and planet migration. In total, 68 high-resolution simulation runs using 2000 disk planetesimals were performed, which was a significant improvement on previously published results. Even when the effects of the 1:2 MMR crossing and planet migration were included in the system, Venus and Earth analogs (considering both orbits and masses) successfully formed in several runs. In addition, we found that the orbits of planetesimals beyond a {approx} 1.5-2 AU were dynamically depleted by the strengthened sweeping secular resonances associated with Jupiter's and Saturn's more eccentric orbits (relative to the present day) during planet migration. However, this depletion did not prevent the formation of massive Mars analogs (planets with more than 1.5 times Mars's mass). Although late MMR crossings (at t > 30 Myr) could remove such planets, Mars-like small mass planets survived on overly excited orbits (high e and/or i), or were completely lost in these systems. We conclude that the orbital migration and crossing of the mutual 1:2 MMR of Jupiter and Saturn are unlikely to provide suitable orbital conditions for the formation of solar system terrestrial planets. This suggests that to explain Mars's small mass and the absence of other planets between Mars and Jupiter, the outer asteroid belt must have suffered a severe depletion due to interactions with Jupiter/Saturn, or by an alternative mechanism (e.g., rogue super-Earths)

  16. IDENTIFICATION OF PHARMACEUTICAL EXCIPIENT BEHAVIOR OF CHICKPEA (CICER ARIETINUM) STARCH IN GLICLAZIDE IMMEDIATE RELEASE TABLETS.

    PubMed

    Meka, Venkata Srikanth; Yee, Phung; Sheshala, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    In the past few years, there are number of researchers carrying out their research on the excipients derived from polysaccharides and some of these researches show that natural excipients are comparable and can serve as an alternative to the synthetic excipients. Hence, the objectives of this research are to characterize the naturally sourced chickpea starch powder and to study the pharmaceutical excipient behavior of chickpea starch in gliclazide immediate release (IR) tablets. In this research, the binding properties of chickpea starch were compared to that of povidone, whereas the disintegrant properties of chickpea starch were compared to those of crospovidone, croscarmellose sodium and sodium starch glycolate. Flow property of chickpea starch was assessed with the measurement of bulk density, tapped density, compressibility index and angle of repose. Calibration curve for gliclazide in phosphate buffer pH 7.4 was developed. Gliclazide IR tablets were then produced with direct compression method. Physicochemical characteristics of the tablets, including thickness, tablet weight uniformity, hardness, disintegration time and friability were evaluated. Then, in vitro dissolution studies were performed by following United States Pharmacopeia (USP) dissolution method. The dissolution results were analyzed and compared with t30, t50, dissolution efficiency (DE). Lastly, drug-excipient compatibility studies, including Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic analysis and differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) analysis were carried out. Fair flow property was observed in the chickpea starch powder. Furthermore, the tablets produced passed all the tests in physicochemical characteristics evaluation except hardness and disintegration test. Additionally, in vitro dissolution studies show that chickpea starch acted as a disintegrant instead of a binder in gliclazide IR tablets and its disintegrant properties were comparable to those of crospovidone, croscarmellose

  17. Three-band Hubbard model: A Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dopf, G.; Muramatsu, A.; Hanke, W.

    1990-05-01

    We have studied a two-dimensional multiband Hubbard model describing CuO2 sheets in the high-Tc oxides. The simulations were performed for a grand-canonical ensemble on lattice sizes up to 16 unit cells of three atoms each and temperatures down to kBT~t/30, where t is the Cu-O hybridization. For generally accepted values of the Hubbard coupling on the Cu sites Ud>~6t, two different regimes can be distinguished in the magnetic properties of the model. In the half-filled band case we see for Δ>Ud/2 (Δ=ɛp-ɛd being the charge-transfer energy) the formation of a correlation gap, as expected for a charge-transfer insulator. For Δ~4/t, although no phase transition to a superconducting state could be seen.

  18. Can Aerosol Forcing Compensate the Greenhouse Gas Warming?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feichter, J.; Liepert, B.; Lohmann, U.; Roeckner, E.

    2002-12-01

    Fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning modify the chemical composition of the atmosphere by enhancing aerosol particles (AP) and greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations. These changes induce opposite effects on temperature, i.e. warming through increasing GHG levels and cooling through increasing AP concentrations. While increasing GHGs tend to enhance the hydrological cycle, the APs have the opposite effect: First, through climate cooling and, second, through a reduction in solar radiation absorbed at the Earth's surface. Moreover, in contrast to GHGs, there is a strong coupling between aerosols, clouds and precipitation formation such that AP induced changes in the hydrological cycle feed back on the aerosol distribution. We performed simulations with of a low-resolution version (T30 spectral truncation) of the atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM4 coupled to an ocean mixed layer model and a thermodynamic sea ice model. Furthermore, the atmospheric model solves prognostic equations for the mass mixing ratio of dimethyl sulfide, sulfur dioxide, sulfate aerosols, organic and black carbon aerosols, mineral dust, sea-salt, cloud liquid water, cloud ice and for the cloud droplet and ice crystal number concentration. It also includes a fully coupled aerosol-cloud microphysics module. We performed three pairs of climate equilibrium experiments. Each pair consists of two simulations: one represents pre-industrial (year 1870) (PI) and one present-day (early 1980's) conditions (PD). In the first pair we change the greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations and apply the model's operational aerosol climatology as PD conditions. In the second pair we calculate the aerosol interactively and we change the anthropogenic aerosol and aerosol precursor emissions and keep the GHG concentrations fixed to PD level. In the third pair we change both, GHG concentrations and aerosol emissions. The climate responses and the basic mechanisms will be discussed.

  19. Sustained AS160 and TBC1D1 phosphorylations in human skeletal muscle 30 min after a single bout of exercise

    PubMed Central

    Vendelbo, M. H.; Møller, A. B.; Treebak, J. T.; Gormsen, L. C.; Goodyear, L. J.; Wojtaszewski, J. F. P.; Jørgensen, J. O. L.; Møller, N.

    2014-01-01

    Background: phosphorylation of AS160 and TBC1D1 plays an important role for GLUT4 mobilization to the cell surface. The phosphorylation of AS160 and TBC1D1 in humans in response to acute exercise is not fully characterized. Objective: to study AS160 and TBC1D1 phosphorylation in human skeletal muscle after aerobic exercise followed by a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp. Design: eight healthy men were studied on two occasions: 1) in the resting state and 2) in the hours after a 1-h bout of ergometer cycling. A hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp was initiated 240 min after exercise and in a time-matched nonexercised control condition. We obtained muscle biopsies 30 min after exercise and in a time-matched nonexercised control condition (t = 30) and after 30 min of insulin stimulation (t = 270) and investigated site-specific phosphorylation of AS160 and TBC1D1. Results: phosphorylation on AS160 and TBC1D1 was increased 30 min after the exercise bout, whereas phosphorylation of the putative upstream kinases, Akt and AMPK, was unchanged compared with resting control condition. Exercise augmented insulin-stimulated phosphorylation on AS160 at Ser341 and Ser704 270 min after exercise. No additional exercise effects were observed on insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Thr642 and Ser588 on AS160 or Ser237 and Thr596 on TBC1D1. Conclusions: AS160 and TBC1D1 phosphorylations were evident 30 min after exercise without simultaneously increased Akt and AMPK phosphorylation. Unlike TBC1D1, insulin-stimulated site-specific AS160 phosphorylation is modified by prior exercise, but these sites do not include Thr642 and Ser588. Together, these data provide new insights into phosphorylation of key regulators of glucose transport in human skeletal muscle. PMID:24876356

  20. Two-stage electrochemical treatment of bio-digested distillery spent wash using stainless steel and aluminum electrodes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pinki; Joshi, Himanshu; Srivastava, Vimal C

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of two-stage electro-coagulation (EC) process using multi-parameter optimization for treating bio-digested distillery spent wash by stainless steel (SS) and aluminum (Al) electrodes. Operating parameters have been optimized and treatment efficiency of SS and Al electrodes have been compared by central composite design of response surface analysis in terms of COD, color and total organic carbon (TOC) removal. Individual and interactive effects of four independent parameters namely initial pH (pHo: 2-10 and 4-10 for SS and Al electrodes, respectively), current density (j: 30.86-154.32 A m(-2)), inter-electrode distance (g: 0.5-2.5 cm) and electrolysis time (t: 30-150 min) on the COD, color and TOC removal efficiency were evaluated for both the electrodes. SS electrode was found to be more effective for the removal of COD, color and TOC with removal efficiencies of 70%, 93% and 72%, respectively, as compared to Al electrode, which showed respective removal efficiencies of 59%, 80% and 55%. A two-stage EC process was also conducted to study the predominance of different types of electrodes, and to increase the efficiency of EC process. Results shows that SS followed by Al electrode (with total COD, color and TOC removal efficiency of 81%, 94% and 78%, respectively) was found to be more effective than Al followed by SS electrode combination (with total COD, color and TOC removal efficiency of 78%, 89% and 76%, respectively). Present study shows that EC process can be used as an additional step to bio-methanation process so as to meet effluent discharge standards in distilleries. PMID:25837564

  1. Calibration and use of the Chemcatcher passive sampler for monitoring organotin compounds in water.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Martínez, R; Palacios-Corvillo, M A; Greenwood, R; Mills, G A; Vrana, B; Gómez-Gómez, M M

    2008-06-23

    An integrative passive sampler (Chemcatcher) consisting of a 47 mm C18 Empore disk as the receiving phase overlaid with a thin cellulose acetate diffusion membrane was developed and calibrated for the measurement of time-weighted average water concentrations of organotin compounds [monobutyltin (MBT), dibutyltin (DBT), tributlytin (TBT) and triphenyltin (TPhT)] in water. The effect of water temperature and turbulence on the uptake rate of these analytes was evaluated in the laboratory using a flow-through tank. Uptake was linear over a 14-day period being in the range: MBT (3-23 mL day(-1)), DBT (40-200 mL day(-1)), TBT (30-200 mL day(-1)) and TPhT (30-190 mL day(-1)) for all the different conditions tested. These sampling rates were high enough to permit the use of the Chemcatcher to monitor levels of organotin compounds typically found in polluted aquatic environments. Using gas chromatography (GC) with either ICP-MS or flame photometric detection, limits of detection for the device (14-day deployment) for the different organotin compounds in water were in the range of 0.2-7.5 ng L(-1), and once accumulated in the receiving phase the compounds were stable over prolonged periods. Due to anisotropic exchange kinetics, performance reference compounds could not be used with this passive sampling system to compensate for changes in sampling rate due to variations in water temperature, turbulence and biofouling of the surface of the diffusion membrane during field deployments. The performance of the Chemcatcher was evaluated alongside spot water sampling in Alicante Habour, Spain which is known to contain elevated levels of organotin compounds. The samplers provided time-weighted average concentrations of the bioavailable fractions of the tin compounds where environmental concentrations fluctuated markedly in time. PMID:18513537

  2. Circulating concentrations of cardiac proteins indicate the severity of congestive heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Goto, T; Takase, H; Toriyama, T; Sugiura, T; Sato, K; Ueda, R; Dohi, Y

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that myocardium specific proteins may be useful markers for evaluating the severity of congestive heart failure. Methods: Serum concentrations of myosin light chain I (MLC-I), heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP), creatine kinase isoenzyme MB (CK-MB), and troponin T (TnT) and plasma concentrations of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) were determined in 48 patients with acute deterioration of congestive heart failure, both before and after effective treatment. Results: Before treatment, MLC-I (mean (SEM) 3.2 (2.2) μg/l), H-FABP (9.0 (3.5) μg/l), TnT (30 (21) ng/l), and BNP (761 (303) ng/l) were higher than the normal reference range, and concentrations of CK-MB (5.4 (2.9) μg/l) were near normal. Treatment of congestive heart failure with conventional medication significantly decreased the concentrations of MLC-I (1.2 (0.3) μg/l, p < 0.0001), H-FABP (6.0 (2.0) μg/l, p < 0.0001), CK-MB (2.9 (1.5) μg/l, p < 0.0001), TnT (9 (1) ng/l, p < 0.001), and BNP (156 (118) ng/l, p < 0.0001). The decreases in H-FABP and CK-MB concentrations after treatment correlated with the decrease in BNP concentrations (p < 0.05). The absolute concentrations of MLC-I, H-FABP, CK-MB, and TnT correlated positively with those of BNP (p < 0.01). Conclusions: These findings suggest that MLC-I, H-FABP, CK-MB, and TnT may be used as reliable markers for the evaluation of the severity of congestive heart failure. PMID:14594884

  3. Tear Oxygen Under Hydrogel and Silicone Hydrogel Contact Lenses in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Bonanno, Joseph A.; Clark, Christopher; Pruitt, John; Alvord, Larry

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine the tear oxygen tension under a variety of conventional and silicone hydrogel contact lenses in human subjects. Methods Three hydrogel and five silicone hydrogel lenses (Dk/t = 17 to 329) were coated on the back surface with an oxygen sensitive, bovine serum albumin-Pd meso-tetra (4-carboxyphenyl) porphine complex (BSA-porphine). Each lens type was placed on the right eye of 15 non-contact lens wearers to obtain a steady-state open eye tear oxygen tension using oxygen sensitive phosphorescence decay of BSA-porphine. A closed-eye oxygen tension estimate was obtained by measuring the change in tear oxygen tension after 5 min of eye closure. In separate experiments, a goggle was placed over the lens wearing eye and a gas mixture (PO2 = 51 torr) flowed over the lens to simulate anterior lens oxygen tension during eye closure. Results Mean open eye oxygen tension ranged from 58 to 133 torr. Closed eye estimates ranged from 11 to 42 torr. Oxygen tension under the goggle ranged from 8 to 48 torr and was higher than the closed eye estimate for six out of the eight lenses, suggesting that the average closed eye anterior lens surface oxygen tension is <51 torr. For Dk/t >30, the measured tear oxygen tension is significantly lower than that predicted from previous studies. Conclusions The phosphorescence decay methodology is capable of directly measuring the in vivo post lens PO2 of high Dk/t lenses without disturbing the contact lens or cornea. Our data indicate that increasing Dk/t up to and beyond 140 continues to yield increased flux into the central cornea. PMID:19609230

  4. Distribution and interplay of geologic processes on Titan from Cassini radar data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopes, R.M.C.; Stofan, E.R.; Peckyno, R.; Radebaugh, J.; Mitchell, K.L.; Mitri, G.; Wood, C.A.; Kirk, R.L.; Wall, S.D.; Lunine, J.I.; Hayes, A.; Lorenz, R.; Farr, Tom; Wye, L.; Craig, J.; Ollerenshaw, R.J.; Janssen, M.; LeGall, A.; Paganelli, F.; West, R.; Stiles, B.; Callahan, P.; Anderson, Y.; Valora, P.; Soderblom, L.

    2010-01-01

    The Cassini Titan Radar Mapper is providing an unprecedented view of Titan's surface geology. Here we use Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image swaths (Ta-T30) obtained from October 2004 to December 2007 to infer the geologic processes that have shaped Titan's surface. These SAR swaths cover about 20% of the surface, at a spatial resolution ranging from ???350 m to ???2 km. The SAR data are distributed over a wide latitudinal and longitudinal range, enabling some conclusions to be drawn about the global distribution of processes. They reveal a geologically complex surface that has been modified by all the major geologic processes seen on Earth - volcanism, tectonism, impact cratering, and erosion and deposition by fluvial and aeolian activity. In this paper, we map geomorphological units from SAR data and analyze their areal distribution and relative ages of modification in order to infer the geologic evolution of Titan's surface. We find that dunes and hummocky and mountainous terrains are more widespread than lakes, putative cryovolcanic features, mottled plains, and craters and crateriform structures that may be due to impact. Undifferentiated plains are the largest areal unit; their origin is uncertain. In terms of latitudinal distribution, dunes and hummocky and mountainous terrains are located mostly at low latitudes (less than 30??), with no dunes being present above 60??. Channels formed by fluvial activity are present at all latitudes, but lakes are at high latitudes only. Crateriform structures that may have been formed by impact appear to be uniformly distributed with latitude, but the well-preserved impact craters are all located at low latitudes, possibly indicating that more resurfacing has occurred at higher latitudes. Cryovolcanic features are not ubiquitous, and are mostly located between 30?? and 60?? north. We examine temporal relationships between units wherever possible, and conclude that aeolian and fluvial/pluvial/lacustrine processes are the

  5. Gastric emptying, postprandial blood pressure, glycaemia and splanchnic flow in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Trahair, Laurence G; Kimber, Thomas E; Flabouris, Katerina; Horowitz, Michael; Jones, Karen L

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine gastric emptying, blood pressure, mesenteric artery blood flow, and blood glucose responses to oral glucose in Parkinson’s disease. METHODS: Twenty-one subjects (13 M, 8 F; age 64.2 ± 1.6 years) with mild to moderate Parkinson’s disease (Hoehn and Yahr score 1.4 ± 0.1, duration of known disease 6.3 ± 0.9 years) consumed a 75 g glucose drink, labelled with 20 MBq 99mTc-calcium phytate. Gastric emptying was quantified with scintigraphy, blood pressure and heart rate with an automated device, superior mesenteric artery blood flow by Doppler ultrasonography and blood glucose by glucometer for 180 min. Autonomic nerve function was evaluated with cardiovascular reflex tests and upper gastrointestinal symptoms by questionnaire. RESULTS: The mean gastric half-emptying time was 106 ± 9.1 min, gastric emptying was abnormally delayed in 3 subjects (14%). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure fell (P < 0.001) and mesenteric blood flow and blood glucose (P < 0.001 for both) increased, following the drink. Three subjects (14%) had definite autonomic neuropathy and 8 (38%) had postprandial hypotension. There were no significant relationships between changes in blood pressure, heart rate or mesenteric artery blood flow with gastric emptying. Gastric emptying was related to the score for autonomic nerve function (R = 0.55, P < 0.01). There was an inverse relationship between the blood glucose at t = 30 min (R = -0.52, P < 0.05), while the blood glucose at t = 180 min was related directly (R = 0.49, P < 0.05), with gastric emptying. CONCLUSION: In mild to moderate Parkinson’s disease, gastric emptying is related to autonomic dysfunction and a determinant of the glycaemic response to oral glucose. PMID:27239112

  6. Macromolecular Design via an Organocatalytic, Monomer-Specific and Temperature-Dependent “On/Off Switch”. High Precision Synthesis of Polyester/Polycarbonate Multiblock Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The employment of a monomer-specific “on/off switch” was used to synthesize a nine-block copolymer with a predetermined molecular weight and narrow distribution (Đ = 1.26) in only 2.5 h. The monomers consisted of a six-membered cyclic carbonate (i.e., 2-allyloxymethyl-2-ethyl-trimethylene carbonate (AOMEC)) and ε-caprolactone (εCL), which were catalyzed by 1,5,7-triazabicyclo[4.4.0]-dec-5-ene (TBD). The dependence of polymerization rate with temperature was different for the two monomers. Under similar reaction conditions, the ratio of the apparent rate constant of AOMEC and εCL [kpapp(AOMEC)/kpapp(εCL)] changes from 400 at T = −40 °C to 50 at T = 30 °C and 10 at T = 100 °C. Therefore, by decreasing the copolymerization temperature from 30 °C to −40 °C, the conversion of εCL can be switched “off”, and by increasing the temperature to 30 °C, the conversion of εCL can be switched “on” again. The addition of AOMEC at T = −40 °C results in the formation of a pure carbonate block. The cyclic addition of AOMEC to a solution of εCL along with a simultaneous temperature change leads to the formation of multiblock copolymers. This result provides a new straightforward synthetic route to degradable multiblock copolymers, yielding new interesting materials with endless structural possibilities. PMID:26294800

  7. Performance evaluation of different solar advanced oxidation processes applied to the treatment of a real textile dyeing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Manenti, Diego R; Soares, Petrick A; Silva, Tânia F C V; Módenes, Aparecido N; Espinoza-Quiñones, Fernando R; Bergamasco, Rosângela; Boaventura, Rui A R; Vilar, Vítor J P

    2015-01-01

    The performance of different solar-driven advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), such as TiO2/UV, TiO2/H2O2/UV, and Fe(2+)/H2O2/UV-visible in the treatment of a real textile effluent using a pilot plant with compound parabolic collectors (CPCs), was investigated. The influence of the main photo-Fenton reaction variables such as iron concentration (20-100 mg Fe(2+) L(-1)), pH (2.4-4.5), temperature (10-50 °C), and irradiance (22-68 WUV m(-2)) was evaluated in a lab-scale prototype using artificial solar radiation. The real textile wastewater presented a beige color, with a maximum absorbance peak at 641 nm, alkaline pH (8.1), moderate organic content (dissolved organic carbon (DOC) = 129 mg C L(-1) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) = 496 mg O2 L(-1)), and high conductivity mainly associated to the high concentration of chloride (1.1 g Cl(-) L(-1)), sulfate (0.4 g SO 4 (2 -) L(- 1)), and sodium (1.2 g Na(+) L(-1)) ions. Although all the processes tested contributed to complete decolorization and effective mineralization, the most efficient process was the solar photo-Fenton with an optimum catalyst concentration of 60 mg Fe(2+) L(-1), leading to 70 % mineralization (DOCfinal = 41 mg C L(-1); CODfinal < 150 mg O2 L(-1)) at pH 3.6, requiring a UV energy dose of 3.5 kJUV L(-1) (t 30 W = 22.4 min; [Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]) and consuming 18.5 mM of H2O2. PMID:24737016

  8. Selective CGRP and adrenomedullin peptide binding by tethered RAMP-calcitonin receptor-like receptor extracellular domain fusion proteins

    PubMed Central

    Moad, Heather E; Pioszak, Augen A

    2013-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and adrenomedullin (AM) are related peptides that are potent vasodilators. The CGRP and AM receptors are heteromeric protein complexes comprised of a shared calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) subunit and a variable receptor activity modifying protein (RAMP) subunit. RAMP1 enables CGRP binding whereas RAMP2 confers AM specificity. How RAMPs determine peptide selectivity is unclear and the receptor stoichiometries are a topic of debate with evidence for 1:1, 2:2, and 2:1 CLR:RAMP stoichiometries. Here, we describe bacterial production of recombinant tethered RAMP-CLR extracellular domain (ECD) fusion proteins and biochemical characterization of their peptide binding properties. Tethering the two ECDs ensures complex stability and enforces defined stoichiometry. The RAMP1-CLR ECD fusion purified as a monomer, whereas the RAMP2-CLR ECD fusion purified as a dimer. Both proteins selectively bound their respective peptides with affinities in the low micromolar range. Truncated CGRP(27-37) and AM(37-52) fragments were identified as the minimal ECD complex binding regions. The CGRP C-terminal amide group contributed to, but was not required for, ECD binding, whereas the AM C-terminal amide group was essential for ECD binding. Alanine-scan experiments identified CGRP residues T30, V32, and F37 and AM residues P43, K46, I47, and Y52 as critical for ECD binding. Our results identify CGRP and AM determinants for receptor ECD complex binding and suggest that the CGRP receptor functions as a 1:1 heterodimer. In contrast, the AM receptor may function as a 2:2 dimer of heterodimers, although our results cannot rule out 2:1 or 1:1 stoichiometries. PMID:24115156

  9. Two-dimensional Tomographic Inversion Model of Ross Island, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maraj, S.; Aster, R. C.; Knox, H. A.; Zandomeneghi, D.; Snelson, C. M.; Kyle, P. R.

    2010-12-01

    A controlled-source seismic refraction experiment (Tomo-Erebus; TE) was undertaken during the 2008-09 Austral summer field season to examine the magmatic system beneath the active Erebus volcano (TE-3D) and the crustal structure beneath Ross Island, including details of the Terror Rift (TE-2D). Previous geophysical studies north of Ross Island have determined the north-south trending Terror Rift within the broader Victoria Land Basin, which are part of the intraplate West Antarctic Rift System. For TE-2D, 21 seismic recorders (Ref Tek 130) with three-component 4.5 Hz geophones (Sercel L-28-3D) were deployed along a 77-km east-west line between Capes Royds and Crozier. For TE-3D, 79 similar instruments were deployed in a 3 x 3 km grid around the crater of Erebus, an array of 8 permanent short period and broadband sensors and 23 three-component sensors (Guralp CMG-40T, 30s-100 Hz) were positioned around the flanks and summit of Erebus. Fifteen chemical sources ranging from 75 to 600 kg of ANFO were used. An additional shot was detonated in the sea (McMurdo Sound) using 200 kg of dynamite. Although the station spacing is ~5 km, the data have a high signal to noise ratio with clear first arrivals and wide-angle reflections across the array. Forward modelling ray tracing was used to develop 1-D P-wave velocity models by matching layers of known velocities with the P-wave first arrival times. 1-D velocity models developed for 3 sources and show ~3 layers with a velocity of ~7 km/s below 6-8 km depth. The 1-D models were used as the starting model for a the P-wave tomographic velocity model.

  10. Molecular Investigation of Distal Renal Tubular Acidosis in Tunisia, Evidence for Founder Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Voskarides, Konstantinos; Nouira, Sonia; Ben Halim, Nizar; Kefi, Rym; Aloulou, Hajer; Romdhane, Lilia; Ben Abdallah, Rim; Ben Rhouma, Faten; Aissa, Khaoula; Boughamoura, Lamia; Kammoun, Thouraya; Azzouz, Hatem; Abroug, Saoussen; Ben Turkia, Hathemi; Ayadi, Abdelkarim; Mrad, Ridha; Chabchoub, Imen; Hachicha, Mongia; Chemli, Jalel; Deltas, Constantinos; Abdelhak, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) is a rare genetic disease caused by mutations in different genes involved in the secretion of H+ ions in the intercalated cells of the collecting duct. Both autosomal dominant and recessive forms have been described; the latter is also associated with sensorineural hearing loss. Methods: Twenty-two Tunisian families were analyzed for mutations in the ATP6V1B1 and ATP6V0A4 genes by direct sequencing. Dating of the founder mutations was performed. Results: Two founder mutations in the ATP6V1B1 gene were found in 16/27 dRTA cases. The p.Ile386Hisfs*56 founder mutation was estimated to be older than 2400 years and no correlations were found with deafness. For the remaining patients, two mutations in the ATP6V0A4 gene, one of them being novel, were found in three Tunisian cases. The presence of a heterozygous missense mutation p.T30I, of the ATP6V1B1 gene, was identified in six patients, while no mutations of the second gene were detected. No deleterious mutations of either ATP6V1B1 or ATP6V0A were found for the two probands. Conclusion: Our study gives evidence of phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity of dRTA in the Tunisian population. Five different mutations were found, two of them were due to a founder effect, and screening of these mutations could provide a rapid and valuable tool for diagnosis of dRTA. PMID:25285676

  11. Environmental occurrence, origin, physical and geochemical properties, and carcinogenic potential of erionite near San Miguel de Allende, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Guerrero, M Adrián; Carrasco-Núñez, Gerardo

    2014-06-01

    Detailed geologic surveys and different microscopic and analytical techniques were conducted near Tierra Blanca de Abajo where lung cancer and malignant mesothelioma (MM) are the primary causes of death. Results show that erionite-K occurs as a diagenetic product in altered Oligocene-Miocene rhyolitic tuffs. The microscopic structure of erionite minerals shows concentrations of individual fibers in the range of 0.14-0.547 μm in diameter and 2.81-50 μm in length, with a few "bundles" about 0.2-2.5 μm wide by 10-50 μm long. Chemical properties of erionite show Si/Al in the range of 3.23-3.58 (at.%) and T Si in the range of 0.76-0.78 (at.%). Potassium is the dominant cation (K > Ca > Mg > Fe). Associated minerals are heulandite, clinoptilolite, quartz, sanidine, anorthite, smectite and opal. This mineral assemblage formed in the lower part of an open catchment, where bicarbonate-rich (T > 30 °C, pH > 8) groundwater discharge conditions prevailed in the past. The physical and chemical characteristics of erionite near San Miguel de Allende are similar to those of erionite from the Cappadocian region of Turkey where erionite is associated with MM. The presence of erionite and the type of respiratory diseases that occur in the village strongly suggest the need for detailed health-based studies in the region. Pliocene-Holocene fine-grain deposits, used in the past for the construction of adobe-houses and exposed in recreational areas, also contain erionite associated with erosion and alluvial transport from the rhyolitic tuffs, potentially affecting more than 13 villages located downstream toward the Allende Dam. PMID:24271499

  12. Synthesis, structure and magnetic ordering of the mullite-type Bi2Fe(4-x)CrxO9 solid solutions with a frustrated pentagonal Cairo lattice.

    PubMed

    Rozova, M G; Grigoriev, V V; Bobrikov, I A; Filimonov, D S; Zakharov, K V; Volkova, O S; Vasiliev, A N; Antipov, E V; Tsirlin, A A; Abakumov, A M

    2016-01-21

    Highly homogeneous mullite-type solid solutions Bi2Fe(4-x)CrxO9 (x = 0.5, 1, 1.2) were synthesized using a soft chemistry technique followed by a solid-state reaction in Ar. The crystal structure of Bi2Fe3CrO9 was investigated using X-ray and neutron powder diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy (S.G. Pbam, a = 7.95579(9) Å, b = 8.39145(9) Å, c = 5.98242(7) Å, RF(X-ray) = 0.022, RF(neutron) = 0.057). The ab planes in the structure are tessellated with distorted pentagonal loops built up by three tetrahedrally coordinated Fe sites and two octahedrally coordinated Fe/Cr sites, linked together in the ab plane by corner-sharing forming a pentagonal Cairo lattice. Magnetic susceptibility measurements and powder neutron diffraction show that the compounds order antiferromagnetically (AFM) with the Néel temperatures decreasing upon increasing the Cr content from TN ∼ 250 K for x = 0 to TN ∼ 155 K for x = 1.2. The magnetic structure of Bi2Fe3CrO9 at T = 30 K is characterized by a propagation vector k = (1/2,1/2,1/2). The tetrahedrally coordinated Fe cations form singlet pairs within dimers of corner-sharing tetrahedra, but spins on the neighboring dimers are nearly orthogonal. The octahedrally coordinated (Fe,Cr) cations form antiferromagnetic up-up-down-down chains along c, while the spin arrangement in the ab plane is nearly orthogonal between nearest neighbors and collinear between second neighbors. The resulting magnetic structure is remarkably different from the one in pure Bi2Fe4O9 and features several types of spin correlations even on crystallographically equivalent exchange that may be caused by the simultaneous presence of Fe and Cr on the octahedral site. PMID:26661379

  13. New observations of flux ropes in the magnetotail reconnection region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shiyong; Retino, Alessandro; Phan, Tai; Daughton, W. Bill; Vaivads, Andris; Karimabadi, Homa; Pang, Ye; Zhou, Meng; Sahraoui, Fouad; Li, Guanlai; Yuan, Zhigang; Deng, Xiaohua; Fu, Huishan; Fu, Song; Wang, Dedong

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental physical process that enables the rapid transfer of magnetic energy into plasma kinetic and thermal energy in the laboratory, astrophysical and space plasma. Flux ropes have been suggested to play important role in controlling the micro-scale physics of magnetic reconnection and electron acceleration. In this presentation, we report new observations of flux ropes in the magnetotail reconnection region based on the Cluster multi-spacecraft data. Firstly, two consecutive magnetic flux ropes, separated by less than 30 s (Δt < 30 s), are observed within one magnetic reconnection diffusion region without strong guide field. In spite of the small but non-trivial global scale negative guide field (-By), there exists a directional change of the core fields of two flux ropes, i.e. -By for the first one, and +By for the second one. This is inconsistent with any theory and simulations. Therefore, we suggest that the core field of flux ropes is formed by compression of the local preexisting By, and that the directional change of core field is due to the change of local preexisting By. Such a change in ambientBy might be caused by some microscale physics. Secondary, we will present in-situ observations of a small scale flux rope locally formed at the separatrix region of magnetic reconnection without large guide field. Bidirectional electron beams (cold and hot beams) and density cavity accompanied by intense wave activities substantiate the crossing of the separatrix region. Density compression and one parallel electron beam are detected inside the flux rope. We suggest that this flux rope is locally generated at the separatrix region due to the tearing instability within the separatrix current layer. This observation sheds new light on the 3D picture of magnetic reconnection in space plasma.

  14. ARAC dispersion modeling support for January-March 1995 Vandenberg AFB launches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskett, R. L.; Pace, J. C.

    1995-05-01

    The Glory Trip (GT) 17-PA Peacekeeper launch originally scheduled at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) between 15 and 20 November 1994 was cancelled based on modeled toxic exhaust cloud calculations. The Missile Flight Control Branch, 30th Space Wing Safety Office (30 SW/SEY), made several successive 'No Go' decisions using Version 7.05 Rocket Exhaust Effluent Dispersion Model (REEDM) with forecasted meteorological conditions. REEDM runs made from T-14 hours to T-30 minutes predicted that ground-level concentrations of hydrogen chloride (HCl) gas from the catastrophic abort case would exceed 5 ppM, the 'instantaneous' ambient air concentration 'Tier 2' limit at that time, modeled as a peak 1-minute cloud centerline concentration. Depending on the forecasted wind direction and speed at launch time, this limit was predicted to be exceeded sometimes at Base Housing, approximately 10 km southeast of the launch, and during other launch windows at the town of Casmalia, about 5 km east- southeast. In late December 1994, the LLNL Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) program modeled the aborted November 1994 Peacekeeper launch and compared its results with REEDM. This initial comparison showed that the ARAC model predicted values about 1/3 as large as REEDM for the limiting case at Base Housing. Subsequently ARAC was asked to provide real-time modeling support to 30 SW/SEY during the rescheduled Peacekeeper GT 17-PA launch in January 1995 and two Minuteman launches in February and March. This report first briefly discusses the model differences and then summarizes the results of the three supported launches.

  15. Efficient selection of biomineralizing DNA aptamers using deep sequencing and population clustering.

    PubMed

    Bawazer, Lukmaan A; Newman, Aaron M; Gu, Qian; Ibish, Abdullah; Arcila, Mary; Cooper, James B; Meldrum, Fiona C; Morse, Daniel E

    2014-01-28

    DNA-based information systems drive the combinatorial optimization processes of natural evolution, including the evolution of biominerals. Advances in high-throughput DNA sequencing expand the power of DNA as a potential information platform for combinatorial engineering, but many applications remain to be developed due in part to the challenge of handling large amounts of sequence data. Here we employ high-throughput sequencing and a recently developed clustering method (AutoSOME) to identify single-stranded DNA sequence families that bind specifically to ZnO semiconductor mineral surfaces. These sequences were enriched from a diverse DNA library after a single round of screening, whereas previous screening approaches typically require 5-15 rounds of enrichment for effective sequence identification. The consensus sequence of the largest cluster was poly d(T)30. This consensus sequence exhibited clear aptamer behavior and was shown to promote the synthesis of crystalline ZnO from aqueous solution at near-neutral pH. This activity is significant, as the crystalline form of this wide-bandgap semiconductor is not typically amenable to solution synthesis in this pH range. High-resolution TEM revealed that this DNA synthesis route yields ZnO nanoparticles with an amorphous-crystalline core-shell structure, suggesting that the mechanism of mineralization involves nanoscale coacervation around the DNA template. We thus demonstrate that our new method, termed Single round Enrichment of Ligands by deep Sequencing (SEL-Seq), can facilitate biomimetic synthesis of technological nanomaterials by accelerating combinatorial selection of biomolecular-mineral interactions. Moreover, by enabling direct characterization of sequence family demographics, we anticipate that SEL-Seq will enhance aptamer discovery in applications employing additional rounds of screening. PMID:24341560

  16. Effects of Five-Week Resistance Training in Hypoxia on Hormones and Muscle Strength.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bing; Lai, Xiangxun; Yi, Longyan; Wang, Yang; Hu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The effects of different levels of systemic hypoxia on hormonal responses, strength, and body composition to 5-week resistance training were investigated. Twenty-five male subjects were randomly assigned into 3 experimental groups that performed 10 sessions (2 sessions per week) of barbell back squat (10 repetitions, 5 sets, 70% 1 repetition maximum [RM]) under normoxia (NR, FiO2 = 21%) and hypoxia (HL, FiO2 = 16%; HH, FiO2 = 12.6%). Serum growth hormone (GH), testosterone (T), and cortisol (C) concentrations were measured before (Pre) and at 0 (T-0), 15 (T-15), 30 (T-30) minutes after exercise in the first and last training sessions. One repetition maximum, isometric knee extension, isometric leg press (LP), and body composition were evaluated before and after the protocol. In the first session, GH of HH (p < 0.01) and HL (p < 0.01) was higher than NR at T-0. In the last session, only GH of HH was higher than NR at T-0 (p ≤ 0.05); meanwhile, T/C ratio of HH was higher than NR at Pre (p < 0.01), T-0 (p < 0.01), and T-15 (p ≤ 0.05). Following the training protocol, HH showed greater (p ≤ 0.05) improvement of isometric LP strength compared with NR; lean body mass was increased in the hypoxia groups only. Moderate-intensity resistance training performed in severe hypoxia (FiO2 = 12.6%) induced greater GH responses and isometric strength gains in LP than that in NR. FiO2 of 12.6% was recommended when performing the moderate-intensity resistance training under systemic hypoxia. PMID:26691409

  17. OEM-TACE: a new therapeutic approach in unresectable intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Poggi, Guido; Amatu, A; Montagna, B; Quaretti, P; Minoia, C; Sottani, C; Villani, L; Tagliaferri, B; Sottotetti, F; Rossi, O; Pozzi, E; Zappoli, F; Riccardi, A; Bernardo, G

    2009-11-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is a rare life-threatening disease, whose only treatment with potential for cure is surgical resection. However, only 27% of patients at most are suitable for surgery when first diagnosed. For patients with unresectable disease, therapeutic options are chemotherapy or chemoradiation. We evaluated the feasibility and safety of oxaliplatin-eluting microspheres transarterial chemoembolization (OEM-TACE) associated with chemotherapy (ChT) in patients affected by unresectable ICC. Between December 2005 and May 2008 we treated nine patients (six female and three male) with unresectable ICC. All patients had undergone OEM-TACE associated with chemotherapy with oxaliplatin and gemcitabine. A retrospective comparison was carried out with a historical group of 11 patients treated with ChT only, estimating the prevalence of adverse effects and the median survival of the two groups. A total of 30 TACEs were performed during the observational time (ranging from one to seven procedures per patient). OEM-TACEs were followed by few adverse effects (AEs), without G4 AEs, according to CTACAE 3.0. According to RECIST criteria, 44% (4/9) of patients achieved partial responses and 56% (5/9) stabilization of disease. Overall survival analysis in the two groups showed a significantly increased survival in patients treated with ChT and OEM-TACE, with respect to those treated with ChT (30 vs. 12.7 months; p=0.004). In conclusion, in our experience OEM-TACE associated with ChT in the treatment of advanced unresectable ICC is a safe and feasible treatment causing no major adverse events. Although RECIST criteria can underestimate the rate of responses in patients treated with locoregional therapies, we achieved very encouraging results. A randomized multicentric trial is warranted to assess the actual superiority of OEM-TACE associated with ChT compared to conventional chemotherapy. PMID:19727937

  18. Postprandial hyperglycemia was ameliorated by taking metformin 30 min before a meal than taking metformin with a meal; a randomized, open-label, crossover pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Muhei; Okada, Hiroshi; Mistuhashi, Kazuteru; Kimura, Toshihiro; Kitagawa, Noriyuki; Fukuda, Takuya; Majima, Saori; Fukuda, Yukiko; Tanaka, Yoshimitsu; Yamada, Shunji; Senmaru, Takafumi; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Asano, Mai; Yamazaki, Masahiro; Oda, Yohei; Hasegawa, Goji; Nakamura, Naoto; Fukui, Michiaki

    2016-05-01

    Taking metformin with a meal has been shown to decrease bioavailability of metformin. We hypothesized that taking metformin 30 min before a meal improves glucose metabolism. As an animal model, 18 Zucker-rats were divided into three groups as follows: no medication (Control), metformin (600 mg/kg) with meal (Met), and metformin 10 min before meal (pre-Met). In addition, five diabetic patients were recruited and randomized to take metformin (1000 mg) either 30 min before a meal (pre-Met protocol) or with a meal (Met protocol). In the animal model, the peak glucose level of pre-Met (7.8 ± 1.5 mmol/L) was lower than that of Control (12.6 ± 2.5 mmol/L, P = 0.010) or Met (14.1 ± 2.9 mmol/L, P = 0.020). Although there was no statistical difference among the three groups, total GLP-1 level at t = 0 min of pre-Met (7.4 ± 2.7 pmol/L) tended to be higher than that of Control (3.7 ± 2.0 pmol/L, P = 0.030) or Met (3.9 ± 1.2 pmol/L, P = 0.020). In diabetic patients, the peak glucose level of pre-Met protocol (7.0 ± 0.4 mmol/L) was lower than that of Met protocol (8.5 ± 0.9 mmol/L, P = 0.021). Total GLP-1 level at t = 30 min of pre-Met protocol (11.0 ± 6.1 pmol/L) was higher than that of Met protocol (6.7 ± 3.9 pmol/L, P = 0.033). Taking metformin 30 min before a meal ameliorated postprandial hyperglycemia. This promises to be a novel approach for postprandial hyperglycemia. PMID:26518190

  19. Plastic responses of Abies pinsapo xylogenesis to drought and competition.

    PubMed

    Linares, Juan Carlos; Camarero, J Julio; Carreira, José Antonio

    2009-12-01

    Radial growth and xylogenesis were studied to investigate the influence of climate variability and intraspecific competition on secondary growth in Abies pinsapo Boiss., a relic Mediterranean fir. We monitored the responses to three thinning treatments (unthinned control -C-, 30% -T30- and 60% -T60- of basal area removed) to test the hypothesis that they may improve the adaptation capacity of tree growth to climatic stress. We also assessed whether xylogenesis was differentially affected by tree-to-tree competition. Secondary growth was assessed using manual band dendrometers from 2005 to 2007. In 2006, xylogenesis (phases of tracheid formation) was also investigated by taking microcores and performing histological analyses. Seasonal dynamics of radial increment were modeled using Gompertz functions and correlations with microclimate and radiation were performed. Histological analyses revealed it as fundamental to calibrate the dendrometer estimates of radial increment and to establish the actual onset and end dates of tracheid production. The lower radial-increment rates and number of produced tracheids were observed in the trees subjected to high competition in the unthinned plots. The growing season differed among the plots, and its duration ranged from an average of 78 days in unthinned plots to 115 days in thinned ones (T60). Variations in the beginning of the growing season (13 April to 22 May) and earlywood-latewood transition (early August) were mainly determined by the temperature pattern, while the onset and the end of the growing season were related to both annual precipitation and tree-to-tree competition. The tracheid-formation phases of radial enlargement and cell-wall thickening showed similar patterns in the trees from thinned and unthinned plots subjected to low and high competition, respectively, but the mean number of tracheids in each phase was always higher in the trees from the thinned plots. The reduction of competition through thinning

  20. Hybrid control and acquisition system for distributed sensors for environmental monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garufi, Fabio; Acernese, Fausto; Boiano, Alfonso; De Rosa, Rosario; Romano, Rocco; Barone, Fabrizio

    2007-04-01

    In this paper we describe the architecture and the performances of a hybrid modular acquisition and control system prototype we developed in Napoli for the implementation of geographycally distributed monitoring and control systems. The system, an improvement of a VME-UDP/IP based system developed by our group for interferometric detectors of gravitational waves, is based on a dual-channel 18-bit low noise ADC and 16-bit DAC module at 1 MHz, managed by an ALTERA FPGA, that can be used standalone or mounted as mezzanine (also in parallel with other modules) on a motherboard. Both the modules and the motherboard can send/receive the configuration and the acquired/correction data for control through a standard EPP parallel port to an external PC, where the real-time computation is performed. Experimental tests have demonstrated that this architeture allows the implementation of distributed control systems, using a standard laptop PC for the realtime computation, with delay time Δt < 30 μs on a single channel, that is a sustained sampling frequency f c > 30kHz. Each module is also equipped with a 20-bit slower ADC necessary for the acquisition of an external calibration signal. The system is now under extensive test in two different experiments, i.e. the control of a Michelson Interferometer to be used as Velocimeter for Seismic Waves in Geophysics and the control of the end mirrors a suspended Michelson Interferometer through electrostatic actuators, a prototype for mirror control for Interferometric Detectors of Gravitational Waves.

  1. High-Resolution Submillimeter and Near-Infrared Studies of the Transition Disk around Sz 91

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsukagoshi, Takashi; Momose, Munetake; Hashimoto, Jun; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Andrews, Sean; Saito, Masao; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Wilner, David; Kawabe, Ryohei; Abe, Lyu; Akiyama, Eiji; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Carson, Joseph; Currie, Thayne; Enger, Sebastian E.; Goto, Miwa; Grady, Carol A.; Guyon, Olivier; Hayano, Yutaka; Hayashi, Masahiko; Henning, Thomas; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Ishii, Miki; Iye, Masanori; Janson, Markus; Kandori, Ryo; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Kwon, Jungmi; McElwain, Michael W.; Matsuo, Taro; Mayama, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    To reveal the structures of a transition disk around a young stellar object in Lupus, Sz 91, we have performed aperture synthesis 345 GHz continuum and CO(32) observations with the Submillimeter Array ( 13 resolution), and high-resolution imaging of polarized intensity at the Ks-band by using the Hi-CIAO instrument on the Subaru Telescope (0.25 resolution). Our observations successfully resolved the inner and outer radii of the dust disk to be 65 and 170AU, respectively, which indicates that Sz 91 is a transition disk source with one of the largest known inner holes. The model fitting analysis of the spectral energy distribution reveals an H2 mass of 2.4 103 M in the cold (T 30 K) outer part at 65 r 170 AU by assuming a canonical gas-to-dust mass ratio of 100, although a small amount ( 3109 M) of hot (T 180 K) dust possibly remains inside the inner hole of the disk. The structure of the hot component could be interpreted as either an unresolved self-luminous companion body (not directly detected in our observations) or a narrow ring inside the inner hole. Significant CO(32) emission with a velocity gradient along the major axis of the dust disk is concentrated on the Sz 91 position, suggesting a rotating gas disk with a radius of 420 AU. The Sz 91 disk is possibly a rare disk in an evolutionary stage immediately after the formation of protoplanets because of the large inner hole and the lower disk mass than other transition disks studied thus far.

  2. The Stellar Population of the M31 Spiral Arm around OB Association A24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodaira, Keiichi; Vansevičius, Vladas; Tamura, Motohide; Miyazaki, Satoshi

    1999-07-01

    A study of the stellar population of the M31 spiral arm around OB association A24 was carried out based on the photometric data obtained from deep V and JHK imaging. The luminosity function was obtained for -7<~Mbol<~-3.5 by applying the extinction correction corresponding to AV=1 and the bolometric correction BCK as an empirical function of (J-K)0. In comparing the observed color-luminosity diagrams with semitheoretical isochrones modified for the dust-shell effects, we found the young population of t<~30 Myr with supergiants of Mbol<~-5, the bulk of the intermediate-age population of t~0.2-2.5 Gyr with bright asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars of -5<~Mbol<~-4, and old populations of t>~3 Gyr with AGB and red giant branch (RGB) stars of Mbol>~-4. The average star formation rate was estimated to be ~1.8×104 msolar Myr-1 and ~0.7×104 msolar Myr-1 per deprojected disk area of 1 kpc2 from the number density of B0 V stars around MV=-4.0 (age ~10 Myr) and the number density of bright AGB stars around Mbol=-4.3 (age ~1 Gyr), respectively. A study of the local variation in the V and the J and H luminosity functions revealed a kind of anticorrelation between the population of the young component and that of the intermediate-age component when subdomains of ~100 pc scales were concerned. This finding suggests that the disk domain around the A24 area experienced a series of star formation episodes alternatively among different subdomains with a timescale of several spiral passage periods. Brief discussions are given about the interstellar extinction and about the lifetimes of bright AGB stars and the highly red objects in the same area.

  3. Interfacing Detectors to Triggers And DAQ Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Crosetto, Dario B.

    1999-05-03

    The complete design of the front-end electronics interfacing LHCb detectors, Level-0 trigger and higher levels of trigger with flexible configuration parameters has been made for (a) ASIC implementation, and (b) FPGA implementation. The importance of approaching designs in technology-independent form becomes essential with the actual rapid electronics evolution. Being able to constrain the entire design to a few types of replicated components: (a) the fully programmable 3D-Flow system, and (b) the configurable front-end circuit described in this article, provides even further advantages because only one or two types of components will need to migrate to the newer technologies. To base on today's technology the design of a system such as the LHCb project that is to begin working in 2006 is not cost-effective. The effort required to migrate to a higher-performance will, in that case, be almost equivalent to completely redesigning the architecture from scratch. The proposed technology independent design with the current configurable front-end module described in this article and the scalable 3D-Flow fully programmable system described elsewhere, based on the study of the evolution of electronics during the past few years and the forecasted advances in the years to come, aims to provide a technology-independent design which lends itself to any technology at any time. In this case, technology independence is based mainly on generic-HDL reusable code which allows a very rapid realization of the state-of-the-art circuits in terms of gate density, power dissipation, and clock frequency. The design of four trigger towers presently fits into an OR3T30 FPGA. Preliminary test results (provided in this paper) meet the functional requirements of LHCb and provide sufficient flexibility to introduce future changes. The complete system design is also provided along with the integration of the front-end design in the entire system and the cost and dimension of the electronics.

  4. Observational capabilities of solar satellite "Coronas-Photon"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, Yu.

    Coronas-Photon mission is the third satellite of the Russian Coronas program on solar activity observation The main goal of the Coronas-Photon is the study of solar hard electromagnetic radiation in the wide energy range from UV up to high energy gamma-radiation sim 2000MeV Scientific payload for solar radiation observation consists of three type of instruments 1 monitors Natalya-2M Konus-RF RT-2 Penguin-M BRM Phoka Sphin-X Sokol for spectral and timing measurements of full solar disk radiation with timing in flare burst mode up to one msec Instruments Natalya-2M Konus-RF RT-2 will cover the wide energy range of hard X-rays and soft Gamma rays 15keV to 2000MeV and will together constitute the largest area detectors ever used for solar observations Detectors of gamma-ray monitors are based on structured inorganic scintillators with energy resolution sim 5 for nuclear gamma-line band to 35 for GeV-band PSD analysis is used for gamma neutron separation for solar neutron registration T 30MeV Penguin-M has capability to measure linear polarization of hard X-rays using azimuth are measured by Compton scattering asymmetry in case of polarization of an incident flux For X-ray and EUV monitors the scintillation phoswich detectors gas proportional counter CZT assembly and Filter-covered Si-diodes are used 2 Telescope-spectrometer TESIS for imaging solar spectroscopy in X-rays with angular resolution up to 1 in three spectral lines and RT-2 CZT assembly of CZT

  5. How do liquid mixtures solubilize insoluble gelators? Self-assembly properties of pyrenyl-linker-glucono gelators in tetrahydrofuran-water mixtures.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ni; Xu, Zhiyan; Diehn, Kevin K; Raghavan, Srinivasa R; Fang, Yu; Weiss, Richard G

    2013-06-19

    The self-assembly behavior of a series of glucono-appended 1-pyrenesulfonyl derivatives containing α,ω-diaminoalkane spacers (Pn, where n, the number of methylene units separating the amino groups, is 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, and 8) in v:v tetrahydrofuran (THF):water mixtures is examined at room temperature. The Pn at 2 w/v % concentrations do not dissolve in either THF or water at room temperature. However, the Pn can be dissolved in some THF:water mixtures, and they form gels spontaneously in other compositions without dissolving completely. The self-assembly of the Pn in the liquid mixtures has been investigated using a variety of techniques. The particle sizes of the Pn in their solutions/sols, critical gelation concentrations, microstructures, thermal and mechanical stabilities of the gels, and molecular packing modes of Pn molecules in their gel networks are found to be very dependent on the composition of the liquid mixtures. Correlations between the self-assembly behavior of the Pn and the polarity of the liquid mixtures, as probed by E(T)(30) and Hansen solubility parameters, yield both qualitative and quantitative insights into why self-assembly of the Pn can or cannot be achieved in different liquid compositions. As revealed by UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy studies, π-π stacking of the pyrenyl groups occurs as part of the aggregation process. Correlations between the rheological properties of the gels and the Hansen solubility parameters of the Pn and the solvent mixtures indicate that hydrogen-bonding interactions are a major contributor to the mechanical stability. Overall, the results of this study offer a new strategy to investigate the balance between dissolution and aggregation of molecular gelators. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of the spontaneous formation of molecular gels without heating by placing gelators in mixtures of liquids in which they are insoluble in the neat components. PMID:23735009

  6. A multiwavelength study of star formation in the L1495E cloud in Taurus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strom, Karen M.; Strom, Stephen E.

    1994-01-01

    We have carried out a deep (t = 30,000 s) X-ray search of the eastern portion of the L1495 cloud centered on the well-known weak line T Tauri star (WTTS) V410 Tau using the Roentgen Satellite (ROSAT) PSPC. This deep exposure enabled a search for candidate pre-main-sequence (PMS) objects in this cloud to a limit approximately 20 times more sensitive than that typical of the fields examined with the Einstein searches. Despite assertions that the PMS population in Taurus-Auriga is nearly completely known, this Stet survey revealed eight new PMS objects in a region 50 min in diameter, as compared to a previously known stellar population of 12 objects, including deeply embedded Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) sources. Spectroscopic and photometric observations enable us to place these objects in the H-R diagram. The newly discovered objects are predominantly stars of spectral-type M0 and later, and a large fraction (6/8) appear to be surrounded by circumstellar accretion disks as judged by their infrared excess and H alpha emission. We combined the data for these Stet-discovered objects with extant and new data for the previously identified PMS stars in this region to examine the history of star formation and the frequency distribution of stellar masses in this cloud. If the 'post-ROSAT' population is either complete or representative, we conclude (1) that star formation in L1495 East took place approximately 1 x 10(exp 6) yr ago and that the spread in ages is small; (2) the frequency distribution of masses, N(M), in this apparently coeval group appears to peak near log M = -0.5 (using masses derived from recently published PMS tracks of D'Antona & Mazzitelli and Swenson et al. and to decline toward lower masses. The derived N(log M) for L1495E compares well with the IMF derived from studies of stars in the solar neighborhood, a result which suggests that the Taurus-Auriga clouds are currently producing stars whose mass spectrum approximates the time

  7. Development of Fast, Background-Limited Transition-Edge Sensors for the Background-Limited Infrared/Sub-Millimetre Spectrograph (BLISS) for SPICA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyer, Andrew D.; Runyan, M. C.; Kenyon, M.; Echternach, P. M.; Chui, T.; Bumble, B.; Bradford, C. M.; Holmes, W. A.; Bock, J. J.

    2012-01-01

    We report experimental progress toward demonstrating background-limited arrays of membrane-isolated transition-edge sensors (TESs) for the Background Limited Infrared/Sub-mm Spectrograph (BLISS). BLISS is a space-borne instrument with grating spectrometers for wavelengths lambda = 35-435 microns and with R = lambda/(delta)lambda approx. 500. The goals for BLISS TESs are: noise equivalent power (NEP) = 5x10(exp -20) W/Hz(1/2) and response time t<30ms. We expect background-limited performance from bilayers TESs with T(sub c)=65mK and G=15fW/K. However, such TESs cannot be operated at 50mK unless stray power on the devices, or dark power PD, is less than 200aW. We describe criteria for measuring P? that requires accurate knowledge of TC. Ultimately, we fabricated superconducting thermistors from Ir (T(sub c) > or = 135mK) and Mo/Cu proximitized bilayers, where T(sub c) is the thermistor transition temperature. We measured the Ir TES arrays in our 50mK adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator test system, which can measure up to eight 1x32 arrays simultaneously using a time-division multiplexer, as well as our single-pixel test system which can measure down to 15mK. In our previous Ir array measurements our best reported performance was NEP=2.5x10(exp -19) W/Hz(1/2) and tapprox.5ms for straight-beam TESs. In fact, we expected NEPapprox.1.5x10(exp -19)W/Hz(1/2) for meander beam TESs, but did not achieve this previously due to 1/f noise. Here, we detail improvements toward measuring the expected NEP and demonstrate NEP=(1.3+0.2)x10(exp -19)W/Hz(1/2) in our single-pixel test system and NEP=(1.6+0.3)x10(exp -19)W/Hz(1/2) in our array test system.

  8. The Madden-Julian Oscillation in ECHAM4 Coupled and Uncoupled GCMs

    SciTech Connect

    Sperber, K R; Gualdi, S; Legutke, S; Gayler, V

    2004-10-13

    with ECHO-G and SINTEX, which used T30 atmospheres, produce westward propagation of the latent heat flux anomalies, contrary to reanalysis. It is suggested that the differing ability of the models to represent the near-surface westerlies over the Indian Ocean is related to the different horizontal resolutions of the atmospheric model employed.

  9. The Madden-Julian oscillation in ECHAM4 coupled and uncoupled general circulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Sperber, Kenneth R.; Gualdi, Silvio; Legutke, Stephanie; Gayler, Veronika

    2005-06-29

    anomalies. However, the integrations with ECHO-G and SINTEX, which used T30 atmospheres, produce westward propagation of the latent heat flux anomalies, contrary to reanalysis. Furthermore, it is suggested that the differing ability of the models to represent the near-surface westerlies over the Indian Ocean is related to the different horizontal resolutions of the atmospheric model employed.

  10. Effect of dorzolamide-timolol fixed combination prophylaxis on intraocular pressure spikes after intravitreal bevacizumab injection

    PubMed Central

    Ozcaliskan, Sehnaz; Ozturk, Faruk; Yilmazbas, Pelin; Beyazyildiz, Ozlem

    2015-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the effect of topical dorzolamide-timolol fixed combination prophylaxis on short term intraocular pressure (IOP) changes in patients who had intravitreal bevacizumab injection. METHODS One hundred and fifty one eyes of 151 patients which were followed up in retina clinic in Ulucanlar Eye Training and Research Hospital were evaluated in this study. Patients were divided into two groups. Group 1 consists of 75 patients who had topical dorzolamid-timolol medication two hours before injection; while Group 2 consists of 76 patients without prophylaxis. Demographic data, IOP measurements prior to the injection and one, thirty and sixty minutes and twenty-four hours after the injection were recorded. The data were analyzed using SPSS software version 15.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). RESULTS There were no significant difference between two groups in age, gender distrubition and indications for injections. The mean IOPs in Groups 1 and 2 prior to the injection (T0) were 17.84±0.43 and 18.15±0.43 mm Hg, one minute after the injection (T1) were 29.75±1.6 and 34.44±1.59 mm Hg, 30min after the injection (T30) were 20.06±0.6 and 21.71±0.59 mm Hg respectively. The mean IOPs were 18.26±0.56 mm Hg in Group 1 and 19.78±0.56 mm Hg in Group 2 sixty minutes after the injection (T60). All IOP values after the injection were compared between two groups, there was a significant difference between two groups only on T1; one minute after the injection (P=0.04). There were a statiscially significant difference between the baseline values and other recorded values; except on T60, in Groups 1 and 2 (P<0.05). CONCLUSION After intravitreal bevacizumab injection; we observe a transient IOP elevation which normalizes about one hour after intravitreal injection. In patients who had topical dorzolamid-timolol combination prophylaxis before injections, a significant decrease is seen in IOP spikes due to this injection. The appropiate approach will monitor IOP after

  11. The effect of volcanic eruptions on the North Atlantic ocean temperatures over the past millennium (800-2000 AD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyrina, M.; Wagner, S.; Zorita, E.

    2014-12-01

    Several studies suggest that the North Atlantic Ocean is of particular importance for the climate variability, especially that of western Europe (Schlesinger M. E. & Ramankutty 1994, Knight J., Folland C. K. & Scaife A. 2006). The changes in North Atlantic sea surface temperatures are related to the thermohaline's circulation strength (Kushnir Y., 1994) and affected by volcanic eruptions (Church J.A, White N.J. & Arblaster J.M. 2005), due to their release of aerosols into the stratosphere. In this study we examine the signal of tropical volcanic eruptions in the temperatures of the North Atlantic Ocean in various depths (6, 100, 560 and 3070 m from the sea surface), for the past millennium. The temperatures are derived from the comprehensive COSMOS Earth System Model (ECHAM5-OM at T30 spatial resolution) and are presented for a control run and for three fully forced ensemble simulations including changes in orbital, solar, volcanic, land use and greenhouse gas changes. The model shows a response in the years following volcanic eruptions, being mostly pronounced after the large eruptions that took place between 1200 and 1300 AD, as well as at the beginning of the 19thcentury. The strongest impact on the ocean temperatures, due to the increased atmospheric optical depth, is evident in the uppermost level, especially for two out of the three ensemble simulations. In these simulations a pronounced decrease in the ocean temperature between 1400 and 1500 AD is observed due to the increase of the aerosol effective radius. In the mixed ocean layers the response to volcanic aerosols is more obvious in the third ensemble simulation, whereas in the deep ocean the temperatures do not seem to be strongly affected by volcanic eruptions. Schlesinger, M. E. & Ramankutty, N. An oscillation in the global climate system of period 65-70 years. Nature 367, 723-726 (1994). Kushnir, Y. Interdecadal variations in North Atlantic sea surface temperature and associated atmospheric conditions

  12. An efficient climate model with water isotope physics: NEEMY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J.; Emile-Geay, J.

    2015-12-01

    This work describes the development of an isotope-enabled atmosphere-ocean global climate model, NEEMY. This is a model of intermediate complexity, which can run 100 model years in 30 hours using 33 CPUs. The atmospheric component is the SPEEDY-IER (Molteni et al. 2003; Dee et al. 2015a), which is a water isotope-enabled (with equilibrium and kinetic fractionation schemes in precipitation, evaporation and soil moisture) simplified atmospheric general circulation model, with T30 horizontal resolution and 8 vertical layers. The oceanic component is NEMO 3.4 (Madec 2008), a state-of-the-art oceanic model (~2° horizontal resolution and 31 vertical layers) with an oceanic isotope module (a passive tracer scheme). A 1000-year control run shows that NEEMY is stable and its energy is conserved. The mean state is comparable to that of CMIP3-era CGCMs, though much cheaper to run. Atmospheric teleconnections such as the NAO and PNA are simulated very well. NEEMY also simulates the oceanic meridional overturning circulation well. The tropical climate variability is weaker than observations, and the climatology exhibits a double ITCZ problem despite bias corrections. The standard deviation of the monthly mean Nino3.4 index is 0.61K, compared to 0.91K in observations (Reynolds et al. 2002). We document similarities and differences with a close cousin, SPEEDY-NEMO (Kucharski et al. 2015). With its fast speed and relatively complete physical processes, NEEMY is suitable for paleoclimate studies ; we will present some forced simulations of the past millennium and their use in forward-modeling climate proxies, via proxy system models (PSMs, Dee et al 2015b). References Dee, S., D. Noone, N. Buenning, J. Emile-Geay, and Y. Zhou, 2015a: SPEEDY-IER: A fast atmospheric GCM with water isotope physics. J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 120: 73-91. doi:10.1002/2014JD022194. Dee, S. G., J. Emile-Geay, M. N. Evans, Allam, A., D. M. Thompson, and E. J. Steig, 2015b: PRYSM: an open-source framework

  13. Effects of quaternary ammonium-methacrylates on the mechanical properties of unfilled resins

    PubMed Central

    Hoshika, Tomohiro; Nishitani, Yoshihiro; Yoshiyama, Masahiro; Key, William O.; William, Brantley; Agee, Kelli A.; Breschi, Lorenzo; Cadenaro, Milena; Tay, Franklin R.; Rueggeberg, Frederick; Pashley, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Adding antimicrobial/anti-MMP quaternary ammonium methacrylates (QAMs) to comonomer blends should not weaken the mechanical properties of dental resins. This work evaluated the degree conversion and mechanical properties of BisGMA/TEGDMA/HEMA (60:30:10) containing 0–15 mass% QAMs A–E (A:2-acryloxyethyltrimethyl ammonium chloride; B:[3-(methacryloylamino)propyl]trimethylammonium chloride; C:[2-(methacryloxy)ethyl] trimethyl ammonium chloride; D:diallyldimethyl ammonium chloride; E:2-(methacryloyloxy) ethyltrimethyl ammonium methyl sulfate. Methods Unfilled resins with and without QAM were placed on ATR-FTIR and light-polymerized for 20 s in a thin film t 30°C. Unfilled resin beams were casted from square hollow glass tubings. Half of the beams were tested after 3 days of drying (control); the other half were tested wet after 3 days of water storage. Results Addition of QAMs in control resins significantly increased conversion 600s after light termination, with the exception of 5% MAPTAC (p<0.05). Increase of QAM content within a formulation significantly increased conversion. Control beams gave dry Young’s moduli of ~700 MPa. Addition of 5, 10 or 15 mass% QAMs produced significant reductions in dry Young’s moduli except for 5% B or C. 15 mass% A, B and C lowered the wet Young’s moduli of the resin beams by more than 30%. The ultimate tensile stress (UTS) of control dry resin was 89±11 MPa. Addition of 5–10 mass% QAMs had no adverse effect on the dry UTS. After water storage, the UTS of all resin blends fell significantly (p<0.05), especially when 15 wt% QAMs was added. Control dry beams gave fracture toughness (KIC) values of 0.88±0.1 MPa√m. Wet values were significantly higher at 1.02±0.06 (p<0.05). KIC of dry beams varied from 0.85±0.08 at 5% QAMs to 0.49±0.05 at 15% QAMs. Wet beams gave KIC values of 1.02±0.06 MPa√m that fell to 0.23±0.01 at 15% QAMs. Significance Addition of 10% QAMs increased the degree of conversion of

  14. A Double-Disruption Substorm Model - The Growth Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofko, G. J.; McWilliams, K. A.; Hussey, G. C.

    2014-12-01

    When the IMF turns from Bz- to Bz+, dayside merging forms open lobe field lines at low latitudes. These lobe lines are populated with shocked solar wind and dayside magnetospheric plasma from the reconnection inflow. As those lobe flux tubes pass tailward over the polar caps, they are also populated with outflow from the north and south polar cap ionospheres. As the lobe lines move tailward, they acquire a convex curvature that blocks the westward-flowing cross-tail current (XTJ). This constitutes the first stage of XTJ disruption, and it begins less than 10 min after the frontside merging.The disrupted XTJ closes dawn-to-dusk in the transition plasmasheet (TPS), where it produces a downward FAC to the ionosphere. This causes the proton arc, which is seen for the period from about 10 - 80 min after frontside merging begins at time t=0. The lobe lines eventually reconnect well downtail at about t=30 minutes. The middle section that closes the lobe lines has concave curvature and is called the Neutral Sheet (NSh). The resulting stretched field lines thus have a central NSh which separates the two convex-curvature regions to the north and south, regions which are called the Disruption Zones (DZs); the overall combination of the NDZ, NSh and SDZ is called the Stretched Plasmasheet (SPS). As the SPS continues to grow and the stretched lines are pulled earthward to relieve the magnetic tension, the filling of the NSh occurs both from the DTNL with the higher energy magnetospheric particle population on the lobe lines, but eventually also at about 25 earth radii when the polar cap ionospheric outflow (PCO) component finally reaches the NSh. A NSh FAC system forms, from which electrons flow down to the auroral ionosphere to create the pre-onset arc, starting at about t=65 min. At the same time, the Lyons-Speiser mechanism is initiated in the inner NSh, causing the PCO ions to become trapped and accelerated in the inner NSh region. Eventually, when the SPS grows earthward

  15. Comparison of fluid types for resuscitation in acute hemorrhagic shock and evaluation of gastric luminal and transcutaneous Pco2 in Leghorn chickens.

    PubMed

    Wernick, Morena B; Steinmetz, Hanspeter W; Martin-Jurado, Olga; Howard, Judith; Vogler, Barbara; Vogt, Rainer; Codron, Daryl; Hatt, Jean-Michel

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of 3 different fluid types for resuscitation after experimentally induced hemorrhagic shock in anesthetized chickens and to evaluate partial pressures of carbon dioxide measured in arterial blood (Paco2), with a transcutaneous monitor (TcPco2), with a gastric intraluminal monitor (GiPco2), and by end tidal measurements (Etco2) under stable conditions and after induced hemorrhagic shock. Hemorrhagic shock was induced in 40 white leghorn chickens by removing 50% of blood volume by phlebotomy under general anesthesia. Birds were divided into 4 groups: untreated (control group) and treated with intravenous hetastarch (haes group), with a hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier (hemospan group), or by autotransfusion (blood group). Respiratory rates, heart rates, and systolic arterial blood pressure (SAP) were compared at 8 time points (baseline [T0]; at the loss of 10% [T10%], 20% [T20%], 30% [T30%], 40% [T40%], and 50% [T50%] of blood volume; at the end of resuscitation [RES]; and at the end of anesthesia [END]). Packed cell volume (PCV) and blood hemoglobin content were compared at 6 time points (T0, T50%, RES, and 1, 3, and 7 days after induced hemorrhagic shock). Measurements of Paco2, TcPco2, GiPco2, and Etco2 were evaluated at 2 time points (T0 and T50%), and venous lactic acid concentrations were evaluated at 3 time points (T0, T50%, and END). No significant differences were found in mortality, respiratory rate, heart rate, PCV, or hemoglobin values among the 4 groups. Birds given fluid resuscitation had significantly higher SAPs after fluid administration than did birds in the control group. In all groups, PCV and hemoglobin concentrations began to rise by day 3 after phlebotomy, and baseline values were reached 7 days after blood removal. At T0, TcPco2 did not differ significantly from Paco2, but GiPco2 and Etco2 differed significantly from Paco2. After hemorrhagic shock, GiPco2 and TcPco2 differed significantly

  16. Hard X-Ray Emission in the Star-Forming Region ON 2: Discovery with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskinova, L. M.; Gruendl, R. A.; Ignace, R.; Chu, Y.-H.; Hamann, W.-R.; Feldmeier, A.

    2010-04-01

    We obtained X-ray XMM-Newton observations of the open cluster Berkeley 87 and the massive star-forming region (SFR) ON 2. In addition, archival infrared Spitzer Space Telescope observations were used to study the morphology of ON 2, to uncover young stellar objects, and to investigate their relationship with the X-ray sources. It is likely that the SFR ON 2 and Berkeley 87 are at the same distance, 1.23 kpc, and hence are associated. The XMM-Newton observations detected X-rays from massive stars in Berkeley 87 as well as diffuse emission from the SFR ON 2. The two patches of diffuse X-ray emission are encompassed in the shell-like H II region GAL 75.84+0.40 in the northern part of ON 2 and in the ON 2S region in the southern part of ON 2. The diffuse emission from GAL 75.84+0.40 suffers an absorption column equivalent to A V ≈ 28 mag. Its spectrum can be fitted either with a thermal plasma model at T >~ 30 MK or by an absorbed power-law model with γ ≈ -2.6. The X-ray luminosity of GAL 75.84+0.40 is L X ≈ 6 × 1031 erg s-1. The diffuse emission from ON 2S is adjacent to the ultra-compact H II (UCH II) region Cygnus 2N, but does not coincide with it or with any other known UCH II region. It has a luminosity of L X ≈ 4 × 1031 erg s-1. The spectrum can be fitted with an absorbed power-law model with γ ≈ -1.4. We adopt the view of Turner & Forbes that the SFR ON 2 is physically associated with the massive star cluster Berkeley 87 hosting the WO-type star WR 142. We discuss different explanations for the apparently diffuse X-ray emission in these SFRs. These include synchrotron radiation, invoked by the co-existence of strongly shocked stellar winds and turbulent magnetic fields in the star-forming complex, cluster wind emission, or an unresolved population of discrete sources.

  17. SIMULATION OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SHOCK WAVE GENERATION, PROPAGATION, AND HEATING IN THE PHOTOSPHERE AND CHROMOSPHERE USING A COMPLETE ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY TENSOR

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, Michael L.; Kazeminezhad, Farzad E-mail: fkazemin@earthlink.ne

    2010-01-01

    An electrical conductivity tensor is used in a 1.5D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation to describe how MHD shock waves may form, propagate, and heat the photosphere and chromosphere by compression and resistive dissipation. The spatial resolution is 1 km. A train of six shock waves is generated by a sinusoidal magnetic field driver in the photosphere with a period T = 30 s, mean of 500 G, and variation of 250 G. The duration of the simulation is 200 s. Waves generated in the photosphere evolve into shock waves at a height z approx 375 km above the photosphere. The transition of the atmosphere from weakly to strongly magnetized with increasing height causes the Pedersen resistivity eta{sub P} to increase to approx2000 times the Spitzer resistivity. This transition occurs over a height range of a few hundred kilometers near the temperature minimum of the initial state at z approx 500 km. The initial state is a model atmosphere derived by Fontenla et al., plus a background magnetic field. The increase in eta{sub P} is associated with an increase in the resistive heating rate Q. Shock layer thicknesses are approx10-20 km. They are nonzero due to the presence of resistive dissipation, so magnetization-induced resistivity plays a role in determining shock structure, and hence the compressive heating rate Q{sub c} . At t = 200 s the solution has the following properties. Within shock layers, Q{sub maximum} approx 1.4-7 erg cm{sup -3} s{sup -1}, and Q{sub c,maximum} approx 10-10{sup 3} Q{sub maximum}. Between shock waves, and at some points within shock layers, Q{sub c} < 0, indicating cooling by rarefaction. The integrals of Q and Q{sub c} over the shock wave train are F approx 4.6 x 10{sup 6} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} and F{sub c} approx 1.24 x 10{sup 9} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. A method based on the thermal, mechanical, and electromagnetic energy conservation equations is presented for checking the accuracy of the numerical solution, and gaining insight into energy

  18. Jet energy measurement with the ATLAS detector in proton-proton collisions at √{s}=7 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Akiyama, A.; Aktas, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barashkou, A.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, D.; Bartsch, V.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Battistoni, G.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Beck, G. A.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernardet, K.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. 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N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinnari, L. A.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skovpen, K.; Skubic, P.; Skvorodnev, N.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloper, J.; Smakhtin, V.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B. C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snow, S. W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E.; Soldevila, U.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Sondericker, J.; Soni, N.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sorbi, M.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiriti, E.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stahl, T.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Stavropoulos, G.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stevenson, K.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockmanns, T.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strang, M.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Stupak, J.; Sturm, P.; Soh, D. A.; Su, D.; Subramania, HS.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suita, K.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Sviridov, Yu. M.; Swedish, S.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szeless, B.; Sánchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, Y.; Tani, K.; Tannoury, N.; Tappern, G. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teinturier, M.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Thadome, J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thompson, R. J.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timmermans, C. J. W. P.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F. J.; Tisserant, S.; Tobias, J.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokunaga, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, G.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torchiani, I.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Traynor, D.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T. N.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trivedi, A.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tua, A.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuggle, J. M.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Twomey, M. S.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Tyrvainen, H.; Tzanakos, G.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Underwood, D. G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urkovsky, E.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valenta, J.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vandoni, G.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Varela Rodriguez, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Villa, M.; Villani, E. G.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virchaux, M.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vujicic, M.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walbersloh, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Warsinsky, M.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Wessels, M.; Weydert, C.; Whalen, K.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; Whitaker, S. P.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whitehead, S. R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, W. C.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, M.; Wright, D.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wunstorf, R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xaplanteris, L.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xie, Y.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Xu, G.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ybeles Smit, G. V.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaets, V. G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zalite, Yo. K.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, Q.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zieminska, D.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zolnierowski, Y.; Zsenei, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2013-03-01

    The jet energy scale and its systematic uncertainty are determined for jets measured with the ATLAS detector at the LHC in proton-proton collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of sqrt{s}=7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 38 pb-1. Jets are reconstructed with the anti- k t algorithm with distance parameters R=0.4 or R=0.6. Jet energy and angle corrections are determined from Monte Carlo simulations to calibrate jets with transverse momenta p T≥20 GeV and pseudorapidities | η|<4.5. The jet energy systematic uncertainty is estimated using the single isolated hadron response measured in situ and in test-beams, exploiting the transverse momentum balance between central and forward jets in events with dijet topologies and studying systematic variations in Monte Carlo simulations. The jet energy uncertainty is less than 2.5 % in the central calorimeter region (| η|<0.8) for jets with 60≤ p T<800 GeV, and is maximally 14 % for p T<30 GeV in the most forward region 3.2≤| η|<4.5. The jet energy is validated for jet transverse momenta up to 1 TeV to the level of a few percent using several in situ techniques by comparing a well-known reference such as the recoiling photon p T, the sum of the transverse momenta of tracks associated to the jet, or a system of low- p T jets recoiling against a high- p T jet. More sophisticated jet calibration schemes are presented based on calorimeter cell energy density weighting or hadronic properties of jets, aiming for an improved jet energy resolution and a reduced flavour dependence of the jet response. The systematic uncertainty of the jet energy determined from a combination of in situ techniques is consistent with the one derived from single hadron response measurements over a wide kinematic range. The nominal corrections and uncertainties are derived for isolated jets in an inclusive sample of high- p T jets. Special cases such as event topologies with close-by jets, or selections of samples with an enhanced

  19. Photon Physics Potential at ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, Hisayuki

    2009-10-01

    The ALICE detector has been designed to study the strongly interacting matter created in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In heavy-ion collisions, it is very critical to measure thermal photons, which are known to carry the temperature information of hot created matter. The thermal photon measurements at RHIC are suggesting the systematic study with better photon detectors at LHC. Furthermore, the suppression of high pT hadrons has provided the first strong signature of hot and dense partonic matter created in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC. Therefore, the suppression behavior of various particle species, including photons, up to LHC energy, is a key observable for the study of the hot matter dynamics. The ALICE PHOton Spectrometer (PHOS) consists of 17920 PWO crystals and Avalanche Photo Diode (APD) covering a rapidity range of ±0.3 and an azimuthal range of 100^o. The fine segment structure and small Moliere radius allow to separate two photons from 0̂ decay at pT=30GeV/c with about 100% efficiency and at even higher pT with smaller efficiency. The decay photons from lower pT 0̂ is the largest background in measuring the thermal photons and can be tagged in a very efficient way with a good energy resolution (3%/√E(GeV)). The ALICE EMCAL consists of shashlik lead-scintillator sampling units covering a rapidity range of ±0.7 and an azimuthal range of 110^ o and sits in the opposite coverage azimuthally to PHOS. The jet measurements by EMCAL and other tracking detectors, especially when tagged by a direct photon in the opposite PHOS detector, represent a key probe for investigating jet quenching effects. In this presentation, physics potential with photon detectors at ALICE during the first physics run of LHC will be discussed. The construction and installation status of the photon detectors as well as their expected physics will be presented.

  20. Correlations between VIMS and RADAR data over the surface of Titan: Implications for Titan's surface properties.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, Federico; Orosei, Roberto; Seu, Roberto; Coradini, Angioletta; Lunine, Jonathan; Filacchione, Gianrico; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Cerroni, Priscilla; Brown, Robert

    2010-05-01

    We present new results combining the VIMS and RADAR data on Titan's surface. In RADAR data we consider two geophysical quantities: the normalized backscatter cross-section obtained from the scatterometer measurement, corrected for the incidence angle, and the calibrated antenna temperature determined from the radiometer measurement, as found in publicly available data products. In VIMS data, combining spatial and spectral information, we have selected some atmospheric windows in the spectral range between 2 and 5 μm, providing the best optical depth to measure surface reflectance. The two RADAR parameters are combined with VIMS data, with estimated errors, to produce an aggregate data set, that we process using multivariate classification methods to identify homogeneous taxonomic units in the multivariate space of the samples. The use of data sets from different instruments onboard the Cassini spacecraft has the potential to deepen our understanding of the nature of the surface. Our analysis relies on the G-mode method, which has been successfully used in the past for the classification of such diverse data sets as lunar rock samples, asteroids and planetary surfaces. Due to the large number of data of Titan, the classification work proceeds in several steps. In a previous work (Tosi et al., 2010), we analyzed the data acquired in Titan flybys: T3, T4, T8, T13 and T16, covering mostly the major bright and dark features seen around the equator, combined with VIMS infrared data, in order to validate the classification method. Now we focus on flybys: T23, T25, T28, T30, and T43, covering also regions of Titan located at higher latitudes, and partly including the polar regions. The obtained results are generally in agreement with previous work devoted both to the analysis of the scatterometry data through physical models and to the correlation between SAR and radiometry data at a high resolution scale. This evidence, evaluated for the first time through a multivariate

  1. Correlations between VIMS and RADAR data over the surface of Titan: Implications for Titan's surface properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, F.; Orosei, R.; Seu, R.; Coradini, A.; Lunine, J. I.; Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Brown, R. H.; Cassini Vims; Radar Teams

    2010-04-01

    We present new results combining the VIMS and RADAR data on Titan's surface. In RADAR data we consider two geophysical quantities: the normalized backscatter cross-section obtained from the scatterometer measurement, corrected for the incidence angle, and the calibrated antenna temperature determined from the radiometer measurement, as found in publicly available data products. In VIMS data, combining spatial and spectral information, we have selected some atmospheric windows in the spectral range between 2 and 5 μm, providing the best optical depth to measure surface reflectance. The two RADAR parameters are combined with VIMS data, with estimated errors, to produce an aggregate data set, that we process using multivariate classification methods to identify homogeneous taxonomic units in the multivariate space of the samples. The use of data sets from different instruments onboard the Cassini spacecraft has the potential to deepen our understanding of the nature of the surface. Our analysis relies on the G-mode method, which has been successfully used in the past for the classification of such diverse data sets as lunar rock samples, asteroids and planetary surfaces. Due to the large number of data of Titan, the classification work proceeds in several steps. In a previous work (Tosi et al., 2010), we analyzed the data acquired in Titan flybys: T3, T4, T8, T13 and T16, covering mostly the major bright and dark features seen around the equator, combined with VIMS infrared data, in order to validate the classification method. Now we focus on flybys: T23, T25, T28, T30, and T43, covering also regions of Titan located at higher latitudes, and partly including the polar regions. The obtained results are generally in agreement with previous work devoted both to the analysis of the scatterometry data through physical models and to the correlation between SAR and radiometry data at a high resolution scale. This evidence, evaluated for the first time through a multivariate

  2. Correlations between VIMS and RADAR data over the surface of Titan: Implications for Titan's surface properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, F.; Orosei, R.; Seu, R.; Coradini, A.; Lunine, J. I.; Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Flamini, E.; Brown, R. H.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Lopes, R. M.

    2010-12-01

    We present new results combining the VIMS and RADAR medium resolution data on Titan’s surface. In RADAR data we consider two geophysical quantities: the normalized backscatter cross-section obtained from the scatterometer measurement, corrected for the incidence angle, and the calibrated antenna temperature determined from the radiometer measurement, as found in publicly available data products. In VIMS data, combining spatial and spectral information, we have selected some atmospheric windows in the spectral range between 2 and 5 μm, providing the best optical depth to measure surface reflectance. The two RADAR parameters are combined with VIMS data, with estimated errors, to produce an aggregate data set, that we process using multivariate classification methods to identify homogeneous taxonomic units in the multivariate space of the samples. Such units in fact reveal compositional trends in the surface, that are likely related to different abundances of simple ices and/or hydrocarbons. Our analysis relies on the G-mode method, which has been successfully used in the past for the classification of such diverse data sets as lunar rock samples, asteroids and planetary surfaces. Due to the large number of data of Titan, the classification work proceeds in several steps. In a previous work (Tosi et al., 2010), we analyzed the data acquired in Titan flybys: T3, T4, T8, T13 and T16, covering mostly the major bright and dark features seen around the equator, combined with VIMS infrared data, in order to validate the classification method. Now we focus on flybys: T23, T25, T28, T30, and T43, covering also regions of Titan located at higher latitudes, and partly including the polar regions. The obtained results are generally in agreement with previous work devoted both to the analysis of the scatterometry data through physical models and to the correlation between SAR and radiometry data at a high resolution scale. This classification can be expanded and refined as new

  3. The Madden-Julian oscillation in ECHAM4 coupled and uncoupled general circulation models

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sperber, Kenneth R.; Gualdi, Silvio; Legutke, Stephanie; Gayler, Veronika

    2005-06-29

    flux anomalies. However, the integrations with ECHO-G and SINTEX, which used T30 atmospheres, produce westward propagation of the latent heat flux anomalies, contrary to reanalysis. Furthermore, it is suggested that the differing ability of the models to represent the near-surface westerlies over the Indian Ocean is related to the different horizontal resolutions of the atmospheric model employed.« less

  4. Analysis and interpretation of Ibuji spring magnetic anomaly using the Mellin transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozebo, Vitalis C.; Ogunsanwo, Fidelis O.; Adebayo, Gboyega A.; Adeniran, Olusola J.

    2013-03-01

    The Mellin transform is a mathematical tool which has been applied in many areas of Mathematics, Physics and Engineering. Its application in Geophysics is in the computation of solution of potential problems for the determination of the mass as well as the depth to the basement of some solid mineral deposits. In this study, the Mellin transform is used to determine the depth to the top ( h) and the depth to the bottom ( H) of the basement of a profile of an anomalous magnetic body. Ibuji, the study area is located in Ifedore Local Government area of Ondo state, Nigeria, underlain by Precambrian complex rocks and bounded by geographical co-ordinate of Easting 5°00t'00″ to 5°4t'30″ and Northing 7°24t'00″ to 7°27t'36″. The magnetic anomaly profile due to a two- dimensional body(vertical thin sheet)over magnetic spring of the study area was digitised and the values of magnetic amplitude (nT) with respect to its horizontal distance (say interval of 5 m) obtained from the digitized profile was then used in the computation of Mellin transform using Matlab programs. In order to determine the depths H and h, the amplitudes were considered at three arbitrary point ( s = ¼, ½ and ¾) such that, (0 < s < 1), where s is a complex variable of real positive integer. The value obtained for H was 47.95 m, which compared favourably with the result obtained using other methods. Meanwhile, the value obtained for h has a convergence restriction, whereby, at lower values of s, there is divergence, while at higher values of s, (about 0.9), the result converges and h was obtained to be 32.56 m. The Ibuji magnetic anomaly was therefore analysed to have a depth to the bottom ( H) of 47.95 m and depth to the top of 32.56 m using this mathematical tool.

  5. Analysis and interpretation of Ibuji spring magnetic anomaly using the Mellin transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozebo, Vitalis; Ogunsanwo, Fidelis; Adebayo, Gboyega; Adeniran, Olusola

    2013-03-01

    The Mellin transform is a mathematical tool which has been applied in many areas of Mathematics, Physics and Engineering. Its application in Geophysics is in the computation of solution of potential problems for the determination of the mass as well as the depth to the basement of some solid mineral deposits. In this study, the Mellin transform is used to determine the depth to the top (h) and the depth to the bottom (H) of the basement of a profile of an anomalous magnetic body. Ibuji, the study area is located in Ifedore Local Government area of Ondo state, Nigeria, underlain by Precambrian complex rocks and bounded by geographical co-ordinate of Easting 5°00t'00″ to 5°4t'30″ and Northing 7°24t'00″ to 7°27t'36″. The magnetic anomaly profile due to a two- dimensional body(vertical thin sheet)over magnetic spring of the study area was digitised and the values of magnetic amplitude (nT) with respect to its horizontal distance (say interval of 5 m) obtained from the digitized profile was then used in the computation of Mellin transform using Matlab programs. In order to determine the depths H and h, the amplitudes were considered at three arbitrary point (s = 1/4, 1/2, and 3/4) such that, (0 < s < 1), where s is a complex variable of real positive integer. The value obtained for H was 47.95 m, which compared favourably with the result obtained using other methods. Meanwhile, the value obtained for h has a convergence restriction, whereby, at lower values of s, there is divergence, while at higher values of s, (about 0.9), the result converges and h was obtained to be 32.56 m. The Ibuji magnetic anomaly was therefore analysed to have a depth to the bottom (H) of 47.95 m and depth to the top of 32.56 m using this mathematical tool.

  6. Collisionless Three-dimensional Reconnection In Impulsive Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somov, Boris V.; Kosugi, Takeo; Sakao, Taro

    1998-04-01

    Two subclasses of impulsive solar flares, observed with the Hard X-Ray Telescope (HXT) onboard Yohkoh, have been discovered by Sakao et al. The two subclasses can be characterized as more impulsive (MI) and less impulsive (LI) flares, the former having a shorter total duration of the impulsive phase in the hard X-ray emission than the latter. We assume that in both subclasses, the collisionless three-dimensional reconnection process occurs at the separator with a longitudinal magnetic field. The high-temperature turbulent-current sheet (HTTCS), located along the separator, generates accelerated particles and fast outflows of ``superhot'' (T >= 30 MK) plasma. Powerful anomalous heat-conductive fluxes along the reconnected field lines maintain a high temperature in the superhot plasma. The difference between the LI and MI flares presumably appears because the footpoint separation (the distance between two brightest hard X-ray sources) increases in time in the LI flares, but decreases in the MI flares. According to our model, in the LI flares the three-dimensional reconnection process accompanies an increase in the longitudinal magnetic field at the separator. In contrast, in the MI flares the reconnection proceeds with a decrease of the longitudinal field; hence, the reconnection rate is higher in the MI flares. Since reconnection in the MI flares proceeds with a decrease of the longitudinal field, the reconnected field lines become shorter in this process. As the reconnected lines become shorter, accelerated electron beams arrive at the upper chromosphere faster. So, in the MI flares chromospheric evaporation begins earlier than in the LI flares. The evaporation process driven by accelerated electron beams generates upflows of ``warm'' (T <= 10 MK) plasma that interacts with downflows of superhot plasma and can switch off the accumulation of superhot plasma in the MI flares during the impulsive phase. In the LI flares, however, an observable amount of superhot

  7. Big Data and High-Performance Computing in Global Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozdag, Ebru; Lefebvre, Matthieu; Lei, Wenjie; Peter, Daniel; Smith, James; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Tromp, Jeroen

    2014-05-01

    Much of our knowledge of Earth's interior is based on seismic observations and measurements. Adjoint methods provide an efficient way of incorporating 3D full wave propagation in iterative seismic inversions to enhance tomographic images and thus our understanding of processes taking place inside the Earth. Our aim is to take adjoint tomography, which has been successfully applied to regional and continental scale problems, further to image the entire planet. This is one of the extreme imaging challenges in seismology, mainly due to the intense computational requirements and vast amount of high-quality seismic data that can potentially be assimilated. We have started low-resolution inversions (T > 30 s and T > 60 s for body and surface waves, respectively) with a limited data set (253 carefully selected earthquakes and seismic data from permanent and temporary networks) on Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Cray XK7 "Titan" system. Recent improvements in our 3D global wave propagation solvers, such as a GPU version of the SPECFEM3D_GLOBE package, will enable us perform higher-resolution (T > 9 s) and longer duration (~180 m) simulations to take the advantage of high-frequency body waves and major-arc surface waves, thereby improving imbalanced ray coverage as a result of the uneven global distribution of sources and receivers. Our ultimate goal is to use all earthquakes in the global CMT catalogue within the magnitude range of our interest and data from all available seismic networks. To take the full advantage of computational resources, we need a solid framework to manage big data sets during numerical simulations, pre-processing (i.e., data requests and quality checks, processing data, window selection, etc.) and post-processing (i.e., pre-conditioning and smoothing kernels, etc.). We address the bottlenecks in our global seismic workflow, which are mainly coming from heavy I/O traffic during simulations and the pre- and post-processing stages, by defining new data

  8. A Theoretical Light-Curve Model for the 1999 Outburst of U Scorpii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachisu, Izumi; Kato, Mariko; Kato, Taichi; Matsumoto, Katsura

    2000-01-01

    A theoretical light curve for the 1999 outburst of U Scorpii is presented in order to obtain various physical parameters of the recurrent nova. Our U Sco model consists of a very massive white dwarf (WD) with an accretion disk and a lobe-filling, slightly evolved, main-sequence star (MS). The model includes a reflection effect by the companion and the accretion disk together with a shadowing effect on the companion by the accretion disk. The early visual light curve (with a linear phase of t~1-15 days after maximum) is well reproduced by a thermonuclear runaway model on a very massive WD close to the Chandrasekhar limit (MWD=1.37+/-0.01 Msolar), in which optically thick winds blowing from the WD play a key role in determining the nova duration. The ensuing plateau phase (t~15-30 days) is also reproduced by the combination of a slightly irradiated MS and a fully irradiated flaring-up disk with a radius ~1.4 times the Roche lobe size. The cooling phase (t~30-40 days) is consistent with a low-hydrogen content of X~0.05 of the envelope for the 1.37 Msolar WD. The best-fit parameters are the WD mass of MWD~1.37 Msolar, the companion mass of MMS~1.5 Msolar (0.8-2.0 Msolar is acceptable), the inclination angle of the orbit (i~80deg), and the flaring-up edge, the vertical height of which is ~0.30 times the accretion disk radius. The duration of the strong wind phase (t~0-17 days) is very consistent with the BeppoSAX supersoft X-ray detection at t~19-20 days because supersoft X-rays are self-absorbed by the massive wind. The envelope mass at the peak is estimated to be ~3×10-6 Msolar, which is indicates an average mass accretion rate of ~2.5×10-7 Msolar yr-1 during the quiescent phase between 1987 and 1999. These quantities are exactly the same as those predicted in a new progenitor model of Type Ia supernovae.

  9. The Wildland Fire Emission Inventory: emission estimates and an evaluation of uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanski, S. P.; Hao, W. M.; Nordgren, B.

    2011-08-01

    We present the Wildland Fire Emission Inventory (WFEI), a high resolution model for non-agricultural open biomass burning (hereafter referred to as wildland fires) in the contiguous United States (CONUS). WFEI was used to estimate emissions of CO and PM2.5 for the western United States from 2003-2008. The estimated annual CO emitted ranged from 436 Gg yr-1 in 2004 to 3107 Gg yr-1 in 2007. The extremes in estimated annual PM2.5 emitted were 65 Gg yr-1 in 2004 and 454 Gg yr-1 in 2007. Annual wildland fire emissions were significant compared to other emission sources in the western United States as estimated in a national emission inventory. In the peak fire year of 2007, fire emissions were ~20 % of total CO emissions and ~39 % of total PM2.5 emissions. During the months with the greatest fire activity, wildland fires accounted for the majority of CO and PM2.5 emitted across the study region. The uncertainty in the inventory estimates of CO and PM2.5 emissions (ECO and EPM2.5, respectively) have been quantified across spatial and temporal scales relevant to regional and global modeling applications. The uncertainty in annual, domain wide emissions was 28 % to 51 % for CO and 40 % to 65 % for PM2.5. Sensitivity of the uncertainty in ECO and EPM2.5 to the emission model components depended on scale. At scales relevant to regional modeling applications (Δx = 10 km, Δt = 1 day) WFEI estimates 50 % of total ECO with an uncertainty <133 % and half of total EPM2.5 with an uncertainty <146 %. The uncertainty in ECO and EPM2.5 is significantly reduced at the scale of global modeling applications (Δx = 100 km, Δt = 30 day). Fifty percent of total emissions are estimated with an uncertainty <50 % for CO and <64 % for PM2.5. Uncertainty in the burned area drives the emission uncertainties at regional scales. At global scales the uncertainty in ECO is most sensitive to uncertainties in the fuel load consumed while the uncertainty in the emission factor for PM2.5 drives the

  10. Temporal evolution of parent volatiles and dust in Comet 9P/Tempel 1 resulting from the Deep Impact experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiSanti, Michael A.; Villanueva, Geronimo L.; Bonev, Boncho P.; Magee-Sauer, Karen; Lyke, James E.; Mumma, Michael J.

    2007-03-01

    The Deep Impact encounter with the Jupiter family Comet 9P/Tempel 1 on UT 2005 July 4 was observed at high spectral resolving power ( λ/δλ˜25,000) using the cross-dispersed near-infrared echelle spectrometer (NIRSPEC) at Keck-2. We report the temporal evolution of parent volatiles and dust (simultaneously measured) resulting from the event. Column abundances are presented for H 2O and C 2H 6 beginning 30 min prior to impact (T-30) and ending 50 min following impact (T+50), and for H 2O and HCN from T+50 until T+96, in time steps of approximately 6 min post-impact. The ejecta composition was revealed by an abrupt increase in H 2O and C 2H 6 near T+25. This showed C 2H 6/H 2O to be higher than its pre-impact value by a factor 2.4±0.5, while HCN/H 2O was unchanged within the uncertainty of the measurements. The mixing ratios for C 2H 6 and HCN in the ejecta agree with those found in the majority of Oort cloud comets, perhaps indicating a common region of formation. The expanding dust plume was tracked by continuum measurements, both through the 3.5-μm spectral continuum and through 2-μm images acquired with the SCAM slit-viewing camera, and each showed a monotonic increase in continuum intensity following impact. A Monte Carlo model that included dust opacity was applied to the dust coma, and its parameters were constrained by observations; the simulated continuum intensities reproduced both spectral and SCAM data. The relatively sudden appearance of the volatile ejecta signature is attributed to heating of icy grains (perhaps to a threshold temperature) that are decreasingly shadowed by intervening (sunward) dust particles in an optically thick ejecta plume, perhaps coupled with an accelerated decrease in dust optical depth near T+25.

  11. Temporal evolution of parent volatiles and dust in Comet 9P/Tempel 1 resulting from the Deep Impact experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disanti, Michael A.; Villanueva, Geronimo L.; Bonev, Boncho P.; Magee-Sauer, Karen; Lyke, James E.; Mumma, Michael J.

    The Deep Impact encounter with the Jupiter family Comet 9P/Tempel 1 on UT 2005 July 4 was observed at high spectral resolving power (λ/δλ˜25,000) using the cross-dispersed near-infrared echelle spectrometer (NIRSPEC) at Keck-2. We report the temporal evolution of parent volatiles and dust (simultaneously measured) resulting from the event. Column abundances are presented for H2O and C2H6 beginning 30 min prior to impact (T-30) and ending 50 min following impact (T+50), and for H2O and HCN from T+50 until T+96, in time steps of approximately 6 min post-impact. The ejecta composition was revealed by an abrupt increase in H2O and C2H6 near T+25. This showed C2H6/H2O to be higher than its pre-impact value by a factor 2.4±0.5, while HCN/H2O was unchanged within the uncertainty of the measurements. The mixing ratios for C2H6 and HCN in the ejecta agree with those found in the majority of Oort cloud comets, perhaps indicating a common region of formation. The expanding dust plume was tracked by continuum measurements, both through the 3.5-μm spectral continuum and through 2-μm images acquired with the SCAM slit-viewing camera, and each showed a monotonic increase in continuum intensity following impact. A Monte Carlo model that included dust opacity was applied to the dust coma, and its parameters were constrained by observations; the simulated continuum intensities reproduced both spectral and SCAM data. The relatively sudden appearance of the volatile ejecta signature is attributed to heating of icy grains (perhaps to a threshold temperature) that are decreasingly shadowed by intervening (sunward) dust particles in an optically thick ejecta plume, perhaps coupled with an accelerated decrease in dust optical depth near T+25.

  12. The Radio and X-Ray Luminous SN 2003bg and the Circumstellar Density Variations around Radio Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderberg, A. M.; Chevalier, R. A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Frail, D. A.

    2006-11-01

    We report extensive radio and X-ray observations of SN 2003bg, whose spectroscopic evolution shows a transition from a broad-lined Type Ic to a hydrogen-rich Type II, and later to a typical hydrogen-poor Type Ibc. We show that the extraordinarily luminous radio emission is well described by a self-absorption-dominated synchrotron spectrum, while the observed X-ray emission at t~30 days is adequately fit by inverse Compton scattering of the optical photons off of the synchrotron-emitting electrons. Our radio model implies a subrelativistic ejecta velocity, v~0.24c, at t0~10 days after the explosion, which emphasizes that broad optical absorption lines do not imply relativistic ejecta. We find that the total energy of the radio-emitting region evolves as E~7.3×1048(t/t0)0.4 ergs, assuming equipartition of energy between relativistic electrons and magnetic fields (ɛe=ɛB=0.1). The circumstellar density is well described by a stellar wind profile, with modest (factor of ~2) episodic density enhancements that produce abrupt achromatic flux variations. We estimate an average mass-loss rate of M˙~3×10-4 Msolar yr-1 (assuming a wind velocity of vw=103 km s-1) for the progenitor, consistent with the observed values for Galactic Wolf-Rayet stars. Comparison with other events reveals that ~50% of radio supernovae show similar short-timescale flux variations, attributable to circumstellar density irregularities. Specifically, the radio light curves of SN 2003bg are strikingly similar to those of the Type IIb SN 2001ig, suggestive of a common progenitor evolution for these two events. Based on the relative intensity of the inferred density enhancements, we conclude that the progenitors of SNe 2003bg and 2001ig experienced quasi-periodic mass-loss episodes just prior to the SN explosion. Finally, this study emphasizes that abrupt radio light-curve variations cannot be used as a reliable proxy for an engine-driven explosion, including off-axis gamma-ray bursts.

  13. Climate Variability in Comprehensive Climate Simulations at the Beginning of the Common Era over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, S.; Zorita, E.; Gomez-Navarro, J. J.; Bothe, O.

    2014-12-01

    The climate of the Common Era has yet been studied, albeit with an overall focus on the last millennium. Here we present an analysis for the period 100 BC until 300 AD. The results are based on three simulations with comprehensive climate models, the coupled atmosphere-ocean model ECHO-G (T30) and a recent simulation with the Earth System Model MPI-ESM-P (T63). The ECHO-G simulations are forced (i) only with changes in earth orbital parameters and (ii) additional solar and greenhouse gas forcings, respectively. The MPI-ESM-P simulation additionally includes the effect of volcanic activity. In all simulations summer temperatures show a quite stable temperature level, albeit with a slight negative trend caused by a decline in shortwave insolation due to changes in earth orbit. During the 2nd half of the 3rdcentury AD the MPI-ESM-P simulation shows a decline in temperatures. Since this negative temperature excursion is not evident in the ECHO-G simulations, which does not include volcanic forcing, it seems plausible that a large-size tropical volcanic eruption is responsible for this cooling event. Interestingly, the historical prominent eruption of the Vesuvius in 79 AD is not clear-cut reflected within the European temperature time series, most likely because of the small amount of injections of sulfate aerosols into the stratosphere. In comparison to the only orbitally forced ECHO-G simulation, the additionally solar and GHG forced ECHO-G simulation indicates some externally forced decadal variability connected to solar anomalous periods. Overall, the MPI-ESM-P simulation shows largest decadal variability compared to the ECHO-G simulations, most probably due to the increased horizontal resolution. Further analysis will include a comparison with proxy data with an overall emphasis on hydrological variations. For this task, a number of Regional Climate Model simulations will be used to downscale these global simulations and obtain better insight in the interactions

  14. Controlled-source seismic investigations of the crustal structure beneath Erebus volcano and Ross Island, Antarctica: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maraj, S.; Kyle, P. R.; Zandomeneghi, D.; Knox, H. A.; Aster, R. C.; Snelson, C. M.; Miller, P. E.; Kaip, G. M.

    2009-12-01

    During the 2008-09 Austral summer field season we undertook a controlled-source seismic experiment (Tomo-Erebus, TE) to examine the shallow magmatic system beneath the active Erebus volcano (TE-3D) and the crustal structure beneath Ross Island. Here we report on the TE-2D component, which was designed to produce a two-dimensional P-wave velocity model along an east-west profile across Ross Island. Marine geophysical observations near Ross Island have identified the north-south trending Terror Rift within the older and broader Victoria Land Basin, which are a component of the intraplate West Antarctic Rift System. Mount Erebus and Ross Island are circumstantially associated with the Terror Rift and its thin (~20 km) crust. The nature, extent and role of the Terror Rift in controlling the evolution of Ross Island volcanism and the on-going eruptive activity of Erebus volcano are unknown. In TE-2D, we deployed 21 seismic recorders (Ref Tek 130) with three-component 4.5 Hz geophones (Sercel L-28-3D) along a 90-km east-west line between Capes Royds and Crozier. These were supplemented by 79 similar instruments deployed for the high-resolution TE-3D experiment within a 3 x 3 km grid around the summit crater of Erebus, an array of 8 permanent short period and broadband sensors used to monitor the activity of Erebus and 23 three-component sensors (Guralp CMG-40T, 30s-100 Hz) positioned around the flanks and summit of Erebus. Fifteen chemical sources were loaded in holes drilled about 15 m deep in the snow and ice. The size of these shots ranged from 75 to 600 kg of ANFO with the largest shots at the ends of the profile. An additional shot was detonated in the sea (McMurdo Sound) using 200 kg of dynamite. Due to the rugged terrain, short field seasons and large area to be covered, the seismometer spacing along the TE-2D profile is quite large (~ 5 km spacing), resulting in poor near-surface data resolution. However, the data have a high signal to noise ratio with clear

  15. Using the VentCam and Optical Plume Velocimetry to Measure High-Temperature Hydrothermal Fluid Flow Rates in the ASHES Vent Field on Axial Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crone, T. J.; Mittelstaedt, E. L.; Fornari, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Fluid flow rates through high-temperature mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal vents are likely quite sensitive to poroelastic forcing mechanisms such as tidal loading and tectonic activity. Because poroelastic deformation and flow perturbations are estimated to extend to considerable depths within young oceanic crust, observations of flow rate changes at seafloor vents have the potential to provide constraints on the flow geometry and permeability structure of the underlying hydrothermal systems, as well as the quantities of heat and chemicals they exchange with overlying ocean, and the potential biological productivity of ecosystems they host. To help provide flow rate measurements in these challenging environments, we have developed two new optical flow oriented technologies. The first is a new form of Optical Plume Velocimetry (OPV) which relies on single-frame temporal cross-correlation to obtain time-averaged image velocity fields from short video sequences. The second is the VentCam, a deep sea camera system that can collect high-frame-rate video sequences at focused hydrothermal vents suitable for analysis with OPV. During the July 2014 R/V Atlantis/Alvin expedition to Axial Seamount, we deployed the VentCam at the ~300C Phoenix vent within the ASHES vent field and positioned it with DSRV Alvin. We collected 24 seconds of video at 50 frames per second every half-hour for approximately 10 days beginning July 22nd. We are currently applying single-frame lag OPV to these videos to estimate relative and absolute fluid flow rates through this vent. To explore the relationship between focused and diffuse venting, we deployed a second optical flow camera, the Diffuse Effluent Measurement System (DEMS), adjacent to this vent at a fracture within the lava carapace where low-T (~30C) fluids were exiting. This system collected video sequences and diffuse flow measurements at overlapping time intervals. Here we present the preliminary results of our work with VentCam and OPV

  16. Characterizing the audibility of sound field with diffusion in architectural spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utami, Sentagi Sesotya

    The significance of diffusion control in room acoustics is that it attempts to avoid echoes by dispersing reflections while removing less valuable sound energy. Some applications place emphasis on the enhancement of late reflections to promote a sense of envelopment, and on methods required to measure the performance of diffusers. What still remains unclear is the impact of diffusion on the audibility quality due to the geometric arrangement of architectural elements. The objective of this research is to characterize the audibility of the sound field with diffusion in architectural space. In order to address this objective, an approach utilizing various methods and new techniques relevant to room acoustics standards was applied. An array of microphones based on beam forming (i.e., an acoustic camera) was utilized for field measurements in a recording studio, classrooms, auditoriums, concert halls and sport arenas. Given the ability to combine a visual image with acoustical data, the impulse responses measured were analyzed to identify the impact of diffusive surfaces on the early, late, and reverberant sound fields. The effects of the room geometry and the proportions of the diffusive and absorptive surfaces were observed by utilizing geometrical room acoustics simulations. The degree of diffuseness in each space was measured by coherences from different measurement positions along with the acoustical conditions predicted by well-known objective parameters such as T30, EDT, C80, and C50. Noticeable differences of the auditory experience were investigated by utilizing computer-based survey techniques, including the use of an immersive virtual environment system, given the current software auralization capabilities. The results based on statistical analysis demonstrate the users' ability to localize the sound and to distinguish the intensity, clarity, and reverberation created within the virtual environment. Impact of architectural elements in diffusion control is

  17. Heterogeneity in a solid solution and its effect on the magnetization: hemo-ilmenite as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eva, S.; Luster, J.; Fischer, H.; Gehring, A. U.

    2006-12-01

    Mineral phases of the hematite-ilmenite solid solutions series (y FeTiO3 - (1-y) α{Fe2O3; 0 < y < 1) belong to the most abundant and chemically stable accessory constituents in rocks. They can play an important role in the magnetization of the lithosphere or as magnetic proxy in the reconstruction of weathering regimes. We investigated the micromagnetic properties of hemo-ilmenite grains in a soil in southern Mali. All magnetic accessory minerals except the weathering resistant hemo-ilmenite grains were removed by chemical treatment with concentrated acid followed by magnetic separation. Magnetization versus applied magnetic field plots in a temperature range between 6 and 300 K were recorded in order to study the hysteresis and the exchange properties. In addition, field and frequency dependent low field AC susceptibility measurements were performed with and without a DC bias field in order to analyze the dynamic magnetization of the sample down to 3 K. The hemo-ilmenite is considered as a heterogeneous system with cation-ordered areas forming the bulk structure and boundary layers in between. Ferrimagnetic ordering in the bulk started at about 220 K. Superparamagnetic (SP) clusters attributed to boundary layers were detected at about 150 K. No interaction between the FM bulk and the SP clusters was observed at this temperature. The FM bulk revealed field dependence and an average blocking temperature at 44 K. Partial blocking of the SP clusters at 38 K generated AFM ordered areas in the boundary layers which became more prominent with decreasing temperature. The simultaneous occurrence of SP clusters and AFM ordered areas generated spin-glass like properties. At T < 30 K exchange coupling between FM bulk and boundary layers via the AFM ordered areas set in and was documented by an increase in Hc. At lower temperature, the additional shift of the hysteresis indicated a change in AFM anisotropy. At 5 K, the hemo-ilmenite can be described as a heterogeneous system

  18. Astrochemistry of transition metals? The selected cases of [FeN](+), [FeNH](+) and [(CO)2FeN](+): pathways toward CH3NH2 and HNCO.

    PubMed

    Fioroni, Marco

    2014-11-28

    Transition metals (TMs) are proposed to play a role in astrophysical environments in both gas and solid state astrochemistry by co-determining the homogeneous/heterogeneous chemistry represented by the gas-gas and gas-dust grain interactions. Their chemistry is a function of temperature, radiation field and chemical composition/coordination sphere and as a consequence, dependent on the astrophysical object in which TMs are localized. Here five main categories of TM compounds are proposed and classified as: (a) pure bulk and clusters; (b) TM naked ions; (c) TM oxides/minerals or inorganic compounds; (d) TM-L (L = ligand) with L = (σ and/or π)-donor/acceptor species like H/H2, N/N2, CO, and H2O and (e) TM-organoligands such as Cp, PAH, and R1=˙=˙=R2. Each of the classes is correlated to their possible localization within astrophysical objects. Because of this variety coupled with their ability to modulate reactivity and regio/enantioselectivity by ligand sphere composition, TM compounds can introduce a fine organic synthesis in astrochemistry. For the selection of small TM parental compounds to be analyzed as first examples, by constraining the TMs and the second element/molecule on the basis of their cosmic abundance and mutual reactivity, Fe atoms coupled with N and CO are studied by developing the chemistry of [FeN](+), [FeNH](+) and [(CO)2FeN](+). These molecules, due to their ability to perform C-C and C-H bond activation, are able to open the pathway toward nitrogenation/amination and carbonylation of organic substrates. By considering the simplest organic substrate CH4, the parental reaction schemes (gas phase, T = 30 K): (I) [FeN](+) + CH4 + H → [Fe](+) + H3C-NH2; (II) [FeNH](+) + CH4 → [Fe](+) + H3C-NH2 and (III) [(CO)2FeN](+) + H → [FeCO](+) + HNCO are analyzed by theoretical methods (B2PLYP double hybrid functional/TZVPPP basis set). All reactions are thermodynamically favored and first step transition states can follow a minimal energy path by

  19. Consequence of dexmedetomidine on emergence delirium following sevoflurane anesthesia in children with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Kang, Dao-Lin; Na, He-Yi; Li, Bi-Lian; Xu, Ying-Yi; Ni, Jin; Wu, Jun-Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Children with cerebral palsy can demonstrate irritability following emergence from general anaesthesia. As well, an elevated rate of emergence delirium (ED) in children has been associated with the application of sevoflurane. The current study’s intent is to administer dexmedetomidine, in a single dosage administration, at the initial phase of sevoflurane based anesthesia with regard to the occurrence and severity of ED in children afflicted with cerebral palsy. Participating in the study (American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II) are eighty children ranging in ages two through twelve years. They would be anaesthetised with sevoflurane based anesthesia while undergoing lower limb surgical procedures. The participants were equally distributed to either Group c or Group D. Group C was administered 10 ml saline 0.9%, and Group D was administered dexmedetomidine 0.5 μg•kg-1. Five minutes prior to commencement of the surgical procedures, the participants received the prescribed pharmaceutical dosages under the anesthesia of sevoflurane. In order to sustain the BIS values in a range of 45 and 55, at 60 second increments, endtidal sevoflurane concentrations (ETsev) were modified. After conclusion of the surgical procedures, in post anesthesia care unit (PACU), the frequency of ED was gauged with Aonos four point scale and the severity of ED was gauged with pediatric anesthesia emergence delirium scale upon admission (T0), after intervals of five minutes (T5), fifteen minutes (T15) and thirty minutes (T30). Extubation time, emergence time and length of at stay at the PACU were assessed. Relative to Group C, participants of Group D exhibited noticeably shortened times of emergence, extubation and PACU duration of stay. Prior to surgical incision, ETsev was elevated in the control group, (1.9±0.2 vs 1.6±0.3; P = 0.023) and amid the initial 20 minutes following the surgical incision (1.6±0.2 vs 1.1±0.2; P = 0.016). At intervals of commencement, T0, of five minutes

  20. PREFACE: The 395th Wilhelm and Else Heraeus Seminar: `Time-dependent phenomena in Quantum Mechanics'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleber, Manfred; Kramer, Tobias

    2008-03-01

    The 395th Wilhelm and Else Heraeus Seminar: `Time-dependent phenomena in Quantum Mechanics' took place at the Heinrich Fabri Institute in Blaubeuren, Germany, 12-16 September 2007. The conference covered a wide range of topics connected with time-dependent phenomena in quantum mechanical systems. The 20 invited talks and 15 short talks with posters at the workshop covered the historical debate between Schrödinger, Dirac and Pauli about the role of time in Quantum Mechanics (the debate was carried out sometimes in footnotes) up to the almost direct observation of electron dynamics on the attosecond time-scale. Semiclassical methods, time-delay, monodromy, variational principles and quasi-resonances are just some of the themes which are discussed in more detail in the papers. Time-dependent methods also shed new light on energy-dependent systems, where the detour of studying the time-evolution of a quantum states allows one to solve previously intractable problems. Additional information is available at the conference webpage http://www.quantumdynamics.de The organizer would like to thank all speakers, contributors, session chairs and referees for their efforts in making the conference a success. We also gratefully acknowledge the generous financial support from the Wilhelm and Else Heraeus Foundation for the conference and the production of this special volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. Manfred Kleber Physik Department T30, Technische Universität München, 85747 Garching, Germany mkleber@ph.tum.de Tobias Kramer Institut I: Theoretische Physik, Universität Regensburg, 93040 Regensburg, Germany tobias.kramer@physik.uni-regensburg.de Guest Editors Conference photograph Front row (from left): W Schleich, E J Heller, J B Delos, H Friedrich, K Richter, M Kleber, P Kramer, M Man'ko, A del Campo, V Man'ko, M Efremov, A Ruiz, M O Scully Middle row: A Zamora, R Aganoglu, T Kramer, J

  1. Cold-batter mincing of hot-boned and crust-freezing air-chilled turkey breast improved meat turnover time and product quality.

    PubMed

    Medellin-Lopez, M; Sansawat, T; Strasburg, G; Marks, B P; Kang, I

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the combined effects of turkey hot-boning and cold-batter mincing technology on acceleration of meat turnover and meat quality improvement. For each of 3 replications, 15 turkeys were slaughtered and eviscerated. Three of the eviscerated carcasses were randomly assigned to water-immersion chilling for chill-boning (CB) and the remaining were immediately hot-boned (HB), half of which were used without chilling whereas the remaining were subjected to crust-freezing air chilling (CFAC) in an air-freezing room (1.0 m/s, -12°C) with/without 1/4; sectioning (HB-1/4;CFAC, HB-CFAC). As a result, CB and HB breasts were minced using 1 of 5 treatments: (1) CB and traditional mincing (CB-T), (2) HB and mincing with no chilling (HB-NC), (3) HB and mincing with CO2 (HB-CO2), (4) HB and mincing after CFAC (HB-CFAC), and (5) HB and mincing after quarter sectioning and CFAC (HB-1/4;CFAC). Traditional water-immersion chilling took an average of 5.5 h to reduce the breast temperature to 4°C, whereas HB-CFAC and HB-1/4;CFAC took 1.5 and 1 h, respectively. The breast of HB-CFAC and HB-1/4;CFAC showed significantly higher pH (6.0-6.1), higher fragmentation index (196-198), and lower R-value (1.0-1.1; P < 0.05) than those of the CB controls. No significant differences (P > 0.05) in sarcomere length were seen between CB-T and HB-CFAC filets regardless of quarter sectioning. When muscle was minced, the batter pH (5.9) of CB-T was significantly lower (P < 0.05) than those (6.1-6.3) of HB-NC, HB-CO2, and HB-1/4;CFAC, with the intermediate pH (6.0) seen for the HB-CFAC. When meat batters were cooked, higher cooking yield (90 - 91%; P < 0.05) was found in HB-CFAC, HB-1/4;CFAC, and HB-CO2, followed by HB-NC (90%) and finally CB-T (86%). Stress values (47-51 kPa) of HB-CFAC gels were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those of CB-T (30 kPa) and HB-NC (36 kPa). A similar trend was found in strain values. PMID:24604866

  2. The effect of α- or β-casein addition to waxy maize starch on postprandial levels of glucose, insulin, and incretin hormones in pigs as a model for humans

    PubMed Central

    Kett, Anthony P.; Bruen, Christine M.; O'Halloran, Fiona; Chaurin, Valérie; Lawlor, Peadar G.; O'Mahony, James A.; Giblin, Linda; Fenelon, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Starch is a main source of glucose and energy in the human diet. The extent to which it is digested in the gastrointestinal tract plays a major role in variations in postprandial blood glucose levels. Interactions with other biopolymers, such as dairy proteins, during processing can influence both the duration and extent of this postprandial surge. Objective To evaluate the effect of the addition of bovine α- or β-casein to waxy maize starch on changes in postprandial blood glucose, insulin, and incretin hormones [glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1)] in 30 kg pigs used as an animal model for humans. Design Gelatinised starch, starch gelatinised with α-casein, and starch gelatinised with β-casein were orally administered to trained pigs (n = 8) at a level of 60 g of available carbohydrate. Pre- and postprandial glucose measurements were taken every 15 min for the first hour and every 30 min thereafter up to 180 min. Insulin, GIP, and GLP-1 levels were measured in plasma samples up to 90 min postprandial. Results Starch gelatinised with α-casein had a significantly (p < 0.05) lower peak viscosity on pasting and resulted in significantly lower glucose release at 15, 30, and 90 min postprandial compared to starch gelatinised with β-casein. During the first 45-min postprandial, the area under the glucose curve (AUC) for starch gelatinised with α-casein was significantly (p < 0.05) lower than that for starch gelatinised with β-casein. There was also a significant (p < 0.05) difference at T30 in GIP levels in response to the control compared to starch gelatinised with α- or β-casein. Significant (p < 0.05) increases in several free amino acid concentrations were observed on ingestion of either α- or β-casein gelatinised with starch at 30 and 90 min postprandial compared to starch alone. In addition, plasma levels of six individual amino acids were increased on ingestion of starch gelatinised with

  3. Transcription of TIR1-Controlled Genes Can be Regulated within 10 Min by an Auxin-Induced Process. Can TIR1 be the Receptor?

    PubMed Central

    Labusch, Corinna; Effendi, Yunus; Fulda, Martin; Scherer, Günther F. E.

    2016-01-01

    ABP1 and TIR1/AFBs are known as auxin receptors. ABP1 is linked to auxin responses several of which are faster than 10 min. TIR1 regulates auxin-induced transcription of early auxin genes also within minutes. We use transcription of such TIR1-dependent genes as indicator of TIR1 activity to show the rapid regulation of TIR1 by exogenous auxin. To this end, we used quantification of transcription of a set of fifteen early auxin-induced reporter genes at t = 10 and t = 30 min to measure this as a TIR1-dependent auxin response. We conducted this study in 22 mutants of auxin transporters (pin5, abcb1, abcb19, and aux1/lax3), protein kinases and phosphatases (ibr5, npr1, cpk3, CPK3-OX, d6pk1, d6pkl1-1, d6pkl3-2, d6pkl1-1/d6pkl2-2, and d6pkl1-1/d6pkl3-2), of fatty acid metabolism (fad2-1, fad6-1, ssi2, lacs4, lacs9, and lacs4/lacs9) and receptors (tir1, tir1/afb2, and tir1/afb3) and compared them to the wild type. After 10 min auxin application, in 18 out of 22 mutants mis-regulated expression of at least one reporter was found, and in 15 mutants transcription of two-to-three out of five selected auxin reporter genes was mis-regulated. After 30 min of auxin application to mutant plants, mis-regulation of reporter genes ranged from one to 13 out of 15 tested reporter genes. Those genes chosen as mutants were themselves not regulated in their expression by auxin for at least 1 h, excluding an influence of TIR1/AFBs on their transcription. The expression of TIR1/AFB genes was also not modulated by auxin for up to 3 h. Together, this excludes a feedback or feedforward of these mutant genes/proteins on TIR1/AFBs output of transcription in this auxin-induced response. However, an auxin-induced response needed an as yet unknown auxin receptor. We suggest that the auxin receptor necessary for the fast auxin-induced transcription modulation could be, instead, ABP1. The alternative hypothesis would be that auxin-induced expression of a protein, initiated by TIR1/AFBs receptors

  4. Grape harvest and yield responses to inter-annual changes in temperature and precipitation in an area of north-east Spain with a Mediterranean climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camps, Josep Odó; Ramos, María Concepción

    2012-09-01

    This study presents an analysis of temperature and precipitation trends and their impact on grape harvests in the Penedès region (NE Spain). It includes analyses of maximum, minimum and mean daily temperatures (for both the growing and ripening seasons) and daily rainfall (for the hydrological year, the growing season and each phenological stage) for three observatories in the immediate area. We analysed a series of factors: beginning and end harvest dates; the day on which a given potential alcoholic degree was reached; and yield for several varieties of grape grown in the area in relation to climatic variables. Maximum temperatures increased at all the observatories, with greater values being recorded in recent years (1996-2009) than in previous decades (1960s-2000s): we observed increases in average growing season temperatures of 0.11°C per year for the period 1996-2009 vs 0.04°C per year for the period 1960-2009 at Vilafranca del Penedès. These temperature changes were due mainly to increases in maximum temperatures and an increase in the incidence of extreme heat (number of days with T > 30°C). Crop evapotranspiration also increased significantly during the same period. The Winkler index also increased, so the study area would correspond to region IV according to that climatic classification. There were no significant trends in annual rainfall but rainfall recorded between bloom and veraison decreased significantly at the three observatories, with the greatest decrease corresponding to the period 1996-2009. The dates on which harvests started and ended showed a continuous advance (of between -0.7 and -1.1 days per year, depending on the variety), which was significantly correlated with the average mean and maximum daily growing season temperatures (up to -7.68 days for 1°C increase). Winegrape yield was influenced by the estimated water deficit (crop evapotranspiration minus precipitation) in the bloom-veraison period; this value increased due to a

  5. Variability of matric potential measurements in evaporation experiments and its influence on the derived hydraulic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spieckermann, Mathias; Scharnagl, Benedikt; Pertassek, Thomas; von Unold, Georg; Durner, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    significantly increased during the transition from stage-1 to stage-2 evaporation (t = 30 h), reaching its maximum at the end of the measurement (cv = 6% to 8%). Despite differences in the tensiometer readings, the calculated hydraulic functions are very similar and associated only with very small uncertainties. The horizontally and vertically aligned tensiometers showed no systematic differences. We conclude that matric potentials measured with individual tensiometers can be reliably regarded as representative for the measurement plane. The increasing scattering of the upper tensiometers during stage-2 evaporation had a negligible effect on the identified hydraulic functions. The orientation of the tensiometers had no influence on the measured values.

  6. The microphysical and radiative properties of tropical cirrus from the 2006 Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Um, Jun Shik

    for the fresh anvil (i.e., 2 Feb) is larger than that for cirrus bands of varying ages (i.e., 27 and 29 Jan.) for -60 < T < -45°C and -45 < T < -30°C where the fractional contributions of small ice crystals to total cross sectional area are small. The impact using different models for small ice crystals on ḡ is largest at lower temperatures (T < -60°C). The impact of enhanced number concentrations of small ice crystals on the bulk scattering properties depends on the assumed shapes of small ice crystals, which is largest (smallest) in the temperature ranges of -45 < T < -30 T (T < -60°C) where the CAS/CDP ratio of N of small ice crystals is maximum (minimum).

  7. Pharmacokinetics of ceftazidime in serum and suction blister fluid during continuous and intermittent infusions in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed Central

    Mouton, J W; Horrevorts, A M; Mulder, P G; Prens, E P; Michel, M F

    1990-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of ceftazidime were investigated during intermittent (II) and continuous (CI) infusion in eight healthy male volunteers in a crossover fashion. The total daily dose was 75 mg/kg of body weight per 24 h in both regimens, given in three doses of 25 mg/kg/8 h (II) or 60 mg/kg/24 h with 15 mg/kg as a loading dose (CI). After the third dose (II) and during CI, serum and blister fluid samples were taken. Seven new blisters were raised for each timed sample by a suction blister technique. Blisters took 90 min to form. Samples were then taken from four blisters (A samples) and 1 h later were taken from the remaining three (B samples). The concentration of ceftazidime was determined using a high-performance liquid chromatography method. After II, the concentrations in serum immediately after infusion (t = 30 min) and 8 h after the start of the infusion were 137.9 (standard deviation [SD], 27.5) and 4.0 (SD, 0.7) micrograms/ml, respectively. The half-life at alpha phase (t1/2 alpha) was 9.6 min (SD, 4.6), t1/2 beta was 94.8 min (SD, 5.4), area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) was 285.4 micrograms.h/ml (SD, 22.7), total body clearance was 0.115 liter/h.kg (SD, 0.022), and volume of distribution at steady state was 0.178 liter/kg (SD, 0.023). The blister fluid (A) samples showed a decline in concentration parallel to that of the concentrations in serum during the elimination phase with a ratio of 1:1. The t1/2 of the A samples was 96.4 min (SD, 3.2). The concentration of ceftazidime in the B blister fluid samples was significantly higher (27%) than in the A samples over time. This shows that blisters may behave as a separate compartment and establishes the need to raise new blisters for each timed sample. The mean AUC/h during continuous infusion was 21.3 micrograms . h/ml (SD, 3.0). The total body clearance was 0.113 liter/h . kg (SD, 0.018), the urinary clearance was 0.105 liter/h . kg (SD, 0.012), and the ceftazidime/creatinine clearance ratio

  8. Radiative association of He{sup +} with H{sub 2} at temperatures below 100 K

    SciTech Connect

    Mrugala, Felicja; Kraemer, Wolfgang P.

    2005-06-08

    The paper presents a theoretical study of the low-energy dynamics of radiative association processes in the He{sup +}+H{sub 2} collision system. Formation of the triatomic HeH{sub 2}{sup +} ion in its bound rotation-vibration states on the potential-energy surfaces of the ground and of the first excited electronic states is investigated. Close-coupling calculations are performed to determine detailed state-to-state characteristics (bound<-free transition rates, radiative and dissociative widths of resonances) as well as temperature-average characteristics (rate constants, photon emission spectra) of the two-state (X<-A) reaction He{sup +}({sup 2}S)+H{sub 2}(X{sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +}){yields}HeH{sub 2}{sup +}(X{sup 2}A{sup '})+h{nu} and of the single-state (A<-A) reaction He{sup +}({sup 2}S)+H{sub 2}(X{sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +}){yields}HeH{sub 2}{sup +}(A{sup 2}A{sup '})+h{nu}. The potential-energy surfaces of the X- and A-electronic states of HeH{sub 2}{sup +} and the dipole moment surfaces determined ab initio in an earlier work [Kraemer, Spirko, and Bludsky, Chem. Phys. 276, 225 (2002)] are used in the calculations. The rate constants k(T) as functions of temperature are calculated for the temperature interval 1{<=}T{<=}100 K. The maximum k(T) values are predicted as 3.3x10{sup -15} s{sup -1} cm{sup 3} for the X<-A reaction and 2.3x10{sup -20} s{sup -1} cm{sup 3} for the A<-A reaction at temperatures around 2 K. Rotationally predissociating states of the He{sup +}-H{sub 2} complex, correlating with the {upsilon}=0, j=2 state of free H{sub 2}, are found to play a crucial role in the dynamics of the association reactions at low temperatures; their contribution to the k(T) function of the X<-A reaction at T<30 K is estimated as larger than 80%. The calculated partial rate constants and emission spectra show that in the X<-A reaction the HeH{sub 2}{sup +}(X) ion is formed in its highly excited vibrational states. This is in contrast with the vibrational state

  9. Pathway Study of Cl-cycle on Mars, Step-I & II: Oxychlorine Salts and Electrostatic Discharge Phenomenon in a Mars Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z.; Wang, A.; Ling, Z.; Li, B.; Zhang, J.; Xu, W.

    2015-12-01

    The directly measured high ClO4-/Cl- ratio (4.3-8.75) at Phoenix site and the implied ClO4- existences at Curiosity and Viking sites reminded Mars science community on the importance of (1) the global distribution of ClO4-/Cl- ratio; (2) the mechanisms that are responsible for Cl- to ClOy- (y=1,2,3,4) transformation; and (3) the current and historical Cl- cycle on Mars. Our goal is to study electrostatic discharge (ESD) in a Mars Chamber, as one of the four proposed mechanisms for the formation of Martian perchlorate. ESD was anticipated during dust storm/devil on Mars. A model estimated that ESD generated oxidants can be 200 times of those produced by photochemistry. Our study is conducted in three steps. Firstly, oxychlorine salts, NaClOy, Mg(ClO4)2.xH2O (x=0,6), and Ca(ClO4)2.xH2O (x=0,4), were analyzed at ambient conditions using MIR, NIR (1.4-2.6 µm), Raman spectroscopy, and in a Mars Chamber using in-situ NIR and Raman spectroscopy. Our purpose is to understand their phase transition and spectral change at Mars pressure (P) and temperature (T) conditions. We have found: (1) Under current surface/subsurface P-T conditions in mid-latitudes/equatorial regions on Mars, Mg(ClO4)2.6H2O and Ca(ClO4)2.4H2O are stable, while the hydration degree of NaClO4.H2O would increase at T<-30℃ and decrease in 5

  10. Addressing Value and Belief Systems on Climate Literacy in the Southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeal, K. S.

    2012-12-01

    The southeast (SEUS; AL, AR, GA, FL, KY, LA, NC, SC, TN, E. TX) faces the greatest impacts as a result of climate change of any region in the U.S. which presents considerable and costly adaptation challenges. Paradoxically, people in the SEUS hold attitudes and perceptions that are more dismissive of climate change than those of any other region. An additional mismatch exists between the manner in which climate science is generally communicated and the underlying core values and beliefs held by a large segment of people in the SEUS. As a result, people frequently misinterpret and/or distrust information sources, inhibiting efforts to productively discuss and consider climate change and related impacts on human and environmental systems, and possible solutions and outcomes. The Climate Literacy Partnership in the Southeast (CLiPSE) project includes an extensive network of partners throughout the SEUS from faith, agriculture, culturally diverse, leisure, and K-20 educator communities that aim to address this educational need through a shared vision. CLiPSE has conducted a Climate Stewardship Survey (CSS) to determine the knowledge and perceptions of individuals in and beyond the CLiPSE network. The descriptive results of the CSS indicate that religion, predominantly Protestantism, plays a minor role in climate knowledge and perceptions. Likewise, political affiliation plays a minimal role in climate knowledge and perceptions between religions. However, when Protestants were broken out by political affiliation, statistically significant differences (t(30)=2.44, p=0.02) in knowledge related to the causes of climate change exist. Those Protestants affiliated with the Democratic Party (n=206) tended to maintain a statistically significant stronger knowledge of the causes of global climate change than their Republican counterparts. When SEUS educator (n=277) group was only considered, similar trends were evidenced, indicating that strongly held beliefs potentially

  11. BRINE Distribution in Harite Rocks-Inference from Measured Electrical CONDUCTIVITY-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitano, M.; Watanabe, T.

    2013-12-01

    Intercrystalline fluid can significantly affect rheological and transport properties of rocks. Its influences are strongly depended on its distribution. The dihedral angle between solid and liquid phases has been widely accepted as a key parameter that controls solid-liquid textures. The liquid phase is not expected to be interconnected if the dihedral angle is larger than 60°. However, observations contradictory to dihedral angle values have been reported. Watanabe (2010) suggested that the grain boundary fluid coexist with a positive dihedral angle. Similar thin fluid films might exist in grain boundaries of crustal rocks, and play important roles in crustal processes. In order to understand the nature of this fluid, we have studied the distribution of brine in halite rocks through measurements of conductivity. A sample was prepared by cold-pressing (the axial stress of 140MPa, 40minutes) and annealing (the temperature of 160°C and 180MPa confining pressure for about 160hours) of wet NaCl powder. During annealing, conductivity of a sample was monitored (2-electrode method) to reach a quasi-stationary value. The volume fraction of water is estimated to be 0.1×0.01% based on the FTIR measurement. Grains are polygonal and their diameters are ~100 μm. The cylindrical (D=9mm, L=3mm) surface of an annealed sample was weakly dried and coated with RTV rubber to suppress the conduction on the surface. Conductivity measurements were made at various pressure and temperature conditions(P<180 MPa, T<180°C). The dihedral angle of NaCl-water system is 66° at P=30MPa and T=30°C, and it becomes smaller than 60° at high pressure and temperature conditions(Holness & Lewis, 1997). Measured conductivity was of the order of 10-7~10-9 (S/m). When the temperature was fixed, a lower conductivity was observed for a higher pressure. The decrease in conductivity was typically 50% for the increase in pressure of 30MPa. For a given pressure, the conductivity increased with increasing

  12. Automatic Recognition of Cosmic Rays at Deep Impact CCDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipatov, S. I.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Deep Impact Team

    2005-12-01

    mainly there were no rays consisting of more than 2t pixels, where t is the exposure time in seconds. For t=30 s there were about 150, 100, 50, and 40 objects consisted of 1, 2, 3, and 4 pixels, respectively, on one dark image, and about 170-200, 110-150, 40-60, 40-50 objects on a typical sky image. At high solar activity, Nsc sometimes exceeded 10. The ratio of the number of cosmic rays consisting of n pixels obtained at high solar activity to that at low solar activity was greater for greater n, e.g., it was about 1-2 for n=1 and about 4-10 at n=5. At 0.004

  13. Transit time estimation of tunnel inflow in fractured granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balvín, A.; Hokr, M.; Šanda, M.; Vitvar, T.; Rálek, P.

    2012-04-01

    We study the water flow from surface to a tunnel in the average depth of 100 m to evaluate the water residence times in the fractured rock. Transport of 2H and 18O in groundwater was simulated by use of the lumped parameter approach. The area of interest is located in the Jizera Mountains near the Bedrichov municipality in the northern part of the Czech Republic. Input concentrations of 2H and 18O were measured at Uhlícská experimental catchment in a 5km distance from the tunnel. The output concentrations were measured in the water supply tunnel near Bedcichov. The tunnel is built in compact granite, it is 2600 m long and has a maximal depth of 150 m. The samples were taken from seven different groundwater seepage sites and from the channel collecting all inflow to the tunnel, in 14 days intervals in the period from February 2010 to present. The groundwater discharges were distinguished by their intensity - three dripping ones and four with continual fluxes. The residence times of the inflowing water were estimated with the dispersion model in the FLOWPC simulation program and cover the range of 2010-2011 years. In addition, we have made preliminary tests with "filtering" the infiltrated concentration data, e.g. assumption of larger ratio of winter infiltration, time shift between snowfall and snowmelt and use of soil water sampling instead of precipitation for the input. The best fit was achieved for spring V7 (for deuterium 2H: water residence time T = 23.6 months, apparent dispersion parameter Pd = 0.28 and Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient 80.3 % and for oxygen 18O: T = 30.9 months, Pd = 0.488 and N-S = 80.1 %, both for redistribution of rain), other fits were approximately 50-65 % (spring V6: T = 24.9 months, Pd = 0.26, N-S = 61.77 %; spring V1: T = 28.6 months, Pd = 0.24, N-S = 50.09 %, both for oxygen 18O). The discharge in the shallow part of the tunnel is probably supplied by flow on the soil-bedrock interface, with a quick reaction to precipitation and dry in

  14. The Compact Muon Solenoid Heavy Ion program

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Pablo Yepes

    2005-12-15

    The Pb-Pb center of mass energy at the LHC will exceed that of Au-Au collisions at RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) by nearly a factor of 30, providing exciting opportunities for addressing unique physics issues in a completely new energy domain. The interest of the Heavy Ion (HI) Physics at LHC is discussed in more detail in the LHC-USA white paper and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Heavy Ion proposal. A few highlights are presented in this document. Heavy ion collisions at LHC energies will explore regions of energy and particle density significantly beyond those reachable at RHIC. The energy density of the thermalized matter created at the LHC is estimated to be 20 times higher than at RHIC, implying an initial temperature, which is greater than at RHIC by more than a factor of two. The higher density of produced partons also allows a faster thermalization. As a consequence, the ratio of the quark-gluon plasma lifetime to the thermalization time increases by a factor of 10 over RHIC. Thus the hot, dense systems created in HI collisions at the LHC spend most of the time in a purely partonic state. The longer lifetime of the quark-gluon plasma state widens significantly the time window available to probe it experimentally. RHIC experiments have reported evidence for jet production in HI collisions and for suppression of high p{sub T} particle production. Those results open a new field of exploration of hot and dense nuclear matter. Even though RHIC has already broken ground, the production rates for jets with p{sub T} > 30 GeV are several orders of magnitude larger at the LHC than at RHIC, allowing for systematic studies with high statistics in a clean kinematic region. High p{sub T} quark and gluon jets can be used to study the hot hadronic medium produced in HI interactions. The larger Q{sup 2} causes jets to materialize very soon after the collision. They are thus embedded in and propagate through the dense environment as it forms and evolves. Through

  15. Geometrical Model of Solar Radiation Pressure Based on High-Performing Galileo Clocks - First Geometrical Mapping of the Yarkowsky effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svehla, Drazen; Rothacher, Markus; Hugentobler, Urs; Steigenberger, Peter; Ziebart, Marek

    2014-05-01

    depends on the orbit quality and should rather be called GNSS orbit bias instead of SLR bias. When LEO satellite orbits are estimated using GPS, this GPS orbit bias is mapped into the antenna phase center. All LEO satellites, such as CHAMP, GRACE and JASON-1/2, need an adjustment of the radial antenna phase center offset. GNSS orbit translations towards the Sun in the orbital plane do not only propagate into the estimated LEO orbits, but also into derived gravity field and altimetry products. Geometrical mapping of orbit perturbations using an on board GNSS clock is a new technique to monitor orbit perturbations along the orbit and was successfully applied in the modeling of Solar radiation pressure. We show that CODE Solar radiation pressure parameterization lacks dependency with the Sun's elevation, i.e. elongation angle (rotation of Solar arrays), especially at low Sun elevations (eclipses). Parameterisation with the Sun elongation angle is used in the so-called T30 model (ROCK-model) that includes thermal re-radiation. A preliminary version of Solar radiation pressure for the first five Galileo and the GPS-36 satellite is based on 2×180 days of the MGEX Campaign. We show that Galileo clocks map the Yarkowsky effect along the orbit, i.e. the lag between the Sun's illumination and thermal re-radiation. We present the first geometrical mapping of anisotropic thermal emission of absorbed sunlight of an illuminated satellite. In this way, the effects of Solar radiation pressure can be modelled with only two paramaters for all Sun elevations.

  16. Development of a practical tool for the flood risk assessment in highly urbanized areas: The case of the Arno River, Firenze (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelli, S.; Segoni, S.; Catani, F.; Battistini, A.; Manzo, G.; Ermini, L.

    2011-12-01

    The dynamic evolution of a river and the adjacent morphological environment are particularly important especially if there are communities that concentrate in these areas their socio-economic activities. So a proper hydraulic risk management is an increasingly felt necessity, but when working at small scales no established fast methodology exists to map the position and the height of the various elements with centimetric accuracy. In the current work an operative methodology likely to obtain this purpose is proposed on the basis of data obtained from a real test area. It is along the Arno river (Italy) which could be considered on the whole a representative case study of other realities in the world. Various issues have been deepened. Firstly RTK-GPS measurements and information about all the natural and artificial elements, connected to hydraulic risk and fluvial dynamics, were collected. All these elements were mapped with high accuracy, in particular a local geoid model, related only to the study area, was developed to obtain orthometric heights affected with errors ≤ 0.05 m. Consequently a GIS geodatabase was built to visualize the spatial distribution of the mapped elements and to store the most important technical data. Such geodatabase provides an overview of the territories connected with the fluvial dynamics of the main rivers near the city of Firenze. This is confirmed by some applications, realized to verify the capability of the instrument. First of all the real hydraulic risk in the study area has been checked out. So the comparison between the measured dike height and the hydraulic modeling conducted by the Arno River Basin Authority has identified areas at risk of overflowing for various return periods (T30, T100, T200 , T500). Subsequently a deeper analysis of hydraulic hazards has been carried out in the urban area of Firenze. A model of surface-water flows concentrated on the historic center has provided a comprehensive response of this area to

  17. The wildland fire emission inventory: western United States emission estimates and an evaluation of uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanski, S. P.; Hao, W. M.; Nordgren, B.

    2011-12-01

    . The estimated annual, domain wide ECO ranged from 436 Gg yr-1 in 2004 to 3107 Gg yr-1 in 2007. The extremes in estimated annual, domain wide EPM2.5 were 65 Gg yr-1 in 2004 and 454 Gg yr-1 in 2007. Annual WF emissions were a significant share of total emissions from non-WF sources (agriculture, dust, non-WF fire, fuel combustion, industrial processes, transportation, solvent, and miscellaneous) in the western United States as estimated in a national emission inventory. In the peak fire year of 2007, WF emissions were ~20% of total (WF + non-WF) CO emissions and ~39% of total PM2.5 emissions. During the months with the greatest fire activity, WF accounted for the majority of total CO and PM2.5 emitted across the study region. Uncertainties in annual, domain wide emissions was 28% to 51% for CO and 40% to 65% for PM2.5. Sensitivity of ũECO and ũEPM2.5 to the emission model components depended on scale. At scales relevant to regional modeling applications (Δx = 10 km, Δt = 1 day) WFEI estimates 50% of total ECO with an uncertainty <133% and half of total EPM2.5 with an uncertainty <146%. ũECO and ũEPM2.5 are reduced by more than half at the scale of global modeling applications (Δ x = 100 km, Δ t = 30 day) where 50% of total emissions are estimated with an uncertainty <50% for CO and <64% for PM2.5. Uncertainties in the estimates of burned area drives the emission uncertainties at regional scales. At global scales ũECO is most sensitive to uncertainties in the fuel load consumed while the uncertainty in the emission factor for PM2.5 plays the dominant role in ũEPM2.5. Our analysis indicates that the large scale aggregate uncertainties (e.g. the uncertainty in annual CO emitted for CONUS) typically reported for biomass burning emission inventories may not be appropriate for evaluating and interpreting results of regional scale modeling applications that employ the emission estimates. When feasible, biomass burning emission inventories should be evaluated and

  18. Parametric Study of Heavy Element Distributions in SiC Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, W. M.; Arnould, M.

    1992-07-01

    Recent determinations of the isotopic composition of a series of heavy elements in small-sized (micron) SiC grains have provided nuclear astrophysics with a wealth of compositional clues as to the astrophysical origin of these grains. In particular, the isotopic compositions of Si, Ca, Ti, Sr, Kr, Xe, Ba, Nd, and Sm (1,2,3,4) have been measured and exhibit significant deviations from their solar system counterparts. Although various astrophysical sources of these anomalous compositions have been proposed, e.g., AGB or Wolf-Rayet stars, no consistent picture has emerged. We t parametrized model in order to investigate in as a broad way as possible the neutron exposures or ranges of such exposures that could replicate the series of measured isotopic compositions without relying on any specific (and highly uncertain) astrophysical scenario. This study is in the same spirit in which one has studied the s-process as well as the r- and p- processes with parametrized models in order to understand the bulk solar system composition. We find that we can reproduce the general trends of the isotopic data for the elements from krypton through samarium with a rather simple neutron exposure history. We also show how one can relax the classical assumption of a two- component mixing curve. We interpret the linear correlations in the three-isotope plots as a mixture of components with slightly different neutron exposures. The neutron captures are calculated by a method described earlier (5,6), where we use the latest compilation of neutron capture rates and of the temperature and density dependent beta-decay rates. For the initial composition we take a solar-like composition (7). We define a standard model by tau = 0.006 mb-1, a neutron exposure timescale of 5x10**6 s and a temperature kT = 30 keV, this implying a neutron density of 5x10**9 cm-3. This model defines a standard set of abundances. A series of computations has been performed with different tau values and initial